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Sample records for va homeless providers

  1. 76 FR 48204 - Fund Availability Under VA's Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-08

    ... availability of funds for currently operational fiscal year (FY) 2009 VA Grant and Per Diem Special Need Grant Recipients in conjunction with their collaborative VA Special Need partners and currently operational VA... under VA's Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program for FY 2009 operational Grant and Per...

  2. 78 FR 48543 - Veterans Health Administration Fund Availability Under the VA's Homeless Providers Grant and Per...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-08

    ... Veterans Affairs (VA) is announcing the availability of 1-year renewal funding for currently operational... Special Need partners and currently operational VA GPD Special Need Grant Recipients which do not involve... under VA's Homeless Providers GPD Program for FY 2011 operational GPD Special Need grant recipients...

  3. 75 FR 3970 - Fund Availability Under the VA Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-25

    ... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. Chelsea Watson, VA Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program... and per diem applicants. Dated: January 13, 2010. John R. Gingrich, Chief of Staff, Department of... if the applicant scores at least 500 cumulative points from paragraphs (b), (c), (d), (e), and (i)...

  4. 75 FR 3968 - Fund Availability Under the VA Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-25

    ... not funded. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. Chelsea Watson, VA Homeless Providers Grant and Per... funds available for other grant and per diem applicants. Dated: January 11, 2010. John R. Gingrich... points under the criteria in paragraphs (b), (c), (d), (e) and (i) of Sec. 61.13. The...

  5. 78 FR 12600 - VA Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-25

    ... and dealing with mental health issues, including substance use. Other related VA programs that offer... professions, Health records, Homeless, Mental health programs, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements... a diagnosis from a licensed mental health professional, with at least one documented...

  6. 78 FR 28947 - Fund Availability Under VA's Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program (VANS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-16

    ... veteran participants for currently operational Grant and Per Diem grantee projects funded under VA's... Grant and Per Diem Program for current operational Grant and Per Diem grantees seeking to purchase a van... operational grant project number may be awarded. However, in the one allowable application, if the grantee...

  7. 78 FR 28949 - Fund Availability Under VA's Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program (Rehabilitation)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-16

    ..., applicants must be operational and therefore have previously provided documentation of Accounting System... announcing the availability of funds for assistance to rehabilitate currently operational Grant and Per Diem... for current operational Grant and Per Diem grantees to rehabilitate their Grant and Per Diem...

  8. VA Health Service Utilization for Homeless and Low-income Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Gabrielian, Sonya; Yuan, Anita H.; Andersen, Ronald M.; Rubenstein, Lisa V.; Gelberg, Lillian

    2016-01-01

    Background The US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)-VA Supportive Housing (VASH) program—the VA’s Housing First effort—is central to efforts to end Veteran homelessness. Yet, little is known about health care utilization patterns associated with achieving HUD-VASH housing. Objectives We compare health service utilization at the VA Greater Los Angeles among: (1) formerly homeless Veterans housed through HUD-VASH (HUD-VASH Veterans); (2) currently homeless Veterans; (3) housed, low-income Veterans not in HUD-VASH; and (4) housed, not low-income Veterans. Research Design We performed a secondary database analysis of Veterans (n = 62,459) who received VA Greater Los Angeles care between October 1, 2010 and September 30, 2011. We described medical/surgical and mental health utilization [inpatient, outpatient, and emergency department (ED)]. We controlled for demographics, need, and primary care use in regression analyses of utilization data by housing and income status. Results HUD-VASH Veterans had more inpatient, outpatient, and ED use than currently homeless Veterans. Adjusting for demographics and need, HUD-VASH Veterans and the low-income housed Veterans had similar likelihoods of medical/surgical inpatient and outpatient utilization, compared with the housed, not low-income group. Adjusting first for demographics and need (model 1), then also for primary care use (model 2), HUD-VASH Veterans had the greatest decrease in incident rates of specialty medical/surgical, mental health, and ED care from models 1 to 2, becoming similar to the currently homeless, compared with the housed, not low-income group. Conclusions Our findings suggest that currently homeless Veterans underuse health care relative to housed Veterans. HUD-VASH may address this disparity by providing housing and linkages to primary care. PMID:24714583

  9. Identifying Homelessness among Veterans Using VA Administrative Data: Opportunities to Expand Detection Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Rachel; Gundlapalli, Adi V.; Metraux, Stephen; Carter, Marjorie E.; Palmer, Miland; Redd, Andrew; Samore, Matthew H.; Fargo, Jamison D.

    2015-01-01

    Researchers at the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) have used administrative criteria to identify homelessness among U.S. Veterans. Our objective was to explore the use of these codes in VA health care facilities. We examined VA health records (2002-2012) of Veterans recently separated from the military and identified as homeless using VA conventional identification criteria (ICD-9-CM code V60.0, VA specific codes for homeless services), plus closely allied V60 codes indicating housing instability. Logistic regression analyses examined differences between Veterans who received these codes. Health care services and co-morbidities were analyzed in the 90 days post-identification of homelessness. VA conventional criteria identified 21,021 homeless Veterans from Operations Enduring Freedom, Iraqi Freedom, and New Dawn (rate 2.5%). Adding allied V60 codes increased that to 31,260 (rate 3.3%). While certain demographic differences were noted, Veterans identified as homeless using conventional or allied codes were similar with regards to utilization of homeless, mental health, and substance abuse services, as well as co-morbidities. Differences were noted in the pattern of usage of homelessness-related diagnostic codes in VA facilities nation-wide. Creating an official VA case definition for homelessness, which would include additional ICD-9-CM and other administrative codes for VA homeless services, would likely allow improved identification of homeless and at-risk Veterans. This also presents an opportunity for encouraging uniformity in applying these codes in VA facilities nationwide as well as in other large health care organizations. PMID:26172386

  10. Homeless and nonhomeless VA service users likely eligible for Medicaid expansion.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jack; Rosenheck, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    Administrative data on the population of Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) service users in 2010 under the age of 65 (n = 3,841,225) were analyzed to identify the number and characteristics of homeless and nonhomeless VA service users who are likely to be eligible for the Medicaid expansion (LEME) option under the Affordable Care Act. Results showed that, estimating conservatively, about 1.2 million (21%) current VA users are LEME if all states implement the expansion. Homeless service users were twice as likely to be eligible than nonhomeless users (64% vs 30%). VA service users who are LEME, regardless of housing status, were physically healthier than those not LEME but were more likely to have substance use disorders and posttraumatic stress disorder. These findings suggest that many VA service users are LEME, particularly those who are homeless and/or have mental health needs. Cross-system use of VA and Medicaid-funded services may be advantageous for veterans with extensive medical and psychiatric needs but also risks fragmented care. Information and education for VA clinicians and their patients about possible implications of the Affordable Care Act may be important. PMID:25358031

  11. VA Disability Compensation and Money Spent on Substance Use Among Homeless Veterans: A Controversial Association

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Jack; Rosenheck, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective There has long been concern that public support payments are used to support addictive behaviors. This study examined the amount of money homeless veterans spend on alcohol and drugs and the association between public support income, including VA disability compensation, and expenditures on alcohol and drugs. Methods Data were from 1,160 veterans from 19 sites on entry into the Housing and Urban Development–Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing program. Descriptive statistics and nonparametric analyses were conducted. Results About 33% of veterans reported spending money on alcohol and 22% reported spending money on drugs in the past month. No significant association was found between public support income, VA disability compensation, and money spent on alcohol and drugs. Conclusions A substantial proportion of homeless veterans spend some income on alcohol and drugs, but disability income, including VA compensation, does not seem to be related to substance use or money spent on addictive substances. PMID:25726979

  12. 7 CFR 272.9 - Approval of homeless meal providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Approval of homeless meal providers. 272.9 Section 272.9 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOOD STAMP AND FOOD DISTRIBUTION PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS FOR PARTICIPATING...

  13. 7 CFR 272.9 - Approval of homeless meal providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Approval of homeless meal providers. 272.9 Section 272.9 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOOD STAMP AND FOOD DISTRIBUTION PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS FOR PARTICIPATING...

  14. 7 CFR 272.9 - Approval of homeless meal providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Approval of homeless meal providers. 272.9 Section 272.9 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOOD STAMP AND FOOD DISTRIBUTION PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS FOR PARTICIPATING...

  15. 7 CFR 272.9 - Approval of homeless meal providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Approval of homeless meal providers. 272.9 Section 272.9 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOOD STAMP AND FOOD DISTRIBUTION PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS FOR PARTICIPATING...

  16. 7 CFR 272.9 - Approval of homeless meal providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Approval of homeless meal providers. 272.9 Section 272.9 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOOD STAMP AND FOOD DISTRIBUTION PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS FOR PARTICIPATING...

  17. 38 CFR 63.10 - Selection of non-VA community-based providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) HEALTH CARE FOR HOMELESS VETERANS (HCHV) PROGRAM § 63.10 Selection of non-VA... in 48 CFR chapters 1 and 8. Such contracts will be awarded only after the quality, effectiveness and... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Selection of...

  18. 38 CFR 63.10 - Selection of non-VA community-based providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) HEALTH CARE FOR HOMELESS VETERANS (HCHV) PROGRAM § 63.10 Selection of non-VA... in 48 CFR chapters 1 and 8. Such contracts will be awarded only after the quality, effectiveness and... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Selection of...

  19. 38 CFR 63.10 - Selection of non-VA community-based providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... in 48 CFR chapters 1 and 8. Such contracts will be awarded only after the quality, effectiveness and safety of the applicant's program and facilities have been ascertained to VA's satisfaction, and then... VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) HEALTH CARE FOR HOMELESS VETERANS (HCHV) PROGRAM § 63.10 Selection of...

  20. Providing smoking cessation programs to homeless youth: the perspective of service providers.

    PubMed

    Shadel, William G; Tucker, Joan S; Mullins, Leslie; Staplefoote, Lynette

    2014-10-01

    There is almost no information available on cigarette smoking among homeless youth, whether they are currently receiving services for smoking cessation, and how to best help them quit. This paper presents data collected from a series of semi-structured telephone interviews with service providers from 23 shelters and drop-in centers serving homeless youth in Los Angeles County about their current smoking cessation programming, interest in providing smoking cessation services to their clients, potential barriers to providing this service, and ways to overcome these barriers. Results indicated that 84% of facilities did not offer smoking cessation services, although nearly all (91%) were interested in doing so. Barriers to implementing formal smoking cessation programs on site included lack of resources (e.g., money, personnel) to support the programs, staff training, and concern that smoking cessation may not be a high priority for homeless youth themselves. Overall, service providers seemed to prefer a less intensive smoking cessation program that could be delivered at their site by existing staff. Data from this formative needs assessment will be useful for developing and evaluating a smoking cessation treatment that could be integrated into the busy, complex environment that characterizes agencies that serve homeless youth. PMID:25012554

  1. Providing Lifelines for Our Nation's Homeless Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffield, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses educational challenges for homeless children and explains how districts can and must meet their needs. According to the U.S. Department of Education Federal Data Collection, 1,065,794 homeless children and youth were enrolled in public schools for the school year 2010-2011, the highest number on record. After listing…

  2. Increasing School Stability for Students Experiencing Homelessness: Overcoming Challenges to Providing Transportation to the School of Origin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Diana; Barksdale, Katina

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this monograph is to review the provisions of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act as related to the provision of transportation of homeless children and youth to their school of origin and provide recommendations for implementing the transportation mandate. The National Center for Homeless Education (NCHE) in 2003-2004…

  3. 78 FR 42455 - Medications Prescribed by Non-VA Providers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-16

    ... Administrative practice and procedure, Alcohol abuse, Alcoholism, Claims, Day care, Dental health, Drug abuse... section to read as follows: Sec. 17.96 Medication prescribed by non-VA physicians. * * * * * (a) * * *...

  4. 78 FR 26250 - Payment for Home Health Services and Hospice Care to Non-VA Providers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-06

    ... November 21, 2011 (76 FR 71920), VA proposed to amend its regulations concerning the billing methodology... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 17 RIN 2900-AN98 Payment for Home Health Services and Hospice Care to Non-VA Providers... services and hospice care. Because the newly applicable methodology cannot supersede rates for which VA...

  5. Communication between VA providers and sexual and gender minority veterans: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Michelle D; Kauth, Michael R; Shipherd, Jillian C; Street, Richard L

    2014-05-01

    Approximately one million gay and lesbian Americans are veterans, and rates of engagement in the Veterans Affairs (VA) health care system may be increasing for both sexual and gender minority veterans. Very little research has examined the experience of these veterans when receiving care at VA health care facilities. The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences, beliefs, and preferences of lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT) veterans in their communication with VA health care providers. LGBT veterans (n = 58) participated in focus groups or individual interviews and completed self-report measures at two southern VA hospitals. Approximately 2/3 of veterans report that none of their VA providers have specifically asked about their sexual orientation, and 24% of the veterans indicate that they have not disclosed their orientation to any VA provider. Although some veterans want providers to initiate these discussions, veterans also expressed fears about disclosure and its possible negative consequences. Similarly, LGBT veterans report varied opinions about the appropriateness of routine assessment of minority status. Only 28% of these veterans experience VA as welcoming to them as LGBT veterans. Systematic training is needed for all VA providers about the rationale for assessing sexual and gender orientation. Staff education should include specific skills for initiating these assessments, and ways of responding to veteran concerns about discussing this topic in the VA health care system. PMID:24588107

  6. College Access and Success for Students Experiencing Homelessness: A Toolkit for Educators and Service Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dukes, Christina

    2013-01-01

    This toolkit serves as a comprehensive resource on the issue of higher education access and success for homeless students, including information on understanding homeless students, assisting homeless students in choosing a school, helping homeless students pay for application-related expenses, assisting homeless students in finding financial aid…

  7. The Education of Homeless Children: Rules, Rights and Practical Solutions. A Training Manual for Shelter Providers, Staff, Advocates and Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heybach, Laurene M.; Nix-Hodes, Patricia; Price, Sarah

    These training materials provide advocates with the tools needed to help families obtain a stable and effective education for their children despite the condition of homelessness and the trauma that accompanies it. Nine sections include: (1) "Introduction"; (2) "How Mobility Hurts Homeless Children and Schools"; (3) "Laws and Rules Governing the…

  8. Provider views of harm reduction versus abstinence policies within homeless services for dually diagnosed adults

    PubMed Central

    Padgett, Deborah K.; Tiderington, Emmy

    2013-01-01

    Harm reduction is considered by many to be a legitimate alternative to abstinence-based services for dually diagnosed individuals, yet there is limited understanding of how varying approaches affect front-line practice within supportive housing services for homeless adults. This paper examines how front-line providers working with individuals who have experienced homelessness, serious mental illness, and addiction view policies of harm reduction versus abstinence within two distinctly different approaches to homeless services: the traditional or ‘treatment first’ (TF) approach that requires abstinence and the more recent Housing First (HF) approach that incorporates harm reduction. As part of a federally-funded qualitative study, 129 in-depth interviews conducted with 41 providers were thematically analyzed to understand how providers view a harm reduction versus abstinence approach. Themes included: (a) harm reduction as a welcomed alternative; (b) working with ambiguity; and (c) accommodating abstinence. Drawing on recovery principles, we consider the broader implications of the findings for behavioral health care with this population. PMID:23404076

  9. Medical Respite and Linkages to Outpatient Health Care Providers among Individuals Experiencing Homelessness.

    PubMed

    Zur, Julia; Linton, Sabriya; Mead, Holly

    2016-01-01

    Medical respite programs provide nursing care and case management to individuals experiencing homelessness following hospitalization for an acute medical problem. One goal of these programs is to link clients to outpatient providers to decrease their reliance on hospital services. Through qualitative interviews with staff members (n = 8) and clients (n = 14) at a medical respite program, we explored processes of, and challenges associated with, linking clients to outpatient care. Six themes were identified, which offer insight about important considerations when linking clients to outpatient providers and highlight the value of medical respite programs for this population. PMID:27074404

  10. 76 FR 79067 - Payment or Reimbursement for Emergency Treatment Furnished by Non-VA Providers in Non-VA...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ...- connected conditions. As explained in a notice of proposed rulemaking published on June 11, 2010 (75 FR... with Non- VA Outpatient Care''. 75 FR 7218 (Feb. 18, 2010). Second, section 402(b)(3) made the... proposed rule published on June 11, 2010 (75 FR 33216), we proposed to amend the following VA...

  11. 77 FR 12697 - VA Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-01

    ... supportive housing, health care, and social services programs, have more successful outcomes. We would... Health Administration, Department of Veterans Affairs, 810 Vermont Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20420, (877... regulatory approaches that maximize net benefits (including potential economic, environmental, public...

  12. 77 FR 12647 - Fund Availability Under VA's Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-01

    ... within the unit to store, prepare, and serve food in a sanitary manner (including, at a minimum, a refrigerator, freezer, sink, and stove). Note: Microwave ovens, hot plates, or similar items are not...

  13. 76 FR 71920 - Payment for Home Health Services and Hospice Care by Non-VA Providers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-21

    ... medical charges associated with non-VA outpatient care, provided under 38 CFR 17.52 or 17.120. 75 FR 78901.... See 75 FR 78901. We explained: Home Health Care and Hospice Care he pricing methodology adopted by... amended Sec. 17.56. See 75 FR 7218 (Feb. 18, 2010); 75 FR 78901. We need not repeat them here. Indeed,...

