Sample records for va homeless providers

  1. 78 FR 28947 - Fund Availability Under VA's Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program (VANS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-16

    ...AFFAIRS Fund Availability Under VA's Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program...grantee projects funded under VA's Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program...copies) for assistance under VA's Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem...

  2. 77 FR 12647 - Fund Availability Under VA's Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-01

    ...accordance with this NOFA no later than 4 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesday, May 30, 2012. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Chelsea Watson, VA's Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program, Department of Veterans Affairs, 10770 North 46th...

  3. 75 FR 3970 - Fund Availability Under the VA Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-25

    ...package for consideration and may result in the application being rejected or not funded. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. Chelsea Watson, VA Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program, Department of Veterans Affairs, 10770 N. 46th Street,...

  4. 76 FR 48204 - Fund Availability Under VA's Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-08

    ...separately will not be included in the re-application package for consideration. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. Chelsea Watson, Deputy Director, VA's Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program, Department of Veterans Affairs, 10770...

  5. 7 CFR 272.9 - Approval of homeless meal providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 2014-01-01 false Approval of homeless meal providers. 272.9 Section...STATE AGENCIES § 272.9 Approval of homeless meal providers. The State food...shall approve establishments serving the homeless upon sufficient evidence, as...

  6. 7 CFR 272.9 - Approval of homeless meal providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 2011-01-01 false Approval of homeless meal providers. 272.9 Section...STATE AGENCIES § 272.9 Approval of homeless meal providers. The State food...shall approve establishments serving the homeless upon sufficient evidence, as...

  7. 7 CFR 272.9 - Approval of homeless meal providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 2013-01-01 false Approval of homeless meal providers. 272.9 Section...STATE AGENCIES § 272.9 Approval of homeless meal providers. The State food...shall approve establishments serving the homeless upon sufficient evidence, as...

  8. 7 CFR 272.9 - Approval of homeless meal providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 2010-01-01 false Approval of homeless meal providers. 272.9 Section...STATE AGENCIES § 272.9 Approval of homeless meal providers. The State food...shall approve establishments serving the homeless upon sufficient evidence, as...

  9. 7 CFR 272.9 - Approval of homeless meal providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 2012-01-01 false Approval of homeless meal providers. 272.9 Section...STATE AGENCIES § 272.9 Approval of homeless meal providers. The State food...shall approve establishments serving the homeless upon sufficient evidence, as...

  10. 38 CFR 63.10 - Selection of non-VA community-based providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...community-based providers. 63.10 Section 63.10 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) HEALTH CARE FOR HOMELESS VETERANS (HCHV) PROGRAM § 63.10 Selection of non-VA...

  11. 38 CFR 63.10 - Selection of non-VA community-based providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...community-based providers. 63.10 Section 63.10 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) HEALTH CARE FOR HOMELESS VETERANS (HCHV) PROGRAM § 63.10 Selection of non-VA...

  12. 38 CFR 63.10 - Selection of non-VA community-based providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...community-based providers. 63.10 Section 63.10 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) HEALTH CARE FOR HOMELESS VETERANS (HCHV) PROGRAM § 63.10 Selection of non-VA...

  13. Homelessness: Programs and the People They Serve. Summary Report. Findings of the National Survey of Homeless Assistance Providers and Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burt, Martha R.; Aron, Laudan Y.; Douglas, Toby; Valente, Jesse; Lee, Edgar; Iwen, Britta

    The National Survey of Homeless Assistance Providers and Clients (NSHAPC) was conducted to provide information about the providers of homeless assistance services and the characteristics of homeless clients who use them. This survey was conducted for use by federal agencies and other interested parties responsible for administering homeless

  14. 77 FR 39342 - Proposed Information Collection (Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program) Activity; Comment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-02

    ...2900-0554] Proposed Information Collection (Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program...or per diem for programs to assist homeless veterans' transition to independent...of information technology. Titles a. Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem...

  15. Providing WIC Services to Homeless Families

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lisa Ann Hamm; E. Wayne Holden

    1999-01-01

    The Families in Transition program (FIT), in collaboration with the University of Maryland School of Medicine, designed and implemented a Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) homeless outreach project. Staff scheduled regular outreach visits to shelters and soup kitchens to ensure that eligible participants were certified for the WIC program and families were closely followed.Two hundred

  16. Barriers and facilitators to Veterans Administration collaboration with community providers: the Lodge Project for homeless veterans.

    PubMed

    Cretzmeyer, Margaret; Moeckli, Jane; Liu, William Ming

    2014-01-01

    Since 2009, the U.S. Veterans Administration has made concentrated efforts to end homelessness among veterans. As part of these efforts, the Iowa City, Iowa, VA Health Care System in collaboration with local community providers deployed a supportive housing program aimed at homeless veterans. Called the Lodge program, it is intended to serve a Mid-Western mid-size city and its surrounding rural communities. This article presents qualitative findings from a mixed-method, two-year formative evaluation of the Lodge's implementation. Primary barriers to the effectiveness of the Lodge program were regulations hindering cooperation between service programs, followed by problems regarding information sharing and client substance abuse. Facilitators included personal communication and cooperation between individuals within and among service groups. The feasibility of implementing a Lodge program in a more rural community than Iowa City was also discussed. PMID:25255336

  17. For Homeless Veterans

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Veterans within this program. Homeless Veterans Dental Program Project CHALENG (Community Homelessness Assessment, Local Education and Networking ... better serve homeless Veterans. For more information on Project CHALENG, call VA’s toll-free hotline or visit ...

  18. Homeless youths' interpersonal perspectives of health care providers.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Angela L; Nyamathi, Adeline; Sweat, Jeff

    2008-12-01

    In the United States, youth run away from home due to poor interpersonal relationships with parents or guardians; often times, they have been the recipients of parental neglect or abuse. As youth become increasingly entrenched in street-based living and problem substance use, their ability to rehabilitate their lives is incumbent upon trusting and engaging relationships with adult service providers. A total of 54 substance-using homeless youth (18-25 years) participated in focus groups to provide their perspectives on encounters and interpersonal relationships with health care providers. Participants were recruited from shelters in Hollywood, California, and from a drop-in shelter in Santa Monica, California. Four themes related to interpersonal barriers to care from service providers were identified: authoritative communication, one-way communication, disrespect, and empathy. Participants appreciate care providers who convey information in a helpful, meaningful manner and prefer providers who can, themselves, share similar life experiences. Implications point to the need for agencies and services specifically tailored to homeless, drug-using youth. These agencies should employ care providers who are trained to understand the developmental needs and histories of runaway youth. For proper reintegration of this vulnerable population into mainstream society, the narratives of these youth underscore the necessity of targeted services. PMID:19052945

  19. Providing Lifelines for Our Nation's Homeless Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffield, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses educational challenges for homeless children and explains how districts can and must meet their needs. According to the U.S. Department of Education Federal Data Collection, 1,065,794 homeless children and youth were enrolled in public schools for the school year 2010-2011, the highest number on record. After listing…

  20. 76 FR 75509 - Autopsies at VA Expense

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-02

    ...015, Veterans State Nursing Home Care; 64.018, Sharing Specialized Medical...022, Veterans Home Based Primary Care; and 64.024, VA Homeless Providers...Alcohol abuse; Alcoholism; Claims; Day care; Dental health; Drug abuse;...

  1. Detecting earlier indicators of homelessness in the free text of medical records.

    PubMed

    Redd, Andrew; Carter, Marjorie; Divita, Guy; Shen, Shuying; Palmer, Miland; Samore, Matthew; Gundlapalli, Adi V

    2014-01-01

    Early warning indicators to identify US Veterans at risk of homelessness are currently only inferred from administrative data. References to indicators of risk or instances of homelessness in the free text of medical notes written by Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) providers may precede formal identification of Veterans as being homeless. This represents a potentially untapped resource for early identification. Using natural language processing (NLP), we investigated the idea that concepts related to homelessness written in the free text of the medical record precede the identification of homelessness by administrative data. We found that homeless Veterans were much higher utilizers of VA resources producing approximately 12 times as many documents as non-homeless Veterans. NLP detected mentions of either direct or indirect evidence of homelessness in a significant portion of Veterans earlier than structured data. PMID:25000039

  2. The Education of Homeless Children: Rules, Rights and Practical Solutions. A Training Manual for Shelter Providers, Staff, Advocates and Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heybach, Laurene M.; Nix-Hodes, Patricia; Price, Sarah

    These training materials provide advocates with the tools needed to help families obtain a stable and effective education for their children despite the condition of homelessness and the trauma that accompanies it. Nine sections include: (1) "Introduction"; (2) "How Mobility Hurts Homeless Children and Schools"; (3) "Laws and Rules Governing the…

  3. Communication between VA providers and sexual and gender minority veterans: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Michelle D; Kauth, Michael R; Shipherd, Jillian C; Street, Richard L

    2014-05-01

    Approximately one million gay and lesbian Americans are veterans, and rates of engagement in the Veterans Affairs (VA) health care system may be increasing for both sexual and gender minority veterans. Very little research has examined the experience of these veterans when receiving care at VA health care facilities. The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences, beliefs, and preferences of lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT) veterans in their communication with VA health care providers. LGBT veterans (n = 58) participated in focus groups or individual interviews and completed self-report measures at two southern VA hospitals. Approximately 2/3 of veterans report that none of their VA providers have specifically asked about their sexual orientation, and 24% of the veterans indicate that they have not disclosed their orientation to any VA provider. Although some veterans want providers to initiate these discussions, veterans also expressed fears about disclosure and its possible negative consequences. Similarly, LGBT veterans report varied opinions about the appropriateness of routine assessment of minority status. Only 28% of these veterans experience VA as welcoming to them as LGBT veterans. Systematic training is needed for all VA providers about the rationale for assessing sexual and gender orientation. Staff education should include specific skills for initiating these assessments, and ways of responding to veteran concerns about discussing this topic in the VA health care system. PMID:24588107

  4. Client-provider relationships in a community health clinic for people who are experiencing homelessness.

    PubMed

    Oudshoorn, Abe; Ward-Griffin, Catherine; Forchuk, Cheryl; Berman, Helene; Poland, Blake

    2013-12-01

    Recognizing the importance of health-promoting relationships in engaging people who are experiencing homelessness in care, most research on health clinics for homeless persons has involved some recognition of client-provider relationships. However, what has been lacking is the inclusion of a critical analysis of the policy context in which relationships are enacted. In this paper, we question how client-provider relationships are enacted within the culture of community care with people who are experiencing homelessness and how clinic-level and broader social and health policies shape relationships in this context. We explore these questions within a critical theoretical perspective utilizing a critical ethnographic methodology. Data were collected using multiple methods of document review, participant observation, in-depth interviews and focus groups. The participants include both clients at a community health clinic, and all clinic service providers. We explore how clients and providers characterized each other as 'good' or 'bad'. For providers, this served as a means by which they policed behaviours and enforced social norms. The means by which both providers' and clients' negotiated relationships are explored, but this is couched within both local and system-level policies. This study highlights the importance of healthcare providers and clients being involved in broader policy and systemic change. PMID:23033851

  5. Provider views of harm reduction versus abstinence policies within homeless services for dually diagnosed adults

    PubMed Central

    Padgett, Deborah K.; Tiderington, Emmy

    2013-01-01

    Harm reduction is considered by many to be a legitimate alternative to abstinence-based services for dually diagnosed individuals, yet there is limited understanding of how varying approaches affect front-line practice within supportive housing services for homeless adults. This paper examines how front-line providers working with individuals who have experienced homelessness, serious mental illness, and addiction view policies of harm reduction versus abstinence within two distinctly different approaches to homeless services: the traditional or ‘treatment first’ (TF) approach that requires abstinence and the more recent Housing First (HF) approach that incorporates harm reduction. As part of a federally-funded qualitative study, 129 in-depth interviews conducted with 41 providers were thematically analyzed to understand how providers view a harm reduction versus abstinence approach. Themes included: (a) harm reduction as a welcomed alternative; (b) working with ambiguity; and (c) accommodating abstinence. Drawing on recovery principles, we consider the broader implications of the findings for behavioral health care with this population. PMID:23404076

  6. 76 FR 71920 - Payment for Home Health Services and Hospice Care by Non-VA Providers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-21

    ...governing payment for other non-VA health care providers. Because the newly applicable...methodology for in- and outpatient health care professional services provided...FR 78901. We explained: Home Health Care and Hospice Care [T]he...

  7. Families on the Edge: Homeless Young Parents and Their Welfare Experiences. A Survey of Homeless Youth and Service Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeg, Bob; Grisham, Christine; Shepard, Annie

    This report examines the experiences of homeless young parents with the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program, which can be an important tool in helping them achieve long-term stability and economic self-sufficiency. The 1996 welfare reform act included special provisions that applied only to minor teen parents, requiring them to…

  8. 38 CFR 3.1701 - Deceased veterans for whom VA may provide burial benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Deceased veterans for whom VA may provide burial benefits...Section 3.1701 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS...

  9. Diabetes in homeless persons: barriers and enablers to health as perceived by patients, medical, and social service providers.

    PubMed

    Elder, Nancy C; Tubb, Matthew R

    2014-01-01

    The ways homelessness and diabetes affect each other is not well known. The authors sought to understand barriers and enablers to health for homeless people with diabetes as perceived by homeless persons and providers. The authors performed semistructured interviews with a sample of participants (seven homeless persons, six social service providers, and five medical providers) in an urban Midwest community. Data analysis was performed with the qualitative editing method. Participants described external factors (chaotic lifestyle, diet/food availability, access to care, and medications) and internal factors (competing demands, substance abuse, stress) that directly affect health. Social service providers were seen as peripheral to diabetes care, although all saw their primary functions as valuable. These factors and relationships are appropriately modeled in a complex adaptive chronic care model, where the framework is bottom up and stresses adaptability, self-organization, and empowerment. Adapting the care of homeless persons with diabetes to include involvement of patients and medical and social service providers must be emergent and responsive to changing needs. PMID:24802217

  10. 77 FR 38179 - Autopsies at VA Expense

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-27

    ...while receiving fee-basis care under Sec. 17.52 and...170. We provided a 60 day comment period, which ended...Veterans Home Based Primary Care; and 64.024, VA Homeless...Alcoholism; Claims; Day care; Dental health; Drug...

  11. Providing care for children and adolescents facing homelessness and housing insecurity.

    PubMed

    2013-06-01

    Child health and housing security are closely intertwined, and children without homes are more likely to suffer from chronic disease, hunger, and malnutrition than are children with homes. Homeless children and youth often have significant psychosocial development issues, and their education is frequently interrupted. Given the overall effects that homelessness can have on a child's health and potential, it is important for pediatricians to recognize the factors that lead to homelessness, understand the ways that homelessness and its causes can lead to poor health outcomes, and when possible, help children and families mitigate some of the effects of homelessness. Through practice change, partnership with community resources, awareness, and advocacy, pediatricians can help optimize the health and well-being of children affected by homelessness. PMID:23713108

  12. 78 FR 12600 - VA Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-25

    ...grant for acquisition of a van. Capital lease is defined by Sec. 61.4. Chronically mentally ill means a condition of schizophrenia or major affective disorder (including bipolar disorder) or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), based on a...

  13. 77 FR 12697 - VA Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-01

    ...grant for acquisition of a van. Capital lease is defined by Sec. 61.4. Chronically mentally ill means a condition of schizophrenia or major affective disorder (including bipolar disorder) or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), based on a...

  14. 78 FR 28949 - Fund Availability Under VA's Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program (Rehabilitation)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-16

    ...the first funding priority, funds not expended in this priority...the second funding priority, funds not expended in this priority...kitchens, dining facilities, laundry, counseling facilities, bedrooms...reserves the right to not award funds and to use the funds...

  15. 78 FR 26250 - Payment for Home Health Services and Hospice Care to Non-VA Providers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-06

    ...governing payments for certain non-VA health care, 38 CFR 17.56, applicable to...rule, we estimate that each home health care and hospice provider that does...negotiated contracts offer home health care or hospice care to veterans...

  16. 76 FR 79067 - Payment or Reimbursement for Emergency Treatment Furnished by Non-VA Providers in Non-VA...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ...Brown, Chief Policy Management Department, Department...related to non-VA emergency treatment furnished...rendered in a medical emergency of such nature that...standard is met by an emergency medical condition manifesting...severe [[Page 79071

  17. Teaching Our Homeless Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheldon, George H.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses some of the major concerns associated with the instructional process of our homeless children. The reader is provided with a brief overview of the prevalence of this population. According to the National Center on Family Homelessness the number of school children who are homeless is growing rapidly with 1.4 to 1.5 million…

  18. Homelessness: A General Information Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Homelessness Exchange, Washington, DC.

    This packet contains documents that provide general information about homelessness and the need for both Federal and local action to help the homeless people in America. Sections 1 and 2 contain the following articles released by the Homelessness Information Exchange: (1) "The Problem of Homelessness Nationwide"; and "Alternative Family Housing…

  19. Criteria and Recordkeeping Requirements for Definition of Homeless

    MedlinePLUS

    ... document provides a high-level overview of the homeless definition by outlining the criteria for defining homelessness ... under which individuals and families may qualify as homeless. These categories include: 1) literally homeless; 2) imminent ...

  20. 38 CFR 63.15 - Duties of, and standards applicable to, non-VA community-based providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...local consumer services. (7) Adequate meals must be provided in a setting that encourages social interaction; nutritious snacks between meals and before bedtime must be available. (d) Staffing. The non-VA community-based provider must...

  1. 38 CFR 63.15 - Duties of, and standards applicable to, non-VA community-based providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...local consumer services. (7) Adequate meals must be provided in a setting that encourages social interaction; nutritious snacks between meals and before bedtime must be available. (d) Staffing. The non-VA community-based provider must...

  2. 38 CFR 63.15 - Duties of, and standards applicable to, non-VA community-based providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...local consumer services. (7) Adequate meals must be provided in a setting that encourages social interaction; nutritious snacks between meals and before bedtime must be available. (d) Staffing. The non-VA community-based provider must...

  3. The New Homelessness Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Barrett A.; Tyler, Kimberly A.; Wright, James D.

    2014-01-01

    The ‘new homelessness’ has drawn sustained attention from scholars over the past three decades. Definitional inconsistencies and data limitations rendered early work during this period largely speculative in nature. Thanks to conceptual, theoretical, and methodological progress, however, the research literature now provides a fuller understanding of homelessness. Contributions by sociologists and other social scientists since the mid-1990s differentiate among types of homelessness, provide credible demographic estimates, and show how being homeless affects a person's life chances and coping strategies. Agreement also exists about the main macro- and micro-level causes of homelessness. Active lines of inquiry examine public, media, and governmental responses to the problem as well as homeless people's efforts to mobilize on their own behalf. Despite the obstacles faced when studying a stigmatized population marked by high turnover and weak anchors to place, recent investigations have significantly influenced homelessness policy. A greater emphasis on prevention should further strengthen the research-policy nexus. PMID:24910495

  4. 38 CFR 17.120 - Payment or reimbursement for emergency treatment furnished by non-VA providers to certain...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01...furnished by non-VA providers to certain veterans with service-connected disabilities...120 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF...

  5. 38 CFR 17.120 - Payment or reimbursement for emergency treatment furnished by non-VA providers to certain...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01...furnished by non-VA providers to certain veterans with service-connected disabilities...120 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF...

  6. Experience of Primary Care among Homeless Individuals with Mental Health Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Chrystal, Joya G.; Glover, Dawn L.; Young, Alexander S.; Whelan, Fiona; Austin, Erika L.; Johnson, Nancy K.; Pollio, David E.; Holt, Cheryl L.; Stringfellow, Erin; Gordon, Adam J.; Kim, Theresa A.; Daigle, Shanette G.; Steward, Jocelyn L.; Kertesz, Stefan G

    2015-01-01

    The delivery of primary care to homeless individuals with mental health conditions presents unique challenges. To inform healthcare improvement, we studied predictors of favorable primary care experience among homeless persons with mental health conditions treated at sites that varied in degree of homeless-specific service tailoring. This was a multi-site, survey-based comparison of primary care experiences at three mainstream primary care clinics of the Veterans Administration (VA), one homeless-tailored VA clinic, and one tailored non-VA healthcare program. Persons who accessed primary care service two or more times from July 2008 through June 2010 (N = 366) were randomly sampled. Predictor variables included patient and organization characteristics suggested by the patient perception model developed by Sofaer and Firminger (2005), with an emphasis on mental health. The primary care experience was assessed with the Primary Care Quality-Homeless (PCQ-H) questionnaire, a validated survey instrument. Multiple regression identified predictors of positive experiences (i.e. higher PCQ-H total score). Significant predictors of a positive experience included a site offering tailored service design, perceived choice among providers, and currently domiciled status. There was an interaction effect between site and severe psychiatric symptoms. For persons with severe psychiatric symptoms, a homeless-tailored service design was significantly associated with a more favorable primary care experience. For persons without severe psychiatric symptoms, this difference was not significant. This study supports the importance of tailored healthcare delivery designed for homeless persons’ needs, with such services potentially holding special relevance for persons with mental health conditions. To improve patient experience among the homeless, organizations may want to deliver services that are tailored to homelessness and offer a choice of providers. PMID:25659142

  7. Pressure Ulcer Development in the VA: Characteristics of Nursing Homes Providing Best Care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dan R. Berlowitz; Jennifer J. Anderson; Gary H. Brandeis; Laura A. Lehner; Harriet K. Brand; Arlene S. Ash; Mark A. Moskowitz

    1999-01-01

    This study identifies structural characteristics of VA nursing homes that are associated with the best patient outcomes. We evaluated risk-adjusted rates of pressure ulcer development in VA nursing homes and related these rates to facility size, staffing patterns, teaching nursing home status, and rural versus urban locale. Higher rates of pressure ulcer development were seen among urban teaching nursing homes

  8. Addressing Homelessness: Recent Happenings--Iowa, 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Department of Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This guide provides information on the following resources available to the homeless in Iowa: (1) Funding Sources for School District Programs Serving Homeless Students; (2) Local Educational Liaison for Homeless Children and Youth; (3) Homeless Advisory Committee; (4) Identification, Counting, and Maintaining Data at the Local School District…

  9. Homelessness and Hunger?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barrett A. Lee; Meredith J. Greif

    2008-01-01

    We employ data from the National Survey of Homeless Assistance Providers and Clients to examine the character and correlates of hunger among homeless people. Our analysis, couched in an adaptation framework, finds more support for the differentiation hypothesis than for the leveling hypothesis: Complex patterns of food insecurity exist at the individual level, and they vary with the resources available

  10. Homelessness and Dual Diagnosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert E. Drake; Fred C. Osher; Michael A. Wallach

    1991-01-01

    People who are dually diagnosed with severe mental illness and substance use disorders constitute 10%–20% of homeless persons. They are a heterogeneous and extremely vulnerable subgroup with complex, poorly understood needs. In this article recent research on the epidemiology, subject characteristics, and service needs of the dually diagnosed homeless population is reviewed. Also, the range of evolving approaches to providing

  11. VA Community Mental Health Service Providers' Utilization of and Attitudes toward Telemental Health Care: The Gatekeeper's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jameson, John Paul; Farmer, Mary Sue; Head, Katharine J.; Fortney, John; Teal, Cayla R.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Mental health (MH) providers in community-based outpatient clinics (CBOCs) are important stakeholders in the development of the Veterans Health Administration (VA) telemental health (TMH) system, but their perceptions of these technologies have not been systematically examined. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the…

  12. Supporting School Success for Homeless Children of Veterans and Active Duty Military Members. Best Practices in Interagency Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Homeless Education at SERVE, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This brief is designed for local staff of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), state McKinney-Vento coordinators and school district McKinney-Vento liaisons, educators, and other providers of services to active members of the military and veterans, and their children. It provides basic information to assist homeless children of veterans or…

  13. Where Do You Go from Nowhere: Homelessness in Maryland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health and Welfare Council of Central Maryland, Inc., Baltimore.

    This report assesses the extent of homelessness in Maryland. Data are provided in the following areas: (1) the number of homeless people; (2) causes of homelessness; (3) distribution of the homeless and characteristics of those sheltered; (4) shelter beds available; (5) what is needed to address the problems of homelessness; (6) the extent of the…

  14. A Unique Population: Women Who Are Homeless and Mentally Ill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markos, Patricia A.; Baron, Heather Lyn; Allen, Daniel N.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes a unique population within the homeless community--women who are homeless and mentally ill. Homelessness prevalence and etiology data are presented, followed by a general discussion of how mental illness affects people who are homeless. The article provides an overview of women who are homeless, focusing on those who are…

  15. Homelessness and hunger.

    PubMed

    Lee, Barrett A; Greif, Meredith J

    2008-03-01

    We employ data from the National Survey of Homeless Assistance Providers and Clients to examine the character and correlates of hunger among homeless people. Our analysis, couched in an adaptation framework, finds more support for the differentiation hypothesis than for the leveling hypothesis: Complex patterns of food insecurity exist at the individual level, and they vary with the resources available (e.g., higher monthly income, regular shelter use) and obstacles faced (e.g., alcohol, drug, and physical and mental health problems). The chronically homeless, who suffer from multiple deficits, appear particularly food-insecure, a finding that favors the desperation hypothesis over its street-wisdom alternative. We conclude that hunger is not uniformly experienced by members of the homeless population. Rather, some individuals are better situated than others to cope with the stressful nature of homelessness when addressing their sustenance needs. PMID:18418982

  16. Homeless Children

    MedlinePLUS

    ... year. That's over 1.6 million children. While homeless, they experience high rates of acute and chronic ... of emotional and behavioral problems compared to non-homeless children. 3 Experiences of Violence Violence plays a ...

  17. The role of a student-run clinic in providing primary care for Calgary’s homeless populations: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite the increasing popularity of Student-Run Clinics (SRCs) in Canada, there is little existing literature exploring their role within the Canadian healthcare system. Generalizing American literature to Canadian SRCs is inappropriate, given significant differences in healthcare delivery between the two countries. Medical students at the University of Calgary started a SRC serving Calgary’s homeless population at the Calgary Drop-In and Rehabilitation Centre (CDIRC). This study explored stakeholders’ desired role for a SRC within Calgary’s primary healthcare system and potential barriers it may face. Methods Individual and group semi-structured interviews were undertaken with key stakeholders in the SRC project: clients (potential patients), CDIRC staff, staff from other stakeholder organizations, medical students, and faculty members. Convenience sampling was used in the recruitment of client participants. Interview transcripts were analyzed using a coding template which was derived from the literature. Results Participants identified factors related to the clinic and to medical students that suggest there is an important role for a SRC in Calgary. The clinic was cited as improving access to primary healthcare for individuals experiencing homelessness. It was suggested that students may be ideally suited to provide empathetic healthcare to this population. Barriers to success were identified, including continuity of care and the exclusion of some subsets of the homeless population due to location. Conclusions SRCs possess several unique features that may make them a potentially important primary healthcare resource for the homeless. Participants identified numerous benefits of the SRC to providing primary care for homeless individuals, as well as several important limitations that need to be accounted for when designing and implementing such a program. PMID:23866968

  18. Swimming Upstream: How to Reduce Homelessness in

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Junshan

    Swimming Upstream: How to Reduce Homelessness in Tempe's Emerging Urban Setting David V. Summers of the Tempe First United Methodist Church, provides vital support services to homeless and working poor people

  19. Homeless service Utilization report

    E-print Network

    Homeless service Utilization report H a w a i ` i 2 0 0 9 #12;2 Homeless service Utilization report Hawai`i is unique in having a statewide, centralized electronic data system in which all homeless`i and the Homeless Programs Branch of the Hawai`i Public Housing Authority (HPHA) issued the first Homeless Service

  20. Families Experiencing Homelessness

    MedlinePLUS

    ... which may compound the stress the family feels. Families experiencing homelessness: Are typically comprised of a mother ... of other women. The Relationship Between Homelessness and Family Separation: Families who have experienced homelessness have much ...

  1. Homelessness as a Choice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cameron Parsell; Mitch Parsell

    2012-01-01

    It has long been assumed that homelessness is a personal choice. As a choice, homelessness is embedded within debates about deviant behaviours and problematic pathologies. The “homeless person” is either making calculated and immoral choices to be homeless, or they are perceived to be powerless agents who lack the capacity to exercise choices. Rarely has it been adequately explained, however,

  2. Youth Homelessness 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKenzie, David; Chamberlain, Chris

    2008-01-01

    The third national census of homeless school students, conducted in 2006, found that the number of homeless students had decreased since 2001. There were 9,389 homeless students in 2006 compared with 12,227 in 2001. Three groups were over-represented in the homeless population: Indigenous students, young people from single parent and blended…

  3. Homelessness in Public Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Yi Ling

    2009-01-01

    This paper takes a theoretical and practical approach in defining the "problem" of homelessness in libraries. The author examines three fundamental problems on homelessness. The three fundamental questions are: (a) Who are the homeless? (b) Why are they homeless? (c) What are their information needs in libraries? These questions are important in…

  4. Homelessness and health in Canada: research lessons and priorities.

    PubMed

    Frankish, C James; Hwang, Stephen W; Quantz, Darryl

    2005-01-01

    This article was for prepared for an international think-tank on reducing health disparities and promoting equity for vulnerable populations. Its purposes are to provide an overview of homelessness research and to stimulate discussion on strategic directions for research. We identified studies on homelessness, with an emphasis on Canadian research. Studies were grouped by focus and design under the following topics: the scope of homelessness, the health status of homeless persons, interventions to reduce homelessness and improve health, and strategic directions for future research. Key issues include the definition of homelessness, the scope of homelessness, its heterogeneity, and competing explanations of homelessness. Homeless people suffer from higher levels of disease and the causal pathways linking homelessness and poor health are complex. Efforts to reduce homelessness and improve health have included biomedical, educational, environmental, and policy strategies. Significant research gaps and opportunities exist in these areas. Strategic research will require stakeholder and community engagement, and more rigorous methods. Priorities include achievement of consensus on measuring homelessness, health status of the homeless, development of research infrastructure, and ensuring that future initiatives can be evaluated for effectiveness. PMID:16078553

  5. Food Security and Homelessness in the City of Anaheim

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ann G. Ora; Michele Mouttapa; Jie Weiss; Penny Weissmuller

    2008-01-01

    The primary purpose of the City of Anaheim's 2007 Homeless Survey was to provide city staff with an opportunity to understand the characteristics of the City's homeless population. The purpose of this study was to determine whether food insecurity was associated with: (1) homelessness, (2) demographic characteristics such as age, gender, and ethnicity, (3) mental and physical illness, and (4)

  6. Education Rights of Homeless Students: A Guide for Advocates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Law Center, 2005

    2005-01-01

    There is no question that students who are homeless, like all students, are entitled to be educated. A federal law, known as the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act, requires states to provide homeless children and youth with the same access to free public education as is available to other students. The Act also requires states to eliminate…

  7. Moving on from homelessness: A narrative inquiry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Helen Kirkpatrick

    2005-01-01

    This narrative study explores the experience of “moving on” from homelessness for individuals with a major mental illness, after they obtained permanent housing with supports as part of the Province of Ontario Homelessness Strategy. Narrative inquiry provides a valuable method to understand the concept of a journey of recovery, specifically because each person's journey is unique. Individual stories are developed

  8. Working to End Family Homelessness. Annual Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Family Homelessness (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    The National Center on Family Homelessness is determined to end family homelessness. Sheltering families provides a temporary safe haven. Connecting families to permanent housing, essential services, and critical supports can change their lives forever. Through research the Center learns what families need to rebound from the housing, economic,…

  9. Addressing the Problems of Homeless Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Joseph F.; Tobin, Kerri

    2012-01-01

    Homeless adolescents, known as "unaccompanied youth," constitute a small but important portion of the overall homeless population, one that needs particular attention at school. In this article, we review existing literature to provide a background for educational leaders, researchers, and policymakers hoping to understand the phenomenon of…

  10. Improving access to health care for homeless people.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Venetia; Joels, Claire

    2014-10-13

    Homeless people have the poorest health outcomes in our society and the number of people who are homeless is increasing. This article explores the effect that homelessness has on health, provides details of organisations that offer services to the homeless population of London, and highlights the role of nurses in advocating for improved services for homeless patients. The need to understand and address inequalities in access to health care is also discussed. An example of the authors' practice is provided in the form of a case study. PMID:25294486

  11. Cost-effectiveness of Supported Housing for Homeless Persons With Mental Illness

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert Rosenheck; Wesley Kasprow; Linda Frisman; Wen Liu-Mares

    2003-01-01

    Background: Supported housing, integrating clinical and housing services, is a widely advocated intervention for homeless people with mental illness. In 1992, the US De- partment of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) established the HUD-VA Supported Housing (HUD-VASH) program. Methods: Homeless veterans with psychiatric and\\/or sub- stance abuse disorders or both (N=460) were

  12. What is eBenefits? eBenefits is a joint VA/DoD web portal that provides resources and self-service capabilities to Veterans, Service members, and

    E-print Network

    New Hampshire, University of

    -service capabilities to Veterans, Service members, and their families to research, access and manage their VA of links to other sites that provide information about military and Veteran benefits. It is an essential way for Veterans, Service members, and their families to receive access to and service from VA and Do

  13. Michigan's Campaign to End Homelessness

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Michigan’s Campaign to End Homelessness

    The Michigan State Homeless Management Information System (MSHMIS) is a single database platform that provides an unduplicated count of homeless persons living in each region of Michigan. The system also measures patterns of service use and the effectiveness of the services delivered, providing the ability to assess progress across programs and regions. It was developed to improve consistency of reporting among Michigan’s Continuum of Care (CoC) network and includes information from all the service organizations in each region, a total of 524 organizations statewide.

