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Sample records for va homeless providers

  1. 76 FR 48204 - Fund Availability Under VA's Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-08

    ... in Massachusetts). If you do not know your project number. please call VA's Grant and Per Diem... AFFAIRS Fund Availability Under VA's Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program AGENCY: Department of... assistance under the Special Need Grant Component of VA's Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program....

  2. 78 FR 48543 - Veterans Health Administration Fund Availability Under the VA's Homeless Providers Grant and Per...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-08

    ... project is located in Massachusetts). If you do not know your project number, call VA's GPD Field Office... AFFAIRS Veterans Health Administration Fund Availability Under the VA's Homeless Providers Grant and Per... ] Component of VA's Homeless Providers GPD Program. The focus of this NOFA is to encourage applicants...

  3. 77 FR 12697 - VA Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-01

    ..., 2011, 2012, 2061, and 2064, the VA Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program, provides capital... provide grants to renovate facilities that already received a capital grant under Sec. 3 of the Homeless... addressed below. We would move the definition of ``capital lease'' to Sec. 61.4, and make the...

  4. 78 FR 12600 - VA Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-25

    ..., 2012, ] 2061, and 2064, the VA Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program provides capital grants... the Federal Register on March 1, 2012 (77 FR 12698), VA proposed to amend its regulations concerning... capital grants to eligible organizations, or per diem payments to entities that are either receiving...

  5. 78 FR 28949 - Fund Availability Under VA's Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program (Rehabilitation)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-16

    ...The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is announcing the availability of funds for assistance to rehabilitate currently operational Grant and Per Diem grantee facilities originally funded under VA's Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program (see funding priorities). This Notice of Funding Availability (NOFA) contains information concerning the program, funding priorities, application......

  6. 77 FR 12647 - Fund Availability Under VA's Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-01

    ... Department places special emphasis on addressing the needs of underserved populations, including homeless women veterans with or without the care of dependent children. 2. Funding Priority 2--VA is offering...

  7. 78 FR 28947 - Fund Availability Under VA's Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program (VANS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-16

    ... Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program and demonstrate an occupancy rate of 65 percent or better for... demonstrate an occupancy rate of 65 percent or better for the period of October 1, 2012, through March...

  8. 75 FR 3968 - Fund Availability Under the VA Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-25

    ... Assistance Act of 2001,'' Public Law 107-95, Sec. 5, codified as amended at 38 U.S.C. 2011, 2012, 2013, 2061... Act of 2001,'' Public Law 107-95, Sec. 5, codified as amended at 38 U.S.C. 2011, 2012, 2013, 2061... availability of funds for applications for assistance under the Capital Grant component of VA's...

  9. 77 FR 56712 - Agency Information Collection (Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program) Activities Under...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-13

    ... Form 10-0361-PDO. d. Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program, Special Needs Application, VA Form.... Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program, Per Diem Only Application, VA Form 10-0361-PDO--3,000 hours.... c. Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program, Per Diem Only Application, VA Form...

  10. 77 FR 39342 - Proposed Information Collection (Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program) Activity; Comment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-02

    .../or per diem for programs to assist homeless veterans' transition to independent living and to... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program) Activity; Comment.... Titles a. Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program, Capital Grant. Application, VA Form...

  11. VA Health Service Utilization for Homeless and Low-income Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Gabrielian, Sonya; Yuan, Anita H.; Andersen, Ronald M.; Rubenstein, Lisa V.; Gelberg, Lillian

    2016-01-01

    Background The US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)-VA Supportive Housing (VASH) program—the VA’s Housing First effort—is central to efforts to end Veteran homelessness. Yet, little is known about health care utilization patterns associated with achieving HUD-VASH housing. Objectives We compare health service utilization at the VA Greater Los Angeles among: (1) formerly homeless Veterans housed through HUD-VASH (HUD-VASH Veterans); (2) currently homeless Veterans; (3) housed, low-income Veterans not in HUD-VASH; and (4) housed, not low-income Veterans. Research Design We performed a secondary database analysis of Veterans (n = 62,459) who received VA Greater Los Angeles care between October 1, 2010 and September 30, 2011. We described medical/surgical and mental health utilization [inpatient, outpatient, and emergency department (ED)]. We controlled for demographics, need, and primary care use in regression analyses of utilization data by housing and income status. Results HUD-VASH Veterans had more inpatient, outpatient, and ED use than currently homeless Veterans. Adjusting for demographics and need, HUD-VASH Veterans and the low-income housed Veterans had similar likelihoods of medical/surgical inpatient and outpatient utilization, compared with the housed, not low-income group. Adjusting first for demographics and need (model 1), then also for primary care use (model 2), HUD-VASH Veterans had the greatest decrease in incident rates of specialty medical/surgical, mental health, and ED care from models 1 to 2, becoming similar to the currently homeless, compared with the housed, not low-income group. Conclusions Our findings suggest that currently homeless Veterans underuse health care relative to housed Veterans. HUD-VASH may address this disparity by providing housing and linkages to primary care. PMID:24714583

  12. Identifying Homelessness among Veterans Using VA Administrative Data: Opportunities to Expand Detection Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Rachel; Gundlapalli, Adi V.; Metraux, Stephen; Carter, Marjorie E.; Palmer, Miland; Redd, Andrew; Samore, Matthew H.; Fargo, Jamison D.

    2015-01-01

    Researchers at the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) have used administrative criteria to identify homelessness among U.S. Veterans. Our objective was to explore the use of these codes in VA health care facilities. We examined VA health records (2002-2012) of Veterans recently separated from the military and identified as homeless using VA conventional identification criteria (ICD-9-CM code V60.0, VA specific codes for homeless services), plus closely allied V60 codes indicating housing instability. Logistic regression analyses examined differences between Veterans who received these codes. Health care services and co-morbidities were analyzed in the 90 days post-identification of homelessness. VA conventional criteria identified 21,021 homeless Veterans from Operations Enduring Freedom, Iraqi Freedom, and New Dawn (rate 2.5%). Adding allied V60 codes increased that to 31,260 (rate 3.3%). While certain demographic differences were noted, Veterans identified as homeless using conventional or allied codes were similar with regards to utilization of homeless, mental health, and substance abuse services, as well as co-morbidities. Differences were noted in the pattern of usage of homelessness-related diagnostic codes in VA facilities nation-wide. Creating an official VA case definition for homelessness, which would include additional ICD-9-CM and other administrative codes for VA homeless services, would likely allow improved identification of homeless and at-risk Veterans. This also presents an opportunity for encouraging uniformity in applying these codes in VA facilities nationwide as well as in other large health care organizations. PMID:26172386

  13. 7 CFR 272.9 - Approval of homeless meal providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Approval of homeless meal providers. 272.9 Section 272... AGENCIES § 272.9 Approval of homeless meal providers. The State food stamp agency, or another appropriate... does in fact serve meals to homeless persons. Where the State food stamp agency identifies...

  14. 7 CFR 272.9 - Approval of homeless meal providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Approval of homeless meal providers. 272.9 Section 272... AGENCIES § 272.9 Approval of homeless meal providers. The State food stamp agency, or another appropriate... does in fact serve meals to homeless persons. Where the State food stamp agency identifies...

  15. 7 CFR 272.9 - Approval of homeless meal providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Approval of homeless meal providers. 272.9 Section 272... AGENCIES § 272.9 Approval of homeless meal providers. The State food stamp agency, or another appropriate... does in fact serve meals to homeless persons. Where the State food stamp agency identifies...

  16. 7 CFR 272.9 - Approval of homeless meal providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Approval of homeless meal providers. 272.9 Section 272... AGENCIES § 272.9 Approval of homeless meal providers. The State food stamp agency, or another appropriate... does in fact serve meals to homeless persons. Where the State food stamp agency identifies...

  17. 7 CFR 272.9 - Approval of homeless meal providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Approval of homeless meal providers. 272.9 Section 272... AGENCIES § 272.9 Approval of homeless meal providers. The State food stamp agency, or another appropriate... does in fact serve meals to homeless persons. Where the State food stamp agency identifies...

  18. Clinical and Demographic Factors Associated With Homelessness and Incarceration Among VA Patients With Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Alexander L.; Welsh, Deborah E.; McCarthy, John F.; Zeber, John E.; Kilbourne, Amy M.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. We assessed the association between homelessness and incarceration in Veterans Affairs patients with bipolar disorder. Methods. We used logistic regression to model each participant's risk of incarceration or homelessness after we controlled for known risk factors. Results. Of 435 participants, 12% reported recent homelessness (within the past month), and 55% reported lifetime homelessness. Recent and lifetime incarceration rates were 2% and 55%, respectively. In multivariate models, current medication adherence (based on a 5-point scale) was independently associated with a lower risk of lifetime homelessness (odds ratio [OR] = 0.80 per point, range 0–4; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.66, 0.96), and lifetime incarceration increased the risk of lifetime homelessness (OR = 4.4; 95% CI = 2.8, 6.9). Recent homelessness was associated with recent incarceration (OR = 26.4; 95% CI = 5.2, 133.4). Lifetime incarceration was associated with current substance use (OR = 2.6; 95% CI = 2.7, 6.7) after control for lifetime homelessness (OR = 4.2; 95% CI = 2.7, 6.7). Conclusions. Recent and lifetime incarceration and homelessness were strongly associated with each other. Potentially avoidable or treatable correlates included current medication nonadherence and substance use. Programs that better coordinate psychiatric and drug treatment with housing programs may reduce the cycle of incarceration, homelessness, and treatment disruption within this vulnerable patient population. PMID:19299667

  19. Providing smoking cessation programs to homeless youth: the perspective of service providers.

    PubMed

    Shadel, William G; Tucker, Joan S; Mullins, Leslie; Staplefoote, Lynette

    2014-10-01

    There is almost no information available on cigarette smoking among homeless youth, whether they are currently receiving services for smoking cessation, and how to best help them quit. This paper presents data collected from a series of semi-structured telephone interviews with service providers from 23 shelters and drop-in centers serving homeless youth in Los Angeles County about their current smoking cessation programming, interest in providing smoking cessation services to their clients, potential barriers to providing this service, and ways to overcome these barriers. Results indicated that 84% of facilities did not offer smoking cessation services, although nearly all (91%) were interested in doing so. Barriers to implementing formal smoking cessation programs on site included lack of resources (e.g., money, personnel) to support the programs, staff training, and concern that smoking cessation may not be a high priority for homeless youth themselves. Overall, service providers seemed to prefer a less intensive smoking cessation program that could be delivered at their site by existing staff. Data from this formative needs assessment will be useful for developing and evaluating a smoking cessation treatment that could be integrated into the busy, complex environment that characterizes agencies that serve homeless youth. PMID:25012554

  20. Providing Lifelines for Our Nation's Homeless Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffield, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses educational challenges for homeless children and explains how districts can and must meet their needs. According to the U.S. Department of Education Federal Data Collection, 1,065,794 homeless children and youth were enrolled in public schools for the school year 2010-2011, the highest number on record. After listing…

  1. Dental students' attitudes toward homeless people while providing oral health care.

    PubMed

    Habibian, Mina; Elizondo, Laura; Mulligan, Roseann

    2010-11-01

    Homeless people have multiple barriers in accessing health care services, and health care providers' negative attitudes toward homeless people have been suggested as part of the problem. Studies on dental students' attitudes toward homeless people are lacking, so our aim was to understand dental students' attitudes. Dental students under the supervision of faculty members spent one day per week for seven weeks at the University of Southern California Union Rescue Mission Dental Clinic providing comprehensive dental services to homeless patients. Students completed the attitudes towards the homeless questionnaire (ATHQ) before and after the rotation with an experience evaluation questionnaire at the end. Data were collected over two years. A total of 242 students completed the questionnaires. The score on the ATHQ after rotation increased slightly but statistically significantly (70.36 pretest/71.38 posttest, P=0.01). Students' age, gender, and prior contact with the homeless population were not related to their attitudes toward homeless patients. Eighty-five percent agreed that the rotation made them feel more comfortable treating homeless patients, and 98 percent agreed that the patients made their experience enjoyable. Results suggest that dental students had positive attitudes toward the homeless and their scores on the ATHQ improved slightly after providing care. PMID:21045223

  2. Increasing School Stability for Students Experiencing Homelessness: Overcoming Challenges to Providing Transportation to the School of Origin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Diana; Barksdale, Katina

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this monograph is to review the provisions of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act as related to the provision of transportation of homeless children and youth to their school of origin and provide recommendations for implementing the transportation mandate. The National Center for Homeless Education (NCHE) in 2003-2004…

  3. 78 FR 26250 - Payment for Home Health Services and Hospice Care to Non-VA Providers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-06

    ... November 21, 2011 (76 FR 71920), VA proposed to amend its regulations concerning the billing methodology... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 17 RIN 2900-AN98 Payment for Home Health Services and Hospice Care to Non-VA Providers... services and hospice care. Because the newly applicable methodology cannot supersede rates for which VA...

  4. Comparing Homeless Persons’ Care Experiences in Tailored Versus Nontailored Primary Care Programs

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Cheryl L.; Steward, Jocelyn L.; Jones, Richard N.; Roth, David L.; Stringfellow, Erin; Gordon, Adam J.; Kim, Theresa W.; Austin, Erika L.; Henry, Stephen Randal; Kay Johnson, N.; Shanette Granstaff, U.; O’Connell, James J.; Golden, Joya F.; Young, Alexander S.; Davis, Lori L.; Pollio, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We compared homeless patients’ experiences of care in health care organizations that differed in their degree of primary care design service tailoring. Methods. We surveyed homeless-experienced patients (either recently or currently homeless) at 3 Veterans Affairs (VA) mainstream primary care settings in Pennsylvania and Alabama, a homeless-tailored VA clinic in California, and a highly tailored non-VA Health Care for the Homeless Program in Massachusetts (January 2011-March 2012). We developed a survey, the “Primary Care Quality-Homeless Survey," to reflect the concerns and aspirations of homeless patients. Results. Mean scores at the tailored non-VA site were superior to those from the 3 mainstream VA sites (P < .001). Adjusting for patient characteristics, these differences remained significant for subscales assessing the patient–clinician relationship (P < .001) and perceptions of cooperation among providers (P = .004). There were 1.5- to 3-fold increased odds of an unfavorable experience in the domains of the patient–clinician relationship, cooperation, and access or coordination for the mainstream VA sites compared with the tailored non-VA site; the tailored VA site attained intermediate results. Conclusions. Tailored primary care service design was associated with a superior service experience for patients who experienced homelessness. PMID:24148052

  5. 38 CFR 3.1701 - Deceased veterans for whom VA may provide burial benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... whom VA may provide burial benefits. 3.1701 Section 3.1701 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION Burial Benefits Burial Benefits: General § 3.1701 Deceased veterans for whom VA may provide burial benefits. For purposes of providing burial benefits under subpart...

  6. 38 CFR 63.10 - Selection of non-VA community-based providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... in 48 CFR chapters 1 and 8. Such contracts will be awarded only after the quality, effectiveness and... community-based providers. 63.10 Section 63.10 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF... community-based providers. (a) Who can apply. VA may award per diem contracts to non-VA...

  7. 38 CFR 63.10 - Selection of non-VA community-based providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... in 48 CFR chapters 1 and 8. Such contracts will be awarded only after the quality, effectiveness and... community-based providers. 63.10 Section 63.10 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF... community-based providers. (a) Who can apply. VA may award per diem contracts to non-VA...

  8. 38 CFR 63.10 - Selection of non-VA community-based providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... in 48 CFR chapters 1 and 8. Such contracts will be awarded only after the quality, effectiveness and... community-based providers. 63.10 Section 63.10 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF... community-based providers. (a) Who can apply. VA may award per diem contracts to non-VA...

  9. College Access and Success for Students Experiencing Homelessness: A Toolkit for Educators and Service Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dukes, Christina

    2013-01-01

    This toolkit serves as a comprehensive resource on the issue of higher education access and success for homeless students, including information on understanding homeless students, assisting homeless students in choosing a school, helping homeless students pay for application-related expenses, assisting homeless students in finding financial aid…

  10. The Education of Homeless Children: Rules, Rights and Practical Solutions. A Training Manual for Shelter Providers, Staff, Advocates and Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heybach, Laurene M.; Nix-Hodes, Patricia; Price, Sarah

    These training materials provide advocates with the tools needed to help families obtain a stable and effective education for their children despite the condition of homelessness and the trauma that accompanies it. Nine sections include: (1) "Introduction"; (2) "How Mobility Hurts Homeless Children and Schools"; (3) "Laws and Rules Governing the…

  11. Trust in Health Care Providers: Factors Predicting Trust among Homeless Veterans over Time

    PubMed Central

    van den Berk-Clark, Carissa; McGuire, James

    2014-01-01

    We examined whether a combination of predisposing, enabling, need, and primary care experience variables would predict trust in medical health care providers for homeless veterans over 18 months. Linear mixed model analysis indicated that, among these variables, race, social support, service-connected disability status, and satisfaction and continuity with providers predicted trust in provider over time. Trust in providers improved during the initial stages of the relationship between patient and provider and then declined to slightly below baseline levels over time. Further research is needed to determine generalizability and effects of provider trust on patient health care status over longer periods of time. PMID:25130239

  12. 76 FR 79067 - Payment or Reimbursement for Emergency Treatment Furnished by Non-VA Providers in Non-VA...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ... time the veteran can be safely transferred to a VA or other Federal facility and such facility is...- connected conditions. As explained in a notice of proposed rulemaking published on June 11, 2010 (75 FR... treatment'' in section1725(f)(1), extending VA's payment authority until ``such time as the veteran can...

  13. Medical Respite and Linkages to Outpatient Health Care Providers among Individuals Experiencing Homelessness.

    PubMed

    Zur, Julia; Linton, Sabriya; Mead, Holly

    2016-01-01

    Medical respite programs provide nursing care and case management to individuals experiencing homelessness following hospitalization for an acute medical problem. One goal of these programs is to link clients to outpatient providers to decrease their reliance on hospital services. Through qualitative interviews with staff members (n = 8) and clients (n = 14) at a medical respite program, we explored processes of, and challenges associated with, linking clients to outpatient care. Six themes were identified, which offer insight about important considerations when linking clients to outpatient providers and highlight the value of medical respite programs for this population. PMID:27074404

  14. Families on the Edge: Homeless Young Parents and Their Welfare Experiences. A Survey of Homeless Youth and Service Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeg, Bob; Grisham, Christine; Shepard, Annie

    This report examines the experiences of homeless young parents with the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program, which can be an important tool in helping them achieve long-term stability and economic self-sufficiency. The 1996 welfare reform act included special provisions that applied only to minor teen parents, requiring them to…

  15. 76 FR 71920 - Payment for Home Health Services and Hospice Care by Non-VA Providers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-21

    ... medical charges associated with non-VA outpatient care, provided under 38 CFR 17.52 or 17.120. 75 FR 78901.... See 75 FR 78901. We explained: Home Health Care and Hospice Care he pricing methodology adopted by... amended Sec. 17.56. See 75 FR 7218 (Feb. 18, 2010); 75 FR 78901. We need not repeat them here. Indeed,...

  16. 75 FR 3970 - Fund Availability Under the VA Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-25

    ... Assistance Act of 2001,'' Public Law 107-95, Sec. 5, codified as amended at 38 U.S.C. 2011, 2012, 2013, 2061... Comprehensive Assistance Act of 2001, Public Law 107-95, Sec. 5, codified as amended at 38 U.S.C. 2011, 2012... availability of funds for applications for assistance under the ``Per Diem-Only'' (PDO) component of...

  17. For Homeless Veterans

    MedlinePlus

    ... situations and connect them with VA bridge housing, health care and case management services that promote safe, stable living arrangements. More Information Health Care for Homeless Veterans (HCHV) HCHV Rule Change Helps ...

  18. Diabetes in homeless persons: barriers and enablers to health as perceived by patients, medical, and social service providers.

    PubMed

    Elder, Nancy C; Tubb, Matthew R

    2014-01-01

    The ways homelessness and diabetes affect each other is not well known. The authors sought to understand barriers and enablers to health for homeless people with diabetes as perceived by homeless persons and providers. The authors performed semistructured interviews with a sample of participants (seven homeless persons, six social service providers, and five medical providers) in an urban Midwest community. Data analysis was performed with the qualitative editing method. Participants described external factors (chaotic lifestyle, diet/food availability, access to care, and medications) and internal factors (competing demands, substance abuse, stress) that directly affect health. Social service providers were seen as peripheral to diabetes care, although all saw their primary functions as valuable. These factors and relationships are appropriately modeled in a complex adaptive chronic care model, where the framework is bottom up and stresses adaptability, self-organization, and empowerment. Adapting the care of homeless persons with diabetes to include involvement of patients and medical and social service providers must be emergent and responsive to changing needs. PMID:24802217

  19. Reaching out to the forgotten: providing access to medical care for the homeless in Italy

    PubMed Central

    De Maio, Gianfranco; Van den Bergh, Rafael; Garelli, Silvia; Maccagno, Barbara; Raddi, Freja; Stefanizzi, Alice; Regazzo, Costantina; Zachariah, Rony

    2014-01-01

    Background A program for outpatient and intermediate inpatient care for the homeless was pioneered by the humanitarian organization Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) in Milan, Italy, during the winter of 2012-2013. We aimed to document the characteristics and clinical management of inpatients and outpatients seen during this program. Methods A clinic providing outpatient and intermediate inpatient care (24 bed capacity) was set up in an existing homeless hostel. Patients were admitted for post-hospitalization intermediate care or for illnesses not requiring secondary care. This study was a retrospective audit of the routine program data. Results Four hundred and fifty four individuals presented for outpatient care and 123 patients were admitted to inpatient intermediary care. On average one outpatient consultation was conducted per patient per month, most for acute respiratory tract infections (39.8%; 522/1311). Eleven percent of all outpatients suffered from an underlying chronic condition and 2.98% (38/1311) needed referral to emergency services or secondary care facilities. Most inpatients were ill patients referred through public reception centers (72.3%; 89/123), while 27.6% (34/123) were post-hospitalization patients requiring intermediate care. Out of all inpatients, 41.4% (51/123) required more than 1 week of care and 6.5% (8/123) needed counter-referral to secondary care. Conclusions The observed service usage, morbidity patterns, relatively long lengths of stay, high referral completion and need for counter-referrals, all reflect the important gap-filling role played by an intermediate care facility for this vulnerable population. We recommend that in similar contexts, medical non-governmental organizations (NGOs) focus on the setup of inpatient intermediary care services; while outpatient services are covered by the public health system. PMID:24505079

  20. 76 FR 52575 - Health Care for Homeless Veterans Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-23

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 63 RIN 2900-AN73 Health Care for Homeless Veterans Program AGENCY: Department of... community-based treatment facilities in the Health Care for Homeless Veterans (HCHV) program of the... enrolled in the VA health care system. Through the HCHV program, VA identifies homeless veterans...

  1. Priorities in the primary care of persons experiencing homelessness: convergence and divergence in the views of patients and provider/experts

    PubMed Central

    Steward, Jocelyn; Holt, Cheryl L; Pollio, David E; Austin, Erika L; Johnson, Nancy; Gordon, Adam J; Kertesz, Stefan G

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Homeless individuals face unique challenges in health care. Several US initiatives seeking to advance patient-centered primary care for homeless persons are more likely to succeed if they incorporate the priorities of the patients they are to serve. However, there has been no prior research to elicit their priorities in primary care. This study sought to identify aspects of primary care important to persons familiar with homelessness based on personal experience or professional commitment, and to highlight where the priorities of patients and professionals dedicated to their care converge or diverge. Methods This qualitative exercise asked 26 homeless patients and ten provider/experts to rank 16 aspects of primary care using a card sort. Patient-level respondents (n=26) were recruited from homeless service organizations across all regions of the USA and from an established board of homeless service users. Provider/expert-level respondents (n=10) were recruited from veteran and non-veteran-focused homeless health care programs with similar geographic diversity. Results Both groups gave high priority to accessibility, evidence-based care, coordination, and cooperation. Provider/experts endorsed patient control more strongly than patients. Patients ranked information about their care more highly than provider/experts. Conclusion Accessibility and the perception of care based on medical evidence represent priority concerns for homeless patients and provider/experts. Patient control, a concept endorsed by experts, is not strongly endorsed by homeless patients. Understanding how to assure fluid communication, coordination, and team member cooperation could represent more worthy targets for research and quality improvement in this domain. PMID:26929607

  2. Teaching Our Homeless Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheldon, George H.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses some of the major concerns associated with the instructional process of our homeless children. The reader is provided with a brief overview of the prevalence of this population. According to the National Center on Family Homelessness the number of school children who are homeless is growing rapidly with 1.4 to 1.5 million…

  3. 75 FR 79323 - Health Care for Homeless Veterans Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ...This proposed rule would establish regulations for contracting with community-based treatment facilities in the Health Care for Homeless Veterans (HCHV) program of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). It would formalize VA's policies and procedures in connection with this program, which is designed to assist certain homeless veterans in obtaining treatment from non-VA community-based......

  4. Experience of Primary Care among Homeless Individuals with Mental Health Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Chrystal, Joya G.; Glover, Dawn L.; Young, Alexander S.; Whelan, Fiona; Austin, Erika L.; Johnson, Nancy K.; Pollio, David E.; Holt, Cheryl L.; Stringfellow, Erin; Gordon, Adam J.; Kim, Theresa A.; Daigle, Shanette G.; Steward, Jocelyn L.; Kertesz, Stefan G

    2015-01-01

    The delivery of primary care to homeless individuals with mental health conditions presents unique challenges. To inform healthcare improvement, we studied predictors of favorable primary care experience among homeless persons with mental health conditions treated at sites that varied in degree of homeless-specific service tailoring. This was a multi-site, survey-based comparison of primary care experiences at three mainstream primary care clinics of the Veterans Administration (VA), one homeless-tailored VA clinic, and one tailored non-VA healthcare program. Persons who accessed primary care service two or more times from July 2008 through June 2010 (N = 366) were randomly sampled. Predictor variables included patient and organization characteristics suggested by the patient perception model developed by Sofaer and Firminger (2005), with an emphasis on mental health. The primary care experience was assessed with the Primary Care Quality-Homeless (PCQ-H) questionnaire, a validated survey instrument. Multiple regression identified predictors of positive experiences (i.e. higher PCQ-H total score). Significant predictors of a positive experience included a site offering tailored service design, perceived choice among providers, and currently domiciled status. There was an interaction effect between site and severe psychiatric symptoms. For persons with severe psychiatric symptoms, a homeless-tailored service design was significantly associated with a more favorable primary care experience. For persons without severe psychiatric symptoms, this difference was not significant. This study supports the importance of tailored healthcare delivery designed for homeless persons’ needs, with such services potentially holding special relevance for persons with mental health conditions. To improve patient experience among the homeless, organizations may want to deliver services that are tailored to homelessness and offer a choice of providers. PMID:25659142

  5. 78 FR 68364 - Payment for Home Health Services and Hospice Care to Non-VA Providers; Delay of Effective Date

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-14

    ... (78 FR 26250) a final rule to change the billing methodology for non-VA providers of home health... for the final rule published May 6, 2013, at 78 FR 26250, is delayed from November 15, 2013, until... final rule published in the Federal Register on May 6, 2013 (78 FR 26250). The original effective...

  6. 38 CFR 63.15 - Duties of, and standards applicable to, non-VA community-based providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... facility must meet all applicable safety requirements set forth in 38 CFR 17.81(a). (b) Treatment plans and...) Adequate meals must be provided in a setting that encourages social interaction; nutritious snacks between... set forth in 38 CFR 17.33. (g) Services and supplies. VA per diem payments under this part...

  7. 38 CFR 63.15 - Duties of, and standards applicable to, non-VA community-based providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... facility must meet all applicable safety requirements set forth in 38 CFR 17.81(a). (b) Treatment plans and...) Adequate meals must be provided in a setting that encourages social interaction; nutritious snacks between... set forth in 38 CFR 17.33. (g) Services and supplies. VA per diem payments under this part...

  8. 38 CFR 63.15 - Duties of, and standards applicable to, non-VA community-based providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... facility must meet all applicable safety requirements set forth in 38 CFR 17.81(a). (b) Treatment plans and...) Adequate meals must be provided in a setting that encourages social interaction; nutritious snacks between... set forth in 38 CFR 17.33. (g) Services and supplies. VA per diem payments under this part...

  9. VA Community Mental Health Service Providers' Utilization of and Attitudes toward Telemental Health Care: The Gatekeeper's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jameson, John Paul; Farmer, Mary Sue; Head, Katharine J.; Fortney, John; Teal, Cayla R.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Mental health (MH) providers in community-based outpatient clinics (CBOCs) are important stakeholders in the development of the Veterans Health Administration (VA) telemental health (TMH) system, but their perceptions of these technologies have not been systematically examined. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the…

  10. The New Homelessness Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Barrett A.; Tyler, Kimberly A.; Wright, James D.

    2014-01-01

    The ‘new homelessness’ has drawn sustained attention from scholars over the past three decades. Definitional inconsistencies and data limitations rendered early work during this period largely speculative in nature. Thanks to conceptual, theoretical, and methodological progress, however, the research literature now provides a fuller understanding of homelessness. Contributions by sociologists and other social scientists since the mid-1990s differentiate among types of homelessness, provide credible demographic estimates, and show how being homeless affects a person's life chances and coping strategies. Agreement also exists about the main macro- and micro-level causes of homelessness. Active lines of inquiry examine public, media, and governmental responses to the problem as well as homeless people's efforts to mobilize on their own behalf. Despite the obstacles faced when studying a stigmatized population marked by high turnover and weak anchors to place, recent investigations have significantly influenced homelessness policy. A greater emphasis on prevention should further strengthen the research-policy nexus. PMID:24910495

  11. Health Care for the Homeless.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altman, Drew; And Others

    1989-01-01

    This supplementary statement, prepared by 10 members of the Institute of Medicine's Committee on Health Care for the Homeless, expands upon the Committee's report, "Homelessness, Health and Human Needs." Argues that the only broad, long-term solution to the health problems of the homeless is immediate action to provide decent, affordable housing.…

  12. Evaluating Programs for the Homeless.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rog, Debra J., Ed.

    1991-01-01

    Six articles provide an overview of the multiple approaches to evaluating the problems of homelessness and introduce the challenges of evaluating interventions for the homeless. The first part focuses on research about homelessness, and the second part describes major demonstration programs and their evaluations. (SLD)

  13. 38 CFR 17.101 - Collection or recovery by VA for medical care or services provided or furnished to a veteran for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., emergency room visits and observation care, hearing/speech exams, immunizations, inpatient visits, maternity... VA for medical care or services provided or furnished to a veteran for a nonservice-connected... MEDICAL Charges, Waivers, and Collections § 17.101 Collection or recovery by VA for medical care...

  14. 38 CFR 17.101 - Collection or recovery by VA for medical care or services provided or furnished to a veteran for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., emergency room visits and observation care, hearing/speech exams, immunizations, inpatient visits, maternity... VA for medical care or services provided or furnished to a veteran for a nonservice-connected... MEDICAL Charges, Waivers, and Collections § 17.101 Collection or recovery by VA for medical care...

  15. 38 CFR 17.101 - Collection or recovery by VA for medical care or services provided or furnished to a veteran for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., emergency room visits and observation care, hearing/speech exams, immunizations, inpatient visits, maternity... VA for medical care or services provided or furnished to a veteran for a nonservice-connected... MEDICAL Charges, Waivers, and Collections § 17.101 Collection or recovery by VA for medical care...

  16. Education of Homeless Children and Youth, 1989.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem. Student Services Section.

    This report contains the Oregon state plan for educating homeless children and youth required by the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act of 1987. Data on the number and location of homeless children and homeless youth in the state and the barriers they face in obtaining a free public education are discussed. Section 1 provides an overview…

  17. The Homelessness Muddle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellickson, Robert C.

    1990-01-01

    Examines subgroups of the homeless population and their needs for shelter. Argues that governments and charities should make distinctions among the highly diverse groups of the homeless and cease providing unlimited and unconditional aid to the able bodied, which tends to ensnare youth in the culture of dependency. (FMW)

  18. Supporting School Success for Homeless Children of Veterans and Active Duty Military Members. Best Practices in Interagency Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Homeless Education at SERVE, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This brief is designed for local staff of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), state McKinney-Vento coordinators and school district McKinney-Vento liaisons, educators, and other providers of services to active members of the military and veterans, and their children. It provides basic information to assist homeless children of veterans or…

  19. Latent Homeless Risk Profiles of a National Sample of Homeless Veterans and Their Relation to Program Referral and Admission Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Kasprow, Wesley J.; Rosenheck, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We identified risk and need profiles of homeless veterans and examined the relation between profiles and referrals and admissions to Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) homeless service programs. Methods. We examined data from the VA’s new Homeless Operations Management and Evaluation System on 120 852 veterans from 142 sites nationally in 2011 and 2012 using latent class analyses based on 9 homeless risk factors. The final 4-class solution compared both referral and admission to VA homeless services. Results. We identified 4 latent classes: relatively few problems, dual diagnosis, poverty–substance abuse–incarceration, and disabling medical problems. Homeless veterans in the first group were more likely to be admitted to the VA’s permanent supportive housing program, whereas those in the second group were more likely to be admitted to more restrictive VA residential treatment. Homeless veterans in the third group were more likely to be admitted to the VA’s prisoner re-entry program, and those in the fourth group were more likely to be directed to VA medical services. Conclusions. The heterogeneous risk and need profiles of homeless veterans supported the diversity of VA homeless services and encouraged the development of specialized services to meet their diverse needs. PMID:24148048

  20. Providing health care services to the formerly homeless: a quasi-experimental evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ciaranello, Andrea L; Molitor, Fred; Leamon, Martin; Kuenneth, Christina; Tancredi, Daniel; Diamant, Allison L; Kravitz, Richard L

    2006-05-01

    We performed a quasi-experiment to assess the effects of a focused health care intervention delivered in transitional housing facilities in Sacramento, California. Four transitional housing facilities (THFs) receiving the intervention were compared with 2 THFs that did not receive it. A multidisciplinary team provided a diverse package of services to residents at the intervention sites. Residents at comparison sites received usual care. Survey and physical examination data were collected in repeated cross-sectional surveys at baseline (pre-intervention) and after 6 and 18 months of follow-up (post-intervention). Using analysis of covariance techniques, our statistical models showed improved odds of receiving recommended gynecologic preventive care and decreased odds of frequent Emergency Department use at 18 months among residents at the intervention sites. At 6 months, residents at the intervention sites also experienced improved blood pressure control. There was no intervention effect on residents' access to specialists or on physical functioning, mental health, or dental health. PMID:16702726

  1. Myosin VA Movements in Normal and Dilute-Lethal Axons Provide Support for a Dual Filament Motor Complex

    PubMed Central

    Bridgman, P.C.

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the role that myosin Va plays in axonal transport of organelles, myosin Va–associated organelle movements were monitored in living neurons using microinjected fluorescently labeled antibodies to myosin Va or expression of a green fluorescent protein–myosin Va tail construct. Myosin Va–associated organelles made rapid bi-directional movements in both normal and dilute-lethal (myosin Va null) neurites. In normal neurons, depolymerization of microtubules by nocodazole slowed, but did not stop movement. In contrast, depolymerization of microtubules in dilute-lethal neurons stopped movement. Myosin Va or synaptic vesicle protein 2 (SV2), which partially colocalizes with myosin Va on organelles, did not accumulate in dilute-lethal neuronal cell bodies because of an anterograde bias associated with organelle transport. However, SV2 showed peripheral accumulations in axon regions of dilute-lethal neurons rich in tyrosinated tubulin. This suggests that myosin Va–associated organelles become stranded in regions rich in dynamic microtubule endings. Consistent with these observations, presynaptic terminals of cerebellar granule cells in dilute-lethal mice showed increased cross-sectional area, and had greater numbers of both synaptic and larger SV2 positive vesicles. Together, these results indicate that myosin Va binds to organelles that are transported in axons along microtubules. This is consistent with both actin- and microtubule-based motors being present on these organelles. Although myosin V activity is not necessary for long-range transport in axons, myosin Va activity is necessary for local movement or processing of organelles in regions, such as presynaptic terminals that lack microtubules. PMID:10477758

  2. Homeless youth: a concept analysis.

    PubMed

    Washington, Philisie Starling

    2011-07-01

    INTRODUCTION. A variety of terms have been used to describe the homeless youth population. PURPOSE. The purpose of this article is to analyze the conceptual meanings of the term homeless youths by examining the evolution of the concept and its related terms in the current literature. Method. Online databases from 1990-2010 were analyzed using the Rodgers evolutionary approach. RESULTS. The 6 attributes relating to homeless youth were physical location, age, health, behavior, choice, and survival. CONCLUSION. The analysis provided insight and clarification of homeless youth from a variety of related terms in the literature. PMID:21809932

  3. 78 FR 6405 - Advisory Committee on Homeless Veterans, Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-30

    ... AFFAIRS Advisory Committee on Homeless Veterans, Notice of Meeting The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA... Committee on Homeless Veterans will be held on February 13-15, 2013. On February 13, the Committee will meet... Department in assisting homeless Veterans. The Committee shall assemble and review information relating...

  4. 76 FR 56881 - Advisory Committee on Homeless Veterans; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-14

    ... AFFAIRS Advisory Committee on Homeless Veterans; Notice of Meeting The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA... Committee on Homeless Veterans will be held on September 20- 21, 2011. On September 20, the Committee will... services of the Department in assisting homeless Veterans. The Committee shall assemble and...

  5. Development of the Primary Care Quality-Homeless (PCQ-H) Instrument: A Practical Survey of Patients' Experiences in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Kertesz, Stefan. G.; Pollio, David E.; Jones, Richard N.; Steward, Jocelyn; Stringfellow, Erin J.; Gordon, Adam J.; Johnson, Nancy K.; Kim, Theresa A.; Granstaff, Unita; Austin, Erika L.; Young, Alexander S.; Golden, Joya; Davis, Lori L.; Roth, David L.; Holt, Cheryl L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Homeless patients face unique challenges in obtaining primary care responsive to their needs and context. Patient experience questionnaires could permit assessment of patient-centered medical homes for this population, but standard instruments may not reflect homeless patients' priorities and concerns. Objectives This report describes (a) the content and psychometric properties of a new primary care questionnaire for homeless patients and (b) the methods utilized in its development. Methods Starting with quality-related constructs from the Institute of Medicine, we identified relevant themes by interviewing homeless patients and experts in their care. A multidisciplinary team drafted a preliminary set of 78 items. This was administered to homeless-experienced clients (n=563) across 3 VA facilities and 1 non-VA Health Care for the Homeless Program. Using Item Response Theory, we examined Test Information Function curves to eliminate less informative items and devise plausibly distinct subscales. Results The resulting 33-item instrument (Primary Care Quality-Homeless, PCQ-H) has four subscales: Patient-Clinician Relationship (15 items), Cooperation among Clinicians (3 items), Access/Coordination (11 items) and Homeless-Specific Needs (4 items). Evidence for divergent and convergent validity is provided. Test Information Function (TIF) graphs showed adequate informational value to permit inferences about groups for 3 subscales (Relationship, Cooperation and Access/Coordination). The 3-item Cooperation subscale had lower informational value (TIF<5) but had good internal consistency (alpha=0.75) and patients frequently reported problems in this aspect of care. Conclusions Systematic application of qualitative and quantitative methods supported the development of a brief patient-reported questionnaire focused on the primary care of homeless patients and offers guidance for future population-specific instrument development. PMID:25023918

  6. Homelessness and Dual Diagnosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Robert E.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Reviews recent research on the epidemiology, subject characteristics, and service needs of the homeless population who are dually diagnosed to suffer both severe mental illness and substance abuse disorders. Discusses evolving approaches to providing social services, various treatments, system and legal issues, and problems with current research.

  7. Predictors of treatment interest and treatment initiation in a VA outpatient trauma services program providing evidence-based care.