  14. Development and Validation of an Instrument to Assess Imminent Risk of Homelessness Among Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Fargo, Jamison D.; Kane, Vincent; Culhane, Dennis P.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Veterans are overrepresented within the homeless population compared with their non-veteran counterparts, particularly when controlling for poverty. The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) aims to prevent new episodes of homelessness by targeting households at greatest risk; however, there are no instruments that systematically assess veterans' risk of homelessness. We developed and tested a brief screening instrument to identify imminent risk of homelessness among veterans accessing VA health care. Methods The study team developed initial assessment items, conducted cognitive interviews with veterans experiencing homelessness, refined pilot items based on veterans' and experts' feedback and results of psychometric analyses, and assigned weights to items in the final instrument to indicate a measure of homelessness risk. Results One-third of veterans who responded to the field instrument reported imminent risk of homelessness (i.e., housing instability in the previous 90 days or expected in the next 90 days). The reliability coefficient for the instrument was 0.85, indicating good internal consistency. Veterans who had a recent change in income, had unpaid housing expenses, were living temporarily with family and friends, needed help to get or keep housing, and had poor rental and credit histories were more likely to report a risk of homelessness than those who did not. Conclusion This study provides the field with an instrument to identify individuals and households at risk of or experiencing homelessness, which is necessary to prevent and end homelessness. In addition, it supports VA's investment in homelessness prevention and rapid rehousing services for veterans who are experiencing or are at risk for homelessness. PMID:25177054

  15. 76 FR 52575 - Health Care for Homeless Veterans Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-23

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 63 RIN 2900-AN73 Health Care for Homeless Veterans Program AGENCY: Department of... community-based treatment facilities in the Health Care for Homeless Veterans (HCHV) program of the... enrolled in the VA health care system. Through the HCHV program, VA identifies homeless veterans...

  16. Priorities in the primary care of persons experiencing homelessness: convergence and divergence in the views of patients and provider/experts

    PubMed Central

    Steward, Jocelyn; Holt, Cheryl L; Pollio, David E; Austin, Erika L; Johnson, Nancy; Gordon, Adam J; Kertesz, Stefan G

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Homeless individuals face unique challenges in health care. Several US initiatives seeking to advance patient-centered primary care for homeless persons are more likely to succeed if they incorporate the priorities of the patients they are to serve. However, there has been no prior research to elicit their priorities in primary care. This study sought to identify aspects of primary care important to persons familiar with homelessness based on personal experience or professional commitment, and to highlight where the priorities of patients and professionals dedicated to their care converge or diverge. Methods This qualitative exercise asked 26 homeless patients and ten provider/experts to rank 16 aspects of primary care using a card sort. Patient-level respondents (n=26) were recruited from homeless service organizations across all regions of the USA and from an established board of homeless service users. Provider/expert-level respondents (n=10) were recruited from veteran and non-veteran-focused homeless health care programs with similar geographic diversity. Results Both groups gave high priority to accessibility, evidence-based care, coordination, and cooperation. Provider/experts endorsed patient control more strongly than patients. Patients ranked information about their care more highly than provider/experts. Conclusion Accessibility and the perception of care based on medical evidence represent priority concerns for homeless patients and provider/experts. Patient control, a concept endorsed by experts, is not strongly endorsed by homeless patients. Understanding how to assure fluid communication, coordination, and team member cooperation could represent more worthy targets for research and quality improvement in this domain. PMID:26929607

  17. Teaching Our Homeless Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheldon, George H.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses some of the major concerns associated with the instructional process of our homeless children. The reader is provided with a brief overview of the prevalence of this population. According to the National Center on Family Homelessness the number of school children who are homeless is growing rapidly with 1.4 to 1.5 million…

  18. Providing Palliative Care in a Swedish Support Home for People Who Are Homeless.

    PubMed

    Håkanson, Cecilia; Sandberg, Jonas; Ekstedt, Mirjam; Kenne Sarenmalm, Elisabeth; Christiansen, Mats; Öhlén, Joakim

    2016-07-01

    Despite high frequencies of multiple, life-limiting conditions relating to palliative care needs, people who are homeless are one of the most underserved and rarely encountered groups in palliative care settings. Instead, they often die in care places where palliative competence is not available. In this qualitative single-case study, we explored the conditions and practices of palliative care from the perspective of staff at a Swedish support home for homeless people. Interpretive description guided the research process, and data were generated from repeated reflective conversations with staff in groups, individually, and in pairs. The findings disclose a person-centered approach to palliative care, grounded in the understanding of the person's health/illness and health literacy, and how this is related to and determinant on life as a homeless individual. Four patterns shape this approach: building trustful and family-like relationships, re-dignifying the person, re-considering communication about illness and dying, and re-defining flexible and pragmatic care solutions. PMID:25994318

  19. Experience of Primary Care among Homeless Individuals with Mental Health Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Chrystal, Joya G.; Glover, Dawn L.; Young, Alexander S.; Whelan, Fiona; Austin, Erika L.; Johnson, Nancy K.; Pollio, David E.; Holt, Cheryl L.; Stringfellow, Erin; Gordon, Adam J.; Kim, Theresa A.; Daigle, Shanette G.; Steward, Jocelyn L.; Kertesz, Stefan G

    2015-01-01

    The delivery of primary care to homeless individuals with mental health conditions presents unique challenges. To inform healthcare improvement, we studied predictors of favorable primary care experience among homeless persons with mental health conditions treated at sites that varied in degree of homeless-specific service tailoring. This was a multi-site, survey-based comparison of primary care experiences at three mainstream primary care clinics of the Veterans Administration (VA), one homeless-tailored VA clinic, and one tailored non-VA healthcare program. Persons who accessed primary care service two or more times from July 2008 through June 2010 (N = 366) were randomly sampled. Predictor variables included patient and organization characteristics suggested by the patient perception model developed by Sofaer and Firminger (2005), with an emphasis on mental health. The primary care experience was assessed with the Primary Care Quality-Homeless (PCQ-H) questionnaire, a validated survey instrument. Multiple regression identified predictors of positive experiences (i.e. higher PCQ-H total score). Significant predictors of a positive experience included a site offering tailored service design, perceived choice among providers, and currently domiciled status. There was an interaction effect between site and severe psychiatric symptoms. For persons with severe psychiatric symptoms, a homeless-tailored service design was significantly associated with a more favorable primary care experience. For persons without severe psychiatric symptoms, this difference was not significant. This study supports the importance of tailored healthcare delivery designed for homeless persons’ needs, with such services potentially holding special relevance for persons with mental health conditions. To improve patient experience among the homeless, organizations may want to deliver services that are tailored to homelessness and offer a choice of providers. PMID:25659142

  20. Improving PTSD/substance abuse treatment in the VA: a survey of providers.

    PubMed

    Najavits, Lisa M; Norman, Sonya B; Kivlahan, Daniel; Kosten, Thomas R

    2010-01-01

    We surveyed 205 Veterans Affairs (VA) staff on treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), substance use disorder (SUD), and the combination (PTSD/SUD). The survey was anonymous and VA-wide. PTSD/SUD was perceived as more difficult to treat than either disorder alone; gratification in the work was stronger than difficulty (for PTSD, SUD, and PTSD/SUD); and difficulty and gratification appeared separate constructs. Respondents endorsed views that represent expert treatment for the comorbidity; however, there was also endorsement of "myths." Thus, there is a need for more training, policy clarifications, service integration, and adaptations for veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan. Limitations are described. PMID:20525033

  1. 77 FR 39342 - Proposed Information Collection (Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program) Activity; Comment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-02

    ... Federal Docket Management System (FDMS) at www.Regulations.gov ; or to Cynthia Harvey-Pryor, Veterans... 20420; or email: cynthia.harvey-pryor@va.gov . Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900-0554'' in any... INFORMATION CONTACT: Cynthia Harvey-Pryor (202) 461-5870 or Fax (202) 273-9381. SUPPLEMENTARY...

  2. 78 FR 68364 - Payment for Home Health Services and Hospice Care to Non-VA Providers; Delay of Effective Date

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-14

    ... (78 FR 26250) a final rule to change the billing methodology for non-VA providers of home health... for the final rule published May 6, 2013, at 78 FR 26250, is delayed from November 15, 2013, until... final rule published in the Federal Register on May 6, 2013 (78 FR 26250). The original effective...

  3. VA Community Mental Health Service Providers' Utilization of and Attitudes toward Telemental Health Care: The Gatekeeper's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jameson, John Paul; Farmer, Mary Sue; Head, Katharine J.; Fortney, John; Teal, Cayla R.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Mental health (MH) providers in community-based outpatient clinics (CBOCs) are important stakeholders in the development of the Veterans Health Administration (VA) telemental health (TMH) system, but their perceptions of these technologies have not been systematically examined. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the…

  4. The New Homelessness Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Barrett A.; Tyler, Kimberly A.; Wright, James D.

    2014-01-01

    The ‘new homelessness’ has drawn sustained attention from scholars over the past three decades. Definitional inconsistencies and data limitations rendered early work during this period largely speculative in nature. Thanks to conceptual, theoretical, and methodological progress, however, the research literature now provides a fuller understanding of homelessness. Contributions by sociologists and other social scientists since the mid-1990s differentiate among types of homelessness, provide credible demographic estimates, and show how being homeless affects a person's life chances and coping strategies. Agreement also exists about the main macro- and micro-level causes of homelessness. Active lines of inquiry examine public, media, and governmental responses to the problem as well as homeless people's efforts to mobilize on their own behalf. Despite the obstacles faced when studying a stigmatized population marked by high turnover and weak anchors to place, recent investigations have significantly influenced homelessness policy. A greater emphasis on prevention should further strengthen the research-policy nexus. PMID:24910495

  5. Evaluating Programs for the Homeless.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rog, Debra J., Ed.

    1991-01-01

    Six articles provide an overview of the multiple approaches to evaluating the problems of homelessness and introduce the challenges of evaluating interventions for the homeless. The first part focuses on research about homelessness, and the second part describes major demonstration programs and their evaluations. (SLD)

  6. Addressing Homelessness: Recent Happenings--Iowa, 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Department of Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This guide provides information on the following resources available to the homeless in Iowa: (1) Funding Sources for School District Programs Serving Homeless Students; (2) Local Educational Liaison for Homeless Children and Youth; (3) Homeless Advisory Committee; (4) Identification, Counting, and Maintaining Data at the Local School District…

  7. People Experiencing Chronic Homelessness

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ending Family Homelessness Ending Youth Homelessness Setting a Path to End All Homelessness Solutions Solutions Housing Housing ... Ending Family Homelessness Ending Youth Homelessness Setting a Path to End All Homelessness Solutions Solutions Housing Housing ...

  8. Supporting School Success for Homeless Children of Veterans and Active Duty Military Members. Best Practices in Interagency Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Homeless Education at SERVE, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This brief is designed for local staff of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), state McKinney-Vento coordinators and school district McKinney-Vento liaisons, educators, and other providers of services to active members of the military and veterans, and their children. It provides basic information to assist homeless children of veterans or…

  9. Where Do You Go from Nowhere: Homelessness in Maryland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health and Welfare Council of Central Maryland, Inc., Baltimore.

    This report assesses the extent of homelessness in Maryland. Data are provided in the following areas: (1) the number of homeless people; (2) causes of homelessness; (3) distribution of the homeless and characteristics of those sheltered; (4) shelter beds available; (5) what is needed to address the problems of homelessness; (6) the extent of the…

  10. Comparison of provider-documented and patient-reported brief intervention for unhealthy alcohol use in VA outpatients☆

    PubMed Central

    Lapham, Gwen T.; Rubinsky, Anna D.; Shortreed, Susan M.; Hawkins, Eric J.; Richards, Julie; Williams, Emily C.; Berger, Douglas; Chavez, Laura J.; Kivlahan, Daniel R.; Bradley, Katharine A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Performance measures for brief alcohol interventions (BIs) are currently based on provider documentation of BI. However, provider documentation may not be a reliable measure of whether or not patients are offered clinically meaningful BIs. In particular, BI documented with clinical decision support in an electronic medical record (EMR) could appear identical irrespective of the quality of BI provided. We hypothesized that differences in how BI was implemented across health systems could lead to differences in the proportion of documented BI recalled and reported by patients across health systems. Methods Male outpatients with unhealthy alcohol use identified by confidential satisfaction surveys (2009–2012) were assessed for whether they reported receiving BI in the past year (patient-reported BI) and whether they had BI documented in the EMR during the same period (documented BI). We evaluated and compared the prevalence of documented BI to patient-reported BI across 21 VA networks to determine whether documented BI had a variable association with patient-reported BI across the networks. Results Of 9896 eligible male outpatients with unhealthy alcohol use, 59.0% (95% CI 57.4–60.5%) reported BI (50.4–64.9% across networks) and 37.4% (95% CI 36.0–38.9%) had BI documented in the EMR (28.0–44.2% across networks). Overall, 72.9% (95% CI 70.8–75.5%) of patients with documented BI also reported BI. The association between documented BI and patient-reported BI did not vary across VA networks in adjusted logistic regression models. Conclusions Performance measures of BI that rely on provider documentation in EMRs appear comparable to patient report for comparing care across VA networks. PMID:26072218

  11. Homelessness and Hunger*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Barrett A; Greif, Meredith J

    2014-01-01

    We employ data from the National Survey of Homeless Assistance Providers and Clients to examine the character and correlates of hunger among homeless people. Our analysis, couched in an adaptation framework, finds more support for the differentiation hypothesis than for the leveling hypothesis: Complex patterns of food insecurity exist at the individual level, and they vary with the resources available (e.g., higher monthly income, regular shelter use) and obstacles faced (e.g., alcohol, drug, and physical and mental health problems). The chronically homeless, who suffer from multiple deficits, appear particularly food-insecure, a finding that favors the desperation hypothesis over its street-wisdom alternative. We conclude that hunger is not uniformly experienced by members of the homeless population. Rather, some individuals are better situated than others to cope with the stressful nature of homelessness when addressing their sustenance needs. PMID:18418982

  12. For Homeless Veterans

    MedlinePlus

    ... families find and sustain permanent housing. How It Works Through public housing authorities, HUD provides rental assistance ... might remain homeless without this assistance. How It Works Through referrals and direct outreach, nonprofit agencies and ...

  13. 38 CFR 63.15 - Duties of, and standards applicable to, non-VA community-based providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) HEALTH CARE FOR HOMELESS VETERANS (HCHV) PROGRAM § 63.15 Duties of... facility must meet all applicable safety requirements set forth in 38 CFR 17.81(a). (b) Treatment plans and... counseling, including counseling on self care skills, adaptive coping skills and, as appropriate,...

  14. 38 CFR 63.15 - Duties of, and standards applicable to, non-VA community-based providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) HEALTH CARE FOR HOMELESS VETERANS (HCHV) PROGRAM § 63.15 Duties of... facility must meet all applicable safety requirements set forth in 38 CFR 17.81(a). (b) Treatment plans and... counseling, including counseling on self care skills, adaptive coping skills and, as appropriate,...

  15. 38 CFR 63.15 - Duties of, and standards applicable to, non-VA community-based providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... any additional requirements set forth in a specific contract. (a) Facility safety requirements. The facility must meet all applicable safety requirements set forth in 38 CFR 17.81(a). (b) Treatment plans and... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) HEALTH CARE FOR HOMELESS VETERANS (HCHV) PROGRAM § 63.15 Duties...

  16. Providing health care services to the formerly homeless: a quasi-experimental evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ciaranello, Andrea L; Molitor, Fred; Leamon, Martin; Kuenneth, Christina; Tancredi, Daniel; Diamant, Allison L; Kravitz, Richard L

    2006-05-01

    We performed a quasi-experiment to assess the effects of a focused health care intervention delivered in transitional housing facilities in Sacramento, California. Four transitional housing facilities (THFs) receiving the intervention were compared with 2 THFs that did not receive it. A multidisciplinary team provided a diverse package of services to residents at the intervention sites. Residents at comparison sites received usual care. Survey and physical examination data were collected in repeated cross-sectional surveys at baseline (pre-intervention) and after 6 and 18 months of follow-up (post-intervention). Using analysis of covariance techniques, our statistical models showed improved odds of receiving recommended gynecologic preventive care and decreased odds of frequent Emergency Department use at 18 months among residents at the intervention sites. At 6 months, residents at the intervention sites also experienced improved blood pressure control. There was no intervention effect on residents' access to specialists or on physical functioning, mental health, or dental health. PMID:16702726

  17. 78 FR 6405 - Advisory Committee on Homeless Veterans, Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-30

    ... AFFAIRS Advisory Committee on Homeless Veterans, Notice of Meeting The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA... Committee on Homeless Veterans will be held on February 13-15, 2013. On February 13, the Committee will meet... Department in assisting homeless Veterans. The Committee shall assemble and review information relating...

  18. 76 FR 76917 - Homeless Management Information Systems Requirements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-09

    ...This proposed rule provides for the establishment of regulations for Homeless Management Information Systems (HMIS), which are the local information technology systems that HUD recipients and subrecipients use for homeless assistance programs authorized by the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act (the McKinney-Vento Act). The Homeless Emergency Assistance and Rapid Transition to Housing Act......

  19. Association between Women Veterans’ Experiences with VA Outpatient Healthcare and Designation as a Women’s Health Provider in Primary Care Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Bastian, Lori A.; Trentalange, Mark; Murphy, Terrence E.; Brandt, Cynthia; Bean-Mayberry, Bevanne; Maisel, Natalya C.; Wright, Steven M.; Gaetano, Vera S.; Allore, Heather; Skanderson, Melissa; Reyes-Harvey, Evelyn; Yano, Elizabeth M.; Rose, Danielle; Haskell, Sally

    2016-01-01

    Background Women Veterans comprise a small percentage of VA healthcare users. Prior research on women Veterans’ experiences with primary care has focused on VA site differences and not individual provider characteristics. In 2010, the VA established policy requiring the provision of comprehensive women’s healthcare by designated women’s health providers (DWHPs). Little is known about the quality of healthcare delivered by DWHPs and women Veterans’ experience with care from these providers. Methods Secondary data were obtained from the VA Survey of Healthcare Experience of Patients (SHEP) using the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CAHPS) patient-centered medical home (PCMH) survey from March 2012 through February 2013, a survey designed to measure patient experience with care and the DWHPs Assessment of Workforce Capacity (DAWC) that discerns between DWHPs versus non-DWHPs. Findings Of the 28,994 surveys mailed to women Veterans, 24,789 were seen by primary care providers and 8,151 women responded to the survey (response rate 32%). A total of 3,147 providers were evaluated by the SHEP-CAHPS-PCMH survey (40%; n=1,267 were DWHPs). In a multivariable model, patients seen by DWHPs (RR=1.02 95% CI=1.01−1.04) reported higher overall experiences with care compared to patients seen by non-DWHPs. Conclusions The main finding is that women Veterans’ overall experiences with outpatient healthcare are slightly better for those receiving care from DWHPs compared to those receiving care from non-DWHPs. Our findings have important policy implications for how to continue to improve women Veterans’ experiences. Our work provides support to increase access to DWHPs at VA primary care clinics. PMID:25442706

  20. Psychological distress among homeless adults.

    PubMed

    Gelberg, L; Linn, L S

    1989-05-01

    Recent studies have reported a high prevalence of mental illness among the homeless. As part of a community-based survey of 529 homeless adults, we developed and tested a model to increase our understanding of the factors related to their psychological distress. Using a previously validated and reliable scale of perceived psychological distress, we found that homeless adults were more likely to report psychological distress than the general population (80% vs. 49%). Distress levels were not associated with most demographic or homeless characteristics or general appearance. However, distress was related to unemployment, greater cigarette and alcohol use, worse physical health, fewer social supports, and perceived barriers to obtaining needed medical care. Since mental, physical, and social health are strongly related among homeless adults, alleviating distress among them may be most effectively done by implementing a broad-based health services package coupled with employment programs provided in an accessible service delivery setting. PMID:2785158

  1. Federally Supported Centers Provide Needed Services for Runaways and Homeless Youths. Report to the Chairman, Subcommittee on Human Resources, Committee on Education and Labor, House of Representatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Div. of Human Resources.

