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Sample records for vacuum annealing phenomena

  1. Vacuum annealing phenomena in ultrathin TiDy/Pd bi-layer films evaporated on Si(100) as studied by TEM and XPS.

    PubMed

    Lisowski, W; Keim, E G

    2010-04-01

    Using a combination of TEM and XPS, we made an analysis of the complex high-temperature annealing effect on ultrathin titanium deuteride (TiD(y)) films evaporated on a Si(100) substrate and covered by an ultrathin palladium layer. Both the preparation and annealing of the TiD(y)/Pd bi-layer films were performed in situ under UHV conditions. It was found that the surface and bulk morphology of the bi-layer film as well as that of the Si substrate material undergo a microstructural and chemical conversion after annealing and annealing-induced deuterium evolution from the TiD(y) phase. Energy-filtered TEM (EFTEM) mapping of cross-section images and argon ion sputter depth profiling XPS analysis revealed both a broad intermixing between the Ti and Pd layers and an extensive inter-diffusion of Si from the substrate into the film bulk area. Segregation of Ti at the Pd top layer surface was found to occur by means of angle-resolved XPS (ARXPS) and the EFTEM analyses. Selected area diffraction (SAD) and XPS provided evidence for the formation of a new PdTi(2) bimetallic phase within the top region of the annealed film. Moreover, these techniques allowed to detect the initial stages of TiSi phase formation within the film-substrate interlayer. PMID:19771415

  2. Crystallization and thermochromism in tungsten oxide films annealed in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapovalov, V. I.; Lapshin, A. E.; Komlev, A. E.; Komlev, A. A.

    2012-06-01

    The crystalline phases formed in tungsten oxide (WO3 - x ) films upon isothermal step annealing in vacuum and air at various temperatures within 500-750°C have been studied. The films were deposited onto silica glass substrates by reactive dc magnetron sputtering. It is established that the observed thermochromism is related to the presence of an oxygen-deficient WO3 - x phase belonging to the hexagonal system, which is intensely formed as the annealing temperature increases from 650 to 750°C.

  3. Controlling superconductivity in La2-xSrxCuO4+? by ozone and vacuum annealing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Leng, Xiang; Bozovic, Ivan

    2014-11-21

    In this study we performed a series of ozone and vacuum annealing experiments on epitaxial La2-xSrxCuO4+? thin films. The transition temperature after each annealing step has been measured by the mutual inductance technique. The relationship between the effective doping and the vacuum annealing time has been studied. Short-time ozone annealing at 470 °C oxidizes an underdoped film all the way to the overdoped regime. The subsequent vacuum annealing at 350 °C to 380 °C slowly brings the sample across the optimal doping point back to the undoped, non-superconducting state. Several ozone and vacuum annealing cycles have been done on themore »same sample and the effects were found to be repeatable and reversible Vacuum annealing of ozone-loaded LSCO films is a very controllable process, allowing one to tune the doping level of LSCO in small steps across the superconducting dome, which can be used for fundamental physics studies.« less

  4. A review of anode phenomena in vacuum arces

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, H.C.

    1988-09-01

    This report discusses arc modes at the anode, experimental results pertinent to anode phenomena, and theoretical explanations of anode phenomena. The dominant mechanism controlling the formation of an anode spot appears to depend upon the electrode geometry, the electrode material, and the current waveforms of the particular vacuum arc being considered. In specific experimental conditions, either magnetic constriction in the gap plasma or gross anode melting or local anode evaporation can trigger the transition. However, the most probable explanation of anode spot formation is a combination theory, which considers magnetic constriction in the plasma together with the fluxes of material from the anode and cathode as well as the thermal, electrical, and geometric effects of the anode in analyzing the behavior of the anode and the nearby plasma. 88 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs.

  5. Annealing effect for SnS thin films prepared by high-vacuum evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Revathi, Naidu Bereznev, Sergei; Loorits, Mihkel; Raudoja, Jaan; Lehner, Julia; Gurevits, Jelena; Traksmaa, Rainer; Mikli, Valdek; Mellikov, Enn; Volobujeva, Olga

    2014-11-01

    Thin films of SnS are deposited onto molybdenum-coated soda lime glass substrates using the high-vacuum evaporation technique at a substrate temperature of 300?°C. The as-deposited SnS layers are then annealed in three different media: (1) H{sub 2}S, (2) argon, and (3) vacuum, for different periods and temperatures to study the changes in the microstructural properties of the layers and to prepare single-phase SnS photoabsorber films. It is found that annealing the layers in H{sub 2}S at 400?°C changes the stoichiometry of the as-deposited SnS films and leads to the formation of a dominant SnS{sub 2} phase. Annealing in an argon atmosphere for 1?h, however, causes no deviations in the composition of the SnS films, though the surface morphology of the annealed SnS layers changes significantly as a result of a 2?h annealing process. The crystalline structure, surface morphology, and photosensitivity of the as-deposited SnS films improves significantly as the result of annealing in vacuum, and the vacuum-annealed films are found to exhibit promising properties for fabricating complete solar cells based on these single-phase SnS photoabsorber layers.

  6. Physical properties of vacuum evaporated CdTe thin films with post-deposition thermal annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chander, Subhash; Dhaka, M. S.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents the physical properties of vacuum evaporated CdTe thin films with post-deposition thermal annealing. The thin films of thickness 500 nm were grown on glass and indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass substrates employing thermal vacuum evaporation technique followed by post-deposition thermal annealing at temperature 450 °C. These films were subjected to the X-ray diffraction (XRD),UV-Vis spectrophotometer, source meter and atomic force microscopy (AFM) for structural, optical, electrical and surface morphological analysis respectively. The X-ray diffraction patterns reveal that the films have zinc-blende structure of single cubic phase with preferred orientation (111) and polycrystalline in nature. The crystallographic and optical parameters are calculated and discussed in brief. The optical band gap is found to be 1.62 eV and 1.52 eV for as-grown and annealed films respectively. The I-V characteristics show that the conductivity is decreased for annealed thin films. The AFM studies reveal that the surface roughness is observed to be increased for thermally annealed films.

  7. Crystallization and Optoelectronic Properties of Indium-Zinc-Oxide Thin Films Annealed in Argon and Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choy, S. F.; Gong, H.; Zhu, F.

    Multi-component oxides based on the In2O3 - ZnO system has recently gained much attention as an alternative transparent conducting oxide. In2O3 and ZnO react to form several homologous compounds of the form ZnkIn2Ok+3, some of which possess excellent electrical and optical properties. Although the appearance of an amorphous-like phase has been reported at intermediate Zn/(In + Zn) ratios, little work has been done on the effect of post-deposition heat treatment on such IZO films. In this work, representative samples of IZO deposited in different ambience and conditions by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering exhibiting an amorphous diffraction pattern were annealed in an argon atmosphere of 1.6 × 102 mbar and vacuum of 10-6 mbar at 500°C for 1 hour. XRD and SEM studies of the annealed films showed a marked difference in both the diffraction pattern and surface morphology after annealing. A variety of morphology, including dendrite-like patterns radiating outward was observed. The electrical and optical properties of the IZO films after annealing were also studied. Results show that while crystallinity of the films was improved after annealing, the electrical conductivity was reduced by several orders of magnitude. Annealing also seems to induce the crystallization of multiple phases in IZO films.

  8. Laser-plasma simulations of astrophysical phenomena and novel applications to semiconductor annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grun, J.; Laming, M.; Manka, C.; Donnelly, D. W.; Covington, B. C.; Fischer, R. P.; Velikovich, A.; Khokhlov, A.

    2003-10-01

    At the frontier of plasma physics and technology are applications of laser-generated plasmas to laboratory simulations of astrophysical phenomena and to industrial processing. This article presents work at the Naval Research Laboratory in both of these areas. We show how laser plasmas are used to measure a blast wave corrugation overstability important in astrophysics. Detailed atomic physics calculations of radiative cooling within the blast front are used to develop a criterion of the existence of the overstability and are used to explain the experimental results. The criterion depends on quantities such as element abundances, densities, temperatures, and blast wave velocities—quantities which can be measured spectroscopically—and therefore used to infer whether astrophysical blast wave nonuniformities are the result of this instability. In other experiments, high-velocity jets are formed in the laboratory using miniature hollow cones. Jets produced by these cones are used to study the physics of jets occurring in supernovae and in star-forming accretion disks. In industrial semiconductor processing, annealing, that is, removing crystal damage and electrically activating the semiconductor, is a critical step. Industrial annealing techniques most often utilize heat generated by an oven, flash lamps, or a low-power laser. During such heating dopants within the semiconductor lattice diffuse and spread. This degrades the performance of circuits in which the individual circuit elements are very close to each other. We are developing an annealing technique in which shock or sound waves generated by a laser plasma are used to anneal the semiconductor. We have demonstrated that the method works over small areas and that it does not lead to significant dopant diffusion.

  9. Characterization of Magnetic Ni Clusters on Graphene Scaffold after High Vacuum Annealing

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Zhenjun; Grisafe, Benjamin; Lee, Ji Ung; Lloyd, James R

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic Ni nanoclusters were synthesized by electron beam deposition utilizing CVD graphene as a scaffold. The subsequent clusters were subjected to high vacuum (5-8 x10-7 torr) annealing between 300 and 600 0C. The chemical stability, optical and morphological changes were characterized by X-ray photoemission microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and magnetic measurement. Under ambient exposure, nickel nanoparticles was observed to be oxidized quickly, forming antiferromagnetic nickel oxide. Here, we report that the majority of the oxidized nickel is in non-stoichiometric form and can be reduced under high vacuum at temperature as low as 300 0C. Importantly, the resulting annealed clusters are relatively stable and no further oxidation was detectable after three weeks of air exposure at room temperature.

  10. Twinned Si nanowires grown by high temperature annealing of Au/Si system in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffino, F.; Torrisi, V.; Grimaldi, M. G.

    2015-09-01

    Periodically twinned Si nanowires were fabricated on Si surface by high-temperature annealing, in vacuum, of deposited colloidal Au nanoparticles. While performing the annealing process in a gas carrier with trace amounts of oxygen almost-cylindrical silica nanowires are obtained thanks to the stabilizing effect of the oxygen, faceted nanowires are obtained in vacuum condition. In this last case, nanowires with diameter in the 70-150 nm range and length of some microns are obtained. They present an arrangement of periodically twinned segments with a rather uniform thickness along the entire growth length. A minimum surface energy and strain energy argument is used to explain the formation of periodic twins in the Si nanowires. The thickness of the periodic twinned segments is found to be linearly proportional to the nanowire diameter, and a constant volume model is used to explain the relation. By the fit of the experimental data, in particular, an estimation of the twin energy formation is obtained.

  11. Influence of rapid thermal vacuum annealing and high temperature treatment on the properties of PSG films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beschkov, G.; Bakardjieva, V.; Alexieva, Z.

    2008-05-01

    The effect is presented of rapid thermal annealing (RTA) in vacuum and thermal annealing in water vapor at 850 °C on the properties of phosphosilicate glass (PSG) films deposited in PECVD and ?PCVD reactors. The films were characterized by etch rates and XPS and AES analyses. The RTA was carried out at 800 - 1400 °C at annealing times varying from 15 to 180 sec. The RTA caused a significant decrease in the etch rate, which is indicative of structural changes. The XPS and AES analyses showed that the PECVD PSG films contain excess Si due to the lower oxidation activity of N2O. The excess Si can be oxidized in water vapor at high temperatures. The excess Si leads to a decrease in the etching rate of the PECVD PSG layers as compared to that of the ?PCVD films.

  12. Effects of Vacuum Annealing on the Conduction Characteristics of ZnO Nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Chris J; Smith, Nathan A; Jones, Daniel R; Maffeis, Thierry G G; Cobley, Richard J

    2015-12-01

    ZnO nanosheets are a relatively new form of nanostructure and have demonstrated potential as gas-sensing devices and dye sensitised solar cells. For integration into other devices, and when used as gas sensors, the nanosheets are often heated. Here we study the effect of vacuum annealing on the electrical transport properties of ZnO nanosheets in order to understand the role of heating in device fabrication. A low cost, mass production method has been used for synthesis and characterisation is achieved using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), photoluminescence (PL), auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and nanoscale two-point probe. Before annealing, the measured nanosheet resistance displayed a non-linear increase with probe separation, attributed to surface contamination. Annealing to 300 °C removed this contamination giving a resistance drop, linear probe spacing dependence, increased grain size and a reduction in the number of n-type defects. Further annealing to 500 °C caused the n-type defect concentration to reduce further with a corresponding increase in nanosheet resistance not compensated by any further sintering. At 700 °C, the nanosheets partially disintegrated and the resistance increased and became less linear with probe separation. These effects need to be taken into account when using ZnO nanosheets in devices that require an annealing stage during fabrication or heating during use. PMID:26383543

  13. Effects of Vacuum Annealing on the Conduction Characteristics of ZnO Nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, Chris J.; Smith, Nathan A.; Jones, Daniel R.; Maffeis, Thierry G. G.; Cobley, Richard J.

    2015-09-01

    ZnO nanosheets are a relatively new form of nanostructure and have demonstrated potential as gas-sensing devices and dye sensitised solar cells. For integration into other devices, and when used as gas sensors, the nanosheets are often heated. Here we study the effect of vacuum annealing on the electrical transport properties of ZnO nanosheets in order to understand the role of heating in device fabrication. A low cost, mass production method has been used for synthesis and characterisation is achieved using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), photoluminescence (PL), auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and nanoscale two-point probe. Before annealing, the measured nanosheet resistance displayed a non-linear increase with probe separation, attributed to surface contamination. Annealing to 300 °C removed this contamination giving a resistance drop, linear probe spacing dependence, increased grain size and a reduction in the number of n-type defects. Further annealing to 500 °C caused the n-type defect concentration to reduce further with a corresponding increase in nanosheet resistance not compensated by any further sintering. At 700 °C, the nanosheets partially disintegrated and the resistance increased and became less linear with probe separation. These effects need to be taken into account when using ZnO nanosheets in devices that require an annealing stage during fabrication or heating during use.

  14. Low vacuum annealing of cellulose acetate on nickel towards transparent conductive CNT-graphene hybrid films.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Duc Dung; Tiwari, Rajanish N; Matsuoka, Yuki; Hashimoto, Goh; Rokuta, Eiji; Chen, Yu-Ze; Chueh, Yu-Lun; Yoshimura, Masamichi

    2014-06-25

    We report a versatile method based on low vacuum annealing of cellulose acetate on nickel (Ni) surface for rapid fabrication of graphene and carbon nanotube (CNT)-graphene hybrid films with tunable properties. Uniform films mainly composed of tri-layer graphene can be achieved via a surface precipitation of dissociated carbon at 800 °C for 30 seconds under vacuum conditions of ?0.6 Pa. The surface precipitation process is further found to be efficient for joining the precipitated graphene with pre-coated CNTs on the Ni surface, consequently, generating the hybrid films. As expected, the hybrid films exhibit substantial opto-electrical and field electron emission properties superior to their individual counterparts. The finding suggests a promising route to hybridize the graphene with diverse nanomaterials for constructing novel hybrid materials with improved performances. PMID:24852931

  15. Blow-up phenomena for compressible Euler equations with non-vacuum initial data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Sen; Yuen, Manwai

    2015-10-01

    In this article, we study the blow-up phenomena of compressible Euler equations with non-vacuum initial data. Our new results, which cover a general class of testing functions, present new initial value blow-up conditions. The corresponding blow-up results of the 1-dimensional case in non-radial symmetry are also included.

  16. Arcing and interruption phenomena in ac vacuum switchgear and in dc switches subjected to magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kimblin, C.W.

    1983-09-01

    Vacuum interrupters are extensively used in contactors, motor starters, tap-changers, distribution apparatus, and metalclad switchgear. The present paper reviews this growing technology with descriptions of the internal components of a vacuum interrupter, a brief history of the development steps, and a discussion of the range of application of these devices. The basic physical properties of cathode and anode spots are described, together with a discussion of the arcing and interruption phenomena which occur in vacuum interrupters during an ac wave. This includes a description of arc initiation, the high current arc mode, current zero phenomena, and dielectric recovery plus voltage withstand. The influence of electrode material and electrode configuration is included. The paper concludes with a brief description of dc applications for vacuum interrupters, where axial magnetic fields have been used in conjunction with current counterpulse in tokamak circuits, and transverse magnetic fields have been used to commutate current from vacuum arcs to parallel circuits. The extensive references have been selected to give the reader a broader overview of vacuum switching technology.

  17. Structural, electrical, and luminescence characteristics of vacuum-annealed epitaxial (Ba,La)SnO3 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anoop, G.; Park, Eun Young; Lee, Sungsu; Jo, Ji Young

    2015-07-01

    The correlation between the structural, electrical, and luminescence behaviors of La-doped BaSnO3 (LBSO) epitaxial films was intensively studied. We found that Sn2+ defects and oxygen vacancies control the electrical properties of epitaxial LBSO films that are grown on (001)-oriented SrTiO3 substrates using pulsed laser deposition. Under optimized deposition condition, the films exhibit room temperature resistivity of 16 m?·cm, with a mobility of 1.62 cm2V-1s-1. To further reduce the resistivity, the films were vacuum-annealed at various temperatures in the range from 600? to 900? and the film annealed at 600? exhibited the lowest room temperature resistivity of 5 m?·cm with the highest mobility of 3.09 cm2V-1s-1. The decrease of resistivity in the film vacuum-annealed at 600? originates from the higher concentration of Sn2+ ions and oxygen vacancies, which was also confirmed from photoluminescence studies, in which emission peaks associated with Sn2+ defects were observed at 710 and 910 nm. Raman analysis revealed the presence of defect states related to octahedral tilting in vacuum-annealed LBSO films. Our studies show that the electrical properties of epitaxial films could be controlled by the Sn2+ defects generated with oxygen vacancies during the vacuum-annealing of the films. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  18. The surface of SrTiO3 (111): effect of annealing in vacuum and in oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saghayezhian, Mohammad; Chen, Lina; Wang, Gaomin; Guo, Hangwen; Zhang, Jiandi; Plummer, Earl W.

    2015-03-01

    The surface of SrTiO3 (111) have created a new playground for new physics, exhibiting novel properties such as 2DEG and topological phases such as quantum spin Hall effect. Due to the polar nature of the surface, it is very susceptible to different kinds of reconstructions which results in various terminations. There has been a fair amount of investigations on SrTiO3 (111) as a function of sputtering and annealing, while less attention has been paid to its reconstruction when the surface comes in contact with oxygen or the mere effect of annealing in vacuum. We have focused on the surface reconstruction and chemical composition of SrTiO3 (111) as a function of annealing temperature and oxygen pressure using LEED and ARXPS. We observed that annealing in oxygen brings more Ti to the surface in comparison with annealing in vacuum. Our data show that the SrTiO3 (111) surface is highly reactive and easily absorbs carbon. Furthermore, we show that in contrast to SrTiO3 (001), where carbon tends to be physisorbed and can easily be removed by low temperature annealing, on SrTiO3 (111), carbon only leaves the surface after annealing to very high temperature. Also, our data show that the presence of oxygen can facilitate de-contamination of the surface and makes the surface more ordered. Supported by U.S. DOE under Grant No. DOE DE-SC0002136.

  19. Surface ferromagnetism and exchange bias in vacuum annealed Co3-yZnyO4 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudakar, C.; Kharel, P.; Lawes, G.; Suryanarayanan, R.; Naik, R.; Naik, V. M.

    2008-02-01

    We report on the structural and the magnetic properties of spin coated Co3-yZnyO4 thin films. The microstructure of high vacuum annealed films exhibit a crystalline Zn:CoO core with a disordered oxygen deficient amorphous Co:ZnO surface. Weak ferromagnetism (m˜15m?B/Co) and an exchange bias (HE˜500Oe) are observed at 10K despite the absence of any Co metal clusters. HE is smaller for samples with smaller Zn fractions (for Co3O4-HV, HE˜250Oe). Adding Zn significantly enhances HE. The exchange anisotropy in an antiferromagnetic material due to surface disordered weak ferromagnetism and its overall implications to dilute magnetic semiconducting oxides are discussed.

  20. Physical property characterization of Fe-tube encapsulated and vacuum annealed bulk MgB 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awana, V. P. S.; Rawat, Rajeev; Gupta, Anurag; Isobe, M.; Singh, K. P.; Vajpayee, Arpita; Kishan, H.; Takayama-Muromachi, E.; Narlikar, A. V.

    2006-08-01

    We report the phase formation, and present a detailed study of magnetization and resistivity under magnetic field of MgB 2 polycrystalline bulk samples prepared by the Fe-tube encapsulated and vacuum (10 -5 Torr) annealed (750 ?C) route. Zero-field-cooled magnetic susceptibility (?) measurements exhibited a sharp transition to the superconducting state with a sizeable diamagnetic signal at 39 K (Tc). The measured magnetization loops of the samples, despite the presence of flux jumps, exhibited a stable current density (Jc) of around 2.4×10 5 A/cm 2 in up to 2 T (Tesla) field and at temperatures (T) up to 10 K. The upper critical field is estimated from resistivity measurements in various fields and shows a typical value of 8 T at 21 K. Further, ? measurements at an applied field of 0.1 T reveal a paramagnetic Meissner effect (PME) that is briefly discussed.

  1. Annealing effect on the laser-induced damage resistance of ZrO(2) films in vacuum.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xiulan; Li, Shuhong; Zhou, Ming; Liu, Xiaofeng; Zhao, Yuanan; Shao, Jianda; Fan, Zhengxiu

    2009-10-10

    By modifying some structural characteristics, the annealing process can have considerable effects on the optical performance and laser-induced damage resistance of ZrO(2) thin films deposited by electron-beam deposition. Annealing at increased temperature gives rise to an increase of refractive index, the evolutions of packing density, and the structure order of the films due to the removal of adsorbed water in advance, material crystallization, and phase transformation. Thus, the combined effects of greatly strengthened endurance, crystal structure ordering, and stress transition after the annealing leads to an increase of the laser-induced damage threshold in a vacuum environment from 12 to 16 J/cm(2) (at 1064 nm, 12 ns pulse duration, and 1-on-1 testing mode). PMID:19823226

  2. Study of the I-V characteristics of nanostructured Pd films on a Si substrate after vacuum annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Tomilin, S. V. Yanovsky, A. S.; Tomilina, O. A.; Mikaelyan, G. R.

    2013-06-15

    The I-V characteristics of nanostructured Pd films on a Si substrate are investigated. The nanostructures (nanoislands) are formed by the vacuum annealing of continuous ultrathin Pd films sputtered onto a substrate. The shape of the I-V characteristics of the investigated Si substrate-Pd film system is shown to be heavily dependent on the degree of film nanostructuring. The surface morphology of the films is studied using scanning electron microscopy.

  3. Controlling superconductivity in La2-xSrxCuO4+? by ozone and vacuum annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Leng, Xiang; Bozovic, Ivan

    2014-11-21

    In this study we performed a series of ozone and vacuum annealing experiments on epitaxial La2-xSrxCuO4+? thin films. The transition temperature after each annealing step has been measured by the mutual inductance technique. The relationship between the effective doping and the vacuum annealing time has been studied. Short-time ozone annealing at 470 °C oxidizes an underdoped film all the way to the overdoped regime. The subsequent vacuum annealing at 350 °C to 380 °C slowly brings the sample across the optimal doping point back to the undoped, non-superconducting state. Several ozone and vacuum annealing cycles have been done on the same sample and the effects were found to be repeatable and reversible Vacuum annealing of ozone-loaded LSCO films is a very controllable process, allowing one to tune the doping level of LSCO in small steps across the superconducting dome, which can be used for fundamental physics studies.

  4. Vacuum annealed cerium-substituted yttrium iron garnet films on non-garnet substrates for integrated optical circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Goto, Taichi; Ross, C. A.; Eto, Yu; Kobayashi, Keiichi; Haga, Yoji; Inoue, Mitsuteru

    2013-05-07

    Polycrystalline cerium-substituted yttrium iron garnet (CeYIG) showing large Faraday rotation (FR) in the near-IR region was grown on non-garnet (synthetic fused silica, Si, and Si-on-insulator) substrates by sputtering followed by thermal annealing in vacuum. The FR of the films is comparable to the single crystal value. Structural characterization, magnetic properties, refractive index, extinction coefficient, surface topography, and FR vs. wavelength were measured and the magnetooptical figure of merit was compared with that of CeYIG films on garnet substrates.

  5. Structural transformations in thermal spray coatings of Ni/sub 60/Nb/sub 40/ alloy in vacuum annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Borisov, Yu.S.; Korzhik, V.N.; Kunitskii, Ya.A.; Revo, S.L.; Gritiskiv, Ya.P.

    1987-03-01

    This article investigates the crystal-phase transformations and microstructure of the title alloy under conditions of plasma arc spraying and vacuum annealing. The structure is determined to be amorphous with inclusions of niobium dioxide, nickel, and nickel monoxide participating. Oxidation of the niobium during spraying and subsequent precipitation of its oxides in heating changes the sequence of crystallization from the amorphous matrix of stable phases and causes initial precipitation of a phase rich in nickel. Crystallization of the amorphous structure occurs in two phases.

  6. Quantum Features of Vacuum Flux Impact: An Interpretation of Quantum Phenomena

    E-print Network

    C. L. Herzenberg

    2005-11-25

    Special relativity combined with the stochastic vacuum flux impact model lead to an explicit interpretation of many of the phenomena of elementary quantum mechanics. We examine characteristics of a repetitively impacted submicroscopic particle in conjunction with examination of the ways in which effects associated with the particle's behavior appear in moving frames of reference. As seen from relatively moving frames of reference, the time and location of impacts and recoils automatically exhibit wave behavior. This model leads to free particle waves with frequencies proportional to the energy and wavelengths inversely proportional to the momentum. As seen from relatively moving frames of reference, impacts and their associated recoils can appear to an observer to take place simultaneously at multiple locations in space. For superposed free particle waves corresponding to bidirectional motion, an amplitude that varies sinusoidally with distance results. A governing equation identical in form to the Schroedinger equation is developed that describes the behavior of the impacts and their associated recoils. This approach permits many features of quantum mechanics to be examined within an intuitively visualizable framework.

  7. Solid state interdiffusions in epitaxial Fe/GaAs(001) heterostructures during ultrahigh vacuum annealings up to 450 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lépine, B.; Ababou, S.; Guivarc'h, A.; Jézéquel, G.; Députier, S.; Guérin, R.; Filipe, A.; Schuhl, A.; Abel, F.; Cohen, C.; Rocher, A.; Crestou, J.

    1998-03-01

    We have used a set of complementary experimental techniques to characterize an epitaxial structure (25 nm Fe)/GaAs(001) annealed at 450 °C under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. The solid state interdiffusion leads to the formation of an epitaxial reaction layer made of Fe2As patches embedded in a Ga rich Fe3Ga2-XAsX ternary phase. The epitaxial character of this layer explains how the usually reported epitaxial growth of Fe on GaAs performed in the temperature range of 175 to 225 °C is possible in spite of the species intermixing occurring at the interface. Moreover, the observed grains of Fe2As explain the decrease of magnetization at the interface in such contact, since Fe2As is an antiferromagnetic alloy.

  8. Non-vacuum, single-step conductive transparent ZnO patterning by ultra-short pulsed laser annealing of solution-deposited nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Daeho; Pan, Heng; Ko, Seung Hwan; Park, Hee K.; Kim, Eunpa; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.

    2012-04-01

    A solution-processable, high-concentration transparent ZnO nanoparticle (NP) solution was successfully synthesized in a new process. A highly transparent ZnO thin film was fabricated by spin coating without vacuum deposition. Subsequent ultra-short-pulsed laser annealing at room temperature was performed to change the film properties without using a blanket high temperature heating process. Although the as-deposited NP thin film was not electrically conductive, laser annealing imparted a large conductivity increase and furthermore enabled selective annealing to write conductive patterns directly on the NP thin film without a photolithographic process. Conductivity enhancement could be obtained by altering the laser annealing parameters. Parametric studies including the sheet resistance and optical transmittance of the annealed ZnO NP thin film were conducted for various laser powers, scanning speeds and background gas conditions. The lowest resistivity from laser-annealed ZnO thin film was about 4.75×10-2 ? cm, exhibiting a factor of 105 higher conductivity than the previously reported furnace-annealed ZnO NP film and is even comparable to that of vacuum-deposited, impurity-doped ZnO films within a factor of 10. The process developed in this work was applied to the fabrication of a thin film transistor (TFT) device that showed enhanced performance compared with furnace-annealed devices. A ZnO TFT performance test revealed that by just changing the laser parameters, the solution-deposited ZnO thin film can also perform as a semiconductor, demonstrating that laser annealing offers tunability of ZnO thin film properties for both transparent conductors and semiconductors.

  9. Effect of Vacuum Annealing on the Characteristics of Plasma Sprayed Al2O3-13wt.%TiO2 Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jingjing, Zhang; Zehua, Wang; Pinghua, Lin; Hongbin, Yuan; Zehua, Zhou; Shaoqun, Jiang

    2012-09-01

    Adhesion strength is one of the critical properties for plasma-sprayed coating. In this study, the plasma-sprayed Al2O3-13wt.%TiO2/NiCrAl coatings were annealed at 300-900 °C for 6 h in vacuum. The tensile bond strength and porosity of the coatings were investigated. The microstructure and the fracture were studied using optical microscopy, scanning electron spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction. It was found that the tensile bond strength of coatings increased with the increase of annealing temperature until 500 °C, reaching the maximum value of 41.2 MPa, and then decreased as the annealing temperature continues to increase. All coatings presented a brittle fracture and the fracture occurred inside the ceramic coatings except for the coating annealed at 500 °C, which had a brittle-ductile mixed fracture and the fracture occurred at the interface of bond coating and the substrate.

  10. Effect of vacuum annealing on structural, morphological and optical properties of Sn2Sb2S5 thin films with different thicknesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khedmi, Nawel; Ben Rabeh, Mohamed; Aousgi, Fethi; Kanzari, Mounir

    2015-01-01

    Sn2Sb2S5 thin films in thickness of 100-900 nm were deposited on unheated glass substrates using thermal evaporation method and annealed in vacuum at temperature of 200 °C for 2 h. X-ray diffraction spectra indicated that all the Sn2Sb2S5 samples are polycrystalline in nature having orthorhombic structure. The various structural parameters, such as, crystalline size, dislocation density, strain and texture coefficient were calculated and the surface morphology of the films was also analyzed. The optical constants, i.e., refractive index, absorption coefficient and optical band gap of the as-deposited and post-annealed films have been determined from the analysis of the transmittance and reflectance spectral data over the wavelength range 300-1800 nm. All the Sn2Sb2S5 thin films before and after annealing have relatively high absorption coefficient between 104 and 105 cm-1 in the visible spectral range. The optical band gap was found to decrease, from 1.72 to 1.5 eV for samples before annealing and from 172 to 1.46 eV for samples annealed in vacuum, with increasing films thickness in the 100-900 nm range.

  11. Epitactic formation of forsterite on MgO single crystals during vacuum annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Farrer, J.K.; Johnson, M.T.; Bentley, James; Carter, C.B.

    2005-01-01

    Specimens of {l_brace}0 0 1{r_brace} MgO, prepared for analysis in the transmission electron microscope (TEM), have been heated in situ in a conventional TEM in order to study the effect of different heat treatments on the surface of the MgO specimens. A previous study, using a similar in situ heat treatment of MgO, found that at elevated temperatures ({approx}500 K) a film of different structure and composition formed on the surface of the sample. The previous study concluded that the composition and structure corresponded to that of MgO{sub 2}. In the present study, similar results to those shown previously have been found. However, the interpretation of these results is quite different. The films are shown to be of a composition and crystal structure that is consistent with forsterite, Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}. The films can form as a result of contamination during the high-temperature in situ annealing process.

  12. The expansion of a plasma into a vacuum - Basic phenomena and processes and applications to space plasma physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, K. H., Jr.; Stone, N. H.; Samir, U.

    1983-01-01

    In this review attention is called to basic phenomena and physical processes involved in the expansion of a plasma into a vacuum, or the expansion of a plasma into a more tenuous plasma, in particular the fact that upon the expansion, ions are accelerated and reach energies well above their thermal energy. Also, in the process of the expansion a rarefaction wave propagates into the ambient plasma, an ion front moves into the expansion volume, and discontinuities in plasma parameters occur. The physical processes which cause the above phenomena are discussed, and their possible application is suggested for the case of the distribution of ions and electrons (hence plasma potential and electric fields) in the wake region behind artificial and natural obstacles moving supersonically in a rarefied space plasma. To illustrate this, some in situ results are reexamined. Directions for future work in this area via the utilization of the Space Shuttle and laboratory work are also mentioned.

  13. The effect of post-deposition annealing on the optical properties of filtered vacuum arc deposited ZnO SnO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çetinörgü, E.; Goldsmith, S.; Boxman, R. L.

    2007-06-01

    Zinc stannate (ZnO-SnO2) thin films were deposited on ultraviolet fused silica (UVFS) substrates using filtered vacuum arc deposition (FVAD). During deposition, the substrates were at 200 and 400 °C. As-deposited films were annealed at 500 and 600 °C in Ar for 50 min. The structure was determined before and after annealing using x-ray diffraction (XRD). The XRD patterns of all ZnO-SnO2 thin films had an amorphous structure. The average optical transmission of the film in the visible spectrum was>80% and was affected by annealing. The films' optical constants in the 250-989 nm wavelength range were determined by variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry (VASE). The refractive indexes of as-deposited and annealed films were in the ranges 1.95-2.35 and 2.0-2.32, respectively. The extinction coefficients of as-deposited annealed films were in the same range, approximately 0-0.5. However, in the UV range (<450 nm) the extinction coefficient values decreased significantly for annealed films. The optical energy band gap (Eg) was determined by the dependence of the absorption coefficient on the photon energy at short wavelengths. It varied between 3.65 and 3.72 eV for annealed films as a function of deposition pressure. Although the lowest electrical resistivity of zinc stannate films obtained for as-deposited films on 400 °C heated substrates, using 0.93 Pa oxygen pressure, was 1.08 × 10-2 ? cm, highly resistive films (>105 ? cm) were obtained by annealing.

  14. Phenomena associated with bench and thermal-vacuum testing of super conductors - Heat pipes.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshburn, J. P.

    1973-01-01

    Test failures of heat pipes occur when the functional performance is unable to match the expected design limits or when the power applied to the heat pipe (in the form of heat) is distributed unevenly through the system, yielding a large thermal gradient. When a thermal gradient larger than expected is measured, it normally occurs in the evaporator or condenser sections of the pipe. Common causes include evaporator overheating, condenser dropout, noncondensable gas formation, surge and partial recovery of evaporator temperatures, masking of thermal profiles, and simple malfunctions due to leaks and mechanical failures or flaws. Examples of each of these phenomena are described along with corresponding failure analyses and corrective measures.

  15. Improvement of electrical characteristics of solution-processed InZnO thin-film transistor by vacuum annealing and nitrogen pressure treatment at 200 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Woong Hee; Rim, You Seung; Lim Kim, Dong; Kim, Hyun Jae

    2015-12-01

    Electrical characteristics of the InZnO (IZO) thin-film transistor (TFT) using solution process were improved via vacuum annealing and N2 pressure treatment (PT) at 200 °C. Especially, the PT reduced the IZO film thickness and enhanced the IZO film density. It reduced the trap sites at the interface of IZO/gate insulator and those in the IZO bulk. Therefore, the PT IZO TFT exhibited a higher mobility of 4.44 cm2 V?1 s?1 and a steeper subthreshold swing of 0.79 V/decade than non-PT IZO TFT. The improvement of hysteresis on the PT IZO TFT was also observed.

  16. Characterization of mixed titanium-niobium oxide Ti2Nb10O29 annealed in vacuum as anode material for lithium-ion battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takashima, Toshiki; Tojo, Tomohiro; Inada, Ryoji; Sakurai, Yoji

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, the properties of mixed titanium-niobium oxide Ti2Nb10O29 (TNO) annealed in air and vacuum as anode material for lithium-ion battery were investigated. The color of TNO annealed in vacuum (V-TNO) is dark blue while white for TNO annealed in air (A-TNO). Moreover, lattice parameters for V-TNO were confirmed to be slightly larger than those for A-TNO. Introduction of oxygen defect in V-TNO was confirmed by thermogravimetric analysis. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis also indicated that Ti4+ in V-TNO are partially reduced into Ti3+, due to the introduction of oxygen defect in V-TNO. Electronic conductivity at room temperature for uni-axially pressed V-TNO powder is estimated to be around 10-6-10-5 S cm-1, which is more than three digits higher than that for pressed A-TNO powder (= 10-9 S cm-1). The enhancement of intrinsic electronic conductivity of TNO greatly contributes for improving the rate performance. At low current density of 0.5 mA cm-2, both A-TNO and V-TNO showed reversible capacity around 250 mAh g-1 at potential range from 1.0 to 2.5 V vs. Li/Li+, while at higher current density of 10 mA cm-2, V-TNO maintained much higher discharge capacity of 150 mAh g-1 than that for TNO (= 50 mAh g-1).

  17. Characteristics of Al-doped ZnO thin films prepared in Ar + H{sub 2} atmosphere and their vacuum annealing behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Bailin; Lü, Kun; Wang, Jun; Li, Taotao; Wu, Jun; Zeng, Dawen; Xie, Changsheng

    2013-11-15

    The microstructure and electrical–optical properties of Al-doped ZnO (AZO) films have been studied as a function of H{sub 2} flux in the magnetron sputtering process at 150 °C and postannealing temperature in vacuum. As H{sub 2} flux increases in the sputtering gas, the AZO films deposited have a (002) preferred orientation rather than the mixed (100) and (002) orientations, the grain size shows a tendency to first increase then decrease, and (002) diffraction peak position is inclined to shift to higher angles first then to lower angles. The resistivity of the films first decreases then increases with H{sub 2} flux, and the lowest resistivity of 4.02 × 10{sup ?4}? cm is obtained at a H{sub 2} flux of 10 sccm. The average transmittance in the visible region shows little dependence on H{sub 2} flux. As a whole, the AZO films with higher values of figure of merit are obtained when the H{sub 2} flux is in the range of 6–12 sccm. The AZO films deposited in Ar and Ar + H{sub 2} exhibit different annealing behaviors. For the AZO film deposited in Ar, the grain size gradually increases, the stresses are relaxed, the resistivity first decreases then increases, and the average transmittance in the visible region is unchanged initially then somewhat decreased as annealing temperature is increased. The optimum annealing temperature for improving properties of AZO films deposited in Ar is 300 °C. For the AZO films deposited in Ar + H{sub 2}, annealing does not significantly change the microstructure but increases the resistivity of the films; the average transmittance in the visible region remains unchanged initially but greatly reduced with further increase in annealing temperature. The carrier transport in the as-deposited and annealed films appears to be controlled by a mechanism of grain boundary scattering, and the value of E{sub g} increases with the increase in carrier concentration due to Burstein–Moss effect.

  18. CROSS-DISCIPLINARY PHYSICS AND RELATED AREAS OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY: Vacuum relaxation and annealing-induced enhancement of mobility of regioregular poly (3-hexylthiophene) field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xue-Yan; Xu, Zheng; Zhao, Su-Ling; Zhang, Fu-Jun; Xu, Xu-Rong; Yuan, Guang-Cai; Li, Jing; Sun, Qin-Jun; Wang, Ying

    2009-11-01

    In order to enhance the performance of regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (RR-P3HT) field-effect transistors (FETs), RR-P3HT FETs are prepared by the spin-coating method followed by vacuum placement and annealing. This paper reports that the crystal structure, the molecule interconnection, the surface morphology, and the charge carrier mobility of RR-P3HT films are affected by vacuum relaxation and annealing. The results reveal that the field-effect mobility of RR-P3HT FETs can reach 4.17 × 10-2 m2/(V · s) by vacuum relaxation at room temperature due to an enhanced local self-organization. Furthermore, it reports that an appropriate annealing temperature can facilitate the crystal structure, the orientation and the interconnection of polymer molecules. These results show that the field-effect mobility of device annealed at 150 °C for 10 minutes in vacuum at atmosphere and followed by placement for 20 hours in vacuum at room temperature is enhanced dramatically to 9.00 × 10-2 cm2/(V · s).

  19. Effect of Annealing Temperature on Tribological Properties and Material Transfer Phenomena of CrN and CrAlN Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Linlin; Nie, X.

    2013-10-01

    This study evaluates the effects of annealing temperature and of the oxides produced during annealing processes on the tribological properties and material transfer behavior between the PVD CrN and CrAlN coatings and various counterface materials, i.e., ceramic alumina, steel, and aluminum. CrAlN coating has better thermal stability than CrN coating in terms of hardness degradation and oxidation resistance. When sliding against ceramic Al2O3 counterface, both CrN and CrAlN coatings present excellent wear resistance, even after annealing at 800 °C. The Cr-O compounds on the coating surface could serve as a lubricious layer and decrease the coefficient of friction of annealed coatings. When sliding against steel balls, severe material transfer and adhesive wear occurred on the CrN and CrAlN coatings annealed at 500 and 700 °C. However, for the CrAlN coating annealed at 800 °C, much less material sticking and only small amount of adhesive wear occurred, which is possibly due to the formation of a continuous Al-O layer on the coating outer layer. The sliding tests against aluminum balls indicate that both coatings are not suitable as the tool coatings for dry machining of aluminum alloys.

  20. Annealing effect on the particle size and chemical composition of activated carbon obtained from vacuum furnace of teak sawdust

    SciTech Connect

    Armynah, B. Tahir, D. Jaya, N.

    2014-09-25

    Activated carbon was produced from sawdust by using physical method in a high temperature vacuum furnace without additional chemical. Fast pyrolysis process was carried out prior in fluidized a bed furnace to produce char before activation process. Experiments were conducted to investigate the influence of various process parameters such as particle size, activation temperature and activation time on the quality of the activated carbon. In addition, the chemical composition studies were done by using x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy. The crystallite sizes were calculated by using Scherer equation based on x-ray diffraction (XRD) spectroscopy data. The pyrolysis temperature and time were varied from 600°C to 900°C and from 3 hours to 6 hours, respectively. The particle size of activated carbon was increase with increasing temperature. The composition and crystallite size of the prepared activated carbon was compared with the non-activated carbon. The results indicated that the teak sawdust carbon could be employed as a low cost alternative to produce commercial activated carbon.

  1. In-situ x-ray diffraction studies on post-deposition vacuum-annealing of ultra-thin iron oxide films

    SciTech Connect

    Bertram, F.; Deiter, C.; Pflaum, K.; Suendorf, M.; Otte, C.; Wollschlaeger, J.

    2011-11-15

    A maghemite ({gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) film of 8.3 nm thickness is epitaxially grown on MgO(001) single crystal substrate by reactive molecular beam epitaxy. Chemical composition and crystal structure of the surface was studied by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and low energy electron diffraction, respectively. Afterwards the sample was moved to a heating cell for in situ x-ray diffraction experiments on the post-deposition annealing process in high-vacuum to study structural phase transitions of the iron oxide film. The iron oxide film is reduced with increasing temperature. This reduction occurs in two steps that are accompanied by structural transitions. The first step is a reduction from {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} to Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} at 360 deg. C and the second step is the reduction from Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} to FeO at 410 deg. C.

  2. Effect of Ti3SiC2 formation on p-type GaN by vacuum annealing on the contact properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd Halil, Aiman bin; Maeda, Masakatsu; Takahashi, Yasuo

    2014-08-01

    In the present study, after the formation of Ti3SiC2 on p-type GaN by depositing Ti- Si-C ternary film with a composition stoichiometrically close to Ti3SiC2 and subsequent annealing at temperatures of 973 K and 1073 K (lower than the annealing temperature for a contact between p-type SiC and Ti3SiC2), the resulting contact properties were analysed by X- ray diffraction, a direct-current conduction test, and a Hall-effect measurement test. The X-ray diffraction results reveal that the Ti3SiC2 phase is successfully formed after the annealing. The direct-current conduction test shows that ohmic-like contacts are achieved after the formation of Ti3SiC2. However, the Hall-effect measurement test reveals that the dominant carrier type of the specimens is inverted from p-type to n-type even after the annealing at 973 K. The N vacancy formation during the annealing is likely the cause of this change. The contact properties of the annealed specimens are discussed because it is difficult to achieve ohmic contact formation between n-type GaN and Ti3SiC2.

  3. Paranormal phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaina, Alex

    1996-08-01

    Critical analysis is given of some paranormal phenomena events (UFO, healers, psychokinesis (telekinesis))reported in Moldova. It is argued that correct analysis of paranormal phenomena should be made in the framework of electromagnetism.

  4. Hardening by annealing: insights from different alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renk, O.; Hohenwarter, A.; Schuh, B.; Li, J. H.; Pippan, R.

    2015-08-01

    In contrast to the general notion about the annealing behavior of coarse grained materials, hardening phenomena in nanocrystalline materials can occur. Although the phenomena have already been recognized several years ago, the mechanisms behind are still controversially discussed. For example, the influence of solutes segregated to grain boundaries on the strengthening mechanism is unclear. We present a combination of atom probe tomography and mechanical data to reveal the role of segregations to the strengthening. The results show that despite large modifications of the boundary chemistry the mechanical behavior remains widely unaffected. Additionally, it will be shown that hardening upon annealing can only occur below a material-specific grain size threshold value.

  5. Quantum vacuum fluctuations

    E-print Network

    Serge Reynaud; Astrid Lambrecht; Cyriaque Genet; Marc-Thierry Jaekel

    2001-06-19

    The existence of irreducible field fluctuations in vacuum is an important prediction of quantum theory. These fluctuations have many observable consequences, like the Casimir effect which is now measured with good accuracy and agreement with theory, provided that the latter accounts for differences between real experiments and the ideal situation considered by Casimir. But the vacuum energy density calculated by adding field mode energies is much larger than the density observed around us through gravitational phenomena. This ``vacuum catastrophe'' is one of the unsolved problems at the interface between quantum theory on one hand, inertial and gravitational phenomena on the other hand. It is however possible to put properly formulated questions in the vicinity of this paradox. These questions are directly connected to observable effects bearing upon the principle of relativity of motion in quantum vacuum.

  6. Colloidal Phenomena.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russel, William B.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Described is a graduate level engineering course offered at Princeton University in colloidal phenomena stressing the physical and dynamical side of colloid science. The course outline, reading list, and requirements are presented. (BT)

  7. Movement of oxygen vacancies in oxide film during annealing observed by an optical reflectivity difference technique

    E-print Network

    Zhu, Xiangdong

    Movement of oxygen vacancies in oxide film during annealing observed by an optical reflectivity. The growth and annealing of the film in vacuum and in oxygen ambient are monitored in real time by an oblique tell whether the oxygen vacancies are moving into or moving out of the film during the annealing

  8. Vacuum tunneling in gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Y. M.; Pak, D. G.

    2011-08-01

    Topologically non-trivial vacuum structures in gravity models with Cartan variables (vielbein and contortion) are considered. We study the possibility of vacuum spacetime tunneling in Einstein gravity assuming that the vielbein may play a fundamental role in quantum gravitational phenomena. It has been shown that in the case of RP3 space topology, the tunneling between non-trivial topological vacuums can be realized by means of Eguchi-Hanson gravitational instanton. In the Riemann-Cartan geometric approach to quantum gravity, the vacuum tunneling can be provided by means of contortion quantum fluctuations. We define a double self-duality condition for the contortion and give explicit self-dual configurations which can contribute to vacuum tunneling amplitude.

  9. Transport Phenomena.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCready, Mark J.; Leighton, David T.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the problems created in graduate chemical engineering programs when students enter with a wide diversity of understandings of transport phenomena. Describes a two-semester graduate transport course sequence at the University of Notre Dame which focuses on fluid mechanics and heat and mass transfer. (TW)

  10. Post-Growth Annealing of Bridgman-grown CdZnTe and CdMnTe Crystals for Room-temperature Nuclear Radiation Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Egarievwe, Stephen U.; Yang, Ge; Egarievwe, Alexander; Okwechime, Ifechukwude O.; Gray, Justin; Hales, Zaveon M.; Hossain, Anwar; Camarda, Guiseppe S.; Bolotnikov, Aleksey E.; James, Ralph B.

    2015-02-11

    Bridgman-grown cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe or CZT) and cadmium manganese telluride (CdMnTe or CMT) crystals often have Te inclusions that limit their performances as X-ray- and gamma-ray-detectors. We present here the results of post-growth thermal annealing aimed at reducing and eliminating Te inclusions in them. In a 2D analysis, we observed that the sizes of the Te inclusions declined to 92% during a 60-h annealing of CZT at 510 °C under Cd vapor. Further, tellurium inclusions were eliminated completely in CMT samples annealed at 570 °C in Cd vapor for 26 h, whilst their electrical resistivity fell by an order of 102. During the temperature-gradient annealing of CMT at 730 °C and an 18 °C/cm temperature gradient for 18 h in a vacuum of 10-5 mbar, we observed the diffusion of Te from the sample, causing a reduction in size of the Te inclusions. For CZT samples annealed at 700 °C in a 10 °C/cm temperature gradient, we observed the migration of Te inclusions from a low-temperature region to a high one at 0.022 ?m/s. During the temperature-gradient annealing of CZT in a vacuum of 10-5 mbar at 570 °C and 30 °C/cm for 18 h, some Te inclusions moved toward the high-temperature side of the wafer, while other inclusions of the same size, i.e., 10 µm in diameter, remained in the same position. These results show that the migration, diffusion, and reaction of Te with Cd in the matrix of CZT- and CMT-wafers are complex phenomena that depend on certain conditions.

  11. Post-Growth Annealing of Bridgman-grown CdZnTe and CdMnTe Crystals for Room-temperature Nuclear Radiation Detectors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Egarievwe, Stephen U.; Yang, Ge; Egarievwe, Alexander; Okwechime, Ifechukwude O.; Gray, Justin; Hales, Zaveon M.; Hossain, Anwar; Camarda, Guiseppe S.; Bolotnikov, Aleksey E.; James, Ralph B.

    2015-02-11

    Bridgman-grown cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe or CZT) and cadmium manganese telluride (CdMnTe or CMT) crystals often have Te inclusions that limit their performances as X-ray- and gamma-ray-detectors. We present here the results of post-growth thermal annealing aimed at reducing and eliminating Te inclusions in them. In a 2D analysis, we observed that the sizes of the Te inclusions declined to 92% during a 60-h annealing of CZT at 510 °C under Cd vapor. Further, tellurium inclusions were eliminated completely in CMT samples annealed at 570 °C in Cd vapor for 26 h, whilst their electrical resistivity fell by an ordermore »of 102. During the temperature-gradient annealing of CMT at 730 °C and an 18 °C/cm temperature gradient for 18 h in a vacuum of 10-5 mbar, we observed the diffusion of Te from the sample, causing a reduction in size of the Te inclusions. For CZT samples annealed at 700 °C in a 10 °C/cm temperature gradient, we observed the migration of Te inclusions from a low-temperature region to a high one at 0.022 ?m/s. During the temperature-gradient annealing of CZT in a vacuum of 10-5 mbar at 570 °C and 30 °C/cm for 18 h, some Te inclusions moved toward the high-temperature side of the wafer, while other inclusions of the same size, i.e., 10 µm in diameter, remained in the same position. These results show that the migration, diffusion, and reaction of Te with Cd in the matrix of CZT- and CMT-wafers are complex phenomena that depend on certain conditions.« less

  12. Post-annealed gallium and aluminum co-doped zinc oxide films applied in organic photovoltaic devices

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Gallium and aluminum co-doped zinc oxide (GAZO) films were produced by magnetron sputtering. The GAZO films were post-annealed in either vacuum or hydrogen microwave plasma. Vacuum- and hydrogen microwave plasma-annealed GAZO films show different surface morphologies and lattice structures. The surface roughness and the spacing between adjacent (002) planes decrease; grain growth occurs for the GAZO films after vacuum annealing. The surface roughness increases and nanocrystals are grown for the GAZO films after hydrogen microwave plasma annealing. Both vacuum and hydrogen microwave plasma annealing can improve the electrical and optical properties of GAZO films. Hydrogen microwave plasma annealing improves more than vacuum annealing does for GAZO films. An electrical resistivity of 4.7?×?10?4 ?-cm and average optical transmittance in the visible range from 400 to 800 nm of 95% can be obtained for the GAZO films after hydrogen microwave plasma annealing. Hybrid organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices were fabricated on the as-deposited, vacuum-annealed, and hydrogen microwave plasma-annealed GAZO-coated glass substrates. The active layer consisted of blended poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) in the OPV devices. The power conversion efficiency of the OPV devices is 1.22% for the hydrogen microwave plasma-annealed GAZO films, which is nearly two times higher compared with that for the as-deposited GAZO films. PMID:25352768

  13. Understanding the thermal annealing process on metallic thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonzo-Medina, G. M.; González-González, A.; Sacedón, J. L.; Oliva, A. I.

