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Sample records for vaginal cuff brachytherapy

  1. Prospective Clinical Trial of Bladder Filling and Three-Dimensional Dosimetry in High-Dose-Rate Vaginal Cuff Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Alexandra J.; Cormack, Robert A.; Lee, Hang; Xiong Li; Hansen, Jorgen L.; O'Farrell, Desmond A.; Viswanathan, Akila N.

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of bladder filling on dosimetry and to determine the best bladder dosimetric parameter for vaginal cuff brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: In this prospective clinical trial, a total of 20 women underwent vaginal cylinder high-dose-rate brachytherapy. The bladder was full for Fraction 2 and empty for Fraction 3. Dose-volume histogram and dose-surface histogram values were generated for the bladder, rectum, and urethra. The midline maximal bladder point (MBP) and the midline maximal rectal point were recorded. Paired t tests, Pearson correlations, and regression analyses were performed. Results: The volume and surface area of the irradiated bladder were significantly smaller when the bladder was empty than when full. Of the several dose-volume histogram and dose-surface histogram parameters evaluated, the bladder maximal dose received by 2 cm{sup 3} of tissue, volume of bladder receiving {>=}50% of the dose, volume of bladder receiving {>=}70% of the dose, and surface area of bladder receiving {>=}50% of the dose significantly predicted for the difference between the empty vs. full filling state. The volume of bladder receiving {>=}70% of the dose and the maximal dose received by 2 cm{sup 3} of tissue correlated significantly with the MBP. Bladder filling did not alter the volume or surface area of the rectum irradiated. However, an empty bladder did result in the nearest point of bowel being significantly closer to the vaginal cylinder than when the bladder was full. Conclusions: Patients undergoing vaginal cuff brachytherapy treated with an empty bladder have a lower bladder dose than those treated with a full bladder. The MBP correlated well with the volumetric assessments of bladder dose and provided a noninvasive method for reporting the MBP dose using three-dimensional imaging. The MBP can therefore be used as a surrogate for complex dosimetry in the clinic.

  2. Adjuvant vaginal cuff brachytherapy for high-risk, early stage endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eastwick, Gary; Anne, Pramila Rani; Rosenblum, Norman G.; Schilder, Russell J.; Chalian, Raffi; Zibelli, Allison M.; Kim, Christine H.; Den, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To report outcomes following adjuvant high-dose-rate vaginal brachytherapy (VBT) with or without chemotherapy for high-intermediate risk (HIR) and high-risk, early stage endometrial cancer as defined in Gynecologic Oncology Group trial 0249. Material and methods From May 2000 to January 2014, 68 women with HIR and high-risk endometrial cancer underwent surgical staging followed by VBT. Median VBT dose was 21 Gy delivered in three fractions prescribed to 0.5 cm depth. Paclitaxel 175 mg/m2 and carboplatin area under the curve 6 was administered every 21 days in sequence with VBT. Actuarial survival estimates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results Patient demographics included a median age of 66 years (range: 36-91) and stages IA (49%), IB (38%), and II (13%), respectively. Thirty-one (46%) patients had HIR disease with endometrioid histology, and 33 (48%) patients had serous or clear cell histology. Thirty-seven (54%) patients received a median 3 cycles (range: 3-6) of chemotherapy in addition to VBT, and 65 patients (96%) completed all prescribed therapy. During a median follow up of 33.1 months (range: 4.0-161.7), four patients have recurred, including one vaginal recurrence. The 3-year estimates of vaginal, pelvic, and distant recurrences were 1.9%, 2.4%, and 9.1%, respectively. The 3-year rates of disease-free and overall survival were 87.7% and 93.9%, respectively. Conclusions Early outcomes with adjuvant VBT with or without chemotherapy demonstrate high rates of vaginal and pelvic control for women with HIR disease. Early vaginal and pelvic relapses in high-risk patients suggest that pelvic external beam radiotherapy is warranted in this subgroup, but additional data from large phase III trials is warranted. PMID:25337127

  3. Magnitude of Interfractional Vaginal Cuff Movement: Implications for External Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Daniel J.; Michaletz-Lorenz, Martha; Goddu, S. Murty; Grigsby, Perry W.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To quantify the extent of interfractional vaginal cuff movement in patients receiving postoperative irradiation for cervical or endometrial cancer in the absence of bowel/bladder instruction. Methods and Materials: Eleven consecutive patients with cervical or endometrial cancer underwent placement of three gold seed fiducial markers in the vaginal cuff apex as part of standard of care before simulation. Patients subsequently underwent external irradiation and brachytherapy treatment based on institutional guidelines. Daily megavoltage CT imaging was performed during each external radiation treatment fraction. The daily positions of the vaginal apex fiducial markers were subsequently compared with the original position of the fiducial markers on the simulation CT. Composite dose-volume histograms were also created by summing daily target positions. Results: The average ({+-} standard deviation) vaginal cuff movement throughout daily pelvic external radiotherapy when referenced to the simulation position was 16.2 {+-} 8.3 mm. The maximum vaginal cuff movement for any patient during treatment was 34.5 mm. In the axial plane the mean vaginal cuff movement was 12.9 {+-} 6.7 mm. The maximum vaginal cuff axial movement was 30.7 mm. In the craniocaudal axis the mean movement was 10.3 {+-} 7.6 mm, with a maximum movement of 27.0 mm. Probability of cuff excursion outside of the clinical target volume steadily dropped as margin size increased (53%, 26%, 4.2%, and 1.4% for 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 cm, respectively.) However, rectal and bladder doses steadily increased with larger margin sizes. Conclusions: The magnitude of vaginal cuff movement is highly patient specific and can impact target coverage in patients without bowel/bladder instructions at simulation. The use of vaginal cuff fiducials can help identify patients at risk for target volume excursion.

  4. SU-F-19A-03: Dosimetric Advantages in Critical Structure Dose Sparing by Using a Multichannel Cylinder in High Dose Rate Brachytherapy to Treat Vaginal Cuff Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Syh, J; Syh, J; Patel, B; Zhang, J; Wu, H; Rosen, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The multichannel cylindrical vaginal applicator is a variation of traditional single channel cylindrical vaginal applicator. The multichannel applicator has additional peripheral channels that provide more flexibility in the planning process. The dosimetric advantage is to reduce dose to adjacent organ at risk (OAR) such as bladder and rectum while maintaining target coverage with the dose optimization from additional channels. Methods: Vaginal HDR brachytherapy plans are all CT based. CT images were acquired in 2 mm thickness to keep integrity of cylinder contouring. The CTV of 5mm Rind with prescribed treatment length was reconstructed from 5mm expansion of inserted cylinder. The goal was 95% of CTV covered by 95% of prescribed dose in both single channel planning (SCP)and multichannel planning (MCP) before proceeding any further optimization for dose reduction to critical structures with emphasis on D2cc and V2Gy . Results: This study demonstrated noticeable dose reduction to OAR was apparent in multichannel plans. The D2cc of the rectum and bladder were showing the reduced dose for multichannel versus single channel. The V2Gy of the rectum was 93.72% and 83.79% (p=0.007) for single channel and multichannel respectively (Figure 1 and Table 1). To assure adequate coverage to target while reducing the dose to the OAR without any compromise is the main goal in using multichannel vaginal applicator in HDR brachytherapy. Conclusion: Multichannel plans were optimized using anatomical based inverse optimization algorithm of inverse planning simulation annealing. The optimization solution of the algorithm was to improve the clinical target volume dose coverage while reducing the dose to critical organs such as bladder, rectum and bowels. The comparison between SCP and MCP demonstrated MCP is superior to SCP where the dwell positions were based on geometric array only. It concluded that MCP is preferable and is able to provide certain features superior to SCP.

  5. Vaginal Cuff Dehiscence in Robotic-Assisted Total Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kashani, Shabnam; Gallo, Taryn; Sargent, Anita; ElSahwi, Karim; Silasi, Dan-Arin

    2012-01-01

    Study Objective: The aim of this study was to estimate the cumulative incidence of vaginal cuff dehiscence in robotic-assisted total hysterectomies in our patients and to provide recommendations to decrease the incidence of vaginal cuff dehiscence. Methods: This was an observational case series, Canadian Task Force Classification II-3 conducted at an academic and community teaching hospital. A total of 654 patients underwent robotic-assisted total laparoscopic hysterectomy for both malignant and benign reasons from September 1, 2006 to March 1, 2011 performed by a single surgeon. The da Vinci Surgical System was used for robotic-assisted total laparoscopic hysterectomy. Results: There were 3 cases of vaginal cuff dehiscence among 654 robotic-assisted total laparoscopic hysterectomies, making our cumulative incidence of vaginal cuff dehiscence 0.4%. The mean time between the procedures and vaginal cuff dehiscence was 44.3 d (6.3 wk). All patients were followed up twice after surgery, at 3 to 4 wk and 12 to 16 wk. Conclusion: In our study, the incidence of vaginal cuff dehiscence after robotic-assisted total laparoscopic hysterectomy compares favorably to that of total abdominal and vaginal hysterectomy. Our study suggests that the incidence of vaginal cuff dehiscence is more likely related to the technique of colpotomy and vaginal cuff suturing than to robotic-assisted total hysterectomy per se. With proper technique and patient education, our vaginal dehiscence rate has been 0.4%, which is 2.5 to 10 times less than the previously reported vaginal cuff dehiscence rate in the literature. PMID:23484559

  6. Trends in the Utilization of Adjuvant Vaginal Cuff Brachytherapy and/or External Beam Radiation Treatment in Stage I and II Endometrial Cancer: A Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End-Results Study

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Mehul K.; Cote, Michele L.; Ali-Fehmi, Rouba; Buekers, Thomas; Munkarah, Adnan R.; Elshaikh, Mohamed A.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: The optimal adjuvant radiation treatment for endometrial carcinoma (EC) remains controversial. Adjuvant vaginal cuff brachytherapy (VB) has emerged as an increasingly common treatment modality. However, the time trends for using VB, external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), or combined therapy (VB+EBRT) have not been well characterized. We therefore examined the utilization trends of VB, EBRT, and VB+EBRT for adjuvant RT in International Federation of Gynecologic Oncology (FIGO) stage I and II EC over time. Methods and Materials: We evaluated treatment patterns for 48,122 patients with EC diagnosed between January 1995 and December 2005, using the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) public use database. Chi-squared tests were used to assess differences by radiation type (VB, EBRT, and VB+EBRT) and various demographic and clinical variables. Results: Analyses were limited to 9,815 patients (20.4%) with EC who met the inclusion criteria. Among women who received adjuvant RT, the proportion receiving VB increased yearly (12.9% in 1995 compared to 32.8% in 2005 (p < 0.0001). The increasing use of VB was proportional to the decreasing use of EBRT (56.1% in 1995 to 45.8% in 2005; p < 0.0001) and VB+EBRT (31.0% in 1995 to 21.4% in 2005; p < 0.001). Conclusions: This population-based report demonstrates an increasing trend in the use of VB in the adjuvant setting after hysterectomy for treatment of women with FIGO stage I-II EC. VB alone appears to be replacing pelvic EBRT and VB+EBRT therapy in the management of stage I-II EC.

  7. Dosimetric Effects of Air Pockets Around High-Dose Rate Brachytherapy Vaginal Cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, Susan; Palaniswaamy, Geethpriya; Grigsby, Perry W.

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: Most physicians use a single-channel vaginal cylinder for postoperative endometrial cancer brachytherapy. Recent published data have identified air pockets between the vaginal cylinders and the vaginal mucosa. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the incidence, size, and dosimetric effects of these air pockets. Methods and Materials: 25 patients receiving postoperative vaginal cuff brachytherapy with a high-dose rate vaginal cylinders were enrolled in this prospective data collection study. Patients were treated with 6 fractions of 200 to 400 cGy per fraction prescribed at 5 mm depth. Computed tomography simulation for brachytherapy treatment planning was performed for each fraction. The quantity, volume, and dosimetric impact of the air pockets surrounding the cylinder were quantified. Results: In 25 patients, a total of 90 air pockets were present in 150 procedures (60%). Five patients had no air pockets present during any of their treatments. The average number of air pockets per patient was 3.6, with the average total air pocket volume being 0.34 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.01-1.32 cm{sup 3}). The average dose reduction to the vaginal mucosa at the air pocket was 27% (range, 9-58%). Ten patients had no air pockets on their first fraction but air pockets occurred in subsequent fractions. Conclusion: Air pockets between high-dose rate vaginal cylinder applicators and the vaginal mucosa are present in the majority of fractions of therapy, and their presence varies from patient to patient and fraction to fraction. The existence of air pockets results in reduced radiation dose to the vaginal mucosa.

  8. Delayed Presentation of Vaginal Cuff Dehiscence after Robotic Hysterectomy for Gynecologic Cancer: A Case Series and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Escobar, Pamela A.; Gressel, Gregory M.; Goldberg, Gary L.; Kuo, Dennis Yi-Shin

    2016-01-01

    Background. Vaginal cuff dehiscence after hysterectomy has varying incidence according to surgical approach, with highest rates associated with laparoscopic surgery. Comparative data on timing of diagnosis describe a wide range of clinical presentation from weeks to years after hysterectomy. Limited reports have focused specifically on delayed presentation of vaginal cuff dehiscence. Cases. All cases of vaginal cuff dehiscence at our institution between 2005 and 2015 were collectively reviewed and three cases were identified of women who presented with cuff dehiscence greater than 180 days from index surgery. Diagnosis occurred at 342 to 461 days after operation. One patient presented with abdominal pain, a second case presented with vaginal discharge, and the third case lacked clinical symptoms altogether. Prior to diagnosis, one case received chemotherapy and external beam radiation for Stage IB1 cervical cancer and another case received external beam radiation alone for Stage II endometrioid adenocarcinoma. All cuffs were repaired vaginally with interrupted, early absorbable suture. Conclusion. Robotic total laparoscopic hysterectomy may be associated with increased risk of vaginal cuff dehiscence. Further studies are needed to determine risk factors and patient characteristics associated with delayed presentation of vaginal cuff dehiscence in robotic total hysterectomy as well as all surgical approaches. PMID:27110413

  9. Adherence to Vaginal Dilation Following High Dose Rate Brachytherapy for Endometrial Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Lois C.; Abdallah, Rita; Schluchter, Mark; Panneerselvam, Ashok; Kunos, Charles A.

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: We report demographic, clinical, and psychosocial factors associated with adherence to vaginal dilation and describe the sexual and marital or nonmarital dyadic functioning of women following high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy for endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively evaluated women aged 18 years or older in whom early-stage endometrial (IAgr3-IIB) cancers were treated by HDR intravaginal brachytherapy within the past 3.5 years. Women with or without a sexual partner were eligible. Patients completed questionnaires by mail or by telephone assessing demographic and clinical variables, adherence to vaginal dilation, dyadic satisfaction, sexual functioning, and health beliefs. Results: Seventy-eight of 89 (88%) eligible women with early-stage endometrial cancer treated with HDR brachytherapy completed questionnaires. Only 33% of patients were adherers, based on reporting having used a dilator more than two times per week in the first month following radiation. Nonadherers who reported a perceived change in vaginal dimension following radiation reported that their vaginas were subjectively smaller after brachytherapy (p = 0.013). Adherers reported more worry about their sex lives or lack thereof than nonadherers (p = 0.047). Patients reported considerable sexual dysfunction following completion of HDR brachytherapy. Conclusions: Adherence to recommendations for vaginal dilator use following HDR brachytherapy for endometrial cancer is poor. Interventions designed to educate women about dilator use benefit may increase adherence. Although sexual functioning was compromised, it is likely that this existed before having cancer for many women in our study.

  10. Image-Based 3D Treatment Planning for Vaginal Cylinder Brachytherapy: Dosimetric Effects of Bladder Filling on Organs at Risk

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, Jennifer; Shen Sui; De Los Santos, Jennifer F.; Kim, Robert Y.

    2012-07-01

    and sigmoid volume doses were not affected by bladder filling. Conclusions: In high-dose rate vaginal cylinder brachytherapy, treatment with a distended bladder preferentially reduces high dose to the small bowel around the vaginal cuff without a significant change in dose to the bladder, rectum, or sigmoid.

  11. Does Laparoscopic Hysterectomy Increase the Risk of Vaginal Cuff Dehiscence? An Analysis of Outcomes from Multiple Academic Centers and a Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Mikhail, Emad; Cain, Mary Ashley; Shah, Madhvi; Solnik, M Jonathon; Sobolewski, Craig J; Hart, Stuart

    2015-11-01

    Vaginal cuff dehiscence represents a serious, but infrequent complication after hysterectomy, with a reported increased incidence following a laparoscopic approach. Various risk factors have been proposed including laparoscopically placed suture, surgical experience, use of electrosurgery, surgical indication, and obesity. Technical aspects of the procedure itself have also been questioned such as the variable use of monopolar electrosurgery during colpotomy and the suture type or number of layers chosen to reapproximate the vaginal cuff. Nothwithstanding the tendency for cuff dehiscence to occur following laparoscopic approach, there remains a paucity of high-quality data that supports or refutes this finding or clearly defines the mechanism(s) by which this event occurs allowing for the proposal of objective guidelines for reducing risk. Various techniques have been proposed to decrease the risk of vaginal cuff dehiscence during endoscopic hysterectomy, including use of monopolar current on cutting mode, achievement of cuff hemostasis with sutures rather than electrocoagulation, use of a two-layer cuff closure with polydioxanone suture, and use of bidirectional barbed suture for cuff closure. The authors experience at three university-based minimally invasive gynecologic surgery programs showed a low rate of vaginal cuff dehiscence in their own practices. Large randomized controlled trials are needed to truly determine whether there is a difference in vaginal cuff dehiscence between surgical modalities for hysterectomy as well as to determine the true risk factors. PMID:26680391

  12. Vaginal brachytherapy alone is sufficient adjuvant treatment of surgical stage I endometrial cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Solhjem, Matthew C. . E-mail: petersen.ivy@mayo.edu; Petersen, Ivy A.; Haddock, Michael G.

    2005-08-01

    Purpose To determine the efficacy and complications of adjuvant vaginal high-dose-rate brachytherapy alone for patients with Stage I endometrial cancer in whom complete surgical staging had been performed. Methods and Materials Between April 1998 and March 2004, 100 patients with Stage I endometrial cancer underwent surgical staging (total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy with pelvic {+-} paraaortic nodal sampling) and postoperative vaginal high-dose-rate brachytherapy at our institution. The total dose was 2100 cGy in three fractions. Results With a median follow-up of 23 months (range 2-62), no pelvic or vaginal recurrences developed. All patients underwent pelvic dissection, and 42% underwent paraaortic nodal dissection. A median of 29.5 pelvic nodes (range 1-67) was removed (84% had >10 pelvic nodes removed). Most patients (73%) had endometrioid (or unspecified) adenocarcinoma, 16% had papillary serous carcinoma, and 11% had other histologic types. The International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage and grade was Stage IA, grade III in 5; Stage IB, grade I, II, or III in 6, 27, or 20, respectively; and Stage IC, grade I, II, or III in 13, 17, or 10, respectively. The Common Toxicity Criteria (version 2.0) complications were mild (Grade 1-2) and consisted primarily of vaginal mucosal changes, temporary urinary irritation, and temporary diarrhea. Conclusion Adjuvant vaginal high-dose-rate brachytherapy alone may be a safe and effective alternative to pelvic external beam radiotherapy for surgical Stage I endometrial cancer.

  13. High-dose-rate vaginal brachytherapy with chemotherapy for surgically staged localized uterine serous carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Susan A.; Ratner, Elena; De Leon, Maria C.; Mani, Sheida; Silasi, Dan-Arin; Azodi, Masoud; Santin, Alessandro; Rutherford, Thomas; Schwartz, Peter E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate our institutional experience combining carboplatin-paclitaxel (C/T) chemotherapy with high-dose-rate (HDR) intra-vaginal brachytherapy (IVB) following comprehensive surgical staging in localized uterine serous carcinoma (USC). Material and methods Institutional chart review identified 56 patients with FIGO 2009 stage I-II USC treated between 2000-2010. Patients underwent total hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oopherectomy, and comprehensive surgical staging including pelvic and para-aortic lymph node dissection, omentectomy, and peritoneal cytology. Chemotherapy was 6 cycles of C/T, and the IVB dose was 14 Gy in 2 fractions, prescribed to 0.5 cm from the cylinder surface. Kaplan-Meier methods were used to estimate recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS). Results The median follow-up time was 49 months (range: 9-145). The 5-yr RFS and OS were 85% and 93%, respectively. In all cases of recurrence (n = 8), the first site of failure was extra-pelvic. There were no isolated vaginal recurrences, however, there was one vaginal apex recurrence recorded at 19 months in a patient with simultaneous lung metastases. Thus, the 2-year vaginal RFS was 98%. Conclusions Excellent vaginal/pelvic control rates were observed. Further study of HDR brachytherapy dose and fractionation in combination with chemotherapy is worthwhile. PMID:25829935

  14. A novel method for vaginal cylinder treatment planning: a seamless transition to 3D brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Vincent; Wang, Zhou; Patil, Sachin

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Standard treatment plan libraries are often used to ensure a quick turn-around time for vaginal cylinder treatments. Recently there is increasing interest in transitioning from conventional 2D radiograph based brachytherapy to 3D image based brachytherapy, which has resulted in a substantial increase in treatment planning time and decrease in patient through-put. We describe a novel technique that significantly reduces the treatment planning time for CT-based vaginal cylinder brachytherapy. Material and methods Oncentra MasterPlan TPS allows multiple sets of data points to be classified as applicator points which has been harnessed in this method. The method relies on two hard anchor points: the first dwell position in a catheter and an applicator configuration specific dwell position as the plan origin and a soft anchor point beyond the last active dwell position to define the axis of the catheter. The spatial location of various data points on the applicator's surface and at 5 mm depth are stored in an Excel file that can easily be transferred into a patient CT data set using window operations and then used for treatment planning. The remainder of the treatment planning process remains unaffected. Results The treatment plans generated on the Oncentra MasterPlan TPS using this novel method yielded results comparable to those generated on the Plato TPS using a standard treatment plan library in terms of treatment times, dwell weights and dwell times for a given optimization method and normalization points. Less than 2% difference was noticed between the treatment times generated between both systems. Using the above method, the entire planning process, including CT importing, catheter reconstruction, multiple data point definition, optimization and dose prescription, can be completed in ~5–10 minutes. Conclusion The proposed method allows a smooth and efficient transition to 3D CT based vaginal cylinder brachytherapy planning. PMID:23349650

  15. Selective perturbation of in vivo linear energy transfer using high- Z vaginal applicators for Cf-252 brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivard, M. J.; Evans, K. E.; Leal, L. C.; Kirk, B. L.

    2004-01-01

    Californium-252 ( 252Cf) brachytherapy sources emit both neutrons and photons, and have the potential to vastly improve the current standard-of-practice for brachytherapy. While hydrogenous materials readily attenuate the 252Cf fission energy neutrons, high- Z materials are utilized to attenuate the 252Cf gamma-rays. These differences in shielding materials may be exploited when treating with a vaginal applicator to possibly improve patient survival through perturbation of the in vivo linear energy transfer radiation.

  16. SU-E-T-366: Clinical Implementation of MR-Guided Vaginal Cylinder Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Owrangi, A; Jolly, S; Balter, J; Cao, Y; Young, L; Zhu, T; Prisciandaro, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of MR-based vaginal brachytherapy source localization using an in-house MR-visible marker versus the alignment of an applicator model to MR images. Methods: Three consecutive patients undergoing vaginal HDR brachytherapy with a plastic cylinder were scanned with both CT and MRI (including T1- and T2- weighted images). An MR-visible source localization marker, consisting of a sealed thin catheter filled with either water (for T2 contrast) or Gd-doped water (for T1 contrast), was assembled shortly before scanning. Clinically, the applicator channel was digitized on CT with an x-ray marker. To evaluate the efficacy of MR-based applicator reconstruction, each MR image volume was aligned locally to the CT images based on the region containing the cylinder. Applicator digitization was performed on the MR images using (1) the MR visible marker and (2) alignment of an applicator surface model from Varian's Brachytherapy Planning software to the MRI images. Resulting source positions were compared with the original CT digitization. Results: Although the source path was visualized by the MR marker, the applicator tip proved difficult to identify due to challenges in achieving a watertight seal. This resulted in observed displacements of the catheter tip, at times >1cm. Deviations between the central source positions identified via aligning the applicator surface model to MR and using the xray marker on CT ranged from 0.07 – 0.19 cm and 0.07 – 0.20 cm on T1- weighted and T2-weighted images, respectively. Conclusion: Based on the current study, aligning the applicator model to MRI provides a practical, current approach to perform MR-based brachytherapy planning. Further study is needed to produce catheters with reliably and reproducibly identifiable tips. Attempts are being made to improve catheter seals, as well as to increase the viscosity of the contrast material to decrease fluid mobility inside the catheter.

  17. Clinical applications of custom-made vaginal cylinders constructed using three-dimensional printing technology

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, Adam; Mellis, Katherine; Siauw, Timmy; Diederich, Chris; Pouliot, Jean; Hsu, I-Chow

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Three-dimensional (3D) printing technology allows physicians to rapidly create customized devices for patients. We report our initial clinical experience using this technology to create custom applicators for vaginal brachytherapy. Material and methods Three brachytherapy patients with unique clinical needs were identified as likely to benefit from a customized vaginal applicator. Patient 1 underwent intracavitary vaginal cuff brachytherapy after hysterectomy and chemotherapy for stage IA papillary serous endometrial cancer using a custom printed 2.75 cm diameter segmented vaginal cylinder with a central channel. Patient 2 underwent interstitial brachytherapy for a vaginal cuff recurrence of endometrial cancer after prior hysterectomy, whole pelvis radiotherapy, and brachytherapy boost. We printed a 2 cm diameter vaginal cylinder with one central and six peripheral catheter channels to fit a narrow vaginal canal. Patient 3 underwent interstitial brachytherapy boost for stage IIIA vulvar cancer with vaginal extension. For more secure applicator fit within a wide vaginal canal, we printed a 3.5 cm diameter solid cylinder with one central tandem channel and ten peripheral catheter channels. The applicators were printed in a biocompatible, sterilizable thermoplastic. Results Patient 1 received 31.5 Gy to the surface in three fractions over two weeks. Patient 2 received 36 Gy to the CTV in six fractions over two implants one week apart, with interstitial hyperthermia once per implant. Patient 3 received 18 Gy in three fractions over one implant after 45 Gy external beam radiotherapy. Brachytherapy was tolerated well with no grade 3 or higher toxicity and no local recurrences. Conclusions We established a workflow to rapidly manufacture and implement customized vaginal applicators that can be sterilized and are made of biocompatible material, resulting in high-quality brachytherapy for patients whose anatomy is not ideally suited for standard, commercially

  18. American Brachytherapy Society survey regarding practice patterns of postoperative irradiation for endometrial cancer: Current status of vaginal brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Small, William . E-mail: w-small@northwestern.edu; Erickson, Beth; Kwakwa, Francis M.A.