    The Runaway and Homeless Youth Act authorizes funds under the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 for community-based centers that serve the shelter needs of runaway or homeless youths. To examine the effectiveness of the programs and the characteristics of program participants, the Government Accounting Office (GAO) visited 17…

  2. 78 FR 76061 - Authorization for Non-VA Medical Services

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-16

    ..., Health professions, Health records, Homeless, Mental health programs, Nursing homes, Reporting and.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: On November 28, 2012, VA proposed a rule in the Federal Register, at 77 FR 70967, to... for that disability. On the same date, VA published a companion direct final rule at 77 FR 70893...

  3. Homelessness and Dual Diagnosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Robert E.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Reviews recent research on the epidemiology, subject characteristics, and service needs of the homeless population who are dually diagnosed to suffer both severe mental illness and substance abuse disorders. Discusses evolving approaches to providing social services, various treatments, system and legal issues, and problems with current research.…

  4. Jobs, Welfare and Homelessness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Einbinder, Susan; And Others

    This report provides objective information about the relationship of poverty, welfare, and homelessness to California's regional economy and about the design of programs that help people in poverty build working lives. California does not have enough jobs for its workforce, and welfare caseloads are consequently determined by the economy. The…

  5. Runaway and Homeless Youth: A Three Phase Differential Response Which Provides Crisis Intervention, Assessment, and Long-Term Programs--Both Residential and Non-Residential--for Adolescent Males and Females 16-21 Years of Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faye, Michael

    A practicum at a crisis intervention center in the middle of a large Canadian city in Ontario was designed to offer crisis intervention, shelter, and non-residential support for runaway and homeless youth, ages 16 to 21, who lived on the streets or in emergency shelters. The practicum provided an opportunity for program staff to develop a…

  6. Homelessness in Public Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Yi Ling

    2009-01-01

    This paper takes a theoretical and practical approach in defining the "problem" of homelessness in libraries. The author examines three fundamental problems on homelessness. The three fundamental questions are: (a) Who are the homeless? (b) Why are they homeless? (c) What are their information needs in libraries? These questions are important in…

  7. Youth Homelessness 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKenzie, David; Chamberlain, Chris

    2008-01-01

    The third national census of homeless school students, conducted in 2006, found that the number of homeless students had decreased since 2001. There were 9,389 homeless students in 2006 compared with 12,227 in 2001. Three groups were over-represented in the homeless population: Indigenous students, young people from single parent and blended…

  8. Double Jeopardy: Homeless & Illiterate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BCEL Newsletter for the Business Community, 1988

    1988-01-01

    For the first time, federal funding for literacy services will focus new attention on the plight of the homeless. Under the McKinney Homeless Assistance Act, each state will receive funds for literacy for the homeless. Although there are no firm estimates on how many persons are homeless, a number of indicators point to a problem of major and…

  9. Homelessness in America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumohl, Jim, Ed.

    This book about homelessness in the United States offers 16 chapters in three parts. Part 1, "History Definitions, and Causes," includes: (1) "Redefining the Cursed Word: A Historical Interpretation of American Homelessness" (Kim Hopper and Jim Baumohl); (2) "Homelessness: Definitions and Counts" (Martha R. Burt); (3) "The Causes of Homelessness"…

  10. Education Rights of Homeless Students: A Guide for Advocates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Law Center, 2005

    2005-01-01

    There is no question that students who are homeless, like all students, are entitled to be educated. A federal law, known as the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act, requires states to provide homeless children and youth with the same access to free public education as is available to other students. The Act also requires states to eliminate…

  11. Imagine the Possibilities: Sourcebook for Educators Committed to the Educational Success of Students Experiencing Homelessness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berliner, BethAnn

    This sourcebook assembles the results of research on educating homeless students and offers classroom strategies for people working with homeless students, providing training tools to strengthen programs and practices in schools and shelters. Chapter 1, "Increasing Awareness about Students Experiencing Homelessness," defines homelessness,…

  12. 75 FR 4453 - Advisory Committee on Homeless Veterans; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Advisory Committee on Homeless Veterans; Notice of Meeting The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA... Committee on Homeless Veterans will be held February 24-26, 2010, in the Lafayette Park Room at the...

  13. 77 FR 26069 - Advisory Committee on Homeless Veterans, Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Advisory Committee on Homeless Veterans, Notice of Meeting The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA... Committee on Homeless Veterans will be held on June 1-2, 2012, in room 900 at 1722 Eye Street...

  14. 76 FR 56881 - Advisory Committee on Homeless Veterans; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Advisory Committee on Homeless Veterans; Notice of Meeting The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA... Committee on Homeless Veterans will be held on September 20- 21, 2011. On September 20, the Committee...

  15. Helping Homeless People: Unique Challenges and Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Clemmie, Ed.; Jackson-Jobe, Peggy, Ed.

    This publication is designed to provide a practical guide for gaining a detailed awareness and understanding of homelessness. After a foreword by Jesse Jackson, these chapters are included: (1) Introduction: Assessing the Unique Needs of Homeless People (Clemmie Solomon), which discusses the need for helping professionals to commit to addressing…

  16. Addressing the Problems of Homeless Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Joseph F.; Tobin, Kerri

    2012-01-01

    Homeless adolescents, known as "unaccompanied youth," constitute a small but important portion of the overall homeless population, one that needs particular attention at school. In this article, we review existing literature to provide a background for educational leaders, researchers, and policymakers hoping to understand the phenomenon of…

  17. A Rural County's Response to Homelessness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loughran, Elizabeth Lee; White, Priscilla

    This paper describes the response of one locality, a rural county in Western Massachusetts, to the reality of rural homelessness. Jessie's House, in Hampshire County, Massachusetts, is a short-term emergency shelter providing meals, housing, and advocacy to homeless families and individuals. The shelter has a staff of three full-time residents and…

  18. Working to End Family Homelessness. Annual Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Family Homelessness (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    The National Center on Family Homelessness is determined to end family homelessness. Sheltering families provides a temporary safe haven. Connecting families to permanent housing, essential services, and critical supports can change their lives forever. Through research the Center learns what families need to rebound from the housing, economic,…

  19. Health interventions for people who are homeless.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Stephen W; Burns, Tom

    2014-10-25

    Homelessness has serious implications for the health of individuals and populations. Primary health-care programmes specifically tailored to homeless individuals might be more effective than standard primary health care. Standard case management, assertive community treatment, and critical time intervention are effective models of mental health-care delivery. Housing First, with immediate provision of housing in independent units with support, improves outcomes for individuals with serious mental illnesses. Many different types of interventions, including case management, are effective in the reduction of substance misuse. Interventions that provide case management and supportive housing have the greatest effect when they target individuals who are the most intensive users of services. Medical respite programmes are an effective intervention for homeless patients leaving the hospital. Although the scientific literature provides guidance on interventions to improve the health of homeless individuals, health-care providers should also seek to address social policies and structural factors that result in homelessness. PMID:25390579

  20. Becoming homeless, being homeless, and resolving homelessness among women.

    PubMed

    Finfgeld-Connett, Deborah

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to more comprehensively articulate the experiences of homeless women and make evidence-based inferences regarding optimal social services. This study was conducted using qualitative meta-synthesis methods. As youth, homeless women experience challenging circumstances that leave them ill-prepared to prevent and resolve homelessness in adulthood. Resolution of homelessness occurs in iterative stages: crisis, assessment, and sustained action. To enhance forward progression through these stages, nurses are encouraged to promote empowerment in concordance with the Transtheoretical and Harm Reduction Models. Services that are highly valued include physical and mental health care and child care assistance. PMID:20521916

  1. Hurricane Sandy's impact on the predisaster homeless and homeless shelter services in New Jersey.

    PubMed

    Settembrino, Marc R

    2016-01-01

    Presently, there is little research on how people experiencing homelessness prepare for, respond to, and recover from disasters. Existing emergency management literature does not provide an understanding of how disasters affect homeless shelter services. The present study seeks to fill these gaps by examining how Hurricane Sandy impacted homeless shelters and their guests in New Jersey. Presenting findings from ethnographic research in Atlantic City and Hoboken, this study identifies several areas in which homeless shelters and their guests may be able to assist in emergency response and disaster recovery such as preparing meals for victims, sorting and processing donated items, and assisting victims in filing for emergency assistance. PMID:26963226

  2. Measuring pain in the context of homelessness

    PubMed Central

    Matter, Rebecca; Kline, Susan; Cook, Karon F.; Amtmann, Dagmar

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The primary objective of this study was to inform the development of measures of pain impact appropriate for all respondents, including homeless individuals, so that they can be used in clinical research and practice. The secondary objective was to increase understanding about the unique experience of homeless people with pain. Methods Seventeen homeless individuals with chronic health conditions (often associated with pain) participated in cognitive interviews to test the functioning of 56 pain measurement items and provided information about their experience living with and accessing treatment for pain. Results The most common problems identified with items were that they lacked clarity or were irrelevant in the context of homelessness. Items that were unclear, irrelevant and/or had other identified problems made it difficult for participants to respond. Participants also described multiple ways in which their pain was exacerbated by conditions of homelessness and identified barriers to accessing appropriate treatment. Conclusions Results suggested that the majority of items were problematic for the homeless and require substantial modifications to make the pain impact bank relevant to this population. Additional recommendations include involving homeless in future item bank development, conducting research on the topic of pain and homelessness, and using cognitive interviewing in other types of health disparities research. PMID:19582592

  3. Correlates of adult assault among homeless women.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Angela L; Wright, Kynna; Bhattacharya, Debika; Sinha, Karabi; Nyamathi, Adeline; Marfisee, Mary

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess predictors of sexual and physical assault among homeless women. A multivariate, correlation design was utilized to identify independent correlates of adult physical and sexual assault. The sample consisted of 202 homeless women residing in shelters or living on the street in the Skid Row area of Los Angeles. Respondents reporting a history of child sexual abuse were almost four times more likely to report being sexually assaulted as adults and were almost two and one third times more likely to report being physically assaulted as adults. A range of factors increase homeless women's risk of adult physical and sexual victimization, including child sexual abuse, substance use, lifetime sex trade activity, and previous incarceration. It is important for homeless service providers to develop an individual risk profile for homeless women and to intervene in order to decrease their risk of re-victimization. PMID:21099076

  4. Life Shocks and Homelessness

    PubMed Central

    Corman, Hope; Noonan, Kelly; Reichman, Nancy E.

    2014-01-01

    We exploited an exogenous health shock—namely, the birth of a child with a severe health condition—to investigate the effect of a life shock on homelessness in large cities in the United States as well as the interactive effects of the shock with housing market characteristics. We considered a traditional measure of homelessness, two measures of housing instability thought to be precursors to homelessness, and a combined measure that approximates the broadened conceptualization of homelessness under the 2009 Homeless Emergency Assistance and Rapid Transition to Housing Act (2010). We found that the shock substantially increases the likelihood of family homelessness, particularly in cities with high housing costs. The findings are consistent with the economic theory of homelessness, which posits that homelessness results from a conjunction of adverse circumstances in which housing markets and individual characteristics collide. PMID:23868747

  5. Life shocks and homelessness.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Marah A; Corman, Hope; Noonan, Kelly; Reichman, Nancy E

    2013-12-01

    We exploited an exogenous health shock-namely, the birth of a child with a severe health condition-to investigate the effect of a life shock on homelessness in large cities in the United States as well as the interactive effects of the shock with housing market characteristics. We considered a traditional measure of homelessness, two measures of housing instability thought to be precursors to homelessness, and a combined measure that approximates the broadened conceptualization of homelessness under the 2009 Homeless Emergency Assistance and Rapid Transition to Housing Act (2010). We found that the shock substantially increases the likelihood of family homelessness, particularly in cities with high housing costs. The findings are consistent with the economic theory of homelessness, which posits that homelessness results from a conjunction of adverse circumstances in which housing markets and individual characteristics collide. PMID:23868747

  6. Parenting while Being Homeless

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swick, Kevin J.; Williams, Reginald; Fields, Evelyn

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the dynamics of parenting while being in a homeless context. The mosaic of stressors involved in this homeless parenting process are explicated and discussed. In addition, resources and strategies that may support parenting are presented and discussed.

  7. Educating Homeless Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berliner, BethAnn

    2002-01-01

    Over the past decade, the number of homeless children in America has more than doubled. Educators, however, are still legally obligated to enroll and support them, because of the passage of the "No Child Left Behind" Act of 2001, which reauthorized the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act. Although schools cannot solve homelessness, they can…

  8. Pennsylvania's Rural Homeless Reality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Rural Pennsylvania, Harrisburg.

    The Center for Rural Pennsylvania analyzed data from the Pennsylvania Department of Public Welfare concerning rural homelessness for fiscal years 1997 through 1999. Findings indicate that rural Pennsylvania has a homeless population and it is growing. In 1999, more than 21,700 clients received homeless assistance in rural areas, 44 percent of whom…

  9. Feeding the homeless.

    PubMed

    Hales, A; Magnus, M H

    1991-12-01

    Nurses have a unique role in addressing homelessness, an issue of vital national concern. The management and organizational expertise of nurses can be key elements to coordinating community resources to assist the homeless. The authors describe the design and implementation of a community meal program for the homeless. PMID:1744733

  10. Homeless Health Concerns

    MedlinePlus

    ... Many homeless women are victims of domestic or sexual abuse. Homeless children have high rates of emotional and behavioral problems, often from having witnessed abuse. Help such as shelters, health centers, and free meals are available. Contact your local homelessness assistance agency.

  11. The health of homeless children revisited.

    PubMed

    Grant, Roy; Shapiro, Alan; Joseph, Sharon; Goldsmith, Sandra; Rigual-Lynch, Lourdes; Redlener, Irwin

    2007-01-01

    To the extent that representative data are available for specific health conditions (eg, under-immunization, asthma prevalence), the authors' data suggest that the gap between the health status of homeless children and housed children in minority, low-income families is narrowing. Studies of the health status of homeless children allow a window into the health status of medically underserved children whose needs may not be readily documented because of their lack of access to the health care system. Although prevalence rates of most of the health conditions discussed in this article exceeded national norms, they were generally consistent with rates characteristic of health disparities based on race-ethnicity and income. It must be emphasized that in most instances, children were seen for their first pediatric visit within weeks of entering the homeless shelter system. The health conditions identified were often present before the child and family became homeless. The high prevalence of asthma among homeless children should therefore be a matter of concern to health providers and payors, because the authors' data strongly suggest that this is not confined to children in homeless shelters as a special population. Similarly, childhood obesity predates homelessness (or at least the episode of homelessness during which health care was provided) and as such the authors' data may indicate the extent of this problem more generally among medically underserved children in the communities of origin. These conditions seem to be exacerbated by the specific conditions associated with homeless shelter life. Asthma care, assuming it was previously available, is disrupted when housing is lost, and shelter conditions may have multiple asthma triggers. Nutrition often suffers as a result of inadequate access to nutritious food and cooking facilities in shelters, as indicated by the high rate of iron-deficiency anemia among very young children. It is clear that homeless children in

  12. Health-Seeking Challenges Among Homeless Youth

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Angela L.; Nyamathi, Adeline; Greengold, Barbara; Slagle, Alexandra; Koniak-Griffin, Deborah; Khalilifard, Farinaz; Getzoff, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Background Approximately 1.5 to 2 million homeless young persons live on the streets in the United States. With the current economic situation, research is needed on quality of services geared toward homeless young adults. Objectives The objective of this study was to explore homeless young adults' perspectives on barriers and facilitators of health-care-seeking behavior and their perspectives on improving existing programs for homeless persons. Methods This article is a descriptive qualitative study using focus groups, with a purposeful sample of 24 homeless drug-using young adults. Results Identified themes were failing access to care based on perceived structural barriers (limited clinic sites, limited hours of operation, priority health conditions, and long wait times) and social barriers (perception of discrimination by uncaring professionals, law enforcement, and society in general). Discussion Results provide insight into programmatic and agency resources that facilitate health-seeking behaviors among homeless young adults and include implications for more research with providers of homeless health and social services. PMID:20404776

  13. Prepping Homeless Students for School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vissing, Yvonne

    2004-01-01

    The Yellow School Bus Project (YSBP) was created to provide homeless children with the supplies and clothes they need to succeed in school and feel good about themselves. When given these gifts, they receive the explicit message that they are smart and worthwhile, the implicit message that there are people in the community who are invested in…

  14. The homeless: help from hotels and restaurants.

    PubMed

    Hales, A; Eyster, J J; Ford, J L

    1993-07-01

    Specific examples and information are given to service providers to address the needs of homeless people. Together nurses and restaurant and hotel managers combined their expertise to assist local agencies in their community kitchens and shelters. PMID:8321464

  15. Care of the homeless: an overview.

    PubMed

    Maness, David L; Khan, Muneeza

    2014-04-15

    Homelessness affects men, women, and children of all races and ethnicities. On any given night, more than 610,000 persons in the United States are homeless; a little more than one-third of these are families. Homeless persons are more likely to become ill, have greater hospitalization rates, and are more likely to die at a younger age than the general population. The average life span for a homeless person is between 42 and 52 years. Homeless children are much sicker and have more academic and behavioral problems. Insufficient personal income and the lack of affordable housing are the major reasons for homelessness. Complex, advanced medical problems and psychiatric illnesses, exacerbated by drug and alcohol abuse, in combination with the economic and social issues (such as the lack of housing and proper transportation) make this subset of the population a unique challenge for the health care system, local communities, and the government. An integrated, multidisciplinary health care team with an outreach focus, along with involvement of local and state agencies, seems best suited to address the components needed to ensure quality of care, to help make these patients self-sufficient, and to help them succeed. Family physicians are well suited to manage the needs of the homeless patient, provide continuity of care, and lead these multidisciplinary teams. PMID:24784122

  16. Maternal Depression as a Risk Factor for Family Homelessness

    PubMed Central

    Corman, Hope; Noonan, Kelly; Reichman, Nancy E.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We estimated the effects of maternal depression during the postpartum year, which is often an unexpected event, on subsequent homelessness and risk of homelessness in a national sample of urban, mostly low-income mothers. Methods. We used logistic regression models to estimate associations between maternal depression during the postpartum year and both homelessness and risk of homelessness 2 to 3 years later, controlling for maternal and family history of depression, prenatal housing problems, and other covariates. Risk factors for homelessness included experiencing evictions or frequent moves and moving in with family or friends and not paying rent. Results. We found robust associations between maternal depression during the postpartum year and subsequent homelessness and risk of homelessness, even among mothers who had no history of mental illness, whose own mothers did not have a history of depressive symptoms, and who had no previous housing problems. Conclusions. This study provides robust evidence that maternal mental illness places families with young children at risk for homelessness, contributes to the scant literature elucidating directional and causal links between mental illness and homelessness, and contributes to a stagnant but important literature on family homelessness. PMID:25033116

  17. If You Provide the Test, They will Take It: Factors Associated with HIV/STI Testing in a Representative Sample of Homeless Youth in Los Angeles*

    PubMed Central

    Ober, Allison J.; Martino, Steven C.; Ewing, Brett; Tucker, Joan S.