  14. Correlates of adult assault among homeless women.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Angela L; Wright, Kynna; Bhattacharya, Debika; Sinha, Karabi; Nyamathi, Adeline; Marfisee, Mary

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess predictors of sexual and physical assault among homeless women. A multivariate, correlation design was utilized to identify independent correlates of adult physical and sexual assault. The sample consisted of 202 homeless women residing in shelters or living on the street in the Skid Row area of Los Angeles. Respondents reporting a history of child sexual abuse were almost four times more likely to report being sexually assaulted as adults and were almost two and one third times more likely to report being physically assaulted as adults. A range of factors increase homeless women's risk of adult physical and sexual victimization, including child sexual abuse, substance use, lifetime sex trade activity, and previous incarceration. It is important for homeless service providers to develop an individual risk profile for homeless women and to intervene in order to decrease their risk of re-victimization. PMID:21099076

  15. Life Shocks and Homelessness

    PubMed Central

    Corman, Hope; Noonan, Kelly; Reichman, Nancy E.

    2014-01-01

    We exploited an exogenous health shock—namely, the birth of a child with a severe health condition—to investigate the effect of a life shock on homelessness in large cities in the United States as well as the interactive effects of the shock with housing market characteristics. We considered a traditional measure of homelessness, two measures of housing instability thought to be precursors to homelessness, and a combined measure that approximates the broadened conceptualization of homelessness under the 2009 Homeless Emergency Assistance and Rapid Transition to Housing Act (2010). We found that the shock substantially increases the likelihood of family homelessness, particularly in cities with high housing costs. The findings are consistent with the economic theory of homelessness, which posits that homelessness results from a conjunction of adverse circumstances in which housing markets and individual characteristics collide. PMID:23868747

  16. Parenting while Being Homeless

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swick, Kevin J.; Williams, Reginald; Fields, Evelyn

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the dynamics of parenting while being in a homeless context. The mosaic of stressors involved in this homeless parenting process are explicated and discussed. In addition, resources and strategies that may support parenting are presented and discussed.

  17. Life shocks and homelessness.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Marah A; Corman, Hope; Noonan, Kelly; Reichman, Nancy E

    2013-12-01

    We exploited an exogenous health shock-namely, the birth of a child with a severe health condition-to investigate the effect of a life shock on homelessness in large cities in the United States as well as the interactive effects of the shock with housing market characteristics. We considered a traditional measure of homelessness, two measures of housing instability thought to be precursors to homelessness, and a combined measure that approximates the broadened conceptualization of homelessness under the 2009 Homeless Emergency Assistance and Rapid Transition to Housing Act (2010). We found that the shock substantially increases the likelihood of family homelessness, particularly in cities with high housing costs. The findings are consistent with the economic theory of homelessness, which posits that homelessness results from a conjunction of adverse circumstances in which housing markets and individual characteristics collide. PMID:23868747

  18. HOMELESS SERVICE UTILIZATION REPORT

    E-print Network

    HOMELESS SERVICE UTILIZATION REPORT H A W A I ` I 2 0 11 #12;State 2007 2,136 2,201 2,204 2,069 2) Hawai`i, Kaua`i and Maui Counties 2 HOMELESS SERVICE UTILIZATION REPORT The 2011 Homeless Service of Hawai`i and the Homeless Programs Office of the Hawai`i State Department of Human Services (DHS

  19. Educating Homeless Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berliner, BethAnn

    2002-01-01

    Over the past decade, the number of homeless children in America has more than doubled. Educators, however, are still legally obligated to enroll and support them, because of the passage of the "No Child Left Behind" Act of 2001, which reauthorized the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act. Although schools cannot solve homelessness, they can…

  20. Japan's “New Homeless

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Aya Ezawa

    2002-01-01

    Since the mid-1990s, homelessness has become a major issue of public discussion in Japan, and is often viewed as a new social problem facing Japanese society. The issue of homelessness contrasts images of the absence of poverty and homelessness in postwar Japan, often explained based on the unique features of Japanese-style employment and welfare, containing poverty and unemployment. This paper

  1. Homeless Health Concerns

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Many homeless women are victims of domestic or sexual abuse. Homeless children have high rates of emotional and behavioral problems, often from having witnessed abuse. Help such as shelters, health centers, and free meals are available. Contact your local homelessness assistance agency.

  2. Homelessness and theory reconsidered

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joanne Neale

    1997-01-01

    Theory will not directly explain the development of policy and provision for homeless people, but it is an important consideration and one deserving of careful attention. In the UK, however, homelessness has often been explained simplistically and somewhat atheoretically as either a housing or a welfare problem, caused either by structural or by individual factors. Likewise, homeless people have been

  3. Homelessness and health

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen W. Hwang

    HOMELESSNESS AFFECTS TENS OF THOUSANDS OF CANADIANS and has important health implications. Homeless people are at increased risk of dying prematurely and suffer from a wide range of health problems, including seizures, chronic obstructive pul- monary disease, musculoskeletal disorders, tuberculosis, and skin and foot prob- lems. Homeless people also face significant barriers that impair their access to health care. More

  4. TRANSITIONAL SETTLEMENTS Planning Homeless

    E-print Network

    Zaferatos, Nicholas C.

    TRANSITIONAL SETTLEMENTS 1 Planning Homeless Settlement Communities Western Washington University the living conditions faced by our fellow citizens who live in Homeless camps, public resources are necessary to help the Homeless segment of society regain their footing in society. PROJECT FOCUS This course

  5. SPRING 2004 the Homeless

    E-print Network

    Dasgupta, Dipankar

    SPRING 2004 Hope for the Homeless U of M Alumni Making a Difference #12;Above: Spring and all its play key roles in getting homeless people back on track as Memphis and Shelby County push to end chronic homelessness by 2013. Photograph by Michael Spikes. Illustration by Aaron Drown. #12;issue

  6. The health of homeless children revisited.

    PubMed

    Grant, Roy; Shapiro, Alan; Joseph, Sharon; Goldsmith, Sandra; Rigual-Lynch, Lourdes; Redlener, Irwin

    2007-01-01

    To the extent that representative data are available for specific health conditions (eg, under-immunization, asthma prevalence), the authors' data suggest that the gap between the health status of homeless children and housed children in minority, low-income families is narrowing. Studies of the health status of homeless children allow a window into the health status of medically underserved children whose needs may not be readily documented because of their lack of access to the health care system. Although prevalence rates of most of the health conditions discussed in this article exceeded national norms, they were generally consistent with rates characteristic of health disparities based on race-ethnicity and income. It must be emphasized that in most instances, children were seen for their first pediatric visit within weeks of entering the homeless shelter system. The health conditions identified were often present before the child and family became homeless. The high prevalence of asthma among homeless children should therefore be a matter of concern to health providers and payors, because the authors' data strongly suggest that this is not confined to children in homeless shelters as a special population. Similarly, childhood obesity predates homelessness (or at least the episode of homelessness during which health care was provided) and as such the authors' data may indicate the extent of this problem more generally among medically underserved children in the communities of origin. These conditions seem to be exacerbated by the specific conditions associated with homeless shelter life. Asthma care, assuming it was previously available, is disrupted when housing is lost, and shelter conditions may have multiple asthma triggers. Nutrition often suffers as a result of inadequate access to nutritious food and cooking facilities in shelters, as indicated by the high rate of iron-deficiency anemia among very young children. It is clear that homeless children in shelters require enhanced access to primary and specialist care. Shelter placement necessarily disrupts prior health care relationships (if any), while simultaneously placing additional stress on the child's physical and emotional well being. A medical home model is strongly recommended to allow for continuous, culturally competent care. Developmental and mental health problems are also more prevalent among homeless children. These conditions may jeopardize life successes. The overcrowding associated with homeless shelters and the housing conditions that frequently precede episodes of homelessness are associated with the higher prevalence of otitis media found among young children. This in turn is associated with developmental delay. Also contributing to the developmental risk associated with homelessness is exposure to DV, which is also frequently an antecedent of homelessness. Developmental surveillance for young, homeless children, monitoring of school attendance and academic performance, and assessment of mental status for homeless adolescents are recommended to facilitate early identification of problems and delivery of necessary interventions. For young children, providers of health care to the homeless should be well networked into the Early Intervention and Preschool Special Education programs in their locality. Given the multiplicity of needs for homeless families, which of course includes help finding affordable housing, health care providers serving this population should also develop linkages with community agencies, including those that can help parents develop the skills necessary for economic self-sufficiency and long-term ability to sustain independent housing. PMID:17918471

  7. Homeless ?Management?: Evaluating Governmental and Faith-Based Mandates on Homeless Persons

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Todd Belt; Shannon Northrop

    We examine four questions related to social welfare policy which have become increasingly important as social welfare policy is devolved to states and faith-based and community groups: What do the homeless want? What do we give them? How do we decide? And, how do they obtain what is not provided? The National Law Center on Homelessness and Poverty puts out

  8. Health-Seeking Challenges Among Homeless Youth

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Angela L.; Nyamathi, Adeline; Greengold, Barbara; Slagle, Alexandra; Koniak-Griffin, Deborah; Khalilifard, Farinaz; Getzoff, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Background Approximately 1.5 to 2 million homeless young persons live on the streets in the United States. With the current economic situation, research is needed on quality of services geared toward homeless young adults. Objectives The objective of this study was to explore homeless young adults' perspectives on barriers and facilitators of health-care-seeking behavior and their perspectives on improving existing programs for homeless persons. Methods This article is a descriptive qualitative study using focus groups, with a purposeful sample of 24 homeless drug-using young adults. Results Identified themes were failing access to care based on perceived structural barriers (limited clinic sites, limited hours of operation, priority health conditions, and long wait times) and social barriers (perception of discrimination by uncaring professionals, law enforcement, and society in general). Discussion Results provide insight into programmatic and agency resources that facilitate health-seeking behaviors among homeless young adults and include implications for more research with providers of homeless health and social services. PMID:20404776

  9. Care of the homeless: an overview.

    PubMed

    Maness, David L; Khan, Muneeza

    2014-04-15

    Homelessness affects men, women, and children of all races and ethnicities. On any given night, more than 610,000 persons in the United States are homeless; a little more than one-third of these are families. Homeless persons are more likely to become ill, have greater hospitalization rates, and are more likely to die at a younger age than the general population. The average life span for a homeless person is between 42 and 52 years. Homeless children are much sicker and have more academic and behavioral problems. Insufficient personal income and the lack of affordable housing are the major reasons for homelessness. Complex, advanced medical problems and psychiatric illnesses, exacerbated by drug and alcohol abuse, in combination with the economic and social issues (such as the lack of housing and proper transportation) make this subset of the population a unique challenge for the health care system, local communities, and the government. An integrated, multidisciplinary health care team with an outreach focus, along with involvement of local and state agencies, seems best suited to address the components needed to ensure quality of care, to help make these patients self-sufficient, and to help them succeed. Family physicians are well suited to manage the needs of the homeless patient, provide continuity of care, and lead these multidisciplinary teams. PMID:24784122

  10. Comments of Kathi Sheffel Homeless Liaison, Fairfax County Public Schools Submitted to the U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness Federal Strategic Plan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Youth Workgroup

    1. Strategies for preventing and ending youth homelessness Identifying and providing support for unaccompanied homeless youth requires a comprehensive strategy that examines and addresses: 1) how youth become homeless and on their own; 2) the unique basic and educational needs that they have; and 3) how to build a continuum of services to meet those needs so youth can sustain

  11. Finding home : making a place for the homeless in the urban landscape

    E-print Network

    Cheng, Marissa A

    2007-01-01

    Is homelessness a problem? What if you considered homelessness to be a state, rather than a problem, and provided for it accordingly in the urban landscape? As roads and water and sewer lines are one type of infrastructure, ...

  12. Effectiveness of outreach to homeless substance abusers 1 1 This study was supported by the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment Grant ?? 5 H87 T110345-04, 5U95TT 100 789-02

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anthony C Tommasello; C. Patrick Myers; Laura Gillis; L. Louise Treherne; Michael Plumhoff

    1999-01-01

    Substance abuse is a frequent and complicating feature of homelessness. Barriers to service access have prevented homeless individuals from receiving substance abuse care. Outreach to homeless persons is a mechanism for identifying homeless substance abusers and engaging them in treatment. This study describes a program of substance abuse treatment conducted by a medical care provider for homeless persons in Baltimore,

  13. Nutrition for the Homeless. Hearing on S. 728, A Bill To Improve the Nutrition of the Homeless, and for Other Purposes; and S. 812, A Bill to Amend the Food Stamp Act of 1977 to Provide Urgent Relief to Improve the Nutrition of the Homeless...(Nutrition for Homeless Individuals Act of 1987) before the Subcommittee on Nutrition and Investigations of the Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry. United States Senate, One Hundredth Congress, First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry.

    This document contains oral testimony by state and government officials, prepared statements, and supporting materials concerning food assistance for the homeless. The bills before the Senate would increase Temporary Emergency Food Assistance Program (TEFAP) funding by $10 million in fiscal year 1987, and $20 million in 1988. According to John W.…

  14. Aversion to Injection Limits Acceptability of Extended-Release Naltrexone Among Homeless, Alcohol-Dependent Patients

    PubMed Central

    Friedmann, Peter D.; Mello, Dawn; Lonergan, Sean; Bourgault, Claire; O’Toole, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Ending homelessness is a major priority of the Department of Veteran Affairs (VA), and alcohol use can be a barrier to stable housing. Clinical trials suggest that depot extended-release naltrexone (XR-NTX) is efficacious in reducing alcohol consumption among alcohol-dependent subjects. Methods An open-label, randomized pilot study sought to examine the feasibility and effectiveness of XR-NTX versus oral naltrexone to improve alcohol consumption and housing stability among homeless, alcohol-dependent veterans at the Providence Veteran Affairs Medical Center. Results Of 215 potential candidates approached over a 16-month recruitment period, only 15 agreed to consider study entry and 7 were randomized. The primary reasons given for refusal were not wanting an injection; fear of needles; and not wanting to change drinking habits. Only 1 participant in the XR-NTX group returned after the first injection. Three participants in the oral naltrexone group attended all 7 visits and had good outcomes. Conclusions Although XR-NTX has demonstrated efficacy in reducing heavy drinking, limited acceptance of the injection might reduce its effectiveness among homeless, alcohol-dependent patients. PMID:23577900

  15. Making a Place for Nona: Meeting the Needs of Homeless Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boxill, Nancy A.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the dilemmas that homeless children face and what day-care center staff can do to help meet the needs of such children, including providing consistency in homeless children's lives; providing basic necessities such as food, sleep, and privacy and showing a willingness to develop a normal relationship with homeless children. (MDM)

  16. Characteristics of Homeless Youth Attending Two Different Youth Drop-In Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shillington, A. M.; Bousman, C. A.; Clapp, J. D.

    2011-01-01

    Services for homeless youth traditionally provided shelter and nourishment but do little to break the cycle of homelessness. A more comprehensive approach to serve homeless youth is the drop-in center model that provides safe and easy-to-find facilities within communities to bridge the gap between the streets and transitional/permanent housing.…

  17. Homeless Children and Youth in Utah. 1991 Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Office of Education, Salt Lake City.

    A study was done of the numbers and educational status of homeless children in the state of Utah in 1991. A survey was conducted using data provided by 31 shelters statewide and included children and youth who were provided shelter at any time during the year. The total count of 4,894 homeless children and youth, when corrected for general…

  18. Homeless Children and Youth in Utah. 1992 Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Office of Education, Salt Lake City.

    A study was done of the numbers and educational status of homeless children in the state of Utah in 1992. A survey was conducted using data provided by 31 shelters statewide and included children and youth who were provided shelter at any time during the year. The total count included 4,424 homeless children and youth in 1992. The largest…

  19. Community-Driven Homeless Housing

    E-print Network

    Frank, Thomas D.

    Community-Driven Homeless Housing Programs: Best Practices Report Prepared for City of Champaign Anne Householder Latonya Jones Maria Kaidas Rebecca Long Huong Phu #12;Homeless Housing Best Practices Resources 31 Appendix: Financing Sources 35 #12;Homeless Housing Best Practices 3 Introduction Homelessness

  20. Homelessness in California

    E-print Network

    Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

    Homelessness in California · · · John M. Quigley Steven Raphael Eugene Smolensky with Erin Mansur Larry A. Rosenthal 2001 PUBLIC POLICY INSTITUTE OF CALIFORNIA #12;Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Quigley, John M. Homelessness in California / John M. Quigley, Steven Raphael, Eugene Smolensky. p

  1. Homelessness and food insecurity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Craig Gundersen; Linda Weinreb; Cheryl Wehler; David Hosmer

    2003-01-01

    Numerous assistance programs are designed to alleviate homelessness and food insecurity in the US, two of the more severe possible consequences of poverty. While we expect families with a higher probability of homelessness to also be at higher risk of food insecurity, after controlling for observed factors the relationship is not immediately apparent. To analyze this relationship, we use a

  2. Intellectual Disability and Homelessness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercier, C.; Picard, S.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The association between poverty and intellectual disability (ID) has been well documented. However, little is known about persons with ID who face circumstances of extreme poverty, such as homelessness. This paper describes the situation of persons with ID who were or are homeless in Montreal and are currently receiving services from a…

  3. The reality of homeless mobility and implications for improving care.

    PubMed

    Parker, R David; Dykema, Shana

    2013-08-01

    Homeless persons are perceived as a highly mobile population, and have high rates of co-morbid conditions, including mental health and substance use issues. This study sought to determine the characteristics of the mobility and reported health conditions of homeless persons. The sample for this cross sectional study (n = 674) accounted for 88 % of the homeless population in a medium sized southern city in the United States. Participants were recruited from a homeless shelter operating during the winter season. Homeless persons were less mobile than the general state population (46.11 % were born in-state vs. 40.7 % of the general population) and less transient than the general state population (78 % reported an in-state zip code for the last permanent residence). 31.9 % reported a disabling condition of a serious and long term nature. These findings challenge the concept that homeless persons are primarily a mobile population. Furthermore, homeless persons in this sample were more likely to remain in the state where they lived after becoming homeless. Thus, provider perceptions that homeless persons would not benefit from referral to a regular source of outpatient care may be misinformed. As homeless persons often seek care in emergency departments for conditions that could be addressed through outpatient care, if a medical care system implemented standard practices specifically for homeless patients, this could decrease recidivism. Such interventions represent significant opportunities to reduce costs, conserve resources, and improve care through policy modification that ensures a focus on a successful, active linkage to outpatient care and programs specific to the homeless population. PMID:23494281

  4. Homelessness is everyone's problem First multi-site randomized trial of housing interventions in Canada

    E-print Network

    , the stigma towards the homeless and mentally ill held by some health care providers can be a major obstacle for Applied Research in Mental Health and Addiction (CARMHA). Somers was heading to the homeless shelter-million five-city Canadian Multi-site Research Demonstration Project in Mental Health and Homelessness

  5. What do homeless people eat and can Crisis FareShare help improve their diet?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Naomi Evans

    1996-01-01

    Reports on a survey of the diets of 423 homeless people attending day centres and soup runs in London during 1994 and 1995. Also analyses the potential nutritional benefits of Crisis FareShare - a project which distributes surplus fresh food to homeless people. Highlights the vitamin and mineral deficiencies of homeless people and the achievements of Crisis FareShare in providing

  6. South Dakota State Plan: Education of Homeless Children and Youth. Implementation Date: July 1, 1989.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Dakota State Dept. of Education and Cultural Affairs, Pierre.

    South Dakota's state plan for the education of homeless children and youth is presented in compliance with provisions of the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act of 1987. The plan is comprised of eight sections. The first section provides a program narrative and presents the following homeless needs as determined by two State surveys: (1)…

  7. Advocacy and EnumerationCounting Homeless People in a Suburban Community

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cynthia J. Bogard

    2001-01-01

    Enumerating or estimating the numbers of homeless people has become an important research activity in the past few decades. The methodologies of almost all efforts to count homeless people have been closely linked to advocacy activities such as providing shelter and food to those in need. Yet the effect of advocacy work on estimating or enumerating homeless populations has not

  8. Sampling Methods and Construction of Weights 2007 Alameda County Homeless Survey

    E-print Network

    Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

    Sampling Methods and Construction of Weights for the 2007 Alameda County Homeless Survey by Thomas;1 1. OVERVIEW 1.1 Background of the Study The 2007 Alameda County Homeless Survey was designed to provide an estimate of the number of unsheltered homeless persons in Alameda County and to study

  9. Improving the Safety of Homeless Young People with Mobile Phones: Values, Form and Function

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Richard

    Improving the Safety of Homeless Young People with Mobile Phones: Values, Form and Function Jill this proposition, 43 participants, from four stakeholder groups (homeless young people, service providers, police officers, and community members), were asked to consider how homeless young people could use mobile phones

  10. The Role of Music in the Lives of Homeless Young People

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Richard

    The Role of Music in the Lives of Homeless Young People in Seattle WA and Vancouver BC Abstract I outline my proposed dissertation study of music in the lives of homeless young people. Participants will include homeless young people and service providers in Seattle WA and Vancouver BC. The study is a mixed

  11. Sampling Methods and Construction of Weights 2009 Alameda County Homeless Survey

    E-print Network

    Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

    Sampling Methods and Construction of Weights for the 2009 Alameda County Homeless Survey by Thomas;1 1. OVERVIEW 1.1 Background of the Study The 2009 Alameda County Homeless Survey was designed to provide an estimate of the number of unsheltered homeless persons in Alameda County and to study

  12. Educational Rights of Homeless Children and Youth: Legal and Community Advocacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Bradley, Ann Aviles

    2008-01-01

    Many homeless children and youth have difficulty in school due to their loss of stable housing, and lack of consistent contact with family and friends. When a child becomes homeless, schools are federally mandated to identify these students and provide the same access to a free and appropriate education as their non-homeless counterparts. Within a…

  13. Homelessness: A Common Vocabulary Could Help Agencies Collaborate and Collect More Consistent Data. Report to Congressional Requesters. GAO-10-702

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cackley, Alicia Puente

    2010-01-01

    Multiple federal programs provide homelessness assistance through programs targeted to those experiencing homelessness or through mainstream programs that broadly assist low-income populations. Programs' definitions of homelessness range from including primarily people in homeless shelters or on the street to also including those living with…

  14. Homelessness in America: What Should We Do? Public Talk Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niedergang, Mark; McCoy, Martha, Ed.

    This program guide provides a forum for discussing the different beliefs that influence public policy about homelessness as well as policy goals. The central question is addressed in two parts: (1) what society ought to do for homeless people; and (2) laying out a range of possible answers for part 1. Four possible answers are discussed: help only…

  15. Confronting Homelessness among American Families: Federal Programs and Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeWoody, Madelyn

    This book offers specific information on the wide range of federal prevention, emergency shelter, and family service programs available today that provide children and families who are homeless or at risk of homelessness with financial support, education, job training, nutritional services, and crisis funding. The chapters are: (1) "Coordinating a…

  16. Strengthening At-Risk and Homeless Young Mothers and Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medeiros, Debra; Vaulton, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    The Strengthening At Risk and Homeless Young Mothers and Children Initiative, funded by the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation, aims to improve the housing, health, and development of homeless and at-risk young families. This article describes the services provided in four program sites (Pomona, CA; Antelope Valley, CA; Minneapolis, MN; and Chicago, IL)…

  17. Lessons Learned: A "Homeless Shelter Intervention" by a Medical Student

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owusu, Yasmin; Kunik, Mark; Coverdale, John; Shah, Asim; Primm, Annelle; Harris, Toi

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The authors explored the process of implementing a medical student-initiated program designed to provide computerized mental health screening, referral, and education in a homeless shelter. Method: An educational program was designed to teach homeless shelter staff about psychiatric disorders and culturally-informed treatment…

  18. Homelessness: Programs and the People They Serve, Technical Report

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1999-01-01

    In December 1999, the department of Housing and Urban development released their "most comprehensive study ever of homelessness in America." The survey of the homeless and the social programs supporting them is offered online in three separate chunks. The Technical Report provides the "full, detailed technical report consisting of 17 chapters with appendices and complete sets of data tables (over 500 pages)."

  19. Lessons learned from a quality improvement intervention with homeless veteran services.

    PubMed

    Chinman, Matthew; Hannah, Gordon; McCarthy, Sharon

    2012-08-01

    Homeless veterans are a vulnerable population, with high mortality and morbidity rates. Evidence-based practices for homelessness have been challenging to implement. This study engaged staff members from three VA homeless programs to improve their quality using Getting-To-Outcomes (GTO), a model and intervention of trainings and technical assistance that builds practitioner capacity to plan, implement, and self-evaluate evidence-based practices. Primarily used in community-based, non-VA settings, this study piloted GTO in VA by creating a GTO project within each homeless program and one across all three. The feasibility and acceptability of GTO in VA is examined using the results of the projects, time spent on GTO, and data from focus groups and interviews. With staff members averaging 33 minutes per week on GTO, each team made significant programmatic changes. Homeless staff stated GTO was helpful, and that high levels of communication, staff member commitment to the program, and technical assistance were critical. PMID:22864498

  20. Developing programs for homeless veterans: understanding driving forces in implementation.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, John; McGuire, Jim; Berman, Stephen; Daniels, William

    2004-01-01

    Between 1992 and 2003, services for homeless veterans at the Veterans Affairs Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System went from inappropriate utilization of hospital medical and psychiatric beds, to a continuum of residential treatment, transitional housing, and employment programs through arrangements with private agencies. The authors use elements of Hasenfeld and Brock's Political Economy Model (1991) to explain this transformation in service delivery that was spearheaded by a VA social work leadership team. It is argued that three driving forces crucial to program implementation were present: technological certainty, economic stability, and concentration of power. Evidence of the implementation's impact includes creation of new homeless program beds, a reduction in use of medical/psychiatric beds, and a large number of formerly homeless veterans with housing and employment at program discharge. Study limitations and implications for future studies are discussed. PMID:15774360

  1. Permanent homelessness in America?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard B. Freeman; Brian Hall

    1987-01-01

    This paper seeks to determine the approximate number of homeless persons in the U.S., the rate of change in the number, and whether or not the problem is likely to be permanent or transitory. It makes particular use of a new 1985 survey of over 500 homeless people in New York City. It finds that:(1)the much-maligned 1984 study by the

  2. Homelessness, behavioral health disorders and intimate partner violence: barriers to services for women.

    PubMed

    Ponce, Allison N; Lawless, Martha Staeheli; Rowe, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Homeless women comprise a significant portion of the homeless population and may encounter multiple life stressors including mental illness, substance abuse, and trauma. Women who are homeless may experience difficulty gaining access to resources such as shelter and health care. In addition, the interaction of behavioral health problems with intimate partner violence (IPV) may create extraordinary barriers to their engagement in services. This paper explores the co-occurrence of homelessness, behavioral health problems, and IPV and lessons learned through a gender-specific homeless services program designed to reach women who are unengaged in traditional services. Recommendations for providing gender-responsive services are discussed. PMID:24566559

  3. Counting the homeless in Malta

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cyrus Vakili-Zad

    2006-01-01

    There are no visible signs of homelessness in Malta similar to what can be seen on the streets of many North American or European cities, yet there are few hundred homeless who stay in shelters and another few thousand households that are at risk of being homeless. Malta has a comparatively sizeable social housing sector (9000–10,000) and approximately 3300 households

  4. Homeless Veterans Need your help!!

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Peter D.

    Homeless Veterans Need your help!! "1-1-1" Event Please bring: 1 ­ Gently used item of MEN United Veterans who run a shelter for homeless veterans in Yaphank. Please go through your closets adopting-a-shelter or adopt-a-house where the homeless veterans live. For more details please go

  5. No Homeless Child Left behind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saxberg, David

    2011-01-01

    Although it is difficult to determine the precise number of homeless children, the National Coalition for the Homeless reports that there are more than 1.3 million children lacking a permanent residence on any given night. Further, 39 percent of the homeless population was comprised of children under the age of 18 in July 2009, the most recent…

  6. AIDS: overview and VA update.

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, H. D.

    1987-01-01

    Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), a devastating disease with numerous masks (e.g., a primary neurosymptomatic disease), has now been reported in over one hundred countries of the world. Projections by the Public Health Service of the numbers of cases and fatal illnesses in the United States by 1991 stagger the imagination, and we are told that these projections may be understated. The Veterans Administration (VA) has not been immune to this disorder, over 2,000 cases of frank AIDS (as defined by the Centers for Disease Control [CDC] having been reported to VA's Central Office by 111 of the VA's 172 medical centers. These findings do not include AIDS-related complex (ARC) or other manifestations of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Seventy-seven percent of this total have been reported from 22 of the VA's largest tertiary care centers. The VA has developed an action plan, one of whose features is the development of a direct discussion and collaboration with other federal health care agencies, including the military. Emphasis is to be placed on the exchange of information among these various executive branches and, most important, on the smooth transfer of patients with AIDS or ARC from the uniformed services into the VA's health care system. In addition to the primary goal of providing timely, compassionate care to these patients, the VA also has a commitment to the dissemination of information to our patients, their families, and our employees. PMID:3324505

  7. Healthcare experiences of the homeless Bonnie Nickasch, RN, MSN, FNP, APNP (Family Nurse Practitioner)1 & Suzanne K. Marnocha, PhD, RN, CCRN (Associate Professor and Director of Traditional Undergraduate Program)2

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bonnie Nickasch

    Purpose: To explore the healthcare experiences of homeless individuals and inform providers of the barriers created by the situation of homelessness. Data sources: This was a qualitative research study using a grounded theory approach. The sample included homeless individuals older than 18 years living in northeastern Wisconsin. Conclusions: This research provided rich insight into the healthcare experi- encesofthehomeless.Fivekeyconclusionsweremade:(a)thegreatmajorityof homeless people

  8. Twenty-Five Years of Child and Family Homelessness: Where Are We Now?

    PubMed Central

    Gracy, Delaney; Goldsmith, Grifin; Shapiro, Alan; Redlener, Irwin E.

    2013-01-01

    Family homelessness emerged as a major social and public health problem in the United States during the 1980s. We reviewed the literature, including journal articles, news stories, and government reports, that described conditions associated with family homelessness, the scope of the problem, and the health and mental health of homeless children and families. Much of this literature was published during the 1980s and 1990s. This raises questions about its continued applicability for the public health community. We concluded that descriptions of the economic conditions and public policies associated with family homelessness are still relevant; however, the homeless family population has changed over time. Family homelessness has become more prevalent and pervasive among poor and low-income families. We provide public health recommendations for these homeless families. PMID:24148055

  9. A Different Kind of Smart: A Study of the Educational Obstacles Confronting Homeless Youth in New England.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Melanie; Houghton, Alison

    This study provides information on obstacles facing homeless youth in school. Research occurred in four diverse New England cities. Researchers collected detailed case histories on youth age 10-15 years who were currently homeless or who had recently been homeless. Data came from staff of local youth agencies, government officials, and youths…

  10. Homeless Houston Youth Find Refuge in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penning, Nick

    1989-01-01

    To attack their community's homeless student problem, the Houston Board of Education last February opened a "lighted schoolhouse" as a temporary shelter. Houston's superintendent, Joan Raymond, is convinced that more school districts will need to provide residential care. The 20 children using the shelter were turned over to Children's Protective…

  11. Gender Differences in Predictors of Suicidal Thoughts and Attempts Among Homeless Veterans that Abuse Substances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benda, Brent B.

    2005-01-01

    This study of 315 male and 310 female homeless military veterans in a V.A. inpatient program designed to treat substance abusers, many of whom also suffer psychiatric disorders, was designed to examine gender differences in factors associated with the odds of having suicidal thoughts, and of attempting suicide, in comparison to being nonsuicidal.…

  12. Hope as seen through the eyes of homeless children.

    PubMed

    Herth, K

    1998-11-01

    Children now constitute the largest segment of the homeless population. Multiple studies have identified the adverse effects of homelessness on children's health, development, academic success, and behaviour. Minimal literature exists that describes homeless children from the perspective of their strengths. The purpose of this study was to investigate the meaning of hope in homeless children and to identify strategies that children use in fostering and maintaining their hope. Using the technique of methodological triangulation (semi-structured interviews and drawings) the investigator collected data on a convenience sample of 60 homeless children (6 to 16 years old) currently residing in homeless shelters. Transcriptions of the audio-taped interviews were analysed following Colaizzi's method of analysis. Transcript statements were compared with the drawings. Five themes representing hope emerged from the data: connectedness, internal resources, cognitive strategies, energy, and hope objects. School age children drew story book tale characters, pre-adolescents drew real life situations, and adolescents drew future plans to represent their hopes. An understanding of hope from the perspective of homeless children could provide a basis upon which to develop interventions that engender hope and to develop programmes that build on the hopes that children had already developed. PMID:9840877

  13. Hope for Homeless Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Cyndy Jones

    1996-01-01

    The Thomas J. Pappas Regional Education Center in Phoenix, Arizona, is a magnet school for homeless students from unorganized territories, military installations, Indian reservations, and national forest lands. This "accommodation" school, supported by federal grants, in-kind business donations, and committed volunteer mentors from the local…

  14. Paul Glowaski: Garden Director, Homeless Garden Project

    E-print Network

    Reti, Irene H.

    2010-01-01

    like the Homeless Garden are brilliant, and Food What?! andeconomy and of local food—the Homeless Garden Project hasHomeless Garden Project, Glowaski brings together his passions for economic, social, ecological, and food

  15. 24 CFR 576.405 - Homeless participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Homeless participation. 576.405 Section... Program Requirements § 576.405 Homeless participation. (a) Unless the...the participation of not less than one homeless individual or formerly...

