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1

The water quality of the LOCAR Pang and Lambourn catchments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The water quality of the Pang and Lambourn, tributaries of the River Thames, in south-eastern England, is described in relation to spatial and temporal dimensions. The river waters are supplied mainly from Chalk-fed aquifer sources and are, therefore, of a calcium-bicarbonate type. The major, minor and trace element chemistry of the rivers is controlled by a combination of atmospheric and pollutant inputs from agriculture and sewage sources superimposed on a background water quality signal linked to geological sources. Water quality does not vary greatly over time or space. However, in detail, there are differences in water quality between the Pang and Lambourn and between sites along the Pang and the Lambourn. These differences reflect hydrological processes, water flow pathways and water quality input fluxes. The Pang’s pattern of water quality change is more variable than that of the Lambourn. The flow hydrograph also shows both a cyclical and "uniform pattern" characteristic of aquifer drainage with, superimposed, a series of "flashier" spiked responses characteristic of karstic systems. The Lambourn, in contrast, shows simpler features without the "flashier" responses. The results are discussed in relation to the newly developed UK community programme LOCAR dealing with Lowland Catchment Research. A descriptive and box model structure is provided to describe the key features of water quality variations in relation to soil, unsaturated and groundwater flows and storage both away from and close to the river.

Neal, C.; Jarvie, H. P.; Wade, A. J.; Neal, M.; Wyatt, R.; Wickham, H.; Hill, L.; Hewitt, N.

2

STS-96 Crew Interview: Valery Tokarev  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Live footage of a preflight interview with the Russian Cosmonaut Valery Ivanovich Tokarev is presented. The interview addresses many different questions including why Tokarev wanted to be a cosmonaut, and the events that led to his interest. Other interesting information that this one-on-one interview discusses is this logistics and supply mission, and why it is important to send equipment to the International Space Station (ISS) before the astronauts. Tokarev compares both the Russian and United States space programs, and space shuttles. He mentions the logistics and supply mission, plans to transfer the supply, his involvement with the installation of mufflers, and the undocking of Discovery. The future automatic docking of the Service Module to the Zarya Module of the ISS, and the role that the ISS will play in future space flight and exploration are also discussed.

1999-01-01

3

The water quality of the LOCAR Pang and Lambourn catchments  

Microsoft Academic Search

The water quality of the Pang and Lambourn, tributaries of the River Thames, in south-eastern England, is described in relation to spatial and temporal dimensions. The river waters are supplied mainly from Chalk-fed aquifer sources and are, therefore, of a calcium-bicarbonate type. The major, minor and trace element chemistry of the rivers is controlled by a combination of atmospheric and

C. Neal; H. P. Jarvie; A. J. Wade; M. Neal; R. Wyatt; H. Wickham; L. Hill; N. Hewitt

2004-01-01

4

78 FR 36642 - Proposed Information Collection (VA Loan Electronic Reporting Interface (VALERI) System) Activity...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Proposed Information Collection (VA Loan Electronic Reporting Interface (VALERI) System) Activity: Comment Request AGENCY: Veterans...information technology. Title: VA Loan Electronic Reporting Interface (VALERI) System. OMB Control Number: 2900-0021....

2013-06-18

5

75 FR 17832 - Proposed Information Collection (VA Loan Electronic Reporting Interface (VALERI) System) Activity...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Proposed Information Collection (VA Loan Electronic Reporting Interface (VALERI) System) Activity: Comment Request AGENCY: Veterans...information technology. Title: VA Loan Electronic Reporting Interface (VALERI) System. OMB Control Number: 2900-0021....

2010-04-07

6

78 FR 59099 - Agency Information Collection (VA Loan Electronic Reporting Interface (VALERI) System) Activity...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Agency Information Collection (VA Loan Electronic Reporting Interface (VALERI) System) Activity Under OMB Review AGENCY: Veterans...SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: VA Loan Electronic Reporting Interface (VALERI) System. OMB Control Number: 2900-0021....

2013-09-25

7

75 FR 33898 - Agency Information Collection (VA Loan Electronic Reporting Interface (VALERI) System) Activity...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Agency Information Collection (VA Loan Electronic Reporting Interface (VALERI) System) Activity Under OMB Review AGENCY: Veterans...SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: VA Loan Electronic Reporting Interface (VALERI) System. OMB Control Number: 2900-0021....

2010-06-15

8

DCEG Distinguished Lecturer - Dame Valerie Beral, M.D.  

Cancer.gov

Dame Valerie Beral, M.D. is the 2014 recipient of the NCI Rosalind Franklin Award, which she will receive at the NCI Intramural Scientific Investigators Retreat. Dr. Beral has extended her visit in order to come to NCI Shady Grove to spend a day with her collaborators. As a DCEG Distinguished Lecturer she will present a short talk about her career in epidemiology.

9

Plasmacytoma-associated neuronal glycoprotein, Pang, maps to mouse chromosome 6 and human chromosome 3  

SciTech Connect

A new member of the immunoglobulin/fibronectin superfamily of adhesion molecules, Pang (plasmacytoma-associated neuronal glycoprotein), was recently isolated from a plasmacytoma. In previous studies, Pang was found to be normally expressed in the brain and ectopically activated by intracisternal A-type particle long terminal repeats in plasmacytomas. In this study, Pang was initially mapped to mouse Chr 6 by somatic cell hybrid analysis and further positioned on the chromosome between Wnt7a and Pcp1. Southern blot analysis of human-rodent somatic cell hybrids together with predictions from the mouse map location indicate that human PANG is located at 3p26. 13 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

Mock, B.A.; McBride, O.W.; Kozak, C.A. [NIH, Bethesda, MD (United States)] [and others] [NIH, Bethesda, MD (United States); and others

1996-06-01

10

STS-84 Post Landing - Valery Ryumin greets wife Elena Kondakova  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FL - Veteran cosmonaut Valery Ryumin greets his wife, STS-84 Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova, with some flowers after the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis lands on KSC's Runway 33. STS-84 was the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The nine-day STS-84 mission was Kondakova's second space flight, but her first on the Space Shuttle. She spent 169 days in space as flight engineer of the 17th main mission on Mir from October 1994 to March 1995. Her husband is now director of the Mir-Shuttle program for Russia.

1997-01-01

11

PanG, a New Ketopantoate Reductase Involved in Pantothenate Synthesis  

PubMed Central

Pantothenate, commonly referred to as vitamin B5, is an essential molecule in the metabolism of living organisms and forms the core of coenzyme A. Unlike humans, some bacteria and plants are capable of de novo biosynthesis of pantothenate, making this pathway a potential target for drug development. Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis Schu S4 is a zoonotic bacterial pathogen that is able to synthesize pantothenate but is lacking the known ketopantoate reductase (KPR) genes, panE and ilvC, found in the canonical Escherichia coli pathway. Described herein is a gene encoding a novel KPR, for which we propose the name panG (FTT1388), which is conserved in all sequenced Francisella species and is the sole KPR in Schu S4. Homologs of this KPR are present in other pathogenic bacteria such as Enterococcus faecalis, Coxiella burnetii, and Clostridium difficile. Both the homologous gene from E. faecalis V583 (EF1861) and E. coli panE functionally complemented Francisella novicida lacking any KPR. Furthermore, panG from F. novicida can complement an E. coli KPR double mutant. A Schu S4 ?panG strain is a pantothenate auxotroph and was genetically and chemically complemented with panG in trans or with the addition of pantolactone. There was no virulence defect in the Schu S4 ?panG strain compared to the wild type in a mouse model of pneumonic tularemia. In summary, we characterized the pantothenate pathway in Francisella novicida and F. tularensis and identified an unknown and previously uncharacterized KPR that can convert 2-dehydropantoate to pantoate, PanG.

Miller, Cheryl N.; LoVullo, Eric D.; Kijek, Todd M.; Fuller, James R.; Brunton, Jason C.; Steele, Shaun P.; Taft-Benz, Sharon A.; Richardson, Anthony R.

2013-01-01

12

PanG, a new ketopantoate reductase involved in pantothenate synthesis.  

PubMed

Pantothenate, commonly referred to as vitamin B(5), is an essential molecule in the metabolism of living organisms and forms the core of coenzyme A. Unlike humans, some bacteria and plants are capable of de novo biosynthesis of pantothenate, making this pathway a potential target for drug development. Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis Schu S4 is a zoonotic bacterial pathogen that is able to synthesize pantothenate but is lacking the known ketopantoate reductase (KPR) genes, panE and ilvC, found in the canonical Escherichia coli pathway. Described herein is a gene encoding a novel KPR, for which we propose the name panG (FTT1388), which is conserved in all sequenced Francisella species and is the sole KPR in Schu S4. Homologs of this KPR are present in other pathogenic bacteria such as Enterococcus faecalis, Coxiella burnetii, and Clostridium difficile. Both the homologous gene from E. faecalis V583 (EF1861) and E. coli panE functionally complemented Francisella novicida lacking any KPR. Furthermore, panG from F. novicida can complement an E. coli KPR double mutant. A Schu S4 ?panG strain is a pantothenate auxotroph and was genetically and chemically complemented with panG in trans or with the addition of pantolactone. There was no virulence defect in the Schu S4 ?panG strain compared to the wild type in a mouse model of pneumonic tularemia. In summary, we characterized the pantothenate pathway in Francisella novicida and F. tularensis and identified an unknown and previously uncharacterized KPR that can convert 2-dehydropantoate to pantoate, PanG. PMID:23243306

Miller, Cheryl N; LoVullo, Eric D; Kijek, Todd M; Fuller, James R; Brunton, Jason C; Steele, Shaun P; Taft-Benz, Sharon A; Richardson, Anthony R; Kawula, Thomas H

2013-03-01

13

Saccharification of cassava starch by Saccharomycopsis fibuligera YCY1 isolated from Loog-Pang (rice cake starter)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The main objectives of this study were to select amylolytic yeasts from Loog-Pang, a traditional starter culture for production of alcoholic foods and drinks in southern Thailand, and to optimize the saccharification of cassava starch to reducing sugar by the selected yeast isolate. Seventy-four yeast isolates were obtained from ten samples of Loog-Pang. The isolates were tested for amylolytic activity

Kraiyot Saelim; Yaowaluk Dissara; Aran H-Kittikun

14

The Pragmatic Idealist: Valerie Gross--Howard County Library, Columbia, MD  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the two years since Valerie Gross became director of the Howard County Library (HCL), it has won the county's Community Organization of the Year award, its Accessibility Award, and its Chamber of Commerce's Non-Profit Business of the Year ACE award for contributions to education, economic development, and quality of life. And for the first…

Library Journal, 2004

2004-01-01

15

PANG, a gene encoding a neuronal glycoprotein, is ectopically activated by intracisternal A-type particle long terminal repeats in murine plasmacytomas.  

PubMed Central

Plasmacytomagenesis provides a murine model to decipher progressive genetic events culminating in a B-cell neoplasia. Activation of the c-myc protooncogene by chromosomal translocation is considered an initiating event. Intracisternal A-type particles (IAPs) are defective retroviral-like structures present in the endoplasmic reticulum of plasmacytomas (PCTs). IAP proviral insertions have been documented to engender negative or positive effects on the expression of nearby cellular genes. We have isolated a gene, PANG (plasmacytoma-associated neuronal glycoprotein), that is ectopically transcribed in a number of PCTs due to IAP long terminal repeat (LTR) activation. A full-length PANG cDNA was isolated from an MPC-11 plasma cell tumor cDNA library and encodes a polypeptide of about 113 kDa with six immunoglobulin C2-like and four type III fibronectin-like domains. PANG bears a striking resemblance to axonal glycoproteins TAG-1 and F11 known to function in neuronal outgrowth. An extensive survey revealed a predominant 3.6-kb PANG transcript in 60% (30 of 50) of PCTs as well as unique smaller and larger species. All other normal and transformed lymphoid and nonlymphoid cell lines and normal tissues were negative for PANG expression except for the brain, wherein unique 4.0- and 6.1-kb transcripts were detected. Reverse transcriptase PCR analysis revealed IAP LTR fusion to PANG mRNAs in five PCTs and in a neuroblastoma line. The 5' end of a mouse brain PANG cDNA was identical to the MPC-11 PANG transcript except for the precise replacement of its 5' LTR sequence. Images

Connelly, M A; Grady, R C; Mushinski, J F; Marcu, K B

1994-01-01

16

Rainfall and runoff water quality of the Pang and Lambourn, tributaries of the River Thames, south-eastern England  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The water quality of rainfall and runoff is described for two catchments of two tributaries of the River Thames, the Pang and Lambourn. Rainfall chemistry is variable and concentrations of most determinands decrease with increasing volume of catch probably due to "wash out" processes. Two rainfall sites have been monitored, one for each catchment. The rainfall site on the Lambourn shows higher chemical concentrations than the one for the Pang which probably reflects higher amounts of local inputs from agricultural activity. Rainfall quality data at a long-term rainfall site on the Pang (UK National Air Quality Archive) shows chemistries similar to that for the Lambourn site, but with some clear differences. Rainfall chemistries show considerable variation on an event-to-event basis. Average water quality concentrations and flow-weighted concentrations as well as fluxes vary across the sites, typically by about 30%. Stream chemistry is much less variable due to the main source of water coming from aquifer sources of high storage. The relationship between rainfall and runoff chemistry at the catchment outlet is described in terms of the relative proportions of atmospheric and within-catchment sources. Remarkably, in view of the quantity of agricultural and sewage inputs to the streams, the catchments appear to be retaining both P and N.

Neal, C.; Skeffington, R.; Neal, M.; Wyatt, R.; Wickham, H.; Hill, L.; Hewitt, N.

17

STS-96 M.S. Valery Ivanovich Tokarev suits up for launch  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-96 Mission Specialist Valery Ivanovich Tokarev, who represents the Russian Space Agency, waves as he is assisted by a suit technician in donning his launch and entry suit during final launch preparations. STS-96 is a 10-day logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying about 4,000 pounds of supplies, to be stored aboard the station for use by future crews, including laptop computers, cameras, tools, spare parts, and clothing. The mission also includes such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-involved experiment. It will include a space walk to attach the cranes to the outside of the ISS for use in future construction. Space Shuttle Discovery is due to launch today at 6:49 a.m. EDT. Landing is expected at the SLF on June 6 about 1:58 a.m. EDT.

1999-01-01

18

Application of Distributed Hydrology-Soil-Vegetation Model in Pang Khum Experimental Watershed, Chiang Mai Province, Thailand  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Distributed hydrology-soil-vegetation model (DHSVM) uses a digital elevation model (DEM) and accounts for topographic effects on soil moisture, groundwater, and surface water redistribution in a complex terrain. In this study, DHSVM is used to simulate soil moisture, net radiation and stream flow in a 1-km2 tropical mountainous watershed in Pang Khum, Chang Mai, Thailand. Pang Khum Experimental Watershed (PKEW) has two meteorological stations, four soil moisture stations, and one stream flow station at basin outlet. Meteorological measurements are used as forcing data for DHSVM. The grid resolution for this simulation is 50 m. Initial soil and vegetation parameter settings based on field measurements and literature review are adjusted through model calibration. The model is run for a six month warm-up period, followed by a calibration period of approximately one year. Validation is done for two periods totaling 18 months. At the forested site, net radiation is reasonably well simulated, although underestimated in the dry season, and overestimated in the wet season. At the agricultural site, net radiation is consistently overestimated. Soil moisture is well simulated at the forest site. In the simulation, the water table rises into the soil zone during the wet season, saturating all three soil layers at the agricultural site; measured values remained at unsaturated levels. Baseflow is significantly underestimated in calibration and validation periods. Difficulty in simulating streamflow may be caused by road-related effects in the basin. Our prior field work has shown that the road significantly alters runoff in PKEW. The principal mechanism of road-induced effects is Horton Overland Flow (HOF) generated on the road surface. In its present form DHSVM can account for interception of subsurface flow by roads, but not HOF generated on the road. We do not think subsurface flow interception is important in PKEW, and have therefore not implemented the road in our simulation. In future applications, we hope to include road effects, including HOF generation. As far as we know, this is the first application of DHSVM in a tropical location. Also, we apply the model over a very small watershed using a smaller grid-cell size than prior applications. Overall, we find the model to perform reasonably well despite being applied in a region and at a scale that contrast strongly with those in which it was developed. >http://webdata.soc.hawaii.edu/climate/Roads1/Roads.html

Cuo, L.; Giambelluca, T. W.; Ziegler, A. D.; Sutherland, R. A.; Nullet, M. A.; Larkin, E. D.; Vana, T. T.

2001-12-01

19

Science Policy: Pangs of Science  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presented is the prepared text of a public lecture given by the president of the National Academy of Sciences. Dr. Handler attempts to articulate the state of science today. He deals with such issues as nuclear power and genetic engineering. (MDR)

Handler, Philip

1978-01-01

20

The birth pangs of monoclonal antibody therapeutics  

PubMed Central

This paper examines the development and termination of nebacumab (Centoxin®), a human IgM monoclonal antibody (mAb) drug frequently cited as one of the notable failures of the early biopharmaceutical industry. The non-approval of Centoxin in the United States in 1992 generated major concerns at the time about the future viability of any mAb therapeutics. For Centocor, the biotechnology company that developed Centoxin, the drug posed formidable challenges in terms of safety, clinical efficacy, patient selection, the overall economic costs of health care, as well as financial backing. Indeed, Centocor's development of the drug brought it to the brink of bankruptcy. This article shows how many of the experiences learned with Centoxin paved the way for the current successes in therapeutic mAb development.

2012-01-01

21

Birth of an ocean in the Red Sea: Initial pangs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We obtained areal variations of crustal thickness, magnetic intensity, and degree of melting of the sub-axial upwelling mantle at Thetis and Nereus Deeps, the two northernmost axial segments of initial oceanic crustal accretion in the Red Sea, where Arabia is separating from Africa. The initial emplacement of oceanic crust occurred at South Thetis and Central Nereus roughly ˜2.2 and ˜2 Ma, respectively, and is taking place today in the northern Thetis and southern Nereus tips. Basaltic glasses major and trace element composition suggests a rift-to-drift transition marked by magmatic activity with typical MORB signature, with no contamination by continental lithosphere, but with slight differences in mantle source composition and/or potential temperature between Thetis and Nereus. Eruption rate, spreading rate, magnetic intensity, crustal thickness and degree of mantle melting were highest at both Thetis and Nereus in the very initial phases of oceanic crust accretion, immediately after continental breakup, probably due to fast mantle upwelling enhanced by an initially strong horizontal thermal gradient. This is consistent with a rift model where the lower continental lithosphere has been replaced by upwelling asthenosphere before continental rupturing, implying depth-dependent extension due to decoupling between the upper and lower lithosphere with mantle-lithosphere-necking breakup before crustal-necking breakup. Independent along-axis centers of upwelling form at the rifting stage just before oceanic crust accretion, with buoyancy-driven convection within a hot, low viscosity asthenosphere. Each initial axial cell taps a different asthenospheric source and serves as nucleus for axial propagation of oceanic accretion, resulting in linear segments of spreading.

Ligi, Marco; Bonatti, Enrico; Bortoluzzi, Giovanni; Cipriani, Anna; Cocchi, Luca; Caratori Tontini, Fabio; Carminati, Eugenio; Ottolini, Luisa; Schettino, Antonio

2012-08-01

22

Desiring Dexter: The pangs and pleasures of serial killer body technique  

Microsoft Academic Search

The television series Dexter uses the figure of appealing monstrosity to unfold troubled relationships between corporeality, spectatorship, and desire. Through a plastic-wrapped display of body horror, lightly veiled by suburban romance, Dexter turns its audience on to the consuming sensations of blood, death, and dismemberment while simultaneously alluding to its own narrative and ethical contradictions. The excitations of Dexter are

Stephanie Green

2012-01-01

23

What's spirit got to do with it? Interview by Valerie Michele Hoskins.  

PubMed

HIV-infected people are turning to strengthening the spirit while fighting the virus. Spiritual leaders participated in a discussion about the impact of spirituality on people living with HIV and responded to such questions as the relationship between the spirituality-seeking patient and the spiritual leader, whether spiritual support has grown or decreased with the advent of protease inhibitors, and whether the alternative therapies used today are considered spiritual tools. Participants also discussed rituals or practices they feel should be used to attain a healthy mind, body, and spirit; other appropriate services for HIV-positive people; and obstacles to more spiritual and religious resources sensitive and responsive to HIV-positive people. PMID:11365613

Bumgardner, P; Cheek, D; Kleinbaum, S; Rivera, E

1998-07-01

24

NCI-CCR Pediatric Oncology Branch - Pediatric Psycho-Oncology Professionals Profile Listings - Valerie Crabtree  

Cancer.gov

Skip to Main Content CCR Home | About CCR | CCR Intranet Main Navigation Home Profiles Research Newsworthy References Special Interest Groups Training Main Links Psycho-Oncology Home Profiles Research Publications Newsworthy/Resources References Special

25

EDITORIAL: Special issue in honour of Professor Valery V Tuchin’s contribution to the field of biomedical optics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This special issue of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics covers some of the applied physics currently being addressed by light source researchers. Most of these papers originate from presentations made at the 10th International Symposium on the Science and Technology of Light Sources, held in Toulouse, France, on 18--22 July 2004. The conference attracted about 400 participants from all over the world. Abstracts of all papers, including extended abstracts of invited papers, were published in the conference book Light Sources 2004 (Institute of Physics Conference Series 182) edited by G Zissis. The full papers published in this issue reflect the wide-ranging nature of research on light sources. These collected full papers survived our rigorous journal review process and they report completed, previously unpublished, pieces of work. This is a research field that has seen many major contributions over the last hundred years; nevertheless it continues to produce new sources and important improvements to existing types. It is evident from these papers just how crucial are the materials used for light sources. Numerous recent lamp developments have depended critically on new or improved materials. Ten or more of the papers are concerned explicitly with materials: for example, an environmentally important and challenging area of research is to find a viable alternative to the use of mercury, particularly in fluorescent lamps. This is difficult because a substitute for Hg in general lighting must match the remarkable efficiency of Hg, or risk doing harm to the environment through increased energy consumption. Large-scale computation of the properties of both high- and low-pressure discharge lamps has become indispensable. A good example is in the paper by Derra et al, which is the first major review of an important lamp type. The lamp of interest is a mercury arc used in data projectors, operating with an arc gap of approximately 1 mm at more than 100 bar pressure. Most of the information needed for design is not accessible experimentally. Computer models were essential tools in many aspects of development, including finding out how the highly stressed materials could be used in ways that ensured acceptable life. Short-arc metal-halide lamps are used for producing white light in commercial premises, but they present numerous challenges to developers. Exceedingly complex chemistry, the many emitters and absorbers, the lack of symmetry, and the increasing influence of electrodes as the arc is shortened—all these pose many design problems that are being tackled with increasing success with the help of computer models. This special issue has many papers that deal with electrode issues, with special emphasis on the experimental verification of model predictions. Radiation transport also continues to be a major issue in constructing realistic discharge models. A number of papers tackle this in a simplified manner, whilst a new ray-tracing scheme offers hope of a realistic calculation of radiation in the complicated short-arc metal-halide lamps mentioned above. Light-emitting diodes are now having a major impact on some areas of lighting; two papers in this issue reflect that trend. The group of papers in this special issue will surely provide an important resource for those researching new and improved lamps.

Wang, Ruikang K.; Priezzhev, Alexander V.; Fantini, Sergio

2005-08-01

26

In-Vitro Effects of Clostridium Welchii TypeD Epsilon Toxin on GuineaPig, Mouse, Rabbit and Sheep Cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

SOME bacterial products can affect the performance of the lympho-reticular system (see Stuart, 1970). Recently it has been shown that Vibrio cholerae enterotoxin can cause mitochondria1 swelling in murine lymphoblastoid cells .and murine plasmacytoid cells (Douglas, Zuckerman and Ooka, 1976). As Clostridium welchii type-D epsilon toxin shares some of the properties of V. cholerae enterotoxin (Buxton, 1978b) it was decided

D. BUXTON

1978-01-01

27

The Nuremberg war crimes trials on CD?Rom  

Microsoft Academic Search

James Joseph SANCHEZ, Kelly READ, Brian PECK, Valerie CAQUIAS, Vickey BISHOP, eds, Anthony HURSH, ‘Bdexx’ developer, Nuremberg War Crimes Trial Online, Artistarchus Knowledge Industries, Seattle, 1995.

Antony Glees

1997-01-01

28

COMMENT: Comment on `Dynamic properties of proton transfer in hydrogen-bonded molecular systems'  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A recent model for proton transfer in hydrogen-bonded chains given by Pang and Müller-Kirsten (Pang X F and Müller-Kirsten H J W 2000 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 12 885) is critically reconsidered. The model violates a basic symmetry of the system. The meaning of the model parameters is overinterpreted. The model can be applied only to describe the motion of ionic defects. The kink solutions corresponding to bonding defects obtained in this work by Pang and Müller-Kirsten are proven to be incorrect.

Khalack, Julia M.; Velgakis, M. J.

2002-05-01

29

Enhanced Feature Selection and Generation for 802.11 User Identification  

Microsoft Academic Search

To provide user privacy, several anonymization techniques (e.g., pseudonyms applied to MAC addresses) have been proposed in 802.11 networks. However, recent research done by Pang et al. has demonstrated that pseudonyms are not adequate to protect user privacy. The key idea of Pang et al.'s method is to locate implicit identifiers (e.g., IP addresses and port numbers a user frequently

Dingbang Xu; Yu Wang; Xinghua Shi

2009-01-01

30

International Toys in Space: Kendama  

NASA Video Gallery

Cosmonaut Valery Korzun attempts to capture the ball in a cup using the Japanese Kendama toy. The game must be adapted for the ball to stay in the cup in microgravity. Astronaut Peggy Whitson narra...

31

75 FR 27343 - Environmental Impacts Statements; Notice of Availability  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Period Ends: 06/16/2010, Contact: Valerie Nottingham 301-480-8056. EIS No. 20100169, Final Supplement, BR, CA, Mormon Island Auxiliary Dam Modification Project, Addressing Hydrologic, Seismic, Static, and Flood Management Issues,...

2010-05-14

32

Google Earth Blog: Great collection of resources for the Fukushima power plant  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Google Earth blog entry features a single network link from Valery Hronusov devoted to the Fukushima power plant. The file is packed with information about the plant -- photo overlays, 3D buildings, photos, videos and more.

Hronusov, Valery; Blog, Google E.

33

Forests in Flux  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this video presentation, Jerry Franklin, Review author Gordon Bonan, and Perspective author Valerie Kapos discuss the importance of understanding the influence of forests on climate and some of the challenges of global forest governance.

Robert Frederick (AAAS;)

2008-06-13

34

The theory of bio-energy transport in the protein molecules and its properties  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The bio-energy transport is a basic problem in life science and related to many biological processes. Therefore to establish the mechanism of bio-energy transport and its theory have an important significance. Based on different properties of structure of ?-helical protein molecules some theories of bio-energy transport along the molecular chains have been proposed and established, where the energy is released by hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). A brief survey of past researches on different models and theories of bio-energy, including Davydov's, Takeno's, Yomosa's, Brown et al.'s, Schweitzer's, Cruzeiro-Hansson's, Forner's and Pang's models were first stated in this paper. Subsequently we studied and reviewed mainly and systematically the properties, thermal stability and lifetimes of the carriers (solitons) transporting the bio-energy at physiological temperature 300 K in Pang's and Davydov's theories. From these investigations we know that the carrier (soliton) of bio-energy transport in the ?-helical protein molecules in Pang's model has a higher binding energy, higher thermal stability and larger lifetime at 300 K relative to those of Davydov's model, in which the lifetime of the new soliton at 300 K is enough large and belongs to the order of 10 -10 s or ?/??700. Thus we can conclude that the soliton in Pang's model is exactly the carrier of the bio-energy transport, Pang's theory is appropriate to ?-helical protein molecules.

Pang, Xiao-feng

2011-10-01

35

The genus Aspidimerus Mulsant, 1850 (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae) from China, with descriptions of two new species  

PubMed Central

Abstract Chinese members of the genus Aspidimerus Mulsant, 1850 are reviewed. Ten species are recognized, including two new species: A. zhenkangicus Huo & Ren, sp. n. and A. menglensis Huo & Ren, sp. n. A. kabakovi Hoàng is recorded from China for the first time. A. blandus (Mader, 1954) is recognized as synonymous with A. ruficrus Gorham, 1895 (syn. n.). Aspidimerus rectangulatus Kuznetsov & Pang, 1991 and A. serratus Kuznetsov & Pang, 1991 are transferred to the genus Pseudaspidimerus Kapur, 1948 (comb. n.). All species from China are described and illustrated. Distribution maps of the Chinese species, a key and a catalogue of all known Aspidimerus are provided.

Huo, Lizhi; Wang, Xingmin; Chen, Xiaosheng; Ren, Shunxiang

2013-01-01

36

Redescription of Platynaspis flavoguttata (Gorham) (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae) and notes on nomenclature of Platynaspis kapuri Chakraborty & Biswas  

PubMed Central

Abstract Platynaspis flavoguttata (Gorham) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) is redescribed and the male genitalia are illustrated for the first time. It is also recorded from Sri Lanka for the first time. Platynaspis bimaculata (Hoang, 1983) is a new junior synonym of Platynaspis bimaculata Pang & Mao, 1979 (new synonym). Platynaspis kapuri Chakraborty & Biswas, 2000, the replacement name for Platynaspis bimaculata Pang & Mao, 1979 established by Ukrainsky (2007), is also the new replacement name for Platynaspis bimaculata (Hoang, 1983), as both are junior homonyms of Platynaspis bimaculata Weise, 1888 besides being synonyms. Platynaspis hoangi Ukrainsky (2007) is an unnecessary replacement name for Platynaspis bimaculata (Hoang).

2014-01-01

37

The geomagnetic storm of 1910 May 18 and the tail of Halley's Comet  

Microsoft Academic Search

On May 18, 1910, the Lu-Kia-Pang Observatory near Shanghai recorded a geomagnetic storm, but it was thought that this storm was not connected with the tail of Halley's comet. In the present paper, it is argued that this storm, rather than originating in some solar activity (coronal hole or solar flare), could have been the result of the interaction of

L.-S. Yan; Z.-Y. Li; S.-Y. Gu

1984-01-01

38

A living light bulb, ultrasensitive biodetection made easy  

PubMed Central

A team of scientists led by Professor DW Pang at Wuhan University have developed a new class of fluorescence probes based on bacterial cells. These microbial factories manufacture semiconductor nanocrystals inside and display protein A molecules on cell surface, transforming Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) cells into highly fluorescent cellular beacons that can be easily adapted for detection of diverse biological targets.

2014-01-01

39

A semi-smooth Newton method for elasto-plastic contact problems  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we reformulate the frictional contact problem for elasto-plastic bodies as a set of unconstrained, non-smooth equations. The equations are semi-smooth so that Pang's Newton method for B-differentiable equations can be applied. An algorithm based on this method is described in detail. An example demonstrating the efficiency of the algorithm is presented.

Peter W. Christensen

2002-01-01

40

TESL Reporter, Vol. 3, Nos. 1-4.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Four issues of "TESL Reporter" are presented. Contents include the following articles: "Feedback: An Anti-Madeirization Compound" by Henry M. Schaafsma; "Using the Personal Pronoun 'I' as a Compound Subject" by G. Pang and D. Chu; "The Consonant'L' in Initial and Final Positions" by Maybelle Chong; "Sentence Expansion for the Elementary Level" by…

Pack, Alice C., Ed.