    2012-01-01

    Homeless youth are at high risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and other sexually transmitted infections (STI), yet those at greatest risk may never have been tested for HIV or STI. In a probability sample of sexually active homeless youth in Los Angeles (n =305), this study identifies factors associated with HIV/STI testing status. Most youth (85%) had ever been tested and 47% had tested in the past 3 months. Recent testing was significantly more likely among youth who self-identified as gay, were Hispanic, injected drugs, and used drop-in centers, and marginally more likely among youth with more depressive symptoms. Drop-in center use mediated the association of injection drug use with HIV/STI testing. HIV/STI testing was unrelated to sexual risk behavior. Drop-in centers can play an important role in facilitating testing, including among injection drug users, but more outreach is needed to encourage testing in other at-risk subgroups. PMID:22827904

  18. The Education for Homeless Children and Youth Program: Learning To Succeed. Volume I: Reducing Barriers for Homeless Children and Youth for Access and Achievement. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Clarenda M.; Wodatch, Jessica K.; Kelliher, Catherine T.

    A 1984 amendment to the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act instructs states to ensure that homeless students have equal access to the same free and appropriate public education as nonhomeless students. It provides local educational authorities increased flexibility to use funds, specify the rights of homeless preschoolers, give parents of…

  19. 38 CFR 17.101 - Collection or recovery by VA for medical care or services provided or furnished to a veteran for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... physician service, procedure, test, supply, or other medical service. ICU means Intensive Care Unit... of this section, standard room and board days and ICU room and board days are mutually exclusive: VA will bill either a standard room and board per diem charge or an ICU room and board per diem charge,...

  20. Proposals Relating to Increasing Housing Opportunities for Homeless Persons. Discussion Paper 91-1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Laura; Matthias, Mary

    This paper provides a basis for discussion of housing proposals relating to increasing housing opportunities for homeless persons in Wisconsin. Six major topics relating to housing for homeless and potentially homeless persons are presented. Issues are listed under each topic. For each issue, background information is provided and alternatives for…

  1. Characteristics of Homeless Youth Attending Two Different Youth Drop-In Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shillington, A. M.; Bousman, C. A.; Clapp, J. D.

    2011-01-01

    Services for homeless youth traditionally provided shelter and nourishment but do little to break the cycle of homelessness. A more comprehensive approach to serve homeless youth is the drop-in center model that provides safe and easy-to-find facilities within communities to bridge the gap between the streets and transitional/permanent housing.…

  2. Homelessness Assistance and Resources

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Program Affordable Housing Community Development Consolidated Planning Economic Development Environmental Review Financial Management Homelessness Assistance Rural Systems News News Feed Email Updates Training & Events All ...

  3. Voices of the Homeless: An Emic Approach to the Experiences of Health Disparities Faced by People Who Are Homeless.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Elaine

    2016-07-01

    People who are homeless are particularly vulnerable to health disparities. Rather than using population statistics to highlight the prevalence or severity of the suffering of people who are homeless, 28 undergraduate students each conducted an in-depth interview with an individual who relied on a local homeless shelter to cope with everyday life. The interview explored the participants' health concerns and strategies for health management. Due to equipment failure and incomplete recording, only 16 interviews are included in this study. The author adopted thematic analysis while focused on preserving the richness of the interactions between the participants who are homeless and the undergraduate students. The author's goal is to provide emic, intimate insights about the struggles and challenges faced by the people who are homeless. The author concluded the study by situating the findings in the larger literature of health disparities experienced by people who are homeless. PMID:27093127

  4. From homeless to housed: caring for people in transition.

    PubMed

    Drury, Lin J

    2008-01-01

    This ethnographic study was conducted to determine what homeless people experience during the transition from street life into community housing. Data were gathered through participant observation at a program designed to secure housing and support services for homeless people upon discharge from a psychiatric hospital. Sixty homeless, mentally ill adults were followed from hospital discharge through their first 2 years in community housing. Homeless people interact with health care providers across a cultural divide produced by vast differences in their lived experiences. This cultural distance limits access to the services that these individuals require to achieve residential stability. PMID:18449834

  5. Homeless Children and Youth in Utah. 1992 Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Office of Education, Salt Lake City.

    A study was done of the numbers and educational status of homeless children in the state of Utah in 1992. A survey was conducted using data provided by 31 shelters statewide and included children and youth who were provided shelter at any time during the year. The total count included 4,424 homeless children and youth in 1992. The largest…

  6. Homeless Children and Youth in Utah. 1991 Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Office of Education, Salt Lake City.

    A study was done of the numbers and educational status of homeless children in the state of Utah in 1991. A survey was conducted using data provided by 31 shelters statewide and included children and youth who were provided shelter at any time during the year. The total count of 4,894 homeless children and youth, when corrected for general…

  7. Homelessness: Recommendations for State Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland Governor's Advisory Board on the Shelter, Nutrition, and Service Programs for Homeless Persons, Annapolis.

    This report identifies the following objectives in the State of Maryland's efforts to prevent and substantially reduce homelessness: (1) expand resources for the prevention of homelessness, and investigate possible changes in policies contributing to homelessness; (2) establish a strong emergency response to homelessness throughout the State; (3)…

  8. Water, sanitation and hygiene for homeless people.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Sayed Mohammad Nazim; Walters, Vicky; Gaillard, J C; Hridi, Sanjida Marium; McSherry, Alice

    2016-02-01

    This short communication provides insights into water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) for homeless people through a scoping study conducted in Dhaka, Bangladesh. It investigates homeless access to WASH through the lens of a rights-based approach. It demonstrates that homeless people's denial of their right to WASH reflects their marginal position in society and an unequal distribution of power and opportunities. The study ultimately suggests a rights-based approach to work toward dealing with the root causes of discrimination and marginalisation rather than just the symptoms. For the homeless, who not only lack substantive rights, but also the means through which to claim their rights, an integrated rights-based approach to WASH offers the possibility for social inclusion and significant improvements in their life conditions. Given the unique deprivation of homelessness it is argued that in addressing the lack of access to adequate WASH for homeless people the immediate goal should be the fulfilment and protection of the right to adequate shelter. PMID:26837829

  9. Educational Rights of Homeless Children and Youth: Legal and Community Advocacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Bradley, Ann Aviles

    2008-01-01

    Many homeless children and youth have difficulty in school due to their loss of stable housing, and lack of consistent contact with family and friends. When a child becomes homeless, schools are federally mandated to identify these students and provide the same access to a free and appropriate education as their non-homeless counterparts. Within a…

  10. Out of Sight, Out of Mind: Homeless Children and Families in Small-Town America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vissing, Yvonne M.

    Homelessness in small towns and rural areas is on the rise, and a substantial portion of the rural homeless consists of families with children. This book draws on interviews and case studies of over 300 homeless children and their families, primarily in New Hampshire, and on supporting statistics to provide individual and sociological perspectives…

  11. Hope for the Future: The State Plan for Educating Homeless Children and Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Office of Compensatory Education.

    This report contains the California state plan for educating homeless children and youth required by the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act of 1987. The plan is designed to raise the level of awareness of schools and school districts to the needs of homeless children and to provide ideas and suggestions for meeting those needs. It is…

  12. Comprehensive Substance Abuse Services for Homeless Persons with Alcohol and Other Drug Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirby, Michael W., Jr.; Braucht, G. Nicholas

    Homeless people with alcohol and other drug problems present the traditional substance abuse services delivery provider with special challenges. This paper discusses the optimal designs of comprehensive treatment services for homeless persons with alcohol and other drug problems. Most importantly, the homeless must have immediate access to a safe…

  13. Intellectual Disability and Homelessness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercier, C.; Picard, S.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The association between poverty and intellectual disability (ID) has been well documented. However, little is known about persons with ID who face circumstances of extreme poverty, such as homelessness. This paper describes the situation of persons with ID who were or are homeless in Montreal and are currently receiving services from a…

  14. Homelessness: A Common Vocabulary Could Help Agencies Collaborate and Collect More Consistent Data. Report to Congressional Requesters. GAO-10-702

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cackley, Alicia Puente

    2010-01-01

    Multiple federal programs provide homelessness assistance through programs targeted to those experiencing homelessness or through mainstream programs that broadly assist low-income populations. Programs' definitions of homelessness range from including primarily people in homeless shelters or on the street to also including those living with…

  15. Lessons Learned: A "Homeless Shelter Intervention" by a Medical Student

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owusu, Yasmin; Kunik, Mark; Coverdale, John; Shah, Asim; Primm, Annelle; Harris, Toi

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The authors explored the process of implementing a medical student-initiated program designed to provide computerized mental health screening, referral, and education in a homeless shelter. Method: An educational program was designed to teach homeless shelter staff about psychiatric disorders and culturally-informed treatment…

  16. 24 CFR 576.103 - Homelessness prevention component.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Homelessness prevention component... and Eligible Activities § 576.103 Homelessness prevention component. ESG funds may be used to provide... paragraph (1) of the “homeless” definition in § 576.2. This assistance, referred to as...

  17. 24 CFR 576.103 - Homelessness prevention component.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Homelessness prevention component... and Eligible Activities § 576.103 Homelessness prevention component. ESG funds may be used to provide... paragraph (1) of the “homeless” definition in § 576.2. This assistance, referred to as...

  18. 24 CFR 576.103 - Homelessness prevention component.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Homelessness prevention component... and Eligible Activities § 576.103 Homelessness prevention component. ESG funds may be used to provide... paragraph (1) of the “homeless” definition in § 576.2. This assistance, referred to as...

  19. Homeless Children: Meeting the Educational Challenges. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goins, Brad; Cesarone, Bernard

    Difficulties faced by homeless children include depression, low self-esteem, lack of sleep and nutrition, and feelings of shame and embarrassment. Challenges faced by schools in providing education to homeless children include: (1) keeping children in one school despite frequent family moves; (2) ensuring that children's health records are…

  20. Confronting Homelessness among American Families: Federal Programs and Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeWoody, Madelyn

    This book offers specific information on the wide range of federal prevention, emergency shelter, and family service programs available today that provide children and families who are homeless or at risk of homelessness with financial support, education, job training, nutritional services, and crisis funding. The chapters are: (1) "Coordinating a…

  1. Strengthening At-Risk and Homeless Young Mothers and Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medeiros, Debra; Vaulton, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    The Strengthening At Risk and Homeless Young Mothers and Children Initiative, funded by the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation, aims to improve the housing, health, and development of homeless and at-risk young families. This article describes the services provided in four program sites (Pomona, CA; Antelope Valley, CA; Minneapolis, MN; and Chicago, IL)…

  2. Living the Research: Stories from Homeless Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norum, Karen E.

    There is an alarming trend in homelessness: children aged 17 and younger are the most rapidly growing group of the homeless; families continue to be a growing group of the homeless; and many people who are homeless were raised or have lived in the suburbs. Homelessness is no longer an inner-city phenomenon. Three homeless youth were interviewed…

  3. The prevalence and characteristics of homelessness in the NSW substance treatment population: implications for practice.

    PubMed

    Allan, Julaine; Kemp, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the prevalence and characteristics of homelessness episodes in Australian substance misuse treatment. A dataset containing all closed substance treatment episodes in NSW, Australia from July 2006 to June 2011 was used. Statistical analysis was used to determine any relationships between demographic and treatment variables and homelessness. Of the 213, 129 treatment episodes in the dataset 12.8% have some form of homelessness. Non-government and residential services have the highest prevalence of homelessness. Sex, age, and drug type have weak relationships with homelessness. Leaving against the advice of the treatment provider is more common in episodes where homelessness is a factor. Homelessness is a problem experienced by a significant proportion of the substance treatment population and treatment providers have an opportunity and an obligation to address it in their treatment delivery. PMID:24483335

  4. Characteristics of Mothers Caring for Children During Episodes of Homelessness

    PubMed Central

    Whitbeck, Les B.; Armenta, Brian E.

    2016-01-01

    This study provides a description of the physical, psychological, and substance use problems of adult homeless women who are and are not caring for children. We also examined differences in the characteristics of these two groups of women. Interviews were conducted with 148 homeless women from three mid-sized U.S. cities, 24.3 % of whom were caring for at least one child. Our results showed that women caring for children were more likely to be sheltered and have health insurance. Homeless women caring for children and solitary homeless women were generally similar in terms of substance abuse problems. However, rates of Borderline Personality Disorder were higher among women caring for children than among solitary homeless women. Our results are somewhat consistent with previous research, with the exception of substance abuse problems and mental health problems, which were shown to be equally problematic for all women, regardless of current caregiving status. PMID:25536936

  5. Aging on the Street: Homeless Older Adults in America.

    PubMed

    Sorrell, Jeanne M

    2016-09-01

    Older adults are at greater risk for homelessness today than at any time in recent history. Approximately one half of homeless individuals in America are older than 50, which has created serious challenges for how cities, governments, and health care providers care for homeless populations. Systems established in the 1980s to help care for homeless individuals were not designed to address problems of aging. It is critical that nurses and all health professionals have a better understanding of the unique needs and concerns of homeless older adults. Nurses can be an important part of the solution, not only through direct patient care but by advocating for improvements in care for this vulnerable population. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 54(9), 25-29.]. PMID:27576225

  6. National Center on Family Homelessness

    MedlinePlus

    ... efforts to understand and respond to homelessness, trauma, poverty and the need for social services and supports ... efforts to understand and respond to homelessness, trauma, poverty and the need for social services and supports ...

  7. Twenty-Five Years of Child and Family Homelessness: Where Are We Now?

    PubMed Central

    Gracy, Delaney; Goldsmith, Grifin; Shapiro, Alan; Redlener, Irwin E.

    2013-01-01

    Family homelessness emerged as a major social and public health problem in the United States during the 1980s. We reviewed the literature, including journal articles, news stories, and government reports, that described conditions associated with family homelessness, the scope of the problem, and the health and mental health of homeless children and families. Much of this literature was published during the 1980s and 1990s. This raises questions about its continued applicability for the public health community. We concluded that descriptions of the economic conditions and public policies associated with family homelessness are still relevant; however, the homeless family population has changed over time. Family homelessness has become more prevalent and pervasive among poor and low-income families. We provide public health recommendations for these homeless families. PMID:24148055

  8. Homelessness: From the Clients' Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hertzberg, Edwina L.

    Although homelessness is not a new phenomenon, the number of homeless people today has fostered mobilization on their behalf by public and private sectors. Principal factors accepted as contributing to homelessness are inadequate low-cost housing, unemployment, chemical dependency, family violence, and inadequate community services for the…

  9. No Homeless Child Left behind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saxberg, David

    2011-01-01

    Although it is difficult to determine the precise number of homeless children, the National Coalition for the Homeless reports that there are more than 1.3 million children lacking a permanent residence on any given night. Further, 39 percent of the homeless population was comprised of children under the age of 18 in July 2009, the most recent…

  10. Health of the homeless and climate change.

    PubMed

    Ramin, Brodie; Svoboda, Tomislav

    2009-07-01

    The homeless are amongst the most vulnerable groups in developed regions, suffering from high rates of poorly controlled chronic disease, smoking, respiratory conditions, and mental illness, all of which render them vulnerable to new and resurgent disease processes associated with climate change. To date, there have been no papers reviewing the impacts of climate change on the homeless population. This paper provides a framework for understanding the nature of such an impact. We review four pathways: increased heat waves, increased air pollution, increased severity of floods and storms, and the changing distribution of West Nile Virus. We emphasize the need for further debate and research in this field. PMID:19444615

  11. A Different Kind of Smart: A Study of the Educational Obstacles Confronting Homeless Youth in New England.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Melanie; Houghton, Alison

    This study provides information on obstacles facing homeless youth in school. Research occurred in four diverse New England cities. Researchers collected detailed case histories on youth age 10-15 years who were currently homeless or who had recently been homeless. Data came from staff of local youth agencies, government officials, and youths…

  12. 78 FR 17703 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-22

    ... Aeronautics & Space Administration, Code JX, Washington, DC 20546, (202)-358-1124; VA: Ms. Jessica L. Kaplan... Number: 71201310002 Status: Underutilized Directions: T1701-T1704 Comments: Secured area; public access... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of...

  13. Gender Differences in Predictors of Suicidal Thoughts and Attempts Among Homeless Veterans that Abuse Substances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benda, Brent B.

