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1

Defragmenting DHT-based Distributed File Jeffrey Pang  

E-print Network

less fragmented. Second, a new DHT lookup must be performed to locate each block accessed by the taskDefragmenting DHT-based Distributed File Systems Jeffrey Pang Phillip B. Gibbons Michael Kaminsky-050-284- 133. #12;Keywords: DHT, locality, defragmenting, file systems #12;Abstract Existing DHT-based file

Fisher, Kathleen

2

Defragmenting DHT-based Distributed File Systems Jeffrey Pang  

E-print Network

of Singapore Abstract Existing DHT-based file systems use consistent hashing to assign file blocks to random. Second, a new DHT lookup must be performed to locate each block accessed by the task since each blockDefragmenting DHT-based Distributed File Systems Jeffrey Pang Phillip B. Gibbons Michael Kaminsky

Yu, Haifeng

3

ELECTROLYSIS-BASED DIAPHRAGM ACTUATORS Changlin Pang1  

E-print Network

ELECTROLYSIS-BASED DIAPHRAGM ACTUATORS Changlin Pang1 , Yu-Chong Tai1 , Joel W. Burdick2 and latchable (without power). We have since proposed to develop electrolysis-based actuators for the movable probes. This work presents our initial work on a large- force bidirectional electrolysis actuator

Andersen, Richard

4

State-Set Search Bo Pang and Robert C. Holte  

E-print Network

State-Set Search Bo Pang and Robert C. Holte Computing Science Department University of Alberta Edmonton, AB Canada T6G 2E8 (bpang,rholte@ualberta.ca) Abstract State-set search is state space search when the states being manipulated by the search algorithm are sets of states from some underlying state space

Holte, Robert

5

Valerie A. Olson University of California, Irvine  

E-print Network

Publications Book Chapters, Peer-Reviewed Olson, Valerie "NEOspace: the solar system's emerging environmental. Douglas A. Vakoch Ph.D.. Washington, D.C: NASA History Program Office, 2011. Journal Articles, Peer: A Systematic Review on the Effects of Nurse Staffing on Patient, Nurse Employee, and Hospital Outcomes

Loudon, Catherine

6

ShapePalettes: Interactive Normal Transfer via Sketching Tai-Pang Wu  

E-print Network

ShapePalettes: Interactive Normal Transfer via Sketching Tai-Pang Wu The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology Chi-Keung Tang The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology Michael S. Brown

Wu, Dekai

7

STS-96 Crew Interview: Valery Tokarev  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Live footage of a preflight interview with the Russian Cosmonaut Valery Ivanovich Tokarev is presented. The interview addresses many different questions including why Tokarev wanted to be a cosmonaut, and the events that led to his interest. Other interesting information that this one-on-one interview discusses is this logistics and supply mission, and why it is important to send equipment to the International Space Station (ISS) before the astronauts. Tokarev compares both the Russian and United States space programs, and space shuttles. He mentions the logistics and supply mission, plans to transfer the supply, his involvement with the installation of mufflers, and the undocking of Discovery. The future automatic docking of the Service Module to the Zarya Module of the ISS, and the role that the ISS will play in future space flight and exploration are also discussed.

1999-01-01

8

Expedition 5 Crew Interviews: Valery Korzun, Commander  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Expedition 5 Commander Valery Kozun is seen during a prelaunch interview. He gives details on the mission's goals and significance, his role in the mission and what his responsibilities will be as commander, what the crew exchange will be like (the Expedition 5 crew will replace the Expedition 4 crew on the International Space Station (ISS)), the daily life on an extended stay mission, the loading operations that will take place, the experiments he will be conducting on board, and the planned extravehicular activities (EVAs) scheduled for the mission. Kozun discusses the EVAs in greater detail and explains the significance of the Mobile Base System and the Crew Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) cart for the ISS. He also explains at some length the science experiments which will be conducted on board by the Expedition 5 crew members. Korzun also touches on how his previous space experience on Mir (including dealing with a very serious fire) will benefit the Expedition 5 mission.

2002-01-01

9

PanG, a new ketopantoate reductase involved in pantothenate synthesis.  

PubMed

Pantothenate, commonly referred to as vitamin B(5), is an essential molecule in the metabolism of living organisms and forms the core of coenzyme A. Unlike humans, some bacteria and plants are capable of de novo biosynthesis of pantothenate, making this pathway a potential target for drug development. Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis Schu S4 is a zoonotic bacterial pathogen that is able to synthesize pantothenate but is lacking the known ketopantoate reductase (KPR) genes, panE and ilvC, found in the canonical Escherichia coli pathway. Described herein is a gene encoding a novel KPR, for which we propose the name panG (FTT1388), which is conserved in all sequenced Francisella species and is the sole KPR in Schu S4. Homologs of this KPR are present in other pathogenic bacteria such as Enterococcus faecalis, Coxiella burnetii, and Clostridium difficile. Both the homologous gene from E. faecalis V583 (EF1861) and E. coli panE functionally complemented Francisella novicida lacking any KPR. Furthermore, panG from F. novicida can complement an E. coli KPR double mutant. A Schu S4 ?panG strain is a pantothenate auxotroph and was genetically and chemically complemented with panG in trans or with the addition of pantolactone. There was no virulence defect in the Schu S4 ?panG strain compared to the wild type in a mouse model of pneumonic tularemia. In summary, we characterized the pantothenate pathway in Francisella novicida and F. tularensis and identified an unknown and previously uncharacterized KPR that can convert 2-dehydropantoate to pantoate, PanG. PMID:23243306

Miller, Cheryl N; LoVullo, Eric D; Kijek, Todd M; Fuller, James R; Brunton, Jason C; Steele, Shaun P; Taft-Benz, Sharon A; Richardson, Anthony R; Kawula, Thomas H

2013-03-01

10

Raybased Data Level Comparisons of Direct Volume Rendering Algorithms Kwansik Kim and Alex Pang  

E-print Network

of the variations for DVR include schemes like different transfer functions and optical models [16], ray casting. In this paper, we report on how ray tracing can be used as a common frame­ work for comparing a class of DVRRay­based Data Level Comparisons of Direct Volume Rendering Algorithms Kwansik Kim and Alex Pang

Pang, Alex

11

Fabric defect detection by Fourier analysis Chi-ho Chan and Grantham Pang  

E-print Network

1 Fabric defect detection by Fourier analysis Chi-ho Chan and Grantham Pang Dept. of Electrical)-2859-2689 Email: chichan@eee.hku.hk Abstract - Many fabric defects are very small and undistinguishable, which are very difficult to detect by only monitoring the intensity change. Faultless fabric is a repetitive

Pang, Grantham

12

SenSec: Mobile Security through Passive Sensing Jiang Zhu, Pang Wu, Xiao Wang, Joy Zhang  

E-print Network

SenSec: Mobile Security through Passive Sensing Jiang Zhu, Pang Wu, Xiao Wang, Joy Zhang Department uses passive sensory data to ensure the security of applications and data on mobile devices. Sen to provide active authentication (such as a strong password), or disable certain features of the mobile

Tague, Patrick

13

Finding Spatio-Temporal Patterns in Earth Science Data * Pang-Ning Tan+  

E-print Network

1 Finding Spatio-Temporal Patterns in Earth Science Data * Pang-Ning Tan+ Michael Steinbach+ Vipin-temporal patterns from Earth Science data. The data consists of time series measurements for various Earth science of the spatio-temporal issues. Earth Science data has strong seasonal components that need to be removed prior

Kumar, Vipin

14

Mixed-mode oscillations in chemical systems Valery Petrov  

E-print Network

Mixed-mode oscillations in chemical systems Valery Petrov Department of Chemistry, West Virginia to reveal the origin of mixed-mode oscillations. The initial oscillatory solution is born at a supercritical solution subsequently loses stability, but continues to exist-regaining stability to form the 1'mixed-mode

Showalter, Kenneth

15

DCEG Distinguished Lecturer - Dame Valerie Beral, M.D.  

Cancer.gov

Dame Valerie Beral, M.D. is the 2014 recipient of the NCI Rosalind Franklin Award, which she will receive at the NCI Intramural Scientific Investigators Retreat. Dr. Beral has extended her visit in order to come to NCI Shady Grove to spend a day with her collaborators. As a DCEG Distinguished Lecturer she will present a short talk about her career in epidemiology.

16

Xilin Yang, Hemanshu Pota, Matt Garratt, Valery Ugrinovskii Heave Motion Prediction for Maritime Operations of UAVs  

E-print Network

Xilin Yang, Hemanshu Pota, Matt Garratt, Valery Ugrinovskii Heave Motion Prediction for Maritime-helicopter approaches and landing guidance systems. INTRODUCTION The increasing demand for maritime flight operations

Pota, Himanshu Roy

17

STS-84 Post Landing - Valery Ryumin greets wife Elena Kondakova  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FL - Veteran cosmonaut Valery Ryumin greets his wife, STS-84 Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova, with some flowers after the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis lands on KSC's Runway 33. STS-84 was the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The nine-day STS-84 mission was Kondakova's second space flight, but her first on the Space Shuttle. She spent 169 days in space as flight engineer of the 17th main mission on Mir from October 1994 to March 1995. Her husband is now director of the Mir-Shuttle program for Russia.

1997-01-01

18

DUAL USE OF LEDS: SIGNALING AND COMMUNICATIONS IN ITS Grantham Pang, Chi-ho Chan, Hugh Liu, Thomas Kwan  

E-print Network

1 DUAL USE OF LEDS: SIGNALING AND COMMUNICATIONS IN ITS Grantham Pang, Chi-ho Chan, Hugh Liu of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) over incandescent lights is well-supported. This is due to their high. One important characteristic of LEDs is that they are semiconductor devices and are capable of fast

Pang, Grantham

19

Rethinking the conceptual foundations of habitat fragmentation Raphael K. Didham, Valerie Kapos and Robert M. Ewers  

E-print Network

, Valerie Kapos and Robert M. Ewers R. K. Didham, (raphael.didham@uwa.edu.au), School of Animal Biology, The Univ. of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia, and CSIRO Ecosystem

Hansen, Andrew J.

20

Nonparametric Bootstrap Recycling Val'erie Ventura, Department of Statistics, Baker Hall 132  

E-print Network

Nonparametric Bootstrap Recycling Val'erie Ventura, Department of Statistics, Baker Hall 132 adjustments. The amount of computation involved is usually considerable, and recycling provides a less computer intensive alternative. Recycling consists of using repeatedly the same samples drawn from

21

Straight talk with...Valery Danilenko. Interviewed by Gary Peach.  

PubMed

Russian medicine is-at long last-undergoing a renaissance. The country's rocky economic ride following the collapse of the Soviet Union disrupted its research rubric and impoverished its healthcare system. Now, however, the nation's leadership is spearheading various initiatives to reverse the situation. One of them, the US-Russian Scientific Forum, established two years ago by a bilateral presidential commission, hopes to bring improvements by facilitating public-private research in biomedicine and innovative drugs. The Forum, which on the Russian side is represented by the country's Ministry of Health and Social Development and the Russian Academy of Sciences, among others, held its inaugural planning meeting in late April in Moscow. Valery Danilenko, who is helping to spearhead the effort and also leads the biotechnology division at the Vavilov Institute of General Genetics in Moscow, told Nature Medicine about the meeting and Russia's hopes for the Forum. The interview was conducted in Russian and translated by the interviewer, Gary Peach. PMID:21738143

Danilenko, Valery

2011-07-01

22

Within-river nutrient processing in Chalk streams: The Pang and Lambourn, UK  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

SummaryThis work examines baseflow nutrient concentrations and loads along two rural Chalk streams, the Pang and Lambourn. Soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) and boron (B) concentrations in these streams were heavily influenced by point-source inputs and the effects of downstream flow accretion and dilution. Unlike B (which is chemically conservative), SRP loads were also strongly influenced by in-stream processing resulting in uptake of SRP, particularly immediately downstream of sewage effluent discharges, where rates of SRP uptake were highest. For the upper River Pang, up to 80% of SRP loads were lost within 4 km downstream of Compton sewage treatment works (STW) and on the River Lambourn up to 55% of SRP loads were lost within 1.6 km downstream of East Shefford STW. In contrast, nitrate (NO 3) concentrations at sites along the Pang and Lambourn were largely controlled by groundwater inputs and plant uptake during periods of high photosynthetic activity in spring and summer and silicon (Si) by diatom uptake in April/May. There were net gains in NO 3 loads along the river reaches, as a result of volumetric increases in groundwater discharge, and, compared with SRP, the role of in-stream processing of NO 3 appeared low. Examination of SRP exchange by bed sediment and uptake of SRP into algal biofilms indicated that biofilms accounted for only a very small percentage of in-stream P-uptake, but that bed sediment SRP-exchanges had a more important control on baseflow SRP concentrations and loads. Point source P remediation at East Shefford STW, by removal of P from final effluent (P-stripping), resulted in 70-90% reductions in river-water SRP loads. After introduction of P-stripping at East Shefford STW, bed sediments immediately downstream of the STW switched from being net sinks to net sources of SRP. Our results show that, in the immediate aftermath of P-stripping, bed sediment SRP-release was responsible for a 30 ?g-P l -1 rise in river-water SRP along this reach. While this increase in SRP concentration, as a result of bed sediment SRP release, is potentially ecologically significant, it is small in relation to the increase in SRP concentrations from effluent prior to P-stripping, which resulted in increases in SRP concentration of up to 500 ?g-P l -1. There was a six-month lag between the introduction of P-stripping at East Shefford STW and bed sediment EPC 0 recovering to equilibrium levels with the overlying river water (and thus negligible SRP release). Recovery of bed sediments to equilibrium levels is likely to have occurred as a result of winnowing and removal of high-EPC 0 sediment and delivery of lower EPC 0 sediment from upstream. Under higher/more variable flow conditions and greater rates of in-channel sediment erosion/delivery, more rapid recovery of bed sediment EPC 0 levels following P-stripping might be expected.

Jarvie, Helen P.; Neal, Colin; Jrgens, Monika D.; Sutton, Elizabeth J.; Neal, Margaret; Wickham, Heather D.; Hill, Linda K.; Harman, Sarah A.; Davies, Jennifer J. L.; Warwick, Alan; Barrett, Cyril; Griffiths, Jim; Binley, Andrew; Swannack, Natalie; McIntyre, Neil

2006-10-01

23

Learning Physics by Listening To Children Danielle B. Harlow and Valerie K. Otero  

E-print Network

Learning Physics by Listening To Children Danielle B. Harlow and Valerie K. Otero University of these terms may make learning to listen to and interpret children's ideas about science difficult. Children when analyzing video tapes of elementary children learning physics? We found that prospective teachers

Colorado at Boulder, University of

24

Introduction: Hydrogen isotopes as environmental recorders Valery J. Terwilligera,b,c,d  

E-print Network

1 Introduction: Hydrogen isotopes as environmental recorders Valery J. Terwilligera,b,c,d , Jérémy for the future of societies. Stable hydrogen isotopic ratio (D/H) analyses of organic compounds preserved place globally (Jackson et al., 1999; Tang and Feng, 2001; Ogee et al., 2007). Hydrogen isotopic

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

25

Nonparametric Bootstrap Recycling Val'erie Ventura, Department of Statistics, Baker Hall 132  

E-print Network

Nonparametric Bootstrap Recycling Val'erie Ventura, Department of Statistics, Baker Hall 132. The amount of computation involved is usually considerable, and recycling provides a less computer intensive alternative. Recycling consists of using repeatedly the same samples drawn from a recycling distribution G

26

Coverage statistics for sequence census methods Steven N. Evans, Valerie Hower and Lior Pachter  

E-print Network

, rather than just coverage statistics at individual sites. Sequence census methods [5] are experiments fragments that contained it. As with many sequence census methods, "noise" in the experiment leads to randomCoverage statistics for sequence census methods Steven N. Evans, Valerie Hower and Lior Pachter

Evans, Steven N.

27

A Scottish Ecopoetics: Feminism and Environmentalism in the Works of Kathleen Jamie and Valerie Gillies  

Microsoft Academic Search

:The article examines the ongoing attempts of contemporary Scottish poets Kathleen Jamie (1962-) and Valerie Gillies (1948-) to develop a feminist and environmentalist nature poetry that re-envisions the connection between nature and humanity. These poets' artistic journeys have led them from traditional print-page poetry to challenging multimedia art forms that combine the visual and the written word, as in Jamie's

Laura Severin

2011-01-01

28

A Scottish Ecopoetics: Feminism and Environmentalism in the Works of Kathleen Jamie and Valerie Gillies  

Microsoft Academic Search

The article examines the ongoing attempts of contemporary Scottish poets Kathleen Jamie (1962-) and Valerie Gillies (1948-) to develop a feminist and environmentalist nature poetry that re-envisions the connection between nature and humanity. These poets' artistic journeys have led them from traditional print-page poetry to challenging multimedia art forms that combine the visual and the written word, as in Jamie's

Laura Severin

2011-01-01

29

Fireclimate interactions in the American West since 1400 CE Valerie Trouet,1  

E-print Network

records for four regions in the American West that extend back to 1400 CE. In all regions, years with highClick Here for Full Article Fireclimate interactions in the American West since 1400 CE Valerie a strong anthropogenic fingerprint on 20th Century wildland fire activity in the American West, climate

Stephens, Scott L.