41

Normal Families and Shared Values of Meromorphic Functions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Some criteria for determining the normality of the family F of mero- morphic functions in the unit disc, which share values depending on f 2 F with their derivatives is obtained. The new results in this paper improve some earlier related results given by Pang and Zalcman, Fang and Zalcman, A. P. Singh and A. Singh.

Chao Meng

2008-01-01

42

Incremental linear discriminant analysis for evolving feature spaces in multitask pattern recognition problems  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we propose a new incremental linear discriminant analysis (ILDA) for multitask pattern recognition (MTPR) problems in which a chunk of training data for a particular task are given sequentially and the task is switched to another related task one after another. The Pang et al.'s ILDA is extended such that a discriminant space of the current task

Masayuki Hisada; Seiichi Ozawa; Kau Zhang; Nikola Kasabov

2010-01-01

43

Menace of Undesirables: The Eugenics Movement During the Progressive Era  

Microsoft Academic Search

th century had produced industrial misery, class polarization, and urban distress. Americans, experiencing the social inequities of the post-Civil War period and the pangs of depression during the 1890's, enthusiastically embraced movements for reform to help alleviate the injustices and suffering. Originally, progressive reformers sought to regulate irresponsible corporate monopoly, safeguarding consumers and labor from the excesses of the profit

Ted L. DeCorte

44

Statistics Glossary: Design of Experiments & ANOVA  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site, created by authors Valerie Eastor and John H. McColl, lists definitions of key terms related to experimental design and ANOVA. Some of these include factorial, blocking, interaction, experimental design, treatment, variance testing, placebo, and many others. This site is part of the "Statistics Glossary" for the STEPS project (Statistical Education through Problem Solving).

Eastor, Valerie; Mccoll, John H.

2008-12-12

45

Electronic Portfolios. [SITE 2002 Section].  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document contains the following papers on electronic portfolios from the SITE (Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education) 2002 conference: (1) "What Is the Perceived Value of Creating Electronic Portfolios to Teacher Credential Candidates?" (Valerie Amber and Brenda Czech); (2) "Development and Use of Electronic Portfolios in…

Barrett, Helen C., Ed.

46

Technology and Higher Education: Report from the Front.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Includes two reports on the current integration of technology in postsecondary education. Mara Mayor and Peter Dirr discuss the relationship between technology and access and quality. Valerie Crane presents study results on how students use and evaluate telecourses compared to on-campus courses. (DMM)

Mayor, Mara; And Others

1987-01-01

47

Teachers Teaching Teachers (T3)[TM]. Volume 4, Number 8  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Teachers Teaching Teachers" ("T3") focuses on coaches' roles in the professional development of teachers. Each issue also explores the challenges and rewards that teacher leaders encounter. This issue includes: (1) Tackling Behavior from All Sides (Valerie von Frank); (2) Tools: Effective Behavior Support Self-Assessment Survey; (3) Lessons from…

von Frank, Valerie, Ed.

2009-01-01

48

Conversation Currents: Create Partnerships, Not Programs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This "Conversation Currents" features JoBeth Allen and Valerie Kinloch discussing their thoughts and experiences working with families and communities. Allen bases her comments on the belief that programs have to be adaptable to many different constituencies and demographics, and so must be recreated every year with every teacher and…

Allen, JoBeth; Kinloch, Valerie

2013-01-01

49

Crossing Boundaries: Collaborative Solutions to Urban Problems. Selected Proceedings of the National Conference on Urban Issues (1st, Buffalo, New York, November 11-13, 1994).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Selected papers are presented from a national conference on urban issues. They are: (1) "Collaboration as a Social Process: Inter-Institutional Cooperation and Educational Change" (Charles F. Underwood and Hardy T. Frye); (2) "Mobilizing the Village To Educate the Child" (Valerie Maholmes); (3) "Pathways to Teaching: An Urban Teacher Licensure…

Koritz, Douglas, Ed.; And Others

50

Tools for Schools. Volume 12, Number 4, May-June 2009  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This newsletter is published four times a year. It offers articles on school improvement, organizational planning, training, and managing change. This issue contains: (1) Link Up & Learn: Use Technology to Create a Personal Learning Network to Connect with Experts and Mentors Everywhere (Valerie von Frank); (2) NSDC Tool: Get Connected with…

von Frank, Valerie, Ed.

2009-01-01

51

Long-term space flights - personal impressions  

Microsoft Academic Search

During a final 4-month stage of a 1-year space flight of cosmonauts Titov and Manarov, a physician, Valery Polyakov was included on a crew for the purpose of evaluating their health, correcting physical status to prepare for the spacecraft reentry and landing operations. The complex program of scientific investigations and experiments performed by the physician included an evaluation of adaptation

V. V. Polyakov

1992-01-01

52

[Alajouanine's writers].  

PubMed

Great scholar and enthusiastic bibliophile, Pr Alajouanine privileged relationships with three famous writers during his neurological career. Valery Larbaud and Léon-Paul Fargue were his patients and then became his friends. Dostoievski's biography and works provided him with a penetrating look into the world of epilepsy. PMID:11625160

Trillet, M

1997-01-01

53

Reforming Chicago's High Schools: Research Perspectives on School and System Level Change.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This collection of papers describes research on school and system level change in Chicago's high schools. Papers include "Introduction: Setting Chicago High School Reform within the National Context" (Valerie E. Lee); (1) "The Effort to Redesign Chicago High Schools: Effects on Schools and Achievement" (G. Alfred Hess, Jr. and Solomon Cytrynbaum);…

Lee, Valerie E., Ed.

54

The Learning System. Volume 5, Number 1  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"The Learning System" is an eight-page newsletter published eight times a year. Designed for superintendents and central office staff with professional learning responsibilities. This issue includes: (1) Superintendent Stays on Course with Personal Learning Plan (Valerie von Frank); (2) District Leadership: Permit, Don't Proscribe, to Build…

von Frank, Valerie, Ed.

2009-01-01

55

STS-91: Flight Crew Meets with Family and Friends at Launch Complex 39A  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The crew (Commander Charles J. Precourt, Pilot Dominic L. Pudwill Gorie, Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, Janet L. Kavandi and Valery Victorovitch Ryumin) take time from their busy schedule to chat with friends and family, at a distance. They also pose for group and single pictures.

1998-01-01

56

Comparative Performance and Barrier Properties of Biodegradable Thermoplastics and Nanobiocomposites versus PET for Food Packaging Applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reports on preliminary studies of several comparative packaging properties between polyethylene terephthalate (PET) packaging films and biodegradable biopolymers such as polycarpolactone (PCL), polylacticacid (PLA), amorphous PLA (aPLA), and polyhydroxyalcanoates copolymer with 8 mol% valeriate (PHBV) and of some nanobiocomposites, in terms of thermal and retorting resistance (thermal humid processes) and oxygen, water vapor, aroma, and solvent barrier by

D. Cava; E. Gimenez; R. Gavara; J. M. Lagaron

2006-01-01

57

Conceptualising Hy-Bivalent Subjectivities to Facilitate an Examination of Australian Government Mutual Obligations Policies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper illustrates how the work of feminist theorists Valerie Walkerdine, Helen Lucey and June Melody, Beverly Skeggs, and Nancy Fraser were used together to examine the lived effects of Australian government Mutual Obligations policies. As "active" welfare policies, Mutual Obligations construct particular relations between themselves and…

Edwards, Jan

2006-01-01

58

Expedition Five crew is ready to leave KSC for Houston  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Expedition Five crew are ready to leave KSC for Houston. From left are Science Officer Peggy Whitson, Commander Valery Korzun and Flight Engineer Sergei Treschev. The three returned to Earth on Endeavour Dec. 7, with the STS-113 crew, after six months on the International Space Station.

2002-01-01

59

Expedition Five crew members wave to onlookers as they leave KSC for Houston  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Expedition Five crew members wave to onlookers as they leave KSC for Houston. From left are Science Officer Peggy Whitson and Commander Valery Korzun. Not seen is Flight Engineer Sergei Treschev. The three returned to Earth Dec. 7 on Endeavour, with the STS-113 crew, after six months on the International Space Station.

2002-01-01

60

The Learning System. Volume 4, Number 7  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"The Learning System" is a newsletter designed for superintendents and central office staff with professional learning responsibilities. This issue includes: (1) District Pulls Together in Pursuit of Excellence: Creating Collaboration Systemwide Requires Commitment (Valerie von Frank); (2) Scheduling Time for Teacher Learning Is Key for Both…

von Frank, Valerie, Ed.

2009-01-01

61

English Teaching at Lilydale High.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents six narratives from teachers including: "VCE English at Lilydale High School" (Valerie Mayer); "Should 'I' Be Their Teacher" (Mark Matcott); "Teaching Poetry to Year 7 English Students" (Janet Lyons); "Creative Art Therapy and Mandalas" (Demi Flessa); "Would the 'Real' Teacher Please Stand Up?" (Anna Hayman); and "When Volumes Speak…

Mayer, Valerie; Matcott, Mark; Lyons, Janet; Flessa, Demi; Hayman, Anna; Hough, Peter

2002-01-01

62

TB or Not TB: how Mycobacterium tuberculosis may evade drug treatment.  

PubMed

In this issue of Cell, a study by Valerie Mizrahi and her colleagues suggests that a putative error-prone DNA polymerase encoded by the dnaE2 gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis may bypass certain types of DNA base damage, generating mutations. This may be an important mechanism for generating drug-resistant strains of M. tuberculosis. PMID:12705860

Friedberg, Errol C; Fischhaber, Paula L

2003-04-18

63

Toward understanding the cumulative impacts of roads in upland agricultural watersheds of northern Thailand  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the interactions of various physical processes that allow unpaved roads to contribute disproportionately to basin-wide runoff and stream sediment in the 93.7ha Pang Khum Experimental Watershed (PKEW) in northern Thailand. Many road sections in PKEW are constant sources of sediment entering the stream during most rain events because: (1) Horton overland flow is generated on the compacted

Alan D. Ziegler; Thomas W. Giambellucab; Ross A. Sutherland; Mike A. Nullet; Sanay Yarnasarn; Jitti Pinthong; Pornchai Preechapanya; Sathaporn Jaiaree

2004-01-01

64

STS-96 crew at Skid Strip to return to Houston  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-96 crew members and their families exit the bus at the Cape Canaveral Air Station Skid Strip to return to the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. From left are Mission Specialist Valery Ivanovich Tokarev (with the Russian Space Agency) and his wife, Irina; Sue Barry and Jennifer Barry, the wife and daughter, respectively, of Mission Specialist Daniel Barry (M.D., Ph.D.) (background); (foreground) Andrew Barry, son of Daniel; Pilot Rick D. Husband and his wife, Evelyn; and Ivan Tokarev, son of Valery. Other crew members also returning are Commander Kent V. Rominger and Mission Specialists Ellen Ochoa (Ph.D.), Tamara E. Jernigan (Ph.D.), and Julie Payette (with the Canadian Space Agency). After a successful 10-day mission to the International Space Station aboard Space Shuttle Discovery, the crew landed June 6 at 2:02:43 a.m. EDT, in the 11th night landing at KSC.

1999-01-01

65

Soap Opera Video on Handheld Computers to Reduce Young Urban Women’s HIV Sex Risk  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to develop a soap opera video, A Story about Toni, Mike, and Valerie, designed to communicate HIV risk reduction themes. The study evaluated viewing the video and responding to audio computer\\u000a assisted self-interview (ACASI) on a handheld computer. The sample was 76 predominately African American women, aged 18–29,\\u000a in sexual relationships with men. Data

Rachel Jones

2008-01-01

66

Exploring the variability in how educators attend to science classroom interactions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Many researchers assert educators must develop a shared instructional vision in order for schools to be effective. While this research tends to focus on educators' alignment around goals of science classrooms, I argue that we can't assume that educators agree on what they see when they look at science classrooms. In this dissertation, I explore the variability in what teachers and leaders notice in science classroom episodes and how they reason about what they notice. I ground my studies in real classroom practice: a videotaped lesson in the first study and a live classroom observation in the second. In Chapter 2, I discuss the importance of grounding discussions about teaching and learning in classroom artifacts, a commitment that motivates my dissertation: educators may have a shared vision when discussing teaching and learning in the abstract but disagree about whether that vision is being realized in a classroom. I then describe and analyze the video clip I used in my interviews, highlighting moments that I consider to be good teaching and learning. In Chapter 3, I present my first study, in which I showed this episode to 15 different science teachers, science instructional leaders, and principals. I found that participants attended to many different features in the episode, which led to significant disagreement about what is happening in the episode. Additionally, I found that these differences in attention corresponded to differences in how participants were framing the activity of watching the clip. In Chapter 4, I explore the attentional variability of one science instructional leader, Valerie, in multiple contexts. In addition to interviewing Valerie about the videotaped lesson, I also observed Valerie engage in an "observation cycle" with a teacher. Even though Valerie is quite skilled at attending to student thinking in some contexts, I found that Valerie's attention is strongly context-dependent and gets pulled away from students' scientific thinking when she uses a district mandated form. Finally, in Chapter 5 I summarize my findings and describe the implications my work has for both research and practice.

Gillespie, Colleen Elizabeth

67

An NE/SQP method for the bounded nonlinear complementarity problem  

SciTech Connect

NE/SQP is a recent algorithm that has proven quite effective for solving the pure and mixed forms of the nonlinear complementarity problem (NCP). NE/SQP is robust in the sense that its direction-finding subproblems are always solvable; in addition, the convergence rate of this method is Q-quadratic. In this paper the author considers a generalized version of NE/SQP proposed by Pang and Qi, that is suitable for the bounded NCP. The author extends their work by demonstrating a stronger convergence result and then tests a proposed method on several numerical problems.

Gabriel, S.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Mathematics and Computer Science Div.

1995-05-30

68

Exhumation history of the Red River shear zone in northern Vietnam: New insights from zircon and apatite fission-track analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new set of zircon and apatite fission-track ages from the Ailao Shan and Day Nui Con Voi (DNCV) metamorphic massifs of the Red River shear zone (RRSZ) and neighboring rocks in northern Vietnam is presented. A complex, along-strike diachronous, denudation history is revealed. The southern sector of the DNCV cooled to about 100 °C by the Late Oligocene, whereas its central compartment was affected by the later thermotectonic evolution of the Song Chay dome to the E of the RRSZ, whose final exhumation occurred during the Early Miocene. The northern sector of the RRSZ is characterized by the 35 Ma Phan Si Pang pre- to synkinematic intrusion. Fission-track ages from a vertical section within the Phan Si Pang granite indicate rapid exhumation and cooling. The Paleozoic tectonic block to the west of the RRSZ (fission-track ages between 40 and 30 Ma) was exhumed and cooled earlier than the fault mylonite belt (fission track ages of 30 Ma and younger) and also than the eastern block. Its structural level is consistent with field observations that suggest the RRSZ in northern Vietnam to be a transtensional system, with a regional NE-SW oriented extension component.

Viola, G.; Anczkiewicz, R.

2008-06-01

69

China Forest Aboveground Biomass Estimation by Fusion of Inventory and Remote Sensing Data: 1st results from Heilongjiang Province and Yunnan Province  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Forests play an irreplaceable role in maintaining regional ecological environment, global carbon balance and mitigating global climate change. Forest aboveground biomass (AGB) is an important indicator of forest carbon stocks. Estimating forest aboveground biomass accurately could significantly reduce the uncertainties in terrestrial ecosystem carbon cycle. LIDAR provides accurate information on the vertical structure of forests (Lefsky et al., 2007; Naesset et al., 2004; Pang et al., 2008). Combining airborne LiDAR and spaceborne LiDAR for regional forest biomass retrieval could provide a more reliable and accurate quantitative information in regional forest biomass estimate (Boudreau et al., 2008; Nelson et al., 2009; Pang et al., 2011; Saatchi et al., 2011). The Heilongjiang Province and Yunnan Province are rich in forest resources and suffers intensive forest management activities for timber products. The Heilongjiang Province is typical in temperate forest and the Yunnan Province contains multiple forest types including tropical forest. These two provinces also have good ground inventory system with thousands of permanent field plots. Two campaign consists of in-situ measurement, airborne Lidar data and spaceborne data fusion were designed and implemented. First results show that i). Both spaceborne lidar and forest inventory data are useful for AGB mapping at province level. ii). The combination of spaceborne lidar and forest inventory data gave better biomass estimation with less bias. iii). A pixel level bias mapping was also proposed and gave spatial explicit map of estimation uncertainties. This method will be investigated further with more reference data and tested in other area.

Pang, Y.; Li, Z.; Huang, G.; Sun, G.; Cheng, Z.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, G.

2013-12-01

70

Long-term space flights - personal impressions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During a final 4-month stage of a 1-year space flight of cosmonauts Titov and Manarov, a physician, Valery Polyakov was included on a crew for the purpose of evaluating their health, correcting physical status to prepare for the spacecraft reentry and landing operations. The complex program of scientific investigations and experiments performed by the physician included an evaluation of adaptation reactions of the human body at different stages of space mission using clinicophysiological and biochemical methods; testing of alternative regimes of exercise and new countermeasures to prevent an unfavourable effect of long-term weightlessness.

Polyakov, V. V.

71

The physician-cosmonaut tasks in stabilizing the crew members health and increasing an effectiveness of their preparation for returning to Earth  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During a final 4-month stage of I-year space flight of cosmonauts Titov and Manarov, a physician, Valery Polyakov was included on a crew for the purpose of evaluating their health, correcting physical status to prepare for the spacecraft reentry and landing operations. The complex program of scientific investigations and experiments performed by a physician included an evaluation of adaptation reactions of the human body at different stages of space mission using clinicophysiological and biochemical methods; testing of alternative regimes of exercises and new countermeasures to prevent an unfavorable effect of long-term weightlessness.

Polyakov, V. V.

72

STS-91 Day 03 Highlights  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

On this third day of the STS-91 mission, the flight crew, Cmdr. Charles J. Precourt, Pilot Dominic L. Pudwill Gorie and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, Janet L. Kavandi, and Valery Victorovitch Ryumin prepare for docking with the Mir Space Station and a reunion with U.S. Astronaut Andy Thomas, who is about to conclude his more-than-four-month mission to the Russian outpost. After the docking the two crews open the entry hatch and greet each other. The astronauts and cosmonauts transfer supplies from the shuttle to Mir.

1998-01-01

73

STS-113 Flight Day 10 Highlights Replay  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The activities of the STS-113 (Jim Wetherbee, Commander; Paul Lockhart, Pilot; Michael Lopez-Alegria, John Herrington, Mission Specialists) crew during flight day 10 are shown. Also seen are the outgoing Expedition 5 (Valeri Korzun, Commander; Peggy Whitsun, ISS Science Officer/Flight Engineer; Sergei Treschev, Flight Engineer) and incoming Expedition 6 (Kenneth Bowersox, Commander; Donald Pettit, Nikolai Budarin, Flight Engineers) crews of the International Space Station (ISS). A panoramic view of the undocking of the Space Shuttle Endeavor from the International Space Station is also presented.

2002-01-01

74

Commercial Biomedical Experiments  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Experiments to seek solutions for a range of biomedical issues are at the heart of several investigations that will be hosted by the Commercial Instrumentation Technology Associates (ITA), Inc. Biomedical Experiments (CIBX-2) payload. CIBX-2 is unique, encompassing more than 20 separate experiments including cancer research, commercial experiments, and student hands-on experiments from 10 schools as part of ITA's ongoing University Among the Stars program. Valerie Cassanto of ITA checks the Canadian Protein Crystallization Experiment (CAPE) carried by STS-86 to Mir in 1997. The experiments are sponsored by NASA's Space Product Development Program (SPD).

2003-01-01

75

Stomatal Density and Responsiveness of Banana Fruit Stomates  

PubMed Central

Determination of stomatal densities of the banana peel (Musa acuminata L. var Hort. Valery) by microscopic observations showed 30 times fewer stomates on fruit epidermis than found on the banana leaf. Observations also showed that peel stomates were not laid down in a linear pattern as on the leaf. It was demonstrated that stomatal responses occurred in banana fruit. Specific conditions of high humidity and light were necessary for stomatal opening: low humidity and darkness were necessary for closure. Responsiveness of the stomates continued for a considerable length of time after the fruit had been severed from the host. Images

Johnson, Barbara E.; Brun, W. A.

1966-01-01

76

Stomatal density and responsiveness of banana fruit stomates.  

PubMed

Determination of stomatal densities of the banana peel (Musa acuminata L. var Hort. Valery) by microscopic observations showed 30 times fewer stomates on fruit epidermis than found on the banana leaf. Observations also showed that peel stomates were not laid down in a linear pattern as on the leaf.It was demonstrated that stomatal responses occurred in banana fruit. Specific conditions of high humidity and light were necessary for stomatal opening: low humidity and darkness were necessary for closure. Responsiveness of the stomates continued for a considerable length of time after the fruit had been severed from the host. PMID:16656239

Johnson, B E; Brun, W A

1966-01-01

77

STS-96 FD Highlights and Crew Activities Report: Flight Day 07  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

On this seventh day of the STS-96 Discovery mission, the flight crew, Commander Kent V. Rominger, Pilot Rick D. Husband, and Mission Specialists Ellen Ochoa, Tamara E. Jernigan, Daniel T. Barry, Julie Payette, and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev are seen completing the transfer of material and equipment to the International Space Station. The astronauts install parts of a wireless strain gauge system, clean filters and check smoke detectors. The crew participates in a variety of news conferences with media representatives. Payette accepts a congratulatory call from Canadian Prime Minister Jean Chretien and answers questions from schoolchildren in Ottawa.

1999-01-01

78

Advances in Continuous Mass Measurement Technology: TEOM Mass Monitor at 30° C with a Nafion Dryer at Rural and Urban New York State Locations.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for particulate matter (both PM10 and PM2.5) are expressed in terms of mass concentrations in micrograms per cubic meter of air. While there is tremendous interest in measuring chemically speciated concentrations of PM, bulk mass concentration will clearly be the regulated quantity for the foreseeable future. With this in mind, it is critically important to establish the quality of data collected under current promulgated PM2.5 mass measurement techniques; to identify any significant sources of error associated with the techniques; as well as to evaluate newer technologies that are capable of measuring PM continuously and in real time. The well-known problems inherent in the measurement of ambient particulate matter include evaporation (and condensation) of semi-volatile compounds from (or onto) the collection medium; and the condensation and adsorption of reactive gases from the atmosphere. Recent work quantifying the sources of artifact errors for the Federal Reference Method (Pang, et al., 2002a; 2002b) showed significant evaporative losses from FRM filters. Similar losses are observed for the TEOM mass monitor, where evaporation of material from the filter head occurs at the default sensor temperature setting of 50° C. The TEOM SES (Sample Equilibration System) was developed to reduce the transient measurement errors reported by the TEOM instrument due to water vapor, the most abundant condensable gas in the atmosphere; and to allow instrument operation at temperatures lower than 50° C. The SES TEOM has been operated at a site in rural SW New York State (Addison, NY) for more than two years and at a site in Queens, New York City for more than a year. Each site also has a co-located standard TEOM (operated at 50° C without a Nafion dryer) and an FRM filter sampler. For these sites, the summer data from all three instruments agrees quite well, typically to better than 10%. Significant differences, on the order of 40% or more, are apparent during the winter months. We will present these year round data sets and draw conclusions on the status of continuous mass concentration measurements using the TEOM mass monitor. Pang, Y., Eatough, N. L., Wilson, J., and Eatough, D. J. (2002a) Effect of Semivolatile Material on PM2.5 Measurement by the PM2.5 Federal Reference Method Sampler at Bakersfield, California. Aerosol Sci. Technol. 36:289-299 Pang, Y., Eatough, N. L., and Eatough, D. J. (2002b) PM2.5 Semivolatile Organic Material at Riverside, California: Implications for the PM2.5 Federal Reference Method Sampler. Aerosol Sci. Technol. 36:277-288

Schwab, J. J.; Felton, H. D.; Ambs, J.; Spicer, J.; Demerjian, K. L.

2002-12-01

79

Impact of Spatial LAI Heterogeneity on Estimate of Directional Gap Fraction from SPOT-Satellite Data  

PubMed Central

Directional gap probability or gap fraction is a basic parameter in the optical remote sensing modeling. Although some approaches have been proposed to estimate this gap probability from remotely sensed measurements, few efforts have been made to investigate the scaling effects of this parameter. This paper analyzes the scaling effect through aggregating the high-resolution directional gap probability (pixel size of 20 meters) estimated from leaf area index (LAI) images of VALERI database by means of Beer's law and introduces an extension of clumping index, ?, to compensate the scaling bias. The results show that the scaling effect depends on both the surface heterogeneity and the nonlinearity degree of the retrieved function. Analytical expressions for the scaling bias of gap probability and ? are established in function of the variance of LAI and the mean value of LAI in a coarse pixel. With the VALERI dataset, the study in this paper shows that relative scaling bias of gap probability increases with decreasing spatial resolution for most of land cover types. Large relative biases are found for most of crops sites and a mixed forest site due to their relative large variance of LAI, while very small biases occur over grassland and shrubs sites. As for ?, it varies slowly in the pure forest, grassland and shrubs sites, while more significantly in crops and mixed forest.

Ma, Lingling; Li, Chuanrong; Tang, Bohui; Tang, Lingli; Bi, Yuyin; Zhou, Beiyan; Li, Zhao-Liang

2008-01-01

80

Self-confined GaN hetero-phased quantum wells  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Wurtzite/zinc-blende/wurtzite GaN hetero-phased quantum wells (QWs) were grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. A self-assembling mechanism was used to simulate the hetero-phased QW, in which a wurtzite/zinc-blende phase transition was created by rotating the threefold symmetric N-Ga vertical bond of wurtzite 60^o. From the cathodoluminescence measurement, we observed an additional peak (energy ˜3.2eV) associated with GaN zinc-blende phase. From the transmission electron microscopy images and selective area electron diffraction patterns, we confirmed the formation of hetero-phased quantum wells with a transition of wurtzite/zinc-blende GaN [1]. [4pt] [1] I. Lo, Y.-C. Hsu, C.-H. Hsieh, W.-Y. Pang, M. M.C. Chou, Y.-L. Chen, C.-H. Shih, and Y.-C. Wang, Appl. Phys. Lett. 96, 222105 (2010).

Hsu, Yu-Chi; Lo, Ikai; Hsieh, Chia-Ho; Pang, Wen-Yuan; Chou, Mitch M. C.; Chen, Yen-Liang; Shih, Cheng-Hung; Wang, Ying-Chieh

2011-03-01

81

A cell-permeable inhibitor to trap g?q proteins in the empty pocket conformation.  

PubMed

In spite of the crucial role of heterotrimeric G proteins as molecular switches transmitting signals from G protein-coupled receptors, their selective manipulation with small molecule, cell-permeable inhibitors still remains an unmet challenge. Here, we report that the small molecule BIM-46187, previously classified as pan-G protein inhibitor, preferentially silences G?q signaling in a cellular context-dependent manner. Investigations into its mode of action reveal that BIM traps G?q in the empty pocket conformation by permitting GDP exit but interdicting GTP entry, a molecular mechanism not yet assigned to any other small molecule G? inhibitor to date. Our data show that G? proteins may be "frozen" pharmacologically in an intermediate conformation along their activation pathway and propose a pharmacological strategy to specifically silence G? subclasses with cell-permeable inhibitors. PMID:25036778

Schmitz, Anna-Lena; Schrage, Ramona; Gaffal, Evelyn; Charpentier, Thomas H; Wiest, Johannes; Hiltensperger, Georg; Morschel, Julia; Hennen, Stephanie; Häußler, Daniela; Horn, Velten; Wenzel, Daniela; Grundmann, Manuel; Büllesbach, Katrin M; Schröder, Ralf; Brewitz, H Henning; Schmidt, Johannes; Gomeza, Jesús; Galés, Céline; Fleischmann, Bernd K; Tüting, Thomas; Imhof, Diana; Tietze, Daniel; Gütschow, Michael; Holzgrabe, Ulrike; Sondek, John; Harden, T Kendall; Mohr, Klaus; Kostenis, Evi

2014-07-17

82

Development of high quantum efficiency, flat panel, thick detectors for megavoltage x-ray imaging: An experimental study of a single-pixel prototype  

SciTech Connect

Our overall goal is to develop a new generation of electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) with a quantum efficiency (QE) more than an order of magnitude higher and a spatial resolution equivalent to that of EPIDs currently used for portal imaging. A novel design of such a high QE flat-panel based EPID was introduced recently and its feasibility was investigated theoretically [see Pang and Rowlands, Med. Phys. 31, 3004 (2004)]. In this work, we constructed a prototype single-pixel detector based on the novel design. Some fundamental imaging properties including the QE, spatial resolution, and sensitivity of the prototype detector were measured with a 6 MV beam. It has been shown that the experimental results agree well with theoretical predictions and further development based on the novel design including the construction of a prototype area detector is warranted.

Mei, X.; Pang, G. [Toronto-Sunnybrook Regional Cancer Centre, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto M4N 3M5 (Canada); Toronto-Sunnybrook Regional Cancer Centre, Departments of Radiation Oncology (Canada) and Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto M4N 3M5 (Canada)

2005-11-15

83

Anxiety Sensitivity in Bereaved Adults with and without Complicated Grief  

PubMed Central

Complicated grief (CG) is a bereavement specific syndrome chiefly characterized by symptoms of persistent separation distress. Physiological reactivity to reminders of the loss and repeated acute pangs or waves of severe anxiety and psychological pain are prominent features of CG. Fear of this grief-related physiological arousal may contribute to CG by increasing the distress associated with grief reactions and increasing the likelihood of maladaptive coping strategies and grief-related avoidance. Here, we examined anxiety sensitivity (i.e., the fear of anxiety-related sensations; AS) in two studies of bereaved adults with and without CG. In both studies, bereaved adults with CG exhibited elevated AS relative to those without CG. In Study 2, AS was positively associated with CG symptom severity among those with CG. These findings are consistent with the possibility that AS contributes to the development or maintenance of CG symptoms.

Robinaugh, Donald J.; McNally, Richard J.; LeBlanc, Nicole J.; Pentel, Kimberly Z.; Schwarz, Noah R.; Shah, Riva M.; Nadal-Vicens, Mireya F.; Moore, Cynthia W.; Marques, Luana; Bui, Eric; Simon, Naomi M.

2014-01-01

84

Ponderable soliton stars  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The theory of Lee and Pang (1987), who obtained solutions for soliton stars composed of zero-temperature fermions and bosons, is applied here to quark soliton stars. Model soliton stars based on a simple physical model of the proton are computed, and the properties of the solitons are discussed, including the important problem of the existence of a limiting mass and thus the possible formation of black holes of primordial origin. It is shown that there is a definite mass limit for ponderable soliton stars, so that during cooling a soliton star might reach a stage beyond which no equilibrium configuration exists and the soliton star probably will collapse to become a black hole. The radiation of ponderable soliton stars may alter the short-wavelength character of the cosmic background radiation, and may be observed as highly redshifted objects at z of about 100,000.

Chiu, Hong-Yee

1990-01-01

85

Human trafficking: crime in our own backyard.  

