Sample records for vaginal cuff brachytherapy

  1. Adjuvant vaginal cuff brachytherapy for high-risk, early stage endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eastwick, Gary; Anne, Pramila Rani; Rosenblum, Norman G.; Schilder, Russell J.; Chalian, Raffi; Zibelli, Allison M.; Kim, Christine H.; Den, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To report outcomes following adjuvant high-dose-rate vaginal brachytherapy (VBT) with or without chemotherapy for high-intermediate risk (HIR) and high-risk, early stage endometrial cancer as defined in Gynecologic Oncology Group trial 0249. Material and methods From May 2000 to January 2014, 68 women with HIR and high-risk endometrial cancer underwent surgical staging followed by VBT. Median VBT dose was 21 Gy delivered in three fractions prescribed to 0.5 cm depth. Paclitaxel 175 mg/m2 and carboplatin area under the curve 6 was administered every 21 days in sequence with VBT. Actuarial survival estimates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results Patient demographics included a median age of 66 years (range: 36-91) and stages IA (49%), IB (38%), and II (13%), respectively. Thirty-one (46%) patients had HIR disease with endometrioid histology, and 33 (48%) patients had serous or clear cell histology. Thirty-seven (54%) patients received a median 3 cycles (range: 3-6) of chemotherapy in addition to VBT, and 65 patients (96%) completed all prescribed therapy. During a median follow up of 33.1 months (range: 4.0-161.7), four patients have recurred, including one vaginal recurrence. The 3-year estimates of vaginal, pelvic, and distant recurrences were 1.9%, 2.4%, and 9.1%, respectively. The 3-year rates of disease-free and overall survival were 87.7% and 93.9%, respectively. Conclusions Early outcomes with adjuvant VBT with or without chemotherapy demonstrate high rates of vaginal and pelvic control for women with HIR disease. Early vaginal and pelvic relapses in high-risk patients suggest that pelvic external beam radiotherapy is warranted in this subgroup, but additional data from large phase III trials is warranted. PMID:25337127

  2. Magnitude of Interfractional Vaginal Cuff Movement: Implications for External Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Daniel J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Michaletz-Lorenz, Martha [Department of Education and Training, Elekta, Maryland Heights, MO (United States); Goddu, S. Murty [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Grigsby, Perry W., E-mail: pgrigsby@wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Division of Nuclear Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To quantify the extent of interfractional vaginal cuff movement in patients receiving postoperative irradiation for cervical or endometrial cancer in the absence of bowel/bladder instruction. Methods and Materials: Eleven consecutive patients with cervical or endometrial cancer underwent placement of three gold seed fiducial markers in the vaginal cuff apex as part of standard of care before simulation. Patients subsequently underwent external irradiation and brachytherapy treatment based on institutional guidelines. Daily megavoltage CT imaging was performed during each external radiation treatment fraction. The daily positions of the vaginal apex fiducial markers were subsequently compared with the original position of the fiducial markers on the simulation CT. Composite dose-volume histograms were also created by summing daily target positions. Results: The average ({+-} standard deviation) vaginal cuff movement throughout daily pelvic external radiotherapy when referenced to the simulation position was 16.2 {+-} 8.3 mm. The maximum vaginal cuff movement for any patient during treatment was 34.5 mm. In the axial plane the mean vaginal cuff movement was 12.9 {+-} 6.7 mm. The maximum vaginal cuff axial movement was 30.7 mm. In the craniocaudal axis the mean movement was 10.3 {+-} 7.6 mm, with a maximum movement of 27.0 mm. Probability of cuff excursion outside of the clinical target volume steadily dropped as margin size increased (53%, 26%, 4.2%, and 1.4% for 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 cm, respectively.) However, rectal and bladder doses steadily increased with larger margin sizes. Conclusions: The magnitude of vaginal cuff movement is highly patient specific and can impact target coverage in patients without bowel/bladder instructions at simulation. The use of vaginal cuff fiducials can help identify patients at risk for target volume excursion.

  3. Vaginal Cuff Dehiscence in Robotic-Assisted Total Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kashani, Shabnam; Gallo, Taryn; Sargent, Anita; ElSahwi, Karim; Silasi, Dan-Arin

    2012-01-01

    Study Objective: The aim of this study was to estimate the cumulative incidence of vaginal cuff dehiscence in robotic-assisted total hysterectomies in our patients and to provide recommendations to decrease the incidence of vaginal cuff dehiscence. Methods: This was an observational case series, Canadian Task Force Classification II-3 conducted at an academic and community teaching hospital. A total of 654 patients underwent robotic-assisted total laparoscopic hysterectomy for both malignant and benign reasons from September 1, 2006 to March 1, 2011 performed by a single surgeon. The da Vinci Surgical System was used for robotic-assisted total laparoscopic hysterectomy. Results: There were 3 cases of vaginal cuff dehiscence among 654 robotic-assisted total laparoscopic hysterectomies, making our cumulative incidence of vaginal cuff dehiscence 0.4%. The mean time between the procedures and vaginal cuff dehiscence was 44.3 d (6.3 wk). All patients were followed up twice after surgery, at 3 to 4 wk and 12 to 16 wk. Conclusion: In our study, the incidence of vaginal cuff dehiscence after robotic-assisted total laparoscopic hysterectomy compares favorably to that of total abdominal and vaginal hysterectomy. Our study suggests that the incidence of vaginal cuff dehiscence is more likely related to the technique of colpotomy and vaginal cuff suturing than to robotic-assisted total hysterectomy per se. With proper technique and patient education, our vaginal dehiscence rate has been 0.4%, which is 2.5 to 10 times less than the previously reported vaginal cuff dehiscence rate in the literature. PMID:23484559

  4. Trends in the Utilization of Adjuvant Vaginal Cuff Brachytherapy and/or External Beam Radiation Treatment in Stage I and II Endometrial Cancer: A Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End-Results Study

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Mehul K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Cote, Michele L. [Karmanos Cancer Institute and Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Ali-Fehmi, Rouba [Department of Pathology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Buekers, Thomas; Munkarah, Adnan R. [Department of Women's Health Services, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Elshaikh, Mohamed A., E-mail: melshai1@hfhs.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: The optimal adjuvant radiation treatment for endometrial carcinoma (EC) remains controversial. Adjuvant vaginal cuff brachytherapy (VB) has emerged as an increasingly common treatment modality. However, the time trends for using VB, external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), or combined therapy (VB+EBRT) have not been well characterized. We therefore examined the utilization trends of VB, EBRT, and VB+EBRT for adjuvant RT in International Federation of Gynecologic Oncology (FIGO) stage I and II EC over time. Methods and Materials: We evaluated treatment patterns for 48,122 patients with EC diagnosed between January 1995 and December 2005, using the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) public use database. Chi-squared tests were used to assess differences by radiation type (VB, EBRT, and VB+EBRT) and various demographic and clinical variables. Results: Analyses were limited to 9,815 patients (20.4%) with EC who met the inclusion criteria. Among women who received adjuvant RT, the proportion receiving VB increased yearly (12.9% in 1995 compared to 32.8% in 2005 (p < 0.0001). The increasing use of VB was proportional to the decreasing use of EBRT (56.1% in 1995 to 45.8% in 2005; p < 0.0001) and VB+EBRT (31.0% in 1995 to 21.4% in 2005; p < 0.001). Conclusions: This population-based report demonstrates an increasing trend in the use of VB in the adjuvant setting after hysterectomy for treatment of women with FIGO stage I-II EC. VB alone appears to be replacing pelvic EBRT and VB+EBRT therapy in the management of stage I-II EC.

  5. Vaginal Cuff Dehiscence: Risk Factors and Associated Morbidities

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs Weizman, Noga; Einarsson, Jon I.; Wang, Karen C.; Vitonis, Allison F.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: To evaluate whether the route and surgical technique by which hysterectomy is performed influence the incidence of vaginal cuff dehiscence. Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of total hysterectomy cases performed at Brigham and Woman's Hospital or Faulkner Hospital during 2009 through 2011. Results: During the study period, 2382 total hysterectomies were performed; 23 of these (0.96%) were diagnosed with cuff dehiscence, and 4 women had recurrent dehiscence. Both laparoscopic (odds ratio, 23.4; P = .007) and robotic (odds ratio, 73; P = .0006) hysterectomies were associated with increased odds of cuff dehiscence in a multivariate regression analysis. The type of energy used during colpotomy, mode of closure (hand sewn, laparoscopic suturing, or suturing assisted by a device), and suture material did not differ significantly between groups; however, continuous suturing of the cuff was a protective factor (odds ratio, 0.24; P = .03). Women with dehiscence had more extensive procedures, as well as an increased incidence of additional major postoperative complications (17.4% vs 3%, P = .004). Conclusion: The rate of cuff dehiscence in our cohort correlates with the current literature. This study suggests that the risk of dehiscence is influenced mainly by the scope and complexity of the surgical procedure. It seems that different colpotomy techniques do not influence the rate of cuff dehiscence; however, continuous suturing of the cuff may be superior to interrupted suturing. PMID:25901104

  6. Evaluation of risk factors of vaginal cuff dehiscence after hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myung Ji; Kim, Seongmin; Bae, Hyo Sook; Lee, Jae Kwan; Lee, Nak Woo

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate risk factors of vaginal cuff dehiscence or evisceration according to the type of operation. Methods Medical records of 604 women who underwent hysterectomies at Korea University Anam Hospital between June 2007 and June 2011 were reviewed. They were allocated to six groups. The six types of hysterectomies included robotic hysterectomy (n = 7), robotic radical hysterectomy and node dissection (RRHND, n = 9), total laparoscopic hysterectomy (TLH, n = 274), laparoscopy assisted vaginal hysterectomy (LAVH, n = 238), laparoscopic radical hysterectomy and node dissection (n = 11), and abdominal radical hysterectomy (ARH, n = 63). The characteristics and outcomes of each groups were compared. Results There was no difference in the characteristics of patients between 6 groups. In total of 604 hysterectomies, 3 evisceration (0.49%) and 21 dehiscences (3.47%) occurred. Evisceration were found in RRHND (1/9, 11.1%), TLH (1/276, 0.36%), and ARH (1/63, 1.56%). Dehiscences occurred in TLH (15/274, 5.42%), LAVH (4/238, 1.68%), and ARH (2/63, 3.17%). In 169 cases of TLH with intra-corporeal continuous suture, 1 evisceration and 4 dehiscences occurred, whereas 11 dehiscences occurred in 105 TLH cases with vaginal continuous locking suture (2.96% vs. 10.47%, P = 0.02). Conclusion The incidence of vaginal cuff dehiscenceand eviscerationwas significantly higher in TLH than LAVH. The intra-corporeal cuff suture was superior to the vaginal suture to prevent the vaginal cuff complications in TLH. PMID:24678487

  7. Dosimetric Effects of Air Pockets Around High-Dose Rate Brachytherapy Vaginal Cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, Susan, E-mail: srichardson@radonc.wustl.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Palaniswaamy, Geethpriya; Grigsby, Perry W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: Most physicians use a single-channel vaginal cylinder for postoperative endometrial cancer brachytherapy. Recent published data have identified air pockets between the vaginal cylinders and the vaginal mucosa. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the incidence, size, and dosimetric effects of these air pockets. Methods and Materials: 25 patients receiving postoperative vaginal cuff brachytherapy with a high-dose rate vaginal cylinders were enrolled in this prospective data collection study. Patients were treated with 6 fractions of 200 to 400 cGy per fraction prescribed at 5 mm depth. Computed tomography simulation for brachytherapy treatment planning was performed for each fraction. The quantity, volume, and dosimetric impact of the air pockets surrounding the cylinder were quantified. Results: In 25 patients, a total of 90 air pockets were present in 150 procedures (60%). Five patients had no air pockets present during any of their treatments. The average number of air pockets per patient was 3.6, with the average total air pocket volume being 0.34 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.01-1.32 cm{sup 3}). The average dose reduction to the vaginal mucosa at the air pocket was 27% (range, 9-58%). Ten patients had no air pockets on their first fraction but air pockets occurred in subsequent fractions. Conclusion: Air pockets between high-dose rate vaginal cylinder applicators and the vaginal mucosa are present in the majority of fractions of therapy, and their presence varies from patient to patient and fraction to fraction. The existence of air pockets results in reduced radiation dose to the vaginal mucosa.

  8. Vaginal cuff closure at abdominal hysterectomy: comparing sutures with absorbable staples.

    PubMed

    Stovall, T G; Summitt, R L; Lipscomb, G H; Ling, F W

    1991-09-01

    To compare two methods of vaginal cuff closure during abdominal hysterectomy, 60 patients were randomized to one of two cuff-closure methods. The vaginal cuff was closed with three interrupted 0-Dexon sutures in 30 and with absorbable staples in 30. Both groups were similar with respect to age, gravidity, parity, preoperative indication, hemoglobin, and hematocrit. The operative technique and quantity of irrigation used was standardized. Operative blood loss was calculated by the weight method and an unactivated, medium flat Jackson-Pratt drain was left in place for collecting postoperative cuff cultures at 24 and 48 hours. The mean operative times in the suture group (97.4 minutes) and staple group (93.4 minutes) were not significantly different (P greater than .05). Cuff-closure time was more rapid (P = .0001) in the staple group (5.8 minutes) than in the suture group (9.3 minutes). Intraoperative cultures were positive in eight of 30 suture patients (26.7%) and eight of 30 staple patients (26.7%). Postoperative cultures at either 24 or 48 hours were positive in four women (13.3%) in the suture group and six (20%) in the staple group. Febrile morbidity occurred in six (20%) in each group. Three staple and two suture subjects developed a vaginal cuff abscess or hematoma, one of whom was readmitted to the hospital for intravenous antibiotics and draining of the vaginal cuff abscess. The presence of a positive vaginal cuff culture did not predict clinical outcome. Based on these observations and the increased cost of the stapling device, we conclude that there is no significant clinical advantage of surgical staples over traditional sutures for vaginal cuff closure at abdominal hysterectomy. PMID:1876376

  9. Design and characterization of an intracavitary ultrasound hyperthermia applicator for recurrent or residual lesions in the vaginal cuff.

    PubMed

    Lee, R J; Suh, H

    2003-01-01

    For evaluating the feasibility of treating recurrent lesions in the vaginal cuff by hyperthermia, a 2-element ultrasound applicator was designed, constructed and characterized. A half-cylindrical transducer (d=1 cm, length=1 cm) was used to construct the 2-element ultrasound applicator. Each element of this applicator was operated at 1.5 MHz and characterized by measuring transducer efficiency and acoustic power distribution. Thermocouple probes were used to measure the temperature rise in the phantom. The element sizes used in this study were selected to be comparable to a high dose rate brachytherapy colpostat applicator. Each element was powered separately to achieve a desired temperature pattern in a target. The acoustic output power as a function of applied electric power of elements 1 and 2 were linear over this 1-40 W range and efficiencies were 32.2 +/- 3.4% and 46.2 +/- 0.8%, respectively. The temperature measurements in the phantom showed that a 6 degrees C temperature rise was achieved 2 cm from the applicator surface. As a conclusion, the ability of the ultrasound colpostat applicator to be used for hyperthermia was demonstrated by measuring acoustic output power, ultrasound field distribution and temperature rise in the phantom. Based on the characteristics of this applicator, it has the potential to be useful for inducing hyperthermia to the vaginal cuff in the clinic. PMID:12944170

  10. Two cases of post-coital vaginal cuff dehiscence with small bowel evisceration after robotic-assisted laparoscopic hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, My-Linh T.; Kapoor, Monica; Pradhan, Tana S.; Pua, Tarah L.; Tedjarati, Sean S.

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Vaginal cuff dehiscence following robotic surgery is uncommon. Published reports of vaginal cuff dehiscence following robotic surgery are increasing, but the true incidence is unknown. PRESENTATION OF CASE Case 1. A 45 year old female had sexual intercourse and presented with a vaginal cuff dehiscence complicated by small bowel evisceration 4 months after RA-TLH. Case 2. A 44 year old female had sexual intercourse and presented with a vaginal cuff dehiscence with small bowel evisceration 6 weeks after RA-TLH. DISCUSSION We discuss the rate of vaginal cuff dehiscence by mode of hysterectomy, surgical and non-surgical risk factors that may contribute to vaginal cuff dehiscence, and proposed preventative methods at the time of RA-TLH to reduce this complication. CONCLUSION Vaginal cuff dehiscence with associated evisceration of intraabdominal contents is a potentially severe complication of hysterectomy. We recommend counseling patients who undergo RA-TLH to abstain from vaginal intercourse for a minimum of 8–12 weeks. PMID:23708306

  11. Adherence to Vaginal Dilation Following High Dose Rate Brachytherapy for Endometrial Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Lois C., E-mail: Lois.Friedman@UHhospitals.org [Department of Psychiatry, CASE Comprehensive Cancer Center and University Hospitals of Cleveland, Cleveland, OH (United States); Abdallah, Rita [Ireland Cancer Center, CASE Comprehensive Cancer Center and University Hospitals of Cleveland, Cleveland, OH (Ireland); Schluchter, Mark; Panneerselvam, Ashok [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, CASE Comprehensive Cancer Center and University Hospitals of Cleveland, Cleveland, OH (United States); Kunos, Charles A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, CASE Comprehensive Cancer Center and University Hospitals of Cleveland, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: We report demographic, clinical, and psychosocial factors associated with adherence to vaginal dilation and describe the sexual and marital or nonmarital dyadic functioning of women following high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy for endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively evaluated women aged 18 years or older in whom early-stage endometrial (IAgr3-IIB) cancers were treated by HDR intravaginal brachytherapy within the past 3.5 years. Women with or without a sexual partner were eligible. Patients completed questionnaires by mail or by telephone assessing demographic and clinical variables, adherence to vaginal dilation, dyadic satisfaction, sexual functioning, and health beliefs. Results: Seventy-eight of 89 (88%) eligible women with early-stage endometrial cancer treated with HDR brachytherapy completed questionnaires. Only 33% of patients were adherers, based on reporting having used a dilator more than two times per week in the first month following radiation. Nonadherers who reported a perceived change in vaginal dimension following radiation reported that their vaginas were subjectively smaller after brachytherapy (p = 0.013). Adherers reported more worry about their sex lives or lack thereof than nonadherers (p = 0.047). Patients reported considerable sexual dysfunction following completion of HDR brachytherapy. Conclusions: Adherence to recommendations for vaginal dilator use following HDR brachytherapy for endometrial cancer is poor. Interventions designed to educate women about dilator use benefit may increase adherence. Although sexual functioning was compromised, it is likely that this existed before having cancer for many women in our study.

  12. Local Recurrence in High-Risk Node-Negative Stage I Endometrial Carcinoma Treated with Postoperative Vaginal Vault Brachytherapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Y. Ng; L. C. Perrin; J. L. Nicklin; R. Cheuk; A. J. Crandon

    2000-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of this study is to examine the patterns of failure after extended surgical staging and postoperative vaginal vault brachytherapy as the only adjuvant treatment in high-risk surgical Stage I patients with endometrial carcinoma.Methods. The records of all patients with endometrial carcinoma (adenocarcinoma or adenosquamous) receiving vaginal vault brachytherapy as the only adjuvant treatment from January 1989 to

  13. Vaginal brachytherapy alone is sufficient adjuvant treatment of surgical stage I endometrial cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Solhjem, Matthew C. [Division of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States)]. E-mail: petersen.ivy@mayo.edu; Petersen, Ivy A. [Division of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States); Haddock, Michael G. [Division of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2005-08-01

    Purpose To determine the efficacy and complications of adjuvant vaginal high-dose-rate brachytherapy alone for patients with Stage I endometrial cancer in whom complete surgical staging had been performed. Methods and Materials Between April 1998 and March 2004, 100 patients with Stage I endometrial cancer underwent surgical staging (total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy with pelvic {+-} paraaortic nodal sampling) and postoperative vaginal high-dose-rate brachytherapy at our institution. The total dose was 2100 cGy in three fractions. Results With a median follow-up of 23 months (range 2-62), no pelvic or vaginal recurrences developed. All patients underwent pelvic dissection, and 42% underwent paraaortic nodal dissection. A median of 29.5 pelvic nodes (range 1-67) was removed (84% had >10 pelvic nodes removed). Most patients (73%) had endometrioid (or unspecified) adenocarcinoma, 16% had papillary serous carcinoma, and 11% had other histologic types. The International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage and grade was Stage IA, grade III in 5; Stage IB, grade I, II, or III in 6, 27, or 20, respectively; and Stage IC, grade I, II, or III in 13, 17, or 10, respectively. The Common Toxicity Criteria (version 2.0) complications were mild (Grade 1-2) and consisted primarily of vaginal mucosal changes, temporary urinary irritation, and temporary diarrhea. Conclusion Adjuvant vaginal high-dose-rate brachytherapy alone may be a safe and effective alternative to pelvic external beam radiotherapy for surgical Stage I endometrial cancer.

  14. High-dose-rate vaginal brachytherapy with chemotherapy for surgically staged localized uterine serous carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Susan A.; Ratner, Elena; De Leon, Maria C.; Mani, Sheida; Silasi, Dan-Arin; Azodi, Masoud; Santin, Alessandro; Rutherford, Thomas; Schwartz, Peter E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate our institutional experience combining carboplatin-paclitaxel (C/T) chemotherapy with high-dose-rate (HDR) intra-vaginal brachytherapy (IVB) following comprehensive surgical staging in localized uterine serous carcinoma (USC). Material and methods Institutional chart review identified 56 patients with FIGO 2009 stage I-II USC treated between 2000-2010. Patients underwent total hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oopherectomy, and comprehensive surgical staging including pelvic and para-aortic lymph node dissection, omentectomy, and peritoneal cytology. Chemotherapy was 6 cycles of C/T, and the IVB dose was 14 Gy in 2 fractions, prescribed to 0.5 cm from the cylinder surface. Kaplan-Meier methods were used to estimate recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS). Results The median follow-up time was 49 months (range: 9-145). The 5-yr RFS and OS were 85% and 93%, respectively. In all cases of recurrence (n = 8), the first site of failure was extra-pelvic. There were no isolated vaginal recurrences, however, there was one vaginal apex recurrence recorded at 19 months in a patient with simultaneous lung metastases. Thus, the 2-year vaginal RFS was 98%. Conclusions Excellent vaginal/pelvic control rates were observed. Further study of HDR brachytherapy dose and fractionation in combination with chemotherapy is worthwhile. PMID:25829935

  15. The impact of a vaginal brachytherapy boost to pelvic radiation in stage III endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huddleston, Adam; Zhen, Sally; Qi, Lihong; Rash, Dominique; Leiserowitz, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We investigate the use and impact of a vaginal brachytherapy boost (VBB) after pelvic radiotherapy for stage III endometrial adenocarcinoma on vaginal and pelvic control. Material and methods One hundred patients treated from 1998-2011 with surgery and adjuvant therapy with or without a VBB were included. Variables examined were grade, stage, lymphovascular space invasion (LVSI), vaginal involvement (VI), cervical stromal involvement (CSI), myometrial invasion (MI), and a VBB. Failure was scored as vaginal, or pelvic. Fisher's exact test assessed association between variables with vaginal and pelvic control. Results With a median follow up of 43 months, 31% were stage IIIA, 6% stage IIIB, and 63% stage IIIC. Thirty-eight (38%) received pelvic radiotherapy alone, and 62% received adjuvant chemotherapy. Of the 100 patients, 82 were treated with a VBB, 10 were not treated with a VBB, and 8 were not treated with RT. Of the 82 patients who received a VBB, 5 failed in the vagina with vaginal and pelvic control rates of 94% and 92%. The impact of VB reached borderline significance with its impact on pelvic control, 92% vs. 70% (p = 0.056), and did not affect vaginal control, 94% and 90% (p = 0.50). Neither tumor grade, LVSI, CSI, stage, nor LVSI (p > 0.05) statistically significantly impacted vaginal control. Conclusions There are no clinical guidelines for the use of a VBB in stage III endometrial cancer. The majority of our patients were treated with a VBB and experienced excellent pelvic and vaginal control. The presence of traditional adverse features did not negatively impact control in our patient cohort. However, the role of a VBB needs further investigation to understand the incremental benefit beyond pelvic RT.

  16. SU-E-T-366: Clinical Implementation of MR-Guided Vaginal Cylinder Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Owrangi, A; Jolly, S; Balter, J; Cao, Y; Young, L; Zhu, T; Prisciandaro, J [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of MR-based vaginal brachytherapy source localization using an in-house MR-visible marker versus the alignment of an applicator model to MR images. Methods: Three consecutive patients undergoing vaginal HDR brachytherapy with a plastic cylinder were scanned with both CT and MRI (including T1- and T2- weighted images). An MR-visible source localization marker, consisting of a sealed thin catheter filled with either water (for T2 contrast) or Gd-doped water (for T1 contrast), was assembled shortly before scanning. Clinically, the applicator channel was digitized on CT with an x-ray marker. To evaluate the efficacy of MR-based applicator reconstruction, each MR image volume was aligned locally to the CT images based on the region containing the cylinder. Applicator digitization was performed on the MR images using (1) the MR visible marker and (2) alignment of an applicator surface model from Varian's Brachytherapy Planning software to the MRI images. Resulting source positions were compared with the original CT digitization. Results: Although the source path was visualized by the MR marker, the applicator tip proved difficult to identify due to challenges in achieving a watertight seal. This resulted in observed displacements of the catheter tip, at times >1cm. Deviations between the central source positions identified via aligning the applicator surface model to MR and using the xray marker on CT ranged from 0.07 – 0.19 cm and 0.07 – 0.20 cm on T1- weighted and T2-weighted images, respectively. Conclusion: Based on the current study, aligning the applicator model to MRI provides a practical, current approach to perform MR-based brachytherapy planning. Further study is needed to produce catheters with reliably and reproducibly identifiable tips. Attempts are being made to improve catheter seals, as well as to increase the viscosity of the contrast material to decrease fluid mobility inside the catheter.

  17. Vaginal vault brachytherapy in endometrial cancer: verifying target coverage with image-guided applicator placement

    PubMed Central

    Cornes, P; Al-Booz, H

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This quality assurance study assesses whether CT image-guided verification has led to improvements in the technique when compared with previous studies. Methods: The CT images were studied from a cohort of 105 consecutive patients with endometrial cancer having adjuvant brachytherapy to the vaginal vault in 2010. Images were taken at first insertion, checked for air gaps and treatment delivered. Images were later transferred to the planning system and air gaps between vaginal mucosa and vaginal cylinder were measured. Comparisons were made with the 2008 results from this centre and the literature series. Results: Images from two patients were not assessable owing to artefacts from hip replacements. Air gaps >2?mm were seen in 11/103 patients. Repositioning or use of a larger cylinder reduced air gaps to 7/103 patients. In total, 96/103 patients (over 93%) were able to achieve good vaginal contact throughout the treatment volume. This shows a significant improvement in applicator positioning in our centre since 2008 and also a significant improvement over the total data published in 2010 (Pearson ?2 test=46.19; p<0.0001). Conclusion: The vaginal cylinder technique with CT imaging was proven to be effective for 96/103 patients. It is necessary to consider whether there is a better technique for the few patients with air gaps >2?mm. Advances in knowledge: For the vast majority of patients, this technique is well tolerated, without the need for analgesia, and will continue to be the first choice technique in this centre. PMID:23407428

  18. Vulval and Vaginal Rhabdomyosarcoma in Children: Update and Reappraisal of Institut Gustave Roussy Brachytherapy Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Magne, Nicolas [Department of Radiotherapy, Brachytherapy Unit, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Oberlin, Odile [Department of Pediatric Medical Oncology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Martelli, Helene [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Hopital du Kremlin-Bicetre, Bicetre (France); Gerbaulet, Alain; Chassagne, Daniel [Department of Radiotherapy, Brachytherapy Unit, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Haie-Meder, Christine [Department of Radiotherapy, Brachytherapy Unit, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France)], E-mail: christine.haie@igr.fr

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To report the Institut Gustave Roussy brachytherapy (BT) experience in the management of vulval and vaginal rhabdomyosarcoma with special emphasis on long-term outcome. Patients and Methods: Between 1971 and 2005, the data concerning 39 girls who had undergone BT as a part of their treatment were retrospectively analyzed. Of the 39 girls, 20 had been treated before 1990, when the BT volume encompassed the initial tumor extension. After 1990, only residual disease was included in the BT volume. Side effects were classified using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. Results: The median age was 16.3 months at diagnosis. Vaginal or vulvar rhabdomyosarcoma was diagnosed in 26 and 6 patients, respectively. The median follow-up was 8.4 years. The 5-year overall survival rate was 91%. Of the 39 patients, 6 developed a relapse. Of the 20 patients treated before 1990, 6 experienced Grade 1-2 renal/genitourinary function symptoms and 75% developed sequelae, in the form of vaginal or urethral sclerosis or stenosis. Four patients received follow-up treatment for psychological disorders. Of the 19 patients treated after 1990, 2 developed acute side effects, with maximal Grade 1-2 renal/genitourinary function symptoms, and 20% developed vaginal or urethral sclerosis or stenosis. Two cases of psychological disturbances were also documented. Conclusion: Reducing the BT volume coverage, better indications for surgery, and more efficient chemotherapy, all combined within a multidisciplinary approach, tended to improve results in terms of both survival and long-term sequelae.

  19. Vaginitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... common vaginal infections are Bacterial Vaginosis Trichomoniasis Vaginal Yeast Infection Some vaginal infections are transmitted through sexual contact, but others, such as yeast infections, probably are not. Other Causes of Vaginitis ...

  20. High Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy for Cervical Carcinomas With Lower Vaginal Infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Kazumoto, Tomoko [Department of Radiology, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama (Japan)], E-mail: tomokaz31@cancer-c.pref.saitama.jp; Kato, Shingo [Department of Radiological Technology, Nagoya University School of Health Sciences, Nagoya (Japan); Tabushi, Katsuyoshi; Kutsutani-Nakamura, Yuzuru [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saitama Medical School, Saitama (Japan); Mizuno, Hideyuki [Department of Radiological Technology, Nagoya University School of Health Sciences, Nagoya (Japan); Takahashi, Michiko [Department of Gynecology, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama (Japan); Research Center Hospital for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Shiromizu, Kenji [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Saitama Medical School, Saitama (Japan); Saito, Yoshihiro [Department of Radiology, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama (Japan)

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: This report presents the clinical applications of an automated treatment-planning program of high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT) for advanced uterine cervical cancer infiltrating the parametrium and the lower vagina. Methods and Materials: We adopted HDR-ICBT under optimized dose distribution for 22 cervical cancer patients with tumor infiltration of the lower half of the vagina. All patients had squamous cell carcinoma with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics clinical stages IIB-IVA. After whole pelvic external beam irradiation with a median dose of 30.6 Gy, a conventional ICBT was applied as 'pear-shaped' isodose curve. Then 3-4 more sessions per week of this new method of ICBT were performed. With a simple determination of the treatment volume, the cervix-parametrium, and the lower vagina were covered automatically and simultaneously by this program, that was designated as 'utero-vaginal brachytherapy'. The mean follow-up period was 87.4 months (range, 51.8-147.9 months). Results: Isodose curve for this program was 'galaxy-shaped'. Five-year local-progression-free survival and overall survival rates were 90.7% and 81.8%, respectively. Among those patients with late complications higher than Grade 2 Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer morbidity score, only one (4.5%) developed severe proctitis. Conclusions: Because of the favorable treatment outcomes, this treatment-planning program with a simplified target-volume based dosimetry was proposed for cervical cancer with lower vaginal infiltration.

  1. Patterns of Failure in Endometrial Carcinoma Stage IB Grade 3 and IC Patients Treated with Postoperative Vaginal Vault Brachytherapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Chadha; P. J. Nanavati; P. Liu; J. Fanning; A. Jacobs

    1999-01-01

    Objective. The vagina is the most common site of locoregional failure in surgical stage IB, IC, and II (occult) endometrial adenocarcinoma. The objective of this study is to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of vaginal vault brachytherapy alone for surgical stage I patients with high-risk features.Materials and methods. The study group consists of high-risk stage I patients with either stage IB

  2. Administration of Concurrent Vaginal Brachytherapy During Chemotherapy for Treatment of Endometrial Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nagar, Himanshu; Boothe, Dustin; Parikh, Amar; Yondorf, Menachem; Parashar, Bhupesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States); Gupta, Divya; Holcomb, Kevin; Caputo, Thomas [Division of Gynecological Oncology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States); Chao, K. S. Clifford; Nori, Dattatreyudu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States); Wernicke, A. Gabriella, E-mail: gaw9006@med.cornell.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the tolerability and toxicity of administering vaginal brachytherapy (VB) concurrently during chemotherapy compared with the sequential approach for patients with endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis of 372 surgically staged patients with endometrial cancer American Joint Committee on Cancer 2009 stages I to IV treated with adjuvant postoperative radiation therapy (RT) at our institution from 2001 to 2012 was conducted. All patients received VB + external beam RT (EBRT) + 6 cycles of adjuvant carboplatin- and paclitaxel-based chemotherapy. The VB mean dose was 15.08 Gy (range, 15-20 Gy), with 3 to 4 weekly applications, and the EBRT mean dose was 45 Gy delivered with 3-dimensional or intensity modulated RT techniques. Hematologic, gastrointestinal (GI), and genitourinary (GU) toxicities were assessed by Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC) and compared between sequential and concurrent chemotherapy and VB schedules. Results: Among patients who received RT and adjuvant chemotherapy, 180 of 372 patients (48%) received RT sandwiched between cycles 3 and 4 of chemotherapy. A separate group of 192 patients (52%) were treated with VB during the first 3 cycles of chemotherapy, with a weekly application on nonchemotherapy days, and received the EBRT portion in a sandwiched fashion. Patients treated with VB during chemotherapy had a decreased overall treatment time by 4 weeks (P<.001; 95% confidence interval: 3.99-4.02) and sustained no difference in CTC-graded acute hematologic, GI, or GU toxicities in comparison with the patients treated with VB and chemotherapy in a sequential manner (P>.05). CTC grade 3 or 4 hematologic, GI, and GU toxicities were zero. Conclusions: VB during chemotherapy is well tolerated, decreases overall treatment time, and does not render more toxicity than the sequential regimen.

  3. The Role of Vaginal Brachytherapy in the Treatment of Surgical Stage I Papillary Serous or Clear Cell Endometrial Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Barney, Brandon M., E-mail: barney.brandon@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Petersen, Ivy A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Mariani, Andrea; Dowdy, Sean C.; Bakkum-Gamez, Jamie N. [Division of Gynecologic Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)] [Division of Gynecologic Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Haddock, Michael G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The optimal adjuvant therapy for International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage I papillary serous (UPSC) or clear cell (CC) endometrial cancer is unknown. We report on the largest single-institution experience using adjuvant high-dose-rate vaginal brachytherapy (VBT) for surgically staged women with FIGO stage I UPSC or CC endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: From 1998-2011, 103 women with FIGO 2009 stage I UPSC (n=74), CC (n=21), or mixed UPSC/CC (n=8) endometrial cancer underwent total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy followed by adjuvant high-dose-rate VBT. Nearly all patients (n=98, 95%) also underwent extended lymph node dissection of pelvic and paraortic lymph nodes. All VBT was performed with a vaginal cylinder, treating to a dose of 2100 cGy in 3 fractions. Thirty-five patients (34%) also received adjuvant chemotherapy. Results: At a median follow-up time of 36 months (range, 1-146 months), 2 patients had experienced vaginal recurrence, and the 5-year Kaplan Meier estimate of vaginal recurrence was 3%. The rates of isolated pelvic recurrence, locoregional recurrence (vaginal + pelvic), and extrapelvic recurrence (including intraabdominal) were similarly low, with 5-year Kaplan-Meier estimates of 4%, 7%, and 10%, respectively. The estimated 5-year overall survival was 84%. On univariate analysis, delivery of chemotherapy did not affect recurrence or survival. Conclusions: VBT is effective at preventing vaginal relapse in women with surgical stage I UPSC or CC endometrial cancer. In this cohort of patients who underwent comprehensive surgical staging, the risk of isolated pelvic or extrapelvic relapse was low, implying that more extensive adjuvant radiation therapy is likely unnecessary.

  4. Determination of Prognostic Factors for Vaginal Mucosal Toxicity Associated With Intravaginal High-Dose Rate Brachytherapy in Patients With Endometrial Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bahng, Agnes Y.; Dagan, Avner [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bruner, Deborah W. [University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Lin, Lilie L., E-mail: lin@xrt.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to determine the patient- and treatment-related prognostic factors associated with vaginal toxicity in patients who received intravaginal high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy alone as adjuvant treatment for endometrial cancer. Secondary goals of this study included a quantitative assessment of optimal dilator use frequency and a crude assessment of clinical predictors for compliant dilator use. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 100 patients with histologically confirmed endometrial cancer who underwent total hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy with or without lymph node dissection and adjuvant intravaginal brachytherapy between 1995 and 2009 at the Hospital of University of Pennsylvania. The most common treatment regimen used was 21 Gy in three fractions (71 patients). Symptoms of vaginal mucosal toxicity were taken from the history and physical exams noted in the patients' charts and were graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events v. 4.02. Results: The incidence of Grade 1 or asymptomatic vaginal toxicity was 33% and Grade 2-3 or symptomatic vaginal toxicity was 14%. Multivariate analysis of age, active length, and dilator use two to three times a week revealed odds ratios of 0.93 (p = 0.013), 3.96 (p = 0.008), and 0.17 (p = 0.032) respectively. Conclusion: Increasing age, vaginal dilator use of at least two to three times a week, and shorter active length were found to be significantly associated with a decreased risk of vaginal stenosis. Future prospective studies are necessary to validate our findings.

  5. Is there a subset of patients with recurrent cancer in the vagina who are not candidates for interstitial brachytherapy that can be treated with multichannel vaginal brachytherapy using graphic optimization?

    PubMed Central

    Bylund, Kevin C.; Matloubieh, Ahmad; Mazloom, Ali; Gray, Alexander; Sidhu, Ravinder; Barrette, Lucille; Chen, Yuhchyau

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate recurrent vaginal cancer treated with vaginal brachytherapy (VBT) using graphic optimization in patients not amenable to surgery and interstitial brachytherapy (ISBT). Material and methods We retrospectively reviewed the records of 5 patients with recurrent cancer in the vagina that were deemed not to be good candidates for ISBT implant because of medical reasons. All patients received computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (CT/MRI) based evaluation in addition to a detailed clinical examination, and were noted to have recurrent nodules in the vagina with size ranging from 10-25 mm. Four of the 5 patients had recurrent disease in the vaginal apex, whereas one patient had recurrence in the lateral vaginal wall. Subsequently, all patients were treated with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) followed by multichannel vaginal cylinder (MVC)-based VBT using graphic optimization for shaping the isodose to improve the clinical target volume (CTV) coverage, as well as to spare the organs at risk (OAR). The dose to the bladder and rectum with regard to 0.1 cc, 1 cc, and 2 cc were recorded. Results Median age of the patients was 78 years (range 58-86 years). Thickness of the lesions before VBT ranged from 6-15 mm. All patients were followed up with MRI at 3 months. All patients but one demonstrated complete clinical/ radiological response of the tumor. No patient had any grade III/IV toxicity at 24 months. Conclusions MVC-based VBT using graphic optimization is safe and yields favorable results if used judiciously.

  6. A Monte Carlo dosimetry study of vaginal {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy applications with a shielded cylindrical applicator set

    SciTech Connect

    Lymperopoulou, G.; Pantelis, E.; Papagiannis, P.; Rozaki-Mavrouli, H.; Sakelliou, L.; Baltas, D.; Karaiskos, P. [Nuclear and Particle Physics Section, Physics Department, University of Athens, Panepistimioupolis, Ilisia, 157 71 Athens (Greece); Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Strahlenklinik, Klinikum Offenbach, 63069 Offenbach, Germany and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, 15773 Zografou, Athens (Greece); Medical Physics Department, Hygeia Hospital, Kiffisias Ave and 4 Erythroy Stavrou, Marousi, 151 23 Athens (Greece)

    2004-11-01

    A durable recommendation for brachytherapy treatment planning systems to account for the effect of tissue, applicator and shielding material heterogeneities exists. As different proposed approaches have not been integrated in clinical treatment planning routine yet, currently utilized systems disregard or, most commonly, do not fully account for the aforementioned effects. Therefore, it is of interest to evaluate the efficacy of current treatment planning in clinical applications susceptible to errors due to heterogeneities. In this work the effect of the internal structure as well as the shielding used with a commercially available cylindrical shielded applicator set (Nucletron part no. 084.320) for vaginal and rectum treatments is studied using three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulation for a clinical treatment plan involving seven source dwell positions of the classic microSelectron HDR {sup 192}Ir source. Results are compared to calculations of a treatment planning system (Plato BPS v.14.2.7), which assumes homogeneous water medium and applies a constant, multiplicative transmission factor only at points lying in the shadow of the shield. It is found that the internal structure of the applicator (which includes stainless steel, air and plastic materials) with no shield loaded does not affect the dose distribution relative to homogeneous water. In the unshielded side of the applicator with a 90 deg., 180 deg., or 270 deg. tungsten alloy shield loaded, an overestimation of treatment planning system calculations relative to Monte Carlo results was observed which is both shield and position dependent. While significant (up to 15%) at increased distances, which are not of major clinical importance, this overestimation does not affect dose prescription distances by more than 3%. The inverse effect of approx. 3% dose increase at dose prescription distances is observed for stainless steel shields. Regarding the shielded side of the applicator, it is shown that the default treatment planning system transmission factors for tungsten alloy result in a consistent dose overestimation thus constituting a safe approach given the nature of associated clinical applications. Stainless steel is shown to be an ineffective shielding material with transmission factors reaching up to 0.68 at increased distances irrespective of shield geometry.

  7. Treatment of Locally Advanced Vaginal Cancer With Radiochemotherapy and Magnetic Resonance Image-Guided Adaptive Brachytherapy: Dose-Volume Parameters and First Clinical Results

    SciTech Connect

    Dimopoulos, Johannes C.A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Metropolitan Hospital, Athens (Greece); Schmid, Maximilian P., E-mail: maximilian.schmid@akhwien.at [Department of Radiotherapy, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Fidarova, Elena; Berger, Daniel; Kirisits, Christian; Poetter, Richard [Department of Radiotherapy, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical feasibility of magnetic resonance image-guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT) for patients with locally advanced vaginal cancer and to report treatment outcomes. Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients with vaginal cancer were treated with external beam radiotherapy (45-50.4 Gy) plus IGABT with or without chemotherapy. Distribution of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages among patients were as follows: 4 patients had Stage II cancer, 5 patients had Stage III cancer, and 4 patients had Stage IV cancer. The concept of IGABT as developed for cervix cancer was transferred and adapted for vaginal cancer, with corresponding treatment planning and reporting. Doses were converted to the equivalent dose in 2 Gy, applying the linear quadratic model ({alpha}/{beta} = 10 Gy for tumor; {alpha}/{beta} = 3 for organs at risk). Endpoints studied were gross tumor volume (GTV), dose-volume parameters for high-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV), and organs at risk, local control (LC), adverse side effects, and survival. Results: The mean GTV ({+-} 1 standard deviation) at diagnosis was 45.3 ({+-}30) cm{sup 3}, and the mean GTV at brachytherapy was 10 ({+-}14) cm{sup 3}. The mean D90 for the HRCTV was 86 ({+-}13) Gy. The mean D2cc for bladder, urethra, rectum, and sigmoid colon were 80 ({+-}20) Gy, 76 ({+-}16) Gy, 70 ({+-}9) Gy, and 60 ({+-}9) Gy, respectively. After a median follow-up of 43 months (range, 19-87 months), one local recurrence and two distant metastases cases were observed. Actuarial LC and overall survival rates at 3 years were 92% and 85%. One patient with Stage IVA and 1 patient with Stage III disease experienced fistulas (one vesicovaginal, one rectovaginal), and 1 patient developed periurethral necrosis. Conclusions: The concept of IGABT, originally developed for treating cervix cancer, appears to be applicable to vaginal cancer treatment with only minor adaptations. Dose-volume parameters for HRCTV and organs at risk are in a comparable range. First clinical results indicate excellent LC. Further prospective multicenter studies are needed to establish this method and to confirm these results.

  8. Effects of prescription depth, cylinder size, treatment length, tip space, and curved end on doses in high-dose-rate vaginal brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Li Shidong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States)]. E-mail: sli1@hfhs.org; Aref, Ibrahim [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Walker, Eleanor [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Movsas, Benjamin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States)

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: To determine the effects of the prescription depth, cylinder size, treatment length, tip space, and curved end on high-dose-rate vaginal brachytherapy (HDR-VBT) of endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: Treatment plans were prescribed and optimized based on points at the cylinder surface or at 0.5-cm depth. Cylinder sizes ranging from 2 to 4 cm in diameter, and treatment lengths ranging from 3 to 8 cm were used. Dose points in various depths were precisely defined along the cylinder dome. The given dose and dose uniformity to a depth of interest were measured by the mean dose (MD) and standard deviation (SD), respectively, among the dose points belonging to the depth. Dose fall-off beyond the 0.5 cm treatment depth was determined by the ratio of MD at 0.75-cm depth to MD at 0.5-cm depth. Results: Dose distribution varies significantly with different prescriptions. The surface prescription provides more uniform doses at all depths in the target volume, whereas the 0.5-cm depth prescription creates larger dose variations at the cylinder surface. Dosimetric uncertainty increases significantly (>30%) with shorter tip space. Extreme hot (>150%) and cold spots (<60%) occur if no optimization points were placed at the curved end. Conclusions: Instead of prescribing to a depth of 0.5 cm, increasing the dose per fraction and prescribing to the surface with the exact surface points around the cylinder dome appears to be the optimal approach.

  9. Comparison of high-dose-rate and low-dose-rate brachytherapy in the treatment of endometrial carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Fayed, Alaa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Mutch, David G.; Rader, Janet S.; Gibb, Randall K. [Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)]|[Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, St. Louis, MO (United States); Powell, Matthew A. [Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)]|[Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, St. Louis, MO (United States); Wright, Jason D. [Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); El Naqa, Issam [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Zoberi, Imran [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)]|[Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, St. Louis, MO (United States); Grigsby, Perry W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)]|[Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)]|[Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, St. Louis, MO (United States)]|[Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)]. E-mail: pgrigsby@wustl.edu

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: To compare the outcomes for endometrial carcinoma patients treated with either high-dose-rate (HDR) or low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: This study included 1,179 patients divided into LDR (1,004) and HDR groups (175). Patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) surgical Stages I-III were included. All patients were treated with postoperative irradiation. In the LDR group, the postoperative dose applied to the vaginal cuff was 60-70 Gy surface doses to the vaginal mucosa. The HDR brachytherapy prescription was 6 fractions of 2 Gy each to a depth of 0.5 cm from the surface of the vaginal mucosa. Overall survival, disease-free survival, local control, and complications were endpoints. Results: For all stages combined, the overall survival, disease-free survival, and local control at 5 years in the LDR group were 70%, 69%, and 81%, respectively. For all stages combined, the overall survival, disease-free survival, and local control at 5 years in the HDR group were 68%, 62%, and 78%, respectively. There were no significant differences in early or late Grade III and IV complications in the HDR or LDR groups. Conclusion: Survival outcomes, pelvic tumor control, and Grade III and IV complications were not significantly different in the LDR brachytherapy group compared with the HDR group.

  10. Bilateral uterosacral ligament vaginal vault suspension with site-specific endopelvic fascia defect repair for treatment of pelvic organ prolapse

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matthew D. Barber; Anthony G. Visco; Alison C. Weidner; Cindy L. Amundsen; Richard C. Bump

    2000-01-01

    Objective: The anatomic and functional success of suspension of the vaginal cuff to the proximal uterosacral ligaments is described. Study Design: Forty-six women underwent vaginal site-specific repair of endopelvic fascia defects with suspension of the vaginal cuff to the proximal uterosacral ligaments for pelvic organ prolapse. Outcome measures included operative complications, pelvic organ prolapse quantitation, and assessment of pelvic floor

  11. Comparison of 2D and 3D Imaging and Treatment Planning for Postoperative Vaginal Apex High-Dose Rate Brachytherapy for Endometrial Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, James K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Armeson, Kent E. [Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Richardson, Susan, E-mail: srichardson@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate bladder and rectal doses using two-dimensional (2D) and 3D treatment planning for vaginal cuff high-dose rate (HDR) in endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: Ninety-one consecutive patients treated between 2000 and 2007 were evaluated. Seventy-one and 20 patients underwent 2D and 3D planning, respectively. Each patient received six fractions prescribed at 0.5 cm to the superior 3 cm of the vagina. International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) doses were calculated for 2D patients. Maximum and 2-cc doses were calculated for 3D patients. Organ doses were normalized to prescription dose. Results: Bladder maximum doses were 178% of ICRU doses (p < 0.0001). Two-cubic centimeter doses were no different than ICRU doses (p = 0.22). Two-cubic centimeter doses were 59% of maximum doses (p < 0.0001). Rectal maximum doses were 137% of ICRU doses (p < 0.0001). Two-cubic centimeter doses were 87% of ICRU doses (p < 0.0001). Two-cubic centimeter doses were 64% of maximum doses (p < 0.0001). Using the first 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5 fractions, we predicted the final bladder dose to within 10% for 44%, 59%, 83%, 82%, and 89% of patients by using the ICRU dose, and for 45%, 55%, 80%, 85%, and 85% of patients by using the maximum dose, and for 37%, 68%, 79%, 79%, and 84% of patients by using the 2-cc dose. Using the first 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5 fractions, we predicted the final rectal dose to within 10% for 100%, 100%, 100%, 100%, and 100% of patients by using the ICRU dose, and for 60%, 65%, 70%, 75%, and 75% of patients by using the maximum dose, and for 68%, 95%, 84%, 84%, and 84% of patients by using the 2-cc dose. Conclusions: Doses to organs at risk vary depending on the calculation method. In some cases, final dose accuracy appears to plateau after the third fraction, indicating that simulation and planning may not be necessary in all fractions. A clinically relevant level of accuracy should be determined and further research conducted to address this issue.

  12. Comparative dosimetric and radiobiological assessment among a nonstandard RapidArc, standard RapidArc, classical intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and 3D brachytherapy for the treatment of the vaginal vault in patients affected by gynecologic cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pedicini, Piernicola, E-mail: ppiern@libero.it [Service of Medical Physics, IRCCS Regional Cancer Hospital (C.R.O.B.), Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Caivano, Rocchina [Service of Medical Physics, IRCCS Regional Cancer Hospital (C.R.O.B.), Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Fiorentino, Alba [U.O. of Radiotherapy, IRCCS Regional Cancer Hospital (C.R.O.B.), Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Strigari, Lidia [Laboratory of Medical Physics and Expert Systems, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Califano, Giorgia [Service of Medical Physics, IRCCS Regional Cancer Hospital (C.R.O.B.), Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Barbieri, Viviana; Sanpaolo, Piero; Castaldo, Giovanni [U.O. of Radiotherapy, IRCCS Regional Cancer Hospital (C.R.O.B.), Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Benassi, Marcello [Service of Medical Physics, Scientific Institute of Tumors of Romagna IRST, Meldola (Italy); Fusco, Vincenzo [U.O. of Radiotherapy, IRCCS Regional Cancer Hospital (C.R.O.B.), Rionero in Vulture (Italy)

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate a nonstandard RapidArc (RA) modality as alternative to high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BRT) or IMRT treatments of the vaginal vault in patients with gynecological cancer (GC). Nonstandard (with vaginal applicator) and standard (without vaginal applicator) RapidArc plans for 27 women with GC were developed to compare with HDR-BRT and IMRT. Dosimetric and radiobiological comparison were performed by means of dose-volume histogram and equivalent uniform dose (EUD) for planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs). In addition, the integral dose and the overall treatment times were evaluated. RA, as well as IMRT, results in a high uniform dose on PTV compared with HDR-BRT. However, the average of EUD for HDR-BRT was significantly higher than those with RA and IMRT. With respect to the OARs, standard RA was equivalent of IMRT but inferior to HDR-BRT. Furthermore, nonstandard RA was comparable with IMRT for bladder and sigmoid and better than HDR-BRT for the rectum because of a significant reduction of d{sub 2cc}, d{sub 1cc}, and d{sub max} (p < 0.01). Integral doses were always higher than HDR-BRT, although the values were very low. Delivery times were about the same and more than double for HDR-BRT compared with IMRT and RA, respectively. In conclusion, the boost of dose on vaginal vault in patients affected by GC delivered by a nonstandard RA technique was a reasonable alternative to the conventional HDR-BRT because of a reduction of delivery time and rectal dose at substantial comparable doses for the bladder and sigmoid. However HDR-BRT provides better performance in terms of PTV coverage as evidenced by a greater EUD.

  13. Rotator Cuff Injuries

    MedlinePLUS

    ... made of muscles and tendons. It helps your shoulder to move and stay stable. Problems with the rotator cuff are common. They include tendinitis, bursitis, and injuries such as tears. Rotator cuff tendons can become ...

  14. Vaginal Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    Vaginal problems are some of the most common reasons women go to the doctor. They may have ... the problem is vaginitis, an inflammation of the vagina. The main symptom is smelly vaginal discharge, but ...

  15. Use of synthetic mesh to prevent recurrent vaginal evisceration: a case report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Derek Jurus; Peter Finamore; Babak Vakili

    2009-01-01

    Vaginal evisceration of the bowel is a rare and life-threatening complication of gynecologic surgery; recurrence is even more\\u000a rare. Most cases in the literature discuss primary closure of the dehisced vaginal cuff with delayed absorbable sutures via\\u000a a vaginal, abdominal, or laparoscopic approach. The case presented here is of a patient who had a history of recurrent vaginal\\u000a evisceration treated

  16. Clindamycin Vaginal

    MedlinePLUS

    ... an infection caused by an overgrowth of harmful bacteria in the vagina). Clindamycin is in a class ... works by slowing or stopping the growth of bacteria. Vaginal clindamycin cannot be used to treat vaginal ...

  17. Rotator Cuff Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Many baseball players suffer from shoulder injuries related to the rotator cuff muscles. These injuries may be classified as muscular strain, tendonitis or tenosynovitis, and impingement syndrome. Treatment varies from simple rest to surgery, so it is important to be seen by a physician as soon as possible. In order to prevent these injuries, the…

  18. Prostate brachytherapy

    MedlinePLUS

    Implant therapy - prostate cancer; Radioactive seed placement; Internal radiation therapy - prostate ... Brachytherapy takes 30 minutes or more, depending on the type of therapy you have. Before the procedure, ...

  19. Hysterectomy - vaginal - discharge

    MedlinePLUS

    Vaginal hysterectomy - discharge; Laparoscopically assisted vaginal hysterectomy - discharge; LAVH - discharge ... you were in the hospital, you had a vaginal hysterectomy. Your surgeon made a cut in your ...

  20. Estrogen Vaginal

    MedlinePLUS

    ... estradiol vaginal ring is also used to treat hot flushes ('hot flashes'; sudden strong feelings of heat and sweating) ... mild soap and warm water. Do not use hot water or boil the applicator. Ask your pharmacist ...

  1. Vaginal reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Lesavoy, M.A.

    1985-05-01

    Vaginal reconstruction can be an uncomplicated and straightforward procedure when attention to detail is maintained. The Abbe-McIndoe procedure of lining the neovaginal canal with split-thickness skin grafts has become standard. The use of the inflatable Heyer-Schulte vaginal stent provides comfort to the patient and ease to the surgeon in maintaining approximation of the skin graft. For large vaginal and perineal defects, myocutaneous flaps such as the gracilis island have been extremely useful for correction of radiation-damaged tissue of the perineum or for the reconstruction of large ablative defects. Minimal morbidity and scarring ensue because the donor site can be closed primarily. With all vaginal reconstruction, a compliant patient is a necessity. The patient must wear a vaginal obturator for a minimum of 3 to 6 months postoperatively and is encouraged to use intercourse as an excellent obturator. In general, vaginal reconstruction can be an extremely gratifying procedure for both the functional and emotional well-being of patients.

  2. Stages of Vaginal Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Treatment (PDQ®) General Information About Vaginal Cancer Key Points Vaginal cancer is a disease in which malignant ( ... to the pelvis . Stages of Vaginal Cancer Key Points After vaginal cancer has been diagnosed, tests are ...

  3. Rolling cuff flexible bellows

    DOEpatents

    Lambert, Donald R. (Livermore, CA)

    1985-01-01

    A flexible connector apparatus used to join two stiff non-deformable members, such as piping. The apparatus is provided with one or more flexible sections or assemblies each utilizing a bellows of a rolling cuff type connected between two ridge members, with the bellows being supported by a back-up ring, such that only the curved end sections of the bellows are unsupported. Thus, the bellows can be considered as being of a tube-shaped configuration and thus have high pressure resistance. The components of the flexible apparatus are sealed or welded one to another such that it is fluid tight.

  4. Rotator Cuff Injuries

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Patient Education Institute

    This patient education program discusses rotator cuff injuries, their causes, symptoms, diagnosis, prevention, and options for their treatment including physiotherapy and surgery. This resource is a MedlinePlus Interactive Health Tutorial from the National Library of Medicine, designed and developed by the Patient Education Institute. NOTE: This tutorial requires a special Flash plug-in, version 4 or above. If you do not have Flash, you will be prompted to obtain a free download of the software before you start the tutorial. You will also need an Acrobat Reader, available as a free download, in order to view the Reference Summary.

  5. Vaginal anus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fidel Ruiz-Moreno; Amable Gerdo-Ceballo; Gilberto Lozano-Saldivar

    1980-01-01

    A technique is described by which congenital ectopic anorectum with normal intestinal tissue opening into the vulva (“vaginal\\u000a anus”) was successfully corrected in two teen-age patients. The technique has several advantages: a new anal canal is formed\\u000a and the wounds heal promptly with little postoperative pain and reduced risk of postoperative anal stenosis.

  6. Vaginal molds for intracavitary curietherapy: a new method of preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Bertoni, F.; Bertoni, G.; Bignardi, M.

    1983-10-01

    A new method of preparing vaginal molds for afterloading intracavitary brachytherapy is described. Our technique makes it possible to obtain the most accurate individualization of therapy as far as dose distribution is concerned by taking into account the patient's anatomy and target volume.

  7. Efficacy of Different Rotator Cuff Repair Techniques.

    PubMed

    Gurnani, Navin; van Deurzen, Derek Friedrich Petrus; Flipsen, Mark; Raven, Eric Ernest Joseph; van den Bekerom, Michel Pieter Jozef

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this review article is to describe the currently used techniques for rotator cuff repair and after treatment. The literature was searched for the different surgical techniques and additional treatment including: [1] full arthroscopic and arthroscopic assisted rotator cuff repair, [2] acromioplasty as an additional treatment to rotator cuff repair, [3] the use of plasma rich platelets (PRP) after rotator cuff repair, [4] the single and double row fixation techniques, [5] long head of the biceps brachii tenotomy or tenodesis with rotator cuff repair, [6] scaffolds in rotator cuff surgery, and [7] early motion or immobilization after rotator cuff repair. The rationale, the results, and the scientific evidence were reported for the eligible procedures. PMID:26055023

  8. COMMUNITY CUFF: MANUALLYPOWERED BLOOD PRESSURE CUFF FOR SUBSAHARAN AFRICA

    E-print Network

    McGaughey, Alan

    Bons Full cuff design Rigid elbow piece Manual pumping Output Electronics + casing Ashley Brienza usability while minimizing cost. With automaDc deflaDon, intuiDve visual cues, a rigid elbow worker. Novel design · Rigid elbow piece and SBR forearm sleeve to keep arm at 45 degrees

  9. 21 CFR 870.1120 - Blood pressure cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Blood pressure cuff. 870.1120 Section 870...Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1120 Blood pressure cuff. (a) Identification. A blood pressure cuff is a device that has...

  10. 21 CFR 868.5750 - Inflatable tracheal tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. 868.5750 Section 868.5750...Devices § 868.5750 Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. (a) Identification. An inflatable tracheal tube cuff is a device used to provide an...

  11. 21 CFR 868.5750 - Inflatable tracheal tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. 868.5750 Section 868.5750...Devices § 868.5750 Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. (a) Identification. An inflatable tracheal tube cuff is a device used to provide an...

  12. 21 CFR 868.5750 - Inflatable tracheal tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. 868.5750 Section 868.5750...Devices § 868.5750 Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. (a) Identification. An inflatable tracheal tube cuff is a device used to provide an...

  13. 21 CFR 868.5750 - Inflatable tracheal tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. 868.5750 Section 868.5750...Devices § 868.5750 Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. (a) Identification. An inflatable tracheal tube cuff is a device used to provide an...

  14. 21 CFR 870.1120 - Blood pressure cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Blood pressure cuff. 870.1120 Section 870...Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1120 Blood pressure cuff. (a) Identification. A blood pressure cuff is a device that has...

  15. 21 CFR 870.1120 - Blood pressure cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Blood pressure cuff. 870.1120 Section 870...Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1120 Blood pressure cuff. (a) Identification. A blood pressure cuff is a device that has...

  16. 21 CFR 870.1120 - Blood pressure cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Blood pressure cuff. 870.1120 Section 870...Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1120 Blood pressure cuff. (a) Identification. A blood pressure cuff is a device that has...

  17. 21 CFR 868.5750 - Inflatable tracheal tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. 868.5750 Section 868.5750...Devices § 868.5750 Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. (a) Identification. An inflatable tracheal tube cuff is a device used to provide an...

  18. 21 CFR 870.1120 - Blood pressure cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Blood pressure cuff. 870.1120 Section 870...Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1120 Blood pressure cuff. (a) Identification. A blood pressure cuff is a device that has...

  19. General Information about Vaginal Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Treatment (PDQ®) General Information About Vaginal Cancer Key Points Vaginal cancer is a disease in which malignant ( ... to the pelvis . Stages of Vaginal Cancer Key Points After vaginal cancer has been diagnosed, tests are ...

  20. Advanced brachytherapy dosimetric considerations

    E-print Network

    Melhus, Christopher S. (Christopher Scott), 1974-

    2008-01-01

    The practice of brachytherapy and brachytherapy dosimetry was investigated with emphasis on evaluations of dose distributions and shielding considerations for both photon- and neutron-emitting radionuclides. Monte Carlo ...

  1. Rotator cuff and subacromial pathology.

    PubMed

    Yablon, Corrie M; Jacobson, Jon A

    2015-07-01

    Both MRI and ultrasound (US) demonstrate equivalent accuracy in the evaluation of the rotator cuff. Both modalities have their advantages, disadvantages, and pitfalls. Radiography is an important complementary modality in that it can demonstrate occult sources of shoulder pain. MRI is recommended for the evaluation of shoulder pain in patients??40 years, US should be the first-line modality because the incidence of rotator cuff pathology increases with age. US is useful to guide procedures such as subacromial injection and calcific tendinosis lavage. Radiologists should be knowledgeable of both MRI and US of the shoulder to tailor these examinations to the specific needs of their patients. PMID:26021584

  2. Vaginal and Vulvar Cancers

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Fighting Cervical Cancer Worldwide Stay Informed Cancer Home Vaginal and Vulvar Cancers Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend ... body parts later. When cancer starts in the vagina, it is called vaginal cancer. The vagina, also ...

  3. Vaginal Yeast Infection

    MedlinePLUS

    ... on. Read more information on enabling JavaScript. Vaginal Yeast Infection Skip Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Vaginal yeast infection, or vulvovaginal candidiasis, is a common cause ...

  4. Biomechanical evaluation of rotator cuff fixation methods

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Paul France; Lonnie E. Paulos; Chris D. Harner; Chris B. Straight

    1989-01-01

    Initial fixation strength and failure mode for various rotator cuff reattachment techniques (variations of the McLaughlin technique) were evaluated. Repair methods included standard suture (control), reinforced suture [expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) patch and polydioxanone (PDS) tape augmentation] and stapling (nonarthroscopic and arthroscopic soft-tissue staples). The average strength of intact rotator cuff tissue (su praspinatus tendon) was also determined. The different rotator

  5. Logic-controlled occlusive cuff system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, J. T.; Hoffler, G. W. (inventors); Hursta, W. N.

