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1

Controlled planar interface synthesis by ultrahigh vacuum diffusion bonding/deposition  

SciTech Connect

An ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) diffusion bonding/deposition instrument was designed and constructed, which can produce homophase and heterophase planar interfaces from a wide array of materials. The interfaces are synthesized in situ by diffusion bonding of two substrates with or without various interfacial layers, at temperatures up to about 1500 degree sign C. Substrate surfaces can be heat treated, ion-beam sputter cleaned, and chemically characterized in situ by Auger electron spectroscopy prior to deposition and/or bonding. Bicrystals can be synthesized by bonding two single-crystal substrates at a specified orientation. Interfacial layers can be deposited by electron beam evaporation and/or sputter deposition in any layered or alloyed combination on the substrates before bonding. The instrument can accommodate cylindrical and/or wafer type specimens whose sizes are sufficient for fracture mechanical testing to measure interface bond strength. A variety of planar interfaces of metals, semiconductors, and ceramics were synthesized. Examples of bonded stainless steel/Ti/stainless steel, Si/Si, and sapphire/sapphire interfaces are presented. (c) 2000 Materials Research Society.

Kim, M. J. [Center for Solid State Science, Science and Engineering of Materials, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1704 (United States); Carpenter, R. W. [Center for Solid State Science, Science and Engineering of Materials, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1704 (United States); Cox, M. J. [Center for Solid State Science, Science and Engineering of Materials, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1704 (United States); Xu, J. [Center for Solid State Science, Science and Engineering of Materials, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1704 (United States)

2000-04-01

2

Diffusion Bonding of Metals.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The need to reduce the cost and weight of aerospace metallic structures has led to increased interest in solid state and liquid phase diffusion bonding processes, especially in combination with superplastic forming. The bonding mechanisms and bonding tech...

P. G. Partridge

1989-01-01

3

Method for vacuum fusion bonding  

DOEpatents

An improved vacuum fusion bonding structure and process for aligned bonding of large area glass plates, patterned with microchannels and access holes and slots, for elevated glass fusion temperatures. Vacuum pumpout of all components is through the bottom platform which yields an untouched, defect free top surface which greatly improves optical access through this smooth surface. Also, a completely non-adherent interlayer, such as graphite, with alignment and location features is located between the main steel platform and the glass plate pair, which makes large improvements in quality, yield, and ease of use, and enables aligned bonding of very large glass structures.

Ackler, Harold D. (Sunnyvale, CA); Swierkowski, Stefan P. (Livermore, CA); Tarte, Lisa A. (Livermore, CA); Hicks, Randall K. (Stockton, CA)

2001-01-01

4

Vacuum fusion bonding of glass plates  

DOEpatents

An improved apparatus and method for vacuum fusion bonding of large, patterned glass plates. One or both glass plates are patterned with etched features such as microstructure capillaries and a vacuum pumpout moat, with one plate having at least one hole therethrough for communication with a vacuum pumpout fixture. High accuracy alignment of the plates is accomplished by a temporary clamping fixture until the start of the fusion bonding heat cycle. A complete, void-free fusion bond of seamless, full-strength quality is obtained through the plates; because the glass is heated well into its softening point and because of a large, distributed force that is developed that presses the two plates together from the difference in pressure between the furnace ambient (high pressure) and the channeling and microstructures in the plates (low pressure) due to the vacuum drawn. The apparatus and method may be used to fabricate microcapillary arrays for chemical electrophoresis; for example, any apparatus using a network of microfluidic channels embedded between plates of glass or similar moderate melting point substrates with a gradual softening point curve, or for assembly of glass-based substrates onto larger substrates, such as in flat panel display systems.

Swierkowski, Steve P. (Livermore, CA); Davidson, James C. (Livermore, CA); Balch, Joseph W. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01

5

Vacuum fusion bonding of glass plates  

DOEpatents

An improved apparatus and method for vacuum fusion bonding of large, patterned glass plates. One or both glass plates are patterned with etched features such as microstructure capillaries and a vacuum pumpout moat, with one plate having at least one hole therethrough for communication with a vacuum pumpout fixture. High accuracy alignment of the plates is accomplished by a temporary clamping fixture until the start of the fusion bonding heat cycle. A complete, void-free fusion bond of seamless, full-strength quality is obtained through the plates; because the glass is heated well into its softening point and because of a large, distributed force that is developed that presses the two plates together from the difference in pressure between the furnace ambient (high pressure) and the channeling and microstructures in the plates (low pressure) due to the vacuum drawn. The apparatus and method may be used to fabricate microcapillary arrays for chemical electrophoresis; for example, any apparatus using a network of microfluidic channels embedded between plates of glass or similar moderate melting point substrates with a gradual softening point curve, or for assembly of glass-based substrates onto larger substrates, such as in flat panel display systems.

Swierkowski, Steve P. (Livermore, CA); Davidson, James C. (Livermore, CA); Balch, Joseph W. (Livermore, CA)

2001-01-01

6

Electrospray emitters For diffusion vacuum pumps  

E-print Network

Following similar principles as regular diffusion vacuum pumps, an electrospray emitter is set to produce a jet of charged particles that will drag air molecules out of a volume. To be a feasible concept, the emitted ...

Diaz Gómez Maqueo, Pablo (Pablo Ly)

2011-01-01

7

Diffusion bonding of ?-TiAl sheets  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using advanced ?-TiAl based alloys and various ingot and powder metallurgical routes, several aerospace engine components are now being developed. Further application of this material in the aerospace industry can only be implemented provided that successful joining and cost effective fabrication methods for this material are developed. In this context, diffusion bonding and superplastic forming of this material is considered

G. Çm; H. Clemens; R. Gerling; M. Koçak

1999-01-01

8

Vacuum fusion bonded glass plates having microstructures thereon  

DOEpatents

An improved apparatus and method for vacuum fusion bonding of large, patterned glass plates. One or both glass plates are patterned with etched features such as microstructure capillaries and a vacuum pumpout moat, with one plate having at least one hole therethrough for communication with a vacuum pumpout fixture. High accuracy alignment of the plates is accomplished by a temporary clamping fixture until the start of the fusion bonding heat cycle. A complete, void-free fusion bond of seamless, full-strength quality is obtained through the plates; because the glass is heated well into its softening point and because of a large, distributed force that is developed that presses the two plates together from the difference in pressure between the furnace ambient (high pressure) and the channeling and microstructures in the plates (low pressure) due to the vacuum drawn. The apparatus and method may be used to fabricate microcapillary arrays for chemical electrophoresis; for example, any apparatus using a network of microfluidic channels embedded between plates of glass or similar moderate melting point substrates with a gradual softening point curve, or for assembly of glass-based substrates onto larger substrates, such as in flat panel display systems.

Swierkowski, Steve P. (Livermore, CA); Davidson, James C. (Livermore, CA); Balch, Joseph W. (Livermore, CA)

2001-01-01

9

Using Diffusion Bonding in Making Piezoelectric Actuators  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A technique for the fabrication of piezoelectric actuators that generate acceptably large forces and deflections at relatively low applied voltages involves the stacking and diffusion bonding of multiple thin piezoelectric layers coated with film electrodes. The present technique stands in contrast to an older technique in which the layers are bonded chemically, by use of urethane or epoxy agents. The older chemical-bonding technique entails several disadvantages, including the following: It is difficult to apply the bonding agents to the piezoelectric layers. It is difficult to position the layers accurately and without making mistakes. There is a problem of disposal of hazardous urethane and epoxy wastes. The urethane and epoxy agents are nonpiezoelectric materials. As such, they contribute to the thickness of a piezoelectric laminate without contributing to its performance; conversely, for a given total thickness, the performance of the laminate is below that of a unitary piezoelectric plate of the same thickness. The figure depicts some aspects of the fabrication of a laminated piezoelectric actuator by the present diffusion- bonding technique. First, stock sheets of the piezoelectric material are inspected and tested. Next, the hole pattern shown in the figure is punched into the sheets. Alternatively, if the piezoelectric material is not a polymer, then the holes are punched in thermoplastic films. Then both faces of each punched piezoelectric sheet or thermoplastic film are coated with a silver-ink electrode material by use of a silkscreen printer. The electrode and hole patterns are designed for minimal complexity and minimal waste of material. After a final electrical test, all the coated piezoelectric layers (or piezoelectric layers and coated thermoplastic films) are stacked in an alignment jig, which, in turn, is placed in a curved press for the diffusion-bonding process. In this process, the stack is pressed and heated at a specified curing temperature and pressure for a specified curing time. The pressure, temperature, and time depend on the piezoelectric material selected. At the end of the diffusion-bonding process, the resulting laminated piezoelectric actuator is tested to verify the adequacy of the mechanical output as a function of an applied DC voltage.

Sager, Frank E.

2003-01-01

10

Effective moisture diffusivity of plain yogurt undergoing microwave vacuum drying  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effective moisture diffusivity of yogurt was estimated by the method of slopes of the drying curve and the regular regime technique using the isothermal drying data obtained by microwave vacuum drying. The use of microwave vacuum drying seemed advantageous for obtaining the isothermal data. The method of slopes of the drying curve was found useful for estimating effective moisture

Suk Shin Kim; Santi R. Bhowmik

1995-01-01

11

Diffusion bonding of IN 718 to VM 350 grade maraging steel  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Diffusion bonding studies have been conducted on IN 718, VM 350 and the dissimilar alloy couple, IN 718 to maraging steel. The experimental processing parameters critical to obtaining consistently good diffusion bonds between IN 718 and VM 350 were determined. Interrelationships between temperature, pressure and surface preparation were explored for short bending intervals under vacuum conditions. Successful joining was achieved for a range of bonding cycle temperatures, pressures and surface preparations. The strength of the weaker parent material was used as a criterion for a successful tensile test of the heat treated bond. Studies of VM-350/VM-350 couples in the as-bonded condition showed a greater yielding and failure outside the bond region.

Crosby, S. R.; Biederman, R. R.; Reynolds, C. C.

1972-01-01

12

On the Direct Diffusion Bonding of Titanium Alloy to Stainless Steel  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the present study, direct diffusion bonding of Ti-6Al-4 V to 304 L stainless steel has been carried out in vacuum in the temperature range of 850–950°C using 3 MPa uniaxial load for 30 to 90 min durations. Different reaction layers in the diffusion zone have been examined by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) using the back scattered mode, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and

Swarup K. Ghosh; S. Chatterjee

2010-01-01

13

Low-temperature diffusion bonding of pure aluminum  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

1 keV argon ion beam was employed to remove the oxide film of pure aluminum before diffusion bonding. A sound joint of pure aluminum was obtained by ion activation-assisted diffusion bonding at the low temperature of , while the high-quality joining of pure aluminum was infeasible by conventional diffusion bonding at the temperature lower than . The residual oxide film ratios of joints decreased with the increase of ion cleaning time. When the specimens were cleaned for 120 min, the joint with the maximum tensile strength of 62.3 MPa and the elongation of 14.1 % was obtained. The argon ion beam etching surface treatment provides a new route for the low-temperature diffusion bonding. The reliable diffusion bonded joint of pure aluminum indicates that low-temperature diffusion bonding is feasible for bulk materials, especially for materials with the outstanding plasticity.

Chen, Haiyan; Cao, Jian; Tian, Xiaoyu; Li, Rui; Feng, Jicai

2013-10-01

14

Diffusion in Nickel-Base Superalloys and Bond Coats  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Nickel-base superalloys are known for their high temperature strengths and their corrosion resistant properties. To increase the service temperatures of the Ni-base superalloys, thermal barrier coatings (TBC) are used in conjunction with a bond coat. The role of the bond coat is to prevent diffusion between the superalloy and the TBC, especially the depletion of Al from the superalloy. Diffusion studies between various bond coat materials and Ni-base superalloys were conducted for two purposes: (1) to better understand the interaction between the bond coats and the superalloys and (2) to provide data to evaluate the current diffusion mobility database. Superalloys considered in this study were Inconel X-750, Inconel 625, Inconel 718, and CMSX-4. Bond coatings considered were RuAl, PtAl, and Ni. Diffusion couples were heat treated at 1150 C and 850 C for various times. For Ni/superalloy couples, diffusion simulations using multicomponent thermodynamics and diffusion mobility databases were performed. Evaluation of the bond coats and the diffusion mobility database required measurement of phase fraction and composition profiles. Optical metallography and image analysis software were used to measure the phasefraction profiles. Electron diffraction spectroscopy (EDS) was used to measure the composition profiles. This data was used to determine how well the bond coatings limited diffusion of Al out of the superalloy and into the bond coat. Comparison of the measured and calculated composition profiles and phase fraction profiles indicated whether specific mobility parameters or thermodynamic descriptions should be re-evaluated.

Mesick, Nathan

2005-01-01

15

Diffusion bonding and brazing of high purity copper for linear collider accelerator structures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Diffusion bonding and brazing of high purity copper were investigated to develop procedures for joining precision machined copper components for the Next Linear Collider (NLC). Diffusion bonds were made over a range of temperatures from 400 °C to 1000 °C, under two different loading conditions [3.45 kPa (0.5 psi) and 3.45 MPa (500 psi)], and on two different diamond machined surface finishes. Brazes were made using pure silver, pure gold, and gold-nickel alloys, and different heating rates produced by both radiation and induction heating. Braze materials were applied by both physical vapor deposition (PVD) and conventional braze alloy shims. Results of the diffusion bonding experiments showed that bond strengths very near that of the copper base metal could be made at bonding temperatures of 700 °C or higher at 3.45 MPa bonding pressure. At lower temperatures, only partial strength diffusion bonds could be made. At low bonding pressures (3.45 kPa), full strength bonds were made at temperatures of 800 °C and higher, while no bonding (zero strength) was observed at temperatures of 700 °C and lower. Observations of the fracture surfaces of the diffusion bonded samples showed the effects of surface finish on the bonding mechanism. These observations clearly indicate that bonding began by point asperity contact, and flatter surfaces resulted in a higher percentage of bonded area under similar bonding conditions. Results of the brazing experiments indicated that pure silver worked very well for brazing under both conventional and high heating rate scenarios. Similarly, pure silver brazed well for both the PVD layers and the braze alloy shims. The gold and gold-containing brazes had problems, mainly due to the high diffusivity of gold in copper. These problems led to the necessity of overdriving the temperature to ensure melting, the presence of porosity in the joint, and very wide braze joints. Based on the overall findings of this study, a two-step joining method is proposed for fabricating the NLC structures. The structure would be assembled with pure silver braze inserts using a self-aligning step joint design, then the assembly would be vacuum diffusion bonded at 700 °C and 3.45 MPa pressure to seal the critical inner portion of the assembly. Finally, during the same furnace cycle, the temperature would be increased to 800 °C in order to react the silver with the copper to form a liquid braze alloy that would join and seal the outer portion of the cells together.

Elmer, J. W.; Klingmann, J.; van Bibber, K.

2001-05-01

16

Diffusion Bonding of Silicon Carbide for MEMS-LDI Applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A robust joining approach is critically needed for a Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems-Lean Direct Injector (MEMS-LDI) application which requires leak free joints with high temperature mechanical capability. Diffusion bonding is well suited for the MEMS-LDI application. Diffusion bonds were fabricated using titanium interlayers between silicon carbide substrates during hot pressing. The interlayers consisted of either alloyed titanium foil or physically vapor deposited (PVD) titanium coatings. Microscopy shows that well adhered, crack free diffusion bonds are formed under optimal conditions. Under less than optimal conditions, microcracks are present in the bond layer due to the formation of intermetallic phases. Electron microprobe analysis was used to identify the reaction formed phases in the diffusion bond. Various compatibility issues among the phases in the interlayer and substrate are discussed. Also, the effects of temperature, pressure, time, silicon carbide substrate type, and type of titanium interlayer and thickness on the microstructure and composition of joints are discussed.

Halbig, Michael C.; Singh, Mrityunjay; Shpargel, Tarah P.; Kiser, J. Douglas

2007-01-01

17

Hydrogen bonds and heat diffusion in ?-helices: a computational study.  

PubMed

Recent evidence has shown a correlation between the heat diffusion pathways and the known allosteric communication pathways in proteins. Allosteric communication in proteins is a central, yet unsolved, problem in biochemistry, and the study and characterization of the structural determinants that mediate energy transfer among different parts of proteins is of major importance. In this work, we characterized the role of hydrogen bonds in diffusivity of thermal energy for two sets of ?-helices with different abilities to form hydrogen bonds. These hydrogen bonds can be a constitutive part of the ?-helices or can arise from the lateral chains. In our in vacuo simulations, it was observed that ?-helices with a higher possibility of forming hydrogen bonds also had higher rates of thermalization. Our simulations also revealed that heat readily flowed through atoms involved in hydrogen bonds. As a general conclusion, according to our simulations, hydrogen bonds fulfilled an important role in heat diffusion in structural patters of proteins. PMID:25105349

Miño, German; Barriga, Raul; Gutierrez, Gonzalo

2014-08-28

18

Diffusion Bonding of Silicon Carbide Ceramics using Titanium Interlayers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Robust joining approaches for silicon carbide ceramics are critically needed to fabricate leak free joints with high temperature mechanical capability. In this study, titanium foils and physical vapor deposited (PVD) titanium coatings were used to form diffusion bonds between SiC ceramics using hot pressing. Silicon carbide substrate materials used for bonding include sintered SiC and two types of CVD SiC. Microscopy results show the formation of well adhered diffusion bonds. The bond strengths as determined from pull tests are on the order of several ksi, which is much higher than required for a proposed application. Microprobe results show the distribution of silicon, carbon, titanium, and other minor elements across the diffusion bond. Compositions of several phases formed in the joint region were identified. Potential issues of material compatibility and optimal bond formation will also be discussed.

Halbig, Michael C.; Singh, Mrityunjay; Shpargel, Tarah P.; Kiser, James D.

2006-01-01

19

Electrospray Emitters For Diffusion Vacuum Pumps Pablo Diaz Gomez Maqueo, Paulo C. Lozano  

E-print Network

Electrospray Emitters For Diffusion Vacuum Pumps Pablo Diaz Gomez Maqueo, Paulo C. Lozano June 2011 SSL # 12-11 #12;#12;Electrospray Emitters For Diffusion Vacuum Pumps Pablo Diaz Gomez Maqueo, Paulo C;Electrospray Emitters For Diffusion Vacuum Pumps by Pablo Diaz Gomez Maqueo Submitted to the Department

20

Ultrasonic evaluation of beryllium-copper diffusion bonds  

SciTech Connect

A study was performed to compare the effectiveness of several advanced ultrasonic techniques when used to determine the strength of diffusion bonded beryllium-copper, which heretofore have each been applied to only a few material systems. The use of integrated backscatter calculations, frequency domain reflection coefficients, and time-of-flight variance was compared in their ability to characterize the bond strength in a series of beryllium-copper diffusion bond samples having a wide variation in bond quality. Correlation of integrated backscatter calculations and time-of-flight variance with bond strength was good. Some correlation of the slope of the frequency based reflection coefficient was shown for medium and high strength bonds, while its Y-intercept showed moderate correlation for all bond strengths.

Jamieson, E.E.

2000-06-08

21

Diffusion Bonding Aluminium Alloys and Composites: New Approaches and Modelling  

E-print Network

friendship and food-wise logistic; Liz, Ken, Kai and Paul for improving my knowledge to the single currency diffusion bonding and hot isostatic pressing without encapsulation. It allows the fabrication of intricate

Cambridge, University of

22

Joining of Silicon Carbide: Diffusion Bond Optimization and Characterization  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Joining and integration methods are critically needed as enabling technologies for the full utilization of advanced ceramic components in aerospace and aeronautics applications. One such application is a lean direct injector for a turbine engine to achieve low NOx emissions. In the application, several SiC substrates with different hole patterns to form fuel and combustion air channels are bonded to form the injector. Diffusion bonding is a joining approach that offers uniform bonds with high temperature capability, chemical stability, and high strength. Diffusion bonding was investigated with the aid of titanium foils and coatings as the interlayer between SiC substrates to aid bonding. The influence of such variables as interlayer type, interlayer thickness, substrate finish, and processing time were investigated. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and electron microprobe analysis were used to characterize the bonds and to identify the reaction formed phases.

Halbig, Michael C.; Singh, Mrityunjay

2008-01-01

23

Thermoelectric elements diffusion-bonded to tungsten electrodes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Solid-state diffusion process bonds lead telluride and lead telluride-tin telluride thermoelectric elements to tungsten electrodes. The resulting bond is nonmagnetic and has high strength and low electrical and thermal resistance. This method is also used with tantalum electrodes.

1965-01-01

24

Metal honeycomb to porous wireform substrate diffusion bond evaluation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Two nondestructive techniques were used to evaluate diffusion bond quality between a metal foil honeycomb and porous wireform substrate. The two techniques, cryographics and acousto-ultrasonics, are complementary in revealing variations of bond integrity and quality in shroud segments from an experimental aircraft turbine engine.

Vary, A.; Moorhead, P. E.; Hull, D. R.

1982-01-01

25

Fabrication and Characterization of Diffusion Bonds for Silicon Carbide  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Diffusion bonds of silicon carbide (SiC) were fabricated using several different types of titanium (Ti) based interlayers between the SiC substrates. The interlayers were an alloyed Ti foil, a pure Ti foil, and a physically vapor deposited (PVD) Ti coating. Microscopy was conducted to evaluate the cross-sections of the resulting bonds. Microprobe analysis identified reaction formed phases in the diffusion bonded region. Uniform and well adhered bonds were formed between the SiC substrates. In the case where the alloyed Ti foil or a thick Ti coating (i.e. 20 micron) was used as the interlayer, microcracks and several phases were present in the diffusion bonds. When a thinner interlayer was used (i.e. 10 micron PVD Ti), no microcracks were observed and only two reaction formed phases were present. The two phases were preferred and fully reacted phases that did not introduce thermal stresses or microcracks during the cool-down stage after processing. Diffusion bonded samples were evaluated with the non-destructive evaluation (NDE) methods of pulsed thermography and immersion ultrasonic testing. Joined SiC substrates that were fully bonded and that had simulated bond flaws in the interlayer were also evaluated using immersion ultrasound. Pull testing was conducted on the bonds to determine the tensile strength. To demonstrate the joining approach for a complex multilayered component for a low NOx injector application, the diffusion bonding approach was used to join three 4" diameter SiC discs that contained complex fuel and air flow channels.

Halbig, Michael; Singh, Mrityunjay; Martin, Richard E.; Cosgriff, Laura M.

2007-01-01

26

Diffusion bonding of the oxide dispersion strengthened steel PM2000  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ferritic oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels are well suited as structural materials, e.g. for claddings in fission reactors and for plasma facing components in fusion power plants due to their high mechanical and oxidation stability at high temperatures and their high irradiation resistance. PM2000 is an iron based ODS ferritic steel with homogeneously distributed nanometric yttria particles. Melting joining techniques are not suitable for such ODS materials because of the precipitation and agglomeration of the oxide particles and hence the loss of their strengthening effect. Solid state diffusion bonding is thus chosen to join PM2000 and is investigated in this work with a focus on oxide particles. The diffusion bonding process is aided by the computational modeling, including the influence of the ODS particles. For modeling the microstructure stability and the creep behavior of PM2000 at various, diffusion bonding relevant temperatures (50-80% Tm) are investigated. Particle distribution (TEM), strength (tensile test) and toughness (Charpy impact test) obtained at temperatures relevant for bonding serve as input for the prediction of optimal diffusion bonding parameters. The optimally bonded specimens show comparable strength and toughness relative to the base material.

Sittel, Wiebke; Basuki, Widodo W.; Aktaa, Jarir

2013-11-01

27

Diffusion bonding resistant valve development for sodium service  

SciTech Connect

Unanticipated functional failures occurred in valves undergoing containment integrity testing for liquid sodium service. The failures resulted from diffusion bonding of the Stellite 6B valve plug to the Type 316 stainless steel (SS) seat. As a result of these failures, a valve development program was undertaken. A modified valve incorporating a Tribaloy 800 plug showed significant improvement in resistance to diffusion bonding but still failed after long term exposure in a closed position. A second modified valve using Tribaloy 800 in both the valve plug and seat successfully resisted diffusion bonding failure. This paper reports the details of the testing and posttest valve examinations. The results of scanning electron microscopy, dispersive x-ray spectrometry, and metallography provide the characteristics of the valve failures. Limitations of the various valve designs are also discussed.

Crandall, D.L.; Low, J.O.; Chung, D.T.; Loop, R.B.

1984-04-16

28

Diffusion bonding of commercially pure Ni using Cu interlayer  

SciTech Connect

The concentration dependence of diffusivity in a multi-component diffusion system makes it complicated to predict the concentration profiles of diffusing species. This so called chemical diffusivity can be expressed as a function of thermodynamic and kinetic data. DICTRA software can calculate the concentration profiles using appropriate mobility and thermodynamic data. It can also optimize the diffusivity data using experimental diffusivity data. Then the optimized diffusivity data is stored as mobility data which is a linear function of temperature. In this work, diffusion bonding of commercially pure Ni using Cu interlayers is reported. The mobility parameters of Ni-Cu alloy binary systems were optimized using DICTRA/Thermocalc software from the available self-, tracer and chemical diffusion coefficients. The optimized mobility parameters were used to simulate concentration profiles of Ni-Cu diffusion joints using DICTRA/Thermocalc software. The calculated and experimental concentration profiles agreed well at 1100 Degree-Sign C. Agreement between the simulated and experimental profiles was less good at 1050 Degree-Sign C due to the grain boundary contribution to the overall diffusion. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The concentration profiles of Cu in Ni-Cu diffusion joints are modeled. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interdiffusion coefficients in Ni-Cu system are optimized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optimized interdiffusion coefficients are expressed as mobility parameters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simulated profiles are comparable with experimental profiles.

Rahman, A.H.M.E., E-mail: a.rahman@my.und.edu; Cavalli, M.N.

2012-07-15

29

Algorithm for anisotropic diffusion in hydrogen-bonded networks  

E-print Network

In this paper I describe a specialized algorithm for anisotropic diffusion determined by a field of transition rates. The algorithm can be used to describe some interesting forms of diffusion that occur in the study of proton motion in a network of hydrogen bonds. The algorithm produces data that require a nonstandard method of spectral analysis which is also developed here. Finally, I apply the algorithm to a simple specific example.

Edoardo Milotti

2007-04-04

30

Silver plating ensures reliable diffusion bonding of dissimilar metals  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dissimilar metals are reliably joined by diffusion bonding when the surfaces are electroplated with silver. The process involves cleaning and etching, anodization, silver striking, and silver plating with a conventional plating bath. It minimizes the formation of detrimental intermetallic phases and provides greater tolerance of processing parameters.

1967-01-01

31

Electron paramagnetic resonance of dangling bond centers in vacuum-annealed porous silicon  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) of centers produced in porous silicon (PS) by heat treatment in vacuum is investigated. Annealing in the temperature range of 400-600 °C and vacuum up to 5×10-5 Torr increases the EPR line intensity of Pb centers in a way depending on the time of annealing. This can be explained by hydrogen depassivation of the Pb centers. An isotropic line with g=2.0055, usually attributed to disordered Si dangling bonds, appears after vacuum annealing of some minutes but at a longer heat treatment its intensity decreases. At room temperature this decrease is exponential with a time constant of a few minutes, depending on the level of vacuum. Heat treatment of PS in vacuum leads to amplification of the Pb EPR spectrum after exposition of samples to air at room temperature.

Laiho, R.; Vlasenko, L. S.

1995-08-01

32

Vacuum-free diffusion bonding of aluminium metal matrix composite  

Microsoft Academic Search

Owing to their high specific strength aluminium metal–matrix composites (Al-MMC) are becoming popular for many critical engineering applications. These materials are prepared by controlled melting and solidification processing. In order to broaden their applications further, it is necessary to develop suitable joining techniques. Due to the metallurgical nature of these materials, conventional fusion welding techniques such as arc welding cannot

C. S Lee; H Li; R. S Chandel

1999-01-01

33

Microstructural characterization of the Mg/Cu/Al diffusion bonded joint  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A vacuum hot-pressed diffusion bonding method was used to prepare an Mg/Cu/Al laminated composite. Both the Mg/Cu and Al/Cu interfaces were investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis, X-ray diffraction spectrometer system and Vickers microhardness test. The results showed that two kinds of intermetallic compounds, Al4Cu9 adjacent to the Cu side and Al2Cu adjacent to the Al side, were formed in the interface of Al-Cu. Meanwhile, Mg2Cu was formed at the interface of Mg/Cu. The maximum value of shear strength is 13.1 MPa and the fracture of the joints had taken place at the Mg-Cu interface. The microhardness of the interface increased due to the formation of the intermetallic compounds, which is the main cause leading to poor bond properties.

Zhang, Jian; Shen, Qiang; Luo, Guoqiang; Wang, Yiyu; Li, Meijuan; Zhang, Lianmeng

2013-03-01

34

Joining of Silicon Carbide Through the Diffusion Bonding Approach  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In order for ceramics to be fully utilized as components for high-temperature and structural applications, joining and integration methods are needed. Such methods will allow for the fabrication the complex shapes and also allow for insertion of the ceramic component into a system that may have different adjacent materials. Monolithic silicon carbide (SiC) is a ceramic material of focus due to its high temperature strength and stability. Titanium foils were used as an interlayer to form diffusion bonds between chemical vapor deposited (CVD) SiC ceramics with the aid of hot pressing. The influence of such variables as interlayer thickness and processing time were investigated to see which conditions contributed to bonds that were well adhered and crack free. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and electron microprobe analysis were used to characterize the bonds and to identify the reaction formed phases.

Halbig, Michael .; Singh, Mrityunjay

2009-01-01

35

Microstructure and strength of diffusion-bonded joints of TiAl base alloy to steel  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diffusion bonding of TiAl-based alloy to steel was carried out at 850–1100 °C for 1–60 min under a pressure of 5–40 MPa in this paper. The relationship of the bond parameters and tensile strength of the joints was discussed, and the optimum bond parameters were obtained. When products are diffusion-bonded, the optimum bond parameters are as follows: bonding temperature is

P. He; J. C. Feng; B. G. Zhang; Y. Y Qian

2002-01-01

36

Mo/Ti Diffusion Bonding for Making Thermoelectric Devices  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An all-solid-state diffusion bonding process that exploits the eutectoid reaction between molybdenum and titanium has been developed for use in fabricating thermoelectric devices based on skutterudite compounds. In essence, the process is one of heating a flat piece of pure titanium in contact with a flat piece of pure molybdenum to a temperature of about 700 C while pushing the pieces together with a slight pressure [a few psi (of the order of 10 kPa)]. The process exploits the energy of mixing of these two metals to form a strong bond between them. These two metals were selected partly because the bonds formed between them are free of brittle intermetallic phases and are mechanically and chemically stable at high temperatures. The process is a solution of the problem of bonding hot-side metallic interconnections (denoted hot shoes in thermoelectric jargon) to titanium-terminated skutterudite n and p legs during the course of fabrication of a unicouple, which is the basic unit cell of a thermoelectric device (see figure). The hot-side operating temperature required for a skutterudite thermoelectric device is 700 C. This temperature precludes the use of brazing to attach the hot shoe; because brazing compounds melt at lower temperatures, the hot shoe would become detached during operation. Moreover, the decomposition temperature of one of the skutterudite compounds is 762 C; this places an upper limit on the temperature used in bonding the hot shoe. Molybdenum was selected as the interconnection metal because the eutectoid reaction between it and the titanium at the ends of the p and n legs has characteristics that are well suited for this application. In addition to being suitable for use in the present bonding process, molybdenum has high electrical and thermal conductivity and excellent thermal stability - characteristics that are desired for hot shoes of thermoelectric devices. The process takes advantage of the chemical potential energy of mixing between molybdenum and titanium. These metals have a strong affinity for each other. They are almost completely soluble in each other and remain in the solid state at temperatures above the eutectoid temperature of 695 C. As a result, bonds formed by interdiffusion of molybdenum and titanium are mechanically stable at and well above the original bonding temperature of about 700 C. Inasmuch as the bonds are made at approximately the operating temperature, thermomechanical stresses associated with differences in thermal expansion are minimized.

Sakamoto, Jeffrey; Kisor, Adam; Caillat, Thierry; Lara, Liana; Ravi, Vilupanur; Firdosy, Samad; Fleuiral, Jean-Pierre

2007-01-01

37

Defect density and atomic bond structure of tetrahedral amorphous carbon (taC) films prepared by filtered vacuum arc process  

Microsoft Academic Search

Defect density of tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) film prepared by filtered vacuum arc process was investigated in a wide range of fraction of sp3 hybridized bond. We could observe a close relationship between unpaired spin density measured by electron spin resonance spectroscopy and their atomic bond structure: the defect density was proportional to the content of sp3 hybridized bond in

Churl Seung Lee; Jin-Koog Shin; Kwang Yong Eun; Kwang-Ryeol Lee; Ki Hyun Yoon

2004-01-01

38

Elastic constants for superplastically formed/diffusion-bonded sandwich structures  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Formulae and the associated graphs are presented for contrasting the effective elastic constants for a superplastically formed/diffusion-bonded (SPF/DB) corrugated sandwich core and a honeycomb sandwich core. The results used in the comparison of the structural properties of the two types of sandwich cores are under conditions of equal sandwich density. It was found that the stiffness in the thickness direction of the optimum SPF/DB corrugated core (i.e., triangular truss core) was lower than that of the honeycomb core, and that the former had higher transverse shear stiffness than the latter.

Ko, W. L.

1979-01-01

39

Diffusion Bonding and Characterization of a Dispersion Strengthened Aluminum Alloy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Aluminum metal matrix composites (Al-MMC's) containing silicon carbide or alumina particle reinforcements are used extensively in automotive and aircraft industries. The addition of a reinforcing phase has led to significant improvements in the mechanical properties of these alloys. However, despite substantial improvements in the properties, the lack of a reliable joining method has restricted their full potential. The differences in physical and metallurgical properties between the ceramic phase and the Al-MMC, prevents the successful application of the fusion welding processes, conventionally used for joining monolithic aluminum alloys. Therefore, alternative techniques that prevent microstructural changes in the base metal need to be developed. In this study, the transient liquid phase diffusion bonding and eutectic bonding of a particle reinforced Al 6061-MMC was investigated to identify a method that could control particle segregation within the joint and increase the final joint strength. The results showed that TLP bonding using Ni-foil was possible at 600°C for 10 minutes using a pressure of 0.01 MPa. However, characterization of the bond interface showed a wide particle segregated zone due to the "pushing effect" of the solid/liquid interface during isothermal solidification stage of bonding. The presence of this particle segregated zone was shown to cause low joint strengths. In order to overcome these problems, TLP bonding was performed using electrodeposited coatings of Ni and Ni-Al 2O3 as a way of controlling the volume of eutectic liquid formed at the joint. Theoretical and experimental work showed that the use of thin coatings was successful in reducing the width of the segregated zone formed at the joint and this had the effect of increasing joint shear strength values. Furthermore, lower bonding temperature could also be used as a method of reducing particle segregation and therefore, a Cu-Sn interlayer was used to form a eutectic bond. The experimental results showed that particle segregation could be prevented, but lower joint shear strengths were obtained. Comparative analysis indicated that when Ni-Al2O3 coating was used, shear strength of 92% of the base metal strength was achievable. In comparison, when Ni coating, Ni-foil and Cu-Sn interlayers were used, the maximum joint strengths achievable were 84% 62% and 60% respectively.

Cooke, Kavian Omar

40

Cracking during solidification of diffusion bonded Inconel 625 in the presence of Zircaloy4 interlayer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diffusion bonded specimens of Inconel 625 in the presence of Zircaloy-4 interlayer have been investigated using scanning electron microscope (SEM) having energy dispersive system (EDS) as an attachment. Cracking is observed in the center of the diffusion zone (DZ) in both the samples bonded at 1050 and 1100°C. The bonding of Inconel 625 in the presence of Zircaloy-4 occurs due

M. Ahmad; J. I. Akhter; M. Shahzad; M. Akhtar

2008-01-01

41

Analyzing the Effect of Diffusion Bonding Process Parameters on Bond Characteristics of Mg-Al Dissimilar Joints  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The principle difficulty when joining magnesium (Mg)-aluminium (Al) lies in the existence of formation of oxide films and brittle intermetallic in the bond region. However, diffusion bonding can be used to join these alloys without much difficulty. Temperature, pressure, and holding time are the three main variables which govern the integrity of a diffusion bond. This paper focuses on the effect of these parameters on diffusion layer thickness, hardness and strength of AZ31B magnesium-AA2024 aluminium dissimilar joints. The experiments were conducted based on three factors, five-level, and central composite rotatable design with full replications technique. Empirical relationships were developed to predict diffusion layer thickness, hardness and strength using response surface methodology. From this investigation, it is found that bonding temperature has predominant effect on bond characteristics.

Mahendran, G.; Babu, S.; Balasubramanian, V.

2010-07-01

42

Diffusion Bonding of Stainless Steel to Copper with Tin Bronze and Gold Interlayers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Vacuum diffusion bonding of stainless steel to copper was carried out at a temperature ranging from 830 to 950 °C under an axial pressure of 3 MPa for 60 min with three kinds of interlayer metals: tin-bronze (TB) foil, Au foil, and TB-Au composite interlayer. The results showed that the grain boundary wetting was formed within the steel adjacent to the interface due to the contact melting between TB and Au when TB-Au composite interlayer was used. The grain boundary wetting could occur at a relatively low temperature of 830 °C and becomes significant with the increase of temperature. The tensile strength of the joint with TB-Au was higher than that with TB or Au interlayer separately and could be 228 MPa at the joining temperature of 850 °C. Furthermore, the axial compression ratio of the specimen joined at 850 °C was approximately 1.2%. Therefore, a reliable and precise joining of stainless steel to copper could be realized by diffusion bonding with the TB-Au composite interlayer at a comparatively low temperature.

Xiong, Jiang-Tao; Xie, Qing; Li, Jing-Long; Zhang, Fu-Sheng; Huang, Wei-Dong

2012-01-01

43

Effect of Surface Preparation on CLAM\\/CLAM Hot Isostatic Pressing diffusion bonding joints  

Microsoft Academic Search

Surface preparation is essential for the Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) diffusion bonding of RAFM steels. Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) diffusion bonding experiments on China Low Activation Martensitic (CLAM) steel was performed to study the effect of surface preparation. A few approaches such as hand lapping, dry-milling and grinding etc., were used to prepare the faying surfaces of the HIP joints.

C. Li; Q. Huang; P. Zhang

2009-01-01

44

Vacuum-compatible standard diffuse source, manufacture and calibration  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratories has completed the design, manufacture and calibration of a vacuum-compatible, tungsten lamp, integrated sphere. The light source has been calibrated at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and is intended for use as a calibration standard for remote sensing instrumentation. Calibration 2{sigma} uncertainty varied with wavelength from 1.21% at 400 nm and 0.73% at 900 nm, to 3.95% at 2,400 nm. The inner radius of the Spectralon-coated sphere is 21.2 cm with a 7.4 cm square exit aperture. A small satellite sphere is attached to the main sphere and its output coupled through a stepper motor driven aperture. The variable aperture allows a constant radiance without effecting the color temperature output from the main sphere. The sphere`s output is transmitted into a vacuum test environment through a fused silica window that is an integral part of the outer housing of the vacuum shell assembly. The atmosphere within this outer housing is composed of 240 K nitrogen gas, provided by a custom LN{sub 2} vaporizer unit. Use of the nitrogen gas maintains the internal temperature of the sphere at a nominal 300 K {+-}10{degree}. The calibrated spectral range of the source is 0.4 {micro}m through 2.4 {micro}m. Three, color temperature matched, 20 W bulbs together with a 10 W bulb are within the main integrating sphere. Two 20 W bulbs, also color temperature matched, reside in the satellite integrating sphere. A Silicon and a Germanium broadband detector are situated within the inner surface of the main sphere. Their purpose is for the measurement of the internal broadband irradiance. A fiber-optic-coupled spectrometer measures the internal color temperature that is maintained by current control on the lamps. Each lamp is independently operated allowing for radiances with common color temperatures ranging from near 0.026 W/cm{sup 2}/sr to about 0.1 W/cm{sup 2}/sr at a wavelength of 0.9 {micro}m (the location of the peak spectral radiance).

Byrd, D.A.; Atkins, W.H.; Bender, S.C.; Christensen, R.W.; Michaud, F.D.

1999-03-01

45

Silver diffusion bonding and layer transfer of lithium niobate to silicon Kenneth Diest,a  

E-print Network

Silver diffusion bonding and layer transfer of lithium niobate to silicon Kenneth Diest,a Melissa J substrates. A silver film was deposited onto both the silicon and lithium niobate surfaces prior to bonding silver grains to replace the as-bonded interface by a single polycrystalline silver film. The transferred

Atwater, Harry

46

A Stationary Vacuum Arc with a Diffuse Spot on a Nonemitting Chrome Cathode  

Microsoft Academic Search

The results are given of experimental investigations of a stationary vacuum arc with a diffuse spot on a hot cathode of solid chrome in the current range from 20 to 220 A. The characteristics of the discharge are compared to those of a similar discharge on a thermionic gadolinium cathode. It is demonstrated that, in the case of a chrome

V. M. Batenin; I. I. Klimovskii; V. P. Polishchuk; V. A. Sinel'shchikov

2003-01-01

47

Transient phonon vacuum squeezing due to femtosecond-laser-induced bond hardening  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ultrashort optical pulses can be used both to create fundamental quasiparticles in crystals and to change their properties. In noble metals, femtosecond lasers induce bond hardening, but little is known about its origin and consequences. Here we simulate ultrafast laser excitation of silver at high fluences. We compute laser-excited potential-energy surfaces by all-electron ab initio theory and analyze the resulting quantum lattice dynamics. We also consider incoherent lattice heating due to electron-phonon interactions using the generalized two-temperature model. We find phonon hardening, which we attribute to the excitation of s electrons. We demonstrate that this may result in phonon vacuum squeezed states with an optimal squeezing factor of ˜0.001 at the L-point longitudinal mode. This finding implies that ultrafast laser-induced bond hardening may be used as a tool to manipulate the quantum state of opaque materials, where, so far, the squeezing of phonons below the zero-point motion has only been realized in transparent crystals by a different mechanism. On the basis of our finding, we further propose a method for directly measuring bond hardening.

Cheenicode Kabeer, Fairoja; Grigoryan, Naira S.; Zijlstra, Eeuwe S.; Garcia, Martin E.

2014-09-01

48

Lateral diffusion of receptor-ligand bonds in membrane adhesion zones: Effect of thermal membrane roughness  

E-print Network

The adhesion of cells is mediated by membrane receptors that bind to complementary ligands in apposing cell membranes. It is generally assumed that the lateral diffusion of mobile receptor-ligand bonds in membrane-membrane adhesion zones is slower than the diffusion of unbound receptors and ligands. We find that this slowing down is not only caused by the larger size of the bound receptor-ligand complexes, but also by thermal fluctuations of the membrane shape. We model two adhering membranes as elastic sheets pinned together by receptor-ligand bonds and study the diffusion of the bonds using Monte Carlo simulations. In our model, the fluctuations reduce the bond diffusion constant in planar membranes by a factor close to 2 in the biologically relevant regime of small bond concentrations.

H. Krobath; G. J. Schuetz; R. Lipowsky; T. R. Weikl

2007-03-19

49

Light-induced hydrogen evolution from hydrogenated amorphous silicon: Hydrogen diffusion by formation of bond centered hydrogen  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The light-induced hydrogen evolution (LIHE) from amorphous (a-) Si:H by the order of at. % is observed during white light soaking (WLS) of 100-400 mW/cm2 at 350-500 K or ultra violet light soaking (UVLS) of 30-120 mW/cm2 at 305-320 K in a vacuum. The thermal desorption spectroscopy indicates that LIHE originated from bonded hydrogen takes place through the diffusion of light-induced mobile hydrogen (LIMH) with the activation energy of 0.5 eV. LIMH is assigned to bond centered hydrogen and the hydrogen diffusion process becomes prominent when LIMH can leave from a-Si:H such under light soaking in a vacuum above room temperature. For H2 in microvoids, the hydrogen evolution rate is governed by the surface barrier and its activation energy of 1.0 eV in dark decreases to 0.4 eV under WLS or UVLS.

Tanimoto, H.; Arai, H.; Mizubayashi, H.; Yamanaka, M.; Sakata, I.

2014-02-01

50

Bonding Mechanisms in Resistance Microwelding of 316 Low-Carbon Vacuum Melted Stainless Steel Wires  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Resistance microwelding (RMW) is an important joining process used in the fabrication of miniature instruments, such as electrical and medical devices. The excellent corrosion resistance of 316 low-carbon vacuum melted (LVM) stainless steel (SS) wire makes it ideal for biomedical applications. The current study examines the microstructure and mechanical properties of crossed resistance microwelded 316LVM wire. Microtensile and microhardness testing was used to analyze the mechanical performance of welds, and fracture surfaces were examined using scanning electron microscopy. Finally, a bonding mechanism is proposed based on optimum joint breaking force (JBF) using metallurgical observations of weld cross sections. Moreover, comparisons with RMWs of Ni, Au-plated Ni, and SUS304 SS wire are discussed.

Khan, M. I.; Kim, J. M.; Kuntz, M. L.; Zhou, Y.

2009-04-01

51

Diffusion bonding and its application to manufacturing. [for joining of metal parts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In its simplest form diffusion bonding is accomplished by placing clean metal surfaces together under a sufficient load and heating. The natural interatomic attractive force between atoms transforms the interface into a natural grain boundary. Therefore, in principle, the properties of the bond area are identical to those of the parent metal. Other advantages of diffusion bonding over conventional methods of bonding include freedom from residual stresses, excessive deformation, foreign metals, or changed crystal structures. Stainless steels, nickel-base superalloys, and aluminum alloys have all been successfully joined. Complex hardware, including integrated flueric devices, jet engine servovalves, and porous woven structures have been fabricated. The processing involved is discussed, along with such theoretical considerations as the role of metal surfaces, the formation of metal contact junctions, and the mechanisms of material transport in diffusion bonding.