  16. 24 CFR 576.405 - Homeless participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Homeless participation. 576.405 Section... Program Requirements § 576.405 Homeless participation. (a) Unless the...the participation of not less than one homeless individual or formerly...

  17. 24 CFR 576.405 - Homeless participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Homeless participation. 576.405 Section... Program Requirements § 576.405 Homeless participation. (a) Unless the...the participation of not less than one homeless individual or formerly...

  18. The Neighborhood Context of Homelessness

    PubMed Central

    Pollio, David E.; North, Carol S.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We examined and compared the changing neighborhood characteristics of a group of homeless adults over time. Methods. We collected the addresses of previous housing and sleep locations from a longitudinal study of 400 homeless adults in the St. Louis, Missouri, region and compared census measures of housing and economic opportunities at different points along individual pathways from housing to homelessness and at 1- and 2-year follow-up interviews. Results. Sleep locations of homeless adults were much more concentrated in the urban core at baseline than were their previous housed and follow-up locations. These core areas had higher poverty, unemployment, and rent-to-income ratios and lower median incomes. Conclusions. The spatial concentration of homeless adults in areas with fewer opportunities and more economic and housing distress may present additional barriers to regaining stable housing and employment. A big-picture spatial and time-course viewpoint is critical for both policymakers and future homelessness researchers. PMID:23409889

  19. Stand Down 95. Nutrition Intervention for Homeless Veterans

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. B. Martin

    1996-01-01

    LEARNING OUTCOME: The participant will be able to plan and implement a nutrition intervention\\/assessment for home-less veterans at a Stand Down event after attending this presentation.In September 1995, the first nutrition intervention was provided at The Houston Stand Down for Homeless Veterans. This was the second year for the event in Houston and gave dietitians and students an opportunity to

  20. Barriers and aids in conducting research with older homeless individuals.

    PubMed

    Vance, D

    1995-06-01

    Field notes of a qualitative pilot study of older homeless people in Cincinnati identified several barriers and aids to the study of homeless elders. Identified research barriers were researcher's lack of contextual wisdom (street smarts), locating elders, substance abuse, attrition, victimization, credibility of informants, and xenophobia. Identified research aids were friendliness of certain elders, openness of the researcher, attractive incentives in exchange for interviews, and service providers' willingness to share experiences. PMID:7568590

  1. Marketing to the marginalised: tobacco industry targeting of the homeless and mentally ill

    PubMed Central

    Apollonio, D; Malone, R

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the tobacco industry's relationships with and influence on homeless and mentally ill smokers and organisations providing services to them. Methods: Analysis of internal tobacco industry documents and journal articles. Results: The tobacco industry has marketed cigarettes to the homeless and seriously mentally ill, part of its "downscale" market, and has developed relationships with homeless shelters and advocacy groups, gaining positive media coverage and political support. Discussion: Tobacco control advocates and public health organisations should consider how to target programmes to homeless and seriously mentally ill individuals. Education of service providers about tobacco industry efforts to cultivate this market may help in reducing smoking in these populations. PMID:16319365

  2. Towards a Delivery System of Services for Rural Homeless Youth: A Literature Review and Case Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hans A. Skott-Myhre; Rebecca Raby; Jamie Nikolaou

    2008-01-01

    The majority of the literature on homelessness conceptualizes it as an urban problem and a wide body of research exists that\\u000a provides estimates of metropolitan street youth and qualitatively describes their experiences. Similar descriptions and population\\u000a estimates are virtually absent for youth who experience rural homelessness despite the number of urban homeless youth with\\u000a rural origins. Indeed, although some metropolitan

  3. Outreach to the homeless: craft, science, and future implications.

    PubMed

    Ng, Anthony T; McQuistion, Hunter L

    2004-03-01

    Outreach is a treatment modality for engaging underserved populations in health care. Nowhere is outreach more relevant than in delivering services to homeless persons with mental illness. Programs providing outreach to homeless people have been in existence for at least two decades and a craft has developed naturalistically. However, there has been insufficient formal examination of factors that influence the effectiveness of outreach and how it is actually performed. The authors present an in-depth examination of issues related to outreach to the homeless. They review different outreach modalities, the role of the individual clinician, and the art of teamwork. They also discuss external issues such as financing, access to housing, interactions with other professions, and working conditions. The authors conclude with a brief discussion concerning the application of outreach to populations other than homeless individuals with psychiatric disorders and suggest future directions for improving our understanding of this important modality. PMID:15330405

  4. The Community College and the Homeless: A Model for the Nation. Job Training for the Homeless Demonstration Program Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moehrlin, Cynthia D.

    Established in 1981, the Alternatives Program at Elgin Community College (ECC) has provided services for displaced homemakers, single parents, welfare recipients, and homeless women, laying the groundwork for the 1988 formation of the Fox Valley Consortium for Job Training and Placement of the Homeless. Using federal funding, the Consortium offers…

  5. Helping homeless individuals with co-occurring disorders: the four components.

    PubMed

    Sun, An-Pyng

    2012-01-01

    Homeless individuals with co-occurring disorders (CODs) of severe mental illness and substance use disorder are one of the most vulnerable populations. This article provides practitioners with a framework and strategies for helping this client population. Four components emerged from a literature review: (1) ensuring an effective transition for individuals with CODs from an institution (such as a hospital, foster care, prison, or residential program) into the community, a particularly important component for clients who were previously homeless, impoverished, or at risk of homelessness; (2) increasing the resources of homeless individuals with CODs by helping them apply for government entitlements or supported employment (3) linking homeless individuals to supportive housing, including housing first options as opposed to only treatment first options, and being flexible in meeting their housing needs; and (4) engaging homeless individuals in COD treatment, incorporating modified assertive community treatment, motivational interviewing, cognitive-behavioral therapy, contingency management, and COD specialized self-help groups. PMID:22768626

  6. Hepatitis A/B Vaccine Completion among Homeless Adults with History of Incarceration

    PubMed Central

    Nyamathi, Adeline M.; Marlow, Elizabeth; Branson, Catherine; Marfisee, Mary; Nandy, Karabi

    2012-01-01

    HBV vaccination rates for incarcerated adults remain low despite their high risk for infection. This study determined predictors of vaccine completion in homeless adults (N=297) who reported histories of incarceration and participated in one of three nurse-led hepatitis programs of different intensity. Moreover time since release from incarceration was also considered. Just over half of the former prisoners completed the vaccine series. Older age (? 40), having a partner, and chronic homelessness were associated with vaccine completion. Recent research has documented the difficulty in providing vaccine services to younger homeless persons and homeless males at risk for HBV. Additional strategies are needed to achieve HBV vaccination completion rates greater than 50% for formerly incarcerated homeless men. Keywords: Hepatitis B, former prisoners, homeless, men, vaccine completion PMID:22372394

  7. Programmatic Impact of 5 Years of Mortality Surveillance of New York City Homeless Populations

    PubMed Central

    Marder, Dova; Begier, Elizabeth; Gutkovich, Alexander; Mos, Robert; Griffin, Angela; Zimmerman, Regina; Madsen, Ann

    2013-01-01

    A homeless mortality surveillance system identifies emerging trends in the health of the homeless population and provides this information to key stakeholders in a timely and ongoing manner to effect evidence-based, programmatic change. We describe the first 5 years of the New York City homeless mortality surveillance system and, for the first time in peer-reviewed literature, illustrate the impact of key elements of sustained surveillance (i.e., timely dissemination of aggregate mortality data and real-time sharing of information on individual homeless decedents) on the programs of New York City’s Department of Homeless Services. These key elements had a positive impact on the department’s programs that target sleep-related infant deaths and hypothermia, drug overdose, and alcohol-related deaths among homeless persons. PMID:24148068

  8. Homeless adolescents: a descriptive study of similarities and differences between runaways and throwaways.

    PubMed

    Adams, G R; Gullotta, T; Clancy, M A

    1985-01-01

    A sample of 43 homeless adolescents was categorized as being either runaways, throwaways, or societal rejects. Comparisons of these categories of homeless youths were completed to assess the descriptive utility of internal social control, strain, and psychopathological theory in making distinctions between various homeless adolescents. Descriptive data support the view that control and psychopathology perspectives provide some promise for understanding differing types of runaway adolescents. Sex differences between runaway and throwaway youths were explored. However, few sex X type of homeless adolescent interactions were observed. Implications for secondary prevention, based upon these data, are offered. PMID:4083132

  9. 38 CFR 74.27 - How will VA store information?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VETERANS SMALL BUSINESS REGULATIONS Records Management § 74.27 How will VA store information? VA intends to store records provided to complete...

  10. 38 CFR 74.27 - How will VA store information?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VETERANS SMALL BUSINESS REGULATIONS Records Management § 74.27 How will VA store information? VA intends to store records provided to complete...

  11. 38 CFR 74.27 - How will VA store information?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VETERANS SMALL BUSINESS REGULATIONS Records Management § 74.27 How will VA store information? VA intends to store records provided to complete...

  12. Homelessness in Augusta, Georgia. Preliminary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Shirley A.; Bennett, Gerald

    Two studies examined homelessness in Augusta, Georgia. The Key Informant Survey, conducted in 1987, involved interviewing individuals (N=42) knowledgeable about homeless people in the community. In the Shelter and Street Surveys of homeless people, conducted in March (N=51) and July (N=71) of 1988, homeless subjects were interviewed concerning…

  13. Can Better National Policy End Family Homelessness?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Nan

    2010-01-01

    An understanding of the close link between federal policy and family homelessness is critical for ensuring that one day no child in the United States is homeless. This article discusses the nature of family homelessness, the national policy framework that exists to help vulnerable families, the homeless assistance system that federal policy has…

  14. Homeless Youth: A Concept Analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Philisie Starling Washington

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. A variety of terms have been used to describe the homeless youth population. Purpose. The purpose of this article is to analyze the conceptual meanings of the term homeless youths by examining the evolution of the concept and its related terms in the current literature. Method. Online databases from 1990–2010 were analyzed using the Rodgers evolutionary approach. Results. The

  15. Obesity Among Chronically Homeless Adults: Is It a Problem?

    PubMed Central

    Rosenheck, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective We examined rates of obesity and associated characteristics in the chronically homeless population to explore how a range of factors, including sociodemographics, housing, food source, physical and mental health, and health service use, were related to being overweight or obese. Methods We conducted multivariate regression analyses on a community sample of 436 chronically homeless adults across 11 U.S. cities to examine the prevalence of obesity. Results The majority (57%) of chronically homeless adults were overweight or obese. Chronically homeless adults who were female or Hispanic appeared to be at particular risk for obesity. There were few differences on physical and mental health by weight group. Although overweight and obese chronically homeless adults were more likely to discuss exercise with a health-care provider, they reported engaging in less exercise than those who were underweight or normal weight. Conclusion These findings underscore the need for greater attention to obesity in chronically homeless adults and demonstrate a food insecurity-obesity paradox or poverty-obesity link. PMID:23277657

  16. Comparisons of Prevention Programs for Homeless Youth

    PubMed Central

    Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane

    2014-01-01

    There are six HIV prevention programs for homeless youth whose efficacy has been or is currently being evaluated: STRIVE, the Community Reinforcement Approach, Strengths-Based Case Management, Ecologically-Based Family Therapy, Street Smart, and AESOP (street outreach access to resources). Programs vary in their underlying framework and theoretical models for understanding homelessness. All programs presume that the youths’ families lack the ability to support their adolescent child. Some programs deemphasize family involvement while others focus on rebuilding connections among family members. The programs either normalize current family conflicts or, alternatively, provide education about the importance of parental monitoring. All programs aim to reduce HIV-related sexual and drug use acts. A coping skills approach is common across programs: Problem-solving skills are specifically addressed in four of the six programs; alternatively, parents in other programs are encouraged to contingently reward their children. Each program also engineers ongoing social support for the families and the youth, either by providing access to needed resources or by substituting a new, supportive relationship for the existing family caretaker. All of the interventions provide access to health and mental health services as basic program resources. A comparison of HIV prevention programs for homeless youth identifies the robust components of each and suggests which programs providers may choose to replicate. PMID:19067164

  17. Access to Pre-K Education under the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act. Pre-K Policy Brief Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boylan, Ellen; Splansky, Deborah

    2010-01-01

    The federal McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act ("McKinney-Vento") provides federal funding to states to address the problems that homeless children and youth encounter in enrolling, attending, and succeeding in the nation's public schools. McKinney-Vento requires states to develop plans that ensure homeless children and youth the same access…

  18. Pathways to homelessness among the mentally ill

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Sullivan; A. Burnam; P. Koegel

    2000-01-01

    Background: Persons with mental illness are over-represented among the homeless relative to the general population, and mental illness\\u000a is most likely one of many vulnerabilities that confer risk for homelessness. Method: This paper elucidates the pathways to homelessness for persons with mental illness by comparing and contrasting groups of\\u000a mentally ill homeless persons, non-mentally ill homeless persons, and housed mentally

  19. Electronic case management with homeless youth.

    PubMed

    Bender, Kimberly; Schau, Nicholas; Begun, Stephanie; Haffejee, Badiah; Barman-Adhikari, Anamika; Hathaway, Jessica

    2015-06-01

    Case management, a widely practiced form of service brokerage, is associated with a variety of positive outcomes for homeless youth, but it may be difficult to implement, as youth face logistical barriers to attending in-person meetings. As part of a larger clinical trial, the current study investigates the feasibility of providing electronic case management (ECM) to homeless youth, using cell-phones, texts, email, and Facebook. Youth were given prepaid cell-phones and a case manager who provided four ECM sessions every 2-3 weeks over a 3-month period. Contact logs were used to record how many youth engaged in ECM, how many attempts were necessary to elicit engagement, and youths' preferred technology methods for engaging. Although engagement in the number of ECM sessions varied, the majority of youth (87.5%) engaged in at least one ECM session. Youth (41%) most commonly needed one contact before they engaged in an ECM session, and the majority responded by the third attempt. While youth most commonly answered calls directly, their chosen method of returning calls was texting. The majority of youth (80%) described ECM positively, reporting themes of convenience, connection, and accountability. The use of ECM, particularly of texting, offers promising implications for providing services to homeless youth. PMID:25748603

  20. Words from the HEArt: Poetry therapy and group work with the homeless

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicholas Mazza

    2007-01-01

    The focus of this article is on the use of poetry therapy in group work with the homeless and their service providers. Particular attention is directed to task and treatment groups. Practice observations and a review of poetic material indicate the expressive\\/creative component of poetry therapy can help advance the self-development and empowerment of the homeless, as well as serve

  1. Cornell University's Homeless Program: The "Give and Take" Process of Service-Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hales, Ann

    1996-01-01

    Describes a service-learning program at Cornell University's School of Hotel Administration that provides courses and community service activities related to homelessness and hunger. Reviews the program's three components: a course on housing and feeding the homeless, industry linkages, and a research and advocacy center. Presents student…

  2. Service learning: population-focused nursing for the homeless at a soup kitchen.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Laura H; Dilley, Kathy B

    2009-01-01

    The authors describe the development of an undergraduate population-focused nursing service learning experience at a soup kitchen for the homeless. Through this experience, senior BSN students are able to increase their awareness of health disparities and use interdisciplinary communication and collaboration skills to provide basic healthcare and health promotion to the homeless population. PMID:19412058

  3. The Power of the Drug, Nature of Support, and Their Impact on Homeless Youth

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Angela L. Hudson; Adeline Nyamathi; Alexandra Slagle; Barbara Greengold; Deborah Koniak Griffin; Farinaz Khalilifard; Danny Gedzoff; Courtney Reid

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore homeless youths' perspectives on the power of drugs in their lives, the preferred type of drugs used, barriers to treatment, and strategies to prevent drug initiation and abuse. This was a descriptive, qualitative study using focus groups with a purposeful sample of 24 drug-using homeless youth. The results provided insight into the

  4. School Selection for Students in Out-of-Home Care. Best Practices in Homeless Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Homeless Education at SERVE, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Legal Center for Foster Care and Education and the National Center for Homeless Education present this brief to provide a framework for local homeless education liaisons, educators, child welfare caseworkers, and other child welfare advocates for assessing best interest when selecting a school for students in out-of-home care. While the brief…

  5. Conceptualizing Social Integration among Formerly Homeless Adults with Severe Mental Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Jack; Rosenheck, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    The multiple dimensions of social integration among formerly homeless adults with severe mental illness have not been well-studied. Previous studies have focused on clinical measures or narrow components of social integration. We used a multisite study of chronically homeless adults who were provided housing to (a) identify the main factors…

  6. The McKinney-Vento Education for Homeless Children and Youth Program: Implications for Special Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Losinski, Mickey; Katsiyannis, Antonis; Ryan, Joseph B.

    2013-01-01

    During the 2008-2009 academic school year, nearly a million (956,914) students were reported by school districts as being homeless, a 41% increase over just a 2-year period year. The purpose of this article is to provide a brief overview of national legislative efforts to address the education of children who are homeless, with a particular…

  7. Young Children and Their Families Who Are Homeless. A University Affiliated Program's Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Tawara D.; Brown, Marisa C.

    This monograph describes a University Affiliated Program's (UAP) initiative that targets the development needs of children from birth to 5 years of age who are homeless and the services and supports provided to their families. The Georgetown University Child Development Center, the UAP for the District of Columbia, has implemented a homelessness

  8. Homeless Aging Veterans in Transition: A Life-Span Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Carla J.; Bridier, Nancy L.

    2013-01-01

    The need for counseling and career/educational services for homeless veterans has captured political and economic venues for more than 25 years. Veterans are three times more likely to become homeless than the general population if veterans live in poverty or are minority veterans. This mixed methods study emphasized a life-span perspective approach for exploring factors influencing normative aging and life-quality of 39 homeless veterans in Alabama and Florida. Seven descriptive quantitative and qualitative research questions framed the investigation. Study participants completed a quantitative survey reflecting their preferences and needs with a subset of the sample (N = 12) also participating in individual qualitative interview sessions. Thirty-two service providers and stakeholders completed quantitative surveys. Empirical and qualitative data with appropriate triangulation procedures provided interpretive information relative to a life-span development perspective. Study findings provide evidence of the need for future research efforts to address strategies that focus on the health and economic challenges of veterans before they are threatened with the possibility of homelessness. Implications of the study findings provide important information associated with the premise that human development occurs throughout life with specific characteristics influencing the individual's passage. Implications for aging/homelessness research are grounded in late-life transitioning and human development intervention considerations. PMID:24286010

  9. The medical origins of homelessness.

    PubMed Central

    Winkleby, M A; Rockhill, B; Jatulis, D; Fortmann, S P

    1992-01-01

    In 1989 through 1990, we conducted a cross-sectional survey of 1437 homeless adults in northern California (98% response rate). Prevalences of alcohol abuse, illegal drug use, and psychiatric hospitalization when adults first became homeless were 15% to 33% lower than prevalences following homelessness. The largest differences between the homeless and a comparison group of 3122 nonhomeless adults were for psychiatric hospitalization (odds ratios [ORs] of 4.6 for men and 5.9 for women) and alcohol abuse (ORs of 2.3 for men and 4.0 for women). However, when prehomeless prevalences of addictive and psychiatric disorders were compared with prevalences among the nonhomeless, absolute differences were no greater than 12%. PMID:1415869

  10. Overdose Deaths Among Homeless Persons

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of them involving opioids—are now the biggest killer among homeless people in the Boston area. Drug ... Cancer and heart disease were the next biggest killers (at around 16 percent each); HIV =accounted for ...

  11. Temporary shelter for the homeless

    E-print Network

    Lin, Christine, 1982-

    2005-01-01

    A one-person cardboard structure was designed to temporarily shelter the homeless during harsh weather conditions. The overall form is based on the folding Yoshimura pattern. It is collapsible, wind and water resistant, ...

  12. Engaging the Homeless Paranoid Patient

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Gayatri

    2007-01-01

    For people who are disenfranchised from society for other reasons, especially homelessness, a paranoid delusional system can create an additional obstacle in the therapeutic engagement and treatment of such individuals. In this article, we describe a composite case of a homeless woman with paranoid schizophrenia. Through this case example, we will explore various obstacles to treatment and discuss strategies to overcome these hurdles to treatment, initiate a therapeutic alliance, and further facilitate and maintain therapy. PMID:20526407

  13. Homeless Children: Needs and Services

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anne Hicks-Coolick; Patricia Burnside-Eaton; Ardith Peters

    2003-01-01

    This study explored needs of homeless children and shelter services available to them. The first phase of this mixed-method study consisted of open-ended interviews of key personnel in six diverse homeless shelters in metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia. This qualitative data gave direction to the creation of a questionnaire used in a larger follow-up survey of shelters in the state of Georgia.

  14. The health of homeless immigrants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S Chiu; D A Redelmeier; G Tolomiczenko; A Kiss; S W Hwang

    2009-01-01

    Background:This study examined the association between immigrant status and current health in a representative sample of 1189 homeless people in Toronto, Canada.Methods:Multivariate regression analyses were performed to examine the relationship between immigrant status and current health status (assessed using the SF-12) among homeless recent immigrants (?10 years since immigration), non-recent immigrants (>10 years since immigration) and Canadian-born individuals recruited at

  15. 38 CFR 61.33 - Payment of per diem.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VA HOMELESS PROVIDERS GRANT AND PER DIEM PROGRAM...pay per diem to the recipient for those homeless veterans: (1) Who VA referred to...recipient for furnishing services to homeless veterans that the per diem...

  16. 38 CFR 61.33 - Payment of per diem.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VA HOMELESS PROVIDERS GRANT AND PER DIEM PROGRAM...recipient or non-grant recipient for those homeless veterans— (1) Who VA referred to...recipient for furnishing services to homeless veterans that the per diem...

  17. 38 CFR 61.33 - Payment of per diem.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VA HOMELESS PROVIDERS GRANT AND PER DIEM PROGRAM...pay per diem to the recipient for those homeless veterans: (1) Who VA referred to...recipient for furnishing services to homeless veterans that the per diem...

  18. 38 CFR 61.33 - Payment of per diem.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VA HOMELESS PROVIDERS GRANT AND PER DIEM PROGRAM...recipient or non-grant recipient for those homeless veterans— (1) Who VA referred to...recipient for furnishing services to homeless veterans that the per diem...

  19. 38 CFR 61.33 - Payment of per diem.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VA HOMELESS PROVIDERS GRANT AND PER DIEM PROGRAM...recipient or non-grant recipient for those homeless veterans— (1) Who VA referred to...recipient for furnishing services to homeless veterans that the per diem...

  20. Art Messaging as a Medium to Engage Homeless Young Adults Art Messaging as a Medium to Engage Homeless Youth

    PubMed Central

    Nyamathi, Adeline; Slagle, Alexandra; Thomas, Alexandra; Hudson, Angela; Khalilifard, Farinaz; Avila, Glenna; Orser, Julie; Cuchilla, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Background Art has been shown to be an empowering and engaging entity with numerous benefits to vulnerable populations, including the homeless persons and young adults. Yet, little is known how homeless young adults perceive the use of art as messages that can communicate the danger of initiating or continuing drug and alcohol use. Objectives The purpose of this study was to solicit perspectives of homeless drug-using young adults as to how art can be used to design messages for their peers about the danger of initiating or continuing drug and alcohol use. Methods Qualitative methodology via focus group discussions was utilized to engage 24 homeless young adults enrolled from a drop-in site in Santa Monica. Results The findings revealed support for a myriad of delivery styles, including in person communication, flyers, music, documentary film and creative writing. The young adults also provided insight into the importance of the thematic framework of messages. Such themes ranged from empowering and hopeful messages to those designed to scare young homeless adults into not experimenting with drugs. Conclusions The findings indicate that in addition to messages communicating the need to prevent or reduce drug and alcohol use, homeless young adults respond to messages that remind them of goals and dreams they once had for their future, and to content that is personal, real and truthful. . Our research indicates that messages that reinforce protective factors such as hope for the future and self-esteem may be as important to homeless young adults as information about the risks and consequences of drug use. PMID:21441664

  1. Homelessness and the Homeless: Responses and Innovations. A Canadian Contribution to IYSH 1987.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oberlander, H. Peter; Fallick, Arthur L.

    This report presents descriptions of successful Canadian public and private programs to aid the homeless and alleviate homelessness as part of participation in the International Year of Shelter for the Homeless (IYSH). Part 1, "The International Year of Shelter for the Homeless," includes the following: (1) objectives; (2) global conditions of the…

  2. HOMELESS IN AMERICA, HOMELESS IN CALIFORNIA John M. Quigley, Steven Raphael, and Eugene Smolensky*

    E-print Network

    Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

    HOMELESS IN AMERICA, HOMELESS IN CALIFORNIA John M. Quigley, Steven Raphael, and Eugene Smolensky of the alternate hypothesis that variations in homelessness arise from changed circumstances in the housing market and in the income distribution. We assemble essentially all the systematic information avail- able on homelessness

  3. 2 Homeless service Utilization report The 2010 Homeless Service Utilization Report is the

    E-print Network

    Dong, Yingfei

    #12;2 Homeless service Utilization report The 2010 Homeless Service Utilization Report is the fifth in a series of reports prepared by the Center on the Family at the University of Hawai`i and the Homeless Programs Office of the Hawai`i State Department of Human Services (DHS). Since the first Homeless Service

  4. Homeless in God's Country: Coping Strategies and Felt Experiences of the Rural Homeless

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilton, Timothy; DeJong, Cornell

    2010-01-01

    This study examines coping behaviors and felt experiences of homeless adults in Michigan's Upper Peninsula. Data from in-depth interviews with 55 homeless adults reveal 5 general coping pattern groups: shelter users, campers, couch hoppers, mixed users, and circumstantial homeless. Homeless adults within each group experienced similar levels of…

  5. Homeless and Freezing HowYou Can Help the Homeless Community this Winter

    E-print Network

    Subramanian, Venkat

    Homeless and Freezing HowYou Can Help the Homeless Community this Winter Each winter't phase us. For someone who is homeless and sleeps on the streets or in an abandoned building, those dips in temperatures can mean the difference ­ literally ­ between life and death. About 10 years ago, a homeless

  6. Hepatitis A/B vaccine completion among homeless adults with history of incarceration.

    PubMed

    Nyamathi, Adeline M; Marlow, Elizabeth; Branson, Catherine; Marfisee, Mary; Nandy, Karabi

    2012-03-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccination rates for incarcerated adults remain low despite their high risk for infection. This study determined predictors of vaccine completion in homeless adults (N= 297) who reported histories of incarceration and who participated in one of three nurse-led hepatitis programs of different intensity. Moreover time since release from incarceration was also considered. Just over half of the former prisoners completed the vaccine series. Older age (?40), having a partner, and chronic homelessness were associated with vaccine completion. Recent research has documented the difficulty in providing vaccine services to younger homeless persons and homeless males at risk for HBV. Additional strategies are needed to achieve HBV vaccination completion rates greater than 50% for formerly incarcerated homeless men. PMID:22372394

  7. Parents' perspectives on homelessness and its effects on the educational development of their children.

    PubMed

    Morris, Rita I; Butt, Rachael A

    2003-02-01

    This qualitative study explored parents' perceptions of how their homelessness affected the development and academic achievement of their children. Grounded theory with symbolic interactionism was the framework for this study. Data were collected through semistructured interviews with 34 homeless families in a variety of settings. Multiple factors were found, including unstable relationships, abuse and violence, abdication of parental responsibility, poor parenting models, and resilient children. The findings present a case for supportive educational services for homeless school-age children. School nurses play a dual role. They can ensure that school personnel and resource providers understand the culture of homelessness, and they can develop and implement innovative programs for parents and school personnel to help homeless children. PMID:12562224

  8. Ecosystem Services and Trade-Offs Mediated by Urban Water Bodies for Homeless Popula@ons in Phoenix Wolf, A.1,2, M.M. Palta,2 N.B. Grimm,2 J. Gwiszcz,3 O. Schwake,4

    E-print Network

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Ecosystem Services and Trade-Offs Mediated by Urban Water Bodies for Homeless provide heat miLgaLon, privacy, and other services to the homeless popula-offs provided by the wetlands to the homeless populaLon in Phoenix · Monitor

  9. Homelessness: A Data-Driven Learning Guide

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    ICPSR

    This is a learning guide that uses data to investigate the characteristics of the Washington DC, metropolitan area homeless population, and the relationship between homelessness and several measures of health.

  10. Determination of VA health care costs.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Paul G

    2003-09-01

    In the absence of billing data, alternative methods are used to estimate the cost of hospital stays, outpatient visits, and treatment innovations in the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). The choice of method represents a trade-off between accuracy and research cost. The direct measurement method gathers information on staff activities, supplies, equipment, space, and workload. Since it is expensive, direct measurement should be reserved for finding short-run costs, evaluating provider efficiency, or determining the cost of treatments that are innovative or unique to VA. The pseudo-bill method combines utilization data with a non-VA reimbursement schedule. The cost regression method estimates the cost of VA hospital stays by applying the relationship between cost and characteristics of non-VA hospitalizations. The Health Economics Resource Center uses pseudo-bill and cost regression methods to create an encounter-level database of VA costs. Researchers are also beginning to use the VA activity-based cost allocation system. PMID:15095549

  11. Predictors of Homelessness Among Street Living Youth

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Natasha Slesnick; Suzanne Bartle-Haring; Pushpanjali Dashora; Min Ju Kang; Erin Aukward

    2008-01-01

    While few studies have identified predictors of exiting homelessness among adults, even fewer studies have attempted to identify\\u000a these predictors among homeless youth. The current study explored predictors of change in homelessness among 180 homeless\\u000a youth between the ages of 14 and 22, recruited through an urban drop-in center. All youth were assessed at baseline, 3 and\\u000a 6 months. The sample

  12. Using natural language processing on the free text of clinical documents to screen for evidence of homelessness among US veterans.

    PubMed

    Gundlapalli, Adi V; Carter, Marjorie E; Palmer, Miland; Ginter, Thomas; Redd, Andrew; Pickard, Steven; Shen, Shuying; South, Brett; Divita, Guy; Duvall, Scott; Nguyen, Thien M; D'Avolio, Leonard W; Samore, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Information retrieval algorithms based on natural language processing (NLP) of the free text of medical records have been used to find documents of interest from databases. Homelessness is a high priority non-medical diagnosis that is noted in electronic medical records of Veterans in Veterans Affairs (VA) facilities. Using a human-reviewed reference standard corpus of clinical documents of Veterans with evidence of homelessness and those without, an open-source NLP tool (Automated Retrieval Console v2.0, ARC) was trained to classify documents. The best performing model based on document level work-flow performed well on a test set (Precision 94%, Recall 97%, F-Measure 96). Processing of a naïve set of 10,000 randomly selected documents from the VA using this best performing model yielded 463 documents flagged as positive, indicating a 4.7% prevalence of homelessness. Human review noted a precision of 70% for these flags resulting in an adjusted prevalence of homelessness of 3.3% which matches current VA estimates. Further refinements are underway to improve the performance. We demonstrate an effective and rapid lifecycle of using an off-the-shelf NLP tool for screening targets of interest from medical records. PMID:24551356

  13. Using Natural Language Processing on the Free Text of Clinical Documents to Screen for Evidence of Homelessness Among US Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Gundlapalli, Adi V.; Carter, Marjorie E.; Palmer, Miland; Ginter, Thomas; Redd, Andrew; Pickard, Steven; Shen, Shuying; South, Brett; Divita, Guy; Duvall, Scott; Nguyen, Thien M.; D’Avolio, Leonard W.; Samore, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Information retrieval algorithms based on natural language processing (NLP) of the free text of medical records have been used to find documents of interest from databases. Homelessness is a high priority non-medical diagnosis that is noted in electronic medical records of Veterans in Veterans Affairs (VA) facilities. Using a human-reviewed reference standard corpus of clinical documents of Veterans with evidence of homelessness and those without, an open-source NLP tool (Automated Retrieval Console v2.0, ARC) was trained to classify documents. The best performing model based on document level work-flow performed well on a test set (Precision 94%, Recall 97%, F-Measure 96). Processing of a naïve set of 10,000 randomly selected documents from the VA using this best performing model yielded 463 documents flagged as positive, indicating a 4.7% prevalence of homelessness. Human review noted a precision of 70% for these flags resulting in an adjusted prevalence of homelessness of 3.3% which matches current VA estimates. Further refinements are underway to improve the performance. We demonstrate an effective and rapid lifecycle of using an off-the-shelf NLP tool for screening targets of interest from medical records. PMID:24551356

  14. Adult Education for the Homeless. FY 89 Project Abstracts. Twenty-Eight Programs that Can Help the Homeless.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Vocational and Adult Education (ED), Washington, DC. Clearinghouse on Adult Education and Literacy.

    In the first portion of this document, abstracts are given for 30 projects that were designed to provide basic skills and literacy training to homeless adults in fiscal year 1989. The following information is provided for each project: state; grant award number; grantee; project title; project director, telephone number, and address; and…

  15. National Resource Center on Homelessness and Mental Illness

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Operated by a private research firm under contract to the Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the National Resource Center on Homelessness and Mental Illness serves as a clearinghouse for technical assistance and research information. Included here are comprehensive, well-annotated national listings of organizations concerned with mental health, housing and homelessness, as well as housing-related technical assistance resources. The site also provides an "extensive bibliographic database on homelessness and mental illness" broken down by subject; a listing of research monographs and papers commissioned by the center, some of which may be accessed online; an annotated directory of online resources; information about technical assistance given by the Center to professionals in the field; and selected posted articles from issues of Access, a periodic information letter to the field.