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To survey the current postoperative recommendations for radiotherapy (RT) in patients with endometrial cancer, with an emphasis on vaginal brachytherapy (VBT). Methods and Materials: In August 2003, a 32-item questionnaire was mailed to a random sample of 2396 members of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology and the American Brachytherapy Society. The sample excluded members-in-training, physicists, and non-U.S. members. A follow-up mailing was conducted in November 2003. Those who had not treated any patient in the previous year for endometrial carcinoma were instructed to indicate so at the beginning of the questionnaire and return it without responding to any other item. Responses were tabulated to determine the relative frequency distribution. Results: of the 2396 surveys sent out, 757 were returned, for a response rate of 31.6%. Of those who responded, 551 (72.8%) had performed postoperative irradiation for endometrial cancer and were included in this study. Of the 551 respondents, 99.8% had delivered external beam RT to some endometrial cancer patients. An increasing trend was found toward referrals for VBT; 91.5% of those who treated endometrial cancer performed VBT. The vaginal target most often irradiated was the upper vagina in 40.7%, upper 4-5 cm in 54.5%, and the entire vagina in 4.9%; 21.3% placed clips at the vaginal apex for applicator verification. The maximal dose to the bladder and rectum was recorded in 78.3% and 80.2% of patients, respectively. Of the respondents, 40% did not use low-dose-rate (LDR) VBT. The two most common LDR applicators were Delclos cylinders (29.7%) and Fletcher colpostats (29.3%). The mean boost dose delivered with LDR VBT when prescribed to the surface was 29.9 Gy and when prescribed to 0.5 cm was 23.8 Gy. When LDR therapy was used without external beam RT, the mean dose when prescribed to the surface was 56.8 Gy and when prescribed to 0.5 cm was 47.9 Gy. In 2002, 69.1% of respondents treated

  19. Vulval and Vaginal Rhabdomyosarcoma in Children: Update and Reappraisal of Institut Gustave Roussy Brachytherapy Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Magne, Nicolas; Oberlin, Odile; Martelli, Helene; Gerbaulet, Alain; Chassagne, Daniel; Haie-Meder, Christine

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To report the Institut Gustave Roussy brachytherapy (BT) experience in the management of vulval and vaginal rhabdomyosarcoma with special emphasis on long-term outcome. Patients and Methods: Between 1971 and 2005, the data concerning 39 girls who had undergone BT as a part of their treatment were retrospectively analyzed. Of the 39 girls, 20 had been treated before 1990, when the BT volume encompassed the initial tumor extension. After 1990, only residual disease was included in the BT volume. Side effects were classified using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. Results: The median age was 16.3 months at diagnosis. Vaginal or vulvar rhabdomyosarcoma was diagnosed in 26 and 6 patients, respectively. The median follow-up was 8.4 years. The 5-year overall survival rate was 91%. Of the 39 patients, 6 developed a relapse. Of the 20 patients treated before 1990, 6 experienced Grade 1-2 renal/genitourinary function symptoms and 75% developed sequelae, in the form of vaginal or urethral sclerosis or stenosis. Four patients received follow-up treatment for psychological disorders. Of the 19 patients treated after 1990, 2 developed acute side effects, with maximal Grade 1-2 renal/genitourinary function symptoms, and 20% developed vaginal or urethral sclerosis or stenosis. Two cases of psychological disturbances were also documented. Conclusion: Reducing the BT volume coverage, better indications for surgery, and more efficient chemotherapy, all combined within a multidisciplinary approach, tended to improve results in terms of both survival and long-term sequelae.

  20. Modified Fletcher's 3-channel brachytherapy system with vaginal line source loading versus uterine tandem and vaginal cylinder system in Stage IIIA cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Low, JSH; Ng, KB

    2006-01-01

    Purpose The uterine tandem with open-ended vaginal cylinder is the most commonly used brachytherapy system for Federation Internationale de Gynecologie et d'Obstetrique (FIGO) Stage IIIA cervix cancer at the National Cancer Centre, Singapore. Without the 3-channel ovoid system, the dose to the parametrium is often compromised. In this study, a vaginal cylinder that could potentially be incorporated with the 3-channel system was developed, hence addressing the problem of treating both the vaginal disease extension and the parametrium. Methods and materials A hollow cylinder of 3 cm in diameter was incorporated with the Fletcher's 3-channel tandem and ovoid system. Treatment plans were generated with the single tandem line source with a vaginal cylinder applicator and the modified Fletcher's system using the Abacus version 3 brachytherapy treatment planning software. A nominal dose of 5 Gy was prescribed to point H for both plans. The perpendicular distance of the 5 Gy isodose line from the uterine tandem plane at the centre of the ovoid and the vaginal cylinder plane 1 cm below the os guard were then compared. Results The 5 Gy isodose line was 1.7 cm from the uterine tandem source at the location lateral through the centre of the ovoids on the plan with the uterine tandem and vaginal cylinder system as compared to a distance of 3.3 cm using the modified 3-channel Fletcher system. The 5 Gy isodose line was 2 cm lateral to the central source at the vaginal cylinder plane 1 cm below the os guard on the uterine tandem and vaginal cylinder system as compared to a distance of 2.5 cm on the Modified-Fletcher system. This corresponds to an increase of 1.6 cm and 0.5 cm depth of treated parametrium on the uterine tandem plane and vaginal cylinder plane respectively with the modified Fletcher's applicator as compared with the single line source cylinder system. Conclusion As compared with the single uterine tandem and open-ended vaginal cylinder system, an addition of 1.6 cm

  1. High Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy for Cervical Carcinomas With Lower Vaginal Infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Kazumoto, Tomoko Kato, Shingo; Tabushi, Katsuyoshi; Kutsutani-Nakamura, Yuzuru; Mizuno, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Michiko; Shiromizu, Kenji; Saito, Yoshihiro

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: This report presents the clinical applications of an automated treatment-planning program of high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT) for advanced uterine cervical cancer infiltrating the parametrium and the lower vagina. Methods and Materials: We adopted HDR-ICBT under optimized dose distribution for 22 cervical cancer patients with tumor infiltration of the lower half of the vagina. All patients had squamous cell carcinoma with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics clinical stages IIB-IVA. After whole pelvic external beam irradiation with a median dose of 30.6 Gy, a conventional ICBT was applied as 'pear-shaped' isodose curve. Then 3-4 more sessions per week of this new method of ICBT were performed. With a simple determination of the treatment volume, the cervix-parametrium, and the lower vagina were covered automatically and simultaneously by this program, that was designated as 'utero-vaginal brachytherapy'. The mean follow-up period was 87.4 months (range, 51.8-147.9 months). Results: Isodose curve for this program was 'galaxy-shaped'. Five-year local-progression-free survival and overall survival rates were 90.7% and 81.8%, respectively. Among those patients with late complications higher than Grade 2 Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer morbidity score, only one (4.5%) developed severe proctitis. Conclusions: Because of the favorable treatment outcomes, this treatment-planning program with a simplified target-volume based dosimetry was proposed for cervical cancer with lower vaginal infiltration.

  2. Volumetric (3D) bladder dose parameters are more reproducible than point (2D) dose parameters in vaginal vault high-dose-rate brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Sapienza, Lucas Gomes; Flosi, Adriana; Aiza, Antonio; de Assis Pellizzon, Antonio Cassio; Chojniak, Rubens; Baiocchi, Glauco

    2016-01-01

    There is no consensus on the use of computed tomography in vaginal cuff brachytherapy (VCB) planning. The purpose of this study was to prospectively determine the reproducibility of point bladder dose parameters (DICRU and maximum dose), compared with volumetric-based parameters. Twenty-two patients who were treated with high-dose-rate (HDR) VCB underwent simulation by computed tomography (CT-scan) with a Foley catheter at standard tension (position A) and extra tension (position B). CT-scan determined the bladder ICRU dose point in both positions and compared the displacement and recorded dose. Volumetric parameters (D0.1cc, D1.0cc, D2.0cc, D4.0cc and D50%) and point dose parameters were compared. The average spatial shift in ICRU dose point in the vertical, longitudinal and lateral directions was 2.91 mm (range: 0.10–9.00), 12.04 mm (range: 4.50–24.50) and 2.65 mm (range: 0.60–8.80), respectively. The DICRU ratio for positions A and B was 1.64 (p < 0.001). Moreover, a decrease in Dmax was observed (p = 0.016). Tension level of the urinary catheter did not affect the volumetric parameters. Our data suggest that point parameters (DICRU and Dmax) are not reproducible and are not the ideal choice for dose reporting. PMID:27296459

  3. MCNP modelling of vaginal and uterine applicators used in intracavitary brachytherapy and comparison with radiochromic film measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceccolini, E.; Gerardy, I.; Ródenas, J.; van Dycke, M.; Gallardo, S.; Mostacci, D.

    Brachytherapy is an advanced cancer treatment that is minimally invasive, minimising radiation exposure to the surrounding healthy tissues. Microselectron© Nucletron devices with 192Ir source can be used for gynaecological brachytherapy, in patients with vaginal or uterine cancer. Measurements of isodose curves have been performed in a PMMA phantom and compared with Monte Carlo calculations and TPS (Plato software of Nucletron BPS 14.2) evaluation. The isodose measurements have been performed with radiochromic films (Gafchromic EBT©). The dose matrix has been obtained after digitalisation and use of a dose calibration curve obtained with a 6 MV photon beam provided by a medical linear accelerator. A comparison between the calculated and the measured matrix has been performed. The calculated dose matrix is obtained with a simulation using the MCNP5 Monte Carlo code (F4MESH tally).

  4. Vaginal tolerance of CT based image-guided high-dose rate interstitial brachytherapy for gynecological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Purpose of this study was to identify predictors of vaginal ulcer after CT based three-dimensional image-guided high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (HDR-ISBT) for gynecologic malignancies. Methods Records were reviewed for 44 female (14 with primary disease and 30 with recurrence) with gynecological malignancies treated with HDR-ISBT with or without external beam radiation therapy. The HDR-ISBT applicator insertion was performed with image guidance by trans-rectal ultrasound and CT. Results The median clinical target volume was 35.5 ml (2.4-142.1 ml) and the median delivered dose in equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2) for target volume D90 was 67.7 Gy (48.8-94.2 Gy, doses of external-beam radiation therapy and brachytherapy were combined). For re-irradiation patients, median EQD2 of D2cc for rectum and bladder, D0.5cc, D1cc, D2cc, D4cc, D6cc and D8cc for vaginal wall was 91.1 Gy, 100.9 Gy, 260.3 Gy, 212.3 Gy, 170.1 Gy, 117.1 Gy, 105.2 Gy, and 94.7 Gy, respectively. For those without prior radiation therapy, median EQD2 of D2cc for rectum and bladder, D0.5cc, D1cc, D2cc, D4cc, D6cc and D8cc for vaginal wall was 56.3 Gy, 54.3 Gy, 147.4 Gy, 126.2 Gy, 108.0 Gy, 103.5 Gy, 94.7 Gy, and 80.7 Gy, respectively. Among five patients with vaginal ulcer, three had prior pelvic radiation therapy in their initial treatment and three consequently suffered from fistula formation. On univariate analysis, re-irradiation and vaginal wall D2cc in EQD2 was the clinical predictors of vaginal ulcer (p = 0.035 and p = 0.025, respectively). The ROC analysis revealed that vaginal wall D2cc is the best predictor of vaginal ulcer. The 2-year incidence rates of vaginal ulcer in the patients with vaginal wall D2cc in EQD2 equal to or less than 145 Gy and over 145 Gy were 3.7% and 23.5%, respectively, with a statistically significant difference (p = 0.026). Conclusions Re-irradiation and vaginal D2cc is a significant predictor of vaginal ulcer after HDR-ISBT for

  5. Administration of Concurrent Vaginal Brachytherapy During Chemotherapy for Treatment of Endometrial Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nagar, Himanshu; Boothe, Dustin; Parikh, Amar; Yondorf, Menachem; Parashar, Bhupesh; Gupta, Divya; Holcomb, Kevin; Caputo, Thomas; Chao, K. S. Clifford; Nori, Dattatreyudu; Wernicke, A. Gabriella

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the tolerability and toxicity of administering vaginal brachytherapy (VB) concurrently during chemotherapy compared with the sequential approach for patients with endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis of 372 surgically staged patients with endometrial cancer American Joint Committee on Cancer 2009 stages I to IV treated with adjuvant postoperative radiation therapy (RT) at our institution from 2001 to 2012 was conducted. All patients received VB + external beam RT (EBRT) + 6 cycles of adjuvant carboplatin- and paclitaxel-based chemotherapy. The VB mean dose was 15.08 Gy (range, 15-20 Gy), with 3 to 4 weekly applications, and the EBRT mean dose was 45 Gy delivered with 3-dimensional or intensity modulated RT techniques. Hematologic, gastrointestinal (GI), and genitourinary (GU) toxicities were assessed by Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC) and compared between sequential and concurrent chemotherapy and VB schedules. Results: Among patients who received RT and adjuvant chemotherapy, 180 of 372 patients (48%) received RT sandwiched between cycles 3 and 4 of chemotherapy. A separate group of 192 patients (52%) were treated with VB during the first 3 cycles of chemotherapy, with a weekly application on nonchemotherapy days, and received the EBRT portion in a sandwiched fashion. Patients treated with VB during chemotherapy had a decreased overall treatment time by 4 weeks (P<.001; 95% confidence interval: 3.99-4.02) and sustained no difference in CTC-graded acute hematologic, GI, or GU toxicities in comparison with the patients treated with VB and chemotherapy in a sequential manner (P>.05). CTC grade 3 or 4 hematologic, GI, and GU toxicities were zero. Conclusions: VB during chemotherapy is well tolerated, decreases overall treatment time, and does not render more toxicity than the sequential regimen.

  6. The Role of Vaginal Brachytherapy in the Treatment of Surgical Stage I Papillary Serous or Clear Cell Endometrial Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Barney, Brandon M.; Petersen, Ivy A.; Mariani, Andrea; Dowdy, Sean C.; Bakkum-Gamez, Jamie N.; Haddock, Michael G.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The optimal adjuvant therapy for International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage I papillary serous (UPSC) or clear cell (CC) endometrial cancer is unknown. We report on the largest single-institution experience using adjuvant high-dose-rate vaginal brachytherapy (VBT) for surgically staged women with FIGO stage I UPSC or CC endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: From 1998-2011, 103 women with FIGO 2009 stage I UPSC (n=74), CC (n=21), or mixed UPSC/CC (n=8) endometrial cancer underwent total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy followed by adjuvant high-dose-rate VBT. Nearly all patients (n=98, 95%) also underwent extended lymph node dissection of pelvic and paraortic lymph nodes. All VBT was performed with a vaginal cylinder, treating to a dose of 2100 cGy in 3 fractions. Thirty-five patients (34%) also received adjuvant chemotherapy. Results: At a median follow-up time of 36 months (range, 1-146 months), 2 patients had experienced vaginal recurrence, and the 5-year Kaplan Meier estimate of vaginal recurrence was 3%. The rates of isolated pelvic recurrence, locoregional recurrence (vaginal + pelvic), and extrapelvic recurrence (including intraabdominal) were similarly low, with 5-year Kaplan-Meier estimates of 4%, 7%, and 10%, respectively. The estimated 5-year overall survival was 84%. On univariate analysis, delivery of chemotherapy did not affect recurrence or survival. Conclusions: VBT is effective at preventing vaginal relapse in women with surgical stage I UPSC or CC endometrial cancer. In this cohort of patients who underwent comprehensive surgical staging, the risk of isolated pelvic or extrapelvic relapse was low, implying that more extensive adjuvant radiation therapy is likely unnecessary.

  7. Uncertainties in Assesment of the Vaginal Dose for Intracavitary Brachytherapy of Cervical Cancer using a Tandem-ring Applicator

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, Daniel . E-mail: daniel.berger@akhwien.at; Dimopoulos, Johannes; Georg, Petra; Georg, Dietmar; Poetter, Richard; Kirisits, Christian

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: The vagina has not been widely recognized as organ at risk in brachytherapy for cervical cancer. No widely accepted dose parameters are available. This study analyzes the uncertainties in dose reporting for the vaginal wall using tandem-ring applicators. Methods and Materials: Organ wall contours were delineated on axial magnetic resonance (MR) slices to perform dose-volume histogram (DVH) analysis. Different DVH parameters were used in a feasibility study based on 40 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based treatment plans of different cervical cancer patients. Dose to the most irradiated, 0.1 cm{sup 3}, 1 cm{sup 3}, 2 cm{sup 3}, and at defined points on the ring surface and at 5-mm tissue depth were reported. Treatment-planning systems allow different methods of dose point definition. Film dosimetry was used to verify the maximum dose at the surface of the ring applicator in an experimental setup. Results: Dose reporting for the vagina is extremely sensitive to geometrical uncertainties with variations of 25% for 1 mm shifts. Accurate delineation of the vaginal wall is limited by the finite pixel size of MRI and available treatment-planning systems. No significant correlation was found between dose-point and dose-volume parameters. The DVH parameters were often related to noncontiguous volumes and were not able to detect very different situations of spatial dose distributions inside the vaginal wall. Deviations between measured and calculated doses were up to 21%. Conclusions: Reporting either point dose values or DVH parameters for the vaginal wall is based on high inaccuracies because of contouring and geometric positioning. Therefore, the use of prospective dose constraints for individual treatment plans is not to be recommended at present. However, for large patient groups treated within one protocol correlation with vaginal morbidity can be evaluated.

  8. Dose Reduction Study in Vaginal Balloon Packing Filled With Contrast for HDR Brachytherapy Treatment;HDR; Uterine cervix cancer; Vaginal balloon packing; Contrast; Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Saini, Amarjit S.; Zhang, Geoffrey G.; Finkelstein, Steven E.; Biagioli, Matthew C.

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Vaginal balloon packing is a means to displace organs at risk during high dose rate brachytherapy of the uterine cervix. We tested the hypothesis that contrast-filled vaginal balloon packing reduces radiation dose to organs at risk, such as the bladder and rectum, in comparison to water- or air-filled balloons. Methods and Materials: In a phantom study, semispherical vaginal packing balloons were filled with air, saline solution, and contrast agents. A high dose rate iridium-192 source was placed on the anterior surface of the balloon, and the diode detector was placed on the posterior surface. Dose ratios were taken with each material in the balloon. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, by use of the MC computer program DOSXYZnrc, were performed to study dose reduction vs. balloon size and contrast material, including commercially available iodine- and gadolinium-based contrast agents. Results: Measured dose ratios on the phantom with the balloon radius of 3.4 cm were 0.922 {+-} 0.002 for contrast/saline solution and 0.808 {+-} 0.001 for contrast/air. The corresponding ratios by MC simulations were 0.895 {+-} 0.010 and 0.781 {+-} 0.010. The iodine concentration in the contrast was 23.3% by weight. The dose reduction of contrast-filled balloon ranges from 6% to 15% compared with water-filled balloon and 11% to 26% compared with air-filled balloon, with a balloon size range between 1.4 and 3.8 cm, and iodine concentration in contrast of 24.9%. The dose reduction was proportional to the contrast agent concentration. The gadolinium-based contrast agents showed less dose reduction because of much lower concentrations in their solutions. Conclusions: The dose to the posterior wall of the bladder and the anterior wall of the rectum can be reduced if the vaginal balloon is filled with contrast agent in comparison to vaginal balloons filled with saline solution or air.

  9. Endometrial adenocarcinoma in one horn of a didelphic uterus with vaginal duplication

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez Vicente, Daniel; Di Fiore, Hugo Ariel; Garcia-Foncillas, Jesús; Plaza Arranz, Javier

    2014-01-01

    A 59-year-old female patient presented with vaginal bleeding. A didelphic uterus with vaginal duplication was diagnosed on the basis of physical examination and radiology tests. Biopsy revealed an endometrial cancer in the left horn, while the right was atrophic. Laparoscopic hysterectomy, bilateral salphingo-oophorectomy, pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy were performed. According to Federation International of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) staging the tumour was classified Ib. The adjuvant therapy was vaginal cuff brachytherapy. After 6 months, she has no evidence of the disease. PMID:24842355

  10. [Brachytherapy].

    PubMed

    Itami, Jun

    2014-12-01

    Brachytherapy do require a minimal expansion of CTV to obtain PTV and it is called as ultimate high precision radiation therapy. In high-dose rate brachytherapy, applicators will be placed around or into the tumor and CT or MRI will be performed with the applicators in situ. With such image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT) 3-dimensional treatment planning becomes possible and DVH of the tumor and organs at risk can be obtained. It is now even possible to make forward planning satisfying dose constraints. Traditional subjective evaluation of brachytherapy can be improved to the objective one by IGBT. Brachytherapy of the prostate cancer, cervical cancer, and breast cancer with IGBT technique was described. PMID:25596048

  11. Impact of the vaginal applicator and dummy pellets on the dosimetry parameters of Cs-137 brachytherapy source.

    PubMed

    Sina, Sedigheh; Faghihi, Reza; Meigooni, Ali S; Mehdizadeh, Simin; Mosleh Shirazi, M Amin; Zehtabian, Mehdi

    2011-01-01

    In this study, dose rate distribution around a spherical 137Cs pellet source, from a low-dose-rate (LDR) Selectron remote afterloading system used in gynecological brachytherapy, has been determined using experimental and Monte Carlo simulation techniques. Monte Carlo simulations were performed using MCNP4C code, for a single pellet source in water medium and Plexiglas, and measurements were performed in Plexiglas phantom material using LiF TLD chips. Absolute dose rate distribution and the dosimetric parameters, such as dose rate constant, radial dose functions, and anisotropy functions, were obtained for a single pellet source. In order to investigate the effect of the applicator and surrounding pellets on dosimetric parameters of the source, the simulations were repeated for six different arrangements with a single active source and five non-active pellets inside central metallic tubing of a vaginal cylindrical applicator. In commercial treatment planning systems (TPS), the attenuation effects of the applicator and inactive spacers on total dose are neglected. The results indicate that this effect could lead to overestimation of the calculated F(r,θ), by up to 7% along the longitudinal axis of the applicator, especially beyond the applicator tip. According to the results obtained in this study, in a real situation in treatment of patients using cylindrical vaginal applicator and using several active pellets, there will be a large discrepancy between the result of superposition and Monte Carlo simulations. PMID:21844861

  12. Brachytherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... smaller area in less time than conventional external beam radiation therapy. Brachytherapy is used to treat cancers ... to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. External beam radiation therapy (EBRT) involves high-energy x-ray ...

  13. Determination of Prognostic Factors for Vaginal Mucosal Toxicity Associated With Intravaginal High-Dose Rate Brachytherapy in Patients With Endometrial Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bahng, Agnes Y.; Dagan, Avner; Bruner, Deborah W.; Lin, Lilie L.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to determine the patient- and treatment-related prognostic factors associated with vaginal toxicity in patients who received intravaginal high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy alone as adjuvant treatment for endometrial cancer. Secondary goals of this study included a quantitative assessment of optimal dilator use frequency and a crude assessment of clinical predictors for compliant dilator use. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 100 patients with histologically confirmed endometrial cancer who underwent total hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy with or without lymph node dissection and adjuvant intravaginal brachytherapy between 1995 and 2009 at the Hospital of University of Pennsylvania. The most common treatment regimen used was 21 Gy in three fractions (71 patients). Symptoms of vaginal mucosal toxicity were taken from the history and physical exams noted in the patients' charts and were graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events v. 4.02. Results: The incidence of Grade 1 or asymptomatic vaginal toxicity was 33% and Grade 2-3 or symptomatic vaginal toxicity was 14%. Multivariate analysis of age, active length, and dilator use two to three times a week revealed odds ratios of 0.93 (p = 0.013), 3.96 (p = 0.008), and 0.17 (p = 0.032) respectively. Conclusion: Increasing age, vaginal dilator use of at least two to three times a week, and shorter active length were found to be significantly associated with a decreased risk of vaginal stenosis. Future prospective studies are necessary to validate our findings.

  14. Is there a subset of patients with recurrent cancer in the vagina who are not candidates for interstitial brachytherapy that can be treated with multichannel vaginal brachytherapy using graphic optimization?

    PubMed Central

    Bylund, Kevin C.; Matloubieh, Ahmad; Mazloom, Ali; Gray, Alexander; Sidhu, Ravinder; Barrette, Lucille; Chen, Yuhchyau

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate recurrent vaginal cancer treated with vaginal brachytherapy (VBT) using graphic optimization in patients not amenable to surgery and interstitial brachytherapy (ISBT). Material and methods We retrospectively reviewed the records of 5 patients with recurrent cancer in the vagina that were deemed not to be good candidates for ISBT implant because of medical reasons. All patients received computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (CT/MRI) based evaluation in addition to a detailed clinical examination, and were noted to have recurrent nodules in the vagina with size ranging from 10-25 mm. Four of the 5 patients had recurrent disease in the vaginal apex, whereas one patient had recurrence in the lateral vaginal wall. Subsequently, all patients were treated with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) followed by multichannel vaginal cylinder (MVC)-based VBT using graphic optimization for shaping the isodose to improve the clinical target volume (CTV) coverage, as well as to spare the organs at risk (OAR). The dose to the bladder and rectum with regard to 0.1 cc, 1 cc, and 2 cc were recorded. Results Median age of the patients was 78 years (range 58-86 years). Thickness of the lesions before VBT ranged from 6-15 mm. All patients were followed up with MRI at 3 months. All patients but one demonstrated complete clinical/ radiological response of the tumor. No patient had any grade III/IV toxicity at 24 months. Conclusions MVC-based VBT using graphic optimization is safe and yields favorable results if used judiciously. PMID:26034494

  15. Comparison of doses to the rectum derived from treatment planning system with in-vivo dose values in vaginal vault brachytherapy using cylinder applicators

    PubMed Central

    Obed, Rachel Ibhade; Akinlade, Bidemi Idayat; Ntekim, Atara

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In-vivo measurements to determine doses to organs-at-risk can be an essential part of brachytherapy quality assurance (QA). This study compares calculated doses to the rectum with measured dose values as a means of QA in vaginal vault brachytherapy using cylinder applicators. Material and methods At the Department of Radiotherapy, University College Hospital (UCH), Ibadan, Nigeria, intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) was delivered by a GyneSource high-dose-rate (HDR) unit with 60Co. Standard 2D treatment plans were created with HDR basic 2.6 software for prescription doses 5-7 Gy at points 5 mm away from the posterior surface of vaginal cylinder applicators (20, 25, and 30 mm diameters). The LiF:Mg, Ti thermoluminescent dosimeter rods (1 x 6 mm) were irradiated to a dose of 7 Gy on Theratron 60Co machine for calibration purpose prior to clinical use. Measurements in each of 34 insertions involving fourteen patients were performed with 5 TLD-100 rods placed along a re-usable rectal marker positioned in the rectum. The dosimeters were read in Harshaw 3500 TLD reader and compared with doses derived from the treatment planning system (TPS) at 1 cm away from the dose prescription points. Results The mean calculated and measured doses ranged from 2.1-3.8 Gy and 1.2-5.6 Gy with averages of 3.0 ± 0.5 Gy and 3.1 ± 1.1 Gy, respectively, for treatment lengths 2-8 cm along the cylinder-applicators. The mean values correspond to 48.9% and 50.8% of the prescribed doses, respectively. The deviations of the mean in-vivo doses from the TPS values ranged from –1.9 to 2.1 Gy with a p-value of 0.427. Conclusions This study was part of efforts to verify rectal dose obtained from the TPS during vaginal vault brachytherapy. There was no significant difference in the dose to the rectum from the two methods of measurements. PMID:26816506

  16. A Monte Carlo dosimetry study of vaginal {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy applications with a shielded cylindrical applicator set

    SciTech Connect

    Lymperopoulou, G.; Pantelis, E.; Papagiannis, P.; Rozaki-Mavrouli, H.; Sakelliou, L.; Baltas, D.; Karaiskos, P.

    2004-11-01

    A durable recommendation for brachytherapy treatment planning systems to account for the effect of tissue, applicator and shielding material heterogeneities exists. As different proposed approaches have not been integrated in clinical treatment planning routine yet, currently utilized systems disregard or, most commonly, do not fully account for the aforementioned effects. Therefore, it is of interest to evaluate the efficacy of current treatment planning in clinical applications susceptible to errors due to heterogeneities. In this work the effect of the internal structure as well as the shielding used with a commercially available cylindrical shielded applicator set (Nucletron part no. 084.320) for vaginal and rectum treatments is studied using three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulation for a clinical treatment plan involving seven source dwell positions of the classic microSelectron HDR {sup 192}Ir source. Results are compared to calculations of a treatment planning system (Plato BPS v.14.2.7), which assumes homogeneous water medium and applies a constant, multiplicative transmission factor only at points lying in the shadow of the shield. It is found that the internal structure of the applicator (which includes stainless steel, air and plastic materials) with no shield loaded does not affect the dose distribution relative to homogeneous water. In the unshielded side of the applicator with a 90 deg., 180 deg., or 270 deg. tungsten alloy shield loaded, an overestimation of treatment planning system calculations relative to Monte Carlo results was observed which is both shield and position dependent. While significant (up to 15%) at increased distances, which are not of major clinical importance, this overestimation does not affect dose prescription distances by more than 3%. The inverse effect of approx. 3% dose increase at dose prescription distances is observed for stainless steel shields. Regarding the shielded side of the applicator, it is shown that the

  17. Clinical Outcomes in International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stage IA Endometrial Cancer With Myometrial Invasion Treated With or Without Postoperative Vaginal Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Diavolitsis, V.; Rademaker, A.; Lurain, J.; Hoekstra, A.; Strauss, J.; Small, W.