Spurgeon, W. M.

1972-01-01

52

Pulsed Plasma-Assisted Diffusion Bonding of ODS-FeCrAl Alloys  

SciTech Connect

The successful joining of ODS alloy PM2000 rods by pulsed plasma-assisted diffusion bonding is reported. During secondary recrystallisation after joining, the alloy grains grew across the original interface, which was then marked only by a row of remnant alumina particles. These did not appear to act as pinning sites for the grain boundaries, which moved easily past them, leaving a strong diffusion bond.

Tatlock, Gordon J [ORNL; Dyadko, Dr. Eugene G. [MER Corp., Tucson, AZ; Dryepondt, Sebastien N [ORNL; Wright, Ian G [ORNL

2007-01-01

53

Method of fluxless brazing and diffusion bonding of aluminum containing components  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A method of diffusion bonding and fluxless brazing of aluminum containing components is reported. The aluminum surfaces are freed of any aluminum oxide coating and are coated with a polymeric sealer which can be thermally removed leaving essentially no residue. The polymeric sealer is being removed in a substantially oxygen free environment, and the aluminum components are then being brazed or diffusion bonded without the use of a flux to remove oxide coating.

Featherston, A. B.; Okelly, K. P. (inventors)

1976-01-01

54

Diffusion bonding and brazing of high purity copper for linear collider accelerator structures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diffusion bonding and brazing of high purity copper were investigated to develop procedures for joining precision machined copper components for the Next Linear Collider (NLC). Diffusion bonds were made over a range of temperatures from 400 °C to 1000 °C, under two different loading conditions [3.45 kPa (0.5 psi) and 3.45 MPa (500 psi)], and on two different diamond machined

J. W. Elmer; J. Klingmann; K. van Bibber

2001-01-01

55

Diffusion welding. [heat treatment of nickel alloys following single step vacuum welding process  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dispersion-strengthened nickel alloys are sanded on one side and chemically polished. This is followed by a single-step welding process wherein the polished surfaces are forced into intimate contact at 1,400 F for one hour in a vacuum. Diffusion, recrystallization, and grain growth across the original weld interface are obtained during postheating at 2,150 F for two hours in hydrogen.

Holko, K. H. (inventors)

1974-01-01

56

The characteristics of vacuum arc with stationary diffuse spot on non-thermionic cathode  

Microsoft Academic Search

The vacuum arc with stationary diffuse spot on the solid cathode from chromium has been studied. The arc current was 30-220 A, cathode temperature 1800-2100 K. The mean current density on the cathode 10-10 2 A\\/cm2. The part of thermionic current at the cathode was less than 0.1 % from arc current. Observations of cathode surface during arcing with help

V. M. Batenin; L. I. Klimovsky; V. P. Polistchook; V. A. Sinel'shchikov

2000-01-01

57

Chemical and structural characterization of gamma(Ni)\\/gamma-prime(Ni3Al) diffusion bonded interfaces  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gamma(Ni)\\/gamma-prime(Ni3Al) diffusion bonded specimens are prepared under experimental conditions whose effect is confirmed by modeling the bonding process. The migration of the interphase boundary and the chemical concentration profiles are described and analyzed. Some TEM observations of these synthetic phase boundaries and their structural features are also reported.

M. Dupeux; H. Rouault-Rogez; P. Willemin

1988-01-01

58

Diffusion bonding of beryllium to CuCrZr for ITER applications.  

SciTech Connect

Low temperature diffusion bonding of beryllium to CuCrZr was investigated for fusion reactor applications. Hot isostatic pressing was accomplished using various metallic interlayers. Diffusion profiles suggest that titanium is effective at preventing Be-Cu intermetallics. Shear strength measurements suggest that acceptable results were obtained at temperatures as low as 540C.

Cadden, Charles H.; Puskar, Joseph David; Goods, Steven Howard

2008-08-01

59

Concurrent solid state diffusion bonding and superplastic forming of aluminum alloy 7475  

SciTech Connect

Earlier studies on diffusion bonding (DB) of Al alloys have focused mostly in extrinsically changing the bonding conditions through the use of interlayers, surface etching, or environment. The problem with focusing on the extrinsic conditions only is that the benefits of the DB process are not fully utilized and instead, it can create problems for the base alloy. The approach we have taken to study solid state diffusion bondability of Al alloy is to utilize the intrinsic behavior of superplastic material. Beginning with this preprocessed material, we used a unique method, to obtain diffusion bonding concurrently with superplastic forming to achieve ductile, oxide-free bonds at significantly lower pressures and temperature in an argon atmosphere.

Sunwoo, A.; Lum, R.; Vandervoort, R.

1995-01-01

60

The effect of hydrogen bonds on diffusion mechanism of water inside single-walled carbon nanotubes.  

PubMed

Nanopores can serve as a molecule channel for transport of fluid, where water diffusion differs remarkably from that of simple particles. Hydrogen bonds play an essential role in the diffusion anomaly. Detailed investigations are carried out on the systems of rigid (6, 6), (7, 7), (8, 8), (9, 9), and (10, 10) armchair carbon nanotubes, solvated with Lennard-Jones water fluids. The role of hydrogen bonds is examined by diffusivity statistics and animation snapshots. It is found that in small (6,6) CNT, hydrogen bonds tend to aggregate water into a wire and lead to rapid collective drift. Confinement can stabilize the hydrogen bond of water molecules and enhance its lifetime. In relatively smaller CNTs, the diffusion mechanism could be altered by the temperature. Moreover, in larger nanotubes hydrogen bonding network allows the water to form regional concentrated clusters. This allows water fluid in extremely low density exhibit rather slow self-diffusion motion. This fundamental study attempts to provide insights in understanding nanoscale delivery system in aqueous solution. PMID:24908026

Chen, Qu; Wang, Qi; Liu, Ying-Chun; Wu, Tao

2014-06-01

61

The effect of hydrogen bonds on diffusion mechanism of water inside single-walled carbon nanotubes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nanopores can serve as a molecule channel for transport of fluid, where water diffusion differs remarkably from that of simple particles. Hydrogen bonds play an essential role in the diffusion anomaly. Detailed investigations are carried out on the systems of rigid (6, 6), (7, 7), (8, 8), (9, 9), and (10, 10) armchair carbon nanotubes, solvated with Lennard-Jones water fluids. The role of hydrogen bonds is examined by diffusivity statistics and animation snapshots. It is found that in small (6,6) CNT, hydrogen bonds tend to aggregate water into a wire and lead to rapid collective drift. Confinement can stabilize the hydrogen bond of water molecules and enhance its lifetime. In relatively smaller CNTs, the diffusion mechanism could be altered by the temperature. Moreover, in larger nanotubes hydrogen bonding network allows the water to form regional concentrated clusters. This allows water fluid in extremely low density exhibit rather slow self-diffusion motion. This fundamental study attempts to provide insights in understanding nanoscale delivery system in aqueous solution.

Chen, Qu; Wang, Qi; Liu, Ying-Chun; Wu, Tao

2014-06-01

62

Microstructure and strength of diffusion-bonded joints of TiAl base alloy to steel  

SciTech Connect

Diffusion bonding of TiAl-based alloy to steel was carried out at 850-1100 deg. C for 1-60 min under a pressure of 5-40 MPa in this paper. The relationship of the bond parameters and tensile strength of the joints was discussed, and the optimum bond parameters were obtained. When products are diffusion-bonded, the optimum bond parameters are as follows: bonding temperature is 930-960 deg. C, bonding pressure is 20-25 MPa, bonding time is 5-6 min. The maximum tensile strength of the joint is 170-185 MPa. The reaction products and the interface structures of the joints were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron probe X-ray microanalysis (EPMA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Three kinds of reaction products were observed to have formed during the diffusion bonding of TiAl-based alloy to steel, namely Ti{sub 3}Al+FeAl+FeAl{sub 2} intermetallic compounds formed close to the TiAl-based alloy. A decarbonised layer formed close to the steel and a face-centered cubic TiC formed in the middle. The interface structure of diffusion-bonded TiAl/steel joints is TiAl/Ti{sub 3}Al+FeAl+FeAl{sub 2}/TiC/decarbonised layer/steel, and this structure will not change with bond time once it forms. The formation of the intermetallic compounds results in the embrittlement of the joint and poor joint properties. The thickness of each reaction layer increases with bonding time according to a parabolic law. The activation energy Q and the growth velocity K{sub 0} of the reacting layer Ti{sub 3}Al+FeAl+FeAl{sub 2}+TiC in the diffusion-bonded joints of TiAl base alloy to steel are 203 kJ/mol and 6.07 mm{sup 2}/s, respectively. Careful control of the growth of the reacting layer Ti{sub 3}Al+FeAl+FeAl{sub 2}+TiC can influence the final joint strength.

He, P.; Feng, J.C.; Zhang, B.G.; Qian, Y.Y

2002-07-15

63

Improvement of EB-PVD thermal barrier coatings by treatments of a vacuum plasma-sprayed bond coat  

Microsoft Academic Search

The lifetime of electron beam physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems with conventional 7 YSZ ceramic top layers was investigated in 1 h thermal-cyclic testing at 1100 °C. The single crystal alloy CMSX-4 and the polycrystalline IN 100 alloy that had been coated with a vacuum plasma-sprayed MCrAlY bond coat were chosen as substrate materials. A fully plasma-sprayed TBC

U. Schulz; O. Bernardi; A. Ebach-Stahl; R. Vassen; D. Sebold

2008-01-01

64

Diffusion Bonding of Silicon Carbide for a Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems Lean Direct Injector  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Robust approaches for joining silicon carbide (SiC) to silicon carbide sub-elements have been developed for a micro-electro-mechanical systems lean direct injector (MEMS LDI) application. The objective is to join SiC sub-elements to form a leak-free injector that has complex internal passages for the flow and mixing of fuel and air. Previous bonding technology relied upon silicate glass interlayers that were not uniform or leak free. In a newly developed joining approach, titanium foils and physically vapor deposited titanium coatings were used to form diffusion bonds between SiC materials during hot pressing. Microscopy results show the formation of well adhered diffusion bonds. Initial tests show that the bond strength is much higher than required for the component system. Benefits of the joining technology are fabrication of leak free joints with high temperature and mechanical capability.

Halbig, Michael C.; Singh, Mrityunjay; Shpargel, Tarah P.; Kiser, James D.

2006-01-01

65

Joint design for improved fatigue life of diffusion-bonded box-stiffened panels  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Simple photoelastic models were used to identify a cross-section geometry that would eliminate the severe stress concentrations at the bond line between box stiffeners diffusion bonded to a panel skin. Experimental fatigue-test data from titanium test specimens quantified the allowable stress in terms of cycle life for various joint geometries. It is shown that the effect of stress concentration is reduced and an acceptable fatigue life is achieved.

Davis, R. C.; Moses, P. L.; Kanenko, R. S.

1985-01-01

66

Transient liquid phase diffusion bonding of Udimet 720 for Stirling power converter applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Udimet 720 has been selected for use on Stirling power converters for space applications. Because Udimet 720 is generally considered susceptible to strain age cracking if traditional fusion welding is used, other joining methods are being considered. A process for transient liquid phase diffusion bonding of Udimet 720 has been theoretically developed in an effort to eliminate the strain age crack concern. This development has taken into account such variables as final grain size, joint homogenization, joint efficiency related to bonding aid material, bonding aid material application method, and thermal cycle.

Mittendorf, Donald L.; Baggenstoss, William G.

67

Diffusion soldering for stable high-temperature thin-film bonds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Diffusion soldering is a special bonding technique to produce joints at a moderate temperature that are subsequently stable at higher temperatures. The search for material systems extending the upper-temperature limit of stability requires information from the pertinent phase diagrams and the reaction kinetics. Combining experimental studies on phase equilibration in powder samples with bulk and thin-film diffusion couples is a useful approach for a systematic search. Promising candidates for dsoldering are Pt-In or Pd-In, and molybdenum is also an effective diffusion barrier against the attack of liquid tin.

Studnitzky, Thomas; Schmid-Fetzer, Rainer

2002-12-01

68

Thermomechanical analysis of diffusion-bonded tungsten/EUROFER97 with a vanadium interlayer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Earlier basic investigations revealed that diffusion bonding between tungsten and RAFM-steel at a relatively low temperature using a thin low-activation vanadium interlayer having a CTE between that of the parent materials can significantly reduce the residual stresses and produce defect-free bond interfaces. The joint has a high strength as well as sufficient ductility and toughness especially at the test temperature of about 550 °C. To apply this knowledge in fusion power plants, particularly in divertors, an acceptable lifetime of such structural joints is required, since they are exposed to high thermomechanical cyclic loading. To simulate the possible operational conditions of a He-cooled divertor, diffusion-bonded specimens are loaded by thermal cycling in a temperature range between 350 °C and 500 °C and a constant tensile stress based on the calculation of the internal pressure of the divertor thimble. The aim of this experimental work is to check the resistance of the diffusion-bonded W/EUROFER97 against ratcheting during thermomechanical loading and analyze the evolution of microstructures of the joint especially along the bond interfaces.

Basuki, Widodo Widjaja; Dahm, Ralf; Aktaa, Jarir

2014-12-01

69

Transient liquid phase diffusion bonding of Udimet 720 for Stirling power converter applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Udimet 720 has been selected for use on Stirling power converters for space applications. Because Udimet 720 is generally considered susceptible to strain age cracking if traditional fusion welding is used, other joining methods are being considered. A process for transient liquid phase diffusion bonding of Udimet 720 has been theoretically developed in an effort to eliminate the strain age

Donald L. Mittendorf; William G. Baggenstoss

1992-01-01

70

Development and analysis of diffusion bonding techniques for LBE-cooled spallation targets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Spallation sources incorporating solid targets may be driven to utilize liquid metal coolants by neutronics or temperature concerns. If tungsten is chosen as the target material, it will require cladding given its poor performance under irradiation. One option to meet this need are ferritic/martensitic stainless steel alloys. This study investigates possible diffusion bonding techniques suitable to clad tungsten targets with HT9, a high chromium stainless steel familiar to the nuclear industry. A test bonding matrix was performed to identify bonding conditions and process parameters suitable for the three material systems of interest (HT9/Ta, HT9/W, and HT9/HT9). Temperatures of 900 and 1060 °C were investigated along with bonding pressures of 7 and 70 MPa. A nominal soak time of 3 h was used for all tests. Three interlayers were investigated: pure nickel, Ni-6P, and vanadium. Finally, different surface preparation techniques for the tungsten were explored in order to gage their effect on the bond quality. Following joining, the bonds were characterized using an array of microscopy and micromechanical techniques to determine the resulting interface character. The nickel and NiP coatings were found to stabilize austenite at the HT9 surface during bonding, while the vanadium remained generally inert given good solubility in each of the three systems. Intermetallic formation is also a significant concern at elevated bonding temperatures as FeTa, FeW, NiTa, and NiW each rapidly form during interdiffusion. Multiple failures were observed through crack propagation parallel to the interface along the intermetallic phases. Differing contraction rates among the base materials also resulted in brittle fracture within the tungsten during cooling from bonding temperatures. Bonding performed at 900 °C under 70 MPa for 3 h with the inclusion of a vanadium interlayer was found to be superior of the conditions explored in this work.

Nelson, A. T.; Hosemann, P.; Maloy, S. A.

2012-12-01

71

Microstructure of Diffusion-Bonded Mg-Ag-Al Multilayer Composite Materials  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mg-Al bonded composite materials expand Mg and Al alloys' applications by combining their unique performances together. However, the formation of Mg-Al intermetallic compounds in interface zone of Mg/Al directly-bonded joint seriously obstructs its further development. To solve this problem, Mg-Ag-Al multilayer composite materials have been successfully prepared by diffusion bonding technology. The effect of key process parameter (bonding temperature) on microstructure of this material has been mainly investigated. The results show that Mg and Al were well bonded by using silver interlayer when the bonding temperature exceeded 370°C. But Mg17Al12 and Mg2Al3 compounds were formed in the interface zone at temperatures higher than 420°C. By means of controlling the bonding temperature (380 °C-420 °C), silver interlayer effectively restrained the generation of Mg-Al intermetallic compounds, and Mg-Ag intermetallic compounds (Mg3Ag, MgAg) were formed in the interface zone instead.

Wang, Yiyu; Luo, Guoqiang; Zhang, Jian; Shen, Qiang; Zhang, Lianmeng

2013-03-01

72

Visible to vacuum-UV range optical absorption of oxygen dangling bonds in amorphous SiO{sub 2}  

SciTech Connect

Synthetic silica glass with an optical absorption spectrum dominated by oxygen dangling bonds (nonbridging oxygen hole centers, or NBOHCs) and having negligible (<1%) contribution from the usually copresent Si dangling bonds (E'-centers), was prepared by room temperature ultraviolet photobleaching of high SiOH content (''wet'') silica, irradiated by F{sub 2} laser (7.9 eV) at T = 80 K. This allowed us to obtain the up-to-now controversial optical absorption spectrum of NBOHC in the ultraviolet and vacuum-ultraviolet (UV-VUV) region of the spectrum and to show that it is semicontinuous from 4 to 7.8 eV and cannot be represented by a pair of distinct Gaussian bands. Since NBOHC is one of the main UV-VUV range optical absorbers in silica, its spectral shape provides a tool to disentangle contributions of different color centers to optical losses in this spectral region.

Skuja, Linards [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Latvia, Kengaraga iela 8, LV1063 Riga (Latvia); Kajihara, Koichi [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Urban Environmental Sciences, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 1-1 Minami-Osawa, Hachioji 192-0397 (Japan); Hirano, Masahiro [Frontier Collaborative Research Center, Mail Box S2-13, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Hosono, Hideo [Frontier Collaborative Research Center, Mail Box S2-13, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Materials and Structures Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan)

2011-11-15

73

A new technology for diffusion bonding intermetallic TiAl to steel with composite barrier layers  

SciTech Connect

In this study, intermetallic TiAl and steel are diffusion bonded successfully by using composite barrier layers of titanium/vanadium/copper. The relationship of the bond parameters and tensile strength of the joints is discussed, and the optimum bond parameters were obtained. The reaction products and the interface structures of the joints were investigated by SEM, EPMA, and XRD. In this case, a dual phase Ti{sub 3}Al+TiAl layer and a Ti solid solution, which enhances the strength of the joint, are obtained at the TiAl/Ti interface. A formation mechanism at the interface of TiAl/Ti was proposed. The whole reaction process can be divided into three stages. In the first stage, Ti (Al{sub ss}) layer is formed at the interface TiAl/titanium. In the second stage, the continuous diffusion of Al atoms from TiAl to titanium leads to the formation of Ti{sub 3}Al, a TiAl+Ti{sub 3}Al layer is formed adjacent to TiAl. In the last stage, the thickness of each reaction layer increases with bonding time according to a parabolic law. The interface of TiAl/titanium/vanadium/copper/steel was free from intermetallic compounds and other brittle phases, and the strength of the joint was as high as 420 MPa, very close to that of the TiAl base. This method provides a reliable bonding method of intermetallic TiAl and steel.

He, P.; Feng, J.C.; Zhang, B.G.; Qian, Y.Y

2003-01-15

74

Diffusion Bonding Beryllium to Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic Steel: Development of Processes and Techniques  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Only a few materials are suitable to act as armor layers against the thermal and particle loads produced by magnetically confined fusion. These candidates include beryllium, tungsten, and carbon fiber composites. The armor layers must be joined to the plasma facing components with high strength bonds that can withstand the thermal stresses resulting from differential thermal expansion. While specific joints have been developed for use in ITER (an experimental reactor in France), including beryllium to CuCrZr as well as tungsten to stainless steel interfaces, joints specific to commercially relevant fusion reactors are not as well established. Commercial first wall components will likely be constructed front Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic (RAFM) steel, which will need to be coating with one of the three candidate materials. Of the candidates, beryllium is particularly difficult to bond, because it reacts during bonding with most elements to form brittle intermetallic compounds. This brittleness is unacceptable, as it can lead to interface crack propagation and delamination of the armor layer. I have attempted to overcome the brittle behavior of beryllium bonds by developing a diffusion bonding process of beryllium to RAFM steel that achieves a higher degree of ductility. This process utilized two bonding aids to achieve a robust bond: a. copper interlayer to add ductility to the joint, and a titanium interlayer to prevent beryllium from forming unwanted Be-Cu intermetallics. In addition, I conducted a series of numerical simulations to predict the effect of these bonding aids on the residual stress in the interface. Lastly, I fabricated and characterized beryllium to ferritic steel diffusion bonds using various bonding parameters and bonding aids. Through the above research, I developed a process to diffusion bond beryllium to ferritic steel with a 150 M Pa tensile strength and 168 M Pa shear strength. This strength was achieved using a Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) process (at a temperature between 700 °C and 750 °C for 2 hours at 103 M Pa) with 10 mu m of titanium and 20 mum of copper deposited between substrates. Without the copper and titanium interlayers, the bond formed an intermetallic that lead to fracture from internal residual stresses. Also, slowing the rate of cooling and adding an intermediate hold temperature during cool-down significantly increased bond strength. These beneficial effects were confirmed by the numerical simulations, which showed reduced residual stress resulting from all bonding techniques. Both metals interlayers, as well as the reduced cooling rate were critical in overcoming the otherwise brittle quality of the beryllium to ferritic steel joint. However, the introduced interlayers are not an ideal solution to the problem. They introduced both Be-Ti and Cu-Ti compounds, which proved to be the eventual failure location in the bond. Further optimization of this joint is necessary, and can potentially be achieved with variation of cooling rates. To make the joint ready for implementation will require larger scale fabrication to verify reliability and to test the joint under operational loads.

Hunt, Ryan Matthew

75

Room temperature CuCu direct bonding using surface activated bonding method  

E-print Network

Room temperature Cu­Cu direct bonding using surface activated bonding method T. H. Kim,a) M. M. R; published 10 February 2003 Thin copper Cu films of 80 nm thickness deposited on a diffusion barrier layered surfaces. © 2003 American Vacuum Society. DOI: 10.1116/1.1537716 I. INTRODUCTION The wafer direct bonding

Howlader, Matiar R

76

Fabrication and Design Aspects of High-Temperature Compact Diffusion Bonded Heat Exchangers  

SciTech Connect

The very high temperature reactor (VHTR), using gas-cooled reactor technology, is one of the six reactor concepts selected by the Generation IV International Forum and is anticipated to be the reactor type for the next generation nuclear plant (NGNP). In this type of reactor with an indirect power cycle system, a high-temperature and high integrity intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) with high effectiveness is required to efficiently transfer the core thermal output to secondary fluid for electricity production, process heat, or hydrogen cogeneration. The current Technology Readiness Level status issued by NGNP to all components associated with the IHX for reactor core outlet temperatures of 750-800oC is 3 on a scale of 1 to 10 with 10 being the most ready. At present, there is no proven high-temperature IHX concept for VHTRs. Amongst the various potential IHX concepts available, diffusion bonded heat exchangers (henceforth called printed circuit heat exchangers, or PCHEs) appear promising for NGNP applications. The design and fabrication of this key component of NGNP is the primary focus of this paper. In the current study, two PCHEs were fabricated using Alloy 617 plates and will be experimentally investigated for their thermal-hydraulic performance in a high-temperature helium test facility (HTHF). The HTHF was primarily designed and constructed to test the thermal-hydraulic performance of PCHEs The test facility is primarily of Alloy 800H construction and is designed to facilitate experiments at temperatures and pressures up to 800oC and 3 MPa, respectively. The PCHE fabrication related processes, i.e., photochemical machining and diffusion bonding are briefly discussed for Alloy 617 plates. Diffusion bonding of Alloy 617 plates with and without a Ni interlayer is discussed. Furthermore, preliminary microstructural and mechanical characterization studies of representative diffusion bonded Alloy 617 specimens are presented.

Mylavarapu, Sai K. [Ohio State University; Sun, Xiaodong [Ohio State University; Christensen, Richard N. [Ohio State University; Glosup, Richard E. [Ohio State University; Unocic, Raymond R [ORNL

2012-01-01

77

Liquid phase diffusion bonding and thermoelectric properties of Pb 1-xSnxTe compounds  

Microsoft Academic Search

The solidified Pb1-xSnxTe compounds with different x were joined by liquid phase diffusion bonding technique in order to prepare the segmented thermoelectric materials which had a fundamental FGM (functionally graded materials) structure. The Pb1-xSnxTe compound is a p-type semiconductor whose carrier concentration increases with increasing x. Therefore the maximum thermoelectric figure of merit of Pb1-xSnxTe shifted to a higher temperature

M. Hashimoto; I. Shiota; O. Ohashi; Y. Isoda; Y. Imai; Y. Shinohara; I. A. Nishida

1998-01-01

78

Interface microstructures in the diffusion bonding of a titanium alloy Ti 6242 to an INCONEL 625  

Microsoft Academic Search

A Ti6242 alloy has been diffusion bonded to a superalloy INCONEL 625. The microstructures of the as-processed products have\\u000a been analyzed using optical metallography, scanning electron microscope (SEM), and scanning transmission electron microscope\\u000a (STEM) techniques. The interdiffusion of the different elements through the interface has been determined using energy-dispersive\\u000a spectroscopy (EDS) microanalysis in both a SEM and a STEM. Several

B. Alemán; I. Gutiérrez; J. J. Urcola

1995-01-01

79

TEM Observation of the Ti Interlayer Between SiC Substrates During Diffusion Bonding  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Diffusion bonding was carried out to join SiC to SiC substrates using titanium interlayers. In this study, 10 m and 20 m thick physical vapor deposited (PVD) Ti surface coatings, and 10 and 20 m thick Ti foils were used. Diffusion bonding was performed at 1250 C for PVD Ti coatings and 1200 C for Ti foil. This study investigates the microstructures of the phases formed during diffusion bonding through TEM and selected-area diffraction analysis of a sample prepared with an FIB, which allows samples to be taken from the reacted area. In all samples, Ti3SiC2, Ti5Si3Cx and TiSi2 phases were identified. In addition, TiC and unknown phases also appeared in the samples in which Ti foils were used as interlayers. Furthermore, Ti3SiC2 phases show high concentration and Ti5Si3Cx formed less when samples were processed at a higher temperature and thinner interlayer samples were used. It appears that the formation of microcracks is caused by the presence of intermediate phase Ti5Si3Cx, which has anisotropic thermal expansion, and by the presence of an unidentified Ti-Si-C ternary phase with relatively low Si content.

Tsuda, Hiroshi; Mori, Shigeo; Halbig, Michael C.; Singh, Mori

2012-01-01

80

Fabrication and Design Aspects of High-Temperature Compact Diffusion Bonded Heat Exchangers  

SciTech Connect

The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) using gas-cooled reactor technology is anticipated to be the reactor type for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). In this reactor concept with an indirect power cycle system, a high-temperature and high integrity Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) with high effectiveness is required to efficiently transfer the core thermal output to a secondary fluid for electricity generation, hydrogen production, and/or industrial process heat applications. At present, there is no proven IHX concept for VHTRs. The current Technology Readiness Level (TRL) status issued by NGNP to all components associated with the IHX for reduced nominal reactor outlet temperatures of 750–800 degrees C is 3 on a 1–10 scale, with 10 indicating omplete technological maturity. Among the various potential IHX concepts available, diffusion bonded heat exchangers (henceforth called printed circuit heat exchangers, or PCHEs) appear promising for NGNP applications. The design and fabrication of this key component of NGNP with Alloy 617, a candidate high-temperature structural material for NGNP applications, are the primary focus of this paper. In the current study, diffusion bonding of Alloy 617 has been demonstrated, although the optimum diffusion bonding process parameters to engineer a quasi interface-free joint are yet to be determined. The PCHE fabrication related processes, i.e., photochemical etching and diffusion bonding are discussed for Alloy 617 plates. In addition, the authors’ experiences with these non-conventional machining and joining techniques are discussed. Two PCHEs are fabricated using Alloy 617 plates and are being experimentally investigated for their thermal-hydraulic performance in a High-Temperature Helium Facility (HTHF). The HTHF is primarily of Alloy 800H construction and is designed to facilitate experiments at temperatures and pressures up to 800 degrees C and 3 MPa, respectively. Furthermore, some preliminary microstructural and mechanical property characterization studies of representative diffusion bonded Alloy 617 specimens are presented. The characterization studies are restricted and less severe from an NGNP perspective but provide sufficient confidence to ensure safe operation of the heat exchangers in the HTHF. The test results are used to determine the design operating conditions for the PCHEs fabricated.

Sai K. Mylavarapu; Richard N. Christensen; Raymond R. Unocic; Richard E. Glosup; Mike W. Patterson

2012-08-01

81

Diffusion bonding of commercially pure titanium to low carbon steel using a silver interlayer  

SciTech Connect

Titanium and low carbon steel plates were joined through diffusion bonding using a silver interlayer at various temperatures for various diffusion times. In order to determine the strength of the resulting joints, tensile-shear tests and hardness tests were applied. Additionally, optical, scanning electron microscopy examinations and energy dispersive spectrometry elemental analyses were carried out to determine the interface properties of the joint. The work showed that the highest interface strength was obtained for the specimens joined at 850 deg. C for 90 min. It was seen from the hardness results that the highest hardness value was obtained for the interlayer material and the hardness values on the both sides of the interlayer decreased gradually as the distance from the joint increased. In energy dispersive spectrometry analyses, it was seen that the amount of silver in the interlayer decreased markedly depending on the temperature rise. In addition, increasing diffusion time also caused some slight decrease in the amount of silver.

Atasoy, Evren [Tokat Adocim Cement Factory, 60100, Tokat (Turkey); Kahraman, Nizamettin [Karabuk University, Technical Education Faculty, 78050, Karabuk (Turkey)], E-mail: nizamettinkahraman@gmail.com

2008-10-15

82

Diffusion bonding of Al7075 alloy to titanium aluminum vanadate alloy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The aluminum alloy (Al7075) and titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) are used in a variety of applications in the aerospace industry. However, the high cost of Ti-6Al-4V alloy has been a major factor which has limited its use and therefore, the ability to join Al7075 alloy to Ti-6Al-4V alloy can provide a product that is less costly, but retains the high strength and light weight properties necessary for the transport industry. However, the large difference in the physical properties between these two alloys prevents the use of conventional joining techniques such as fusion welding to join these dissimilar alloys. Therefore, the diffusion bonding technique was used to join Al7075 alloy to Ti-6Al-4V alloy with the objective of minimizing microstructural changes of the two alloys during the bonding process. In this thesis, solid state and liquid phase bonding processes were undertaken. Solid state bonding was employed without interlayers and was successful at 510°C and 7 MPa. The bond interface showed an absence of the oxides due to the dissolution of oxygen into the titanium solution. Bonds made using copper interlayers at a temperature sufficient enough to form eutectic liquid formation between copper and aluminum were produced. The intermetallics theta(Al2Cu), S(Al2CuMg) and T(Al2Mg3Zn3) were identified at the aluminum interface while Cu3Ti2 intermetallic was identified at the titanium interface. Bonds made using tin based alloys interlayers and copper coatings were successful and gave the highest shear strength. The eutectic formation on the Al7075 alloy was responsible for joint formation at the aluminum interface while the formation of Sn3Ti5 intermetallic was responsible for the joint formation at titanium interface. The corrosion rate of the bonds decreased with increasing bonding time for joints made using the tin based interlayer in 3% NaCl solution. However, the presence of copper within the joint increased the corrosion rate of the bonds and this was attributed to the corrosive effect of copper in the Al7075 alloy.

Alhazaa, Abdulaziz Nasser

83

Verification of the effect of surface preparation on Hot Isostatic Pressing diffusion bonding joints of CLAM steel  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) diffusion bonding with CLAM steel is the primary candidate fabrication technique for the first wall (FW) of DFLL-TBM. Surface state is one of the key factors for the joints quality. The effect of surface state prepared with grinder and miller on HIP diffusion bonding joints of CLAM steel was investigated. HIP diffusion bonding was performed at 140 MPa and 1373 K within 3 h. The mechanical properties of the joints were investigated with instrumented Charpy V-notch impact tests and the microstructures of the joints were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that the milled samples with fine surface roughness were more suitable for CLAM steel HIP diffusion bonding.

Zhao, Yanyun; Li, Chunjing; Huang, Bo; Liu, Shaojun; Huang, Qunying

2014-12-01

84

Molecular Dynamics Study of the Disruption of H-BONDS by Water Molecules and its Diffusion Behavior in Amorphous Cellulose  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hydrolysis is an important component of the aging of cellulose, and it severely affects the insulating performance of cellulosic materials. The diffusion behavior of water molecules in amorphous cellulose and their destructive effect on the hydrogen bonding structure of cellulose were investigated by molecular dynamics. The change in the hydrogen bonding structure indicates that water molecules have a considerable effect on the hydrogen bonding structure within cellulose: both intermolecular and intramolecular hydrogen bonds decreased with an increase in ingressive water molecules. Moreover, the stabilities of the cellulose molecules were disrupted when the number of intermolecular hydrogen bonds declined to a certain degree. Both the free volumes of amorphous cells and water molecule-cellulose interaction affect the diffusion of water molecules. The latter, especially the hydrogen bonding interaction between water molecules and cellulose, plays a predominant role in the diffusion behavior of water molecules in the models of which the free volume rarely varies. The diffusion coefficient of water molecules has an excellent correlation with water molecule-cellulose interaction and the average hydrogen bonds between each water molecule and cellulose; however, this relationship was not apparent between the diffusion coefficient and free volume.

Liao, Ruijin; Zhu, Mengzhao; Zhou, Xin; Zhang, Fuzhou; Yan, Jiaming; Zhu, Wenbin; Gu, Chao

2012-06-01

85

Optimizing Diffusion Bonding Parameters in AA6061-T6 Aluminum and AZ80 Magnesium Alloy Dissimilar Joints  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The main difficulty when joining magnesium (Mg) and aluminum (Al) alloys by fusion welding lies in the formation of oxide films and brittle intermetallic in the bond region which affects the integrity of the joints. However, diffusion bonding is a suitable process to join these two materials as no such characteristic defects are produced at the joints. The diffusion bonding process parameters such as bonding temperature, bonding pressure, holding time, and surface roughness of the specimen play a major role in determining the joint strength. In this investigation, an attempt was made to develop empirical relationships to predict the strengths of diffusion bonded AZ80 magnesium and AA6061 aluminum alloys dissimilar joints from the process parameters based on central composite factorial design. Response surface methodology was applied to optimize the process parameters to attain the maximum shear strength and bonding strength of the joint. From this investigation, it was found that the bonds produced with the temperature of 405.87 °C, pressure of 7.87 MPa, holding time of 29.02 min and surface roughness of 0.10 ?m exhibited maximum shear strength and bonding strength of 57.70 and 76.90 MPa, respectively. The intermetallic formation at the interface was identified.

Joseph Fernandus, M.; Senthilkumar, T.; Balasubramanian, V.; Rajakumar, S.

2012-11-01

86

Examination of superplastic forming combined with diffusion bonding for titanium: Perspective from experience  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Superplastic forming (SPF) combined with diffusion bonding (DB) has been used successfully for the fabrication of titanium aerospace hardware. Many of these applications have been for military aircraft, whereby a complex built-up structure has been replaced with monolithic parts. Several methods for applying the two- and four-sheet titanium SPF/DB processes have been devised, including the welding of sheets prior to forming and the use of silk-screened stop-off (yttria) to prevent bonding where it is undesirable. Very little progress has been made in the past few years toward understanding and modeling the SPF/DB process using constitutive equations and data by laboratory testing. Concerns that engineers face in designing for fatigue life, acceptable design loads, and damage tolerance are currently being studied, but the database is very limited. This is a summary of past work found in the literature and forms the foundation for additional research.

Sanders, Daniel G.; Ramulu, Mamidala

2004-12-01

87

Structural properties of superplastically formed/diffusion-bonded orthogonally corrugated core sandwich plates  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes a new superplastically formed/diffusion-bonded (SPF/DB) orthogonally corrugated sandwich structure, and presents formulae and the associated plots for evaluating the effective elastic constants for the core of this new sandwich structure. Comparison of structural properties of this new sandwich structure with the conventional honeycomb core sandwich structure was made under the condition of equal sandwich density. It was found that the SPF/DB orthogonally corrugated sandwich core has higher transverse shear stiffness than the conventional honeycomb sandwich core. However, the former has lower stiffness in the sandwich core thickness direction than the latter.

Ko, W. L.

1980-01-01

88

Elastic constants for superplastically formed/diffusion-bonded corrugated sandwich core  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Formulas and associated graphs for evaluating the effective elastic constants for a superplastically formed/diffusion bonded (SPF/DB) corrugated sandwich core, are presented. A comparison of structural stiffnesses of the sandwich core and a honeycomb core under conditions of equal sandwich core density was made. The stiffness in the thickness direction of the optimum SPF/DB corrugated core (that is, triangular truss core) is lower than that of the honeycomb core, and that the former has higher transverse shear stiffness than the latter.

Ko, W. L.

1980-01-01

89

Diffusion Bonding Technology of Tungsten and SiC/SiC Composites for Nuclear Applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Silicon carbide (SiC) is a candidate for the structural material in the next generation nuclear plants. Use of SiC/SiC composites is expected to increase the operation temperature of system over 1000 °C. For the high temperature system, refractory metals are planned to be used for several components. Tungsten is a candidate of armor on the divertor component in fusion, and is planned to be used for an upper-end plug of SiC/SiC fuel pin in a Gas cooled Fast Reactor (GFR). Joining technique of the SiC/SiC composites and tungsten is an important issue for nuclear systems in future. Nano-Infiltration and Transient Eutectoid (NITE) method is able to provide dense stable and high strength SiC/SiC composites having high resistance against pressure at elevated temperature, a diffusion bonding technique is usable to join the materials. Present research produces a NITE-SiC/SiC composite and tungsten as the similar dimension as a projected cladding tube of fuel pin for GFR using diffusion bonding, and investigated microstructure and mechanical properties.

Kishimoto, Hirotatsu; Shibayama, Tamaki; Abe, Takahiro; Shimoda, Kazuya; Kawamura, Satoshi; Kohyama, Akira

2011-10-01

90

Advanced diffuser technology helps reduce vent-up times while maintaining wafer integrity on vacuum tools loadlock chambers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Wafer throughput and particle counts are key metrics for any semiconductor manufacturer's yield enhancement programs. Recent advancements in diffuser technology have helped manufacturers enhance these metrics while improving the attributes for most vacuum processes. These processes include dry etch, chemical vapor deposition (CVD), physical vapor deposition (PVD), rapid thermal processing (RTP) and Epitaxial deposition (Epi). Execution of membrane diffuser technology dramatically decreases required vent time and has become a highly effective tool upgrade option. An early implementation of this technology was used on 200mm batch-style loadlocks that had an inherently large internal volume. The loadlock was prone to long vent cycles to prevent particle contamination. As the industry transitioned to a 300mm wafer platform, factories increased their development of single-wafer loadlocks (SWLL) in an effort to boost tool throughput. Gas diffusers with ultra fine filtration membranes solved these issues. Compared to the 200mm batch-style loadlocks, the SWLLs had extremely low internal volumes and were designed to cycle vacuum to atmosphere very quickly. With the low volumes inherent in the SWLL, the velocity of the incoming vent gas became critical, since any particles on the bottom of the loadlock chamber would easily sweep onto the wafer should they be hit with a high velocity gas. Particles are typically present in the loadlock due to mechanical wafer handling devices and environmental exposure. Gas diffusers allowed a large, uniform volumetric flowrate of gas into the loadlock chamber at low downstream gas velocities. While now standard on most 300mm loadlocks, the majority of 200mm tools in the field do not utilize membrane diffusers. Typically a screen, frit and/or soft vent procedure is used to control the flow into the loadlock. However, these tools can now be retrofitted with membrane diffuser technology. The result is a large reduction in particle count while maintaining throughput levels at a low cost with minimal downtime.

Vroman, Chris; Quartaro, Chris; Randolph, Marshall

2008-03-01

91

Interface microstructures in the diffusion bonding of a titanium alloy Ti 6242 to an Inconel 625  

SciTech Connect

Surveys carried out by some oil companies have shown a recent and clear trend toward drilling wells to greater depths. As the drilling for oil and gas gets deeper, the requirements of materials for tubing become more stringent, due to the rise in temperature and pressure and also because the tubes have to sustain their own weight. In this paper, Ti6242 alloy has been diffusion bonded to a superalloy INCONEL 625. The microstructures of the as-processed products have been analyzed using optical metallography, scanning electron microscope (SEM), and scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) techniques. The interdiffusion of the different elements through the interface has been determined using energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) microanalysis in both a SEM and a STEM. Several regions around the original interface have been observed. Starting from the superalloy INCONEL 625, first a sigma phase (Cr[sub 4]Ni[sub 3]Mo[sub 2]), followed by several phases like NbNi[sub 3], [eta]Ni[sub 3]Ti, Cr(20 pct Mo), [beta] Cr[sub 2]Ti, NiTi, TiO, TiNi, and Ti[sub 2]Ni intermetallics, just before the Ti6242 have been identified. Because the diffusion of Ni in Ti is faster than the diffusion of Ti in the superalloy, a Kirkendall effect was produced. The sequence of formation of the different phases were in agreement with the ternary Ti-Cr-Ni diagram.

Aleman, B.; Gutierrez, I.; Urcola, J.J. (Centro de Estudios e Investigaciones Tecnicos de Guipuzcoa, San Sebastian (Spain). Dept. of Materials)

1995-02-01

92

Comparison of ion sites and diffusion paths in glasses obtained by molecular dynamics simulations and bond valence analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Based on molecular dynamics simulations of a lithium metasilicate glass we study the potential of bond valence sum calculations to identify sites and diffusion pathways of mobile Li ions in a glassy silicate network. We find that the bond valence method is not well suitable to locate the sites, but allows one to estimate the number of sites. Spatial regions of the glass determined as accessible for the Li ions by the bond valence method can capture up to 90% of the diffusion path. These regions however entail a significant fraction that does not belong to the diffusion path. Because of this low specificity, care must be taken to determine the diffusive motion of particles in amorphous systems based on the bond valence method. The best identification of the diffusion path is achieved by using a modified valence mismatch in the BV analysis that takes into account that a Li ion favors equal partial valences to the neighboring oxygen ions. Using this modified valence mismatch it is possible to replace hard geometric constraints formerly applied in the BV method. Further investigations are necessary to better understand the relation between the complex structure of the host network and the ionic diffusion paths.

Müller, Christian; Zienicke, Egbert; Adams, Stefan; Habasaki, Junko; Maass, Philipp

2007-01-01

93

Low-distortion, high-strength bonding of thermoplastic microfluidic devices employing case-II diffusion-mediated permeant activation.  

PubMed

We demonstrate a new method for joining thermoplastic surfaces to produce microfluidic devices. The method takes advantage of the sharply defined permeation boundary of case-II diffusion to generate dimensionally controlled, activated bonding layers at the surfaces being joined. The technique is capable of producing bonds that exhibit cohesive failure, while preserving the fidelity of fine features in the bonding interface. This approach is uniquely suited to production of layered microfluidic structures, as it allows the bond-forming interface between plastic parts to be precisely manipulated at micrometre length scales. Distortions in microfluidic device channels are limited to the size scale of the permeant-swollen layer; 6 microm deep channels are routinely produced with no detectable cross-sectional distortions. Conventional thermal diffusion bonding of identical parts yields less strongly bonded microfluidic structures with increasingly severe dimensional compressions as bonding temperatures approach the thermoplastic glass-transition temperature: a preliminary rheological analysis is consistent with the observed compressions. The bond-enhancing procedure is easily integrated in standard process flows, uses inexpensive reagents, and requires no specialized equipment. PMID:18030407

Wallow, Thomas I; Morales, Alfredo M; Simmons, Blake A; Hunter, Marion C; Krafcik, Karen Lee; Domeier, Linda A; Sickafoose, Shane M; Patel, Kamlesh D; Gardea, Andy

2007-12-01

94

A Comparison Between Cold-Welded and Diffusion-Bonded Al/Cu Bimetallic Rods Produced by ECAE Process  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this research, the application of equal channel angular extrusion process to produce both the cold-welded and diffusion-bonded Al/Cu bimetallic rods is assessed. The joints shear strength for both of the methods are measured and compared. The microstructure examinations were also carried out using scanning electron microscope equipped with EDX system and x-ray diffraction analysis. The results exhibit that the strength of the bond in cold-welded specimens is dependent on the amount of stretch and pressure at the materials interface. But in the diffusion-bonded specimens, it is depended on the struggle between the oxidation rate of the mating surfaces accompanied by inter-metallic compounds formation and the aluminum and copper atoms ability to diffuse in the joint interface.

Eslami, P.; Karimi Taheri, A.; Zebardast, M.

2013-10-01

95

Application of superplastically formed and diffusion bonded aluminum to a laminar flow control leading edge  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA sponsored the Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) program in 1976 to develop technologies to improve fuel efficiency. Laminar flow control was one such technology. Two approaches for achieving laminar flow were designed and manufactured under NASA sponsored programs: the perforated skin concept used at McDonnell Douglas and the slotted design used at Lockheed-Georgia. Both achieved laminar flow, with the slotted design to a lesser degree (JetStar flight test program). The latter design had several fabrication problems concerning springback and adhesive flow clogging the air flow passages. The Lockheed-Georgia Company accomplishments is documented in designing and fabricating a small section of a leading edge article addressing a simpler fabrication method to overcome the previous program's manufacturing problems, i.e., design and fabrication using advanced technologies such as diffusion bonding of aluminum, which has not been used on aerospace structures to date, and the superplastic forming of aluminum.

Goodyear, M. D.