PubMed

Imagine for a moment being in a small, cold, dark, and dirty room. You haven't seen your family in months and you're not sure if you ever will again. When the drugs that you've given begin to wear off, you feel hunger pangs because you haven't eaten anything in more hours than you can count. You hear a door opening and are filled with paralyzing fear and dread. You are never quite sure who or what will greet you on the other side of that door. You may have to endure a brutal beating, you may be forced to take drugs, or you may be raped. PMID:24685757

McNulty, Melissa S

2014-04-01

86

Melatonin as a principal component of red light therapy.  

PubMed

Melatonin is well recognized for its role as a potent antioxidant and is directly implicated in the free radical theory of aging [1] [Reiter RJ, Pablos MI, Agapito TT, Guerrero JM. Melatonin in the context of the free radical theory of aging. Ann N Y Acad Sci 1996;786:362-78]. Moreover, melatonin has been shown to retard age-related increases in lipid peroxidation and oxidative damage [2] [Okatani Y, Wakatsuki A, Reiter RJ. Melatonin protects hepatic mitochondrial respiratory chain activity in senescence-accelerated mice. J Pineal Res 2002;32:143-8] and to act directly upon the immune system [3] [Poon AM, Liu ZM, Pang CS, Brown GM, Pang SF. Evidence for a direct action of melatonin on the immune system. Biol Signals 1994;3:107-17]. This report focuses on characterizing documented functions of melatonin in the context of red light therapy and proposes that melatonin is a potential mediator of red light's therapeutic effects, a hypothesis that is as yet untested. Red light therapy (670 nm, 4J/cm(2)) has been shown to restore glutathione redox balance upon toxicological insult and enhance both cytochrome c oxidase and energy production, all of which may be affected by melatonin. The red light treatment has also been successfully implemented in the clinical setting for its effectiveness in reducing both the number of incidences and severity of oral mucositis resulting in part from the chemotherapy and/or radiation administered prior to bone marrow transplants. Moreover, red light therapy improves wound healing and is being further tested for its ability to ameliorate toxicant-induced retinal and visual cortical neuron damage. Researchers in the growing field of light therapy may be in a position to draw from and collaborate with melatonin researchers to better characterize this alternative treatment. PMID:17321060

Yeager, Ronnie L; Oleske, Deanna A; Sanders, Ruth A; Watkins, John B; Eells, Janis T; Henshel, Diane S

2007-01-01

87

Get A Bite On The "Delicious" Young Star Cluster NGC 3603  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Young star cluster NGC3603 is one of the most massive star clusters in the Milky Way. It hosts 10 times more OB stars than the Orion Nebular Cluster, among which two are the most massive binaries in the Galaxy (Schnurr et al. 2008). To investigate this star formation arena, we utilize the HST/WFPC2 data. Those data are 10 years apart, which permits us to determine star membership. The cluster displays a significant degree of mass segregation (Pang et al. 2010). To quantify the lower limit in stellar mass at which we see segregation, we apply the minimum spanning tree analysis to cluster stars. The result shows that the stars above 5 solar mass exhibit pronounced mass segregation. What's the origin of this mass segregation? Simulations by Moeckel & Bate (2010) show that primordial segregation is transient and exists within the first 1 Myr. The cluster pre-main sequence (PMS) stars display an age spread up to 3 Myr, while the main sequence stars are consistent with an age of 1 Myr (Pang et al. 2010). And Beccari et al. (2010) derive an age spread as large as 10 Myr among PMS stars. Therefore, at present, the age of NGC3603 is still highly uncertain. A way to improve the age determination of the cluster is to quantify the differential reddening across the cluster. The differential reddening is about 0.8 mag from the core of NGC3603 to the outer region (Sung & Bessel 2004). This affects the PMS stars, which are spatially distributed more widely than the MS stars. We are currently deriving an extinction map of the cluster through Halpha and Paschenbeta images from WFC3 (work in progress), in order to correct the color magnitude diagram, and thus to better constrain the age of the cluster and the masses of its members.

Pang, Xiaoying; Grebel, E.; Altmann, M.; Pasquali, A.

2011-01-01

88

STS-79 Flight Day 8  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

On this eighth day of the STS-79 mission, the flight crew, Cmdr. William F. Readdy, Pilot Terrence W. Wilcutt, Mission Specialists, Thomas D. Akers, Shannon Lucid, Jay Apt, and Carl E. Walz, are seen bidding the crew of Mir farewell and then closing the hatches between their two spacecraft in preparation for undocking. The nine astronauts and cosmonauts gathered in the Core Module of the Russian space station for a formal goodbye. With the official ceremony complete, the crewmembers shared a final meal together and exchanged private farewells as Shannon Lucid prepared to return home in Atlantis and her replacement on Mir, John Blaha, began a four month stay on the station. Walz and Apt and Mir 22 Commander Valery Korzun with assistance from Flight Engineer 2 John Blaha, swung the hatches between their spacecraft closed concluding five days of joint operations. The vestibule between Atlantis and Mir was depressurized and leak checks were performed in readiness for undocking.

1996-01-01

89

Meteors in the Earth's Atmosphere  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

1. Introduction Iwan Williams and Edmond Murad; 2. The evolution of meteoroid streams Iwan Williams; 3. Space dust measurements Eberhard Grun, Valeri Dikarev, Harald Kruger and Markus Landgraf; 4. Extraterrestrial dust in the near-Earth environment George Flynn; 5. Detection and analysis procedures for visual photographic and image intensified CCD meteor observations Robert Hawkes; 6. Radar observations W. Jack Baggaley; 7. Meteor trails as observed by Lidar Ulf von Zahn, J. Hoffner and William McNeil; 8. In situ measurements of meteoritic ions Joseph Grebowsky and Arthur Aikin; 9. Collected extraterrestrial materials: interplanetary dust particles, micrometeorites, meteorites, and meteoritic dust Frans Rietmeijer; 10. Meteoroid impacts on spacecraft; Luigi Foschini; 11. Models of meteoritic metals in the atmosphere William McNeil, Edmond Murad and John Plane; 12. Laboratory studies of meteoritic metal chemistry John Plane; 13. Summary and future outlook Edmond Murad and Iwan Williams.

Murad, Edmond; Williams, Iwan P.

2002-09-01

90

Gaps and spaces: representations of dementia in contemporary British poetry.  

PubMed

This article considers the work of a number of contemporary British poets who have attempted to articulate some of the experiences that dementia entails. The unique potential of poetry as a means of portraying the dislocations and reinventions of self that dementia involves has been mostly overlooked. The insights offered by critical gerontology are central to this article. This perspective calls for critical thought about the ways in which dementia has been socially constructed. The challenges posed by poets such as Vuyelwa Carlin, Valerie Laws and Jo Shapcott in particular, are examined. The complex poetic representations offered by these poets acknowledge the pathological declines of dementia and simultaneously celebrate the individuality and life of their subjects. Considering dementia with reference to the work of contemporary poets and critical gerontology is one way in which we can deepen our understanding of what this illness involves and humanise those who suffer from it. PMID:24599811

Zeilig, Hannah

2014-03-01

91

STS-96 M.S. Tokarev tries gas mask as part of a TCDT  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-96 Mission Specialist Valery Ivanovich Tokarev, with the Russian Space Agency, tries on an oxygen gas mask during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities at Launch Pad 39B. The TCDT provides the crew with simulated countdown exercises, emergency egress training and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. Other crew members taking part in the TCDT are Commander Kent V. Rominger, Pilot Rick Douglas Husband, and Mission Specialists Tamara E. Jernigan (Ph.D.), Daniel Barry (M.D., Ph.D.), Ellen Ochoa (Ph.D.) and Julie Payette, with the Canadian Space Agency. Scheduled for liftoff on May 20 at 9:32 a.m., STS-96 is a logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-led experiment.

1999-01-01

92

STS-96 crew at Skid Strip to return to Houston  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

At the Cape Canaveral Air Station Skid Strip, STS-96 crew members and their families board a plane to return to the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. From left are the son, Ivan, and wife, Irina, of Mission Specialist Valery Ivanovich Tokarev (carrying a duffel bag); and Mission Specialist Ellen Ochoa, holding her son, Wilson Miles-Ochoa. Other crew members also returning are Commander Kent V. Rominger, Pilot Rick D. Husband, and Mission Specialists Tamara E. Jernigan (Ph.D.), Daniel Barry (M.D., Ph.D.) and Julie Payette (with the Canadian Space Agency). After a successful 10-day mission to the International Space Station aboard Space Shuttle Discovery, the crew landed June 6 at 2:02:43 a.m. EDT, in the 11th night landing at KSC.

1999-01-01

93

STS-96 M.S. Payette and Pilot Husband try on gas masks as part of a TCDT  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

At Launch Pad 39B, STS-96 Mission Specialist Julie Payette, with the Canadian Space Agency, and Pilot Rick Douglas Husband practice putting on oxygen gas masks as part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The TCDT provides the crew with emergency egress traiing, simulated countdown exercises and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. Other crew members taking part in the TCDT are Commander Kent V. Rominger and Mission Specialists Tamara E. Jernigan (Ph.D.), Daniel Barry (M.D., Ph.D.), Ellen Ochoa (Ph.D.) and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev, with the Russian Space Agency. Scheduled for liftoff on May 20 at 9:32 a.m., STS- 96 is a logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student- led experiment.

1999-01-01

94

STS-96 M.S. Tokarev and Payette, plus Pilot Husband, examine slidewire basket  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

At the 195-foot level of Launch Pad 39B, STS-96 Mission Specialists Valery Ivanovich Tokarev and Julie Payette, plus Pilot Rick Douglas Husband, inspect the slidewire basket used for emergency egress. The training is part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities, which also provide the crew with simulated countdown exercises and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. Other crew members taking part in the TCDT are Commander Kent V. Rominger and Mission Specialists Tamara E. Jernigan (Ph.D.), Daniel Barry (M.D., Ph.D.), and Ellen Ochoa (Ph.D.). Scheduled for liftoff on May 20 at 9:32 a.m., STS-96 is a logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-led experiment.

1999-01-01

95

STS-96 crew at Skid Strip to return to Houston  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-96 Mission Specialist Julie Payette, who is with the Canadian Space Agency, heads for a plane at the Cape Canaveral Air Station Skid Strip for her return to the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. Other crew members also returning are Commander Kent V. Rominger, Pilot Rick D. Husband, and Mission Specialists Ellen Ochoa (Ph.D.), Tamara E. Jernigan (Ph.D.), Daniel Barry (M.D., Ph.D.) and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev, with the Russian Space Agency. After a successful 10-day mission to the International Space Station aboard Space Shuttle Discovery, the STS-96 crew landed June 6 at 2:02:43 a.m. EDT, in the 11th night landing at KSC.

1999-01-01

96

Human Embryology Animations  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

For students of human development, the Human Embryology Animations site is a worthy resource. Created by Dr. Valerie O'Loughlin at Indiana University, the goal of this site is to help students "better understand the complex processes that must occur in embryologic development." The animations are divided into five thematic sections, including General Embryology, Development of the Limbs, and Urinary and Reproductive Embryology. Each animation lasts anywhere from 20 seconds to 8 minutes, and they cover heart tube folding, septum development, postnatal circulation, and 30 or so other processes. The site is designed for students and members of the general public with a basic understanding of human biology, and the animations are well-planned and worth a look. Additionally, they could be used for students reviewing materials for a course like AP Biology.

O'Loughlin, Valerie

2012-03-02

97

Could the Ways in Which Animals Regenerate Hair and Feathers Lead to Clues for Restoring Human Fingers and Toes?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Press release - The latest issue of the journal Physiology contains a review article that looks at possible routes that unlock cellular regeneration in general, and the principles by which hair and feathers regenerate themselves in particular. The authors apply what is currently known about regenerative biology to the emerging field of regenerative medicine, which is being transformed from fantasy to reality.The Review is entitled ÃÂPhysiological Regeneration of Skin Appendages and Implications for Regenerative MedicineÃÂ and was written by Cheng-Ming Chuong, Randall B. Widelitz, Ping Wu, and Ting-Xin Jiang of the University of Southern California, and Valerie A. Randall of the University of Bradford. It appears in the current edition of Physiology, published by the American Physiological Society.

APS Communications Office (American Physiological Society Communications Office)

2012-05-10

98

Science Signaling Podcast: 24 May 2011  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Podcast features conversations with authors of articles related to Hippo signaling that appear in Science and Science Signaling. James Martin discusses his group’s finding that Hippo signaling regulates the size of the mouse heart by antagonizing Wnt signaling through a mechanism that involves cooperation between the transcription factors Yap and β-catenin, as described in a Research Report published in the 22 April 2011 issue of Science. Valeri Vasioukhin and Mark Silvis discuss their findings related to Hippo signaling in tumorigenesis, as reported in the 24 May 2011 issue of Science Signaling. They report that the adhesion protein αE-catenin acts as a tumor suppressor by regulating the localization and activity of the transcriptional coactivator Yap, which is also regulated by Hippo signaling.

James F. Martin (Texas A&M System Health Science Center;Institute of Biosciences and Technology REV); Valeri Vasioukhin (Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center;Division of Human Biology REV); Mark R. Silvis (Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center;Division of Human Biology REV); Annalisa M. VanHook (American Association for the Advancement of Science;Science Signaling REV)

2011-05-24

99

STS-91 Day 07 Highlights  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

On this seventh day of the STS-91 mission, the flight crew, Cmdr. Charles J. Precourt, Pilot Dominic L. Pudwill Gorie and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, Janet L. Kavandi, and Valery Victorovitch Ryumin awaken to 'Manic Monday' performed by The Bangles, played the crew by Mission Control in honor of an historic Monday for the U.S. and Russian space programs. Today's schedule includes television feed from the Mir of a final crew farewell and hatch closing. After undocking, the shuttle backs away from the Mir until it reaches a distance of approximately 240 feet below the station. Pilot Dom Gorie then performs a nose forward flyaround of Mir.

1998-01-01

100

Fermion frontiers in vector lattice gauge theories: Proceedings. Volume 8  

SciTech Connect

The inclusion of fermions into simulations of lattice gauge theories is very difficult both theoretically and numerically. With the presence of Teraflops-scale computers for lattice gauge theory, the authors wanted a forum to discuss new approaches to lattice fermions. The workshop concentrated on approaches which are ripe for study on such large machines. Although lattice chiral fermions are vitally important to understand, there is not technique at hand which is viable on these Teraflops-scale machines for real-world problems. The discussion was therefore focused on recent developments and future prospects for QCD-like theories. For the well-known fermion formulations, the Aoki phase in Wilson fermions, novelties of U{sub A}(1) symmetry and the {eta}{prime} for staggered fermions and new approaches for simulating the determinant for Wilson fermions were discussed. The newer domain-wall fermion formulation was reviewed, with numerical results given by many speakers. The fermion proposal of Friedberg, Lee and Pang was introduced. They also were able to compare and contrast the dependence of QCD and QCD-like SUSY theories on the number of quark flavors. These proceedings consist of several transparencies and a summary page from each speaker. This should serve to outline the major points made in each talk.

NONE

1998-11-01

101

Osteology of Huabeisaurus allocotus (Sauropoda: Titanosauriformes) from the Upper Cretaceous of China  

PubMed Central

Background The Late Cretaceous titanosauriform sauropod Huabeisaurus allocotus Pang and Cheng is known from teeth and much of the postcranial skeleton. Its completeness makes it an important taxon for integrating and interpreting anatomical observations from more fragmentary Cretaceous East Asian sauropods and for understanding titanosauriform evolution in general. Methodology/Principal Findings We present a detailed redescription of Huabeisaurus allocotus and a suite of anatomical comparisons with other titanosauriforms that demonstrate its validity via autapomorphies (e.g., division of some presacral vertebral laminae, reduced development of caudal ribs, the development of fossae relative to one another in caudal vertebral neural arches, high tibia-to-femur ratio). Huabeisaurus shares many features with other Cretaceous East Asian sauropods (e.g., pendant cervical ribs, anterior-middle caudal vertebrae with a nearly flat anterior centrum face and a concave posterior centrum face) that are absent in sauropods from other landmasses and strata, suggesting a close relationship among many of these forms within the clade Somphospondyli. Conclusions/Significance Restudy of Huabeisaurus provides further evidence for the existence of a clade of somphospondylans – Euhelopodidae – mainly found in the Cretaceous of East Asia. Euhelopodidae represents a fourth example of the evolution of narrow crowns within Sauropoda, along with diplodocoids, brachiosaurids, and advanced titanosaurs (lithostrotians). Despite being known from fewer species than Diplodocoidea, Brachiosauridae, or Lithostrotia, euhelopodids possessed a broader range of tooth shapes than any of these clades, suggesting that euhelopodids exemplified a comparably broad range of feeding strategies and perhaps diets.

D'Emic, Michael D.; Mannion, Philip D.; Upchurch, Paul; Benson, Roger B. J.; Pang, Qiqing; Zhengwu, Cheng

2013-01-01

102

A clear case for conscience in healthcare practice.  

PubMed

The value of conscience in healthcare ethics is widely debated. While some sources present it as an unquestionably positive attribute, others question both the veracity of its decisions and the effect of conscientious objection on patient access to health care. This paper argues that the right to object conscientiously should be broadened, subject to certain previsos, as there are many benefits to healthcare practice in the development of the consciences of practitioners. While effects such as the preservation of moral integrity are widely considered to benefit practitioners, this paper draws on the work of Hannah Arendt to offer several original arguments in defence of conscience that may more directly benefit patients, namely that a pang of conscience may be useful in rapidly unfolding situations in which there is no time to reflect satisfactorily upon activities and that, given the hierarchical nature of healthcare institutions, a right to defy authority on the basis of conscience may benefit junior staff who lack the institutional power to challenge the orders of superiors. PMID:21708833

Birchley, Giles

2012-01-01

103

The ethics and regulation of overcharging: issues in the commerciality of the health practitioner-patient relationship.  

PubMed

Overcharging by health practitioners is a difficult issue with few guidelines available for practitioners or patients. For the most part it has not been the subject of disciplinary censure and has been dealt with by conciliation processes. However, during 2013 the Singapore High Court twice addressed the commerciality of the health-practitioner-patient relationship, acknowledging that this is a fundamental attribute of the contemporary dynamic between providers and recipients of health services. In Lim Mey Lee Susan v Singapore Medical Council [2013] SGHC 122, it concluded that the obligation to refrain from overcharging is an inherent ethical responsibility of practitioners and affirmed the suspension for three years of a surgeon with Australian training and tertiary connections for what it classified as grossly excessive charging. In Pang Ah San v Singapore Medical Council [2013] SGHC 266, it observed that medical practitioners have a legitimate right to appropriate levels of remuneration but that the right balance has to be struck between professional virtues and business considerations. The Singapore High Court's decisions raise the question of whether professional associations and practitioner regulators have a responsibility to provide guidelines and, potentially, processes by which practical assistance can be provided to medical and other health care practitioners so that they can avoid unacceptable charging practices. PMID:24804522

Freckelton, Ian

2014-03-01

104

Integrating chemical and biological control of European corn borer in bell pepper.  

PubMed

Using multiple locations and a series of field trials over 2 yr, we evaluated an integrated pest management program for Ostrinia nubilalis (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) management in peppers involving biorational chemistries, inundative releases of Trichogramma ostriniae (Pang & Chen), and conservation of generalist predators. In small plot trials, three biorational insecticides (spinosad, indoxacarb, and methoxyfenozide) provided comparable control of O. nubilalis as two broad-spectrum conventional insecticides (acephate and lambda-cyhalothrin). However, lambdacyhalothrin at most locations, and indoxacarb at one location, resulted in outbreaks of green peach aphids. We also observed significant effects on the generalist predator community: beneficial communities in methoxyfenozide-treated plots were most similar to untreated controls, and acephate-treated plots were the least similar. Management systems comparing untreated controls, inundative release of T. ostriniae with methoxyfenozide applied when lepidopterans exceeded thresholds, or weekly applications of acephate or lambda-cyhalothrin, showed no effects on marketable fruit or percentage of fruit damaged, but the conventional insecticide approach caused aphid flares. Inundative releases of T. ostriniae and biorational chemistries provide a more environmentally sound approach to managing O. nubilalis in peppers, due, in part, to conservation of generalist predators. PMID:19253647

Chapman, Anna V; Kuhar, Thomas P; Schultz, Peter B; Leslie, Timothy W; Fleischer, Shelby J; Dively, Galen P; Whalen, Joanne

2009-02-01

105

Comparative characterization of L-lactic acid-producing thermotolerant Rhizopus fungi.  

PubMed

Acid-producing Rhizopus fungi from loog-pang, a traditional Thai fermented food, was screened to investigate its potential for use in industrial lactic acid production from starch. A thermotolerant strain, TISTR 3518, was isolated and characterized by its morphological, physiological, genetic and fermentation properties, and compared with its mesophilic isolates, TISTR 3514 and TISTR 3523. TISTR 3518 was characterized by shorter sporangiophores and smaller sporangia than the other isolates; however, apparent differences between the mesophilic isolates and the strain could not be clarified. Moreover, TISTR 3518 grew at 45 degrees C, whereas the others did not. The three isolates showed different profiles of oligosaccharide assimilation and organic acid production. Their rDNA ITS sequences indicated that TISTR 3518 is a strain of Rhizopus microsporus, and TISTR 3514 and TISTR 3523 are strains of Rhizopus oryzae. TISTR 3523 and TISTR 3518 mainly formed L-lactic acid from glucose, while TISTR 3514 primarily formed fumaric acid. Under thermotolerant conditions, R. microsporus TISTR 3518 showed higher glucoamylase activity than the others, suggesting this enzyme from TISTR 3518 is more thermostable than that from TISTR 3523. The strain formed higher amounts of L-lactic acid from starch at 40 degrees C compared to R. oryzae TISTR 3523. This is the first report on the production of optically active L-lactic acid from starch by a thermotolerant fungus and could potentially provide a good tool for transforming biomass resources to chemical materials. PMID:19134548

Kitpreechavanich, Vichien; Maneeboon, Thanapoom; Kayano, Youichi; Sakai, Kenji

2008-12-01

106

Massive soliton stars  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The structure of nontopological solutions of Einstein field equations as proposed by Friedberg, Lee, and Pang (1987) is examined. This analysis incorporates finite temperature effects and pair creation. Quarks are assumed to be the only species that exist in interior of soliton stars. The possibility of primordial creation of soliton stars in the incomplete decay of the degenerate vacuum in early universe is explored. Because of dominance of pair creation inside soliton stars, the luminosity of soliton stars is not determined by its radiative transfer characteristics, and the surface temperature of soliton stars can be the same as its interior temperature. It is possible that soliton stars are intense X-ray radiators at large distances. Soliton stars are nearly 100 percent efficient energy converters, converting the rest energy of baryons entering the interior into radiation. It is possible that a sizable number of baryons may also be trapped inside soliton stars during early epochs of the universe. In addition, if soliton stars exist they could assume the role played by massive black holes in galactic centers.

Chiu, Hong-Yee

1990-01-01

107

STS-96 Mission Highlights. Part 2  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In this second part of a three-part video mission-highlights set, on-orbit spacecrew activities performed on the STS-96 Space Shuttle Orbiter Discovery and the International Space Station are reviewed. The flight crew consists of Kent V. Rominger, Commander; Rick D. Husband, Pilot; and Mission Specialists Ellen Ochoa, Tamara E. Jernigan, Daniel T. Barry, Julie Payette (Canadian), and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev (Russian). The primary goals of this mission were to work on logistics and resupply the International Space Station. This second part in the mission series features video from Flight Day 4-7 (FD 4-7). FD 4 of STS-96 presents astronauts Tammy Jernigan and Dan Barry completing the second longest space walk in shuttle history. Footage includes Jernigan and Barry transferring and installing two cranes from the shuttle's payload bay to locations on the outside of the station. The astronauts enter the International Space Station delivering supplies and prepare the outpost to receive its first resident crew, scheduled to arrive in early 2000 on FD 5. The video also captures the crew involved in logistics transfer activities within the Discovery/ISS orbiting complex. FD 6 includes footage of Valery Tokarev and Canadian astronaut Julie Payette charging out the final six battery recharge controller units for two of Zarya's power-producing batteries and all crew members' involvement in logistics transfer activities from the SPACEHAB module to designated locations in the International Space Station. With the transfer work of FD 6 all but complete, the astronauts conduct some additional work, installing parts of a wireless strain gauge system that will help engineers track the effects of adding modules to the station throughout its assembly. Moving the few remaining items from Discovery to the ISS, then closing a series of hatches within the station's modules leading back to the shuttle are the primary activities contained in FD 7. Final coverage features Discovery's astronauts finishing their work inside the International Space Station, closing all of the hatches and readying the shuttle's small thrusters to be fired to raise the entire complex's orbit in preparation for the undocking and departure set for FD 8.

1999-01-01

108

STS-96 Mission Highlights. Part 3  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In this third part of a three-part video mission-highlights set, spacecrew operations between the STS-96 Space Shuttle Orbiter Discovery and the International Space Station, as well as STS reentry and landing is reviewed. The flight crew consists of Kent V. Rominger, Commander; Rick D. Husband, Pilot; and Mission Specialists Ellen Ochoa, Tamara E. Jernigan, Daniel T. Barry, Julie Payette (Canadian), and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev (Russian). The primary goals of this mission were to work on logistics and resupply the International Space Station. This third part of the three part series includes footage from Flight Days 8-11 (FD 8-11) of the mission. FD 8 includes the crew members moving the last items from Discovery into the International Space Station (ISS), closing the final hatch on the orbiting outpost and commanding a series of 17 pulses of Discovery's reaction control system jets to boost the station's orbit. Discovery undocks from the station, performs a 2 1/2 lap flyaround of the station, before Husband fires Discovery's jets in a final burst to move Discovery away from the station, concluding six days of docked operations. After the flyaround, Husband fires Discovery's jets to depart the station's vicinity. Beginning FD 9, as Discovery departs from the station, Mission Specialists Tammy Jernigan and Dan Barry pack away the space suit gear they used during their spacewalk early in the mission, while Commander Kent Rominger and Pilot Rick Husband practice landings on a laptop computer program. Mission Specialists Julie Payette and Valery Tokarev help to stow gear and repressurize the shuttle's cabin to its standard 14.7 pounds per square inch. The crew also readies to deploy a small, student-built payload called STARSHINE (Student Tracked Atmospheric Research Satellite for Heuristic International Networking Equipment). In and around landing preparations and the STARSHINE deploy, the crew stowe all equipment used throughout the mission. The STARSHINE satellite ejects from a canister in Discovery's payload bay on FD 10. FD 11 is completed as Discovery swoops out of the darkness as Commander Kent Rominger sets the shuttle and his crewmates down on Runway 15 at the Shuttle Landing Facility in Florida to successfully complete the first shuttle mission of the year. Several different views of the landing are highlighted in the video.

1999-01-01

109

Relativistic Astrophysics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Preface; Prologue: Conference overview Bernard Carr; Part I. The Universe At Large and Very Large Redshifts: 2. The size and age of the Universe Gustav A. Tammann; 3. Active galaxies at large redshifts Malcolm S. Longair; 4. Observational cosmology with the cosmic microwave background George F. Smoot; 5. Future prospects in measuring the CMB power spectrum Philip M. Lubin; 6. Inflationary cosmology Michael S. Turner; 7. The signature of the Universe Bernard J. T. Jones; 8. Theory of large-scale structure Sergei F. Shandarin; 9. The origin of matter in the universe Lev A. Kofman; 10. New guises for cold-dark matter suspects Edward W. Kolb; Part II. Physics and Astrophysics Of Relativistic Compact Objects: 11. On the unification of gravitational and inertial forces Donald Lynden-Bell; 12. Internal structure of astrophysical black holes Werner Israel; 13. Black hole entropy: external facade and internal reality Valery Frolov; 14. Accretion disks around black holes Marek A. Abramowicz; 15. Black hole X-ray transients J. Craig Wheeler; 16. X-rays and gamma rays from active galactic nuclei Roland Svensson; 17. Gamma-ray bursts: a challenge to relativistic astrophysics Martin Rees; 18. Probing black holes and other exotic objects with gravitational waves Kip Thorne; Epilogue: the past and future of relativistic astrophysics Igor D. Novikov; I. D. Novikov's scientific papers and books.

Jones, Bernard J. T.; Markovic, Dragoljub

1997-06-01

110

AMS undergoes a final weight and balance check in the SSPF  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Under the supervision of Boeing technicians, the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), a payload slated to fly on STS-91, is undergoing a final weight and balance check on the Launch Package Integration Stand in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). Next, it will be placed in the Payload Canister and transported to Launch Complex 39A where it will be installed into Space Shuttle Discovery's payload bay. Weighing in at approximately three tons, the AMS is a major particle physics experiment that will look for cosmic antimatter originating from outside our galaxy. The data it gathers could also give clues about the mysterious 'dark matter' that may make up 90 percent or more of the universe. STS-91 is scheduled to be launched on June 2 with a launch window opening around 6:10 p.m. EDT. The mission will also feature the ninth Shuttle docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, the first Mir docking for Discovery, and the conclusion of Phase I of the joint U.S.-Russian International Space Station Program. The STS-91 flight crew includes Commander Charles Precourt; Pilot Dominic Gorie; and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence; Franklin Chang-Diaz, Ph.D.; Janet Kavandi, Ph.D.; and Valery Ryumin, with the Russian Space Agency. Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will be returning to Earth with the crew after living more than four months aboard Mir.

1998-01-01

111

Senescense: association of synthesis of Acid phosphatase with banana ripening.  

PubMed

During ripening of banana (Musa sapientum L., var. Gros Michel or Valery) acid phosphatase activity increases 13-to 26-fold in the precipitate and 2- to 4-fold in the supernatant fraction of tissue homogenates. These increases are closely correlated with the onset and peak of the climacteric. The precipitate enzyme may be extracted with Triton X-100, CaCl(2) or NaCl; about 80% of it is in a 500g precipitate. Studies on effect of tonicity of the grinding medium indicate that the precipitate enzyme is desorbed from membrane or cell wall surfaces, and is not released as a result of lysis of membranes. The development of acid phosphatase during aging of tissue slices is the same as in intact fruit. Short term studies of tissue slices with cycloheximide and actinomycin D indicate that the increase in activity is owed to new enzyme synthesis, which is dependent upon synthesis of RNA. The possible effects of the increase in acid phosphatase on ripening are discussed. PMID:16657436

De Leo, P; Sacher, J A

1970-08-01

112

Human Embryology Animations  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

One of the most impressive ways to learn about biology, particularly that which we seldom see, is through modeling. Dr. Valerie O'Loughlin and her colleagues at Indiana University have created this thoroughly impressive set of animations so that "students could better understand the complex processes that must occur in embryologic development." The site is arranged into five main areas, including: Cardiovascular Embryology, Development of the Head and Neck, Gastrointestinal Embryology, Development of the Limbs, and Urinary and Reproductive Embryology. However, the only two sections currently loaded with animations are the first two. Presumably, the rest are coming soon. Also, because these animations are part of a study of teaching efficacy, Dr. O'Loughlin asks that users participate in an optional survey. However, all animations can be accessed without taking part. As a great addition to the site, users are presented with a few questions regarding the anatomy which they are about to see, prior to viewing the animation. Undboutedly, this is related to the Indiana University course that these animations are a part of, but they serve as a great addition for visitors other than students, too.

O'Loughlin, Valerie

2008-09-10

113

In vitro digestibility, physicochemical, thermal and rheological properties of banana starches.  