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To assess the clinical outcomes of patients with Stage IA endometrial cancer with myometrial invasion treated with postoperative vaginal brachytherapy (VBT) with those who received no adjuvant therapy (NAT). Methods and Materials: All patients treated with hysterectomy for endometrial cancer at Northwestern Memorial Hospital between 1978 and 2005 were identified. Those patients with Stage IA disease with myometrial invasion who were treated with VBT alone or NAT were identified and included in the present analysis. Results: Of 252 patients with Stage IA endometrial cancer with superficial (<50%) myometrial invasion who met the inclusion criteria, 169 underwent VBT and 83 received NAT. The median follow-up in the VBT and NAT groups was 103 and 61 months, respectively. In the VBT group, 56.8% had Grade 1, 37.9% had Grade 2, and 5.3% had Grade 3 tumors. In the NAT group, 75.9%, 20.5%, and 3.6% had Grade 1, 2, and 3 tumors, respectively. Lymphatic or vascular space invasion was noted in 12.4% of the VBT patients and 5.6% of the NAT patients. The 5-year overall survival rate was 95.5%. The 5-year recurrence-free survival rate was 92.4% for all patients, 94.4% for the VBT group, and 87.4% for the NAT group (p = NS). Of the 169 VBT patients and 83 NAT patients, 8 (4.7%) and 6 (7.2%) developed recurrent disease. One vaginal recurrence occurred in the VBT group (0.6%) and three in the NAT group (3.8%). Recurrences developed 2-102 months after surgical treatment. Two of the four vaginal recurrences were salvaged. No Grade 3 or higher acute or late radiation toxicity was noted. Conclusions: The use of postoperative VBT in patients with Stage I endometrial cancer with <50% myometrial invasion yielded excellent vaginal disease control and disease-free survival, with minimal toxicity.

  18. Treatment of Locally Advanced Vaginal Cancer With Radiochemotherapy and Magnetic Resonance Image-Guided Adaptive Brachytherapy: Dose-Volume Parameters and First Clinical Results

    SciTech Connect

    Dimopoulos, Johannes C.A.; Schmid, Maximilian P.; Fidarova, Elena; Berger, Daniel; Kirisits, Christian; Poetter, Richard

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical feasibility of magnetic resonance image-guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT) for patients with locally advanced vaginal cancer and to report treatment outcomes. Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients with vaginal cancer were treated with external beam radiotherapy (45-50.4 Gy) plus IGABT with or without chemotherapy. Distribution of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages among patients were as follows: 4 patients had Stage II cancer, 5 patients had Stage III cancer, and 4 patients had Stage IV cancer. The concept of IGABT as developed for cervix cancer was transferred and adapted for vaginal cancer, with corresponding treatment planning and reporting. Doses were converted to the equivalent dose in 2 Gy, applying the linear quadratic model ({alpha}/{beta} = 10 Gy for tumor; {alpha}/{beta} = 3 for organs at risk). Endpoints studied were gross tumor volume (GTV), dose-volume parameters for high-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV), and organs at risk, local control (LC), adverse side effects, and survival. Results: The mean GTV ({+-} 1 standard deviation) at diagnosis was 45.3 ({+-}30) cm{sup 3}, and the mean GTV at brachytherapy was 10 ({+-}14) cm{sup 3}. The mean D90 for the HRCTV was 86 ({+-}13) Gy. The mean D2cc for bladder, urethra, rectum, and sigmoid colon were 80 ({+-}20) Gy, 76 ({+-}16) Gy, 70 ({+-}9) Gy, and 60 ({+-}9) Gy, respectively. After a median follow-up of 43 months (range, 19-87 months), one local recurrence and two distant metastases cases were observed. Actuarial LC and overall survival rates at 3 years were 92% and 85%. One patient with Stage IVA and 1 patient with Stage III disease experienced fistulas (one vesicovaginal, one rectovaginal), and 1 patient developed periurethral necrosis. Conclusions: The concept of IGABT, originally developed for treating cervix cancer, appears to be applicable to vaginal cancer treatment with only minor adaptations. Dose-volume parameters for HRCTV and

  19. Manifestation Pattern of Early-Late Vaginal Morbidity After Definitive Radiation (Chemo)Therapy and Image-Guided Adaptive Brachytherapy for Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer: An Analysis From the EMBRACE Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kirchheiner, Kathrin; Nout, Remi A.; Tanderup, Kari; Lindegaard, Jacob C.; Westerveld, Henrike; Haie-Meder, Christine; Petrič, Primož; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Dörr, Wolfgang; Pötter, Richard

    2014-05-01

    Background and Purpose: Brachytherapy in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer has changed substantially because of the introduction of combined intracavitary/interstitial applicators and an adaptive target concept, which is the focus of the prospective, multi-institutional EMBRACE study ( (www.embracestudy.dk)) on image-guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT). So far, little has been reported about the development of early to late vaginal morbidity in the frame of IGABT. Therefore, the aim of the present EMBRACE analysis was to evaluate the manifestation pattern of vaginal morbidity during the first 2 years of follow-up. Methods and Materials: In total, 588 patients with a median follow-up time of 15 months and information on vaginal morbidity were included. Morbidity was prospectively assessed at baseline, every 3 months during the first year, and every 6 months in the second year according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3, regarding vaginal stenosis, dryness, mucositis, bleeding, fistula, and other symptoms. Crude incidence rates, actuarial probabilities, and prevalence rates were analyzed. Results: At 2 years, the actuarial probability of severe vaginal morbidity (grade ≥3) was 3.6%. However, mild and moderate vaginal symptoms were still pronounced (grade ≥1, 89%; grade ≥2, 29%), of which the majority developed within 6 months. Stenosis was most frequently observed, followed by vaginal dryness. Vaginal bleeding and mucositis were mainly mild and infrequently reported. Conclusion: Severe vaginal morbidity within the first 2 years after definitive radiation (chemo)therapy including IGABT with intracavitary/interstitial techniques for locally advanced cervical cancer is limited and is significantly less than has been reported from earlier studies. Thus, the new adaptive target concept seems to be a safe treatment with regard to the vagina being an organ at risk. However, mild to moderate vaginal morbidity

  20. Effects of prescription depth, cylinder size, treatment length, tip space, and curved end on doses in high-dose-rate vaginal brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Li Shidong . E-mail: sli1@hfhs.org; Aref, Ibrahim; Walker, Eleanor; Movsas, Benjamin

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: To determine the effects of the prescription depth, cylinder size, treatment length, tip space, and curved end on high-dose-rate vaginal brachytherapy (HDR-VBT) of endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: Treatment plans were prescribed and optimized based on points at the cylinder surface or at 0.5-cm depth. Cylinder sizes ranging from 2 to 4 cm in diameter, and treatment lengths ranging from 3 to 8 cm were used. Dose points in various depths were precisely defined along the cylinder dome. The given dose and dose uniformity to a depth of interest were measured by the mean dose (MD) and standard deviation (SD), respectively, among the dose points belonging to the depth. Dose fall-off beyond the 0.5 cm treatment depth was determined by the ratio of MD at 0.75-cm depth to MD at 0.5-cm depth. Results: Dose distribution varies significantly with different prescriptions. The surface prescription provides more uniform doses at all depths in the target volume, whereas the 0.5-cm depth prescription creates larger dose variations at the cylinder surface. Dosimetric uncertainty increases significantly (>30%) with shorter tip space. Extreme hot (>150%) and cold spots (<60%) occur if no optimization points were placed at the curved end. Conclusions: Instead of prescribing to a depth of 0.5 cm, increasing the dose per fraction and prescribing to the surface with the exact surface points around the cylinder dome appears to be the optimal approach.

  1. Optimized Dose Distribution of Gammamed Plus Vaginal Cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Supe, Sanjay S. Bijina, T.K.; Varatharaj, C.; Shwetha, B.; Arunkumar, T.; Sathiyan, S.; Ganesh, K.M.; Ravikumar, M.

    2009-04-01

    Endometrial carcinoma is the most common malignancy arising in the female genital tract. Intracavitary vaginal cuff irradiation may be given alone or with external beam irradiation in patients determined to be at risk for locoregional recurrence. Vaginal cylinders are often used to deliver a brachytherapy dose to the vaginal apex and upper vagina or the entire vaginal surface in the management of postoperative endometrial cancer or cervical cancer. The dose distributions of HDR vaginal cylinders must be evaluated carefully, so that clinical experiences with LDR techniques can be used in guiding optimal use of HDR techniques. The aim of this study was to optimize dose distribution for Gammamed plus vaginal cylinders. Placement of dose optimization points was evaluated for its effect on optimized dose distributions. Two different dose optimization point models were used in this study, namely non-apex (dose optimization points only on periphery of cylinder) and apex (dose optimization points on periphery and along the curvature including the apex points). Thirteen dwell positions were used for the HDR dosimetry to obtain a 6-cm active length. Thus 13 optimization points were available at the periphery of the cylinder. The coordinates of the points along the curvature depended on the cylinder diameters and were chosen for each cylinder so that four points were distributed evenly in the curvature portion of the cylinder. Diameter of vaginal cylinders varied from 2.0 to 4.0 cm. Iterative optimization routine was utilized for all optimizations. The effects of various optimization routines (iterative, geometric, equal times) was studied for the 3.0-cm diameter vaginal cylinder. The effect of source travel step size on the optimized dose distributions for vaginal cylinders was also evaluated. All optimizations in this study were carried for dose of 6 Gy at dose optimization points. For both non-apex and apex models of vaginal cylinders, doses for apex point and three dome

  2. Comparison of high-dose-rate and low-dose-rate brachytherapy in the treatment of endometrial carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Fayed, Alaa; Mutch, David G.; Rader, Janet S.; Gibb, Randall K. |; Powell, Matthew A. |; Wright, Jason D.; El Naqa, Issam; Zoberi, Imran |; Grigsby, Perry W. |||. E-mail: pgrigsby@wustl.edu

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: To compare the outcomes for endometrial carcinoma patients treated with either high-dose-rate (HDR) or low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: This study included 1,179 patients divided into LDR (1,004) and HDR groups (175). Patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) surgical Stages I-III were included. All patients were treated with postoperative irradiation. In the LDR group, the postoperative dose applied to the vaginal cuff was 60-70 Gy surface doses to the vaginal mucosa. The HDR brachytherapy prescription was 6 fractions of 2 Gy each to a depth of 0.5 cm from the surface of the vaginal mucosa. Overall survival, disease-free survival, local control, and complications were endpoints. Results: For all stages combined, the overall survival, disease-free survival, and local control at 5 years in the LDR group were 70%, 69%, and 81%, respectively. For all stages combined, the overall survival, disease-free survival, and local control at 5 years in the HDR group were 68%, 62%, and 78%, respectively. There were no significant differences in early or late Grade III and IV complications in the HDR or LDR groups. Conclusion: Survival outcomes, pelvic tumor control, and Grade III and IV complications were not significantly different in the LDR brachytherapy group compared with the HDR group.

  3. Vaginal cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Vaginal cancer; Cancer - vagina; Tumor - vaginal ... Most vaginal cancers occur when another cancer, such as cervical or endometrial cancer , spreads. This is called secondary vaginal cancer. Cancer ...

  4. Comparison of 2D and 3D Imaging and Treatment Planning for Postoperative Vaginal Apex High-Dose Rate Brachytherapy for Endometrial Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, James K.; Armeson, Kent E.; Richardson, Susan

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate bladder and rectal doses using two-dimensional (2D) and 3D treatment planning for vaginal cuff high-dose rate (HDR) in endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: Ninety-one consecutive patients treated between 2000 and 2007 were evaluated. Seventy-one and 20 patients underwent 2D and 3D planning, respectively. Each patient received six fractions prescribed at 0.5 cm to the superior 3 cm of the vagina. International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) doses were calculated for 2D patients. Maximum and 2-cc doses were calculated for 3D patients. Organ doses were normalized to prescription dose. Results: Bladder maximum doses were 178% of ICRU doses (p < 0.0001). Two-cubic centimeter doses were no different than ICRU doses (p = 0.22). Two-cubic centimeter doses were 59% of maximum doses (p < 0.0001). Rectal maximum doses were 137% of ICRU doses (p < 0.0001). Two-cubic centimeter doses were 87% of ICRU doses (p < 0.0001). Two-cubic centimeter doses were 64% of maximum doses (p < 0.0001). Using the first 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5 fractions, we predicted the final bladder dose to within 10% for 44%, 59%, 83%, 82%, and 89% of patients by using the ICRU dose, and for 45%, 55%, 80%, 85%, and 85% of patients by using the maximum dose, and for 37%, 68%, 79%, 79%, and 84% of patients by using the 2-cc dose. Using the first 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5 fractions, we predicted the final rectal dose to within 10% for 100%, 100%, 100%, 100%, and 100% of patients by using the ICRU dose, and for 60%, 65%, 70%, 75%, and 75% of patients by using the maximum dose, and for 68%, 95%, 84%, 84%, and 84% of patients by using the 2-cc dose. Conclusions: Doses to organs at risk vary depending on the calculation method. In some cases, final dose accuracy appears to plateau after the third fraction, indicating that simulation and planning may not be necessary in all fractions. A clinically relevant level of accuracy should be determined and further research conducted to address

  5. Vaginal dryness

    MedlinePlus

    Vaginitis - atrophic; Vaginitis due to reduced estrogen; Atrophic vaginitis; Menopause vaginal dryness ... Atrophic vaginitis is caused by a decrease in estrogen. Estrogen keeps the tissues of the vagina lubricated ...

  6. Comparative dosimetric and radiobiological assessment among a nonstandard RapidArc, standard RapidArc, classical intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and 3D brachytherapy for the treatment of the vaginal vault in patients affected by gynecologic cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pedicini, Piernicola; Caivano, Rocchina; Fiorentino, Alba; Strigari, Lidia; Califano, Giorgia; Barbieri, Viviana; Sanpaolo, Piero; Castaldo, Giovanni; Benassi, Marcello; Fusco, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate a nonstandard RapidArc (RA) modality as alternative to high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BRT) or IMRT treatments of the vaginal vault in patients with gynecological cancer (GC). Nonstandard (with vaginal applicator) and standard (without vaginal applicator) RapidArc plans for 27 women with GC were developed to compare with HDR-BRT and IMRT. Dosimetric and radiobiological comparison were performed by means of dose-volume histogram and equivalent uniform dose (EUD) for planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs). In addition, the integral dose and the overall treatment times were evaluated. RA, as well as IMRT, results in a high uniform dose on PTV compared with HDR-BRT. However, the average of EUD for HDR-BRT was significantly higher than those with RA and IMRT. With respect to the OARs, standard RA was equivalent of IMRT but inferior to HDR-BRT. Furthermore, nonstandard RA was comparable with IMRT for bladder and sigmoid and better than HDR-BRT for the rectum because of a significant reduction of d{sub 2cc}, d{sub 1cc}, and d{sub max} (p < 0.01). Integral doses were always higher than HDR-BRT, although the values were very low. Delivery times were about the same and more than double for HDR-BRT compared with IMRT and RA, respectively. In conclusion, the boost of dose on vaginal vault in patients affected by GC delivered by a nonstandard RA technique was a reasonable alternative to the conventional HDR-BRT because of a reduction of delivery time and rectal dose at substantial comparable doses for the bladder and sigmoid. However HDR-BRT provides better performance in terms of PTV coverage as evidenced by a greater EUD.

  7. Rotator Cuff Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... others can be very painful. Treatment for a torn rotator cuff depends on age, health, how severe ... is, and how long you've had the torn rotator cuff. Treatment for torn rotator cuff includes: ...

  8. Rotator cuff problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... days, such as in painting and carpentry Poor posture over many years Aging Rotator cuff tears TEARS ... also help prevent rotator cuff problems. Practice good posture to keep your rotator cuff tendons and muscles ...

  9. Rotator Cuff Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... cuff are common. They include tendinitis, bursitis, and injuries such as tears. Rotator cuff tendons can become ... cuff depends on age, health, how severe the injury is, and how long you've had the ...

  10. Combined experimental and Monte Carlo verification of brachytherapy plans for vaginal applicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloboda, Ron S.; Wang, Ruqing

    1998-12-01

    Dose rates in a phantom around a shielded and an unshielded vaginal applicator containing Selectron low-dose-rate sources were determined by experiment and Monte Carlo simulation. Measurements were performed with thermoluminescent dosimeters in a white polystyrene phantom using an experimental protocol geared for precision. Calculations for the same set-up were done using a version of the EGS4 Monte Carlo code system modified for brachytherapy applications into which a new combinatorial geometry package developed by Bielajew was recently incorporated. Measured dose rates agree with Monte Carlo estimates to within 5% (1 SD) for the unshielded applicator, while highlighting some experimental uncertainties for the shielded applicator. Monte Carlo calculations were also done to determine a value for the effective transmission of the shield required for clinical treatment planning, and to estimate the dose rate in water at points in axial and sagittal planes transecting the shielded applicator. Comparison with dose rates generated by the planning system indicates that agreement is better than 5% (1 SD) at most positions. The precision thermoluminescent dosimetry protocol and modified Monte Carlo code are effective complementary tools for brachytherapy applicator dosimetry.

  11. Vaginal Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Vaginal problems are some of the most common reasons women go to the doctor. They may have ... the problem is vaginitis, an inflammation of the vagina. The main symptom is smelly vaginal discharge, but ...

  12. Application of the MCNP5 code to the Modeling of vaginal and intra-uterine applicators used in intracavitary brachytherapy: a first approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerardy, I.; Rodenas, J.; Van Dycke, M.; Gallardo, S.; Tondeur, F.

    2008-02-01

    Brachytherapy is a radiotherapy treatment where encapsulated radioactive sources are introduced within a patient. Depending on the technique used, such sources can produce high, medium or low local dose rates. The Monte Carlo method is a powerful tool to simulate sources and devices in order to help physicists in treatment planning. In multiple types of gynaecological cancer, intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR Ir-192 source) is used combined with other therapy treatment to give an additional local dose to the tumour. Different types of applicators are used in order to increase the dose imparted to the tumour and to limit the effect on healthy surrounding tissues. The aim of this work is to model both applicator and HDR source in order to evaluate the dose at a reference point as well as the effect of the materials constituting the applicators on the near field dose. The MCNP5 code based on the Monte Carlo method has been used for the simulation. Dose calculations have been performed with *F8 energy deposition tally, taking into account photons and electrons. Results from simulation have been compared with experimental in-phantom dose measurements. Differences between calculations and measurements are lower than 5%.The importance of the source position has been underlined.

  13. Brachytherapy for malignancies of the vagina in the 3D era

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Scott M.

    2015-01-01

    Vaginal cancer is an uncommon malignancy and can be either recurrent or primary. In both cases, brachytherapy places a central role in the overall treatment course. Recent technological advances have led to more advanced brachytherapy techniques, which in turn have translated to improved outcomes for patients with malignancies of the vagina. The aim of this manuscript is to outline the incorporation of modern brachytherapy into the treatment of patients with vaginal cancer including patient selection along with the role of brachytherapy in conjunction with other treatment modalities, various brachytherapy techniques, treatment planning, dose fractionation schedules, and normal tissue tolerance. PMID:26622234

  14. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Burkhart, Stephen S; Lo, Ian K Y

    2006-06-01

    Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is being performed by an increasing number of orthopaedic surgeons. The principles, techniques, and instrumentation have evolved to the extent that all patterns and sizes of rotator cuff tear, including massive tears, can now be repaired arthroscopically. Achieving a biomechanically stable construct is critical to biologic healing. The ideal repair construct must optimize suture-to-bone fixation, suture-to-tendon fixation, abrasion resistance of suture, suture strength, knot security, loop security, and restoration of the anatomic rotator cuff footprint (the surface area of bone to which the cuff tendons attach). By achieving optimized repair constructs, experienced arthroscopic surgeons are reporting results equal to those of open rotator cuff repair. As surgeons' arthroscopic skill levels increase through attendance at surgical skills courses and greater experience gained in the operating room, there will be an increasing trend toward arthroscopic repair of most rotator cuff pathology. PMID:16757673

  15. SU-D-19A-05: The Dosimetric Impact of Using Xoft Axxent® Electronic Brachytherapy Source TG-43 Dosimetry Parameters for Treatment with the Xoft 30 Mm Diameter Vaginal Applicator

    SciTech Connect

    Simiele, S; Micka, J; Culberson, W; DeWerd, L

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A full TG-43 dosimetric characterization has not been performed for the Xoft Axxent ® electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft, a subsidiary of iCAD, San Jose, CA) within the Xoft 30 mm diameter vaginal applicator. Currently, dose calculations are performed using the bare-source TG-43 parameters and do not account for the presence of the applicator. This work focuses on determining the difference between the bare-source and sourcein- applicator TG-43 parameters. Both the radial dose function (RDF) and polar anisotropy function (PAF) were computationally determined for the source-in-applicator and bare-source models to determine the impact of using the bare-source dosimetry data. Methods: MCNP5 was used to model the source and the Xoft 30 mm diameter vaginal applicator. All simulations were performed using 0.84p and 0.03e cross section libraries. All models were developed based on specifications provided by Xoft. The applicator is made of a proprietary polymer material and simulations were performed using the most conservative chemical composition. An F6 collision-kerma tally was used to determine the RDF and PAF values in water at various dwell positions. The RDF values were normalized to 2.0 cm from the source to accommodate the applicator radius. Source-in-applicator results were compared with bare-source results from this work as well as published baresource results. Results: For a 0 mm source pullback distance, the updated bare-source model and source-in-applicator RDF values differ by 2% at 3 cm and 4% at 5 cm. The largest PAF disagreements were observed at the distal end of the source and applicator with up to 17% disagreement at 2 cm and 8% at 8 cm. The bare-source model had RDF values within 2.6% of the published TG-43 data and PAF results within 7.2% at 2 cm. Conclusion: Results indicate that notable differences exist between the bare-source and source-in-applicator TG-43 simulated parameters. Xoft Inc. provided partial funding for this work.

  16. Radiation tolerance of the vaginal mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Hintz, b.L.; Kagan, A.R.; Chan, P.; Gilbert, H.A.; Nussbaum, H.; Rao, A.R.; Wollin, M.

    1980-06-01

    Sixteen patients with cancer of the vagina that were controlled locally for a minimum of eighteen months after teletherpay (T) or brachytherapy (B) or both (T and B), were analyzed for radiation tolerance of the vaginal mucosa. The site of vaginal necrosis did not always coincide with the site of the tumor. The posterior wall appeared more vulnerable than the anterior or lateral walls. For the distal vaginal mucosa, necrosis requiring surgical intervention occurred following combined T and B, if summated rad exceeded9800. The upper vagina tolerated higher dosages. No patient surgery for upper vaginal necrosis even though summated (T and B) dosage up to 14,000 rad was applied. Placing radioactive needles on the surface of the vaginal cylinder with or without interstitial perincal needles should be avoided. Further accumulation of data is needed to define these vaginal mucosa tolerance limits more closely.

  17. Clindamycin Vaginal

    MedlinePlus

    ... an infection caused by an overgrowth of harmful bacteria in the vagina). Clindamycin is in a class ... works by slowing or stopping the growth of bacteria. Vaginal clindamycin cannot be used to treat vaginal ...

  18. Bladder (ICRU) dose point does not predict urinary acute toxicity in adjuvant isolated vaginal vault high-dose-rate brachytherapy for intermediate-risk endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aiza, Antonio; Gomes, Maria José Leite; Chen, Michael Jenwei; Pellizzon, Antonio Cassio de Assis; Mansur, David B.; Baiocchi, Glauco

    2015-01-01

    Purpose High-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) alone is an adjuvant treatment option for stage I intermediaterisk endometrial cancer after complete surgical resection. The aim of this study was to determine the value of the dose reported to ICRU bladder point in predicting acute urinary toxicity. Oncologic results are also presented. Material and methods One hundred twenty-six patients were treated with postoperative HDR-BT 24 Gy (4 × 6 Gy) per ICRU guidelines for dose reporting. Cox analysis was used to identify variables that affected local control. The mean bladder point dose was examined for its ability to predict acute urinary toxicity. Results Two patients (1.6%) developed grade 1 gastrointestinal toxicity and 12 patients (9.5%) developed grades 1-2 urinary toxicity. No grade 3 or greater toxicity was observed. The mean bladder point dose was 46.9% (11.256 Gy) and 49.8% (11.952 Gy) for the asymptomatic and symptomatic groups, respectively (p = 0.69). After a median follow-up of 36.8 months, the 3-year local failure and 5-year cancer-specific and overall survival rates were 2.1%, 100%, and 94.6%, respectively. No pelvic failure was seen in this cohort. Age over 60 years (p = 0.48), lymphatic invasion (p = 0.77), FIGO histological grade (p = 0.76), isthmus invasion (p = 0.68), and applicator type (cylinder × ovoid) (p = 0.82) did not significantly affect local control. Conclusions In this retrospective study, ICRU bladder point did not correlate with urinary toxicity. Four fractions of 6 Gy HDR-BT effected satisfactory local control, with acceptable urinary and gastrointestinal toxicity. PMID:26622241

  19. Analysis of a Standardized Technique for Laparoscopic Cuff Closure following 1924 Total Laparoscopic Hysterectomies

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Alfred; Sten, Margaret S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To review the vaginal cuff complications from a large series of total laparoscopic hysterectomies in which the laparoscopic culdotomy closure was highly standardized. Methods. Retrospective cohort study (Canadian Task Force Classification II-3) of consecutive total and radical laparoscopic hysterectomy patients with all culdotomy closures performed laparoscopically was conducted using three guidelines: placement of all sutures 5 mm deep from the vaginal edge with a 5 mm interval, incorporation of the uterosacral ligaments with the pubocervical fascia at each angle, and, whenever possible, suturing the bladder peritoneum over the vaginal cuff edge utilizing two suture types of comparable tensile strength. Four outcomes are reviewed: dehiscence, bleeding, infection, and adhesions. Results. Of 1924 patients undergoing total laparoscopic hysterectomy, 44 patients (2.29%) experienced a vaginal cuff complication, with 19 (0.99%) requiring reoperation. Five patients (0.26%) had dehiscence after sexual penetration on days 30–83, with 3 requiring reoperation. Thirteen patients (0.68%) developed bleeding, with 9 (0.47%) requiring reoperation. Twenty-three (1.20%) patients developed infections, with 4 (0.21%) requiring reoperation. Three patients (0.16%) developed obstructive small bowel adhesions to the cuff requiring laparoscopic lysis. Conclusion. A running 5 mm deep × 5 mm apart culdotomy closure that incorporates the uterosacral ligaments with the pubocervical fascia, with reperitonealization when possible, appears to be associated with few postoperative vaginal cuff complications. PMID:27579179

  20. Analysis of a Standardized Technique for Laparoscopic Cuff Closure following 1924 Total Laparoscopic Hysterectomies.

    PubMed

    O'Hanlan, Katherine A; Emeney, Pamela L; Peters, Alfred; Sten, Margaret S; McCutcheon, Stacey P; Struck, Danielle M; Hoang, Joseph K

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To review the vaginal cuff complications from a large series of total laparoscopic hysterectomies in which the laparoscopic culdotomy closure was highly standardized. Methods. Retrospective cohort study (Canadian Task Force Classification II-3) of consecutive total and radical laparoscopic hysterectomy patients with all culdotomy closures performed laparoscopically was conducted using three guidelines: placement of all sutures 5 mm deep from the vaginal edge with a 5 mm interval, incorporation of the uterosacral ligaments with the pubocervical fascia at each angle, and, whenever possible, suturing the bladder peritoneum over the vaginal cuff edge utilizing two suture types of comparable tensile strength. Four outcomes are reviewed: dehiscence, bleeding, infection, and adhesions. Results. Of 1924 patients undergoing total laparoscopic hysterectomy, 44 patients (2.29%) experienced a vaginal cuff complication, with 19 (0.99%) requiring reoperation. Five patients (0.26%) had dehiscence after sexual penetration on days 30-83, with 3 requiring reoperation. Thirteen patients (0.68%) developed bleeding, with 9 (0.47%) requiring reoperation. Twenty-three (1.20%) patients developed infections, with 4 (0.21%) requiring reoperation. Three patients (0.16%) developed obstructive small bowel adhesions to the cuff requiring laparoscopic lysis. Conclusion. A running 5 mm deep × 5 mm apart culdotomy closure that incorporates the uterosacral ligaments with the pubocervical fascia, with reperitonealization when possible, appears to be associated with few postoperative vaginal cuff complications. PMID:27579179

  1. [Vaginal ecosystem].