1987-01-01

96

Microstructures of brazed and solid-state diffusion bonded joints of tungsten with oxide dispersion strengthened steel  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The brazed and solid-state diffusion bonded (SSDB) joints of tungsten with oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel were fabricated to use ODS steels as a structure component of first wall with tungsten as a plasma facing material in fusion blankets. Particular attention was paid to changes in the microstructure and chemical compositions in the bonding region. W was found to diffuse significantly into ODS steel, whereas there was only a limited diffusion of Fe and Cr from the ODS steel into W; these results are consistent with the diffusivity of each element. Interdiffusion multi-layer containing a layer with high concentration of B and of C was produced in the brazed joint and the SSDB joint, respectively.

Oono, Naoko; Noh, Sanghoon; Iwata, Noriyuki; Nagasaka, Takuya; Kasada, Ryuta; Kimura, Akihiko

2011-10-01

97

Theoretical study on the diffusive transport of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene in polymer-bonded explosive  

Microsoft Academic Search

Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to study the migration of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) in the fluorine rubber\\u000a binder of polymer-bonded explosives (PBX) over a wide range of temperatures. The diffusion coefficient (D) of TNT is determined via microcanonical (NVE) MD simulation using the COMPASS force field. The calculated diffusion coefficient\\u000a (D) was then used to compute the migration time of

Yang Zhou; XinPing Long; XingWen Wei

98

Low cycle fatigue strength of diffusion bonded joints of alumina dispersion-strengthened copper to stainless steel  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is proposed that the first wall and divertor components of ITER employ alumina dispersion-strengthened copper (DS Cu) joined to austenitic stainless steel. In this work, low cycle fatigue tests were performed on a direct diffusion bonded joint, a diffusion bonded joint with a Au interlayer, stainless steel and DS Cu in order to investigate their fatigue strength and fracture behavior. For the direct diffusion bonded joint, the fatigue strength in the small strain range was considerably lower than that of the DS Cu, while in the large strain range the fatigue strength was similar to that of the DS Cu. The low cycle fatigue strength of the Au interlayer joint increased compared with the direct diffusion bonded joint, and was the same as that of the DS Cu. The strain distribution in joint specimens was not uniform, because the deformation stress was different between the 316 stainless steel and the DS Cu. The fracture locations for the joint specimens varied depending on their strain distribution.

Nishi, H.; Araki, T.

2000-12-01

99

Diffusion bonding of CMSX-4 to UDIMET 720 using PVD-coated interfaces and HIP  

SciTech Connect

There is an increasing interest in development of manufacturing methods for Dual Property BLISKs (BLaded dISKs), consisting of creep resistant airfoils and fatigue resistant disks bonded together by a durable joint. Optimum heat treatments are, however, very different for creep resistant single crystal CMSX-4 and fatigue resistant polycrystalline Udimet 720 selected in this study, but fortunately the first aging treatment for CMSX-4 (1140 C, 2-6h, AC) is similar to the partial solution treatment of U 720 HS2 (1115 C, 4h, OQ). Based on this, diffusion bonding was performed by HIP at 1120 C and 200 MPa argon pressure for 4 h, followed by cooling to 400 C. Subsequently, a shortened Udimet 720 HS2 two-step aging treatment was adopted by heating to 650 C for 6 h followed by cooling to 400 C, heating to 760 C for 2 h, and finally cooling to R.T. under remaining HIP pressure. Plasma etching followed by thin (80 nm) PVD coating with either nickel or titanium were used to clean and protect the polished surfaces before joining. The selection of coatings was governed by the possibility to reduce oxidized nickel by flushing with hydrogen at 330 C during evacuation of the HIP capsules, and by the large solubility of oxygen in titanium. Hot tensile testing was performed at 750 C on both joined and reference materials subjected to the modified heat treatment. Initially solution treated Udimet 720 and CMSX-4 comprised the reference materials. The testing showed that joints with Ni-PV coatings were almost as strong as Udimet 720 (although with very limited elongation), while the joints with Ti-PVD coatings were weaker.

Larker, R. [Lulea Univ. of Technology (Sweden). Div. of Engineering Materials; Ockborn, J.; Selling, B. [Volvo Aero Corp., Trollhattan (Sweden)

1999-07-01

100

Method for producing components with internal architectures, such as micro-channel reactors, via diffusion bonding sheets  

DOEpatents

This invention relates to a method for producing components with internal architectures, and more particularly, this invention relates to a method for producing structures with microchannels via the use of diffusion bonding of stacked laminates. Specifically, the method involves weakly bonding a stack of laminates forming internal voids and channels with a first generally low uniaxial pressure and first temperature such that bonding at least between the asperites of opposing laminates occurs and pores are isolated in interfacial contact areas, followed by a second generally higher isostatic pressure and second temperature for final bonding. The method thereby allows fabrication of micro-channel devices such as heat exchangers, recuperators, heat-pumps, chemical separators, chemical reactors, fuel processing units, and combustors without limitation on the fin aspect ratio.

Alman, David E. (Corvallis, OR); Wilson, Rick D. (Corvallis, OR); Davis, Daniel L. (Albany, OR)

2011-03-08

101

Indirect Versus Direct Heating of Sheet Materials: Superplastic Forming and Diffusion Bonding Using Lasers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Many from within manufacturing industry consider superplastic forming (SPF) to be ‘high tech’, but it is often criticized as too complicated, expensive, slow and, in general, an unstable process when compared to other methods of manipulating sheet materials. Perhaps, the fundamental cause of this negative perception of SPF, and also of diffusion bonding (DB), is the fact that the current process of SPF/DB relies on indirect sources of heating to produce the conditions necessary for the material to be formed. Thus, heat is usually derived from the electrically heated platens of hydraulic presses, to a lesser extent from within furnaces and, sometimes, from heaters imbedded in ceramic moulds. Recent evaluations of these isothermal methods suggest they are slow, thermally inefficient and inappropriate for the process. In contrast, direct heating of only the material to be formed by modern, electrically efficient, lasers could transform SPF/DB into the first choice of designers in aerospace, automotive, marine, medical, architecture and leisure industries. Furthermore, ‘variable temperature’ direct heating which, in theory, is possible with a laser beam(s) may provide a means to control material thickness distribution, a goal of enormous importance as fuel efficient, lightweight structures for transportation systems are universally sought. This paper compares, and contrasts, the two systems and suggests how a change to laser heating might be achieved.

Jocelyn, Alan; Kar, Aravinda; Fanourakis, Alexander; Flower, Terence; Ackerman, Mike; Keevil, Allen; Way, Jerome

2010-06-01

102

Nanostructure Particle-Reinforced Transient Liquid Phase Diffusion Bonding: a Comparative Study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Particle-reinforced aluminum-metal matrix composites (Al-MMCs) are used in many engineering applications, because they provide significant advantages when compared to monolithic aluminum alloys. However, there still exists the need to identify a suitable joining process for these materials, which minimizes particulate disruption and retains the strength of the MMC within the joint region. This study presents a comparison between joint qualities achieved when a monolithic interlayer is used vs when a nanoparticle-reinforced composite interlayer is used during transient liquid phase diffusion bonding of Al-6061 alloy containing 15 vol pct of Al2O3 particles. Examination of the joint region using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed the formation of eutectic phases such as Al3Ni, Al9FeNi, and Ni3Si within the joint zone. The results indicate that the addition of nanoparticle reinforcements into the interlayer can be used to improve joint strength and minimize particle segregation.

Cooke, Kavian O.; Khan, Tahir I.; Oliver, Gossett D.

2011-08-01

103

Effects of interface bonding and defects on boron diffusion at Si/SiO{sub 2} interface  

SciTech Connect

We perform first-principles density functional calculations to find the migration pathway and barrier for B diffusion at the Si/SiO{sub 2} interface. For various interface models, in which crystalline ?-quartz or amorphous silica (a-SiO{sub 2}) is placed on Si, we examine stable and metastable configurations of B-related defects which play a role in B diffusion. While a substitutional B alone is immobile in Si, it tends to diffuse to the interface via an interstitialcy mechanism in the presence of a self-interstitial and then changes into an interstitial B in oxide via a kick-out mechanism, leaving the self-interstitial at the interface. At the defect-free interface, where bridging O atoms are inserted to remove interface dangling bonds, an interstitial B prefers to intervene between the interface Si and bridging O atoms and subsequently diffuses through the hollow space or along the network of the Si-O-Si bonds in oxide. The overall migration barriers are calculated to be 2.02–2.12?eV at the Si/?-quartz interface, while they lie in the range of 2.04?±?0.44?eV at the Si/a-SiO{sub 2} interface, similar to that in ?-quartz. The migration pathway and barrier are not significantly affected by interface defects such as suboxide bond and O protrusion, while dangling bonds in the suboxide region can increase the migration barrier by about 1.5?eV. The result that the interface generally does not hinder the B diffusion from Si to SiO{sub 2} assists in understanding the underlying mechanism for B segregation which commonly occurs at the Si/SiO{sub 2} interface.

Kim, Geun-Myeong; Oh, Young Jun; Chang, K. J., E-mail: kchang@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-12-14

104

Structural dynamics of hydrogen bonded methanol oligomers: Vibrational transient hole burning studies of spectral diffusion  

E-print Network

Structural dynamics of hydrogen bonded methanol oligomers: Vibrational transient hole burning donate and receive hydrogen bonds have an inhomogeneously broadened hydroxyl stretch absorption line the dynamics are attributed to fluctuations in the local hydrogen bond network, which is consistent with recent

Fayer, Michael D.

105

Diffusion Bonding Behavior and Characterization of Joints Made Between 316L Stainless Steel Alloy and AZ31 Magnesium Alloy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The 316L austenitic stainless steel and AZ31 magnesium alloy have physical and mechanical properties which makes these alloys suitable in a number of high technology based industries such as the aerospace and automotive sectors. However, for these alloys to be used in engineering applications, components must be fabricated and joined successfully. The differences in the physical and metallurgical properties between these two alloys prevents the use of conventional fusion welding processes commonly employed in aerospace and transport industry. Therefore, alternative techniques need to be developed and diffusion bonding technology is a process that has considerable potential to join these two dissimilar alloys. In this research work both solid-state and transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding processes were applied. The solid-state bonding of 316L steel to AZ31 magnesium alloy was possible at a bonding temperature of 550°C for 120 minutes using a pressure of 1.3 MPa. The interface characterization of the joint showed a thin intermetallic zone rich in Fe-Al was responsible for providing a metallurgical bond. However, low joint shear strengths were recorded and this was attributed to the poor surface to surface contact. The macro-deformation of the AZ31 alloy prevented the use of higher bonding pressures and longer bonding times. In order to overcome these problems, the TLP bonding process was implemented using pure Cu and Ni foils as interlayers which produced a eutectic phase at the bonding temperature. This research identified the bonding mechanism through microstructural and differential scanning calorimetry investigations. The microstructural characterization of the TLP joints identified intermetallics which became concentrated along the 316L steel/AZ31 bond interface due to the "pushing effect" of the solid/liquid interface during isothermal solidification stage of bonding. The size and concentration of the intermetallics had a noticeable effect on the final joint strength properties. TLP bonding using electrodeposited coatings of Cu and Ni were used as a way of controlling the volume of eutectic liquid formed at the joint. Theoretical and experimental work showed that the use of thin coatings was successful in reducing the size and amount of intermetallics formed at the joint and this had the effect on increasing joint shear strength values.

Elthalabawy, Waled Mohamed

106

Photodissociation of CS2 in the vacuum ultraviolet - Determination of bond dissociation energy from the lowest vibrational level of the ground state CS2.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Photolysis in the vacuum ultraviolet results almost exclusively in the production of S(super-3)P atoms, which is in apparent violation of spin conservation. The threshold energy of incident photons required to produce fluorescence was used to calculate the bond dissociation energy (from the lowest vibrational level of the ground state), and the result agrees with the value previously derived from the photoionization of CS2. The fluorescence excitation spectrum shows peaks corresponding to Rydberg series I and II, indicating that the observed photodissociation of CS2 in the vacuum ultraviolet is mainly the result of predissociation from Rydberg states. The absorption coefficient of CS2 was measured in the region of 1200 to 1400 A.

Okabe, H.

1972-01-01

107

Diffusion Bonding of Tungsten to Reduced Activation Ferritic\\/Martensitic Steel F82H Using a Titanium Interlayer  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Development of materials and related fabrication process is one of the most important technologies for fusion energy development.\\u000a In fusion reactor, joining of tungsten (W) to reduced activation ferritic\\/martensitic steel is required. In this work, diffusion\\u000a bonding between W and ferritic\\/martensitic steel F82H using a Ti interlayer was investigated. The results indicated that all\\u000a the joints were successfully obtained. The

Zhihong Zhong; Tatsuya Hinoki; Akira Kohyama

108

Superplastic forming and diffusion bonding of rapidly solidified, dispersion strengthened aluminum alloys for elevated temperature structural applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Rapidly solidified alloys, based upon the Al-Fe-V-Si system and designed for elevated temperature applications, were evaluated for superplasticity and diffusion bonding behavior. Alloys with 8, 16, 27, and 36 volume percent silicide dispersoids were produced; dispersoid condition was varied by rolling at 300, 400, and 500 C (572, 752, and 932 F). Superplastic behavior was evaluated at strain rates from 1 x 10(exp -6)/s to 8.5/s at elevated temperatures. The results indicate that there was a significant increase in elongation at higher strain rates and at temperatures above 600 C (1112 F). However, the exposure of the alloys to temperatures greater than 600 C (1112 F) resulted in the coarsening of the strengthening dispersoid and the degradation of mechanical properties. Diffusion bonding was possible using low gas pressure at temperatures greater than 600 C (1112 F) which also resulted in degraded properties. The bonding of Al-Fe-V-Si alloys to 7475 aluminum alloy was performed at 516 C (960 F) without significant degradation in microstructure. Bond strengths equal to 90 percent that of the base metal shear strength were achieved. The mechanical properties and microstructural characteristics of the alloys were investigated.

Ting, E. Y.; Kennedy, J. R.

1989-01-01

109

Thermal conditions in a hot evaporating cathode in a stationary vacuum arc with diffuse cathode emission  

SciTech Connect

A study has been made of an arc on a thermally insulated metal cathode with indirect electron-beam heating. The cathode material (gadolinium) resembles ordinary refractory metals in having a small ratio of the evaporated-atom flux to the thermionic-emission electron one. At cathode temperatures T /SUB c/ greater than or equal to 1900/sup 0/K and saturation-vapor pressures greater than or equal to Pa, one gets stationary diffuse cathode emission with a mean current density of 10-100 A/cm/sup 2/. A method has been developed from measuring the heat flux Q*c, which is the difference between the flux from the plasma to the cathode and the flux transported from the cathode by electron emission. As the heating power and correspondingly T /SUB c/ increase, Q*c decreases, and there is a continuous transition from the self-heated condition with Q*c > O to the externally heated one Q*c < O. This Q*c(Tc) dependence provides for thermal stability of the diffuse cathode emission. In the first state, the ratio of the thermionic emission current to the arc current is about1, while in the second it is >1. To explain the cathode heating at maximal values Q*c > O by the ion flux from the plasma, it has to be assumed that there are highly charged ions with energies of about200 eV.

Paranin, S.N.; Polishchuk, V.P.; Shabashov, V.I.; Sychev, P.E.; Yartsev, I.M.

1986-11-01

110

Efficiency of ?-alumina as diffusion barrier between bond coat and bulk material of gas turbine blades  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gas turbine blades are often covered with protective coatings to withstand the high thermal and corrosive loads during operation. One of the most effective coating systems used consists of a MCrAlY bond coat and a YSZ thermal barrier coating. At high operating temperatures, a depletion of aluminum in the bond coat occurs not only due to the formation of thermally

Jürgen Müller; Dieter Neuschütz

2003-01-01

111

Preparation and Bond Properties of Thermal Barrier Coatings on Mg Alloy with Sprayed Al or Diffused Mg-Al Intermetallic Interlayer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sprayed Al or diffused Mg-Al layer was designed as interlayer between the thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) and Mg alloy substrate. The effects of the interlayer on the bond properties of the coats were investigated. Al layers were prepared by arc spraying and atmospheric plasma spraying (APS), respectively. Mg-Al diffused layer was obtained after the heat treatment of the sprayed sample (Mg alloy with APS Al coat) at 400 °C. The results show that sprayed Al interlayer does not improve the bond stability of TBCs. The failure of the TBCs on Mg alloy with Al interlayer occurs mainly due to the low strength of Al layer. Mg-Al diffused layer improves corrosion resistance of substrate and the bond interface. The TBCs on Mg alloy with Mg-Al diffused interlayer shows better bond stability than the sample of which the TBCs is directly sprayed on Mg alloy substrate by APS.

Fan, Xizhi; Wang, Ying; Zou, Binglin; Gu, Lijian; Huang, Wenzhi; Cao, Xueqiang

2014-02-01

112

Microstructure of Reaction Zone Formed During Diffusion Bonding of TiAl with Ni/Al Multilayer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this article, the characterization of the interfacial structure of diffusion bonding a TiAl alloy is presented. The joining surfaces were modified by Ni/Al reactive multilayer deposition as an alternative approach to conventional diffusion bonding. TiAl substrates were coated with alternated Ni and Al nanolayers. The nanolayers were deposited by dc magnetron sputtering with 14 nm of period (bilayer thickness). Joining experiments were performed at 900 °C for 30 and 60 min with a pressure of 5 MPa. Cross sections of the joints were prepared for characterization of their interfaces by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), high resolution TEM (HRTEM), energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Several intermetallic compounds form at the interface, assuring the bonding of the TiAl. The interface can be divided into three distinct zones: zone 1 exhibits elongated nanograins, very small equiaxed grains are observed in zone 2, while zone 3 has larger equiaxed grains. EBSD analysis reveals that zone 1 corresponds to the intermetallic Al2NiTi and AlNiTi, and zones 2 and 3 to NiAl.

Simões, Sónia; Viana, Filomena; Koçak, Mustafa; Ramos, A. Sofia; Vieira, M. Teresa; Vieira, Manuel F.

2012-05-01

113

Study of diffusion bond development in 6061 aluminum and its relationship to future high density fuels fabrication.  

SciTech Connect

Powder metallurgy dispersions of uranium alloys and silicides in an aluminum matrix have been developed by the RERTR program as a new generation of proliferation-resistant fuels. Testing is done with miniplate-type fuel plates to simulate standard fuel with cladding and matrix in plate-type configurations. In order to seal the dispersion fuel plates, a diffusion bond must exist between the aluminum coverplates surrounding the fuel meat. Four different variations in the standard method for roll-bonding 6061 aluminum were studied. They included mechanical cleaning, addition of a getter material, modifications to the standard chemical etching, and welding methods. Aluminum test pieces were subjected to a bend test after each rolling pass. Results, based on 400 samples, indicate that at least a 70% reduction in thickness is required to produce a diffusion bond using the standard rollbonding method versus a 60% reduction using the Type II method in which the assembly was welded 100% and contained open 9mm holes at frame corners.

Prokofiev, I.; Wiencek, T.; McGann, D.

1997-10-07

114

Tensile and creep properties of diffusion bonded titanium alloy IMI 834 to gamma titanium aluminide IHI alloy 01A  

SciTech Connect

Diffusion bonding of the Ti-alloy Ti-5.8Al-4.0Sn-3.5Zr-0.7Nb-0.5Mo-0.35Se-0.06C (wt%) to the intermetallic {gamma}-based alloy Ti-33Al-2Fe-1.8V-0.1B (wt%) using hot isostatic pressing at 900 C, 200 MPa held for 1 h was studied. Sound joints without any pores or cracks with a width of approximately 5--7 {micro}m could be produced. Tensile testing showed that the strengths of the joints are similar to the strength of the {gamma}-TiAl base material at temperatures between room temperature and 600 C. The fracture occurs either at the joint or in the {gamma}-TiAl material. The fracture initiation process is a competition between initiation in the {gamma}-TiAl base material and initiation at the {gamma}-TiAl/diffusion bond interface. Creep testing showed that most of the creep elongation occurs in the Ti-alloy, but failure is initiated in the joint bond line. Creep causes degradation and pore formation in this line. Interlinkage of these pores creates a crack which grows slowly until the fracture toughness of the {gamma}-TiAl is exceeded and the crack starts to propagate in the {gamma}-TiAl material and terminates creep life.

Holmquist, M.; Recina, V.; Pettersson, B. [Volvo Aero Corp., Trollhaettan (Sweden)] [Volvo Aero Corp., Trollhaettan (Sweden)

1999-04-23

115

Interfacial microstructure and mechanical strength of WC–Co\\/90MnCrV8 cold work tool steel diffusion bonded joint with Cu\\/Ni electroplated interlayer  

Microsoft Academic Search

An important challenge in the design and processing of engineering materials is to combine incompatible properties of materials in the same component. One of the most common processes for joining dissimilar materials is brazing, but as a result of the poor resistance of the joints in service at high temperatures, diffusion bonding is proposed as the best suited alternative bonding

M. I. Barrena; J. M. Gómez de Salazar; L. Matesanz

2010-01-01

116

Nonuniversal critical dynamics of the alternating-bond Ising chain: Relaxational and diffusive kinetics  

SciTech Connect

Nonuniversal dynamic critical exponents are obtained for both the Glauber and Kawasaki dynamics of the Ising chain with alternating near-neighbor interactions, J/sub 1/, J/sub 2/, with the exponents related to the ratio of the two interaction strengths. We expand upon the recent work of Droz et al. (Phys. Lett. 115A, 448 (1986)) for the ferromagnetic system (J/sub 1/>0,J/sub 2/>0). For Glauber (spin-flip) dynamics we obtain the exact exponent z = 1+rho (rhoequivalentchemically bondJ/sub 1//J/sub 2/chemically bond) which generalizes the result of Droz et al. and is valid irrespective of the signs of J/sub 1/ and J/sub 2/, where it is assumed that chemically bondJ/sub 1/chemically bond>chemically bondJ/sub 2/chemically bond (rhogreater than or equal to1). For Kawasaki (spin-exchange) dynamics, we obtain dynamic critical exponents from conventional theory which provides a rigorous lower bound for the exponent z. For the case of the conserved (ferromagnetic) order parameter, however, we present arguments that the conventional exponent is exact. We obtain z = 4+rho in this case. For J/sub 1/>0,J/sub 2/<0 we derive the conventional exponent z = 1+rho, whereas for J/sub 1/<0 we find z = 2 irrespective of J/sub 2/. A key aspect of this system is the narrowing of the dynamic critical region as compared with the isotropic system (J/sub 1/ = J/sub 2/). The extra bond periodicity splits the isotropic order parameter into components such that only comparatively closer to criticality does the order parameter become the dominant slow mode.

Luscombe, J.H.

1987-07-01

117

Comparison of structural behavior of superplastically formed/diffusion-bonded sandwich structures and honeycomb core sandwich structures  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A superplasticity formed/diffusion-bonded (SPF/DB) orthogonally corrugated core sandwich structure is discussed and its structural behavior is compared to that of a conventional honeycomb core sandwich structure. The stiffness and buckling characteristics of the two types of sandwich structures are compared under conditions of equal structural density. It is shown that under certain conditions, the SPF/DB orthogonally corrugated core sandwich structure is slightly more efficient than the optimum honeycomb core (square-cell core) sandwich structure. However, under different conditions, this effect can be reversed.

Ko, W. L.

1980-01-01

118

Transient Liquid Phase Diffusion Bonding of Magnesium Alloy (Mg-AZ31) to Titanium Alloy (Ti-6Al-4V)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The magnesium alloy Mg-AZ31 and titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V have physical characteristics and mechanical properties that makes it attractive for a wide range of engineering applications in the aerospace and automotive industries. However, the differences in melting temperature and coefficient of thermal expansion hinder the use of traditional fusion welding techniques. Transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding of magnesium alloy Mg-AZ31 and titanium alloy Ti-6Al- 4V was performed and different interlayer types and configurations were used to facilitate joint formation. The joining of these alloys using Ni foils was successful at a bonding temperature of 515°C, bonding pressure 0.2 MPa, for bonding time of 5 minutes. At the Ni/Mg-AZ31 bond interface, the formation of a eutectic liquid between Mg and Ni was observed. The formation of Mg2Ni and Mg3AlNi2 were identified along the bond interface resulting in an isothermally solidified joint. At the Ni/Ti-6Al-4V interface, the solid-state diffusion process results in joint formation. The use of double Ni-Cu sandwich joint resulted in further enhancement in joint formation and this produced joints with greater shear strength values. The configuration of Mg-AZ31/Cu- Ni/Ti-6Al-4V or Mg-AZ31/Ni-Cu/Ti-6Al-4V influence the mechanism of bonding and the type of intermetallics formed within the joint. The application of thin Ni electrodeposited coatings resulted in further enhancements of joint quality due to better surface-to-surface contact and a reduction in the formation of intermetallics at the joint. The effect of Cu nano-particles in the coatings was found to decrease the eutectic zone width and this resulted in an increase the shear strength of the joints. The highest shear strength of 69 MPa was possible with bonds made using coatings containing Cu nano-particle dispersion.

Atieh, Anas Mahmoud

119

Effect of electron energy distribution functions on plasma generated vacuum ultraviolet in a diffusion plasma excited by a microwave surface wave  

SciTech Connect

Plasma generated vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) in diffusion plasma excited by a microwave surface wave has been studied by using dielectric-based VUV sensors. Evolution of plasma VUV in the diffusion plasma as a function of the distance from the power coupling surface is investigated. Experimental results have indicated that the energy and spatial distributions of plasma VUV are mainly controlled by the energy distribution functions of the plasma electrons, i.e., electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs). The study implies that by designing EEDF of plasma, one could be able to tailor plasma VUV in different applications such as in dielectric etching or photo resist smoothing.

Zhao, J. P.; Chen, L.; Funk, M.; Sundararajan, R. [Austin Plasma Laboratory, Tokyo Electron America, Inc., Austin, Texas 78741 (United States); Nozawa, T. [Tokyo Electron Limited, TEL Technology Center Sendai, 2-1 Osawa 3-chome, Izumi-ku, Sendai 981-3137 (Japan); Samukawa, S. [Institute of Fluid Science, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

2013-07-15

120

The effect of hydrogen bonding on the diffusion of water in n-alkanes and n-alcohols measured with a novel single microdroplet method.  

PubMed

While the Stokes-Einstein (SE) equation predicts that the diffusion coefficient of a solute will be inversely proportional to the viscosity of the solvent, this relation is commonly known to fail for solutes, which are the same size or smaller than the solvent. Multiple researchers have reported that for small solutes, the diffusion coefficient is inversely proportional to the viscosity to a fractional power, and that solutes actually diffuse faster than SE predicts. For other solvent systems, attractive solute-solvent interactions, such as hydrogen bonding, are known to retard the diffusion of a solute. Some researchers have interpreted the slower diffusion due to hydrogen bonding as resulting from the effective diffusion of a larger complex of a solute and solvent molecules. We have developed and used a novel micropipette technique, which can form and hold a single microdroplet of water while it dissolves in a diffusion controlled environment into the solvent. This method has been used to examine the diffusion of water in both n-alkanes and n-alcohols. It was found that the polar solute water, diffusing in a solvent with which it cannot hydrogen bond, closely resembles small nonpolar solutes such as xenon and krypton diffusing in n-alkanes, with diffusion coefficients ranging from 12.5x10(-5) cm(2)/s for water in n-pentane to 1.15x10(-5) cm(2)/s for water in hexadecane. Diffusion coefficients were found to be inversely proportional to viscosity to a fractional power, and diffusion coefficients were faster than SE predicts. For water diffusing in a solvent (n-alcohols) with which it can hydrogen bond, diffusion coefficient values ranged from 1.75x10(-5) cm(2)/s in n-methanol to 0.364x10(-5) cm(2)/s in n-octanol, and diffusion was slower than an alkane of corresponding viscosity. We find no evidence for solute-solvent complex diffusion. Rather, it is possible that the small solute water may be retarded by relatively longer residence times (compared to non-H-bonding solvents) as it moves through the liquid. PMID:20113048

Su, Jonathan T; Duncan, P Brent; Momaya, Amit; Jutila, Arimatti; Needham, David

2010-01-28

121

Vacuum Technology: Vacuum Technology III  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a link to a PDF version of lecture slides that discuss gas sources in a vacuum. The presentation explains concepts such as vapor pressure curves, thermal desorption and first and second order desorption. Keywords: Vaporization, desorption, diffusion, permeation, backstreaming

Rack, Philip D.

2012-12-12

122

Diffusion bonding of CMSX-4 to UDIMET 720 using PVD-coated interfaces and HIP  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is an increasing interest in development of manufacturing methods for Dual Property BLISKs (BLaded dISKs), consisting of creep resistant airfoils and fatigue resistant disks bonded together by a durable joint. Optimum heat treatments are, however, very different for creep resistant single crystal CMSX-4 and fatigue resistant polycrystalline Udimet 720 selected in this study, but fortunately the first aging treatment

R. Larker; J. Ockborn; B. Selling

1999-01-01

123

Diffusion welding of SUS304L stainless steel to titanium  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purposes of this study are first to investigate the relationship between the diffusion welding parameters and quality of SUS304L stainless steel\\/titanium diffusion?welded joints, and second to develop a bonding method to obtain sound joints, by vacuum heat treatment for surface control. The equipment used consists of an ultra?high vacuum chamber and surface analysis chamber with Auger device.The strength of

O. O. Hashi; K. El; H. Irie

1996-01-01

124

Brazing process using'al-Si filler alloy reliably bonds aluminum parts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Brazing process employs an aluminum-silicon filler alloy for diffusion bonding of aluminum parts in a vacuum or inert gas atmosphere. This process is carried out at temperatures substantially below those required in conventional process and produces bonds of greater strength and reliability.

Beuyukian, C. S.; Johnson, W. R.

1966-01-01

125

Evaluation of superplastic forming and co-diffusion bonding of Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy expanded sandwich structures  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The application of the superplastic forming/diffusion bonding (SPF/DB) process to supersonic cruise research is investigated. The capability of an SPF/DB titanium structure to meet the structural requirements of the inner wing area of the NASA arrow-wing advanced supersonic transport design is evaluated. Selection of structural concepts and their optimization for minimum weight, SPF/DB process optimization, fabrication of representative specimens, and specimen testing and evaluation are described. The structural area used includes both upper and lower wing panels, where the upper wing panel is used for static compression strength evaluation and the lower panel, in tension, is used for fracture mechanics evaluations. The individual test specimens, cut from six large panels, consist of 39 static specimens, 10 fracture mechanics specimens, and one each full size panel for compression stability and fracture mechanics testing. Tests are performed at temperatures of -54 C (-65 F), room temperature, and 260 C (500 F).

Arvin, G. H.; Israeli, L.; Stolpestad, J. H.; Stacher, G. W.

1981-01-01

126

Role of large-scale slip in mode II fracture of bimaterial interface produced by diffusion bonding  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Bimaterial interfaces present in diffusion-bonded (and in-situ) composites are often not flat interfaces. The unevenness of the interface can result not only from interface reaction products but also from long-range waviness associated with the surfaces of the component phases bonded together. Experimental studies aimed at determining interface mechanical properties generally ignore the departure in the local stress due to waviness and assume a theoretically flat interface. Furthermore, the commonly used testing methods involving superimposed tension often renders the interface so extremely brittle that if microplastic effects were present it becomes impossible to perceive them. This article examines the role of waviness of the interface and microplastic effects on crack initiation. To do this, a test was selected that provides significant stability against crack growth by superimposing compressive stresses. Mode II interface fracture was studied for NiAl/Mo model laminates using a recently developed asymmetrically loaded shear (ALS) interface shear test. The ALS test may be viewed as opposite of the laminate bend test. In the bend test, shear at the interface is created via tension on one surface of the bend, while in the ALS test, shear is created by compression on one side of the interface relative to the other. Normal to the interface, near the crack tip, an initially compressive state is replaced by slight tension due to Poisson’s expansion of the unbonded part of the compressed beam.

Fox, M. R.; Ghosh, A. K.

2001-08-01

127

Nonuniversal critical dynamics of the alternating-bond Ising chain: Relaxational and diffusive kinetics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nonuniversal dynamic critical exponents are obtained for both the Glauber and Kawasaki dynamics of the Ising chain with alternating near-neighbor interactions, J1, J2, with the exponents related to the ratio of the two interaction strengths. We expand upon the recent work of Droz et al. [Phys. Lett. 115A, 448 (1986)] for the ferromagnetic system (J1>0,J2>0). For Glauber (spin-flip) dynamics we obtain the exact exponent z=1+? (??||J1/J2||) which generalizes the result of Droz et al. and is valid irrespective of the signs of J1 and J2, where it is assumed that ||J1||>||J2|| (?>=1). For Kawasaki (spin-exchange) dynamics, we obtain dynamic critical exponents from conventional theory which provides a rigorous lower bound for the exponent z. For the case of the conserved (ferromagnetic) order parameter, however, we present arguments that the conventional exponent is exact. We obtain z=4+? in this case. For J1>0,J2<0 we derive the conventional exponent z=1+?, whereas for J1<0 we find z=2 irrespective of J2. A key aspect of this system is the narrowing of the dynamic critical region as compared with the isotropic system (J1=J2). The extra bond periodicity splits the isotropic order parameter into components such that only comparatively closer to criticality does the order parameter become the dominant slow mode. The nonuniversal critical dynamics is intrinsically linked to the nonuniform bond distribution, being shown to arise from a kinetic coefficient which vanishes with a nonuniversal critical exponent. Nonuniversality of the dynamic exponent for Ising systems with inhomogeneous couplings is argued to be specific to zero-temperature critical points.

Luscombe, James H.

1987-07-01

128

Diffusion  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Diffusion is the net movement of particles from areas of high concentration (number of particles per unit area) to low concentration. In this activity, students use a molecular dynamics model to view the behavior of diffusion in gases and liquids.

Consortium, The C.

2011-12-11

129

Diffusion Bonding of Monoclinic Yb:KY(WO4)2\\/KY(WO4)2 and its Continuous-Wave and Mode-Locked Laser Performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diffusion bonding of strongly anisotropic double tungstate crystals with high quality interfaces was successfully implemented. The bonded Yb:KY(WO4)2\\/KY(WO4)2 composite crystals showed an impressive performance both in the continuous-wave and mode-locked laser regime. More than 800 mW of continuous-wave output power at 1.04 mum and slope efficiencies up to 70% were obtained at room temperature without cooling. In the passively mode-locked

Simon Rivier; Valentin Petrov; Andreas Gross; Sophie Vernay; Volker Wesemann; Daniel Rytz; Uwe Griebner

2008-01-01

130

Diffusion  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Diffusion is the movement of particles from an area of high concentration to an area of low concentration. The molecules move until equilibrium is reached. If a perfume is sprayed on one side of the room, the perfume molecules will eventually spread out all over the room until there are equal concentrations of the molecules throughout the space.

Christopher Thomas (None;)

2006-11-09

131

Modified diffusion bonding for both Cu and SiO2 at 150 °C in ambient air  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents the vapor-assisted bonding method that is applicable to Cu and SiO2 at 150 °C at atmospheric pressure. Considering a future three-dimensional integration of highly flattened substrates, such a bonding technology is expected to be effective in generating high binding energy on both the metal electrodes and the insulation layer at the same time. To interconnect the materials

Akitsu Shigetou; Tadatomo Suga

2010-01-01

132

Diffusion  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Since the advent of the internet, a number of artists and related organizations have become interested in utilizing the web to promulgate new forms of artistic creation and their subsequent dissemination. Supported by the Arts Council of England, these Diffusion eBooks are essentially pdf files that readers can download, print out and make into booklets. As the site suggests, "the Diffusion format challenges conventions of interactivity-blending the physical and the virtual and breaking the dominance of mouse and screen as the primary forms of human computer interaction...the format's aim is to take the reader away from the screen and computer and engage them in the process of production." There are a number of creative booklets available here for visitors, complete with instruction on how to assemble them for the desired effect. For anyone with even a remote interest in the possibilities afforded by this rather curious new form of expression, this website is worth a look.

133

Characterization of a diffusion-bonded Al-Mg alloy/SiC interface by high resolution and analytical electron microscopy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The interfacial structure of a diffusion-bonded Al-4.55 at. pct Mg/SiC interface was examined by conventional and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Formation of Mg2Si, MgO, and Al2MgO4 was observed. The monoclinic Mg2Si phase formed at the Al/SiC interface, while the oxides MgO and Al2MgO4 formed at the monoclinic Mg2Si/Al interface. It is shown that the formation of these phases can be predicted using simple thermodynamic criteria such as the relative bond strengths between Al, Si, C, O, and Mg. In addition, precipitation of some equilibrium Al8Mg5 precipitate was also observed at the interface. The interfacial structure observed in the Al-Mg/SiC system is contrasted with that observed in the pure Al/SiC system.

Ratnaparkhi, P. L.; Howe, J. M.

1994-03-01

134

In Situ Characterization of NiTi/Ti6Al4V Joints During Reaction-Assisted Diffusion Bonding Using Ni/Ti Multilayers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Reaction-assisted diffusion bonding process of NiTi and Ti6Al4V was studied in situ. For this purpose, experiments were carried out at the High Energy Materials Science beamline (P-07) at PETRA-III (DESY). Ni/Ti multilayer thin films 2.5 ?m thick with 12 and 25 nm modulation periods were directly deposited by magnetron sputtering onto the materials being joined. The NiTi and Ti6Al4V coated parts were placed with the films facing each other in a dilatometer equipped with Kapton windows for the x-ray beams. Microjoining was promoted by applying a 10 MPa pressure and inductively heating the materials, while simultaneously acquiring x-ray diffraction scans across the bond interface. Sound joints were produced at 750 °C. The formation of the NiTi2 phase could not be avoided.

Cavaleiro, A. J.; Ramos, A. S.; Braz Fernandes, F. M.; Schell, N.; Vieira, M. T.

2014-05-01

135

Effect of Prebonding Anneal on the Microstructure Evolution and Cu-Cu Diffusion Bonding Quality for Three-Dimensional Integration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Electroplated copper (Cu) films are often annealed during back-end processes to stabilize grain growth in order to improve their electrical properties. The effect of prebonding anneal and hence the effective initial grain size of the Cu films on the final bond quality are studied using a 300-nm-thick Cu film that was deposited on a 200-mm silicon (Si) wafer and bonded at 300°C. As compared with the control wafer pair with a prebonding anneal at 300°C for 1 h in N2, the wafer pair without a prebonding anneal showed greater improvement in void density based on c-mode scanning acoustic microscopy (c-SAM). Dicing yield and shear strength were also enhanced when a prebonding anneal was not applied. This improvement is due to substantial grain growth of smaller Cu grains during the bonding process, which leads to a stronger Cu-Cu bond. Our work has identified a Cu-Cu bonding process with a lower total thermal budget, which is seen as a favorable option for future three-dimensional (3D) integrated circuit (IC) technology.

Peng, L.; Lim, D. F.; Zhang, L.; Li, H. Y.; Tan, C. S.

2012-09-01

136

Effect of the surface coverage of C 18 -bonded silica particles on the obstructive factor and intraparticle diffusion mechanism  

Microsoft Academic Search

The intraparticle obstructive factors of several endcapped C18-bonded silica particles with different C18 surface densities (0, 0.42, 1.01, 2.03, and 3.15?mol\\/m2) were measured. A column packed with the reference neat silica was also used. The stop and flow experiment technique was applied, with the injection of a pulse of 5?L of a dilute solution of thiourea, a nearly unretained compound.

Fabrice Gritti; Georges Guiochon

2006-01-01

137

Plates for vacuum thermal fusion  

DOEpatents

A process for effectively bonding arbitrary size or shape substrates. The process incorporates vacuum pull down techniques to ensure uniform surface contact during the bonding process. The essence of the process for bonding substrates, such as glass, plastic, or alloys, etc., which have a moderate melting point with a gradual softening point curve, involves the application of an active vacuum source to evacuate interstices between the substrates while at the same time providing a positive force to hold the parts to be bonded in contact. This enables increasing the temperature of the bonding process to ensure that the softening point has been reached and small void areas are filled and come in contact with the opposing substrate. The process is most effective where at least one of the two plates or substrates contain channels or grooves that can be used to apply vacuum between the plates or substrates during the thermal bonding cycle. Also, it is beneficial to provide a vacuum groove or channel near the perimeter of the plates or substrates to ensure bonding of the perimeter of the plates or substrates and reduce the unbonded regions inside the interior region of the plates or substrates.

Davidson, James C. (Livermore, CA); Balch, Joseph W. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01

138

Strong bonding between sputtered bioglass-ceramic films and Ti-substrate implants induced by atomic inter-diffusion post-deposition heat-treatments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Bioglasses (BG) are the inorganic materials exhibiting the highest indices of bioactivity. Their appliance as films for bio-functionalization of metallic implant surfaces has been regarded as an optimal solution for surpassing their limited bulk mechanical properties. This study reports on magnetron sputtering of alkali-free BG thin films by varying the target-to-substrate working distance, which proved to play an important role in determining the films’ properties. Post deposition heat-treatments at temperatures slightly above the glass transformation temperature were then applied to induce inter-diffusion processes at the BG/titanium substrate interface and strengthening the bonding as determined by pull-out adherence measurements. The morphological and structural features assessed by SEM-EDS, XRD, and FTIR revealed a good correlation between the formations of inter-metallic titanium silicide phases and the films’ bonding strength. The highest mean value of pull-out adherence (60.3 ± 4.6 MPa), which is adequate even for load-bearing biomedical applications, was recorded for films deposited at a working distance of 35 mm followed by a heat-treatment at 750 °C for 2 h in air. The experimental findings are explained on the basis of structural, compositional and thermodynamic considerations.

Stan, G. E.; Popa, A. C.; Galca, A. C.; Aldica, G.; Ferreira, J. M. F.

2013-09-01

139

Range-separated approach to the RPA correlation applied to van der Waals bond and to diffusion of defects  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Random Phase Approximation (RPA) is a promising approximation to the exchange-correlation energy of Density Functional Theory (DFT), since it contains the van der Waals (vdW) interaction and yields a potential with the correct band gap. However, its calculation is computationally very demanding. We apply a range separation concept [1] to RPA and demonstrate how it drastically speeds up the calculations without loss of accuracy. The scheme is succesfully applied to a layered system subjected to weak vdW attraction and to address the controversy of the self-diffusion in silicon [2]. We calculate the formation and migration energies of self-interstitials and vacancies taking into account atomic relaxations. The obtained activation energies deviate significantly from the earlier calculations that were affected by the band gap problem and challenge some of the experimental interpretations [3]: the diffusion of vacancies and interstitials have almost the same activation energy.[4pt] [1] J. Toulouse, F. Colonna, and A. Savin, Phys. Rev. A 70, 062505 (2004).[0pt] [2] F. Bruneval, Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 256403 (2012).[0pt] [3] H. Bracht, E. E. Haller, and R. Clark-Phelps, Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 393 (1998).

Bruneval, Fabien

2013-03-01

140

Method for vacuum pressing electrochemical cell components  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Assembling electrochemical cell components using a bonding agent comprising aligning components of the electrochemical cell, applying a bonding agent between the components to bond the components together, placing the components within a container that is essentially a pliable bag, and drawing a vacuum within the bag, wherein the bag conforms to the shape of the components from the pressure outside the bag, thereby holding the components securely in place. The vacuum is passively maintained until the adhesive has cured and the components are securely bonded. The bonding agent used to bond the components of the electrochemical cell may be distributed to the bonding surface from distribution channels in the components. To prevent contamination with bonding agent, some areas may be treated to produce regions of preferred adhesive distribution and protected regions. Treatments may include polishing, etching, coating and providing protective grooves between the bonding surfaces and the protected regions.

Andrews, Craig C. (Inventor); Murphy, Oliver J. (Inventor)

2004-01-01

141

Vacuum Technology  

SciTech Connect

The environmental condition called vacuum is created any time the pressure of a gas is reduced compared to atmospheric pressure. On earth we typically create a vacuum by connecting a pump capable of moving gas to a relatively leak free vessel. Through operation of the gas pump the number of gas molecules per unit volume is decreased within the vessel. As soon as one creates a vacuum natural forces (in this case entropy) work to restore equilibrium pressure; the practical effect of this is that gas molecules attempt to enter the evacuated space by any means possible. It is useful to think of vacuum in terms of a gas at a pressure below atmospheric pressure. In even the best vacuum vessels ever created there are approximately 3,500,000 molecules of gas per cubic meter of volume remaining inside the vessel. The lowest pressure environment known is in interstellar space where there are approximately four molecules of gas per cubic meter. Researchers are currently developing vacuum technology components (pumps, gauges, valves, etc.) using micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) technology. Miniature vacuum components and systems will open the possibility for significant savings in energy cost and will open the doors to advances in electronics, manufacturing and semiconductor fabrication. In conclusion, an understanding of the basic principles of vacuum technology as presented in this summary is essential for the successful execution of all projects that involve vacuum technology. Using the principles described above, a practitioner of vacuum technology can design a vacuum system that will achieve the project requirements.

Biltoft, P J

2004-10-15

142

Vacuum mechatronics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The discipline of vacuum mechatronics is defined as the design and development of vacuum-compatible computer-controlled mechanisms for manipulating, sensing and testing in a vacuum environment. The importance of vacuum mechatronics is growing with an increased application of vacuum in space studies and in manufacturing for material processing, medicine, microelectronics, emission studies, lyophylisation, freeze drying and packaging. The quickly developing field of vacuum mechatronics will also be the driving force for the realization of an advanced era of totally enclosed clean manufacturing cells. High technology manufacturing has increasingly demanding requirements for precision manipulation, in situ process monitoring and contamination-free environments. To remove the contamination problems associated with human workers, the tendency in many manufacturing processes is to move towards total automation. This will become a requirement in the near future for e.g., microelectronics manufacturing. Automation in ultra-clean manufacturing environments is evolving into the concept of self-contained and fully enclosed manufacturing. A Self Contained Automated Robotic Factory (SCARF) is being developed as a flexible research facility for totally enclosed manufacturing. The construction and successful operation of a SCARF will provide a novel, flexible, self-contained, clean, vacuum manufacturing environment. SCARF also requires very high reliability and intelligent control. The trends in vacuum mechatronics and some of the key research issues are reviewed.