30

Valerie Njie Executive Director/Senior Vice-President, Bidwell Training Center, Inc.  

E-print Network

in photography. She is the proud mother of two extremely talented daughters, Lingaire and Njaimeh; both graduates and Colleges (ACCSC). Valerie was influenced by her mother, grandmother and other African-American women NAACP Achievement Thru Excellence Award; Alpha Kappa Alpha Mothers of Distinction Award; 2012 ACCSC

Sibille, Etienne

31

Calibration For Augmented Reality Experimental Testbeds Valerie A. Summers*& Kellogg S. Booth Tom Calvert  

E-print Network

Calibration For Augmented Reality Experimental Testbeds Valerie A. Summers*& Kellogg S. Booth Tom.3.7[ComputerGraphics]: Three-Dimensional GraphicsandRealism-virtual reality Keywords: augmentedreality "augment" theuser's view of thereal 3D world with computer-generatedvirtual objects. Thesevirtual

32

Pressure diffusion waves in porous media Dmitry Silin* and Valeri Korneev, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory,  

E-print Network

describing wave propagation in fluid-bearing porous media are usually derived from Biot's theoryPressure diffusion waves in porous media Dmitry Silin* and Valeri Korneev, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Gennady Goloshubin, University of Houston Summary Pressure diffusion wave in porous

Korneev, Valeri A.

33

Mining Interesting Contrast Rules for a Web-based Educational System Behrouz Minaei-Bidgoli, Pang-Ning Tan, and William F. Punch  

E-print Network

-2]. LON-CAPA involves three types of large data sets: 1) educational resources such as web pagesMining Interesting Contrast Rules for a Web-based Educational System Behrouz Minaei-Bidgoli, Pang, 48824, USA {minaeibi, ptan, punch}@cse.msu.edu Abstract Web-based educational technologies allow

34

Assessment of Impact of Insecticides on Anagrus nilaparvatae (Pang et Wang) (Hymenoptera: Mymanidae), an Egg Parasitoid of the Rice Planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens (Hemiptera: Delphacidae)  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The parasitoid Anagrus Nilaparvatae (Pang et Wang) (Hymenoptera: Mymanidae) is a major natural enemy of the rice planthopper Nilaparvata lugens (Hemiptera: Delphacidae). It plays an important role in the IPM of the rice planthopper. Contact and oral toxicity and residual effect of fourteen pesticide...

35

Light-Induced Frequency Shift in Chemical Spirals Valery Petrov, Qi Ouyang, Ge Li, and Harry L. Swinney*  

E-print Network

Light-Induced Frequency Shift in Chemical Spirals Valery Petrov, Qi Ouyang, Ge Li, and Harry L-Tyson relation for the spirals, D /3k2 , is independent of light intensity (D ) 2.5 ? 10-6 cm2 /s). Introduction The light-sensitive Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction with a ruthenium-based catalyst is a convenient

Texas at Austin. University of

36

Preliminary geochemical study of volcanic rocks in the Pang Mayao area, Phrao, Chiang Mai, northern Thailand: tectonic setting of formation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The least-altered, Permian mafic volcanic rocks from the Pang Mayao area, Phrao District, Chiang Mai Province, part of Chiang Rai-Chiang Mai volcanic belt, have been analyzed and are found to be mid-ocean ridge and ocean-island basalts. The mid-ocean ridge basalts occur as lava flows or dike rocks. They are equigranular, fine- to medium-grained and consist largely of plagioclase, clinopyroxene and olivine. These basalt samples are tholeiitic, and have compositions very similar to T-MORB from the region where the Du Toit Fracture Zone intersects the Southwest Indian Ridge. The ocean-island basalt occurs as pillow breccia, and lava flows or dike rocks. They are slightly to moderately porphyritic, with phenocrysts/microphenocrysts of clinopyroxene, olivine, plagioclase and/or Fe-Ti oxide. The groundmass is very fine-grained, and made up largely of felty plagioclase laths with subordinate clinopyroxene. These basalt samples are alkalic, and chemically analogous to those from Haleakala Volcano, Maui, Hawaiian Chain. These mafic volcanic rocks may have been formed in a major ocean basin rather than in a mature back-arc basin.

Phajuy, Burapha; Panjasawatwong, Yuenyong; Osataporn, Pukpong

2005-03-01

37

An N-Terminal EF Hand-like Motif Modulates Ion Transport by Pmr1, the Yeast Ying Wei, Valerie Marchi, Runsheng Wang, and Rajini Rao*  

E-print Network

+ -ATPase Ying Wei, Valerie Marchi, Runsheng Wang, and Rajini Rao* Department of Physiology, The Johns+ pump activity [Sorin, A., Rosas, G., and Rao, R. (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 9895-9901]. Here we show

Rao, Rajini

38

A Semantic End-to-End QoS Model for Dynamic Service Oriented Environments Nebil Ben Mabrouk, Nikolaos Georgantas, Valerie Issarny  

E-print Network

A Semantic End-to-End QoS Model for Dynamic Service Oriented Environments Nebil Ben Mabrouk.benmabrouk,nikolaos.georgantas,valerie.issarny}@inria.fr Abstract In Service Oriented Computing (SOC), modeling the Quality of Service (QoS) is a cornerstone service environments more dy- namic, QoS models must change accordingly. In this paper, we present a QoS

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

39

Science Policy: Pangs of Science  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presented is the prepared text of a public lecture given by the president of the National Academy of Sciences. Dr. Handler attempts to articulate the state of science today. He deals with such issues as nuclear power and genetic engineering. (MDR)

Handler, Philip

1978-01-01

40

Purdue extension Valerie A. Mock  

E-print Network

.Ferris AndreasWestphal Purdue University Kevin Bradley University of Missouri Winter Annual Weeds and Soybean Cyst Nematode Management With a Guide for Identifying Known Weed Hosts Winter Annual Weeds and Soybean; and the Purdue University Botany and Plant Pathology Department. Support for printing this publication

41

Double Importance Sampling Val'erie Ventura  

E-print Network

) [f ` (x)=g(x)] g(x) dx = R t i (x; `) g(x) dx; which then can be estimated by ?? fl i (`) = Q \\Gamma1 or response surface estimation, and sensitivity analysis, where one set of observations from g can be used to calculate one or more characteristics fl i (`) for varying parameters of a density f ` , in an attempt

42

Jamie Snyder Valerie DeMean  

E-print Network

trading partners made strong gains. Various reasons played a part in this decline of efficiency. One to increase the value of American products in the changing global market. As a result, a committee was formed manufacturers and engineers calling the shots if America is to compete effectively in world markets." His

Vardeman, Stephen B.

43

Stochastic Models for Epidemics Valerie Isham  

E-print Network

): heterogeneity, thresholds and persistence, nonstationarity, control. In spite of considerable advances, many transmission had already taken place before the threat of an epidemic was recognised. In such situations

Guillas, Serge

44

Mining Indirect Associations in Web Data PangNing Tan  

E-print Network

informative even though they seldom co-occur together. These anti-correlated patterns may represent is that it does not adequately address the impact of Web site structure on the support of a Web page. As a result with the current association mining technique is that it does not adequately address the impact of Web site

Kumar, Vipin

45

Accelerometer for Mobile Robot Positioning Hugh Liu, Grantham Pang  

E-print Network

. Example of an absolute positioning system is the Global Positioning System (GPS). The advantage positioning system, dead reckoning method is employed to find the position. The angle and distance data are used to find the current position. One of the commonly used relative positioning system is Inertial

Pang, Grantham

46

Dlivr par UNIVERSITE PAUL-VALERY MONTPELLIER 3  

E-print Network

, and played social roles within family unit only. They were daughters, spouses and mothers, and considered subordinate to their fathers and husbands. This thesis aims to show how the twentieth century challenged representation, redefinition and subversion of female gender, female social roles and relationship between men

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

47

Multiple-Sensor Indoor Surveillance System Valery A. Petrushin1)  

E-print Network

-red badges, RFID tags, etc.) in public places such as airports, train stations, streets, parking lots, hospitals, governmental buildings, shopping malls, and homes has created the opportunities for development reader is installed at the entrance and is used for matching an employee #12;Figure 1. Locations

Wolfson, Ouri E.

48

Iraq's Oil Tomorrow Valerie Marcel, Senior Research Fellow  

E-print Network

is negatively affected by Washington's unpopular policies. 1 By the US Geological Survey's own estimates published in 2000, Iraq is a poor third to Saudi Arabia and Russia in terms of potential oil suppl

O'Donnell, Tom

49

Choosing a Random Peer in Chord Valerie King  

E-print Network

algorithms for choosing a peer uniformly at random from the set of all peers in a Distributed Hash Table (DHT Phone: 505-277-5446, Fax: 505-277-6927 1 #12; Providing an Algorithmic Building Block: An algorithm for randomly sam- pling a peer can be used as a building block for other distributed algo- rithms. For example

Saia, Jared

50

JOHN VALERY WHITE EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT AND PROVOST  

E-print Network

. At LSU, he taught for 15 years and wrote and lectured extensively about civil rights law. He was also of civil rights law and multicultural theories in responding to globalism. He helped organize and direct. Before teaching law, he was an Orville Schell Fellow at Human Rights Watch in New York City where he

Hemmers, Oliver

51

More Importance Sampling better title? Val'erie Ventura  

E-print Network

indicates with respect to which density integration must be made. Applications include response surface, 1987), efficient bootstrap likelihood calculations (Davison, Hinkley, and Worton, 1992, 1995; (2) and we estimate fl i (`) by its empirical analogue, ?? fl i (`) = Q \\Gamma1 Q X q=1 t i` (x q

52

Welcome to Wayne Valerie M. Parisi, MD, MPH, MBA  

E-print Network

Assistant Dean Medical Eval & Edu Research Patrick Bridge Assistant Dean Student Affairs Kertia Black in 1868 as the Detroit College of Medicine · Of 130 medical schools in the US ­ 3rd highest medical student enrollment ­ 1st largest single-campus medical school · Detroits only Medical School #12;Current

Finley Jr., Russell L.

53

Valerie T. Eviner Department of Plant Sciences, University of California  

E-print Network

Honors and Awards 2011 Honor Society of Agriculture, Gamma Sigma Delta 2009 Outstanding Mentor Award, UCD's Consortium for Women and Research 2008 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE on the roles of different plant species in altering nitrogen inputs, recycling, and retention. California

Eviner, Valerie

54

Spline-based deconvolution Amir Averbuch , Valery Zheludev  

E-print Network

identification, spectroscopy, seismic processing, image deblurring, to name a few. This is an active area measuring a signal by an instrument, transmission through a channel, propagation of a seismic signal through functions enable to overcome this contra- diction by mapping the discrete data into spaces of smooth

Averbuch, Amir

55

Fault Diagnosis in Mixed-Signal Low Testability System Jing Pang Janusz A. Starzyk  

E-print Network

-0007 jingpang@bobcat.ent.ohiou.edu starzyk@bobcat.ent.ohiou.edu KEY WORDS: ambiguity groups, fault diagnosis University Athens, OH 45701, U. S. A. Tel.(740) 593-1580 Fax (740) 593-0007 jingpang@bobcat.ent.ohiou.edu starzyk@bobcat.ent.ohiou.edu ABSTRACT This paper describes a new approach for fault diagnosis of analog

Starzyk, Janusz A.

56

Separating Interaction Concerns from Distributed Feature Components Jianxiong Pang Lynne Blair  

E-print Network

components. "Loosely related software components" means that the software units were developed without between heterogeneous applications" refers to the co-execution or cooperation of loosely related software a strictly unified design process. They might come from different domains or providers or even the same

57

HIGH FREQUENCY MICROMECHANICAL PIEZO ACTUATED DISK RESONATOR , Wei Pang*, Jian Wu  

E-print Network

micromechanical resonator. The resonator is designed to operate in the wine-glass mode and the anchors is fabricated with a simple 4-mask low temperature process from SOI wafer. The highest temperature during with calibrated RF cables. INTRODUCTION Due to their small sizes, on-chip integration potential, and better

Tang, William C

58

PanG, a new ketopantoate reductase involved in pantothenate synthesis  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Pantothenate, commonly referred to as vitamin B5, is an essential molecule in the metabolism of living organisms and forms the core of coenzyme A. Unlike humans, some bacteria and plants are capable of de novo biosynthesis of pantothenate making this pathway a potential target for drug development. ...

59

PANG AND SCHULTHEISSASSESSING IMPLICIT MOTIVES Assessing Implicit Motives in U.S. College Students  

E-print Network

Students: Effects of Picture Type and Position, Gender and Ethnicity, and Cross-Cultural Comparisons Joyce and Winter's (1994) content coding system. Picture cues differed markedly in the amount of motive imagery with questionnaire measures of impulsivity and anxiety (Behavioral Inhibition SystemBehavioral Activation System

Schultheiss, Oliver C.

60

Collapse limit states of reinforced earth retaining walls M. D. BOLTON* and P. L. R. PANG7  

E-print Network

- Instrumented models showed that whereas the first occurrence of ultimate tensile strength in a strand-scale reinforced earth structure is even more hkely to be associated with the first fracture ofsome weak bolted to offer their ultimate strength. L'emploi de systemes de renforcement ou d'ancrage du sol devient de plus

Bolton, Malcolm

61

LED Traffic Light as a Communications Device Grantham Pang, Thomas Kwan, Chi-Ho Chan, Hugh Liu.  

E-print Network

:http://www.eee.hku.hk/~gpang Abstract The visible light from an LED (light emitting diode) traffic light can be modulated and encoded on the description of an audio information system made up of high brightness, visible light emitting diodes (LEDs messages 1. Introduction Recently, high intensity light emitting diodes for traffic signals are available

Pang, Grantham

62

Coffee for morning hunger pangs. An examination of coffee and caffeine on appetite, gastric emptying, and energy intake.  

PubMed

Coffee is one of the most widely consumed beverages in the world and has a number of potential health benefits. Coffee may influence energy expenditure and energy intake, which in turn may affect body weight. However, the influence of coffee and its constituents - particularly caffeine - on appetite remains largely unexplored. The objective of this study was to examine the impact of coffee consumption (with and without caffeine) on appetite sensations, energy intake, gastric emptying, and plasma glucose between breakfast and lunch meals. In a double-blind, randomised crossover design. Participants (n?=?12, 9 women; Mean??SD age and BMI: 26.3??6.3 y and 22.7??2.2?kgm(-2)) completed 4 trials: placebo (PLA), decaffeinated coffee (DECAF), caffeine (CAF), and caffeine with decaffeinated coffee (COF). Participants were given a standardised breakfast labelled with (13)C-octanoic acid and 225?mL of treatment beverage and a capsule containing either caffeine or placebo. Two hours later, another 225?mL of the treatment beverage and capsule was administered. Four and a half?hours after breakfast, participants were given access to an ad libitum meal for determination of energy intake. Between meals, participants provided exhaled breath samples for determination of gastric emptying; venous blood and appetite sensations. Energy intake was not significantly different between the trials (Means??SD, p>?0.05; Placebo: 2118??663?kJ; Decaf: 2128??739?kJ; Caffeine: 2287??649?kJ; Coffee: 2016??750?kJ); Other than main effects of time (p?<0.05), no significant differences were detected for appetite sensations or plasma glucose between treatments (p?>?0.05). Gastric emptying was not significantly different across trials (p?>?0.05). No significant effects of decaffeinated coffee, caffeine or their combination were detected. However, the consumption of caffeine and/or coffee for regulation of energy balance over longer periods of time warrant further investigation. PMID:25218717

Schubert, Matthew M; Grant, Gary; Horner, Katy; King, Neil; Leveritt, Michael; Sabapathy, Surendran; Desbrow, Ben

2014-12-01

63

Controlled ultrasonic micro-dissection of thin tissue sections Changhai Ru & Jun Liu & Ming Pang & Yu Sun  

E-print Network

cutting tool to induce low-amplitude, high-frequency vibration to a fine metal tip to excise selected cell, we have developed an ultrasonic microdissection system. The system utilizes a vision-based method on micro- dissection accuracy and speed were evaluated. Keywords Piezoelectric actuator . Ultrasonic

Sun, Yu

64

Valerie M. Parisi, MD, MPH, MBA Began in 1868 as the Detroit College of Medicine  

E-print Network

medical schools in the US · 3rd highest medical student enrollment · 1st largest single-campus medical school Detroit's only Medical School #12; Nearly 2,300 Students and Trainees Degree Programs ~1,160 MD medical school class from 270 to 300 to address the impending physician shortage * Michigan Blue Ribbon

Finley Jr., Russell L.

