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Sample records for vaccines biological products

  1. 77 FR 42319 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... lines derived from human tumors for vaccine manufacture. FDA intends to make background...

  2. 76 FR 3639 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... selection of strains to be included in the influenza virus vaccine for the 2011-2012 influenza season....

  3. 75 FR 17929 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... circovirus type 1 (PCV 1) in Rotarix, a U.S. licensed vaccine manufactured by GlaxoSmithKline and...

  4. 75 FR 2876 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... selection of strains to be included in the influenza virus vaccine for the 2010 - 2011 influenza season....

  5. 75 FR 59729 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... portion of the meeting will be closed to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological... for protective antigen-based anthrax vaccines for a post-exposure prophylaxis indication using...

  6. 76 FR 13646 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-14

    ... Person: Donald W. Jehn or Denise Royster, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (HFM-71), Food and... morning of April 6, 2011, the committee will meet in open session to hear updates of the research programs... Products, Office of Vaccines Research and Review, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, FDA. In...

  7. 77 FR 3780 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-25

    ... Research (HFM-71), Food and Drug Administration, 1401 Rockville Pike Rockville, MD 20852, (301) 827- 0314... research program in the Laboratory of Mycobacterial Diseases and Cellular Immunology, Division of Bacterial, Parasitic and Allergenic Products, Office of Vaccines Research and Review, Center for Biologics...

  8. 78 FR 20663 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a public...

  9. 77 FR 63839 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a public...

  10. 76 FR 44016 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-22

    ... Biologics Evaluation and Research (HFM-71), Food and Drug Administration, 1401 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD... hear an overview of the research program in the Laboratory of Enteric and Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Division of Bacterial, Parasitic and Allergenic Products, Office of Vaccines Research and Review,...

  11. 78 FR 5465 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a public...

  12. 76 FR 55397 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a public...

  13. In situ pneumococcal vaccine production and delivery through a hybrid biological-biomaterial vector

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Beitelshees, Marie; Fang, Lei; Hill, Andrew; Ahmadi, Mahmoud Kamal; Chen, Mingfu; Davidson, Bruce A.; Knight, Paul; Smith, Randall J.; Andreadis, Stelios T.; Hakansson, Anders P.; Jones, Charles H.; Pfeifer, Blaine A.

    2016-01-01

    The type and potency of an immune response provoked during vaccination will determine ultimate success in disease prevention. The basis for this response will be the design and implementation of antigen presentation to the immune system. Whereas direct antigen administration will elicit some form of immunological response, a more sophisticated approach would couple the antigen of interest to a vector capable of broad delivery formats and designed for heightened response. New antigens associated with pneumococcal disease virulence were used to test the delivery and adjuvant capabilities of a hybrid biological-biomaterial vector consisting of a bacterial core electrostatically coated with a cationic polymer. The hybrid design provides (i) passive and active targeting of antigen-presenting cells, (ii) natural and multicomponent adjuvant properties, (iii) dual intracellular delivery mechanisms, and (iv) a simple formulation mechanism. In addition, the hybrid format enables device-specific, or in situ, antigen production and consolidation via localization within the bacterial component of the vector. This capability eliminates the need for dedicated antigen production and purification before vaccination efforts while leveraging the aforementioned features of the overall delivery device. We present the first disease-specific utilization of the vector toward pneumococcal disease highlighted by improved immune responses and protective capabilities when tested against traditional vaccine formulations and a range of clinically relevant Streptococcus pneumoniae strains. More broadly, the results point to similar levels of success with other diseases that would benefit from the production, delivery, and efficacy capabilities offered by the hybrid vector. PMID:27419235

  14. Systems biology in vaccine design

    PubMed Central

    Six, Adrien; Bellier, Bertrand; Thomas‐Vaslin, Véronique; Klatzmann, David

    2012-01-01

    Summary Vaccines are the most effective tools to prevent infectious diseases and to minimize their impact on humans or animals. Despite the successful development of vaccines that are able to elicit potent and protective immune responses, the majority of vaccines have been so far developed empirically and mechanistic events leading to protective immune responses are often poorly understood. This hampers the development of new prophylactic as well as therapeutic vaccines for infectious diseases and cancer. Biological correlates of immune‐mediated protection are currently based on standard readout such as antibody titres and ELISPOT assays. The development of successful vaccines for difficult settings, such as infectious agents leading to chronic infection (HIV, HCV. . .) or cancer, calls for novel ‘readout systems’ or ‘correlates’ of immune‐mediated protection that would reliably predict immune responses to novel vaccines in vivo. Systems biology offers a new approach to vaccine design that is based upon understanding the molecular network mobilized by vaccination. Systems vaccinology approaches investigate more global correlates of successful vaccination, beyond the specific immune response to the antigens administered, providing new methods for measuring early vaccine efficacy and ultimately generating hypotheses for understanding the mechanisms that underlie successful immunogenicity. Using functional genomics, specific molecular signatures of individual vaccine can be identified and used as predictors of vaccination efficiency. The immune response to vaccination involves the coordinated induction of master transcription factors that leads to the development of a broad, polyfunctional and persistent immune response integrating all effector cells of the immune systems. PMID:22189033

  15. A comparison of the oral application and injection routes using the onderstepoort biological products fowl typhoid vaccine, its safety, efficacy and duration of protection in commercial laying hens.

    PubMed

    Purchase, C; Picard, J; McDonald, R; Bisschop, S P R

    2008-03-01

    This study was undertaken to establish whether the Onderstepoort Biological Products Fowl Typhoid (OBPft) vaccine registered as an injectable vaccine was effective and safe when administered orally to commercial layers. Its efficacy and duration of protection were compared with application by intramuscular injection. Commercial brown layer hens were used as they were found to be highly susceptible to Salmonella gallinarum infections. In the vaccine safety trial birds were euthanased at timed intervals spanning 4 weeks postvaccination. Necropsies were performed and samples were taken and tested. No clinical signs or mortalities could be attributed to the OBPft vaccine nor could active shedding of the vaccine strain be detected. Slight pathological changes were noted with both routes of vaccination; however, these changes were transient, returning to normal within the observation period. The injected groups showed a better serological response with the rapid serum plate agglutination (RSPA) test than the orally vaccinated groups. In the duration of protection trial, birds were challenged at 3-8-week intervals post-vaccination. All unvaccinated birds died. Protection 8 and 16 weeks after vaccination was above 60 %,by 24 weeks after challenge, the vaccine protection was below 30 %. It was found that there was no significant difference (P < 0.05) in the protection offered by either the oral or injected route of vaccination with the OBPft vaccine. PMID:18678191

  16. 76 FR 79203 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Veterinary Biological Products for Swine Influenza Vaccines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ...; and USSN 12/838,292, filed Jul 16, 2010; entitled ``Influenza DNA Vaccination and Methods of Use... animals increase the risk of reassortment and adaption to humans. This technology describes DNA...

  17. Vaccine Adverse Events

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Home Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Safety & Availability ( ... Center for Biologics Evaluation & Research Vaccine Adverse Events Vaccine Adverse Events Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ...

  18. 78 FR 60884 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ..., the committee will meet in open session to hear an overview of the research programs in the Laboratory... Research and Review, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Review, FDA. FDA intends to make background.... 552b(c)(6)). The committee will discuss the report of the intramural research programs and...

  19. 76 FR 52668 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Amendment of Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-23

    ... Laboratory of Enteric and Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Division of Bacterial, Parasitic, and Allergenic... Products Advisory Committee. This meeting was announced in the Federal Register of July 22, 2011 (76...

  20. Assessment of the impact of manufacturing changes on the physicochemical properties and biological activity of Her1-ECD vaccine during product development.

    PubMed

    Garcia Duardo, Katia; Prieto Curbelo, Yadira; Raymond Pous, Judith; Rabasa Legón, Estela Yamilet; Ramírez, Belinda Sánchez; Hernández, Kathya Rashida de la Luz; Castillo Vitoch, Adolfo

    2015-08-20

    Vaccine preparations based on the extracellular domain of Her1 (Her1-ECD) have demonstrated, in vitro and in vivo, a potent antimetastatic effect on EGFR(+) Lewis lung carcinoma model, while associated side effects were absent. The Her1-ECD is a glycoprotein with a molecular weight of 105 kDa and has 11 potential sites for N-glycosylation. Currently Her1-ECD based vaccine has been evaluated in patients with hormone refractory prostate cancer. Her1-ECD molecule used for in clinical trials was obtained from culture supernatant of HEK 293 transfectomes used the protein free culture media and is purified by immunoaffinity chromatography. In order to increase the cell growth and productivity, new defined culture media have been developed (alternative culture media) in Her1-ECD vaccine production process. In this work, a comparability study was performed to evaluate the impact of process changes in the characteristics physic-chemical and biologicals of the Her1-ECD protein and the degree of similitude between both variants. Techniques such as: SDS-PAGE, SEC-HPLC, isoelectric point, peptide mapping, mass spectrometric, SCX-HPLC, oligosaccharide map, ELISA and flow cytometric were used with this aim. Results indicated that this process change decreases the degree of sialylation of the protein but does not affect its biological activity (measured as titers of Abs and recognition for A431 cell line). PMID:26003492

  1. Evaluation of some selected vaccines and other biological products irradiated by gamma rays, electron beams and X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, J. C.; Rey, L.; Lee, Chi-Jen

    2002-03-01

    Molecular sizing potency results are presented for irradiated samples of one lot of Haemophilus b conjugate vaccine, pneumococcal polysaccharide type 6B and typhoid vi polysaccharide vaccine. The samples were irradiated (25 kGy) by gamma rays, electron beams and X-rays. IgG and IgM antibody response in mice test results (ELISA) are given for the Hib conjugate vaccine irradiated at 0°C or frozen in liquid nitrogen.

  2. Biological challenges to effective vaccines in the developing world

    PubMed Central

    Grassly, Nicholas C.; Kang, Gagandeep; Kampmann, Beate

    2015-01-01

    The reason for holding a meeting to discuss biological challenges to vaccines is simple: not all vaccines work equally well in all settings. This special issue reviews the performance of vaccines in challenging environments, summarizes current thinking on the reasons why vaccines underperform and considers what approaches are necessary to understand the heterogeneity in responses and to improve vaccine immunogenicity and efficacy. PMID:25964451

  3. Biological challenges to effective vaccines in the developing world.

    PubMed

    Grassly, Nicholas C; Kang, Gagandeep; Kampmann, Beate

    2015-06-19

    The reason for holding a meeting to discuss biological challenges to vaccines is simple: not all vaccines work equally well in all settings. This special issue reviews the performance of vaccines in challenging environments, summarizes current thinking on the reasons why vaccines underperform and considers what approaches are necessary to understand the heterogeneity in responses and to improve vaccine immunogenicity and efficacy. PMID:25964451

  4. Now that you want to take your HIV/AIDS vaccine/biological product research concept into the clinic: what are the "cGMP"?

    PubMed

    Sheets, Rebecca L; Rangavajhula, Vijaya; Pullen, Jeffrey K; Butler, Chris; Mehra, Vijay; Shapiro, Stuart; Pensiero, Michael

    2015-04-01

    The Division of AIDS Vaccine Research Program funds the discovery and development of HIV/AIDS vaccine candidates. Basic researchers, having discovered a potential vaccine in the laboratory, next want to take that candidate into the clinic to test the concept in humans, to see if it translates. Many of them have heard of "cGMP" and know that they are supposed to make a "GMP product" to take into the clinic, but often they are not very familiar with what "cGMP" means and why these good practices are so important. As members of the Vaccine Translational Research Branch, we frequently get asked "can't we use the material we made in the lab in the clinic?" or "aren't Phase 1 studies exempt from cGMP?" Over the years, we have had many experiences where researchers or their selected contract manufacturing organizations have not applied an appropriate degree of compliance with cGMP suitable for the clinical phase of development. We share some of these experiences and the lessons learned, along with explaining the importance of cGMP, just what cGMP means, and what they can assure, in an effort to de-mystify this subject and facilitate the rapid and safe translational development of HIV vaccines. PMID:25698494

  5. Vaccines Directed Against Microorganisms or Their Products Present During Biofilm Lifestyle: Can We Make a Translation as a Broad Biological Model to Tuberculosis?

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Valdez, Mario A.

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains as a global public health problem. In recent years, experimental evidence suggesting the relevance of in vitro pellicle (a type of biofilm formed at the air-liquid interface) production as a phenotype mimicking aspects found by Mycobacterium tuberculosis-complex bacteria during in vivo infection has started to accumulate. There are still opportunities for better diagnostic tools, therapeutic molecules as well as new vaccine candidates to assist in TB control programs worldwide and particularly in less developed nations. Regarding vaccines, despite the availability of a live, attenuated strain (Mycobacterium bovis BCG) since almost a century ago, its variable efficacy and lack of protection against pulmonary and latent disease has prompted basic and applied research leading to preclinical and clinical evaluation of up to 15 new candidates. In this work, I present examples of vaccines based on whole cells grown as biofilms, or specific proteins expressed under such condition, and the effect they have shown in relevant animal models or directly in the natural host. I also discuss why it might be worthwhile to explore these approaches, for constructing and developing new vaccine candidates for testing their efficacy against TB. PMID:26834732

  6. Vaccine production, distribution, access, and uptake.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jon; Lipsitch, Marc; Almond, Jeffrey W

    2011-07-30

    For human vaccines to be available on a global scale, complex production methods, meticulous quality control, and reliable distribution channels are needed to ensure that the products are potent and effective at the point of use. The technologies used to manufacture different types of vaccines can strongly affect vaccine cost, ease of industrial scale-up, stability, and, ultimately, worldwide availability. The complexity of manufacturing is compounded by the need for different formulations in different countries and age-groups. Reliable vaccine production in appropriate quantities and at affordable prices is the cornerstone of developing global vaccination policies. However, to ensure optimum access and uptake, strong partnerships are needed between private manufacturers, regulatory authorities, and national and international public health services. For vaccines whose supply is insufficient to meet demand, prioritisation of target groups can increase the effect of these vaccines. In this report, we draw from our experience of vaccine development and focus on influenza vaccines as an example to consider production, distribution, access, and other factors that affect vaccine uptake and population-level effectiveness. PMID:21664680

  7. Development of pandemic influenza vaccine production capacity in Viet Nam.

    PubMed

    Hoa, L K; Hiep, L V; Be, L V

    2011-07-01

    The Institute of Vaccines and Medical Biologicals (IVAC), a state-owned vaccine manufacturer, initiated research into avian influenza vaccines in the early 1990 s in response to the threat of a highly pathogenic avian influenza pandemic. Successful results from laboratory studies on A(H5N1) influenza virus attracted seed funds and led to participation in the WHO technology transfer project to enhance influenza vaccine production in developing countries. IVAC's goal is to produce 500,000 doses of inactivated monovalent whole-virion influenza vaccine per year by 2012, and progressively increase capacity to more than 1 million doses to protect essential populations in Viet Nam in the event of an influenza pandemic. The WHO seed grants, supplemented by other international partner support, enabled IVAC to build in a very short time an influenza vaccine manufacturing plant under Good Manufacturing Practice and relevant biosafety standards, a waste treatment system and a dedicated chicken farm for high-quality eggs. Much of the equipment and instrumentation required for vaccine production has been installed and tested for functional operation. Staff have been trained on site and at specialized courses which provided comprehensive manuals on egg-based manufacturing processes and biosafety. Following process validation, clinical trials will start in 2011 and the first domestic influenza vaccine doses are expected in 2012. PMID:21684426

  8. Systems biology approach predicts immunogenicity of the yellow fever vaccine in humans

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eva K; Cao, Weiping; Nakaya, Helder I; Teuwen, Dirk; Pirani, Ali; Gernert, Kim; Deng, Jiusheng; Marzolf, Bruz; Kennedy, Kathleen; Wu, Haiyan; Bennouna, Soumaya; Oluoch, Herold; Miller, Joseph; Vencio, Ricardo Z; Mulligan, Mark; Aderem, Alan; Ahmed, Rafi; Pulendran, Bali

    2014-01-01

    A major challenge in vaccinology is to prospectively determine vaccine efficacy. Here we have used a systems biology approach to identify early gene ‘signatures’ that predicted immune responses in humans vaccinated with yellow fever vaccine YF-17D. Vaccination induced genes that regulate virus innate sensing and type I interferon production. Computational analyses identified a gene signature, including complement protein C1qB and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 alpha kinase 4—an orchestrator of the integrated stress response—that correlated with and predicted YF-17D CD8+ T cell responses with up to 90% accuracy in an independent, blinded trial. A distinct signature, including B cell growth factor TNFRS17, predicted the neutralizing antibody response with up to 100% accuracy. These data highlight the utility of systems biology approaches in predicting vaccine efficacy. PMID:19029902

  9. Synthetic biology devices and circuits for RNA-based 'smart vaccines': a propositional review.

    PubMed

    Andries, Oliwia; Kitada, Tasuku; Bodner, Katie; Sanders, Niek N; Weiss, Ron

    2015-02-01

    Nucleic acid vaccines have been gaining attention as an alternative to the standard attenuated pathogen or protein based vaccine. However, an unrealized advantage of using such DNA or RNA based vaccination modalities is the ability to program within these nucleic acids regulatory devices that would provide an immunologist with the power to control the production of antigens and adjuvants in a desirable manner by administering small molecule drugs as chemical triggers. Advances in synthetic biology have resulted in the creation of highly predictable and modular genetic parts and devices that can be composed into synthetic gene circuits with complex behaviors. With the recent advent of modified RNA gene delivery methods and developments in the RNA replicon platform, we foresee a future in which mammalian synthetic biologists will create genetic circuits encoded exclusively on RNA. Here, we review the current repertoire of devices used in RNA synthetic biology and propose how programmable 'smart vaccines' will revolutionize the field of RNA vaccination. PMID:25566800

  10. Pulsed ultrasound for enhancing vaccine production.

    PubMed

    Xing, Jida; Hu, Chenxia; Ma, Allan; George, Rajan; Xing, James Z; Chen, Jie

    2015-08-01

    Hepatitis B is an infectious liver disease and vaccination is an effective way to protect individuals. We have applied mechanical wave stimulation to increase protein production. To validate our design, we used Sf9 insect cells to increase antigen fragment fusion protein expression for hepatitis B virus (HBV S1/S2). We discovered that stimulation at a frequency of 1.5 MHz, intensity of 60 mW/cm(2), for a duration of 10 minutes per day increased HBV S1/S2 production by 15%. This finding is very significant for shortening vaccine production time or increasing the yield of proteins for use as vaccines. PMID:26736715

  11. Biological and clinical developments in melanoma vaccines.

    PubMed

    Marchand, M; Brichard, V; van Baren, N; Coulie, P G

    2001-05-01

    The identification of antigens recognised on human tumours by autologous T-lymphocytes has opened the way for vaccination strategies involving defined tumour antigens. These vaccinations are therapeutic, i.e. they involve patients with detectable disease. Tumour regressions have been observed in a minority of melanoma patients in Phase I/II trials. Some of these regressions have been complete and long lasting. Improving the efficacy of therapeutic vaccines will critically depend on their capacity to trigger a robust immune response, on the development of appropriate methods to monitor these antitumour immune responses to vaccination and on a better understanding of the mechanisms used by tumours to escape immune attack. Finally, the initiation of large randomised Phase III trials will determine the impact of these vaccines on melanoma treatment. PMID:11727521

  12. Plastids: The Green Frontiers for Vaccine Production

    PubMed Central

    Waheed, Mohammad T.; Ismail, Hammad; Gottschamel, Johanna; Mirza, Bushra; Lössl, Andreas G.

    2015-01-01

    Infectious diseases pose an increasing risk to health, especially in developing countries. Vaccines are available to either cure or prevent many of these diseases. However, there are certain limitations related to these vaccines, mainly the costs, which make these vaccines mostly unaffordable for people in resource poor countries. These costs are mainly related to production and purification of the products manufactured from fermenter-based systems. Plastid biotechnology has become an attractive platform to produce biopharmaceuticals in large amounts and cost-effectively. This is mainly due to high copy number of plastids DNA in mature chloroplasts, a characteristic particularly important for vaccine production in large amounts. An additional advantage lies in the maternal inheritance of plastids in most plant species, which addresses the regulatory concerns related to transgenic plants. These and many other aspects of plastids will be discussed in the present review, especially those that particularly make these green biofactories an attractive platform for vaccine production. A summary of recent vaccine antigens against different human diseases expressed in plastids will also be presented. PMID:26635832

  13. Systems vaccinology: Enabling rational vaccine design with systems biological approaches.

    PubMed

    Hagan, Thomas; Nakaya, Helder I; Subramaniam, Shankar; Pulendran, Bali

    2015-09-29

    Vaccines have drastically reduced the mortality and morbidity of many diseases. However, vaccines have historically been developed empirically, and recent development of vaccines against current pandemics such as HIV and malaria has been met with difficulty. The advent of high-throughput technologies, coupled with systems biological methods of data analysis, has enabled researchers to interrogate the entire complement of a variety of molecular components within cells, and characterize the myriad interactions among them in order to model and understand the behavior of the system as a whole. In the context of vaccinology, these tools permit exploration of the molecular mechanisms by which vaccines induce protective immune responses. Here we review the recent advances, challenges, and potential of systems biological approaches in vaccinology. If the challenges facing this developing field can be overcome, systems vaccinology promises to empower the identification of early predictive signatures of vaccine response, as well as novel and robust correlates of protection from infection. Such discoveries, along with the improved understanding of immune responses to vaccination they impart, will play an instrumental role in development of the next generation of rationally designed vaccines. PMID:25858860

  14. Biological hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Benemann, J.R.

    1995-11-01

    Biological hydrogen production can be accomplished by either thermochemical (gasification) conversion of woody biomass and agricultural residues or by microbiological processes that yield hydrogen gas from organic wastes or water. Biomass gasification is a well established technology; however, the synthesis gas produced, a mixture of CO and H{sub 2}, requires a shift reaction to convert the CO to H{sub 2}. Microbiological processes can carry out this reaction more efficiently than conventional catalysts, and may be more appropriate for the relatively small-scale of biomass gasification processes. Development of a microbial shift reaction may be a near-term practical application of microbial hydrogen production.

  15. Novel molecular biology approaches to acellular vaccines.

    PubMed

    Rappuoli, R; Pizza, M

    1996-01-01

    Bacterial toxins are commonly detoxified by chemical treatment in order to use them in human vaccines. We have used site-directed mutagenesis of toxin genes to obtain bacteria that produce naturally nontoxic mutants of bacterial toxins, such as pertussis toxin (PT), cholera toxin (CT) and Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin (LT). Genetically detoxified PT showed a superior safety and immunogenicity in animal models, phase I and phase II clinical trials, and a superior protective efficacy in the early and late stage of a phase III efficacy trial, proving in a definitive and extensive way that genetic detoxification of bacterial toxins can, and should, replace chemical treatment. The results obtained with genetically inactivated LT and CT indicate that genetic detoxification of bacterial toxins can be used not only to produce vaccines for systemic immunization that are superior to the ones produced by conventional technologies, but suggest that these type of molecules may be the prototype molecules for the design and construction of innovative vaccines with a totally new design, such as mucosally delivered preventive and therapeutic vaccines. PMID:9704103

  16. The search for a promising cell factory system for production of edible vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Barzegari, Abolfazl; Saeedi, Nazli; Zarredar, Habib; Barar, Jaleh; Omidi, Yadollah

    2014-01-01

    Despite worldwide vaccination against devastating diseases for decades, millions of children in remote and impoverished regions of the globe die every year from vaccine-preventable infectious diseases. The reasons for incomplete coverage of vaccination programs are based in part on the relatively high costs of conventional vaccinations, including mass production, refrigeration, transportation, and training as well as funding personnel for their administration. Plant-based edible vaccines (PEVs) have been introduced as a revolutionary cost-effective vaccination modality. However, they suffer from major deficiencies that have restricted their application to bench-scale. This article discusses the deficiencies of PEVs and also provides concise overview on the health-promoting, biological and biotechnological features of spirulina (Arthrospira). In short, we envision that spirulina could be considered as a potential alternative biofactory system to the plants toward the production of edible vaccines in high-yield with low-costs that other hosts cannot yet offer. PMID:25424962

  17. The search for a promising cell factory system for production of edible vaccine.

    PubMed

    Barzegari, Abolfazl; Saeedi, Nazli; Zarredar, Habib; Barar, Jaleh; Omidi, Yadollah

    2014-01-01

    Despite worldwide vaccination against devastating diseases for decades, millions of children in remote and impoverished regions of the globe die every year from vaccine-preventable infectious diseases. The reasons for incomplete coverage of vaccination programs are based in part on the relatively high costs of conventional vaccinations, including mass production, refrigeration, transportation, and training as well as funding personnel for their administration. Plant-based edible vaccines (PEVs) have been introduced as a revolutionary cost-effective vaccination modality. However, they suffer from major deficiencies that have restricted their application to bench-scale. This article discusses the deficiencies of PEVs and also provides concise overview on the health-promoting, biological and biotechnological features of spirulina (Arthrospira). In short, we envision that spirulina could be considered as a potential alternative biofactory system to the plants toward the production of edible vaccines in high-yield with low-costs that other hosts cannot yet offer. PMID:25424962

  18. [Production of rabies vaccine in animal diploid cells].