Hackwood, Susan; Belinski, Steven E.; Beni, Gerardo

1989-01-01

143

Vacuum Virtues  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Upright vacuums, like cars, vary in quality, features and performance. Like automobiles, some uprights are reliable, others may be problematic, and some become a problem as a result of neglect or improper use. So, how do education institutions make an informed choice and, having done so, ensure that an upright vacuum goes the distance? In this…

Rathey, Allen

2007-01-01

144

Vacuum Plasma Spraying Replaces Electrodeposition  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Vacuum plasma spraying used to fabricate large parts with complicated contours and inner structures, without uninspectable welds. Reduces time, and expense of fabrication. Wall of combustion chamber built up inside of outer nickel-alloy jacket by plasma spraying. Particles of metal sprayed partially melted in plasma gun and thrown at supersonic speed toward deposition surface. Vacuum plasma-spray produces stronger bond between the grooves and covering layer completing channels and wall of combustion chamber. In tests, bond withstood pressure of 20 kpsi, three times allowable limit by old method.

Holmes, Richard R.; Power, Chris; Burns, David H.; Daniel, Ron; Mckechnie, Timothy N.

1992-01-01

145

Vacuum die attach for integrated circuits  

DOEpatents

A thin film eutectic bond for attaching an integrated circuit die to a circuit substrate is formed by coating at least one bonding surface on the die and substrate with an alloying metal, assembling the die and substrate under compression loading, and heating the assembly to an alloying temperature in a vacuum. A very thin bond, 10 microns or less, which is substantially void free, is produced. These bonds have high reliability, good heat and electrical conduction, and high temperature tolerance. The bonds are formed in a vacuum chamber, using a positioning and loading fixture to compression load the die, and an IR lamp or other heat source. For bonding a silicon die to a silicon substrate, a gold silicon alloy bond is used. Multiple dies can be bonded simultaneously. No scrubbing is required.

Schmitt, Edward H. (Livermore, CA); Tuckerman, David B. (Livermore, CA)

1991-01-01

146

Vacuum die attach for integrated circuits  

DOEpatents

A thin film eutectic bond for attaching an integrated circuit die to a circuit substrate is formed by coating at least one bonding surface on the die and substrate with an alloying metal, assembling the die and substrate under compression loading, and heating the assembly to an alloying temperature in a vacuum. A very thin bond, 10 microns or less, which is substantially void free, is produced. These bonds have high reliability, good heat and electrical conduction, and high temperature tolerance. The bonds are formed in a vacuum chamber, using a positioning and loading fixture to compression load the die, and an IR lamp or other heat source. For bonding a silicon die to a silicon substrate, a gold silicon alloy bond is used. Multiple dies can be bonded simultaneously. No scrubbing is required. 1 figure.

Schmitt, E.H.; Tuckerman, D.B.

1991-09-10

147

Efficient second harmonic generation of double-end diffusion-bonded Nd:YVO4 self-Raman laser producing 7.9 W yellow light.  

PubMed

A high power and efficient 588 nm yellow light is demonstrated through intracavity frequency doubling of an acousto-optic Q-switched self-frequency Raman laser. A 30-mm-length double-end diffusion-bonded Nd:YVO(4) crystal was utilized for efficient self-Raman laser operation by reducing the thermal effects and increasing the interaction length for the stimulated Raman scattering. A 15-mm-length LBO with non-critical phase matching (theta = 90 degrees, phi = 0 degrees) cut was adopted for efficient second-harmonic generation. The focus position of incident pump light and both the repetition rate and the duty cycle of the Q-switch have been optimized. At a repetition rate of 110 kHz and a duty cycle of 5%, the average power of 588 nm light is up to 7.93 W while the incident pump power is 26.5 W, corresponding to an overall diode-yellow conversion efficiency of 30% and a slope efficiency of 43%. PMID:19997395

Zhu, Haiyong; Duan, Yanmin; Zhang, Ge; Huang, Chenghui; Wei, Yong; Shen, Hongyuan; Zheng, Yiqun; Huang, Lingxiong; Chen, Zhenqiang

2009-11-23

148

Thermalized Vacuum and Vacuum Effects  

E-print Network

Some of the well-known effects regarding the vacuum are revisited under the formalism of the imaginary-time field theory. From these effects, they could imply the existence of one thermal vacuum in different circumstances. The imaginary-time hamiltonian of the vacuum is found to provide not only exact distribution functions in the calculations of the Casimir effect and the Van der Waals force but also cutoff functions. The thermal bath for the Unruh effect is constructed from the imaginary-time Green function. From the field theory in the curved space-time, field quantizations are defined according to different vacuum states and lead to the Hawking radiation; the introduced conformal invariance agree with the formalism of the imaginary-time field theory. The induced Green functions in the curved space-time are in accordance with those from the picture given from the thermal vacuum.

Yi-Cheng Huang

2013-11-14

149

Fusion bonding and alignment fixture  

DOEpatents

An improved vacuum fusion bonding structure and process for aligned bonding of large area glass plates, patterned with microchannels and access holes and slots, for elevated glass fusion temperatures. Vacuum pumpout of all the components is through the bottom platform which yields an untouched, defect free top surface which greatly improves optical access through this smooth surface. Also, a completely non-adherent interlayer, such as graphite, with alignment and location features is located between the main steel platform and the glass plate pair, which makes large improvements in quality, yield, and ease of use, and enables aligned bonding of very large glass structures.

Ackler, Harold D. (Sunnyvale, CA); Swierkowski, Stefan P. (Livermore, CA); Tarte, Lisa A. (Livermore, CA); Hicks, Randall K. (Stockton, CA)

2000-01-01

150

Vacuum Gauges  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a description for a learning module from Maricopa Advanced Technology Education Center. This PDF describes the module; access may be purchased by visiting the MATEC website. Semiconductor manufacturing equipment requires the use of many different types of vacuum gauges. Selection is based on range of process operations and production requirements. This MATEC module explores the theory and functionality of vacuum gauges and provides many examples of different types of gauges. The focus is on understanding the operating ranges and application constraints of each type of gauge. Mathematical equations are used to explain calibration, sensitivity, and overall operations of each type of gauge.

2012-11-28

151

Microstructural evolution during transient liquid phase bonding of Inconel 738LC using AMS 4777 filler alloy  

SciTech Connect

IN-738LC nickel-based superalloy was joined by transient liquid phase diffusion bonding using AMS 4777 filler alloy. The bonding process was carried out at 1050 Degree-Sign C under vacuum atmosphere for various hold times. Microstructures of the joints were studied by optical and scanning electron microscopy. Continuous centerline eutectic phases, characterized as nickel-rich boride, chromium-rich boride and nickel-rich silicide were observed at the bonds with incomplete isothermal solidification. In addition to the centerline eutectic products, precipitation of boron-rich particles was observed in the diffusion affected zone. The results showed that, as the bonding time was increased to 75 min, the width of the eutectic zone was completely removed and the joint was isothermally solidified. Homogenization of isothermally solidified joints at 1120 Degree-Sign C for 300 min resulted in the elimination of intermetallic phases formed at the diffusion affected zone and the formation of significant {gamma} Prime precipitates in the joint region. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TLP bonding of IN-738LC superalloy was performed using AMS 4777 filler alloy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Insufficient diffusion time resulted in the formation of eutectic product. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Precipitation of B-rich particles was observed within the DAZ. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The extent of isothermal solidification increased with increasing holding time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Homogenizing of joints resulted in the dissolution of DAZ intermetallics.

Jalilvand, V., E-mail: jalilvand@aut.ac.ir [Department of Mining and Metallurgical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology (Tehran Polytechnic), Tehran 15875-4413 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Omidvar, H. [Department of Mining and Metallurgical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology (Tehran Polytechnic), Tehran 15875-4413 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Mining and Metallurgical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology (Tehran Polytechnic), Tehran 15875-4413 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shakeri, H.R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E4 (Canada)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E4 (Canada); Rahimipour, M.R. [Department of Ceramic, Materials and Energy Research Center, Karaj 31787-316 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Ceramic, Materials and Energy Research Center, Karaj 31787-316 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-01-15

152

Fine pitch Cu\\/Sn solid state diffusion bonding for making high yield bump interconnections and its application in 3D integration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Low temperature stacking of dies for 3D integration has been gaining interest due to the thermal sensitivity of some advanced node devices such as DRAM. Sn-based solder joint is considered as a promising approach for making die to die interconnections because Sn to Cu bonding temperature is lower and the yield is higher as compared with Cu to Cu bonding.

W. Zhang; P. Limaye; Y. Civale; R. Labie; P. Soussan

2010-01-01

153

Vacuum waves  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An exact solution of the five-dimensional field equations is studied which describes waves in the classical Einstein vacuum. While the solution is essentially 5D in nature, the waves exist in ordinary 3D space. They should not be confused with standard gravitational waves, since their phase velocity can exceed that of light. They resemble de Broglie waves, and may give insight to wave-particle duality.

Wesson, Paul S.

2013-05-01

154

A Study of the Effect of Nanosized Particles on Transient Liquid Phase Diffusion Bonding Al6061 Metal-Matrix Composite (MMC) Using Ni/Al2O3 Nanocomposite Interlayer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Transient liquid phase (TLP) diffusion bonding of Al-6061 containing 15 vol pct alumina particles was carried out at 873 K (600 °C) using electrodeposited nanocomposite coatings as the interlayer. Joint formation was attributed to the solid-state diffusion of Ni into the Al-6061 alloy followed by eutectic formation and isothermal solidification of the joint region. An examination of the joint region using an electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), wavelength-dispersive spectroscopy (WDS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed the formation of intermetallic phases such as Al3Ni, Al9FeNi, and Ni3Si within the joint zone. The result indicated that the incorporation of 50 nm Al2O3 dispersions into the interlayer can be used to improve the joint significantly.

Cooke, Kavian O.

2012-06-01

155

Application of self assembly monolayer (SAM) in lowering the process temperature during Cu-Cu diffusion bonding of 3D IC  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this research work, we investigate the feasibility of lowering the bonding temperature by refining the copper surface with the application of a self assembly monolayer (SAM). First, the stability of SAM when it is subjected to different exposure environments is measured quantitatively by the change in the contact angle. The different environments includes: 1) exposure in clean room ambient;

Dau Fatt Lim; Shiv Govind Singh; Xiao Fang Ang; Jun Wei; Chee Mang Ng; Chuan Seng Tan

2009-01-01

156

Bonding techniques for the fabrication of internally cooled x-ray monochromators  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

At CHESS, 2500 W total are absorbed by the first crystal of the double bounce monochromators located at the A2 and F2 wiggler beamlines. In order to dissipate this absorbed power and deliver the highest X-ray flux to an end station, we have explored the technique of internally cooling the silicon first crystals with water channels. This technique brings with it the need for reliable mechanical joints between the silicon diffracting surface and a glass or silicon water manifold. The joint must have structural strength to resist the internal water pressure and the cyclic heat load, be vacuum leak tight for operation in UHV, and not act as a source of residual strain in the crystal lattice of the diffracting surface. We have explored four bonding techniques which have been tested for their suitability to monochromator fabrication: direct silicon to silicon bonding, anodic glass to silicon bonding, a variety of ceramic and die attach adhesives (alumina, zirconia, silica/silver) and metallic diffusion bonding/brazing. In this paper, we characterize each method with respect to the requirements of structural integrity (bond tensile strength), residual strain (minimal effect on diffraction quality) and vacuum compatibility.

Smolenski, Karl W.; Conolly, Chris; Doing, Park A.; Kiang, Bonnie; Shen, Qun

1996-11-01

157

Vacuum deposition and curing of liquid monomers  

DOEpatents

The present invention is the formation of solid polymer layers under vacuum. More specifically, the present invention is the use of standard polymer layer-making equipment that is generally used in an atmospheric environment in a vacuum, and degassing the monomer material prior to injection into the vacuum. Additional layers of polymer or metal may be vacuum deposited onto solid polymer layers. Formation of polymer layers under a vacuum improves material and surface characteristics, and subsequent quality of bonding to additional layers. Further advantages include use of less to no photoinitiator for curing, faster curing, fewer impurities in the polymer electrolyte, as well as improvement in material properties including no trapped gas resulting in greater density, and reduced monomer wetting angle that facilitates spreading of the monomer and provides a smoother finished surface.

Affinito, J.D.

1993-11-09

158

Vacuum deposition and curing of liquid monomers  

DOEpatents

The present invention is the formation of solid polymer layers under vacuum. More specifically, the present invention is the use of "standard" polymer layer-making equipment that is generally used in an atmospheric environment in a vacuum, and degassing the monomer material prior to injection into the vacuum. Additional layers of polymer or metal may be vacuum deposited onto solid polymer layers. Formation of polymer layers under a vacuum improves material and surface characteristics, and subsequent quality of bonding to additional layers. Further advantages include use of less to no photoinitiator for curing, faster curing, fewer impurities in the polymer electrolyte, as well as improvement in material properties including no trapped gas resulting in greater density, and reduced monomer wetting angle that facilitates spreading of the monomer and provides a smoother finished surface.

Affinito, John D. (Richland, WA)

1993-01-01

159

Vacuum deposition and curing of liquid monomers  

DOEpatents

The present invention is the formation of solid polymer layers under vacuum. More specifically, the present invention is the use of "standard" polymer layer-making equipment that is generally used in an atmospheric environment in a vacuum, and degassing the monomer material prior to injection into the vacuum. Additional layers of polymer or metal or oxide may be vacuum deposited onto solid polymer layers. Formation of polymer layers under a vacuum improves material and surface characteristics, and subsequent quality of bonding to additional layers. Further advantages include use of less to no photoinitiator for curing, faster curing, fewer impurities in the polymer electrolyte, as well as improvement in material properties including no trapped gas resulting in greater density, and reduced monomer wetting angle that facilitates spreading of the monomer and provides a smoother finished surface.

Affinito, John D. (Kennewick, WA)

1995-01-01

160

Vacuum deposition and curing of liquid monomers  

DOEpatents

The present invention is the formation of solid polymer layers under vacuum. More specifically, the present invention is the use of ``standard`` polymer layer-making equipment that is generally used in an atmospheric environment in a vacuum, and degassing the monomer material prior to injection into the vacuum. Additional layers of polymer or metal or oxide may be vacuum deposited onto solid polymer layers. Formation of polymer layers under a vacuum improves material and surface characteristics, and subsequent quality of bonding to additional layers. Further advantages include use of less to no photoinitiator for curing, faster curing, fewer impurities in the polymer electrolyte, as well as improvement in material properties including no trapped gas resulting in greater density, and reduced monomer wetting angle that facilitates spreading of the monomer and provides a smoother finished surface.

Affinito, J.D.

1995-03-07

161

Vacuum plasma spray coating  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Currently, protective plasma spray coatings are applied to space shuttle main engine turbine blades of high-performance nickel alloys by an air plasma spray process. Originally, a ceramic coating of yttria-stabilized zirconia (ZrO2.12Y2O3) was applied for thermal protection, but was removed because of severe spalling. In vacuum plasma spray coating, plasma coatings of nickel-chromium-aluminum-yttrium (NiCrAlY) are applied in a reduced atmosphere of argon/helium. These enhanced coatings showed no spalling after 40 MSFC burner rig thermal shock cycles between 927 C (1700 F) and -253 C (-423 F), while current coatings spalled during 5 to 25 test cycles. Subsequently, a process was developed for applying a durable thermal barrier coating of ZrO2.8Y2O3 to the turbine blades of first-stage high-pressure fuel turbopumps utilizing the enhanced NiCrAlY bond-coating process. NiCrAlY bond coating is applied first, with ZrO2.8Y2O3 added sequentially in increasing amounts until a thermal barrier coating is obtained. The enchanced thermal barrier coating has successfully passed 40 burner rig thermal shock cycles.

Holmes, Richard R.; Mckechnie, Timothy N.

1989-01-01

162

Performance tests of large thin vacuum windows  

SciTech Connect

Tests of thin composition vacuum windows of the type used for the Tagger in Hall B at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility are described. Three different tests have been performed. These include: (1) measurement of the deformation and durability of a window under long term (>8 years) almost continuous vacuum load, (2) measurement of the deformation as a function of flexing of the window as it is cycled between vacuum and atmosphere, and (3) measurement of the relative diffusion rate of gas through a variety of thin window membranes.

Hall Crannell

2011-02-01

163

Vacuum self-magnetization?  

Microsoft Academic Search

We study vacuum properties in a strong magnetic field as the zero temperature and zero density limit of quantum statistics. For charged vector bosons (W bosons) the vacuum energy density diverges for B > Bc = mw2\\/e, leading to vacuum instability. A logarithmic divergence of vacuum magnetization is found for B = Bc, which suggests that if the magnetic field

H. Pe´rez Rojas; E. Rodri´guez Querts

2006-01-01

164

Hydrodesulfurization and hydrodemetallization of different origin vacuum residues: New modeling approach  

E-print Network

1 Hydrodesulfurization and hydrodemetallization of different origin vacuum residues: New modeling and gives fairly good simulations of residues performances. KEYWORDS : Vacuum residue, Diffusion, Kinetic is more necessary before converting. Residue upgrading processes produce either more distillates (low

Boyer, Edmond

165

Natural vacuum electronics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The ambient natural vacuum of space is proposed as a basis for electron valves. Each valve is an electron controlling structure similiar to a vacuum tube that is operated without a vacuum sustaining envelope. The natural vacuum electron valves discussed offer a viable substitute for solid state devices. The natural vacuum valve is highly resistant to ionizing radiation, system generated electromagnetic pulse, current transients, and direct exposure to space conditions.

Leggett, Nickolaus

1990-01-01

166

Indian Vacuum Society: The Indian Vacuum Society  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Indian Vacuum Society (IVS) was established in 1970. It has over 800 members including many from Industry and R & D Institutions spread throughout India. The society has an active chapter at Kolkata. The society was formed with the main aim to promote, encourage and develop the growth of Vacuum Science, Techniques and Applications in India. In order to achieve this aim it has conducted a number of short term courses at graduate and technician levels on vacuum science and technology on topics ranging from low vacuum to ultrahigh vacuum So far it has conducted 39 such courses at different parts of the country and imparted training to more than 1200 persons in the field. Some of these courses were in-plant training courses conducted on the premises of the establishment and designed to take care of the special needs of the establishment. IVS also regularly conducts national and international seminars and symposia on vacuum science and technology with special emphasis on some theme related to applications of vacuum. A large number of delegates from all over India take part in the deliberations of such seminars and symposia and present their work. IVS also arranges technical visits to different industries and research institutes. The society also helped in the UNESCO sponsored post-graduate level courses in vacuum science, technology and applications conducted by Mumbai University. The society has also designed a certificate and diploma course for graduate level students studying vacuum science and technology and has submitted a syllabus to the academic council of the University of Mumbai for their approval, we hope that some colleges affiliated to the university will start this course from the coming academic year. IVS extended its support in standardizing many of the vacuum instruments and played a vital role in helping to set up a Regional Testing Centre along with BARC. As part of the development of vacuum education, the society arranges the participation of expert members on the subject to deliver lectures and take part in devising courses in the universities. IVS publishes a quarterly called the `Bulletin of Indian Vacuum Society' since its inception, in which articles on vacuum and related topics are published. NIRVAT, news, announcements, and reports are the other features of the Bulletin. The articles in the Bulletin are internationally abstracted. The Bulletin is distributed free to all the members of the society. The society also publishes proceedings of national/international symposia and seminars, manuals, lecture notes etc. It has published a `Vacuum Directory' containing very useful information on vacuum technology. IVS has also set up its own website http://www.ivsnet.org in January 2002. The website contains information about IVS, list of members, list of EC members, events and news, abstracts of articles published in the `Bulletin of Indian Vacuum Society', utilities, announcements, reports, membership and other forms which can be completed online and also gives links to other vacuum societies. Our Society has been a member of the executive council of the International Union of Vacuum Science, Techniques and Applications (IUVSTA) and its various committees since 1970. In 1983 IVS conducted an International Symposium on Vacuum Technology and Nuclear Applications in BARC, Mumbai, under the sponsorship of IUVSTA. In 1987 IVS arranged the Triennial International Conference on Thin Films in New Delhi, where more than 200 foreign delegates participated. IVS also hosted the IUVSTA Executive Council Meeting along with the conference. The society organized yet again an International Conference on Vacuum Science and Technology and SRS Vacuum Systems at CAT, Indore in1995. IVS arranges the prestigious Professor Balakrishnan Memorial Lecture in memory of its founder vice-president. Leading scientists from India and abroad in the field are invited to deliver the talks. So far 23 lectures have been held in this series. IVS has instituted the `IVS- Professor D Y Phadke Memorial Prize' in memory of our founder presid

Saha, T. K.

2008-03-01

167

Educational Vacuum Trainers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Have you inherited a bell jar vacuum system and are scratching your head over how to set it up or are unsure of its operations or capabilities? Or do you want to do more with your bell jar vacuum? The forum on Bell Jar Vacuums - with the topic Vacuum Trainers can help you. The intent of this forum is for this to be a place where technical issues, classroom exercises, activities, etc. can be discussed. There's no endorsement by manufacturers and commercial issues are off limits. Steve Hansen (bell jar expert) gives some brief descriptions of the vacuum trainers that are or have been available over the past decade or so - Varian, MKS, Science Source, American Vacuum Society. Links are provided to various data sheets, articles and online exercises. Steve, the forum moderator has experience in all of these.Keywords: vacuum, "vacuum trainer","bell jar" and/or belljar, MKSVarian, VPAL, VTS, sputtering, plasma

Hansen, Steve

2012-07-31

168

Stainless Steel Vacuum Chambers  

Microsoft Academic Search

The vacuum properties of stainless steel are excellent. The fabrication and welding process can be handled easily by a large number of vacuum manufacturers. In particular, the use for intermediate energy light sources gives a lot of advantages, which leads to a cost effective and industrial vacuum system design. Several design solutions are compared in this paper. The common fabrication

Lothar Schulz

169

Diffusion Geometry Diffusion Geometry  

E-print Network

Diffusion Geometry Diffusion Geometry for High Dimensional Data Matthew J. Hirn July 3, 2013 #12;Diffusion Geometry Introduction Embedding of closed curve Figure: Left: A closed, non-self-intersecting curve in 3 dimensions. Right: Its embedding as a circle. #12;Diffusion Geometry Introduction Cartoon

Hirn, Matthew

170

Car-Parrinello simulation of an O-H stretching envelope and potential of mean force of an intramolecular hydrogen bonded system: Application to a Mannich base in solid state and in vacuum  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) study was performed for an anharmonic system—an intramolecularly hydrogen bonded Mannich-base-type compound, 4,5-dimethyl-2(N,N-dimethylaminemethyl)phenol, to investigate the vibrational spectrum associated with the O-H stretching. Calculations were carried out for the solid state and for an isolated molecule. The classical CPMD simulation was performed and then the proton potential snapshots were extracted from the trajectory. The vibrational Schrödinger equation for the snapshots was solved numerically, and the (O-H) envelope was calculated as a superposition of the 0?1 transitions. The potential of mean force for the proton stretching mode was calculated from the proton vibrational eigenfunctions and eigenvalues incorporating statistical sampling, nuclear quantum effects, and effects of the environment. Perspectives for application of the presented methodology in the computational support of biocatalysis are given in the study.

Jezierska, Aneta; Panek, Jaros?aw J.; Koll, Aleksander; Mavri, Janez

2007-05-01

171

Solid-state bonding of single-crystals of Ni(111)/Al2O3(0001)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Some fundamental aspects of the solid state bonding process between single crystals of alumina and nickel were studied. It was shown that a model formerly developed to account for the kinetics of diffusion bonding between two metals can be adapted to the case of a metal-ceramic couple. A coincidence site lattice calculation proved that one of the crystallographic relative orientations often mentioned in literature was certainly energetically favourable. With this relative orientation, several nickel-alumina bicrystals have been produced by solid state bonding under secondary vacuum. The influence of operating conditions such as contact pressure and annealing duration has been explored and compared with the calculated results of the bonding kinetics model. Characterization of the solid-state bonded interface was undertaken by optical microscopy and scanning as well as transmission electron microscopy. Observations prove that the initial imposed crystallographic relative orientation was maintained during the solid-state bonding process, and that the synthetic alumina-nickel interface obtained by this technique was free from reaction layer at the usual TEM scale.

Wan, C.; Dupeux, M.

1993-09-01

172

Metal Nitride Diffusion Barriers for Copper Interconnects  

E-print Network

, and HRTEM. The electrical resistivity measured by FPP was as low as 70 mu omega-cm. Preliminary copper diffusion tests showed good diffusion barrier properties with a diffusion depth of 2~3 nm after vacuum annealing at 500 degrees C for 30 minutes...

Araujo, Roy A.

2010-01-14

173

Space vacuum processing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The unique ultra-vacuum environment of low-earth orbit space is to be utilized for vacuum processing of advanced semiconductor and superconductor materials through epitaxial thin-film growth. The quality of semiconductor single crystal (epitaxial) thin-films can be significantly enhanced in the space ultra-vacuum through the reduction of impurities. This will be accomplished by the development of the free-flying Wake Shield Facility presently being built by the Space Vacuum Epitaxy Center in conjunction with industry and NASA under a low-cost, short time commercial approach to space hardware development.

Ignatiev, A.; Shih, H. D.; Daniels, M.; Sega, R.; Bonner, T.

1991-01-01

174

NSLS II Vacuum System  

SciTech Connect

National Synchrotron Light Source II, being constructed at Brookhaven, is a 3-GeV, 500 mA, 3rd generation synchrotron radiation facility with ultra low emittance electron beams. The storage ring vacuum system has a circumference of 792 m and consists of over 250 vacuum chambers with a simulated average operating pressure of less than 1 x 10{sup -9} mbar. A summary of the update design of the vacuum system including girder supports of the chambers, gauges, vacuum pumps, bellows, beam position monitors and simulation of the average pressure will be shown. A brief description of the techniques and procedures for cleaning and mounting the chambers are given.

Ferreira, M.; Doom, L.; Hseuh, H.; Longo, C.; Settepani, P.; Wilson, K.; Hu, J.

2009-09-13

175

Vacuum control valve  

Microsoft Academic Search

A vacuum modulating chamber of a vacuum control valve is communicated with a diaphragm chamber of a EGR valve for controlling an amount of exhaust gas to be recirculated into combustion chambers of an engine, so that a modulated negative pressure is applied thereto. The chamber is provided with a diaphragm deflected responding to the negative pressure in the chamber.

M. Naito; K. Itou; K. Tsuzuki; K. Yano

1984-01-01

176

Working in a Vacuum  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the author discusses several myths about vacuum cleaners and offers tips on evaluating and purchasing this essential maintenance tool. These myths are: (1) Amps mean performance; (2) Everyone needs high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA): (3) Picking up a "bowling ball" shows cleaning power; (4) All vacuum bags are the same; (5)…

Rathey, Allen

2005-01-01

177

Vacuum pump aids ejectors  

Microsoft Academic Search

The steam ejector\\/vacuum pump hybrid system has been operating satisfactorily since the summer of 1981. This system has essentially been as troublefree as the all-ejector system and, of course, has provided a substantial cost savings. Construction is currently under way to convert the vacuum system of another crude still which is equipped with steam ejectors and barometric condensers to the

1982-01-01

178

Vacuum Energy Decay  

E-print Network

The problem of the vacuum energy decay is studied through the analysis of the vacuum survival amplitude ${\\mathcal A}(z, z')$. Transition amplitudes are computed for finite time-span, $Z\\equiv z^\\prime-z$, and their {\\em late time} behavior is discussed up to first order in the coupling constant, $\\l$.

Enrique Álvarez; Roberto Vidal

2011-11-09

179

Stellarator helical vacuum vessel  

Microsoft Academic Search

A design study of a stainless steel, heavy wall, helically shaped vacuum torus has been made for use in a proposed Stellarator configuration. The study concerns itself with the shape of the vacuum vessel and the division of the vessel into components that can be machined and welded together into a helical configuration. A complication in the design requires that

Yavornik

1983-01-01

180

Characteristic features of carburizing of steel during vacuum carburizing  

Microsoft Academic Search

1.The quantitative relationship obtained between the carbon concentration in the case and the basic parameters of the vacuum carburizing process makes it possible to determine the effective case depth for any ratio of saturation and diffusion times.2.The duration of the diffusion stage dependents on the final surface concentration of carbon required.3.The variation obtained for a given duration of the diffusion

S. N. Tsepov

1979-01-01

181

Vacuum deposition and curing of liquid monomers apparatus  

DOEpatents

The present invention is the formation of solid polymer layers under vacuum. More specifically, the present invention is the use of "standard" polymer layer-making equipment that is generally used in an atmospheric environment in a vacuum, and degassing the monomer material prior to injection into the vacuum. Additional layers of polymer or metal or oxide may be vacuum deposited onto solid polymer layers. Formation of polymer layers under a vacuum improves material and surface characteristics, and subsequent quality of bonding to additional layers. Further advantages include use of less to no photoinitiator for curing, faster curing, fewer impurities in the polymer electrolyte, as well as improvement in material properties including no trapped gas resulting in greater density, and reduced monomer wetting angle that facilitates spreading of the monomer and provides a smoother finished surface.

Affinito, John D. (Kennewick, WA)

1996-01-01

182

Vacuum deposition and curing of liquid monomers apparatus  

DOEpatents

The present invention is the formation of solid polymer layers under vacuum. More specifically, the present invention is the use of ``standard`` polymer layer-making equipment that is generally used in an atmospheric environment in a vacuum, and degassing the monomer material prior to injection into the vacuum. Additional layers of polymer or metal or oxide may be vacuum deposited onto solid polymer layers. Formation of polymer layers under a vacuum improves material and surface characteristics, and subsequent quality of bonding to additional layers. Further advantages include use of less to no photoinitiator for curing, faster curing, fewer impurities in the polymer electrolyte, as well as improvement in material properties including no trapped gas resulting in greater density, and reduced monomer wetting angle that facilitates spreading of the monomer and provides a smoother finished surface. 3 figs.

Affinito, J.D.

1996-08-20

183

Adhesives For Use In Vacuum, Radiation, And Cold  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Report presents results of literature searches and tests of eight adhesives for use in high-radiation, low-temperature, vacuum environment of Galileo spacecraft mission to Jupiter. Used as bonding agents for thermal blankets, instruments, structural members, and coatings. Adhesives tested for contamination, reflectance, bond integrity, color, transmittance, outgassing, dielectric constant, coefficient of thermal expansion, optical interference, peel strength, and shear strength. Some of tests conducted at temperature of liquid nitrogen (-150 degree C).

Bouquet, Frank L.

1988-01-01

184

Vacuum-driven Metamorphosis  

E-print Network

We show that nonperturbative vacuum effects can produce a vacuum-driven transition from a matter-dominated universe to one in which the effective equation of state is that of radiation plus cosmological constant. The actual material content of the universe after the transition remains that of non-relativistic matter. This metamorphosis of the equation of state can be traced to nonperturbative vacuum effects that cause the scalar curvature to remain nearly constant at a well-defined value after the transition, and is responsible for the observed acceleration of the recent expansion of the universe.

Parker, L; Parker, Leonard; Raval, Alpan

1999-01-01

185

Vacuum-driven Metamorphosis  

E-print Network

We show that nonperturbative vacuum effects can produce a vacuum-driven transition from a matter-dominated universe to one in which the effective equation of state is that of radiation plus cosmological constant. The actual material content of the universe after the transition remains that of non-relativistic matter. This metamorphosis of the equation of state can be traced to nonperturbative vacuum effects that cause the scalar curvature to remain nearly constant at a well-defined value after the transition, and is responsible for the observed acceleration of the recent expansion of the universe.

Leonard Parker; Alpan Raval

1999-08-26

186

Bonded Lubricants  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Another spinoff to the food processing industry involves a dry lubricant developed by General Magnaplate Corp. of Linden, N.J. Used in such spacecraft as Apollo, Skylab and Viking, the lubricant is a coating bonded to metal surfaces providing permanent lubrication and corrosion resistance. The coating lengthens equipment life and permits machinery to be operated at greater speed, thus increasing productivity and reducing costs. Bonded lubricants are used in scores of commercia1 applications. They have proved particularly valuable to food processing firms because, while increasing production efficiency, they also help meet the stringent USDA sanitation codes for food-handling equipment. For example, a cookie manufacturer plagued production interruptions because sticky batter was clogging the cookie molds had the brass molds coated to solve the problem. Similarly, a pasta producer faced USDA action on a sanitation violation because dough was clinging to an automatic ravioli-forming machine; use of the anti-stick coating on the steel forming plates solved the dual problem of sanitation deficiency and production line downtime.

1977-01-01

187

Collapse of Vacuum Bubbles in a Vacuum  

E-print Network

Motivated by the discovery of a plenitude of metastable vacua in a string landscape and the possibility of rapid tunneling between these vacua, we revisit the dynamics of a false vacuum bubble in a background de Sitter spacetime. We find that there exists a large parameter space that allows the bubble to collapse into a black hole or to form a wormhole. This may have interesting implications to inflationary physics.

Kin-Wang Ng; Shang-Yung Wang

2010-06-17

188

Basics of Fidelity Bonding.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Fidelity bonds are important for an agency to hold to protect itself against any financial loss that can result from dishonest acts by its employees. Three types of fidelity bonds are available to an agency: (1) public official bonds; (2) dishonesty bonds; and (3) faithful performance bonds. Public official bonds are required by state law to be…

Kahn, Steven P.

189

Welding space vacuum technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objective was to assist the EH 42 Division in putting together a vacuum system that could attain the desired pressure and be large enough to accommodate the gas-metal arc (GMA) welding fixture apparatus. A major accomplishment was the design and fabrication of the controller/annunciator for the 4' by 8' system. It contains many safety features such as thermocouple set point relays that will only allow inlet and exit gas and vacuum valves to be operated at pre-selected system pressures, and a fail safe mode for power interruptions and operator mistakes. It is felt that significant progress was made in this research effort to weld in a vacuum environment. With continued efforts to increase the pump speeds for vacuum chambers and further studies on weld fixtures and gas inlet pressures, the NASA program will be successful.

Johnson, R. Barry

1991-01-01

190

Welding space vacuum technology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The objective was to assist the EH 42 Division in putting together a vacuum system that could attain the desired pressure and be large enough to accommodate the gas-metal arc (GMA) welding fixture apparatus. A major accomplishment was the design and fabrication of the controller/annunciator for the 4' by 8' system. It contains many safety features such as thermocouple set point relays that will only allow inlet and exit gas and vacuum valves to be operated at pre-selected system pressures, and a fail safe mode for power interruptions and operator mistakes. It is felt that significant progress was made in this research effort to weld in a vacuum environment. With continued efforts to increase the pump speeds for vacuum chambers and further studies on weld fixtures and gas inlet pressures, the NASA program will be successful.

Johnson, R. Barry

1991-12-01

191

Vacuum Camera Cooler  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Acquiring cheap, moving video was impossible in a vacuum environment, due to camera overheating. This overheating is brought on by the lack of cooling media in vacuum. A water-jacketed camera cooler enclosure machined and assembled from copper plate and tube has been developed. The camera cooler (see figure) is cup-shaped and cooled by circulating water or nitrogen gas through copper tubing. The camera, a store-bought "spy type," is not designed to work in a vacuum. With some modifications the unit can be thermally connected when mounted in the cup portion of the camera cooler. The thermal conductivity is provided by copper tape between parts of the camera and the cooled enclosure. During initial testing of the demonstration unit, the camera cooler kept the CPU (central processing unit) of this video camera at operating temperature. This development allowed video recording of an in-progress test, within a vacuum environment.

Laugen, Geoffrey A.

2011-01-01

192

Vacuum control valve  

SciTech Connect

A vacuum modulating chamber of a vacuum control valve is communicated with a diaphragm chamber of a EGR valve for controlling an amount of exhaust gas to be recirculated into combustion chambers of an engine, so that a modulated negative pressure is applied thereto. The chamber is provided with a diaphragm deflected responding to the negative pressure in the chamber. The vacuum control valve is further provided with a cam member and a spring which urges the diaphragm in one direction so as to change a value at which the pressure in the vacuum modulating chamber is controlled. A push rod is movably held by a cam follower and another spring is provided for urging the push rod in the above direction. The spring force of the other spring is applied to the diaphragm, when a rotational angle of the cam member exceeds a predetermined angle, so that the negative pressure is changed rapidly.

Naito, M.; Itou, K.; Tsuzuki, K.; Yano, K.

1984-04-03

193

Vacuum Boundary Effects  

E-print Network

The effect of boundary conditions on the vacuum structure of quantum field theories is analysed from a quantum information viewpoint. In particular, we analyse the role of boundary conditions on boundary entropy and entanglement entropy. The analysis of boundary effects on massless free field theories points out the relevance of boundary conditions as a new rich source of information about the vacuum structure. In all cases the entropy does not increase along the flow from the ultraviolet to the infrared.

M. Asorey; J. M. Munoz-Castaneda

2008-03-18

194

Vacuum self-magnetization?  

SciTech Connect

We study vacuum properties in a strong magnetic field as the zero temperature and zero density limit of quantum statistics. For charged vector bosons (W bosons) the vacuum energy density diverges for B > B{sub c} = m{sub w}{sup 2}/e, leading to vacuum instability. A logarithmic divergence of vacuum magnetization is found for B = Bc, which suggests that if the magnetic field is large enough, it is self-consistently maintained, and this mechanism actually prevents B from reaching the critical value Bc. For virtual neutral vector bosons bearing an anomalous magnetic moment, the instability of the ground state for B > B{sub c}{sup '} = m{sub n}{sup 2}/q also leads to the vacuum energy density divergence for fields B > B{sub c}{sup '} and to the magnetization divergence for B B{sub c}{sup '}. The possibility of virtual electron-positron pairs bosonization in strong magnetic field and the applicability of the neutral bosons model to describe the virtual positronium behavior in a magnetic field are discussed. We conjecture that this could lead to vacuum self-magnetization in QED.

Perez Rojas, H.; Rodriguez Querts, E. [Instituto de Cibernetica, Matematica y Fisica, Calle E No. 309, esq. a 15 Vedado, C. Havana (Cuba)

2006-06-19

195

Vacuum chamber-free centrifuge with magnetic bearings.  

PubMed

Centrifuges are devices that separate particles of different densities and sizes through the application of a centrifugal force. If a centrifuge could be operated under atmospheric conditions, all vacuum-related components such as the vacuum chamber, vacuum pump, diffusion pump, and sealing could be removed from a conventional centrifuge system. The design and manufacturing procedure for centrifuges could then be greatly simplified to facilitate the production of lightweight centrifuge systems of smaller volume. Furthermore, the maintenance costs incurred owing to wear and tear due to conventional ball bearings would be eliminated. In this study, we describe a novel vacuum chamber-free centrifuge supported by magnetic bearings. We demonstrate the feasibility of the vacuum chamber-free centrifuge by presenting experimental results that verify its high-speed support capability and motoring power capacity. PMID:24089865

Park, Cheol Hoon; Kim, Soohyun; Kim, Kyung-Soo

2013-09-01

196

Vacuum Technology in the study of Graphene  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Graphene, an allotrope of carbon is a two-dimensional sheet of covalently bonded carbon atoms that has been attracting great attention in the field of electronics. In a recent review graphene is defined as a flat monolayer of carbon atoms tightly packed into a 2-D honeycomb lattice. A survey has been made of the production processes and instrumentation for characterization of graphene. In the production of graphene, the methods mainly used are Epitaxial growth, oxide reduction, growth from metal-carbon melts, growth from sugar. In the characterization of graphene, the instruments that are mainly used to study the atomic properties, electronic properties, optical properties, spin properties are Scanning Electron Microscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy, Raman Spectroscopy. In all these instruments high or ultra-high vacuum is required. This paper attempts to correlate vacuum technology in the production and characterization of graphene.

Ghoshal, A. K.; Banerjee, S. N.; Chakraborty, D.

2012-11-01

197

Mathematical Aspects of Vacuum Energy on Quantum Graphs  

E-print Network

We use quantum graphs as a model to study various mathematical aspects of the vacuum energy, such as convergence of periodic path expansions, consistency among different methods (trace formulae versus method of images) and the possible connection with the underlying classical dynamics. We derive an expansion for the vacuum energy in terms of periodic paths on the graph and prove its convergence and smooth dependence on the bond lengths of the graph. For an important special case of graphs with equal bond lengths, we derive a simpler explicit formula. The main results are derived using the trace formula. We also discuss an alternative approach using the method of images and prove that the results are consistent. This may have important consequences for other systems, since the method of images, unlike the trace formula, includes a sum over special ``bounce paths''. We succeed in showing that in our model bounce paths do not contribute to the vacuum energy. Finally, we discuss the proposed possible link between the magnitude of the vacuum energy and the type (chaotic vs. integrable) of the underlying classical dynamics. Within a random matrix model we calculate the variance of the vacuum energy over several ensembles and find evidence that the level repulsion leads to suppression of the vacuum energy.

G. Berkolaiko; J. M. Harrison; J. H. Wilson

2007-11-17

198

Stellarator helical vacuum vessel  

SciTech Connect

A design study of a stainless steel, heavy wall, helically shaped vacuum torus has been made for use in a proposed Stellarator configuration. The study concerns itself with the shape of the vacuum vessel and the division of the vessel into components that can be machined and welded together into a helical configuration. A complication in the design requires that a circular magnet coil be located at the minor toroidal axis and that this coil be embedded within the periphery of the vacuum vessel. The vacuum vessel has a minor toroidal axis diameter of 4 meters, a 68.6-cm shell diameter, and a 1.9-cm wall thickness. It twists about the minor toroidal axis twice in 360/sup 0/C. (An n value of 2). It is proposed that the unit be made of cylindrical segments with the ends of the cylinders cut at appropriate lengths and angles to form the helix. A mathematical derivation of the dimensions necessary to produce the required shapes of the segments has been made. Also, drawings of the vacuum vessel components have been produced on LANL's CTR CAD/CAM system. The procedure developed can be used for any value of n as dictated by physics requirements.

Yavornik, E.J.

1983-01-01

199

(Reverse) Engineering Vacuum Alignment  

E-print Network

In the presence of spontaneous symmetry breaking, the alignment of the vacuum with respect to the gauge group is often controlled by quadratically divergent operators in the low energy non-linear sigma model. In principle the magnitudes and signs of these operators can be changed by making different assumptions about the ultraviolet physics, but in practice all known ways of regulating these theories preserve the naive vacuum alignment. We show that by "integrating in" different sets of heavy spin-one fields, it is possible to UV extend certain non-linear sigma models into two distinct UV insensitive theories. These UV extensions have identical low energy degrees of freedom but different radiative potentials, making it possible to engineer two different vacuum alignments for the original non-linear sigma model. Our construction employs "non-square" theory spaces which generically violate the common lore that the preferred vacuum alignment preserves the maximal gauge symmetry. By UV extending the SO(9)/(SO(4) X SO(5)) little Higgs model, we find a radiative potential that deviates from the naive expectation but does not stabilize the correct vacuum for proper electroweak symmetry breaking.

Clifford Cheung; Jesse Thaler

2006-04-28

200

Acceleration and vacuum temperature  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The quantum fluctuations of an “accelerated” vacuum state, that is, vacuum fluctuations in the presence of a constant electromagnetic field, can be described by the temperature TM. Considering TM for the gyromagnetic factor g=1 we show that TM(g=1)=TU, where TU is the Unruh temperature experienced by an accelerated observer. We conjecture that both particle production and nonlinear field effects inherent in the Unruh accelerated observer case are described by the case g=1 QED of strong fields. We present rates of particle production for g=0, 1, 2 and show that the case g=1 is experimentally distinguishable from g=0, 2. Therefore, either accelerated observers are distinguishable from accelerated vacuum or there is unexpected modification of the theoretical framework.

Labun, Lance; Rafelski, Johann

2012-08-01

201

The Diffusion Process  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website includes an animation which illustrates the diffusion process. The two models that have been developed to explain the mechanism for the diffusion of dopants into silicon are the Vacancy model and the Interstitial model. It is the different bonding characteristics of the dopants with silicon that determine the diffusion mechanism. Although each model is based on these differences, they are not mutually exclusive. Objective: Explain the difference between the Vacancy and Interstitial diffusion models. You can find this animation under the heading "Process & Equipment III." This simulation is from Module 019 of the Process & Equipment III Cluster of the MATEC Module Library (MML). To view other clusters or for more information about the MML visit http://matec.org/ps/library3/process_I.shtmlKey

2012-11-22

202

Vacuum Arc Ion Sources  

E-print Network

The vacuum arc ion source has evolved into a more or less standard laboratory tool for the production of high-current beams of metal ions, and is now used in a number of different embodiments at many laboratories around the world. Applications include primarily ion implantation for material surface modification research, and good performance has been obtained for the injection of high-current beams of heavy-metal ions, in particular uranium, into particle accelerators. As the use of the source has grown, so also have the operational characteristics been improved in a variety of different ways. Here we review the principles, design, and performance of vacuum arc ion sources.

Brown, I

2014-01-01

203

Vacuum energy of Schrödinger operators on metric graphs  

E-print Network

We present an integral formulation of the vacuum energy of Schr\\"odinger operators on finite metric graphs. Local vertex matching conditions on the graph are classified according to the general scheme of Kostrykin and Schrader. While the vacuum energy of the graph can contain finite ambiguities the Casimir force on a bond with compactly supported potential is well defined. The vacuum energy is determined from the zeta function of the graph Schr\\"odinger operator which is derived from an appropriate secular equation via the argument principle. A quantum graph has an associated probabilistic classical dynamics which is generically both ergodic and mixing. The results therefore present an analytic formulation of the vacuum energy of this quasi-one-dimensional quantum system which is classically chaotic.