    1981-01-01

    An occlusive cuff system comprises a pressure cuff and a source of regulated compressed gas feeding the cuff through an electrically operated fill valve. An electrically operated vent valve vents the cuff to the ambient pressure. The fill valve is normally closed and the vent valve is normally open. In response to an external start signal, a logic network opens the fill valve and closes the vent valve, thereby starting the pressurization cycle and a timer. A pressure transducer continuously monitors the pressure in the cuff. When the transducer's output equals a selected reference voltage, a comparator causes the logic network to close the fill valve. The timer, after a selected time delay, opens the vent valve to the ambient pressure, thereby ending the pressurization cycle.

  6. Partial Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears: Current Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Matthewson, Graeme; Beach, Cara J.; Nelson, Atiba A.; Woodmass, Jarret M.; Ono, Yohei; Boorman, Richard S.; Lo, Ian K. Y.; Thornton, Gail M.

    2015-01-01

    Partial thickness rotator cuff tears are a common cause of pain in the adult shoulder. Despite their high prevalence, the diagnosis and treatment of partial thickness rotator cuff tears remains controversial. While recent studies have helped to elucidate the anatomy and natural history of disease progression, the optimal treatment, both nonoperative and operative, is unclear. Although the advent of arthroscopy has improved the accuracy of the diagnosis of partial thickness rotator cuff tears, the number of surgical techniques used to repair these tears has also increased. While multiple repair techniques have been described, there is currently no significant clinical evidence supporting more complex surgical techniques over standard rotator cuff repair. Further research is required to determine the clinical indications for surgical and nonsurgical management, when formal rotator cuff repair is specifically indicated and when biologic adjunctive therapy may be utilized. PMID:26171251

  7. [Ultrasound assessment of reconstructed rotator cuffs].

    PubMed

    Cammerer, U; Habermeyer, P; Plenk, A; Huber, R

    1992-12-01

    The evaluation of recurrent shoulder symptoms in patients who have had rotator cuff repair is a diagnostic challenge. Pain and limitation of motion may be caused by a recurrence of the rotator cuff tear. Arthrography is not considered to be helpful in postoperative cases, since it is false-positive in most of them. Pre-operative ultrasonography of the shoulder is regarded as a highly accurate diagnostic tool for rotator cuff tears. The diagnostic criteria used are: the continuity of the rotator cuff, its contour, its thickness and its echogenicity. Our study was aimed at determining which ultrasonographic criteria were significant for a retear. In addition, the "normal" postoperative sonographic appearance of the rotator cuff was established. Of 133 patients with a full thickness rotator cuff tear, 110 were evaluated 4-48 months (mean in 21 months) after surgery. A total of 85 cuffs were reconstructed, in 46 cases by direct suture, in 33 cases by suture to the major tubercle and in 6 cases by tendon transfer (Cofield technique). In 25 cases cuffs the could not be reconstructed. Subacromial decompression was performed routinely. The patients were evaluated clinically by range of movement, force and isometric and impingement tests. The subjective outcome was assessed by the algo-functional index of Patte. Ultrasonography was performed using a 7.5-MHz linear scanner. Each sonographic criterion was referred to the clinical and subjective findings. Ultrasonographic evaluation of the rotator cuffs that could not be reconstructed revealed non-visualization of the tendons. In 13 of the 85 patients in whom reconstruction of the cuff was possible a normal sonographic pattern was seen.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1287844

  8. Analysis of Vaginal Cell Populations during Experimental Vaginal Candidiasis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    PAUL L. FIDEL; WEI LUO; CHAD STEELE; JOSEPH CHABAIN; MARC BAKER

    1999-01-01

    Studies with an estrogen-dependent murine model of vaginal candidiasis suggest that local cell-mediated immunity (CMI) is more important than systemic CMI for protection against vaginitis. The present study, however, showed that, compared to uninfected mice, little to no change in the percentage or types of vaginal T cells occurred during a primary vaginal infection or during a secondary vaginal infection

  9. Rolling-cuff flexible bellows

    DOEpatents

    Lambert, D.R.

    1982-09-27

    A flexible connector apparatus used to join two stiff non-deformable members, such as piping, is described. The apparatus is provided with one or more flexible sections or assemblies each utilizing a bellows of a rolling cuff type connected between two ridge members, with the bellows being supported by a back-up ring, such that only the curved end sections of the bellows are unsupported. Thus, the bellows can be considered as being of a tube-shaped configuration and thus have high pressure resistance. The components of the flexible apparatus are sealed or welded one to another such that it is fluid tight.

  10. Rotator cuff tears in the throwing athlete.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, Benjamin; Huttman, Daniel

    2014-06-01

    Tears of the rotator cuff, both partial, and less commonly, full thickness, are relatively common in the throwing athlete. The rotator cuff is subjected to enormous stresses during repetitive overhead activity. The supraphysiological strains, especially when combined with pathology elsewhere in the kinetic chain, can lead to compromise of the cuff fabric, most commonly on the undersurface where tensile overload occurs. Exacerbation by a tight posterior capsular, anterior instability, and internal impingement render the cuff progressively compromised, with intrinsic shear stresses and undersurface fiber failure. Advances in imaging technology, including contrast magnetic resonance imaging, dynamic ultrasound, and arthroscopic visualization have enhanced our understanding of cuff pathology in this athletic population. Unfortunately, this has not yet translated into how to best approach these athletes to return them to their previous level of activity. Nonoperative management remains the mainstay for most throwers, with arthroscopic debridement an effective surgical option for those with refractory symptoms. Despite technological advances in cuff repair in the general population, comparable outcomes have not been achieved in high-level throwers. Widespread appreciation that securing the cuff operatively will likely end an athletes' throwing career has led to adopting a surgical approach that emphasizes debridement over repair for nearly all partial and full-thickness tears. Whether advances in surgical technique will ultimately permit definitive and lasting repairs that allow overhead throwers to return to their previous level of sports remains unknown at this time. PMID:24787724

  11. Five-year cure of cervical cancer treated using californium-252 neutron brachytherapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John R. van Nagell; Justine Yoneda; Elvis Donaldson; Michael Hanson; Ann Martin; Leonard C. Wilson; Charles W Coffey; Jose Feola; J. Lawrence Beach

    1984-01-01

    Female pelvic carcinoma is one of the common malignancies seen at the University of Kentucky Medical Center and often presents in an advanced stage. In 1976, the authors began to test californium-252 neutron brachytherapy (NT) for its efficacy for control of primary and recurrent advanced uterine, cervix, and vaginal cancers. The first protocol used was 5000-5500 rad of whole pelvis

  12. The Human Vaginal Microbiome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brenda A. Wilson; Susan M. Thomas; Mengfei Ho

    \\u000a Humans live in association with abundant, complex, and dynamic microbial populations (the microbiome) that colonize many body\\u000a sites, including the vaginal tract. Interactions between the host and the vaginal microbiota greatly affect women’s health,\\u000a where they often serve a protective role in maintaining vaginal health. Disruption of the microbial composition can lead to\\u000a increased susceptibility to various urogenital diseases, including

  13. JAMA Patient Page: Vaginal Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of the American Medical Association JAMA PATIENT PAGE Vaginal Symptoms V aginal symptoms are one of the ... includes an article about diagnosing vaginal symptoms. DIAGNOSING VAGINAL SYMPTOMS FOR MORE INFORMATION • American College of Obstetricians ...

  14. Prostate brachytherapy - discharge

    MedlinePLUS

    Implant therapy - prostate cancer - discharge; Radioactive seed placement - discharge ... You had a procedure called brachytherapy to treat prostate cancer. Your treatment lasted 30 minutes or more, ...

  15. Rotator cuff injuries in adolescent athletes.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Jennifer M; Arkader, Alexandre; Wells, Lawrence M; Ganley, Theodore J

    2013-03-01

    The cause of rotator cuff injuries in the young athlete has been described as an overuse injury related to internal impingement. Abduction coupled with external rotation is believed to impinge on the rotator cuff, specifically the supraspinatus, and lead to undersurface tears that can progress to full-thickness tears. This impingement is believed to be worsened with increased range of motion and instability in overhead athletes. A retrospective review of seven patients diagnosed with rotator cuff injuries was performed to better understand this shoulder injury pattern. The type of sport played, a history of trauma, diagnosis, treatment method, and outcome were noted. Six patients were male and one was a female. Baseball was the primary sport for four patients, basketball for one, gymnastics for one, and wrestling for one. The following injury patterns were observed: two patients tore their subscapularis tendon, two sustained avulsion fractures of their lesser tuberosity, one tore his rotator interval, one tore his supraspinatus, and one avulsed his greater tuberosity. Only four patients recalled a specific traumatic event. Three patients were treated with arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, three with miniopen repair, and one was treated with rehabilitation. Six of the seven patients returned to their preinjury level of sport after treatment. Rotator cuff tears are rare in the adolescent age group. The injury patterns suggest that acute trauma likely accounts for many rotator cuff tears and their equivalents in the young patient. Adolescents with rotator cuff tears reliably return to sports after treatment. The possibility of rotator cuff tears in skeletally immature athletes should be considered. The prognosis is very good once this injury is identified and treated. PMID:22668571

  16. Clinical Examination of the Rotator Cuff

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Nitin B.; Wilcox, Reginald; Katz, Jeffrey N.; Higgins, Laurence D.

    2013-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears are the leading cause of shoulder pain and shoulder-related disability accounting for 4.5 million physician visits in the United States annually. A careful history and structured physical examination are often sufficient for diagnosing rotator cuff disorders. We are not aware of a clinical review article that presents a structured physical examination protocol of the rotator cuff for the interested clinician. To fill this void, we present a physical examination protocol developed on the basis of review of prior literature and our clinical experience from dedicated shoulder practices. Our protocol includes range of motion testing using a goniometer, strength testing using a dynamometer, and select special tests. Among the many tests for rotator cuff disorders that have been described, we chose ones that have been more thoroughly assessed for sensitivity and specificity. This protocol can be used to isolate the specific rotator cuff tendon involved. The protocol can be typically completed in 15 minutes. We also discuss the clinical implications and limitations of the physical examination maneuvers described in our protocol. This protocol is thorough yet time-efficient for a busy clinical practice. It is useful in diagnosis of rotator cuff tears, impingement syndrome, and biceps pathology. PMID:23332909

  17. Management of persistent vaginitis.

    PubMed

    Nyirjesy, Paul

    2014-12-01

    With vaginitis remaining a common condition that leads women to seek care, it is not surprising that some women develop chronic vulvovaginal problems that are difficult to diagnose and treat. With a differential diagnosis that encompasses vulvar disorders and infectious and noninfectious causes of vaginitis, accurate diagnosis is the cornerstone of choosing effective therapy. Evaluation should include a symptom-specific history, careful vulvar and vaginal examination, and office-based tests (vaginal pH, amine test, saline and 10% potassium hydroxide microscopy). Ancillary tests, especially yeast culture with speciation, are frequently crucial to obtaining a correct diagnosis. A heavy but normal physiologic discharge can be determined by excluding other causes. With vulvovaginal candidiasis, differentiating between Candida albicans and non-albicans Candida infection has important treatment ramifications. Most patients with C albicans infections can be successfully treated with maintenance antifungal therapy, usually with fluconazole. Although many non-albicans Candida, particularly Candida glabrata, may at times be innocent bystanders, vaginal boric acid therapy is an effective first choice for many true non-albicans Candida infections. Recurrent bacterial vaginosis, a difficult therapeutic challenge, can often be controlled with maintenance therapy. Multiple options, especially high-dose tinidazole, have been used for metronidazole-resistant trichomoniasis. With the aging of the U.S. population, atrophic vaginitis and desquamative inflammatory vaginitis, both associated with hypoestrogenism, are encountered frequently in women with persistent vaginitis. PMID:25415165

  18. Vaginal erotic sensitivity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Heli Alzate; Maria Ladi Londono

    1984-01-01

    Vaginal erotic sensitivity was investigated in a group of 48 coitally experienced volunteers by means of systematic digital stimulation of both vaginal walls. It was found that 45 subjects reported erotic sensitivity located in most cases on the upper anterior wall, and of those, 30 (66. 7%) either reached orgasm or requested to stop stimulation short of orgasm. This study

  19. 21 CFR 868.5800 - Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. 868.5800 Section 868.5800 Food and Drugs...DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5800 Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. (a) Identification. A...

  20. 21 CFR 868.5800 - Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. 868.5800 Section 868.5800 Food and Drugs...DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5800 Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. (a) Identification. A...

  1. 21 CFR 868.5800 - Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. 868.5800 Section 868.5800 Food and Drugs...DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5800 Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. (a) Identification. A...

  2. 21 CFR 868.5800 - Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. 868.5800 Section 868.5800 Food and Drugs...DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5800 Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. (a) Identification. A...

  3. Prehospital endotracheal intubation; need for routine cuff pressure measurement?

    PubMed

    Peters, Joost H; Hoogerwerf, Nico

    2013-10-01

    In endotracheal intubation, a secured airway includes an insufflated cuff distal to the vocal cords. High cuff pressures may lead to major complications occurring after a short period of time. Cuff pressures are not routinely checked after intubation in the prehospital setting, dealing with a vulnerable group of patients. We reviewed cuff pressures after intubation by Helicopter Emergency Medical Services and paramedics noted in a dispatch database. Initial cuff pressures are almost all too high, needing adjustment to be in the safe zone. Dutch paramedics lack manometers and, therefore, only few paramedic intubations are followed by cuff pressure measurements. We recommend cuff pressure measurements after all (prehospital) intubations and, therefore, all ambulances need to be equipped with cuff manometers. PMID:23100319

  4. Effect of brachytherapy technique and patient characteristics on cervical cancer implant dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Anker, Christopher J; O'Donnell, Kristen; Boucher, Kenneth M; Gaffney, David K

    2013-01-01

    Our purpose was to evaluate the relationship between brachytherapy technique and patient characteristics on dose to organs-at-risk (OARs) in patients undergoing high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy for cervical cancer. From 1998 to 2008, 31 patients with cervical cancer with full dosimetric data were identified who received definitive external-beam radiation and HDR brachytherapy with tandem and ovoid applicators. Doses were recorded at point A, the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU)-38 rectal point, the ICRU-38 bladder point, the vaginal surface, and the pelvic sidewall. Generalized estimating equations were used to determine the significance of changes in OAR to point A dose ratios with differences in brachytherapy technique or patient characteristics. Patients underwent a median of 5 brachytherapy procedures (range, 3 to 5), with a total of 179 procedures for 31 patients. For all brachytherapy treatments, the average ratios between the doses for the rectal, bladder, vaginal surface, and pelvic sidewall reference points to those at point A were 0.49, 0.59, 1.15, and 0.17, respectively. In general, decreased OAR dose was associated with a lower stage, younger age, increased ovoid size, increased tandem length, and earlier implant number. Increased tandem curvature significantly increased bladder dose and decreased rectal dose. Intravenous anesthesia usage was not correlated with improved dosimetry. This study allowed identification of patient and procedure characteristics influencing OAR dosing. Although the advent of 3-dimensional (3D) image-guided brachytherapy will bring new advances in treatment optimization, the actual technique involved at the time of the brachytherapy implant procedure will remain important. PMID:23973016

  5. Vaginal and Vulvar Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Inside Knowledge: Get the Facts About Gynecologic Cancer campaign. The ... the facts about gynecologic cancer, providing important “inside knowledge” about their bodies and health. What are vaginal ...

  6. Review of Vaginitis

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Adisruption of the dynamic equilibrium of the healthy vagina may have significant sequelae, leading to chronic or serious conditions. Therefore, all cases of vaginitis should be accurately diagnosed and appropriately treated. PMID:18475337

  7. Vaginitis - self-care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of all ages. It can be caused by: Yeast , bacteria, viruses, and parasites Bubble baths, soaps, vaginal ... Creams or suppositories are used to treat yeast infections in the ... at drug stores, some grocery stores, and other stores. Treating ...

  8. Partial-thickness rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Matava, Matthew J; Purcell, Derek B; Rudzki, Jonas R

    2005-09-01

    Partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff have been diagnosed with increased frequency because of a heightened awareness of the condition by clinicians and improved diagnostic methods. Research into the causes, natural history, and optimal treatment of this condition lags behind that of full-thickness tears. However, despite the limitations in the existing literature, there has emerged a consensus among shoulder experts that partial-thickness rotator cuff tears should be aggressively treated in the active athlete because of the unfavorable natural history of these lesions and success of accepted surgical algorithms. This review will provide an overview of the theories regarding the origins of partial-thickness rotator cuff tears, discuss the relative accuracy of accepted diagnostic techniques, and summarize the indications and methods of operative repair with an emphasis on the results of various treatment approaches. PMID:16127127

  9. Morphology of the torn rotator cuff.

    PubMed Central

    Itoi, E; Hsu, H C; Carmichael, S W; Morrey, B F; An, K N

    1995-01-01

    The morphological characteristics of shoulders with torn rotator cuffs were determined using 41 embalmed specimens. The following parameters were measured in the supraspinatus (SSP), infraspinatus (ISP) and subscapularis (SSC) muscles: the length, thickness and width of the extramuscular tendon; the length of the intramuscular tendon; the length and width of a tear, if present, muscle fibre length; and muscle volume. The cross-sectional area (CSA) of the tendon was measured on the photographic image of slices of the tendon using an image analysis system, and the CSA of the muscle was calculated by dividing the muscle volume by muscle fibre length. The rotator cuff was intact in 11 shoulders. A partial-thickness tear of the cuff was present in 12 shoulders, a full-thickness tear of the SSP in 11 shoulders, and a full-thickness tear of more than 2 tendons in 7. Overall incidence of full-thickness tears of the rotator cuff was 44%, and that of partial-thickness tears 29%. With increase of tear size, the functional tendon length (extramuscular tendon length plus tear length) increased by a statistically significant amount in the SSP, ISP and SSC, whereas muscle fibre length decreased in SSP and ISP. It is concluded that the increased functional tendon length and decreased muscle fibre length are the main morphological changes that make the rotator cuff a physiologically abnormal unit. Surgical repair of the torn cuff would be expected to improve these anatomical changes and restore the kinetics of the glenohumeral joint.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Fig. 2 PMID:7649844

  10. Full thickness tears: retaining the cuff.

    PubMed

    Osti, Leonardo; Rizzello, Giacomo; Panascì, Manlio; Denaro, Vincenzo; Maffulli, Nicola

    2011-12-01

    Repair of rotator cuff tears is technically challenging. Full thickness rotator cuff tears have no potential for spontaneous healing, no reliable tendons substitutes are available, and their management is only partially understood. Many factors seem to contribute to the final outcome, and considerable variations in the decision-making process exist. For these reasons, decisions are often taken on the basis of surgeon's clinical experience. Accurate and prompt diagnosis is fundamental to guide correct management, and the tear pattern should be carefully evaluated to planning the most appropriate repair. PMID:22089291

  11. A Novel Device for Intravaginal Electronic Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg (Germany)], E-mail: frank.schneider@umm.de; Fuchs, Holger [Carl Zeiss Surgical GmbH, Oberkochen (Germany); Lorenz, Friedlieb; Steil, Volker [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg (Germany); Ziglio, Francesco [Ospedale S. Chiara, Trento, Fisica Sanitaria, Trento (Italy); Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta; Lohr, Frank; Wenz, Frederik [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg (Germany)

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: Postoperative intravaginal brachytherapy for endometrial carcinoma is usually performed with {sup 192}Ir high-dose rate (HDR) afterloading. A potential alternative is treatment with a broadband 50kV X-ray point source, the advantage being its low energy and the consequential steep dose gradient. The aim of this study was to create and evaluate a homogeneous cylindrical energy deposition around a newly designed vaginal applicator. Methods and Materials: To create constant isodose layers along the cylindrical plastic vaginal applicator, the source (INTRABEAM system) was moved in steps of 17-19.5 mm outward from the tip of the applicator. Irradiation for a predetermined time was performed at each position. The axial shift was established by a stepping mechanism that was mounted on a table support. The total dose/dose distribution was determined using film dosimetry (Gafchromic EBT) in a 'solid water' phantom. The films were evaluated with Mathematica 5.2 and OmniPro-I'mRT 1.6. The results (dose D0/D5/D10 in 0/5/10 mm tissue depth) were compared with an {sup 192}Ir HDR afterloading plan for multiple sampling points around the applicator. Results: Three different dose distributions with lengths of 3.9-7.3 cm were created. The irradiation time based on the delivery of 5/7 Gy to a 5 mm tissue depth was 19/26 min to 27/38 min. D0/D5/D10 was 150%/100%/67% for electronic brachytherapy and 140%/100%/74% for the afterloading technique. The deviation for repeated measurements in the phantom was <7%. Conclusions: It is possible to create a homogeneous cylindrical dose distribution, similar to {sup 192}Ir HDR afterloading, through the superimposition of multiple spherical dose distributions by stepping a kilovolt point source.

  12. Biological aspects of rotator cuff healing

    PubMed Central

    Wildemann, Britt; Klatte, Franka

    2011-01-01

    Summary Tendon tears of the rotator cuff show a high prevalence in today’s population. Patients suffer from permanent pain and disability, and surgical reconstruction may be the only possibility for abatement. The complex process of tendon-bone healing leads to mechanically inferior scar-tissue, which often results in retears or non-healing. In the current literature, factors such as patients age, sex and fatty muscle infiltration are highly correlated to the presence of rotator cuff tears and the incidence of retears. To improve the tendon tissue quality after surgical reconstructions biologically based strategies with use of growth factors arouse more and more interest in the last years. However, to optimize the treatment of rotator cuff tears the biological background of tears and retears must be investigated in more detail. This article will elucidate different aspects that have an impact on rotator cuff healing and give a brief insight in tendon/ligament cell culture and animal studies focusing on growth factor treatments. PMID:23738265

  13. Regenerative medicine in rotator cuff injuries.

    PubMed

    Randelli, Pietro; Randelli, Filippo; Ragone, Vincenza; Menon, Alessandra; D'Ambrosi, Riccardo; Cucchi, Davide; Cabitza, Paolo; Banfi, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Rotator cuff injuries are a common source of shoulder pathology and result in an important decrease in quality of patient life. Given the frequency of these injuries, as well as the relatively poor result of surgical intervention, it is not surprising that new and innovative strategies like tissue engineering have become more appealing. Tissue-engineering strategies involve the use of cells and/or bioactive factors to promote tendon regeneration via natural processes. The ability of numerous growth factors to affect tendon healing has been extensively analyzed in vitro and in animal models, showing promising results. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a whole blood fraction which contains several growth factors. Controlled clinical studies using different autologous PRP formulations have provided controversial results. However, favourable structural healing rates have been observed for surgical repair of small and medium rotator cuff tears. Cell-based approaches have also been suggested to enhance tendon healing. Bone marrow is a well known source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Recently, ex vivo human studies have isolated and cultured distinct populations of MSCs from rotator cuff tendons, long head of the biceps tendon, subacromial bursa, and glenohumeral synovia. Stem cells therapies represent a novel frontier in the management of rotator cuff disease that required further basic and clinical research. PMID:25184132

  14. Control device for prosthetic urinary sphincter cuff

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinicke, Robert H. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A device for controlling flow of fluid to and from a resilient inflatable cuff implanted about the urethra to control flow of urine therethrough. The device comprises a flexible bulb reservoir and a control unit that includes a manually operated valve that opens automatically when the bulb is squeezed to force fluid into the cuff for closing the urethra. The control unit also includes a movable valve seat member having a relatively large area exposed to pressure of fluid in a chamber that is connected to the cuff and which moves to a position in which the valve member is unseated by an abutment when fluid pressure in the chamber exceeds a predetermined value to thereby relieve excess fluid pressure in the cuff. The arrangement is such that the valve element is held closed against the seat member by the full differential in fluid pressures acting on both sides of the valve element until the seat member is moved away from the valve element to thus insure positive closing of the valve element until the seat member is moved out of engagement with the valve element by excess pressure differential.

  15. Partial-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Although the incidence of partial-thickness rotator cuff tears (PTRCTs) was reported to be from 13% to 32% in cadaveric studies, the actual incidence is not yet known. The causes of PTRCTs can be explained by either extrinsic or intrinsic theories. Studies suggest that intrinsic degeneration within the rotator cuff is the principal factor in the pathogenesis of rotator cuff tears. Extrinsic causes include subacromial impingement, acute traumatic events, and repetitive microtrauma. However, acromially initiated rotator cuff pathology does not occur and extrinsic impingement does not cause pathology on the articular side of the tendon. An arthroscopic classification system has been developed based on the location and depth of the tear. These include the articular, bursal, and intratendinous areas. Both ultrasound and magnetic resonance image are reported with a high accuracy of 87%. Conservative treatment, such as subacromial or intra-articular injections and suprascapular nerve block with or without block of the articular branches of the circumflex nerve, should be considered prior to operative treatment for PTRCTs. PMID:21716613

  16. Regenerative Medicine in Rotator Cuff Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Randelli, Pietro; Ragone, Vincenza; Menon, Alessandra; Cabitza, Paolo; Banfi, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Rotator cuff injuries are a common source of shoulder pathology and result in an important decrease in quality of patient life. Given the frequency of these injuries, as well as the relatively poor result of surgical intervention, it is not surprising that new and innovative strategies like tissue engineering have become more appealing. Tissue-engineering strategies involve the use of cells and/or bioactive factors to promote tendon regeneration via natural processes. The ability of numerous growth factors to affect tendon healing has been extensively analyzed in vitro and in animal models, showing promising results. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a whole blood fraction which contains several growth factors. Controlled clinical studies using different autologous PRP formulations have provided controversial results. However, favourable structural healing rates have been observed for surgical repair of small and medium rotator cuff tears. Cell-based approaches have also been suggested to enhance tendon healing. Bone marrow is a well known source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Recently, ex vivo human studies have isolated and cultured distinct populations of MSCs from rotator cuff tendons, long head of the biceps tendon, subacromial bursa, and glenohumeral synovia. Stem cells therapies represent a novel frontier in the management of rotator cuff disease that required further basic and clinical research. PMID:25184132

  17. Subacromial volume and rotator cuff tears

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Anthony; Avramis, Ioannis A; Argintar, Evan H; White, Eric R; Villacis, Diego C; Hatch III, George F Rick

    2015-01-01

    Background: Rotator cuff pathology occurs commonly and its cause is likely multifocal in origin. The development and progression of rotator cuff injury, especially in relation to extrinsic shoulder compression, remain unclear. Traditionally, certain acromial morphologies have been thought to contribute to rotator cuff injury by physically decreasing the subacromial space. The relationship between subacromial space volume and rotator cuff tears (RCT) has, however, never been experimentally confirmed. In this study, we retrospectively compared a control patient population to patients with partial or complete RCTs in an attempt to quantify the relationship between subacromial volume and tear type. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively identified a total of 46 eligible patients who each had shoulder magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed from January to December of 2008. These patients were stratified into control, partial RCT, and full-thickness RCT groups. Subacromial volume was estimated for each patient by averaging five sequential MRI measurements of subacromial cross-sectional areas. These volumes were compared between control and experimental groups using the Student's t-test. Results: With the numbers available, there was no statistically significant difference in subacromial volume measured between: the control group and patients diagnosed partial RCT (P > 0.339), the control group and patients with complete RCTs (P > 0.431). Conclusion: We conclude that subacromial volumes cannot be reliably used to predict RCT type. PMID:26015629

  18. Vaginal itching and discharge - child

    MedlinePLUS

    Pruritus vulvae; Itching - vaginal area; Vulvar itching ... Common causes of vaginal itching and discharge in young girls include: Chemicals such as perfumes and dyes in detergents, fabric softeners, creams, ointments, ...

  19. Aerobic vaginitis in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Donders, Ggg; Bellen, G; Rezeberga, D

    2011-09-01

    Aerobic vaginitis (AV) is an alteration in vaginal bacterial flora that differs from bacterial vaginosis (BV). AV is characterised by an abnormal vaginal microflora accompanied by an increased localised inflammatory reaction and immune response, as opposed to the suppressed immune response that is characteristic of BV. Given the increased local production of interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6 and IL-8 associated with AV during pregnancy, not surprisingly AV is associated with an increased risk of preterm delivery, chorioamnionitis and funisitis of the fetus. There is no consensus on the optimal treatment for AV in pregnant or non-pregnant women, but a broader spectrum drug such as clindamycin is preferred above metronidazole to prevent infection-related preterm birth. The exact role of AV in pregnancy, the potential benefit of screening, and the use of newer local antibiotics, disinfectants, probiotics and immune modulators need further study. PMID:21668769

  20. Vaginal Toxic Shock Reaction Triggering Desquamative Inflammatory Vaginitis

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Nigel; Edlind, Thomas D.; Schlievert, Patrick M.; Nyirjesy, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Objective To report two cases of desquamative inflammatory vaginitis (DIV) associated with toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1)-producing Staphylococcus aureus strains. Materials and Methods Case report of two patients, one with an acute and one with a chronic presentation, diagnosed with DIV on the basis of clinical findings and wet mount microscopy. Pre- and posttreatment vaginal bacterial and yeast cultures were obtained. Results Pretreatment vaginal bacterial cultures from both patients grew TSST-1-producing S. aureus. Subsequent vaginal bacterial cultures following oral antibiotic therapy were negative. Conclusions DIV may be triggered through TSST-1-mediated vaginal toxic shock reaction. PMID:23222054

  1. Dosimetric audit in brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Palmer, A L; Bradley, D A; Nisbet, A

    2014-09-01

    Dosimetric audit is required for the improvement of patient safety in radiotherapy and to aid optimization of treatment. The reassurance that treatment is being delivered in line with accepted standards, that delivered doses are as prescribed and that quality improvement is enabled is as essential for brachytherapy as it is for the more commonly audited external beam radiotherapy. Dose measurement in brachytherapy is challenging owing to steep dose gradients and small scales, especially in the context of an audit. Several different approaches have been taken for audit measurement to date: thimble and well-type ionization chambers, thermoluminescent detectors, optically stimulated luminescence detectors, radiochromic film and alanine. In this work, we review all of the dosimetric brachytherapy audits that have been conducted in recent years, look at current audits in progress and propose required directions for brachytherapy dosimetric audit in the future. The concern over accurate source strength measurement may be essentially resolved with modern equipment and calibration methods, but brachytherapy is a rapidly developing field and dosimetric audit must keep pace. PMID:24807068

  2. Rotator Cuff Deficient Arthritis of the Glenohumeral Joint

    PubMed Central

    Macaulay, Alec A.; Greiwe, R. Michael

    2010-01-01

    Rotator cuff deficient arthritis of the glenohumeral joint, especially cuff tear arthropathy, has proved a challenging clinical entity for orthopaedic surgeons ever since Charles Neer originally detailed the problem in 1983. Understanding has improved regarding the pathophysiology and pathomechanics underlying cuff tear arthropathy. Surgical reconstruction options can lead to excellent outcomes for patients afflicted with these painful and functionally limited shoulders. Humeral hemiarthroplasty and reverse total shoulder arthroplasty have jumped to the forefront in the treatment of cuff tear arthropathy. As studies continue to look at the results of these procedures in cuff tear arthropathy, existing indications and treatment algorithms will be further refined. In this article the history and pathophysiology of cuff tear arthropathy are reviewed. Additionally, the clinical findings and results of surgical reconstruction are discussed. PMID:21119934

  3. INJURIES OF THE MUSCULOTENDINOUS CUFF OF THE SHOULDER

    PubMed Central

    Blanche, Donald W.

    1953-01-01

    Injuries of the musculotendinous cuff are frequent and often cause long periods of disability. The cuff is subject to progressive degenerative changes which are visible microscopically in most persons past 30 years of age, and visible grossly in those past 40. The cuff ruptures through areas of degeneration. A great majority of patients recover good shoulder function under conservative treatment. Operation is not urgent. Accurate diagnosis of a complete tear of the cuff cannot be made until the acute phase of injury has passed, and delay in operating does not decrease chances of good results. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2. PMID:13059640

  4. Sphygmomanometer cuffs: a potential source of infection!

    PubMed

    Zargaran, David; Hardwick, Sarah; Adel, Reeja; Hill, George; Stubbins, Daniel; Salmasi, Abdul Majeed

    2015-02-01

    We evaluated the potential pathogenic hazard of sphygmomanometer blood pressure cuffs (BPCs) in a hospital setting. Prospectively, the presence of bacterial organisms on 120 BPCs in 14 medical wards and outpatient clinics in a district general hospital in London was assessed. Swabs taken from the inner aspect of the cuffs were cultured using standard microbiological techniques. Bacterial organisms were found in 85% (102) of the 120 BPCs assessed. The highest rates of contamination were found in the outpatients department (90%). There were differences in the most common bacterial species isolated between the samples obtained from the outpatient clinics and the wards, with coagulase-negative Staphylococcus and diphtheroids being the most prevalent species in the wards and outpatient clinics, respectively. These findings highlight the necessity to eliminate this potential risk of infection. PMID:24569512

  5. Anomalous biceps origin from the rotator cuff.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Samik; Patel, Vipul R

    2015-01-01

    Variations in the origin of the long head of biceps tendon (LHBT) have been described in literature; however, its clinical significance remains uncertain. We describe in this report, the history, physical examination and the arthroscopic findings in a patient who had an anomalous origin of the LHBT from the rotator cuff, resulting in restriction of range of motion. This anomalous origin of the long head of biceps tendon causing capsular contracture and restriction of movements leading to secondary internal impingement, has not been extensively reported in the literature. Shoulder arthroscopists should be aware that, although, an uncommon clinical condition, the aberrant congenital origin of the LHBT from the rotator cuff can rarely become pathologic in middle age and lead to shoulder dysfunction. In such cases, release of the anomalous band may be required, along with the treatment of other concomitant intraarticular pathologies in the glenohumeral joint. PMID:25593361

  6. Symptomatic Progression of Asymptomatic Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Mall, Nathan A.; Kim, H. Mike; Keener, Jay D.; Steger-May, Karen; Teefey, Sharlene A.; Middleton, William D.; Stobbs, Georgia; Yamaguchi, Ken

    2010-01-01

    Background: The purposes of this study were to identify changes in tear dimensions, shoulder function, and glenohumeral kinematics when an asymptomatic rotator cuff tear becomes painful and to identify characteristics of individuals who develop pain compared with those who remain asymptomatic. Methods: A cohort of 195 subjects with an asymptomatic rotator cuff tear was prospectively monitored for pain development and examined annually for changes in various parameters such as tear size, fatty degeneration of the rotator cuff muscle, glenohumeral kinematics, and shoulder function. Forty-four subjects were found to have developed new pain, and the parameters before and after pain development were compared. The forty-four subjects were then compared with a group of fifty-five subjects who remained asymptomatic over a two-year period. Results: With pain development, the size of a full-thickness rotator cuff tear increased significantly, with 18% of the full-thickness tears showing an increase of >5 mm, and 40% of the partial-thickness tears had progressed to a full-thickness tear. In comparison with the assessments made before the onset of pain, the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scores for shoulder function were significantly decreased and all measures of shoulder range of motion were decreased except for external rotation at 90° of abduction. There was an increase in compensatory scapulothoracic motion in relation to the glenohumeral motion during early shoulder abduction with pain development. No significant changes were found in external rotation strength or muscular fatty degeneration. Compared with the subjects who remained asymptomatic, the subjects who developed pain were found to have significantly larger tears at the time of initial enrollment. Conclusions: Pain development in shoulders with an asymptomatic rotator cuff tear is associated with an increase in tear size. Larger tears are more likely to develop pain in the short term than are smaller tears. Further research is warranted to investigate the role of prophylactic treatment of asymptomatic shoulders to avoid the development of pain and loss of shoulder function. Level of Evidence: Prognostic Level III. See Instructions to Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:21084574

  7. Heterogeneity of vaginal microbial communities within individuals.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Kyung; Thomas, Susan M; Ho, Mengfei; Sharma, Shobha; Reich, Claudia I; Frank, Jeremy A; Yeater, Kathleen M; Biggs, Diana R; Nakamura, Noriko; Stumpf, Rebecca; Leigh, Steven R; Tapping, Richard I; Blanke, Steven R; Slauch, James M; Gaskins, H Rex; Weisbaum, Jon S; Olsen, Gary J; Hoyer, Lois L; Wilson, Brenda A

    2009-04-01

    Recent culture-independent studies have revealed that a healthy vaginal ecosystem harbors a surprisingly complex assemblage of microorganisms. However, the spatial distribution and composition of vaginal microbial populations have not been investigated using molecular methods. Here, we evaluated site-specific microbial composition within the vaginal ecosystem and examined the influence of sampling technique in detection of the vaginal microbiota. 16S rRNA gene clone libraries were prepared from samples obtained from different locations (cervix, fornix, outer vaginal canal) and by different methods (swabbing, scraping, lavaging) from the vaginal tracts of eight clinically healthy, asymptomatic women. The data reveal that the vaginal microbiota is not homogenous throughout the vaginal tract but differs significantly within an individual with regard to anatomical site and sampling method used. Thus, this study illuminates the complex structure of the vaginal ecosystem and calls for the consideration of microenvironments when sampling vaginal microbiota as a clinical predictor of vaginal health. PMID:19158255

  8. Treatment of vaginal atrophy.

    PubMed

    Domoney, Claudine

    2014-03-01

    Vaginal or vulvovaginal atrophy is a widespread but poorly recognized condition of peri- and post-menopausal women. It causes urogenital symptoms of dryness, reduced lubrication, itching, burning, irritable bladder symptoms and painful intercourse. This impacts quality of life and sexual health, but increases with time rather than reduces, as with most other menopausal symptoms. With early identification, treatments can improve these symptoms and reverse the physical changes. However, when embedded, bladder and sexual changes have occurred and these may be more difficult to remedy. Therefore, it is important to educate both healthcare professionals and women about these symptoms and advise on the range of interventions available. PMID:24601810

  9. Vaginal extrusion of a ventriculo-peritoneal shunt catheter in an adult

    PubMed Central

    Bonfield, Christopher M.; Weiner, Gregory M.; Bradley, Megan S.; Engh, Johnathan A.

    2015-01-01

    Ventriculo-peritoneal shunts (VPS) are commonly used in the treatment of various neurosurgical conditions, including hydrocephalus and pseudotumor cerebri. We report only the second case of vaginal extrusion of a VPS catheter in an adult, and the first case with a modern VPS silastic peritoneal catheter. A 45-year-old female with a history of VPS for pseudotumor cerebri, Behcet's syndrome, and hysterectomy presented to our institution with the chief complaint of tubing protruding from her vagina after urination. On gynecologic examination, the patient was found to have approximately 15 cm of VPS catheter protruding from her vaginal apex. A computed tomography scan of the abdomen and shunt X-ray series demonstrated no breaks in the tubing, but also confirmed the finding of the VPS catheter extruding through the vaginal cuff into the vagina. The patient had the VPS removed and an external ventricular drain was placed for temporary cerebrospinal fluid diversion. Ventricular catheter cultures were positive for diphtheroids. After an appropriate course of antibiotics, a contralateral ventriculo-pleural shunt was placed one week later. Although vary rare, vaginal extrusion can occur in adults, even with modern VPS catheters. PMID:25552862

  10. Vaginitis, cervicitis, and cervical length in pregnancy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jantien J. Boomgaard; Karin S. Dekker; Elsabet van Rensburg; Corlia van den Berg; Illse Niemand; Roosmarie H. Bam; Hendrik S. Cronjé

    1999-01-01

    Objective: We sought to determine the possible association among vaginitis, cervicitis, and cervical length in pregnancy. Study Design: Primigravid volunteers, between 20 and 36 weeks’ gestation (n = 210), were examined. Vaginitis was diagnosed by pH determination and wet mount smear, cervicitis was diagnosed by cervicography, and cervical length was diagnosed by vaginal ultrasonographic measurement. Patients with both vaginitis and

  11. Profile soft-seal cuff, a new endotracheal tube, effectively inhibits an increase in the cuff pressure through high compliance rather than low diffusion of nitrous oxide.

    PubMed

    Karasawa, F; Mori, T; Okuda, T; Satoh, T

    2001-01-01

    We assessed the nitrous oxide (N(2)O) gas-barrier properties of a new endotracheal tube cuff, the Profile Soft-Seal Cuff (PSSC) (Sims Portex, Kent, UK). The tracheas of randomly selected patients were intubated with the Trachelon (Terumo, Tokyo, Japan), Profile Cuff (PC) (Sims Portex), or PSSC (n = 15 for each) endotracheal tube. Cuffs were inflated with air, and intracuff pressure was measured during anesthesia with 67% N(2)O. The concentration of N(2)O in cuffs was measured at the end of anesthesia. Postoperative sore throat was assessed. The volume-pressure relationship and thickness of the cuff were also measured. Cuff pressure, which increased gradually during anesthesia, was significantly less in the PSSC and PC groups than in the Trachelon group. The PSSC had smaller pressure than the PC 120 min after the start of anesthesia (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences in the N(2)O concentration in cuffs among the groups, although the PSSC had the thinnest cuff with the highest compliance. The incidence of postoperative sore throat in the Trachelon group was significantly higher than in the other two groups. In summary, the PSSC effectively inhibits an increase in cuff pressure during anesthesia with N(2)O. The underlying mechanism is probably the higher compliance of the thinner cuff, rather than a reduction in N(2)O diffusion into the cuff. PMID:11133616

  12. Comparative histological analysis of anterior vaginal wall in women with pelvic organ prolapse or control subjects. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Badiou, Wassim; Granier, Guillaume; Bousquet, Philippe-Jean; Monrozies, Xavier; Mares, Pierre; de Tayrac, Renaud

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare smooth muscle content of anterior vaginal wall in women with pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and control subjects. Specimens were taken in the midline from the apex of anterior vaginal cuff from eleven women with POP and eight control subjects operated for hysterectomy without prolapse. Masson's trichrome stain was used to determine the distribution of collagen in the extracellular matrix of the vaginal muscularis and to quantify the collagen in area of interest. Slides of alpha smooth muscle actin were detected using antibodies. Morphometric analysis was used to compare and to quantify the smooth muscle content of the vaginal muscularis. Fractional area of nonvascular vaginal smooth muscle of women with POP was significantly decreased in comparison to control subjects (41.9 vs 61.9%, p = 0.005). Fractional area of connective tissue was significantly increased (56.8 vs 35%, p = 0.004). Fractional area of blood vessels was similar (2.2 vs 3.4%, p = 0.20). PMID:18183343

  13. Dual-camera technique for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Tuttle, John R; Ramos, Paul; DaSilva, Manuel F

    2014-12-01

    An all-arthroscopic rotator cuff repair demands a high level of technical skill and is associated with a steep learning curve. It is well accepted that small rotator cuff tears or partial tears can be more difficult than large or even massive tears to repair. Part of the reason is the difficulty in visualizing the tear, as well as important surrounding structures, during repair. To improve visibility during the repair process, we have introduced a second arthroscopic camera. Two cameras allow the surgeon to observe the rotator cuff from both the articular and bursal sides. We find this technique has merit in small or partial-thickness rotator cuff tears; however, there may be other applications. PMID:25685668

  14. Dual-Camera Technique for Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Tuttle, John R.; Ramos, Paul; DaSilva, Manuel F.

    2014-01-01

    An all-arthroscopic rotator cuff repair demands a high level of technical skill and is associated with a steep learning curve. It is well accepted that small rotator cuff tears or partial tears can be more difficult than large or even massive tears to repair. Part of the reason is the difficulty in visualizing the tear, as well as important surrounding structures, during repair. To improve visibility during the repair process, we have introduced a second arthroscopic camera. Two cameras allow the surgeon to observe the rotator cuff from both the articular and bursal sides. We find this technique has merit in small or partial-thickness rotator cuff tears; however, there may be other applications. PMID:25685668

  15. Massive Rotator Cuff Tear in an Adolescent Athlete

    PubMed Central

    Turman, Kimberly A.; Anderson, Mark W.; Miller, Mark D.

    2010-01-01

    Full-thickness rotator cuff tears in the young athlete are a rare injury. These injuries typically result from an acute traumatic event in a contact athlete, as opposed to overuse injuries more commonly seen in throwing athletes. Acute tears may be initially overlooked, with the symptoms attributed to other, more common causes, such as cuff contusion or brachial plexus neuropraxia (“stinger” or “burner”). If undiagnosed, the tear may progress to an irreparable state at the time of eventual diagnosis. Therefore, rotator cuff tear must be included in the differential for acute shoulder injuries in the young athlete. This article presents a case of an adolescent athlete with a traumatic, massive rotator cuff tear that was diagnosed and managed promptly with excellent outcome. PMID:23015923

  16. [Treatment of uterine prolapse and vaginal vault by vaginal route].

    PubMed

    de Tayrac, R; Letouzey, V; Costa, P; Haab, F; Delmas, V

    2009-12-01

    All the prolapses of the median compartment (uterine or vault prolapse) of the pelvis have the same physiopathology. The surgical treatment must be reserved to symptomatic patients. Hysterectomy is discussed. The gold standard of the vaginal way is the sacrospinofixation (Richter procedure) Many other procedures are possible: colpofixation or colpocléisis. On young premenopausal women, the abdominal sacrofixation is the gold standard, but in postmenopausal ones, the vaginal way, specially the sacrospinofixation, is quicker and with less morbidity and hospitalization. PMID:19969278

  17. Five-year cure of cervical cancer treated using californium-252 neutron brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, Y.; van Nagell, J.R.; Yoneda, J.; Donaldson, E.; Hanson, M.; Martin, A.; Wilson, L.C.; Coffey, C.W.; Feola, J.; Beach, J.L.

    1984-10-01

    Female pelvic carcinoma is one of the common malignancies seen at the University of Kentucky Medical Center and often presents in an advanced stage. In 1976, the authors began to test californium-252 neutron brachytherapy (NT) for its efficacy for control of primary and recurrent advanced uterine, cervix, and vaginal cancers. The first protocol used was 5000-5500 rad of whole pelvis irradiation followed by 1-2 Cf-252 insertions using a single tandem placed in the utero-cervico-vaginal region. Of 27 patients with primary carcinomas treated, 10 are alive and well 5 year later (37%). Two of two recurrent tumors were locally controlled but failed later. These patients had advanced cervical, vaginal, or endometrial carcinomas. In 1977, a transitional year, treatment of only unfavorable stages and presentations with NT was initiated. Similar results were obtained with NT as compared to conventional photon therapy (PT). Further improvement in treatment results can be anticipated as NT brachytherapy is used for advanced cancer therapy by more effective treatment schedules and radiation doses. Cf-252 can be used as a radium substitute and achieved similar rates of tumor control and 5-year survivals. 21 references, 2 tables.

  18. Transverse vaginal septum with congenital vesical-vaginal communication and cyclical hematuria.

    PubMed

    Chin, Arnold I; Rutman, Matthew; Raz, Shlomo

    2007-03-01

    Cyclical hematuria is an unusual presentation of a müllerian fusion anomaly. We report a patient with transverse vaginal septum and menstruation by way of the lower urinary tract because of a vesical-vaginal communication. A defect of vertical fusion, transverse vaginal septum results from failure of canalization of the vaginal plate. Reconstruction using a transvaginal and transabdominal approach created a direct anastomosis between the proximal vaginal segment and the distal vaginal pouch. Previously described cases are reviewed. PMID:17382175

  19. Drugs Approved for Vaginal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to prevent vaginal cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  20. Desquamative inflammatory vaginitis. A review.

    PubMed Central

    Oates, J K; Rowen, D

    1990-01-01

    Desquamative inflammatory vaginitis is an uncommon cause of an intractable vaginitis often accompanied by serious dyspareunia, which can occur at any stage of reproductive life and after the menopause. The cytological changes are identical with those seen in atrophic vaginitis yet the disorder often occurs in the presence of apparently normal ovarian function. Vaginal synechiae and stenosis develop in an appreciable number of patients. Treatment is unsatisfactory though there is some response to either local or systemic steroid therapy. The literature is reviewed and the association of some cases with lichen planus of the mouth and genitals discussed. Its causation and natural history remain largely unknown and there is as yet, insufficient evidence to regard it as a single entity. It is likely that the incidence of the disorder is underestimated. PMID:2202657

  1. Location and Initiation of Degenerative Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Kim, H. Mike; Dahiya, Nirvikar; Teefey, Sharlene A.; Middleton, William D.; Stobbs, Georgia; Steger-May, Karen; Yamaguchi, Ken; Keener, Jay D.

    2010-01-01

    Background: It has been theorized that degenerative rotator cuff tears most commonly involve the supraspinatus tendon, initiating at the anterior portion of the supraspinatus insertion and propagating posteriorly. The purposes of this study were to determine the most common location of degenerative rotator cuff tears and to examine tear location patterns associated with various tear sizes. Methods: Ultrasonograms of 360 shoulders with either a full-thickness rotator cuff tear (272) or a partial-thickness rotator cuff tear (eighty-eight) were obtained to measure the width and length of the tear and the distance from the biceps tendon to the anterior margin of the tear. Tears were grouped on the basis of their size (anteroposterior width) and extent (partial or full-thickness). Each tear was represented numerically as a column of consecutive numbers representing the tear width and distance posterior to the biceps tendon. All tears were pooled to graphically represent the width and location of the tears within groups. Frequency histograms of the pooled data were generated, and the mode was determined for each histogram representing various tear groups. Results: The mean age (and standard deviation) of the 233 subjects (360 shoulders) was 64.7 ± 10.2 years. The mean width and length of the tears were 16.3 ± 12.1 mm and 17.0 ± 13.0 mm, respectively. The mean distance from the biceps tendon to the anterior tear margin was 7.8 ± 5.7 mm (range, 0 to 26 mm). Histograms of the various tear groups invariably showed the location of 15 to 16 mm posterior to the biceps tendon to be the most commonly torn location within the posterior cuff tendons. The histograms of small tears (a width of <10 mm) and partial-thickness tears showed similar distributions of tear locations, indicating that the region approximately 15 mm posterior to the biceps tendon may be where rotator cuff tears most commonly initiate. Conclusions: Degenerative rotator cuff tears most commonly involve a posterior location, near the junction of the supraspinatus and infraspinatus. The patterns of tear location across multiple tear sizes suggest that degenerative cuff tears may initiate in a region 13 to 17 mm posterior to the biceps tendon. Clinical Relevance: The findings of this study speak to the specific location of the most common type of rotator cuff lesions, degenerative rotator cuff tears. PMID:20439653

  2. Definitive radiotherapy in the management of isolated vaginal recurrences of endometrial cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Lilie L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University Medical School, St. Louis, MO (United States); Grigsby, Perry W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University Medical School, St. Louis, MO (United States) and Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, St. Louis, MO (United States)]. E-mail: pgrigsby@wustl.edu; Powell, Matthew A. [Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, St. Louis, MO (United States); Division Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Washington University Medical School, St. Louis, MO (United States); Mutch, David G. [Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, St. Louis, MO (United States); Division Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Washington University Medical School, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2005-10-01

    Purpose: The aim of our study was to assess prognostic factors and overall survival after salvage radiotherapy for patients who had endometrial carcinoma and who experienced an isolated vaginal recurrence. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the records of 50 patients treated at our institution between 1967 and 2003 for an isolated vaginal recurrence of endometrial carcinoma. Initial treatment for endometrial carcinoma was definitive surgery in 49 patients and definitive radiotherapy in 1 patient. The median time from initial diagnosis of endometrial carcinoma to recurrence was 25 months (range, 4-179 months). Three patients (6%) received external-beam radiotherapy alone, 8 patients (16%) received brachytherapy only, and 39 patients (78%) received combined external-beam radiation therapy and brachytherapy. Median dose of radiation to the recurrence was 60 Gy (range, 16-85 Gy). Overall survival was calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Endpoints were measured from the date of diagnosis of the vaginal recurrence. Median follow-up of survivors after recurrence was 53 months (range, 8-159 months). Results: The 5-year and 10-year disease-free and overall survivals were 68% and 55%, and 53% and 40%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, age (p = 0.0242), Grade 1 or 2 vs. Grade 3 tumor (p = 0.002), and size of recurrence (p < 0.001) were significant predictors of overall survival. All patients who had Grade 3 disease were dead by 3.6 years from the time of recurrence. Five patients experienced a Grade 3 or 4 complication. Conclusions: Patients treated with radiotherapy for an isolated vaginal recurrence can be cured in over 50% the cases. Radiotherapy is well tolerated, with a low risk of complications. Factors predictive of overall survival include tumor grade, patient age at recurrence, and tumor size.

  3. Intraoral angiosarcoma: treatment with a brachytherapy prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Evan B; Ko, Eugene; Wolden, Suzanne; Huryn, Joseph M; Estilo, Cherry L

    2015-03-01

    Angiosarcomas are rare, malignant neoplasms of vascular origin that account for less than 1% of all soft tissue tumors. Angiosarcomas of the oral cavity are especially rare, and brachytherapy may be prescribed as a localized treatment to manage these malignancies. Intraoral brachytherapy requires collaboration between the radiation oncologist and a dental professional for the fabrication of the brachytherapy delivery prosthesis. This clinical report describes an intraoral angiosarcoma and the fabrication of an intraoral brachytherapy prosthesis to manage this malignancy. PMID:25449613

  4. Impingement is not impingement: the case for calling it “Rotator Cuff Disease”

    PubMed Central

    McFarland, Edward G.; Maffulli, Nicola; Del Buono, Angelo; Murrell, George A. C.; Garzon-Muvdi, Juan; Petersen, Steve A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Historically, many causes have been proposed for rotator cuff conditions. The most prevalent theory is that the rotator cuff tendons, especially the supraspinatus, make contact with the acromion and coracoacromial ligament, resulting in pain and eventual tearing of the tendon. However, more recent evidence suggests that this concept does not explain the changes in rotator cuff tendons with age. The role of acromioplasty and coracoacromial ligament release in the treatment of rotator cuff disease has become questioned. Evidence now suggests that tendinopathy associated with aging may be a predominant factor in the development of rotator cuff degeneration. We propose that the overwhelming evidence favors factors other than “impingement” as the major cause of rotator cuff disease and that a paradigm shift in the way the development of rotator cuff pathology is conceptualized allows for a more comprehensive approach to the care of the patient with rotator cuff disease. PMID:24367779

  5. Should helical tomotherapy replace brachytherapy for cervical cancer? Case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) administered via a helical tomotherapy (HT) system is an effective modality for treating lung cancer and metastatic liver tumors. Whether SBRT delivered via HT is a feasible alternative to brachytherapy in treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer in patients with unusual anatomic configurations of the uterus has never been studied. Case Presentation A 46-year-old woman presented with an 8-month history of abnormal vaginal bleeding. Biopsy revealed squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a cervical tumor with direct invasion of the right parametrium, bilateral hydronephrosis, and multiple uterine myomas. International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IIIB cervical cancer was diagnosed. Concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) followed by SBRT delivered via HT was administered instead of brachytherapy because of the presence of multiple uterine myomas with bleeding tendency. Total abdominal hysterectomy was performed after 6 weeks of treatment because of the presence of multiple uterine myomas. Neither pelvic MRI nor results of histopathologic examination at X-month follow-up showed evidence of tumor recurrence. Only grade 1 nausea and vomiting during treatment were noted. Lower gastrointestinal bleeding was noted at 14-month follow-up. No fistula formation and no evidence of haematological, gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicities were noted on the most recent follow-up. Conclusions CCRT followed by SBRT appears to be an effective and safe modality for treatment of cervical cancer. Larger-scale studies are warranted. PMID:21092235

  6. Sexual function after permanent prostate brachytherapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. W. Galbreath; G. S. Merrick; W. M. Butler; R. L. Stipetich; L. J. Abel; J. H. Lief

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of potency preservation following permanent prostate brachytherapy and to evaluate the effect of multiple clinical and treatment parameters on penile erectile function.Materials and Methods: 425 patients underwent permanent prostate brachytherapy from April 1995 to October 1999. 209 patients who were potent prior to brachytherapy and currently not receiving hormonal manipulation were mailed an International Index

  7. Conformal Brachytherapy Planning for Cervical Cancer Using Transabdominal Ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dyk, Sylvia [Radiation Therapy Services, Peter MacCallum Cancer Center, East Melbourne (Australia)], E-mail: sylvia.vandyk@petermac.org; Narayan, Kailash [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Center, East Melbourne (Australia); Fisher, Richard [Center for Biostatistics and Clinical Trials, Peter MacCallum Cancer Center, East Melbourne (Australia); Bernshaw, David [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Center, East Melbourne (Australia)

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: To determine if transabdominal ultrasound (US) can be used for conformal brachytherapy in cervical cancer patients. Materials and Methods: Seventy-one patients with locoregionally advanced cervix cancer treated with chemoradiation and brachytherapy were included in this study. The protocol consisted of US-assisted tandem insertion and conformal US-based planning. Orthogonal films for applicator reconstruction were also taken. A standard plan was modified to suit the US-based volume and treatment was delivered. The patient then underwent a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan with the applicators in situ. Retrospectively, individual standard (STD), US, and MRI plans were extrapolated for five fractions and superimposed onto the two-dimensional sagittal MRI images for comparison. Doses to Point A, target volume, International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) 38 bladder and rectal points, and individualized bowel points were calculated on original implant geometry on Plato for each planning method. Results: STD (high-dose-rate) plans reported higher doses to Point A, target volume, ICRU 38 bladder and rectal points, and individualized bowel point compared with US and MRI plans. There was a statistically significant difference between standard plans and image-based plans-STD vs. US, STD vs. MRI, and STD vs. Final-having consistent (p {<=} 0.001) respectively for target volume, Point A, ICRU 38 bladder, and bowel point. US plan assessed on two-dimensional MRI image was comparable for target volume (p = 0.11), rectal point (p = 0.8), and vaginal mucosa (p = 0.19). Local control was 90%. Late bowel morbidity (G3, G4) was <2%. Conclusions: Transabdominal ultrasound offers an accurate, quick, accessible, and cost-effective method of conformal brachytherapy planning.

  8. Arthroscopic vs mini-open rotator cuff repair. A quality of life impairment study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Leonardo Osti; Rocco Papalia; Massimo Paganelli; Enzo Denaro; Nicola Maffulli

    2010-01-01

    We compared the clinical and quality of life related outcome of rotator cuff repair performed using either a mini-open or\\u000a an arthroscopic technique for rotator cuff tears of less than 3 cm. The records of 64 patients who underwent rotator cuff\\u000a repair between September 2003 and September 2005 were evaluated. Thirty-two patients underwent a mini-open rotator cuff repair,\\u000a and 32 patients

  9. Degenerative rotator cuff tear in an elderly athlete: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kazemi, Mohsen

    1999-01-01

    The incidence of rotator cuff tear increases with age. Degenerative rotator cuff tears are commonly seen in athletes above 40 years. These athletes are commonly involved in overhead activities. Repetitive microtrauma is a more important factor in rotator cuff degeneration than acute trauma. Conservative treatment is the mainstay treatment for these injuries. A case report of an elderly athlete who sailed competitively is presented. The clinical and radiographic presentations, management and rehabilitation of degenerative rotator cuff tears are discussed. ImagesFigure 1

  10. High uterosacral vaginal vault suspension with fascial reconstruction for vaginal repair of enterocele and vaginal vault prolapse

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Karram; S. Goldwasser; S. Kleeman; A. Steele; B. Vassallo; P. Walsh

    2001-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to review retrospectively the functional and anatomic outcomes of women who underwent vaginal repair of enterocele and vault prolapse with the use of an intraperitoneal suspension of the vaginal vault to the uterosacral ligaments in conjunction with fascial reconstruction of the anterior and posterior vaginal wall. Study Design: Two hundred two women with

  11. Uterosacral ligament fixation for vaginal vault suspension in uterine and vaginal vault prolapse

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Van Jenkins

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to determine the simplicity, safety, anatomic, and functional success of using the uterosacral ligaments for correction of significant complex uterine and vaginal vault prolapse by the vaginal route. STUDY DESIGN: Fifty women with uterine or vaginal vault prolapse with descent of the cervix or the vaginal vault to the introitus or greater were

  12. Symptoms of Vaginal and Vulvar Cancers

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Knowledge Campaign Print Materials Brochure Fact Sheets Symptoms Diaries Posters Public Service Announcements Survivor Stories Dee Toni ... on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Gynecologic cancer symptoms diaries Vaginal Cancer Early on, most vaginal cancers do ...

  13. Complementary and Alternative Therapies for Vaginal Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Vaginal Cancer? Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Treating Vaginal Cancer Talking With ... and References Cancer Information Cancer Basics Cancer Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects Cancer ...

  14. Vaginal birth after C-section

    MedlinePLUS

    VBAC ... section in the past. This is called a vaginal birth after cesarean (VBAC). ... Most women who try VBAC are able to deliver vaginally. If you can have a VBAC, there are many good reasons to try it rather ...

  15. Leakage of fluid around endotracheal tube cuffs: a cadaver study

    PubMed Central

    Lucius, Ralph; Ewald, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to evaluate the leakage of liquid past the cuffs of tracheal tubes in fresh frozen human heads. Methods Six truncated fresh frozen heads were used and intubated with 8.0 mm endotracheal tubes. The intracuff pressures tested were 30 and 100 cmH2O. Subsequently, 20 ml of each of two oral antiseptic rinses (0.2% chlorhexidine and octenidine [octenidol®, Schülke & Mayr GmbH, Norderstedt, Germany]) was applied for thirty seconds in the mouth. During the trial, leakage of the cuffs was examined. Results The sealing between the tracheal cuff and tracheal wall was leakage-proof for all tested intracuff pressures and all tested antiseptic rinses. However, approximately 5.6 ml and 1.8 ml leaked into the esophagus and remained as a cuff-puddle, respectively. Conclusions The sealing between an endotracheal tube cuff with an intracuff pressure of 30 cmH2O and the tracheal wall is leakage-proof during oral care with antiseptic rinsing. An increase of intracuff pressure to 100 cmH2O does not appear to be required. PMID:24363847

  16. Open versus Two Forms of Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Millar, Neal L.; Wu, Xiao; Tantau, Robyn; Silverstone, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    There have been technologic advances in the methods for repairing torn rotator cuffs. We compared the clinical and structural outcomes of three different forms of rotator cuff repair with up to 24 months’ followup. We wished to assess how surgical technique affected clinical outcomes and see how these correlated to repair integrity. Three cohorts of patients had repair of a symptomatic rotator cuff tear using (1) an open technique (n = 49); (2) arthroscopic knotted (n = 53); or (3) arthroscopic knotless (n = 57) by one surgeon. Standardized patient- and examiner-determined outcomes were obtained preoperatively and at 6 weeks, 3 and 6 months, and 2 years postoperatively. Ultrasound studies were performed with a validated protocol at 6 months and 2 years postsurgery. Clinical outcomes were similar with the exception that the arthroscopic groups had, on average, 20% better American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scores than the open group at 6 months and 2 years. Retear correlated with tear size and operation time and occurred more frequently after open repair (39%) than after arthroscopic knotted (25%) and arthroscopic knotless (16%) repair. An intact cuff on ultrasound corresponded to better results for supraspinatus strength, patient outcomes, and rotator cuff functional ability. Level of Evidence: Level III, therapeutic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:19184264

  17. Effects of Wing-Cuff on NACA 23015 Aerodynamic Performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meftah, S. M. A.; Belhenniche, M.; Madani Fouatih, O.; Imine, B.

    2014-03-01

    The main subject of this work is the numerical study control of flow separation on a NACA 23015 airfoil by using wing cuff. This last is a leading edge modification done to the wing. The modification consists of a slight extension of the chord on the outboard section of the wings. Different numerical cases are considered for the baseline and modified airfoil NACA 23015 according at different angle of incidence. The turbulence is modeled by two equations k-epsilon model. The results of this numerical investigation showed several benefits of the wing cuff compared with a conventional airfoil and an agreement is observed between the experimental data and the present study. The most intriguing result of this research is the capability for wing cuff to perform short take-offs and landings.