  16. The Second Student-Run Homeless Shelter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seider, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    From 1983-2011, the Harvard Square Homeless Shelter (HSHS) in Cambridge, Massachusetts, was the only student-run homeless shelter in the United States. However, college students at Villanova, Temple, Drexel, the University of Pennsylvania, and Swarthmore drew upon the HSHS model to open their own student-run homeless shelter in Philadelphia,…

  17. Service Utilization Patterns of Homeless Youth

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sarah L Akinyemi

    2010-01-01

    Few studies exist on the types of characteristics associated with service utilization (e.g., shelters, food programs) among homeless youth in the U.S. Services are important, however, because without food and shelter, numerous homeless youth resort to trading sex in order to meet their daily survival needs. Access to physical and mental health services gives homeless youth more of an opportunity

  18. The Invisible Homeless: A New Urban Ecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ropers, Richard H.

    Contemporary homelessness is the result of increasing social and economic inequality faced by those in American society who are most vulnerable to individual, family, and economic instability. This case study of the homeless population of Los Angeles (California), based on two surveys conducted in 1984, views the homeless as a segment of the…

  19. Unaccompanied Homeless Youth in Illinois: 2005

    E-print Network

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    Unaccompanied Homeless Youth in Illinois: 2005 Funded by the Illinois Department of Human Services (IDHS) Coordinated by the Chicago Coalition for the Homeless Timothy P. Johnson Ingrid Graf Survey Research Laboratory University of Illinois at Chicago December 2005 #12;#12;Unaccompanied Homeless Youth

  20. Negative Cultural Capital and Homeless Young People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Justin David

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the ways in which homeless young people find a sense of self-worth and dignity within the conditions of youth homelessness. It notes that, while homeless young people seek a space where they do not feel marginalised and can attain a form of social status and cultural competence, they also engage in practices and acts of…

  1. Homelessness in Cambridge: A Social Attitudes Survey

    E-print Network

    Steiner, Ullrich

    Homelessness in Cambridge: A Social Attitudes Survey Department of Geography February 2013 #12;Homelessness in Cambridge: A Social Attitudes Survey February 2013 This report presents the findings today: homelessness. The questions put to the public emerged from an initial consultation workshop

  2. Homeless Young People and Technology: Ordinary

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Richard

    Homeless Young People and Technology: Ordinary Interactions, Extraordinary Circumstances JillWashington|dhendry@uw.edu Homelessness among young people aged 13 to 30 is a pressing problem with lasting social and economic consequences for the U.S. By one estimate, 3 million young people experience homelessness annu- ally; that is

  3. The Paradox of Homelessness in America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levitan, Sar A.; Schillmoeller, Susan

    Homelessness is a growing problem in the midst of relative prosperity. However, as the problem persists, the public may be becoming increasingly less compassionate to the homeless and annoyed by the problem. Although it is difficult to determine how many people are homeless, the most widely circulated estimate puts their number at about 600,000.…

  4. Homelessness and Its Effects on Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart-Shegos, Ellen

    Homelessness influences every facet of children's lives, inhibiting their physical, emotional, cognitive, social, and behavioral development. Homeless women face such obstacles to healthy pregnancies as chemical abuse, chronic health problems, and lack of prenatal care. Homeless infants are more likely to have low birth weights and are at greater…

  5. Sexual Health Information Seeking Online Among Runaway and Homeless Youth.

    PubMed

    Barman-Adhikari, Anamika; Rice, Eric

    2011-06-01

    Research shows runaway and homeless youth are reluctant to seek help from traditional health providers. The Internet can be useful in engaging this population and meeting their needs for sexual health information, including information about HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Using a sample of homeless youth living in Los Angeles, California in June 2009, this study assesses the frequency with which runaway and homeless youth seek sexual health information via the Internet, and assesses which youth are more likely to engage in seeking health information from online sources. Drawing from Andersen's (1968) health behavior model and Pescosolido's (1992) network episode model, we develop and refine a model for seeking online sexual health information among homeless youth. Rather than testing the predicative strength of a given model, our aim is to identify and explore conceptually driven correlates that may shed light on the characteristics associated with these help seeking behaviors among homeless youth. Analyses using multivariate logistic regression models reveal that among the sample of youth, females and gay males most frequently seek sexual health information online. We demonstrate the structure of social network ties (e.g., connection with parents) and the content of interactions (e.g., e-mail forwards of health information) across ties are critical correlates of online sexual health information seeking. Results show a continued connection with parents via the Internet is significantly associated with youth seeking HIV or STI information. Similarly for content of interactions, more youth who were sent health information online also reported seeking HIV information and HIV-testing information. We discuss implications for intervention and practice, focusing on how the Internet may be used for dissemination of sexual health information and as a resource for social workers to link transient, runaway, and homeless youth to care. PMID:22247795

  6. Materials on the Education of Homeless Children. Updated.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Shelley

    This document comprises resource materials on the education of homeless children. It is divided into three parts. Part 1, "Overview," collects publications of the Center for Law and Education, and articles and editorials from "Education Week" and "The New York Times." Part 2, "Relevant Statutes and Regulations," provides materials pertaining to…

  7. Nutrition Education and Food for the Homeless--University Outreach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truesdell, Delores; Sani, Amy V.

    2001-01-01

    The Food Stamp Nutrition Education Initiative targeted homeless people in overnight shelters. College students made monthly visits to provide nutrition education and meals. Students received training in quantity food service and leadership in helping improve food security. (Contains 16 references.) (JOW)

  8. Kids in Crisis. How Can I Help a Homeless Child?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodkin, Adele M.; Coleman, Melba

    1994-01-01

    Presents strategies for working with homeless students. Teachers must recognize the power of school, focus on family needs, provide academic aid, suggest help for the parents, and marshall all available forces. Teachers must also begin with each child's basic needs (food and clothing), enhance social skills, then work on attendance. (SM)

  9. A Look at Child Welfare from a Homeless Education Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Homeless Education at SERVE, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Although navigating the child welfare system can be daunting for those working in the field of homeless education, local liaisons and others must determine whether children in the child welfare system are eligible for McKinney-Vento services and collaborate with child welfare staff. This document provides an overview of the U.S. child welfare…

  10. Making Meaning of Citizenship: Mental Illness, Forensic Involvement, and Homelessness

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Allison N. Ponce; Ashley Clayton; Jenny Noia; Michael Rowe; Maria J. OConnell

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with mental illness, substance use disorders, and criminal justice involvement who experience homelessness are often marginalized and have difficulty achieving community inclusion. A framework of citizenship provides a basis for understanding the components of integration necessary to achieve status as a member of one's community. A citizenship “map” was presented to focus groups of persons with mental illness and

  11. Supporting the Literacy Development of Children Living in Homeless Shelters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacGillivray, Laurie; Ardell, Amy Lassiter; Curwen, Margaret Sauceda

    2010-01-01

    There are approximately 1.5 million children in the United States who go to sleep each night without a home of their own (National Center on Family Homelessness, 2009). In this article, we provide insights into how educators can create greater classroom support, particularly in literacy learning and development, for this population. Drawing from…

  12. Recognizing the Needs of the Homeless and the Hungry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    France, Joseph B.

    This publication describes services of selected American Red Cross chapters to the homeless and the hungry. Chapter profiles provide information on how chapters of various sizes develop, fund, and implement programs in response to their communities' needs. Program descriptions detail the chapters' fund-raising from private, public, and voluntary…

  13. Runaway and Homeless Youth Grants: Improvements Needed in the Grant Award Process. Report to Congressional Committees. GAO-10-335

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Kay E.

    2010-01-01

    The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) awards grants to provide shelter and services to runaway and homeless youth through the Basic Center, Transitional Living and Street Outreach Programs. In response to a mandate for a review of the grant award process for these programs in the Reconnecting Homeless Youth Act of 2008 (Pub. L. No.…

  14. An Examination of the McKinney-Vento Act and Its Influence on the Homeless Education Situation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Peter Michael

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the central elements of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act and, drawing from Spillane's distributed leadership perspective, examines the policy's impact on the homeless education situation. Although the initial passing and subsequent revisions to McKinney-Vento are depicted as providing numerous benefits for students…

  15. Aged, Adrift and Alone: Detroit's Elderly Homeless. Final Report to the Detroit Area Agency on Aging, October 1988.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglass, Richard L.; And Others

    The majority of long-term, non-transient homeless people in Detroit, Michigan are elderly. An understanding of the elderly homeless population in terms of demographic characteristics, family relationships, economic and health status, and other factors is a prerequisite to determining appropriate courses of action for those who provide services to…

  16. Elderly Homeless Veterans in Los Angeles: Chronicity and Precipitants of Homelessness

    PubMed Central

    van den Berk-Clark, Carissa; McGuire, James

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We compared the characteristics of chronically homeless and acutely homeless elderly veterans to better understand precipitants of homelessness. Methods. We conducted interviews with 33 chronically and 26 acutely homeless veterans aged 65 years and older receiving transitional housing services in Los Angeles, California, between 2003 and 2005. We asked questions regarding their sociodemographic characteristics and other social status measures. Other precipitants of homelessness were acquired via observation and open-ended and structured questions. Results. Both veterans groups were more similar than different, with substantial levels of physical, psychiatric, and social impairment. They differed significantly in homelessness history, with chronically homeless veterans having more homelessness episodes and more total time homeless. They were also less educated and had smaller social networks. In response to open-ended questioning, elderly homeless veterans revealed how health and substance use issues interacted with loss of social support and eviction to exacerbate homelessness. Conclusions. Assessment of a range of factors is needed to address risk factors and events leading to homelessness. Further research with larger samples is needed to confirm the characteristics and needs of the elderly homeless veteran population. PMID:24148059

  17. VA Organization Department of

    E-print Network

    (EHR) 7 #12;Achievements · The VA's EMR been estimated to improve efficiency by 6% per year · Pharmacy #12;VistA Electronic Health Record (EHR) ­ The name was adopted in 1994 under Ken Kizer ­ 1996 Health Record ­ PHR) ­ 2010 ­ Blue Button (Data Download) #12;16 · Virtually Eliminates Errors

  18. Macroeconomic Causes of Family Homelessness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McChesney, Kay Young

    The welfare of American families improved steadily for over 20 years after World War II. After the War on Poverty of the 1960s, the number of people living in poverty fell, reaching its lowest point in 1973. During the 1980s, homeless families, including those living in the streets, in cars, and in shelters seemingly appeared out of nowhere. As…

  19. Designing Services for Homeless Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagen, Jan L.

    1990-01-01

    The complex needs of the heterogeneous group of homeless women suggest that policy and services must focus on a continuum from adequate and accessible emergency services (shelter, food, financial assistance) to transitional assistance with housing, employment, and mental and physical health care, and ultimately to stabilization. (SK)

  20. Youth Homelessness and Social Stigma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidd, Sean A.

    2007-01-01

    Building upon previous exploratory qualitative research (Kidd S.A. (2003) "Child Adol. Social Work J." 20(4):235-261), this paper examines the mental health implications of social stigma as it is experienced by homeless youth. Surveys conducted with 208 youths on the streets and in agencies in New York City and Toronto revealed significant…

  1. 76 FR 52575 - Health Care for Homeless Veterans Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-23

    ...veterans suffering from serious mental illness, including veterans who are homeless...homeless and suffering from serious mental illness or a substance use disorder...homeless veterans with serious mental illness and/or substance use...

  2. 75 FR 79323 - Health Care for Homeless Veterans Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ...veterans suffering from serious mental illness, including veterans who are homeless...homeless and suffering from serious mental illness or a substance use disorder...homeless veterans with serious mental illness and/or substance use...

  3. 24 CFR 91.405 - Housing and homeless needs assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Housing and homeless needs assessment. 91.405 Section 91...Consolidated Plan § 91.405 Housing and homeless needs assessment. Housing and homeless needs must be described in the...

  4. 24 CFR 576.56 - Homeless assistance and participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Homeless assistance and participation. 576...GRANTS PROGRAM: STEWART B. McKINNEY HOMELESS ASSISTANCE ACT Program Requirements § 576.56 Homeless assistance and participation....

  5. 24 CFR 576.56 - Homeless assistance and participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Homeless assistance and participation. 576...GRANTS PROGRAM: STEWART B. McKINNEY HOMELESS ASSISTANCE ACT Program Requirements § 576.56 Homeless assistance and participation....

  6. 24 CFR 91.405 - Housing and homeless needs assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Housing and homeless needs assessment. 91.405 Section 91...Consolidated Plan § 91.405 Housing and homeless needs assessment. Housing and homeless needs must be described in the...

  7. 24 CFR 91.405 - Housing and homeless needs assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Housing and homeless needs assessment. 91.405 Section 91...Consolidated Plan § 91.405 Housing and homeless needs assessment. Housing and homeless needs must be described in the...

  8. 24 CFR 91.405 - Housing and homeless needs assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Housing and homeless needs assessment. 91.405 Section 91...Consolidated Plan § 91.405 Housing and homeless needs assessment. Housing and homeless needs must be described in the...

  9. 24 CFR 91.405 - Housing and homeless needs assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Housing and homeless needs assessment. 91.405 Section 91...Consolidated Plan § 91.405 Housing and homeless needs assessment. Housing and homeless needs must be described in the...

  10. An inexpensive, interdisciplinary, methodology to conduct an impact study of homeless persons on hospital based services.

    PubMed

    Parker, R David; Regier, Michael; Brown, Zachary; Davis, Stephen

    2015-02-01

    Homelessness is a primary concern for community health. Scientific literature on homelessness is wide ranging and diverse. One opportunity to add to existing literature is the development and testing of affordable, easily implemented methods for measuring the impact of homeless on the healthcare system. Such methodological approaches rely on the strengths in a multidisciplinary approach, including providers, both healthcare and homeless services and applied clinical researchers. This paper is a proof of concept for a methodology which is easily adaptable nationwide, given the mandated implementation of homeless management information systems in the United States and other countries; medical billing systems by hospitals; and research methods of researchers. Adaptation is independent of geographic region, budget restraints, specific agency skill sets, and many other factors that impact the application of a consistent methodological science based approach to assess and address homelessness. We conducted a secondary data analysis merging data from homeless utilization and hospital case based data. These data detailed care utilization among homeless persons in a small, Appalachian city in the United States. In our sample of 269 persons who received at least one hospital based service and one homeless service between July 1, 2012 and June 30, 2013, the total billed costs were $5,979,463 with 10 people costing more than one-third ($1,957,469) of the total. Those persons were primarily men, living in an emergency shelter, with pre-existing disabling conditions. We theorize that targeted services, including Housing First, would be an effective intervention. This is proposed in a future study. PMID:24894404

  11. Homelessness Outcome Reporting Normative Framework: Systems-Level Evaluation of Progress in Ending Homelessness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austen, Tyrone; Pauly, Bernie

    2012-01-01

    Homelessness is a serious and growing issue. Evaluations of systemic-level changes are needed to determine progress in reducing or ending homelessness. The report card methodology is one means of systems-level assessment. Rather than solely establishing an enumeration, homelessness report cards can capture pertinent information about structural…

  12. Finding Homeless Youth. Patterns Based on Geographical Area and Number of Homeless Episodes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witkin, Andrea L.; Milburn, Norweeta G.; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Batterham, Philip; May, Susanne; Brooks, Ronald

    2005-01-01

    A census of homeless youth was conducted in locations across Los Angeles County, California. Building on previous research that has focused on homeless youth in cruise areas, the authors examined demographic and behavioral differences between homeless youth in cruise and noncruise areas. Youth in cruise areas were more likely than youth in…

  13. Counting homeless persons with surveys of users of services for the homeless

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Franklin J. James

    1991-01-01

    Because of their comparative economy, the most commonly used methods for counting the homeless focus on users of shelters, food lines, health clinics for the homeless, and other services for the homeless. This paper argues that surveys restricted to shelter users are of limited usefulness, but that joint surveys of food?line, shelter, and clinic users include very substantial proportions of

  14. Head injury and mortality in the homeless.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Thomas M; Laurie, Marie; Oddy, Michael; Menzies, Mark; Stewart, Elaine; Wainman-Lefley, Jessica

    2015-01-15

    Risk factors for head injury are also risk factors for becoming homeless but there is little research on this vulnerable group, who can be neglected by health services that specialize in acquired brain injury. This study investigates the prevalence of admissions to hospital with a head injury in the homeless and associations with later mortality. It compares homeless people with and without a record of hospitalized head injury (HHI) and the Glasgow population. Data were obtained from a U.K. National Health Service strategy to enhance care of the homeless. This included development and production of local registers of homeless people. In Glasgow, the initiative took place over a seven-year period (2004-2010) and comprised 40 general practitioner (family practice) services in the locality of 55 homeless hostels. The register was linked to hospital admissions with head injury recorded in Scottish Medical Records and to the General Register of Scotland, which records deaths. A total of 1590 homeless people was registered in general practitioner (family doctor) returns. The prevalence of admission to hospital with head injury in the homeless over a 30-year period (13.5%) was 5.4 times higher than in the Glasgow population. In the homeless with HHI, 33.6% died in the seven-year census period, compared with 13.9% in the homeless with no hospitalized HI (NHHI). The standardized mortality ratio for HHI (4.51) was more than twice that for NHHI (2.08). The standardized mortality ratio for HHI aged 15-34 (17.54) was particularly high. These findings suggest that HHI is common in the homeless relative to the general population and is a risk factor for late mortality in the homeless population. PMID:25010750

  15. Risk Factors for Homelessness Among US Veterans.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jack; Rosenheck, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Homelessness among US veterans has been a focus of research for over 3 decades. Following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, this is the first systematic review to summarize research on risk factors for homelessness among US veterans and to evaluate the evidence for these risk factors. Thirty-one studies published from 1987 to 2014 were divided into 3 categories: more rigorous studies, less rigorous studies, and studies comparing homeless veterans with homeless nonveterans. The strongest and most consistent risk factors were substance use disorders and mental illness, followed by low income and other income-related factors. There was some evidence that social isolation, adverse childhood experiences, and past incarceration were also important risk factors. Veterans, especially those who served since the advent of the all-volunteer force, were at greater risk for homelessness than other adults. Homeless veterans were generally older, better educated, and more likely to be male, married/have been married, and to have health insurance coverage than other homeless adults. More studies simultaneously addressing premilitary, military, and postmilitary risk factors for veteran homelessness are needed. This review identifies substance use disorders, mental illness, and low income as targets for policies and programs in efforts to end homelessness among veterans. PMID:25595171

  16. Deviance over the life course: the case of homeless substance abusers.

    PubMed

    Hartwell, Stephanie

    2003-01-01

    Characteristics of the homeless population highlight current and emerging social problems in America. It is estimated there are two to three million homeless people in the United States and that between 20% and 80% have substance abuse problems. In this paper I apply Hirschi's social bond theory to a qualitative study of 31 male homeless substance users from New Haven, Connecticut. I interviewed each man once in 1992 and a second time during 1993. The interview data provide evidence of non-normative attachments to families, friends, and institutions where there is little commitment to conventional goals. I conclude that for these men, being homeless and abusing substances is normative to their lives. PMID:12747395

  17. Drug use and barriers to and facilitators of drug treatment for homeless youth.

    PubMed

    Nyamathi, Adeline; Hudson, Angela; Mutere, Malaika; Christiani, Ashley; Sweat, Jeff; Nyamathi, Kamala; Broms, Theresa

    2007-01-01

    In the United States, homeless youth are becoming increasingly entrenched in problem substance use, including high prevalence of alcohol abuse and injection use. A total of 54 substance-using homeless youth (18-25 years) participated in focus groups in order to provide their perspectives on barriers to and facilitators of seeking treatment. Participants were recruited from shelters in Hollywood, CA, and from a street-based, drop-in site in Santa Monica, CA. Participants identified personal barriers to treatment, but reported that facilitators of treatment tended to be more systematic. Homeless youth used and abused substances to dim the psychological effects of living on the streets. They appreciated programs that facilitated treatment and rehabilitation such as mentoring, support groups, and alternative choices to substance use. Implications point to the need for further development and research on culturally-appropriate, age-sensitive programs for homeless youth. The experiences of these youth underscore the need for strategic interventions. PMID:19956442

  18. Oh, the things you will learn: taking undergraduate research to the homeless shelter.

    PubMed

    August-Brady, Michele; Adamshick, Pamela

    2013-06-01

    Teaching research to undergraduate students has been described as a challenge. This article describes how a small group of students participated in a service-learning research project that culminated in the development of an educational intervention for volunteers who staff homeless shelters in the local community. By interacting with the homeless population and the volunteer staff who provide their care, students developed a greater understanding of the needs of the homeless, recognized some mental health disorders, and interacted with volunteer staff to assess their educational needs. Students were able to learn the research process through their participation in this collaborative project. The students' learning exceeded typical outcomes, as they displayed leadership skills and advocacy in areas of social justice and made compassionate connections with this vulnerable population. These students also forged new territory for future students who will be working with homeless populations and those who minister to them. PMID:23668249

  19. STANFORD/VASTANFORD/VASTANFORD/VA ALZHEIMER'ALZHEIMER'ALZHEIMER'SSS

    E-print Network

    Puglisi, Joseph

    STANFORD/VASTANFORD/VASTANFORD/VA ALZHEIMER'ALZHEIMER'ALZHEIMER'SSS RESEARCHRESEARCHRESEARCH CENTERCENTERCENTER For Information call: 650-858-3915 Web Site: http://svalz.stanford.edu Alzheimer's disease of their symptoms and provide appropriate referrals for possible treatment and care. STANFORD/VA ALZHEIMER

  20. Sheltered versus nonsheltered homeless women

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Adeline M. Nyamathi; Barbara Leake; Lillian Gelberg

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To contrast sociodemographic characteristics, physical and mental health status, substance use, sexual behaviors, victimization,\\u000a and utilization of health services between homeless women residing in sheltered and nonsheltered environments.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey. A structured scale was used to measure mental health status. Physical health status, substance use,\\u000a sexual behavior, history of adult victimization, and health services utilization were measured by

  1. V&A Channel

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Victoria & Albert (V&A) Museum has an online media channel which will fascinate those who are curious about the fascinating world we live in. From interviews with playground architects to conversations with abstract artists, this site has something for just about everyone. First-time users should go ahead and click on the "Most Recent" videos to view short videos on costume exhibits at the museum, the renaissance of rural architecture, and architects like Rintala Eggertsson. On the right hand side of the site, visitors can view brief descriptions of some recent programs, and they can also search the contents of the site.

  2. Over the Edge: Homeless Families and the Welfare System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Coalition for the Homeless, Washington, DC.

    Homelessness among families is quickly reaching crisis proportions across the country. Over 30 percent of America's three million homeless people are members of families, and families are the fastest growing segment of the homeless population. Perhaps more disturbing, homelessness represents only the most extreme manifestation of a more…

  3. No place like home: A study of two homeless shelters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bruce D. Friedman

    1994-01-01

    Homelessness is one of the most pressing social problems today. Society has responded to the problem with the creation of homeless shelters. Yet, the nature of the operation of the shelter is not defined. This study explored the operations of two single adult homeless shelters to understand how they operate in addressing the problem of homelessness. The study identified two

  4. Age Differences Among Homeless Individuals: Adolescence Through Adulthood

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carolyn J. Tompsett; Patrick J. Fowler; Paul A. Toro

    2009-01-01

    The present study examines differences between homeless adolescents, young adults, and older adults served by homeless shelters or food programs to inform service provision. Four homeless studies using the same sampling and measurement methods were pooled to permit comparisons across age groups. Results showed that homeless adolescents demonstrated greater resilience than younger and older adults. Adolescents reported the shortest duration

  5. Homeless Women in Public Spaces: Strategies of Resistance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rionach Casey; Rosalind Goudie; Kesia Reeve

    2008-01-01

    This paper explores homeless women's use of public spaces and buildings in England. In doing so it problematises the spatial boundaries typically presented in the literature and research which suggest homeless women are largely confined to institutional or private spaces of homelessness. The paper argues that homeless women also use highly visible public spaces and semi-private spaces, and that these

  6. 2013 -2014 HOMELESSNESS STATUS VERIFICATION FORM STUDENT NAME: SPU ID

    E-print Network

    Nelson, Tim

    2013 - 2014 HOMELESSNESS STATUS VERIFICATION FORM STUDENT NAME: SPU ID: On your 2013-2014 Free time on or after July 1, 2012 you were an unaccompanied youth who was homeless or self-supporting and at risk of being homeless as determined by: · Your high school or school district homeless liaison

  7. 2012 -2013 HOMELESSNESS STATUS VERIFICATION FORM STUDENT NAME: SPU ID

    E-print Network

    Nelson, Tim

    2012 - 2013 HOMELESSNESS STATUS VERIFICATION FORM STUDENT NAME: SPU ID: On your 2012-2013 Free time on or after July 1, 2011 you were an unaccompanied youth who was homeless or self-supporting and at risk of being homeless as determined by: · Your high school or school district homeless liaison

  8. Who Is Doing Well? A Typology of Newly Homeless Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milburn, Norweeta; Liang, Li-Jung; Lee, Sung-Jae; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Rosenthal, Doreen; Mallett, Shelley; Lightfoot, Marguerita; Lester, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    There is growing evidence to support developing new typologies for homeless adolescents. Current typologies focus on the risks associated with being homeless, with less consideration of the positive attributes of homeless adolescents. The authors examined both risk and protective factors in a sample of newly homeless adolescents. Using cluster…

  9. Homeless Women, Special Possessions, and the Meaning of \\

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ronald Paul Hill

    1991-01-01

    This article investigates homelessness among adult women, an important and growing subpopulation among the homeless. To examine their situation within a consumer-behavior context, an ethnographic case study of a shelter for homeless women run by an order of Roman Catholic sisters was performed. The study focused on how these women became homeless, the effects of early life experiences on their

  10. Predictors of Transience among Homeless Emerging Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Kristin M.; Bender, Kimberly; Thompson, Sanna J.

    2014-01-01

    This study identified predictors of transience among homeless emerging adults in three cities. A total of 601 homeless emerging adults from Los Angeles, Austin, and Denver were recruited using purposive sampling. Ordinary least squares regression results revealed that significant predictors of greater transience include White ethnicity, high…

  11. Correlates of Homeless Episodes among Indigenous People

    PubMed Central

    Whitbeck, Les B.; Crawford, Devan M.; Hartshorn, Kelley J. Sittner

    2011-01-01

    This study reports the correlates of homeless episodes among 873 Indigenous adults who are part of an ongoing longitudinal study on four reservations in the Northern Midwest and four Canadian First Nation reserves. Descriptive analyses depict differences between those who have and have not experienced an episode of homelessness in their lifetimes. Multivariate analyses assess factors associated with a history of homeless episodes at the time of their first interview. Results show that individuals with a history of homeless episodes had significantly more individual and family health, mental health, and substance abuse problems. Periods of homelessness also were associated with financial problems. Among the female caretakers who experienced episodes of homelessness over the course of the study, the majority had been homeless at least once prior to the start of the study and approximately one–fifth met criteria for lifetime alcohol dependence, drug abuse, or major depression. Family adversity during childhood was also common for women experiencing homelessness during the study. PMID:21656303

  12. Homeless mentally disordered offenders and violent crimes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel A. Martell

    1991-01-01

    This study examines the prevalence of homelessness in a cross-sectional sample of 150 patients retained in a maximum-security hospital for mentally disordered offenders in New York City. The homeless mentally ill comprise only 2% of the city's mentally ill population, yet they account for 50% of the admissions to this forensic facility from the community. Compared to population base rate

  13. Homeless Children: The Watchers and the Waiters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boxill, Nancy A., Ed.

    This book takes an interdisciplinary approach in discussing the issue of homeless children and the resolution of the problem. An introduction by Nancy A. Boxill presents background on the nature of the problem and summarizes the subsequent papers. "Home and Homelessness in the Lives of Children" by Leanne G. Rivlin analyzes the impact on children…

  14. Assessing the Nutritional Needs of Homeless Adolescents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. L. Grover; AC Hergenroeder; SR Morrow; BL Haefner

    1998-01-01

    A survey instrument was developed to describe the nutritional habits and needs of homeless adolescents. It incorporated the Block Food Frequency (BFFQ) questionnaire with 37 questions regarding: current practices of obtaining food; nutritional education needs; and demographic information. The survey was reviewed, pilot-tested, and revised Subjects were 18-20 year old residents at a homeless shelter for less than 72 hours

  15. Tuberculosis in the Homeless A Prospective Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ANDREW R. MOSS; JUDITH A. HAHN; JACQUELINE P. TULSKY; CHARLES L. DALEY; PETER M. SMALL; PHILLIP C. HOPEWELL

    We set out to determine tuberculosis incidence and risk factors in the homeless population in San Francisco. We also examined the trans- mission of tuberculosis by molecular methods. We followed a cohort of 2,774 of the homeless first seen between 1990 and 1994. There were 25 incident cases during the period 1992 to 1996, or 270 per 100,000 per year

  16. Food insecurity among homeless and runaway adolescents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Les B. Whitbeck; Xiaojin Chen; Kurt D. Johnson

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of food insecurity and factors related to it among homeless and runaway adolescents. Design: Computer-assisted personal interviews were conducted with homeless and runaway adolescents directly on the streets and in shelters. Setting: Interviews were conducted in eight Midwest cities: Des Moines, Cedar Rapids, Iowa City, Kansas City, Lincoln, Omaha,

  17. Homelessness and Substance Use in Cook County

    E-print Network

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    and Substance Abuse State of Illinois by Timothy P. Johnson and Mark E. Barrett Survey Research Laboratory University of Illinois September 1991 #12;#12;Homelessness & Substance Abuse in Cook County i CONTENTS Page ....................................................................................................49 #12;Homelessness & Substance Abuse in Cook County ii CONTENTS--Continued Page REFERENCES

  18. Spirituality and Mental Health among Homeless Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodge, David R.; Moser, Stephanie E.; Shafer, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Mothers are one of the fastest growing segments of the homeless population in the United States. Although mental health problems often contribute to homelessness, little is known about the factors that affect mothers' mental health. To help identify protective factors, this longitudinal study examined the relationship between spirituality and…

  19. Perceptions about Homeless Elders and Community Responsibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Michael N.; Green, Diane; Jacobs, Robin

    2013-01-01

    Human service students were surveyed ("N" = 207) to determine their perceptions about homeless elders and communal responsibility for their well-being. Using a backward regression analysis, a final model ("F" = 15.617, "df" = 7, "p" < 0.001) for Perceptions about Homeless Persons and Community…

  20. Transmission of Tuberculosis Among the Urban Homeless

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter F. Barnes; Hiyam El-Hajj; Susan Preston-Martin; M. Donald Cave; Brenda E. Jones; Michiko Otaya; Janice Pogoda; Kathleen D. Eisenach

    2010-01-01

    Conclusions.\\\\p=m-\\\\Theminimum percentage of cases due to primary tuberculosis in the homeless was estimated to be 53%, compared with the traditional estimate of 10% in the general population. The results suggest that primary tuberculosis caused the majority of tuberculosis cases in this population of the urban homeless in central Los Angeles. (JAMA. 1996;275:305-307)

  1. Homelessness, Poverty, and Children's Literacy Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker-Dalhouse, Doris; Risko, Victoria J.