    PubMed

    Lamp, Kristen; Maieritch, Kelly P; Winer, E Samuel; Hessinger, Jonathan D; Klenk, Megan

    2014-12-01

    The present study explored interest in treatment and treatment initiation patterns among veterans presenting at a VA posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) clinic. U.S. veterans who were referred for treatment of posttraumatic stress symptoms (N = 476) attended a 2-session psychoeducation and orientation class where they completed measures of demographic variables, PTSD and depression symptom severity, and interest in treatment. Consistent with previous literature and our hypotheses, Vietnam (OR = 1.78) and Persian Gulf veterans (OR = 2.05) were more likely than Iraq and Afghanistan veterans to initiate treatment. Veterans reporting more severe PTSD and depression symptoms were more likely to initiate treatment than not (OR for PTSD = 1.02, OR for depression = 1.02). Interest in treatment emerged as a strong predictor of treatment initiation. Specifically, interest in trauma-focused treatment showed a significant independent predictive effect on initiation such that veterans who expressed interest in trauma-focused treatment were significantly more likely to initiate treatment than those who did not express interest (OR = 2.13). Building interest in trauma-focused treatment may be a vital component for engaging veterans in evidence-based trauma-focused therapy. PMID:25418632

  8. Nutrition and health services needs among the homeless.

    PubMed Central

    Wiecha, J L; Dwyer, J T; Dunn-Strohecker, M

    1991-01-01

    This review discusses nutrition and related health problems among homeless Americans, summarizes recent information, and identifies needs for services and future research. The nature of homelessness today provides a context for the discussion. Many homeless persons eat fewer meals per day, lack food more often, and are more likely to have inadequate diets and poorer nutritional status than housed U.S. populations. Yet many homeless people eligible for food stamps do not receive them. While public and private agencies provide nutritious food and meals for homeless persons, availability of the services to homeless persons is limited. Many homeless people lack appropriate health care, and certain nutrition-related health problems are prevalent among them. Compared with housed populations, alcoholism, anemia, and growth problems are more common among homeless persons, and pregnancy rates are higher. The risks vary among homeless persons for malnutrition, nutrition-related health problems, drug and alcohol abuse, and mental illness. For example, among homeless persons, fewer heads of families than single adults are substance abusers, and mental illness varies in prevalence among single men, single women, and parents in homeless families. Homeless persons need improved access to food, nutrition, and health services. More nutrition education needs to be available to them and to service providers. Use of representative samples and validation of self-reported nutrition and health data will help future investigators to clarify the relationships between the characteristics of the homeless and their nutritional status. PMID:1908587

  9. 76 FR 71439 - Enhanced-Use Lease (EUL) of Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Real Property for the Development...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-17

    ...- sufficiency. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Edward Bradley, Office of Asset Enterprise Management (044... homeless Veterans and Veterans at risk of homelessness and their families; and provide a...

  10. Youth Homelessness 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKenzie, David; Chamberlain, Chris

    2008-01-01

    The third national census of homeless school students, conducted in 2006, found that the number of homeless students had decreased since 2001. There were 9,389 homeless students in 2006 compared with 12,227 in 2001. Three groups were over-represented in the homeless population: Indigenous students, young people from single parent and blended…

  11. Homelessness in Public Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Yi Ling

    2009-01-01

    This paper takes a theoretical and practical approach in defining the "problem" of homelessness in libraries. The author examines three fundamental problems on homelessness. The three fundamental questions are: (a) Who are the homeless? (b) Why are they homeless? (c) What are their information needs in libraries? These questions are important in…

  12. Homelessness in America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumohl, Jim, Ed.

    This book about homelessness in the United States offers 16 chapters in three parts. Part 1, "History Definitions, and Causes," includes: (1) "Redefining the Cursed Word: A Historical Interpretation of American Homelessness" (Kim Hopper and Jim Baumohl); (2) "Homelessness: Definitions and Counts" (Martha R. Burt); (3) "The Causes of Homelessness"…

  13. Materials on the Education of Homeless Children. Supplement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Law and Education, Boston, MA.

    Information is provided about the legal developments affecting the educational rights of homeless students that were made by the McKinney Homeless Assistance Amendments Act of 1990 (P.L. 101-645). Presented in three parts, Part 1 gives an overview of some of the problems that keep homeless children from attending school or hindering their…

  14. Education Rights of Homeless Students: A Guide for Advocates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Law Center, 2005

    2005-01-01

    There is no question that students who are homeless, like all students, are entitled to be educated. A federal law, known as the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act, requires states to provide homeless children and youth with the same access to free public education as is available to other students. The Act also requires states to eliminate…

  15. 77 FR 52135 - Advisory Committee on Homeless Veterans, Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Advisory Committee on Homeless Veterans, Notice of Meeting The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) gives notice under Public Law 92-463 (Federal Advisory Committee Act) that a meeting of the Advisory Committee on Homeless Veterans will be held...

  16. 78 FR 53820 - Advisory Committee on Homeless Veterans, Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Advisory Committee on Homeless Veterans, Notice of Meeting The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) gives notice under the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. 2, that a meeting of the Advisory Committee on Homeless Veterans will be...

  17. Imagine the Possibilities: Sourcebook for Educators Committed to the Educational Success of Students Experiencing Homelessness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berliner, BethAnn

    This sourcebook assembles the results of research on educating homeless students and offers classroom strategies for people working with homeless students, providing training tools to strengthen programs and practices in schools and shelters. Chapter 1, "Increasing Awareness about Students Experiencing Homelessness," defines homelessness,…

  18. VA Residential Provider Perceptions of Dissuading Factors to the Use of Two Evidence-Based PTSD Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Joan M.; Dinnen, Stephanie; Simiola, Vanessa; Thompson, Richard; Schnurr, Paula P.

    2014-01-01

    Providers (N = 198) from 38 Department of Veterans Affairs residential posttraumatic stress disorder treatment programs across the United States completed qualitative interviews regarding implementation of 2 evidence-based treatments: prolonged exposure and cognitive processing therapy. As part of this investigation, providers were asked how they decide which patients are appropriate for these treatments. Many indicated that they did not perceive any patient factors that dissuade their use of either evidence-based treatment. However, 3 broad categories emerged surrounding reasons that patients were perceived to be less suitable candidates for the treatments: the presence of psychiatric comorbidities, cognitive limitations, and low levels of patient motivation. Interestingly, providers’ perceived reasons for limited or nonuse of a treatment did not correspond entirely to those espoused by treatment developers. Possible solutions to address provider concerns, including educational and motivational interventions, are noted. PMID:25309031

  19. A Rural County's Response to Homelessness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loughran, Elizabeth Lee; White, Priscilla

    This paper describes the response of one locality, a rural county in Western Massachusetts, to the reality of rural homelessness. Jessie's House, in Hampshire County, Massachusetts, is a short-term emergency shelter providing meals, housing, and advocacy to homeless families and individuals. The shelter has a staff of three full-time residents and…

  20. Working to End Family Homelessness. Annual Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Family Homelessness (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    The National Center on Family Homelessness is determined to end family homelessness. Sheltering families provides a temporary safe haven. Connecting families to permanent housing, essential services, and critical supports can change their lives forever. Through research the Center learns what families need to rebound from the housing, economic,…

  1. Homeless Housing: HUD's Shelter Programs. Updated.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanhorenbeck, Susan M.

    This paper briefly discusses new housing programs for the homeless sponsored by the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), the funding provided by the 100th Congress, and two additional HUD programs to aid the homeless. The following four programs are discussed: (1) the Emergency Shelter Program; (2) the Transitional Housing Program,…

  2. Addressing the Problems of Homeless Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Joseph F.; Tobin, Kerri

    2012-01-01

    Homeless adolescents, known as "unaccompanied youth," constitute a small but important portion of the overall homeless population, one that needs particular attention at school. In this article, we review existing literature to provide a background for educational leaders, researchers, and policymakers hoping to understand the phenomenon of…

  3. Understanding homelessness using a simulated nursing experience.

    PubMed

    Barry, Charlotte D; Blum, Cynthia Ann; Eggenberger, Terry L; Palmer-Hickman, Candice L; Mosley, Rebecca

    2009-01-01

    Students have an opportunity to understand the full experience of being homeless using simulated community nursing situations with a high-fidelity simulator. The Community Nursing Practice Model provides a context for using this innovative teaching strategy to enable students to respond holistically to the needs of the homeless. PMID:19574760

  4. Educational Services for Homeless Children and Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts State Dept. of Education, Boston. Office of Homeless Children and Youth.

    As provided by the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act, the Massachusetts State Department of Education (MSDE) has developed this plan to attempt to meet the educational needs of homeless children and to supply them with resources to meet those needs. The plan contains a section delineating federal and state laws and state policies…

  5. 24 CFR 576.405 - Homeless participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... annual action plan required under 24 CFR 91.220. (c) To the maximum extent practicable, the recipient or... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Homeless participation. 576.405... Homeless participation. (a) Unless the recipient is a State, the recipient must provide for...

  6. 24 CFR 576.405 - Homeless participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... annual action plan required under 24 CFR 91.220. (c) To the maximum extent practicable, the recipient or... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Homeless participation. 576.405... Homeless participation. (a) Unless the recipient is a State, the recipient must provide for...

  7. 24 CFR 576.405 - Homeless participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... annual action plan required under 24 CFR 91.220. (c) To the maximum extent practicable, the recipient or... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Homeless participation. 576.405... Homeless participation. (a) Unless the recipient is a State, the recipient must provide for...

  8. Health interventions for people who are homeless.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Stephen W; Burns, Tom

    2014-10-25

    Homelessness has serious implications for the health of individuals and populations. Primary health-care programmes specifically tailored to homeless individuals might be more effective than standard primary health care. Standard case management, assertive community treatment, and critical time intervention are effective models of mental health-care delivery. Housing First, with immediate provision of housing in independent units with support, improves outcomes for individuals with serious mental illnesses. Many different types of interventions, including case management, are effective in the reduction of substance misuse. Interventions that provide case management and supportive housing have the greatest effect when they target individuals who are the most intensive users of services. Medical respite programmes are an effective intervention for homeless patients leaving the hospital. Although the scientific literature provides guidance on interventions to improve the health of homeless individuals, health-care providers should also seek to address social policies and structural factors that result in homelessness. PMID:25390579

  9. Humanizing the homeless: does contact erode stereotypes?

    PubMed

    Knecht, Tom; Martinez, Lisa M

    2009-09-01

    This paper employs a field experiment to assess whether interpersonal contact changes domiciled individuals' attitudes of the homeless. Volunteers for Project Homeless Connect-a one-day event that provides social services to the homeless-were asked to complete a pre- and post-survey. The results provide mixed support for the contact hypothesis. After volunteering, respondents were far less likely to see homelessness as the result of individual characteristics, such as substance abuse or work aversion. However, opinion was remarkably stable when it came to policy preferences. The results cast doubt on the conventional wisdom that individuals' perceptions of the causes of homelessness track closely with their preferences for governmental policy. PMID:19856699

  10. Hurricane Sandy's impact on the predisaster homeless and homeless shelter services in New Jersey.

    PubMed

    Settembrino, Marc R

    2016-01-01

    Presently, there is little research on how people experiencing homelessness prepare for, respond to, and recover from disasters. Existing emergency management literature does not provide an understanding of how disasters affect homeless shelter services. The present study seeks to fill these gaps by examining how Hurricane Sandy impacted homeless shelters and their guests in New Jersey. Presenting findings from ethnographic research in Atlantic City and Hoboken, this study identifies several areas in which homeless shelters and their guests may be able to assist in emergency response and disaster recovery such as preparing meals for victims, sorting and processing donated items, and assisting victims in filing for emergency assistance. PMID:26963226

  11. Measuring pain in the context of homelessness

    PubMed Central

    Matter, Rebecca; Kline, Susan; Cook, Karon F.; Amtmann, Dagmar

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The primary objective of this study was to inform the development of measures of pain impact appropriate for all respondents, including homeless individuals, so that they can be used in clinical research and practice. The secondary objective was to increase understanding about the unique experience of homeless people with pain. Methods Seventeen homeless individuals with chronic health conditions (often associated with pain) participated in cognitive interviews to test the functioning of 56 pain measurement items and provided information about their experience living with and accessing treatment for pain. Results The most common problems identified with items were that they lacked clarity or were irrelevant in the context of homelessness. Items that were unclear, irrelevant and/or had other identified problems made it difficult for participants to respond. Participants also described multiple ways in which their pain was exacerbated by conditions of homelessness and identified barriers to accessing appropriate treatment. Conclusions Results suggested that the majority of items were problematic for the homeless and require substantial modifications to make the pain impact bank relevant to this population. Additional recommendations include involving homeless in future item bank development, conducting research on the topic of pain and homelessness, and using cognitive interviewing in other types of health disparities research. PMID:19582592

  12. Life Shocks and Homelessness

    PubMed Central

    Corman, Hope; Noonan, Kelly; Reichman, Nancy E.

    2014-01-01

    We exploited an exogenous health shock—namely, the birth of a child with a severe health condition—to investigate the effect of a life shock on homelessness in large cities in the United States as well as the interactive effects of the shock with housing market characteristics. We considered a traditional measure of homelessness, two measures of housing instability thought to be precursors to homelessness, and a combined measure that approximates the broadened conceptualization of homelessness under the 2009 Homeless Emergency Assistance and Rapid Transition to Housing Act (2010). We found that the shock substantially increases the likelihood of family homelessness, particularly in cities with high housing costs. The findings are consistent with the economic theory of homelessness, which posits that homelessness results from a conjunction of adverse circumstances in which housing markets and individual characteristics collide. PMID:23868747

  13. Parenting while Being Homeless

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swick, Kevin J.; Williams, Reginald; Fields, Evelyn

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the dynamics of parenting while being in a homeless context. The mosaic of stressors involved in this homeless parenting process are explicated and discussed. In addition, resources and strategies that may support parenting are presented and discussed.

  14. Pennsylvania's Rural Homeless Reality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Rural Pennsylvania, Harrisburg.

    The Center for Rural Pennsylvania analyzed data from the Pennsylvania Department of Public Welfare concerning rural homelessness for fiscal years 1997 through 1999. Findings indicate that rural Pennsylvania has a homeless population and it is growing. In 1999, more than 21,700 clients received homeless assistance in rural areas, 44 percent of whom…

  15. Health-Seeking Challenges Among Homeless Youth

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Angela L.; Nyamathi, Adeline; Greengold, Barbara; Slagle, Alexandra; Koniak-Griffin, Deborah; Khalilifard, Farinaz; Getzoff, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Background Approximately 1.5 to 2 million homeless young persons live on the streets in the United States. With the current economic situation, research is needed on quality of services geared toward homeless young adults. Objectives The objective of this study was to explore homeless young adults' perspectives on barriers and facilitators of health-care-seeking behavior and their perspectives on improving existing programs for homeless persons. Methods This article is a descriptive qualitative study using focus groups, with a purposeful sample of 24 homeless drug-using young adults. Results Identified themes were failing access to care based on perceived structural barriers (limited clinic sites, limited hours of operation, priority health conditions, and long wait times) and social barriers (perception of discrimination by uncaring professionals, law enforcement, and society in general). Discussion Results provide insight into programmatic and agency resources that facilitate health-seeking behaviors among homeless young adults and include implications for more research with providers of homeless health and social services. PMID:20404776

  16. Prepping Homeless Students for School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vissing, Yvonne

    2004-01-01

    The Yellow School Bus Project (YSBP) was created to provide homeless children with the supplies and clothes they need to succeed in school and feel good about themselves. When given these gifts, they receive the explicit message that they are smart and worthwhile, the implicit message that there are people in the community who are invested in…

  17. Overdose Deaths Among Homeless Persons

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Director Email Facebook Twitter Overdose Deaths Among Homeless Persons January 2013 Homelessness is a persistent problem—nearly 690,000 people are homeless on a given night in America—and it ...

  18. Nutrition for the Homeless. Hearing on S. 728, A Bill To Improve the Nutrition of the Homeless, and for Other Purposes; and S. 812, A Bill to Amend the Food Stamp Act of 1977 to Provide Urgent Relief to Improve the Nutrition of the Homeless...(Nutrition for Homeless Individuals Act of 1987) before the Subcommittee on Nutrition and Investigations of the Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry. United States Senate, One Hundredth Congress, First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry.

    This document contains oral testimony by state and government officials, prepared statements, and supporting materials concerning food assistance for the homeless. The bills before the Senate would increase Temporary Emergency Food Assistance Program (TEFAP) funding by $10 million in fiscal year 1987, and $20 million in 1988. According to John W.

  19. Faith-based programs and their influence on homelessness.

    PubMed

    Bass, Ben Gray

    2009-01-01

    In America today, homelessness is coming under increasing pressure by federal, state, local, and faith-based providers of prevention and intervention services. American philanthropy makes a response to this pervasive problem possible through faith-based institutional and local efforts that facilitate the effectiveness of governmental programs designed to eliminate long-term homelessness by 2014. Faith-based providers of services are on the front line of efforts to wrap services around willing participants who build or rebuild effective social and instrumental resources. Most homelessness is temporary and even long-term homelessness often responds to supportive services delivered in a stable housing environment. PMID:19752633

  20. Characteristics of Homeless Youth Attending Two Different Youth Drop-In Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shillington, A. M.; Bousman, C. A.; Clapp, J. D.

    2011-01-01

    Services for homeless youth traditionally provided shelter and nourishment but do little to break the cycle of homelessness. A more comprehensive approach to serve homeless youth is the drop-in center model that provides safe and easy-to-find facilities within communities to bridge the gap between the streets and transitional/permanent housing.…

  1. Voices of the Homeless: An Emic Approach to the Experiences of Health Disparities Faced by People Who Are Homeless.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Elaine

    2016-07-01

    People who are homeless are particularly vulnerable to health disparities. Rather than using population statistics to highlight the prevalence or severity of the suffering of people who are homeless, 28 undergraduate students each conducted an in-depth interview with an individual who relied on a local homeless shelter to cope with everyday life. The interview explored the participants' health concerns and strategies for health management. Due to equipment failure and incomplete recording, only 16 interviews are included in this study. The author adopted thematic analysis while focused on preserving the richness of the interactions between the participants who are homeless and the undergraduate students. The author's goal is to provide emic, intimate insights about the struggles and challenges faced by the people who are homeless. The author concluded the study by situating the findings in the larger literature of health disparities experienced by people who are homeless. PMID:27093127

  2. Educating Homeless Youth in Texas: The McKinney-Vento Homeless Education Assistance Improvements Act of 2001.

    PubMed

    Windsor, Liliane Cambraia; Thompson, Sanna J

    2008-07-01

    This paper discusses homeless youth in the US focusing on educational issues addressed by the implementation of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Education Assistance Improvements Act of 2001. This law requires that states ensure each homeless child has equal access to public education. Moreover, the law requires states to identify and remove barriers to homeless children's education, such as requirements for previous school records and proof of residency. Following description of homelessness, educational issues, and barriers for homeless youth, the McKinney-Vento Act is described as it is applied in Texas. Finally, the paper concludes that further development, education, and commitment from service providers in schools and other community agencies will be needed to improve outcomes for these highly vulnerable youth. PMID:22553382

  3. Homelessness: Recommendations for State Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland Governor's Advisory Board on the Shelter, Nutrition, and Service Programs for Homeless Persons, Annapolis.

    This report identifies the following objectives in the State of Maryland's efforts to prevent and substantially reduce homelessness: (1) expand resources for the prevention of homelessness, and investigate possible changes in policies contributing to homelessness; (2) establish a strong emergency response to homelessness throughout the State; (3)…

  4. Water, sanitation and hygiene for homeless people.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Sayed Mohammad Nazim; Walters, Vicky; Gaillard, J C; Hridi, Sanjida Marium; McSherry, Alice

    2016-02-01

    This short communication provides insights into water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) for homeless people through a scoping study conducted in Dhaka, Bangladesh. It investigates homeless access to WASH through the lens of a rights-based approach. It demonstrates that homeless people's denial of their right to WASH reflects their marginal position in society and an unequal distribution of power and opportunities. The study ultimately suggests a rights-based approach to work toward dealing with the root causes of discrimination and marginalisation rather than just the symptoms. For the homeless, who not only lack substantive rights, but also the means through which to claim their rights, an integrated rights-based approach to WASH offers the possibility for social inclusion and significant improvements in their life conditions. Given the unique deprivation of homelessness it is argued that in addressing the lack of access to adequate WASH for homeless people the immediate goal should be the fulfilment and protection of the right to adequate shelter. PMID:26837829

  5. Intellectual Disability and Homelessness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercier, C.; Picard, S.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The association between poverty and intellectual disability (ID) has been well documented. However, little is known about persons with ID who face circumstances of extreme poverty, such as homelessness. This paper describes the situation of persons with ID who were or are homeless in Montreal and are currently receiving services from a…

  6. People Experiencing Chronic Homelessness

    MedlinePlus

    ... Doors Download the Plan Annual Update Goals Our Goals Veterans Chronic Family Youth Setting a Path to End All Homelessness Solutions Solutions ... Doors Download the Plan Annual Update Goals Our Goals Veterans Chronic Family Youth Setting a Path to End All Homelessness Solutions Solutions ...

  7. Out of Sight, Out of Mind: Homeless Children and Families in Small-Town America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vissing, Yvonne M.

    Homelessness in small towns and rural areas is on the rise, and a substantial portion of the rural homeless consists of families with children. This book draws on interviews and case studies of over 300 homeless children and their families, primarily in New Hampshire, and on supporting statistics to provide individual and sociological perspectives…

  8. Educational Rights of Homeless Children and Youth: Legal and Community Advocacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Bradley, Ann Aviles

    2008-01-01

    Many homeless children and youth have difficulty in school due to their loss of stable housing, and lack of consistent contact with family and friends. When a child becomes homeless, schools are federally mandated to identify these students and provide the same access to a free and appropriate education as their non-homeless counterparts. Within a…

  9. Education and Community Support for Homeless Children and Youth: Profiles of 15 Innovative and Promising Approaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeldin, Shepherd; Bogart, Joanne

    This report profiles 15 programs that are providing education and support services to homeless students. These programs have been selected from over 40 nominations from state homeless coordinators and from national organizations concerned with services to the homeless. The profiled programs were selected on the basis of innovative educational…

  10. Homelessness: A Common Vocabulary Could Help Agencies Collaborate and Collect More Consistent Data. Report to Congressional Requesters. GAO-10-702

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cackley, Alicia Puente

    2010-01-01

    Multiple federal programs provide homelessness assistance through programs targeted to those experiencing homelessness or through mainstream programs that broadly assist low-income populations. Programs' definitions of homelessness range from including primarily people in homeless shelters or on the street to also including those living with…

  11. Issues in community-based care among homeless minorities.

    PubMed

    Bralock, Anita R; Farr, Nadine Brown; Kay, Jade; Lee, Marcia Jean; Smythe-Padgham, Cheryl; Scherlin, Dianna Danced; Strickland, Ora

    2011-07-01

    Homelessness is an increasing major public health problem in the United States. The homeless population consists of men, women, youth and families who live on the streets or in shelters. Minorities, especially African-Americans and Hispanics, are particularly at risk for homelessness due to their high rates of poverty. Homelessness predisposes persons to poor health, including a variety of acute and chronic physical and psychological diseases for which they often have difficulty obtaining healthcare. This article discusses common issues and challenges that homeless minorities and their health-care providers face in obtaining community-based healthcare, including issues in caring for homeless men and women, fragmentation of healthcare, perceived discrimination and provider bias, provider-patient trust issues, lack of access to care, and health literacy issues. Two programs designed to provide community-based experiential learning for nursing students to address these issues and the health-care needs of the homeless are described, i.e., the Men Achieving Self Health (MASH) and Women Inspired Self Health (WISH) Outreach Programs. Approaches used by faculty and students who are engaged in providing health-care services to the homeless via the MASH and WISH Programs are discussed. PMID:21888151

  12. 24 CFR 576.103 - Homelessness prevention component.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Homelessness prevention component... and Eligible Activities § 576.103 Homelessness prevention component. ESG funds may be used to provide... paragraph (1) of the “homeless” definition in § 576.2. This assistance, referred to as...

  13. 24 CFR 576.103 - Homelessness prevention component.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Homelessness prevention component... and Eligible Activities § 576.103 Homelessness prevention component. ESG funds may be used to provide... paragraph (1) of the “homeless” definition in § 576.2. This assistance, referred to as...

  14. 24 CFR 576.103 - Homelessness prevention component.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Homelessness prevention component... and Eligible Activities § 576.103 Homelessness prevention component. ESG funds may be used to provide... paragraph (1) of the “homeless” definition in § 576.2. This assistance, referred to as...

  15. Homeless Children: Meeting the Educational Challenges. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goins, Brad; Cesarone, Bernard

    Difficulties faced by homeless children include depression, low self-esteem, lack of sleep and nutrition, and feelings of shame and embarrassment. Challenges faced by schools in providing education to homeless children include: (1) keeping children in one school despite frequent family moves; (2) ensuring that children's health records are…

  16. American Nightmare: A Decade of Homelessness in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Coalition for the Homeless, Washington, DC.

    A 1989 national survey of the dimensions of homelessness found that at least three million Americans are homeless and that the shortage of affordable housing was cited as the chief cause. Information was gathered from a telephone survey of emergency shelter providers, housing advocacy organizations, and local governments in 26 communities, ranging…

  17. Strengthening At-Risk and Homeless Young Mothers and Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medeiros, Debra; Vaulton, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    The Strengthening At Risk and Homeless Young Mothers and Children Initiative, funded by the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation, aims to improve the housing, health, and development of homeless and at-risk young families. This article describes the services provided in four program sites (Pomona, CA; Antelope Valley, CA; Minneapolis, MN; and Chicago, IL)…

  18. Nowhere to Run: HIV Prevention for Runaway and Homeless Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posner, Marc

    This volume is a guide to providing effective Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and substance abuse prevention services to runaway and homeless youth. The guide is based on current research and the best programs in this field. Chapters 1 and 2 summarize what is known about runaway and homeless youth, the services these youth require if they are…

  19. Lessons Learned: A "Homeless Shelter Intervention" by a Medical Student

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owusu, Yasmin; Kunik, Mark; Coverdale, John; Shah, Asim; Primm, Annelle; Harris, Toi

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The authors explored the process of implementing a medical student-initiated program designed to provide computerized mental health screening, referral, and education in a homeless shelter. Method: An educational program was designed to teach homeless shelter staff about psychiatric disorders and culturally-informed treatment…

  20. Educational Policy and Reform for Homeless Students. An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mawhinney-Rhoads, Lynnette; Stahler, Gerald

    2006-01-01

    This article provides an overview of educational reform efforts that have been targeted toward assisting homeless students. The authors first review some of the difficulties and barriers that confront homeless children in terms of school access and academic success. The authors then examine four different types of educational reforms for homeless…

  1. Prescription Drug Misuse among Homeless Youth

    PubMed Central

    Rhoades, Harmony; Winetrobe, Hailey; Rice, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Background Prescription drug misuse (PDM) is highly prevalent among youth in the U.S., and can have serious health consequences. Homeless youth are a particularly vulnerable population with high rates of substance use. However, PDM has not been studied in a sample comprised exclusively of homeless youth. Methods A sample of 451 homeless youth recruited from drop-in centers in Los Angeles, CA provided information on substance use, mental health, service utilization, trauma, and sexual risk behavior. Multivariable logistic regression assessed correlates of past month PDM. Results Nearly 50% reported lifetime PDM and 21.6% reported PDM in the past month. The most frequently used prescriptions in the past month were: opioids only (24.5%), sedatives only (23.4%), and stimulants only (10.6%); 14.9% used some combination of these three types of prescription medications. Homeless youth reported that prescriptions were most commonly obtained for free from friends or relatives (24.5%). Foster care involvement was associated withdecreased PDM, while hard drug use, suicidal ideation, and unprotected sex were associated with increased PDM. Conclusions Homeless youth report high rates of PDM, and access these medications most frequently from friends and family. PDM among homeless youth clusters with other risk factors, including hard drug use, unprotected sex, and suicidal ideation. Surprisingly, foster care history was associated with decreased PDM. Programs aimed at preventing PDM among homeless youth should recognize the clustering of risk behaviors, assess prescription use/access when providing mental health services, and educate the general public about proper disposal of prescriptions. PMID:24613220

  2. Recognizing the Needs of the Homeless.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    France, Joseph B.

    This paper summarizes reports and research on the homeless in the United States, presents findings of a survey of Red Cross chapters on services to the homeless, and describes programs for the homeless of selected Red Cross chapters. Section 1 discusses definitions of homelessness and methodologies used to count homeless people. The homeless are

  3. Recognizing the Needs of the Homeless.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    France, Joseph B.

    This paper summarizes reports and research on the homeless in the United States, presents findings of a survey of Red Cross chapters on services to the homeless, and describes programs for the homeless of selected Red Cross chapters. Section 1 discusses definitions of homelessness and methodologies used to count homeless people. The homeless are…

  4. Increasing access--a qualitative study of homelessness and palliative care in a major urban center.

    PubMed

    Krakowsky, Yonah; Gofine, Mirriam; Brown, Pnina; Danziger, Jana; Knowles, Holly

    2013-05-01

    Rates of morbidity and mortality are significantly higher in homeless populations. Homeless people experience many barriers to receive adequate palliative care. This qualitative study examines how a major urban city's palliative care resources can be improved to increase access and better serve the homeless. Audiotaped interviews were preformed with 7 homeless care providers in Toronto, Canada, and their transcripts were analyzed using thematic analysis. The findings of the study suggest that in order to increase access and to serve the city's terminally ill homeless better, the following 4 areas must be addressed: (1) increasing positive interaction between the health care system and the homeless, (2) training staff to deal with the unique issues confronting the homeless, (3) providing patient-centered care, and (4) diversifying the methods of delivery. PMID:22669932

  5. Characteristics of Mothers Caring for Children During Episodes of Homelessness

    PubMed Central

    Whitbeck, Les B.; Armenta, Brian E.

    2016-01-01

    This study provides a description of the physical, psychological, and substance use problems of adult homeless women who are and are not caring for children. We also examined differences in the characteristics of these two groups of women. Interviews were conducted with 148 homeless women from three mid-sized U.S. cities, 24.3 % of whom were caring for at least one child. Our results showed that women caring for children were more likely to be sheltered and have health insurance. Homeless women caring for children and solitary homeless women were generally similar in terms of substance abuse problems. However, rates of Borderline Personality Disorder were higher among women caring for children than among solitary homeless women. Our results are somewhat consistent with previous research, with the exception of substance abuse problems and mental health problems, which were shown to be equally problematic for all women, regardless of current caregiving status. PMID:25536936

  6. National Center on Family Homelessness

    MedlinePlus

    ... Events You are here Home National Center on Family Homelessness Center A staggering 2.5 million children ... the impact of homelessness on children, youth, and families. Through research, programs, trainings, and partnerships with the ...

  7. National Center on Family Homelessness

    MedlinePlus

    ... Children START With Kids Healing Hearts, Promoting Health Domestic Violence and Homelessness TA America's Youngest Outcasts Veterans Veterans ... 6) the ways in which traumatic experiences, especially domestic violence, precede and prolong homelessness for families. Effective solutions ...

  8. Supporting Homeless Students with Disabilities: Implementing IDEA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Homeless Education at SERVE, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) guarantees rights and services for children and youth with special needs. This Q&A brief provides basic information about IDEA and specific ways the law applies to homeless and highly mobile students with special needs. In addition, the brief provides strategies recommended by homeless…

  9. Twenty-Five Years of Child and Family Homelessness: Where Are We Now?

    PubMed Central

    Gracy, Delaney; Goldsmith, Grifin; Shapiro, Alan; Redlener, Irwin E.

    2013-01-01

    Family homelessness emerged as a major social and public health problem in the United States during the 1980s. We reviewed the literature, including journal articles, news stories, and government reports, that described conditions associated with family homelessness, the scope of the problem, and the health and mental health of homeless children and families. Much of this literature was published during the 1980s and 1990s. This raises questions about its continued applicability for the public health community. We concluded that descriptions of the economic conditions and public policies associated with family homelessness are still relevant; however, the homeless family population has changed over time. Family homelessness has become more prevalent and pervasive among poor and low-income families. We provide public health recommendations for these homeless families. PMID:24148055

  10. Homeless Youths and HIV Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Reviews studies on the risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) among homeless adolescents, and makes policy recommendations. Discusses factors affecting delivery of services, social networks and risk acts, and describes intervention programs aimed at homeless youth. Homeless youth are well informed about HIV and responsive to behavior change.…

  11. No Homeless Child Left behind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saxberg, David

    2011-01-01

    Although it is difficult to determine the precise number of homeless children, the National Coalition for the Homeless reports that there are more than 1.3 million children lacking a permanent residence on any given night. Further, 39 percent of the homeless population was comprised of children under the age of 18 in July 2009, the most recent…

  12. Methamphetamine Use among Homeless Former Foster Youth: The Mediating Role of Social Networks

    PubMed Central

    Yoshioka-Maxwell, Amanda; Rice, Eric; Rhoades, Harmony; Winetrobe, Hailey

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Social network analysis can provide added causal insight into otherwise confusing epidemiologic findings in public health research. Although foster care and homelessness are risk factors for methamphetamine use, current research has failed to explicate why homeless youth with foster care experience engage in methamphetamine use at higher rates than other homeless young adults. This study examined the mediating effect of network engagement and time spent homeless on the relationship between foster care experience and recent methamphetamine use among homeless youth in Los Angeles. Methods Egocentric network data from a cross-sectional community-based sample (n = 652) of homeless youth aged 13–25 were collected from drop-in centers in Los Angeles. Questions addressed foster care experience, time spent homeless, methamphetamine use, and perceived drug use in social networks. Path analysis was performed in SAS to examine mediation. Results Controlling for all other variables, results of path analysis regarding recent methamphetamine use indicated a direct effect between foster care experience and recent methamphetamine use (B = .269, t = 2.73, p < .01). However, this direct effect became statistically nonsignificant when time spent homeless and network methamphetamine use were added to the model, and indirect paths from time spent homeless and network methamphetamine use became statistically significant. Conclusions Foster care experience influenced recent methamphetamine use indirectly through time spent homeless and methamphetamine use by network members. Efforts to reduce methamphetamine use should focus on securing stable housing and addressing network interactions among homeless former foster youth. PMID:26146647

  13. Gender Differences in Predictors of Suicidal Thoughts and Attempts Among Homeless Veterans that Abuse Substances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benda, Brent B.

    2005-01-01

    This study of 315 male and 310 female homeless military veterans in a V.A. inpatient program designed to treat substance abusers, many of whom also suffer psychiatric disorders, was designed to examine gender differences in factors associated with the odds of having suicidal thoughts, and of attempting suicide, in comparison to being nonsuicidal.…

  14. A Different Kind of Smart: A Study of the Educational Obstacles Confronting Homeless Youth in New England.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Melanie; Houghton, Alison

    This study provides information on obstacles facing homeless youth in school. Research occurred in four diverse New England cities. Researchers collected detailed case histories on youth age 10-15 years who were currently homeless or who had recently been homeless. Data came from staff of local youth agencies, government officials, and youths…

  15. Adapting an Evidence-Based Intervention for Homeless Women: Engaging the Community in Shared Decision-making

    PubMed Central

    Cederbaum, Julie A.; Song, Ahyoung; Hsu, Hsun-Ta; Tucker, Joan S.; Wenzel, Suzanne L.

    2014-01-01

    As interest grows in the diffusion of evidence-based interventions (EBIs), there is increasing concern about how to mitigate implementation challenges; this paper concerns adapting an EBI for homeless women. Complementing earlier focus groups with homeless women, homeless service providers (n = 32) were engaged in focus groups to assess capacity, needs, and barriers with implementation of EBIs. Deductive analyses of data led to the selection of four EBIs. Six consensus groups were then undertaken; three each with homeless women (n = 24) and homeless service providers (n = 21). The selected EBI was adapted and pretested with homeless women (n = 9) and service providers (n = 6). The structured consensus group process provided great utility and affirmed the expertise of homeless women and service providers as experts in their domain. Engaging providers in the selection process reduced the structural barriers within agencies as obstacles to diffusion. PMID:25418227

  16. Comprehensive Planning To Address Homelessness. City Initiatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zawisza, Kris

    This packet contains documents that provide information about the planning and implementation of a comprehensive plan to address homelessness in cities throughout the U.S. Information on the following components of a comprehensive strategy are included: (1) "Task Forces"; (2) "Assessment Studies"; (3) "Emergency Services"; (4) "Transitional…

  17. Extreme weather-related health needs of people who are homeless.

    PubMed

    Cusack, Lynette; van Loon, Antonia; Kralik, Debbie; Arbon, Paul; Gilbert, Sandy

    2013-01-01

    To identify the extreme weather-related health needs of homeless people and the response by homeless service providers in Adelaide, South Australia, a five-phased qualitative interpretive study was undertaken. (1) Literature review, followed by semi-structured interviews with 25 homeless people to ascertain health needs during extreme weather events. (2) Identification of homeless services. (3) Semi-structured interviews with 16 homeless service providers regarding their response to the health needs of homeless people at times of extreme weather. (4) Gap analysis. (5) Suggestions for policy and planning. People experiencing homelessness describe adverse health impacts more from extreme cold, than extreme hot weather. They considered their health suffered more, because of wet bedding, clothes and shoes. They felt more depressed and less able to keep themselves well during cold, wet winters. However, homeless service providers were more focussed on planning for extra service responses during times of extreme heat rather than extreme cold. Even though a city may be considered to have a temperate climate with a history of very hot summers, primary homeless populations have health needs during winter months. The experiences and needs of homeless people should be considered in extreme weather policy and when planning responses. PMID:22950903

  18. Telephone Enrollment in the VA Healthcare System. Interim final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-03-16

    This rulemaking amends VA's medical regulations to allow veterans to complete applications for health care enrollment by telephone by providing application information to a VA employee, agreeing to VA's provisions regarding copayment liability and assignment of third-party insurance benefits, and attesting to the accuracy and authenticity of the information provided over the phone. This action will make it easier for veterans to apply to enroll and will speed VA processing of applications. PMID:26987128

  19. Where There Is No Hope: A Teacher's Experience with Homelessness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nath, Veena; Hallett, Ronald E.

    2015-01-01

    Stereotypical notions of who experiences homelessness frame how educational institutions approach policy and program development. This life history of a teacher challenges assumptions by providing an in-depth look at a mother's struggle to find stability.

  20. Part II, Provider perspectives: should patients be activated to request evidence-based medicine? a qualitative study of the VA project to implement diuretics (VAPID)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Hypertension guidelines recommend the use of thiazide diuretics as first-line therapy for uncomplicated hypertension, yet diuretics are under-prescribed, and hypertension is frequently inadequately treated. This qualitative evaluation of provider attitudes follows a randomized controlled trial of a patient activation strategy in which hypertensive patients received letters and incentives to discuss thiazides with their provider. The strategy prompted high discussion rates and enhanced thiazide-prescribing rates. Our objective was to interview providers to understand the effectiveness and acceptability of the intervention from their perspective, as well as the suitability of patient activation for more widespread guideline implementation. Methods Semi-structured phone interviews were conducted with 21 primary care providers. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and reviewed by the interviewer before being analyzed for content. Interviews were coded, and relevant themes and specific responses were identified, grouped, and compared. Results Of the 21 providers interviewed, 20 (95%) had a positive opinion of the intervention, and 18 of 20 (90%) thought the strategy was suitable for wider use. In explaining their opinions of the intervention, many providers discussed a positive effect on treatment, but they more often focused on the process of patient activation itself, describing how the intervention facilitated discussions by informing patients and making them more pro-active. Regarding effectiveness, providers suggested the intervention worked like a reminder, highlighted oversights, or changed their approach to hypertension management. Many providers also explained that the intervention 'aligned' patients' objectives with theirs, or made patients more likely to accept a change in medications. Negative aspects were mentioned infrequently, but concerns about the use of financial incentives were most common. Relevant barriers to initiating thiazide treatment included a hesitancy to switch medications if the patient was at or near goal blood pressure on a different anti-hypertensive. Conclusions Patient activation was acceptable to providers as a guideline implementation strategy, with considerable value placed on the activation process itself. By 'aligning' patients' objectives with those of their providers, this process also facilitated part of the effectiveness of the intervention. Patient activation shows promise for wider use as an implementation strategy, and should be tested in other areas of evidence-based medicine. Trial registration National Clinical Trial Registry number NCT00265538 PMID:20298564

  1. Moving Away From Homelessness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gael, Young Fine

    This discussion document from a symposium on shut out youth attempts to heighten awareness of the housing problems experienced by youth in Ireland. It is based on information obtained from a questionnaire sent to voluntary organizations working in local areas. It focuses on homelessness and its related issues of health, education, and the…

  2. Readings in Homelessness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matuszowicz, Peter F.

    Researchers have documented links between a number of behavioral issues and homelessness, including the following: limited/no social networks; social isolation; proneness of victimization; history of emotional, physical, sexual, and substance abuse; lack of education; and anxiety resulting from inadequate physical space. The possible benefits of…

  3. 38 CFR 3.1700 - Types of VA burial benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Types of VA burial... ADJUDICATION Burial Benefits Burial Benefits: General § 3.1700 Types of VA burial benefits. Pt. 3, Subpt. B, Nt. (a) Burial benefits. VA provides the following types of burial benefits, which are discussed in §§...