  18. Subacromial Spacer Placement for Protection of Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Szöllösy, Gregor; Rosso, Claudio; Fogerty, Simon; Petkin, Kalojan; Lafosse, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Rotator cuff repairs have a high failure rate proportional to the tear size. Various techniques have been described to improve the repair strength and failure rate. The described surgical technique uses a biodegradable subacromial balloon-shaped spacer (InSpace; OrthoSpace, Caesarea, Israel) that is implanted arthroscopically to protect our tendon repair. We describe the introduction technique and suggest some hints and tricks. The spacer is placed under direct vision in the subacromial space after the rotator cuff repair is finished. Correct placement is verified by moving the arm freely. The subacromial spacer may help to protect the rotator cuff repair by centering the humeral head and reducing friction between suture knots and the acromion. It may also help to flatten dog-ear formations. PMID:25473615

  19. [Brachytherapy of local prostatic carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Deger, S; Böhmer, D; Roigas, J; Türk, I; Budach, V; Loening, S A

    2001-05-01

    Brachytherapy of prostate cancer has become attractive in recent years in Germany. There are several radioactive sources available, which are physically different. Some of them are used as permanent or temporary implants. The permanent sources most frequently used are iodine 125, palladium 103, and gold 198. Iridium is a temporary implant. The techniques used in Germany are low-dose rate (LDR) and high-dose rate brachytherapy, which differ in dose distribution and patient population. The success of prostate cancer brachytherapy depends on patient selection and choosing the right source for the technique used. Best suited for LDR monotherapy is the low-risk patient with a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level below 10 ng/ml, maximal tumor stage T2b, and a Gleason score of less than 7. PMID:11405125

  20. Perivascular fluid cuffs decrease lung compliance by increasing tissue resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Kevin; Alvarez, Diego F.; King, Judy A.; Stevens, Troy

    2010-01-01

    Objective Lung inflammation causes perivascular fluid cuffs to form around extra-alveolar blood vessels; however, the physiologic consequences of such cuffs remain poorly understood. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that perivascular fluid cuffs, without concomitant alveolar edema, are sufficient to decrease lung compliance. Design Prospective, randomized, controlled study. Setting Research laboratory. Subjects One hundred twenty male CD40 rats. Interventions To test this hypothesis, the plant alkaloid thapsigargin was used to activate store-operated calcium entry and increase cytosolic calcium in endothelium. Thapsigargin was infused into a central venous catheter of intact, sedated, and mechanically ventilated rats. Measurements Static and dynamic lung mechanics and hemodynamics were measured continuously. Main Results Thapsigargin produced perivascular fluid cuffs along extra-alveolar vessels but did not cause alveolar flooding or blood gas abnormalities. Lung compliance dose-dependently decreased after thapsigargin infusion, attributable to an increase in tissue resistance that was attributed to increased tissue damping and tissue elastance. Airway resistance was not changed. Neither central venous pressure nor left ventricular end diastolic pressure was altered by thapsigargin. Heart rate did not change, although thapsigargin decreased pressure over time sufficient to reduce cardiac output by 50%. Infusion of the type 4 phosphodiesterase inhibitor, rolipram, prevented thapsigargin from inducing perivascular cuffs and decreasing lung compliance. Rolipram also normalized pressure over time and corrected the deficit in cardiac output. Conclusions Our findings resolve for the first time that perivascular cuff formation negatively impacts mechanical coupling between the bronchovascular bundle and the lung parenchyma, decreasing lung compliance without impacting central venous pressure. PMID:20400904

  1. EM-navigated catheter placement for gynecologic brachytherapy: an accuracy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrtash, Alireza; Damato, Antonio; Pernelle, Guillaume; Barber, Lauren; Farhat, Nabgha; Viswanathan, Akila; Cormack, Robert; Kapur, Tina

    2014-03-01

    Gynecologic malignancies, including cervical, endometrial, ovarian, vaginal and vulvar cancers, cause significant mortality in women worldwide. The standard care for many primary and recurrent gynecologic cancers consists of chemoradiation followed by brachytherapy. In high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, intracavitary applicators and /or interstitial needles are placed directly inside the cancerous tissue so as to provide catheters to deliver high doses of radiation. Although technology for the navigation of catheters and needles is well developed for procedures such as prostate biopsy, brain biopsy, and cardiac ablation, it is notably lacking for gynecologic HDR brachytherapy. Using a benchtop study that closely mimics the clinical interstitial gynecologic brachytherapy procedure, we developed a method for evaluating the accuracy of image-guided catheter placement. Future bedside translation of this technology offers the potential benefit of maximizing tumor coverage during catheter placement while avoiding damage to the adjacent organs, for example bladder, rectum and bowel. In the study, two independent experiments were performed on a phantom model to evaluate the targeting accuracy of an electromagnetic (EM) tracking system. The procedure was carried out using a laptop computer (2.1GHz Intel Core i7 computer, 8GB RAM, Windows 7 64-bit), an EM Aurora tracking system with a 1.3mm diameter 6 DOF sensor, and 6F (2 mm) brachytherapy catheters inserted through a Syed-Neblett applicator. The 3D Slicer and PLUS open source software were used to develop the system. The mean of the targeting error was less than 2.9mm, which is comparable to the targeting errors in commercial clinical navigation systems.

  2. 10 CFR 35.432 - Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...false Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources. 35.432 Section 35...MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.432 Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources. (a) Before the...

  3. 10 CFR 35.2406 - Records of brachytherapy source accountability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 false Records of brachytherapy source accountability. 35...Records § 35.2406 Records of brachytherapy source accountability. ...licensee shall maintain a record of brachytherapy source accountability...

  4. Variables affecting leakage past endotracheal tube cuffs: a bench study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Renée Pitts; Daniel Fisher; Demet Sulemanji; Joseph Kratohvil; Yandong Jiang; Robert Kacmarek

    2010-01-01

    Purpose  Leakage of oral secretions past endotracheal tubes (ETT) has been implicated in ventilator associated pneumonia. The aim of\\u000a this bench study was to compare the ability of current generation ETT cuffs to prevent fluid leakage and to determine the\\u000a specific mechanical ventilator settings that affect movement of fluid across an inflated ETT cuff.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Using a 2.3-cm internal diameter (ID) tracheal

  5. Evaluation and nonsurgical management of rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Greis, Ari C; Derrington, Stephen M; McAuliffe, Matthew

    2015-04-01

    Rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy is a common finding that accounts for about 7% of patients with shoulder pain. There are numerous theories on the pathogenesis of rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy. The diagnosis is confirmed with radiography, MRI or ultrasound. There are numerous conservative treatment options available and most patients can be managed successfully without surgical intervention. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and multiple modalities are often used to manage pain and inflammation; physical therapy can help improve scapular mechanics and decrease dynamic impingement; ultrasound-guided needle aspiration and lavage techniques can provide long-term improvement in pain and function in these patients. PMID:25771323

  6. Pharmacokinetic fundamentals of vaginal treatment with clotrimazole.

    PubMed

    Ritter, W; Patzschke, K; Krause, U; Stettendorf, S

    1982-01-01

    Absorption of clotrimazole after vaginal application was estimated to be between 3 and 10%. In order to investigate the fate of clotrimazole reaching systemic circulation, pharmacokinetic studies following oral and intravenous administration were carried out. The concentrations of clotrimazole in vaginal fluid and in blood plasma after vaginal application of 200 and 500 mg were determined using a specific assay by quantitative thin-layer chromatography. Fungicidal concentrations of clotrimazole in vaginal fluid up to 3 days after application of one vaginal tablet containing 500 mg were found. In contrast, clotrimazole plasma levels were lower than 0.01 micrograms/ml, demonstrating that clotrimazole is rapidly metabolized. PMID:7160239

  7. Magnetic resonance-guided interstitial therapy for vaginal recurrence of endometrial cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, Akila N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)]. E-mail: aviswanathan@partners.org; Cormack, Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Holloway, Caroline L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Tanaka, Cynthia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); O'Farrell, Desmond C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Devlin, Phillip M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Tempany, Clare [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and to describe the acute toxicity of a real-time intraoperative magnetic resonance (MR)-image guided interstitial approach to treating vaginal recurrence of endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: From February 2004 to April 2005, 10 patients with recurrent endometrial cancer underwent MR-guided interstitial brachytherapy. Parameters evaluated included needle placement, dose-volume histograms (DVH), and complications. Results: Magnetic resonance-image guidance resulted in accurate needle placement. Tumor DVH values included median volume, 47 cc; V100, 89%; V150, 61%; V200, 38%; D90, 71 Gy; and D100, 60 Gy. DVH of organs at risk resulted in a median D2cc of external beam and brachytherapy dose (% of brachytherapy prescription): bladder, 75Gy{sub 3} (88%); rectum, 70Gy{sub 3} (87%); and sigmoid, 56Gy{sub 3} (41%). All patients experienced either a Grade 1 or 2 acute toxicity related to the radiation; only 1 patient had Grade 3 toxicity. No toxicities were attributable to the use of MR guidance. Conclusions: Real-time MR guidance during the insertion of interstitial needles reduces the likelihood of an inadvertent insertion of the needles into the bladder and the rectum. Three-dimensional dosimetry allows estimation of the dose to organs at risk. Toxicities are limited.

  8. How Is Vaginal Cancer Diagnosed?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... present and, if so, what type it is. Imaging tests Chest x-ray If vaginal cancer is diagnosed, a plain x- ... possible metastases. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans use radio waves and strong magnets instead of x-rays to make images of the body. The energy ...

  9. Definitive radiotherapy for primary vaginal cancer: correlation between treatment patterns and recurrence rate

    PubMed Central

    Kanayama, Naoyuki; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Baek, Sungjae; Chatani, Masashi; Kotsuma, Tadayuki; Tanaka, Eiichi; Yoshida, Ken; Seo, Yuji; Suzuki, Osamu; Mabuchi, Seiji; Shiki, Yasuhiko; Tatsumi, Keiji; Kimura, Tadashi; Teshima, Teruki; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the outcomes and optimal practice patterns of definitive radiotherapy for primary vaginal cancer. Between 1993 and 2012, 49 patients were treated with definitive radiotherapy for primary vaginal cancer in three hospitals. Of these, 15 patients (31%) had clinically positive regional lymph node metastasis. A total of 34 patients (70%) received external beam radiotherapy with high-dose-rate brachytherapy (interstitial or intracavitary), and 8 (16%) (with small superficial Stage I tumors) were treated with local radiotherapy. The median follow-up was 33 months (range: 1–169 months). The 3-year overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), and loco-regional control (LRC) rates were 83%, 59% and 71%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, the histological type (P = 0.044) was significant risk factors for LRC. In Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) Stage I cases, 3 of 8 patients (38%) who did not undergo prophylactic lymph node irradiation had lymph node recurrence, compared with 2 of 12 patients (17%) who underwent prophylactic pelvic irradiation. For Stage III–IV tumors, the local recurrence rate was 50% and the lymph node recurrence rate was 40%. Patients with FIGO Stage I/II or clinical Stage N1 had a higher recurrence rate with treatment using a single modality compared with the recurrence rate using combined modalities. In conclusion, our treatment outcomes for vaginal cancer were acceptable, but external beam radiotherapy with brachytherapy (interstitial or intracavitary) was needed regardless of FIGO stage. Improvement of treatment outcomes in cases of FIGO Stage III or IV remains a significant challenge. PMID:25614068

  10. Understanding and preventing complications in repairing rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Osti, Leonardo; Papalia, Rocco; Del Buono, Angelo; Denaro, Vincenzo; Maffulli, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    Repair of rotator cuff tears is a common procedure. Prior to approaching this surgery, it should be realized that each surgical step can lead to complications, including those related to positioning and anaesthesia. Stiffness, infection and failure of repair are the more frequent complications reported. PMID:21986055

  11. 21 CFR 868.5800 - Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...tracheostomy tube. The cuff is used to prevent the patient's aspiration of substances, such as blood or vomit, or to provide a means for positive-pressure ventilation of the patient. This device is made of either stainless steel or plastic....

  12. The Factors Affecting Pain Pattern after Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang-Wan; Kim, Dong-Gyun

    2014-01-01

    Background We evaluated the factors that affect pain pattern after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Methods From June 2009 to October 2010, 210 patients underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair operations. Of them, 84 patients were enrolled as subjects of the present study. The evaluation of postoperative pain was conducted by visual analog scale (VAS) scores during postoperative outpatient interviews at 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months. The factors that were thought to affect postoperative pain were evaluated by dividing into three categories: preoperative, operative, and postoperative. Results Pain after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair surgery showed a strictly decreasing pain pattern. In single analysis and multiple regression tests for factors influencing the strictly decreasing pain pattern, initial VAS and pain onset were shown to be statistically significant factors (p = 0.012, 0.012, 0.044 and 0.028, respectively). With regard to the factors influencing lower than average intensity pain pattern for each period, the stiffness of internal rotation at 3 months postoperatively was shown to be a statistically significant factor in single and multiple regression tests (p = 0.017 and p = 0.004, respectively). Conclusions High initial VAS scores and the acute onset of pain affected the strictly decreasing postoperative pain pattern. Additionally, stiffness of internal rotation at postoperative 3 months affected the higher than average intensity pain pattern for each period after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. PMID:25436062

  13. Thromboembolic events following brachytherapy: case reports

    PubMed Central

    Guy, Jean-Baptiste; Chargari, Cyrus; Bertoletti, Laurent; Magné, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Pulsed-dose-rate (PDR) brachytherapy is a recent brachytherapy modality combining the radiobiological advantages of low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy with increased possibilities of dose optimization and radiation safety. However, treatment duration remains protracted, as the prescribed dose is typically delivered through pulses that do not exceed 0.5 Gy/h for critical organs. It is frequently used for the treatment of gynaecological malignancies. Although, the relationship between thrombosis and cancer is well known, specific data on thromboembolic events during brachytherapy are scarce. We report two cases of major thromboembolic events during brachytherapy treatment for gynaecological malignancies. We discuss the possible causal relationship between brachytherapy procedures and the occurrence of thromboembolic events, drawing a preventive practical attitude. PMID:25829939

  14. Primary Vaginal Cancer Treated With Concurrent Chemoradiation Using Cis-Platinum

    SciTech Connect

    Samant, Rajiv [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ottawa Hospital Regional Cancer Centre, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, ON (Canada)], E-mail: rsamant@ottawahospital.on.ca; Lau, Bedy [Department of Otolaryngology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); E, Choan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ottawa Hospital Regional Cancer Centre, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Le, Tien [Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Tam, Tiffany [Department of Radiation Oncology, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON (Canada)

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of concurrent weekly Cis-platinum chemoradiation (CRT) in the curative treatment of primary vaginal cancer. Methods: A retrospective review was performed of all primary vaginal cancer patients treated with curative intent at the Ottawa Hospital Regional Cancer Centre between 1999 and 2004 using concurrent Cis-platinum CRT. Results: Twelve patients were treated with concurrent weekly CRT. The median age at diagnosis was 56 years (range, 34-69 years), and the median follow-up was 50 months (range, 11-75 months). Ten patients (83%) were diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma and 2 patients (17%) with adenocarcinoma. The distribution according to stage was as follows: 6 (50%) Stage II, 4 (33%) Stage III, and 2 (17%) Stage IVA. All patients received pelvic external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) concurrently with weekly intravenous Cis-platinum chemotherapy (40 mg/m{sup 2}) followed by brachytherapy (BT). The median dose of EBRT was 4500 cGy given in 25 fractions over 5 weeks. Ten patients received interstitial BT, and 2 patients received intracavitary BT, with the median dose being 3000 cGy. The 5-year overall survival, progression-free survival, and locoregional progression-free survival rates were 66%, 75%, and 92%, respectively. Late toxicity requiring surgery occurred in 2 patients (17%). Conclusions: For the treatment of primary vaginal cancer, it is feasible to deliver concurrent weekly Cis-platinum chemotherapy with high-dose radiation, leading to excellent local control and an acceptable toxicity profile.

  15. A Comparison of Conventional Ultrasonography and Arthrosonography in the Assessment of Cuff Integrity after Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwang Won; Chun, Tong Jin; Bae, Kyoung Wan; Choy, Won Sik; Park, Hyeon Jong

    2014-01-01

    Background This study was designed to perform conventional ultrasonography, magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) and arthrosonography exams after rotator cuff repair to compare the results of conventional ultrasonography and arthrosonography with those of MRA as the gold standard. Methods We prospectively studied 42 consecutive patients (14 males, 28 females; average age, 59.4 years) who received arthroscopic rotator cuff repair due to full-thickness tears of the supraspinatus tendon from 2008 to 2010. The integrity assessment of the repaired rotator cuff was performed 6 months postoperatively using conventional ultrasonography, MRA, and arthrosonography. Results The diagnostic accuracy of the conventional ultrasonography compared to MRA was 78.6% and the McNemar test results were 0.016 in full-thickness tear and 0.077 in partial-thickness tear. The diagnostic accuracy of arthrosonography compared to MRA was 92.9% and the McNemar test results were 0.998 in full-thickness tear and 0.875 in partial-thickness tear. Conclusions It was found that the integrity assessment of the repaired rotator cuff by ultrasonography must be guarded against and that arthrosonography is an effective alternative method in the postoperative integrity assessment. Also, an arthrosonography seems to be a suitable modality to replace the conventional ultrasonography. PMID:25177461

  16. 10 CFR 35.2432 - Records of calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources. 35.2432 Section...calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources. (a) A licensee...record of the calibrations of brachytherapy sources required by §...

  17. Suitability of point kernel dose calculation techniques in brachytherapy treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Lakshminarayanan, Thilagam; Subbaiah, K V; Thayalan, K; Kannan, S E

    2010-04-01

    Brachytherapy treatment planning system (TPS) is necessary to estimate the dose to target volume and organ at risk (OAR). TPS is always recommended to account for the effect of tissue, applicator and shielding material heterogeneities exist in applicators. However, most brachytherapy TPS software packages estimate the absorbed dose at a point, taking care of only the contributions of individual sources and the source distribution, neglecting the dose perturbations arising from the applicator design and construction. There are some degrees of uncertainties in dose rate estimations under realistic clinical conditions. In this regard, an attempt is made to explore the suitability of point kernels for brachytherapy dose rate calculations and develop new interactive brachytherapy package, named as BrachyTPS, to suit the clinical conditions. BrachyTPS is an interactive point kernel code package developed to perform independent dose rate calculations by taking into account the effect of these heterogeneities, using two regions build up factors, proposed by Kalos. The primary aim of this study is to validate the developed point kernel code package integrated with treatment planning computational systems against the Monte Carlo (MC) results. In the present work, three brachytherapy applicators commonly used in the treatment of uterine cervical carcinoma, namely (i) Board of Radiation Isotope and Technology (BRIT) low dose rate (LDR) applicator and (ii) Fletcher Green type LDR applicator (iii) Fletcher Williamson high dose rate (HDR) applicator, are studied to test the accuracy of the software. Dose rates computed using the developed code are compared with the relevant results of the MC simulations. Further, attempts are also made to study the dose rate distribution around the commercially available shielded vaginal applicator set (Nucletron). The percentage deviations of BrachyTPS computed dose rate values from the MC results are observed to be within plus/minus 5.5% for BRIT LDR applicator, found to vary from 2.6 to 5.1% for Fletcher green type LDR applicator and are up to -4.7% for Fletcher-Williamson HDR applicator. The isodose distribution plots also show good agreements with the results of previous literatures. The isodose distributions around the shielded vaginal cylinder computed using BrachyTPS code show better agreement (less than two per cent deviation) with MC results in the unshielded region compared to shielded region, where the deviations are observed up to five per cent. The present study implies that the accurate and fast validation of complicated treatment planning calculations is possible with the point kernel code package. PMID:20589118

  18. Use of A Neonatal Blood Pressure Cuff to Monitor Blood Pressure In The Adult Finger – Comparison With A Standard Adult Arm Cuff

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sohail Q Khan; Joanna M. Wardlaw; Richard Davenport; Jim Slattery; Stephanie Lewis

    1998-01-01

    Background. There are few suitable methods for monitoring blood pressure continously (or intermittently) for research in adult stroke patients, who are ill but do not justify invasive intensive care monitoring. Method. We tested a neonatal arm blood pressure in adults by placing it on the forefinger (“finger cuff”). We compared the repeatability of the finger cuff with blood pressure measured

  19. The vaginal microbiome: rethinking health and diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Bing; Forney, Larry J.; Ravel, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Vaginal microbiota form a mutually beneficial relationship with their host and have major impact on health and disease. In recent years our understanding of vaginal bacterial community composition and structure has significantly broadened as a result of investigators using cultivation-independent methods based on the analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequences. In asymptomatic, otherwise healthy women, several kinds of vaginal microbiota exist, the majority often dominated by species of Lactobacillus, while others comprise a diverse array of anaerobic microorganisms. Bacterial vaginosis is the most common vaginal conditions and is vaguely characterized as the disruption of the equilibrium of the ‘normal’ vaginal microbiots. A better understanding of ‘normal’ and ‘healthy’ vaginal ecosystems that is based on its ‘true’ function and not simply on its composition would help better define health and further improve disease diagnostics as well as the development of more personalized regimens to promote health and treat diseases. PMID:22746335

  20. Vaginal microbiome: rethinking health and disease.

    PubMed

    Ma, Bing; Forney, Larry J; Ravel, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Vaginal microbiota form a mutually beneficial relationship with their host and have a major impact on health and disease. In recent years our understanding of vaginal bacterial community composition and structure has significantly broadened as a result of investigators using cultivation-independent methods based on the analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequences. In asymptomatic, otherwise healthy women, several kinds of vaginal microbiota exist, the majority often dominated by species of Lactobacillus, while others are composed of a diverse array of anaerobic microorganisms. Bacterial vaginosis is the most common vaginal condition and is vaguely characterized as the disruption of the equilibrium of the normal vaginal microbiota. A better understanding of normal and healthy vaginal ecosystems that is based on their true function and not simply on their composition would help better define health and further improve disease diagnostics as well as the development of more personalized regimens to promote health and treat diseases. PMID:22746335

  1. Vaginal microbial flora and outcome of pregnancy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laura DonatiAugusto; Augusto Di Vico; Marta Nucci; Lorena Quagliozzi; Terryann Spagnuolo; Antonietta Labianca; Marina Bracaglia; Francesca Ianniello; Alessandro Caruso; Giancarlo Paradisi

    2010-01-01

    Background  The vaginal microflora of a healthy asymptomatic woman consists of a wide variety of anaerobic and aerobic bacterial genera\\u000a and species dominated by the facultative, microaerophilic, anaerobic genus Lactobacillus. The activity of Lactobacillus is essential to protect women from genital infections and to maintain the natural healthy balance of the vaginal flora. Increasing\\u000a evidence associates abnormalities in vaginal flora during

  2. Epidemiologic determinants of vaginal pH

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Montserrat García-Closas; Rolando Herrero; Concepción Bratti; Allan Hildesheim; Mark E. Sherman; Lidia Ana Morera; Mark Schiffman

    1999-01-01

    Objectives: This study was undertaken to evaluate the relationship between vaginal pH and factors related to cervical cancer. Study Design: In a population-based sample of 9161 women from Guanacaste Province in Costa Rica women were categorized into 2 groups, those with vaginal pH in the reference range (4.0-4.5) and those with elevated vaginal pH (5.0-5.5). Odds ratios were used to

  3. Continuous low dose estradiol released from a vaginal ring versus estriol vaginal cream for urogenital atrophy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ronald Barentsen; Peter H. M. van de Weijer; Jan H. N. Schram

    1997-01-01

    Objectives: To determine if the efficacy of continuous low dose estradiol released from a vaginal ring is equivalent to estriol vaginal cream regarding improvement of the patient's subjective feeling of vaginal dryness and to determine if there is a preference for either of the two study treatments. Methods: Open-label randomized parallel group trial with active control with a blind evaluation

  4. 21 CFR 884.5900 - Therapeutic vaginal douche apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 2014-04-01 false Therapeutic vaginal douche apparatus. 884.5900 Section...Therapeutic Devices § 884.5900 Therapeutic vaginal douche apparatus. (a) Identification. A therapeutic vaginal douche apparatus is a device...

  5. 21 CFR 884.5900 - Therapeutic vaginal douche apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 2012-04-01 false Therapeutic vaginal douche apparatus. 884.5900 Section...Therapeutic Devices § 884.5900 Therapeutic vaginal douche apparatus. (a) Identification. A therapeutic vaginal douche apparatus is a device...

  6. 21 CFR 884.5900 - Therapeutic vaginal douche apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 2011-04-01 false Therapeutic vaginal douche apparatus. 884.5900 Section...Therapeutic Devices § 884.5900 Therapeutic vaginal douche apparatus. (a) Identification. A therapeutic vaginal douche apparatus is a device...

  7. 21 CFR 884.5900 - Therapeutic vaginal douche apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 2010-04-01 false Therapeutic vaginal douche apparatus. 884.5900 Section...Therapeutic Devices § 884.5900 Therapeutic vaginal douche apparatus. (a) Identification. A therapeutic vaginal douche apparatus is a device...

  8. 21 CFR 884.5900 - Therapeutic vaginal douche apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 2013-04-01 false Therapeutic vaginal douche apparatus. 884.5900 Section...Therapeutic Devices § 884.5900 Therapeutic vaginal douche apparatus. (a) Identification. A therapeutic vaginal douche apparatus is a device...

  9. What Are the Key Statistics about Vaginal Cancer?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... factors for vaginal cancer? What are the key statistics about vaginal cancer? Vaginal cancer is rare. Only ... Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects Cancer Facts & Statistics News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services ...

  10. Management of twins: vaginal or cesarean delivery?

    PubMed

    Bibbo, Carolina; Robinson, Julian N

    2015-06-01

    Recent level I evidence from a single randomized-controlled trial has shown that there is no difference in fetal or neonatal outcomes (composite of fetal/neonatal death or serious neonatal morbidity) between planned cesarean delivery and planned vaginal delivery for twins between 32 and 38 6/7 weeks. As long as the presenting twin is vertex, vaginal delivery should be considered regardless of the presentation of the second twin. To avoid unnecessary cesarean deliveries and maternal morbidity, it is important to continue to train residents to perform obstetrics maneuvers necessary for vaginal delivery of twins such as vaginal breech extraction. PMID:25851847

  11. Paris System for Interstitial Brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinello, Ginette

    The Paris System is a complete dosimetric system which greatly facilitates brachytherapy, using iridium 192 sources at low, pulsed or high dose-rate. The aim of this chapter is to present briefly the part of the system dedicated to interstitial brachytherapy. After a short description of the sources which can be used, the three basic principles of the Paris System are presented together with its particular mode of dose specification within the implanted volume, and the fixed value of the Reference Isodose (RI) equal to 85% of the Basal Dose-rate (BD), representative of the arithmetic mean of the minimal dose-rates in the central region of the implant. The method to calculate the treatment time is given. Simple relationships which can be used to predict the minimal dimensions of the treated volume (volume encompassed by the RI) at the very moment of the implant are presented.

  12. Platelet-Rich Plasma Augmentation for Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff RepairA Randomized Controlled Trial

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roberto Castricini; Umile Giuseppe Longo; Massimo De Benedetto; Nicola Panfoli; Piergiorgio Pirani; Raul Zini; Nicola Maffulli; Vincenzo Denaro

    2011-01-01

    Background: After reinsertion on the humerus, the rotator cuff has limited ability to heal. Growth factor augmentation has been proposed to enhance healing in such procedure.Purpose: This study was conducted to assess the efficacy and safety of growth factor augmentation during rotator cuff repair.Study Design: Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1.Methods: Eighty-eight patients with a rotator cuff tear were

  13. Computerized cuff pressure algometry: A new method to assess deep-tissue hypersensitivity in fibromyalgia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anders Jespersen; Lene Dreyer; Sally Kendall; Thomas Graven-Nielsen; Lars Arendt-Nielsen; Henning Bliddal; Bente Danneskiold-Samsoe

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of computerized cuff pressure algometry (CPA) in fibromyalgia (FM) and to correlate deep-tissue sensitivity assessed by CPA with other disease markers of FM. Forty-eight women with FM and 16 healthy age-matched women were included. A computer-controlled, pneumatic tourniquet cuff was placed over the gastrocnemius muscle. The cuff was inflated, and

  14. Bacterial vaginosis, vaginal flora patterns and vaginal hygiene practices in patients presenting with vaginal discharge syndrome in The Gambia, West Africa

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Edward Demba; Linda Morison; Maarten Schim van der Loeff; Akum A Awasana; Euphemia Gooding; Robin Bailey; Philippe Mayaud; Beryl West

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bacterial vaginosis (BV) – a syndrome characterised by a shift in vaginal flora – appears to be particularly common in sub-Saharan Africa, but little is known of the pattern of vaginal flora associated with BV in Africa. We conducted a study aimed at determining the prevalence of BV and patterns of BV-associated vaginal micro-flora among women with vaginal discharge

  15. [Endobronchial brachytherapy: technique and indications].

    PubMed

    Hennequin, C; Bleichner, O; Trédaniel, J; Maylin, C

    2003-02-01

    The endobronchial brachytherapy procedure involves the insertion of an afterloading catheter into bronchus in close proximity to an endoluminal lesion, and to perform limited irradiation sparing as much as possible normal health tissues. The catheter is inserted during a classical flexible bronchoscopy. Three types of indications have been discussed: (i) palliative treatment of lung carcinoma, with or without laser desobstruction: an improvement in respiratory symptoms was observed in 60 to 80% of the cases; (ii) curative treatment for localised endobronchial carcinomas, in previously irradiated patients, or in case of contraindication of surgery or external beam irradiation; local control rate range from 60 to 70% at 2 years; (iii) combination of external irradiation and brachytherapy in the first line treatment of lung cancers. Two randomised trials did not show any improvement in survival for this approach; however, they have included advanced diseases. In the opposite, this association seems very effective for early stage lung carcinomas. Two major complications were regularly reported, haemoptysis and radiation bronchitis. Predictive factors for these toxicities are actually better known: haemoptysis could be due to a progressive disease more often than to brachytherapy itself; technical factors (dose, volume, fractionation), however, could explain a number of radiation bronchitis, and their incidence could decrease in the future. PMID:12648715

  16. Biologically based strategies to augment rotator cuff tears

    PubMed Central

    Schaer, M.; Schober, M.; Berger, S.; Boileau, P.; Zumstein, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    Lesions of the rotator cuff (RC) are among the most frequent tendon injuries. In spite of the developments in both open and arthroscopic surgery, RC repair still very often fails. In order to reduce the failure rate after surgery, several experimental in vitro and in vivo therapy methods have been developed for biological improvement of the reinsertion. This article provides an overview of the current evidence for augmentation of RC reconstruction with growth factors. Furthermore, potential future therapeutic approaches are discussed. We performed a comprehensive search of the PubMed database using various combinations of the keywords “tendon,” “rotator cuff,” “augmentation,” “growth factor,” “platelet-rich fibrin,” and “platelet-rich plasma” for publications up to 2011. Given the linguistic capabilities of the research team, we considered publications in English, German, French, and Spanish. We excluded literature reviews, case reports, and letters to the editor. PMID:22787334

  17. Dynamic rotating-shield brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yunlong [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Flynn, Ryan T.; Kim, Yusung [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Yang, Wenjun [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Wu, Xiaodong [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To present dynamic rotating shield brachytherapy (D-RSBT), a novel form of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) with electronic brachytherapy source, where the radiation shield is capable of changing emission angles during the radiation delivery process.Methods: A D-RSBT system uses two layers of independently rotating tungsten alloy shields, each with a 180° azimuthal emission angle. The D-RSBT planning is separated into two stages: anchor plan optimization and optimal sequencing. In the anchor plan optimization, anchor plans are generated by maximizing the D{sub 90} for the high-risk clinical-tumor-volume (HR-CTV) assuming a fixed azimuthal emission angle of 11.25°. In the optimal sequencing, treatment plans that most closely approximate the anchor plans under the delivery-time constraint will be efficiently computed. Treatment plans for five cervical cancer patients were generated for D-RSBT, single-shield RSBT (S-RSBT), and {sup 192}Ir-based intracavitary brachytherapy with supplementary interstitial brachytherapy (IS + ICBT) assuming five treatment fractions. External beam radiotherapy doses of 45 Gy in 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy each were accounted for. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) doses were escalated such that the D{sub 2cc} of the rectum, sigmoid colon, or bladder reached its tolerance equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2 with ?/?= 3 Gy) of 75 Gy, 75 Gy, or 90 Gy, respectively.Results: For the patients considered, IS + ICBT had an average total dwell time of 5.7 minutes/fraction (min/fx) assuming a 10 Ci{sup 192}Ir source, and the average HR-CTV D{sub 90} was 78.9 Gy. In order to match the HR-CTV D{sub 90} of IS + ICBT, D-RSBT required an average of 10.1 min/fx more delivery time, and S-RSBT required 6.7 min/fx more. If an additional 20 min/fx of delivery time is allowed beyond that of the IS + ICBT case, D-RSBT and S-RSBT increased the HR-CTV D{sub 90} above IS + ICBT by an average of 16.3 Gy and 9.1 Gy, respectively.Conclusions: For cervical cancer patients, D-RSBT can boost HR-CTV D{sub 90} over IS + ICBT and S-RSBT without violating the tolerance doses to the bladder, rectum, or sigmoid. The D{sub 90} improvements from D-RSBT depend on the patient, the delivery time budget, and the applicator structure.

  18. High dose rate brachytherapy for oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    YamazakI, Hideya; Yoshida, Ken; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Furukawa, Souhei; Koizumi, Masahiko; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Brachytherapy results in better dose distribution compared with other treatments because of steep dose reduction in the surrounding normal tissues. Excellent local control rates and acceptable side effects have been demonstrated with brachytherapy as a sole treatment modality, a postoperative method, and a method of reirradiation. Low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy has been employed worldwide for its superior outcome. With the advent of technology, high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy has enabled health care providers to avoid radiation exposure. This therapy has been used for treating many types of cancer such as gynecological cancer, breast cancer, and prostate cancer. However, LDR and pulsed-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapies have been mainstays for head and neck cancer. HDR brachytherapy has not become widely used in the radiotherapy community for treating head and neck cancer because of lack of experience and biological concerns. On the other hand, because HDR brachytherapy is less time-consuming, treatment can occasionally be administered on an outpatient basis. For the convenience and safety of patients and medical staff, HDR brachytherapy should be explored. To enhance the role of this therapy in treatment of head and neck lesions, we have reviewed its outcomes with oral cancer, including Phase I/II to Phase III studies, evaluating this technique in terms of safety and efficacy. In particular, our studies have shown that superficial tumors can be treated using a non-invasive mold technique on an outpatient basis without adverse reactions. The next generation of image-guided brachytherapy using HDR has been discussed. In conclusion, although concrete evidence is yet to be produced with a sophisticated study in a reproducible manner, HDR brachytherapy remains an important option for treatment of oral cancer. PMID:23179377

  19. Arthroscopic Repair of Rotator Cuff Tears Using Extracellular Matrix Graft

    PubMed Central

    Gilot, Gregory J.; Attia, Ahmed K.; Alvarez, Andres M.

    2014-01-01

    Despite advances in surgical technology, as well as generally good outcomes, repairs of full-thickness rotator cuff tears show a retear rate of 25% to 57% and may fail to provide full return of function. The repairs tend to fail at the suture-tendon junction, which is due to several factors, including tension at the repair site, quality of the tendon, and defective tissue repair. One strategy to augment repair of large to massive rotator cuff tears is the development of biological scaffold materials, composed of extracellular matrix (ECM). The goal is to strengthen and evenly distribute the mechanical load across the repair site, thus minimizing the rupture risk of the native tendon while providing the biological elements needed for healing. The promising results of ECM-derived materials and their commercial availability have increased their popularity among shoulder surgeons. In contrast to a traditional open or arthroscopically assisted mini-open approach, this completely arthroscopic technique offers the full advantages warranted by the use of a minimally invasive approach. This technical guide describes arthroscopic rotator cuff repair using an ECM graft technique. PMID:25276607

  20. Laparoscopically assisted vaginal resection of rectovaginal endometriosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marc Possover; Herbert Diebolder; Karin Plaul; Achim Schneider

    2000-01-01

    Background: We wanted to establish a technique of laparoscopically assisted radical vaginal surgery for deep endometriosis of the rectovaginal septum with extensive rectal involvement.Technique: The procedure is started by vaginally excising the involved area which is left on the rectum, followed by bilateral dissection of the pararectal and retrorectal spaces. Para- and retrosigmoido-rectal spaces are developed laparoscopically along the coccygeosacral

  1. Vaginal Lactobacillus Flora of Healthy Swedish Women

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alejandra Vasquez; Tell Jakobsson; Siv Ahrne; Urban Forsum; Goran Molin

    2002-01-01

    Species of the Lactobacillus acidophilus complex are generally considered to constitute most of the vaginal Lactobacillus flora, but the flora varies between studies. However, this may be due to difficulties in identifying the closely related species within the L. acidophilus complex by using traditional methods and to variations in the vaginal status of the participants. Two hundred two isolates from

  2. Excision of high vaginal septum

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fahed Al-Abdulhadi; Michael Fidelis Diejomaoh; Assem El Biaa; Jiri Jirous; Mona Al-Qenae

    2010-01-01

    Introduction  Transverse vaginal septum occurs because there is a defect in vertical fusion during embryological development of the vagina.\\u000a It is quite rare and is infrequently encountered by most obstetricians and gynecologists in their practice.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Case report  A 14-year-old unmarried student, Miss AUX, presented to a private gynecologist complaining of absent menses. Initial examination\\u000a and investigation revealed intact hymen, normal uterus but

  3. A Review of Comparison of Complications of Vaginal Hysterectomy with and without Concomitant Surgery for SUI: A 5 Years' Experience at a Tertiary Care Hospital of Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Mohsin Rizvi, Raheela; Akhtar, Munnazza; Zuberi, Nadeem Faiyaz

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The study was performed to review the complications of surgery for POP with or without surgery for SUI. This included the need for second procedure two years after the primary surgery. Study Design. We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional comparative study at the Aga Khan University, Karachi, Pakistan. International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) was used to identify women who underwent vaginal hysterectomy with anterior/posterior repair alone and those with concomitant tension-free vaginal tape surgery for urodynamic stress incontinence. Results. The 28 cases of VH/repair combined with TVT were compared for complications with 430 cases of VH with repair alone. The basic characteristics like age, BMI, and degree of prolapse showed no statistical difference among two groups. The main comorbidities in both groups were hypertension, diabetes, and bronchial asthma. We observed no significant differences in intraoperative and postoperative complications except for cuff abscess, need for medical intervention, and readmission following discharge from hospital, which were higher in cases with vaginal hysterectomy with concomitant TVT. Conclusions. Vaginal hysterectomy is an efficient treatment for uterovaginal prolapse with a swift recovery, short length of hospital stay, and rare serious complications. The addition of surgery for USI does not appear to increase the morbidity. PMID:24454388

  4. External Pelvic and Vaginal Irradiation Versus Vaginal Irradiation Alone as Postoperative Therapy in Medium-Risk Endometrial Carcinoma-A Prospective Randomized Study

    SciTech Connect

    Sorbe, Bengt, E-mail: bengt.sorbe@orebroll.se [Department of Gynecological Oncology, Oerebro University Hospital, Oerebro (Sweden); Horvath, Gyoergy; Andersson, Hakan [Department of Gynecological Oncology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Boman, Karin [Department of Gynecological Oncology, Umea University Hospital, Umea (Sweden); Lundgren, Caroline [Department of Gynecological Oncology, Radiumhemmet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Pettersson, Birgitta [Medical Products Agency, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the value of adjuvant external beam pelvic radiotherapy as adjunct to vaginal brachytherapy (VBT) in medium-risk endometrial carcinoma, with regard to locoregional tumor control, recurrences, survival, and toxicity. Methods and Materials: Consecutive series of 527 evaluable patients were included in this randomized trial. Median follow-up for patients alive was 62 months. The primary study endpoints were locoregional recurrences and overall survival. Secondary endpoints were recurrence-free survival, recurrence-free interval, cancer-specific survival, and toxicity. Results: Five-year locoregional relapse rates were 1.5% after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) plus VBT and 5% after vaginal irradiation alone (p = 0.013), and 5-year overall survival rates were 89% and 90%, respectively (p = 0.548). Endometrial cancer-related death rates were 3.8% after EBRT plus VBT and 6.8% after VBT (p = 0.118). Pelvic recurrences (exclusively vaginal recurrence) were reduced by 93% by the addition of EBRT to VBT. Deep myometrial infiltration was a significant prognostic factor in this medium-risk group of endometrioid carcinomas but not International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics grade or DNA ploidy. Combined radiotherapy was well tolerated, with serious (Grade 3) late side effects of less than 2%. However, there was a significant difference in favor of VBT alone. Conclusions: Despite a significant locoregional control benefit with combined radiotherapy, no survival improvement was recorded, but increased late toxicity was noted in the intestine, bladder, and vagina. Combined RT should probably be reserved for high-risk cases with two or more high-risk factors. VBT alone should be the adjuvant treatment option for purely medium-risk cases.

  5. Early results of a novel technique for anterior vaginal wall prolapse repair: anterior vaginal wall darn

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to describe the results of a 1-year patient follow-up after anterior vaginal wall darn, a novel technique for the repair of anterior vaginal wall prolapse. Methods Fifty-five patients with anterior vaginal wall prolapse underwent anterior vaginal wall darn. The anterior vaginal wall was detached using sharp and blunt dissection via an incision beginning 1 cm proximal to the external meatus and extending to the vaginal apex. The space between the tissues that attach the lateral vaginal walls to the arcus tendineus fasciae pelvis was then darned. Cough Stress Test, Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification, seven-item Incontinence Impact Questionnaire, and six-item Urogenital Distress Inventory scores were performed 1-year postoperatively to evaluate recovery. Results One-year postoperatively, all patients were satisfied with the results of the procedure. No patient had vaginal mucosal erosion or any other complication. Conclusions One-year postoperative findings for patients in this series indicate that patients with stage II–III anterior vaginal wall prolapse were successfully treated with the anterior vaginal wall darn technique. PMID:24973955

  6. Cardiac and vascular adaptation to 0g with and without thigh cuffs (Antares 14 and Altair 21 day Mir spaceflights)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ph. Arbeille; G. Fomina; F. Achaibou; J. Pottier; A. Kotovskaya

    1995-01-01

    Cardiovascular Actaptation was evaluated on 2 astronauts: one wearing thigh cuffs from flight day 1 to 8 (14d flight), the second without cuffs (21d flight). Ultrasound investigations were performed at rest and during LBNP. Results: Without thigh cuffs the cardiovascular Actaptation consists in (1) the development of a hypovolemia with an increase of the heart rate and the cardiac output,

  7. Acromial impression fracture of the greater tuberosity with massive rotator cuff tear: this need not be a nightmare!

    PubMed Central

    Fahmy, Amr; Antonakopoulos, Nick; Khan, Amer

    2011-01-01

    An avulsion fracture of the greater tuberosity of the humerus with associated rotator cuff tear is rare. The authors describe the unusual case of a shoulder injury with an isolated, displaced greater tuberosity fracture associated with a massive rotator cuff tear. Due to the rotator cuff dysfunction, this patient presented with significant functional loss. PMID:22707607

  8. Arthroscopic According Subacromial Decompression: Results to the Degree of Rotator Cuff Tear

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James C. Esch; Leonard R. Ozerkis; Norman Kane; Nancy Lilliott

    Summary: We evaluated the results of arthroscopic subacromial decompres- sion according to the degree of rotator cuff tear in 71 patients, available for follow-up for at least 1 year (average 19 months). Of the patients with stage II disease, 82% were satisfied regardless of whether they had no rotator cuff tear (nine of 11) or had a partial tear (28

  9. Simultaneous rupture of bilateral quadriceps tendon and rotator cuff tear: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chen, H T

    2012-03-01

    This is a case report of a patient who sustained both a bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture and a complete rotator cuff tear. Overuse is a known risk factor for rotator cuff tears, but this case suggests that it can also be a risk factor for quadriceps tendon rupture. PMID:23155972

  10. Cuff-less and Noninvasive Measurements of Arterial Blood Pressure by Pulse Transit Time

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. C. Y. Poon; Y. T. Zhang

    2005-01-01

    The current blood pressure (BP) measurement devices are mostly built on the principle of auscultation, oscillometry or tonometry, all of which use an inflatable cuff to occlude or unload the artery. The need of a cuff in these devices limits the further reduction in size and power consumption, and restricts the frequency and ease of their usage. Therefore, this study

  11. REHABILITATION AFTER ARTHROSCOPIC ROTATOR CUFF REPAIR: CURRENT CONCEPTS REVIEW AND EVIDENCE-BASED GUIDELINES

    PubMed Central

    Westgard, Paul; Chandler, Zachary; Gaskill, Trevor R.; Kokmeyer, Dirk; Millett, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To provide an overview of the characteristics and timing of rotator cuff healing and provide an update on treatments used in rehabilitation of rotator cuff repairs. The authors' protocol of choice, used within a large sports medicine rehabilitation center, is presented and the rationale behind its implementation is discussed. Background: If initial nonsurgical treatment of a rotator cuff tear fails, surgical repair is often the next line of treatment. It is evident that a successful outcome after surgical rotator cuff repair is as much dependent on surgical technique as it is on rehabilitation. To this end, rehabilitation protocols have proven challenging to both the orthopaedic surgeon and the involved physical therapist. Instead of being based on scientific rationale, traditionally most rehabilitation protocols are solely based on clinical experience and expert opinion. Methods: A review of currently available literature on rehabilitation after arthroscopic rotator cuff tear repair on PUBMED / MEDLINE and EMBASE databases was performed to illustrate the available evidence behind various postoperative treatment modalities. Results: There is little high-level scientific evidence available to support or contest current postoperative rotator cuff rehabilitation protocols. Most existing protocols are based on clinical experience with modest incorporation of scientific data. Conclusion: Little scientific evidence is available to guide the timing of postsurgical rotator cuff rehabilitation. To this end, expert opinion and clinical experience remains a large facet of rehabilitation protocols. This review describes a rotator cuff rehabilitation protocol that incorporates currently available scientific literature guiding rehabilitation. PMID:22530194

  12. Rat rotator cuff muscle responds differently from hindlimb muscle to a combined tendon-nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Davies, Michael R; Ravishankar, Bharat; Laron, Dominique; Kim, Hubert T; Liu, Xuhui; Feeley, Brian T

    2015-07-01

    Rotator cuff tears (RCTs) are among the most common musculoskeletal injuries seen by orthopaedic surgeons. Clinically, massive cuff tears lead to unique pathophysiological changes in rotator cuff muscle, including atrophy, and massive fatty infiltration, which are rarely seen in other skeletal muscles. Studies in a rodent model for RCT have demonstrated that these histologic findings are accompanied by activation of the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and transforming growth factor-? (TGF-?) pathways following combined tendon-nerve injury. The purpose of this study was to compare the histologic and molecular features of rotator cuff muscle and gastrocnemius muscle-a major hindlimb muscle, following combined tendon-nerve injury. Six weeks after injury, the rat gastrocnemius did not exhibit notable fatty infiltration compared to the rotator cuff. Likewise, the adipogenic markers SREBP-1 and PPAR? as well as the TGF-? canonical pathway were upregulated in the rotator cuff, but not the gastrocnemius. Our study suggests that the rat rotator cuff and hindlimb muscles differ significantly in their response to a combined tendon-nerve injury. Clinically, these findings highlight the unique response of the rotator cuff to injury, and may begin to explain the poor outcomes of massive RCTs compared to other muscle-tendon injuries. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 33:1046-1053, 2015. PMID:25974842

  13. The use of the supraclavicular fossa portal in arthroscopic rotator cuff repair

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William J. Ciccone; John W. Miles; Sang-Jin Cheon; Stephen Ash; James Esch; James Tasto

    2000-01-01

    Advances in arthroscopic technology allow rotator cuff repair through a minimally invasive approach. However, fixation of the rotator cuff tendon to suture anchors can be tedious and time consuming. The supraclavicular fossa portal allows improved access to the tear for passing suture. The authors describe the relevant anatomy, positioning, and surgical technique for use of the supraclavicular fossa portal to

  14. Delineation of diagnostic criteria and a rehabilitation program for rotator cuff injuries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frank W. Jobe; Diane Radovich Moynes

    1982-01-01

    In the examination and rehabilitation of patients with shoulder injuries it is necessary to isolate the individ ual rotator cuff muscles as much as possible. We subscribe to the belief that, independent of the deltoid, the rotator cuff muscles can become fatigued, injured, or atrophied individually. Accordingly, we feel that these muscles must be considered separately during examination and rehabilitation.This

  15. Vaginitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... resources for press Selected Profiles & Interviews Selected biographies & science-focused interviews Multimedia Audio briefings, videos & podcasts related to NICHD research About NICHD Institute ...

  16. Detection of endobronchial intubation by monitoring the CO2 level above the endotracheal cuff.

    PubMed

    Efrati, Shai; Deutsch, Israel; Weksler, Nathan; Gurman, Gabriel M

    2015-02-01

    Early detection of accidental endobronchial intubation (EBI) is still an unsolved problem in anesthesia and critical care daily practice. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of monitoring above cuff CO2 to detect EBI (the working hypothesis was that the origin of CO2 is from the unventilated, but still perfused, lung). Six goats were intubated under general anesthesia and the ETT positioning was verified by a flexible bronchoscope. The AnapnoGuard system, already successfully used to detect air leak around the ETT cuff, was used for continuous monitoring of above-the-cuff CO2 level. When the ETT distal tip was located in the trachea, with an average cuff pressure of 15 mmHg, absence of CO2 above the cuff was observed. The ETT was then deliberately advanced into one of the main bronchi under flexible bronchoscopic vision. In all six cases the immediate presence of CO2 above the cuff was identified. Further automatic inflation of the cuff, up to a level of 27 mmHg, did not affect the above-the-cuff measured CO2 level. Withdrawal of the ETT and repositioning of its distal tip in mid-trachea caused the disappearance of CO2 above the cuff in a maximum of 3 min, confirming the absence of air leak and the correct positioning of the ETT. Our results suggest that measurement of the above-the-cuff CO2 level could offer a reliable, on-line solution for early identification of accidental EBI. Further studies are planned to validate the efficacy of the method in a clinical setup. PMID:24870932

  17. Vaginal atrophy in breast cancer survivors: role of vaginal estrogen therapy.

    PubMed

    Mariani, Luciano; Gadducci, Angiolo; Vizza, Enrico; Tomao, Silverio; Vici, Patrizia

    2013-01-01

    Early menopause and related vaginal atrophy is a well known side-effect of hormone adjuvant treatment in breast cancer patients, particularly during aromatase-inhibitors therapy. Due to estrogens contra-indication, proper therapy for such symptom remains often an inadequately addressed clinical problem. After an accurate assessment of the risk/benefit ratio, vaginal low-dose estrogen treatment (better with estriol) [corrected] may have a role in controlling vaginal atrophy in selected and informed breast cancer women. PMID:22994445

  18. Vaginal calculi secondary to urethrovaginal fistula with vaginal stenosis in a 14-year-old girl

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ben Liu; Xiao Huang; Junjie Lu; Zhigen Zhang; Ping Wang; Zheng Huang

    2008-01-01

    The author reports a case of vaginal calculi secondary to urethrovaginal fistula with vaginal stenosis in a 14-year-old girl.\\u000a The initial urethrovaginal fistula and vaginal stenosis resulted from pelvic trauma after a traffic accident, with subsequent\\u000a surgical urethral realignment and anterior colporrhaphy without success. The patient had continuous urinary incontinence for\\u000a a duration of 11 years after surgery, and was finally

  19. Human dermal allograft for massive rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Kokkalis, Zinon T; Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Scarlat, Marius; Christodoulou, Michael; Vottis, Christos; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J; Sotereanos, Dean G

    2014-12-01

    Previously published studies reported variable results using various suture techniques and reconstruction options for massive rotator cuff tears. Therefore, the current authors retrospectively studied 21 consecutive patients/shoulders with massive rotator cuff tears treated from January 2005 to October 2011 with a human dermal allograft through a mini-open approach. Mean patient age was 58 years (range, 33-72 years). Mean follow-up was 29 months (range, 18-52 months). Ten patients underwent revision repair for a failed rotator cuff repair. The authors measured the tendon gap (mean, 1.7 cm) and acromiohumeral interval (mean, 6.5 mm). They evaluated pain, shoulder range of motion (ROM) and function, patient satisfaction with the operation and outcome, and complications. At last follow-up, all patients experienced significant pain relief (P=.001) and improved ROM (P=.001) and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score (P=.001). Eighteen patients reported that they were satisfied or very satisfied and 3 reported that they were not satisfied with the operation and outcome. Comparison of outcomes between patients who underwent primary repair and those who underwent revision repair and between patients who had muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration grades 0 to II and those who had grades III to IV showed no statistically significant differences. A statistically significant correlation was observed between the size of the tendon gap and postoperative pain, ROM (except external rotation), and ASES score (P<.050). No significant correlation was observed between postoperative pain, ROM, and ASES score and the acromiohumeral interval (P>.050). Complications related to the dermal human allograft were not observed. PMID:25437086

  20. Evaluation of tracheal cuff pressure variation in spontaneously breathing patients

    PubMed Central

    Plotnikow, Gustavo A; Roux, Nicolas; Feld, Viviana; Gogniat, Emiliano; Villalba, Dario; Ribero, Noelia Vairo; Sartore, Marisa; Bosso, Mauro; Quiroga, Corina; Leiva, Valeria; Scrigna, Mariana; Puchulu, Facundo; Distéfano, Eduardo; Scapellato, Jose Luis; Intile, Dante; Planells, Fernando; Noval, Diego; Buñirigo, Pablo; Jofré, Ricardo; Nielsen, Ernesto Díaz

    2013-01-01

    Background: Most of the studies referring cuff tubes’ issues were conducted on intubated patients. Not much is known about the cuff pressure performance in chronically tracheostomized patients disconnected from mechanical ventilation. Objective: To evaluate cuff pressure (CP) variation in tracheostomized, spontaneously breathing patients in a weaning rehabilitation center. Materials and Methods: Experimental setup to test instruments in vitro, in which the gauge (TRACOE) performance at different pressure levels was evaluated in six tracheostomy tubes, and a clinical setupin which CP variation over 24 h, every 4 h, and for 6 days was measured in 35 chronically tracheostomized clinically stable, patients who had been disconnected from mechanical ventilation for at least 72 h. The following data were recorded: Tube brand, type, and size; date of the tube placed; the patient's body position; the position of the head; axillary temperature; pulse and respiration rates; blood pressure; and pulse oximetry. Results: In vitro difference between the initial pressure (IP) and measured pressure (MP) was statistically significant (P < 0.05). The difference between the IP and MP was significant when selecting for various tube brands (P < 0.05). In the clinical set-up, 207 measurements were performed and the CP was >30 cm H2O in 6.28% of the recordings, 20-30 cm H2O in 42.0% of the recordings, and <20 cm H2O in 51.69% of the recordings. Conclusion: The systematic CP measurement in chronically tracheostomized, spontaneously breathing patients showed high variability, which was independent of tube brand, size, type, or time of placement. Consequently, measurements should be made more frequently. PMID:24459624

  1. Classification of rotator cuff tendinopathy using high definition ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Hinsley, Hannah; Nicholls, Alex; Daines, Michael; Wallace, Gemma; Arden, Nigel; Carr, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background: ultrasound is a valid cost effective tool in screening for rotator cuff pathology with high levels of accuracy in detecting full-thickness tears. To date there is no rotator cuff tendinopathy classification using ultrasound. The aims of this study are to define a valid high-definition ultrasound rotator cuff tendinopathy classification, which has discriminate validity between groups based upon anatomical principles. Methods: 464 women, aged 65–87, from an established general population cohort underwent bilateral shoulder ultrasound and musculoskeletal assessment. Sonographer accuracy was established in a separate study by comparing ultrasound findings to the gold standard intra-operative findings. Results: there were 510 normal tendons, 217 abnormal tendons, 77 partial tears, and 124 full-thickness tears. There was no statistical difference in age or the proportion with pain between the abnormal enthesis and partial tear groups, however both groups were statistically older (p<0.001) and had a greater proportion with pain (p<0.001 & p=0.050) than normal tendons. The full-thickness tears were statistically older than normal tendons (p<0.001), but not abnormal/partially torn tendons. The proportion with pain was significantly greater than both groups (p<0.001 & p=0.006). Symptomatic shoulders had a larger median tear size than asymptomatic shoulders (p=0.006). Using tear size as a predictor of pain likelihood, optimum sensitivity and specificity occurred when dividing tears into groups up to 2.5cm and >2.5cm, which corresponds with anatomical descriptions of the width of the supraspinatus tendon. Conclusion: the classification system is as follows: Normal Tendons; Abnormal enthesis/Partial-thickness tear; Single tendon full-thickness tears (0–2.5cm); Multi-tendon full-thickness tears (>2.5cm). PMID:25489559

  2. Metronidazole in the treatment of cervical cancer using Cf-252 neutron brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, Y.

    1986-01-01

    Metronidazole was tested for its possible use in the Cf-252 brachytherapy of cervical cancer as a radiosensitizer and to deal with anaerobic pelvic infection. 15 patients were treated by only 14 were evaluable. All stages from stage IB-IVB were treated and complete local tumor regression was noted in all cases although it could take place very slowly. 5/14 (36%) are 1.5-3 year survivors but only among the patients with stage I-II disease. No unusual radio-enhancing action was observed but metronidazole appeared to be useful to treat the vaginal, cervix and uterine infections often associated with high stage disease and bulky, ulcerative or necrotic tumors.

  3. Vaginal childbirth and pelvic floor disorders

    PubMed Central

    Memon, Hafsa U; Handa, Victoria L

    2013-01-01

    Childbirth is an important event in a woman’s life. Vaginal childbirth is the most common mode of delivery and it has been associated with increased incidence of pelvic floor disorders later in life. In this article, the authors review and summarize current literature associating pelvic floor disorders with vaginal childbirth. Stress urinary incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse are strongly associated with vaginal childbirth and parity. The exact mechanism of injury associating vaginal delivery with pelvic floor disorders is not known, but is likely multifactorial, potentially including mechanical and neurovascular injury to the pelvic floor. Observational studies have identified certain obstetrical exposures as risk factors for pelvic floor disorders. These factors often coexist in clusters; hence, the isolated effect of these variables on the pelvic floor is difficult to study. PMID:23638782

  4. Development of Vaginal Microbicides and Related Information

    Center for Drug Evaluation (CDER)

    ... Search FDA Submit search. ... draft FDA guidance for vaginal microbicides, select presentations from public meetings, and literature publications in ...

  5. Extremely preterm vaginal breech delivery en caul

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jane R Richmond; Lucie Morin; Alice Benjamin

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:To describe an alternative method of vaginal birth to the conventional assisted delivery for extremely preterm breech infants within intact amnions, and to compare the immediate neonatal outcomes with those delivered by cesarean.METHODS:Retrospective review of singleton breech deliveries under 26 weeks’ gestation after spontaneous labor with intact membranes. Nine “en caul” vaginal births after tocolysis and six cesarean deliveries performed

  6. Emerging therapies for postmenopausal vaginal atrophy.

    PubMed

    Pickar, James H

    2013-05-01

    Symptoms related to vaginal atrophy are a significant problem for postmenopausal women and estrogen has been the gold standard for its treatment. A number of recent reviews of vaginal estrogen products are available. This review will, therefore, focus on other products and potential products for this indication, including the tissue selective estrogen complex and selective estrogen receptor modulators. Additionally, lesser-studied approaches will be discussed. PMID:23434231

  7. 10 CFR 35.2406 - Records of brachytherapy source accountability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Records of brachytherapy source accountability...Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Records § 35.2406 Records of brachytherapy source...

  8. 10 CFR 35.2406 - Records of brachytherapy source accountability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Records of brachytherapy source accountability...Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Records § 35.2406 Records of brachytherapy source...

  9. 10 CFR 35.2406 - Records of brachytherapy source accountability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Records of brachytherapy source accountability...Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Records § 35.2406 Records of brachytherapy source...

  10. Optimization of intravascular brachytherapy treatment planning in peripheral arteries

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Optimization of intravascular brachytherapy treatment planning in peripheral arteries Zhengdong brachytherapy (IVB) in peripheral arteries. The objective is both to quantitatively study the validity solution to avoid iterative redilations practiced after minimally invasive treatment of peripheral arterial

  11. Mixed vaginitis-more than coinfection and with therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Sobel, Jack D; Subramanian, Chitra; Foxman, Betsy; Fairfax, Marilyn; Gygax, Scott E

    2013-04-01

    Mixed vaginitis is due to the simultaneous presence of at least two vaginal pathogens, both contributing to an abnormal vaginal milieu and, hence, symptoms and signs of vaginitis. In mixed vaginitis, both pathogens require specific therapy for complete eradication of concurrent manifestations. In coinfection, although two pathogens are identified, a potential pathogen may be present but may not be a cause of existing vaginal symptoms. Although data remain sparse, mixed vaginitis occurs rarely (<5 %). By contrast, pathogen coinfection occurs frequently in women with vaginitis. Approximately 20 %-30 % of women with bacterial vaginosis (BV) are coinfected with Candida species. Coexistence of BV pathogens and T. vaginalis is even more common, with coinfection rates of 60 %-80 %. Both coinfection and mixed vaginitis have significant clinical and therapeutic implications and are worthy of further investigation. PMID:23354954

  12. Tissue Engineering for Rotator Cuff Repair: An Evidence-Based Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Maffulli, Nicola; Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Loppini, Mattia; Berton, Alessandra; Spiezia, Filippo; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to address the treatment of rotator cuff tears by applying tissue engineering approaches to improve tendon healing, specifically platelet rich plasma (PRP) augmentation, stem cells, and scaffolds. Our systematic search was performed using the combination of the following terms: “rotator cuff”, “shoulder”, “PRP”, “platelet rich plasma”, “stemcells”, “scaffold”, “growth factors”, and “tissue engineering”. No level I or II studies were found on the use of scaffolds and stem cells for rotator cuff repair. Three studies compared rotator cuff repair with or without PRP augmentation. All authors performed arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with different techniques of suture anchor fixation and different PRP augmentation. The three studies found no difference in clinical rating scales and functional outcomes between PRP and control groups. Only one study showed clinical statistically significant difference between the two groups at the 3-month follow up. Any statistically significant difference in the rates of tendon rerupture between the control group and the PRP group was found using the magnetic resonance imaging. The current literature on tissue engineering application for rotator cuff repair is scanty. Comparative studies included in this review suggest that PRP augmented repair of a rotator cuff does not yield improved functional and clinical outcome compared with non-augmented repair at a medium and long-term followup. PMID:25098365

  13. Delivered growth factor therapy to improve healing after rotator cuff repair

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Emilie V; Silverio, Luz; Yao, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    Background Degenerative rotator cuff tears are a significant cause of shoulder pain in the aging population. Rotator cuff repair surgery may be more successful when growth factors are delivered to the repair site. This study was designed to determine the cellular processes involved in normal bone-to-tendon healing and the current approaches used for biologic augmentation of rotator cuff repair. Methods This review focuses on animal studies of rotator cuff repair and early human trials. Results Regular bone-to-tendon healing forms a fibrous junction between tendon and bone that is markedly different from the original bone-to-tendon junction. Tendon augmentation with cellular components serves as scaffolding for endogenous fibroblastic cells and a possible source of growth factors and fibroblastic cells. Extracellular matrices provide a scaffold for incoming fibroblastic cells. However, research in extracellular matrices is not conclusive due to intermanufacturer variation and the lack of human subject research. Growth factors and platelet-rich plasma are established in other fields of research and show promise, but have not yet been rigorously tested in rotator cuff repair augmentation. Conclusions Rotator cuff repair can benefit from biologic augmentation. However, research in this field is still young and has not yet demonstrated that the benefits in healing rates are significant enough to merit regular clinical use. Randomized controlled trials will elucidate the use of biologic augmentation in rotator cuff repairs. PMID:24198519

  14. [Usefulness of tracheal tube with N2O gas-barrier cuff].