65

Up Front with Valerie and Joe: Fair Game and Other Stories of Reprisal  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The movie "Fair Game" (Butterworth et al., 2010) is a fact-based political thriller that calls attention to a process of turning respectable members of established institutions, who are performing their roles properly, into excluded deviants. The result of this transformation may be the creation of a new group initiating its own subculture. The

Beck, Bernard

2011-01-01

66

The birth of Emerging Themes in Epidemiology: a tale of Valerie, causality and epidemiology  

PubMed Central

Emerging Themes in Epidemiology (ETE) is a new, online, Open Access peer-reviewed journal. The Journal is unique in that it was conceived and is managed by research degree students in epidemiology and related public health fields. The Journal's management is overseen by its Editor-in-Chief and Associate Faculty Editors, all of whom are senior members of faculty. ETE aims to encourage debate and discussion on the theoretical, methodological and practical aspects of epidemiologic research and practice. In addition, ETE is dedicated to the promotion of Open Access publication and the training of research students in the scientific publishing process. This editorial, to coincide with the launch of ETE, sets out the Journal's philosophy and aims. Epidemiology is a rich and innovative science that has much to gain from broader discussion of the causal frameworks that underpin it. ETE aims to be a major forum for such discussion. PMID:15679908

Tam, Clarence C

2004-01-01

67

UNIVERSIT MONTPELLIER III PAUL VALERY cole doctorale n 60 : Territoires, Temps, Socits et Dveloppement  

E-print Network

affects chez des enfants présentant des troubles dysorthographiques La dysorthographie est considérée en purement fonctionnelle et mécanique chez certains patients dysorthographiques. Mots clés : dysorthographie

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

68

Probing single molecule kinetics by photon arrival trajectories Valeri Barsegov and Shaul Mukamel  

E-print Network

- ing the Kubo­Andersen sudden jump stochastic model23 or harmonic degrees of freedom the spin fluorescence resonant energy transfer measurements are computed using a simple model representing slow exhibit stochastic behavior due to cou- pling with various molecular and environment degrees of freedom.5

Mukamel, Shaul

69

VISIONING WESTON NURSERIES Team 1: Valerie Gingrich, Helen Lee, Taylor Mammen, Adam Marcus  

E-print Network

are the open spaces and natural environment as well as the general rural character of Hopkinton. At the heart uses such as an organic food store and caf. On the western portion off of Wilson Road, we propose the hill to the north is Azalea Hill, a residential village center on the hill off of Phipps Road, which

Ishii, Hiroshi

70

A review of "The Renaissance of Lesbianism in Early Modern England." by Valerie Traub  

E-print Network

of these rep- resentations to classical sources and models. More polemically, she also wishes to expose the inadequacy of the traditional view of the Renaissance as an organically coherent, ideologically homogeneous culture, an account that is belied... by the ?dynamic interactions of a range of knowledges? about lesbian desire during this period (10). It is through her meticulously rendered, deeply informed, exposi- tion of this range of knowledges that Traub makes her greatest contribution to seventeenth...

Mario Digangi

2003-01-01

71

Wavelet based acoustic detection of moving vehicles Amir Averbuch Valery Zheludev Neta Rabin and Alon Schclar  

E-print Network

]). The experiments in the current paper demonstrate that a choice of distinctive characteristic features-vehicle recordings (the training database) contains signals emitted by planes, helicopters, wind, speech, steps, etc conditions that may contain sounds emitted by planes, helicopters, speech, wind, steps, to name a few

Averbuch, Amir

72

NCI-CCR Pediatric Oncology Branch - Pediatric Psycho-Oncology Professionals Profile Listings - Valerie Crabtree  

Cancer.gov

Skip to Main Content CCR Home | About CCR | CCR Intranet Main Navigation Home Profiles Research Newsworthy References Special Interest Groups Training Main Links Psycho-Oncology Home Profiles Research Publications Newsworthy/Resources References Special

73

Virus-mediated chemical changes in rice plants impact the relationship between non-vector planthopper Nilaparvata lugens Stl and its egg parasitoid Anagrus nilaparvatae Pang et Wang.  

PubMed

In order to clarify the impacts of southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV) infection on rice plants, rice planthoppers and natural enemies, differences in nutrients and volatile secondary metabolites between infected and healthy rice plants were examined. Furthermore, the impacts of virus-mediated changes in plants on the population growth of non-vector brown planthopper (BPH), Nilaparvata lugens, and the selectivity and parasitic capability of planthopper egg parasitoid Anagrus nilaparvatae were studied. The results showed that rice plants had no significant changes in amino acid and soluble sugar contents after SRBSDV infection, and SRBSDV-infected plants had no significant effect on population growth of non-vector BPH. A. nilaparvatae preferred BPH eggs both in infected and healthy rice plants, and tended to parasitize eggs on infected plants, but it had no significant preference for infected plants or healthy plants. GC-MS analysis showed that tridecylic aldehyde occurred only in rice plants infected with SRBSDV, whereas octanal, undecane, methyl salicylate and hexadecane occurred only in healthy rice plants. However, in tests of behavioral responses to these five volatile substances using a Y-tube olfactometer, A. nilaparvatae did not show obvious selectivity between single volatile substances at different concentrations and liquid paraffin in the control group. The parasitic capability of A. nilaparvatae did not differ between SRBSDV-infected plants and healthy plant seedlings. The results suggested that SRBSDV-infected plants have no significant impacts on the non-vector planthopper and its egg parasitoid, A. nilaparvatae. PMID:25141278

He, Xiaochan; Xu, Hongxing; Gao, Guanchun; Zhou, Xiaojun; Zheng, Xusong; Sun, Yujian; Yang, Yajun; Tian, Junce; Lu, Zhongxian

2014-01-01

74

Cardiac Hypertrophy 713. Ai D, Pang W, Li N, Xu M, Jones PD, Yang J, Zhang Y, Chiamvimonvat N, Shyy JY, Hammock BD, Zhu Y (2009)  

E-print Network

JY, Hammock BD, Zhu Y (2009) Soluble epoxide hydrolase plays an essential role in angiotensin II formation and of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids degradation attenuates hypertension and hypertension-induced end

Ferrara, Katherine W.

75

Virus-Mediated Chemical Changes in Rice Plants Impact the Relationship between Non-Vector Planthopper Nilaparvata lugens Stl and Its Egg Parasitoid Anagrus nilaparvatae Pang et Wang  

PubMed Central

In order to clarify the impacts of southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV) infection on rice plants, rice planthoppers and natural enemies, differences in nutrients and volatile secondary metabolites between infected and healthy rice plants were examined. Furthermore, the impacts of virus-mediated changes in plants on the population growth of non-vector brown planthopper (BPH), Nilaparvata lugens, and the selectivity and parasitic capability of planthopper egg parasitoid Anagrus nilaparvatae were studied. The results showed that rice plants had no significant changes in amino acid and soluble sugar contents after SRBSDV infection, and SRBSDV-infected plants had no significant effect on population growth of non-vector BPH. A. nilaparvatae preferred BPH eggs both in infected and healthy rice plants, and tended to parasitize eggs on infected plants, but it had no significant preference for infected plants or healthy plants. GC-MS analysis showed that tridecylic aldehyde occurred only in rice plants infected with SRBSDV, whereas octanal, undecane, methyl salicylate and hexadecane occurred only in healthy rice plants. However, in tests of behavioral responses to these five volatile substances using a Y-tube olfactometer, A. nilaparvatae did not show obvious selectivity between single volatile substances at different concentrations and liquid paraffin in the control group. The parasitic capability of A. nilaparvatae did not differ between SRBSDV-infected plants and healthy plant seedlings. The results suggested that SRBSDV-infected plants have no significant impacts on the non-vector planthopper and its egg parasitoid, A. nilaparvatae. PMID:25141278

Gao, Guanchun; Zhou, Xiaojun; Zheng, Xusong; Sun, Yujian; Yang, Yajun; Tian, Junce; Lu, Zhongxian

2014-01-01

76

Tube-wave monitoring of oil fields Valeri Korneev, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Andrey Bakulin*, Shell International Exploration and  

E-print Network

production and injection wells. Method Conventional cross-well seismic requires the source and receiver wells, and every production or injection well can be used provided the well(heads) can be permanently instrumented

Korneev, Valeri A.

77

Publikationen 2013 -2014 106. S. Benedetti , F. Stavale , S. Valeri , C. Noguera, H.-J. Freund , J. Goniakowski,* N. Nilius*  

E-print Network

.-J. Freund , J. Goniakowski,* N. Nilius* Advanced Functional Materials 23 (2013) 7580. Self of (111)-type MgO islands at the local scale 108. F. Stavale, N. Nilius,* H.-J. Freund, Surf. Sci. 609, M. Baldowski, J. Sauer, H.-J. Freund, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 52 (2013) 11385-11387 Adsorption

Peinke, Joachim

78

Seismic imaging of oil production rate Valeri A. Korneev, Dmitry Silin, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California  

E-print Network

reflectivity from fluid-saturated reservoirs at the low-frequency seismic range. It also has been observed. In the presented example we quantify low- frequency imaging amplitude attribute in terms of reservoir fluidHz) seismic frequencies. Here is the reservoir rock permeability, is the viscosity of the reservoir fluid

Korneev, Valeri A.

79

A map-based algorithm for controlling low-dimensional chaos Valery Petrov, 80 Peng, and Kenneth Showalter@  

E-print Network

in chemical systems is of special inter- est, both from a practical perspective, such as in tank reactor in a chemical system based on targeting an unstable point in the return map corresponding to a particu- lar in the vicinity of any particular fixed point x,; e.g., for the period- 1 unstable point, J%+*(P) =f[xn -X,(P)] +x

Showalter, Kenneth

80

Sustainability criteria for bioenergy systems: results from an expert survey Thomas Buchholz*, Valerie A. Luzadis, Timothy A. Volk  

E-print Network

Drive, Syracuse, NY 13210, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 28 July 2008 Received, biofuels and bioproducts. However, the use of biomass does not automatically imply that its production criteria varied among the experts surveyed. Only two criteria, energy balance and greenhouse gas balance

Vermont, University of

81

An Efficient Group Key Agreement Protocol for Ad hoc Networks Daniel Augot, Raghav Bhaskar, Valerie Issarny and Daniele Sacchetti  

E-print Network

An Efficient Group Key Agreement Protocol for Ad hoc Networks Daniel Augot, Raghav Bhaskar, Val´erie.Bhaskar, Val´erie.Issarny, Daniele.Sacchetti}@inria.fr Abstract A Group Key Agreement (GKA) protocol is a mecha by the constrained devices often present in ad hoc networks, others lack a formal security analysis. In this pa- per

Boyer, Edmond

82

EDITORIAL: Special issue in honour of Professor Valery V Tuchins contribution to the field of biomedical optics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This special issue of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics covers some of the applied physics currently being addressed by light source researchers. Most of these papers originate from presentations made at the 10th International Symposium on the Science and Technology of Light Sources, held in Toulouse, France, on 18--22 July 2004. The conference attracted about 400 participants from all over the world. Abstracts of all papers, including extended abstracts of invited papers, were published in the conference book Light Sources 2004 (Institute of Physics Conference Series 182) edited by G Zissis. The full papers published in this issue reflect the wide-ranging nature of research on light sources. These collected full papers survived our rigorous journal review process and they report completed, previously unpublished, pieces of work. This is a research field that has seen many major contributions over the last hundred years; nevertheless it continues to produce new sources and important improvements to existing types. It is evident from these papers just how crucial are the materials used for light sources. Numerous recent lamp developments have depended critically on new or improved materials. Ten or more of the papers are concerned explicitly with materials: for example, an environmentally important and challenging area of research is to find a viable alternative to the use of mercury, particularly in fluorescent lamps. This is difficult because a substitute for Hg in general lighting must match the remarkable efficiency of Hg, or risk doing harm to the environment through increased energy consumption. Large-scale computation of the properties of both high- and low-pressure discharge lamps has become indispensable. A good example is in the paper by Derra et al, which is the first major review of an important lamp type. The lamp of interest is a mercury arc used in data projectors, operating with an arc gap of approximately 1 mm at more than 100 bar pressure. Most of the information needed for design is not accessible experimentally. Computer models were essential tools in many aspects of development, including finding out how the highly stressed materials could be used in ways that ensured acceptable life. Short-arc metal-halide lamps are used for producing white light in commercial premises, but they present numerous challenges to developers. Exceedingly complex chemistry, the many emitters and absorbers, the lack of symmetry, and the increasing influence of electrodes as the arc is shortenedall these pose many design problems that are being tackled with increasing success with the help of computer models. This special issue has many papers that deal with electrode issues, with special emphasis on the experimental verification of model predictions. Radiation transport also continues to be a major issue in constructing realistic discharge models. A number of papers tackle this in a simplified manner, whilst a new ray-tracing scheme offers hope of a realistic calculation of radiation in the complicated short-arc metal-halide lamps mentioned above. Light-emitting diodes are now having a major impact on some areas of lighting; two papers in this issue reflect that trend. The group of papers in this special issue will surely provide an important resource for those researching new and improved lamps.

Wang, Ruikang K.; Priezzhev, Alexander V.; Fantini, Sergio

2005-08-01

83

taMd at Hqaotogy. I d ,3 No. r pp 27r a0. rsa coPyrtht rq tury for rhcsrdy  

E-print Network

.ty of fil6nak6 (A.ro.nordus aranaae) in freshrard bill.bonF of rorth.m Austr.li. previded drta on >3400 duk6OOka ha 1)in rhe @in stuaty bill.bons. Thb hiSh bioda$ .an be naitrt.ined b.c.6. of the hiAh abundance(Shine, 1986b).In or- der to evaluate the .apa.lty ot A. anfutrc to withstand exploitation by humans, data

Shine, Rick

84

To cite this document: SELVA Pierre, CHERRIER Olivier, BUDINGER, Valerie, LACHAUD, Frdric, MORLIER. Joseph.Smart EMI monitoring of thin composite structures. In: 16th  

E-print Network

health monitoring (SHM) method for in-situ damage detection and localization in carbon fibre reinforced plates (CFRP). The detection is achieved using the electromechanical impedance (EMI) technique employing are then used to quantify and detect changes between the electromechanical impedance spectrum of a pristine

Mailhes, Corinne

85

Radar Subsurface Imaging by Phase Shift Migration Hui Zhang1, Wolf-Stefan Benedix1, Dirk Plettemeier1, Valerie Ciarletti2  

E-print Network

Radar Subsurface Imaging by Phase Shift Migration Algorithm Hui Zhang1, Wolf-Stefan Benedix1, Dirk the phase shift migration based Syn- thetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is described and applied on radar imaging for dual polarized ground penetrating radar system (GPR). Conventional techniques for SAR imaging focusing

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

86

Model-independent nonlinear control algorithm with application to a liquid bridge experiment Valery Petrov,* Anders Haaning, Kurt A. Muehlner, Stephen J. Van Hook, and Harry L. Swinney  

E-print Network

constructs a high-dimensional look-up table based on the system's responses to a sequence of random of the original system. For example, unstable periodic orbits that densely fill a chaotic attractor provide an infinite reservoir of different periodic behaviors and the chaotic system can be forced to follow any

Texas at Austin. University of

87

Results of the Nematode Variety Test at AG-CARES, Lamesa, TX 2003. Terry A. Wheeler, John R. Gannaway, Lyndon Schoenhals, Anna Hall, and Valerie Morgan,  

E-print Network

/500 cc of soil, and had the 5th highest average yield (Table 1). The nematode resistant check ST LA887TITLE: Results of the Nematode Variety Test at AG-CARES, Lamesa, TX 2003. AUTHORS: Terry A. Wheeler, Senior Research Associate, Research Associate, Technician MATERIALS AND METHODS: Test: Nematode

Mukhtar, Saqib

88

To cite this document: Budinger, Valerie and Cherrier, Olivier and Morlier, Joseph and Lachaud, Frdric Damage location method for thin composites structures -application  

E-print Network

: AST 2013 4th International Workshop on Aircraft System Technologies, 23-24 Apr 2013, Hamburg, Germany. Open Archive Toulouse Archive Ouverte (OATAO) OATAO is an open access repository that collects the work damage indicators and on the acoustic attenuation level to localize damage. One of the main advantages

Mailhes, Corinne

89

Journal of Coastal Conservation Planning and Management  

E-print Network

Atlases Elizabeth K. O'Dea, Edward Dwyer, Valerie Cummins & Dawn J. Wright #12;Potentials and limitations of Coastal Web Atlases Elizabeth K. O'Dea & Edward Dwyer & Valerie Cummins & Dawn J. Wright Received: 8

Wright, Dawn Jeannine

90

Dynamic wake meandering Gunner C. Larsen, Helge Aa. Madsen, Ferhat  

E-print Network

, Søren Ott, Jens N. Sørensen, Valery Okulov, Niels Troldborg, Morten Nielsen, Kenneth Thomsen, Torben J, Søren Ott, Jens N. Sørensen, Valery Okulov, Niels Troldborg, Morten Nielsen, Kenneth Thomsen, Torben J

91

Administrative Faculty Committee (AFC) Meeting Minutes  

E-print Network

Hart. The following guests were present: John Valery White and Larry Hamilton. Discussion with John Valery White, Executive Vice President & Provost: Executive Vice President & Provost, John Valery White continue to increase so there is hope that pay cuts may be restored. Health Benefits & the PEBP: The task

Hemmers, Oliver

92

Target Audience: Health care professionals  

E-print Network

Valerie has been a social worker for over 20 years working in a variety of settings including health care (palliative care, chronic ill- ness), child welfare, and do- mestic violence. Valerie is an Assistant fatigue, work/life balance, and end-of-life care. Valerie is also a meditation teacher trained in the use

Hitchcock, Adam P.