    PubMed

    Lucas, G; Reculard, P; Adamowicz, P; Vacher, B; Prunet, P

    1982-01-01

    Modalities for production of inactivated rabies vaccine derived from diploid hamster cell cultures are reported. The inactivated concentrated virus, purified by zonal centrifugation, is utilised for the preparation of vaccines destinated to carnivores, either in the form of monovalent vaccine or associated with distemper and canine contagious hepatitis vaccines. The inactivated concentrated virus is utilised for the preparation of bovine vaccine. The procedure is compatible with industrial production. The results concerning safety and potency tests of the experimental lots are presented. PMID:7128072

  19. Now That You Want to Take Your HIV/AIDS Vaccine/Biological Product Research Concept into the Clinic: What are “cGMP”?

    PubMed Central

    Sheets, Rebecca L.; Rangavajhula, Vijaya; Pullen, Jeffrey K.; Butler, Chris; Mehra, Vijay; Shapiro, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    The Division of AIDS Vaccine Research Program funds the discovery and development of HIV/AIDS vaccine candidates. Basic researchers, having discovered a potential vaccine in the laboratory, next want to take that candidate into the clinic to test the concept in humans, to see if it translates. Many of them have heard of “cGMP” and know that they are supposed to make a “GMP product” to take into the clinic, but often they are not very familiar with what “cGMP” means and why these good practices are so important. As members of the Vaccine Translational Research Branch, we frequently get asked “can’t we use the material we made in the lab in the clinic?” or “aren’t Phase 1 studies exempt from cGMP?” Over the years, we have had many experiences where researchers or their selected contract manufacturing organizations have not applied an appropriate degree of compliance with cGMP suitable for the clinical phase of development. We share some of these experiences and the lessons learned, along with explaining the importance of cGMP, just what cGMP means, and what they can assure, in an effort to de-mystify this subject and facilitate the rapid and safe translational development of HIV vaccines. PMID:25698494

  20. FDA 101: Regulating Biological Products

    MedlinePlus

    ... animal, and microorganism—and may be produced by biotechnology methods. Gene-based and cellular biologics, at the ... other categories of biological products mostly produced by biotechnology methods, including: monoclonal antibodies designed as targeted therapies ...

  1. Different applications of virus-like particles in biology and medicine: Vaccination and delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Shirbaghaee, Zeinab; Bolhassani, Azam

    2016-03-01

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) mimic the whole construct of virus particles devoid of viral genome as used in subunit vaccine design. VLPs can elicit efficient protective immunity as direct immunogens compared to soluble antigens co-administered with adjuvants in several booster injections. Up to now, several prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems such as insect, yeast, plant, and E. coli were used to express recombinant proteins, especially for VLP production. Recent studies are also generating VLPs in plants using different transient expression vectors for edible vaccines. VLPs and viral particles have been applied for different functions such as gene therapy, vaccination, nanotechnology, and diagnostics. Herein, we describe VLP production in different systems as well as its applications in biology and medicine. PMID:26509554

  2. Workshop report: Schistosomiasis vaccine clinical development and product characteristics.

    PubMed

    Mo, Annie X; Colley, Daniel G

    2016-02-17

    A schistosomiasis vaccine meeting was organized to evaluate the utility of a vaccine in public health programs, to discuss clinical development paths, and to define basic product characteristics for desirable vaccines to be used in the context of schistosomiasis control and elimination programs. It was concluded that clinical evaluation of a schistosomiasis vaccine is feasible with appropriate trial design and tools. Some basic Preferred Product Characteristics (PPC) for a human schistosomiasis vaccine and for a veterinary vaccine for bovine use were also proposed. PMID:26721329

  3. Tetravalent DNA vaccine product as a vaccine candidate against dengue.

    PubMed

    Porter, Kevin R; Teneza-Mora, Nimfa; Raviprakash, Kanakatte

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is the most important arbovirus worldwide and is the virus that causes dengue fever and the more severe dengue hemorrhagic fever. There are four serotypes of dengue with each possessing the ability to cause disease. Developing a preventive vaccine is the most efficient and effective way to prevent these diseases, and because immunity to one serotype does not protect against the other serotypes, a vaccine must provide tetravalent protection. We used DNA immunization as a platform to develop a tetravalent vaccine. In this chapter, we describe the laboratory, regulatory, and clinical methodology for evaluating a candidate tetravalent vaccine in a Phase 1 clinical trial. PMID:24715294

  4. Current Status and Development of Vaccines and Other Biologics for Human Rabies Prevention.

    PubMed

    Rupprecht, Charles E; Nagarajan, Thirumeni; Ertl, Hildegund

    2016-06-01

    Rabies is a neglected viral zoonosis with the highest case fatality of any infectious disease. Pasteur's historical accomplishments during the late 19(th) century began the process of human vaccine development, continuing to evolve into the 21(st) century. Over the past 35 years, great improvements occurred in the production of potent tissue culture vaccines and the gradual removal from the market of unsafe nerve tissue products. Timely and appropriate administration of modern biologics virtually assures survivorship, even after severe exposures. Nevertheless, in the developing world, if not provided for free nationally, the cost of a single course of human prophylaxis exceeds the average monthly wage of the common worker. Beyond traditional approaches, recombinant, sub-unit and other novel methods are underway to improve the availability of safe, effective and more affordable rabies biologics. PMID:26796599

  5. Avipoxviruses: infection biology and their use as vaccine vectors

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Avipoxviruses (APVs) belong to the Chordopoxvirinae subfamily of the Poxviridae family. APVs are distributed worldwide and cause disease in domestic, pet and wild birds of many species. APVs are transmitted by aerosols and biting insects, particularly mosquitoes and arthropods and are usually named after the bird species from which they were originally isolated. The virus species Fowlpox virus (FWPV) causes disease in poultry and associated mortality is usually low, but in flocks under stress (other diseases, high production) mortality can reach up to 50%. APVs are also major players in viral vaccine vector development for diseases in human and veterinary medicine. Abortive infection in mammalian cells (no production of progeny viruses) and their ability to accommodate multiple gene inserts are some of the characteristics that make APVs promising vaccine vectors. Although abortive infection in mammalian cells conceivably represents a major vaccine bio-safety advantage, molecular mechanisms restricting APVs to certain hosts are not yet fully understood. This review summarizes the current knowledge relating to APVs, including classification, morphogenesis, host-virus interactions, diagnostics and disease, and also highlights the use of APVs as recombinant vaccine vectors. PMID:21291547

  6. [Optimization of the pertussis vaccine production process].

    PubMed

    Germán Santiago, J; Zamora, N; de la Rosa, E; Alba Carrión, C; Padrón, P; Hernández, M; Betancourt, M; Moretti, N

    1995-01-01

    The production of Pertussis Vaccine was reevaluated at the Instituto Nacional de Higiene "Rafael Rangel" in order to optimise it in terms of vaccine yield, potency, specific toxicity and efficiency (cost per doses). Four different processes, using two culture media (Cohen-Wheeler and Fermentación Glutamato Prolina-1) and two types of bioreactors (25 L Fermentador Caracas and a 450 L industrial fermentor) were compared. Runs were started from freeze-dried strains (134 or 509) and continued until the obtention of the maximal yield. It was found that the combination Fermentación Glutamato Prolina-1/industrial fermentor, shortened the process to 40 hours while consistently yielding a vaccine of higher potency (7.91 +/- 2.56 IU/human dose) and lower specific toxicity in a mice bioassay. In addition, the physical aspect of the preparation was rather homogeneous and free of dark aggregates. Most importantly, the biomass yield more than doubled those of the Fermentador Caracas using the two different media and that in the industrial fermentor with the Cohen-Wheeler medium. Therefore, the cost per doses was substantially decreased. PMID:9279028

  7. Biological Effects of Listeriolysin O: Implications for Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Flores, K. G.; Vivanco-Cid, H.

    2015-01-01

    Listeriolysin O (LLO) is a thiol-activated cholesterol-dependent pore-forming toxin and the major virulence factor of Listeria monocytogenes (LM). Extensive research in recent years has revealed that LLO exerts a wide array of biological activities, during the infection by LM or by itself as recombinant antigen. The spectrum of biological activities induced by LLO includes cytotoxicity, apoptosis induction, endoplasmic reticulum stress response, modulation of gene expression, intracellular calcium oscillations, and proinflammatory activity. In addition, LLO is a highly immunogenic toxin and the major target for innate and adaptive immune responses in different animal models and humans. Recently, the crystal structure of LLO has been published in detail. Here, we review the structure-function relationship for this fascinating microbial molecule, highlighting the potential uses of LLO in the fields of biomedicine and biotechnology, particularly in vaccination. PMID:25874208

  8. Evolution of M. bovis BCG Vaccine: Is Niacin Production Still a Valid Biomarker?

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sarman; Singh, Pragati

    2015-01-01

    BCG vaccine is usually considered to be safe though rarely serious complications have also been reported, often incriminating contamination of the seed strain with pathogenic Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In such circumstances, it becomes prudent to rule out the contamination of the vaccine seed. M. bovis BCG can be confirmed by the absence of nitrate reductase, negative niacin test, and resistance to pyrazinamide and cycloserine. Recently in India, some stocks were found to be niacin positive which led to a national controversy and closer of a vaccine production plant. This prompted us to write this review and the comparative biochemical and genotypic studies were carried out on the these contentious vaccine stocks at the Indian vaccine plant and other seeds and it was found that some BCG vaccine strains and even some strains of M. bovis with eugenic-growth characteristics mainly old laboratory strains may give a positive niacin reaction. Most probably, the repeated subcultures lead to undefined changes at the genetic level in these seed strains. These changing biological characteristics envisage reevaluation of biochemical characters of existing BCG vaccine seeds and framing of newer guidelines for manufacturing, production, safety, and effectiveness of BCG vaccine. PMID:25694828

  9. Automated production of plant-based vaccines and pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Wirz, Holger; Sauer-Budge, Alexis F; Briggs, John; Sharpe, Aaron; Shu, Sudong; Sharon, Andre

    2012-12-01

    A fully automated "factory" was developed that uses tobacco plants to produce large quantities of vaccines and other therapeutic biologics within weeks. This first-of-a-kind factory takes advantage of a plant viral vector technology to produce specific proteins within the leaves of rapidly growing plant biomass. The factory's custom-designed robotic machines plant seeds, nurture the growing plants, introduce a viral vector that directs the plant to produce a target protein, and harvest the biomass once the target protein has accumulated in the plants-all in compliance with Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidelines (e.g., current Good Manufacturing Practices). The factory was designed to be time, cost, and space efficient. The plants are grown in custom multiplant trays. Robots ride up and down a track, servicing the plants and delivering the trays from the lighted, irrigated growth modules to each processing station as needed. Using preprogrammed robots and processing equipment eliminates the need for human contact, preventing potential contamination of the process and economizing the operation. To quickly produce large quantities of protein-based medicines, we transformed a laboratory-based biological process and scaled it into an industrial process. This enables quick, safe, and cost-effective vaccine production that would be required in case of a pandemic. PMID:23015521

  10. Regulatory expectations during product development for tumour vaccines.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, K; Puri, R K

    2004-01-01

    Among various approaches for the treatment of cancer, tumour vaccines stimulate the host immune response against cancer and produce local inflammation that may result in the regression of existing tumour in the body. Therapeutic tumour vaccines may generally be grouped into cellular vaccines, synthetic peptides, purified or recombinant proteins, and multi-antigen preparations including shed, or secreted antigens or cell lysates. While no tumour vaccines have been licensed by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), a large number of products and approaches are being developed and numerous clinical trials are currently ongoing. In this article, we summarize regulatory issues associated with different types of tumour vaccines. The step-wise approach to regulatory requirements including current good manufacturing practices (cGMPs) and characterization of these vaccines at various stages of product development is discussed. PMID:15603183

  11. Vector Design for Improved DNA Vaccine Efficacy, Safety and Production

    PubMed Central

    Williams, James A.

    2013-01-01

    DNA vaccination is a disruptive technology that offers the promise of a new rapidly deployed vaccination platform to treat human and animal disease with gene-based materials. Innovations such as electroporation, needle free jet delivery and lipid-based carriers increase transgene expression and immunogenicity through more effective gene delivery. This review summarizes complementary vector design innovations that, when combined with leading delivery platforms, further enhance DNA vaccine performance. These next generation vectors also address potential safety issues such as antibiotic selection, and increase plasmid manufacturing quality and yield in exemplary fermentation production processes. Application of optimized constructs in combination with improved delivery platforms tangibly improves the prospect of successful application of DNA vaccination as prophylactic vaccines for diverse human infectious disease targets or as therapeutic vaccines for cancer and allergy. PMID:26344110

  12. Vaccine stability study design and analysis to support product licensure.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Timothy L

    2009-11-01

    Stability evaluation supporting vaccine licensure includes studies of bulk intermediates as well as final container product. Long-term and accelerated studies are performed to support shelf life and to determine release limits for the vaccine. Vaccine shelf life is best determined utilizing a formal statistical evaluation outlined in the ICH guidelines, while minimum release is calculated to help assure adequate potency through handling and storage of the vaccine. In addition to supporting release potency determination, accelerated stability studies may be used to support a strategy to recalculate product expiry after an unintended temperature excursion such as a cold storage unit failure or mishandling during transport. Appropriate statistical evaluation of vaccine stability data promotes strategic stability study design, in order to reduce the uncertainty associated with the determination of the degradation rate, and the associated risk to the customer. PMID:19717312

  13. A Synthetic Biology Approach for a Vaccine Platform against Known and Newly Emerging Serotypes of Bluetongue Virus

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Sandro Filipe; Hamers, Claude; Ratinier, Maxime; Shaw, Andrew; Brunet, Sylvie; Hudelet, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bluetongue is one of the major infectious diseases of ruminants and is caused by bluetongue virus (BTV), an arbovirus existing in nature in at least 26 distinct serotypes. Here, we describe the development of a vaccine platform for BTV. The advent of synthetic biology approaches and the development of reverse genetics systems has allowed the rapid and reliable design and production of pathogen genomes which can be subsequently manipulated for vaccine production. We describe BTV vaccines based on “synthetic” viruses in which the outer core proteins of different BTV serotypes are incorporated into a common tissue-culture-adapted backbone. As a means of validation for this approach, we selected two BTV-8 synthetic reassortants and demonstrated their ability to protect sheep against virulent BTV-8 challenge. In addition to further highlight the possibilities of genome manipulation for vaccine production, we also designed and rescued a synthetic BTV chimera containing a VP2 protein, including regions derived from both BTV-1 and BTV-8. Interestingly, while the parental viruses were neutralized only by homologous antisera, the chimeric proteins could be neutralized by both BTV-1 and BTV-8 antisera. These data suggest that neutralizing epitopes are present in different areas of the BTV VP2 and likely “bivalent” strains eliciting neutralizing antibodies for multiple strains can be obtained. IMPORTANCE Overall, this vaccine platform can significantly reduce the time taken from the identification of new BTV strains to the development and production of new vaccines, since the viral genomes of these viruses can be entirely synthesized in vitro. In addition, these vaccines can be brought quickly into the market because they alter the approach, but not the final product, of existing commercial products. PMID:25142610

  14. Biological and phylogenetic characterization of a genotype VII Newcastle disease virus from Venezuela: Efficacy of vaccination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we describe the characterization a virulent genotype VII Newcastle disease virus (NDV) from Venezuela and evaluate the efficacy of heterologous genotype commercial vaccination under field and controlled rearing conditions. Biological pathotyping and molecular analysis were applied. Results sh...

  15. DNA Virus Vectors for Vaccine Production in Plants: Spotlight on Geminiviruses

    PubMed Central

    Hefferon, Kathleen L.

    2014-01-01

    Plants represent a safe, efficacious and inexpensive production platform by which to provide vaccines and other therapeutic proteins to the world’s poor. Plant virus expression vector technology has rapidly become one of the most popular methods to express pharmaceutical proteins in plants. This review discusses several of the state-of-the-art plant expression systems based upon geminiviruses that have been engineered for vaccine production. An overview of the advantages of these small, single-stranded DNA viruses is provided and comparisons are made with other virus expression systems. Advances in the design of several different geminivirus vectors are presented in this review, and examples of vaccines and other biologics generated from each are described. PMID:26344750

  16. IRRIGATION FOR VACCINE PRODUCTION IN PHARMACEUTICAL TOBACCO

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biotechnology companies in North America and Europe have engineered plants to produce recombinant proteins for therapeutic drugs and vaccines. Chlorogen, Inc. located in St. Louis, Missouri, inserted the protective antigen (PA) gene from Bacillus anthracis into tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv LAMD 60...

  17. Monoclonal Antibodies to Shigella Lipopolysaccharide Are Useful for Vaccine Production.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jisheng; Smith, Mark A; Benjamin, William H; Kaminski, Robert W; Wenzel, Heather; Nahm, Moon H

    2016-08-01

    There is a significant need for an effective multivalent Shigella vaccine that targets the most prevalent serotypes. Most Shigella vaccines under development utilize serotype-specific lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) as a major component based on protection and epidemiological data. As vaccine formulations advance from monovalent to multivalent, assays and reagents need to be developed to accurately and reproducibly quantitate the amount of LPSs from multiple serotypes in the final product. To facilitate this effort, we produced 36 hybridomas that secrete monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the O antigen on the LPS from Shigella flexneri 2a, Shigella flexneri 3a, and Shigella sonnei We used six of these monoclonal antibodies for an inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (iELISA), measuring LPSs with high sensitivity and specificity. It was also demonstrated that the Shigella serotype-specific MAbs were useful for bacterial surface staining detected by flow cytometry. These MAbs are also useful for standardizing the serum bactericidal assay (SBA) for Shigella Functional assays, such as the in vitro bactericidal assay, are necessary for vaccine evaluation and may serve as immunological correlates of immunity. An S. flexneri 2a-specific monoclonal antibody killed S. flexneri 2b isolates, suggesting that S. flexneri 2a LPS may induce cross-protection against S. flexneri 2b. Overall, the Shigella LPS-specific MAbs described have potential utility to the vaccine development community for assessing multivalent vaccine composition and as a reliable control for multiple immunoassays used to assess vaccine potency. PMID:27280622

  18. Ontology-supported Research on Vaccine Efficacy, Safety, and Integrative Biological Networks

    PubMed Central

    He, Yongqun

    2016-01-01

    Summary While vaccine efficacy and safety research has dramatically progressed with the methods of in silico prediction and data mining, many challenges still exist. A formal ontology is a human- and computer-interpretable set of terms and relations that represent entities in a specific domain and how these terms relate to each other. Several community-based ontologies (including the Vaccine Ontology, Ontology of Adverse Events, and Ontology of Vaccine Adverse Events) have been developed to support vaccine and adverse event representation, classification, data integration, literature mining of host-vaccine interaction networks, and analysis of vaccine adverse events. The author further proposes minimal vaccine information standards and their ontology representations, ontology-based linked open vaccine data and meta-analysis, an integrative One Network (“OneNet”) Theory of Life, and ontology-based approaches to study and apply the OneNet theory. In the Big Data era, these proposed strategies provide a novel framework for advanced data integration and analysis of fundamental biological networks including vaccine immune mechanisms. PMID:24909153

  19. Biological safety concepts of genetically modified live bacterial vaccines.

    PubMed

    Frey, Joachim

    2007-07-26

    Live vaccines possess the advantage of having access to induce cell-mediated and antibody-mediated immunity; thus in certain cases they are able to prevent infection, and not only disease. Furthermore, live vaccines, particularly bacterial live vaccines, are relatively cheap to produce and easy to apply. Hence they are suitable to immunize large communities or herds. The induction of both cell-mediated immunity as well as antibody-mediated immunity, which is particularly beneficial in inducing mucosal immune responses, is obtained by the vaccine-strain's ability to colonize and multiply in the host without causing disease. For this reason, live vaccines require attenuation of virulence of the bacterium to which immunity must be induced. Traditionally attenuation was achieved simply by multiple passages of the microorganism on growth medium, in animals, eggs or cell cultures or by chemical or physical mutagenesis, which resulted in random mutations that lead to attenuation. In contrast, novel molecular methods enable the development of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) targeted to specific genes that are particularly suited to induce attenuation or to reduce undesirable effects in the tissue in which the vaccine strains can multiply and survive. Since live vaccine strains (attenuated by natural selection or genetic engineering) are potentially released into the environment by the vaccinees, safety issues concerning the medical as well as environmental aspects must be considered. These involve (i) changes in cell, tissue and host tropism, (ii) virulence of the carrier through the incorporation of foreign genes, (iii) reversion to virulence by acquisition of complementation genes, (iv) exchange of genetic information with other vaccine or wild-type strains of the carrier organism and (v) spread of undesired genes such as antibiotic resistance genes. Before live vaccines are applied, the safety issues must be thoroughly evaluated case-by-case. Safety assessment

  20. Enhancing the role of veterinary vaccines reducing zoonotic diseases of humans: Linking systems biology with vaccine development

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Leslie G.; Khare, Sangeeta; Lawhon, Sara D.; Rossetti, Carlos A.; Lewin, Harris A.; Lipton, Mary S.; Turse, Joshua E.; Wylie, Dennis C.; Bai, Yu; Drake, Kenneth L.

    2011-09-22

    The aim of research on infectious diseases is their prevention, and brucellosis and salmonellosis as such are classic examples of worldwide zoonoses for application of a systems biology approach for enhanced rational vaccine development. When used optimally, vaccines prevent disease manifestations, reduce transmission of disease, decrease the need for pharmaceutical intervention, and improve the health and welfare of animals, as well as indirectly protecting against zoonotic diseases of people. Advances in the last decade or so using comprehensive systems biology approaches linking genomics, proteomics, bioinformatics, and biotechnology with immunology, pathogenesis and vaccine formulation and delivery are expected to enable enhanced approaches to vaccine development. The goal of this paper is to evaluate the role of computational systems biology analysis of host:pathogen interactions (the interactome) as a tool for enhanced rational design of vaccines. Systems biology is bringing a new, more robust approach to veterinary vaccine design based upon a deeper understanding of the host pathogen interactions and its impact on the host's molecular network of the immune system. A computational systems biology method was utilized to create interactome models of the host responses to Brucella melitensis (BMEL), Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis (MAP), Salmonella enterica Typhimurium (STM), and a Salmonella mutant (isogenic *sipA, sopABDE2) and linked to the basis for rational development of vaccines for brucellosis and salmonellosis as reviewed by Adams et al. and Ficht et al. [1,2]. A bovine ligated ileal loop biological model was established to capture the host gene expression response at multiple time points post infection. New methods based on Dynamic Bayesian Network (DBN) machine learning were employed to conduct a comparative pathogenicity analysis of 219 signaling and metabolic pathways and 1620 gene ontology (GO) categories that defined the host's biosignatures

  1. Comparative biological activities of acellular pertussis vaccines produced by Kitasato.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, M; Izumiya, K; Sato, T; Yoshino, K; Nakagawa, N; Ohoishi, M; Hoshino, M

    1991-04-01

    The quality of 14 lots of acellular pertussis-diphtheria-tetanus (AC-PDT) vaccines manufactured by the Kitasato Institute during the period 1987-1990 were investigated. The geometric means of HSU, LPU, and BWDU were 0.078, 0.257, and 7.33 per ml respectively. The potency was higher than 14 IU per ml. These results indicated the consistency of the Kitasato AC-PDT vaccines. The antibody response to the AC-PDT vaccines was measured in primary and secondary vaccinated mice by ELISA. IgG antibody response to FHA and PT was obtained in all immunized mice (P less than 0.001) after the primary injection. In contrast, IgG antibody response to fimbriae 2 showed a significant titer rise (P less than 0.001) after the booster injection. The results indicated that the Kitasato AC-P vaccines consisted of protein, PT and FHA as the major antigens, and a little agglutinogen as the minor antigen. PMID:1798236

  2. Antigenicity of Streptococcus agalactiae extracellular products and vaccine efficacy.

    PubMed

    Pasnik, D J; Evans, J J; Panangala, V S; Klesius, P H; Shelby, R A; Shoemaker, C A

    2005-04-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae is a major bacterial pathogen that is the cause of serious economic losses in many species of freshwater, marine and estuarine fish worldwide. A highly efficacious S. agalactiae vaccine was developed using extracellular products (ECP) and formalin-killed whole cells of S. agalactiae. The vaccine efficacy following storage of S. agalactiae ECP and formalin-killed S. agalactiae cells at 4 degrees C for 1 year was determined. The stored ECP containing S. agalactiae formalin-killed cells failed to prevent morbidity and mortality among the vaccinated fish, and the relative percentage survival was 29. Serum antibody responses of the stored ECP and freshly prepared ECP against soluble whole cell extract of S. agalactiae indicated that significantly less antibody was produced in fish immunized with stored ECP and S. agalactiae cells than in those fish immunized with freshly prepared ECP and S. agalactiae cells at day 31 post-vaccination. Silver staining of sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gels and immunostaining of Western blots with tilapia antiserum to S. agalactiae revealed that predominant 54 and 55 kDa bands were present in the freshly prepared ECP fraction. The 55 kDa band was absent from the stored ECP and new bands below 54 kDa appeared on the Western blot. The results of this study on S. agalactiae ECP provide evidence for a correlation between protection and antibody production to ECP and for the importance of the 55 kDa ECP antigen for vaccine efficacy. PMID:15813862

  3. Vaccinations

    MedlinePlus

    ... vaccinated? For many years, a set of annual vaccinations was considered normal and necessary for dogs and ... to protect for a full year. Consequently, one vaccination schedule will not work well for all pets. ...