J. M. Harrison; K. Kirsten

2012-01-18

204

Vacuum arc deposition devices  

SciTech Connect

The vacuum arc is a high-current, low-voltage electrical discharge which produces a plasma consisting of vaporized and ionized electrode material. In the most common cathodic arc deposition systems, the arc concentrates at minute cathode spots on the cathode surface and the plasma is emitted as a hypersonic jet, with some degree of contamination by molten droplets [known as macroparticles (MPs)] of the cathode material. In vacuum arc deposition systems, the location and motion of the cathode spots are confined to desired surfaces by an applied magnetic field and shields around undesired surfaces. Substrates are mounted on a holder so that they intercept some portion of the plasma jet. The substrate often provides for negative bias to control the energy of depositing ions and heating or cooling to control the substrate temperature. In some systems, a magnetic field is used to guide the plasma around an obstacle which blocks the MPs. These elements are integrated with a deposition chamber, cooling, vacuum gauges and pumps, and power supplies to produce a vacuum arc deposition system.

Boxman, R.L.; Zhitomirsky, V.N. [Electrical Discharge and Plasma Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University, P.O. Box 39040, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

2006-02-15

205

Experiments with Vacuum Tubes  

Microsoft Academic Search

IN my letter published in the last number of NATURE I omitted to say that we have compared vacuum tubes without electrodes with a tube containing water. A tube was filled about nine-tenths full of water and then sealed hermetically. It was then applied to the prime conductor of the electric machine and electrified in the same way as the

J. T. Bottomley

1881-01-01

206

Cryogenic vacuum techniques  

Microsoft Academic Search

A survey is made of the state-of-the-art in cryopumping technologies. Among the aspects of the technology reviewed are: molecular flow in nonisothermal vacuum chambers, diverse methods of cryopumping such as condensation, cryosorption at solid gas condensates, and at porous solids such as molecular sieves and activated charcoal, cryotrapping and cryogettering at metal films. Also covered are calculation of cryopump systems

R. A. Haefer

1981-01-01

207

Vacuum ultraviolet holography  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The authors report the first demonstration of holographic techniques in the vacuum ultraviolet spectral region. Holograms were produced with coherent 1182 A radiation. The holograms were recorded in polymethyl methacrylate and read out with an electron microscope. A holographic grating with a fringe spacing of 836 A was produced and far-field Fraunhofer holograms of sub-micron particles were recorded.

Bjorklund, G. C.; Harris, S. E.; Young, J. F.

1974-01-01

208

Sorption vacuum trap  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Modified sorption trap for use in high vacuum systems contains provisions for online regeneration of sorbent material. Trap is so constructed that it has a number of encapsulated resistance heaters and a valving and pumping device for removing gases from heated sorbing material. Excessive downtime is eliminated with this trap.

Barrington, A. E.; Caruso, A. J.

1970-01-01

209

Vacuum thermal insulation panel  

Microsoft Academic Search

A vacuum thermal insulation panel comprises a pair of laminated plastic and aluminum sheets together with a plastic edge strip sealed to the edges of the sheets so as to define an evacuable volume in which a glass fiber mat is disposed. The insulation panel of the present invention takes advantage of the light-weight, low cost and low thermal conductivity

J. R. Young; R. M. Schreck

1984-01-01

210

Topics in vacuum decay  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

If a theory has more than one classically stable vacuum, quantum tunneling and thermal jumps make the transition between the vacua possible. The transition happens through a first order phase transition started by nucleation of a bubble of the new vacuum. The outward pressure of the truer vacuum makes the bubble expand and consequently eat away more of the old phase. In the presence of gravity this phenomenon gets more complicated and meanwhile more interesting. It can potentially have important cosmological consequences. Some aspects of this decay are studied in this thesis. Solutions with different symmetry than the generically used O(4) symmetry are studied and their actions calculated. Vacuum decay in a spatial vector field is studied and novel features like kinky domain walls are presented. The question of stability of vacua in a landscape of potentials is studied and the possible instability in large dimension of fields is shown. Finally a compactification of the Einstein-Maxwell theory is studied which can be a good lab to understand the decay rates in compactification models of arbitrary dimensions.

Masoumi, Ali

211

Langmuir vacuum and superconductivity  

SciTech Connect

It is shown that, in the 'jelly' model of cold electron-ion plasma, the interaction between electrons and the quantum electromagnetic vacuum of Langmuir waves involves plasma superconductivity with an energy gap proportional to the energy of the Langmuir quantum.

Veklenko, B. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation)

2012-06-15

212

Welding space vacuum technology  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective was to assist the EH 42 Division in putting together a vacuum system that could attain the desired pressure and be large enough to accommodate the gas-metal arc (GMA) welding fixture apparatus. A major accomplishment was the design and fabrication of the controller\\/annunciator for the 4' by 8' system. It contains many safety features such as thermocouple set

R. Barry Johnson

1991-01-01

213

29 CFR 2580.412-20 - Use of existing bonds, separate bonds and additional bonding.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...bonds, separate bonds and additional bonding. 2580.412-20 Section 2580...DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TEMPORARY BONDING RULES UNDER THE EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT INCOME SECURITY ACT OF 1974 TEMPORARY BONDING RULES General Bond Rules §...

2013-07-01

214

29 CFR 2580.412-20 - Use of existing bonds, separate bonds and additional bonding.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...bonds, separate bonds and additional bonding. 2580.412-20 Section 2580...DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TEMPORARY BONDING RULES UNDER THE EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT INCOME SECURITY ACT OF 1974 TEMPORARY BONDING RULES General Bond Rules §...

2010-07-01

215

29 CFR 2580.412-20 - Use of existing bonds, separate bonds and additional bonding.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...bonds, separate bonds and additional bonding. 2580.412-20 Section 2580...DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TEMPORARY BONDING RULES UNDER THE EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT INCOME SECURITY ACT OF 1974 TEMPORARY BONDING RULES General Bond Rules §...

2011-07-01

216

29 CFR 2580.412-20 - Use of existing bonds, separate bonds and additional bonding.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...bonds, separate bonds and additional bonding. 2580.412-20 Section 2580...DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TEMPORARY BONDING RULES UNDER THE EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT INCOME SECURITY ACT OF 1974 TEMPORARY BONDING RULES General Bond Rules §...

2012-07-01

217

Demonstrations with a Vacuum: Old Demonstrations for New Vacuum Pumps.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explains mechanisms of 19th-century vacuum pumps. Describes demonstrations using the pump including guinea and feather tube, aurora tube, electric egg, Gassiots cascade, air mill, bell in vacuum, density and buoyancy of air, fountain in vacuum, mercury shower, palm and bladder glasses, Bacchus demonstration, pneumatic man-lifter, and Magdeburg…

Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

1989-01-01

218

Tritium handling in vacuum systems  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a course in Tritium handling in vacuum systems. Topics presented are: Properties of Tritium; Tritium compatibility of materials; Tritium-compatible vacuum equipment; and Tritium waste treatment.

Gill, J.T. [Monsanto Research Corp., Miamisburg, OH (United States). Mound Facility; Coffin, D.O. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1986-10-01

219

Vacuum Energy in Quantum Graphs  

E-print Network

We calculate the vacuum energy in quantum graphs. Vacuum energy arose in quantum physics but has an independent mathematical interest as a functional carrying information about the eigenvalue spectrum of a system. A quantum graph is a metric graph...

Wilson, Justin

2007-07-14

220

Vacuum Frying of Carrot Chips  

Microsoft Academic Search

Vacuum frying is an alternative method to produce high quality vegetable or fruit chips. The effect of frying temperature and vacuum degree on moisture content, oil content, color, and texture of fried carrot chips were investigated. During the early stage of vacuum frying, the rate of moisture removal and oil absorption increased with increasing frying oil temperature and degree of

Liu-ping Fan; Min Zhang; Arun S. Mujumdar

2005-01-01

221

Portable vacuum object handling device  

DOEpatents

The disclosure relates to a portable device adapted to handle objects which are not to be touched by hand. A piston and bore wall form a vacuum chamber communicating with an adaptor sealably engageable with an object to be lifted. The piston is manually moved and set to establish vacuum. A valve is manually actuatable to apply the vacuum to lift the object.

Anderson, Gordon H. (Los Alamos, NM)

1983-08-09

222

Vacuum Energy: Myths and Reality  

E-print Network

We discuss the main myths related to the vacuum energy and cosmological constant, such as: ``unbearable lightness of space-time''; the dominating contribution of zero point energy of quantum fields to the vacuum energy; non-zero vacuum energy of the false vacuum; dependence of the vacuum energy on the overall shift of energy; the absolute value of energy only has significance for gravity; the vacuum energy depends on the vacuum content; cosmological constant changes after the phase transition; zero-point energy of the vacuum between the plates in Casimir effect must gravitate, that is why the zero-point energy in the vacuum outside the plates must also gravitate; etc. All these and some other conjectures appear to be wrong when one considers the thermodynamics of the ground state of the quantum many-body system, which mimics macroscopic thermodynamics of quantum vacuum. In particular, in spite of the ultraviolet divergence of the zero-point energy, the natural value of the vacuum energy is comparable with the observed dark energy. That is why the vacuum energy is the plausible candidate for the dark energy.

G. E. Volovik

2006-04-14

223

Effect of Ti, Nb, and Ti + Nb Coatings on the Bond Strength-Structure Relationship in Al/Al2O3 Joints  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There is a growing interest in metal-ceramic bonding for wide range of applications in electronic devices and high technology industry for fabrication of metal matrix composites and bonding of ceramic components to metals. The object of the work was to study the effect of Ti, Nb, and Ti + Nb thin films deposited by PVD method on alumina substrates on structure and bond strength properties of Al/Al2O3 joints. The joints were fabricated using the results of a wetting experiment and the sessile drop method at a temperature of 1223 K in a vacuum of 0.2 MPa for 30 min of contact. The structure of the metal/ceramic interface was investigated using scanning electron microscopy. The elemental distribution at the metal-ceramic interface was analyzed using energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. Transmission electron microscopy was also used to investigate some aspects of the metal/ceramic interface. The bond strength properties of joints were measured using shear test. The shear strength results demonstrated significant improvement of shear strength of Al/Al2O3 joints due to the application of Ti + Nb thin film on alumina substrate. Microstructural investigations of the interface indicated that Al/coating/Al2O3 couples have diffusion transition interface which influences the strengthening of these joints. A conclusion could be drawn that the presence of thin film layers changes the character of interaction and leads to the formation of new reaction products in the bonding layer.

Ksiazek, Marzanna; Richert, Maria; Tchorz, Aam; Boron, Lukasz

2012-05-01

224

Compact vacuum insulation  

DOEpatents

An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially "point" or "line" contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form "line" contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively "point" contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Potter, Thomas F. (Denver, CO)

1993-01-01

225

Compact vacuum insulation embodiments  

DOEpatents

An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially "point" or "line" contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form "line" contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively "point" contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Potter, Thomas F. (Denver, CO)

1992-01-01

226

Vacuum Structure and Potential  

E-print Network

Based on overall experimental observations, especially the pair processes, I developed a model structure of the vacuum along with a basic-particle formation scheme begun in 2000 (with collaborator P-I Johansson). The model consists in that the vacuum is, briefly, filled of neutral but polarizable vacuuons, consisting each of a p-vaculeon and n- vaculeon of charges $+e$ and $-e$ of zero rest masses but with spin motions, assumed interacting each other with a Coulomb force. The model has been introduced in full in a book (Nova Sci, 2005) and referred to in a number of journal/E-print papers. I outline in this easier accessible paper the detailed derivation of the model and a corresponding quantitative determination of the vacuuon size.

J. X. Zheng-Johansson

2007-04-02

227

An automated vacuum system  

SciTech Connect

Software tools available with the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) control system provide the capability to express a control problem as a finite state machine. System states and transitions are expressed in terms of accelerator parameters and actions are taken based on state transitions. This is particularly useful for sequencing operations which are modal in nature or are unwieldy when implemented with conventional programming. State diagrams are automatically translated into code which is executed by the control system. These tools have been applied to the vacuum system for the GTA accelerator to implement automatic sequencing of operations. With a single request, the operator may initiate a complete pump-down sequence. He can monitor the progress and is notified if an anomaly occurs requiring intervention. The operator is not required to have detailed knowledge of the vacuum system and is protected from taking inappropriate actions. 1 ref., 6 figs.

Atkins, W.H. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Vaughn, G.D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Bridgman, C. (Grumman Corp., Bethpage, NY (USA))

1991-01-01

228

Vacuum tool manipulator  

DOEpatents

Apparatus for manipulating a vacuum hose in a reactor vessel comprises a housing with two opposing openings, an arm carried by the housing and deployable from a stowed position essentially completely within the housing to an extended position where the arm extends through the two openings in a generally horizontal position. The arm preferably has a two-fingered gripping device for gripping the vacuum hose but may carry a different end effector such as a grinding wheel. The fingers are opened and closed by one air cylinder. A second air cylinder extends the device. A third air cylinder within the housing pivotally pulls the opposing end of the arm into the housing via a pivoting member pivotally connected between the third air cylinder shaft and the arm.

Zollinger, William T. (3927 Almon Dr., Martinez, GA 30907)

1993-01-01

229

Integrated structure vacuum tube  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

High efficiency, multi-dimensional thin film vacuum tubes suitable for use in high temperature, high radiation environments are described. The tubes are fabricated by placing thin film electrode members in selected arrays on facing interior wall surfaces of an alumina substrate envelope. Cathode members are formed using thin films of triple carbonate. The photoresist used in photolithography aids in activation of the cathodes by carbonizing and reacting with the reduced carbonates when heated in vacuum during forming. The finely powdered triple carbonate is mixed with the photoresist used to delineate the cathode locations in the conventional solid state photolithographic manner. Anode and grid members are formed using thin films of refractory metal. Electron flow in the tubes is between grid elements from cathode to anode as in a conventional three-dimensional tube.

Dimeff, J.; Kerwin, W. J. (inventors)

1976-01-01

230

Vacuum brazing of carbon nanotube strands  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) discovered at 1991 have attracted great interest for applications in Nano-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (NEMS). However, the search for methods to join CNTs with metallic parts has been a worldwide challenge. Many efforts have been devoted to manipulating individual CNTs and joining them to each other. Joining processes so far attempted are premature and fall short of efficiency for joint quality evaluation. Thus, it has been found necessary to work on macro CNTs strands which are easy to handle via macro joining techniques. In this study, vacuum brazing technology has been developed for joining macro CNTs strands with Ni using a Ti-Ag-Cu alloy. The brazing mechanism has been confirmed as due to TiC formation at the CNTs/Ti-Ag-Cu interface. To evaluate this novel vacuum brazing technique for CNTs joining, the temperature effect on the brazing mechanism, microstructure and stoichiometry at joint interface needed to be understood. Firstly, the influence of temperature (from room temperature to 1000°C) on mechanical behaviour of CNTs was well examined. The ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of CNTs was measured to be a maximum at 900°C. Then, the mechanical performance of the joints was investigated from 850°C to 1000°C, and the fracture modes of the joints were identified. The UTS of joint also achieves maximum at 900°C. Below 900°C, due to little TiC formation, the bonding is weak thus leading to interfacial fracture. Above 900°C, due to much TiC formation, the bonding is strong thus resulting in CNTs fracture. Furthermore, the vacuum brazing technique was applied to join CNTs to Ni contact wires used as a lamp filament. Compared to the filament joined by Ag paste or mechanical connection, the illumination of the brazed CNTs filament was stronger. The current density of the brazed filament was superior to the Ag paste connected filament. This may represent a promising way to produce energy saving lamps.

Wu, Wei

231

Vacuum application of thermal barrier plasma coatings  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Coatings are presently applied to Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbine blades for protection against the harsh environment realized in the engine during lift off-to-orbit. High performance nickel, chromium, aluminum, and yttrium (NiCrAlY) alloy coatings, which are applied by atmospheric plasma spraying, crack and spall off because of the severe thermal shock experienced during start-up and shut-down of the engine. Ceramic coatings of yttria stabilized zirconia (ZrO2-Y2O3) were applied initially as a thermal barrier over coating to the NiCrAlY but were removed because of even greater spalling. Utilizing a vacuum plasma spraying process, bond coatings of NiCrAlY were applied in a low pressure atmosphere of argon/helium, producing significantly improved coating-to-blade bonding. The improved coatings showed no spalling after 40 MSFC burner rig thermal shock cycles, cycling between 1700 and -423 F. The current atmospheric plasma NiCrAlY coatings spalled during 25 test cycles. Subsequently, a process was developed for applying a durable thermal barrier coating of ZrO2-Y2O3 to the turbine blades of first stage high-pressure fuel turbopumps utilizing the vacuum plasma process. The improved thermal barrier coating has successfully passed 40 burner rig thermal shock cycles without spalling. Hot firing in an SSME turbine engine is scheduled for the blades. Tooling was installed in preparation for vacuum plasma spray coating other SSME hardware, e.g., the titanium main fuel valve housing (MFVH) and the fuel turbopump nozzle/stator.

Holmes, R. R.; Mckechnie, T. N.

1988-01-01

232

Is vacuum dispersive?  

E-print Network

The question we ask is: does the speed of light {\\it{in vacuo}} depend on its frequency? While the answer is NO in the frame of classical physics, we point out that the opposite could be true if one takes into account the polarization of Dirac sea. We estimate the dependence of the index of refraction of vacuum + Dirac sea versus the wavelength of an incoming beam, and suggest a way to test this effect.

Yves Pomeau

2014-09-02

233

The vacuum energy crisis  

E-print Network

The smallness of the vacuum energy density and its near coincidence with the average matter density of the universe are naturally explained by anthropic selection. An alternative explanation, based on the cyclic model of Steinhardt and Turok, does not address the coincidence problem and is therefore less convincing. This article appeared in ``Science'' (4 May 2006) as a ``perspective'' for Steinhardt and Turok's paper in the same issue (astro-ph/0605173).

Alexander Vilenkin

2006-05-09

234

Wafer Level Surface Activated Bonding Tool for MEMS M. M. R. Howlader,a,z  

E-print Network

bonded by this technique at low temperature. Radioisotope fine leak and vacuum seal tests of sealed the American military standard encapsulation requirements for MEMS devices in harsh environments. Void temperature, which eliminates thermal mismatch problems, and the production of electrically

Howlader, Matiar R

235

Ionization of dimethyluracil dimers leads to facile proton transfer in the absence of hydrogen bonds  

E-print Network

, a model p-stacked system with no hydrogen bonds. Upon photoionization by tunable vacuum ultraviolet-stacking architectures has led to novel applications for artificial photosystems by forming ion channels , protects living systems from UV radiati

Krylov, Anna I.

236

Fluxless indium and silver-indium bonding processes for photonics and high-temperature electronics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A fluxless oxidation-free bonding technology using multilayer composite solders based on indium, or low melting temperature indium. alloys such as Ag-In, In-Sn and Au-In has been developed and studied. This technology eliminates the need of flux and scrubbing motion that are used in conventional soldering processes, and still produces good quality joints. By depositing multilayer composite materials in high vacuum, we eliminate the formation of an oxide layer thus removing the origin of the problem---solder oxidation. To understand the oxidation kinetics in the bonding process, I have modeled the oxidation rate of tin, which follows a parabolic growth law. For completeness of the oxidation model, I incorporated the temperature dependency of Henry's coefficient in the oxidation model. To prevent the solder material from oxidation when exposing to atmosphere, I have developed a technique, which utilizes the in-situ formation of stable intermetallic compound on the outer surface, or a gold layer to protect the bonding materials. The bonding is achieved by means of solid-liquid interdiffusion (SLID) and in-situ compound formation. The first alloy system that I studied is indium-silver. GaAs and silicon dice have been successfully bonded on silicon or glass substrates. The bonding quality is examined by a Scanning Acoustic Microscope (SAM). The results confirm that void-free joints are achieved. Cross-sections of the joint are examined using a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) equipped with Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. The results reveal that the joint is composed of AuIn2, AgIn2-intermetallic compound and pure indium. From the Ag-In phase diagram, as indium composition is reduced to 25 wt. %, the solidus temperature jumps from 144 to above 695°C. By modifying the design of the multilayer composite, we developed a 210°C process to produce 700°C joints. All the well-bonded devices, before or after annealing, exceed the shear test force requirement of 2.5 kg. Indium has been a choice for bonding photonic devices such as laser diodes. A major concern is the change of solder composition during device operation caused by diffusion of copper atoms from the copper substrate. Copper atoms can easily diffuse into and react with the indium joint to form intermetallic compounds Cu2In, CuIn, Cu9In4, Cu11 In9. This reaction continues even after the bonding process is completed and the device is put in operation at some temperature. Consequently, the composition, the microstructure and physical properties of the joint change during the device life.To prevent the intermetallic formation, the solder joint must remain indium rich. A barrier metallization on the copper substrate is necessary to stop copper atoms from getting into the solder joint. Device packages usually need more than one soldering operation to complete. The indium-rich alloys have a 156°C melting temperature. During subsequent bonding operations, another process with a bonding temperature lower than 156°C is valuable. Desirable bonding temperature should be lower than 156°C but higher than the maximum temperature of the joint during device operation. In-Sn eutectic alloy with a melting temperature of 118°C is chosen. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

So, William Wilson

237

Savings Bonds Value Calculator  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

From the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, this site computes the redemption value of users's US savings bonds. Easy-to-use pull-down menus allow visitors to enter information such as the date of issue and face value of their Series E bonds, Series EE bonds, and Series S bonds. After entering the information, the Calculator will then show a chart of issue dates and denominations and actual worth of the bonds, if cashed within a set period of time.

238

Vacuum Energy: Myths and Reality  

E-print Network

We discuss the main myths related to the vacuum energy and cosmological constant, such as: ``unbearable lightness of space-time''; the dominating contribution of zero point energy of quantum fields to the vacuum energy; non-zero vacuum energy of the false vacuum; dependence of the vacuum energy on the overall shift of energy; the absolute value of energy only has significance for gravity; the vacuum energy depends on the vacuum content; cosmological constant changes after the phase transition; zero-point energy of the vacuum between the plates in Casimir effect must gravitate, that is why the zero-point energy in the vacuum outside the plates must also gravitate; etc. All these and some other conjectures appear to be wrong when one considers the thermodynamics of the ground state of the quantum many-body system, which mimics macroscopic thermodynamics of quantum vacuum. In particular, in spite of the ultraviolet divergence of the zero-point energy, the natural value of the vacuum energy is comparable with the...

Volovik, G E

2006-01-01

239

Thermal behaviors of petn base polymer bonded explosives  

Microsoft Academic Search

The thermal behaviors of three pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) base polymer bonded explosives (PBX), Detasheet A (EL506A,\\u000a red) and Datasheet C (EL506C, yellow-green) that supply by DuPont Co., PBXN-301 were investigated using thermal techniques\\u000a in this work. The thermal properties of PETN base polymer bonded explosives, such as vacuum thermal stability (VTS), time\\u000a to ignition, auto-ignition and shelf life of PBX

K.-S. Jaw; J.-S. Lee

2008-01-01

240

LET'S BOND! A Chemical Bonding Webquest  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Today we are going to use the internet to explore chemical bonding! Even though there are just a few questions for each website, you need to read the entire content. Don't worry about understanding all of it, but make sure that you are familiar with it! Stay on task and have fun! Let's start with some basics. Click on the link below and answer the questions on your worksheet under "Bonding Basics". Bonding Basics Good job! Lets move on and talk about ions. Ions are a big part of bonding, so make sure you get this section down pat! Click on the ...

Hicken, Mrs.

2009-04-08

241

Investing in Bonds.com  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Investing in Bonds was created by the Bond Market Association to educate investors about the benefits of bonds investing. The Investor's Guide to Bond Basics educates investors about the types of bonds available, criteria for evaluating a bond, a guide to buying bonds, bond investment strategies and a glossary of bond market terms. The Bond Market section provides an overview of the U.S. bond market while the Investor's Checklist section takes the investor step-by-step through the bond investment decision process. Investors will also find sections with information on municipal bonds, corporate bonds, mortgage securities and U.S. Inflation-Indexed Securities.

242

Bonded ultrasonic transducer and method for making  

DOEpatents

An ultrasonic transducer is formed as a diffusion bonded assembly of piezoelectric crystal, backing material, and, optionally, a ceramic wear surface. The mating surfaces of each component are silver films that are diffusion bonded together under the application of pressure and heat. Each mating surface may also be coated with a reactive metal, such as hafnium, to increase the adhesion of the silver films to the component surfaces. Only thin silver films are deposited, e.g., a thickness of about 0.00635 mm, to form a substantially non-compliant bond between surfaces. The resulting transducer assembly is substantially free of self-resonances over normal operating ranges for taking resonant ultrasound measurements.

Dixon, Raymond D. (Los Alamos, NM); Roe, Lawrence H. (Los Alamos, NM); Migliori, Albert (Santa Fe, NM)

1995-01-01

243

A vacuum-driven peristaltic micropump with valved actuation chambers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents a simple peristaltic micropump design incorporated with valved actuation chambers and propelled by a pulsed vacuum source. The vacuum-driven peristaltic micropump offers high pumping rates, low backflow, appreciable tolerance to air bubbles, and minimal destruction to fluid contents. The pumping device, fabricated by laser micromachining and plasma bonding of three polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) layers, includes a pneumatic network, actuation membranes, and microfluidic channels. As the key to peristaltic motion, the sequential deflection of the elastic membranes is achieved by periodic pressure waveforms (negative) traveling through the pneumatic network, provided by a vacuum source regulated by an electromagnetic valve. This configuration eliminates the complicated control logic typically required in peristaltic motion. Importantly, the valved actuation chambers substantially reduce backflow and improve the pumping rates. In addition, the pneumatic network with negative pressure provides a means to effectively remove air bubbles present in the microflow through the gas-permeable PDMS membrane, which can be highly desired in handling complex fluidic samples. Experimental characterization of the micropump performance has been conducted by controlling the resistance of the pneumatic network, the number of normally closed valves, the vacuum pressure, and the frequency of pressure pulses. A maximal flow rate of 600 µL min-1 has been optimized at the pulsed vacuum frequency of 30 Hz with a vacuum pressure of 50 kPa, which is comparable to that of compressed air-actuated peristaltic micropumps.

Cui, Jianguo; Pan, Tingrui

2011-06-01

244

Supramolecular hydrogen-bonding assembly of silanediols with bifunctional heterocycles.  

PubMed

X-ray crystallography showcases the distinct self-association and hydrogen-bonding patterns of organic silanediols, R2Si(OH)2, with bifunctional heterocycles for supramolecular assembly. Diffusion-ordered spectroscopy (DOSY) studies identify the dominant hydrogen-bonding patterns and structures in solution, which correlate with solid-state patterns at high concentrations. PMID:24577634

Tran, Ngon T; Wilson, Sean O; Franz, Annaliese K

2014-04-11

245

Realization of MEMS-IC Vertical Integration Utilizing Smart Bumpless Bonding  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper reports fundamental technologies, properties, and new experimental results of SBB (Smart Bumpless Bonding) to realize MEMS-IC vertical integration. Although conventional bonding technologies have had difficulties integrating MEMS and its processing circuit because of their rough bonding surfaces, fragile structures, and thermal restriction, SBB technology realized the vertical integration without thermal treatment, any adhesive materials including bumps, and chemical mechanical polishing. The SBB technology bonds sealing parts for vacuum sealing and electrodes for electrical connection simultaneously as published in previous experimental study. The plasma CVD SiO2 is utilized to realize vacuum sealing as sealing material. And Au projection studs are formed on each electrode and connected electrically between two wafers by compressive plastic deformation and surface activation. In this paper, new experimental results including vacuum sealing properties, electrical improvement, IC bonding results on the described fundamental concept and properties are reported.

Shiozaki, Masayoshi; Moriguchi, Makoto; Sasaki, Sho; Oba, Masatoshi

246

Charged vacuum bubble stability  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A type of scenario is considered where electrically charged vacuum bubbles, formed from degenerate or nearly degenerate vacua separated by a thin domain wall, are cosmologically produced due to the breaking of a discrete symmetry, with the bubble charge arising from fermions residing within the domain wall. Stability issues associated with wall tension, fermion gas, and Coulombic effects for such configurations are examined. The stability of a bubble depends upon parameters such as the symmetry breaking scale and the fermion coupling. A dominance of either the Fermi gas or the Coulomb contribution may be realized under certain conditions, depending upon parameter values.

Morris, J. R.

1999-01-01

247

Photoinduced diffusion through polymer networks.  

PubMed

Photomediated addition-fragmentation chemistry is applied to demonstrate the precisely controlled diffusion of chemical species through polymer networks. Fluorescent groups connected to polymer networks by allyl sulfide moieties become mobile upon irradiation with UV light due to radical-mediated addition-fragmentation bond exchange. Photoinduced transport through the bulk, into solution, and across film interfaces is demonstrated. PMID:25155441

Meng, Yuan; Fenoli, Christopher R; Aguirre-Soto, Alan; Bowman, Christopher N; Anthamatten, Mitchell

2014-10-01

248

R&D ERL: Vacuum  

SciTech Connect

The ERL Vacuum systems are depicted in a figure. ERL has eight vacuum volumes with various sets of requirements. A summary of vacuum related requirements is provided in a table. Five of the eight volumes comprise the electron beamline. They are the 5-cell Superconducting RF Cavity, Superconducting e-gun, injection, loop and beam dump. Two vacuum regions are the individual cryostats insulating the 5-cell Superconducting RF Cavity and the Superconducting e-gun structures. The last ERL vacuum volume not shown in the schematic is the laser transport line. The beamline vacuum regions are separated by electropneumatic gate valves. The beam dump is common with loop beamline but is considered a separate volume due to geometry and requirements. Vacuum in the 5-cell SRF cavity is maintained in the {approx}10{sup -9} torr range at room temperature by two 20 l/s ion pumps and in the e-gun SRF cavity by one 60 l/s ion pump. Vacuum in the SRF cavities operated at 2{sup o}K is reduced to low 10{sup -11} torr via cryopumping of the cavity walls. The cathode of the e-gun must be protected from poisoning, which can occur if vacuum adjacent to the e-gun in the injection line exceeds 10-11 torr range in the injection warm beamline near the e-gun exit. The vacuum requirements for beam operation in the loop and beam dump are 10-9 torr range. The beamlines are evacuated from atmospheric pressure to high vacuum level with a particulate free, oil free turbomolecular pumping cart. 25 l/s shielded ion pumps distributed throughout the beamlines maintain the vacuum requirement. Due to the more demanding vacuum requirement of the injection beamline proximate to the e-gun, a vacuum bakeout of the injection beamline is required. In addition, two 200 l/s diode ion pumps and supplemental pumping provided by titanium sublimation pumps are installed in the injection line just beyond the exit of the e-gun. Due to expected gas load a similar pumping arrangement is planned for the beam dump. The cryostat vacuum thermally insulating the SRF cavities need only reduce the convective heat load such that heat loss is primarily radiation through several layers of multi-layer insulation and conductive end-losses which are contained by 5{sup o}K thermal transitions. Prior to cool down rough vacuum {approx}10{sup -5} torr range is established and maintained by a dedicated turbomolecular pump station. Cryopumping by the cold mass and heat shields reduces the insulating vacuum to 10{sup -7} torr range after cool down.

Mapes, M.; Smart, L.; Weiss, D.; Steszyn, A.; Todd, R.

2010-01-01

249

Vacuum melting and mechanical testing of simulated lunar glasses  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Lunar silicate glasses may possess superior mechanical properties compared to terrestrial glasses because the anhydrous lunar environment should prevent hydrolytic weakening of the strong Si-O bonds. This hypothesis was tested by melting, solidifying, and determining the fracture toughness of simulated mare and highlands composition glasses in a high vacuum chamber. The fracture toughness, K(IC), of the resulting glasses was obtained via microindentation techniques. K(IC) increased as the testing environment was changed from air to a vacuum of 10 exp -7 torr. However, this increase in toughness may not result solely from a reduction in the hydrolytic weakening effect; the vacuum-melting process produced both the formation of spinel crystallites on the surfaces of the glass samples and significant changes in the compositions which may have contributed to the improved K(IC).

Carsley, J. E.; Blacic, J. D.; Pletka, B. J.

1992-01-01

250

Vacuum plasma spray applications on liquid fuel rocket engines  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The vacuum plasma spray process (VPS) has been developed by NASA and Rocketdyne for a variety of applications on liquid fuel rocket engines, including the Space Shuttle Main Engine. These applications encompass thermal barrier coatings which are thermal shock resistant for turbopump blades and nozzles; bond coatings for cryogenic titanium components; wear resistant coatings and materials; high conductivity copper, NaRloy-Z, combustion chamber liners, and structural nickel base material, Inconel 718, for nozzle and combustion chamber support jackets.

Mckechnie, T. N.; Zimmerman, F. R.; Bryant, M. A.

1992-01-01

251

Vacuum vapor deposition  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A method and apparatus is described for vapor deposition of a thin metallic film utilizing an ionized gas arc directed onto a source material spaced from a substrate to be coated in a substantial vacuum while providing a pressure differential between the source and the substrate so that, as a portion of the source is vaporized, the vapors are carried to the substrate. The apparatus includes a modified tungsten arc welding torch having a hollow electrode through which a gas, preferably inert, flows and an arc is struck between the electrode and the source. The torch, source, and substrate are confined within a chamber within which a vacuum is drawn. When the arc is struck, a portion of the source is vaporized and the vapors flow rapidly toward the substrate. A reflecting shield is positioned about the torch above the electrode and the source to ensure that the arc is struck between the electrode and the source at startup. The electrode and the source may be confined within a vapor guide housing having a duct opening toward the substrate for directing the vapors onto the substrate.

Poorman, Richard M. (inventor); Weeks, Jack L. (inventor)

1995-01-01

252

Accelerator Vacuum Protection System  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new and elaborate automatic vacuum protection system using fast acting valve has been installed to avoid accidental venting of accelerator from experimental chamber side. To cover all the beam lines and to reduce the system cost, it has been installed at a common point from where all the seven beam lines originate. The signals are obtained by placing fast response pressure sensing gauges (HV SENSOR) near all the experimental stations. The closing time of the fast valve is 10 milli-second. The fast closing system protects only one vacuum line at a time. At IUAC, we have seven beam lines so one sensor was placed in each of the beam lines near experimental chamber and a multiplexer was incorporated into the fast closing system. At the time of experiment, the sensor of the active beam line is selected through the multiplexer and the Fast closing valve is interlocked with the selected sensor. As soon as the pressure sensor senses the pressure rise beyond a selected pressure, the signal is transferred and the fast valve closes within 10 to 12 millisecond.

Barua, Pradip; Kothari, Ashok; Archunan, M.; Joshi, Rajan

2012-11-01

253

Portable vacuum object handling device  

DOEpatents

The disclosure relates to a portable device adapted to handle objects which are not to be touched by hand. A piston and bore wall form a vacuum chamber communicating with an adaptor sealably engageable with an object to be lifted. The piston is manually moved and set to establish vacuum. A valve is manually actuatable to apply the vacuum to lift the object. 1 fig.

Anderson, G.H.

1983-08-09

254

Measurements of the moisture diffusion coefficient of asphalt mixtures and its relationship to mixture composition  

Microsoft Academic Search

The presence of moisture in asphalt pavements detrimentally affects the bond between the aggregate and binder and the bond within the binder. The loss of these bonds leads to the deterioration of asphalt pavements. In regions with low rainfall, moisture diffusion is an important source of moisture transport in asphalt mixtures. The diffusion coefficient is a necessary input for models

Emad Kassem; Eyad Masad; Robert Lytton; Rifat Bulut

2009-01-01

255

A Common Eurozone Bond  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction\\u000aThe sovereign bond yields of the Eurozone, or more correctly the euro area, have since the introduction of the Euro undergone a bond yield compression. However, as can be seen in table 1, these bond yields started to diverge considerably around mid 2008 following the recent financial crisis and increased sovereign risk. Yields on Greek, Irish, and Portuguese bond

Erik Welin

2010-01-01

256

Vacuum system of the cyclotrons in VECC, Kolkata  

SciTech Connect

The vacuum system of the K=130 Room Temperature Cyclotron (RTC) (operational since 1978) has been recently modernized and the same of the K{sub bend}=520 Superconducting Cyclotron (SCC), currently under commissioning, is being deployed for remote monitoring and control. The vacuum system of RTC is designed to achieve and maintain vacuum level of 2 X 10{sup -6} mbar inside 23 m{sup 3} volume of Resonator tank and DEE tank. This has been upgraded by replacing several valves, Freon units, gauges and pumps. The relay based manual control system has been replaced by PLC based automated system. The SCC vacuum system also has an elaborate arrangement comprising of turbo molecular pumping modules with associated isolation valves and characteristic gauges. This paper describes essential elements, typically used to obtain high (1X10{sup -7} mbar) vacuum using rotary pumps, diffusion pumps and cold traps/turbo-molecular pumps and other system components such as valves, gauges and baffles. The supervisory control methodology/scheme of both the vacuum systems, developed in-house using EPICS (Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System), a standard open-source software tool for designing distributed control system, is also elaborated here. (author)

Roy, Anindya; Bhole, R.B.; Akhtar, J.; Yadav, R.C.; Pal, Sarbajit; Sarkar, D.; Bhandari, R.K., E-mail: r_ani@vecc.gov.in, E-mail: rbb@vecc.gov.in, E-mail: javed@vecc.gov.in, E-mail: yadav@vecc.gov.in, E-mail: sarbajit@vecc.gov.in, E-mail: dsarkar@vecc.gov.in, E-mail: bhandari@vecc.gov.in [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata (India)

2011-07-01

257

Vacuum leak detector and method  

DOEpatents

Apparatus and method for detecting leakage in a vacuum system involves a moisture trap chamber connected to the vacuum system and to a pressure gauge. Moisture in the trap chamber is captured by freezing or by a moisture adsorbent to reduce the residual water vapor pressure therein to a negligible amount. The pressure gauge is then read to determine whether the vacuum system is leaky. By directing a stream of carbon dioxide or helium at potentially leaky parts of the vacuum system, the apparatus can be used with supplemental means to locate leaks.

Edwards, Jr., David (7 Brown's La., Bellport, NY 11713)

1983-01-01

258

Manipulator For A Vacuum Chamber  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Rotary seal provides for external actuators. Positioner in vacuum employs four actuators; up/down, horizontal rotary, horizontal, and vertical rotary. External up/down and azimuthal actuators drives shaft entering vacuum chamber through sliding and rotating seal. Placement of actuator motors outside vacuum chamber reduces heat-removal load on system. Atop 2.5-cm-diameter shaft is stage supporting masses as great as 15 kg. Small motors on stage provide horizontal translation and rotation in vertical plane. Manipulator developed for calibrating plasma detectors by subjecting them to particle beams in vacuum. Standard, commercially available parts used.

Hunsaker, F.; Ogilvie, K.

1988-01-01

259

Rapid adhesive bonding concepts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Adhesive bonding in the aerospace industry typically utilizes autoclaves or presses which have considerable thermal mass. As a consequence, the rates of heatup and cooldown of the bonded parts are limited and the total time and cost of the bonding process is often relatively high. Many of the adhesives themselves do not inherently require long processing times. Bonding could be performed rapidly if the heat was concentrated in the bond lines or at least in the adherends. Rapid adhesive bonding concepts were developed to utilize induction heating techniques to provide heat directly to the bond line and/or adherends without heating the entire structure, supports, and fixtures of a bonding assembly. Bonding times for specimens are cut by a factor of 10 to 100 compared to standard press bonding. The development of rapid adhesive bonding for lap shear specimens (per ASTM D1003 and D3163), for aerospace panel bonding, and for field repair needs of metallic and advanced fiber reinforced polymeric matrix composite structures are reviewed.

Stein, B. A.; Tyeryar, J. R.; Hodges, W. T.

1984-01-01

260

Making and Breaking Bonds  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Atoms collide and, under certain circumstances, react to form bonds with one another. The process of association is the bonding of atoms into a molecule while dissociation is the process by which a molecule breaks apart into simpler groups of atoms, individual atoms, or ions. Students interact with a molecular dynamics model to explore the making and breaking of bonds.

Consortium, The C.

2011-12-11

261

H-Bonding Supramolecular Assemblies of PTCDI Molecules on the Au(111) Surface F. Silly,,,|  

E-print Network

vacuum, we discovered a completely new "domino" phase, also predicted by our theory, in which moleculesH-Bonding Supramolecular Assemblies of PTCDI Molecules on the Au(111) Surface M. Mura, F. Silly possible hydrogen bond connections between molecules with subsequent density functional theory (DFT

Castell, Martin

262

A large high vacuum, high pumping speed space simulation chamber for electric propulsion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Testing high power electric propulsion devices poses unique requirements on space simulation facilities. Very high pumping speeds are required to maintain high vacuum levels while handling large volumes of exhaust products. These pumping speeds are significantly higher than those available in most existing vacuum facilities. There is also a requirement for relatively large vacuum chamber dimensions to minimize facility wall/thruster plume interactions and to accommodate far field plume diagnostic measurements. A 4.57 m (15 ft) diameter by 19.2 m (63 ft) long vacuum chamber at NASA Lewis Research Center is described. The chamber utilizes oil diffusion pumps in combination with cryopanels to achieve high vacuum pumping speeds at high vacuum levels. The facility is computer controlled for all phases of operation from start-up, through testing, to shutdown. The computer control system increases the utilization of the facility and reduces the manpower requirements needed for facility operations.

Grisnik, Stanley P.; Parkes, James E.

1994-01-01

263

Cosmic Vacuum Prevents Radiopanspermia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The paper describes the new physical mechanism for the explanation of the irreversible damage of vegetative cells and spores of microorganisms (m/o) under space thermovacuum conditions (tvc) (vacuum+high temperatures), developed by the authors based on the published experimental data of various authors. The suggestion was made that this mechanism could inactivate most vegetative cells and spores of the m/o at the initial stage of their spontaneous migration into the cosmos from the platforms where life has originated and evolved. The authors believe the Earth and Earth-like planets to be such platforms. Such a mechanism could restrict the application of the radiopanspermia hypothesis to the explanation of the origin of life on the Earth.

Nussinov, M. D.; Lysenko, S. V.

1983-12-01

264

Vacuum thermal insulation panel  

SciTech Connect

A vacuum thermal insulation panel comprises a pair of laminated plastic and aluminum sheets together with a plastic edge strip sealed to the edges of the sheets so as to define an evacuable volume in which a glass fiber mat is disposed. The insulation panel of the present invention takes advantage of the light-weight, low cost and low thermal conductivity of plastic materials to form an evacuable volume into which a glass fiber insulating mat is disposed for support of the panel which is evacuated to provide improved thermal insulation. Additionally, a gas permeation barrier is employed on the edge strip of the panel to minimize gas permeation at its edges. A metal foil layer provides gas permeation protection through the large surface areas of the sheets themselves.

Young, J.R.; Schreck, R.M.

1984-04-24

265

Future complete vacuum spacetimes  

E-print Network

In this paper we prove a global existence theorem, in the direction of cosmological expansion, for sufficiently small perturbations of a family of spatially compact variants of the $k=-1$ Friedmann--Robertson--Walker vacuum spacetime. We use a special gauge defined by constant mean curvature slicing and a spatial harmonic coordinate condition, and develop energy estimates through the use of the Bel-Robinson energy and its higher order generalizations. In addition to the smallness condition on the data, we need a topological constraint on the spatial manifold to exclude the possibility of a non--trivial moduli space of flat spacetime perturbations, since the latter could not be controlled by curvature--based energies such as those of Bel--Robinson type. Our results also demonstrate causal geodesic completeness of the perturbed spacetimes (in the expanding direction) and establish precise rates of decay towards the background solution which serves as an attractor asymptotically.

Lars Andersson; Vincent Moncrief

2003-03-11

266

Abdominal intrauterine vacuum aspiration.  

PubMed

Evaluating and "cleaning" of the uterine cavity is probably the most performed operation in women. It is done for several reasons: abortion, evaluation of irregular bleeding in premenopausal period, and postmenopausal bleeding. Abortion is undoubtedly the number one procedure with more than 44 million pregnancies terminated every year. This procedure should not be underestimated and a careful preoperative evaluation is needed. Ideally a sensitive pregnancy test should be done together with an ultrasound in order to confirm a uterine pregnancy, excluding extra-uterine pregnancy, and to detect genital and/or uterine malformations. Three out of four abortions are performed by surgical methods. Surgical methods include a sharp, blunt, and suction curettage. Suction curettage or vacuum aspiration is the preferred method. Despite the fact that it is a relative safe procedure with major complications in less than one percent of cases, it is still responsible for 13% of all maternal deaths. All the figures have not declined in the last decade. Trauma, perforation, and bleeding are a danger triage. When there is a perforation, a laparoscopy should be performed immediately, in order to detect intra-abdominal lacerations and bleeding. The bleeding should be stopped as soon as possible in order to not destabilize the patient. When there is a perforation in the uterus, this "entrance" can be used to perform the curettage. This is particularly useful if there is trauma of the isthmus and uterine wall, and it is difficult to identify the uterine canal. A curettage is a frequent performed procedure, which should not be underestimated. If there is a perforation in the uterus, then this opening can safely be used for vacuum aspiration. PMID:25134300

Tjalma, W A A

2014-01-01

267

Prospective bonding applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Adhesive bonding in industry and in the laboratory is surveyed and prospects for its wider utilization are assessed. The economic impact of bonding technology on industry is discussed. Research is reviewed, centering on the development of nondestructive testing and inspection techniques. Traditional (wood) as well as new materials susceptible to bonding are considered. Applications in construction and civil engineering, in aeronautics, and in the automobile industry are covered. The use of glues in mechanical constructions, in assembling cylindrical parts, and in metal-metal bonding are examined. Hybrid assembling and bonding of composite materials are included.

Ancenay, H.; Benazet, D.