    PubMed

    Kovachev, S

    2011-01-01

    Vaginal flora plays an important role in preventing genital and urinary tract infections in women. In fact every little movement of obligate and/or facultative vaginal micro flora over the normal limits for this ecosystem causes vaginal disbacteriosis. Vaginal disbacteriosis is a risk condition which can cause infection. Thus an accurate understanding of the composition and ecology of the ecosystem is important to understanding the etiology of urogenital diseases. The aim of this review is to update knowledge about vaginal micro biota, the Lactobacillus species that dominate normal vaginal flora and the way they suppressed infectivity and/or proliferation of pathogenic bacteria. A Medline (Pub med) and medical literature search from 1990-2010 for relevant articles was performed and the most informative articles were selected. Lactic acid bacteria determinate the most of defense mechanisms of women vagina by concurrent adhesion, producing lactic acid, antimicrobial products, hydrogen peroxide and by local interactions with the innate and cell-mediated immune systems and plasminogen-plasmin system. All this mechanisms promotes the stability of the normal vaginal micro flora. Every Lactobacillus species play a different role in host--defense vaginal system. The presence of different Lactobacillus species with the normal vaginal micro flora is a major determinant to the stability of this micro flora and for urogenital health. PMID:21916315

  2. Rotator cuff problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... tear occurs when one of the tendons is torn from the bone from overuse or injury. Causes ... surgery with a larger incision) to repair the torn tendon. Outlook (Prognosis) With rotator cuff tendinitis, rest, ...

  3. Rotator cuff repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... already torn from chronic rotator cuff problems. A partial tear may not require surgery. Instead, rest and ... Follow any discharge and self-care instructions you are given. You will be wearing a sling when you leave the hospital. ...

  4. Vaginal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Vaginal cancer is a rare type of cancer. It is more common in women 60 and older. You are also more likely to get it if you have had a human ... test can find abnormal cells that may be cancer. Vaginal cancer can often be cured in its ...

  5. [Vaginal dryness].

    PubMed

    Mares, P; Hoffet, M; Rousseau, O; Ripart-Neveu, S

    2001-01-31

    Vaginal dryness is one of the "little problems" that are too often, ignored. The disorder essentially manifests at the time of menopause, but can occur at other times, such as with oral contraception, following vaginal infection, after treatment for infection, etc. Screening for the disorder should become routine. Management should have precise objectives: cure of the infection and restablishment of the vaginal flora in order to reconstitute a natural balance. Treatment can be adapted for each patient to obtain effective and lasting results. PMID:11252940

  6. Estrogen Vaginal

    MedlinePlus

    ... estradiol vaginal ring is also used to treat hot flushes ('hot flashes'; sudden strong feelings of heat and sweating) ... mild soap and warm water. Do not use hot water or boil the applicator. Ask your pharmacist ...

  7. Vaginal Pessary

    MedlinePlus

    ... your vagina). A pessary can also help many women who have stress urinary incontinence (the leaking of urine when you cough, strain or exercise). Pregnant women who have incontinence can also use a vaginal ...

  8. Vaginal Discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... also be on the lookout for symptoms of yeast infections, bacterial vaginosis and trichomoniasis, 3 infections that ... cause changes in your vaginal discharge. Signs of yeast infections White, cottage cheese-like discharge Swelling and ...

  9. Vaginal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Two common vaginal infections are bacterial vaginosis and yeast infections . Bacterial vaginosis (BV) happens when a certain ... increases the chances that you’ll get BV. Yeast infections happen when a fungus (a type of ...

  10. Hysterectomy - vaginal - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Vaginal hysterectomy - discharge; Laparoscopically assisted vaginal hysterectomy - discharge; LAVH - discharge ... you were in the hospital, you had a vaginal hysterectomy. Your surgeon made a cut in your ...

  11. Hysterectomy - vaginal - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Vaginal hysterectomy - discharge; Laparoscopically assisted vaginal hysterectomy - discharge; LAVH - discharge ... were in the hospital, you had a vaginal hysterectomy. Your surgeon made a cut in your vagina. ...

  12. Vaginal reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Lesavoy, M.A.

    1985-05-01

    Vaginal reconstruction can be an uncomplicated and straightforward procedure when attention to detail is maintained. The Abbe-McIndoe procedure of lining the neovaginal canal with split-thickness skin grafts has become standard. The use of the inflatable Heyer-Schulte vaginal stent provides comfort to the patient and ease to the surgeon in maintaining approximation of the skin graft. For large vaginal and perineal defects, myocutaneous flaps such as the gracilis island have been extremely useful for correction of radiation-damaged tissue of the perineum or for the reconstruction of large ablative defects. Minimal morbidity and scarring ensue because the donor site can be closed primarily. With all vaginal reconstruction, a compliant patient is a necessity. The patient must wear a vaginal obturator for a minimum of 3 to 6 months postoperatively and is encouraged to use intercourse as an excellent obturator. In general, vaginal reconstruction can be an extremely gratifying procedure for both the functional and emotional well-being of patients.

  13. Vaginal Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Mendling, Werner

    2016-01-01

    The knowledge about the normal and abnormal vaginal microbiome has changed over the last years. Culturing techniques are not suitable any more for determination of a normal or abnormal vaginal microbiota. Non culture-based modern technologies revealed a complex and dynamic system mainly dominated by lactobacilli.The normal and the abnormal vaginal microbiota are complex ecosystems of more than 200 bacterial species influenced by genes, ethnic background and environmental and behavioral factors. Several species of lactobacilli per individuum dominate the healthy vagina. They support a defense system together with antibacterial substances, cytokines, defensins and others against dysbiosis, infections and care for an normal pregnancy without preterm birth.The numbers of Lactobacillus (L.) iners increase in the case of dysbiosis.Bacterial vaginosis (BV) - associated bacteria (BVAB), Atopobium vaginae and Clostridiales and one or two of four Gardnerella vaginalis - strains develop in different mixtures and numbers polymicrobial biofilms on the vaginal epithelium, which are not dissolved by antibiotic therapies according to guidelines and, thus, provoke recurrences.Aerobic vaginitis seems to be an immunological disorder of the vagina with influence on the microbiota, which is here dominated by aerobic bacteria (Streptococcus agalactiae, Escherichia coli). Their role in AV is unknown.Vaginal or oral application of lactobacilli is obviously able to improve therapeutic results of BV and dysbiosis. PMID:27161352

  14. Total Laparoscopic Hysterectomy and Laparoscopic-Assisted Vaginal Hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    King, Cara R; Giles, Dobie

    2016-09-01

    Vaginal hysterectomy has been shown to have the lowest complication rate, better cosmesis, and decreased cost compared with alternate routes of hysterectomy. However, there are times when a vaginal hysterectomy is not feasible and an open abdominal hysterectomy should be avoided. Minimally invasive surgery has evolved over the last several decades; with the improvement in optics and surgical instruments, laparoscopic hysterectomy is becoming increasingly common. A total laparoscopic hysterectomy is possible with proper training, including sound technique in laparoscopic suturing for closure of the vaginal cuff. PMID:27521879

  15. Rotator Cuff Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Many baseball players suffer from shoulder injuries related to the rotator cuff muscles. These injuries may be classified as muscular strain, tendonitis or tenosynovitis, and impingement syndrome. Treatment varies from simple rest to surgery, so it is important to be seen by a physician as soon as possible. In order to prevent these injuries, the…

  16. Vaginal molds for intracavitary curietherapy: a new method of preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Bertoni, F.; Bertoni, G.; Bignardi, M.

    1983-10-01

    A new method of preparing vaginal molds for afterloading intracavitary brachytherapy is described. Our technique makes it possible to obtain the most accurate individualization of therapy as far as dose distribution is concerned by taking into account the patient's anatomy and target volume.

  17. Biologics in rotator cuff surgery

    PubMed Central

    Schär, Michael O; Rodeo, Scott A

    2014-01-01

    Pathologies of the rotator cuff are by far the most common cause of shoulder dysfunction and pain. Even though reconstruction of the rotator cuff results in improved clinical outcome scores, including decreased pain, several studies report high failure rates. Orthopaedic research has therefore focused on biologically augmenting the rotator cuff reconstruction and improving tendon–bone healing of the rotator cuff. This biological augmentation has included the application of different platelet concentrates containing growth factors, mesenchymal stem cells, scaffolds and a combination of the above. The present review provides an overview over the biological augmentation options based upon current evidence.

  18. Special report: Occlusive cuff controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, J. T.

    1975-01-01

    A mechanical occlusive cuff controller suitable for blood flow experiments in space shuttle flights is described. The device requires 115 volt ac power and a pressurized gas source. Two occluding cuff pressures (30 and 50 mmHg) are selectable by a switch on the front panel. A screw driver adjustment allows accurate cuff pressurization levels for under or oversized limbs. Two pressurization cycles (20 second and 2 minutes) can be selected by a front panel switch. Adjustment of the timing cycles is also available through the front panel. A pushbutton hand switch allows remote start of the cuff inflation cycle. A stop/reset switch permits early termination of the cycle and disabling of the controller to prevent inadvertent reactivation. Pressure in the cuff is monitored by a differential aneroid barometer. In addition, an electrocardiogram trigger circuit permits the initiation of the pressurization cycle by an externally supplied ECG cycle.

  19. Factors affecting rotator cuff healing.

    PubMed

    Mall, Nathan A; Tanaka, Miho J; Choi, Luke S; Paletta, George A

    2014-05-01

    Several studies have noted that increasing age is a significant factor for diminished rotator cuff healing, while biomechanical studies have suggested the reason for this may be an inferior healing environment in older patients. Larger tears and fatty infiltration or atrophy negatively affect rotator cuff healing. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, double-row repairs, performing a concomitant acromioplasty, and the use of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) do not demonstrate an improvement in structural healing over mini-open rotator cuff repairs, single-row repairs, not performing an acromioplasty, or not using PRP. There is conflicting evidence to support postoperative rehabilitation protocols using early motion over immobilization following rotator cuff repair. PMID:24806015

  20. Vaginal yeast infection

    MedlinePlus

    Yeast infection - vagina; Vaginal candidiasis; Monilial vaginitis ... Most women have a vaginal yeast infection at some time. Candida albicans is a common type of fungus. It is often found in small amounts in the vagina , ...

  1. Vaginal yeast infection

    MedlinePlus

    Yeast infection - vagina; Vaginal candidiasis; Monilial vaginitis ... Most women have a vaginal yeast infection at some time. Candida albicans is a common type of fungus. It is often found in small amounts in the ...

  2. Rolling cuff flexible bellows

    DOEpatents

    Lambert, Donald R.

    1985-01-01

    A flexible connector apparatus used to join two stiff non-deformable members, such as piping. The apparatus is provided with one or more flexible sections or assemblies each utilizing a bellows of a rolling cuff type connected between two ridge members, with the bellows being supported by a back-up ring, such that only the curved end sections of the bellows are unsupported. Thus, the bellows can be considered as being of a tube-shaped configuration and thus have high pressure resistance. The components of the flexible apparatus are sealed or welded one to another such that it is fluid tight.

  3. Rolling cuff flexible bellows

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, D. R.

    1985-09-10

    A flexible connector apparatus used to join two stiff non-deformable members, such as piping. The apparatus is provided with one or more flexible sections or assemblies each utilizing a bellows of a rolling cuff type connected between two ridge members, with the bellows being supported by a back-up ring, such that only the curved end sections of the bellows are unsupported. Thus, the bellows can be considered as being of a tube-shaped configuration and thus have high pressure resistance. The components of the flexible apparatus are sealed or welded one to another such that it is fluid tight.

  4. 21 CFR 868.5760 - Cuff spreader.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cuff spreader. 868.5760 Section 868.5760 Food and... ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5760 Cuff spreader. (a) Identification. A cuff spreader is a device used to install tracheal tube cuffs on tracheal or tracheostomy tubes. (b) Classification. Class...

  5. 21 CFR 868.5760 - Cuff spreader.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cuff spreader. 868.5760 Section 868.5760 Food and... ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5760 Cuff spreader. (a) Identification. A cuff spreader is a device used to install tracheal tube cuffs on tracheal or tracheostomy tubes. (b) Classification. Class...

  6. 21 CFR 868.5760 - Cuff spreader.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cuff spreader. 868.5760 Section 868.5760 Food and... ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5760 Cuff spreader. (a) Identification. A cuff spreader is a device used to install tracheal tube cuffs on tracheal or tracheostomy tubes. (b) Classification. Class...

  7. 21 CFR 868.5760 - Cuff spreader.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cuff spreader. 868.5760 Section 868.5760 Food and... ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5760 Cuff spreader. (a) Identification. A cuff spreader is a device used to install tracheal tube cuffs on tracheal or tracheostomy tubes. (b) Classification. Class...

  8. 21 CFR 868.5760 - Cuff spreader.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cuff spreader. 868.5760 Section 868.5760 Food and... ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5760 Cuff spreader. (a) Identification. A cuff spreader is a device used to install tracheal tube cuffs on tracheal or tracheostomy tubes. (b) Classification. Class...

  9. Vaginal sponge and spermicides

    MedlinePlus

    Birth control - over the counter; Contraceptives - over the counter ... include irritation and allergic reactions. VAGINAL SPONGE Vaginal contraceptive sponges are soft sponges covered with a spermicide. ...

  10. Rotator cuff repair - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... shoulder and arm bones. The tendons can be torn from overuse or injury. ... Surgery to repair a torn rotator cuff is usually very successful at relieving pain in the shoulder. The procedure is less predictable at returning strength ...

  11. Rotator cuff - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    ... tendons that attach to the bones of the shoulder joint, allowing the shoulder to move and remain stable. Common rotator cuff ... can help when you feel pain in your shoulder. An ice pack applied to the shoulder 20 ...

  12. Interstitial radiotherapy for early stage vaginal cancer. A new method of tumor localization.

    PubMed

    Finan, M A; Hoffman, M S; Greenberg, H; Roberts, W S; Cavanagh, D; Fiorica, J V

    1993-03-01

    Carcinoma of the vagina is optimally treated primarily with teletherapy, followed by interstitial needle brachytherapy. Following teletherapy, identification of the original tumor site is frequently difficult. We describe a method of marking the tumor with an india ink "tattoo" at initial presentation, followed by placement of a purse-string suture and titanium hemoclips at the time of brachytherapy. A stable marker is created so that the location of the original vaginal tumor can be easily identified on dosimetric films. PMID:7683723

  13. Postpartum Vaginal Stenosis Due to Chemical Vaginitis.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurcharan; Sinha, Maruti; Gupta, Ridhima

    2016-05-01

    Acquired vaginal stenosis is a rare obstructing anomaly, which can be caused by use of chemicals in the vagina. A 21-year-old gravida 1 para 1, presented with secondary amenorrhea and inability to have sexual intercourse, after normal spontaneous vaginal delivery complicated by post partum bleeding. The delivery was conducted by untrained traditional birth attendant at home. The wash cloth soaked with caustic soda was packed in the patient's vagina and was left in situ for 10 days, which ultimately led to the severe scarring and stenosis of the vagina. Patient underwent surgical management and the extensive vaginal adhesions were excised and a patent vagina was reconstructed. Patient then reported successful vaginal intercourse without dyspareunia. Post partum vaginal stenosis due to chemical vaginitis is rare. These cases can be prevented by adequate training of untrained health care workers. PMID:27437311

  14. Postpartum Vaginal Stenosis Due to Chemical Vaginitis

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Gurcharan; Gupta, Ridhima

    2016-01-01

    Acquired vaginal stenosis is a rare obstructing anomaly, which can be caused by use of chemicals in the vagina. A 21-year-old gravida 1 para 1, presented with secondary amenorrhea and inability to have sexual intercourse, after normal spontaneous vaginal delivery complicated by post partum bleeding. The delivery was conducted by untrained traditional birth attendant at home. The wash cloth soaked with caustic soda was packed in the patient’s vagina and was left in situ for 10 days, which ultimately led to the severe scarring and stenosis of the vagina. Patient underwent surgical management and the extensive vaginal adhesions were excised and a patent vagina was reconstructed. Patient then reported successful vaginal intercourse without dyspareunia. Post partum vaginal stenosis due to chemical vaginitis is rare. These cases can be prevented by adequate training of untrained health care workers. PMID:27437311

  15. Vaginal birth - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100198.htm Vaginal birth - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features ... vaginal delivery. Please keep in mind that every birth is unique, and your labor and delivery may ...

  16. Vaginal sponge and spermicides

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/004003.htm Vaginal sponge and spermicides To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Spermicides and vaginal sponges are two over-the-counter birth control methods ...

  17. Vaginal bleeding between periods

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003156.htm Vaginal bleeding between periods To use the sharing features ... this page, please enable JavaScript. This article discusses vaginal bleeding that occurs between a woman's monthly menstrual ...

  18. Assisted Vaginal Delivery

    MedlinePlus

    ... having a repeat assisted vaginal delivery in a future pregnancy? If you have had one assisted vaginal ... a vacuum device. Vacuum Device: A metal or plastic cup that is applied to the fetus’ head ...

  19. Management of aerobic vaginitis.

    PubMed

    Tempera, Gianna; Furneri, Pio Maria

    2010-01-01

    Aerobic vaginitis is a new nonclassifiable pathology that is neither specific vaginitis nor bacterial vaginosis. The diversity of this microbiological peculiarity could also explain several therapeutic failures when patients were treated for infections identified as bacterial vaginosis. The diagnosis 'aerobic vaginitis' is essentially based on microscopic examinations using a phase-contrast microscope (at ×400 magnification). The therapeutic choice for 'aerobic vaginitis' should take into consideration an antibiotic characterized by an intrinsic activity against the majority of bacteria of fecal origin, bactericidal effect and poor/absent interference with the vaginal microbiota. Regarding the therapy for aerobic vaginitis when antimicrobial agents are prescribed, not only the antimicrobial spectrum but also the presumed ecological disturbance on the anaerobic and aerobic vaginal and rectal microbiota should be taken into a consideration. Because of their very low impact on the vaginal microbiota, kanamycin or quinolones are to be considered a good choice for therapy. PMID:21051843

  20. Vaginal Yeast Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... t diagnose this condition by a person’s medical history and physical examination. They usually diagnose yeast infection by examining vaginal secretions under a microscope for evidence of yeast. Treatment Various antifungal vaginal ...

  1. Efficacy of Different Rotator Cuff Repair Techniques.

    PubMed

    Gurnani, Navin; van Deurzen, Derek Friedrich Petrus; Flipsen, Mark; Raven, Eric Ernest Joseph; van den Bekerom, Michel Pieter Jozef

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this review article is to describe the currently used techniques for rotator cuff repair and after treatment. The literature was searched for the different surgical techniques and additional treatment including: [1] full arthroscopic and arthroscopic assisted rotator cuff repair, [2] acromioplasty as an additional treatment to rotator cuff repair, [3] the use of plasma rich platelets (PRP) after rotator cuff repair, [4] the single and double row fixation techniques, [5] long head of the biceps brachii tenotomy or tenodesis with rotator cuff repair, [6] scaffolds in rotator cuff surgery, and [7] early motion or immobilization after rotator cuff repair. The rationale, the results, and the scientific evidence were reported for the eligible procedures. PMID:26055023

  2. Rotator Cuff Tear Shape Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, David Steven; Kaplan, Daniel James; Fralinger, David; Gyftopoulos, Soterios; Meislin, Robert J.; Jazrawi, Laith M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Proper surgical planning requires accurate and reliable pre-operative patient information. The more comprehensive the data, the more the surgeon can tailor a general surgical technique to an individual patient’s unique anatomy. A previous retrospective study demonstrated that three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging more accurately characterized rotator cuff tears compared to two-dimensional images when checked against intra-operative pictures. The purpose of this study was to determine if three-dimensional MRI imaging would continue to be more accurate than two-dimensional imaging in a prospective study. Methods: Patients were prospectively included if they had a full-thickness primary rotator cuff tear on pre-operative MRI. Intra-op videos were taken from the posterior and lateral portals, with a grasper fully mobilizing the torn tendon in each view. 7 surgeons then reviewed the videos and independently characterized the shape of the tears into crescent, U-shaped tears, L-shaped tears, or massive tears. This was considered the gold-standard. Two musculoskeletal radiologists reviewed the corresponding MRI studies independently and blind to the arthroscopic findings and characterized the shape on the basis of the tear’s retraction and size 2D MRI. The 3D reconstructions of each cuff tear were reviewed by each radiologist to characterize the shape. Statistical analysis included 95% confidence intervals and fleiss’s kappa. Results: 37 patients were enrolled in the study. Among the 7 surgeons, agreement on cuff tear was 93% ( =.87). The accuracy for differentiating between crescent-shaped, longitudinal, and massive tears using measurements on 2D MRI was 73.4% for reader 1 and 71.2% for reader 2. The accuracy for tear shape characterization into crescent and longitudinal U- or L-shaped using 3D MRI was 92% for reader 1 and 94% for reader 2. When further characterizing the longitudinal tears as massive or not using 3D MRI, both readers had an

  3. Reconstruction of vaginal agenesis.

    PubMed

    Ozkan, Ozlenen; Erman Akar, Münire; Ozkan, Omer; Doğan, N Utku

    2011-06-01

    Vaginal ageneses are by no means rare anomalies. Complete Mullerian agenesis is the most common reason for vaginal agenesis requiring reconstruction. Patients usually present with pain, hematocolpos, or hematometra in puberty, and later with amenorrhea and dyspareunia. Detailed information is given here regarding etiologies, timing of surgery, and current treatment options for vaginal agenesis. Outcomes and short- and long-term complications of recent treatment options are also discussed. PMID:21372677

  4. Vaginal itching and discharge - child

    MedlinePlus

    ... vagina or the skin around the vagina. Vaginal yeast infection Vaginitis . Vaginitis in girls before puberty is ... recommend drugs, such as: Cream or lotion for yeast infections Certain allergy medicines (antihistamines) for relief of ...

  5. Ultrasound determination of rotator cuff tear repairability

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Andrew K; Lam, Patrick H; Walton, Judie R; Hackett, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Background Rotator cuff repair aims to reattach the torn tendon to the greater tuberosity footprint with suture anchors. The present study aimed to assess the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound in predicting rotator cuff tear repairability and to assess which sonographic and pre-operative features are strongest in predicting repairability. Methods The study was a retrospective analysis of measurements made prospectively in a cohort of 373 patients who had ultrasounds of their shoulder and underwent rotator cuff repair. Measurements of rotator cuff tear size and muscle atrophy were made pre-operatively by ultrasound to enable prediction of rotator cuff repairability. Tears were classified following ultrasound as repairable or irreparable, and were correlated with intra-operative repairability. Results Ultrasound assessment of rotator cuff tear repairability has a sensitivity of 86% (p < 0.0001) and a specificity of 67% (p < 0.0001). The strongest predictors of rotator cuff repairability were tear size (p < 0.001) and age (p = 0.004). Sonographic assessments of tear size ≥4 cm2 or anteroposterior tear length ≥25 mm indicated an irreparable rotator cuff tear. Conclusions Ultrasound assessment is accurate in predicting rotator cuff tear repairability. Tear size or anteroposterior tear length and age were the best predictors of repairability. PMID:27582996

  6. Cuff width alters the amplitude envelope of wrist cuff pressure pulse waveforms.

    PubMed

    Jilek, Jiri; Stork, Milan

    2010-07-01

    The accuracy of noninvasive blood pressure (BP) measurement with any method is affected by cuff width. Measurement with a too narrow cuff overestimates BP and measurement with a too wide cuff underestimates BP. Automatic wrist cuff BP monitors use permanently attached narrow cuffs with bladders about 6 cm wide. Such narrow cuffs should result in under-cuffing for wrist circumferences larger than 15 cm. The objective of this qualitative study was to show that a narrow wrist cuff results in increased BP values when a cuff pulse amplitude ratio algorithm is used. According to the algorithm used in this study, systolic pressure (SBP) corresponds to the point of 50% of maximal amplitude; for diastolic pressure (DBP) the ratio is 70%. Data were acquired from 12 volunteers in the sitting position. The mean wrist circumference was 18 cm. The acquired cuff pulse data were used to compute SBP, mean pressure (MAP) and DBP. The mean values for a 6 cm cuff were SBP = 144 mmHg, MAP = 104 mmHg and DBP = 88 mmHg. The values for a 10 cm cuff were SBP = 128 mmHg, MAP = 93 mmHg and DBP = 78 mmHg. The reference BP values were SBP = 132 mmHg, MAP = 96 mmHg and DBP = 80 mmHg. All narrow (6 cm) cuff BP values were higher than wide (10 cm) cuff or reference BP values. The results indicate that wider wrist cuffs may be desirable for more accurate and reliable BP measurement with wrist monitors. PMID:20505218

  7. 21 CFR 882.5275 - Nerve cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nerve cuff. 882.5275 Section 882.5275 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5275 Nerve cuff. (a) Identification. A nerve...

  8. 21 CFR 882.5275 - Nerve cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nerve cuff. 882.5275 Section 882.5275 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5275 Nerve cuff. (a) Identification. A nerve...

  9. 21 CFR 882.5275 - Nerve cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nerve cuff. 882.5275 Section 882.5275 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5275 Nerve cuff. (a) Identification. A nerve...

  10. 21 CFR 882.5275 - Nerve cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nerve cuff. 882.5275 Section 882.5275 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5275 Nerve cuff. (a) Identification. A nerve...

  11. 21 CFR 882.5275 - Nerve cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nerve cuff. 882.5275 Section 882.5275 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5275 Nerve cuff. (a) Identification. A nerve...

  12. Logic-controlled occlusive cuff system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, J. T.; Hoffler, G. W. (Inventor); Hursta, W. N.

    1981-01-01

    An occlusive cuff system comprises a pressure cuff and a source of regulated compressed gas feeding the cuff through an electrically operated fill valve. An electrically operated vent valve vents the cuff to the ambient pressure. The fill valve is normally closed and the vent valve is normally open. In response to an external start signal, a logic network opens the fill valve and closes the vent valve, thereby starting the pressurization cycle and a timer. A pressure transducer continuously monitors the pressure in the cuff. When the transducer's output equals a selected reference voltage, a comparator causes the logic network to close the fill valve. The timer, after a selected time delay, opens the vent valve to the ambient pressure, thereby ending the pressurization cycle.

  13. Vaginal drug distribution modeling.

    PubMed

    Katz, David F; Yuan, Andrew; Gao, Yajing

    2015-09-15

    This review presents and applies fundamental mass transport theory describing the diffusion and convection driven mass transport of drugs to the vaginal environment. It considers sources of variability in the predictions of the models. It illustrates use of model predictions of microbicide drug concentration distribution (pharmacokinetics) to gain insights about drug effectiveness in preventing HIV infection (pharmacodynamics). The modeling compares vaginal drug distributions after different gel dosage regimens, and it evaluates consequences of changes in gel viscosity due to aging. It compares vaginal mucosal concentration distributions of drugs delivered by gels vs. intravaginal rings. Finally, the modeling approach is used to compare vaginal drug distributions across species with differing vaginal dimensions. Deterministic models of drug mass transport into and throughout the vaginal environment can provide critical insights about the mechanisms and determinants of such transport. This knowledge, and the methodology that obtains it, can be applied and translated to multiple applications, involving the scientific underpinnings of vaginal drug distribution and the performance evaluation and design of products, and their dosage regimens, that achieve it. PMID:25933938

  14. Rolling-cuff flexible bellows

    DOEpatents

    Lambert, D.R.

    1982-09-27

    A flexible connector apparatus used to join two stiff non-deformable members, such as piping, is described. The apparatus is provided with one or more flexible sections or assemblies each utilizing a bellows of a rolling cuff type connected between two ridge members, with the bellows being supported by a back-up ring, such that only the curved end sections of the bellows are unsupported. Thus, the bellows can be considered as being of a tube-shaped configuration and thus have high pressure resistance. The components of the flexible apparatus are sealed or welded one to another such that it is fluid tight.

  15. Effect of brachytherapy technique and patient characteristics on cervical cancer implant dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Anker, Christopher J.; O'Donnell, Kristen; Boucher, Kenneth M.; Gaffney, David K.

    2013-01-01

    Our purpose was to evaluate the relationship between brachytherapy technique and patient characteristics on dose to organs-at-risk (OARs) in patients undergoing high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy for cervical cancer. From 1998 to 2008, 31 patients with cervical cancer with full dosimetric data were identified who received definitive external-beam radiation and HDR brachytherapy with tandem and ovoid applicators. Doses were recorded at point A, the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU)-38 rectal point, the ICRU-38 bladder point, the vaginal surface, and the pelvic sidewall. Generalized estimating equations were used to determine the significance of changes in OAR to point A dose ratios with differences in brachytherapy technique or patient characteristics. Patients underwent a median of 5 brachytherapy procedures (range, 3 to 5), with a total of 179 procedures for 31 patients. For all brachytherapy treatments, the average ratios between the doses for the rectal, bladder, vaginal surface, and pelvic sidewall reference points to those at point A were 0.49, 0.59, 1.15, and 0.17, respectively. In general, decreased OAR dose was associated with a lower stage, younger age, increased ovoid size, increased tandem length, and earlier implant number. Increased tandem curvature significantly increased bladder dose and decreased rectal dose. Intravenous anesthesia usage was not correlated with improved dosimetry. This study allowed identification of patient and procedure characteristics influencing OAR dosing. Although the advent of 3-dimensional (3D) image-guided brachytherapy will bring new advances in treatment optimization, the actual technique involved at the time of the brachytherapy implant procedure will remain important.