  4. Vaccine production: upstream processing with adherent or suspension cell lines.

    PubMed

    Genzel, Yvonne; Rödig, Jana; Rapp, Erdmann; Reichl, Udo

    2014-01-01

    The production of viral vaccines in cell culture can be accomplished with primary, diploid, or continuous (transformed) cell lines. Each cell line, each virus type, and each vaccine preparation require the specific design of upstream and downstream processing. Media have to be selected as well as production vessels, cultivation conditions, and modes of operation. Many viruses only replicate to high titers in adherently growing cells, but similar to processes established for recombinant protein production, an increasing number of suspension cell lines is being evaluated for future use. Here, we describe key issues to be considered for the establishment of large-scale virus production in bioreactors. As an example upstream processing of cell culture-derived influenza virus production is described in more detail for adherently growing and for suspension cells. In particular, use of serum-containing, serum-free, and chemically defined media as well as choice of cultivation vessel are considered. PMID:24297427

  5. 9 CFR 114.4 - Identification of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Identification of biological products... REQUIREMENTS FOR BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS § 114.4 Identification of biological products. Suitable tags or labels of... biological products, all component parts to be combined to form a biological product, all biological...

  6. 9 CFR 114.4 - Identification of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Identification of biological products... REQUIREMENTS FOR BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS § 114.4 Identification of biological products. Suitable tags or labels of... biological products, all component parts to be combined to form a biological product, all biological...

  7. 9 CFR 114.4 - Identification of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Identification of biological products... REQUIREMENTS FOR BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS § 114.4 Identification of biological products. Suitable tags or labels of... biological products, all component parts to be combined to form a biological product, all biological...

  8. 9 CFR 114.4 - Identification of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Identification of biological products... REQUIREMENTS FOR BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS § 114.4 Identification of biological products. Suitable tags or labels of... biological products, all component parts to be combined to form a biological product, all biological...

  9. 9 CFR 114.4 - Identification of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Identification of biological products... REQUIREMENTS FOR BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS § 114.4 Identification of biological products. Suitable tags or labels of... biological products, all component parts to be combined to form a biological product, all biological...

  10. Hijacking bacterial glycosylation for the production of glycoconjugates, from vaccines to humanised glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Cuccui, Jon; Wren, Brendan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Glycosylation or the modification of a cellular component with a carbohydrate moiety has been demonstrated in all three domains of life as a basic post-translational process important in a range of biological processes. This review will focus on the latest studies attempting to exploit bacterial N-linked protein glycosylation for glycobiotechnological applications including glycoconjugate vaccine and humanised glycoprotein production. The challenges that remain for these approaches to reach full biotechnological maturity will be discussed. Key findings Oligosaccharyltransferase-dependent N-linked glycosylation can be exploited to make glycoconjugate vaccines against bacterial pathogens. Few technical limitations remain, but it is likely that the technologies developed will soon be considered a cost-effective and flexible alternative to current chemical-based methods of vaccine production. Some highlights from current glycoconjugate vaccines developed using this in-vivo production system include a vaccine against Shigella dysenteriae O1 that has passed phase 1 clinical trials, a vaccine against the tier 1 pathogen Francisella tularensis that has shown efficacy in mice and a vaccine against Staphylococcus aureus serotypes 5 and 8. Generation of humanised glycoproteins within bacteria was considered impossible due to the distinct nature of glycan modification in eukaryotes and prokaryotes. We describe the method used to overcome this conundrum to allow engineering of a eukaryotic pentasaccharide core sugar modification within Escherichia coli. This core was assembled by combining the function of the initiating transferase WecA, several Alg genes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the oligosaccharyltransferase function of the Campylobacter jejuni PglB. Further exploitation of a cytoplasmic N-linked glycosylation system found in Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae where the central enzyme is known as N-linking glycosyltransferase has overcome some of the

  11. [Viral safety of biological medicinal products].

    PubMed

    Stühler, A; Blümel, J

    2014-10-01

    Viral safety of blood donations, plasma products, viral vaccines and gene therapy medicinal products, biotechnical-derived products and tissue and cell therapy products is a particular challenge. These products are manufactured using a variety of human or animal-derived starting materials and reagents; therefore, extensive testing of donors and of cell banks established for production is required. Furthermore, the viral safety of reagents, such as bovine sera, porcine trypsin and human transferrin or albumin needs to be considered. Whenever possible, manufacturing steps for inactivation or removal of viruses should be introduced; however, sometimes it is not possible to introduce such steps for tissues or cell-based medicinal products as the activity and viability of cells will be compromised. It might be possible to implement steps for inactivation or removal of potential contaminating enveloped viruses only for production of small and stable non-enveloped viral gene vectors. PMID:25123140

  12. Structural and Computational Biology in the Design of Immunogenic Vaccine Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Liljeroos, Lassi; Malito, Enrico; Ferlenghi, Ilaria; Bottomley, Matthew James

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination is historically one of the most important medical interventions for the prevention of infectious disease. Previously, vaccines were typically made of rather crude mixtures of inactivated or attenuated causative agents. However, over the last 10–20 years, several important technological and computational advances have enabled major progress in the discovery and design of potently immunogenic recombinant protein vaccine antigens. Here we discuss three key breakthrough approaches that have potentiated structural and computational vaccine design. Firstly, genomic sciences gave birth to the field of reverse vaccinology, which has enabled the rapid computational identification of potential vaccine antigens. Secondly, major advances in structural biology, experimental epitope mapping, and computational epitope prediction have yielded molecular insights into the immunogenic determinants defining protective antigens, enabling their rational optimization. Thirdly, and most recently, computational approaches have been used to convert this wealth of structural and immunological information into the design of improved vaccine antigens. This review aims to illustrate the growing power of combining sequencing, structural and computational approaches, and we discuss how this may drive the design of novel immunogens suitable for future vaccines urgently needed to increase the global prevention of infectious disease. PMID:26526043

  13. Constructing target product profiles (TPPs) to help vaccines overcome post-approval obstacles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bruce Y; Burke, Donald S

    2010-04-01

    As history has demonstrated, post-approval obstacles can impede a vaccine's use and potentially lead to its withdrawal. Addressing these potential obstacles when changes in a vaccine's technology can still be easily made may improve a vaccine's chances of success. Augmented vaccine target product profiles (TPPs) can help vaccine scientists better understand and anticipate these obstacles and galvanize conversations among various vaccine stakeholders (e.g., scientists, marketers, business development managers, policy makers, public health officials, health care workers, third party payors, etc.) earlier in a vaccine's development. PMID:19782109

  14. Biological production of products from waste gases

    DOEpatents

    Gaddy, James L.

    2002-01-22

    A method and apparatus are designed for converting waste gases from industrial processes such as oil refining, and carbon black, coke, ammonia, and methanol production, into useful products. The method includes introducing the waste gases into a bioreactor where they are fermented to various products, such as organic acids, alcohols, hydrogen, single cell protein, and salts of organic acids by anaerobic bacteria within the bioreactor. These valuable end products are then recovered, separated and purified.

  15. Synthetic biology advances for pharmaceutical production

    PubMed Central

    Breitling, Rainer; Takano, Eriko

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biology enables a new generation of microbial engineering for the biotechnological production of pharmaceuticals and other high-value chemicals. This review presents an overview of recent advances in the field, describing new computational and experimental tools for the discovery, optimization and production of bioactive molecules, and outlining progress towards the application of these tools to pharmaceutical production systems. PMID:25744872

  16. Patent landscape for biological hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Levin, David B; Lubieniechi, Simona

    2013-12-01

    Research and development of biological hydrogen production have expanded significantly in the past decade. Production of renewable hydrogen from agricultural, forestry, or other organic waste streams offers the possibility to contribute to hydrogen production capacity with no net, or at least with lower, greenhouse gas emissions. Significant improvements in the volumetric or molar yields of hydrogen production have been accomplished through genetic engineering of hydrogen synthesizing microorganisms. Although no commercial scale renewable biohydrogen production facilities are currently in operation, a few pilot scale systems have been demonstrated successfully, and while industrial scale production of biohydrogen still faces a number of technical and economic barriers, understanding the patent landscape is an important step in developing a viable commercialization strategy. In this paper, we review patents filed on biological hydrogen production. Patents on biohydrogen production from both the Canadian and American Patents databases were classified into three main groups: (1) patents for biological hydrogen by direct photolysis; (2) patents for biological hydrogen by dark fermentation; and (3) patents for process engineering for biological hydrogen production. PMID:23521705

  17. A Design of Experiment approach to predict product and process parameters for a spray dried influenza vaccine.

    PubMed

    Kanojia, Gaurav; Willems, Geert-Jan; Frijlink, Henderik W; Kersten, Gideon F A; Soema, Peter C; Amorij, Jean-Pierre

    2016-09-25

    Spray dried vaccine formulations might be an alternative to traditional lyophilized vaccines. Compared to lyophilization, spray drying is a fast and cheap process extensively used for drying biologicals. The current study provides an approach that utilizes Design of Experiments for spray drying process to stabilize whole inactivated influenza virus (WIV) vaccine. The approach included systematically screening and optimizing the spray drying process variables, determining the desired process parameters and predicting product quality parameters. The process parameters inlet air temperature, nozzle gas flow rate and feed flow rate and their effect on WIV vaccine powder characteristics such as particle size, residual moisture content (RMC) and powder yield were investigated. Vaccine powders with a broad range of physical characteristics (RMC 1.2-4.9%, particle size 2.4-8.5μm and powder yield 42-82%) were obtained. WIV showed no significant loss in antigenicity as revealed by hemagglutination test. Furthermore, descriptive models generated by DoE software could be used to determine and select (set) spray drying process parameter. This was used to generate a dried WIV powder with predefined (predicted) characteristics. Moreover, the spray dried vaccine powders retained their antigenic stability even after storage for 3 months at 60°C. The approach used here enabled the generation of a thermostable, antigenic WIV vaccine powder with desired physical characteristics that could be potentially used for pulmonary administration. PMID:27523619

  18. Vaccines

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Vaccinations are injections of antigens into the body. Once the antigens enter the blood, they circulate along ... suppressor T cells stop the attack. After a vaccination, the body will have a memory of an ...

  19. Models of risk assessments for biologicals or related products in the European Union.

    PubMed

    Moos, M

    1995-12-01

    In the context of veterinary biologicals, environmental risk assessment means the evaluation of the risk to human health and the environment (which includes plants and animals) connected with the release of such products. The following categories or types of veterinary biologicals can be distinguished: non-genetically modified organisms (non-GMOs) (inactivated/live) GMOs (inactivated/live) carrier products related products (e.g. non-specific "inducers'). Suitable models used in risk assessment for these products should aim to identify all possible adverse effects. A good working model should lead, at least, to a qualitative judgement on the environmental risk of the biological product (e.g. negligible, low, medium, severe, unacceptable). Quantifiable outcomes are rare; therefore, the producer of a biological product and the European control authorities should accept only models which are based on testable points and which are relevant to the type of product and its instructions for use. In view of animal welfare aspects, models working without animals should be preferred. In recent years, some of these methods have been integrated into safety tests described in European Union Directives and in monographs of the European Pharmacopoeia. By reviewing vaccine/registration problems (e.g. Aujeszky's disease live vaccine for pigs, and vaccinia-vectored rabies vaccine), several models used in risk assessment are demonstrated and discussed. PMID:8639943

  20. On the optimal production capacity for influenza vaccine.

    PubMed

    Forslid, Rikard; Herzing, Mathias

    2015-06-01

    This paper analyzes the profit maximizing capacity choice of a monopolistic vaccine producer facing the uncertain event of a pandemic in a homogenous population of forward-looking individuals. For any capacity level, the monopolist solves the intertemporal price discrimination problem within the dynamic setting generated by the standard mathematical epidemiological model of infectious diseases. Even though consumers are assumed to be identical, the monopolist will be able to exploit the ex post heterogeneity between infected and susceptible individuals by raising the price of vaccine in response to the increasing hazard rate. The monopolist thus bases its investment decision on the expected profits from the optimal price path given the infection dynamics. It is shown that the monopolist will always choose to invest in a lower production capacity than the social planner. Through numerical simulation, it is demonstrated how the loss to society of having a monopoly producer decreases with the speed of infection transmission. Moreover, it is illustrated how the monopolist's optimal vaccination rate increases as its discount rate rises for cost parameters based on Swedish data. However, the effect of the firm discount rate on its investment decision is sensitive to assumptions regarding the cost of production capacity. PMID:24798081

  1. Human adenovirus-vectored foot-and-mouth disease vaccines: establishment of a vaccine product profile through in vitro testing.

    PubMed

    Brake, D A; McIlhaney, M; Miller, T; Christianson, K; Keene, A; Lohnas, G; Purcell, C; Neilan, J; Schutta, C; Barrera, J; Burrage, T; Brough, D E; Butman, B T

    2012-01-01

    Next generation, foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) molecular vaccines based on replication deficient human adenovirus serotype 5 viral vectored delivery of FMD capsid genes (AdFMD) are being developed by the United States Dept. of Homeland Security and industry partners. The strategic goal of this program is to develop AdFMD licensed vaccines for the USA National Veterinary Stockpile for use, if needed, as emergency response tools during an FMD outbreak. This vaccine platform provides a unique opportunity to develop a set of in vitro analytical parameters to generate an AdFMD vaccine product profile to replace the current lot release test for traditional, inactivated FMD vaccines that requires FMDV challenge in livestock. The possibility of an indirect FMD vaccine potency test based on a serological alternative was initially investigated for a lead vaccine candidate, Adt.A24. Results show that serum virus neutralization (SVN) based serology testing for Adt.A24 vaccine lot release is not feasible, at least not in the context of vaccine potency assessment at one week post-vaccination. Thus, an in vitro infectious titer assay (tissue culture infectious dose 50, TCID50) which measures FMD infectious (protein expression) titer was established. Pre-validation results show acceptable assay variability and linearity and these data support further studies to validate the TCID50 assay as a potential potency release test. In addition, a quantitative physiochemical assay (HPLC) and three immunochemical assays (Fluorescent Focus-Forming Unit (FFU); tissue culture expression dose 50 (TCED50); Western blot) were developed for potential use as in vitro assays to monitor AdFMD vaccine lot-to-lot consistency and other potential applications. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using a traditional modified-live vaccine virus infectivity assay in combination with a set of physiochemical and immunochemical tests to build a vaccine product profile that will ensure the each Ad

  2. Biological production of organic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Jianping; Paddock, Troy; Carrieri, Damian; Maness, Pin-Ching; Seibert, Michael

    2016-04-12

    Strains of cyanobacteria that produce high levels of alpha ketoglutarate (AKG) and pyruvate are disclosed herein. Methods of culturing these cyanobacteria to produce AKG or pyruvate and recover AKG or pyruvate from the culture are also described herein. Nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides that function as ethylene-forming enzymes and their use in the production of ethylene are further disclosed herein. These nucleic acids may be expressed in hosts such as cyanobacteria, which in turn may be cultured to produce ethylene.

  3. Use of viral vectors for vaccine production in plants.

    PubMed

    Cañizares, M Carmen; Nicholson, Liz; Lomonossoff, George P

    2005-06-01

    The small size of plant viral genomes, the ease with which they can be manipulated, and the simplicity of the infection process is making the viral vectors an attractive alternative to the transgenic systems for the expression of foreign proteins in plants. One use of these virus expression systems is for vaccine production. There are two basic types of viral system that have been developed for the production of immunogenic peptides and proteins in plants: epitope presentation and polypeptide expression systems. In this review, we discuss advances made in this field. PMID:15877604

  4. Antiviral Biologic Produced in DNA Vaccine/Goose Platform Protects Hamsters Against Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome When Administered Post-exposure

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Thomas; Nilles, Matthew L.; Kwilas, Steve A.; Josleyn, Matthew D.; Hammerbeck, Christopher D.; Schiltz, James; Royals, Michael; Ballantyne, John; Hooper, Jay W.; Bradley, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Andes virus (ANDV) and ANDV-like viruses are responsible for most hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) cases in South America. Recent studies in Chile indicate that passive transfer of convalescent human plasma shows promise as a possible treatment for HPS. Unfortunately, availability of convalescent plasma from survivors of this lethal disease is very limited. We are interested in exploring the concept of using DNA vaccine technology to produce antiviral biologics, including polyclonal neutralizing antibodies for use in humans. Geese produce IgY and an alternatively spliced form, IgYΔFc, that can be purified at high concentrations from egg yolks. IgY lacks the properties of mammalian Fc that make antibodies produced in horses, sheep, and rabbits reactogenic in humans. Geese were vaccinated with an ANDV DNA vaccine encoding the virus envelope glycoproteins. All geese developed high-titer neutralizing antibodies after the second vaccination, and maintained high-levels of neutralizing antibodies as measured by a pseudovirion neutralization assay (PsVNA) for over 1 year. A booster vaccination resulted in extraordinarily high levels of neutralizing antibodies (i.e., PsVNA80 titers >100,000). Analysis of IgY and IgYΔFc by epitope mapping show these antibodies to be highly reactive to specific amino acid sequences of ANDV envelope glycoproteins. We examined the protective efficacy of the goose-derived antibody in the hamster model of lethal HPS. α-ANDV immune sera, or IgY/IgYΔFc purified from eggs, were passively transferred to hamsters subcutaneously starting 5 days after an IM challenge with ANDV (25 LD50). Both immune sera, and egg-derived purified IgY/IgYΔFc, protected 8 of 8 and 7 of 8 hamsters, respectively. In contrast, all hamsters receiving IgY/IgYΔFc purified from normal geese (n=8), or no-treatment (n=8), developed lethal HPS. These findings demonstrate that the DNA vaccine/goose platform can be used to produce a candidate antiviral biological product

  5. Biological challenges and technological opportunities for respiratory syncytial virus vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Graham, Barney S

    2011-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is an important cause of respiratory disease causing high rates of hospitalizations in infants, significant morbidity in children and adults, and excess mortality in the elderly. Major barriers to vaccine development include early age of RSV infection, capacity of RSV to evade innate immunity, failure of RSV-induced adaptive immunity to prevent reinfection, history of RSV vaccine-enhanced disease, and lack of an animal model fully permissive to human RSV infection. These biological challenges, safety concerns, and practical issues have significantly prolonged the RSV vaccine development process. One great advantage compared to other difficult viral vaccine targets is that passively administered neutralizing monoclonal antibody is known to protect infants from severe RSV disease. Therefore, the immunological goals for vaccine development are to induce effective neutralizing antibody to prevent infection and to avoid inducing T-cell response patterns associated with enhanced disease. Live-attenuated RSV and replication-competent chimeric viruses are in advanced clinical trials. Gene-based strategies, which can control the specificity and phenotypic properties of RSV-specific T-cell responses utilizing replication-defective vectors and which may improve on immunity from natural infection, are progressing through preclinical testing. Atomic level structural information on RSV envelope glycoproteins in complex with neutralizing antibodies is guiding design of new vaccine antigens that may be able to elicit RSV-specific antibody responses without induction of RSV-specific T-cell responses. These new technologies may allow development of vaccines that can protect against RSV-mediated disease in infants and establish a new immunological paradigm in the host to achieve more durable protection against reinfection. PMID:21198670

  6. 9 CFR 114.6 - Mixing biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Mixing biological products. 114.6 Section 114.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS § 114.6 Mixing biological products. Each biological product, when in liquid form,...

  7. 9 CFR 114.6 - Mixing biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mixing biological products. 114.6 Section 114.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS § 114.6 Mixing biological products. Each biological product, when in liquid form,...

  8. 9 CFR 114.6 - Mixing biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Mixing biological products. 114.6 Section 114.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS § 114.6 Mixing biological products. Each biological product, when in liquid form,...

  9. 9 CFR 114.6 - Mixing biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mixing biological products. 114.6 Section 114.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS § 114.6 Mixing biological products. Each biological product, when in liquid form,...

  10. 9 CFR 114.6 - Mixing biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mixing biological products. 114.6 Section 114.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS § 114.6 Mixing biological products. Each biological product, when in liquid form,...

  11. [Book review] Developments in biological standardization (Vol. 49): Fish Biologics: Seriodiagnostics and Vaccines, edited by W. Hennessen and D. P. Andersen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, D.P.

    1981-01-01

    Review of: Developments in Biologicals, Vol. 49. Fish Biologics: Serodiagnostics and Vaccines. International Symposium, Leetown, W.Va., April 1981. Editor(s): Hennessen, W. (Bern); Andersen, D.P. (Leetown, W.Va.); Society/Societies: International Association of Biological Standardization, XII + 496 p., 90 fig., 110 tab., soft cover, 1981. ISBN: 978-3-8055-3471-0.

  12. Recombinant and epitope-based vaccines on the road to the market and implications for vaccine design and production.

    PubMed

    Oyarzún, Patricio; Kobe, Bostjan

    2016-03-01

    Novel vaccination approaches based on rational design of B- and T-cell epitopes - epitope-based vaccines - are making progress in the clinical trial pipeline. The epitope-focused recombinant protein-based malaria vaccine (termed RTS,S) is a next-generation approach that successfully reached phase-III trials, and will potentially become the first commercial vaccine against a human parasitic disease. Progress made on methods such as recombinant DNA technology, advanced cell-culture techniques, immunoinformatics and rational design of immunogens are driving the development of these novel concepts. Synthetic recombinant proteins comprising both B- and T-cell epitopes can be efficiently produced through modern biotechnology and bioprocessing methods, and can enable the induction of large repertoires of immune specificities. In particular, the inclusion of appropriate CD4+ T-cell epitopes is increasingly considered a key vaccine component to elicit robust immune responses, as suggested by results coming from HIV-1 clinical trials. In silico strategies for vaccine design are under active development to address genetic variation in pathogens and several broadly protective "universal" influenza and HIV-1 vaccines are currently at different stages of clinical trials. Other methods focus on improving population coverage in target populations by rationally considering specificity and prevalence of the HLA proteins, though a proof-of-concept in humans has not been demonstrated yet. Overall, we expect immunoinformatics and bioprocessing methods to become a central part of the next-generation epitope-based vaccine development and production process. PMID:26430814

  13. Synthetic biology of fungal natural products

    PubMed Central

    Mattern, Derek J.; Valiante, Vito; Unkles, Shiela E.; Brakhage, Axel A.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biology is an ever-expanding field in science, also encompassing the research area of fungal natural product (NP) discovery and production. Until now, different aspects of synthetic biology have been covered in fungal NP studies from the manipulation of different regulatory elements and heterologous expression of biosynthetic pathways to the engineering of different multidomain biosynthetic enzymes such as polyketide synthases or non-ribosomal peptide synthetases. The following review will cover some of the exemplary studies of synthetic biology in filamentous fungi showing the capacity of these eukaryotes to be used as model organisms in the field. From the vast array of different NPs produced to the ease for genetic manipulation, filamentous fungi have proven to be an invaluable source for the further development of synthetic biology tools. PMID:26284053

  14. Standardization for natural product synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huimin; Medema, Marnix H

    2016-08-27

    Standardization is one of the foundational features of modern-day engineering, and the use of standardized parts and processes is a key element that distinguishes bona fide synthetic biology from traditional genetic engineering. Here, we discuss the role of standardization in natural product synthetic biology, focusing on standardization of data on biosynthetic pathways and gene clusters, as well as the role of standardization in the process of biosynthetic gene cluster engineering. PMID:27313083

  15. Utilizing population variation, vaccination, and systems biology to study human immunology

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, John S.

    2016-01-01

    The move toward precision medicine has highlighted the importance of understanding biological variability within and across individuals in the human population. In particular, given the prevalent involvement of the immune system in diverse pathologies, an important question is how much and what information about the state of the immune system is required to enable accurate prediction of future health and response to medical interventions. Towards addressing this question, recent studies using vaccination as a model perturbation and systems-biology approaches are beginning to provide a glimpse of how natural population variation together with multiplexed, high-throughput measurement and computational analysis can be used to uncover predictors of immune response quality in humans. Here I discuss recent developments in this emerging field, with emphasis on baseline correlates of vaccination responses, sources of immune-state variability, as well as relevant features of study design, data generation, and computational analysis. PMID:26187853

  16. Vaccine production training to develop the workforce of foreign institutions supported by the BARDA influenza vaccine capacity building program.