    2013-06-01

    Thermal annealing is an usual process used for intrinsic stress liberation, structural improving, and surface roughness control in materials. In a qualitative way, annealing modifies the surface morphology of materials with temperature and time. In this work, a methodology to explain the surface modification of thin films when they are submitted to an annealing process is discussed. Two thermally evaporated Au films with 200 nm-thicknesses were post-annealed in a vacuum chamber at 100 °C with an argon atmosphere, and annealing times from 0 to 1000 minutes. Each Au film grown at different rate deposition was cyclical annealed and imaged under different annealing times. Data obtained from high quality AFM images after different annealing times of Au samples were used to calculate surface parameters such as roughness, grain size, and slope at the border, also the respective exponents as a function of the annealing time. The experimental results allow understanding the temporal evolution of the annealing process, as a rearrangement of the surface protrusions.

  14. Vacuum force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yongquan

    2015-03-01

    To study on vacuum force, we must clear what is vacuum, vacuum is a space do not have any air and also ray. There is not exist an absolute the vacuum of space. The vacuum of space is relative, so that the vacuum force is relative. There is a certain that vacuum vacuum space exists. In fact, the vacuum space is relative, if the two spaces compared to the existence of relative vacuum, there must exist a vacuum force, and the direction of the vacuum force point to the vacuum region. Any object rotates and radiates. Rotate bend radiate- centripetal, gravity produced, relative gravity; non gravity is the vacuum force. Gravity is centripetal, is a trend that the objects who attracted wants to Centripetal, or have been do Centripetal movement. Any object moves, so gravity makes the object curve movement, that is to say, the radiation range curve movement must be in the gravitational objects, gravity must be existed in non vacuum region, and make the object who is in the region of do curve movement (for example: The earth moves around the sun), or final attracted in the form gravitational objects, and keep relatively static with attract object. (for example: objects on the earth moves but can't reach the first cosmic speed).

  15. Quantum simulated annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boixo, Sergio; Somma, Rolando; Barnum, Howard

    2008-03-01

    We develop a quantum algorithm to solve combinatorial optimization problems through quantum simulation of a classical annealing process. Our algorithm combines techniques from quantum walks and quantum phase estimation, and can be viewed as the quantum analogue of the discrete-time Markov Chain Monte Carlo implementation of classical simulated annealing.

  16. On the Debossing, Annealing and Mounting of Bells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PERRIN, R.; SWALLOWE, G. M.; CHARNLEY, T.; MARSHALL, C.

    1999-10-01

    Changes in the frequencies of the musical partials of various types of bells following debossing dismounting/mounting and annealing/quench annealing are reported. Debossing, dismounting and quench annealing lead to frequency drops, while mounting gives rises. Annealing can lead to frequency increases or decreases depending upon the maximum temperature employed and the initial residual stress. Qualitative explanations of these phenomena are given in terms of changes in crown stiffness, internal stress and alloy phase structure. These are supported by the results of X-ray diffraction measurements. Although the effects are all small they can be large enough to be detected by a reasonably musical car. This, together with the fact that the effects cannot be controlled, gives a plausible explanation of why modern bellfounders use vertical lathes for tuning, even with small carillon bells, and do not anneal bells when trying to control warble.

  17. Annealing effect in structural and electrical properties of sputtered Mo thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelvanathan, P.; Zakaria, Z.; Yusoff, Y.; Akhtaruzzaman, M.; Alam, M. M.; Alghoul, M. A.; Sopian, K.; Amin, N.

    2015-04-01

    In this study, the effects of vacuum annealing on the structural and electrical properties of DC-sputtered molybdenum (Mo) thin films have been investigated. Mo thin films were deposited by DC sputtering and subsequently subjected to vacuum annealing in a tube furnace from 350 to 500 °C. Films that were deposited with different temperatures showed good adhesion with soda lime glass substrate after "tape testing". X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra have indicated existence of (1 1 0) and (2 1 1) orientations. However, I(1 1 0)/I(2 1 1) peak intensity ratio decreased for all vacuum annealed Mo films compared to as-sputtered films indicating change of preferential orientation. This suggests vacuum annealing can be employed to tailor the Mo thin film atomic packing density of the plane parallel to the substrate. SEM images of surface morphology clearly show compact and dense triangular like grains for as-sputtered film, while annealed films at 350 °C, 400 °C and 450 °C indicate rice-like grains. Stony grains with less uniformity were detected for films annealed for 500 °C. Meanwhile, electrical resistivity is insensitive to the vacuum annealing condition as all films showed more or less same resistivity in the range of 3 × 10-5-6 × 10-5 ? cm.

  18. Vacuum Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Biltoft, P J

    2004-10-15

    The environmental condition called vacuum is created any time the pressure of a gas is reduced compared to atmospheric pressure. On earth we typically create a vacuum by connecting a pump capable of moving gas to a relatively leak free vessel. Through operation of the gas pump the number of gas molecules per unit volume is decreased within the vessel. As soon as one creates a vacuum natural forces (in this case entropy) work to restore equilibrium pressure; the practical effect of this is that gas molecules attempt to enter the evacuated space by any means possible. It is useful to think of vacuum in terms of a gas at a pressure below atmospheric pressure. In even the best vacuum vessels ever created there are approximately 3,500,000 molecules of gas per cubic meter of volume remaining inside the vessel. The lowest pressure environment known is in interstellar space where there are approximately four molecules of gas per cubic meter. Researchers are currently developing vacuum technology components (pumps, gauges, valves, etc.) using micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) technology. Miniature vacuum components and systems will open the possibility for significant savings in energy cost and will open the doors to advances in electronics, manufacturing and semiconductor fabrication. In conclusion, an understanding of the basic principles of vacuum technology as presented in this summary is essential for the successful execution of all projects that involve vacuum technology. Using the principles described above, a practitioner of vacuum technology can design a vacuum system that will achieve the project requirements.

  19. Recent progress of quantum annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Sei

    2015-03-10

    We review the recent progress of quantum annealing. Quantum annealing was proposed as a method to solve generic optimization problems. Recently a Canadian company has drawn a great deal of attention, as it has commercialized a quantum computer based on quantum annealing. Although the performance of quantum annealing is not sufficiently understood, it is likely that quantum annealing will be a practical method both on a conventional computer and on a quantum computer.

  20. Vacuum mechatronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hackwood, Susan; Belinski, Steven E.; Beni, Gerardo

    1989-01-01

    The discipline of vacuum mechatronics is defined as the design and development of vacuum-compatible computer-controlled mechanisms for manipulating, sensing and testing in a vacuum environment. The importance of vacuum mechatronics is growing with an increased application of vacuum in space studies and in manufacturing for material processing, medicine, microelectronics, emission studies, lyophylisation, freeze drying and packaging. The quickly developing field of vacuum mechatronics will also be the driving force for the realization of an advanced era of totally enclosed clean manufacturing cells. High technology manufacturing has increasingly demanding requirements for precision manipulation, in situ process monitoring and contamination-free environments. To remove the contamination problems associated with human workers, the tendency in many manufacturing processes is to move towards total automation. This will become a requirement in the near future for e.g., microelectronics manufacturing. Automation in ultra-clean manufacturing environments is evolving into the concept of self-contained and fully enclosed manufacturing. A Self Contained Automated Robotic Factory (SCARF) is being developed as a flexible research facility for totally enclosed manufacturing. The construction and successful operation of a SCARF will provide a novel, flexible, self-contained, clean, vacuum manufacturing environment. SCARF also requires very high reliability and intelligent control. The trends in vacuum mechatronics and some of the key research issues are reviewed.

  1. Vacuum Virtues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathey, Allen

    2007-01-01

    Upright vacuums, like cars, vary in quality, features and performance. Like automobiles, some uprights are reliable, others may be problematic, and some become a problem as a result of neglect or improper use. So, how do education institutions make an informed choice and, having done so, ensure that an upright vacuum goes the distance? In this…

  2. Photochemically deposited and post annealed copper indium disulphide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suriakarthick, R.; Nirmal Kumar, V.; Indirajith, R.; Shyju, T. S.; Gopalakrishnan, R.

    2014-11-01

    Copper indium disulfide (CIS) thin films were deposited using novel photochemical deposition (PCD) technique by selective deposition parameters. In this work CIS film deposition was made by cationic, anionic precursor solution concentration ratio 1:1:2. Na2EDTA was used as a chelating agent. The as deposited CIS films were post annealed at different temperatures up to 400 °C in vacuum. The as deposited and annealed CIS films were examined to reveal the structural, optical, morphological, compositional and electrical properties by X-ray diffraction, Raman analysis, UV-Vis spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy, TEM, EDX and Hall effect respectively. From the XRD and Raman studies the Cu-Au ordering was confirmed both in as deposited and annealed films. The crystallite size increases with increasing of annealing temperature and the surface structuring shows rod like microstructure.

  3. GenAnneal: Genetically modified Simulated Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoulos, Ioannis G.; Lagaris, Isaac E.

    2006-05-01

    A modification of the standard Simulated Annealing (SA) algorithm is presented for finding the global minimum of a continuous multidimensional, multimodal function. We report results of computational experiments with a set of test functions and we compare to methods of similar structure. The accompanying software accepts objective functions coded both in Fortran 77 and C++. Program summaryTitle of program:GenAnneal Catalogue identifier:ADXI_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADXI_v1_0 Program available from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computer for which the program is designed and others on which it has been tested: The tool is designed to be portable in all systems running the GNU C++ compiler Installation: University of Ioannina, Greece on Linux based machines Programming language used:GNU-C++, GNU-C, GNU Fortran 77 Memory required to execute with typical data: 200 KB No. of bits in a word: 32 No. of processors used: 1 Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: No No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.:84 885 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:14 896 Distribution format: tar.gz Nature of physical problem: A multitude of problems in science and engineering are often reduced to minimizing a function of many variables. There are instances that a local optimum does not correspond to the desired physical solution and hence the search for a better solution is required. Local optimization techniques are frequently trapped in local minima. Global optimization is hence the appropriate tool. For example, solving a non-linear system of equations via optimization, employing a "least squares" type of objective, one may encounter many local minima that do not correspond to solutions (i.e. they are far from zero). Typical running time: Depending on the objective function. Method of solution: We modified the process of step selection that the traditional Simulated Annealing employs and instead we used a global technique based on grammatical evolution.

  4. Nested Quantum Annealing Correction

    E-print Network

    Walter Vinci; Tameem Albash; Daniel A. Lidar

    2015-11-22

    We present a general error-correcting scheme for quantum annealing that allows for the encoding of a logical qubit into an arbitrarily large number of physical qubits. Given any Ising model optimization problem, the encoding replaces each logical qubit by a complete graph of degree $C$, representing the distance of the error-correcting code. A subsequent minor-embedding step then implements the encoding on the underlying hardware graph of the quantum annealer. We demonstrate experimentally that the performance of a D-Wave Two quantum annealing device improves as $C$ grows. We show that the performance improvement can be interpreted as arising from an effective increase in the energy scale of the problem Hamiltonian, or equivalently, an effective reduction in the temperature at which the device operates. The number $C$ thus allows us to control the amount of protection against thermal and control errors, and in particular, to trade qubits for a lower effective temperature that scales as $C^{-\\eta}$, with $\\eta \\leq 2$. This effective temperature reduction is an important step towards scalable quantum annealing.

  5. Vacuum technology /2nd revised and enlarged edition/

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, A.

    Principles and phenomena germane to the field of vacuum technology are dealt with in the book. Natural and artificial vacuums are discussed, together with the history of vacuum technology development. Various factors and laws defining the content of rarefied gas theory are reviewed. Typical flows encountered in gas at low pressures are examined, as are calculations appropriate to vacuum situations. Attention is given to the physical and chemical phenomena observed in vacuum techniques, and methods and equipment for producing low pressure conditions are explored, noting the various types of pumps employed to approximate a vacuum. Calibration of instruments and the measurement of vacuums and partial pressures are considered. Finally, the techniques, vessels, cleaning procedures, and sealing methods for producing a clean vacuum are described.

  6. Vacuum Waves

    E-print Network

    Paul S. Wesson

    2012-12-11

    As an example of the unification of gravitation and particle physics, an exact solution of the five-dimensional field equations is studied which describes waves in the classical Einstein vacuum. While the solution is essentially 5D in nature, the waves exist in ordinary 3D space, and may provide a way to test for an extra dimension.

  7. Quantum vacuum and dark matter

    E-print Network

    Dragan Slavkov Hajdukovic

    2011-11-21

    Recently, the gravitational polarization of the quantum vacuum was proposed as alternative to the dark matter paradigm. In the present paper we consider four benchmark measurements: the universality of the central surface density of galaxy dark matter haloes, the cored dark matter haloes in dwarf spheroidal galaxies, the non-existence of dark disks in spiral galaxies and distribution of dark matter after collision of clusters of galaxies (the Bullet cluster is a famous example). Only some of these phenomena (but not all of them) can (in principle) be explained by the dark matter and the theories of modified gravity. However, we argue that the framework of the gravitational polarization of the quantum vacuum allows the understanding of the totality of these phenomena.

  8. Rapid preparation of solution-processed InGaZnO thin films by microwave annealing and photoirradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheong, Heajeong; Ogura, Shintaro; Ushijima, Hirobumi; Yoshida, Manabu; Fukuda, Nobuko; Uemura, Sei

    2015-06-01

    We fabricated solution-processed indium-gallium-zinc oxide (IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs) by microwave (MW) annealing an IGZO precursor film followed by irradiating with vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light. MW annealing allows more rapid heating of the precursor film than conventional annealing processes using a hot plate or electric oven and promotes the crystallization of IGZO. VUV irradiation was used to reduce the duration and temperature of the post-annealing step. Consequently, the IGZO TFTs fabricated through MW annealing for 5 min and VUV irradiation for 1 min exhibited an on/off current ratio of 108 and a field-effect mobility of 0.3 cm2 V-1 s-1. These results indicate that MW annealing and photoirradiation is an effective combination for annealing solution processed IGZO precursor films to prepare the semiconductor layers of TFTs.

  9. The quest for new phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Hinchliffe, I.

    1996-12-01

    The Standard Model of particle physics has been very successful in describing experimental data with great precision. With the exception of some neutrino anomalies, there is no data that is in disagreement with it. Nevertheless, the model is regarded as incomplete and unsatisfactory. There is no explanation of the pattern of quark and lepton masses and, possibly more important, no understanding of the scale of electroweak interactions. Electroweak symmetry breaking is implemented in the Standard Model from the presence of a scalar electroweak doublet, the Higgs field, that acquires a vacuum expectation value of order 250 GeV and leaves as a remnant one physical state, the electrically neutral Higgs boson whose mass is not predicted. In this talk, the author compares the techniques used at, and capabilities of, various facilities in searching for new phenomena. The author emphasizes the cases where information from more than one facility may be needed to fully explore the physics.

  10. Annealing to Mitigate Pitting in Electropolished Niobium Coupons and SRF Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Cooley, L.D.; Hahn, E.; Hicks, D.; Romanenko, A.; Schuessler, R.; Thompson, C.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-08

    Ongoing studies at Fermilab investigate whether dislocations and other factors instigate pitting during cavity electropolishing (EP), despite careful processing controls and the inherent leveling mechanism of EP itself. Here, cold-worked niobium coupons, which exhibited increased tendencies for pitting in our past study, were annealed in a high vacuum furnace and subsequently processed by EP. Laser confocal scanning microscopy and special defect counting algorithms were used to assess the population of pits formed. Hardness measurements indicated that annealing for 2 hours at 800 C produced recovery, whereas annealing for 12 hours at 600 C did not, as is consistent with known changes for cavities annealed in a similar way. The 800 C anneal was effective in some cases but not others, and we discuss reasons why tendencies for pitting remain. We discuss implications for cavities and continued work to understand pitting.

  11. Effect of post-deposition annealing on the structural, optical and electrical properties of IGZO films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Jae-Hyun; Gong, Tae-Kyung; Kong, Young-Min; Lee, Hak Min; Kim, Daeil

    2015-05-01

    IGZO thin films were deposited on glass substrates via RF magnetron co-sputtering with In2O3 and GZO targets. The films were then vacuum annealed at 100°C, 200°C and 300°C for 30 minutes to investigate the effects of the annealing temperature on the structural, electrical, and optical properties of the films. Although XRD patterns demonstrated that all films had an amorphous phase regardless of annealing temperature, electrical resistivity decreased to as low as 3.2 × 10-4 ? cm at an annealing temperature of 300°C. The optical transmittance in the visible wavelength region also improved from 80 to 83%. The figure of merit shows that IGZO films annealed at 300°C have the higher optical and electrical performance than other films prepared under different conditions in this study. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  12. Crystallization and thermochromism of annealed heterostructures containing titanium and tungsten oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapovalov, V. I.; Lapshin, A. E.; Komlev, A. E.; Arsent'ev, M. Yu.; Komlev, A. A.

    2013-09-01

    Crystalline phases in heterostructures containing titanium and tungsten oxide films are studied after step annealing in vacuum at temperatures between 500 and 750°C. The films are deposited on a silica glass substrate by dc reactive magnetron sputtering. It is found that crystalline phases in single layers and bilayer structures form in a different way. In the latter, crystallization is influenced by the order of layer arrangement on the substrate. Thermochromism in structures annealed in vacuum is due to the oxygen-deficient phase WO3 - x belonging to the hexagonal syngony. This phase intensely grows as the temperature rises from 650 to 750°C.

  13. Surface Superstructure of Carbon Nanotubes on Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite Annealed at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Bai; Fukuyama, Seiji; Yokogawa, Kiyoshi; Yoshimura, Masamichi

    1998-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes deposited on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) are annealed in ultra high vacuum. The effect of annealing temperature on the surface morphology of the carbon nanotubes on HOPG is examined by scanning tunneling microscopy. The ring-like surface superstructure of (\\sqrt {3}× \\sqrt {3})R30° of graphite is found on the carbon nanotubes annealed above 1593 K. The tips of the carbon nanotubes are destroyed and the stacking misarrangement between the upper and the lower walls of the tube join with HOPG resulting in the superstructure.

  14. Coupled Phenomena in Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsubara, Akira; Nomura, Kazuo

    1979-01-01

    Various phenomena in chemistry and biology can be understood through Gibbs energy utilization. Some common phenomena in chemistry are explained including neutralization, hydrolysis, oxidation and reaction, simultaneous dissociation equilibrium of two weak acids, and common ion effect on solubility. (Author/SA)

  15. Recent advances in vacuum sciences and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozeti?, M.; Ostrikov, K.; Ruzic, D. N.; Curreli, D.; Cvelbar, U.; Vesel, A.; Primc, G.; Leisch, M.; Jousten, K.; Malyshev, O. B.; Hendricks, J. H.; Kövér, L.; Tagliaferro, A.; Conde, O.; Silvestre, A. J.; Giapintzakis, J.; Buljan, M.; Radi?, N.; Draži?, G.; Bernstorff, S.; Biederman, H.; Kylián, O.; Hanuš, J.; Miloševi?, S.; Galtayries, A.; Dietrich, P.; Unger, W.; Lehocky, M.; Sedlarik, V.; Stana-Kleinschek, K.; Drmota-Petri?, A.; Pireaux, J. J.; Rogers, J. W.; Anderle, M.

    2014-04-01

    Recent advances in vacuum sciences and applications are reviewed. Novel optical interferometer cavity devices enable pressure measurements with ppm accuracy. The innovative dynamic vacuum standard allows for pressure measurements with temporal resolution of 2 ms. Vacuum issues in the construction of huge ultra-high vacuum devices worldwide are reviewed. Recent advances in surface science and thin films include new phenomena observed in electron transport near solid surfaces as well as novel results on the properties of carbon nanomaterials. Precise techniques for surface and thin-film characterization have been applied in the conservation technology of cultural heritage objects and recent advances in the characterization of biointerfaces are presented. The combination of various vacuum and atmospheric-pressure techniques enables an insight into the complex phenomena of protein and other biomolecule conformations on solid surfaces. Studying these phenomena at solid-liquid interfaces is regarded as the main issue in the development of alternative techniques for drug delivery, tissue engineering and thus the development of innovative techniques for curing cancer and cardiovascular diseases. A review on recent advances in plasma medicine is presented as well as novel hypotheses on cell apoptosis upon treatment with gaseous plasma. Finally, recent advances in plasma nanoscience are illustrated with several examples and a roadmap for future activities is presented.

  16. Wear of Steel and Ti6Al4V Rollers in Vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krantz, Timothy L.; Shareef, Iqbal

    2012-01-01

    This investigation was prompted by results of a qualification test of a mechanism to be used for the James Webb Space Telescope. Post-test inspections of the qualification test article revealed some loose wear debris and wear of the steel rollers and the mating Ti6Al4V surfaces. An engineering assessment of the design and observations from the tested qualification unit suggested that roller misalignment was a controlling factor. The wear phenomena were investigated using dedicated laboratory experiments. Tests were done using a vacuum roller rig for a range of roller misalignment angles. The wear in these tests was mainly adhesive wear. The measured wear rates were highly correlated to the misalignment angle. For all tests with some roller misalignment, the steel rollers lost mass while the titanium rollers gained mass indicating strong adhesion of the steel with the titanium alloy. Inspection of the rollers revealed that the adhesive wear was a two-way process as titanium alloy was found on the steel rollers and vice versa. The qualification test unit made use of 440F steel rollers in the annealed condition. Both annealed 440F steel rollers and hardened 440C rollers were tested in the vacuum roller rig to investigate possibility to reduce wear rates and the risk of loose debris formation. The 440F and 440C rollers had differing wear behaviors with significantly lesser wear rates for the 440C. For the test condition of zero roller misalignment, the adhesive wear rates were very low, but still some loose debris was formed

  17. Anti-Unruh Phenomena

    E-print Network

    Wilson G. Brenna; Robert B. Mann; Eduardo Martin-Martinez

    2015-10-16

    We find that a uniformly accelerated particle detector coupled to the vacuum can cool down as its acceleration increases, due to relativistic effects. We show that in (1+1)-dimensions, a detector coupled to the scalar field vacuum for finite timescales (but long enough to satisfy the KMS condition) has a KMS temperature that decreases with acceleration, in certain regimes. This contrasts with the heating that one would expect from the Unruh effect.

  18. The effect of post oxide deposition annealing on the effective work function in metal/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/InGaAs gate stack

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, R.; Krylov, I.; Eizenberg, M.; Ahn, J.; McIntyre, P. C.

    2014-05-19

    The effect of post oxide deposition annealing on the effective work function in metal/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/ InGaAs gate stacks was investigated. Using a systematic method for effective work function extraction, a shift of 0.3?±?0.1?eV was found between the effective work function of forming gas annealed samples and vacuum annealed samples. The electrical measurements enabled us to obtain the band alignment of the metal/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/InGaAs gate stack. This band alignment was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The measured shift in the effective work function between different annealing ambient may be attributed to indium out-diffusion during post oxide deposition annealing that is observed in forming gas anneal to a much larger extent than in vacuum.

  19. Quantum annealing speedup over simulated annealing on random Ising chains

    E-print Network

    Zanca, Tommaso

    2015-01-01

    We show clear evidence of a speedup of a quantum annealing (QA) Schr\\"odinger dynamics over a Glauber master-equation simulated annealing (SA) for a random Ising model in one dimension. Annealings are tackled on equal footing, by a deterministic dynamics of the resulting Jordan-Wigner fermionic problems. We find that disorder, without frustration, makes both SA and real-time QA logarithmically slow in the annealing time $\\tau$, but QA shows a quadratic speedup with respect to SA. We also find that an imaginary-time Schr\\"odinger QA dynamics provides a further exponential speedup, with an asymptotic residual error compatible with a power-law $\\tau^{-\\mu}$.

  20. Reactor vessel annealing system

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Phillip E. (Greensburg, PA); Katz, Leonoard R. (Pittsburgh, PA); Nath, Raymond J. (Murrysville, PA); Blaushild, Ronald M. (Export, PA); Tatch, Michael D. (Randolph, NJ); Kordalski, Frank J. (White Oak, PA); Wykstra, Donald T. (Pittsburgh, PA); Kavalkovich, William M. (Monroeville, PA)

    1991-01-01

    A system for annealing a vessel (14) in situ by heating the vessel (14) to a defined temperature, composed of: an electrically operated heater assembly (10) insertable into the vessel (14) for heating the vessel (14) to the defined temperature; temperature monitoring components positioned relative to the heater assembly (10) for monitoring the temperature of the vessel (14); a controllable electric power supply unit (32-60) for supplying electric power required by the heater assembly (10); a control unit (80-86) for controlling the power supplied by the power supply unit (32-60); a first vehicle (2) containing the power supply unit (32-60); a second vehicle (4) containing the control unit (80-86); power conductors (18,22) connectable between the power supply unit (32-60) and the heater unit (10) for delivering the power supplied by the power supply unit (32-60) to the heater assembly (10); signal conductors (20,24) connectable between the temperature monitoring components and the control unit (80-86) for delivering temperature indicating signals from the temperature monitoring components to the control unit (80-86); and control conductors (8) connectable between the control unit (80-86) and the power supply unit (32-60) for delivering to the power supply unit (32-60) control signals for controlling the level of power supplied by the power supply unit (32-60) to the heater assembly (10).

  1. Fullerene formation and annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Mintmire, J.W.

    1996-04-05

    Why does the highly symmetric carbon cluster C{sub 60} form in such profusion under the right conditions? This question was first asked in 1985, when Kroto suggested that the predominance of the C{sub 60} carbon clusters observed in the molecular beam experiments could be explained by the truncated icosahedral (or soccer ball) form. The name given to this cluster, buckminsterfullerene, led to the use of the term fullerenes for the family of hollow-cage carbon clusters made up of even numbers of triply coordinated carbons arranged with 12 pentagonal rings and an almost arbitrary number of hexagonal rings. More than a decade later, we still lack a completely satisfying understanding of the fundamental chemistry that takes place during fullerene formation. Most current models for fullerene formation require a facile mechanism for ring rearrangement in the fullerene structure, but the simplest proposed mechanisms are believed to have unrealistically high activation barriers. In recent research calculations have suggested that atomic carbon in the reaction mixture could act as a catalyst and allow substantially lower activation barriers for fullerene annealing. This article discusses the background for this research and other adjunct research. 14 refs.

  2. Study on effect of annealing conditions on structural, magnetic and superconducting properties of MgB2 bulk samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phaneendra, Konduru; Asokan, K.; Awana, V. P. S.; Sastry, S. Sreehari; Kanjilal, D.

    2014-04-01

    Effect of annealing conditions on structural, magnetic and superconducting properties of Magnesium Diboride (MgB2) bulk superconductor samples prepared by solid state route method are compared. The samples are made by taking Magnesium and Boron powders in stoichiometric ratio, grounded well and pelletized at pressure of about 10Tonnes. These pellets are annealed in both Argon and vacuum environment separately up to 800°c for two hours. Both the samples show clear superconducting transition at Tc ˜ 38 k. This is further conformed by AC/DC magnetization (M-T), Resistivity [? (T, H)] measurements under magnetic field up to 14 Tesla as well. Rietveld refinement of X-ray diffraction of both samples conformed the MgB2 phase formation with P6/mmm space group symmetry. Scanning Electron Microscopy images of the surface revile more agglomeration of grains in case of Argon annealed samples. This result in more critical current density (Jc) of Argon annealed samples than vacuum annealed one calculated from Bean's critical state model. This high Jc is explained in terms of more inter grain connectivity for Argon annealed sample than vacuum annealed sample.

  3. Study on effect of annealing conditions on structural, magnetic and superconducting properties of MgB{sub 2} bulk samples

    SciTech Connect

    Phaneendra, Konduru Asokan, K. Kanjilal, D.; Awana, V. P. S.; Sastry, S. Sreehari

    2014-04-24

    Effect of annealing conditions on structural, magnetic and superconducting properties of Magnesium Diboride (MgB{sub 2}) bulk superconductor samples prepared by solid state route method are compared. The samples are made by taking Magnesium and Boron powders in stoichiometric ratio, grounded well and pelletized at pressure of about 10Tonnes. These pellets are annealed in both Argon and vacuum environment separately up to 800°c for two hours. Both the samples show clear superconducting transition at Tc ? 38 k. This is further conformed by AC/DC magnetization (M-T), Resistivity [? (T, H)] measurements under magnetic field up to 14 Tesla as well. Rietveld refinement of X-ray diffraction of both samples conformed the MgB{sub 2} phase formation with P6/mmm space group symmetry. Scanning Electron Microscopy images of the surface revile more agglomeration of grains in case of Argon annealed samples. This result in more critical current density (J{sub c}) of Argon annealed samples than vacuum annealed one calculated from Bean's critical state model. This high Jc is explained in terms of more inter grain connectivity for Argon annealed sample than vacuum annealed sample.

  4. THE VACUUM/STEAM/VACUUM PROCESS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Vacuum/Steam/Vacuum surface intervention pilot plant process was developed. The process was developed for chicken, hot dogs, fruits and vegetables, and catfish. Optimum process conditions were determined as nominally, 138 C saturated steam, vacuum and steam times of 0.1 s except that the final...

  5. Mathematical foundation of quantum annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, Satoshi; Nishimori, Hidetoshi

    2008-12-15

    Quantum annealing is a generic name of quantum algorithms that use quantum-mechanical fluctuations to search for the solution of an optimization problem. It shares the basic idea with quantum adiabatic evolution studied actively in quantum computation. The present paper reviews the mathematical and theoretical foundations of quantum annealing. In particular, theorems are presented for convergence conditions of quantum annealing to the target optimal state after an infinite-time evolution following the Schroedinger or stochastic (Monte Carlo) dynamics. It is proved that the same asymptotic behavior of the control parameter guarantees convergence for both the Schroedinger dynamics and the stochastic dynamics in spite of the essential difference of these two types of dynamics. Also described are the prescriptions to reduce errors in the final approximate solution obtained after a long but finite dynamical evolution of quantum annealing. It is shown there that we can reduce errors significantly by an ingenious choice of annealing schedule (time dependence of the control parameter) without compromising computational complexity qualitatively. A review is given on the derivation of the convergence condition for classical simulated annealing from the view point of quantum adiabaticity using a classical-quantum mapping.

  6. Applicability of vacuum deposited silicon layers for solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Zolingen, R. J. C.; Kipperman, A. H. M.

    An approach to the production of thin film solar cells is investigated which involves vacuum deposition at a relatively low substrate temperature (350-550 C) of a silicon layer onto a sintered silicon substrate followed by a high-temperature (1250 C) recrystallization step. Coevaporation is shown to be a convenient technique to dope vacuum-deposited layers during growth. Annealing of the vacuum-deposited silicon layers significantly improves the crystallinity and electrical properties of the films, but further research is required to increase the size of the crystallites above a few microns in order to further improve the electrical properties.

  7. Linear response theory for annealing of radiation damage in semiconductor devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litovchenko, Vitaly

    1988-01-01

    A theoretical study of the radiation/annealing response of MOS ICs is described. Although many experiments have been performed in this field, no comprehensive theory dealing with radiation/annealing response has been proposed. Many attempts have been made to apply linear response theory, but no theoretical foundation has been presented. The linear response theory outlined here is capable of describing a broad area of radiation/annealing response phenomena in MOS ICs, in particular, both simultaneous irradiation and annealing, as well as short- and long-term annealing, including the case when annealing is nearing completion. For the first time, a simple procedure is devised to determine the response function from experimental radiation/annealing data. In addition, this procedure enables us to study the effect of variable temperature and dose rate, effects which are of interest in spaceflight. In the past, the shift in threshold potential due to radiation/annealing has usually been assumed to depend on one variable: the time lapse between an impulse dose and the time of observation. While such a suggestion of uniformity in time is certainly true for a broad range of radiation annealing phenomena, it may not hold for some ranges of the variables of interest (temperature, dose rate, etc.). A response function is projected which is dependent on two variables: the time of observation and the time of the impulse dose. This dependence on two variables allows us to extend the theory to the treatment of a variable dose rate. Finally, the linear theory is generalized to the case in which the response is nonlinear with impulse dose, but is proportional to some impulse function of dose. A method to determine both the impulse and response functions is presented.

  8. Laser sealed vacuum insulation window

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Tracy, C. Edwin (Golden, CO)

    1987-01-01

    A laser sealed evacuated window panel is comprised of two glass panes held spaced apart in relation to each other by a plurality of spherical glass beads and glass welded around the edges to provide an evacuated space between the glass panes that is completely glass sealed from the exterior. The glass welded edge seal is obtained by welding the edges of the glass panes together with a laser beam while the glass panes and bead spacers are positioned in a vacuum furnace and heated to the annealing point of the glass to avoid stress fracture in the area of the glass weld. The laser welding in the furnace can be directed around the perimeter of the glass panel by a combination of rotating the glass panel and linearly translating or aiming the laser with a relay mirror.

  9. Laser sealed vacuum insulating window

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Tracy, C.E.

    1985-08-19

    A laser sealed evacuated window panel is comprised of two glass panes held spaced apart in relation to each other by a plurality of spherical glass beads and glass welded around the edges to provide an evacuated space between the glass panes that is completely glass sealed from the exterior. The glass welded edge seal is obtained by welding the edges of the glass panes together with a laser beam while the glass panes and bead spacers are positioned in a vacuum furnace and heated to the annealing point of the glass to avoid stress fracture in the area of the glass weld. The laser welding in the furnace can be directed around the perimeter of the galss panel by a combination of rotating the glass panel and linearly translating or aiming the laser with a relay mirror.

  10. Ion exchange phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.

    2011-05-01

    Ion exchange phenomena involve the population of readily exchangeable ions, the subset of adsorbed solutes that balance the intrinsic surface charge and can be readily replaced by major background electrolyte ions (Sposito, 2008). These phenomena have occupied a central place in soil chemistry research since Way (1850) first showed that potassium uptake by soils resulted in the release of an equal quantity of moles of charge of calcium and magnesium. Ion exchange phenomena are now routinely modeled in studies of soil formation (White et al., 2005), soil reclamation (Kopittke et al., 2006), soil fertilitization (Agbenin and Yakubu, 2006), colloidal dispersion/flocculation (Charlet and Tournassat, 2005), the mechanics of argillaceous media (Gajo and Loret, 2007), aquitard pore water chemistry (Tournassat et al., 2008), and groundwater (Timms and Hendry, 2007; McNab et al., 2009) and contaminant hydrology (Chatterjee et al., 2008; van Oploo et al., 2008; Serrano et al., 2009).

  11. Indium out-diffusion in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/InGaAs stacks during anneal at different ambient conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Krylov, Igor; Winter, Roy; Ritter, Dan; Eizenberg, Moshe

    2014-06-16

    Indium out-diffusion during anneal enhances leakage currents in metal/dielectric/InGaAs gate stacks. In this work, we study the influence of ambient conditions during anneal on indium out-diffusion in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/InGaAs structures, prior to the gate metal deposition. Using X-ray photoemission spectroscopy and time of flight secondary ions mass spectrometry, we observed much lower indium concentrations in the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer following vacuum and O{sub 2} anneals compared to forming gas or nitrogen anneals. The electrical characteristics of the Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/InGaAs gate stack following these pre-metallization anneals as well as after subsequent post metallization anneals are presented. Possible explanations for the role of the annealing ambient conditions on indium out-diffusion are presented.

  12. Self field electromagnetism and quantum phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schatten, Kenneth H.

    1994-07-01

    Quantum Electrodynamics (QED) has been extremely successful inits predictive capability for atomic phenomena. Thus the greatest hope for any alternative view is solely to mimic the predictive capability of quantum mechanics (QM), and perhaps its usefulness will lie in gaining a better understanding of microscopic phenomena. Many ?paradoxes? and problematic situations emerge in QED. To combat the QED problems, the field of Stochastics Electrodynamics (SE) emerged, wherein a random ?zero point radiation? is assumed to fill all of space in an attmept to explain quantum phenomena, without some of the paradoxical concerns. SE, however, has greater failings. One is that the electromagnetic field energy must be infinit eto work. We have examined a deterministic side branch of SE, ?self field? electrodynamics, which may overcome the probelms of SE. Self field electrodynamics (SFE) utilizes the chaotic nature of electromagnetic emissions, as charges lose energy near atomic dimensions, to try to understand and mimic quantum phenomena. These fields and charges can ?interact with themselves? in a non-linear fashion, and may thereby explain many quantum phenomena from a semi-classical viewpoint. Referred to as self fields, they have gone by other names in the literature: ?evanesccent radiation?, ?virtual photons?, and ?vacuum fluctuations?. Using self fields, we discuss the uncertainty principles, the Casimir effects, and the black-body radiation spectrum, diffraction and interference effects, Schrodinger's equation, Planck's constant, and the nature of the electron and how they might be understood in the present framework. No new theory could ever replace QED. The self field view (if correct) would, at best, only serve to provide some understanding of the processes by which strange quantum phenomena occur at the atomic level. We discuss possible areas where experiments might be employed to test SFE, and areas where future work may lie.

  13. Stress pulse phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    McGlaun, M.

    1993-08-01

    This paper is an introductory discussion of stress pulse phenomena in simple solids and fluids. Stress pulse phenomena is a very rich and complex field that has been studied by many scientists and engineers. This paper describes the behavior of stress pulses in idealized materials. Inviscid fluids and simple solids are realistic enough to illustrate the basic behavior of stress pulses. Sections 2 through 8 deal with the behavior of pressure pulses. Pressure is best thought of as the average stress at a point. Section 9 deals with shear stresses which are most important in studying solids.

  14. The Vacuum Bubble Nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Bum-Hoon; Lee, Wonwoo

    2009-07-10

    We study the nucleation of a vacuum bubble via the vacuum-to-vacuum tunneling transition in curved spacetime. We consider Coleman-de Luccia's semiclassical approximation at zero temperature in pure Einstein theory of gravity and the theory with nonminimal coupling. We discuss the dynamics of a nucleated vacuum bubble.

  15. Atomic-scale investigation of graphene grown on Cu foil and the effects of thermal annealing.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jongweon; Gao, Li; Tian, Jifa; Cao, Helin; Wu, Wei; Yu, Qingkai; Yitamben, Esmeralda N; Fisher, Brandon; Guest, Jeffrey R; Chen, Yong P; Guisinger, Nathan P

    2011-05-24

    We have investigated the effects of thermal annealing on ex-situ chemically vapor deposited submonolayer graphene islands on polycrystalline Cu foil at the atomic-scale using ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy. Low-temperature annealed graphene islands on Cu foil (at ?430 °C) exhibit predominantly striped Moire? patterns, indicating a relatively weak interaction between graphene and the underlying polycrystalline Cu foil. Rapid high-temperature annealing of the sample (at 700-800 °C) gives rise to the removal of Cu oxide and the recovery of crystallographic features of the copper that surrounds the intact graphene. These experimental observations of continuous crystalline features between the underlying copper (beneath the graphene islands) and the surrounding exposed copper areas revealed by high-temperature annealing demonstrates the impenetrable nature of graphene and its potential application as a protective layer against corrosion. PMID:21500843

  16. Atomic-scale investigation of graphene grown on Cu foil and the effects of thermal annealing.

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, J. W.; Gao, L.; Tian, J.; Cao, H.; Wu, W.; Yu, Q.; Yitamben, E. N.; Fisher, B.; Guest, J. R.; Chen, Y. P.; Guisinger, N. P.

    2011-05-01

    We have investigated the effects of thermal annealing on ex-situ chemically vapor deposited submonolayer graphene islands on polycrystalline Cu foil at the atomic-scale using ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy. Low-temperature annealed graphene islands on Cu foil (at 430 C) exhibit predominantly striped Moir patterns, indicating a relatively weak interaction between graphene and the underlying polycrystalline Cu foil. Rapid high-temperature annealing of the sample (at 700-800 C) gives rise to the removal of Cu oxide and the recovery of crystallographic features of the copper that surrounds the intact graphene. These experimental observations of continuous crystalline features between the underlying copper (beneath the graphene islands) and the surrounding exposed copper areas revealed by high-temperature annealing demonstrates the impenetrable nature of graphene and its potential application as a protective layer against corrosion.

  17. Vacuum polarization and Hawking radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmati, Shohreh

    Quantum gravity is one of the interesting fields in contemporary physics which is still in progress. The purpose of quantum gravity is to present a quantum description for spacetime at 10-33cm or find the 'quanta' of gravitational interaction.. At present, the most viable theory to describe gravitational interaction is general relativity which is a classical theory. Semi-classical quantum gravity or quantum field theory in curved spacetime is an approximation to a full quantum theory of gravity. This approximation considers gravity as a classical field and matter fields are quantized. One interesting phenomena in semi-classical quantum gravity is Hawking radiation. Hawking radiation was derived by Stephen Hawking as a thermal emission of particles from the black hole horizon. In this thesis we obtain the spectrum of Hawking radiation using a new method. Vacuum is defined as the possible lowest energy state which is filled with pairs of virtual particle-antiparticle. Vacuum polarization is a consequence of pair creation in the presence of an external field such as an electromagnetic or gravitational field. Vacuum polarization in the vicinity of a black hole horizon can be interpreted as the cause of the emission from black holes known as Hawking radiation. In this thesis we try to obtain the Hawking spectrum using this approach. We re-examine vacuum polarization of a scalar field in a quasi-local volume that includes the horizon. We study the interaction of a scalar field with the background gravitational field of the black hole in the desired quasi-local region. The quasi-local volume is a hollow cylinder enclosed by two membranes, one inside the horizon and one outside the horizon. The net rate of particle emission can be obtained as the difference of the vacuum polarization from the outer boundary and inner boundary of the cylinder. Thus we found a new method to derive Hawking emission which is unitary and well defined in quantum field theory.

  18. Quantum phenomena in superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, J.

    1987-08-01

    This paper contains remarks by the author on aspects of macroscopic quantum phenomena in superconductors. Some topics discussed are: Superconducting low-inductance undulatory galvanometer (SLUGS), charge imbalance, cylindrical dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUIDS), Geophysics, noise theory, magnetic resonance with SQUIDS, and macroscopic quantum tunneling. 23 refs., 4 figs. (LSP)

  19. Neutron Star Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruderman, Malvin

    1998-01-01

    Various phenomena involving neutron stars are addressed. Electron-positron production in the near magnetosphere of gamma-ray pulsars is discussed along with magnetic field evolution in spun-up and spinning-down pulsars. Glitches and gamma-ray central engines are also discussed.

  20. Natural vacuum electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leggett, Nickolaus

    1990-01-01

    The ambient natural vacuum of space is proposed as a basis for electron valves. Each valve is an electron controlling structure similiar to a vacuum tube that is operated without a vacuum sustaining envelope. The natural vacuum electron valves discussed offer a viable substitute for solid state devices. The natural vacuum valve is highly resistant to ionizing radiation, system generated electromagnetic pulse, current transients, and direct exposure to space conditions.

  1. Annealing studies of amorphous alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Wiley, J.D.; Perepezko, J.H.; Nordman, J.E.

    1983-04-01

    Amorphous films of the alloys Ni-Nb, Ni-Mo, Mo-Si, and W-Si were sputter deposited on single-crystal semiconductor substrates. One-hour crystallization temperatures of the films were determined to within +-25/sup 0/C by annealing and x-ray diffraction measurements. Interdiffusion between Au or Cu overlayers and the amorphous films were studied by annealing combined with Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) profiling, and by Rutherford Backscatter (RBS) analysis. Supplementary measurements used to study structural relaxation and crystallization included resistivity as a function of temperature; DTA and DSC; and electron microscopy.

  2. Magnetic and electric properties of quantum vacuum

    E-print Network

    Rémy Battesti; Carlo Rizzo

    2012-11-05

    In this report we show that vacuum is a nonlinear optical medium and we discuss what are the optical phenomena that should exist in the framework of the standard model of particle physics. We pay special attention to the low energy limit. The predicted effects for photons of energy smaller than the electron rest mass are of such a level that none has been observed experimentally yet. Progresses in field sources and related techniques seem to indicate that in few years vacuum nonlinear optics will be accessible to human investigation.

  3. Membrane Transport Phenomena (MTP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Larry W.

    1997-01-01

    The third semi-annual period of the MTP project has been involved with performing experiments using the Membrane Transport Apparatus (MTA), development of analysis techniques for the experiment results, analytical modeling of the osmotic transport phenomena, and completion of a DC-9 microgravity flight to test candidate fluid cell geometries. Preparations were also made for the MTP Science Concept Review (SCR), held on 13 June 1997 at Lockheed Martin Astronautics in Denver. These activities are detailed in the report.

  4. An Introduction to Simulated Annealing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albright, Brian

    2007-01-01

    An attempt to model the physical process of annealing lead to the development of a type of combinatorial optimization algorithm that takes on the problem of getting trapped in a local minimum. The author presents a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet that illustrates how this works.

  5. Annealing properties of rice starch.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thermal properties of starch can be modified by annealing, i.e., a pre-treatment in excessive amounts of water at temperatures below the gelatinization temperatures. This treatment is known to improve the crystalline properties, and is a useful tool to gain a better control of the functional proper...

  6. Indian Vacuum Society: The Indian Vacuum Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, T. K.

    2008-03-01

    The Indian Vacuum Society (IVS) was established in 1970. It has over 800 members including many from Industry and R & D Institutions spread throughout India. The society has an active chapter at Kolkata. The society was formed with the main aim to promote, encourage and develop the growth of Vacuum Science, Techniques and Applications in India. In order to achieve this aim it has conducted a number of short term courses at graduate and technician levels on vacuum science and technology on topics ranging from low vacuum to ultrahigh vacuum So far it has conducted 39 such courses at different parts of the country and imparted training to more than 1200 persons in the field. Some of these courses were in-plant training courses conducted on the premises of the establishment and designed to take care of the special needs of the establishment. IVS also regularly conducts national and international seminars and symposia on vacuum science and technology with special emphasis on some theme related to applications of vacuum. A large number of delegates from all over India take part in the deliberations of such seminars and symposia and present their work. IVS also arranges technical visits to different industries and research institutes. The society also helped in the UNESCO sponsored post-graduate level courses in vacuum science, technology and applications conducted by Mumbai University. The society has also designed a certificate and diploma course for graduate level students studying vacuum science and technology and has submitted a syllabus to the academic council of the University of Mumbai for their approval, we hope that some colleges affiliated to the university will start this course from the coming academic year. IVS extended its support in standardizing many of the vacuum instruments and played a vital role in helping to set up a Regional Testing Centre along with BARC. As part of the development of vacuum education, the society arranges the participation of expert members on the subject to deliver lectures and take part in devising courses in the universities. IVS publishes a quarterly called the `Bulletin of Indian Vacuum Society' since its inception, in which articles on vacuum and related topics are published. NIRVAT, news, announcements, and reports are the other features of the Bulletin. The articles in the Bulletin are internationally abstracted. The Bulletin is distributed free to all the members of the society. The society also publishes proceedings of national/international symposia and seminars, manuals, lecture notes etc. It has published a `Vacuum Directory' containing very useful information on vacuum technology. IVS has also set up its own website http://www.ivsnet.org in January 2002. The website contains information about IVS, list of members, list of EC members, events and news, abstracts of articles published in the `Bulletin of Indian Vacuum Society', utilities, announcements, reports, membership and other forms which can be completed online and also gives links to other vacuum societies. Our Society has been a member of the executive council of the International Union of Vacuum Science, Techniques and Applications (IUVSTA) and its various committees since 1970. In 1983 IVS conducted an International Symposium on Vacuum Technology and Nuclear Applications in BARC, Mumbai, under the sponsorship of IUVSTA. In 1987 IVS arranged the Triennial International Conference on Thin Films in New Delhi, where more than 200 foreign delegates participated. IVS also hosted the IUVSTA Executive Council Meeting along with the conference. The society organized yet again an International Conference on Vacuum Science and Technology and SRS Vacuum Systems at CAT, Indore in1995. IVS arranges the prestigious Professor Balakrishnan Memorial Lecture in memory of its founder vice-president. Leading scientists from India and abroad in the field are invited to deliver the talks. So far 23 lectures have been held in this series. IVS has instituted the `IVS- Professor D Y Phadke Memorial Prize' in memory of our founder presid

  7. Paramutation phenomena in plants.

    PubMed

    Pilu, Roberto

    2015-08-01

    Paramutation is a particular epigenetic phenomenon discovered in Zea mays by Alexander Brink in the 1950s, and then also found in other plants and animals. Brink coined the term paramutation (from the Greek syllable "para" meaning beside, near, beyond, aside) in 1958, with the aim to differentiate paramutation from mutation. The peculiarity of paramutation with respect to other gene silencing phenomena consists in the ability of the silenced allele (named paramutagenic) to silence the other allele (paramutable) present in trans. The newly silenced (paramutated) allele remains stable in the next generations even after segregation from the paramutagenic allele and acquires paramutagenic ability itself. The inheritance behaviour of these epialleles permits a fast diffusion of a particular gene expression level/phenotype in a population even in the absence of other evolutionary influences, thus breaking the Hardy-Weinberg law. As with other gene silencing phenomena such as quelling in the fungus Neurospora crassa, transvection in Drosophila, co-suppression and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) described in transgenic plants and RNA interference (RNAi) in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, paramutation occurs without changes in the DNA sequence. So far the molecular basis of paramutation remains not fully understood, although many studies point to the involvement of RNA causing changes in DNA methylation and chromatin structure of the silenced genes. In this review I summarize all paramutation phenomena described in plants, focusing on the similarities and differences between them. PMID:26335267

  8. The origin of GEMS in IDPs as deduced from microstructural evolution of amorphous silicates with annealing

    E-print Network

    C. Davoisne; Z. Djouadi; H. Leroux; L. d'Hendecourt; A. Jones; D. Deboffle

    2006-02-03

    We present laboratory studies of the micro-structural evolution of an amorphous ferro-magnesian silicate, of olivine composition, following thermal annealing under vacuum. Annealing under vacuum was performed at temperatures ranging from 870 to 1020 K. After annealing spheroidal metallic nano-particles (2-50 nm) are found within the silicate films. We interpret this microstructure in terms of a reduction of the initial amorphous silicate FeO component, because of the carbon-rich partial pressure in the furnace due to pumping mechanism. Annealing in a controlled oxygen-rich atmosphere confirms this interpretation. The observed microstructures closely resemble those of the GEMS (Glass with Embedded Metal and Sulphides) found in chondritic IDPs (Interplanetary Dust Particles). Since IDPs contain abundant carbonaceous matter, a solid-state reduction reaction may have occurred during heating in the hot inner regions of the proto-solar disc. Related to this, the presence of forsterite grains grown from the amorphous precursor material clearly demonstrates that condensation from gaseous species is not required to explain the occurrence of forsterite around young protostars and in comets. Forsterite grains in these environments can be formed directly in the solid phase by thermal annealing of amorphous ferro-magnesian silicates under reducing conditions.

  9. A new effective method for thermal annealing of magnetic tunnel junctions in air with protective overlayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pong, Philip W. T.; Schmoueli, Moshe; Li, Feifei; Egelhoff, William F.

    2008-04-01

    Thermal annealing is an important process to enhance greatly the tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) of magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs). MTJ annealing is conventionally carried out in vacuum below 10-5Torr. However, this method involves the cost and complications of using a vacuum furnace. Pumping and venting a chamber are time-consuming; moreover, the sample temperature is difficult to measure accurately and therefore not easy to control. We have developed a method and an instrument to perform thermal annealing of MTJs in air. The method is based on protective overlayers, and the instrument has a simple structure composed of an air heat gun, thermocouple with feedback control, permanent magnets for magnetic field, and a sample holder. The influence of thermal annealing in air on MTJs properties was studied systematically on Al2O3 MTJ samples. The samples are successfully protected from oxidation by using Au /Ru, or Al2O3 films as protective overlayers. The Al2O3 overlayer can be removed easily with NaOH solution. A MgO MTJ sample was annealed with this technique and its TMR increased from 17.5% to 141.3%.

  10. High power, high frequency, vacuum flange

    DOEpatents

    Felker, Brian (Livermore, CA); McDaniel, Michael R. (Manteca, CA)

    1993-01-01

    An improved waveguide flange is disclosed for high power operation that helps prevent arcs from being initiated at the junctions between waveguide sections. The flanges at the end of the waveguide sections have counterbores surrounding the waveguide tubes. When the sections are bolted together the counterbores form a groove that holds a fully annealed copper gasket. Each counterbore has a beveled step that is specially configured to insure the gasket forms a metal-to-metal vacuum seal without gaps or sharp edges. The resultant inner surface of the waveguide is smooth across the junctions between waveguide sections, and arcing is prevented.