1981-07-01

268

Chemical Bonding, Interfaces and Defects in Hafnium Oxide/Germanium Oxynitride Gate Stacks on Ge (100)  

SciTech Connect

Correlations among interface properties and chemical bonding characteristics in HfO{sub 2}/GeO{sub x}N{sub y}/Ge MIS stacks were investigated using in-situ remote nitridation of the Ge (100) surface prior to HfO{sub 2} atomic layer deposition (ALD). Ultra thin ({approx}1.1 nm), thermally stable and aqueous etch-resistant GeO{sub x}N{sub y} interfaces layers that exhibited Ge core level photoelectron spectra (PES) similar to stoichiometric Ge{sub 3}N{sub 4} were synthesized. To evaluate GeO{sub x}N{sub y}/Ge interface defects, the density of interface states (D{sub it}) was extracted by the conductance method across the band gap. Forming gas annealed (FGA) samples exhibited substantially lower D{sub it} ({approx} 1 x 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2} eV{sup -1}) than did high vacuum annealed (HVA) and inert gas anneal (IGA) samples ({approx} 1x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2} eV{sup -1}). Germanium core level photoelectron spectra from similar FGA-treated samples detected out-diffusion of germanium oxide to the HfO{sub 2} film surface and apparent modification of chemical bonding at the GeO{sub x}N{sub y}/Ge interface, which is related to the reduced D{sub it}.

Oshima, Yasuhiro; /Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept.; Sun, Yun; /SLAC, SSRL; Kuzum, Duygu; /Stanford U.; Sugawara, Takuya; Saraswat, Krishna C.; Pianetta, Piero; /SLAC, SSRL; McIntyre, Paul C.; /Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept.

2008-10-31

269

Vacuum enhanced cutaneous biopsy instrument  

DOEpatents

A syringe-like disposable cutaneous biopsy instrument equipped with a tubular blade at its lower end, and designed so that a vacuum is created during use, said vacuum serving to retain undeformed a plug of tissue cut from a patient's skin.

Collins, Joseph (St. Petersburg, FL)

2000-01-01

270

Vacuum pyrolysis of sugarcane bagasse  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study was to provide background data on sugarcane bagasse vacuum pyrolysis. Product yields and properties were investigated. Vacuum pyrolysis tests were performed at bench and pilot plant scales. The bagasse finest particles with a diameter smaller than 450 ?m were removed in order to overcome difficulties caused by their low density and high ash content. In

Abdelkader Chaala; Christian Roy

2002-01-01

271

Vacuum flash evaporated polymer composites  

DOEpatents

A method for fabrication of polymer composite layers in a vacuum is disclosed. More specifically, the method of dissolving salts in a monomer solution, vacuum flash evaporating the solution, condensing the flash evaporated solution as a liquid film, and forming the condensed liquid film into a polymer composite layer on a substrate is disclosed.

Affinito, J.D.; Gross, M.E.

1997-10-28

272

Statistical mechanics of the vacuum  

E-print Network

The vacuum is full of virtual particles which exist for short moments of time. In this paper we construct a chaotic model of vacuum fluctuations associated with a fundamental entropic field that generates an arrow of time. The dynamics can be physically interpreted in terms of fluctuating virtual momenta. This model leads to a generalized statistical mechanics that distinguishes fundamental constants of nature.

Christian Beck

2011-12-07

273

Vacuum flash evaporated polymer composites  

DOEpatents

A method for fabrication of polymer composite layers in a vacuum is disclosed. More specifically, the method of dissolving salts in a monomer solution, vacuum flash evaporating the solution, condensing the flash evaporated solution as a liquid film, and forming the condensed liquid film into a polymer composite layer on a substrate is disclosed.

Affinito, John D. (Kennewick, WA); Gross, Mark E. (Pasco, WA)

1997-01-01

274

Vacuum Technology for Ion Sources  

E-print Network

The basic notions of vacuum technology for ion sources are presented, with emphasis on pressure profile calculation and choice of pumping technique. A Monte Carlo code (Molflow+) for the evaluation of conductances and the vacuum-electrical analogy for the calculation of time-dependent pressure variations are introduced. The specific case of the Linac4 H- source is reviewed.

Chiggiato, P

2013-01-01

275

Vacuum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A two-year program investigated vacuum gas tungsten arc welding (VGTAW) as a method to modify or improve the weldability of normally difficult-to-weld materials. After a vacuum chamber and GTAW power supply were modified, several difficult-to-weld materials were studied and key parameters developed. Finally, Incoloy 903 weld overlays were produced without microfissures.

Weeks, J. L.; Todd, D. T.; Wooten, J. R.

1997-01-01

276

Temperature Gradient Vacuum Furnace for Diffusion Studies to 2000°C  

Microsoft Academic Search

An rf induction-heated furnace has been designed that produces a stable linear temperature gradient greater than 1000° C?cm and a maximum specimen temperature of 2000°C. Methods of measuring temperature in a temperature gradient have been evaluated and the performance of the furnace and its power requirements are discussed.

R. O. Meyer; J. C. Voglewede

1971-01-01

277

Corporate bond liquidity and matrix pricing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Matrix priced bond price data are investigated to model the liquidity of a corporate bond. Preliminary study shows that the yield spread is wide when a yield history records jumps. As well as respecting the way how matrix prices are generated, this finding leads us to a conjecture that time series of yield is represented by a jump-diffusion process. Then the kurtosis of a yield distribution can be regarded as a proxy variable for the liquidity. The conjecture is empirically validiated by regression analysis of yield spreads.

Kagraoka, Yusho

2005-09-01

278

The diffusion welding of 7075Al-3%SiC particles reinforced composites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A group of 3% SiC particle reinforced Al-7075 alloys was diffusion joined at 560°C between 1 h and 2 h durations under 2 MPa applied pressure in a vacuum of 2 × 10-3 Pa. Optical microscopy and SEM-EDS studies were used to characterise the weldment and the fracture surfaces of all samples investigated. A non-planar interface formation was observed at the bond interface. The maximum shear strength of 137 MPa was obtained with the composite 7075-3% SiC joined for two hours, which is 92% of the shear strength of the parent material. The fracture surface of the 7075-3% SiC composites displayed a non-planar fracture surfaces with some plastic deformation.

Aydin, M.; Gürler, R.; Türker, M.

2009-02-01

279

Low-Temperature Fabrication of Germanium-on-Insulator Using Remote Plasma Activation Bonding and Hydrogen Exfoliation  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Low-temperature germanium to silicon wafer bonding was demonstrated by in situ radical activation and bonding in vacuum. After\\u000a low temperature direct bonding of Ge to Si followed by annealing at 200 and 300°C, advanced imaging techniques were used to\\u000a characterize the bonded interface. The feasibility of transferring hydrogen-implanted germanium to silicon with a reduced\\u000a thermal budget is also demonstrated. Germanium

C. A. Colinge; K. Y. Byun; I. P. Ferain; R. Yu; M. Goorsky

280

Cosmology with decaying vacuum energy  

SciTech Connect

Motivated by recent attempts to solve the cosmological constant problem, we examine the observational consequences of a vacuum energy density which decays in time. For all times later than t approx. 1 sec, the ratio of the vacuum to the total energy density of the universe must be small. Although the vacuum cannot provide the ''missing mass'' required to close the universe today, its presence earlier in the history of the universe could have important consequences. We discuss restrictions on the vacuum energy arising from primordial nucleosynthesis, the microwave and gamma ray background spectra, and galaxy formation. A small vacuum component at the era of nucleosynthesis, 0.01 < rho/sub vac//rho/sup rad/ < 0.1, increase the number of allowed neutino species to N/sup nu/ > 5, but in some cases would severely distort the microwave spectrum. 9 refs., 3 figs.

Freese, K.; Adams, F.; Frieman, J.; Mottola, E.

1987-09-01

281

Bubbling the False Vacuum Away  

E-print Network

We investigate the role of nonperturbative, bubble-like inhomogeneities on the decay rate of false-vacuum states in two and three-dimensional scalar field theories. The inhomogeneities are induced by setting up large-amplitude oscillations of the field about the false vacuum as, for example, after a rapid quench or in certain models of cosmological inflation. We show that, for a wide range of parameters, the presence of large-amplitude bubble-like inhomogeneities greatly accelerates the decay rate, changing it from the well-known exponential suppression of homogeneous nucleation to a power-law suppression. It is argued that this fast, power-law vacuum decay -- known as resonant nucleation -- is promoted by the presence of long-lived oscillons among the nonperturbative fluctuations about the false vacuum. A phase diagram is obtained distinguishing three possible mechanisms for vacuum decay: homogeneous nucleation, resonant nucleation, and cross-over. Possible applications are briefly discussed.

Marcelo Gleiser; Barrett Rogers; Joel Thorarinson

2007-08-28

282

Laser phase noise quenching via squeezed vacuum reservoir  

SciTech Connect

It is shown by Gea-Banacloche [Phys. Rev Lett. 59, 543 (1987)] that the Laser Phase diffusion rate may be reduced by as much as one-half when laser is coupled out through a partially transmitting mirror to 'squeezed vacuum' as opposed to ordinary vacuum. This happens for a particular choice of the phase of the squeezed field. However, phase stability is not achieved for this choice of phase. In this paper, this analysis is extended by including a separate squeezed vacuum reservoir which couples the spontaneous decay between the lasing levels. The results show that, it is possible to obtain the phase stability as well as phase noise quenching in this system.

Anwar, Javaid [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan)

2005-12-15

283

Vacuum ultraviolet photoionization of carbohydrates and nucleotides  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Carbohydrates (2-deoxyribose, ribose, and xylose) and nucleotides (adenosine-, cytidine-, guanosine-, and uridine-5'-monophosphate) are generated in the gas phase, and ionized with vacuum ultraviolet photons (VUV, 118.2 nm). The observed time of flight mass spectra of the carbohydrate fragmentation are similar to those observed [J.-W. Shin, F. Dong, M. Grisham, J. J. Rocca, and E. R. Bernstein, Chem. Phys. Lett. 506, 161 (2011)] for 46.9 nm photon ionization, but with more intensity in higher mass fragment ions. The tendency of carbohydrate ions to fragment extensively following ionization seemingly suggests that nucleic acids might undergo radiation damage as a result of carbohydrate, rather than nucleobase fragmentation. VUV photoionization of nucleotides (monophosphate-carbohydrate-nucleobase), however, shows that the carbohydrate-nucleobase bond is the primary fragmentation site for these species. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that the removed carbohydrate electrons by the 118.2 nm photons are associated with endocyclic C-C and C-O ring centered orbitals: loss of electron density in the ring bonds of the nascent ion can thus account for the observed fragmentation patterns following carbohydrate ionization. DFT calculations also indicate that electrons removed from nucleotides under these same conditions are associated with orbitals involved with the nucleobase-saccharide linkage electron density. The calculations give a general mechanism and explanation of the experimental results.

Shin, Joong-Won; Bernstein, Elliot R.

2014-01-01

284

Vacuum energy, antigravity, and modern cosmology  

E-print Network

Vacuum energy, antigravity, and modern cosmology John Peacock, University of Edinburgh Loretto and zero- point energy (inevitable from uncertainty principle) ­ not the only contribution to vacuum energy;Vacuum energy: Einstein's missed chance Now: `Dark Energy' can cause the

Peacock, John

285

Hillslope diffusion  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lab is designed to help students apply hillslope diffusion equations (derived in class prior to the lab) to understand real-world hillslopes. The major goal is a deeper understanding of hillslope processes and the equations used to describe hillslope diffusion by observing the same factors described in the equations on real-world hillslopes.

Mcdermott, Jeni

286

Cleaning of a thermal vacuum chamber with shrouds in place  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In February, 1991, a failure of a rotary booster pump caused the diffusion pumps to backstream into a 10 ft x 15 ft thermal vacuum chamber. Concerns existed about the difficulty of removing and reinstalling the shrouds without causing leaks. The time required for the shroud removal was also of concern. These concerns prompted us to attempt to clean the chamber without removing the shrouds.

Bond, William R.

1992-01-01

287

Stationary vacuum arc on the hot non-thermionic cathode  

Microsoft Academic Search

A vacuum arc with a stationary diffuse spot on a solid chromium cathode has been studied. The arc current was 30-220 A, cathode temperature 1800-2100 K. The mean current density on the cathode was 10-102 A\\/cm2. The part of thermionic current at the cathode was less than 0.1% from the arc current. Observations of cathode surface during arcing with the

V. M. Batenin; I. I. Klimovsky; V. P. Polistchook; V. A. Sinel'shchikov

1998-01-01

288

NCSX Vacuum Vessel Fabrication  

SciTech Connect

The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) is being constructed at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) in conjunction with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The goal of this experiment is to develop a device which has the steady state properties of a traditional stellarator along with the high performance characteristics of a tokamak. A key element of this device is its highly shaped Inconel 625 vacuum vessel. This paper describes the manufacturing of the vessel. The vessel is being fabricated by Major Tool and Machine, Inc. (MTM) in three identical 120º vessel segments, corresponding to the three NCSX field periods, in order to accommodate assembly of the device. The port extensions are welded on, leak checked, cut off within 1" of the vessel surface at MTM and then reattached at PPPL, to accommodate assembly of the close-fitting modular coils that surround the vessel. The 120º vessel segments are formed by welding two 60º segments together. Each 60º segment is fabricated by welding ten press-formed panels together over a collapsible welding fixture which is needed to precisely position the panels. The vessel is joined at assembly by welding via custom machined 8" (20.3 cm) wide spacer "spool pieces." The vessel must have a total leak rate less than 5 X 10-6 t-l/s, magnetic permeability less than 1.02?, and its contours must be within 0.188" (4.76 mm). It is scheduled for completion in January 2006.

Viola, M. E.; Brown, T.; Heitzenroeder, P.; Malinowski, F.; Reiersen, W.; Sutton, L.; Goranson, P.; Nelson, B.; Cole, M.; Manuel, M.; McCorkle, D.

2005-10-07

289

Vacuum energy and cosmological evolution  

E-print Network

An expanding universe is not expected to have a static vacuum energy density. The so-called cosmological constant $\\Lambda$ should be an approximation, certainly a good one for a fraction of a Hubble time, but it is most likely a temporary description of a true dynamical vacuum energy variable that is evolving from the inflationary epoch to the present day. We can compare the evolving vacuum energy with a Casimir device where the parallel plates slowly move apart ("expand"). The total vacuum energy density cannot be measured, only the effect associated to the presence of the plates, and then also their increasing separation with time. In the universe there is a nonvanishing spacetime curvature $R$ as compared to Minkowskian spacetime that is changing with the expansion. The vacuum energy density must change accordingly, and we naturally expect $\\delta\\Lambda\\sim R\\sim H^2$. A class of dynamical vacuum models that trace such rate of change can be constructed. They are compatible with the current cosmological data, and conveniently extended can account for the complete cosmic evolution from the inflationary epoch till the present days. These models are very close to the $\\Lambda$CDM model for the late universe, but very different from it at the early times. Traces of the inherent vacuum dynamics could be detectable in our recent past.

Joan Sola

2014-02-27

290

Vacuum Brazing of Accelerator Components  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Commonly used materials for accelerator components are those which are vacuum compatible and thermally conductive. Stainless steel, aluminum and copper are common among them. Stainless steel is a poor heat conductor and not very common in use where good thermal conductivity is required. Aluminum and copper and their alloys meet the above requirements and are frequently used for the above purpose. The accelerator components made of aluminum and its alloys using welding process have become a common practice now a days. It is mandatory to use copper and its other grades in RF devices required for accelerators. Beam line and Front End components of the accelerators are fabricated from stainless steel and OFHC copper. Fabrication of components made of copper using welding process is very difficult and in most of the cases it is impossible. Fabrication and joining in such cases is possible using brazing process especially under vacuum and inert gas atmosphere. Several accelerator components have been vacuum brazed for Indus projects at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT), Indore using vacuum brazing facility available at RRCAT, Indore. This paper presents details regarding development of the above mentioned high value and strategic components/assemblies. It will include basics required for vacuum brazing, details of vacuum brazing facility, joint design, fixturing of the jobs, selection of filler alloys, optimization of brazing parameters so as to obtain high quality brazed joints, brief description of vacuum brazed accelerator components etc.

Singh, Rajvir; Pant, K. K.; Lal, Shankar; Yadav, D. P.; Garg, S. R.; Raghuvanshi, V. K.; Mundra, G.

2012-11-01

291

Vacuum energy and cosmological evolution  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An expanding universe is not expected to have a static vacuum energy density. The so-called cosmological constant ? should be an approximation, certainly a good one for a fraction of a Hubble time, but it is most likely a temporary description of a true dynamical vacuum energy variable that is evolving from the inflationary epoch to the present day. We can compare the evolving vacuum energy with a Casimir device where the parallel plates slowly move apart ("expand"). The total vacuum energy density cannot be measured, only the effect associated to the presence of the plates, and then also their increasing separation with time. In the universe there is a nonvanishing spacetime curvature R as compared to Minkowskian spacetime that is changing with the expansion. The vacuum energy density must change accordingly, and we naturally expect ??˜R˜H2. A class of dynamical vacuum models that trace such rate of change can be constructed. They are compatible with the current cosmological data, and conveniently extended can account for the complete cosmic evolution from the inflationary epoch till the present days. These models are very close to the ?CDM model for the late universe, but very different from it at the early times. Traces of the inherent vacuum dynamics could be detectable in our recent past.

Solà, Joan

2014-07-01

292

Amorphous Ternary Diffusion Barriers for Silicon Metallizations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Reactively sputtered from transition-metal silicide or boride targets in Ar/N_2 discharges, thin amorphous films of TM-Si-N (TM = Mo, Ta, Ti, or W) and W-B-N are investigated. Resistivity, density, stress, and structure are given as functions of composition, and in some cases, temperature. Transmission electron microscopy shows that most of the films are marginally amorphous with the scale of local order ranging from 0.5 to 1.5 nm. Small -angle scattering measurements reveal chemically dissimilary regions in the films. When fully nitrided, Si appears to be preferentially bonded to nitrogen in the form of Si_3N_4 in the TM-Si-N films, according to extended energy loss fine structure (EXELFS) measurements. By tests on shallow-junction diodes, 100-nm thick TM-Si-N barriers are able to prevent aluminum overlayers from spiking the Si substrate at temperatures above aluminum's melting point, 660^circC. The exceptional stability is partly attributable to a 3 nm, self-sealing AlN layer which grows at the TM-Si-N/Al interface. The performance of the TM-Si-N and W-B-N barriers with copper overlayers is equally impressive. At the proper compositions, 100-nm barriers prevent copper from diffusing into the junction at 800^circC or higher for a 30-min vacuum annealing. Diode failure typically corresponds to the crystallization temperature of the barrier, which can be reduced by the presence of copper. Preliminary diffusion measurements of Cu in Ta _{36}Si_ {14}N_{50} films by SIMS yield an approximate diffusivity constant of D_{CU} = (0.014 cm ^2/s) times exp(-2.7 eV/kT). A 10-nm-thick TM-Si-N barrier with a Cu overlayer on MOS capacitors reveals no penetration of Cu into SiO_2 during an 80 h bias-thermal-stress at 300^circ C and 1 MV/cm applied field. Through a microscopic four-point probe lithographically defined on a Cu/barrier/Cu trilayer stack, the specific contact resistances of barrier/Cu interfaces are determined for TM-Si-N, TiN, and W barriers. In all instances, the contact resistivty is approximately 10^ {-9} Omega cm^2 for as-deposited samples.

Reid, Jason Sven

1995-01-01

293

Energy pulse bonding  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

To eliminate many of the present termination problems a technique called energy pulse bonding (EPB) was developed. The process demonstrated the capability of: (1) joining conductors without prior removal of insulations, (2) joining conductors without danger of brittle intermetallics, (3) increased joint temperature capability, (4) simultaneous formation of several bonds, (5) capability of higher joint density, and (6) a production oriented process. The following metals were successfully bonded in the solid state: copper, beryllium copper, phosphor bronze, aluminum, brass, and Kovar.

Smith, G. C.

1972-01-01

294

Chemical bonding technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Primers employed in bonding together the various material interfaces in a photovoltaic module are being developed. The approach develops interfacial adhesion by generating actual chemical bonds between the various materials bonded together. The current status of the program is described along with the progress toward developing two general purpose primers for ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA), one for glass and metals, and another for plastic films.

Plueddemann, E.

1986-01-01

295

Vacuum energy, spectral determinant and heat kernel asymptotics of graph Laplacians with general vertex matching conditions  

E-print Network

We consider Laplace operators on metric graphs, networks of one-dimensional line segments (bonds), with matching conditions at the vertices that make the operator self-adjoint. Such quantum graphs provide a simple model of quantum mechanics in a classically chaotic system with multiple scales corresponding to the lengths of the bonds. For graph Laplacians we briefly report results for the spectral determinant, vacuum energy and heat kernel asymptotics of general graphs in terms of the vertex matching conditions.

J. M. Harrison; K. Kirsten

2009-11-30

296

Bonding and Sealing Evaluations for Cryogenic Tanks  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Several different cryogenic tank concepts are being considered for reusable launch vehicles (RLV'S) . Though different tank concepts are being considered, many will require that the cryogenic insulation be evacuated and be bonded to a structure. In this work, an attempt was made to evaluate the effectiveness of maintaining a vacuum on a specimen where foam or honeycomb core was encased within Gr/Ep. In addition to these tests, flatwise adhesion pull off tests were performed at room temperature with PR 1664, EA 9394, FM-300, Crest 3170, and HT 435 adhesives. The materials bonded included Gr/Ep, Gr/BMI, Al, and stainless steel facesheets, and Ti honeycomb, Hexcel honeycomb, and Rohacell foam core materials.

Glass, David E.

1997-01-01

297

Hydrogen bonding and anaesthesia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

General anaesthetics act by perturbing intermolecular associations without breaking or forming covalent bonds. These associations might be due to a variety of van der Waals interactions or hydrogen bonding. Neurotransmitters all contain OH or NH groups, which are prone to form hydrogen bonds with those of the neurotransmitter receptors. These could be perturbed by anaesthetics. Aromatic rings in amino acids can act as weak hydrogen bond acceptors. On the other hand the acidic hydrogen in halothane type anaesthetics are weak proton donors. These two facts together lead to a probable mechanism of action for all general anaesthetics.

Sándorfy, C.

2004-12-01

298

The localized quantum vacuum field  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A model for the localized quantum vacuum is proposed in which the zero-point energy (ZPE) of the quantum electromagnetic field originates in energy- and momentum-conserving transitions of material systems from their ground state to an unstable state with negative energy. These transitions are accompanied by emissions and re-absorptions of real photons, which generate a localized quantum vacuum in the neighborhood of material systems. The model could help resolve the cosmological paradox associated with the ZPE of electromagnetic fields, while reclaiming quantum effects associated with quantum vacuum such as the Casimir effect and the Lamb shift. It also offers a new insight into the Zitterbewegung of material particles.

Dragoman, D.

2008-03-01

299

Vacuum Function Operation and Systems  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The understanding of vacuum function and systems is essential for students and employees working within the micro- and nanofabrication industry. This presentation/webinar highlights the use, construction, and examples of current vacuum technology systems today. Prepared by WHO, of the Nanotechnology Applications and Career Knowledge (NACK), a National ATE Center, this presentation provides material presented from the instructor/engineer viewpoint. Discussions include vacuum pump function, gauge use and ranges, applicable design considerations, as well as insight on cost and equipment training methodologies that have been utilized by the NACK Center. This site requires a free log-in to access.

2009-10-06

300

Fluxless eutectic bonding of GaAs-on-Si by using Ag/Sn solder  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fluxless GaAs-on-Si wafer bonding using Ag/Sn solder was investigated to realize uniform and void-free heterogeneous material integration. The effects of the diffusion barrier, Ag/Sn thickness, and Ar plasma treatment were studied to achieve the optimal fluxless bonding process. Pt on a GaAs wafer and Mo on a Si wafer act as diffusion barriers by preventing the flow of Ag/Sn solder into both the wafers. The bonding strength is closely related to the Ag/Sn thickness and Ar plasma treatment. A shear strength test was carried out to investigate the bonding strength. Under identical bonding conditions, the Ag/Sn thickness was optimized to achieve higher bonding strength and to avoid the formation of voids due to thermal stress. An Ar plasma pretreatment process improved the bonding strength because the Ar plasma removed carbon contaminants and metal-oxide bonds from the metal surface.

Eo, Sung-Hwa; Kim, Dae-Seon; Jeong, Ho-Jung; Jang, Jae-Hyung

2013-11-01

301

Femtosecond dynamics in hydrogen-bonded solvents  

SciTech Connect

We present results on the ultrafast dynamics of pure hydrogen-bonding solvents, obtained using femtosecond Fourier-transform optical-heterodyne-detected, Raman-induced Kerr effect spectroscopy. Solvent systems we have studied include the formamides, water, ethylene glycol, and acetic acid. Inertial and diffusive motions are clearly resolved. We comment on the effect that such ultrafast solvent motions have on chemical reactions in solution.

Castner, E.W. Jr.; Chang, Y.J.

1993-09-01

302

Fokker-Planck . . . Diffusion . . .  

E-print Network

Fokker-Planck . . . Diffusion . . . Diffusion- . . . Application: . . . Summary and . . . First #12;Fokker-Planck . . . Diffusion . . . Diffusion- . . . Application: . . . Summary and . . . Topics: 1. Fokker-Planck transport equation 2. Diffusion approximation 3. Diffusion-convection transport

303

Diffusion behaviour of charge carriers in thin films of phthalocyanines  

Microsoft Academic Search

Phthalocyanine (Pc) thin films were prepared by the vacuum-evaporating method. The diffusion behaviour of the charge carriers in these films was investigated by means of transient photovoltage (Dember effect) measurements. The experiments imply that the dominant charge carriers in phthalocyanines are electrons which diffuse from the surface closest to the light to the internal bulk. As a comparative system, photovoltic

He Tian; Kong-Chang Chen

1995-01-01

304

Self diffusion of reversibly aggregating spheres  

E-print Network

Reversible diffusion limited cluster aggregation of hard spheres with rigid bonds was simulated and the self diffusion coefficient was determined for equilibrated systems. The effect of increasing attraction strength was determined for systems at different volume fractions and different interaction ranges. It was found that the slowing down of the diffusion coefficient due to crowding is decoupled from that due to cluster formation. The diffusion coefficient could be calculated from the cluster size distribution and became zero only at infinite attraction strength when permanent gels are formed. It is concluded that so-called attractive glasses are not formed at finite interaction strength.

Sujin Babu; Jean Christophe Gimel; Taco Nicolai

2007-05-10

305

Anodic bonded graphene  

Microsoft Academic Search

We show how to prepare graphene samples on a glass substrate with the anodic bonding method. In this method, a graphite precursor in flake form is bonded to a glass substrate with the help of an electrostatic field and then cleaved off to leave few layer graphene on the substrate. Now that several methods are available for producing graphene, the

Adrian Balan; Rakesh Kumar; Mohamed Boukhicha; Olivier Beyssac; Jean-Claude Bouillard; Dario Taverna; William Sacks; Massimiliano Marangolo; Emanuelle Lacaze; Roger Gohler; Walter Escoffier; Jean-Marie Poumirol; Abhay Shukla

2010-01-01

306

The Sibling Bond.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The relationships among brothers and sisters are infinitely varied, but whatever their characteristics, these bonds last throughout life. This book examines the sibling relationship as a distinctive emotional, passionate, painful, and solacing power. Chapter 1, "Unraveling the Sibling Bond," addresses research on siblings and development of the…

Bank, Stephen P.; Kahn, Michael D.

307

Measuring Abnormal Bond Performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

We analyze the empirical power and specification of test statistics designed to detect abnormal bond returns in corporate event studies, using monthly and daily data. We find that test statistics based on frequently used methods of calculating abnormal monthly bond returns are biased. Most methods implemented in monthly data also lack power to detect abnormal returns. We also consider unique

Hendrik Bessembinder; Kathleen M. Kahle; William F. Maxwell; Danielle Xu

2009-01-01

308

Water's Hydrogen Bond Strength  

Microsoft Academic Search

Water is necessary both for the evolution of life and its continuance. It possesses particular properties that cannot be found in other materials and that are required for life-giving processes. These properties are brought about by the hydrogen bonded environment particularly evident in liquid water. Each liquid water molecule is involved in about four hydrogen bonds with strengths considerably less

Martin Chaplin

2007-01-01

309

Interactive Pi Bonding Effects  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This application demonstrates the effect of pi bonding on the one-electron ligand field splitting in an octahedral. By clicking on the appropriate buttons students can see how D changes when you move from ligands with no pi bonding capability to pi donor and pi acceptor ligands.

310

Vacuum energy and cosmological evolution  

E-print Network

An expanding universe is not expected to have a static vacuum energy density. The so-called cosmological constant $\\Lambda$ should be an approximation, certainly a good one for a fraction of a Hubble time, but it is most likely a temporary description of a true dynamical vacuum energy variable that is evolving from the inflationary epoch to the present day. We can compare the evolving vacuum energy with a Casimir device where the parallel plates slowly move apart ("expand"). The total vacuum energy density cannot be measured, only the effect associated to the presence of the plates, and then also their increasing separation with time. In the universe there is a nonvanishing spacetime curvature $R$ as compared to Minkowskian spacetime that is changing with the expansion. The vacuum energy density must change accordingly, and we naturally expect $\\delta\\Lambda\\sim R\\sim H^2$. A class of dynamical vacuum models that trace such rate of change can be constructed. They are compatible with the current cosmological d...

Sola, Joan

2014-01-01

311

Cold cathode vacuum gauging system  

DOEpatents

A vacuum gauging system of the cold cathode type is provided for measuring the pressure of a plurality of separate vacuum systems, such as in a gas centrifuge cascade. Each casing is fitted with a gauge tube assembly which communicates with the vacuum system in the centrifuge casing. Each gauge tube contains an anode which may be in the form of a slender rod or wire hoop and a cathode which may be formed by the wall of the gauge tube. The tube is provided with an insulated high voltage connector to the anode which has a terminal for external connection outside the vacuum casing. The tube extends from the casing so that a portable magnet assembly may be inserted about the tube to provide a magnetic field in the area between the anode and cathode necessary for pressure measurements in a cold cathode-type vacuum gauge arrangement. The portable magnetic assembly is provided with a connector which engages the external high voltage terminal for providing power to the anode within in the gauge tube. Measurement is made in the same manner as the prior cold cathode gauges in that the current through the anode to the cathode is measured as an indication of the pressure. By providing the portable magnetic assembly, a considerable savings in cost, installation, and maintenance of vacuum gauges for pressure measurement in a gas centrifuge cascade is realizable.

Denny, Edward C. (Knoxville, TN)

2004-03-09

312

Technical specification for vacuum systems  

SciTech Connect

The vacuum systems at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) are primarily of all-metal construction and operate at pressures from 10/sup -5/ to 10/sup -11/ Torr. The primary gas loads during operation result from thermal desorption and beam-induced desorption from the vacuum chamber walls. These desorption rates can be extremely high in the case of hydrocarbons and other contaminants. These specifications place a major emphasis on eliminating contamination sources. The specifications and procedures have been written to insure the cleanliness and vacuum integrity of all SLAC vacuum systems, and to assist personnel involved with SLAC vacuum systems in choosing and designing components that are compatible with existing systems and meet the quality and reliability of SLAC vacuum standards. The specification includes requirements on design, procurement, fabrication, chemical cleaning, clean room practices, welding and brazing, helium leak testing, residual gas analyzer testing, bakeout, venting, and pumpdown. Also appended are specifications regarding acceptable vendors, isopropyl alcohol, bakeable valve cleaning procedure, mechanical engineering safety inspection, notes on synchrotron radiation, and specifications of numerous individual components. (LEW)

Khaw, J. (ed.)

1987-01-01

313

Wood Bond Testing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A joint development program between Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection Technologies and The Weyerhaeuser Company resulted in an internal bond analyzer (IBA), a device which combines ultrasonics with acoustic emission testing techniques. It is actually a spinoff from a spinoff, stemming from a NASA Lewis invented acousto-ultrasonic technique that became a system for testing bond strength of composite materials. Hartford's parent company, Acoustic Emission Technology Corporation (AET) refined and commercialized the technology. The IBA builds on the original system and incorporates on-line process control systems. The IBA determines bond strength by measuring changes in pulsar ultrasonic waves injected into a board. Analysis of the wave determines the average internal bond strength for the panel. Results are displayed immediately. Using the system, a mill operator can adjust resin/wood proportion, reduce setup time and waste, produce internal bonds of a consistent quality and automatically mark deficient products.

1989-01-01

314

Ultrasonically bonded value assembly  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A valve apparatus capable of maintaining a fluid-tight seal over a relatively long period of time by releasably bonding a valve member to its seat is described. The valve member is bonded or welded to the seat and then released by the application of the same energy to the bond joint. The valve member is held in place during the bonding by a clamping device. An appropriate force device can activate the opening and closing of the valve member. Various combinations of material for the valve member and valve seat can be utilized to provide an adequate sealing bond. Aluminum oxide, stainless steel, inconel, tungsten carbide as hard materials and copper, aluminum, titanium, silver, and gold as soft materials are suggested.

Salvinski, R. J. (inventor)

1975-01-01

315

Dynamic Simulation of the Thermal Decomposition of Pyrite Under Vacuum  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ultrasoft pseudopotential plane wave method is applied to dynamic simulation of the thermal decomposition mechanism of FeS2 under vacuum. The FeS2 (100), (111), and (210) surface relaxation and the geometric and electronic structure of the reactants and products are calculated. The results indicate that FeS2 (100) is the most preferred surface to dissociate and also the most common cleavage surface. The thermal decomposition mechanism of FeS2 is explained by dynamic simulation on a micro stratum: in general, the S-Fe bond gradually elongated until it fractured, the S-S bond strengthened gradually, the S-Fe bond was cleaved to form S, the force is relatively weaker between different layers, and thermal decomposition occurred easily between the layers. Simultaneously, the intermediate products, such as Fe x S y , were formed. Evidence of Fe pyrolysis into Fe metal was not found, and the intermediate products decomposed further. The contributions of the p and d orbitals of Fe increased, whereas that of the s orbital decreased. The contributions of the s and p orbitals of S decreased. The results obtained from FeS2 thermal decomposition experiments under vacuum and differential thermal analysis—thermogravimetry are consistent with the results of calculation and simulation.

Deng, Jiushuai; Wen, Shuming; Chen, Xiumin; Xian, Yongjun; Wu, Dandn

2014-05-01

316

A composite vacuum barrier for the LHC short straight section  

SciTech Connect

The lattice of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will contain 384 Short Straight Section (SSS) units, one in every 53 m half-cell. The SSS is composed of a twin aperture high-field superconducting quadrupole and of two combined-function corrector magnets operating in pressurized helium at 1.9 K. The SSS cryostat contains also a barrier for sectorisation of the insulation vacuum. The vacuum barrier is mounted between the helium vessel and the vacuum enclosure. Its functions are to limit the extent of eventual helium leaks and to facilitate the leak detection and the pumping-down from atmospheric pressure. During installation of the LHC, the vacuum barrier permits independent testing of the half-cells, thus enabling higher installation rates. In parallel to a conventional barrier made out of austenitic stainless steel, a barrier of composite material was developed, taking advantage of the lower thermal conductivity of glass fibre reinforced epoxy resin, and with the aim of reducing costs for LHC. The thermo-mechanical design together with the conception and the moulding techniques used for the manufacture of the prototype are described. Bonding techniques for the leak tight stainless steel composite interfaces are presented and test results shown. Results on the mechanical performance and on the helium tests carried out on the prototype are given.

Jenny, B.; Rohmig, P. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Uriarte, J.M. [FIBERTECNIC, Vitoria-Gasteiz (Spain)

1996-12-31

317

Preparative compound class separation of heavy oil vacuum residua by high performance liquid chromatography  

SciTech Connect

The authors describe an HPLC system used to separate deasphalted vacuum resids of heavy oils, into saturates, aromatics and two types of resins, at preparative scale. The separation is achieved using two silica and one cyano bonded silica columns, and cyclopentane, a mixture of chloroform-methanol and dichloromethane as solvents. Automated repetitive injection is required. Recoveries of the sample are around 100%.

Carbognani, L.; Izquierdo, A. (Dept. of Analysis and Evaluation, Intevep, S.A., Caracas, Venezuela (US))

1990-01-01

318

Chemical Bonding, again ionic bonding (in salts): transfer of e-  

E-print Network

Chemical Bonding, again · ionic bonding (in salts): transfer of e- · covalent bonding (organicJ/mol Li+ (g) + F¯ (g) #12;The Covalent Bond H H HH+ HHH · + · H ! H : H Lewis electron-dot structures single bond, a shared pair of electrons The Covalent Bond H H HH+ HH #12;E N E R G Y kJ/mol distance 74

Zakarian, Armen

319

Studies of Lubricating Materials in Vacuum  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Lubricating materials for use in a vacuum environment have been the subject of a series of experimental investigations. Evaporation properties were evaluated for solid polymeric compositions. Friction and wear studies explored the behavior during sliding contact for series of polymeric compositions, binary alloys containing soft film-forming phases, complex alloys with film-forming materials, and a burnished MoS2 film. Friction and wear experiments were conducted at 10(exp-9)mm Hg with a 3/16-inch-radius-hemisphere rider specimen sliding on the flat surface of a rotating 2-1/2-inch-diameter disk specimen with materials that had low rates of evaporation. The influence of fillers in polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) on decomposition during vacuum friction studies was determined with a mass spectrometer. A real advantage in reducing decomposition and improving friction wear properties is gained by adding fillers (e.g., copper) that improve thermal conductivity through the composite materials. A polyimide and an epoxy-MoS2 composition material were found to have better friction and wear properties than PTFE compositions. A series of alloys (cast binary as well as more complex alloys) that contained microinclusions of potential film-forming material was studied. These materials replaced the normal surface oxides as they were worn away on sliding contact. Iron sulfide, nickel oxide, and tin are typical film-forming materials employed and were demonstrated to be effective in inhibiting surface welding and reducing friction. A burnished MoS2 film applied to type 440-C stainless steel in argon with a rotating soft wire brush had good endurance properties but somewhat higher friction than commercially available bonded films. An oil film applied to the burnished MoS2 markedly reduced its endurance life.

Buckley, D. H.; Johnson, R. L.; Swikert, M. A.

1964-01-01

320

Probability distribution of the vacuum energy density  

SciTech Connect

As the vacuum state of a quantum field is not an eigenstate of the Hamiltonian density, the vacuum energy density can be represented as a random variable. We present an analytical calculation of the probability distribution of the vacuum energy density for real and complex massless scalar fields in Minkowski space. The obtained probability distributions are broad and the vacuum expectation value of the Hamiltonian density is not fully representative of the vacuum energy density.

Duplancic, Goran; Stefancic, Hrvoje [Theoretical Physics Division, Rudjer Boskovic Institute, P.O. Box 180, HR-10002 Zagreb (Croatia); Glavan, Drazen [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, P.O. Box 331, HR-10002 Zagreb (Croatia)

2010-12-15

321

Diffuser Test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Tests begun at Stennis Space Center's E Complex Sept. 13 evaluated a liquid oxygen lead for engine start performance, part of the A-3 Test Facility Subscale Diffuser Risk Mitigation Project at SSC's E-3 Test Facility. Phase 1 of the subscale diffuser project, completed Sept. 24, was a series of 18 hot-fire tests using a 1,000-pound liquid oxygen and gaseous hydrogen thruster to verify maximum duration and repeatability for steam generation supporting the A-3 Test Stand project. The thruster is a stand-in for NASA's developing J-2X engine, to validate a 6 percent scale version of A-3's exhaust diffuser. Testing the J-2X at altitude conditions requires an enormous diffuser. Engineers will generate nearly 4,600 pounds per second of steam to reduce pressure inside A-3's test cell to simulate altitude conditions. A-3's exhaust diffuser has to be able to withstand regulated pressure, temperatures and the safe discharge of the steam produced during those tests. Before the real thing is built, engineers hope to work out any issues on the miniature version. Phase 2 testing is scheduled to begin this month.

2007-01-01

322

Kissing bonds A kissing bond is adhesively bonded but holds little of the strength usually  

E-print Network

Kissing bonds · A kissing bond is adhesively bonded but holds little of the strength usually weight saving and excellent stress transfer. · The ability to reliably assess defects in adhesive bonds · To develop a non destructive method to assess the integrity of adhesive bonds using pulsed phase thermography

Sóbester, András

323

Finite Time Vacuum Survival Amplitude and Vacuum Energy Decay  

E-print Network

The problem of the vacuum energy decay is studied for both signs of the cosmological constant, through the analysis of the vacuum survival amplitude, defined in terms of the {\\em conformal time}, $z$, by ${\\mathcal A}(z,z^\\prime)\\equiv $. Transition amplitudes are computed for finite time-span, $Z\\equiv z^\\prime-z$, and their {\\em late time} behavior (directly related to the putative decay width of the state) as well as the transients are discussed up to first order in the coupling constant, $\\lambda$.

Enrique Álvarez; Roberto Vidal

2011-07-15

324

Vacuum as a hyperbolic metamaterial  

E-print Network

As demonstrated by Chernodub, vacuum in a strong magnetic field behaves as a periodic Abrikosov vortex lattice in a type-II superconductor. We investigate electromagnetic behavior of vacuum in this state. Since superconductivity is realized along the axis of magnetic field only, strong anisotropy of the vacuum dielectric tensor is observed. The diagonal components of the tensor are positive in the x and y directions perpendicular to the magnetic field, and negative in the z direction along the field. As a result, vacuum behaves as a hyperbolic metamaterial medium. If the magnetic field is constant, low frequency extraordinary photons experience this medium as a (3+1) Minkowski spacetime in which the role of time is played by the spatial z coordinate. Spatial variations of the magnetic field curve this effective spacetime, and may lead to formation of "event horizons", which are analogous to electromagnetic black holes in hyperbolic metamaterials. We also note that hyperbolic metamaterials behave as diffractionless "perfect lenses". Since large enough magnetic fields probably had arisen in the course of evolution of early Universe, the demonstrated hyperbolic behavior of early vacuum may have imprints in the large scale structure of the present-day Universe.

Igor I. Smolyaninov

2011-08-10

325

Kinetics of scrap tyre pyrolysis under vacuum conditions  

SciTech Connect

Scrap tyre pyrolysis under vacuum is attractive because it allows easier product condensation and control of composition (gas, liquid and solid). With the aim of determining the effect of vacuum on the pyrolysis kinetics, a study has been carried out in thermobalance. Two data analysis methods have been used in the kinetic study: (i) the treatment of experimental data of weight loss and (ii) the deconvolution of DTG (differential thermogravimetry) curve. The former allows for distinguishing the pyrolysis of the three main components (volatile components, natural rubber and styrene-butadiene rubber) according to three successive steps. The latter method identifies the kinetics for the pyrolysis of individual components by means of DTG curve deconvolution. The effect of vacuum in the process is significant. The values of activation energy for the pyrolysis of individual components of easier devolatilization (volatiles and NR) are lower for pyrolysis under vacuum with a reduction of 12 K in the reaction starting temperature. The kinetic constant at 503 K for devolatilization of volatile additives at 0.25 atm is 1.7 times higher than that at 1 atm, and that corresponding to styrene-butadiene rubber at 723 K is 2.8 times higher. Vacuum enhances the volatilization and internal diffusion of products in the pyrolysis process, which contributes to attenuating the secondary reactions of the repolymerization and carbonization of these products on the surface of the char (carbon black). The higher quality of carbon black is interesting for process viability. The large-scale implementation of this process in continuous mode requires a comparison to be made between the economic advantages of using a vacuum and the energy costs, which will be lower when the technologies used for pyrolysis require a lower ratio between reactor volume and scrap tyre flow rate.

Lopez, Gartzen; Aguado, Roberto [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apartado 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); Olazar, Martin [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apartado 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain)], E-mail: martin.olazar@ehu.es; Arabiourrutia, Miriam; Bilbao, Javier [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apartado 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain)

2009-10-15

326

Evaporation in equilibrium, in vacuum, and in hydrogen gas  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Evaporation experiments were conducted for SiO2 in three different conditions: in equilibrium, in vacuum, and in hydrogen gas. Evaporation rate in vacuum is about two orders of magnitude smaller than that in equilibrium, which is consistent with previous works. The rate in hydrogen gas changes depending on hydrogen pressure. The rate at 10 exp -7 bar of hydrogen pressure is as small as that of free evaporation, but at 10 exp -5 bar of hydrogen pressure it is larger than that in equilibrium. In equilibrium and in vacuum, the evaporation rate is limited by decomposition of SiO2 on the crystal surface, but it is limited by a diffusion process for evaporation in hydrogen gas. Therefore, evaporation rate of minerals in the solar nebula can be shown neither by that in equilibrium nor by that in vacuum. The maximum temperature of the solar nebula at the midplane at 2-3 AU where chondrites are believed to have originated is calculated to be as low as 150 K, 1500 K, or in between them. The temperature is, in any case, not high enough for total evaporation of the interstellar materials. Therefore, evaporation of interstellar materials is one of the most important processes for the origin and fractionation of solid materials. The fundamental process of evaporation of minerals has been intensively studied for these several years. Those experiments were carried out either in equilibrium or in vacuum; however, evaporation in the solar nebula is in hydrogen (and much smaller amount of helium) gas. In order to investigate evaporation rate and compositional (including isotopic) fractionation during evaporation, vaporization experiments for various minerals in various conditions are conducted. At first, SiO2 was adopted for a starting material, because thermochemical data and its nature of congruent vaporization are well known. Experiments were carried out in a vacuum furnace system.

Nagahara, Hiroko

1993-01-01

327

Gold Thermocompression Wafer Bonding  

E-print Network

Thermocompression bonding of gold is a promising technique for the fabrication and packaging microelectronic and MEMS devices. The use of a gold interlayer and moderate temperatures and pressures results in a hermetic, ...

Spearing, S. Mark

328

Characterization of anodic bonding  

E-print Network

Anodic bonding is a common process used in MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) device fabrication and packaging. Polycrystalline chemical vapor deposited (CVD) silicon carbide (SiC) is emerging as a new MEMS device and ...