    PubMed

    Tarbet, E Bart; Dorward, James T; Day, Craig W; Rashid, Kamal A

    2013-03-15

    In the event of an influenza pandemic, vaccination will be the best method to limit virus spread. However, lack of vaccine biomanufacturing capacity means there will not be enough vaccine for the world's population. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA) provides support to the World Health Organization to enhance global vaccine production capacity in developing countries. However, developing a trained workforce in some of those countries is necessary. Biomanufacturing is labor-intensive, requiring unique skills not found in traditional academic programs. Employees must understand the scientific basis of biotechnology, operate specialized equipment, and work in an environment regulated by good manufacturing practices (cGMP). Therefore, BARDA supported development of vaccine biomanufacturing training at Utah State University. The training consisted of a three-week industry-focused course for participants from institutions supported by the BARDA and WHO influenza vaccine production capacity building program. The curriculum was divided into six components: (1) biosafety, (2) cell culture and growth of cells in bioreactors, (3) virus assays and inactivation, (4) scale-up strategies, (5) downstream processing, and (6) egg- and cell-based vaccine production and cGMP. Lectures were combined with laboratory exercises to provide a balance of theory and hands-on training. The initial course included sixteen participants from seven countries including: Egypt, Romania, Russia, Serbia, South Korea, Thailand, and Vietnam. The participant's job responsibilities included: Production, Quality Control, Quality Assurance, and Research; and their education ranged from bachelors to doctoral level. Internal course evaluations utilized descriptive methods including surveys, observation of laboratory activities, and interviews with participants. Generally, participants had appropriate academic backgrounds, but

  17. Development of a Salmonella cross-protective vaccine for food animal production systems.

    PubMed

    Heithoff, Douglas M; House, John K; Thomson, Peter C; Mahan, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Intensive livestock production is associated with increased Salmonella exposure, transmission, animal disease, and contamination of food and water supplies. Modified live Salmonella enterica vaccines that lack a functional DNA adenine methylase (Dam) confer cross-protection to a diversity of salmonellae in experimental models of murine, avian, ovine, and bovine models of salmonellosis. However, the commercial success of any vaccine is dependent upon the therapeutic index, the ratio of safety/efficacy. Herein, secondary virulence-attenuating mutations targeted to genes involved in intracellular and/or systemic survival were introduced into Salmonella dam vaccines to screen for vaccine candidates that were safe in the animal and the environment, while maintaining the capacity to confer cross-protective immunity to pathogenic salmonellae serotypes. Salmonella dam mgtC, dam sifA, and dam spvB vaccine strains exhibited significantly improved vaccine safety as evidenced by the failure to give rise to virulent revertants during the infective process, contrary to the parental Salmonella dam vaccine. Further, these vaccines exhibited a low grade persistence in host tissues that was associated with reduced vaccine shedding, reduced environmental persistence, and induction of cross-protective immunity to pathogenic serotypes derived from infected livestock. These data indicate that Salmonella dam double mutant vaccines are suitable for commercial applications against salmonellosis in livestock production systems. Reducing pre-harvest salmonellae load through vaccination will promote the health and productivity of livestock and reduce contamination of livestock-derived food products, while enhancing overall food safety. PMID:25448106

  18. 9 CFR 112.6 - Packaging biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Packaging biological products. 112.6... § 112.6 Packaging biological products. (a) Each multiple-dose final container of a biological product... equipment. (e) Final containers of biological product prepared at a licensed establishment, or imported,...

  19. 9 CFR 112.6 - Packaging biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Packaging biological products. 112.6... § 112.6 Packaging biological products. (a) Each multiple-dose final container of a biological product... equipment. (e) Final containers of biological product prepared at a licensed establishment, or imported,...

  20. 9 CFR 112.6 - Packaging biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Packaging biological products. 112.6... § 112.6 Packaging biological products. (a) Each multiple-dose final container of a biological product... equipment. (e) Final containers of biological product prepared at a licensed establishment, or imported,...

  1. 9 CFR 112.6 - Packaging biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Packaging biological products. 112.6... § 112.6 Packaging biological products. (a) Each multiple-dose final container of a biological product... equipment. (e) Final containers of biological product prepared at a licensed establishment, or imported,...

  2. Do biological medicinal products pose a risk to the environment?: a current view on ecopharmacovigilance.

    PubMed

    Kühler, Thomas C; Andersson, Mikael; Carlin, Gunnar; Johnsson, Ann; Akerblom, Lennart

    2009-01-01

    The occurrence of active pharmaceutical substances in the environment is of growing concern. The vast majority of the compounds in question are of low molecular weight, intended for oral use and designed to tolerate, for example, the digestive enzymes in the upper alimentary tract, the harsh milieus found in the acidic stomach, or the microbe rich intestine. Accordingly, these xenobiotic compounds may, due to their inherent biological activity, constitute a risk to the environment. Biological medicinal products, for example recombinant human insulin or monoclonal antibodies, however, are different. They are primarily made up of oligomers or polymers of amino acids, sugars or nucleotides and are thus readily metabolized. They are therefore generally not considered to pose any risk to the environment. Certain classes of biological medicinal products, however, are associated with specific safety issues. Genetically modified organisms as vectors in vaccines or in gene therapy products have attracted much attention in this regard. Issues include the degree of attenuation of the live recombinant vaccine, replication restrictions of the vaccine vector, alteration of the host and tissue tropism of the vector, the possibility of reversion to virulence, and risk to the ecosystem. In this review we discuss the fate and the potential environmental impact of biological medicinal products following clinical use from an ecopharmacovigilance point of view, and review relevant policy documents and regulatory statements. PMID:19810773

  3. [Public laboratories for vaccine production: a new paradigm].

    PubMed

    Homma, A; di Fabio, J L; de Quadros, C

    1998-10-01

    In Latin America and the Caribbean, public laboratories that produce vaccines have contributed in varying degrees to the control and eradication of vaccine-preventable diseases, and several of them are manufacturing vaccines that are routinely applied in national immunization programs, such as the vaccine against tuberculosis (made with the bacillus of Calmette-Guérin, BCG), the triple vaccine against diphtheriatetanus-pertussis (DTP), tetanus toxoid (TT), the vaccine against measles and the oral vaccine against polio. Thanks to recent scientific strides, one can foresee an important increase in the number of safe and effective vaccines that will be available in the near future for use in routine vaccination programs. However, there are high costs involved in developing such vaccines and in protecting the intellectual property rights involved, and few laboratories in Latin America have the technical capacity to research and develop these vaccines. Such factors will affect the speed with which they are assimilated into vaccination programs in countries of the Region. Currently, public laboratories that manufacture vaccines in the Region are not equipped to compete in this new scenario and run the risk of being completely outmarketed. Thus, they must radically change their style of management and their scientific and technical capabilities, backed by a commitment from governments to improve and strengthen those political and financial aspects that can assure that national laboratories participate in the sustainable supply of vaccines to immunization programs, as well as in researching, developing, and producing new vaccines. PMID:9924504

  4. Beware When Buying "All Natural" Erectile Dysfunction Products

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... search Popular Content Home Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics ... Area Product Areas back Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics ...

  5. Application of new vaccine technology to improve immunity and productivity: advantages and challenges

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vaccines play a critical role in the poultry industry’s efforts to protect animals against disease. However, providing safe, efficacious, and cost-effective vaccines remains a constant concern to the industry. Recent advances in avian immunology, genetics, molecular biology, and pathogenesis have ...

  6. [VACCINES].

    PubMed

    Bellver Capella, Vincente

    2015-10-01

    Vaccines are an extraordinary instrument of immunization of the population against infectious diseases. Around them there are many ethical issues. One of the most debated is what to do with certain groups opposition to vaccination of their children. States have managed in different ways the conflict between the duty of vaccination and the refusal to use vaccines: some impose the vaccination and others simply promote it. In this article we deal with which of these two approaches is the most suitable from an ethical and legal point of view. We stand up for the second option, which is the current one in Spain, and we propose some measures which should be kept in mind to improve immunization programs. PMID:26685562

  7. Vaccines

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... help the body defend itself against foreign invaders. As the antigens invade the body's tissues, they attract ... the suppressor T cells stop the attack. After a vaccination, the body will have a memory of ...

  8. 9 CFR 114.18 - Reprocessing of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Reprocessing of biological products. 114.18 Section 114.18 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... REQUIREMENTS FOR BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS § 114.18 Reprocessing of biological products. The Administrator...

  9. 9 CFR 114.17 - Rebottling of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Rebottling of biological products. 114.17 Section 114.17 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... REQUIREMENTS FOR BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS § 114.17 Rebottling of biological products. The Administrator...

  10. 9 CFR 114.18 - Reprocessing of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reprocessing of biological products. 114.18 Section 114.18 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... REQUIREMENTS FOR BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS § 114.18 Reprocessing of biological products. The Administrator...

  11. 9 CFR 114.17 - Rebottling of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Rebottling of biological products. 114.17 Section 114.17 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... REQUIREMENTS FOR BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS § 114.17 Rebottling of biological products. The Administrator...

  12. 9 CFR 114.18 - Reprocessing of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Reprocessing of biological products. 114.18 Section 114.18 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... REQUIREMENTS FOR BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS § 114.18 Reprocessing of biological products. The Administrator...

  13. 9 CFR 114.18 - Reprocessing of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Reprocessing of biological products. 114.18 Section 114.18 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... REQUIREMENTS FOR BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS § 114.18 Reprocessing of biological products. The Administrator...

  14. 9 CFR 114.17 - Rebottling of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rebottling of biological products. 114.17 Section 114.17 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... REQUIREMENTS FOR BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS § 114.17 Rebottling of biological products. The Administrator...

  15. 9 CFR 114.17 - Rebottling of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Rebottling of biological products. 114.17 Section 114.17 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... REQUIREMENTS FOR BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS § 114.17 Rebottling of biological products. The Administrator...

  16. 9 CFR 114.18 - Reprocessing of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Reprocessing of biological products. 114.18 Section 114.18 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... REQUIREMENTS FOR BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS § 114.18 Reprocessing of biological products. The Administrator...

  17. 9 CFR 114.17 - Rebottling of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Rebottling of biological products. 114.17 Section 114.17 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... REQUIREMENTS FOR BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS § 114.17 Rebottling of biological products. The Administrator...

  18. Assessment of tuberculosis infection during treatment with biologic agents in a BCG-vaccinated pediatric population.

    PubMed

    Atikan, Basak Yildiz; Cavusoglu, Cengiz; Dortkardesler, Merve; Sozeri, Betul

    2016-02-01

    Biologic therapies, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) blockers, are commonly used to treat rheumatological diseases in childhood. Screening patients for tuberculosis (TB) is highly recommended before starting therapy with TNF-α blockers. Despite appropriate screening, TB still remains a problem in patients receiving anti-TNF therapy in countries where TB is not endemic. TB in anti-TNF-treated patients is often diagnosed late due to altered presentation, and this delay results in high morbidity and mortality with a high proportion of extrapulmonary and disseminated disease. The aim of this study is to show the course of TB disease in children who are on biologic therapy, in an era where many of the children are BCG-vaccinated and TB is intermediately endemic. We recruited 71 patients with several types of inflammatory diseases. Six of them had a positive test result during TB screening and began taking isoniazid (INH) prophylactically. During the 3 years of follow-up, none of these patients developed TB disease. Biologic agents can be safely used in a BCG-vaccinated pediatric population, as long as patients are closely monitored to ensure that any cases of TB will be detected early. PMID:25515621

  19. Vaccine industry perspective of current issues of good manufacturing practices regarding product inspections and stability testing.

    PubMed

    Monahan, T R

    2001-12-15

    I address 2 important topics of current good manufacturing practices as they apply to vaccine products: product inspections and stability testing. The perspective presented is that of regulated industry. There are 2 major categories of product/facility inspections: those occurring before licensure of a vaccine product and those occurring after a vaccine product is licensed. The logistics and focus of each inspection type, the preapproval inspection, and the required biennial inspection are discussed, as are guidance and recommendations for achieving successful inspections. The requirements, guidance, and recommendations regarding the type, amount, and extensiveness of stability data for vaccine products are presented. The discussion details the potential differences in the amount and type of data required for products that are not yet licensed versus marketed products. Guidance, from a regulated industry perspective, regarding the design and implementation of a successful stability program is also discussed. PMID:11709773

  20. Development of a candidate reference material for adventitious virus detection in vaccine and biologicals manufacturing by deep sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Mee, Edward T.; Preston, Mark D.; Minor, Philip D.; Schepelmann, Silke; Huang, Xuening; Nguyen, Jenny; Wall, David; Hargrove, Stacey; Fu, Thomas; Xu, George; Li, Li; Cote, Colette; Delwart, Eric; Li, Linlin; Hewlett, Indira; Simonyan, Vahan; Ragupathy, Viswanath; Alin, Voskanian-Kordi; Mermod, Nicolas; Hill, Christiane; Ottenwälder, Birgit; Richter, Daniel C.; Tehrani, Arman; Jacqueline, Weber-Lehmann; Cassart, Jean-Pol; Letellier, Carine; Vandeputte, Olivier; Ruelle, Jean-Louis; Deyati, Avisek; La Neve, Fabio; Modena, Chiara; Mee, Edward; Schepelmann, Silke; Preston, Mark; Minor, Philip; Eloit, Marc; Muth, Erika; Lamamy, Arnaud; Jagorel, Florence; Cheval, Justine; Anscombe, Catherine; Misra, Raju; Wooldridge, David; Gharbia, Saheer; Rose, Graham; Ng, Siemon H.S.; Charlebois, Robert L.; Gisonni-Lex, Lucy; Mallet, Laurent; Dorange, Fabien; Chiu, Charles; Naccache, Samia; Kellam, Paul; van der Hoek, Lia; Cotten, Matt; Mitchell, Christine; Baier, Brian S.; Sun, Wenping; Malicki, Heather D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Unbiased deep sequencing offers the potential for improved adventitious virus screening in vaccines and biotherapeutics. Successful implementation of such assays will require appropriate control materials to confirm assay performance and sensitivity. Methods A common reference material containing 25 target viruses was produced and 16 laboratories were invited to process it using their preferred adventitious virus detection assay. Results Fifteen laboratories returned results, obtained using a wide range of wet-lab and informatics methods. Six of 25 target viruses were detected by all laboratories, with the remaining viruses detected by 4–14 laboratories. Six non-target viruses were detected by three or more laboratories. Conclusion The study demonstrated that a wide range of methods are currently used for adventitious virus detection screening in biological products by deep sequencing and that they can yield significantly different results. This underscores the need for common reference materials to ensure satisfactory assay performance and enable comparisons between laboratories. PMID:26709640

  1. 9 CFR 113.3 - Sampling of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sampling of biological products. 113.3... Applicability § 113.3 Sampling of biological products. Each licensee and permittee shall furnish representative samples of each serial or subserial of a biological product manufactured in the United States or...

  2. 9 CFR 103.3 - Shipment of experimental biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Shipment of experimental biological... PRODUCTION, DISTRIBUTION, AND EVALUATION OF BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS PRIOR TO LICENSING § 103.3 Shipment of experimental biological products. Except as provided in this section, no person shall ship or deliver...

  3. 9 CFR 113.3 - Sampling of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Sampling of biological products. 113.3... Applicability § 113.3 Sampling of biological products. Each licensee and permittee shall furnish representative samples of each serial or subserial of a biological product manufactured in the United States or...

  4. 9 CFR 106.1 - Biological products; exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Biological products; exemption. 106.1... AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS EXEMPTION FOR BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS USED IN DEPARTMENT PROGRAMS OR UNDER DEPARTMENT CONTROL OR SUPERVISION § 106.1 Biological...

  5. 9 CFR 113.50 - Ingredients of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ingredients of biological products... REQUIREMENTS Ingredient Requirements § 113.50 Ingredients of biological products. All ingredients used in a licensed biological product shall meet accepted standards of purity and quality; shall be...

  6. 9 CFR 106.1 - Biological products; exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Biological products; exemption. 106.1... AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS EXEMPTION FOR BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS USED IN DEPARTMENT PROGRAMS OR UNDER DEPARTMENT CONTROL OR SUPERVISION § 106.1 Biological...

  7. 9 CFR 106.1 - Biological products; exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Biological products; exemption. 106.1... AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS EXEMPTION FOR BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS USED IN DEPARTMENT PROGRAMS OR UNDER DEPARTMENT CONTROL OR SUPERVISION § 106.1 Biological...

  8. 9 CFR 113.50 - Ingredients of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ingredients of biological products... REQUIREMENTS Ingredient Requirements § 113.50 Ingredients of biological products. All ingredients used in a licensed biological product shall meet accepted standards of purity and quality; shall be...

  9. 9 CFR 103.3 - Shipment of experimental biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Shipment of experimental biological... PRODUCTION, DISTRIBUTION, AND EVALUATION OF BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS PRIOR TO LICENSING § 103.3 Shipment of experimental biological products. Except as provided in this section, no person shall ship or deliver...

  10. 9 CFR 113.3 - Sampling of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Sampling of biological products. 113.3... Applicability § 113.3 Sampling of biological products. Each licensee and permittee shall furnish representative samples of each serial or subserial of a biological product manufactured in the United States or...

  11. 9 CFR 113.50 - Ingredients of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Ingredients of biological products... REQUIREMENTS Ingredient Requirements § 113.50 Ingredients of biological products. All ingredients used in a licensed biological product shall meet accepted standards of purity and quality; shall be...

  12. 9 CFR 103.3 - Shipment of experimental biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Shipment of experimental biological... PRODUCTION, DISTRIBUTION, AND EVALUATION OF BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS PRIOR TO LICENSING § 103.3 Shipment of experimental biological products. Except as provided in this section, no person shall ship or deliver...

  13. 9 CFR 113.3 - Sampling of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Sampling of biological products. 113.3... Applicability § 113.3 Sampling of biological products. Each licensee and permittee shall furnish representative samples of each serial or subserial of a biological product manufactured in the United States or...

  14. 9 CFR 103.1 - Preparation of experimental biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Preparation of experimental biological... PRODUCTION, DISTRIBUTION, AND EVALUATION OF BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS PRIOR TO LICENSING § 103.1 Preparation of experimental biological products. Except as otherwise provided in this section, experimental...

  15. 9 CFR 106.1 - Biological products; exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Biological products; exemption. 106.1... AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS EXEMPTION FOR BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS USED IN DEPARTMENT PROGRAMS OR UNDER DEPARTMENT CONTROL OR SUPERVISION § 106.1 Biological...

  16. 9 CFR 113.50 - Ingredients of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Ingredients of biological products... REQUIREMENTS Ingredient Requirements § 113.50 Ingredients of biological products. All ingredients used in a licensed biological product shall meet accepted standards of purity and quality; shall be...

  17. 9 CFR 106.1 - Biological products; exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Biological products; exemption. 106.1... AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS EXEMPTION FOR BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS USED IN DEPARTMENT PROGRAMS OR UNDER DEPARTMENT CONTROL OR SUPERVISION § 106.1 Biological...

  18. 9 CFR 103.1 - Preparation of experimental biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Preparation of experimental biological... PRODUCTION, DISTRIBUTION, AND EVALUATION OF BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS PRIOR TO LICENSING § 103.1 Preparation of experimental biological products. Except as otherwise provided in this section, experimental...

  19. 9 CFR 113.50 - Ingredients of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Ingredients of biological products... REQUIREMENTS Ingredient Requirements § 113.50 Ingredients of biological products. All ingredients used in a licensed biological product shall meet accepted standards of purity and quality; shall be...

  20. 9 CFR 113.3 - Sampling of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Sampling of biological products. 113.3... Applicability § 113.3 Sampling of biological products. Each licensee and permittee shall furnish representative samples of each serial or subserial of a biological product manufactured in the United States or...

  1. Developing whole mycobacteria cell vaccines for tuberculosis: Workshop proceedings, Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Berlin, Germany, July 9, 2014.

    PubMed

    2015-06-12

    On July 9, 2014, Aeras and the Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology convened a workshop entitled "Whole Mycobacteria Cell Vaccines for Tuberculosis" at the Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology on the grounds of the Charité Hospital in Berlin, Germany, close to the laboratory where, in 1882, Robert Koch first identified Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) as the pathogen responsible for tuberculosis (TB). The purpose of the meeting was to discuss progress in the development of TB vaccines based on whole mycobacteria cells. Live whole cell TB vaccines discussed at this meeting were derived from Mtb itself, from Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG), the only licensed vaccine against TB, which was genetically modified to reduce pathogenicity and increase immunogenicity, or from commensal non-tuberculous mycobacteria. Inactivated whole cell TB and non-tuberculous mycobacterial vaccines, intended as immunotherapy or as safer immunization alternatives for HIV+ individuals, also were discussed. Workshop participants agreed that TB vaccine development is significantly hampered by imperfect animal models, unknown immune correlates of protection and the absence of a human challenge model. Although a more effective TB vaccine is needed to replace or enhance the limited effectiveness of BCG in all age groups, members of the workshop concurred that an effective vaccine would have the greatest impact on TB control when administered to adolescents and adults, and that use of whole mycobacteria cells as TB vaccine candidates merits greater support, particularly given the limited understanding of the specific Mtb antigens necessary to generate an immune response capable of preventing Mtb infection and/or disease. PMID:25882170

  2. Synthetic Biological Approaches to Natural Product Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Jaclyn M; Tang, Yi

    2012-01-01

    Small molecules produced in Nature continue to be an inspiration for the development of new therapeutic agents. These natural products possess exquisite chemical diversity, which gives rise to their wide range of biological activities. In their host organism, natural products are assembled and modified by dedicated biosynthetic pathways that Nature has meticulously developed. Often times, the complex structures or chemical modifications instated by these pathways are difficult to replicate using traditional synthetic methods. An alternative approach for creating or enhancing the structural variation of natural products is through combinatorial biosynthesis. By rationally reprogramming and manipulating the biosynthetic machinery responsible for their production, unnatural metabolites that were otherwise inaccessible can be obtained. Additionally, new chemical structures can be synthesized or derivatized by developing the enzymes that carry out these complicated chemical reactions into biocatalysts. In this review, we will discuss a variety of combinatorial biosynthetic strategies, their technical challenges, and highlight some recent (since 2007) examples of rationally designed unnatural metabolites, as well as platforms that have been established for the production and modification of clinically important pharmaceutical compounds. PMID:22221832

  3. [Vaccination perspectives].

    PubMed

    Saliou, P; Plotkin, S

    1994-01-01

    The aim of vaccinology is to improve the available vaccines and to develop new ones in the light of progress in immunology, molecular biology and biotechnologies. But it must go beyond this, and aim to protect all populations and control diseases, even eradicate them where possible. New vaccine strategies must be developed taking into account the epidemiology of diseases and the inherent logistic problems of implementing these strategies under local conditions. There are three major thrusts to the progress of the discipline. The improvement of the vaccines available. One of the drives of vaccinology is not only to deliver vaccines of increasing safety (replacement of the current vaccine for whooping cough with an acellular vaccine for example), but also to improve vaccine efficacy and immunogenicity (in particular for flu, tuberculosis, cholera and rabies vaccines). The optimisation of vaccination programmes and strategies for vaccinations. The ideal is to protect against the greatest possible number of diseases with the smallest number of vaccinations. The development of combinations of vaccines is central to this goal. The objective for the year 2000 is a hexavalent vaccine DTPP Hib HB. The development of new vaccines. Classic techniques continue to be successfully used (inactivated hepatitis A vaccine; attenuated live vaccines for chicken pox and dengue fever; conjugated polyosidic bacterial vaccines for meningococci and Streptococcus pneumoniae). However, it will become possible to prepare vaccines against most transmissible diseases using genetic engineering techniques.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7921696

  4. Production of Chikungunya Virus-Like Particles and Subunit Vaccines in Insect Cells.

    PubMed

    Metz, Stefan W; Pijlman, Gorben P

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya virus is a reemerging human pathogen that causes debilitating arthritic disease in humans. Like dengue and Zika virus, CHIKV is transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes in an epidemic urban cycle, and is now rapidly spreading through the Americas since its introduction in the Caribbean in late 2013. There are no licensed vaccines or antiviral drugs available, and only a few vaccine candidates have passed Phase I human clinical trials. Using recombinant baculovirus expression technology, we have generated CHIKV glycoprotein subunit and virus-like particle (VLP) vaccines that are amenable to large scale production in insect cells. These vaccines, in particular the VLPs, have shown high immunogenicity and protection against CHIKV infection in different animal models of CHIKV-induced disease. Here, we describe the production, purification, and characterization of these potent CHIKV vaccine candidates. PMID:27233282

  5. Developmental biology of the innate immune response: implications for neonatal and infant vaccine development

    PubMed Central

    Philbin, Victoria Jane; Levy, Ofer

    2009-01-01

    Molecular characterization of mechanisms by which human pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) detect danger signals has greatly expanded our understanding of the innate immune system. PRRs include Toll-like receptors (TLRs), nucleotide oligomerization domain-like receptors (NLRs), retinoic acid inducible gene-like receptors (RLRs) and C-type lectin receptors (CLRs). Characterization of the developmental expression of these systems in the fetus, newborn and infant is incomplete but has yielded important insights into neonatal susceptibility to infection. Activation of PRRs on antigen-presenting cells enhances co-stimulatory function, and thus PRRs agonists are potential vaccine adjuvants, some of which are already in clinical use. Thus study of PRRs has also revealed how previously mysterious immunomodulators are able to mediate their actions, including the vaccine adjuvant aluminum hydroxide (Alum) whose adjuvant activity depends on its ability to activate a cytosolic protein complex known as the Nacht Domain Leucine-Rich Repeat and PYD-Containing Protein 3 (NALP3) inflammasome leading to IL-1ß production. Progress in characterizing PRRs is thus informing and expanding the design of improved adjuvants. This review summarizes recent developments in the field of innate immunity with special emphasis on developmental expression in the fetus, newborn and infant and its implications for the design of more effective neonatal and infant vaccines. PMID:19918215

  6. 9 CFR 112.6 - Packaging biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Packaging biological products. 112.6 Section 112.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS PACKAGING AND LABELING § 112.6 Packaging biological products....

  7. 9 CFR 103.1 - Preparation of experimental biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Preparation of experimental biological products. 103.1 Section 103.1 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... PRODUCTION, DISTRIBUTION, AND EVALUATION OF BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS PRIOR TO LICENSING § 103.1 Preparation...

  8. 9 CFR 101.3 - Biological products and related terms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Biological products and related terms. 101.3 Section 101.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS DEFINITIONS § 101.3 Biological products and related...