  16. 21 CFR 868.5800 - Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. 868.5800 Section... cuff. (a) Identification. A tracheostomy tube and tube cuff is a device intended to be placed into a surgical opening of the trachea to facilitate ventilation to the lungs. The cuff may be a separate...

  17. 21 CFR 868.5800 - Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. 868.5800 Section... cuff. (a) Identification. A tracheostomy tube and tube cuff is a device intended to be placed into a surgical opening of the trachea to facilitate ventilation to the lungs. The cuff may be a separate...

  18. 21 CFR 868.5800 - Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. 868.5800 Section... cuff. (a) Identification. A tracheostomy tube and tube cuff is a device intended to be placed into a surgical opening of the trachea to facilitate ventilation to the lungs. The cuff may be a separate...

  19. Vaginal dryness alternative treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... it would seem that a diet rich in soy foods would improve symptoms of vaginal dryness. There continues ... the ideal sources or dose is still unknown. Soy foods include tofu, soy milk, and whole soybeans (also ...

  20. Anterior vaginal wall repair

    MedlinePlus

    Lentz GM. Anatomic defects of the abdominal wall and pelvic floor: abdominal and inguinal hernias, cystocele, urethrocele, ... uterine and vaginal prolapse: diagnosis and management. In: Lentz GM, Lobo RA, Gershenson DM, Katz VL, eds. ...

  1. Vaginal gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Gascón, Alicia; Del Pozo-Rodríguez, Ana; Isla, Arantxazu; Solinís, María Angeles

    2015-09-15

    In the last years, vaginal gene therapy has gained increasing attention mainly for the treatment and control of sexually transmitted infections. DNA delivery has been also suggested to improve reproductive outcomes for women with deficiencies in the female reproductive tract. Although no product has reached clinical phase, preclinical investigations reveal the potential of the vaginal tract as an effective administration route for gene delivery. This review focuses on the main advantages and challenges of vaginal gene therapy, and on the most used nucleic acid delivery systems, including viral and non-viral vectors. Additionally, the advances in the application of vaginal gene therapy for the treatment and/or prevention of infectious diseases such as the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the human papillomavirus (HPV) or the herpes simplex virus (HSV) are presented. PMID:26189799

  2. Review of Vaginitis

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Adisruption of the dynamic equilibrium of the healthy vagina may have significant sequelae, leading to chronic or serious conditions. Therefore, all cases of vaginitis should be accurately diagnosed and appropriately treated. PMID:18475337

  3. Anterior vaginal wall repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cystocele Anterior vaginal wall repair (surgical treatment of urinary incontinence) - series References Lentz GM. Anatomic defects of the ... 72. Read More Anterior Inflatable artificial sphincter Stress urinary incontinence Urinary catheters Urinary incontinence - injectable implant Urinary incontinence - ...

  4. [Brachytherapy for oesophageal cancer].

    PubMed

    Wong, S; Hennequin, C; Quero, L

    2013-04-01

    The main indication of oesophageal brachytherapy is palliative: it can improve dysphagia in patients with a tumor not suitable for surgery or chemoradiotherapy. A randomized clinical trial showed that survival without dysphagia and quality of life was improved by endoluminal brachytherapy in comparison to self-expansible metallic stents. It also increases the duration of palliation after laser deobstruction. Its role as a curative treatment of locally advanced tumors is still discussed: in combination with external beam radiotherapy, it seems that brachytherapy increased the rate of severe toxicity (haemorrhages, fistula, stenosis). In superficial lesions, brachytherapy with or without external beam radiotherapy seems logical but large prospective studies are missing in this setting. PMID:23603254

  5. Current Biomechanical Concepts for Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    For the past few decades, the repair of rotator cuff tears has evolved significantly with advances in arthroscopy techniques, suture anchors and instrumentation. From the biomechanical perspective, the focus in arthroscopic repair has been on increasing fixation strength and restoration of the footprint contact characteristics to provide early rehabilitation and improve healing. To accomplish these objectives, various repair strategies and construct configurations have been developed for rotator cuff repair with the understanding that many factors contribute to the structural integrity of the repaired construct. These include repaired rotator cuff tendon-footprint motion, increased tendon-footprint contact area and pressure, and tissue quality of tendon and bone. In addition, the healing response may be compromised by intrinsic factors such as decreased vascularity, hypoxia, and fibrocartilaginous changes or aforementioned extrinsic compression factors. Furthermore, it is well documented that torn rotator cuff muscles have a tendency to atrophy and become subject to fatty infiltration which may affect the longevity of the repair. Despite all the aforementioned factors, initial fixation strength is an essential consideration in optimizing rotator cuff repair. Therefore, numerous biomechanical studies have focused on elucidating the strongest devices, knots, and repair configurations to improve contact characteristics for rotator cuff repair. In this review, the biomechanical concepts behind current rotator cuff repair techniques will be reviewed and discussed. PMID:23730471

  6. Menopause and the vaginal microbiome.

    PubMed

    Muhleisen, Alicia L; Herbst-Kralovetz, Melissa M

    2016-09-01

    For over a century it has been well documented that bacteria in the vagina maintain vaginal homeostasis, and that an imbalance or dysbiosis may be associated with poor reproductive and gynecologic health outcomes. Vaginal microbiota are of particular significance to postmenopausal women and may have a profound effect on vulvovaginal atrophy, vaginal dryness, sexual health and overall quality of life. As molecular-based techniques have evolved, our understanding of the diversity and complexity of this bacterial community has expanded. The objective of this review is to compare the changes that have been identified in the vaginal microbiota of menopausal women, outline alterations in the microbiome associated with specific menopausal symptoms, and define how hormone replacement therapy impacts the vaginal microbiome and menopausal symptoms; it concludes by considering the potential of probiotics to reinstate vaginal homeostasis following menopause. This review details the studies that support the role of Lactobacillus species in maintaining vaginal homeostasis and how the vaginal microbiome structure in postmenopausal women changes with decreasing levels of circulating estrogen. In addition, the associated transformations in the microanatomical features of the vaginal epithelium that can lead to vaginal symptoms associated with menopause are described. Furthermore, hormone replacement therapy directly influences the dominance of Lactobacillus in the microbiota and can resolve vaginal symptoms. Oral and vaginal probiotics hold great promise and initial studies complement the findings of previous research efforts concerning menopause and the vaginal microbiome; however, additional trials are required to determine the efficacy of bacterial therapeutics to modulate or restore vaginal homeostasis. PMID:27451320

  7. A Novel Device for Intravaginal Electronic Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Frank Fuchs, Holger; Lorenz, Friedlieb; Steil, Volker; Ziglio, Francesco; Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta; Lohr, Frank; Wenz, Frederik

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: Postoperative intravaginal brachytherapy for endometrial carcinoma is usually performed with {sup 192}Ir high-dose rate (HDR) afterloading. A potential alternative is treatment with a broadband 50kV X-ray point source, the advantage being its low energy and the consequential steep dose gradient. The aim of this study was to create and evaluate a homogeneous cylindrical energy deposition around a newly designed vaginal applicator. Methods and Materials: To create constant isodose layers along the cylindrical plastic vaginal applicator, the source (INTRABEAM system) was moved in steps of 17-19.5 mm outward from the tip of the applicator. Irradiation for a predetermined time was performed at each position. The axial shift was established by a stepping mechanism that was mounted on a table support. The total dose/dose distribution was determined using film dosimetry (Gafchromic EBT) in a 'solid water' phantom. The films were evaluated with Mathematica 5.2 and OmniPro-I'mRT 1.6. The results (dose D0/D5/D10 in 0/5/10 mm tissue depth) were compared with an {sup 192}Ir HDR afterloading plan for multiple sampling points around the applicator. Results: Three different dose distributions with lengths of 3.9-7.3 cm were created. The irradiation time based on the delivery of 5/7 Gy to a 5 mm tissue depth was 19/26 min to 27/38 min. D0/D5/D10 was 150%/100%/67% for electronic brachytherapy and 140%/100%/74% for the afterloading technique. The deviation for repeated measurements in the phantom was <7%. Conclusions: It is possible to create a homogeneous cylindrical dose distribution, similar to {sup 192}Ir HDR afterloading, through the superimposition of multiple spherical dose distributions by stepping a kilovolt point source.

  8. Rotator cuff tear measurement by arthropneumotomography

    SciTech Connect

    Kilcoyne, R.F.; Matsen, F.A. III

    1983-02-01

    Five years of experience with a method of shoulder arthrography using upright tomography in cases of suspected or known rotator cuff tears has demonstrated its effectiveness. The value of the procedure lies in its ability to demonstrate the size of the cuff tear and the thickness of the remaining cuff tissue. This information provides the surgeon with a preoperative estimate of the difficulty of the repair and the prognosis for a good functional recovery. In 33 cases, there was good correlation between the upright thin-section tomogram findings and the surgical results. The tomograms provided better information about the size of the tear and the quality of the remaining cuff than did plain arthrograms.

  9. Rotator cuff injuries in adolescent athletes.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Jennifer M; Arkader, Alexandre; Wells, Lawrence M; Ganley, Theodore J

    2013-03-01

    The cause of rotator cuff injuries in the young athlete has been described as an overuse injury related to internal impingement. Abduction coupled with external rotation is believed to impinge on the rotator cuff, specifically the supraspinatus, and lead to undersurface tears that can progress to full-thickness tears. This impingement is believed to be worsened with increased range of motion and instability in overhead athletes. A retrospective review of seven patients diagnosed with rotator cuff injuries was performed to better understand this shoulder injury pattern. The type of sport played, a history of trauma, diagnosis, treatment method, and outcome were noted. Six patients were male and one was a female. Baseball was the primary sport for four patients, basketball for one, gymnastics for one, and wrestling for one. The following injury patterns were observed: two patients tore their subscapularis tendon, two sustained avulsion fractures of their lesser tuberosity, one tore his rotator interval, one tore his supraspinatus, and one avulsed his greater tuberosity. Only four patients recalled a specific traumatic event. Three patients were treated with arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, three with miniopen repair, and one was treated with rehabilitation. Six of the seven patients returned to their preinjury level of sport after treatment. Rotator cuff tears are rare in the adolescent age group. The injury patterns suggest that acute trauma likely accounts for many rotator cuff tears and their equivalents in the young patient. Adolescents with rotator cuff tears reliably return to sports after treatment. The possibility of rotator cuff tears in skeletally immature athletes should be considered. The prognosis is very good once this injury is identified and treated. PMID:22668571

  10. Clinical Examination of the Rotator Cuff

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Nitin B.; Wilcox, Reginald; Katz, Jeffrey N.; Higgins, Laurence D.

    2013-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears are the leading cause of shoulder pain and shoulder-related disability accounting for 4.5 million physician visits in the United States annually. A careful history and structured physical examination are often sufficient for diagnosing rotator cuff disorders. We are not aware of a clinical review article that presents a structured physical examination protocol of the rotator cuff for the interested clinician. To fill this void, we present a physical examination protocol developed on the basis of review of prior literature and our clinical experience from dedicated shoulder practices. Our protocol includes range of motion testing using a goniometer, strength testing using a dynamometer, and select special tests. Among the many tests for rotator cuff disorders that have been described, we chose ones that have been more thoroughly assessed for sensitivity and specificity. This protocol can be used to isolate the specific rotator cuff tendon involved. The protocol can be typically completed in 15 minutes. We also discuss the clinical implications and limitations of the physical examination maneuvers described in our protocol. This protocol is thorough yet time-efficient for a busy clinical practice. It is useful in diagnosis of rotator cuff tears, impingement syndrome, and biceps pathology. PMID:23332909

  11. Dosimetric audit in brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, D A; Nisbet, A

    2014-01-01

    Dosimetric audit is required for the improvement of patient safety in radiotherapy and to aid optimization of treatment. The reassurance that treatment is being delivered in line with accepted standards, that delivered doses are as prescribed and that quality improvement is enabled is as essential for brachytherapy as it is for the more commonly audited external beam radiotherapy. Dose measurement in brachytherapy is challenging owing to steep dose gradients and small scales, especially in the context of an audit. Several different approaches have been taken for audit measurement to date: thimble and well-type ionization chambers, thermoluminescent detectors, optically stimulated luminescence detectors, radiochromic film and alanine. In this work, we review all of the dosimetric brachytherapy audits that have been conducted in recent years, look at current audits in progress and propose required directions for brachytherapy dosimetric audit in the future. The concern over accurate source strength measurement may be essentially resolved with modern equipment and calibration methods, but brachytherapy is a rapidly developing field and dosimetric audit must keep pace. PMID:24807068

  12. Vaginal calculi in the dolphin.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, J E; Walker, W A

    1977-10-01

    Examination of the reproductive tract of a mature spotted dolphin, Stenella attenuata , revealed 13 vaginal calculi, composed primarily of calcium phosphate compounds. Vaginal calculi also were found in two mature Lagenorhynchus obliquidens and in six mature Delphinus delphis . PMID:24228951

  13. Vaginal itching and discharge - child

    MedlinePlus

    Common causes of vaginal itching and discharge in young girls include: Chemicals such as perfumes and dyes in ... in girls before puberty is common. If a young girl has a sexually transmitted vaginal infection, however, sexual ...

  14. General Information about Vaginal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Vaginal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Vaginal Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  15. Vaginal Yeast Infections (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Vaginal Yeast Infections KidsHealth > For Teens > Vaginal Yeast Infections Print ... side effect of taking antibiotics. What Is a Yeast Infection? A yeast infection is a common infection ...

  16. Handcrafted cuff manometers do not accurately measure endotracheal tube cuff pressure

    PubMed Central

    Annoni, Raquel; de Almeida, Antonio Evanir

    2015-01-01

    Objective To test the agreement between two handcrafted devices and a cuff-specific manometer. Methods The agreement between two handcrafted devices adapted to measure tracheal tube cuff pressure and a cuff-specific manometer was tested on 79 subjects. The cuff pressure was measured with a commercial manometer and with two handcrafted devices (HD) assembled with aneroid sphygmomanometers (HD1 and HD2). The data were compared using Wilcoxon and Spearman tests, the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and limit-of-agreement analysis. Results Cuff pressures assessed with handcrafted devices were significantly different from commercial device measurements (pressures were higher when measured with HD1 and lower with HD2). The ICCs between the commercial device and HD1 and HD2 were excellent (ICC = 0.8 p < 0.001) and good (ICC = 0.66, p < 0.001), respectively. However, the Bland- Altman plots showed wide limits of agreement between HD1 and HD2 and the commercial device. Conclusion The handcrafted manometers do not provide accurate cuff pressure measurements when compared to a cuff-specific device and should not be used to replace the commercial cuff manometers in mechanically ventilated patients. PMID:26376160

  17. Occult Interpositional Rotator Cuff - an Extremely Rare Case of Traumatic Rotator Cuff Tear

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cheng-Li; Su, Wei-Ren; Jou, I-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic interposition of a rotator cuff tendon in the glenohumeral joint without recognizable glenohumeral dislocation is an unusual complication after shoulder trauma. Here we report the clinical and imaging presentations of a 17-year-old man with trapped rotator cuff tendons in the glenohumeral joint after a bicycle accident. The possible trauma mechanism is also discussed. PMID:22247643

  18. Canadian prostate brachytherapy in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Keyes, Mira; Crook, Juanita; Morris, W. James; Morton, Gerard; Pickles, Tom; Usmani, Nawaid; Vigneault, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Prostate brachytherapy can be used as a monotherapy for low- and intermediate-risk patients or in combination with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) as a form of dose escalation for selected intermediate- and high-risk patients. Prostate brachytherapy with either permanent implants (low dose rate [LDR]) or temporary implants (high dose rate [HDR]) is emerging as the most effective radiation treatment for prostate cancer. Several large Canadian brachytherapy programs were established in the mid- to late-1990s. Prostate brachytherapy is offered in British Columbia, Alberta, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec and New Brunswick. We anticipate the need for brachytherapy services in Canada will significantly increase in the near future. In this review, we summarize brachytherapy programs across Canada, contemporary eligibility criteria for the procedure, toxicity and prostate-specific antigen recurrence free survival (PRFS), as published from Canadian institutions for both LDR and HDR brachytherapy. PMID:23671495

  19. [Safety in brachytherapy].

    PubMed

    Marcié, S; Marinello, G; Peiffert, D; Lartigau, É

    2013-04-01

    No technique can now be used without previously considering the safety of patients, staff and public and risk management. This is the case for brachytherapy. The various aspects of brachytherapy are discussed for both the patient and the staff. For all, the risks must be minimized while achieving a treatment of quality. It is therefore necessary to establish a list as comprehensive as possible regardless of the type of brachytherapy (low, high, pulsed dose-rate). Then, their importance must be assessed with the help of their criticality. Radiation protection of personnel and public must take into account the many existing regulation texts. Four axes have been defined for the risk management for patients: organization, preparation, planning and implementation of treatment. For each axis, a review of risks is presented, as well as administrative, technical and medical dispositions for staff and the public. PMID:23465784

  20. Vaginal Cancer Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... the epithelium, which contains cells called squamous epithelial cells. The vaginal wall, underneath the epithelium, is made up of connective tissue, involuntary muscle tissue, lymph vessels, and nerves. About ... begins when normal cells in the vagina change and grow uncontrollably, forming ...

  1. Rotator Cuff Tendinitis and Tear (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePlus

    ... is usually treated with ice, antiinflammatory drugs, and physical therapy. (See 'Rotator cuff injury treatment' below.) Rotator cuff ... small- to medium-size tears usually improve with physical therapy exercises, stopping painful activities, and, in some cases, ...

  2. Restenosis: Intracoronary Brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Drachman, Douglas E.; Simon, Daniel I.

    2002-04-01

    Though interventional strategies have revolutionized the management of patients with symptomatic coronary artery disease, in-stent restenosis has emerged as the single most important limitation of long-term success following percutaneous coronary intervention. Once present, in-stent restenosis is extraordinarily difficult to treat, with conventional revascularization techniques failing in 50% to 80% of patients. Intracoronary radiation, or brachytherapy, targets cellular proliferation within the culprit neointima. Clinical trials have demonstrated that brachytherapy is a highly effective treatment for in-stent restenosis, reducing angiographic restenosis by 50% to 60% and the need for target vessel revascularization by 40% to 50%. The benefits of intracoronary brachytherapy may be particularly pronounced in certain patient subgroups (eg, those with diabetes, long lesions, or lesions in saphenous vein bypass grafts), but comes at the cost of an increased rate of late stent thrombosis and the need for extended antiplatelet therapy. The role of brachytherapy in the arsenal of the interventional cardiologist will continue to evolve, particularly in light of the unprecedented recent advances with the use of drug-eluting stents for restenosis prevention. PMID:11858773

  3. 21 CFR 868.5800 - Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. 868.5800 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5800 Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. (a) Identification. A tracheostomy tube and tube cuff is a device intended to be placed into...

  4. 21 CFR 870.1120 - Blood pressure cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Blood pressure cuff. 870.1120 Section 870.1120...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1120 Blood pressure cuff. (a) Identification. A blood pressure cuff is a device that has an inflatable bladder in an...

  5. 21 CFR 868.5750 - Inflatable tracheal tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. 868.5750 Section 868.5750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... cuff. (a) Identification. An inflatable tracheal tube cuff is a device used to provide an airtight...

  6. 21 CFR 870.1120 - Blood pressure cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Blood pressure cuff. 870.1120 Section 870.1120...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1120 Blood pressure cuff. (a) Identification. A blood pressure cuff is a device that has an inflatable bladder in an...

  7. 21 CFR 870.1120 - Blood pressure cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Blood pressure cuff. 870.1120 Section 870.1120...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1120 Blood pressure cuff. (a) Identification. A blood pressure cuff is a device that has an inflatable bladder in an...

  8. 21 CFR 870.1120 - Blood pressure cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Blood pressure cuff. 870.1120 Section 870.1120...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1120 Blood pressure cuff. (a) Identification. A blood pressure cuff is a device that has an inflatable bladder in an...

  9. 21 CFR 870.1120 - Blood pressure cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Blood pressure cuff. 870.1120 Section 870.1120...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1120 Blood pressure cuff. (a) Identification. A blood pressure cuff is a device that has an inflatable bladder in an...

  10. 21 CFR 868.5750 - Inflatable tracheal tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. 868.5750 Section 868.5750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... cuff. (a) Identification. An inflatable tracheal tube cuff is a device used to provide an airtight...

  11. 21 CFR 868.5750 - Inflatable tracheal tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. 868.5750 Section 868.5750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... cuff. (a) Identification. An inflatable tracheal tube cuff is a device used to provide an airtight...

  12. 21 CFR 868.5750 - Inflatable tracheal tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. 868.5750 Section 868.5750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... cuff. (a) Identification. An inflatable tracheal tube cuff is a device used to provide an airtight...

  13. 21 CFR 868.5750 - Inflatable tracheal tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. 868.5750 Section 868.5750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... cuff. (a) Identification. An inflatable tracheal tube cuff is a device used to provide an airtight...

  14. Vaginal Vault Prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Uzoma, Azubuike; Farag, K. A.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction. Vaginal vault prolapse is a common complication following vaginal hysterectomy with negative impact on women's quality of life due to associated urinary, anorectal and sexual dysfunction. A clear understanding of the supporting mechanism for the uterus and vagina is important in making the right choice of corrective procedure. Management should be individualised, taking into consideration the surgeon's experience, patients age, comorbidities, previous surgery and sex life. Result. Preexisting pelvic floor defect prior to hysterectomy is the single most important risk factor for vault prolapse. Various surgical techniques have been advanced at hysterectomy to prevent vault prolapse. Studies have shown the McCall's culdoplasty under direct visualisation to be superior. Vault prolapse repair rely on either the use of patient's tissue or synthetic materials and can be carried out abdominally or vaginally. Sacrospinous fixation and abdominal sacrocolpopexy are the commonly performed procedures, with literature in favour of abdominal sacrocolpopexy over sacrospinous fixation due to its reported higher success rate of about 90%. Other less commonly performed procedures include uterosacral ligament suspension and illiococcygeal fixation, both of which are equally effective, with the former having a high risk of ureteric injury. Colpoclesis will play a greater role in the future as the aging population increases. Mesh procedures are gaining in popularity, and preliminary data from vaginal mesh procedures is encouraging. Laparoscopic techniques require a high level of skill and experience. There are many controversies on the mechanism of prolapse and management techniques, which we have tried to address in this article. Conclusion. As the aging population increases, the incidence of prolapse will also rise, older techniques using native tissue will continue, while new techniques using the mesh needs to be studied further. The later may well be the way forward

  15. Free biceps tendon autograft to augment arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Obma, Padraic R

    2013-01-01

    Arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs have become the standard of treatment for all sizes of tears over the past several years. Current healing rates reported in the literature are quite good, but improving the healing potential of rotator cuff repairs remains a challenging problem. There has been an increase recently in the use of augmentation of rotator cuff repairs with xenografts or synthetics for large and massive tears. Biceps tenodesis is often indicated as part of the treatment plan while one is performing rotator cuff surgery. A subpectoral biceps tenodesis provides a source of autograft to augment rotator cuff repairs of all sizes. Two techniques are presented to augment rotator cuff repairs with a free biceps tendon autograft. This is a novel idea in an attempt to improve healing rates and long-term results of rotator cuff repairs of all sizes. PMID:24400197

  16. The minimal leak test technique for endotracheal cuff maintenance.

    PubMed

    DA, Harvie; Jn, Darvall; M, Dodd; A, De La Cruz; M, Tacey; Rl, D'Costa; D, Ward

    2016-09-01

    Endotracheal tube (ETT) cuff pressure management is an essential part of airway management in intubated and mechanically ventilated patients. Both under- and over-inflation of the ETT cuff can lead to patient complications, with an ideal pressure range of 20-30 cmH2O defined. A range of techniques are employed to ensure adequate ETT cuff inflation, with little comparative data. We performed an observational cross-sectional study in a tertiary metropolitan ICU, assessing the relationship between the minimal leak test and cuff manometry. Forty-five mechanically ventilated patients, over a three-month period, had ETT cuff manometry performed at the same time as their routine cuff maintenance (minimal leak test). Bedside nurse measurements were compared with investigator measurements. At the endpoint of cuff inflation, 20 of 45 patients (44%) had cuff pressures between 20 and 30 cmH2O; 11 of 45 patients (24%) had cuff pressures <20 cmH2O; 14 of 45 patients (31%) had cuff pressures ≥30 cmH2O. Univariate analysis demonstrated an association between both patient obesity and female gender requiring less ETT cuff volume (P=0.008 and P <0.001 respectively), though this association was lost on multivariate analysis. No association was demonstrated between any measured variables and cuff pressures. Inter-operator reliability in performing the minimal leak test showed no evidence of bias between nurse and investigators (Pearson coefficient = 0.897). We conclude the minimal leak test for maintenance of ETT cuffs leads to both over- and under-inflation, and alternative techniques, such as cuff manometry, should be employed. PMID:27608343

  17. Vaginal or uterine bleeding - overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the vaginal bleeding, including: Dysfunctional uterine bleeding Endometriosis Uterine fibroids Ectopic pregnancy Polycystic ovary syndrome Treatment may include hormonal medicines, pain relievers, and possibly ...

  18. Biological aspects of rotator cuff healing

    PubMed Central

    Wildemann, Britt; Klatte, Franka

    2011-01-01

    Summary Tendon tears of the rotator cuff show a high prevalence in today’s population. Patients suffer from permanent pain and disability, and surgical reconstruction may be the only possibility for abatement. The complex process of tendon-bone healing leads to mechanically inferior scar-tissue, which often results in retears or non-healing. In the current literature, factors such as patients age, sex and fatty muscle infiltration are highly correlated to the presence of rotator cuff tears and the incidence of retears. To improve the tendon tissue quality after surgical reconstructions biologically based strategies with use of growth factors arouse more and more interest in the last years. However, to optimize the treatment of rotator cuff tears the biological background of tears and retears must be investigated in more detail. This article will elucidate different aspects that have an impact on rotator cuff healing and give a brief insight in tendon/ligament cell culture and animal studies focusing on growth factor treatments. PMID:23738265

  19. Control device for prosthetic urinary sphincter cuff

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinicke, Robert H. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A device for controlling flow of fluid to and from a resilient inflatable cuff implanted about the urethra to control flow of urine therethrough. The device comprises a flexible bulb reservoir and a control unit that includes a manually operated valve that opens automatically when the bulb is squeezed to force fluid into the cuff for closing the urethra. The control unit also includes a movable valve seat member having a relatively large area exposed to pressure of fluid in a chamber that is connected to the cuff and which moves to a position in which the valve member is unseated by an abutment when fluid pressure in the chamber exceeds a predetermined value to thereby relieve excess fluid pressure in the cuff. The arrangement is such that the valve element is held closed against the seat member by the full differential in fluid pressures acting on both sides of the valve element until the seat member is moved away from the valve element to thus insure positive closing of the valve element until the seat member is moved out of engagement with the valve element by excess pressure differential.