PubMed

Banana starches (BS) were isolated from Enano, Morado, Valery and Macho cultivars. The BS possessed B-type crystallinity and an amylose content varying from 19.32 to 26.35%. Granules had an oval morphology with different major-to-minor axis ratios, exhibiting both mono- and bi-modal distributions and mean particle sizes varying from 32.5 to 45 ?m. BS displayed zeta-potential values ranging between -32.25 and -17.32 mV, and formed gels of incipient to moderate stability. The enthalpy of gelatinization of BS affected the crystalline order stability within the granules. In-vitro digestibility tests showed fractions as high as 68% of resistant starch. Rheological oscillatory tests at 1 Hz showed that BS dispersions (7.0%, w/w) exhibited Type III behaviour, attributed to the formation of a continuous phase complex three-dimensional amylose gel reinforced by swollen starch granules acting as fillers. Amylose content and granules morphology were the main factors influencing the BS properties. PMID:24299760

Utrilla-Coello, R G; Rodríguez-Huezo, M E; Carrillo-Navas, H; Hernández-Jaimes, C; Vernon-Carter, E J; Alvarez-Ramirez, J

2014-01-30

114

STS-96 M.S. Dan Barry checks equipment during a CEIT  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1, STS-96 Mission Specialist Daniel Barry, M.D., Ph.D., looks at one of the foot restraints used for extravehicular activity, or space walks. The STS-96 crew is at KSC to take part in a Crew Equipment Interface Test. The other crew members are Commander Kent V. Rominger, Pilot Rick Douglas Husband, and Mission Specialists Ellen Ochoa (Ph.D.), Tamara E. Jernigan (Ph.D.), Julie Payette and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev. Payette represents the Canadian Space Agency and Tokarev the Russian Space Agency. The primary payload of STS- 96 is the SPACEHAB Double Module. In addition, the Space Shuttle will carry unpressurized cargo such as the external Russian cargo crane known as STRELA; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), which is a logistics items carrier; and an ORU Transfer Device (OTD), a U.S.-built crane that will be stowed on the station for use during future ISS assembly missions. These cargo items will be stowed on the International Cargo Carrier, fitted inside the payload bay behind the SPACEHAB module. STS-96 is targeted for launch on May 24 from Launch Pad 39B.

1999-01-01

115

STS-96 Crew Breakfast in O&C Building before launch  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The STS-96 crew gathers in the early morning for a snack in the Operations and Checkout Building before suiting up for launch. Space Shuttle Discovery is due to launch today at 6:49 a.m. EDT. Seated from left are Mission Specialists Daniel T. Barry and Ellen Ochoa, Pilot Rick D. Husband, Mission Commander Kent V. Rominger, and Mission Specialists Julie Payette, Valery Ivanovich Tokarev, and Tamara E. Jernigan. Tokarev represents the Russian Space Agency and Payette the Canadian Space Agency. STS-96 is a 10-day logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying about 4,000 pounds of supplies to be stored aboard the station for use by future crews, including laptop computers, cameras, tools, spare parts, and clothing. The mission also includes such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student- involved experiment. It will include a space walk to attach the cranes to the outside of the ISS for use in future construction. Landing is expected at the SLF on June 6 about 1:58 a.m. EDT.

1999-01-01

116

Physicists for Human Rights in the Former Soviet Union  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In his 1940 paper `Freedom and Science' Albert Einstein emphasized that ``intellectual independence is a primary necessity for the scientific inquirer'' and that ``political liberty is also extraordinarily important for his work.'' Raised in the tradition of intellectual independence and dedicated to the scientific truth, physicists were among the first to stand up for freedom in the USSR. It was no coincidence that the founders of the first independent Human Rights Committee (1970) were physicists: Andrei Sakharov, Valery Chalidze and Andrei Tverdokhlebov. In 1973 a physicist, Alexander Voronel, founded a Moscow Sunday (refusenik) Seminar -- the first openly independent scientific body in the history of the USSR. In 1976 physicists Andrei Sakharov, Yuri Orlov and a mathematician Natan Sharansky were the leading force in founding the famous Moscow Helsinki Human Rights Watch group. This talk briefly describes the special position of physicists (often viewed as Einstein's colleagues) in Soviet society, as well as their unique role in the struggle for human rights. It describes in some detail the Moscow Sunday Seminar, and extensions thereof such as International Conferences, the Computer School and the Computer Database of Refuseniks. The Soviet government considered such truly independent organizations as a challenge to Soviet authority and tried to destroy them. The Seminar's success and its very existence owed much to the support of Western scientific organizations, who persuaded their members to attend the Seminar and visit scientist-refuseniks. The human rights struggle led by physicists contributed substantially to the demise of the Soviet system.

Chernyak, Yuri

2005-03-01

117

STS-96 M.S. Julie Payette takes part in a CEIT  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1, STS-96 Mission Specialist Julie Payette, with the Canadian Space Agency, maneuvers a foot restraint used during space walks. The STS-96 crew is at KSC to take part in a Crew Equipment Interface Test. The other crew members are Commander Kent V. Rominger, Pilot Rick Douglas Husband and Mission Specialists Ellen Ochoa (Ph.D.), Tamara E. Jernigan (Ph.D.), Daniel Barry (M.D., Ph.D.), and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev, who represents the Russian Space Agency. The primary payload of STS-96 is the SPACEHAB Double Module. In addition, the Space Shuttle will carry unpressurized cargo such as the external Russian cargo crane known as STRELA; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), which is a logistics items carrier; and an ORU Transfer Device (OTD), a U.S.-built crane that will be stowed on the station for use during future ISS assembly missions. These cargo items will be stowed on the International Cargo Carrier, fitted inside the payload bay behind the SPACEHAB module. STS-96 is targeted for launch on May 24 from Launch Pad 39B.

1999-01-01

118

STS-96 M.S. Julie Payette takes a seat in the orbiter Discovery during a CEIT  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1, STS-96 Mission Specialist Julie Payette, with the Canadian Space Agency, sits in the pilot's seat inside the orbiter Discovery. The STS-96 crew is at KSC to take part in a Crew Equipment Interface Test. Other members participating are Commander Kent V. Rominger, Pilot Rick Douglas Husband and Mission Specialists Ellen Ochoa (Ph.D.), Tamara E. Jernigan (Ph.D.), Daniel Barry (M.D., Ph.D.) and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev, who represents the Russian Space Agency. The primary payload of STS-96 is the SPACEHAB Double Module. In addition, the Space Shuttle will carry unpressurized cargo such as the external Russian cargo crane known as STRELA; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), which is a logistics items carrier; and an ORU Transfer Device (OTD), a U.S.-built crane that will be stowed on the station for use during future ISS assembly missions. These cargo items will be stowed on the International Cargo Carrier, fitted inside the payload bay behind the SPACEHAB module. STS-96 is targeted for launch on May 24 from Launch Pad 39B.

1999-01-01

119

STS-96 Mission Specialist Julie Payette poses during a CEIT  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1, STS-96 Mission Specialist Julie Payette, with the Canadian Space Agency, poses during a break in a Crew Equipment Interface Test. The other crew members participating are Commander Kent V. Rominger, Pilot Rick Douglas Husband, and Mission Specialists Ellen Ochoa (Ph.D), Tamara E. Jernigan (Ph.D.), Daniel Barry (M.D., Ph.D.), and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev, who represents the Russian Space Agency. The primary payload of STS-96 is the SPACEHAB Double Module. In addition, the Space Shuttle will carry unpressurized cargo such as the external Russian cargo crane known as STRELA; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), which is a logistics items carrier; and an ORU Transfer Device (OTD), a U.S.-built crane that will be stowed on the station for use during future ISS assembly missions. These cargo items will be stowed on the International Cargo Carrier, fitted inside the payload bay behind the SPACEHAB module. STS-96 is targeted for launch on May 24 from Launch Pad 39B.

1999-01-01

120

STS-96 M.S. Julie Payette and the STS-96 crew takes part in a CEIT  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1, STS-96 Mission Specialist Julie Payette, with the Canadian Space Agency, poses next to the Canadian arm in the payload bay of the orbiter Discovery. The STS-96 crew is at KSC for a Crew Equipment Interface Test. Other crew members are Commander Kent V. Rominger, Pilot Rick Douglas Husband, and Mission Specialists Ellen Ochoa (Ph.D), Tamara E. Jernigan (Ph.D.), Daniel Barry (M.D., Ph.D.), and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev, who represents the Russian Space Agency. The primary payload of STS-96 is the SPACEHAB Double Module. In addition, the Space Shuttle will carry unpressurized cargo such as the external Russian cargo crane known as STRELA; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), which is a logistics items carrier; and an ORU Transfer Device (OTD), a U.S.-built crane that will be stowed on the station for use during future ISS assembly missions. These cargo items will be stowed on the International Cargo Carrier, fitted inside the payload bay behind the SPACEHAB module. STS-96 is targeted for launch on May 24 from Launch Pad 39B.

1999-01-01

121

STS-96 Mission Specialist Payette prepares to enter Discovery as part of TCDT activities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the white room, an environmental chamber at Launch Pad 39B, STS-96 Mission Specialist Julie Payette, with the Canadian Space Agency, is helped with her flight suit before entering the orbiter Discovery. The crew are taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities, which provide opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay, as well as simulated countdown exercises and emergency egress training. Other crew members are Commander Kent V. Rominger, Pilot Rick Douglas Husband, and Mission Specialists Ellen Ochoa (Ph.D.), Tamara E. Jernigan (Ph.D.), Daniel Barry (M.D., Ph.D.) and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev, who is with the Russian Space Agency. STS-96, scheduled for liftoff on May 20 at 9:32 a.m., is a logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-led experiment.

1999-01-01

122

STS-96 M.S. Julie Payette talks to media after arriving at KSC  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-96 Mission Specialist Julie Payette, who represents the Canadian Space Agency, responds to questions from the media after arriving at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. On the right is Mission Specialist Ellen Ochoa. Other crew members are Commander Kent V. Rominger, Pilot Rick D. Husband, Mission Specialists Tamara E. Jernigan, Daniel T. Barry and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev, who represents the Russian Space Agency. The crew will take part in various launch preparations before the scheduled liftoff on May 27 at 6:48 a.m. EDT. STS-96 is a 10-day logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying 5000 pounds of supplies to be stored aboard the station for use by future crews, including laptop computers, cameras, tools, spare parts, and clothing. The mission also includes such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-involved experiment. The mission will include a space walk to attach the cranes to the outside of the ISS for use in future construction. After the 10- day mission, landing is expected at the SLF on June 6 about 3:25 a.m. EDT.

1999-01-01

123

STS-96 M.S. Julie Payette and Tamara Jernigan check equipment during a CEIT  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1, STS-96 Mission Specialists (left) Julie Payette, with the Canadian Space Agency, and Tamara Jernigan, Ph.D., look over the foot restraint used during space walks. The STS-96 crew is at KSC to take part in a Crew Equipment Interface Test. The other crew members are Commander Kent V. Rominger, Pilot Rick Douglas Husband, and Mission Specialists Ellen Ochoa (Ph.D), Daniel Barry (M.D., Ph.D.), and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev, who represents the Russian Space Agency. The primary payload of STS-96 is the SPACEHAB Double Module. In addition, the Space Shuttle will carry unpressurized cargo such as the external Russian cargo crane known as STRELA; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), which is a logistics items carrier; and an ORU Transfer Device (OTD), a U.S.-built crane that will be stowed on the station for use during future ISS assembly missions. These cargo items will be stowed on the International Cargo Carrier, fitted inside the payload bay behind the SPACEHAB module. STS-96 is targeted for launch on May 24 from Launch Pad 39B.

1999-01-01

124

STS-96 Post Flight Presentation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Crew of STS-96 Discovery Shuttle, Commander Kent V. Rominger, Pilot Rick D. Husband, Mission Specialists Ellen Ochoa, Tamara E. Jernigan, Daniel T. Barry, Julie Payette, and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev, are shown narrating the mission highlights. Scenes include walk out to the transfer vehicle, and launch of the shuttle. Also presented are scenes of the start of the main engine, ignition of the solid rocket boosters, and the separation of the solid rocket boosters. Footage of Payette preparing the on-board camera equipment, while Barry and Jernigan perform routine checks of the equipment is seen. Also presented are various pictures of the shuttle in its orbit, the docking of the shuttle with the Mir International Space Station, and crewmembers during their space walk. Beautiful panoramic views of the Great Lake, Houston, and a combined view of Italy and Turkey are seen. The crew of Discovery is shown performing a juice ball experiment, tumbling, undocking, performing transfer operations, and deploying the STARSHINE educational satellite. The film ends with the reentry of the Discovery Space Shuttle into the Earth's atmosphere.

1999-01-01

125

STS-96 Mission Specialist Julie Payette arrives at KSC for TCDT  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-96 Mission Specialist Julie Payette, who represents the Canadian Space Agency, arrives at the Shuttle Landing Facility in a T-38 jet aircraft. The STS-96 crew are taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The TCDT provides the crew with simulated countdown exercises, emergency egress training, and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. Mission STS-96, which is targeted for launch on May 20 at 9:32 a.m., is a logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-led experiment. Others in the STS-96 crew are Commander Kent V. Rominger, Pilot Rick Douglas Husband, and Mission Specialists Ellen Ochoa (Ph.D.), Tamara E. Jernigan (Ph.D.), Daniel Barry (M.D., Ph.D.), and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev, who represents the Russian Space Agency.

1999-01-01

126

STS-96 Mission Highlights. Part 1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In this first part of a three-part video mission-highlights set, the flight of the STS-96 Space Shuttle Orbiter Discovery is reviewed. The flight crew consists of Kent V. Rominger, Commander; Rick D. Husband, Pilot; and Mission Specialists Ellen Ochoa, Tamara E. Jernigan, Daniel T. Barry, Julie Payette (Canadian), and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev (Russian). The primary goals of this mission were to work on logistics and resupply the International Space Station (ISS). This is the first flight to dock to the International Space Station. The primary payloads are the Russian cargo crane, known as STRELA, which the astronauts mount to the exterior of the Russian station segment, the SPACEHAB Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), and a U.S. built crane called the ORU Transfer Device (OTD). Other payloads include the Student Tracked Atmospheric Research Satellite for Heuristic International Networking Equipment (STARSHINE), the Shuttle Vibration Forces Experiment (SVF), and the Orbiter Integrated Vehicle Health Monitoring - HEDS Technology Demonstration (IVHM HTD). The traditional pre-launch breakfast, being suited up, entry into the Shuttle, and views of the liftoff from several different vantage points are shown. In-flight footage includes views from the robot arm conducting a television survey of Discovery's payload bay and the flawless docking of the Unity module with the International Space Station. During the docking, camera views from both the ISS and Discovery are presented. These activities make up the first three Flight Days of STS-96.

1999-01-01

127

STS-96 Mission Specialist Jernigan arrives at KSC for launch  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-96 Mission Specialist Tamara E. Jernigan smiles in excitement on her arrival at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) aboard a T-38 jet aircraft. She joins other crew members Commander Kent V. Rominger, Pilot Rick D. Husband, and Mission Specialists Ellen Ochoa, Daniel T. Barry, Julie Payette and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev for launch preparations prior to liftoff. Payette represents the Canadian Space Agency and Tokarev represents the Russian Space Agency. STS-96 is a 10-day logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying 5000 pounds of supplies to be stored aboard the station for use by future crews, including laptop computers, cameras, tools, spare parts, and clothing. The mission also includes such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-involved experiment. The mission will include a space walk to attach the cranes to the outside of the ISS for use in future construction. Space Shuttle Discovery is due to launch on May 27 at 6:48 a.m. EDT. Landing is expected at the SLF on June 6 about 3:25 a.m. EDT.

1999-01-01

128

STS-96 Commander Rominger arrives at KSC for launch  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-96 Commander Kent V. Rominger smiles on his arrival at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) aboard a T- 38 jet aircraft. He joins other crew members Pilot Rick D. Husband and Mission Specialists Ellen Ochoa, Tamara E. Jernigan, Daniel T. Barry, Julie Payette and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev for launch preparations prior to liftoff. Payette represents the Canadian Space Agency and Tokarev represents the Russian Space Agency. STS-96 is a 10-day logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying 5000 pounds of supplies to be stored aboard the station for use by future crews, including laptop computers, cameras, tools, spare parts, and clothing. The mission also includes such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student- involved experiment. The mission will include a space walk to attach the cranes to the outside of the ISS for use in future construction. Space Shuttle Discovery is due to launch on May 27 at 6:48 a.m. EDT. Landing is expected at the SLF on June 6 about 3:25 a.m. EDT.

1999-01-01

129

STS-96 crew takes part in payload Interface Verification Test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

At the SPACEHAB Facility, STS-96 Mission Specialist Ellen Ochoa and Commander Kent Rominger smile for the camera during a payload Interface Verification Test (IVT) for their upcoming mission to the International Space Station. Other crew members at KSC for the IVT are Pilot Rick Husband and Mission Specialists Tamara Jernigan, Dan Barry, Julie Payette and Valery Tokarev of Russia. Mission STS-96 carries the SPACEHAB Logistics Double Module, which will have equipment to further outfit the International Space Station service module and equipment that can be off-loaded from the early U.S. assembly flights. It carries internal logistics and resupply cargo for station outfitting, plus an external Russian cargo crane to be mounted to the exterior of the Russian station segment and used to perform space walking maintenance activities. The double module stowage provides capacity of up to 10,000 lbs. with the ability to accommodate powered payloads, four external rooftop stowage locations, four double-rack locations (two powered), up to 61 bulkhead-mounted middeck locker locations, and floor storage for large unique items and Soft Stowage. STS-96 is targeted to launch May 20 about 9:32 a.m. EDT.

1999-01-01

130

STS-111 Flight Day 3 Highlights  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

On Flight Day 3 of STS-111, the crew of Endeavour (Kenneth Cockrell, Commander; Paul Lockhart, Pilot; Franklin Chang-Diaz, Mission Specialist; Philippe Perrin, Mission Specialist) and the Expedition 5 crew (Valery Korzun, Commander; Peggy Whitson, Flight Engineer; Sergei Treschev, Flight Engineer), begin their final approach towards the International Space Station (ISS). From cameras aboard the ISS, live video of Endeavour is shown as it approaches the station. The Orbiter is maneuvered slowly to a position for docking, and cameras from multiple angles show this process. As it is maneuvered, there are clear views of its payload bay, which includes the Leonardo MultiPurpose Logistics Module (MPLM) and the Mobile Base System (MBS), both of which will be installed on the ISS during this mission. In the final stages of the docking procedure there is close-up footage of Endeavour meeting the ISS's Pressurized Mating Adapter 2 on the Destiny Laboratory Module. Inside the ISS, the Expedition 4 crew (Yury Onufrienko, Commander; Daniel Bursch, Flight Engineer; Carl Walz, Flight Engineer), which will be replaced by the Expedition 5 crew, prepares for final docking. Crew members are shown transferring equipment from the Endeavour to the ISS, prior to a replay of the mating of the two crafts. In the replay, the hatch is shown being opened and the two newly arrived crews are greeted with excitement by Expedition 4 crewmembers. The video closes with footage of the Quest airlock used for EVA (extravehicular activity) egress, and the Canadarm 2 robotic arm.

2002-01-01

131

STS-113 Post Flight Presentation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The STS-113 post-flight presentation begins with a view of Mission Specialists Michael E. Lopez-Alegria and John B. Herrington getting suited for the space mission. The STS-113 crew consists of: Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Paul Lockhart, Mission Specialists Michael Lopez-Alegria and John Herrington. Cosmonauts Valery Korzun, and Sergei Treschev, and astronaut Peggy Whitson who are all members of the expedition five crew, and Commander Kenneth Bowersox, Flight Engineers Nikolai Budarin and Donald Pettit, members of Expedition Six. The main goal of this mission is to take Expedition Six up to the International Space Station and Return Expedition Five to the Earth. The second objective is to install the P(1) Truss segment. Three hours prior to launch, the crew of Expedition Six along with James Wetherbee, Paul Lockhart, Michael Lopez-Alegria and John Herrington are shown walking to an astrovan, which takes them to the launch pad. The actual liftoff is presented. Three Extravehicular Activities (EVA)'s are performed on this mission. Michael Lopez-Alegria and John Herrington are shown performing EVA 1 and EVA 2 which include making connections between the P1 and S(0) Truss segments, and installing fluid jumpers. A panoramic view of the ISS with the Earth in the background is shown. The grand ceremony of the crew exchange is presented. The astronauts performing everyday duties such as brushing teeth, washing hair, sleeping, and eating pistachio nuts are shown. The actual landing of the Space Shuttle is presented.

2002-01-01

132

STS-112 Flight Day 10 Highlights  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

On Flight Day 10 of the STS-112 mission, its crew (Jeffrey Ashby, Commander; Pamela Melroy, Pilot; David Wolf, Mission Specialist; Piers Sellers, Mission Specialist; Sandra Magnus, Mission Specialist; Fyodor Yurchikhin, Mission Specialist) on the Atlantis and the Expedition 5 crew on the International Space Station (ISS) (Valery Korzun, Commander; Peggy Whitson, Flight Engineer; Sergei Treschev, Flight Engineer) are shown exchanging farewells in the ISS's Destiny Laboratory Module following the completion of a week-long period of docked operations. The Expedition 5 crew is nearing the end of five and a half continuous months aboard the space station. Following the closing of the hatches, the Atlantis Orbiter undocks from the station, and Melroy pilots the shuttle slowly away from the ISS, and engages in a radial fly-around of the station. During the fly-around cameras aboard Atlantis shows ISS from a number of angles. ISS cameras also show Atlantis. There are several shots of each craft with a variety of background settings including the Earth, its limb, and open space. The video concludes with a live interview of Ashby, Melroy and Yurchikhin, still aboard Atlantis, conducted by a reporter on the ground. Questions range from feelings on the conclusion of the mission to the experience of being in space. The primary goal of the mission was the installation of the Integrated Truss Structure S1 on the ISS.

2002-10-01

133

STS-111 crew breakfast before launch  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-111 crew gather for the traditional pre-launch meal before the second launch attempt aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour. Seated left to right are Mission Specialists Franklin Chang-Diaz and Philippe Perrin (CNES); the Expedition 5 crew cosmonauts Sergei Treschev (RSA) and Valeri Korzun (RSA) and astronaut Peggy Whitson; Pilot Paul Lockhart and Commander Kenneth Cockrell. In front of them is the traditional cake. This mission marks the 14th Shuttle flight to the International Space Station and the third Shuttle mission this year. Mission STS-111 is the 18th flight of Endeavour and the 110th flight overall in NASA's Space Shuttle program. On mission STS-111, astronauts will deliver the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, the Mobile Base System (MBS), and the Expedition Five crew to the Space Station. During the seven days Endeavour will be docked to the Station, three spacewalks will be performed dedicated to installing MBS and the replacement wrist-roll joint on the Station's Canadarm2 robotic arm. Liftoff is scheduled for 5:22 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A.

2002-01-01

134

Multiplicity Difference between Heavy and Light Quark Jets Revisited  

SciTech Connect

A peculiar prediction of perturbative QCD, obtained within the Local Parton Hadron Duality (LPHD) framework, is that the multiplicity difference {delta}Ql between heavy and light quark jets produced in e+e- annihilation is energy independent. In the Modified Leading Logarithmic Approximation (MLLA) the corresponding constant is derived in terms of a few experimentally measurable quantities. While the energy independence of {delta}Ql has been successfully verified experimentally for b-quarks up to the highest LEP2 energy, its numerical prediction ({delta}{sub bl}{sup MLLA} = 5.5 {+-} 0.8) overestimates the experimental results. The work presented in this talk, done in collaboration with Yuri L. Dokshitzer, Valery A. Khoze and Wolfgang Ochs, shows that in the light of new experimental results and the improvement in the understanding of the experimental data, this prediction needs indeed a revision. We now find {delta}bl = 4.4 {+-} 0.4, in better agreement with experiment, and we shaw that the remaining difference can be attributed largely to next-to-MLLA contributions, an important subset of which are identified and evaluated. The situation with charmed quarks is also reviewed.

Fabbri, Fabrizio [INFN e Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita, viale Berti Pichat 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy)

2006-04-11

135

STS-91 Launch of Discovery from Launch Pad 39-A  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The last mission of the Shuttle-Mir program begins as the Space Shuttle Discovery lifts off from Launch Pad 39A at 6:06:24 p.m. EDT June 2. A torrent of water is seen flowing onto the mobile launcher platform (MLP) from numerous large quench nozzles, or 'rainbirds,' mounted on its surface. This water, part of the Sound Suppression System, helps protect the orbiter and its payloads from damage by acoustical energy and rocket exhaust reflected from the flame trench and MLP during launch. On board Discovery are Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt; Pilot Dominic L. Gorie; and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, Janet Lynn Kavandi and Valery Victorovitch Ryumin. The nearly 10-day mission will feature the ninth and final Shuttle docking with the Russian space station Mir, the first Mir docking for the Space Shuttle orbiter Discovery, the first on-orbit test of the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), and the first flight of the new Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank. Astronaut Andrew S. W. Thomas will be returning to Earth as an STS-91 crew member after living more than four months aboard Mir.

1998-01-01

136

STS-79 Flight Day 4  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

On this fourth day of the STS-79 mission, the flight crew, Cmdr. William F. Readdy, Pilot Terrence W. Wilcutt, Mission Specialists, Thomas D. Akers, John Blaha, Jay Apt, and Carl E. Walz, are seen docking with the Mir Space Station. After two hours of pressure and leak checks, the hatches between the two spacecraft is then opened. The two crews are seen greeting one another to begin five days of joint operations. The rendezvous and docking went flawlessly as Readdy flew the orbiter manually through the final 2,000 feet. Docking occurred within seconds of the pre-planned time and flight controllers reported that only slight oscillations were felt through the Orbiter Docking System as the two spacecraft locked together. Within hours of the hatch opening, crew members John Blaha and Shannon Lucid formally swapped places before going to bed with Blaha becoming a member of the Mir-22 crew and Lucid joining the STS-79 crew to wrap up 179 days as a member of the Mir station. Blaha joins Mir 22 Commander Valery Korzun and Flight Engineer Alexander Kaleri on Mir for the next four months. Soon after the crew members completed their welcoming ceremony, they went to work, hauling bags of water and other supplies from the Shuttle's Spacehab module into the Mir. More than 4000 pounds of equipment and logistical supplies will be transferred to the Mir before Atlantis undocks from the space station.

1996-01-01

137

STS-96 Pilot Husband arrives at KSC for launch  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-96 Pilot Rick D. Husband waves on his arrival at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) aboard a T-38 jet aircraft. He joins other crew members Commander Kent V. Rominger and Mission Specialists Ellen Ochoa, Tamara E. Jernigan, Daniel T. Barry, Julie Payette and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev for launch preparations prior to liftoff. Payette represents the Canadian Space Agency and Tokarev represents the Russian Space Agency. STS-96 is a 10-day logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying 5000 pounds of supplies to be stored aboard the station for use by future crews, including laptop computers, cameras, tools, spare parts, and clothing. The mission also includes such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student- involved experiment. The mission will include aspace walk to attach the cranes to the outside of the ISS for use in future construction. Space Shuttle Discovery is due to launch on May 27 at 6:48 a.m. EDT. Landing is expected at the SLF on June 6 about 3:25 a.m. EDT.

1999-01-01

138

STS-96 crew arrives at KSC for launch on May 27  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The STS-96 crew gather at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility after landing aboard the T-38 jet aircraft in the background. From left are Commander Kent V. Rominger, Mission Specialists Valery Ivanovich Tokarev, Tamara E. Jernigan, Daniel T. Barry, Ellen Ochoa and Julie Payette, and Pilot Rick D. Husband. The crew will take part in various launch preparations before the scheduled liftoff on May 27 at 6:48 a.m. EDT. STS-96 is a 10-day logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying 5000 pounds of supplies to be stored aboard the station for use by future crews, including laptop computers, cameras, tools, spare parts, and clothing. The mission also includes such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-involved experiment. The mission will include a space walk to attach the cranes to the outside of the ISS for use in future construction. After the 10- day mission, landing is expected at the SLF on June 6 about 3:25 a.m. EDT.

1999-01-01

139

STS-96 crew members in the white room are prepared for entry into Discovery  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Before entering the orbiter Discovery, STS-96 Mission Specialist Valery Ivanovich Tokarev (center) is checked out by white room closeout crew members Mechanical Technician Chris Meinert and Quality Assurance Specialist Jim Davis on the left, and Closeout Chief Travis Thompson and Suit Technician Jean Alexander on the right. The white room is an environmental chamber at the end of the orbiter access arm that provides entry to the orbiter crew compartment. STS-96 is a 10-day logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying about 4,000 pounds of supplies, to be stored aboard the station for use by future crews, including laptop computers, cameras, tools, spare parts, and clothing. The mission also includes such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-involved experiment. It will include a space walk to attach the cranes to the outside of the ISS for use in future construction. Space Shuttle Discovery is due to launch today at 6:49 a.m. EDT. Landing is expected at the SLF on June 6 about 1:58 a.m. EDT.

1999-01-01

140

STS-96 crew talk to the media after arrivking at KSC for launch on May 27  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The STS-96 crew talk to the media at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility after arriving aboard T-38 jet aircraft. From left are Mission Specialists Tamara E. Jernigan, Valery Ivanovich Tokarev and Julie Payette, Commander Kent V. Rominger (at microphone), Mission Specialists Ellen Ochoa, Pilot Rick D. Husband and Daniel T. Barry. The crew will take part in various launch preparations before the scheduled liftoff on May 27 at 6:48 a.m. EDT. STS-96 is a 10-day logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying 5000 pounds of supplies to be stored aboard the station for use by future crews, including laptop computers, cameras, tools, spare parts, and clothing. The mission also includes such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student- involved experiment. The mission will include a space walk to attach the cranes to the outside of the ISS for use in future construction. After the 10-day mission, landing is expected at the SLF on June 6 about 3:25 a.m. EDT.

1999-01-01

141

Expedition Crews Four and Five and STS-111 Crew Aboard the ISS  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Huddled together in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station (ISS) are the Expedition Four crew (dark blue shirts), Expedition Five crew (medium blue shirts) and the STS-111 crew (green shirts). The Expedition Four crewmembers are, from front to back, Cosmonaut Ury I. Onufrienko, mission commander; and Astronauts Daniel W. Bursch and Carl E. Waltz, flight engineers. The ISS crewmembers are, from front to back, Astronauts Kerneth D. Cockrell, mission commander; Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, mission specialist; Paul S. Lockhart, pilot; and Philippe Perrin, mission specialist. Expedition Five crewmembers are, from front to back, Cosmonaut Valery G. Korzun, mission commander; Astronaut Peggy A. Whitson and Cosmonaut Sergei Y. Treschev, flight engineers. The ISS recieved a new crew, Expedition Five, replacing Expedition Four after a record-setting 196 days in space, when the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavour STS-111 mission visited in June 2002. Three spacewalks enabled the STS-111 crew to accomplish additional mission objectives: the delivery and installation of the Mobile Base System (MBS), which is an important part of the station's Mobile Servicing System allowing the robotic arm to travel the length of the station; the replacement of a wrist roll joint on the Station's robotic arm; and unloading supplies and science experiments from the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, which made its third trip to the orbital outpost. The STS-111 mission, the 14th Shuttle mission to visit the ISS, was launched on June 5, 2002 and landed June 19, 2002.