93

Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1007/s10107-003-0242-8 Math. Program., Ser. A 96: 131 (2003)  

E-print Network

) Tim Olson · Jong-Shi Pang · Carey Priebe A likelihood-MPEC approach to target classification Received. These problems occur in many different settings. Examples include the classification of white versus gray matter e-mail: olson@math.ufl.edu J.-S. Pang, C. Priebe: Department of Mathematical Sciences, Whiting

Priebe, Carey E.

94

1. 7084 " The Carbon Matrices Made of Pyrolised Bis-Phtalocyanines as a Base for Encapsulation of the Long-Lived Nuclides of Iodine, Technetium and Minor Actinides" Valeri  

E-print Network

on Environmental Remediation and Radioactive Waste Management ICEM'07 September 2-6, 2007, Oud Sint-Jan Hospital and Radioactive Waste Management ICEM'07 September 2-6, 2007, Oud Sint-Jan Hospital Conference Center, Bruges Waste Management ICEM'07 September 2-6, 2007, Oud Sint-Jan Hospital Conference Center, Bruges, Belgium 4

Titov, Anatoly

95

CONFERENCE ON DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS AND THEIR APPLICATIONS, BRNO, AUGUST 25 29, 1997  

E-print Network

lectures and 34 main lectures in sections. In addition 208 papers were presented as communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123 Valery Gaiko (Belarus State University of Informatics and Radioelec- tronics) The Existence

Cakoni, Fioralba

96

ELECTRICITY DEMAND FORECAST COMPARISON REPORT  

E-print Network

Valerie T. Hall Deputy Director Energy Efficiency and Demand Analysis Division Scott W. Matthews Acting.................................................................................................................................3 PACIFIC GAS & ELECTRIC PLANNING AREA...............................................................................................................................13 SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA EDISON PLANNING AREA ................................................................13

97

Staff Council Meeting February 13, 2008  

E-print Network

, Caroline Crossley, Chris Dickson, Bob Hamilton, Patrice Holt, Carolyn Ivey, Tom Lee, Jacqueline Long Phillips, Sandra Sawyer, Kathy White GUESTS: Janet Collins, Cole Detwiler, Andrew Janke, Valerie Lariscy

O'Toole, Alice J.

98

Taking Awareness, Language, and Novelty into Account in Decision Making and Game Theory  

E-print Network

for Stem Programs: Enhancing Capability and Advancing Practice William M. Trochim, Policy Analysis Kenneth Birman Valerie Bunce David Lin Chekesha Liddell Radu Rugina William Trochim Anthony Reeves Phoebe

Danforth, Bryan Nicholas

99

The Learning Principal[R]. Volume 4, Number 7  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"The Learning Principal" is an eight-page newsletter published eight times a year. It focuses on the important and unique work of school principals. This issue includes: (1) A Learning Community Is Built on Trust (Valerie von Frank); (2) School Leadership: Q & A: Turnaround Doesn't Have to Take Years, Just Solid Leadership (Valerie von Frank); (3)

von Frank, Valerie, Ed.

2009-01-01

100

The Learning Principal[R]. Volume 4, Number 8  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"The Learning Principal" is an eight-page newsletter published eight times a year. It focuses on the important and unique work of school principals. This issue includes: (1) Efficacy Can Overcome Classroom Barriers (Valerie von Frank); (2) Q & A: Leadership, Learning Communities Change School Culture (Valerie von Frank); (3) Focus on NSDC's

von Frank, Valerie, Ed.

2009-01-01

101

The Learning Principal[R]. Volume 5, Number 2  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"The Learning Principal" is an eight-page newsletter published eight times a year. It focuses on the important and unique work of school principals. This issue includes: (1) Data Analysis Is a Courageous Look in the Mirror (Valerie von Frank); (2) Q&A: Opening Doors, Opening Minds (Valerie von Frank); (3) Focus on NSDC's [National Staff

Crow, Tracy, Ed.

2009-01-01

102

Cost Center Department Mail Alt Dept Records Analyst UC Assoc Dir UC Dept Mgr H 1009301 Office of Diversity 929301 Almeida,Evelyn S Acosta,David A Latimore,Darin A (interim)  

E-print Network

Almeida,Evelyn S Condrin,Michael P Adame,Valerie Renee H 1009732 PM&R - Neurological EMG Svcs 929732,Evelyn S Condrin,Michael P Adame,Valerie Renee H 1009734 PM&R - Prosthetics/Orthotics 929734 Almeida

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

103

Traversal, Case Analysis, and Lowering for C++ Program Analysis  

E-print Network

of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved by: Chair of Committee, Bjarne Stroustrup Committee Members, Lawrence Rauchwerger Jaakko J arvi Gregory Berkolaiko Head of Department, Valerie Taylor August 2009 Major Subject: Computer Science iii ABSTRACT Traversal, Case...

Wagner, Luke A.

2010-01-14

104

Programming Language Evolution and Source Code Rejuvenation  

E-print Network

of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Chair of Committee, Bjarne Stroustrup Committee Members, Gabriel Dos Reis Lawrence Rauchwerger Jaakko J arvi Weiping Shi Head of Department, Valerie Taylor December 2010 Major Subject...

Pirkelbauer, Peter Mathias

2011-02-22

105

Catalyst Magazine6 UTSA Catalyst Magazine 7UTSA There is no escape from going online--our jobs require it, but even  

E-print Network

the genes responsible for the biosynthesis of plant hormones called gibberellins. Sponsel's rese to discover medical applications of nanomaterials. $690K keeps plant biology research growing Jurgen Engelberth, assistant professor of plant biochemistry, and Valerie Sponsel, associate professor of biology

Sandhu, Ravi

106

Cornell University, Office of Sponsored Programs Awards Received in April 2012  

E-print Network

AKEY, BRUCE Animal Health Diagnostic Center NYS (NYS DEC) NYS DEC - ZOONOTIC & WILDLIFE DISEASE BRANCH FOR NIH CENTER FOR REHABILITATION RESEARCH USING LARGE DATASETS $155,406 THF 60410 BUNCE, VALERIE

Danforth, Bryan Nicholas

107

Google Earth Blog: Great collection of resources for the Fukushima power plant  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Google Earth blog entry features a single network link from Valery Hronusov devoted to the Fukushima power plant. The file is packed with information about the plant -- photo overlays, 3D buildings, photos, videos and more.

Valery Hronusov

108

VRIJE UNIVERSITEIT BRUSSEL FACULTY OF MEDICINE AND PHARMACY  

E-print Network

..........................................................................................7 1.4 Water scarcity and access Promoter: Prof. Marc Pallemaerts Transboundary Water Disputes in Central Asia: Using Indicators of Water Conflict in Identifying Water Conflict Potential By Valery Votrin A thesis submitted in partial fulfilment

Wolf, Aaron

109

A U T U M N 2 0 1 4www.ucd.ie/ucdtoday 5.Alooktothe  

E-print Network

, Valerie Norton, Eilis O'Brien, Caroline O'Connor, Claire O'Connell, Tracy O'Donoghue, Rosalind Pan, Elaine Flannery, Dominic Martella Design: Loman Cusack Design Print: Fine Print Thanks to: Diarmaid Ferriter, Pat

Pollastri, Gianluca

110

W I N T E R 2 0 1 2www.ucd.ie/ucdtoday 7.MindtheHealth  

E-print Network

Muldoon, Zorica Nedovic Budic, Valerie Norton, Clr N Bhuachalla, Caroline O'Connor, Eilis O'Brien, Aidan, Nerys Williams, Agnieszka Wisniewska, Orla Wrynn. Produced by: Eilis O'Brien, Lisa Flannery, Dominic

111

CERNAB2006004 DESY 06001  

E-print Network

Logachev, Fedor Podgorny, Valery Telnov (BINP SB RAS, Novosibirsk) Deepa Angal­Kalinin, James Jones, Alexander Kalinin (CCLRC/DL/ASTeC,Daresbury, Warrington, Cheshire) Olivier Napoly, Jacques Payet (CEA

112

CERN-AB-2006-004 DESY 06-001  

E-print Network

Logachev, Fedor Podgorny, Valery Telnov (BINP SB RAS, Novosibirsk) Deepa Angal-Kalinin, James Jones, Alexander Kalinin (CCLRC/DL/ASTeC,Daresbury, Warrington, Cheshire) Olivier Napoly, Jacques Payet (CEA

113

4 Leaders' impact giveto.osu.edu A Legacyof Heart  

E-print Network

. The experience increased his awareness of the challenging economic conditions that affected families so close and brightest students right here in Columbus who dream of attending Ohio State." Valerie Lee, vice president

114

UNIVERSITY of CALIFORNIA Santa Barbara  

E-print Network

research days. Thanks to Sumit Paliwal and Kaviyesh Doshi for encouraging me throughout my graduate student to the ECE support staff, especially Valerie de Veyra for the v #12;much needed help in administrative work

California at Santa Barbara, University of

115

PowerPoint Presentation  

Cancer.gov

Center for Applied Proteomi cs and Molecular Medicine Co-Directors: Lance Liotta and Chip Petricoin Amy VanMeter, Julia Wulfkuhle, Mark Ross, Valerie Calvert Robyn Araujo, Weidong Zhou, Isela Galla gher, James Cooper, Vikas Chandhoke, Sally Rucker, Sheila

116

Forests in Flux  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this video presentation, Jerry Franklin, Review author Gordon Bonan, and Perspective author Valerie Kapos discuss the importance of understanding the influence of forests on climate and some of the challenges of global forest governance.

Robert Frederick (AAAS; )

2008-06-13

117

International Toys in Space: Kendama - Duration: 87 seconds.  

NASA Video Gallery

Cosmonaut Valery Korzun attempts to capture the ball in a cup using the Japanese Kendama toy. The game must be adapted for the ball to stay in the cup in microgravity. Astronaut Peggy Whitson narra...

118

7 CFR 318.13-16 - Regulated articles allowed interstate movement subject to specified conditions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...cultivars Williams, Valery, Grand Nain, and standard and dwarf Brazilian only. (iii) Inflorescences only with no stems or leaves attached. (iv) Bare-rooted plants or plants rooted in approved growing media...

2012-01-01

119

7 CFR 318.13-16 - Regulated articles allowed interstate movement subject to specified conditions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...cultivars Williams, Valery, Grand Nain, and standard and dwarf Brazilian only. (iii) Inflorescences only with no stems or leaves attached. (iv) Bare-rooted plants or plants rooted in approved growing media...

2010-01-01

120

7 CFR 318.13-16 - Regulated articles allowed interstate movement subject to specified conditions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...cultivars Williams, Valery, Grand Nain, and standard and dwarf Brazilian only. (iii) Inflorescences only with no stems or leaves attached. (iv) Bare-rooted plants or plants rooted in approved growing media...

2011-01-01

121

7 CFR 318.13-16 - Regulated articles allowed interstate movement subject to specified conditions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...cultivars Williams, Valery, Grand Nain, and standard and dwarf Brazilian only. (iii) Inflorescences only with no stems or leaves attached. (iv) Bare-rooted plants or plants rooted in approved growing media...

2014-01-01

122

7 CFR 318.13-16 - Regulated articles allowed interstate movement subject to specified conditions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...cultivars Williams, Valery, Grand Nain, and standard and dwarf Brazilian only. (iii) Inflorescences only with no stems or leaves attached. (iv) Bare-rooted plants or plants rooted in approved growing media...

2013-01-01

123

1997/98 CSULB Catalog Gerontology 361 Jeanne E. Bader  

E-print Network

Hartley Alan Henderson Harold Hunter Hazel Jackson Mary Jacob K. J. James Judi Kaci Carol Kellett James Kelly Barry Lavay Valerie McKay Walter Moore Marilyn Potts Wendy Reiboldt Susan Rice Pamela Roberts

Sorin, Eric J.

124

Building Captains Location Last Name First Name Phone #  

E-print Network

/Library Alt Barry Martha 64700 Office of Human Resources and Employee Relations Page 1 2/25/08 #12;Building Cummings Ann 63804 Heller Stramowski Terry 67594 Heller Alt Jacobs Claudia 63806 Heller Emmerich Valerie

Fraden, Seth

125

Development and Alumni Office University of Birmingham  

E-print Network

Pauline Victoria Adam 1973 LLB Law Jacob Oluwole Adeniyi 1973 MSc Computer Science(Software Eng) SamuelD Medicine Sheila Ann Battle 1973 BEd Newman College of Education Peter Barry Baxter 1973 LLB Law Valerie

Birmingham, University of

126

International Toys in Space: Hockey - Duration: 2:12.  

NASA Video Gallery

Cosmonauts Sergi Treschev and Valery Korzun discover ways to adapt the game of hockey while trying to overcome the challenges of playing the game in microgravity. Astronaut Peggy Whitson narrates t...

127

CONGRATULATIONS TO CTHB/TPCP STUDENTS AND STAFF IN 2012 AND EARLY 2013  

E-print Network

laude) and Angelica Marsberg at FABI who graduated in 2012 and Gugu Khubeka, Valery Molota, Godfrey-Anne Pillay. D. Katrin Fitza. E. Melissa Simpson. F. Angelica Marsberg. G. Barrie Christie H. Johan van der

128

The Two Hundred Sixty-Seventh Commencement  

E-print Network

AdvancedDegrees Sandra L. Bermann Adam Finkelstein MarshalsforBachelorDegrees Richard A. Register J. Nicole Shelton. Blanks DeanofReligiousLifeandoftheChapel Alison L. Boden Dean of the College Valerie A. Smith Dean

129

Near-Ultrahigh Pressure Processing of Continental Crust: Miocene Crustal Xenoliths  

E-print Network

BRADLEY HACKER1 *, PETER LUFFI2 , VALERY LUTKOV3 , VLADISLAV MINAEV3 , LOTHAR RATSCHBACHER4 , TERRY PLANK5. Fax: 805 893 2314. E-mail: hacker@geol.ucsb.edu # The Author 2005. Published by Oxford University

Hacker, Bradley R.

130

Multitime correlation functions for single molecule kinetics with fluctuating bottlenecks  

E-print Network

and microscopy of processes involving single molecules and quantum dots in condensed phase environments.1Multitime correlation functions for single molecule kinetics with fluctuating bottlenecks Valeri December 2001 Stochastic trajectories in single molecule kinetics coupled to several Gaussian Markovian

Mukamel, Shaul

131

International Toys in Space: Soccer - Duration: 1:45.  

NASA Video Gallery

Cosmonauts Sergi Treschev and cosmonaut Valery Korzun discover they must change the way they play soccer because of the effects of microgravity. They quickly adapt to accommodate for the increased ...

132

International Toys in Space: Jump Rope - Duration: 53 seconds.  

NASA Video Gallery

Cosmonaut Valery Korzun attempts jumping rope in microgravity. He decides to adapt the activity by taking out the "jumping part," but the act of spinning the rope around him still proves difficult....