  11. High power, high frequency, vacuum flange

    DOEpatents

    Felker, B.; McDaniel, M.R.

    1993-03-23

    An improved waveguide flange is disclosed for high power operation that helps prevent arcs from being initiated at the junctions between waveguide sections. The flanges at the end of the waveguide sections have counter bores surrounding the waveguide tubes. When the sections are bolted together the counter bores form a groove that holds a fully annealed copper gasket. Each counterbore has a beveled step that is specially configured to insure the gasket forms a metal-to-metal vacuum seal without gaps or sharp edges. The resultant inner surface of the waveguide is smooth across the junctions between waveguide sections, and arcing is prevented.

  12. In situ laser annealing system for real-time surface kinetic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q.; Sun, Y.-M.; Zhao, W.; Campagna, J.; White, J. M.

    2002-11-01

    For real-time analysis during thermal annealing, a continuous wave CO2 infrared laser was coupled to a surface analysis system equipped for x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ion scattering spectroscopy (ISS). The laser beam was directed into the vacuum chamber through a ZnSe window to the back side of the sample. With 10 W laser output, the sample temperature reached 563 K. The chamber remained below 10-8 Torr during annealing and allowed XPS and ISS data to be gathered as a function of time at selected temperatures. As a test example, real time Cu2O reduction at 563 K was investigated.

  13. Cosmology of Vacuum

    E-print Network

    V. Burdyuzha; G. Vereshkov

    2007-12-29

    Shortly the vacuum component of the Universe from the geometry point of view and from the point of view of the standard model of physics of elementary particles is discussed. Some arguments are given to the calculated value of the cosmological constant (Zeldovich approximation). A new component of space vacuum (the gravitational vacuum condensate) is involved the production of which has fixed time in our Universe. Also the phenomenon of vacuum selforganization must be included in physical consideration of the Universe evolution.

  14. Radiation hard vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, Gordon E. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1990-01-01

    A vacuum switch with an isolated trigger probe which is not directly connected to the switching electrodes. The vacuum switch within the plasmatron is triggered by plasma expansion initiated by the trigger probe which travels through an opening to reach the vacuum switch elements. The plasma arc created is directed by the opening to the space between the anode and cathode of the vacuum switch to cause conduction.

  15. The Classical Vacuum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Timothy H.

    1985-01-01

    The classical vacuum of physics is not empty, but contains a distinctive pattern of electromagnetic fields. Discovery of the vacuum, thermal spectrum, classical electron theory, zero-point spectrum, and effects of acceleration are discussed. Connection between thermal radiation and the classical vacuum reveals unexpected unity in the laws of…

  16. Recursive simulation of quantum annealing

    E-print Network

    Sowa, A P; Samson, J H; Savel'ev, S E; Zagoskin, A M; Heidel, S; Zúñiga-Anaya, J C

    2015-01-01

    The evaluation of the performance of adiabatic annealers is hindered by lack of efficient algorithms for simulating their behaviour. We exploit the analyticity of the standard model for the adiabatic quantum process to develop an efficient recursive method for its numerical simulation in case of both unitary and non-unitary evolution. Numerical simulations show distinctly different distributions for the most important figure of merit of adiabatic quantum computing --- the success probability --- in these two cases.

  17. Recursive simulation of quantum annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowa, A. P.; Everitt, M. J.; Samson, J. H.; Savel'ev, S. E.; Zagoskin, A. M.; Heidel, S.; Zúñiga-Anaya, J. C.

    2015-10-01

    The evaluation of the performance of adiabatic annealers is hindered by the lack of efficient algorithms for simulating their behaviour. We exploit the analyticity of the standard model for the adiabatic quantum process to develop an efficient recursive method for its numerical simulation in case of both unitary and non-unitary evolution. Numerical simulations show distinctly different distributions for the most important figure of merit of adiabatic quantum computing—the success probability—in these two cases.

  18. Simulated annealing model of acupuncture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Charles; Szu, Harold

    2015-05-01

    The growth control singularity model suggests that acupuncture points (acupoints) originate from organizers in embryogenesis. Organizers are singular points in growth control. Acupuncture can cause perturbation of a system with effects similar to simulated annealing. In clinical trial, the goal of a treatment is to relieve certain disorder which corresponds to reaching certain local optimum in simulated annealing. The self-organizing effect of the system is limited and related to the person's general health and age. Perturbation at acupoints can lead a stronger local excitation (analogous to higher annealing temperature) compared to perturbation at non-singular points (placebo control points). Such difference diminishes as the number of perturbed points increases due to the wider distribution of the limited self-organizing activity. This model explains the following facts from systematic reviews of acupuncture trials: 1. Properly chosen single acupoint treatment for certain disorder can lead to highly repeatable efficacy above placebo 2. When multiple acupoints are used, the result can be highly repeatable if the patients are relatively healthy and young but are usually mixed if the patients are old, frail and have multiple disorders at the same time as the number of local optima or comorbidities increases. 3. As number of acupoints used increases, the efficacy difference between sham and real acupuncture often diminishes. It predicted that the efficacy of acupuncture is negatively correlated to the disease chronicity, severity and patient's age. This is the first biological - physical model of acupuncture which can predict and guide clinical acupuncture research.

  19. Breakdown phenomena in high power klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Vlieks, A.E.; Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Fowkes, W.R.; Hoyt, E.W.; Lebacqz, J.V.; Lee, T.G.

    1988-03-01

    In the course of developing new high peak power klystrons at SLAC, high electric fields in several regions of these devices have become an important source of vacuum breakdown phenomena. In addition, a renewed interest in breakdown phenomena for nanosecond pulse, multi-megavolt per centimeter fields has been sparked by recent R and D work in the area of gigawatt RF sources. The most important regions of electrical breakdown are in the output cavity gap area, the RF ceramic windows, and the gun ceramic insulator. The details of the observed breakdown in these regions, experiments performed to understand the phenomena and solutions found to alleviate the problems will be discussed. Recently experiments have been performed on a new prototype R and D klystron. Peak electric fields across the output cavity gaps of this klystron exceed 2 MV/cm. The effect of peak field duration (i.e. pulse width) on the onset of breakdown have been measured. The pulse widths varied from tens of nanoseconds to microseconds. Results from these experiments will be presented. The failure of ceramic RF windows due to multipactor and puncturing was an important problem to overcome in order that our high power klystrons would have a useful life expectancy. Consequently many studies and tests were made to understand and alleviate window breakdown phenomena. Some of the results in this area, especially the effects of surface coatings, window materials and processing techniques and their effects on breakdown will be discussed. Another important source of klystron failure in the recent past at SLAC has been the puncturing of the high voltage ceramic insulator in the gun region. A way of alleviating this problem has been found although the actual cause of the puncturing is not yet clear. The ''practical'' solution to this breakdown process will be described and a possible mechanism for the puncturing will be presented. 9 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Critical Acceleration and Quantum Vacuum

    E-print Network

    Rafelski, Johann

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the physics frontier of strong acceleration; both classical and quantum physics need further development in order to be able to address this newly accessible area of physics. In this lecture we discuss what strong acceleration means and possible experiments using electron-laser collisions and, data available from ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. We review the foundations of the current understanding of charged particle dynamics in presence of critical forces and discuss the radiation reaction inconsistency in electromagnetic theory and the apparent relation with quantum physics and strong field particle production phenomena. The role of the quantum vacuum as an inertial reference frame is emphasized, as well as the absence of such a `Machian' reference frame in the conventional classical limit of quantum field theory.

  1. Critical Acceleration and Quantum Vacuum

    E-print Network

    Johann Rafelski; Lance Labun

    2012-04-22

    Little is known about the physics frontier of strong acceleration; both classical and quantum physics need further development in order to be able to address this newly accessible area of physics. In this lecture we discuss what strong acceleration means and possible experiments using electron-laser collisions and, data available from ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. We review the foundations of the current understanding of charged particle dynamics in presence of critical forces and discuss the radiation reaction inconsistency in electromagnetic theory and the apparent relation with quantum physics and strong field particle production phenomena. The role of the quantum vacuum as an inertial reference frame is emphasized, as well as the absence of such a `Machian' reference frame in the conventional classical limit of quantum field theory.

  2. Recursive Branching Simulated Annealing Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolcar, Matthew; Smith, J. Scott; Aronstein, David

    2012-01-01

    This innovation is a variation of a simulated-annealing optimization algorithm that uses a recursive-branching structure to parallelize the search of a parameter space for the globally optimal solution to an objective. The algorithm has been demonstrated to be more effective at searching a parameter space than traditional simulated-annealing methods for a particular problem of interest, and it can readily be applied to a wide variety of optimization problems, including those with a parameter space having both discrete-value parameters (combinatorial) and continuous-variable parameters. It can take the place of a conventional simulated- annealing, Monte-Carlo, or random- walk algorithm. In a conventional simulated-annealing (SA) algorithm, a starting configuration is randomly selected within the parameter space. The algorithm randomly selects another configuration from the parameter space and evaluates the objective function for that configuration. If the objective function value is better than the previous value, the new configuration is adopted as the new point of interest in the parameter space. If the objective function value is worse than the previous value, the new configuration may be adopted, with a probability determined by a temperature parameter, used in analogy to annealing in metals. As the optimization continues, the region of the parameter space from which new configurations can be selected shrinks, and in conjunction with lowering the annealing temperature (and thus lowering the probability for adopting configurations in parameter space with worse objective functions), the algorithm can converge on the globally optimal configuration. The Recursive Branching Simulated Annealing (RBSA) algorithm shares some features with the SA algorithm, notably including the basic principles that a starting configuration is randomly selected from within the parameter space, the algorithm tests other configurations with the goal of finding the globally optimal solution, and the region from which new configurations can be selected shrinks as the search continues. The key difference between these algorithms is that in the SA algorithm, a single path, or trajectory, is taken in parameter space, from the starting point to the globally optimal solution, while in the RBSA algorithm, many trajectories are taken; by exploring multiple regions of the parameter space simultaneously, the algorithm has been shown to converge on the globally optimal solution about an order of magnitude faster than when using conventional algorithms. Novel features of the RBSA algorithm include: 1. More efficient searching of the parameter space due to the branching structure, in which multiple random configurations are generated and multiple promising regions of the parameter space are explored; 2. The implementation of a trust region for each parameter in the parameter space, which provides a natural way of enforcing upper- and lower-bound constraints on the parameters; and 3. The optional use of a constrained gradient- search optimization, performed on the continuous variables around each branch s configuration in parameter space to improve search efficiency by allowing for fast fine-tuning of the continuous variables within the trust region at that configuration point.

  3. Weld pool phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.; Zacharia, T.; DebRoy, T.

    1994-09-01

    During welding, the composition, structure and properties of the welded structure are affected by the interaction of the heat source with the metal. The interaction affects the fluid flow, heat transfer and mass transfer in the weld pool, and the solidification behavior of the weld metal. In recent years, there has been a growing recognition of the importance of the weld pool transport processes and the solid state transformation reactions in determining the composition, structure and properties of the welded structure. The relation between the weld pool transport processes and the composition and structure is reviewed. Recent applications of various solidification theories to welding are examined to understand the special problems of weld metal solidification. The discussion is focussed on the important problems and issues related to weld pool transport phenomena and solidification. Resolution of these problems would be an important step towards a science based control of composition, structure and properties of the weld metal.

  4. Thermal Wave Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This map from the MGS Horizon Sensor Assembly (HORSE) shows middle atmospheric temperatures near the 1 mbar level of Mars between Ls 170 to 175 (approx. July 14 - 23, 1999). Local Mars times between 1:30 and 4:30 AM are included. Infrared radiation measured by the Mars Horizon Sensor Assembly was used to make the map. That device continuously views the 'limb' of Mars in four directions, to help orient the spacecraft instruments to the nadir: straight down.

    The map shows thermal wave phenomena that are caused by the large topographic variety of Mars' surface, as well the latitudinally symmetric behavior expected at this time of year near the equinox.

  5. Z .Diamond and Related Materials 10 2001 889 894 Field emission studies of low-temperature thermal annealing

    E-print Network

    Bristol, University of

    Z .Diamond and Related Materials 10 2001 889 894 Field emission studies of low-temperature thermal of low temperature 100 450 C2 4 Z y5 .annealing in vacuum F1=10 torr for various times were then studied .Nitrogen-doped hydrogenated amorphous carbon a-C:H:N films have been deposited by radio frequency plasma

  6. Control of Phase in Tin Sulfide Thin Films Produced via RF-Sputtering of SnS2 Target with Post-deposition Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banai, R. E.; Cordell, J. C.; Lindwall, G.; Tanen, N. J.; Shang, S.-L.; Nasr, J. R.; Liu, Z.-K.; Brownson, J. R. S.; Horn, M. W.

    2015-10-01

    Tin (II) Monosulfide (SnS) has become an interesting new material for thin film photovoltaics. SnS-based devices have achieved limited success in improved solar cell efficiency. While annealing is a typical post-deposition treatment used to improve thin film quality, sulfur volatility is an issue, despite strong Sn-S bonds in tin sulfide compounds. Annealing of sulfur-rich sputtered tin sulfide thin films in a vacuum environment has not been previously reported. In the present work, we investigated the optoelectronic properties, crystallographic phase, and morphology of annealed, sputtered tin sulfide thin films. Specifically, we studied the phase change and improvement in material quality as a result of post-deposition heat treatments. Tin sulfide thin films were sputtered with and without substrate heating. These samples were then annealed between 300°C and 500°C under moderate vacuum (<1 × 10-4 Pa) in the deposition chamber to find the optimal annealing process for producing ?-SnS. Significantly improved crystallinity and morphology were seen in sulfur-rich thin films annealed at 400-500°C for 60 min. Annealed films had resistivity in the range of 30-300 ?-cm. Experimental observations were confirmed by calculated phase diagrams, which show that annealing around 400°C at low pressure is optimal to obtain a phase-pure ?-SnS film from an amorphous SnS2 film.

  7. Exoelectron emission from a clean, annealed magnesium single crystal during oxygen adsorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, J.

    1976-01-01

    Exoelectron emission was observed from a clean, annealed Mg (0001) surface during oxygen and chlorine adsorption at pressures of 6.5x10 0.00001- N/sq m and lower. the studies were performed in an ultrahigh vacuum system. The crystals were cleaned by argon ion bombardment and annealed at 300 C. Auger electron spectroscopy was used to verify surface cleanliness, and low energy electron diffraction was used to verify that the surface was annealed. The emission was found to be oxygen arrival rate dependent. Two peaks were observed in the electron emission with exposure. Evidence is presented that the formation of the second peak corresponds to oxidation of the Mg surface. No emission was observed from clean aluminum during adsorption. Results verify that electron emission occurs from a strain free surface simply upon adsorption of oxygen. A qualitative explanation for the mechanisms of emission in terms of chemical effects is presented.

  8. Exoelectron emission from a clean, annealed magnesium single crystal during oxygen adsorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, J.

    1976-01-01

    Exoelectron emission has been observed from a clean, annealed Mg (0001) surface during oxygen and chlorine adsorption at pressures of 0.000065 N/sq m and lower. The studies were performed in an ultrahigh vacuum system. The crystals were cleaned by argon-ion bombardment and annealed at 300 C. Auger electron spectroscopy was used to verify surface cleanliness, and low-energy electron diffraction was used to verify that the surface was annealed. The emission was found to be dependent on oxygen arrival rate. Two peaks were observed in the electron emission with exposure. Evidence is presented that the formation of the second peak corresponds to oxidation of the Mg surface. The results verify that electron emission occurs from a strain-free surface simply upon adsorption of oxygen. A qualitative explanation for the mechanisms of emission in terms of chemical effects is presented.

  9. Vacuum pump aids ejectors

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.E.

    1982-12-01

    The steam ejector/vacuum pump hybrid system has been operating satisfactorily since the summer of 1981. This system has essentially been as troublefree as the all-ejector system and, of course, has provided a substantial cost savings. Construction is currently under way to convert the vacuum system of another crude still which is equipped with steam ejectors and barometric condensers to the hybrid system of steam ejectors, surface condensers, and vacuum pumps. This current project is even more financially attractive because it allows a dirty water cooling tower which serves the barometric condensers to be shut down. Providing a vacuum for crude distillation vacuum towers with this hybrid system is by no means the only application of this technique. Any vacuum system consisting of all steam ejectors would be a candidate for this hybrid system and the resulting savings in energy.

  10. Conductive layers in diamond formed by hydrogen ion implantation and annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, V. P.; Safronov, L. N.; Naumova, O. V.; Nikolaev, D. V.; Kupriyanov, I. N.; Palyanov, Yu. N.

    2012-07-01

    High conductivity is extremely difficult to obtain in diamond due to its wide band gap and low solubility of dopands. The goal of the investigation was to form a conductor inside HPHT synthetic diamond plates with initial high sheet resistivity ?s (˜1012 ?/sq) for 400 ?m thickness. We used metastable character of diamond structures relative to the graphitization of defective layers formed by 50 keV hydrogen molecular ions at high fluence ? = (1-13) × 1016 cm-2 ion implantation. High temperature (HT) (500-1600 °C) and vacuum or high pressure (VP/HP) (3 × 10-3/4 × 109 Pa) thermal annealing were chosen to provide the annealing regimes where the graphitic carbon is the most stable phase. Sheet resistance, dropped down up to nine orders of magnitude (?s ˜ 103 ?/sq), as well as Raman spectroscopy, and AFM measurements were used to determine electrical, optical and geometrical properties of multilayered heterostructures formed in the set of experiments. Temperature dependences of the conductivity show, that after highest fluencies and annealing temperatures the conductivity is quasimetallic and electronic system is above metal-insulator transition (MIT). At lower fluences and/or annealing temperatures the system is under MIT with the transport of charge carriers being well described by variable range hopping (VRH) mechanism with variable decay length of wave function for localized states. Two or three order of magnitude differences in the conductivity in VP and HP annealed samples are attributed with the higher dimensions of graphite nanocrystals in the case of vacuum annealing. This suggestion coincides with Raman spectra and optimum hopping length for carrier jumps in VRH model for conductivity in the buried layers.

  11. Gravitational Annealing of Colloidal Crystals

    E-print Network

    Yoshihisa Suzuki; Jin Endoh; Atsushi Mori; Tomoki Yabutani; Katsuhiro Tamura

    2012-01-20

    A silica colloidal crystal obtained by centrifugation at 9 G for 2 days in water was annealed by additional stronger centrifugation at 50 G for 5 days. The number of the striations observed in the colloidal crystal under crossed polarized light decreased at some parts in a growth container after additional centrifugation, while the number alse increase at the other parts. The decrease probably shows the shrinkage of the stacking disorders under high gravity, while the increase probably shows the production of new stacking disorder.

  12. Physical Vacuum in Superconductors

    E-print Network

    Clovis Jacinto de Matos

    2009-08-31

    Although experiments carried out by Jain et al. showed that the Cooper pairs obey the strong equivalence principle, The measurement of the Cooper pairs inertial mass by Tate et al. revealed an anomalous excess of mass. In the present paper we interpret these experimental results in the framework of an electromagnetic model of dark energy for the superconductors' vacuum. We argue that this physical vacuum is associated with a preferred frame. Ultimately from the conservation of energy for Cooper pairs we derive a model for a variable vacuum speed of light in the superconductors physical vacuum in relation with a possible breaking of the weak equivalence principle for Cooper pairs.

  13. Vacuum probe surface sampler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahlava, B. A. (inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A vacuum probe surface sampler is described for rapidly sampling relatively large surface areas which possess relatively light loading densities of micro-organism, drug particles or the like. A vacuum head with a hollow handle connected to a suitable vacuum source is frictionally attached to a cone assembly terminating in a flared tip adapted to be passed over the surface to be sampled. A fine mesh screen carried by the vacuum head provides support for a membrane filter which collects the microorganisms or other particles. The head assembly is easily removed from the cone assembly without contacting the cone assembly with human hands.

  14. Singular-value decomposition using quantum annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashizume, Yoichiro; Koizumi, Takashi; Akitaya, Kento; Nakajima, Takashi; Okamura, Soichiro; Suzuki, Masuo

    2015-08-01

    In the present study, we demonstrate how to perform, using quantum annealing, the singular value decomposition and the principal component analysis. Quantum annealing gives a way to find a ground state of a system, while the singular value decomposition requires the maximum eigenstate. The key idea is to transform the sign of the final Hamiltonian, and the maximum eigenstate is obtained by quantum annealing. Furthermore, the adiabatic time scale is obtained by the approximation focusing on the maximum eigenvalue.

  15. Simulated Annealing using Hybrid Monte Carlo

    E-print Network

    R. Salazar; R. Toral

    1997-07-31

    We propose a variant of the Simulated Annealing method for optimization in the multivariate analysis of differentiable functions. The method uses global actualizations via the Hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm in their generalized version for the proposal of new configurations. We show how this choice can improve upon the performance of simulated annealing methods (mainly when the number of variables is large) by allowing a more effective searching scheme and a faster annealing schedule.

  16. Comparing codes for error corrected quantum annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Anurag; Albash, Tameem; Paz, Gerardo; Lidar, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Previous work on the D-Wave Two (DW2) device has demonstrated the effectiveness of using error correction and suppression for quantum annealers. As the size of a quantum annealer increases, error correction becomes crucial for improved performance. We introduce a new type of code for error correction tailored to the hardware graph of the DW2, discuss the result of benchmarking this code on qubit chains, discuss various new decoding methods, and compare the performance to previous quantum annealing correction schemes.

  17. The Effect of Argon Ambient Pressure and Annealing Time on Bulk MgB2 Superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdem, Murat; Ozturk, Ozgur; Asikuzun, Elif; Kaya, Seydanur; Safran, Serap; Kilic, Ahmet; Terzioglu, Cabir

    2015-03-01

    The effects of Ar ambient pressure (vacuum, 0B, 10B and 20B) and annealing times (0.5 h and 1 h) on microstructural, superconducting and mechanical properties of bulk superconducting MgB2 are investigated. The samples are produced using the solid state reaction method. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurements were performed for determination of the crystal structure, and surface morphology of MgB2 samples, respectively. The superconducting properties were studied by AC magnetic susceptibility and DC resistivity measurements. Increasing the Ar pressure decreased the lattice parameters and hence the average grain size. Increasing the annealing time results in larger lattice parameters and larger grain formation. The susceptibility measurements revealed two step transition which is reminiscent of granular superconductors. The intra-grain transition temperature is determined to be 38.4 K for all samples. The inter-grain transition temperatures of 37.2 K is obtained for samples produced under Ar ambient. The samples produced under Ar ambient have better superconducting properties than the ones produced in vacuum. Increasing the annealing time under vacuum further decreases the superconducting properties probably due to Mg loss. This research is supported by Kastamonu University Scientific Research Projects Coordination Department under the Grant No. KUBAP-03/2012-03.

  18. Arcjet cathode phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Francis M.; Haag, Thomas W.; Raquet, John F.

    1989-01-01

    Cathode tips made from a number of different materials were tested in a modular arcjet thruster in order to examine cathode phenomena. Periodic disassembly and examination, along with the data collected during testing, indicated that all of the tungsten-based materials behaved similarly despite the fact that in one of these samples the percentage of thorium oxide was doubled and another was 25 percent rhenium. The mass loss rate from a 2 percent thoriated rhenium cathode was found to be an order of magnitude greater than that observed using 2 percent thoriated tungsten. Detailed analysis of one of these cathode tips showed that the molten crater contained pure tungsten to a depth of about 150 microns. Problems with thermal stress cracking were encountered in the testing of a hafnium carbide tip. Post test analysis showed that the active area of the tip had chemically reacted with the propellant. A 100 hour continuous test was run at about 1 kW. Post test analysis revealed no dendrite formation, such as observed in a 30 kW arcjet lifetest, near the cathode crater. The cathodes from both this test and a previously run 1000 hour cycled test displayed nearly identical arc craters. Data and calculations indicate that the mass losses observed in testing can be explained by evaporation.

  19. Arcjet Cathode Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Francis M.; Haag, Thomas W.; Raquet, John F.

    1989-01-01

    Cathode tips made from a number of different materials were tested in a modular arcjet thruster in order to examine cathode phenomena. Periodic disassembly and examination, along with the data collected during testing, indicated that all of the tungsten-based materials behaved similarly despite the fact that in one of these samples the percentage of thorium oxide was doubled and another was 25 percent rhenium. The mass loss rate from a 2 percent thoriated rhenium cathode was found to be an order of magnitude greater than that observed using 2 percent thoriated tungsten. Detailed analysis of one of these cathode tips showed that the molten crater contained pure tungsten to a depth of about 150 microns. Problems with thermal stress cracking were encountered in the testing of a hafnium carbide tip. Post test analysis showed that the active area of the tip had chemically reacted with the propellant. A 100 hour continuous test was run at about 1 kW. Post test analysis revealed no dendrite formation, such as observed in a 30 kW arcjet lifetest, near the cathode crater. The cathodes from both this test and a previously run 1000 hour cycled test displayed nearly identical arc craters. Data and calculations indicate that the mass losses observed in testing can be explained by evaporation.

  20. ON DETECTING TRANSIENT PHENOMENA

    SciTech Connect

    Belanger, G.

    2013-08-10

    Transient phenomena are interesting and potentially highly revealing of details about the processes under observation and study that could otherwise go unnoticed. It is therefore important to maximize the sensitivity of the method used to identify such events. In this article, we present a general procedure based on the use of the likelihood function for identifying transients which is particularly suited for real-time applications because it requires no grouping or pre-processing of the data. The method makes use of all the information that is available in the data throughout the statistical decision-making process, and is suitable for a wide range of applications. Here we consider those most common in astrophysics, which involve searching for transient sources, events or features in images, time series, energy spectra, and power spectra, and demonstrate the use of the method in the case of a weak X-ray flare in a time series and a short-lived quasi-periodic oscillation in a power spectrum. We derive a fit statistic that is ideal for fitting arbitrarily shaped models to a power density distribution, which is of general interest in all applications involving periodogram analysis.

  1. Neutronic optimization in high conversion Th-{sup 233}U fuel assembly with simulated annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Kotlyar, D.; Shwageraus, E.

    2012-07-01

    This paper reports on fuel design optimization of a PWR operating in a self sustainable Th-{sup 233}U fuel cycle. Monte Carlo simulated annealing method was used in order to identify the fuel assembly configuration with the most attractive breeding performance. In previous studies, it was shown that breeding may be achieved by employing heterogeneous Seed-Blanket fuel geometry. The arrangement of seed and blanket pins within the assemblies may be determined by varying the designed parameters based on basic reactor physics phenomena which affect breeding. However, the amount of free parameters may still prove to be prohibitively large in order to systematically explore the design space for optimal solution. Therefore, the Monte Carlo annealing algorithm for neutronic optimization is applied in order to identify the most favorable design. The objective of simulated annealing optimization is to find a set of design parameters, which maximizes some given performance function (such as relative period of net breeding) under specified constraints (such as fuel cycle length). The first objective of the study was to demonstrate that the simulated annealing optimization algorithm will lead to the same fuel pins arrangement as was obtained in the previous studies which used only basic physics phenomena as guidance for optimization. In the second part of this work, the simulated annealing method was used to optimize fuel pins arrangement in much larger fuel assembly, where the basic physics intuition does not yield clearly optimal configuration. The simulated annealing method was found to be very efficient in selecting the optimal design in both cases. In the future, this method will be used for optimization of fuel assembly design with larger number of free parameters in order to determine the most favorable trade-off between the breeding performance and core average power density. (authors)

  2. Annealing of aromatic polyimide precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakelyn, N. T.

    1975-01-01

    A study has been made of the thermal behavior of polyimide precursors: an isomeric pair of crystals of the complex formed by p-phenylenediamine with the separated isomers of the di-isopropyl ester of pyromellitic acid. Specimens of this material were isothermally annealed in the temperature range 120 C to 170 C for periods of time up to 1 week. Although this temperature range is well below that customarily used for imidizations, the working hypothesis was that it would be more likely that a polymer embodying at least part of the precursor structure could be formed if the molecular motion was minimized to that actually required for the formation of the imide linkage. The progress of the annealing was followed by: infrared spectroscopy, differential thermal analysis, powder X-ray diffraction, and thermal gravimetric analysis. Single crystal X-ray analysis of the meta monomer yields a structure of chains of alternating acid and base and suggests that this monomer is amenable to polymerization with a minimum of geometrical disruption.

  3. Quantum Annealing for Constrained Optimization

    E-print Network

    Itay Hen; Federico M. Spedalieri

    2015-08-18

    Recent advances in quantum technology have led to the development and manufacturing of experimental programmable quantum annealers that could potentially solve certain quadratic unconstrained binary optimization problems faster than their classical analogues. The applicability of such devices for many theoretical and practical optimization problems, which are often constrained, is severely limited by the sparse, rigid layout of the devices' quantum bits. Traditionally, constraints are addressed by the addition of penalty terms to the Hamiltonian of the problem, which in turn requires prohibitively increasing physical resources while also restricting the dynamical range of the interactions. Here we propose a method for encoding constrained optimization problems on quantum annealers that eliminates the need for penalty terms and thereby removes many of the obstacles associated with the implementation of these. We argue the advantages of the proposed technique and illustrate its effectiveness. We then conclude by discussing the experimental feasibility of the suggested method as well as its potential to boost the encodability of other optimization problems.

  4. Hypervelocity impact phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Chhabildas, L.C.

    1995-07-01

    There is a need to determine the equations of state of materials in regimes of extreme high pressures, temperatures and strain rates that are not attainable on current two-stage light-gas guns. Understanding high-pressure material behavior is crucial to address the physical processes associated with a variety of hypervelocity impact events related to space sciences-orbital-debris impact, debris-shield designs, high-speed plasma propagation, and impact lethality applications. At very high impact velocities material properties will be dominated by phase-changes, such as melting or vaporization, which cannot be achieved at lower impact velocities. Development of well-controlled and repeatable hypervelocity launch capabilities is the first step necessary to improve our understanding of material behavior at extreme pressures and temperatures not currently available using conventional two-stage light-gas gun techniques. In this paper, techniques that have been used to extend both the launch capabilities of a two-stage light gas gun to 16 km/s, and their use to determine the material properties at pressures and temperature states higher than those ever obtained in the laboratory are summarized. The newly developed hypervelocity launcher (HVL) can launch intact (macroscopic dimensions) plates to 16 km/s. Time-resolved interferometric techniques have been used to determine shock-loading/release characteristics of materials impacted by such fliers as well as shock-induced vaporization phenomena in fully vaporized states. High-speed photography or radiography has been used to evaluate the debris propagation characteristics resulting from disc impact of thin bumper sheets at hypervelocities in excess of 10 km/s using the HVL. Examples of these experiments are provided in this paper.

  5. Photon acceleration in vacuum

    E-print Network

    J. T. Mendonca; M. Marklund; P. K. Shukla; G. Brodin

    2006-08-16

    A new process associated with the nonlinear optical properties of the electromagnetic vacuum, as predicted by quantum electrodynamics, is described. This can be called photon acceleration in vacuum, and corresponds to the frequency shift that takes place when a given test photon interacts with an intense beam of background radiation.

  6. Working in a Vacuum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathey, Allen

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses several myths about vacuum cleaners and offers tips on evaluating and purchasing this essential maintenance tool. These myths are: (1) Amps mean performance; (2) Everyone needs high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA): (3) Picking up a "bowling ball" shows cleaning power; (4) All vacuum bags are the same; (5)…

  7. Vacuum Energy Decay

    E-print Network

    Enrique Álvarez; Roberto Vidal

    2011-11-09

    The problem of the vacuum energy decay is studied through the analysis of the vacuum survival amplitude ${\\mathcal A}(z, z')$. Transition amplitudes are computed for finite time-span, $Z\\equiv z^\\prime-z$, and their {\\em late time} behavior is discussed up to first order in the coupling constant, $\\l$.

  8. Vacuuming radioactive sludge

    SciTech Connect

    2006-10-16

    Vacuuming an estimated 55 cubic yards of radioactive sludge from the floor of Hanford's K East Basin was a complicated process. Workers stood on grates suspended above the 20-foot deep basin and manipulated vacuuming equipment at the end of long poles--using underwater cameras to guide their work.

  9. Teaching Optical Phenomena with Tracker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodrigues, M.; Carvalho, P. Simeão

    2014-01-01

    Since the invention and dissemination of domestic laser pointers, observing optical phenomena is a relatively easy task. Any student can buy a laser and experience at home, in a qualitative way, the reflection, refraction and even diffraction phenomena of light. However, quantitative experiments need instruments of high precision that have a…

  10. Microfabricated triggered vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Roesler, Alexander W. (Tijeras, NM); Schare, Joshua M. (Albuquerque, NM); Bunch, Kyle (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-05-11

    A microfabricated vacuum switch is disclosed which includes a substrate upon which an anode, cathode and trigger electrode are located. A cover is sealed over the substrate under vacuum to complete the vacuum switch. In some embodiments of the present invention, a metal cover can be used in place of the trigger electrode on the substrate. Materials used for the vacuum switch are compatible with high vacuum, relatively high temperature processing. These materials include molybdenum, niobium, copper, tungsten, aluminum and alloys thereof for the anode and cathode. Carbon in the form of graphitic carbon, a diamond-like material, or carbon nanotubes can be used in the trigger electrode. Channels can be optionally formed in the substrate to mitigate against surface breakdown.

  11. Cryogenic vacuum tight adhesive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anashkin, O. P.; Keilin, V. E.; Patrikeev, V. M.

    1999-12-01

    A synthetic adhesive for vacuum tight joints at cryogenic temperatures has been developed. It consists of three components, the main component being epoxy silicone organic resin. The joints made with the adhesive remain vacuum tight at liquid helium temperature, including superfluid helium. It was found possible to connect different materials with the adhesive (copper and stainless steel with each other, aluminum, aluminum alloys, fiberglass, etc.). The joints withstood thermal shock tests of ten repeated sharps cooling to liquid nitrogen temperature and heating in hot water. Using the adhesive a lot of different vacuum tight low temperature joints have been made. More than fifteen years of wide application of this adhesive in vacuum tight cryogenic joints proved its high reliability. Some designs of vacuum tight cryogenic joints are presented and the technique of their manufacturing is described.

  12. The effect of annealing atmosphere on magnetoelectric coupling of the La0.7Sr0.3MnO3/BaTiO3 layered heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tingxian; Wang, Hongwei; Ju, Lin; Tang, Zhenjie; Ma, Dongwei; Li, Kuoshe

    2015-10-01

    The epitaxial La0.7Sr0.3MnO3/BaTiO3 (LSMO/BTO) layered heterostructure was grown on (001) oriented LaAlO3 single-crystal substrate by pulsed laser deposition. Our results showed that the in-situ annealing process in oxygen made the LSMO/BTO interface possess higher oxygen content than that of the one annealing in vacuum, which leaded to the LSMO film presented higher magnetic permeability and higher saturated magnetization. The P-E hystersis loop only could be detected in the sample annealing in oxygen. The ME voltage coefficient of the LSMO/BTO heterostructure annealing in oxygen was higher than that of the one annealing in vacuum, which suggested a more effective ME coupling. It was a combined effect of the two main ME coupling mechanisms, including strain mediation, and polarized carrier mediation.

  13. Effects of thermal annealing on the evolution of He bubbles in zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Shuyan; Velisa, Gihan; Debelle, Aurélien; Yang, Tengfei; Wang, Chenxu; Thomé, Lionel; Xue, Jianming; Yan, Sha; Wang, Yugang

    2014-05-01

    Single crystals of yttria-stabilized zirconia were implanted with 100 keV He ions at two fluences of 9 × 1016 and 3 × 1017 cm-2 (5 and 17 He at.%). In order to investigate the effect of thermal annealing on the evolution of both zirconia lattice and implanted He, the samples were annealed at several temperatures ranging from 500 °C to 1400 °C. Three complementary analysis techniques, RBS/C, AFM and TEM were used to study structural damage and surface morphology of the crystal before and after implantation. Results show different He evolution phenomena under the two implantation fluences. It is inferred that, at the lower fluence, the migration and agglomeration of He ions lead to bubble formation after annealing. These bubbles jack up sample surface causing the deformation of surface region and the damage level of surface region increase accordingly. As the temperature continues to increase, He gradually releases and the damage recovers. However, at the higher fluence, the He concentration is sufficient to induce bubble precipitation without annealing. He release and damage recovering is less efficient upon annealing.

  14. Housing protects laser in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canali, V. G.

    1978-01-01

    Airtight housing encloses laser for easy alinement and operation in high-vacuum chamber. Beam is transmitted through window into vacuum chamber. Flexible line runs through vacuum chamber to outside, maintaining laser enclosure at atmospheric pressure.

  15. "Un-annealed and Annealed Pd Ultra-Thin Film on SiC Characterized by Scanning Probe Microscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, W. J.; Shi, D. T.; Elshot, K.; Bryant, E.; Lafate, K.; Chen, H.; Burger, A.; Collins, W. E.

    1998-01-01

    Pd/SiC has been used as a hydrogen and a hydrocarbon gas sensor operated at high temperature. UHV (Ultra High Vacuum)-Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) techniques were applied to study the relationship between the morphology and chemical compositions for Pd ultra-thin films on SiC (less than 30 angstroms) at different annealing temperatures. Pd ultra-thin film on 6H-SiC was prepared by the RF sputtering method. The morphology from UHV-STM and AFM shows that the Pd thin film was well deposited on SiC substrate, and the Pd was partially aggregated to round shaped participates at an annealing temperature of 300 C. At 400 C, the amount of surface participates decreases, and some strap shape participates appear. From XPS, Pd2Si was formed on the surface after annealing at 300 C, and all Pd reacted with SiC to form Pd2Si after annealing at 400 C. The intensity of the XPS Pd peak decreases enormously at 400 C. The Pd film diffused into SiC, and the Schottky barrier height has almost no changes. The work shows the Pd sicilides/SiC have the same electronic properties with Pd/SiC, and explains why the Pd/SiC sensor still responds to hydrogen at high operating temperatures.

  16. Crystal growth and annealing method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Gianoulakis, Steven E. (Albuquerque, NM); Sparrow, Robert (North Brookfield, MA)

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus for producing crystals that minimizes birefringence even at large crystal sizes, and is suitable for production of CaF.sub.2 crystals. The method of the present invention comprises annealing a crystal by maintaining a minimal temperature gradient in the crystal while slowly reducing the bulk temperature of the crystal. An apparatus according to the present invention includes a thermal control system added to a crystal growth and annealing apparatus, wherein the thermal control system allows a temperature gradient during crystal growth but minimizes the temperature gradient during crystal annealing. An embodiment of the present invention comprises a secondary heater incorporated into a conventional crystal growth and annealing apparatus. The secondary heater supplies heat to minimize the temperature gradients in the crystal during the annealing process. The secondary heater can mount near the bottom of the crucible to effectively maintain appropriate temperature gradients.

  17. Formation of Epitaxial Graphene on SiC(0001) using Vacuum or Argon Environments Luxmi, N. Srivastava, and R. M. Feenstra

    E-print Network

    Feenstra, Randall

    1 Formation of Epitaxial Graphene on SiC(0001) using Vacuum or Argon Environments Luxmi, N on the (0001) surface of SiC (the Si-face) is studied by atomic force microscopy, low-energy electron for industrial applications.1 Thus far, annealing hexagonal polytypes of SiC in vacuum, with the Si atoms

  18. Computational Role of Multiqubit Tunneling in a Quantum Annealer

    E-print Network

    Sergio Boixo; Vadim N. Smelyanskiy; Alireza Shabani; Sergei V. Isakov; Mark Dykman; Vasil S. Denchev; Mohammad Amin; Anatoly Smirnov; Masoud Mohseni; Hartmut Neven

    2015-02-20

    Quantum tunneling, a phenomenon in which a quantum state traverses energy barriers above the energy of the state itself, has been hypothesized as an advantageous physical resource for optimization. Here we show that multiqubit tunneling plays a computational role in a currently available, albeit noisy, programmable quantum annealer. We develop a non-perturbative theory of open quantum dynamics under realistic noise characteristics predicting the rate of many-body dissipative quantum tunneling. We devise a computational primitive with 16 qubits where quantum evolutions enable tunneling to the global minimum while the corresponding classical paths are trapped in a false minimum. Furthermore, we experimentally demonstrate that quantum tunneling can outperform thermal hopping along classical paths for problems with up to 200 qubits containing the computational primitive. Our results indicate that many-body quantum phenomena could be used for finding better solutions to hard optimization problems.

  19. The quantum vacuum

    E-print Network

    G. S. Paraoanu

    2014-12-12

    The vacuum is the lowest energy state of a field in a certain region of space. This definition implies that no particles can be present in the vacuum state. In classical physics, the only features of vacuum are those of its geometry. For example, in the general theory of relativity the geometry is a dynamical structure that guides the motion of matter, and, in turn, it is bent and curved by the presence of matter. Other than this, the classical vacuum is a structure void of any physical properties, since classically properties are strictly associated with physical objects such as particles and finite-amplitude fields. The situation is very different in quantum physics. As I will show in this paper, the difference stems from the fact that in quantum physics the properties are not strictly tied to objects. We know for example that physical properties come into existence - as values of observables - only when the object is measured. Thus, quantum physics allows us to detach properties from objects. This has consequences: one does not need pre-existing real objects to create actual properties, and indeed under certain perturbations the quantum vacuum produces observable effects such as energy shifts and creation of particles. An open question is if by necessity the vacuum comes with an embedded geometry, and if it is possible to construct viable physical theories in which geometry is detached from the vacuum.

  20. Evading death by vacuum

    E-print Network

    A. Barroso; P. M. Ferreira; I. P. Ivanov; Rui Santos; João P. Silva

    2013-03-15

    In the Standard Model, the Higgs potential allows only one minimum at tree-level. But the open possibility that there might be two scalar doublets enriches the vacuum structure, allowing for the risk that we might now be in a metastable state, which we dub the panic vacuum. Current experiments at the LHC are probing the Higgs particle predicted as a result of the spontaneous symmetry breaking. Remarkably, in the two Higgs model with a softly broken U(1) symmetry, the LHC experiments already preclude panic vacuum solutions.

  1. Thermophoretic vacuum wand

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott (San Ramon, CA); Rader, Daniel John (Lafayette, CA)

    2001-01-01

    A thermophoretic vacuum wand that is particularly suited for transporting articles in a cleanroom environment so that potential particle contaminants in the air do not become adhered to the surface of the article is described. The wand includes a housing having a platen with a front surface with suction port(s) through the platen; a vacuum source for applying a negative pressure to the suction port(s); and heating device for the object. Heating the article when it is held by the vacuum wand affords thermophoretic protection that effectively prevents particles in the air from depositing onto the article.

  2. Thermophoretic vacuum wand

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott (San Ramon, CA); Rader, Daniel John (Lafayette, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A thermophoretic vacuum wand that is particularly suited for transporting articles in a cleanroom environment so that potential particle contaminants in the air do not become adhered to the surface of the article is described. The wand includes a housing having a platen with a front surface with suction port(s) through the platen; a vacuum source for applying a negative pressure to the suction port(s); and heating device for the object. Heating the article when it is held by the vacuum wand affords thermophoretic protection that effectively prevents particles in the air from depositing onto the article.

  3. Vacuum-driven Metamorphosis

    E-print Network

    Parker, L; Parker, Leonard; Raval, Alpan

    1999-01-01

    We show that nonperturbative vacuum effects can produce a vacuum-driven transition from a matter-dominated universe to one in which the effective equation of state is that of radiation plus cosmological constant. The actual material content of the universe after the transition remains that of non-relativistic matter. This metamorphosis of the equation of state can be traced to nonperturbative vacuum effects that cause the scalar curvature to remain nearly constant at a well-defined value after the transition, and is responsible for the observed acceleration of the recent expansion of the universe.

  4. Vacuum-driven Metamorphosis

    E-print Network

    Leonard Parker; Alpan Raval

    1999-08-26

    We show that nonperturbative vacuum effects can produce a vacuum-driven transition from a matter-dominated universe to one in which the effective equation of state is that of radiation plus cosmological constant. The actual material content of the universe after the transition remains that of non-relativistic matter. This metamorphosis of the equation of state can be traced to nonperturbative vacuum effects that cause the scalar curvature to remain nearly constant at a well-defined value after the transition, and is responsible for the observed acceleration of the recent expansion of the universe.

  5. Tuning of deep level emission in highly oriented electrodeposited ZnO nanorods by post growth annealing treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Simimol, A.; Manikandanath, N. T.; Chowdhury, Prasanta; Barshilia, Harish C.; Anappara, Aji A.

    2014-08-21

    Highly dense and c-axis oriented zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods with hexagonal wurtzite facets were deposited on fluorine doped tin oxide coated glass substrates by a simple and cost-effective electrodeposition method at low bath temperature (80?°C). The as-grown samples were then annealed at various temperatures (T{sub A}?=?100–500?°C) in different environments (e.g., zinc, oxygen, air, and vacuum) to understand their photoluminescence (PL) behavior in the ultra-violet (UV) and the visible regions. The PL results revealed that the as-deposited ZnO nanorods consisted of oxygen vacancy (V{sub O}), zinc interstitial (Zn{sub i}), and oxygen interstitial (O{sub i}) defects and these can be reduced significantly by annealing in different environments at optimal annealing temperatures. However, the intensity of deep level emission increased for T{sub A} greater than the optimized values for the respective environments due to the introduction of various defect centers. For example, for T{sub A}???450?°C in the oxygen and air environments, the density of O{sub i} defects increased, whereas, the green emission associated with V{sub O} is dominant in the vacuum annealed (T{sub A}?=?500?°C) ZnO nanorods. The UV peak red shifted after the post-growth annealing treatments in all the environments and the vacuum annealed sample exhibited highest UV peak intensity. The observations from the PL data are supported by the micro-Raman spectroscopy. The present study gives new insight into the origin of different defects that exist in the electrodeposited ZnO nanorods and how these defects can be precisely controlled in order to get the desired emissions for the opto-electronic applications.

  6. Collapse of vacuum bubbles in a vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Kin-Wang; Wang, Shang-Yung

    2011-02-15

    We revisit the dynamics of a false vacuum bubble in a background de Sitter spacetime. We find that there exists a large parameter space that allows the bubble to collapse into a black hole or to form a wormhole. This may have interesting implications for the creation of a baby universe in the laboratory, the string landscape where the bubble nucleation takes place among a plenitude of metastable vacua, and the inflationary physics.

  7. Welding space vacuum technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. Barry

    1991-01-01

    The objective was to assist the EH 42 Division in putting together a vacuum system that could attain the desired pressure and be large enough to accommodate the gas-metal arc (GMA) welding fixture apparatus. A major accomplishment was the design and fabrication of the controller/annunciator for the 4' by 8' system. It contains many safety features such as thermocouple set point relays that will only allow inlet and exit gas and vacuum valves to be operated at pre-selected system pressures, and a fail safe mode for power interruptions and operator mistakes. It is felt that significant progress was made in this research effort to weld in a vacuum environment. With continued efforts to increase the pump speeds for vacuum chambers and further studies on weld fixtures and gas inlet pressures, the NASA program will be successful.

  8. Vacuum Camera Cooler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laugen, Geoffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    Acquiring cheap, moving video was impossible in a vacuum environment, due to camera overheating. This overheating is brought on by the lack of cooling media in vacuum. A water-jacketed camera cooler enclosure machined and assembled from copper plate and tube has been developed. The camera cooler (see figure) is cup-shaped and cooled by circulating water or nitrogen gas through copper tubing. The camera, a store-bought "spy type," is not designed to work in a vacuum. With some modifications the unit can be thermally connected when mounted in the cup portion of the camera cooler. The thermal conductivity is provided by copper tape between parts of the camera and the cooled enclosure. During initial testing of the demonstration unit, the camera cooler kept the CPU (central processing unit) of this video camera at operating temperature. This development allowed video recording of an in-progress test, within a vacuum environment.

  9. Cosmology of gravitational vacuum

    E-print Network

    V. Burdyuzha; G. Vereshkov; J. Pacheco

    2007-12-29

    Production of gravitational vacuum defects and their contribution to the energy density of our Universe are discussed. These topological microstructures (defects) could be produced in the result of creation of the Universe from "nothing" when a gravitational vacuum condensate has appeared. They must be isotropically distributed over the isotropic expanding Universe. After Universe inflation these microdefects are smoothed, stretched and broken up. A part of them could survive and now they are perceived as the structures of Lambda-term and an unclustered dark matter. It is shown that the parametrization noninvariance of the Wheeler-De Witt equation can be used to describe phenomenologically vacuum topological defects of different dimensions (worm-holes, micromembranes, microstrings and monopoles). The mathematical illustration of these processes may be the spontaneous breaking of the local Lorentz-invariance of the quasi-classical equations of gravity. Probably the gravitational vacuum condensate has fixed time in our Universe. Besides, 3-dimensional topological defects renormalize Lambda-term.

  10. Vacuum Vessel Remote Handling

    E-print Network

    , seismic, etc.) · Preliminary FEA analysis performed - Linear, static stress analysis - Linear, transient · Vacuum Vessel - Design requirements - Design concept and features - Analysis to date - Status and summary Replacement Time Estimates - Balance of RH Equipment · Design and analysis are consistent with pre

  11. Precision Laser Annealing of Focal Plane Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, Daniel A.; DeRose, Christopher; Starbuck, Andrew Lea; Verley, Jason C.; Jenkins, Mark W.

    2015-09-01

    We present results from laser annealing experiments in Si using a passively Q-switched Nd:YAG microlaser. Exposure with laser at fluence values above the damage threshold of commercially available photodiodes results in electrical damage (as measured by an increase in photodiode dark current). We show that increasing the laser fluence to values in excess of the damage threshold can result in annealing of a damage site and a reduction in detector dark current by as much as 100x in some cases. A still further increase in fluence results in irreparable damage. Thus we demonstrate the presence of a laser annealing window over which performance of damaged detectors can be at least partially reconstituted. Moreover dark current reduction is observed over the entire operating range of the diode indicating that device performance has been improved for all values of reverse bias voltage. Additionally, we will present results of laser annealing in Si waveguides. By exposing a small (<10 um) length of a Si waveguide to an annealing laser pulse, the longitudinal phase of light acquired in propagating through the waveguide can be modified with high precision, <15 milliradian per laser pulse. Phase tuning by 180 degrees is exhibited with multiple exposures to one arm of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer at fluence values below the morphological damage threshold of an etched Si waveguide. No reduction in optical transmission at 1550 nm was found after 220 annealing laser shots. Modeling results for laser annealing in Si are also presented.

  12. TFTR diagnostic vacuum controller

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, D.; Persons, R.

    1981-01-01

    The TFTR diagnostic vacuum controller (DVC) provides in conjunction with the Central Instrumentation Control and Data Acquisition System (CICADA), control and monitoring for the pumps, valves and gauges associated with each individual diagnostic vacuum system. There will be approximately 50 systems on TFTR. Two standard versions of the controller (A and B) wil be provided in order to meet the requirements of two diagnostic manifold arrangements. All pump and valve sequencing, as well as protection features, will be implemented by the controller.

  13. Electromagnetic vacuum of complex media: Dipole emission versus light propagation, vacuum energy, and local field factors

    SciTech Connect

    Donaire, M.

    2011-02-15

    We offer a unified approach to several phenomena related to the electromagnetic vacuum of a complex medium made of point electric dipoles. To this aim, we apply the linear response theory to the computation of the polarization field propagator and study the spectrum of vacuum fluctuations. The physical distinction among the local density of states which enter the spectra of light propagation, total dipole emission, coherent emission, total vacuum energy, and Schwinger-bulk energy is made clear. Analytical expressions for the spectrum of dipole emission and for the vacuum energy are derived. Their respective relations with the spectrum of external light and with the Schwinger-bulk energy are found. The light spectrum and the Schwinger-bulk energy are determined by the Dyson propagator. The emission spectrum and the total vacuum energy are determined by the polarization propagator. An exact relationship of proportionality between both propagators is found in terms of local field factors. A study of the nature of stimulated emission from a single dipole is carried out. Regarding coherent emission, it contains two components. A direct one which is transferred radiatively and directly from the emitter into the medium and whose spectrum is that of external light. And an indirect one which is radiated by induced dipoles. The induction is mediated by one (and only one) local field factor. Regarding the vacuum energy, we find that in addition to the Schwinger-bulk energy the vacuum energy of an effective medium contains local field contributions proportional to the resonant frequency and to the spectral line width.

  14. Vacuum self-magnetization?

    SciTech Connect

    Perez Rojas, H.; Rodriguez Querts, E.