  4. Marketing to the marginalised: tobacco industry targeting of the homeless and mentally ill

    PubMed Central

    Apollonio, D; Malone, R

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the tobacco industry's relationships with and influence on homeless and mentally ill smokers and organisations providing services to them. Methods: Analysis of internal tobacco industry documents and journal articles. Results: The tobacco industry has marketed cigarettes to the homeless and seriously mentally ill, part of its "downscale" market, and has developed relationships with homeless shelters and advocacy groups, gaining positive media coverage and political support. Discussion: Tobacco control advocates and public health organisations should consider how to target programmes to homeless and seriously mentally ill individuals. Education of service providers about tobacco industry efforts to cultivate this market may help in reducing smoking in these populations. PMID:16319365

  5. Programmatic Impact of 5 Years of Mortality Surveillance of New York City Homeless Populations

    PubMed Central

    Marder, Dova; Begier, Elizabeth; Gutkovich, Alexander; Mos, Robert; Griffin, Angela; Zimmerman, Regina; Madsen, Ann

    2013-01-01

    A homeless mortality surveillance system identifies emerging trends in the health of the homeless population and provides this information to key stakeholders in a timely and ongoing manner to effect evidence-based, programmatic change. We describe the first 5 years of the New York City homeless mortality surveillance system and, for the first time in peer-reviewed literature, illustrate the impact of key elements of sustained surveillance (i.e., timely dissemination of aggregate mortality data and real-time sharing of information on individual homeless decedents) on the programs of New York City’s Department of Homeless Services. These key elements had a positive impact on the department’s programs that target sleep-related infant deaths and hypothermia, drug overdose, and alcohol-related deaths among homeless persons. PMID:24148068

  6. Understanding the Attainment of Stable Housing: A Seven-Year Longitudinal Analysis of Homeless Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Braciszewski, Jordan M.; Toro, Paul A.; Stout, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Stable housing provides a solid foundation for youth development, making it an essential topic of study among young homeless people. Although gains have been made in research with adolescents and young adults experiencing homelessness, few longitudinal studies of this population exist, clouding the long-term housing outcome picture. The current study examined the course and risk factors for homelessness in a sample of 243 homeless adolescents followed over a seven-year period. The vast majority of youth returned to stable housing quickly; however, early experiences of homelessness, even at this young age, were observed to have a substantial negative impact on future housing. Participants from poorer neighborhoods and those identifying as ethnic minorities also took longer to achieve stable housing. The data suggest that family reunification interventions may serve this population well. Preparing youth for returning home may prevent subsequent homeless episodes, while also improving their overall functioning. PMID:26997683

  7. The Community College and the Homeless: A Model for the Nation. Job Training for the Homeless Demonstration Program Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moehrlin, Cynthia D.

    Established in 1981, the Alternatives Program at Elgin Community College (ECC) has provided services for displaced homemakers, single parents, welfare recipients, and homeless women, laying the groundwork for the 1988 formation of the Fox Valley Consortium for Job Training and Placement of the Homeless. Using federal funding, the Consortium offers…

  8. An Inside Look at Homeless Youths’ Social Networks: Perceptions of Substance Use Norms1

    PubMed Central

    Melander, Lisa A.; Tyler, Kimberly A.; Schmitz, Rachel M.

    2016-01-01

    Substance use among homeless young people is a pervasive problem, and there have been many efforts to understand more about the dynamics of this health compromising behavior. The current study examined perceived substance use norms within homeless youths’ social networks utilizing in-depth interviews. The sample included 19 homeless individuals aged 16 to 21. Four elements of substance use within networks emerged: substance use choices, drug use safety issues, encouragement and/or discouragement, and appropriate situations in which substance use is condoned. These findings provide unique insight into the norms associated with drug and alcohol use within homeless youths’ social networks. PMID:26989340

  9. The Capacity to Give Informed Consent in a Homeless Population with Developmental Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham-Williams, Renee M.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined homeless persons with developmental disabilities and their ability to understand the informed consent process for research using a capacity-to-consent screener. Bivariate associations with the inability to pass the screener on the first attempt were noted with three factors: an eighth grade or less in education, chronic homelessness, and mental retardation diagnosis. With multiple regression, the only outcome associated with inability to pass the screener on the first attempt was an eighth grade or less education. This study indicates the need for consideration of developmental disabilities when homeless and mental health providers are working with the homeless community. PMID:19263221

  10. Childhood risk factors for homelessness among homeless adults.

    PubMed Central

    Koegel, P; Melamid, E; Burnam, m A

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. This effort used data from the Course of Homelessness study and comparative secondary data on the general population to identify negative childhood and family background experiences that may increase risk for adult homelessness. METHODS. Frequencies of negative childhood experiences were examined among a probability sample of 1563 homeless adults. Differences in risk for such experiences were calculated by sex, age cohort, and racial/ethnicity status. Where possible, rates of negative childhood experiences among the homeless were compared with the general population. RESULTS. Substantial numbers of this sample experienced multiple problems as children across several domains: poverty, residential instability, and family problems. Women and Whites disproportionately reported experiences suggestive of personal or family problems; non-Whites disproportionately reported experiences suggestive of personal or family problems; non-Whites disproportionately reported experiences suggestive of poverty. Homeless adults were at increased risk of childhood out-of-home placement, tenure in public housing, and homelessness, but not at greater risk for physical abuse. Women appeared to be at greater risk for sexual abuse. CONCLUSIONS. The problems that homeless individuals experience as adults have very clear analogs in their childhoods. Vulnerability to homelessness stems from factors unevenly distributed across age, sex, and race/ethnicity groups. PMID:7503338

  11. Determination of VA health care costs.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Paul G

    2003-09-01

    In the absence of billing data, alternative methods are used to estimate the cost of hospital stays, outpatient visits, and treatment innovations in the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). The choice of method represents a trade-off between accuracy and research cost. The direct measurement method gathers information on staff activities, supplies, equipment, space, and workload. Since it is expensive, direct measurement should be reserved for finding short-run costs, evaluating provider efficiency, or determining the cost of treatments that are innovative or unique to VA. The pseudo-bill method combines utilization data with a non-VA reimbursement schedule. The cost regression method estimates the cost of VA hospital stays by applying the relationship between cost and characteristics of non-VA hospitalizations. The Health Economics Resource Center uses pseudo-bill and cost regression methods to create an encounter-level database of VA costs. Researchers are also beginning to use the VA activity-based cost allocation system. PMID:15095549

  12. Experiences With and Attitudes Toward Death and Dying Among Homeless Persons

    PubMed Central

    Ratner, Edward R; Bartels, Dianne M.; Alderton, Lucy; Hudson, Brenda; Ahluwalia, Jasjit S.

    2007-01-01

    Background Homeless persons face many barriers to health care, have few resources, and experience high death rates. They live lives of disenfranchisement and neglect. Few studies have explored their experiences and attitudes toward death and dying. Unfortunately, studies done in other populations may not apply to homeless persons. Exploring these experiences and attitudes may provide insight into life, health care, and end-of-life (EOL) concerns of this population. Objective To explore the experiences and attitudes toward death and dying among homeless persons. Design Qualitative study utilizing focus groups. Participants Fifty-three homeless persons recruited from homeless service agencies. Measurements In-depth interviews, which were audiotaped and transcribed. Results We present seven themes, some of which are previously unreported. Homeless persons described many significant experiences with death and dying, and many participants suffered losses while very young. These encounters influenced participants’ attitudes toward risks and risky behavior: e.g., for some, these experiences provided justification for high-risk behaviors and influenced their behaviors while living on the streets. For others, they may be associated with their homelessness. Finally, these experiences informed their attitudes toward death and dying as well as EOL care; homeless persons believe that care will be poor at the EOL. Conclusions Findings from this study have implications for addressing social services, health promotion, prevention, and EOL care for homeless persons, as well as for others who are poor and disenfranchised. PMID:17372788

  13. Homelessness: An Annotated Bibliography of Australian Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loft, Jenny, Comp.; Davis, Mari, Comp.

    This bibliography, compiled for the International Year of Shelter for the Homeless, lists Australian works published since 1974 about homelessness. It includes definitions of homelessness from the literature and an introductory article looking at different perspectives on homelessness. The entries, mainly taken from FAMILY database, are each…

  14. Homelessness in Augusta, Georgia. Preliminary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Shirley A.; Bennett, Gerald

    Two studies examined homelessness in Augusta, Georgia. The Key Informant Survey, conducted in 1987, involved interviewing individuals (N=42) knowledgeable about homeless people in the community. In the Shelter and Street Surveys of homeless people, conducted in March (N=51) and July (N=71) of 1988, homeless subjects were interviewed concerning…

  15. 34 CFR 303.17 - Homeless children.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Homeless children. 303.17 Section 303.17 Education... DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 303.17 Homeless children. Homeless children means children who meet the definition given the term homeless children and youths in section 725 (42 U.S.C....

  16. 34 CFR 303.17 - Homeless children.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Homeless children. 303.17 Section 303.17 Education... DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 303.17 Homeless children. Homeless children means children who meet the definition given the term homeless children and youths in section 725 (42 U.S.C....

  17. 34 CFR 303.17 - Homeless children.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Homeless children. 303.17 Section 303.17 Education... DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 303.17 Homeless children. Homeless children means children who meet the definition given the term homeless children and youths in section 725 (42 U.S.C....

  18. Can Better National Policy End Family Homelessness?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Nan

    2010-01-01

    An understanding of the close link between federal policy and family homelessness is critical for ensuring that one day no child in the United States is homeless. This article discusses the nature of family homelessness, the national policy framework that exists to help vulnerable families, the homeless assistance system that federal policy has…

  19. Predictors of Homelessness among Street Living Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slesnick, Natasha; Bartle-Haring, Suzanne; Dashora, Pushpanjali; Kang, Min Ju; Aukward, Erin

    2008-01-01

    While few studies have identified predictors of exiting homelessness among adults, even fewer studies have attempted to identify these predictors among homeless youth. The current study explored predictors of change in homelessness among 180 homeless youth between the ages of 14 and 22, recruited through an urban drop-in center. All youth were…

  20. Understanding the Homeless: From Research to Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumann, Donald; Grigsby, Charles

    A study was conducted to examine the homeless population of Austin, Texas and to determine who the homeless were, how they became homeless, how they saw themselves and others, what their needs were, and how they were being served by agencies. Survey data were collected from 500 homeless persons. This document summarizes findings from 3 years of…

  1. Obesity Among Chronically Homeless Adults: Is It a Problem?

    PubMed Central

    Rosenheck, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective We examined rates of obesity and associated characteristics in the chronically homeless population to explore how a range of factors, including sociodemographics, housing, food source, physical and mental health, and health service use, were related to being overweight or obese. Methods We conducted multivariate regression analyses on a community sample of 436 chronically homeless adults across 11 U.S. cities to examine the prevalence of obesity. Results The majority (57%) of chronically homeless adults were overweight or obese. Chronically homeless adults who were female or Hispanic appeared to be at particular risk for obesity. There were few differences on physical and mental health by weight group. Although overweight and obese chronically homeless adults were more likely to discuss exercise with a health-care provider, they reported engaging in less exercise than those who were underweight or normal weight. Conclusion These findings underscore the need for greater attention to obesity in chronically homeless adults and demonstrate a food insecurity-obesity paradox or poverty-obesity link. PMID:23277657

  2. Depression in homeless mothers: addressing an unrecognized public health issue.

    PubMed

    Bassuk, Ellen L; Beardslee, William R

    2014-01-01

    Homeless mothers experience disproportionately high rates of major depressive disorder compared with the general population. Stressed by their circumstances, these women struggle to protect their families. Children living with a depressed parent have poorer medical, mental health, and educational outcomes. Despite the adverse impact on children, depression among mothers experiencing homelessness remains unacknowledged, unrecognized, and untreated. This article reviews the evidence supporting preventive and therapeutic interventions with low-income and homeless mothers and children, and finds that few services have been adapted and evaluated for use in the homelessness service system. Based on the robust evidence describing positive outcomes in programs for low-income parents with depression, the authors propose guidelines for adapting and implementing services directly by programs serving homeless families. Once families are housed and urgent issues addressed, they recommend assessing all family members, routinely providing culturally competent parenting supports, trauma-informed services, and treatment for major depressive disorders. They also emphasize the critical importance of creating child-centered spaces and developmental services for the children. To ensure quality care, training must be available for the staff. Given the increasing numbers of homeless families and high rates of maternal depression and its negative impact on children, support for these programs should become a high public health priority. PMID:24826830

  3. Youth Homelessness and Individualised Subjectivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrugia, David

    2011-01-01

    This article aims to contribute to understandings of youth homelessness and subjectivity by analysing identity construction in terms of young people's negotiation of the structural and institutional environment of youth homelessness. I suggest that while existing literature on this topic concentrates mainly on micro-social encounters, the

  4. The Homeless in Contemporary Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bingham, Richard D.; And Others

    This book consists of 15 chapters on understanding and helping the homeless. The first seven chapters present the "new" homeless in historical context and describe this population and its situation. The remaining eight chapters discuss policy and program options of the government and other organizations in attempting to alleviate the problems of…

  5. Youth Homelessness and Individualised Subjectivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrugia, David

    2011-01-01

    This article aims to contribute to understandings of youth homelessness and subjectivity by analysing identity construction in terms of young people's negotiation of the structural and institutional environment of youth homelessness. I suggest that while existing literature on this topic concentrates mainly on micro-social encounters, the…

  6. Educating Homeless Students: Promising Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stronge, James H., Ed.; Reed-Victor, Evelyn, Ed.

    This book is for educators who serve homeless students or students temporarily sharing houses with other families. It describes many promising strategies for working with these students. The chapters are: (1) "Educating Homeless Children and Youth: An Introduction" (James H. Stronge); (2) "Meeting the Developmental and Educational Needs of…

  7. Policy and Procedures Manual for Assuring Equal Access to Education and Success in School for All Maine's Homeless Children and Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maine State Dept. of Education, Augusta. Office for Homeless Education.

    Guidelines for developing strategies and policies that ensure equal access to education for Maine's homeless children and youth are provided in this document. The first part outlines factors that place students at risk for homelessness. The second part focuses on developing effective school policies and strategies to help homeless children gain…

  8. Access to Pre-K Education under the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act. Pre-K Policy Brief Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boylan, Ellen; Splansky, Deborah

    2010-01-01

    The federal McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act ("McKinney-Vento") provides federal funding to states to address the problems that homeless children and youth encounter in enrolling, attending, and succeeding in the nation's public schools. McKinney-Vento requires states to develop plans that ensure homeless children and youth the same access…

  9. Homelessness during pregnancy: a unique, time-dependent risk factor of birth outcomes.

    PubMed

    Cutts, Diana B; Coleman, Sharon; Black, Maureen M; Chilton, Mariana M; Cook, John T; de Cuba, Stephanie Ettinger; Heeren, Timothy C; Meyers, Alan; Sandel, Megan; Casey, Patrick H; Frank, Deborah A

    2015-06-01

    Evaluate homelessness during pregnancy as a unique, time-dependent risk factor for adverse birth outcomes. 9,995 mothers of children <48 months old surveyed at emergency departments and primary care clinics in five US cities. Mothers were classified as either homeless during pregnancy with the index child, homeless only after the index child's birth, or consistently housed. Outcomes included birth weight as a continuous variable, as well as categorical outcomes of low birth weight (LBW; <2,500 g) and preterm delivery (<37 weeks). Multiple logistic regression and adjusted linear regression analyses were performed, comparing prenatal and postnatal homelessness with the referent group of consistently housed mothers, controlling for maternal demographic characteristics, smoking, and child age at interview. Prenatal homelessness was associated with higher adjusted odds of LBW (AOR 1.43, 95 % CI 1.14, 1.80, p < 0.01) and preterm delivery (AOR 1.24, 95 % CI 0.98, 1.56, p = 0.08), and a 53 g lower adjusted mean birth weight (p = 0.08). Postnatal homelessness was not associated with these outcomes. Prenatal homelessness is an independent risk factor for LBW, rather than merely a marker of adverse maternal and social characteristics associated with homelessness. Targeted interventions to provide housing and health care to homeless women during pregnancy may result in improved birth outcomes. PMID:25404405

  10. Comparisons of Prevention Programs for Homeless Youth

    PubMed Central

    Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane

    2014-01-01

    There are six HIV prevention programs for homeless youth whose efficacy has been or is currently being evaluated: STRIVE, the Community Reinforcement Approach, Strengths-Based Case Management, Ecologically-Based Family Therapy, Street Smart, and AESOP (street outreach access to resources). Programs vary in their underlying framework and theoretical models for understanding homelessness. All programs presume that the youths’ families lack the ability to support their adolescent child. Some programs deemphasize family involvement while others focus on rebuilding connections among family members. The programs either normalize current family conflicts or, alternatively, provide education about the importance of parental monitoring. All programs aim to reduce HIV-related sexual and drug use acts. A coping skills approach is common across programs: Problem-solving skills are specifically addressed in four of the six programs; alternatively, parents in other programs are encouraged to contingently reward their children. Each program also engineers ongoing social support for the families and the youth, either by providing access to needed resources or by substituting a new, supportive relationship for the existing family caretaker. All of the interventions provide access to health and mental health services as basic program resources. A comparison of HIV prevention programs for homeless youth identifies the robust components of each and suggests which programs providers may choose to replicate. PMID:19067164

  11. Electronic case management with homeless youth.

    PubMed

    Bender, Kimberly; Schau, Nicholas; Begun, Stephanie; Haffejee, Badiah; Barman-Adhikari, Anamika; Hathaway, Jessica

    2015-06-01

    Case management, a widely practiced form of service brokerage, is associated with a variety of positive outcomes for homeless youth, but it may be difficult to implement, as youth face logistical barriers to attending in-person meetings. As part of a larger clinical trial, the current study investigates the feasibility of providing electronic case management (ECM) to homeless youth, using cell-phones, texts, email, and Facebook. Youth were given prepaid cell-phones and a case manager who provided four ECM sessions every 2-3 weeks over a 3-month period. Contact logs were used to record how many youth engaged in ECM, how many attempts were necessary to elicit engagement, and youths' preferred technology methods for engaging. Although engagement in the number of ECM sessions varied, the majority of youth (87.5%) engaged in at least one ECM session. Youth (41%) most commonly needed one contact before they engaged in an ECM session, and the majority responded by the third attempt. While youth most commonly answered calls directly, their chosen method of returning calls was texting. The majority of youth (80%) described ECM positively, reporting themes of convenience, connection, and accountability. The use of ECM, particularly of texting, offers promising implications for providing services to homeless youth. PMID:25748603

  12. Service learning: population-focused nursing for the homeless at a soup kitchen.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Laura H; Dilley, Kathy B

    2009-01-01

    The authors describe the development of an undergraduate population-focused nursing service learning experience at a soup kitchen for the homeless. Through this experience, senior BSN students are able to increase their awareness of health disparities and use interdisciplinary communication and collaboration skills to provide basic healthcare and health promotion to the homeless population. PMID:19412058

  13. Characterizing Stressors and Modifiable Health Risk Factors among Homeless Smokers: An Exploratory Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendzor, Darla E.; Reitzel, Lorraine R.; Businelle, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    This pilot study was conducted to explore the associations between stressors related to homelessness and modifiable health risk factors (poor diet, insufficient physical activity, and overweight/obesity) and to provide direction for future research. Participants (N = 57) were homeless adults enrolled in a smoking cessation program. Analyses were

  14. Culture Clash in San Francisco: Reconnecting Youth Who Are Homeless with Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gracenin, Damun

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a curriculum provided to homeless high school students in San Francisco. The curriculum is delivered at a community-based organization already serving the homeless rather than in the schools and features spontaneous symposiums, scheduled symposiums, independent learning, private and small group instruction in basic academic…

  15. Educating Homeless Students in Urban Settings: An Introduction to the Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stronge, James H.

    1993-01-01

    Introduces background issues regarding the education of homeless children in urban areas, focusing on problems of definition and identification and sociological factors related to homelessness. An overview is provided of the articles of the special issue. The challenges are how to meet the needs of an amorphous and troubled population. (SLD)

  16. Conceptualizing Social Integration among Formerly Homeless Adults with Severe Mental Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Jack; Rosenheck, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    The multiple dimensions of social integration among formerly homeless adults with severe mental illness have not been well-studied. Previous studies have focused on clinical measures or narrow components of social integration. We used a multisite study of chronically homeless adults who were provided housing to (a) identify the main factors…

  17. Homeless Students in Special Education: Beyond the Myth of Socioeconomic Dissonance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilder, Lynn K.; Obiakor, Festus E.; Algozzine, Bob

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the needs of homeless students, especially those with disabilities, suggesting some simple strategies for school personnel to help homeless students maximize their fullest potential (e.g., locating the students and bringing them to school for enrollment, providing transportation to school, offering nutritious meals and clean clothing,…

  18. The McKinney-Vento Education for Homeless Children and Youth Program: Implications for Special Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Losinski, Mickey; Katsiyannis, Antonis; Ryan, Joseph B.

    2013-01-01

    During the 2008-2009 academic school year, nearly a million (956,914) students were reported by school districts as being homeless, a 41% increase over just a 2-year period year. The purpose of this article is to provide a brief overview of national legislative efforts to address the education of children who are homeless, with a particular…

  19. Guiding the Discussion on School Selection. Best Practices in Homeless Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Homeless Education at SERVE, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act guarantees a child qualified as homeless the right to attend one of two schools: the school of origin or the local attendance area school. This brief explains the relevant legal provisions and provides a framework to assist in the decision-making process.

  20. Characterizing Stressors and Modifiable Health Risk Factors among Homeless Smokers: An Exploratory Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendzor, Darla E.; Reitzel, Lorraine R.; Businelle, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    This pilot study was conducted to explore the associations between stressors related to homelessness and modifiable health risk factors (poor diet, insufficient physical activity, and overweight/obesity) and to provide direction for future research. Participants (N = 57) were homeless adults enrolled in a smoking cessation program. Analyses were…

  1. Effectiveness of Intensive Case Management for Homeless Adolescents: Results of a 3-Month Follow-Up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cauce, Ana Mari; And Others

    1994-01-01

    The Seattle (Washington) Homeless Adolescent Research Project implemented Project Passage to provide individualized mental health services to homeless adolescents, involving assessment, linkage, advocacy, counseling, treatment teams, and crisis service. Participants evidenced lower levels of aggression and greater satisfaction with quality of life…

  2. Homelessness. Appropriate Controls Implemented for 1990 McKinney Amendments' PATH Program. Report to Congressional Committees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Health, Education, and Human Services Div.

    The Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) program provides the states and territories with funds to serve homeless individuals who are seriously mentally ill or dually diagnosed with serious mental illness and substance abuse disorders. As part of the mandate of the authorizing legislation, the General Accounting Office…

  3. Homeless Aging Veterans in Transition: A Life-Span Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Carla J.; Bridier, Nancy L.

    2013-01-01

    The need for counseling and career/educational services for homeless veterans has captured political and economic venues for more than 25 years. Veterans are three times more likely to become homeless than the general population if veterans live in poverty or are minority veterans. This mixed methods study emphasized a life-span perspective approach for exploring factors influencing normative aging and life-quality of 39 homeless veterans in Alabama and Florida. Seven descriptive quantitative and qualitative research questions framed the investigation. Study participants completed a quantitative survey reflecting their preferences and needs with a subset of the sample (N = 12) also participating in individual qualitative interview sessions. Thirty-two service providers and stakeholders completed quantitative surveys. Empirical and qualitative data with appropriate triangulation procedures provided interpretive information relative to a life-span development perspective. Study findings provide evidence of the need for future research efforts to address strategies that focus on the health and economic challenges of veterans before they are threatened with the possibility of homelessness. Implications of the study findings provide important information associated with the premise that human development occurs throughout life with specific characteristics influencing the individual's passage. Implications for aging/homelessness research are grounded in late-life transitioning and human development intervention considerations. PMID:24286010

  4. Toward Meeting the Needs of Homeless People with Schizophrenia: The Validity of Quality of Life Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Auquier, Pascal; Tinland, Aurelie; Fortanier, Cecile; Loundou, Anderson; Baumstarck, Karine; Lancon, Christophe; Boyer, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Objective To provide new evidence regarding the suitability of using quality of life (QoL) measurements in homeless people with schizophrenia, we assess the acceptability and psychometric properties of a specific QoL instrument (S-QoL 18) in a population of homeless people with schizophrenia, and we compare their QoL levels with those observed in non-homeless people with schizophrenia. Methods This multi-centre prospective study was conducted in the following 4 French cities: Lille, Marseille, Paris and Toulouse. Two hundred and thirty-six homeless patients with schizophrenia were recruited over a 12 month-period. The S-QoL 18 was tested for construct validity, reliability, external validity and sensitivity to change. The QoL of the 236 homeless patients was compared with 236 French age- and sex-matched non-homeless patients with schizophrenia. Results The eight-factor structure of the S-QoL 18 was confirmed by confirmatory factor analysis (RMSEA = 0.035, CFI = 0.95, GFI = 0.99 and SRMR = 0.015). Internal consistency, reliability and sensitivity to change were satisfactory. External validity was confirmed via correlations between S-QoL 18 dimension scores and SF-36, symptomatology and recovery scores. The percentage of missing data did not exceed 5%. Finally, homeless patients had significantly lower QoL levels than non-homeless patients with schizophrenia. Conclusions These results demonstrate the satisfactory acceptability and psychometric properties of the S-QoL 18, suggesting the validity of QoL measurement among homeless patients with schizophrenia. Our study also reported that QoL levels in homeless patients with schizophrenia were dramatically low, highlighting the need for new policies to eradicate homelessness and tackle poverty. PMID:24205390

  5. Health Care Needs of the Homeless of O’ahu

    PubMed Central

    Withy, Kelley M.; Amoa, Francine; Andaya, January M.; Inada, Megan; Berry, Shaun P

    2009-01-01

    An interview study of 162 homeless individuals on O’ahu demonstrated that the homeless studied were 3 times more likely than the general population of O’ahu to rate their health as fair to poor, despite the fact that 77% of interviewees had medical insurance and 66% a regular health care provider. Better self ratings of health were only associated with younger age and self report of having dental insurance when demographic variables were controlled for. Qualitatively, the homeless population interviewed described ‘good health’ as avoiding illness and being able to make healthy lifestyle choices, finding emotional balance and caring for others. Commonly reported barriers to accessing care included financial factors such as being unable to purchase medications; environmental challenges such as clean drinking water and a safe place to stay; and general discomfort with the health care system. Clinical implications of this study indicate the need for providers caring for the homeless be alert to challenges particular to the homeless, such as barriers to following medical advice (high fiber/low salt diet, exercise, refrigerating medications, etc.). The surprising relationship between knowledge of having dental insurance and better self ratings of health deserves additional research, as does the lack of association between health ratings and having health insurance and a regular provider. PMID:18853893

  6. IMPLICATIONS OF HOMELESSNESS FOR PARENTING YOUNG CHILDREN: A PRELIMINARY REVIEW FROM A DEVELOPMENTAL ATTACHMENT PERSPECTIVE

    PubMed Central

    DAVID, DARYN H.; GELBERG, LILLIAN; SUCHMAN, NANCY E.

    2012-01-01

    Although it has been well-documented that parents and children who experience homelessness often have compromised health and well-being, few studies have examined the potential implications of homelessness on the process of parenting young children. In this review, we consider how parents of young children might function under the circumstances of homelessness. We begin with a brief overview of the psychological, social, and medical characteristics of homeless mothers and their young children. Using a developmental attachment perspective, we next briefly review the central tasks of parenting during the first 5 years of life, including emotion regulation and fostering of child autonomy, with an eye toward how homelessness may compromise a mother's ability to complete these tasks. Finally, we provide suggestions for further research that incorporate a developmental attachment perspective and other relevant viewpoints. Because of the paucity of research in this area, our review seeks to provide a heuristic framework for future research, intervention development, and policy. PMID:22685362

  7. IMPLICATIONS OF HOMELESSNESS FOR PARENTING YOUNG CHILDREN: A PRELIMINARY REVIEW FROM A DEVELOPMENTAL ATTACHMENT PERSPECTIVE.

    PubMed

    David, Daryn H; Gelberg, Lillian; Suchman, Nancy E

    2012-01-01

    Although it has been well-documented that parents and children who experience homelessness often have compromised health and well-being, few studies have examined the potential implications of homelessness on the process of parenting young children. In this review, we consider how parents of young children might function under the circumstances of homelessness. We begin with a brief overview of the psychological, social, and medical characteristics of homeless mothers and their young children. Using a developmental attachment perspective, we next briefly review the central tasks of parenting during the first 5 years of life, including emotion regulation and fostering of child autonomy, with an eye toward how homelessness may compromise a mother's ability to complete these tasks. Finally, we provide suggestions for further research that incorporate a developmental attachment perspective and other relevant viewpoints. Because of the paucity of research in this area, our review seeks to provide a heuristic framework for future research, intervention development, and policy. PMID:22685362

  8. Problem gambling and homelessness: results from an epidemiologic study.

    PubMed

    Nower, Lia; Eyrich-Garg, Karin M; Pollio, David E; North, Carol S

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of gambling disorder and comorbid psychiatric disorders in a homeless population and identify features related to potential subtypes. At baseline, participants were administered a structured interview including socio-demographic sections of the National Comorbidity Study (NCS) interview; seven diagnostic sections of the Diagnostic Interview Schedule (DIS); the alcohol and drug abuse sections of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview-Substance Abuse Module (CIDI-SAM); and the Homeless Supplement to the DIS. At nine months post-baseline assessment, participants were administered additional NCS family history questions and the South Oaks Gambling Screen (SOGS). Participants were an epidemiologic sample of 275 predominately African-American homeless individuals, grouped as lifetime non-gamblers (n = 60), recreational gamblers (n = 152), and problem gamblers (n = 63), recruited on the street and through homeless shelters. Results indicate that lifetime rates of sub-clinical problem (46.2%) and disordered (12.0%) gambling were significantly higher than in the general population. Problem gamblers were more likely than non-problem gamblers to meet diagnostic criteria for antisocial personality disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, bipolar disorder, and any psychiatric disorder, and more likely than non-gamblers to use illicit drugs or meet criteria for abuse/dependence for nicotine, alcohol, or any substance. This study provides evidence that problem gambling is a significant public health issue among the African-American homeless population. Homeless services should include assessment for problem gambling along with psychiatric disorders and referrals to resources and treatment programs. Future studies should explore the relationship of the onset and course of problem gambling and other psychiatric disorders with homelessness as well as racial differences in gambling patterns and problem severity over time. PMID:24395010

  9. Drug and drug-related supply promotion by pharmaceutical company representatives at VA facilities. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2012-03-01

    This final rule amends the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) regulations regarding access to VA facilities by pharmaceutical company representatives. The purposes of the rule are to reduce or eliminate any potential for disruption in the patient care environment, manage activities and promotions at VA facilities, and provide pharmaceutical company representatives with a consistent standard of permissible business practice at VA facilities. The amendments will facilitate mutually beneficial relationships between VA and pharmaceutical company representatives. PMID:22420057

  10. The medical origins of homelessness.

    PubMed Central

    Winkleby, M A; Rockhill, B; Jatulis, D; Fortmann, S P

    1992-01-01

    In 1989 through 1990, we conducted a cross-sectional survey of 1437 homeless adults in northern California (98% response rate). Prevalences of alcohol abuse, illegal drug use, and psychiatric hospitalization when adults first became homeless were 15% to 33% lower than prevalences following homelessness. The largest differences between the homeless and a comparison group of 3122 nonhomeless adults were for psychiatric hospitalization (odds ratios [ORs] of 4.6 for men and 5.9 for women) and alcohol abuse (ORs of 2.3 for men and 4.0 for women). However, when prehomeless prevalences of addictive and psychiatric disorders were compared with prevalences among the nonhomeless, absolute differences were no greater than 12%. PMID:1415869

  11. Art Messaging as a Medium to Engage Homeless Young Adults Art Messaging as a Medium to Engage Homeless Youth

    PubMed Central

    Nyamathi, Adeline; Slagle, Alexandra; Thomas, Alexandra; Hudson, Angela; Khalilifard, Farinaz; Avila, Glenna; Orser, Julie; Cuchilla, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Background Art has been shown to be an empowering and engaging entity with numerous benefits to vulnerable populations, including the homeless persons and young adults. Yet, little is known how homeless young adults perceive the use of art as messages that can communicate the danger of initiating or continuing drug and alcohol use. Objectives The purpose of this study was to solicit perspectives of homeless drug-using young adults as to how art can be used to design messages for their peers about the danger of initiating or continuing drug and alcohol use. Methods Qualitative methodology via focus group discussions was utilized to engage 24 homeless young adults enrolled from a drop-in site in Santa Monica. Results The findings revealed support for a myriad of delivery styles, including in person communication, flyers, music, documentary film and creative writing. The young adults also provided insight into the importance of the thematic framework of messages. Such themes ranged from empowering and hopeful messages to those designed to scare young homeless adults into not experimenting with drugs. Conclusions The findings indicate that in addition to messages communicating the need to prevent or reduce drug and alcohol use, homeless young adults respond to messages that remind them of goals and dreams they once had for their future, and to content that is personal, real and truthful. . Our research indicates that messages that reinforce protective factors such as hope for the future and self-esteem may be as important to homeless young adults as information about the risks and consequences of drug use. PMID:21441664

  12. Homeless, Not Hopeless. An Informational Guide for School Personnel: Understanding and Educating Homeless Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seifert, Elli; Stauffer, Carol

    This guide explains how to educate homeless students within the public schools, focusing on the Saint Paul, Minnesota, public schools. Section 1 defines homelessness. Section 2 presents data on the increasing numbers of homeless students in the area. Section 3 describes common problems faced by homeless students, including family mobility,…

  13. Homeless in God's Country: Coping Strategies and Felt Experiences of the Rural Homeless

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilton, Timothy; DeJong, Cornell

    2010-01-01

    This study examines coping behaviors and felt experiences of homeless adults in Michigan's Upper Peninsula. Data from in-depth interviews with 55 homeless adults reveal 5 general coping pattern groups: shelter users, campers, couch hoppers, mixed users, and circumstantial homeless. Homeless adults within each group experienced similar levels of…

  14. Homeless, Not Hopeless: Ensuring Educational Opportunity for America's Homeless Children and Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Joseph F., Jr., Ed.; Wand, Barbara, Ed.

    This position document is introduced by a fact sheet that lists the numbers of homeless people and the appropriations for various programs that assist homeless people. The executive summary discusses: (1) the plight of homeless children; (2) the passage of the McKinney Homeless Assistance Amendments of 1990 by the U.S. Congress; (3) services…

  15. Adverse Outcomes Among Homeless Adolescents and Young Adults Who Report a History of Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Harpin, Scott B.; Grubenhoff, Joseph A.; Rivara, Frederick P.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the prevalence of self-reported traumatic brain injury (TBI) among homeless young people and explored whether sociodemographic characteristics, mental health diagnoses, substance use, exposure to violence, or difficulties with activities of daily living (ADLs) were associated with TBI. Methods. We analyzed data from the Wilder Homelessness Study, in which participants were recruited in 2006 and 2009 from streets, shelters, and locations in Minnesota that provide services to homeless individuals. Participants completed 30-minute interviews to collect information about history of TBI, homelessness, health status, exposure to violence (e.g., childhood abuse, assault), and other aspects of functioning. Results. Of the 2732 participating adolescents and young adults, 43% reported a history of TBI. Participants with TBI became homeless at a younger age and were more likely to report mental health diagnoses, substance use, suicidality, victimization, and difficulties with ADLs. The majority of participants (51%) reported sustaining their first injury prior to becoming homeless or at the same age of their first homeless episode (10%). Conclusions. TBI occurs frequently among homeless young people and is a marker of adverse outcomes such as mental health difficulties, suicidal behavior, substance use, and victimization. PMID:25122029

  16. Using natural language processing on the free text of clinical documents to screen for evidence of homelessness among US veterans.

    PubMed

    Gundlapalli, Adi V; Carter, Marjorie E; Palmer, Miland; Ginter, Thomas; Redd, Andrew; Pickard, Steven; Shen, Shuying; South, Brett; Divita, Guy; Duvall, Scott; Nguyen, Thien M; D'Avolio, Leonard W; Samore, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Information retrieval algorithms based on natural language processing (NLP) of the free text of medical records have been used to find documents of interest from databases. Homelessness is a high priority non-medical diagnosis that is noted in electronic medical records of Veterans in Veterans Affairs (VA) facilities. Using a human-reviewed reference standard corpus of clinical documents of Veterans with evidence of homelessness and those without, an open-source NLP tool (Automated Retrieval Console v2.0, ARC) was trained to classify documents. The best performing model based on document level work-flow performed well on a test set (Precision 94%, Recall 97%, F-Measure 96). Processing of a naïve set of 10,000 randomly selected documents from the VA using this best performing model yielded 463 documents flagged as positive, indicating a 4.7% prevalence of homelessness. Human review noted a precision of 70% for these flags resulting in an adjusted prevalence of homelessness of 3.3% which matches current VA estimates. Further refinements are underway to improve the performance. We demonstrate an effective and rapid lifecycle of using an off-the-shelf NLP tool for screening targets of interest from medical records. PMID:24551356

  17. The Supervised Methadone and Resettlement Team nurse: an effective approach with opiate-dependent, homeless people.

    PubMed

    Mistral, W; Hollingworth, M

    2001-06-01

    Homelessness and substance misuse have risen dramatically over the past 30 years in the UK. The role of the primary care nurse has been signalled as important in working with people who have drug and alcohol problems, and for improving the general health of homeless people. This article focuses on the role of the primary care nurse in a Supervised Methadone and Resettlement Team (SMART). The team works in central Bristol, in southwest England, with people who are homeless and using illegal opiates. The aim of this report is to provide descriptive information that demonstrates the value of the primary care nurse, working in a multiagency partnership, in dealing with the problems of this homeless population, many of whom have problems associated with illicit drug use. Client outcomes from a small sample of homeless persons are also described. PMID:11407458

  18. A Qualitative Study of Pregnancy Intention and the Use of Contraception among Homeless Women with Children

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Sara; Grewal, MPH Mandeep; Roberts, Elizabeth M.; Steinauer, Jody; Dehlendorf, Christine

    2014-01-01

    We undertook a qualitative analysis informed by grounded theory to explore pregnancy intention and the barriers to contraceptive use as perceived by homeless women with children. Semi-structured interviews (n = 22) were performed in English and in Spanish. The dominant theme emerging from the interviews was a strong desire to avoid pregnancy while homeless. However, few women in our sample used contraception or accessed reproductive health care consistently. There were multiple barriers to using contraception and to accessing reproductive health care services that homeless women reported: (1) inability to prioritize health due to competing demands, (2) shelter-related obstacles and restrictive provider practices that impede access to reproductive health care services and the use of contraception, and (3) change in the power dynamics of sexual relationships while homeless, making women more vulnerable to sexual exploitation. Findings suggest a multifactorial approach is needed to help homeless women use contraception and access reproductive health services. PMID:24858884

  19. "Near and far": social distancing in domiciled characterisations of homeless people.