    2005-01-01

    This study of 315 male and 310 female homeless military veterans in a V.A. inpatient program designed to treat substance abusers, many of whom also suffer psychiatric disorders, was designed to examine gender differences in factors associated with the odds of having suicidal thoughts, and of attempting suicide, in comparison to being nonsuicidal.…

  14. Adapting an Evidence-Based Intervention for Homeless Women: Engaging the Community in Shared Decision-making

    PubMed Central

    Cederbaum, Julie A.; Song, Ahyoung; Hsu, Hsun-Ta; Tucker, Joan S.; Wenzel, Suzanne L.

    2014-01-01

    As interest grows in the diffusion of evidence-based interventions (EBIs), there is increasing concern about how to mitigate implementation challenges; this paper concerns adapting an EBI for homeless women. Complementing earlier focus groups with homeless women, homeless service providers (n = 32) were engaged in focus groups to assess capacity, needs, and barriers with implementation of EBIs. Deductive analyses of data led to the selection of four EBIs. Six consensus groups were then undertaken; three each with homeless women (n = 24) and homeless service providers (n = 21). The selected EBI was adapted and pretested with homeless women (n = 9) and service providers (n = 6). The structured consensus group process provided great utility and affirmed the expertise of homeless women and service providers as experts in their domain. Engaging providers in the selection process reduced the structural barriers within agencies as obstacles to diffusion. PMID:25418227

  15. Comprehensive Planning To Address Homelessness. City Initiatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zawisza, Kris

    This packet contains documents that provide information about the planning and implementation of a comprehensive plan to address homelessness in cities throughout the U.S. Information on the following components of a comprehensive strategy are included: (1) "Task Forces"; (2) "Assessment Studies"; (3) "Emergency Services"; (4) "Transitional…

  16. Extreme weather-related health needs of people who are homeless.

    PubMed

    Cusack, Lynette; van Loon, Antonia; Kralik, Debbie; Arbon, Paul; Gilbert, Sandy

    2013-01-01

    To identify the extreme weather-related health needs of homeless people and the response by homeless service providers in Adelaide, South Australia, a five-phased qualitative interpretive study was undertaken. (1) Literature review, followed by semi-structured interviews with 25 homeless people to ascertain health needs during extreme weather events. (2) Identification of homeless services. (3) Semi-structured interviews with 16 homeless service providers regarding their response to the health needs of homeless people at times of extreme weather. (4) Gap analysis. (5) Suggestions for policy and planning. People experiencing homelessness describe adverse health impacts more from extreme cold, than extreme hot weather. They considered their health suffered more, because of wet bedding, clothes and shoes. They felt more depressed and less able to keep themselves well during cold, wet winters. However, homeless service providers were more focussed on planning for extra service responses during times of extreme heat rather than extreme cold. Even though a city may be considered to have a temperate climate with a history of very hot summers, primary homeless populations have health needs during winter months. The experiences and needs of homeless people should be considered in extreme weather policy and when planning responses. PMID:22950903

  17. Where There Is No Hope: A Teacher's Experience with Homelessness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nath, Veena; Hallett, Ronald E.

    2015-01-01

    Stereotypical notions of who experiences homelessness frame how educational institutions approach policy and program development. This life history of a teacher challenges assumptions by providing an in-depth look at a mother's struggle to find stability.

  18. Estimating the number of homeless deaths in France, 2008–2010

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The homeless population of France has increased by 50% over the last 10 years. Studies have shown that homelessness is associated with a high risk of premature death. The aim of this study was to estimate the number of homeless deaths in France between 2008 and 2010, using a reproducible method. Methods We used the capture-recapture method to estimate the number of homeless deaths in France using two independent sources. An associative register of homeless deaths was matched with the national exhaustive database of the medical causes of death, using several matching approaches based on various combinations of the following variables: gender, age, place of death, date of death. Results The estimated number of homeless deaths between 2008 and 2010 was 6730 (95% CI: [4381–9079]), a number greatly underestimated by the two sources considered separately (less than 20%). Conclusions In the absence of a register of the homeless deaths, the capture-recapture method provides an order of magnitude for evaluation of the resources that may be allocated by policy makers to manage the issue. Based on common and routinely produced databases, this estimate may therefore be used to monitor the mortality of the homeless population. Further studies about homeless mortality, particularly on the lead causes of deaths, are needed to manage this issue and to implement strategy to decrease the number of homeless deaths. PMID:24999114

  19. Moving Away From Homelessness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gael, Young Fine

    This discussion document from a symposium on shut out youth attempts to heighten awareness of the housing problems experienced by youth in Ireland. It is based on information obtained from a questionnaire sent to voluntary organizations working in local areas. It focuses on homelessness and its related issues of health, education, and the…

  20. Hope for Homeless Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Cyndy Jones

    1996-01-01

    The Thomas J. Pappas Regional Education Center in Phoenix, Arizona, is a magnet school for homeless students from unorganized territories, military installations, Indian reservations, and national forest lands. This "accommodation" school, supported by federal grants, in-kind business donations, and committed volunteer mentors from the local…

  1. Readings in Homelessness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matuszowicz, Peter F.

    Researchers have documented links between a number of behavioral issues and homelessness, including the following: limited/no social networks; social isolation; proneness of victimization; history of emotional, physical, sexual, and substance abuse; lack of education; and anxiety resulting from inadequate physical space. The possible benefits of…

  2. Telephone Enrollment in the VA Healthcare System. Interim final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-03-16

    This rulemaking amends VA's medical regulations to allow veterans to complete applications for health care enrollment by telephone by providing application information to a VA employee, agreeing to VA's provisions regarding copayment liability and assignment of third-party insurance benefits, and attesting to the accuracy and authenticity of the information provided over the phone. This action will make it easier for veterans to apply to enroll and will speed VA processing of applications. PMID:26987128

  3. Barriers and aids in conducting research with older homeless individuals.

    PubMed

    Vance, D

    1995-06-01

    Field notes of a qualitative pilot study of older homeless people in Cincinnati identified several barriers and aids to the study of homeless elders. Identified research barriers were researcher's lack of contextual wisdom (street smarts), locating elders, substance abuse, attrition, victimization, credibility of informants, and xenophobia. Identified research aids were friendliness of certain elders, openness of the researcher, attractive incentives in exchange for interviews, and service providers' willingness to share experiences. PMID:7568590

  4. The Neighborhood Context of Homelessness

    PubMed Central

    Pollio, David E.; North, Carol S.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We examined and compared the changing neighborhood characteristics of a group of homeless adults over time. Methods. We collected the addresses of previous housing and sleep locations from a longitudinal study of 400 homeless adults in the St. Louis, Missouri, region and compared census measures of housing and economic opportunities at different points along individual pathways from housing to homelessness and at 1- and 2-year follow-up interviews. Results. Sleep locations of homeless adults were much more concentrated in the urban core at baseline than were their previous housed and follow-up locations. These core areas had higher poverty, unemployment, and rent-to-income ratios and lower median incomes. Conclusions. The spatial concentration of homeless adults in areas with fewer opportunities and more economic and housing distress may present additional barriers to regaining stable housing and employment. A big-picture spatial and time-course viewpoint is critical for both policymakers and future homelessness researchers. PMID:23409889

  5. Marketing to the marginalised: tobacco industry targeting of the homeless and mentally ill

    PubMed Central

    Apollonio, D; Malone, R

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the tobacco industry's relationships with and influence on homeless and mentally ill smokers and organisations providing services to them. Methods: Analysis of internal tobacco industry documents and journal articles. Results: The tobacco industry has marketed cigarettes to the homeless and seriously mentally ill, part of its "downscale" market, and has developed relationships with homeless shelters and advocacy groups, gaining positive media coverage and political support. Discussion: Tobacco control advocates and public health organisations should consider how to target programmes to homeless and seriously mentally ill individuals. Education of service providers about tobacco industry efforts to cultivate this market may help in reducing smoking in these populations. PMID:16319365

  6. Hearing the silent voices: narratives of health care and homelessness.

    PubMed

    Wise, Caitlin; Phillips, Kenneth

    2013-05-01

    Most homeless individuals lack adequate health care. With existing literature as a backdrop, this study sought to understand the experience of homeless persons in the health care system. Using a phenomenological approach, 11 homeless participants were interviewed and the transcripts from these interviews were analyzed for meaning. The health care experiences of the participants could be understood only when viewed within the context of homelessness. The four polar themes that emerged from the analysis--same/different, fair/unfair, freedom/barriers, and choice/no choice--highlighted the great divide between the health care experiences of those with a home and those without. Such understanding can help mental health nurses provide more appropriate care to this population. PMID:23663023

  7. Understanding the Attainment of Stable Housing: A Seven-Year Longitudinal Analysis of Homeless Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Braciszewski, Jordan M.; Toro, Paul A.; Stout, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Stable housing provides a solid foundation for youth development, making it an essential topic of study among young homeless people. Although gains have been made in research with adolescents and young adults experiencing homelessness, few longitudinal studies of this population exist, clouding the long-term housing outcome picture. The current study examined the course and risk factors for homelessness in a sample of 243 homeless adolescents followed over a seven-year period. The vast majority of youth returned to stable housing quickly; however, early experiences of homelessness, even at this young age, were observed to have a substantial negative impact on future housing. Participants from poorer neighborhoods and those identifying as ethnic minorities also took longer to achieve stable housing. The data suggest that family reunification interventions may serve this population well. Preparing youth for returning home may prevent subsequent homeless episodes, while also improving their overall functioning. PMID:26997683

  8. 48 CFR 819.7109 - VA review of application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS VA Mentor-Protégé Program 819.7109 VA review of application. (a) VA OSDBU will review the information to establish the mentor and protégé eligibility and to ensure... charge to apply for the Mentor-Protégé Program. (b) After OSDBU completes its review and provides...

  9. 48 CFR 819.7109 - VA review of application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS VA Mentor-Protégé Program 819.7109 VA review of application. (a) VA OSDBU will review the information to establish the mentor and protégé eligibility and to ensure... charge to apply for the Mentor-Protégé Program. (b) After OSDBU completes its review and provides...

  10. 48 CFR 819.7109 - VA review of application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS VA Mentor-Protégé Program 819.7109 VA review of application. (a) VA OSDBU will review the information to establish the mentor and protégé eligibility and to ensure... charge to apply for the Mentor-Protégé Program. (b) After OSDBU completes its review and provides...

  11. 48 CFR 819.7109 - VA review of application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS VA Mentor-Protégé Program 819.7109 VA review of application. (a) VA OSDBU will review the information to establish the mentor and protégé eligibility and to ensure... charge to apply for the Mentor-Protégé Program. (b) After OSDBU completes its review and provides...

  12. 48 CFR 819.7109 - VA review of application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS VA Mentor-Protégé Program 819.7109 VA review of application. (a) VA OSDBU will review the information to establish the mentor and protégé eligibility and to ensure... charge to apply for the Mentor-Protégé Program. (b) After OSDBU completes its review and provides...

  13. An Inside Look at Homeless Youths’ Social Networks: Perceptions of Substance Use Norms1

    PubMed Central

    Melander, Lisa A.; Tyler, Kimberly A.; Schmitz, Rachel M.

    2016-01-01

    Substance use among homeless young people is a pervasive problem, and there have been many efforts to understand more about the dynamics of this health compromising behavior. The current study examined perceived substance use norms within homeless youths’ social networks utilizing in-depth interviews. The sample included 19 homeless individuals aged 16 to 21. Four elements of substance use within networks emerged: substance use choices, drug use safety issues, encouragement and/or discouragement, and appropriate situations in which substance use is condoned. These findings provide unique insight into the norms associated with drug and alcohol use within homeless youths’ social networks. PMID:26989340

  14. Childhood risk factors for homelessness among homeless adults.

    PubMed Central

    Koegel, P; Melamid, E; Burnam, m A

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. This effort used data from the Course of Homelessness study and comparative secondary data on the general population to identify negative childhood and family background experiences that may increase risk for adult homelessness. METHODS. Frequencies of negative childhood experiences were examined among a probability sample of 1563 homeless adults. Differences in risk for such experiences were calculated by sex, age cohort, and racial/ethnicity status. Where possible, rates of negative childhood experiences among the homeless were compared with the general population. RESULTS. Substantial numbers of this sample experienced multiple problems as children across several domains: poverty, residential instability, and family problems. Women and Whites disproportionately reported experiences suggestive of personal or family problems; non-Whites disproportionately reported experiences suggestive of personal or family problems; non-Whites disproportionately reported experiences suggestive of poverty. Homeless adults were at increased risk of childhood out-of-home placement, tenure in public housing, and homelessness, but not at greater risk for physical abuse. Women appeared to be at greater risk for sexual abuse. CONCLUSIONS. The problems that homeless individuals experience as adults have very clear analogs in their childhoods. Vulnerability to homelessness stems from factors unevenly distributed across age, sex, and race/ethnicity groups. PMID:7503338

  15. Homelessness: Too Early To Tell What Kinds of Prevention Assistance Work Best. Report to the Congress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comptroller General of the U.S., Washington, DC.

    Although hundreds of state and local organizations provide homelessness prevention assistance, the Government Accounting Office (GAO) could not determine the effectiveness of this assistance because few assistance providers have the resources available to collect the client follow-up data needed for evaluation. Homelessness prevention programs,…

  16. Homelessness: An Annotated Bibliography of Australian Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loft, Jenny, Comp.; Davis, Mari, Comp.

    This bibliography, compiled for the International Year of Shelter for the Homeless, lists Australian works published since 1974 about homelessness. It includes definitions of homelessness from the literature and an introductory article looking at different perspectives on homelessness. The entries, mainly taken from FAMILY database, are each…

  17. Faces of Homelessness: A Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts State Dept. of Education, Quincy.

    A brief teacher's guide supplements a videotape of two 15-minute segments on homelessness. The stated objective of the video is to cover the issues of homelessness as they exist today and to dispel the stereotypes of homelessness leftover from earlier eras. A family which has found itself homeless is introduced and then aspects of the phenomenon…

  18. 34 CFR 303.17 - Homeless children.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Homeless children. 303.17 Section 303.17 Education... DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 303.17 Homeless children. Homeless children means children who meet the definition given the term homeless children and youths in section 725 (42 U.S.C....

  19. 34 CFR 303.17 - Homeless children.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Homeless children. 303.17 Section 303.17 Education... DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 303.17 Homeless children. Homeless children means children who meet the definition given the term homeless children and youths in section 725 (42 U.S.C....

  20. 34 CFR 303.17 - Homeless children.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Homeless children. 303.17 Section 303.17 Education... DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 303.17 Homeless children. Homeless children means children who meet the definition given the term homeless children and youths in section 725 (42 U.S.C....

  1. Can Better National Policy End Family Homelessness?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Nan

    2010-01-01

    An understanding of the close link between federal policy and family homelessness is critical for ensuring that one day no child in the United States is homeless. This article discusses the nature of family homelessness, the national policy framework that exists to help vulnerable families, the homeless assistance system that federal policy has…

  2. Predictors of Homelessness among Street Living Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slesnick, Natasha; Bartle-Haring, Suzanne; Dashora, Pushpanjali; Kang, Min Ju; Aukward, Erin

    2008-01-01

    While few studies have identified predictors of exiting homelessness among adults, even fewer studies have attempted to identify these predictors among homeless youth. The current study explored predictors of change in homelessness among 180 homeless youth between the ages of 14 and 22, recruited through an urban drop-in center. All youth were…

  3. Lost in the shuffle: culture of homeless adolescents.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Joanne O'sullivan; Burke, Pamela J

    2009-01-01

    Estimates indicate that approximately 1.7 million youth are homeless in the United States. Many associated risk factors have been identified for adolescent homelessness, including family conflict, leaving foster care, running away or being thrown away, physical or sexual abuse, and coming out to parents as gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, or questioning one's sexual identity (GLBTQ). The purpose of this ethnographic study was to explore the culture of homelessness for adolescents. Nineteen homeless adolescents from a major urban area in the northeast U.S. were observed and interviewed over an 18-month period. The elements of the street culture of homeless adolescents were identified by study participants' stories. For many study participants, the decision to live on the streets was a logical and rational alternative to remaining in possibly dangerous and unstable home environments. It provided a means to their generating social capital. Nevertheless, it can be concluded that existing programs and policies relative to adolescents who are at risk for homelessness or already living on the streets should be re-examined and redesigned to meet the unique needs of vulnerable youth so they do not get lost in the shuffle. PMID:19681376

  4. Obesity Among Chronically Homeless Adults: Is It a Problem?

    PubMed Central

    Rosenheck, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective We examined rates of obesity and associated characteristics in the chronically homeless population to explore how a range of factors, including sociodemographics, housing, food source, physical and mental health, and health service use, were related to being overweight or obese. Methods We conducted multivariate regression analyses on a community sample of 436 chronically homeless adults across 11 U.S. cities to examine the prevalence of obesity. Results The majority (57%) of chronically homeless adults were overweight or obese. Chronically homeless adults who were female or Hispanic appeared to be at particular risk for obesity. There were few differences on physical and mental health by weight group. Although overweight and obese chronically homeless adults were more likely to discuss exercise with a health-care provider, they reported engaging in less exercise than those who were underweight or normal weight. Conclusion These findings underscore the need for greater attention to obesity in chronically homeless adults and demonstrate a food insecurity-obesity paradox or poverty-obesity link. PMID:23277657

  5. Access to Pre-K Education under the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act. Pre-K Policy Brief Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boylan, Ellen; Splansky, Deborah

    2010-01-01

    The federal McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act ("McKinney-Vento") provides federal funding to states to address the problems that homeless children and youth encounter in enrolling, attending, and succeeding in the nation's public schools. McKinney-Vento requires states to develop plans that ensure homeless children and youth the same access…

  6. Educating Homeless Students: Promising Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stronge, James H., Ed.; Reed-Victor, Evelyn, Ed.