  9. Safety and immunogenicity of co-administered MF59-adjuvanted 2009 pandemic and plain 2009–10 seasonal influenza vaccines in rheumatoid arthritis patients on biologicals

    PubMed Central

    Milanetti, F; Germano, V; Nisini, R; Donatelli, I; Di Martino, A; Facchini, M; Ferlito, C; Cappella, A; Crialesi, D; Caporuscio, S; Biselli, R; Rossi, F; Salemi, S; D'Amelio, R

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients under immunosuppressive therapy are particularly susceptible to infections, mainly of the respiratory tract, thus vaccination may represent a strategy to reduce their incidence in this vulnerable population. In the 2009–10 influenza season, the safety and immunogenicity of co-administered non-adjuvanted seasonal and MF59-adjuvanted pandemic influenza vaccines were evaluated in this study in 30 RA patients under therapy with anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α agents or Abatacept and in 13 healthy controls (HC). Patients and HC underwent clinical and laboratory evaluation before (T0), 1 (T1) and 6 months (T2) after vaccinations. No severe adverse reactions, but a significant increase in total mild side effects in patients versus HC were observed. Both influenza vaccines fulfilled the three criteria of the Committee for Proprietary Medicinal Products (CPMP). Seroconversion rate for any viral strain in patients and HC was, respectively, 68 versus 45 for H1-A/Brisbane/59/07, 72 versus 81 for H3-A/Brisbane/10/07, 68 versus 54 for B/Brisbane/60/08 and 81 versus 54 for A/California/7/2009. A slight increase in activated interferon (IFN)-γ-, TNF-α- or interleukin (IL)-17A-secreting T cells at T1 compared to T0, followed by a reduction at T2 in both patients and HC, was registered. In conclusion, simultaneous administration of adjuvanted pandemic and non-adjuvanted seasonal influenza vaccines is safe and highly immunogenic. The largely overlapping results between patients and HC, in terms of antibody response and cytokine-producing T cells, may represent further evidence for vaccine safety and immunogenicity in RA patients on biologicals. PMID:24666311

  10. A Cell-Based Systems Biology Assessment of Human Blood to Monitor Immune Responses after Influenza Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Hoek, Kristen L.; Samir, Parimal; Howard, Leigh M.; Niu, Xinnan; Prasad, Nripesh; Galassie, Allison; Liu, Qi; Allos, Tara M.; Floyd, Kyle A.; Guo, Yan; Shyr, Yu; Levy, Shawn E.; Joyce, Sebastian; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Link, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Systems biology is an approach to comprehensively study complex interactions within a biological system. Most published systems vaccinology studies have utilized whole blood or peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to monitor the immune response after vaccination. Because human blood is comprised of multiple hematopoietic cell types, the potential for masking responses of under-represented cell populations is increased when analyzing whole blood or PBMC. To investigate the contribution of individual cell types to the immune response after vaccination, we established a rapid and efficient method to purify human T and B cells, natural killer (NK) cells, myeloid dendritic cells (mDC), monocytes, and neutrophils from fresh venous blood. Purified cells were fractionated and processed in a single day. RNA-Seq and quantitative shotgun proteomics were performed to determine expression profiles for each cell type prior to and after inactivated seasonal influenza vaccination. Our results show that transcriptomic and proteomic profiles generated from purified immune cells differ significantly from PBMC. Differential expression analysis for each immune cell type also shows unique transcriptomic and proteomic expression profiles as well as changing biological networks at early time points after vaccination. This cell type-specific information provides a more comprehensive approach to monitor vaccine responses. PMID:25706537

  11. Analyses of Brucella Pathogenesis, Host Immunity, and Vaccine Targets using Systems Biology and Bioinformatics

    PubMed Central

    He, Yongqun

    2011-01-01

    Brucella is a Gram-negative, facultative intracellular bacterium that causes zoonotic brucellosis in humans and various animals. Out of 10 classified Brucella species, B. melitensis, B. abortus, B. suis, and B. canis are pathogenic to humans. In the past decade, the mechanisms of Brucella pathogenesis and host immunity have been extensively investigated using the cutting edge systems biology and bioinformatics approaches. This article provides a comprehensive review of the applications of Omics (including genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics) and bioinformatics technologies for the analysis of Brucella pathogenesis, host immune responses, and vaccine targets. Based on more than 30 sequenced Brucella genomes, comparative genomics is able to identify gene variations among Brucella strains that help to explain host specificity and virulence differences among Brucella species. Diverse transcriptomics and proteomics gene expression studies have been conducted to analyze gene expression profiles of wild type Brucella strains and mutants under different laboratory conditions. High throughput Omics analyses of host responses to infections with virulent or attenuated Brucella strains have been focused on responses by mouse and cattle macrophages, bovine trophoblastic cells, mouse and boar splenocytes, and ram buffy coat. Differential serum responses in humans and rams to Brucella infections have been analyzed using high throughput serum antibody screening technology. The Vaxign reverse vaccinology has been used to predict many Brucella vaccine targets. More than 180 Brucella virulence factors and their gene interaction networks have been identified using advanced literature mining methods. The recent development of community-based Vaccine Ontology and Brucellosis Ontology provides an efficient way for Brucella data integration, exchange, and computer-assisted automated reasoning. PMID:22919594

  12. Cattle tick vaccines: many candidate antigens, but will a commercially viable product emerge?

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Felix D; Miller, Robert J; Pérez de León, Adalberto A

    2012-05-01

    The cattle tick, Rhipicephalus microplus, is arguably the world's most economically important external parasite of cattle. Sustainable cattle tick control strategies are required to maximise the productivity of cattle in both large production operations and small family farms. Commercially available synthetic acaricides are commonly used in control and eradication programs, but indiscriminate practices in their application have resulted in the rapid evolution of resistance among populations in tropical and subtropical regions where the invasive R. microplus thrives. The need for novel technologies that could be used alone or in combination with commercially available synthetic acaricides is driving a resurgence of cattle tick vaccine discovery research efforts by various groups globally. The aim is to deliver a next-generation vaccine that has an improved efficacy profile over the existing Bm86-based cattle tick vaccine product. We present a short review of these projects and offer our opinion on what constitutes a good target antigen and vaccine, and what might influence the market success of candidate vaccines. The previous experience with Bm86-based vaccines offers perspective on marketing and producer acceptance aspects that a next-generation cattle tick vaccine product must meet for successful commercialisation. PMID:22549026

  13. Soybean Seeds: A Practical Host for the Production of Functional Subunit Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Laura C.; Bost, Kenneth L.; Piller, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    Soybean seeds possess several inherent qualities that make them an ideal host for the production of biopharmaceuticals when compared with other plant-based and non-plant-based recombinant expression systems (e.g., low cost of production, high protein to biomass ratio, long-term stability of seed proteins under ambient conditions, etc.). To demonstrate the practicality and feasibility of this platform for the production of subunit vaccines, we chose to express and characterize a nontoxic form of S. aureus enterotoxin B (mSEB) as a model vaccine candidate. We show that soy-mSEB was produced at a high vaccine to biomass ratio and represented ~76 theoretical doses of human vaccine per single soybean seed. We localized the model vaccine candidate both intracellularly and extracellularly and found no difference in mSEB protein stability or accumulation relative to subcellular environment. We also show that the model vaccine was biochemically and immunologically similar to native and recombinant forms of the protein produced in a bacterial expression system. Immunization of mice with seed extracts containing mSEB mounted a significant immune response within 14 days of the first injection. Taken together, our results highlight the practicality of soybean seeds as a potential platform for the production of functional subunit vaccines. PMID:24822195

  14. Soybean seeds: a practical host for the production of functional subunit vaccines.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Laura C; Garg, Renu; Bost, Kenneth L; Piller, Kenneth J

    2014-01-01

    Soybean seeds possess several inherent qualities that make them an ideal host for the production of biopharmaceuticals when compared with other plant-based and non-plant-based recombinant expression systems (e.g., low cost of production, high protein to biomass ratio, long-term stability of seed proteins under ambient conditions, etc.). To demonstrate the practicality and feasibility of this platform for the production of subunit vaccines, we chose to express and characterize a nontoxic form of S. aureus enterotoxin B (mSEB) as a model vaccine candidate. We show that soy-mSEB was produced at a high vaccine to biomass ratio and represented ~76 theoretical doses of human vaccine per single soybean seed. We localized the model vaccine candidate both intracellularly and extracellularly and found no difference in mSEB protein stability or accumulation relative to subcellular environment. We also show that the model vaccine was biochemically and immunologically similar to native and recombinant forms of the protein produced in a bacterial expression system. Immunization of mice with seed extracts containing mSEB mounted a significant immune response within 14 days of the first injection. Taken together, our results highlight the practicality of soybean seeds as a potential platform for the production of functional subunit vaccines. PMID:24822195

  15. Establishment of pandemic influenza vaccine production capacity at Bio Farma, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Suhardono, Mahendra; Ugiyadi, Dori; Nurnaeni, Ida; Emelia, Imelda

    2011-07-01

    In Indonesia, avian influenza A(H5N1) virus started to spread in humans in June 2005, with an alarming case-fatality rate of more than 80%. Considering that global influenza vaccine production capacity would barely have covered 10% of the world's pandemic vaccine needs, and that countries with no production facilities or prearranged contracts would be without access to a vaccine, the Government of Indonesia embarked on a programme to increase its readiness for a future influenza pandemic. This included the domestic production of influenza vaccine, which was entrusted to Bio Farma. This health security strategy consists of developing trivalent influenza vaccine production capacity in order to be able to convert immediately to monovalent production of up to 20 million pandemic doses for the Indonesian market upon receipt of the seed strain from the World Health Organization (WHO). For this purpose, a dedicated production facility is being constructed within the Bio Farma premises in Bandung. As an initial stage of influenza vaccine development, imported seasonal influenza bulk has been formulated and filled in the Bio Farma facility. Following three consecutive batches and successful clinical trials, the product was licensed by the Indonesian National Regulatory Authority and distributed commercially for the Hajj programme in 2009. With continued support from its technology transfer partners, Bio Farma is now advancing with the development of upstream processes to produce its own bulk for seasonal and pandemic use. PMID:21684423

  16. MMR Vaccine (Measles, Mumps, and Rubella)

    MedlinePlus

    Attenuvax® Measles Vaccine ... R-Vax® II (as a combination product containing Measles Vaccine, Rubella Vaccine) ... M-R® II (as a combination product containing Measles Vaccine, Mumps Vaccine, Rubella Vaccine)

  17. Plasmid DNA Vaccine vector design: impact on efficacy, safety and upstream production

    PubMed Central

    Williams, James A; Carnes, Aaron E; Hodgson, Clague P

    2009-01-01

    Critical molecular and cellular biological factors impacting design of licensable DNA vaccine vectors that combine high yield and integrity during bacterial production with increased expression in mammalian cells are reviewed. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), World Health Organization (WHO) and European Medical Agencies (EMEA) regulatory guidance’s are discussed, as they relate to vector design and plasmid fermentation. While all new vectors will require extensive preclinical testing to validate safety and performance prior to clinical use, regulatory testing burden for follow-on products can be reduced by combining carefully designed synthetic genes with existing validated vector backbones. A flowchart for creation of new synthetic genes, combining rationale design with bioinformatics, is presented. The biology of plasmid replication is reviewed, and process engineering strategies that reduce metabolic burden discussed. Utilizing recently developed low metabolic burden seed stock and fermentation strategies, optimized vectors can now be manufactured in high yields exceeding 2 g/L, with specific plasmid yields of 5% total dry cell weight. PMID:19233255

  18. Systems Biology of Microbial Exopolysaccharides Production.

    PubMed

    Ates, Ozlem

    2015-01-01

    Exopolysaccharides (EPSs) produced by diverse group of microbial systems are rapidly emerging as new and industrially important biomaterials. Due to their unique and complex chemical structures and many interesting physicochemical and rheological properties with novel functionality, the microbial EPSs find wide range of commercial applications in various fields of the economy such as food, feed, packaging, chemical, textile, cosmetics and pharmaceutical industry, agriculture, and medicine. EPSs are mainly associated with high-value applications, and they have received considerable research attention over recent decades with their biocompatibility, biodegradability, and both environmental and human compatibility. However, only a few microbial EPSs have achieved to be used commercially due to their high production costs. The emerging need to overcome economic hurdles and the increasing significance of microbial EPSs in industrial and medical biotechnology call for the elucidation of the interrelations between metabolic pathways and EPS biosynthesis mechanism in order to control and hence enhance its microbial productivity. Moreover, a better understanding of biosynthesis mechanism is a significant issue for improvement of product quality and properties and also for the design of novel strains. Therefore, a systems-based approach constitutes an important step toward understanding the interplay between metabolism and EPS biosynthesis and further enhances its metabolic performance for industrial application. In this review, primarily the microbial EPSs, their biosynthesis mechanism, and important factors for their production will be discussed. After this brief introduction, recent literature on the application of omics technologies and systems biology tools for the improvement of production yields will be critically evaluated. Special focus will be given to EPSs with high market value such as xanthan, levan, pullulan, and dextran. PMID:26734603

  19. Systems Biology of Microbial Exopolysaccharides Production

    PubMed Central

    Ates, Ozlem

    2015-01-01

    Exopolysaccharides (EPSs) produced by diverse group of microbial systems are rapidly emerging as new and industrially important biomaterials. Due to their unique and complex chemical structures and many interesting physicochemical and rheological properties with novel functionality, the microbial EPSs find wide range of commercial applications in various fields of the economy such as food, feed, packaging, chemical, textile, cosmetics and pharmaceutical industry, agriculture, and medicine. EPSs are mainly associated with high-value applications, and they have received considerable research attention over recent decades with their biocompatibility, biodegradability, and both environmental and human compatibility. However, only a few microbial EPSs have achieved to be used commercially due to their high production costs. The emerging need to overcome economic hurdles and the increasing significance of microbial EPSs in industrial and medical biotechnology call for the elucidation of the interrelations between metabolic pathways and EPS biosynthesis mechanism in order to control and hence enhance its microbial productivity. Moreover, a better understanding of biosynthesis mechanism is a significant issue for improvement of product quality and properties and also for the design of novel strains. Therefore, a systems-based approach constitutes an important step toward understanding the interplay between metabolism and EPS biosynthesis and further enhances its metabolic performance for industrial application. In this review, primarily the microbial EPSs, their biosynthesis mechanism, and important factors for their production will be discussed. After this brief introduction, recent literature on the application of omics technologies and systems biology tools for the improvement of production yields will be critically evaluated. Special focus will be given to EPSs with high market value such as xanthan, levan, pullulan, and dextran. PMID:26734603

  20. Biological production of ethanol from coal

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    Due to the abundant supply of coal in the United States, significant research efforts have occurred over the past 15 years concerning the conversion of coal to liquid fuels. Researchers at the University of Arkansas have concentrated on a biological approach to coal liquefaction, starting with coal-derived synthesis gas as the raw material. Synthesis gas, a mixture of CO, H[sub 2], CO[sub 2], CH[sub 4] and sulfur gases, is first produced using traditional gasification techniques. The CO, CO[sub 2] and H[sub 2] are then converted to ethanol using a bacterial culture of Clostridium 1jungdahlii. Ethanol is the desired product if the resultant product stream is to be used as a liquid fuel. However, under normal operating conditions, the wild strain'' produces acetate in favor of ethanol in conjunction with growth in a 20:1 molar ratio. Research was performed to determine the conditions necessary to maximize not only the ratio of ethanol to acetate, but also to maximize the concentration of ethanol resulting in the product stream.

  1. IRRIGATION TO MAXIMIZE VACCINE ANTIGEN PRODUCTION IN PHARMACEUTICAL TOBACCO

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biotechnology companies have engineered plants to produce recombinant proteins for therapeutic drugs and vaccines. Chlorogen, Inc. located in St. Louis, Missouri, inserted the protective antigen (PA) gene from Bacillus anthracis into tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) chloroplasts to produce an anthrax va...

  2. Chemical and biological production of cyclotides

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yilong; Bi, Tao; Camarero, Julio A.

    2016-01-01

    Cyclotides are fascinating naturally occurring micro-proteins (≈30 residues long) present in several plant families, and display various biological properties such as protease inhibitory, anti-microbial, insecticidal, cytotoxic, anti-HIV and hormone-like activities. Cyclotides share a unique head-to-tail circular knotted topology of three disulfide bridges, with one disulfide penetrating through a macrocycle formed by the two other disulfides and interconnecting peptide backbones, forming what is called a cystine knot topology. This cyclic cystine knot (CCK) framework gives the cyclotides exceptional rigidity, resistance to thermal and chemical denaturation, and enzymatic stability against degradation. Interestingly, cyclotides have been shown to be orally bioavailable, and other cyclotides have been shown to cross the cell membranes. Moreover, recent reports have also shown that engineered cyclotides can be efficiently used to target extracellular and intracellular protein-protein interactions, therefore making cyclotides ideal tools for drug development to selectively target protein-protein interactions. In this work we will review all the available methods for production of these interesting proteins using chemical or biological methods. PMID:27064329

  3. Production of Rice Seed-Based Allergy Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Hidenori; Takaiwa, Fumio

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant hypoallergenic derivative is the next generation of tolerogen replacing the natural allergen extract to increase safety and efficacy. Japanese cedar pollinosis is the predominant seasonal allergy disease in Japan. A rice seed-based oral vaccine containing the recombinant hypoallergens derived from these allergens was developed. Efficacy of this rice-based allergy vaccine was evaluated by oral administration in animal models. PMID:27076162

  4. Assessment of packed bed bioreactor systems in the production of viral vaccines

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination is believed to be the most effective method for the prevention of infectious diseases. Thus it is imperative to develop cost effective and scalable process for the production of vaccines so as to make them affordable for mass use. In this study, performance of a novel disposable iCELLis fixed bed bioreactor system was investigated for the production of some viral vaccines like Rabies, Hepatitis-A and Chikungunya vaccines in comparison to conventional systems like the commercially available packed bed system and roller bottle system. Vero and MRC-5 cell substrates were evaluated for growth parameters in all the three systems maintaining similar seeding density, multiplicity of infection (MOI) and media components. It was observed that Vero cells showed similar growth in all the three bioreactors whereas MRC-5 cells showed better growth in iCELLis Nano system and roller bottle system. Subsequently, the virus infection and antigen production studies also revealed that for Hepatitis-A and Chikungunya iCELLis Nano bioreactor system was better to the commercial packed bed bioreactor and roller bottle systems. Although for rabies antigen production commercially available packed bed bioreactor system was found to be better. This study shows that different bioreactor platforms may be employed for viral vaccine production and iCELLis Nano is one of such new convenient and a stable platform for production of human viral vaccines. PMID:24949260

  5. Immunization against Genital Herpes with a Vaccine Virus That has Defects in Productive and Latent Infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Costa, Xavier J.; Jones, Cheryl A.; Knipe, David M.

    1999-06-01

    An effective vaccine for genital herpes has been difficult to achieve because of the limited efficacy of subunit vaccines and the safety concerns about live viruses. As an alternative approach, mutant herpes simplex virus strains that are replication-defective can induce protective immunity. To increase the level of safety and to prove that replication was not needed for immunization, we constructed a mutant herpes simplex virus 2 strain containing two deletion mutations, each of which eliminated viral replication. The double-mutant virus induces protective immunity that can reduce acute viral shedding and latent infection in a mouse genital model, but importantly, the double-mutant virus shows a phenotypic defect in latent infection. This herpes vaccine strain, which is immunogenic but has defects in both productive and latent infection, provides a paradigm for the design of vaccines and vaccine vectors for other sexually transmitted diseases, such as AIDS.

  6. Physicochemical and biological characterization of 1E10 Anti-Idiotype vaccine

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background 1E10 monoclonal antibody is a murine anti-idiotypic antibody that mimics N-glycolyl-GM3 gangliosides. This antibody has been tested as an anti-idiotypic cancer vaccine, adjuvated in Al(OH)3, in several clinical trials for melanoma, breast, and lung cancer. During early clinical development this mAb was obtained in vivo from mice ascites fluid. Currently, the production process of 1E10 is being transferred from the in vivo to a bioreactor-based method. Results Here, we present a comprehensive molecular and immunological characterization of 1E10 produced by the two different production processes in order to determine the impact of the manufacturing process in vaccine performance. We observed differences in glycosylation pattern, charge heterogeneity and structural stability between in vivo-produced 1E10 and bioreactor-obtained 1E10. Interestingly, these modifications had no significant impact on the immune responses elicited in two different animal models. Conclusions Changes in 1E10 primary structure like glycosylation; asparagine deamidation and oxidation affected 1E10 structural stability but did not affect the immune response elicited in mice and chickens when compared to 1E10 produced in mice. PMID:22108317

  7. Vaccine process technology.

    PubMed

    Josefsberg, Jessica O; Buckland, Barry

    2012-06-01

    The evolution of vaccines (e.g., live attenuated, recombinant) and vaccine production methods (e.g., in ovo, cell culture) are intimately tied to each other. As vaccine technology has advanced, the methods to produce the vaccine have advanced and new vaccine opportunities have been created. These technologies will continue to evolve as we strive for safer and more immunogenic vaccines and as our understanding of biology improves. The evolution of vaccine process technology has occurred in parallel to the remarkable growth in the development of therapeutic proteins as products; therefore, recent vaccine innovations can leverage the progress made in the broader biotechnology industry. Numerous important legacy vaccines are still in use today despite their traditional manufacturing processes, with further development focusing on improving stability (e.g., novel excipients) and updating formulation (e.g., combination vaccines) and delivery methods (e.g., skin patches). Modern vaccine development is currently exploiting a wide array of novel technologies to create safer and more efficacious vaccines including: viral vectors produced in animal cells, virus-like particles produced in yeast or insect cells, polysaccharide conjugation to carrier proteins, DNA plasmids produced in E. coli, and therapeutic cancer vaccines created by in vitro activation of patient leukocytes. Purification advances (e.g., membrane adsorption, precipitation) are increasing efficiency, while innovative analytical methods (e.g., microsphere-based multiplex assays, RNA microarrays) are improving process understanding. Novel adjuvants such as monophosphoryl lipid A, which acts on antigen presenting cell toll-like receptors, are expanding the previously conservative list of widely accepted vaccine adjuvants. As in other areas of biotechnology, process characterization by sophisticated analysis is critical not only to improve yields, but also to determine the final product quality. From a regulatory

  8. Influenza vaccine production for Brazil: a classic example of successful North-South bilateral technology transfer.

    PubMed

    Miyaki, Cosue; Meros, Mauricio; Precioso, Alexander R; Raw, Isaias

    2011-07-01

    Technology transfer is a promising approach to increase vaccine production at an affordable price in developing countries. In the case of influenza, it is imperative that developing countries acquire the technology to produce pandemic vaccines through the transfer of know-how, as this will be the only way for the majority of these countries to face the huge demand for vaccine created by influenza pandemics. Access to domestically produced influenza vaccine in such health crises is thus an important national defence strategy. However, technology transfer is not a simple undertaking. It requires a committed provider who is willing to transfer a complete production process, and not just the formulation and fill-finish parts of the process. It requires a recipient with established experience in vaccine production for human use and the ability to conduct research into new developments. In addition, the country of the recipient should preferably have sufficient financial resources to support the undertaking, and an internal market for the new vaccine. Technology transfer should create a solid partnership that results in the joint development of new competency, improvements to the product, and to further innovation. The Instituto Butantan-sanofi pasteur partnership can be seen as a model for successful technology transfer and has led to the technological independence of the Instituto Butantan in the use a strategic public health tool. PMID:21684420

  9. Constructing target product profiles (TPPs) to help vaccines overcome post-approval obstacles

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bruce Y.; Burke, Donald S.