    PubMed

    Hodgetts, Darrin; Stolte, Ottilie; Radley, Alan; Leggatt-Cook, Chez; Groot, Shiloh; Chamberlain, Kerry

    2011-01-01

    For domiciled individuals, homeless people provide a disturbing reminder that all is not right with the world. Reactions to seeing homeless people frequently encompass repulsion, discomfort, sympathy and sometimes futility. This paper considers domiciled constructions of homeless people drawn from interviews with 16 participants recruited in the central business district of a New Zealand city. It documents how, when trying to make sense of this complex social problem, domiciled people draw on shared characterizations of homeless people. The concept of "social distance" is used to interrogate the shifting and sometimes incongruous reactions evident in participant accounts. "Social distancing" is conceptualised as a dynamic communal practice existing in interactions between human beings and reflected in the ways that domiciled people talk about their experiences with homeless individuals. PMID:21954486

  20. The impact of psychosocial factors on subjective well-being among homeless young adults.

    PubMed

    Barczyk, Amanda N; Thompson, Sanna J; Rew, Lynn

    2014-08-01

    Homeless young adults are one of this country's most vulnerable populations, and information surrounding issues of subjective well-being among this particularly diverse population is scarce. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact social support, future expectations, and homeless cultural factors have on subjective well-being among homeless young adults. A purposive sample of 185 homeless young people, ages 18 to 23, and known to use alcohol or drugs, participated in the study. Multiple regression analyses showed that participants who had a higher level of subjective well-being reported significantly higher levels of social support, more optimistic expectations of the future, and a better perception of the flow of time. More fatalistic views of the future significantly predicted lower levels of subjective well-being. Findings suggest that service providers should focus on understanding the strengths of individuals and, specifically, gain a deeper understanding of homeless young adults' support networks and views of the future. PMID:25095630

  1. Recognizing work as a priority in preventing or ending homelessness.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Gary; Rio, John

    2007-07-01

    The literature speaks to the importance of employment in the lives of homeless individuals and shows how they can be assisted in job seeking (Long & Amendolia, 2003; Marrone, 2005; Quimby, Drake, & Becker, 2001; Rio, Russell, Dudasik, & Gravino, 1999; Rog & Holupka, 1998; Shaheen, Williams, & Dennis, 2003; Trutko, Barnow, Beck, Min, & Isbell, 1998). Some reports suggest it may be effective and worthwhile to offer employment at the earliest stages of engagement to help people who are homeless develop trust, motivation, and hope (Cook et al., 2001; Min, Wong, & Rothbard, 2004). Practitioners have historically focused on providing people with access to safe and affordable housing and supportive services, usually addressing employment later in the continuum. This practice-oriented report from the field proposes that employment should be offered as early as possible and maintains that facilitating employment is an unrecognized and underutilized practice for preventing and ending homelessness. The paper provides principles, practices, and strategies programs can use to make work a priority. PMID:17564838

  2. Trajectories of women's homelessness in Canada's 3 northern territories

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Rose; Hrenchuk, Charlotte; Bopp, Judie; Poole, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Background Repairing the Holes in the Net was a 2-year, multilevel action research project designed to inform the development of culturally appropriate and gender-specific services for northern women who are homeless or marginally housed and who face mental health and substance use concerns. The study was designed to learn about the barriers and supports experienced by homeless women in the North when accessing mental health care, shelter, housing and other services; and to inform the work of northern service providers and policy advocates in a position to implement adjustments in their praxis. Methods This article describes the trajectories of women's service access and their ideas for service improvement from 61 qualitative, semi-structured interviews conducted with homeless women in Whitehorse, Yukon (YT), Yellowknife, Northwest Territories (NT), and Iqualit, Nunavut (NU). Results Unresolved trauma, poverty and social exclusion, inability to find and maintain housing and ineffective services emerged as interconnected and multifaceted challenges related to women's service engagement. In the face of these challenges, women displayed significant resilience and resistance, and offered important ideas for service improvement. Conclusions The 4 interconnected systemic challenges identified in the research, coupled with specific ideas for change cited by the resilient homeless women interviewed, offer points of entry to improve service policy and delivery. Implementing trauma-informed approaches emerged as a key example of how access to, and quality of, services could be improved for homeless women in the North. PMID:26700413

  3. Barriers and facilitators to shelter utilization among homeless young adults.

    PubMed

    Ha, Yoonsook; Narendorf, Sarah C; Santa Maria, Diane; Bezette-Flores, Noel

    2015-12-01

    Rates of shelter use among homeless youth are low compared to use of other supportive services, yet research on barriers to shelter use has been conducted in limited regions, specifically in West Coast or Midwest cities. Additionally, while studies have generally focused on barriers to shelter use, studies on what might facilitate shelter use are lacking. This study explores barriers and facilitators to shelter use among homeless young adults from a large city in the Southwest region. Focus groups were conducted with a diverse sample of 49 homeless young adults ages 18-24. Drawing on models of health service use, findings were categorized into two domains--attitudinal and access. Themes related to attitudinal barriers include stigma/shame and self-reliance/pride. Attitudinal facilitators include the desire to extricate themselves from street life and turn their lives in a new direction. Access-related themes include barriers such as a lack of shelters and services available to meet the needs of youth, adverse shelter conditions, staff attitudes that are not acceptable to youth, restrictive shelter rules, restrictive definitions of homelessness, and a desire to differentiate themselves from older homeless individuals. Certain characteristics or circumstances (e.g., being pregnant), having supportive others, and shelters' ability to connect them to other services emerged as access facilitators to shelter use. Implications for policymakers, service providers, and future research are discussed. PMID:26246453

  4. 77 FR 70893 - Authorization for Non-VA Medical Services

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-28

    ... decades, the healthcare industry has increasingly emphasized providing care in the least restrictive... healthcare delivery. Although VA has made great strides to expand the delivery of healthcare to veterans, VA is, like the rest of the healthcare industry, economically unable to provide all possible services...

  5. 77 FR 70967 - Authorization for Non-VA Medical Services

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-28

    ...: Over the past two decades, the healthcare industry has increasingly emphasized providing care in the... restrictive modes of healthcare delivery. Although VA has made great strides to expand the delivery of healthcare to veterans, VA is, like the rest of the healthcare industry, economically unable to provide...

  6. Pets Help Homeless Youth, Study Finds

    MedlinePlus

    ... policy. More Health News on: Homeless Health Concerns Pet Health Teen Mental Health Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Homeless Health Concerns Pet Health Teen Mental Health About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs ...

  7. Innovative Efforts to Address Homelessness Among Veterans.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, Thomas P; Pape, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Ending homelessness among veterans has been a goal of the Department of Veterans Affairs for some time, and it is now becoming a reality in many communities. Unprecedented strides have been made through the rapid implementation of evidence-based innovations, capacity building, and a comprehensive strategic focus on 4 goals: prevention, moving veterans into permanent housing, providing the population-tailored care and services needed to keep them housed, and providing the supports necessary to allow them to recover and be productive members of their communities. PMID:26946863

  8. Escaping Homelessness: Anticipated and Perceived Facilitators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Allisha; Tweed, Roger

    2009-01-01

    One study with two distinct sections was conducted to identify factors facilitating escape from homelessness. In Section 1, 58 homeless individuals rated possible facilitators of escape (factors they believed would help them become more independent and self-sufficient). In Section 2, 80 participants who had already exited homelessness rated the…

  9. An Annotated Publications List on Homelessness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tutunjian, Beth Ann

    This annotated publications list on homelessness contains citations for 19 publications, most of which deal with problems of alcohol or drug abuse among homeless persons. Citations are listed alphabetically by author and cover the topics of homelessness and alcoholism, drug abuse, public policy, research methodologies, mental illness, alcohol- and

  10. The Invisible Homeless: A New Urban Ecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ropers, Richard H.

    Contemporary homelessness is the result of increasing social and economic inequality faced by those in American society who are most vulnerable to individual, family, and economic instability. This case study of the homeless population of Los Angeles (California), based on two surveys conducted in 1984, views the homeless as a segment of the…

  11. Negative Cultural Capital and Homeless Young People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Justin David

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the ways in which homeless young people find a sense of self-worth and dignity within the conditions of youth homelessness. It notes that, while homeless young people seek a space where they do not feel marginalised and can attain a form of social status and cultural competence, they also engage in practices and acts of…

  12. 34 CFR 300.19 - Homeless children.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Homeless children. 300.19 Section 300.19 Education... REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.19 Homeless children. Homeless children has...

  13. 34 CFR 300.19 - Homeless children.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Homeless children. 300.19 Section 300.19 Education... REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.19 Homeless children. Homeless children has...

  14. 34 CFR 300.19 - Homeless children.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Homeless children. 300.19 Section 300.19 Education... REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.19 Homeless children. Homeless children has...

  15. 34 CFR 300.19 - Homeless children.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Homeless children. 300.19 Section 300.19 Education... REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.19 Homeless children. Homeless children has...

  16. 34 CFR 300.19 - Homeless children.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Homeless children. 300.19 Section 300.19 Education... REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.19 Homeless children. Homeless children has...

  17. The Paradox of Homelessness in America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levitan, Sar A.; Schillmoeller, Susan

    Homelessness is a growing problem in the midst of relative prosperity. However, as the problem persists, the public may be becoming increasingly less compassionate to the homeless and annoyed by the problem. Although it is difficult to determine how many people are homeless, the most widely circulated estimate puts their number at about 600,000.…

  18. The Second Student-Run Homeless Shelter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seider, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    From 1983-2011, the Harvard Square Homeless Shelter (HSHS) in Cambridge, Massachusetts, was the only student-run homeless shelter in the United States. However, college students at Villanova, Temple, Drexel, the University of Pennsylvania, and Swarthmore drew upon the HSHS model to open their own student-run homeless shelter in Philadelphia,…

  19. Homelessness and Its Effects on Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart-Shegos, Ellen

    Homelessness influences every facet of children's lives, inhibiting their physical, emotional, cognitive, social, and behavioral development. Homeless women face such obstacles to healthy pregnancies as chemical abuse, chronic health problems, and lack of prenatal care. Homeless infants are more likely to have low birth weights and are at greater…

  20. Pushed Out: America's Homeless. Thanksgiving 1987.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Coalition for the Homeless, Washington, DC.

    By winter 1987, up to three million men, women, and children will be homeless; the number of homeless persons will continue to increase at a rate of 25 percent. This report surveys the changes in the homeless population in the following 23 cities over the past year: Albuquerque (New Mexico), Atlanta (Georgia), Boston (Massachusetts), Chicago…

  1. Homelessness and Housing: A Human Tragedy, A Moral Challenge. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Housing and Community Development of the Committee on Banking, Finance, and Urban Affairs, House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, Second Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Banking, Finance and Urban Affairs.

    Catholic charities and church groups have been actively engaged in providing basic shelter needs for homeless people long before the issue of homelessness came to the national attention. The purpose of this hearing was to allow the U.S. Catholic Conference and its Domestic Policy Committee to present its report, "Homelessness and Housing: A Human…

  2. Pathways to Homelessness among Older Homeless Adults: Results from the HOPE HOME Study

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Rebecca T.; Goodman, Leah; Guzman, David; Tieu, Lina; Ponath, Claudia; Kushel, Margot B.

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about pathways to homelessness among older adults. We identified life course experiences associated with earlier versus later onset of homelessness in older homeless adults and examined current health and functional status by age at first homelessness. We interviewed 350 homeless adults, aged 50 and older, recruited via population-based sampling. Participants reported age at first episode of adult homelessness and their life experiences during 3 time periods: childhood (<18 years), young adulthood (ages 18–25), and middle adulthood (ages 26–49). We used a structured modeling approach to identify experiences associated with first adult homelessness before age 50 versus at age 50 or older. Participants reported current health and functional status, including recent mental health and substance use problems. Older homeless adults who first became homeless before 50 had more adverse life experiences (i.e., mental health and substance use problems, imprisonment) and lower attainment of adult milestones (i.e., marriage, full-time employment) compared to individuals with later onset. After multivariable adjustment, adverse experiences were independently associated with experiencing a first episode of homelessness before age 50. Individuals who first became homeless before age 50 had higher prevalence of recent mental health and substance use problems and more difficulty performing instrumental activities of daily living. Life course experiences and current vulnerabilities of older homeless adults with first homelessness before age 50 differed from those with later onset of homelessness. Prevention and service interventions should be adapted to meet different needs. PMID:27163478

  3. Sexual Health Information Seeking Online Among Runaway and Homeless Youth

    PubMed Central

    Barman-Adhikari, Anamika; Rice, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Research shows runaway and homeless youth are reluctant to seek help from traditional health providers. The Internet can be useful in engaging this population and meeting their needs for sexual health information, including information about HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Using a sample of homeless youth living in Los Angeles, California in June 2009, this study assesses the frequency with which runaway and homeless youth seek sexual health information via the Internet, and assesses which youth are more likely to engage in seeking health information from online sources. Drawing from Andersen’s (1968) health behavior model and Pescosolido’s (1992) network episode model, we develop and refine a model for seeking online sexual health information among homeless youth. Rather than testing the predicative strength of a given model, our aim is to identify and explore conceptually driven correlates that may shed light on the characteristics associated with these help seeking behaviors among homeless youth. Analyses using multivariate logistic regression models reveal that among the sample of youth, females and gay males most frequently seek sexual health information online. We demonstrate the structure of social network ties (e.g., connection with parents) and the content of interactions (e.g., e-mail forwards of health information) across ties are critical correlates of online sexual health information seeking. Results show a continued connection with parents via the Internet is significantly associated with youth seeking HIV or STI information. Similarly for content of interactions, more youth who were sent health information online also reported seeking HIV information and HIV-testing information. We discuss implications for intervention and practice, focusing on how the Internet may be used for dissemination of sexual health information and as a resource for social workers to link transient, runaway, and homeless youth to care. PMID:22247795

  4. The Social Networks of Homeless Youth Experiencing Intimate Partner Violence

    PubMed Central

    Petering, Robin; Rice, Eric; Rhoades, Harmony; Winetrobe, Hailey

    2015-01-01

    While there is a growing body of research on intimate partner violence (IPV) experienced by the housed youth population, a limited amount is known about IPV experienced by homeless youth. To our knowledge, no previous studies have examined how homeless youths’ experience of IPV is related to their social network, even though the social networks of homeless youth have been shown to be significant indicators of health and mental health. The purpose of this study is to understand the relationship between IPV, gender, and social networks among a sample of 386 homeless youth in Los Angeles, California. Results revealed that one fifth of the sample experienced IPV in the past year. Stratified regression models revealed that IPV was not significantly related to any measure of male social networks; however, females who experienced IPV had more male friends (β = 2.03, SE = 0.89, p < .05) than females who did not experience IPV. Female homeless youth who witnessed family violence during childhood had more male friends (β = 2.75, SE = 1.08, p < .05), but those who experienced sexual abuse during childhood had fewer male friends (β = −2.04, SE = 0.93, p < .05). Although there was no significant difference in the rate of IPV victimization across genders, the context of this abuse appears to be drastically different. The results suggest that females with more male friendships are at greater risk for exposure to IPV. To date, there are few effective youth-targeted IPV prevention programs and none have been shown to be effective with homeless youth. These results provide insight into future program development. PMID:24421071

  5. Homelessness: Issues and Legislation in the 101st Congress. Updated.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasem, Ruth Ellen

    This report discusses the nature of homelessness and the homeless in America, recent programs that have been implemented to help the homeless, and issues concerning the Federal government's role in helping these people. The following topics concerning the characteristics of the homeless and the causes of homelessness are covered: (1) "Mental…

  6. The VA-Medical School Partnership: The VA Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gronvall, John A.

    1987-01-01

    Issues in the future of the Veterans' Administration (VA)-medical school relationship are discussed, including the cost of medical care, competition in the health care sector, and the changing government role. It is concluded that the existing relationship is strong and its maintenance of vital importance to the VA. (MSE)

  7. A Comparison of Homeless Male Veterans in Metropolitan and Micropolitan Areas in Nebraska: A Methodological Caveat.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jack; Ramaswamy, Sriram; Bhatia, Subhash C; Rosenheck, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    This study explored differences between homeless male veterans in metropolitan and micropolitan cities in Nebraska on sociodemographic, housing, clinical, and psychosocial characteristics as well as health service use. A convenience sample of 151 homeless male veterans (112 metropolitan, 39 micropolitan) were recruited from Veterans Affairs facilities and area shelters in Omaha, Lincoln, Grand Island, and Hastings in Nebraska. Research staff conducted structured interviews with homeless veterans. Results showed that compared to homeless veterans in metropolitans, those in micropolitans were more likely to be White, unmarried, living in transitional settings, and were far more transient but reported greater social support and housing satisfaction. Veterans in micropolitans also reported more medical problems, diagnoses of anxiety and personality disorders, and unexpectedly, were more likely to report using various health services and less travel time for services. Together, these findings suggest access to homeless and health services for veterans in micropolitan areas may be facilitated through Veterans Affairs facilities and community providers that work in close proximity to one another. Many homeless veterans in these areas are transient, making them a difficult population to study and serve. Innovative ways to provide outreach to homeless veterans in micropolitan and more rural areas are needed. PMID:26354600

  8. Dying on the Streets: Homeless Persons’ Concerns and Desires about End of Life Care

    PubMed Central

    Bartels, Dianne M.; Ratner, Edward R.; Alderton, Lucy; Hudson, Brenda; Ahluwalia, Jasjit S.

    2007-01-01

    Background There is little understanding about the experiences and preferences at the end of life (EOL) for people from unique cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds. Homeless individuals are extreme examples of these overlooked populations; they have the greatest risk of death, encounter barriers to health care, and lack the resources and relationships assumed necessary for appropriate EOL care. Exploring their desires and concerns will provide insight for the care of this vulnerable and disenfranchised population, as well as others who are underserved. Objective Explore the concerns and desires for EOL care among homeless persons. Design Qualitative study utilizing focus groups. Participants Fifty-three homeless persons recruited from agencies providing homeless services. Measurements In-depth interviews, which were audiotaped and transcribed. Results We present 3 domains encompassing 11 themes arising from our investigation, some of which are previously unreported. Homeless persons worried about dying and EOL care; had frequent encounters with death; voiced many unique fears, such as dying anonymously and undiscovered; favored EOL documentation, such as advance directives; and demonstrated ambivalence towards contacting family. They also spoke of barriers to EOL care and shared interventions to improve dying among the very poor and estranged. Conclusions Homeless persons have significant personal experience and feelings about death, dying, and EOL care, much of which is different from those previously described in the EOL literature about other populations. These findings have implications not only for homeless persons, but for others who are poor and disenfranchised. PMID:17372789

  9. Immigration and Schools: Supporting Success for Undocumented Unaccompanied Homeless Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for the Education of Homeless Children and Youth, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Attending school and securing lawful status in the United States are two keys to safety and security for undocumented unaccompanied homeless youth. This brief is designed to provide young people, immigration attorneys and advocates, McKinney-Vento liaisons and educators with basic information to help them access these keys. After describing some…

  10. Summary of Head Start Provisions on Homelessness and Foster Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for the Education of Homeless Children and Youth, 2008

    2008-01-01

    On Wednesday, December 12, President Bush signed the "Improving Head Start for School Readiness Act of 2007" into law. The legislation reauthorizes the Head Start Act and contains numerous provisions on homelessness and foster care. A summary of those provisions is provided in this paper.

  11. 77 FR 1971 - Supplemental Security Income and Homeless Individuals

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-12

    ... the unique needs of homeless Supplemental Security Income (SSI) recipients, particularly those who... their needs. The SSI program provides a minimum income level for aged, blind, or disabled persons who do... http://www.socialsecurity.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background The primary goal of the...

  12. Small Is Beautiful: The Library Train for Homeless Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheunwattana, Aree; Meksawat, Pimol

    This paper presents the story of an effort in Thailand to reach out to children in high-risk situations by providing them with a library on old train carriages. The Library Train Project was initiated in 1999 by the Railway Police Division within the Royal Police Office. It is aimed at offering education services to homeless children as a way of…

  13. Nutrition Education and Food for the Homeless--University Outreach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truesdell, Delores; Sani, Amy V.

    2001-01-01

    The Food Stamp Nutrition Education Initiative targeted homeless people in overnight shelters. College students made monthly visits to provide nutrition education and meals. Students received training in quantity food service and leadership in helping improve food security. (Contains 16 references.) (JOW)

  14. Recognizing the Needs of the Homeless and the Hungry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    France, Joseph B.

    This publication describes services of selected American Red Cross chapters to the homeless and the hungry. Chapter profiles provide information on how chapters of various sizes develop, fund, and implement programs in response to their communities' needs. Program descriptions detail the chapters' fund-raising from private, public, and voluntary

  15. Immigration and Schools: Supporting Success for Undocumented Unaccompanied Homeless Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for the Education of Homeless Children and Youth, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Attending school and securing lawful status in the United States are two keys to safety and security for undocumented unaccompanied homeless youth. This brief is designed to provide young people, immigration attorneys and advocates, McKinney-Vento liaisons and educators with basic information to help them access these keys. After describing some

  16. Supporting the Literacy Development of Children Living in Homeless Shelters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacGillivray, Laurie; Ardell, Amy Lassiter; Curwen, Margaret Sauceda

    2010-01-01

    There are approximately 1.5 million children in the United States who go to sleep each night without a home of their own (National Center on Family Homelessness, 2009). In this article, we provide insights into how educators can create greater classroom support, particularly in literacy learning and development, for this population. Drawing from…

  17. Recognizing the Needs of the Homeless and the Hungry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    France, Joseph B.

    This publication describes services of selected American Red Cross chapters to the homeless and the hungry. Chapter profiles provide information on how chapters of various sizes develop, fund, and implement programs in response to their communities' needs. Program descriptions detail the chapters' fund-raising from private, public, and voluntary…

  18. Materials on the Education of Homeless Children. Updated.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Shelley

    This document comprises resource materials on the education of homeless children. It is divided into three parts. Part 1, "Overview," collects publications of the Center for Law and Education, and articles and editorials from "Education Week" and "The New York Times." Part 2, "Relevant Statutes and Regulations," provides materials pertaining to…

  19. The Yellow School Bus Project: Helping Homeless Students Get Ready for School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vissing, Yvonne

    2003-01-01

    Describes the Yellow School Bus Project, a community program jointly sponsored by religious, civic, fraternal, business, and nonprofit organizations in Durham, New Hampshire, to provide homeless children with supplies and clothes to help them succeed in school. (PKP)

  20. 77 FR 27790 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-11

    ...., acreage, floor plan, existing sanitary facilities, exact street address), providers should contact the... facility to assist the homeless; 2230 sq. ft., presence of asbestos, most recent use--office Oregon...

  1. The Most Frequently Asked Questions on the Education Rights of Children and Youth in Homeless Situations. Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for the Education of Homeless Children and Youth, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This document provides answers to frequently asked questions on the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act and the education rights of children and youth in homeless situations. The answers are general responses based on federal statutes, regulations, and guidance; relevant case law; and best practices from across the country. While the National…

  2. An Examination of the McKinney-Vento Act and Its Influence on the Homeless Education Situation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Peter Michael

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the central elements of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act and, drawing from Spillane's distributed leadership perspective, examines the policy's impact on the homeless education situation. Although the initial passing and subsequent revisions to McKinney-Vento are depicted as providing numerous benefits for students…

  3. Adults in Transition. A Report of the Fourth Year of the Adult Education for the Homeless Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Vocational and Adult Education (ED), Washington, DC. Div. of Adult Education and Literacy.

    In 1991, the Adult Education for the Homeless (AEH) Program consisted of projects in 31 states; a total of $7.4 million was available to these projects. The projects provided instruction in basic and life skills, further assisted homeless adults through counseling and life planning activities, and coordinated efforts with other homeless…

  4. Runaway and Homeless Youth Grants: Improvements Needed in the Grant Award Process. Report to Congressional Committees. GAO-10-335

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Kay E.

    2010-01-01

    The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) awards grants to provide shelter and services to runaway and homeless youth through the Basic Center, Transitional Living and Street Outreach Programs. In response to a mandate for a review of the grant award process for these programs in the Reconnecting Homeless Youth Act of 2008 (Pub. L. No.…

  5. Navigating the Intersections of IDEA and McKinney-Vento: A Problem-Solving Process. Best Practices in Homeless Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Julianelle, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    The McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act is the main federal program concerning the education of children and youth experiencing homelessness. It provides federal funding to states, which then distribute the funds to their school districts through a competitive application process; the funds are used to ensure that children and youth…

  6. Impacts of extreme weather on the health and well-being of people who are homeless.

    PubMed

    Pendrey, Catherine G A; Carey, Marion; Stanley, Janet

    2014-01-01

    This letter responds to the article by Cusack et al., 'Extreme weather-related health needs of people who are homeless' (Australian Journal of Primary Health, 2013, 19(3), 250-255), which addressed the impacts of extreme weather on the health of the homeless population in inner city Adelaide. We compare the findings of Cusack et al. to our own original research, based on interviews with service providers to the homeless in urban and rural Victoria. We further place this issue in the broader context of climate change, which is crucial given the expected increase in extreme weather events and associated health impacts. PMID:24290233

  7. Mobile Phone and Social Media Use of Homeless Youth in Denver, Colorado.

    PubMed

    Harpin, Scott; Davis, Jillian; Low, Hana; Gilroy, Christine

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate homeless youth mobile phone and social media use, to plan health promotion efforts. Nearly half (46.7%) of runaway/homeless youth in this sample (n = 181) owned a mobile phone and a majority of those devices were smart phones. Ownership did not vary significantly by shelter location, though regular use of Facebook was more prevalent among those in housing programs or camping, than those living on the streets. Over 90% of youth in the sample reported using Facebook. Such media use might facilitate parent, family, and health provider communications with homeless youth. PMID:27074405

  8. The Impact of a Service-Learning Project on Student Awareness of Homelessness, Civic Attitudes, and Stereotypes toward the Homeless

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buch, Kim; Harden, Susan

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, the University of North Carolina at Charlotte (UNC Charlotte) joined in a community initiative with the Urban Ministry Center to provide shelter to the homeless during the winter months. A student organization was formed to sustain university support. The author created a service-learning project as part of a Citizenship and Service…

  9. Ensuring Full Participation in Extra-Curricular Activities for Students Experiencing Homelessness. Best Practices in Homeless Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Homeless Education at SERVE, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Extra-curricular school activities, such as sports, music, theater, debate, and clubs, are often a key to engaging children and youth in school. They can provide students with a sense of belonging, stability, pride, and responsibility and strengthen a student's applications for higher education admission and scholarships. Homelessness, however,…

  10. Social Networks as the Context for Understanding Employment Services Utilization among Homeless Youth

    PubMed Central

    Barman-Adhikari, Anamika; Rice, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the factors associated with use of employment services among homeless youth. Social network characteristics have been known to be influential in motivating people's decision to seek services. Traditional theoretical frameworks applied to studies of service use emphasize individual factors over social contexts and interactions. Using key social network, social capital, and social influence theories, this paper developed an integrated theoretical framework that could capture the social network processes that act as barriers or facilitators of use of employment services by homeless youth, and understand empirically, the salience of each of these constructs in influencing the use of employment services among homeless youth. We used the “Event based-approach” strategy to recruit a sample of 136 homeless youth at one drop-in agency serving homeless youth in Los Angeles, California in 2008. The participants were queried regarding their individual and network characteristics. Data were entered into NetDraw 2.090 and the spring embedder routine was used to generate the network visualizations. Logistic regression was used to assess the influence of the network characteristics on use of employment services. The study findings suggest that social capital is more significant in understanding why homeless youth use employment services, relative to network structure and network influence. In particular, bonding and bridging social capital were found to have differential effects on use of employment services among this population. The results from this study provide specific directions for interventions aimed to increase use of employment services among homeless youth. PMID:24780279

  11. Determining VA physician requirements through empirically based models.

    PubMed Central

    Lipscomb, J; Kilpatrick, K E; Lee, K L; Pieper, K S

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: As part of a project to estimate physician requirements for the Department of Veterans Affairs, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) developed and tested empirically based models of physician staffing, by specialty, that could be applied to each VA facility. DATA SOURCE/STUDY SETTING. These analyses used selected data on all patient encounters and all facilities in VA's management information systems for FY 1989. STUDY DESIGN. Production functions (PFs), with patient workload dependent on physicians, other providers, and nonpersonnel factors, were estimated for each of 14 patient care areas in a VA medical center. Inverse production functions (IPFs), with physician staffing levels dependent on workload and other factors, were estimated for each of 11 specialty groupings. These models provide complementary approaches to deriving VA physician requirements for patient care and medical education. DATA COLLECTION/EXTRACTION METHODS. All data were assembled by VA and put in analyzable SAS data sets containing FY 1989 workload and staffing variables used in the PFs and IPFs. All statistical analyses reported here were conducted by the IOM. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. Existing VA data can be used to develop statistically strong, clinically plausible, empirically based models for calculating physician requirements, by specialty. These models can (1) compare current physician staffing in a given setting with systemwide norms and (2) yield estimates of future staffing requirements conditional on future workload. CONCLUSIONS. Empirically based models can play an important role in determining VA physician staffing requirements. VA should test, evaluate, and revise these models on an ongoing basis. PMID:7860320

  12. Psychopharmacologic Services for Homeless Veterans: Comparing Psychotropic Prescription Fills Among Homeless and Non-Homeless Veterans with Serious Mental Illness.

    PubMed

    Hermes, Eric; Rosenheck, Robert

    2016-02-01

    Using national Veterans Health Administration (VHA) administrative data, this study evaluated differences in psychotropic medication use between homeless and non-homeless adults with serious mental illness (SMI) who used VHA services in 2010. The adjusted mean number of psychotropic prescription fills associated with homeless individuals were identified using regression models adjusted for socio-demographics, diagnoses, and use of health services. Of the 876,989 individuals with SMI using VHA services, 7.2 % were homeless at some time during 2010. In bivariate analysis, homeless individuals filled more psychotropic medication prescriptions compared with non-homeless individuals. However, after adjusting for potentially confounding variables, homeless individuals were found to have filled 16.2 % fewer prescriptions than non-homeless individuals when all psychotropics were analyzed together (F = 6947.1, p < .001) and for most individual classes of psychotropics. Greater use of residential/inpatient mental health services by the homeless was the most important single factor associated with filling more psychotropic prescriptions than non-homeless individuals. PMID:26202545

  13. Elderly Homeless Veterans in Los Angeles: Chronicity and Precipitants of Homelessness

    PubMed Central

    van den Berk-Clark, Carissa; McGuire, James

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We compared the characteristics of chronically homeless and acutely homeless elderly veterans to better understand precipitants of homelessness. Methods. We conducted interviews with 33 chronically and 26 acutely homeless veterans aged 65 years and older receiving transitional housing services in Los Angeles, California, between 2003 and 2005. We asked questions regarding their sociodemographic characteristics and other social status measures. Other precipitants of homelessness were acquired via observation and open-ended and structured questions. Results. Both veterans groups were more similar than different, with substantial levels of physical, psychiatric, and social impairment. They differed significantly in homelessness history, with chronically homeless veterans having more homelessness episodes and more total time homeless. They were also less educated and had smaller social networks. In response to open-ended questioning, elderly homeless veterans revealed how health and substance use issues interacted with loss of social support and eviction to exacerbate homelessness. Conclusions. Assessment of a range of factors is needed to address risk factors and events leading to homelessness. Further research with larger samples is needed to confirm the characteristics and needs of the elderly homeless veteran population. PMID:24148059

  14. Disaster response and people experiencing homelessness: Addressing challenges of a population with limited resources.

    PubMed

    Wexler, Bryan; Smith, Mary-Elise

    2015-01-01

    In this article the authors provide an overview of some issues that inhibit disaster planning and response for people experiencing homelessness and discuss the planning process conducted for this population in Worcester, MA. People experiencing homelessness face numerous challenges in preparing for disasters both natural and human caused. Similarly, providers attempting to aid these individuals must recognize and overcome various factors that hamper efforts to provide assistance. People experiencing homelessness lack the general resources many in the United States take for granted, including food, shelter, communication methods, and transportation. The population also has an increased prevalence of medical and psychiatric conditions. These factors amplify the typical difficulties in preparedness, communication, sheltering, and training for disasters. With these principles in mind, the authors reviewed the literature for best practices, identified potential stakeholders, and developed an annex to help address organization and delivery of care to those experiencing homelessness during a disaster. PMID:26150363

  15. The eating patterns and problems of homeless women.

    PubMed

    Bunston, T; Breton, M

    1990-01-01

    While inadequate nutrition has been identified as a factor affecting the health of the homeless, there has been little research to identify the extent to which inadequate nutrition is a problem. The goal of this paper is to document the eating patterns and problems of single homeless women and to locate the determinants of nutritional adequacy in their diets. Our findings are based on a random sample of 84 single homeless women using hostels and drop-in centers. For 85.5% of the women food was provided primarily by hostels and supplemented by the drop-ins. When their daily food intake was compared to the Canada's Food Guide recommendations, the average number of servings in each of the four food groups was below the recommended. The women in our sample indicated that their problems with food consumption were rooted in their poverty and further analysis indicated that the provision of food by social agencies was an important factor in the nutritional adequacy of their diets. Hostels and drop-in centers not only provide shelter, they have also assumed most of the responsibility for feeding the homeless. It is their poverty which burdens these women and structures their eating patterns. PMID:2309494

  16. An inexpensive, interdisciplinary, methodology to conduct an impact study of homeless persons on hospital based services.

    PubMed

    Parker, R David; Regier, Michael; Brown, Zachary; Davis, Stephen

    2015-02-01

    Homelessness is a primary concern for community health. Scientific literature on homelessness is wide ranging and diverse. One opportunity to add to existing literature is the development and testing of affordable, easily implemented methods for measuring the impact of homeless on the healthcare system. Such methodological approaches rely on the strengths in a multidisciplinary approach, including providers, both healthcare and homeless services and applied clinical researchers. This paper is a proof of concept for a methodology which is easily adaptable nationwide, given the mandated implementation of homeless management information systems in the United States and other countries; medical billing systems by hospitals; and research methods of researchers. Adaptation is independent of geographic region, budget restraints, specific agency skill sets, and many other factors that impact the application of a consistent methodological science based approach to assess and address homelessness. We conducted a secondary data analysis merging data from homeless utilization and hospital case based data. These data detailed care utilization among homeless persons in a small, Appalachian city in the United States. In our sample of 269 persons who received at least one hospital based service and one homeless service between July 1, 2012 and June 30, 2013, the total billed costs were $5,979,463 with 10 people costing more than one-third ($1,957,469) of the total. Those persons were primarily men, living in an emergency shelter, with pre-existing disabling conditions. We theorize that targeted services, including Housing First, would be an effective intervention. This is proposed in a future study. PMID:24894404

  17. Arthropod-borne diseases in homeless.

    PubMed

    Brouqui, Philippe; Raoult, Didier

    2006-10-01

    Homeless people are particularly exposed to ectoparasite. The living conditions and the crowded shelters provide ideal conditions for the spread of lice, fleas, ticks, and mites. Body lice have long been recognized as human parasites and although typically prevalent in rural communities in upland areas of countries close to the equator, it is now increasingly encountered in developed countries especially in homeless people or inner city economically deprived population. Fleas are widespread but are not adapted to a specific host and may occasionally bite humans. Most common fleas that parasite humans are the cat, the rat, and the human fleas, Ctenocephalides felis, Xenopsylla cheopis, and Pulex irritans, respectively. Ticks belonging to the family Ixodidae, in particular, the genera Dermacentor, Rhipicephalus, and Ixodes, are frequent parasites in humans. Sarcoptes scabiei var. hominis is a mite (Arachnida class) responsible for scabies. It is an obligate parasite of human skin. The hematophagic-biting mite, Liponyssoides sanguineus, is a mite of the rat, mouse, and other domestic rodents but can also bite humans. Finally, the incidence of skin disease secondary to infestation with the human bedbug, Cimex lectularius, has increased recently. Bacteria, such as Wolbacchia spp. have been detected in bedbug. The threat posed by the ectoparasite in homeless is not the ectoparasite themselves but the associated infectious diseases that they may transmit to humans. Except for scabies all these ectoparasites are potential vectors for infectious agents. Three louse-borne diseases are known at this time. Trench fever caused by Bartonella quintana (B. quintana), epidemic typhus caused by Rickettsia prowazekii, and relapsing fever caused by the spirochete Borrelia recurrentis. Fleas transmit plague (Xenopsylla cheopis and Pulex irritans), murine typhus (Xenopsylla cheopis), flea-borne spotted rickettsiosis on account of the recently described species Rickettsia felis (C. felis), and occasionally cat scratch disease on account of Bartonella henselae (C. felis). The role of fleas as potential vector of B. quintana has recently been suggested. Among the hematophagic-biting mites, L. sanguineus, is responsible for the transmission of Rickettsia akari, the etiologic agent of rickettsialpox. Virtually, no data are available on tick-borne disease in this population. This article will deal with epidemiology, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of these ectoparasite and the infectious diseases they transmit to the homeless people. PMID:17114713

  18. Homelessness: a problem for primary care?

    PubMed

    Riley, Anthony J; Harding, Geoffrey; Underwood, Martin R; Carter, Yvonne H

    2003-06-01

    Homelessness is a social problem that affects all facets of contemporary society. This paper discusses the concept of homelessness in terms of its historical context and the dominance of the pervasive 'victim blaming' ideologies, which, together with the worldwide economic changes that have contributed to a fiscal crisis of the state, and the resultant policies and circumstances, have led to an increase in the number of 'new homeless' people. This paper attempts to challenge the dominant political discourse on homelessness. The widespread healthcare problems and heterogeneity of homeless people have a particular impact on health services, with many homeless people inappropriately accessing local accident and emergency (A&E) departments because of barriers inhibiting adequate access to primary care. A number of primary care schemes have been successfully implemented to enable the homeless to have better access to appropriate care. However, there is no consistency in the level of services around the United Kingdom (UK), and innovations in service are not widespread and by their nature they are ad hoc. Despite the successes of such schemes, many homeless people still access health care inappropriately. Until homeless people are fully integrated into primary care the situation will not change. The question remains, how can appropriate access be established? A start can be made by building on some of the positive work that is already being done in primary care, but in reality general practitioners (GPs) will be 'swimming against the tide' unless a more integrated policy approach is adopted to tackle homelessness. PMID:12939894

  19. Homelessness: The Foster Care Connection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute for Children and Poverty, New York, NY.

    Roughly 600,000 families are homeless today in America, while over 2.7 million children are in foster care or out-of-home placements. Few policymakers have examined these issues together, or understood that they are interrelated and must be addressed jointly to break the cycle of family disintegration, violence, and poverty. A recent survey by the…

  20. Macroeconomic Causes of Family Homelessness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McChesney, Kay Young

    The welfare of American families improved steadily for over 20 years after World War II. After the War on Poverty of the 1960s, the number of people living in poverty fell, reaching its lowest point in 1973. During the 1980s, homeless families, including those living in the streets, in cars, and in shelters seemingly appeared out of nowhere. As

  1. Homeless--And Doubled Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dill, Vicky

    2015-01-01

    The bank foreclosed on your home because your parents divorced and don't have enough money to pay the mortgage. You're locked out of your house. Where will the family sleep? Most families turn to friends and relatives at times like these. That's why about 75 percent of the 1,258,182 homeless students in the United States live

  2. Youth Homelessness and Social Stigma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidd, Sean A.

    2007-01-01

    Building upon previous exploratory qualitative research (Kidd S.A. (2003) "Child Adol. Social Work J." 20(4):235-261), this paper examines the mental health implications of social stigma as it is experienced by homeless youth. Surveys conducted with 208 youths on the streets and in agencies in New York City and Toronto revealed significant…

  3. Homeless--And Doubled Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dill, Vicky

    2015-01-01

    The bank foreclosed on your home because your parents divorced and don't have enough money to pay the mortgage. You're locked out of your house. Where will the family sleep? Most families turn to friends and relatives at times like these. That's why about 75 percent of the 1,258,182 homeless students in the United States live…

  4. Universal Screening for Homelessness and Risk for Homelessness in the Veterans Health Administration

    PubMed Central

    Fargo, Jamison D.; Byrne, Thomas H.; Kane, Vincent R.; Culhane, Dennis P.

    2013-01-01

    We examined data for all veterans who completed the Veterans Health Administration’s national homelessness screening instrument between October 1, 2012, and January 10, 2013. Among veterans who were not engaged with the US Department of Veterans Affairs homeless system and presented for primary care services, the prevalence of recent housing instability or homelessness was 0.9% and homelessness risk was 1.2%. Future research will refine outreach strategies, targeting of prevention resources, and development of novel interventions. PMID:24148032

  5. 38 CFR 21.1032 - VA has a duty to assist claimants in obtaining evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false VA has a duty to assist... Educational Assistance Claims § 21.1032 VA has a duty to assist claimants in obtaining evidence. (a) VA's duty...; (ii) Private medical care providers; (iii) Current or former employers; and (iv) Other...

  6. Unaccompanied Homeless Youth: Intersections of Homelessness, School Experiences and Educational Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aviles de Bradley, Ann M.