    2006-06-19

    We study vacuum properties in a strong magnetic field as the zero temperature and zero density limit of quantum statistics. For charged vector bosons (W bosons) the vacuum energy density diverges for B > B{sub c} = m{sub w}{sup 2}/e, leading to vacuum instability. A logarithmic divergence of vacuum magnetization is found for B = Bc, which suggests that if the magnetic field is large enough, it is self-consistently maintained, and this mechanism actually prevents B from reaching the critical value Bc. For virtual neutral vector bosons bearing an anomalous magnetic moment, the instability of the ground state for B > B{sub c}{sup '} = m{sub n}{sup 2}/q also leads to the vacuum energy density divergence for fields B > B{sub c}{sup '} and to the magnetization divergence for B B{sub c}{sup '}. The possibility of virtual electron-positron pairs bosonization in strong magnetic field and the applicability of the neutral bosons model to describe the virtual positronium behavior in a magnetic field are discussed. We conjecture that this could lead to vacuum self-magnetization in QED.

  15. Excimer laser annealing of silicon nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Nipun; Xu, Li; Pan, Yaoling; Cheung, Nathan; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.

    2007-03-01

    Nanowires can potentially be used with low-cost flexible plastic substrates for applications such as large-area displays and sensor arrays. However, high temperature processing steps such as thermal annealing that are incompatible with plastic substrates are still a major hindrance. Laser annealing permits localized energy input without affecting the underlying substrate and can help overcome this problem. In this study, the excimer laser annealing of silicon nanowires is demonstrated to be an efficient means of activating implanted dopants. The optical absorption of the nanowires is discussed and the effect of parameters such as fluence and number of pulses is investigated.

  16. Phase balancing using simulated annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, J.; Bilbro, G.; Chow, M.Y.

    1999-11-01

    Deregulation eliminates the boundary of the territory of the monopoly power industry. Competition forces utilities to improve power quality as well as to reduce investment and operation costs. Feeder imbalance describes a situation in which the voltages of a three-phase voltage source are not identical in magnitude, or the phase differences between them are not 120 electrical degrees, or both. It affects motors and other devices that depend upon a well-balanced three-phase voltage source. Phase balancing is to make the voltages balanced at each load point of the feeder. Phase swapping is a direct approach for phase balancing with the minimum cost. Phase balancing can enhance utilities' competitive capability by improving reliability, quality, and reducing costs. Therefore, phase balancing optimization is nowadays receiving more attention in the power industry, especially in today's deregulating environments. The non-linear effects, such as, voltage drops and energy losses, make the problem difficult to solve. This paper introduces Simulated Annealing as an effective method to solve a power distribution phase balancing problem with its non-linear effects.

  17. VACUUM SYSTEMS PHYSICS 359E

    E-print Network

    Landstreet, John D.

    VACUUM SYSTEMS PHYSICS 359E September 28, 2004 INTRODUCTION In this laboratory, you will familiarize yourself with the principles of simple vacuum systems and their use. You will measure the pumping.) VACUUM SYSTEMS AND COMPONENTS In one way or another vacuum techniques appear in most fields of modern

  18. FePt nanoparticles formed in Al2O3 by ion beam synthesis: Annealing environment effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, C. W.; Withrow, S. P.; Williams, J. M.; Budai, J. D.; Meldrum, A.; Sorge, K. D.; Thompson, J. R.; Boatner, L. A.

    2004-06-01

    The properties of FePt nanoparticles formed by the implantation of Fe+Pt into c-axis-oriented Al2O3 single crystals followed by thermal annealing are shown to be strongly dependent on the annealing environment. Annealing in a reducing environment (flowing Ar+4% H2, or ultrahigh vacuum) gives rise to ferromagnetic FePt nanoparticles with the L10 structure and very high magnetic coercivity (greater than 20 kOe). FePt alloy formation does not occur during annealing in an oxidizing environment. Instead, the implanted Pt precipitates out forming oriented Pt nanoparticles and the implanted Fe redistributes with ˜40% segregating to the surface where it forms epitaxial ?-Fe2O3 precipitates at the surface; the remainder of the implanted Fe remains in the bulk, most likely in solid solution in the matrix. Results obtained by sequential annealing of Fe+Pt implanted samples in reducing (oxidizing) environments followed by annealing in an oxidizing (reducing) environment suggest that equilibrium, rather than kinetic, effects are responsible for the observed microstructures.

  19. Influence of annealing temperature on structural and optical properties of nanocrystalline Platinum octaethylporphyrin (PtOEP) thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abuelwafa, A. A.; El-Denglawey, A.; Dongol, M.; El-Nahass, M. M.; Soga, T.

    2015-11-01

    Thermal evaporation technique was used to prepare the Platinum octaethylporphyrin (PtOEP) thin films at room temperature. The deposited films were studied before and after thermal annealing at 373 and 473 K for 3 h under vacuum (10-3 Pa). The film structure, surface morphologies and molecular structure were investigated as a function of annealing temperature by X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Field-Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) and Fourier-transform infrared techniques (FT-IR) respectively. The results confirmed that the as-deposited and annealed films have nanostructural features. Optical constants of the as-deposited and annealed films have been obtained in the wavelength range 200-1100 nm by using spectrophotometric measurements. Analysis of the spectra of absorption coefficient showed indirect allowed transition and optical energy gap found to decrease with increase in annealing temperature. The dispersion of refractive index at the normal dispersion (? > 600 nm) was discussed in terms of single oscillator model of Wemple-Didomenico. Based on generalized Miller's rule the third order non-linear susceptibility, ?(3) and nonlinear refractive index, n2 were estimated and studied at lower photon energy and showing lower value for the annealed film.

  20. Critical velocity phenomena and the LTP. [Lunar Transient Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srnka, L. J.

    1977-01-01

    When the relative velocity between magnetized plasma and neutral gas exceeds a critical value, the gas-plasma interaction is dominated by collective phenomena which rapidly excite and ionize the neutrals. The interaction of the solar wind with a large cloud (between 10 to the 24th and 10 to the 28th power neutrals) vented from the moon should be of this type. Line radiation from such an interaction can yield an apparent lunar surface brightness rivaling reflected sunlight levels over small areas, if the kinetic-energy flow density of the gas is sufficiently high. The aberrated solar-wind flow past the moon would enhance the visibility of such interactions near the lunar sunrise terminator, supporting the statistical studies which indicate that the 'Lunar Transient Phenomena' (anomalous optical phenomena on the moon) are significantly correlated with the position of the terminator on the lunar surface.

  1. CIRCUIT PARTITIONING USING MEAN FIELD ANNEALING

    E-print Network

    Aykanat, Cevdet

    CIRCUIT PARTITIONING USING MEAN FIELD ANNEALING Tevfik Bultan Department of Computer Science problem and graph partitioning problem. In this paper, MFA is formulated for the circuit partitioning for electrical circuits are avoided. An efficient implementation scheme, which decreases the complexity

  2. Biofilaments as annealed semi-flexible copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fierling, Julien; Mohrbach, Hervé; Kulic, Igor; Lee, Nam-Kyung; Johner, Albert

    2014-06-01

    In many in vivo or in vitro situations, biofilaments manifest some annealed heterogeneity and should be considered as annealed random copolymers. The building blocks of the filaments differ from each other, for example, by the internal structure of the monomer, by the presence of some adsorbed species or by the curvature. Based on the copolymer concept, we embed the description of these systems in a common formalism. We demonstrate how the annealed heterogeneous nature of the filament is reflected by statistical correlations like the tangent-tangent correlation function or the cyclization probability. Our results show that annealed filaments adapt cooperatively to external constraints. This could contribute to explain anomalous elasticity manifested by biofilaments.

  3. Quantum Simulations of Classical Annealing Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somma, R. D.; Boixo, S.; Barnum, H.; Knill, E.

    2008-09-01

    We describe a quantum algorithm that solves combinatorial optimization problems by quantum simulation of a classical simulated annealing process. Our algorithm exploits quantum walks and the quantum Zeno effect induced by evolution randomization. It requires order 1/? steps to find an optimal solution with bounded error probability, where ? is the minimum spectral gap of the stochastic matrices used in the classical annealing process. This is a quadratic improvement over the order 1/? steps required by the latter.

  4. Mirowave annealing of silicon nitride materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kiggans, J.O. Jr.; Montgomery, F.C.; Tiegs, T.N.

    1997-08-01

    Dense silicon nitride-based ceramics were microwave annealed to determine if microwave heating offers advantages over conventional heating for the enhancement of the high temperature creep resistance. Gas pressure sintered silicon nitride (GPS-SN) and sintered reaction-bonded silicon nitride (SRBSN) were heated in microwave or graphite element furnaces at 1150{degrees}C and 1600{degrees}C. Annealed materials were characterized for the room and high temperature flexural strengths, room temperature fracture toughness values, and high temperature creep properties. In addition, SEM analyses were performed to study grain growth and other microstructural changes. The results of this study showed that both types of furnace anneals at 1150{degrees}C lowered the room temperature strength and toughness values of both SRBSN and GPS-SN materials; however, the anneal treatments at 1600{degrees}C had little effect on the room temperature properties. Both the SRBSN and GPS-SN control and annealed samples had reduced high temperature fast fracture strengths, when compared to the room temperature strengths. Creep tests at 1200{degrees}C indicated that both the SRBSN and the GPS-SN materials that were annealed by microwave heating at I 150{degrees}C for 20 h showed enhanced creep resistance, when compared to unheated controls and conventionally heated materials. No qualitative differences were seen in the microstructures of the SRBSN and the GPS-SN materials which could account for the differences in the creep properties of the annealed materials. Additional experimental work is in progress to further understand the mechanisms for the enhanced creep properties of silicon nitride materials annealed by microwave heating.

  5. Annealed CVD molybdenum thin film surface

    DOEpatents

    Carver, Gary E. (Tucson, AZ); Seraphin, Bernhard O. (Tucson, AZ)

    1984-01-01

    Molybdenum thin films deposited by pyrolytic decomposition of Mo(CO).sub.6 attain, after anneal in a reducing atmosphere at temperatures greater than 700.degree. C., infrared reflectance values greater than reflectance of supersmooth bulk molybdenum. Black molybdenum films deposited under oxidizing conditions and annealed, when covered with an anti-reflecting coating, approach the ideal solar collector characteristic of visible light absorber and infrared energy reflector.

  6. Magnetic induced heating for ferritic metal annealing

    SciTech Connect

    De Witt, G.L.; Huber, D.J.

    1987-03-24

    A method is described for annealing the wall of a nuclear reactor vessel, including, positioning an electromagnet within a vertically positioned nuclear reactor vessel by lowering the electromagnet into the vessel, supplying power to the electromagnet to generate substantially uniform heat in the vessel wall, maintaining the power to the electromagnet for a predetermined length of time which will anneal the vessel wall, and removing the electromagnet.

  7. ISABELLE vacuum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Halama, H J

    1980-01-01

    The Intersecting Storage Accelerator (ISABELLE) consists of two rings having a circumference of 3.8 km each. In these rings superconducting magnets, held at 4 K, bend and focus the proton beam which is accelerated up to 400 GeV. Due to very different pressure requirements, ISABELLE has two completely independent vacuum systems. One, which operates at 1 x 10/sup -11/ Torr, provides a very clean environment for the circulating proton beam. Here only ion and titanium sublimation pumps are used to provide the vacuum. The other system maintains superconducting magnet vessels at a pressure below 1 x 10/sup -4/ Torr, since at this pressure the gas conduction becomes negligible. In this so-called insulating vacuum system, turbomolecular pumps pump the inadvertent small helium leaks. Other gases are cryocondensed on the cold surfaces of the cryogenic system. The basic element of ISABELLE known as Full Cell containing 45 meters of beam tube, 8 pumping stations, 8 superconducting magnets and complete instrumentation has been constructed, leak checked and tested. All design parameters have been achieved in both vacuum systems. The two vacuum systems are described with particular emphasis on the influence of superconducting magnets in the selection of materials and UHV components.

  8. The local crystallization in nanoscale diamond-like carbon films during annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Kolpakov, A. Ya. Poplavsky, A. I.; Galkina, M. E.; Gerus, J. V.; Manokhin, S. S.

    2014-12-08

    The local crystallization during annealing at 600?°C in nanoscale diamond-like carbon coatings films grown by pulsed vacuum-arc deposition method was observed using modern techniques of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The crystallites formed by annealing have a face-centred cubic crystal structure and grow in the direction [01{sup ¯}1{sup ¯}] as a normal to the film surface. The number and size of the crystallites depend on the initial values of the intrinsic stresses before annealing, which in turn depend on the conditions of film growth. The sizes of crystallites are 10?nm for films with initial compressive stresses of 3?GPa and 17?nm for films with initial compressive stresses of 12?GPa. Areas of local crystallization arising during annealing have a structure different from the graphite. Additionally, the investigation results of the structure of nanoscale diamond-like carbon coatings films using Raman spectroscopy method are presented, which are consistent with the transmission electron microscopy research results.

  9. Investigation into the optoelectrical properties of tungsten oxide thin films annealed in an oxygen air

    SciTech Connect

    Arfaoui, A.; Ouni, B. Touihri, S.; Mannoubi, T.

    2014-12-15

    Tungsten oxide (WO{sub x}) thin film have been deposited onto glass substrates using the thermal vacuum evaporation technique, monitored by an annealing process in a variable oxygen atmosphere. Analysis by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy showed the structural changes from orthorhombic to monoclinic which depend on the annealing temperature and the oxygen content. AFM study shows that the increase of oxygen content leads to a decrease of the root-mean-square from 94.64 nm to 2 nm. Ellipsometric measurements have been used to evaluate the optical constants. Further, it is found that when the oxygen content increases, the band gap of the annealed layer varies from 3.01 eV to 3.52 eV by against, the Urbach energy decreases. The AC conductivity plot showed a universal power law according to the Jonscher model. Moreover, at high frequency semiconductor-to-metallic behavior has been observed. Finally, the effect of annealing in oxygen atmosphere on their structural modifications, morphological, optical properties and electrical conductivity are reported.

  10. Photo annealing effect on p-doped inverted organic solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafalce, Evan; Toglia, Patrick; Lewis, Jason E.; Jiang, Xiaomei

    2014-06-01

    We report the transient positive photo annealing effect in which over 600% boost of power conversion efficiency was observed in inverted organic photovoltaic devices (OPV) made from P3HT/PCBM by spray method, after 2 hrs of constant solar AM 1.5 irradiation at low temperature. This is opposite to usual photodegradation of OPV, and cannot be explained by thermal activation alone since the mere temperature effect could only account for 30% of the enhancement. We have investigated the temperature dependence, cell geometry, oxygen influence, and conclude that, for p-doped active layer at room temperature, the predominant mechanism is photo-desorption of O2, which eliminates electron traps and reduces space charge screening. As temperature decreases, thermal activation and deep trap-state filling start to show noticeable effect on the enhancement of photocurrent at intermediate low temperature (T = 125 K). At very low temperature, the dominant mechanism for photo annealing is trap-filling, which significantly reduces recombination between free and trapped carriers. At all temperature, photo annealing effect depends on illumination direction from cathode or anode. We also explained the large fluctuation of photocurrent by the capture/reemit of trapped electrons from shallow electron traps of O2- generated by photo-doping. Our study has demonstrated the dynamic process of photo-doping and photo-desorption, and shown that photo annealing in vacuum can be an efficient method to improve OPV device efficiency.

  11. Effect of annealing on structural and optical properties of diamond-like nanocomposite thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Sukhendu; Das, Sayan; De, Debasish; Gangopadhyay, Utpal; Ghosh, Prajit; Mondal, Anup

    2014-03-01

    The annealing effect on structural and optical properties of the Diamond-like Nanocomposite (DLN) thin film deposited on glass substrate by Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition (PACVD) method has been investigated. The films were annealed at temperature ranging from 300 to 600 °C, with 100 °C interval for 9 minutes by rapid thermal process (RTP) under vacuum. The structural changes of the annealed films have been studied using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), and optical parameters have been determined using transmittance and reflectance spectra in UV-UIS-NIR range. The result shows that the refractive index increases gradually from 1.79 to 2.84 with annealing temperature due to out-diffusion of H by breaking Si-H and C-H bond leads to Si-C bond, i.e. more cross linking structure. In higher temperature range, graphitization also enhanced the refractive index. However, the optical band gap at up to 400 °C initially increases from 3.05 to 3.20 eV and then decreases due to graphitization. The film has a great potential to be used as anti-reflection coating (ARC) on silicon-based solar cell.

  12. The annealing effect of crystal 4H-SiC films prepared by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu-xia, Wang; Jun, Wen; Ye-qing, Tang; Zhen, Guo; Hong-gao, Tang; Jian-xin, Wu

    1998-08-01

    SiC films were prepared by pulsed XeCl laser ablation of ceramic SiC target on Si(100) substrate at temperature 850 °C and post-deposition high temperature annealing above 1100°C (1100 °C< T < 1400 °C) in high vacuum (1.3×10-7 Pa). The surface morphology, crystal structure, composition and chemical state of the element in the films before and after annealing were studied by x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Auger electron Spectrum, x-ray photoelectron spectrum and photoluminescence methods. It was found that the films were consisted of polycrystal 4H-SiC structure before annealing and were turned into singlecrystal epitaxial 4H-SiC after annealing. The surfaces of the films were smooth and the adhesion of films with the substrate was good. The films were transparent. Excited by the laser with wavelength 290 nm at room temperature, the films emitted two luminescence bands with the peaks at 377 nm and 560 nm. The emission at 377 nm was attributed to the combination of the transmission among the valence and conductor bands, while the one at 560 nm was possibly to be from exciton emission.

  13. Photo annealing effect on p-doped inverted organic solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Lafalce, Evan; Toglia, Patrick; Lewis, Jason E.; Jiang, Xiaomei

    2014-06-28

    We report the transient positive photo annealing effect in which over 600% boost of power conversion efficiency was observed in inverted organic photovoltaic devices (OPV) made from P3HT/PCBM by spray method, after 2?hrs of constant solar AM 1.5 irradiation at low temperature. This is opposite to usual photodegradation of OPV, and cannot be explained by thermal activation alone since the mere temperature effect could only account for 30% of the enhancement. We have investigated the temperature dependence, cell geometry, oxygen influence, and conclude that, for p-doped active layer at room temperature, the predominant mechanism is photo-desorption of O{sub 2}, which eliminates electron traps and reduces space charge screening. As temperature decreases, thermal activation and deep trap-state filling start to show noticeable effect on the enhancement of photocurrent at intermediate low temperature (T?=?125?K). At very low temperature, the dominant mechanism for photo annealing is trap-filling, which significantly reduces recombination between free and trapped carriers. At all temperature, photo annealing effect depends on illumination direction from cathode or anode. We also explained the large fluctuation of photocurrent by the capture/reemit of trapped electrons from shallow electron traps of O{sub 2}{sup -} generated by photo-doping. Our study has demonstrated the dynamic process of photo-doping and photo-desorption, and shown that photo annealing in vacuum can be an efficient method to improve OPV device efficiency.

  14. Improving Vacuum Cleaners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Under a Space Act Agreement between the Kirby company and Lewis Research Center, NASA technology was applied to a commercial vacuum cleaner product line. Kirby engineers were interested in advanced operational concepts, such as particle flow behavior and vibration, critical factors to improve vacuum cleaner performance. An evaluation of the company 1994 home care system, the Kirby G4, led to the refinement of the new G5 and future models. Under the cooperative agreement, Kirby had access to Lewis' holography equipment, which added insight into how long a vacuum cleaner fan would perform, as well as advanced computer software that can simulate the flow of air through fans. The collaboration resulted in several successes including fan blade redesign and continuing dialogue on how to improve air-flow traits in various nozzle designs.

  15. Scaling law in thermal phenomena

    E-print Network

    M. Kozlowski; J. Marciak-Kozlowska

    2006-10-29

    In this paper the scaling law for the relaxation times in thermal phenomena is investigated. It is shown that dependent on the value of the parameter K=E/m(c\\alpha)^2,where E is the energy which is delivered to the system, m is the parton mass and \\alpha=1/137 for electromagnetic interaction and \\alpha=0.16 for strong interaction respectively, heat transport is diffusive, for K1. For the system with N partons the relaxation time is scaled as \\tau^N\\to N (\\hbar/(mc\\alpha)^2). Key words: Thermal phenomena, scaling

  16. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  17. Influence of in-situ annealing ambient on p-type conduction in dual ion beam sputtered Sb-doped ZnO thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Sushil Kumar; Kumar Pandey, Saurabh; Awasthi, Vishnu; Mukherjee, Shaibal; Gupta, M.; Deshpande, U. P.

    2013-08-12

    Sb-doped ZnO (SZO) films were deposited on c-plane sapphire substrates by dual ion beam sputtering deposition system and subsequently annealed in-situ in vacuum and in various proportions of O{sub 2}/(O{sub 2} + N{sub 2})% from 0% (N{sub 2}) to 100% (O{sub 2}). Hall measurements established all SZO films were p-type, as was also confirmed by typical diode-like rectifying current-voltage characteristics from p-ZnO/n-ZnO homojunction. SZO films annealed in O{sub 2} ambient exhibited higher hole concentration as compared with films annealed in vacuum or N{sub 2} ambient. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analysis confirmed that Sb{sup 5+} states were more preferable in comparison to Sb{sup 3+} states for acceptor-like Sb{sub Zn}-2V{sub Zn} complex formation in SZO films.

  18. Electrostatic Levitator Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Optical ports ring the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) vacuum chamber to admit light from the heating laser (beam passes through the window at left), positioning lasers (one port is at center), and lamps to allow diagnostic instruments to view the sample. The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  19. Influence of annealing ambient on the structure, photoluminescence and photocatalytic activity of low temperature grown ZnO nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Hongru; Zhao, Xiaoru; Duan, Libing; Wang, Yajun; Wang, Fenggui; Ali, Amjed; Liu, Ruidi

    2015-07-01

    ZnO nanowires were synthesized via a low-temperature (90 °C) hydrothermal route on glass substrates pre-deposited with a ZnO seed layer. The influence of different annealing ambient conditions (air or vacuum) on the structure, photoluminescence and photocatalytic activity of ZnO nanowires was investigated by Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, photoluminescence (PL) and photochemical reactions etc. It was found that there existed graphitic carbons on the surfaces of ZnO nanowires after vacuum annealing. The PL intensity of ZnO nanowires with the graphitic carbons was significantly reduced while the photocatalytic activity was enhanced, indicating that the graphitic carbons could decrease the recombination probability of photo-induced carriers.

  20. Improved electron collection in fullerene via caesium iodide or carbonate by means of annealing in inverted organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Jouad, Zouhair; Louarn, Guy; Praveen, Thappily; Predeep, Padmanabhan; Cattin, Linda; Bernède, Jean-Christian; Addou, Mohammed; Morsli, Mustapha

    2014-05-01

    Inverted organic photovoltaic cells (IOPVCs), based on the planar heterojunction C60/CuPc, were grown using MoO3 as anode buffer layer and CsI or Cs2CO3 as cathode buffer layer (CBL), the cathode being an ITO coated glass. Work functions, ?f, of treated cathode were estimated using the cyclic voltammetry method. It is shown that ?f of ITO covered with a Cs compounds is decreased. This decrease is amplified by the annealing. It is shown that the thermal deposition under vacuum of the CBL induces a partial decomposition of the caesium compounds. In parallel, the formation of a compound with the In of ITO is put in evidence. This reaction is amplified by annealing, which allows obtaining IOPVCs with improved efficiency. The optimum annealing conditions is 150 °C for 5 min.

  1. Carbon Monoxide-Induced Stability and Atomic Segregation Phenomena in Shape-Selected Octahedral PtNi Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Mahdi; Cui, Chunhua; Mistry, Hemma; Strasser, Peter; Roldan Cuenya, Beatriz

    2015-11-24

    The chemical and morphological stability of size- and shape-selected octahedral PtNi nanoparticles (NP) were investigated after different annealing treatments up to a maximum temperature of 700 °C in a vacuum and under 1 bar of CO. Atomic force microscopy was used to examine the mobility of the NPs and their stability against coarsening, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to study the surface composition, chemical state of Pt and Ni in the NPs, and thermally and CO-induced atomic segregation trends. Exposing the samples to 1 bar of CO at room temperature before annealing in a vacuum was found to be effective at enhancing the stability of the NPs against coarsening. In contrast, significant coarsening was observed when the sample was annealed in 1 bar of CO, most likely as a result of Ni(CO)4 formation and their enhanced mobility on the support surface. Sample exposure to CO at room temperature prior to annealing led to the segregation of Pt to the NP surface. Nevertheless, oxidic PtOx and NiOx species still remained at the NP surface, and, irrespective of the initial sample pretreatment, Ni surface segregation was observed upon annealing in a vacuum at moderate temperature (T < 300 °C). Interestingly, a distinct atomic segregation trend was detected between 300 and 500 °C for the sample pre-exposed to CO; namely, Ni surface segregation was partially hindered. This might be attributed to the higher bonding energy of CO to Pt as compared to Ni. Annealing in the presence of 1 bar CO also resulted in the initial surface segregation of Ni (T < 400 °C) as long as PtOx and NiOx species were available on the surface as a result of the higher affinity of Ni for oxygen. Above 500 °C, and regardless of the sample pretreatment, the diffusion of Pt atoms to the NP surface and the formation of a Ni-Pt alloy are observed. PMID:26418831

  2. Origin of reverse annealing effect in hydrogen-implanted silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Di, Zengfeng; Nastasi, Michael A; Wang, Yongqiang

    2009-01-01

    In contradiction to conventional damage annealing, thermally annealed H-implanted Si exhibits an increase in damage or reverse annealing behavior, whose mechanism has remained elusive. On the basis of quantitative high resolution transmission electron microscopy combined with channeling Rutherford backscattering analysis, we conclusively elucidate that the reverse annealing effect is due to the nucleation and growth of hydrogen-induce platelets. Platelets are responsible for an increase in the height and width the channeling damage peak following increased isochronal anneals.

  3. Improving Simulated Annealing by Replacing Its Variables with Game-Theoretic Utility Maximizers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolpert, David H.; Bandari, Esfandiar; Tumer, Kagan

    2001-01-01

    The game-theory field of Collective INtelligence (COIN) concerns the design of computer-based players engaged in a non-cooperative game so that as those players pursue their self-interests, a pre-specified global goal for the collective computational system is achieved as a side-effect. Previous implementations of COIN algorithms have outperformed conventional techniques by up to several orders of magnitude, on domains ranging from telecommunications control to optimization in congestion problems. Recent mathematical developments have revealed that these previously developed algorithms were based on only two of the three factors determining performance. Consideration of only the third factor would instead lead to conventional optimization techniques like simulated annealing that have little to do with non-cooperative games. In this paper we present an algorithm based on all three terms at once. This algorithm can be viewed as a way to modify simulated annealing by recasting it as a non-cooperative game, with each variable replaced by a player. This recasting allows us to leverage the intelligent behavior of the individual players to substantially improve the exploration step of the simulated annealing. Experiments are presented demonstrating that this recasting significantly improves simulated annealing for a model of an economic process run over an underlying small-worlds topology. Furthermore, these experiments reveal novel small-worlds phenomena, and highlight the shortcomings of conventional mechanism design in bounded rationality domains.

  4. Long-term microstructural stability of oxide-dispersion strengthened Eurofer steel annealed at 800 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilnyk, K. D.; Sandim, H. R. Z.; Bolmaro, R. E.; Lindau, R.; Möslang, A.; Kostka, A.; Raabe, D.

    2014-05-01

    Oxide-dispersion strengthened ferritic martensitic steels such as ODS-Eurofer grade are good candidates for structural applications in future fusion power reactors. Long-term annealing treatments in vacuum were carried out in cold-rolled samples (80% reduction in thickness) from 1 h up to 4320 h (6 months) at 800 °C, i.e. the maximum temperature in the ferritic phase field, to follow its softening behavior. The microstructural stability of this steel was mapped using several characterization techniques including scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction, Vickers microhardness testing, X-ray diffraction texture measurements, low-temperature electrical resistivity, and magnetic coercive field measurements. ODS-Eurofer steel displays good microstructural stability. Discontinuous recrystallization occurs at the early stages of annealing resulting in a low volume fraction of recrystallized grains. Extended recovery is the predominant softening mechanism at this temperature for longer times.

  5. A method for diffraction-based identification of annealing-produced restructuring of amorphous fullerene

    E-print Network

    Neverov, V S; Kukushkin, A B; Voloshinov, V V

    2014-01-01

    A method is suggested for estimation of structural properties of amorphous fullerene and its derivatives produced by vacuum annealing. The method is based on the fitting of the neutron or x-ray powder diffraction patterns for scattering wave vector's modulus in the range from few units to several tens of inverse nanometers. The respective inverse problem assumes that the structured component of a sample can be described with a limited number, Nstr, of candidate sp2 carbon structures (fullerenes, flat and curved flakes with graphene-like atom arrangement) of a limited number of atoms, Natom. These structures are packed heterogeneously, in the domains with various average density of atoms and various degree of ordering of structures, using the Rigid Body Molecular Dynamics with variable parameter of pair interaction of atoms in the neighboring rigid-body nanostructures. The method is applied to interpreting the data of neutron diffraction by an amorphous fullerene annealed at temperatures 600, 800, 850, 900 and...

  6. Critical phenomena in atmospheric precipitation

    E-print Network

    Loss, Daniel

    regime of the convecting fluid is entirely different from the well-known discontinuous phase transition314 C ritical phenomena occur near continuous phase transitions. As a tuning parameter crosses its convection and precipitation (the order parameter)--with correlated regions on scales of tens to hundreds

  7. Visualizing Chemical Phenomena in Microdroplets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Sunghee; Wiener, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Phenomena that occur in microdroplets are described to the undergraduate chemistry community. Droplets having a diameter in the micrometer range can have unique and interesting properties, which arise because of their small size and, especially, their high surface area-to-volume ratio. Students are generally unfamiliar with the characteristics of…

  8. Graphene tests of Klein phenomena

    E-print Network

    Stefano De Leo; Pietro Rotelli

    2012-02-07

    Graphene is characterized by chiral electronic excitations. As such it provides a perfect testing ground for the production of Klein pairs (electron/holes). If confirmed, the standard results for barrier phenomena must be reconsidered with, as a byproduct, the accumulation within the barrier of holes.

  9. Nuclear pairing: basic phenomena revisited

    E-print Network

    G. F. Bertsch

    2012-03-25

    I review the phenomena associated with pairing in nuclear physics, most prominently the ubiquitous presence of odd-even mass differences and the properties of the excitation spectra, very different for even-even and odd-A nuclei. There are also significant dynamical effects of pairing, visible in the inertias associated with nuclear rotation and large-amplitude shape deformation.

  10. Effects of annealing, acid and alcoholic beverages on Fe1+yTe0.6Se0.4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y.; Taen, T.; Tsuchiya, Y.; Shi, Z. X.; Tamegai, T.

    2013-01-01

    We have systematically investigated and compared different methods to induce superconductivity in the iron chalcogenide Fe1+yTe0.6Se0.4, including annealing in a vacuum, N2, O2 and I2 atmospheres and immersing samples into acid and alcoholic beverages. Vacuum and N2 annealing are proved to be ineffective in inducing superconductivity in a Fe1+yTe0.6Se0.4 single crystal. Annealing in O2 and I2 and immersion in acid and alcoholic beverages can induce superconductivity by oxidizing the excess Fe in the sample. Superconductivity in O2 annealed samples is of a bulk nature, while I2, acid and alcoholic beverages can only induce superconductivity near the surface. By comparing the different effects of O2, I2, acid and alcoholic beverages we propose a scenario to explain how the superconductivity is induced in the non-superconducting as-grown Fe1+yTe0.6Se0.4.

  11. The quantum vacuum

    E-print Network

    Paraoanu, G S

    2014-01-01

    The vacuum is the lowest energy state of a field in a certain region of space. This definition implies that no particles can be present in the vacuum state. In classical physics, the only features of vacuum are those of its geometry. For example, in the general theory of relativity the geometry is a dynamical structure that guides the motion of matter, and, in turn, it is bent and curved by the presence of matter. Other than this, the classical vacuum is a structure void of any physical properties, since classically properties are strictly associated with physical objects such as particles and finite-amplitude fields. The situation is very different in quantum physics. As I will show in this paper, the difference stems form the fact that in quantum physics the properties are not strictly tied to objects. We know for example that physical properties come into existence - as values of observables - only when the object is measured. Thus, quantum physics allows us to detach properties from objects. This has cons...

  12. The vacuum conservation theorem

    E-print Network

    E. Minguzzi

    2015-02-28

    A version of the vacuum conservation theorem is proved which does not assume the existence of a time function nor demands stronger properties than the dominant energy condition. However, it is shown that a stronger stable version plays a role in the study of compact Cauchy horizons.

  13. Langmuir vacuum and superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Veklenko, B. A.

    2012-06-15

    It is shown that, in the 'jelly' model of cold electron-ion plasma, the interaction between electrons and the quantum electromagnetic vacuum of Langmuir waves involves plasma superconductivity with an energy gap proportional to the energy of the Langmuir quantum.

  14. The vacuum conservation theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minguzzi, E.

    2015-03-01

    A version of the vacuum conservation theorem is proved which does not assume the existence of a time function nor demands stronger properties than the dominant energy condition. However, it is shown that a stronger stable version plays a role in the study of compact Cauchy horizons.

  15. Is our vacuum stable?

    E-print Network

    E. I. Guendelman; J. Portnoy

    2000-04-04

    The stability of our vacuum is analyzed and several aspects concerning this question are reviewed. 1) In the standard Glashow-Weinberg-Salam (GWS) model we review the instability towards the formation of a bubble of lower energy density and how the rate of such bubble formation process compares with the age of the Universe for the known values of the GWS model. 2) We also review the recent work by one of us (E.I.G) concerning the vacuum instability question in the context of a model that solves the cosmological constant problem. It turns out that in such model the same physics that solves the cosmological constant problem makes the vacuum stable. 3) We review our recent work concerning the instability of elementary particle embedded in our vacuum, towards the formation of an infinite Universe. Such process is not catastrophic. It leads to a "bifurcation type" instability in which our Universe is not eaten by a bubble (instead a baby universe is born). This universe does not replace our Universe rather it disconnects from it (via a wormhole) after formation.

  16. Topics in vacuum decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoumi, Ali

    2013-12-01

    If a theory has more than one classically stable vacuum, quantum tunneling and thermal jumps make the transition between the vacua possible. The transition happens through a first order phase transition started by nucleation of a bubble of the new vacuum. The outward pressure of the truer vacuum makes the bubble expand and consequently eat away more of the old phase. In the presence of gravity this phenomenon gets more complicated and meanwhile more interesting. It can potentially have important cosmological consequences. Some aspects of this decay are studied in this thesis. Solutions with different symmetry than the generically used O(4) symmetry are studied and their actions calculated. Vacuum decay in a spatial vector field is studied and novel features like kinky domain walls are presented. The question of stability of vacua in a landscape of potentials is studied and the possible instability in large dimension of fields is shown. Finally a compactification of the Einstein-Maxwell theory is studied which can be a good lab to understand the decay rates in compactification models of arbitrary dimensions.

  17. Surface morphological evolution during annealing of epitaxial Cu(001) layers

    SciTech Connect

    Purswani, J. M.; Gall, D.

    2008-08-15

    Single crystal Cu(001) layers were grown on MgO(001) by ultrahigh vacuum magnetron sputtering at T{sub s}=100 deg. C. Quantitative surface morphological analyses by in situ scanning tunneling microscopy show that the surfaces exhibit self-affine mound structures with a scaling exponent of 0.82{+-}0.03 and a mound radius r{sub c} that increases from 31{+-}8 to 39{+-}6 nm for increasing layer thickness t=24-120 nm. In situ annealing at 200 and 300 deg. C leads to a thermodynamically driven mass transport that minimizes the surface step density, resulting in broader mounds and a smaller root mean square surface roughness {sigma}. This effect is most pronounced for t=24 nm, for which r{sub c} increases from 31{+-}8 to 70{+-}20 nm and {sigma} decreases from 1.3{+-}0.1 to 0.74{+-}0.08 nm, resulting in a decrease in the average surface slope from {chi}=7 deg. to 2 deg. and an increase in the average terrace width w{sub T} by more than a factor of 4. In contrast, w{sub T} increases by only 20% for t=120 nm. This remarkable difference between 'thin' and 'thick' layers is attributed to diverging surface morphological pathways during annealing: The strong smoothening for t=24 nm is due to a competitive coalescence process where some mounds grow laterally at the expense of their smaller neighbors, which die out. In contrast, the initially wider mounds of thicker layers (t=120 nm) combine to form a quasistable surface morphology that exhibits anisotropic mound structures, which limit mass transport and stabilize the surface step density.

  18. Surface morphological evolution during annealing of epitaxial Cu(001) layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purswani, J. M.; Gall, D.

    2008-08-01

    Single crystal Cu(001) layers were grown on MgO(001) by ultrahigh vacuum magnetron sputtering at Ts=100 °C. Quantitative surface morphological analyses by in situ scanning tunneling microscopy show that the surfaces exhibit self-affine mound structures with a scaling exponent of 0.82±0.03 and a mound radius rc that increases from 31±8 to 39±6 nm for increasing layer thickness t =24-120 nm. In situ annealing at 200 and 300 °C leads to a thermodynamically driven mass transport that minimizes the surface step density, resulting in broader mounds and a smaller root mean square surface roughness ?. This effect is most pronounced for t =24 nm, for which rc increases from 31±8 to 70±20 nm and ? decreases from 1.3±0.1 to 0.74±0.08 nm, resulting in a decrease in the average surface slope from ? =7° to 2° and an increase in the average terrace width wT by more than a factor of 4. In contrast, wT increases by only 20% for t =120 nm. This remarkable difference between "thin" and "thick" layers is attributed to diverging surface morphological pathways during annealing: The strong smoothening for t =24 nm is due to a competitive coalescence process where some mounds grow laterally at the expense of their smaller neighbors, which die out. In contrast, the initially wider mounds of thicker layers (t =120 nm) combine to form a quasistable surface morphology that exhibits anisotropic mound structures, which limit mass transport and stabilize the surface step density.

  19. Highly efficient low-bandgap polymer solar cells with solution-processed and annealing-free phosphomolybdic acid as hole-transport layers.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xu; Shen, Liang; Yao, Mengnan; Liu, Yan; Yu, Wenjuan; Guo, Wenbin; Ruan, Shengping

    2015-03-11

    We demonstrate a novel solution-processed method to fabricate a stable anode buffer layer without any annealing process. As we know, buffer layers in polymer solar cells (PSCs) are always prepared by the traditional high-vacuum thermal evaporation or annealing-treated spin-coating methods, but the fabricating processes are complicated and time-consuming. Here, a solution method without any annealing to fabricate phosphomolybdic acid (PMA) as anode buffers is presented, which brings an obvious improvement of power conversion efficiency (PCE) from 1.75% to 6.57% by optimizing the PMA concentrations and interface pretreatment with device structure shown as ITO/TiO2/PCDTBT:PC70BM/PMA/Ag. The improvement is ascribed to the fine energy-level matching and perfect surface modification. This annealing-free method greatly simplifies the device fabrication process and supplies a wide way to achieve a large area fabrication for PSCs. PMID:25695125

  20. Vacuum requirements for RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Rhoades-Brown, M.J.; Harrison, M.

    1991-12-01

    In this note the lifetime due to inelastic scattering of beam and residual gas ions is calculated in units of pressure (Torr). In addition, the transverse emittance growth due to elastic scattering is expressed in units of pressure. The definition of inelastic scattering includes both capture of an electron from a residual gas ion and central nuclear collisions between beam ion and gas atom. Emittance growth via elastic scattering is a simple consequence of multiple Coulomb scattering. Is is important to note that in an accelerator only the density of residual gas atoms is relevant to the machine operation. The measure of this density is the vacuum gauge, where this gauge is calibrated in pressure units at some known temperature T{sub G}. The vacuum unit or pressure is of course temperature dependent, and thus when quoting vacuum requirements for RHIC it is vital to state the temperature at which the pressure is computed. It might be necessary to scale any computed gas density to the pressure appropriate for the measurement with the vacuum gauge. Typically, the vacuum gauge operates at room temperature {approximately}300{degree}K. An explanation on how to rescale pressure as a function of temperature is given in the text. This note assumes the residual gas density in the so-called warm section (300{degree}K) of RHIC to be composed of 90% H{sub 2}, 5% CH{sub 4} and 5% CO. The gas in the cold section (5{degree}K) is assumed to be 100% He. The beam ions are taken to be {sup 197}Au{sup 79+}.

  1. films on silicon at different annealing temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yan; Zhou, Chunlan; Zhang, Xiang; Zhang, Peng; Dou, Yanan; Wang, Wenjing; Cao, Xingzhong; Wang, Baoyi; Tang, Yehua; Zhou, Su

    2013-03-01

    Thermal atomic layer-deposited (ALD) aluminum oxide (Al2O3) acquires high negative fixed charge density ( Q f) and sufficiently low interface trap density after annealing, which enables excellent surface passivation for crystalline silicon. Q f can be controlled by varying the annealing temperatures. In this study, the effect of the annealing temperature of thermal ALD Al2O3 films on p-type Czochralski silicon wafers was investigated. Corona charging measurements revealed that the Q f obtained at 300°C did not significantly affect passivation. The interface-trapping density markedly increased at high annealing temperature (>600°C) and degraded the surface passivation even at a high Q f. Negatively charged or neutral vacancies were found in the samples annealed at 300°C, 500°C, and 750°C using positron annihilation techniques. The Al defect density in the bulk film and the vacancy density near the SiO x /Si interface region decreased with increased temperature. Measurement results of Q f proved that the Al vacancy of the bulk film may not be related to Q f. The defect density in the SiO x region affected the chemical passivation, but other factors may dominantly influence chemical passivation at 750°C.

  2. Demonstrations with a Vacuum: Old Demonstrations for New Vacuum Pumps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Explains mechanisms of 19th-century vacuum pumps. Describes demonstrations using the pump including guinea and feather tube, aurora tube, electric egg, Gassiots cascade, air mill, bell in vacuum, density and buoyancy of air, fountain in vacuum, mercury shower, palm and bladder glasses, Bacchus demonstration, pneumatic man-lifter, and Magdeburg…

  3. Furnace brazing under partial vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckown, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    Brazing furnace utilizing partial-vacuum technique reduces tooling requirements and produces better bond. Benefit in that partial vacuum helps to dissociate metal oxides that inhibit metal flow and eliminates heavy tooling required to hold parts together during brazing.

  4. Tritium handling in vacuum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, J.T.; Coffin, D.O.

    1986-10-01

    This report provides a course in Tritium handling in vacuum systems. Topics presented are: Properties of Tritium; Tritium compatibility of materials; Tritium-compatible vacuum equipment; and Tritium waste treatment.

  5. Vacuum Energy in Quantum Graphs 

    E-print Network

    Wilson, Justin

    2007-07-14

    We calculate the vacuum energy in quantum graphs. Vacuum energy arose in quantum physics but has an independent mathematical interest as a functional carrying information about the eigenvalue spectrum of a system. A quantum graph is a metric graph...

  6. Dielectric Theory of the Vacuum

    E-print Network

    J. X. Zheng-Johansson

    2006-12-11

    The vacuum is proposed to be a dielectric medium constituted of neutral but polarizable vacuuons based on overall experimental observations in separate publications. In the present paper I formally develop the dielectric theory for this dielectric vacuum.

  7. A radiation hard vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, G.E.

    1988-07-19

    A vacuum switch with an isolated trigger probe which is not directly connected to the switching electrodes. The vacuum switch within the plasmatron is triggered by plasma expansion initiated by the trigger probe which travels through an opening to reach the vacuum switch elements. The plasma arc created is directed by the opening to the space between the anode and cathode of the vacuum switch to cause conduction. 3 figs.

  8. Difficult to process? Vacuum it!

    SciTech Connect

    Eckles, A.J.

    1997-09-01

    Recent improvements in vacuum processing have broadened the technology`s use in the chemical process industries, running the gamut from vacuum distillation and evaporation, degassing, freeze drying, vapor deposition and etching, to vacuum filtrations. The paper discusses process improvements, attaining liquid distribution, medium-vacuum processing, falling-film evaporators, wiped-film evaporators, short-path evaporators, evaporation and crystallization, filtration, drying, refrigeration, freeze drying, degassing, semiconductor processing, pumps and their selection, and leak testing.

  9. Furnace transient anneal process and apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, D. A.; Lile, D. L.; Zeisse, C. R.

    1984-02-01

    A method for annealing semiconductor samples, especially following ion-implantation of semiconductor samples is disclosed. A furnace on a set of rails is passed over the semiconductor sample which is supported on a stationary wire basket made of low thermal mass, fine tungsten wire. The furnace temperature may be about 5 deg above the desired anneal temperature of the semiconductor sample such that the sample temperature rises to within a few degrees of the furnace temperature within seconds. Utilizing the moveable furnace insures uniform heating without elaborate temperature control or expensive beam generating equipment. The apparatus and process of the present invention are utilized for rapid annealing of ion-implanted indium phosphide semiconductors within 10 to 30 seconds and at temperatures of approximately 700 deg C, thereby eliminating undesired and damaging movement of impurities within the ion-implanated InP.

  10. Quantum annealing correction for random Ising problems

    E-print Network

    Kristen L. Pudenz; Tameem Albash; Daniel A. Lidar

    2015-04-02

    We demonstrate that the performance of a quantum annealer on hard random Ising optimization problems can be substantially improved using quantum annealing correction (QAC). Our error correction strategy is tailored to the D-Wave Two device. We find that QAC provides a statistically significant enhancement in the performance of the device over a classical repetition code, improving as a function of problem size as well as hardness. Moreover, QAC provides a mechanism for overcoming the precision limit of the device, in addition to correcting calibration errors. Performance is robust even to missing qubits. We present evidence for a constructive role played by quantum effects in our experiments by contrasting the experimental results with the predictions of a classical model of the device. Our work demonstrates the importance of error correction in appropriately determining the performance of quantum annealers.

  11. Computational multiqubit tunnelling in programmable quantum annealers.

    PubMed

    Boixo, Sergio; Smelyanskiy, Vadim N; Shabani, Alireza; Isakov, Sergei V; Dykman, Mark; Denchev, Vasil S; Amin, Mohammad H; Smirnov, Anatoly Yu; Mohseni, Masoud; Neven, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    Quantum tunnelling is a phenomenon in which a quantum state traverses energy barriers higher than the energy of the state itself. Quantum tunnelling has been hypothesized as an advantageous physical resource for optimization in quantum annealing. However, computational multiqubit tunnelling has not yet been observed, and a theory of co-tunnelling under high- and low-frequency noises is lacking. Here we show that 8-qubit tunnelling plays a computational role in a currently available programmable quantum annealer. We devise a probe for tunnelling, a computational primitive where classical paths are trapped in a false minimum. In support of the design of quantum annealers we develop a nonperturbative theory of open quantum dynamics under realistic noise characteristics. This theory accurately predicts the rate of many-body dissipative quantum tunnelling subject to the polaron effect. Furthermore, we experimentally demonstrate that quantum tunnelling outperforms thermal hopping along classical paths for problems with up to 200 qubits containing the computational primitive. PMID:26739797

  12. Black anneal marking with pulsed fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, T.; Harrison, P.; Norman, S.

    2015-07-01

    High contrast marking of metals is used in a wide range of industries. Fiber laser marking of these metals provides non-contact marking with no consumables, offering many advantages over traditional methods of metal marking. The laser creates a permanent mark on the material surface combining heat and oxygen with no noticeable ablation. The focussed beam of the fiber laser in combination with precision control of the heat input is able to treat small areas of the material surface evenly and consistently, which is critical for producing black anneal marks. The marks are highly legible which is ideal for marking serial numbers or small data matrices where traceability is required. This paper reports the experimental study for producing black anneal marks on various grades of stainless steel using fiber lasers. The influence of metal surface finish, beam quality, spot size diameter and pulse duration are investigated for producing both smooth and decorative anneal marks.

  13. Hydrogen Annealing Of Single-Crystal Superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.; Schaeffer, John C.; Murphy, Wendy

    1995-01-01

    Annealing at temperature equal to or greater than 2,200 degrees F in atmosphere of hydrogen found to increase ability of single-crystal superalloys to resist oxidation when subsequently exposed to oxidizing atmospheres at temperatures almost as high. Supperalloys in question are principal constituents of hot-stage airfoils (blades) in aircraft and ground-based turbine engines; also used in other high-temperature applications like chemical-processing plants, coal-gasification plants, petrochemical refineries, and boilers. Hydrogen anneal provides resistance to oxidation without decreasing fatigue strength and without need for coating or reactive sulfur-gettering constituents. In comparison with coating, hydrogen annealing costs less. Benefits extend to stainless steels, nickel/chromium, and nickel-base alloys, subject to same scale-adhesion and oxidation-resistance considerations, except that scale is chromia instead of alumina.

  14. Quantum annealing correction with minor embedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinci, Walter; Albash, Tameem; Paz-Silva, Gerardo; Hen, Itay; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2015-10-01

    Quantum annealing provides a promising route for the development of quantum optimization devices, but the usefulness of such devices will be limited in part by the range of implementable problems as dictated by hardware constraints. To overcome constraints imposed by restricted connectivity between qubits, a larger set of interactions can be approximated using minor embedding techniques whereby several physical qubits are used to represent a single logical qubit. However, minor embedding introduces new types of errors due to its approximate nature. We introduce and study quantum annealing correction schemes designed to improve the performance of quantum annealers in conjunction with minor embedding, thus leading to a hybrid scheme defined over an encoded graph. We argue that this scheme can be efficiently decoded using an energy minimization technique provided the density of errors does not exceed the per-site percolation threshold of the encoded graph. We test the hybrid scheme using a D-Wave Two processor on problems for which the encoded graph is a two-level grid and the Ising model is known to be NP-hard. The problems we consider are frustrated Ising model problem instances with "planted" (a priori known) solutions. Applied in conjunction with optimized energy penalties and decoding techniques, we find that this approach enables the quantum annealer to solve minor embedded instances with significantly higher success probability than it would without error correction. Our work demonstrates that quantum annealing correction can and should be used to improve the robustness of quantum annealing not only for natively embeddable problems but also when minor embedding is used to extend the connectivity of physical devices.

  15. Quantum Annealing Correction with Minor Embedding

    E-print Network

    Walter Vinci; Tameem Albash; Gerardo Paz-Silva; Itay Hen; Daniel A. Lidar

    2015-07-09

    Quantum annealing provides a promising route for the development of quantum optimization devices, but the usefulness of such devices will be limited in part by the range of implementable problems as dictated by hardware constraints. To overcome constraints imposed by restricted connectivity between qubits, a larger set of interactions can be approximated using minor embedding techniques whereby several physical qubits are used to represent a single logical qubit. However, minor embedding introduces new types of errors due to its approximate nature. We introduce and study quantum annealing correction schemes designed to improve the performance of quantum annealers in conjunction with minor embedding, thus leading to a hybrid scheme defined over an encoded graph. We argue that this scheme can be efficiently decoded using an energy minimization technique provided the density of errors does not exceed the per-site percolation threshold of the encoded graph. We test the hybrid scheme using a D-Wave Two processor on problems for which the encoded graph is a 2-level grid and the Ising model is known to be NP-hard. The problems we consider are frustrated Ising model problem instances with "planted" (a priori known) solutions. Applied in conjunction with optimized energy penalties and decoding techniques, we find that this approach enables the quantum annealer to solve minor embedded instances with significantly higher success probability than it would without error correction. Our work demonstrates that quantum annealing correction can and should be used to improve the robustness of quantum annealing not only for natively embeddable problems, but also when minor embedding is used to extend the connectivity of physical devices.

  16. Structure and decay in the QED vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labun, Lance Andrew

    This thesis is a guide to a selection of the author's published work that connect and contribute to understanding the vacuum of quantum electrodynamics in strong, prescribed electromagnetic fields. This theme is elaborated over the course of two chapters: The first chapter sets the context, defining the relevant objects and conditions of the study and reviewing established knowledge upon which this study builds. The second chapter organizes and explains important results appearing in the published work. The papers 1. (Labun and Rafelski, 2009) "Vacuum Decay Time in Strong External Fields" 2. (Labun and Rafelski, 2010a) "Dark Energy Simulacrum in Nonlinear Electrodynamics" 3. (Labun and Rafelski, 2010b) "QED Energy-Momentum Trace as a Force in Astrophysics" 4. (Labun and Rafelski, 2010c) "Strong Field Physics: Probing Critical Acceleration and Inertia with Laser Pulses and Quark-Gluon Plasma" 5. (Labun and Rafelski, 2010d) "Vacuum Structure and Dark Energy" 6. (Labun and Rafelski, 2011) "Spectra of Particles from Laser-Induced Vacuum Decay" are presented in their published format as appendices. Related literature is cited throughout the body where it directly supports the content of this overview; more extensive references are found within the attached papers. This study begins with the first non-perturbative result in quantum electrodynamics, a result obtained by Heisenberg and Euler (1936) for the energy of a zero-particle state in a prescribed, long-wavelength electromagnetic field. The resulting Euler-Heisenberg effective potential generates a nonlinear theory of electromagnetism and exhibits the ability of the electrical fields to decay into electron-positron pairs. Context for phenomena arising from the Euler-Heisenberg effective potential is established by considering the energy-momentum tensor of a general nonlinear electromagnetic theory. The mass of a field configuration is defined, and I discuss two of its consequences pertinent to efforts to observe vacuum decay. I develop a method for non-perturbative evaluation of a trace component of the energy-momentum tensor and discuss its significance and consequences. I study the effect of the energy-momentum trace as part of a Euler-Heisenberg-generated modification to the Lorentz force. Modifications of the energy-momentum tensor from the Maxwell theory are evaluated numerically and compared to those arising from Born-Infeld electromagnetism and the Euler-Heisenberg effective potential for a scalar electron. Finally, I explore how this study guides investigation into how vacuum structure can generate the cosmological dark energy.