    2012-01-01

    As history has demonstrated, post-approval obstacles can impede a vaccine’s use and potentially lead to its withdrawal. Addressing these potential obstacles when changes in a vaccine’s technology can still be easily made may improve a vaccine’s chances of success. Augmented vaccine target product profiles (TPPs) can help vaccine scientists better understand and anticipate these obstacles and galvanize conversations among various vaccine stakeholders (e.g., scientists, marketers, business development managers, policy makers, public health officials, health care workers, third party payors, etc.) earlier in a vaccine’s development. PMID:19782109

  10. Prokaryotic Production of Virus-Like Particle Vaccine of Betanodavirus.

    PubMed

    Xie, Junfeng; Huang, Runqing; Lai, Yuxiong

    2016-01-01

    Betanodaviruses are the causative agents of viral nervous necrosis (VNN), a serious disease of cultured marine fish worldwide. To control this disease, vaccines of subunit capsid proteins (recombinant proteins or peptides), inactivated viruses, and virus-like particles (VLPs) were developed. VLP, which is highly similar to the wild-type virus in virion structure and contains no viral genome, was proved as one of the good and safe vaccines that can activate humoral immune response in the long term and induce cellular and innate immunities in the early stage post-immunization. The VLP vaccines can be expressed in vitro either by Baculovirus-based or yeast-based eukaryotic system or by bacterial expression system. In this chapter, the prokaryotic expression and the subsequent purification of VLP of betanodavirus orange-spotted grouper nervous necrosis virus (OGNNV) are presented. PMID:27076301

  11. Large-scale production in Pichia pastoris of the recombinant vaccine Gavac against cattle tick.

    PubMed

    Canales, M; Enríquez, A; Ramos, E; Cabrera, D; Dandie, H; Soto, A; Falcón, V; Rodríguez, M; de la Fuente, J

    1997-03-01

    A gene coding for the Bm86 tick protein was recently cloned, expressed in Pichia pastoris and shown to induce an inmunological response in cattle against ticks. Moreover, the Gavac vaccine (Heber Biotec S.A., Havana, Cuba), which contains this recombinant protein, has proved to control the Boophilus microplus populations under field conditions. This paper reviews the development and large-scale production of this vaccine, the efficacy of the resulting product and the strategy followed in designing its production plant. The production plant fulfills biosafety requirements and GMP. PMID:9141213

  12. Recent advances in biological production of 3-hydroxypropionic acid.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinod; Ashok, Somasundar; Park, Sunghoon

    2013-11-01

    3-Hydroxypropionic acid (3-HP) is a valuable platform chemical that can be produced biologically from glucose or glycerol. This review article provides an overview and the current status of microbial 3-HP production. The constraints of microbial 3-HP production and possible solutions are also described. Finally, future prospects of biological 3-HP production are discussed. PMID:23473969

  13. Sweeten PAMPs: Role of Sugar Complexed PAMPs in Innate Immunity and Vaccine Biology

    PubMed Central

    Mahla, Ranjeet Singh; Reddy, Madhava C.; Prasad, D. Vijaya Raghava; Kumar, Himanshu

    2013-01-01

    Innate sensors play a critical role in the early innate immune responses to invading pathogens through sensing of diverse biochemical signatures also known as pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). These biochemical signatures primarily consist of a major family of biomolecules such as proteins, lipids, nitrogen bases, and sugar and its complexes, which are distinct from host molecules and exclusively expressed in pathogens and essential to their survival. The family of sensors known as pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) are germ-line encoded, evolutionarily conserved molecules, and consist of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs), NOD-like receptors (NLRs), C-type lectin-like receptors (CLRs), and DNA sensors. Sensing of PAMP by PRR initiates the cascade of signaling leading to the activation of transcription factors, such as NF-κB and interferon regulatory factors (IRFs), resulting in a variety of cellular responses, including the production of interferons (IFNs) and pro-inflammatory cytokines. In this review, we discuss sensing of different types of glycosylated PAMPs such as β-glucan (a polymeric sugar) or lipopolysaccharides, nucleic acid, and so on (sugar complex PAMPs) by different families of sensors, its role in pathogenesis, and its application in development of potential vaccine and vaccine adjuvants. PMID:24032031

  14. Two initial vaccinations with the Bm86-based Gavacplus vaccine against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus induce similar reproductive suppression to three initial vaccinations under production conditions

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, affects livestock production in many regions of the world. Up to now, the widespread use of chemical acaricides has led to the selection of acaricide-resistant ticks and to environmental contamination. Gavacplus is a subunit vaccine based on the recombinant Bm86 tick antigen expressed in yeast, capable to control infestations of R. microplus under controlled and production conditions. The vaccine constitutes the core element of broad control programs against this ectoparasite, in which acquired immunity in cattle to Bm86 is combined with a rational use of acaricides. At present, the conventional vaccine scheme consists of three doses that should be administered at weeks 0, 4 and 7, followed by a booster every six months. Results In this study we assayed a reduction in the number of the initial doses of Gavacplus, evaluated the time course and the level of bovine anti-Bm86 antibodies elicited, and analyzed the vaccine effect on ticks engorging on immunized cattle under production conditions. Following three different immunization schemes, the bovines developed a strong and specific immune response characterized by elevated anti-Bm86 IgG titers. A reduction in the weight of engorging female ticks, in the weight of the eggs laid and also in R. microplus viable eggs percentage was obtained by using only two doses of Gavacplus administered at weeks 0 and 4, followed by a booster six months later. This reduction did not differ from the results obtained on ticks engorging on cattle immunized at weeks 0, 4 and 7. It was also demonstrated that anti-Bm86 antibody titers over 1:640, measured in bovines immunized at weeks 0 and 4, were sufficient to affect weight and reproductive potential of female ticks as compared with ticks engorging on unvaccinated animals. In addition, no statistically significant differences were detected in the average weight of eggs laid by ticks engorged on immunized cattle that showed

  15. Biological treatment of shrimp production wastewater.

    PubMed

    Boopathy, Raj

    2009-07-01

    Over the last few decades, there has been an increase in consumer demand for shrimp, which has resulted in its worldwide aquaculture production. In the United States, the stringent enforcement of environmental regulations encourages shrimp farmers to develop new technologies, such as recirculating raceway systems. This is a zero-water exchange system capable of producing high-density shrimp yields. The system also produces wastewater characterized by high levels of ammonia, nitrate, nitrite, and organic carbon, which make waste management costs prohibitive. Shrimp farmers have a great need for a waste management method that is effective and economical. One such method is the sequencing batch reactor (SBR). A SBR is a variation of the activated sludge biological treatment process. This process uses multiple steps in the same reactor to take the place of multiple reactors in a conventional treatment system. The SBR accomplishes equalization, aeration, and clarification in a timed sequence in a single reactor system. This is achieved through reactor operation in sequences, which includes fill, react, settle, decant, and idle. A laboratory scale SBR was successfully operated using shrimp aquaculture wastewater. The wastewater contained high concentrations of carbon and nitrogen. By operating the reactors sequentially, namely, aerobic and anoxic modes, nitrification and denitrification were achieved as well as removal of carbon. Ammonia in the waste was nitrified within 4 days. The denitrification of nitrate was achieved by the anoxic process, and 100% removal of nitrate was observed within 15 days of reactor operation. PMID:19396482

  16. Influenza Vaccine Manufacturing: Effect of Inactivation, Splitting and Site of Manufacturing. Comparison of Influenza Vaccine Production Processes.

    PubMed

    Kon, Theone C; Onu, Adrian; Berbecila, Laurentiu; Lupulescu, Emilia; Ghiorgisor, Alina; Kersten, Gideon F; Cui, Yi-Qing; Amorij, Jean-Pierre; Van der Pol, Leo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of different inactivation and splitting procedures on influenza vaccine product composition, stability and recovery to support transfer of process technology. Four split and two whole inactivated virus (WIV) influenza vaccine bulks were produced and compared with respect to release criteria, stability of the bulk and haemagglutinin recovery. One clarified harvest of influenza H3N2 A/Uruguay virus prepared on 25.000 fertilized eggs was divided equally over six downstream processes. The main unit operation for purification was sucrose gradient zonal ultracentrifugation. The inactivation of the virus was performed with either formaldehyde in phosphate buffer or with beta-propiolactone in citrate buffer. For splitting of the viral products in presence of Tween®, either Triton™ X-100 or di-ethyl-ether was used. Removal of ether was established by centrifugation and evaporation, whereas removal of Triton-X100 was performed by hydrophobic interaction chromatography. All products were sterile filtered and subjected to a 5 months real time stability study. In all processes, major product losses were measured after sterile filtration; with larger losses for split virus than for WIV. The beta-propiolactone inactivation on average resulted in higher recoveries compared to processes using formaldehyde inactivation. Especially ether split formaldehyde product showed low recovery and least stability over a period of five months. PMID:26959983

  17. Influenza Vaccine Manufacturing: Effect of Inactivation, Splitting and Site of Manufacturing. Comparison of Influenza Vaccine Production Processes

    PubMed Central

    Kon, Theone C.; Onu, Adrian; Berbecila, Laurentiu; Lupulescu, Emilia; Ghiorgisor, Alina; Kersten, Gideon F.; Cui, Yi-Qing; Amorij, Jean-Pierre; Van der Pol, Leo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of different inactivation and splitting procedures on influenza vaccine product composition, stability and recovery to support transfer of process technology. Four split and two whole inactivated virus (WIV) influenza vaccine bulks were produced and compared with respect to release criteria, stability of the bulk and haemagglutinin recovery. One clarified harvest of influenza H3N2 A/Uruguay virus prepared on 25.000 fertilized eggs was divided equally over six downstream processes. The main unit operation for purification was sucrose gradient zonal ultracentrifugation. The inactivation of the virus was performed with either formaldehyde in phosphate buffer or with beta-propiolactone in citrate buffer. For splitting of the viral products in presence of Tween®, either Triton™ X-100 or di-ethyl-ether was used. Removal of ether was established by centrifugation and evaporation, whereas removal of Triton-X100 was performed by hydrophobic interaction chromatography. All products were sterile filtered and subjected to a 5 months real time stability study. In all processes, major product losses were measured after sterile filtration; with larger losses for split virus than for WIV. The beta-propiolactone inactivation on average resulted in higher recoveries compared to processes using formaldehyde inactivation. Especially ether split formaldehyde product showed low recovery and least stability over a period of five months. PMID:26959983

  18. Biological and phylogenetic characterization of a genotype VII Newcastle disease virus from Venezuela: efficacy of field vaccination.

    PubMed

    Perozo, Francisco; Marcano, Rosmar; Afonso, Claudio L

    2012-04-01

    Here we report the biological and molecular characterization of a virulent genotype VII Newcastle disease virus (NDV) circulating in Venezuela and the assessment of the vaccination efficacy under field conditions compared to controlled rearing conditions. Biological pathotyping showed a mean embryo dead time of 50 h and an intracerebral pathogenicity index of 1.86. Sequence-based phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the virus belongs to genotype VII in class II (a genotype often found in Asia and Africa), representing the first report of the presence of this genotype in the continent of South America. A vaccine-challenge trial in commercial broilers reared in fields or in a experimental setting included dual (live/killed) priming of 1-day-old chicks plus two live NDV and infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) field vaccinations at days 7 and 17, followed by a very stringent genotype VII NDV challenge at day 28. Serology for NDV and IBDV, bursal integrity, and protection against NDV lethal challenge were assessed. At 28 days, field vaccinates showed significantly lower NDV (1,356 versus 2,384) and higher IBD (7,295 versus 1,489) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) antibody titers than the experimentally reared birds. A lower bursal size and bursa-body weight ratio (P < 0.05) and higher bursa lesion score were also detected in the field set. Only 57.1% of field vaccinates survived the lethal challenge, differing (P < 0.05) from 90.5% survival in the experimental farm. Overall, results confirmed the presence of the genotype VII viruses in South America and suggest that field-associated factors such as immunosuppression compromise the efficacy of the vaccination protocols implemented. PMID:22238433

  19. 77 FR 28883 - Cooperative Agreement To Support Innovation in Vaccine Clinical Trial Design and Collaboration in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-16

    ..., regulatory control, and surveillance of vaccines and biological medicinal products are major challenges for... and unmet need exists. Diseases such as malaria, tuberculosis, and human immunodeficiency virus...

  20. Experimental production of clinical-grade dendritic cell vaccine for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yuen-Fen; Sim, Geok-Choo; Habsah, Aziz; Leong, Chooi-Fun; Cheong, Soon-Keng

    2008-12-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen presenting cells of the immune system. Through the use of DC vaccines (DC after exposure to tumour antigens), cryopreserved in single-use aliquots, an attractive and novel immunotherapeutic strategy is available as an option for treatment. In this paper we describe an in vitro attempt to scale-up production of clinical-grade DC vaccines from leukemic cells. Blast cells of two relapsed AML patients were harvested for DC generation in serum-free culture medium containing clinical-grade cytokines GM-CSF, IL-4 and TNF-alpha. Cells from patient 1 were cultured in a bag and those from patient 2 were cultured in a flask. The numbers of seeding cells were 2.24 x 10(8) and 0.8 x 10(8), respectively. DC yields were 10 x 10(6) and 29.8 x 10(6) cells, giving a conversion rate of 4.7% and 37%, respectively. These DC vaccines were then cryopreserved in approximately one million cells per vial with 20% fresh frozen group AB plasma and 10% DMSO. At 12 months and 21 months post cryopreservation, these DC vaccines were thawed, and their sterility, viability, phenotype and functionality were studied. DC vaccines remained sterile up to 21 months of storage. Viability of the cryopreserved DC in the culture bag and flask was found to be 50% and 70% at 12 months post cryopreservation respectively; and 48% and 67% at 21 months post cryopreservation respectively. These DC vaccines exhibited mature DC surface phenotypic markers of CD83, CD86 and HLA-DR, and negative for haemopoietic markers. Mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) study showed functional DC vaccines. These experiments demonstrated that it is possible to produce clinical-grade DC vaccines in vitro from blast cells of leukemic patients, which could be cryopreserved up to 21 months for use if repeated vaccinations are required in the course of therapy. PMID:19291915

  1. Estimated economic benefits during the 'decade of vaccines' include treatment savings, gains in labor productivity.

    PubMed

    Stack, Meghan L; Ozawa, Sachiko; Bishai, David M; Mirelman, Andrew; Tam, Yvonne; Niessen, Louis; Walker, Damian G; Levine, Orin S

    2011-06-01

    In 2010 the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation announced a $10 billion commitment over the next ten years to increase access to childhood vaccines in the world's poorest countries. The effort was labeled the "Decade of Vaccines." This study estimates both the short- and long-term economic benefits from the introduction and increased use of six vaccines in seventy-two of the world's poorest countries from 2011 to 2020. Increased rates of vaccination against pneumococcal and Haemophilus influenzae type b pneumonia and meningitis, rotavirus, pertussis, measles, and malaria over the next ten years would save 6.4 million lives and avert 426 million cases of illness, $6.2 billion in treatment costs, and $145 billion in productivity losses. Monetary estimates based on this type of analysis can be used to determine the return on investment in immunization from both the international community and local governments, and they should be considered in policy making. PMID:21653952

  2. A Plant-Based Transient Expression System for the Rapid Production of Malaria Vaccine Candidates.

    PubMed

    Boes, Alexander; Reimann, Andreas; Twyman, Richard M; Fischer, Rainer; Schillberg, Stefan; Spiegel, Holger

    2016-01-01

    There are currently no vaccines that provide sterile immunity against malaria. Various proteins from different stages of the Plasmodium falciparum life cycle have been evaluated as vaccine candidates, but none of them have fulfilled expectations. Therefore, combinations of key antigens from different stages of the parasites life cycle may be essential for the development of efficacious malaria vaccines. Following the identification of promising antigens using bioinformatics, proteomics, and/or immunological approaches, it is necessary to express, purify, and characterize these proteins and explore the potential of fusion constructs combining different antigens or antigen domains before committing to expensive and time-consuming clinical development. Here, using malaria vaccine candidates as an example, we describe how Agrobacterium tumefaciens-based transient expression in plants can be combined with a modular and flexible cloning strategy as a robust and versatile tool for the rapid production of candidate antigens during research and development. PMID:27076325

  3. Agility in adversity: Vaccines on Demand.

    PubMed

    De Groot, Anne S; Moise, Leonard; Olive, David; Einck, Leo; Martin, William

    2016-09-01

    Is the US ready for a biological attack using Ebola virus or Anthrax? Will vaccine developers be able to produce a Zika virus vaccine, before the epidemic spreads around the world? A recent report by The Blue Ribbon Study Panel on Biodefense argues that the US is not ready for these challenges, however, technologies and capabilities that could address these deficiencies are within reach. Vaccine technologies have advanced and readiness has improved in recent years, due to advances in sequencing technology and computational power making the 'vaccines on demand' concept a reality. Building a robust strategy to design effective biodefense vaccines from genome sequences harvested by real-time biosurveillance will benefit from technologies that are being brought to bear on the cancer cure 'moonshot'. When combined with flexible vaccine production platforms, vaccines on demand will relegate expensive and, in some cases, insufficiently effective vaccine stockpiles to the dust heap of history. PMID:27389971

  4. No adverse effects of simultaneous vaccination with the immunocontraceptive GonaCon and a commercial rabies vaccine on rabies virus neutralizing antibody production in dogs.

    PubMed

    Bender, Scott C; Bergman, David L; Wenning, Krista M; Miller, Lowell A; Slate, Dennis; Jackson, Felix R; Rupprecht, Charles E

    2009-11-27

    Parenteral vaccination campaigns are integral to the elimination of canine rabies. To maximize herd immunity in dogs, immunocontraception provided at the time of rabies vaccination should reduce fecundity and dog abundance. GonaCon has been used successfully as an immunocontraceptive in a variety of mammals, and by inference, the dog would be an ideal candidate for testing. As an initial step in evaluating a combination-vaccination program, we assessed the effects of GonaCon on rabies virus neutralizing antibody production in dogs after administration of a veterinary rabies vaccine. Eighteen feral/free ranging dogs were included in this initial study: six were given GonaCon only, six were given rabies vaccination only, and six received GonaCon and rabies vaccination. Antibody levels were evaluated over 82 days. The use of the immunocontraceptive GonaCon did not affect the ability of dogs to seroconvert in response to the rabies vaccine. Thus, GonaCon provides a potential immunocontraceptive for use in combination with rabies vaccine to increase herd immunity and address dog population over abundance to better manage rabies. PMID:19925955

  5. Optimization of a methamphetamine conjugate vaccine for antibody production in mice.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Misty W; Gunnell, Melinda G; Tawney, Rachel; Owens, S Michael

    2016-06-01

    There are still no approved medications for treating patients who abuse methamphetamine. Active vaccines for treating abuse of nicotine and cocaine are in clinical studies, but have not proven effective seemingly due to inadequate anti-drug antibody production. The current studies aimed to optimize the composition, adjuvant and route of administration of a methamphetamine conjugate vaccine, ICKLH-SMO9, in mice with the goal of generating significantly higher antibody levels. A range of hapten epitope densities were compared, as were the adjuvants Alhydrogel and a new Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) agonist called GLA-SE. While methamphetamine hapten density did not strongly affect the antibody response, the adjuvant did. Glucopyranosyl lipid A in a stable oil-in-water emulsion (GLA-SE) produced much higher levels of antibody in response to immunization compared with Alhydrogel; immunization with GLA-SE also produced antibodies with higher affinities for methamphetamine. GLA-SE has been used in human studies of vaccines for influenza among others and like some other clinical TLR4 agonists, it is safe and elicits a strong immune response. GLA-SE adjuvanted vaccines are typically administered by intramuscular injection and this also proved effective in these mouse studies. Clinical studies of the ICKLH-SMO9 methamphetamine vaccine adjuvanted with GLA-SE have the potential for demonstrating efficacy by generating much higher levels of antibody than substance abuse vaccines that have unsuccessfully used aluminum-based adjuvants. PMID:27039212

  6. 9 CFR 101.3 - Biological products and related terms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Biological products and related terms. 101.3 Section 101.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... shall be considered a serial of the multiple fraction product. (i) Subserial. Each of two or...

  7. 9 CFR 101.3 - Biological products and related terms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Biological products and related terms. 101.3 Section 101.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... shall be considered a serial of the multiple fraction product. (i) Subserial. Each of two or...

  8. 9 CFR 103.1 - Preparation of experimental biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Preparation of experimental biological products. 103.1 Section 103.1 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS...

  9. 9 CFR 103.3 - Shipment of experimental biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... products. 103.3 Section 103.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... PRODUCTION, DISTRIBUTION, AND EVALUATION OF BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS PRIOR TO LICENSING § 103.3 Shipment of... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. (f) Data acceptable to the Administrator demonstrating...

  10. Vaccines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antigens that are processed by antigen-processing cells via the exogenous pathway elicit antibodies. Thus, extracellular bacteria (live or killed), inactivated viral particles, portions (subunits) of virus, and products are processed by the exogenous pathway. Epitopes are presented to the immune sys...

  11. Development of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae Recombinant Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Marchioro, Silvana Beutinger; Simionatto, Simone; Dellagostin, Odir

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is the etiological agent of swine enzootic pneumonia (EP), a disease that affects swine production worldwide. Vaccination is the most cost-effective strategy for the control and prevention of the disease. Research using genome-based approach has the potential to elucidate the biology and pathogenesis of M. hyopneumoniae and contribute to the development of more effective vaccines. Here, we describe the protocol for developing M. hyopneumoniae recombinant vaccines using reverse vaccinology approaches. PMID:27076288

  12. Impact of fowlpox-vectored Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccine Vectormune FP MG on layer hen egg production and egg quality parameters.

    PubMed

    Leigh, S A; Branton, S L; Evans, J D; Collier, S D

    2013-12-01

    This study was conducted to determine the impact of vaccination with Vectormune FP MG on egg production and egg quality characteristics of Single Comb White Leghorn hens. Due to questions of the efficacy of this vaccine in preventing Mycoplasma gallisepticum-mediated pathology, the ability of this vaccine to protect against postproduction-peak egg losses associated with F-strain M. gallisepticum (FMG) vaccination was also investigated. Vaccination with Vectormune FP MG did not result in any significant change in egg production or egg quality parameters compared with control (unvaccinated) hens. Subsequent revaccination with FMG at 45 wk of age (woa) yielded no impact on egg production or egg quality parameters of Vectormune FP MG vaccinated hens, unlike prior results for postproduction-peak vaccination of M. gallisepticum-clean hens with FMG, which exhibited a drop in egg production of approximately 6%. No difference in egg size distribution was observed for any of the treatment groups before or after FMG revaccination. These results suggest that hens can be safely vaccinated with Vectormune FP MG as pullets and can be revaccinated with a live M. gallisepticum vaccine such as FMG at a later date with no deleterious effects on egg production or egg or eggshell quality parameters. PMID:24235227

  13. Antiradiation Vaccine: Technology Development Of Prophylaxis, Prevention And Treatment Of Biological Consequences And Complications After Neutron Irradiation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Slava; Jones, Jeffrey

    Introduction: Neutrons irradiation produce a unique biological effectiveness compare to different types of radiation because their ability to create a denser trail of ionized atoms in biological living tissues[Straume 1982; Latif et al.2010; Katz 1978; Bogatyrev 1982]. The efficacy of an Anti-Radiation Vaccine for the prophylaxis, prevention and therapy of acute radiation pathology was studied in a neutron exposure facility. The biological effects of fast neutrons include damage of central nervous system and cardiovascular system with development of Acute Cerebrovascular and Cardiovascular forms of acute radiation pathology. After irradiation by high doses of fast neutron, formation of neurotoxins, hematotoxins,cytotoxins forming from cell's or tissue structures. High doses of Neutron Irradiation generate general and specific toxicity, inflammation reactions. Current Acute Medical Management and Methods of Radiation Protection are not effective against moderate and high doses of neutron irradiation. Our experiments demonstrate that Antiradiation Vaccine is the most effective radioprotectant against high doses of neutron-radiation. Radiation Toxins(biological substances with radio-mimetic properties) isolated from central lymph of gamma-irradiated animals could be working substance with specific antigenic properties for vaccination against neutron irradiation. Methods: Antiradiation Vaccine preparation standard - mixture of a toxoid form of Radiation Toxins - include Cerebrovascular RT Neurotoxin, Cardiovascular RT Neurotoxin, Gastrointestinal RT Neurotoxin, Hematopoietic RT Hematotoxin. Radiation Toxins were isolated from the central lymph of gamma-irradiated animals with different forms of Acute Radiation Syndromes - Cerebrovascular, Cardiovascular, Gastrointestinal, Hematopoietic forms. Devices for Y-radiation were "Panorama","Puma". Neutron exposure was accomplished at the Department of Research Institute of Nuclear Physics, Dubna, Russia. The neutrons

  14. Lot-to-lot consistency of live attenuated SA 14-14-2 Japanese encephalitis vaccine manufactured in a good manufacturing practice facility and non-inferiority with respect to an earlier product.

    PubMed

    Zaman, K; Naser, Abu Mohd; Power, Maureen; Yaich, Mansour; Zhang, Lei; Ginsburg, Amy Sarah; Luby, Stephen P; Rahman, Mahmudur; Hills, Susan; Bhardwaj, Mukesh; Flores, Jorge

    2014-10-21

    We conducted a four-arm, double-blind, randomized controlled trial among 818 Bangladeshi infants between 10 and 12 months of age to establish equivalence among three lots of live attenuated SA 14-14-2 JE vaccine manufactured by the China National Biotec Group's Chengdu Institute of Biological Products (CDIBP) in a new Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) facility and to evaluate non-inferiority of the product with a lot of the same vaccine manufactured in CDIBP's original facility. The study took place in two sites in Bangladesh, rural Matlab and Mirpur in urban Dhaka. We collected pre-vaccination (Day 0) and post-vaccination Day 28 (-4 to +14 days) blood samples to assess neutralizing anti-JE virus antibody titers in serum by plaque reduction neutralization tests (PRNT). Seroprotection following vaccination was defined as a PRNT titer ≥1:10 at Day 28 in participants non-immune at baseline. Follow-up for reactogenicity and safety was conducted through home visits at Day 7 and monitoring for serious adverse events through Day 28. Seroprotection rates ranged from 80.2% to 86.3% for all four lots of vaccine. Equivalence of the seroprotection rates between pairs of vaccine lots produced in the new GMP facility was satisfied at the pre-specified 10% margin of the 95% confidence interval (CI) for two of the three pairwise comparisons, but not for the third (-4.3% observed difference with 95% CI of -11.9 to 3.3%). Nevertheless, the aggregate seroprotection rate for all three vaccine lots manufactured in the GMP facility was calculated and found to be within the non-inferiority margin (within 10%) to the vaccine lot produced in the original facility. All four lots of vaccine were safe and well tolerated. These study results should facilitate the use of SA 14-14-2 JE vaccine as a routine component of immunization programs in Asian countries. PMID:25239483

  15. Clinical Development of a Cytomegalovirus DNA Vaccine: From Product Concept to Pivotal Phase 3 Trial

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Larry R.; Wloch, Mary K.; Chaplin, Jennifer A.; Gerber, Michele; Rolland, Alain P.