    2011-01-01

    School districts are faced with the challenge of how best to serve the needs of a growing homeless student population. As the numbers of homeless children and youth continue to rise, it is imperative for educators and others to understand the experiences of unaccompanied homeless youth. A qualitative research project was undertaken to obtain the…

  7. Homelessness Outcome Reporting Normative Framework: Systems-Level Evaluation of Progress in Ending Homelessness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austen, Tyrone; Pauly, Bernie

    2012-01-01

    Homelessness is a serious and growing issue. Evaluations of systemic-level changes are needed to determine progress in reducing or ending homelessness. The report card methodology is one means of systems-level assessment. Rather than solely establishing an enumeration, homelessness report cards can capture pertinent information about structural…

  8. Family violence and homelessness: the relevance of trauma histories in the lives of homeless women.

    PubMed

    Browne, A

    1993-07-01

    Studies of homeless women reveal high lifetime rates of childhood physical and sexual abuse and of assault by intimate male partners. The extent of family violence in the lives of homeless women is examined, as are parallels between the long-term effects of childhood abuse and characteristics identified in homeless women. Implications for research and service provision are discussed. PMID:8372904

  9. Homelessness and Housing Insecurity Among Former Prisoners

    PubMed Central

    HERBERT, CLAIRE W.; MORENOFF, JEFFREY D.; HARDING, DAVID J.

    2016-01-01

    The United States has experienced dramatic increases in both incarceration rates and the population of insecurely housed or homeless persons since the 1980s. These marginalized populations have strong overlaps, with many people being poor, minority, and from an urban area. That a relationship between homelessness, housing insecurity, and incarceration exists is clear, but the extent and nature of this relationship is not yet adequately understood. We use longitudinal, administrative data on Michigan parolees released in 2003 to examine returning prisoners’ experiences with housing insecurity and homelessness. Our analysis finds relatively low rates of outright homelessness among former prisoners, but very high rates of housing insecurity, much of which is linked to features of community supervision, such as intermediate sanctions, returns to prison, and absconding. We identify risk factors for housing insecurity, including mental illness, substance use, prior incarceration, and homelessness, as well as protective “buffers” against insecurity and homelessness, including earnings and social supports. PMID:26913294

  10. Rebuilding the lives of the homeless.

    PubMed

    Larson, L

    1998-01-01

    Drawing on the community's health care, business, and social service resources, the I.M. Sulzbacher Center for the Homeless in Jacksonville, Fla., goes beyond just meeting the food, shelter, and medical needs of the city's destitute. As one center resident puts it: "Homelessness is feeling like you're less of a human being. I really don't feel homeless; I feel like this is my home." PMID:10183108

  11. Teen Peer Outreach-Street Work Project: HIV prevention education for runaway and homeless youth.

    PubMed

    Podschun, G D

    1993-01-01

    Each year, there are approximately 2 million homeless and runaway youths in the United States. On any given night, there are 1,000 homeless youngsters living on the streets of San Diego, CA. Homeless young people are commonly involved in one or more of the following activities that place them at risk for HIV infection--unprotected sexual intercourse, needle-sharing in the use of injectable drugs, sex with someone who injects drugs. The Teen Peer Outreach-Street Work Project trains teen peer educators to work in three existing San Diego youth service programs with street outreach staff members to provide HIV prevention education and referral services to San Diego's homeless youth. Selected teens from the target population also participate in street-based case management that provides skill development to bring about behavioral and attitudinal changes. An HIV outreach program cannot stand alone and is most successful if it is integrated with services that meet the basic needs of its clients. In the three participating youth service programs of the Teen Peer Outreach-Street Work Project, food, clothes, and shelter information are provided. There are shelters in two of the three programs that become places where HIV educational messages, delivered on the street, can be reinforced. Immediate and concrete assistance can be offered to homeless youth. Low literacy among the target population presents a significant obstacle to adequate and appropriate HIV prevention education for homeless youth. Currently, education materials that specifically target homeless youth do not exit. The outreach street project is being expanded to develop materials for homeless youth with low literacy levels. Teen peers will be used to facilitate structured focus groups composed of members of the target population. Focus groups will be used in concept development, product development, and evaluation of draft products.Because the project is unique.in San Diego, it addresses an unmet need, reaching a population often missed by traditional HIV education efforts. PMID:8464971

  12. Teen Peer Outreach-Street Work Project: HIV prevention education for runaway and homeless youth.

    PubMed Central

    Podschun, G D

    1993-01-01

    Each year, there are approximately 2 million homeless and runaway youths in the United States. On any given night, there are 1,000 homeless youngsters living on the streets of San Diego, CA. Homeless young people are commonly involved in one or more of the following activities that place them at risk for HIV infection--unprotected sexual intercourse, needle-sharing in the use of injectable drugs, sex with someone who injects drugs. The Teen Peer Outreach-Street Work Project trains teen peer educators to work in three existing San Diego youth service programs with street outreach staff members to provide HIV prevention education and referral services to San Diego's homeless youth. Selected teens from the target population also participate in street-based case management that provides skill development to bring about behavioral and attitudinal changes. An HIV outreach program cannot stand alone and is most successful if it is integrated with services that meet the basic needs of its clients. In the three participating youth service programs of the Teen Peer Outreach-Street Work Project, food, clothes, and shelter information are provided. There are shelters in two of the three programs that become places where HIV educational messages, delivered on the street, can be reinforced. Immediate and concrete assistance can be offered to homeless youth. Low literacy among the target population presents a significant obstacle to adequate and appropriate HIV prevention education for homeless youth. Currently, education materials that specifically target homeless youth do not exit. The outreach street project is being expanded to develop materials for homeless youth with low literacy levels.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8464971

  13. Evaluation of a community dental service for homeless and 'hard to reach' people.

    PubMed

    Caton, S; Greenhalgh, F; Goodacre, L

    2016-01-22

    Objective Since 2013, Revive Dental Care has been operating a community outreach dental service for homeless and 'hard-to-reach' patients. This research aimed to (a) explore the dental care experienced by people accessing the service, (b) examine barriers and facilitators to using a dental service, (c) examine the impact of the service and (d) identify good practice in providing dental services for homeless people.Methods Semi-structured interviews with 20 patients, nine members of the dental staff and four staff members from the community centres providing services for homeless people.Results Findings suggest that homeless patients have overall poor daily dental care and experience significant dental problems due to a range of lifestyle factors. Most participants had not seen a dentist for many years and previous experiences of seeing a dentist were often unpleasant. Barriers to care included fear, embarrassment, lack of money, living chaotic lifestyles, not prioritising dental care and difficulties finding an NHS dentist that would take on homeless people. Service provision for homeless and/or hard-to-reach patients needs to be proactive with dental staff going to community settings and making personal contact.Conclusion Crucially, providers must acknowledge that the patients are vulnerable. A successful service needs to be informal, adapt to patient needs and accommodates chaotic lives. PMID:26794111

  14. Risk Factors for Homelessness Among US Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Jack; Rosenheck, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Homelessness among US veterans has been a focus of research for over 3 decades. Following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, this is the first systematic review to summarize research on risk factors for homelessness among US veterans and to evaluate the evidence for these risk factors. Thirty-one studies published from 1987 to 2014 were divided into 3 categories: more rigorous studies, less rigorous studies, and studies comparing homeless veterans with homeless nonveterans. The strongest and most consistent risk factors were substance use disorders and mental illness, followed by low income and other income-related factors. There was some evidence that social isolation, adverse childhood experiences, and past incarceration were also important risk factors. Veterans, especially those who served since the advent of the all-volunteer force, were at greater risk for homelessness than other adults. Homeless veterans were generally older, better educated, and more likely to be male, married/have been married, and to have health insurance coverage than other homeless adults. More studies simultaneously addressing premilitary, military, and postmilitary risk factors for veteran homelessness are needed. This review identifies substance use disorders, mental illness, and low income as targets for policies and programs in efforts to end homelessness among veterans. PMID:25595171

  15. Addressing the Needs of Homeless Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holloway, John H.

    2003-01-01

    Reviews studies on the plight and needs of homeless students. Includes reports on family mobility and school attendance, dysfunctional families, and school intervention strategies. (Contains 11 references.) (PKP)

  16. Smoking cessation among sheltered homeless: a pilot

    PubMed Central

    Shelley, Donna; Cantrell, Jennifer; Warn, Doug; Wong, Selena

    2010-01-01

    Objective To test the feasibility and effect of a smoking cessation intervention among sheltered homeless. Methods Homeless smokers were enrolled in a 12-week group counseling program plus pharmacotherapy (n=58). Results The mean number of sessions attended was 7.2, most participants used at least one type of medication (67%) and 75% completed 12-week end of treatment surveys. Carbon monoxide verified abstinence rates at 12 and 24 weeks were 15.5% and 13.6% respectively. Conclusion Results support the feasibility of enrolling and retaining sheltered homeless in a smoking cessation program. Counseling plus pharmacotherapy options may be effective in helping sheltered homeless smokers quit. PMID:20524884

  17. An exploration of subjective wellbeing among people experiencing homelessness: a strengths-based approach.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Yvonne; Gray, Marion A; McGinty, Sue

    2012-01-01

    Negative perceptions of homelessness contribute to deficit models of practice, false notions of homogeneity, and marginalization. Wellbeing is a state of satisfaction with material, social, and human aspects of life and can be measured both objectively and subjectively. The study explored the meaning and experience of wellbeing in the everyday lives of 20 homeless participants through fieldwork and interviews. This study revealed that health contributed little to their overall perception of wellbeing. Keeping safe, being positive and feeling good, connecting with others, and the ability to participate in "normal" life were the key contributors of subjective wellbeing. The authors demonstrate that social exclusion experienced in homelessness has a negative effect on subjective wellbeing. Services that provide opportunities to experience social inclusion and develop community and cultural connections will improve the wellbeing of homeless persons. PMID:23078011

  18. Making international links to further interprofessional learning: a student-led initiative for the homeless population.

    PubMed

    Goodier, Robyn; Uppal, Shiv; Ashcroft, Harriet

    2015-05-01

    Supporting homeless people to recovery requires interprofessional collaborative responses. In North America interprofessional student groups have supported traditional services to address the needs of homeless populations. We report on the first two years of designing and developing an interprofessional student-led response to support homeless people in the UK. The project began with working in partnership with local statutory and voluntary services; and was affirmed through interviews with local homeless people. The findings identified that many avoided going to the services provided and 90% would welcome clinical services from interprofessional groups of students. The results have led to the launch of project LIGHT (Leicester Initiative Good Health Team) and today interprofessional student groups run health promotion activities for this population. PMID:25078466

  19. Promoting oral health among the inner city homeless: a community-academic partnership.

    PubMed

    Lashley, Mary

    2008-09-01

    Oral health care resources for the homeless are scarce, underfunded, and generally inadequate to meet the oral health needs of this population. The purpose of this program was to improve oral health among the urban homeless in a faith-based inner city mission through education, screening, and improved access to oral health care. The program provided for expanded delivery of oral health care services to the homeless while preparing students in the health professions for community-based practice with at-risk and vulnerable populations. By proactively addressing oral health needs through prevention and earlier diagnosis and treatment, morbidity, quality of life, and cost can be positively affected. Innovative, cross-disciplinary, community delivery models that involve key stakeholders at all levels are needed to address the oral health needs of the homeless and underserved adequately. PMID:18674670

  20. Oh, the things you will learn: taking undergraduate research to the homeless shelter.

    PubMed

    August-Brady, Michele; Adamshick, Pamela

    2013-06-01

    Teaching research to undergraduate students has been described as a challenge. This article describes how a small group of students participated in a service-learning research project that culminated in the development of an educational intervention for volunteers who staff homeless shelters in the local community. By interacting with the homeless population and the volunteer staff who provide their care, students developed a greater understanding of the needs of the homeless, recognized some mental health disorders, and interacted with volunteer staff to assess their educational needs. Students were able to learn the research process through their participation in this collaborative project. The students' learning exceeded typical outcomes, as they displayed leadership skills and advocacy in areas of social justice and made compassionate connections with this vulnerable population. These students also forged new territory for future students who will be working with homeless populations and those who minister to them. PMID:23668249

  1. Comparing homeless and domiciled patients' utilization of the Harris County, Texas public hospital system.

    PubMed

    Buck, David S; Brown, Carlie A; Mortensen, Karoline; Riggs, John W; Franzini, Luisa

    2012-11-01

    Homeless individuals have mortality rates three to six times higher than their housed counterparts and have elevated rates of mental illness, substance abuse, and co-morbidities that increase their need for health services. Data on the utilization of Harris County, Texas' public hospital system by 331 homeless individuals and a random sample of 17,824 domiciled patients were obtained from June 2008 to July 2009. Homeless individuals had increased readmission rates, especially within 30 days of discharge, resulting in significantly higher total annual length of stay. Homeless patients also more frequently utilize public hospitals for mental illness and HIV. Lack of community health services contributes to an increased dependence and preventable over-utilization of public hospital systems. Case management interventions integrating primary and behavioral care into health homes, medical respite programs, and training for health care professionals who provide indigent care will improve health outcomes of this population and reduce costs. PMID:23698680

  2. 76 FR 72046 - Enhanced-Use Lease (EUL) of Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Real Property for the Development...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-21

    ... provide preference and priority placement for homeless and at-risk Veterans, and provide on-site supportive services. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Edward Bradley, Office of Asset Enterprise...

  3. Homeless drug users' awareness and risk perception of peer "Take Home Naloxone" use – a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Nat; Oldham, Nicola; Francis, Katharine; Jones, Lesley

    2006-01-01

    Background Peer use of take home naloxone has the potential to reduce drug related deaths. There appears to be a paucity of research amongst homeless drug users on the topic. This study explores the acceptability and potential risk of peer use of naloxone amongst homeless drug users. From the findings the most feasible model for future treatment provision is suggested. Methods In depth face-to-face interviews conducted in one primary care centre and two voluntary organisation centres providing services to homeless drug users in a large UK cosmopolitan city. Interviews recorded, transcribed and analysed thematically by framework techniques. Results Homeless people recognise signs of a heroin overdose and many are prepared to take responsibility to give naloxone, providing prior training and support is provided. Previous reports of the theoretical potential for abuse and malicious use may have been overplayed. Conclusion There is insufficient evidence to recommend providing "over the counter" take home naloxone" to UK homeless injecting drug users. However a programme of peer use of take home naloxone amongst homeless drug users could be feasible providing prior training is provided. Peer education within a health promotion framework will optimise success as current professionally led health promotion initiatives are failing to have a positive impact amongst homeless drug users. PMID:17014725

  4. Who Is Doing Well? A Typology of Newly Homeless Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milburn, Norweeta; Liang, Li-Jung; Lee, Sung-Jae; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Rosenthal, Doreen; Mallett, Shelley; Lightfoot, Marguerita; Lester, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    There is growing evidence to support developing new typologies for homeless adolescents. Current typologies focus on the risks associated with being homeless, with less consideration of the positive attributes of homeless adolescents. The authors examined both risk and protective factors in a sample of newly homeless adolescents. Using cluster…

  5. Over the Edge: Homeless Families and the Welfare System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Coalition for the Homeless, Washington, DC.

    Homelessness among families is quickly reaching crisis proportions across the country. Over 30 percent of America's three million homeless people are members of families, and families are the fastest growing segment of the homeless population. Perhaps more disturbing, homelessness represents only the most extreme manifestation of a more…

  6. 24 CFR 576.56 - Homeless assistance and participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Homeless assistance and... HOMELESS ASSISTANCE ACT Program Requirements § 576.56 Homeless assistance and participation. (a) Assistance. (1) Grantees and recipients must assure that homeless individuals and families are given...

  7. Persisting Barriers to Employment for Recently Housed Adults with Mental Illness Who Were Homeless.

    PubMed

    Poremski, Daniel; Woodhall-Melnik, Julia; Lemieux, Ashley J; Stergiopoulos, Vicky

    2016-02-01

    Adults with mental illness who are homeless experience multiple barriers to employment, contributing to difficulties securing and maintaining housing. Housing First programs provide quick, low-barrier access to housing and support services for this population, but their success in improving employment outcomes has been limited. Supported employment interventions may augment Housing First programs and address barriers to employment for homeless adults with mental illness. The present paper presents data from qualitative interviews to shed light on the persisting barriers to employment among people formerly homeless. Once housed, barriers to employment persisted, including the following: (1) worries about disclosing sensitive information, (2) fluctuating motivation, (3) continued substance use, and (4) fears about re-experiencing homelessness-related trauma. Nevertheless, participants reported that their experiences of homelessness helped them develop interpersonal strength and resilience. Discussing barriers with an employment specialist helps participants develop strategies to overcome them, but employment specialists must be sensitive to specific homelessness-related experiences that may not be immediately evident. Supported housing was insufficient to help people return to employment. Supported employment may help people return to work by addressing persisting barriers. PMID:26666250

  8. Assessing trauma, substance abuse, and mental health in a sample of homeless men.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mimi M; Ford, Julian D; Howard, Daniel L; Bradford, Daniel W

    2010-02-01

    This study examined the impact of physical and sexual trauma on a sample of 239 homeless men. Study participants completed a self-administered survey that collected data on demographics, exposure to psychological trauma, physical health and mental health problems, and substance use or misuse. Binomial logistic regression analyses were used to examine the relative significance of demographic factors and the four types of trauma exposure associated with three outcomes: mental health, substance abuse, and physical health problems. The authors found that trauma history was significantly associated with more mental health problems but was not associated with substance abuse problems for homeless men. This study reinforces service providers' perceptions that because many homeless men experience the long-term, deleterious effects of not only current stressors, but also abuse and victimization that often begin in childhood, homeless men are a subpopulation in need of proactive prevention services that emphasize long-term continuity of care rather than sporadic crisis-based services. Study findings suggest that mentally ill, homeless men need proactive services that address the sequelae of abuse with care that is specialized and distinctly different from care for homeless adults with substance abuse or physical health care issues. PMID:20218452

  9. Perceptions about Homeless Elders and Community Responsibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Michael N.; Green, Diane; Jacobs, Robin

    2013-01-01

    Human service students were surveyed ("N" = 207) to determine their perceptions about homeless elders and communal responsibility for their well-being. Using a backward regression analysis, a final model ("F" = 15.617, "df" = 7, "p" < 0.001) for Perceptions about Homeless Persons and Community…

  10. Correlates of Homeless Episodes among Indigenous People

    PubMed Central

    Whitbeck, Les B.; Crawford, Devan M.; Hartshorn, Kelley J. Sittner

    2011-01-01

    This study reports the correlates of homeless episodes among 873 Indigenous adults who are part of an ongoing longitudinal study on four reservations in the Northern Midwest and four Canadian First Nation reserves. Descriptive analyses depict differences between those who have and have not experienced an episode of homelessness in their lifetimes. Multivariate analyses assess factors associated with a history of homeless episodes at the time of their first interview. Results show that individuals with a history of homeless episodes had significantly more individual and family health, mental health, and substance abuse problems. Periods of homelessness also were associated with financial problems. Among the female caretakers who experienced episodes of homelessness over the course of the study, the majority had been homeless at least once prior to the start of the study and approximately one–fifth met criteria for lifetime alcohol dependence, drug abuse, or major depression. Family adversity during childhood was also common for women experiencing homelessness during the study. PMID:21656303

  11. Spirituality and Mental Health among Homeless Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodge, David R.; Moser, Stephanie E.; Shafer, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Mothers are one of the fastest growing segments of the homeless population in the United States. Although mental health problems often contribute to homelessness, little is known about the factors that affect mothers' mental health. To help identify protective factors, this longitudinal study examined the relationship between spirituality and…

  12. Homeless Children: The Watchers and the Waiters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boxill, Nancy A., Ed.

    This book takes an interdisciplinary approach in discussing the issue of homeless children and the resolution of the problem. An introduction by Nancy A. Boxill presents background on the nature of the problem and summarizes the subsequent papers. "Home and Homelessness in the Lives of Children" by Leanne G. Rivlin analyzes the impact on children…

  13. Alcoholism, Drug Abuse, and the Homeless.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarty, Dennis; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Reviews policies that address substance abuse among the homeless. Recommends that the changing needs of the homeless require an integration of alcoholism and drug abuse recovery services with programs for various groups, substance-free housing, and psychological knowledge incorporated into programs for those struggling with addiction and

  14. Young Children and Families Experiencing Homelessness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Allison B.; Squires, Jane

    2014-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of homelessness among young children and families in the United States is described, as is the developmental impact on young children and cost to society. Although services are mandated for this population under the McKinney­-Vento Act, Education of Homeless Children and Youth Program, and the Individuals With…

  15. Predictors of Transience among Homeless Emerging Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Kristin M.; Bender, Kimberly; Thompson, Sanna J.

    2014-01-01

    This study identified predictors of transience among homeless emerging adults in three cities. A total of 601 homeless emerging adults from Los Angeles, Austin, and Denver were recruited using purposive sampling. Ordinary least squares regression results revealed that significant predictors of greater transience include White ethnicity, high

  16. Perceptions about Homeless Elders and Community Responsibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Michael N.; Green, Diane; Jacobs, Robin

    2013-01-01

    Human service students were surveyed ("N"=207) to determine their perceptions about homeless elders and communal responsibility for their well-being. Using a backward regression analysis, a final model ("F"=15.617, "df"=7, "p"<0.001) for Perceptions about Homeless Persons and Community

  17. Homelessness, Poverty, and Children's Literacy Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker-Dalhouse, Doris; Risko, Victoria J.

    2008-01-01

    Over 100 million families worldwide lack permanent housing or income sufficient to meet their basic needs. Some homeless children are able to succeed in school despite the many challenges they face, but others are not. Seventy-five percent of U.S. homeless children perform below grade level in reading, and schools and teachers may not be prepared…

  18. Predictors of Transience among Homeless Emerging Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Kristin M.; Bender, Kimberly; Thompson, Sanna J.

    2014-01-01

    This study identified predictors of transience among homeless emerging adults in three cities. A total of 601 homeless emerging adults from Los Angeles, Austin, and Denver were recruited using purposive sampling. Ordinary least squares regression results revealed that significant predictors of greater transience include White ethnicity, high…

  19. Intervention Strategies with the Homeless Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dykeman, Bruce F.

    2011-01-01

    A literature review describing psychological and sociological factors of homelessness. Methods of estimating the frequency of homelessness are described, along with recent point-in-time and period-of-time estimates. Models of service delivery are reviewed. A biopsychosocial model of intervention is proposed that describes stages of intervention…

  20. Capacity for Survival: Exploring Strengths of Homeless Street Youth

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Kimberly; Thompson, Sanna J.; McManus, Holly; Lantry, Janet; Flynn, Patrick M.

    2009-01-01

    The majority of research on homeless youth has focused on the multitude of problems faced by this vulnerable population. The current study, while acknowledging the hazards of life on the streets, seeks to explore the personal strengths and informal resources street youth rely on to navigate their environments. Qualitative data from seven focus groups conducted with street youth ages 18–24 were analyzed using content analysis. These data, rich with interactions among youth participants, highlight three important themes: developing “street smarts,” existence of personal strengths, and informal resources relied upon by youth to survive. Results provide valuable insights into the strengths of homeless youth that can be useful to providers in assessing street youths’ service needs and increasing the likelihood of long-term positive outcomes. PMID:19915687

  1. Changing homelessness services: revanchism, ‘professionalisation’ and resistance

    PubMed Central

    Scullion, Lisa; Somerville, Peter; Brown, Philip; Morris, Gareth

    2015-01-01

    This paper argues that the increasing international salience of homelessness can be partially explained by reference to the revanchist thesis (involving processes of coerced exclusion and abjection), but the situation on the ground is more complex. It reports on interviews with 18 representatives of 11 homelessness service providers in one city in England. As Cloke et al. found, these providers tended to be either larger, more ‘professional’, ‘insider’ services or smaller, more ‘amateur’, ‘outsider’ services. However, this does not mean that the former were necessarily more revanchist and the latter less so. Rather, the actions of both types of organisation could, in some cases, be construed as both advancing and counteracting a revanchist project. PMID:25442718

  2. Capacity for Survival: Exploring Strengths of Homeless Street Youth.

    PubMed

    Bender, Kimberly; Thompson, Sanna J; McManus, Holly; Lantry, Janet; Flynn, Patrick M

    2007-02-01

    The majority of research on homeless youth has focused on the multitude of problems faced by this vulnerable population. The current study, while acknowledging the hazards of life on the streets, seeks to explore the personal strengths and informal resources street youth rely on to navigate their environments. Qualitative data from seven focus groups conducted with street youth ages 18-24 were analyzed using content analysis. These data, rich with interactions among youth participants, highlight three important themes: developing "street smarts," existence of personal strengths, and informal resources relied upon by youth to survive. Results provide valuable insights into the strengths of homeless youth that can be useful to providers in assessing street youths' service needs and increasing the likelihood of long-term positive outcomes. PMID:19915687

  3. Preventing homelessness: an examination of the transition resource action center.

    PubMed

    Senteio, Charles; Marshall, Khiya J; Ritzen, Evy Kay; Grant, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Each year in the United States, as adolescents age out or are emancipated from the foster care system, they are at risk of experiencing homelessness. It is essential that services and programs focus on encouraging and supporting youth in transition from foster care to a life of independence, and The Transition Resource Action Center (TRAC) strives to provide these services. The researchers sought to determine if TRAC's residential program provides their clients with a chance of a stable life (e.g., housing, employment, health care). Findings suggest that fewer clients of TRAC became homeless and more acquired transitional or temporary housing from screening 1 to screening 2, demonstrating promise that these services have fostered change in the lives of their clients. PMID:19363771

  4. 38 CFR 61.40 - Special needs grants-general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) VA HOMELESS PROVIDERS GRANT AND PER DIEM PROGRAM § 61.40 Special needs grants—general. (a) VA... providing beds or services in supportive housing and at service centers for the following homeless...

  5. 38 CFR 61.40 - Special needs grants-general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) VA HOMELESS PROVIDERS GRANT AND PER DIEM PROGRAM § 61.40 Special needs grants—general. (a) VA... providing beds or services in supportive housing and at service centers for the following homeless...

  6. 38 CFR 61.40 - Special needs grants-general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) VA HOMELESS PROVIDERS GRANT AND PER DIEM PROGRAM § 61.40 Special needs grants—general. (a) VA... providing beds or services in supportive housing and at service centers for the following homeless...

  7. 76 FR 71443 - Enhanced-Use Lease (EUL) of Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Real Property for the Development...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-17

    ... placement for homeless and/or at-risk Veterans and their families; and provide a supportive services program. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Edward Bradley, Office of Asset Enterprise Management...

  8. 76 FR 71442 - Enhanced-Use Lease (EUL) of Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Real Property for the Development...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-17

    ... homeless and at-risk Veterans and their families; and provide a supportive services program. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Edward Bradley, Office of Asset Enterprise Management (044), Department of...

  9. Health disparities in the Native Hawaiian homeless.

    PubMed

    Yamane, David P; Oeser, Steffen G; Omori, Jill

    2010-06-01

    While it is well accepted that Native Hawaiians have poor health statistics compared to other ethnic groups in Hawaii, it is not well documented if these disparities persist when comparing Native Hawaiian homeless individuals to the general homeless population. This paper examines the Native Hawaiian homeless population living in three shelters on the island of Oahu, to determine if there are significant differences in the frequency of diseases between the Native Hawaiian and non-Native Hawaiian homeless. A retrospective data collection was performed using records from the Hawaii Homeless Outreach and Medical Education (H.O.M.E.) project. Data from 1182 patients was collected as of 12/05/09. Information collected included patient demographics, frequency of self reported diseases, family history of diseases, risk factors, prevalence of chronic diseases, and most common complaints. The data from Native Hawaiians and non-Native Hawaiians were examined for differences and a 1-tail Fisher exact analysis was done to confirm significance. The data reveals that the Native Hawaiian homeless population is afflicted more frequently with asthma and hypertension compared to other ethnic groups. While diabetes constituted more visits to the clinics for Native Hawaiians compared to the non-Native Hawaiians, there was no significant difference in patient reported prevalence of diabetes. The Native Hawaiian homeless also had increased rates of risky behaviors demonstrated by higher past use of marijuana and methamphetamines. Interestingly, there was a lower use of alcohol in the Native Hawaiian homeless and no significant difference between Native Hawaiians and non-native Hawaiians in current use of illicit drugs, which may represent a hopeful change in behaviors. These troubling statistics show that some of the health disparities seen in the general Native Hawaiian population persist despite the global impoverished state of all homeless. Hopefully, these results will aid organizations like the H.O.M.E. project to better address the health needs of the Native Hawaiian homeless population. PMID:20540000

  10. Good practice towards homeless drug users: research evidence from Scotland.

    PubMed

    Neale, Joanne; Kennedy, Catherine

    2002-05-01

    Evidence of large numbers of people who are both homeless and drug dependent, the complexity of their needs, and the many difficulties which they can encounter when trying to access assistance highlight the importance of basic standards of good practice in working with homeless drug users. This is particularly relevant given the growth of new managerialism and the expansion of social care markets occurring within the UK public sector since the 1980s. Within this context, the aim of the present paper is to further understanding of how best to provide support to homeless drug users by examining good practice from the perspectives of both service providers and service users. Data were collected from 48 semi-structured interviews (12 with staff and 36 with clients) conducted in six case study agencies (three homelessness agencies and three drug agencies). Interviews were audio-recorded and the data were analysed using Framework. Findings from the study revealed that good practice related to five broad areas. These were: (1) staffing; (2) agency environment; (3) support provided; (4) service delivery; and (5) agency aims and objectives. Similarities between the views of service providers and users were evident. However, differences of opinion suggested that the best definitions of good practice are achieved by consultation with a range of stakeholders (including staff and clients). Data also showed that good practice is fundamentally related to the qualitative and intangible aspects of service provision, and not just to more easily quantifiable inputs, processes, outputs and outcomes. The paper concludes by arguing that the challenge for new managerialism is to build evaluation frameworks which can accommodate this complexity, and thus, begin to portray good practice in a more accurate and meaningful light. PMID:12121256

  11. Chronic disease management for recently homeless Veterans: a clinical practice improvement program to apply home telehealth technology to a vulnerable population

    PubMed Central

    Gabrielian, Sonya; Yuan, Anita; Andersen, Ronald M.; McGuire, James; Rubenstein, Lisa; Sapir, Negar; Gelberg, Lillian

    2013-01-01

    Background Though vulnerable populations may benefit from in-home health information technologies (HIT) that promote disease self-management, there is a digital divide in which these groups are often unlikely to use such programs. We describe the early phases of applying and testing an existing Veterans Administration (VA) HIT care management program, Care Coordination Home Telehealth (CCHT), to recently homeless Veterans in the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development-VA Supportive Housing (HUD-VASH) program. Peers were used to support patient participation. Methods CCHT uses in-home messaging devices to provide health education and daily questions about clinical indicators from chronic illness care guidelines, with patient responses reviewed by VA nurses. Patients could also receive adjunctive peer support. We used medical record review, Veteran interviews, and staff surveys to diagnose barriers to CCHT use, assess program acceptability, explore the role of peer support, and inform future quality improvement. Subjects Fourteen eligible Veterans in HUD-VASH agreed to CCHT participation. Ten of these Veterans opted to have adjunctive peer support and the other four enrolled in CCHT usual care. Results Though barriers to enrollment/engagement must be addressed, this subset of Veterans in HUD-VASH was satisfied with CCHT. Most Veterans did not require support from peers to engage in CCHT but valued peer social assistance amidst the isolation felt in their scattered-site homes. Conclusions HIT tools hold promise for in-home care management for recently housed Veterans. Patient-level barriers to enrollment must be addressed in the next steps of quality improvement, testing and evaluating peer-driven CCHT recruitment. PMID:23407011

  12. Children and Youths: About 68,000 Homeless and 186,000 in Shared Housing at Any Given Time. Report to Congressional Committees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Program Evaluation and Methodology Div.

    In compliance with Section 724 of the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act of July 22, 1987 (Public Law 100-77), this GAO report to Congressional Committees provides estimates of the number of homeless children and youth in all states. Estimates are reported, along with additional information on subgroups for whom it was not possible to…

  13. Family Histories and Multiple Transitions Among Homeless Young Adults: Pathways to Homelessness

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, Kimberly A.; Schmitz, Rachel M.

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the early family histories of homeless young adults, the types and number of transitions they experienced, and their pathways to the street. Intensive qualitative interviews were audio taped and transcribed with 40 homeless young adults 19 to 21 years of age in the Midwest. Findings show that family backgrounds were generally characterized by substance use, child maltreatment, and witnessing violence, all of which provide social context for understanding why so many of these young people opted to leave home in search of an alternative living situation. The current findings also reveal that while some young adults ran away from home as adolescents, others were “pushed out” (i.e., told to leave), or removed by state agencies. Current study findings illustrate that young adults’ trajectories are marked by multiple living arrangements such as home, foster care, detention facility, and drug rehabilitation. Overall, study results show that young adults’ family histories place them on trajectories for early independence marked by multiple transitions and numerous living situations, culminating in a lack of a permanent residence to call home. PMID:24151346

  14. Homelessness among the Elderly in Bangkok Metropolitan.

    PubMed

    Viwatpanich, Kanvee

    2015-03-01

    The combination between quantitative and qualitative research, "Homelessness among the Elderly in Bangkok Metropolitan" aimed to study causes of homelessness, patterns of living, problems, health status, social and health needs. Purposive sampling of 60 older homeless people could be divided into two groups; temporary and permanent homeless. Causes of homelessness were health problems, money problems, family background, emotional management, cultural sensitivities, limitation of extended family, financial management, political control, and domestic violence. Their living problems included:financial insecurity, police suppression, social and medical services, attacks from the young generations, sexual harassment, stealing, and social hierarchy of homelessness. 63.3% reported having hearing problems and a peptic ulcer before becoming homeless. These evolved into musculo-skeletal problems, accident-injuries, and skin diseases. 95% performed ADL/IADLs independently, 78.3% were depressed, 5% diagnosed with severe stress depression. 70% rated themselves happier than the rest ofthe population, and 75% were identified as having normal cognition. 58.3% had a good relationship with a religious network, 55% still had some contacts with theirfamily members. More than 90% indicated that they were satisfied, could sustainin a life on the street, were happy with theirfreedom, liked being close to green areas, learned about human life,fulfilled the dhamma, and felt close to the king. PMID:26211113

  15. Risk factors associated with recurrent homelessness after a first homeless episode.

    PubMed

    McQuistion, Hunter L; Gorroochurn, Prakash; Hsu, Eustace; Caton, Carol L M

    2014-07-01

    Alcohol and drug use are commonly associated with the experience of homelessness. In order to better understand this, we explored the prevalence of drug and alcohol use as it related to successful re-housing within a sample of first-time single homeless adults at municipal shelters. From within this sample, we compared the features of recurrent homelessness with those of chronic homelessness and of being stably housed. We interviewed 344 subjects upon shelter entry and followed each one every six months for 18 months using standardized social and mental health measures. We analyzed baseline assessments relative to housing experiences during follow-up using Chi square and multinomial logistic regression. Eighty-one percent (N = 278) obtained housing over 18 months, of which 23.7 % (N = 66) experienced homelessness again. Recurrent homelessness was more common among those with a high school education and if initially re-housed with family. Bivariate analysis resulted in the observation of the highest rate of alcohol and other drug use among this recurrent group and multinomial logistic regression supported this only with the coupling of arrest history and diagnosed antisocial personality disorder. With relatively high rates of recurrent homelessness, there were differences between subjects who experienced recurrent homelessness compared to those who were stably housed and with chronic homelessness. That alcohol and other substance use disorders were associated with recurrent homelessness only if they were linked to other risk factors highlights the complexity of causes for homelessness and a resultant need to organize them into constellations of causal risk factors. Consistent with this, there should be initiatives that span bureaucratic boundaries so as to flexibly meet multiple complex service needs, thus improving outcomes concerning episodes of recurrent homelessness. PMID:23744291

  16. Interventions to Improve Access to Primary Care for People Who Are Homeless: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background People who are homeless encounter barriers to primary care despite having greater needs for health care, on average, than people who are not homeless. We evaluated the effectiveness of interventions to improve access to primary care for people who are homeless. Methods We performed a systematic review to identify studies in English published between January 1, 1995, and July 8, 2015, comparing interventions to improve access to a primary care provider with usual care among people who are homeless. The outcome of interest was access to a primary care provider. The risk of bias in the studies was evaluated, and the quality of the evidence was assessed according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) Working Group criteria. Results From a total of 4,047 citations, we identified five eligible studies (one randomized controlled trial and four observational studies). With the exception of the randomized trial, the risk of bias was considered high in the remaining studies. In the randomized trial, people who were homeless, without serious mental illness, and who received either an outreach intervention plus clinic orientation or clinic orientation alone, had improved access to a primary care provider compared with those receiving usual care. An observational study that compared integration of primary care and other services for people who are homeless with usual care did not observe any difference in access to a primary care provider between the two groups. A small observational study showed improvement among participants with a primary care provider after receiving an intervention consisting of housing and supportive services compared with the period before the intervention. The quality of the evidence was considered moderate for both the outreach plus clinic orientation and clinic orientation alone, and low to very low for the other interventions. Despite limitations, the literature identified reports of interventions developed to overcome barriers in access to primary care in people who are homeless. The interventions studied are complex and include multiple components that are consistent with proposed dimensions of access to care (availability, affordability, and acceptability). Conclusions Our systematic review of the literature identified various types of interventions that seek to improve access to primary care by attempting to address barriers to care encountered by people who are homeless. Moderate-quality evidence indicates that orientation to clinic services (either alone or combined with outreach) improves access to a primary care provider in adults who are homeless, without serious mental illness, and living in urban centres. PMID:27099645

  17. 38 CFR 61.61 - Agreement and funding actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) VA HOMELESS PROVIDERS GRANT AND PER DIEM PROGRAM § 61.61 Agreement and funding actions. (a) When... designated for use, to assist homeless veterans. (j) VA may obligate any recovered funds without fiscal...

  18. 38 CFR 61.61 - Agreement and funding actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) VA HOMELESS PROVIDERS GRANT AND PER DIEM PROGRAM § 61.61 Agreement and funding actions. (a) When... designated for use, to assist homeless veterans. (j) VA may obligate any recovered funds without fiscal...