133

New Endowments PMI Houston Endowed College Professorship in  

E-print Network

HOUSTON The Phoenix Endowed Scholarship by Kim and Kelly Hales William l. and Sabra Hall Gill Scholarship Endowment. Kathryn Jenkins Football Scholarship Endowment Valerie King Freeman and Greg King UH Tier One Scholarship

Azevedo, Ricardo

134

The genus Aspidimerus Mulsant, 1850 (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae) from China, with descriptions oftwonew species  

PubMed Central

Abstract Chinese members of the genus Aspidimerus Mulsant, 1850 are reviewed. Ten species are recognized, including two new species: A. zhenkangicus Huo & Ren, sp. n. and A. menglensis Huo & Ren, sp. n. A. kabakovi Hong is recorded from China for the first time. A. blandus (Mader, 1954) is recognized as synonymous with A. ruficrus Gorham, 1895 (syn. n.). Aspidimerus rectangulatus Kuznetsov & Pang, 1991 and A. serratus Kuznetsov & Pang, 1991 are transferred to the genus Pseudaspidimerus Kapur, 1948 (comb. n.). All species from China are described and illustrated. Distribution maps of the Chinese species, a key and a catalogue of all known Aspidimerus are provided. PMID:24294073

Huo, Lizhi; Wang, Xingmin; Chen, Xiaosheng; Ren, Shunxiang

2013-01-01

135

VAV System Optimization through Continuous Commissioning in an Office Building  

E-print Network

building. ICEBO, Pittsburgh, PA. Figure 21. Post-CC hot water supply temperature and outside air temperature (January 7~10, 2007) 3. Zheng B, Liu M, and Xiufeng Pang, 2005. Continuous Commissioning of an Office Building. ICEBO, Pittsburgh, PA.... Figure 22 compares electricity consumption over a one-year period before CC and after CC . The electricity consumption savings was 1,328,832 kWh, a reduction of 26.8% in one year. 5. Pang X, Liu M, and Bin Zheng, 2005. Building Pressure Control...

Cho, Y.; Pang, X.; Liu, M.

2007-01-01

136

Continuous Commissioning of an Office Building  

E-print Network

Continuous Commissioning of an Office Building Bin Zheng Mingsheng Liu, Ph.D., P.E. Xiufeng Pang Jinrong Wang P.E. Ken Hansen P.E. Energy Systems Laboratory University of Nebraska-Lincoln Omaha Public Power District Abstract... Control in VAV Systems, Proceedings of ISEC 2003. [3] Liu, M, G. Liu, Joo, I, Song, L. and Wang, G. 2004, Development of In-situ Fan Curve Measurement for VAV AHU System, Proceedings of ISEC 2004. [4] Zheng, B., Pang, X. and Liu, M., 2005, Using...

Zheng, B.; Liu, M.; Pang, X.; Wang, J.; Hansen, K.

2005-01-01

137

Redescription of Platynaspis flavoguttata (Gorham) (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae) and notes on nomenclature of Platynaspis kapuri Chakraborty & Biswas  

PubMed Central

Abstract Platynaspis flavoguttata (Gorham) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) is redescribed and the male genitalia are illustrated for the first time. It is also recorded from Sri Lanka for the first time. Platynaspis bimaculata (Hoang, 1983) is a new junior synonym of Platynaspis bimaculata Pang & Mao, 1979 (new synonym). Platynaspis kapuri Chakraborty & Biswas, 2000, the replacement name for Platynaspis bimaculata Pang & Mao, 1979 established by Ukrainsky (2007), is also the new replacement name for Platynaspis bimaculata (Hoang, 1983), as both are junior homonyms of Platynaspis bimaculata Weise, 1888 besides being synonyms.Platynaspis hoangi Ukrainsky (2007) is an unnecessary replacement name for Platynaspis bimaculata (Hoang). PMID:25057247

2014-01-01

138

Evaluation of Internet education to increase dietary calcium intake in youth  

E-print Network

EVALUATION OF INTERNET EDUCATION TO INCREASE DIETARY CALCIUM INTAKE IN YOUTH A Thesis by VALERIE SUZANNE HENDERSON Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2003 Major Subject: Nutrition EVALUATION OF INTERNET EDUCATION TO INCREASE DIETARY CALCIUM INTAKE IN YOUTH A Thesis by VALERIE SUZANNE HENDERSON Submitted to the Office of Graduate...

Henderson, Valerie Suzanne

2004-11-15

139

Two characterizations of sufficient matrices  

SciTech Connect

Two characterizations are given for the class of sufficient matrices defined by Cottle, Pang, and Venkateswaran. The first is a direct translation of the definition into linear programming terms. The second can be thought of as a generalization of a theorem of T. D. Parsons on P-matrices. 19 refs.

Cottle, R.W.; Guu, Sy-Ming.

1990-12-01

140

Child Health Institute of New Jersey: Bringing Us Closer to Understanding and Treating Autism Saturday, September 13  

E-print Network

D Associate Professor, Neuroscience and Cell Biology Autism, Stem Cells and Personalized Medicine Zhiping Pang, PhD Assistant Professor, Neuroscience and Cell Biology Utilizing Human Neurons to Understand Autism Biochemical Studies of Autism Stem Cells Help Identify Environmental Factors? Non

Garfunkel, Eric

141

1 Electronic Sensitivity of Carbon 2 Nanotubes to Internal Water Wetting  

E-print Network

for chemical and biological sensor 18 applications. Here, we address the question of 19 how internal water1 Electronic Sensitivity of Carbon 2 Nanotubes to Internal Water Wetting 3 Di Cao,, Pei Pang,, Jin of a 13 large number of new types of electronic 14 sensor13 in which analytes generate a signal 15

Hone, James

142

Postgraduate Research Day 22nd March 2010  

E-print Network

in the important transferable skills of oral and poster presentation. to inform Postgraduates and other Hypoxiamimicking materials for bone tissue engineering Mohammed Abdul Azeem Transformation pathways in Ni human cells using a selenium label Bo Pang Development and characterization of transparent

143

Database Search Algorithm for Identification of Intact Cross-Links in Proteins and Peptides Using Tandem Mass Spectrometry  

E-print Network

, Campus Chemical Instrument Center Mass Spectrometry and Proteomics Facility, the Ohio State University. Keywords: chemical cross-link tandem mass spectrometry database search proteomics Introduction Three Tandem Mass Spectrometry Hua Xu,*,,, Pang-Hung Hsu,*,,|,,O Liwen Zhang,# Ming-Daw Tsai,|, and Michael A

Tsai, Ming-Daw

144

Characterizing Geospatial Dynamics of Application Usage in a 3G Cellular Data Network  

E-print Network

Characterizing Geospatial Dynamics of Application Usage in a 3G Cellular Data Network M. Zubair Shafiq, Lusheng Ji, Alex X. Liu, Jeffrey Pang, Jia Wang Department of Computer Science and Engineering provided the evidence that significant geospatial correla- tions, in terms of traffic volume

Fisher, Kathleen

145

Finding Distinctive Shape Features for Automatic Hematoma Classification in Head CT Images from Traumatic Brain Injuries  

E-print Network

, chengli,leehk}@bii.a-star.edu.sg Bolan Su, Chew Lim Tan School of Computing National University: lis@i2r.a-star.edu.sg C. C. Tchoyoson Lim, Boon Chuan Pang, Cheng Kiang Lee National Neuroscience of traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients with hematomas. Hematoma caused by blood vessel rupture is the major

Tan, Chew Lim

146

Semi-Supervised Recursive Autoencoders for Predicting Sentiment Distributions  

E-print Network

). For instance, while the two phrases "white blood cells destroying an infection" and "an infection destroying white blood cells" have the same bag-of-words representation, the former is a positive reaction while/negative categories or scales such as star ratings. Examples are movie reviews (Pang and Lee, 2005), opinions (Wiebe

147

Electrolysis-based Parylene Balloon Actuators for Movable Neural Probes  

E-print Network

Electrolysis-based Parylene Balloon Actuators for Movable Neural Probes Changlin Pang1 , Yu a novel electrolysis-based parylene balloon actuator fabricated with MEMS technology. The actuator a parylene balloon structure with silicon spring structure, electrolysis electrodes and electrolyte inside

Andersen, Richard

148

A living light bulb, ultrasensitive biodetection made easy.  

PubMed

A team of scientists led by Professor DW Pang at Wuhan University have developed a new class of fluorescence probes based on bacterial cells. These microbial factories manufacture semiconductor nanocrystals inside and display protein A molecules on cell surface, transforming Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) cells into highly fluorescent cellular beacons that can be easily adapted for detection of diverse biological targets. PMID:25057347

Shang, Jing; Gao, Xiaohu

2014-01-01

149

KSX Issue 1  

E-print Network

niftiestinventionsince slicedbread. 1 isi pn r All this busywork was making me tired just watching it So I suffered not the slightest pang of guilt for interrupting it every chance I got I made myself comfortable in the vacant chair and slid the slate across his...

Multiple Contributors

1987-01-01

150

TESL Reporter, Vol. 3, Nos. 1-4.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Four issues of "TESL Reporter" are presented. Contents include the following articles: "Feedback: An Anti-Madeirization Compound" by Henry M. Schaafsma; "Using the Personal Pronoun 'I' as a Compound Subject" by G. Pang and D. Chu; "The Consonant'L' in Initial and Final Positions" by Maybelle Chong; "Sentence Expansion for the Elementary Level" by

Pack, Alice C., Ed.

151

Clustering in the Presence of Bridge-Nodes Jerry Scripps  

E-print Network

Clustering in the Presence of Bridge-Nodes Jerry Scripps Computer Science and Engineering Michigan State University scripps@msu.edu Pang-Ning Tan Computer Science and Engineering Michigan State University ptan@msu.edu Abstract In this paper, we study the ill-effects of bridge- nodes, which causes many

Tan, Pang-Ning

152

Quantitative Study of the Dynamic Tumor-Endothelial Cell Interactions through an Integrated Microfluidic Coculture System  

E-print Network

Microfluidic Coculture System Chunhong Zheng, Liang Zhao, Gui'e Chen, Ying Zhou, Yuhong Pang, and Yanyi Huang of lymphatic or blood circuit and colonize and grow at a new site.1 During this process, the first and foremost. To investigate such interactions in vitro, it is necessary to create a coculture system, in which two types

Huang, Yanyi

153

Uncertainties in Energy Consumption Introduced by Building Operations and  

E-print Network

-Size Office Building Liping Wang, Paul Mathew, Xiufeng Pang Environmental Energy Technologies Division) the accuracy of input parameters describing the design conditions of building envelope and HVAC systems, (3 the impact of design features. Keywords: Building operations, Uncertainties, EnergyPlus, Monte Carlo Analysis

154

Wifi-Reports: Improving Wireless Network Selection with Collaboration  

E-print Network

Wifi-Reports: Improving Wireless Network Selection with Collaboration Jeffrey Pang Carnegie Mellon.mccoy@colorado.edu Srinivasan Seshan Carnegie Mellon University srini@cmu.edu ABSTRACT Wi-Fi clients can obtain much better access. To address this problem, this paper presents Wifi-Reports, a collaborative service that provides

Fisher, Kathleen

155

TRICOLOR LIGHT EMITTING DIODE DOT MATRIX DISPLAY SYSTEM WITHAUDIO OUTPUT  

E-print Network

1 TRICOLOR LIGHT EMITTING DIODE DOT MATRIX DISPLAY SYSTEM WITHAUDIO OUTPUT Grantham Pang, Chi emitting diodes; tricolor display; audio communication. I. Introduction This paper relates to a tricolor broadcasting through the visible light rays transmitted by the display panel or assembly. Keywords: light

Pang, Grantham

156

Microstructure and mechanical properties of chromium oxide coatings  

E-print Network

Microstructure and mechanical properties of chromium oxide coatings Xiaolu Pang Department 33620 (Received 2 August 2007; accepted 12 September 2007) Chromium oxide coatings were deposited on low to investigate the microstructure of chromium oxide coatings. Varying oxygen flux changed the coating

Volinsky, Alex A.

157

DOI: 10.1002/adem.200700057 Interfacial Microstructure of Chromium Oxide Coatings**  

E-print Network

DOI: 10.1002/adem.200700057 Interfacial Microstructure of Chromium Oxide Coatings** By Xiaolu Pang, Kewei Gao,* Huisheng Yang, Lijie Qiao, Yanbin Wang and A. A. Volinsky Chromium oxide coatings was about 14.7 GPa, while a 200 nm thick RF-sputtered chromium oxide coating, stoichiometri- cally close

Volinsky, Alex A.

158

Microstructure and mechanical properties of Ti/AlTiN/Ti-diamondlike carbon composite coatings on steel  

E-print Network

were deposited by mid- frequency magnetron sputtering and Hall ion source-assisted deposition on high-speed such as dry high-speed milling, turning, tapping, and drilling, or when minimal lubrication is required on steel Xiaolu Pang, Huisheng Yang,a) Shijian Shi, Kewei Gao, and Yanbin Wang Department of Materials

Volinsky, Alex A.

159

Stochastic Systems 2012 Vol. 0, No. 0, 18  

E-print Network

_ssy3.tex date: June 26, 2012 #12;2 KANG AND PANG i.i.d. service times in the order of arrival customer contact centers and healthcare usually have a large volume of arrivals as well as a large number of servers, it has been fruitful to study their corresponding queueing systems in the many-server heavy-traffic

Pang, Guodong "Gordon"

160

The Application of Clustering to Earth Science Data: Progress and Challenges  

E-print Network

The Application of Clustering to Earth Science Data: Progress and Challenges Michael Steinbach Pang for some land areas, and still other clusters may represent potentially new Earth science phenomena. Although this application of clustering to Earth science data has proven useful, many challenges remain

Minnesota, University of

161

Impact of footprint diameter and off-nadir pointing on the precision of canopy height estimates from spaceborne lidar  

E-print Network

from spaceborne lidar Yong Pang a,b , Michael Lefsky a, , Guoqing Sun c , Jon Ranson d a Center for Ecological Applications of Lidar, Warner College of Natural Resources, Colorado State University, Fort August 2010 Accepted 31 August 2010 Available online 12 May 2011 Keywords: Spaceborne lidar Lidar

Lefsky, Michael

162

Some New World Lessons for the Old World  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this essay, I propose that we take Publius and Lincoln at their word, and consider some lessons that the New World experiment in republican government can offer to an Old World in the pangs of political rebirth. I do not mean to suggest that the American tradition merits full-fledged replication abroad. Nor is such replication likely; the draft constitutions

Akhil Reed Amar

1991-01-01

163

Java Therapy: Web-Based Robotic Rehabilitation  

E-print Network

Java Therapy: Web-Based Robotic Rehabilitation David J. Reinkensmeyer, Clifton T. Pang, Jeff A performance, allowing users and their caregivers to assess rehabilitation progress via the Web. 1 are developing robotic devices, termed "rehabilitators", that physically interact with people to stimulate

Reinkensmeyer, David J.

164

Plasmonic coupled nanotorch structures leading to uniform surface enhanced Raman scattering detection  

E-print Network

detection Haiping M. Chen,*a Lin Pang,a Andrew King,b Grace M. Hwangc and Yeshaiahu Fainmana Received 16th scattering (SERS) detection has grad- ually become a powerful tool from material identification to single successful commercialization. Subsequently, researchers have studied multiple resonances coupling

Fainman, Yeshaiahu

165

BMB Dept Seminar Schedule (Fall 2012) _v8 Dates Speakers (& their homepages), Seminar Title, and Hosts  

E-print Network

.umdnj.edu/neuroscience/faculty/ZhipingPangPhD.html) Title: Making neurons from fibroblasts: Direct reprogramming to neural lineages Host: Jianjun Wang Sept: Coevolution Reveals a Network of Human Proteins Originating with Multicellularity Host: Domenico Gatti Oct 9D, Assistant Professor, Associate Research Fellow, Pfizer Global Research and Development, Groton, CT (http

Cinabro, David

166

Understanding fish behavior during typhoon events in real-life underwater environments  

E-print Network

Understanding fish behavior during typhoon events in real-life underwater environments Concetto Fang-Pang Lin Daniela Giordano Lynda Hardman Robert B. Fisher Abstract The study of fish inevitably influenced the behavior of the fish under observation. Recent projects involving the installation

Fisher, Bob

167

Wide Field-of-View On-Chip Talbot Fluorescence Microscopy for Longitudinal Cell Culture Monitoring from within the Incubator  

E-print Network

from within the Incubator Chao Han,*,, Shuo Pang,, Danielle V. Bower, Patrick Yiu, and Changhuei Yang image cell cultures directly from within an incubator. Our prototype has a resolution limit of 1.2 m cultures in incubators. Time-lapse or longitudinal fluorescence microscopy can reveal dynamics

Yang, Changhuei

168

Evaluation of a Low Cost Solid-State Accelerometer as a Distance Measuring Sensor for Vehicle Positioning System  

E-print Network

system is the Global Positioning System (GPS). The advantage of this system Positioning System Hugh Liu, Grantham Pang Dept. of Electrical and Electronic Engineering The University. For a relative positioning system, dead reckoning method was employed to find the position. The angle

Pang, Grantham

169

Infants and Toddlers: Discovering and Exploring the Outdoors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Babies' interest in the outer world develops very slowly. During the first half year or so, babies are strongly tuned in to themselves. They feel hunger pangs when they need to be fed. Their skin is fragile, and they need help maintaining their body temperature in cold weather. This article discusses outside interests, safe exploration, animal

Honig, Alice Sterling

2005-01-01

170

404 Cell 141, April 30, 2010 2010 Elsevier Inc. CED-3 caspase dimer resides inside the  

E-print Network

. (2005). Nature 434, 926­933. Yan, N., Chai, J., Lee, E.S., Gu, L., Liu, Q., He, J., Wu, J.W., Kokel, D., Vidal-Ingigliardi, D., and Richet, E. (2009). Structure 17, 172­182. Diemand, A.V., and Lupas, A 22, 269­275. Qi, S., Pang, Y., Hu, Q., Liu, Q., Li, H., Zhou, Y., He, T., Liang, Q., Liu, Y., Yuan, X

Ungermann, Christian

171

Upregulation of soluble epoxide hydrolase in proximal tubular cells mediated proteinuria-induced renal damage  

E-print Network

-induced renal damage Qian Wang,1,3 * Wei Pang,2 * Zhuan Cui,1 Junbao Shi,1 Yan Liu,2 Bo Liu,2 Yunfeng Zhou,2 Youfei Guan,2 Bruce D. Hammock,4 Yue Wang,1 * and Yi Zhu2 * 1 Department of Nephrology, Peking University, Shi J, Liu Y, Liu B, Zhou Y, Guan Y, Hammock BD, Wang Y, Zhu Y. Upregulation of soluble epoxide hydro

Hammock, Bruce D.