    2008-01-01

    Over 100 million families worldwide lack permanent housing or income sufficient to meet their basic needs. Some homeless children are able to succeed in school despite the many challenges they face, but others are not. Seventy-five percent of U.S. homeless children perform below grade level in reading, and schools and teachers may not be prepared…

  2. The Impact of Homelessness on Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rafferty, Yvonne; Shinn, Marybeth

    1991-01-01

    Reviews community-based research on the effects of homelessness on children. Homeless children face threats to their future well-being resulting from health problems, hunger, poor nutrition, developmental delays, anxiety, depression, behavioral problems, and educational underachievement. Contributing factors may include inadequate shelter,…

  3. Publicizing, Politicizing, and Neutralizing Homelessness: Comic Strips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penner, Maurice; Penner, Susan

    1994-01-01

    Analyzes 231 comic strips and 126 editorial cartoons featuring homelessness to uncover differences between public opinion manifested in popular culture and views held by local and national power groups. Finds that 57% of comic strips and 30% of editorial cartoons are neutralizing, either by using the homeless as "props" for other stories or issues…

  4. Retrospective assessment of the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors among homeless individuals with schizophrenia in Shanghai

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, Qing; WAN, Min; BAN, Chunxia; GAO, Yafang

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular diseases are increasingly important in China, but the prevalence of risk factors for cardiovascular diseases in the indigent mentally ill are unknown. Aim Assess the prevalence of four key risk factors for cardiovascular disease -- hypertension, hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia and smoking – among homeless patients with schizophrenia and identify factors associated with the presence of these risk factors. Methods We reviewed medical charts of 181 homeless and 181 non-homeless patients with schizophrenia or schizophreniform disorder admitted to the Shanghai Jiading Mental Health Center between May 2007 and April 2013. Demographic characteristics and risk factors of cardiovascular events were compared between the two groups. Logistic regression models identified the factors that were associated with the presence of one or more of the four risk factors. Results The prevalence of hypertension and hyperlipidemia were 19 to 20% in both males and females in the two groups; these rates are similar to those reported in the general population. The prevalence of hyperglycemia ranged from 11 to 15% among males and females in the two groups. Smoking was highly prevalent in male patients (82% in homeless males and 78% in non-homeless males) but, like in China generally, much less prevalent in female patients (7% in homeless females and 5% in non-homeless females). The logistic regression analysis found that male gender, older age, and urban (vs. rural) residence were independently associated with the presence of one or more of the four cardiovascular risk factors. Homelessness was not associated with the presence of cardiovascular risk factors. Conclusion This study is the first known report on cardiovascular risk factors among homeless mentally ill in China. The study did not assess several important factors (such as the type, dose and duration of use of antipsychotic medication) but it was, nevertheless, able to show that, unlike in high-income countries, homelessness is not related to elevated risk of cardiovascular disease in Chinese individuals with mental illnesses. Prospective studies with the growing number of homeless individuals in China will be needed to get a clearer picture of the best ways to provide them with the health care services they need. PMID:25114489

  5. Assessing health conditions and medication use among the homeless community in Long Beach, California

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Mok Thoong; Yamaki, Jason; Harwood, Megan; d'Assalenaux, Richard; Rosenberg, Ettie; Aruoma, Okezie; Bishayee, Anupam

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Persons experiencing homelessness are a vulnerable population and are at increased risk for morbidity and all-cause mortality compared to the general population. This study sought to evaluate medication use, regular physician visits, and identify health conditions among the homeless population of Long Beach, California. Methods: Two “brown bag” medication review events were held at homeless shelters in the Long Beach area. Demographic information, medication use, and comorbid disease states were obtained through surveys. Findings: Three-fourths of the cohort (95 participants) consisted of males, and the average age of participants was 48 years. Psychiatric disorders and cardiovascular disease were the most common disease states reported at 32% and 46%, respectively and so were medications used in treating these chronic diseases. Medication adherence was found to be a significant problem in this population, where more than 30% of patients were nonadherent to medications for chronic diseases. Furthermore, foot problems, hearing and vision difficulties constitute the most commonly overlooked health problems within the homeless population. Conclusion: Based on this and other similar finding, we must accept that the homeless represent a vulnerable population, and that because of this fact, more programs should be focused at improving availability and access to health care among the homeless. Regarding the high number of reported health problems in the study, more studies are needed and more studies should incorporate screening for foot, hearing, and vision issues, both to increase awareness and to provide an opportunity for devising possible solutions to these highly preventable conditions. PMID:25114938

  6. School-based service delivery for homeless students: relevant laws and overcoming access barriers.

    PubMed

    Sulkowski, Michael L; Joyce-Beaulieu, Diana K

    2014-11-01

    Schools in the United States are facing a record number of homeless students. These students are highly at-risk for experiencing negative life outcomes, and they face considerable academic and social-emotional functional impairments. To help address the complex needs of homeless students, this article reviews the intersection of laws and practices that impact homeless students, as well as contemporary school-based service delivery efforts to support the academic and social-emotional needs of these students. In addition, this article also reviews several barriers to school-based service delivery for homeless students and ways to overcome these barriers. These barriers include confusion regarding consent and record-sharing procedures, ineffectively utilizing homeless liaisons, and misapplying tenants of Multitiered Systems of Support (MTSS), which is a school-based service-delivery framework that has been adopted by and implemented in many U.S. schools. Ultimately, this article aims to provide members of school communities with practical information that they can use to support the homeless youth they encounter and serve. PMID:25545437

  7. 38 CFR 61.40 - Special need grants-general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VA HOMELESS PROVIDERS GRANT AND PER DIEM PROGRAM...provide, for the following special need homeless veteran populations: (1) Women...services directly to a dependent of a homeless veteran with special needs who is...

  8. 38 CFR 61.50 - Technical assistance grants-general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VA HOMELESS PROVIDERS GRANT AND PER DIEM PROGRAM...relating to the provision of assistance for homeless veterans. The recipients are to use...experience in providing assistance to homeless veterans in order to help such...

  9. 38 CFR 61.50 - Technical assistance grants-general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VA HOMELESS PROVIDERS GRANT AND PER DIEM PROGRAM...relating to the provision of assistance for homeless veterans. The recipients are to use...experience in providing assistance to homeless veterans in order to help such...

  10. 38 CFR 61.50 - Technical assistance grants-general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VA HOMELESS PROVIDERS GRANT AND PER DIEM PROGRAM...relating to the provision of assistance for homeless veterans. The recipients are to use...experience in providing assistance to homeless veterans in order to help such...

  11. 38 CFR 61.2 - Supportive services-general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VA HOMELESS PROVIDERS GRANT AND PER DIEM PROGRAM...appropriate assistance, to address the needs of homeless veterans. The following are examples...child care services for dependents of homeless veterans; (4) Providing...

  12. 38 CFR 61.40 - Special need grants-general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VA HOMELESS PROVIDERS GRANT AND PER DIEM PROGRAM...provide, for the following special need homeless veteran populations: (1) Women...services directly to a dependent of a homeless veteran with special needs who is...

  13. 38 CFR 61.2 - Supportive services-general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VA HOMELESS PROVIDERS GRANT AND PER DIEM PROGRAM...appropriate assistance, to address the needs of homeless veterans. The following are examples...child care services for dependents of homeless veterans; (4) Providing...

  14. Risk factors for cardiovascular disease among the homeless and in the general population of the city of Porto, Portugal.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Luis de Pinho; Pereira, Maria Lurdes; Azevedo, Ana; Lunet, Nuno

    2012-08-01

    We described the distribution of risk factors for cardiovascular disease among homeless people living in the city of Porto, Portugal. Comparisons were made between subsamples of homeless people recruited in different settings and between the overall homeless sample group and a sample of the general population. All "houseless" individuals attending one of two homeless hostels or two institutions providing meal programs on specific days were invited to participate and were matched with subjects from the general population. We estimated sex, age and education-adjusted prevalence ratios or mean differences. The prevalence of previous illicit drug consumption and imprisonment was almost twice as high among the homeless from institutions providing meal programs. This group also showed lower mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Prevalence of smoking was almost 50% higher in the overall homeless group. Mean body mass index and waist circumference were also lower in the homeless group and its members were almost five times less likely to report dyslipidemia. Our findings contribute to defining priorities for interventions directed at this segment of society and to reducing inequalities in this extremely underprivileged population. PMID:22892971

  15. Family Histories and Multiple Transitions Among Homeless Young Adults: Pathways to Homelessness

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, Kimberly A.; Schmitz, Rachel M.

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the early family histories of homeless young adults, the types and number of transitions they experienced, and their pathways to the street. Intensive qualitative interviews were audio taped and transcribed with 40 homeless young adults 19 to 21 years of age in the Midwest. Findings show that family backgrounds were generally characterized by substance use, child maltreatment, and witnessing violence, all of which provide social context for understanding why so many of these young people opted to leave home in search of an alternative living situation. The current findings also reveal that while some young adults ran away from home as adolescents, others were “pushed out” (i.e., told to leave), or removed by state agencies. Current study findings illustrate that young adults’ trajectories are marked by multiple living arrangements such as home, foster care, detention facility, and drug rehabilitation. Overall, study results show that young adults’ family histories place them on trajectories for early independence marked by multiple transitions and numerous living situations, culminating in a lack of a permanent residence to call home. PMID:24151346

  16. Family Histories and Multiple Transitions Among Homeless Young Adults: Pathways to Homelessness.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Kimberly A; Schmitz, Rachel M

    2013-10-01

    This study explored the early family histories of homeless young adults, the types and number of transitions they experienced, and their pathways to the street. Intensive qualitative interviews were audio taped and transcribed with 40 homeless young adults 19 to 21 years of age in the Midwest. Findings show that family backgrounds were generally characterized by substance use, child maltreatment, and witnessing violence, all of which provide social context for understanding why so many of these young people opted to leave home in search of an alternative living situation. The current findings also reveal that while some young adults ran away from home as adolescents, others were "pushed out" (i.e., told to leave), or removed by state agencies. Current study findings illustrate that young adults' trajectories are marked by multiple living arrangements such as home, foster care, detention facility, and drug rehabilitation. Overall, study results show that young adults' family histories place them on trajectories for early independence marked by multiple transitions and numerous living situations, culminating in a lack of a permanent residence to call home. PMID:24151346

  17. Open VA: Video Archive

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Open and Digital Learning Resources Conference is a collaborative initiative between the Office of Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia, the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia, the Virginia Community College System, and fourteen institutions of higher education. This corner of its website brings together an archive of videos from the first annual OpenVA conference. Users can make their way through six different videos, including "A Future With Only Ten Universities" and "Staying Relevant in the Future of Education" by David Wiley. Taken as a whole, these vignettes offer a portrait of how higher education will change in the coming decades and is a resource most valuable to policymakers and education specialists.

  18. ‘Folks Should Have Access?…?How You Do it is the Difficult Thing’: exploring the importance of leadership to maintaining community policing programmes for the homeless

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laura Huey; Marianne Quirouette

    2010-01-01

    In the present paper we examine the operation of a community policing programme that facilitates reporting of victimisation by homeless victims of crime through the assistance of local community service providers. Using data from two sources – our original study of Homeless Remote Reporting in 2003 and a follow-up evaluation conducted in 2008 – we examine the extent to which

  19. Confirming Eligibility for McKinney-Vento Services: Do's and Don'ts for School Districts. Best Practices in Homeless Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Homeless Education at SERVE, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Under the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act, schools must identify children and youth in homeless situations and provide appropriate services. One such service is immediate enrollment in school, even when students lack paperwork normally required for enrollment, such as school records, proof of guardianship, a birth certificate, immunization…

  20. Confirming Eligibility for McKinney-Vento Services: Do's and Don'ts for Local Liaisons. Best Practices in Homeless Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Homeless Education at SERVE, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Under the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act, schools must identify children and youth in homeless situations and provide appropriate services. One such service is immediate enrollment in school, even when students lack paperwork normally required for enrollment, such as school records, proof of guardianship, a birth certificate, immunization…

  1. Risk factors associated with recurrent homelessness after a first homeless episode.

    PubMed

    McQuistion, Hunter L; Gorroochurn, Prakash; Hsu, Eustace; Caton, Carol L M

    2014-07-01

    Alcohol and drug use are commonly associated with the experience of homelessness. In order to better understand this, we explored the prevalence of drug and alcohol use as it related to successful re-housing within a sample of first-time single homeless adults at municipal shelters. From within this sample, we compared the features of recurrent homelessness with those of chronic homelessness and of being stably housed. We interviewed 344 subjects upon shelter entry and followed each one every six months for 18 months using standardized social and mental health measures. We analyzed baseline assessments relative to housing experiences during follow-up using Chi square and multinomial logistic regression. Eighty-one percent (N = 278) obtained housing over 18 months, of which 23.7 % (N = 66) experienced homelessness again. Recurrent homelessness was more common among those with a high school education and if initially re-housed with family. Bivariate analysis resulted in the observation of the highest rate of alcohol and other drug use among this recurrent group and multinomial logistic regression supported this only with the coupling of arrest history and diagnosed antisocial personality disorder. With relatively high rates of recurrent homelessness, there were differences between subjects who experienced recurrent homelessness compared to those who were stably housed and with chronic homelessness. That alcohol and other substance use disorders were associated with recurrent homelessness only if they were linked to other risk factors highlights the complexity of causes for homelessness and a resultant need to organize them into constellations of causal risk factors. Consistent with this, there should be initiatives that span bureaucratic boundaries so as to flexibly meet multiple complex service needs, thus improving outcomes concerning episodes of recurrent homelessness. PMID:23744291

  2. 38 CFR 61.0 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VA HOMELESS PROVIDERS GRANT AND PER DIEM PROGRAM § 61.0 Purpose. This part implements the VA Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program which consists of the...

  3. 38 CFR 61.67 - Recovery provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VA HOMELESS PROVIDERS GRANT AND PER DIEM PROGRAM Awards, Monitoring...capital grant, the grant recipient has withdrawn from the VA Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program (Program),...

  4. 38 CFR 63.3 - Eligible veterans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) HEALTH CARE FOR HOMELESS VETERANS (HCHV) PROGRAM § 63.3...community-based provider must be: (1) Homeless; (2) Enrolled in the VA health...community agencies that primarily serve the homeless population, such as shelters,...

  5. 38 CFR 63.3 - Eligible veterans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) HEALTH CARE FOR HOMELESS VETERANS (HCHV) PROGRAM § 63.3...community-based provider must be: (1) Homeless; (2) Enrolled in the VA health...community agencies that primarily serve the homeless population, such as shelters,...

  6. Sex Trade Behavior Among Heterosexually Active Homeless Men

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Joan S.; Wenzel, Suzanne L.; Kennedy, David P.; Golinelli, Daniela; Ewing, Brett

    2013-01-01

    Sex trade behavior is fairly common among homeless adults and may contribute to higher rates of HIV/AIDS in this population. This study provides a detailed examination of the sex trade-related attitudes and behaviors of homeless men by: (1) determining the prevalence of sex trade-related behaviors, including sex with female sex workers (FSWs); (2) identifying risk factors for having sex with FSWs; and (3) comparing men's relationships with FSWs and non-FSWs in terms of relationship qualities and HIV-related risk behaviors, such as condom use. Structured interviews were conducted with a probability sample of 305 heterosexually active homeless men recruited from meal lines in Los Angeles. Recent sex with a FSW was reported by 26% of men, and more likely among those who were older, used crack cocaine, had more sex partners, believed that sometimes men just need to have sex no matter what, and were embedded in networks that were denser and where risky sex was more normative. Compared to non-FSW partners, men with FSW partners felt less emotionally close to them, were more likely to believe the partner had never been tested for HIV, and were more likely to have sex with them under the influence of drugs or alcohol; however, they were not more likely to talk about using condoms or to use condoms with FSWs. Whether the relationship was considered “serious” was a stronger correlate of condom use than whether the partner was a FSW. Implications of these findings for HIV prevention efforts among homeless adults are discussed. PMID:23720137

  7. Feasibility of completing an accelerated vaccine series for homeless adults.

    PubMed

    Nyamathi, A M; Sinha, K; Saab, S; Marfisee, M; Greengold, B; Leake, B; Tyler, D

    2009-09-01

    Homeless adults are at high risk for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. In addition to culturally sensitive programmes designed to enhance vaccination compliance, accelerated HBV vaccination (three doses over 21 days) have also been suggested to improve compliance among high-risk groups. In this paper, we examined predictors of completers of two of three doses of a HAV/HBV vaccine series, normally delivered over a 6-month period, to simulate compliance with an accelerated series, dosed over 4 weeks. A convenience sample of 865 homeless adults was randomized into a nurse case-managed approach (NCMIT) vs standard programmes with (SIT) and without tracking (SI). Each group was assessed for completion of two of the three dose HAV/HBV vaccine series as well as the full three dose vaccine series. Sixty-eight percent of the NCMIT participants completed the three dose vaccination series at 6 months compared to 61% of SIT participants and 54% of SI participants. Eighty-one percent of the NCMIT participants completed two of the vaccinations compared to 78% of SIT participants and 73% of SI participants. The NCMIT approach resulted in greater numbers of completers of two of three doses and of the full three dose vaccine series. Predictors of completers of two doses and the full three dose vaccine series are provided. A greater number of homeless persons completed two doses across the three groups compared to the three dose vaccine series. The use of nurse case-management and tracking, coupled with an accelerated HAV/HBV vaccination schedule, may optimize vaccination compliance in homeless adults. PMID:19245384

  8. Feasibility of Completing an Accelerated Vaccine Series for Homeless Adults

    PubMed Central

    Nyamathi, Adeline M.; Sinha, Karabi; Saab, Sammy; Marfisee, Mary; Greengold, Barbara; Leake, Barbara; Tyler, Darlene

    2013-01-01

    Homeless adults are at high risk for HBV infection. In addition to culturally-sensitive programs designed to enhance vaccination compliance, accelerated HBV vaccination (three doses over 21 days) have also been suggested to improve compliance among high-risk groups. In this paper, we examined predictors of completers of two of three doses of a HAV/HBV vaccine series, normally delivered over a six-month period, to simulate compliance with an accelerated series, dosed over four weeks. A convenience sample of 865 homeless adults were randomized into a nurse case-managed approach (NCMIT) versus standard programs with (SIT) and without tracking (SI). Each group was assessed for completion of two of the three dose HAV/HBV vaccine series as well as the full three dose vaccine series. Sixty-eight percent of the NCMIT participants completed the three dose vaccination series at 6 months compared to 61% of SIT participants and 54% of SI participants. Eighty-one percent of the NCMIT participants completed two of the vaccinations compared to 78% of SIT participants and 73% of SI participants. The NCMIT approach resulted in greater numbers of completers of two of three doses and of the full three dose vaccine series. Predictors of completers of two doses and the full three dose vaccine series are provided. A greater number of homeless persons completed two doses across the three groups compared to the three-dose vaccine series. The use of nurse case-management and tracking, coupled with an accelerated HAV/HBV vaccination schedule, may optimize vaccination compliance in homeless adults. PMID:19245384

  9. United States Interagency Council on Homelessness

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Deals Think Upstream Share the Vision Build a Bank of Knowledge Be an Agent of Change Follow ... more... Issues Human Rights and Alternatives to Criminalization Banks: Investing to End Homelessness Domestic Violence Economic Value ...

  10. A support intervention to promote health and coping among homeless youths.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Miriam; Reutter, Linda; Letourneau, Nicole; Makwarimba, Edward

    2009-06-01

    Homeless youths are often vulnerable to limited support resources and loneliness. Peers are a potent source of social support. A support intervention for homeless youths was designed to optimize peer influence and was pilot tested. The intervention was based on an initial assessment of support needs and intervention preferences from the perspective of 36 homeless youths and 27 service providers. Based on the results, a 20-week pilot intervention program was designed, consisting of 4 support groups, optional one-on-one support, group recreational activities, and meals. Support was provided by professional and peer mentors, including formerly homeless youths. A total of 56 homeless youths aged 16 to 24 took part. Participants completed pre-, mid-, and post-test quantitative measures and qualitative interviews. In spite of challenges due primarily to attrition, the youths reported enhanced health behaviours, improved mental well-being, decreased loneliness, expanded social network, increased coping skills, enhanced self-efficacy, and diminished use of drugs and alcohol. Further research could focus on replication at other sites with a larger sample. PMID:19650513

  11. Correlates of depressed mood among young stimulant-using homeless gay and bisexual men.

    PubMed

    Nyamathi, Adeline; Branson, Catherine; Idemundia, Faith; Reback, Cathy; Shoptaw, Steven; Marfisee, Mary; Keenan, Colleen; Khalilifard, Farinaz; Liu, Yihang; Yadav, Kartik

    2012-10-01

    Homeless gay and bisexual (G/B) men are at risk for suicide attempts and have high risk of depressed mood, defined as elevated level of depressive symptoms. This study describes baseline socio-demographic, cognitive, psychosocial, and health- and drug-related correlates of depressed mood in 267 stimulant-using homeless G/B young men who entered a study designed to reduce drug use. G/B men without social support were 11 times more likely to experience depressed mood than their counterparts who had support; those who reported severe body pain were almost six times more likely to report depressed mood than those without pain. Other factors that increased risk of depressed mood included being homeless in the last four months, injecting drugs, reporting poor or fair health status, and high levels of internalized homophobia. This study is one of the first studies to draw a link between pain experienced and depressed mood in homeless young G/B men. Understanding the correlates of depressed mood among homeless G/B young men can help service providers design more targeted treatment plans and provide more appropriate referrals to ancillary care services. PMID:23017039

  12. Enhancing mental health services for homeless persons: state proposals under the MHSH Block Grant Program.

    PubMed Central

    Salem, D A; Levine, I S

    1989-01-01

    The Mental Health Services for the Homeless Block Grant Program has made available more than $57 million to the States in fiscal years 1987-89 to encourage States to develop and strengthen community services for homeless mentally ill persons. Funds were provided for five basic services, which include outreach, case management, mental health treatment, residential support services, and training for service providers. State applications for funds reflected considerable diversity among the services proposed. The manner in which States proposed to use the funds is described, including methods used to identify high need areas and distribute funds and plans for delivering services. PMID:2543021

  13. Confrontations and donations: encounters between homeless pet owners and the public.

    PubMed

    Irvine, Leslie; Kahl, Kristina N; Smith, Jesse M

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the interactions between homeless pet owners and the domiciled public with a focus on how the activities of pet ownership help construct positive personal identities. Homeless people are often criticized for having pets. They counter these attacks using open and contained responses to stigmatization. More often, they redefine pet ownership to incorporate how they provide for their animals, challenging definitions that require a physical home. Homeless pet owners thus create a positive moral identity by emphasizing that they feed their animals first and give them freedom that the pets of the domiciled lack. Through what we call “enabled resistance,” donations of pet food from the supportive public provide the resources to minimize the impact of stigmatization. PMID:22329059

  14. Experiences of Being Homeless or at Risk of Being Homeless among Canadian Youths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Pamela; Donahue, Peter; Este, Dave; Hofer, Marvin

    2004-01-01

    A qualitative study was undertaken with four groups -- immigrants, youths, Aboriginal people, and landlords -- in order to explore, compare, and contrast diversity issues among the homeless population and those at risk of homelessness in a larger Canadian city (Calgary, Alberta) with a smaller city (Lethbridge, Alberta), to better understand their…

  15. Homelessness Comes to School: How Homeless Children and Youths Can Succeed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Joseph F.; Tobin, Kerri J.

    2011-01-01

    Homelessness is a complex and layered phenomenon, but schools can be effective in reducing its educational consequences. Schools currently are not doing enough. The next step is to consider the services that are needed for students as they arrive on the school campus. Taking care of homeless children in school systems involves seven provisos:…

  16. Educational Rights of Homeless Youth: Exploring Racial Dimensions of Homeless Educational Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aviles de Bradley, Ann Marie

    2009-01-01

    Research that addresses educational rights of unaccompanied homeless youth in grades 9-12 is limited. The McKinney-Vento Act was created to address the many needs of homeless individuals, including children and youth's right to an education. McKinney-Vento was created over twenty-years ago, and this research sought to examine the implementation of…

  17. An Ecological Systems Comparison Between Homeless Sexual Minority Youths and Homeless Heterosexual Youths

    PubMed Central

    Gattis, Maurice N.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined risk and protective outcomes by comparing homeless sexual minority youths to heterosexual homeless youths regarding family, peer behaviors, school, mental health (suicide risk and depression), stigma, discrimination, substance use, and sexual risk behaviors. Structured interviews (N = 147) were conducted with individuals ages 16-24 at three drop-in programs serving homeless youths in Toronto. Bivariate analyses indicated statistically significant differences between homeless sexual minorities (n=66) and their heterosexual counterparts (n=81) regarding all variables: family, peer behaviors, stigma, discrimination, mental health, substance use and sexual risk behaviors with the exception of school belonging. Specifically, homeless sexual minority youths fared more poorly (e.g. lower satisfaction with family communication, experienced more stigma, used more drugs and alcohol) than their heterosexual counterparts. Improving family communication may be a worthwhile intervention if the youths are still in contact with their families. Future research should focus on victimization in the context of multiple systems. PMID:23687399

  18. Correlates of Depressed Mood among Young Stimulant-Using Homeless Gay and Bisexual Men

    PubMed Central

    Nyamathi, Adeline; Branson, Catherine M.; Idemundia, Faith E.; Reback, Cathy J.; Shoptaw, Steve; Marfisee, Mary; Keenan, Colleen; Khalilifard, Farinaz; Liu, Yihang; Yadav, Kartik

    2013-01-01

    Homeless gay and bisexual (G/B) men are at risk for reporting suicide attempts and have high risk of depressed mood, defined as elevated level of depressive symptoms. This study describes baseline socio-demographic, cognitive, psychosocial and health- and drug-related correlates of depressed mood in 267 stimulant-using homeless G/B young men who entered a study designed to reduce drug use. G/B men without social support were 11 times more likely to be experience depressed mood than their counterparts who had support while persons who reported severe body pain were almost 6 times more likely to report depressed mood than those without pain. Other factors that increased risk of depressed mood included being homeless in the last four months, injecting drugs, reporting poor or fair health status and high levels of internalized homophobia. This study is one of the first to draw a link between pain experienced and depressed mood in homeless young G/B men. Understanding the correlates of depressed mood among homeless G/B young men can help service providers design more targeted treatment plans and more appropriate referrals to ancillary care services. PMID:23017039

  19. Effectiveness of interventions to improve the health and housing status of homeless people: a rapid systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Research on interventions to positively impact health and housing status of people who are homeless has received substantially increased attention over the past 5 years. This rapid review examines recent evidence regarding interventions that have been shown to improve the health of homeless people, with particular focus on the effect of these interventions on housing status. Methods A total of 1,546 articles were identified by a structured search of five electronic databases, a hand search of grey literature and relevant journals, and contact with experts. Two reviewers independently screened the first 10% of titles and abstracts for relevance. Inter-rater reliability was high and as a result only one reviewer screened the remaining titles and abstracts. Articles were included if they were published between January 2004 and December 2009 and examined the effectiveness of an intervention to improve the health or healthcare utilization of people who were homeless, marginally housed, or at risk of homelessness. Two reviewers independently scored all relevant articles for quality. Results Eighty-four relevant studies were identified; none were of strong quality while ten were rated of moderate quality. For homeless people with mental illness, provision of housing upon hospital discharge was effective in improving sustained housing. For homeless people with substance abuse issues or concurrent disorders, provision of housing was associated with decreased substance use, relapses from periods of substance abstinence, and health services utilization, and increased housing tenure. Abstinent dependent housing was more effective in supporting housing status, substance abstinence, and improved psychiatric outcomes than non-abstinence dependent housing or no housing. Provision of housing also improved health outcomes among homeless populations with HIV. Health promotion programs can decrease risk behaviours among homeless populations. Conclusions These studies provide important new evidence regarding interventions to improve health, housing status, and access to healthcare for homeless populations. The additional studies included in this current review provide further support for earlier evidence which found that coordinated treatment programs for homeless persons with concurrent mental illness and substance misuse issues usually result in better health and access to healthcare than usual care. This review also provides a synthesis of existing evidence regarding interventions that specifically support homeless populations with HIV. PMID:21831318

  20. Homeless in Dhaka: violence, sexual harassment, and drug-abuse.

    PubMed

    Koehlmoos, Tracey Pérez; Uddin, Md Jasim; Ashraf, Ali; Rashid, Mashida

    2009-08-01

    Bangladesh has experienced one of the highest urban population growth rates (around 7% per year) over the past three decades. Dhaka, the capital city, attracts approximately 320,000 migrants from rural areas every year. The city is unable to provide shelter, food, education, healthcare, and employment for its rapidly-expanding population. An estimated 3.4 million people live in the overcrowded slums of Dhaka, and many more live in public spaces lacking the most basic shelter. While a small but growing body of research describes the lives of people who live in urban informal settlements or slums, very little research describes the population with no housing at all. Anecdotally, the homeless population in Dhaka is known to face extortion, erratic unemployment, exposure to violence, and sexual harassment and to engage in high-risk behaviours. However, this has not been systematically documented. This cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted to better understand the challenges in the lives of the homeless population in 11 areas of Dhaka during a 13-month period from June 2007 to June 2008. A modified cluster-sampling method was used for selecting 32 clusters of 14 female and male respondents, for a sample of 896. In addition to sociodemographic details, this paper focuses specifically on violence, drug-abuse, and sexual harassment. The findings showed that physical assaults among the homeless, particularly among women, were a regular phenomenon. Eighty-three percent of female respondents (n=372) were assaulted by their husbands, station masters, and male police officers. They were subjected to lewd gestures, unwelcome advances, and rape. Male respondents reported being physically assaulted while trying to collect food, fighting over space, or while stealing, by police officers, miscreants, or other homeless people. Sixty-nine percent of the male respondents (n=309) used locally-available drugs, such as marijuana and heroin, and two-thirds of injecting drug-users shared needles. The study determined that the homeless are not highly mobile but tend to congregate in clusters night after night. Income-generating activities, targeted education, gender-friendly community police programmes, shelters and crises centres, and greater community involvement are suggested as policy and programmatic interventions to raise the quality of life of this population. In addition, there is a need to reduce high rates of urban migration, a priority for Bangladesh. PMID:19761080

  1. Homeless in Dhaka: Violence, Sexual Harassment, and Drug-abuse

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Md. Jasim; Ashraf, Ali; Rashid, Mashida

    2009-01-01

    Bangladesh has experienced one of the highest urban population growth rates (around 7% per year) over the past three decades. Dhaka, the capital city, attracts approximately 320,000 migrants from rural areas every year. The city is unable to provide shelter, food, education, healthcare, and employment for its rapidly-expanding population. An estimated 3.4 million people live in the overcrowded slums of Dhaka, and many more live in public spaces lacking the most basic shelter. While a small but growing body of research describes the lives of people who live in urban informal settlements or slums, very little research describes the population with no housing at all. Anecdotally, the homeless population in Dhaka is known to face extortion, erratic unemployment, exposure to violence, and sexual harassment and to engage in high-risk behaviours. However, this has not been systematically documented. This cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted to better understand the challenges in the lives of the homeless population in 11 areas of Dhaka during a 13-month period from June 2007 to June 2008. A modified cluster-sampling method was used for selecting 32 clusters of 14 female and male respondents, for a sample of 896. In addition to sociodemographic details, this paper focuses specifically on violence, drug-abuse, and sexual harassment. The findings showed that physical assaults among the homeless, particularly among women, were a regular phenomenon. Eighty-three percent of female respondents (n=372) were assaulted by their husbands, station masters, and male police officers. They were subjected to lewd gestures, unwelcome advances, and rape. Male respondents reported being physically assaulted while trying to collect food, fighting over space, or while stealing, by police officers, miscreants, or other homeless people. Sixty-nine percent of the male respondents (n=309) used locally-available drugs, such as marijuana and heroin, and two-thirds of injecting drug-users shared needles. The study determined that the homeless are not highly mobile but tend to congregate in clusters night after night. Income-generating activities, targeted education, gender-friendly community police programmes, shelters and crises centres, and greater community involvement are suggested as policy and programmatic interventions to raise the quality of life of this population. In addition, there is a need to reduce high rates of urban migration, a priority for Bangladesh. PMID:19761080

  2. Mental Illness, Homelessness Linked to Heart Disease in Study

    MedlinePLUS

    ... sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Mental Illness, Homelessness Linked to Heart Disease in Study High ... Feb. 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Homeless people with mental illness are at high risk for heart disease, a ...

  3. Housing Stability among Homeless Individuals with Serious Mental Illness Participating in Housing First Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, Carol; Montgomery, Ann Elizabeth; Locke, Gretchen

    2009-01-01

    This article presents findings from an exploratory study of three programs using the Housing First approach to provide permanent supportive housing for single, homeless adults with serious mental illness and often co-occurring substance-related disorders. This approach provides direct, or nearly direct, access to housing that is intended to be…

  4. Experiences associated with intervening with homeless, substance-abusing mothers: the importance of success.

    PubMed

    Slesnick, Natasha; Glassman, Michael; Katafiasz, Heather; Collins, Jennifer C

    2012-10-01

    This article documents the experiences of providing housing and supportive services, or ecologically based treatment, to shelter-recruited, substance-abusing homeless women with young children in their care. Among clients, observed experiences related to housing, substance abuse, and health and mental health care are discussed. Among therapists, experiences related to managing the chaotic nature of the client's lives, wanting to manage the client's lives, and frustration with client's life trajectories are reviewed. Observations related to the therapeutic process include the client's relationship to the therapist, balancing the client's independence and need for assistance, and unrealistic expectations among the clients. Recommendations for successfully approaching these clinical situations and experiences are offered. The purpose of this article is to document these therapy experiences to facilitate the work of future teams seeking to intervene in the lives of homeless families through homeless shelters or other settings. PMID:23285834

  5. Correlates of risky alcohol and methamphetamine use among currently homeless male parolees.

    PubMed

    Salem, Benissa E; Nyamathi, Adeline; Keenan, Colleen; Zhang, Sheldon; Marlow, Elizabeth; Khalilifard, Farinaz; Yadav, Kartik; Faucette, Mark; Leake, Barbara; Marfisee, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Homeless men on parole are a hard-to-reach population with significant community reintegration challenges. This cross-sectional study describes sociodemographic, cognitive, psychosocial, and drug-related correlates of alcohol and methamphetamine use in 157 homeless male parolees (age range 18-60) enrolled in a substance abuse treatment center in Los Angeles, California. Logistic regression results revealed that being African American and older were negatively related to methamphetamine use, whereas being older and more hostile were related to riskier alcohol abuse. Findings from this study provide a greater understanding of correlates of methamphetamine and alcohol--two of the most detrimental forms of substances abused among currently homeless parolees. PMID:24325770

  6. Correlates of Self-Reported Incarceration Among Homeless Gay and Bisexual Stimulant-Using Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Nyamathi, Adeline; Reback, Cathy J; Salem, Benissa E; Zhang, Sheldon; Shoptaw, Steven; Branson, Catherine M; Leake, Barbara

    2014-04-14

    Gay and bisexual (G/B) homeless adults face multiple challenges in life which may place them at high risk for incarceration. Yet, little is known about this understudied population in terms of risk for incarceration. Baseline data collected from a longitudinal study between October 2009 and March 2012 in Hollywood, California, explored correlates of self-reported incarceration among G/B homeless stimulant-using adults (N = 353). Findings revealed older age, less education, having children, as well as a history of injection drug use and being born in the United States were positively associated with incarceration. Moreover, having poor social support and having received hepatitis information were also correlated with a history of incarceration. Our findings help us gain a greater awareness of homeless G/B adults who may be at greater risk for incarceration, which may be used by health care providers to design targeted interventions for this underserved population. PMID:24733231

  7. Correlates of Risky Alcohol and Methamphetamine Use among Currently Homeless Male Parolees

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Benissa E.; Nyamathi, Adeline; Keenan, Colleen; Zhang, Sheldon; Marlow, Elizabeth; Khalilifard, Farinaz; Yadav, Kartik; Faucette, Mark; Leake, Barbara; Marfisee, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Homeless men on parole are a hard-to-reach population with significant community reintegration challenges. This cross-sectional study describes socio-demographic, cognitive, psychosocial and drug-related correlates of alcohol and methamphetamine use in 157 homeless male parolees (age range 18–60) enrolled in a substance abuse treatment center in Los Angeles. Logistic regression results revealed that being African American and older were negatively related to methamphetamine use, while being older and more hostile were related to riskier alcohol abuse. Findings from this study provide a greater understanding of correlates of methamphetamine and alcohol- two of the most detrimental forms of substances abused among currently homeless parolees. PMID:24325770

  8. A Status Report on Hunger and Homelessness in America's Cities 2000

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2000-01-01

    The United States Conference of Mayors makes available its annual status report on hunger and homelessness in America's cities. "The survey, conducted in 25 cities, examined the causes of hunger and homelessness, the demographic groups that make up this population, demand for emergency food and housing-related assistance, model programs that respond to these problems, and the projected impact of the economy on hunger and homelessness in America." The 125-page report finds that emergency demands for food were at their second highest rate in 2000 since 1991 with a seventeen percent increase in demand. The average demand for emergency shelter also increased by fifteen percent -- the highest one-year increase of the decade. The data are compiled from surveys conducted by city officials who consult with and collect data from community-based providers and government agencies.