    PubMed

    Umezono, Y; Fujita, A; Toi, T; Sakio, H

    1999-11-01

    We evaluated three different tracheal tubes, Portex Profile Soft-Seal Cuff (PSSC), Portex Profile Cuff (PC) and Mallincrodt Lo-Contour (LC), when they are used in the artificial trachea and in anesthetized patients. When a cuff was inflated in the artificial trachea, PSSC with a cuff of high N2O gas-barrier property, and PC could achieve air-tight sealing with a smaller amount of injected air, compared with LC. This finding suggests that the inflated cuff-shape and cuff-fold formation are important to block the airway leakage with small volume of air. Either of three tubes was used randomly in thirty adult patients for general anesthesia using nitrous oxide 65%. Intracuff pressures were increased significantly with the passage of time. In PSSC group, however, intracuff pressure was 25 +/- 6 mmHg (mean +/- SD) at two hours, and in other two groups it was between 32 and 48 mmHg. The use of a tracheal tube with gas-barrier cuff is recommended to prevent a high tracheal wall pressure. PMID:10586564

  15. Robotic-Assisted Laparoscopic Nephroureterectomy and Bladder Cuff Excision

    PubMed Central

    Ozdemir, A. T.; Asil, E.; Balbay, M. D.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Our aim was to show that bladder cuff excision and distal ureterectomy can be safely performed by using the LigaSure device during robotic-assisted laparoscopic nephroureterectomy. Methods: A 60-year-old man presented with gross hematuria. He was diagnosed with upper urinary tract transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) on the left side and was scheduled for robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery. Without changing the patient's position, sealing with the LigaSure atlas for bladder cuff excision and distal ureterectomy was performed. Results: The operating time was 140 minutes from the initial incision to skin closure of all incisions. The estimated blood loss during the surgery was 120mL. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. The Foley drain was removed on day 3 after normal cystographic findings, and the patient was discharged from the hospital on the fourth postoperative day. Conclusion: Robot-assisted nephroureterectomy with distal ureterectomy in the same position using a LigaSure device is a safe alternative for upper tract transitional cell carcinoma. PMID:23477188

  16. Complications associated with arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Randelli, P; Spennacchio, P; Ragone, V; Arrigoni, P; Casella, A; Cabitza, P

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this literature review was to report complications associated with arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (RCR). A computerized search of articles published between 200 and 2009 was performed using MEDLINE and PubMed. We included clinical studies (Level 1-4): (a) investigating patients with rotator cuff tears, managed by a completely arthroscopic RCR technique; (b) reported data about complications. Data about arthroscopic-assisted techniques were excluded. Articles that meet criteria inclusion were analytically examined. Complications were classified into general complications and specific complications related to arthroscopic RCR. We found 414 complications in 2,890 patients; most of them were specific complications related to arthroscopic RCR. Re-rupture was the most frequently encountered complication: re-tear rate ranged between 11.4 and 94%. Stiffness and hardware-related complications were observed in 74 and 12 patients, respectively. Eleven less common complications were also reported: 5 neurovascular, 3 septic, 2 thromboembolic events, and 1 anesthesiological complication. This review stated that arthroscopic RCR is a low-risk surgical procedure. Anatomical failure of the repair is the most common complication encountered in the literature. PMID:22205384

  17. The application of Geant4 simulation code for brachytherapy treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S Agostinelli; F Foppiano; S Garelli; G Paoli; P Nieminen; M G Pia

    2000-01-01

    Brachytherapy is a radiotherapeutic modality that makes use of radionuclides to deliver a high radiation dose to a well-defined volume while sparing surrounding healthy structures. At the National Institute for Cancer Research of Genova a High Dose Rate remote afterloading system provides Ir(192) endocavitary brachytherapy treatments. We studied the possibility to use the Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation toolkit in brachytherapy

  18. The use of tetrahedral mesh geometries in Monte Carlo simulation of applicator based brachytherapy dose distributions.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Gabriel Paiva; Landry, Guillaume; White, Shane; D'Amours, Michel; Yoriyaz, Hélio; Beaulieu, Luc; Reniers, Brigitte; Verhaegen, Frank

    2014-10-01

    Accounting for brachytherapy applicator attenuation is part of the recommendations from the recent report of AAPM Task Group 186. To do so, model based dose calculation algorithms require accurate modelling of the applicator geometry. This can be non-trivial in the case of irregularly shaped applicators such as the Fletcher Williamson gynaecological applicator or balloon applicators with possibly irregular shapes employed in accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) performed using electronic brachytherapy sources (EBS). While many of these applicators can be modelled using constructive solid geometry (CSG), the latter may be difficult and time-consuming. Alternatively, these complex geometries can be modelled using tessellated geometries such as tetrahedral meshes (mesh geometries (MG)). Recent versions of Monte Carlo (MC) codes Geant4 and MCNP6 allow for the use of MG. The goal of this work was to model a series of applicators relevant to brachytherapy using MG. Applicators designed for (192)Ir sources and 50?kV EBS were studied; a shielded vaginal applicator, a shielded Fletcher Williamson applicator and an APBI balloon applicator. All applicators were modelled in Geant4 and MCNP6 using MG and CSG for dose calculations. CSG derived dose distributions were considered as reference and used to validate MG models by comparing dose distribution ratios. In general agreement within 1% for the dose calculations was observed for all applicators between MG and CSG and between codes when considering volumes inside the 25% isodose surface. When compared to CSG, MG required longer computation times by a factor of at least 2 for MC simulations using the same code. MCNP6 calculation times were more than ten times shorter than Geant4 in some cases. In conclusion we presented methods allowing for high fidelity modelling with results equivalent to CSG. To the best of our knowledge MG offers the most accurate representation of an irregular APBI balloon applicator. PMID:25210788

  19. The use of tetrahedral mesh geometries in Monte Carlo simulation of applicator based brachytherapy dose distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paiva Fonseca, Gabriel; Landry, Guillaume; White, Shane; D'Amours, Michel; Yoriyaz, Hélio; Beaulieu, Luc; Reniers, Brigitte; Verhaegen, Frank

    2014-10-01

    Accounting for brachytherapy applicator attenuation is part of the recommendations from the recent report of AAPM Task Group 186. To do so, model based dose calculation algorithms require accurate modelling of the applicator geometry. This can be non-trivial in the case of irregularly shaped applicators such as the Fletcher Williamson gynaecological applicator or balloon applicators with possibly irregular shapes employed in accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) performed using electronic brachytherapy sources (EBS). While many of these applicators can be modelled using constructive solid geometry (CSG), the latter may be difficult and time-consuming. Alternatively, these complex geometries can be modelled using tessellated geometries such as tetrahedral meshes (mesh geometries (MG)). Recent versions of Monte Carlo (MC) codes Geant4 and MCNP6 allow for the use of MG. The goal of this work was to model a series of applicators relevant to brachytherapy using MG. Applicators designed for 192Ir sources and 50?kV EBS were studied; a shielded vaginal applicator, a shielded Fletcher Williamson applicator and an APBI balloon applicator. All applicators were modelled in Geant4 and MCNP6 using MG and CSG for dose calculations. CSG derived dose distributions were considered as reference and used to validate MG models by comparing dose distribution ratios. In general agreement within 1% for the dose calculations was observed for all applicators between MG and CSG and between codes when considering volumes inside the 25% isodose surface. When compared to CSG, MG required longer computation times by a factor of at least 2 for MC simulations using the same code. MCNP6 calculation times were more than ten times shorter than Geant4 in some cases. In conclusion we presented methods allowing for high fidelity modelling with results equivalent to CSG. To the best of our knowledge MG offers the most accurate representation of an irregular APBI balloon applicator.

  20. Influence of endometriosis on visceromotor and cardiovascular responses induced by vaginal distention in the rat

    E-print Network

    Berkley, Karen J.

    Influence of endometriosis on visceromotor and cardiovascular responses induced by vaginal; accepted 30 April 2007 Abstract This study examined pseudoaffective responses elicited by vaginal. Distendable latex balloons were inserted into the vaginal canal. While an increasing series of vaginal

  1. Dosimetric Characteristics for Brachytherapy Sources

    SciTech Connect

    DeWerd, Larry A.; Davis, Stephen D. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States)

    2011-05-05

    Brachytherapy sources are characterized by the dosimetric parameters in a protocol such as the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 43. The air-kerma strength is measured and traceable to a primary standard. Then the parameters such as dose-rate constant, radial dose function, and anisotropy function are measured and related back to the primary standard. This is normally accomplished with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). Since radial dose function and anisotropy function are relative parameters, some of the dosimetric corrections are negligible. For the dose-rate constant, parameters such as the energy dependence compared with a calibration beam such as {sup 60}Co need to be accounted for. A description of the primary standard measurements and TLD measurements will be discussed.

  2. Control of tracheal cuff pressure: a pilot study using a pneumatic device

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexandre Duguet; Leda D’Amico; Giuseppina Biondi; Hélène Prodanovic; Jésus Gonzalez-Bermejo; Thomas Similowski

    2007-01-01

    Objective  To evaluate the efficacy of a simple mechanical device to maintain constant endotracheal cuff pressure (Pcuff) during mechanical\\u000a ventilation (large encased inflatable cuff connected to the endotracheal cuff and receiving constant pressure from a heavy\\u000a mass attached to an articulated arm).\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Design and setting  Single-center, prospective, randomized, crossover, pilot study in a medical intensive care unit.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Patients and participants  Nine consecutive mechanically ventilated patients (age

  3. Vaginal oestrogen for overactive bladder in post-menopausal women.

    PubMed

    Ostle, Zoe

    2015-06-11

    This article asks the question 'Should nurses recommend vaginal oestrogen for overactive bladder in post-menopausal women?' The article will review the evidence for use of vaginal oestrogen and consider the potential side-effects and risks. The main finding is that vaginal oestrogen is effective for treatment of overactive bladder in post-menopausal women with vaginal atrophy. However, vaginal atrophy is undertreated. This article identifies some of the barriers that may prevent diagnosis and treatment, and suggests changes in practice. Nurses should take the initiative and ask post-menopausal women about symptoms. Nurses should be trained to examine women, diagnose vaginal atrophy and discuss treatment. PMID:26067792

  4. Brachytherapy in the Treatment of Cholangiocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Shinohara, Eric T., E-mail: Shinohara@xrt.upenn.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Guo Mengye; Mitra, Nandita; Metz, James M. [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To examine the role of brachytherapy in the treatment of cholangiocarcinomas in a relatively large group of patients. Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database, a total of 193 patients with cholangiocarcinoma treated with brachytherapy were identified for the period 1988-2003. The primary analysis compared patients treated with brachytherapy (with or without external-beam radiation) with those who did not receive radiation. To try to account for confounding variables, propensity score and sensitivity analyses were used. Results: There was a significant difference between patients who received radiation (n = 193) and those who did not (n = 6859) with regard to surgery (p < 0.0001), race (p < 0.0001), stage (p < 0.0001), and year of diagnosis (p <0.0001). Median survival for patients treated with brachytherapy was 11 months (95% confidence interval [CI] 9-13 months), compared with 4 months for patients who received no radiation (p < 0.0001). On multivariable analysis (hazard ratio [95% CI]) brachytherapy (0.79 [0.66-0.95]), surgery (0.50 [0.46-0.53]), year of diagnosis (1998-2003: 0.66 [0.60-0.73]; 1993-1997: (0.96 [0.89-1.03; NS], baseline 1988-1992), and extrahepatic disease (0.84 [0.79-0.89]) were associated with better overall survival. Conclusions: To the authors' knowledge, this is the largest dataset reported for the treatment of cholangiocarcinomas with brachytherapy. The results of this retrospective analysis suggest that brachytherapy may improve overall survival. However, because of the limitations of the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database, these results should be interpreted cautiously, and future prospective studies are needed.

  5. Administration of oral and vaginal prebiotic lactoferrin for a woman with a refractory vaginitis recurring preterm delivery: appearance of lactobacillus in vaginal flora followed by term delivery.

    PubMed

    Otsuki, Katsufumi; Tokunaka, Mayumi; Oba, Tomohiro; Nakamura, Masamitsu; Shirato, Nahoko; Okai, Takashi

    2014-02-01

    Lactoferrin (LF) is one of the prebiotics present in the human body. A 38-year-old multiparous woman with poor obstetrical histories, three consecutive preterm premature rupture of membrane at the 19th, 23rd and 25th week of pregnancy, was referred to our hospital. She was diagnosed as having refractory vaginitis. Although estriol vaginal tablets were used for 4 months, the vaginitis was not cured. We administrated vaginal tablets and oral agents of prebiotic LF, resulting in a Lactobacillus predominant vaginal flora. When she was pregnant, she continued to use the LF, and the Lactobacillus in the vaginal flora was continuously observed during pregnancy. An elective cesarean section was performed at the 38th week of pregnancy. When the administration of LF was discontinued after the delivery, Lactobacillus in the vaginal flora was disappeared. PMID:24118573

  6. Effect of Vaginal Lubricants on Natural Fertility

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Anne Z.; Long, D. Leann; Tanner, Catherine; Herring, Amy H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Over-the-counter vaginal lubricants have been shown to negatively affect in vitro sperm motility. The objective of this study was to estimate the effect of vaginal lubricant use during procreative intercourse on natural fertility. Methods Women aged 30–44 years with no history of infertility who had been trying to conceive for less than 3 months completed a baseline questionnaire on vaginal lubricant use. Subsequently, women kept a diary to record menstrual bleeding, intercourse, and vaginal lubricant use and conducted standardized pregnancy testing for up to 6 months. Diary data were used to determine the fertile window and delineate lubricant use during the fertile window. A proportional hazards model was used to estimate fecundability ratios with any lubricant use in the fertile window considered as a time-varying exposure. Results Of the 296 participants, 75 (25%) stated in their baseline questionnaire that they use vaginal lubricants while attempting to conceive. Based on daily diary data, 57% of women never used a lubricant, 29% occasionally used a lubricant, and 14% used a lubricant frequently. Women who used lubricants during the fertile window had similar fecundability to those women who did not use lubricants (fecundability ratio 1.05, 95% CI: 0.59, 1.85) after adjusting for age, partner race, and intercourse frequency in the fertile window. Conclusion Lubricants are commonly used by couples during procreative intercourse. Lubricant use during procreative intercourse does not appear to reduce the probability of conceiving. PMID:22914390

  7. A comprehensive review of vaginitis phytotherapy.

    PubMed

    Azimi, Hanieh; Fallah-Tafti, Mehrnaz; Karimi-Darmiyan, Maliheh; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2011-11-01

    To overview phytotherapy of vaginitis in order to identify new approaches for new pharmacological treatments. All related literature databases were searched for herbal medicinal treatment in vaginitis. The search terms were plant, herb, herbal therapy, phytotherapy, vaginitis, vaginal, anti-candida, anti-bacterial and anti-trichomonas. All of the human, animal and in vitro studies were included. Anti-candida, anti-bacterial and anti-trichomonas effects were the key outcomes. The plants including carvacrol, 1,8-cineole, geranial, germacrene-D, limonene, linalool, menthol, terpinen-4-ol and thymol exhibited anti-candida effects. A very low concentration of geranium oil and geraniol blocked mycelial growth, but not yeast. Tea tree oil including terpinen-4-ol, alpha-terpinene, gamma-terpinene and alpha-terpineol showed anti-bacterial, anti-fungal and anti-protozoal properties against trichomonas. Allium hirtifolium (persian shallot) comparable to metronidazole exhibited anti-trichomonas activity due to its components such as allicin, ajoene and other organosulfides. The plants having beneficial effects on vaginitis encompass essential oils that clear the pathway that future studies should be focused to standardize theses herbs. PMID:22514885

  8. Disturbed anal sphincter function following vaginal delivery.

    PubMed Central

    Wynne, J M; Myles, J L; Jones, I; Sapsford, R; Young, R E; Hattam, A; Cantamessa, S E

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recently interest in idiopathic (neurogenic) faecal incontinence has swung from denervation of the external anal sphincter to the internal sphincter. AIMS: To evaluate the effects of vaginal delivery on the internal sphincter. SUBJECTS: 1372 mothers were studied antenatally and 1202 were accepted into the study. METHODS: Sphincter pressures were measured antenatally, in the early postnatal period, and six to 10 weeks later in selected patients. RESULTS: 755 of 1202 subjects assessed antenatally were primiparous women and 447 multiparous women. Some 320 previous spontaneous vaginal deliveries (SVD) (mean 59 mm Hg) and 67 previous forceps deliveries (mean 58 mm Hg) had lower resting pressures than 755 primiparous women (mean 66 mm Hg) (p < 0.01). A total of 493 subjects were reassessed postnatally. There were 372 SVDs, 47 vacuum extractions, 20 forceps, and 54 caesarean deliveries. All vaginal deliveries but not caesarean sections dropped their resting anal pressures from antenatal values (p < 0.001). Some 227 first SVDs had a much greater fall than 145 subsequent SVDs. In 162 subjects who had undergone their first vaginal delivery and who were followed up there was some recovery but the resting pressures were still lowered at six to 10 weeks post partum. CONCLUSIONS: The first vaginal delivery causes a permanent lowering of resting anal pressures. The possible reasons for this are discussed. PMID:8881822

  9. Following rotator cuff tears, the remaining (intact) tendons are mechanically altered

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Stephanie M.; Getz, Charles L.; Soslowsky, Louis J.

    2009-01-01

    Although presumed, damage in the remaining (intact) rotator cuff tendons in the presence of an isolated supraspinatus tendon tear or multiple tendon tear has not been well studied. This study utilized an animal model of multiple rotator cuff tendon tears to investigate alterations in the remaining (intact) tendon mechanical properties at 4 and 8 weeks post-injury. Twenty-four animals served as uninjured controls, while seventy-two were divided among the tendon detachment groups (supraspinatus tendon detachment, supraspinatus+infraspinatus tendon detachment, supraspinatus+subscapularis tendon detachment). We found the remaining (intact) rotator cuff tendons have decreased mechanical properties in the presence of rotator cuff tears. Remaining (intact) subscapularis and infraspinatus tendon cross-sectional area increased, while tendon modulus decreased after both one and two tendon tears. Additionally, the remaining (intact) tendon cross-sectional areas continued to increase with time post-injury. These alterations could potentially lead to further tendon damage and tear progression. PMID:19095175

  10. Shoulder Strength in Asymptomatic Individuals with Intact Compared with Torn Rotator Cuffs

    PubMed Central

    Kim, H. Mike; Teefey, Sharlene A.; Zelig, Ari; Galatz, Leesa M.; Keener, Jay D.; Yamaguchi, Ken

    2009-01-01

    Background: Normative data are essential to the evaluation of shoulder function. The purposes of this study were to establish a normative database of isometric shoulder strength measured in asymptomatic individuals verified to have intact rotator cuffs and to determine the effect of asymptomatic rotator cuff tears on shoulder strength. Methods: Two hundred and thirty-seven volunteers with no shoulder pain or history of shoulder injury were screened with ultrasonography bilaterally for rotator cuff tears and then underwent isometric strength measurements for abduction in the scapular plane and external rotation. Statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the effect of age, body habitus, hand dominance, and the presence of a rotator cuff tear on shoulder strength. Results: Of the 237 volunteers, forty-one were found to have a torn rotator cuff in at least one shoulder. The prevalence of rotator cuff tears was 0% for the subjects between forty and forty-nine years old; 10%, between fifty and fifty-nine years old; 20%, between sixty and sixty-nine years old; and 40.7% for those seventy years old or older. Both abduction strength and external rotation strength in the male subjects showed an age-dependent decrease, whereas only abduction strength showed an age-dependent decrease in the female subjects. In multiple regression analysis, age and weight were the most important predictors of abduction strength and external rotation strength, respectively. In the shoulders with a large-to-massive full-thickness rotator cuff tear, abduction strength was significantly decreased (p = 0.007). Additionally, the ratio of abduction strength to external rotation strength was significantly decreased in the shoulders with a large-to-massive full-thickness tear compared with the shoulders with an intact rotator cuff (p < 0.001). Conclusions: There is a high prevalence of rotator cuff tears in elderly asymptomatic individuals. Asymptomatic shoulders with a large-to-massive full-thickness rotator cuff tear have significantly decreased abduction strength. When there is a substantial decrease in abduction strength in relation to external rotation strength, the presence of an asymptomatic full-thickness tear should be suspected in that shoulder. Previous studies establishing normative values for isometric shoulder strength may have been skewed by the presence of asymptomatic rotator cuff tears in elderly subgroups. PMID:19181972

  11. Once daily nisoldipine in hypertension: cuff and ambulatory intra-arterial blood pressure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Brigden; M. Heber; M. Caruana; A. Lahiri; E. B. Raftery

    1989-01-01

    Cuff blood pressure data has suggested that the calcium channel antagonist nisoldipine has full twenty four hour efficacy. To test this, 24 h ambulatory intra-arterial blood pressure monitoring was performed on 18 untreated hypertensive subjects (12 men, 6 women) (cuff blood pressure >150\\/95 mm Hg) before and after chronic treatment with 10–20 mg oral nisoldipine taken daily at 08.00 h.

  12. Does Platelet-Rich Plasma Accelerate Recovery After Rotator Cuff Repair? A Prospective Cohort Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chris Hyunchul Jo; Ji Eun Kim; Kang Sup Yoon; Ji Ho Lee; Seung Baik Kang; Jae Hyup Lee; Hyuk Soo Han; Seung Hwan Rhee; Sue Shin

    2011-01-01

    Background: Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been recently used to enhance and accelerate the healing of musculoskeletal injuries and diseases, but evidence is still lacking, especially on its effects after rotator cuff repair.Hypothesis: Platelet-rich plasma accelerates recovery after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in pain relief, functional outcome, overall satisfaction, and enhanced structural integrity of repaired tendon.Study Design: Cohort study; Level of

  13. Living with a symptomatic rotator cuff tear ‘bad days, bad nights’: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Rotator cuff tears are a common cause of shoulder pain. There is an absence of information about symptomatic rotator cuffs from the patients’ perspective; this limits the information clinicians can share with patients and the information that patients can access via sources such as the internet. This study describes the experiences of people with a symptomatic rotator cuff, their symptoms, the impact upon their daily lives and the coping strategies utilised by study participants. Methods An interpretive phenomenological analysis approach was used. 20 participants of the UKUFF trial (The United Kingdom Rotator Cuff Surgery Trial) agreed to participate in in-depth semi-structured interviews about their experiences about living with a symptomatic rotator cuff tear. Interviews were digitally recorded and fully transcribed. Field notes, memos and a reflexive diary were used. Data was coded in accordance with interpretive phenomenological analysis. Peer review, code-recode audits and constant comparison of data, codes and categories occurred throughout. Results The majority of patients described intense pain and severely disturbed sleep. Limited movement and reduced muscle strength were described by some participants. The predominantly adverse impact that a symptomatic rotator cuff tear had upon activities of daily living, leisure activities and occupation was described. The emotional and financial impact and impact upon caring roles were detailed. Coping strategies included attempting to carry on as normally as possible, accepting their condition, using their other arm, using analgesics, aids and adaptions. Conclusions Clinicians need to appreciate and understand the intensity and shocking nature of pain that may be experienced by participants with known rotator cuff tears and understand the detrimental impact tears can have upon all areas of patient’s lives. Clinicians also need to be aware of the potential emotional impact caused by cuff tears and to ensure that patients needing help for conditions such as depression are speedily identified and provided with support, explanation and appropriate treatment. PMID:25008095

  14. Correlation of acromial morphology with impingement syndrome and rotator cuff tears

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose Indications for acromioplasty are based on clinical symptoms and are generally supported by typical changes in acromial morphology on standard radiographs. We evaluated 5 commonly used radiographic parameters of acromial morphology and assessed the association between different radiographic characteristics on the one hand and subacromial impingement or rotator cuff tears on the other. Patients and methods We measured acromial type (Bigliani), acromial slope (AS), acromial tilt (AT), lateral acromial angle (LAA), and acromion index (AI) on standard radiographs from 50 patients with full-thickness supraspinatus tendon tears, 50 patients with subacromial impingement, and 50 controls without subacromial pathology. Results The acromial type according to Bigliani was not associated with any particular cuff lesion. A statistically significant difference between controls and impingement patients was found for AS. AT of controls was significantly smaller than that of impingement patients and cuff-tear patients. LAA of cuff-tear patients differed significantly from that of controls and impingement patients, but LAA of controls was not significantly different from that of impingement patients. Differences between impingement patients and cuff-tear patients were also significant. AI of controls was significantly lower than of impingement patients and of cuff-tear patients. A good correlation was found between acromial type and AS. Interpretation A low lateral acromial angle and a large lateral extension of the acromion were associated with a higher prevalence of impingement and rotator cuff tears. An extremely hooked anterior acromion with a slope of more than 43° and an LAA of less than 70° only occurred in patients with rotator cuff tears. PMID:23409811

  15. Brachytherapy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... that stores a very powerful source of radioactive isotopes (Iridium-192). This is done to protect the ... help your physician determine if your condition is stable or has changed. These visits also give you ...

  16. The preterm prediction study: Significance of vaginal infections

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul J. Meis; Robert L. Goldenberg; Brian Mercer; Atef Moawad; Anita Das; Donald McNellis; Francee Johnson; Jay D. Iams; Elizabeth Thom; William W. Andrews

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Our purpose was to evaluate the association of bacterial vaginosis, trichomonas vaginitis, and monilial vaginitis with spontaneous preterm birth at<35 weeks 0 days.STUDY DESIGN: A total of 2929 women at 10 centers were studied at 24 and 28 weeks' gestation by Gram stain of vaginal smear, wet mount, and 10% potassium hydroxide preparations to detect vaginal infections.RESULTS: The rates

  17. Effect of estradiol valerate and levonorgestrel on vaginal health

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jittima Manonai; Apichart Chittacharoen; Urusa Theppisai

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effect of the combined hormone replacement therapy (HRT) estradiol valerate\\/levonorgestrel on vaginal symptoms, vaginal health index, vaginal pH, and vaginal cytology. Study design: A prospective, open-label study involving 32 postmenopausal women was performed in Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand. All the subjects received sequential oral estrogen–progestogen hormone replacement therapy, which contains 2mg estradiol valerate and

  18. Recovery of neural activity from nerve cuff electrodes.

    PubMed

    Wodlinger, B; Durand, D M

    2011-01-01

    The ability to recover signals from the peripheral nerves would provide natural and physiological signals for controlling artificial limbs and neural prosthetic devices. Current cuff electrode systems can provide multiple channels but the signals have low signal to noise ratio and are difficult to recover. Previous work has shown that beamforming algorithms provide a method to extract such signals from peripheral nerve activiy [1]. This paper describes in-silico and in vivo experiments done to validate that method in a more realistic case. A modified beam forming algorithm capable of significantly decrease cross talk between channels is described and the results of the a 16-channel Flat Interface Nerve Electrode used to recover signals from the sciatic nerve in rabbit while the distal tibial and peroneal branches were stimulated The beamforming spatial filters were able to distinguish which branch was being stimulated, and in many cases how strongly, over a large range of stimulation intensities. PMID:22255375

  19. Endotracheal tube cuff ignited by electrocautery during tracheostomy.

    PubMed

    Le Clair, J; Gartner, S; Halma, G

    1990-08-01

    A 64-year old female requiring prolonged ventilatory support was scheduled for an elective tracheostomy. Anesthesia consisted of surgical infiltration of 1% lidocaine and supplemental isoflurane. The patient was mechanically ventilated with an FIO2 of 1.0. An incision was made over the third and fourth tracheal rings. Opening the trachea with electrocautery resulted in a large leak around the endotracheal tube. The cuff was visualized through the tracheal incision and noted to be deflated. A small bleeder was coagulated on the tracheal ring. At this point, a flash fire occurred rising about one-inch high through the tracheal incision. The surgeon immediately covered the site with his hand. The anesthetist promptly disconnected the anesthesia circuit and removed the endotracheal tube. The surgeon inserted the tracheostomy tube and ventilation resumed. The fire lasted approximately 1-2 seconds. Dexamethasone 10 mg was administered intravenously. End-tidal CO2 and oxygen saturation levels were unchanged. The endotracheal tube was inspected. Approximately one-third to one-half of the cuff was charred. Proper management of an endotracheal tube fire includes stopping ventilation, disconnecting the oxygen source, removing the endotracheal tube, diagnosing injury, administering short-term steroids, administering antibiotics if indicated, providing ventilation and medical support as necessary and monitoring the patient for at least 24 hours. Extreme caution is necessary when using electrocautery in close proximity to an endotracheal tube. If electrocautery is used in close proximity to an endotracheal tube, an FIO2 of 0.3 or less with helium should be used. PMID:2399778

  20. Arthroscopic vs mini-open rotator cuff repair. A quality of life impairment study

    PubMed Central

    Osti, Leonardo; Papalia, Rocco; Paganelli, Massimo; Denaro, Enzo

    2009-01-01

    We compared the clinical and quality of life related outcome of rotator cuff repair performed using either a mini-open or an arthroscopic technique for rotator cuff tears of less than 3 cm. The records of 64 patients who underwent rotator cuff repair between September 2003 and September 2005 were evaluated. Thirty-two patients underwent a mini-open rotator cuff repair, and 32 patients underwent an arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. The mean follow-up period was 31 months in the mini-open group and 30.6 months in the arthroscopic group (P?>?0.05). The UCLA rating system, range of motion examination and the self-administered SF-36 used for postoperative evaluation showed a statistically significant improvement from the preoperative to the final score for both groups (P? 0.05). This study suggests that there is no difference in terms of subjective and objective outcomes between the two surgical procedures studied if patients have rotator cuff tears of less than 3 cm. PMID:19424692

  1. A simple method to control tracheal cuff pressure in anaesthesia and in air evacuation.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, I; Watanabe, K; Hayashida, S; Kanno, M; Sato, T

    1999-10-01

    The pressure within latex balloons remains constant despite the balloons being inflated to more than 40 times their initial volume. We used this property to enable improved tracheal cuff pressure control. A latex balloon with an initial volume of 5 ml was connected via a vinyl duct attached with a roller clamp and three-way stopcock to a standard tracheal tube cuff. The 5 ml latex balloon was then inflated with 250 ml of air. The pressure within the tracheal tube cuff was monitored throughout anaesthesia with the inflated latex balloon acting as a pressure controller. Throat symptoms were recorded on the first four postoperative days. The controller kept the tracheal tube cuff pressures constant, and reduced the incidence of postoperative throat symptoms. Variations in cuff pressures with and without the controller were investigated in an altitude chamber to simulate flight. In the altitude chamber, cuff pressure reached over 200 cmH2O at 10 000 feet without the controller, whereas such variations were practically eliminated when the controller was used. PMID:10540063

  2. A new tear pattern of the rotator cuff and its treatment: Fosbury flop tears

    PubMed Central

    Lädermann, Alexandre; Denard, Patrick J.; Kolo, Frank C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this report is to describe a new full-thickness tear pattern of the posterosuperior rotator cuff with reversal healing. We describe the specific radiologic signs associated with this tear pattern and the arthroscopic rotator cuff repair technique. Materials and Methods: A prospective radiologic and clinical study collected all patients with a magnetic resonance imaging arthrogram that underwent an arthroscopic rotator cuff repair over a 1 year period. Results: Among 97 patients, five demonstrated a tear of the posterosuperior rotator cuff with reversal healing. Characteristic radiographic findings included a thicker tendon than normal, the presence of a stump and accumulation of liquid in the superior-medial part of the subacromial bursa, and adhesions between the supraspinatus tendon and the wall of the subacromial bursa. Conclusion: Avulsion of the posterosuperior rotator cuff with reversal healing on its bursal-side is a less common condition. This type of lesion and distinct radiographic signs that can be recognized to facilitate anatomic repair of the rotator cuff. Level of evidence: Level IV. PMID:25709239

  3. Is the Supraspinatus Muscle Atrophy Truly Irreversible after Surgical Repair of Rotator Cuff Tears?

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Seok Won; Kim, Sae Hoon; Tae, Suk-Kee; Yoon, Jong Pil; Choi, Jung-Ah

    2013-01-01

    Background Atrophy of rotator cuff muscles has been considered an irreversible phenomenon. The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether atrophy is truly irreversible after rotator cuff repair. Methods We measured supraspinatus muscle atrophy of 191 patients with full-thickness rotator cuff tears on preoperative magnetic resonance imaging and postoperative multidetector computed tomography images, taken at least 1 year after operation. The occupation ratio was calculated using Photoshop CS3 software. We compared the change between pre- and postoperative occupation ratios after modifying the preoperative occupation ratio. In addition, possible relationship between various clinical factors and the change of atrophy, and between the change of atrophy and cuff integrity after surgical repair were evaluated. Results The mean occupation ratio was significantly increased postoperatively from 0.44 ± 0.17 to 0.52 ± 0.17 (p < 0.001). Among 191 patients, 81 (42.4%) showed improvement of atrophy (more than a 10% increase in occupation ratio) and 33 (17.3%) worsening (more than a 10% decrease). Various clinical factors such as age tear size, or initial degree of atrophy did not affect the change of atrophy. However, the change of atrophy was related to repair integrity: cuff healing failure rate of 48.5% (16 of 33) in worsened atrophy; and 22.2% (18 of 81) in improved atrophy (p = 0.007). Conclusions The supraspinatus muscle atrophy as measured by occupation ratio could be improved postoperatively in case of successful cuff repair. PMID:23467404

  4. Is coracoacromial arch angle a predisposing factor for rotator cuff tears?

    PubMed Central

    Çay, Nurdan; Tosun, Özgür; I??k, Çetin; Ünal, Özlem; Kartal, Merve Gülbiz; Bozkurt, Murat

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of the present study was to investigate whether coracoacromial arch angle is a predisposing factor for rotator cuff tears. METHODS Shoulder magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations of 40 patients having shoulder arthroscopy due to rotator cuff tears and 28 patients with normal MRI findings were evaluated retrospectively. Acromio-humeral distance, coraco-humeral distance, the angle between the longitudinal axis of the coracoacromial ligament and longitudinal axis of the acromion (coracoacromial arch angle), and thickness of the coracoacromial ligament were measured. RESULTS In patients with rotator cuff pathology the mean coraco-humeral distance was 7.88±2.37 mm, the mean acromio-humeral distance was 7.89±2.09 mm, and the mean coracoacromial arch angle was 132.38°±6.52° compared to 11.67±1.86 mm, 11.15±1.84 mm, and 116.95°±7.66° in the control group, respectively (P < 0.001, for all). In regression analysis, all three parameters were found to be significant predictors of rotator cuff tears. The mean thickness of the coracoacromial ligament was not significantly different between the patient and control groups (0.95±0.30 mm vs. 1.00±0.33 mm, P > 0.05). CONCLUSION Acromio-humeral and coraco-humeral distances are narrower than normal limits in patients with rotator cuff tears. In addition, coracoacromial arch angle may be a predisposing factor for rotator cuff tears. PMID:25205023

  5. [Quality control in pulsed dose rate brachytherapy].

    PubMed

    Métayer, Y; Meyer, P; Brunaud, C; Peiffert, D

    2009-07-01

    A prospective multicenter study (PDR) was leaded on pulsed dose rate brachytherapy over 2 years (2005/2006) in 20 French centres, as part of a programme entitled Stic-PDR and supported by the French ministry of health. Eight hundred and fifty patients were treated for cervix carcinoma with 2D classic or 3D innovative brachytherapy (425 in each arm). The main objectives of this study were to assess the cost of PDR brachytherapy with dose optimization compared to traditional treatments, and to evaluate the complications and local control. A joint programme of quality control was established by the physicists of the different centres, concerning the software treatment planning, the source replacement, the projector and the technical parameters of the course of patient treatment. This technical note lists these controls, and their frequency. PMID:19427253

  6. Group A streptococcal vaginitis: an unrecognized cause of vaginal symptoms in adult women

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hans Verstraelen; Rita Verhelst; Mario Vaneechoutte; Marleen Temmerman

    2011-01-01

    Purpose  Vaginal infection with group A streptococci (GAS) is an established cause of vaginitis amongst prepubescent girls, but largely\\u000a unrecognized in adult women and therefore often misdiagnosed as vulvovaginal candidosis. We sought to give an overview of\\u000a the epidemiology, risk factors, symptoms, signs, and treatment of GAS vaginitis in adult women.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Systematic literature search.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Results  We identified nine case reports covering 12

  7. High-Dose Rate Brachytherapy Using Inverse Planning Simulated Annealing for Locoregionally Advanced Cervical Cancer: A Clinical Report With 2-Year Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Daniel H.; Wang-Chesebro, Alice [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Weinberg, Vivian [Comprehensive Cancer Center Biostatistics Core, University of California San Francisco, CA (United States); Pouliot, Jean [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Chen, Lee-May [Division of Gynecologic Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Speight, Joycelyn [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Littell, Ramey [Permanente Medical Group, San Francisco, CA (United States); Hsu, I.-Chow, E-mail: ihsu@radonc.ucsf.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: We present clinical outcomes of image-guided brachytherapy using inverse planning simulated annealing (IPSA) planned high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy boost for locoregionally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: From February 2004 through December 2006, 51 patients were treated at the University of California, San Francisco with HDR brachytherapy boost as part of definitive radiation for International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stage IB1 to Stage IVA cervical cancer. Of the patients, 46 received concurrent chemotherapy, 43 with cisplatin alone and 3 with cisplatin/5-fluorouracil. All patients had IPSA-planned HDR brachytherapy boost after whole-pelvis external radiation to a total tumor dose of 85 Gy or greater (for alpha/beta = 10). Toxicities are reported according to National Cancer Institute CTCAE v3.0 (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0) guidelines. Results: At a median follow-up of 24.3 months, there were no toxicities of Grade 4 or greater and the frequencies of Grade 3 acute and late toxicities were 4% and 2%, respectively. The proportion of patients having Grade 1 or 2 gastrointestinal and genitourinary acute toxicities was 48% and 52%, respectively. Low-grade late toxicities included Grade 1 or 2 vaginal, gastrointestinal, and hormonal toxicities in 31%, 18%, and 4% of patients, respectively. During the follow-up period, local recurrence developed in 2 patients, regional recurrence developed in 2, and new distant metastases developed in 15. The rates of locoregional control of disease and overall survival at 24 months were 91% and 86%, respectively. Conclusions: Definitive radiation by use of inverse planned HDR brachytherapy boost for locoregionally advanced cervical cancer is well tolerated and achieves excellent local control of disease.

  8. 10 CFR 35.400 - Use of sources for manual brachytherapy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... false Use of sources for manual brachytherapy. 35.400 Section 35.400 Energy...MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.400 Use of sources for manual brachytherapy. A licensee shall use only...

  9. Predictors of Toxicity After Image-guided High-dose-rate Interstitial Brachytherapy for Gynecologic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Larissa J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Viswanathan, Akila N., E-mail: aviswanathan@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To identify predictors of grade 3-4 complications and grade 2-4 rectal toxicity after three-dimensional image-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy for gynecologic cancer. Methods and Materials: Records were reviewed for 51 women (22 with primary disease and 29 with recurrence) treated with HDR interstitial brachytherapy. A single interstitial insertion was performed with image guidance by computed tomography (n = 43) or magnetic resonance imaging (n = 8). The median delivered dose in equivalent 2-Gy fractions was 72.0 Gy (45 Gy for external-beam radiation therapy and 24 Gy for brachytherapy). Toxicity was reported according to the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events. Actuarial toxicity estimates were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: At diagnosis, the median patient age was 62 years and the median tumor size was 3.8 cm. The median D90 and V100 were 71.4 Gy and 89.5%; the median D2cc for the bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were 64.6 Gy, 61.0 Gy, and 52.7 Gy, respectively. The actuarial rates of all grade 3-4 complications at 2 years were 20% gastrointestinal, 9% vaginal, 6% skin, 3% musculoskeletal, and 2% lymphatic. There were no grade 3-4 genitourinary complications and no grade 5 toxicities. Grade 2-4 rectal toxicity was observed in 10 patients, and grade 3-4 complications in 4; all cases were proctitis with the exception of 1 rectal fistula. D2cc for rectum was higher for patients with grade 2-4 (68 Gy vs 57 Gy for grade 0-1, P=.03) and grade 3-4 (73 Gy vs 58 Gy for grade 0-2, P=.02) rectal toxicity. The estimated dose that resulted in a 10% risk of grade 2-4 rectal toxicity was 61.8 Gy (95% confidence interval, 51.5-72.2 Gy). Discussion: Image-guided HDR interstitial brachytherapy results in acceptable toxicity for women with primary or recurrent gynecologic cancer. D2cc for the rectum is a reliable predictor of late rectal complications. Three-dimensional-based treatment planning should be performed to ensure adequate tumor coverage while minimizing the D2cc to the rectum.

  10. Fixation of the vaginal apex to the coccygeous fascia during repair of vaginal vault eversion with enterocele

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William A. Peters; Maureen L. Christenson

    1995-01-01

    Objective: This study was undertaken to compare the effectiveness of fixation of the vaginal apex to the coccygeus fascia with fixation to the sacrospinous ligament during surgical repair of vaginal vault eversion with enetrocele.Study design: The records of 121 patients with postheysterectomy vaginal vault eversion with enterocele treated by the author between 1983 and 1994 were reviewed. Preoperative and postoperative

  11. Immunity to vaginal infection by herpes simplex virus type 2 in adult mice: characterization of the immunoglobulins in vaginal mucus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Earl L Parr; John J Bozzola; Margaret B Parr

    1998-01-01

    Progestin-treated female mice are susceptible to vaginal infection by two sexually transmitted disease organisms: herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) and Chlamydia trachomatis. Vaccination of mice with HSV-2 or chlamydial antigens elicits immunity to vaginal infection that may be due in part to secreted antibodies in the vaginal lumen. Analysis of the role of these antibodies in immunity would be

  12. Gadolinium neutron capture brachytherapy (GdNCB), a new treatment method for intravascular brachytherapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hans Lundqvist; Per Munck af Rosenschoeld; Arash Rezaei; Shirin A. Enger

    2006-01-01

    Restenosis is a major problem after balloon angioplasty and stent implantation. The aim of this study is to introduce gadolinium neutron capture brachytherapy (GdNCB) as a suitable modality for treatment of stenosis. The utility of GdNCB in intravascular brachytherapy (IVBT) of stent stenosis is investigated by using the GEANT4 and MCNP4B Monte Carlo radiation transport codes. To study capture rate,

  13. Clinical and Radiological Evaluation after Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair Using Suture Bridge Technique

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwang Won; Bae, Kyoung Wan; Choy, Won Sik

    2013-01-01

    Background We retrospectively assessed the clinical outcomes and investigated risk factors influencing retear after arthroscopic suture bridge repair technique for rotator cuff tear through clinical assessment and magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA). Methods Between January 2008 and April 2011, sixty-two cases of full-thickness rotator cuff tear were treated with arthroscopic suture bridge repair technique and follow-up MRA were performed. The mean age was 56.1 years, and mean follow-up period was 27.4 months. Clinical and functional outcomes were assessed using range of motion, Korean shoulder score, Constant score, and UCLA score. Radiological outcome was evaluated with preoperative and follow-up MRA. Potential predictive factors that influenced cuff retear, such as age, gender, geometric patterns of tear, size of cuff tear, acromioplasty, fatty degeneration, atrophy of cuff muscle, retraction of supraspinatus, involved muscles of cuff and osteolysis around the suture anchor were evaluated. Results Thirty cases (48.4%) revealed retear on MRA. In univariable analysis, retear was significantly more frequent in over 60 years age group (62.5%) than under 60 years age group (39.5%; p = 0.043), and also in medium to large-sized tear than small-sized tear (p = 0.003). There was significant difference in geometric pattern of tear (p = 0.015). In multivariable analysis, only age (p = 0.036) and size of tear (p = 0.030) revealed a significant difference. The mean active range of motion for forward flexion, abduction, external rotation at the side and internal rotation at the side were significantly improved at follow-up (p < 0.05). The mean Korean shoulder score, Constant score, and UCLA score increased significantly at follow-up (p < 0.01). The range of motion, Korean shoulder score, Constant score, and UCLA score did not differ significantly between the groups with retear and intact repairs (p > 0.05). The locations of retear were insertion site in 10 cases (33.3%) and musculotendinous junction in 20 cases (66.7%; p = 0.006). Conclusions Suture bridge repair technique for rotator cuff tear showed improved clinical results. Cuff integrity after repair did not affect clinical results. Age of over 60 years and size of cuff tear larger than 1 cm were factors influencing rotator cuff retear after arthroscopic suture bridge repair technique. PMID:24340151

  14. Vaginal Lactobacillus: biofilm formation in vivo - clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Ventolini, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Vaginal lactobacilli provide protection against intrusive pathogenic bacteria. Some Lactobacillus spp. produce in vitro a thick, protective biofilm. We report in vivo formation of biofilm by vaginal Lactobacillus jensenii. The biofilm formation was captured in fresh wet-mount microscopic samples from asymptomatic patients after treatment for recurrent bacterial vaginitis. In vivo documentation of biofilm formation is in our opinion noteworthy, and has significant clinical implications, among which are the possibility to isolate, grow, and therapeutically utilize lactobacilli to prevent recurrent vaginal infections and preterm labor associated with vaginal microbial pathogens. PMID:25733930

  15. Secretory Aspartyl Proteinases Cause Vaginitis and Can Mediate Vaginitis Caused by Candida albicans in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pericolini, Eva; Gabrielli, Elena; Amacker, Mario; Kasper, Lydia; Roselletti, Elena; Luciano, Eugenio; Sabbatini, Samuele; Kaeser, Matthias; Moser, Christian; Hube, Bernhard; Vecchiarelli, Anna

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vaginal inflammation (vaginitis) is the most common disease caused by the human-pathogenic fungus Candida albicans. Secretory aspartyl proteinases (Sap) are major virulence traits of C. albicans that have been suggested to play a role in vaginitis. To dissect the mechanisms by which Sap play this role, Sap2, a dominantly expressed member of the Sap family and a putative constituent of an anti-Candida vaccine, was used. Injection of full-length Sap2 into the mouse vagina caused local neutrophil influx and accumulation of the inflammasome-dependent interleukin-1? (IL-1?) but not of inflammasome-independent tumor necrosis factor alpha. Sap2 could be replaced by other Sap, while no inflammation was induced by the vaccine antigen, the N-terminal-truncated, enzymatically inactive tSap2. Anti-Sap2 antibodies, in particular Fab from a human combinatorial antibody library, inhibited or abolished the inflammatory response, provided the antibodies were able, like the Sap inhibitor Pepstatin A, to inhibit Sap enzyme activity. The same antibodies and Pepstatin A also inhibited neutrophil influx and cytokine production stimulated by C. albicans intravaginal injection, and a mutant strain lacking SAP1, SAP2, and SAP3 was unable to cause vaginal inflammation. Sap2 induced expression of activated caspase-1 in murine and human vaginal epithelial cells. Caspase-1 inhibition downregulated IL-1? and IL-18 production by vaginal epithelial cells, and blockade of the IL-1? receptor strongly reduced neutrophil influx. Overall, the data suggest that some Sap, particularly Sap2, are proinflammatory proteins in vivo and can mediate the inflammasome-dependent, acute inflammatory response of vaginal epithelial cells to C. albicans. These findings support the notion that vaccine-induced or passively administered anti-Sap antibodies could contribute to control vaginitis. PMID:26037125

  16. Development and evaluation of acid-buffering bioadhesive vaginal tablet for mixed vaginal infections

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mohd Aftab Alam; Farhan Jalees Ahmad; Zeenat Iqbal Khan; Roop Krishen Khar; Mushir Ali

    2007-01-01

    An acid-buffering bioadhesive vaginal tablet was developed for the treatment of genitourinary tract infections. From the bioadhesion\\u000a experiment and release studies it was found that polycarbophil and sodium carboxymethylcellulose is a good combination for\\u000a an acid-buffering bioadhesive vaginal tablet. Sodium monocitrate was used as a buffering agent to provide acidic pH (4.4),\\u000a which is an attribute of a healthy vagina.

  17. [Neonatal outcomes after instrumental vaginal delivery].

    PubMed

    Baud, O

    2008-12-01

    Instrumental vaginal delivery is currently widely used among obstetrical practices and leads to significant decrease in fetal mortality and morbidity. However, these practices could be associated with several neonatal adverse effects. Very few of these complications are specific and most of them could be observed during normal vaginal delivery. Neonatal mortality is not changed by forceps or vacuum use if no other risk factors are associated. The main neonatal adverse outcomes described with both techniques are extra and intracranial haemorrhages. Usually, intra-cerebral haemorrhages have good neurological prognosis. However, few longitudinal studies are available in the literature on long term outcome of exposed newborns. Other traumatic complications observed when using forceps (facial nerve palsy, cranial skull) are not associated with long term functional consequences. Many of the most severe neonatal complications are observed when perinatal asphyxia has occurred. Extractor types and quality of use under defined criteria are closely associated with neonatal adverse outcomes in operative vaginal delivery. Forceps deliveries are as safe as vacuum deliveries to the neonate. In conclusion, operative vaginal delivery performed for maternal or fetal reasons are associated with several neonatal adverse events, usually non specific and with a short term good prognosis. PMID:19268202

  18. Vaginal mesh erosion after abdominal sacral colpopexy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anthony G. Visco; Alison C. Weidner; Matthew D. Barber; Evan R. Myers; Geoffrey W. Cundiff; Richard C. Bump; W. Allen Addison

    2001-01-01

    Objective: Our goal was to compare the prevalence of vaginal mesh erosion between abdominal sacral colpopexy and various sacral colpoperineopexy procedures. Study Design: We undertook a retrospective analysis of all sacral colpopexies and colpoperineopexies performed between March 1, 1992, and February 28, 1999. The patients were divided into the following 4 groups: abdominal sacral colpopexy, abdominal sacral colpoperineopexy, and 2

  19. Postirradiation angiosarcoma of the vaginal vault

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, W.W.; SenGupta, S.K. (Queen's Univ., Kingston, (Ontario))

    1991-05-01

    We describe a unique case of an angiosarcoma arising in the vaginal vault 21 years after hysterectomy and radiotherapy for stage I carcinoma of the cervix. We also review the literature regarding angiosarcomas arising after previous radiation therapy for gynecologic malignancies.

  20. Vaginal Discharge: What's Normal, What's Not

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for Parents for Kids for Teens Teens Home Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Q&A School & Jobs Drugs & Alcohol Staying Safe Recipes En Español ... Guide to Body Image Vaginal Discharge: What's Normal, What's Not KidsHealth > ...

  1. Vaginal misoprostol compared with vaginal gemeprost in termination of second trimester pregnancy. A randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Wong, K S; Ngai, C S; Wong, A Y; Tang, L C; Ho, P C

    1998-10-01

    A prospective randomized trial was conducted in 140 women to compare the efficacy of vaginal gemeprost with vaginal misoprostol for termination of second trimester pregnancy. Women requesting termination of second trimester pregnancy were randomized into two groups. Group A women were given 1 mg vaginal gemeprost every 3 h for a maximum of five doses in the first 24 h, whereas group B women were given 400 micrograms vaginal misoprostol every 3 h for a maximum of five doses in 24 h. The median induction-abortion interval in the vaginal misoprostol group (14.1 h) was significantly shorter than that in the gemeprost group (19.5 h). The percentage of women who achieved successful abortion within 24 h in the misoprostol group (80.0%) was significantly higher than that in the gemeprost group (58.6%). There was no significant difference in the incidence of side effects between the two groups except for diarrhea, which was more common in the gemeprost group. The incidence of fever was more common in the misoprostol group. It is concluded that vaginal misoprostol is more effective than gemeprost in termination of second trimester pregnancy. PMID:9866000

  2. Atrophic Vaginitis in Breast Cancer Survivors: A Difficult Survivorship Issue

    PubMed Central

    Lester, Joanne; Pahouja, Gaurav; Andersen, Barbara; Lustberg, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Management of breast cancer includes systematic therapies including chemotherapy and endocrine therapy can lead to a variety of symptoms that can impair the quality of life of many breast cancer survivors. Atrophic vaginitis, caused by decreased levels of circulating estrogen to urinary and vaginal receptors, is commonly experienced by this group. Chemotherapy induced ovarian failure and endocrine therapies including aromatase inhibitors and selective estrogen receptor modulators can trigger the onset of atrophic vaginitis or exacerbate existing symptoms. Symptoms of atrophic vaginitis include vaginal dryness, dyspareunia, and irritation of genital skin, pruritus, burning, vaginal discharge, and soreness. The diagnosis of atrophic vaginitis is confirmed through patient-reported symptoms and gynecological examination of external structures, introitus, and vaginal mucosa. Lifestyle modifications can be helpful but are usually insufficient to significantly improve symptoms. Non-hormonal vaginal therapies may provide additional relief by increasing vaginal moisture and fluid. Systemic estrogen therapy is contraindicated in breast cancer survivors. Continued investigations of various treatments for atrophic vaginitis are necessary. Local estrogen-based therapies, DHEA, testosterone, and pH-balanced gels continue to be evaluated in ongoing studies. Definitive results are needed pertaining to the safety of topical estrogens in breast cancer survivors. PMID:25815692

  3. Vaginal Douching Among Latinas: Practices and Meaning

    PubMed Central

    Baquero, María; Anderson, Matthew R.; Alvarez, Adelyn; Karasz, Alison

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Vaginal douching is widely practiced by American women, particularly among minority groups, and is associated with increased risk of pelvic and vaginal infections. This research sought to investigate vaginal hygiene practices and meaning associated with them among Latina women and adolescents. Study results would guide development of an intervention to decrease douching among Latinas. Methods In depth qualitative interviews conducted with English- and Spanish-speaking women aged 16–40, seeking care for any reason who reported douching within the last year (n = 34). Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed and analyzed using qualitative methods. One-third of interviews were conducted in Spanish. Results Two explanatory models for douching motives emerged: one stressed cosmetic benefits; the other, infection prevention and control. Most women reported douching to eliminate menstrual residue; a small number reported douching in context of sexual intercourse or vaginal symptoms. Many were unaware of associated health risks. Respondents typically learned about douching from female family members and friends. Male partners were described as having little to no involvement in the decision to douche. Women varied in their willingness to stop douching. Two-thirds reported receiving harm reduction messages about “overdouching”. About half indicated previous discussion about douching with health care providers; some had reduced frequency in response to counseling. A number of previously unreported vaginal hygiene practices and products were described, including use of a range of traditional hygiene practices, and products imported from outside the US. Conclusions Respondents expressed a range of commitment to douching. Counseling messages acknowledging benefits women perceive as well as health risks should be developed and delivered tailored to individual beliefs. Further research is needed to assess prevalence and safety of previously unreported practices. PMID:18297379

  4. Activity characterization of pure- ?-emitting brachytherapy sources

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Collé

    2002-01-01

    A generalized approach for characterizing the activity content of sealed ?-emitting sources has been developed, and was employed to establish National Institute of Standards and Technology based activity standardizations for three different types of intravascular brachytherapy sources. Initial ionization current measurements on the sources prior to destructive assays led to the establishment of calibration factors that can be used for

  5. Radiation safety requirements for cardiovascular brachytherapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Billy G Bass

    1999-01-01

    Cardiovascular brachytherapy, the use of high intensity radiation to inhibit the growth of neointimal tissue after coronary revascularization by either balloon angioplasty or other methods is being tested in a number of clinical trials to assess the efficacy of the treatment. This new use of radiation to aleviate the suffering of individuals with coronary artery disease has excited many interventionalists

  6. Gadolinium-153 as a brachytherapy isotope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enger, Shirin A.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Flynn, Ryan T.

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this work was to present the fundamental dosimetric characteristics of a hypothetical 153Gd brachytherapy source using the AAPM TG-43U1 dose-calculation formalism. Gadolinium-153 is an intermediate-energy isotope that emits 40-100 keV photons with a half-life of 242 days. The rationale for considering 153Gd as a brachytherapy source is for its potential of patient specific shielding and to enable reduced personnel shielding requirements relative to 192Ir, and as an isotope for interstitial rotating shield brachytherapy (I-RSBT). A hypothetical 153Gd brachytherapy source with an active core of 0.84 mm diameter, 10 mm length and specific activity of 5.55 TBq of 153Gd per gram of Gd was simulated with Geant4. The encapsulation material was stainless steel with a thickness of 0.08 mm. The radial dose function, anisotropy function and photon spectrum in water were calculated for the 153Gd source. The simulated 153Gd source had an activity of 242 GBq and a dose rate in water 1 cm off axis of 13.12 Gy h-1, indicating that it would be suitable as a low-dose-rate or pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy source. The beta particles emitted have low enough energies to be absorbed in the source encapsulation. Gadolinium-153 has an increasing radial dose function due to multiple scatter of low-energy photons. Scattered photon dose takes over with distance from the source and contributes to the majority of the absorbed dose. The anisotropy function of the 153Gd source decreases at low polar angles, as a result of the long active core. The source is less anisotropic at polar angles away from the longitudinal axes. The anisotropy function increases with increasing distance. The 153Gd source considered would be suitable as an intermediate-energy low-dose-rate or pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy source. The source could provide a means for I-RSBT delivery and enable brachytherapy treatments with patient specific shielding and reduced personnel shielding requirements relative to 192Ir.

  7. Gadolinium-153 as a brachytherapy isotope.

    PubMed

    Enger, Shirin A; Fisher, Darrell R; Flynn, Ryan T

    2013-02-21

    The purpose of this work was to present the fundamental dosimetric characteristics of a hypothetical (153)Gd brachytherapy source using the AAPM TG-43U1 dose-calculation formalism. Gadolinium-153 is an intermediate-energy isotope that emits 40-100 keV photons with a half-life of 242 days. The rationale for considering (153)Gd as a brachytherapy source is for its potential of patient specific shielding and to enable reduced personnel shielding requirements relative to (192)Ir, and as an isotope for interstitial rotating shield brachytherapy (I-RSBT). A hypothetical (153)Gd brachytherapy source with an active core of 0.84 mm diameter, 10 mm length and specific activity of 5.55 TBq of (153)Gd per gram of Gd was simulated with Geant4. The encapsulation material was stainless steel with a thickness of 0.08 mm. The radial dose function, anisotropy function and photon spectrum in water were calculated for the (153)Gd source. The simulated (153)Gd source had an activity of 242 GBq and a dose rate in water 1 cm off axis of 13.12 Gy h(-1), indicating that it would be suitable as a low-dose-rate or pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy source. The beta particles emitted have low enough energies to be absorbed in the source encapsulation. Gadolinium-153 has an increasing radial dose function due to multiple scatter of low-energy photons. Scattered photon dose takes over with distance from the source and contributes to the majority of the absorbed dose. The anisotropy function of the (153)Gd source decreases at low polar angles, as a result of the long active core. The source is less anisotropic at polar angles away from the longitudinal axes. The anisotropy function increases with increasing distance. The (153)Gd source considered would be suitable as an intermediate-energy low-dose-rate or pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy source. The source could provide a means for I-RSBT delivery and enable brachytherapy treatments with patient specific shielding and reduced personnel shielding requirements relative to (192)Ir. PMID:23339848

  8. Automated intraoperative calibration for prostate cancer brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kuiran Chen, Thomas; Heffter, Tamas; Lasso, Andras; Pinter, Csaba; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Burdette, E. Clif; Fichtinger, Gabor [Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6 (Canada); University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4 (Canada); Acoustic MedSystems, Inc., Champaign, Illinois 61820-3979 (United States); Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6 (Canada) and Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218-2682 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Prostate cancer brachytherapy relies on an accurate spatial registration between the implant needles and the TRUS image, called ''calibration''. The authors propose a new device and a fast, automatic method to calibrate the brachytherapy system in the operating room, with instant error feedback. Methods: A device was CAD-designed and precision-engineered, which mechanically couples a calibration phantom with an exact replica of the standard brachytherapy template. From real-time TRUS images acquired from the calibration device and processed by the calibration system, the coordinate transformation between the brachytherapy template and the TRUS images was computed automatically. The system instantly generated a report of the target reconstruction accuracy based on the current calibration outcome. Results: Four types of validation tests were conducted. First, 50 independent, real-time calibration trials yielded an average of 0.57 {+-} 0.13 mm line reconstruction error (LRE) relative to ground truth. Second, the averaged LRE was 0.37 {+-} 0.25 mm relative to ground truth in tests with six different commercial TRUS scanners operating at similar imaging settings. Furthermore, testing with five different commercial stepper systems yielded an average of 0.29 {+-} 0.16 mm LRE relative to ground truth. Finally, the system achieved an average of 0.56 {+-} 0.27 mm target registration error (TRE) relative to ground truth in needle insertion tests through the template in a water tank. Conclusions: The proposed automatic, intraoperative calibration system for prostate cancer brachytherapy has achieved high accuracy, precision, and robustness.