  20. Ruthenium-106 brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Pe'er, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    Brachytherapy is the most common method for treating uveal melanoma, and currently the ruthenium-106 (Ru-106) and iodine-125 (I-125) applicators are the most frequently used. Ru-106 applicators were introduced by Prof. Peter Lommatzsch in the 1960s, and since then have been used widely by many ocular oncologists, mainly in Europe. The Ru-106 isotope is a beta ray (electron) emitter, and as such it has a limited depth of penetration. This is the reason why many experts use Ru-106 applicators for tumors with a maximal thickness of up to 7.0 mm, although others use it successfully for thicker tumors. The Ru-106 applicators are manufactured commercially and have a half-life of about 1 year. Ru-106 brachytherapy for uveal melanoma provides excellent local control rates and eye preservation with a relatively low recurrence rate. The main advantage of Ru-106 over other isotopes is the better preservation of vision in the treated eye, and less damage to the healthy parts of the eye due to its limited range of radiation. This can also be achieved by positioning the Ru-106 plaque eccentrically, away from the macula and optic nerve head. Ru-106 brachytherapy can be used in combination with other methods of treatment of uveal melanoma, such as local resection or transpupillary thermotherapy, and is sporadically combined with other isotopes, such as gamma-emitting cobalt-60 and I-125. PMID:22042011

  1. Cervical brachytherapy technique for locally advanced carcinoma of the cervix in a patient with septate uterus

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Charlie; Gondi, Vinai; Das, Rupak; Straub, Margaret; Al-Niaimi, Ahmed; Applegate, Glenn; Bradley, Kristin A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To describe an approach to cervical brachytherapy in a patient with congenital septate uterus and locally advanced cervical carcinoma. Material and methods The patient is a 34-year-old female with septate uterus presenting with pelvic pain. Workup demonstrated a stage IIB cervical adenocarcinoma with imaging evidence of an involved right external iliac lymph node. The patient received whole pelvic radiation, with concurrent weekly cisplatin (40 mg/m2), to a dose of 45 Gy in 25 fractions followed by a parametrial boost of 5.4 Gy and an additional nodal boost of 9 Gy. Results The patient was initiated on cervical brachytherapy following fraction 23 of pelvic radiation. To conform to her septated uterus, a Rotte-Y tandem was used. Additionally, 2 CT-compatible ovoids were placed in the vaginal apex to enhance dose distribution and coverage of the target volume. Each fraction of brachytherapy was performed with CT-based planning. A high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) and normal structures were defined and constrained per American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) and Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie/European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (GEC-ESTRO) guidelines. The brachytherapy dose was 27.5 Gy in 5 fractions of 5.5 Gy each, prescribed to the HR-CTV. Conclusions Herein, we report the first documented case of cervical brachytherapy in a patient with septate uterus and locally advanced cervical carcinoma. Using CT-guided planning, in conjunction with the ABS and GEC-ESTRO guidelines, the patient was effectively treated with adapted cervical brachytherapy, meeting criteria for HR-CTV coverage and normal tissue tolerances. PMID:24790625

  2. Salvage Brachytherapy for Biochemically Recurrent Prostate Cancer following Primary Brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lacy, John M.; Wilson, William A.; Bole, Raevti; Chen, Li; Meigooni, Ali S.; Rowland, Randall G.; Clair, William H. St.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. In this study, we evaluated our experience with salvage brachytherapy after discovery of biochemical recurrence after a prior brachytherapy procedure. Methods and Materials. From 2001 through 2012 twenty-one patients treated by brachytherapy within University of Kentucky or from outside centers developed biochemical failure and had no evidence of metastases. Computed tomography (CT) scans were evaluated; patients who had an underseeded portion of their prostate were considered for reimplantation. Results. The majority of the patients in this study (61.9%) were low risk and median presalvage PSA was 3.49 (range 17.41–1.68). Mean follow-up was 61 months. At last follow-up after reseeding, 11/21 (52.4%) were free of biochemical recurrence. There was a trend towards decreased freedom from biochemical recurrence in low risk patients (p = 0.12). International Prostate Symptom Scores (IPSS) increased at 3-month follow-up visits but decreased and were equivalent to baseline scores at 18 months. Conclusions. Salvage brachytherapy after primary brachytherapy is possible; however, in our experience the side-effect profile after the second brachytherapy procedure was higher than after the first brachytherapy procedure. In this cohort of patients we demonstrate that approximately 50% oncologic control, low risk patients appear to have better outcomes than others. PMID:27092279

  3. Biotherapeutic agents and vaginal health.

    PubMed

    Al-Ghazzewi, F H; Tester, R F

    2016-07-01

    Treatment of vaginal infection requires different drugs although the recurrence rate post treatment remains high due to adverse effects on the beneficial microbiota. Thus, there are clear clinical advantages for the use of biotherapeutic agents (prebiotics and/or probiotics) for treating these infections. Pre- and probiotic beneficial effects can be delivered topically or systemically. In general, both approaches have the potential to optimize, maintain and restore the ecology of the vaginal ecosystem. Specific carbohydrates provide a therapeutic approach for controlling infections by stimulating the growth of the indigenous lactobacilli but inhibiting the growth and adhesion of pathogens to the vaginal epithelial cells. Overall, little evidence exists to promote the prevention or treatment of vaginal disease with prebiotic carbohydrates in formulations such as pessaries, creams or douches. However, recent reports have promoted prebiotic applications in ecosystems other than the gut and include the mouth, skin and vagina. This review focuses on the utilization of pre- and probiotics for vaginal health. PMID:26757173

  4. Treatment of lesions of the rotator cuff.

    PubMed

    Saggini, R; Cavezza, T; Di Pancrazio, L; Pisciella, V; Saladino, G; Zuccaro, M C; Bellomo, R G

    2010-01-01

    The impingement syndrome and tendinopathy of the rotator cuff are the most common causes (complaints) of pain and disability of the shoulder. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of a specific rehabilitative protocol, integrated with the administration of a nutritional supplement, in the conservative rehabilitative treatment, as well as in post-surgery, of patients with lesions of the rotator cuff. Two groups with syndrome of the rotator cuff were formed to follow different therapeutic courses, in relation to the choice of each subject to undergo the conservative treatment (Arm A) or the surgical one (Arm B). In Arm A the study included the association of therapy with ESWT (shock waves) with the proprioceptive Multi Joint System, for rehabilitating joint movement and muscle strength of the shoulder, and a specific nutritional supplement to reduce the pain and conserve the cartilage tissue. Between February 2009 and June 2009, we enrolled 30 subjects (randomized into three homogenous groups A1, A2, A3), average age 45±10 years, with rotator cuff syndrome with calcification of the shoulder, diagnosed through clinical examination and investigative instruments (X-ray, echography or NMR). In Arm B, from September 2009 to January 2010, we enrolled 50 patients (randomized into two groups, B1 and B2), 24 male (average age 58.4: min 28 and max 78) and 26 females (average age 59.5: min 30 and max 80), who had undergone rotator cuff operations and acromionplasty for non-massive lesions without important gleno-humeral instability, with either open or arthroscopic procedures. The analysis of the results of Arm A highlights that in terms of reducing pain the main benefits were found in Group A1 where the supplement was given. From the analysis of the data of Arm B, in both groups an improvement of the first 4 items evaluated was evident. In Group B1, 84 percent of the patients declared to be satisfied and improved and 16 percent were dissatisfied; in Group B2

  5. A case of an ectopic ureter with vaginal insertion diagnosed in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Demir, Mehmet; Çiftçi, Halil; Kılıçarslan, Nihat; Gümüş, Kemal; Oğur, Mehmet; Gülüm, Mehmet; Yeni, Ercan

    2015-03-01

    Ectopic ureter which is one of the causes of urinary incontinence in adults is a rarely seen entity. In this case, diagnosis and treatment of urinary incontinence in a female patient thought to originate from an ectopic ureter will be evaluated. On magnetic resonance (MR) urograms double collecting system in both kidneys and also grade 3 hydroureteronephrosis in the collecting system which drained the upper pole of the right kidney were seen. The ureter draining the upper pole of the right kidney was seen to open into a 24 mm-wide cystic pouch inside the right lateral wall of the vaginal cuff. During vaginal examination an orifice of 3 mm was observed on the right wall of the vagina. Right ureteroneocystostomy was performed. Ureters with ectopic orifices are very rarely seen causes of urinary incontinence. To establish the diagnosis, this pathology must be recognized, should be kept in mind, and appropriate diagnostic methods must be used. PMID:26328201

  6. Anomalous biceps origin from the rotator cuff

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Samik; Patel, Vipul R

    2015-01-01

    Variations in the origin of the long head of biceps tendon (LHBT) have been described in literature; however, its clinical significance remains uncertain. We describe in this report, the history, physical examination and the arthroscopic findings in a patient who had an anomalous origin of the LHBT from the rotator cuff, resulting in restriction of range of motion. This anomalous origin of the long head of biceps tendon causing capsular contracture and restriction of movements leading to secondary internal impingement, has not been extensively reported in the literature. Shoulder arthroscopists should be aware that, although, an uncommon clinical condition, the aberrant congenital origin of the LHBT from the rotator cuff can rarely become pathologic in middle age and lead to shoulder dysfunction. In such cases, release of the anomalous band may be required, along with the treatment of other concomitant intraarticular pathologies in the glenohumeral joint. PMID:25593361

  7. Sphygmomanometer cuffs: a potential source of infection!

    PubMed

    Zargaran, David; Hardwick, Sarah; Adel, Reeja; Hill, George; Stubbins, Daniel; Salmasi, Abdul Majeed

    2015-02-01

    We evaluated the potential pathogenic hazard of sphygmomanometer blood pressure cuffs (BPCs) in a hospital setting. Prospectively, the presence of bacterial organisms on 120 BPCs in 14 medical wards and outpatient clinics in a district general hospital in London was assessed. Swabs taken from the inner aspect of the cuffs were cultured using standard microbiological techniques. Bacterial organisms were found in 85% (102) of the 120 BPCs assessed. The highest rates of contamination were found in the outpatients department (90%). There were differences in the most common bacterial species isolated between the samples obtained from the outpatient clinics and the wards, with coagulase-negative Staphylococcus and diphtheroids being the most prevalent species in the wards and outpatient clinics, respectively. These findings highlight the necessity to eliminate this potential risk of infection. PMID:24569512

  8. Cerebrovascular effects of the thigh cuff maneuver.

    PubMed

    Panerai, R B; Saeed, N P; Robinson, T G

    2015-04-01

    Arterial hypotension can be induced by sudden release of inflated thigh cuffs (THC), but its effects on the cerebral circulation have not been fully described. In nine healthy subjects [aged 59 (9) yr], bilateral cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) was recorded in the middle cerebral artery (MCA), noninvasive arterial blood pressure (BP) in the finger, and end-tidal CO2 (ETCO2) with nasal capnography. Three THC maneuvers were performed in each subject with cuff inflation 20 mmHg above systolic BP for 3 min before release. Beat-to-beat values were extracted for mean CBFV, BP, ETCO2 , critical closing pressure (CrCP), resistance-area product (RAP), and heart rate (HR). Time-varying estimates of the autoregulation index [ARI(t)] were also obtained using an autoregressive-moving average model. Coherent averages synchronized by the instant of cuff release showed significant drops in mean BP, CBFV, and RAP with rapid return of CBFV to baseline. HR, ETCO2 , and ARI(t) were transiently increased, but CrCP remained relatively constant. Mean values of ARI(t) for the 30 s following cuff release were not significantly different from the classical ARI [right MCA 5.9 (1.1) vs. 5.1 (1.6); left MCA 5.5 (1.4) vs. 4.9 (1.7)]. HR was strongly correlated with the ARI(t) peak after THC release (in 17/22 and 21/24 recordings), and ETCO2 was correlated with the subsequent drop in ARI(t) (19/22 and 20/24 recordings). These results suggest a complex cerebral autoregulatory response to the THC maneuver, dominated by myogenic mechanisms and influenced by concurrent changes in ETCO2 and possible involvement of the autonomic nervous system and baroreflex. PMID:25659488

  9. On cuff imbalance and tripolar ENG amplifier configurations.

    PubMed

    Triantis, Iasonas F; Demosthenous, Andreas; Donaldson, Nick

    2005-02-01

    Electroneurogram (ENG) recording techniques benefit from the use of tripolar cuffs because they assist in reducing interference from sources outside the cuff. However, in practice the performance of ENG amplifier configurations, such as the quasi-tripole and the true-tripole, has been widely reported to be degraded due to the departure of the tripolar cuff from ideal behavior. This paper establishes the presence of cuff imbalance and investigates its relationship to cuff asymmetry, cuff end-effects and interference source proximity. The paper also presents a comparison of the aforementioned amplifier configurations with a new alternative, termed the adaptive-tripole, developed to automatically compensate for cuff imbalance. The output signal-to-interference ratio of the three amplifier configurations were compared in vivo for two interference signals (stimulus artifact and M-wave) superimposed on compound action potentials. The experiments showed (for the first time) that the two interference signals result in different cuff imbalance values. Nevertheless, even with two distinct cuff imbalances present, the adaptive-tripole performed better than the other two systems in 61.9% of the trials. PMID:15709669

  10. Assessment and treatment strategies for rotator cuff tears

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hakim, Wisam; Noorani, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Tears of the rotator cuff are common and becoming an increasingly frequent problem. There is a vast amount of literature on the merits and limitations of the various methods of clinical and radiological assessment of rotator cuff tears. This is also the case with regard to treatment strategies. Certain popular beliefs and principles practiced widely and the basis upon which they are derived may be prone to inaccuracy. We provide an overview of the historical management of rotator cuff tears, as well as an explanation for how and why rotator cuff tears should be managed, and propose a structured methodology for their assessment and treatment.

  11. Mucoadhesive vaginal drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Acartürk, Füsun

    2009-11-01

    Vaginal delivery is an important route of drug administration for both local and systemic diseases. The vaginal route has some advantages due to its large surface area, rich blood supply, avoidance of the first-pass effect, relatively high permeability to many drugs and self-insertion. The traditional commercial preparations, such as creams, foams, gels, irrigations and tablets, are known to reside in the vaginal cavity for a relatively short period of time owing to the self-cleaning action of the vaginal tract, and often require multiple daily doses to ensure the desired therapeutic effect. The vaginal route appears to be highly appropriate for bioadhesive drug delivery systems in order to retain drugs for treating largely local conditions, or for use in contraception. In particular, protection against sexually-transmitted diseases is critical. To prolong the residence time in the vaginal cavity, bioadhesive therapeutic systems have been developed in the form of semi-solid and solid dosage forms. The most commonly used mucoadhesive polymers that are capable of forming hydrogels are synthetic polyacrylates, polycarbophil, chitosan, cellulose derivatives (hydroxyethycellulose, hydroxy-propylcellulose and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose), hyaluronic acid derivatives, pectin, tragacanth, carrageenan and sodium alginate. The present article is a comprehensive review of the patents related to mucoadhesive vaginal drug delivery systems. PMID:19925443

  12. Vaginoscopic resection of vaginal septum.

    PubMed

    Nassif, Joseph; Al Chami, Ali; Abu Musa, Antoine; Nassar, Anwar H; Kurdi, Ahmad; Ghulmiyyah, Labib

    2012-12-01

    We report the resection of a vaginal septum while preserving the virginity of a 12-year-old girl with Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich Syndrome (HWWS) having a didelphys uterus, obstructed hemivagina, and an ipsilateral renal agenesis with follow-up at 18 months. Successful resection of the vaginal septum with conservation of the hymenal ring and complete drainage of both the hematocolpos and the hematometra were achieved. Cyclic dysmenorrhea and pelvic pain were completely resolved on follow-up visits at 4, 6, and 18 months. Office hysteroscopy performed during the last follow-up visit revealed a patent vaginal vault without evidence of adenosis or recurrence of the vaginal septum. Vaginoscopy is a safe, convenient, and efficient diagnostic and therapeutic modality that can be used in the management of patients with an obstructed hemivagina. It maintains the patient's virginity and it is useful in patients with a restrictive vaginal opening or narrow vaginal canal. Furthermore, the hysteroscopic excision of the vaginal septum offers minimal risk of recurrence of the septal defect. PMID:23315718

  13. A rare case of giant vaginal fibromyoma

    PubMed Central

    Asnani, Mona; Srivastava, Kumkum; Gupta, Hem Prabha; Kunwar, Shipra; Srivastava, A N

    2016-01-01

    Summary Vaginal fibroids rarely exist as a primary vaginal tumor. Approximately 300 cases have been reported in the literature. Here we are reporting a rare case of giant vaginal fibromyoma. It was diagnosed as cervical fibroid polyp preoperatively but found to be vaginal fibromyoma peroperatively. PMID:26989649

  14. Vaginal Leiomyoma in a Dog

    PubMed Central

    Kang, T. B.; Holmberg, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    The surgical treatment of vaginal leiomyoma in a seven year old Blue Heeler bitch is described. A smooth, 12 cm diameter submucosal, intraluminal, firm mass was found on vaginal examination. It appeared to arise from the left ventral vaginal wall, cranial to the clitoris but caudal to the cervix. There was no history of urinary problems and the dog was normal in all other aspects. The treatment was surgical excision of the mass via an episiotomy. Histological examination indicated a leiomyoma. The differential diagnoses, possible etiologies and control or prevention of the condition by ovariohysterectomy are also discussed. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2. PMID:17422296

  15. Vaginal ultrasound in assisted reproduction.

    PubMed

    Wikland, M

    1992-06-01

    Vaginal scanning of the ovaries and the uterus is a diagnostic and monitoring tool of utmost importance in assisted conception. Although the value of ultrasound for monitoring follicular growth has been questioned, few groups working on assisted conception do not use it. Follicle aspiration under the guidance of vaginal sonography is the method of choice. With such a simple and safe technique available, using laparoscopy for retrieving oocytes for assisted conception cannot be justified. The introduction of ultrasound-guided transvaginal retrograde tubal catheterization has meant that laparoscopic GIFT and ZIFT procedures will probably soon be unnecessary. Vaginal sonography is one of the most clinically important diagnostic instruments in assisted conception. PMID:1424325

  16. Increased risks of endotracheal tube cuff colonization after prolonged intubation.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wen-Hui; Hsu, Hui-Chi; Shih, Chung-Hung

    2014-06-30

    Mechanical ventilation using endotracheal tube (ETT) intubation is crucial in saving life but may also cause ventilator-associated pneumonia resulting in morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of intubation duration on pathogen colonization rates of ETT cuff region, and its association with the subsequent re-intubation and tracheostomy. We enrolled 92 patients who were successfully weaned from ventilator and were extubated within 20 days of intubation duration. Patients were divided into Group I and II based on intubation for 1-9 days and 10-20 days, respectively. Pathogen colonization over ETT cuff region and extra-cuff region (including sputum and ETT aspirates) were assessed. As compared to Group I patients, Group II patients had a significant higher pathogen colonization rate (100% vs. 69.2%; P < 0.001) in the ETT cuff samples, but not in the extra-cuff samples (92.6% vs. 84.8%; P = 0.442). Further studies demonstrated that there was no difference between Group I and II patients in the percentages of patients with the same pathogen over both the cuff and extra-cuff samples (35.5% vs. 30.8%; P = 0.925), suggesting that the increased pathogen colonization rate over the ETT cuff region was least likely from the extra-cuff region. In addition, the results showed that longer intubation was also associated with increased tracheostomy rate from 9.3% to 28.9% for Group I and Group II respectively (P = 0.025). We conclude that longer intubation has a higher pathogen colonization rate over the ETT cuff region in patients receiving mechanical ventilation support; longer intubation also increases the trend of receiving re-intubation and tracheostomy. Our findings indicate that it is crucial to remove ETT as soon as possible and perform pathogen culture over the ETT cuff regions immediately after extubation. PMID:24826783

  17. Can Vaginal Cancer Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... can be spread during sex – including vaginal intercourse, anal intercourse, and oral sex – but sex doesn’t ... not letting others come in contact with your anal or genital area, but even then there could ...

  18. Vaginal or uterine bleeding - overview

    MedlinePlus

    Vaginal bleeding normally occurs during a woman's menstrual cycle, when she gets her period. Every woman's period is different. Most women have cycles between 24 and 34 days apart. It usually lasts ...

  19. Urinary incontinence - vaginal sling procedures

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007376.htm Urinary incontinence - vaginal sling procedures To use the sharing features ... are types of surgeries that help control stress urinary incontinence . This is urine leakage that happens when you ...

  20. Drugs Approved for Vaginal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to prevent vaginal cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  1. Five-year cure of cervical cancer treated using californium-252 neutron brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, Y.; van Nagell, J.R.; Yoneda, J.; Donaldson, E.; Hanson, M.; Martin, A.; Wilson, L.C.; Coffey, C.W.; Feola, J.; Beach, J.L.

    1984-10-01

    Female pelvic carcinoma is one of the common malignancies seen at the University of Kentucky Medical Center and often presents in an advanced stage. In 1976, the authors began to test californium-252 neutron brachytherapy (NT) for its efficacy for control of primary and recurrent advanced uterine, cervix, and vaginal cancers. The first protocol used was 5000-5500 rad of whole pelvis irradiation followed by 1-2 Cf-252 insertions using a single tandem placed in the utero-cervico-vaginal region. Of 27 patients with primary carcinomas treated, 10 are alive and well 5 year later (37%). Two of two recurrent tumors were locally controlled but failed later. These patients had advanced cervical, vaginal, or endometrial carcinomas. In 1977, a transitional year, treatment of only unfavorable stages and presentations with NT was initiated. Similar results were obtained with NT as compared to conventional photon therapy (PT). Further improvement in treatment results can be anticipated as NT brachytherapy is used for advanced cancer therapy by more effective treatment schedules and radiation doses. Cf-252 can be used as a radium substitute and achieved similar rates of tumor control and 5-year survivals. 21 references, 2 tables.

  2. Breast metastasis from vaginal cancer.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Neeraja; Scharifker, Daniel; Varsegi, George; Almeida, Zoyla

    2016-01-01

    Vaginal cancer is a rare malignancy accounting for 1-2% of all pelvic neoplasms. Dissemination usually occurs through local invasion and rarely metastasises to distal locations. Metastasis of vaginal cancer to the breast is extremely infrequent and unique. A 66-year-old Asian woman presented with vaginal bleeding and was found to have a vaginal mass and a left breast mass. Pathological assessment of the biopsies revealed identical squamous cell characteristics of both masses. We describe a very rare and novel case of a distally located vaginal carcinoma with metastasis to the breast Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IV (FIGO IVB). Robot-assisted extrafascial total hysterectomy with local vaginal mass excision and partial mastectomy of the left breast were performed. After surgery, the patient underwent adjuvant chemotherapy followed by breast and pelvic radiotherapy, with maintained complete remission after 3 years of follow-up. This combination of findings and treatment is very distinct with a unique and favourable response. PMID:27444140

  3. 21 CFR 868.5800 - Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. 868.5800 Section 868.5800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5800 Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. (a) Identification. A tracheostomy...

  4. Rotator Cuff Disease and Injury--Evaluation and Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Randy

    This presentation considers the incidence, evaluation, and management of rotator cuff disease and injury. Pathogenesis, symptoms, physical findings, treatment (therapeutic and surgical), and prevention are discussed. It is noted that rotator cuff problems, common in athletes, are usually related to an error in training or lack of training. They…

  5. Rotator Cuff Damage: Reexamining the Causes and Treatments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, Heyward L.

    1988-01-01

    Sports medicine specialists are beginning to reexamine the causes and treatments of rotator cuff problems, questioning the role of primary impingement in a deficient or torn cuff and trying new surgical procedures as alternatives to the traditional open acromioplasty. (Author/CB)

  6. Rotator Cuff Tear Consequent to Glenohumeral Dislocation.

    PubMed

    Gilotra, Mohit N; Christian, Matthew W; Lovering, Richard M

    2016-08-01

    The patient was a 21-year-old collegiate running back who was tackled during a football game and sustained a posterior glenohumeral dislocation. He was referred to an orthopaedist and presented 3 weeks after the injury, and, following examination, further imaging was ordered by the orthopaedist due to rotator cuff weakness. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a complete tear of the supraspinatus and infraspinatus, as well as a posterior Bankart lesion, a subscapularis tear, and a dislocation of the biceps long head tendon into the reverse Hill-Sachs lesion. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(8):708. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.0413. PMID:27477475

  7. Definitive radiotherapy in the management of isolated vaginal recurrences of endometrial cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Lilie L.; Grigsby, Perry W. . E-mail: pgrigsby@wustl.edu; Powell, Matthew A.; Mutch, David G.

    2005-10-01

    Purpose: The aim of our study was to assess prognostic factors and overall survival after salvage radiotherapy for patients who had endometrial carcinoma and who experienced an isolated vaginal recurrence. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the records of 50 patients treated at our institution between 1967 and 2003 for an isolated vaginal recurrence of endometrial carcinoma. Initial treatment for endometrial carcinoma was definitive surgery in 49 patients and definitive radiotherapy in 1 patient. The median time from initial diagnosis of endometrial carcinoma to recurrence was 25 months (range, 4-179 months). Three patients (6%) received external-beam radiotherapy alone, 8 patients (16%) received brachytherapy only, and 39 patients (78%) received combined external-beam radiation therapy and brachytherapy. Median dose of radiation to the recurrence was 60 Gy (range, 16-85 Gy). Overall survival was calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Endpoints were measured from the date of diagnosis of the vaginal recurrence. Median follow-up of survivors after recurrence was 53 months (range, 8-159 months). Results: The 5-year and 10-year disease-free and overall survivals were 68% and 55%, and 53% and 40%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, age (p = 0.0242), Grade 1 or 2 vs. Grade 3 tumor (p = 0.002), and size of recurrence (p < 0.001) were significant predictors of overall survival. All patients who had Grade 3 disease were dead by 3.6 years from the time of recurrence. Five patients experienced a Grade 3 or 4 complication. Conclusions: Patients treated with radiotherapy for an isolated vaginal recurrence can be cured in over 50% the cases. Radiotherapy is well tolerated, with a low risk of complications. Factors predictive of overall survival include tumor grade, patient age at recurrence, and tumor size.

  8. Conformal Brachytherapy Planning for Cervical Cancer Using Transabdominal Ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dyk, Sylvia Narayan, Kailash; Fisher, Richard; Bernshaw, David

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: To determine if transabdominal ultrasound (US) can be used for conformal brachytherapy in cervical cancer patients. Materials and Methods: Seventy-one patients with locoregionally advanced cervix cancer treated with chemoradiation and brachytherapy were included in this study. The protocol consisted of US-assisted tandem insertion and conformal US-based planning. Orthogonal films for applicator reconstruction were also taken. A standard plan was modified to suit the US-based volume and treatment was delivered. The patient then underwent a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan with the applicators in situ. Retrospectively, individual standard (STD), US, and MRI plans were extrapolated for five fractions and superimposed onto the two-dimensional sagittal MRI images for comparison. Doses to Point A, target volume, International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) 38 bladder and rectal points, and individualized bowel points were calculated on original implant geometry on Plato for each planning method. Results: STD (high-dose-rate) plans reported higher doses to Point A, target volume, ICRU 38 bladder and rectal points, and individualized bowel point compared with US and MRI plans. There was a statistically significant difference between standard plans and image-based plans-STD vs. US, STD vs. MRI, and STD vs. Final-having consistent (p {<=} 0.001) respectively for target volume, Point A, ICRU 38 bladder, and bowel point. US plan assessed on two-dimensional MRI image was comparable for target volume (p = 0.11), rectal point (p = 0.8), and vaginal mucosa (p = 0.19). Local control was 90%. Late bowel morbidity (G3, G4) was <2%. Conclusions: Transabdominal ultrasound offers an accurate, quick, accessible, and cost-effective method of conformal brachytherapy planning.