Tudryn, Carissa Debra, 1978-

2004-01-01

329

Space simulation ultimate pressure lowered two decades by removal of diffusion pump oil contaminants during operation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The complex problem why large space simulation chambers do not realize the true ultimate vacuum was investigated. Some contaminating factors affecting diffusion pump performance have been identified and some advances in vacuum/distillation/fractionation technology have been achieved which resulted in a two decade or more lower ultimate pressure. Data are presented to show the overall or individual contaminating effect of commonly used phthalate ester plasticizers of 390 to 530 molecular weight on diffusion pump performance. Methods for removing contaminants from diffusion pump silicone oil during operation and reclaiming contaminated oil by high vacuum molecular distillation are described.

Buggele, A. E.

1973-01-01

330

All about Chemical Bonding  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Stephen Lower, a retired professor at Simon Fraser University, created this expansive and instructive website as a supplement to formal chemistry education for undergraduate students. Visitors will find in-depth descriptions along with several diagrams dealing with chemical bonding issues including their properties, shared-electron covalent bonds, hybrid orbitals, coordination complexes, and metals and semiconductors. General chemistry students looking for assistance should visit this well-developed educational site.

Lower, Stephen

331

Coupled quintessence and vacuum decay  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We discuss observational consequences of a class of cosmological models characterized by the dilution of pressureless matter attenuated with respect to the usual a-3 scaling due to the decay of vacuum energy. We carry out a joint statistical analysis of observational data from the new gold sample of 182 SNe Ia, recent estimates of the cosmic microwave background shift parameter, and baryon acoustic oscillations measurements from the SDSS to show that such models favor the decay of vacuum only into the dark matter sector, and that the separately conserved baryons cannot be neglected. In order to explore ways to more fundamentally motivate these models, we also derive a coupled scalar field version for this general class of vacuum decay scenarios.

Costa, F. E. M.; Alcaniz, J. S.; Maia, J. M. F.

2008-04-01

332

Neutron radiation hardness of vacuum compatible two-component adhesives  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper reports the investigation of the irradiation dependent bonding strength of two-component glues which have low outgassing compatible with vacuum applications. The strength of the glue joints is compared before and after exposure to a thermal neutron fluence of 2.35×10 neutrons per cm. The goal of this work is to establish a glue which is applicable to join glass and metal parts of the ultra-cold neutron (UCN) guide system at the Paul Scherrer Institute's UCN source.

Bertsch, J.; Goeltl, L.; Kirch, K.; Lauss, B.; Zubler, R.

2009-04-01

333

Water's Hydrogen Bond Strength  

E-print Network

Water is necessary both for the evolution of life and its continuance. It possesses particular properties that cannot be found in other materials and that are required for life-giving processes. These properties are brought about by the hydrogen bonded environment particularly evident in liquid water. Each liquid water molecule is involved in about four hydrogen bonds with strengths considerably less than covalent bonds but considerably greater than the natural thermal energy. These hydrogen bonds are roughly tetrahedrally arranged such that when strongly formed the local clustering expands, decreasing the density. Such low density structuring naturally occurs at low and supercooled temperatures and gives rise to many physical and chemical properties that evidence the particular uniqueness of liquid water. If aqueous hydrogen bonds were actually somewhat stronger then water would behave similar to a glass, whereas if they were weaker then water would be a gas and only exist as a liquid at sub-zero temperatures. The overall conclusion of this investigation is that water's hydrogen bond strength is poised centrally within a narrow window of its suitability for life.

Martin Chaplin

2007-06-10

334

Orthodontic bonded retainers.  

PubMed

Retention is usually necessary following orthodontic treatment to overcome the elastic recoil of the periodontal supporting fibres and to allow remodelling of the alveolar bone. The degree of change is variable and largely unpredictable. Bonded lingual retainers have been shown to be an effective means of retaining aligned anterior teeth in the post-treatment position in the long term. Two basic designs of lingual bonded retainers are currently in use. Rigid mandibular canine-to-canine retainers are attached to the canines only. They are effective in maintaining intercanine width but less so in preventing individual tooth rotations. Flexible spiral wire retainers are bonded to each tooth in the segment, their flexibility allowing for physiological movement of the teeth. This design is more effective at preventing rotation of the bonded teeth. Failure of bonded retainers may occur at the wire-composite interface, at the adhesive-enamel interface or as a stress fracture of the wire. Failure of a retainer may lead to unwanted tooth movement. In many cases it will be possible to repair the appliance in the mouth. However, in some instances it will be necessary to replace the retainer. A disadvantage of fixed retainers is that they complicate oral hygiene procedures, and favour the accumulation of plaque and calculus. Despite this, the presence of a bonded retainer appears to cause no increase in incidence of caries or periodontal disease. Use of interdental cleaning aids is required to ensure adequate oral hygiene. PMID:15789987

Butler, Jonathan; Dowling, Paul

2005-01-01

335

Diffusion in associated and non-associated homologous series  

E-print Network

using the rough hard sphere model. A parameter was introduced to account for the effects of hydrogen bonding. 19 Sanchez and Clifton (1978) measured the mutual diffusion coefficients for the binary mixtures methanol-carbon tetrachloride, propanol-carbon... using the rough hard sphere model. A parameter was introduced to account for the effects of hydrogen bonding. 19 Sanchez and Clifton (1978) measured the mutual diffusion coefficients for the binary mixtures methanol-carbon tetrachloride, propanol-carbon...

Alhamid, Khalid A.

2012-06-07

336

Mass Dependence of Vacuum Energy  

E-print Network

The regularized vacuum energy (or energy density) of a quantum field subjected to static external conditions is shown to satisfy a certain partial differential equation with respect to two variables, the mass and the "time" (ultraviolet cutoff parameter). The equation is solved to provide integral expressions for the regularized energy (more precisely, the cylinder kernel) at positive mass in terms of that for zero mass. Alternatively, for fixed positive mass all coefficients in the short-time asymptotics of the regularized energy can be obtained recursively from the first nontrivial coefficient, which is the renormalized vacuum energy.

S. A. Fulling

2005-07-05

337

Particle description of zero energy vacuum. II. Basic vacuum systems  

E-print Network

We describe vacuum as a system of virtual particles, some of which have negative energies. Any system of vacuum particles is a part of a keneme, i.e. of a system of n particles which can, without violating the conservation laws, annihilate in the strict sense of the word (transform into nothing). A keneme is a homogeneous system, i.e. its state is invariant by all transformations of the invariance group. But a homogeneous system is not necessarily a keneme. In the simple case of a spin system, where the invariance group is SU(2), a homogeneous system is a system whose total spin is unpolarized; a keneme is a system whose total spin is zero. The state of a homogeneous system is described by a statistical operator with infinite trace (von Neumann), to which corresponds a characteristic distribution. The characteristic distributions of the homogeneous systems of vacuum are defined and studied. Finally it is shown how this description of vacuum can be used to solve the frame problem posed in (I).

J. Y. Grandpeix; F. Lurcat

2001-06-25

338

Solid state bonding of beryllium-copper for an ITER first wall application  

SciTech Connect

Several different joint assemblies were evaluated in support of a manufacturing technology for diffusion bonding a beryllium armor tile to a copper alloy heat sink for fusion reactor applications. Because beryllium reacts with all but a few elements to form intermetallic compounds, this study considered several different surface treatments as a means of both inhibiting these reactions and promoting a good diffusion bond between the two substrates. A diffusion bonded assemblies used aluminum or an aluminum-beryllium composite (AlBeMet-150) as the interfacial material in contact with beryllium. In most cases, explosive bonding was utilized as a technique for joining the copper alloy heat sink to an aluminum or AlBeMet-150 substrate, which was subsequently diffusion bonded to an aluminum coated beryllium tile. In this approach, a 250 {micro}m thick titanium foil was used as a diffusion barrier between the copper and aluminum to prevent the formation of Cu-Al intermetallic phases. In all cases, a hot isostatic pressing (HIP) furnace was used in conjunction with canned assemblies in order to minimize oxidation and apply sufficient pressure on the assembly for excellent metal-to-metal contact and subsequent bonding. Several different processing schedules were evaluated during the course of this study; bonded assemblies were produced that failed outside the bond area indicating a 100% joint efficiency.

Odegard, B.C. Jr.; Cadden, C.H.

1998-02-01

339

Demonstrating Diffusion  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two demonstrations are described. Materials and instructions for demonstrating movement of molecules into cytoplasm using agar blocks, phenolphthalein, and sodium hydroxide are given. A simple method for demonstrating that the rate of diffusion of a gas is inversely proportional to its molecular weight is also presented. (AJ)

Foy, Barry G.

1977-01-01

340

Diffusion Models  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Web-based intructional material describing the use of diffusion models in population ecology. This page is part of a set of on-line lectures on Quantitative Population Ecology produced by Alexei Sharov in the Department of Entomology at Virginia Tech.

Sharov, Alexei

341

Joining of alumina by vacuum brazing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The active brazing method for diffusion bonding of ceramics to metals is addressed. This method is very flexible compared to the traditional Mo-manganese coating with subsequent brazing that includes four process steps: in active brazing the process is done in one step. The joint properties are favorable, the residual stress build up is limited if the braze is correctly selected and the thermal cycle is controlled, and the resulting strength and leak tightness are good. In experimental work the joinability of alumina to titanium and Ni superalloys was studied by wetting experiments, nondestructive test and shear strength measurements. The spreading of the braze is affected not only by the surface conditions of mating materials but also by the type of the brazing alloy. The Ag-Cu base alloys give better wetting, strength and leak tightness properties than the Ag base alloys. A shear test method was developed for the mechanical testing of metal-ceramic joints. However, the sample geometry affects the measured values, namely a smaller specimen size provides better results. The correlation between the C-SAM results, which describe the ratio between the true bonded area and unbonded area, and measured shear strength values is presented. The dependence between the measured strength and the area of the joint defects becomes obvious and should be studied in more detail.

Heikinheimo, Liisa; Siren, Mika; Kauppinen, Pentti

1993-08-01

342

Stable, high quantum efficiency silicon photodiodes for vacuum-UV applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Silicon photodiodes have been developed by defect-free phosphorus diffusion having practically no carrier recombination at the SiSiO2 interface or in the front diffused region. The quantum efficiency of these photodiodes was found to be around 120 percent at 100 nm. Unlike the previously tested silicon photodiodes, the developed photodiodes exhibit extremely stable quantum efficiency over extended periods of time. The possibility of using these photodiodes as vacuum ultraviolet detector standards is being currently investigated.

Korde, Raj; Canfield, L. Randall; Wallis, Brad

1988-01-01

343

Anomalous diffusion profiles of Ag in CdTe due to chemical self-diffusion.  

PubMed

Anomalous diffusion profiles of Ag in single crystalline CdTe were observed using the radiotracer 111Ag. The diffusion anneals were performed at 800 K under Cd or Te vapor and in a vacuum for different Ag concentrations. The measured Ag profiles directly reflect the distribution of the self-interstitials and vacancies of the Cd sublattice and are the result of chemical self-diffusion which describes the variation of the deviation from stoichiometry of the binary crystal as a function of depth and time. PMID:15903939

Wolf, H; Wagner, F; Wichert, Th

2005-04-01

344

Hadrons in Vacuum and Matter  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the first part of this thesis, we investigate the correlators and form factors of hadrons in vacuum viewed as a dilute gas of instantons and antiinstantons. Relying heavily on approximate bosonization techniques in four dimensions, we construct an effective action for constituent quarks in interaction with mesons and glueballs. The effective action is then used to study various meson,

Mourad Kacir

1995-01-01

345

Vacuum-jacketed line spacer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Device has three integral, equally spaced leaf springs. Springs separate outer vacuum jacket from fluid carrying line, yet minimize conductive heat leaks and liquid boiloff. One-piece heat spring has sufficient flexibility to accommodate differential thermal expansion of inner and outer line.

Houte, F. A.; Mckee, H. B.; Patten, T. C.

1976-01-01

346

Switching in High Vacuum Enviroment  

Microsoft Academic Search

An analysis is made of the properties and problems of Maximum current interrupting ability and photos of contacts contacts, switching, and holding off high and low voltages, high which are interrupting up to 18,000 a are shown. and low currents ac, dc, and RF in a high vacuum environment with some relation to outer space problems. Characteristics of contacts from

H. Ross

1963-01-01

347

A vacuum ultraviolet spectrophotometric system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The development of a vacuum ultraviolet spectrophotometric system for measuring transmittance and reflectance at variable angles is presented. Using various detectors and sources, the spectrophotometric system has been used for wavelengths from 80 nm to 300 nm with optical components up to 80 mm in diameter. The capability exists to make measurements through the visible range.

Spann, James F.; Keffer, Charles E.; Zukic, Muamer

1993-01-01

348

Chapter 13. The Vacuum System  

E-print Network

The vacuum chamber sectors are a welded fabrication of aluminum alloy 6061 plate. The standard chambers have the quadrupole feedthroughs, and for positioning of the internal support frame. There are 30 fixed NMR probes per primarily to provide rails for the NMR trolley cable car. The support frame is shown in Fig. 13

Brookhaven National Laboratory - Experiment 821

349

Quantum Vacuum Structure and Cosmology  

SciTech Connect

Contemporary physics faces three great riddles that lie at the intersection of quantum theory, particle physics and cosmology. They are: (1) The expansion of the universe is accelerating - an extra factor of two appears in the size; (2) Zero-point fluctuations do not gravitate - a matter of 120 orders of magnitude; and (3) The 'True' quantum vacuum state does not gravitate. The latter two are explicitly problems related to the interpretation and the physical role and relation of the quantum vacuum with and in general relativity. Their resolution may require a major advance in our formulation and understanding of a common unified approach to quantum physics and gravity. To achieve this goal we must develop an experimental basis and much of the discussion we present is devoted to this task. In the following, we examine the observations and the theory contributing to the current framework comprising these riddles. We consider an interpretation of the first riddle within the context of the universe's quantum vacuum state, and propose an experimental concept to probe the vacuum state of the universe.

Rafelski, Johann; Labun, Lance; Hadad, Yaron; /Arizona U. /Munich U.; Chen, Pisin; /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

2011-12-05

350

Vacuum-insulated catalytic converter  

DOEpatents

A catalytic converter has an inner canister that contains catalyst-coated substrates and an outer canister that encloses an annular, variable vacuum insulation chamber surrounding the inner canister. An annular tank containing phase-change material for heat storage and release is positioned in the variable vacuum insulation chamber a distance spaced part from the inner canister. A reversible hydrogen getter in the variable vacuum insulation chamber, preferably on a surface of the heat storage tank, releases hydrogen into the variable vacuum insulation chamber to conduct heat when the phase-change material is hot and absorbs the hydrogen to limit heat transfer to radiation when the phase-change material is cool. A porous zeolite trap in the inner canister absorbs and retains hydrocarbons from the exhaust gases when the catalyst-coated substrates and zeolite trap are cold and releases the hydrocarbons for reaction on the catalyst-coated substrate when the zeolite trap and catalyst-coated substrate get hot.

Benson, David K. (Golden, CO)

2001-01-01

351

Vacuum arc deposited DLC based coatings  

SciTech Connect

The great interest in the use of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films as a coating material is justified by the superior wear resistance and hardness, chemical inertness, and very low friction coefficients of these coatings. Vacuum arc deposition is well suited to prepare superhard films with high sp{sup 3}/sp{sup 2} ratios. However, the high level of internal stresses originating during growth prevents the deposition of thick films, and their hardness makes it difficult for DLC layers to comply with substrate deformations. In order to overcome these limitations, different approaches are possible. Multilayer structures are one means to maintain the surface mechanical properties of the DLC while relieving the internal stresses. Another possibility is to dope the DLC films in order to reduce the internal stress and to stabilize the desirable sp{sup 3} bonds to higher temperatures. At higher doses of dopants, the formation of nanocrystals is possible and the properties of the coatings change drastically. All these approaches were investigated on films prepared by cathodic arc and a synthesis of the results is presented here.

Monteiro, Othon R.; Delplancke-Ogletree, Marie-Paule

2002-05-01

352

HIGH PRODUCTIVITY VACUUM BLASTING SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to improve the productivity and lower the expense of existing vacuum blasting technology. This technology is used to remove radioactive contamination, PCBs, and lead-based paint and provides worker protection by continuously recycling the material and dust for the decontamination tasks. The proposed work would increase the cleaning rate and provide safe and cost-effective decontamination of the DOE sites. This work focuses on redesigning and improving existing vacuum blasting technology including blast head nozzles, ergonomic handling of the blast head by reducing its weight; brush-ring design, vacuum level regulator, efficiency of the dust separator, and operational control sensors. The redesign is expected to enhance the productivity and economy of the vacuum blasting system by at least 50% over current vacuum blasting systems. There are three phases in the project. Phase I consists of developing and testing mathematical models. Phase II consists of pre-prototype design and fabrication and pre-prototype unit testing. Phase III consists of prototype design and field verification testing. In phase I, mathematical models are developed and analyzed for the nozzle, blast head, wind curtain, and dust separator, first as individual devices and then combined as an integrated model. This allows study of respective airflow and design parameters. The Contractor shall, based on the results of the mathematical modeling studies, design experimental models of the components and test these models. In addition, the Contractor shall develop sensors to detect the relationship of the blast head to the blast surfaces and controls to minimize the dependency on an operator's skill and judgment to obtain optimum positioning, as well as real-time characterization sensors to determine as the blast head is moving the depth to which coatings must be removed, thereby improving production and minimizing waste. In phase II, the Contractor shall design and construct a pre-prototype of the nozzle, blast head with wind curtain, sensors, and dust separator and test this system to assess the performance of the new design under controlled conditions at the contractor's facility. In phase III, the Contractor shall design and construct a prototype of the High Productivity Vacuum Blasting System, based on the results of the pre-prototype design and testing performed. This unit will be a full-scale prototype and will be tested at a designated Department of Energy (DOE) facility. Based on the results, the system performance, the productivity, and the economy of the improved vacuum blasting system will be evaluated.

William S. McPhee

1999-05-31

353

Strength of Chemical Bonds  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Students are not generally made aware of the extraordinary magnitude of the strengths of chemical bonds in terms of the forces required to pull them apart. Molecular bonds are usually considered in terms of the energies required to break them, and we are not astonished at the values encountered. For example, the Cl2 bond energy, 57.00 kcal/mole, amounts to only 9.46 x 10(sup -20) cal/molecule, a very small amount of energy, indeed, and impossible to measure directly. However, the forces involved in realizing the energy when breaking the bond operate over a very small distance, only 2.94 A, and, thus, f(sub ave) approx. equals De/(r - r(sub e)) must be very large. The forces involved in dissociating the molecule are discussed in the following. In consideration of average forces, the molecule shall be assumed arbitrarily to be dissociated when the atoms are far enough separated so that the potential, relative to that of the infinitely separated atoms, is reduced by 99.5% from the potential of the molecule at the equilibrium bond length (r(sub e)) for Cl2 of 1.988 A this occurs at 4.928 A.

Christian, Jerry D.

1973-01-01

354

Hydrogen bonding, halogen bonding and lithium bonding: an atoms in molecules and natural bond orbital perspective towards conservation of total bond order, inter- and intra-molecular bonding.  

PubMed

One hundred complexes have been investigated exhibiting D-XA interactions, where X = H, Cl or Li and DX is the 'X bond' donor and A is the acceptor. The optimized structures of all these complexes have been used to propose a generalized 'Legon-Millen rule' for the angular geometry in all these interactions. A detailed Atoms in Molecules (AIM) theoretical analysis confirms an important conclusion, known in the literature: there is a strong correlation between the electron density at the XA bond critical point (BCP) and the interaction energy for all these interactions. In addition, we show that extrapolation of the fitted line leads to the ionic bond for Li-bonding (electrostatic) while for hydrogen and chlorine bonding, it leads to the covalent bond. Further, we observe a strong correlation between the change in electron density at the D-X BCP and that at the XA BCP, suggesting conservation of the bond order. The correlation found between penetration and electron density at BCP can be very useful for crystal structure analysis, which relies on arbitrary van der Waals radii for estimating penetration. Various criteria proposed for shared- and closed-shell interactions based on electron density topology have been tested for H/Cl/Li bonded complexes. Finally, using the natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis it is shown that the D-X bond weakens upon X bond formation, whether it is ionic (DLi) or covalent (DH/DCl) and the respective indices such as ionicity or covalent bond order decrease. Clearly, one can think of conservation of bond order that includes ionic and covalent contributions to both D-X and XA bonds, for not only X = H/Cl/Li investigated here but also any atom involved in intermolecular bonding. PMID:25127185

Shahi, Abhishek; Arunan, Elangannan

2014-10-01

355

Vacuum polarization and Hawking radiation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Quantum gravity is one of the interesting fields in contemporary physics which is still in progress. The purpose of quantum gravity is to present a quantum description for spacetime at 10-33cm or find the 'quanta' of gravitational interaction.. At present, the most viable theory to describe gravitational interaction is general relativity which is a classical theory. Semi-classical quantum gravity or quantum field theory in curved spacetime is an approximation to a full quantum theory of gravity. This approximation considers gravity as a classical field and matter fields are quantized. One interesting phenomena in semi-classical quantum gravity is Hawking radiation. Hawking radiation was derived by Stephen Hawking as a thermal emission of particles from the black hole horizon. In this thesis we obtain the spectrum of Hawking radiation using a new method. Vacuum is defined as the possible lowest energy state which is filled with pairs of virtual particle-antiparticle. Vacuum polarization is a consequence of pair creation in the presence of an external field such as an electromagnetic or gravitational field. Vacuum polarization in the vicinity of a black hole horizon can be interpreted as the cause of the emission from black holes known as Hawking radiation. In this thesis we try to obtain the Hawking spectrum using this approach. We re-examine vacuum polarization of a scalar field in a quasi-local volume that includes the horizon. We study the interaction of a scalar field with the background gravitational field of the black hole in the desired quasi-local region. The quasi-local volume is a hollow cylinder enclosed by two membranes, one inside the horizon and one outside the horizon. The net rate of particle emission can be obtained as the difference of the vacuum polarization from the outer boundary and inner boundary of the cylinder. Thus we found a new method to derive Hawking emission which is unitary and well defined in quantum field theory.

Rahmati, Shohreh

356

Steel bonded dense silicon nitride compositions and method for their fabrication  

DOEpatents

A two-stage bonding technique for bonding high density silicon nitride and other ceramic materials to stainless steel and other hard metals, and multilayered ceramic-metal composites prepared by the technique are disclosed. The technique involves initially slurry coating a surface of the ceramic material at about 1500.degree. C. in a vacuum with a refractory material and the stainless steel is then pressure bonded to the metallic coated surface by brazing it with nickel-copper-silver or nickel-copper-manganese alloys at a temperature in the range of about 850.degree. to 950.degree. C. in a vacuum. The two-stage bonding technique minimizes the temperature-expansion mismatch between the dissimilar materials.

Landingham, Richard L. (Livermore, CA); Shell, Thomas E. (Tracy, CA)

1987-01-01

357

Steel bonded dense silicon nitride compositions and method for their fabrication  

DOEpatents

A two-stage bonding technique for bonding high density silicon nitride and other ceramic materials to stainless steel and other hard metals, and multilayered ceramic-metal composites prepared by the technique are disclosed. The technique involves initially slurry coating a surface of the ceramic material at about 1500/sup 0/C in a vacuum with a refractory material and the stainless steel is then pressure bonded to the metallic coated surface by brazing it with nickel-copper-silver or nickel-copper-manganese alloys at a temperature in the range of about 850/sup 0/ to 950/sup 0/C in a vacuum. The two-stage bonding technique minimizes the temperature-expansion mismatch between the dissimilar materials.

Landingham, R.L.; Shell, T.E.

1985-05-20

358

Insulation bonding test system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A method and a system for testing the bonding of foam insulation attached to metal is described. The system involves the use of an impacter which has a calibrated load cell mounted on a plunger and a hammer head mounted on the end of the plunger. When the impacter strikes the insulation at a point to be tested, the load cell measures the force of the impact and the precise time interval during which the hammer head is in contact with the insulation. This information is transmitted as an electrical signal to a load cell amplifier where the signal is conditioned and then transmitted to a fast Fourier transform (FFT) analyzer. The FFT analyzer produces energy spectral density curves which are displayed on a video screen. The termination frequency of the energy spectral density curve may be compared with a predetermined empirical scale to determine whether a igh quality bond, good bond, or debond is present at the point of impact.

Beggs, J. M.; Johnston, G. D.; Coleman, A. D.; Portwood, J. N.; Saunders, J. M.; Redmon, J. W.; Porter, A. C. (inventors)

1984-01-01

359

Materials for ultra-high vacuum  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses materials for use in ultrahigh vacuum systems of 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} Torr or lower. The author briefly discusses alloys, solders, insulators and joining methods for vacuum systems. (JDL)

Lee, G.

1989-08-15

360

Teachers' Domain: Ionic Bonding  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Flash interactive tutorial explores ionic bondingâa type of chemical bond formed between two ions with opposite charges. Learners investigate how the transfer of electrons between atoms creates ions and how the mutual attraction of these charged particles forms ionic bonds. It also discusses trends in the periodic table to help learners comprehend how the structure of an ionic compound relates to its formula. Teachers' Domain is a growing collection of more than 1,000 free educational resources compiled by researchers and experienced teachers to promote the use of digital resources in the classroom.

2011-08-16

361

Investing in Bonds  

E-print Network

, also known as strips, are fixed-income securi- ties that do not pay any periodic interest, or ?coupon,? like regular bonds. Instead, the bond is sold at a deep discount from its face value and at maturity the bondholder collects all of the compounded... or the par amount, whichever is greater. Like other Treasury securi- ties, they?re safe and are guaran- teed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government. Inflation- Indexed securities are exempt from state and local taxes, although fed- eral income...

Johnson, Jason; Polk, Wade

2002-08-12

362

Cooperativity in beryllium bonds.  

PubMed

A theoretical study of the beryllium bonded clusters of the (iminomethyl)beryllium hydride and (iminomethyl)beryllium fluoride [HC(BeX)=NH, X = H, F] molecules has been carried out at the B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,2p) level of theory. Linear and cyclic clusters have been characterized up to the decamer. The geometric, energetic, electronic and NMR properties of the clusters clearly indicate positive cooperativity. The evolution of the molecular properties, as the size of the cluster increases, is similar to those reported in polymers held together by hydrogen bonds. PMID:24452820

Alkorta, Ibon; Elguero, José; Yáñez, Manuel; Mó, Otilia

2014-03-01

363

Diffusion-bonded CNT carpets for fundamental CDI studies  

E-print Network

Uncertainty about future energy and water supplies suggests a pressing need to develop efficient technologies for water desalination. Capacitive deionization (CDI), a method that captures ions in the electrical double layer ...

Enright, R.

364

Diffusion bonded boron/aluminum spar-shell fan blade  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Design and process development tasks intended to demonstrate composite blade application in large high by-pass ratio turbofan engines are described. Studies on a 3.0 aspect radio space and shell construction fan blade indicate a potential weight savings for a first stage fan rotor of 39% when a hollow titanium spar is employed. An alternate design which featured substantial blade internal volume filled with titanium honeycomb inserts achieved a 14% potential weight savings over the B/M rotor system. This second configuration requires a smaller development effort and entails less risk to translate a design into a successful product. The feasibility of metal joining large subsonic spar and shell fan blades was demonstrated. Initial aluminum alloy screening indicates a distinct preference for AA6061 aluminum alloy for use as a joint material. The simulated airfoil pressings established the necessity of rigid air surfaces when joining materials of different compressive rigidities. The two aluminum alloy matrix choices both were successfully formed into blade shells.

Carlson, C. E. K.; Cutler, J. L.; Fisher, W. J.; Memmott, J. V. W.

1980-01-01

365

Diffusion bonding of investment cast ?-TiAl  

Microsoft Academic Search

Intensive alloy development studies on intermetallic gamma (?) based alloys in recent years has led to the development of several aerospace engine components using advanced ?-TiAl based alloys by ingot and powder metallurgical routes. These materials are of great interest to the aerospace industry owing to their very low density and good high temperature properties. Further application of this material

G. Çam; M. Koçak

1999-01-01

366

Microstructural and mechanical characterization of diffusion bonded hybrid joints  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ti-alloys, particularly TiAl, are becoming attractive for the use in the production of high-temperature components such as\\u000a turbine blades and exhaust valves, owing to their low density. However, these components may not be cost-effectively cast\\u000a totally from TiAl alloys and casting defects may occur in investment casting of these complex parts. Other manufacturing technologies,\\u000a such as machining, cannot be economically

G. Çam; U. Özdemir; V. Ventzke; M. Koçak

2008-01-01

367

Exchange of bonded hydrogen in amorphous silicon by deuterium  

SciTech Connect

We show that bonded hydrogen in a-Si:H is readily exchanged by atomic deuterium when exposed to a deuterium plasma discharge. The effective diffusion coefficient for the D,H exchange 10/sup -14/ cm/sup 2//sec at 160/sup 0/C, is comparable to that of interstitial hydrogen in c-Si.

Abeles, B.; Yang, L.; Leta, D.P.; Majkrzak, C.F.

1986-12-01

368

Theory of self-healing polymer networks with reversible bonding  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The polymer networks formed by reversible bonds, e.g., hydrogen bonds, feature the striking ability to restore their structural integrity after damage. This self-healing effect is sustainable following an appreciable waiting time after the fracture. The ability of these polymers to self-repair is attributed to very slow decay of non-equilibrium concentration of broken bonds during the waiting time followed by an efficient re-formation of bonds across the interface after two fractured surfaces are brought into contact. This process is distinct form self-adhesion which proceeds at equilibrium (very low) density of broken bonds. By means of analytical theories and scaling arguments we study the reaction kinetics of polymer chain systems that can form reversible bonds. The importance of anomalous diffusive motions of ``stickers'' as portions of dangling chains and reaction kinetics of bonding events including renormalization of bond lifetime and sticker partner exchange have been established for the self-healing process. Theoretical modeling that maps the results of MD/MC simulations onto kinetic models are used to capture the self-healing mechanism and its dynamics.

Stukalin, Evgeny; N, Arun Kumar; Leibler, Ludwik; Rubinstein, Michael

2010-03-01

369

Utilize Vacuum Forming to Make Interdisciplinary Connections  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The concept of vacuum forming has been around since the 19th century, despite not being fully utilized in industry until the 1950s. In the past, industrial arts classes have used vacuum-forming projects to concentrate solely on the manufacturing process and the final product. However, vacuum forming is not just an old industrial arts activity; it…

Love, Tyler S.; Valenza, Frank

2011-01-01

370

Ion pump provides increased vacuum pumping speed  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Multiple-cell ion pumps with increased vacuum pumping speed are used for producing ultrahigh vacuums in vacuum tubes and mass spectrometers. The pump has eight cathode-anode magnetron cells arranged in a cylinder which increase the surface area of the cathode.

1965-01-01

371

REVIEW ARTICLE Vacuum Rabi splitting in semiconductors  

E-print Network

of a nanocavity. This review describes the history of realizing vacuum Rabi splitting (VRS) in the single-QD (SQDREVIEW ARTICLE Vacuum Rabi splitting in semiconductors The recent development of techniques. We discuss the recent results on vacuum Rabi splitting with a single quantum dot, emphasizing

Loss, Daniel

372

Vacuum energy of CP(1) solitons  

E-print Network

The vacuum energy of two CP(1) solitons on a torus is computed numerically. A numerical technique for zeta-function regularisation is proposed to remove the divergences of the vacuum energy. After performing the numerical regularisation, we observe the effect of the vacuum energy on the two soliton interactions.

Ian G Moss; Noriko Shiiki; Takashi Torii

2001-03-22

373

19 CFR 113.12 - Bond application.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bond application. 113.12 Section 113.12 Customs...HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CUSTOMS BONDS Bond Application and Approval of Bond § 113.12 Bond...

2010-04-01

374

Photochemical tissue bonding  

DOEpatents

Photochemical tissue bonding methods include the application of a photosensitizer to a tissue and/or tissue graft, followed by irradiation with electromagnetic energy to produce a tissue seal. The methods are useful for tissue adhesion, such as in wound closure, tissue grafting, skin grafting, musculoskeletal tissue repair, ligament or tendon repair and corneal repair.

Redmond, Robert W. (Brookline, MA); Kochevar, Irene E. (Charlestown, MA)

2012-01-10

375

Bonding without Tears.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses merits of using sigma-pi model of ethylene as a teaching aid in introductory organic chemistry. The nonmathematical treatment of sigma-pi bonding is then extended to such phenomena as conjugation, hyperconjugation, Markovnikoff addition, aromaticity, and aromatic substitution. (SK)

Akeroyd, F. Michael

1982-01-01

376

Quantum vacuum and dark matter  

E-print Network

Recently, the gravitational polarization of the quantum vacuum was proposed as alternative to the dark matter paradigm. In the present paper we consider four benchmark measurements: the universality of the central surface density of galaxy dark matter haloes, the cored dark matter haloes in dwarf spheroidal galaxies, the non-existence of dark disks in spiral galaxies and distribution of dark matter after collision of clusters of galaxies (the Bullet cluster is a famous example). Only some of these phenomena (but not all of them) can (in principle) be explained by the dark matter and the theories of modified gravity. However, we argue that the framework of the gravitational polarization of the quantum vacuum allows the understanding of the totality of these phenomena.

Dragan Slavkov Hajdukovic

2011-11-21

377

Radiation Reaction in Quantum Vacuum  

E-print Network

From the development of the electron theory by H. A. Lorentz in 1906, many authors have tried to reformulate this model named "radiation reaction". P. A. M. Dirac derived the relativistic-classical electron model in 1938, which is now called the Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac model. But this model has the big difficulty of the run-away solution. Recently, this equation has become important for ultra-intense laser-electron (plasma) interactions. Therefore, it is desirable to stabilize this model of the radiation reaction for estimations. Via my recent research, I found a stabilized model of radiation reaction in quantum vacuum. This leads us to an updated Fletcher-Millikan's charge to mass ratio including radiation, de/dm, derived as the 4th order tensor measure. In this paper, I will discuss the latest update of the model and the ability of the equation of motion with radiation reaction in quantum vacuum via photon-photon scatterings.

Seto, Keita

2014-01-01

378

Radiation Reaction in Quantum Vacuum  

E-print Network

From the development of the electron theory by H. A. Lorentz in 1906, many authors have tried to reformulate this model named "radiation reaction". P. A. M. Dirac derived the relativistic-classical electron model in 1938, which is now called the Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac model. But this model has the big difficulty of the run-away solution. Recently, this equation has become important for ultra-intense laser-electron (plasma) interactions. Therefore, it is desirable to stabilize this model of the radiation reaction for estimations. Via my recent research, I found a stabilized model of radiation reaction in quantum vacuum. This leads us to an updated Fletcher-Millikan's charge to mass ratio including radiation, de/dm, derived as the 4th order tensor measure. In this paper, I will discuss the latest update of the model and the ability of the equation of motion with radiation reaction in quantum vacuum via photon-photon scatterings.

Keita Seto

2014-05-26

379

Dark Energy From Vacuum Fluctuations  

E-print Network

We describe briefly a novel interpretation of the physical nature of dark energy (DE), based on the vacuum fluctuations model by Gurzadyan & Xue, and describe an internally consistent solution for the behavor of DE as a function of redshift. A key choice is the nature of the upper bound used for the computation of energy density contributions by vacuum modes. We show that use of the comoving horizon radius produces a viable model, whereas use of the proper horizon radius is inconsistent with the observations. After introduction of a single phenomenological parameter, the model is consistent with all of the curently available data, and fits them as well as the standard cosmological constant model, while making testable predictions. While some substantial interpretative uncertainties remain, future developments of this model may lead to significant new insights into the physical nature of DE.

S. G. Djorgovski; V. G. Gurzadyan

2006-10-06

380

Effect of preoxidation on the bond strength of titanium and porcelain.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of preoxidation on porcelain titanium- bond strength and the effect of paste bonder (adhesive) on the titanium porcelain bond strength. 11 specimens of commercially pure titanium (26 x 7 x 3 mm) were prepared by different heat treatments in programmable dental furnace. Identification of the oxides formed on the metal surface was conducted with an X-Ray diffractometer with CuKalpha radiation. Vickers hardness numbers were determine. Additional 50 specimens of commercially pure titanium were used to bond with low fusing porcelain. The bond strength was measured in a universal testing machine. X-ray diffraction analysis of the surface of pure titanium revealed that the relative peak intensity of alpha -Ti decreased and that of TiO2 increased with increasing firing temperature. The Vickers hardness number decreased initially as the temperature increased but it increased remarkably above 900 degrees C & was harder in air than vacuum. The tensile shear bond strength was highest in the green stage i.e. without preoxidation of metal, and decreased above 900 degrees C, and was the lowest in the group without paste bonder application. The difference in bond strengths was statistically highly significant for all groups. Preoxidation under vacuum before porcelain firing can effectively improve bonding. The adhesive provided with the low fusing porcelain helps in the bond between titanium & porcelain. PMID:25134366

Mahale, K M; Nagda, S J

2014-06-01

381

The development of a portable ultrahigh vacuum chamber via silicon block  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper describes a nonmetallic, light weight portable chamber for ultra-high vacuum (UHV) applications. The chamber consists of a processed silicon block anodically bonding five polished Pyrex glass windows and a Pyrex glass adapter, without using any screws, bolts or vacuum adhesives. The design features provide an alternative chamber for UHV applications which require nonmetallic components. We have cyclically baked the chamber up to 180 °C for 160 h and have achieved an ultimate pressure of 1.4 × 10-9 Torr (limited by our pumping station), with no leak detected. Both Pyrex glass windows and Pyrex glass adapter have been used successfully.

Chuang, Ho-Chiao; Huang, Chia-Shiuan

2014-05-01

382

Bubbles created from vacuum fluctuation  

E-print Network

We show that the bubbles $S^2\\times S^2$can be created from vacuum fluctuation in certain De Sitter universe, so the space-time foam-like structure might really be constructed from bubbles of $S^2\\times S^2$ in the very early inflating phase of our universe. But whether such foam-like structure persisted during the later evolution of the universe is a problem unsolved now.

Liao Liu; Feng He

2001-01-05

383

Vacuum Energy as Spectral Geometry  

E-print Network

Quantum vacuum energy (Casimir energy) is reviewed for a mathematical audience as a topic in spectral theory. Then some one-dimensional systems are solved exactly, in terms of closed classical paths and periodic orbits. The relations among local spectral densities, energy densities, global eigenvalue densities, and total energies are demonstrated. This material provides background and motivation for the treatment of higher-dimensional systems (self-adjoint second-order partial differential operators) by semiclassical approximation and other methods.

Stephen A. Fulling

2007-06-19

384

Diffusion modeling of the carburization process  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mathematical models have been developed for simulating the carburization process. One model simulates carburization in low\\u000a alloy steels where temperature, time, surface carbon content, and diffusion coefficient vary during the process. Two step\\u000a and vacuum carburization are among the treatments considered. The other model simulates the ef-fect of major ternary alloying\\u000a additions such as Mn, Cr, Ni and Si during

J. I. Goldstein; A. E. Moren

1978-01-01

385

Solid state bonding of CuCrZr to 316L stainless steel for ITER applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dissimilar metal bonds between CuCrZr and 316L stainless steel were prepared using two different solid state joining techniques. In the first instance, hot isostatic pressing, a high temperature diffusion bonding process was used to join the copper alloy to the stainless steel substrate at temperatures near 1000°C. In the second instance, explosion bonding at ambient temperature was employed. These two

S. H. Goods; J. D. Puskar

2011-01-01

386

Failure Mechanisms Associated with Die-to-Header Bonds of Planar Transistors  

Microsoft Academic Search

An investigation of failure mechanisms associated with die-to-header bonds in planar transistors was centered on five thermally induced physical processes that occur in these bonds. The five processes include solid-state diffusion of intermediate materials into the bonding layer and outgassing of materials on the header, both resulting in void formation; nickel-silicon intermetallic formation leading to cracking; thermal reordering of gold-silicon

J. D. Guttenplan; F. H. Stuckenberg

1965-01-01

387

Holographic description of vacuum bubbles  

E-print Network

We discuss a holographic description of vacuum bubbles, with possible implications for a consistent description of the multiverse. In particular, we elaborate on the recent observation by Maldacena, that the interior of AdS bubbles can be described in terms of CFT degrees of freedom living on the worldsheet of the bubble wall. We consider the scattering of bulk gravitons in the ambient parent vacuum, off the bubble wall. In the dual description, the transmission coefficient is interpreted as the probability that a graviton is absorbed by the worldsheet CFT degrees of freedom. The result is in agreement with intuitive expectations. Conformal invariance is not exact in this setup, and the leading corrections due to the IR and UV cut-offs are displayed. Aside from bulk scattering states, we find that when a bubble nucleates within a parent dS vacuum, there is a zero mode of the graviton which describes lower dimensional gravity with a finite Newton's constant. This massless graviton lives within one Hubble radius away from the bubble wall. Possible implications for a fully holographic description of the inflating multiverse are briefly discussed.

Jaume Garriga

2010-12-29

388

Cosmic vacuum and galaxy formation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is demonstrated that the protogalactic perturbations must enter the nonlinear regime before the red shift z? 1; otherwise they would be destroyed by the antigravity of the vacuum dark energy at the subsequent epoch of the vacuum domination. At the zrrV={M/[(8?/3)?V]}1/3, where M is the mass of a given over-density and ?V is the vacuum density. The criterion provides a new relation between the largest mass condensations and their spatial scales. All the real large-scale systems follow this relation definitely. It is also shown that a simple formula is possible for the key quantity in the theory of galaxy formation, namely the initial amplitude of the perturbation of the gravitational potential in the protogalactic structures. The amplitude is time independent and given in terms of the Friedmann integrals, which are genuine physical characteristics of the cosmic energies. The results suggest that there is a strong correspondence between the global design of the Universe as a whole and the cosmic structures of various masses and spatial scales.

Chernin, A. D.

2006-04-01

389

Holographic description of vacuum bubbles  

E-print Network

We discuss a holographic description of vacuum bubbles, with possible implications for a consistent description of the multiverse. In particular, we elaborate on the recent observation by Maldacena, that the interior of AdS bubbles can be described in terms of CFT degrees of freedom living on the worldsheet of the bubble wall. We consider the scattering of bulk gravitons in the ambient parent vacuum, off the bubble wall. In the dual description, the transmission coefficient is interpreted as the probability that a graviton is absorbed by the worldsheet CFT degrees of freedom. The result is in agreement with intuitive expectations. Conformal invariance is not exact in this setup, and the leading corrections due to the IR and UV cut-offs are displayed. Aside from bulk scattering states, we find that when a bubble nucleates within a parent dS vacuum, there is a zero mode of the graviton which describes lower dimensional gravity with a finite Newton's constant. This massless graviton lives within one Hubble radiu...

Garriga, Jaume

2010-01-01

390

Non-Brownian molecular self-diffusion in bulk water  

E-print Network

The paper presents the velocity autocorrelation spectrum of bulk water measured by a new technique of NMR modulated gradient spin echo method. This technique is unprecedented for the spectrum measurement in the frequency interval between a few Hz to about 100 kHz with respect to directness and clarity of results and shows that a simple model of Brownian self-diffusion is not applicable to describe the diffusion dynamics of water molecules. The observed temperature dependant spectra of water show the existence of a slow chain-like dynamics in water, which we explain by coupling of diffusing molecule to broken bonds in the hydrogen bond network.

Janez Stepišnik; Aleš Mohori?; Igor Serša

2010-10-06

391

Advanced Bonding\\/Joining Techniques  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a In this chapter, three advanced bonding\\/joining techniques, adhesive bonding, direct bonding, and lead-free soldering, are\\u000a presented. For each technique, we first review the bonding principles and applications in electronic industries, followed\\u000a by novel bonding materials and processes.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a For adhesive bonding, four popular adhesives, epoxy resins, silicon resins, polymides, and acrylics, are reviewed. Two new\\u000a adhesives, liquid crystal polymer (LCP) and

Chin C. Lee; Pin J. Wang; Jong S. Kim

392

Purfication kinetics of beryllium during vacuum induction melting  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The kinetics of evaporation in binary alloys were quantitatively treated. The formalism so developed works well for several systems studied. The kinetics of purification of beryllium was studied through evaporation data actually acquired during vacuum induction melting. Normal evaporation equations are shown to be generally valid and useful for understanding the kinetics of beryllium purification. The normal evaporation analysis has been extended to cover cases of limited liquid diffusion. It was shown that under steady-state evaporation, the solute concentration near the surface may be up to six orders of magnitude different from the bulk concentration. Corrections for limited liquid diffusion are definitely needed for the highly evaporative solute elements, such as Zn, Mg, and Na, for which the computed evaporation times are improved by five orders of magnitude. The commonly observed logarithmic relation between evaporation time and final concentration further supports the validity of the normal evaporation equations.

Mukherjee, J. L.; Gupta, K. P.; Li, C. H.

1972-01-01

393

Introduction Diffusion Tensor Imaging  

E-print Network

Introduction Diffusion Tensor Imaging Diffusion Kurtosis Imaging D-Eigenvalues and . . . Further ·Full Screen ·Close ·Quit Diffusion Tensor and Diffusion Kurtosis Tensor in Biomedical Engineering Diffusion Tensor Imaging Diffusion Kurtosis Imaging D-Eigenvalues and . . . Further Discussion Home Page

Zhang, Shuzhong

394

Amalgam shear bond strength to dentin using different bonding agents.  