  9. Arthroscopic treatment options for irreparable rotator cuff tears of the shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Anley, Cameron M; Chan, Samuel KL; Snow, Martyn

    2014-01-01

    The management of patients with irreparable rotator cuff tears remains a challenge for orthopaedic surgeons with the final treatment option in many algorithms being either a reverse shoulder arthroplasty or a tendon transfer. The long term results of these procedures are however still widely debated, especially in younger patients. A variety of arthroscopic treatment options have been proposed for patients with an irreparable rotator cuff tear without the presence of arthritis of the glenohumeral joint. These include a simple debridement with or without a biceps tenotomy, partial rotator cuff repair with or without an interval slide, tuberplasty, graft interposition of the rotator cuff, suprascapular nerve ablation, superior capsule reconstruction and insertion of a biodegradable spacer (Inspace) to depress the humeral head. These options should be considered as part of the treatment algorithm in patients with an irreparable rotator cuff and could be used as either as an interim procedure, delaying the need for more invasive surgery in the physiologically young and active, or as potential definitive procedures in the medically unfit. The aim of this review is to highlight and summarise arthroscopic procedures and the results thereof currently utilised in the management of these challenging patients. PMID:25405083

  10. Epidemiology of the rotator cuff tears: a new incidence related to thyroid disease

    PubMed Central

    Oliva, Francesco; Osti, Leonardo; Padulo, Johnny; Maffulli, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background: in the last years the incidence of rotator cuff tears increased and one main cause still waiting to be clarified. Receptors for thyroid hormones in rotator cuff tendons suggest possible effects on tendons metabolism and status. We undertook a retrospective, observational cohort study of 441 patients who underwent arthroscopic and mini-open repair for non traumatic degenerative rotator cuff tears. Methods: all the patients, predominantly females (63%), were interview to assess the relationship (frequency for class age “20 yrs” and factor analysis) between lesions of the rotator cuff with the following variables: gender, thyroid disease, smoker, taking medications for diabetes, hypertension or high cholesterol; presence of associated conditions (diabetes, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia). Results: thyroid disease is highly frequently (until 63% for 60<80 yrs) in females group independent to the age. Conversely, males showed a high frequency for smoker 37<62% until 80 yrs and 50% hypercholesterolemia over 80 yrs for the clinical variable studied. Conclusions: this is the first clinical report that shown a relationship between thyroid pathologies and non-traumatic rotator cuff tear as increased risk factors. PMID:25489548

  11. The effect of pilot balloon design on estimation of safe tracheal tube cuff pressure.

    PubMed

    Janossy, K M; Pullen, J; Young, D; Bell, G

    2010-08-01

    We studied the effect of pilot balloon design on the ability of experienced anaesthetists to assess and inflate tracheal tube cuffs to safe pressures. A model trachea was designed, incorporating a degree of compliance and an air leak, to evaluate six different pilot balloons grafted onto identical tracheal tubes. Pilot balloons were inflated to one of four pressures and anaesthetists were asked to estimate whether the pressure was acceptable, too low or too high. Anaesthetists were then asked to inflate the cuff of each tube. Overall, 103 (42.9%) of anaesthetists' assessments of tracheal tube cuff pressures were correct (33% correct would be expected by chance, p = 0.002). Pressures generated by anaesthetists inflating tracheal tube cuffs were very variable. Median (IQR [range]) pressures for each pilot balloon ranged from 29 (17-43 [9-56]) cmH(2)O to 74 (49-114 [4-140]) cmH(2)O (p < 0.001). The design of the pilot balloon significantly affects anaesthetists' ability to inflate tracheal tube cuffs to safe pressures. PMID:20573148

  12. The vaginal microflora in relation to gingivitis

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Gingivitis has been linked to adverse pregnancy outcome (APO). Bacterial vaginosis (BV) has been associated with APO. We assessed if bacterial counts in BV is associated with gingivitis suggesting a systemic infectious susceptibilty. Methods Vaginal samples were collected from 180 women (mean age 29.4 years, SD ± 6.8, range: 18 to 46), and at least six months after delivery, and assessed by semi-quantitative DNA-DNA checkerboard hybridization assay (74 bacterial species). BV was defined by Gram stain (Nugent criteria). Gingivitis was defined as bleeding on probing at ? 20% of tooth sites. Results A Nugent score of 0–3 (normal vaginal microflora) was found in 83 women (46.1%), and a score of > 7 (BV) in 49 women (27.2%). Gingivitis was diagnosed in 114 women (63.3%). Women with a diagnosis of BV were more likely to have gingivitis (p = 0.01). Independent of gingival conditions, vaginal bacterial counts were higher (p < 0.001) for 38/74 species in BV+ in comparison to BV- women. Counts of four lactobacilli species were higher in BV- women (p < 0.001). Independent of BV diagnosis, women with gingivitis had higher counts of Prevotella bivia (p < 0.001), and Prevotella disiens (p < 0.001). P. bivia, P. disiens, M. curtisii and M. mulieris (all at the p < 0.01 level) were found at higher levels in the BV+/G+ group than in the BV+/G- group. The sum of bacterial load (74 species) was higher in the BV+/G+ group than in the BV+/G- group (p < 0.05). The highest odds ratio for the presence of bacteria in vaginal samples (> 1.0 × 104 cells) and a diagnosis of gingivitis was 3.9 for P. bivia (95% CI 1.5–5.7, p < 0.001) and 3.6 for P. disiens (95%CI: 1.8–7.5, p < 0.001), and a diagnosis of BV for P. bivia (odds ratio: 5.3, 95%CI: 2.6 to 10.4, p < 0.001) and P. disiens (odds ratio: 4.4, 95% CI: 2.2 to 8.8, p < 0.001). Conclusion Higher vaginal bacterial counts can be found in women with BV and gingivitis in comparison to women with BV but not gingivitis. P. bivia and P. disiens may be of specific significance in a relationship between vaginal and gingival infections. PMID:19161595

  13. Electromyographic assessment of muscle fatigue in massive rotator cuff tear.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, D H; Alizadehkhaiyat, O; Kemp, G J; Fisher, A C; Roebuck, M M; Frostick, S P

    2015-02-01

    Shoulder muscle fatigue has not been assessed in massive rotator cuff tear (MRCT). This study used EMG to measure fatigability of 13 shoulder muscles in 14 healthy controls and 11 patients with MRCT. A hand grip protocol was applied to minimise artifacts due to pain experience during measurement. The fatigue index (median frequency slope) was significantly non-zero (negative) for anterior, middle, and posterior parts of deltoid, supraspinatus and subscapularis muscles in the controls, and for anterior, middle, and posterior parts of deltoid, and pectoralis major in patients (p ? 0.001). Fatigue was significantly greater in patients compared to the controls for anterior and middle parts of deltoid and pectoralis major (p ? 0.001). A submaximal grip task provided a feasible way to assess shoulder muscle fatigue in MRCT patients, however with some limitations. The results suggest increased activation of deltoid is required to compensate for lost supraspinatus abduction torque. Increased pectoralis major fatigue in patients (adduction torque) likely reflected strategy to stabilise the humeral head against superior subluxing force of the deltoid. Considering physiotherapy as a primary or adjunct intervention for the management of MRCT, the findings of this study generate a base for future clinical studies aiming at the development of evidence-based protocols. PMID:25301260

  14. Assessment and characterization of in situ rotator cuff biomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trent, Erika A.; Bailey, Lane; Mefleh, Fuad N.; Raikar, Vipul P.; Shanley, Ellen; Thigpen, Charles A.; Dean, Delphine; Kwartowitz, David M.

    2013-03-01

    Rotator cuff disease is a degenerative disorder that is a common, costly, and often debilitating, ranging in severity from partial thickness tear, which may cause pain, to total rupture, leading to loss in function. Currently, clinical diagnosis and determination of disease extent relies primarily on subjective assessment of pain, range of motion, and possibly X-ray or ultrasound images. The final treatment plan however is at the discretion of the clinician, who often bases their decision on personal experiences, and not quantitative standards. The use of ultrasound for the assessment of tissue biomechanics is established, such as in ultrasound elastography, where soft tissue biomechanics are measured. Few studies have investigated the use of ultrasound elastography in the characterization of musculoskeletal biomechanics. To assess tissue biomechanics we have developed a device, which measures the force applied to the underlying musculotendentious tissue while simultaneously obtaining the related ultrasound images. In this work, the musculotendinous region of the infraspinatus of twenty asymptomatic male organized baseball players was examined to access the variability in tissue properties within a single patient and across a normal population. Elastic moduli at percent strains less than 15 were significantly different than those above 15 percent strain within the normal population. No significant difference in tissue properties was demonstrated within a single patient. This analysis demonstrated elastic moduli are variable across individuals and incidence. Therefore threshold elastic moduli will likely be a function of variation in local-tissue moduli as opposed to a specific global value.

  15. Relationship among vaginal palpation, vaginal squeeze pressure, electromyographic and ultrasonographic variables of female pelvic floor muscles.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Vanessa S; Hirakawa, Humberto S; Oliveira, Ana B; Driusso, Patricia

    2014-10-10

    Background: The proper evaluation of the pelvic floor muscles (PFM) is essential for choosing the correct treatment. Currently, there is no gold standard for the assessment of female PFM function. Objective: To determine the correlation between vaginal palpation, vaginal squeeze pressure, and electromyographic and ultrasonographic variables of the female PFM. Method: This cross-sectional study evaluated 80 women between 18 and 35 years of age who were nulliparous and had no pelvic floor dysfunction. PFM function was assessed based on digital palpation, vaginal squeeze pressure, electromyographic activity, bilateral diameter of the bulbocavernosus muscles and the amount of bladder neck movement during voluntary PFM contraction using transperineal bi-dimensional ultrasound. The Pearson correlation was used for statistical analysis (p<0.05). Results: There was a strong positive correlation between PFM function and PFM contraction pressure (0.90). In addition, there was a moderate positive correlation between these two variables and PFM electromyographic activity (0.59 and 0.63, respectively) and movement of the bladder neck in relation to the pubic symphysis (0.51 and 0.60, respectively). Conclusions: This study showed that there was a correlation between vaginal palpation, vaginal squeeze pressure, and electromyographic and ultrasonographic variables of the PFM in nulliparous women. The strong correlation between digital palpation and PFM contraction pressure indicated that perineometry could easily be replaced by PFM digital palpation in the absence of equipment. PMID:25317769

  16. Ultra-low-dose vaginal estrogen tablets for the treatment of postmenopausal vaginal atrophy.

    PubMed

    Simon, J A; Maamari, R V

    2013-08-01

    Vaginal atrophy is a common chronic condition affecting up to 57% of postmenopausal women. The decrease in estrogen following cessation of menses can lead to bothersome symptoms that include vaginal dryness and irritation, pain and burning during urination (dysuria), urinary tract infections, and pain (dyspareunia) and bleeding during sexual activities. These symptoms can be safely and effectively managed with the use of local estrogen therapy, which reduces the risks associated with long-term systemic hormone therapy. The ultra-low-dose 10 ?g estradiol vaginal tablet is the lowest approved dose available and has an annual estradiol exposure of only 1.14 mg. Its development addresses recommendations from regulatory agencies and women's health societies regarding the use of the lowest hormonal dose. The 10 ?g vaginal tablet displays minimal estradiol absorption, causes no increased risk of endometrial hyperplasia or carcinoma, and provides significant symptom relief. The clinical evidence presented here may offer greater reassurance to health-care professionals and postmenopausal women that vaginal atrophy can be treated safely and effectively. PMID:23848490

  17. Development and evaluation of acid-buffering bioadhesive vaginal tablet for mixed vaginal infections.

    PubMed

    Alam, Mohd Aftab; Ahmad, Farhan Jalees; Khan, Zeenat Iqbal; Khar, Roop Krishen; Ali, Mushir

    2007-01-01

    An acid-buffering bioadhesive vaginal tablet was developed for the treatment of genitourinary tract infections. From the bioadhesion experiment and release studies it was found that polycarbophil and sodium carboxymethylcellulose is a good combination for an acid-buffering bioadhesive vaginal tablet. Sodium monocitrate was used as a buffering agent to provide acidic pH (4.4), which is an attribute of a healthy vagina. The effervescent mixture (citric acid and sodium bicarbonate) along with a superdisintegrant (Ac-Di-sol) was used to enhance the swellability of the bioadhesive tablet. The drugs clotrimazole (antifungal) and metronidazole (antiprotozoal as well as an antibacterial) were used in the formulation along with Lactobacillus acidophilus spores to treat mixed vaginal infections. From the ex vivo retention study it was found that the bioadhesive polymers hold the tablet for more than 24 hours inside the vaginal tube. The hardness of the acid-buffering bioadhesive vaginal tablet was optimized, at 4 to 5 kg hardness the swelling was found to be good and the cumulative release profile of the developed tablet was matched with a marketed conventional tablet (Infa-V). The in vitro spreadability of the swelled tablet was comparable to the marketed gel. In the in vitro antimicrobial study it was found that the acid-buffering bioadhesive tablet produces better antimicrobial action than marketed intravaginal drug delivery systems (Infa-V, Candid-V and Canesten 1). PMID:18181530

  18. Vaginal Evisceration: An Unexpected Complication of Conization

    PubMed Central

    Ghassani, Ali; Andre, Benoit; Simon-Toulza, Caroline; Tanguy le Gac, Yann; Martinez, Alejandra; Vidal, Fabien

    2014-01-01

    Background. Large loop excision of the transformation zone (LLETZ) is routinely performed for the management of high grade intracervical neoplasia (CIN). Several uncommon complications have been described, including postoperative peritonitis, pseudoaneurysm of uterine artery, and bowel fistula. We report a unique case of postoperative vaginal evisceration and the subsequent management. Case. A 73-years-old woman underwent LLETZ for high grade CIN. On postoperative day 3, she was admitted for small bowel evisceration through the vagina. Surgical management was based on combined laparoscopic and transvaginal approach and consisted in bowel inspection and reinstatement, peritoneal washing, and dehiscence repair. Conclusions. Vaginal evisceration is a rare but potentially serious complication of pelvic surgery. This case report is to make clinicians aware of such complication following LLETZ and its management. PMID:25506010

  19. Fabrication and performance analysis of a DEA cuff designed for dry-suit applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, S.; Camacho Mattos, A.; Barbazza, A.; Soleimani, M.; Boscariol, P.; Menon, C.

    2013-03-01

    A method for manufacturing a cylindrical dielectric elastomer actuator (DEA) is presented. The cylindrical DEA can be used in fabricating the cuff area of dry-suits where the garment is very tight and wearing the suit is difficult. When electrically actuated, the DEA expands radially and the suit can be worn more comfortably. In order to study the performance of the DEA, a customized testing setup was designed, and silicone-made cuff samples with different material stiffnesses were tested. Analytical and FEM modeling were considered to evaluate the experimental output. The results revealed that although the stiffness of the DEA material has a direct relationship with the radial constrictive pressure caused by mechanically stretching the DEA, it has a minor effect on the actuation pressure. It was also found that stacking multiple layers of the DEA to fabricate a laminated structure enabled the attainment of a desired variation of pressure required for the implementation of an electrically tunable cuff.

  20. Tendon transfer for irreparable rotator cuff tears: indications and surgical rationale

    PubMed Central

    Merolla, Giovanni; Chillemi, Claudio; Franceschini, Vincenzo; Cerciello, Simone; Ippolito, Giorgio; Paladini, Paolo; Porcellini, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background: treatment of symptomatic irreparable rotator cuff tears is extremely challenging because, at present, there are no ideal solutions to this problem. Many patients respond favorably to nonsurgical treatment. However, when conservative measures fail to improve the patient’s pain and disability, surgery should be considered. Methods: different surgical techniques are available and the choice of the most appropriate procedure depends on the presenting symptoms, age of the patient, functional demand, medical comorbidities, joint stability and presence of arthritic changes. The transposition of the surrounding muscles to replace the rotator cuff function represents a viable option in the treatment of younger patients without glenohumeral osteoarthritis and with severe functional limitation. Purpose: aim of this study is to give an overview of the currently available evidence regarding tendon transfer procedures for irreparable rotator cuff tears. PMID:25767779

  1. Sacrospinous ligament fixation for vaginal vault prolapse

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Lantzsch; C. Goepel; M. Wolters; H. Koelbl; H. D. Methfessel

    2001-01-01

    Introduction. To assess intra- and postoperative complications and to look for long term follow-up results in women with sacrospinous ligament\\u000a fixation. Methods. Between 1988 and 1999, 200 women (mean age 59.8 years, range 33 to 83 years) underwent vaginal unilateral sacrospinous ligament\\u000a fixation. 172 patients had had prior hysterectomy. In 28 patients concomitant hysterectomy and sacrospinous ligament fixation\\u000a was performed.

  2. Complications of anterior compartment vaginal surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eric S. Rovner

    2007-01-01

    Many complications can be associated with anterior compartment surgery of the vagina. With the integration of synthetic materials\\u000a into the surgical armamentarium for the repair of stress urinary incontinence in the form of midurethral slings, and for the\\u000a repair of vaginal prolapse as a primary procedure or to augment an existing repair, the spectrum of complications related\\u000a to this type

  3. Vaginitis: Making Sense of Over-the-Counter Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    B. Angotti, Lauren; C. Lambert, Lara; E. Soper, David

    2007-01-01

    Background. The FDA approved over-the-counter (OTC) use of vaginal antifungals in 1990. Subsequently, a plethora of OTC products have become available to women on drugstore shelves. Objectives. The purpose of this study was to determine the availability of OTC products marketed for the treatment of vaginitis and to determine if their efficacy had been confirmed by published prospective randomized control trials (RCTs). Materials and methods. The authors chose four retail locations frequented by women seeking vaginitis treatment. All products deemed a viable treatment option were purchased. Results. All intravaginal imidazoles purchased, regardless of treatment duration or active ingredient, were found to be of proven efficacy. We were unable to find an RCT confirming the effectiveness of vaginal anti-itch creams and homeopathic treatments for vaginitis. Conclusion. 45% of products available to women in the feminine hygiene section of the stores surveyed could not be confirmed to be effective for treating infectious vaginitis. PMID:18253469

  4. Vaginal retention of locally administered clindamycin.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Katarina; Larsson, Per-Göran; Nilsson, Maud; Forsum, Urban

    2011-06-01

    Since bacterial vaginosis (BV) is characterized by a lack of, or very few, lactobacilli and high numbers of small, mostly anaerobic bacteria, an obvious treatment modality would be eradication of the BV-associated bacterial flora followed by reintroduction of lactobacilli vaginally. As probiotic treatment with lactobacilli is one tool for improving the cure rate when treating BV, it is necessary to know the length of time after treatment that clindamycin can be found in the vagina and if this could interfere with the growth of the probiotic lactobacilli. We evaluated the vaginal concentration of clindamycin in 12 women for 8 days to obtain data on the concentration of clindamycin in the vagina after intravaginal treatment with the drug. The participants were examined five times between two menstrual periods: before treatment, the day after treatment was finished, and 3, 5 and 8 days post-treatment. The first day post-treatment clindamycin 0.46 × 10(-3) to 8.4 × 10(-3) g/g vaginal fluid (median 2.87 × 10(-3)) was found. Thereafter, the concentration of clindamycin decreased rapidly. In 10 patients clindamycin was found after 3 days. A very low concentration was still present 5 days after treatment in four patients. After 8 days no clindamycin was found. Clindamycin is rapidly eliminated from the vagina, within 3-8 days, after local administration. Our results indicate that treatment with probiotic lactobacilli could be problematic if carried out within 5 days after cessation of clindamycin treatment. PMID:21569095

  5. SU-E-T-263: Point Dose Variation Using a Single Ir-192 HDR Brachytherapy Plan for Two Treatments with a Single Tandem-Ovoid Insertion for Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, X; Morrill, S; Hardee, M; Han, E; Penagaricano, J; Zhang, X; Vaneerat, R [University of Arkansas Medical Science, Little Rock, AR (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the point dose variations between Ir-192 HDR treatments on two consecutive days using a single tandem-ovoid insertion without replanning in cervical cancer patients. Methods: This study includes eleven cervical cancer patients undergoing HDR brachytherapy with a prescribed dose of 28 Gy in 4 fractions. Each patient had two tandemovoid insertions one week apart. Each insertion was treated on consecutive days with rescanning and replanning prior to each treatment. To study the effect of no replanning for day 2 treatments, the day 1 plan dwell position and dwell time with decay were applied to the day 2 CT dataset. The point dose variations on the prescription point H (defined according to American Brachytherapy Society), and normal tissue doses at point B, bladder, rectum and vaginal mucosa (based on ICRU Report 38) were obtained. Results: Without replanning, the mean point H dose variation was 4.6 ± 10.7% on the left; 2.3 ± 2.9% on the right. The mean B point variation was 3.8 ± 4.9% on the left; 3.6 ± 4.7% on the right. The variation in the left vaginal mucosal point was 12.2 ± 10.7%; 9.5 ± 12.5% on the right; the bladder point 5.5 ± 7.4%; and the rectal point 7.9 ± 9.1%. Conclusion: Without replanning, there are variations both in the prescription point and the normal tissue point doses. The latter can vary as much as 10% or more. This is likely due to the steep dose gradient from brachytherapy compounded by shifts in the positions of the applicator in relationship to the patients anatomy. Imaging prior to each treatment and replanning ensure effective and safe brachytherapy are recommended.

  6. Treatment of bulky stage IB and IIB cervical cancers with outpatient neutron brachytherapy, external pelvic radiation and extrafascial hysterectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Van Nagell, J.R.; Maruyama, Y.; Yoneda, J.; Donaldson, E.S.; Hanson, M.B.; Gallion, H.H.; Powell, D.E.; Kryscio, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    From January, 1977, to December, 1982, twenty-nine patients with bulky (>4 cms diameter) Stage IB or IIB cervical cancer were treated at the University of Kentucky Medical Center by a combination of out-patient neutron brachytherapy (Cf-252) and external pelvic radiation followed by extrafascial hysterectomy. Residual tumor was present in the hysterectomy specimens of 25 per cent. Complications during and following radiation therapy and surgery were minimal and included vaginal stenosis, proctitis, and hemorrhagic cystitis. The mean duration of hospitalization for surgery in these patients was 6.6 days (range 5-15 days) and postoperative morbidity was low. No patient required blood transfusion. Four patients developed urinary tract infections and two had superficial wound separations. Following treatment, patients were seen at monthly intervals for one year, every three months for two years, and every six months thereafter. No patient has been lost to follow-up. Two patients (7 per cent) developed tumor recurrence and have died of disease (1 of distant metastases; 1 local). The remaining 27 patients (93 per cent) are alive and well with no evidence of disease 24-89 months (mean 48 months) after therapy. No radiogenic fistulae or bowel obstruction were observed. These preliminary results suggest that the combination of outpatient neutron brachytherapy, external pelvic radiation, and extrafascial hysterectomy for patients with Stage IB and IIB cervical cancer is well tolerated. Complications associated with this treatment regimen have been minimal, and the recurrence rate is low. The duration of intracavitary neutron brachytherapy was short, and outpatient therapy was well received by patients.

  7. Arterial pressure: agreement between a brachial cuff-based device and radial tonometry

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chloe M.; Korolkova, Olga; Davies, Justin E.; Parker, Kim H.; Siggers, Jennifer H.; March, Katherine; Tillin, Therese; Chaturvedi, Nish; Hughes, Alun D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Aortic (central) blood pressure (BP) differs from brachial BP and may be a superior predictor of cardiovascular events. However, its measurement is currently restricted to research settings, owing to a moderate level of operator dependency. We tested a new noninvasive device in a large UK cohort. The device estimates central BP using measurements obtained with an upper arm cuff inflated to suprasystolic pressure. We compared these estimates with those obtained using radial tonometry as well as with invasively acquired measurements of aortic BP in a limited number of individuals. Methods: Consecutive cuff-based and tonometry-based estimates of the pressure waveform and the central BP were obtained from 1107 individuals (70?±?6 years). Short-term and long-term reproducibility studies were performed on 28 individuals. Simultaneous cuff-based and invasively measured pressure traces were acquired and compared in an additional six individuals (65?±?20 years). Results: Central systolic BP, as estimated by the cuff-based device, was found to be highly reproducible (coefficient of variation 4 and 8% for short and long-term reproducibility, respectively) and was comparable to that estimated by tonometry (average difference 3?±?6?mmHg, intraclass correlation coefficient?=?0.91). The cuff-based pressure waveforms were similar to those acquired invasively (cross-correlation coefficient 0.93), and the difference in the estimated central systolic BP was ?5?±?8?mmHg (P?=?0.2). Conclusion: Cuff-based devices show promise to simplify the measurement of central BP, whilst maintaining a similar fidelity to tonometry. This could lead to improved adoption of estimates of central BP in clinical practice. PMID:24379000

  8. Subacromial pain pump use is safe after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair

    PubMed Central

    Busfield, Benjamin T.; Romero, Denise M.; Korshad, Daniel; Kharrazi, F. Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Background Intra-articular pain pumps with local anesthetics have been implicated as a potential cause of post-arthroscopic glenohumeral chondrolysis (PAGCL) of the shoulder. In short-term studies, subacromial pain pump use is effective and safe without association with PAGCL. Patients with full thickness rotator cuff tears may be at high risk of PAGCL given disruption of the tendinous integrity which may allow intra-articular infusion of local anesthetics. We hypothesized that subacromial pain pump use after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair would not result in PAGCL. Methods We analyzed a consecutive series of 34 patients treated with subacromial pain pump placement after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair and subacromial decompression for full thickness rotator cuff tears. Thirty patients met inclusion criteria of greater than 12-month follow-up with an average age of 51 (28–68). All patients had the subacromial pain pumps placed under arthroscopic visualization and infused 0.25% bupivacaine without epinephrine at 2 cc/h for 48 h. All patients had clinical examinations and radiographic studies performed more than 1 year after surgery. Results Patients had an average rotator cuff size of 1.6 cm and fixation was performed with bioabsorbable suture anchors. All patients had at least 150° of abduction and forward flexion at latest follow-up without palpable crepitus and no patients had any evidence of joint space narrowing on post-operative radiographs. Conclusion Subacromial pain pump use after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is safe. Despite probable lack of a water-tight seal from repair, there were no cases of PAGCL. Level of evidence IV. PMID:25104887

  9. SU-GG-T-49: Real Time Dose Verification for Novel Shielded Balloon Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Govindarajan, Nandakarthik; Nazaryan, Vahagn; Gueye, Paul; Keppel, Cynthia

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: The validation of a novel approach for reducing skindoses to an acceptable level during Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI) when the balloon-to-skin distance is inadequate (less than 7 mm) is reported. The study uses a real time dose verification method for a metallic shielded balloon applicator using scintillation fiber technology. Method and Materials: Partial shielding of the radiationdose to the skin using iron or other ferrous powder could enable the extension of APBI to some patients. With small external and pre-determined magnetic fields (Brachytherapy treatments with relatively weak magnetic fields. Additional measurements provided negligible corrections (< few %) on the saline water density from the suspended ironpowder.Conclusion: This project opens the possibility to increasing the survival expectancy and minimizing negative side effects during brachytherapy treatments, as well as improving cosmetic outcome for all APBI patients. The proposed method may also be used in other procedures for brain, heart, rectal, or vaginal cancers.

  10. Modern head and neck brachytherapy: from radium towards intensity modulated interventional brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Intensity modulated brachytherapy (IMBT) is a modern development of classical interventional radiation therapy (brachytherapy), which allows the application of a high radiation dose sparing severe adverse events, thereby further improving the treatment outcome. Classical indications in head and neck (H&N) cancers are the face, the oral cavity, the naso- and oropharynx, the paranasal sinuses including base of skull, incomplete resections on important structures, and palliation. The application type can be curative, adjuvant or perioperative, as a boost to external beam radiation as well as without external beam radiation and with palliative intention. Due to the frequently used perioperative application method (intraoperative implantation of inactive applicators and postoperative performance of radiation), close interdisciplinary cooperation between surgical specialists (ENT-, dento-maxillary-facial-, neuro- and orbital surgeons), as well interventional radiotherapy (brachytherapy) experts are obligatory. Published results encourage the integration of IMBT into H&N therapy, thereby improving the prognosis and quality of life of patients. PMID:25834586

  11. The treatment of postmenopausal vaginal atrophy with ovestin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. M. Kicovic; J. Cortesprieto; S. Milojevic; A. A. Haspels; A. Aljinovic

    1980-01-01

    Seventy-four postmenopausal women presenting with vaginal atrophy were treated with either Ovestin® vaginal cream (Group A, 23 women: 1 mg\\/day E3; Group B, 30 women: 0.5 mg\\/day E3) or vaginal suppositories (Group C, 21 women: 0.5 mg\\/day E3), applied daily for 3 wk (A and B) or 2 wk (C) before retiring. Ten women from A and 10 from B

  12. Physics and basic parameters of brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, E J; Weinhous, M S

    1997-06-01

    Brachytherapy (short-distance therapy) is the therapeutic process whereby radioactive sources are placed into very close proximity to target tissue. Radioactive materials were so used beginning shortly after the discovery of radium by Marie and Pierre Curie in 1898. For the purposes of brachytherapy, radioactive materials are those that emit "rays" that can cause ionization (and hence DNA damage and the destruction of target cells). The potentially useful rays include beta, gamma, and other possibilities such as neutrons. Beta rays, properly beta particles, are simply high energy electrons. Gamma rays are high energy photons (part of the electromagnetic spectrum like visible light, but with much higher energy). These particles are produced during the radioactive decay of certain isotopes. The physics of those events and the parameters that apply to the therapeutic use of the isotopes are the primary topics of this report. PMID:9209529

  13. 21 CFR 884.5940 - Powered vaginal muscle stimulator for therapeutic use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Powered vaginal muscle stimulator for therapeutic use. 884...Devices § 884.5940 Powered vaginal muscle stimulator for therapeutic use. (a) Identification. A powered vaginal muscle stimulator is an electrically...

  14. 21 CFR 884.5940 - Powered vaginal muscle stimulator for therapeutic use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Powered vaginal muscle stimulator for therapeutic use. 884...Devices § 884.5940 Powered vaginal muscle stimulator for therapeutic use. (a) Identification. A powered vaginal muscle stimulator is an electrically...

  15. 21 CFR 884.5940 - Powered vaginal muscle stimulator for therapeutic use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Powered vaginal muscle stimulator for therapeutic use. 884...Devices § 884.5940 Powered vaginal muscle stimulator for therapeutic use. (a) Identification. A powered vaginal muscle stimulator is an electrically...

  16. 21 CFR 884.5940 - Powered vaginal muscle stimulator for therapeutic use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Powered vaginal muscle stimulator for therapeutic use. 884...Devices § 884.5940 Powered vaginal muscle stimulator for therapeutic use. (a) Identification. A powered vaginal muscle stimulator is an electrically...

  17. 21 CFR 884.5940 - Powered vaginal muscle stimulator for therapeutic use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Powered vaginal muscle stimulator for therapeutic use. 884...Devices § 884.5940 Powered vaginal muscle stimulator for therapeutic use. (a) Identification. A powered vaginal muscle stimulator is an electrically...

  18. 76 FR 17444 - In the Matter of Certain Vaginal Ring Birth Control Devices; Notice of Investigation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-29

    ...Matter of Certain Vaginal Ring Birth Control Devices; Notice of Investigation...importation of certain vaginal ring birth control devices by reason of infringement...importation of certain vaginal ring birth control devices that infringe claim...

  19. Isotope selection for patients undergoing prostate brachytherapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christine M Cha; Louis Potters; Richard Ashley; Katherine Freeman; Xiao-Hong Wang; Robert Waldbaum; Steven Leibel

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Ultrasound-guided transperineal interstitial permanent prostate brachytherapy (TIPPB) is generally performed with either 103Pd or 125I. The use of 125I for low Gleason score tumors and 103Pd for higher Gleason scores has been suggested based on isotope dose rate and cell doubling time observed in in vitro studies. While many centers follow these isotope selection criteria, other centers have elected

  20. Endovascular brachytherapy — Treatment planning and radiation protection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ulrich Quast; Dirk Flühs; Markus Bambynek

    1998-01-01

    The risk of restenosis, main late effect limiting the success of percutaneous transluminal coronary artery angioplasty, can\\u000a be reduced significantly by vascular radiotherapy, subsequent to PTCA. This discovery lead to the development of new irradiation\\u000a techniques. Endovascular brachytherapy is the choice in treatment of coronary artery stenosis. Successful irradiation, however,\\u000a requires precise treatment planning. This review addresses the physical possibilities

  1. Rotating-shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenjun; Kim, Yusung; Wu, Xiaodong; Song, Qi; Liu, Yunlong; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Sun, Wenqing; Flynn, Ryan T.

    2013-06-01

    In this treatment planning study, the potential benefits of a rotating shield brachytherapy (RSBT) technique based on a partially-shielded electronic brachytherapy source were assessed for treating cervical cancer. Conventional intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT), intracavitary plus supplementary interstitial (IS+ICBT), and RSBT treatment plans for azimuthal emission angles of 180° (RSBT-180) and 45° (RSBT-45) were generated for five patients. For each patient, high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2) (?/? = 10 Gy) was escalated until bladder, rectum, or sigmoid colon tolerance EQD2 values were reached. External beam radiotherapy dose (1.8 Gy × 25) was accounted for, and brachytherapy was assumed to have been delivered in 5 fractions. IS+ICBT provided a greater HR-CTV D90 (minimum EQD2 to the hottest 90%) than ICBT. D90 was greater for RSBT-45 than IS+ICBT for all five patients, and greater for RSBT-180 than IS+ICBT for two patients. When the RSBT-45/180 plan with the lowest HR-CTV D90 that was greater than the D90 the ICBT or IS+ICBT plan was selected, the average (range) of D90 increases for RSBT over ICBT and IS+ICBT were 16.2 (6.3-27.2)and 8.5 (0.03-20.16) Gy, respectively. The average (range) treatment time increase per fraction of RSBT was 34.56 (3.68-70.41) min over ICBT and 34.59 (3.57-70.13) min over IS+ICBT. RSBT can increase D90 over ICBT and IS+ICBT without compromising organ-at-risk sparing. The D90 and treatment time improvements from RSBT depend on the patient and shield emission angle.

  2. Brachytherapy radiation doses to the neurovascular bundles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steven J DiBiase; Kent Wallner; Kevin Tralins; Steven Sutlief

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the role of radiation dose to the neurovascular bundles (NVB) in brachytherapy-related impotence.Methods and Materials: Fourteen Pd-103 or I-125 implant patients were studied. For patients treated with implant alone, the prostate and margin (clinical target volume [CTV]) received a prescription dose of 144 Gy for I-125 or 115 Gy for Pd-103. Two patients received Pd-103 (90 Gy)

  3. Magnetite nanoparticles for nonradionuclide brachytherapy1

    PubMed Central

    Safronov, Victor; Sozontov, Evgeny; Polikarpov, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles possess several properties that can make them useful for targeted delivery of radiation to tumors for the purpose of brachytherapy. Such particles are biodegradable and magnetic and can emit secondary radiation when irradiated by an external source. In this work, the dose distribution around a magnetite particle of 10?nm diameter being irradiated by monochromatic X-rays with energies in the range 4–60 keV is calculated. PMID:26089761

  4. Brachytherapy needle deflection evaluation and correction

    SciTech Connect

    Wan Gang; Wei Zhouping; Gardi, Lori; Downey, Donal B.; Fenster, Aaron [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada); Biomedical Engineering Program, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B9 (Canada); Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada); Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada); Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5A5 (Canada); Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada); Biomedical Engineering Program, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B9 (Canada); Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5A5 (Canada)

    2005-04-01

    In prostate brachytherapy, an 18-gauge needle is used to implant radioactive seeds. This thin needle can be deflected from the preplanned trajectory in the prostate, potentially resulting in a suboptimum dose pattern and at times requiring repeated needle insertion to achieve optimal dosimetry. In this paper, we report on the evaluation of brachytherapy needle deflection and bending in test phantoms and two approaches to overcome the problem. First we tested the relationship between needle deflection and insertion depth as well as whether needle bending occurred. Targeting accuracy was tested by inserting a brachytherapy needle to target 16 points in chicken tissue phantoms. By implanting dummy seeds into chicken tissue phantoms under 3D ultrasound guidance, the overall accuracy of seed implantation was determined. We evaluated methods to overcome brachytherapy needle deflection with three different insertion methods: constant orientation, constant rotation, and orientation reversal at half of the insertion depth. Our results showed that needle deflection is linear with needle insertion depth, and that no noticeable bending occurs with needle insertion into the tissue and agar phantoms. A 3D principal component analysis was performed to obtain the population distribution of needle tip and seed position relative to the target positions. Our results showed that with the constant orientation insertion method, the mean needle targeting error was 2.8 mm and the mean seed implantation error was 2.9 mm. Using the constant rotation and orientation reversal at half insertion depth methods, the deflection error was reduced. The mean needle targeting errors were 0.8 and 1.2 mm for the constant rotation and orientation reversal methods, respectively, and the seed implantation errors were 0.9 and 1.5 mm for constant rotation insertion and orientation reversal methods, respectively.

  5. Design and optimization of a brachytherapy robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meltsner, Michael A.

    Trans-rectal ultrasound guided (TRUS) low dose rate (LDR) interstitial brachytherapy has become a popular procedure for the treatment of prostate cancer, the most common type of non-skin cancer among men. The current TRUS technique of LDR implantation may result in less than ideal coverage of the tumor with increased risk of negative response such as rectal toxicity and urinary retention. This technique is limited by the skill of the physician performing the implant, the accuracy of needle localization, and the inherent weaknesses of the procedure itself. The treatment may require 100 or more sources and 25 needles, compounding the inaccuracy of the needle localization procedure. A robot designed for prostate brachytherapy may increase the accuracy of needle placement while minimizing the effect of physician technique in the TRUS procedure. Furthermore, a robot may improve associated toxicities by utilizing angled insertions and freeing implantations from constraints applied by the 0.5 cm-spaced template used in the TRUS method. Within our group, Lin et al. have designed a new type of LDR source. The "directional" source is a seed designed to be partially shielded. Thus, a directional, or anisotropic, source does not emit radiation in all directions. The source can be oriented to irradiate cancerous tissues while sparing normal ones. This type of source necessitates a new, highly accurate method for localization in 6 degrees of freedom. A robot is the best way to accomplish this task accurately. The following presentation of work describes the invention and optimization of a new prostate brachytherapy robot that fulfills these goals. Furthermore, some research has been dedicated to the use of the robot to perform needle insertion tasks (brachytherapy, biopsy, RF ablation, etc.) in nearly any other soft tissue in the body. This can be accomplished with the robot combined with automatic, magnetic tracking.

  6. Erectile Function Durability Following Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Taira, Al V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Merrick, Gregory S., E-mail: gmerrick@urologicresearchinstitute.or [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, West Virginia (United States); Galbreath, Robert W.; Butler, Wayne M. [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, West Virginia (United States); Wallner, Kent E. [Puget Sound Healthcare Corporation, Group Health Cooperative, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Kurko, Brian S.; Anderson, Richard; Lief, Jonathan H. [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, West Virginia (United States)

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate long-term changes in erectile function following prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: This study included 226 patients with prostate cancer and preimplant erectile function assessed by the International Index of Erectile Function-6 (IIEF-6) who underwent brachytherapy in two prospective randomized trials between February 2001 and January 2003. Median follow-up was 6.4 years. Pre- and postbrachytherapy potency was defined as IIEF-6 >= 13 without pharmacologic or mechanical support. The relationship among clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters and erectile function was examined. Results: The 7-year actuarial rate of potency preservation was 55.6% with median postimplant IIEF of 22 in potent patients. Potent patients were statistically younger (p = 0.014), had a higher preimplant IIEF (p < 0.001), were less likely to be diabetic (p = 0.002), and were more likely to report nocturnal erections (p = 0.008). Potency preservation in men with baseline IIEF scores of 29-30, 24-28, 18-23, and 13-17 were 75.5% vs. 73.6%, 51.7% vs. 44.8%, 48.0% vs. 40.0%, and 23.5% vs. 23.5% in 2004 vs. 2008. In multivariate Cox regression analysis, preimplant IIEF, hypertension, diabetes, prostate size, and brachytherapy dose to proximal penis strongly predicted for potency preservation. Impact of proximal penile dose was most pronounced for men with IIEF of 18-23 and aged 60-69. A significant minority of men who developed postimplant impotence ultimately regained erectile function. Conclusion: Potency preservation and median IIEF scores following brachytherapy are durable. Thoughtful dose sparing of proximal penile structures and early penile rehabilitation may further improve these results.

  7. An Active Mammosite For Breast Brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cudjoe, Thomas

    2006-03-01

    Brachytherapy is an advanced cancer treatment that uses radioactive sources inside or in close proximity to cancerous tumors, thus minimizing exposure to neighboring healthy cells. This radiation oncology treatment unlike many others is localized and precise. The latest involvement of the Brachytherapy research group of the medical physics program at Hampton University is in the development of a scintillator fiber based detector for the breast cancer specific Mammosite (balloon device) from Cytyc Inc. Radioactive sources are inserted into a small plastic catheter (shaft) and pushed at the end of the tube. At that location, a water filled balloon surrounds the source and allow uniform gamma emission into cancer tumors. There is presently no capability for this device to provide measurements of the location of the source, as well as the radiation emitted from the source. Recent data were acquired to evaluate the possibility of measuring the dose distribution during breast Brachytherapy cancer treatments with this device. A high activity ^192Ir radioactive source and a 0.5 and 1 mm^2 scintillating fibers were used. Results will be presented and discussed.

  8. Myths and fallacies in permanent prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, Wayne M.; Merrick, Gregory S

    2003-09-30

    Because there are competing modalities to treat early-stage prostate cancer, the constraints or deficiencies of one modality may be erroneously applied to others. Some valid concerns arising from surgery and external beam therapy, which have been falsely transferred to brachytherapy, are constraints based on patient age, clinical and pathological parameters, patient weight, and size of prostate. Although the constraints have a valid basis in one modality, knowledge of the origin and mechanism of the constraint has provided a means to circumvent or overcome it in brachytherapy. Failures as measured by biochemical no-evidence of disease (bNED) survival may be attributed to extracapsular disease extension. Such extension often expresses itself in surrogate parameters such as a high percentage of positive biopsies, perineural invasion, or the dominant pattern in Gleason score histology. Failures due to such factors may be prevented by implanting with consistent extracapsular dosimetric margins. Some presumed limitations on prostate brachytherapy originated from data on patients implanted in the first few years the procedure was being developed. Most of the urinary morbidity and a significant part of the decrease in sexual function observed may be avoided by controlling the dosimetry along the prostatic and membranous urethra and at the penile bulb.

  9. Effects Of The Inhomogeneity of Brachytherapy Sources In Cancer Treatments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nnenna Onumah

    2006-01-01

    Uniformity of radioactive sources is vital in delivering accurate doses in Brachytherapy. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) defines source uniformity as no more than a 20 % deviation from the average value of the dose along a transverse region. Brachytherapy induced cell damages occur at the microdosimetric levels, and as such, small deviations in dose delivered from different geometrical

  10. Vault Prolapse II: Restoration of Dynamic Vaginal Supports by Infracoccygeal Sacropexy, an Axial Day-Case Vaginal Procedure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. E. Papa Petros

    2001-01-01

    :   Our objective was to present and critically analyze the first 75 infracoccygeal sacropexy (ICS) operations for cure of vault\\u000a prolapse. Level 1 reconstruction was achieved by the insertion of a tension-free vaginal tape (nylon) via the ischiorectal\\u000a fossa into a transversely incised posterior vaginal fornix. Level 2 defects were repaired by cutting a central ‘bridge’ in\\u000a the posterior vaginal

  11. An investigation of a PRESAGE® in vivo dosimeter for brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidovic, A. K.; Juang, T.; Meltsner, S.; Adamovics, J.; Chino, J.; Steffey, B.; Craciunescu, O.; Oldham, M.

    2014-07-01

    Determining accurate in vivo dosimetry in brachytherapy treatment with high dose gradients is challenging. Here we introduce, investigate, and characterize a novel in vivo dosimeter and readout technique with the potential to address this problem. A cylindrical (4 mm × 20 mm) tissue equivalent radiochromic dosimeter PRESAGE® in vivo (PRESAGE®-IV) is investigated. Two readout methods of the radiation induced change in optical density (OD) were investigated: (i) volume-averaged readout by spectrophotometer, and (ii) a line profile readout by 2D projection imaging utilizing a high-resolution (50 micron) telecentric optical system. Method (i) is considered the gold standard when applied to PRESAGE® in optical cuvettes. The feasibility of both methods was evaluated by comparison to standard measurements on PRESAGE® in optical cuvettes via spectrophotometer. An end-to-end feasibility study was performed by a side-by-side comparison with TLDs in an 192Ir HDR delivery. 7 and 8 Gy was delivered to PRESAGE®-IV and TLDs attached to the surface of a vaginal cylinder. Known geometry enabled direct comparison of measured dose with a commissioned treatment planning system. A high-resolution readout study under a steep dose gradient region showed 98.9% (5%/1 mm) agreement between PRESAGE®-IV and Gafchromic® EBT2 Film. Spectrometer measurements exhibited a linear dose response between 0-15 Gy with sensitivity of 0.0133 ± 0.0007 ?OD/(Gy???cm) at the 95% confidence interval. Method (ii) yielded a linear response with sensitivity of 0.0132 ± 0.0006 (?OD/Gy), within 2% of method (i). Method (i) has poor spatial resolution due to volume averaging. Method (ii) has higher resolution (˜1 mm) without loss of sensitivity or increased noise. Both readout methods are shown to be feasible. The end-to-end comparison revealed a 2.5% agreement between PRESAGE®-IV and treatment plan in regions of uniform high dose. PRESAGE®-IV shows promise for in vivo dose verification, although improved sensitivity would be desirable. Advantages include high-resolution, convenience and fast, low-cost readout.

  12. Vaginal fold histology reduces the variability introduced by vaginal exfoliative cytology in the classification of mouse estrous cycle stages

    PubMed Central

    Arnon, Gal; Po-Ching, Lin; Anne M, Barger; Amy L, MacNeill; CheMyong, Ko

    2015-01-01

    Vaginal exfoliative cytology is commonly used in biomedical and toxicological research to classify the stages of the rodent estrous cycle. However, mouse vaginal exfoliative cytology is commonly used as a stand-alone tool and has not been evaluated in reference to vaginal histology and serum sex hormone levels. In this study, the direct and Giemsa-stained methods of vaginal exfoliative cytology were compared in reference to vaginal fold histology and serum sex hormone levels. Both methods predicted the estrous stages similarly with mean discordance rates of 55%, 77%, 46% and 31%, for diestrus, proestrus, estrus and metestrus, respectively. From these results we conclude that vaginal exfoliative cytology may be used as a general guide to determine the desired estrous stage endpoint, and that a definitive confirmation of the estrous stage should obtained from evaluation of vaginal fold histology. Confirmation of the stage of the estrous cycle by vaginal fold histology will decrease the variability otherwise introduced by misclassification of estrous cycle stages with vaginal exfoliative cytology. PMID:24705880

  13. Directional interstitial brachytherapy from simulation to application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Liyong

    Organs at risk (OAR) are sometimes adjacent to or embedded in or overlap with the clinical target volume (CTV) to be treated. The purpose of this PhD study is to develop directionally low energy gamma-emitting interstitial brachytherapy sources. These sources can be applied between OAR to selectively reduce hot spots in the OARs and normal tissues. The reduction of dose over undesired regions can expand patient eligibility or reduce toxicities for the treatment by conventional interstitial brachytherapy. This study covers the development of a directional source from design optimization to construction of the first prototype source. The Monte Carlo code MCNP was used to simulate the radiation transport for the designs of directional sources. We have made a special construction kit to assemble radioactive and gold-shield components precisely into D-shaped titanium containers of the first directional source. Directional sources have a similar dose distribution as conventional sources on the treated side but greatly reduced dose on the shielded side, with a sharp dose gradient between them. A three-dimensional dose deposition kernel for the 125I directional source has been calculated. Treatment plans can use both directional and conventional 125I sources at the same source strength for low-dose-rate (LDR) implants to optimize the dose distributions. For prostate tumors, directional 125I LDR brachytherapy can potentially reduce genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities and improve potency preservation for low risk patients. The combination of better dose distribution of directional implants and better therapeutic ratio between tumor response and late reactions enables a novel temporary LDR treatment, as opposed to permanent or high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for the intermediate risk T2b and high risk T2c tumors. Supplemental external-beam treatments can be shortened with a better brachytherapy boost for T3 tumors. In conclusion, we have successfully finished the design optimization and construction of the first prototype directional source. Potential clinical applications and potential benefits of directional sources have been shown for prostate and breast tumors.

  14. Treatment planning methodology for the Miami Multichannel Applicator following the American Brachytherapy Society recently published guidelines: the Lahey Clinic experience.

    PubMed

    Iftimia, Ileana; Cirino, Eileen T; Mower, Herbert W; McKee, Andrea B

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a standardized procedure from simulation to treatment delivery for the multichannel Miami applicator, in order to increase planning consistency and reduce errors. A plan is generated prior to the 1st treatment using the CT images acquired with the applicator in place, and used for all 3 fractions. To confirm the application placement before each treatment fraction, an AP image is acquired and compared with the AP baseline image taken at simulation. A preplanning table is generated using the EBRT doses and is used to compute the maximum allowable D2cc for bladder, rectum, and sigmoid, and the mean allowable dose for the upper vaginal wall per HDR brachytherapy fraction. These data are used to establish the criteria for treatment planning dose optimization. A step-by-step treatment planning approach was developed to ensure appropriate coverage for the tumor (D90 > 100% prescribed dose of 700 cGy/fraction) and the uninvolved vaginal surface (dose for the entire treatment length > 600 cGy/fraction), while keeping the organs at risk below the tolerance doses. The equivalent dose 2 Gy (EQD2) tolerances for the critical structures are based on the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) recently published guidelines. An independent second check is performed before the 1st treatment using an in-house Excel spreadsheet. This methodology was successfully applied for our first few cases. For these patients: the cumulative tumor dose was 74-79 EQD2 Gy10 (ABS recommended range 70-85); tumor D90 was >100% of prescribed dose (range 101%-105%); cumulative D2cc for bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were lower than the tolerances of 90, 75, and 75 EQD2 Gy3, respectively; cumulative upper vaginal wall mean dose was below the tolerance of 120 EQD2 Gy3; the second check agreement was within 5%. By using a standardized procedure the planning consistency was increased and all dosimetric criteria were met. PMID:23318396

  15. A New Technique for Patch Augmentation of Rotator Cuff Repairs

    PubMed Central

    Mihara, Shuzou; Ono, Teruyasu; Inoue, Hirofumi; Kisimoto, Tetsurou

    2014-01-01

    Massive rotator cuff tears defying primary repair have been treated with debridement, arthroscopic subacromial decompression, partial repair, muscle-tendon transfer, and joint prosthesis, among other techniques. However, the treatment results have not been satisfactory compared with those of small- to medium-sized rotator cuff tears; each procedure has its merits and demerits, and currently, there is no single established method. For massive rotator cuff tears defying primary repair, the arthroscopic patch graft procedure has been reported as an effective surgical procedure, and this procedure is chosen as the first-line treatment in our department. In this procedure, suture anchors are generally used to fix the patch graft to the footprint on the side of the greater tuberosity. However, tendon-to-bone healing is frequently difficult to achieve, and bone-to-bone healing seems more advantageous for the repair of the rotator cuff attachment site. To improve the results of treatment, a new patch graft procedure was developed, in which the iliotibial ligament with bone was collected at Gerdy's tubercle and the bone was anchored to the footprint on the side of the greater tuberosity. With this procedure, excellent results were obtained, although only short-term results are available at present. The technique and its results so far are reported. PMID:25126505

  16. Using the Boazul Cuff to Reduce Blood Loss in Varicose Vein Surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J Robinson; J Macierewicz; JD Beard

    2000-01-01

    Objective: this study was designed to assess if the use of a sterile exsanguination tourniquet (Boazul cuff) reduced blood loss from the groin and avulsion wounds during varicose vein surgery, (saphenofemoral disconnection, stripping to knee and multiple avulsions). Design: prospective, parallel cohort study. Materials: thirty-eight patients undergoing primary varicose vein surgery. Methods: the blood loss and number of avulsion wounds

  17. Feasibility of cuff-free measurement of systolic and diastolic arterial blood pressure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michela Masè; Walter Mattei; Roberta Cucino; Luca Faes; Giandomenico Nollo

    2011-01-01

    We validated a prototype cuff-free device for noninvasive estimation of blood pressure (BP). The system assumed a linear relation between BP values and the inverse of arterial blood pulse transit time, measured as time interval between the R wave on the electrocardiograph and the onset of the peripheral pulse wave on a finger plethysmogram. Thirty-three healthy subjects were analyzed at

  18. Comparison of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in healthy patients over and under 65 years of age.

    PubMed

    Osti, Leonardo; Papalia, Rocco; Del Buono, Angelo; Denaro, Vincenzo; Maffulli, Nicola

    2010-12-01

    We compared the outcomes of arthroscopically repaired rotator cuff tears in 28 patients older than 65 years (the over 65 group: median age 70 years) with a control group of 28 patients younger than 65 years (the under 65 group: median age 57 years). The groups were similar in regard to sex distribution, surgical technique, and post-operative rehabilitation programmes, but different in age. After careful arthroscopic evaluation of the full-thickness rotator cuff tear, rotator cuff repair and biceps tenotomy were performed in all patients. Pre- and post-operatively, each patient was evaluated for range of motion, shoulder score (UCLA), and SF-36 self-administered questionnaire. Comparing pre- versus post-operative status at a minimum 24 months follow-up, forward elevation, internal and external rotation, modified UCLA rating system scores, and SF-36 scores improved significantly in both groups, with no significant difference between the groups. At the last follow-up, strength improved significantly in both groups, with non-significant intergroup difference. The Popeye sign was detected in 13/28 (46%) of the patients in the over 65 group and in 11/28 (39%) in the under 65 group (? = 0.29) with non-significant difference between the two groups. In selected active patients older than 65, arthroscopic rotator cuff repair associated with biceps tenotomy (when necessary) can yield clinical and related quality of life outcomes similar to those of patients younger than 65 years. PMID:20182868

  19. Revision reverse shoulder arthroplasty in failed shoulder arthroplasties for rotator cuff deficiency

    PubMed Central

    RANDELLI, PIETRO; RANDELLI, FILIPPO; COMPAGNONI, RICCARDO; CABITZA, PAOLO; RAGONE, VINCENZA; PULICI, LUCA; BANFI, GIUSEPPE

    2015-01-01

    Purpose the aim of this systematic literature review is to report clinical outcomes of reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) used as a revision surgery following failure of the primary implant due to rotator cuff insufficiency. Methods a systematic review was performed using the following key words: revision, shoulder, rotator cuff deficiency, outcome assessment, treatment outcome, complications. Studies eligible for inclusion in the review were clinical trials investigating patients in whom a primary shoulder arthroplasty implant with an incompetent rotator cuff was replaced with a reverse shoulder prosthesis. Results nine articles were identified and further reviewed. The results refer to a total of 226 shoulders that were treated with RSA as revision surgery. The patients in the studies had a mean age ranging from 64 to 72 years and the longest follow-up was 3.8 years. Improvements in function and reduction of pain were shown by many studies, but the mean Constant score ranged from 44.2 to 56. High complication rates (of up to 62%) were recorded, and a mean reoperation rate of 27.5%. Conclusions RSA as revision surgery for patients with rotator cuff deficiency is a valid option, and often the only solution available, but it should be limited to elderly patients with poor function and severe pain. Level of evidence level IV, systematic review of level I–IV studies. PMID:26151037

  20. A Multicenter Study of 210 Rotator Cuff Tears Treated by Arthroscopic Acromioplasty

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jean-François Kempf; Pascal Gleyze; François Bonnomet; Gilles Walch; Daniel Mole; André Frank; Philippe Beaufils; Christophe Levigne; Bruno Rio; André Jaffe

    1999-01-01

    Summary: We followed 210 cases of rotator cuff tears treated in four French centers by arthroscopic acromioplasty in 195 cases and by a tenotomy of the Long Head of Biceps (LHB) in 15 cases. All patients were evaluated by means of the Constant score (CS) and radiographic imaging. The mean age was 61 years and the mean follow-up period was

  1. Fate of the proximal aortic cuff: Implications for endovascular aneurysm repair

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karl A. Illig; Richard M. Green; Kenneth Ouriel; Patrick Riggs; Stephen Bartos; James A. DeWeese

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Long-term success of endoluminally placed grafts for exclusion of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) relies on secure fixation at the proximal and distal cuffs and, as such, assumes that the fixation sites will not dilate over time. Data regarding this issue, however, are not yet available. This study was performed to evaluate the region of the proximal anastomosis in patients

  2. Preclinical Models for Translating Regenerative Medicine Therapies for Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Andrew Ryan; Iannotti, Joseph P.; McCarron, Jesse A.

    2010-01-01

    Despite improvements in the understanding of rotator cuff pathology and advances in surgical treatment options, repairs of chronic rotator cuff tears often re-tear or fail to heal after surgery. Hence, there is a critical need for new regenerative repair strategies that provide effective mechanical reinforcement of rotator cuff repair as well as stimulate and enhance the patient's intrinsic healing potential. This article will discuss and identify appropriate models for translating regenerative medicine therapies for rotator cuff repair. Animal models are an essential part of the research and development pathway; however, no one animal model reproduces all of the features of the human injury condition. The rat shoulder is considered the most appropriate model to investigate the initial safety, mechanism, and efficacy of biologic treatments aimed to enhance tendon-to-bone repair. Whereas large animal models are considered more appropriate to investigate the surgical methods, safety and efficacy of the mechanical—or combination biologic/mechanical—strategies are ultimately needed for treating human patients. The human cadaver shoulder model, performed using standard-of-care repair techniques, is considered the best for establishing the surgical techniques and mechanical efficacy of various repair strategies at time zero. While preclinical models provide a critical aspect of the translational pathway for engineered tissues, controlled clinical trials and postmarketing surveillance are also needed to define the efficacy, proper indications, and the method of application for each new regenerative medicine strategy. PMID:19663651

  3. On the identification of sensory information from mixed nerves by using single-channel cuff electrodes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stanisa Raspopovic; Jacopo Carpaneto; Esther Udina; Xavier Navarro; Silvestro Micera

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several groups have shown that the performance of motor neuroprostheses can be significantly improved by detecting specific sensory events related to the ongoing motor task (e.g., the slippage of an object during grasping). Algorithms have been developed to achieve this goal by processing electroneurographic (ENG) afferent signals recorded by using single-channel cuff electrodes. However, no efforts have been made

  4. Visual sensations produced by optic nerve stimulation using an implanted self-sizing spiral cuff electrode

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Claude Veraart; Christian Raftopoulos; J. Thomas Mortimer; Jean Delbeke; Delphine Pins; Géraldine Michaux; Annick Vanlierde; Simone Parrini; Marie-Chantal Wanet-Defalque

    1998-01-01

    A blind volunteer with retinitis pigmentosa was chronically implanted with a self-sizing spiral cuff electrode around an optic nerve. Electrical stimuli applied to the nerve produced localized visual sensations that were broadly distributed throughout the visual field and could be varied by changing the stimulating conditions. These results demonstrate the potential for constructing a visual prosthesis, based on electrical stimulation

  5. Isokinetic torque imbalances in the rotator cuff of the elite water polo player

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William C. McMaster; Susan C. Long; Vincent J. Caiozzo

    1991-01-01

    The specific repetitive activity of water polo, like base ball pitching, emphasizes adduction and internal rota tion. This study used the Cybex II to evaluate the isokinetic strength of the rotator cuff in elite water polo players and in a group of control subjects. The water polo players were significantly stronger than the con trols. Of greater importance was the

  6. Novel Nanofiber-Based Scaffold for Rotator Cuff Repair and Augmentation

    E-print Network

    Lu, Helen H.

    and augmentation. To address this challenge, we have designed a poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanofiber of human rotator cuff fibroblasts on aligned and unaligned PLGA nanofiber scaffolds. Additionally mechanical properties were maintained. These observations demonstrate the potential of the PLGA nanofiber

  7. Single-Versus Double-Row Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair in Massive Tears

    PubMed Central

    Wang, EnZhi; Wang, Liang; Gao, Peng; Li, ZhongJi; Zhou, Xiao; Wang, SongGang

    2015-01-01

    Background It is a challenge for orthopaedic surgeons to treat massive rotator cuff tears. The optimal management of massive rotator cuff tears remains controversial. Therefore, the goal of this study was to compare arthroscopic single- versus double-row rotator cuff repair with a larger sample size. Material/Methods Of the subjects with massive rotator cuff tears, 146 were treated using single-row repair, and 102 were treated using double-row repair. Pre- and postoperative functional outcomes and radiographic images were collected. The clinical outcomes were evaluated for a minimum of 2 years. Results No significant differences were shown between the groups in terms of functional outcomes. Regarding the integrity of the tendon, a lower rate of post-treatment retear was observed in patients who underwent double-row repair compared with single-row repair. Conclusions The results suggest that double-row repair is relatively superior in shoulder ROM and the strength of tendon compared with single-row repair. Future studies involving more patients in better-designed randomized controlled trials will be required. PMID:26017641

  8. Selectivity of multiple-contact nerve cuff electrodes: a simulation analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Adam Q. Choi; James K. Cavanaugh; Dominique M. Durand

    2001-01-01

    Advances in functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS) have increased the need for nerve cuff designs that can control multiple motor functions through selective stimulation of selected populations of axons. This selectivity has proved to be difficult to achieve. Recent experiments suggest that it is possible to slowly reshape peripheral nerve without affecting its physiological function. Using computer simulations the authors have

  9. Intraoperative Evaluation of the Spiral Nerve Cuff Electrode for a Standing Neuroprosthesis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Katharine H. Polasek; Matthew A. Schiefer; Gilles C. Pinault; Ronald J. Triolo; Dustin J. Tyler

    2007-01-01

    Evaluation of the spiral nerve cuff electrode on the proximal femoral nerve for a standing neuroprosthesis was performed intraoperatively in 4 subjects. The mean stimulation threshold was 17.7 plusmn 12 nC, similar to stimulation thresholds in upper extremity nerves. The femoral nerve was found to have an oblong cross section with an average width of 9 mm and height of

  10. The geyser sign and torn rotator cuff: clinical significance and pathomechanics.

    PubMed

    Craig, E V

    1984-12-01

    The geyser radiographic sign on shoulder arthrogram is characterized by leakage of dye from the glenohumeral joint into the subdeltoid bursa. The dye outlines the acromioclavicular joint. It is usually an indication of a full-thickness cuff tear of long duration. The clinical occurrence and pathomechanics of this finding indicate that repair is generally difficult. PMID:6499313

  11. The MRI geyser sign: acromioclavicular joint cysts in the setting of a chronic rotator cuff tear.

    PubMed

    Cooper, H John; Milillo, Ralph; Klein, Devon A; DiFelice, Gregory S

    2011-06-01

    We present the case of a 71-year-old man with a large acromioclavicular (AC) joint cyst successfully managed with surgical excision. AC joint cysts are soft tissue masses generally signifying underlying rotator cuff pathology. Traditionally, these cysts were identified with shoulder arthrography as a "geyser" of fluid escaping through the AC joint. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is today's preferred imaging modality; we describe the MRI equivalent of the "geyser sign," signifying synovial fluid escaping through the cuff defect, across the subacromial bursa, and decompressing superiorly through a degenerated AC joint. Surgical management is preferred for symptomatic cysts. Based on a review of limited retrospective case series, recommendations for management of these lesions are as follows. Repair of the rotator cuff is preferable whenever possible. In the case of an irreparable defect, good results can be achieved through excisional AC joint arthroplasty and resection of the cyst base. Aspiration of these cysts should not be attempted, due to the high recurrence rate and potential for a draining sinus. Hemiarthroplasty also may be effective in indirectly decompressing these cysts; but given the invasive nature of this procedure, it should be reserved for patients who are also symptomatic from cuff arthropathy. PMID:21869946

  12. American Brachytherapy Society Guidelines for High-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yoshiya Yamada; LeLand Rogers; Jeffery Demanes; Gerard Morton; Bradley R Prestidge; Jean Pouliot; Mihai Ghilezan; Gilad Cohen; Marco Zaider; I Chow J. Hsu

    IntroductionA well established body of literature supports the use of high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy as definitive treatment for localized prostate cancer. The majority of articles describe HDR as a boost with adjuvant external beam radiation, but there is growing experience with HDR monotherapy.

  13. Human papillomavirus in vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Chao, Angel; Chen, Tse-Ching; Hsueh, Chuen; Huang, Chu-Chun; Yang, Jung-Erh; Hsueh, Swei; Huang, Huei-Jean; Lin, Cheng-Tao; Tang, Yun-Hsin; Liou, Jui-Der; Chang, Chee-Jen; Chou, Hung-Hsueh; Lai, Chyong-Huey

    2012-08-01

    There are limited data on the prevalence and distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes in vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia (VAIN). We sought to clarify this issue in a series of 450 VAIN cases with a confirmed diagnosis between 1990 and 2006. HPV genotyping was performed using paraffin-embedded specimens and polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods. Multiple HPV types were validated by E6 type-specific PCR and direct sequencing. The HPV genotypes of the vaginal and cervical neoplasms were compared for those with incident VAIN and a history of previous/concomitant cervical neoplasms. Ki-67 was performed for supporting diagnosis of VAIN. Of these 450 VAIN cases (median age, 59 years; range, 19-93), two with missing paraffin blocks and 54 with poor DNA quality were excluded. HPV was detected in 273/394 (69.3%) VAIN, and multiple infections were found in 17.9% of HPV-positive samples. The leading types were HPV16 (35.5%), HPV58 (9.9%), HPV52 (9.9%), HPV39 (8.4%), HPV33 (7.3%) and HPV53 (7.0%). Among the 156 cases with a history of previous cervical neoplasia, 29.0% had concordant HPV genotypes, while synchronous VAIN samples (n = 49) were more likely to harbor concordant genotypes (58.7%) with the concomitant cervical neoplasm (p = 0.0003). Whether those HPV types in the incident VAIN lesions had existed in the vaginal epithelium at the time of the previous cervical neoplasia or a new acquisition needs to be clarified in prospective follow-up studies. PMID:22095387

  14. Vaginal microbiome of reproductive-age women.

    PubMed

    Ravel, Jacques; Gajer, Pawel; Abdo, Zaid; Schneider, G Maria; Koenig, Sara S K; McCulle, Stacey L; Karlebach, Shara; Gorle, Reshma; Russell, Jennifer; Tacket, Carol O; Brotman, Rebecca M; Davis, Catherine C; Ault, Kevin; Peralta, Ligia; Forney, Larry J

    2011-03-15

    The means by which vaginal microbiomes help prevent urogenital diseases in women and maintain health are poorly understood. To gain insight into this, the vaginal bacterial communities of 396 asymptomatic North American women who represented four ethnic groups (white, black, Hispanic, and Asian) were sampled and the species composition characterized by pyrosequencing of barcoded 16S rRNA genes. The communities clustered into five groups: four were dominated by Lactobacillus iners, L. crispatus, L. gasseri, or L. jensenii, whereas the fifth had lower proportions of lactic acid bacteria and higher proportions of strictly anaerobic organisms, indicating that a potential key ecological function, the production of lactic acid, seems to be conserved in all communities. The proportions of each community group varied among the four ethnic groups, and these differences were statistically significant [?(2)(10) = 36.8, P < 0.0001]. Moreover, the vaginal pH of women in different ethnic groups also differed and was higher in Hispanic (pH 5.0 ± 0.59) and black (pH 4.7 ± 1.04) women as compared with Asian (pH 4.4 ± 0.59) and white (pH 4.2 ± 0.3) women. Phylotypes with correlated relative abundances were found in all communities, and these patterns were associated with either high or low Nugent scores, which are used as a factor for the diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis. The inherent differences within and between women in different ethnic groups strongly argues for a more refined definition of the kinds of bacterial communities normally found in healthy women and the need to appreciate differences between individuals so they can be taken into account in risk assessment and disease diagnosis. PMID:20534435

  15. Vaginal microbiome of reproductive-age women

    PubMed Central

    Ravel, Jacques; Gajer, Pawel; Abdo, Zaid; Schneider, G. Maria; Koenig, Sara S. K.; McCulle, Stacey L.; Karlebach, Shara; Gorle, Reshma; Russell, Jennifer; Tacket, Carol O.; Brotman, Rebecca M.; Davis, Catherine C.; Ault, Kevin; Peralta, Ligia; Forney, Larry J.