    2013-01-01

    2013 marks a milestone year for plasmid DNA vaccine development as a first-in-class cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA vaccine enters pivotal phase 3 testing. This vaccine consists of two plasmids expressing CMV antigens glycoprotein B (gB) and phosphoprotein 65 (pp65) formulated with a CRL1005 poloxamer and benzalkonium chloride (BAK) delivery system designed to enhance plasmid expression. The vaccine’s planned initial indication under investigation is for prevention of CMV reactivation in CMV-seropositive (CMV+) recipients of an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HCT). A randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled phase 2 proof-of-concept study provided initial evidence of the safety of this product in CMV+ HCT recipients who underwent immune ablation conditioning regimens. This study revealed a significant reduction in viral load endpoints and increased frequencies of pp65-specific interferon-γ-producing T cells in vaccine recipients compared to placebo recipients. The results of this endpoint-defining trial provided the basis for defining the primary and secondary endpoints of a global phase 3 trial in HCT recipients. A case study is presented here describing the development history of this vaccine from product concept to initiation of the phase 3 trial. PMID:26344340

  16. Levels of humoral antibodies induced by different inactivated vaccines correlate with egg production in commercial layers challenged with virulent Newcastle disease virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To evaluate the relationship between humoral antibodies from homologous and heterologous vaccines and egg production, twenty-two week-old commercial layers previously vaccinated with four live B1 vaccines were boosted with two different inactivated Newcastle disease virus (NDV) vaccines, a virulent ...

  17. Cholesterol oxidation products and their biological importance.

    PubMed

    Kulig, Waldemar; Cwiklik, Lukasz; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Rog, Tomasz; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2016-09-01

    The main biological cause of oxysterols is the oxidation of cholesterol. They differ from cholesterol by the presence of additional polar groups that are typically hydroxyl, keto, hydroperoxy, epoxy, or carboxyl moieties. Under typical conditions, oxysterol concentration is maintained at a very low and precisely regulated level, with an excess of cholesterol. Like cholesterol, many oxysterols are hydrophobic and hence confined to cell membranes. However, small chemical differences between the sterols can significantly affect how they interact with other membrane components, and this in turn can have a substantial effect on membrane properties. In this spirit, this review describes the biological importance and the roles of oxysterols in the human body. We focus primarily on the effect of oxysterols on lipid membranes, but we also consider other issues such as enzymatic and nonenzymatic synthesis processes of oxysterols as well as pathological conditions induced by oxysterols. PMID:26956952

  18. A plant‐based system for rapid production of influenza vaccine antigens

    PubMed Central

    Shoji, Yoko; Farrance, Christine E.; Bautista, James; Bi, Hong; Musiychuk, Konstantin; Horsey, April; Park, HeeWoo; Jaje, Jennifer; Green, Brian J.; Shamloul, Moneim; Sharma, Satish; Chichester, Jessica A.; Mett, Vadim; Yusibov, Vidadi

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Shoji et al. (2011) A plant‐based system for rapid production of influenza vaccine antigens. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 6(3), 204–210. Background  Influenza virus is a globally important respiratory pathogen that causes a high degree of annual morbidity and mortality. Significant antigenic drift results in emergence of new, potentially pandemic, virus variants. The best prophylactic option for controlling emerging virus strains is to manufacture and administer pandemic vaccines in sufficient quantities and to do so in a timely manner without impacting the regular seasonal influenza vaccine capacity. Current, egg‐based, influenza vaccine production is well established and provides an effective product, but has limited capacity and speed. Objectives  To satisfy the additional global demand for emerging influenza vaccines, high‐performance cost‐effective technologies need to be developed. Plants have a potential as an economic and efficient large‐scale production platform for vaccine antigens. Methods  In this study, a plant virus‐based transient expression system was used to produce hemagglutinin (HA) proteins from the three vaccine strains used during the 2008–2009 influenza season, A/Brisbane/59/07 (H1N1), A/Brisbane/10/07 (H3N2), and B/Florida/4/06, as well as from the recently emerged novel H1N1 influenza A virus, A/California/04/09. Results  The recombinant plant‐based HA proteins were engineered and produced in Nicotiana benthamiana plants within 2 months of obtaining the genetic sequences specific to each virus strain. These antigens expressed at the rate of 400–1300 mg/kg of fresh leaf tissue, with >70% solubility. Immunization of mice with these HA antigens induced serum anti‐HA IgG and hemagglutination inhibition antibody responses at the levels considered protective against these virus infections. Conclusions  These results demonstrate the feasibility of our transient plant

  19. 9 CFR 102.5 - U.S. Veterinary Biological Product License.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false U.S. Veterinary Biological Product... BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS § 102.5 U.S. Veterinary Biological Product License. (a) Authorization to produce each biological product shall be specified on a U.S. Veterinary Biological Product License, issued by...

  20. 9 CFR 102.5 - U.S. Veterinary Biological Product License.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false U.S. Veterinary Biological Product... BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS § 102.5 U.S. Veterinary Biological Product License. (a) Authorization to produce each biological product shall be specified on a U.S. Veterinary Biological Product License, issued by...

  1. 9 CFR 102.5 - U.S. Veterinary Biological Product License.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false U.S. Veterinary Biological Product... BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS § 102.5 U.S. Veterinary Biological Product License. (a) Authorization to produce each biological product shall be specified on a U.S. Veterinary Biological Product License, issued by...

  2. Keynote symposium - avian influenza: Vectors, vaccines, public health, and product marketability introduction and welcome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper is the introduction to the Keynote Symposium titled “Avian Influenza: Vectors, Vaccines, Public Health, and Product Marketability” that the author organized for the Poultry Science Association (PSA) on July 20, 2008. The purpose of the symposium was to provide the members and guests of PS...

  3. [Development of new vaccines].

    PubMed

    González-Romo, Fernando; Picazo, Juan J

    2015-10-01

    Recent and important advances in the fields of immunology, genomics, functional genomics, immunogenetics, immunogenomics, bioinformatics, microbiology, genetic engineering, systems biology, synthetic biochemistry, proteomics, metabolomics and nanotechnology, among others, have led to new approaches in the development of vaccines. The better identification of ideal epitopes, the strengthening of the immune response due to new adjuvants, and the search of new routes of vaccine administration, are good examples of advances that are already a reality and that will favour the development of more vaccines, their use in indicated population groups, or its production at a lower cost. There are currently more than 130 vaccines are under development against the more wished (malaria or HIV), difficult to get (CMV or RSV), severe re-emerging (Dengue or Ebola), increasing importance (Chagas disease or Leishmania), and nosocomial emerging (Clostridium difficile or Staphylococcus aureus) infectious diseases. PMID:26341041

  4. Study designs for the nonclinical safety testing of new vaccine products.

    PubMed

    Forster, Roy

    2012-07-01

    During the development of a new vaccine, the purpose of nonclinical studies is to provide safety information to support the clinical development and licensure of the product. In this article the study designs currently accepted for the nonclinical safety testing of new vaccines are described for single dose, local tolerance, repeat dose toxicity and safety pharmacology studies; these studies together form the basis of a typical nonclinical safety evaluation dossier. The detailed design of the preclinical package must take account of the intended clinical use, patient population, route of administration, formulation, dose level and immunisation schedule. The test item that is used for these studies must be adequately representative of the intended clinical formulation. The animal model used for these studies must be selected on criteria of relevance. Single dose toxicity studies provide information on acute actions or the potential effect of accidental overdose, but this information is often available from the repeat dose toxicity study, obviating the need for the acute study. Local tolerance studies provide information on tissue reactions at the site of administration. Evaluation of the findings must distinguish between normal tissue responses to injected material and findings indicative of undesirable pathological changes. The repeated dose toxicity studies are the principal studies that support the safety profile of the vaccines. The design of these studies must take full account of the features of the vaccine in the choice of treatment regime, dose levels, pharmacodynamic monitoring and timing of investigations and sacrifice. Safety pharmacology studies are performed to evaluate the potential for undesirable secondary pharmacological actions of vaccines if there is data to suggest that such studies are needed; this evaluation is made on a case by case basis. In the absence of specific guidance the design of studies for therapeutic vaccines follows the same

  5. Biological production of ethanol from coal

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    A batch kinetic study involving Clostridium lungdahlii in a mineral medium was carried out in order to provide baseline data for the effects of nutrients on product ratio and kinetics. The use of this minimal medium containing vitamins, minerals, select amino acids and salts showed both a lower maximum specific growth rate and a lower maximum specific uptake rate than found when using a complex medium supplemented with 0.01% yeast extract. At the same time, the product ratio was improved slightly in favor of ethanol over acetate. Future experiments will measure the effects of ammonia and phosphate limitation on product ratio and process kinetics.

  6. Biological production of ethanol from coal

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    Previous results have shown that the medium pH, the composition of the medium and concentration of medium constituents significantly affect the ratio of ethanol to acetate in the product stream when fermenting CO, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} in synthesis gas to products by Clostridium ljungdahlii. An additional batch study was carried out varying the agitation rate at pH 4, 4.5 and 5.0. It was speculated that increased agitation rates in combination with low pH might result in increased ethanol production while, at the same time, yielding higher cell concentrations which could eventually result in higher ethanol concentrations.

  7. Biological Activity of Recently Discovered Halogenated Marine Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Gribble, Gordon W.

    2015-01-01

    This review presents the biological activity—antibacterial, antifungal, anti-parasitic, antiviral, antitumor, antiinflammatory, antioxidant, and enzymatic activity—of halogenated marine natural products discovered in the past five years. Newly discovered examples that do not report biological activity are not included. PMID:26133553

  8. Biological production of ethanol from coal

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Previously studies have shown the importance of both medium composition and concentration and medium pH on ethanol production of Clostridium ljungdahlii in fermenting CO, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} in synthesis gas. Four additional batch experiments involving medium composition and concentration were carried out in modified basal medium without yeast extract at pH 4.0. These experiments indicate that basal medium with only small amounts of B-vitamins can yield significant cell growth while yielding ethanol as the major product. Product ratios as high as 11.0 g ethanol per g acetate were obtained with half strength B-vitamins. Further experiments indicates that Ca-pantothenate may be necessary for the growth of C. ljungdahlii and that growth and ethanol production can occur simultaneously.

  9. Biological production of ethanol from coal

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Research is continuing in an attempt to increase both the ethanol concentration and product ratio using C. ljungdahlii. The purpose of this report is to present data utilizing a medium prepared especially for C. ljungdahlii. Medium development studies are presented, as well as reactor studies with the new medium in batch reactors. CSTRs and CSTRs with cell recycle. The use of this new medium has resulted in significant improvements in cell concentration, ethanol concentration and product ratio.

  10. Biological production of ethanol fom coal

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    Research is continuing in an attempt to increase both the ethanol concentration and product ratio using C. ljungdahlii. The purpose of this report is to present data (acetate to ethanol) utilizing a medium prepared especially for C. ljungdahlii. Medium development studies are presented, as well as reactor studies with the new medium in batch reactors. Continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) with cell recycle. The use of this new medium has resulted in significant improvements in cell concentration, ethanol concentration and product ratio.

  11. Systems biological approaches to measure and understand vaccine immunity in humans

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuzhao; Nakaya, Helder I; Kazmin, Dmitri A; Oh, Jason; Pulendran, Bali

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the utility of using systems approaches to identify molecular signatures that can be used to predict vaccine immunity in humans. Such approaches are now being used extensively in vaccinology, and are beginning to yield novel insights about the molecular networks driving vaccine immunity. In this review, we present a broad review of the methodologies involved in these studies, and discuss the promise and challenges involved in this emerging field of “systems vaccinology.” PMID:23796714

  12. Production of a recombinant vaccine candidate against Burkholderia pseudomallei exploiting the bacterial N-glycosylation machinery.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Quintanilla, Fatima; Iwashkiw, Jeremy A; Price, Nancy L; Stratilo, Chad; Feldman, Mario F

    2014-01-01

    Vaccines developing immune responses toward surface carbohydrates conjugated to proteins are effective in preventing infection and death by bacterial pathogens. Traditional production of these vaccines utilizes complex synthetic chemistry to acquire and conjugate the glycan to a protein. However, glycoproteins produced by bacterial protein glycosylation systems are significantly easier to produce, and could possible be used as vaccine candidates. In this work, we functionally expressed the Burkholderia pseudomallei O polysaccharide (OPS II), the Campylobacter jejuni oligosaccharyltransferase (OTase), and a suitable glycoprotein (AcrA) in a designer E. coli strain with a higher efficiency for production of glycoconjugates. We were able to produce and purify the OPS II-AcrA glycoconjugate, and MS analysis confirmed correct glycan was produced and attached. We observed the attachment of the O-acetylated deoxyhexose directly to the acceptor protein, which expands the range of substrates utilized by the OTase PglB. Injection of the glycoprotein into mice generated an IgG immune response against B. pseudomallei, and this response was partially protective against an intranasal challenge. Our experiments show that bacterial engineered glycoconjugates can be utilized as vaccine candidates against B. pseudomallei. Additionally, our new E. coli strain SDB1 is more efficient in glycoprotein production, and could have additional applications in the future. PMID:25120536

  13. Production of a recombinant vaccine candidate against Burkholderia pseudomallei exploiting the bacterial N-glycosylation machinery

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Quintanilla, Fatima; Iwashkiw, Jeremy A.; Price, Nancy L.; Stratilo, Chad; Feldman, Mario F.

    2014-01-01

    Vaccines developing immune responses toward surface carbohydrates conjugated to proteins are effective in preventing infection and death by bacterial pathogens. Traditional production of these vaccines utilizes complex synthetic chemistry to acquire and conjugate the glycan to a protein. However, glycoproteins produced by bacterial protein glycosylation systems are significantly easier to produce, and could possible be used as vaccine candidates. In this work, we functionally expressed the Burkholderia pseudomallei O polysaccharide (OPS II), the Campylobacter jejuni oligosaccharyltransferase (OTase), and a suitable glycoprotein (AcrA) in a designer E. coli strain with a higher efficiency for production of glycoconjugates. We were able to produce and purify the OPS II-AcrA glycoconjugate, and MS analysis confirmed correct glycan was produced and attached. We observed the attachment of the O-acetylated deoxyhexose directly to the acceptor protein, which expands the range of substrates utilized by the OTase PglB. Injection of the glycoprotein into mice generated an IgG immune response against B. pseudomallei, and this response was partially protective against an intranasal challenge. Our experiments show that bacterial engineered glycoconjugates can be utilized as vaccine candidates against B. pseudomallei. Additionally, our new E. coli strain SDB1 is more efficient in glycoprotein production, and could have additional applications in the future. PMID:25120536

  14. An Automated HIV-1 Env-Pseudotyped Virus Production for Global HIV Vaccine Trials

    PubMed Central

    Fuss, Martina; Mazzotta, Angela S.; Sarzotti-Kelsoe, Marcella; Ozaki, Daniel A.; Montefiori, David C.; von Briesen, Hagen; Zimmermann, Heiko; Meyerhans, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Background Infections with HIV still represent a major human health problem worldwide and a vaccine is the only long-term option to fight efficiently against this virus. Standardized assessments of HIV-specific immune responses in vaccine trials are essential for prioritizing vaccine candidates in preclinical and clinical stages of development. With respect to neutralizing antibodies, assays with HIV-1 Env-pseudotyped viruses are a high priority. To cover the increasing demands of HIV pseudoviruses, a complete cell culture and transfection automation system has been developed. Methodology/Principal Findings The automation system for HIV pseudovirus production comprises a modified Tecan-based Cellerity system. It covers an area of 5×3 meters and includes a robot platform, a cell counting machine, a CO2 incubator for cell cultivation and a media refrigerator. The processes for cell handling, transfection and pseudovirus production have been implemented according to manual standard operating procedures and are controlled and scheduled autonomously by the system. The system is housed in a biosafety level II cabinet that guarantees protection of personnel, environment and the product. HIV pseudovirus stocks in a scale from 140 ml to 1000 ml have been produced on the automated system. Parallel manual production of HIV pseudoviruses and comparisons (bridging assays) confirmed that the automated produced pseudoviruses were of equivalent quality as those produced manually. In addition, the automated method was fully validated according to Good Clinical Laboratory Practice (GCLP) guidelines, including the validation parameters accuracy, precision, robustness and specificity. Conclusions An automated HIV pseudovirus production system has been successfully established. It allows the high quality production of HIV pseudoviruses under GCLP conditions. In its present form, the installed module enables the production of 1000 ml of virus-containing cell culture supernatant per

  15. Setting up a platform for plant-based influenza virus vaccine production in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background During a global influenza pandemic, the vaccine requirements of developing countries can surpass their supply capabilities, if these exist at all, compelling them to rely on developed countries for stocks that may not be available in time. There is thus a need for developing countries in general to produce their own pandemic and possibly seasonal influenza vaccines. Here we describe the development of a plant-based platform for producing influenza vaccines locally, in South Africa. Plant-produced influenza vaccine candidates are quicker to develop and potentially cheaper than egg-produced influenza vaccines, and their production can be rapidly upscaled. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of producing a vaccine to the highly pathogenic avian influenza A subtype H5N1 virus, the most generally virulent influenza virus identified to date. Two variants of the haemagglutinin (HA) surface glycoprotein gene were synthesised for optimum expression in plants: these were the full-length HA gene (H5) and a truncated form lacking the transmembrane domain (H5tr). The genes were cloned into a panel of Agrobacterium tumefaciens binary plant expression vectors in order to test HA accumulation in different cell compartments. The constructs were transiently expressed in tobacco by means of agroinfiltration. Stable transgenic tobacco plants were also generated to provide seed for stable storage of the material as a pre-pandemic strategy. Results For both transient and transgenic expression systems the highest accumulation of full-length H5 protein occurred in the apoplastic spaces, while the highest accumulation of H5tr was in the endoplasmic reticulum. The H5 proteins were produced at relatively high concentrations in both systems. Following partial purification, haemagglutination and haemagglutination inhibition tests indicated that the conformation of the plant-produced HA variants was correct and the proteins were functional. The immunisation of chickens and

  16. The potential of plants as a system for the development and production of human biologics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiang; Davis, Keith R.

    2016-01-01

    The growing promise of plant-made biologics is highlighted by the success story of ZMapp™ as a potentially life-saving drug during the Ebola outbreak of 2014-2016. Current plant expression platforms offer features beyond the traditional advantages of low cost, high scalability, increased safety, and eukaryotic protein modification. Novel transient expression vectors have been developed that allow the production of vaccines and therapeutics at unprecedented speed to control potential pandemics or bioterrorism attacks. Plant-host engineering provides a method for producing proteins with unique and uniform mammalian post-translational modifications, providing opportunities to develop biologics with increased efficacy relative to their mammalian cell-produced counterparts. Recent demonstrations that plant-made proteins can function as biocontrol agents of foodborne pathogens further exemplify the potential utility of plant-based protein production. However, resolving the technical and regulatory challenges of commercial-scale production, garnering acceptance from large pharmaceutical companies, and obtaining U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for several major classes of biologics are essential steps to fulfilling the untapped potential of this technology. PMID:27274814

  17. The potential of plants as a system for the development and production of human biologics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiang; Davis, Keith R

    2016-01-01

    The growing promise of plant-made biologics is highlighted by the success story of ZMapp™ as a potentially life-saving drug during the Ebola outbreak of 2014-2016. Current plant expression platforms offer features beyond the traditional advantages of low cost, high scalability, increased safety, and eukaryotic protein modification. Novel transient expression vectors have been developed that allow the production of vaccines and therapeutics at unprecedented speed to control potential pandemics or bioterrorism attacks. Plant-host engineering provides a method for producing proteins with unique and uniform mammalian post-translational modifications, providing opportunities to develop biologics with increased efficacy relative to their mammalian cell-produced counterparts. Recent demonstrations that plant-made proteins can function as biocontrol agents of foodborne pathogens further exemplify the potential utility of plant-based protein production. However, resolving the technical and regulatory challenges of commercial-scale production, garnering acceptance from large pharmaceutical companies, and obtaining U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for several major classes of biologics are essential steps to fulfilling the untapped potential of this technology. PMID:27274814

  18. Biological production of liquid fuels from biomass

    SciTech Connect

    1982-01-01

    A scheme for the production of liquid fuels from renewable resources such as poplar wood and lignocellulosic wastes from a refuse hydropulper was investigated. The particular scheme being studied involves the conversion of a cellulosic residue, resulting from a solvent delignified lignocellulosic feed, into either high concentration sugar syrups or into ethyl and/or butyl alcohol. The construction of a pilot apparatus for solvent delignifying 150 g samples of lignocellulosic feeds was completed. Also, an analysis method for characterizing the delignified product has been selected and tested. This is a method recommended in the Forage Fiber Handbook. Delignified samples are now being prepared and tested for their extent of delignification and susceptibility to enzyme hydrolysis. Work is continuing on characterizing the cellulase and cellobiase enzyme systems derived from the YX strain of Thermomonospora.

  19. Biological production of ethanol from coal

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    Research is continuing in attempting to increase both the ethanol concentration and product ratio (acetate to ethanol) from the C. ljungdahlii fermentation. Both batch and continuous reactors are being used for this purpose. The purpose of this report is four-fold. First, the data presented in PETC Report No. 2-4-91 (June--September, 1991) are analyzed and interpreted using normalized specific growth and production rates. This technique eliminates experimental variation due to differences in inoculum history. Secondly, the effects of the sulfur gases H{sub 2}S and COS on the performance of C. ljungdahlii are presented and discussed. Although these are preliminary results, they illustrate the tolerance of the bacterium to low levels of sulfur gases. Thirdly, the results of continuous stirred tank reactor studies are presented, where cell and product concentrations are shown as a function of agitation rate and gas flow rate. Finally, additional data are presented showing the performance of C. ljungdahlii in a CSTR with cell recycle.

  20. Biological production of ethanol from coal

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Research is continuing in attempting to increase both the ethanol concentration and product ratio from the C. ljungdahlii fermentation. Both batch and continuous reactors are being used for this purpose. The purpose of this report is four-fold. First, the data presented in PETC Report No. 2-4-91 (June--September 1991) are analyzed and interpreted using normalized specific growth and production rates. This technique eliminates experimental variation due to the differences in inoculum history. Secondly, the effects of the sulfur gases H{sub 2}S and COS on the performance of C. ljungdahlii are presented and discussed. Although these are preliminary results, they illustrate the tolerance of the bacterium to low levels of sulfur gases. Thirdly, the results of continuous stirred tank reactor studies are presented, where cell and product concentrations are shown as a function of agitation rate and gas flow rate. Finally, additional data are presented showing the performance of C. ljungdahlii in a CSTR with cell recycle.

  1. ACAM2000 clonal Vero cell culture vaccinia virus (New York City Board of Health strain)--a second-generation smallpox vaccine for biological defense.

    PubMed

    Monath, Thomas P; Caldwell, Joseph R; Mundt, Wolfgang; Fusco, Joan; Johnson, Casey S; Buller, Mark; Liu, Jian; Gardner, Bridget; Downing, Greg; Blum, Paul S; Kemp, Tracy; Nichols, Richard; Weltzin, Richard

    2004-10-01

    The threat of smallpox as a biological weapon has spurred efforts to create stockpiles of vaccine for emergency preparedness. In lieu of preparing vaccine in animal skin (the original method), we cloned vaccinia virus (New York City Board of Health strain, Dryvax by plaque purification and amplified the clone in cell culture. The overarching goal was to produce a modern vaccine that was equivalent to the currently licensed Dryvax in its preclinical and clinical properties, and could thus reliably protect humans against smallpox. A variety of clones were evaluated, and many were unacceptably virulent in animal models. One clonal virus (ACAM1000) was selected and produced at clinical grade in MRC-5 human diploid cells. ACAM1000 was comparable to Dryvax in immunogenicity and protective activity but was less neurovirulent for mice and nonhuman primates. To meet requirements for large quantities of vaccine after the events of September 11th 2001, the ACAM1000 master virus seed was used to prepare vaccine (designated ACAM2000) at large scale in Vero cells under serum-free conditions. The genomes of ACAM1000 and ACAM2000 had identical nucleotide sequences, and the vaccines had comparable biological phenotypes. ACAM1000 and ACAM2000 were evaluated in three Phase 1 clinical trials. The vaccines produced major cutaneous reactions and evoked neutralizing antibody and cell-mediated immune responses in the vast majority of subjects and had a reactogenicity profile similar to that of Dryvax. PMID:15491873

  2. Neurotrophic Natural Products: Chemistry and Biology

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jing; Lacoske, Michelle H.

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases and spinal cord injury affect approximately 50 million people worldwide, bringing the total healthcare cost to over 600 billion dollars per year. Nervous system growth factors, that is, neurotrophins, are a potential solution to these disorders, since they could promote nerve regeneration. An average of 500 publications per year attests to the significance of neurotrophins in biomedical sciences and underlines their potential for therapeutic applications. Nonetheless, the poor pharmacokinetic profile of neurotrophins severely restricts their clinical use. On the other hand, small molecules that modulate neurotrophic activity offer a promising therapeutic approach against neurological disorders. Nature has provided an impressive array of natural products that have potent neurotrophic activities. This Review highlights the current synthetic strategies toward these compounds and summarizes their ability to induce neuronal growth and rehabilitation. It is anticipated that neurotrophic natural products could be used not only as starting points in drug design but also as tools to study the next frontier in biomedical sciences: the brain activity map project. PMID:24353244

  3. Changing climate increases biological productivity in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2011-11-01

    Climate change is leading to increased biological productivity in the coastal Arctic. As ice melts and recedes far from land, winds interact with open waters to increase the upwelling of nutrient-rich deep water and stimulate biological productivity. Tremblay et al. quantified these changes using remote sensing and in situ observations in the coastal Beaufort Sea. They found that ice ablation and the combination of increased upwelling and greater light penetration into the water column during fall 2007 and summer 2008 increased the production of ice algae, phytoplankton, and zooplankton by 2-6 times. (Geophysical Research Letters, doi:10.1029/2011GL048825, 2011)

  4. 9 CFR 113.51 - Requirements for primary cells used for production of biologics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... for production of biologics. 113.51 Section 113.51 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... production of biologics. Primary cells used to prepare biological products shall be derived from normal... of Production, each batch of primary cells used to prepare a biological product shall be tested...