  19. Comparisons of family environment between homeless and non-homeless individuals with schizophrenia in Xiangtan, Hunan

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, Jinliang; CHEN, Jindong; LI, Shuchun; LIU, Jun; OUYANG, Guohua; LUO, Wenxuan; GUO, Xiaofeng; LI, Ting; LI, Kaijie; LI, Zhenkuo; WANG, Gan

    2015-01-01

    Background Homelessness is an increasingly important problem for individuals with serious mental illness in China. Aim Identify the characteristics of families that are associated with homelessness among individuals with schizophrenia. Methods Participants were 1856 homeless individuals with schizophrenia (defined as those who had no place of residence or involved caregivers for 7 consecutive days) and 1728 non-homeless individuals with schizophrenia from Xiangtan, Hunan. The self-completion Family Environment Scale-Chinese Version (FES-CV) was administered to these participants after their acute psychotic symptoms resolved. Results Compared to individuals in the non-homeless group, those in the homeless group were older and more likely to be non-locals (i.e., from outside of Xiangtan), be residents of rural (versus urban) communities, have temporary (versus permanent) jobs, be married, and have a low level of education. After controlling for demographic differences using multivariate logistic regression models, homelessness was independently associated higher scores in the FES-CV intellectual-cultural orientation, organization, achievement orientation, and control subscales and with lower scores in the FES-CV cohesion, moralreligious emphasis, independence, and active-recreational orientation subscales. Conclusion After controlling for sociodemographic factors, certain aspects of the family environment areassociated with being homeless among patients with schizophrenia in China. Further work is needed to identify interventions that can reduce the risk of homelessness in high-risk individuals. PMID:26300600

  20. Nurse-managed free clinic fosters care connection for homeless population.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Cornelia Ronan

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this article is to demystify the process that healthcare providers must follow when working with homeless patients who sustain injuries or exhibit illnesses that necessitate rehabilitation care. Observations made over a period of more than 12 years at an inner-city medical/psychiatric nurse-managed free clinic that delivers cutting-edge services and educates multidisciplinary students to care for disenfranchised populations led the author to several conclusions: homeless people frequently lose their identity as individuals when facing healthcare providers; previous negative perceptions of homelessness can turn positive when care providers meet these patients on a person-to-person level; the concept of health and rehabilitation must be clearly understood in the same way by both providers and patients for nursing goals to be realistic and achievable; and a collaborative relationship must be formed between nurses and patients. PMID:19475805

  1. Police use of handcuffs in the homeless population leads to long-term negative attitudes within this group.

    PubMed

    Krameddine, Yasmeen I; Silverstone, Peter H

    2016-01-01

    The police interact with homeless individuals frequently. However, there has been relatively little research on the attitudes of homeless individuals towards the police, and how police interactions may impact these. This is important since the attitudes of homeless individuals can impact how often they report crimes, and how well they support police when they are investigating crimes in this population. We interviewed 213 homeless individuals in a single city, representing approximately 10% of the total homeless population. They were interviewed at either homeless shelters, or events held specifically for the homeless population. Of these individuals, 75% were male, and 47% had interacted with a police officer within the past month. Self-reports suggested that 60% had a drug and/or alcohol issue and 78% had a mental illness. We found a highly statistically significant difference between the group that had been handcuffed and/or arrested compared to those that had not. This was across multiple domains and included how the individual regarded the police in terms of their empathy and communication skills, and how much they trusted the police. These changes were long-term, and if a homeless individual had been arrested or handcuffed (and verbal reporting suggested that being handcuffed was the by far the most important factor) then these negative attitudes lasted at least 2 years. The primary conclusion from this study is that when police handcuff a homeless individual, this can lead to long-term negative views about the police across several domains that appear to be long lasting, and were linked to feelings of not being respected by the police. It is therefore proposed that police officers should be made aware of the potential long-term negative consequences of this single action, and that police forces should consider providing specific training to minimize any unnecessary overuse of handcuffs. PMID:26314889

  2. Assessing the health of homeless people.

    PubMed

    Parker-Radford, David

    2015-12-16

    New guidance on assessing the health of homeless people features an assessment template for community nurses working with this group. It includes key questions on general physical health, mental health, long-term conditions, substance use, sexual health and housing. It also incorporates template care plans for use by both nurses and patients, and includes Read Codes for practice-based settings. This article looks at the impact homelessness can have on health, and summarises the Queen's Nursing Institute's guidance on assessing the healthcare needs of homeless people. PMID:26841481

  3. Caring for and connecting with homeless adolescents.

    PubMed

    Rew, Lynn

    2008-01-01

    Adolescents from a variety of backgrounds are among the growing number of homeless Americans. Although they lack maturity and various skills, they manage to survive in dangerous and stressful environments. This article asserts that social policy that leads to services such as housing, education, and healthcare should be based on a philosophy, ethic, and theory of caring and connectedness, which have been shown to protect adolescents as they mature. The article includes brief descriptions of theories of caring, pathways to homelessness for adolescents, survival needs of homeless youth, and characteristics of service programs that incorporate caring and connectedness. PMID:18091141

  4. 77 FR 42753 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-20

    ...., acreage, floor plan, existing sanitary facilities, exact street address), providers should contact the...: Secured Area Land Virginia 5 Acres Naval Support Facility Dahlgren VA Landholding Agency: Navy...

  5. Homelessness Assistance and Resources

    MedlinePlus

    ... in this SNAPS In Focus message . Coordinated Entry Resources View a policy brief, videos, FAQs, notices, and ... Providers to view the toolkits. Systems Performance Measure Resources View videos, programming specifications, an introductory guide, and ...

  6. A strengths based method for homeless youth: Effectiveness and fidelity of Houvast

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background While homelessness among youth is a serious problem, there is little information about evidence-based interventions for homeless youth. In cooperation with professionals and youths, Wolf (2012) developed Houvast (Dutch for ‘grip’): a strengths based method grounded in scientific and practice evidence. The main aim of Houvast is to improve the quality of life of homeless youths by focusing on their strengths, thus stimulating their capacity for autonomy and self-reliance. Method/Design The effectiveness and fidelity of Houvast will be tested in ten Dutch services for homeless youth which are randomly allocated to an intervention group (n = 5), or a control group which provides care as usual (n = 5). Measurements of both objective and subjective quality of life and secondary outcomes (mental and physical health, substance use, coping, resilience, psychological needs, care needs, working relationship with the professional and attainment of personal goals) will be conducted among homeless youths (n = 251). Youths in both groups will be interviewed by means of a structured interview at baseline, at time of ending care or after having received care for six months (T1) and at nine months after baseline (T2). Model fidelity will be tested around T1. Discussion This study is unique as it includes a large number of homeless youths who are followed for a period of nine months, and because it focuses on a strengths based approach. If the Houvast method proves to be effective in improving quality of life it will be the first evidence-based intervention for homeless youth. Trail registration Netherlands Trail Register (NTR):NTR3254 PMID:23594410

  7. An Exploratory Factor Analysis of Coping Styles and Relationship to Depression Among a Sample of Homeless Youth.

    PubMed

    Brown, Samantha M; Begun, Stephanie; Bender, Kimberly; Ferguson, Kristin M; Thompson, Sanna J

    2015-10-01

    The extent to which measures of coping adequately capture the ways that homeless youth cope with challenges, and the influence these coping styles have on mental health outcomes, is largely absent from the literature. This study tests the factor structure of the Coping Scale using Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA) and then investigates the relationship between coping styles and depression using hierarchical logistic regression with data from 201 homeless youth. Results of the EFA indicate a 3-factor structure of coping, which includes active, avoidant, and social coping styles. Results of the hierarchical logistic regression show that homeless youth who engage in greater avoidant coping are at increased risk of meeting criteria for major depressive disorder. Findings provide insight into the utility of a preliminary tool for assessing homeless youths' coping styles. Such assessment may identify malleable risk factors that could be addressed by service providers to help prevent mental health problems. PMID:25821043

  8. Touched by Homelessness: An Examination of Hospitality for the Down and Out

    PubMed Central

    Bolland, John M.; McCallum, Debra Moehle

    2002-01-01

    Objectives. This study investigated patterns of “doubled-up” homelessness using an indirect measure based on host households. Methods. In random household telephone surveys conducted in Alabama between 1990 and 2000 and nationally in 1997, respondents indicated whether any individual had stayed with them during the past year because that person was homeless. Results. The percentage of Alabama households providing shelter during the past year declined from 16.2% in 1990 to 7.1% in 2000. The national rate for providing shelter in 1997 was 18.0%. Conclusions. Many households provide shelter to people to prevent them from being literally homeless. As the economy has expanded, these rates have declined in Alabama. PMID:11772773

  9. Deep in the heart of Texas: A phenomenological exploration of unsheltered homelessness.

    PubMed

    Petrovich, James C; Cronley, Courtney C

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to develop an in-depth understanding of the experience of unsheltered homelessness in Fort Worth, Texas. Eighteen individuals participated in the study; 13 were full-time residents of Fort Worth and 5 were traveling through the area via freight train. All reported long-term histories of unsheltered homelessness. Interviews were conducted in naturalistic settings; for example, on the street, under bridges, and in camps. Results indicated that the participants entered homelessness through diverse paths, but all of these paths were characterized by loss and social isolation. Many described homelessness as a threatening and dangerous experience; relying on strong street-based social networks and their own personal strengths for survival. Participants viewed shelter service providers as sources of stress and stigma to be avoided but heavily utilized street outreach services and faith-based missions. The overemphasis by providers on "fixing" people, rather than addressing immediate needs, made many participants ambivalent about traditional services. This study supports the use of nontraditional housing interventions and robust community-based approaches to care for individuals experiencing unsheltered homelessness. PMID:25602352

  10. Advanced Battery Manufacturing (VA)

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, Jeremy

    2012-09-30

    LiFeBATT has concentrated its recent testing and evaluation on the safety of its batteries. There appears to be a good margin of safety with respect to overheating of the cells and the cases being utilized for the batteries are specifically designed to dissipate any heat built up during charging. This aspect of LiFeBATT’s products will be even more fully investigated, and assuming ongoing positive results, it will become a major component of marketing efforts for the batteries. LiFeBATT has continued to receive prismatic 20 Amp hour cells from Taiwan. Further testing continues to indicate significant advantages over the previously available 15 Ah cells. Battery packs are being assembled with battery management systems in the Danville facility. Comprehensive tests are underway at Sandia National Laboratory to provide further documentation of the advantages of these 20 Ah cells. The company is pursuing its work with Hybrid Vehicles of Danville to critically evaluate the 20 Ah cells in a hybrid, armored vehicle being developed for military and security applications. Results have been even more encouraging than they were initially. LiFeBATT is expanding its work with several OEM customers to build a worldwide distribution network. These customers include a major automotive consulting group in the U.K., an Australian maker of luxury off-road campers, and a number of makers of E-bikes and scooters. LiFeBATT continues to explore the possibility of working with nations that are woefully short of infrastructure. Negotiations are underway with Siemens to jointly develop a system for using photovoltaic generation and battery storage to supply electricity to communities that are not currently served adequately. The IDA has continued to monitor the progress of LiFeBATT’s work to ensure that all funds are being expended wisely and that matching funds will be generated as promised. The company has also remained current on all obligations for repayment of an IDA loan and lease payments for space to the IDA. A commercial venture is being formed to utilize the LiFeBATT product for consumer use in enabling photovoltaic powered boat lifts. Field tests of the system have proven to be very effective and commercially promising. This venture is expected to result in significant sales within the next six months.

  11. Unsheltered Homelessness Among Veterans: Correlates and Profiles.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Thomas; Montgomery, Ann Elizabeth; Fargo, Jamison D

    2016-02-01

    We identified correlates of unsheltered status among Veterans experiencing homelessness and described distinct subgroups within the unsheltered homeless Veteran population using data from a screening instrument for homelessness that is administered to all Veterans accessing outpatient care at a Veterans Health Administration (VHA) facility. Correlates of unsheltered homelessness included male gender, white race, older age, lower levels of VHA eligibility, substance use disorders, frequent use of VHA inpatient and infrequent use of VHA outpatient services, and residing in the West. We identified six distinct subgroups of unsheltered Veterans; the tri-morbid frequent users represented the highest need group, but the largest group was comprised of Veterans who made highly infrequent use of VHA healthcare services. Differences between sheltered and unsheltered Veterans and heterogeneity within the unsheltered Veteran population should be considered in targeting housing and other interventions. PMID:26289119

  12. [Palliative care for a homeless person].

    PubMed

    Slockers, Marcel T; Baar, Frans P M; den Breejen, Petra; Slockers, Christian J; Geijteman, Eric C T; Rietjens, Judith A C

    2015-01-01

    Homeless people have substantial health disadvantages as compared to the general population, and excessive losses in life expectancy. High proportions of psychiatric disorders, substance abuse and intellectual disability have been reported. This makes palliative care for this population extremely complex. A 55-year-old man, addicted to heroin and cocaine, was diagnosed with metastatic lung cancer. His terminal phase of life was complicated by many admissions to different care settings and problems with symptom management. Involvement of a palliative care consultation team and transfer to a homeless shelter, to which homeless people with life-threatening diseases could be admitted, gave both the patient and his family relief. This case illustrates that palliative care in homeless patients may be extremely complex due to the specific physical and psychosocial features involved. Such care should be offered proactively and on a multidisciplinary basis. PMID:26306486

  13. Perspectives on housing among homeless emerging adults.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Tiffany N; Thompson, Sanna J

    2013-02-01

    Homeless emerging adults need the safety and stability of housing programs if they are to avoid the elements and victimization of the streets, however, barriers to obtaining housing are numerous. This study identified factors associated with perspectives of housing services among 29 homeless emerging adults (ages 18-23 years) through one-on-one interviews. Data were gathered and analyzed using grounded theory methodology for qualitative information. Major themes of peer support and positive personal and programmatic interactions in the context of emerging adult development were noted as important factors in housing service utilization. These major themes should be taken into consideration for current housing programs, due to homeless emerging adults' oscillation between their desire for formal support and personal independence. Greater emphasis on services that do not require long term commitments and are more flexible in addressing specific barriers to housing for homeless emerging adults may increase use. PMID:23032602

  14. Use of the FirstSTEp screening tool with children exposed to domestic violence and homelessness: a group case study.

    PubMed

    Helfritch, Christine A; Beer, David W

    2007-01-01

    Children who experience homelessness and domestic violence enter early childhood programs with developmental and behavioral challenges. Thoroughly evaluating these children can be daunting for daycare staff without advanced training. Occupational therapists can provide child development expertise and consultation. This group case study examined the FirstSTEp screening tool's ability to measure the behavioral, developmental, and emotional changes of 19 pre-schoolers who experienced homelessness and witnessed domestic violence. The tool was found to be effective with this population. PMID:17442655

  15. Part I, Patient perspective: activating patients to engage their providers in the use of evidence-based medicine: a qualitative evaluation of the VA Project to Implement Diuretics (VAPID)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background This qualitative evaluation follows a randomized-control trial of a patient activation intervention in which hypertensive patients received a letter in the mail asking them to discuss thiazide diuretics with their provider. Results of the parent study indicated that the intervention was effective at facilitating discussions between patients and providers and enhancing thiazide prescribing rates. In the research presented here, our objective was to interview patients to determine their receptivity to patient activation, a potential leverage point for implementing interventions. Methods Semi-structured phone interviews were conducted with 54 patients, purposefully sampled from a randomized controlled trial of a patient activation intervention. All subjects had a history of hypertension and received primary care from one of twelve Veterans Affairs primary care clinics. All interviews were transcribed verbatim and reviewed by the interviewer. Interviews were independently coded by three qualitative researchers until consensus was attained, and relevant themes and responses were identified, grouped, and compared. NVivo 8.0 was used for data management and analysis. Results Data from this qualitative study revealed that most participants held favorable opinions toward the patient activation intervention used in the clinical trial. Most (82%) stated they had a positive reaction. Patients emphasized they liked the intervention because it was straightforward and encouraged them to initiate discussions with their provider. Also, by being active participants in their healthcare, patients felt more invested. Of the few patients offering negative feedback (11%), their main concern was discomfort with possibly challenging their providers' healthcare practices. Another outcome of interest was the patients' perceptions of why they were or were not prescribed a thiazide diuretic, for which several clinically relevant reasons were provided. Conclusion Patients' perceptions of the intervention indicated it was effective via the encouragement of dialogue between themselves and their provider regarding evidence-based treatment options for hypertension. Additionally, patients' experiences with thiazide prescribing discussions shed light on the facilitators and barriers to implementing clinical practice guidelines regarding thiazides as first-line therapy for hypertension. Trial registration National Clinical Trial Registry number NCT00265538 PMID:20298563

  16. Health care for the homeless: a partnership between a city and a school of nursing.

    PubMed

    Pennington, Karen; Coast, Mary Jo; Kroh, Maura

    2010-12-01

    Although there is extant research on the homeless, less is available suggesting an innovative community partnership such as Project HOPE. This partnership provided baccalaureate nursing students with greater understanding of underserved populations and health care delivery systems, and encouraged their future work with marginalized populations upon graduation. Students collected descriptive information on the homeless population. Correlations were found among site placement: age, clothing and supplies given, wound care, referrals given, assessments, and season of the year. Student evaluations revealed paradigm shifts in attitudes and inspired advocacy toward this population. Through the descriptive information and qualitative comments, we gained insight on demographics, conditions observed, and interventions offered, which provided direction for quality improvement in curriculum design for the Community Health Nursing course, direction for future student groups working in shelters and with street outreach workers, and information useful to strengthening partnerships with local organizations working with the homeless population. PMID:20954573

  17. From Homelessness to Community: Psychological Integration of Women Who Have Experienced Homelessness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nemiroff, Rebecca; Aubry, Tim; Klodawsky, Fran

    2011-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined psychological integration of women who were homeless at the study's outset. Participants (N = 101) were recruited at homeless shelters and participated in 2 in-person interviews, approximately 2 years apart. A predictive model identifying factors associated with having a psychological sense of community within…

  18. From Homelessness to Community: Psychological Integration of Women Who Have Experienced Homelessness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nemiroff, Rebecca; Aubry, Tim; Klodawsky, Fran

    2011-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined psychological integration of women who were homeless at the study's outset. Participants (N = 101) were recruited at homeless shelters and participated in 2 in-person interviews, approximately 2 years apart. A predictive model identifying factors associated with having a psychological sense of community within

  19. Homelessness Comes to School: How Homeless Children and Youths Can Succeed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Joseph F.; Tobin, Kerri J.

    2011-01-01

    Homelessness is a complex and layered phenomenon, but schools can be effective in reducing its educational consequences. Schools currently are not doing enough. The next step is to consider the services that are needed for students as they arrive on the school campus. Taking care of homeless children in school systems involves seven provisos:…

  20. Educational Rights of Homeless Youth: Exploring Racial Dimensions of Homeless Educational Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aviles de Bradley, Ann Marie

    2009-01-01

    Research that addresses educational rights of unaccompanied homeless youth in grades 9-12 is limited. The McKinney-Vento Act was created to address the many needs of homeless individuals, including children and youth's right to an education. McKinney-Vento was created over twenty-years ago, and this research sought to examine the implementation of…

  1. Who Are Homeless Families? A Profile of Homelessness in New York City.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Homes for the Homeless, Inc., New York, NY.

    This document presents results of a survey involving 400 homeless families on a number of social and economic factors, including family structure, housing history, employment background, educational attainment, and various interpersonal problems. The study sought to gain a greater understanding of the demographics surrounding homelessness.…

  2. Perceptions, Attitudes, and Experience Regarding mHealth Among Homeless Persons in New York City Shelters.

    PubMed

    Asgary, Ramin; Sckell, Blanca; Alcabes, Analena; Naderi, Ramesh; Adongo, Philip; Ogedegbe, Gbenga

    2015-01-01

    Mobile health may be an effective means of providing access and education to the millions of homeless Americans. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 50 homeless people from different shelters in New York City to evaluate their perceptions, attitudes, and experiences regarding mobile health. Participants' average age was 51.66 (SD = 11.34) years; duration of homelessness was 2.0 (SD = 3.10) years. The majority had a mobile phone with the ability to receive and send text messages. Most participants attempted to maintain the same phone number over time. The homeless were welcoming and supportive of text messaging regarding health care issues, including appointment reminders, health education, or management of diseases considering their barriers and mobility, and believed it would help them access necessary health care. Overwhelmingly they preferred text reminders that were short, positively framed, and directive in nature compared to lengthy or motivational texts. The majority believed that free cell phone plans would improve their engagement with, help them navigate, and ultimately improve their access to care. These positive attitudes and experience could be effectively used to improve health care for the homeless. Policies to improve access to mobile health and adapted text messaging strategies regarding the health care needs of this mobile population should be considered. PMID:26313765

  3. Teaching treatment of mild, acute diarrhea and secondary dehydration to homeless parents.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, L G

    1987-01-01

    Homeless people in America are at risk for numerous health hazards. Diarrhea and consequent dehydration commonly affect homeless infants and children. Dehydration, if not treated, can quickly become a medical emergency. If, however, signs of diarrhea and dehydration are recognized and treated early, medical complications may be avoided. Fortunately, some homeless people now have access to shelter facilities that provide health education and services. Education is a fundamental tool in the prevention of disease. For homeless children sick with diarrhea, an educated parent may mean the difference between life and death. Therefore, an educational program was developed to help homeless parents recognize and treat mild, acute diarrhea and secondary dehydration. Participants were urged to treat mild diarrhea at home with oral rehydration therapy, thus preventing expensive medical treatment and hospitalization. The project was based on a format used in workshops designed for battered women's shelters. The program's philosophy reflects the belief that people possess many answers to problems, but often lack the opportunity or encouragement to make use of their knowledge. PMID:3116585

  4. Perceptions, Attitudes, and Experience Regarding mHealth Among Homeless People in New York City Shelters

    PubMed Central

    Asgary, Ramin; Sckell, Blanca; Alcabes, Analena; Naderi, Ramesh; Adongo, Philip; Ogedegbe, Gbenga

    2015-01-01

    Mobile health may be an effective means of providing access and education to the millions of homeless Americans. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 50 homeless people from different shelters in New York City to evaluate their perceptions, attitudes and experiences regarding mobile health. Participants’ average age was 51.66 (SD±11.34) years; duration of homelessness was 2.0 (SD±3.10) years. The majority had a mobile phone with the ability to receive and send text messages. Most participants attempted to maintain the same phone number over time. The homeless were welcoming and supportive of text messaging regarding healthcare issues including appointment reminders, health education, or management of diseases considering their barriers and mobility, and believed it would help them access necessary healthcare. Overwhelmingly they preferred text reminders that were short, positively framed, and directive in nature compared to lengthy or motivational texts. The majority believed that free cell phone plans would improve their engagement with, help them navigate, and ultimately improve their access to care. These positive attitudes and experience could be effectively used to improve the homeless healthcare. Policies to improve access to mobile health and adapted text messaging strategies regarding healthcare needs of this mobile population should be considered. PMID:26313765

  5. RN-to-MSN students' attitudes toward women experiencing homelessness: A focus group study.

    PubMed

    Chung-Park, Min; Hatton, Diane; Robinson, Linda; Kleffel, Dorothy

    2006-08-01

    When health professionals, including RNs, have negative attitudes toward women experiencing homelessness, they create barriers to services. It is incumbent on nursing faculty to develop curricula that address homelessness and associated stereotypes, as well as to prepare students to provide safe and appropriate care to the homeless population. The aim of this qualitative study was to examine the attitudes of RN-to-MSN students toward mothers living with their children in a transitional shelter. A convenience sample of 10 students enrolled in a community health nursing course at a university in southern California participated in the study. Two focus groups were conducted: one before and one after a 15-week clinical experience. Data analysis revealed that during the clinical experience, students discovered that they, or perhaps an individual like them, could become homeless. Their attitudes and views changed to include a bigger picture of homelessness, described by public health nursing researchers as "moving upstream." This article suggests strategies for integrating clinical experiences with socioeconomically vulnerable individuals into undergraduate nursing curricula. PMID:16915991

  6. An Ecological Systems Comparison Between Homeless Sexual Minority Youths and Homeless Heterosexual Youths.

    PubMed

    Gattis, Maurice N

    2013-01-01

    This study examined risk and protective outcomes by comparing homeless sexual minority youths to heterosexual homeless youths regarding family, peer behaviors, school, mental health (suicide risk and depression), stigma, discrimination, substance use, and sexual risk behaviors. Structured interviews (N = 147) were conducted with individuals ages 16-24 at three drop-in programs serving homeless youths in Toronto. Bivariate analyses indicated statistically significant differences between homeless sexual minorities (n=66) and their heterosexual counterparts (n=81) regarding all variables: family, peer behaviors, stigma, discrimination, mental health, substance use and sexual risk behaviors with the exception of school belonging. Specifically, homeless sexual minority youths fared more poorly (e.g. lower satisfaction with family communication, experienced more stigma, used more drugs and alcohol) than their heterosexual counterparts. Improving family communication may be a worthwhile intervention if the youths are still in contact with their families. Future research should focus on victimization in the context of multiple systems. PMID:23687399

  7. Smoking's Grip Adds to Misery of the Homeless

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_157349.html Smoking's Grip Adds to Misery of the Homeless Average ... 18, 2016 THURSDAY, Feb. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking is common among the homeless, and it's costing ...

  8. Homeless in Dhaka: violence, sexual harassment, and drug-abuse.

    PubMed

    Koehlmoos, Tracey Pérez; Uddin, Md Jasim; Ashraf, Ali; Rashid, Mashida

    2009-08-01

    Bangladesh has experienced one of the highest urban population growth rates (around 7% per year) over the past three decades. Dhaka, the capital city, attracts approximately 320,000 migrants from rural areas every year. The city is unable to provide shelter, food, education, healthcare, and employment for its rapidly-expanding population. An estimated 3.4 million people live in the overcrowded slums of Dhaka, and many more live in public spaces lacking the most basic shelter. While a small but growing body of research describes the lives of people who live in urban informal settlements or slums, very little research describes the population with no housing at all. Anecdotally, the homeless population in Dhaka is known to face extortion, erratic unemployment, exposure to violence, and sexual harassment and to engage in high-risk behaviours. However, this has not been systematically documented. This cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted to better understand the challenges in the lives of the homeless population in 11 areas of Dhaka during a 13-month period from June 2007 to June 2008. A modified cluster-sampling method was used for selecting 32 clusters of 14 female and male respondents, for a sample of 896. In addition to sociodemographic details, this paper focuses specifically on violence, drug-abuse, and sexual harassment. The findings showed that physical assaults among the homeless, particularly among women, were a regular phenomenon. Eighty-three percent of female respondents (n=372) were assaulted by their husbands, station masters, and male police officers. They were subjected to lewd gestures, unwelcome advances, and rape. Male respondents reported being physically assaulted while trying to collect food, fighting over space, or while stealing, by police officers, miscreants, or other homeless people. Sixty-nine percent of the male respondents (n=309) used locally-available drugs, such as marijuana and heroin, and two-thirds of injecting drug-users shared needles. The study determined that the homeless are not highly mobile but tend to congregate in clusters night after night. Income-generating activities, targeted education, gender-friendly community police programmes, shelters and crises centres, and greater community involvement are suggested as policy and programmatic interventions to raise the quality of life of this population. In addition, there is a need to reduce high rates of urban migration, a priority for Bangladesh. PMID:19761080

  9. Homeless in Dhaka: Violence, Sexual Harassment, and Drug-abuse

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Md. Jasim; Ashraf, Ali; Rashid, Mashida

    2009-01-01

    Bangladesh has experienced one of the highest urban population growth rates (around 7% per year) over the past three decades. Dhaka, the capital city, attracts approximately 320,000 migrants from rural areas every year. The city is unable to provide shelter, food, education, healthcare, and employment for its rapidly-expanding population. An estimated 3.4 million people live in the overcrowded slums of Dhaka, and many more live in public spaces lacking the most basic shelter. While a small but growing body of research describes the lives of people who live in urban informal settlements or slums, very little research describes the population with no housing at all. Anecdotally, the homeless population in Dhaka is known to face extortion, erratic unemployment, exposure to violence, and sexual harassment and to engage in high-risk behaviours. However, this has not been systematically documented. This cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted to better understand the challenges in the lives of the homeless population in 11 areas of Dhaka during a 13-month period from June 2007 to June 2008. A modified cluster-sampling method was used for selecting 32 clusters of 14 female and male respondents, for a sample of 896. In addition to sociodemographic details, this paper focuses specifically on violence, drug-abuse, and sexual harassment. The findings showed that physical assaults among the homeless, particularly among women, were a regular phenomenon. Eighty-three percent of female respondents (n=372) were assaulted by their husbands, station masters, and male police officers. They were subjected to lewd gestures, unwelcome advances, and rape. Male respondents reported being physically assaulted while trying to collect food, fighting over space, or while stealing, by police officers, miscreants, or other homeless people. Sixty-nine percent of the male respondents (n=309) used locally-available drugs, such as marijuana and heroin, and two-thirds of injecting drug-users shared needles. The study determined that the homeless are not highly mobile but tend to congregate in clusters night after night. Income-generating activities, targeted education, gender-friendly community police programmes, shelters and crises centres, and greater community involvement are suggested as policy and programmatic interventions to raise the quality of life of this population. In addition, there is a need to reduce high rates of urban migration, a priority for Bangladesh. PMID:19761080

  10. Problems of Runaway Youth. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Juvenile Justice of the Committee on the Judiciary. United States Senate, Ninety-Seventh Congress, Second Session on Problems of and Services Provided for Runaway and Homeless Youth, Focusing on Support to State and Local Governments and Nonprofit Agencies for the Development of Community-Based Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on the Judiciary.

    These hearings, focusing on financial support for community-based programs dealing with problems of runaway and homeless youths, explore the scope of the problem, types of activities which are being undertaken, and paths for future action. Testimony and prepared statements are presented by several witnesses including a commissioner of the…

  11. 38 CFR 61.33 - Payment of per diem.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) VA HOMELESS PROVIDERS GRANT AND PER DIEM PROGRAM Per Diem Payments § 61.33 Payment of per diem. (a) General. VA will pay per diem to the recipient for those homeless veterans: (1) Who VA referred to the... sources of payments to the per diem recipient for furnishing services to homeless veterans that the...

  12. 38 CFR 61.33 - Payment of per diem.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) VA HOMELESS PROVIDERS GRANT AND PER DIEM PROGRAM Per Diem Payments § 61.33 Payment of per diem. (a) General. VA will pay per diem to the recipient for those homeless veterans: (1) Who VA referred to the... sources of payments to the per diem recipient for furnishing services to homeless veterans that the...

  13. Making It Happen: Improving Basic Skills for Organisations Involved with Housing and Homelessness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adult Literacy and Basic Skills Unit, London (England).

    This booklet provides an introduction for people working in organizations concerned with housing and homelessness about basic skills. It provides background on the link between poor basic skills and poor housing and information about ways in which people use basic skills in their daily lives. Two reasons for housing organizations to be involved…

  14. Housing Stability among Homeless Individuals with Serious Mental Illness Participating in Housing First Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, Carol; Montgomery, Ann Elizabeth; Locke, Gretchen

    2009-01-01

    This article presents findings from an exploratory study of three programs using the Housing First approach to provide permanent supportive housing for single, homeless adults with serious mental illness and often co-occurring substance-related disorders. This approach provides direct, or nearly direct, access to housing that is intended to be…

  15. 75 FR 22164 - Urban Non-Urban Homeless Female Veterans and Homeless Veterans With Families' Reintegration Into...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Office of the Assistant Secretary for Veterans' Employment and Training Urban Non-Urban Homeless Female Veterans and Homeless Veterans With Families' Reintegration Into Employment AGENCY: Veterans'...

  16. Mean-VaR Models and Algorithms for Fuzzy Portfolio Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Wen; Peng, Jin

    In this paper, value-at-risk (VaR for short) is used as the measure of risk. Based on the concept of VaR, a fuzzy mean-VaR model is proposed. Firstly, we recall some definitions and results of value-at-risk in credibilistic risk analysis. Secondly, we propose the fuzzy mean- VaR model of fuzzy programming, or more precisely, credibilistic programming. Thirdly, a hybrid intelligent algorithm is provided to give a general solution of the optimization problem. Finally, numerical examples are also presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  17. Experiences Associated with Intervening with Homeless, Substance-abusing Mothers: The Importance of Success

    PubMed Central

    Slesnick, Natasha; Glassman, Michael; Katafiasz, Heather; Collins, Jennifer C.

    2015-01-01

    This article documents the experiences of providing housing and supportive services, or ecologically based treatment, to shelter-recruited, substance-abusing homeless women with young children in their care. Among clients, observed experiences related to housing, substance abuse, and health and mental health care are discussed. Among therapists, experiences related to managing the chaotic nature of the client's lives, wanting to manage the client's lives, and frustration with client's life trajectories are reviewed. Observations related to the therapeutic process include the client's relationship to the therapist, balancing the client's independence and need for assistance, and unrealistic expectations among the clients. Recommendations for successfully approaching these clinical situations and experiences are offered. The purpose of this article is to document these therapy experiences to facilitate the work of future teams seeking to intervene in the lives of homeless families through homeless shelters or other settings. PMID:23285834

  18. Social work practice with homeless mentally ill people: engaging the client.

    PubMed

    Cohen, M B

    1989-11-01

    The engagement phase in practice with homeless mentally ill clients is central to work with this vulnerable population. In this article, the author develops an empowerment-oriented approach to the tasks of engagement. Specific engagement strategies include making a clear offer of service and providing voluntary services that meet clients' perceived needs. The author's thesis that homeless mentally ill individuals can be helped most effectively if their control over the helping process is maximized suggests practice strategies that encourage clients to participate fully in identifying needs, determining goals, and setting the terms of the helping process. Involving clients in program planning further promotes client self-determination and autonomy. Recent studies of programs for homeless mentally ill people suggest that empowerment-oriented approaches have been highly effective in engaging clients in the service relationship. PMID:10296497

  19. Characterizing Stressors and Modifiable Health Risk Factors Among Homeless Smokers: An Exploratory Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Kendzor, Darla E; Reitzel, Lorraine R; Businelle, Michael S

    2015-10-01

    This pilot study was conducted to explore the associations between stressors related to homelessness and modifiable health risk factors (poor diet, insufficient physical activity, and overweight/obesity) and to provide direction for future research. Participants (N = 57) were homeless adults enrolled in a smoking cessation program. Analyses were conducted to characterize the sample as well as the relations between relevant stressors (discrimination, chronic stress, and fear and mistrust) and health risk factors. Inadequate daily consumption of fruits, vegetables, and fiber was common. High-fat diet and insufficient physical activity were also prevalent, and the majority of participants were overweight/obese. Participants commonly endorsed discrimination, fear of victimization, mistrust of others, and several other stressors. Greater endorsement of stressors was associated with a high-fat diet. Results suggest that lifestyle interventions and policy changes may be warranted in homeless shelters to attenuate the potential effects of stressors on high-fat dietary consumption among smokers. PMID:25616410

  20. Correlates of self-reported incarceration among homeless gay and bisexual stimulant-using young adults.

    PubMed

    Nyamathi, Adeline; Reback, Cathy J; Salem, Benissa E; Zhang, Sheldon; Shoptaw, Steven; Branson, Catherine M; Leake, Barbara

    2015-06-01

    Gay and bisexual (G/B) homeless adults face multiple challenges in life which may place them at high risk for incarceration. Yet, little is known about this understudied population in terms of risk for incarceration. Baseline data collected from a longitudinal study between October 2009 and March 2012 in Hollywood, California, explored correlates of self-reported incarceration among G/B homeless stimulant-using adults (N = 353). Findings revealed older age, less education, having children, as well as a history of injection drug use and being born in the United States were positively associated with incarceration. Moreover, having poor social support and having received hepatitis information were also correlated with a history of incarceration. Our findings help us gain a greater awareness of homeless G/B adults who may be at greater risk for incarceration, which may be used by health care providers to design targeted interventions for this underserved population. PMID:24733231

  1. Correlates of Risky Alcohol and Methamphetamine Use among Currently Homeless Male Parolees

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Benissa E.; Nyamathi, Adeline; Keenan, Colleen; Zhang, Sheldon; Marlow, Elizabeth; Khalilifard, Farinaz; Yadav, Kartik; Faucette, Mark; Leake, Barbara; Marfisee, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Homeless men on parole are a hard-to-reach population with significant community reintegration challenges. This cross-sectional study describes socio-demographic, cognitive, psychosocial and drug-related correlates of alcohol and methamphetamine use in 157 homeless male parolees (age range 18–60) enrolled in a substance abuse treatment center in Los Angeles. Logistic regression results revealed that being African American and older were negatively related to methamphetamine use, while being older and more hostile were related to riskier alcohol abuse. Findings from this study provide a greater understanding of correlates of methamphetamine and alcohol- two of the most detrimental forms of substances abused among currently homeless parolees. PMID:24325770

  2. Survey of Needs: Single Homeless Men. Denver Metro Area, 1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Education, Denver.

    The Adult Learning Source Homeless Program of the Colorado Department of Education conducted an educational needs assessment of single homeless men in the Denver metropolitan area. A questionnaire was developed with the input of social services workers and administered to 74 homeless men in the summer of 1993. Forty-one percent were White, 24…

  3. The Cycle of Family Homelessness: A Social Policy Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute for Children and Poverty, New York, NY.

    Research on homeless children and families carried out by the Institute for Children and Poverty over the last 6 years is compiled in this document. The contents range from programmatic solutions and policy recommendations to simple "snapshots" of homeless families. Much of the research is based on the experiences of Homes for the Homeless, which…

  4. The Coping Strategies of Homeless Children and Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horowitz, Sandra V.

    This study investigated the stresses confronting homeless adolescents and the coping strategies that enable stressed urban minority children to achieve in school. A total of 176 homeless children ranging in age from 9 to 14 years were interviewed, and 199 control subjects who were not homeless were surveyed. Academic achievement was determined…

  5. Private Lives in Public Places: Loneliness of the Homeless

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rokach, Ami

    2005-01-01

    At the dawn of the 21st century, both loneliness and homelessness are more pervasive than we would possibly like to admit. In this study, the experience of loneliness of the homeless was compared to that of the general population. Two hundred and sixty six homeless and 595 men and women from the general population answered a 30 item yes/no…

  6. Homeless and Runaway Youth: Attachment Theory and Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henk, Joanne M.

    The "new homeless" of the eighties and nineties are not only more numerous; they are younger, more likely to use drugs, and they exhibit symptoms of mental illness. Homeless mentally ill individuals typically have estranged family relationships and fewer supportive relationships compared with other homeless persons. They typically have more…

  7. Children in Homeless Families: Risks to Mental Health and Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masten, Ann S.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Examined psychological adjustment in 159 homeless and 62 low-income, at-home children. Homeless children had greater recent stress exposure, more disrupted schooling/friendships. Behavior problems were above norms for homeless children, particularly for antisocial behavior. Behavior problems in both samples were more related to parental distress,

  8. The Coping Strategies of Homeless Children and Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horowitz, Sandra V.

    This study investigated the stresses confronting homeless adolescents and the coping strategies that enable stressed urban minority children to achieve in school. A total of 176 homeless children ranging in age from 9 to 14 years were interviewed, and 199 control subjects who were not homeless were surveyed. Academic achievement was determined

  9. The Multi-Dimensional Lives of Children Who Are Homeless

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grineski, Steve

    2014-01-01

    It is widely reported that children who are homeless are victimized by overwhelming challenges like poverty and ill-advised policy decisions, such as underfunding the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act. This act is the only federal legislation devoted to this marginalized group. Children who are homeless, however, should not be characterized…

  10. Homelessness in the Elementary School Classroom: Social and Emotional Consequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chow, Kirby A.; Mistry, Rashmita S.; Melchor, Vanessa L.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined elementary school teachers' experiences working with homeless students. Specifically, we focused on the psychosocial impacts of homelessness on students and their teachers. Qualitative, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 28 teachers who worked at designated public schools for family homeless shelters. A prominent…

  11. Exploring the Lived Experiences of Homeless Families with Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinton, Stephanie; Cassel, Darlinda

    2013-01-01

    This study researched the experiences of homeless families with young children between the ages of four and eight. Many families experience homelessness every year; therefore, it is important for early childhood educators to have an understanding of how homelessness affects families with young children so that educators can effectively serve the…

  12. Homeless High School Students in America: Who Counts?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cumming, John M.; Gloeckner, Gene W.

    2012-01-01

    After interviewing homeless high school students, the research team in a Colorado school district discovered that many students had not revealed their true living conditions (homelessness) to anyone in the school district. This research team developed an anonymous survey written around the homeless categories identified in the McKinney-Vento…

  13. Falling through the Gaps: Homeless Children and Youth. Fact Sheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovell, Phillip; DeBaun, Bill

    2012-01-01

    In each state, between 41 percent and 91 percent of the homeless students identified by the U.S. Department of Education (ED) are not considered homeless by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). Nationwide, as many as 715,238 homeless students fall into a bureaucratic gap between HUD and ED. This is because ED, HUD, and other…

  14. Transforming Teacher Constructs of Children and Families Who Are Homeless

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers-Costello, Beth; Swick, Kevin J.

    2011-01-01

    The focus of this article is on articulating the importance of teacher development of constructs about homeless children and families and examining factors that influence teachers' perceptions of children and families who are homeless or at high-risk of becoming homeless. The article also explores some strategies to support teachers in…

  15. The Teacher Attitudes toward Homeless Students Scale: Development and Validation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Jessica J.

    2012-01-01

    Recent estimates suggest there are roughly 1.6 million homeless children and this number is growing (National Center on Family Homelessness, 2011). This trend is particularly worrisome given that homeless children face a number of obstacles within society and education, not the least of which is negative teacher attitudes (Swick, 2000; U.S.…

  16. From substance use to homelessness or vice versa?

    PubMed

    McVicar, Duncan; Moschion, Julie; van Ours, Jan C

    2015-07-01

    Homelessness is associated with substance use, but whether substance use precedes or follows homelessness is unclear. We investigate the nature of the relationship between homelessness and substance use using data from the unique Australian panel dataset Journeys Home collected in 4 surveys over the period from October 2011 to May 2013. Our data refer to 1325 individuals who were homeless or at risk of becoming homeless. We investigate dynamics in homelessness and substance use over the survey period. We find that the two are closely related: homeless individuals are more likely to be substance users and substance users are more likely to be homeless. These relationships, however, are predominantly driven by observed and unobserved individual characteristics which cause individuals to be both more likely to be homeless and to be substance users. Once we take these personal characteristics into account it seems that homelessness does not affect substance use, although we cannot rule out that alcohol use increases the probability that an individual becomes homeless. These overall relationships also hide some interesting heterogeneity by 'type' of homelessness. PMID:25989002

  17. 24 CFR 91.405 - Housing and homeless needs assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Housing and homeless needs... Consortia; Contents of Consolidated Plan § 91.405 Housing and homeless needs assessment. Housing and homeless needs must be described in the consolidated plan in accordance with the provisions of § 91.205...