  9. Rural Homelessness in Northwest Ohio: Reasons, Patterns, Statistics, and Trends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Podlin, Georgette A.

    Rural homelessness in America is difficult to define, to count, and to see. This article reports the findings of a 1993 county-wide study of rural homelessness. During a one year survey, 118 homeless households were interviewed. Of those surveyed, 25.8 percent were male adults, 30.9 percent were female adults, and 43.2 percent were children.…

  10. Educating Homeless Children and Adolescents: Evaluating Policy and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stronge, James H., Ed.

    One of the more enigmatic issues of contemporary homelessness is that of schooling. This collection highlights issues related to the provision of an education to homeless children and youths. Background information is offered, with an analysis of educational policy relating to homeless children. Practical strategies and a review of successful…

  11. Private Lives in Public Places: Loneliness of the Homeless

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rokach, Ami

    2005-01-01

    At the dawn of the 21st century, both loneliness and homelessness are more pervasive than we would possibly like to admit. In this study, the experience of loneliness of the homeless was compared to that of the general population. Two hundred and sixty six homeless and 595 men and women from the general population answered a 30 item yes/no…

  12. Disaffiliation to Entrenchment: A Model for Understanding Homelessness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grigsby, Charles; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Survey data collected from 166 homeless persons in Austin (Texas) identified four clusters distinguished by the size of the individual's social network, the degree of dysfunction, and the length of time homeless. Recommends group-based plans for building better paths out of homelessness. (DM)

  13. School Help for Homeless Children with Disabilities: Information for Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Homeless Education at SERVE, 2007

    2007-01-01

    It is difficult for families dealing with homelessness to enroll their children in school and ensure their daily attendance. The McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act gives homeless children and youth the right to enroll in school immediately, even if they do not have documents that are usually required for enrollment. The Individuals with…

  14. Transforming Teacher Constructs of Children and Families Who Are Homeless

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers-Costello, Beth; Swick, Kevin J.

    2011-01-01

    The focus of this article is on articulating the importance of teacher development of constructs about homeless children and families and examining factors that influence teachers' perceptions of children and families who are homeless or at high-risk of becoming homeless. The article also explores some strategies to support teachers in…

  15. Community factors influencing the prevalence of homeless youth services

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicole Esparza

    2009-01-01

    Studies of homeless youth services conclude that services contribute to improving the life chances of homeless youth, but little research has addressed the structural conditions that promote the creation of these services. This study investigates the prevalence of programs serving unaccompanied homeless youth in 26 metropolitan areas from 1989 to 2006. Specifically, it examines the extent to which the supply

  16. Homelessness and Information Systems: Diverse Settings, Common Questions

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Richard

    Homelessness and Information Systems: Diverse Settings, Common Questions David G. Hendry The Info pre- selected audience discussants will seed a participatory dialog con- cerning homelessness the welfare of homeless people and discuss the potential impacts of information systems on four dimensions

  17. Office of Student Financial Aid & Scholarships Homeless Verification Form

    E-print Network

    Li, X. Rong

    Office of Student Financial Aid & Scholarships 2013-2014 Homeless Verification Form According, did your high school or school district homeless liaison determine that you were an unaccompanied youth who was homeless? (Q55) If this is the case, you will need to submit a letter of confirmation

  18. Exploring the Lived Experiences of Homeless Families with Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinton, Stephanie; Cassel, Darlinda

    2013-01-01

    This study researched the experiences of homeless families with young children between the ages of four and eight. Many families experience homelessness every year; therefore, it is important for early childhood educators to have an understanding of how homelessness affects families with young children so that educators can effectively serve the…

  19. The Multi-Dimensional Lives of Children Who Are Homeless

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grineski, Steve

    2014-01-01

    It is widely reported that children who are homeless are victimized by overwhelming challenges like poverty and ill-advised policy decisions, such as underfunding the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act. This act is the only federal legislation devoted to this marginalized group. Children who are homeless, however, should not be characterized…

  20. The Teacher Attitudes toward Homeless Students Scale: Development and Validation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Jessica J.

    2012-01-01

    Recent estimates suggest there are roughly 1.6 million homeless children and this number is growing (National Center on Family Homelessness, 2011). This trend is particularly worrisome given that homeless children face a number of obstacles within society and education, not the least of which is negative teacher attitudes (Swick, 2000; U.S.…

  1. Shadow Count 2012: Help New York City's Homeless Be Counted!

    E-print Network

    Qiu, Weigang

    ! Shadow Count 2012: Help New York City's Homeless Be Counted! Become a Shadow Count Decoy Shadow Count 2012 What: Monday Jan. 30th ­ 31st (overnight), the NYC Department of Homeless Services (DHS) will send hundreds of volunteers all across the city to count NYC's unsheltered homeless people

  2. THE ECONOMICS OF HOMELESSNESS: THE EVIDENCE FROM NOR TH AMERICA

    E-print Network

    Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

    THE ECONOMICS OF HOMELESSNESS: THE EVIDENCE FROM NOR TH AMERICA John M. Quigley and Steven Raphael ABSTRACT It is generally believed that the increased incidence of homelessness in the US has arisen from that variations in homelessness arise from changed circumstances in the housing market and in the income

  3. Homeless Young People's Experiences with Information Systems: Life and Work

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Richard

    Homeless Young People's Experiences with Information Systems: Life and Work in a Community Seattle, WA 98195-2840 {woelfj, dhendry}@u.washington.edu ABSTRACT This paper explores how homeless young (Conformity, Youth-Adult Relationships, and Goals). Any information system for homeless young people must

  4. Designing for Homeless Young People: Precaution in Ubiquitous Computing

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Richard

    Designing for Homeless Young People: Precaution in Ubiquitous Computing Abstract How should ubiquitous access to information through computing be shaped to improve the lives of homeless young people? Drawing on social and material considerations of homeless young people and service agencies, uncovered

  5. Shadow Count 2012: Help New York City's Homeless Be Counted!

    E-print Network

    Qiu, Weigang

    ! Shadow Count 2012: Help New York City's Homeless Be Counted! Become a Shadow Count Decoy Shadow Count 2013 What: Monday Jan. 28th ­ 29th (overnight), the NYC Department of Homeless Services (DHS) will send hundreds of volunteers all across the city to count NYC's unsheltered homeless people

  6. Homeless Young People and Living with Personal Digital Artifacts

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Richard

    Homeless Young People and Living with Personal Digital Artifacts Jill Palzkill Woelfer and David G}@uw.edu ABSTRACT This paper reports on an investigation of how homeless young people hold themselves in relation the ordinary and extraordinary circumstances of homelessness. The paper concludes with a discussion

  7. Falling through the Gaps: Homeless Children and Youth. Fact Sheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovell, Phillip; DeBaun, Bill

    2012-01-01

    In each state, between 41 percent and 91 percent of the homeless students identified by the U.S. Department of Education (ED) are not considered homeless by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). Nationwide, as many as 715,238 homeless students fall into a bureaucratic gap between HUD and ED. This is because ED, HUD, and other…

  8. At Home With The Homeless By Ian Jamison

    E-print Network

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    At Home With The Homeless By Ian Jamison Like millions of other Americans, my first exposure,000 Americans are homeless. Immediately after entering Holy Apostles, our group was made to feel at home. A pair alike. He was quickly joined by a homeless man, who, after finishing his meal, took out his harmonica

  9. Homeless Children in America: Challenges for the 1990s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rafferty, Yvonne

    The 1980s brought an unprecedented rise in the number of homeless families with children. That there may be as many as three million homeless persons in the United States, with families representing one-third of this population, indicates that homelessness is a social problem of catastrophic proportions. This paper finds that while Federal…

  10. Homeless Youth: Characteristics, Contributing Factors, and Service Options

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sanna J. Thompson; Kimberly Bender; Liliane Windsor; Mary S. Cook; Travonne Williams

    2010-01-01

    Distinguishing between causes and consequences of youth homelessness is often difficult. Characteristics may have existed prior to youths' leaving home, likely contributing to their running away, or may develop once the youths become immersed in “street culture.” Owing to these complexities, characteristics and contributing factors associated with youth homelessness often intersect. Homeless youths' diverse backgrounds and experiences, including difficult family

  11. The Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program: A Public Health Framework

    PubMed Central

    Oppenheimer, Sarah C.; Judge, Christine M.; Taube, Robert L.; Blanchfield, Bonnie B.; Swain, Stacy E.; Koh, Howard K.

    2010-01-01

    During the past 25 years, the Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program has evolved into a service model embodying the core functions and essential services of public health. Each year the program provides integrated medical, behavioral, and oral health care, as well as preventive services, to more than 11 000 homeless people. Services are delivered in clinics located in 2 teaching hospitals, 80 shelters and soup kitchens, and an innovative 104-bed medical respite unit. We explain the program's principles of care, describe the public health framework that undergirds the program, and offer lessons for the elimination of health disparities suffered by this vulnerable population. PMID:20558804

  12. 41 CFR 102-75.1200 - How may representatives of the homeless apply for the use of properties to assist the homeless?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... false How may representatives of the homeless apply for the use of properties to assist the homeless? 102-75.1200 Section 102-75...Use of Federal Real Property to Assist the Homeless Application Process §...

  13. 41 CFR 102-75.1200 - How may representatives of the homeless apply for the use of properties to assist the homeless?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... false How may representatives of the homeless apply for the use of properties to assist the homeless? 102-75.1200 Section 102-75...Use of Federal Real Property to Assist the Homeless Application Process §...

  14. 41 CFR 102-75.1200 - How may representatives of the homeless apply for the use of properties to assist the homeless?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... false How may representatives of the homeless apply for the use of properties to assist the homeless? 102-75.1200 Section 102-75...Use of Federal Real Property to Assist the Homeless Application Process §...

  15. 41 CFR 102-75.1200 - How may representatives of the homeless apply for the use of properties to assist the homeless?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... false How may representatives of the homeless apply for the use of properties to assist the homeless? 102-75.1200 Section 102-75...Use of Federal Real Property to Assist the Homeless Application Process §...

  16. 41 CFR 102-75.1200 - How may representatives of the homeless apply for the use of properties to assist the homeless?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... false How may representatives of the homeless apply for the use of properties to assist the homeless? 102-75.1200 Section 102-75...Use of Federal Real Property to Assist the Homeless Application Process §...

  17. Immediate Enrollment under McKinney-Vento: How Schools Can Keep Homeless Students Safe. Best Practices in Homeless Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Homeless Education at SERVE, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Children and youth in homeless situations, particularly unaccompanied youth and survivors of domestic violence, are at a high risk for experiencing violence and victimization. Frequently, unaccompanied youth become homeless after leaving abusive or destructive home environments. In turn, their homelessness, which often involves "couch surfing"…

  18. Immediate Enrollment under McKinney-Vento: How Local Liaisons Can Keep Homeless Students Safe. Best Practices in Homeless Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Homeless Education at SERVE, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Children and youth in homeless situations, particularly unaccompanied youth and survivors of domestic violence, are at a high risk for experiencing violence and victimization. Frequently, unaccompanied youth become homeless after leaving abusive or destructive home environments. In turn, their homelessness, which often involves "couch surfing" or…

  19. A Comparison of Weight-Related Behaviors among High School Students Who Are Homeless and Non-Homeless

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fournier, Mary E.; Austin, S. Bryn; Samples, Cathryn L.; Goodenow, Carol S.; Wylie, Sarah A.; Corliss, Heather L.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Previous research has shown that youth who are homeless engage in high-risk behaviors. However, there has been little information published on nutritional and physical activity behaviors in this population, and studies comparing homeless youth in school with their non-homeless peers are scarce. This study compares weight-related risk…

  20. Prolonged and persistent homelessness: multivariable analyses in a cohort experiencing current homelessness and mental illness in Vancouver, British Columbia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michelle L. Patterson; Julian M. Somers; Akm Moniruzzaman

    2011-01-01

    Recent research and policy making concerning homelessness has focused on the particular challenges associated with ending chronic homelessness. It is generally assumed that individuals who have been homeless for longer durations have a greater impact on the public system of care and are in need of the most assistance. The aim of this study was to examine key sample characteristics

  1. Prolonged and persistent homelessness: multivariable analyses in a cohort experiencing current homelessness and mental illness in Vancouver, British Columbia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michelle L. Patterson; Julian M. Somers; Akm Moniruzzaman

    2012-01-01

    Recent research and policy making concerning homelessness has focused on the particular challenges associated with ending chronic homelessness. It is generally assumed that individuals who have been homeless for longer durations have a greater impact on the public system of care and are in need of the most assistance. The aim of this study was to examine key sample characteristics

  2. Homelessness: Programs and the People They Serve, Highlights Report

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1999-01-01

    In December 1999, the department of Housing and Urban development released their "most comprehensive study ever of homelessness in America." The survey of the homeless and the social programs supporting them is offered online in three separate chunks. The Highlights Report offers a substantial review of both the data and analytic conclusions. One significant finding that seems to fly in the face of certain myths about homelessness: "when homeless people get housing assistance and needed services - such as health care, substance abuse treatment, mental health services, education and job training - 76% of those living in families and 60% of those living alone end their homeless status."

  3. Risk Factors for Homelessness Among Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Youths: A Developmental Milestone Approach.

    PubMed

    Rosario, Margaret; Schrimshaw, Eric W; Hunter, Joyce

    2012-01-01

    Lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) youths are over-represented in the homeless population. To examine why some LGB youths become homeless, this report compares homeless and non-homeless LGB youths. Of the 156 LGB youths, 48% reported ever being homeless (i.e., running away or being evicted from home). Results indicate that sexual orientation awareness and the initiation of sexual behavior occurred earlier in homeless than in non-homeless LGB youths and predated the first homeless episode. Substance use was more frequent and first occurred at an earlier age in homeless as compared to non-homeless LGB youths; however, substance use occurred subsequent to first homelessness. Childhood sexual abuse was associated with homelessness; and, early sexual orientation development was related to homelessness among youths without a history of sexual abuse. Findings suggest that interventions should help youths cope with their unfolding sexual orientation and work to prevent or address the consequences of sexual abuse. PMID:22347763

  4. Risk Factors for Homelessness Among Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Youths: A Developmental Milestone Approach

    PubMed Central

    Rosario, Margaret; Schrimshaw, Eric W.; Hunter, Joyce

    2011-01-01

    Lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) youths are over-represented in the homeless population. To examine why some LGB youths become homeless, this report compares homeless and non-homeless LGB youths. Of the 156 LGB youths, 48% reported ever being homeless (i.e., running away or being evicted from home). Results indicate that sexual orientation awareness and the initiation of sexual behavior occurred earlier in homeless than in non-homeless LGB youths and predated the first homeless episode. Substance use was more frequent and first occurred at an earlier age in homeless as compared to non-homeless LGB youths; however, substance use occurred subsequent to first homelessness. Childhood sexual abuse was associated with homelessness; and, early sexual orientation development was related to homelessness among youths without a history of sexual abuse. Findings suggest that interventions should help youths cope with their unfolding sexual orientation and work to prevent or address the consequences of sexual abuse. PMID:22347763

  5. Correlates of service utilization among homeless youth

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, Kimberly A.; Akinyemi, Sarah L.; Kort-Butler, Lisa A.

    2013-01-01

    Though few studies exist on service utilization among homeless youth in the U.S., services are important because without them, many of these young people may resort to delinquent strategies in order to meet their daily survival needs. The current study examines frequency and correlates of service utilization (i.e., shelters, food programs, street outreach, counseling, STI and HIV testing) among a sample of 249 homeless youth ages 14 to 21. Multivariate analysis revealed significant differences in service usage by sex, age, and sexual orientation. Experiencing family physical and/or sexual abuse, being kicked out of the family home, spending more nights per week sleeping on the street, and having ever stayed in a group home facility were significant correlates of homeless youths’ service usage. PMID:24496226

  6. Correlates of service utilization among homeless youth.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Kimberly A; Akinyemi, Sarah L; Kort-Butler, Lisa A

    2012-07-01

    Though few studies exist on service utilization among homeless youth in the U.S., services are important because without them, many of these young people may resort to delinquent strategies in order to meet their daily survival needs. The current study examines frequency and correlates of service utilization (i.e., shelters, food programs, street outreach, counseling, STI and HIV testing) among a sample of 249 homeless youth ages 14 to 21. Multivariate analysis revealed significant differences in service usage by sex, age, and sexual orientation. Experiencing family physical and/or sexual abuse, being kicked out of the family home, spending more nights per week sleeping on the street, and having ever stayed in a group home facility were significant correlates of homeless youths' service usage. PMID:24496226

  7. A Dimensional Model of Psychopathology among Homeless Adolescents: Suicidality, Internalizing, and Externalizing Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoder, Kevin A.; Longley, Susan L.; Whitbeck, Les B.; Hoyt, Dan R.

    2008-01-01

    The present study examined associations among dimensions of suicidality and psychopathology in a sample of 428 homeless adolescents (56.3% female). Confirmatory factor analysis results provided support for a three-factor model in which suicidality (measured with lifetime suicidal ideation and suicide attempts), internalizing disorders (assessed…

  8. Evidence of nutritional inadequacy of meals served to homeless populations in rural Northern California

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kathryn Silliman; Shannon L. Wood

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this survey was to assess the nutritional adequacy of meals served to rural homeless populations. Sample meals (n = 106) were collected and weighed for a period of one week at thirteen emergency facilities. Results indicate that the meals, on average, provide less than 33% of the RDA\\/DRI for folate, calcium, magnesium, and zinc. The meals, on

  9. Do Soup Kitchen Meals Contribute to Suboptimal Nutrient Intake & Obesity in the Homeless Population?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lisa G. Sisson; Deborah A. Lown

    2011-01-01

    The double burden of suboptimal nutrient intake and obesity exists when available foods lack essential nutrients to promote health and provide high amounts of energy. This study evaluated the nutrition content of 41 meals served to the homeless at 3 urban soup kitchens. The mean nutrient content of all meals and of meals from each of the kitchens was compared

  10. Youth with Disabilities Who Are Runaways and/or Homeless: Responding to the Need.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fesko, Sheila Lynch; Graham, Steven; Temelini, David

    This document reports on two studies by the Bridges to Inclusion project concerning issues surrounding runaway and/or homeless youth with disabilities. The first study surveyed emergency adolescent shelter providers funded by the Family and Youth Service Bureau. Findings addressed types of disabilities frequently identified or suspected in…

  11. Trials, Tribulations, and Occasional Jubilations While Conducting Research with Homeless Children, Youth, and Families

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul A. Toro

    2006-01-01

    A personal account of a program of research on homelessness and poverty spanning the past 20 years is provided, with a focus on the many methodological, practical, and ethical difficulties encountered. Interesting discoveries and enjoyable aspects of the research process are also presented. Several role conflicts that arose for the researcher in this community-based work are also described, and the

  12. Helping Homeless Individuals with Co-Occurring Disorders: The Four Components

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, An-Pyng

    2012-01-01

    Homeless individuals with co-occurring disorders (CODs) of severe mental illness and substance use disorder are one of the most vulnerable populations. This article provides practitioners with a framework and strategies for helping this client population. Four components emerged from a literature review: (1) ensuring an effective transition for…

  13. Homeless access to dental health care: Creation of a dental service model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Adriana Vargas

    2010-01-01

    This project involved developing a model for planning a dental emergency treatment center that could function as an embedded component of a shelter for the homeless population. The dental services provided by such a clinic should include treatment for tooth pain, dental caries or cavities, chipped or broken teeth, broken partials, abscessed teeth, emergency cleanings, periodontal disease or gum disease

  14. On Their Own: Runaway and Homeless Youth and Programs that Serve Them.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pires, Sheila A.; Silber, Judith Tolmach

    This monograph discusses runaway and homeless youth and the programs that serve them in seven large and medium-sized cities throughout the United States. The monograph focuses on the characteristics and service needs of these youths and the demands they pose for service providers. It examines how the population and the service environment have…

  15. Experiences Associated with Intervening with Homeless, Substance-Abusing Mothers: The Importance of Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slesnick, Natasha; Glassman, Michael; Katafiasz, Heather; Collins, Jennifer C.

    2012-01-01

    This article documents the experiences of providing housing and supportive services, or ecologically based treatment, to shelter-recruited, substance-abusing homeless women with young children in their care. Among clients, observed experiences related to housing, substance abuse, and health and mental health care are discussed. Among therapists,…

  16. Mercer Veterinary Clinic for Pets of the Homeless All About Mercer Clinic

    E-print Network

    Schladow, S. Geoffrey

    Mercer Veterinary Clinic for Pets of the Homeless All About Mercer Clinic Mercer Veterinary Clinic for the Pets of the Homeless Mercer Veterinary Clinic for the Homeless is a 501(C)3 non-profit, student an array of services to the homeless. In addition to improving the lives of the pets of the homeless

  17. EMPLOYMENT SUMMARY Lexington, VA 24450

    E-print Network

    Marsh, David

    EMPLOYMENT SUMMARY Lexington, VA 24450 Website : http://www.wlu.edu Phone : 540-458-8400 WASHINGTON AND LEE UNIVERSITY - 2011 Sydney Lewis Hall Total graduates 123 Unemployed - seeking 2 Employment status unknown 5 Unemployed - not seeking 0 Employed 111 97 14 Pursuing graduate degree FT 5 EMPLOYMENT STATUS

  18. Oversight Hearing on Jobs and Education for the Homeless. Joint Hearing before the Committee on Education and Labor and the Select Committee on Aging. House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, First Session (Los Angeles, California, March 20, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and Labor.

    This document provides witnesses' testimonies and prepared statements from the Congressional hearing held in Los Angeles, California to examine the problems of the homeless and to suggest ways to alleviate some of the problems of the homeless. Opening statements are included by Representatives Augustus Hawkins, Edward Roybal, and Matthew Martinez.…

  19. 78 FR 31840 - Safety Zone; USO Patriotic Festival Air Show, Atlantic Ocean; Virginia Beach, VA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-28

    ...Festival Air Show, Atlantic Ocean; Virginia Beach, VA...waters of the Atlantic Ocean in Virginia Beach, VA...provide for the safety of life on navigable waters during...provide for the safety of life and property on navigable...event over the Atlantic Ocean in Virginia Beach,...

  20. Mobile phone technology: a new paradigm for the prevention, treatment, and research of the non-sheltered "street" homeless?

    PubMed

    Eyrich-Garg, Karin M

    2010-05-01

    Individuals experiencing homelessness have disproportionately high rates of health problems. Those who perceive themselves as having greater access to their social support networks have better physical and mental health outcomes as well as lower rates of victimization. Mobile phones offer a connection to others without the physical constraints of landlines and, therefore, may make communication (e.g., access to one's social support networks) more feasible for homeless individuals. This, in turn, could lead toward better health outcomes. This exploratory study examined mobile phone possession and use among a sample of 100 homeless men and women who do not use the shelter system in Philadelphia, PA. Interviews were comprised of the Homeless Supplement to the Diagnostic Interview Schedule, a technology module created for this investigation, and the substance use and psychiatric sections of the Addiction Severity Index. Almost half (44%) of the sample had a mobile phone. In the past 30 days, 100% of those with mobile phones placed or received a call, over half (61%) sent or received a text message, and one fifth (20%) accessed the Internet via their mobile phone. Participants possessed and used mobile phones to increase their sense of safety, responsibility (employment, stable housing, personal business, and sobriety or "clean time"), and social connectedness. Mobile phones could potentially be used by public health/health care providers to disseminate information to the street homeless, to enhance communication between the street homeless and providers, and to increase access for the street homeless to prevention, intervention, and aftercare services. Finally, this technology could also be used by researchers to collect data with this transient population. PMID:20397058

  1. Mobile Phone Technology: A New Paradigm for the Prevention, Treatment, and Research of the Non-sheltered “Street” Homeless?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Individuals experiencing homelessness have disproportionately high rates of health problems. Those who perceive themselves as having greater access to their social support networks have better physical and mental health outcomes as well as lower rates of victimization. Mobile phones offer a connection to others without the physical constraints of landlines and, therefore, may make communication (e.g., access to one’s social support networks) more feasible for homeless individuals. This, in turn, could lead toward better health outcomes. This exploratory study examined mobile phone possession and use among a sample of 100 homeless men and women who do not use the shelter system in Philadelphia, PA. Interviews were comprised of the Homeless Supplement to the Diagnostic Interview Schedule, a technology module created for this investigation, and the substance use and psychiatric sections of the Addiction Severity Index. Almost half (44%) of the sample had a mobile phone. In the past 30 days, 100% of those with mobile phones placed or received a call, over half (61%) sent or received a text message, and one fifth (20%) accessed the Internet via their mobile phone. Participants possessed and used mobile phones to increase their sense of safety, responsibility (employment, stable housing, personal business, and sobriety or “clean time”), and social connectedness. Mobile phones could potentially be used by public health/health care providers to disseminate information to the street homeless, to enhance communication between the street homeless and providers, and to increase access for the street homeless to prevention, intervention, and aftercare services. Finally, this technology could also be used by researchers to collect data with this transient population. PMID:20397058

  2. Medicaid Expansion Initiative in Massachusetts: Enrollment Among Substance-Abusing Homeless Adults

    PubMed Central

    Mojtabai, Ramin

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We assessed whether homeless adults entering substance abuse treatment in Massachusetts were less likely than others to enroll in Medicaid after implementation of the MassHealth Medicaid expansion program in 1997. Methods. We used interrupted time-series analysis in data on substance abuse treatment admissions from the Treatment 0Episode Data Set (1992–2009) to evaluate Medicaid coverage rates in Massachusetts and to identify whether trends differed between homeless and housed participants. We also compared Massachusetts data with data from 17 other states and the District of Columbia combined. Results. The percentage of both homeless and housed people entering treatment with Medicaid increased approximately 21% after expansion (P?=?.01), with an average increase of 5.4% per year over 12 years (P?=?.01). The increase in coverage was specific to Massachusetts, providing evidence that the MassHealth policy was the cause of this increase. Conclusions. Findings provide evidence in favor of state participation in the Medicaid expansion in January 2014 under the Affordable Care Act and suggest that hard-to-reach vulnerable groups such as substance-abusing homeless adults are as likely as other population groups to benefit from this policy. PMID:24028262

  3. The power of the drug, nature of support, and their impact on homeless youth.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Angela L; Nyamathi, Adeline; Slagle, Alexandra; Greengold, Barbara; Griffin, Deborah Koniak; Khalilifard, Farinaz; Gedzoff, Danny; Reid, Courtney

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore homeless youths' perspectives on the power of drugs in their lives, the preferred type of drugs used, barriers to treatment, and strategies to prevent drug initiation and abuse. This was a descriptive, qualitative study using focus groups with a purposeful sample of 24 drug-using homeless youth. The results provided insight into the lives of drug-using homeless youth. The most commonly used drugs were marijuana and alcohol. Reported reasons for drug use were parental drug use, low self-esteem, and harsh living conditions on the streets. Barriers to treatment were pleasurable enjoyment of the drug, physical dependence, and non-empathetic mental health providers. Strategies to prevent initiation and abuse of drugs were creative activities, such as art, sports, and music, and disdain for parental/family drug use and abuse. Comparative research is needed on specific personal factors that cause initiation and deterrence of drugs use/abuse among homeless youth. PMID:20155605

  4. The Power of the Drug, Nature of Support, and their Impact on Homeless Youth

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Angela L.; Nyamathi, Adeline; Slagle, Alexandra; Greengold, Barbara; Griffin, Deborah Koniak; Khalilifard, Farinaz; Gedzoff, Danny; Reid, Courtney

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore homeless youths’ perspectives on the power of drugs in their lives, the preferred type of drugs used, barriers to treatment, and strategies to prevent drug initiation and abuse. This was a descriptive, qualitative study using focus groups with a purposeful sample of 24 homeless drug-using youth. The results provided insight into the lives of drug-using homeless youth. Most commonly-used drugs were marijuana and alcohol. Reported reasons for drug use were parental drug use, low self-esteem, and harsh living conditions on the streets. Barriers to treatment were pleasurable enjoyment of the drug, physical dependence, and non-empathetic mental health providers. Strategies to prevent initiation and abuse of drugs were creative activities, such as art, sports, and music, and disdain for parental/family drug use and abuse. Comparative research is needed on specific personal factors that cause initiation and deterrence of drugs use/abuse among homeless youth. PMID:20155605

  5. Stanford University Reviewing Veterans Affairs (VA) Research

    E-print Network

    Puglisi, Joseph

    Stanford University HRPP Reviewing Veterans Affairs (VA) Research [for IRB staff and members] AID applicable to research supported by, or otherwise subject to, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA Questions-VA Research: Participation of non-veterans Justification should be discussed in IRB meeting

  6. Resilience and Suicidality among Homeless Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleverley, Kristin; Kidd, Sean A.

    2011-01-01

    Homeless and street-involved youth are considered an extremely high risk group, with many studies highlighting trajectories characterized by abusive, neglectful, and unstable family histories, victimization and criminal involvement while on the streets, high rates of physical and mental illness, and extremely high rates of mortality. While there…

  7. Survival Strategies of Older Homeless Men.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Carl I.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Examined how 281 homeless men aged 50 and older living on skid row were able to procure basic necessities such as money, food, shelter, and health care. Found men had and used informal supports to survive. Inability to fulfill needs was primarily associated with physical health, depression, lack of contacts with institutions and agencies, and…

  8. Subgroups of the Homeless: Street Kids

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bruce Clary; James Harrod; Rachel Olney

    1992-01-01

    Street kids are a feature of many cities, but only recently have they been included among the homeless. They were defined as runaways, throwaways, or youth in crisis. They had a place to live, even if it was a foster or group home or an institutional setting. However, many are without shelter at one time or another and face the

  9. Gender Differences in Victimized Homeless Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Regina Jones; Rew, Lynn; Kouzekanani, Kamiar

    2006-01-01

    Most of what we know about sexual abuse comes from efforts to examine female children victimized by men. Although some researchers have identified similarities between male and female victims of sexual abuse, few studies have examined gender-specific factors associated with sexual health practices among homeless adolescents. The aim of this study…

  10. Education and Homeless Youth: Policy Implementations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Higher Education Policy Analysis, University of Southern California, 2007

    2007-01-01

    "The Navigator" is a free newsletter published by the Center for Higher Education Policy Analysis (CHEPA) focusing on directions and trends in higher education policy. The theme of this issue is: "Education and Homeless Youth: Policy Implementations." The lead article, authored by CHEPA director William G. Tierney, describes CHEPA's study of the…

  11. The impact of homelessness on children

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yvonne Rafferty; Marybeth Shinn

    1991-01-01

    This article reviews and critiques community-based re- search on the effects of homelessness on children. Home- less children confront serious threats to their ability to succeed and their future well-being. Of particular concern are health problems, hunger, poor nutrition, developmental delays, anxiety, depression, behavioral problems, and ed- ucational underachievement. Factors that may mediate the observed outcomes include inadequate shelter condi-

  12. 24 CFR 291.415 - Lease with option to purchase properties for use by the homeless.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...purchase properties for use by the homeless. 291.415 Section 291.415...Single Family Properties for the Homeless § 291.415 Lease with option to purchase properties for use by the homeless. (a) Certification....

  13. 24 CFR 291.415 - Lease with option to purchase properties for use by the homeless.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...purchase properties for use by the homeless. 291.415 Section 291.415...Single Family Properties for the Homeless § 291.415 Lease with option to purchase properties for use by the homeless. (a) Certification....

  14. 24 CFR 291.415 - Lease with option to purchase properties for use by the homeless.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...purchase properties for use by the homeless. 291.415 Section 291.415...Single Family Properties for the Homeless § 291.415 Lease with option to purchase properties for use by the homeless. (a) Certification....

  15. 38 CFR 1.710 - Homeless claimants: Delivery of benefit payments and correspondence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Homeless claimants: Delivery of benefit payments and...DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL PROVISIONS Homeless Claimants § 1.710 Homeless claimants: Delivery of benefit payments...

  16. 78 FR 26559 - Homeless Emergency Assistance and Rapid Transition to Housing: Rural Housing Stability Assistance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-07

    ...No. 5573-N-02] RIN 2506-AC33 Homeless Emergency Assistance and Rapid Transition...to the Definition of ``Chronically Homeless'' Extension of Public Comment Only...to the definition of ``chronically homeless.'' This document announces that...