2002-01-01

142

STS-111 Flight Day 2 Highlights  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

On Flight Day 2 of STS-111, the crew of Endeavour (Kenneth Cockrell, Commander; Paul Lockhart, Pilot; Franklin Chang-Diaz, Mission Specialist; Philippe Perrin, Mission Specialist) and the Expedition 5 crew (Valery Korzun, Commander; Peggy Whitson, Flight Engineer; Sergei Treschev, Flight Engineer), having successfully entered orbit around the Earth, begin to maneuver towards the International Space Station (ISS), where the Expedition 5 crew will replace the Expedition 4 crew. Live video is shown of the Earth from several vantage points aboard the Shuttle. The center-line camera, which will allow Shuttle pilots to align the docking apparatus with that on the ISS, provides footage of the Earth. Chang-Diaz participates in an interview, in Spanish, conducted from the ground via radio communications, with Cockrell also appearing. Footage of the Earth includes: Daytime video of the Eastern United States with some cloud cover as Endeavour passes over the Florida panhandle, Georgia, and the Carolinas; Daytime video of Lake Michigan unobscured by cloud cover; Nighttime low-light camera video of Madrid, Spain.

2002-01-01

143

STS-113 Flight Day 6 Highlights  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This video shows the activities of the STS-113 crew (Jim Wetherbee, Commander; Paul Lockhart, Pilot; Michael Lopez-Alegria, John Herrington, Mission Specialists) during flight day 6. Also shown are the Expedition 5 (Valeri Korzun, Commander; Peggy Whitsun, ISS Science Officer/Flight Engineer; Sergei Treschev, Flight Engineer) and Expedition 6 (Kenneth Bowersox, Commander; Donald Pettit, Nikolai Budarin, Flight Engineers) crews of the ISS (International Space Station). The primary activity of flight day 6 is the outfitting of the P1 (Port 1) Truss Structure. The suiting up and departure of Lopez-Alegria and Herrington through the ISS Quest airlock is shown. The departure is shown through sequential still video. The ISS CETA handrail cart is shown in use, as is a pistol-grip space tool. At the end of the EVA, the astronauts are shown cleaning up outside the ISS. The video also contains a Thanksgiving message about the importance of technological advances in spaceflight, and footage of the Moon disappearing behind the Earth's limb.

2002-01-01

144

STS-112 Mission Highlights Resource Tape Part 2 of 3  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An overview of the STS-112 Mission is presented. The fourth flight day begins with a view inside of the Destiny Laboratory of the International Space Station where Expedition Five Commander Valery Korzun is shown. The robotics workstation where Mission Specialist Sandra Mangus and Flight Engineer Peggy Whitson operate Canadarm 2 to lift the S(1) Truss segment out of the payload bay of the Space Shuttle Atlantis and maneuver it for installation onto the S(1) Truss is presented. Mission Specialist Piers Sellers is shown preparing for his six and one half hour spacewalk by performing breathing exercises. Animation of the installation of the S(1) Truss, and also the unbirthing of the S(1) truss is also presented. Mission Specialists David Wolf and Piers Sellers are shown getting suited for their spacewalks. During the spacewalk, David Wolf is removing the antenna assembly from its launched position and Piers Sellers is releasing launch restraints from the Radiator Beam Assembly. A beautiful view of the coast of Texas is captured during this spacewalk. Flight day five shows pilot Pam Melroy and Mission Specialist Dave Wolf working inside of the International Space Station's Quest Airlock. Flight day six is shown with Dave Wolf and Piers Sellers exiting their spacesuits inside of the Quest Airlock Module after a successful spacewalk. This presentation ends with views of the International Space Station's installed S(1) Truss, rotation of the radiator assembly and the radiator's coolant tubing.

2003-01-01

145

Two Shuttle crews check equipment at SPACEHAB to be used on ISS Flights  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

At Astrotech in Titusville, Fla., STS-96 Mission Specialists Tamara E. Jernigan and Daniel T. Barry take turns working with a Russian cargo crane, the Strela, which is to be mounted to the exterior of the Russian station segment on the International Space Station (ISS). Technicians around the table observe. The STS-96 crew is taking part in a Crew Equipment Interface Test. Other members participating are Commander Kent V. Rominger, Pilot Rick Douglas Husband, and Mission Specialists Julie Payette, with the Canadian Space Agency, and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev, with the Russian Space Agency. For the first time, STS-96 will include an Integrated Cargo Carrier (ICC) that will carry the Russian cargo crane; the SPACEHAB Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), which is a logistics items carrier; and a U.S.-built crane (ORU Transfer Device, or OTD) that will be stowed on the station for use during future ISS assembly missions. The ICC can carry up to 6,000 lb of unpressurized payload. It was built for SPACEHAB by DaimlerChrysler Aerospace and RSC Energia of Korolev, Russia. STS-96 is targeted for launch on May 24 from Launch Pad 39B. STS-101 is scheduled to launch in early December 1999.

1999-01-01

146

Two Shuttle crews check equipment at SPACEHAB to be used on ISS Flights  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

At Astrotech in Titusville, Fla., STS-96 Mission Speciaists Daniel T. Barry (left), Julie Payette (center, with camera), and Tamara E. Jernigan (right, pointing) get a close look at one of the payloads on their upcoming mission. Other crew members are Commander Kent V. Rominger, and Mission Specialists Ellen Ochoa and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev, with the Russian Space Agency. Payette is with the Canadian Space Agency. For the first time, STS-96 will include an Integrated Cargo Carrier (ICC) that will carry a Russian cargo crane, the Strela, to be mounted to the exterior of the Russian station segment on the International Space Station (ISS); the SPACEHAB Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), which is a logistics items carrier; and a U.S.-built crane (ORU Transfer Device, or OTD) that will be stowed on the station for use during future ISS assembly missions. The ICC can carry up to 6,000 lb of unpressurized payload. It was built for SPACEHAB by DaimlerChrysler and RSC Energia of Korolev, Russia. STS-96 is targeted for launch on May 24 from Launch Pad 39B. STS-101 is scheduled to launch in early December 1999.

1999-01-01

147

Resistance and host-response of selected plants to Meloidogyne megadora.  

PubMed

Fourteen plant species, including 30 genotypes, were assessed for host suitability to Meloidogyne megadora in a growth room at 20 to 28 degrees C. Host suitability was based on the gall index (GI) and the reproduction factor (Rf):final population density (Pf)/initial population density (Pi). The presence of distinct galling was observed on roots of six plant species, and reproduction occurred on five of the 14 species tested. Three cultivars of cantaloupe (cvs. Branco do Ribatejo, Concerto, and Galia), three of cucumber (cvs. LM 809, Half Long Palmetto, and Market More), six of banana (cvs. Maçá, Ouro Branco, Ouro Roxo, Prata, Páo, and Valery), and one of broad bean (cv. Algarve) were considered susceptible (Pf/Pi > 1). Resistant cultivars (Pf/Pi = 0) included beet (cv, Crosby), pepper (cv. LM 204), watermelon (cvs. Black Magic and Crimson Sweet), tomato (cvs. Moneymaker and Rossol), radish (cv. Cherry Belle), and corn (cv. Dunia); sunn hemp and black velvetbean genotypes were also resistant. All Brassica cultivars were galled, although no egg masses were observed (Pf/Pi = 0), and classified as resistant/hypersensitive. PMID:19265922

de Almeida, A M S F; de A Santos, M S N

2002-06-01

148

STS-91 Mission Specialist Ryumin suits up for launch  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-91 Mission Specialist and Russian cosmonaut Valery Victorovitch Ryumin is outfitted with his ascent/reentry flight suit and helmet by two suit technicians in the Operations and Checkout (O&C) Building. The final suit fitting and checkout takes place prior to the crew walkout and transport to Launch Pad 39A. He has been director of the Russian Shuttle-Mir program and flight director for the Salyut-7 and Mir space stations and is a veteran of three space flights with a total of 362 days in space. This will be Ryumin's first visit to Mir. However, his experience with Russian spacecraft in orbit will prove extremely valuable as he helps the crew with Mir equipment transfer operations. He will also be assessing the condition of the station for the Russian space program. STS-91 is scheduled to be launched on June 2 with a launch window opening around 6:10 p.m. EDT. The mission will feature the ninth and final Shuttle docking with the Russian space station Mir, the first Mir docking for Discovery, the first on-orbit test of the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), and the first flight of the new Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank. Astronaut Andrew S. W. Thomas will return to Earth as a STS- 91 crew member after living more than four months aboard Mir.

1998-01-01

149

STS-91 Mission Specialist Ryumin visits KSC to participate in the TCDT  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-91 Mission Specialist and Russian cosmonaut Valery Victorovitch Ryumin, arrives at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard a T-38 jet. He is here to participate in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. The STS-91 launch is targeted for June 2 with a launch window opening around 6:10 p.m. EDT. The mission will conclude Phase I of the joint U.S.-Russian International Space Station Program. Although it will be the ninth Shuttle docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, it will be the first Mir docking for the Space Shuttle orbiter Discovery. Ryumin is a veteran of three space flights and has logged 362 days in space. The STS-91 mission will also be the first flight for the new Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank. The STS-91 flight crew also includes Mission Commander Charles Precourt; Pilot Dominic Gorie; and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence; Franklin Chang-Diaz, Ph.D.; and Janet Kavandi, Ph.D. Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will be returning to Earth with the crew after living aboard Mir since January 25, 1998.

1998-01-01

150

SOFIA FORCAST Images of the Bipolar Planetary Nebula M2-9  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As part of a SOFIA Basic Science program to study compact planetary nebulae, we have obtained images of the bipolar nebula M2-9, using the FORCAST bands at 6.6, 11.1, 19.7, 24.2, 33.6, and 37.1um. All images show a very bright point like central condensation associated with the exciting star of the nebula and the surrounding circumstellar dust. At the four longest wavelengths, the two bipolar lobes are seen in the images, extending some 20 arcsec from the central star. The integrated signal from each of the lobes may be visible at the two shorter wavelengths as well. The intensity and spectrum of the infrared radiation from the lobes is consistent with thermal emission from grains entrained in the bipolar outflow, and seen at visible wavelengths in scattered starlight. We compare the structure of the lobes as seen from SOFIA with that seen in Hubble images and report the results of attempting to fit the lobe profiles with emission from an outflow cavity with limb-brightened edges. Jessica Davis was the Charles and Valerie Elachi SURF Fellow at JPL during the summer of 2011. We appreciate the support of Jim DeBuizer and others at the Sofia Science Center. Portions of this research were carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

Werner, Michael W.; Davis, J.; Sahai, R.; Morris, M.; Keller, L.; Herter, T.

2012-01-01

151

STS-96 crew leaves the O&C Building enroute to Pad 39B  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The STS-96 crew wave to onlookers as they walk out of the Operations and Checkout Building enroute to Launch Pad 39B and liftoff of Space Shuttle Discovery, targeted for 6:49 a.m. EDT. In their orange launch and entry suits, they are (clockwise from bottom left) Mission Specialists Tamara E. Jernigan, Julie Payette, Ellen Ochoa, Valery Ivanovich Tokarev and Daniel T. Barry, Pilot Rick D. Husband, and Commander Kent V. Rominger. Payette is with the Canadian Space Agency, and Tokarev is with the Russian Space Agency. STS-96 is a 10-day logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying about 4,000 pounds of supplies, to be stored aboard the station for use by future crews, including laptop computers, cameras, tools, spare parts, and clothing. The mission also includes such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-involved experiment. It will include a space walk to attach the cranes to the outside of the ISS for use in future construction. Landing is expected at the SLF on June 6 about

1999-01-01

152

STS-96 crew leaves the O&C Building enroute to Pad 39B  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The STS-96 crew smile and wave at onlookers as they eagerly head for the bus that will take them to Launch Pad 39B for liftoff of Space Shuttle Discovery, targeted for 6:49 a.m. EDT. From left to right in front are Mission Specialists Valery Ivanovich Tokarev, Ellen Ochoa, Julie Payette and Tamara E. Jernigan; in back are Mission Specialist Daniel T. Barry, Pilot Rick D. Husband, and Commander Kent V. Rominger. Payette is with the Canadian Space Agency, and Tokarev is with the Russian Space Agency. STS-96 is a 10-day logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying about 4,000 pounds of supplies, to be stored aboard the station for use by future crews, including laptop computers, cameras, tools, spare parts, and clothing. The mission also includes such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student- involved experiment. It will include a space walk to attach the cranes to the outside of the ISS for use in future construction. Landing is expected at the SLF on June 6 about 1:58 a.m. EDT.

1999-01-01

153

Sensitivity Analysis and Parameter Identifiability of the Land Surface Model JULES at the point scale in permeable catchments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Land surface models (LSMs) are recognised as important components of Global Circulation Models (GCMs). Simulating exchanges of the moisture, carbon and energy between land surface and atmosphere in a consistent manner requires physics-based LSMs of high complexity, fine vertical resolution and a large number of parameters that need to be estimated. The "physics" that is incorporated in such models is generally based on our knowledge of point (or very small) scale hydrological processes. Therefore, while larger GCM grid-scale performance may be the ultimate goal, the ability of the model to simulate the point-scale processes is, intuitively, a pre-requisite for its reliable use at larger scales. Critical evaluation of model performance and parameter uncertainty at point scales is therefore a rational starting point for critical evaluation of LSMs; and identification of optimal parameter sets at the point scale is a significant stage of the model evaluation at larger scales. The Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES) is a complex LSM, which is used to represent surface exchanges in the UK Met Office's forecast and climate change models. This complexity necessitates a large number of model parameters (in total 108) some of which are incapable of being measured directly at large (i.e. kilometer) scales. For this reason, a parameter sensitivity analysis is a vital confidence building process within the framework of every LSM, and as a part of the calibration strategy. The problem of JULES parameter estimation and uncertainty at the point scale with a view to assessing the accuracy and the uncertainty in the default parameter values is addressed. The sensitivity of the JULES output of soil moisture is examined using parameter response surface analysis. The implemented technique is based on the Regional Sensitivity Analysis method (RSA), which evaluates the model response surface over a region of parameter space using Monte Carlo sampling. The modified version of RSA used here takes into account a multiobjective approach, which means that more than one objective functions are evaluated. These are the Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE) and the Absolute value of the relative bias (Absr-bias). The sensitivity analysis also provided an approximation of the optimal parameter sets so that the residual model error would originate mainly from the datasets and the model structure. JULES performance at the point scale using the default recommended parameter values was variable. The case study area is focused on the Thames catchment and more specifically on the Pang and Lambourn catchments. The examined areas are located in the WarrenFarm site, a grassland livestock site that is high on Lambourn Downs, and the Frilsham Meadow site, a grassland recharge site next to the River Pang. With the incorporation of the optimised parameters the soil moisture performance was considered reasonable so that there is no evidence that the model structure is insufficient in these catchments, and that the challenge is parameter estimation. The greater problem of parameter estimation at larger operational scales is discussed.

Bakopoulou, C.; Bulygina, N.; Butler, A. P.; McIntyre, N. R.

2012-04-01

154

Extreme Rainfall Impacts in Fractured Permeable Catchments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Serious groundwater flooding events have occurred on Chalk catchments in both the UK and north west Europe in the last decade, causing substantial amounts of disruption and economic damage. These fractured, permeable catchments are characterized by low surface runoff, high baseflow indices and strongly attenuated streamflow hydrographs. They have a general resilience to drought and pluvial/fluvial flooding. The small pore size of the Chalk matrix (~ 1 µm) exerts a high suction, such that dynamic storage is primarily due to the fractures, and amounts to ~ 1% of the total volume. As a result, under sustained rainfall the water table can rise up to exceptional levels leading to surface water emergence from springs and valleys. Floodwater may slowly drain with the topography, or, in localized depressions, it may simply pond until the groundwater levels decline. In winter 2000/1, a sequence of individually unexceptional rainfall events over several months led to large scale flooding in the Pang catchment, Berkshire, UK. By contrast, an extreme rainfall event on 20th July 2007 in the same catchment caused a very rapid response at the water table, but due to the antecedent conditions did not lead to flooding. The objective of this study is to quantify how the water table in a fractured permeable catchment responds to different types of rainfall, and the implications of this for groundwater flooding. We make use of measurements from the Pang catchment, including: rainfall (tipping bucket gauges); actual evaporation (eddy flux correlation); soil water content (profile probes and neutron probes); near surface matric potential (tensiometers and equitensiometers); deep (>10m) matric potential (deep jacking tensiometers); and water table elevation (piezometers). Conventional treatment of recharge in Chalk aquifers considers a fixed bypass component of rainfall, normally 15%, to account for the role of the fractures. However, interpretation of the field data suggest three modes of recharge: under low rainfall intensities recharge is slow (lags of > 100 days) and through the matrix; under moderate intensities recharge is via the matrix and partially saturated fractures (lags of 10s of days) and, if sustained, can lead to flooding (as in 2000/1); under high intensity rainfall fractures transmit rainfall preferentially, leading to a large, rapid (<1 day) water table response. Given the expectation that extreme rainfall events are likely to become more frequent and intense, our main focus is the preferential recharge mechanism, which has the potential to cause rapid flooding. By examining rainfall-water table response patterns, we demonstrate how the combined intensity-duration characteristics of rainfall events can be used to predict when preferential recharge is likely to occur. A 2D physically based, dual permeability Richards' equation model of the Chalk, which fully couples the unsaturated/saturated zones was developed and conditioned on field observations. This was used in a sensitivity study of water table response to a wide range of rainfall conditions, such as might be expected under future climate scenarios. The model also demonstrated the importance of the soil and weathered chalk layers on matrix and fracture flow response to rainfall infiltration.

Ireson, A. M.; Butler, A. P.

2009-12-01

155

Pre-Venus-Transit Dark Lunar Eclipse Reveals a Very Large Volcanic Eruption in 1761  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Kepler's third law states Sun-planet distances in AU. International observations of the solar parallax during the 1761/1769 Venus transits gave us the first AU in miles. Benjamin Franklin promoted American participation in the project. While serving as Ambassador to France he observed that a "dry fog” from the 1783 Laki eruption in Iceland had obscured the Sun, and led to a cold summer and winter. Using Benjamin Franklin's method I analyzed photometric observations of the dark lunar eclipse made just before the 1761 Venus transit, ice core, tree ring, and Chinese weather data, and conclude that a very large previously unknown volcanic eruption in early 1761 had cooled the world climate. Observers worldwide found the 18 May 1761 totally eclipsed Moon very dark or invisible, e.g., Wargentin could not see the Moon for 38 minutes even with a 2-ft telescope (Phil. Trans. 52, 208, 1761-1762). Since the totally eclipsed Moon is illuminated only by sunlight refracted by the Earth's atmosphere, the obscuration must have been very severe. Ice cores from Greenland and Antarctica have large sulfuric acid contents in 1761-1762, precipitated from the global volcanic acid cloud (Zeilinski, J. Geophys. Res. 102, 26625, 1997). Frost-damaged rings in American bristlecone pines confirm that 1761 was very cold (LaMarche, Nature 307, 121, 1984). Contemporary Chinese chronicles report that heavy sustained snow fell from the Tropic of Cancer to the Yellow River. Wells and rivers froze, e.g., Taihu "Great Lake” and nearby Yangtze tributaries were not navigable. Innumerable trees, birds and livestock perished, etc. All observations are consistent with the above conclusion. Finally Benjamin Franklin's criteria for a climate-altering volcanic eruption are still universally used. Moreover his legacy continues to inspire climate researchers. See Pang, Eos 74, no. 43, 106, 1993; and as cited in "Earth in Balance,” Al Gore, p. 379, 1993.

Pang, Kevin

2009-01-01

156

Mechanisms of cervical spine injuries for non-fatal motorcycle road crash.  

PubMed

Cervical spine injuries such as subluxation and fracture dislocation have long been known to result in severe consequences, as well as the trauma management itself. The injury to the region has been identified as one of the major causes of death in Malaysian motorcyclists involved in road crashes, besides head and chest injuries (Pang, 1999). Despite this, cervical spine injury in motorcyclists is not a well-studied injury, unlike the whiplash injury in motorcar accidents. The present study is a retrospective study on the mechanisms of injury in cervical spine sustained by Malaysian motorcyclists, who were involved in road crash using an established mechanistic classification system. This will serve as an initial step to look at the cervical injuries pattern. The information obtained gives engineer ideas to facilitate design and safety features to reduce injuries. All cervical spine injured motorcyclists admitted to Hospital Kuala Lumpur between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2001 were included in the present study. Based on the medical notes and radiological investigations (X-rays, CT and MRI scans), the mechanisms of injuries were formulated using the injury mechanics classification. The result shows that flexion of the cervical vertebrae is the most common vertebral kinematics in causing injury to motorcyclists. This indicates that the cervical vertebrae sustained a high-energy loading at flexion movement in road crash, and exceeded its tolerance level. The high frequency of injury at the C5 vertebra, C6 vertebra and C5-C6 intervertebral space are recorded. Classification based on the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) is made to give a view on injury severity, 9.1% of the study samples have been classified as AIS code 1, 51.5% with AIS 2 and 21.2% with AIS 3. PMID:15559162

Ooi, S S; Wong, S V; Radin Umar, R S; Azhar, A A; Yeap, J S; Megat Ahmad, M M H

2004-06-01

157

Dengue Virus Type 3 Isolated from a Fatal Case with Visceral Complications Induces Enhanced Proinflammatory Responses and Apoptosis of Human Dendritic Cells?†  

PubMed Central

A recent (2007 to 2009) dengue outbreak caused by dengue virus (DENV) in Paraguay presented unusual severe clinical outcomes associated with 50% mortality rates. Although it has been reported that inflammatory responses influence the severity of dengue virus infection (T. Pang, M. J. Cardosa, and M. G. Guzman, Immunol. Cell Biol. 85:43–45, 2007), there remains a paucity of information on virus-innate immunity interactions influencing clinical outcome. Using human dendritic cells from a major innate immune cell population as an in vitro model, we have investigated signature cytokine responses as well as infectivity-replicative profiles of DENV clinical isolates from either a nonfatal case of classical dengue fever (strain DENV3/290; isolated in Brazil in 2002) or a fatal case of dengue fever with visceral complications isolated in Paraguay in 2007 (strain DENV3/5532). Strain DENV3/5532 was found to display significantly higher replicative ability than DENV3/290 in monocyte-derived dendritic cells (mdDCs). In addition, compared to DENV3/290 results, mdDCs exposed to DENV3/5532 showed increased production of proinflammatory cytokines associated with higher rates of programmed cell death, as shown by annexin V staining. The observed phenotype was due to viral replication, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-?) appears to exert a protective effect on virus-induced mdDC apoptosis. These results suggest that the DENV3/5532 strain isolated from the fatal case replicates within human dendritic cells, modulating cell survival and synthesis of inflammatory mediators.

Silveira, Guilherme F.; Meyer, Florencia; Delfraro, Adriana; Mosimann, Ana Luiza P.; Coluchi, Norma; Vasquez, Cyntia; Probst, Christian M.; Bafica, Andre; Bordignon, Juliano; dos Santos, Claudia N. Duarte

2011-01-01

158

Regulation of yeast acetohydroxyacid synthase by valine and ATP.  

PubMed Central

The first step in the common pathway for the biosynthesis of branched-chain amino acids is catalysed by acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS; EC 4.1.3.18). The enzyme is found in plants, fungi and bacteria, and is regulated by controls on transcription and translation, and by allosteric modulation of catalytic activity. It has long been known that the bacterial enzyme is composed of two types of subunit, and a similar arrangement has been found recently for the yeast and plant enzymes. One type of subunit contains the catalytic machinery, whereas the other has a regulatory function. Previously, we have shown [Pang and Duggleby (1999) Biochemistry 38, 5222--5231] that yeast AHAS can be reconstituted from its separately purified subunits. The reconstituted enzyme is inhibited by valine, and ATP reverses this inhibition. In the present work, we further characterize the structure and the regulatory properties of reconstituted yeast AHAS. High phosphate concentrations are required for reconstitution and it is shown that these conditions are necessary for physical association between the catalytic and regulatory subunits. It is demonstrated by CD spectral changes that ATP binds to the regulatory subunit alone, most probably as MgATP. Neither valine nor MgATP causes dissociation of the regulatory subunit from the catalytic subunit. The specificity of valine inhibition and MgATP activation are examined and it is found that the only effective analogue of either regulator of those tested is the non-hydrolysable ATP mimic, adenosine 5'-[beta,gamma-imido]triphosphate. The kinetics of regulation are studied in detail and it is shown that the activation by MgATP depends on the valine concentration in a complex manner that is consistent with a proposed quantitative model.

Pang, S S; Duggleby, R G

2001-01-01

159

Development of high quantum efficiency, flat panel, thick detectors for megavoltage x-ray imaging: A novel direct-conversion design and its feasibility  

SciTech Connect

Most electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) developed to date, including recently developed flat panel systems, have low x-ray absorption, i.e., low quantum efficiency (QE) of 2%-4% as compared to the theoretical limit of 100%. A significant increase of QE is desirable for applications such as a megavoltage cone-beam computed tomography (MVCT) and megavoltage fluoroscopy. However, the spatial resolution of an imaging system usually decreases significantly with an increase of QE. The key to the success in the design of a high QE detector is therefore to maintain the spatial resolution. Recently, we demonstrated theoretically that it is possible to design a portal imaging detector with both high QE and high resolution [see Pang and Rowlands, Med. Phys. 29, 2274 (2002)]. In this paper, we introduce such a novel design consisting of a large number of microstructured plates (made by, e.g., photolithographic patterning of evaporated or electroplated layers) packed together and aligned with the incident x rays. On each plate, microstrip charge collectors are focused toward the x-ray source to collect charges generated in the ionization medium (e.g., air or gas) surrounded by high-density materials that act as x-ray converters. The collected charges represent the x-ray image and can be read out by various means, including a two-dimensional (2-D) active readout matrix. The QE, spatial resolution, and sensitivity of the detector have been calculated. It has been shown that the new design will have a QE of more than an order of magnitude higher and a spatial resolution equivalent to that of flat panel systems currently used for portal imaging. The new design is also quantum noise limited down to very low doses ({approx}1-2 radiation pulses of the linear accelerator)

Pang, G.; Rowlands, J.A. [Toronto--Sunnybrook Regional Cancer Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto M4N 3M5 (Canada); Imaging Research, Sunnybrook and Womens College Health Sciences Centre, Departments of Medical Imaging and Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto M4N 3M5 (Canada)

2004-11-01

160

Parasitism, development and adult longevity of the egg parasitoid Telenomus nawai (Hymenoptera: Scelionidae) on the eggs of Spodoptera litura (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).  

PubMed

When Telenomus nawai Ashmead or Trichogramma ostriniae Pang & Chen (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae) was inoculated into intact egg masses of Spodoptera litura (Fabricius) that were covered with a scale-hair layer, T. nawai emerged from 76% of the eggs, while emergence of T. ostriniae was from only 3% of the eggs. When the hair layer was removed before inoculation, the rate by the latter increased to 21%. These observations confirmed that the hair layer effectively protects S. litura egg masses from attack by T. ostriniae, and that T. nawai parasitism is more effective. In order to assess the feasibility of T. nawai as a biological control agent for S. litura, parasitism rate, development time and adult longevity were examined in the laboratory. Emergence of T. nawai was observed in more than 95% of 0- and 1-day-old separated eggs of S. litura, but the rate decreased to 60% and 0% for 2- and 3-day-old eggs, respectively. The emergence rates of T. nawai were near 95% for temperatures in a range from 25 degrees C to 35 degrees C, but decreased to 80% at 20 degrees C. No parasitoids emerged at 15 degrees C. The developmental periods decreased as temperature increased from 20 degrees C to 35 degrees C. The developmental threshold occurred at 13.7 degrees C and 13.9 degrees C, and the effective accumulative temperatures from egg to adult emergence were 149.3 and 147.1 degree-days for females and males, respectively. Mean longevity of the adult females decreased with increasing temperature; 87.0 days at 15 degrees C and 9.5 days at 35 degrees C. The feasibility of the use of T. nawai for controlling S. litura is discussed. PMID:17411481

Fukuda, T; Wakamura, S; Arakaki, N; Yamagishi, K

2007-04-01

161

Increased levels of inosine in a mouse model of inflammation  

PubMed Central

One possible mechanism linking inflammation with cancer involves the generation of reactive oxygen, nitrogen and halogen species by activated macrophages and neutrophils infiltrating sites of infection or tissue damage, with these chemical mediators causing damage that ultimately leads to cell death and mutation. To determine the most biologically deleterious chemistries of inflammation, we previously assessed products across the spectrum of DNA damage arising in inflamed tissues in the SJL mouse model nitric oxide over-production (Pang et al., Carcinogenesis 28: 1807–1813, 2007). Among the anticipated DNA damage chemistries, we observed significant changes only in lipid peroxidation-derived etheno adducts. We have now developed an isotope-dilution, liquid chromatography-coupled, tandem quadrupole mass spectrometric method to quantify representative species across the spectrum of RNA damage products predicted to arise at sites of inflammation, including nucleobase deamination (xanthosine, inosine), oxidation (8-oxoguanosine), and alkylation (1,N6-etheno-adenosine). Application of the method to liver, spleen, and kidney from the SJL mouse model revealed generally higher levels of oxidative background RNA damage than was observed in DNA in control mice. However, compared to control mice, RcsX treatment to induce nitric oxide overproduction resulted in significant increases only in inosine and only in the spleen. Further, the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, N-methylarginine, did not significantly affect the levels of inosine in control and RcsX-treated mice. The differences between DNA and RNA damage in the same animal model of inflammation point to possible influences from DNA repair, RcsX-induced alterations in adenosine deaminase activity, and differential accessibility of DNA and RNA to reactive oxygen and nitrogen species as determinants of nucleic acid damage during inflammation.

Prestwich, Erin G; Mangerich, Aswin; Pang, Bo; McFaline, Jose L; Lonkar, Pallavi; Sullivan, Matthew R; Trudel, Laura J; Taghizedeh, Koli; Dedon, Peter C

2013-01-01

162

Receptive field properties of ON- and OFF-ganglion cells in the mouse retina  

PubMed Central

There are two subclasses of alpha cell in the mammalian retina, which are morphologically identical in plain view but have opposite responses to a luminance change: one is ON center and the other is OFF center. Recent studies have shown that the neural circuitries, which underlie light responses in such ON- and OFF-ganglion cell pairs, are not mirror symmetric with respect to the ON and OFF pathways (Pang et al., 2003; Zaghloul et al., 2003; Murphy & Rieke, 2006). This study examines alpha-cell homologues in the mouse retina and elucidates the synaptic mechanisms that generate their light responses. Morphological analysis of recorded cells revealed three subclasses that were essentially identical in plan view but had distinct vertical stratification levels. We refer to these cells as the sustained ON (ON-S), sustained OFF (OFF-S), and transient OFF (OFF-T) cells (Murphy & Rieke, 2006; Margolis & Detwiler, 2007). Both ON-S and OFF-S cells were largely driven through the ON pathway via changes in excitatory and inhibitory inputs, respectively. Light responses of OFF-T cells were driven by transient changes in excitatory and inhibitory inputs. Light responses of OFF-S cells were also measured in connexin 36 knockout mice in order to dissect glycinergic input arising from AII amacrine cells. At photopic/mesopic intensities, peak glycinergic input to OFF-S cells in the connexin 36 knockout mouse was reduced by ~85% compared to OFF-S cells in the wild-type retina. This is consistent with the idea that AII cells receive their input from ON-cone bipolar cells through gap junctions and in turn provide glycinergic inhibition to OFF-S cells.