  5. History of vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Plotkin, Stanley

    2014-01-01

    Vaccines have a history that started late in the 18th century. From the late 19th century, vaccines could be developed in the laboratory. However, in the 20th century, it became possible to develop vaccines based on immunologic markers. In the 21st century, molecular biology permits vaccine development that was not possible before. PMID:25136134

  6. Antiradiation UV Vaccine: UV Radiation, Biological effects, lesions and medical management - immune-therapy and immune-protection.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Dmitri; Jones, Jeffrey; Maliev, Slava

    rabbits, 11-12 months old, live weight 3.5-3.7 (n=11), Balb mice, 2-3 months old, live weight 20-22 g (n=33), Wistar rats, 3-4 months old, live weight 180-220 g(n=33). The studies were approved by the Animal Care and Use Committee for ethical animal research equivalent, at each institution. Seven rabbits, ten mice, eleven Wistar rats were vaccinated with a UV antiradiation vaccine. A second group of animals was used as biological control which received vaccine but no UV Radiation and a third group of animals was used as control without any interventions. Before and after UV Radiation, Vaccination with the UV antiradiation vaccine were provided 17 days prior to UV exposure. The animals were irradiated by a DRT-1 UV generator lamp. The dose of irradiation for laboratory, experimental animals was 10-12 * Standard Erythema Dose (SED) at L=283,7 Laboratory animals were placed in to the box with ventilation. Results: Ultraviolet irradiation of the skin was performed with high doses and causes an inflammation or erythema in all experimental animals. However the grade of skin damage and inflammation was significantly different between animals protected by vaccination and non-protected, non-vaccinated animals. Animals UV-irradiated, but who did not receive the antiradiation vaccine suffered from extensive UV skin burns of second or third degree (grade 2-3). However, animals protected with the UV antiradiation vaccine demonstrated much mild forms of skin cellular injury - mainly erythema, first degree skin burns and a few small patches with second degree skin burns (grade 1-2). Discussion: The severity of skin damage depended on area of exposed skin, time and dose of UV irradiation. Skin injury could be divided into 4 major grades: 1. Faint erythema with dry desquamation. 2. Moderate to severe erythema. 3. Severe erythema with blistering, moist desquamation. 4. Toxic epidermal necrolysis. Mild doses of UV radiation and ionizing radiation can induce cell death by apoptosis and

  7. Limited efficacy of inactivated influenza vaccine in elderly individuals is associated with decreased production of vaccine-specific antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Sanae; Sullivan, Meghan; Narvaez, Carlos F.; Holmes, Tyson H.; Furman, David; Zheng, Nai-Ying; Nishtala, Madhuri; Wrammert, Jens; Smith, Kenneth; James, Judith A.; Dekker, Cornelia L.; Davis, Mark M.; Wilson, Patrick C.; Greenberg, Harry B.; He, Xiao-Song

    2011-01-01

    During seasonal influenza epidemics, disease burden is shouldered predominantly by the very young and the elderly. Elderly individuals are particularly affected, in part because vaccine efficacy wanes with age. This has been linked to a reduced ability to induce a robust serum antibody response. Here, we show that this is due to reduced quantities of vaccine-specific antibodies, rather than a lack of antibody avidity or affinity. We measured levels of vaccine-specific plasmablasts by ELISPOT 1 week after immunization of young and elderly adults with inactivated seasonal influenza vaccine. Plasmablast-derived polyclonal antibodies (PPAbs) were generated from bulk-cultured B cells, while recombinant monoclonal antibodies (re-mAbs) were produced from single plasmablasts. The frequency of vaccine-specific plasmablasts and the concentration of PPAbs were lower in the elderly than in young adults, whereas the yields of secreted IgG per plasmablast were not different. Differences were not detected in the overall vaccine-specific avidity or affinity of PPAbs and re-mAbs between the 2 age groups. In contrast, reactivity of the antibodies induced by the inactivated seasonal influenza vaccine toward the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus, which was not present in the vaccine, was higher in the elderly than in the young. These results indicate that the inferior antibody response to influenza vaccination in the elderly is primarily due to reduced quantities of vaccine-specific antibodies. They also suggest that exposure history affects the cross-reactivity of vaccination-induced antibodies. PMID:21785218

  8. Production of a Shigella sonnei Vaccine Based on Generalized Modules for Membrane Antigens (GMMA), 1790GAHB

    PubMed Central

    Gerke, Christiane; Colucci, Anna Maria; Giannelli, Carlo; Sanzone, Silvia; Vitali, Claudia Giorgina; Sollai, Luigi; Rossi, Omar; Martin, Laura B.; Auerbach, Jochen; Di Cioccio, Vito; Saul, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we developed a high yield production process for outer membrane particles from genetically modified bacteria, called Generalized Modules of Membrane Antigens (GMMA), and the corresponding simple two step filtration purification, enabling economic manufacture of these particles for use as vaccines. Using a Shigella sonnei strain that was genetically modified to produce penta-acylated lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with reduced endotoxicity and to maintain the virulence plasmid encoding for the immunodominant O antigen component of the LPS, scale up of the process to GMP pilot scale was straightforward and gave high yields of GMMA with required purity and consistent results. GMMA were formulated with Alhydrogel and were highly immunogenic in mice and rabbits. In mice, a single immunization containing 29 ng protein and 1.75 ng of O antigen elicited substantial anti-LPS antibody levels. As GMMA contain LPS and lipoproteins, assessing potential reactogenicity was a key aspect of vaccine development. In an in vitro monocyte activation test, GMMA from the production strain showed a 600-fold lower stimulatory activity than GMMA with unmodified LPS. Two in vivo tests confirmed the low potential for reactogenicity. We established a modified rabbit pyrogenicity test based on the European Pharmacopoeia pyrogens method but using intramuscular administration of the full human dose (100 μg of protein). The vaccine elicited an average temperature rise of 0.5°C within four hours after administration, which was considered acceptable and showed that the test is able to detect a pyrogenic response. Furthermore, a repeat dose toxicology study in rabbits using intramuscular (100 μg/dose), intranasal (80 μg/dose), and intradermal (10 μg/dose) administration routes showed good tolerability of the vaccine by all routes and supported its suitability for use in humans. The S. sonnei GMMA vaccine is now in Phase 1 dose-escalation clinical trials. PMID:26248044

  9. The Interstellar Production of Biologically Important Organics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Scott A.; Bernstein, Max P.; Dworkin, Jason; Allamandola, Louis J.

    2000-01-01

    One of the primary tasks of the Astrochemistry Laboratory at Ames Research Center is to use laboratory simulations to study the chemical processes that occur in dense interstellar clouds. Since new stars are formed in these clouds, their materials may be responsible for the delivery of organics to new habitable planets and may play important roles in the origin of life. These clouds are extremely cold (less than 50 kelvin), and most of the volatiles in these clouds are condensed onto dust grains as thin ice mantles. These ices are exposed to cosmic rays and ultraviolet (UV) photons that break chemical bonds and result in the production of complex molecules when the ices are warmed (as they would be when incorporated into a star-forming region). Using cryovacuum systems and UV lamps, this study simulates the conditions of these clouds and studies the resulting chemistry. Some of the areas of progress made in 1999 are described below. It shows some of the types of molecules that may be formed in the interstellar medium. Laboratory simulations have already confirmed that many of these compounds are made under these conditions.

  10. Optimizing selection of large animals for antibody production by screening immune response to standard vaccines.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Mary K; Fridy, Peter C; Keegan, Sarah; Chait, Brian T; Fenyö, David; Rout, Michael P

    2016-03-01

    Antibodies made in large animals are integral to many biomedical research endeavors. Domesticated herd animals like goats, sheep, donkeys, horses and camelids all offer distinct advantages in antibody production. However, their cost of use is often prohibitive, especially where poor antigen response is commonplace; choosing a non-responsive animal can set a research program back or even prevent experiments from moving forward entirely. Over the course of production of antibodies from llamas, we found that some animals consistently produced a higher humoral antibody response than others, even to highly divergent antigens, as well as to their standard vaccines. Based on our initial data, we propose that these "high level responders" could be pre-selected by checking antibody titers against common vaccines given to domestic farm animals. Thus, time and money can be saved by reducing the chances of getting poor responding animals and minimizing the use of superfluous animals. PMID:26775851

  11. The potential of Physcomitrella patens as a platform for the production of plant-based vaccines.

    PubMed

    Rosales-Mendoza, Sergio; Orellana-Escobedo, Lucía; Romero-Maldonado, Andrea; Decker, Eva L; Reski, Ralf

    2014-02-01

    The moss Physcomitrella patens has a number of advantages for the production of biopharmaceuticals, including: i) availability of standardized conditions for cultivation in bioreactors; ii) not being part of the food chain; iii) high biosafety; iv) availability of highly efficient transformation methods; v) a haploid, fully sequenced genome providing genetic stability and uniform expression; vi) efficient gene targeting at the nuclear level allows for the generation of mutants with specific post-translational modifications (e.g., glycosylation patterns); and vii) oral formulations are a viable approach as no toxic effects are attributed to ingestion of this moss. In the light of this panorama, this opinion paper analyzes the possibilities of using P. patens for the production of oral vaccines and presents some specific cases where its use may represent significant progress in the field of plant-based vaccine development. The advantages represented by putative adjuvant effects of endogenous secondary metabolites and producing specific glycosylation patterns are highlighted. PMID:24405402

  12. Vaccination and acute phase mediator production in chickens challenged with low pathogenic avian influenza virus; novel markers for vaccine efficacy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methods to determine vaccine efficacy of low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) isolates are limited in poultry because experimental infections with LPAI virus in specific pathogen free chickens rarely causes clinical disease. The most commonly used method to compare LPAI vaccine efficacy is to quant...

  13. Light-enhanced primary marine aerosol production from biologically productive seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, M. S.; Keene, W. C.; Kieber, D. J.; Frossard, A. A.; Russell, L. M.; Maben, J. R.; Kinsey, J. D.; Quinn, P. K.; Bates, T. S.

    2014-04-01

    Physical and biogeochemical processes in seawater controlling primary marine aerosol (PMA) production and composition are poorly understood and associated with large uncertainties in estimated fluxes into the atmosphere. PMA production was investigated in the biologically productive NE Pacific Ocean and in biologically productive and oligotrophic regions of the NW Atlantic Ocean. Physicochemical properties of model PMA, produced by aeration of fresh seawater under controlled conditions, were quantified. Diel variability in model PMA mass and number fluxes was observed in biologically productive waters, increasing following sunrise and decreasing to predawn levels overnight. Such variability was not seen in oligotrophic waters. During daytime, surfactant scavenging by aeration in the aerosol generator without replenishing the seawater in the reservoir reduced the model PMA production in productive waters to nighttime levels but had no influence on production from oligotrophic waters. Results suggest bubble plume interactions with sunlight-mediated biogenic surfactants in productive seawater significantly enhanced model PMA production.

  14. Milk kefir: composition, microbial cultures, biological activities, and related products

    PubMed Central

    Prado, Maria R.; Blandón, Lina Marcela; Vandenberghe, Luciana P. S.; Rodrigues, Cristine; Castro, Guillermo R.; Thomaz-Soccol, Vanete; Soccol, Carlos R.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a strong focus on beneficial foods with probiotic microorganisms and functional organic substances. In this context, there is an increasing interest in the commercial use of kefir, since it can be marketed as a natural beverage that has health promoting bacteria. There are numerous commercially available kefir based-products. Kefir may act as a matrix in the effective delivery of probiotic microorganisms in different types of products. Also, the presence of kefir’s exopolysaccharides, known as kefiran, which has biological activity, certainly adds value to products. Kefiran can also be used separately in other food products and as a coating film for various food and pharmaceutical products. This article aims to update the information about kefir and its microbiological composition, biological activity of the kefir’s microflora and the importance of kefiran as a beneficial health substance. PMID:26579086

  15. Assessment of biological Hydrogen production processes: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najafpour, G. D.; Shahavi, M. H.; Neshat, S. A.

    2016-06-01

    Energy crisis created a special attention on renewable energy sources. Among these sources; hydrogen through biological processes is well-known as the most suitable and renewable energy sources. In terms of process yield, hydrogen production from various sources was evaluated. A summary of microorganisms as potential hydrogen producers discussed along with advantages and disadvantages of several bioprocesses. The pathway of photo-synthetic and dark fermentative organisms was discussed. In fact, the active enzymes involved in performance of biological processes for hydrogen generation were identified and their special functionalities were discussed. The influential factors affecting on hydrogen production were known as enzymes assisting liberation specific enzymes such as nitrogenase, hydrogenase and uptake hydrogenase. These enzymes were quite effective in reduction of proton and form active molecular hydrogen. Several types of photosynthetic systems were evaluated with intension of maximum hydrogen productivities. In addition dark fermentative and light intensities on hydrogen productions were evaluated. The hydrogen productivities of efficient hydrogen producing strains were evaluated.

  16. 75 FR 75682 - Reclassification of Category IIIA Biological Products, Bacterial Vaccines and Related Biological...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-06

    ... order finalizes the proposed order published in the Federal Register of May 15, 2000 (65 FR 31003) (May..., 1973 (38 FR 4319), FDA issued procedures for the review by independent advisory panels of the safety... codified in Sec. 601.25 (21 CFR 601.25) (38 FR 32048 at 32052, November 20, 1973). Under Sec. 601.25,...

  17. DNA vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregersen, Jens-Peter

    2001-12-01

    Immunization by genes encoding immunogens, rather than with the immunogen itself, has opened up new possibilities for vaccine research and development and offers chances for new applications and indications for future vaccines. The underlying mechanisms of antigen processing, immune presentation and regulation of immune responses raise high expectations for new and more effective prophylactic or therapeutic vaccines, particularly for vaccines against chronic or persistent infectious diseases and tumors. Our current knowledge and experience of DNA vaccination is summarized and critically reviewed with particular attention to basic immunological mechanisms, the construction of plasmids, screening for protective immunogens to be encoded by these plasmids, modes of application, pharmacokinetics, safety and immunotoxicological aspects. DNA vaccines have the potential to accelerate the research phase of new vaccines and to improve the chances of success, since finding new immunogens with the desired properties is at least technically less demanding than for conventional vaccines. However, on the way to innovative vaccine products, several hurdles have to be overcome. The efficacy of DNA vaccines in humans appears to be much less than indicated by early studies in mice. Open questions remain concerning the persistence and distribution of inoculated plasmid DNA in vivo, its potential to express antigens inappropriately, or the potentially deleterious ability to insert genes into the host cell's genome. Furthermore, the possibility of inducing immunotolerance or autoimmune diseases also needs to be investigated more thoroughly, in order to arrive at a well-founded consensus, which justifies the widespread application of DNA vaccines in a healthy population.

  18. Natural product synthesis at the interface of chemistry and biology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Nature has evolved to produce unique and diverse natural products that possess high target affinity and specificity. Natural products have been the richest sources for novel modulators of biomolecular function. Since the chemical synthesis of urea by Wöhler, organic chemists have been intrigued by natural products, leading to the evolution of the field of natural product synthesis over the past two centuries. Natural product synthesis has enabled natural products to play an essential role in drug discovery and chemical biology. With the introduction of novel, innovative concepts and strategies for synthetic efficiency, natural product synthesis in the 21st century is well poised to address the challenges and complexities faced by natural product chemistry and will remain essential to progress in biomedical sciences. PMID:25043880

  19. Tetanus, Diphtheria, Pertussis (Tdap) Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    Adacel® (as a combination product containing Diphtheria, Tetanus Toxoids, Acellular Pertussis Vaccine) ... Boostrix® (as a combination product containing Diphtheria, Tetanus Toxoids, Acellular Pertussis Vaccine)

  20. Influenza Vaccines: Challenges and Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Houser, Katherine; Subbarao, Kanta

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination is the best method for the prevention and control of influenza. Vaccination can reduce illness and lessen severity of infection. This review focuses on how currently licensed influenza vaccines are generated in the U.S., why the biology of influenza poses vaccine challenges, and vaccine approaches on the horizon that address these challenges. PMID:25766291

  1. The Structural Biology of Enzymes Involved in Natural Product Glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shanteri; Phillips, George N.

    2012-01-01

    The glycosylation of microbial natural products often dramatically influences the biological and/or pharmacological activities of the parental metabolite. Over the past decade, crystal structures of several enzymes involved in the biosynthesis and attachment of novel sugars found appended to natural products have emerged. In many cases, these studies have paved the way to a better understanding of the corresponding enzyme mechanism of action and have served as a starting point for engineering variant enzymes to facilitate to production of differentially-glycosylated natural products. This review specifically summarizes the structural studies of bacterial enzymes involved in biosynthesis of novel sugar nucleotides. PMID:22688446

  2. Pharmacist Substitution of Biological Products: Issues and Considerations.

    PubMed

    Li, Edward; Ramanan, Sundar; Green, Larry

    2015-07-01

    Biosimilars are biological products that are highly similar to their biological reference products, notwithstanding minor differences in clinically inactive components. However, unlike generics of small-molecule drugs, biosimilars are not identical to their reference products, since each manufacturer uses unique cell lines and processes, and these lead to slight structural differences between products. Because these structural variations can lead to differences in clinical response, clinical studies demonstrating biosimilarity are required before and robust pharmacovigilance after approval. Although the FDA has not yet issued formal guidance on interchangeable biosimilars, higher standards of similarity will be required in order to achieve an interchangeable designation. In this commentary, we review the differences between generics and biosimilars, describe their respective regulatory approval pathways, discuss interchangeability and substitution, and review substitution of interchangeable biosimilars, focusing on key professional considerations for pharmacists. PMID:26108377

  3. New Strains Intended for the Production of Inactivated Polio Vaccine at Low-Containment After Eradication

    PubMed Central

    Knowlson, Sarah; Burlison, John; Giles, Elaine; Fox, Helen; Macadam, Andrew J.; Minor, Philip D.

    2015-01-01

    Poliomyelitis has nearly been eradicated through the efforts of the World Health Organization’s Global Eradication Initiative raising questions on containment of the virus after it has been eliminated in the wild. Most manufacture of inactivated polio vaccines currently requires the growth of large amounts of highly virulent poliovirus, and release from a production facility after eradication could be disastrous; WHO have therefore recommended the use of the attenuated Sabin strains for production as a safer option although it is recognised that they can revert to a transmissible paralytic form. We have exploited the understanding of the molecular virology of the Sabin vaccine strains to design viruses that are extremely genetically stable and hyperattenuated. The viruses are based on the type 3 Sabin vaccine strain and have been genetically modified in domain V of the 5’ non-coding region by changing base pairs to produce a cassette into which capsid regions of other serotypes have been introduced. The viruses give satisfactory yields of antigenically and immunogenically correct viruses in culture, are without measurable neurovirulence and fail to infect non-human primates under conditions where the Sabin strains will do so. PMID:26720150

  4. Oral vaccination of dogs with recombinant rabies virus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Rupprecht, Charles E; Hanlon, Cathleen A; Blanton, Jesse; Manangan, Jamie; Morrill, Patricia; Murphy, Staci; Niezgoda, Michael; Orciari, Lillian A; Schumacher, Carolin L; Dietzschold, Bernhard

    2005-07-01

    Oral rabies virus (RV) vaccines are used to immunize a diversity of mammalian carnivores, but no single biological is effective for all major species. Recently, advances in reverse genetics have allowed the design of recombinant RV for consideration as new vaccines. The objective of this experiment was to examine the safety, immunogenicity and efficacy of recombinant RV vaccines administered to captive dogs by the oral route, compared to a commercial vaccinia-rabies glycoprotein (V-RG) recombinant virus vaccine. Animals consisted of naive purpose-bred beagles of both sexes, and were 6 months of age or older. Dogs were randomly assigned to one of six groups, and received either diluent or vaccine (PBS; V-RG; RV SN10-333; RV SPBN-Cyto c; RV SPBNGA; RV SPBNGAGA), with at least six animals per group. On day 0, 1 ml of each vaccine (or PBS) was administered to the oral cavity of each dog, at an approximate concentration of 10(8) to 10(9) TCID50. After vaccination, dogs were observed daily and bled weekly, for 5 weeks, prior to RV challenge. No signs of illness related to vaccination were detected during the observation period. Excluding the controls, RV neutralizing antibodies were detected in the majority of animals within 1-2 weeks of primary vaccination. Thereafter, all dogs were inoculated in the masseter muscle with a street virus of canine origin. All control animals developed rabies, but no vaccinates succumbed, with the exception of a single dog in the V-RG group. Review of these preliminary data demonstrates the non-inferiority of recombinant RV products, as concerns both safety and efficacy, and supports the suggestion that these vaccines may hold promise for future development as oral immunogens for important carnivore species, such as dogs. PMID:15896409

  5. Continuous downstream processing for high value biological products: A Review.

    PubMed

    Zydney, Andrew L

    2016-03-01

    There is growing interest in the possibility of developing truly continuous processes for the large-scale production of high value biological products. Continuous processing has the potential to provide significant reductions in cost and facility size while improving product quality and facilitating the design of flexible multi-product manufacturing facilities. This paper reviews the current state-of-the-art in separations technology suitable for continuous downstream bioprocessing, focusing on unit operations that would be most appropriate for the production of secreted proteins like monoclonal antibodies. This includes cell separation/recycle from the perfusion bioreactor, initial product recovery (capture), product purification (polishing), and formulation. Of particular importance are the available options, and alternatives, for continuous chromatographic separations. Although there are still significant challenges in developing integrated continuous bioprocesses, recent technological advances have provided process developers with a number of attractive options for development of truly continuous bioprocessing operations. PMID:26153056

  6. Biological cleaning of soil and reservoirs from oil products

    SciTech Connect

    Zinberg, M.B.; Ivanovskaya, I.B.; Gafarov, N.A.

    1996-12-31

    The production of oil and gas condensate invariably involves environmental hazards: water and soil contamination due to miscellaneous breakdowns of technological equipment and pipeline damage. Among many existing contamination methods biological cleaning has become more popular lately. It took us some years to make investigations and to carry out a number of field tests in order to develop biological methods of cleaning soil and reservoirs from oil and gas condensate products. Our method is based on the use of special biological agents containing various active hydrocarbon oxidizing bacteria. It has been experimentally proved that biological agents of {open_quotes}Devouroil{close_quotes} possess the greatest oxidizing properties. {open_quotes}Devouroil{close_quotes} contains five kinds of hydrocarbon oxidizing bacteria of Pseudomonas, Rodococcus, Candida genera. These bacteria are extracted from natural ecosystems: underground waters, soils, reservoirs. As the agents are grown on oil distillate, they are very destructive to different oil products. We also proved the described microorganisms ability to oxidize sulfate oil and hydrocarbon condensate, which are the most toxic components. For four years our colleagues have been cleaning soil and reservoirs contaminated with oil, black oil, gas condensate and other products of hydrocarbon origin. This method was used to treat different kinds of soil and ground (grass and arable land, swamp and forest) in actual hazardous situations involving oil and gas condensate spills. Besides it was successfully applied to clean sludge storage which had been filled with oil process sewage for several years.

  7. PRODUCTION AND BIOLOGICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF METHYLATED TRIVALENT ARSENICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    PRODUCTION AND BIOLOGICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF METHYLATED TRIVALENT ARSENICALS

    Miroslav Styblo1,2,*, Zuzana Drobna1, Felecia S. Walton1, Ilona Jaspers1,2, Shan Lin3,
    Stephen B. Waters3, David J. Thomas4

    1Department of Pediatrics, 2Center for Environmental Medicine an...

  8. Natural products with health benefits from marine biological resources

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ocean is the cradle of lives, which provides a diverse array of intriguing natural products that has captured scientists’ attention in the past few decades due to their significant and extremely potent biological activities. In addition to being rich sources for pharmaceutical drugs, marine nat...

  9. Biology and management of psocids infesting stored products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previously regarded as minor nuisance pests, psocids belonging to the genus Liposcelis are now a major problem for effective protection of stored-products world-wide. In this review we examine the apparent biological and operational reasons behind this phenomenon and why conventional pest management...

  10. Human vaccines & immunotherapeutics: news.

    PubMed

    Riedmann, Eva M

    2013-07-01

    Recent advances in the development of immunotherapeutic mAbs for cancer New vaccine reduces malaria infection by 72% Bavarian Nordic's cancer immunotherapy shows promise in colorectal cancer Chinese HFMD vaccine shows high efficacy in Phase 3 Two-dose regimen of Merck's Gardasil looks effective Accelerating influenza vaccine development using synthetic biology A key role for gut microbes in vaccination Understanding of and attitudes towards vaccines: a study in teenagers. PMID:23863285