  17. Portable vacuum object handling device

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Gordon H. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1983-08-09

    The disclosure relates to a portable device adapted to handle objects which are not to be touched by hand. A piston and bore wall form a vacuum chamber communicating with an adaptor sealably engageable with an object to be lifted. The piston is manually moved and set to establish vacuum. A valve is manually actuatable to apply the vacuum to lift the object.

  18. Casimir effect and vacuum energy

    E-print Network

    Cyriaque Genet; Astrid Lambrecht; Serge Reynaud

    2002-10-25

    Vacuum fluctuations have observable consequences, like the Casimir force appearing between two mirrors in vacuum. This force is now measured with good accuracy and agreement with theory. We discuss the meaning and consequences of these statements by emphasizing their relation with the problem of vacuum energy, one of the main unsolved problems at the interface between gravitational and quantum theory.

  19. E ective geometry Casimir vacuum

    E-print Network

    Visser, Matt

    E#11;ective geometry in the Casimir vacuum Matt Visser Physics Department Washington University- hibit anomalous propagation in the Casimir vac- uum (the quantum vacuum between perfectly conducting the Casimir vacuum: A region of empty space delimited by two per- fectly conducting parallel plates

  20. Rock melting tool with annealer section

    DOEpatents

    Bussod, Gilles Y. (Santa Fe, NM); Dick, Aaron J. (Oakland, CA); Cort, George E. (Montrose, CO)

    1998-01-01

    A rock melting penetrator is provided with an afterbody that rapidly cools a molten geological structure formed around the melting tip of the penetrator to the glass transition temperature for the surrounding molten glass-like material. An annealing afterbody then cools the glass slowly from the glass transition temperature through the annealing temperature range to form a solid self-supporting glass casing. This allows thermally induced strains to relax by viscous deformations as the molten glass cools and prevents fracturing of the resulting glass liner. The quality of the glass lining is improved, along with its ability to provide a rigid impermeable casing in unstable rock formations.

  1. Annealing Increases Stability Of Iridium Thermocouples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Germain, Edward F.; Daryabeigi, Kamran; Alderfer, David W.; Wright, Robert E.; Ahmed, Shaffiq

    1989-01-01

    Metallurgical studies carried out on samples of iridium versus iridium/40-percent rhodium thermocouples in condition received from manufacturer. Metallurgical studies included x-ray, macroscopic, resistance, and metallographic studies. Revealed large amount of internal stress caused by cold-working during manufacturing, and large number of segregations and inhomogeneities. Samples annealed in furnace at temperatures from 1,000 to 2,000 degree C for intervals up to 1 h to study effects of heat treatment. Wire annealed by this procedure found to be ductile.

  2. Accretion Disks and Eruptive Phenomena

    E-print Network

    Scott J. Kenyon

    1999-04-05

    This paper describes eruptive phenomena in pre-main sequence stars. The eruptions of FU Orionis stars have much in common with outbursts in other accreting systems, such as dwarf novae and some symbiotic stars. These common features are best understood as increases in the rate material flows through an accretion disk. The spectroscopic properties, decay of the light curves, and outflow phenomena suggest that these outbursts arise from thermal instabilities in the disk. Available data and estimates for recurrence times indicate that young stars can accrete much, perhaps all, of their mass in FU Ori accretion events. Future observations can test this notion and place better constraints on the importance of eruptive events in the early life of a low mass star.

  3. Coning phenomena under laminar flow.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Mizuki; Terada, Katsuhide; Sugano, Kiyohiko

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate coning phenomena in the paddle dissolution test under laminar flow (Reynolds number <500). The minimum rotation speed at which the coning phenomena disappear (no coning rpm, NCrpm) was measured in viscous media (23 to 147mPa?s) using various particles. The exponent values of particle size, density, and viscosity parameters in the Zwietering equation were found to be 0.066, 0.38, and 0.22, respectively. NCrpm was appropriately predicted by the Zwietering equation (average error: 8rpm). These values are very different from those for turbulent flow, suggesting that the main physical forces governing the motion of particles can be different between turbulent flow and laminar flow. This point should be taken into account when understanding the dissolution of drug products in viscous fluids representing the fed state. PMID:26296866

  4. Transport phenomena in nanoporous materials.

    PubMed

    Kärger, Jörg

    2015-01-12

    Diffusion, that is, the irregular movement of atoms and molecules, is a universal phenomenon of mass transfer occurring in all states of matter. It is of equal importance for fundamental research and technological applications. The present review deals with the challenges of the reliable observation of these phenomena in nanoporous materials. Starting with a survey of the different variants of diffusion measurement, it highlights the potentials of "microscopic" techniques, notably the pulsed field gradient (PFG) technique of NMR and the techniques of microimaging by interference microscopy (IFM) and IR microscopy (IRM). Considering ensembles of guest molecules, these techniques are able to directly record mass transfer phenomena over distances of typically micrometers. Their concerted application has given rise to the clarification of long-standing discrepancies, notably between microscopic equilibrium and macroscopic non-equilibrium measurements, and to a wealth of new information about molecular transport under confinement, hitherto often inaccessible and sometimes even unimaginable. PMID:25123096

  5. Thermal annealing and magnetic anisotropy of NiFe thin films on n+-Si for spintronic device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Q. H.; Huang, R.; Wang, L. S.; Wu, Z. G.; Li, C.; Luo, Q.; Zuo, S. Y.; Li, J.; Peng, D. L.; Han, G. L.; Yan, P. X.

    2015-11-01

    To ensure that the magnetic metal electrodes can meet the requirements of the spin injection, NiFe films prepared both on HfO2 dielectric layer and n+-Si directly by sputtering deposition, and treated by conventional furnace annealing and/or high vacuum magnetic field annealing were investigated. It was found that thermal annealing at 250 °C improved the crystalline quality and reduced surface roughness of the NiFe films, thus enhancing its saturation magnetization intensity. The 100 nm thick NiFe films had too large coercive force and saturation magnetization intensity in vertical direction to meet the requirements of Hanle curve detection. While, 30 nm thick NiFe films showed paramagnetic hysteresis loops in vertical direction, and the magnetization intensity of the sample after annealing at 250 °C for 30 min was less than 2% to the parallel when the external magnetic field was given between ±10 Oe. This was preferred to Hanle curve detection. The thin HfO2 dielectric layer between metal and Si partially suppressed the diffusion of Ni in NiFe into Si substrate and formation of NiSi, greatly enhancing the saturation magnetization intensity of the Al/NiFe/HfO2/Si sample by thermal annealing. Those results suggest that Al/NiFe/HfO2/Si structure, from the point view of magnetic electrodes, would be suitable for spin injection and detection applications.

  6. THE EFFECT OF POST-IRRADATION ANNEALING ON STACKING FAULT TETRAHEDRA IN NEUTRON-IRRADIATED OFHC COPPER

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Danny J.; Singh, Bachu N.; Eldrup, M.

    2003-09-03

    Two irradiation experiments have been completed wherein two sets of tensile specimens of OFHC copper were irradiated with fission neutrons, one set at 200 degrees C and the other at 250 degrees C. Post-irradiation annealing in vacuum was then used to evaluate the change in the defect microstructure, including vacancy-type SFT, voids, and dislocation loops. Individual samples within each set were given one annealing exposure at 300, 350, 400, 450, 500, or 550 degrees C for 2 hours. The fine-scale defect microstructure was characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to compare the defect size and spatial distribution at each annealing temperature and reference the results to that measured in the as-irradiated condition. Based on the change in the SFT size distributions, post-irradiation annealing led to a preferential removal of the smaller sized SFT, but did not lead to a general coarsening as might be expected from an Oswald ripening scenario. The issue of whether the SFT produced during irradiation are all structurally perfect is still being investigated at the time of this report, however, the images of the SFT appeared more perfect after annealing at 300 degrees C and higher. Further analysis is being performed to determine whether intermediate stages of SFT formation exist in the as-irradiated condition.

  7. Vacuum Rabi spectra of a single quantum emitter

    E-print Network

    Ota, Yasutomo; Kumagai, Naoto; Iwamoto, Satoshi; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2015-01-01

    We report the observation of the vacuum Rabi splitting of a single quantum emitter by measuring its direct spontaneous emission into free space. We used a semiconductor quantum dot inside a photonic crystal nanocavity, in conjunction with an appropriate cavity design and filtering with a polarizer and an aperture, enabling the extraction of the inherently-weak emitter's signal. The emitter's vacuum Rabi spectra exhibit clear differences to those measured by detecting the cavity photon leakage. Moreover, we observed an asymmetric vacuum Rabi spectrum induced by interference between the emitter and cavity detection channels. Our observations lay the groundwork for accessing various cavity quantum electrodynamics phenomena that manifest themselves only in the emitter's direct spontaneous emission.

  8. Vacuum Rabi Spectra of a Single Quantum Emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ota, Yasutomo; Ohta, Ryuichi; Kumagai, Naoto; Iwamoto, Satoshi; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2015-04-01

    We report the observation of the vacuum Rabi splitting of a single quantum emitter by measuring its direct spontaneous emission into free space. We use a semiconductor quantum dot inside a photonic crystal nanocavity, in conjunction with an appropriate cavity design and filtering with a polarizer and an aperture, enabling the extraction of the inherently weak emitter's signal. The emitter's vacuum Rabi spectra exhibit clear differences from those measured by detecting the cavity photon leakage. Moreover, we observe an asymmetric vacuum Rabi spectrum induced by interference between the emitter and cavity detection channels. Our observations lay the groundwork for accessing various cavity quantum electrodynamics phenomena that manifest themselves only in the emitter's direct spontaneous emission.

  9. Vacuum Rabi spectra of a single quantum emitter

    E-print Network

    Yasutomo Ota; Ryuichi Ohta; Naoto Kumagai; Satoshi Iwamoto; Yasuhiko Arakawa

    2015-03-06

    We report the observation of the vacuum Rabi splitting of a single quantum emitter by measuring its direct spontaneous emission into free space. We used a semiconductor quantum dot inside a photonic crystal nanocavity, in conjunction with an appropriate cavity design and filtering with a polarizer and an aperture, enabling the extraction of the inherently-weak emitter's signal. The emitter's vacuum Rabi spectra exhibit clear differences to those measured by detecting the cavity photon leakage. Moreover, we observed an asymmetric vacuum Rabi spectrum induced by interference between the emitter and cavity detection channels. Our observations lay the groundwork for accessing various cavity quantum electrodynamics phenomena that manifest themselves only in the emitter's direct spontaneous emission.

  10. Improved zircon fission-track annealing model based on reevaluation of annealing data

    SciTech Connect

    Guedes, Sandro; Moreira, Pedro A.F.P.; Devanathan, Ram; Weber, William J; Hadler, Julio C

    2013-01-01

    The thermal recovery (annealing) of mineral structure modified by the passage of fission fragments has long been studied by the etching technique. In minerals like apatite and zircon, the annealing kinetics are fairly well constrained from the hour to the million-year timescale and have been described by empirical and semi-empirical equations. On the other hand, laboratory experiments, in which ion beams interact with minerals and synthetic ceramics, have shown that there is a threshold temperature beyond which thermal recovery impedes ion-induced amorphization. In this work, it is assumed that this behavior can be extended to the annealing of fission tracks in minerals. It is proposed that there is a threshold temperature, T0, beyond which fission tracks are erased within a time t0, which is independent of the current state of lattice deformation. This implies that iso-annealing curves should converge to a fanning point in the Arrhenius pseudo-space (ln t vs. 1/T). Based on the proposed hypothesis, and laboratory and geological data, annealing equations are reevaluated. The geological timescale estimations of a model arising from this study are discussed through the calculation of partial annealing zone and closure temperature, and comparison with geological sample constraints found in literature. It is shown that the predictions given by this model are closer to field data on closure temperature and partial annealing zone than predictions given by previous models.

  11. Improved zircon fission-track annealing model based on reevaluation of annealing data

    SciTech Connect

    Guedes, S.; Moreira, Pedro; Devanathan, Ramaswami; Weber, William J.; Hadler, J. C.

    2012-11-10

    The thermal recovery (annealing) of mineral structure modified by the passage of fission fragments has long been studied by the etching technique. In minerals like apatite and zircon, the annealing kinetics are fairly well constrained from the hour to the million-year timescale and have been described by empirical and semi-empirical equations. On the other hand, laboratory experiments, in which ion beams interact with minerals and synthetic ceramics, have shown that there is a threshold temperature beyond which thermal recovery impedes ion-induced amorphization. In this work, it is assumed that this behavior can be extended to the annealing of fission tracks in minerals. It is proposed that there is a threshold temperature, T 0, beyond which fission tracks are erased within a time t 0, which is independent of the current state of lattice deformation. This implies that iso-annealing curves should converge to a fanning point in the Arrhenius pseudo-space (ln t vs. 1/T). Based on the proposed hypothesis, and laboratory and geological data, annealing equations are reevaluated. The geological timescale estimations of a model arising from this study are discussed through the calculation of partial annealing zone and closure temperature, and comparison with geological sample constraints found in literature. It is shown that the predictions given by this model are closer to field data on closure temperature and partial annealing zone than predictions given by previous models.

  12. New phenomena searches at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Soha, Aron; /UC, Davis

    2006-04-01

    The authors report on recent results from the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) experiment, which is accumulating data from proton-antiproton collisions with {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron. The new phenomena being explored include Higgs, Supersymmetry, and large extra dimensions. They also present the latest results of searches for heavy objects, which would indicate physics beyond the Standard Model.

  13. Mathematical Modeling of Diverse Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, J. C.

    1979-01-01

    Tensor calculus is applied to the formulation of mathematical models of diverse phenomena. Aeronautics, fluid dynamics, and cosmology are among the areas of application. The feasibility of combining tensor methods and computer capability to formulate problems is demonstrated. The techniques described are an attempt to simplify the formulation of mathematical models by reducing the modeling process to a series of routine operations, which can be performed either manually or by computer.

  14. Compact vacuum insulation embodiments

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Potter, Thomas F. (Denver, CO)

    1992-01-01

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially "point" or "line" contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form "line" contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively "point" contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  15. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Potter, Thomas F. (Denver, CO)

    1993-01-01

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially "point" or "line" contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form "line" contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively "point" contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  16. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1993-01-05

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially point'' or line'' contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form line'' contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively point'' contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  17. Compact vacuum insulation embodiments

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1992-04-28

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially point' or line' contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form line' contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively point' contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included. 26 figs.

  18. Electrostatic Levitator Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Optical prots ring the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) vacuum chamber to admit light from the heating laser (the beam passes through the window at left), poisitioning lasers (one port is at center), and lamps (arc lamp at right), and to allow diagnostic instruments to view the sample. The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  19. Electrostatic Levitator Vacuum Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Optical prots ring the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) vacuum chamber to admit light from the heating laser (the beam passes through the window at left), poisitioning lasers (one port is at center), and lamps (such as the deuterium arc lamp at right), and to allow diagnostic instruments to view the sample. The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  20. Vacuum tool manipulator

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, W.T.

    1993-11-23

    Apparatus for manipulating a vacuum hose in a reactor vessel comprises a housing with two opposing openings, an arm carried by the housing and deployable from a stowed position essentially completely within the housing to an extended position where the arm extends through the two openings in a generally horizontal position. The arm preferably has a two-fingered gripping device for gripping the vacuum hose but may carry a different end effector such as a grinding wheel. The fingers are opened and closed by one air cylinder. A second air cylinder extends the device. A third air cylinder within the housing pivotally pulls the opposing end of the arm into the housing via a pivoting member pivotally connected between the third air cylinder shaft and the arm. 6 figures.

  1. Vacuum tool manipulator

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, William T. (3927 Almon Dr., Martinez, GA 30907)

    1993-01-01

    Apparatus for manipulating a vacuum hose in a reactor vessel comprises a housing with two opposing openings, an arm carried by the housing and deployable from a stowed position essentially completely within the housing to an extended position where the arm extends through the two openings in a generally horizontal position. The arm preferably has a two-fingered gripping device for gripping the vacuum hose but may carry a different end effector such as a grinding wheel. The fingers are opened and closed by one air cylinder. A second air cylinder extends the device. A third air cylinder within the housing pivotally pulls the opposing end of the arm into the housing via a pivoting member pivotally connected between the third air cylinder shaft and the arm.

  2. Vacuum Structure and Potential

    E-print Network

    J. X. Zheng-Johansson

    2007-04-02

    Based on overall experimental observations, especially the pair processes, I developed a model structure of the vacuum along with a basic-particle formation scheme begun in 2000 (with collaborator P-I Johansson). The model consists in that the vacuum is, briefly, filled of neutral but polarizable vacuuons, consisting each of a p-vaculeon and n- vaculeon of charges $+e$ and $-e$ of zero rest masses but with spin motions, assumed interacting each other with a Coulomb force. The model has been introduced in full in a book (Nova Sci, 2005) and referred to in a number of journal/E-print papers. I outline in this easier accessible paper the detailed derivation of the model and a corresponding quantitative determination of the vacuuon size.

  3. Dry vacuum pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibuet, R.

    2008-05-01

    For decades and for ultimate pressure below 1 mbar, oil-sealed Rotary Vane Pumps have been the most popular solution for a wide range of vacuum applications. In the late 80ies, Semiconductor Industry has initiated the development of the first dry roughing pumps. Today SC applications are only using dry pumps and dry pumping packages. Since that time, pumps manufacturers have developed dry vacuum pumps technologies in order to make them attractive for other applications. The trend to replace lubricated pumps by dry pumps is now spreading over many other market segments. For the Semiconductor Industry, it has been quite easy to understand the benefits of dry pumps, in terms of Cost of Ownership, process contamination and up-time. In this paper, Technology of Dry pumps, its application in R&D/industries, merits over conventional pumps and future growth scope will be discussed.

  4. The vacuum energy crisis

    E-print Network

    Alexander Vilenkin

    2006-05-09

    The smallness of the vacuum energy density and its near coincidence with the average matter density of the universe are naturally explained by anthropic selection. An alternative explanation, based on the cyclic model of Steinhardt and Turok, does not address the coincidence problem and is therefore less convincing. This article appeared in ``Science'' (4 May 2006) as a ``perspective'' for Steinhardt and Turok's paper in the same issue (astro-ph/0605173).

  5. The ITER vacuum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, C.; Murdoch, D.

    2008-05-01

    ITER is a large vacuum facility which comprises many service, diagnostic and monitoring vacuum sub-systems as well as three large cryogenic pumping systems for evacuation and maintenance of the required pressure levels. Control of the gas throughput is one of the key issues affecting the performance and achievable burn time of a fusion reactor. The main pumping systems are the torus exhaust pumping, the cryopumps for the neutral beam injection systems for plasma heating, and the cryopumps for the ITER cryostat. All customized cryosorption pumps are force-cooled with supercritical helium and share a similar modular design of cryosorption pumping panels. For regeneration of the cryopumps as well as for roughing down the system volumes prior to operation, four identical sets of forepump trains are used. This paper will focus on the areas of the ITER vacuum systems which require customized developments and cannot rely on commercial solutions. The complex pumps have been tailored for the very specific applications and requirements at ITER, especially characterised by the need to be tritium compatible. An outline of the development path which was needed to come up with a sound design for the ITER cryopumps is given. The way of development is culminating in the manufacturing of 1:1 scale prototypes, which will be extensively tested in dedicated test facilities to ensure compatibility with all design requirements.

  6. The LHC Vacuum System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gröbner, O.

    1997-05-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, involves two proton storage rings with colliding beams of 7 TeV. The machine will be housed in the existing LEP tunnel and requires 16 m long superconducting bending magnets. The vacuum chamber will be the inner wall of the cryostat and hence at the temperature of the magnet cold bore, i.e. at 1.9 K and therefore a very good cryo-pump. To reduce the cryogenic power consumption, the heat load from synchrotron radiation and from the image currents in the vacuum chamber will be absorbed on a 'beam screen', which operates between 5 and 20 K, inserted in the magnet cold bore. The design pressure necessary for operation must provide a lifetime of many days and a stringent requirement comes from the power deposition in the superconducting magnet coils due to protons scattered on the residual gas which could lead to a magnet quench. Cryo-pumping of gas on the cold surfaces provides the necessary low gas densities but it must be ensured that the vapour pressure of cryo-sorbed molecules, of which H2 and He would be the most critical species, remains within acceptable limits. The room temperature sections of the LHC, specifically in the experiments, the vacuum must be stable against ion induced desorption and ISR-type 'pressure bumps'.

  7. Is dark matter an illusion created by the gravitational polarization of the quantum vacuum?

    E-print Network

    Hajdukovic, Dragan Slavkov

    2011-01-01

    Assuming that a particle and its antiparticle have the gravitational charge of the opposite sign, the physical vacuum may be considered as a fluid of virtual gravitational dipoles. Following this hypothesis, we present the first indications that dark matter may not exist and that the phenomena for which it was invoked might be explained by the gravitational polarization of the quantum vacuum by the known baryonic matter.

  8. Is dark matter an illusion created by the gravitational polarization of the quantum vacuum?

    E-print Network

    Dragan Slavkov Hajdukovic

    2011-11-08

    Assuming that a particle and its antiparticle have the gravitational charge of the opposite sign, the physical vacuum may be considered as a fluid of virtual gravitational dipoles. Following this hypothesis, we present the first indications that dark matter may not exist and that the phenomena for which it was invoked might be explained by the gravitational polarization of the quantum vacuum by the known baryonic matter.

  9. CIRCUIT PARTITIONING USING MEAN FIELD ANNEALING

    E-print Network

    Bultan, Tevfik

    CIRCUIT PARTITIONING USING MEAN FIELD ANNEALING Tevfik Bultan Department of Computer Science problem, knapsack problem and graph partitioning problem. In this paper, MFA is formulated for the circuit representation for elec­ trical circuits are avoided. An efficient implementation scheme, which decreases

  10. Unraveling Quantum Annealers using Classical Hardness

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Mayor, Victor; Hen, Itay

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in quantum technology have led to the development and manufacturing of experimental programmable quantum annealing optimizers that contain hundreds of quantum bits. These optimizers, commonly referred to as ‘D-Wave’ chips, promise to solve practical optimization problems potentially faster than conventional ‘classical’ computers. Attempts to quantify the quantum nature of these chips have been met with both excitement and skepticism but have also brought up numerous fundamental questions pertaining to the distinguishability of experimental quantum annealers from their classical thermal counterparts. Inspired by recent results in spin-glass theory that recognize ‘temperature chaos’ as the underlying mechanism responsible for the computational intractability of hard optimization problems, we devise a general method to quantify the performance of quantum annealers on optimization problems suffering from varying degrees of temperature chaos: A superior performance of quantum annealers over classical algorithms on these may allude to the role that quantum effects play in providing speedup. We utilize our method to experimentally study the D-Wave Two chip on different temperature-chaotic problems and find, surprisingly, that its performance scales unfavorably as compared to several analogous classical algorithms. We detect, quantify and discuss several purely classical effects that possibly mask the quantum behavior of the chip. PMID:26483257

  11. Optimal Groundwater Management: 1. Simulated Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dougherty, David E.; Marryott, Robert A.

    1991-10-01

    Simulated annealing is introduced and applied to the optimization of groundwater management problems cast in combinatorial form. This heuristic, probabilistic optimization method seeks minima in analogy with the annealing of solids and is effective on large-scale problems. No continuity requirements are imposed on objective (cost) functions. Constraints may be added to the cost function via penalties, imposed by designation of the solution domain, or imbedded in submodels (e.g., mass balance in aquifer flow simulators) used to evaluate costs. The location of global optima may be theoretically guaranteed, but computational limitations lead to searches for nearly optimal solutions in practice. Like other optimization methods, most of the computational effort is expended in flow and transport simulators. Practical algorithmic guidance that leads to enormous computational savings and sometimes makes simulated annealing competitive with gradient-type optimization methods is provided. The method is illustrated by example applications to idealized problems of groundwater flow and selection of remediation strategy, including optimization with multiple groundwater control technologies. They demonstrate the flexibility of the method and indicate its potential for solving groundwater management problems. The application of simulated annealing to water resources problems is new and its development is immature, so further performance improvements can be expected.

  12. Unraveling Quantum Annealers using Classical Hardness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Mayor, Victor; Hen, Itay

    2015-10-01

    Recent advances in quantum technology have led to the development and manufacturing of experimental programmable quantum annealing optimizers that contain hundreds of quantum bits. These optimizers, commonly referred to as ‘D-Wave’ chips, promise to solve practical optimization problems potentially faster than conventional ‘classical’ computers. Attempts to quantify the quantum nature of these chips have been met with both excitement and skepticism but have also brought up numerous fundamental questions pertaining to the distinguishability of experimental quantum annealers from their classical thermal counterparts. Inspired by recent results in spin-glass theory that recognize ‘temperature chaos’ as the underlying mechanism responsible for the computational intractability of hard optimization problems, we devise a general method to quantify the performance of quantum annealers on optimization problems suffering from varying degrees of temperature chaos: A superior performance of quantum annealers over classical algorithms on these may allude to the role that quantum effects play in providing speedup. We utilize our method to experimentally study the D-Wave Two chip on different temperature-chaotic problems and find, surprisingly, that its performance scales unfavorably as compared to several analogous classical algorithms. We detect, quantify and discuss several purely classical effects that possibly mask the quantum behavior of the chip.

  13. Unraveling Quantum Annealers using Classical Hardness.

    PubMed

    Martin-Mayor, Victor; Hen, Itay

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in quantum technology have led to the development and manufacturing of experimental programmable quantum annealing optimizers that contain hundreds of quantum bits. These optimizers, commonly referred to as 'D-Wave' chips, promise to solve practical optimization problems potentially faster than conventional 'classical' computers. Attempts to quantify the quantum nature of these chips have been met with both excitement and skepticism but have also brought up numerous fundamental questions pertaining to the distinguishability of experimental quantum annealers from their classical thermal counterparts. Inspired by recent results in spin-glass theory that recognize 'temperature chaos' as the underlying mechanism responsible for the computational intractability of hard optimization problems, we devise a general method to quantify the performance of quantum annealers on optimization problems suffering from varying degrees of temperature chaos: A superior performance of quantum annealers over classical algorithms on these may allude to the role that quantum effects play in providing speedup. We utilize our method to experimentally study the D-Wave Two chip on different temperature-chaotic problems and find, surprisingly, that its performance scales unfavorably as compared to several analogous classical algorithms. We detect, quantify and discuss several purely classical effects that possibly mask the quantum behavior of the chip. PMID:26483257

  14. Crystal Nucleation in Plasma Deposited Dlc Coatings during Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaliampalias, D.; Pavlidou, E.; Psyllaki, P.; Chrissafis, K.; Vourlias, G.

    2010-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films, hard carbon coatings, with unique physical and mechanical properties which approach those of natural diamond, such as high hardness, low coefficient of friction and chemical inertness. In several applications, heavy loads and high friction forces are generated and lead to local temperature increase. In such cases these coatings must be thermal stable and with enhanced high temperature oxidation resistance in order to be good candidates for wear protection of metallic components. In the present study a radio frequency plasma deposition system was used for the deposition of 2 ?m-thick amorphous DLC coatings onto AISI D2 substrates. The as deposited DLC covered samples were dense, homogeneous and well bonded to the substrate, while no cracks were observed. In order to study the thermal stability of the coatings' DLC nature, in-situ Transmission Electron Microscopic (TEM) observations were carried out during slow annealing of the specimen in the microscope vacuum chamber, as well as thermo-gravimetric (TG) measurements in argon atmosphere, up to 800° C. The first crystallites appeared within the DLC amorphous matrix at about 450° C as surface crystallization, while the mass crystallization started at 600° C as the TG measurements indicated. Finally, the nucleation was completed at 700° C. The oxidation results, performed from ambient temperature up to 1000° C, showed that DLC covered coupons are remarkably resistant as their mass gain was significantly lower than that of the uncovered substrates.

  15. Consideration on Isochronal Anneal Technique: From Measurement to Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Flament, O.; Fleetwood, D.M.; Leray, J.L.; Paillet, P.

    1999-03-09

    The isochronal anneal technique used to predict isothermal anneal behavior of MOS devices is analyzed as a function of experimental parameters. The effects of detrapping of trapped holes and compensating electrons are discussed.

  16. Vacuum ultraviolet and infrared spectra of condensed methyl acetate on cold astrochemical dust analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Sivaraman, B.; Nair, B. G.; Mason, N. J.; Lo, J.-I.; Cheng, B.-M.; Kundu, S.; Davis, D.; Prabhudesai, V.; Krishnakumar, E.; Raja Sekhar, B. N.

    2013-12-01

    Following the recent report of the first identification of methyl acetate (CH{sub 3}COOCH{sub 3}) in the interstellar medium (ISM), we have carried out vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and infrared (IR) spectroscopy studies on methyl acetate from 10 K until sublimation in an ultrahigh vacuum chamber simulating astrochemical conditions. We present the first VUV and IR spectra of methyl acetate relevant to ISM conditions. Spectral signatures clearly showed molecular reorientation to have started in the ice by annealing the amorphous ice formed at 10 K. An irreversible phase change from amorphous to crystalline methyl acetate ice was found to occur between 110 K and 120 K.

  17. Surface Chemistry, Friction, and Wear Properties of Untreated and Laser-Annealed Surfaces of Pulsed-Laser-Deposited WS(sub 2) Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Wheeler, Donald R.; Zabinski, Jeffrey S.

    1996-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to examine the surface chemistry, friction, and wear behavior of untreated and annealed tungsten disulfide (WS2) coatings in sliding contact with a 6-mm-diameter 440C stainless-steel ball. The WS2 coatings and annealing were performed using the pulsed-laser-deposition technique. All sliding friction experiments were conducted with a load of 0.98 N (100 g), an average Hertzian contact pressure of 0.44 GPa, and a constant rotating speed of 120 rpm. The sliding velocity ranged from 31 to 107 mm/s because of the range of wear track radii involved in the experiments. The experiment was performed at room temperature in three environments: ultrahigh vacuum (vacuum pressure, 7X(exp -10) Pa), dry nitrogen (relative humidity, less than 1 percent), and humid air (relative humidity, 15 to 40 percent). Analytical techniques, including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX), x-ray photo electron spectroscopy (XPS), surface profilometry, and Vickers hardness testing, were used to characterize the tribological surfaces of WS2 coatings. The results of the investigation indicate that the laser annealing decreased the wear of a WS2 coating in an ultrahigh vacuum. The wear rate was reduced by a factor of 30. Thus, the laser annealing increased the wear life and resistance of the WS2 coating. The annealed WS 2 coating had a low coefficient of friction (less than O.1) and a low wear rate ((10(exp -7) mm(exp 3)/N-m)) both of which are favorable in an ultrahigh vacuum.

  18. Measurements design and phenomena discrimination

    E-print Network

    Laura Rebollo-Neira

    2009-08-05

    The construction of measurements suitable for discriminating signal components produced by phenomena of different types is considered. The required measurements should be capable of cancelling out those signal components which are to be ignored when focusing on a phenomenon of interest. Under the hypothesis that the subspaces hosting the signal components produced by each phenomenon are complementary, their discrimination is accomplished by measurements giving rise to the appropriate oblique projector operator. The subspace onto which the operator should project is selected by nonlinear techniques in line with adaptive pursuit strategies.

  19. Phenomena and Diosignes of Aratous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avgoloupis, S. I.

    2013-01-01

    Aratous (305-240B.C.) was a singular intellectual, writer and poet which engage himself to compose a very interesting astronomical poet, using the "Dactylous sixstage' style, the formal style of the ancient Greek Epic poetry. This astronomic poem of Aratous "Phenomena and Diosignes" became very favorite reading during the Alexandrine, the Romman and the Byzandin eras as well and had received many praises from significant poets and particularly from Hipparchous and from Theonas from Alexandria, an astronomer of 4rth century A.C.(in Greeks)

  20. Engineering of nanoscale defect patterns in CeO2 nanorods via ex situ and in situ annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakthivel, Tamil Selvan; Reid, David L.; Bhatta, Umananda M.; Möbus, Günter; Sayle, Dean C.; Seal, Sudipta

    2015-03-01

    Single-crystalline ceria nanorods were fabricated using a hydrothermal process and annealed at 325 °C-800 °C. As-synthesized CeO2 nanorods contain a high concentration of defects, such as oxygen vacancies and high lattice strains. Annealing resulted in an improved lattice crystalline quality along with the evolution of novel cavity-shaped defects in the nanorods with polyhedral morphologies and bound by e.g. {111} and {100} (internal) surfaces, confirmed for both air (ex situ) and vacuum (in situ) heating. We postulate that the cavities evolve via agglomeration of vacancies within the as-synthesized nanorods.Single-crystalline ceria nanorods were fabricated using a hydrothermal process and annealed at 325 °C-800 °C. As-synthesized CeO2 nanorods contain a high concentration of defects, such as oxygen vacancies and high lattice strains. Annealing resulted in an improved lattice crystalline quality along with the evolution of novel cavity-shaped defects in the nanorods with polyhedral morphologies and bound by e.g. {111} and {100} (internal) surfaces, confirmed for both air (ex situ) and vacuum (in situ) heating. We postulate that the cavities evolve via agglomeration of vacancies within the as-synthesized nanorods. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: W-H analysis result, the XPS spectrum of the annealed CeO2 nanorods, XPS binding energies of individual peaks, additional HRTEM images of as-synthesized CeO2 nanorods, and in situ TEM images in various places after heating. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr07308h

  1. Irradiation-induced phenomena in carbon

    E-print Network

    Krasheninnikov, Arkady V.

    Chapter 1 Irradiation-induced phenomena in carbon nanotubes To appear in "Chemistry of Carbon@acclab.helsinki.fi 1 #12;2CHAPTER 1. IRRADIATION-INDUCED PHENOMENA IN CARBON NANOTUBES #12;Contents 1 Irradiation-induced phenomena in carbon nanotubes 1 1.1 Introduction

  2. Natural phenomena hazards, Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Conrads, T.J.

    1998-09-29

    This document presents the natural phenomena hazard loads for use in implementing DOE Order 5480.28, Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation, and supports development of double-shell tank systems specifications at the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State. The natural phenomena covered are seismic, flood, wind, volcanic ash, lightning, snow, temperature, solar radiation, suspended sediment, and relative humidity.

  3. AUTOMATED MALLEABLE ANNEALING OVENS SLOWLY HEAT AND COOL CASTINGS AS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    AUTOMATED MALLEABLE ANNEALING OVENS SLOWLY HEAT AND COOL CASTINGS AS THEY MOVE IN BINS ALONG TRACKS IN THE OVEN BOTTOM IN THE MALLEABLE ANNEALING BUILDING. THIS PROCESS TRANSFORMS BRITTLE WHITE IRON CASTINGS INTO SOFTER, STRONGER MALLEABLE IRON. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Malleable Annealing Building, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  4. Spectra of thermoprogrammed annealing of photoinduced color centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazkova, N. I.; Mikhaylov, R. V.; Kuznetsov, V. N.

    2015-04-01

    The kinetics of photoinduced formation and thermoprogrammed annealing of color centers in photochromic rutile ceramics has been studied in situ with the aid of a specially designed attachment for a spectrofluorimeter. Using a regime of constant heating rate, the spectra of color center annealing have been measured and the energy depths of hole traps responsible for the annealing of these centers have been determined.

  5. Polymers in a Vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Deutsch, J. M.

    2007-12-07

    In a variety of situations, isolated polymer molecules are found in a vacuum, and here we examine their properties. Angular momentum conservation is shown to significantly alter the average size of a chain and its conservation is only broken slowly by thermal radiation. For an ideal chain, the time autocorrelation for monomer position oscillates with a period proportional to chain length. The oscillations and damping are analyzed in detail. Short-range repulsive interactions suppress oscillations and speed up relaxation, but stretched chains still show damped oscillatory correlations.

  6. Polymers in a vacuum

    E-print Network

    J. M. Deutsch

    2007-06-13

    In a variety of situations, isolated polymer molecules are found in a vacuum and here we examine their properties. Angular momentum conservation is shown to significantly alter the average size of a chain and its conservation is only broken slowly by thermal radiation. The time autocorrelation for monomer position oscillates with a characteristic time proportional to chain length. The oscillations and damping are analyzed in detail. Short range repulsive interactions suppress oscillations and speed up relaxation but stretched chains still show damped oscillatory time correlations.

  7. What is vacuum?

    E-print Network

    Peter Rowlands

    2008-10-01

    Vacuum can be defined with exact mathematical precision as the state which remains when a fermion, with all its special characteristics, is created out of absolutely nothing. The definition leads to a special form of relativistic quantum mechanics, which only requires the construction of a creation operator. This form of quantum mechanics is especially powerful for analytic calculation, at the same time as explaining, from first principles, many aspects of the Standard Model of particle physics. In particular, the characteristics of the weak, strong and electric interactions can be derived from the structure of the creation operator itself.

  8. Avoiding Death by Vacuum

    E-print Network

    A. Barroso; P. M. Ferreira; I. Ivanov; R. Santos; Joao P. Silva

    2013-05-08

    The two-Higgs doublet model (2HDM) can have two electroweak breaking, CP-conserving, minima. The possibility arises that the minimum which corresponds to the known elementary particle spectrum is metastable, a possibility we call the "panic vacuum". We present analytical bounds on the parameters of the softly broken Peccei-Quinn 2HDM which are necessary and sufficient conditions to avoid this possibility. We also show that, for this particular model, the current LHC data already tell us that we are necessarily in the global minimum of the theory, regardless of any cosmological considerations about the lifetime of the false vacua.

  9. High-Efficiency Small Molecule-Based Bulk-Heterojunction Solar Cells Enhanced by Additive Annealing.

    PubMed

    Li, Lisheng; Xiao, Liangang; Qin, Hongmei; Gao, Ke; Peng, Junbiao; Cao, Yong; Liu, Feng; Russell, Thomas P; Peng, Xiaobin

    2015-09-30

    Solvent additive processing is important in optimizing an active layer's morphology and thus improving the performance of organic solar cells (OSCs). In this study, we find that how 1,8-diiodooctane (DIO) additive is removed plays a critical role in determining the film morphology of the bulk heterojunction OSCs in inverted structure based on a porphyrin small molecule. Different from the cases reported for polymer-based OSCs in conventional structures, the inverted OSCs upon the quick removal of the additive either by quick vacuuming or methanol washing exhibit poorer performance. In contrast, the devices after keeping the active layers in ambient pressure with additive dwelling for about 1 h (namely, additive annealing) show an enhanced power conversion efficiency up to 7.78% with a large short circuit current of 19.25 mA/cm(2), which are among the best in small molecule-based solar cells. The detailed morphology analyses using UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, resonant soft X-ray scattering, and atomic force microscopy demonstrate that the active layer shows smaller-sized phase separation but improved structure order upon additive annealing. On the contrary, the quick removal of the additive either by quick vacuuming or methanol washing keeps the active layers in an earlier stage of large scaled phase separation. PMID:26355348

  10. Behaviour of Copper In Annealed Cu/Sio2/Si Systems For On-Chip Interconnections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Htwe, Thant Zin; Latt, Khin Maung

    2010-01-01

    The electrical and structural properties of thin copper films attract increasing attention nowadays because of the use for on-chip interconnections. The main advantages of copper are the excellent conductivity and the relatively high stability against electro migration damaging. Interdiffusion at the copper/silicon interface can be a remarkable drawback of the interconnection quality even at room temperature which leads to the use of barrier layers between copper and silicon in technical applications. Often, thermal annealing of the as-deposited copper films is required to ensure proper process integration. In the present paper, Copper thin films of thickness 100 nm are deposited on SiO2/Si by ionized metal plasma deposition method. Then samples are annealed at different temperatures under high vacuum condition. The behavior of copper and the mechanism of compound formation studied at different temperatures, using scanning electron microscopy SEM, X-ray diffraction XRD and four point probe method. Diffusion of Cu into SiO2/Si layer start at 550° C and form CuxSiy. Oxidation of Cu is also take place at high temperature annealing.

  11. Effect of annealing on Ni/GaN(0 0 0 1) contact morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grodzicki, M.; Mazur, P.; Zuber, S.; Pers, J.; Brona, J.; Ciszewski, A.

    2014-06-01

    Morphology of Ni/GaN contact formed at room temperature (RT) by Ni vapor deposition onto the (0 0 0 1)-oriented n-type GaN surface under ultrahigh vacuum, and morphological changes introduced by annealing were studied. Measurements were carried out in situ using XPS, UPS, LEED and STM. The WF of the Ni film of the mean thickness 1 nm equaled 4.1 eV. For thicker layers (?2 nm), it increased to 5.1 eV. The Schottky barrier height of the Ni/GaN(0 0 0 1) contact formed at RT amounted to 1.20 eV. Annealing of the Ni/GaN contact at 650 °C resulted in Ga diffusion into the Ni film and Ni-Ga alloying. The dominating alloy phase was Ni3Ga. The alloying was accompanied by coalescence of Ni film grains into 3D islands of a Ni-Ga alloy. Annealing at 800 °C enriched the islands with Ga. The Ga-rich phases of NiGa and/or Ni3Ga2 were dominant in the alloy.

  12. Processing of silicon solar cells by ion implantation and laser annealing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnucci, J. A.; Matthei, K. W.; Greenwald, A. C.

    1981-01-01

    Methods to improve the radiation tolerance of silicon cells for spacecraft use are described. The major emphasis of the program was to reduce the process-induced carbon and oxygen impurities in the junction and base regions of the solar cell, and to measure the effect of reduced impurity levels on the radiation tolerance of cells. Substrates of 0.1, 1.0 and 10.0 ohm-cm float-zone material were used as starting material in the process sequence. High-dose, low-energy ion implantation was used to form the junction in n+p structures. Implant annealing was performed by conventional furnace techniques and by pulsed laser and pulsed electron beam annealing. Cells were tested for radiation tolerance at Spire and NASA-LeRC. After irradiation by 1 MeV electrons to a fluence of 10 to the 16th power per sq cm, the cells tested at Spire showed no significant process induced variations in radiation tolerance. However, for cells tested at Lewis to a fluence of 10 to the 15th power per sq cm, ion-implanted cells annealed in vacuum by pulsed electron beam consistently showed the best radiation tolerance for all cell resistivities.

  13. Special Orientation Relationships of CuZr2 in the Annealed Zr64.5Cu35.5 Metallic Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Pengfei; Zhang, Lijun; Cheng, Hu; Zhang, Huan; Jing, Qin; Ma, Mingzhen; Liaw, Peter K.; Li, Gong; Liu, Riping

    2015-05-01

    The amorphous Zr64.5Cu35.5 alloy ribbon was prepared and annealed in a high vacuum furnace at 645 K (372 °C) for different times. It was found that the main crystallization phases in the alloy ribbon are CuZr2 and CuZr3. The grains of CuZr2 show special orientation relationships. The grains in opposite dendrites show the same orientation, and adjacent dendrites behave as a twinlike orientation with a (103) twin plane. The CuZr3 with a superstructure is discovered in annealed ZrCu metallic glasses.

  14. Uranium Pyrophoricity Phenomena and Prediction

    SciTech Connect

    DUNCAN, D.R.

    2000-04-20

    We have compiled a topical reference on the phenomena, experiences, experiments, and prediction of uranium pyrophoricity for the Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNFP) with specific applications to SNFP process and situations. The purpose of the compilation is to create a reference to integrate and preserve this knowledge. Decades ago, uranium and zirconium fires were commonplace at Atomic Energy Commission facilities, and good documentation of experiences is surprisingly sparse. Today, these phenomena are important to site remediation and analysis of packaging, transportation, and processing of unirradiated metal scrap and spent nuclear fuel. Our document, bearing the same title as this paper, will soon be available in the Hanford document system [Plys, et al., 2000]. This paper explains general content of our topical reference and provides examples useful throughout the DOE complex. Moreover, the methods described here can be applied to analysis of potentially pyrophoric plutonium, metal, or metal hydride compounds provided that kinetic data are available. A key feature of this paper is a set of straightforward equations and values that are immediately applicable to safety analysis.

  15. Fourier Analysis of Fast Vacuum Arc Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Oks, Efim M.; Yushkov, Georgy Yu.

    2006-08-17

    Vacuum arcs are known for their noisy character: allparameters show more-or-less rapid fluctuations. This is of particularconcern to those who would like to utilize the exceptional properties ofthe vacuum arc plasma in ion sources and other devices. Among theseproperties are the very high degree of ionization and the presence ofmultiply ionized species. The rapid fluctuations are known to beultimately caused by the explosive nature of the perpetual spot ignitionand plasma production. We present a systematic application of the FastFourier Transform to the fluctuating arc voltage and current. Newpossibilities have arisen with the advent of fast digital oscilloscopesand low cost computation of large amounts of data. We show that thespectral power density (SPD) scales with a power law in log-logpresentation for all frequencies below 50 MHz, supporting a fractaldescription of the cathode spot phenomena below this limit. At higherfrequencies, the result is less clear. The fractal behavior seems to becut off as indicated by material dependent fluctuations which are abovethe level found for the power law at lower frequencies. This might beassociated with approaching the region of individual explosive processes,also known as ectons. However, the nonlinear behavior of the SPD containspeaks that are the same for different materials, indicating thatresonances in the measuring circuit play a role, too. Hence, fractalbehavior may be possible for frequencies faster than 50 MHz.

  16. R&D ERL: Vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Mapes, M.; Smart, L.; Weiss, D.; Steszyn, A.; Todd, R.

    2010-01-01

    The ERL Vacuum systems are depicted in a figure. ERL has eight vacuum volumes with various sets of requirements. A summary of vacuum related requirements is provided in a table. Five of the eight volumes comprise the electron beamline. They are the 5-cell Superconducting RF Cavity, Superconducting e-gun, injection, loop and beam dump. Two vacuum regions are the individual cryostats insulating the 5-cell Superconducting RF Cavity and the Superconducting e-gun structures. The last ERL vacuum volume not shown in the schematic is the laser transport line. The beamline vacuum regions are separated by electropneumatic gate valves. The beam dump is common with loop beamline but is considered a separate volume due to geometry and requirements. Vacuum in the 5-cell SRF cavity is maintained in the {approx}10{sup -9} torr range at room temperature by two 20 l/s ion pumps and in the e-gun SRF cavity by one 60 l/s ion pump. Vacuum in the SRF cavities operated at 2{sup o}K is reduced to low 10{sup -11} torr via cryopumping of the cavity walls. The cathode of the e-gun must be protected from poisoning, which can occur if vacuum adjacent to the e-gun in the injection line exceeds 10-11 torr range in the injection warm beamline near the e-gun exit. The vacuum requirements for beam operation in the loop and beam dump are 10-9 torr range. The beamlines are evacuated from atmospheric pressure to high vacuum level with a particulate free, oil free turbomolecular pumping cart. 25 l/s shielded ion pumps distributed throughout the beamlines maintain the vacuum requirement. Due to the more demanding vacuum requirement of the injection beamline proximate to the e-gun, a vacuum bakeout of the injection beamline is required. In addition, two 200 l/s diode ion pumps and supplemental pumping provided by titanium sublimation pumps are installed in the injection line just beyond the exit of the e-gun. Due to expected gas load a similar pumping arrangement is planned for the beam dump. The cryostat vacuum thermally insulating the SRF cavities need only reduce the convective heat load such that heat loss is primarily radiation through several layers of multi-layer insulation and conductive end-losses which are contained by 5{sup o}K thermal transitions. Prior to cool down rough vacuum {approx}10{sup -5} torr range is established and maintained by a dedicated turbomolecular pump station. Cryopumping by the cold mass and heat shields reduces the insulating vacuum to 10{sup -7} torr range after cool down.

  17. LHC vacuum system

    E-print Network

    Gröbner, Oswald

    1999-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project, now in the advanced construction phase at CERN, comprises two proton storage rings with colliding beams of 7-TeV energy. The machine is housed in the existing LEP tunnel with a circumference of 26.7 km and requires a bending magnetic field of 8.4 T with 14-m long superconducting magnets. The beam vacuum chambers comprise the inner 'cold bore' walls of the magnets. These magnets operate at 1.9 K, and thus serve as very good cryo-pumps. In order to reduce the cryogenic power consumption, both the heat load from synchrotron radiation emitted by the proton beams and the resistive power dissipation by the beam image currents have to be absorbed on a 'beam screen', which operates between 5 and 20 K and is inserted inside the vacuum chamber. The design of this beam screen represents a technological challenge in view of the numerous and often conflicting requirements and the very tight mechanical tolerances imposed. The synchrotron radiation produces strong outgassing from the...

  18. The LHC Vacuum System

    E-print Network

    Gröbner, Oswald

    1998-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, involves two proton storage rings with colliding beams of 7 TeV. The machine will be housed in the existing LEP tunnel and requires 16 m long superconducting b ending magnets. The vacuum chamber will be the inner wall of the cryostat and hence at the temperature of the magnet cold bore, i.e. at 1.9 K and therefore a very good cryopump. To reduce the cryogeni c power consumption, the heat load from synchrotron radiation and from the image currents in the vacuum chamber will be absorbed on a 'beam screen', which operates between 5 and 20 K, inserted in the magnet cold bore. The design pressure necessary for operation must provide a lifetime of several days and a further stringent requirement comes from the power deposition in the superconducting magnet coils due to protons scattered on the residual gas which could lead to a magnet quench. Cryopumping of gas on the cold surfaces provides the necessary low gas densities but it must be ensured that the vapour pressure of cr...

  19. Changing MFTF vacuum environment

    SciTech Connect

    Margolies, D.; Valby, L.

    1982-12-01

    The Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) vacuum vessel will be about 60m long and 10m in diameter at the widest point. The allowable operating densities range from 2 x 10/sup 9/ to 5 x 10/sup 10/ particles per cc. The maximum leak rate of 10/sup -6/ tl/sec is dominated during operation by the deliberately injected cold gas of 250 tl/sec. This gas is pumped by over 1000 square meters of cryopanels, external sorption pumps and getters. The design and requirements have changed radically over the past several years, and they are still not in final form. The vacuum system design has also changed, but more slowly and less radically. This paper discusses the engineering effort necessary to meet these stringent and changing requirements. Much of the analysis of the internal systems has been carried out using a 3-D Monte Carlo computer code, which can estimate time dependent operational pressures. This code and its use will also be described.

  20. Portable vacuum object handling device

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, G.H.

    1983-08-09

    The disclosure relates to a portable device adapted to handle objects which are not to be touched by hand. A piston and bore wall form a vacuum chamber communicating with an adaptor sealably engageable with an object to be lifted. The piston is manually moved and set to establish vacuum. A valve is manually actuatable to apply the vacuum to lift the object. 1 fig.

  1. Annealing of Solar Cells and Other Thin Film Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Escobar, Hector; Kuhlman, Franz; Dils, D. W.; Lush, G. B.; Mackey, Willie R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Annealing is a key step in most semiconductor fabrication processes, especially for thin films where annealing enhances performance by healing defects and increasing grain sizes. We have employed a new annealing oven for the annealing of CdTe-based solar cells and have been using this system in an attempt to grow US on top of CdTe by annealing in the presence of H2S gas. Preliminary results of this process on CdTe solar cells and other thin-film devices will be presented.

  2. Vacuum leak detector and method

    DOEpatents

    Edwards, Jr., David (7 Brown's La., Bellport, NY 11713)

    1983-01-01

    Apparatus and method for detecting leakage in a vacuum system involves a moisture trap chamber connected to the vacuum system and to a pressure gauge. Moisture in the trap chamber is captured by freezing or by a moisture adsorbent to reduce the residual water vapor pressure therein to a negligible amount. The pressure gauge is then read to determine whether the vacuum system is leaky. By directing a stream of carbon dioxide or helium at potentially leaky parts of the vacuum system, the apparatus can be used with supplemental means to locate leaks.