172

The correlation of carbohydrate/nitrogen ratios and rooting ability of Rosa multiflora stem cuttings  

E-print Network

OF SCIENCE May 1985 Major Subject: Geology FLUVIAL DEPOSITIONAL SEQUENCES IN THE HANNA FORMATION, HANNA BASIN, WYOMING A Thesi s by J. KIMBERLY HARRIZ Approved as to style and content by: Robert R. Berg (Chairman of Committe ) o n H. pang (Member...) enneth White (Member) arne zzu o (M ber) M. har es Gi ert (Head of Department) May 1985 ABSTRACT Fluvial Depositional Sequences in the Hanna Formation, Hanna Basin, Wyoming. (May 1985) J. Kimberly Harriz, B. S. , The Pennsylvania State University...

Hambrick, Carroll Edward

1985-01-01

173

Commissioning, Operation, Real Time Monitoring and Evaluation of Pilot: Achieving Optimal Performance through Building Commissioning  

E-print Network

specific on LEED Cx Its better to provide more case studies and explain in more detail Want to know how to Cx a control system Should talk about how to adapt it to the building industry in China 6 Cx Workshop Items Excellent Good Neutral Poor...BUILDINGS ENERGY EFFICIENCY CONSORTIUM U.S. - CHINA CLEAN ENERGY RESEARCH CENTER (CERC-BEE) E3: Commissioning, Operation, Real Time Monitoring and Evaluation of Pilot Achieving Optimal Performance through Building Commissioning Xiufeng Pang...

Pang,X.; Piette, M.A.; Hao,B.

2014-01-01

174

Impacts of Static Pressure Reset on VAV System Air Leakage, Fan Power and Thermal Energy - Part I: Theoretical Model and Simulation  

E-print Network

Impacts of Static Pressure Reset on VAV System Air Leakage, Fan Power and Thermal Energy ???Part I: Theoretical Model and Simulation Mingsheng Liu, Jingjuan Feng, Zhan Wang, Lixia Wu, Keke Zheng, Xiufeng Pang PKI243 University... not be achieved due to higher pressure before the terminal box dampers [2] . Liu et al studied the impact of low static pressure in dual-duct system on fan energy consumption [3] . Wu et.al presented the fan power saving models for both pressure...

Liu, M.; Feng, J.; Wang, Z.; Wu, L.; Zheng, K.; Pang, W.

2007-01-01

175

[Exploring the changes of inheritance model of medical knowledge as viewed from the description of physicians in the Song Dynasty].  

PubMed

From the Southern and Northern Dynasties to the beginning of the Northern Song Dynasty, the models of "master and apprentice" and "physician of long family tradition for generations" were the main ways for teaching medical knowledge. With the rapid amassment of medical books in the Song Dynasty, "reading text" became increasingly important and prominent in the inheritance of medical knowledge, which could be seen clearly from the descriptions on physicians in the Song Dynasty. For instance, Hao Yun's medical knowledge was recorded as a model of "master and apprentice" in Hao Yun's Epitaph written by Zhang Xun. However, in Ye Mengde's description, this model was played down, while at the same time, "reading text" was emphasized. Pang Anshi, though coming from a physician family for generations, got rid of some medical knowledge from his own family and turned to the medical knowledge by "reading text". According to Pang Anshi's Epitaph written by Zhang Lei and Fang ji Zhuan (Biography of Technicians) in Song shi (The Song History), Pang Anshi was a typical model of becoming a famous physician by "reading text". In the Epitaph, Pang Anshi's brilliance was stressed, and in the latter, "reading text" was more important and the family tradition was denied. In the description of the Song Dynasty, Chen Zhaoyu's wonderful medical skills was coming from the "practice", and "reading text" was denied right away. What is more, "reading text" was introspected and criticized through Chen Zhaoyu's lip. The different descriptions of the Song Dynasty reflected the change of inheritance model of medical knowledge. PMID:25620356

Zhang, Haipeng

2014-11-01

176

Case Study of Continuous Commissioning in an Office Building  

E-print Network

ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China Building Commissioning for Energy Efficiency and Comfort, Vol.VI-9-3 Case Study of Continuous Commissioning? in an Office Building Xiufeng Pang Bin Zheng Mingsheng Liu Graduate Student Graduate... Commissioning? Guidebook: Maximize Building Energy Efficiency and Comfort. [2] Dong D, and Mingsheng Liu, 2005. Continuous Commissioning? of a single fan dual duct system in an office building. ICEBO, Pittsburgh, PA. [3] Zheng B, Liu M, and Xiufeng...

Pang, X.; Zheng, B.; Liu, M.

2006-01-01

177

Whispering gallery modes in quantum dot-embedded dielectric microspheres for tagless remote refractometric sensing  

E-print Network

will be destroyed). A thin film of polyethyleneimine (PEI) immobilizes the microspheres on a microscope cover slip, as shown in Figure 11. Due to the presence of surface sulfate group, the commercial plain polystyrene spheres usually have negative charge... WHISPERING GALLERY MODES IN QUANTUM DOT-EMBEDDED DIELECTRIC MICROSPHERES FOR TAGLESS REMOTE REFRACTOMETRIC SENSING A Thesis by SHUO PANG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

Pang, Shuo

2008-10-10

178

Building Pressure Control in VAV System with Relief Air Fan  

E-print Network

Building Pressure Control in VAV Systems with Relief Air Fan Xiufeng Pang, Mingsheng Liu, PhD, P.E., Bin Zheng University of Nebraska, LincolnESL 1110 So. 67 th St, Omaha, NE, 68182 Abstract Building pressure control is critical... to energy conservation and indoor air quality by preventing excessive infiltration or exfiltration. In the supply and the return/relief fan Air Handling Unit (AHU) system, better space pressurization can be achieved when return/relief fan operates...

Pang, X.; Liu, M.; Zheng, B.

2005-01-01

179

Research on Data Structures of Wireless Data Acquisition Instrument for Amusement Ride  

Microsoft Academic Search

Based on ARM9 RSIC CPU AT91SAM9260 and WinCE, the wireless data acquisition instrument for amusement ride was designed and developed. According to Ping-Pang mechanism, two buffers are created to save real-time sampling data in turns and the full buffer is saved to SD card between sampling timeslot. When data acquisition instrument begins to sample, the sampling start time is saved

Jianping Ye; Linxiang Shi; Chenxi Guan; Yuan Xiao

2009-01-01

180

Cell Growth and Size Homeostasis in Proliferating Animal Cells  

E-print Network

Cell Growth and Size Homeostasis in Proliferating Animal Cells Amit Tzur,1 * Ran Kafri,1 * Valerie there is an intrinsic mechanism for coordinating growth and the cell cycle in metazoan cells. We examined cell size vary with both cell size and the cell cycle. Our results show that growth rate is size

Lahav, Galit

181

Revue de presse ANGLAIS Semaine du 19 au 25 septembre 2011  

E-print Network

. Bush, Tom Brokaw, General David Petraeus, Valerie Plame Wilson, Black Hawk helicopter pilot Tammy will they compete against America's global rivals? The Guardian Weekly- September 23, 2011 Inside Guardian Weekly Inside the 23 September edition (by Abby Deveney) : 21 Sep 2011: Well-worn phrases and the global economy

Rennes, Université de

182

Electronic Portfolios. [SITE 2002 Section].  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document contains the following papers on electronic portfolios from the SITE (Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education) 2002 conference: (1) "What Is the Perceived Value of Creating Electronic Portfolios to Teacher Credential Candidates?" (Valerie Amber and Brenda Czech); (2) "Development and Use of Electronic Portfolios in

Barrett, Helen C., Ed.

183

Oct. 26Nov. 1, 2011 wayne.edu/today  

E-print Network

,participants broke into smaller sessions to develop recommendations to confront the problem. The planning groups, as demonstrated through ultrasound screening, cut the rate of preterm birth by as much as 45 percent. Dean Valerie-1908). The 10-foot limestone figures represent four French pioneers who helped open up Michigan territory

Baskaran, Mark

184

Developing Ambient Intelligence Systems: A Solution based on Web Services  

E-print Network

Developing Ambient Intelligence Systems: A Solution based on Web Services Valerie Issarny, Daniele Team, INRIA-Rocquencourt, France http://www-rocq.inria.fr/arles Abstract. Enabling the ambient system development aspect, this means that the actual implementation of any ambient intelligence

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

185

David S. Meyer Department of Sociology  

E-print Network

in America, New York: Oxford University Press, 2007. DSM, Valerie Jenness, and Helen Ingram, eds., Routing the Opposition: Social Movements, Public Policy, and Democracy in America, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota, "Organizing around Gender Identities," forthcoming in S. Laurel Weldon, ed., Oxford Handbook on Gender

Loudon, Catherine

186

Higher Prices from Entry: Pricing of Brand-Name Drugs  

E-print Network

Higher Prices from Entry: Pricing of Brand-Name Drugs Jeffrey M. Perloffa Valerie Y. Suslowb,* Paul or collusive game. We find support for our theory using data on brand-name entry in the anti-ulcer drug market; Pharmaceutical drugs #12;1. Introduction When a new firm starts marketing a product that is spatially

Perloff, Jeffrey M.

187

Higher Prices from Entry: Pricing of Brand-Name Drugs  

E-print Network

Higher Prices from Entry: Pricing of Brand-Name Drugs Jeffrey M. Perloff* Valerie Y. Suslow** Paul anti-ulcer drugs rose as new products entered the market. #12;Higher Prices from Entry: Pricing of Brand-Name Drugs When a new firm starts marketing a product that is spatially differentiated from

Perloff, Jeffrey M.

188

LIGHT EMITTING DIODE (LED) TRAFFIC SIGNAL SURVEY RESULTS  

E-print Network

Bronson Principal Author Merry Bronson Project Manager John Sugar Manager Public Programs Office Valerie Merced Portola Valley Commerce Hillsborough Mill Valley Poway Concord Hollister Millbrae Rancho Cordova Sacramento County Rocklin Santee Walnut Creek San Benito County Rolling Hills Estates Seaside Waterford San

189

DIVERSITY PLANS: AN ANALYSIS  

E-print Network

that remains most underrepresented in all areas is the Native American population. · The message of diversity Valerie B. Lee, Chair Carole Anderson, ex-officio Deborah Ballam Jane Case-Smith Jose Castro Olga Esquivel Peterson Matthew Platz john a. powell, J.D. Mac Stewart Ming Trammel Rebecca Nelson Ijeoma Emenike June 8

190

CALIFORNIA ENERGY CALIFORNIA'S STATE ENERGY  

E-print Network

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CALIFORNIA'S STATE ENERGY EFFICIENT APPLIANCE REBATE PROGRAM INITIAL November 2009 CEC-400-2009-026-CMD Arnold Schwarzenegger, Governor #12;#12;CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Program Manager Paula David Supervisor Appliance and Process Energy Office Valerie T. Hall Deputy Director

191

Human land use and patterns of parasitism in tropical amphibian hosts  

E-print Network

Human land use and patterns of parasitism in tropical amphibian hosts Valerie J. Mc: Amphibian Parasite Land use Tropics Forest Pasture A B S T R A C T Landscape alterations by humans can amphibians was associated with land use change, I studied three species of amphibians, Rana vaillanti

McKenzie, Valerie

192

This Provisional PDF corresponds to the article as it appeared upon acceptance. Fully formatted PDF and full text (HTML) versions will be made available soon.  

E-print Network

beta as a cell cycle negative regulator BMC Cell Biology 2008, 9:14 doi:10.1186/1471-2121-9-14 Valerie the original work is properly cited. #12;- 1 - Xenopus importin beta validates human importin beta as a cell the question for us as to whether importin beta was an authentic negative regulator of cell cycle events

Forbes, Douglass

193

Birds of a Feather: Technology and Tools for Computing Educators  

E-print Network

resources. It will feature web 2.0-style user tagging, search, rating and commentary. The goal of this BOF, Tablets for Presentation, Classroom Response "Clickers", Program Visualization and Algorithm Animation their feedback on the content and design. DISCUSSION LEADER(S) Dan, Valerie and Maggie will lead the discussion

Zakhor, Avideh

194

Teachers Teaching Teachers (T3)[TM]. Volume 5, Number 1  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Teachers Teaching Teachers" ("T3") focuses on coaches' roles in the professional development of teachers. Each issue also explores the challenges and rewards that teacher leaders encounter. This issue includes: (1) Districts Harness the Expertise of Classroom Teachers (Valerie von Frank); (2) Tool: Measuring Collaborative Norms; (3) Lessons from

von Frank, Valerie, Ed.

2009-01-01

195

The Learning System. Volume 5, Number 1  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"The Learning System" is an eight-page newsletter published eight times a year. Designed for superintendents and central office staff with professional learning responsibilities. This issue includes: (1) Superintendent Stays on Course with Personal Learning Plan (Valerie von Frank); (2) District Leadership: Permit, Don't Proscribe, to Build

von Frank, Valerie, Ed.

2009-01-01

196

Tools for Schools. Volume 13, Number 1, August-September 2009  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This newsletter is published four times a year. It offers articles on school improvement, organizational planning, training, and managing change. This issue contains: (1) Leadership Teams Create Lasting Change (Valerie von Frank); (2) NSDC Tool: Force-Field Analysis; (3) NSDC Tool: Identify Your Internal and External Foci; (4) NSDC Tool: Assess

von Frank, Valerie, Ed.

2009-01-01

197

Tools for Schools. Volume 12, Number 4, May-June 2009  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This newsletter is published four times a year. It offers articles on school improvement, organizational planning, training, and managing change. This issue contains: (1) Link Up & Learn: Use Technology to Create a Personal Learning Network to Connect with Experts and Mentors Everywhere (Valerie von Frank); (2) NSDC Tool: Get Connected with

von Frank, Valerie, Ed.

2009-01-01

198

Tools for Schools. Volume 13, Number 2. October-November 2009  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This newsletter is published four times a year. It offers articles on school improvement, organizational planning, training, and managing change. This issue contains: (1) Let Data Do the Talking: Clarify Goals and Roles by Examining Data (Valerie von Frank); (2) NSDC Tool: The Responsive School Scan Tool; and (3) NSDC Tool: Data Conversations Put

Crow, Tracy, Ed.

2009-01-01

199

The Learning Principal[R]. Volume 5, Number 1  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"The Learning Principal" is an eight-page newsletter published eight times a year. It focuses on the important and unique work of school principals. This issue includes: (1) Framework "for" Improvement: Effective School Leadership Translates into Increased Student Learning (Valerie von Frank); (2) Q & A: Instructional Leader Creates Culture of

von Frank, Valerie, Ed.

2009-01-01

200

Teachers Teaching Teachers (T3)[TM]. Volume 5, Number 2  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Teachers Teaching Teachers" ("T3") focuses on coaches' roles in the professional development of teachers. Each issue also explores the challenges and rewards that teacher leaders encounter. This issue includes: (1) Sharpening Skills for Our Century (Valerie von Frank); (2) Lessons from a Coach: First, I Assess How Teachers Learn (Julie

Crow, Tracy, Ed.