Van Wyk, Michiel; Wassle, Heinz; Taylor, W. Rowland

2010-01-01

163

Comparison of Three Amyloid Assembly Inhibitors: The Sugar scyllo-Inositol, the Polyphenol Epigallocatechin Gallate, and the Molecular Tweezer CLR01  

PubMed Central

Many compounds have been tested as inhibitors or modulators of amyloid ?-protein (A?) assembly in hope that they would lead to effective, disease-modifying therapy for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). These compounds typically were either designed to break apart ?-sheets or selected empirically. Two such compounds, the natural inositol derivative scyllo-inositol and the green-tea-derived flavonoid epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), currently are in clinical trials. Similar to most of the compounds tested thus far, the mechanism of action of scyllo-inositol and EGCG is not understood. Recently, we discovered a novel family of assembly modulators, Lys-specific molecular tweezers, which act by binding specifically to Lys residues and modulate the self-assembly of amyloid proteins, including A?, into formation of nontoxic oligomers by a process-specific mechanism (Sinha, S., Lopes, D. H., Du, Z., Pang, E. S., Shanmugam, A., Lomakin, A., Talbiersky, P., Tennstaedt, A., McDaniel, K., Bakshi, R., Kuo, P. Y., Ehrmann, M., Benedek, G. B., Loo, J. A., Klarner, F. G., Schrader, T., Wang, C., and Bitan, G. (2011) Lysine-specific molecular tweezers are broad-spectrum inhibitors of assembly and toxicity of amyloid proteins. J. Am. Chem. Soc.133, 16958–16969). Here, we compared side-by-side the capability of scyllo-inositol, EGCG, and the molecular tweezer CLR01 to inhibit A? aggregation and toxicity. We found that EGCG and CLR01 had comparable activity whereas scyllo-inositol was a weaker inhibitor. Exploration of the binding of EGCG and CLR01 to A? using heteronuclear solution-state NMR showed that whereas CLR01 bound to the two Lys and single Arg residues in A? monomers, only weak, nonspecific binding was detected for EGCG, leaving the binding mode of the latter unresolved.

2012-01-01

164

PREFACE: Rusnanotech 2010 International Forum on Nanotechnology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Rusnanotech 2010 International Forum on Nanotechnology was held from November 1-3, 2010, in Moscow, Russia. It was the third forum organized by RUSNANO (Russian Corporation of Nanotechnologies) since 2008. In March 2011 RUSNANO was established as an open joint-stock company through the reorganization of the state corporation Russian Corporation of Nanotechnologies. RUSNANO's mission is to develop the Russian nanotechnology industry through co-investment in nanotechnology projects with substantial economic potential or social benefit. Within the framework of the Forum Science and Technology Program, presentations on key trends of nanotechnology development were given by foreign and Russian scientists, R&D officers of leading international companies, universities and scientific centers. The science and technology program of the Forum was divided into eight sections as follows (by following hyperlinks you may find each section's program including videos of all oral presentations): Catalysis and Chemical Industry Nanobiotechnology Nanodiagnostics Nanoelectronics Nanomaterials Nanophotonics Nanotechnolgy In The Energy Industry Nanotechnology in Medicine The scientific program of the forum included 115 oral presentations by leading scientists from 15 countries. Among them in the "Nanomaterials" section was the lecture by Dr Konstantin Novoselov, winner of the Nobel Prize in Physics 2010. The poster session consisted of over 500 presentations, 300 of which were presented in the framework of the young scientists' nanotechnology papers competition. This volume of the Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes a selection of 57 submissions. The scientific program committee: Prof Zhores Alferov, AcademicianVice-president of Russian Academy of Sciences, Nobel Prize winner, Russia, Chairman of the Program CommitteeProf Sergey Deev, Corresponding Member of Russian Academy of SciencesHead of the Laboratory of Molecular Immunology, M M Shemyakin and Yu A Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia, Deputy Chairman of the Program CommitteeProf Alexander Aseev, AcademicianVice-president of Russian Academy of Sciences Director, A V Rzhanov-Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, RussiaProf Sergey Bagaev, AcademicianDirector, Institute of Laser Physics, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, RussiaProf Alexander Gintsburg, Ademician, Russian Academy of Medical SciencesDirector Gamaleya Research Institute of Epidemiology and Microbiology, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, RussiaProf Anatoly Grigoryev, Academician, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russian Academy of Medical SciencesVice-president, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, RussiaProf Michael Kovalchuk, RAS Corresponding MemberDirector, Kurchatov Institute Russian Scientific Center, RussiaProf Valery Lunin, AcademicianDean, Department of Chemistry, Lomonosov Moscow State University, RussiaProf Valentin Parmon, Academician, DirectorBoreskov Institute of Catalysis, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, RussiaProf Rem Petrov, AcademicianAdvisor, Russian Academy of Sciences, RussiaProf Konstantin Skryabin, AcademicianDirector, Bioinzheneriya Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, RussiaProf Vsevolod Tkachuk, Academician, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russian Academy of Medical SciencesDean, Faculty of Fundamental Medicine, Lomonosov Moscow State University, RussiaProf Vladimir Fortov, AcademicianDirector, Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, RussiaProf Alexey Khokhlov, AcademicianVice Principal, Head of Innovation, Information and International Scientific Affairs Department, Lomonosov Moscow State University, RussiaProf Valery Bukhtiyarov, RAS Corresponding MemberDirector, Physicochemical Research Methods Dept., Boreskov Institute of Catalysis, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, RussiaProf Anatoly Dvurechensky, RAS Corresponding MemberDeputy Director, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of S

Kazaryan, Konstantin

2011-03-01

165

Electric Fields in Plasma Flows to Insulating Walls  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the analysis of plasma flows to insulating walls, it often is desired to represent the plasma flow as the sum of two regions, a broad flow of essentially neutral plasma extending from the center of the discharge to the vicinity of the wall, and a narrow space-charge sheath very near the wall. The need then arises to properly match the properties of the neutral region and the sheath at their common boundary. In the established analysis(1) for this problem, the electric field in the neutral-plasma region is calculated by differentiating the Boltzmann equilibrium distribution of electron density vs. electric potential. With the usual approximations made to permit analytic solutions, the result of that calculation is an infinite electric field when the ion flow velocity reaches the Bohm velocity, a condition of particular interest in the matching process. Proposals have been made to avoid the difficulty of a matching boundary at an infinite electric field by interposing an intermediate patch region(2) or by placing the boundary where the flow velocity does not equal the Bohm velocity(3), but none has yet been generally accepted. To overcome this problem, a different calculation of electric field is proposed here, one based on an approximate integration of the Poisson equation. The result is an electric field that remains finite at all flow conditions and permits a simple matching of a neutral-plasma region to a space-charge sheath. (1)R. N. Franklin, Plasma Phenomena in Gas Discharges, Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1976. (2)R. N. Franklin and J. R. Ockendon, J. Plasma Phys. 4, 371-385, 1970. (3)Valery Godyak and Natalia Sternberg, IEEE Trans. Plasma Science 31, 303, 2003.

Harris, Lawson

2003-10-01

166

STS-112 Flight Day 4 Highlights  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

On the fourth day of STS-112, its crew (Jeffrey Ashby, Commander; Pamela Melroy, Pilot; David Wolf, Mission Specialist; Piers Sellers, Mission Specialist; Sandra Magnus, Mission Specialist; Fyodor Yurchikhin, Mission Specialist) onboard Atlantis and the Expedition 5 crew (Valery Korzun, Commander; Peggy Whitson, Flight Engineer; Sergei Treschev, Flight Engineer) onboard the International Space Station (ISS) are seen preparing for the installation of the S1 truss structure. Inside the Destiny Laboratory Module, Korzun and other crewmembers are seen as they busily prepare for the work of the day. Sellers dons an oxygen mask and uses an exercise machine in order to purge the nitrogen from his bloodstream, in preparation for an extravehicular activity (EVA). Whitson uses the ISS's Canadarm 2 robotic arm to grapple the S1 truss and remove it from Atlantis' payload bay, with the assistance of Magnus. Using the robotic arm, Whitson slowly maneuvers the 15 ton truss structure into alignment with its attachment point on the starboard side of the S0 truss structure, where the carefully orchestrated mating procedures take place. There is video footage of the entire truss being rotated and positioned by the arm, and ammonia tank assembly on the structure is visible, with Earth in the background. Following the completion of the second stage capture, the robotic arm is ungrappled from truss. Sellers and Wolf are shown exiting the the Quest airlock hatch to begin their EVA. They are shown performing a variety of tasks on the now attached S1 truss structure, including work on the Crew Equipment Translation Cart (CETA), the S-band Antenna Assembly, and umbilical cables that provide power and remote operation capability to cameras. During their EVA, they are shown using a foot platform on the robotic arm. Significant portions of their activities are shown from the vantage of helmet mounted video cameras. The video closes with a final shot of the ISS and its new S1 truss.

2002-10-01

167

Radiolytic Model for Chemical Composition of Europa's Atmosphere and Surface  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The overall objective of the present effort is to produce models for major and selected minor components of Europa s neutral atmosphere in 1-D versus altitude and in 2-D versus altitude and longitude or latitude. A 3-D model versus all three coordinates (alt, long, lat) will be studied but development on this is at present limited by computing facilities available to the investigation team. In this first year we have focused on 1-D modeling with Co-I Valery Shematovich s Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code for water group species (H2O, O2, O, OH) and on 2-D with Co-I Mau Wong's version of a similar code for O2, O, CO, CO2, and Na. Surface source rates of H2O and O2 from sputtering and radiolysis are used in the 1-D model, while observations for CO2 at the Europa surface and Na detected in a neutral cloud ejected from Europa are used, along with the O2 sputtering rate, to constrain source rates in the 2-D version. With these separate approaches we are investigating a range of processes important to eventual implementation of a comprehensive 3-D atmospheric model which could be used to understand present observations and develop science requirements for future observations, e.g. from Earth and in Europa orbit. Within the second year we expect to merge the full water group calculations into the 2-D version of the DSMC code which can then be extended to 3-D, pending availability of computing resources. Another important goal in the second year would be the inclusion of sulk and its more volatile oxides (SO, SO2).

Cooper, John F.

2004-01-01

168

The survival and function of baboon red blood cells, platelets, and plasma proteins: a review of the experience from 1972 to 2002 at the Naval Blood Research Laboratory, Boston, Massachusetts.  

PubMed

The studies reported in this monograph were performed between 1972 and 2002 when it was possible to study healthy male and female baboons. A colony of baboons was maintained for 30 years without any adverse events observed in these baboons in the numerous studies that were performed. These protocols were reviewed and approved by the institutional animal care and use committees (IACUC) at the sites where the studies were performed and by the veterinarian services of the U.S. Navy's Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, the Office of Naval Research, and the Department of Defense. The physiology of red blood cells (RBCs), platelets (PLTs), and plasma proteins in the baboon was investigated together with the viability and function of preserved RBCs, PLTs, and plasma proteins. These studies in the baboon could not have been performed in normal volunteers and patients. The data obtained have provided critical information to explain the clinical observations reported in normal volunteers and patients after transfusion of fresh and preserved blood products. These studies were supported by the U.S. Navy's Bureau of Medicine and Surgery and the Office of Naval Research. In addition, the support of the late Congressman J. Joseph Moakley from Massachusetts is acknowledged because without his support many of these studies could not have been performed. The authors acknowledge the contributions of the numerous research collaborators identified in the 52 peer-reviewed publications that cite other funding agencies that supported the research that is reported, the editorial assistance of Ms Cynthia Ann Valeri, and the assistance of Ms Deborah Tattersall who prepared the figures and tables reported in this publication. PMID:16889560

Valeri, C Robert; Ragno, Gina

2006-08-01

169

List of participants at SIDE IV meeting, Tokyo, 27 November--1 December 2000  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mark J Ablowitz, Vsevolod Adler, Mark Alber, Said Belmehdi, Marco Boiti, Claude Brezinski, R Bullough, Y M Chiang, Theodore Chihara, Peter A Clarkson, Robert Conte, Adam Doliwa, Vladimir Dorodnitsyn, Mitsuaki Eguchi, Claire Gilson, Basil Grammaticos, Valeri Gromak, Rod Halburd, Koji Hasegawa, Jarmo Hietarinta, Ryogo Hirota, Xing Biao Hu, M Idzumi, J Inoguchi, Hiroya Ishikara, Mourad Ismail, Shin Isojima, Kenichi Ito, Yoshiaki Itoh, Masashi Iwasaki, Klara Janglajew, Michio Jimbo, Nalini Joshi, Kenji Kajiwara, Saburo Kakei, Masaru Kamata, Satoshi Kamei, Rinat Kashaev, Shingo Kawai, Taeko Kimijima, K Kimura, Anatol Kirillov, Koichi Kondo, Boris Konopelchenko, Martin Kruskal, Atsuo Kuniba, Wataru Kunishima, Franklin Lambert, Serguei Leble, Decio Levi, Shigeru Maeda, Manuel Manas, Ken-Ichi Maruno, Tetsu Masuda, J Matsukidaira, Atsushi Matsumiya, Shigeki Matsutani, Yukitaka Minesaki, Mikio Murata, Micheline Musette, Atsushi Nagai, Katsuya Nakagawa, Atsushi Nakamula, Akira Nakamura, Yoshimasa Nakamura, Frank Nijhoff, J J C Nimmo, Katsuhiro Nishinari, Michitomo Nishizawa, A Nobe, Masatoshi Noumi, Yaeko Ohsaki, Yasuhiro Ohta, Kazuo Okamoto, Alexandre Orlov, Naoki Osada, Flora Pempinelli, Spiro Pyrlis, Reinout Quispel, Orlando Ragnisco, Alfred Ramani, Jean-Pierre Ramis, Andreas Ruffing, Simon Ruijsenaars, Satoru Saito, Noriko Saitoh, Hidetaka Sakai, Paulo Santini, Narimasa Sasa, Ryu Sasaki, Yoshikatsu Sasaki, Junkichi Satsuma, Sergei Sergeev, Nobuhiko Shinzawa, Evgueni Sklyanin, Juris Suris, Norio Suzuki, Yukiko Tagami, Katsuaki Takahashi, Daisuke Takahashi, Tomoyuki Takenawa, Yoshiro Takeyama, K M Tamizhmani, T Tamizhmani, Kouichi Toda, Morikatsu Toda, Tetsuji Tokihiro, Takayuki Tsuchida, Yohei Tsuchiya, Teruhisa Tsuda, Satoru Tsujimoto, Walter Van Assche, Claude Viallet, Luc Vinet, Shinsuke Watanabe, Yoshihida Watanabe, Ralph Willox, Pavel Winternitz, Yasuhiko Yamada, Yuji Yamada, Jin Yoneda, Haruo Yoshida, Katsuhiko Yoshida, Daisuke Yoshihara, Fumitaka Yura, J Zagrodzinski, Alexei Zhedanov

2001-12-01

170

Banana Ripening: Implications of Changes in Glycolytic Intermediate Concentrations, Glycolytic and Gluconeogenic Carbon Flux, and Fructose 2,6-Bisphosphate Concentration 1  

PubMed Central

In ripening banana (Musa sp. [AAA group, Cavendish subgroup] cv Valery) fruit, the concentration of glycolytic intermediates increased in response to the rapid conversion of starch to sugars and CO2. Glucose 6-phosphate (G-6-P), fructose 6-phosphate (Fru 6-P), and pyruvate (Pyr) levels changed in synchrony, increasing to a maximum one day past the peak in ethylene synthesis and declining rapidly thereafter. Fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (Fru 1,6-P2) and phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) levels underwent changes dissimilar to those of G 6-P, Fru 6-P, and Pyr, indicating that carbon was regulated at the PEP/Pyr and Fru 6-P/Fru 1,6-P2 interconversion sites. During the climacteric respiratory rise, gluconeogenic carbon flux increased 50- to 100-fold while glycolytic carbon flux increased only 4- to 5-fold. After the climacteric peak in CO2 production, gluconeogenic carbon flux dropped dramatically while glycolytic carbon flux remained elevated. The steady-state fructose 2,6-bisphosphate (Fru 2,6-P2) concentration decreased to ½ that of preclimacteric fruit during the period coinciding with the rapid increase in gluconeogenesis. Fru 2,6-P2 concentration increased thereafter as glycolytic carbon flux increased relative to gluconeogenic carbon flux. It appears likely that the initial increase in respiration in ripening banana fruit is due to the rapid influx of carbon into the cytosol as starch is degraded. As starch reserves are depleted and the levels of intermediates decline, the continued enhancement of respiration may, in part, be maintained by an increased steady-state Fru 2,6-P2 concentration acting to promote glycolytic carbon flux at the step responsible for the interconversion of Fru 6-P and Fru 1,6-P2.

Beaudry, Randolph M.; Severson, Ray F.; Black, Clanton C.; Kays, Stanley J.

1989-01-01

171

Crustaceans from a tropical estuarine sand-mud flat, Pacific, Costa Rica, (1984-1988) revisited.  

PubMed

The availability of data sets for time periods of more than a year is scarce for tropical environments. Advances in hardware and software speed-up the re-analysis of old data sets and facilitates the description of population oscillations. Using recent taxonomic literature and software we have updated and re-analized the information on crustacean diversity and population fluctuations from a set of cores collected at a mud-sand flat in the mid upper Gulf of Nicoya estuary, Pacific coast of Costa Rica (1984-1988). A total of 112 morphological species of macroinvertebrates was found, of which 29 were crustaceans. Taxonomic problems, maily with the peracarids, prevented the identification of a group of species. The abundance patterns of the crab Pinnixa valerii, the ostracod Cyprideis pacifica, and the cumacean Coricuma nicoyensis were analized with the Generalized Additive Models of the free software R. The models evidenced a variety of population oscillations during the sampling period. These oscillations probably included perturbations induced by external factors, like the strong red tide events of 1985. In additon, early on 1984 the populations might have been at an altered state due to the inpact of El Niño 1982-83. Thus, the oscillations observed during the study period departed from the expected seasonality (dry vs rainy) pattern and are thus considered atypical for this tropical estuarine tidal-flat. Crustacean diversity and population peaks were within the range of examples found in worldwide literature. However, abundances of the cumacean C. nicoyensis, an endemic species, are the highest reported for a tropical estuary. Comparative data from tropical tidal flat crustaceans continues to be scarce. Crustaceans (total vs groups) had population changes in response to the deployment of predator exclusion cages during the dry and rainy seasons of 1985. Temporal and spatial patchiness characterized the abundances of P. valeri, C. pacifica and C. nicoyenis. PMID:23342527

Vargas-Zamora, José A; Sibaja-Cordero, Jeffrey A; Vargas-Castillo, Rita

2012-12-01

172

The Single Scattering Albedo of Martian Atmospheric Dust in the 290-500 nm Region  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Despite multiple previous investigations, the detailed wavelength-dependence of Martian atmospheric dust absorption at ultraviolet (UV) and near-UV wavelengths is not particularly well-known. Several efforts have made some progress (e.g., Pang and Ajello, Icarus, 30, 63, 1977; Clancy et al., JGR, 100, 5251, 1995; Wolff et al., JGR, 104, 9027, 1999), but observational or instrumental constraints have severely limited the amount of detail retrievable. Ideally, one would observe an isolated dust signature with moderate spectral resolution and adequate spectral coverage. In essence, one would like to obtain data of a large-scale, optically-thick dust storm with a well-calibrated spacecraft-based spectrometer. Such a set of data has very recently been obtained, albeit somewhat fortuitously. Using the Hubble Space Telescope and the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) instrument to perform high resolution imaging spectroscopy of Mars during the 2001 opposition, the combination of an electronics failure and an unusually early onset of a global dust storm, we have observations of Martian atmospheric dust with a minimal-to-undetectable surface contribution. Our 2001 observations utilized the G430L grating to cover 289 to 590 nm at 0.27 nm/channel. The STIS 0.2 arcec slit was pushbroom-scanned across the 13-16 arcsec diameter planet in ~70 adjacent steps, yielding a 3-dimensional image cube in 1024 wavelengths and at ~20x80 km spatial resolution per spectrum. This was done during four visits on 2001 August 9, 10, 14, and September 4 (LS=211°\\ to 227°). We will present the derived dust absorption spectra (i.e., single scattering albedo) which has resulted from our multiple-scattering, radiative transfer analyses of the STIS data. Our results will be compared to analogous efforts of Goguen et al. (personal communication, 2002) using nearly-contemporaneous observations in the 230-300 nm range (STIS/G230L). In addition, in order to better constrain the dust properties (e.g., size, shape) and subsequently isolate the single scattering albedo, our work includes retrievals from Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer observations (both the thermal infrared and solar-band channel).

Wolff, M. J.; Bell, J. F.; Sohl-Dickstein, J.

2002-12-01

173

A central role for G9a and EZH2 in the epigenetic silencing of cyclooxygenase-2 in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis  

PubMed Central

Selective silencing of the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) gene with the loss of the antifibrotic mediator prostaglandin E2 contributes to the fibrotic process in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). This study explored the role of G9a- and enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2)-mediated methylation of histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9me3) and histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3) in COX-2 silencing in IPF. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and re-ChIP assays demonstrated marked increases in H3K9me3, H3K27me3, and DNA methylation, together with their respective modifying enzymes G9a, EZH2, and DNA methyltransferases (Dnmts) and respective binding proteins heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1), polycomb protein complex 1 (PRC1) and methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2), at the COX-2 promoter in lung fibroblasts from patients with IPF (F-IPFs) compared with fibroblasts from nonfibrotic lungs. HP1, EZH2, and MeCP2 in turn were associated with additional repressive chromatin modifiers in F-IPFs. G9a and EZH2 inhibitors and small interfering RNAs and the Dnmt1 inhibitor markedly reduced H3K9me3 (49?79%), H3K27me3 (44?81%), and DNA methylation (61?97%) at the COX-2 promoter. These reductions were correlated with increased histone H3 and H4 acetylation, resulting in COX-2 mRNA and protein reexpression in F-IPFs. Our results support a central role for G9a- and EZH2-mediated histone hypermethylation and a model of bidirectional, mutually reinforcing, and interdependent crosstalk between histone hypermethylation and DNA methylation in COX-2 epigenetic silencing in IPF.—Coward, W. R., Feghali-Bostwick, C. A., Jenkins, G., Knox, A. J., Pang, L. A central role for G9a and EZH2 in the epigenetic silencing of cyclooxygenase-2 in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

Coward, William R.; Feghali-Bostwick, Carol A.; Jenkins, Gisli; Knox, Alan J.; Pang, Linhua

2014-01-01

174

Oligopolistic competition in wholesale electricity markets: Large-scale simulation and policy analysis using complementarity models  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This dissertation conducts research into the large-scale simulation of oligopolistic competition in wholesale electricity markets. The dissertation has two parts. Part I is an examination of the structure and properties of several spatial, or network, equilibrium models of oligopolistic electricity markets formulated as mixed linear complementarity problems (LCP). Part II is a large-scale application of such models to the electricity system that encompasses most of the United States east of the Rocky Mountains, the Eastern Interconnection. Part I consists of Chapters 1 to 6. The models developed in this part continue research into mixed LCP models of oligopolistic electricity markets initiated by Hobbs [67] and subsequently developed by Metzler [87] and Metzler, Hobbs and Pang [88]. Hobbs' central contribution is a network market model with Cournot competition in generation and a price-taking spatial arbitrage firm that eliminates spatial price discrimination by the Cournot firms. In one variant, the solution to this model is shown to be equivalent to the "no arbitrage" condition in a "pool" market, in which a Regional Transmission Operator optimizes spot sales such that the congestion price between two locations is exactly equivalent to the difference in the energy prices at those locations (commonly known as locational marginal pricing). Extensions to this model are presented in Chapters 5 and 6. One of these is a market model with a profit-maximizing arbitrage firm. This model is structured as a mathematical program with equilibrium constraints (MPEC), but due to the linearity of its constraints, can be solved as a mixed LCP. Part II consists of Chapters 7 to 12. The core of these chapters is a large-scale simulation of the U.S. Eastern Interconnection applying one of the Cournot competition with arbitrage models. This is the first oligopolistic equilibrium market model to encompass the full Eastern Interconnection with a realistic network representation (using a DC load flow approximation). Chapter 9 shows the price results. In contrast to prior market power simulations of these markets, much greater variability in price-cost margins is found when using a realistic model of hourly conditions on such a large network. Chapter 10 shows that the conventional concentration indices (HHIs) are poorly correlated with PCMs. Finally, Chapter 11 proposes that the simulation models are applied to merger analysis and provides two large-scale merger examples. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

Helman, E. Udi

175

Atomically Precise Bottom-up Fabrication of Graphene Nanoribbons  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) -- narrow stripes of graphene -- are predicted to exhibit remarkable properties making them suitable for future electronic applications. Contrary to their two-dimensional (2D) parent material graphene, which exhibits semimetallic behavior, GNRs with widths smaller than 10 nm are predicted to be semiconductors due to quantum confinement and edge effects. Despite significant advances in GNR fabrication using chemical, sonochemical and lithographic methods as well as recent reports on the successful unzipping of carbon nanotubes into GNRs, the production of sub-10 nm GNRs with chemical precision remains a major challenge. In this talk, we will present a simple GNR fabrication method that allows for the production of atomically precise GNRs of different topologies and widths [1]. Our bottom-up approach consists in the surface-assisted coupling of suitably designed molecular precursors into linear polyphenylenes and their subsequent cyclodehydrogenation, and results in GNRs whose topology, width and edge periphery are defined by the precursor monomers. By means of STM and Raman characterization, we demonstrate that this fabrication process allows for the atomically precise fabrication of complex GNR topologies. Furthermore, we have developed a reliable procedure to transfer GNRs fabricated on metal surfaces onto other substrates. It will for example be shown that millimeter sized sheets of crosslinked GNRs can be transferred onto silicon wafers, making them available for further processing, e.g. by lithography, prototype device fabrication and characterization. [4pt] Coauthors: Pascal Ruffieux, Rached Jaafar, Marco Bieri, Thomas Braun, and Stephan Blankenburg, Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, 3602 Thun and 8600 D"ubendorf, Switzerland; Matthias Muoth, ETH Zurich, Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering, 8092 Zurich, Switzerland; Ari P. Seitsonen, University of Zurich, Physical Chemistry Institute, 8057 Zurich, Switzerland; Moussa Saleh, Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, 55124 Mainz, Germany; Ivan Shorubalko, Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, 3602 Thun and 8600 D"ubendorf, Switzerland; Shuping Pang, Xinliang Feng, and Klaus M"ullen, Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, 55124 Mainz, Germany; and Roman Fasel, Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, 3602 Thun and 8600 D"ubendorf, Switzerland and University of Bern, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, 3012 Bern, Switzerland. [4pt] [1] J. Cai et.al, Nature 466, 470-473 (2010)

Cai, Jinming

2011-03-01

176

A simple model of variable residence time flow and nutrient transport in the chalk  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

SummaryA basic problem of modelling flow and transport in Chalk catchments arises from the existence of a deep unsaturated zone, with complex interactions between flow in fractures and water held in the fine pores of the rock matrix. The response of the water table to major infiltration episodes is rapid (of the order of days). However, chemical signals are strongly damped, suggesting that this water is of varying age, with a corresponding mixed history of nutrient loading. Clearly this effect should be represented in any model of nutrients in Chalk systems. The applicability of simplified physically-based model formulations to represent the dual response in an integrated way has been investigated by a variety of researchers, but it has been shown that these approximations break down in application to the Chalk. Mathias et al. [Mathias, S., Butler, A.P., Jackson, B.M., Wheater, H.S., this issue. Characterising flow in the Chalk unsaturated zone. In: Wheater, H.S., Peach, D., Neal, C, editors, Hydrology on LOCAR in the Pang/Lambourn, special issue of J. Hydrol, doi:10.1016/j.jhydrol.2006.04.010] present a dual permeability model that explains the observed response, but such complex formulations are not readily incorporated in catchment-scale nutrient models. This paper reviews previous approaches to modelling the Chalk and then presents a pragmatic approach, with transport of solute and water through the unsaturated zone treated separately, and combined at the water table. Varying residence times are included through considering the distance between the water table and the soil surface, and the history of nutrient application at the surface. If an average rate of downwards migration of the nutrients is assumed, it is possible to derive a travel time distribution of nitrate transport to the water table using a DTM (digital terrain model) map of elevation and information on groundwater levels. This distribution can then be implemented through difference equations. The rationale behind the model and the resulting algorithm is described, and the algorithm then applied to a hypothetical case study of nutrient loading located in the Lambourn, a groundwater-dominated Chalk catchment in Southern England. Simulated groundwater concentrations are very similar in magnitude and variability to observed Chalk groundwater series, suggesting that this simple conceptual model may well be able to capture the dominant responses of nutrient transport through the Chalk.

Jackson, Bethanna M.; Wheater, Howard S.; Mathias, Simon A.; McIntyre, Neil; Butler, Adrian P.

2006-10-01

177

U.S. high school curriculum: three phases of contemporary research and reform.  

PubMed

Valerie Lee and Douglas Ready explore the influences of the high school curriculum on student learning and the equitable distribution of that learning by race and socioeconomic status. They begin by tracing the historical development of the U.S. comprehensive high school and then examine the curricular reforms of the past three decades. During the first half of the twentieth century, the authors say, public high schools typically organized students into rigid curricular "tracks" based largely on students' past academic performance and future occupational and educational plans. During the middle of the century, however, high schools began to provide students with a choice among courses that varied in both content and academic rigor. Although the standards movement of the 1980s limited these curricular options somewhat, comprehensive curricula remained, with minority and low-income students less often completing college-prep courses. During the 1990s, say the authors, researchers who examined the associations between course-taking and student learning reported that students completing more advanced coursework learned more, regardless of their social or academic backgrounds. Based largely on this emerging research consensus favoring college-prep curriculum, in 1997 public high schools in Chicago began offering exclusively college-prep courses. To address the needs of the city's many low-performing ninth graders, schools added extra coursework in subjects in which their performance was deficient. A recent study of this reform, however, found that these approaches made little difference in student achievement. Lee and Ready hypothesize that "selection bias" may explain the divergent conclusions reached by the Chicago study and previous research. Earlier studies rarely considered the unmeasured characteristics of students who completed college-prep courses-characteristics such as motivation, access to academic supports, and better teachers-that are also positively related to student learning. Although the Chicago evaluation is only one study of one city, its findings raise the worrisome possibility that the recent push for "college-prep for all" may not generate the improvements for which researchers and policy makers had hoped. PMID:21141708

Lee, Valerie E; Ready, Douglas D

2009-01-01

178

Satellite Observations of Surface Flow Variations at Southeast Alaskan Glaciers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Glaciers in southeast Alaska are undergoing rapid changes that affect global sea level rise, lake formation and water levels, and flood risks. A key to understanding the ice dynamics is knowledge of the surface ice velocities and how they vary through time. Here we present updated maps of surface velocities for several glaciers in southeast Alaska produced through a pixel tracking technique using synthetic aperature radar data (ALOS, TerraSAR-X) and high-resolution optical imagery (WorldView, QuickBird, IKONOS, GeoEye). We focus on several glaciers that have enough data to form multi-year timeseries, including Hubbard, Yakutat, and LeConte. Hubbard Glacier is the largest non-polar tidewater glacier in the world and is currently in the advance phase of the tidewater glacier cycle. The glacier shows strong seasonal variations of more than 5 m/day along the terminal lobe, with the highest speeds occurring between late December and early February and the lowest speeds occurring in late summer/early fall. The region directly above the terminal lobe displays a smaller seasonal variation in speed. Near the terminus of the glacier, an increase in speed from ~8 m/day to more than 11 m/day is observed between Winter 2008 and Winter 2010. The Valerie Glacier, which is separated from the terminal lobe of the Hubbard by a medial moraine, displays a decrease in speed from ~8 m/day to ~4 m/day between March 2009 and March 2011. LeConte Glacier, which is located in the southern Stikine Icefield, appears to have retreated to a stable position. In contrast to Hubbard, the observed speeds along the lower part of LeConte do not vary significantly between years. Peak speeds at the terminus reach ~22 m/day in both 2008 and 2012. The lake-terminating Yakutat Glacier is in a state of collapse, with rapid retreat creating two separate termini in late summer 2011. Our dataset allows us to document the surface velocity variations that occurred during this time and the subsequent years as the retreat has continued.