  3. Vacuum metastability with black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burda, Philipp; Gregory, Ruth; Moss, Ian G.

    2015-08-01

    We consider the possibility that small black holes can act as nucleation seeds for the decay of a metastable vacuum, focussing particularly on the Higgs potential. Using a thin-wall bubble approximation for the nucleation process, which is possible when generic quantum gravity corrections are added to the Higgs potential, we show that primordial black holes can stimulate vacuum decay. We demonstrate that for suitable parameter ranges, the vacuum decay process dominates over the Hawking evaporation process. Finally, we comment on the application of these results to vacuum decay seeded by black holes produced in particle collisions.

  4. Shock, Post-Shock Annealing, and Post-Annealing Shock in Ureilites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, Alan E.

    2006-01-01

    The thermal and shock histories of ureilites can be divided into four periods: 1) formation, 2) initial shock, 3) post-shock annealing, and 4) post-annealing shock. Period 1 occurred approx.4.55 Ga ago when ureilites formed by melting chondritic material. Impact events during period 2 caused silicate darkening, undulose to mosaic extinction in olivines, and the formation of diamond, lonsdaleite, and chaoite from indigenous carbonaceous material. Alkali-rich fine-grained silicates may have been introduced by impact injection into ureilites during this period. About 57% of the ureilites were unchanged after period 2. During period 3 events, impact-induced annealing caused previously mosaicized olivine grains to become aggregates of small unstrained crystals. Some ureilites experienced reduction as FeO at the edges of olivine grains reacted with C from the matrix. Annealing may also be responsible for coarsening of graphite in a few ureilites, forming euhedral-appearing, idioblastic crystals. Orthopyroxene in Meteorite Hills (MET) 78008 may have formed from pigeonite by annealing during this period. The Rb-Sr internal isochron age of approx.4.0 Ga for MET 78008 probably dates the annealing event. At this late date, impacts are the only viable heat source. About 36% of ureilites experienced period 3 events, but remained unchanged afterwards. During period 4, approx.7% of the ureilites were shocked again, as is evident in the polymict breccia, Elephant Moraine (EET) 83309. This rock contains annealed mosaicized olivine aggregates composed of small individual olivine crystals that exhibit undulose extinction. Ureilites may have formed by impact-melting chondritic material on a primitive body with heterogeneous O isotopes. Plagioclase was preferentially lost from the system due to its low impedance to shock compression. Brief melting and rapid burial minimized the escape of planetary-type noble gases from the ureilitic melts. Incomplete separation of metal from silicates during impact melting left ureilites with relatively high concentrations of trace siderophile elements.

  5. Unraveling Quantum Annealers using Classical Hardness

    E-print Network

    Victor Martin-Mayor; Itay Hen

    2015-02-09

    Recent advances in quantum technology have led to the development and manufacturing of experimental programmable quantum annealing optimizers that contain hundreds of quantum bits. These optimizers, named `D-Wave' chips, promise to solve practical optimization problems potentially faster than conventional `classical' computers. Attempts to quantify the quantum nature of these chips have been met with both excitement and skepticism but have also brought up numerous fundamental questions pertaining to the distinguishability of quantum annealers from their classical thermal counterparts. Here, we propose a general method aimed at answering these, and apply it to experimentally study the D-Wave chip. Inspired by spin-glass theory, we generate optimization problems with a wide spectrum of `classical hardness', which we also define. By investigating the chip's response to classical hardness, we surprisingly find that the chip's performance scales unfavorably as compared to several analogous classical algorithms. We detect, quantify and discuss purely classical effects that possibly mask the quantum behavior of the chip.

  6. Annealing-environment effects on the properties of CoPt nanoparticles formed in single-crystal Al2O3 by ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, C. W.; Withrow, S. P.; Budai, J. D.; Thomas, D. K.; Williams, J. M.; Meldrum, A.; Sorge, K. D.; Thompson, J. R.; Ownby, G. W.; Wendelken, J. F.; Boatner, L. A.

    2005-12-01

    The ion implantation of nearly equal doses of Co and Pt into a single-crystal Al2O3 host followed by thermal annealing leads to the formation of nanoparticles whose phase, structure, and physical properties are strongly dependent on the annealing environment. Annealing in 96%Ar+4%H2 gives rise to ferromagnetic, chemically ordered CoPt nanoparticles with the L10 structure and a magnetic coercivity that can exceed 10kOe at 5K. Annealing in O2 (or in Ar) does not result in the formation of a CoPt alloy. Instead, the implanted Pt precipitates to form oriented elemental Pt nanoparticles, and the implanted Co combines with oxygen to form Co3O4 oxide nanoparticles. Annealing in ultrahigh-vacuum conditions results in a mixture of phases including CoPt3 and Co3O4 and possibly Co. The results obtained for Co +Pt-implanted Al2O3 are compared with the previous results for Fe +Pt-implanted Al2O3 annealed in similar environments.

  7. Influence of air annealing temperature and time on the optical properties of Yb:YAG single crystal grown by HDS method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Ying; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Yequan; Zhang, Mingfu

    2015-08-01

    8 at.% Yb:YAG plate single crystal with the dimension of 170 mm × 150 mm × 30 mm was grown in vacuum by Horizontal Directional Solidification method. Aimed at blue-green color centers, annealing treatments of 15 mm × 15 mm × 1 mm samples from 900 °C to 1400 °C for 5 h and at 900 °C from 5 h to 40 h in air were conducted. The absorption spectra, emission spectra, fluorescence lifetime and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of samples under different annealing conditions were measured at room temperature, respectively. Annealing at above 1000 °C for 5 h or at 900 °C for 40 h made the blue-green color centers disappear and the samples turned to transparent. Absorption coefficients decreased in the 300 nm-800 nm wavelength range, emission intensities increased and emission bands broadened around 486 nm and 1029 nm with increasing temperature up to 1200 °C, then varied inversely. These values decreased or increased monotonically with increasing annealing time at 900 °C. The maximal increases of fluorescence lifetime were 62.3% and 64.7%, respectively. The calculated emission cross section of 1200 °C for 5 h was up to 4.4 × 10-20 cm2. In X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the concentrations of oxygen vacancies reduced from 1.28% down to absence by annealing. These experiments show that color centers are detrimental to the optical properties of HDS-Yb:YAG laser crystal and optimal annealing treatments should be conducted.

  8. Ion-implanted laser annealed silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katzeff, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    Development of low cost solar cells fabrication technology is being sponsored by NASA JPL as part of the Low Cost Solar Array Project (LSA). In conformance to Project requirements ion implantation and laser annealing were evaluated as junction formation techniques offering low cost-high throughput potential. Properties of cells fabricated utilizing this technology were analyzed by electrical, transmission electron microscopy, Rutherford backscattering and secondary ion mass spectrometry techniques. Tests indicated the laser annealed substrates to be damage free and electrically active. Similar analysis of ion implanted furnace annealed substrates revealed the presence of residual defects in the form of dislocation lines and loops with substantial impurity redistribution evident for some anneal temperature/time regimes. Fabricated laser annealed cells exhibited improved spectral response and conversion efficiency in comparison to furnace annealed cells. An economic projection for LSA indicates a potential for considerable savings from laser annealing technology.

  9. Application of laser annealing to solar cell junction formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katzeff, J. S.; Lopez, M.; Josephs, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    The possibility of using high-energy Q-switched Nd:glass lasers to form pn junctions in solar cells by annealing ion-implanted substrates is investigated. The properties of laser annealed cells are analyzed by electrical, transmission electron microscopy, Rutherford backscattering and secondary ion mass spectrometry techniques. Tests indicate the laser annealed substrates to be damage-free and electrically active. Similar reference analysis of ion-implanted furnace-annealed substrates reveals the presence of residual defects in the form of dislocation lines and loops with substantial impurity redistribution evident for some anneal temperature/time regimes. Fabricated laser annealed cells exhibit excellent conversion efficiency. It is noted that additional improvements are anticipated once the anneal parameters for a back surface field are optimized.

  10. Interpolating function and Stokes phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Masazumi; Jatkar, Dileep P.

    2015-11-01

    When we have two expansions of physical quantity around two different points in parameter space, we can usually construct a family of functions, which interpolates the both expansions. In this paper we study analytic structures of such interpolating functions and discuss their physical implications. We propose that the analytic structures of the interpolating functions provide information on analytic property and Stokes phenomena of the physical quantity, which we approximate by the interpolating functions. We explicitly check our proposal for partition functions of zero-dimensional ?4 theory and Sine-Gordon model. In the zero dimensional Sine-Gordon model, we compare our result with a recent result from resurgence analysis. We also comment on construction of interpolating function in Borel plane.

  11. Onset phenomena in MPD thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnett, J. W.; Jahn, R. G.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental study has clarified some aspects of MPD thruster onset phenomena. The steep increase in terminal voltage that occurs as the onset current is approached may have different causes, depending on the propellant injection geometry. For propellant injection at the cathode radius, terminal voltage increase corresponds to a growing anode fall voltage; for injection at a larger radius, the increase is related to the back emf in the near-cathode plasma. The formation of the onset current pattern within the arc has been mapped experimentally as the thruster responds to an input current step which rises from below onset to the onset value. The appearance of terminal voltage hash at onset correlates with the extension into the exhaust region of a significant fraction of the arc current.

  12. Relaxation phenomena in cryogenic electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikin, V.; Chikina, I.; Nazin, S.

    2013-06-01

    Proposed is a scenario for the development of observed relaxation phenomena in a cryogenic electrolyte with the structure of "liquid hydrogen + injected ions." Ions of one sign are generated in the bulk of liquid hydrogen in the presence of external field E? by a stationary radioactive source of ± ions at the bottom of a vessel. After accumulation near the free surface of the liquid with a finite density ns the ions can break its stability producing a pulse of ion current to the collector located above the liquid surface. The outlined process is periodically repeated. Its period contains information on the ion mobility and, which is most interesting, on dissociation (association) processes occurring in a system of charged particles placed in an external field. The cryogenic problem is a good model for dissociation in the presence of external field occurring in normal electrolytes without any external ion sources.

  13. Induced-charge Electrokinetic Phenomena

    E-print Network

    Bazant, M Z; Bazant, Martin Z.; Squires, Todd M.

    2003-01-01

    Motivated by the recent discovery of AC electro-osmosis near micro-electrodes, we predict a broad class of nonlinear electrokinetic phenomena involving induced interfacial charge. By considering various polarizable objects (metals or dielectrics) in DC and AC applied fields, we develop a simple physical picture of `induced-charge electro-osmosis' (ICEO), the fluid slip at a surface due to an electric field acting on the diffuse charge it induces. We also discuss `induced-charge electrophoresis' (ICEP), the analogous motion of a freely-suspended polarizable particle. Both differ significantly from their classical linear counterparts. We present a mathematical theory of ICEO flows in the weakly nonlinear limit of thin double layers. As an example, we calculate the time-dependent ICEO slip around a metallic sphere with a thin dielectric coating in a suddenly-applied DC field. We briefly discuss possible applications of ICEO to microfluidics and of ICEP to colloidal manipulation.

  14. Unidentified phenomena - Unusual plasma behavior?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avakian, S. V.; Kovalenok, V. V.

    1992-06-01

    The paper describes observations of a phenomenon belonging to the UFO category and the possible causes of these events. Special attention is given to an event which occurred during the night of September 19-20, 1974, when a huge 'star' was observed over Pertrozavodsk (Russia), consisting of a bright-white luminous center, emitting beams of light, and a less bright light-blue shell. The star gradually formed a cometlike object with a tail consisting of beams of light and started to descend. It is suggested that this event was related to cosmic disturbances caused by an occurrence of unusually strong solar flares. Other examples are presented that relate unusual phenomena observed in space to the occurrence of strong magnetic turbulence events.

  15. Emergent Phenomena at Oxide Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, H.Y.

    2012-02-16

    Transition metal oxides (TMOs) are an ideal arena for the study of electronic correlations because the s-electrons of the transition metal ions are removed and transferred to oxygen ions, and hence the strongly correlated d-electrons determine their physical properties such as electrical transport, magnetism, optical response, thermal conductivity, and superconductivity. These electron correlations prohibit the double occupancy of metal sites and induce a local entanglement of charge, spin, and orbital degrees of freedom. This gives rise to a variety of phenomena, e.g., Mott insulators, various charge/spin/orbital orderings, metal-insulator transitions, multiferroics, and superconductivity. In recent years, there has been a burst of activity to manipulate these phenomena, as well as create new ones, using oxide heterostructures. Most fundamental to understanding the physical properties of TMOs is the concept of symmetry of the order parameter. As Landau recognized, the essence of phase transitions is the change of the symmetry. For example, ferromagnetic ordering breaks the rotational symmetry in spin space, i.e., the ordered phase has lower symmetry than the Hamiltonian of the system. There are three most important symmetries to be considered here. (i) Spatial inversion (I), defined as r {yields} -r. In the case of an insulator, breaking this symmetry can lead to spontaneous electric polarization, i.e. ferroelectricity, or pyroelectricity once the point group belongs to polar group symmetry. (ii) Time-reversal symmetry (T) defined as t {yields} -t. In quantum mechanics, the time-evolution of the wave-function {Psi} is given by the phase factor e{sup -iEt/{h_bar}} with E being the energy, and hence time-reversal basically corresponds to taking the complex conjugate of the wave-function. Also the spin, which is induced by the 'spinning' of the particle, is reversed by time-reversal. Broken T-symmetry is most naturally associated with magnetism, since the spin operator changes sign with T-operation. (iii) Gauge symmetry (G), which is associated with a change in the phase of the wave-function as {Psi} {yields} e{sup i{theta}}{Psi}. Gauge symmetry is connected to the law of charge conservation, and broken G-symmetry corresponds to superconductivity/superfluidity. To summarize, the interplay among these electronic degrees of freedom produces various forms of symmetry breaking patterns of I, T, and G, leading to novel emergent phenomena, which can appear only by the collective behavior of electrons and cannot be expected from individual electrons. Figure 1 shows this schematically by means of several representative phenomena. From this viewpoint, the interfaces of TMOs offer a unique and important laboratory because I is already broken by the structure itself, and the detailed form of broken I-symmetry can often be designed. Also, two-dimensionality usually enhances the effects of electron correlations by reducing their kinetic energy. These two features of oxide interfaces produce many novel effects and functions that cannot be attained in bulk form. Given that the electromagnetic responses are a major source of the physical properties of solids, and new gauge structures often appear in correlated electronic systems, we put 'emergent electromagnetism' at the center of Fig. 1.

  16. Evolution of strain and mechanical properties upon annealing in He-implanted 6H-SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, B. S.; Wang, Z. G.; Zhang, C. H.; Wei, K. F.; Yao, C. F.; Sun, J. R.; Cui, M. H.; Li, Y. F.; Zhu, H. P.; Du, Y. Y.; Zhu, Y. B.; Pang, L. L.; Song, P.; Wang, J.

    2014-12-01

    The effects of annealing temperature on strain and mechanical property changes of 6H-SiC implanted with helium ions at 600 K to doses of 3 × 1015 cm-2, 1 × 1016 cm-2 and 3 × 1016 cm-2 and at an ion energy of 100 keV were investigated by using high-resolution X-ray diffraction (XRD), nano-indentation and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Strain increases with increasing displacements per atom (dpa). Strain relaxation in terms of changes in ?d/d exhibited a linear decrease with increasing annealing temperature ranging from 873 K to 1473 K for 30 min in vacuum. The relaxation activation energies of the strains were estimated by Arrhenius law to be in the range of 0.4-0.7 eV. Irradiation-induced hardening was observed via nano-indentation measurements as a function of annealing. The hardness of the highly damaged layer decreased monotonically with increasing annealing temperature for the samples implanted with He ions to doses of 3 × 1015 cm-2 and 1 × 1016 cm-2, and where no helium bubbles were formed in the damaged layer. The hardness of the damaged layer initially decreased and then increased with increasing annealing temperature from 600 K to 1073 K for the sample implanted He ions to a dose of 3 × 1016 cm-2, where numerous helium bubbles were formed in the damaged layer. The TEM results suggest that the growth of helium bubbles emits interstitials upon annealing. These interstitials agglomerate into stacking faults and dislocation loops, which increase the hardness.

  17. PREFACE Integrability and nonlinear phenomena Integrability and nonlinear phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Ullate, David; Lombardo, Sara; Mañas, Manuel; Mazzocco, Marta; Nijhoff, Frank; Sommacal, Matteo

    2010-10-01

    Back in 1967, Clifford Gardner, John Greene, Martin Kruskal and Robert Miura published a seminal paper in Physical Review Letters which was to become a cornerstone in the theory of integrable systems. In 2006, the authors of this paper received the AMS Steele Prize. In this award the AMS pointed out that `In applications of mathematics, solitons and their descendants (kinks, anti-kinks, instantons, and breathers) have entered and changed such diverse fields as nonlinear optics, plasma physics, and ocean, atmospheric, and planetary sciences. Nonlinearity has undergone a revolution: from a nuisance to be eliminated, to a new tool to be exploited.' From this discovery the modern theory of integrability bloomed, leading scientists to a deep understanding of many nonlinear phenomena which is by no means reachable by perturbation methods or other previous tools from linear theories. Nonlinear phenomena appear everywhere in nature, their description and understanding is therefore of great interest both from the theoretical and applicative point of view. If a nonlinear phenomenon can be represented by an integrable system then we have at our disposal a variety of tools to achieve a better mathematical description of the phenomenon. This special issue is largely dedicated to investigations of nonlinear phenomena which are related to the concept of integrability, either involving integrable systems themselves or because they use techniques from the theory of integrability. The idea of this special issue originated during the 18th edition of the Nonlinear Evolution Equations and Dynamical Systems (NEEDS) workshop, held at Isola Rossa, Sardinia, Italy, 16-23 May 2009 (http://needs-conferences.net/2009/). The issue benefits from the occasion offered by the meeting, in particular by its mini-workshops programme, and contains invited review papers and contributed papers. It is worth pointing out that there was an open call for papers and all contributions were peer reviewed according to the standards of the journal. The selection of papers in this issue aims to bring together recent developments and findings, even though it consists of only a fraction of the impressive developments in recent years which have affected a broad range of fields, including the theory of special functions, quantum integrable systems, numerical analysis, cellular automata, representations of quantum groups, symmetries of difference equations, discrete geometry, among others. The special issue begins with four review papers: Integrable models in nonlinear optics and soliton solutions Degasperis [1] reviews integrable models in nonlinear optics. He presents a number of approximate models which are integrable and illustrates the links between the mathematical and applicative aspects of the theory of integrable dynamical systems. In particular he discusses the recent impact of boomeronic-type wave equations on applications arising in the context of the resonant interaction of three waves. Hamiltonian PDEs: deformations, integrability, solutions Dubrovin [2] presents classification results for systems of nonlinear Hamiltonian partial differential equations (PDEs) in one spatial dimension. In particular he uses a perturbative approach to the theory of integrability of these systems and discusses their solutions. He conjectures universality of the critical behaviour for the solutions, where the notion of universality refers to asymptotic independence of the structure of solutions (at the point of gradient catastrophe) from the choice of generic initial data as well as from the choice of a generic PDE. KP solitons in shallow water Kodama [3] presents a survey of recent studies on soliton solutions of the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) equation. A large variety of exact soliton solutions of the KP equation are presented and classified. The study includes numerical analysis of the stability of the found solution as well as numerical simulations of the initial value problems which indicate that a certain class of initial waves approach asymptotically these exact solutions

  18. Control Dewar Secondary Vacuum Container

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, R.; /Fermilab

    1993-10-04

    This engineering note provides background information regarding the control dewar secondary vacuum container. The secondary vacuum container has it's origin with the CDP control dewar design. The name secondary vacuum container replaced the CDP term 'Watt can' which was named after Bob Watt (SLAC), a PAC/DOE review committee member who participated in a review of CDP and recommended a secondary vacuum enclosure. One of the most fragile parts of the control dewar design is the ceramic electrical feed throughs located in the secondary vacuum container. The secondary vacuum container is provided to guard against potential leaks in these ceramic insulating feed throughs. The secondary vacuum container has a pumping line separate from the main solenoid/control dewar insulating vacuum. This pumping line is connected to the inlet of the turbo pump for initial pumpdown. Under normal operation the container is isolated. Should a feedthrough develop a small leak, alternate pumping arrangements for the secondary vacuum container could be arranged. The pressure in the secondary vacuum container should be kept in a range that the breakdown voltage is kept at a maximum. The breakdown voltage is known to be a function of pressure and is described by a Paschen curve. I cannot find a copy of the curve at this time, but from what I remember, the breakdown voltage is a minimum somewhere around 10-3 torr. Ideally the pressure in the secondary vacuum can should be kept very low, around 10 E-6 or 10 E-7 torr for maximum breakdown voltage. If however a leak developed and this was not possible, then one could operate at a pressure higher than the minima point.

  19. Application of Seismic Design Requirements to Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility Structures and Systems and Components

    SciTech Connect

    CREA, B.A.

    1999-11-15

    The methodology followed in assignment of Performance Class (PC) for Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) seismic loads for Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) Structures, Systems and Components is defined. The loading definition associated with each PC and structure, system and component is then defined.

  20. Photoluminescence probing of interface evolution with annealing in InGa(N)As/GaAs single quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Jun; Qi, Zhen; Zhao, H.; Zhu, Liang; Song, Yuxin; Chen, Xiren; Zha, F.-X.; Guo, Shaoling; Wang, S. M.

    2015-10-01

    The effects of thermal annealing on the interfaces of InGa(N)As/GaAs single quantum wells (SQWs) are investigated by excitation-, temperature-, and magnetic field-dependent photoluminescence (PL). The annealing at 750 °C results in more significant blueshift and narrowing to the PL peak than that at 600 °C. Each of the PL spectra can be reproduced with two PL components: (i) the low-energy component (LE) keeps energetically unchanged, while the high-energy component (HE) moves up with excitation and shows at higher energy for the In0.375Ga0.625As/GaAs but crosses over with the LE at a medium excitation power for the In0.375Ga0.625N0.012As0.988/GaAs SQWs. The HE is broader than the corresponding LE, the annealing at 750 °C narrows the LE and HE and shrinks their energetic separation; (ii) the PL components are excitonic, and the InGaNAs shows slightly enhanced excitonic effects relative to the InGaAs SQW; (iii) no typical S-shape evolution of PL energy with temperature is detectable, and similar blueshift and narrowing are identified for the same annealing. The phenomena are mainly from the interfacial processes. Annealing improves the intralayer quality, enhances the interfacial In-Ga interdiffusion, and reduces the interfacial fluctuation. The interfacial interdiffusion does not change obviously by the small N content and hence similar PL-component narrowing and blueshift are observed for the SQWs after a nominally identical annealing. Comparison with previous studies is made and the PL measurements under different conditions are shown to be effective for probing the interfacial evolution in QWs.

  1. Comparing Monte Carlo methods for finding ground states of Ising spin glasses: Population annealing, simulated annealing, and parallel tempering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenlong; Machta, Jonathan; Katzgraber, Helmut G.

    2015-07-01

    Population annealing is a Monte Carlo algorithm that marries features from simulated-annealing and parallel-tempering Monte Carlo. As such, it is ideal to overcome large energy barriers in the free-energy landscape while minimizing a Hamiltonian. Thus, population-annealing Monte Carlo can be used as a heuristic to solve combinatorial optimization problems. We illustrate the capabilities of population-annealing Monte Carlo by computing ground states of the three-dimensional Ising spin glass with Gaussian disorder, while comparing to simulated-annealing and parallel-tempering Monte Carlo. Our results suggest that population annealing Monte Carlo is significantly more efficient than simulated annealing but comparable to parallel-tempering Monte Carlo for finding spin-glass ground states.

  2. The ``friction'' of vacuum, and other fluctuation-induced forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kardar, Mehran; Golestanian, Ramin

    1999-07-01

    The static Casimir effect describes an attractive force between two conducting plates, due to quantum fluctuations of the electromagnetic (EM) field in the intervening space. Thermal fluctuations of correlated fluids (such as critical mixtures, super-fluids, liquid crystals, or electrolytes) are also modified by the boundaries, resulting in finite-size corrections at criticality, and additional forces that affect wetting and layering phenomena. Modified fluctuations of the EM field can also account for the ``van der Waals'' interaction between conducting spheres, and have analogs in the fluctuation-induced interactions between inclusions on a membrane. We employ a path integral formalism to study these phenomena for boundaries of arbitrary shape. This allows us to examine the many unexpected phenomena of the dynamic Casimir effect due to moving boundaries. With the inclusion of quantum fluctuations, the EM vacuum behaves essentially as a complex fluid, and modifies the motion of objects through it. In particular, from the mechanical response function of the EM vacuum, we extract a plethora of interesting results, the most notable being: (i) The effective mass of a plate depends on its shape, and becomes anisotropic. (ii) There is dissipation and damping of the motion, again dependent upon shape and direction of motion, due to emission of photons. (iii) There is a continuous spectrum of resonant cavity modes that can be excited by the motion of the (neutral) boundaries.

  3. Vacuum enhanced cutaneous biopsy instrument

    DOEpatents

    Collins, Joseph (St. Petersburg, FL)

    2000-01-01

    A syringe-like disposable cutaneous biopsy instrument equipped with a tubular blade at its lower end, and designed so that a vacuum is created during use, said vacuum serving to retain undeformed a plug of tissue cut from a patient's skin.

  4. Vacuum flash evaporated polymer composites

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, John D. (Kennewick, WA); Gross, Mark E. (Pasco, WA)

    1997-01-01

    A method for fabrication of polymer composite layers in a vacuum is disclosed. More specifically, the method of dissolving salts in a monomer solution, vacuum flash evaporating the solution, condensing the flash evaporated solution as a liquid film, and forming the condensed liquid film into a polymer composite layer on a substrate is disclosed.

  5. mixing tube vent to vacuum

    E-print Network

    Wilson, Rachel

    mixing tube vent to vacuum main air tube (ID = 6 mm) valve (Cole Palmer 01380-02) a 0 10 20 30 40 after placing an odor into the device vacuum line. (c) Command to the valve, created from binary random

  6. Statistical mechanics of the vacuum

    E-print Network

    Christian Beck

    2012-03-01

    The vacuum is full of virtual particles which exist for short moments of time. In this paper we construct a chaotic model of vacuum fluctuations associated with a fundamental entropic field that generates an arrow of time. The dynamics can be physically interpreted in terms of fluctuating virtual momenta. This model leads to a generalized statistical mechanics that distinguishes fundamental constants of nature.

  7. Multipurpose Vacuum Induction Processing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindaraju, M.; Kulkarni, Deepak; Balasubramanian, K.

    2012-11-01

    Multipurpose vacuum processing systems are cost effective; occupy less space, multiple functional under one roof and user friendly. A multipurpose vacuum induction system was designed, fabricated and installed in a record time of 6 months time at NFTDC Hyderabad. It was designed to function as a) vacuum induction melting/refining of oxygen free electronic copper/pure metals, b) vacuum induction melting furnace for ferrous materials c) vacuum induction melting for non ferrous materials d) large vacuum heat treatment chamber by resistance heating (by detachable coil and hot zone) e) bottom discharge vacuum induction melting system for non ferrous materials f) Induction heat treatment system and g) directional solidification /investment casting. It contains provision for future capacity addition. The attachments require to manufacture multiple shaped castings and continuous rod casting can be added whenever need arises. Present capacity is decided on the requirement for 10years of development path; presently it has 1.2 ton liquid copper handling capacity. It is equipped with provision for capacity addition up to 2 ton liquid copper handling capacity in future. Provision is made to carry out the capacity addition in easy steps quickly. For easy operational maintenance and troubleshooting, design was made in easily detachable sections. High vacuum system is also is detachable, independent and easily movable which is first of its kind in the country. Detailed design parameters, advantages and development history are presented in this paper.

  8. Breather cloth for vacuum curing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, M. W.

    1979-01-01

    Finely-woven nylon cloth that has been treated with Teflon improves vacuum adhesive bonding of coatings to substrates. Cloth is placed over coating; entire assembly, including substrate, coating, and cloth, is placed in plastic vacuum bag for curing. Cloth allows coating to "breathe" when bag is evacuated. Applications include bonding film coatings to solar concentrators and collectors.

  9. Detecting leaks in vacuum bags

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlstrom, E. E.

    1980-01-01

    Small leaks in vacuum bag can be readily detected by eye, using simple chemical reaction: combination of ammonia and acetic acid vapors to produce cloudy white smoke. Technique has been successfully used to test seam integrity and to identify minute pinholes in vacuum bag used in assembly of ceramic-tile heat shield for Space Shuttle Orbiter.

  10. Vacuum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeks, J. L.; Todd, D. T.; Wooten, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    A two-year program investigated vacuum gas tungsten arc welding (VGTAW) as a method to modify or improve the weldability of normally difficult-to-weld materials. After a vacuum chamber and GTAW power supply were modified, several difficult-to-weld materials were studied and key parameters developed. Finally, Incoloy 903 weld overlays were produced without microfissures.

  11. Vacuum flash evaporated polymer composites

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, J.D.; Gross, M.E.

    1997-10-28

    A method for fabrication of polymer composite layers in a vacuum is disclosed. More specifically, the method of dissolving salts in a monomer solution, vacuum flash evaporating the solution, condensing the flash evaporated solution as a liquid film, and forming the condensed liquid film into a polymer composite layer on a substrate is disclosed.

  12. Purifying Aluminum by Vacuum Distillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Du Fresne, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    Proposed method for purifying aluminum employs one-step vacuum distillation. Raw material for process impure aluminum produced in electrolysis of aluminum ore. Impure metal melted in vacuum. Since aluminum has much higher vapor pressure than other constituents, boils off and condenses on nearby cold surfaces in proportions much greater than those of other constituents.

  13. Cosmology with decaying vacuum energy

    SciTech Connect

    Freese, K.; Adams, F.; Frieman, J.; Mottola, E.

    1987-09-01

    Motivated by recent attempts to solve the cosmological constant problem, we examine the observational consequences of a vacuum energy density which decays in time. For all times later than t approx. 1 sec, the ratio of the vacuum to the total energy density of the universe must be small. Although the vacuum cannot provide the ''missing mass'' required to close the universe today, its presence earlier in the history of the universe could have important consequences. We discuss restrictions on the vacuum energy arising from primordial nucleosynthesis, the microwave and gamma ray background spectra, and galaxy formation. A small vacuum component at the era of nucleosynthesis, 0.01 < rho/sub vac//rho/sup rad/ < 0.1, increase the number of allowed neutino species to N/sup nu/ > 5, but in some cases would severely distort the microwave spectrum. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Spacetime structure and vacuum entanglement

    E-print Network

    Eduardo Martin-Martinez; Alexander R. H. Smith; Daniel R. Terno

    2015-07-09

    We study the role that both vacuum fluctuations and vacuum entanglement of a scalar field play in identifying the spacetime topology, which is not prescribed from first principles---neither in general relativity or quantum gravity. We analyze how the entanglement and observable correlations acquired between two particle detectors are sensitive to the spatial topology of spacetime. We examine the detector's time evolution to all orders in perturbation theory and then study the phenomenon of vacuum entanglement harvesting in Minkowski spacetime and two flat topologically distinct spacetimes constructed from identifications of the Minkowski space. We show that, for instance, if the spatial topology induces a preferred direction, this direction may be inferred from the dependence of correlations between the two detectors on their orientation. We therefore show that vacuum fluctuations and vacuum entanglement harvesting makes it, in principle, possible to distinguish spacetimes with identical local geometry that differ only in their topology.

  15. Electromechanical phenomena in semiconductor nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lew Yan Voon, L. C.; Willatzen, M.

    2011-02-01

    Electromechanical phenomena in semiconductors are still poorly studied from a fundamental and an applied science perspective, even though significant strides have been made in the last decade or so. Indeed, most current electromechanical devices are based on ferroelectric oxides. Yet, the importance of the effect in certain semiconductors is being increasingly recognized. For instance, the magnitude of the electric field in an AlN/GaN nanostructure can reach 1-10 MV/cm. In fact, the basic functioning of an (0001) AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor is due to the two-dimensional electron gas formed at the material interface by the polarization fields. The goal of this review is to inform the reader of some of the recent developments in the field for nanostructures and to point out still open questions. Examples of recent work that involves the piezoelectric and pyroelectric effects in semiconductors include: the study of the optoelectronic properties of III-nitrides quantum wells and dots, the current controversy regarding the importance of the nonlinear piezoelectric effect, energy harvesting using ZnO nanowires as a piezoelectric nanogenerator, the use of piezoelectric materials in surface acoustic wave devices, and the appropriateness of various models for analyzing electromechanical effects. Piezoelectric materials such as GaN and ZnO are gaining more and more importance for energy-related applications; examples include high-brightness light-emitting diodes for white lighting, high-electron mobility transistors, and nanogenerators. Indeed, it remains to be demonstrated whether these materials could be the ideal multifunctional materials. The solutions to these and other related problems will not only lead to a better understanding of the basic physics of these materials, but will validate new characterization tools, and advance the development of new and better devices. We will restrict ourselves to nanostructures in the current article even though the measurements and calculations of the bulk electromechanical coefficients remain challenging. Much of the literature has focused on InGaN/GaN, AlGaN/GaN, ZnMgO/ZnO, and ZnCdO/ZnO quantum wells, and InAs/GaAs and AlGaN/AlN quantum dots for their optoelectronic properties; and work on the bending of nanowires have been mostly for GaN and ZnO nanowires. We hope the present review article will stimulate further research into the field of electromechanical phenomena and help in the development of applications.

  16. Epsilon near zero based phenomena in metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basharin, Alexey A.; Mavidis, Charalampos; Kafesaki, Maria; Economou, Eleftherios N.; Soukoulis, Costas M.

    2013-04-01

    We present and analyze unique phenomena of enhanced transmission through systems of subwavelength dielectric cylinders embedded in an epsilon near zero host. Our analysis shows that these phenomena are due to Mie-resonance modes arisen in the dielectric cylinders. Subwavelength waveguides and lenses are proposed based on coupling of these modes between neighboring cylinders. Finally, the proposed phenomena and their possible applications are numerically demonstrated in the THz regime in a realistic polaritonic material of LiF rods in KCl.

  17. Intrinsic interfacial phenomena in manganite heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, C. A. F.; Walker, F. J.; Ahn, C. H.; Ismail-Beigi, S.

    2015-04-01

    We review recent advances in our understanding of interfacial phenomena that emerge when dissimilar materials are brought together at atomically sharp and coherent interfaces. In particular, we focus on phenomena that are intrinsic to the interface and review recent work carried out on perovskite manganites interfaces, a class of complex oxides whose rich electronic properties have proven to be a useful playground for the discovery and prediction of novel phenomena.

  18. Intrinsic interfacial phenomena in manganite heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Vaz, C A F; Walker, F J; Ahn, C H; Ismail-Beigi, S

    2015-04-01

    We review recent advances in our understanding of interfacial phenomena that emerge when dissimilar materials are brought together at atomically sharp and coherent interfaces. In particular, we focus on phenomena that are intrinsic to the interface and review recent work carried out on perovskite manganites interfaces, a class of complex oxides whose rich electronic properties have proven to be a useful playground for the discovery and prediction of novel phenomena. PMID:25721578

  19. Galvanomagnetic phenomena in layered organic conductors (Review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartson?k, M. V.; Peschansky, V. G.

    2005-03-01

    The experimental research on galvanomagnetic phenomena in layered organic conductors at high magnetic fields is discussed in terms of the theoretical ideas about charge transfer phenomena in conductors with a metallic type of conductivity and a quasi-two-dimensional electron energy spectrum of arbitrary form. Attention is devoted mainly to the problem of recovering the dispersion relation of the conduction electrons in layered organic charge-transfer complexes from experimental studies of their magnetoresistance and quantum oscillation phenomena at low temperatures.

  20. The effect of annealing on structural and optical properties of ?-Fe2O3/CdS/?-Fe2O3 multilayer heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleem, M.; Durrani, S. M. A.; Saheb, N.; Al-Kuhaili, M. F.; Bakhtiari, I. A.

    2014-11-01

    Multilayered thin film heterostructures of ?-Fe2O3/CdS/?-Fe2O3 were prepared through physical vapor deposition. Each ?-Fe2O3 layer was deposited by e-beam evaporation of iron in an oxygen atmosphere. The CdS layer was deposited by thermal evaporation in a vacuum. The effect of post annealing of multilayered thin films in air in the temperature range 250 °C to 450 °C was investigated. Structural characterization indicated the growth of the ?-Fe2O3 phase with a polycrystalline structure without any CdS crystalline phase. As-deposited multilayer heterostructures were amorphous and transformed into polycrystalline upon annealing. The surface modification of the films during annealing was revealed by scanning electron microscopy. Spectrophotometric measurements were used to determine the optical properties, including the transmittance, absorbance, and band gap. All the films had both direct as well as indirect band gaps.

  1. Effects of rapid thermal annealing on the ferromagnetic properties of sputtered Zn1-x(Co0.5Fe0.5)xO thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Young Mok; Choo, Woong Kil; Kim, Hyojin; Kim, Dojin; Ihm, YoungEon

    2002-05-01

    We have investigated the effects of rapid thermal annealing under vacuum on the CoFe-doped ZnO [Zn1-x(Co0.5Fe0.5)xO] films grown by reactive magnetron co-sputtering. At least up to x=0.15, the films have the single phase of the same wurtzite structure as pure ZnO. Ferromagnetism was observed for the CoFe-doped ZnO films. We found that rapid thermal annealing leads to a remarkable increase in the spontaneous magnetization of the CoFe-doped ZnO as well as the electron concentration. The annealing also leads to a significant increase in the Curie temperature (TC), resulting in room temperature ferromagnetism with TC>300 K for the CoFe-doped ZnO films.

  2. The effect of low temperature thermal annealing on the magnetic properties of Heusler Ni-Mn-Sn melt-spun ribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llamazares, J. L. Sánchez; Quintana-Nedelcos, A.; Ríos-Jara, D.; Sánchez-Valdes, C. F.; García-Fernández, T.; García, C.

    2016-03-01

    We report the effect of low temperature vacuum annealing (823 K; 550 °C) on the elemental chemical composition, structural phase transition temperatures, phase structure, and magnetic properties of Ni50.6Mn36.3Sn13.1 as-solidified ribbons. Their elemental chemical composition, highly oriented columnar-like microstructure and single-phase character (L21-type crystal structure for austenite) remain unchanged after this low temperature annealing. Annealed ribbons show a reduction of interatomic distances which lead to a small change in the characteristic phase transition temperatures (~3-6 K) but to a significant rise of ~73 and 63% in the saturation magnetization of the martensite and austenite phases, respectively, that can be strictly ascribed to the strengthening of ferromagnetic interactions due to the change in interatomic distances.

  3. Effect of thermal annealing on structure and optical band gap of amorphous Se{sub 72}Te{sub 25}Sb{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Dwivedi, D. K. Pathak, H. P. Shukla, Nitesh; Kumar, Vipin

    2014-04-24

    Thin films of a?Se{sub 72}Te{sub 25}Sb{sub 3} were prepared by vacuum evaporation technique in a base pressure of 10{sup ?6} Torr on to well cleaned glass substrate. a?Se{sub 72}Te{sub 25}Sb{sub 3} thin films were annealed at different temperatures below their crystallization temperatures for 2h. The structural analysis of the films has been investigated using X-ray diffraction technique. The optical band gap of as prepared and annealed films as a function of photon energy in the wavelength range 400–1100 nm has been studied. It has been found that the optical band gap decreases with increasing annealing temperatures in the present system.

  4. EDITORIAL: Quantum phenomena in Nanotechnology Quantum phenomena in Nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loss, Daniel

    2009-10-01

    Twenty years ago the Institute of Physics launched the journal Nanotechnology from its publishing house based in the home town of Paul Dirac, a legendary figure in the development of quantum mechanics at the turn of the last century. At the beginning of the 20th century, the adoption of quantum mechanical descriptions of events transformed the existing deterministic world view. But in many ways it also revolutionised the progress of research itself. For the first time since the 17th century when Francis Bacon established inductive reasoning as the means of advancing science from fact to axiom to law, theory was progressing ahead of experiments instead of providing explanations for observations that had already been made. Dirac's postulation of antimatter through purely theoretical investigation before its observation is the archetypal example of theory leading the way for experiment. The progress of nanotechnology and the development of tools and techniques that enabled the investigation of systems at the nanoscale brought with them many fascinating observations of phenomena that could only be explained through quantum mechanics, first theoretically deduced decades previously. At the nanoscale, quantum confinement effects dominate the electrical and optical properties of systems. They also render new opportunities for manipulating the response of systems. For example, a better understanding of these systems has enabled the rapid development of quantum dots with precisely determined properties, which can be exploited in a range of applications from medical imaging and photovoltaic solar cells to quantum computation, a radically new information technology being currently developed in many labs worldwide. As the first ever academic journal in nanotechnology, {\\it Nanotechnology} has been the forum for papers detailing progress of the science through extremely exciting times. In the early years of the journal, the investigation of electron spin led to the formulation of quantum cellular automata, a new paradigm for computing as reported by Craig S Lent and colleagues (Lent C S, Tougaw P D, Porod W and Bernstein G H 1993 Nanotechnology 4 49-57). The increasingly sophisticated manipulation of spin has been an enduring theme of research throughout this decade, providing a number of interesting developments such as spin pumping (Cota E, Aguado R, Creffield C E and Platero G 2003 Nanotechnology 14 152-6). The idea of spin qubits, proposed by D Loss and D P DiVincenzo (1998 Phys. Rev. A 57 120), developed into an established option for advancing research in quantum computing and continues to drive fruitful avenues of research, such as the integrated superconductive magnetic nanosensor recently devised by researchers in Italy (Granata C, Esposito E, Vettoliere A, Petti L and Russo M 2008 Nanotechnology 19 275501). The device has a spin sensitivity in units of the Bohr magneton of 100 spin Hz-1/2 and has large potential for applications in the measurement of nanoscale magnetization and quantum computing. The advance of science and technology at the nanoscale is inextricably enmeshed with advances in our understanding of quantum effects. As Nanotechnology celebrates its 20th volume, research into fundamental quantum phenomena continues to be an active field of research, providing fertile pasture for developing nanotechnologies.

  5. Observation of Celestial Phenomena in Ancient China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaochun

    Because of the need for calendar-making and portent astrology, the Chinese were diligent and meticulous observers of celestial phenomena. China has maintained the longest continuous historical records of celestial phenomena in the world. Extraordinary or abnormal celestial events were particularly noted because of their astrological significance. The historical records cover various types of celestial phenomena, which include solar and lunar eclipses, sunspots, "guest stars" (novae or supernovae as we understand today), comets and meteors, and all kinds of planetary phenomena. These records provide valuable historical data for astronomical studies today.

  6. Annealing effects on the microstructure and coercive field of two ferritic-martensitic Eurofer steels: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, V. B.; Sandim, M. J. R.; Stamopoulos, D.; Renzetti, R. A.; Santos, A. D.; Sandim, H. R. Z.

    2013-04-01

    Reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic steels are promising candidates for structural applications in future nuclear fusion power plants. Oxide dispersion strengthened ODS-Eurofer and Eurofer 97 steels were cold rolled to 80% reduction in thickness and annealed in vacuum for 1 h from 200 to 1350 °C to evaluate both their thermal stability and magnetic behavior. The microstructural changes were followed by magnetic measurements, in particular the corresponding variation of the coercive field (Hc), as a function of both annealing and tempering treatments. Results show that Y2O3 nanoparticles strongly affect the mechanical properties of ODS-Eurofer steel but leave their magnetic properties fairly unchanged when compared with Eurofer-97 steel.

  7. Effects of a modular two-step ozone-water and annealing process on silicon carbide graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, Matthew J. Lundstedt, Anna; Grennberg, Helena; Polley, Craig; Niu, Yuran; Zakharov, Alexei A.; Balasubramanian, Thiagarajan; Dirscherl, Kai; Burwell, Gregory; Guy, Owen J.; Palmgren, Pål; Yakimova, Rositsa

    2014-08-25

    By combining ozone and water, the effect of exposing epitaxial graphene on silicon carbide to an aggressive wet-chemical process has been evaluated after high temperature annealing in ultra high vacuum. The decomposition of ozone in water produces a number of oxidizing species, however, despite long exposure times to the aqueous-ozone environment, no graphene oxide was observed after the two-step process. The systems were comprehensively characterized before and after processing using Raman spectroscopy, core level photoemission spectroscopy, and angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy together with low energy electron diffraction, low energy electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. In spite of the chemical potential of the aqueous-ozone reaction environment, the graphene domains were largely unaffected raising the prospect of employing such simple chemical and annealing protocols to clean or prepare epitaxial graphene surfaces.

  8. Microstructure evolution during annealing of TiAl/NiCoCrAl multilayer composite prepared by EB-PVD

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rubing; Zhang, Deming; Chen, Guiqing; Wang, Yuesheng

    2014-07-01

    TiAl/NiCoCrAl laminate composite sheet with a thickness of 0.4–0.6 mm as well as a dimension of 150 mm × 100 mm was fabricated successfully by using electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) method. The annealing treatment was processed at 1123 and 1323 K for 3 h in a high vacuum atmosphere, respectively. The phase composition and microstructure of TiAl/NiCoCrAl microlaminated sheet have been analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Based on the sheet characterization and results of the microstructure evolution during annealing treatment process, the diffusion mechanism of interfacial reaction in TiAl/NiCoCrAl microlaminate was investigated and discussed.

  9. WESF natural phenomena hazards survey

    SciTech Connect

    Wagenblast, G.R., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-01

    A team of engineers conducted a systematic natural hazards phenomena (NPH) survey for the 225-B Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF). The survey is an assessment of the existing design documentation to serve as the structural design basis for WESF, and the Interim Safety Basis (ISB). The lateral force resisting systems for the 225-B building structures, and the anchorages for the WESF safety related systems were evaluated. The original seismic and other design analyses were technically reviewed. Engineering judgment assessments were made of the probability of NPH survival, including seismic, for the 225-B structures and WESF safety systems. The method for the survey is based on the experience of the investigating engineers,and documented earthquake experience (expected response) data.The survey uses knowledge on NPH performance and engineering experience to determine the WESF strengths for NPH resistance, and uncover possible weak links. The survey, in general, concludes that the 225-B structures and WESF safety systems are designed and constructed commensurate with the current Hanford Site design criteria.

  10. Critical Phenomena in Population Coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkowitz, John; Sharpee, Tatyana

    2014-03-01

    Populations of neurons that code for sensory stimuli are often modeled as having sigmoidal tuning curves where the midpoint and slope of the curve represent, respectively, an intrinsic firing threshold and noise level. Recent studies have shown for two subpopulations of neurons that states below a critical noise level are associated with symmetry breaking between the populations' thresholds. In this work we consider the case of up to seven distinct subpopulations encoding a common gaussian stimulus. We optimized the mutual information between output patterns and stimuli by adjusting the thresholds for a fixed noise level. In the high-noise regime the optimal thresholds are fully redundant whereas the low noise limit predicts distinct threshold values that achieve histogram equalization of the input signal. Between the two limits, the thresholds exhibit a complex branching process that occur at successive values of the noise level. Each branch corresponds to a critical point of a continuous phase transition. The behavior of the system in the limit of a large number of subpopulations is also investigated, and critical phenomena are also present in the distribution of thresholds in this limit.

  11. Vacuum energy and cosmological evolution

    E-print Network

    Joan Sola

    2014-03-03

    An expanding universe is not expected to have a static vacuum energy density. The so-called cosmological constant $\\Lambda$ should be an approximation, certainly a good one for a fraction of a Hubble time, but it is most likely a temporary description of a true dynamical vacuum energy variable that is evolving from the inflationary epoch to the present day. We can compare the evolving vacuum energy with a Casimir device where the parallel plates slowly move apart ("expand"). The total vacuum energy density cannot be measured, only the effect associated to the presence of the plates, and then also their increasing separation with time. In the universe there is a nonvanishing spacetime curvature $R$ as compared to Minkowskian spacetime that is changing with the expansion. The vacuum energy density must change accordingly, and we naturally expect $\\delta\\Lambda\\sim R\\sim H^2$. A class of dynamical vacuum models that trace such rate of change can be constructed. They are compatible with the current cosmological data, and conveniently extended can account for the complete cosmic evolution from the inflationary epoch till the present days. These models are very close to the $\\Lambda$CDM model for the late universe, but very different from it at the early times. Traces of the inherent vacuum dynamics could be detectable in our recent past.

  12. Vacuum Brazing of Accelerator Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rajvir; Pant, K. K.; Lal, Shankar; Yadav, D. P.; Garg, S. R.; Raghuvanshi, V. K.; Mundra, G.

    2012-11-01

    Commonly used materials for accelerator components are those which are vacuum compatible and thermally conductive. Stainless steel, aluminum and copper are common among them. Stainless steel is a poor heat conductor and not very common in use where good thermal conductivity is required. Aluminum and copper and their alloys meet the above requirements and are frequently used for the above purpose. The accelerator components made of aluminum and its alloys using welding process have become a common practice now a days. It is mandatory to use copper and its other grades in RF devices required for accelerators. Beam line and Front End components of the accelerators are fabricated from stainless steel and OFHC copper. Fabrication of components made of copper using welding process is very difficult and in most of the cases it is impossible. Fabrication and joining in such cases is possible using brazing process especially under vacuum and inert gas atmosphere. Several accelerator components have been vacuum brazed for Indus projects at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT), Indore using vacuum brazing facility available at RRCAT, Indore. This paper presents details regarding development of the above mentioned high value and strategic components/assemblies. It will include basics required for vacuum brazing, details of vacuum brazing facility, joint design, fixturing of the jobs, selection of filler alloys, optimization of brazing parameters so as to obtain high quality brazed joints, brief description of vacuum brazed accelerator components etc.

  13. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1992-10-27

    Improved compact insulation panel is provided which is comprised of two adjacent metal sheets spaced close together with a plurality of spherical, or other discretely shaped, glass or ceramic beads optimally positioned between the sheets to provide support and maintain the spacing between the metal sheets when the gases there between are evacuated to form a vacuum. These spherical glass beads provide the maximum support while minimizing thermal conductance. In its preferred embodiment; these two metal sheets are textured with ribs or concave protrusions in conjunction with the glass beads to maximize the structural integrity of the panels while increasing the spacing between beads, thereby reducing the number of beads and the number of thermal conduction paths. Glass or porcelain-enameled liners in combination with the glass spacers and metal sidewalls effectively decrease thermal conductivity, and various laminates, including wood, porcelain-enameled metal, and others effectively increase the strength and insulation capabilities of the panels. Also, a metal web is provided to hold the spacers in place, and strategic grooves are shown to accommodate expansion and contraction or shaping of the panels. 35 figs.

  14. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Potter, Thomas F. (Denver, CO)

    1992-01-01

    Improved compact insulation panel is provided which is comprised of two adjacent metal sheets spaced close together with a plurality of spherical, or other discretely shaped, glass or ceramic beads optimally positioned between the sheets to provide support and maintain the spacing between the metal sheets when the gases therebetween are evacuated to form a vacuum. These spherical glass beads provide the maximum support while minimizing thermal conductance. In its preferred embodiment; these two metal sheets are textured with ribs or concave protrusions in conjunction with the glass beads to maximize the structural integrity of the panels while increasing the spacing between beads, thereby reducing the number of beads and the number of thermal conduction paths. Glass or porcelain-enameled liners in combination with the glass spacers and metal sidewalls effectively decrease thermal conductivity, and variious laminates, including wood, porcelain-enameled metal, and others effectively increase the strength and insulation capabilities of the panels. Also, a metal web is provided to hold the spacers in place, and strategic grooves are shown to accommodate expansion and contraction or shaping of the panels.

  15. NCSX Vacuum Vessel Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Viola, M. E.; Brown, T.; Heitzenroeder, P.; Malinowski, F.; Reiersen, W.; Sutton, L.; Goranson, P.; Nelson, B.; Cole, M.; Manuel, M.; McCorkle, D.

    2005-10-07

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) is being constructed at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) in conjunction with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The goal of this experiment is to develop a device which has the steady state properties of a traditional stellarator along with the high performance characteristics of a tokamak. A key element of this device is its highly shaped Inconel 625 vacuum vessel. This paper describes the manufacturing of the vessel. The vessel is being fabricated by Major Tool and Machine, Inc. (MTM) in three identical 120º vessel segments, corresponding to the three NCSX field periods, in order to accommodate assembly of the device. The port extensions are welded on, leak checked, cut off within 1" of the vessel surface at MTM and then reattached at PPPL, to accommodate assembly of the close-fitting modular coils that surround the vessel. The 120º vessel segments are formed by welding two 60º segments together. Each 60º segment is fabricated by welding ten press-formed panels together over a collapsible welding fixture which is needed to precisely position the panels. The vessel is joined at assembly by welding via custom machined 8" (20.3 cm) wide spacer "spool pieces." The vessel must have a total leak rate less than 5 X 10-6 t-l/s, magnetic permeability less than 1.02?, and its contours must be within 0.188" (4.76 mm). It is scheduled for completion in January 2006.