  9. Clinical Characteristics of Aerobic Vaginitis and Its Association to Vaginal Candidiasis, Trichomonas Vaginitis and Bacterial Vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Jahic, Mahira; Mulavdic, Mirsada; Nurkic, Jasmina; Jahic, Elmir; Nurkic, Midhat

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim of the work: Examine clinical characteristics of aerobic vaginitis and mixed infection for the purpose of better diagnostic accuracy and treatment efficiency. Materials and methods: Prospective research has been conducted at Clinic for Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department for Microbiology and Pathology at Polyclinic for laboratory diagnostic and Gynecology and Obstetrics Department at Health Center Sapna. Examination included 100 examinees with the signs of vaginitis. Examination consisted of: anamnesis, clinical, gynecological and microbiological examination of vaginal smear. Results: The average age of the examinees was 32,62±2,6. Examining vaginal smears of the examinees with signs of vaginitis in 96% (N-96) different microorganisms have been isolated, while in 4% (N-4) findings were normal. AV has been found in 51% (N-51) of the examinees, Candida albicans in 17% (N-17), BV in 15% (N-15), Trichomonas vaginalis in 13% (N-13). In 21% (N-21) AV was diagnosed alone while associated with other agents in 30% (N-30). Most common causes of AV are E. coli (N-55) and E. faecalis (N-52). AV and Candida albicanis have been found in (13/30, 43%), Trichomonas vaginalis in (9/30, 30%) and BV (8/30, 26%). Vaginal secretion is in 70,05% (N-36) yellow coloured, red vagina wall is recorded in 31,13% (N-16) and pruritus in 72,54% (N-37). Increased pH value of vagina found in 94,10% (N-48). The average pH value of vaginal environment was 5,15±0,54 and in associated presence of AV and VVC, TV and BV was 5,29±0,56 which is higher value considering presence of AV alone but that is not statistically significant difference (p>0,05). Amino-odor test was positive in 29,94% (N-15) of associated infections. Lactobacilli are absent, while leukocytes are increased in 100% (N-51) of the examinees with AV. Conclusion: AV is vaginal infection similar to other vaginal infections. It is important to be careful while diagnosing because the treatment of AV differentiates from

  10. Unsafe health and safety: sphygmomanometer cuffs are not interchangeable.

    PubMed

    Shaw, K C; McEniery, C M; Wilkinson, I B; Brown, M J

    2013-07-01

    Unknown to its hypertension specialists, a major teaching hospital changed the cuffs on its sphygmomanometers from manufacturer-validated to a uniform washable alternative, in line with 'Health and Safety' concerns surrounding potential cross-contamination between patients. When clinic doctors suspected serious under-reading with the new cuffs, a systematic comparison was undertaken in 54 patients (mean±s.d. age, 61±17 years), using two UM-101 sphygmomanometers, one using the original, manufacturer-supplied cuff and the other with the washable replacement. The study confirmed an average under-reading of 8±10/5±5 mm Hg using the washable cuff, and a third of patients with poorly controlled hypertension were considered normotensive, after using this cuff. The UM-101 sphygmomanometers have now been re-fitted with the original cuffs. Sphygmomanometer cuffs are not interchangeable between devices and a modicum of common sense should be shown to prevent changes made in the name of Health and Safety from having the opposite effect to that intended. PMID:23172028

  11. Management of Rotator Cuff and Impingement Injuries in the Athlete

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Gerald R.; Kelley, Martin

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To review current concepts of the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of rotator cuff and impingement injuries in the athlete. Data Sources: The information we present was compiled from a review of classic and recently published material regarding rotator cuff and impingement injuries. These materials were identified through a search of a personal literature database compiled by the authors, as well as by selective searching of the MEDLINE. In addition, much of the information presented represents observations and opinions of the authors developed over 8 to 10 years of treating shoulder injuries in athletes. Data Synthesis: Biomechanics of the normal shoulder and pathophysiology of rotator cuff injuries in the athletic population are discussed, followed by a summary of the important diagnostic features of rotator cuff and impingement injuries. The principles of rehabilitation are extensively presented, along with indications and important technical aspects of selected surgical procedures. General principles and specific protocols of postoperative rehabilitation are also summarized. Conclusions/Recommendations: Rotator cuff and impingement injuries in the athletic population are multifactorial in etiology, exhibiting significant overlap with glenohumeral instability. Nonoperative treatment is successful in most athletic patients with rotator cuff and impingement injuries. When nonoperative treatment fails, arthroscopic surgical techniques such as rotator cuff repair and subacromial decompression may be successful in returning the athlete to competition. ImagesFigure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10.Figure 11.Figure 12.Figure 13. PMID:16558644

  12. Paecilomyces lilacinus Vaginitis in an Immunocompetent Patient

    PubMed Central

    D’Amico, Ron; Sutton, Deanna A.; Rinaldi, Michael G.

    2003-01-01

    Paecilomyces lilacinus, an environmental mold found in soil and vegetation, rarely causes human infection. We report the first case of P. lilacinus isolated from a vaginal culture in a patient with vaginitis. PMID:14519255

  13. Vaginal itching and discharge - adult and adolescent

    MedlinePlus

    ... to vaginal dryness and other symptoms ( atrophic vaginitis ). Forgotten tampon or foreign body, which may cause a ... In: Rakel RE, Rakel D, eds. Textbook of Family Medicine . 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap ...

  14. Vaginitis: current microbiologic and clinical concepts.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, L V; Embil, J A

    1986-01-01

    Infectious vaginitis occurs when the normal vaginal flora is disrupted; it may arise when saprophytes overwhelm the host immune response, when pathogenic organisms are introduced into the vagina or when changes in substrate allow an imbalance of microorganisms to develop. Examples of these types of vaginitis include the presence of chronic fungal infection in women with an inadequate cellular immune response to the yeast, the introduction of trichomonads into vaginal epithelium that has a sufficient supply of glycogen, and the alteration in bacterial flora, normally dominated by Lactobacillus spp., and its metabolites that is characteristic of "nonspecific vaginitis". The authors review microbiologic and clinical aspects of the fungal, protozoal and bacterial infections, including the interactions of bacteria thought to produce nonspecific vaginitis, that are now recognized as causing vaginitis. Other causes of vaginitis are also discussed. PMID:3510698

  15. A Comparison of Rehabilitation Methods After Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Anthony; Villacis, Diego; Yalamanchili, Raj; Hatch, George F. Rick

    2015-01-01

    Context: Despite the significant attention directed toward optimizing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, there has been less focus on rehabilitation after rotator cuff repair surgery. Objective: To determine the effect of different rehabilitation protocols on clinical outcomes by comparing early versus late mobilization approaches and continuous passive mobilization (CPM) versus manual therapy after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Data Sources: PubMed was searched for relevant articles using the keywords rotator cuff, rotator, cuff, tears, lacerations, and rehabilitation to identify articles published from January 1980 to March 2014. Study Selection: Inclusion criteria consisted of articles of level 1 or 2 evidence, written in the English language, and with reported outcomes for early versus late mobilization or rehabilitation with CPM versus manual therapy after primary arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Exclusion criteria consisted of articles of level 3, 4, or 5 evidence, non-English language, and those with significantly different demographic variables between study groups. Included studies were evaluated with the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials criteria. Study Design: Systematic review. Level of Evidence: Level 2. Data Extraction: Level of evidence, study type, number of patients enrolled, number of patients at final follow-up, length of follow-up, age, sex, rotator cuff tear size, surgical technique, and concomitant operative procedures were extracted from included articles. Postoperative data included clinical outcome scores, visual analog score for pain, shoulder range of motion, strength, and rotator cuff retear rates. Results: A total of 7 studies met all criteria and were included in the final analysis. Five studies compared early and late mobilization. Two studies compared CPM and manual therapy. Conclusion: In general, current data do not definitively demonstrate a significant difference between postoperative rotator cuff rehabilitation

  16. Tracheomegaly Secondary to Tracheotomy Tube Cuff in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong Hoon; Yoon, Tae Mi; Lee, Joon Kyoo; Lim, Sang Chul

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Tracheomegaly has not been reported in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Herein, the authors report a case of tracheomegaly secondary to tracheotomy tube cuff in a patient with ALS. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an ALS patient with tracheomegaly and of tracheomegaly being associated with tracheotomy tube cuff and home tracheotomy mechanical ventilator. The clinician should consider the possibility of tracheomegaly in the differential diagnosis, if a patient with ALS develops repeat air leakage around the tracheotomy tube or rupture of tracheotomy tube cuff. PMID:26496301

  17. 21 CFR 884.5920 - Vaginal insufflator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Vaginal insufflator. 884.5920 Section 884.5920 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... § 884.5920 Vaginal insufflator. (a) Identification. A vaginal insufflator is a device used to...

  18. 21 CFR 884.5920 - Vaginal insufflator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Vaginal insufflator. 884.5920 Section 884.5920 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... § 884.5920 Vaginal insufflator. (a) Identification. A vaginal insufflator is a device used to...

  19. 21 CFR 884.5920 - Vaginal insufflator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Vaginal insufflator. 884.5920 Section 884.5920 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... § 884.5920 Vaginal insufflator. (a) Identification. A vaginal insufflator is a device used to...

  20. 21 CFR 884.5920 - Vaginal insufflator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vaginal insufflator. 884.5920 Section 884.5920 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... § 884.5920 Vaginal insufflator. (a) Identification. A vaginal insufflator is a device used to...

  1. 21 CFR 884.5920 - Vaginal insufflator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Vaginal insufflator. 884.5920 Section 884.5920 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... § 884.5920 Vaginal insufflator. (a) Identification. A vaginal insufflator is a device used to...

  2. 21 CFR 884.3575 - Vaginal pessary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Vaginal pessary. 884.3575 Section 884.3575 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... Vaginal pessary. (a) Identification. A vaginal pessary is a removable structure placed in the vagina...

  3. 21 CFR 884.3575 - Vaginal pessary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Vaginal pessary. 884.3575 Section 884.3575 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... Vaginal pessary. (a) Identification. A vaginal pessary is a removable structure placed in the vagina...

  4. 21 CFR 884.3575 - Vaginal pessary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vaginal pessary. 884.3575 Section 884.3575 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... Vaginal pessary. (a) Identification. A vaginal pessary is a removable structure placed in the vagina...

  5. 21 CFR 884.3575 - Vaginal pessary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Vaginal pessary. 884.3575 Section 884.3575 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... Vaginal pessary. (a) Identification. A vaginal pessary is a removable structure placed in the vagina...

  6. 21 CFR 884.3575 - Vaginal pessary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Vaginal pessary. 884.3575 Section 884.3575 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... Vaginal pessary. (a) Identification. A vaginal pessary is a removable structure placed in the vagina...

  7. Rotator cuff tears: An evidence based approach

    PubMed Central

    Sambandam, Senthil Nathan; Khanna, Vishesh; Gul, Arif; Mounasamy, Varatharaj

    2015-01-01

    Lesions of the rotator cuff (RC) are a common occurrence affecting millions of people across all parts of the globe. RC tears are also rampantly prevalent with an age-dependent increase in numbers. Other associated factors include a history of trauma, limb dominance, contralateral shoulder, smoking-status, hypercholesterolemia, posture and occupational dispositions. The challenge lies in early diagnosis since a high proportion of patients are asymptomatic. Pain and decreasing shoulder power and function should alert the heedful practitioner in recognizing promptly the onset or aggravation of existing RC tears. Partial-thickness tears (PTT) can be bursal-sided or articular-sided tears. Over the course of time, PTT enlarge and propagate into full-thickness tears (FTT) and develop distinct chronic pathological changes due to muscle retraction, fatty infiltration and muscle atrophy. These lead to a reduction in tendon elasticity and viability. Eventually, the glenohumeral joint experiences a series of degenerative alterations - cuff tear arthropathy. To avert this, a vigilant clinician must utilize and corroborate clinical skill and radiological findings to identify tear progression. Modern radio-diagnostic means of ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging provide excellent visualization of structural details and are crucial in determining further course of action for these patients. Physical therapy along with activity modifications, anti-inflammatory and analgesic medications form the pillars of nonoperative treatment. Elderly patients with minimal functional demands can be managed conservatively and reassessed at frequent intervals. Regular monitoring helps in isolating patients who require surgical interventions. Early surgery should be considered in younger, active and symptomatic, healthy patients. In addition to being cost-effective, this helps in providing a functional shoulder with a stable cuff. An easily reproducible technique of maximal strength and

  8. EM-navigated catheter placement for gynecologic brachytherapy: an accuracy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrtash, Alireza; Damato, Antonio; Pernelle, Guillaume; Barber, Lauren; Farhat, Nabgha; Viswanathan, Akila; Cormack, Robert; Kapur, Tina

    2014-03-01

    Gynecologic malignancies, including cervical, endometrial, ovarian, vaginal and vulvar cancers, cause significant mortality in women worldwide. The standard care for many primary and recurrent gynecologic cancers consists of chemoradiation followed by brachytherapy. In high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, intracavitary applicators and /or interstitial needles are placed directly inside the cancerous tissue so as to provide catheters to deliver high doses of radiation. Although technology for the navigation of catheters and needles is well developed for procedures such as prostate biopsy, brain biopsy, and cardiac ablation, it is notably lacking for gynecologic HDR brachytherapy. Using a benchtop study that closely mimics the clinical interstitial gynecologic brachytherapy procedure, we developed a method for evaluating the accuracy of image-guided catheter placement. Future bedside translation of this technology offers the potential benefit of maximizing tumor coverage during catheter placement while avoiding damage to the adjacent organs, for example bladder, rectum and bowel. In the study, two independent experiments were performed on a phantom model to evaluate the targeting accuracy of an electromagnetic (EM) tracking system. The procedure was carried out using a laptop computer (2.1GHz Intel Core i7 computer, 8GB RAM, Windows 7 64-bit), an EM Aurora tracking system with a 1.3mm diameter 6 DOF sensor, and 6F (2 mm) brachytherapy catheters inserted through a Syed-Neblett applicator. The 3D Slicer and PLUS open source software were used to develop the system. The mean of the targeting error was less than 2.9mm, which is comparable to the targeting errors in commercial clinical navigation systems.

  9. Primary Vaginal Adenosarcoma With Sarcomatous Overgrowth Arising in Recurrent Endometriosis: Feasibility of Laparoscopic Treatment and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Pontrelli, Giovanni; Cozzolino, Mauro; Stepniewska, Anna; Bruni, Francesco; Pesci, Anna; Ceccaroni, Marcello

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a primary vaginal adenosarcoma with sarcomatous overgrowth in a postmenopausal 58-year-old woman with recurrent endometriosis. In the past 5 years she underwent several biopsies of a polypoid lesion on the vaginal cuff, and the last histologic examination of the biopsy showed an adenosarcoma with "sarcomatous overgrowth" in a background of endometriosis. There was no evidence of distant metastatic disease on the diagnostic workup, and we performed a laparoscopy to remove the pelvic mass. We reviewed the literature on the electronic databases Medline, Embase, and Science Direct on articles published in English from 1990 to 2015. We identified 5 articles in which the surgical treatment was performed via a laparotomic approach. The present case is the first in the literature to report feasibility of laparoscopic treatment for this kind of pathology with a detailed description of the surgical technique. PMID:27041653

  10. Management of complications after rotator cuff surgery.

    PubMed

    Parada, Stephen A; Dilisio, Matthew F; Kennedy, Colin D

    2015-03-01

    Rotator cuff repair (RCR) is a common procedure performed by orthopedic surgeons via arthroscopic, open, or mini-open techniques. While this surgery is considered to be of low morbidity, several potential complications can arise either intraoperatively or during the postoperative time period. Some of these complications are related to the surgical approach (arthroscopic or open), while others are patient dependent. Many of these complications can be managed through nonoperative means; however, early recognition and timely treatment is essential in limiting the long-term sequela and improving patient outcome. There are several different ways to classify complications after RCR repair: timing, severity, preventability, whether or not the pathology is intra- or extra-articular, and the type of treatment necessary. It is essential that the surgeon is cognizant of the etiology contributing to the failed RCR surgery in order to provide timely and proper management. PMID:25532916

  11. Tendon graft substitutes-rotator cuff patches.

    PubMed

    Coons, David A; Alan Barber, F

    2006-09-01

    Over the past few years, many biologic patches have been developed to augment repairs of large or complex tendon tears. These patches include both allograft and xenografts. Regardless of their origins, these products are primarily composed of purified type I collagen. Many factors should be considered when choosing an augmentation patch including tissue origin, graft processing, cross-linking, clinical experience, and physical properties. The purpose of this article is to familiarize the sports medicine community with several tendon augmentation grafts: GraftJacket (Wright Medical Technology, Arlington, TN), CuffPatch (Organogenesis, Canton, MA, licensed to Arthrotek, Warsaw, IN), Restore (Depuy, Warsaw, IN), Zimmer Collagen Repair (Permacol) patch (Tissue Science Laboratories Covington, GA, licensed to Zimmer, Warsaw, IN), TissueMend (TEI Biosciences, Boston, MA, licensed to Stryker Howmedica Osteonics, Kalamazoo, MI), OrthoADAPT (Pegasus Biologics, Irvine, CA), and BioBlanket (Kensey Nash, Exton, PA). PMID:17135966

  12. Current Concepts of Treating Vaginitis

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Theresa

    1977-01-01

    Vaginitis can be a frustrating entity to treat, since the incidence of recurrence is high. This paper examines evidence from the literature concerning diagnosis and treatment of Candida albicans, Trichomonas vaginalis, Corynebacterium vaginale, herpes simplex type 2 and gonorrhea. A protocol based on these readings is outlined. PMID:21304797

  13. Vaginal flora in asymptomatic women.

    PubMed

    Tashjian, J H; Coulam, C B; Washington, J A

    1976-09-01

    Four groups of 25 asymptomatic women--pregnant, premenopausal and taking oral contraceptives, premenopausal and not taking oral contraceptives, and postmenopausal--were studied for the presence in vaginal specimens of aerobic bacteria, anaerobic bacteria, fungi, Mycoplasma, Chlamydia, herpes simplex virus, mycobacteria, and Trichomonas. No significant differences in microbial flora were found among the groups. PMID:957791

  14. Tests for diagnosing subacromial impingement syndrome and rotator cuff disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Clinical examination techniques need to allow the physician to determine the underlying pathology of a patient’s condition with confidence. This review examines the evidence for two common conditions: impingement and rotator cuff disease

  15. Magnetic resonance-guided interstitial therapy for vaginal recurrence of endometrial cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, Akila N. . E-mail: aviswanathan@partners.org; Cormack, Robert; Holloway, Caroline L.; Tanaka, Cynthia; O'Farrell, Desmond C.; Devlin, Phillip M.; Tempany, Clare

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and to describe the acute toxicity of a real-time intraoperative magnetic resonance (MR)-image guided interstitial approach to treating vaginal recurrence of endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: From February 2004 to April 2005, 10 patients with recurrent endometrial cancer underwent MR-guided interstitial brachytherapy. Parameters evaluated included needle placement, dose-volume histograms (DVH), and complications. Results: Magnetic resonance-image guidance resulted in accurate needle placement. Tumor DVH values included median volume, 47 cc; V100, 89%; V150, 61%; V200, 38%; D90, 71 Gy; and D100, 60 Gy. DVH of organs at risk resulted in a median D2cc of external beam and brachytherapy dose (% of brachytherapy prescription): bladder, 75Gy{sub 3} (88%); rectum, 70Gy{sub 3} (87%); and sigmoid, 56Gy{sub 3} (41%). All patients experienced either a Grade 1 or 2 acute toxicity related to the radiation; only 1 patient had Grade 3 toxicity. No toxicities were attributable to the use of MR guidance. Conclusions: Real-time MR guidance during the insertion of interstitial needles reduces the likelihood of an inadvertent insertion of the needles into the bladder and the rectum. Three-dimensional dosimetry allows estimation of the dose to organs at risk. Toxicities are limited.

  16. Augmentation of Rotator Cuff Repair With Soft Tissue Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Thangarajah, Tanujan; Pendegrass, Catherine J.; Shahbazi, Shirin; Lambert, Simon; Alexander, Susan; Blunn, Gordon W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Tears of the rotator cuff are one of the most common tendon disorders. Treatment often includes surgical repair, but the rate of failure to gain or maintain healing has been reported to be as high as 94%. This has been substantially attributed to the inadequate capacity of tendon to heal once damaged, particularly to bone at the enthesis. A number of strategies have been developed to improve tendon-bone healing, tendon-tendon healing, and tendon regeneration. Scaffolds have received considerable attention for replacement, reconstruction, or reinforcement of tendon defects but may not possess situation-specific or durable mechanical and biological characteristics. Purpose To provide an overview of the biology of tendon-bone healing and the current scaffolds used to augment rotator cuff repairs. Study Design Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods A preliminary literature search of MEDLINE and Embase databases was performed using the terms rotator cuff scaffolds, rotator cuff augmentation, allografts for rotator cuff repair, xenografts for rotator cuff repair, and synthetic grafts for rotator cuff repair. Results The search identified 438 unique articles. Of these, 214 articles were irrelevant to the topic and were therefore excluded. This left a total of 224 studies that were suitable for analysis. Conclusion A number of novel biomaterials have been developed into biologically and mechanically favorable scaffolds. Few clinical trials have examined their effect on tendon-bone healing in well-designed, long-term follow-up studies with appropriate control groups. While there is still considerable work to be done before scaffolds are introduced into routine clinical practice, there does appear to be a clear indication for their use as an interpositional graft for large and massive retracted rotator cuff tears and when repairing a poor-quality degenerative tendon. PMID:26665095

  17. Physiotherapy assessment of patients with rotator cuff pathology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Pathology of the rotator cuff and sub-acromial bursa are considered to be the main cause of shoulder pain and dysfunction. In the absence of trauma, conservative care, including physiotherapy is the primary treatment. This paper aims to present the key features of a physiotherapy assessment, excluding diagnostic tests for rotator cuff pathology. It describes and explores how assessment can be used to direct management options and develop a treatment plan.

  18. Brachytherapy dosimeter with silicon photomultipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moutinho, L. M.; Castro, I. F. C.; Peralta, L.; Abreu, M. C.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.

    2015-07-01

    In-vivo and in-situ measurement of the radiation dose administered during brachytherapy faces several technical challenges, requiring a very compact, tissue-equivalent, linear and highly sensitive dosimeter, particularly in low-dose rate brachytherapy procedures, which use radioactive seeds with low energy and low dose deposition rate. In this work we present a scintillating optical fiber dosimeter composed of a flexible sensitive probe and a dedicated electronic readout system based on silicon photomultiplier photodetection, capable of operating both in pulse and current modes. The performance of the scintillating fiber optic dosimeter was evaluated in low energy regimes, using an X-ray tube operating at voltages of 40-50 kV and currents below 1 mA, to assess minimum dose response of the scintillating fiber. The dosimeter shows a linear response with dose and is capable of detecting mGy dose variations like an ionization chamber. Besides fulfilling all the requirements for a dosimeter in brachytherapy, the high sensitivity of this device makes it a suitable candidate for application in low-dose rate brachytherapy. According to Peralta and Rego [1], the BCF-10 and BCF-60 scintillating optical fibers used in dosimetry exhibit high variations in their sensitivity for photon beams in the 25-100 kVp energy range. Energy linearity for energies below 50 keV needs to be further investigated, using monochromatic X-ray photons.

  19. Improved apparatus for predictive diagnosis of rotator cuff disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillai, Anup; Hall, Brittany N.; Thigpen, Charles A.; Kwartowitz, David M.

    2014-03-01

    Rotator cuff disease impacts over 50% of the population over 60, with reports of incidence being as high as 90% within this population, causing pain and possible loss of function. The rotator cuff is composed of muscles and tendons that work in tandem to support the shoulder. Heavy use of these muscles can lead to rotator cuff tear, with the most common causes is age-related degeneration or sport injuries, both being a function of overuse. Tears ranges in severity from partial thickness tear to total rupture. Diagnostic techniques are based on physical assessment, detailed patient history, and medical imaging; primarily X-ray, MRI and ultrasonography are the chosen modalities for assessment. The final treatment technique and imaging modality; however, is chosen by the clinician is at their discretion. Ultrasound has been shown to have good accuracy for identification and measurement of full-thickness and partial-thickness rotator cuff tears. In this study, we report on the progress and improvement of our method of transduction and analysis of in situ measurement of rotator cuff biomechanics. We have improved the ability of the clinician to apply a uniform force to the underlying musculotendentious tissues while simultaneously obtaining the ultrasound image. This measurement protocol combined with region of interest (ROI) based image processing will help in developing a predictive diagnostic model for treatment of rotator cuff disease and help the clinicians choose the best treatment technique.

  20. No prosthetic management of massive and irreparable rotator cuff tears

    PubMed Central

    Garofalo, Raffaele; Cesari, Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    A massive rotator cuff tear is not necessarily irreparable. Number of tendons involved, muscle-tendon unit quality, and decreased acromionhumeral distance (AHD) are as important as tear size in determining reparability of lesion. Massive and irreparable rotator cuff tears cannot be anatomically repaired to the bone and are a common source of pain and disability even in middle-aged patients. In these patients when conservative management has failed, it is possible to perform different surgical techniques. A functional repair can help to restore the horizontal force couple of the cuff on the humeral head and to increase the AHD. Debridement of irreparable tears and biceps tenotomy or tenodesis can have a role in low functional demand patients but results deteriorate over time. Recently, several commercially available tissue-engineered biological and synthetic scaffolds have been developed to augment rotator cuff repairs. The aim is to provide a mechanical improvement in case of poor quality tissue at time zero and give a support to have a better cuff healing. In selected cases, the scaffold can be used also to bridge tendon defect. Patients who not have pseudoparalysis, cuff tear arthropathy and with intact deltoid function can benefit from tendon transfers with satisfactory outcomes. These different procedures should be chosen for each patient with selected criteria and after a satisfactory explanation about the really possible expectation after surgery.

  1. Suprascapular Nerve: Is It Important in Cuff Pathology?

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lewis L.; Freehill, Michael T.; Yannopoulos, Paul; Warner, Jon J. P.

    2012-01-01

    Suprascapular nerve and rotator cuff function are intimately connected. The incidence of suprascapular neuropathy has been increasing due to improved understanding of the disease entity and detection methods. The nerve dysfunction often results from a traction injury or compression, and a common cause is increased tension on the nerve from retracted rotator cuff tears. Suprascapular neuropathy should be considered as a diagnosis if patients exhibit posterosuperior shoulder pain, atrophy or weakness of supraspinatus and infraspinatus without rotator cuff tear, or massive rotator cuff with retraction. Magnetic resonance imaging and electromyography studies are indicated to evaluate the rotator cuff and function of the nerve. Fluoroscopically guided injections to the suprascapular notch can also be considered as a diagnostic option. Nonoperative treatment of suprascapular neuropathy can be successful, but in the recent decade there is increasing evidence espousing the success of surgical treatment, in particular arthroscopic suprascapular nerve decompression. There is often reliable improvement in shoulder pain, but muscle atrophy recovery is less predictable. More clinical data are needed to determine the role of rotator cuff repair and nerve decompression in the same setting. PMID:23193484

  2. Image-based brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vargo, John A; Beriwal, Sushil

    2014-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer in women worldwide; definitive radiation therapy and concurrent chemotherapy is the accepted standard of care for patients with node positive or locally advanced tumors > 4 cm. Brachytherapy is an important part of definitive radiotherapy shown to improve overall survival. While results for two-dimensional X-ray based brachytherapy have been good in terms of local control especially for early stage disease, unexplained toxicities and treatment failures remain. Improvements in brachytherapy planning have more recently paved the way for three-dimensional image-based brachytherapy with volumetric optimization which increases tumor control, reduces toxicity, and helps predict outcomes. Advantages of image-based brachytherapy include: improved tumor coverage (especially for large volume disease), decreased dose to critical organs (especially for small cervix), confirmation of applicator placement, and accounting for sigmoid colon dose. A number of modalities for image-based brachytherapy have emerged including: magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), CT-MRI hybrid, and ultrasound with respective benefits and outcomes data. For practical application of image-based brachytherapy the Groupe Europeen de Curietherapie-European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology Working Group and American Brachytherapy Society working group guideline serve as invaluable tools, additionally here-in we outline our institutional clinical integration of these guidelines. While the body of literature supporting image-based brachytherapy continues to evolve a number of uncertainties and challenges remain including: applicator reconstruction, increasing resource/cost demands, mobile four-dimensional targets and organs-at-risk, and accurate contouring of “grey zones” to avoid marginal miss. Ongoing studies, including the prospective EMBRACE (an international study of MRI-guided brachytherapy in locally advanced

  3. Definitive radiotherapy for primary vaginal cancer: correlation between treatment patterns and recurrence rate

    PubMed Central

    Kanayama, Naoyuki; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Baek, Sungjae; Chatani, Masashi; Kotsuma, Tadayuki; Tanaka, Eiichi; Yoshida, Ken; Seo, Yuji; Suzuki, Osamu; Mabuchi, Seiji; Shiki, Yasuhiko; Tatsumi, Keiji; Kimura, Tadashi; Teshima, Teruki; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the outcomes and optimal practice patterns of definitive radiotherapy for primary vaginal cancer. Between 1993 and 2012, 49 patients were treated with definitive radiotherapy for primary vaginal cancer in three hospitals. Of these, 15 patients (31%) had clinically positive regional lymph node metastasis. A total of 34 patients (70%) received external beam radiotherapy with high-dose-rate brachytherapy (interstitial or intracavitary), and 8 (16%) (with small superficial Stage I tumors) were treated with local radiotherapy. The median follow-up was 33 months (range: 1–169 months). The 3-year overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), and loco-regional control (LRC) rates were 83%, 59% and 71%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, the histological type (P = 0.044) was significant risk factors for LRC. In Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) Stage I cases, 3 of 8 patients (38%) who did not undergo prophylactic lymph node irradiation had lymph node recurrence, compared with 2 of 12 patients (17%) who underwent prophylactic pelvic irradiation. For Stage III–IV tumors, the local recurrence rate was 50% and the lymph node recurrence rate was 40%. Patients with FIGO Stage I/II or clinical Stage N1 had a higher recurrence rate with treatment using a single modality compared with the recurrence rate using combined modalities. In conclusion, our treatment outcomes for vaginal cancer were acceptable, but external beam radiotherapy with brachytherapy (interstitial or intracavitary) was needed regardless of FIGO stage. Improvement of treatment outcomes in cases of FIGO Stage III or IV remains a significant challenge. PMID:25614068

  4. Arthroscopic Transosseous Rotator Cuff Repair: Technical Note, Outcomes, and Complications

    PubMed Central

    Black, Eric M.; Lin, Albert; Srikumaran, Uma; Jain, Nitin; Freehill, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to review the authors’ initial experience with arthroscopic transosseous rotator cuff repair. Thirty-one patients with full-thickness rotator cuff tears underwent arthroscopic transosseous rotator cuff repair over a 15-month period. Preoperatively, demographics and subjective scores were recorded. Postoperatively, pain levels, subjective shoulder values, satisfaction scores, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) scores, complications, and reoperations were noted with a minimum 2-year follow-up. The relationships between pre- and intraoperative variables and outcome scores were determined with univariate analysis. Average patient age was 56 years, and 23 patients (74%) were men. Twenty patients (65%) underwent primary rotator cuff repair, and 11 patients (35%) underwent revision repair. Average time to follow-up was 26 months. Average preoperative pain level and subjective shoulder value were 5.1 of 10 and 35%, respectively. Average postoperative scores included pain level of 0.9 of 10, subjective shoulder value of 84%, satisfaction score of 90.6 of 100, and ASES score of 86.3 of 100. There were 3 (9.7%) major and 2 (6%) minor complications. Patients undergoing revision rotator cuff repair had significantly worse outcomes (pain level, subjective shoulder value, ASES score; P<.05) compared with those undergoing primary repair, and cortical augmentation did not significantly affect outcome. Overall, outcomes after arthroscopic transosseous rotator cuff repair are good, although patients undergoing revision repair do not have the same outcomes as those undergoing primary cuff repair. The procedure is not without complications (9.7% major, 6% minor complications). Cortical augmentation may be used to supplement fixation, although it does not necessarily affect outcomes. Patients without such augmentation may be at increased risk for suture cutout through the bone. PMID:25970360

  5. Primary Vaginal Cancer Treated With Concurrent Chemoradiation Using Cis-Platinum

    SciTech Connect

    Samant, Rajiv Lau, Bedy; E, Choan; Le, Tien; Tam, Tiffany

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of concurrent weekly Cis-platinum chemoradiation (CRT) in the curative treatment of primary vaginal cancer. Methods: A retrospective review was performed of all primary vaginal cancer patients treated with curative intent at the Ottawa Hospital Regional Cancer Centre between 1999 and 2004 using concurrent Cis-platinum CRT. Results: Twelve patients were treated with concurrent weekly CRT. The median age at diagnosis was 56 years (range, 34-69 years), and the median follow-up was 50 months (range, 11-75 months). Ten patients (83%) were diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma and 2 patients (17%) with adenocarcinoma. The distribution according to stage was as follows: 6 (50%) Stage II, 4 (33%) Stage III, and 2 (17%) Stage IVA. All patients received pelvic external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) concurrently with weekly intravenous Cis-platinum chemotherapy (40 mg/m{sup 2}) followed by brachytherapy (BT). The median dose of EBRT was 4500 cGy given in 25 fractions over 5 weeks. Ten patients received interstitial BT, and 2 patients received intracavitary BT, with the median dose being 3000 cGy. The 5-year overall survival, progression-free survival, and locoregional progression-free survival rates were 66%, 75%, and 92%, respectively. Late toxicity requiring surgery occurred in 2 patients (17%). Conclusions: For the treatment of primary vaginal cancer, it is feasible to deliver concurrent weekly Cis-platinum chemotherapy with high-dose radiation, leading to excellent local control and an acceptable toxicity profile.