    2011-01-01

    The means by which vaginal microbiomes help prevent urogenital diseases in women and maintain health are poorly understood. To gain insight into this, the vaginal bacterial communities of 396 asymptomatic North American women who represented four ethnic groups (white, black, Hispanic, and Asian) were sampled and the species composition characterized by pyrosequencing of barcoded 16S rRNA genes. The communities clustered into five groups: four were dominated by Lactobacillus iners, L. crispatus, L. gasseri, or L. jensenii, whereas the fifth had lower proportions of lactic acid bacteria and higher proportions of strictly anaerobic organisms, indicating that a potential key ecological function, the production of lactic acid, seems to be conserved in all communities. The proportions of each community group varied among the four ethnic groups, and these differences were statistically significant [?2(10) = 36.8, P < 0.0001]. Moreover, the vaginal pH of women in different ethnic groups also differed and was higher in Hispanic (pH 5.0 ± 0.59) and black (pH 4.7 ± 1.04) women as compared with Asian (pH 4.4 ± 0.59) and white (pH 4.2 ± 0.3) women. Phylotypes with correlated relative abundances were found in all communities, and these patterns were associated with either high or low Nugent scores, which are used as a factor for the diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis. The inherent differences within and between women in different ethnic groups strongly argues for a more refined definition of the kinds of bacterial communities normally found in healthy women and the need to appreciate differences between individuals so they can be taken into account in risk assessment and disease diagnosis. PMID:20534435

  16. Symptoms of Pain Do Not Correlate with Rotator Cuff Tear Severity

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Warren R.; Kuhn, John E.; Sanders, Rosemary; An, Qi; Baumgarten, Keith M.; Bishop, Julie Y.; Brophy, Robert H.; Carey, James L.; Holloway, G. Brian; Jones, Grant L.; Ma, C. Benjamin; Marx, Robert G.; McCarty, Eric C.; Poddar, Sourav K.; Smith, Matthew V.; Spencer, Edwin E.; Vidal, Armando F.; Wolf, Brian R.; Wright, Rick W.

    2014-01-01

    Background: For many orthopaedic disorders, symptoms correlate with disease severity. The objective of this study was to determine if pain level is related to the severity of rotator cuff disorders. Methods: A cohort of 393 subjects with an atraumatic symptomatic full-thickness rotator-cuff tear treated with physical therapy was studied. Baseline pretreatment data were used to examine the relationship between the severity of rotator cuff disease and pain. Disease severity was determined by evaluating tear size, retraction, superior humeral head migration, and rotator cuff muscle atrophy. Pain was measured on the 10-point visual analog scale (VAS) in the patient-reported American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score. A linear multiple regression model was constructed with use of the continuous VAS score as the dependent variable and measures of rotator cuff tear severity and other nonanatomic patient factors as the independent variables. Forty-eight percent of the patients were female, and the median age was sixty-one years. The dominant shoulder was involved in 69% of the patients. The duration of symptoms was less than one month for 8% of the patients, one to three months for 22%, four to six months for 20%, seven to twelve months for 15%, and more than a year for 36%. The tear involved only the supraspinatus in 72% of the patients; the supraspinatus and infraspinatus, with or without the teres minor, in 21%; and only the subscapularis in 7%. Humeral head migration was noted in 16%. Tendon retraction was minimal in 48%, midhumeral in 34%, glenohumeral in 13%, and to the glenoid in 5%. The median baseline VAS pain score was 4.4. Results: Multivariable modeling, controlling for other baseline factors, identified increased comorbidities (p = 0.002), lower education level (p = 0.004), and race (p = 0.041) as the only significant factors associated with pain on presentation. No measure of rotator cuff tear severity correlated with pain (p > 0.25). Conclusions: Anatomic features defining the severity of atraumatic rotator cuff tears are not associated with the pain level. Factors associated with pain are comorbidities, lower education level, and race. Level of Evidence: Prognostic Level III. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:24875019

  17. Quantitation of vaginally administered nonoxynol-9 in premenopausal women

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patricia Barditch-Crovo; Frank Witter; Fayez Hamzeh; Jason McPherson; Pamela Stratton; Nancy J. Alexander; Carol Braun Trapnell

    1997-01-01

    A feasibility study was performed in 11 healthy nonpregnant premenopausal women to determine a method for collection and recovery of vaginally administered nonoxynol-9. We also determined if nonoxynol-9 could be quantitated in vaginal lavage fluid obtained 2 h after instillation of a standard precoital dose of a foam formulation of nonoxynol-9. Samples were analyzed in batch using a validated normal

  18. Women's Psychological Adjustment Following Emergency Cesarean versus Vaginal Delivery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padawer, Jill A.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Investigated psychological adjustment and satisfaction in women who had given birth vaginally or by cesarean section. Cesarean mothers reported significantly less satisfaction with the delivery than did vaginal mothers; however no differences were found in postpartum psychological adjustment as measured by depression, anxiety, and confidence in…

  19. Liposomes containing drugs for treatment of vaginal infections

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Željka Paveli?; Nataša Škalko-Basnet; Ivan Jalšenjak

    1999-01-01

    To develop a novel vaginal delivery system, able to effectively deliver entrapped drugs during an extended period of time at the site of action, liposomes made of phosphatidylcholine were prepared by two different methods, namely the polyol dilution method and the proliposome method. Liposomes containing three commonly applied drugs in the treatment of vaginal infections: clotrimazole, metronidazole and chloramphenicol were

  20. Vaginal Eroticism and Female Orgasm: A Current Appraisal

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Heli Alzate

    1985-01-01

    In the light of very recent studies, this paper reviews two controversial issues in the area of female sexuality: vaginal eroticism and female orgasm. From the available evidence, it is concluded that most (and probably all) women possess vaginal zones, mainly located on the anterior wall, whose tactile stimulation can lead to orgasm. The apparent contradiction between this finding and

  1. Efficacy and tolerability of fitostimoline (vaginal cream, ovules, and vaginal washing) and of benzydamine hydrochloride (tantum rosa vaginal cream and vaginal washing) in the topical treatment of symptoms of bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Boselli, F; Petrella, E; Campedelli, A; Muzi, M; Rullo, V; Ascione, L; Papa, R; Saponati, G

    2012-01-01

    Two hundred and 91 patients showing signs and symptoms of bacterial vaginosis (BV) were randomized to receive topical treatment with Fitostimoline (vaginal cream and vaginal ovules + vaginal washing) or benzydamine hydrochloride (vaginal cream + vaginal washing) for 7 days. Signs (leucorrhoea, erythema, oedema, and erosion) and symptoms (burning, pain, itching, vaginal dryness, dyspareunia, and dysuria) (scored 0-3) were evaluated at baseline and at the end of treatment; the total symptoms score (TSS) was also calculated. In 125 patients, a bacterial vaginosis was confirmed by vaginal swab test. The primary efficacy variable analysis, that is, the percentage of patients with therapeutic success (almost complete disappearance of signs and symptoms), demonstrated that Fitostimoline ovules and vaginal cream were therapeutically equivalent and that pooled Fitostimoline treatment was not inferior to benzydamine hydrochloride. All the treatments were well tolerated, with only minor local adverse events infrequently reported. The results of this study confirmed that gynaecological Fitostimoline is a safe and effective topical treatment for BV. PMID:23209922

  2. Efficacy and Tolerability of Fitostimoline (Vaginal Cream, Ovules, and Vaginal Washing) and of Benzydamine Hydrochloride (Tantum Rosa Vaginal Cream and Vaginal Washing) in the Topical Treatment of Symptoms of Bacterial Vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Boselli, F.; Petrella, E.; Campedelli, A.; Muzi, M.; Rullo, V.; Ascione, L.; Papa, R.; Saponati, G.

    2012-01-01

    Two hundred and 91 patients showing signs and symptoms of bacterial vaginosis (BV) were randomized to receive topical treatment with Fitostimoline (vaginal cream and vaginal ovules + vaginal washing) or benzydamine hydrochloride (vaginal cream + vaginal washing) for 7 days. Signs (leucorrhoea, erythema, oedema, and erosion) and symptoms (burning, pain, itching, vaginal dryness, dyspareunia, and dysuria) (scored 0–3) were evaluated at baseline and at the end of treatment; the total symptoms score (TSS) was also calculated. In 125 patients, a bacterial vaginosis was confirmed by vaginal swab test. The primary efficacy variable analysis, that is, the percentage of patients with therapeutic success (almost complete disappearance of signs and symptoms), demonstrated that Fitostimoline ovules and vaginal cream were therapeutically equivalent and that pooled Fitostimoline treatment was not inferior to benzydamine hydrochloride. All the treatments were well tolerated, with only minor local adverse events infrequently reported. The results of this study confirmed that gynaecological Fitostimoline is a safe and effective topical treatment for BV. PMID:23209922

  3. 2005 Nature Publishing Group Protection of macaques from vaginal SHIV

    E-print Network

    Cai, Long

    © 2005 Nature Publishing Group Protection of macaques from vaginal SHIV challenge by vaginally delivered inhibitors of virus­cell fusion Ronald S. Veazey1 , Per Johan Klasse2 , Susan M. Schader2 , Qinxue. Shattock3 , Martin S. Springer6 & John P. Moore2 Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) continues

  4. Pharmacological profiling of neuropeptides on rabbit vaginal wall and vaginal artery smooth muscle in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Aughton, K L; Hamilton-Smith, K; Gupta, J; Morton, J S; Wayman, C P; Jackson, V M

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Hypothalamic neuropeptides centrally modulate sexual arousal. However, the role of neuropeptides in peripheral arousal has been ignored. Vascular and non-vascular smooth muscle relaxation in the vagina is important for female sexual arousal. To date, in vitro studies have focused on vaginal strips with no studies on vaginal arteries. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of sexual hypothalamic neuropeptides on rabbit vaginal wall strips and arteries. Experimental approach: Tissue bath and wire myography techniques were used to measure isometric tension from strips and arteries, respectively. Key results: Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) relaxed both preparations, effects that were only antagonized by the VIP/PACAP antagonist VIP6–28 (10?nM) and the PAC1 antagonist PACAP 6–38 (1??M). The melanocortin agonist ?-melanocortin-stimulating hormone (1??M), but not bremelanotide (1??M), also relaxed both preparations. Oxytocin and vasopressin contracted vaginal preparations, which could be antagonized by the V1A antagonist SR 49059. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) and the NPY Y1 agonist Leu31, Pro34 NPY only contracted arteries, which was antagonized by the NPY Y1 receptor antagonist BIBP 3226. Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH; 1??M) contracted arteries. Conclusion and implications: Hypothalamic neuropeptides can exert contractile and relaxant effects on vaginal strips and arteries. NPY Y1, V1A, MCH1 antagonists as well as VIP/PAC1 agonists may have therapeutic potential in both central and peripheral female sexual arousal. Differences in effect of neuropeptides between preparations raise the question of which preparation is important for female sexual arousal. PMID:18587425

  5. Pathology Case Study: Bloody Vaginal Discharge

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Dickson, H.

    This is a case study presented by the University of Pittsburgh Department of Pathology in which an elderly woman experienced bloody vaginal discharge long after menopause. Visitors are given both the microscopic pap smear and biopsy findings, including images, and are given the opportunity to diagnose the patient. This is an excellent resource for students in the health sciences to familiarize themselves with using patient history and laboratory results to diagnose disease. It is also a helpful site for educators to use to introduce or test student learning in gynecologic pathology.

  6. 10 CFR 35.2067 - Records of leaks tests and inventory of sealed sources and brachytherapy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...and inventory of sealed sources and brachytherapy sources. 35.2067 Section 35...and inventory of sealed sources and brachytherapy sources. (a) A licensee...physical inventory of sealed sources and brachytherapy sources required by §...

  7. Vaginal Primary Malignant Melanoma: A Rare and Aggressive Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Terzakis, Emmanouil; Ioannidou, Georgia; Tsamandas, Athanasios; Decavalas, Georgios

    2013-01-01

    Vaginal primary malignant melanoma is a rare and very aggressive tumor. It most commonly occurs in postmenopausal women, with a mean age of 57 years. Our patient is an 80-year-old, postmenopausal Greek woman presented with a complaint of abnormal vaginal bleeding. On gynecologic examination there was a pigmented, raised, ulcerated, and irregular lesion 5 × 4.5?cm in the upper third of anterior vaginal wall. She underwent a wide local excision of the lesion. The histopathology revealed vaginal primary malignant melanoma with ulceration and no clear surgical margins. She denied any additional surgical interventions and underwent to postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy. Follow up 5 months after initial diagnosis revealed no evidence of local recurrence or distant metastasis. The prognosis of vaginal primary malignant melanoma is very poor despite treatment modality, because most of the cases are diagnosed at advanced stage. Particularly patients with no clear surgical margins and tumor size >3?cm needed postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy. PMID:23970985

  8. Vaginal primary malignant melanoma: a rare and aggressive tumor.

    PubMed

    Androutsopoulos, Georgios; Terzakis, Emmanouil; Ioannidou, Georgia; Tsamandas, Athanasios; Decavalas, Georgios

    2013-01-01

    Vaginal primary malignant melanoma is a rare and very aggressive tumor. It most commonly occurs in postmenopausal women, with a mean age of 57 years. Our patient is an 80-year-old, postmenopausal Greek woman presented with a complaint of abnormal vaginal bleeding. On gynecologic examination there was a pigmented, raised, ulcerated, and irregular lesion 5 × 4.5?cm in the upper third of anterior vaginal wall. She underwent a wide local excision of the lesion. The histopathology revealed vaginal primary malignant melanoma with ulceration and no clear surgical margins. She denied any additional surgical interventions and underwent to postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy. Follow up 5 months after initial diagnosis revealed no evidence of local recurrence or distant metastasis. The prognosis of vaginal primary malignant melanoma is very poor despite treatment modality, because most of the cases are diagnosed at advanced stage. Particularly patients with no clear surgical margins and tumor size >3?cm needed postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy. PMID:23970985

  9. Three-Dimensional Imaging in Gynecologic Brachytherapy: A Survey of the American Brachytherapy Society

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, Akila N., E-mail: aviswanathan@lroc.harvard.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Erickson, Beth A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: To determine current practice patterns with regard to three-dimensional (3D) imaging for gynecologic brachytherapy among American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) members. Methods and Materials: Registered physician members of the ABS received a 19-item survey by e-mail in August 2007. This report excludes physicians not performing brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Results: Of the 256 surveys sent, we report results for 133 respondents who perform one or more implantations per year for locally advanced cervical cancer. Ultrasound aids 56% of physicians with applicator insertion. After insertion, 70% of physicians routinely obtain a computed tomography (CT) scan. The majority (55%) use CT rather than X-ray films (43%) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; 2%) for dose specification to the cervix. However, 76% prescribe to Point A alone instead of using a 3D-derived tumor volume (14%), both Point A and tumor volume (7%), or mg/h (3%). Those using 3D imaging routinely contour the bladder and rectum (94%), sigmoid (45%), small bowel (38%), and/or urethra (8%) and calculate normal tissue dose-volume histogram (DVH) analysis parameters including the D2cc (49%), D1cc (36%), D0.1cc (19%), and/or D5cc (19%). Respondents most commonly modify the treatment plan based on International Commission on Radiation Units bladder and/or rectal point dose values (53%) compared with DVH values (45%) or both (2%). Conclusions: More ABS physician members use CT postimplantation imaging than plain films for visualizing the gynecologic brachytherapy apparatus. However, the majority prescribe to Point A rather than using 3D image based dosimetry. Use of 3D image-based treatment planning for gynecologic brachytherapy has the potential for significant growth in the United States.

  10. Pulsed electromagnetic fields after rotator cuff repair: a randomized, controlled study.

    PubMed

    Osti, Leonardo; Buono, Angelo Del; Maffulli, Nicola

    2015-03-01

    The current study tested the hypothesis that the use of pulsed electromagnetic fields after rotator cuff repair is effective in the short term as an adjuvant treatment to reduce local inflammation, postoperative joint swelling, and recovery time, as well as to induce pain relief. Sixty-six patients who underwent shoulder arthroscopy for repair of small to medium rotator cuff tears were randomly divided into 2 groups with a block randomization procedure. Thirty-two patients underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair and application of pulsed electromagnetic fields postoperatively; 34 patients underwent rotator cuff repair and placebo treatment (placebo group). All patients had the same postoperative rehabilitation protocol. At 3 months from the index procedure, visual analog scale, range of motion, and University of California at Los Angeles and Constant scores were significantly better in the pulsed electromagnetic fields group than in the placebo group (P<.05). Three patients in the pulsed electromagnetic fields group and 7 patients in the placebo group had mild to moderate capsulitis (P=.2). Severe capsulitis occurred in 1 patient in the pulsed electromagnetic fields group and 2 patients in the placebo group (P=.6). At the last follow-up (minimum, 2 years), clinical and functional outcomes were further improved in both groups, with no significant intergroup differences. Application of pulsed electromagnetic fields after rotator cuff repair is safe and reduces postoperative pain, analgesic use, and stiffness in the short term. At 2 years, no difference was seen in outcomes in patients who did or did not undergo treatment with pulsed electromagnetic fields. PMID:25760511

  11. Biochemical markers in the synovial fluid of glenohumeral joints from patients with rotator cuff tear.

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, Y; Hamada, K; Nakajima, T; Fujikawa, K; Fukuda, H

    2001-07-01

    It is known that rotator cuff tears are sometimes accompanied by joint destruction. Our purpose was to elucidate the pathology with this condition. Thirty-two synovial fluid (SF) samples aspirated from the glenohumeral joints of patients with rotator cuff tears, including 7 with partial-thickness and 25 with full-thickness tears of the rotator cuff (10 massive and 15 isolated supraspinatus tendon (SSp) tears), were examined. Collagenase (MMP-1), stromelysin 1 (MMP-3), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) and carboxy-terminal type II procollagen peptide (pCOL Il-C) were measured in the SF using the respective sandwich enzyme immunoassays. Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) was also quantified with a cationic dye binding method using 1,9-dimethylmethylene blue. Levels of any molecules except pCOL II-C in the SF appeared to be higher in full-thickness tears than those in partial-thickness tears. Moreover, levels of MMP-1, MMP-3 and GAG in the SF were significantly higher in massive tears of the rotator cuff in comparison with those in isolated SSp tears. Such significance was not observed in the levels of TIMP-1 or pCOL II C in the SF. We examined the relation of those levels with operative findings or clinical parameters from full-thickness tears, and observed significant correlations of the tear size with the levels of MMP-1, MMP-3 and GAG in the SF. Although these marker molecules in SF do not always originate from cartilage, our results may indicate the potential for accelerated cartilage-degrading activity in the glenohumeral joint in massive tears of the rotator cuff. PMID:11518264

  12. How do massive immobile rotator cuff tears behave after arthroscopic interval slides? Comparison with mobile tears

    PubMed Central

    FOSSATI, CHIARA; ARRIGONI, PAOLO; RAGONE, VINCENZA; SPENNACCHIO, PIETRO; BANFI, GIUSEPPE; RANDELLI, FILIPPO; RANDELLI, PIETRO

    2014-01-01

    Purpose the aim of this study was to compare clinical outcomes of contracted immobile massive rotator cuff tears mobilised through an arthroscopic interval slide technique versus massive mobile cuff tears directly repaired without any mobilisation. Methods twenty-five patients who underwent arthroscopic repair for massive rotator cuff tears with a minimum of 18 months follow-up were included. The patients were retrospectively divided into two groups. In group 1, a single or double interval slide was performed to achieve adequate tendon mobilisation. In group 2 (control group), massive rotator cuff tears were arthroscopically repaired without any additional release. Patients were evaluated with validated outcomes scores: subjective and objective Constant score, a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for pain, and single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (SANE). Results the two groups were comparable in terms of age, gender and involvement of the dominant arm. The mean follow-up duration was 31 months in group 1 and 28 months in group 2 (p = 0.4). The two groups showed no significant differences in SANE and VAS results (group 1: SANE 77%, VAS 1.3; group 2: SANE 88%, VAS 1.6), or in total Constant score (group 1: 66.5 ± 11; group 2: 75 ± 14; p = 0.1) and subjective Constant score (Group 1: 31 ± 5; group 2: 30.8 ± 7; p = 0.9). A significant difference was found for the objective Constant score, which was higher in the control group (group 1: 35.5 ± 7; group 2: 44 ± 8; p = 0.009). Conclusions Subjective clinical outcomes of arthroscopic repair with or without interval slides did not differ and were satisfactory. Objectively, immobile cuff tears showed inferior results. The use of interval slides might be considered a first step or an alternative to more invasive procedures for low demanding patients. Level of evidence Level III, retrospective comparative study. PMID:25606545

  13. Functional evaluation of patient after arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff tear

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rohit; Jadhav, Umesh

    2014-01-01

    Background Rotator cuff tear is a common problem either after trauma or after degenerative tear in old age group. Arthroscopic repair is the current concept of rotator cuff repair. Here, we are trying to evaluate the functional outcome after arthroscopic repair of full thickness rotator cuff tear (single row) in Indian population. Materials and methods Twenty five patients (14 males and 11 females) who underwent arthroscopic repair of full thickness rotator cuff tear at a single institution were included in the study. Postoperatively patient's shoulder was rated according to UCLA score, pain was graded according to the visual analog score. The range of motion was analysed and documented. Results The mean age of the patients were 50.48 years. The preoperative VAS score mode was 7 and post operative VAS was 1 (p value <0.001). The UCLA grading was good in 80% (n = 20), fair in 12% (n = 3), excellent in 8% (n = 2) and poor results were seen in none of the patients. The mean UCLA improved from a score of 15.84 to 30.28 with a p value <0.001. Mean postoperative forward flexion was 161.6°, mean abduction was 147.6° and mean external rotation was 45.4°. Conclusion Arthroscopic repair is a good procedure for full thickness rotator cuff tear with minimal complications. The newer double row repair claims to be biomechanically superior with faster healing rates without functional advantages, hence we used a single row repair considering the Indian population and the cost effectiveness of the surgery with good to excellent results. PMID:25983476

  14. Caudal epidural anesthesia during intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Isoyama-Shirakawa, Yuko; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Abe, Madoka; Kunitake, Naonobu; Matsumoto, Keiji; Ohga, Saiji; Sasaki, Tomonari; Uehara, Satoru; Okushima, Kazuhiro; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Honda, Hiroshi

    2015-05-01

    It has been suggested that pain control during intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer is insufficient in most hospitals in Japan. Our hospital began using caudal epidural anesthesia during high-dose-rate (HDR) intracavitary brachytherapy in 2011. The purpose of the present study was to retrospectively investigate the effects of caudal epidural anesthesia during HDR intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer patients. Caudal epidural anesthesia for 34 cervical cancer patients was performed during HDR intracavitary brachytherapy between October 2011 and August 2013. We used the patients' self-reported Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) score at the first session of HDR intracavitary brachytherapy as a subjective evaluation of pain. We compared NRS scores of the patients with anesthesia with those of 30 patients who underwent HDR intracavitary brachytherapy without sacral epidural anesthesia at our hospital between May 2010 and August 2011. Caudal epidural anesthesia succeeded in 33 patients (97%), and the NRS score was recorded in 30 patients. The mean NRS score of the anesthesia group was 5.17 ± 2.97, significantly lower than that of the control group's 6.80 ± 2.59 (P = 0.035). The caudal epidural block resulted in no side-effects. Caudal epidural anesthesia is an effective and safe anesthesia option during HDR intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer. PMID:25852151

  15. The dosimetry of brachytherapy-induced erectile dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Merrick, Gregory S.; Butler, Wayne M

    2003-12-31

    There is emerging evidence that brachytherapy-induced erectile dysfunction (ED) is technique-related and may be minimized by careful attention to source placement. Herein, we review the relationship between radiation doses to the prostate gland/surrounding structures and the development of brachytherapy-induced ED. The permanent prostate brachytherapy literature was reviewed using MEDLINE searches to ensure completeness. Although the site-specific structure associated with brachytherapy-induced ED remains unknown, there is an increasing body of data implicating the proximal penis. With day 0 CT-based dosimetry, the dose to 50% (D{sub 50}) and 25% (D{sub 25}) of the bulb of the penis should be maintained below 40% and 60% mPD, respectively, while the crura D{sub 50} should be maintained below 28% mPD to maximize post-brachytherapy potency. To date, there is no data to suggest that either radiation doses to the neurovascular bundles or choice of isotope is associated with brachytherapy-induced ED, while conflicting data has been reported regarding radiation dose to the prostate and the use of supplemental external beam radiation therapy. Although the etiology of brachytherapy-induced ED is likely multifactorial, the available data supports the proximal penis as an important site-specific structure. Refinements in implant technique, including preplanning and intraoperative seed placement, will result in lower radiation doses to the proximal penis with potential improvement in potency preservation.

  16. Caudal epidural anesthesia during intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Isoyama-Shirakawa, Yuko; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Abe, Madoka; Kunitake, Naonobu; Matsumoto, Keiji; Ohga, Saiji; Sasaki, Tomonari; Uehara, Satoru; Okushima, Kazuhiro; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Honda, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that pain control during intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer is insufficient in most hospitals in Japan. Our hospital began using caudal epidural anesthesia during high-dose-rate (HDR) intracavitary brachytherapy in 2011. The purpose of the present study was to retrospectively investigate the effects of caudal epidural anesthesia during HDR intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer patients. Caudal epidural anesthesia for 34 cervical cancer patients was performed during HDR intracavitary brachytherapy between October 2011 and August 2013. We used the patients' self-reported Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) score at the first session of HDR intracavitary brachytherapy as a subjective evaluation of pain. We compared NRS scores of the patients with anesthesia with those of 30 patients who underwent HDR intracavitary brachytherapy without sacral epidural anesthesia at our hospital between May 2010 and August 2011. Caudal epidural anesthesia succeeded in 33 patients (97%), and the NRS score was recorded in 30 patients. The mean NRS score of the anesthesia group was 5.17 ± 2.97, significantly lower than that of the control group's 6.80 ± 2.59 (P = 0.035). The caudal epidural block resulted in no side-effects. Caudal epidural anesthesia is an effective and safe anesthesia option during HDR intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer. PMID:25852151

  17. A Novel MRI Marker for Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, Steven J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)], E-mail: sjfrank@mdanderson.org; Stafford, R. Jason; Bankson, James A. [Department of Imaging Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Li Chun [Department of Experimental Diagnostic Imaging, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Swanson, David A. [Department of Urology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Kudchadker, Rajat J. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Martirosyan, Karen S. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, TX (United States)

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the optimal imaging modality for the prostate and surrounding critical organ structures. However, on MRI, the titanium radioactive seeds used for brachytherapy appear as black holes (negative contrast) and cannot be accurately localized. We sought to develop an encapsulated contrast agent marker (ECAM) with high-signal intensity on MRI to permit accurate localization of radioactive seeds with MRI during and after prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: We investigated several agents with paramagnetic and superparamagnetic properties. The agents were injected into titanium, acrylic, and glass seeds, which were linked together in various combinations and imaged with MRI. The agent with the greatest T1-weighted signal was tested further in a canine prostate and agarose phantom. Studies were performed on a 1.5-T clinical MRI scanner. Results: The cobalt-chloride complex contrast (C4) agent with stoichiometry (CoCl{sub 2}){sub 0.8}(C{sub 2}H{sub 5}NO{sub 2}){sub 0.2} had the greatest T1-weighted signal (positive contrast) with a relaxivity ratio >1 (r{sub 2}/r{sub 1} = 1.21 {+-} 0.29). Acrylic-titanium and glass-titanium seed strands were clearly visualized with the encapsulated contrast agent marker. Conclusion: We have developed a novel ECAM that permits positive identification of the radioactive seeds used for prostate brachytherapy on MRI. Preclinical in vitro phantom studies and in vivo canine studies are needed to further optimize MRI sequencing techniques to facilitate MRI-based dosimetry.

  18. Phantom size in brachytherapy source dosimetric studies.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Calatayud, J; Granero, D; Ballester, F

    2004-07-01

    An important point to consider in a brachytherapy dosimetry study is the phantom size involved in calculations or experimental measurements. As pointed out by Williamson [Med. Phys. 18, 776-786 (1991)] this topic has a relevant influence on final dosimetric results. Presently, one-dimensional (1-D) algorithms and newly-developed 3-D correction algorithms are based on physics data that are obtained under full scatter conditions, i.e., assumed infinite phantom size. One can then assume that reference dose distributions in source dosimetry for photon brachytherapy should use an unbounded phantom size rather than phantom-like dimensions. Our aim in this paper is to study the effect of phantom size on brachytherapy for radionuclide 137Cs, 192Ir, 125I and 103Pd, mainly used for clinical purposes. Using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo code, we can ascertain effects on derived dosimetry parameters and functions to establish a distance dependent difference due to the absence of full scatter conditions. We have found that for 137Cs and 192Ir, a spherical phantom with a 40 cm radius is the equivalent of an unbounded phantom up to a distance of 20 cm from the source, as this size ensures full scatter conditions at this distance. For 125I and 103Pd, the required radius for the spherical phantom in order to ensure full scatter conditions at 10 cm from the source is R = 15 cm. A simple expression based on fits of the dose distributions for various phantom sizes has been developed for 137Cs and 192Ir in order to compare the dose rate distributions published for different phantom sizes. Using these relations it is possible to obtain radial dose functions for unbounded medium from bounded phantom ones. PMID:15305460

  19. Biologic augmentation in rotator cuff repair--should we do it, who should get it, and has it worked?

    PubMed

    McCormack, Richard A; Shreve, Mark; Strauss, Eric J

    2014-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears are a common pathologic entity, and rotator cuff repairs are a frequently performed procedure. Given the high rate of structural failure of repair, biological augmentation of repairs is increasingly important. Biological augmentation primarily enhances the healing response and secondarily provides a mechanical bridge for tension free repair. Understanding biology of tendons and tendon healing aids in determining an optimal environment for repair. The basic principles of rotator cuff repair are aimed at achieving high initial fixation strength of the repair, restoring the anatomic footprint of the cuff tendon, minimizing gap formation, and maintaining mechanical stability until biologic healing occurs. Methods of augmentation come in many different forms and can be categorized by cell type and mechanism of delivery. Cell types include individual growth factors, stem cells, or a combination of both. Vehicles range from in situ delivery, such as microfracture, direct injection, or scaffold materials that are biologic or synthetic. PMID:25150331

  20. [Pulsed-dose rate brachytherapy in cervical cancers: why, how?].

    PubMed

    Mazeron, R; Dumas, I; Martin, V; Martinetti, F; Benhabib-Boukhelif, W; Gensse, M-C; Chargari, C; Guemnie-Tafo, A; Haie-Méder, C

    2014-10-01

    The end of the production of 192 iridium wires terminates low dose rate brachytherapy and requires to move towards pulsed-dose rate or high-dose rate brachytherapy. In the case of gynecological cancers, technical alternatives exist, and many teams have already taken the step of pulsed-dose rate for scientific reasons. Using a projector source is indeed a prerequisite for 3D brachytherapy, which gradually installs as a standard treatment in the treatment of cervical cancers. For other centers, this change implies beyond investments in equipment and training, organizational consequences to ensure quality. PMID:25155782

  1. Brachytherapy in the treatment of cervical cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Robyn; Kamrava, Mitchell

    2014-01-01

    Dramatic advances have been made in brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Radiation treatment planning has evolved from two-dimensional to three-dimensional, incorporating magnetic resonance imaging and/or computed tomography into the treatment paradigm. This allows for better delineation and coverage of the tumor, as well as improved avoidance of surrounding organs. Consequently, advanced brachytherapy can achieve very high rates of local control with a reduction in morbidity, compared with historic approaches. This review provides an overview of state-of-the-art gynecologic brachytherapy, with a focus on recent advances and their implications for women with cervical cancer. PMID:24920937

  2. Low dose rate brachytherapy in lip carcinoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Conill; E. Verger; J. Marruecos; M. Vargas; A. Biete

    2007-01-01

    Background:  Lip cancer is frequently treated with surgery although radiation therapy offers comparable results. The aim of the study was\\u000a to evaluate the local cure rate in patients with lip carcinoma treated with 192-Ir low dose rate interstitial brachytherapy.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods:  Fifty-four patients with a mean age of 70 years (range, 40-90 years) were retrospectively evaluated. The tumour location was\\u000a the superior lip

  3. Development of an in vitro alternative assay method for vaginal irritation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Seyoum Ayehunie; Chris Cannon; Karen LaRosa; Jeffrey Pudney; Deborah J. Anderson; Mitchell Klausner

    2011-01-01

    The vaginal mucosa is commonly exposed to chemicals and therapeutic agents that may result in irritation and\\/or inflammation. In addition to acute effects, vaginal irritation and inflammation can make women more susceptible to infections such as HIV-1 and herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2). Hence, the vaginal irritation potential of feminine care formulations and vaginally administered therapeutic agents is a significant

  4. Relationship of Radiographic Acromial Characteristics and Rotator Cuff Disease: A Prospective Investigation of Clinical, Radiographic, and Sonographic Findings

    PubMed Central

    Hamid, Nady; Omid, Reza; Yamaguchi, Ken; Steger-May, Karen; Stobbs, Georgia; Keener, Jay D

    2013-01-01

    Background Many studies have attempted to correlate radiographic acromial characteristics with rotator cuff tears, but the results have not been conclusive. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between rotator cuff disease and development of symptoms with different radiographic acromial characteristics including shape, index, and presence of a spur. Materials and Methods The records of 216 patients enrolled in an ongoing prospective, longitudinal study investigating asymptomatic rotator cuff tears were reviewed. All patients underwent standardized radiographic evaluation, clinical evaluation, and shoulder ultrasonography at regularly scheduled surveillance visits. Three blinded observers reviewed all radiographs to determine the acromial morphology, presence and size of an acromial spur, and acromial index. These findings were analyzed to determine an association with the presence of a full-thickness rotator cuff tear. Results The three observers demonstrated poor agreement for acromial morphology, substantial agreement for the presence of an acromial spur, and excellent agreement for acromial index (kappa= 0.41, 0.65, and 0.86 respectively). The presence of an acromial spur was highly associated with the presence of a full-thickness rotator cuff tear (p=0.003) even after adjusting for age. No association was found between acromial index and rotator cuff disease (p=0.92). Conclusion The presence of an acromial spur is highly associated with the presence of a full-thickness rotator cuff tear in both the symptomatic and asymptomatic patient. The acromial morphology classification system is an unreliable method to assess the acromion. The acromial index shows no association with the presence of rotator cuff disease. PMID:22217644

  5. Changes in endotracheal tube cuff pressure during laparoscopic surgery in head-up or head-down position

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The abdominal insufflation and surgical positioning in the laparoscopic surgery have been reported to result in an increase of airway pressure. However, associated effects on changes of endotracheal tube cuff pressure are not well established. Methods 70 patients undergoing elective laparoscopic colorectal tumor resection (head-down position, n?=?38) and laparoscopic cholecystecomy (head-up position, n?=?32) were enrolled and were compared to 15 patients undergoing elective open abdominal surgery. Changes of cuff and airway pressures before and after abdominal insufflation in supine position and after head-down or head-up positioning were analysed and compared. Results There was no significant cuff and airway pressure changes during the first fifteen minutes in open abdominal surgery. After insufflation, the cuff pressure increased from 26?±?3 to 32?±?6 and 27?±?3 to 33?±?5 cmH2O in patients receiving laparoscopic cholecystecomy and laparoscopic colorectal tumor resection respectively (both p?cuff pressure from 33?±?5 to 35?±?5 cmH2O (p?cuff pressure more than 10 cm H2O (18.8%). There was no significant correlation between increase of cuff pressure and either the patient's body mass index or the common range of intra-abdominal pressure (10-15 mmHg) used in laparoscopic surgery. Conclusions An increase of endotracheal tube cuff pressure may occur during laparoscopic surgery especially in the head-down position. PMID:25210501

  6. Dosimetric characterization and output verification for conical brachytherapy surface applicators. Part I. Electronic brachytherapy source

    PubMed Central

    Fulkerson, Regina K.; Micka, John A.; DeWerd, Larry A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Historically, treatment of malignant surface lesions has been achieved with linear accelerator based electron beams or superficial x-ray beams. Recent developments in the field of brachytherapy now allow for the treatment of surface lesions with specialized conical applicators placed directly on the lesion. Applicators are available for use with high dose rate (HDR) 192Ir sources, as well as electronic brachytherapy sources. Part I of this paper will discuss the applicators used with electronic brachytherapy sources; Part II will discuss those used with HDR 192Ir sources. Although the use of these applicators has gained in popularity, the dosimetric characteristics including depth dose and surface dose distributions have not been independently verified. Additionally, there is no recognized method of output verification for quality assurance procedures with applicators like these. Existing dosimetry protocols available from the AAPM bookend the cross-over characteristics of a traditional brachytherapy source (as described by Task Group 43) being implemented as a low-energy superficial x-ray beam (as described by Task Group 61) as observed with the surface applicators of interest. Methods: This work aims to create a cohesive method of output verification that can be used to determine the dose at the treatment surface as part of a quality assurance/commissioning process for surface applicators used with HDR electronic brachytherapy sources (Part I) and 192Ir sources (Part II). Air-kerma rate measurements for the electronic brachytherapy sources were completed with an Attix Free-Air Chamber, as well as several models of small-volume ionization chambers to obtain an air-kerma rate at the treatment surface for each applicator. Correction factors were calculated using MCNP5 and EGSnrc Monte Carlo codes in order to determine an applicator-specific absorbed dose to water at the treatment surface from the measured air-kerma rate. Additionally, relative dose measurements of the surface dose distributions and characteristic depth dose curves were completed in-phantom. Results: Theoretical dose distributions and depth dose curves were generated for each applicator and agreed well with the measured values. A method of output verification was created that allows users to determine the applicator-specific dose to water at the treatment surface based on a measured air-kerma rate. Conclusions: The novel output verification methods described in this work will reduce uncertainties in dose delivery for treatments with these kinds of surface applicators, ultimately improving patient care. PMID:24506635

  7. Dosimetric characterization and output verification for conical brachytherapy surface applicators. Part I. Electronic brachytherapy source

    SciTech Connect

    Fulkerson, Regina K., E-mail: rmkenned@gmail.com; Micka, John A.; DeWerd, Larry A. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Historically, treatment of malignant surface lesions has been achieved with linear accelerator based electron beams or superficial x-ray beams. Recent developments in the field of brachytherapy now allow for the treatment of surface lesions with specialized conical applicators placed directly on the lesion. Applicators are available for use with high dose rate (HDR){sup 192}Ir sources, as well as electronic brachytherapy sources. Part I of this paper will discuss the applicators used with electronic brachytherapy sources; Part II will discuss those used with HDR {sup 192}Ir sources. Although the use of these applicators has gained in popularity, the dosimetric characteristics including depth dose and surface dose distributions have not been independently verified. Additionally, there is no recognized method of output verification for quality assurance procedures with applicators like these. Existing dosimetry protocols available from the AAPM bookend the cross-over characteristics of a traditional brachytherapy source (as described by Task Group 43) being implemented as a low-energy superficial x-ray beam (as described by Task Group 61) as observed with the surface applicators of interest. Methods: This work aims to create a cohesive method of output verification that can be used to determine the dose at the treatment surface as part of a quality assurance/commissioning process for surface applicators used with HDR electronic brachytherapy sources (Part I) and{sup 192}Ir sources (Part II). Air-kerma rate measurements for the electronic brachytherapy sources were completed with an Attix Free-Air Chamber, as well as several models of small-volume ionization chambers to obtain an air-kerma rate at the treatment surface for each applicator. Correction factors were calculated using MCNP5 and EGSnrc Monte Carlo codes in order to determine an applicator-specific absorbed dose to water at the treatment surface from the measured air-kerma rate. Additionally, relative dose measurements of the surface dose distributions and characteristic depth dose curves were completed in-phantom. Results: Theoretical dose distributions and depth dose curves were generated for each applicator and agreed well with the measured values. A method of output verification was created that allows users to determine the applicator-specific dose to water at the treatment surface based on a measured air-kerma rate. Conclusions: The novel output verification methods described in this work will reduce uncertainties in dose delivery for treatments with these kinds of surface applicators, ultimately improving patient care.

  8. Long-term vaginal antibody delivery: delivery systems and biodistribution.

    PubMed

    Saltzman, W M; Sherwood, J K; Adams, D R; Castle, P; Haller, P

    2000-02-01

    Topical delivery systems can provide prolonged delivery of antibodies to the vaginal mucosal surface for long-term protection against infectious diseases. We examined the biodistribution of antibodies during 30 days of vaginal antibody delivery in mice. Different antibody preparations (including monoclonal IgG and IgM, as well as several different (125)I-labeled IgGs) were administered by polymer vaginal rings, which were designed to provide continuous antibody delivery. Antibody concentrations remained high in the vaginal secretions for up to 30 days after disk insertion; radiolabeled antibody was also found, at approximately 100 times lower concentration, in the blood and other tissues. The measured concentrations agreed reasonably well with a simple pharmacokinetic model, which was used to calculate mucosal and systemic concentrations as a function of antibody delivery and elimination rates. Results from the model were consistent with previously reported antibody pharmacokinetic measurements: the half-life for antibody elimination for the vagina was approximately 3 h; the half-life for IgG(1) clearance from the blood was >1 day; and the overall permeability constant for vaginal uptake of IgG was approximately 0.01 to 0.03 h(-1). These results provide important information for the design of controlled antibody delivery devices for vaginal use, and suggest that high-dose, long-term vaginal administration of antibodies may be a reasonable approach for achieving sustained mucosal and systemic antibody levels. PMID:10620255

  9. Local Probiotic Therapy for Vaginal Candida albicans Infections.

    PubMed

    Kovachev, Stefan Miladinov; Vatcheva-Dobrevska, Rossitza Stefanova

    2015-03-01

    The high rate of vaginal Candida albicans recurrence is attributed to azole resistance rates as high as 15 %. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical and microbiological efficacy of standard azole therapy for treatment of vaginal C. albicans infection alone and in combination with local probiotic as well as the effects on vaginal microbiota. This study included 436 women with vaginal candidiasis randomly assigned to two treatment groups. The first group, with 207 patients (12 dropouts), was administered 150 mg fluconazole and a single vaginal globule of fenticonazole (600 mg) on the same day. The second group of 209 patients (8 dropouts) followed the same treatment schedule; however, ten applications of a vaginal probiotic containing Lactobacillus acidophilus, L. rhamnosus, Streptococcus thermophilus, and L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus were also administered beginning the fifth day after azole treatment. Microbiological analysis of the therapy efficacy in the first treatment group showed C. albicans resistance in over 30 % of patients. Clinical complaints persisted after treatment administration in 79.7 % (n = 165) of women in this group. Clinical complaints in the second group decreased to 31.1 % (n = 65) and microbiological efficacy also improved among investigated parameters, from 93.7 % (n = 193) to 95.2 % (n = 198). The local application of probiotics after administration of combined azoles for treatment of vaginal C. albicans infections increases therapy efficacy and could prevent relapse. PMID:25362524

  10. A Temperature-Monitoring Vaginal Ring for Measuring Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Peter; Desjardins, Delphine; Kumar, Sandeep; Fetherston, Susan M.; Le-Grand, Roger; Dereuddre-Bosquet, Nathalie; Helgadóttir, Berglind; Bjarnason, Ásgeir; Narasimhan, Manjula; Malcolm, R. Karl

    2015-01-01

    Background Product adherence is a pivotal issue in the development of effective vaginal microbicides to reduce sexual transmission of HIV. To date, the six Phase III studies of vaginal gel products have relied primarily on self-reporting of adherence. Accurate and reliable methods for monitoring user adherence to microbicide-releasing vaginal rings have yet to be established. Methods A silicone elastomer vaginal ring prototype containing an embedded, miniature temperature logger has been developed and tested in vitro and in cynomolgus macaques for its potential to continuously monitor environmental temperature and accurately determine episodes of ring insertion and removal. Results In vitro studies demonstrated that DST nano-T temperature loggers encapsulated in medical grade silicone elastomer were able to accurately and continuously measure environmental temperature. The devices responded quickly to temperature changes despite being embedded in different thickness of silicone elastomer. Prototype vaginal rings measured higher temperatures compared with a subcutaneously implanted device, showed high sensitivity to diurnal fluctuations in vaginal temperature, and accurately detected periods of ring removal when tested in macaques. Conclusions Vaginal rings containing embedded temperature loggers may be useful in the assessment of product adherence in late-stage clinical trials. PMID:25965956

  11. Effects of estroprogestins containing natural estrogen on vaginal flora.

    PubMed

    De Seta, Francesco; Restaino, Stefano; Banco, Rubina; Conversano, Ester; De Leo, Rossella; Tonon, Maddalena; Maso, Gianpaolo; Barbati, Giulia; Lello, Stefano

    2014-11-01

    Estroprogestins with "natural oestrogen" has represented a new option in terms of combined hormonal contraception. So, the aim of this study is to investigate how estroprogestins with natural estrogen may modify the vaginal niche. In literature, very few studies focused on the interaction between hormonal contraception and vaginal milieu. This is a prospective comparative study. We enrolled 60 women from January 2013 to September 2013, 30 of them were administered estradiol valerate dienogest (E2V+DNG - Klaira®) in a quadriphasic regimen, while the other 30 women were administered 17-? estradiol with nomestrol acetate (EV+NOMAC - Zoely®) in a monophasic regimen. After a baseline study of vaginal milieu at recruitment of patients (Gram stain with Nugent score, vaginal pH, vaginal wet mount for the quantification of leukocytes, Lactobacilli and/or presence of Candida), we performed the same follow-up after six months of estroprogestin therapy. Our results showed that the women treated with E2V+DNG had a trend of an improvement of vaginal health in terms of increase of lactobacillar flora and reduction of vaginal pH in place of women treated with EV+NOMAC that showed a reduction of cervical mucus. Finally, our data about the effects on vaginal flora exerted by two estroprogestin pills (EPs) containing a natural estrogen suggest slight, but interesting differences in terms of vaginal ecology. These differences could be related to the type of estrogen, type of progestin, regimen of administration and, after all, to the net balance between estrogenic and progestin component of the EPs. PMID:24993504

  12. Performing vaginal lavage, crystal violet staining, and vaginal cytological evaluation for mouse estrous cycle staging identification.

    PubMed

    McLean, Ashleigh C; Valenzuela, Nicolas; Fai, Stephen; Bennett, Steffany A L

    2012-01-01

    A rapid means of assessing reproductive status in rodents is useful not only in the study of reproductive dysfunction but is also required for the production of new mouse models of disease and investigations into the hormonal regulation of tissue degeneration (or regeneration) following pathological challenge. The murine reproductive (or estrous) cycle is divided into 4 stages: proestrus, estrus, metestrus, and diestrus. Defined fluctuations in circulating levels of the ovarian steroids 17-?-estradiol and progesterone, the gonadotropins luteinizing and follicle stimulating hormones, and the luteotropic hormone prolactin signal transition through these reproductive stages. Changes in cell typology within the murine vaginal canal reflect these underlying endocrine events. Daily assessment of the relative ratio of nucleated epithelial cells, cornified squamous epithelial cells, and leukocytes present in vaginal smears can be used to identify murine estrous stages. The degree of invasiveness, however, employed in collecting these samples can alter reproductive status and elicit an inflammatory response that can confound cytological assessment of smears. Here, we describe a simple, non-invasive protocol that can be used to determine the stage of the estrous cycle of a female mouse without altering her reproductive cycle. We detail how to differentiate between the four stages of the estrous cycle by collection and analysis of predominant cell typology in vaginal smears and we show how these changes can be interpreted with respect to endocrine status. PMID:23007862

  13. Treating dyspareunia caused by vaginal atrophy: a review of treatment options using vaginal estrogen therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kingsberg, SA; Kellogg, S; Krychman, M

    2010-01-01

    Vulvovaginal atrophy (VVA) and dryness are common symptoms of the decline in endogenous production of estrogen at menopause and often result in dyspareunia. Yet while 10% to 40% of women experience discomfort due to VVA, it is estimated that only 25% seek medical help. The main goals of treatment for vaginal atrophy are to improve symptoms and to restore vaginal and vulvar anatomic changes. Treatment choices for postmenopausal dyspareunia resulting from vulvovaginal atrophy will depend on the underlying etiology and might include individualized treatment. A number of forms of vaginal estrogen and manner of delivery are currently available to treat moderate to severe dyspareunia caused by VVA. They all have been shown to be effective and are often the preferred treatment due to the targeted efficacy for urogenital tissues while resulting in only minimal systemic absorption. Both healthcare professionals and patients often find it difficult to broach the subject of sexual problems associated with VVA. However, with minimal effort to initiate a conversation about these problems, healthcare providers can provide useful information to their postmenopausal patients in order to help them each choose the optimal treatment for their needs and symptoms. PMID:21072280

  14. Vaginal microbiome and sexually transmitted infections: an epidemiologic perspective

    PubMed Central

    Brotman, Rebecca M.

    2011-01-01

    Vaginal bacterial communities are thought to help prevent sexually transmitted infections. Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a common clinical syndrome in which the protective lactic acid–producing bacteria (mainly species of the Lactobacillus genus) are supplanted by a diverse array of anaerobic bacteria. Epidemiologically, BV has been shown to be an independent risk factor for adverse outcomes including preterm birth, development of pelvic inflammatory disease, and acquisition of sexually transmitted infections. Longitudinal studies of the vaginal microbiome using molecular techniques such as 16S ribosomal DNA analysis may lead to interventions that shift the vaginal microbiota toward more protective states. PMID:22133886

  15. Norepinephrine Potentiates Proinflammatory Responses of Human Vaginal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brosnahan, Amanda J.; Vulchanova, Lucy; Witta, Samantha R.; Dai, Yuying; Jones, Bryan J.; Brown, David R.

    2013-01-01

    The vaginal epithelium provides a barrier to pathogens and recruits immune defenses through the secretion of cytokines and chemokines. Several studies have shown that mucosal sites are innervated by norepinephrine-containing nerve fibers. Here we report that norepinephrine potentiates the proinflammatory response of human vaginal epithelial cells to products produced by Staphylococcus aureus, a pathogen that causes menstrual toxic shock syndrome. The cells exhibit immunoreactivity for catecholamine synthesis enzymes and the norepinephrine transporter. Moreover, the cells secrete norepinephrine and dopamine at low concentrations. These results indicate that norepinephrine may serve as an autocrine modulator of proinflammatory responses in the vaginal epithelium. PMID:23571017

  16. Policy for Prevention of a Retained Sponge after Vaginal Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Garry, David J.; Asanjarani, Sandra; Geiss, Donna M.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Policies for sponge count are not routine practice in most labor and delivery rooms. Ignored or hidden retained vaginal foreign bodies has potentially significant health care morbidity. Case. This was a case of a retained vaginal sponge following an uncomplicated spontaneous vaginal delivery. Delivery room policy resulted in the discovery of the sponge on X-ray when an incorrect sponge count occurred and physical exam did not find the sponge. Conclusion. This emphasizes the use of protocols to enhance patient safety and prevent medical error. PMID:22312370

  17. Pelviscopic Compared to Laparotomic and Vaginal Intrafascial Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Lutzewitsch, N.

    1997-01-01

    Between 1993 and 1994, 368 women underwent hysterectomies for benign disorders at the University of Kiel. Of these, 58.7% were performed either by pelviscopic or by laparotomy Classic Intrafascial Supracervical Hysterectomy (CISH). Of the remaining, 14.8% were performed by abdominal hysterectomy, 13.6% by Intrafascial Vaginal Hysterectomy (IVH), 12.2% by Vaginal Hysterectomy (VH), and only 0.05% by Laparoscopic Assisted Vaginal Hysterectomy (LAVH). Comparative data of these six surgical techniques concerning patients characteristics, indications for operation, histological features, blood loss, operating time, hospital stay, uterine weights and postoperatively used analgesics are described. PMID:18493441

  18. Importance of implant dosimetry for patients undergoing prostate brachytherapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Louis Potters; David Huang; Emel Calugaru; Paul Fearn; Lucille Lee; Michael W. Kattan

    2003-01-01

    ObjectivesTo evaluate the disease and treatment-related factors for predicting biochemical freedom from recurrence (BFR) in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer undergoing permanent prostate brachytherapy.

  19. Coregistered photoacoustic-ultrasound imaging applied to brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Tyler; Zemp, Roger J.

    2011-08-01

    Brachytherapy is a form of radiation therapy commonly used in the treatment of prostate cancer wherein sustained radiation doses can be precisely targeted to the tumor area by the implantation of small radioactive seeds around the treatment area. Ultrasound is a popular imaging mode for seed implantation, but the seeds are difficult to distinguish from the tissue structure. In this work, we demonstrate the feasibility of photoacoustic imaging for identifying brachytherapy seeds in a tissue phantom, comparing the received intensity to endogenous contrast. We have found that photoacoustic imaging at 1064 nm can identify brachytherapy seeds uniquely at laser penetration depths of 5 cm in biological tissue at the ANSI limit for human exposure with a contrast-to-noise ratio of 26.5 dB. Our realtime combined photoacoustic-ultrasound imaging approach may be suitable for brachytherapy seed placement and post-placement verification, potentially allowing for realtime dosimetry assessment during implantation.

  20. Image-Based Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Cervical Cancer.

    PubMed

    Harkenrider, Matthew M; Alite, Fiori; Silva, Scott R; Small, William

    2015-07-15

    Cervical cancer is a disease that requires considerable multidisciplinary coordination of care and labor in order to maximize tumor control and survival while minimizing treatment-related toxicity. As with external beam radiation therapy, the use of advanced imaging and 3-dimensional treatment planning has generated a paradigm shift in the delivery of brachytherapy for the treatment of cervical cancer. The use of image-based brachytherapy, most commonly with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), requires additional attention and effort by the treating physician to prescribe dose to the proper volume and account for adjacent organs at risk. This represents a dramatic change from the classic Manchester approach of orthogonal radiographic images and prescribing dose to point A. We reviewed the history and currently evolving data and recommendations for the clinical use of image-based brachytherapy with an emphasis on MRI-based brachytherapy. PMID:26104944

  1. Hallazgo de una leucorrea vaginal de carácter no inflamatoria en hembras bovinas. II. Pesquisaje microbiológico vaginal y uterino (Finding of a vaginal leucorrhea of non-inflammatory character in bovine females. II. Microbiological examination)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Luis O. Alba Gómez; Edgar Segredo Cañizare; Enrique A. Silveira Prado; Eduardo Cruz Muñoz; Luis O. Maroto Martín

    With the objective of demonstrating that the bovine vaginal leucorrhea was not produced by the aggressive action of the microbial agents, 660 genital organs of cows and heifers of different races and ages, slaughtered were examined. In 120 of those organs were found exudates, for a relative frequency of 18% of vaginal leucorrhea. In 40 of the vaginal samples (33.3%)

  2. Temporal Dynamics of the Human Vaginal Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Gajer, Pawel; Brotman, Rebecca M.; Bai, Guoyun; Sakamoto, Joyce; Schütte, Ursel M.E.; Zhong, Xue; Koenig, Sara S.K.; Fu, Li; Ma, Zhanshan; Zhou, Xia; Abdo, Zaid; Forney, Larry J.; Ravel, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Elucidating the factors that impinge on the stability of bacterial communities in the vagina may help in predicting the risk of diseases that affect women’s health. Here, we describe the temporal dynamics of the composition of vaginal bacterial communities in 32 reproductive age women over a 16-week period. The analysis revealed the dynamics of five major classes of bacterial communities and showed that some communities change markedly over short time periods, whereas others are relatively stable. Modeling community stability using new quantitative measures indicates that deviation from stability correlates with time in the menstrual cycle, bacterial community composition and sexual activity. The women studied are healthy, thus it appears that neither variation in community composition per se, nor higher levels of observed diversity (co-dominance) are necessarily indicative of dysbiosis, in which there is microbial imbalance accompanied by symptoms. PMID:22553250

  3. Temporal dynamics of the human vaginal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Gajer, Pawel; Brotman, Rebecca M; Bai, Guoyun; Sakamoto, Joyce; Schütte, Ursel M E; Zhong, Xue; Koenig, Sara S K; Fu, Li; Ma, Zhanshan Sam; Zhou, Xia; Abdo, Zaid; Forney, Larry J; Ravel, Jacques

    2012-05-01

    Elucidating the factors that impinge on the stability of bacterial communities in the vagina may help in predicting the risk of diseases that affect women's health. Here, we describe the temporal dynamics of the composition of vaginal bacterial communities in 32 reproductive-age women over a 16-week period. The analysis revealed the dynamics of five major classes of bacterial communities and showed that some communities change markedly over short time periods, whereas others are relatively stable. Modeling community stability using new quantitative measures indicates that deviation from stability correlates with time in the menstrual cycle, bacterial community composition, and sexual activity. The women studied are healthy; thus, it appears that neither variation in community composition per se nor higher levels of observed diversity (co-dominance) are necessarily indicative of dysbiosis. PMID:22553250

  4. Mesh repair of vaginal wall prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Kapur, Krishan; Dalal, Vinod

    2014-01-01

    Background Over the last decade, mesh augmented surgical repair is being increasingly used in pelvic organ prolapse. Perigee and Apogee are comprehensive, single-use needle suspension kits that provide a standardized delivery method for mesh or graft-augmented repairs. This study has been carried out to study the safety and efficacy of the Perigee and Apogee mesh repair systems. Methods 10 cases of posterior vaginal wall prolapse with or without Apical prolapse underwent Apogee mesh repair surgery and 10 cases of anterior vaginal wall prolapse underwent Perigee mesh repair surgery. Depending on the findings either Apogee or Perigee or both were used. Patients were followed up for complications of the surgery if any, and for the relief of the symptoms related to prolapse and associated symptoms of bowel/bladder dysfunction. Objective cure rate was prolapse < stage 1 as per the POPQ system. Data collected was statistically analyzed. Results The objective and subjective cure rates were 100%. Postoperative complications were minor. No patient developed de novo urinary urge symptoms, stress urinary incontinence or UTI postoperatively. There were no operative complications like bladder injuries, hematoma and rectal injuries. The mean blood loss was 180 ml and the mean duration of surgery during the Apogee and Perigee mesh repair was 51.5 ± 2.99 min and 60.9 ± 4.65 min respectively. Conclusion In the present study there was a significant improvement in the degree of prolapse after the mesh repair surgeries and the results were consistent even at 12 months follow up. PMID:24843196

  5. Dosimetry errors in endovascular high-dose-rate brachytherapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W Schumer; S Wallace; T Wong; G Quong; M Geso

    2000-01-01

    Monte Carlo data were used to demonstrate the dosimetry of the microSelectron high-dose-rate (HDR) iridium 192 (192Ir) stepping source. These data were used to assess the accuracy of the Nucletron brachytherapy planning system (BPS version 13) for peripheral vessel endovascular brachytherapy. Dose rates from the high-dose-rate (HDR) source are calculated using the Monte Carlo code MCNP4A. Calculations are made at

  6. Endobronchial brachytherapy in the treatment of malignant lung tumours

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. A. Escobar-Sacristan; J. I. Granda-Orive; T. Gutierrez Jimenez; J. M. Delgado; A. Rodero Banos; R. Saez Valls

    2004-01-01

    Endobronchial brachytherapy in the treatment of malignant lung tumours. J.A. Escobar-Sacristan, J.I. Granda-Orive, T. Gutierrez Jimenez, J.M. Delgado, A. Rodero Banos, R. Saez Valls. #ERS Journals Ltd 2004. ABSTRACT: A prospective study was made to assess the short-term clinical and endoscopic response to high-dose-rate endobronchial brachytherapy (HDREB) in patients with malignant endobronchial tumours. From July 1995 to May 2000, 288

  7. Dosimetric characteristics of a new unit for electronic skin brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Martinez, Teresa; Chan, Jan-Pieter; Perez-Calatayud, Jose

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Brachytherapy with radioactive high dose rate (HDR) 192Ir source is applied to small skin cancer lesions, using surface applicators, i.e. Leipzig or Valencia type. New developments in the field of radiotherapy for skin cancer include electronic brachytherapy. This technique involves the placement of an HDR X-ray source close to the skin, therefore combining the benefits of brachytherapy with the reduced shielding requirements and targeted energy of low energy X-rays. Recently, the Esteya® Electronic Brachytherapy System (Esteya EBS, Elekta AB-Nucletron, Stockholm, Sweden) has been developed specifically for HDR brachytherapy treatment of surface lesions. The system provides radionuclide free HDR brachytherapy by means of a small 69.5 kV X-ray source. The purpose of this study is to obtain the dosimetric characterization required for clinical implementation, providing the detailed methodology to perform the commissioning. Material and methods Flatness, symmetry and penumbra, percentage of depth dose (PDD), kV stability, HVL, output, spectrum, linearity, and leakage have been evaluated for a set of applicators (from 10 mm to 30 mm in diameter). Results Flatness and symmetry resulted better than 5% with around 1 mm of penumbra. The depth dose gradient is about 7%/mm. A kV value of 68.4 ± 1.0 kV (k = 1) was obtained, in good agreement with manufacturer data (69.5 kV). HVL was 1.85 mm Al. Dose rate for a typical 6 Gy to 7 Gy prescription resulted about 3.3 Gy/min and the leakage value was < 100 µGy/min. Conclusions The new Esteya® Electronic Brachytherapy System presents excellent flatness and penumbra as with the Valencia applicator case, combined with an improved PDD, allowing treatment of lesions of up to a depth of 5 mm in combination with reduced treatment duration. The Esteya unit allows HDR brachytherapy superficial treatment within a minimally shielded environment due its low energy. PMID:24790622

  8. A GENERAL-PURPOSE DOSIMETRIC SYSTEM FOR BRACHYTHERAPY

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Foppiano; S. Guatelli; M. G. Pia

    A general-purpose, object oriented software system has been developed for the simulation and dosimetric analysis of brachytherapy applications. The flexible object-oriented design makes this system very versatile, offering the possibility to configure it for different types of brachytherapy techniques (such as I-125 or Ir-192, for instance). The dosimetric system is based on the Geant4 Simulation Toolkit, allowing accurate geometry and

  9. MCNP modeling of prostate brachytherapy and organ dosimetry

    E-print Network

    Usgaonker, Susrut Rajanikant

    2004-09-30

    MCNP MODELING OF PROSTATE BRACHYTHERAPY AND ORGAN DOSIMETRY A Thesis by SUSRUT RAJANIKANT USGAONKER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 2003 Major Subject: Health Physics MCNP MODELING OF PROSTATE BRACHYTHERAPY AND ORGAN DOSIMETRY A Thesis by SUSRUT RAJANIKANT USGAONKER Submitted to Texas A&M...