  16. Vacuum plasma spray coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard R.; Mckechnie, Timothy N.

    1989-01-01

    Currently, protective plasma spray coatings are applied to space shuttle main engine turbine blades of high-performance nickel alloys by an air plasma spray process. Originally, a ceramic coating of yttria-stabilized zirconia (ZrO2.12Y2O3) was applied for thermal protection, but was removed because of severe spalling. In vacuum plasma spray coating, plasma coatings of nickel-chromium-aluminum-yttrium (NiCrAlY) are applied in a reduced atmosphere of argon/helium. These enhanced coatings showed no spalling after 40 MSFC burner rig thermal shock cycles between 927 C (1700 F) and -253 C (-423 F), while current coatings spalled during 5 to 25 test cycles. Subsequently, a process was developed for applying a durable thermal barrier coating of ZrO2.8Y2O3 to the turbine blades of first-stage high-pressure fuel turbopumps utilizing the enhanced NiCrAlY bond-coating process. NiCrAlY bond coating is applied first, with ZrO2.8Y2O3 added sequentially in increasing amounts until a thermal barrier coating is obtained. The enchanced thermal barrier coating has successfully passed 40 burner rig thermal shock cycles.

  17. Study on thermal annealing of cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, G.; Bolotnikov, A.E.; Fochuk, P.M.; Camarda, G.S.; Cui, Y.; Hossain, A.; Kim, K.; Horace, J.; McCall, B.; Gul, R.; Xu, L.; Kopach, O.V.; and James, R.B.

    2010-08-01

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) has attracted increasing interest with its promising potential as a room-temperature nuclear-radiation-detector material. However, different defects in CZT crystals, especially Te inclusions and dislocations, can degrade the performance of CZT detectors. Post-growth annealing is a good approach potentially to eliminate the deleterious influence of these defects. At Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), we built up different facilities for investigating post-growth annealing of CZT. Here, we report our latest experimental results. Cd-vapor annealing reduces the density of Te inclusions, while large temperature gradient promotes the migration of small-size Te inclusions. Simultaneously, the annealing lowers the density of dislocations. However, only-Cd-vapor annealing decreases the resistivity, possibly reflecting the introduction of extra Cd in the lattice. Subsequent Te-vapor annealing is needed to ensure the recovery of the resistivity after removing the Te inclusions.

  18. Optimised simulated annealing for Ising spin glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isakov, S. V.; Zintchenko, I. N.; Rønnow, T. F.; Troyer, M.

    2015-07-01

    We present several efficient implementations of the simulated annealing algorithm for Ising spin glasses on sparse graphs. In particular, we provide a generic code for any choice of couplings, an optimised code for bipartite graphs, and highly optimised implementations using multi-spin coding for graphs with small maximum degree and discrete couplings with a finite range. The latter codes achieve up to 50 spin flips per nanosecond on modern Intel CPUs. We also compare the performance of the codes to that of the special purpose D-Wave devices built for solving such Ising spin glass problems.

  19. Equilibrium charge distribution on annealed polyelectrolytes.

    PubMed

    Zito, T; Seidel, C

    2002-06-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are used to study the non-uniform equilibrium charge distribution along a single annealed polyelectrolyte chain under theta solvent conditions and with added salt. Within a range of the order of the Debye length charge accumulates at chain ends while a slight charge depletion appears in the central part of the chain. The simulation results are compared with theoretical predictions recently given by Castelnovo et al. In the parameter range where the theory can be applied we find almost perfect quantitative agreement. PMID:15010956

  20. Functionality limit of classical simulated annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, M.

    2015-09-01

    By analyzing the system dynamics in the landscape paradigm, optimization function of classical simulated annealing is reviewed on the random traveling salesman problems. The properly functioning region of the algorithm is experimentally determined in the size-time plane and the influence of its boundary on the scalability test is examined in the standard framework of this method. From both results, an empirical choice of temperature length is plausibly explained as a minimum requirement that the algorithm maintains its scalability within its functionality limit. The study exemplifies the applicability of computational physics analysis to the optimization algorithm research.

  1. Annealing relaxation of ultrasmall gold nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaban, Vitaly

    2015-01-01

    Except serving as an excellent gift on proper occasions, gold finds applications in life sciences, particularly in diagnostics and therapeutics. These applications were made possible by gold nanoparticles, which differ drastically from macroscopic gold. Versatile surface chemistry of gold nanoparticles allows coating with small molecules, polymers, biological recognition molecules. Theoretical investigation of nanoscale gold is not trivial, because of numerous metastable states in these systems. Unlike elsewhere, this work obtains equilibrium structures using annealing simulations within the recently introduced PM7-MD method. Geometries of the ultrasmall gold nanostructures with chalcogen coverage are described at finite temperature, for the first time.

  2. Understanding of thermoacoustic phenomena and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biwa, Tetsushi

    2012-09-01

    The problem of acoustic wave propagation in a tube provides a starting point for the study of thermoacoustic phenomena, which can be analyzed in detail using hydrodynamics. A thermodynamic approach has elucidated various applications of thermoacoustic phenomena. The thermoacoustical perspective unifies these two approaches through acoustical energy flows and facilitates the development of thermoacoustic heat engines.

  3. Economic Agents and Markets as Emergent Phenomena

    E-print Network

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    Economic Agents and Markets as Emergent Phenomena LEIGH TESFATSION Department of Economics, Iowa Colloquium session "Economic Agents and Markets as Emergent Phenomena" held in October 2001. Decentralized market economies are complex adap- tive systems, consisting of large numbers of buyers and sellers

  4. Burst annealing of high temperature GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brothers, P. R.; Horne, W. E.

    1991-01-01

    One of the major limitations of solar cells in space power systems is their vulnerability to radiation damage. One solution to this problem is to periodically heat the cells to anneal the radiation damage. Annealing was demonstrated with silicon cells. The obstacle to annealing of GaAs cells was their susceptibility to thermal damage at the temperatures required to completely anneal the radiation damage. GaAs cells with high temperature contacts and encapsulation were developed. The cells tested are designed for concentrator use at 30 suns AMO. The circular active area is 2.5 mm in diameter for an area of 0.05 sq cm. Typical one sun AMO efficiency of these cells is over 18 percent. The cells were demonstrated to be resistant to damage after thermal excursions in excess of 600 C. This high temperature tolerance should allow these cells to survive the annealing of radiation damage. A limited set of experiments were devised to investigate the feasibility of annealing these high temperature cells. The effect of repeated cycles of electron and proton irradiation was tested. The damage mechanisms were analyzed. Limitations in annealing recovery suggested improvements in cell design for more complete recovery. These preliminary experiments also indicate the need for further study to isolate damage mechanisms. The primary objective of the experiments was to demonstrate and quantify the annealing behavior of high temperature GaAs cells. Secondary objectives were to measure the radiation degradation and to determine the effect of repeated irradiation and anneal cycles.

  5. A laboratory flash furnace for strand annealing simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Page, J.H.R.

    1995-08-01

    The economic production of CRML steels depends on the use of continuous annealing. Successful developed of improved CRML steels, the compositions of which have moved to lower carbon contents, is critically dependent on the rate of heating and its effect on transformation characteristics. As a result, accurate simulation of annealing conditions, particularly the heating rate, is essential. With this in mind, European Electrical Steels set criteria for a laboratory annealing facility that would, as far as was practicable, reproduce day-to-day continuous furnace operation. This paper outlines the design criteria, construction, and operation of the resulting annealing facility.

  6. Synthesis of Hermite polynomial excited squeezed vacuum states from two separate single-mode squeezed vacuum states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao-liang; Yuan, Hong-chun; Hu, Li-yun; Xu, Xue-xiang

    2015-12-01

    A projection synthesis scheme for generating Hermite polynomial excited squeezed vacuum states (HPESVSs, non-Gaussian quantum states) is proposed. Injecting two separate single-mode squeezed vacuum states into a beam splitter and counting the photons in one of the output channels (conditional measurement or post-detection), the conditional state in the other channel is just the HPESVS. The success probability, related to a Legendre polynomial form, is obtained analytically and analyzed numerically in detail. To exhibit the nonclassical effects of this conditional state, we also present the photon-number distribution, sub-Poissionian distribution, anti-bunching effect, quadrature squeezing effect, and Wigner function, respectively. The results show that by tuning the interaction parameters, a wide range of nonclassical phenomena can be created.

  7. Understanding the Physics of changing mass phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellermeijer, A. L.

    2008-05-01

    Changing mass phenomena, like a falling chain or a bungee jumper, might give surprising results, even for experienced physicists. They have resulted in hot discussions in journals, in which for instance Physics professors claim the impossibility of an acceleration larger then g in case of a bungee jumper. These phenomena are also interesting as topics for challenging student projects, and used as such by Dutch high school students. I will take these phenomena as the context in which I like to demonstrate the possibilities of ICT in the learning process of physics. Especially dynamical modeling enables us to describe these phenomena in an elegant way and with knowledge of high school mathematics. Furthermore tools for video-analysis and data from measurements with sensors allow us to study the phenomena in experiments. This example demonstrates the level of implementation of ICT in Physics Education in The Netherlands [1].

  8. Annealing Would Improve beta" - Alumina Solid Electrolyte

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Roger; Homer, Margie; Ryan, Margaret; Cortez, Roger; Shields, Virgil; Kisor, Adam

    2003-01-01

    A pre-operational annealing process is under investigation as a potential means of preventing a sudden reduction of ionic conductivity in a Beta"-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE) during use. On the basis of tests, the sudden reduction of ionic conductivity, followed by a slow recovery, has been found to occur during testing of the solid electrolyte and electrode components of an alkali metal thermal-to-electric converter (AMTEC) cell. At this time, high-temperature tests of limited duration have indicated the superiority of the treated BASE, but reproducible tests over thousands of hours are necessary to confirm that microcracking has been eliminated. The ionic conductivity of the treated BASE is also measured to be higher than untreated BASE at 1,073 K in low-pressure sodium vapor. Microcracking resulting in loss of conductivity was not observed with treated BASE in one high-temperature experiment, but this result must be duplicated over very long testing times to be sure of the effect. Shorter annealing times (10 to 20 hours) were found to result in significantly less loss of mass; it may be necessary for the packed powder mixture to evolve some Na2O before the Na2O can leave the ceramic.

  9. Magnetic field annealing for improved creep resistance

    DOEpatents

    Brady, Michael P.; Ludtka, Gail M.; Ludtka, Gerard M.; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Nicholson, Don M.; Rios, Orlando; Yamamoto, Yukinori

    2015-12-22

    The method provides heat-resistant chromia- or alumina-forming Fe-, Fe(Ni), Ni(Fe), or Ni-based alloys having improved creep resistance. A precursor is provided containing preselected constituents of a chromia- or alumina-forming Fe-, Fe(Ni), Ni(Fe), or Ni-based alloy, at least one of the constituents for forming a nanoscale precipitate MaXb where M is Cr, Nb, Ti, V, Zr, or Hf, individually and in combination, and X is C, N, O, B, individually and in combination, a=1 to 23 and b=1 to 6. The precursor is annealed at a temperature of 1000-1500.degree. C. for 1-48 h in the presence of a magnetic field of at least 5 Tesla to enhance supersaturation of the M.sub.aX.sub.b constituents in the annealed precursor. This forms nanoscale M.sub.aX.sub.b precipitates for improved creep resistance when the alloy is used at service temperatures of 500-1000.degree. C. Alloys having improved creep resistance are also disclosed.

  10. Viscoelastic leveling of annealed thin polystyrene films.

    PubMed

    Rognin, Etienne; Landis, Stefan; Davoust, Laurent

    2014-06-17

    Theoretical and experimental work on nanoscale viscoelastic flows of polystyrene melts is presented. The reflow above the glass transition temperature (T(g)) of a continuous patterned film is characterized. Attention is paid to the topographical consequences of the flow rather than to the temporal description of the leveling of the film. In the framework of capillary wave theory, it is shown that only the shortest spatial wavelengths of the topography exhibit an elastic behavior, while long waves follow a viscous decay. The threshold wavelength depends on the surface tension, on the elastic plateau modulus, and, for ultrathin films, on the film thickness. Besides, for polystyrene, this threshold is a nanoscale parameter and weakly depends on the temperature of annealing. Experiments are conducted on polystyrene 130 kg/mol submicrometer films. The samples are embossed using thermal nanoimprint technology and then annealed at different temperatures between T(g) + 10 °C and T(g) + 50 °C. The smoothed topographies of the films are measured by atomic force microscopy and compared to a single-mode Maxwell leveling model and a more elaborated model based on reptation theory. PMID:24850138

  11. Alumina barrier for vacuum brazing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beuyukian, C. S.

    1980-01-01

    Heating platens of vacuum-brazing press will not stick to workpiece if aluminum oxide "paper" is interposed. Paper does not disintegrate in press, will not contaminate braze alloy, and helps form smoothly contoured, regular fillet at brazed edges.

  12. Vacuum lamination of photovoltaic modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burger, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    Vacuum lamination of terrestrial photovoltaic modules is a new high volume process requiring new equipment and newly develop materials. Equipment development, materials research, and some research in related fields and testing methods are discussed.

  13. APS storage ring vacuum system

    SciTech Connect

    Niemann, R.C.; Benaroya, R.; Choi, M.; Dortwegt, R.J.; Goeppner, G.A.; Gonczy, J.; Krieger, C.; Howell, J.; Nielsen, R.W.; Roop, B.; Wehrle, R.B.

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source synchrotron radiation facility, under construction at the Argonne National Laboratory, incorporates a large ring for the storage of 7 GeV positrons for the generation of photon beams for the facility's experimental program. The Storage Ring's 1104 m circumference is divided into 40 functional sectors. The sectors include vacuum, beam transport, control, acceleration and insertion device components. The vacuum system, which is designed to operate at a pressure of 1 n Torr, consists of 240 connected sections, the majority of which are fabricated from an aluminum alloy extrusion. The sections are equipped with distributed NeG pumping, photon absorbers with lumped pumping, beam position monitors, vacuum diagnostics and valving. The details of the vacuum system design, selected results of the development program and general construction plans are presented. 11 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. X-ray reflectivity measurements of vacuum deposited thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Chason, M. ); Chason, E. )

    1992-01-01

    X-ray reflectivity using energy dispersive X-ray detection, a nondestructive probe of surface roughness over the region of [approximately] 1--50 [Angstrom], has been used to investigate the characteristicsof vacuum deposited thin films. With a surface roughness sensitivity better than 1 [Angstrom] X-ray reflectivity is sensitive to interfaces between different materials for sample thicknesses up to approximately2000 [Angstrom] (depending on material density). We have investigated discrete Cr/Al deposits on quartz substrates and determined the surface roughness at the interfaces. We have also monitored the evolution ofthe Cr/Al interface following annealing. The experimental data is presented and discussed. The use of the technique for studying thin film deposits is addressed.

  15. X-ray reflectivity measurements of vacuum deposited thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Chason, M.; Chason, E.

    1992-12-31

    X-ray reflectivity using energy dispersive X-ray detection, a nondestructive probe of surface roughness over the region of {approximately} 1--50 {Angstrom}, has been used to investigate the characteristicsof vacuum deposited thin films. With a surface roughness sensitivity better than 1 {Angstrom} X-ray reflectivity is sensitive to interfaces between different materials for sample thicknesses up to approximately2000 {Angstrom} (depending on material density). We have investigated discrete Cr/Al deposits on quartz substrates and determined the surface roughness at the interfaces. We have also monitored the evolution ofthe Cr/Al interface following annealing. The experimental data is presented and discussed. The use of the technique for studying thin film deposits is addressed.

  16. Ex situ elaborated proximity mesoscopic structures for ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Stolyarov, V. S.; Cren, T. Debontridder, F.; Brun, C.; Veshchunov, I. S.; Skryabina, O. V.; Rusanov, A. Yu.; Roditchev, D.

    2014-04-28

    We apply ultrahigh vacuum Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy (STS) at ultra-low temperature to study proximity phenomena in metallic Cu in contact with superconducting Nb. In order to solve the problem of Cu-surface contamination, Cu(50?nm)/Nb(100?nm) structures are grown by respecting the inverted order of layers on SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate. Once transferred into vacuum, the samples are cleaved at the structure-substrate interface. As a result, a contamination-free Cu-surface is exposed in vacuum. It enables high-resolution STS of superconducting correlations induced by proximity from the underlying superconducting Nb layer. By applying magnetic field, we generate unusual proximity-induced superconducting vortices and map them with a high spatial and energy resolution. The suggested method opens a way to access local electronic properties of complex electronic mesoscopic devices by performing ex situ STS under ultrahigh vacuum.

  17. Novel Non-Vacuum Fabrication of Solid State Lithium Ion Battery Components

    SciTech Connect

    Oladeji, I.; Wood, D. L.; Wood, III, D. L.

    2012-10-19

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Planar Energy Devices, Inc. was to develop large?scale electroless deposition and photonic annealing processes associated with making all?solid?state lithium ion battery cathode and electrolyte layers. However, technical and processing difficulties encountered in 2011 resulted in the focus of the CRADA being redirected solely to annealing of the cathode thin films. In addition, Planar Energy Devices de?emphasized the importance of annealing of the solid?state electrolytes within the scope of the project, but materials characterization of stabilized electrolyte layers was still of interest. All?solid?state lithium ion batteries are important to automotive and stationary energy storage applications because they would eliminate the problems associated with the safety of the liquid electrolyte in conventional lithium ion batteries. However, all?solid?state batteries are currently produced using expensive, energy consuming vacuum methods suited for small electrode sizes. Transition metal oxide cathode and solid?state electrolyte layers currently require about 30?60 minutes at 700?800°C vacuum processing conditions. Photonic annealing requires only milliseconds of exposure time at high temperature and a total of <1 min of cumulative processing time. As a result, these processing techniques are revolutionary and highly disruptive to the existing lithium ion battery supply chain. The current methods of producing all?solid?state lithium ion batteries are only suited for small?scale, low?power cells and involve high?temperature vacuum techniques. Stabilized LiNixMnyCozAl1?x?y?zO2 (NMCA) nanoparticle films were deposited onto stainless steel substrates using Planar Energy Devices’ streaming process for electroless electrochemical deposition (SPEED). Since successful SPEED trials were demonstrated by Planar Energy Devices with NMCA prior to 2010, this high?voltage (i.e. 5 V) cathode material was the focus of the project. ORNL had also shown in prior work that photonic annealing can be used to anneal conventionally coated cathode metal oxide structures into the active crystalline phase. Planar Energy Devices also had demonstrated SPEED with solid electrolyte layers consisting of LiGaAlSPO4 prior to the start of the project.

  18. Cold cathode vacuum gauging system

    DOEpatents

    Denny, Edward C. (Knoxville, TN)

    2004-03-09

    A vacuum gauging system of the cold cathode type is provided for measuring the pressure of a plurality of separate vacuum systems, such as in a gas centrifuge cascade. Each casing is fitted with a gauge tube assembly which communicates with the vacuum system in the centrifuge casing. Each gauge tube contains an anode which may be in the form of a slender rod or wire hoop and a cathode which may be formed by the wall of the gauge tube. The tube is provided with an insulated high voltage connector to the anode which has a terminal for external connection outside the vacuum casing. The tube extends from the casing so that a portable magnet assembly may be inserted about the tube to provide a magnetic field in the area between the anode and cathode necessary for pressure measurements in a cold cathode-type vacuum gauge arrangement. The portable magnetic assembly is provided with a connector which engages the external high voltage terminal for providing power to the anode within in the gauge tube. Measurement is made in the same manner as the prior cold cathode gauges in that the current through the anode to the cathode is measured as an indication of the pressure. By providing the portable magnetic assembly, a considerable savings in cost, installation, and maintenance of vacuum gauges for pressure measurement in a gas centrifuge cascade is realizable.

  19. Technical specification for vacuum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Khaw, J.

    1987-01-01

    The vacuum systems at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) are primarily of all-metal construction and operate at pressures from 10/sup -5/ to 10/sup -11/ Torr. The primary gas loads during operation result from thermal desorption and beam-induced desorption from the vacuum chamber walls. These desorption rates can be extremely high in the case of hydrocarbons and other contaminants. These specifications place a major emphasis on eliminating contamination sources. The specifications and procedures have been written to insure the cleanliness and vacuum integrity of all SLAC vacuum systems, and to assist personnel involved with SLAC vacuum systems in choosing and designing components that are compatible with existing systems and meet the quality and reliability of SLAC vacuum standards. The specification includes requirements on design, procurement, fabrication, chemical cleaning, clean room practices, welding and brazing, helium leak testing, residual gas analyzer testing, bakeout, venting, and pumpdown. Also appended are specifications regarding acceptable vendors, isopropyl alcohol, bakeable valve cleaning procedure, mechanical engineering safety inspection, notes on synchrotron radiation, and specifications of numerous individual components. (LEW)

  20. Effect of air annealing on the color center in Yb:Y3Al5O12 transparent ceramics with MgO as sintering additive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhongwen; Lu, Tiecheng; Wei, Nian; Zhang, Wei; Ma, Benyuan; Qi, Jianqi; Guan, Yongbing; Chen, Xingtao; Wu, Huajun; Zhao, Yu

    2015-09-01

    High quality Yb:Y3Al5O12 (YAG) transparent ceramics were fabricated by vacuum sintering with MgO as sintering aids. The Yb:YAG samples were annealed at 1250-1450 °C for 20 h in air. The experimental results showed that the transparency of Yb:YAG samples declined markedly with the annealing temperatures of 1250-1450 °C. The samples became increasingly orange-yellow in color with the increase of annealing temperature. The potential reasons of discoloration were discussed for the first time. It was attributed to the complex color center [Mg2+F+] formed during the annealing, which was evidenced by optical absorption in the range of 300-500 nm wavelength and the presence of an electron spin resonance (ESR) line at g = 1.9806. The formation mechanism of the complex color center was explained in detail. The complex color center can be eliminated after post-HIP (hot isostatic pressing). And by air annealing and post-HIP, the transmittance of the samples increased from 80.3% to 83.4%.

  1. Cold-Cathodes for Sensors and Vacuum Microelectronics

    SciTech Connect

    Siegal, M.P.; Sullivan, J.P.; Tallant, D.R.; Simpson, R.L.; DiNardo, N.J.; Mercer, T.W.; Martinez-Miranda, L.J.

    1998-05-01

    The aim of this laboratory-directed research and development project was to study amorphous carbon (a-C) thin films for eventual cold-cathode electron emitter applications. The development of robust, cold-cathode emitters are likely to have significant implications for modern technology and possibly launch a new industry: vacuum micro-electronics (VME). The potential impact of VME on Sandia`s National Security missions, such as defense against military threats and economic challenges, is profound. VME enables new microsensors and intrinsically radiation-hard electronics compatible with MOSFET and IMEM technologies. Furthermore, VME is expected to result in a breakthrough technology for the development of high-visibility, low-power flat-panel displays. This work covers four important research areas. First, the authors studied the nature of the C-C bonding structures within these a-C thin films. Second, they determined the changes in the film structures resulting from thermal annealing to simulate the effects of device processing on a-C properties. Third, they performed detailed electrical transport measurements as a function of annealing temperature to correlate changes in transport properties with structural changes and to propose a model for transport in these a-C materials with implications on the nature of electron emission. Finally, they used scanning atom probes to determine important aspects on the nature of emission in a-C.

  2. Ultrahigh vacuum and low-temperature cleaning of oxide surfaces using a low-concentration ozone beam

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, A.; Graziosi, P.; Bergenti, I.; Dediu, A.; Prezioso, M.; Yamauchi, Y.

    2014-07-15

    We present a novel method of delivering a low-concentration (<15%) ozone beam to an ultra-high vacuum environment for the purpose of cleaning and dosing experimental samples through oxidation processing. The system described is safe, low-cost, and practical and overcomes the limitations of ozone transport in the molecular flow environment of high or ultrahigh vacuum whilst circumventing the use of pure ozone gas which is potentially highly explosive. The effectiveness of this method in removing surface contamination is demonstrated through comparison of high-temperature annealing of a simple oxide (MgO) in ozone and oxygen environments as monitored using quadrupole mass spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy. Additionally, we demonstrate the potential of ozone for obtaining clean complex oxide surfaces without the need for high-temperature annealing which may significantly alter surface structure.

  3. The impact of annealing and evaporation of ? crystals on their surface composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lushkin, A. Ye; Nazarenko, V. B.; Pilipchak, K. N.; Shnyukov, V. F.; Naumovets, A. G.

    1999-01-01

    Auger electron spectroscopy and mass spectrometry have been used to investigate the elemental composition of single-crystalline 0022-3727/32/1/003/img9 surfaces subjected to annealing and evaporation in vacuum and to analyse the evaporation products. We found three distinct temperature regimes, within which the surface composition of 0022-3727/32/1/003/img9 undergoes different changes: outgassing (T = 300-650 K); surface segregation of Li and O (T = 650-1150 K); and evaporation of Li, 0022-3727/32/1/003/img11 and LiO (0022-3727/32/1/003/img12 K). The evaporation of Nb becomes noticeable only at temperatures close to the Curie temperature (1483 K).

  4. Vacuum Fluctuations Cannot Mimic a Cosmological Constant

    E-print Network

    Robert D. Klauber

    2007-11-05

    When the vacuum fluctuation pressure is calculated directly from fundamental principles of quantum field theory, in the same manner as vacuum fluctuation energy density is commonly calculated, one finds it is not equal to the negative of the vacuum fluctuation energy density. Thus, vacuum fluctuations cannot manifest as a cosmological constant of any order.

  5. Phase Transition Phenomena of La0.7Ce0.3MnO3 Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagida, Takeshi; Kanki, Teruo; Vilquin, Bertrand; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Kawai, Tomoji

    2004-03-01

    The perovskite type of manganese oxides has attracted much attention of many researchers due to their fascinating physical properties including colossal magnetoresistance phenomena. Although the major interest of research in this field has been directed at hole-doped systems with doping a divalent cation (e.g. Ca, Sr and Ba), it has been recently realized that electron-doped manganese oxide systems with a tetravalent cation (e.g. Ce and Sn) would be also feasible. In addition, the use of both hole- and electron-doped manganese oxides would be promising for spintronics applications in future. In this study, Ce-doped LaMnO3 thin films were fabricated via a PLD method by controlling the experimental conditions with thermodynamic consideration. Both XRD and EPMA data did not show the presence of CeO2 impurity phases within the films. The resultant films with oxygen or argon post-annealing showed a metal-insulator transition and ferromagnetic property, and the phase transition temperature Tc was found to be significantly influenced by the post-annealing conditions with the Tc ranging from 200-300K. In addition, Hall measurements identified that the major carriers within the films are holes. Microscopic structural and composition analysis using TEM-EDX indicated that cation deficiencies due to nanoclustering cerium oxides within the post-annealed films are responsible for the emergence of the metal-insulator transition and ferromagnetic transition phenomena.

  6. TOP OF STRAND ANNEALING TOWER, ONE OF FIVE SUCH STRUCTURES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TOP OF STRAND ANNEALING TOWER, ONE OF FIVE SUCH STRUCTURES THE BUFFALO PLANT OF AMERICAN BRASS. HEAVIER-GAUGE STRIP IS CONTINUOUSLY ANNEALED TO GIVE THE PRODUCT A MORE UNIFORM GRAIN SIZE AND RENDER IT MORE DUCTILE. - American Brass Foundry, 70 Sayre Street, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  7. BELL ANNEALING FURNACES, SHOWING EMPLOYEEDESIGN CENTER POST WITH THREE RADIAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BELL ANNEALING FURNACES, SHOWING EMPLOYEE-DESIGN CENTER POST WITH THREE RADIAL ARMS FOR HANGING COILS. ANNEALING SOFTENS BATCHES OF COILS WHICH HAVE BEEN HARDENED BY ROLLING SO THAT THEY WILL BE SUITABLE FOR FURTHER PROCESSING. - American Brass Foundry, 70 Sayre Street, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  8. Deformation and annealing response of TD-nickel chromium sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, R. D.; Ebert, L. J.

    1973-01-01

    The deformation and annealing response of TD-nickel chromium (TD-NiCr) 0.1 inch thick sheet was examined using various cold-rolling and annealing treatments. Upon annealing (above 816 C (1500 F), the as-received material was converted from an initially ultra-fine grain size (average grain dimension 0.51 micron) to a large grain structure. Increases in grain size by a factor of 100 to 200 were observed for this transformation. However, in those material states where the large grain transformation was absent, a fine grain recrystallized structure formed upon annealing (above 732 C (1350 F)). The deformation and annealing response of TD-NiCr sheet was evaluated with respect to the processing related variables as mode and severity of deformation and annealing temperature. Results indicate that the large grain transformation, classical primary recrystallization occurs. Using selected materials produced during the deformation and annealing study, the elevated temperature tensile properties of TD-NiCr sheet were examined in the temperature range 593 C (1100 F) to 1093 C (2000 F). It was observed that the elevated temperature tensile properties of TD-NiCr sheet could be optimized by the stabilization of a large grain size in this material using the cold working and/or annealing treatments developed during the present investigation.

  9. Growth and surface modification of LaFeO3 thin films induced by reductive annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Brendan T.; Zhang, Kelvin H. L.; Shutthanandan, Vaithiyalingam; Varga, Tamas; Colby, Robert J.; Oleksak, Richard P.; Manandhar, Sandeep; Engelhard, Mark H.; Chambers, Scott A.; Henderson, Michael A.; Herman, Gregory S.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2015-03-01

    The mixed electronic and ionic conductivity of perovskite oxides has enabled their use in diverse applications such as automotive exhaust catalysts, solid oxide fuel cell cathodes, and visible light photocatalysts. The redox chemistry at the surface of perovskite oxides is largely dependent on the oxidation state of the metal cations as well as the oxide surface stoichiometry. In this study, LaFeO3 (LFO) thin films grown on yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) was characterized using both bulk and surface sensitive techniques. A combination of in situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) demonstrated that the film is primarily textured in the [1 0 0] direction and is stoichiometric. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy measurements show regions that are dominated by [1 0 0] oriented LFO grains that are oriented with respect to the substrates lattice. However, selected regions of the film show multiple domains of grains that are not [1 0 0] oriented. The film was annealed in an ultra-high vacuum chamber to simulate reducing conditions and studied by angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Iron was found to exist as Fe(0), Fe(II), and Fe(III) depending on the annealing conditions and the depth within the film. A decrease in the concentration of surface oxygen species was correlated with iron reduction. These results should help guide and enhance the design of LFO materials for catalytic applications.

  10. Raman and XPS analyses of pristine and annealed N-doped double-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lei; Sauer, Markus; Domanov, Oleg; Rohringer, Philip; Ayala, Paola; Pichler, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    N-doped single/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were studied for long time from synthesis to properties. However, the stability of N in the CNT lattice still needs further developments. In this work, to obtain more stable N-doped CNTs, concentric double-walled (DW) CNTs with more N were synthesized using benzylamine as C and N source. In order to test the stability of N-doped DWCNTs, high-temperature annealing in vacuum was performed. By XPS and Raman spectroscopic measurements, we found that the N-doped DWCNTs are still stable under 1500 $\\,^{\\circ}\\mathrm{C}$: the graphitic N does not change at all, the molecular N is partly removed, and the pyridinic N ratio greatly increases by more than two times. The reason could be that the N atoms from the surrounded N-contained materials combine into the CNT lattice during the annealing. Compared with the undoped DWCNTs, no Raman frequency shift was observed for the RBM, the G-band, and the G'-band of the N-doped DWCNTs.

  11. Optical and paramagnetic properties of synthetic diamond crystals irradiated with electrons and annealed

    SciTech Connect

    Poklonski, N. A. Gusakov, G. A.; Bayev, V. G. Lapchuk, N. M.

    2009-05-15

    The optical and paramagnetic properties of single crystals of synthetic diamond grown by the temperature-gradient method in high-pressure apparatuses with the systems of catalytic solvents (Co, Fe) and (Ni, Fe) are studied at room temperature. The optical absorption spectra (in the wavelength range {lambda} = 400-800 nm) and the spectra of electron spin resonance are registered for the initial diamond crystals, the crystals irradiated with 6 MeV electrons (the fluence 1.5 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -2}), and the irradiated diamonds subjected to isochronous thermal annealing in vacuum (for 60 min). It is shown that, with such treatment, the diamond crystals synthesized with different metal catalysts (Co or Ni) exhibit similar optical properties, but different paramagnetic properties. The data obtained by infrared spectroscopy and electron spin resonance spectroscopy are coincident for radiation defects and different for nitrogen centers (the P1 centers and exchange-coupled pairs of nitrogen atoms). The spectra of the electron spin resonance of the samples annealed at temperatures below 1273 K (in the case of the Co-containing catalyst) and 1073 K (in the case of Ni-containing catalyst) exhibited broad lines produced by residual impurities of the catalyst metal and were accompanied by a distortion of the spectrum of paramagnetic nitrogen in the form of a tilt of the ESR spectra with respect to the zero line.

  12. Raman and XPS analyses of pristine and annealed N-doped double-walled carbon nanotubes

    E-print Network

    Shi, Lei; Domanov, Oleg; Rohringer, Philip; Ayala, Paola; Pichler, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    N-doped single/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were studied for long time from synthesis to properties. However, the stability of N in the CNT lattice still needs further developments. In this work, to obtain more stable N-doped CNTs, concentric double-walled (DW) CNTs with more N were synthesized using benzylamine as C and N source. In order to test the stability of N-doped DWCNTs, high-temperature annealing in vacuum was performed. By XPS and Raman spectroscopic measurements, we found that the N-doped DWCNTs are still stable under 1500 $\\,^{\\circ}\\mathrm{C}$: the graphitic N does not change at all, the molecular N is partly removed, and the pyridinic N ratio greatly increases by more than two times. The reason could be that the N atoms from the surrounded N-contained materials combine into the CNT lattice during the annealing. Compared with the undoped DWCNTs, no Raman frequency shift was observed for the RBM, the G-band, and the G'-band of the N-doped DWCNTs.

  13. Field emission behavior of carbon nanotube field emitters after high temperature thermal annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yuning; Shin, Dong Hoon; Yun, Ki Nam; Leti, Guillaume; Hwang, Yeon Mo; Song, Yenan; Saito, Yahachi; Lee, Cheol Jin

    2014-07-15

    The carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitters have been fabricated by attaching a CNT film on a graphite rod using graphite adhesive material. The CNT field emitters showed much improved field emission properties due to increasing crystallinity and decreasing defects in CNTs after the high temperature thermal annealing at 900 °C in vacuum ambient. The CNT field emitters showed the low turn-on electric field of 1.15 V/?m, the low threshold electric field of 1.62 V/?m, and the high emission current of 5.9 mA which corresponds to a current density of 8.5 A/cm{sup 2}. In addition, the CNT field emitters indicated the enhanced field emission properties due to the multi-stage effect when the length of the graphite rod increases. The CNT field emitter showed good field emission stability after the high temperature thermal annealing. The CNT field emitter revealed a focused electron beam spot without any focusing electrodes and also showed good field emission repeatability.

  14. Bit patterned media optimization at 1 Tdot/in{sup 2} by post-annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Hellwig, Olav; Marinero, Ernesto E.; Kercher, Dan; Hennen, Tyler; McCallum, Andrew; Dobisz, Elizabeth; Wu, Tsai-Wei; Lille, Jeff; Hirano, Toshiki; Ruiz, Ricardo; Grobis, Michael K.; Weller, Dieter; Albrecht, Thomas R.

    2014-09-28

    We report on the fabrication of 1 Tdot/in{sup 2} bit patterned media with high coercivity (H{sub C}) and narrow intrinsic switching field distribution (iSFD) based on nanoimprint from a master pattern formed by e-beam guided block copolymer assembly onto a carbon hard mask and subsequent pattern transfer via etching into a thin CoCrPt perpendicular anisotropy recording layer. We demonstrate that an additional vacuum annealing step after pattern transfer into the CoCrPt layer and after Carbon hard mask removal not only yields recovery from undesired damage of the island edges, but actually transforms the islands into a magnetically more favorable compositional phase with higher H{sub C}, lower iSFD/H{sub C}, and three-fold increased thermal stability. Energy filtered transmission electron microscopy analysis reveals that the diffusion of Cr from the island cores to the periphery of the islands during post-annealing is responsible for the transformation of the magnetic bits into a more stable state.

  15. Growth and Surface Modification of LaFeO3 Thin Films Induced By Reductive Annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, Brendan T.; Zhang, Hongliang; Shutthanandan, V.; Varga, Tamas; Colby, Robert J.; Oleksak, Richard P.; Manandhar, Sandeep; Engelhard, Mark H.; Chambers, Scott A.; Henderson, Michael A.; Herman, Gregory S.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2015-03-01

    The electronic and ionic conductivity of perovskite oxides has enabled their use in diverse applications such as automotive exhaust catalysts, solid oxide fuel cell cathodes, and visible light photocatalysts. The redox chemistry at the surface of perovskite oxides is largely dependent on the oxidation state of the metal cations as well as the oxide surface stoichiometry. In this study, LaFeO3 (LFO) thin films grown on yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) was characterized using both bulk and surface sensitive techniques. A combination of in situ reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED), x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) demonstrated that the film is highly oriented and stoichiometric. The film was annealed in an ultra-high vacuum chamber to simulate reducing conditions and studied by angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Iron was found to exist as Fe(0), Fe(II), and Fe(III) depending on the annealing conditions and the depth within the film. A decrease in the concentration of surface oxygen species was correlated with iron reduction. These results should help guide and enhance the design of perovskite materials for catalysts.

  16. Annealing a Magnetic Cactus into Phyllotaxis

    E-print Network

    Nisoli, Cristiano; Lammert, Paul E; Maynard, J D; Crespi, Vincent H

    2010-01-01

    The appearance of mathematical regularities in the disposition of leaves on a stem, scales on a pine-cone and spines on a cactus has puzzled scholars for millennia; similar so-called phyllotactic patterns are seen in self-organized growth, polypeptides, convection, magnetic flux lattices and ion beams. Levitov showed that a cylindrical lattice of repulsive particles can reproduce phyllotaxis under the (unproved) assumption that minimum of energy would be achieved by 2-D Bravais lattices. Here we provide experimental and numerical evidence that the Phyllotactic lattice is actually a ground state. When mechanically annealed, our experimental "magnetic cactus" precisely reproduces botanical phyllotaxis, along with domain boundaries (called transitions in Botany) between different phyllotactic patterns. We employ a structural genetic algorithm to explore the more general axially unconstrained case, which reveals multijugate (multiple spirals) as well as monojugate (single spiral) phyllotaxis.

  17. Annealing a Magnetic Cactus into Phyllotaxis

    E-print Network

    Cristiano Nisoli; Nathaniel M. Gabor; Paul E. Lammert; J. D. Maynard; Vincent H. Crespi

    2010-02-03

    The appearance of mathematical regularities in the disposition of leaves on a stem, scales on a pine-cone and spines on a cactus has puzzled scholars for millennia; similar so-called phyllotactic patterns are seen in self-organized growth, polypeptides, convection, magnetic flux lattices and ion beams. Levitov showed that a cylindrical lattice of repulsive particles can reproduce phyllotaxis under the (unproved) assumption that minimum of energy would be achieved by 2-D Bravais lattices. Here we provide experimental and numerical evidence that the Phyllotactic lattice is actually a ground state. When mechanically annealed, our experimental "magnetic cactus" precisely reproduces botanical phyllotaxis, along with domain boundaries (called transitions in Botany) between different phyllotactic patterns. We employ a structural genetic algorithm to explore the more general axially unconstrained case, which reveals multijugate (multiple spirals) as well as monojugate (single spiral) phyllotaxis.

  18. Annealing a magnetic cactus into phyllotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nisoli, Cristiano; Gabor, Nathaniel M.; Lammert, Paul E.; Maynard, J. D.; Crespi, Vincent H.

    2010-04-01

    The appearance of mathematical regularities in the disposition of leaves on a stem, scales on a pine-cone, and spines on a cactus has puzzled scholars for millennia; similar so-called phyllotactic patterns are seen in self-organized growth, polypeptides, convection, magnetic flux lattices and ion beams. Levitov showed that a cylindrical lattice of repulsive particles can reproduce phyllotaxis under the (unproved) assumption that minimum of energy would be achieved by two-dimensional Bravais lattices. Here we provide experimental and numerical evidence that the Phyllotactic lattice is actually a ground state. When mechanically annealed, our experimental “magnetic cactus” precisely reproduces botanical phyllotaxis, along with domain boundaries (called transitions in Botany) between different phyllotactic patterns. We employ a structural genetic algorithm to explore the more general axially unconstrained case, which reveals multijugate (multiple spirals) as well as monojugate (single-spiral) phyllotaxis.

  19. Thermoelectric properties by high temperature annealing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ren, Zhifeng (Inventor); Chen, Gang (Inventor); Kumar, Shankar (Inventor); Lee, Hohyun (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention generally provides methods of improving thermoelectric properties of alloys by subjecting them to one or more high temperature annealing steps, performed at temperatures at which the alloys exhibit a mixed solid/liquid phase, followed by cooling steps. For example, in one aspect, such a method of the invention can include subjecting an alloy sample to a temperature that is sufficiently elevated to cause partial melting of at least some of the grains. The sample can then be cooled so as to solidify the melted grain portions such that each solidified grain portion exhibits an average chemical composition, characterized by a relative concentration of elements forming the alloy, that is different than that of the remainder of the grain.

  20. Entanglement in a quantum annealing processor

    E-print Network

    T. Lanting; A. J. Przybysz; A. Yu. Smirnov; F. M. Spedalieri; M. H. Amin; A. J. Berkley; R. Harris; F. Altomare; S. Boixo; P. Bunyk; N. Dickson; C. Enderud; J. P. Hilton; E. Hoskinson; M. W. Johnson; E. Ladizinsky; N. Ladizinsky; R. Neufeld; T. Oh; I. Perminov; C. Rich; M. C. Thom; E. Tolkacheva; S. Uchaikin; A. B. Wilson; G. Rose

    2014-01-15

    Entanglement lies at the core of quantum algorithms designed to solve problems that are intractable by classical approaches. One such algorithm, quantum annealing (QA), provides a promising path to a practical quantum processor. We have built a series of scalable QA processors consisting of networks of manufactured interacting spins (qubits). Here, we use qubit tunneling spectroscopy to measure the energy eigenspectrum of two- and eight-qubit systems within one such processor, demonstrating quantum coherence in these systems. We present experimental evidence that, during a critical portion of QA, the qubits become entangled and that entanglement persists even as these systems reach equilibrium with a thermal environment. Our results provide an encouraging sign that QA is a viable technology for large-scale quantum computing.

  1. Annealing effects on cathodoluminescence of zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Y.; Nishido, H.; Noumi, Y.

    2011-12-01

    U-Pb zircon dating (e. g., SHRIMP) is an important tool to interpret a history of the minerals at a micrometer-scale, where cathodoluminescence (CL) imaging allows us to recognize internal zones and domains with different chemical compositions and structural disorder at high spatial resolution. The CL of zircon is attributed by various types of emission centers, which are extrinsic ones such as REE impurities and intrinsic ones such as structural defects. Metamictization resulted from radiation damage to the lattice by alpha particles from the decay of U and Th mostly causes an effect on the CL features of zircon as a defect center. However, slightly radiation-damaged zircon, which is almost nondetectable by XRD, has not been characterized using CL method. In this study, annealing effects on CL of zircon has been investigated to clarify a recovery process of the damaged lattice at low radiation dose. A single crystal of zircon from Malawi was selected for CL measurements. It contains HfO2: 2.30 w.t %, U: 241 ppm and Th: 177 ppm. Two plate samples perpendicular to c and a axes were prepared for annealing experiments during 12 hours from room temperature to 1400 degree C. Color CL images were captured using a cold-cathode microscope (Luminoscope: Nuclide ELM-3R). CL spectral measurements were conducted using an SEM (JEOL: JSM-5410) combined with a grating monochromator (Oxford: Mono CL2) to measure CL spectra ranging from 300 to 800 nm in 1 nm steps with a temperature controlled stage. The dispersed CL was collected by a photoncounting method using a photomultiplier tube (Hamamatsu: R2228) and converted to digital data. All CL spectra were corrected for the total instrumental response. Spectral analysis reveals an anisotropy of the CL emission bands related to intrinsic defect center in blue region, radiation-induced defect center from 500 to 700 nm, and trivalent Dy impurity center at 480 and 580 nm, but their relative intensities are almost constant. CL on the surface perpendicular to c-axis, at which direction its intensity is maximum, was characterized in this study. Color CL imaging indicates yellow emission below 300 degree C, white to pale blue between 400 ~ 800 degree C and blue above 900 degree C. The broad band emission assigned to radiation-induced defect center in metamict state decreases in an increase of annealed temperature and disappeared above 700 degree C, whereas any change in XRD patterns was not detected. The blue CL emission caused by intrinsic defect center gradually increases in heating due to a recovery of its crystal field. Furthermore, the emission bands of trace amounts of trivalent Gd at 320 nm and Er at 400nm become to be appeared in response to a recrystallization by annealing. Therefore, CL analysis provides useful information on characteristics of the nature of metamict zircon rather than other conventional methods.

  2. Annealed Importance Sampling Reversible Jump MCMC algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Karagiannis, Georgios; Andrieu, Christophe

    2013-03-20

    It will soon be 20 years since reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (RJ-MCMC) algorithms have been proposed. They have significantly extended the scope of Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation methods, offering the promise to be able to routinely tackle transdimensional sampling problems, as encountered in Bayesian model selection problems for example, in a principled and flexible fashion. Their practical efficient implementation, however, still remains a challenge. A particular difficulty encountered in practice is in the choice of the dimension matching variables (both their nature and their distribution) and the reversible transformations which allow one to define the one-to-one mappings underpinning the design of these algorithms. Indeed, even seemingly sensible choices can lead to algorithms with very poor performance. The focus of this paper is the development and performance evaluation of a method, annealed importance sampling RJ-MCMC (aisRJ), which addresses this problem by mitigating the sensitivity of RJ-MCMC algorithms to the aforementioned poor design. As we shall see the algorithm can be understood as being an “exact approximation” of an idealized MCMC algorithm that would sample from the model probabilities directly in a model selection set-up. Such an idealized algorithm may have good theoretical convergence properties, but typically cannot be implemented, and our algorithms can approximate the performance of such idealized algorithms to an arbitrary degree while not introducing any bias for any degree of approximation. Our approach combines the dimension matching ideas of RJ-MCMC with annealed importance sampling and its Markov chain Monte Carlo implementation. We illustrate the performance of the algorithm with numerical simulations which indicate that, although the approach may at first appear computationally involved, it is in fact competitive.

  3. Encapsulated Annealing: Enhancing the Plasmon Quality Factor in Lithographically–Defined Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Bosman, Michel; Zhang, Lei; Duan, Huigao; Tan, Shu Fen; Nijhuis, Christian A.; Qiu, Cheng–Wei; Yang, Joel K. W.

    2014-01-01

    Lithography provides the precision to pattern large arrays of metallic nanostructures with varying geometries, enabling systematic studies and discoveries of new phenomena in plasmonics. However, surface plasmon resonances experience more damping in lithographically–defined structures than in chemically–synthesized nanoparticles of comparable geometries. Grain boundaries, surface roughness, substrate effects, and adhesion layers have been reported as causes of plasmon damping, but it is difficult to isolate these effects. Using monochromated electron energy–loss spectroscopy (EELS) and numerical analysis, we demonstrate an experimental technique that allows the study of these effects individually, to significantly reduce the plasmon damping in lithographically–defined structures. We introduce a method of encapsulated annealing that preserves the shape of polycrystalline gold nanostructures, while their grain-boundary density is reduced. We demonstrate enhanced Q–factors in lithographically–defined nanostructures, with intrinsic damping that matches the theoretical Drude damping limit. PMID:24986023

  4. A technique for creating new visual phenomena

    E-print Network

    Ritter, Donald

    1988-01-01

    This paper outlines a technique for creating new visual phenomena by proposing a systematic method of using existing media in novel manners. The technique involve s the random and purposeful manipulation of person-media ...

  5. Fractal Geometry and Spatial Phenomena A Bibliography

    E-print Network

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    Fractal Geometry and Spatial Phenomena A Bibliography January 1991 Mark MacLennan, A. Stewart. MEASUREMENT ISSUES........................................................... 8 II.1 ESTIMATION OF FRACTAL DIMENSION - GENERAL ISSUES .......... 8 II.2 ESTIMATION OF FRACTAL DIMENSION FOR CURVES/PROFILES ... 9 II.3

  6. Measurement of partial pressures in vacuum technology and vacuum physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, W. K.

    1986-01-01

    It is pointed out that the measurement of gaseous pressures of less than 0.0001 torr is based on the ionization of gas atoms and molecules due to collisions with electrons. The particle density is determined in place of the pressure. The ionization cross sections for molecules of various gases are discussed. It is found that the true pressure in a vacuum system cannot be determined with certainty if it is unknown which gas is present. Effects of partial pressure determination on the condition of the vacuum system are discussed together with ion sources, systems of separation, and ion detection.

  7. Finite Time Vacuum Survival Amplitude and Vacuum Energy Decay

    E-print Network

    Enrique Álvarez; Roberto Vidal

    2011-07-15

    The problem of the vacuum energy decay is studied for both signs of the cosmological constant, through the analysis of the vacuum survival amplitude, defined in terms of the {\\em conformal time}, $z$, by ${\\mathcal A}(z,z^\\prime)\\equiv $. Transition amplitudes are computed for finite time-span, $Z\\equiv z^\\prime-z$, and their {\\em late time} behavior (directly related to the putative decay width of the state) as well as the transients are discussed up to first order in the coupling constant, $\\lambda$.

  8. RFQ Vacuum brazing at CERN

    E-print Network

    Mathot, S

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe the vacuum brazing procedure used at CERN for the brazing of Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ). The RFQ is made of high precision machined OFE copper pieces assembled together. Vacuum brazing is one of the most promising techniques used to join the individual components leading to vacuum tightness and high precision alignment. The RFQ modules brazed at CERN are made of four 100 or 120 cm long vanes (two major and two minor vanes). Our brazing procedure consists of two steps. The first step involves the brazing of the four vanes in a horizontal position. The second step consists of brazing the vacuum stainless steel flanges to the copper structure in a vertical position. The paper describes the problems encountered with the alignment and the vacuum tightness. The difficulties related to the stress relaxation of the machined copper pieces during the brazing heat treatment are discussed. In addition, the solutions developed to improve the alignment of the brazed RFQâ??s are...

  9. Vacuum as a hyperbolic metamaterial

    E-print Network

    Igor I. Smolyaninov

    2011-08-10

    As demonstrated by Chernodub, vacuum in a strong magnetic field behaves as a periodic Abrikosov vortex lattice in a type-II superconductor. We investigate electromagnetic behavior of vacuum in this state. Since superconductivity is realized along the axis of magnetic field only, strong anisotropy of the vacuum dielectric tensor is observed. The diagonal components of the tensor are positive in the x and y directions perpendicular to the magnetic field, and negative in the z direction along the field. As a result, vacuum behaves as a hyperbolic metamaterial medium. If the magnetic field is constant, low frequency extraordinary photons experience this medium as a (3+1) Minkowski spacetime in which the role of time is played by the spatial z coordinate. Spatial variations of the magnetic field curve this effective spacetime, and may lead to formation of "event horizons", which are analogous to electromagnetic black holes in hyperbolic metamaterials. We also note that hyperbolic metamaterials behave as diffractionless "perfect lenses". Since large enough magnetic fields probably had arisen in the course of evolution of early Universe, the demonstrated hyperbolic behavior of early vacuum may have imprints in the large scale structure of the present-day Universe.

  10. Reduce costs with vacuum excavation

    SciTech Connect

    Vitale, S.A.

    1983-09-01

    Although vacuum excavation equipment and methods are in their infancy, this developing technology offers tremendous promise for the future. The author explains Brooklyn Union Gas Co.'s experience with five vacuum trucks and the procedures that are used. In recent years, the higher cost of natural gas has increased the need for gas utilities to reduce their operating expenses. One way, which has been successful at Brooklyn Union Gas, is the use of vacuum excavation. Although vacuum excavation equipment and techniques are in their infancy, this developing technology offers substantial savings today and tremendous promise for the future. Brooklyn Union started its vacuum digging program by locating keyhole cutoffs--small surface openings ranging from 1 ft by 1 ft to 1 1/2 ft by 1 1/2 ft (0.3 m to 0.45 m square). It is no easy task to accurately locate a service that was installed 60 years ago. Reading the street indications, locating an existing curb valve or repair opening, gaining access to the building, making a physical lineup, and using an M-scope, plus any other tools available, have produced a high success rate.