PubMed

This study evaluated the shear bond strength of amalgam to dentin using five different bonding agents: Amalgambond Plus, Optibond, Imperva Dual, All-Bond 2, and Clearfil Liner Bond. Flat dentin surfaces obtained by grinding the occlusal portion of 50 human third molars were used for this study. To contain the amalgam on the tooth surface, cylindrical plastic molds were placed on the dentin and secured with sticky wax. The bonding agents were then applied according to the manufacturers' instructions or light activated and Tytin amalgam was condensed into the plastic molds. The samples were thermocycled and shear bond strengths were determined using an Instron Universal Testing Machine. Analysis by one-way ANOVA indicated significant difference between the five groups (P < 0.05). The bond strength of amalgam to dentin was significantly higher with Amalgambond Plus using the High-Performance Additive than with the other four bonding agents. PMID:9028242

Vargas, M A; Denehy, G E; Ratananakin, T

1994-01-01

395

Compactified Vacuum in Ten Dimensions.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Since the 1920's, theories which unify gravity with the other fundamental forces have called for more than the four observed dimensions of space-time. According to such a theory, the vacuum consists of flat four-dimensional space-time described by the Minkowski metric M ^4 and a "compactified" space B. The dimensions of B are small, and the space can only be observed at distance scales smaller than the present experimental limit. These theories have had serious difficulties. The equations of gravity severely restrict the possible choices for the space B. The allowed spaces are complicated and difficult to study. The vacuum is furthermore unstable in the sense that a small perturbation causes the compactified dimensions to expand indefinitely. There is an addition a semi-classical argument which implies that the compactified vacuum be annihilated by virtual black holes. It follows that a universe with compactified extra dimensions could not have survived to the present. These results were derived by applying the equations of general relativity to spaces of more than four dimensions. The form of these equations was assumed to be unchanged by an increase in the number of dimensions. Recently, it has been proposed that gravity in more than four dimensions may involve terms of higher order in the curvature as well as the linear terms present in ordinary general relativity. I illustrate the effect of such terms by considering the example B = S^6 where S ^6 is the six-dimensional sphere. Only when the extra terms are included is this choice of the compactified space allowed. I explore the effect of a small perturbation on such a vacuum. The ten-dimensional spherically symmetric potential is examined, and I determine conditions under which the formation of virtual black holes is forbidden. The example M^4 times S^6 is still plagued by the semi -classical instability, but this result does not hold in general. The requirement that virtual black holes be forbidden provides a test for any theory which predicts a compactified vacuum.

Wurmser, Daniel

1987-09-01

396

Vacuum Energy and Inflation: 2. A Vacuum Energy Universe  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In most of our undergraduate physics courses, we study what can happen in space, but space itself plays a passive role. In basic cosmology, the opposite is true. It is the behavior of space that plays the major role. In this, paper #2, we first discuss the nature of a simple expanding space, and then look at the consequence of applying Newton's law of gravity in this space. The calculations are particularly simple if most of the energy behaves like the vacuum energy discussed earlier in paper #1. The calculation is easy but the results are spectacular.

Huggins, Elisha

2013-10-01

397

The Illiquidity of Corporate Bonds  

E-print Network

This paper examines the illiquidity of corporate bonds and its asset-pricing implications. Using transactions data from 2003 to 2009, we show that the illiquidity in corporate bonds is substantial, significantly greater ...

Bao, Jack

398

Effects of surface treatment on the bonding quality of wafer-level Cu-to-Cu thermo-compression bonding for 3D integration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Various surface treatments are applied for surface oxide removal prior to wafer-level Cu-to-Cu thermo-compression bonding and the bonding quality is systematically analyzed in this work. Three methods are investigated: self-assembled monolayer (SAM) passivation, forming gas annealing and acetic acid wet cleaning. The surface conditions are carefully examined including roughness, contact angle and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) scan. The wafer pairs are bonded at 250 °C under a bonding force of 5500 N for a duration of 1 h in a vacuum environment. The bonding medium consists of a Cu (300 nm) bonding layer and a Ti (50 nm) barrier layer. The bonding quality investigation consists of two parts: hermeticity based on helium leak test and mechanical strength using four-point bending method. Although all samples under test with different surface treatment methods present an excellent hermetic seal and a robust mechanical support, the measurement results show that samples bonded after SAM passivation exhibit the best hermeticity and bonding strength for 3D integration application.

Fan, J.; Lim, D. F.; Tan, C. S.

2013-04-01

399

Low temperature reactive bonding  

DOEpatents

The joining technique requires no external heat source and generates very little heat during joining. It involves the reaction of thin multilayered films deposited on faying surfaces to create a stable compound that functions as an intermediate or braze material in order to create a high strength bond. While high temperatures are reached in the reaction of the multilayer film, very little heat is generated because the films are very thin. It is essentially a room temperature joining process.

Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); Bionta, Richard M. (Livermore, CA)

1995-01-01

400

Direct bonding of metals to ceramics: Interface investigations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There is a growing interest in metal/ceramic bonding for a wide range of applications from electronic packaging to biomedical implants. In this research work, results are reported for direct bonding of copper to ceramic (e.g., Al2O3 and ZrO) in a furnace under inert atmosphere (e.g., N2 and Ar2). Other, metals such as Cu, Ni, SS-316 were directly bonded to ceramics (e.g., ?- Al2O3, sapphire) using laser heating (e.g., 247 nm and 10.6 ?m wavelengths) in the presence of N2 atmosphere. Cu flakes have bean bonded to industrial alumina ceramic and sapphire in the presence of methyl, ethyl and isopropyl alcohols using a CO2 laser. All these experiments were performed by heating the metal or metal-organic media member for a sufficient time in order to create a metal-metal oxide eutectic melt at the interface with the ceramic substrate. Thermal wave imaging (TWI) was used to investigate the bonding at the metal/ceramic interface. It was found that the method of direct bonding of metals to ceramics using lasers performed better than the furnace. The properties of the copper bonded layer on alumina ceramic was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Also, the elemental distribution at the metal/ceramic interface was analyzed, using energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS). With the help of x-ray diffraction (XRD), the phase present at the copper/industrial alumina ceramic interface was determined to be CuAl2O4. This was different from the CuAlO2 phase found at the copper/sapphire interface for the furnace bonding case. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) was also used to investigate the aspects of metal/ceramic interfaces. It was found that the samples processed by furnace heating and by laser beam heating have a diffused transition interface. The electron diffraction patterns revealed the phase present at the interface (Cu/ /alpha- Al2O3) to be a cubic one, with the CuAl2O4 crystallographic structure. The TEM images show that the samples heated using excimer laser have an amorphous top copper layer. The HRTEM images of the samples heated with the excimer laser beam under N2 atmosphere revealed that the inter-atomic spacing at the Cu//alpha/ Al2O3 interface region to be 0.365 nm in average. In order to investigate inter-diffusion between the copper layer and the sapphire and also to measure the percentage of diffused of copper in sapphire, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) was performed. Based on heat transfer theory and on diffusion theory, a model was derived to explain and predict the behavior of furnace and laser beam bonding of metals to ceramics. The predictions of the model were in agreement with the experimental percentage values of diffused copper in sapphire obtained in the RBS investigations. Experimental investigations and the theoretical model concluded that the direct bonding phenomenon is a thermal effect. The direct bonding phenomenon is similar to transient liquid phase bonding (TLP). The major advantage of direct bonding is that no filler element is required between the metallic member and the ceramic substrate. Finally, the method of direct bonding of metals to ceramics using laser beam is capable of directly drawing a metallic pattern on a ceramic substrate.

Curicuta, Victor

401

Development of solid state bonding processes for spallation neutron targets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Solid state bonding techniques are of vital interest to current and future spallation target design efforts for both cladding and wider fabrication requirements. The distinct needs of both water and liquid metal cooled sources were considered in this study. Development of hot isostatic pressing techniques and process controls necessary for successful cladding of tungsten with tantalum as needed for existing water cooled designs constituted the first component of this work. A second independent study performed with an emphasis on high temperature lead bismuth coolants focused on exploration of uniaxial diffusion bonding methods to join tungsten and tantalum to HT9, a ferritic-martensitic stainless steel. A technique for evaluation of the thermal performance of joined interfaces was also developed and employed to study the diffusion bonded systems. Hot isostatic pressing performed at 1500°C for 3 hours and 200 MPa was found to produce an acceptable tantalum-tungsten bond provided extensive tantalum getter foil was used to wrap the target during the process. Excellent interface coherency was observed along with no oxidation or carburization on the tantalum surface. Uniaxial diffusion bonding at a temperature of 1060°C for 3 hours at pressures below 7 MPa resulted in excessive intermetallic formation at the HT9-tungsten and HT9-tantalum interfaces and significant residual interface porosity. Nickel and NiP interlayers were also observed to impart little benefit but did stabilize austenite with the HT9. A transition to lower temperatures and higher pressures improved bond quality. Conditions of 900°C for 3 hours and 70 MPa significantly improved both the HT9-tungsten and HT9-tantalum interfaces compared with the high temperature bond. An exploratory investigation of vanadium interlayers enhanced the result even further under these conditions and warrants further investigation. All interfaces produced in this study possessed a thermal resistance well below that needed to affect the target centerline temperatures. The presence of cracking within the tungsten of bonded samples was observed to severely degrade thermal transport. All diffusion bonded samples contained far superior thermal resistances compared to either unbonded or mechanically constrained structures.

Nelson, Andrew T.

402

Fluid diffusion in porous silica  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fluid motion in porous media has received a great deal of theoretical and experimental attention due to its importance in systems as diverse as ground water aquifers, catalytic processes, and size separation schemes. Often, the motion of interest is the random thermal motion of molecules in a fluid undergoing no net flow. This diffusive motion is particularly important when the size of the pores is nearly the same as the size of the molecules. In this study, fluid diffusion is measured in several varieties of porous silica whose pore structure is determined by the process by which it is made. The samples in this study have porosities (?, the ratio of the pore volume to the total sample volume) that vary from 0.3 to 0.75 and average pore radii that range from approximately 15 to 120 A. Determining the effect of the pore structure on the diffusion of a liquid in a porous material is complicated by the chemical interactions between the diffusing molecules and the pore surface. In this study, ions in a hydrophilic fluid are used to block the adsorption of the diffusing dye molecules to the hydroxyl groups covering the silica surface. This technique is unlike typical surface treatments of silica in that it does not permanently alter the pore geometry. In this work, fluid diffusion is measured with a transient holographic grating technique where interfering laser beams create a periodic refractive index modulation in the fluid. The diffraction of a third laser off this grating is monitored to determine how quickly the grating relaxes, thereby determining the diffusion coefficient of the molecules in the fluid. Varying the grating periodicity controls the length scale of the diffusion measurement from 1.2 to 100 ?m which is much larger than the average pore sizes of the samples. Therefore, over these large scales, we measure 'normal' diffusion, where the mean squared displacement of a diffusing particle varies linearly with time. In one particular type of porous silica, manufactured to create a narrow distribution of pore sizes in each sample, the normalized diffusion coefficient depends upon ? as D/Do~ (/phi - ?c)1.5, as ? approaches a critical porosity ? c. Here, D o and D are the diffusion coefficients of the free fluid and the fluid within the porous sample, respectively. This result is compared with predictions of diffusion on a percolating cluster of identical pores as well as with continuum models based on networks with a distribution of pore sizes. While diffusion in these materials might be expected to behave according to a continuum model of porous networks based on the aggregation of spherical particles (the 'Swiss-cheese' model), the behavior seen agrees with the prediction for networks whose smallest bonds have a non-singular distribution of conductances. This experiment is unique in that the materials chosen appear to produce a system that is close enough to the percolation threshold to allow a measurement of the percolation exponents. The diffusion coefficient in these samples is also shown to depend on the average pore radius as D/Do ~ (Rp - Rc)0.49 a result which, while unpredicted, is shown to be consistent with a previous study of fluid diffusion in silica.

McCann, Lowell I.

403

Disulfide bonds of acetylcholinesterase  

SciTech Connect

The positions of the inter- and intrasubunit disulfide bridges were established for the 11S form of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) isolated from Torpedo californica. A major form of AChE localized within the basal lamina of the synapse is a dimensionally asymmetric molecule which contains either two (13S) or three (17S) sets of catalytic subunits linked to collagenous and non-collagenous structural subunits. Limited proteolysis yields a tetramer of catalytic subunits which sediments at 11S. Each catalytic subunit contains 8 cysteine residues. Initially, these Cys residues were identified following trypsin digestion of the reduced protein alkylated with (/sup 14/C)-iodoacetate. Peptides were resolved by gel filtration followed by reverse phase HPLC. To determine the disulfide bonding profile, native non-reduced 11S AChE was treated with a fluorescent, sulfhydryl-specific reagent, monobromobimane, prior to proteolytic digestion. One fluorescent Cys peptide was identified indicating that a single sulfhydryl residue was present in its reduced form. Three pairs of disulfide bonded peptides were identified, sequenced, and localized in the polypeptide chain. The Cys residue that is located in the C-terminal tryptic peptide was disulfide bonded to an identical peptide and thus forms the intersubunit crosslink. Finally, the cysteine positions have been compared with the sequence of the homologous protein, thyroglobulin. Both likely share a common pattern of folding.

MacPhee-Quigley, K.; Vedvick, T.; Taylor, P.; Taylor, S.

1986-05-01

404

Electronic configuration and bond energy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Conclusions  The original interpretation of the method of molecular orbitals as a theory of valency, in which the single electron possesses\\u000a bonding power was based on the assumption that non-premoted electrons are bonding and premoted ones are anti-bonding or non-bonding.\\u000a This assumption is not the outcome of any requirements of theory but is an empirical postulate, which seeks justification\\u000a in experimental

R. K. Asundi; R. Samuel

1936-01-01

405

Continuing Conversation about Continuing Bonds  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The article is a response to the contributions the special issue of Death Studies on continuing bonds. The contributions indicate that the conversation among scholars has clarified our thinking on how bonds function in individual grief. The author discussed two issues to help keep the conversation moving: (a) the relationship of continuing bonds

Klass, Dennis

2006-01-01

406

Rapid Adhesive Bonding of Composites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Strong bonds created in less time and with less power than use of conventional bonding methods. Rapid adhesive bonding (RAB) technique for composites uses high-frequency induction heating toroids to quickly heat metallic susceptor impregnated with thermoplastic adhesive or sandwiched between thermoset or thermoplastic adhesive cloths or films. Susceptor steel screen or perforated steel foil.

Stein, B. A.; Tyeryar, J. R.; Fox, R. L.; Sterling, S. Elmo, Jr.; Buckley, J. D.; Inge, Spencer V., Jr.; Burcher, L. G.; Wright, Robert E., Jr.

1986-01-01

407

Bond financing in volatile times.  

PubMed

A competitive landscape for providers and changing market conditions require an understanding of key capital sources: tax-exempt bonds remain an attractive capital source. Credit enhancement for bonds is more expensive and more difficult to find than it was in years past. Direct bond purchases by commercial banks mitigate the traditional risks. PMID:24701850

Gould, Kenneth A; Blanda, Christopher M

2014-03-01

408

46 CFR Sec. 10 - Bonds.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 10 Bonds...payment bonds required by Article 14 of the NSA-LUMPSUMREP Contract. The stand- ard...payment bond requirements of Article 14 of the NSA-LUMPSUMREP Contract, the...

2013-10-01

409

Vacuum friction in rotating particles  

E-print Network

We study the frictional torque acting on particles rotating in empty space. At zero temperature, vacuum friction transforms mechanical energy into light emission and produces particle heating. However, particle cooling relative to the environment occurs at finite temperatures and low rotation velocities. Radiation emission is boosted and its spectrum significantly departed from a hot-body emission profile as the velocity increases. Stopping times ranging from hours to billions of years are predicted for materials, particle sizes, and temperatures accessible to experiment. Implications for the behavior of cosmic dust are discussed.

A. Manjavacas; F. J. García de Abajo

2010-09-21

410

Leak Detection in Vacuum Technology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a description for a learning module from Maricopa Advanced Technology Education Center. This PDF describes the module; access may be purchased by visiting the MATEC website. This module explains the importance of determining vacuum system integrity through leak qualification tests. Learners are introduced to a systematic set of methods for determining the existence of a leak, as well as its size, type and location. Emphasis is placed on the use of a helium mass spectrometer leak detector (MSLD). The centerpiece of this module is a computer program that simulates leak detection with an MSLD.

2012-12-26

411

Vacuum energy and relativistic invariance  

E-print Network

It is argued that the zero-point energies of free quantum fields diverge at most quadratically and not quartically, as is generally believed. This is a consequence of the relativistic invariance which requires that the energy density of the vacuum $\\rho$ and its pressure $p$ satisfy $\\rho=-p$. The usually obtained quartic divergence is an artifact of the use of a noninvariant regularization which violates this relation. One consequence of our results is that the zero-point energies of free massless fields vanish. Implications for the cosmological constant problem are briefly discussed.

E. Kh. Akhmedov

2002-04-04

412

Shielding vacuum fluctuations with graphene  

E-print Network

The Casimir-Polder interaction of ground-state and excited atoms with graphene is investigated with the aim to establish whether graphene systems can be used as a shield for vacuum fluctuations of an underlying substrate. We calculate the zero-temperature Casimir-Polder potential from the reflection coefficients of graphene within the framework of the Dirac model. For both doped and undoped graphene we show limits at which graphene could be used effectively as a shield. Additional results are given for AB-stacked bilayer graphene.

Sofia Ribeiro; Stefan Scheel

2013-10-22

413

Laser-triggered vacuum switch  

DOEpatents

A laser-triggered vacuum switch has a material such as a alkali metal halide on the cathode electrode for thermally activated field emission of electrons and ions upon interaction with a laser beam, the material being in contact with the cathode with a surface facing the discharge gap. The material is preferably a mixture of KCl and Ti powders. The laser may either shine directly on the material, preferably through a hole in the anode, or be directed to the material over a fiber optic cable.

Brannon, Paul J. (Albuquerque, NM); Cowgill, Donald F. (Danville, CA)

1990-01-01

414

Vacuum Friction in Rotating Particles  

SciTech Connect

We study the frictional torque acting on particles rotating in empty space. At zero temperature, vacuum friction transforms mechanical energy into light emission and produces particle heating. However, particle cooling relative to the environment occurs at finite temperatures and low rotation velocities. Radiation emission is boosted and its spectrum significantly departed from a hot-body emission profile as the velocity increases. Stopping times ranging from hours to billions of years are predicted for materials, particle sizes, and temperatures accessible to experiment. Implications for the behavior of cosmic dust are discussed.

Manjavacas, A.; Garcia de Abajo, F. J. [Instituto de Optica--CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

2010-09-10

415

Characterization of wafer-level bonded hermetic packages using optical leak detection  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For MEMS devices required to be operated in a hermetic environment, one of the main reliability issues is related to the packaging methods applied. In this paper, an optical method for testing low volume hermetic cavities formed by anodic bonding between glass and SOI (silicon on insulator) wafer is presented. Several different cavity-geometry structures have been designed, fabricated and applied to monitor the hermeticity of wafer level anodic bonding. SOI wafer was used as the cap wafer on which the different-geometry structures were fabricated using standard MEMS technology. The test cavities were bonded using SOI wafers to glass wafers at 400C and 1000mbar pressure inside a vacuum bonding chamber. The bonding voltage varies from 200V to 600V. The bonding strength between glass and SOI wafer was mechanically tested using shear tester. The deformation amplitudes of the cavity cap surface were monitored by using an optical interferometer. The hermeticity of the glass-to-SOI wafer level bonding was characterized through observing the surface deformation in a 6 months period in atmospheric environment. We have observed a relatively stable micro vacuum-cavity.

Duan, Ani; Wang, Kaiying; Aasmundtveit, Knut; Hoivik, Nils

2009-07-01

416

Sentinel-2 diffuser on-ground calibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Sentinel-2 multi-spectral instrument (MSI) will provide Earth imagery in the frame of the Global Monitoring for Environment and Security (GMES) initiative which is a joint undertaking of the European Commission and the Agency. MSI instrument, under Astrium SAS responsibility, is a push-broom spectro imager in 13 spectral channels in VNIR and SWIR. The instrument radiometric calibration is based on in-flight calibration with sunlight through a quasi Lambertian diffuser. The diffuser covers the full pupil and the full field of view of the instrument. The on-ground calibration of the diffuser BRDF is mandatory to fulfil the in-flight performances. The diffuser is a 779 x 278 mm2 rectangular flat area in Zenith-A material. It is mounted on a motorised door in front of the instrument optical system entrance. The diffuser manufacturing and calibration is under the Centre Spatial of Liege (CSL) responsibility. The CSL has designed and built a completely remote controlled BRDF test bench able to handle large diffusers in their mount. As the diffuser is calibrated directly in its mount with respect to a reference cube, the error budget is significantly improved. The BRDF calibration is performed directly in MSI instrument spectral bands by using dedicated band-pass filters (VNIR and SWIR up to 2200 nm). Absolute accuracy is better than 0.5% in VNIR spectral bands and 1% in SWIR spectral bands. Performances were cross checked with other laboratories. The first MSI diffuser for flight model was calibrated mid 2013 on CSL BRDF measurement bench. The calibration of the diffuser consists mainly in thermal vacuum cycles, BRDF uniformity characterisation and BRDF angular characterisation. The total amount of measurement for the first flight model diffuser corresponds to more than 17500 BRDF acquisitions. Performance results are discussed in comparison with requirements.

Mazy, E.; Camus, F.; Chorvalli, V.; Domken, I.; Laborie, A.; Marcotte, S.; Stockman, Y.

2013-10-01

417

Physical Disorder and Optical Properties in the Vacuum Ultraviolet Region of Amorphous SiO2  

Microsoft Academic Search

The optical absorption of point-defect-free SiO2 glass in the vacuum ultraviolet region is primarily controlled by the concentrations of three- and four-membered ring structures composed of heavily strained Si-O-Si bonds. The main channel of color center formation by F2 excimer laser (7.9 eV) irradiation is not Frenkel-defect generation of oxygen via two-photon absorption processes but a pair generation of E'

Hideo Hosono; Yoshiaki Ikuta; Takeru Kinoshita; Kouichi Kajihara; Masahiro Hirano

2001-01-01

418

Sodium Ion Diffusion in Al2O3: A Distinct Perspective Compared with Lithium Ion Diffusion.  

PubMed

Surface coating of active materials has been one of the most effective strategies to mitigate undesirable side reactions and thereby improve the overall battery performance. In this direction, aluminum oxide (Al2O3) is one of the most widely adopted coating materials due to its easy synthesis and low material cost. Nevertheless, the effect of Al2O3 coating on carrier ion diffusion has been investigated mainly for Li ion batteries, and the corresponding understanding for emerging Na ion batteries is currently missing. Using ab initio molecular dynamics calculations, herein, we first find that, unlike lithiation, sodiation of Al2O3 is thermodynamically unfavorable. Nonetheless, there can still exist a threshold in the Na ion content in Al2O3 before further diffusion into the adjacent active material, delivering a new insight that both thermodynamics and kinetics should be taken into account to describe ionic diffusion in any material media. Furthermore, Na ion diffusivity in NaxAl2O3 turns out to be much higher than Li ion diffusivity in LixAl2O3, a result opposite to the conventional stereotype based on the atomic radius consideration. While hopping between the O-rich trapping sites via an Na-O bond breaking/making process is identified as the main Na ion diffusion mechanism, the weaker Na-O bond strength than the Li-O counterpart turns out to be the origin of the superior diffusivity of Na ions. PMID:25286155

Jung, Sung Chul; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Choi, Jang Wook; Han, Young-Kyu

2014-11-12

419

Vacuum Attachment for XRF Scanner  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Vacuum apparatuses have been developed for increasing the range of elements that can be identified by use of x-ray fluorescent (XRF) scanners of the type mentioned in the two immediately preceding articles. As a consequence of the underlying physical principles, in the presence of air, such an XRF scanner is limited to analysis of chlorine and elements of greater atomic number. When the XRF scanner is operated in a vacuum, it extends the range of analysis to lower atomic numbers - even as far as aluminum and sodium. Hence, more elements will be available for use in XRF labeling of objects as discussed in the two preceding articles. The added benefits of the extended capabilities also have other uses for NASA. Detection of elements of low atomic number is of high interest to the aerospace community. High-strength aluminum alloys will be easily analyzed for composition. Silicon, a major contaminant in certain processes, will be detectable before the process is begun, possibly eliminating weld or adhesion problems. Exotic alloys will be evaluated for composition prior to being placed in service where lives depend on them. And in the less glamorous applications, such as bolts and fasteners, substandard products and counterfeit items will be evaluated at the receiving function and never allowed to enter the operation

Schramm, Harry F.; Kaiser, Bruce

2005-01-01

420

Vacuum silicon photomultipliers: Recent developments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

VSiPMT (Vacuum Silicon PhotoMultiplier Tube) is an innovative design for a modern hybrid, high gain, silicon based photodetector based on the combination of a SiPM with a hemispherical vacuum glass PMT standard envelope. In such a device photoelectrons emitted by the photocathode are accelerated and focused by an electric field towards a small focal area covered by the SiPM which therefore acts as an amplifier, thus substituting the classical dynode chain of a PMT. With a view to the realization of a first prototype of VSiPMT our group is carrying out a preliminary work aimed at the study of SiPM performances as an electron detector, including an accurate Geant4-based simulation of the interaction between SiPM and electron beams. In order to perform a full characterization of the SiPM we developed an experimental setup for the extraction and the acceleration of a beam of backward secondary electrons emitted after the bombardment of a carbon foil by a proton beam extracted in a TTT-3 accelerator.

Barbarino, Giancarlo; Barbato, Felicia Carla Tiziana; Campajola, Luigi; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Rosa, Gianfranca; Mollo, Carlos Maximiliano; Vivolo, Daniele

2013-08-01

421

Vacuum systems for the ILC helical undulator  

SciTech Connect

The International Linear Collider (ILC) positron source uses a helical undulator to generate polarized photons of {approx}10 MeV at the first harmonic. Unlike many undulators used in synchrotron radiation sources, the ILC helical undulator vacuum chamber will be bombarded by photons, generated by the undulator, with energies mostly below that of the first harmonic. Achieving the vacuum specification of {approx}100 nTorr in a narrow chamber of 4-6 mm inner diameter, with a long length of 100-200 m, makes the design of the vacuum system challenging. This article describes the vacuum specifications and calculations of the flux and energy of photons irradiating the undulator vacuum chamber and considers possible vacuum system design solutions for two cases: cryogenic and room temperature.

Malyshev, O. B.; Scott, D. J.; Bailey, I. R.; Barber, D. P.; Baynham, E.; Bradshaw, T.; Brummitt, A.; Carr, S.; Clarke, J. A.; Cooke, P.; Dainton, J. B.; Ivanyushenkov, Y.; Malysheva, L. I.; Moortgat-Pick, G. A.; Rochford, J. [ASTeC, STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Cockcroft Institute, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); ASTeC, STFC Daresbury Laboratory Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Cockcroft Institute, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom) and Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Oxford St. Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, University of Liverpool Oxford St. Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Cockcroft Institute, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); DESY-Hamburg, Notkestrasse 85 22607 Hamburg (Germany); STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory Chilton, Didcot Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); ASTeC, STFC Daresbury Laboratory Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Cockcroft Institute, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, University of Liverpool Oxford St. Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Cockcroft Institute, Warrington WA4 4AD [United Kingdom and Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Oxford St., Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton Didcot Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Cockcroft Institute, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, University of Liverpool Oxford St. Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Institute of Particle Physics Phenomenology, University of Durham Durham DH1 3LE, (United Kingdom); CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton Didcot Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

2007-07-15

422

The large-scale structure of vacuum  

E-print Network

The vacuum state in quantum field theory is known to exhibit an important number of fundamental physical features. In this work we explore the possibility that this state could also present a non-trivial space-time structure on large scales. In particular, we will show that by imposing the renormalized vacuum energy-momentum tensor to be conserved and compatible with cosmological observations, the vacuum energy of sufficiently heavy fields behaves at late times as non-relativistic matter rather than as a cosmological constant. In this limit, the vacuum state supports perturbations whose speed of sound is negligible and accordingly allows the growth of structures in the vacuum energy itself. This large-scale structure of vacuum could seed the formation of galaxies and clusters very much in the same way as cold dark matter does.

F. D. Albareti; J. A. R. Cembranos; A. L. Maroto

2014-05-15

423

The large-scale structure of vacuum  

E-print Network

The vacuum state in quantum field theory is known to exhibit an important number of fundamental physical features. In this work we explore the possibility that this state could also present a non-trivial space-time structure on large scales. In particular, we will show that by imposing the renormalized vacuum energy-momentum tensor to be conserved and compatible with cosmological observations, the vacuum energy of sufficiently heavy fields behaves at late times as non-relativistic matter rather than as a cosmological constant. In this limit, the vacuum state supports perturbations whose speed of sound is negligible and accordingly allows the growth of structures in the vacuum energy itself. This large-scale structure of vacuum could seed the formation of galaxies and clusters very much in the same way as cold dark matter does.

Albareti, F D; Maroto, A L

2014-01-01

424

Development of the Vacuum Comparison Standard Device  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The standard device of vacuum comparison is built compared the dynamic method, the static compared method and the static expansion method, this device combined three methods are to meet the wide range of calibrating vacuum gauge. It is used to calibrate 1×105?5×10-4 Pa within the scope of various types of vacuum gauge. The characteristic of this equipment is a simple in structure, easy to operate, high efficiency, practicability of the vacuum standard. Especially suitable for a large number of routine calibrations, the device consists of turbo-molecular pump, calibration container, the standard vacuum gauge and metal expansion valves and other components, and its main technical specifications in line with the International Standards Organization (ISO) and the domestic vacuum standards.

Shufeng, Zhang; Ruihai, Song; Ming, Gao; Huan, Wang; Junwei, Jia; Hulin, Tian

425

Robot design for a vacuum environment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The cleanliness requirements for many processing and manufacturing tasks are becoming ever stricter, resulting in a greater interest in the vacuum environment. Researchers discuss the importance of this special environment, and the development of robots which are physically and functionally suited to vacuum processing tasks. Work is in progress at the Center for robotic Systems in Microelectronics (CRSM) to provide a robot for the manufacture of a revolutionary new gyroscope in high vacuum. The need for vacuum in this and other processes is discussed as well as the requirements for a vacuum-compatible robot. Finally, researchers present details on work done at the CRSM to modify an existing clean-room compatible robot for use at high vacuum.

Belinski, S.; Trento, W.; Imani-Shikhabadi, R.; Hackwood, S.

1987-01-01

426

NONLINEAR DIFFUSION Erkut Erdem  

E-print Network

NONLINEAR DIFFUSION Erkut Erdem Hacettepe University March 9th, 2013 CONTENTS 1 Perona-Malik Type Nonlinear Diffusion 1 2 Total Variation (TV) Regularization 5 3 Edge Enhancing Diffusion 8 References 11 1 PERONA-MALIK TYPE NONLINEAR DIFFUSION The main theory behind nonlinear diffusion models is to use

Erdem, Erkut

427

LINEAR DIFFUSION Erkut Erdem  

E-print Network

LINEAR DIFFUSION Erkut Erdem Hacettepe University February 24th, 2012 CONTENTS 1 Linear Diffusion 1 2 Appendix - The Calculus of Variations 5 References 6 1 LINEAR DIFFUSION The linear diffusion (heat (noisy) input image and u(x, t) be initialized with u(x, 0) = u0(x) = f (x). Then, the linear diffusion

Erdem, Erkut

428

Electromagnetic Fields in the QCD Vacuum  

E-print Network

Quarks play an active role in shaping the QCD vacuum structure. Being dual carriers of both `color' and `electric' charges they also respond to externally applied electromagnetic fields. Thus, in principle, the vacuum of strong interactions influences higher order QED processes such as photon-photon scattering. We survey here the current status of the understanding of the vacuum structure of strong interactions, and take a fresh look at its electromagnetic properties.

Johann Rafelski; H. -Thomas Elze

1998-06-16

429

Advanced Photon Source accelerator ultrahigh vacuum guide  

SciTech Connect

In this document the authors summarize the following: (1) an overview of basic concepts of ultrahigh vacuum needed for the APS project, (2) a description of vacuum design and calculations for major parts of APS, including linac, linac waveguide, low energy undulator test line, positron accumulator ring (PAR), booster synchrotron ring, storage ring, and insertion devices, and (3) cleaning procedures of ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) components presently used at APS.

Liu, C.; Noonan, J.

1994-03-01

430

Improved diffusion welding and roll welding of titanium alloys  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Auto-vacuum cleaning technique was applied to titanium parts prior to welding. This provides oxide-free welding surfaces. Diffusion welding can be accomplished in as little as five minutes of hot pressing. Roll welding can be accomplished with only ten percent deformation.

Holko, K. H.

1973-01-01

431

Qualifying Energy Conservation Bonds  

E-print Network

1Qualified Energy Construction Bonds (QECB’s) CATEE Conference December 18, 2013 ESL-KT-13-12-39 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 • Originally authorized by the Energy Improvement & Extension... are QECB’s ESL-KT-13-12-39 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 • 70% of allocation must be for public use, 30% of allocation MAY be used for a private activity • Representative projects include school...

Briggs, J.

2013-01-01

432

Low temperature reactive bonding  

DOEpatents

The joining technique is disclosed that requires no external heat source and generates very little heat during joining. It involves the reaction of thin multilayered films deposited on faying surfaces to create a stable compound that functions as an intermediate or braze material in order to create a high strength bond. While high temperatures are reached in the reaction of the multilayer film, very little heat is generated because the films are very thin. It is essentially a room temperature joining process. 5 figures.

Makowiecki, D.M.; Bionta, R.M.

1995-01-17

433

Effects of Bonding Wires and Epoxy Molding Compound on Gold and Copper Ball Bonds Intermetallic Growth Kinetics in Electronic Packaging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper discusses the influence of bonding wires and epoxy mold compounds (EMC) on intermetallic compound (IMC) diffusion kinetics and apparent activation energies ( E aa) of CuAl and AuAl IMCs in a fineline ball grid array package. The objective of this study is to study the CuAl and AuAl IMC growth rates with different epoxy mold compounds and to determine the apparent activation energies of different combination of package bills of materials. IMC thickness measurement has been carried out to estimate the coefficient of diffusion ( D o) and E aa various aging conditions of different EMCs and bonding wires. Apparent activation energies ( E aa) of both wire types were investigated after high temperature storage life tests (HTSL) for both molding compounds. Au bonds were identified to have faster IMC formation, compared to slower IMC growth of Cu. The E aa obtained for CuAl IMC diffusion kinetics are 1.08 and 1.04 eV with EMC A and EMC B, respectively. For AuAl IMC diffusion kinetics, the E aa obtained are 1.04 and 0.98 eV, respectively, on EMC A and EMC B. These values are close to previous HTSL studies conducted on Au and Cu ball bonds and are in agreement to the theory of HTSL performance of Au and Cu bonding wires.Overall, EMC B shows slightly lower apparent activation energy ( E aa) valueas in CuAl and AuAl IMCs. This proves that the different types of epoxy mold compounds have some influence on IMC growth rates.

Gan, C. L.; Classe, F. C.; Chan, B. L.; Hashim, U.

2014-04-01

434

Electrical Strength of Multilayer Vacuum Insulators  

SciTech Connect

The electrical strength of vacuum insulators is a key constraint in the design of particle accelerators and pulsed power systems. Vacuum insulating structures assembled from alternating layers of metal and dielectric can result in improved performance compared to conventional insulators, but previous attempts to optimize their design have yielded seemingly inconsistent results. Here, we present two models for the electrical strength of these structures, one assuming failure by vacuum arcing between adjacent metal layers and the other assuming failure by vacuum surface flashover. These models predict scaling laws which are in agreement with the experimental data currently available.

Harris, J R; Kendig, M; Poole, B; Sanders, D M; Caporaso, G J

2008-07-01

435

Cold vacuum drying facility design requirements  

SciTech Connect

This document provides the detailed design requirements for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Cold Vacuum Drying Facility. Process, safety, and quality assurance requirements and interfaces are specified.

IRWIN, J.J.

1999-07-01

436

Attractor Explosions and Catalyzed Vacuum Decay  

E-print Network

We present a mechanism for catalyzed vacuum bubble production obtained by combining moduli stabilization with a generalized attractor phenomenon in which moduli are sourced by compact objects. This leads straightforwardly to a class of examples in which the Hawking decay process for black holes unveils a bubble of a different vacuum from the ambient one, generalizing the new endpoint for Hawking evaporation discovered recently by Horowitz. Catalyzed vacuum bubble production can occur for both charged and uncharged bodies, including Schwarzschild black holes for which massive particles produced in the Hawking process can trigger vacuum decay. We briefly discuss applications of this process to the population and stability of metastable vacua.

Daniel Green; Eva Silverstein; David Starr

2006-05-04

437

Low-Temperature, Strong SiO2-SiO2 Covalent Wafer Bonding for IIIV Compound Semiconductors-to-Silicon Photonic  

E-print Network

Low-Temperature, Strong SiO2-SiO2 Covalent Wafer Bonding for III­V Compound Semiconductors-temperature process for covalent bonding of thermal SiO2 to plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited (PECVD) SiO2 required temperature for strong covalent bond for- mation and greater diffusion efficiency of gas

Bowers, John

438

Bonding of glass nanofluidic chips at room temperature by a one-step surface activation using an O2/CF4 plasma treatment.  

PubMed

A technical bottleneck to the broadening of applications of glass nanofluidic chips is bonding, due to the strict conditions, especially the extremely high temperatures (~1000 °C) and the high vacuum required in the current glass-to-glass fusion bonding method. Herein, we report a strong, nanostructure-friendly, and high pressure-resistant bonding method, performed at room temperature (RT, ~25 °C) for glass nanofluidic chips, using a one-step surface activation process with an O(2)/CF(4) gas mixture plasma treatment. The developed RT bonding method is believed to be able to conquer the technical bottleneck in bonding in nanofluidic fields. PMID:23377319

Xu, Yan; Wang, Chenxi; Li, Lixiao; Matsumoto, Nobuhiro; Jang, Kihoon; Dong, Yiyang; Mawatari, Kazuma; Suga, Tadatomo; Kitamori, Takehiko

2013-03-21

439

27 CFR 17.107 - Strengthening bonds.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-04-01 false Strengthening bonds. 17.107 Section 17.107 Alcohol...USED IN MANUFACTURING NONBEVERAGE PRODUCTS Bonds and Consents of Sureties § 17.107 Strengthening bonds. Whenever the amount of a bond on...

2010-04-01

440

27 CFR 25.96 - Superseding bond.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Bonds and Consents of Surety § 25.96 Superseding bond. When the principal submits a new bond to supersede a bond...

2010-04-01

441

27 CFR 19.241 - Operations bond-distilled spirits plant and adjacent bonded wine cellar.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Operations bond-distilled spirits plant and adjacent bonded wine cellar. 19...TREASURY LIQUORS DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Bonds and Consents of Surety § 19.241 Operations bond—distilled spirits plant and adjacent bonded wine cellar....

2010-04-01

442

77 FR 32128 - Cancellation of Bond Subject to Enhanced Bonding Requirements Upon CBP's Acceptance of Qualified...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Cancellation of Bond Subject to Enhanced Bonding Requirements Upon CBP's Acceptance of...amount was calculated pursuant to enhanced bonding requirements (EBR bond) upon the agency's...INFORMATION: Background I. Enhanced Bonding Requirements In 2004, U.S....

2012-05-31

443

27 CFR 19.162 - Operations bond for distilled spirits plant and adjacent bonded wine cellar.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... Operations bond for distilled spirits plant and adjacent bonded wine cellar. 19...TREASURY ALCOHOL DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Bonds and Consents of Surety Requirements... Operations bond for distilled spirits plant and adjacent bonded wine cellar....

2013-04-01

444

27 CFR 19.162 - Operations bond for distilled spirits plant and adjacent bonded wine cellar.  

... Operations bond for distilled spirits plant and adjacent bonded wine cellar. 19...TREASURY ALCOHOL DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Bonds and Consents of Surety Requirements... Operations bond for distilled spirits plant and adjacent bonded wine cellar....

2014-04-01

445

27 CFR 19.162 - Operations bond for distilled spirits plant and adjacent bonded wine cellar.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... Operations bond for distilled spirits plant and adjacent bonded wine cellar. 19...TREASURY LIQUORS DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Bonds and Consents of Surety Requirements... Operations bond for distilled spirits plant and adjacent bonded wine cellar....

2012-04-01

446

27 CFR 19.162 - Operations bond for distilled spirits plant and adjacent bonded wine cellar.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... Operations bond for distilled spirits plant and adjacent bonded wine cellar. 19...TREASURY LIQUORS DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Bonds and Consents of Surety Requirements... Operations bond for distilled spirits plant and adjacent bonded wine cellar....

2011-04-01

447

Ultrasonic Nondestructive Characterization of Adhesive Bonds  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Adhesives and adhesive joints are widely used in various industrial applications to reduce weight and costs, and to increase reliability. For example, advances in aerospace technology have been made possible, in part, through the use of lightweight materials and weight-saving structural designs. Joints, in particular, have been and continue to be areas in which weight can be trimmed from an airframe through the use of novel attachment techniques. In order to save weight over traditional riveted designs, to avoid the introduction of stress concentrations associated with rivet holes, and to take full advantage of advanced composite materials, engineers and designers have been specifying an ever-increasing number of adhesively bonded joints for use on airframes. Nondestructive characterization for quality control and remaining life prediction has been a key enabling technology for the effective use of adhesive joints. Conventional linear ultrasonic techniques generally can only detect flaws (delamination, cracks, voids, etc) in the joint assembly. However, more important to structural reliability is the bond strength. Although strength, in principle, cannot be measured nondestructively, a slight change in material nonlinearity may indicate the onset of failure. Furthermore, microstructural variations due to aging or under-curing may also cause changes in the third order elastic constants, which are related to the ultrasonic nonlinear parameter of the polymer adhesive. It is therefore reasonable to anticipate a correlation between changes in the ultrasonic nonlinear acoustic parameter and the remaining bond strength. It has been observed that higher harmonics of the fundamental frequency are generated when an ultrasonic wave passes through a nonlinear material. It seems that such nonlinearity can be effectively used to characterize bond strength. Several theories have been developed to model this nonlinear effect. Based on a microscopic description of the nonlinear interface binding force, a quantitative method was presented. Recently, a comparison between the experimental and simulated results based on a similar theoretical model was presented. A through-transmission setup for water immersion mode-converted shear waves was used to analyze the ultrasonic nonlinear parameter of an adhesive bond. In addition, ultrasonic guided waves have been used to analyze adhesive or diffusion bonded joints. In this paper, the ultrasonic nonlinear parameter is used to characterize the curing state of a polymer/aluminum adhesive joint. Ultrasonic through-transmission tests were conducted on samples cured under various conditions. The magnitude of the second order harmonic was measured and the corresponding ultrasonic nonlinear parameter was evaluated. A fairly good correlation between the curing condition and the nonlinear parameter is observed. The results show that the nonlinear parameter might be used as a good indicator of the cure state for adhesive joints.

Qu, Jianmin

1999-01-01

448

Parallel flow diffusion battery  

DOEpatents

A parallel flow diffusion battery for determining the mass distribution of an aerosol has a plurality of diffusion cells mounted in parallel to an aerosol stream, each diffusion cell including a stack of mesh wire screens of different density.

Yeh, Hsu-Chi (Albuquerque, NM); Cheng, Yung-Sung (Albuquerque, NM)

1984-08-07

449

Parallel flow diffusion battery  

DOEpatents

A parallel flow diffusion battery for determining the mass distribution of an aerosol has a plurality of diffusion cells mounted in parallel to an aerosol stream, each diffusion cell including a stack of mesh wire screens of different density.

Yeh, H.C.; Cheng, Y.S.

1984-01-01

450

Erosion behaviour of a Ti3SiC2 cathode under low-current vacuum arc  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this article, the arc erosion behaviour of high-purity Ti3SiC2 in vacuum was investigated by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. From the results obtained, Ti3SiC2 is unstable due to the high energy intensity and high temperature of the vacuum arc. The dissociation of Ti3SiC2 takes place at the sample surface, resulting in the formation of solid TiCx and gaseous Si. TiCx is ejected from cathode to the surface of anode while Si is evaporated to the vacuum chamber. The micro-Raman results reveal that small amounts of carbon appeared as a by-product of the dissociation of Ti3SiC2, indicating that the Ti-C bonding is broken down under the vacuum arc.

Zhang, Peng; Ngai, Tungwai L.; Xie, Heng; Li, Yuanyuan

2013-10-01

451

Surface diffusion activation energy determination using ion beam microtexturing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The activation energy for impurity atom (adatom) surface diffusion can be determined from the temperature dependence of the spacing of sputter cones. These cones are formed on the surface during sputtering while simultaneously adding impurities. The impurities form clusters by means of surface diffusion, and these clusters in turn initiate cone formation. Values are given for the surface diffusion activation energies for various materials on polycrystalline Cu, Al, Pb, Au, and Ni. The values for different impurity species on each of these substrates are approximately independent of impurity species within the experimental uncertainty, suggesting the absence of strong chemical bonding effects on the diffusion.

Rossnagel, S. M.; Robinson, R. S.

1982-01-01

452

Laser sealed vacuum insulation window  

DOEpatents

A laser sealed evacuated window panel is comprised of two glass panes held spaced apart in relation to each other by a plurality of spherical glass beads and glass welded around the edges to provide an evacuated space between the glass panes that is completely glass sealed from the exterior. The glass welded edge seal is obtained by welding the edges of the glass panes together with a laser beam while the glass panes and bead spacers are positioned in a vacuum furnace and heated to the annealing point of the glass to avoid stress fracture in the area of the glass weld. The laser welding in the furnace can be directed around the perimeter of the glass panel by a combination of rotating the glass panel and linearly translating or aiming the laser with a relay mirror.

Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Tracy, C. Edwin (Golden, CO)

1987-01-01

453

Fermion Mass Mixing in Vacuum  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Renormalization group procedure for effective particles is applied to a theory of fermions that interact only through mass mixing terms in their Hamiltonian. Problems with virtual pair production in vacuum are avoided by using the front form of Hamiltonian dynamics. Masses and states of physical fermions emerge at the end of a calculation that is carried out exactly irrespective of the strength of the mass mixing terms. An a priori infinite set of renormalization group equations for all momentum modes of fermion quantum fields is reduced to just one equation for a two-by-two mass matrix. In distinction from scalars, fermions never become tachyons but appear chirally rotated when the mass mixing interaction term is sufficiently strong.

G?azek, Stanis?aw D.

2014-06-01

454