  10. Human epididymis protein 4 and secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor in vaginal fluid: relation to vaginal components and bacterial composition.

    PubMed

    Orfanelli, Theofano; Jayaram, Aswathi; Doulaveris, Georgios; Forney, Larry J; Ledger, William J; Witkin, Steven S

    2014-04-01

    Human epididymis protein 4 (HE4) is a protease inhibitor and a recently identified serum biomarker for ovarian cancer. Properties of HE4 in the genital tract of healthy women have not been evaluated. We evaluated associations between HE4 and a second vaginal protease inhibitor, secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI), with vaginal concentrations of innate immune mediators or proteases and with the types of vaginal bacterial communities. Vaginal secretions were collected from 18 healthy reproductive age women and assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for concentrations of HE4, SLPI, kallikrein 5, cathepsin B, interleukin 1? (IL-1), IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1 ra), mannose-binding lectin (MBL), the inducible 70-kDa heat shock protein, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-8. The species composition of vaginal bacterial communities in 16 women was characterized by sequencing amplicons derived from 16S bacterial ribosomal RNA genes. Correlations between any 2 assays were analyzed by the Spearman rank correlation tests. Differences in the concentrations of HE4 and SLPI, and between soluble components and vaginal community types, were analyzed by the Mann-Whitney U tests. Vaginal HE4 concentrations, but not SLPI levels, were positively correlated with levels of IL-1? (P = .0152), IL-1ra (P = .0061), MBL (P = .0100), and MMP-8 (P = .0315). The median vaginal HE4 level, as well as concentrations of MBL, IL-1?, IL-1ra, and MMP-8, was highest when Gardnerella vaginalis dominated a vaginal community. The association between HE4, elevated levels of proteases, immune mediators and high proportions of G vaginalis strongly suggests that HE4 is a component of the proinflammatory immune response in the female genital tract. PMID:24023032

  11. Parameterization of brachytherapy source phase space file for Monte Carlo-based clinical brachytherapy dose calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Zou, W.; Chen, T.; Kim, L.; Khan, A.; Haffty, B.; Yue, N. J.

    2014-01-01

    A common approach to implementing the Monte Carlo method for the calculation of brachytherapy radiation dose deposition is to use a phase space file containing information on particles emitted from a brachytherapy source. However, the loading of the phase space file during the dose calculation consumes a large amount of computer random access memory, imposing a higher requirement for computer hardware. In this study, we propose a method to parameterize the information (e.g., particle location, direction and energy) stored in the phase space file by using several probability distributions. This method was implemented for dose calculations of a commercial Ir-192 high dose rate source. Dose calculation accuracy of the parameterized source was compared to the results observed using the full phase space file in a simple water phantom and in a clinical breast cancer case. The results showed the parameterized source at a size of 200 kB was as accurate as the phase space file represented source of 1.1 GB. By using the parameterized source representation, a compact Monte Carlo job can be designed, which allows an easy setup for parallel computing in brachytherapy planning.

  12. Rehabilitation following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a review of current literature.

    PubMed

    Ross, David; Maerz, Tristan; Lynch, Jamie; Norris, Sarah; Baker, Kevin; Anderson, Kyle

    2014-01-01

    Physical rehabilitation following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair has conventionally involved a 4- to 6-week period of immobilization; there are two schools of thought regarding activity level during this period. Some authors encourage early, more aggressive rehabilitation along with the use of a continuous passive motion device; others propose later, more conservative rehabilitation. Although some studies report trends in improved early range of motion, pain relief, and outcomes scores with aggressive rehabilitation following rotator cuff repair, no definitive consensus exists supporting a clinical difference resulting from rehabilitation timing in the early stages of healing. Rehabilitation timing does not affect outcomes after 6 to 12 months postoperatively. Given the lack of information regarding which patient groups benefit from aggressive rehabilitation, individualized patient care is warranted. PMID:24382874

  13. A Load-Sharing Rip-Stop Fixation Construct for Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Denard, Patrick J.; Burkhart, Stephen S.

    2012-01-01

    Despite advancements in arthroscopic rotator cuff repair techniques, achieving tendon-to-bone healing can be difficult in the setting of poor-quality tendon. Moreover, medial tendon tears or tears with lateral tendon loss may preclude standard techniques. Rip-stop suture configurations have been shown to improve load to failure compared with simple or mattress stitch patterns and may be particularly valuable in these settings. The purpose of this report is to describe a technical modification of a rip-stop rotator cuff repair that combines the advantages of a rip-stop suture (by providing resistance to tissue cutout) and a double row of load-sharing suture anchors (minimizing the load per anchor and therefore the load per suture within each anchor). PMID:23766972

  14. Latissimus dorsi transfer for irreparable rotator cuff tears: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Irlenbusch, Ulrich; Bracht, Meike; Gansen, Heike-Kathrin; Lorenz, Ulrike; Thiel, Jens

    2008-01-01

    Latissimus dorsi transfer is indicated for isolated posterior superior defects of the rotator cuff. Additional lesions limit the success of the outcome, but they are relatively frequent in revision surgery. We analyzed their influence on the postoperative function in 52 patients with an irreparable tear of the rotator cuff (35 primary operations, 17 revision surgeries). We observed a continuous improvement in the Constant score from 36 to 69 points, also in ROM, strength, relief of pain and of different subjective parameters for the entire group in consecutive examinations at 11.1, 35.7 and 50.2 months. We found increased osteoarthritis (from 1.0 to 1.5 mm), as well as a decrease in the acromiohumeral distance (from 5.6 to 4.7 mm). In contrast, we detected a slight decrease in the values in the revision group and in the presence of an additional subscapularis lesion. PMID:18430594

  15. The evolution of computerized treatment planning for brachytherapy: American contributions

    PubMed Central

    Rivard, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To outline the evolution of computerized brachytherapy treatment planning in the United States through a review of technological developments and clinical practice refinements. Material and methods A literature review was performed and interviews were conducted with six participants in the development of computerized treatment planning for brachytherapy. Results Computerized brachytherapy treatment planning software was initially developed in the Physics Departments of New York's Memorial Hospital (by Nelson, Meurk and Balter), and Houston's M. D. Anderson Hospital (by Stovall and Shalek). These public-domain programs could be used by institutions with adequate computational resources; other clinics had access to them via Memorial's and Anderson's teletype-based computational services. Commercial brachytherapy treatment planning programs designed to run on smaller computers (Prowess, ROCS, MMS), were developed in the late 1980s and early 1990s. These systems brought interactive dosimetry into the clinic and surgical theatre. Conclusions Brachytherapy treatment planning has evolved from systems of rigid implant rules to individualized pre- and intra-operative treatment plans, and post-operative dosimetric assessments. Brachytherapy dose distributions were initially calculated on public domain programs on large regionally located computers. With the progression of computer miniaturization and increase in processor speeds, proprietary software was commercially developed for microcomputers that offered increased functionality and integration with clinical practice. PMID:25097560

  16. Intraarticular morphine and bupivacaine reduces postoperative pain after rotator cuff repair

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John E. Tetzlaff; John Brems; John Dilger

    2000-01-01

    Background and Objectives: To determine whether intraarticular injection of morphine, fentanyl, or sufentanil added to bupivacaine provided pain control after open rotator cuff repair. Methods: These data were collected as a prospective, randomized, blinded observer study. All patients received a standard interscalene anesthetic with 1.4% mepivacaine with 1:200,000 epinephrine. At the conclusion of surgery, they received an intraarticular injection after

  17. New perspectives in rotator cuff tendon regeneration: review of tissue engineered therapies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roberto Rotini; Milena Fini; Gianluca Giavaresi; Alessandro Marinelli; Enrico Guerra; Diego Antonioli; Alessandro Castagna; Roberto Giardino

    2008-01-01

    Tissue engineering may play a major role in the treatment of rotator cuff tendon lesions through replacement of an injured\\u000a tendon segment. Tendons have very poor spontaneous regenerative capabilities, and despite intensive remodelling, complete\\u000a regeneration is never achieved and the strength of tendon and ligaments remains as much as 30% lower than normal even months\\u000a or years following an acute

  18. How Important is the Recommended Slow Cuff Pressure Deflation Rate for Blood Pressure Measurement?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dingchang Zheng; John N. Amoore; Stephan Mieke; Alan Murray

    Cuff pressure deflation rate influences blood pressure (BP) measurement. However, there is little quantitative clinical evidence\\u000a on its effect. Oscillometric pulses recorded from 75 subjects at the recommended deflation rate of 2–3 mmHg per second were\\u000a analyzed. Some pulses were removed to realize six faster rates (2–7 times faster than the original). Systolic, diastolic,\\u000a and mean arterial blood pressures (SBP, DBP,

  19. Cuff-Less Estimation of Blood Pressure Using Pulse Transit Time and Pre-ejection Period

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sujay Deb; Chinmayee Nanda; D. Goswami; J. Mukhopadhyay; S. Chakrabarti

    2007-01-01

    Non-invasive and cuff-less measurement of arterial blood pressure (BP) is desirable for continuous patient monitoring. Among the various possible techniques pulse transit time (PTT) based approach for estimation of BP is the most promising one. But change in BP is reflected both in PTT and pre-ejection period (PEP). We propose to measure PTT using multiple PPG and PPG-ECG combination recorded

  20. Comparison of rotator cuff muscle architecture between humans and other selected vertebrate species

    PubMed Central

    Mathewson, Margie A.; Kwan, Alan; Eng, Carolyn M.; Lieber, Richard L.; Ward, Samuel R.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we compare rotator cuff muscle architecture of typically used animal models with that of humans and quantify the scaling relationships of these muscles across mammals. The four muscles that correspond to the human rotator cuff – supraspinatus, infraspinatus, subscapularis and teres minor – of 10 commonly studied animals were excised and subjected to a series of comparative measurements. When body mass among animals was regressed against physiological cross-sectional area, muscle mass and normalized fiber length, the confidence intervals suggested geometric scaling but did not exclude other scaling relationships. Based on the architectural difference index (ADI), a combined measure of fiber length-to-moment arm ratio, fiber length-to-muscle length ratio and the fraction of the total rotator cuff physiological cross-sectional area contributed by each muscle, chimpanzees were found to be the most similar to humans (ADI=2.15), followed closely by capuchins (ADI=2.16). Interestingly, of the eight non-primates studied, smaller mammals such as mice, rats and dogs were more similar to humans in architectural parameters compared with larger mammals such as sheep, pigs or cows. The force production versus velocity trade-off (indicated by fiber length-to-moment arm ratio) and the excursion ability (indicated by fiber length-to-muscle length ratio) of humans were also most similar to those of primates, followed by the small mammals. Overall, primates provide the best architectural representation of human muscle architecture. However, based on the muscle architectural parameters of non-primates, smaller rather than larger mammals may be better models for studying muscles related to the human rotator cuff. PMID:24072803

  1. The Biomechanical and Histologic Effects of Platelet-Rich Plasma on Rat Rotator Cuff Repairs

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Jennifer; Evans, Douglas; Tonino, Pietro M.; Yong, Sherri; Callaci, John J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Rotator cuff tears are common injuries that are often treated with surgical repair. Because of the high concentration of growth factors within platelets, platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has the potential to enhance healing in rotator cuff repairs. Hypothesis Platelet-rich plasma would alter the biomechanical and histologic properties of rotator cuff repair during an acute injury response. Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Methods Platelet-rich plasma was produced from inbred donor rats. A tendon-from-bone supraspinatus tear was created surgically and an immediate transosseous repair performed. The control group underwent repair only. The PRP group underwent a repair with PRP augmentation. Rats in each group were sacrificed at 7, 14, and 21 days. The surgically repaired tendons underwent biomechanical testing, including failure load, stiffness, failure strain, and stress relaxation characteristics. Histological analysis evaluated the cellular characteristics of the repair tissue. Results At 7- and 21-day periods, augmentation with PRP showed statistically significant effects on the biomechanical properties of the repaired rat supraspinatus tear, but failure load was not increased at the 7-, 14-, or 21-day periods (P = .688, .209, and .477, respectively). The control group had significantly higher stiffness at 21 days (P = .006). The control group had higher failure strain at 7 days (P = .02), whereas the PRP group had higher failure strain at 21 days (P = .008). Histologically, the PRP group showed increased fibroblastic response and vascular proliferation at each time point. At 21 days, the collagen fibers in the PRP group were oriented in a more linear fashion toward the tendon footprint. Conclusion In this controlled, rat model study, PRP altered the tissue properties of the supraspinatus tendon without affecting the construct’s failure load. Clinical Relevance The decreased tendon tissue stiffness acutely and failure to enhance tendon-to-bone healing of repairs should be considered before augmenting rotator cuff repairs with PRP. Further studies will be necessary to determine the role of PRP in clinical practice. PMID:22822177

  2. Long Head of the Biceps Pathology Combined with Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Ditsios, Konstantinos; Agathangelidis, Filon; Boutsiadis, Achilleas; Karataglis, Dimitrios; Papadopoulos, Pericles

    2012-01-01

    The long head of the biceps tendon (LHBT) is an anatomic structure commonly involved in painful shoulder conditions as a result of trauma, degeneration, or overuse. Recent studies have pointed out the close correlation between LHBT lesions and rotator cuff (RCT) tears. Clinicians need to take into account the importance of the LHBT in the presence of other shoulder pathologies. This paper provides an up-to-date overview of recent publications on anatomy, pathophysiology, diagnosis, classification, and current treatment strategies. PMID:23209915

  3. Intraosseous foreign body granuloma in rotator cuff repair with bioabsorbable suture anchor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Nusselt; S. Freche; H.-M. Klinger; M. H. Baums

    2010-01-01

    Biodegradable implants lead to problems such as cyst formation, soft-tissue inflammation, loose implant fragments or local\\u000a osteolysis. This report represents the first published case of an intraosseous foreign body granuloma in the humeral head\\u000a after arthroscopic rotator cuff tear fixation with a poly-l-lactide (PLLA) suture anchor. A 48-year-old female patient presented with pain in her right shoulder. A refixation of

  4. Comparison of rotator cuff muscle architecture between humans and other selected vertebrate species.

    PubMed

    Mathewson, Margie A; Kwan, Alan; Eng, Carolyn M; Lieber, Richard L; Ward, Samuel R

    2014-01-15

    In this study, we compare rotator cuff muscle architecture of typically used animal models with that of humans and quantify the scaling relationships of these muscles across mammals. The four muscles that correspond to the human rotator cuff - supraspinatus, infraspinatus, subscapularis and teres minor - of 10 commonly studied animals were excised and subjected to a series of comparative measurements. When body mass among animals was regressed against physiological cross-sectional area, muscle mass and normalized fiber length, the confidence intervals suggested geometric scaling but did not exclude other scaling relationships. Based on the architectural difference index (ADI), a combined measure of fiber length-to-moment arm ratio, fiber length-to-muscle length ratio and the fraction of the total rotator cuff physiological cross-sectional area contributed by each muscle, chimpanzees were found to be the most similar to humans (ADI=2.15), followed closely by capuchins (ADI=2.16). Interestingly, of the eight non-primates studied, smaller mammals such as mice, rats and dogs were more similar to humans in architectural parameters compared with larger mammals such as sheep, pigs or cows. The force production versus velocity trade-off (indicated by fiber length-to-moment arm ratio) and the excursion ability (indicated by fiber length-to-muscle length ratio) of humans were also most similar to those of primates, followed by the small mammals. Overall, primates provide the best architectural representation of human muscle architecture. However, based on the muscle architectural parameters of non-primates, smaller rather than larger mammals may be better models for studying muscles related to the human rotator cuff. PMID:24072803

  5. Diversity of the vaginal microbiome correlates with preterm birth.

    PubMed

    Hyman, Richard W; Fukushima, Marilyn; Jiang, Hui; Fung, Eula; Rand, Larry; Johnson, Brittni; Vo, Kim Chi; Caughey, Aaron B; Hilton, Joan F; Davis, Ronald W; Giudice, Linda C

    2014-01-01

    Reproductive tract infection is a major initiator of preterm birth (PTB). The objective of this prospective cohort study of 88 participants was to determine whether PTB correlates with the vaginal microbiome during pregnancy. Total DNA was purified from posterior vaginal fornix swabs during gestation. The 16S ribosomal RNA gene was amplified using polymerase chain reaction primers, followed by chain-termination sequencing. Bacteria were identified by comparing contig consensus sequences with the Ribosomal Database Project. Dichotomous responses were summarized via proportions and continuous variables via means ± standard deviation. Mean Shannon Diversity index differed by Welch t test (P = .00016) between caucasians with PTB and term gestation. Species diversity was greatest among African Americans (P = .0045). Change in microbiome/Lactobacillus content and presence of putative novel/noxious bacteria did not correlate with PTB. We conclude that uncultured vaginal bacteria play an important role in PTB and race/ethnicity and sampling location are important determinants of the vaginal microbiome. PMID:23715799

  6. Diversity of the Vaginal Microbiome Correlates With Preterm Birth

    PubMed Central

    Hyman, Richard W.; Fukushima, Marilyn; Jiang, Hui; Fung, Eula; Rand, Larry; Johnson, Brittni; Vo, Kim Chi; Caughey, Aaron B.; Hilton, Joan F.; Davis, Ronald W.; Giudice, Linda C.

    2014-01-01

    Reproductive tract infection is a major initiator of preterm birth (PTB). The objective of this prospective cohort study of 88 participants was to determine whether PTB correlates with the vaginal microbiome during pregnancy. Total DNA was purified from posterior vaginal fornix swabs during gestation. The 16S ribosomal RNA gene was amplified using polymerase chain reaction primers, followed by chain-termination sequencing. Bacteria were identified by comparing contig consensus sequences with the Ribosomal Database Project. Dichotomous responses were summarized via proportions and continuous variables via means ± standard deviation. Mean Shannon Diversity index differed by Welch t test (P = .00016) between caucasians with PTB and term gestation. Species diversity was greatest among African Americans (P = .0045). Change in microbiome/Lactobacillus content and presence of putative novel/noxious bacteria did not correlate with PTB. We conclude that uncultured vaginal bacteria play an important role in PTB and race/ethnicity and sampling location are important determinants of the vaginal microbiome. PMID:23715799

  7. Management of Vaginal Atrophy: Implications from the REVIVE Survey.

    PubMed

    Wysocki, Susan; Kingsberg, Sheryl; Krychman, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Vulvar and vaginal atrophy (VVA) is a chronic and progressive medical condition common in postmenopausal women. Symptoms of VVA such as dyspareunia, vaginal dryness, irritation, and itching can negatively impact sexual function and quality of life. The REVIVE (REal Women's VIews of Treatment Options for Menopausal Vaginal ChangEs) survey assessed knowledge about VVA and recorded attitudes about interactions with healthcare providers (HCPs) and available treatment options for VVA. The REVIVE survey identified unmet needs of women with VVA symptoms such as poor understanding of the condition, poor communication with HCPs despite the presence of vaginal symptoms, and concerns about the safety, convenience, and efficacy of available VVA treatments. HCPs can address these unmet needs by proactively identifying patients with VVA and educating them about the condition as well as discussing treatment preferences and available therapies for VVA. PMID:24987271

  8. Vaginal Estrogen Therapy for Patients with Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Moegele, M; Buchholz, S; Seitz, S; Lattrich, C; Ortmann, O

    2013-10-01

    On account of the good prognosis for patients with breast cancer, improving or maintaining the quality of life in the aftercare period is becoming more and more important. In particular, the increasing usage of aromatase inhibitors in the past few years has led to an increased incidence of vaginal atrophy with symptoms such as vaginal dryness, petechial bleeding, dyspareunia and recurrent cystitis. And just these symptoms have a detrimental impact on the quality of life of breast cancer patients. Application of a topical estrogen therapy represents the most effective means to treat vaginal atrophy. The use of a systemic or, respectively, topical hormone therapy is, however, contraindicated for breast cancer patients. Further clinical trials are needed in order to assess the safety of vaginal estrogen therapy. PMID:24771890

  9. Mucus-penetrating nanoparticles for vaginal and gastrointestinal drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ensign-Hodges, Laura

    A method that could provide more uniform and longer-lasting drug delivery to mucosal surfaces holds the potential to greatly improve the effectiveness of prophylactic and therapeutic approaches for numerous diseases and conditions, including sexually transmitted infections and inflammatory bowel disease. However, the body's natural defenses, including adhesive, rapidly cleared mucus linings coating nearly all entry points to the body not covered by skin, has limited the effectiveness of drug and gene delivery by nanoscale delivery systems. Here, we investigate the use of muco-inert mucus-penetrating nanoparticles (MPP) for improving vaginal and gastrointestinal drug delivery. Conventional hydrophobic nanoparticles strongly adhere to mucus, facilitating rapid clearance from the body. Here, we demonstrate that mucoadhesive polystyrene nanoparticles (conventional nanoparticles, CP) become mucus-penetrating in human cervicovaginal mucus (CVM) after pretreatment with sufficient concentrations of Pluronic F127. Importantly, the diffusion rate of large MPP did not change in F127 pretreated CVM, implying there is no affect on the native pore structure of CVM. Additionally, there was no increase in inflammatory cytokine release in the vaginal tract of mice after daily application of 1% F127 for one week. Importantly, HSV virus remains adherent in F127-pretreated CVM. Mucosal epithelia use osmotic gradients for fluid absorption and secretion. We hypothesized that hypotonically-induced fluid uptake could be advantageous for rapidly delivering drugs through mucus to the vaginal epithelium. We evaluated hypotonic formulations for delivering water-soluble drugs and for drug delivery with MPP. Hypotonic formulations markedly increased the rate at which drugs and MPP reached the epithelial surface. Additionally, hypotonic formulations greatly enhanced drug and MPP delivery to the entire epithelial surface, including deep into the vaginal folds (rugae) that isotonic formulations failed to reach. However, hypotonic formulations caused free drugs to be drawn through the epithelium, reducing vaginal retention. In contrast, hypotonic formulations caused MPP to accumulate rapidly and uniformly on vaginal surfaces, ideally positioned for sustained drug delivery. Using a mouse model of vaginal genital herpes (HSV-2) infection, we found that hypotonic delivery of free drug led to improved immediate protection, but diminished longer-term protection. Minimally hypotonic formulations provided rapid and uniform delivery of MPP to the entire vaginal surface, thus enabling formulations with minimal risk of epithelial toxicity. We then describe an ex vivo method for characterizing particle transport on freshly excised mucosal tissues. By directly observing MPP transport on vaginal, gastrointestinal, and respiratory tissue, we were able to determine an innate difference in mucus mesh size at different anatomical locations. In addition, we were able to optimize particle size for gastrointestinal delivery in mice. As described here, there are numerous barriers to effective drug delivery in the gastrointestinal tract, including the mucus barrier. We go on to demonstrate that MPP can improve delivery in the gastrointestinal tract, both by rectal and oral administration. Finally, we describe the use of MPP for improving vaginal drug delivery. Incomplete drug coverage and short duration of action limit the effectiveness of vaginally administered drugs, including microbicides for preventing sexually transmitted infections. We show that MPP provide uniform distribution over the vaginal epithelium, whereas CP are aggregated by mouse vaginal mucus, leading to poor distribution. By penetrating into the deepest mucus layers in the rugae, more MPP were retained in the vaginal tract compared to CP. After 24 h, when delivered in a conventional vaginal gel, patches of a model drug remained on the vaginal epithelium, whereas the epithelium was coated with drug delivered by MPP. We then demonstrate that when administered 30 min prior to inoculum, anti-HSV-2 MPP protected

  10. HPV-Associated Vaginal Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Is Doing Related Links Stay Informed Rates by Race and Ethnicity for Other Kinds of Cancer All ... Cancer Home HPV-Associated Vaginal Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on ...

  11. Management of Recurrent Stricture Formation after Transverse Vaginal Septum Excision

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ridhima; Bozzay, Joseph D.; Williams, David L.; DePond, Robert T.; Gantt, Pickens A.

    2015-01-01

    Background. A transverse vaginal septum (TVS) is a rare obstructing anomaly, caused due to improper fusion of Müllerian ducts and urogenital sinus during embryogenesis. Case. A 15-year-old girl presented with primary amenorrhea. She had multiple congenital anomalies. Initial examination and imaging investigation revealed the presence of a unicornuate uterus and a TVS. The TVS was excised; however the patient was unable to perform vaginal dilation postoperatively leading to recurrent stricture formation. She underwent multiple surgeries for excision of the stricture. The patient was eventually evaluated every day in the clinic until she was able to demonstrate successful vaginal dilatation in the presence of a clinician. Summary and Conclusion. Properly guided regular and intensive vaginal dilation after TVS excision may decrease the need of reoperations due to recurrent stricture formation. PMID:26078895

  12. On the identification of sensory information from mixed nerves by using single-channel cuff electrodes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Several groups have shown that the performance of motor neuroprostheses can be significantly improved by detecting specific sensory events related to the ongoing motor task (e.g., the slippage of an object during grasping). Algorithms have been developed to achieve this goal by processing electroneurographic (ENG) afferent signals recorded by using single-channel cuff electrodes. However, no efforts have been made so far to understand the number and type of detectable sensory events that can be differentiated from whole nerve recordings using this approach. Methods To this aim, ENG afferent signals, evoked by different sensory stimuli were recorded using single-channel cuff electrodes placed around the sciatic nerve of anesthetized rats. The ENG signals were digitally processed and several features were extracted and used as inputs for the classification. The work was performed on integral datasets, without eliminating any noisy parts, in order to be as close as possible to real application. Results The results obtained showed that single-channel cuff electrodes are able to provide information on two to three different afferent (proprioceptive, mechanical and nociceptive) stimuli, with reasonably good discrimination ability. The classification performances are affected by the SNR of the signal, which in turn is related to the diameter of the fibers encoding a particular type of neurophysiological stimulus. Conclusions Our findings indicate that signals of acceptable SNR and corresponding to different physiological modalities (e.g. mediated by different types of nerve fibers) may be distinguished. PMID:20423488

  13. Laparoscopic Transvesical Resection of an En Bloc Bladder Cuff and Distal Ureter during Nephroureterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Giannakopoulos, Stilianos; Toufas, George; Dimitriadis, Charalampos; Giannopoulos, Stavros; Kalaitzis, Christos; Bantis, Athanasios; Patris, Emmanuel; Touloupidis, Stavros

    2012-01-01

    Objective. The most appropriate technique for excising the distal ureter and bladder cuff during laparoscopic nephroureterectomy is still debated. We report our experience with a pure laparoscopic transvesical method that duplicates the long-standing open transvesical approach. Materials and Methods. Seven men and three women diagnosed with upper tract transitional cell carcinoma were treated with this procedure. Three intravesical ports were inserted, and pneumovesicum was established at 12?mmHg. Transvesical laparoscopic circumferential detachment of the bladder cuff and en bloc mobilization of the last centimeters of the distal ureter were performed, followed by the closure of the bladder defect. Subsequently, a nephrectomy was performed either laparoscopically or using an open flank approach. Results. The median age was 68.5 years. The procedure was completed uneventfully in all cases. The median operating time for distal ureter excision was 82.5 minutes (range 55–120). No complications directly related to the pneumovesicum method were recorded. The median follow-up period was 31 months (range 12–55). During the follow-up period, two patients (20%) died from the disease, and a bladder tumor developed in three cases (30%). Conclusion. The laparoscopic transvesical resection of the en bloc bladder cuff and distal ureter is a reliable, effective, and oncologically safe technique, at least in the midterm. PMID:23049475

  14. A Canine Non-Weight-Bearing Model with Radial Neurectomy for Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Xiaoxi; Bao, Nirong; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C.; Steinmann, Scott P.; Zhao, Chunfeng

    2015-01-01

    Background The major concern of using a large animal model to study rotator cuff repair is the high rate of repair retears. The purpose of this study was to test a non-weight-bearing (NWB) canine model for rotator cuff repair research. Methods First, in the in vitro study, 18 shoulders were randomized to 3 groups. 1) Full-width transections repaired with modified Mason-Allen sutures using 3-0 polyglactin suture, 2) Group 1 repaired using number 2 (#2) polyester braid and long-chain polyethylene suture, and 3) Partial-width transections leaving the superior 2 mm infraspinatus tendon intact without repair. In the in vivo study of 6 dogs, the infraspinatus tendon was partially transected as the same as the in vitro group 3. A radial neurectomy was performed to prevent weight bearing. The operated limb was slung in a custom-made jacket for 6 weeks. Results In the in vitro study, mean ultimate tensile load and stiffness in Group 2 were significantly higher than Group 1 and 3 (p<0.05). In the in vivo study, gross inspection and histology showed that the preserved superior 2-mm portion of the infraspinatus tendon remained intact with normal structure. Conclusions Based on the biomechanical and histological findings, this canine NWB model may be an appropriate and useful model for studies of rotator cuff repair. PMID:26107616

  15. Botulinum toxin is detrimental to repair of a chronic rotator cuff tear in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Gilotra, Mohit; Nguyen, Thao; Christian, Matthew; Davis, Derik; Henn, R Frank; Hasan, Syed Ashfaq

    2015-08-01

    Re-tear continues to be a problem after rotator cuff repair. Intramuscular botulinum toxin (Botox) injection can help optimize tension at the repair site to promote healing but could have an adverse effect on the degenerated muscle in a chronic tear. We hypothesized that Botox injection would improve repair characteristics without adverse effect on the muscle in a chronic rotator cuff tear model. The supraspinatus tendon of both shoulders in 14 rabbits underwent delayed repair 12 weeks after transection. One shoulder was treated with intramuscular Botox injection and the other with a saline control injection. Six weeks after repair, outcomes were based on biomechanics, histology, and magnetic resonance imaging. Botox-treated repairs were significantly weaker (2.64?N) than control repairs (5.51?N, p?=?0.03). Eighty percent of Botox-treated repairs and 40% of control repairs healed with some partial defect. Fatty infiltration of the supraspinatus was present in all shoulders (Goutallier Grade 3 or 4) but was increased in the setting of Botox. This study provides additional support for the rabbit supraspinatus model of chronic cuff tear, showing consistent fatty infiltration. Contrary to our hypothesis, Botox had a negative effect on repair strength and might increase fatty infiltration. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 33:1152-1157, 2015. PMID:25626677

  16. Transverse versus longitudinal tripolar configuration for selective stimulation with multipolar cuff electrodes.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Thomas N; Kurstjens, G A Mathijs; Struijk, Johannes J

    2011-04-01

    The ability to stimulate subareas of a nerve selectively is highly desirable, since it has the potential of simplifying surgery to implanting one cuff on a large nerve instead of many cuffs on smaller nerves or muscles, or alternatively can improve function where surgical access to the smaller nerves is limited. In this paper, stimulation was performed with a four-channel multipolar cuff electrode implanted on the sciatic nerve of nine rabbits to compare the extensively researched longitudinal tripolar configuration with the transverse tripolar configuration, which has received less interest. The performance of these configurations was evaluated in terms of selectivity in recruitment of the three branches of the sciatic nerve. The results showed that the transverse configuration was able to selectively activate the sciatic nerve branches to a functionally relevant level in more cases than the longitudinal configuration (20/27 versus 11/27 branches) and overall achieved a higher mean selectivity [0.79 ± 0.13 versus 0.61 ± 0.09 (mean ± standard deviation)]. The transverse configuration was most successful at recruiting the small cutaneous and medium-sized peroneal branches, and less successful at recruiting the large tibial nerve. PMID:21421427

  17. Arthroscopic Lamina-Specific Double-Row Fixation for Large Delaminated Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Daisuke; Funakoshi, Noboru; Yamashita, Fumiharu

    2014-01-01

    Delamination is a commonly observed finding at the time of rotator cuff repair, but few studies have described the surgical techniques used for delaminated rotator cuff tears (RCTs) or their clinical outcomes. We developed a technique using a combination of a double row and an additional row, which we call lamina-specific double-row fixation, for large delaminated RCTs. The lamina-specific double-row technique is performed using an additional row (lamina-specific lateral row) of suture anchors placed between the typical medial and lateral rows of suture anchors. The technique is performed as follows: (1) medial-row sutures are passed through the inferior (articular-side) and superior (bursal-side) layers in a mattress fashion; (2) lamina-specific lateral-row simple sutures are passed through the inferior layer; and (3) lateral-row simple sutures are passed through the superior layer. We believe that this technique offers the following advantages: (1) creation of a larger area of contact between the inferior layer and the footprint, (2) higher initial fixation strength of the articular-side components of the repaired rotator cuff tendon, and (3) an adaptation between the superficial and inferior layers. This technique represents an alternative option in the operative treatment of large delaminated RCTs. PMID:25685671

  18. Intraoperative atelectasis due to endotracheal tube cuff herniation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Moazeni Bitgani, Mohammad; Madineh, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    Endotracheal tube (ETT) cuff herniation is a rare, and often difficult to diagnose, cause of bronchial obstruction. We present a case of outside cuff herniation of an endotracheal tube that caused pulmonary right lung atelectasis. A 29-year-old man ,a case of car accident with multiple fractures, was admitted to the emergency ward and transferred to the operating room(OR) for open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) of all fractures .The procedures were done under general anesthesia (G/A). The past medical history of the patient did not indicate any problem. Anesthesia was induced with thiopental, atracurium and then maintained by propofol and remifentanyl infusions and 100% O2 via orally inserted ETT. The patient was positioned in left lateral decubitus position for operation. Two hours after induction of anesthesia, the oxygen saturation level dropped to 85 % and the breath sounds in the right side of the chest were weakened. The chest x-ray images showed right lung atelectasis especially in the upper lobe. The problem was disappeared after removal of the ETT. In this case, we observed that an ETT cuff herniation can be a cause of airway obstruction. If there is a decreased unilateral breath sounds, we recommend replacement or repositioning of ETT. PMID:23165818

  19. Iliococcygeus or sacrospinous fixation for vaginal vault prolapse

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christopher F Maher; Christine J Murray; Marcus P Carey; Peter L Dwyer; Antony M Ugoni

    2001-01-01

    Objective:To compare iliococcygeus (prespinous) and sacrospinous fixation for vaginal vault prolapse.Methods:Between 1994 and 1998, 78 women underwent sacrospinous colpopexy and 50 underwent iliococcygeus fixation for the management of symptomatic vaginal vault prolapse. A matched case-control study was designed to compare the two approaches. The matched variables included age, parity, body mass index, degree of vault prolapse, menopause, sexual activity, constipation,

  20. The Sacrospinous Vaginal Vault Suspension: Critical Analysis of Outcomes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Meschia; F. Bruschi; F. Amicarelli; P. Pifarotti; M. Marchini; P. G. Crosignani

    1999-01-01

    :   One hundred and three women with a preoperative diagnosis of a pelvic support defect underwent right sacrospinous fixation\\u000a of the vaginal apex. The procedure was performed either therapeutically (in 63 subjects with vaginal vault eversion) or prophylactically\\u000a (40 patients with severe uterovaginal prolapse), and was associated with other reconstructive procedures to repair the coexisting\\u000a cystocele, enterocele or rectocele. Preoperative

  1. Vaginal laceration and perforation resulting from first coitus.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, R J; Ganti, S

    2001-04-01

    Vaginal laceration resulting from coitus is not uncommon and is well described. Perforation of the vagina during coitus is a very rare occurrence, and there is scant literature reporting it. This is a case of a 14-year-old female who suffered both laceration and perforation of the vagina as a result of her first coitus, which was consensual. The characteristics of vaginal laceration and perforation, presentation, treatment, complications, as well as predisposing factors, are discussed. PMID:11334091

  2. Preclinical evaluation of UC781 microbicide vaginal drug delivery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Meredith R. Clark; Timothy J. McCormick; Gustavo F. Doncel; David R. Friend

    2011-01-01

    UC781 is a potent nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor being investigated as a potential microbicide to prevent transmission\\u000a of HIV-1 both vaginally and rectally. This study was designed to investigate the in vitro drug release, in vitro permeability\\/safety,\\u000a and in vivo pharmacokinetics in rabbits of a vaginal gel prepared with micronized or nonmicronized UC781 (UC781m and UC781nm, respectively). Gels prepared with

  3. Robotic removal of eroded vaginal mesh into the bladder.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Francisco Igor B; O'Connor, Jeffrey; Mittal, Vijay K; Hurley, Patrick

    2013-11-01

    Vaginal mesh erosion into the bladder after midurethral sling procedure or cystocele repair is uncommon, with only a few cases having been reported in the literature. The ideal surgical management is still controversial. Current options for removal of eroded mesh include: endoscopic, transvaginal or abdominal (either open or laparoscopic) approaches. We, herein, present the first case of robotic removal of a large eroded vaginal mesh into the bladder and discuss potential benefits and limitations of the technique. PMID:23600850

  4. Obstetric and gynecological diseases and complications resulting from vaginal dysbacteriosis.

    PubMed

    Kovachev, Stefan Miladinov

    2014-08-01

    Accurate knowledge of the composition and ecology of vaginal microbial environment of a healthy woman is necessary for the understanding of normal flora and how to reduce the risk for diseases. Vagina and its microflora form a balanced ecosystem in which dominated bacteria are vaginal lactobacilli. There are dynamic changes in this ecosystem having structure and composition depending on many factors. The term dysbacteriosis defines any movement outside the normal range for the given biotope of obligate and/or facultative microflora. Such a change in the quantity and quality of the respective microbial balance is fraught with danger and requires correction and recovery. The purpose of this overview is to examine obstetric and gynecological diseases that can cause vaginal impaired microbial balance. Vaginal dysbacteriosis is a cause, predecessor, and often also consequence of vaginal infections. In essence, any vaginal infection can be seen as dysbacteriosis, developed to the most severe extent. Here, there is a dominant microorganism other than lactic acid bacteria in the vagina (clinically manifested or not, respectively), depletion of defense mechanisms of the vagina associated with the shift of lactobacilli from their dominant role in the vaginal balance, decrease in their number and species diversity, and a resulting change in the healthy status of the vagina. Vaginal dysbacteriosis can be found in pathogenetic mechanism, whereby many obstetric and gynecological diseases develop. Most of these diseases lead directly to increased maternal and infant morbidity and mortality, so it is important to understand the reasons for them and the arrangements for their prevention. PMID:24711012

  5. Management of Vaginal Erosion of Polypropylene Mesh Slings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    KATHLEEN C. KOBASHI; FRED E. GOVIER

    2003-01-01

    PurposeThe SPARC (American Medical Systems, Minneapolis, Minnesota) polypropylene sling has recently been introduced as an alternative delivery system to TVT (Ethicon, New Brunswick, New Jersey) tension-free vaginal tape for placement of a tension-free mid urethral sling. Erosion must always be considered a risk of synthetic materials. We present 4 cases of vaginal erosion of polypropylene mesh placed with this system

  6. Predictors of Metastatic Disease After Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Forsythe, Kevin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Burri, Ryan [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY (United States); Stone, Nelson [Department of Urology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Stock, Richard G., E-mail: richard.stock@moutsinai.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To identify predictors of metastatic disease after brachytherapy treatment for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: All patients who received either brachytherapy alone (implant) or brachytherapy in combination with external beam radiation therapy for treatment of localized prostate cancer at The Mount Sinai Hospital between June 1990 and March 2007 with a minimum follow-up of 2 years were included. Univariate and multivariable analyses were performed on the following variables: risk group, Gleason score (GS), clinical T stage, pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level, post-treatment prostate-specific antigen doubling time (PSA-DT), treatment type (implant vs. implant plus external beam radiation therapy), treatment era, total biological effective dose, use of androgen deprivation therapy, age at diagnosis, and race. PSA-DT was analyzed in the following ordinate groups: 0 to 90 days, 91 to 180 days, 180 to 360 days, and greater than 360 days. Results: We included 1,887 patients in this study. Metastases developed in 47 of these patients. The 10-year freedom from distant metastasis (FFDM) rate for the entire population was 95.1%. Median follow-up was 6 years (range, 2-15 years). The only two significant predictors of metastatic disease by multivariable analyses were GS and PSA-DT (p < 0.001 for both variables). Estimated 10-year FFDM rates for GS of 6 or less, GS of 7, and GS of 8 or greater were 97.9%, 94.3%, and 76.1%, respectively (p < 0.001). Estimated FFDM rates for PSA-DT of 0 to 90 days, 91 to 180 days, 181 to 360 days, and greater than 360 days were 17.5%, 67.9%, 74%, and 94.8%, respectively (p < 0.001). Estimated 10-year FFDM rates for the low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups were 98.6%, 96.2%, and 86.7%, respectively. A demographic shift to patients presenting with higher-grade disease in more recent years was observed. Conclusions: GS and post-treatment PSA-DT are both statistically significant independent predictors of metastatic disease. Patients with a high GS and/or short PSA-DT have a higher likelihood of developing metastatic disease and should be considered for systemic therapy.

  7. Endogenous or exogenous origin of vaginal candidiasis in Polish women?

    PubMed

    Mnichowska-Polanowskai, Magdalena; Wojciechowska-Koszko, Iwona; Klimowicz, Bogumia; Szymaniak, Ludmia; Krasnodebska-Szponder, Barbara; Szych, Zbigniew; Giedrys-Kalemba, Stefania

    2013-01-01

    Vaginal candidiasis is a common problem of clinical practice. Many studies have been conducted to explain its origin but only a few have included Polish women. The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence and similarity of oral, anal and vaginal Candida albicans strains isolated from Polish women with vaginal candidiasis. The study involved 20 from 37 recruited women. Swab samples were collected from their vagina, anus, and oral cavity at two-month intervals. All the women were treated with nystatin. Yeast were recovered and identified by the germ-tube test, API /Vitek system, typed by API ZYM and RAPD-PCR. Chi-square test was used to analyze the data. A total of 170 Candida albicans isolates were recovered from 180 samples collected 3 times from 3 sites of 20 women. Positive yeast vaginal cultures were found in all patients before administration of nystatin. Vaginal yeast recovery rate was decreased statistically significant in both follow-up visits (p= 0.001; p= 0.003). The same and different genotypes/biotypes were found concomitantly in a few body sites and/ or repeatedly at time interval from the same body site. The results support the concept of dynamic exchange of yeast within one woman and endogenous or exogenous origin of vaginal candidiasis. PMID:24459839

  8. Vaginitis in pregnancy is related to adverse perinatal outcome

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Fengqiu; Du, Xiaodong; Xie, Lili

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether education level and occupation are risk factors of vaginitis in pregnant women and to investigate relationship between vaginitis occurrence during pregnancy and perinatal mortality rates. Methods: A total of 319 women of early pregnancy or mid-pregnancy were enrolled. Six specimens were collected from posterior fornix of each pregnant woman and then cultured for identification of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, intestinal bacteria, general bacteria, fungi, mycoplasma, and chlamydia, respectively. Results: The pregnant women in the “elementary school or below” group and the “middle school” group had significantly higher incidences of vaginitis compared with the pregnant women in the groups of “high school”, “skill education”, and “college or above”. The pregnant women in the groups of “Worker”, “Government employee”, “Company employee”, and “Professionals” had significantly lower vaginitis incidences. The women with infections of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, intestinal bacteria, and general bacteria had higher perinatal mortalities (0.063 ± 0.011, 0.052 ± 0.012, and 0.017 ± 0.008, respectively) than women with infections of fungi, mycoplasma, and Chlamydia (0.002 ± 0.007, 0.003 ± 0.004, and 0.001 ± 0.001, respectively). Conclusions: Education level and occupation are risk factors related to incidences of vaginitis in pregnant women. The bacteria-related vaginitis is a major reason of perinatal mortality.

  9. Bioadhesive Mini-Tablets for Vaginal Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Hiorth, Marianne; Nilsen, Susanne; Tho, Ingunn

    2014-01-01

    Different non-ionic cellulose ethers (methyl cellulose, MC; hydroxyethyl cellulose, HEC; hydroxypropyl cellulose, HPC; hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose, HPMC) and microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) were investigated as matrix formers for preparation of mini-tablets targeting vaginal drug delivery. Hexyl aminolevulinat hydrochloridum (HAL) was used as a model drug. The mini-tablets were characterized with respect to their mechanical strength, bioadhesion towards cow vaginal tissue in two independent tests (rotating cylinder test, detachment test using texture analyzer), and dissolution rate in two media mimicking the pH levels of fertile, healthy and post-menopausal women (vaginal fluid simulant pH 4.5, phosphate buffer pH 6.8). Mini-tablets with a matrix of either HPMC or HPC were found to possess adequate mechanical strength, superior bioadhesive behavior towards vaginal tissue, and pH independent controlled release of the model drug, suggesting that both systems would be suited for the treatment of women regardless of age, i.e., respective of their vaginal pH levels. Bioadhesive mini-tablets offer a potential for improved residence time in the vaginal cavity targeting contact with mucosal tissue and prolonged release of the drug. PMID:25166286

  10. Recommendations of the Spanish Brachytherapy Group of SEOR for HDR endoluminal treatments. Part 1: Oesophagus.

    PubMed

    Rovirosa, Á; Anchuelo, J; Crispin, V; Gutiérrez, C; Herreros, A; Herruzo, I; Menéndez, J C; Pino, P; Polo, A; Rodríguez, S

    2015-08-01

    The endoesophageal brachytherapy technique provides good results in the treatment of oesophageal cancer, when indicated. In a consensus meeting, the Spanish Brachytherapy Group of SEOR and the Spanish Society of Medical Physics (SEFM) agreed on the indications, dose, fractionation schedule, prescription and reporting to be performed in endoesophageal brachytherapy. The results of this consensus are presented here as recommendations for medical practice. PMID:25893433

  11. Inverse Planning Approach for 3-D MRI-Based Pulse-Dose Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy in Cervix Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chajon, Enrique; Dumas, Isabelle; Touleimat, Mahmoud B.Sc.; Magne, Nicolas; Coulot, Jeremy; Verstraet, Rodolfe; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri [Department of Radiotherapy, Brachytherapy Unit, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Haie-Meder, Christine [Department of Radiotherapy, Brachytherapy Unit, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France)], E-mail: Christine.HAIEMEDER@igr.fr

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the inverse planning simulated annealing (IPSA) software for the optimization of dose distribution in patients with cervix carcinoma treated with MRI-based pulsed-dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients treated with a technique using a customized vaginal mold were selected. Dose-volume parameters obtained using the IPSA method were compared with the classic manual optimization method (MOM). Target volumes and organs at risk were delineated according to the Gynecological Brachytherapy Group/European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology recommendations. Because the pulsed dose rate program was based on clinical experience with low dose rate, dwell time values were required to be as homogeneous as possible. To achieve this goal, different modifications of the IPSA program were applied. Results: The first dose distribution calculated by the IPSA algorithm proposed a heterogeneous distribution of dwell time positions. The mean D90, D100, and V100 calculated with both methods did not differ significantly when the constraints were applied. For the bladder, doses calculated at the ICRU reference point derived from the MOM differed significantly from the doses calculated by the IPSA method (mean, 58.4 vs. 55 Gy respectively; p = 0.0001). For the rectum, the doses calculated at the ICRU reference point were also significantly lower with the IPSA method. Conclusions: The inverse planning method provided fast and automatic solutions for the optimization of dose distribution. However, the straightforward use of IPSA generated significant heterogeneity in dwell time values. Caution is therefore recommended in the use of inverse optimization tools with clinical relevance study of new dosimetric rules.

  12. A Dynamic Dosimetry System for Prostate Brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Nathanael; Dehghan, Ehsan; Deguet, Anton; Song, Danny Y; Prince, Jerry L; Lee, Junghoon

    2013-03-01

    The lack of dynamic dosimetry tools for permanent prostate brachytherapy causes otherwise avoidable problems in prostate cancer patient care. The goal of this work is to satisfy this need in a readily adoptable manner. Using the ubiquitous ultrasound scanner and mobile non-isocentric C-arm, we show that dynamic dosimetry is now possible with only the addition of an arbitrarily configured marker-based fiducial. Not only is the system easily configured from accessible hardware, but it is also simple and convenient, requiring little training from technicians. Furthermore, the proposed system is built upon robust algorithms of seed segmentation, fiducial detection, seed reconstruction, and image registration. All individual steps of the pipeline have been thoroughly tested, and the system as a whole has been validated on a study of 25 patients. The system has shown excellent results of accurately computing dose, and does so with minimal manual intervention, therefore showing promise for widespread adoption of dynamic dosimetry. PMID:24392207

  13. MRI/TRUS data fusion for brachytherapy

    E-print Network

    Daanen, V; Giraud, J Y; Fourneret, P; Descotes, J L; Bolla, M; Collomb, D; Troccaz, Jocelyne

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prostate brachytherapy consists in placing radioactive seeds for tumour destruction under transrectal ultrasound imaging (TRUS) control. It requires prostate delineation from the images for dose planning. Because ultrasound imaging is patient- and operator-dependent, we have proposed to fuse MRI data to TRUS data to make image processing more reliable. The technical accuracy of this approach has already been evaluated. METHODS: We present work in progress concerning the evaluation of the approach from the dosimetry viewpoint. The objective is to determine what impact this system may have on the treatment of the patient. Dose planning is performed from initial TRUS prostate contours and evaluated on contours modified by data fusion. RESULTS: For the eight patients included, we demonstrate that TRUS prostate volume is most often underestimated and that dose is overestimated in a correlated way. However, dose constraints are still verified for those eight patients. CONCLUSIONS: This confirms our init...

  14. Automatic Brachytherapy Seed Placement Under MRI Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Patriciu, Alexandru; Petrisor, Doru; Muntener, Michael; Mazilu, Dumitru; Schär, Michael; Stoianovici, Dan

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents a robotic method of performing low dose rate prostate brachytherapy under magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance. The design and operation of a fully automated MR compatible seed injector is presented. This is used with the MrBot robot for transperineal percutaneous prostate access. A new image-registration marker and algorithms are also presented. The system is integrated and tested with a 3T MRI scanner. Tests compare three different registration methods, assess the precision of performing automated seed deployment, and use the seeds to assess the accuracy of needle targeting under image guidance. Under the ideal conditions of the in vitro experiments, results show outstanding image-guided needle and seed placement accuracy. PMID:17694871

  15. A Dynamic Dosimetry System for Prostate Brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Nathanael; Dehghan, Ehsan; Deguet, Anton; Song, Danny Y.; Prince, Jerry L.; Lee, Junghoon

    2013-01-01

    The lack of dynamic dosimetry tools for permanent prostate brachytherapy causes otherwise avoidable problems in prostate cancer patient care. The goal of this work is to satisfy this need in a readily adoptable manner. Using the ubiquitous ultrasound scanner and mobile non-isocentric C-arm, we show that dynamic dosimetry is now possible with only the addition of an arbitrarily configured marker-based fiducial. Not only is the system easily configured from accessible hardware, but it is also simple and convenient, requiring little training from technicians. Furthermore, the proposed system is built upon robust algorithms of seed segmentation, fiducial detection, seed reconstruction, and image registration. All individual steps of the pipeline have been thoroughly tested, and the system as a whole has been validated on a study of 25 patients. The system has shown excellent results of accurately computing dose, and does so with minimal manual intervention, therefore showing promise for widespread adoption of dynamic dosimetry. PMID:24392207

  16. Harmony search optimization for HDR prostate brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchal, Aditya

    In high dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy, multiple catheters are inserted interstitially into the target volume. The process of treating the prostate involves calculating and determining the best dose distribution to the target and organs-at-risk by means of optimizing the time that the radioactive source dwells at specified positions within the catheters. It is the goal of this work to investigate the use of a new optimization algorithm, known as Harmony Search, in order to optimize dwell times for HDR prostate brachytherapy. The new algorithm was tested on 9 different patients and also compared with the genetic algorithm. Simulations were performed to determine the optimal value of the Harmony Search parameters. Finally, multithreading of the simulation was examined to determine potential benefits. First, a simulation environment was created using the Python programming language and the wxPython graphical interface toolkit, which was necessary to run repeated optimizations. DICOM RT data from Varian BrachyVision was parsed and used to obtain patient anatomy and HDR catheter information. Once the structures were indexed, the volume of each structure was determined and compared to the original volume calculated in BrachyVision for validation. Dose was calculated using the AAPM TG-43 point source model of the GammaMed 192Ir HDR source and was validated against Varian BrachyVision. A DVH-based objective function was created and used for the optimization simulation. Harmony Search and the genetic algorithm were implemented as optimization algorithms for the simulation and were compared against each other. The optimal values for Harmony Search parameters (Harmony Memory Size [HMS], Harmony Memory Considering Rate [HMCR], and Pitch Adjusting Rate [PAR]) were also determined. Lastly, the simulation was modified to use multiple threads of execution in order to achieve faster computational times. Experimental results show that the volume calculation that was implemented in this thesis was within 2% of the values computed by Varian BrachyVision for the prostate, within 3% for the rectum and bladder and 6% for the urethra. The calculation of dose compared to BrachyVision was determined to be different by only 0.38%. Isodose curves were also generated and were found to be similar to BrachyVision. The comparison between Harmony Search and genetic algorithm showed that Harmony Search was over 4 times faster when compared over multiple data sets. The optimal Harmony Memory Size was found to be 5 or lower; the Harmony Memory Considering Rate was determined to be 0.95, and the Pitch Adjusting Rate was found to be 0.9. Ultimately, the effect of multithreading showed that as intensive computations such as optimization and dose calculation are involved, the threads of execution scale with the number of processors, achieving a speed increase proportional to the number of processor cores. In conclusion, this work showed that Harmony Search is a viable alternative to existing algorithms for use in HDR prostate brachytherapy optimization. Coupled with the optimal parameters for the algorithm and a multithreaded simulation, this combination has the capability to significantly decrease the time spent on minimizing optimization problems in the clinic that are time intensive, such as brachytherapy, IMRT and beam angle optimization.

  17. An overview of interstitial brachytherapy and hyperthermia

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, B.B.; Harney, J.

    1989-11-01

    Interstitial thermoradiotherapy, an experimental cancer treatment that combines interstitial radiation implants (brachytherapy) and interstitial hyperthermia, is in the early stages of investigation. In accordance with the procedure used in a current national trial protocol, a 60-minute hyperthermia treatment is administered after catheters are placed into the tumor area while the patient is under general anesthesia. This is immediately followed by loading of radioactive Iridium-192 seeds into the catheters for a defined period of time. Once the prescribed radiation dose is delivered, the radioactive sources are removed and a second, 60-minute hyperthermia treatment is administered. Clinical trials with hyperthermia in combination with radiation have increased in recent years. Nurses caring for these patients need to become more knowledgeable about this investigational therapy. This paper provides an overview of the biologic rationale for this therapy, as well as a description of the delivery method and clinical application. Specific related nursing interventions are defined in a nursing protocol.23 references.

  18. Effect of vaginal ph on efficacy of the dinoprostone vaginal insert for cervical ripening\\/labor induction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Connie S. DiMarco; Patrick S. Ramsey; Paul L. Ogburn; Denise Y. Harris; Robert H. Heise; Kirk D. Ramin

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate whether vaginal pH has an effect on the relative efficacy of the dinoprostone vaginal insert (Cervidil) for cervical ripening\\/labor induction.Methods: Thirty-four gravidas, with an unfavorable cervix and indication for labor induction, were enrolled in this prospective, double-blinded clinical evaluation. Baseline assessment of cervicovaginal pH and Bishop score were made at the time of enrollment by an independent

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Rotator Cuff Tears in Shoulder Impingement Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Freygant, Magdalena; Dziurzy?ska-Bia?ek, Ewa; Guz, Wies?aw; Samojedny, Antoni; Go?ofit, Andrzej; Kostkiewicz, Agnieszka; Terpin, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Shoulder joint is a common site of musculoskeletal pain caused, among other things, by rotator cuff tears due to narrowing of subacromial space, acute trauma or chronic shoulder overload. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an excellent modality for imaging of soft tissues of the shoulder joint considering a possibility of multiplanar image acquisition and non-invasive nature of the study. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of partial and complete rotator cuff tears in magnetic resonance images of patients with shoulder impingement syndrome and to review the literature on the causes and classification of rotator cuff tears. Material/Methods We retrospectively analyzed the results of 137 shoulder MRI examinations performed in 57 women and 72 men in Magnetic Resonance facility of the Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging at the St. Jadwiga the Queen Regional Hospital No. 2 in Rzeszow between June 2010 and February 2013. Examinations were performed using Philips Achieva 1.5T device, including spin echo and gradient echo sequences with T1-, T2- and PD-weighted as well as fat saturation sequences in transverse, frontal and sagittal oblique planes. Patients were referred from hospital wards as well as from outpatient clinics of the subcarpathian province. Results The most frequently reported injuries included partial supraspinatus tendon tear and complete tearing most commonly involved the supraspinatus muscle tendon. The smallest group comprised patients with complete tear of subscapularis muscle tendon. Among 137 patients in the study population, 129 patients suffered from shoulder pain, including 57 patients who reported a history of trauma. There was 44% women and 56% men in a group of patients with shoulder pain. Posttraumatic shoulder pain was predominantly reported by men, while women comprised a larger group of patients with shoulder pain not preceded by injury. Conclusions Rotator cuff injury is a very common pathology in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome. Isolated supraspinatus tendon injury or complete tearing is most frequent, rather than in conjunction with injuries to other rotator cuff tendons. We did not observe isolated complete tears of infraspinatus and subscapular muscle tendons. PMID:25374626

  20. Diagnostic Performance and Reliability of Ultrasonography for Fatty Degeneration of the Rotator Cuff Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Lindley B.; Teefey, Sharlene A.; Middleton, William D.; Dahiya, Nirvikar; Steger-May, Karen; Kim, H. Mike; Wessell, Daniel; Yamaguchi, Ken

    2012-01-01

    Background: Diagnostic evaluation of rotator cuff muscle quality is important to determine indications for potential operative repair. Ultrasonography has developed into an accepted and useful tool for evaluating rotator cuff tendon tears; however, its use for evaluating rotator muscle quality has not been well established. The purpose of this study was to investigate the diagnostic performance and observer reliability of ultrasonography in grading fatty degeneration of the posterior and superior rotator cuff muscles. Methods: The supraspinatus, infraspinatus, and teres minor muscles were prospectively evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasonography in eighty patients with shoulder pain. The degree of fatty degeneration on MRI was graded by four independent raters on the basis of the modified Goutallier grading system. Ultrasonographic evaluation of fatty degeneration was performed by one of three radiologists with use of a three-point scale. The two scoring systems were compared to determine the diagnostic performance of ultrasonography. The interobserver and intraobserver reliability of MRI grading by the four raters were determined. The interobserver reliability of ultrasonography among the three radiologists was determined in a separate group of thirty study subjects. The weighted Cohen kappa, percentage agreement, sensitivity, and specificity were calculated. Results: The accuracy of ultrasonography for the detection of fatty degeneration, as assessed on the basis of the percentage agreement with MRI, was 92.5% for the supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles and 87.5% for the teres minor. The sensitivity was 84.6% for the supraspinatus, 95.6% for the infraspinatus, and 87.5% for the teres minor. The specificity was 96.3% for the supraspinatus, 91.2% for the infraspinatus, and 87.5% for the teres minor. The agreement between MRI and ultrasonography was substantial for the supraspinatus and infraspinatus (kappa = 0.78 and 0.71, respectively) and moderate for the teres minor (kappa = 0.47). The interobserver reliability for MRI was substantial for the supraspinatus and infraspinatus (kappa = 0.76 and 0.77, respectively) and moderate for the teres minor (kappa = 0.59). For ultrasonography, the interobserver reliability was substantial for all three muscles (kappa = 0.71 for the supraspinatus, 0.65 for the infraspinatus, and 0.72 for the teres minor). Conclusions: The diagnostic performance of ultrasonography in identifying and grading fatty degeneration of the rotator cuff muscles was comparable with that of MRI. Ultrasonography can be used as the primary diagnostic imaging modality for fatty changes in rotator cuff muscles. Level of Evidence: Diagnostic Level II. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:22717835

  1. Calibration of Photon Sources for Brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijnders, Alex

    Source calibration has to be considered an essential part of the quality assurance program in a brachytherapy department. Not only it will ensure that the source strength value used for dose calculation agrees within some predetermined limits to the value stated on the source certificate, but also it will ensure traceability to international standards. At present calibration is most often still given in terms of reference air kerma rate, although calibration in terms of absorbed dose to water would be closer to the users interest. It can be expected that in a near future several standard laboratories will be able to offer this latter service, and dosimetry protocols will have to be adapted in this way. In-air measurement using ionization chambers (e.g. a Baldwin—Farmer ionization chamber for 192Ir high dose rate HDR or pulsed dose rate PDR sources) is still considered the method of choice for high energy source calibration, but because of their ease of use and reliability well type chambers are becoming more popular and are nowadays often recommended as the standard equipment. For low energy sources well type chambers are in practice the only equipment available for calibration. Care should be taken that the chamber is calibrated at the standard laboratory for the same source type and model as used in the clinic, and using the same measurement conditions and setup. Several standard laboratories have difficulties to provide these calibration facilities, especially for the low energy seed sources (125I and 103Pd). Should a user not be able to obtain properly calibrated equipment to verify the brachytherapy sources used in his department, then at least for sources that are replaced on a regular basis, a consistency check program should be set up to ensure a minimal level of quality control before these sources are used for patient treatment.

  2. Dilation of the vaginal cuff using the Bakri Postpartum Balloon to extract the large uterus at the time of robotic hysterectomy for endometrial carcinoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael L. Stitely; Younes N. Bakri

    Removal of large uterine specimens during robotic or total laparoscopic hysterectomy poses surgical challenges, particularly\\u000a in cases performed for gynecologic malignancy. A 23-year-old patient with endometrioid adenocarcinoma of the endometrium underwent\\u000a robotic total laparoscopic hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. The large uterine specimen was removed by dilating\\u000a the colpotomy incision using the Bakri Postpartum Balloon™. Dilation of the colpotomy incision with

  3. Preparation and Characterisation of Fluconazole Vaginal Films for the Treatment of Vaginal Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, L.; Reddy, M. S.; Shirodkar, R. K.; Pai, G. K.; Krishna, V. T.; Verma, R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective of the present study was to develop and evaluate vaginal films with essential in vitro studies. Films were developed using hydroxypropyl methylcellulose as a polymer and formulations were coded. The developed films were evaluated with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, drug content, viscosity, surface pH, thickness, mechanical characterisation and in vitro drug release study. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy results confirmed that there is no chemical interaction between drug and stabilisers/excipients. The batch variation was not more than 5% for average thickness and weight of the films. The drug content for the prepared formulation was in the range of 72.32±0.18% to 94.48±0.54%. Viscosity of the formulations increased with the increase in concentration of polymer. Mechanical characterisation revealed that tensile strength and percentage elongation of the films improved as there is increase in degree of substitution of the polymer, but the values of modulus decreased which confirmed that all the prepared films are soft in nature. The in vitro study indicated that 1 and 2% concentrations of polymer are the least concentrations to control the release of drug whereas the 4% concentration of polymer is a good and more effective concentration to control the release. Only one prepared formulation released the drug by following anomalous transport whereas other film formulations released the fluconazole by following Fickian diffusion mechanism. Prepared vaginal films may be an important alternative for the treatment of vaginal candidiasis, because these prepared films suggest the benefits of controlled release of fluconazole at the site of absorption. PMID:24403660

  4. Delayed vaginal reconstruction in the fibrotic pelvis following radiation or previous reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Berek, J.S.; Hacker, N.F.; Lagasse, L.D.; Smith, M.L.

    1983-06-01

    Vaginal reconstruction was performed in 14 patients who had developed vaginal stenosis secondary to extensive pelvic fibrosis after pelvic radiation therapy (12 patients) or prior vaginal reconstruction (2 patients). Sixteen procedures were performed using a split-thickness skin graft. All patients had satisfactory vaginal restoration, and 12 patients reported good vaginal function. No fistula developed as a result of the operative procedure, but one patient later developed a rectovaginal fistula resulting from tumor recurrence. Successful vaginal reconstruction can be achieved even years after initial therapy in patients who develop an obliterated vagina from previous radiation or surgery.