  11. Microscale Digital Vacuum Electronic Gates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manohara, Harish (Inventor); Mojarradi, Mohammed M. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Systems and methods in accordance with embodiments of the invention implement microscale digital vacuum electronic gates. In one embodiment, a microscale digital vacuum electronic gate includes: a microscale field emitter that can emit electrons and that is a microscale cathode; and a microscale anode; where the microscale field emitter and the microscale anode are disposed within at least a partial vacuum; where the microscale field emitter and the microscale anode are separated by a gap; and where the potential difference between the microscale field emitter and the microscale anode is controllable such that the flow of electrons between the microscale field emitter and the microscale anode is thereby controllable; where when the microscale anode receives a flow of electrons, a first logic state is defined; and where when the microscale anode does not receive a flow of electrons, a second logic state is defined.

  12. Gravity-Induced Vacuum Dominance

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, William C. C.; Vanzella, Daniel A. T.

    2010-04-23

    It has been widely believed that, except in very extreme situations, the influence of gravity on quantum fields should amount to just small, subdominant contributions. This view seemed to be endorsed by the seminal results obtained over the last decades in the context of renormalization of quantum fields in curved spacetimes. Here, however, we argue that this belief is false by showing that there exist well-behaved spacetime evolutions where the vacuum energy density of free quantum fields is forced, by the very same background spacetime, to become dominant over any classical energy-density component. By estimating the time scale for the vacuum energy density to become dominant, and therefore for backreaction on the background spacetime to become important, we argue that this (infrared) vacuum dominance may bear unexpected astrophysical and cosmological implications.

  13. Impedances of Laminated Vacuum Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Burov, A.; Lebedev, V.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-22

    First publications on impedance of laminated vacuum chambers are related to early 70s: those are of S. C. Snowdon [1] and of A. G. Ruggiero [2]; fifteen years later, a revision paper of R. Gluckstern appeared [3]. All the publications were presented as Fermilab preprints, and there is no surprise in that: the Fermilab Booster has its laminated magnets open to the beam. Being in a reasonable mutual agreement, these publications were all devoted to the longitudinal impedance of round vacuum chambers. The transverse impedance and the flat geometry case were addressed in more recent paper of K. Y. Ng [4]. The latest calculations of A. Macridin et al. [5] revealed some disagreement with Ref. [4]; this fact stimulated us to get our own results on that matter. Longitudinal and transverse impendances are derived for round and flat laminated vacuum chambers. Results of this paper agree with Ref. [5].

  14. Merguerian, Charles, 1988a, Annealed mylonitic textures in polyphase deformed metamorphic terrains.

    E-print Network

    Merguerian, Charles

    Merguerian, Charles, 1988a, Annealed mylonitic textures in polyphase deformed metamorphic terrains textures. To Cite This Abstract: Merguerian, Charles, 1988a, Annealed mylonitic textures in polyphase

  15. Influence of annealing temperatures on corrosion resistance of magnesium thin film-coated electro-galvanized steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Myeong-Hoon; Kim, Yeon-Won; Lee, Seul-Gee; Kang, Jae-Wook; Park, Jun-Mu; Moon, Kyung-Man; Kim, Yun-Hae

    2015-03-01

    To improve the corrosion resistance of an electro-galvanized steel sheet, we deposited magnesium film on it using a vacuum evaporation method and annealed the films at 250-330°C. The zinc-magnesium alloy is consequently formed by diffusion of magnesium into the zinc coating. From the anodic polarization test in 3% NaCl solution, the films annealed at 270-290°C showed better corrosion resistance than others. In X-ray diffraction analysis, ZnMg2 was detected throughout the temperature range, whereas Mg2Zn11 and FeZn13 were detected only in the film annealed at 310°C. The depth composition profile showed that the compositions of Mg at 270-290°C are evenly and deeply distributed in the film surface layer. These results demonstrate that 270-290°C is a proper temperature range to produce a layer of MgZn2 intermetallic compound to act as a homogenous passive layer.

  16. Enhanced off-resonance magnetoelectric response in laser annealed PZT thick film grown on magnetostrictive amorphous metal substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palneedi, Haribabu; Maurya, Deepam; Kim, Gi-Yeop; Priya, Shashank; Kang, Suk-Joong L.; Kim, Kwang-Ho; Choi, Si-Young; Ryu, Jungho

    2015-07-01

    A highly dense, 4 ?m-thick Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 (PZT) film is deposited on amorphous magnetostrictive Metglas foil (FeBSi) by granule spray in vacuum process at room temperature, followed by its localized annealing with a continuous-wave 560 nm ytterbium fiber laser radiation. This longer-wavelength laser radiation is able to anneal the whole of thick PZT film layer without any deteriorative effects, such as chemical reaction and/or atomic diffusion, at the interface and crystallization of amorphous Metglas substrate. Greatly enhanced dielectric and ferroelectric properties of the annealed PZT are attributed to its better crystallinity and grain growth induced by laser irradiation. As a result, a colossal off-resonance magnetoelectric (ME) voltage coefficient that is two orders of magnitude larger than previously reported output from PZT/Metglas film-composites is achieved. The present work addresses the problems involved in the fabrication of PZT/Metglas film-composites and opens up emerging possibilities in employing piezoelectric materials with low thermal budget substrates (suitable for integrated electronics) and designing laminate composites for ME based devices.

  17. QED vacuum loops and inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, H. M.; Gabellini, Y.

    2015-03-01

    A QED-based model of a new version of vacuum energy has recently been suggested, which leads to a simple, finite, one parameter representation of dark energy. An elementary, obvious, but perhaps radical generalization is then able to describe both dark energy and inflation in the same framework of vacuum energy. One further, obvious generalization then leads to a relation between inflation and the big bang, to the automatic inclusion of dark matter, and to a possible understanding of the birth (and death) of a universe.

  18. Method for vacuum fusion bonding

    DOEpatents

    Ackler, Harold D. (Sunnyvale, CA); Swierkowski, Stefan P. (Livermore, CA); Tarte, Lisa A. (Livermore, CA); Hicks, Randall K. (Stockton, CA)

    2001-01-01

    An improved vacuum fusion bonding structure and process for aligned bonding of large area glass plates, patterned with microchannels and access holes and slots, for elevated glass fusion temperatures. Vacuum pumpout of all components is through the bottom platform which yields an untouched, defect free top surface which greatly improves optical access through this smooth surface. Also, a completely non-adherent interlayer, such as graphite, with alignment and location features is located between the main steel platform and the glass plate pair, which makes large improvements in quality, yield, and ease of use, and enables aligned bonding of very large glass structures.

  19. Birefringence simulation of annealed ingot of calcium fluoride single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogino, H.; Miyazaki, N.; Mabuchi, T.; Nawata, T.

    2008-01-01

    We developed a method for simulating birefringence of an annealed ingot of calcium fluoride single crystal caused by the residual stress after annealing process. The method comprises the heat conduction analysis that provides the temperature distribution during the ingot annealing, the elastic thermal stress analysis using the assumption of the stress-free temperature that provides the residual stress after annealing, and the birefringence analysis of an annealed ingot induced by the residual stress. The finite element method was applied to the heat conduction analysis and the elastic thermal stress analysis. In these analyses, the temperature dependence of material properties and the crystal anisotropy were taken into account. In the birefringence analysis, the photoelastic effect gives the change of refractive indices, from which the optical path difference in the annealed ingot is calculated by the Jones calculus. The relation between the Jones calculus and the approximate method using the stress components averaged along the optical path is discussed theoretically. It is found that the result of the approximate method agrees very well with that of the Jones calculus in birefringence analysis. The distribution pattern of the optical path difference in the annealed ingot obtained from the present birefringence calculation methods agrees reasonably well with that of the experiment. The calculated values also agree reasonably well with those of the experiment, when a stress-free temperature is adequately selected.

  20. Experimental Studies of Light Emission Phenomena in Superconducting RF Cavitites

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony, P.L.; Delayen, J.R.; Fryberger, D.; Goree, W.S.; Mammosser, J.; Szalata, Z.M.; II, J.G.Weisend /SLAC

    2009-08-04

    Experimental studies of light emission phenomena in superconducting RF cavities, which we categorize under the general heading of cavity lights, are described. The cavity lights data, which were obtained using a small CCD video camera, were collected in a series of nine experimental runs ranging from {approx} 1/2 to {approx} 2 h in duration. The video data were recorded on a standard VHS tape. As the runs progressed, additional instrumentation was added. For the last three runs a LabVIEW controlled data acquisition system was included. These runs furnish evidence for several, possibly related, light emission phenomena. The most intriguing of these is what appear to be small luminous objects {le} 1.5 mm in size, freely moving about in the vacuum space, generally without wall contact, as verified by reflections of the tracks in the cavity walls. In addition, on a number of occasions, these objects were observed to bounce off of the cavity walls. The wall-bounce aspect of most of these events was clearly confirmed by pre-bounce and post-bounce reflections concurrent with the tracks. In one of the later runs, a mode of behavior was observed that was qualitatively different from anything observed in the earlier runs. Perhaps the most perplexing aspect of this new mode was the observation of as many as seven luminous objects arrayed in what might be described as a macromolecular formation, coherently moving about in the interior of the cavity for extended periods of time, evidently without any wall contact. It is suggested that these mobile luminous objects are without explanation within the realm of established physics. Some remarks about more exotic theoretical possibilities are made, and future plans are discussed.

  1. Searching for quantum speedup in quasistatic quantum annealers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, Mohammad H.

    2015-11-01

    We argue that a quantum annealer at very long annealing times is likely to experience a quasistatic evolution, returning a final population that is close to a Boltzmann distribution of the Hamiltonian at a single (freeze-out) point during the annealing. Such a system is expected to correlate with classical algorithms that return the same equilibrium distribution. These correlations do not mean that the evolution of the system is classical or can be simulated by these algorithms. The computation time extracted from such a distribution reflects the equilibrium behavior with no information about the underlying quantum dynamics. This makes the search for quantum speedup problematic.

  2. Crystal growth and annealing for minimized residual stress

    DOEpatents

    Gianoulakis, Steven E. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for producing crystals that minimizes birefringence even at large crystal sizes, and is suitable for production of CaF.sub.2 crystals. The method of the present invention comprises annealing a crystal by maintaining a minimal temperature gradient in the crystal while slowly reducing the bulk temperature of the crystal. An apparatus according to the present invention includes a thermal control system added to a crystal growth and annealing apparatus, wherein the thermal control system allows a temperature gradient during crystal growth but minimizes the temperature gradient during crystal annealing.

  3. Photon Propagation in the Casimir Vacuum

    E-print Network

    Javier Pardo Vega; Hugo Pérez Rojas

    2011-10-20

    A transformation that relates the Minkowskian space of the Quantum Electrodynamics (QED) vacuum between parallel conducting plates and the QED vacuum at finite temperature is obtained. From this formal analogy,the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the photon self-energy for the QED vacuum between parallel conducting plates (Casimir vacuum) are found in an approximation independent form. It leads to two different physical eigenvalues and three eigenmodes. We also apply the transformation to derive the low energy photons phase velocity in the Casimir vacuum from its expression in the QED vacuum at finite temperature.

  4. Vacuum-insulated catalytic converter

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K. (Golden, CO)

    2001-01-01

    A catalytic converter has an inner canister that contains catalyst-coated substrates and an outer canister that encloses an annular, variable vacuum insulation chamber surrounding the inner canister. An annular tank containing phase-change material for heat storage and release is positioned in the variable vacuum insulation chamber a distance spaced part from the inner canister. A reversible hydrogen getter in the variable vacuum insulation chamber, preferably on a surface of the heat storage tank, releases hydrogen into the variable vacuum insulation chamber to conduct heat when the phase-change material is hot and absorbs the hydrogen to limit heat transfer to radiation when the phase-change material is cool. A porous zeolite trap in the inner canister absorbs and retains hydrocarbons from the exhaust gases when the catalyst-coated substrates and zeolite trap are cold and releases the hydrocarbons for reaction on the catalyst-coated substrate when the zeolite trap and catalyst-coated substrate get hot.

  5. Vacuum-injection-molding processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, D.P.; Massey, R.T.

    1982-01-01

    An improved processing technique for the manufacture of glass or glass-ceramic headers has been developed. Vacuum-injection molding is a relatively easy processing technique that has been used successfully in the fabrication of several different advantages in certain applications over the present fabrication process which uses glass preforms.

  6. Quantum Vacuum Structure and Cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Rafelski, Johann; Labun, Lance; Hadad, Yaron; Chen, Pisin; /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

    2011-12-05

    Contemporary physics faces three great riddles that lie at the intersection of quantum theory, particle physics and cosmology. They are: (1) The expansion of the universe is accelerating - an extra factor of two appears in the size; (2) Zero-point fluctuations do not gravitate - a matter of 120 orders of magnitude; and (3) The 'True' quantum vacuum state does not gravitate. The latter two are explicitly problems related to the interpretation and the physical role and relation of the quantum vacuum with and in general relativity. Their resolution may require a major advance in our formulation and understanding of a common unified approach to quantum physics and gravity. To achieve this goal we must develop an experimental basis and much of the discussion we present is devoted to this task. In the following, we examine the observations and the theory contributing to the current framework comprising these riddles. We consider an interpretation of the first riddle within the context of the universe's quantum vacuum state, and propose an experimental concept to probe the vacuum state of the universe.

  7. Vacuum pumping system for TPX

    SciTech Connect

    St. Onge, K.D.

    1995-12-31

    The design of the vacuum pumping system for is discussed, and progress in the research and development effort is summarized. The TPX vacuum system will use cryocondensation pumps for hydrogenic divertor pumping and turbomolecular pumps for torus evacuation, glow discharge cleaning, and deuterium-helium divertor pumping. A set of poloidally and toroidally symmetric vacuum ducts will connect the torus to the vacuum pumps; this symmetry will permit simultaneous equal pumping speed at the upper and lower divertors, and it will minimize toroidal variations in divertor pumping speed. At the divertor plena the total cryocondensation pumping speed for D{sub 2} at 65 C and 1 mTorr will be 80 m{sup 3}/s and the total turbomolecular pumping speed for D{sub 2} or He at 65 C and 1 mTorr will be 18 m{sup 3}/s; the system will be compatible with upgrades to improve pumping speed, to operate continuously, or to operate with D-T fuel. The cryocondensation pumps will be custom units capable of completing a low temperature regeneration cycle in 1 hour.

  8. Vacuum barrier for excimer lasers

    DOEpatents

    Shurter, R.P.

    1992-09-15

    A barrier for separating the vacuum area of a diode from the pressurized gas area of an excimer laser. The barrier is a composite material comprising layers of a metal such as copper, along with layers of polyimide, and a matrix of graphite fiber yarns impregnated with epoxy. The barrier is stronger than conventional foil barriers, and allows greater electron throughput. 3 figs.

  9. Vacuum barrier for excimer lasers

    DOEpatents

    Shurter, Roger P. (Jemez Springs, NM)

    1992-01-01

    A barrier for separating the vacuum area of a diode from the pressurized gas area of an excimer laser. The barrier is a composite material comprising layers of a metal such as copper, along with layers of polyimide, and a matrix of graphite fiber yarns impregnated with epoxy. The barrier is stronger than conventional foil barriers, and allows greater electron throughput.

  10. Cleaner Vacuum-Bag Curing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clemons, J. M.; Penn, B. G.; Ledbetter, Frank E., III; Daniels, J. G.

    1987-01-01

    Improvement upon recommended procedures saves time and expense. Autoclave molding in vacuum bag cleaner if adhesive-backed covering placed around caul plate as well as on mold plate. Covering easy to remove after curing and leaves caul plate free of resin deposits.

  11. HIGH PRODUCTIVITY VACUUM BLASTING SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. M.A. Ebadian

    2000-01-13

    The purpose of the project is to increase the productivity and economics of existing vacuum blasting technology. This technology is used to remove radioactive contamination, PCB's and lead-base paint and provides worker and environmental protection by continuously recycling the blast media and the full containment of the dust generated in the process.

  12. Vacuum Flushing of Sewer Solids

    EPA Science Inventory

    The vacuum sewer and tank cleaning (flushing) technology removes sewer solids from urban drainage systems, such as storage tanks and pipes. This technology is both effective and inexpensive. In addition, it can be considered a true green technology. It operates under atmospheri...

  13. Plates for vacuum thermal fusion

    DOEpatents

    Davidson, James C. (Livermore, CA); Balch, Joseph W. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A process for effectively bonding arbitrary size or shape substrates. The process incorporates vacuum pull down techniques to ensure uniform surface contact during the bonding process. The essence of the process for bonding substrates, such as glass, plastic, or alloys, etc., which have a moderate melting point with a gradual softening point curve, involves the application of an active vacuum source to evacuate interstices between the substrates while at the same time providing a positive force to hold the parts to be bonded in contact. This enables increasing the temperature of the bonding process to ensure that the softening point has been reached and small void areas are filled and come in contact with the opposing substrate. The process is most effective where at least one of the two plates or substrates contain channels or grooves that can be used to apply vacuum between the plates or substrates during the thermal bonding cycle. Also, it is beneficial to provide a vacuum groove or channel near the perimeter of the plates or substrates to ensure bonding of the perimeter of the plates or substrates and reduce the unbonded regions inside the interior region of the plates or substrates.

  14. Anomalous Light Phenomena vs. Bioelectric Brain Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodorani, M.; Nobili, G.

    We present a research proposal concerning the instrumented investigation of anomalous light phenomena that are apparently correlated with particular mind states, such as prayer, meditation or psi. Previous research by these authors demonstrate that such light phenomena can be monitored and measured quite efficiently in areas of the world where they are reported in a recurrent way. Instruments such as optical equipment for photography and spectroscopy, VLF spectrometers, magnetometers, radar and IR viewers were deployed and used massively in several areas of the world. Results allowed us to develop physical models concerning the structural and time-variable behaviour of light phenomena, and their kinematics. Recent insights and witnesses have suggested to us that a sort of "synchronous connection" seems to exist between plasma-like phenomena and particular mind states of experiencers who seem to trigger a light manifestation which is very similar to the one previously investigated. The main goal of these authors is now aimed at the search for a concrete "entanglement-like effect" between the experiencer's mind and the light phenomena, in such a way that both aspects are intended to be monitored and measured simultaneously using appropriate instrumentation. The goal of this research project is twofold: a) to verify quantitatively the existence of one very particular kind of mind-matter interaction and to study in real time its physical and biophysical manifestations; b) to repeat the same kind of experiment using the same test-subject in different locations and under various conditions of geomagnetic activity.

  15. Laboratory Exploration of Solar Energetic Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, David

    2007-01-01

    The solar atmosphere displays a wide variety of dynamic phenomena driven by the interaction of magnetic fields and plasma. In particular, plasma jets in the solar chromosphere and corona, coronal heating, solar flares and coronal mass ejections all point to the presence of magnetic phenomena such as reconnection, flux cancellation, the formation of magnetic islands, and plasmoids. While we can observe the signatures and gross features of such phenomena we cannot probe the essential physics driving them, given the spatial resolution of current instrumentation. Flexible and well-controlled laboratory experiments, scaled to solar parameters, open unique opportunities to reproduce the relevant unsteady phenomena under various simulated solar conditions. The ability to carefully control these parameters in the laboratory allows one to diagnose the dynamical processes which occur and to apply the knowledge gained to the understanding of similar processes on the Sun, in addition directing future solar observations and models. This talk introduces the solar phenomena and reviews the contributions made by laboratory experimentation.

  16. The RNA annealing mechanism of the HIV-1 Tat peptide: conversion of the RNA into an annealing-competent conformation

    PubMed Central

    Doetsch, Martina; Fürtig, Boris; Gstrein, Thomas; Stampfl, Sabine; Schroeder, Renée

    2011-01-01

    The annealing of nucleic acids to (partly) complementary RNA or DNA strands is involved in important cellular processes. A variety of proteins have been shown to accelerate RNA/RNA annealing but their mode of action is still mainly uncertain. In order to study the mechanism of protein-facilitated acceleration of annealing we selected a short peptide, HIV-1 Tat(44–61), which accelerates the reaction efficiently. The activity of the peptide is strongly regulated by mono- and divalent cations which hints at the importance of electrostatic interactions between RNA and peptide. Mutagenesis of the peptide illustrated the dominant role of positively charged amino acids in RNA annealing—both the overall charge of the molecule and a precise distribution of basic amino acids within the peptide are important. Additionally, we found that Tat(44–61) drives the RNA annealing reaction via entropic rather than enthalpic terms. One-dimensional-NMR data suggest that the peptide changes the population distribution of possible RNA structures to favor an annealing-prone RNA conformation, thereby increasing the fraction of colliding RNA molecules that successfully anneal. PMID:21297117

  17. HIGH PRODUCTIVITY VACUUM BLASTING SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    William S. McPhee

    1999-05-31

    The objective of this project is to improve the productivity and lower the expense of existing vacuum blasting technology. This technology is used to remove radioactive contamination, PCBs, and lead-based paint and provides worker protection by continuously recycling the material and dust for the decontamination tasks. The proposed work would increase the cleaning rate and provide safe and cost-effective decontamination of the DOE sites. This work focuses on redesigning and improving existing vacuum blasting technology including blast head nozzles, ergonomic handling of the blast head by reducing its weight; brush-ring design, vacuum level regulator, efficiency of the dust separator, and operational control sensors. The redesign is expected to enhance the productivity and economy of the vacuum blasting system by at least 50% over current vacuum blasting systems. There are three phases in the project. Phase I consists of developing and testing mathematical models. Phase II consists of pre-prototype design and fabrication and pre-prototype unit testing. Phase III consists of prototype design and field verification testing. In phase I, mathematical models are developed and analyzed for the nozzle, blast head, wind curtain, and dust separator, first as individual devices and then combined as an integrated model. This allows study of respective airflow and design parameters. The Contractor shall, based on the results of the mathematical modeling studies, design experimental models of the components and test these models. In addition, the Contractor shall develop sensors to detect the relationship of the blast head to the blast surfaces and controls to minimize the dependency on an operator's skill and judgment to obtain optimum positioning, as well as real-time characterization sensors to determine as the blast head is moving the depth to which coatings must be removed, thereby improving production and minimizing waste. In phase II, the Contractor shall design and construct a pre-prototype of the nozzle, blast head with wind curtain, sensors, and dust separator and test this system to assess the performance of the new design under controlled conditions at the contractor's facility. In phase III, the Contractor shall design and construct a prototype of the High Productivity Vacuum Blasting System, based on the results of the pre-prototype design and testing performed. This unit will be a full-scale prototype and will be tested at a designated Department of Energy (DOE) facility. Based on the results, the system performance, the productivity, and the economy of the improved vacuum blasting system will be evaluated.

  18. Can zero-point phenomena truly be the origin of inertia?

    E-print Network

    C. T. Ridgely

    2001-09-16

    A current approach to the problem of inertia suggests that the origin of the inertial properties of matter is the interaction between matter and vacuum electromagnetic zero-point radiation. Herein, it is shown that zero-point phenomena can be treated as the origin of inertia only when one chooses to ignore the mass-energy content of matter. In the absence of any physical basis for such a choice, it is concluded that zero-point-induced forces must arise in addition to the intrinsic inertial properties of ordinary matter.

  19. Critical phenomena in gravitational collapse (review paper)

    E-print Network

    Carsten Gundlach

    1998-01-27

    As first discovered by Choptuik, the black hole threshold in the space of initial data for general relativity shows both surprising structure and surprising simplicity. Universality, power-law scaling of the black hole mass, and scale echoing have given rise to the term "critical phenomena". They are explained by the existence of exact solutions which are attractors within the black hole threshold, that is, attractors of codimension one in phase space, and which are typically self-similar. This review gives an introduction to the phenomena, tries to summarize the essential features of what is happening, and then presents extensions and applications of this basic scenario. Critical phenomena are of interest particularly for creating surprising structure from simple equations, and for the light they throw on cosmic censorship. They may have applications in quantum black holes and astrophysics.

  20. The making of extraordinary psychological phenomena.

    PubMed

    Lamont, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This article considers the extraordinary phenomena that have been central to unorthodox areas of psychological knowledge. It shows how even the agreed facts relating to mesmerism, spiritualism, psychical research, and parapsychology have been framed as evidence both for and against the reality of the phenomena. It argues that these disputes can be seen as a means through which beliefs have been formulated and maintained in the face of potentially challenging evidence. It also shows how these disputes appealed to different forms of expertise, and that both sides appealed to belief in various ways as part of the ongoing dispute about both the facts and expertise. Finally, it shows how, when a formal Psychology of paranormal belief emerged in the twentieth century, it took two different forms, each reflecting one side of the ongoing dispute about the reality of the phenomena. PMID:25363382

  1. Low loss hollow optical-waveguide connection from atmospheric pressure to ultra-high vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermolov, A.; Mak, K. F.; Tani, F.; Hölzer, P.; Travers, J. C.; Russell, P. St. J.

    2013-12-01

    A technique for optically accessing ultra-high vacuum environments, via a photonic-crystal fiber with a long small hollow core, is described. The small core and the long bore enable a pressure ratio of over 108 to be maintained between two environments, while permitting efficient and unimpeded delivery of light, including ultrashort optical pulses. This delivery can be either passive or can encompass nonlinear optical processes such as optical pulse compression, deep UV generation, supercontinuum generation, or other useful phenomena.

  2. Static Friction Phenomena The following static friction phenomena have a direct dependency on velocity.

    E-print Network

    Simpkins, Alex

    Coulomb Friction Viscous Friction Stribeck Friction Static Friction Phenomena The following static friction phenomena have a direct dependency on velocity. Static Friction Model: Friction force opposes the direction of motion when the sliding velocity is zero. Coulomb Friction Model: Friction force

  3. Performance of two different quantum annealing correction codes

    E-print Network

    Anurag Mishra; Tameem Albash; Daniel Lidar

    2015-08-12

    Quantum annealing is a promising approach for solving optimization problems, but like all other quantum information processing methods, it requires error correction to ensure scalability. In this work we experimentally compare two quantum annealing correction codes in the setting of antiferromagnetic chains, using two different quantum annealing processors. The lower temperature processor gives rise to higher success probabilities. The two codes differ in a number of interesting and important ways, but both require four physical qubits per encoded qubit. We find significant performance differences, which we explain in terms of the effective energy boost provided by the respective redundantly encoded logical operators of the two codes. The code with the higher energy boost results in improved performance, at the expense of a lower degree encoded graph. Therefore, we find that there exists an important tradeoff between encoded connectivity and performance for quantum annealing correction codes.

  4. Micro Raman Spectroscopy of Annealed Erbium Implanted GaN

    E-print Network

    Vajpeyi, Agam P.

    Wurtzite GaN epilayers grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition on sapphire substrates were subsequently ion implanted with Er to a dose of 5×10¹? cm?². The implanted samples were annealed in nitrogen atmosphere ...

  5. Simulated annealing in the search for phylogenetic trees 

    E-print Network

    Barker, Daniel

    2000-07-18

    I investigate use of the simulated annealing heuristic to seek phylogenetic trees judged optimal according to the principle of parsimony. I begin by looking into the central data structure in phylogenetic research, the ...

  6. a Method to Change Phase Transition Nature -- Toward Annealing Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Ryo; Tanaka, Shu

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we review a way to change nature of phase transition with annealing methods in mind. Annealing methods are regarded as a general technique to solve optimization problems efficiently. In annealing methods, we introduce a controllable parameter which represents a kind of fluctuation and decrease the parameter gradually. Annealing methods face with a difficulty when a phase transition point exists during the protocol. Then, it is important to develop a method to avoid the phase transition by introducing a new type of fluctuation. By taking the Potts model for instance, we review a way to change the phase transition nature. Although the method described in this paper does not succeed to avoid the phase transition, we believe that the concept of the method will be useful for optimization problems.

  7. INTERIOR VIEW WITH ANNEALING OVEN AND OPERATOR REMOVING EXCESS CORE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW WITH ANNEALING OVEN AND OPERATOR REMOVING EXCESS CORE SAND PRIOR TO PIPE ENTERING OVEN. - McWane Cast Iron Pipe Company, Pipe Casting Area, 1201 Vanderbilt Road, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  8. Distinguishing graphs with a quantum annealer using susceptibility measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmann, Matthew; Hen, Itay; Young, A. P.

    2014-03-01

    Recently it has been proposed that the Graph Isomorphism (GI) problem could be solved using a quantum annealer. This is done by encoding the graphs into Ising Hamiltonians, identifying the vertices with spins and the edges with antiferromagnetic interactions. The idea is that measurements of simple observables during and at the end of the annealing process should distinguish non-isomorphic graphs. The first experimental study of the GI problem using D-Wave's quantum computer has been carried out by Vinci et al., utilizing measurements taken at the end of the annealing process. Here, we will present preliminary evidence that measurements taken part way through the annealing process, now obtainable using state-of-the-art devices, may offer better distinguishing capabilities.

  9. Design and fabrication of a tin-sulfide annealing furnace

    E-print Network

    Lewis, Raymond (Raymond A.)

    2011-01-01

    A furnace was designed and its heat transfer properties were analyzed for use in annealing thin-film tins-ulfide solar cells. Tin sulfide has been explored as an earth abundant solar cell material, and the furnace was ...

  10. Simulated quantum annealing of double-well and multiwell potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inack, E. M.; Pilati, S.

    2015-11-01

    We analyze the performance of quantum annealing as a heuristic optimization method to find the absolute minimum of various continuous models, including landscapes with only two wells and also models with many competing minima and with disorder. The simulations performed using a projective quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) algorithm are compared with those based on the finite-temperature path-integral QMC technique and with classical annealing. We show that the projective QMC algorithm is more efficient than the finite-temperature QMC technique, and that both are inferior to classical annealing if this is performed with appropriate long-range moves. However, as the difficulty of the optimization problem increases, classical annealing loses efficiency, while the projective QMC algorithm keeps stable performance and is finally the most effective optimization tool. We discuss the implications of our results for the outstanding problem of testing the efficiency of adiabatic quantum computers using stochastic simulations performed on classical computers.

  11. OBJECT KINETIC MONTE CARLO SIMULATIONS OF CASCADE ANNEALING IN TUNGSTEN

    SciTech Connect

    Nandipati, Giridhar; Setyawan, Wahyu; Heinisch, Howard L.; Roche, Kenneth J.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2014-03-31

    The objective of this work is to study the annealing of primary cascade damage created by primary knock-on atoms (PKAs) of various energies, at various temperatures in bulk tungsten using the object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) method.

  12. A Class of Stationary Electromagnetic Vacuum Fields

    E-print Network

    Israel, Werner; Wilson, Gordon A.

    1972-01-10

    It is shown how a new class of stationary electromagnetic vacuum fields can be generated from solutions of Laplace's equation. These fields are a stationary generalization of the static electromagnetic vacuum fields of Weyl, Majumdar, and Papapetrou...

  13. Small scale vacuum chamber for general use

    E-print Network

    Clayton, Alexander P

    2013-01-01

    For this thesis a small scale vacuum chamber assembly was designed and fabricated. This chamber's purpose is to provide high quality vacuum conditions for a variety of samples. Often these samples are in need of precise ...

  14. Materials for ultra-high vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, G.

    1989-08-15

    This report discusses materials for use in ultrahigh vacuum systems of 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} Torr or lower. The author briefly discusses alloys, solders, insulators and joining methods for vacuum systems. (JDL)

  15. Vacuum casting of thick polymeric films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuddihy, E. F.; Moacanin, J.

    1979-01-01

    Bubble formation and layering, which often plague vacuum-evaporated films, are prevented by properly regulating process parameters. Vacuum casting may be applicable to forming thick films of other polymer/solvent solutions.

  16. Modeling of fundamental phenomena in welds

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharia, T.; Vitek, J.M.; Goldak, J.A.; DebRoy, T.A.; Rappaz, M.; Bhadeshia, H.K.D.H.

    1993-12-31

    Recent advances in the mathematical modeling of fundamental phenomena in welds are summarized. State-of-the-art mathematical models, advances in computational techniques, emerging high-performance computers, and experimental validation techniques have provided significant insight into the fundamental factors that control the development of the weldment. The current status and scientific issues in the areas of heat and fluid flow in welds, heat source metal interaction, solidification microstructure, and phase transformations are assessed. Future research areas of major importance for understanding the fundamental phenomena in weld behavior are identified.

  17. Annealing effects on microstrain of cobalt oxide nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Deotale, Anjali Jain Nandedkar, R. V.; Sinha, A. K.; Singh, M. N.; Upadhyay, Anuj

    2014-04-24

    Cobalt oxide nanoparticles in different phases have been synthesized using ash supported method. The effect of isochronal annealing on micro-strain of cobalt oxide nanoparticles has been studied. The lattice strain contribution to the x-ray diffraction line broadening in the nanoparticles was analyzed using Williamson Hall (W-H) plot. It is observed that micro-strain was released at higher annealing temperature.

  18. Precise annealing of focal plane arrays for optical detection

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, Daniel A.

    2015-09-22

    Precise annealing of identified defective regions of a Focal Plane Array ("FPA") (e.g., exclusive of non-defective regions of the FPA) facilitates removal of defects from an FPA that has been hybridized and/or packaged with readout electronics. Radiation is optionally applied under operating conditions, such as under cryogenic temperatures, such that performance of an FPA can be evaluated before, during, and after annealing without requiring thermal cycling.

  19. Stochastic search in structural optimization - Genetic algorithms and simulated annealing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajela, Prabhat

    1993-01-01

    An account is given of illustrative applications of genetic algorithms and simulated annealing methods in structural optimization. The advantages of such stochastic search methods over traditional mathematical programming strategies are emphasized; it is noted that these methods offer a significantly higher probability of locating the global optimum in a multimodal design space. Both genetic-search and simulated annealing can be effectively used in problems with a mix of continuous, discrete, and integer design variables.

  20. Ultra High Temperature Rapid Thermal Annealing of GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, X.A.; Fu, M.; Han, J.; Pearton, S.J.; Rieger, D.J.; Sekhar, J.A.; Shul, R.J.; Singh, R.K.; Wilson, R.G.; Zolper, J.C.

    1998-11-20

    All of the major acceptor (Mg, C, Be) and donor (Si, S, Se and Te) dopants have been implanted into GaN films grown on A1203 substrates. Annealing was performed at 1100- 1500 C, using AIN encapsulation. Activation percentages of >90Y0 were obtained for Si+ implantation annealed at 1400 C, while higher temperatures led to a decrease in both carrier concentration and electron mobility. No measurable redistribution of any of the implanted dopants was observed at 1450 C.

  1. Method and apparatus for selectively annealing heterostructures using microwave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwater, Harry A. (Inventor); Brain, Ruth A. (Inventor); Barmatz, Martin B. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention discloses a process for selectively annealing heterostructures using microwaves. A heterostructure, comprised of a material having higher microwave absorption and a material having lower microwave absorption, is exposed to microwaves in the cavity. The higher microwave absorbing material absorbs the microwaves and selectively heats while the lower microwave absorbing material absorbs small amounts of microwaves and minimally heats. The higher microwave absorbing material is thereby annealed onto the less absorbing material which is thermally isolated.

  2. Method and apparatus for selectively annealing heterostructures using microwaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwater, Harry A. (Inventor); Brain, Ruth A. (Inventor); Barmatz, Martin B. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention discloses a process for selectively annealing heterostructures using microwaves. A heterostructure, comprised of a material having higher microwave absorption and a material having lower microwave absorption, is exposed to microwaves in the cavity. The higher microwave absorbing material absorbs the microwaves and selectively heats while the lower microwave absorbing material absorbs small amounts of microwaves and minimally heats. The higher microwave absorbing material is thereby annealed onto the less absorbing material which is thermally isolated.

  3. Nonsmooth trajectory optimization - An approach using continuous simulated annealing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Ping; Khan, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    An account is given of the properties of a continuous simulated annealing algorithm that can function as a global optimization tool for nonsmooth dynamic systems, as shown in the case of a trajectory-optimization program implementation. The approach is shown to successfully solve the problem of nonsmooth trajectory optimization for a high performance rigid-body aircraft. The results obtained demonstrate the superiority of the simulated annealing algorithm over widely used algorithms.

  4. Switching Circuit for Shop Vacuum System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burley, R. K.

    1987-01-01

    No internal connections to machine tools required. Switching circuit controls vacuum system draws debris from grinders and sanders in machine shop. Circuit automatically turns on vacuum system whenever at least one sander or grinder operating. Debris safely removed, even when operator neglects to turn on vacuum system manually. Pickup coils sense alternating magnetic fields just outside operating machines. Signal from any coil or combination of coils causes vacuum system to be turned on.

  5. Microwave Annealing of Ion Implanted 4H-SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Mulpuri V.; Nath, A.; Qadri, S. B.; Tian, Y.-L.; Nipoti, R.

    2011-01-07

    Ultra-fast high-temperature microwave annealing at temperatures as high as 2050 deg. C for 30 s has been performed on phosphorus ion-implanted 4H-SiC for phosphorus doping concentrations in the range 5x10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}-8x10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}. For comparison, inductive heating furnace anneals were performed at 1800 deg. C-1950 deg. C for 5 min. Electrical resistivity of the P{sup +}-implanted samples decreased with increasing annealing temperature reaching a minimum value of 6.8x10{sup -4} {Omega}cm for 2050 deg. C/30 s microwave annealing and a slightly higher value for 1950 deg. C/5 min inductive heating furnace annealing. X-ray rocking curve measurements showed that the microwave annealing not only removed the lattice damage introduced by the ion-implantation process, but also the defects present in the original virgin sample as well.

  6. Melt crystallization/dewetting of ultrathin PEO films via carbon dioxide annealing: the effects of polymer adsorbed layers.

    PubMed

    Asada, Mitsunori; Jiang, Naisheng; Sendogdular, Levent; Sokolov, Jonathan; Endoh, Maya K; Koga, Tadanori; Fukuto, Masafumi; Yang, Lin; Akgun, Bulent; Dimitriou, Michael; Satija, Sushil

    2014-09-14

    The effects of CO2 annealing on the melting and subsequent melt crystallization processes of spin-cast poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) ultrathin films (20-100 nm in thickness) prepared on Si substrates were investigated. By using in situ neutron reflectivity, we found that all the PEO thin films show melting at a pressure as low as P = 2.9 MPa and at T = 48 °C which is below the bulk melting temperature (Tm). The films were then subjected to quick depressurization to atmospheric pressure, resulting in the non-equilibrium swollen state, and the melt crystallization (and/or dewetting) process was carried out in air via subsequent annealing at given temperatures below Tm. Detailed structural characterization using grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and polarized optical microscopy revealed two unique aspects of the CO2-treated PEO films: (i) a flat-on lamellar orientation, where the molecular chains stand normal to the film surface, is formed within the entire film regardless of the original film thickness and the annealing temperature; and (ii) the dewetting kinetics for the 20 nm thick film is much slower than that for the thicker films. The key to these phenomena is the formation of irreversibly adsorbed layers on the substrates during the CO2 annealing: the limited plasticization effect of CO2 at the polymer-substrate interface promotes polymer adsorption rather than melting. Here we explain the mechanisms of the melt crystallization and dewetting processes where the adsorbed layers play vital roles. PMID:24930998

  7. Optical and Electronic Properties of Post Annealed ZnO:Al Thin Films

    E-print Network

    Park, Byungwoo

    Introduction - Transparent Conducting Oxide - Properties of ZnO Yumin Kim 3/22 #12;Transparent Conducting Oxide (TCOOptical and Electronic Properties of Post Annealed ZnO:Al Thin Films Optical and Electronic Properties of Post Annealed ZnO:Al Thin FilmsPost-Annealed ZnO:Al Thin FilmsPost-Annealed ZnO:Al Thin Films

  8. 10 CFR 50.66 - Requirements for thermal annealing of the reactor pressure vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... profile of the annealing operation. These analyses must include heatup and cooldown rates, and must... temperature profiles, and stresses evaluated for the proposed thermal annealing conditions of paragraph (b)(1... time and temperature profiles of the actual thermal annealing; (2) The post-anneal RTNDT and...

  9. 10 CFR 50.66 - Requirements for thermal annealing of the reactor pressure vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... profile of the annealing operation. These analyses must include heatup and cooldown rates, and must... temperature profiles, and stresses evaluated for the proposed thermal annealing conditions of paragraph (b)(1... time and temperature profiles of the actual thermal annealing; (2) The post-anneal RTNDT and...

  10. 10 CFR 50.66 - Requirements for thermal annealing of the reactor pressure vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... profile of the annealing operation. These analyses must include heatup and cooldown rates, and must... temperature profiles, and stresses evaluated for the proposed thermal annealing conditions of paragraph (b)(1... time and temperature profiles of the actual thermal annealing; (2) The post-anneal RTNDT and...

  11. 10 CFR 50.66 - Requirements for thermal annealing of the reactor pressure vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... profile of the annealing operation. These analyses must include heatup and cooldown rates, and must... temperature profiles, and stresses evaluated for the proposed thermal annealing conditions of paragraph (b)(1... time and temperature profiles of the actual thermal annealing; (2) The post-anneal RTNDT and...

  12. 10 CFR 50.66 - Requirements for thermal annealing of the reactor pressure vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... profile of the annealing operation. These analyses must include heatup and cooldown rates, and must... temperature profiles, and stresses evaluated for the proposed thermal annealing conditions of paragraph (b)(1... time and temperature profiles of the actual thermal annealing; (2) The post-anneal RTNDT and...

  13. Lecture 15 Simulated Annealing and Genetic Algorithm Weinan E1,2

    E-print Network

    Li, Tiejun

    Lecture 15 Simulated Annealing and Genetic Algorithm Weinan E1,2 and Tiejun Li2 1 Department, tieli@pku.edu.cn No.1 Science Building, 1575 #12;Introduction Simulated Annealing Genetic Algorithm Outline Introduction Simulated Annealing Genetic Algorithm #12;Introduction Simulated Annealing Genetic

  14. 14 CFR 25.1433 - Vacuum systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Vacuum systems. 25.1433 Section 25.1433...Miscellaneous Equipment § 25.1433 Vacuum systems. There must be means...pressure in the discharge lines from the vacuum air pump when the delivery...

  15. 14 CFR 29.1433 - Vacuum systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Vacuum systems. 29.1433 Section 29.1433...Miscellaneous Equipment § 29.1433 Vacuum systems. (a) There must be means...pressure in the discharge lines from the vacuum air pump when the delivery...

  16. 14 CFR 29.1433 - Vacuum systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Vacuum systems. 29.1433 Section 29.1433...Miscellaneous Equipment § 29.1433 Vacuum systems. (a) There must be means...pressure in the discharge lines from the vacuum air pump when the delivery...

  17. 14 CFR 25.1433 - Vacuum systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Vacuum systems. 25.1433 Section 25.1433...Miscellaneous Equipment § 25.1433 Vacuum systems. There must be means...pressure in the discharge lines from the vacuum air pump when the delivery...

  18. 14 CFR 25.1433 - Vacuum systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Vacuum systems. 25.1433 Section 25.1433...Miscellaneous Equipment § 25.1433 Vacuum systems. There must be means...pressure in the discharge lines from the vacuum air pump when the delivery...

  19. 46 CFR 154.804 - Vacuum protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Vacuum protection. 154.804 Section 154...Equipment Cargo Vent Systems § 154.804 Vacuum protection. (a) Except as allowed...this section, each cargo tank must have a vacuum protection system meeting...

  20. 14 CFR 29.1433 - Vacuum systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Vacuum systems. 29.1433 Section 29.1433...Miscellaneous Equipment § 29.1433 Vacuum systems. (a) There must be means...pressure in the discharge lines from the vacuum air pump when the delivery...

  1. 46 CFR 154.804 - Vacuum protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Vacuum protection. 154.804 Section 154...Equipment Cargo Vent Systems § 154.804 Vacuum protection. (a) Except as allowed...this section, each cargo tank must have a vacuum protection system meeting...

  2. 14 CFR 25.1433 - Vacuum systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Vacuum systems. 25.1433 Section 25.1433...Miscellaneous Equipment § 25.1433 Vacuum systems. There must be means...pressure in the discharge lines from the vacuum air pump when the delivery...

  3. 14 CFR 25.1433 - Vacuum systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Vacuum systems. 25.1433 Section 25.1433...Miscellaneous Equipment § 25.1433 Vacuum systems. There must be means...pressure in the discharge lines from the vacuum air pump when the delivery...

  4. 46 CFR 154.804 - Vacuum protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Vacuum protection. 154.804 Section 154...Equipment Cargo Vent Systems § 154.804 Vacuum protection. (a) Except as allowed...this section, each cargo tank must have a vacuum protection system meeting...

  5. 14 CFR 29.1433 - Vacuum systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Vacuum systems. 29.1433 Section 29.1433...Miscellaneous Equipment § 29.1433 Vacuum systems. (a) There must be means...pressure in the discharge lines from the vacuum air pump when the delivery...

  6. 14 CFR 29.1433 - Vacuum systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Vacuum systems. 29.1433 Section 29.1433...Miscellaneous Equipment § 29.1433 Vacuum systems. (a) There must be means...pressure in the discharge lines from the vacuum air pump when the delivery...

  7. REVIEW ARTICLE Vacuum Rabi splitting in semiconductors

    E-print Network

    Loss, Daniel

    REVIEW ARTICLE Vacuum Rabi splitting in semiconductors The recent development of techniques. We discuss the recent results on vacuum Rabi splitting with a single quantum dot, emphasizing of a nanocavity. This review describes the history of realizing vacuum Rabi splitting (VRS) in the single-QD (SQD

  8. Vacuum energy and Casimir forces : an introduction

    E-print Network

    Vacuum energy and Casimir forces : an introduction casimir-network.org PASI « Frontiers in Casimir. Canaguier-Durand ... ¾ Attractive force (negative pressure) A universal effect from confinement of vacuum performed at room temperature ¾ Effect of thermal field fluctuations to be added to that of vacuum

  9. Utilize Vacuum Forming to Make Interdisciplinary Connections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Tyler S.; Valenza, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The concept of vacuum forming has been around since the 19th century, despite not being fully utilized in industry until the 1950s. In the past, industrial arts classes have used vacuum-forming projects to concentrate solely on the manufacturing process and the final product. However, vacuum forming is not just an old industrial arts activity; it…

  10. Vacuum Fluctuations and the Cosmological Constant

    E-print Network

    Shi Qi

    2006-04-29

    The hypothesis is proposed that under the approximation that the quantum equations of motion reduce to the classical ones, the quantum vacuum also reduces to the classical vacuum--the empty space. The vacuum energy of QED is studied under this hypothesis. A possible solution to the cosmological constant problem is provided and a kind of parameterization of the cosmological "constant" is derived.

  11. FIRE Vacuum Vessel Design and Analysis

    E-print Network

    FIRE Vacuum Vessel Design and Analysis B. Nelson, T. Brown, H-M Fan, G. Jones, C. Kessel, D and features · Analysis status · Summary #12;6 June 2001 FIRE Review: Vacuum Vessel Design 3 FIRE vacuum vessel pressure, coolant pressure - EM loads on vessel and internals (including VDEs) - weight and seismic loads

  12. Fabrication and properties of TiO2 nanofilms on different substrates by a novel and universal method of Ti-ion implantation and subsequent annealing.

    PubMed

    Ren, Feng; Zhou, Xiao-Dong; Liu, Yi-Chao; Wang, Yong-Qiang; Cai, Guang-Xu; Xiao, Xiang-Heng; Dai, Zhi-Gao; Li, Wen-Qing; Yan, Shao-Jian; Wu, Wei; Zhang, Chao; Ni, Hong-Wei; Jiang, Chang-Zhong

    2013-06-28

    We report a new, novel and universal method to fabricate high-quality titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanofilms on different substrates by a solid phase growth process of ion implantation and subsequent annealing in oxygen atmosphere. Ti ions were implanted into fused silica, soda lime glass, Z-cut quartz, or (0001) ?-sapphire by a metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) ion source implanter to fluences of 0.75, 1.5 and 3 × 10(17) ions cm(-2) with a nominal accelerating voltage of 20 kV. To understand the influence of the annealing temperature, time, and substrate on the formation and phase transformation of the TiO2 nanofilms, the Ti-ion-implanted substrates were annealed in oxygen atmosphere from 500 to 1000 °C for 1-6 h. The formation of TiO2 nanofilms resulted from the slow out-diffusion of implanted Ti ions from the substrates which were then oxidized at the surfaces. The thickness and phase of the nanofilms can be tailored by controlling the implantation and annealing parameters. Since the TiO2 nanofilms are formed under high temperature and low growth rate, they show good crystallinity and antibacterial properties, with good film adhesion and stability, suggesting that the TiO2 nanofilms formed by this method have great potential in applications such as antibacterial and self-cleaning transparent glass. PMID:23727692

  13. Effect of annealing in a various oxygen atmosphere on structural, optical, electrical and gas sensing properties of MoxOy thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arfaoui, A.; Ouni, B.; Touihri, S.; Mhamdi, A.; Labidi, A.; Manoubi, T.

    2015-07-01

    Molybdenum oxide thin films were thermally evaporated on a glass substrate and monitored by an annealing process in a variable oxygen atmosphere. The effects of post annealing condition on the microstructural, morphological, optical and electrical properties were investigated using X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscope, spectroscopic ellipsometry and impedance spectroscopy. As-deposited amorphous films crystallized into tetragonal metastable phase of Mo5O14 on annealing at 500 °C in vacuum and air. This structure transformed to stable orthorhombic of MoO3 with annealing in oxygen environment. The optical parameters such as the refractive index, extinction coefficient, optical band gap energy and the Urbach energy were calculated from Cauchy formalism. Ellipsometric measurements reveal that the samples present optical gap located between 3.24 and 3.90 eV when the atmosphere becomes rich on oxygen. The variation of the conductivity in terms of the temperature shows an electrical behavior with oxygen environment. Finally, it has been found that MoO3 thin films had high sensitivity to ethanol, which made them as a good candidate for the ethanol sensor.

  14. Investigation of the annealing effects on the structural and optoelectronic properties of RF-sputtered ZnO films studied by the Drude-Lorentz model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Méndez, Manuel; Bedoya-Calle, Álvaro; Segura, Ricardo Rangel; Coello, Víctor

    2015-09-01

    Zinc oxide films were deposited on glass substrates by RF reactive magnetron sputtering and post-annealed in vacuum at 100, 200, and 300 ºC. Structural and optical properties of films were obtained using X-ray diffraction and UV-visible spectroscopy. Optical parameters were extracted from transmittance curves using the single-oscillator Drude-Lorentz model. The evolution of the optical and structural properties of films with the annealing process was investigated. The films crystallized into the hexagonal würzite lattice structure, with preferential growth along the c-axis [0002]. The results indicate that the crystalline quality of films improved with annealing, whereas transparency was reduced from 90 to 80 % at 300 ºC. With post-annealing, the absorption edge shifted to the red, while the optical band gap decreased from to eV because of the Burstein-Moss effect. Calculated values of plasma frequency, fall within the IR range and decrease with temperature, from rad/s () to rad/s ().

  15. 49 CFR 570.56 - Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system. 570.56 Section 570.56 ...GVWR of More Than 10,000 Pounds § 570.56 Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system....

  16. 49 CFR 570.56 - Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system. 570.56 Section 570.56 ...GVWR of More Than 10,000 Pounds § 570.56 Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system....

  17. 49 CFR 570.56 - Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system. 570.56 Section 570.56 ...GVWR of More Than 10,000 Pounds § 570.56 Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system....

  18. 49 CFR 570.56 - Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system. 570.56 Section 570.56 ...GVWR of More Than 10,000 Pounds § 570.56 Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system....

  19. Atmospheric phenomena before and during sunset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menat, M.

    The atmospheric transmittance and the astronomical refraction for low-elevation trajectories are discussed and quantitatively developed. The results are used to describe and calculate some of the fascinating atmospheric phenomena occurring shortly before and during sunset, such as the diminishing apparent luminance of the sun, its shape during sunset, and the green flash.

  20. Atmospheric phenomena before and during sunset.

    PubMed

    Menat, M

    1980-10-15

    The atmospheric transmittance and the astronomical refraction for low-elevation trajectories are discussed and quantitatively developed. The results are used to describe and calculate some of the fascinating atmospheric phenomena occurring shortly before and during sunset, such as the diminishing apparent luminance of the sun, its shape during sunset, and the green flash. PMID:20234641