  18. 24 CFR 91.405 - Housing and homeless needs assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Housing and homeless needs... Consortia; Contents of Consolidated Plan § 91.405 Housing and homeless needs assessment. Housing and homeless needs must be described in the consolidated plan in accordance with the provisions of § 91.205...

  19. 24 CFR 91.405 - Housing and homeless needs assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Housing and homeless needs... Consortia; Contents of Consolidated Plan § 91.405 Housing and homeless needs assessment. Housing and homeless needs must be described in the consolidated plan in accordance with the provisions of § 91.205...

  20. 24 CFR 91.405 - Housing and homeless needs assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Housing and homeless needs... Consortia; Contents of Consolidated Plan § 91.405 Housing and homeless needs assessment. Housing and homeless needs must be described in the consolidated plan in accordance with the provisions of § 91.205...

  1. Disaffiliation to Entrenchment: A Model for Understanding Homelessness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grigsby, Charles; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Survey data collected from 166 homeless persons in Austin (Texas) identified four clusters distinguished by the size of the individual's social network, the degree of dysfunction, and the length of time homeless. Recommends group-based plans for building better paths out of homelessness. (DM)

  2. Rural Homelessness in Northwest Ohio: Reasons, Patterns, Statistics, and Trends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Podlin, Georgette A.

    Rural homelessness in America is difficult to define, to count, and to see. This article reports the findings of a 1993 county-wide study of rural homelessness. During a one year survey, 118 homeless households were interviewed. Of those surveyed, 25.8 percent were male adults, 30.9 percent were female adults, and 43.2 percent were children.…

  3. The Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program: A Public Health Framework

    PubMed Central

    Oppenheimer, Sarah C.; Judge, Christine M.; Taube, Robert L.; Blanchfield, Bonnie B.; Swain, Stacy E.; Koh, Howard K.

    2010-01-01

    During the past 25 years, the Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program has evolved into a service model embodying the core functions and essential services of public health. Each year the program provides integrated medical, behavioral, and oral health care, as well as preventive services, to more than 11 000 homeless people. Services are delivered in clinics located in 2 teaching hospitals, 80 shelters and soup kitchens, and an innovative 104-bed medical respite unit. We explain the program's principles of care, describe the public health framework that undergirds the program, and offer lessons for the elimination of health disparities suffered by this vulnerable population. PMID:20558804

  4. Preliminary needs assessment of mobile technology use for healthcare among homeless veterans

    PubMed Central

    Fix, Gemmae M.; Solomon, Jeffrey L.; Petrakis, Beth Ann; Sawh, Leon; Smelson, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Homeless veterans have complex healthcare needs, but experience many barriers to treatment engagement. While information technologies (IT), especially mobile phones, are used to engage patients in care, little is known about homeless veterans’ IT use. This study examines homeless veterans’ access to and use of IT, attitudes toward health-related IT use, and barriers to IT in the context of homelessness. Methods. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 30 homeless veterans in different housing programs in Boston, MA, ranging from emergency shelters to supportive transitional housing that allow stays of up to 2 years. Interviews were conducted in person, audio recorded and then transcribed. Three researchers coded transcripts. Inductive thematic analysis was used. Results. Most participants (90%) had a mobile phone and were receptive to IT use for health-related communications. A common difficulty communicating with providers was the lack of a stable mailing address. Some participants were using mobile phones to stay in touch with providers. Participants felt mobile-phone calls or text messages could be used to remind patients of appointments, prescription refills, medication taking, and returning for laboratory results. Mobile phone text messaging was seen as convenient, and helped participants stay organized because necessary information was saved in text messages. Some reported concerns about the costs associated with mobile phone use (calls and texting), the potential to be annoyed by too many text messages, and not knowing how to use text messaging. Conclusion. Homeless veterans use IT and welcome its use for health-related purposes. Technology-assisted outreach among this population may lead to improved engagement in care. PMID:26246964

  5. Preliminary needs assessment of mobile technology use for healthcare among homeless veterans.

    PubMed

    McInnes, D Keith; Fix, Gemmae M; Solomon, Jeffrey L; Petrakis, Beth Ann; Sawh, Leon; Smelson, David A

    2015-01-01

    Background. Homeless veterans have complex healthcare needs, but experience many barriers to treatment engagement. While information technologies (IT), especially mobile phones, are used to engage patients in care, little is known about homeless veterans' IT use. This study examines homeless veterans' access to and use of IT, attitudes toward health-related IT use, and barriers to IT in the context of homelessness. Methods. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 30 homeless veterans in different housing programs in Boston, MA, ranging from emergency shelters to supportive transitional housing that allow stays of up to 2 years. Interviews were conducted in person, audio recorded and then transcribed. Three researchers coded transcripts. Inductive thematic analysis was used. Results. Most participants (90%) had a mobile phone and were receptive to IT use for health-related communications. A common difficulty communicating with providers was the lack of a stable mailing address. Some participants were using mobile phones to stay in touch with providers. Participants felt mobile-phone calls or text messages could be used to remind patients of appointments, prescription refills, medication taking, and returning for laboratory results. Mobile phone text messaging was seen as convenient, and helped participants stay organized because necessary information was saved in text messages. Some reported concerns about the costs associated with mobile phone use (calls and texting), the potential to be annoyed by too many text messages, and not knowing how to use text messaging. Conclusion. Homeless veterans use IT and welcome its use for health-related purposes. Technology-assisted outreach among this population may lead to improved engagement in care. PMID:26246964

  6. Navigating the Boundaries of Emergency Department Care: Addressing the Medical and Social Needs of Patients Who Are Homeless

    PubMed Central

    Vashi, Anita A.; Platis, Stephanie; Curry, Leslie A.; Rowe, Michael; Gang, Maureen; Vaca, Federico E.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We sought to understand interpersonal and systems-level factors relevant to delivering health care to emergency department (ED) patients who are homeless. Methods. We conducted semistructured interviews with emergency medicine residents from 2 residency programs, 1 in New York City and 1 in a medium-sized northeastern city, from February to September 2012. A team of researchers reviewed transcripts independently and coded text segments using a grounded theory approach. They reconciled differences in code interpretations and generated themes inductively. Data collection and analysis occurred iteratively, and interviews continued until theoretical saturation was achieved. Results. From 23 interviews, 3 key themes emerged: (1) use of pattern recognition in identifying and treating patients who are homeless, (2) variations from standard ED care for patients who are homeless, and (3) tensions in navigating the boundaries of ED social care. Conclusions. Our study revealed practical and philosophical tensions in providing social care to patients in the ED who are homeless. Screening for homelessness in the ED and admission practices for patients who are homeless are important areas for future research and intervention with implications for health care costs and patient outcomes. PMID:24148054

  7. Up the Down Staircase: A Look at Family Homelessness in New Jersey. A Report of Homes for the Homeless.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute for Children and Poverty, New York, NY.

    In response to the increasing numbers of homeless families, Homes for the Homeless surveyed families in emergency shelters in Newark (New Jersey) to gain some insights into the characteristics and circumstances of urban homeless families. Newark was chosen because it is a large urban center with a high concentration of welfare recipients that is…

  8. A Comparison of Weight-Related Behaviors among High School Students Who Are Homeless and Non-Homeless

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fournier, Mary E.; Austin, S. Bryn; Samples, Cathryn L.; Goodenow, Carol S.; Wylie, Sarah A.; Corliss, Heather L.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Previous research has shown that youth who are homeless engage in high-risk behaviors. However, there has been little information published on nutritional and physical activity behaviors in this population, and studies comparing homeless youth in school with their non-homeless peers are scarce. This study compares weight-related risk…

  9. 78 FR 42455 - Medications Prescribed by Non-VA Providers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-16

    ..., which were the Mexican Border Period, World War I, World War II, the Korean Conflict, or the Vietnam Era..., the Mexican border period, World War I, World War II, the Korean conflict, the Vietnam era, the... pension recipients who are veterans who served in wars after Vietnam under the same conditions as...

  10. More than just a cargo adapter, melanophilin prolongs and slows processive runs of myosin Va.

    PubMed

    Sckolnick, Maria; Krementsova, Elena B; Warshaw, David M; Trybus, Kathleen M

    2013-10-11

    Myosin Va (myoVa) is a molecular motor that processively transports cargo along actin tracks. One well studied cargo in vivo is the melanosome, a pigment organelle that is moved first by kinesin on microtubules and then handed off to myoVa for transport in the actin-rich dendritic periphery of melanocytes. Melanophilin (Mlph) is the adapter protein that links Rab27a-melanosomes to myoVa. Using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and quantum dot-labeled full-length myoVa, we show at the single-molecule level that Mlph increases the number of processively moving myoVa motors by 17-fold. Surprisingly, myoVa-Mlph moves ~4-fold slower than myoVa alone and with twice the run length. These two changes greatly increase the time spent on actin, a property likely to enhance the transfer of melanosomes to the adjacent keratinocyte. In contrast to the variable stepping pattern of full-length myoVa, the myoVa-Mlph complex shows a normal gating pattern between the heads typical of a fully active motor and consistent with a cargo-dependent activation mechanism. The Mlph-dependent changes in myoVa depend on a positively charged cluster of amino acids in the actin binding domain of Mlph, suggesting that Mlph acts as a "tether" that links the motor to the track. Our results provide a molecular explanation for the uncharacteristically slow speed of melanosome movement by myoVa in vivo. More generally, these data show that proteins that link motors to cargo can modify motor properties to enhance their biological role. PMID:23979131

  11. Risk Factors for Homelessness Among Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Youths: A Developmental Milestone Approach

    PubMed Central

    Rosario, Margaret; Schrimshaw, Eric W.; Hunter, Joyce

    2011-01-01

    Lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) youths are over-represented in the homeless population. To examine why some LGB youths become homeless, this report compares homeless and non-homeless LGB youths. Of the 156 LGB youths, 48% reported ever being homeless (i.e., running away or being evicted from home). Results indicate that sexual orientation awareness and the initiation of sexual behavior occurred earlier in homeless than in non-homeless LGB youths and predated the first homeless episode. Substance use was more frequent and first occurred at an earlier age in homeless as compared to non-homeless LGB youths; however, substance use occurred subsequent to first homelessness. Childhood sexual abuse was associated with homelessness; and, early sexual orientation development was related to homelessness among youths without a history of sexual abuse. Findings suggest that interventions should help youths cope with their unfolding sexual orientation and work to prevent or address the consequences of sexual abuse. PMID:22347763

  12. The Impact of VA and Navy Hospital Collaboration on Medical School Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atre-Vaidya, Nutan; Ross, Arthur, III; Sandu, Ioana C.; Hassan, Tariq

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is the largest single provider of medical education in the United States and is often the preferred training site for medical students and residents. However, changing priorities of patients and the marketplace are forcing medical schools and the VA to consider new ways of practicing medicine…

  13. Military and VA General Dentistry Training: A National Resource.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atchison, Kathryn A.; Bachand, William; Buchanan, C. Richard; Lefever, Karen H.; Lin, Sylvia; Engelhardt, Rita

    2002-01-01

    Compared the program characteristics of the postgraduate general dentistry (PGD) training programs sponsored by the military and the Veterans Health Administration (VA). Gathered information on program infrastructure and emphasis, resident preparation prior to entering the program, and patients served and types of services provided. Programs…

  14. Geropsychology Training in a VA Nursing Home Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karel, Michele J.; Moye, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    There is a growing need for professional psychology training in nursing home settings, and nursing homes provide a rich environment for teaching geropsychology competencies. We describe the nursing home training component of our Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Predoctoral Internship and Geropsychology Postdoctoral Fellowship programs. Our

  15. Geropsychology Training in a VA Nursing Home Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karel, Michele J.; Moye, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    There is a growing need for professional psychology training in nursing home settings, and nursing homes provide a rich environment for teaching geropsychology competencies. We describe the nursing home training component of our Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Predoctoral Internship and Geropsychology Postdoctoral Fellowship programs. Our…

  16. Homelessness in Chicago: Poverty and Pathology, Social Institutions and Social Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sosin, Michael R.; And Others

    All of the very poor have a certain potential for homelessness due to traditional economic reasons. This report on the homeless in Chicago (Illinois) presents an overview of a two-part project whose goals are to determine the following: (1) how to prevent homelessness; (2) how to relieve homelessness; and (3) how to reverse homelessness. The

  17. The Association between Homelessness and Suicidal Ideation and Behaviors: Results of a Cross-Sectional Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eynan, Rahel; Langley, John; Tolomiczenko, George; Rhodes, Anne E.; Links, Paul; Wasylenki, Donald; Goering, Paula

    2002-01-01

    This study examines the prevalence of suicidal ideation and suicide attempts among the homeless and what aspects of homelessness predict suicidality. A sample of 330 homeless adults was interviewed, with 61% reporting suicidal ideation and 34% attempted suicide. Childhood homelessness and periods of homelessness longer than 6 months were found to…

  18. The parallel universe of homeless and HIV-positive youth.

    PubMed

    Ebner, Deborah L; Laviage, Marcia M

    2003-01-01

    The HIV/AIDS crisis among teens in this country is alarming, but the rates are even more staggering when these youth are homeless. They tend to live in a world typically considered by those trying to care for them-family, friends, and healthcare providers-as unreachable and hopeless. This article seeks to present "their world" to health professionals in attempts to depict it not as inaccessible, but as a sensitive one that takes great care and support in order for contact to be successful. Their words and those of individuals who have tried to make this connection are used to facilitate the presentation. PMID:12748920

  19. Youth Homelessness: Prevalence and Associations with Weight in Three Regions.

    PubMed

    Cutuli, J J; Steinway, Caren; Perlman, Staci; Herbers, Janette E; Eyrich-Garg, Karin M; Willard, Joe

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated the utility of the Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) to document associations between homeless status and weight while estimating the prevalence of youth homelessness in three regions. A school-based survey, the YRBS includes youths who have been difficult to involve in past research. Analysis of 2011 YRBS data produced population-weighted estimates of youth homelessness prevalence separately for Connecticut, Delaware, and Philadelphia. Public high school students anonymously reported their housing status, height, and weight on the YRBS. Height and weight were converted to body mass index (BMI) percentile-for-age scores. Homelessness was associated with higher BMI percentile scores for youths compared with nonhomeless peers. Associations between BMI percentile and different forms of homelessness (homeless with family, unaccompanied homeless without family) were explored at each site. Estimates of one-month homelessness prevalence ranged from 3.9 percent to 5.9 percent at each site. Homelessness, especially family homelessness, is associated with risk for higher BMI. The YRBS is an informative tool for estimating the prevalence of youth homelessness, expanding on what is known through other, more commonly used methods. PMID:26638508

  20. Partnering with a Homeless Shelter to Provide Authentic Community Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Edna; Cox, Fannie M.

    2013-01-01

    Hotel Louisville is owned and operated by Wayside Christian Mission and is staffed by screened and vetted Wayside resident clients. This unique situation, along with the University of Louisville (UofL) partnership, positions both as national exemplars for authentic community involvement with higher education. The purpose of this article is to…

  1. Homelessness and Risk of End- stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Maziarz, Marlena; Chertow, Glenn M.; Himmelfarb, Jonathan; Hall, Yoshio N.

    2014-01-01

    To identify homeless people with chronic kidney disease (CKD) who were at highest risk for end-stage renal disease (ESRD), we studied 982 homeless and 15,674 domiciled people with CKD receiving public health care. We developed four risk prediction models for the primary outcome of ESRD. Overall, 71 homeless and 888 domiciled people progressed to ESRD during follow- up (median: 6.6 years). Homeless people with CKD experienced significantly higher incidence rates of ESRD than poor but domiciled peers. Most homeless people who developed progressive CKD were readily identifiable well before ESRD using a prediction model with five common variables. We estimated that program following homeless people in the highest decile of ESRD risk would have captured 64–85% of those who eventually progressed to ESRD within five years. Thus, an approach targeting homeless people at high risk for ESRD appears feasible and could reduce substantial morbidity and costs incurred by this highly vulnerable group. PMID:25130236

  2. Assessing sexual trauma histories in homeless women.

    PubMed

    Weinrich, Sally; Hardin, Sally; Glaser, Dale; Barger, Mary; Bormann, Jill; Lizarraga, Cabiria; Terry, Micheal; Criscenzo, Jeeni; Allard, Carolyn B

    2016-01-01

    Almost 1 out of every 3 homeless women (32%) in the United States, United Kingdom, and Australia has experienced childhood sexual trauma. We assessed lifetime sexual trauma histories among 29 homeless women from three Southern California community sites: one residential safe house and two safe parking areas. More than half of the women (54%) reported a history of sexual trauma. That rate was higher (86%) among women living at the safe home than among women staying at the safe parking sites (only 42%). All four of the women who had served in the military reported having experienced military sexual trauma. The high percentages of sexual trauma found in homeless women highlight the need for effective interventions for sexual trauma. PMID:26583457

  3. On Their Own: Runaway and Homeless Youth and Programs that Serve Them.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pires, Sheila A.; Silber, Judith Tolmach

    This monograph discusses runaway and homeless youth and the programs that serve them in seven large and medium-sized cities throughout the United States. The monograph focuses on the characteristics and service needs of these youths and the demands they pose for service providers. It examines how the population and the service environment have…

  4. Helping Homeless Individuals with Co-Occurring Disorders: The Four Components

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, An-Pyng

    2012-01-01

    Homeless individuals with co-occurring disorders (CODs) of severe mental illness and substance use disorder are one of the most vulnerable populations. This article provides practitioners with a framework and strategies for helping this client population. Four components emerged from a literature review: (1) ensuring an effective transition for…

  5. A Dimensional Model of Psychopathology among Homeless Adolescents: Suicidality, Internalizing, and Externalizing Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoder, Kevin A.; Longley, Susan L.; Whitbeck, Les B.; Hoyt, Dan R.

    2008-01-01

    The present study examined associations among dimensions of suicidality and psychopathology in a sample of 428 homeless adolescents (56.3% female). Confirmatory factor analysis results provided support for a three-factor model in which suicidality (measured with lifetime suicidal ideation and suicide attempts), internalizing disorders (assessed

  6. Health Educators' Perceptions of a Sexual Health Intervention for Homeless Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Rew, Lynn; Rochlen, Aaron B.; Murphey, Christina

    2008-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to explore the perceptions and experiences of health educators in providing a brief, street-based intervention to homeless adolescents. Method Qualitative data were collected via e-mail from a purposive sample of 13 male and female health educators who provided the intervention and analyzed using manifest and latent content analysis techniques. Results Five categories with two or more subcategories were identified in the data and included how the educators' views changed, how they felt homeless youth were similar to and different from other adolescents, positive aspects and challenges of providing the intervention, and suggestions for future interventionists working with this population. Conclusions The health educators' practice was strengthened over the course of providing the intervention through their positive experiences, changes in their perceptions, some of which were biased, and ability to confront the challenges that accompany working with this vulnerable population. Practice Implications Health educators who work with this population should learn about the culture of homeless youth and characteristics of homeless youth that may influence their participation in a sexual health intervention. Moreover, they need to be non-judgmental, practice the intervention, be aware of their biases, and remain flexible. PMID:18343623

  7. Young Children and Their Families Who Are Homeless. A University Affiliated Program's Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Tawara D.; Brown, Marisa C.

    This monograph describes a University Affiliated Program's (UAP) initiative that targets the development needs of children from birth to 5 years of age who are homeless and the services and supports provided to their families. The Georgetown University Child Development Center, the UAP for the District of Columbia, has implemented a homelessness…

  8. Psychosocial Predictors of Rule Following in Hostels for Women Experiencing Homelessness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Katherine; Wood, Maria

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the psychosocial factors impacting upon the rule-following behaviour of residents of a hostel providing crisis accommodation to women who are homeless. After their arrival, residents of a women's hostel (N=83) completed questionnaires assessing the theory of planned behaviour constructs of attitude, subjective norm, perceived…

  9. A Dimensional Model of Psychopathology among Homeless Adolescents: Suicidality, Internalizing, and Externalizing Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoder, Kevin A.; Longley, Susan L.; Whitbeck, Les B.; Hoyt, Dan R.

    2008-01-01

    The present study examined associations among dimensions of suicidality and psychopathology in a sample of 428 homeless adolescents (56.3% female). Confirmatory factor analysis results provided support for a three-factor model in which suicidality (measured with lifetime suicidal ideation and suicide attempts), internalizing disorders (assessed…

  10. Psychosocial Predictors of Rule Following in Hostels for Women Experiencing Homelessness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Katherine; Wood, Maria

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the psychosocial factors impacting upon the rule-following behaviour of residents of a hostel providing crisis accommodation to women who are homeless. After their arrival, residents of a women's hostel (N=83) completed questionnaires assessing the theory of planned behaviour constructs of attitude, subjective norm, perceived

  11. Trials, Tribulations, and Occasional Jubilations while Conducting Research with Homeless Children, Youth, and Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toro, Paul A.

    2006-01-01

    A personal account of a program of research on homelessness and poverty spanning the past 20 years is provided, with a focus on the many methodological, practical, and ethical difficulties encountered. Interesting discoveries and enjoyable aspects of the research process are also presented. Several role conflicts that arose for the researcher in…

  12. 75 FR 43194 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-23

    ... not toll- free), or call the toll-free Title V information line at 800-927-7588. SUPPLEMENTARY.... Homeless assistance providers interested in any such property should send a written expression of interest... 5B-17, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857; (301) 443-2265. (This is not a toll-free number.)...

  13. 75 FR 65366 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-22

    ... not toll- free), or call the toll-free Title V information line at 800-927-7588. SUPPLEMENTARY.... Homeless assistance providers interested in any such property should send a written expression of interest... 5B-17, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857; (301) 443-2265. (This is not a toll-free number.)...

  14. 77 FR 801 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-06

    ... toll- free), or call the toll-free Title V information line at (800) 927- 7588. SUPPLEMENTARY.... Homeless assistance providers interested in any such property should send a written expression of interest..., Room 5B-17, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857; (301) 443-2265. (This is not a toll-free...

  15. 78 FR 9408 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities to Assist the Homeless

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-08

    ... toll- free), or call the toll-free Title V information line at 800-927-7588. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION.... Homeless assistance providers interested in any such property should send a written expression of interest..., room 5B-17, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857; (301) 443-2265. (This is not a toll-free...

  16. 75 FR 39573 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-09

    ... not toll- free), or call the toll-free Title V information line at 800-927-7588. SUPPLEMENTARY.... Homeless assistance providers interested in any such property should send a written expression of interest... 5B-17, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857; (301) 443-2265. (This is not a toll-free number.)...

  17. Transporting Homeless Students To Increase Stability: A Case Study of Two Texas Districts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Barbara Wand; Lopez, Patrick D.

    2003-01-01

    Examines the legislative context of the new McKinney-Vento provisions, looking at the characteristics of homelessness and the resultant educational barriers that these provisions are attempting to address, and describing how two Texas school districts have responded to the challenges of providing transportation to ensure that students in homeless…

  18. Experiences Associated with Intervening with Homeless, Substance-Abusing Mothers: The Importance of Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slesnick, Natasha; Glassman, Michael; Katafiasz, Heather; Collins, Jennifer C.

    2012-01-01

    This article documents the experiences of providing housing and supportive services, or ecologically based treatment, to shelter-recruited, substance-abusing homeless women with young children in their care. Among clients, observed experiences related to housing, substance abuse, and health and mental health care are discussed. Among therapists,…

  19. Oversight Hearing on Jobs and Education for the Homeless. Joint Hearing before the Committee on Education and Labor and the Select Committee on Aging. House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, First Session (Los Angeles, California, March 20, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and Labor.

    This document provides witnesses' testimonies and prepared statements from the Congressional hearing held in Los Angeles, California to examine the problems of the homeless and to suggest ways to alleviate some of the problems of the homeless. Opening statements are included by Representatives Augustus Hawkins, Edward Roybal, and Matthew Martinez.…

  20. Homeless but connected: the role of heterogeneous social network ties and social networking technology in the mental health outcomes of street-living adolescents.

    PubMed

    Rice, Eric; Kurzban, Seth; Ray, Diana

    2012-12-01

    Although social integration tends to have positive effects on the mental health of housed adolescents, the role of homeless adolescents' social networks is more ambiguous. Social network data were collected from 136 homeless adolescents in Hollywood, California to examine how network ties are associated with symptoms of anxiety and depression. Face-to-face relationships with street-based peers were a risk factor for both anxiety and depression, while contacting home-based friends through social networking technology was found to be protective for depression. Community-based and public agencies serving homeless adolescents should consider facilitating the maintenance of these protective relationships by providing internet access. PMID:22075769

  1. 78 FR 32126 - VA Dental Insurance Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-29

    ... in the Federal Register (77 FR 12517) a proposed rule to amend VA regulations to establish VADIP, a... coverage capabilities as determined during the Federal contracting process. See 77 FR 12518. Although VA... 510(b). See 77 FR 12520. We will conduct the Federal contracting process anticipating this...

  2. 76 FR 75509 - Autopsies at VA Expense

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-02

    ... that amendment, VA promulgated 38 CFR 17.38, on October 6, 1999, 64 FR 54212. Section 17.38, inter alia... procedure; Alcohol abuse; Alcoholism; Claims; Day care; Dental health; Drug abuse; Government contracts...-reference to VA regulations that authorize certain outpatient and ambulatory care. The proposed rule...

  3. The VA-Medical School Partnership: The Medical School Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersdorf, Robert G.

    1987-01-01

    Issues in the relationship between the Veterans' Administration (VA) and medical schools are discussed, including VA faculty recruitment and retention, ambulatory care in VA teaching hospitals, governance and growth of research within VA medical centers, and effects of cost containment and competition on teaching and training in VA hospitals. (MSE)

  4. Expanded Access to Non-VA Care Through the Veterans Choice Program. Interim final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-12-01

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) revises its medical regulations that implement section 101 of the Veterans Access, Choice, and Accountability Act of 2014 (hereafter referred to as "the Choice Act"), which requires VA to establish a program to furnish hospital care and medical services through eligible non-VA health care providers to eligible veterans who either cannot be seen within the wait-time goals of the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) or who qualify based on their place of residence (hereafter referred to as the "Veterans Choice Program" or the "Program"). These regulatory revisions are required by the most recent amendments to the Choice Act made by the Construction Authorization and Choice Improvement Act of 2014, and by the Surface Transportation and Veterans Health Care Choice Improvement Act of 2015. The Construction Authorization and Choice Improvement Act of 2014 amended the Choice Act to define additional criteria that VA may use to determine that a veteran's travel to a VA medical facility is an "unusual or excessive burden," and the Surface Transportation and Veterans Health Care Choice Improvement Act of 2015 amended the Choice Act to cover all veterans enrolled in the VA health care system, remove the 60-day limit on an episode of care, modify the wait-time and 40-mile distance eligibility criteria, and expand provider eligibility based on criteria as determined by VA. This interim final rule revises VA regulations consistent with the changes made to the Choice Act as described above. PMID:26634239

  5. A case study of a Canadian homelessness intervention programme for elderly people.

    PubMed

    Ploeg, Jenny; Hayward, Lynda; Woodward, Christel; Johnston, Riley

    2008-12-01

    The aims of this study were to describe: (1) how the Homelessness Intervention Programme addressed the needs of elderly people who were homeless or at risk of homelessness; and (2) the factors that influenced the ability of the programme to address client needs. The programme was offered by a multi-service non-profit agency serving low-income families and individuals in an urban neighbourhood in Ontario, Canada. Using a case study approach, we conducted 10 individual interviews and three focus groups with programme clients, programme providers, other service providers and programme funders. Programme providers completed intake forms, monthly follow-up forms and exit/housing change forms for each of the 129 clients served by the programme over a 28-month period. Approximately equal proportions of clients were between 54 years old and 65 years old (47%) and over 65 years (53%). There were equal proportions of women and men. In addition to being homeless or marginally housed, clients lived with multiple and complex issues including chronic illness, mental illness and substance abuse. Through the facilitation of continuity of care, the programme was able to meet the needs of this vulnerable group of elderly people. Three types of continuity of care were facilitated: relational, informational and management continuity. The study confirmed the value of a continuous caring relationship with an identified provider and the delivery of a seamless service through coordination, integration and information sharing between different providers. Study findings also highlighted the broader systemic factors that acted as barriers to the programme and its ability to meet the needs of elderly people. These factors included limited housing options available; limited income supports; and lack of coordinated, accessible community health and support services. The central findings stress the importance of continuity of care as a guiding concept for intervention programmes for homeless and marginally housed elderly people. PMID:18371167

  6. Mobile phone technology: a new paradigm for the prevention, treatment, and research of the non-sheltered "street" homeless?

    PubMed

    Eyrich-Garg, Karin M

    2010-05-01

    Individuals experiencing homelessness have disproportionately high rates of health problems. Those who perceive themselves as having greater access to their social support networks have better physical and mental health outcomes as well as lower rates of victimization. Mobile phones offer a connection to others without the physical constraints of landlines and, therefore, may make communication (e.g., access to one's social support networks) more feasible for homeless individuals. This, in turn, could lead toward better health outcomes. This exploratory study examined mobile phone possession and use among a sample of 100 homeless men and women who do not use the shelter system in Philadelphia, PA. Interviews were comprised of the Homeless Supplement to the Diagnostic Interview Schedule, a technology module created for this investigation, and the substance use and psychiatric sections of the Addiction Severity Index. Almost half (44%) of the sample had a mobile phone. In the past 30 days, 100% of those with mobile phones placed or received a call, over half (61%) sent or received a text message, and one fifth (20%) accessed the Internet via their mobile phone. Participants possessed and used mobile phones to increase their sense of safety, responsibility (employment, stable housing, personal business, and sobriety or "clean time"), and social connectedness. Mobile phones could potentially be used by public health/health care providers to disseminate information to the street homeless, to enhance communication between the street homeless and providers, and to increase access for the street homeless to prevention, intervention, and aftercare services. Finally, this technology could also be used by researchers to collect data with this transient population. PMID:20397058

  7. 76 FR 81959 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Comment Request; Homelessness Prevention Study Site...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-29

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Comment Request; Homelessness Prevention... following information: Title of Proposal: Homelessness Prevention Study Site Visits. OMB Control Number, if... requirements associated with HUD's Homelessness Prevention Study Site Visits. This information...

  8. 76 FR 64368 - Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB Homelessness Prevention Study

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-18

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB Homelessness Prevention... site visits that are part of HUD's Homelessness Prevention Study. The proposed information collection... collection for the Homelessness Prevention study that was already approved under emergency review...

  9. 77 FR 44653 - Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance Grant Application-Technical Submission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-30

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance Grant Application-- Technical Submission AGENCY... the original Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance Grant Application. DATES: Comments Due Date: August... lists the following information: Title of Proposal: Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance...

  10. Homeless People’s Perceptions of Welcomeness and Unwelcomeness in Healthcare Encounters

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Chuck K.; Hudak, Pamela L.

    2007-01-01

    Background Homeless people face many barriers to obtaining health care, and their attitudes toward seeking health care services may be shaped in part by previous encounters with health care providers. Objective To examine how homeless persons experienced “welcomeness” and “unwelcomeness” in past encounters with health care providers and to characterize their perceptions of these interactions. Design Qualitative content analysis of 17 in-depth interviews. Participants Seventeen homeless men and women, aged 29–62 years, residing at 5 shelters in Toronto, Canada. Approach Interpretive content analysis was performed using iterative stages of inductive coding. Interview transcripts were analyzed using Buber’s philosophical conceptualization of ways of relating as “I–It” (the way persons relate to objects) and “I–You” (the way persons relate to dynamic beings). Results Most participants perceived their experiences of unwelcomeness as acts of discrimination. Homelessness and low social class were most commonly cited as the perceived basis for discriminatory treatment. Many participants reported intense emotional responses to unwelcoming experiences, which negatively influenced their desire to seek health care in the future. Participants’ descriptions of unwelcoming health care encounters were consistent with “I–It” ways of relating in that they felt dehumanized, not listened to, or disempowered. Welcoming experiences were consistent with “I–You” ways of relating, in that patients felt valued as a person, truly listened to, or empowered. Conclusions Homeless people’s perceptions of welcomeness and unwelcomeness are an important aspect of their encounters with health care providers. Buber’s “I–It” and “I–You” concepts are potentially useful aids to health care providers who wish to understand how welcoming and unwelcoming interactions are fostered. PMID:17415619

  11. Education and Homeless Youth: Policy Implementations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Higher Education Policy Analysis, University of Southern California, 2007

    2007-01-01

    "The Navigator" is a free newsletter published by the Center for Higher Education Policy Analysis (CHEPA) focusing on directions and trends in higher education policy. The theme of this issue is: "Education and Homeless Youth: Policy Implementations." The lead article, authored by CHEPA director William G. Tierney, describes CHEPA's study of the…

  12. Needs Assessment on Homeless Children and Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Social Planning Council of Winnipeg (Manitoba).

    This assessment of the needs of homeless runaway youth in Winnipeg (Manitoba, Canada) indicates the need for a cooperative intergovernmental, interdepartmental, and interagency initiative incorporating prevention, intervention and protection, and repatriation. Information was gathered from the Winnipeg Police Department, interviews with 127…

  13. 77 FR 20849 - Homeless Veterans' Reintegration Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-06

    ... Veterans' Reintegration Program AGENCY: Veterans' Employment and Training Service (VETS), Department of...: Section 2021 of Title 38 of the United States Code (U.S.C.) reauthorizes the Homeless Veterans Reintegration Program (HVRP) through fiscal year (FY) 2012 and indicates: ``the Secretary of Labor shall...

  14. Helping the Homeless in School and out

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holgersson-Shorter, Helena

    2010-01-01

    Homeless children can be hard to identify and even harder to help. But teachers can do a great deal to make sure that they do not fall through the cracks. Teachers of highly mobile students must develop the skills to make these children and youth feel welcome while quickly weaving them into classroom routines. They must rapidly assess new…

  15. Food insecurity among homeless and runaway adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Whitbeck, Les B; Chen, Xiaojin; Johnson, Kurt D

    2008-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of food insecurity and factors related to it among homeless and runaway adolescents. Design Computer-assisted personal interviews were conducted with homeless and runaway adolescents directly on the streets and in shelters. Setting Interviews were conducted in eight Midwest cities: Des Moines, Cedar Rapids, Iowa City, Kansas City, Lincoln, Omaha, St. Louis and Wichita. Subjects The subjects were 428 (187 males; 241 females) homeless and runaway adolescents aged 16−19 years. Average age of the adolescents was 17.4 (standard deviation 1.05) years. Results About one-third of the adolescents had experienced food insecurity in the past 30 days. Factors associated with food insecurity were age of adolescent, a history of caretaker neglect and abuse, having ever spent time directly on the street, a small post-runaway social network, and engaging in deviant and non-deviant street food-acquisition strategies. Conclusions Based on these findings, our conservative estimate is that nationally more than 165 000 homeless and runaway adolescents experienced food insecurity in the past 30 days. These adolescents are largely hidden from public notice and they are usually missed in studies that address national hunger. PMID:16480533

  16. Helping the Homeless in School and Out

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holgersson-Shorter, Helena

    2010-01-01

    However much the recession might be receding, the effects remain deep and cruel to families living in poverty. Many have fallen through their communities' social safety nets. Today, families with young children comprise 41% of the nation's homeless population. According to the Institute of Children and Poverty, more than 1.35 million kids in the…

  17. Deinstitutionalisation does not increase imprisonment or homelessness.

    PubMed

    Salisbury, Tatiana Taylor; Thornicroft, Graham

    2016-05-01

    Closing long-stay psychiatric beds remains contentious. The review by Winkler et al in this issue examines 23 studies of deinstitutionalisation for the outcomes of people discharged from psychiatric hospitals after an admission of 1 year or longer. The majority of these studies identified no cases of homelessness, incarceration or suicide after discharge from hospital. PMID:27143004

  18. Coping and Suicidality among Homeless Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidd, Sean A.; Carroll, Michelle R.

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the impact of coping strategies employed by homeless youth upon suicidal ideation, suicide attempts on the streets, and feeling trapped/helpless. Coping strategies examined in the analysis included problem-focused and avoidant coping, along with several coping strategies identified in previous exploratory qualitative studies.…

  19. Gender Differences in Victimized Homeless Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Regina Jones; Rew, Lynn; Kouzekanani, Kamiar

    2006-01-01

    Most of what we know about sexual abuse comes from efforts to examine female children victimized by men. Although some researchers have identified similarities between male and female victims of sexual abuse, few studies have examined gender-specific factors associated with sexual health practices among homeless adolescents. The aim of this study

  20. The New Vagabonds? Homelessness Outside the Megalopolis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huff, Dan; Johnson, David

    This paper reports results of a survey of 47 homeless adults, interviewed in Ada County, Idaho. Most respondents were male, white, currently single, with no religious preference. The mean number of years of formal education was 11.6. Seventeen percent of the sample were American Indians. Ninety-three percent were unemployed. Twenty-five percent of…

  1. Resilience and Suicidality among Homeless Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleverley, Kristin; Kidd, Sean A.

    2011-01-01

    Homeless and street-involved youth are considered an extremely high risk group, with many studies highlighting trajectories characterized by abusive, neglectful, and unstable family histories, victimization and criminal involvement while on the streets, high rates of physical and mental illness, and extremely high rates of mortality. While there…

  2. Foreclosed: Two Million Homeless Students and Counting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKibben, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    This article reports that according to First Focus, a bipartisan advocacy organization for children and families, a predicted two million children will lose their homes over the next two years because of the foreclosure crisis. From an economy deep in recession, an entirely new population of homeless students has emerged. And with job losses at…

  3. Homeless: How Residential Instability Complicates Students' Lives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallett, Ronald E.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author examines the challenges of highly mobile students and what educators can do to retain and support them. The findings and recommendations presented here are based on two complementary research projects conducted with homeless students transitioning from high school to college. The author focuses on the residential…

  4. Helping the Homeless in School and out

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holgersson-Shorter, Helena

    2010-01-01

    Homeless children can be hard to identify and even harder to help. But teachers can do a great deal to make sure that they do not fall through the cracks. Teachers of highly mobile students must develop the skills to make these children and youth feel welcome while quickly weaving them into classroom routines. They must rapidly assess new

  5. Educating Homeless Children: Interprofessional Case Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, William H.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Describes the Kids Organized on Learning in School (KOOL-IS) initiative of the B.F. Day Elementary School in Seattle, Washington, which coordinates health, social, and educational services for homeless children. Organizational components, a case study, and program evaluation are considered. (BB)

  6. The homeless in America: adapting your practice.

    PubMed

    Montauk, Susan Louisa

    2006-10-01

    In 2004, the National Guidelines Clearinghouse placed eight guidelines from the National Health Care for the Homeless Council on its Web site. Seven of the guidelines are on specific disease processes and one is on general care. In addition to straightforward clinical decision making, the guidelines contain medical information specific to patients who are homeless. These guidelines have been endorsed by dozens of physicians who spend a large part of their clinical time caring for some of the millions of adults and children who find themselves homeless each year in the United States. In one guideline, physicians are prompted to keep in mind that someone living on the street does not always have access to water for taking medication. Another guideline points out the difficulty of eating a special diet when the patient depends on what the local shelter serves. As the number of homeless families and individuals increases, family physicians need to become aware of medically related information specific to this population. This can help ensure that physicians continue to offer patient-centered care with minimal adherence barriers. PMID:17039749

  7. Gender Differences in Victimized Homeless Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Regina Jones; Rew, Lynn; Kouzekanani, Kamiar

    2006-01-01

    Most of what we know about sexual abuse comes from efforts to examine female children victimized by men. Although some researchers have identified similarities between male and female victims of sexual abuse, few studies have examined gender-specific factors associated with sexual health practices among homeless adolescents. The aim of this study…

  8. A wraparound treatment engagement intervention for homeless veterans with co-occurring disorders.

    PubMed

    Smelson, David A; Kline, Anna; Kuhn, John; Rodrigues, Stephanie; O'Connor, Kathryn; Fisher, William; Sawh, Leon; Kane, Vincent

    2013-05-01

    This article reports the results of a low-intensity wraparound intervention, Maintaining Independence and Sobriety through Systems Integration, Outreach, and Networking (MISSION), to augment Treatment as Usual (TAU) and engage and retain homeless veterans with a co-occurring disorder (COD) in care. Using a quasi-experimental design, 333 homeless veterans were enrolled, 218 who received MISSION along with TAU and 115 who received TAU alone. Group assignment was based on MISSION treatment slot availability at time of enrollment. Compared with TAU alone, individuals receiving MISSION demonstrated greater outpatient session attendance within the 30 days before the 12-month follow up assessment and a larger decline from baseline in the number of psychiatric hospitalization nights. Individuals in the MISSION and TAU-only groups both showed statistically significant improvements in substance use and related problems at 12 months, with those in MISSION less likely to drink to intoxication and experience serious tension or anxiety. Although this study confirmed that compared with TAU alone, MISSION along with TAU is effective in augmenting usual care and engaging and retaining homeless veterans in treatment, some caution is warranted as this study did not involve random assignment. These results, however, are similar to a recent study involving a briefer version of the intervention which included random assignment. Based on these findings, MISSION is being further studied in the joint Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) - Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Supportive Housing (HUD-VASH) program, which offers rapid housing placement and case management to aid in housing maintenance. PMID:23244030

  9. KENO V.a Primer: A Primer for Criticality Calculations with SCALE/KENO V.a Using CSPAN for Input

    SciTech Connect

    Busch, R.D.