  5. Treatment planning of a skin-sparing conical breast brachytherapy applicator using conventional brachytherapy software

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yun; Melhus, Christopher S.; Sioshansi, Shirin; Rivard, Mark J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: AccuBoost is a noninvasive image-guided technique for the delivery of partial breast irradiation to the tumor bed and currently serves as an alternate to conventional electron beam boost. To irradiate the target volume while providing dose sparing to the skin, the round applicator design was augmented through the addition of an internally truncated conical shield and the reduction of the source to skin distance. Methods: Brachytherapy dose distributions for two types of conical applicators were simulated and estimated using Monte Carlo (MC) methods for radiation transport and a conventional treatment planning system (TPS). MC-derived and TPS-generated dose volume histograms (DVHs) and dose distribution data were compared for both the conical and round applicators for benchmarking purposes. Results: Agreement using the gamma-index test was ?99.95% for distance to agreement and dose accuracy criteria of 2 mm and 2%, respectively. After observing good agreement, TPS DVHs and dose distributions for the conical and round applicators were obtained and compared. Brachytherapy dose distributions generated using Pinnacle3 for ten CT data sets showed that the parallel-opposed beams of the conical applicators provided similar PTV coverage to the round applicators and reduced the maximum dose to skin, chest wall, and lung by up to 27%, 42%, and 43%, respectively. Conclusions: Brachytherapy dose distributions for the conical applicators have been generated using MC methods and entered into the Pinnacle3 TPS via the Tufts technique. Treatment planning metrics for the conical AccuBoost applicators were significantly improved in comparison to those for conventional electron beam breast boost. PMID:21520863

  6. Treatment planning of a skin-sparing conical breast brachytherapy applicator using conventional brachytherapy software

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Yun; Melhus, Christopher S.; Sioshansi, Shirin; Rivard, Mark J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: AccuBoost is a noninvasive image-guided technique for the delivery of partial breast irradiation to the tumor bed and currently serves as an alternate to conventional electron beam boost. To irradiate the target volume while providing dose sparing to the skin, the round applicator design was augmented through the addition of an internally truncated conical shield and the reduction of the source to skin distance. Methods: Brachytherapy dose distributions for two types of conical applicators were simulated and estimated using Monte Carlo (MC) methods for radiation transport and a conventional treatment planning system (TPS). MC-derived and TPS-generated dose volume histograms (DVHs) and dose distribution data were compared for both the conical and round applicators for benchmarking purposes. Results: Agreement using the gamma-index test was {>=}99.95% for distance to agreement and dose accuracy criteria of 2 mm and 2%, respectively. After observing good agreement, TPS DVHs and dose distributions for the conical and round applicators were obtained and compared. Brachytherapy dose distributions generated using Pinnacle{sup 3} for ten CT data sets showed that the parallel-opposed beams of the conical applicators provided similar PTV coverage to the round applicators and reduced the maximum dose to skin, chest wall, and lung by up to 27%, 42%, and 43%, respectively. Conclusions: Brachytherapy dose distributions for the conical applicators have been generated using MC methods and entered into the Pinnacle{sup 3} TPS via the Tufts technique. Treatment planning metrics for the conical AccuBoost applicators were significantly improved in comparison to those for conventional electron beam breast boost.

  7. Percutaneous interstitial brachytherapy for adrenal metastasis: technical report

    PubMed Central

    Kishi, Kazushi; Tamura, Shinji; Mabuchi, Yasushi; Sonomura, Tetsuo; Noda, Yasutaka; Nakai, Motoki; Sato, Morio; Ino, Kazuhiko; Yamanaka, Noboru

    2012-01-01

    We developed and evaluated the feasibility of a brachytherapy technique as a safe and effective treatment for adrenal metastasis. Adapting a paravertebral insertion technique in radiofrequency ablation of adrenal tumors, we developed an interstitial brachytherapy for adrenal metastasis achievable on an outpatient basis. Under local anesthesia and under X-ray CT guidance, brachytherapy applicator needles were percutaneously inserted into the target. A treatment plan was created to eradicate the tumor while preserving normal organs including the spinal cord and kidney. We applied this interstitial brachytherapy technique to two patients: one who developed adrenal metastasis as the third recurrence of uterine cervical cancer after reirradiation, and one who developed metachronous multiple metastases from malignant melanoma. The whole procedure was completed in 2.5 hours. There were no procedure-related or radiation-related early/late complications. FDG PET-CT images at two and three months after treatment showed absence of FDG uptake, and no recurrence of the adrenal tumor was observed for over seven months until expiration, and for six months until the present, respectively. This interventional interstitial brachytherapy procedure may be useful as a safe and eradicative treatment for adrenal metastasis. PMID:22843376

  8. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy With or Without Triapine in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer or Stage II-IVA Vaginal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-28

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIA1 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA2 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vaginal Cancer; Vaginal Adenocarcinoma; Vaginal Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Vaginal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  9. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy With or Without Triapine in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer or Stage II-IVA Vaginal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-25

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIA1 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA2 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vaginal Cancer; Vaginal Adenocarcinoma; Vaginal Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Vaginal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  10. Anterior vaginal wall repair (surgical treatment of urinary incontinence) - series (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    This procedure is used to repair the vaginal wall herniation that occurs with urethrocele, cystocele, or rectocele. ... release a portion of the anterior (front) vaginal wall that is attached to the base of the ...

  11. 77 FR 8900 - Certain Vaginal Ring Birth Control Devices; Termination of the Investigation Based on Withdrawal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-15

    ...Investigation No. 337-TA-768] Certain Vaginal Ring Birth Control Devices; Termination of the Investigation Based on...the United States after importation of certain vaginal birth control devices by reason of infringement of certain...

  12. Drinking Citrus Fruit Juice Inhibits Vascular Remodeling in Cuff-Induced Vascular Injury Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Ohnishi, Arika; Asayama, Rie; Mogi, Masaki; Nakaoka, Hirotomo; Kan-no, Harumi; Tsukuda, Kana; Chisaka, Toshiyuki; Wang, Xiao-Li; Bai, Hui-Yu; Shan, Bao-Shuai; Kukida, Masayoshi; Iwanami, Jun; Horiuchi, Masatsugu

    2015-01-01

    Citrus fruits are thought to have inhibitory effects on oxidative stress, thereby attenuating the onset and progression of cancer and cardiovascular disease; however, there are few reports assessing their effect on vascular remodeling. Here, we investigated the effect of drinking the juice of two different citrus fruits on vascular neointima formation using a cuff-induced vascular injury mouse model. Male C57BL6 mice were divided into five groups as follows: 1) Control (water) (C), 2) 10% Citrus unshiu (CU) juice (CU10), 3) 40% CU juice (CU40), 4) 10% Citrus iyo (CI) juice (CI10), and 5) 40% CI juice (CI40). After drinking them for 2 weeks from 8 weeks of age, cuff injury was induced by polyethylene cuff placement around the femoral artery. Neointima formation was significantly attenuated in CU40, CI10 and CI40 compared with C; however, no remarkable preventive effect was observed in CU10. The increases in levels of various inflammatory markers including cytokines such as monocyte chemotactic protein-1, interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-1?, and tumor necrosis factor-? in response to vascular injury did not differ significantly between C, CU10 and CI10. The increases in cell proliferation and superoxide anion production were markedly attenuated in CI10, but not in CU10 compared with C. The increase in phosphorylated ERK expression was markedly attenuated both in CU10 and CI10 without significant difference between CU10 and CI10. Accumulation of immune cells did not differ between CU10 and CI10. These results indicate that drinking citrus fruit juice attenuates vascular remodeling partly via a reduction of oxidative stress. Interestingly, the preventive efficacy on neointima formation was stronger in CI than in CU at least in part due to more prominent inhibitory effects on oxidative stress by CI. PMID:25692290

  13. Electrochemical performance of platinum electrodes within the multi-electrode spiral nerve cuff.

    PubMed

    Rozman, Janez; Pe?lin, Polona; Mehle, Andraž; Šala, Martin

    2014-09-01

    In this study, the electrochemical performance of platinum electrodes within a multi-electrode spiral cuff to be used for selective nerve stimulation was investigated. The original cuff, simplified into a half-cuff, contained a single row of nine electrodes (0.5 × 2 mm) at a distance of 2 mm from its inner surface. Cyclic voltammetry was used to investigate the electrochemical reactions at the electrode-electrolyte interface, to define a potential window within which the electrode could be safely used in selective nerve stimulation, to calculate the charge injection capacity and cathodal charge storage capacity. Voltage transients retrieved during excitation with quasitrapezoidal biphasic current pulses, tested by selective nerve stimulation of the isolated porcine left cervical vagus nerve segment, were used to determine the maximum polarization across the electrode-electrolyte interface and to calculate cathodic charge injection capacity of the electrode. The results show that the most negative and most positive potentials across the electrode-electrolyte interface reached -0.54 and 0.59 V; these did not exceed the safe potential limits for water electrolysis. Furthermore, the time integral of the cathodic current by cyclic voltammetry measured over the potential range of water electrolysis, actually representing the cathodal charge storage capacity, was approximately -4 mC cm(-2). The charge injection capacity, representing the maximum charge density injected in a current stimulation pulse, using only reversible processes, however, was around 75 µC cm(-2). In conclusion, both, the tested stimulation pulse and electrode are suitable for efficient and safe selective nerve stimulation. PMID:24938675

  14. Rotator cuff healing after continuous subacromial bupivacaine infusion: an in vivo rabbit study

    PubMed Central

    FRIEL, NICOLE A.; WANG, VINCENT M.; SLABAUGH, MARK A.; WANG, FANCHIA; CHUBINSKAYA, SUSAN; COLE, BRIAN J.

    2013-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of continuous subacromial bupivacaine infusion on supraspinatus muscle and rotator cuff tendon healing via gross, biomechanical, and histologic analyses. Methods Thirty-three New Zealand White rabbits underwent unilateral supraspinatus transection and rotator cuff repair (RCR). Rabbits were assigned to 1 of 3 groups: (1)RCR only, (2)RCR with continuous saline infusion for 48 hours, or (3)RCR with continuous 0.25% bupivacaine with epinephrine (1:200,000) infusion for 48 hours. Rabbits were sacrificed at either 2 (for histologic assessment) or 8 weeks post-operatively (for biomechanical and histologic assessment). Results Tensile testing showed significantly higher load to failure in intact tendons compared to repaired tendons (p<0.01); however, no statistical differences were detected among RCR only, RCR Saline, and RCR Bupivacaine groups. Histologically, the enthesis of repaired tendons showed increased cellularity and disorganized collagen fibers compared to intact tendons, with no differences between treatment groups. Muscle histology demonstrated scattered degenerative muscle fibers at 2 weeks in both RCR Saline and RCR Bupivacaine, but no degeneration was noted at 8 weeks. Conclusions The healing supraspinatus tendons exposed to bupivacaine infusion showed similar histologic and biomechanical characteristics compared to untreated and saline infused RCR groups. Muscle histology showed fiber damage at 2 weeks for both the saline and bupivacaine treated groups, with no apparent disruption at 8 weeks, suggesting a recovery process. Therefore, subacromial bupivacaine infusion in this rabbit rotator cuff model does not appear to impair muscle or tendon following acute injury and repair. Level Of Evidence Basic science study PMID:22818894

  15. Endotracheal Tube Cuff Pressure Assessment: Education May Improve but not Guarantee the Safety of Palpation Technique

    PubMed Central

    Seyed Siamdoust, Seyed Alireza; Mohseni, Masood; Memarian, Arash

    2015-01-01

    Background: Endotracheal Tube Cuff Pressure (ETCP) should be kept in the range of 20 - 30 cm H2O. Earlier studies suggested that ETCP assessment by palpation of pilot balloon results in overinflation or underinflation and subsequent complications such as tracheal wall damage and aspiration. Objectives: The current study aimed to evaluate the effect of an in vitro educational program on the ability of anesthesia personnel to inflate Endotracheal Tube Cuffs (ETT) within safe pressure limits. Patients and Methods: The survey included two series of blinded ETCP measurements in intubated patients before and two weeks after an in vitro educational intervention. The in vitro educational program included two separate trials. The anesthesia personnel were asked to inflate an ETT cuff inserted in a tracheal model using their usual inflation technique. In the same session, six ETTs at different pressure levels were examined by the participants and their estimation of ETCP was recorded. After the in vitro assessment, the participants were informed about the actual pressure of the in vitro ETCPs and were allowed to train their fingers by in vitro pilot balloon palpation with validated manometer measurements. Results: The mean ETCP after the in vitro survey was significantly lower than the mean ETCP before the intervention (45 ± 13 vs. 51 ± 15 cm H2O, P = 0.002). The rate of measurements within the safe pressure limits significantly improved after the in vitro education (24.2% vs. 39.7%, P = 0.002). Conclusions: Implementing educational programs with the introduction of estimation techniques besides the use of manometer as a standard intraoperative monitoring will improve the safety of the practice.

  16. Design, fabrication and evaluation of a conforming circumpolar peripheral nerve cuff electrode for acute experimental use

    PubMed Central

    Foldes, Emily L.; Ackermann, D. Michael; Bhadra, Niloy; Kilgore, Kevin L.; Bhadra, Narendra

    2011-01-01

    Nerve cuff electrodes are a principle tool of basic and applied electro-neurophysiology studies and are championed for their ability to achieve good nerve recruitment with low thresholds. We describe the design and method of fabrication for a novel circumpolar peripheral nerve electrode for acute experimental use. This cylindrical cuff-style electrode provides approximately 270 degrees of radial electrode contact with a nerve for each of an arbitrary number of contacts, has a profile that allows for simple placement and removal in an acute nerve preparation, and is designed for adjustment of the cylindrical diameter to ensure a close fit on the nerve. For each electrode, the electrical contacts were cut from 25 µm platinum foil as an array so as to maintain their positions relative to each other within the cuff. Lead wires were welded to each intended contact. The structure was then molded in silicone elastomer, after which the individual contacts were electrically isolated. The final electrode was curved into a cylindrical shape with an inner diameter corresponding to that of the intended target nerve. The positions of these contacts were well maintained during the molding and shaping process and failure rates during fabrication due to contact displacements were very low. Established electrochemical measurements were made on one electrode to confirm expected behavior for a platinum electrode and to measure the electrode impedance to applied voltages at different frequencies. These electrodes have been successfully used for nerve stimulation, recording, and conduction block in a number of different acute animal experiments by several investigators. PMID:21187115

  17. Decreased loading following rotator cuff tears leads to improved biceps tendon properties in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Peltz, Cathryn D.; Hsu, Jason E.; Zgonis, Miltiadis H.; Trasolini, Nicholas A.; Glaser, David L.; Soslowsky, Louis J.

    2010-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to elucidate the mechanism of biceps tendon changes following rotator cuff tears. We hypothesized that increased loading on the biceps tendon following rotator cuff tears will result in further detrimental changes while decreased loading will result in increased organization and more normal tendon composition. Additionally, we hypothesized that changes with altered loading will begin at the proximal insertion into bone and progress along the tendon length at later time points. Materials and methods Supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendon detachments in rats were followed by various loading protocols at various time points. Regional changes in cellularity, cell shape, collagen organization, and matrix proteins of the long head of the biceps tendon were determined by histologic measures and immunohistochemistry. Results Increased loading following detachments resulted in more disorganized collagen after only 1 week and compositional changes by 4 weeks. By 8 weeks, decreased loading resulted in increased organization, decreased cellularity, more elongated cell shape and more normal tendon composition. Organizational changes with increased loading began in the intra-articular space and progressed along the tendon length with time. Conclusions Combined with previous findings of decreased mechanics with increased loading, these results indicate increased compressive loading away from the proximal insertion into bone as a mechanism for biceps tendon pathology in the presence of rotator cuff tears. The striking improvements with decreased loading further support increased loading as a mechanism for biceps tendon pathology as removal of this load led to improvements in tendon histology, organization and composition. Level of evidence Basic Science Study PMID:21393021

  18. The conceptually equivalent Dutch version of the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index (WORC)©

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The WORC is a quality of life questionnaire designed for patients with disorders of the rotator cuff, originally developed in English. The purpose of this study was to cross-culturally adapt the WORC for use in the Dutch population and to evaluate reliability, agreement and floor and ceiling effects of this Dutch version in a population of patients with rotator cuff disease. Methods Reliability was tested by measuring the Cronbach’s alpha for internal consistency and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) for test-retest reliability. Agreement was measured using the Standard Error of Measurement (SEMagreement); and the smallest detectable change (SDC) was calculated based on the SEM. Pearson Correlations Coefficients were used to comparing the WORC with the RAND-36, the Constant Score and 11-point shoulder hindrance scale. Results Fifty-seven patients entered into this study of whom 50 were available for test-retest validation. The internal consistency of the Dutch WORC tested by Cronbach’s alpha was 0.95 for the total questionnaire. The ICC for the WORC is 0.91 with a 95% confidence interval of 0.85-0.95. Standard Error of Measurement was 6.0 points with a Smallest Detectable Change of 16.7 points on a 0-100 scale. Pearson Correlations Coefficients showed a significant positive correlation between the Dutch WORC and Constant Score (r?=?0.60) and a strong reversed correlation with the shoulder hindrance scale (r?=?-0.75). Conclusion The Dutch WORC seems to be a reliable health-related quality of life questionnaire for patients with rotator cuff disorders. Trial registration NCT01532492. PMID:24359231

  19. Study of the vaginal tolerance to acidform, an acid-buffering, bioadhesive gel

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eliana Amaral; Anibal Faúndes; Lourens Zaneveld; Donald Waller; Sanjay Garg

    1999-01-01

    Vaginal tolerance tests were performed with a new potential microbicidal and spermicidal product, an acid-buffering vaginal gel (Acidform) without or with nonoxynol-9 (N-9). The potential advantages over other vaginal products include keeping a low pH, decrease of the irritating effect of N-9 on the cervix or vaginal mucosa associated with greater retention of the product after application, and decreasing “messiness”

  20. The effect of vaginally administered genistein in comparison with hyaluronic acid on atrophic epithelium in postmenopause

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maria Le Donne; Carmela Caruso; Alfredo Mancuso; Gregorio Costa; Raffaella Iemmo; Giovanni Pizzimenti; Vittorio Cavallari

    2011-01-01

    Purpose  The quality of life in postmenopause is seriously affected by the symptoms related to vaginal atrophy. To evaluate in a 3-month,\\u000a prospective, randomized, double blind, study whether vaginal suppositories containing genistein might improve genital symptoms,\\u000a colposcopical and cytologic findings or modify DNA cytometric features in postmenopausal women affected by vaginal atrophy,\\u000a in comparison with vaginal suppositories containing hyaluronic acid (HA).

  1. BLT Humanized Mice as Model to Study HIV Vaginal Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Deruaz, Maud; Luster, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    The majority of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infections occur by sexual exposure, and vaginal transmission accounts for more than half of all newly acquired infections. Studies of vaginal transmission of simian immunodeficiency virus to nonhuman primates (NHPs) have suggested an important role for immune cell trafficking in the establishment of infection as well is in the process of viral dissemination. However, NHP models do not permit the study of HIV transmission and dissemination. The improvement of humanized mouse models with robust human immune cell reconstitution of the female genital tract renders these mice susceptible to intravaginal HIV infection. Thus humanized mouse models of HIV vaginal infection will allow the study of the mechanisms involved in HIV transmission and dissemination in vivo. PMID:24151319

  2. The Human Vaginal Bacterial Biota and Bacterial Vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Sujatha; Fredricks, David N.

    2008-01-01

    The bacterial biota of the human vagina can have a profound impact on the health of women and their neonates. Changes in the vaginal microbiota have been associated with several adverse health outcomes including premature birth, pelvic inflammatory disease, and acquisition of HIV infection. Cultivation-independent molecular methods have provided new insights regarding bacterial diversity in this important niche, particularly in women with the common condition bacterial vaginosis (BV). PCR methods have shown that women with BV have complex communities of vaginal bacteria that include many fastidious species, particularly from the phyla Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria. Healthy women are mostly colonized with lactobacilli such as Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus jensenii, and Lactobacillus iners, though a variety of other bacteria may be present. The microbiology of BV is heterogeneous. The presence of Gardnerella vaginalis and Atopobium vaginae coating the vaginal epithelium in some subjects with BV suggests that biofilms may contribute to this condition. PMID:19282975

  3. [Vaginal delivery safe for twins starting at 32 weeks?].

    PubMed

    Goossens, Simone M T A; Mol, Ben W J; Nijhuis, Jan G; Roumen, Frans J M E

    2014-01-01

    Compared with other countries, the elective caesarean section rate for twins is relatively low in the Netherlands. Worldwide, there is an increasing trend toward performing more elective caesarean sections for women with a twin pregnancy at term, be it for twins with the first child in breech or in cephalic presentation. The results of the 'Twin Birth Study' indicate that a planned caesarean section does not improve outcome as compared with planned vaginal birth for twins with the first child in cephalic position beyond 32 weeks gestation. During the study, an experienced obstetrician was present during planned vaginal delivery and there was a possibility of performing a secondary caesarean section within 30 minutes. This study provides an additional argument to guarantee the aforementioned conditions in all hospitals where women plan to deliver their twins vaginally. However, the definition of an experienced obstetrician is subject to debate. PMID:24735810

  4. Large Vesico-Vaginal Fistula Caused by a Foreign Body

    PubMed Central

    Massinde, AN; Kihunrwa, A

    2013-01-01

    Foreign body is a rare cause of vesico-vaginal fistula most often reported in developed countries. In developing countries obstructed labor is the commonest cause of fistula. A nulliparous 19-year-old female presented with a 3-week history of a foreign body in the vagina causing urinary incontinence and offensive vaginal discharge. Her guardian allegedly inserted the foreign body after she refused a pre-arranged marriage. A plastic container was removed from the vagina under general anesthesia. A large vesico-vaginal fistula was discovered, which was successfully surgically repaired. We recommend urgent removal of the foreign body, preferably under general anesthesia. However, if the history or physical examination reveals prolonged exposure, repair of the fistula should be delayed to allow for adequate debridement in order to prevent any life-threatening complications. PMID:24116334

  5. Double-needle ultrasound-guided percutaneous treatment of rotator cuff calcific tendinitis: tips & tricks.

    PubMed

    Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Viganò, Sara; Martini, Chiara; Aliprandi, Alberto; Randelli, Pietro; Serafini, Giovanni; Sardanelli, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Rotator cuff calcific tendinitis is a very common disease and may result in a very painful shoulder. Aetiology of this disease is still poorly understood. When symptoms are mild, this disease may be treated conservatively. Several treatment options have been proposed. Among them, ultrasound-guided procedures have been recently described. All procedures use one or two needles to inject a fluid, to dissolve calcium and to aspirate it. In the present article, we review some tips and tricks that may be useful to improve performance of an ultrasound-guided double-needle procedure. PMID:22710923

  6. Septic bursitis after ultrasound-guided percutaneous treatment of rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Randelli, Filippo; Sdao, Silvana; Sardanelli, Francesco; Randelli, Pietro

    2014-08-01

    Calcific tendinopathy of the rotator cuff is a common condition. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous aspiration is one of several options to treat this condition. The main advantages of this procedure are short duration, good outcome, and low cost. Furthermore, only minor complications have been reported in the literature, namely, vagal reactions during the procedure and mild postprocedural pain. We report the first case of septic bursitis after ultrasound-guided percutaneous treatment of calcific tendinopathy. Although this is generally considered a very safe procedure, a risk of infection should be taken into account. PMID:24486157

  7. Rotator Cuff Fatigue and Glenohumeral Kinematics in Participants Without Shoulder Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Teyhen, Deydre S; Miller, Joseph M; Middag, Tansy R; Kane, Edward J

    2008-01-01

    Context: Researchers have established that superior migration of the humeral head increases after fatigue of the rotator cuff muscles. In these studies, the investigators used imaging techniques to assess migration of the humeral head during statically held shoulder positions. Their results may not represent the amount of superior humeral head migration that occurs during dynamic arm elevation. Objective: To investigate the effect of rotator cuff fatigue on humeral head migration during dynamic concentric arm elevation (arm at the side [approximately 0°] to 135°) in healthy individuals and to determine the test-retest reliability of digital fluoroscopic video for assessing glenohumeral migration. Design: Test-retest cohort study. Setting: Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Twenty men (age ?=? 27.7 ± 3.6 years, mass ?=? 81.5 ± 11.8 kg) without shoulder disorders participated in this study. Intervention(s): Three digital fluoroscopic videos (2 prefatigue and 1 postfatigue) of arm elevation were collected at 30 Hz. The 2 prefatigue arm elevation trials were used to assess test-retest reliability with the arm at the side and at 45°, 90°, and 135° of elevation. The prefatigue and postfatigue digital fluoroscopic videos were used to assess the effects of rotator cuff fatigue on glenohumeral migration. All measurements were taken in the right shoulder. Main Outcome Measure(s): The dependent measure was glenohumeral migration (in millimeters). We calculated the intraclass correlation coefficient and standard error of the measurement to assess the test-retest reliability. A 2 × 4 repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to assess the effects of fatigue on arm elevation at the 4 shoulder positions. Results: The test-retest reliability ranged from good to excellent (.77 to .92). Superior migration of the humeral head increased postfatigue (P < .001), regardless of angle. Conclusions: Digital fluoroscopic video assessment of shoulder kinematics provides a reliable tool for studying kinematics during arm elevation. Furthermore, superior migration of the humeral head during arm elevation increases with rotator cuff fatigue in individuals without shoulder dysfunction. PMID:18668167

  8. Validation of GPUMCD for low-energy brachytherapy seed dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Hissoiny, Sami; Ozell, Benoit; Despres, Philippe; Carrier, Jean-Francois [Ecole polytechnique de Montreal, Departement de genie informatique et genie logiciel, 2500 chemin de Polytechnique, Montreal, QC, H3T 1J4 (Canada); Departement de radio-oncologie, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec (CHUQ), 11 Cote du Palais, Quebec, QC, G1R 2J6 (Canada); Departement de physique, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada) and Departement de radio-oncologie and Centre de recherche du CHUM, Centre hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal (CHUM), Montreal, QC, H2L 4M1 (Canada)

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To validate GPUMCD, a new package for fast Monte Carlo dose calculations based on the GPU (graphics processing unit), as a tool for low-energy single seed brachytherapy dosimetry for specific seed models. As the currently accepted method of dose calculation in low-energy brachytherapy computations relies on severe approximations, a Monte Carlo based approach would result in more accurate dose calculations, taking in to consideration the patient anatomy as well as interseed attenuation. The first step is to evaluate the capability of GPUMCD to reproduce low-energy, single source, brachytherapy calculations which could ultimately result in fast and accurate, Monte Carlo based, brachytherapy dose calculations for routine planning. Methods: A mixed geometry engine was integrated to GPUMCD capable of handling parametric as well as voxelized geometries. In order to evaluate GPUMCD for brachytherapy calculations, several dosimetry parameters were computed and compared to values found in the literature. These parameters, defined by the AAPM Task-Group No. 43, are the radial dose function, the 2D anisotropy function, and the dose rate constant. These three parameters were computed for two different brachytherapy sources: the Amersham OncoSeed 6711 and the Imagyn IsoStar IS-12501. Results: GPUMCD was shown to yield dosimetric parameters similar to those found in the literature. It reproduces radial dose functions to within 1.25% for both sources in the 0.5< r <10 cm range. The 2D anisotropy function was found to be within 3% at r = 5 cm and within 4% at r = 1 cm. The dose rate constants obtained were within the range of other values reported in the literature.Conclusion: GPUMCD was shown to be able to reproduce various TG-43 parameters for two different low-energy brachytherapy sources found in the literature. The next step is to test GPUMCD as a fast clinical Monte Carlo brachytherapy dose calculations with multiple seeds and patient geometry, potentially providing more accurate results than the TG-43 formalism while being much faster than calculations using general purpose Monte Carlo codes.

  9. Vaginal deployment and tenofovir delivery by microbicide gels.

    PubMed

    Gao, Y; Yuan, A; Chuchuen, O; Ham, A; Yang, K H; Katz, D F

    2015-06-01

    Gels are one of the soft material platforms being evaluated to deliver topically acting anti-HIV drugs (microbicides) to the vaginal environment. For each drug, its loaded concentration, gel properties and applied volume, and frequency of dosing can be designed to optimize PK and, thence, PD. These factors also impact user sensory perceptions and acceptability. Deterministic compartmental modeling of vaginal deployment and drug delivery achieved by test gels can help delineate how multiple parameters characterizing drug, vehicle, vaginal environment, and dosing govern details of PK and PD and also gel leakage from the canal. Such microbicide delivery is a transport process combining convection, e.g., from gel spreading along the vaginal canal, with drug diffusion in multiple compartments, including gel, mucosal epithelium, and stroma. The present work builds upon prior models of gel coating flows and drug diffusion (without convection) in the vaginal environment. It combines and extends these initial approaches in several key ways, including: (1) linking convective drug transport due to gel spreading with drug diffusion and (2) accounting for natural variations in dimensions of the canal and the site of gel placement therein. Results are obtained for a leading microbicide drug, tenofovir, delivered by three prototype microbicide gels, with a range of rheological properties. The model includes phosphorylation of tenofovir to tenofovir diphosphate (which manifests reverse transcriptase activity in host cells), the stromal concentration distributions of which are related to reference prophylactic values against HIV. This yields a computed summary measure related to gel protection ("percent protected"). Analyses illustrate tradeoffs amongst gel properties, drug loading, volume and site of placement, and vaginal dimensions, in the time and space history of gel distribution and tenofovir transport to sites of its anti-HIV action and concentrations and potential prophylactic actions of tenofovir diphosphate therein. PMID:25874971

  10. Effects of feminine hygiene products on the vaginal mucosal biome

    PubMed Central

    Fashemi, Bisiayo; Delaney, Mary L.; Onderdonk, Andrew B.; Fichorova, Raina N.

    2013-01-01

    Background Over-the-counter (OTC) feminine hygiene products come with little warning about possible side effects. This study evaluates in-vitro their effects on Lactobacillus crispatus, which is dominant in the normal vaginal microbiota and helps maintain a healthy mucosal barrier essential for normal reproductive function and prevention of sexually transmitted infections and gynecologic cancer. Methods A feminine moisturizer (Vagisil), personal lubricant, and douche were purchased OTC. A topical spermicide (nonoxynol-9) known to alter the vaginal immune barrier was used as a control. L. crispatus was incubated with each product for 2 and 24h and then seeded on agar for colony forming units (CFU). Human vaginal epithelial cells were exposed to products in the presence or absence of L. crispatus for 24h, followed by epithelium-associated CFU enumeration. Interleukin-8 was immunoassayed and ANOVA was used for statistical evaluation. Results Nonoxynol-9 and Vagisil suppressed Lactobacillus growth at 2h and killed all bacteria at 24h. The lubricant decreased bacterial growth insignificantly at 2h but killed all at 24h. The douche did not have a significant effect. At full strength, all products suppressed epithelial viability and all, except the douche, suppressed epithelial-associated CFU. When applied at non-toxic dose in the absence of bacteria, the douche and moisturizer induced an increase of IL-8, suggesting a potential to initiate inflammatory reaction. In the presence of L. crispatus, the proinflammatory effects of the douche and moisturizer were countered, and IL-8 production was inhibited in the presence of the other products. Conclusion Some OTC vaginal products may be harmful to L. crispatus and alter the vaginal immune environment. Illustrated through these results, L. crispatus is essential in the preservation of the function of vaginal epithelial cells in the presence of some feminine hygiene products. More research should be invested toward these products before they are placed on the market. PMID:24009546

  11. Postmenopausal vaginal atrophy: evaluation of treatment with local estrogen therapy.

    PubMed

    Minkin, Mary Jane; Maamari, Ricardo; Reiter, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    Postmenopausal vaginal atrophy, resulting from decreased estrogen production, frequently requires treatment. Estrogen preparations provide the most effective treatment; local application is preferred to systemic drugs when treating only vaginal symptoms. As local estrogen therapies have comparable efficacy, this study aimed to understand treatment practices, assess experiences with different forms of local estrogen-delivering applicators, and evaluate satisfaction. Women who were US residents aged ?18 years, menopausal (no spontaneous menstrual period for ?1 year or with a double oophorectomy), and receiving local estrogen therapy for 1-6 months (vaginal cream [supplied with a reusable applicator] or vaginal tablets [supplied with a single-use/disposable applicator]), completed an online questionnaire. Data from 200 women (100 cream users and 100 tablet users; mean therapy duration 3.48 months) showed that most stored medication in the room in which it was applied (88%) and applied it at bedtime (71%), a procedure for which cream users required, on average, more than twice the time of tablet users (5.08 minutes versus 2.48 minutes). Many cream users applied larger-than-prescribed amounts of cream, attempting to achieve greater efficacy (42%), or lower-than-recommended doses (45%), most frequently to avoid messiness (33%) or leakage (30%). More tablet users (69%) than cream users (14%) were "extremely satisfied" with their applicator. Postmenopausal women using local estrogen therapy were generally more satisfied with the application of vaginal tablets than cream. Patient satisfaction may help to facilitate accurate dosing. Positive perceptions of medication will help to optimize treatment, which, although not assessed in this study, is likely, in turn, to improve vaginal health. PMID:24648772

  12. Evaluating the potential impact of vaginal microbicides to reduce the risk of acquiring HIV in

    E-print Network

    Blower, Sally

    Evaluating the potential impact of vaginal microbicides to reduce the risk of acquiring HIV: The following questions were addressed: would the introduction of vaginal microbicides substantially reduce) is low. ß 2005 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins AIDS 2005, 19:413­421 Keywords: vaginal microbicides, HIV

  13. Quantity and distribution of levator ani stretch during simulated vaginal childbirth

    E-print Network

    Majumdar, Amit

    Quantity and distribution of levator ani stretch during simulated vaginal childbirth Lennox Hoyte of levator ani stretch during simulated vaginal childbirth. Am J Obstet Gynecol 2008;199:198.e1-198.e5, Lien et al11 performed computer simulations of vaginal childbirth and demonstrated

  14. A multicenter randomized comparison of laparoscopically assisted vaginal hysterectomy and abdominal hysterectomy in abdominal hysterectomy candidates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert L Summitt; Thomas G Stovall; John F Steege; Gary H Lipscomb

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To compare intraoperative and postoperative outcomes between laparoscopically assisted vaginal hysterectomy and abdominal hysterectomy among patients who are not eligible for vaginal hysterectomy.Methods: Study subjects were randomly assigned to undergo laparoscopically assisted vaginal hysterectomy or standard abdominal hysterectomy. Intraoperative and postoperative management was similar for each group. Surgical characteristics, complications, length of hospital stay, charges, and convalescence were analyzed.Results:

  15. Resistance to vaginal or systemic infection with herpes simplex virus type 2

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mary C. Breinig; L. L. Wright; Margaret B. McGeorge; P. S. MORAItAN

    1978-01-01

    Summary Mortality due to vaginal or intravenous infection of female BALB\\/c mice with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) was significantly reduced by treatment of mice with the immunomodulator pyran. Following intravaginal inoculation with virus, the incidence of vaginal infection and titers of virus present in the vaginal secretions were significantly reduced in pyran treated as compared with control mice.

  16. Molecular analysis of the vaginal response to estrogens in the ovariectomized rat and postmenopausal woman

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Scott A Jelinsky; Sung E Choe; Judy S Crabtree; Monette M Cotreau; Ewa Wilson; Kathryn Saraf; Andrew J Dorner; Eugene L Brown; Bryan J Peano; Xiaochun Zhang; Richard C Winneker; Heather A Harris

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vaginal atrophy (VA) is the thinning of the vaginal epithelial lining, typically the result of lowered estrogen levels during menopause. Some of the consequences of VA include increased susceptibility to bacterial infection, pain during sexual intercourse, and vaginal burning or itching. Although estrogen treatment is highly effective, alternative therapies are also desired for women who are not candidates for

  17. Maturitas 41 (2002) 157165 Estrogen replacement reverses ovariectomy-induced vaginal

    E-print Network

    Berkley, Karen J.

    2002-01-01

    of the mechanism is vaginal atrophy associated with the loss of ovarian hormones, particularly estrogen, because both vaginal atrophy and dyspareunia can be reversed by hormone or estrogen replacement therapy [3 and because vaginal atrophy and dyspareunia do not always vary to- gether [3]. Although there are studies

  18. Aetiology & risk factors of recurrent vaginitis & its association with various contraceptive methods

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jyoti Thulkar; Alka Kriplani; Nutan Agarwal; Sreenivas Vishnubhatla

    Background & objectives: Women who do not seek treatment for recurrent vaginitis have risk to acquire other sexually transmitted infections. Besides proper antibiotic treatment, male condom acts as a barrier to various infections. Present study was done to assess type of vaginitis, its association with various contraceptive methods and need of male condom in prevention of recurrent vaginitis. Methods: Prospective

  19. Molecular analysis of the diversity of vaginal microbiota associated with bacterial vaginosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zongxin Ling; Jianming Kong; Fang Liu; Haibin Zhu; Xiaoyi Chen; Yuezhu Wang; Lanjuan Li; Karen E Nelson; Yaxian Xia; Charlie Xiang

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is an ecological disorder of the vaginal microbiota that affects millions of women annually, and is associated with numerous adverse health outcomes including pre-term birth and the acquisition of sexually transmitted infections. However, little is known about the overall structure and composition of vaginal microbial communities; most of the earlier studies focused on predominant vaginal bacteria

  20. Epimacular brachytherapy for wet AMD: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Casaroli-Marano, Ricardo P; Alforja, Socorro; Giralt, Joan; Farah, Michel E

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is considered the most common cause of blindness in the over-60 age group in developed countries. There are basically two forms of presentation: geographic (dry or atrophic) and wet (neovascular or exudative). Geographic atrophy accounts for approximately 85%–90% of ophthalmic frames and leads to a progressive degeneration of the retinal pigment epithelium and the photoreceptors. Wet AMD causes the highest percentage of central vision loss secondary to disease. This neovascular form involves an angiogenic process in which newly formed choroidal vessels invade the macular area. Today, intravitreal anti-angiogenic drugs attempt to block the angiogenic events and represent a major advance in the treatment of wet AMD. Currently, combination therapy for wet AMD includes different forms of radiation delivery. Epimacular brachytherapy (EMBT) seems to be a useful approach to be associated with current anti-vascular endothelial growth factor agents, presenting an acceptable efficacy and safety profile. However, at the present stage of research, the results of the clinical trials carried out to date are insufficient to justify extending routine use of EMBT for the treatment of wet AMD. PMID:25210436

  1. Laparoscopic Management of Congenital Cervico-Vaginal Agenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Nutan; Sircar, Reema

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of cervical agenesis or lack of uterine cervix. It is a rare mullerian anomaly and occurs in 1 in 80,000-100,000 births. The patient presented to us with primary amenorrhea and cyclical left lower abdominal pain. She was diagnosed to have cervical agenesis associated with vaginal agenesis and left endometriotic cyst. Neovagina was created laparoscopically. Utero-vaginal anastomosis was tried but it was not technically feasible. Subsequently, laparoscopic hysterectomy was done due to recurrent endometriotic cyst formation.

  2. Postoperative interstitial brachytherapy in eyelid cancer: long term results and assessment of Cosmesis After Interstitial Brachytherapy scale

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Trinanjan; Chaudhary, Suresh; Chaukar, Devendra; Nadkarni, Mandar; GN, Manjunatha

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To analyse feasibility and safety of postoperative interstitial brachytherapy (IBRT) in patients of eyelid cancer treated primarily by surgical excision. Material and methods In this series, 8 patients with eyelid cancer were treated using postoperative interstitial brachytherapy. Patients were followed up for local control, cosmetic outcome, and acute and late toxicities. Cosmetic outcome was measured using a 6 point indigenous Cosmesis After Interstitial Brachytherapy (CAIB) scale. Results The patients were between 23-82 years (median: 71 years). There were 3 females and 5 males, and 3 patients had lesions in upper eyelid. Postoperative high-dose-rate brachytherapy was used in all with 2 catheters implanted in most of them (6 out of 8). Local control was calculated from end of treatment to last follow-up. At last follow-up, all patients remained locally controlled. Two patients had nodal recurrence 6 months after interstitial brachytherapy and were salvaged effectively by external beam radiotherapy. At last follow-up, 7 patients were loco-regionally controlled and one was lost to follow up. All patients had Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grade 1 acute toxicity and 2 had grade 1 Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version.3 late toxicities. The cosmesis score for the whole group ranged between 0-1 indicating excellent to very good cosmesis. Conclusions Postoperative high-dose-rate brachytherapy resulted in excellent disease control and cosmesis without significant acute or late toxicities. It is an effective modality for treatment of eyelid cancers in selected patients. Future prospective studies with the validation of CAIB scale would give us more insight to this effective yet often ignored modality of IBRT. PMID:25834578

  3. The vaginal microbiome, vaginal anti-microbial defence mechanisms and the clinical challenge of reducing infection-related preterm birth.

    PubMed

    Witkin, S S

    2015-01-01

    Ascending bacterial infection is implicated in about 40-50% of preterm births. The human vaginal microbiota in most women is dominated by lactobacilli. In women whose vaginal microbiota is not lactobacilli-dominated anti-bacterial defence mechanisms are reduced. The enhanced proliferation of pathogenic bacteria plus degradation of the cervical barrier increase bacterial passage into the endometrium and amniotic cavity and trigger preterm myometrial contractions. Evaluation of protocols to detect the absence of lactobaciili dominance in pregnant women by self-measuring vaginal pH, coupled with measures to promote growth of lactobacilli are novel prevention strategies that may reduce the occurrence of preterm birth in low-resource areas. PMID:25316066

  4. Evaluation of the Effects of a New Intravaginal Gel, Containing Purified Bovine Colostrum, on Vaginal Blood Flow and Vaginal Atrophy in Ovariectomized Rat

    PubMed Central

    Vailati, Silvia; Melloni, Elsa; Riscassi, Ermanno; Behr Roussel, Delphine; Sardina, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Vaginal dryness due to vaginal atrophy is a common complaint of postmenopausal women, interfering with sexual function and quality of life. Hormone replacement therapy is the only effective therapy but with known risks that leave unmet medical needs. A new product, ZP-025 vaginal gel, containing purified (dialyzed lyophilized) bovine colostrum, has been developed for the treatment of vaginal dryness secondary to vaginal atrophy. Aim The study aims to investigate the effects of intravaginal application of ZP-025 on vaginal atrophy using an animal model. Methods Ovariectomized female Sprague-Dawley rats were used. Three weeks after surgery, rats were divided into four groups and treated for 4 weeks (twice a day) with placebo or ZP-025 at low (0.5%) or high (2.3%) concentrations of colostrum; in the control group, rats did not receive any treatment. Changes in vaginal blood flow due to pelvic nerve stimulation were assessed by laser Doppler flowmetry and vaginal tissue was collected for histological assay. Main Outcome Measures The main outcome measures were vaginal blood flow before and after pelvic nerve stimulation and histology of vaginal epithelium. Results Treatment with ZP-025 to ovariectomized rats induced an increase of vaginal blood flow parameters (vascular capacitance, amplitude and area under the curve of the response) in response to pelvic nerve stimulation compared with control group, statistically significant at 2.3%. Vaginal epithelium showed a physiological estrous cycle aspect in treated animals, with at least five cell layers vs. one or two cell layers in control rats. As expected from a topical formulation, systemic effects on body weights and uterine wet weights were not observed with application of ZP-025. Conclusions In this study, the new product ZP-025, containing purified colostrum, was shown to have beneficial effects on vaginal atrophy in ovariectomized rats, improving vaginal hemodynamics and thickness of vaginal epithelium. Vailati S, Melloni E, Riscassi E, Behr Roussel D, and Sardina M. Evaluation of the effects of a new intravaginal gel, containing purified bovine colostrum, on vaginal blood flow and vaginal atrophy in ovariectomized rat. Sex Med 2013;1:35–43. PMID:25356286

  5. Studies on the development of (169)Yb-brachytherapy seeds: New generation brachytherapy sources for the management of cancer.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Sanjay Kumar; Kumar, Yogendra; Jagadeesan, K C; Nuwad, Jitendra; Bamankar, Y R; Dash, Ashutosh

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes development of (169)Yb-seeds by encapsulating 0.6-0.65mm (?) sized (169)Yb2O3 microspheres in titanium capsules. Microspheres synthesized by a sol-gel route were characterized by XRD, SEM/EDS and ICP-AES. Optimization of neutron irradiation was accomplished and (169)Yb-seeds up to 74MBq of (169)Yb could be produced from natural Yb2O3 microspheres, which have the potential for use in prostate brachytherapy. A protocol to prepare (169)Yb-brachytherapy sources (2.96-3.7TBq of (169)Yb) with the use of enriched targets was also formulated. PMID:25846454

  6. Vaginal colonization and activity of the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus fermentum L23 in a murine model of vaginal tract infection.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Liliana; Ruiz, Francisco; Giordano, Walter; Barberis, Isabel Lucila

    2010-03-01

    A strain of Lactobacillus, identified as Lactobacillus fermentum L23, was selected from among 100 strains isolated from vaginal swabs of healthy, non-pregnant, pre-menopausal women. L. fermentum L23 was chosen on the basis of its bacteriocinogenic ability and its properties relevant to colonization, i.e. self-aggregation, adherence to vaginal epithelial cells and co-aggregation with bacterial pathogens. The antimicrobial preventative and curative effects produced by the probiotic L. fermentum L23 administered locally against Escherichia coli in a murine vaginal tract infection model were studied. One dose of the human strain L23 containing 10(8) c.f.u. ml(-1) colonized and persisted in the vaginal tract of the female BALB/c mice for 5 days. Infection with the pathogen at 10(6) c.f.u. ml(-1) in the vaginal tract was maintained for more than 7 days. A single dose of L23 administered 24 h pre-infection inhibited E. coli growth on day 3 post-infection, showing the preventative effect displayed by this Lactobacillus strain. Treatment with L. fermentum L23 during the post-infection period showed complete inhibition of pathogen growth from day 5. Thus, this in vivo study indicated that the probiotic bacterium L. fermentum L23 produced both preventative and curative effects on E. coli growth. The beneficial properties and the production of antimicrobial metabolites may act in situ to inhibit a pathogenic micro-organism within the vaginal environment. Strain L23 could be a good natural alternative to other therapies used for genital infections. PMID:19926731

  7. Vaginal micronized progesterone capsule versus vaginal progesterone gel for lutheal support in normoresponder IVF/ICSI-ET cycles

    PubMed Central

    Sofuoglu, Kenan; Gun, Ismet; Sahin, Sadik; Ozden, Okan; Tosun, Oktay; Eroglu, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the outcomes of luteal phase support by micronized progesteron vaginal capsule 600mg/day and progesterone vaginal gel 180mg/day in the normoresponder IVF/ICSI-ET cycles of the patients down-regulated via GnRH agonist long protocol or fixed antagonist protocol below 40 years of age. Methods: A total of 463 normoresponder cycles between January 2013 and December 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. Those with a BMI>28 kg/m2, any kind of uterine, ovarian or adnexial pathology, any significant systemic, endocrine or metabolic disease or who were reported as azoospermia, were excluded from the study. The patients were grouped according to the usage of micronized progesterone vaginal capsule 600mg/day (Group 1) or progesterone vaginal gel 180mg/day (Group 2) as luteal phase support. Treatment cycle characteristics and pregnancy outcomes were compared between groups. Results: Group-I included 220 cycles and group 2 included 243 cycles. Although the MII oocyte percentage among the total number of MII oocytes was significantly higher in Group-II (77.5% and 80.2%; p=0.034), positive ß-hCG (32.3% and 21.8%; p=0.015) and clinical pregnancy (27.3% and 17.7%; p=0.018) rates were significantly higher in Group-I. No difference was observed between groups regarding the ongoing pregnancy rates (23.2% and 17.3%; p=0.143). Conclusion: Micronized progesterone vaginal capsule 600mg daily used for luteal support in the IVF/ICSI-ET cycles was observed to significantly increase the biochemical and clinical pregnancy rates compared to progesterone vaginal gel 180mg daily. However, no difference was observed between two groups regarding ongoing pregnancy rates.

  8. All-Suture Transosseous Repair for Rotator Cuff Tear Fixation Using Medial Calcar Fixation.

    PubMed

    Aramberri-Gutiérrez, Mikel; Martínez-Menduiña, Amaia; Valencia-Mora, María; Boyle, Simon

    2015-04-01

    We describe an all-suture transosseous repair technique used in the management of rotator cuff tears by means of an all-suture anchor secured on the intra-articular side of the humeral calcar. The technique uses an anterior cruciate ligament guide to ensure accurate positioning of the tunnels, avoiding the articular cartilage and minimizing risk to the neurovascular structures. The distal end of the guide is inserted through a rotator interval portal and passed down to the axillary pouch. The proximal end of the guide is approximated to the greater tuberosity at the cuff footprint, and a complete transosseous tunnel is created with a 2.4-mm drill. An all-suture implant is inserted through this tunnel down to the calcar, and its deployment is visualized under arthroscopy. Gentle traction is applied to the anchor, resulting in a 4-mm concertina of the suture anchor that rests opposed to the medial cortex. The major advantage of this technique is the fixation strength gained from the biomechanically superior cortical bone of the calcar. Furthermore, this method permits greater preservation of bone surface area at the level of the footprint for a larger tendon-to-bone healing surface. This technique also provides an excellent alternative in revision situations. PMID:26052495

  9. All-Suture Transosseous Repair for Rotator Cuff Tear Fixation Using Medial Calcar Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Aramberri-Gutiérrez, Mikel; Martínez-Menduiña, Amaia; Valencia-Mora, María; Boyle, Simon

    2015-01-01

    We describe an all-suture transosseous repair technique used in the management of rotator cuff tears by means of an all-suture anchor secured on the intra-articular side of the humeral calcar. The technique uses an anterior cruciate ligament guide to ensure accurate positioning of the tunnels, avoiding the articular cartilage and minimizing risk to the neurovascular structures. The distal end of the guide is inserted through a rotator interval portal and passed down to the axillary pouch. The proximal end of the guide is approximated to the greater tuberosity at the cuff footprint, and a complete transosseous tunnel is created with a 2.4-mm drill. An all-suture implant is inserted through this tunnel down to the calcar, and its deployment is visualized under arthroscopy. Gentle traction is applied to the anchor, resulting in a 4-mm concertina of the suture anchor that rests opposed to the medial cortex. The major advantage of this technique is the fixation strength gained from the biomechanically superior cortical bone of the calcar. Furthermore, this method permits greater preservation of bone surface area at the level of the footprint for a larger tendon-to-bone healing surface. This technique also provides an excellent alternative in revision situations. PMID:26052495

  10. Stem cell therapy in the management of shoulder rotator cuff disorders.

    PubMed

    Mora, Maria Valencia; Ibán, Miguel A Ruiz; Heredia, Jorge Díaz; Laakso, Raul Barco; Cuéllar, Ricardo; Arranz, Mariano García

    2015-05-26

    Rotator cuff tears are frequent shoulder problems that are usually dealt with surgical repair. Despite improved surgical techniques, the tendon-to-bone healing rate is unsatisfactory due to difficulties in restoring the delicate transitional tissue between bone and tendon. It is essential to understand the molecular mechanisms that determine this failure. The study of the molecular environment during embryogenesis and during normal healing after injury is key in devising strategies to get a successful repair. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) can differentiate into different mesodermal tissues and have a strong paracrine, anti-inflammatory, immunoregulatory and angiogenic potential. Stem cell therapy is thus a potentially effective therapy to enhance rotator cuff healing. Promising results have been reported with the use of autologous MSC of different origins in animal studies: they have shown to have better healing properties, increasing the amount of fibrocartilage formation and improving the orientation of fibrocartilage fibers with less immunologic response and reduced lymphocyte infiltration. All these changes lead to an increase in biomechanical strength. However, animal research is still inconclusive and more experimental studies are needed before human application. Future directions include expanded stem cell therapy in combination with growth factors or different scaffolds as well as new stem cell types and gene therapy. PMID:26029341

  11. Numerical validation of a suprasystolic brachial cuff-based method for estimating aortic pressure.

    PubMed

    Liang, Fuyou

    2014-01-01

    Central aortic pressures are better predictors of cardiovascular events than peripheral pressures. However, central aortic blood pressures cannot be measured noninvasively; for this reason, estimating aortic pressures from noninvasive measurements of peripheral pressures has been the subject of numerous studies. In the present study, a novel method was proposed to noninvasively estimate aortic pressures from the oscillometric wave of a suprasystolic brachial cuff. The errors of estimation were evaluated in relation to various cardiovascular properties using an integrated cardiovascular-cuff model. Obtained results demonstrated that the estimation errors are affected mainly by aortic stiffness. The estimation errors for aortic systolic pressure, diastolic pressure, pulse pressure and wave shape under the assumed cardiovascular conditions were 5.84 ± 1.58 mmHg, -0.28 ± 0.41 mmHg, 6.12 ± 1.42 mmHg and 1.72 ± 0.57 mmHg, respectively, all of which fell within the error ranges established by existing devices. Since the method is easy to be automated and bases the estimation fully on patient-specific information, its clinical application is promising, although further clinical studies are awaited to validate the method in vivo. PMID:24211996

  12. Greater Tuberosity Osteotomy and Teres Minor Transfer for Irreparable Superior Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Brian R; Bries, Andrew D; Nepola, James V

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mid- to long- term objective, subjective and radiographic results of patients who underwent anterior-superior transfer of remaining infraspinatus tendon and teres minor tendon for irreparable superior rotator cuff tears. thirteen patients were identified who underwent infraspinatus tendon transfer to a more superior position on the humeral head between January 1, 1990 and december 31, 2001. nine shoulders in eight patients were available for clinical examination, radiographs and questionnaire follow-up at an average of 83.5 ± 31.4 months. radiographic examination revealed 1 fibrous union and 6 united tuberosity osteotomies. Samilson-Prieto grading of radiographs revealed 4 shoulders with mild, and 4 shoulders with moderate, OA. Seven of the patients were satisfied with their shoulder. there were two poor outcomes. Local antero-superior teres minor and residual infraspinatus transfer provides a viable option for irreparable rotator cuff defects. Mid- to long-term satisfactory outcome was achieved in 7 out of 9 shoulders. PMID:17907433

  13. Antioxidant's cytoprotective effects on rotator cuff tenofibroblasts exposed to aminoamide local anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ra Jeong; Hah, Young-Sool; Kang, Jae-Ran; Park, Hyung Bin

    2015-07-01

    Local anesthetics (LA) are among the drugs most frequently used for musculoskeletal problems, in procedures ranging from diagnosis to postoperative pain control. The cytotoxicity of LA is an emerging area of concern. The purpose of this study was to determine whether cyanidin, an antioxidant, exerts cytoprotective effects against tenofibroblast death induced by LA. Primary cultured human rotator cuff tenofibroblasts were used to evaluate the cytotoxicity of these LA: Ropivacaine (0.075%), Bupivacaine (0.05%), and Lidocaine (0.2%). The effects of cyanidin (100??g/ml) on the cytotoxicity induced by these LA were investigated. Cell viability, ROS production, caspase-3/7 activity, and expressions of phospho-extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), phospho-p38, phospho-c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and cleaved PARP-1 were evaluated. Exposure to LA significantly induced cell death (p?cuff tenofibroblasts. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 33:1001-1007, 2015. PMID:25639557

  14. Rotator Cuff Metastases: A Report of Two Cases with Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Soker, Gokhan; Soker, Eda; Gulek, Bozkurt; Acikalin, Arbil; Asut, Elife; Kaya, Omer; Dilek, Okan; Yilmaz, Cengiz

    2014-01-01

    Context: Distant metastases of primary malignancies to the skeletal muscle tissue are a very rare event. Distant metastases that affect the rotator cuff are even rarer, and only a few of cases have been reported so far. Case Report: The present article reports two cases that presented to our hospital with the complaint of shoulder pain and had a soft tissue mass affecting the muscles of the rotator cuff and invading the neighboring bone compartments. One of the patients developed mucoepidermoid cancer metastasis of the submandibular gland, and the other was found to have a malignant epithelial tumor metastasized from the lower lobe of the right lung, whose primary origin could not be diagnosed until the imaging examinations were employed. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging findings are presented in this paper. Conclusion: Metastases to the muscle tissues could be misdiagnosed as primary sarcomas. Because the therapy regiments and prognoses are fairly different for these two entities, the possibility of a metastasis to the muscle tissue must be considered as a differential diagnosis for case of painful soft tissue mass. Ultrasound is very useful in detection of the lesion and acts as a very important tool during guidance for biopsy. Magnetic resonance imaging, however, is a very valuable asset in the evaluation of the borders of the soft tissue mass and its invasive effect on the bony tissues. Particularly when the features such as lobulated contours, peripheral edema, and intratumoral necrosis exist, the possibility of metastases must be considered. PMID:25599056

  15. Stem cell therapy in the management of shoulder rotator cuff disorders

    PubMed Central

    Mora, Maria Valencia; Ibán, Miguel A Ruiz; Heredia, Jorge Díaz; Laakso, Raul Barco; Cuéllar, Ricardo; Arranz, Mariano García

    2015-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears are frequent shoulder problems that are usually dealt with surgical repair. Despite improved surgical techniques, the tendon-to-bone healing rate is unsatisfactory due to difficulties in restoring the delicate transitional tissue between bone and tendon. It is essential to understand the molecular mechanisms that determine this failure. The study of the molecular environment during embryogenesis and during normal healing after injury is key in devising strategies to get a successful repair. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) can differentiate into different mesodermal tissues and have a strong paracrine, anti-inflammatory, immunoregulatory and angiogenic potential. Stem cell therapy is thus a potentially effective therapy to enhance rotator cuff healing. Promising results have been reported with the use of autologous MSC of different origins in animal studies: they have shown to have better healing properties, increasing the amount of fibrocartilage formation and improving the orientation of fibrocartilage fibers with less immunologic response and reduced lymphocyte infiltration. All these changes lead to an increase in biomechanical strength. However, animal research is still inconclusive and more experimental studies are needed before human application. Future directions include expanded stem cell therapy in combination with growth factors or different scaffolds as well as new stem cell types and gene therapy. PMID:26029341

  16. Cuff leak test and laryngeal survey for predicting post-extubation stridor

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Anit B; Ani, Chizobam; Feeney, Colin

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Evidence for the predictive value of the cuff leak test (CLT) for post-extubation stridor (PES) is conflicting. We evaluated the association and accuracy of CLT alone or combined with other laryngeal parameters with PES. Methods: Fifty-one mechanically ventilated adult patients in a medical-surgical intensive care unit were tested prior to extubation using; CLT, laryngeal ultrasound and indirect laryngoscopy. Biometric, laryngeal and endotracheal tube (ETT) parameters were recorded. Results: PES incidence was 4%. CLT demonstrated ‘no leak’ in 20% of patients. Laryngeal oedema was present in 10% of the patients on indirect laryngoscopy, and 71% of the patients had a Grades 1-3 indirect laryngoscopic view. Mean air column width on laryngeal ultrasound was 0.66 ± 0.15 cm (cuff deflated), mean ratio of ETT to laryngeal diameter was 0.48 ± 0.07, and the calculated CLT and laryngeal survey composite was 0.86 ± 1.25 (range 0-5). CLT and the CLT and Laryngeal survey composite measure were not associated with or predict PES. Age, sex, peri-extubation steroid use, intubation duration and body mass index were not associated with PES. Conclusion: Even including ultrasonographic and indirect laryngoscopic examination of the airway, no single aspect of the CLT or combination with laryngeal parameters accurately predicts PES. PMID:25788742

  17. Model-based analysis and design of nerve cuff electrodes for restoring bladder function by selective stimulation of the pudendal nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, Alexander R.; Grill, Warren M.

    2013-06-01

    Objective. Electrical stimulation of the pudendal nerve (PN) is being developed as a means to restore bladder function in persons with spinal cord injury. A single nerve cuff electrode placed on the proximal PN trunk may enable selective stimulation of distinct fascicles to maintain continence or evoke micturition. The objective of this study was to design a nerve cuff that enabled selective stimulation of the PN. Approach. We evaluated the performance of both flat interface nerve electrode (FINE) cuff and round cuff designs, with a range of FINE cuff heights and number of contacts, as well as multiple contact orientations. This analysis was performed using a computational model, in which the nerve and fascicle cross-sectional positions from five human PN trunks were systematically reshaped within the nerve cuff. These cross-sections were used to create finite element models, with electric potentials calculated and applied to a cable model of a myelinated axon to evaluate stimulation selectivity for different PN targets. Subsequently, the model was coupled to a genetic algorithm (GA) to identify solutions that used multiple contact activation to maximize selectivity and minimize total stimulation voltage. Main results. Simulations did not identify any significant differences in selectivity between FINE and round cuffs, although the latter required smaller stimulation voltages for target activation due to preserved localization of targeted fascicle groups. Further, it was found that a ten contact nerve cuff generated sufficient selectivity for all PN targets, with the degree of selectivity dependent on the relative position of the target within the nerve. The GA identified solutions that increased fitness by 0.7-45.5% over single contact activation by decreasing stimulation of non-targeted fascicles. Significance. This study suggests that using an optimal nerve cuff design and multiple contact activation could enable selective stimulation of the human PN trunk for restoration of bladder function.

  18. A Rare Case of Foreign Body Causing Recurrent Vaginal Discharge in Prepubertal Child

    PubMed Central

    Gobbur, Raghavendra.H.; Patil, Ashwini.G; Endigeri, Preetish

    2015-01-01

    Vaginal discharge in prepubertal children is mainly due to hypoestrogenic state of vaginal mucosa making it thin and alkaline leading to mucosal invasion by pathogen. In a paediatric case with persistent foul smelling , blood stained vaginal discharge not responding to medical therapy, vaginal foreign body should always be ruled out. Here, we report a 3 -year -old girl with complaint of recurrent vaginal discharge occasionally blood stained not relieved despite few antibiotics courses. On X -ray pelvis, a radioopaque foreign body hair clip was seen. Under sedation foreign body was removed by forceps following which child became asymptomatic. PMID:25738041

  19. A rare case of foreign body causing recurrent vaginal discharge in prepubertal child.

    PubMed

    Gobbur, Vijayalakshmi R; Gobbur, Raghavendra H; Patil, Ashwini G; Endigeri, Preetish

    2015-01-01

    Vaginal discharge in prepubertal children is mainly due to hypoestrogenic state of vaginal mucosa making it thin and alkaline leading to mucosal invasion by pathogen. In a paediatric case with persistent foul smelling , blood stained vaginal discharge not responding to medical therapy, vaginal foreign body should always be ruled out. Here, we report a 3 -year -old girl with complaint of recurrent vaginal discharge occasionally blood stained not relieved despite few antibiotics courses. On X -ray pelvis, a radioopaque foreign body hair clip was seen. Under sedation foreign body was removed by forceps following which child became asymptomatic. PMID:25738041

  20. Considerations to improve the evidence-based use of vaginal hysterectomy in benign gynecology.

    PubMed

    Moen, Michael; Walter, Andrew; Harmanli, Oz; Cornella, Jeffrey; Nihira, Mikio; Gala, Rajiv; Zimmerman, Carl; Richter, Holly E

    2014-09-01

    Vaginal hysterectomy fulfills the evidence-based requirements as the preferred route of hysterectomy for benign gynecologic disease. Despite proven safety and effectiveness, the vaginal approach for hysterectomy has been and remains underused in surgical practice. Factors associated with underuse of vaginal hysterectomy include challenges during residency training, decreasing case numbers among practicing gynecologists, and lack of awareness of evidence supporting vaginal hysterectomy. Strategies to improve resident training and promote collaboration and referral among practicing physicians and increasing awareness of evidence supporting vaginal hysterectomy can improve the primary use of this hysterectomy approach. PMID:25162260