2009-01-01

201

Teachers Teaching Teachers (T3)[TM]. Volume 4, Number 4  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Teachers Teaching Teachers" ("T3") focuses on coaches' role in the professional development of teachers, exploring challenges and rewards that teacher leaders encounter. This issue includes: (1) Making a Serious Study of Classroom Scenes: High School Faculty Develops Away to Observe and Learn from Each Other (Valerie von Frank); (2) Tools for

von Frank, Valerie, Ed.

2008-01-01

202

The Learning System. Volume 4, Number 8  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"The Learning System" is a newsletter designed for superintendents and central office staff with professional learning responsibilities. This issue includes: (1) Principal-Coaches Transform Teachers and Schools (Valerie von Frank); (2) District Leadership: Delve into NSDC's [National Staff Development Council's] New Definition of Professional

von Frank, Valerie, Ed.

2009-01-01

203

The Learning System. Volume 4, Number 7  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"The Learning System" is a newsletter designed for superintendents and central office staff with professional learning responsibilities. This issue includes: (1) District Pulls Together in Pursuit of Excellence: Creating Collaboration Systemwide Requires Commitment (Valerie von Frank); (2) Scheduling Time for Teacher Learning Is Key for Both

von Frank, Valerie, Ed.

2009-01-01

204

The Learning Principal[R]. Volume 4, Number 6  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"The Learning Principal" is an eight-page newsletter published eight times a year. It focuses on the important and unique work of school principals. This issue includes: (1) Talking "the" Walk Renews Schools: The Transformational Leader Links Values to Actions (Valerie von Frank); (2) School Leadership: Q&A Teacher Learning Turns School from F to

von Frank, Valerie, Ed.

2009-01-01

205

Teachers Teaching Teachers (T3)[TM]. Volume 4, Number 6  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Teachers Teaching Teachers" ("T3") focuses on coaches' roles in the professional development of teachers. Each issue also explores the challenges and rewards that teacher leaders encounter. This issue includes: (1) Values and Clarity Build Classroom Language (Valerie von Frank); (2) Tools: Identifying and Clarifying Beliefs about Learning; (3)

von Frank, Valerie, Ed.

2009-01-01

206

Teachers Teaching Teachers (T3)[TM]. Volume 4, Number 8  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Teachers Teaching Teachers" ("T3") focuses on coaches' roles in the professional development of teachers. Each issue also explores the challenges and rewards that teacher leaders encounter. This issue includes: (1) Tackling Behavior from All Sides (Valerie von Frank); (2) Tools: Effective Behavior Support Self-Assessment Survey; (3) Lessons from

von Frank, Valerie, Ed.

2009-01-01

207

Teachers Teaching Teachers (T3)[TM]. Volume 4, Number 7  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Teachers Teaching Teachers" ("T3") focuses on coaches' roles in the professional development of teachers. Each issue also explores the challenges and rewards that teacher leaders encounter. This issue includes: (1) Learning Cycle Spins Individuals into a Team (Valerie von Frank); (2) NSDC Tool: The Professional Teaching and Learning Cycle; (3)

von Frank, Valerie, Ed.

2009-01-01

208

Journal of Biotechnology 162 (2012) 311318 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect  

E-print Network

Direct Journal of Biotechnology journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/jbiotec Phage display allows a phage display library using a novel approach. Selections were designed to allow for identification of ZP. Samoylova , Bettina Schemerac , Adam H. Breiteneichera , Stephen S. Ditchkoffd , Valery A. Petrenkob , Nancy

Ditchkoff, Steve

209

CRISPR-Cas Systems in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 Exhibit Distinct Processing  

E-print Network

analysis, CRISPR3 spacers with stable secondary structures displayed a greater ratio of degradation and a Cmr2 Protein. PLoS ONE 8(2): e56470. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0056470 Editor: Valerie de Cre an adaptive immunity against invading phages and other genetic elements for the majority of archaea and many

Will, Sebastian

210

For the degree of DOCTOR OF UNIVERSITY GRENOBLE 1  

E-print Network

to measure thousands of isotope samples and who patiently taught me to do this, first of all, to Valerie supervisors, and since 1998 they directed my scientific activity. I benefited a grant "TEMPRA" from Rgion certainly could not have been completed without support of Russian Antarctic Expedition (RAE) headed by Mr

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

211

Reforming Chicago's High Schools: Research Perspectives on School and System Level Change.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This collection of papers describes research on school and system level change in Chicago's high schools. Papers include "Introduction: Setting Chicago High School Reform within the National Context" (Valerie E. Lee); (1) "The Effort to Redesign Chicago High Schools: Effects on Schools and Achievement" (G. Alfred Hess, Jr. and Solomon Cytrynbaum);

Lee, Valerie E., Ed.

212

Type Inference for Recursively Constrained Types and its Application to OOP  

E-print Network

Type Inference for Recursively Constrained Types and its Application to OOP Jonathan Eifrig \\Lambday Scott Smith \\Lambda Valery Trifonov \\Lambday The Johns Hopkins University z November 16, 1994 1 Partially supported by AFOSR grant F49620­93­1­0169 z Contact: Scott Smith, Department of Computer Science

Trifonov, Valery

213

On Binary Methods Kim Bruce \\Lambda Luca Cardelli y Giuseppe Castagna z The Hopkins Objects Group x  

E-print Network

) LIENS­DMI, 45 rue d'Ulm, 75005 Paris, FRANCE. Internet: castagna@dmi.ens.fr x Jonathan Eifrig, Scott Smith, Valery Trifonov. Contact Scott Smith, Department of Computer Science, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218. Internet: scott@cs.jhu.edu. Research partially supported by NSF grant

Ghelli, Giorgio

214

On Binary Methods Kim Bruce \\Lambda  

E-print Network

@src.dec.com. z Internet: castagna@dmi.ens.fr x Jonathan Eifrig, Scott Smith, Valery Trifonov. Contact Scott Smith. Research partially supportedby NSF grant CCR­9301340andAFOSR grant F49620­93­1­0169. Internet: scott

Pierce, Benjamin C.

215

On Binary Methods Department of Computer Science, Williams College, Williamstown, Massachusetts 01267, USA.  

E-print Network

@src.dec.com. zInternet: castagna@dmi.ens.fr xJonathan Eifrig, Scott Smith, Valery Trifonov. Contact Scott Smith. Research partially supportedby NSF grantCCR-9301340and AFOSR grant F49620-93-1-0169. Internet: scott

Castagna, Giuseppe - Laboratoire Preuves, Programmes et Systèmes, Université Paris 7

216

Electronic Notes in Theoretical Computer Science 1(1995) URL: http://www.elsevier.nl/locate/entcs/volume1.html 22 pages  

E-print Network

://www.elsevier.nl/locate/entcs/volume1.html 22 pages Type Inference for Recursively Constrained Types and its Application to OOP Jonathan Eifrig1 2 Scott Smith1 Valery Trifonov1 2 Department of Computer Science The Johns Hopkins University Baltimore, Maryland 21218 feifrig, scott, trifonovg@cs.jhu.edu Abstract We de ne a powerful type inference

Smith, Scott F.

1995-01-01

217

Confirmed SpeakersConfirmed SpeakersConfirmed SpeakersConfirmed Speakers Zvi Artstein (Israel)  

E-print Network

Confirmed SpeakersConfirmed SpeakersConfirmed SpeakersConfirmed Speakers Zvi Artstein (Israel) Rami Atar (Israel) Sergey Aseev (Russia) Avi Berman (Israel) Vivek S. Borkar (India) Dean Carlson (USA (Australia) Valery Glizer (Israel) Rafal Goebel (USA) Ilya Ioslivich (Israel) Jacob Kogan (USA) Arkadii

218

University Faculty Senate Meeting Friday December 4, 2009  

E-print Network

, William Bosshardt, Philippe D'Anjou, Ernest Andrew Brewer, Valerie Bryan, Eric Chiang, Lester Embree, Mary Haky, Mike Harris, Fred Hoffman, Mehdi Kaighobadi, Ryan Karr, Kathryn Keller, James Kumi Diaka, Kevin, Howard Prentice, Marguerite Purnell, Deborah Raines, Markus Schmidmeier, Dilys Schoorman, Eric Shaw

Fernandez, Eduardo

219

Z .Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors 117 2000 139151 www.elsevier.comrlocaterpepi  

E-print Network

Z .Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors 117 2000 139­151 www.elsevier.comrlocaterpepi z in the Earth's inner core Michael I. Bergman ) , Louis Giersch, Michael Hinczewski, Valerie Izzo Physics; accepted 6 April 1999 Abstract The inner core of the Earth has been interpreted as being elastically

Thirumalai, Devarajan

220

WHEN TECHNOLOGICAL DISCONTINUITIES AND DISRUPTIVE BUSINESS MODELS CHALLENGE DOMINANT INDUSTRY  

E-print Network

1 WHEN TECHNOLOGICAL DISCONTINUITIES AND DISRUPTIVE BUSINESS MODELS CHALLENGE DOMINANT INDUSTRY author, tel.: +33.476.706.528 1 : Grenoble Ecole de Management, F-38000 Grenoble, France 2 : GAEL UMR INRA/UPMF, 1215, F-38000 Grenoble, France 3: Genostar, F-38330 Montbonnot, France valerie

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

221

VOLUME 77, NUMBER 18 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 28 OCTOBER 1996 Nonlinear Control of Remote Unstable States in a Liquid Bridge Convection Experiment  

E-print Network

of Remote Unstable States in a Liquid Bridge Convection Experiment Valery Petrov,* Michael F. Schatz, Kurt A space are distant from the unperturbed dynamics in a convective flow experiment. A model independent, nonlinear control algorithm uses temperature measurements near the free surface of a convecting liquid

Texas at Austin. University of

222

Mechanical Properties of Ferrofluids in Loudspeakers.  

E-print Network

1 Mechanical Properties of Ferrofluids in Loudspeakers. Guy Lemarquand, Romain Ravaud, Valerie in ironless electrodynamic loudspeak- ers. The motor is constituted of several outer stacked ring permanent between the loudspeaker faces. Second, they act as bearings and center the moving part. Finally

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

223

Strategic Planning Council Minutes August 11, 2009  

E-print Network

, Valerie Paton, Ronald Phillips, Sam Segran, Michael Shonrock, Bob Smith, Rob Stewart, Pam Tipton, Suzanne, Phil Johnson, Karlene Hoo, Kathy Smith, Vicki West Materials distributed: Strategic Planning Approval of 4/28/09 Minutes: Minutes approved Introductions and Opening Remarks: Provost Bob Smith

Gelfond, Michael

224

Baudelaire: A Collection of Critical Essays. Twentieth Century Views Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One of a series of works aimed at presenting contemporary critical opinion on major authors, this collection includes essays by Paul Valery, Henri Peyre, Fracois Mauriac, Charles du Bos, Etienne Gilson, P.M. Pasinetti, John Middleton Murry, Marcel Proust, Georges Poulet, Erich Auerbach, and Jean Prevost--all dealing with the biography and literary

Peyre, Henri, Ed.

225

Honors Undergraduate Research Conference, 2011-2012 May 1, 2012  

E-print Network

Maguire Miller Roadmap to Becoming a Physician Sponsor: Brian Clinton Assistant #12;Rm. 402 Chair: Walter von Reinhart Valerie Shapiro "Untouched and "A Bridge Away": An Sponsor: Walter von Reinhart Analysis of Homelessness Sponsor: Kendall Moore Andrea Russell Transitional Justice and the Truth Sponsor: Paul Bueno de

Rhode Island, University of

226

77 FR 56815 - Sunshine Act Notice  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...30 a.m. PLACE: The Washington Hilton Hotel, 1919 Connecticut Avenue NW., Washington...or other accommodation should notify Ida Green at igreen@cns.gov or 202- 606-6861...Dated: September 11, 2012. Valerie Green, General Counsel. [FR Doc....

2012-09-14

227

We Are All Adult Educators Now: The Implications of Adult Learning Theory for the Continuing Professional Development of Educational Leaders and Managers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article was written, but never published, by Dr. Valerie Hall, who died in 2002. Its existence was brought to my attention by Professor Ron Glatter at the memorial event for her held at the University of Bristol. It was presented at a seminar in Milton Keynes in 1998 as part of an ESRC series on "Redefining Educational Management"--a field in

Hall, Valerie

2004-01-01

228

Cost Center Department Mail Alt Dept Records Analyst UC Assoc Dir UC Dept Mgr H 1009312 UCPath Expense Reimbursement 929312 Almeida,Evelyn S Lippuner,Elisabeth A Lippuner,Elisabeth A  

E-print Network

&R - Neurological EMG Svcs 929732 Almeida,Evelyn S Condrin,Michael P Lehman,Karen T H 1009733 PM&R - Speech Therapy 929733 Almeida,Evelyn S Condrin,Michael P Adame,Valerie Renee H 1009734 PM&R - Prosthetics

Leistikow, Bruce N.

229

Lyndon B. Johnson School ofPublic Affairs Policy Research Project Report  

E-print Network

Lyndon B. Johnson School ofPublic Affairs Policy Research Project Report Number 130 Multimodal, and Programs Project directed by Leigh B. Boske A report by the Policy Research Project on Multimodal B. Boske, Ph.D. Professor ofEconomics and Public Affairs Students Valerie A. Briggs, B.S. (Civil

Texas at Austin, University of

230

RENEWABLE ENERGY PROGRAM OVERALL PROGRAM GUIDEBOOK  

E-print Network

RENEWABLE ENERGY PROGRAM OVERALL PROGRAM GUIDEBOOK Staff Draft Guidebook Third Edition COMMISSION Kate Zocchetti Project Manager Tony Gonçalves Office Manager Renewable Energy Office Valerie Hall Deputy Director Efficiency and Renewable Energy Division Melissa Jones Executive Director The California

231

Maintaining Minimum Spanning Trees in Dynamic Graphs  

E-print Network

Maintaining Minimum Spanning Trees in Dynamic Graphs Monika R. Henzinger 1 and Valerie King 2 1 for maintaining a minimum spanning tree in time o( p n) per operation. To be precise, the algorithm uses O(n 1 We consider the problem of maintaining a minimum spanning tree during an arbitrary sequence of edge

King, Valerie

232

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MEDICAL IMAGING, VOL. 24, NO. 6, JUNE 2005 767 A Method to Track Cortical Surface Deformations  

E-print Network

and recommending its publication was T. Peters. Asterisk indicates corresponding author. T. K. Sinha, V. Duay Surface Deformations Using a Laser Range Scanner Tuhin K. Sinha, Benoit M. Dawant, Valerie Duay, David M, and D. M. Cash are with the Department of Medical Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN

Miga, Michael I.

233

THE CENTER FOR NANOPHASE MATERIALS SCIENCES USER GROUP MEMBERS August 20, 2014  

E-print Network

of Technology Bridges, Craig ORNL Briggs, Dayrl ORNL Briggs, Sam U. Wisconsin Brown, W. Michael ORNL Browning, Michael ORNL Biskup, Neven Univ. Complutense Avda Black, Jennifer ORISE Bliznyuk, Valery Western Michigan. Basel Bradley, Stephen UOP, LLC Brady, Michael ORNL Brancolini, Giorgia National Research Council, CNR

Pennycook, Steve

234

Statistics Glossary: Design of Experiments & ANOVA  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site, created by authors Valerie Eastor and John H. McColl, lists definitions of key terms related to experimental design and ANOVA. Some of these include factorial, blocking, interaction, experimental design, treatment, variance testing, placebo, and many others. This site is part of the "Statistics Glossary" for the STEPS project (Statistical Education through Problem Solving).

Eastor, Valerie

235

This article was downloaded by:[University of Toronto] On: 11 April 2008  

E-print Network

: [subscription number 789751487] Publisher: Psychology Press Informa Ltd Registered in England and Wales Registered Number: 1072954 Registered office: Mortimer House, 37-41 Mortimer Street, London W1T 3JH, UK knowledge Jonathan A. Fugelsang a ; Valerie A. Thompson b ; Kevin N. Dunbar c a University of Waterloo

Dunbar, Kevin N.