  6. Rotator Cuff Tears in the Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Geary, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears (RCT) are a common clinical problem in the geriatric population, and debate exists over how to best provide pain relief and restore shoulder function. Treatment options can be broadly divided into nonsurgical and surgical, with the majority of patients initially placed on a trial of conservative therapy. For those with irreparable RCT, low functional demand, or interest in nonoperative management, there are a number of nonsurgical treatments to consider, including rehabilitation and injections of corticosteroids, hyaluronate, and platelet-rich plasma. Surgical treatment is increasingly common, as geriatric patients remain active with high functional demands. Studies in elderly populations have demonstrated satisfactory healing and clinical results following surgical repair. Predictors of poor outcome after repair are large tear size as well as higher stages of fatty infiltration. Decompression is a less invasive surgical option that has been shown to provide short-term pain relief, though the lasting effects may deteriorate over time. A number of factors must be weighed when considering which patients are likely to benefit from surgical intervention. PMID:26328240

  7. Acellular Dermal Matrix in Rotator Cuff Surgery.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Joseph; Mirzayan, Raffy

    2016-01-01

    The success of rotator cuff repair (RCR) surgery can be measured clinically (validated outcome scores, range of motion) as well as structurally (re-tear rates using imaging studies). Regardless of repair type or technique, most studies have shown that patients do well clinically. However, multiple studies have also shown that structurally, the failure rate can be very high. A variety of factors, including poor tendon quality, age over 63 years, smoking, advanced fatty infiltration into the muscle, and the inability of the tendon to heal to bone, have been implicated as the cause of the high re-tear rate in RCRs. The suture-tendon interface is felt to be the weakest link in the RCR construct, and suture pullout through the tendon is believed to be the most common method of failure. This review of the published literature seeks to determine if there is support for augmentation of RCR with acellular dermal matrices to strengthen the suture-tendon interface and reduce the re-tear rate. PMID:27552454

  8. Glycosaminoglycans of human rotator cuff tendons: changes with age and in chronic rotator cuff tendinitis.

    PubMed Central

    Riley, G P; Harrall, R L; Constant, C R; Chard, M D; Cawston, T E; Hazleman, B L

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To analyse the glycosaminoglycans of the adult human rotator cuff tendon matrix, to characterise changes in the glycosaminoglycan composition with age and in chronic rotator cuff tendinitis. METHODS--Rotator cuff (supraspinatus) tendons (n = 84) and common biceps tendons (n = 26) were obtained from cadavers with no history of tendon pathology (age range 11-95 years). Biopsies of rotator cuff tendons (supraspinatus and subscapularis tendons, n = 53) were obtained during open shoulder surgery to repair shoulder lesions (age range 38-80 years). Glycosaminoglycans were extracted by papain digestion and analysed by cellulose acetate electrophoresis, the carbazole assay for uronic acid and the dimethylmethylene blue dye-binding assay for sulphated glycosaminoglycans. Some digests were analysed for keratan sulphate by 5D4 monoclonal antibody ELISA. Soluble proteoglycans were extracted in 4M guanidine hydrochloride and analysed by 4-15% SDS PAGE. RESULTS--The mean (SD) sulphated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content of the normal cadaver supraspinatus tendon was 12.3 (4.3) micrograms/mg dry weight, between three and ten times greater than in the common biceps tendon [1.2 (0.6) micrograms/mg dry weight]. The major GAG was chondroitin sulphate [6.9 (2.6) micrograms/mg dry weight], with a smaller proportion of dermatan sulphate [2.5 (1.2) micrograms/mg dry weight]. In contrast, the common biceps tendon contained predominantly dermatan sulphate [0.8 (0.2) microgram/mg dry weight] with less chondroitin sulphate [0.2 (0.2) microgram/mg dry weight]. There was no difference in the concentration of hyaluronan in these tendons [9.3 (2.8) micrograms/mg dry weight and 10.8 (4.3) micrograms/mg dry weight respectively] and there was no significant change of hyaluronan with age. Keratan sulphate was a small but significant component of the supraspinatus tendon [0.43 (0.33) microgram/mg dry weight, n = 25], whereas there was little or none in the common biceps tendon [0.04 (0

  9. Afterloading: The Technique That Rescued Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Aronowitz, Jesse N.

    2015-07-01

    Although brachytherapy had been established as a highly effective modality for the treatment of cancer, its application was threatened by mid-20th century due to appreciation of the radiation hazard to health care workers. This review examines how the introduction of afterloading eliminated exposure and ushered in a brachytherapy renaissance.

  10. Is a Vaginal Birth Possible After a Cesarean Delivery?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Is a vaginal birth possible after a cesarean delivery? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Vaginal birth after cesarean (VBAC) describes vaginal delivery by a ...

  11. Dynamic rotating-shield brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yunlong; Flynn, Ryan T.; Kim, Yusung; Yang, Wenjun; Wu, Xiaodong

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To present dynamic rotating shield brachytherapy (D-RSBT), a novel form of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) with electronic brachytherapy source, where the radiation shield is capable of changing emission angles during the radiation delivery process.Methods: A D-RSBT system uses two layers of independently rotating tungsten alloy shields, each with a 180° azimuthal emission angle. The D-RSBT planning is separated into two stages: anchor plan optimization and optimal sequencing. In the anchor plan optimization, anchor plans are generated by maximizing the D{sub 90} for the high-risk clinical-tumor-volume (HR-CTV) assuming a fixed azimuthal emission angle of 11.25°. In the optimal sequencing, treatment plans that most closely approximate the anchor plans under the delivery-time constraint will be efficiently computed. Treatment plans for five cervical cancer patients were generated for D-RSBT, single-shield RSBT (S-RSBT), and {sup 192}Ir-based intracavitary brachytherapy with supplementary interstitial brachytherapy (IS + ICBT) assuming five treatment fractions. External beam radiotherapy doses of 45 Gy in 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy each were accounted for. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) doses were escalated such that the D{sub 2cc} of the rectum, sigmoid colon, or bladder reached its tolerance equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2 with α/β= 3 Gy) of 75 Gy, 75 Gy, or 90 Gy, respectively.Results: For the patients considered, IS + ICBT had an average total dwell time of 5.7 minutes/fraction (min/fx) assuming a 10 Ci{sup 192}Ir source, and the average HR-CTV D{sub 90} was 78.9 Gy. In order to match the HR-CTV D{sub 90} of IS + ICBT, D-RSBT required an average of 10.1 min/fx more delivery time, and S-RSBT required 6.7 min/fx more. If an additional 20 min/fx of delivery time is allowed beyond that of the IS + ICBT case, D-RSBT and S-RSBT increased the HR-CTV D{sub 90} above IS + ICBT by an average of 16.3 Gy and 9.1 Gy, respectively

  12. Testicular shielding in penile brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bindal, Arpita; Tambe, Chandrashekhar M.; Ghadi, Yogesh; Murthy, Vedang; Shrivastava, Shyam Kishore

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Penile cancer, although rare, is one of the common genitourinary cancers in India affecting mostly aged uncircumcised males. For patients presenting with small superficial lesions < 3 cm restricted to glans, surgery, radical external radiation or brachytherapy may be offered, the latter being preferred as it allows organ and function preservation. In patients receiving brachytherapy, testicular morbidity is not commonly addressed. With an aim to minimize and document the doses to testis after adequate shielding during radical interstitial brachytherapy for penile cancers, we undertook this study in 2 patients undergoing brachytherapy and forms the basis of this report. Material and methods Two patients with early stage penile cancer limited to the glans were treated with radical high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy using interstitial implant. A total of 7-8 tubes were implanted in two planes, parallel to the penile shaft. A total dose of 44-48 Gy (55-60 Gy EQD2 doses with α/β = 10) was delivered in 11-12 fractions of 4 Gy each delivered twice daily. Lead sheets adding to 11 mm (4-5 half value layer) were interposed between the penile shaft and scrotum. The testicular dose was measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters. For each patient, dosimetry was done for 3 fractions and mean calculated. Results The cumulative testicular dose to left and right testis was 31.68 cGy and 42.79 cGy for patient A, and 21.96 cGy and 23.28 cGy for patient B. For the same patients, the mean cumulative dose measured at the posterior aspect of penile shaft was 722.15 cGy and 807.72 cGy, amounting to 16.4% and 16.8% of the prescribed dose. Hence, the application of lead shield 11 mm thick reduced testicular dose from 722-808 cGy to 21.96-42.57 cGy, an “absolute reduction” of 95.99 ± 1.5%. Conclusions With the use of a simple lead shield as described, we were able to effectively reduce testicular dose from “spermicidal” range to “oligospermic” range with possible

  13. A Survey of Expert Opinion Regarding Rotator Cuff Repair.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Daniel C; Paxton, E Scott; Williams, Gerald R; Abboud, Joseph A

    2014-07-16

    Many patients with rotator cuff tears have questions for their surgeons regarding the surgical procedure, perioperative management, restrictions, therapy, and ability to work after a rotator cuff repair. The purpose of our study was to determine common clinical practices among experts regarding rotator cuff repair and to assist them in counseling patients. We surveyed 372 members of the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) and the Association of Clinical Elbow and Shoulder Surgeons (ACESS); 111 members (29.8%) completed all or part of the survey, and 92.8% of the respondents answered every question. A consensus response (>50% agreement) was achieved on 49% (24 of 49) of the questions. Variability in responses likely reflects the fact that clinical practices have evolved over time based on clinical experience. PMID:25031385

  14. Effects of Wing-Cuff on NACA 23015 Aerodynamic Performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meftah, S. M. A.; Belhenniche, M.; Madani Fouatih, O.; Imine, B.

    2014-03-01

    The main subject of this work is the numerical study control of flow separation on a NACA 23015 airfoil by using wing cuff. This last is a leading edge modification done to the wing. The modification consists of a slight extension of the chord on the outboard section of the wings. Different numerical cases are considered for the baseline and modified airfoil NACA 23015 according at different angle of incidence. The turbulence is modeled by two equations k-epsilon model. The results of this numerical investigation showed several benefits of the wing cuff compared with a conventional airfoil and an agreement is observed between the experimental data and the present study. The most intriguing result of this research is the capability for wing cuff to perform short take-offs and landings.

  15. Calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff.

    PubMed

    ElShewy, Mohamed Taha

    2016-01-18

    Calcific tendinitis within the rotator cuff tendon is a common shoulder disorder that should be differentiated from dystrophic calcification as the pathogenesis and natural history of both is totally different. Calcific tendinitis usually occurs in the fifth and sixth decades of life among sedentary workers. It is classified into formative and resorptive phases. The chronic formative phase results from transient hypoxia that is commonly associated with repeated microtrauma causing calcium deposition into the matrix vesicles within the chondrocytes forming bone foci that later coalesce. This phase may extend from 1 to 6 years, and is usually asymptomatic. The resorptive phase extends from 3 wk up to 6 mo with vascularization at the periphery of the calcium deposits causing macrophage and mononuclear giant cell infiltration, together with fibroblast formation leading to an aggressive inflammatory reaction with inflammatory cell accumulation, excessive edema and rise of the intra-tendineous pressure. This results in a severely painful shoulder. Radiological investigations confirm the diagnosis and suggest the phase of the condition and are used to follow its progression. Although routine conventional X-ray allows detection of the deposits, magnetic resonance imaging studies allow better evaluation of any coexisting pathology. Various methods of treatment have been suggested. The appropriate method should be individualized for each patient. Conservative treatment includes pain killers and physiotherapy, or "minimally invasive" techniques as needling or puncture and aspiration. It is almost always successful since the natural history of the condition ends with resorption of the deposits and complete relief of pain. Due to the intolerable pain of the acute and severely painful resorptive stage, the patient often demands any sort of operative intervention. In such case arthroscopic removal is the best option as complete removal of the deposits is unnecessary. PMID

  16. Calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff

    PubMed Central

    ElShewy, Mohamed Taha

    2016-01-01

    Calcific tendinitis within the rotator cuff tendon is a common shoulder disorder that should be differentiated from dystrophic calcification as the pathogenesis and natural history of both is totally different. Calcific tendinitis usually occurs in the fifth and sixth decades of life among sedentary workers. It is classified into formative and resorptive phases. The chronic formative phase results from transient hypoxia that is commonly associated with repeated microtrauma causing calcium deposition into the matrix vesicles within the chondrocytes forming bone foci that later coalesce. This phase may extend from 1 to 6 years, and is usually asymptomatic. The resorptive phase extends from 3 wk up to 6 mo with vascularization at the periphery of the calcium deposits causing macrophage and mononuclear giant cell infiltration, together with fibroblast formation leading to an aggressive inflammatory reaction with inflammatory cell accumulation, excessive edema and rise of the intra-tendineous pressure. This results in a severely painful shoulder. Radiological investigations confirm the diagnosis and suggest the phase of the condition and are used to follow its progression. Although routine conventional X-ray allows detection of the deposits, magnetic resonance imaging studies allow better evaluation of any coexisting pathology. Various methods of treatment have been suggested. The appropriate method should be individualized for each patient. Conservative treatment includes pain killers and physiotherapy, or “minimally invasive” techniques as needling or puncture and aspiration. It is almost always successful since the natural history of the condition ends with resorption of the deposits and complete relief of pain. Due to the intolerable pain of the acute and severely painful resorptive stage, the patient often demands any sort of operative intervention. In such case arthroscopic removal is the best option as complete removal of the deposits is unnecessary. PMID

  17. Biceps Lesion Associated With Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Ho Yeon; Kim, Jung Youn; Cho, Nam Su; Rhee, Yong Girl

    2016-01-01

    Background: Various tenodesis methods are being used for long head of the biceps tendon lesions. However, there is no consensus on the most appropriate surgical method. Hypothesis: There are significant differences in incidence of cosmetic deformity and persistent bicipital pain between open subpectoral and arthroscopic intracuff tenodesis groups. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: This study included 72 patients who underwent biceps tenodesis and rotator cuff repair between January 2009 and May 2014 and who were followed for at least 1 year. Open subpectoral tenodesis was performed in 39 patients (group A), and arthroscopic intracuff tenodesis was performed in 33 patients (group B). Results: In group A, the mean visual analog scale (VAS) score for pain during motion and mean University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) and Constant scores significantly improved from 4.6, 18.6, and 64.5 preoperatively to 1.9, 30.5, and 86.5 at last follow-up, respectively (P < .001 for all). In group B, these scores significantly improved from 5.1, 17.6, and 62.9 preoperatively to 1.8, 31.5, and 85.9 at last follow-up, respectively (P < .001 for all). Popeye deformity was noted in 2 (5.2%) patients from group A and 5 (15.6%) patients from group B (P = .231). Additionally, persistent bicipital tenderness was noted in 1 (2.6%) patient from group A and 8 (24.2%) patients from group B (P = .012). Conclusion: Both open subpectoral tenodesis and arthroscopic intracuff tenodesis show good clinical outcomes for long head of the biceps tendon lesions. However, open subpectoral tenodesis may be more appropriate, considering the low incidence of Popeye deformity and tenderness. PMID:27231699

  18. [Bony avulsions of the rotator cuff : Arthroscopic concepts].

    PubMed

    Greiner, S; Scheibel, M

    2011-01-01

    Bony avulsions of the rotator cuff and isolated greater or lesser tuberosity fractures are rare injuries and a clear consensus regarding classification and therapy does not yet exist. Conservative therapy is limited, especially in injuries with displaced fragments and in these cases surgical treatment is frequently indicated. The ongoing development of arthroscopic techniques has led to quite a number of reports about arthroscopically assisted or total arthroscopic techniques in the treatment of these injuries. The advantages and disadvantages of arthroscopic concepts for the treatment of bony avulsions of the rotator cuff are presented with reference to the current literature. PMID:21153534

  19. 21 CFR 884.3900 - Vaginal stent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Vaginal stent. 884.3900 Section 884.3900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... stent. (a) Identification. A vaginal stent is a device used to enlarge the vagina by stretching, or...

  20. 21 CFR 884.3900 - Vaginal stent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Vaginal stent. 884.3900 Section 884.3900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... stent. (a) Identification. A vaginal stent is a device used to enlarge the vagina by stretching, or...

  1. 21 CFR 884.3900 - Vaginal stent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Vaginal stent. 884.3900 Section 884.3900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... stent. (a) Identification. A vaginal stent is a device used to enlarge the vagina by stretching, or...

  2. 21 CFR 884.3900 - Vaginal stent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Vaginal stent. 884.3900 Section 884.3900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... stent. (a) Identification. A vaginal stent is a device used to enlarge the vagina by stretching, or...

  3. Vaginal microbial flora in normal young women.

    PubMed

    Goldacre, M J; Watt, B; Loudon, N; Milne, L J; Loudon, J D; Vessey, M P

    1979-06-01

    Vaginal swabs were taken from 1498 women attending a family planning clinic. The flora was assessed in the absence of any information about the women to whom the swabs related. Yeasts and fungi were present in 311 women (21%) and were no more prevalent among "pill" users than others. Candida albicans was significantly associated with vulval itching and with a vaginal discharge described as heavier than normal or curdy on clinical examination, though these abnormalities were present in only a minority of women with the organism. Trichomonas vaginalis was found in 14 women (1%) and was associated with abnormalities of vaginal discharge in all but one. Gram-negative anaerobic bacilli were significantly more common in women with a troublesome vaginal discharge and those who used an intrauterine device than others. No associations were found between fungi other than C albicans or the other bacteria sought and either symptoms or clinical abnormalities of vaginal discharge. PMID:380743

  4. Vaginitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... navigation Health & Research A-Z Topics Symptoms, treatments, research, articles, clinical trials, resources Clinical Trials & Clinical Research Find ... pregnancy? How is it prevented? NICHD Research Information Research ... Contacts Clinical Trials Resources and Publications For ...

  5. Vaginitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... AIDS Influenza Malaria Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Tuberculosis Zika Virus Find a Funding Opportunity Opportunities & Announcements Types of ... however, can have severe reactions to EBV infections. Zika Virus Discovered in the Zika forest, Uganda, in 1947, ...

  6. Complications Following Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Tear Repair

    PubMed Central

    Audigé, Laurent; Blum, Raphael; Müller, Andreas M.; Flury, Matthias; Durchholz, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Background Valid comparison of outcomes after surgical procedures requires consensus on which instruments and parameters should be used, including the recording and evaluation of surgical complications. An international standard outlining the terminology and definitions of surgical complications in orthopaedics is lacking. Purpose This study systematically reviewed the literature for terms and definitions related to the occurrence of negative events or complications after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (ARCR) with specific focus on shoulder stiffness. Study Design Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and Scopus databases were searched for reviews, clinical studies, and case reports of complications associated with ARCR. Reference lists of selected articles were also screened. The terminology of complications and their definitions were extracted from all relevant original articles by a single reviewer and verified by a second reviewer. Definitions of shoulder stiffness or equivalent terms were tabulated. Results Of 654 references published after 2007 and obtained from the search, 233 full-text papers (44 reviews, 155 studies, 31 case reports, and 3 surgical technique presentations) were reviewed. Twenty-two additional references cited for a definition were checked. One report defined the term surgical complication. There were 242 different terms used to describe local events and 64 to describe nonlocal events. Furthermore, 16 definitions of terms such as frozen shoulder, shoulder stiffness, or stiff painful shoulder were identified. Diagnosis criteria for shoulder stiffness differed widely; 12 various definitions for restriction in range of motion were noted. One definition included a gradation of stiffness severity, whereas another considered the patient’s subjective assessment of motion. Conclusion The literature does not consistently report on complications after ARCR, making valid comparison of the incidence of

  7. Endotracheal tube cuff pressure before, during, and after fixed-wing air medical retrieval.

    PubMed

    Brendt, Peter; Schnekenburger, Marc; Paxton, Karen; Brown, Anthony; Mendis, Kumara

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background. Increased endotracheal tube (ETT) cuff pressure is associated with compromised tracheal mucosal perfusion and injuries. No published data are available for Australia on pressures in the fixed-wing air medical retrieval setting. Objective. After introduction of a cuff pressure manometer (Mallinckrodt, Hennef, Germany) at the Royal Flying Doctor Service (RFDS) Base in Dubbo, New South Wales (NSW), Australia, we assessed the prevalence of increased cuff pressures before, during, and after air medical retrieval. Methods. This was a retrospective audit in 35 ventilated patients during fixed-wing retrievals by the RFDS in NSW, Australia. Explicit chart review of ventilated patients was performed for cuff pressures and changes during medical retrievals with pressurized aircrafts. Pearson correlation was calculated to determine the relation of ascent and ETT cuff pressure change from ground to flight level. Results. The mean (± standard deviation) of the first ETT cuff pressure measurement on the ground was 44 ± 20 cmH2O. Prior to retrieval in 11 patients, the ETT cuff pressure was >30 cmH2O and in 11 patients >50 cmH2O. After ascent to cruising altitude, the cuff pressure was >30 cmH2O in 22 patients and >50 cmH2O in eight patients. The cuff pressure was reduced 1) in 72% of cases prior to take off and 2) in 85% of cases during flight, and 3) after landing, the cuff pressure increased in 85% of cases. The correlation between ascent in cabin altitude and ETT cuff pressure was r = 0.3901, p = 0.0205. Conclusions. The high prevalence of excessive cuff pressures during air medical retrieval can be avoided by the use of cuff pressure manometers. Key words: cuff pressure; air medical retrieval; prehospital. PMID:23252881

  8. Analysis of Direct Costs of Outpatient Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair.

    PubMed

    Narvy, Steven J; Ahluwalia, Avtar; Vangsness, C Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Arthroscopic rotator cuff surgery is one of the most commonly performed orthopedic surgical procedures. We conducted a study to calculate the direct cost of arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff tears confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. Twenty-eight shoulders in 26 patients (mean age, 54.5 years) underwent primary rotator cuff repair by a single fellowship-trained arthroscopic surgeon in the outpatient surgery center of a major academic medical center. All patients had interscalene blocks placed while in the preoperative holding area. Direct costs of this cycle of care were calculated using the time-driven activity-based costing algorithm. Mean time in operating room was 148 minutes; mean time in recovery was 105 minutes. Calculated surgical cost for this process cycle was $5904.21. Among material costs, suture anchor costs were the main cost driver. Preoperative bloodwork was obtained in 23 cases, adding a mean cost of $111.04. Our findings provide important preliminary information regarding the direct economic costs of rotator cuff surgery and may be useful to hospitals and surgery centers negotiating procedural reimbursement for the increased cost of repairing complex tears. PMID:26761928

  9. Effects of oral contraceptive pill use on vaginal flora and vaginal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Eschenbach, D A; Patton, D L; Meier, A; Thwin, S S; Aura, J; Stapleton, A; Hooton, T M

    2000-09-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effect of oral contraceptive (OC) use on vaginal discharge, epithelium, and flora. Thirty women who planned to use OC for contraception were evaluated before and 2 months after the start of OC use. At both visits, genital symptoms and exposures were assessed by questionnaire; vaginal signs were assessed by speculum examination and colposcopy; vaginal microflora was evaluated by quantitative culture; and a vaginal biopsy was obtained for histopathologic evaluation. Variables were compared between the initial visit and after 2 months of OC use. It was found that OC use did not change the gross, colposcopic, or histologic appearance of the vaginal epithelium or characteristics of vaginal or cervical discharge. Vaginal flora essentially remained unchanged after 2 months of OC use, except that a small decrease occurred in the number of subjects with > or =10(5) colony forming units/mL of H(2)O(2) producing Lactobacillus from 16 at baseline to 9 (p = 0.04) and in the total number of subjects with Ureaplasma urealyticum from 17 at baseline to 10 of 29 (p = 0.04). The results indicate minimal effect of OC use on the vaginal epithelium and vaginal and cervical discharge, and a small effect on vaginal flora. PMID:11124356

  10. External Pelvic and Vaginal Irradiation Versus Vaginal Irradiation Alone as Postoperative Therapy in Medium-Risk Endometrial Carcinoma-A Prospective Randomized Study

    SciTech Connect

    Sorbe, Bengt; Horvath, Gyoergy; Andersson, Hakan; Boman, Karin; Lundgren, Caroline; Pettersson, Birgitta

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the value of adjuvant external beam pelvic radiotherapy as adjunct to vaginal brachytherapy (VBT) in medium-risk endometrial carcinoma, with regard to locoregional tumor control, recurrences, survival, and toxicity. Methods and Materials: Consecutive series of 527 evaluable patients were included in this randomized trial. Median follow-up for patients alive was 62 months. The primary study endpoints were locoregional recurrences and overall survival. Secondary endpoints were recurrence-free survival, recurrence-free interval, cancer-specific survival, and toxicity. Results: Five-year locoregional relapse rates were 1.5% after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) plus VBT and 5% after vaginal irradiation alone (p = 0.013), and 5-year overall survival rates were 89% and 90%, respectively (p = 0.548). Endometrial cancer-related death rates were 3.8% after EBRT plus VBT and 6.8% after VBT (p = 0.118). Pelvic recurrences (exclusively vaginal recurrence) were reduced by 93% by the addition of EBRT to VBT. Deep myometrial infiltration was a significant prognostic factor in this medium-risk group of endometrioid carcinomas but not International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics grade or DNA ploidy. Combined radiotherapy was well tolerated, with serious (Grade 3) late side effects of less than 2%. However, there was a significant difference in favor of VBT alone. Conclusions: Despite a significant locoregional control benefit with combined radiotherapy, no survival improvement was recorded, but increased late toxicity was noted in the intestine, bladder, and vagina. Combined RT should probably be reserved for high-risk cases with two or more high-risk factors. VBT alone should be the adjuvant treatment option for purely medium-risk cases.