Elliott, J.; Melkonian, A. K.; Pritchard, M. E.; Willis, M. J.

2013-12-01

179

Electron Acceleration in the Earth's Magnetotail Using Multi-Scale Simulations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Magnetic reconnection in magnetized plasma represents a change in the topology of magnetic fields and is associated with a concomitant energization of charged particles that results from a conversion of magnetic energy into particle energy. Using data from the THEMIS and Cluster missions together with global and test particle simulations, we demonstrate that during a substorm on February 15, 2008 electrons are energized in two distinct regions: A low-energy population (up to a few keV) appears to arise in the diffusion region where particles are demagnetized and the magnetic topology changes. In addition a high-energy component that is energized by betatron acceleration arises within dipolarization fronts as they sweep toward the inner magnetosphere far from the diffusion region. This study concluded that particle energization is not associated solely with the conversion of magnetic to kinetic energy but, at least in the magnetosphere, also arises in conjunction with macroscopic flows. In a second substorm study, on March 11, 2008 we found that the test particle results compared favorably with observations only when we added a high-energy tail to the distribution function near the reconnection site. This implies that acceleration near the X-line was substantial and needs to be included. THEMIS and Cluster observations indicate that plasma waves are associated with the dipolarization fronts [1]. The test particle calculations are not self-consistent and do not include plasma waves. Therefore, to fully understand the processes that lead to electron acceleration throughout the near-Earth tail, we need to utilize a self-consistent kinetic approach that includes waves and electron acceleration near the neutral line along with large-scale dynamics. We present results from a model which couples the large scale magnetospheric processes and kinetic processes by developing a simulation approach in which a global MHD simulation is coupled with a particle in cell simulation. In this approach we couple the UCLA global MHD code [2] with the iPIC3D implicit particle in cell code [3]. We use a two dimensional version of iPIC3D to investigate the multi-scale nature of the electron energization during the February 15, 2008 substorm. In this multi-scale simulation the electric and magnetic fields show the quadrupolar signature of Hall-MHD which is absent in the resistive MHD simulation. Moreover the electrons move much faster than the ions especially at the separatrices and the inflow boundary. We note that during this event, just like in the case of the MHD, dipolarization fronts are formed mainly earthward of the neutral line. Finally, we find that electrons are energized near both the x-line and dipolarization fronts, but the energization is greater at the latter location. [1] Zhou, M., M. Ashour-Abdalla, X. Deng, D. Schriver, M. El-Alaoui, and Y. Pang (2009), THEMIS observation of multiple dipolarization fronts and associated wave characteristics in the near-Earth magnetotail, Geophys. Res. Lett., 36(20), L20107. [2] El-Alaoui, M. (2001), Current disruption during November 24, 1996, substorm, J. Geophys. Res., 106(A4), 6229-6245. [3] Markidis, S., G. Lapenta, and Rizwan-uddin (2010), Multi-scale simulations of plasma with iPIC3D, Math. Comput. Simulation, 80(7), 1509-1519.

Ashour-Abdalla, Maha; Lapenta, Giovanni; El-Alaoui, Mostafa; Walker, Raymond

2014-05-01

180

Discovery of a Large Volcanic Eruption in 1761 From Pre-Venus-Transit and Other Proxy Data, Using Benjamin Franklin's Method of Linking the 1783-1784 Cold Weather to the Laki Eruption  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Observations of the 1761 and 1769 transits of Venus were crucial to the early development of American geoscience. Accurate longitude measurements were needed for that, the Mason-Dixon survey, the 1804-1806 Lewis and Clark expedition to Oregon, and the westward expansion of the new republic [Woolf, "The Transits of Venus: A Study of 18th Century Science," Princeton, 1959]. As founder of the American Philosophical Society Benjamin Franklin promoted the transit observations, and procured a large telescope for the Philadelphia group. While serving as ambassador to France he observed that a "dry fog" from the 1783 Laki eruption in Iceland had obscured the Sun, and suggested that as a cause of the unseasonably cold weather of that summer and winter. Although the longitude, solar parallax and Sun-Earth distance measurements have long since been improved on, observations of the dark lunar eclipse just before the June 6, 1761 transit are still valuable for identifying a very large volcanic eruption that spring, using Benjamin Franklin's method. Many observers worldwide, while making a final check on their clock/longitude, found the May 18, 1761 totally eclipsed Moon very dark or even invisible, e.g., Wargentin (Stockholm Observatory) could not see the Moon for 38 minutes even with a 2-ft telescope [Phil. Trans. 52, 208, 1761-1762]. Whereas the totally eclipsed Moon is illuminated only by sunlight refracted by the Earth's atmosphere, I conclude that it was severely obscured, thus meeting Benjamin Franklin's first condition. Ice cores from Greenland and Antarctica show a large sulfuric acid peak at 1762 [Crowley, Geophys. Res. Lett. 20, 209, 1993; and Karlof, J. Geophys. Res. 105, D10, 12471, 2000], also satisfying Benjamin Franklin's second condition that the obscuration be due to a "dry fog" (sulfuric acid mist). The weather of 1761-1762 was indeed very cold, as recorded in chronicles, and frost-damaged rings of North American bristlecone pines [LaMarche and Hirschboeck, Nature 307, 121, 1984]. Annual weather reviews in imperial, provincial and county histories in China have been examined. Unseasonable cold are classified by their degree of severity: (1) Late (April-June) or early (July-Sept.) killing frosts; (2) Bitter cold/heavy snowfall; and (3) Heavy sustained snowfall, bitter cold with frozen wells, lakes and rivers. The latter cases were often widespread and multi-year, with the coast icebound also. The weather of 1761-1762 was a "3." Heavy sustained snow fell over many sites from the Tropic of Cancer to the Yellow River. In the north wells and rivers froze. Taihu (Great Lake near Shanghai) and nearby rivers froze over and were not navigable. Innumerable trees, birds and livestock perished, etc. Whereas all three of Benjamin Franklin's conditions have been met I conclude that a very large volcanic eruption early in 1761 had a major impact on the Earth's climate. Its location is unknown, but was probably low- or mid-latitude, as sulfuric acid from the volcanic cloud settled onto both poles. Finally Benjamin Franklin's criteria for a climate-altering volcanic eruption are still universally used (the appearance of brilliant red twilight displays have since been added). Moreover his legacy continues to inspire climate researchers. See, for example, "Climatic Impact of the mid-15th-Century Kuwae Caldera Formation...," Pang, Eos 74, No. 43, 106, 1993; and as cited in "Earth in Balance," Al Gore, p. 379, Penguin, 1993. See also "Constantinople's Volcanic Twilight," Lynn Simarski, Aramco World 47, No. 6, 8-13, 1996.

Pang, K. D.

2006-12-01

181

Potassic magma genesis and the Ailao Shan-Red River fault  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two types of K-rich magma of Eocene to Early Oligocene (ca. 40-30) and Plio-Pleistocene (ca. 5-0.1 Ma) age were emplaced prior to and following left-lateral slip on the Ailao Shan-Red River (ASRR) fault, a regional shear zone extending between southwest China and the Tonkin Gulf (South China Sea) that accommodated 'escape' of the Indochina block. The first type is exposed in the Dali-Lijiang and adjacent regions of western Yunnan and Sichuan and comprises ultramafic potassic to ultrapotassic 'absarokites' and their shoshonite, banakite, and SiO2-rich derivatives which were emplaced immediately prior to activation of the ASRR fault. They are characterized by high Mg.-nos, and low contents of fusible oxides (FeO*, CaO, Al2O3), for equivalent MgO content, and pronounced primitive mantle-normalized high-field strength element (HFSE) depletions. In contrast, 'post-escape' K-rich magmas were erupted in the Puer, Maguan-Pingbian regions of south and southeast Yunnan. Apart from their relative enrichments in potassium they show typical HFSE-rich intra-plate compositional affinity. Geological and geomorphic evidence, and thermochronologic age dating of metamorphisc events, suggest that left-lateral shearing occurred between ca. 30 and 17 Ma; thereby accommodating the southeastward 'escape' of Indochina and (possibly) two episodes of spreading in the South China Sea. The southwestern part of Dali-Lijiang magmatic products was detached and offset by ca. 600 km and are now located in Phan Xi Pang in northern Viet Nam. The same is true for the Permo-Triassic Emeishan flood basalts, whose western exposures were likewise displaced by the same amount and are now represented by the Song Da complex, also in northern Viet Nam. Here, we report geochemical, isotopic, and 40Ar/39Ar age data for samples from both the 'pre-escape' Dali-Lijiang magmas and the 'post-escape' K-rich Puer, Maguan-Pingbian basalts and basanites, with a view to comparing and contrasting their interpolated source compositions, estimated conditions of upper mantle melt segregation and, by inference, their mantle dynamic and contamination histories insofar as these were conditioned by the India-Asia collision. Our interpretations yielded two complementary conclusions. The first contends that the pre-escape magmas result from adiabatic melting of crust-contaminated asthenosphere comprising a 'mélange' of continental lithospheric mantle (CLM) (hydrated by sab-derived hysdrous fluids released at 0.2-0.5 GPa) and lower crust, delaminated from the overriding plate during mantle wedge corner flow and further enriched by metasomatic melts of subducted continental crust. We postulate that incipient H2O-saturated melting of the 'mélange' occurs at depths of between ca. 100 and 200 km after being 'dragged' down by relict oceanic slab fragments, in response to the dehydration of supra-subduction amphibole- and phlogopite. The ensuing viscosity 'crisis' and buoyancy relative to ambient 'fertile' convecting mantle of such asthenospheric 'pockets', and the collision-related change from lithospheric compression to extension, almost certainly predisposes such a refractory yet crust-contaminated 'pockets' to rapid adiabatic melting. The second conclusion concerns the post-escape K-rich basalts and basanites and is based on the contention that decompression melting of thermally anomalous K-rich asthenospheric occurred in response to regional post-escape transtension, concomitant with the cessation Indochina escape and contiguous seafloor spreading. However, although these magmas share the HFSE-rich fertile source character of other, widely dispersed, post-escape Cenozoic basalts they more specifically resemble relatively rare examples of intra-plate, K-rich activity observed in northeast China, central Spain, and elsewhere in Asia and Europe, arguably (indirectly) reflecting mantle perturbations caused by major continental collisions.

Flower, Martin F. J.; Hoàng, Nguy?n; Lo, Chinh-hua; Chí, Cung Thu'?'ng; Cu'ò'ng, Nguy?n Qu?c; Liu, Fu-tian; Deng, Jin-fu; Mo, Xuan-xue

2013-09-01

182

Introduction and Committees  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This volume contains contributions to the XXVIIIth International Colloquium on Group-Theoretical Methods in Physics, the GROUP 28 conference, which took place in Newcastle upon Tyne from 26-30 July 2010. All plenary and contributed papers have undergone an independent review; as a result of this review and the decisions of the Editorial Board most but not all of the contributions were accepted. The volume is organised as follows: it starts with notes in memory of Marcos Moshinsky, followed by contributions related to the Wigner Medal and Hermann Weyl prize. Then the invited talks at the plenary sessions and the public lecture are published followed by contributions in the parallel and poster sessions in alphabetical order. The Editors:Maia Angelova, Wojciech Zakrzewski, Véronique Hussin and Bernard Piette International Advisory Committee Michael BaakeUniversity of Bielefeld, Germany Gerald DunneUniversity of Connecticut, USA J F (Frank) GomesUNESP, Sao Paolo, Brazil Peter HanggiUniversity of Augsburg, Germany Jeffrey C LagariasUniversity of Michigan, USA Michael MackeyMcGill University, Canada Nicholas MantonCambridge University, UK Alexei MorozovITEP, Moscow, Russia Valery RubakovINR, Moscow, Russia Barry SandersUniversity of Calgary, Canada Allan SolomonOpen University, Milton Keynes, UK Christoph SchweigertUniversity of Hamburg, Germany Standing Committee Twareque AliConcordia University, Canada Luis BoyaSalamanca University, Spain Enrico CeleghiniFirenze University, Italy Vladimir DobrevBulgarian Academy of Sciences, Bulgaria Heinz-Dietrich DoebnerHonorary Member, Clausthal University, Germany Jean-Pierre GazeauChairman, Paris Diderot University, France Mo-Lin GeNankai University. China Gerald GoldinRutgers University, USA Francesco IachelloYale University, USA Joris Van der JeugtGhent University, Belgium Richard KernerPierre et Marie Curie University, France Piotr KielanowskiCINVESTAV, Mexico Alan KosteleckyIndiana University, USA Mariano del OlmoValladolid University, Spain George PogosyanUNAM, Mexico, JINR, Dubna, Russia Christoph SchweigertUniversity of Hamburg, Germany Reidun TwarockYork University, UK Luc VinetMontréal University, Canada Apostolos VourdasBradford University, UK Kurt WolfUNAM, Mexico Local Organising Committee Maia Angelova - ChairNorthumbria University, Newcastle Wojtek Zakrzewski - ChairDurham University, Durham Sarah Howells - SecretaryNorthumbria University, Newcastle Jeremy Ellman - WebNorthumbria University, Newcastle Véronique HussinNorthumbria, Durham and University of Montréal Safwat MansiNorthumbria University, Newcastle James McLaughlinNorthumbria University, Newcastle Bernard PietteDurham University, Durham Ghanim PutrusNorthumbria University, Newcastle Sarah ReesNewcastle University, Newcastle Petia SiceNorthumbria University, Newcastle Anne TaorminaDurham University, Durham Rosemary ZakrzewskiAccompanying persons programme Lighthouse Photograph by Bernard Piette: Souter Lighthouse, Marsden, Tyne and Wear, England

Angelova, Maia; Zakrzewski, Wojciech; Hussin, Véronique; Piette, Bernard

2011-03-01

183

EDITORIAL: Invited review and topical lectures from the 13th International Congress on Plasma Physics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The 13th International Congress on Plasma Physics (ICPP 2006) was organized, on behalf of the International Advisory Committee of the ICPP series, by the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine and the Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics (BITP) and held in Kiev, Ukraine, 22 26 May 2006. The Congress Program included the topics: fundamental problems of plasma physics; fusion plasmas; plasmas in astrophysics and space physics; plasmas in applications and technologies; complex plasmas. A total of 305 delegates from 30 countries took part in the Congress. The program included 9 invited review lectures, 32 invited topical and 313 contributed papers (60 of which were selected for oral presentation). The Congress Program was the responsibility of the International Program Committee: Anatoly Zagorodny (Chairman) Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics, Ukraine Olha Kocherga (Scientific Secretary) Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics, Ukraine Boris Breizman The University of Texas at Austin, USA Iver Cairns School of Physics, University of Sydney, Australia Tatiana Davydova Institute for Nuclear Research, Ukraine Tony Donne FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics, Rijnhuizen, The Netherlands Nikolai S Erokhin Space Research Institute of RAS, Russia Xavier Garbet CEA, France Valery Godyak OSRAM SYLVANIA, USA Katsumi Ida National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan Alexander Kingsep Russian Research Centre `Kurchatov Institute', Russia E P Kruglyakov Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Russia Gregor Morfill Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Germany Osamu Motojima National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan Jef Ongena ERM-KMS, Brussels and EFDA-JET, UK Konstantyn Shamrai Institute for Nuclear Research, Ukraine Raghvendra Singh Institute for Plasma Research, India Konstantyn Stepanov Kharkiv Institute of Physics and Technology, Ukraine Masayoshi Tanaka National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan Nodar Tsintsadze Physics Institute, Georgia The four-page texts of the contributed papers are presented as a CD, `ICPP 2006. Contributed Papers' which was distributed among the delegates. They are also available at the Congress website http://icpp2006.kiev.ua. A major part of the review and topical lectures is published in this special issue which has been sent to the Congress delegates. The papers were refereed to the usual high standard of the journal Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion. The Guest Editors of the special issue are grateful to the Publishers for their cooperation. Recognizing the role of Professor Alexej Sitenko (12 February 1927 11 February 2002) in the initiation and organization of the International (Kiev) Conferences on Plasma Theory which, after having been combined with the International Congresses on Waves and Instabilities in Plasma in 1980, created the series of International Congresses on Plasma Physics, and taking into account the contribution of Professor Sitenko to the progress of plasma theory, the Program Committee decided to open ICPP 2006 with the Sitenko memorial lecture. This memorial lecture is available as supplementary data (PDF) at stacks.iop.org/PPCF/49/i=5A.

Zagorodny, A.; Kocherga, O.

2007-05-01

184

The Geochemistry and Hydrography of Lake Tanganyika  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

John Edmond was a key member of the scientific group that participated in the two SIO expeditions on Lake Tanganyika, involved in both the water sampling on the lake and the operations in the potable chemical laboratory used ashore. Much of his data on the nutrient chemistry of the lake has been published in summary form (Limnol.Oceanog.1993). The present paper, which describes some of the other studies made on the lake, is dedicated to John, who was both a close personal friend and a brilliant colleague. Along the ~650 km length of the lake we occupied 18 stations and sampled the major inflowing streams. The CI concentration of the lake waters below ~150m (depth of the epilimnion) is constant (27.8ppm), so that temperature is the only hydrographic variable, and distinctive profiles occur in the two major deep basins (North & South, = NB and SB). In the NB from 100 to 1200m, T° C decreases smoothly to 400m, below which are two ~ isothermal layers extending down to a sharp discontinuity at 700m, followed by a decrease to an nderline{in-situ} minimum (23.32° C at 870m, the coldest water in Lake Tanganyika). The lower-most 300m of the profile is essentially adiabatic, with a bottom T = 23.32° C. The 700m T discontinuity is associated witha sharp cusp in methane concentration, which increases smoothly with depth from zero at the base of the mixed layer to 2.5 cc/kg at 700m, and then increases rapidly to 5.0 cc/kg at 1200m. In the SB, T decreases smoothly to 600m depth, below which is an almost isothermal layer to 1100m, followed by an ~ adiabatic gradient for 300m, to 23.40° C at 1400m. In this basin the CH4 profile is a smoothly continuous curve from 100-1200m, showing that the effective sill-depth between the two basins is at ~700m. Helium isotope profiles also show distinctive profiles in the two deep basins. In the NB, the 4He profile increases downward from atmospheric saturation to a smooth maximum at 450m (2.26 x saturation) and a 3He/4He ratio anomaly ? (3He) = -40% of atmospheric value). In the SB there is a similar though less marked He maximum at 900m. These extrema show the depths of injection of He from crustal sources, which in both basins has a 3He/4He ratio of 0.28 x atmospheric, close to the ratio in radiogenic helium. The He concentration requires a saturation T of 15° C at the present level of 773m above sealevel. If the deep water has not changed and was saturated at the present 23° C, the required lake level is ~250m below the present level. Co2 and 13C data show production of light CO2 at 220m, the depth of a ? (13C) minimum, and on the lake bottom where heavy CO2 is produced by CH4 production. Other data to be discussed as time permits include stable isotopes (D and 18O, enriched in deep water), 14C, tritium, 226Ra, 210Pb, and dissolved N2, Ne, and Ar. Our logistical work was supported by UNDP-FAO. G.W. Coulter (UNDP, Burundi), Ray Weiss (SIO), and Valerie Craig (SIO) participated in the expedition work at sea and on land.

Craig, H.

2001-12-01

185

Study on Mixed-Pixel Clumping Index Calculation and Validation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Clumping index is an important vegetation structure parameter to describe the foliage clumping in canopy quantitatively. The effect of foliage clumping is generally considered at the canopy and below canopy scale in pure vegetation pixel. The mixed-pixel clumping index (MPCI) is an equivalent clumping index. In previous studies, it is usually equal to the clumping index of the dominated vegetation type in the mixed pixel. However, this calculation method cannot consider the effect of mixed pixels and it is almost impossible to get an accurate clumping index of mixed pixels. We propose a new method to calculate the clumping index of mixed pixels by combining the medium-spatial resolution image. The method coupled the linear mixture model and the directional gap fraction formula, and the formula of the mixed-pixel clumping index is deduced (Eq. 1). The scale difference caused by the inhomogeneity of fractional vegetation of cover, clumping index and leaf angle distributions inside the mixed pixel can be better considered in the method. cos(?) ·ln[1 n? P (? )] ----c--ni=1-f,i-c--- ?c = - 1 n? -ln[Pf,i(?f)] cos(?f)·Gc(?c)·ni=1?f,i·Gf,i(?f) (1) where the subscripts f and c correspond to the medium- and coarse-resolution of satellite data respectively. ? is clumping index, ? is view zenith angle, P is gap frequency and G is the projection of unit leaf area in the ? direction. It is assumed that nis the number of medium-resolution pixels covered inside the coarse-resolution pixel. And the end-member gap fraction and clumping index inside mixed pixels are known. They are obtained from medium-resolution images. To analyze the influence of the inhomogeneity inside mixed pixels to the equivalent clumping index, we made the analysis in two cases: one is that the pixel is mixed with the same vegetation type but different fractional cover; the other is that the pixel is mixed with different vegetation types. The result shows that the inhomogeneity of vegetation type and fractional vegetation of cover inside mixed-pixel has an important influence on the mixed-pixel clumping index and according to the above analysis we found that in some area the clumping index difference before and after the mixed pixel correction is obvious. At present there is no a direct way to measure the large scale clumping index. We validate the method by indirect method, which is we employed it to VALERI (VAlidation of Land European Remote sensing Instruments) datasets. Then we correct the coarse resolution effective LAI (Leaf Area Index) with MPCI and compare the results to the true LAI. The Preliminary validation shows good accuracy. The correlation coefficient, R2 is above 0.90; the root-mean-square error (RMSE) is about 0.1, and the average relative error is below 10%. Based on the MPCI method, we employ HJ-1A/1B CCD data to make 1km x 1km MPCI product over Heihe area of China. Through the analysis and validation, the method of MPCI is capable of correcting the scale difference caused by the inhomogeneity of the vegetation cover inside mixed pixels and has more accuracy, which is significant for LAI inversion of coarse spatial resolution and the precision accuracy application of carbon cycle model.

Ma, Q. M.; Li, J.; Liu, Q.; Liu, Q. H.

2012-04-01

186

News and Announcements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

New Source of Information from Advertisers The Journal has a new feature effective with the June 1999 issue. If you would like additional information about our advertisers or their products, the quickest and easiest way to get it is via JCE Online: go to http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu click on Ad Index This will take you to the list of advertisers, each conveniently linked to their home page. When you do contact our advertisers, be sure to tell them that you saw their ad in the Journal of Chemical Education. This is important to them, and to us. JCE Software Receives Award The Journal recently received notice that JCE Software portion of JCE Online has been selected as a Links2Go Key Resource for the topic of chemistry software. According to Links2Go (www.links2go.com), JCE Software's home page is one of the top fifty most accessed online resources in the area of chemistry software (currently ranked 45). Thanks to all of you who have visited JCE Online and the JCE Software area to make this possible. If you haven't visited the site yet, you can go there directly (http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/JCESoft/index.html ) as well as via our JCE Online home page. You will be greeted with a short video of nitrogen triiodide exploding and be able to get a wealth of information about our latest releases, software, CD-ROMs/Video, student resources, materials for authors and software developers. You can see color graphics from our CD-ROMs, video, and software,... Actually, if you are familiar with our Catalog, this is much better. 1999 Welch Chemistry Prize Richard N. Zare, the Marguerite Blake Wilbur Professor of Natural Science at Stanford University, has been named the 1999 recipient of the Welch Award in Chemistry for his lifetime achievements in physical and analytical chemistry. Zare's interests focus on the development and application of lasers and other novel instruments to explore chemical frontiers, ranging from molecules to chemical processes, from the inside of cells to the inside of meteorites. Zare and colleague Andrew Alexander are contributors to the Journal's Viewpoints series, sponsored by the Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation: "Anatomy of Elementary Chemical Reactions", JCE, 1998, 75, 1105. The Welch Award in Chemistry has been given by the Welch Foundation since 1972 to honor lifetime achievements in the field. Zare will be honored and presented with a $300,000 prize and gold medallion during the Foundation's annual award banquet held in Houston in October. NEACT Conference: Chemistry of Materials and Material Science The 61st Summer Conference of NEACT, the New England Association of Chemistry Teachers, will be held from Monday, August 9, through Thursday, August 12, at Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, MA. The four-day conference will feature an exploration of the chemistry of materials and material science and effective methods of presenting these in the classroom and laboratory. The keynote address is "Teaching Solid State Chemistry at MIT" by Ron Latanision of MIT's Department of Material Science. Other presentations include "Driving Force", James Livingston; "The Colorful Nanoworld", Moungi Bawendi; "Molecular Wire-Based Amplification in Chemical Sensors", Timothy Swager; "Putting Solids in the Foundation", Arthur Ellis, George Lisensky, and Karen Nordell; "Miracle Materials", Valerie Wilcox; "Teaching About Polymers to Chemistry Students", Richard Stein; and "Using Software in Teaching About Polymers to Chemistry Students", William Vining. There will be a selection of workshops on the conference theme as well. The conference is open to all. The program chairperson is Peter J. Nassiff, Science Department Chairperson at Burlington High School. For further information contact Nassiff at 80 Gregory Road, Framingham, MA 01701; email: pnassiff@massed.net. Call for Symposia, Papers, & Workshops: 16th BCCE The Web site for the 16th Biennial Conference on Chemical Education, July 30-August 3, 2000, at the Un

1999-07-01

187

European Plate Observing System - the Arctic dimension and the Nordic collaboration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Within the framework of the EPOS project, Nordic interests are significant, not only in fundamental scientific issues related to geodynamic processes, but also in terms of the application of these to several central problems such as, hydrocarbon exploration and production including the related environmental issues, CO2 storage (or other toxic waste repositories) in geological formations, geothermal energy (natural and hot-dry rock) utilization and mining, geohazards (earthquakes, landslides and volcanic eruptions) and their consequences to the society. The Arctic dimension including Fennoscandia, the northern North Atlantic and the Arctic Sea constitutes an area of considerable geographical extent within the European plate. The region also contains a significant part of the European plate boundary submerged under the North Atlantic and the Arctic sea, where geodynamic processes such as rifting and fracturing are especially energetic. In particular, where the plate boundary is exposed on land in the South Iceland seismic zone, large earthquakes are frequently observed including two Mw6.5 events in 2000 and one Mw6.3 event in 2008. But, seismic hazard is not confined to the plate boundary. Significant intra-plate earthquakes have recently occurred in the region (Mw6.1 in the continental shelf near Spitsbergen in 2008, Mw5.0 in Southern Sweden in 2008, Mw5.2 near Kaliningrad in 2004) showing that there is considerable seismic hazard in the region. In addition, submarine landslide earthquakes are always of concern due to possible tsunami generation. Volcanic activity occurs on the plate boundary and is particularly strong in the rift zones of Iceland, where on average two volcanic eruptions occur per decade. subaerial volcanic eruptions also occur on Jan Mayen island, farther north on the Mid Atlantic ridge. Together, the Danish seismic network in Greenland, the Norwegian seismic arrays and national network traversing the length of Norway and the Icelandic seismic and strong motion networks monitor seismic activity and hazard in the North Atlantic. Vigorous volcanic activity along the plate boundary in Iceland and associated hazards are monitored by the Icelandic, seismic, geodetic, meteorological and hydrological networks. Recent eruptions, like the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruptions have demonstrated the far-reaching hazard to aviation caused by volcanic eruptions in Iceland. The high-sensitivity seismic and geodetic networks of Sweden monitor isostatic rebound of Fennoscandia. In this context, the varied Nordic monitoring networks provide a significant contribution to the main objectives of EPOS. There are already existing links with the other ESFRI initiatives where strong Nordic participation is established, such as SIOS and EMSO. As such EPOS provides the necessary platform to collaborate and develop an important Nordic dimension in the European Research Area. There is a long tradition of collaboration at the governmental level between the Nordic countries, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland and Iceland. Within the fields of research and education, the Nordic Ministries have a dedicated program, where research networks are being promoted. Recently a Nordic collaborative network in seismology, "NordQuake" (coordinated by Denmark) was established within this program. This collaboration which is now formalized and supported by the Nordic Ministries is based on a cooperation which was initiated more than 40 years ago, where annual Nordic Seminars in seismology (previously on detection seismology) was the central element. EPOS Nordic collaboration, building upon a long lasting history, has a significant potential for synergy effects in the region and therefore represents an important dimension within EPOS. Nordic EPOS Team: Lars Ottemöller (UiB), Mathilde B. Sørensen (UiB), Louise W. Bjerrum (UiB), Conrad Lindholm (Norsar), Halfdan Kjerulf (SK), Amir Kaynia (NGI), Valerie Maupin (UiO), Tor Langeland (CMR), Joerg Ebbing (NGU), John Dehls (NGU), Øystein Nordgulen (NGU), Roland Roberts (UU), Reynir Bødvarsson (UU),

Atakan, K.; Heikkinen, P.; Juhlin, C.; Thybo, H.; Vogfjord, K.

2012-04-01

188

PREFACE: Preface  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The 9th International Conference on Photonics and Imaging in Biology and Medicine (PIBM 2010), combined with the 3rd Photonics and Optoelectronics Meetings (POEM 2010), was held from November 2-5, 2010, at Wuhan Science & Technology Convention & Exhibition Center, Wuhan, PR China. The present volume contains papers from a selection from the invited, oral, and poster presentations. PIBM is the largest international biomedical photonics conference series in Asia. It was initially held at HUST bi-yearly from 1999. After being held three times in Wuhan (1999, 2001 and 2003), it was hosted once in Tianjin (2005), before returning to Wuhan every year since 2006. PIBM is designed to bring together scientists, engineers and clinical researchers from a variety of disciplines engaged in applying optical science, photonics and imaging technologies to problems in biology and medicine. The scope of this conference ranges from basic research to instrumentation engineering, and biological and clinical studies. It is recognized as one of the largest and most comprehensive international conferences in China, and represents the highest level of worldwide research in this field. In the past ten years, 7 volumes of proceedings with a total of 672 papers were published by SPIE (International Society for Optical Engineering), and a volume with 75 papers was published by World Scientific Publishing Co. in 2007. Proceedings of PIBM 1999, 2001, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2008 and 2009 were indexed by EI Compendex, while proceedings of PIBM 1999, 2001, 2003, 2005, 2006, and 2007 were indexed by SCI. Some excellent papers were recommended for publication in the peer-reviewed Journal of Innovative Optical Health Sciences (JIOHS). An increasing number of young researchers present and exchange their innovative ideas on this friendly and professional platform, which has made PIBM an unforgettable annual meeting in Wuhan. This year PIBM attracted distinguished scholars in the field of biomedical photonics and imaging from all over the world, including the United States, Russia, Australia, Canada, Israel, France, Ireland, Japan, Korea and China. The major topics covered at the conference and presented in this volume include: Photonic Therapeutics, Diagnostics and Instrumentations; Tissue Optics and Laser Tissue Interaction; Biomedical Spectroscopy and Microscopy; Multimodal and Hybrid Biomedical Imaging; and Optical Molecular Imaging. The conference voted for the three best student papers; awards were presented to the participant students whose posters were recognized as excellent and who took part in the oral presentation competition. The conference received 133 submitted abstracts, and this volume of the Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes a selection of 53 excellent submissions. The Conference Secretariat and Local Organizing Committee deserve recognition for planning a smoothly run and productive conference with comprehensive, instructive lectures and innovative work displayed in poster presentations. The faculties and students from Britton Chance Center for Biomedical Photonics were dedicated to their work in reception and service during the conference. It is a pleasure to thank all of them for their efficient and hard work. We are also grateful for the financial support from 111 Project (B07038), and the assistance in organization and coordination from Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics and Huazhong University of Science and Technology. Finally, we would like to thank all the authors for their contributions to PIBM 2010 and all the members of the Committees for their cooperation and time spent reviewing submissions. Special thanks are due to the Advisory Committee members Shu Chien, Aaron Ciechanover, Steve Dahms, Da Hsuan Feng, Steven R Goodman, Brian Salzberg, Fujia Yang, Jianquan Yao, Baoyong Zheng and Olivia Ho Cheng for their participation on-site, and their significant contributions to the conference. Wuhan, PR ChinaDecember, 2010 Qingming LuoLihong V WangValery V TuchinConference Chairs 9th International Conference on P

Luo, Qingming; Wang, Lihong V.; Tuchin, Valery V.