    2003-01-17

    The SCALE (Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation) computer software system developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is widely used and accepted around the world for criticality safety analyses. The well-known KENO V.a three-dimensional Monte Carlo criticality computer code is the primary criticality safety analysis tool in SCALE. The KENO V.a primer is designed to help a new user understand and use the SCALE/KENO V.a Monte Carlo code for nuclear criticality safety analyses. It assumes that the user has a college education in a technical field. There is no assumption of familiarity with Monte Carlo codes in general or with SCALE/KENO V.a in particular. The primer is designed to teach by example, with each example illustrating two or three features of SCALE/KENO V.a that are useful in criticality analyses. The primer is based on SCALE 4.4a, which includes the Criticality Safety Processor for Analysis (CSPAN) input processor for Windows personal computers (PCs). A second edition of the primer, which uses the new KENO Visual Editor, is currently under development at ORNL and is planned for publication in late 2003. Each example in this first edition of the primer uses CSPAN to provide the framework for data input. Starting with a Quickstart section, the primer gives an overview of the basic requirements for SCALE/KENO V.a input and allows the user to quickly run a simple criticality problem with SCALE/KENO V.a. The sections that follow Quickstart include a list of basic objectives at the beginning that identifies the goal of the section and the individual SCALE/KENO V.a features which are covered in detail in the example problems in that section. Upon completion of the primer, a new user should be comfortable using CSPAN to set up criticality problems in SCALE/KENO V.a.

  10. Pathways to and From Homelessness and Associated Psychosocial Outcomes Among Adolescents Leaving the Foster Care System

    PubMed Central

    Toro, Paul A.; Miles, Bart W.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. We evaluated the prevalence and nature of housing problems among adolescents leaving foster care because of their age to provide evidence that can inform public and programmatic policies designed to prevent homelessness. Methods. Housing and psychosocial outcomes in a sample of 265 adolescents who left the foster care system in 2002 and 2003 in a large midwestern metropolitan area were evaluated over a 2-year follow-up period. Analyses focused on identifying latent housing trajectory categories across the first 2 years after participants' exit from foster care. Results. Findings revealed 4 latent housing classifications. Most participants (57%) had experienced stable housing situations since their exit from foster care. Those in the remaining 3 categories endured housing problems, and 20% were chronically homeless during the follow-up period. Housing instability was related to emotional and behavioral problems, physical and sexual victimization, criminal conviction, and high school dropout. Conclusions. Adolescents in foster care are at considerable risk of homelessness. Preventive initiatives can reduce homelessness in this population by implementing improved foster care programming and developing empirically informed interventions targeting foster care adolescents. PMID:19542038

  11. Reaching out to Ray: delivering palliative care services to a homeless person in Melbourne, Australia.

    PubMed

    MacWilliams, Judy; Bramwell, Michael; Brown, Sally; O'Connor, Margaret

    2014-02-01

    Most terminally ill people express a preference for dying at home. Within established models of palliative care, achieving death at home is a particular challenge for homeless people. This paper describes a quality-improvement project undertaken by a community-based palliative care service in Melbourne, Australia, to understand homeless people's palliative care needs and the challenges that workers face. Six semi-structured interviews with workers in hospital and community-based settings were undertaken and a case study documented. The results were used to initiate discussion about how policy and protocols for the community-based palliative care service might serve this population more effectively. The findings confirmed that homeless people have complex psychosocial and medical needs. They may be periodically uncontactable or living in unsafe settings, experience isolation from social support networks, and have issues of compliance with treatment protocols exacerbated by mental health problems and/or substance abuse. Service providers had particular challenges in meeting the palliative care needs of homeless people. A flexible, compassionate, and coordinated response is required, and more work is needed to explore how the needs of this particular group can be met. PMID:24577214

  12. Psychopathology in Young People Experiencing Homelessness: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Shelton, Katherine H.; van den Bree, Marianne B. M.; Los, Férenc J.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding mental health issues faced by young homeless persons is instrumental to the development of successful targeted interventions. No systematic review of recent published literature on psychopathology in this group has been completed. We conducted a systematic review of published research examining the prevalence of psychiatric problems among young homeless people. We examined the temporal relationship between homelessness and psychopathology. We collated 46 articles according to the PRISMA Statement. All studies that used a full psychiatric assessment consistently reported a prevalence of any psychiatric disorder from 48% to 98%. Although there was a lack of longitudinal studies of the temporal relationship between psychiatric disorders and homelessness, findings suggested a reciprocal link. Supporting young people at risk for homelessness could reduce homelessness incidence and improve mental health. PMID:23597340

  13. Voices From the Street: Exploring the Realities of Family Homelessness

    PubMed Central

    Gültekin, Laura; Brush, Barbara L.; Baiardi, Janet M.; Kirk, Keri; VanMaldeghem, Kelley

    2015-01-01

    Homelessness threatens the health and well-being of thousands of families in the United States, yet little is known about their specific needs and how current services address them. To fill this knowledge gap, we explored the experiences of homelessness families in Detroit, Michigan. We targeted homeless mothers and their caseworkers for study to see if the perceptions of needs and services were in alignment. Using focus groups and content analysis, we identified four overarching themes that illustrate homeless mothers' experience with homelessness. We then analyzed data from caseworkers to look specifically for similarities and differences in their perceptions. Key findings included reports of family histories of violence, poverty, social isolation, and a lack of informal support as contributing to homelessness. The differing perspectives of mothers and their caseworkers regarding how best to move forward highlight how current programs and services may not be meeting the needs of this growing and vulnerable cohort. PMID:25186947

  14. Mental health correlates of past homelessness in Latinos and Asians.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hans Y; DeVylder, Jordan E

    2014-11-01

    Mental illness and addiction are strongly associated with homelessness, yet few studies have shown how these relationships vary across ethnic categories that are underrepresented in the homeless population. This study draws from the National Latino and Asian American Survey to examine mental health and substance abuse correlates of homelessness amongst Latinos and Asians living in the United States. Clinical and institutional factors associated with homelessness varied by ethnicity. Among Latinos, alcohol abuse or dependence, conduct disorder and intermittent explosive disorder were risk factors for homelessness, while attending a religious service more than once a week was a protective factor. Among Asians, mood disorder was a risk factor as were health problems and receiving welfare in the past. Understanding ethnicity-specific correlates of homelessness may guide culturally nuanced mental health prevention and intervention efforts. PMID:24659183

  15. Tailoring Care to Vulnerable Populations by Incorporating Social Determinants of Health: the Veterans Health Administration’s “Homeless Patient Aligned Care Team” Program

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Erin E.; Aiello, Riccardo; Kane, Vincent; Pape, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although the clinical consequences of homelessness are well described, less is known about the role for health care systems in improving clinical and social outcomes for the homeless. We described the national implementation of a “homeless medical home” initiative in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) and correlated patient health outcomes with characteristics of high-performing sites. Methods We conducted an observational study of 33 VHA facilities with homeless medical homes and patient- aligned care teams that served more than 14,000 patients. We correlated site-specific health care performance data for the 3,543 homeless veterans enrolled in the program from October 2013 through March 2014, including those receiving ambulatory or acute health care services during the 6 months prior to enrollment in our study and 6 months post-enrollment with corresponding survey data on the Homeless Patient Aligned Care Team (H-PACT) program implementation. We defined high performance as high rates of ambulatory care and reduced use of acute care services. Results More than 96% of VHA patients enrolled in these programs were concurrently receiving VHA homeless services. Of the 33 sites studied, 82% provided hygiene care (on-site showers, hygiene kits, and laundry), 76% provided transportation, and 55% had an on-site clothes pantry; 42% had a food pantry and provided on-site meals or other food assistance. Six-month patterns of acute-care use pre-enrollment and post-enrollment for 3,543 consecutively enrolled patients showed a 19.0% reduction in emergency department use and a 34.7% reduction in hospitalizations. Three features were significantly associated with high performance: 1) higher staffing ratios than other sites, 1) integration of social supports and social services into clinical care, and 3) outreach to and integration with community agencies. Conclusion Integrating social determinants of health into clinical care can be effective for high-risk homeless veterans. PMID:27032987

  16. Meeting the Housing and Care Needs of Older Homeless Adults: A Permanent Supportive Housing Program Targeting Homeless Elders

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Rebecca T.; Thomas, M. Lori; Cutler, Deborah F.; Hinderlie, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The homeless population is aging faster than the general population in the United States. As this vulnerable population continues to age, addressing complex care and housing needs will become increasingly important. This article reviews the often-overlooked issue of homelessness among older adults, including their poor health status and unique care needs, the factors that contribute to homelessness in this population, and the costs of homelessness to the U.S. health care system. Permanent supportive housing programs are presented as a potential solution to elder homelessness, and Hearth, an outreach and permanent supportive housing model in Boston, is described. Finally, specific policy changes are presented that could promote access to housing among the growing older homeless population. PMID:24729832

  17. Creating a Science of Homelessness During the Reagan Era

    PubMed Central

    JONES, MARIAN MOSER

    2015-01-01

    Policy Points: A retrospective analysis of federally funded homeless research in the 1980s serves as a case study of how politics can influence social and behavioral science research agendas today in the United States. These studies of homeless populations, the first funded by the National Institute of Mental Health, demonstrated that only about a third of the homeless population was mentally ill and that a diverse group of people experienced homelessness. This groundbreaking research program set the mold for a generation of research and policy characterizing homelessness as primarily an individual-level problem rather than a problem with the social safety net. Context A decade after the nation's Skid Rows were razed, homelessness reemerged in the early 1980s as a health policy issue in the United States. While activists advocated for government-funded programs to address homelessness, officials of the Reagan administration questioned the need for a federal response to the problem. In this climate, the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) launched a seminal program to investigate mental illness and substance abuse among homeless individuals. This program serves as a key case study of the social and behavioral sciences’ role in the policy response to homelessness and how politics has shaped the federal research agenda. Methods Drawing on interviews with former government officials, researchers, social activists, and others, along with archival material, news reports, scientific literature, and government publications, this article examines the emergence and impact of social and behavioral science research on homelessness. Findings Research sponsored by the NIMH and other federal research bodies during the 1980s produced a rough picture of mental illness and substance abuse prevalence among the US homeless population, and private foundations supported projects that looked at this group's health care needs. The Reagan administration's opposition to funding “social research,” together with the lack of private-sector support for such research, meant that few studies examined the relationship between homelessness and structural factors such as housing, employment, and social services. Conclusions The NIMH's homelessness research program led to improved understanding of substance abuse and mental illness in homeless populations. Its primary research focus on behavioral disorders nevertheless unwittingly reinforced the erroneous notion that homelessness was rooted solely in individual pathology. These distortions, shaped by the Reagan administration's policies and reflecting social and behavioral scientists’ long-standing tendencies to emphasize individual and cultural rather than structural aspects of poverty, fragmented homelessness research and policy in enduring ways. PMID:25752353

  18. How Effective Homelessness Prevention Impacts the Length of Shelter Spells

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Sarena; Messeri, Peter; OFlaherty, Brendan

    2014-01-01

    Homelessness prevention programs intervene with households apparently in imminent danger of becoming homeless, and try to keep them housed. If they are at least partially successful, how do they change the average shelter spell of households actually becoming homeless? We use data from 2003 to 2008 for Homebase, a New York City homelessness prevention program that studies have found to be effective in reducing shelter entries. Homebase made no difference in average shelter spells at the community level. This result, like many results about shelter spell length, is not easy to reconcile with the idea that shelter spell length is a reflection of the seriousness of underlying problems. PMID:24610995

  19. Development of fragility functions to estimate homelessness after an earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brink, Susan A.; Daniell, James; Khazai, Bijan; Wenzel, Friedemann

    2014-05-01

    Immediately after an earthquake, many stakeholders need to make decisions about their response. These decisions often need to be made in a data poor environment as accurate information on the impact can take months or even years to be collected and publicized. Social fragility functions have been developed and applied to provide an estimate of the impact in terms of building damage, deaths and injuries in near real time. These rough estimates can help governments and response agencies determine what aid may be required which can improve their emergency response and facilitate planning for longer term response. Due to building damage, lifeline outages, fear of aftershocks, or other causes, people may become displaced or homeless after an earthquake. Especially in cold and dangerous locations, the rapid provision of safe emergency shelter can be a lifesaving necessity. However, immediately after an event there is little information available about the number of homeless, their locations and whether they require public shelter to aid the response agencies in decision making. In this research, we analyze homelessness after historic earthquakes using the CATDAT Damaging Earthquakes Database. CATDAT includes information on the hazard as well as the physical and social impact of over 7200 damaging earthquakes from 1900-2013 (Daniell et al. 2011). We explore the relationship of both earthquake characteristics and area characteristics with homelessness after the earthquake. We consider modelled variables such as population density, HDI, year, measures of ground motion intensity developed in Daniell (2014) over the time period from 1900-2013 as well as temperature. Using a base methodology based on that used for PAGER fatality fragility curves developed by Jaiswal and Wald (2010), but using regression through time using the socioeconomic parameters developed in Daniell et al. (2012) for "socioeconomic fragility functions", we develop a set of fragility curves that can be used to estimate homelessness as a function of information that is readily available immediately after an earthquake. These fragility functions could be used by relief agencies and governments to provide an initial assessment of the need for allocation of emergency shelter immediately after an earthquake. Daniell JE (2014) The development of socio-economic fragility functions for use in worldwide rapid earthquake loss estimation procedures, Ph.D. Thesis (in publishing), Karlsruhe, Germany. Daniell, J. E., Khazai, B., Wenzel, F., & Vervaeck, A. (2011). The CATDAT damaging earthquakes database. Natural Hazards and Earth System Science, 11(8), 2235-2251. doi:10.5194/nhess-11-2235-2011 Daniell, J.E., Wenzel, F. and Vervaeck, A. (2012). "The Normalisation of socio-economic losses from historic worldwide earthquakes from 1900 to 2012", 15th WCEE, Lisbon, Portugal, Paper No. 2027. Jaiswal, K., & Wald, D. (2010). An Empirical Model for Global Earthquake Fatality Estimation. Earthquake Spectra, 26(4), 1017-1037. doi:10.1193/1.3480331

  20. False security or greater social inclusion? Exploring perceptions of CCTV use in public and private spaces accessed by the homeless.

    PubMed

    Huey, Laura

    2010-03-01

    It has been well documented that owing to the vulnerability inherent in their situation and status, the homeless experience high rates of harassment and criminal victimization. And yet, the question of whether CCTV surveillance of public and private spaces - so frequently viewed by the middle classes as a positive source of potential security - might also be viewed by the homeless in similar ways. Within the present paper, I address this issue by considering the possibility that CCTV might be seen by some homeless men and women as offering: a) a measure of enhanced security for those living in the streets and in shelters, and; b) to the extent that security is conceived of as a social good, the receipt of which marks one as a citizen of the state, a means by which they can be reconstituted as something more than 'lesser citizens'. To test these ideas, I rely on data from interviews conducted with homeless service users, service providers for the homeless, and police personnel in three cities. What is revealed is a mixed set of beliefs as to the relative security and meaning of CCTV. PMID:20377597

  1. Examining women's agency in managing intimate partner violence and the related risk of homelessness: The role of harm minimisation.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Silke

    2016-01-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) has a detrimental impact on women and children's emotional, physical and social well-being and has been identified as one of the most common contributors to women's experiences of housing instabilities and homelessness. Women affected by IPV often experience a great level of uncertainty around housing solutions when trying to leave an abusive partner. This study explores women's responses to IPV and the related risk of homelessness through women's narratives (n = 22) in Queensland, Australia. Of particular interest are women's decisions and actions to minimise the impact of IPV as well as homelessness on their and their children's safety and well-being. Findings reveal that women's agency in relation to harm minimisation can take various forms, including the decision to stay with, leave or return to an abusive partner. The data offer insights into women's strategic attempts to manage IPV and the related risk of homeless while trying to minimise the harm associated with one and the other. Implications for understanding women's agency in managing IPV and the related risk of homelessness and providing adequate support mechanisms to improve women and children's social, emotional and physical well-being are discussed. PMID:26110781

  2. Developing and testing an intervention to prevent homelessness among individuals discharged from psychiatric wards to shelters and 'No Fixed Address'.

    PubMed

    Forchuk, C; MacClure, S K; Van Beers, M; Smith, C; Csiernik, R; Hoch, J; Jensen, E

    2008-09-01

    Shelter data in a recent study revealed discharges from psychiatric facilities to shelters or the street occurred at least 194 times in 2002 in London, Ontario, Canada. This problem must be addressed to reduce the disastrous effects of such discharge, including re-hospitalization and prolonged homelessness. An intervention was developed and tested to prevent homelessness associated with discharge directly to no fixed address. A total of 14 participants at-risk of being discharged without housing were enrolled, with half randomized into the intervention group. The intervention group was provided with immediate assistance in accessing housing and assistance in paying their first and last month's rent. The control group received usual care. Data was collected from participants prior to discharge, at 31 and 6-months post-discharge. All the individuals in the intervention group maintained housing after 3 and 6 months. All but one individual in the control group remained homeless after 3 and 6 months. The exception joined the sex trade to avoid homelessness. The results of this pilot were so dramatic that randomizing to the control group was discontinued. Discussions are underway to routinely implement the intervention. Systemic improvements can prevent homelessness for individuals being discharged from psychiatric wards. PMID:18768009

  3. 76 FR 72045 - Enhanced-Use Lease (EUL) of Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Real Property for the Development...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-21

    ... required to provide preference and priority placement for Veterans at risk for homelessness, and provide on-site supportive services. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Edward Bradley, Office of Asset Enterprise Management (044), Department of Veterans Affairs, 810 Vermont Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20420, (202)...

  4. Personal Network Correlates of Alcohol, Cigarette, and Marijuana Use Among Homeless Youth

    PubMed Central

    Wenzel, Suzanne L.; Tucker, Joan S.; Golinelli, Daniela; Green, Harold D.; Zhou, Annie

    2013-01-01

    Background Youth who are homeless and on their own are among the most marginalized individuals in the United States and face multiple risks, including use of substances. This study investigates how the use of alcohol, cigarettes, and marijuana among homeless youth may be influenced by characteristics of their social networks. Methods Homeless youth aged 13–24 were randomly sampled from 41 service and street sites in Los Angeles County (N = 419). Predictors of substance use were examined using linear regression analysis (for average number of drinks and average number of cigarettes per day) and negative binomal regression analysis (for frequency of past month marijuana use). Results Youth with more substance users in their networks reported greater alcohol, cigarette, and marijuana consumption regardless of whether these network members provided tangible or emotional support. Marijuana use was more frequent for youth who met more network members through homeless settings, but less frequent among those who met more network members through treatment or AA/NA. Greater alcohol use occurred among youth who met more network members through substance use-related activities. Youth having more adults in positions of responsibility in their networks consumed less alcohol, and those with more school attendees in their networks consumed less alcohol and cigarettes. Conclusions Findings highlight the importance of social context in understanding substance use among homeless youth. Results also support the relevance of network-based interventions to change social context for substance using youth, in terms of both enhancing pro-social influences and reducing exposure to substance use. PMID:20656423

  5. A qualitative analysis of perceptions and barriers to therapeutic lifestyle changes among homeless hypertensive patients

    PubMed Central

    Moczygemba, Leticia R.; Kennedy, Amy K.; Marks, Samantha A.; Goode, Jean-Venable R.; Matzke, Gary R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Homeless individuals have higher rates of hypertension when compared to the general population. Therapeutic lifestyle changes (TLCs) have the potential to decrease the morbidity and mortality associated with hypertension, yet TLCs can be difficult for homeless persons to implement due to competing priorities. Objectives To identify: 1) Patients' knowledge and perceptions of hypertension and TLCs; and 2) Barriers to implementation of TLCs. Methods This qualitative study was conducted with patients from an urban healthcare clinic within a homeless center. Patients ≥ 18 years old with a diagnosis of hypertension were eligible. Three focus groups were conducted at which time saturation was deemed to have been reached. Focus group sessions were audio recorded and transcribed for data analysis. A systematic, inductive analysis was conducted to identify emerging themes. Results A total of 14 individuals participated in one of three focus groups. The majority were female (n = 8) and African-American (n = 13). Most participants were housed in a shelter (n=8). Others were staying with family or friends (n=3), living on the street (n=2), or had transitioned to housing (n=1). Participants had a mixed understanding of hypertension and how TLCs impacted hypertension. They were most familiar with dietary and smoking recommendations and less familiar with exercise, alcohol, and caffeine TLCs. Participants viewed TLCs as being restrictive, particularly with regards to diet. Family and friends were viewed as helpful in encouraging some lifestyle changes such as healthy eating, but less helpful in having a positive influence on quitting smoking. Participants indicated that they often have difficulty implementing lifestyle changes because of limited meal choices, poor access to exercise equipment, and being uninformed about recommendations. Conclusions Despite the benefits of TLCs, homeless individuals experience unique challenges to implementing TLCs. Future research should focus on developing and testing interventions that facilitate TLCs among homeless persons. The findings from this study should assist healthcare practitioners, including pharmacists, with providing appropriate and effective education. PMID:22835705

  6. 38 CFR 61.67 - Recovery provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) VA HOMELESS PROVIDERS GRANT AND PER DIEM PROGRAM § 61.67 Recovery provisions. (a) If after 3 years from the date of award of a capital grant, the grant recipient has withdrawn from the VA Homeless... status within 3 years from the time of award. Grantee B then provides services to homeless veterans for...

  7. 38 CFR 61.67 - Recovery provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) VA HOMELESS PROVIDERS GRANT AND PER DIEM PROGRAM § 61.67 Recovery provisions. (a) If after 3 years from the date of award of a capital grant, the grant recipient has withdrawn from the VA Homeless... status within 3 years from the time of award. Grantee B then provides services to homeless veterans for...

  8. 76 FR 72047 - Enhanced-Use Lease (EUL) of Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Real Property for the Development...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-21

    ...The Secretary of VA intends to enter into an EUL on an approximately 3.7-acre parcel of land at the Cheyenne VA Medical Center in Cheyenne, Wyoming. As consideration for the lease, the lessee will be required to construct, operate, and maintain a permanent housing facility; provide preference and priority placement for senior Veterans and their families; and provide a supportive services......

  9. 76 FR 71440 - Enhanced-Use Lease (EUL) of Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Real Property for the Development...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-17

    ...The Secretary of VA intends to enter into an EUL on an approximately 3.0-acre parcel of land at the Spokane VA Medical Center in Spokane, Washington. The selected lessee will finance, design, develop, construct, manage, maintain and operate the EUL development as a permanent housing facility; provide preference and priority placement for Veterans and their families; and provide a supportive......

  10. Educating Homeless Children and Youth: How Are We Measuring Up? A Progress Report, School Year 1990-91.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Dept. of Education, Baltimore. Div. of Compensatory Education and Support Services.

    This report measures how well Maryland educators are working together to provide a public education that meets the long- and short-term needs of homeless children and youth by providing environments that support their physical, social, and emotional growth. It outlines accomplishments for the 1990-91 school year, recommends ways of addressing…

  11. 78 FR 72002 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Danville, VA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-02

    ... Class E surface area airspace at Danville Regional Airport, Danville, VA. (78 FR, 48079). Interested... CFR) part 71 amends Class E surface area airspace at Danville Regional Airport, Danville, VA, within a...: Paragraph 6002 Class E Airspace Designated as Surface Areas. * * * * * AEA VA E2 Danville, VA...

  12. Flexural Stiffness of Myosin Va Subdomains as Measured from Tethered Particle Motion

    PubMed Central

    Michalek, Arthur J.; Kennedy, Guy G.; Warshaw, David M.; Ali, M. Yusuf

    2015-01-01

    Myosin Va (MyoVa) is a processive molecular motor involved in intracellular cargo transport on the actin cytoskeleton. The motor's processivity and ability to navigate actin intersections are believed to be governed by the stiffness of various parts of the motor's structure. Specifically, changes in calcium may regulate motor processivity by altering the motor's lever arm stiffness and thus its interhead communication. In order to measure the flexural stiffness of MyoVa subdomains, we use tethered particle microscopy, which relates the Brownian motion of fluorescent quantum dots, which are attached to various single- and double-headed MyoVa constructs bound to actin in rigor, to the motor's flexural stiffness. Based on these measurements, the MyoVa lever arm and coiled-coil rod domain have comparable flexural stiffness (0.034 pN/nm). Upon addition of calcium, the lever arm stiffness is reduced 40% as a result of calmodulins potentially dissociating from the lever arm. In addition, the flexural stiffness of the full-length MyoVa construct is an order of magnitude less stiff than both a single lever arm and the coiled-coil rod. This suggests that the MyoVa lever arm-rod junction provides a flexible hinge that would allow the motor to maneuver cargo through the complex intracellular actin network. PMID:26770194

  13. Flexural Stiffness of Myosin Va Subdomains as Measured from Tethered Particle Motion.

    PubMed

    Michalek, Arthur J; Kennedy, Guy G; Warshaw, David M; Ali, M Yusuf

    2015-01-01

    Myosin Va (MyoVa) is a processive molecular motor involved in intracellular cargo transport on the actin cytoskeleton. The motor's processivity and ability to navigate actin intersections are believed to be governed by the stiffness of various parts of the motor's structure. Specifically, changes in calcium may regulate motor processivity by altering the motor's lever arm stiffness and thus its interhead communication. In order to measure the flexural stiffness of MyoVa subdomains, we use tethered particle microscopy, which relates the Brownian motion of fluorescent quantum dots, which are attached to various single- and double-headed MyoVa constructs bound to actin in rigor, to the motor's flexural stiffness. Based on these measurements, the MyoVa lever arm and coiled-coil rod domain have comparable flexural stiffness (0.034 pN/nm). Upon addition of calcium, the lever arm stiffness is reduced 40% as a result of calmodulins potentially dissociating from the lever arm. In addition, the flexural stiffness of the full-length MyoVa construct is an order of magnitude less stiff than both a single lever arm and the coiled-coil rod. This suggests that the MyoVa lever arm-rod junction provides a flexible hinge that would allow the motor to maneuver cargo through the complex intracellular actin network. PMID:26770194

  14. Understanding Heterosexual Condom Use Among Homeless Men

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Joan S.; Wenzel, Suzanne L.; Golinelli, Daniela; Kennedy, David P.; Ewing, Brett; Wertheimer, Samuel

    2012-01-01

    This study uses an event-based approach to examine individual, relationship, and contextual correlates of heterosexual condom use among homeless men. Structured interviews were conducted with a predominantly African American sample of 305 men recruited from meal lines in the Skid Row area of Los Angeles. Men reported on their most recent heterosexual event involving vaginal or anal intercourse. Adjusting for demographic characteristics only, condom use was more likely when men had higher condom use self-efficacy, greater HIV knowledge, or talked to their partner about condoms prior to sex. Condom use was less likely when men held more negative attitudes towards condoms, the partner was considered to be a primary/serious partner, hard drug use preceded sex, or sex occurred in a public setting. Condom attitudes, self-efficacy, partner type, and communication were the strongest predictors of condom use in a multivariate model that included all of the above-mentioned factors. Associations of unprotected sex with hard drug use prior to sex and having sex in public settings could be accounted for by lower condom self-efficacy and/or less positive condom attitudes among men having sex under these conditions. Results suggest that it may be promising to adapt existing, evidence-based IMB interventions for delivery in non-traditional settings that are frequented by men experiencing homelessness to achieve HIV risk reduction and thus reduce a significant point of disparity for the largely African American population of homeless men. PMID:22392155

  15. HIV risks in a homeless population.

    PubMed

    Lee, D; Ross, M W; Mizwa, M; Scott, D P

    2000-08-01

    Homeless people are one of the most vulnerable with regard to HIV transmission. However, most research on this population has been carried out on samples from health clinics. We surveyed 390 homeless people in Houston at a day shelter with regard to their HIV/AIDS knowledge and risk behaviours. The sample was 76% African-American, 11% Euro-American, with small numbers of Latin-Americans, Native-Americans and Asian-Americans: half were born in Texas, and 92% were male. Data indicated that HIV/AIDS knowledge was higher in those who were at higher behavioural risk, although the direction of causality in these cross-sectional data cannot be inferred. African-Americans were at slightly higher risk. Compared with previous clinic samples, this sample was older and a higher number (one-third) slept the last night outside. Eighty per cent had had an HIV test. Condom use was low with both males and females most commonly not reporting using condoms although more than half had had sexual contact in the past month. Multivariate analysis indicated that ethnicity and HIV/AIDS knowledge were independent predictors of risk behaviour. Lifetime risks included one-third who had injected drugs (and shared needles), and nearly 10% had had sex with someone they knew to be HIV seropositive. Lack of future time perspective rather than level of knowledge may be a barrier to reducing HIV risks, and the data are discussed in terms of policy implications and homelessness. PMID:10990335

  16. Pharmaceutical services for a homeless population.

    PubMed

    Lamsam, G D; Stone, B A; Rumsey, T; Shevlin, J M; Scott, B E; Reif, C J

    1996-06-15

    Participation of pharmacist volunteers in the medication program of a countrywide health care program for homeless persons is described. Pharmacist volunteers were brought in to manage medications for a health care program serving homeless persons in Ramsey County, Minnesota. After the pharmacy program was structured, volunteers were recruited from the community. Pharmacists duties initially focused on product management but were expanded to include establishing and monitoring the program formulary; reviewing patient records and prescriptions for allergies, potential drug interactions, and appropriate dosage; counseling patients on medication use; and consulting with other members of the health care team. The pharmacists' efforts led to improvements in monitoring and stocking of necessary medications. The cost of the pharmacy program decreased from $1800 a month to as little as $300 a month. The value of donated supplies and medications increased from $8,600 in 1991 to over $122,000 in 1994. Pharmacist volunteers helped to improve the cost-effectiveness and quality of medication use in a homeless population. PMID:8781689

  17. Enabling Older Homeless Minority Women to Overcome Homelessness by Using a Life Management Enhancement Group Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Washington, Olivia G. M.; Moxley, David P.; Taylor, Jacquelyn Y.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the importance of a life management enhancement (LME) group intervention for older minority women in developing personal control and self-confidence in social relationships as they overcome homelessness. Women in the treatment group showed significantly greater personal control and higher levels of self-confidence following the six-week intervention than women in the control group. Increasing personal control and developing self-confidence in social relationships can help individuals achieve desired outcomes as a result of their actions, efforts, and abilities. These attributes can help women increase and sustain appropriate coping methods and overcome homelessness. PMID:19212866

  18. Homeless Education and Social Capital: An Examination of School and Community Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Peter M.

    2011-01-01

    Background/Context: This study contributes to the literature on the schooling of homeless and highly mobile students. Although previous work has detailed the demographics of homelessness, the effects of homelessness on academic progress, and particular legal issues in homeless education, this research focused on how individual and institutional…

  19. 75 FR 29366 - ``Homeless Veterans' Reintegration Program (HVRP) National Technical Assistance Center...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-25

    ... of the Assistant Secretary for Veterans' Employment and Training ``Homeless Veterans' Reintegration... the Homeless Veterans' Reintegration Program (HVRP) to include the Homeless Female Veterans and... to expedite the reintegration of homeless Veterans into the labor force. In order to assist the...

  20. The Dynamics of Families Who Are Homeless: Implications for Early Childhood Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swick, Kevin J.

    2004-01-01

    Family homelessness has emerged as a serious global problem (Stronge, 2000). Over the past 25 years in the United States, the makeup of the homeless population has changed significantly. As De Angelis (1994) reports: The landscape of homelessness has changed since the early 1980s, when nearly all homeless people were men. Today,…

  1. The Relationship between Literacy and Depression and Anxiety in Homeless Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holland, Mark Edward

    2014-01-01

    Homelessness is a problem that has correlating social, psychological, and health problems. The pathways that lead to homelessness are plentiful and varied, as are the risk factors that are associated with chronic homelessness. Much of the research that has been completed with homeless individuals has focused on substance use or psychological…

  2. Learning from Families Experiencing Homelessness--How School Leaders Can Make a Difference through Transformative Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warke, Amy L.

    2012-01-01

    Homelessness is a growing phenomenon, especially among women and children (Hulchanski, 2009). This study was conducted because of the increase in families experiencing homelessness registering in my school. In none of the current studies about homelessness have the researchers spoken to the families and children experiencing homelessness. This…

  3. Multilevel Considerations of Family Homelessness and Schooling in the Recession Era

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Peter; Schreiber, James

    2012-01-01

    This mixed methods investigation of homeless education in a major urban region identified a number of significant developments and dilemmas amid the larger homeless crisis in the United States. We found that the wider community demographics of homelessness have shifted in recent years, resulting in a higher number of homeless families--many of…

  4. Homelessness among Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Youth: Implications for Subsequent Internalizing and Externalizing Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosario, Margaret; Schrimshaw, Eric W.; Hunter, Joyce

    2012-01-01

    Although lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) youth with a history of homelessness (running away or being evicted from their homes by parents) report more psychological symptoms than homeless heterosexual peers, it is unclear whether symptoms are due to homelessness, given the absence of a non-homeless comparison group. This study longitudinally…

  5. 38 CFR 1.710 - Homeless claimants: Delivery of benefit payments and correspondence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Homeless claimants...' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL PROVISIONS Homeless Claimants § 1.710 Homeless claimants... distribute to organizations specially serving the needs of veterans and the homeless, including but...

  6. 38 CFR 1.710 - Homeless claimants: Delivery of benefit payments and correspondence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Homeless claimants...' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL PROVISIONS Homeless Claimants § 1.710 Homeless claimants... distribute to organizations specially serving the needs of veterans and the homeless, including but...

  7. 38 CFR 1.710 - Homeless claimants: Delivery of benefit payments and correspondence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Homeless claimants...' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL PROVISIONS Homeless Claimants § 1.710 Homeless claimants... distribute to organizations specially serving the needs of veterans and the homeless, including but...

  8. 38 CFR 1.710 - Homeless claimants: Delivery of benefit payments and correspondence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Homeless claimants...' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL PROVISIONS Homeless Claimants § 1.710 Homeless claimants... distribute to organizations specially serving the needs of veterans and the homeless, including but...

  9. Multilevel Considerations of Family Homelessness and Schooling in the Recession Era

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Peter; Schreiber, James

    2012-01-01

    This mixed methods investigation of homeless education in a major urban region identified a number of significant developments and dilemmas amid the larger homeless crisis in the United States. We found that the wider community demographics of homelessness have shifted in recent years, resulting in a higher number of homeless families--many of

  10. Do Older Rural and Urban Veterans Experience Different Rates of Unplanned Readmission to VA and Non-VA Hospitals?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weeks, William B.; Lee, Richard E.; Wallace, Amy E.; West, Alan N.; Bagian, James P.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Unplanned readmission within 30 days of discharge is an indicator of hospital quality. Purpose: We wanted to determine whether older rural veterans who were enrolled in the VA had different rates of unplanned readmission to VA or non-VA hospitals than their urban counterparts. Methods: We used the combined VA/Medicare dataset to examine…

  11. 38 CFR 61.30 - Per diem-general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... HOMELESS PROVIDERS GRANT AND PER DIEM PROGRAM § 61.30 Per diem-general. VA provides per diem funds to... of supportive housing or services after November 10, 1992 so they can assist homeless veterans...

  12. 38 CFR 61.30 - Per diem-general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... HOMELESS PROVIDERS GRANT AND PER DIEM PROGRAM § 61.30 Per diem-general. VA provides per diem funds to... of supportive housing or services after November 10, 1992 so they can assist homeless veterans...

  13. 38 CFR 61.30 - Per diem-general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... HOMELESS PROVIDERS GRANT AND PER DIEM PROGRAM § 61.30 Per diem-general. VA provides per diem funds to... of supportive housing or services after November 10, 1992 so they can assist homeless veterans...

  14. The Columbia-Harlem Homeless Medical Partnership: a new model for learning in the service of those in medical need.

    PubMed

    Batra, Priya; Chertok, Judy Sara; Fisher, Carl Erik; Manseau, Marc William; Manuelli, Victoria Nicole; Spears, James

    2009-09-01

    Though altruism and patient advocacy are promoted in medical education curricula, students are given few opportunities to develop these skills. Student-run clinics focusing on the health needs of the underserved can provide important health services to needy patients while providing students with career-influencing primary care experiences. The Columbia-Harlem Homeless Medical Partnership (CHHMP)-a project initiated by medical students to provide primary care to Northern Manhattan's homeless population-serves as a new model of service learning in medical education. Unlike many other student-run clinics, CHHMP has developed direct patient outreach, continuous care (stable "student-patient teams" and a weekly commitment for all volunteers), and regular internal data review. Chart review data presented demonstrate the project's success in providing care to the clinic's target population of homeless and unstably housed patients. Targeted outreach efforts among clients have increased rates of patient follow-up at each subsequent review period. Additionally, CHHMP has used review data to develop services concordant with identified patient needs (psychiatric care and social services). CHHMP has recruited a committed group of volunteers and continues to engender an interest in the health needs of the underserved among students. Not only does CHHMP provide a "medical home" for homeless patients, it also provides a space in which students can develop skills unaddressed in large teaching hospitals. This project, a "win-win" for patients and students, serves as a unique model for community health-based service learning in medical education. PMID:19585243

  15. Visible Voices: Literacy Identity and the Invisible Homeless

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juchniewicz, Melissa M.

    2012-01-01

    Despite calls for increased awareness of and sensitivity to diverse students and their in- and out-of-school literacies, the "invisible homeless"--those who often decline to self-identify--receive inadequate scholarly attention. They are often individuals who fear the stigma associated with homelessness as they navigate workplace, academic, and

  16. A Repeated Observation Approach for Estimating the Street Homeless Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Brent

    2007-01-01

    Risks of life on the street caused by inclement weather, harassment, and assault threaten the unsheltered homeless population. We address some challenges of enumerating the street homeless population by testing a novel capture-recapture (CR) estimation approach that models individuals' intermittent daytime visibility. We tested walking and…

  17. Learning in Limbo: The Educational Deprivation of Homeless Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rafferty, Yvonne; Rollins, Norma

    This document presents a report on the educational needs of homeless children in New York City. Data were analyzed from the following sources: (1) review of the current literature on the impact of homelessness on the physical and emotional well-being of children; (2) field-based interviews with 277 families in New York's shelters and hotels; and…

  18. Toward A Concept of Homelessness among Aged Men.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Carl I.; Sokolovsky, Jay

    1983-01-01

    Compared homeless aged men who live on the Bowry or in hotel rooms in New York City. Results showed homelessness is not a uniform category. Sociability differentiated them from nonhomeless age peers and socioeconomic status differentiated the two groups; also found differences in each groups' social adaptation. (Author/JAC)

  19. How You Can Help Students Who Are Homeless

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curriculum Review, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Many schools are struggling with high numbers of homeless students. Some research has suggested that homeless students are often experiencing exhaustion, hunger, stress, abuse and insecurity, making socialization and learning more difficult for them than it is for their peers. This paper discusses three easy ways school professionals can help and

  20. Homelessness, Violence Exposure, and School Participation among Urban Adolescent Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Angie C.

    2007-01-01

    Using a risk and resilience framework, this exploratory study examines the relationships between homelessness, exposure to multiple types of violence, and school participation within a survey sample of poor adolescent mothers living in an urban setting. Participants who were homeless either currently or historically were compared with participants…