    This book is for educators who serve homeless students or students temporarily sharing houses with other families. It describes many promising strategies for working with these students. The chapters are: (1) "Educating Homeless Children and Youth: An Introduction" (James H. Stronge); (2) "Meeting the Developmental and Educational Needs of…

  7. Homeless identities: enacted and ascribed.

    PubMed

    Parsell, Cameron

    2011-09-01

    Homelessness has been a perennial concern for sociologists. It is a confronting phenomenon that can challenge western notions of home, a discrete family unit and the ascetics and order of public space. To be without a home and to reside in public places illustrates both an intriguing way of living and some fundamental inadequacies in the functioning of society. Much homelessness research has had the consequence of isolating the 'homeless person' as distinct category or indeed type of individual. They are ascribed with homeless identities. The homeless identity is not simply presented as one dimensional and defining, but this imposed and ill-fitting identity is rarely informed by a close and long-term engagement with the individuals it is supposed to say something about. Drawing on a recent Australian ethnographic study with people literally without shelter, this article aims to contribute to understandings of people who are homeless by outlining some nuanced and diverse aspects of their identities. It argues that people can and do express agency in the way they enact elements of the self, and the experience of homelessness is simultaneously important and unimportant to understand this. Further, the article suggests that what is presumably known about the homeless identity is influenced by day-to-day lives that are on public display. PMID:21899522

  8. Youth Homelessness: Early Intervention & Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamberlain, Chris; MacKenzie, David

    The issue of youth homelessness in Australia is examined in the context of relevant social and educational policies. The exploration is based on 8 years of research into the situation of homeless youth in Australia involving several studies, including a study of school students in 9 communities and field visits to 100 schools. In 1994, researchers…

  9. Research on Homelessness: An Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shinn, Marybeth; Weitzman, Beth C.

    1990-01-01

    Introduces an issue on the causes, consequences, and social response to homelessness, with contributions by scholars in anthropology, history, medicine, sociology, economics, public administration, law, and psychology. Much attention has been given to the problems of homeless individuals; this issue attempts a comprehensive overview of the…

  10. Youth Homelessness and Individualised Subjectivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrugia, David

    2011-01-01

    This article aims to contribute to understandings of youth homelessness and subjectivity by analysing identity construction in terms of young people's negotiation of the structural and institutional environment of youth homelessness. I suggest that while existing literature on this topic concentrates mainly on micro-social encounters, the…

  11. Public Policy and the Homeless.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gore, Albert, Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Describes regional and federal responses to the homelessness crisis, including the author-sponsored White House Conference on Homelessness Act. Supports legislative measures to accomplish the following goals: (1) increased low-income housing; (2) treatment of mentally ill and alcohol- and drug-dependent individuals; and (3) new approaches to…

  12. The Homeless in Contemporary Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bingham, Richard D.; And Others

    This book consists of 15 chapters on understanding and helping the homeless. The first seven chapters present the "new" homeless in historical context and describe this population and its situation. The remaining eight chapters discuss policy and program options of the government and other organizations in attempting to alleviate the problems of…

  13. Age and gender differences and predictors of victimization of the older homeless.

    PubMed

    Dietz, Tracy L; Wright, James D

    2005-01-01

    Using data from the National Survey of Homeless Assistance Providers and Clients (NSHAPC) and an application of Felson's Routine Activities Theory, this paper examines gender and age differences in victimization experiences of a sample of more than 4,200 homeless and near-homeless people, mostly adults. Results suggest that there are no differences in victimization experience by homelessness status and that the negative relationship between age and victimization rates found in the general population is also found in the homeless population. However, the relationship is relatively weak and erratic, suggesting that homeless older adults who are at least 50 years old are at increased risk of becoming victims, a finding consistent with Routine Activities Theory. In addition, similar to research with other populations, younger homeless males are statistically more likely to report being victims of theft and physical assault while females of all ages are more likely to report being victims of sexual assault. However, for older homeless adults, the gender difference in likelihood of victimization disappears. Perhaps because older homeless women are labeled as easy targets, they were equally as likely as men to be victims of physical assault and theft in old age. This is also consistent with Routine Activities Theory. PMID:16611616

  14. Changing homelessness services: revanchism, 'professionalisation' and resistance.

    PubMed

    Scullion, Lisa; Somerville, Peter; Brown, Philip; Morris, Gareth

    2015-07-01

    This paper argues that the increasing international salience of homelessness can be partially explained by reference to the revanchist thesis (involving processes of coerced exclusion and abjection), but the situation on the ground is more complex. It reports on interviews with 18 representatives of 11 homelessness service providers in one city in England. As Cloke et al. found, these providers tended to be either larger, more 'professional', 'insider' services or smaller, more 'amateur', 'outsider' services. However, this does not mean that the former were necessarily more revanchist and the latter less so. Rather, the actions of both types of organisation could, in some cases, be construed as both advancing and counteracting a revanchist project. PMID:25442718

  15. Comparisons of Prevention Programs for Homeless Youth

    PubMed Central

    Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane

    2014-01-01

    There are six HIV prevention programs for homeless youth whose efficacy has been or is currently being evaluated: STRIVE, the Community Reinforcement Approach, Strengths-Based Case Management, Ecologically-Based Family Therapy, Street Smart, and AESOP (street outreach access to resources). Programs vary in their underlying framework and theoretical models for understanding homelessness. All programs presume that the youths’ families lack the ability to support their adolescent child. Some programs deemphasize family involvement while others focus on rebuilding connections among family members. The programs either normalize current family conflicts or, alternatively, provide education about the importance of parental monitoring. All programs aim to reduce HIV-related sexual and drug use acts. A coping skills approach is common across programs: Problem-solving skills are specifically addressed in four of the six programs; alternatively, parents in other programs are encouraged to contingently reward their children. Each program also engineers ongoing social support for the families and the youth, either by providing access to needed resources or by substituting a new, supportive relationship for the existing family caretaker. All of the interventions provide access to health and mental health services as basic program resources. A comparison of HIV prevention programs for homeless youth identifies the robust components of each and suggests which programs providers may choose to replicate. PMID:19067164

  16. Self-identified health concerns of two homeless groups.

    PubMed

    Kinzel, D

    1991-04-01

    A number of conclusions can be drawn from the themes derived from the interview data. First, even though the most basic physical needs, such as food, clothing, and shelter were being met, a recurring theme from the responses of the homeless was the need for interaction with a caring person. The feeling that no one cares, a lack of self-worth, and a sense of limited control over their lives may lead to depression, hopelessness, and finally illness. The extent and effectiveness of health-seeking behaviors among this group are limited because of decreased trust, decreased motivation for self-care, and isolation from social and health care systems. Second, if health needs are to be met, services must be provided in sites where they can be accessed by the homeless. For transients, health care services may be provided most effectively through the shelters. For the SRO residents, these services could be provided through a combination of clinics in hotel lobbies and visits to rooms. Third, developing trust with the homeless includes meeting their self-perceived basic needs. What may seem like nonnursing activities, such as fixing a meal, may be important in establishing rapport with SRO residents. If a nurse assists a homeless person to meet survival needs, that person may be more willing to deal with health issues. Fourth, the population is highly heterogeneous. Each subgroup has its own identity. Most SRO residents do not want to be identified with street people, even through a portion of them move between street life and SRO life. Health care professionals need to recognize these differences, accept the life-style of each subgroup, and respect each homeless person as a unique individual. Finally, caring is the primary element necessary in providing nursing services to the homeless. Awareness and understanding of the homeless way of life will increase nurses' effectiveness in working with this ever growing population. PMID:2048311

  17. Electronic case management with homeless youth.

    PubMed

    Bender, Kimberly; Schau, Nicholas; Begun, Stephanie; Haffejee, Badiah; Barman-Adhikari, Anamika; Hathaway, Jessica

    2015-06-01

    Case management, a widely practiced form of service brokerage, is associated with a variety of positive outcomes for homeless youth, but it may be difficult to implement, as youth face logistical barriers to attending in-person meetings. As part of a larger clinical trial, the current study investigates the feasibility of providing electronic case management (ECM) to homeless youth, using cell-phones, texts, email, and Facebook. Youth were given prepaid cell-phones and a case manager who provided four ECM sessions every 2-3 weeks over a 3-month period. Contact logs were used to record how many youth engaged in ECM, how many attempts were necessary to elicit engagement, and youths' preferred technology methods for engaging. Although engagement in the number of ECM sessions varied, the majority of youth (87.5%) engaged in at least one ECM session. Youth (41%) most commonly needed one contact before they engaged in an ECM session, and the majority responded by the third attempt. While youth most commonly answered calls directly, their chosen method of returning calls was texting. The majority of youth (80%) described ECM positively, reporting themes of convenience, connection, and accountability. The use of ECM, particularly of texting, offers promising implications for providing services to homeless youth. PMID:25748603

  18. Challenges to immunization: the experiences of homeless youth

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    population. Conclusions To provide effective public health interventions, it is necessary to consider the knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and experiences of hard to reach, high risk groups. Our study shows that homeless youth are interested and capable in discussing immunization. Active targeting of homeless youth for public health immunization programs is needed. Working collaboratively with non-profit organizations that assist homeless youth provides an opportunity to increase their knowledge of infectious risks and to improve immunization strategies in this vulnerable group. PMID:22568937

  19. Everyday Experiences of Homeless Young People in Supported Accommodation Programmes in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danby, Susan; Farrell, Ann; Leiminer, Michele

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigates young people's accounts of governance in their everyday lives within a Supported Accommodation Assistance Program (SAAP) in regional Australia. The SAAP is a joint Commonwealth and State/Territory programme for assisting people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness by providing transitional supported accommodation and…

  20. Perchance to Sleep: Homeless Children without Shelter in New York City.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coalition for the Homeless, New York, NY.

    New York City's response to the demand for shelter has consistently been adequate. The city's homeless population is estimated at 35,000, including 11,000 members of homeless families, of whom almost 7,625 are children. The City's Human Resources Administration (HRA) has routinely failed to provide temporary emergency shelter for homeless…

  1. Culture Clash in San Francisco: Reconnecting Youth Who Are Homeless with Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gracenin, Damun

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a curriculum provided to homeless high school students in San Francisco. The curriculum is delivered at a community-based organization already serving the homeless rather than in the schools and features spontaneous symposiums, scheduled symposiums, independent learning, private and small group instruction in basic academic…

  2. Characterizing Stressors and Modifiable Health Risk Factors among Homeless Smokers: An Exploratory Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendzor, Darla E.; Reitzel, Lorraine R.; Businelle, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    This pilot study was conducted to explore the associations between stressors related to homelessness and modifiable health risk factors (poor diet, insufficient physical activity, and overweight/obesity) and to provide direction for future research. Participants (N = 57) were homeless adults enrolled in a smoking cessation program. Analyses were…

  3. Cornell University's Homeless Program: The "Give and Take" Process of Service-Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hales, Ann

    1996-01-01

    Describes a service-learning program at Cornell University's School of Hotel Administration that provides courses and community service activities related to homelessness and hunger. Reviews the program's three components: a course on housing and feeding the homeless, industry linkages, and a research and advocacy center. Presents student…

  4. School Selection for Students in Out-of-Home Care. Best Practices in Homeless Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Homeless Education at SERVE, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Legal Center for Foster Care and Education and the National Center for Homeless Education present this brief to provide a framework for local homeless education liaisons, educators, child welfare caseworkers, and other child welfare advocates for assessing best interest when selecting a school for students in out-of-home care. While the brief…

  5. The McKinney-Vento Education for Homeless Children and Youth Program: Implications for Special Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Losinski, Mickey; Katsiyannis, Antonis; Ryan, Joseph B.

    2013-01-01

    During the 2008-2009 academic school year, nearly a million (956,914) students were reported by school districts as being homeless, a 41% increase over just a 2-year period year. The purpose of this article is to provide a brief overview of national legislative efforts to address the education of children who are homeless, with a particular…

  6. Guiding the Discussion on School Selection. Best Practices in Homeless Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Homeless Education at SERVE, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act guarantees a child qualified as homeless the right to attend one of two schools: the school of origin or the local attendance area school. This brief explains the relevant legal provisions and provides a framework to assist in the decision-making process.

  7. YogaHome: teaching and research challenges in a yoga program with homeless adults.

    PubMed

    Davis-Berman, Jennifer; Farkas, Jean

    2012-01-01

    YogaHome is a therapeutic yoga program for homeless women. Developing and refining YogaHome provided a unique opportunity to explore the process of teaching yoga to women faced with the physical and emotional stress of living in a homeless shelter. Unique teaching and research challenges are presented and recommendations for future programs are discussed. PMID:23070681

  8. Conceptualizing Social Integration among Formerly Homeless Adults with Severe Mental Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Jack; Rosenheck, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    The multiple dimensions of social integration among formerly homeless adults with severe mental illness have not been well-studied. Previous studies have focused on clinical measures or narrow components of social integration. We used a multisite study of chronically homeless adults who were provided housing to (a) identify the main factors…

  9. Homeless Aging Veterans in Transition: A Life-Span Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Carla J.; Bridier, Nancy L.

    2013-01-01

    The need for counseling and career/educational services for homeless veterans has captured political and economic venues for more than 25 years. Veterans are three times more likely to become homeless than the general population if veterans live in poverty or are minority veterans. This mixed methods study emphasized a life-span perspective approach for exploring factors influencing normative aging and life-quality of 39 homeless veterans in Alabama and Florida. Seven descriptive quantitative and qualitative research questions framed the investigation. Study participants completed a quantitative survey reflecting their preferences and needs with a subset of the sample (N = 12) also participating in individual qualitative interview sessions. Thirty-two service providers and stakeholders completed quantitative surveys. Empirical and qualitative data with appropriate triangulation procedures provided interpretive information relative to a life-span development perspective. Study findings provide evidence of the need for future research efforts to address strategies that focus on the health and economic challenges of veterans before they are threatened with the possibility of homelessness. Implications of the study findings provide important information associated with the premise that human development occurs throughout life with specific characteristics influencing the individual's passage. Implications for aging/homelessness research are grounded in late-life transitioning and human development intervention considerations. PMID:24286010

  10. Toward Meeting the Needs of Homeless People with Schizophrenia: The Validity of Quality of Life Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Auquier, Pascal; Tinland, Aurelie; Fortanier, Cecile; Loundou, Anderson; Baumstarck, Karine; Lancon, Christophe; Boyer, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Objective To provide new evidence regarding the suitability of using quality of life (QoL) measurements in homeless people with schizophrenia, we assess the acceptability and psychometric properties of a specific QoL instrument (S-QoL 18) in a population of homeless people with schizophrenia, and we compare their QoL levels with those observed in non-homeless people with schizophrenia. Methods This multi-centre prospective study was conducted in the following 4 French cities: Lille, Marseille, Paris and Toulouse. Two hundred and thirty-six homeless patients with schizophrenia were recruited over a 12 month-period. The S-QoL 18 was tested for construct validity, reliability, external validity and sensitivity to change. The QoL of the 236 homeless patients was compared with 236 French age- and sex-matched non-homeless patients with schizophrenia. Results The eight-factor structure of the S-QoL 18 was confirmed by confirmatory factor analysis (RMSEA = 0.035, CFI = 0.95, GFI = 0.99 and SRMR = 0.015). Internal consistency, reliability and sensitivity to change were satisfactory. External validity was confirmed via correlations between S-QoL 18 dimension scores and SF-36, symptomatology and recovery scores. The percentage of missing data did not exceed 5%. Finally, homeless patients had significantly lower QoL levels than non-homeless patients with schizophrenia. Conclusions These results demonstrate the satisfactory acceptability and psychometric properties of the S-QoL 18, suggesting the validity of QoL measurement among homeless patients with schizophrenia. Our study also reported that QoL levels in homeless patients with schizophrenia were dramatically low, highlighting the need for new policies to eradicate homelessness and tackle poverty. PMID:24205390

  11. IMPLICATIONS OF HOMELESSNESS FOR PARENTING YOUNG CHILDREN: A PRELIMINARY REVIEW FROM A DEVELOPMENTAL ATTACHMENT PERSPECTIVE.

    PubMed

    David, Daryn H; Gelberg, Lillian; Suchman, Nancy E

    2012-01-01

    Although it has been well-documented that parents and children who experience homelessness often have compromised health and well-being, few studies have examined the potential implications of homelessness on the process of parenting young children. In this review, we consider how parents of young children might function under the circumstances of homelessness. We begin with a brief overview of the psychological, social, and medical characteristics of homeless mothers and their young children. Using a developmental attachment perspective, we next briefly review the central tasks of parenting during the first 5 years of life, including emotion regulation and fostering of child autonomy, with an eye toward how homelessness may compromise a mother's ability to complete these tasks. Finally, we provide suggestions for further research that incorporate a developmental attachment perspective and other relevant viewpoints. Because of the paucity of research in this area, our review seeks to provide a heuristic framework for future research, intervention development, and policy. PMID:22685362

  12. Who is Supporting Homeless Youth? Predictors of Support in Personal Networks

    PubMed Central

    de la Haye, Kayla; Green, Harold D.; Kennedy, David P.; Zhou, Annie; Golinelli, Daniela; Wenzel, Suzanne L.; Tucker, Joan S.

    2012-01-01

    Homeless youth lack the traditional support networks of their housed peers, which increases their risk for poor health outcomes. Using a multilevel dyadic analytic approach, this study identified characteristics of social contacts, relationships, and social networks associated with the provision of tangible and emotional support to homeless youth (N = 419, M age = 20.09, SD = 2.80). Support providers were likely to be family members, sex-partners, or non-street based contacts. The provision of support was also associated with contacts’ employment and homelessness status, frequency of contact, shared risk behaviors, and the number of network members that were homeless and employed. The results provide insights into how homeless youth could be assisted to develop more supportive social networks. PMID:23204810

  13. IMPLICATIONS OF HOMELESSNESS FOR PARENTING YOUNG CHILDREN: A PRELIMINARY REVIEW FROM A DEVELOPMENTAL ATTACHMENT PERSPECTIVE

    PubMed Central

    DAVID, DARYN H.; GELBERG, LILLIAN; SUCHMAN, NANCY E.