2011-02-01

189

PREFACE: Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This special issue contains papers presented at the International Conference on Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems (SCCS) which was held during the week of 20 24 June 2005 in Moscow, Russia. The Moscow conference was the tenth in a series of conferences. The previous conferences were organized as follows. 1977: Orleans-la-Source, France, as a NATO Advanced Study Institute on Strongly Coupled Plasmas (organized by Marc Feix and Gabor J Kalman) 1982: Les Houches, France (organized by Marc Baus and Jean-Pierre Hansen) 1986: Santa Cruz, California, USA (hosted by Forrest J Rogers and Hugh E DeWitt) 1989: Tokyo, Japan (hosted by Setsuo Ichimaru) 1992: Rochester, NY, USA (hosted by Hugh M Van Horn and Setsuo Ichimaru) 1995: Binz, Germany (hosted by Wolf Dietrich Kraeft and Manfred Schlanges) 1997: Boston, Massachusetts, USA (hosted by Gabor J Kalman) 1999: St Malo, France (hosted by Claude Deutsch and Bernard Jancovici) 2002: Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA (hosted by John F Benage and Michael S Murillo) After 1995 the name of the series was changed from `Strongly Coupled Plasmas' to the present name in order to extend the topics of the conferences. The planned frequency for the future is once every three years. The purpose of these conferences is to provide an international forum for the presentation and discussion of research accomplishments and ideas relating to a variety of plasma liquid and condensed matter systems, dominated by strong Coulomb interactions between their constituents. Strongly coupled Coulomb systems encompass diverse many-body systems and physical conditions. Each meeting has seen an evolution of topics and emphasis as new discoveries and new methods appear. This year, sessions were organized for invited presentations and posters on dense plasmas and warm matter, astrophysics and dense hydrogen, non-neutral and ultracold plasmas, dusty plasmas, condensed matter 2D and layered charged-particle systems, Coulomb liquids, and statistical theory of SCCS. Within each area new results from theory, simulations and experiments were presented. In addition, a special symposium was held one evening to explore the questions on high-energy-density matter generated by intense heavy ion beams and to discuss the outlook for applications to industry. As this special issue illustrates, the field remains vibrant and challenging, being driven to a great extent by new experimental tools and access to new strongly coupled conditions. This is illustrated by the inclusion of developments in the areas of warm matter, dusty plasmas, condensed matter and ultra-cold plasmas. In total, 200 participants from 17 countries attended the conference, including 42 invited speakers. The individuals giving presentations at the conference, including invited plenary and topical talks and posters, were asked to contribute to this special issue and most have done so. We trust that this special issue will accurately record the contents of the conference, and provide a valuable resource for researchers in this rapidly evolving field. We would like to thank the members of the International Advisory Board and all members of the Programme Committee for their contributions to the conference. Of course, nothing would have been possible without the dedicated efforts of the Local Organizing Committee, in particular Igor Morozov and Valery Sultanov. We wish to thank the Russian Academy of Sciences, the Institute for High Energy Densities, the Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, the Ministry of Education and Science of the Russian Federation, the Russian Foundation for Basic Research, the Moscow Committee of Science and Technologies, the Russian Joint Stock Company `Unified Energy System of Russia', and The International Association for the Promotion of Co-operation with Scientists from the New Independent States (NIS) of the Former Soviet Union for sponsoring this conference.

Fortov, Vladimir E.; Golden, Kenneth I.; Norman, Genri E.

2006-04-01

190

Physical Biology : challenges for our second decade  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is quite an honor to be asked to become the third editor-in-chief of Physical Biology . I am following in the footsteps of Tim Newman, who served with energy and enthusiasm. Hopefully, the entire community fully appreciates his contributions to moving the field forward. Thank you, Tim! With the honor, however, goes a clear responsibility. Our journal has survived its birth pangs and emerged as a serious venue for publishing quality research papers using physical science to address the workings of living matter. With the support of scientists in this field and with the ongoing commitment of the IOP, we have successfully reached adolescence. Yet, there is clearly much room to grow and there are clear challenges in defining and maintaining our special niche in the publishing landscape. In this still-developing state, the journal very much mimics the state of the field of physical biology itself. Few scientists continue to question the relevance of physical science for the investigation of the living world. But, will our new perspective and the methods that come with it really lead to radically new principles of how life works? Or, will breakthroughs continue to come from experimental biology (perhaps aided by the traditional physicist-as-tool-builder paradigm), leaving us to put quantitative touches on established fundamentals? In thinking about these questions for the field and for the journal, I have tried to understand what is really unique about our joint endeavors. I have become convinced that living matter represents a new challenge to our physical-science based conceptual framework. Not only is it far from equilibrium, as has been generally recognized, but it violates our simple notions of the separability of constituents, their interactions and the resulting large-scale behavior. Unlike, say, atomic physicists who can do productive research while safely ignoring the latest developments in QCD (let alone particle physics at higher energies), we do not yet understand when the details of proteins and nucleic acids structure and function can be assumed constant when considering the cell. This problem is even more serious as we try to set higher sights and think of cells as constituents of tissue, organ and organism. Trying to understand higher-order biological systems is a bit like trying to play a board game where the pieces and rules are constantly changing, somehow in concert with what is happening at the scale of the game. Others will undoubtedly have their own view of what is really difficult and different about living systems. One of the roles of Physical Biology should therefore be to provide a needed forum to address some of these really difficult questions. Of course, most papers will operate with the safety-setting on, and will use established ideas in physics, either experimental or theoretical, to further our quantitative appreciation of living systems. These papers are without doubt an absolutely necessary part of the field, and we hope that our journal can serve as a home for the best of these. But, my real hope is that we can attract papers that really try to break new ground, that suggest ways in which the living world is not just an extremely messy example of the same phenomena that can be studied in non-biological contexts. Amazingly, this hope is actually shared by many leading biologists. In one of the most influential papers on cancer research in the past decades. Hanahan and Weinberg argue that 'one day, we imagine that cancer biology and treatment—at present, a patchwork quilt of cell biology, genetics, histopathology, biochemistry, immunology, and pharmacology—will become a science with a conceptual structure and logical coherence that rivals that of chemistry or physics.' We should take up the challenge, not just for cancer, and Physical Biology should help. Figuring out exactly how best to do this is now my responsibility, and I look forward to hearing from you and working with all of you, in order to make it happen.

Levine, Herbert

2014-06-01

191

Physical Biology : challenges for our second decade.  

PubMed

It is quite an honor to be asked to become the third editor-in-chief of Physical Biology . I am following in the footsteps of Tim Newman, who served with energy and enthusiasm. Hopefully, the entire community fully appreciates his contributions to moving the field forward. Thank you, Tim! With the honor, however, goes a clear responsibility. Our journal has survived its birth pangs and emerged as a serious venue for publishing quality research papers using physical science to address the workings of living matter. With the support of scientists in this field and with the ongoing commitment of the IOP, we have successfully reached adolescence. Yet, there is clearly much room to grow and there are clear challenges in defining and maintaining our special niche in the publishing landscape. In this still-developing state, the journal very much mimics the state of the field of physical biology itself. Few scientists continue to question the relevance of physical science for the investigation of the living world. But, will our new perspective and the methods that come with it really lead to radically new principles of how life works? Or, will breakthroughs continue to come from experimental biology (perhaps aided by the traditional physicist-as-tool-builder paradigm), leaving us to put quantitative touches on established fundamentals? In thinking about these questions for the field and for the journal, I have tried to understand what is really unique about our joint endeavors. I have become convinced that living matter represents a new challenge to our physical-science based conceptual framework. Not only is it far from equilibrium, as has been generally recognized, but it violates our simple notions of the separability of constituents, their interactions and the resulting large-scale behavior. Unlike, say, atomic physicists who can do productive research while safely ignoring the latest developments in QCD (let alone particle physics at higher energies), we do not yet understand when the details of proteins and nucleic acids structure and function can be assumed constant when considering the cell. This problem is even more serious as we try to set higher sights and think of cells as constituents of tissue, organ and organism. Trying to understand higher-order biological systems is a bit like trying to play a board game where the pieces and rules are constantly changing, somehow in concert with what is happening at the scale of the game. Others will undoubtedly have their own view of what is really difficult and different about living systems. One of the roles of Physical Biology should therefore be to provide a needed forum to address some of these really difficult questions. Of course, most papers will operate with the safety-setting on, and will use established ideas in physics, either experimental or theoretical, to further our quantitative appreciation of living systems. These papers are without doubt an absolutely necessary part of the field, and we hope that our journal can serve as a home for the best of these. But, my real hope is that we can attract papers that really try to break new ground, that suggest ways in which the living world is not just an extremely messy example of the same phenomena that can be studied in non-biological contexts. Amazingly, this hope is actually shared by many leading biologists. In one of the most influential papers on cancer research in the past decades. Hanahan and Weinberg argue that 'one day, we imagine that cancer biology and treatment-at present, a patchwork quilt of cell biology, genetics, histopathology, biochemistry, immunology, and pharmacology-will become a science with a conceptual structure and logical coherence that rivals that of chemistry or physics.' We should take up the challenge, not just for cancer, and Physical Biology should help. Figuring out exactly how best to do this is now my responsibility, and I look forward to hearing from you and working with all of you, in order to make it happen. PMID:24732666

Levine, Herbert

2014-06-01

192

Verochka Zingan or recollections from the Physics Department of the Moscow University  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The author recollects his studentship during 70-th years at the Physics Department of the Moscow University. He was graduated from the theoretical Physics Department in 1977. The Rectors of the University that times were I.G. Petrovskii, R.V. Khokhlov and A.A. Logunov. The dean of the Physics Department was V.S. Fursov. As a particular event a meet with the former prime-minister of the USSR A.N. Kosygin is reported. Between professors mentioned throughout the recollections are A.I.Kitaigorodskii, Ya. B. Zel'dovich, D.D. Ivanenko, A.A. Sokolov, A.A. Vlasov, V.B. Braginsky, I.M. Ternov, L.A. Artsimovich, E.P. Velikhov and other, including that which became University professors later. A great number of colleagues from the Physics, Chemistry, Phylological and Historical Departments of the Moscow University are mentioned. Particularly, the students which entered the group 113 in 1971 and finished the group 601 in 1977 are listed. The recollections include 5 parts. Persons cited throughout the paper: A.N. Kosygin, A.S. Golovin, V. Kostyukevich, I.M. Ternov, E.G. Pozdnyak, A. N. Matveev, V.P. Elyutin, V.V. Kerzhentsev, 113 academic group (1971), V. Topala, E.A. Marinchuk, P.Paduraru, A.I. Kitaygorodski, A. Leahu, S. Berzan, B. Ursu, I. Coanda (Koade), M. Stefanovici, O. Bulgaru, A. Iurie-Apostol, A.S. Davydov, M.I. Kaganov, I.M. Lifshitz, Ya. B. Zel'dovich, A.Zhukov, A.I. Buzdin, N.S. Perov, V. Dolgov, P. Vabishchevich, A.A. Samarskii, V. Makarov, Irina Kamenskih, A.A. Arsen'ev, L.A. Artsimovich, A.A. Tyapkin, B.M. Pontecorvo, D.I. Blokhintsev, I.G. Petrovskii, R.V. Khokhlov, V.N. Rudenko, A.A. Sokolov, D.D. Ivanenko (Iwanenko), A.A. Vlasov, V.N. Ponomarev, N.N. Bogolyubov, N.N. Bogolyubov (Jr), V.Ch. Zhukovskii, Tamara Tarasova, Zarina Radzhabova (Malovekova), V.Malovekov, Tatiana Shmeleva, Alexandra C.Nicolescu, Tatiana Nicolescu, Rano Mahkamova, Miriam Yandieva, Natalia Germaniuk (Grigor'eva), E. Grigor'ev, A. Putro, Elena Nikiforova, B. Kostrykin, Galia Laufer, K. Laufer, Yu. El'nitskii, Gh. Nemtoi, Yu. Oprunenko, N.N. Semenov, Varun Sahni, A.A. Starobinskii, Liusea Burca, Serge Rollet, Tatyana Davydova, Zinaida Uglichina (Khafizova), T.Filippova, V.S. Filippov, Vera Zingan (Stefanovici), B.A. Gaina, E.F. Gaina, Valeri Gaina, A. Kirnitskii, M. Kavalerchik, Margarita Kavalerchik, Mark Rainis, L.I. Sedov, D. Mangeron, S. Taltu (Coanda), Z. Sali(Chitoroaga, Kitoroage), Raisa M. Gorbachova, Maria Bulgaru, S. Pavlichenko, Nadezhda Shishkan, A.N. Matveev, N.Ya. Tyapunina, D.F. Kiselev, V.A. Petukhov, N.Ch. Krutitskaya, G.N. Medvedev, A.A. Shishkin,I.A. Shishmarev,A.G. Sveshnikov, A.B. Vasil'eva, A.G. Yagola, I.I. Ol'hovskii, V.V. Kravtsov, V.V.Petkevich, V.I. Grigor'ev, V.S. Rostovskii, V.V. Balashov, B.I. Spasskii, V.D. Krivchenkov, M.B. Menskii, V.Ya. Fainberg, V.G. Kadyshevskii, B.K. Kerimov, V.A. Matveev, I.A. Kvasnikov, D.V. Gal'tsov, V.R. Khalilov, G.A. Chizhov,I.A. Obukhov, V.N. Melnikov, A.A. Logunov, A.N. Tavkhelidze,Yu.S. Vladimirov, N.F. Florea (Floria), B.A. Lysov, V.D. Kukin, 601-academic group (1977), A.R. Khokhlov, P.L. Kapitza, S.P. Kapitza, Ion C. Inculet, Ion I. Inculet,W. Bittner, Nikolay Florea (Floria), M.M. Heraskov, N.V. Sklifosovskii, N.N. Bantysh-Kamenskii, N.D. Zelinskii, Olga Crusevan (Krushevan), Eugenia Crusevan (Krushevan),L.S. Berg, I. Buzdugan (Buzdyga),S.G. Lazo, M.K. Grebenchya (Grebencea), V.T. Kondurar (Conduraru), E.A. Grebenikov, K.F. Teodorchik, V.A. Albitzky, M.V. Nazarov, Tatiana Nazarova, V. P. Oleinikov, O.V. Bolshakov, D.M. Nikolaev, V. Afanas'ev, Olga Tatarinskaya, Yu.V. Karaganchou, B.A. Volkov, V.K. Turta, S. Varzar, C. Sochichiu, V.B. Braginsky, V.S. Fursov, L.I. Brezhnev, V.I. Sobolev (INP MSU), V.A. Smirnov (INP MSU), L.D. Landau, M.A. Leontovich, A.G. Loskutova, Yu.M. Loskutov, N.S. Akulov, V.B. Gostev, A.R. Frenkin, N.N. Kolesnikov, A. Vasil'ev, V.N. Tsytovich, Ya.A. Frenkel, N.V. Mitskievich, E.A. Grebenikov, A.N. Prokopenya, A. Einstein, L.I. Sedov, A.N. Kolmogorov, V.I. Arnold, G.I.Popov, R.Z. Sagdeev, A.A. Kokoshin, A.E. Marinchuk, D.V. Gal'tsov, V.I. Petukhov, S.I. Vacaru,

Gaina, Alex

193

Sensitivity of ocean model simulation in the coastal ocean to the resolution of the meteorological forcing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The quality of ocean simulations depends on a number of factors such as approximations in governing equations, errors introduced by the numerical scheme, uncertainties in input parameters, and atmospheric forcing. The identification of relations between the uncertainties in input and output data is still a challenge for the development of numerical models. The impacts of ocean variables on ocean models are still not well known (e.g., Kara et al., 2009). Given the considerable importance of the atmospheric forcing to the air-sea interaction, it is essential that researchers in ocean modelling work need a good understanding about how sensitive the atmospheric forcing is to variations of model results, which is beneficial to the development of ocean models. Also, it provides a proper way to choose the atmospheric forcing in ocean modelling applications. Our previous study (Shapiro et al, 2011) has shown that the basin-wide circulation pattern and the temperature structure in the Black Sea produced by the same model is significantly dependent on the source of the meteorological input, giving remarkably different responses. For the purpose of this study we have chosen the Celtic Sea where high resolution meteo data are available from the UK Met office since 2006. The Celtic Sea is tidally dominated water basin, with the tidal stream amplitude varying from 0.25m/s in the southwest to 2 m/s in the Bristol Channel. It is also filled with mesoscale eddies which contribute to the formation of the residual (tidally averaged) circulation pattern (Young et al, 2003). The sea is strongly stratified from April to November, which adds to the formation of density driven currents. In this paper we analyse how sensitive the model output is to variations in the spatial resolution of meteorological using low (1.6°) and high (0.11°) resolution meteo forcing, giving the quantitative relation between variations of met forcing and the resulted differences of model results, as well as identifying the causes. The length scales of most energetic dynamic features in both ocean and atmosphere are defined by the Rossby radius of deformation, which is about 1000 km (a typical size of a cyclone) in the atmosphere while only 10-20 km (a size of a mesoscale eddy) in a shallow sea. However sub-mesoscale atmospheric patterns such as patchiness in the cloud cover could result in smaller scale variations of both the wind and solar radiation hence creating a direct link of these smaller atmospheric features with the ocean mesoscale variability. The simulation has been performed using a version of POLCOMS numerical model (Enriquez et al, 2005). Tidal boundary conditions were taken from the Oregon State University European Shelf Tidal Model (Egbert et al, 2010) and the temperature/ salinity initial fields and boundary conditions were taken from the World Ocean Database (Boyer et al, 2004). The paper discusses what elements of the circulation and water column structure are mostly sensitive to the meteo-fields resolution. References Kara, A.B., Wallcraft, A.J., Hurlburt, H.E., Loh, W.-Y., 2009. Which surface atmospheric variable drives the seasonal cycle of sea surface temperature over the global ocean? Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 114, D05101. Boyer, .T, S. Levitus, H. Garcia, R. Locarnini, C. Stephens, and J. Antonov, T. Boyer, S. Levitus, H. Garcia, R. Locarnini, C. Stephens, and J. Antonov, 2004. Objective Analyses of Annual, Seasonal, and Monthly Temperature and Salinity for the World Ocean on a ¼ Grid. International Journal of Climatology, 25, 931-945. Egbert, G. D., S. Y. Erofeeva, and R. D. Ray, 2010. Assimilation of altimetry data for nonlinear shallow-water tides: quarter-diurnal tides of the Northwest European Shelf, Continental Shelf Research, 30, 668-679. Enriquez, C. E., G. I. Shapiro, A. J. Souza, and A. G. Zatsepin, 2005. Hydrodynamic modelling of mesoscale eddies in the Black Sea. Ocean Dyn., 55, 476-489. Georgy Shapiro, Dmitry Aleynik , Andrei Zatsepin , Valentina Khan, Valery Prostakishin , Tatiana Akivis , Vladimir Belokopytov , Ant

Chen, Feng; Shapiro, Georgy; Thain, Richard

2013-04-01

194

List of Posters  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

List of Posters: Dark matter annihilation in the Galactic galo, by Dokuchaev Vyacheslav, et al. NEMO developments towards km3 telescope in the Mediterranean Sea. The NEMO project. Neutrino Mediterranean Observatory By Antonio Capone, NEMO Collaboration. Alignment as a result from QCD jet production or new still unknown physics at LHC? By Alexander Snigirev. Small-scale fluctuations of extensive air showers: systematics in energy and muon density estimation By Grigory Rubtsov. SHINIE: Simulation of High-Energy Neutrino Interacting with the Earth By Lin Guey-Lin, et al.. Thermodynamics of rotating solutions in n+1 dimensional Einstein - Maxwell -dilation gravity By Ahmad Sheykhi, et al.. Supernova neutrino physics with future large Cherenkov detectors By Daniele Montanino. Crossing of the Cosmological Constant Barrier in the string Inspired Dark Energy Model By S. Yu. Vernov. Calculations of radio signals produced by ultra-high and extremely high energy neutrino induced cascades in Antarctic ice By D. Besson, et al.. Inflation, Cosmic Acceleration and string Gravity By Ischwaree Neupane. Neutrino Physics: Charm and J/Psi production in the atmosphere By Liudmila Volkova. Three generation flavor transitions and decays of supernova relic neutrinos By Daniele Montanino. Lattice calculations & computational quantum field theory: Sonification of Quark and Baryon Spectra By Markum Harald, et al.. Generalized Kramers-Wannier Duality for spin systems with non-commutative symmetry By V. M. Buchstaber, et al.. Heavy ion collisions & quark matter: Nuclear matter jets and multifragmentation By Danut Argintaru, et al.. QCD hard interactions: The qT-spectrum of the Higgs and Slepton-pairs at the LHC By Guiseppe Bozzi. QCD soft interactions: Nonperturbative effects in Single-Spin Asymmetries: Instantons and TMD-parton distributions By Igor Cherednikov, et al.. Gluon dominance model and high multiplicity By Elena Kokoulina. Resonances in eta pi- pi- pi+ system By Dmitry Ryabchikov. Saturation effects in diffractive scattering at LHC By Oleg Selugin. A nonperturbative expansion method in QCD and R-related quantities By Igor Solovtsov. Z-scaling and high multiplicity particle Production in bar pp/pp & AA collisions at Tevatron and RHIC By Mikhail Tokarev. Scaling behaviour of the reactionsdd - > p? /3H and pd - > pd with pT at energy I-2 GeV By Yuri Uzikov. [ADS Note: Title formula can not be rendered correctly in ASCII.] CP violation, rare decays, CKM: Precision Measurements of the Mass of the Top Quark at CDF (Precision Top Mass Measurements at CDF) By Daniel Whiteson. Measurement of the Bs Oscillation at CDF By Luciano Ristori. The Bs mixing phase at LHCb By J. J. van Hunen. ATLAS preparations for precise measurements of semileptonic rare B decays By K. Toms. Hadron spectroscopy & exotics: Searches for radial excited states of charmonium in experiments using cooled antiproton beams By M. Yu. Barabanov. Retardation effects in the rotating string model By Fabien Buisseret and Claude Semay. Final results from VEPP-2M (CMD-2 and SND) By G. V. Fedotovich. Heavy Quark Physics: Prospects for B physics measurements using the CMS detector at the LHC By Andreev Valery. Heavy flavour production at HERA-B By Andrey Bogatyrev. B-Meson subleading form factors in the Heavy Quark Effective Theory (HQET) By Frederic Jugeau. Beyond the Standard Model: Monopole Decay in a Variable External Field By Andrey Zayakin. Two-Loop matching coefficients for the strong coupling in the MSSM By Mihaila Luminita. Test of lepton flavour violation at LHC By Hidaka Keisho. Looking at New Physics through 4 jets and no ET By Maity Manas. Are Preons Dyons? Naturalness of Three Generations By Das Chitta Ranjan. SUSY Dark Matter at Linear Collider By Sezen Sekmen, Mehmet Zeyrek. MSSM light Higgs boson scenario and its test at hadron colliders By Alexander Belyaev. Antiscalar Approach to Gravity and Standard Model By E. Mychelkin. GRID distributed analysis in high energy physics: PAX: Physics Analysis Design and Application on the GRID By Martin Erdmann

195

Obituary: Ronald N. Bracewell, 1921-2007  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ronald N. Bracewell, Professor Emeritus (since 1991) of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University, and a true renaissance man of science, died of a heart attack on 12 August 2007 at his home. Ron Bracewell was born in Sydney, Australia, on 22 July 1921, one of the two sons of Cecil and Valerie Bracewell. He graduated from the University of Sydney in 1941 and received his doctorate degree in physics from Cambridge University in 1949. During World War II, Ron worked in the Australian National Radar Establishment, where he designed and developed microwave radar equipment. Like several other World War II radar scientists, after the war he used this experience to pioneer the new field of radio astronomy. With J. L. Pausey, in 1955 he published the first comprehensive textbook in this field entitled, Radio Astronomy. Bracewell joined the Stanford Electrical Engineering faculty in 1955, and from 1974 on he held the first prestigious Lewis Terman professorship. He was awarded the Outstanding Service Award of the department in 1984. In 1988, he was named an officer of the Order of Australia--the Australian equivalent of Order of the British Empire. Soon after his arrival at Stanford, Bracewell designed and began building a solar spectroheliograph, consisting of thirty-two dish antennas in the form of a cross. This was completed in 1961 and provided daily maps of the Sun for more than a decade encompassing more than one solar activity cycle of eleven years. These maps were useful in predicting magnetic storms caused by solar activity and were used by NASA during the first landing on the Moon. In 1971 he started the building of a five-element radio interferometer, for observation of extragalactic radio sources, with the novel design of unequal spacing that gave the resolution of a ten-element array. Both telescopes are now dismantled. The common characteristics of these and other projects were that they were all built in-house with a limited budget, often a small fraction of what a national laboratory would spend on a comparable project. As a result they provided an excellent arena for training future radio astronomers. Many prominent radio astronomers were indeed trained by Bracewell as graduate students or postdoctoral researchers. An excellent example is the often-forgotten, simple-but-elegant experiment of the first detection of the dipole (or the so-called 24-hour) anisotropy of the then-recently discovered cosmic microwave background radiation. This was done by installing a small horn microwave antenna on top of the Durand building at Stanford, which scanned the sky once every 24 hours as the Earth rotated around its axis. The result of this experiment, incorporated in Dave Conklin's Ph.D. thesis, was instrumental in establishing the Big Bang origin of this radiation and provided the first measurement of the velocity of the Earth (and our Solar System and Galaxy) with respect to the fundamental rest frame of the universe defined by this radiation. The techniques and mathematical algorithms that Ron developed for radio interferometry have been applied to medical imaging such as X-ray tomography for detecting tumors. Bracewell, not directly involved with such experiments, often acted as a consultant to medical practitioners. Another outcome of Bracewell's research was a book published first in 1965 titled, The Fourier Transform and its Applications, which has become the gold standard of this subject and can be found in the personal libraries of many astronomers, engineers, physicists, and medical researchers. Many years ago, before an observing run at Kitt Peak, I needed to refer to this book. I looked for it in the shelves of the library at the National Optical Astronomical Observatory in Tucson, Arizona, but could not find it. The librarian informed me that the book had been signed out. I told her that this is a very useful book, and they should have more than one copy. She agreed and said that there were indeed eleven copies; all were in use by the resident astronomers. A further interest of Ron was the discovery of and

Petrosian, Vahé

2009-01-01

196

EDITORIAL: Colloidal suspensions Colloidal suspensions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Special issue in honour of Henk Lekkerkerker's 65th birthday Professor Henk N W Lekkerkerker is a world-leading authority in the field of experimental and theoretical soft condensed matter. On the occasion of his 65th birthday in the summer of 2011, this special issue celebrates his many contributions to science. Henk Lekkerkerker obtained his undergraduate degree in chemistry at the University of Utrecht (1968) and moved to Calgary where he received his PhD in 1971. He moved to Brussels as a NATO fellow at the Université Libre de Bruxelles and was appointed to an assistant professorship (1974), an associate professorship (1977) and a full professorship (1980) in physical chemistry at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel. In 1985 he returned to The Netherlands to take up a professorship at the Van 't Hoff Laboratory, where he has been ever since. He has received a series of awards during his career, including the Onsager Medal (1999) of the University of Trondheim, the Bakhuys Roozeboom Gold Medal (2003) of the Royal Dutch Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW), the ECIS-Rhodia European Colloid and Interface Prize (2003), and the Liquid Matter Prize of the European Physical Society (2008). He was elected a member of KNAW in 1996, was awarded an Academy Chair position in 2005, and has held several visiting lectureships. Henk's work focuses on phase transitions in soft condensed matter, and he has made seminal contributions to both the theoretical and experimental aspects of this field. Here we highlight three major themes running through his work, and a few selected publications. So-called depletion interactions may lead to phase separation in colloid-polymer mixtures, and Henk realised that the partitioning of polymer needs to be taken into account to describe the phase behaviour correctly [1]. Colloidal suspensions can be used as model fluids, with the time- and length-scales involved leading to novel opportunities, notably the direct observation of capillary waves at a fluid-fluid interface [2]. Together with Remco Tuinier, Henk has recently completed a book in this area which is to appear later this year. A major theme in Henk's research is that of phase transitions in lyotropic liquid crystals. Henk, together with Daan Frenkel and Alain Stroobants, realized in the 1980s that a smectic phase in dispersions of rod-like particles can be stable without the presence of attractive interactions, similar to nematic ordering as predicted earlier by Onsager [3]. Together with Gert-Jan Vroege he wrote a seminal review in this area [4]. Henk once said that 'one can only truly develop one colloidal model system in one's career' and in his case this must be that of gibbsite platelets. Initially Henk's group pursued another polymorph of aluminium hydroxide, boehmite, which forms rod-like particles [5], which already displayed nematic liquid crystal phases. The real breakthrough came when the same precursors treated the produced gibbsite platelets slightly differently. These reliably form a discotic nematic phase [6] and, despite the polydispersity in their diameter, a columnar phase [7]. A theme encompassing a wide range of soft matter systems is that of colloidal dynamics and phase transition kinetics. Many colloidal systems have a tendency to get stuck in metastable states, such as gels or glasses. This is a nuisance if one wishes to study phase transitions, but it is of great practical significance. Such issues feature in many of Henk's publications, and with Valerie Anderson he wrote a highly cited review in this area [8]. Henk Lekkerkerker has also invested significant effort into the promotion of synchrotron radiation studies of colloidal suspensions. He was one of the great supporters of the Dutch-Belgian beamline 'DUBBLE' project at the ESRF [9]. He attended one of the very first experiments in Grenoble in 1999, which led to a Nature publication [7]. He was strongly involved in many other experiments which followed and also has been a member of the beam line board. The most recent synchotron data are reported in this issue and Henk

Petukhov, Andrei; Kegel, Willem; van Duijneveldt, Jeroen

2011-05-01