  17. 24 CFR 291.415 - Lease with option to purchase properties for use by the homeless.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...purchase properties for use by the homeless. 291.415 Section 291.415...Single Family Properties for the Homeless § 291.415 Lease with option to purchase properties for use by the homeless. (a) Certification....

  18. 38 CFR 1.710 - Homeless claimants: Delivery of benefit payments and correspondence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Homeless claimants: Delivery of benefit payments and...DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL PROVISIONS Homeless Claimants § 1.710 Homeless claimants: Delivery of benefit payments...

  19. 24 CFR 291.415 - Lease with option to purchase properties for use by the homeless.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...purchase properties for use by the homeless. 291.415 Section 291.415...Single Family Properties for the Homeless § 291.415 Lease with option to purchase properties for use by the homeless. (a) Certification....

  20. 38 CFR 1.710 - Homeless claimants: Delivery of benefit payments and correspondence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Homeless claimants: Delivery of benefit payments and...DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL PROVISIONS Homeless Claimants § 1.710 Homeless claimants: Delivery of benefit payments...

  1. 38 CFR 1.710 - Homeless claimants: Delivery of benefit payments and correspondence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Homeless claimants: Delivery of benefit payments and...DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL PROVISIONS Homeless Claimants § 1.710 Homeless claimants: Delivery of benefit payments...

  2. 38 CFR 1.710 - Homeless claimants: Delivery of benefit payments and correspondence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Homeless claimants: Delivery of benefit payments and...DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL PROVISIONS Homeless Claimants § 1.710 Homeless claimants: Delivery of benefit payments...

  3. Mean-VaR Models and Algorithms for Fuzzy Portfolio Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Wen; Peng, Jin

    In this paper, value-at-risk (VaR for short) is used as the measure of risk. Based on the concept of VaR, a fuzzy mean-VaR model is proposed. Firstly, we recall some definitions and results of value-at-risk in credibilistic risk analysis. Secondly, we propose the fuzzy mean- VaR model of fuzzy programming, or more precisely, credibilistic programming. Thirdly, a hybrid intelligent algorithm is provided to give a general solution of the optimization problem. Finally, numerical examples are also presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  4. Homeless Women’s Personal Networks: Implications for Understanding Risk Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Joan S.; Kennedy, David; Ryan, Gery; Wenzel, Suzanne L.; Golinelli, Daniela; Zazzali, James

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this exploratory study was to examine the composition of homeless women’s personal networks in order to better understand the social context of risk behavior in this vulnerable population. Twenty-eight homeless women residing in temporary shelters in Los Angeles County provided detailed information about their extended personal networks. Women named 25 people with whom they had contact during the past year, and then were asked a series of questions about each one of these named network members. Results indicate that the personal networks of homeless women are larger and more diverse than suggested by previous research. About one-third of women’s relationships were with high-risk individuals (i.e., people perceived to drink heavily, use drugs, or engage in risky sex). However, most women also reported having relationships that could be characterized as both “low risk” (e.g., involving individuals perceived as not drinking heavily, using drugs, or engaging in risky sex) and “high quality” (e.g., long-term, emotionally close, or supportive), although these relationships tended to be rather tenuous. Our results suggest a need to assist homeless women in strengthening these existing low-risk/high-quality relationships, and extending the diversity of their networks, in order to increase women’s exposure to positive role models and access to tangible support and other needed resources. PMID:20351796

  5. Advanced Battery Manufacturing (VA)

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, Jeremy

    2012-09-30

    LiFeBATT has concentrated its recent testing and evaluation on the safety of its batteries. There appears to be a good margin of safety with respect to overheating of the cells and the cases being utilized for the batteries are specifically designed to dissipate any heat built up during charging. This aspect of LiFeBATT’s products will be even more fully investigated, and assuming ongoing positive results, it will become a major component of marketing efforts for the batteries. LiFeBATT has continued to receive prismatic 20 Amp hour cells from Taiwan. Further testing continues to indicate significant advantages over the previously available 15 Ah cells. Battery packs are being assembled with battery management systems in the Danville facility. Comprehensive tests are underway at Sandia National Laboratory to provide further documentation of the advantages of these 20 Ah cells. The company is pursuing its work with Hybrid Vehicles of Danville to critically evaluate the 20 Ah cells in a hybrid, armored vehicle being developed for military and security applications. Results have been even more encouraging than they were initially. LiFeBATT is expanding its work with several OEM customers to build a worldwide distribution network. These customers include a major automotive consulting group in the U.K., an Australian maker of luxury off-road campers, and a number of makers of E-bikes and scooters. LiFeBATT continues to explore the possibility of working with nations that are woefully short of infrastructure. Negotiations are underway with Siemens to jointly develop a system for using photovoltaic generation and battery storage to supply electricity to communities that are not currently served adequately. The IDA has continued to monitor the progress of LiFeBATT’s work to ensure that all funds are being expended wisely and that matching funds will be generated as promised. The company has also remained current on all obligations for repayment of an IDA loan and lease payments for space to the IDA. A commercial venture is being formed to utilize the LiFeBATT product for consumer use in enabling photovoltaic powered boat lifts. Field tests of the system have proven to be very effective and commercially promising. This venture is expected to result in significant sales within the next six months.

  6. Age differences among homeless individuals: adolescence through adulthood.

    PubMed

    Tompsett, Carolyn J; Fowler, Patrick J; Toro, Paul A

    2009-01-01

    The present study examines differences between homeless adolescents, young adults, and older adults served by homeless shelters or food programs to inform service provision. Four homeless studies using the same sampling and measurement methods were pooled to permit comparisons across age groups. Results showed that homeless adolescents demonstrated greater resilience than younger and older adults. Adolescents reported the shortest duration of homelessness, lowest number of life stressors, fewest physical symptoms, largest social networks, and fewest clinically significant mental health problems. Adolescents also received fewer alcohol and drug abuse diagnoses than younger and older adults. Younger adults reported less time homeless and fewer physical symptoms than older adults, but more life stressors. Younger adults also endorsed higher levels of hostile and paranoid psychological symptoms. Implications for service provision and policy are discussed. PMID:19363770

  7. Predictors of substance abuse treatment participation among homeless adults.

    PubMed

    Ibabe, Izaskun; Stein, Judith A; Nyamathi, Adeline; Bentler, Peter M

    2014-03-01

    The current study focuses on the relationships among a trauma history, a substance use history, chronic homelessness, and the mediating role of recent emotional distress in predicting drug treatment participation among adult homeless people. We explored the predictors of participation in substance abuse treatment because enrolling and retaining clients in substance abuse treatment programs is always a challenge particularly among homeless people. Participants were 853 homeless adults from Los Angeles, California. Using structural equation models, findings indicated that trauma history, substance use history and chronicity of homelessness were associated, and were significant predictors of greater recent emotional distress. The most notable result was that recent emotional distress predicted less participation in current substance abuse treatment (both formal and self-help) whereas a substance use history alone predicted significantly more participation in treatment. Implications concerning treatment engagement and difficulties in obtaining appropriate dual-diagnosis services for homeless mentally distressed individuals are discussed. PMID:24238716

  8. Where the homeless children and youth come from: A study of the residential origins of the homeless in Miami-Dade County, Florida

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Deden Rukmana

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates where homeless children and youth come from and identifies factors associated with the spatial distribution of the residential origins of homeless children and youth. Data was obtained through a point-in-time homelessness survey in Miami-Dade County, Florida in January 2005. The study identified 545 homeless children and youth in 219 homeless families whose residential origins in Miami-Dade County,

  9. Development of fragility functions to estimate homelessness after an earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brink, Susan A.; Daniell, James; Khazai, Bijan; Wenzel, Friedemann

    2014-05-01

    Immediately after an earthquake, many stakeholders need to make decisions about their response. These decisions often need to be made in a data poor environment as accurate information on the impact can take months or even years to be collected and publicized. Social fragility functions have been developed and applied to provide an estimate of the impact in terms of building damage, deaths and injuries in near real time. These rough estimates can help governments and response agencies determine what aid may be required which can improve their emergency response and facilitate planning for longer term response. Due to building damage, lifeline outages, fear of aftershocks, or other causes, people may become displaced or homeless after an earthquake. Especially in cold and dangerous locations, the rapid provision of safe emergency shelter can be a lifesaving necessity. However, immediately after an event there is little information available about the number of homeless, their locations and whether they require public shelter to aid the response agencies in decision making. In this research, we analyze homelessness after historic earthquakes using the CATDAT Damaging Earthquakes Database. CATDAT includes information on the hazard as well as the physical and social impact of over 7200 damaging earthquakes from 1900-2013 (Daniell et al. 2011). We explore the relationship of both earthquake characteristics and area characteristics with homelessness after the earthquake. We consider modelled variables such as population density, HDI, year, measures of ground motion intensity developed in Daniell (2014) over the time period from 1900-2013 as well as temperature. Using a base methodology based on that used for PAGER fatality fragility curves developed by Jaiswal and Wald (2010), but using regression through time using the socioeconomic parameters developed in Daniell et al. (2012) for "socioeconomic fragility functions", we develop a set of fragility curves that can be used to estimate homelessness as a function of information that is readily available immediately after an earthquake. These fragility functions could be used by relief agencies and governments to provide an initial assessment of the need for allocation of emergency shelter immediately after an earthquake. Daniell JE (2014) The development of socio-economic fragility functions for use in worldwide rapid earthquake loss estimation procedures, Ph.D. Thesis (in publishing), Karlsruhe, Germany. Daniell, J. E., Khazai, B., Wenzel, F., & Vervaeck, A. (2011). The CATDAT damaging earthquakes database. Natural Hazards and Earth System Science, 11(8), 2235-2251. doi:10.5194/nhess-11-2235-2011 Daniell, J.E., Wenzel, F. and Vervaeck, A. (2012). "The Normalisation of socio-economic losses from historic worldwide earthquakes from 1900 to 2012", 15th WCEE, Lisbon, Portugal, Paper No. 2027. Jaiswal, K., & Wald, D. (2010). An Empirical Model for Global Earthquake Fatality Estimation. Earthquake Spectra, 26(4), 1017-1037. doi:10.1193/1.3480331

  10. Substance abuse and homelessness: social selection or social adaptation?

    PubMed

    Johnson, T P; Freels, S A; Parsons, J A; Vangeest, J B

    1997-04-01

    Although substance abuse has for many years been documented as a serious problem among homeless populations, there is as yet no clear understanding of the nature of the relationship between substance abuse and homelessness. We evaluate alternative social selection and social adaptation models of this process. Using data from a random probability sample, the substance abuse and homeless experiences of 303 homeless people and people at risk of homelessness in Cook County, Illinois, were investigated. Proportional hazards regression models were employed to assess both social selection and social adaptation models. Drug but not alcohol abuse was associated with first homeless episode. Prior homeless experiences were found to be predictive of first symptoms of both alcohol and drug abuse. Other variables, including the availability of social and economic resources, were also associated with each of these outcomes. Models of both selection and adaptation processes are necessary to account for the association between homelessness and substance abuse, indicating that a multi-directional model is more appropriate. In addition findings suggest that, in recent years, drugs may have displaced alcohol as an important precursor of homelessness for many individuals. PMID:9177065

  11. Evaluations of Continuums of Care for Homeless People

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2002-01-01

    Prepared by the US Department of Housing and Urban Development, "Evaluations of Continuums of Care for Homeless People" is a comprehensive study that examines the continuums of care for homeless people throughout the United States. Critiquing the agenda of the Continuum of Care (CoC), a system designed to help homeless people as well as those at imminent risk of becoming homeless, this 216-page report examines their development, current structure, and possible future. Users should note that this report defaults to small font and may be more easily readable if printed.

  12. How Effective Homelessness Prevention Impacts the Length of Shelter Spells

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Sarena; Messeri, Peter; O’Flaherty, Brendan

    2014-01-01

    Homelessness prevention programs intervene with households apparently in imminent danger of becoming homeless, and try to keep them housed. If they are at least partially successful, how do they change the average shelter spell of households actually becoming homeless? We use data from 2003 to 2008 for Homebase, a New York City homelessness prevention program that studies have found to be effective in reducing shelter entries. Homebase made no difference in average shelter spells at the community level. This result, like many results about shelter spell length, is not easy to reconcile with the idea that shelter spell length is a reflection of the seriousness of underlying problems. PMID:24610995

  13. More Than Just a Cargo Adapter, Melanophilin Prolongs and Slows Processive Runs of Myosin Va*

    PubMed Central

    Sckolnick, Maria; Krementsova, Elena B.; Warshaw, David M.; Trybus, Kathleen M.

    2013-01-01

    Myosin Va (myoVa) is a molecular motor that processively transports cargo along actin tracks. One well studied cargo in vivo is the melanosome, a pigment organelle that is moved first by kinesin on microtubules and then handed off to myoVa for transport in the actin-rich dendritic periphery of melanocytes. Melanophilin (Mlph) is the adapter protein that links Rab27a-melanosomes to myoVa. Using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and quantum dot-labeled full-length myoVa, we show at the single-molecule level that Mlph increases the number of processively moving myoVa motors by 17-fold. Surprisingly, myoVa-Mlph moves ?4-fold slower than myoVa alone and with twice the run length. These two changes greatly increase the time spent on actin, a property likely to enhance the transfer of melanosomes to the adjacent keratinocyte. In contrast to the variable stepping pattern of full-length myoVa, the myoVa-Mlph complex shows a normal gating pattern between the heads typical of a fully active motor and consistent with a cargo-dependent activation mechanism. The Mlph-dependent changes in myoVa depend on a positively charged cluster of amino acids in the actin binding domain of Mlph, suggesting that Mlph acts as a “tether” that links the motor to the track. Our results provide a molecular explanation for the uncharacteristically slow speed of melanosome movement by myoVa in vivo. More generally, these data show that proteins that link motors to cargo can modify motor properties to enhance their biological role. PMID:23979131

  14. Physical and Mental Health Issues among Homeless Youth in British Columbia, Canada: Are they Different from Older Homeless Adults?

    PubMed Central

    Saddichha, Sahoo; Linden, Isabelle; Krausz, Michael Reinhardt

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Youth homelessness is on the rise in North America, yet this vulnerable population is rarely studied and compared with adults. This paper aimed to study the homeless youth and identify specific vulnerabilities, which rendered them different from the adult homeless population. It also aimed to describe the youth homeless population and their significant co-morbidities. Methods: Data was derived from the BC Health of the Homeless Study (BCHOHS), carried out in three cities in British Columbia, Canada: the large urban centre Vancouver (n=250); the mid-sized city and capital of the province Victoria (n=150). Measures included socio-demographic information, the Maudsley Addiction Profile (MAP), the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) and the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) Plus. Results: Youth constituted 16.5% (n=82) of the homeless population. Compared to the adult homeless, the homeless youth were more often female (55%), were Aboriginal (47.6%), had greater substance abuse of alcohol (70.7%), amphetamines (8.5%) and cannabis (75.6%). A lower prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases (0.2%) and psychotic disorders (13.4%) was also observed. The prevalence of traumatic experiences, other psychiatric disorders and physical illnesses were similar between the adult and homeless youth. Conclusion: Homeless youth have high rates of physical and psychiatric comorbidity, similar to the adult homeless, despite being 20 years younger. An urgent need for interventions that go beyond the standardized ones being offered to homeless populations as a whole, and to derive specific strategies that target this vulnerable population is required. PMID:25320613

  15. Association between prescription drug misuse and injection among runaway and homeless youth

    PubMed Central

    Al-Tayyib, Alia A; Rice, Eric; Rhoades, Harmony; Riggs, Paula

    2013-01-01

    Background The nonmedical use of prescription drugs is the fastest growing drug problem in the United States, disproportionately impacting youth. Furthermore, the population prevalence of injection drug use among youth is also on the rise. This short communication examines the association between current prescription drug misuse (PDM) and injection among runaway and homeless youth. Methods Homeless youth were surveyed between October, 2011 and February, 2012 at two drop-in service agencies in Los Angeles, CA. Prevalence ratios (PR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between current PDM and injection behavior were estimated. The outcome of interest was use of a needle to inject any illegal drug into the body during the past 30 days. Results Of 380 homeless youth (median age, 21; IQR, 17-25; 72% male), 84 (22%) reported current PDM and 48 (13%) reported currently injecting. PDM during the past 30 days was associated with a 7.7 (95% CI: 4.4, 13.5) fold increase in the risk of injecting during that same time. Among those reporting current PDM with concurrent heroin, cocaine, and methamphetamine use, the PR with injection was 15.1 (95% CI: 8.5, 26.8). Conclusions Runaway and homeless youth are at increased risk for a myriad of negative outcomes. Our preliminary findings are among the first to show the strong association between current PDM and injection in this population. Our findings provide the basis for additional research to delineate specific patterns of PDM and factors that enable or inhibit transition to injection among homeless and runaway youth. PMID:24300900

  16. Personal Network Correlates of Alcohol, Cigarette, and Marijuana Use Among Homeless Youth

    PubMed Central

    Wenzel, Suzanne L.; Tucker, Joan S.; Golinelli, Daniela; Green, Harold D.; Zhou, Annie

    2013-01-01

    Background Youth who are homeless and on their own are among the most marginalized individuals in the United States and face multiple risks, including use of substances. This study investigates how the use of alcohol, cigarettes, and marijuana among homeless youth may be influenced by characteristics of their social networks. Methods Homeless youth aged 13–24 were randomly sampled from 41 service and street sites in Los Angeles County (N = 419). Predictors of substance use were examined using linear regression analysis (for average number of drinks and average number of cigarettes per day) and negative binomal regression analysis (for frequency of past month marijuana use). Results Youth with more substance users in their networks reported greater alcohol, cigarette, and marijuana consumption regardless of whether these network members provided tangible or emotional support. Marijuana use was more frequent for youth who met more network members through homeless settings, but less frequent among those who met more network members through treatment or AA/NA. Greater alcohol use occurred among youth who met more network members through substance use-related activities. Youth having more adults in positions of responsibility in their networks consumed less alcohol, and those with more school attendees in their networks consumed less alcohol and cigarettes. Conclusions Findings highlight the importance of social context in understanding substance use among homeless youth. Results also support the relevance of network-based interventions to change social context for substance using youth, in terms of both enhancing pro-social influences and reducing exposure to substance use. PMID:20656423

  17. 38 CFR 61.67 - Recovery provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VA HOMELESS PROVIDERS GRANT AND PER DIEM PROGRAM...grant recipient has withdrawn from the VA Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program...Grantee B then provides services to homeless veterans for a period of 6...

  18. 38 CFR 61.67 - Recovery provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VA HOMELESS PROVIDERS GRANT AND PER DIEM PROGRAM...grant recipient has withdrawn from the VA Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program...Grantee B then provides services to homeless veterans for a period of 6...

  19. 38 CFR 61.67 - Recovery provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VA HOMELESS PROVIDERS GRANT AND PER DIEM PROGRAM...grant recipient has withdrawn from the VA Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program...Grantee B then provides services to homeless veterans for a period of 6...

  20. Geropsychology Training in a VA Nursing Home Setting

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michele J. Karel; Jennifer Moye

    2005-01-01

    There is a growing need for professional psychology training in nursing home settings, and nursing homes provide a rich environment for teaching geropsychology competencies. We describe the nursing home training component of our Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Predoctoral Internship and Geropsychology Postdoctoral Fellowship programs. Our training objectives for Interns and Fellows include: increased exposure and interest in nursing home

  1. Geropsychology Training in a VA Nursing Home Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karel, Michele J.; Moye, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    There is a growing need for professional psychology training in nursing home settings, and nursing homes provide a rich environment for teaching geropsychology competencies. We describe the nursing home training component of our Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Predoctoral Internship and Geropsychology Postdoctoral Fellowship programs. Our…

  2. Military and VA General Dentistry Training: A National Resource.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atchison, Kathryn A.; Bachand, William; Buchanan, C. Richard; Lefever, Karen H.; Lin, Sylvia; Engelhardt, Rita

    2002-01-01

    Compared the program characteristics of the postgraduate general dentistry (PGD) training programs sponsored by the military and the Veterans Health Administration (VA). Gathered information on program infrastructure and emphasis, resident preparation prior to entering the program, and patients served and types of services provided. Programs…

  3. U.S. government announces new policy to address homelessness

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Grinnell, Max

    2010-06-25

    Integrating Services a Key to Homelessness Planhttp://abcnews.go.com/Business/wireStory?id=10985475Shelter residents, operators react to U.S. Homeless planhttp://www.joplinglobe.com/local/x383282834/Shelter-residents-operators-react-to-U-S-homeless-planObama builds on Bush success to help the homelesshttp://www.csmonitor.com/Commentary/the-monitors-view/2010/0622/Obama-builds-on-Bush-success-to-help-the-homelessA 1% fix for homelessnesshttp://www.sltrib.com/sltrib/home/49752645-73/percent-homeless-housing-homelessness.html.cspUnited States Interagency Council on Homelessness http://www.usich.gov/U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development: Homelessness Resource Exchangehttp://www.hudhre.info/Addressing the problems of the homeless population is a multi-faceted undertaking, and many different governmental agencies have tried novel approaches recently. For example, a coalition of groups in Seattle opened a residential facility several years ago where homeless persons who were dependent on alcohol could drink openly while living in the facility. This Tuesday, the White House made an announcement that a new effort called "Opening Doors" would be utilized to offer a new approach on the federal level to dealing with homelessness. The basic premise behind this approach is that better coordination among the "many agencies that try to help homeless people find employment and health care as well as stable places to live" is a crucial step to ending homelessness entirely. One of the key components of this plan is to also add housing vouchers for low-income families and affordable rental units in the short-term. The hope is that chronic homelessness (where people tend to cycle through shelters and hospitals) can be effectively alleviated with the implementation of this policy. The first link will take visitors to a story from ABC News about the recent announcement from the White House about this new plan. The second link will lead users to an article from the Joplin Globe which takes a look at reactions from residents and operators of homeless shelters in Joplin, MO. The third link will take users to an editorial from this Tuesday's Christian Science Monitor which discusses the work of the Bush administration on a similar plan to end chronic homelessness. Moving on, the fourth link leads to a thoughtful article from the Salt Lake Tribune which talks about the movement to encourage Utahns to pledge 1 percent of one year's income to generate an endowment to solve homelessness in the state. The fifth link will whisk users to the homepage of the United States Interagency Council on Homelessness. Here visitors can learn about the details of this plan and consider statistics on homelessness. The last and final link leads to the Department of Housing and Urban Development's Homelessness Resource Exchange website. The site contains information for those people "assisting persons who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless."

  4. Notre Dame community supports Homeless Persons' Week

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Leigh Dawson

    2011-01-01

    Hundreds of toiletries, blankets and sleeping bags are heading to some of Western Australia’s neediest residents following an overwhelming response to a collection at Notre Dame’s Fremantle Campus in support of National Homeless Persons’ Week.\\u000aFirst-year Biomedical Science student Alexander Das coordinated the appeal in conjunction with Perth radio station 98.5 Sonshine FM to raise awareness about the unpredictability of

  5. Correlates of Frailty Among Homeless Adults

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Benissa E.; Nyamathi, Adeline M.; Brecht, Mary-Lynn; Phillips, Linda R.; Mentes, Janet C.; Sarkisian, Catherine; Leake, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Frailty, a relatively unexplored concept among vulnerable populations, may be a significant issue for homeless adults. This cross-sectional study assessed correlates of frailty among middle age and older homeless adults (N = 150, 40–73). A Pearson (r) bivariate correlation revealed a weak relationship between frailty and being female (r = .230, p < .01). Significant moderate negative correlations were found between frailty and resilience (r = ?.395, p < .01), social support (r = ?.377, p < .01), and nutrition (r = ?.652, p < .01). Furthermore, Spearman’s rho (rs) bivariate correlations revealed a moderate positive relationship between frailty and health care utilization (rs = .444, p < .01). A stepwise backward linear regression analysis was conducted and in the final model, age, gender, health care utilization, nutrition, and resilience were significantly related to frailty. Over the next two decades, there is an anticipated increase in the number of homeless adults which will necessitate a greater understanding of the needs of this hard-to-reach population. PMID:23676627

  6. Correlates of frailty among homeless adults.

    PubMed

    Salem, Benissa E; Nyamathi, Adeline M; Brecht, Mary-Lynn; Phillips, Linda R; Mentes, Janet C; Sarkisian, Catherine; Leake, Barbara

    2013-10-01

    Frailty, a relatively unexplored concept among vulnerable populations, may be a significant issue for homeless adults. This cross-sectional study assessed correlates of frailty among middle age and older homeless adults (N = 150, 40-73). A Pearson (r) bivariate correlation revealed a weak relationship between frailty and being female (r = .230, p < .01). Significant moderate negative correlations were found between frailty and resilience (r = -.395, p < .01), social support (r = -.377, p < .01), and nutrition (r = -.652, p < .01). Furthermore, Spearman's rho (r s) bivariate correlations revealed a moderate positive relationship between frailty and health care utilization (r(s) = .444, p < .01). A stepwise backward linear regression analysis was conducted and in the final model, age, gender, health care utilization, nutrition, and resilience were significantly related to frailty. Over the next two decades, there is an anticipated increase in the number of homeless adults which will necessitate a greater understanding of the needs of this hard-to-reach population. PMID:23676627

  7. Understanding heterosexual condom use among homeless men.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Joan S; Wenzel, Suzanne L; Golinelli, Daniela; Kennedy, David P; Ewing, Brett; Wertheimer, Samuel

    2013-06-01

    This study uses an event-based approach to examine individual, relationship, and contextual correlates of heterosexual condom use among homeless men. Structured interviews were conducted with a predominantly African American sample of 305 men recruited from meal lines in the Skid Row area of Los Angeles. Men reported on their most recent heterosexual event involving vaginal or anal intercourse. Adjusting for demographic characteristics only, condom use was more likely when men had higher condom use self-efficacy, greater HIV knowledge, or talked to their partner about condoms prior to sex. Condom use was less likely when men held more negative attitudes towards condoms, the partner was considered to be a primary/serious partner, hard drug use preceded sex, or sex occurred in a public setting. Condom attitudes, self-efficacy, partner type, and communication were the strongest predictors of condom use in a multivariate model that included all of the above-mentioned factors. Associations of unprotected sex with hard drug use prior to sex and having sex in public settings could be accounted for by lower condom self-efficacy and/or less positive condom attitudes among men having sex under these conditions. Results suggest that it may be promising to adapt existing, evidence-based IMB interventions for delivery in non-traditional settings that are frequented by men experiencing homelessness to achieve HIV risk reduction and thus reduce a significant point of disparity for the largely African American population of homeless men. PMID:22392155

  8. Enabling Older Homeless Minority Women to Overcome Homelessness by Using a Life Management Enhancement Group Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Washington, Olivia G. M.; Moxley, David P.; Taylor, Jacquelyn Y.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the importance of a life management enhancement (LME) group intervention for older minority women in developing personal control and self-confidence in social relationships as they overcome homelessness. Women in the treatment group showed significantly greater personal control and higher levels of self-confidence following the six-week intervention than women in the control group. Increasing personal control and developing self-confidence in social relationships can help individuals achieve desired outcomes as a result of their actions, efforts, and abilities. These attributes can help women increase and sustain appropriate coping methods and overcome homelessness. PMID:19212866

  9. Homelessness, Social Work, Social Policy and the Print Media in Australian Cities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carole Zufferey

    Homelessness is a significant social problem worldwide. This paper describes an Australian study that examined print media representations of homelessness and social work, social policy and social work responses to homelessness in three Australian cities. The research included a content analysis of seven Australian newspapers and semi-structured interviews with 39 social workers employed in the field of homelessness in Adelaide,

  10. Homelessness among Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Youth: Implications for Subsequent Internalizing and Externalizing Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosario, Margaret; Schrimshaw, Eric W.; Hunter, Joyce

    2012-01-01

    Although lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) youth with a history of homelessness (running away or being evicted from their homes by parents) report more psychological symptoms than homeless heterosexual peers, it is unclear whether symptoms are due to homelessness, given the absence of a non-homeless comparison group. This study longitudinally…

  11. Trauma Among Unaccompanied Homeless Youth: The Integration of Street Culture into a Model of Intervention

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Holly H. McManus; Sanna J. Thompson

    2008-01-01

    Homeless adolescents comprise a population particularly vulnerable to developing symptoms of post-traumatic stress. Research has shown that prevalence of trauma-related symptoms among homeless youth living in shelters and on the streets without families is approximately 18%. The detrimental effects of traumatic experiences often inhibit homeless youths' ability to employ the psychosocial skills necessary to a transition out of homelessness. Consequently,

  12. Identifying the Precipitants of Homeless Protest across 17 U.S. Cities, 1980 to 1990

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snow, David A.; Soule, Sarah A.; Cress, Daniel M.

    2005-01-01

    During the 1980s, homeless people formed social movement organizations and mobilized collective action events in cities across the US. From the vantage point of social movement theories and scholarship on homelessness, it is surprising that homeless protest was so prevalent in the 1980s. Yet we find evidence of homeless protest events across no…

  13. Impaired Immune Function in a Homeless Population with Stress-Related Disorders

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lorena Arranz; Aída de Vicente; Manuel Muñoz; Mónica De la Fuente

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Homeless people suffer high levels of psychological distress. The aim of the present work was to study the immune function in a group of homeless people with stress-related disorders and compare it with that of healthy non-homeless controls. Methods: We included in the study 40 homeless persons and 40 housed controls recruited from the population of Madrid and matched

  14. Homeless Education and Social Capital: An Examination of School and Community Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Peter M.

    2011-01-01

    Background/Context: This study contributes to the literature on the schooling of homeless and highly mobile students. Although previous work has detailed the demographics of homelessness, the effects of homelessness on academic progress, and particular legal issues in homeless education, this research focused on how individual and institutional…

  15. Extending the Parameters: An Inquiry into Teaching Practices for Children from Diverse Populations and Homeless Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Grace Ann

    2012-01-01

    The number of homeless children in the United States is increasing. The National Center on Family Homelessness (2010) reports that on average one in 50 children in the United States have experienced homelessness, defined as unstable housing. The needs of this student demographic are varied and complex. For the purpose of this study, the homeless

  16. Multilevel Considerations of Family Homelessness and Schooling in the Recession Era

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Peter; Schreiber, James

    2012-01-01

    This mixed methods investigation of homeless education in a major urban region identified a number of significant developments and dilemmas amid the larger homeless crisis in the United States. We found that the wider community demographics of homelessness have shifted in recent years, resulting in a higher number of homeless families--many of…

  17. Arizona Head Start for Homeless Children and Families Project. 1995-96 Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulholland, Lori

    Homeless families with children constitute the fastest growing segment of the United States homeless population. This study evaluated Year 2 of the Arizona Head Start for Homeless Children and Families Project, designed to meet educational and social needs of homeless children and families, and to assist Head Start agencies in developing effective…

  18. Designs on dignity: perceptions of technology among the homeless

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christopher A. Le Dantec; W. Keith Edwards

    2008-01-01

    Technology, it is argued, has the potential to improve ev- eryone's life: from the workplace, to entertainment, to eas- ing chores around the home. But what of people who have neither job nor home? We undertook a qualitative study of the homeless population in a metropolitan U.S. city to better understand what it means to be homeless and how technology—from

  19. Constantly Compromised: The Impact of Homelessness on Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molnar, Janice M.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Summarizes the small body of research to date that focuses on the effects of homelessness on children. In matters related to health, development, and education, homeless children are at a grave disadvantage, many from birth. Policy implications are outlined, concluding that children need permanent housing if they are to thrive. (DM)

  20. The State of Homeless Children in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kabler, Brenda; Weinstein, Elana

    2009-01-01

    Across America, the numbers of homeless children and families are growing as a result of many factors including the recent economic crisis, home foreclosures, and natural disasters. Because of an increase in the number of homeless children throughout the United States, this population has unmet needs that can be targeted in school settings under…

  1. Underdiagnosis using scidr in the homeless mentally ill

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joseph J. Parks; Geri Kmetz; James Randolph Hillard

    1995-01-01

    There are a growing number of studies attempting to diagnose the degree and extent of mental illness among the homeless. Increasingly, these studies are relying on structured diagnostic interviews such as the structured clinical interview for DSM III R diagnosis (SCIDR). This study examines the sensitivity of the SCID in diagnosing major mental illness among the homeless. Comparing SCID interviews

  2. Experiential Therapy with Homeless, Runaway and Street Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kallander, Karin; Levings, Laura

    This paper describes the services and activities of the Orion Center, a drop-in day-use facility for homeless and runaway youth in Seattle (Washington). Orion Center uses experiential therapy and adventure-based activities to develop trust, promote fun and relationship building, and facilitate growth and healing among this homeless population. A…

  3. Creative Sources of Funding for Programs for Homeless Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siemon, Dorothy; Doherty, Diane M., Ed.