    2012-01-01

    Although it has been well-documented that parents and children who experience homelessness often have compromised health and well-being, few studies have examined the potential implications of homelessness on the process of parenting young children. In this review, we consider how parents of young children might function under the circumstances of homelessness. We begin with a brief overview of the psychological, social, and medical characteristics of homeless mothers and their young children. Using a developmental attachment perspective, we next briefly review the central tasks of parenting during the first 5 years of life, including emotion regulation and fostering of child autonomy, with an eye toward how homelessness may compromise a mother's ability to complete these tasks. Finally, we provide suggestions for further research that incorporate a developmental attachment perspective and other relevant viewpoints. Because of the paucity of research in this area, our review seeks to provide a heuristic framework for future research, intervention development, and policy. PMID:22685362

  14. Problem gambling and homelessness: results from an epidemiologic study.

    PubMed

    Nower, Lia; Eyrich-Garg, Karin M; Pollio, David E; North, Carol S

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of gambling disorder and comorbid psychiatric disorders in a homeless population and identify features related to potential subtypes. At baseline, participants were administered a structured interview including socio-demographic sections of the National Comorbidity Study (NCS) interview; seven diagnostic sections of the Diagnostic Interview Schedule (DIS); the alcohol and drug abuse sections of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview-Substance Abuse Module (CIDI-SAM); and the Homeless Supplement to the DIS. At nine months post-baseline assessment, participants were administered additional NCS family history questions and the South Oaks Gambling Screen (SOGS). Participants were an epidemiologic sample of 275 predominately African-American homeless individuals, grouped as lifetime non-gamblers (n = 60), recreational gamblers (n = 152), and problem gamblers (n = 63), recruited on the street and through homeless shelters. Results indicate that lifetime rates of sub-clinical problem (46.2%) and disordered (12.0%) gambling were significantly higher than in the general population. Problem gamblers were more likely than non-problem gamblers to meet diagnostic criteria for antisocial personality disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, bipolar disorder, and any psychiatric disorder, and more likely than non-gamblers to use illicit drugs or meet criteria for abuse/dependence for nicotine, alcohol, or any substance. This study provides evidence that problem gambling is a significant public health issue among the African-American homeless population. Homeless services should include assessment for problem gambling along with psychiatric disorders and referrals to resources and treatment programs. Future studies should explore the relationship of the onset and course of problem gambling and other psychiatric disorders with homelessness as well as racial differences in gambling patterns and problem severity

  15. Distal Stressors and Depression among Homeless Men.

    PubMed

    Coohey, Carol; Easton, Scott D

    2016-05-01

    Depression is a common problem among homeless men that may interfere with functional tasks, such as securing stable housing, obtaining employment, and accessing health services. Previous research on depression among homeless men has largely focused on current psychosocial resources, substance abuse, and past victimization. Guided by Ensel and Lin's life course stress process model, the authors examined whether distal stressors, including victimization and exposure to parent problems in childhood, contributed to men's depression above and beyond current (or proximal) stressors, such as substance abuse and health problems, and social resources. The sample consisted of 309 homeless men who had entered a federally funded emergency shelter. Using the Burns Depression Checklist, the authors found that one out of three men met the threshold for moderate to severe depression during the past week. The logistic regression showed that past exposure to parent problems was related to depression after accounting for current stressors and social resources (number of close adult relationships and whether their emotional support needs were met). Past victimization was not related to depression. To address men's depression, workers should concurrently provide services that meet men's basic needs (for example, housing) and address their relationship needs, including their need for emotional support. PMID:27263201

  16. Overdose Deaths Among Homeless Persons

    MedlinePlus

    ... of them involving opioids—are now the biggest killer among homeless people in the Boston area. Drug ... Cancer and heart disease were the next biggest killers (at around 16 percent each); HIV =accounted for ...

  17. Homeless in God's Country: Coping Strategies and Felt Experiences of the Rural Homeless

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilton, Timothy; DeJong, Cornell

    2010-01-01

    This study examines coping behaviors and felt experiences of homeless adults in Michigan's Upper Peninsula. Data from in-depth interviews with 55 homeless adults reveal 5 general coping pattern groups: shelter users, campers, couch hoppers, mixed users, and circumstantial homeless. Homeless adults within each group experienced similar levels of…

  18. Homeless, Not Hopeless. An Informational Guide for School Personnel: Understanding and Educating Homeless Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seifert, Elli; Stauffer, Carol

    This guide explains how to educate homeless students within the public schools, focusing on the Saint Paul, Minnesota, public schools. Section 1 defines homelessness. Section 2 presents data on the increasing numbers of homeless students in the area. Section 3 describes common problems faced by homeless students, including family mobility,…

  19. Adverse Outcomes Among Homeless Adolescents and Young Adults Who Report a History of Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Harpin, Scott B.; Grubenhoff, Joseph A.; Rivara, Frederick P.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the prevalence of self-reported traumatic brain injury (TBI) among homeless young people and explored whether sociodemographic characteristics, mental health diagnoses, substance use, exposure to violence, or difficulties with activities of daily living (ADLs) were associated with TBI. Methods. We analyzed data from the Wilder Homelessness Study, in which participants were recruited in 2006 and 2009 from streets, shelters, and locations in Minnesota that provide services to homeless individuals. Participants completed 30-minute interviews to collect information about history of TBI, homelessness, health status, exposure to violence (e.g., childhood abuse, assault), and other aspects of functioning. Results. Of the 2732 participating adolescents and young adults, 43% reported a history of TBI. Participants with TBI became homeless at a younger age and were more likely to report mental health diagnoses, substance use, suicidality, victimization, and difficulties with ADLs. The majority of participants (51%) reported sustaining their first injury prior to becoming homeless or at the same age of their first homeless episode (10%). Conclusions. TBI occurs frequently among homeless young people and is a marker of adverse outcomes such as mental health difficulties, suicidal behavior, substance use, and victimization. PMID:25122029

  20. A Qualitative Study of Pregnancy Intention and the Use of Contraception among Homeless Women with Children

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Sara; Grewal, MPH Mandeep; Roberts, Elizabeth M.; Steinauer, Jody; Dehlendorf, Christine

    2014-01-01

    We undertook a qualitative analysis informed by grounded theory to explore pregnancy intention and the barriers to contraceptive use as perceived by homeless women with children. Semi-structured interviews (n = 22) were performed in English and in Spanish. The dominant theme emerging from the interviews was a strong desire to avoid pregnancy while homeless. However, few women in our sample used contraception or accessed reproductive health care consistently. There were multiple barriers to using contraception and to accessing reproductive health care services that homeless women reported: (1) inability to prioritize health due to competing demands, (2) shelter-related obstacles and restrictive provider practices that impede access to reproductive health care services and the use of contraception, and (3) change in the power dynamics of sexual relationships while homeless, making women more vulnerable to sexual exploitation. Findings suggest a multifactorial approach is needed to help homeless women use contraception and access reproductive health services. PMID:24858884

  1. The impact of psychosocial factors on subjective well-being among homeless young adults.

    PubMed

    Barczyk, Amanda N; Thompson, Sanna J; Rew, Lynn

    2014-08-01

    Homeless young adults are one of this country's most vulnerable populations, and information surrounding issues of subjective well-being among this particularly diverse population is scarce. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact social support, future expectations, and homeless cultural factors have on subjective well-being among homeless young adults. A purposive sample of 185 homeless young people, ages 18 to 23, and known to use alcohol or drugs, participated in the study. Multiple regression analyses showed that participants who had a higher level of subjective well-being reported significantly higher levels of social support, more optimistic expectations of the future, and a better perception of the flow of time. More fatalistic views of the future significantly predicted lower levels of subjective well-being. Findings suggest that service providers should focus on understanding the strengths of individuals and, specifically, gain a deeper understanding of homeless young adults' support networks and views of the future. PMID:25095630

  2. Recognizing work as a priority in preventing or ending homelessness.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Gary; Rio, John

    2007-07-01

    The literature speaks to the importance of employment in the lives of homeless individuals and shows how they can be assisted in job seeking (Long & Amendolia, 2003; Marrone, 2005; Quimby, Drake, & Becker, 2001; Rio, Russell, Dudasik, & Gravino, 1999; Rog & Holupka, 1998; Shaheen, Williams, & Dennis, 2003; Trutko, Barnow, Beck, Min, & Isbell, 1998). Some reports suggest it may be effective and worthwhile to offer employment at the earliest stages of engagement to help people who are homeless develop trust, motivation, and hope (Cook et al., 2001; Min, Wong, & Rothbard, 2004). Practitioners have historically focused on providing people with access to safe and affordable housing and supportive services, usually addressing employment later in the continuum. This practice-oriented report from the field proposes that employment should be offered as early as possible and maintains that facilitating employment is an unrecognized and underutilized practice for preventing and ending homelessness. The paper provides principles, practices, and strategies programs can use to make work a priority. PMID:17564838

  3. Barriers and facilitators to shelter utilization among homeless young adults.

    PubMed

    Ha, Yoonsook; Narendorf, Sarah C; Santa Maria, Diane; Bezette-Flores, Noel

    2015-12-01

    Rates of shelter use among homeless youth are low compared to use of other supportive services, yet research on barriers to shelter use has been conducted in limited regions, specifically in West Coast or Midwest cities. Additionally, while studies have generally focused on barriers to shelter use, studies on what might facilitate shelter use are lacking. This study explores barriers and facilitators to shelter use among homeless young adults from a large city in the Southwest region. Focus groups were conducted with a diverse sample of 49 homeless young adults ages 18-24. Drawing on models of health service use, findings were categorized into two domains--attitudinal and access. Themes related to attitudinal barriers include stigma/shame and self-reliance/pride. Attitudinal facilitators include the desire to extricate themselves from street life and turn their lives in a new direction. Access-related themes include barriers such as a lack of shelters and services available to meet the needs of youth, adverse shelter conditions, staff attitudes that are not acceptable to youth, restrictive shelter rules, restrictive definitions of homelessness, and a desire to differentiate themselves from older homeless individuals. Certain characteristics or circumstances (e.g., being pregnant), having supportive others, and shelters' ability to connect them to other services emerged as access facilitators to shelter use. Implications for policymakers, service providers, and future research are discussed. PMID:26246453

  4. Trajectories of women's homelessness in Canada's 3 northern territories

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Rose; Hrenchuk, Charlotte; Bopp, Judie; Poole, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Background Repairing the Holes in the Net was a 2-year, multilevel action research project designed to inform the development of culturally appropriate and gender-specific services for northern women who are homeless or marginally housed and who face mental health and substance use concerns. The study was designed to learn about the barriers and supports experienced by homeless women in the North when accessing mental health care, shelter, housing and other services; and to inform the work of northern service providers and policy advocates in a position to implement adjustments in their praxis. Methods This article describes the trajectories of women's service access and their ideas for service improvement from 61 qualitative, semi-structured interviews conducted with homeless women in Whitehorse, Yukon (YT), Yellowknife, Northwest Territories (NT), and Iqualit, Nunavut (NU). Results Unresolved trauma, poverty and social exclusion, inability to find and maintain housing and ineffective services emerged as interconnected and multifaceted challenges related to women's service engagement. In the face of these challenges, women displayed significant resilience and resistance, and offered important ideas for service improvement. Conclusions The 4 interconnected systemic challenges identified in the research, coupled with specific ideas for change cited by the resilient homeless women interviewed, offer points of entry to improve service policy and delivery. Implementing trauma-informed approaches emerged as a key example of how access to, and quality of, services could be improved for homeless women in the North. PMID:26700413

  5. Drug and drug-related supply promotion by pharmaceutical company representatives at VA facilities. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2012-03-01

    This final rule amends the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) regulations regarding access to VA facilities by pharmaceutical company representatives. The purposes of the rule are to reduce or eliminate any potential for disruption in the patient care environment, manage activities and promotions at VA facilities, and provide pharmaceutical company representatives with a consistent standard of permissible business practice at VA facilities. The amendments will facilitate mutually beneficial relationships between VA and pharmaceutical company representatives. PMID:22420057

  6. 34 CFR 300.19 - Homeless children.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Homeless children. 300.19 Section 300.19 Education... REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.19 Homeless children. Homeless children has...

  7. 34 CFR 300.19 - Homeless children.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Homeless children. 300.19 Section 300.19 Education... REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.19 Homeless children. Homeless children has...

  8. 34 CFR 300.19 - Homeless children.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Homeless children. 300.19 Section 300.19 Education... REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.19 Homeless children. Homeless children has...

  9. 34 CFR 300.19 - Homeless children.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Homeless children. 300.19 Section 300.19 Education... REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.19 Homeless children. Homeless children has...

  10. 34 CFR 300.19 - Homeless children.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Homeless children. 300.19 Section 300.19 Education... REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.19 Homeless children. Homeless children has...

  11. 78 FR 21256 - Shelter for the Homeless

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-10

    ... of the Secretary 32 CFR Part 226 RIN 0790-AI88 Shelter for the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the Under... Defense Shelter for the Homeless Program. This direct final rule makes nonsubstantive changes to the... the Homeless Program. DoD expects no opposition to the changes and no significant adverse...

  12. The Second Student-Run Homeless Shelter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seider, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    From 1983-2011, the Harvard Square Homeless Shelter (HSHS) in Cambridge, Massachusetts, was the only student-run homeless shelter in the United States. However, college students at Villanova, Temple, Drexel, the University of Pennsylvania, and Swarthmore drew upon the HSHS model to open their own student-run homeless shelter in Philadelphia,…

  13. Negative Cultural Capital and Homeless Young People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Justin David

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the ways in which homeless young people find a sense of self-worth and dignity within the conditions of youth homelessness. It notes that, while homeless young people seek a space where they do not feel marginalised and can attain a form of social status and cultural competence, they also engage in practices and acts of…

  14. Rural Homelessness: A Geography without a Geography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Mark

    1995-01-01

    Homelessness in rural Iowa is proportionately high but well hidden, obliging the rural homeless to discursively and materially relate their needs to a placeless condition of being defined by agencies, institutions, and academics. Positioning the homeless outside of social space places them in the space of nature, with implications for the meaning…

  15. Escaping Homelessness: Anticipated and Perceived Facilitators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Allisha; Tweed, Roger

    2009-01-01

    One study with two distinct sections was conducted to identify factors facilitating escape from homelessness. In Section 1, 58 homeless individuals rated possible facilitators of escape (factors they believed would help them become more independent and self-sufficient). In Section 2, 80 participants who had already exited homelessness rated the…

  16. An Annotated Publications List on Homelessness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tutunjian, Beth Ann

    This annotated publications list on homelessness contains citations for 19 publications, most of which deal with problems of alcohol or drug abuse among homeless persons. Citations are listed alphabetically by author and cover the topics of homelessness and alcoholism, drug abuse, public policy, research methodologies, mental illness, alcohol- and…

  17. The Paradox of Homelessness in America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levitan, Sar A.; Schillmoeller, Susan

    Homelessness is a growing problem in the midst of relative prosperity. However, as the problem persists, the public may be becoming increasingly less compassionate to the homeless and annoyed by the problem. Although it is difficult to determine how many people are homeless, the most widely circulated estimate puts their number at about 600,000.…

  18. Homelessness and Its Effects on Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart-Shegos, Ellen

    Homelessness influences every facet of children's lives, inhibiting their physical, emotional, cognitive, social, and behavioral development. Homeless women face such obstacles to healthy pregnancies as chemical abuse, chronic health problems, and lack of prenatal care. Homeless infants are more likely to have low birth weights and are at greater…

  19. The Invisible Homeless: A New Urban Ecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ropers, Richard H.

    Contemporary homelessness is the result of increasing social and economic inequality faced by those in American society who are most vulnerable to individual, family, and economic instability. This case study of the homeless population of Los Angeles (California), based on two surveys conducted in 1984, views the homeless as a segment of the…

  20. Innovative Efforts to Address Homelessness Among Veterans.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, Thomas P; Pape, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Ending homelessness among veterans has been a goal of the Department of Veterans Affairs for some time, and it is now becoming a reality in many communities. Unprecedented strides have been made through the rapid implementation of evidence-based innovations, capacity building, and a comprehensive strategic focus on 4 goals: prevention, moving veterans into permanent housing, providing the population-tailored care and services needed to keep them housed, and providing the supports necessary to allow them to recover and be productive members of their communities. PMID:26946863

  1. A prospective study of childhood and adolescent antecedents of homelessness among a community population of African Americans.

    PubMed

    Fothergill, Kate E; Doherty, Elaine E; Robertson, Judith A; Ensminger, Margaret E

    2012-06-01

    Much is known about contemporaneous correlates of homelessness from studies of homeless individuals. However, few studies have prospectively examined early antecedents and prevalence of homelessness in community populations. We use data from a 35-year study of a community population of African Americans to examine relationships between homelessness and prior structural, family, school, and behavioral influences. Nearly 22% of males and 16% of females reported homelessness between ages 15 and 42, providing a rare estimate within an African American urban community population. In bivariate analyses, lower school bonds, depressed mood, violent behavior, and running away in adolescence are predictive for both males and females. Teen parenting and angry mood are unique influences for females, while for males, poor first grade classroom conduct and adolescent substance use are unique risks. In multivariate analyses, poor classroom conduct and weaker school bonds predict homelessness among males, while teen parenting does so for females. Running away before age 15 is strongly predictive of later homelessness for both males and females. These results reveal the relative influence of multiple, interrelated early risks on homelessness and confirm our hypothesis that factors linked to other poor outcomes also relate to homelessness, underscoring another benefit to early prevention efforts. PMID:22234393

  2. Pathways to Homelessness among Older Homeless Adults: Results from the HOPE HOME Study

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Rebecca T.; Goodman, Leah; Guzman, David; Tieu, Lina; Ponath, Claudia; Kushel, Margot B.