    This monograph was written to inform organizations working with homeless families about some potential sources of funding for their programs and to briefly describe the benefits available to homeless families. The focus throughout is exclusively on services and not on housing. Readers are guided to the major resources available through both the…

  4. The Eating Patterns and Problems of Homeless Women

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Terry Bunston; Margot Breton

    1990-01-01

    While inadequate nutrition has been identified as a factor affecting the health of the homeless, there has been little research to identify the extent to which inadequate nutrition is a problem. The goal of this paper is to document the eating patterns and problems of single homeless women and to locate the determinants of nutritional adequacy in their diets. Our

  5. What determines the spatial distribution of homeless people in Japan?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wataru Suzuki

    2008-01-01

    The number of homeless people has been increasing dramatically in Japan since the collapse of the bubble economy in the early of 1990s. This article is the first economic analysis using Geographic Information System (GIS) data to study the spatial distribution of Japan's homeless population. Results suggest that the availability of employment, public medical care and food significantly affect the

  6. Factors That Influence Willingness to Help the Homeless

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael M. Morgan; H. Wallace Goddard; Sherri Newton Givens

    1997-01-01

    Homelessness is an ongoing challenge for many families and individuals. Many struggle to meet their basic needs for food, clothing and shelter. Unfortunately, we know very little about the people who directly help homeless people meet these needs. The present study examines the relationships between empathy, religion, household income, political orientation, gender, race, and people's expressed willingness to assist the

  7. Homelessness: Its Impact on African American Children, Youth, and Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, William H.; And Others

    This paper presents findings from a 1991 study that collected descriptive data on over 209 African-American homeless children and youth in Seattle, Washington. A review of the literature indicates that disproportionate numbers of African-Americans are homeless. Discussion in the paper concerns risk factors and conditions that affect…

  8. Health Risks of Homeless AdolescentsImplications for Holistic Nursing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lynn Rew

    1996-01-01

    Although the exact number of homeless adolescents is unknown, it is estimated that this population may exceed 2 million. Literally living on the streets, homeless youth are at risk for a variety of physical, psychosocial, and spiritual health problems. Many engage in \\

  9. Prevalence and Predictors of Sexual Risks Among Homeless Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halcon, Linda L.; Lifson, Alan R.

    2004-01-01

    This study examined prevalence of sexual risks among homeless adolescents and described factors associated with those risks. Community-based outreach methods were used successfully to access this difficult-to-reach population. The sample included 203 homeless youth aged 15-22 recruited from community sites. Questionnaire items addressed…

  10. Transitions through homelessness and factors that predict them

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert G. Orwin; Chris K. Scott; Carlos Arieira

    2005-01-01

    The course of homelessness was examined among adults entering treatment in the Chicago Target Cities sample, which was aimed at improving the service delivery system in large metropolitan areas across the U.S. The objectives of the present study were: (1) Examine transitions in and out of homelessness over 3 years post entry into treatment; and (2) Determine the treatment and

  11. Homeless women and their families: Characteristics, life circumstances, and needs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mukti Khanna; Nirbhay N. Singh; Mary Nemil; Al Best; Cynthia R. Ellis

    1992-01-01

    This study investigated the needs of a sample of 100 women from shelters for the homeless in Richmond, Virginia. The women's responses to a 117-item interview were used to obtain information regarding their domicilary status, work history, educational background, family and health history, social support, reasons for homelessness, and social service needs. The results indicated that a significant number of

  12. How You Can Help Students Who Are Homeless

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curriculum Review, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Many schools are struggling with high numbers of homeless students. Some research has suggested that homeless students are often experiencing exhaustion, hunger, stress, abuse and insecurity, making socialization and learning more difficult for them than it is for their peers. This paper discusses three easy ways school professionals can help and…

  13. Feminist and Community Psychology Ethics in Research with Homeless Women

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Emily K. Paradis

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a feminist and community psychology analysis of ethical concerns that can arise throughout the process of doing research with women who are homeless. The unique contexts of the lives of women who are homeless demand that researchers redefine traditional ethical constructs such as consent, privacy, harm, and bias. Research that fails to do this may perpetuate the

  14. A Critical Moment: Child & Youth Homelessness in Our Nation's Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for the Education of Homeless Children and Youth, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The economic downturn has forced more families and youth to lose their footing, falling downward into the spiral of homelessness and jeopardizing children and youth's educational success. At the same time, a one-time increase in federal funding for school-based efforts to identify and support homeless children and youth has enabled more school…

  15. Mental Health Woes Common Among Homeless Kids, Study Finds

    MedlinePLUS

    ... sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Mental Health Woes Common Among Homeless Kids, Study Finds Exposure ... Thursday, February 19, 2015 Related MedlinePlus Pages Child Mental Health Homeless Health Concerns THURSDAY, Feb. 19, 2015 (HealthDay ...

  16. Homelessness: Programs and the People They Serve, Summary Report

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1999-01-01

    In December 1999, the department of Housing and Urban development released their "most comprehensive study ever of homelessness in America." The survey of the homeless and the social programs supporting them is offered online in three separate chunks. The Summary Report gives complete analysis of the extensive findings of the survey, including five chapters summarizing the methodology and data.

  17. Homelessness During the Transition From Foster Care to Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Napolitano, Laura; Courtney, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We estimated the incidence of homelessness during the transition to adulthood and identified the risk and protective factors that predict homelessness during this transition. Methods. Using data from the Midwest Evaluation of the Adult Functioning of Former Foster Youth, a longitudinal study of youths aging out of foster care in 3 Midwestern states, and a bounds approach, we estimated the cumulative percentage of youths who become homeless during the transition to adulthood. We also estimated a discrete time hazard model that predicted first reported episode of homelessness. Results. Youths aging out of foster care are at high risk for becoming homeless during the transition to adulthood. Between 31% and 46% of our study participants had been homeless at least once by age 26 years. Running away while in foster care, greater placement instability, being male, having a history of physical abuse, engaging in more delinquent behaviors, and having symptoms of a mental health disorder were associated with an increase in the relative risk of becoming homeless. Conclusions. Policy and practice changes are needed to reduce the risk that youths in foster care will become homeless after aging out. PMID:24148065

  18. Heart to Heart Art: Empowering Homeless Children and Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepard, Jerri; Booth, Deborah

    2009-01-01

    This article describes Heart to Heart Art, an after-school program developed for homeless children and youth at the YWCA in Spokane, Washington. Pre-service teacher candidates from a local university create meaningful activities that engage homeless students in visual art, music, drama, cooking, and community service. Heart to Heart Art was…

  19. A Repeated Observation Approach for Estimating the Street Homeless Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Brent

    2007-01-01

    Risks of life on the street caused by inclement weather, harassment, and assault threaten the unsheltered homeless population. We address some challenges of enumerating the street homeless population by testing a novel capture-recapture (CR) estimation approach that models individuals' intermittent daytime visibility. We tested walking and…

  20. Pregnancy and Sexual Health among Homeless Young Injection Drug Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathazi, Dodi; Lankenau, Stephen E.; Sanders, Bill; Bloom, Jennifer Jackson

    2009-01-01

    Research on pregnancy and sexual health among homeless youth is limited. In this study, qualitative interviews were conducted with 41 homeless young injection drug users (IDUs) in Los Angeles with a history of pregnancy. The relationship between recent pregnancy outcomes, contraception practices, housing status, substance use, utilization of…

  1. Social Networks of Homeless Youth in Emerging Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wenzel, Suzanne; Holloway, Ian; Golinelli, Daniela; Ewing, Brett; Bowman, Richard; Tucker, Joan

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the social networks of homeless youth in emerging adulthood despite the importance of this information for interventions to reduce health risks. This study examined the composition of social networks, and the risks and supports present within them, in a random sample of 349 homeless youth (33.4% female, 23.9% African…

  2. Special Schools for Homeless Students Bursting at the Seams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Michelle D.

    2011-01-01

    Monarch School is a San Diego-based public K-12 institution that exclusively serves homeless students. Begun by the San Diego County Office of Education as a drop-in center for homeless high school students, the 170-student school is now a public-private partnership between the San Diego school board and the nonprofit Monarch School Project. The…

  3. Predicting Overt and Covert Antisocial Behaviors: Parents, Peers, and Homelessness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tompsett, Carolyn J.; Toro, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Parental deviance, parental monitoring, and deviant peers were examined as predictors of overt and covert antisocial behaviors. Homeless (N=231) and housed (N=143) adolescents were assessed in adolescence and again in early adulthood. Homelessness predicted both types of antisocial behaviors, and effects persisted in young adulthood. Parental…

  4. The Impact of Homelessness on the Health of Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Rita I.; Strong, Linda

    2004-01-01

    Qualitative research using the symbolic interactionism framework and grounded theory methodology was employed to discover the perceived health problems and dangers that homeless families with children endure. Data were collected using semistructured interviews from 34 homeless volunteer participants with 87 children. An in-depth analysis of the…

  5. Homeless “squeegee kids”: Food insecurity and daily survival

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Naomi Dachner; Valerie Tarasuk

    2002-01-01

    Current knowledge about food insecurity in North America is largely based on research with low-income households. Much less is known about the food experiences of homeless people, a group who are particularly vulnerable to food insecurity. This study explored the food experiences of street youth, one of the fastest growing segments of the homeless population in Canada. To gain an

  6. Homelessness and Exclusion: Regulating public space in European Cities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joe Doherty; Volker Busch-Geertsema; Vita Karpuskiene; Eoin O'Sullivan; Ingrid Sahlin; Antonio Tosi; Agostino Petrillo

    2008-01-01

    Public space is an essential component of the daily life of homeless people, whether rough sleepers or hostel dwellers or others who are inadequately housed. During 2006 a group of researchers from the European Observatory on Homelessness2 considered the ways in which the increasing surveillance, regulation and control over public space, evident in all European cities, has impacted on the

  7. The Characteristics and Needs of Families Experiencing Homelessness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Family Homelessness (NJ1), 2011

    2011-01-01

    This fact sheet was developed to help you understand the scope, causes, and impact of homelessness on children and families. You are encouraged to use it as well as the publications cited in its footnotes as tools more about homelessness. (Contains 78 endnotes.)

  8. The Invisible Crisis: Connecting Schools with Homeless Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shields, Carolyn M.; Warke, Amy

    2010-01-01

    Children and youth represent a growing proportion of the homeless population. Using the lens of transformative leadership, this multifamily case study explores the realities of homeless children, the challenges their families face, and the role of school leaders in ensuring that they receive a quality education. It recommends that leaders (1)…

  9. Visible Voices: Literacy Identity and the Invisible Homeless

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juchniewicz, Melissa M.

    2012-01-01

    Despite calls for increased awareness of and sensitivity to diverse students and their in- and out-of-school literacies, the "invisible homeless"--those who often decline to self-identify--receive inadequate scholarly attention. They are often individuals who fear the stigma associated with homelessness as they navigate workplace, academic, and…

  10. Teaching science with homeless children: Pedagogy, representation, and identity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Angela Calabrese Barton

    1998-01-01

    In this article, I explore the question of what it means to create a science for all from the vantage point of urban homeless children. I draw on the work of critical and feminist scholars in science and education, as well as my own teaching and research with urban homeless children, to question how inclusive the science education community is

  11. Homeless Families' Education Networks: An Examination of Access and Mobilization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Peter M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study sought deeper understanding of how sheltered families accessed and mobilized educationally related relationships and resources during periods of homelessness. Such work is posited to be especially relevant considering that there is a growing crisis of family homelessness in the United States and school- and community-based…

  12. A Critical Analysis of the Research on Student Homelessness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Peter M.

    2011-01-01

    Since the onset of the economic recession, rates of student homelessness have increased rapidly in urban, suburban, and rural school districts throughout the United States. Despite the widespread urgency of the issue, there is a lack of general coherence in the research about how diverse conditions of homelessness affect students and how schools…

  13. Spaces of Trauma: Young People, Homelessness and Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Lucinda

    2012-01-01

    Little contemporary research has examined young people's experiences of violence and homelessness in detail within the Australian context. This article draws upon qualitative research with 33 homeless youth in Melbourne and seeks to enhance understanding of the impact of violence on young people. It argues that everyday experiences of violence…

  14. Substance Use and Health and Safety among Homeless Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhule-Louie, Dana M.; Bowen, Sarah; Baer, John S.; Peterson, Peggy L.

    2008-01-01

    This study examines how substance use is associated with the health and safety of homeless youth using cross-sectional, self-report data from 285 homeless adolescents. Path models were used to examine concurrent relationships between youth's substance use and multiple aspects of their health and safety, including measures of psychological…

  15. 24 CFR 578.57 - Homeless Management Information System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Homeless Management Information System. 578.57 Section...Eligible Costs § 578.57 Homeless Management Information System. (a) Eligible...to establish and operate a comparable database that complies with HUD's HMIS...

  16. 24 CFR 578.57 - Homeless Management Information System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Homeless Management Information System. 578.57 Section...Eligible Costs § 578.57 Homeless Management Information System. (a) Eligible...to establish and operate a comparable database that complies with HUD's HMIS...

  17. Homeless and Special Education Administrative Collaboration: Recommendations. Policy Forum Proceedings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Diana; Burdette, Paula; Julianelle, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    Project Forum at the National Association of State Directors of Special Education (NASDSE) and the National Center for Homeless Education (NCHE) worked together to collect information regarding the need for a policy forum on the topic of administrative collaboration between school personnel who support homeless education under the McKinney-Vento…

  18. Deja Vu: Family Homelessness in New York City.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute for Children and Poverty, New York, NY.

    This report describes family homelessness in New York City, which has risen sharply since 1980. Currently, the City's family shelter system is at capacity. Homeless children are typically raised by single mothers who receive no child support, are 27 years old, are unemployed and receiving welfare, and have had at least one public assistance…

  19. Water and wastewater feasibility study -- Bayview, VA

    SciTech Connect

    Amthor, S.B.; Bull, P.

    1999-07-01

    The Water and Wastewater Feasibility Study--Bayview, VA explored potable water supply and distribution alternatives and wastewater collection, treatment, and disposal alternatives for the planned community of Bayview, Virginia. Emphasis was placed on technologies that met environmental regulations and that were easy to operate and maintain. Three potable water alternatives--a community water system, private water systems and connection to nearby Cape Charles' water distribution system--and four wastewater alternatives--individual wastewater systems, a community wastewater system, conventional septic tanks and drainfields, and connection to Cape Charles' wastewater system--were evaluated. The recommended potable water option is a community system which will use deep wells and provide water storage. The recommended wastewater alternative is conventional septic tanks and drainfields.

  20. Adherence to HIV treatment and care among previously homeless jail detainees

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Nadine E.; Meyer, Jaimie P.; Avery, Ann K.; Draine, Jeffrey; Flanigan, Timothy P.; Lincoln, Thomas; Spaulding, Anne C.; Springer, Sandra A.; Altice, Frederick L.

    2011-01-01

    HIV-infected persons entering the criminal justice system (CJS) often experience suboptimal healthcare system engagement and social instability, including homelessness. We evaluated surveys from a multisite study of 743 HIV-infected jail detainees prescribed or eligible for antiretroviral therapy (ART) to understand correlates of healthcare engagement prior to incarceration, focusing on differences by housing status. Dependent variables of healthcare engagement were: 1) having an HIV provider, 2) taking ART, and 3) being adherent (>95% of prescribed doses) to ART during the week before incarceration. Homeless subjects, compared to their housed counterparts, were significantly less likely to be engaged in healthcare using any measure. Despite Ryan White funding availability, insurance coverage remains insufficient among those entering jails, and having health insurance was the most significant factor correlated with having an HIV provider and taking ART. Individuals interfacing with the CJS, especially those unstably housed, need innovative interventions to facilitate healthcare access and retention. PMID:22065234

  1. Death, drugs, and disaster: mortality among New Orleans' homeless.

    PubMed

    Rayburn, Rachel L; Pals, Heili; Wright, James D

    2012-01-01

    Tracking homeless individuals over time has proved to be extremely difficult; thus, only limited longitudinal data on the homeless exist. We analyze longitudinal data originally collected from the New Orleans Homeless Substance Abusers Program in 1991-1993, supplemented with mortality data for the same sample by year 2010. We use social bonding theory to examine the effect of conventional social ties on mortality among a sample of substance abusing homeless people. This is of special concern when researching the older homeless persons. We find that social bonding theory does not help to understand mortality among this population. However, alcohol abuse, as compared to crack cocaine, does increase the likelihood of early mortality. PMID:22616445

  2. 78 FR 42455 - Medications Prescribed by Non-VA Providers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-16

    ...Veterans Nursing Home Care; 64.011, Veterans Dental Care; 64.012, Veterans Prescription Service; 64.013, Veterans Prosthetic Appliances; 64.014, Veterans State Domiciliary Care; 64.015, Veterans State Nursing Home Care; 64.018,...

  3. Personal Resources and Homelessness in Early Life: Predictors of Depression in Consumers of Homeless MultiService Centers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bruce R. DeForge; John R. Belcher; Michael ORourke; Michael A. Lindsey

    2008-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between personal resources and previous adverse life events such as homelessness and depression. Participants were recruited from two church sponsored multisite social service centers in Anne Arundel County, Maryland. The interview included demographics and several standardized scales to assess history of homelessness, medical history, personal resources, and depressive symptoms. A hierarchical multiple regression analysis revealed

  4. The VA-Medical School Partnership: The Medical School Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersdorf, Robert G.

    1987-01-01

    Issues in the relationship between the Veterans' Administration (VA) and medical schools are discussed, including VA faculty recruitment and retention, ambulatory care in VA teaching hospitals, governance and growth of research within VA medical centers, and effects of cost containment and competition on teaching and training in VA hospitals. (MSE)

  5. OU Veterans Association (OU-VA) Student Handbook / Educational Benefits

    E-print Network

    Oklahoma, University of

    OU Veterans Association (OU-VA) Student Handbook / Educational Benefits VA Educational Benefits for a particular chapter of VA Educational Benefits. Only the VA can determine eligibility. OU-Veterans Affairs.) (405) 325-2240 ~ E-mail: va@ou.edu Veterans Administration - Regional Office PO Box 8888 Muskogee, OK

  6. Personal Resources and Homelessness in Early Life: Predictors of Depression in Consumers of Homeless Multiservice Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeForge, Bruce R.; Belcher, John R.; O'Rourke, Michael; Lindsey, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between personal resources and previous adverse life events such as homelessness and depression. Participants were recruited from two church sponsored multisite social service centers in Anne Arundel County, Maryland. The interview included demographics and several standardized scales to assess history of…

  7. Trajectories of risk behaviors and exiting homelessness among newly homeless adolescents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Norweeta G. Milburn; Li-Jung Liang; Sung-Jae Lee; Mary Jane Rotheram-Borus

    2009-01-01

    Using cluster analysis techniques, we identified two distinct clusters of newly homeless adolescents in Los Angeles (n = 261): those who are protected and doing relatively well while out of home with more protective than risk factors, and those who are risky with more risk than protective factors. The objective of this study was to examine the trajectories of human

  8. Maximizing Credit Accrual and Recovery for Homeless Students. Best Practices in Homeless Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Homeless Education at SERVE, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Middle and high school students experiencing homelessness often face challenges in accruing credits. Class offerings, methods of calculating credits, and graduation requirements can vary greatly among school districts. Students who change schools late in high school can find themselves suddenly in danger of not graduating due to differing class…

  9. Utility of the Behavioral Model in Predicting Service Utilization by Individuals Suffering from Severe Mental Illness and Homelessness

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matthew R. Lemming; Robert J. Calsyn

    2004-01-01

    This study compared the effectiveness of the behavioral model to predict two service utilization variables: case manager visits and total services used. Nearly 4000 individuals who were homeless and suffered from severe mental illness provided data for the study. Enabling variables explained more variance of both service utilization variables than predisposing or need variables. Social support from professionals was the

  10. Clearing the Path to School Success for Students in Out-of-Home Care. Best Practices in Homeless Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Homeless Education at SERVE, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Legal Center for Foster Care and Education and the National Center for Homeless Education present this guide to help educators and child welfare advocates clear the path to school success for children and youth who are forced to leave their homes due to abuse, neglect, and family dysfunction. Two federal laws, among others, provide tools to…

  11. Monetary Incentives to Reinforce Engagement and Achievement in a Job-Skills Training Program for Homeless, Unemployed Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koffarnus, Mikhail N.; Wong, Conrad J.; Fingerhood, Michael; Svikis, Dace S.; Bigelow, George E.; Silverman, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    The current study examined whether monetary incentives could increase engagement and achievement in a job-skills training program for unemployed, homeless, alcohol-dependent adults. Participants (n?=?124) were randomized to a no-reinforcement group (n?=?39), during which access to the training program was provided but no incentives were given; a…

  12. Mother\\/Child Interaction Among Homeless Women and Their Children in a Public Night Shelter in Atlanta, Georgia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nancy A. Boxill; Anita L. Beaty

    1990-01-01

    Public night shelters across the nation serve as a temporary resting place for hundreds of thousands of homeless families. In this article the delicate and important dyad of mother and child is described as observed in one such shelter. Through participant\\/observation the authors provide a look at the impact that circumstance may have on the nature and quality of mother\\/child

  13. Homeless is What I Am, Not Who I Am”: Insights from an Inner-City Brisbane Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cameron Parsell

    2010-01-01

    This article argues that some homelessness literature has tended to place too great an emphasis on homelessness as a defining characteristic of people who are homeless. As such, ‘homeless people’ are not only defined as the ‘other’ based on what they lack, but they have become depersonalised. This misconception may have been facilitated by research that has considered homelessness an

  14. 38 CFR 61.81 - Outreach activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VA HOMELESS PROVIDERS GRANT AND PER DIEM PROGRAM § 61.81 Outreach...provided assistance. Accordingly, a recipient should search for homeless veterans at places such as shelters, soup kitchens,...

  15. Haemophilia utilization group study - Part Va (HUGS Va): design, methods and baseline data.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Z-Y; Wu, J; Baker, J; Curtis, R; Forsberg, A; Huszti, H; Koerper, M; Lou, M; Miller, R; Parish, K; Riske, B; Shapiro, A; Ullman, M; Johnson, K

    2011-09-01

    To describe the study design, procedures and baseline characteristics of the Haemophilia Utilization Group Study - Part Va (HUGS Va), a US multi-center observational study evaluating the cost of care and burden of illness in persons with factor VIII deficiency. Patients with factor VIII level ? 30%, age 2-64 years, receiving treatment at one of six federally supported haemophilia treatment centres (HTCs) were enrolled in the study. Participants completed an initial interview including questions on socio-demographical characteristics, health insurance status, co-morbidities, access to care, haemophilia treatment regimen, factor utilization, self-reported joint pain and motion limitation and health-related quality of life. A periodic follow-up survey collected data regarding time lost from usual activities, disability days, health care utilization and outcomes of care. HTC clinicians documented participants' baseline clinical characteristics and pharmacy dispensing records for 2 years. Between July 2005 and July 2007, 329 participants were enrolled. Average age was 9.7 years for children and 33.5 years for adults; two-thirds had severe haemophilia. The distributions of age, marital status, education level and barriers to haemophilia care were relatively consistent across haemophilic severity categories. Differences were found in participants' employment status, insurance status and income. Overall, children with haemophilia had quality of life scores comparable to healthy counterparts. Adults had significantly lower physical functioning than the general US population. As one of the largest economic studies of haemophilia care, HUGS Va will provide detailed information regarding the burden of illness and health care utilization in the US haemophilia A population. PMID:21689212

  16. Estimating the costs of VA ambulatory care.

    PubMed

    Phibbs, Ciaran S; Bhandari, Aman; Yu, Wei; Barnett, Paul G

    2003-09-01

    This article reports how we matched Common Procedure Terminology (CPT) codes with Medicare payment rates and aggregate Veterans Affairs (VA) budget data to estimate the costs of every VA ambulatory encounter. Converting CPT codes to encounter-level costs was more complex than a simple match of Medicare reimbursements to CPT codes. About 40 percent of the CPT codes used in VA, representing about 20 percent of procedures, did not have a Medicare payment rate and required other cost estimates. Reconciling aggregated estimated costs to the VA budget allocations for outpatient care produced final VA cost estimates that were lower than projected Medicare reimbursements. The methods used to estimate costs for encounters could be replicated for other settings. They are potentially useful for any system that does not generate billing data, when CPT codes are simpler to collect than billing data, or when there is a need to standardize cost estimates across data sources. PMID:15095546

  17. A randomized control trial of a chronic care intervention for homeless women with alcohol use problems.

    PubMed

    Upshur, Carole; Weinreb, Linda; Bharel, Monica; Reed, George; Frisard, Christine

    2015-04-01

    A clinician-randomized trial was conducted using the chronic care model for disease management for alcohol use problems among n=82 women served in a health care for the homeless clinic. Women with problem alcohol use received either usual care or an intervention consisting of a primary care provider (PCP) brief intervention, referral to addiction services, and on-going support from a care manager (CM) for 6months. Both groups significantly reduced their alcohol consumption, with a small effect size favoring intervention at 3months, but there were no significant differences between groups in reductions in drinking or in housing stability, or mental or physical health. However, intervention women had significantly more frequent participation in substance use treatment services. Baseline differences and small sample size limit generalizability, although substantial reductions in drinking for both groups suggest that screening and PCP brief treatment are promising interventions for homeless women with alcohol use problems. PMID:25488504

  18. Methods for successful follow-up of elusive urban populations: an ethnographic approach with homeless men.

    PubMed Central

    Conover, S.; Berkman, A.; Gheith, A.; Jahiel, R.; Stanley, D.; Geller, P. A.; Valencia, E.; Susser, E.

    1997-01-01

    Public health is paying increasing attention to elusive urban populations such as the homeless, street drug users, and illegal immigrants. Yet, valid data on the health of these populations remain scarce; longitudinal research, in particular, has been hampered by poor follow-up rates. This paper reports on the follow-up methods used in two randomized clinical trials among one such population, namely, homeless men with mental illness. Each of the two trials achieved virtually complete follow-up over 18 months. The authors describe the ethnographic approach to follow-up used in these trials and elaborate its application to four components of the follow-up: training interviewers, tracking participants, administering the research office, and conducting assessments. The ethnographic follow-up method is adaptable to other studies and other settings, and may provide a replicable model for achieving high follow-up rates in urban epidemiologic studies. PMID:9211004

  19. The Social and Treatment Consequences of a Shared Delusional Disorder in a Homeless Family

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Erwin

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Delusional disorder is defined as a fixed, false belief that is held by a person despite evidence to the contrary. Shared psychotic disorder, also known as folie a' deux, psychosis by association and induced psychotic disorder, is an uncommon and unique psychiatric disorder. It is even more unusual when it occurs within families (folie a' famille). Case Presentation: This case report describes the occurrence of a shared delusion within a family consisting of an adults on and two elderly parents. The shared delusion, which was the belief that a large financial settlement was a waiting to be disbursed to the family members by the local law enforcement agency, contributed to their state of homelessness and rejection of all offers of assistance from service providers. Conclusion: The impact of this shared psychotic disorder contributed to the family's state of extreme poverty and homelessness, which, as a consequence, greatly impeded the initiation of evidence-based therapeutic interventions. PMID:21637634

  20. Homeless teen mothers: social and psychological aspects

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anne Lise Silveira Scappaticci; Sergio Luis Blay

    2009-01-01

    Aims  This study proposes to investigate the life contexts and experiences of motherhood among homeless adolescents and their relation\\u000a with the “uncertainty reduction” theory.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Subjects and Methods  A total of 21 teens, living in eight temporary shelters in the city of São Paulo, were intentionally selected. In-depth, face-to-face\\u000a semi-structured interviews were subsequently conducted. The study was performed by means of qualitative methodology.

  1. Rights and Responsibilities of VA Patients and Residents of Community Living Centers

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Veterans Health Administration Rights and Responsibilities of VA Patients and Residents of Community Living Centers The Veterans ... health care. We will provide you with personalized, patient-driven, compassionate, state-of-the-art care. Our ...

  2. Memory impairment among people who are homeless: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ennis, Naomi; Roy, Sylvain; Topolovec-Vranic, Jane

    2015-07-01

    Cognitive impairment may interfere with an individual's ability to function independently in the community and may increase the risk of becoming and remaining homeless. The purpose of this study was to systematically review the literature on memory deficits among people who are homeless in order to gain a better understanding of its nature, causes and prevalence. Studies that measured memory functioning as an outcome among a sample of homeless persons were included. Data on sampling, outcome measures, facet of memory explored and prevalence of memory impairment were extracted from all selected research studies. Included studies were evaluated using a critical appraisal process targetted for reviewing prevalance studies. Eleven studies were included in the review. Verbal memory was the most commonly studied facet of memory. Potential contributing factors to memory deficits among persons who are homeless were explored in seven studies. Memory deficits were common among the samples of homeless persons studied. However, there was a great deal of variation in the methodology and quality of the included studies. Conceptualisations of "homelessness" also differed across studies. There is a need for more controlled research using validated neuropsychological tools to evaluate memory impairment among people who are homeless. PMID:24912102

  3. A Case Study of the Life Experiences of High School Graduates/General Education Development (GED) Recipients in Texas Who Experienced Homelessness During Their Public School Education

    E-print Network

    Reider, Ruth Ann

    2012-07-16

    ) Homeless Youth ........... 35 Teenage Pregnancy and Homelessness .............. 39 Post-Katrina New Orleans ................................. 41 Human Trafficking ............................................ 45 Street Life...

  4. 77 FR 67063 - VA Directive 0005 on Scientific Integrity

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-08

    ...Register notice announces the adoption of the Department of Veterans...employees, including VA scientists, managers, supervisors, visiting scientists, political appointees...thereby including all VA scientists, managers,...

  5. Homelessness and Children's Use of Mental Health Services: A Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung Min; Metraux, Stephen; Culhane, Dennis P; Mandell, David S

    2012-01-01

    This study examined whether children who become homeless differ from other low-income children in their mental health service use before and after their first homeless episode, and to what extent homelessness is associated with an increased likelihood of mental health service use. Differences between children with and without new onset of sheltered homelessness in the use of mental health services emerged following homelessness and widened over time. Sheltered homelessness and foster care placement history were associated with increased odds of receiving inpatient and ambulatory mental health services. Findings underscore the importance of collaborations between homeless assistance, foster care, and mental healthcare in efforts to mitigate family homelessness and collateral needs among homeless children. PMID:22523439

  6. Homelessness and Children’s Use of Mental Health Services: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Metraux, Stephen; Culhane, Dennis P.; Mandell, David S.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined whether children who become homeless differ from other low-income children in their mental health service use before and after their first homeless episode, and to what extent homelessness is associated with an increased likelihood of mental health service use. Differences between children with and without new onset of sheltered homelessness in the use of mental health services emerged following homelessness and widened over time. Sheltered homelessness and foster care placement history were associated with increased odds of receiving inpatient and ambulatory mental health services. Findings underscore the importance of collaborations between homeless assistance, foster care, and mental healthcare in efforts to mitigate family homelessness and collateral needs among homeless children. PMID:22523439

  7. Mercer Veterinary Clinic for the Pets of the Homeless How to Obtain Eligibility for Mercer Veterinary Clinic for the Pets of the Homeless

    E-print Network

    Schladow, S. Geoffrey

    Mercer Veterinary Clinic for the Pets of the Homeless How to Obtain Eligibility for Mercer Veterinary Clinic for the Pets of the Homeless: Utilize Loaves and Fishes services without spending the night a. Fill out this form in full to serve as verification of living homeless b. Ensure the signature

  8. Unaccompanied, Unidentified and Uncounted: Developing Strategies to Meet the Needs of America's Homeless Youth. Issue Brief on the Education of Unaccompanied Homeless Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appleseed, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Unaccompanied homeless youth appear to be one of the fastest growing and most vulnerable segments of the larger homeless population, but flawed information-gathering by government entities makes it impossible to be sure. This issue brief examines reasons why the plight of unaccompanied homeless youth is not fully captured through current models of…

  9. Risk to Resilience : : Exploring Protective Factors for Students Experiencing Homelessness at a Traditional High School and a Modified Comprehensive School

    E-print Network

    Garcia, Joel Romero

    and youth experiencing homelessness: The McKinney-Vento act andHomeless Children and Youth in 1987—the act was reauthorizedand youth program: Title VII-B of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act.

  10. 45 CFR 1351.15 - What costs are supportable under a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...What costs are supportable under a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant? 1351.15 Section...FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.15 What...

  11. 41 CFR 102-75.1210 - What action must be taken on properties determined unsuitable for homeless assistance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...on properties determined unsuitable for homeless assistance? 102-75.1210 Section...of Federal Real Property to Assist the Homeless Unsuitable Properties § 102-75...on properties determined unsuitable for homeless assistance? The landholding...

  12. 45 CFR 1351.20 - What are the additional requirements under a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...additional requirements under a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant? 1351.20 Section...AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Additional Requirements...additional requirements under a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant? (a) To...

  13. 45 CFR 1351.18 - What criteria has HHS established for deciding which Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...HHS established for deciding which Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant applications to fund...FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.18 What...

  14. 45 CFR 1351.12 - Who gets priority for the award of a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...gets priority for the award of a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant? 1351.12 Section...FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.12 Who...

  15. 45 CFR 1351.18 - What criteria has HHS established for deciding which Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...HHS established for deciding which Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant applications to fund...FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.18 What...

  16. 24 CFR 585.310 - Project-related restrictions applicable to Youthbuild transitional housing for the homeless.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...Youthbuild transitional housing for the homeless. 585.310 Section 585.310 ...Youthbuild transitional housing for the homeless. Where the award of a Youthbuild...title IV of the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act). (2) The...

  17. 45 CFR 1351.16 - What costs are not allowable under a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...What costs are not allowable under a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant? 1351.16 Section...FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.16 What...

  18. 41 CFR 102-75.1210 - What action must be taken on properties determined unsuitable for homeless assistance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...on properties determined unsuitable for homeless assistance? 102-75.1210 Section...of Federal Real Property to Assist the Homeless Unsuitable Properties § 102-75...on properties determined unsuitable for homeless assistance? The landholding...

  19. 45 CFR 1351.12 - Who gets priority for the award of a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...gets priority for the award of a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant? 1351.12 Section...FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.12 Who...

  20. 45 CFR 1351.18 - What criteria has HHS established for deciding which Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...HHS established for deciding which Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant applications to fund...FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.18 What...