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about pathways to homelessness among older adults. We identified life course experiences associated with earlier versus later onset of homelessness in older homeless adults and examined current health and functional status by age at first homelessness. We interviewed 350 homeless adults, aged 50 and older, recruited via population-based sampling. Participants reported age at first episode of adult homelessness and their life experiences during 3 time periods: childhood (<18 years), young adulthood (ages 18–25), and middle adulthood (ages 26–49). We used a structured modeling approach to identify experiences associated with first adult homelessness before age 50 versus at age 50 or older. Participants reported current health and functional status, including recent mental health and substance use problems. Older homeless adults who first became homeless before 50 had more adverse life experiences (i.e., mental health and substance use problems, imprisonment) and lower attainment of adult milestones (i.e., marriage, full-time employment) compared to individuals with later onset. After multivariable adjustment, adverse experiences were independently associated with experiencing a first episode of homelessness before age 50. Individuals who first became homeless before age 50 had higher prevalence of recent mental health and substance use problems and more difficulty performing instrumental activities of daily living. Life course experiences and current vulnerabilities of older homeless adults with first homelessness before age 50 differed from those with later onset of homelessness. Prevention and service interventions should be adapted to meet different needs. PMID:27163478

  3. The Social Networks of Homeless Youth Experiencing Intimate Partner Violence

    PubMed Central

    Petering, Robin; Rice, Eric; Rhoades, Harmony; Winetrobe, Hailey

    2015-01-01

    While there is a growing body of research on intimate partner violence (IPV) experienced by the housed youth population, a limited amount is known about IPV experienced by homeless youth. To our knowledge, no previous studies have examined how homeless youths’ experience of IPV is related to their social network, even though the social networks of homeless youth have been shown to be significant indicators of health and mental health. The purpose of this study is to understand the relationship between IPV, gender, and social networks among a sample of 386 homeless youth in Los Angeles, California. Results revealed that one fifth of the sample experienced IPV in the past year. Stratified regression models revealed that IPV was not significantly related to any measure of male social networks; however, females who experienced IPV had more male friends (β = 2.03, SE = 0.89, p < .05) than females who did not experience IPV. Female homeless youth who witnessed family violence during childhood had more male friends (β = 2.75, SE = 1.08, p < .05), but those who experienced sexual abuse during childhood had fewer male friends (β = −2.04, SE = 0.93, p < .05). Although there was no significant difference in the rate of IPV victimization across genders, the context of this abuse appears to be drastically different. The results suggest that females with more male friendships are at greater risk for exposure to IPV. To date, there are few effective youth-targeted IPV prevention programs and none have been shown to be effective with homeless youth. These results provide insight into future program development. PMID:24421071

  4. Homelessness: Issues and Legislation in the 101st Congress. Updated.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasem, Ruth Ellen

    This report discusses the nature of homelessness and the homeless in America, recent programs that have been implemented to help the homeless, and issues concerning the Federal government's role in helping these people. The following topics concerning the characteristics of the homeless and the causes of homelessness are covered: (1) "Mental…

  5. Dying on the Streets: Homeless Persons’ Concerns and Desires about End of Life Care

    PubMed Central

    Bartels, Dianne M.; Ratner, Edward R.; Alderton, Lucy; Hudson, Brenda; Ahluwalia, Jasjit S.

    2007-01-01

    Background There is little understanding about the experiences and preferences at the end of life (EOL) for people from unique cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds. Homeless individuals are extreme examples of these overlooked populations; they have the greatest risk of death, encounter barriers to health care, and lack the resources and relationships assumed necessary for appropriate EOL care. Exploring their desires and concerns will provide insight for the care of this vulnerable and disenfranchised population, as well as others who are underserved. Objective Explore the concerns and desires for EOL care among homeless persons. Design Qualitative study utilizing focus groups. Participants Fifty-three homeless persons recruited from agencies providing homeless services. Measurements In-depth interviews, which were audiotaped and transcribed. Results We present 3 domains encompassing 11 themes arising from our investigation, some of which are previously unreported. Homeless persons worried about dying and EOL care; had frequent encounters with death; voiced many unique fears, such as dying anonymously and undiscovered; favored EOL documentation, such as advance directives; and demonstrated ambivalence towards contacting family. They also spoke of barriers to EOL care and shared interventions to improve dying among the very poor and estranged. Conclusions Homeless persons have significant personal experience and feelings about death, dying, and EOL care, much of which is different from those previously described in the EOL literature about other populations. These findings have implications not only for homeless persons, but for others who are poor and disenfranchised. PMID:17372789

  6. Supporting the Literacy Development of Children Living in Homeless Shelters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacGillivray, Laurie; Ardell, Amy Lassiter; Curwen, Margaret Sauceda

    2010-01-01

    There are approximately 1.5 million children in the United States who go to sleep each night without a home of their own (National Center on Family Homelessness, 2009). In this article, we provide insights into how educators can create greater classroom support, particularly in literacy learning and development, for this population. Drawing from…

  7. Summary of Head Start Provisions on Homelessness and Foster Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for the Education of Homeless Children and Youth, 2008

    2008-01-01

    On Wednesday, December 12, President Bush signed the "Improving Head Start for School Readiness Act of 2007" into law. The legislation reauthorizes the Head Start Act and contains numerous provisions on homelessness and foster care. A summary of those provisions is provided in this paper.

  8. Small Is Beautiful: The Library Train for Homeless Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheunwattana, Aree; Meksawat, Pimol

    This paper presents the story of an effort in Thailand to reach out to children in high-risk situations by providing them with a library on old train carriages. The Library Train Project was initiated in 1999 by the Railway Police Division within the Royal Police Office. It is aimed at offering education services to homeless children as a way of…

  9. Immigration and Schools: Supporting Success for Undocumented Unaccompanied Homeless Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for the Education of Homeless Children and Youth, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Attending school and securing lawful status in the United States are two keys to safety and security for undocumented unaccompanied homeless youth. This brief is designed to provide young people, immigration attorneys and advocates, McKinney-Vento liaisons and educators with basic information to help them access these keys. After describing some…

  10. Recognizing the Needs of the Homeless and the Hungry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    France, Joseph B.

    This publication describes services of selected American Red Cross chapters to the homeless and the hungry. Chapter profiles provide information on how chapters of various sizes develop, fund, and implement programs in response to their communities' needs. Program descriptions detail the chapters' fund-raising from private, public, and voluntary…

  11. A Look at Child Welfare from a Homeless Education Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Homeless Education at SERVE, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Although navigating the child welfare system can be daunting for those working in the field of homeless education, local liaisons and others must determine whether children in the child welfare system are eligible for McKinney-Vento services and collaborate with child welfare staff. This document provides an overview of the U.S. child welfare…

  12. 77 FR 1971 - Supplemental Security Income and Homeless Individuals

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-12

    ... some States) associated Medicaid coverage, as long as he or she meets all of the basic eligibility... ineligible for SSI \\3\\ because the institution in which they reside provides them with both housing and basic... obstacles to homeless individuals who are in need of emergency shelter? 8. Do current SSI eligibility...

  13. General Welfare Assistance: Barriers to Mentally Disabled Homeless Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Marjorie J.

    The present study describes specific conditions which are thought to interfere with application for general welfare assistance by homeless persons with mental disabilities. This report summarizes the observations and recommendations of direct-service providers who serve the target population in the Skid Row area of Los Angeles. In-depth structured…

  14. Materials on the Education of Homeless Children. Updated.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Shelley

    This document comprises resource materials on the education of homeless children. It is divided into three parts. Part 1, "Overview," collects publications of the Center for Law and Education, and articles and editorials from "Education Week" and "The New York Times." Part 2, "Relevant Statutes and Regulations," provides materials pertaining to…

  15. The Yellow School Bus Project: Helping Homeless Students Get Ready for School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vissing, Yvonne

    2003-01-01

    Describes the Yellow School Bus Project, a community program jointly sponsored by religious, civic, fraternal, business, and nonprofit organizations in Durham, New Hampshire, to provide homeless children with supplies and clothes to help them succeed in school. (PKP)

  16. Adults in Transition. A Report of the Fourth Year of the Adult Education for the Homeless Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Vocational and Adult Education (ED), Washington, DC. Div. of Adult Education and Literacy.

    In 1991, the Adult Education for the Homeless (AEH) Program consisted of projects in 31 states; a total of $7.4 million was available to these projects. The projects provided instruction in basic and life skills, further assisted homeless adults through counseling and life planning activities, and coordinated efforts with other homeless…

  17. Runaway and Homeless Youth Grants: Improvements Needed in the Grant Award Process. Report to Congressional Committees. GAO-10-335

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Kay E.

    2010-01-01

    The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) awards grants to provide shelter and services to runaway and homeless youth through the Basic Center, Transitional Living and Street Outreach Programs. In response to a mandate for a review of the grant award process for these programs in the Reconnecting Homeless Youth Act of 2008 (Pub. L. No.…

  18. The Most Frequently Asked Questions on the Education Rights of Children and Youth in Homeless Situations. Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for the Education of Homeless Children and Youth, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This document provides answers to frequently asked questions on the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act and the education rights of children and youth in homeless situations. The answers are general responses based on federal statutes, regulations, and guidance; relevant case law; and best practices from across the country. While the National…

  19. Navigating the Intersections of IDEA and McKinney-Vento: A Problem-Solving Process. Best Practices in Homeless Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Julianelle, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    The McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act is the main federal program concerning the education of children and youth experiencing homelessness. It provides federal funding to states, which then distribute the funds to their school districts through a competitive application process; the funds are used to ensure that children and youth…

  20. An Examination of the McKinney-Vento Act and Its Influence on the Homeless Education Situation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Peter Michael

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the central elements of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act and, drawing from Spillane's distributed leadership perspective, examines the policy's impact on the homeless education situation. Although the initial passing and subsequent revisions to McKinney-Vento are depicted as providing numerous benefits for students…

  1. Impacts of extreme weather on the health and well-being of people who are homeless.

    PubMed

    Pendrey, Catherine G A; Carey, Marion; Stanley, Janet

    2014-01-01

    This letter responds to the article by Cusack et al., 'Extreme weather-related health needs of people who are homeless' (Australian Journal of Primary Health, 2013, 19(3), 250-255), which addressed the impacts of extreme weather on the health of the homeless population in inner city Adelaide. We compare the findings of Cusack et al. to our own original research, based on interviews with service providers to the homeless in urban and rural Victoria. We further place this issue in the broader context of climate change, which is crucial given the expected increase in extreme weather events and associated health impacts. PMID:24290233

  2. Mobile Phone and Social Media Use of Homeless Youth in Denver, Colorado.

    PubMed

    Harpin, Scott; Davis, Jillian; Low, Hana; Gilroy, Christine

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate homeless youth mobile phone and social media use, to plan health promotion efforts. Nearly half (46.7%) of runaway/homeless youth in this sample (n = 181) owned a mobile phone and a majority of those devices were smart phones. Ownership did not vary significantly by shelter location, though regular use of Facebook was more prevalent among those in housing programs or camping, than those living on the streets. Over 90% of youth in the sample reported using Facebook. Such media use might facilitate parent, family, and health provider communications with homeless youth. PMID:27074405

  3. Ensuring Full Participation in Extra-Curricular Activities for Students Experiencing Homelessness. Best Practices in Homeless Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Homeless Education at SERVE, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Extra-curricular school activities, such as sports, music, theater, debate, and clubs, are often a key to engaging children and youth in school. They can provide students with a sense of belonging, stability, pride, and responsibility and strengthen a student's applications for higher education admission and scholarships. Homelessness, however,…

  4. The Impact of a Service-Learning Project on Student Awareness of Homelessness, Civic Attitudes, and Stereotypes toward the Homeless

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buch, Kim; Harden, Susan

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, the University of North Carolina at Charlotte (UNC Charlotte) joined in a community initiative with the Urban Ministry Center to provide shelter to the homeless during the winter months. A student organization was formed to sustain university support. The author created a service-learning project as part of a Citizenship and Service…

  5. Social Networks as the Context for Understanding Employment Services Utilization among Homeless Youth

    PubMed Central

    Barman-Adhikari, Anamika; Rice, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the factors associated with use of employment services among homeless youth. Social network characteristics have been known to be influential in motivating people's decision to seek services. Traditional theoretical frameworks applied to studies of service use emphasize individual factors over social contexts and interactions. Using key social network, social capital, and social influence theories, this paper developed an integrated theoretical framework that could capture the social network processes that act as barriers or facilitators of use of employment services by homeless youth, and understand empirically, the salience of each of these constructs in influencing the use of employment services among homeless youth. We used the “Event based-approach” strategy to recruit a sample of 136 homeless youth at one drop-in agency serving homeless youth in Los Angeles, California in 2008. The participants were queried regarding their individual and network characteristics. Data were entered into NetDraw 2.090 and the spring embedder routine was used to generate the network visualizations. Logistic regression was used to assess the influence of the network characteristics on use of employment services. The study findings suggest that social capital is more significant in understanding why homeless youth use employment services, relative to network structure and network influence. In particular, bonding and bridging social capital were found to have differential effects on use of employment services among this population. The results from this study provide specific directions for interventions aimed to increase use of employment services among homeless youth. PMID:24780279

  6. Service provision and barriers to care for homeless people with mental health problems across 14 European capital cities

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mental health problems are disproportionately higher amongst homeless people. Many barriers exist for homeless people with mental health problems in accessing treatment yet little research has been done on service provision and quality of care for this group. The aim of this paper is to assess current service provision and identify barriers to care for homeless people with mental health problems in 14 European capital cities. Method Two methods of data collection were employed; (i) In two highly deprived areas in each of the 14 European capital cities, homeless-specific services providing mental health, social care or general health services were assessed. Data were obtained on service characteristics, staff and programmes provided. (ii) Semi-structured interviews were conducted in each area with experts in mental health care provision for homeless people in order to determine the barriers to care and ways to overcome them. Results Across the 14 capital cities, 111 homeless-specific services were assessed. Input from professionally qualified mental health staff was reported as low, as were levels of active outreach and case finding. Out-of-hours service provision appears inadequate and high levels of service exclusion criteria were evident. Prejudice in the services towards homeless people, a lack of co-ordination amongst services, and the difficulties homeless people face in obtaining health insurance were identified as major barriers to service provision. Conclusions While there is variability in service provision across European capital cities, the reported barriers to service accessibility are common. Homeless-specific services are more responsive to the initial needs of homeless people with mental health problems, while generic services tend to be more conducive to long term care. Further research is needed to determine the effectiveness of different service delivery models, including the most effective coordination of homeless specific and generic

  7. Psychopharmacologic Services for Homeless Veterans: Comparing Psychotropic Prescription Fills Among Homeless and Non-Homeless Veterans with Serious Mental Illness.

    PubMed

    Hermes, Eric; Rosenheck, Robert

    2016-02-01

    Using national Veterans Health Administration (VHA) administrative data, this study evaluated differences in psychotropic medication use between homeless and non-homeless adults with serious mental illness (SMI) who used VHA services in 2010. The adjusted mean number of psychotropic prescription fills associated with homeless individuals were identified using regression models adjusted for socio-demographics, diagnoses, and use of health services. Of the 876,989 individuals with SMI using VHA services, 7.2 % were homeless at some time during 2010. In bivariate analysis, homeless individuals filled more psychotropic medication prescriptions compared with non-homeless individuals. However, after adjusting for potentially confounding variables, homeless individuals were found to have filled 16.2 % fewer prescriptions than non-homeless individuals when all psychotropics were analyzed together (F = 6947.1, p < .001) and for most individual classes of psychotropics. Greater use of residential/inpatient mental health services by the homeless was the most important single factor associated with filling more psychotropic prescriptions than non-homeless individuals. PMID:26202545

  8. Elderly Homeless Veterans in Los Angeles: Chronicity and Precipitants of Homelessness

    PubMed Central

    van den Berk-Clark, Carissa; McGuire, James

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We compared the characteristics of chronically homeless and acutely homeless elderly veterans to better understand precipitants of homelessness. Methods. We conducted interviews with 33 chronically and 26 acutely homeless veterans aged 65 years and older receiving transitional housing services in Los Angeles, California, between 2003 and 2005. We asked questions regarding their sociodemographic characteristics and other social status measures. Other precipitants of homelessness were acquired via observation and open-ended and structured questions. Results. Both veterans groups were more similar than different, with substantial levels of physical, psychiatric, and social impairment. They differed significantly in homelessness history, with chronically homeless veterans having more homelessness episodes and more total time homeless. They were also less educated and had smaller social networks. In response to open-ended questioning, elderly homeless veterans revealed how health and substance use issues interacted with loss of social support and eviction to exacerbate homelessness. Conclusions. Assessment of a range of factors is needed to address risk factors and events leading to homelessness. Further research with larger samples is needed to confirm the characteristics and needs of the elderly homeless veteran population. PMID:24148059

  9. Disaster response and people experiencing homelessness: Addressing challenges of a population with limited resources.

    PubMed

    Wexler, Bryan; Smith, Mary-Elise

    2015-01-01

    In this article the authors provide an overview of some issues that inhibit disaster planning and response for people experiencing homelessness and discuss the planning process conducted for this population in Worcester, MA. People experiencing homelessness face numerous challenges in preparing for disasters both natural and human caused. Similarly, providers attempting to aid these individuals must recognize and overcome various factors that hamper efforts to provide assistance. People experiencing homelessness lack the general resources many in the United States take for granted, including food, shelter, communication methods, and transportation. The population also has an increased prevalence of medical and psychiatric conditions. These factors amplify the typical difficulties in preparedness, communication, sheltering, and training for disasters. With these principles in mind, the authors reviewed the literature for best practices, identified potential stakeholders, and developed an annex to help address organization and delivery of care to those experiencing homelessness during a disaster. PMID:26150363

  10. An inexpensive, interdisciplinary, methodology to conduct an impact study of homeless persons on hospital based services.

    PubMed

    Parker, R David; Regier, Michael; Brown, Zachary; Davis, Stephen

    2015-02-01

    Homelessness is a primary concern for community health. Scientific literature on homelessness is wide ranging and diverse. One opportunity to add to existing literature is the development and testing of affordable, easily implemented methods for measuring the impact of homeless on the healthcare system. Such methodological approaches rely on the strengths in a multidisciplinary approach, including providers, both healthcare and homeless services and applied clinical researchers. This paper is a proof of concept for a methodology which is easily adaptable nationwide, given the mandated implementation of homeless management information systems in the United States and other countries; medical billing systems by hospitals; and research methods of researchers. Adaptation is independent of geographic region, budget restraints, specific agency skill sets, and many other factors that impact the application of a consistent methodological science based approach to assess and address homelessness. We conducted a secondary data analysis merging data from homeless utilization and hospital case based data. These data detailed care utilization among homeless persons in a small, Appalachian city in the United States. In our sample of 269 persons who received at least one hospital based service and one homeless service between July 1, 2012 and June 30, 2013, the total billed costs were $5,979,463 with 10 people costing more than one-third ($1,957,469) of the total. Those persons were primarily men, living in an emergency shelter, with pre-existing disabling conditions. We theorize that targeted services, including Housing First, would be an effective intervention. This is proposed in a future study. PMID:24894404