236

Oil Price and the Dollar Virginie Coudert  

E-print Network

Oil Price and the Dollar Virginie Coudert , Valerie Mignon , Alexis Penot 6th April 2005 Abstract The aim of this paper is to test whether a stable long-term relationship exists between oil prices and causality study between the two variables. Our results indicate that causality runs from oil prices

Boyer, Edmond

237

Cigarette smoking and cognitive function in human immunodeficiency virus seropositive women Short running title: Smoking and cognition in women with HIV  

E-print Network

Cigarette smoking and cognitive function in human immunodeficiency virus seropositive women Short running title: Smoking and cognition in women with HIV Valerie Wojna1,2 , Lizbeth Robles1 , Richard L the official views of NCRR or NIH. #12;Abstract Cigarette smoking alters the immune system and may improve

Lasalde Dominicc, Jose A. - Department of Biology, Universidad de Puerto Rico

238

EFFECTS OF THE SPACE SHUTTLE COCKPIT AVIONICS UPGRADE ON CREWMEMBER PERFORMANCE AND SITUATION AWARENESS  

E-print Network

EFFECTS OF THE SPACE SHUTTLE COCKPIT AVIONICS UPGRADE ON CREWMEMBER PERFORMANCE AND SITUATION occurs in the MEDS cockpit, as well. To make matters worse, some key situation awareness information AWARENESS Miwa Hayashi, Ph.D., Valerie Huemer, M.S. San Jose State University Foundation Moffett Field, CA

Hayashi, Miwa

239

The Future Energy and GHG Emissions Impact of Alternative Personal  

E-print Network

The Future Energy and GHG Emissions Impact of Alternative Personal Transportation Pathways in China://globalchange.mit.edu/ Printed on recycled paper #12;The Future Energy and GHG Emissions Impact of Alternative Personal Paul N. Kishimoto, Sergey Paltsev and Valerie J. Karplus Report No. 231 September 2012 China Energy

240

TMS Agents: Enabling Dynamic Distributed Supply Chain Management  

E-print Network

T?MS Agents: Enabling Dynamic Distributed Supply Chain Management Tom Wagner Valerie Guralnik John of a discrete distributed dynamic supply chain management problem and specify how TAEMS agents, equipped with new coordination mechanisms, are being used to automate and manage the supply chain. Key words: agent

Wagner, Thomas

241

FOUR BASIC COMMA RULES 1. Use commas to separate items in a series of three or more.  

E-print Network

the rest of the sentence any word or expression that is not essential to the sentence's meaning. · Writing: and nor for or so but yet · Max started writing the draft two weeks ago, and he completed it today. · We Diaries and Larry's Party. · Valerie, predictably, was named class valedictorian. MUN Writing Centre | www

deYoung, Brad

242

Educational Services Department National Air and Space Museum  

E-print Network

Affairs Officer, Office of Space Flight, NASA Headquarters Valerie C. Chase, Staff Biologist, National Aquarium in Baltimore Eric L. Christiansen, Manager, Hypervelocity Impact Analysis Lab., NASA Johnson Space Center Tom Clausen, Education Officer, NASA Ames Research Center Malcolm M. Cohen, Research Scientist

Mathis, Wayne N.

243

History Honors Symposium 2007 William L. Clements Library  

E-print Network

, Pablo Lambea, Harry Kezelian, Charles McCarren, Elliott Mallen (second to top) Kristen DCamp, Amy Jones, Monica Woll, Amy Kamin, Pauline Lewis, Andrew Gould (bottom row) Benedict Lee, Nevila Pahumi Award (2) Valerie Samet Equality of Devotion: Women of the Paris Commune, 1871 Advisor: Joshua Cole Amy

Edwards, Paul N.

244

On the Complexity of Distance-based Evolutionary Tree Reconstruction  

E-print Network

-o#11; between the length of the DNA sequences and the number of distance queries needed to reconstructOn the Complexity of Distance-based Evolutionary Tree Reconstruction Valerie King y#3; Li Zhang y Yunhong Zhou y Abstract We give the #12;rst tight lower bounds on the complexity of reconstructing k

King, Valerie

245

Celebrating the Faces of Literacy. The Twenty-Fourth Yearbook: A Peer Reviewed Publication of the College Reading Association, 2002. [Papers from the College Reading Association Conference, 2001].  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The College Reading Association believes and values literacy education for all as one way to protect people's freedoms. This 24th Yearbook celebrates the varied "faces" of literacy. The yearbook contains the following special articles: (Presidential Address) "What Is Johnny Reading? A Research Update" (Maria Valerie Gold); (Keynote Addresses)

Linder, Patricia E., Ed.; Sampson, Mary Beth, Ed.; Dugan, Jo Ann R., Ed.; Brancato, Barrie, Ed.

246

Educational Restructuring and the Community Education Process.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document explores the application of the community education process to restructuring activities at both the state and local level. The monograph contains the following papers: "In the Forefront of Restructuring" (Larry Decker, Valerie Romney); "Building Learning Communities: Realities of Educational Restructuring" (Larry Decker); "The

Decker, Larry E., Ed.; Romney, Valerie A., Ed.

247

FOURTH EDITION JANUARY 2005  

E-print Network

APPENDIX 3 - CRITERIA FOR LISTING COMPONENTS AS ELIGIBLE 1 A. PHOTOVOLTAIC MODULES 1 B. SOLAR THERMAL 1 C PROGRAM Valerie Hall, Deputy Director ENERGY EFFICIENCY & DEMAND ANALYSIS DIVISION Mike Chrisman-YEAR WARRANTY REQUIREMENTS 6 H. SYSTEM PERFORMANCE METER 6 I. EQUIPMENT SELLERS 6 J. AUDITS AND INSPECTIONS 7

248

FIFTH EDITION CEC-300-2005-001-ED5F  

E-print Network

APPENDIX 3 - CRITERIA FOR LISTING COMPONENTS AS ELIGIBLE 1 A. PHOTOVOLTAIC MODULES 1 B. SOLAR THERMAL 1 C RENEWABLE ENERGY PROGRAM Valerie Hall Deputy Director EFFICIENCY, RENEWABLES & DEMAND ANALYSIS DIVISION #12 REQUIREMENTS 6 H. SYSTEM PERFORMANCE METER 6 I. EQUIPMENT SELLERS 6 J. AUDITS AND INSPECTIONS 7 III. INCENTIVES

249

Understanding the long-term effects of species invasions  

E-print Network

Understanding the long-term effects of species invasions David L. Strayer1 , Valerie T. Eviner1 Laboratory of Ecological and Evolutionary Dynamics, Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Helsinki, 00014 Helsinki, Finland 3 Evolutionary Ecology Unit, Department of Biological

250

RESEARCH TOOLS KNMI CLIMATE EXPLORER: A WEB-BASED RESEARCH TOOL FOR  

E-print Network

-RESOLUTION PALEOCLIMATOLOGY VALERIE TROUET1 and GEERT JAN VAN OLDENBORGH2 * 1 Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University such as climate change research (van Oldenborgh et al. 2009) and the paleoclimate research community current- ly. Throughout this paper, we use an Atlas cedar (Cedrus atlantica)*Corresponding author: oldenborgh@knmi.nl TREE-RING

Haak, Hein

251

Variable Azimuthal Anisotropy in Earth's Lowermost Mantle  

E-print Network

in the D layer. The D layer is located at the base of Earth_s silicate lower mantle, where it meets the liquid iron outer core. The D layer plays a critical role in Earth_s dynamical evolution because it actsVariable Azimuthal Anisotropy in Earth's Lowermost Mantle Edward J. Garnero,1 * Valerie Maupin,2

Garnero, Ed

252

1008 BUILDIN G ENE RGY f~~~2lNIACOMMISSION EFFICIENCY STANDARDS ...J  

E-print Network

or implied, and assume no legal liability for the information in this report; nor does any party represent and Appliance Office Project Manager G.William Pennington Office Manager Buildings and Appliance Office Valerie asset and have benefitted from the conscientious involvement and enduring commitment to the public good

253

2008 BUILDING ENERGY EffIcIENcY StaNDaRDS  

E-print Network

no legal liability for the information in this report; nor does any party represent that the uses and Appliance Office Project Manager G.William Pennington Office Manager Buildings and Appliance Office Valerie asset and have benefitted from the conscientious involvement and enduring commitment to the public good

254

California Energy Commission GUIDELINES  

E-print Network

PROGRAMS (SENATE BILL 1) Third Edition JUNE 2010 CEC3002010004CMF #12;CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Valerie Hall Deputy Director Efficiency and Renewable Energy Division #12;ABSTRACT As required by Senate and commercial structures where solar energy systems are installed. Keywords: Senate Bill 1, SB 1, Million Solar

255

Conversation Currents: Create Partnerships, Not Programs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This "Conversation Currents" features JoBeth Allen and Valerie Kinloch discussing their thoughts and experiences working with families and communities. Allen bases her comments on the belief that programs have to be adaptable to many different constituencies and demographics, and so must be recreated every year with every teacher and

Allen, JoBeth; Kinloch, Valerie

2013-01-01

256

Opportunities for Smart & Tailored Activity Coaching Harm op den Akker  

E-print Network

and Development Telemedicine group h.opdenakker@rrd.nl Randy Klaassen University of Twente Human Media Interaction.j.a.opdenakker@utwente.nl Valerie M. Jones University of Twente Telemedicine group v.m.jones@utwente.nl Hermie J. Hermens Roessingh Research and Development Telemedicine group h.hermens@rrd.nl Abstract This short paper describes how

Twente, Universiteit

257

Crossing Boundaries: Collaborative Solutions to Urban Problems. Selected Proceedings of the National Conference on Urban Issues (1st, Buffalo, New York, November 11-13, 1994).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Selected papers are presented from a national conference on urban issues. They are: (1) "Collaboration as a Social Process: Inter-Institutional Cooperation and Educational Change" (Charles F. Underwood and Hardy T. Frye); (2) "Mobilizing the Village To Educate the Child" (Valerie Maholmes); (3) "Pathways to Teaching: An Urban Teacher Licensure

Koritz, Douglas, Ed.; And Others

258

IRB: Roster Page 1 of 4 STANFORD UNIVERSITY  

E-print Network

(Pharm.D.) Clinical Pharmacist Pharmacy (Alternate for Theodore Jacob) BEHR, Barry R. (Ph.D., HCLD) JACOB, Theodore (Ph.D.) Career Research Scientist Psychology Service (VA) WESTPHAL, Lynn (M.D.) (Also for Theodore Jacob, Laura Peterhans and Robert Oda) BAKER, Valerie Lynn (M.D.) Associate Professor Obstetrics

Sonnenburg, Justin L.

259

2008 Greek Awards Recipients William H. Hall Chapter of the Year  

E-print Network

Scholarship Lauren Shreve, Chi Omega Ross-Gainer Man of the Year Michael Repasky, Sigma Phi Epsilon Nathaniel Valerie Tiu, Omega Tau Zeta Outstanding Chapter President Daphne Everhart, Alpha Gamma Delta Michael, Delta Tau Delta Eric Conklin, Alpha Tau Zeta Michele Dye, Alpha Gamma Delta Laurel Palmer, Kappa Kappa

260

C a r o l i n a F a l l 2 0 1 0  

E-print Network

. anderson, Jr. '61, charleston, sc r. frank andrews '90, '95 MBa, washington, dc valerie ashby '88, '94 Matthew g. Kupec '80, chapel hill, nc william M. lamont, Jr. '71, dallas, TX edwin a. Poston '89. Morgan won a Jno award, created by 2003 economics alumnus Jason norris, to support her efforts

Alterovitz, Ron

261

Science Fiction: The Interdisciplinary Genre An international conference featuring Robert J. Sawyer  

E-print Network

Science Fiction: The Interdisciplinary Genre An international conference featuring Robert J. Sawyer" Chester New Hall 102 #12;Valerie Broege (Vanier College) "Robert J. Sawyer: A Holistic Science Fiction and the Science Fiction of Sawyer and Van Vogt" Nick Matthews (Undergraduate Student, Waterloo) "Through a glass

Haykin, Simon

262

world cultures J. Patrick Gray, Editor  

E-print Network

1045-0564 world cultures J. Patrick Gray, Editor PROLEGOMENA Contents and How to Use This Issue J-Cultural Research Vol 13 No 1 Spring 2002 #12;WORLD CULTURES PUBLISHER William Divale EDITOR J. Patrick Gray Carol R. Ember Dennis O'Neil Pertti J. Pelto Karl Reitz J. Jerome Smith Donald Tuzin Valerie Wheeler

White, Douglas R.

263

Literacy, Community, and Youth Acts of Place-Making  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Valerie Kinloch describes how the literacy narratives around place-making by Phillip, an African American teenager who resides in this historic community, demonstrate complexities of confronting power, struggle, and identity within an out-of-school community that is rapidly becoming gentrified. (Contains 3 notes.)

Kinloch, Valerie

2009-01-01

264

SUSS-EX CLUB Steering Group Meeting no. 7  

E-print Network

Relations Office, Bramber House Present: Sir Gordon Conway (Chairman) Charles Goldie Yvette Ashby Willie Lamont Bob Benewick Jennifer Platt David Betts Mike Tribe Jackie Fuller David Smith Mike English Ken Wheeler Adrian Peasgood Steve Pavey Valerie Cromwell In attendance: Apologies for absence: Gill Blake

Sussex, University of

265

STS-91: Flight Crew Meets with Family and Friends at Launch Complex 39A  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The crew (Commander Charles J. Precourt, Pilot Dominic L. Pudwill Gorie, Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, Janet L. Kavandi and Valery Victorovitch Ryumin) take time from their busy schedule to chat with friends and family, at a distance. They also pose for group and single pictures.

1998-01-01

266

MTL ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2014 MTL Seminar Series 217 MTL Seminar Series  

E-print Network

MTL ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2014 MTL Seminar Series 217 MTL Seminar Series MTL hosts a series of talks each semester known as the MTL Seminar Series. Seminar speakers are selected on the basis. For more information regarding the MTL Seminar Series, send e-mail to valeried@mit.edu. FALL 2013 October

Reif, Rafael

267

Forum on Education: Teacher Preparation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Forum on Education Newsletter, Summer 2006. Articles included: The Learning Assistant Model for Teacher Education in Science and Technology by Valerie Otero, Undergraduate Learning Assistants at the University of Arkansas by Gay Stewart, and Creating and Sustaining a Teaching and Learning Professional Community at Seattle Pacific University by Lane Seeley and Stamatis Vokos.

Malamud, Ernie

268

Key Themes in Intercultural Communication Pedagogy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The seminar, organised by Jane Woodin, Gibson Ferguson, Valerie Hobbs and Lesley Walker (School of Modern Languages & Linguistics and School of English, University of Sheffield), aimed to bring together those working in intercultural communication (IC) pedagogy largely--though not exclusively--in the higher education sector. It drew inspiration

Woodin, Jane

2010-01-01

269

EECCOOLLOOGGYY AANNDD EEVVOOLLUUTTIIOONN SSEEMMIINNAARR SSEERRIIEESS**  

E-print Network

Communities and Ecosystems Valerie Eviner, UC Davis MAY 10 Catchers in the Rye: Climate Change, Biodiversity Responses to Climate Change: What Happens Belowground? Christine Hawkes, University of Texas at Austin Host: Kelly Gravuer, klgravuer@ucdavis.edu MAY 31 Genomic Changes Associated with Speciation in Plants

Ferrara, Katherine W.

270

Conceptualising Hy-Bivalent Subjectivities to Facilitate an Examination of Australian Government Mutual Obligations Policies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper illustrates how the work of feminist theorists Valerie Walkerdine, Helen Lucey and June Melody, Beverly Skeggs, and Nancy Fraser were used together to examine the lived effects of Australian government Mutual Obligations policies. As "active" welfare policies, Mutual Obligations construct particular relations between themselves and

Edwards, Jan

2006-01-01

271

Hue discrimination, unique hues and naming Romain, Bachy1  

E-print Network

Hue discrimination, unique hues and naming Romain, Bachy1 ; Jer^ome, Dias2,3 ; David, Alleysson3 Corresponding : Valerie.Bonnardel@winchester.ac.uk The Hue Discrimination Curve (HDC) that characterizes between hue discrimination and appearance, observers further performed a free color naming and a unique

Alleysson, David

272

LuxU connects quorum sensing to biofilm formation in Vibrio fischeri  

E-print Network

LuxU connects quorum sensing to biofilm formation in Vibrio fischeri Valerie A. Ray and Karen L, USA. Summary Biofilm formation by Vibrio fischeri is a complex process involving multiple regulators polysaccha- ride (syp) locus. To identify other regulators of biofilm formation in V. fischeri, we screened

McFall-Ngai, Margaret

273

KSC-03PD-1461  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Valerie Cassanto (foreground), Instrumentation Technology Associates, Inc., examines one of the experiments carried on mission STS-107. Several experiments were found during the search for Columbia debris. Included in the Commercial ITA Biomedical Experiments payload on mission STS-107 are urokinase cancer research, microencapsulation of drugs, the Growth of Bacterial Biofilm on Surfaces during Spaceflight (GOBBSS), and tin crystal formation.

2003-01-01

274

KSC-03PD-1450  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Valerie Cassanto is one of the scientists recovering experiments found during the search for Columbia debris. Included in the Commercial ITA Biomedical Experiments payload on mission STS-107 are urokinase cancer research, microencapsulation of drugs, the Growth of Bacterial Biofilm on Surfaces during Spaceflight (GOBBSS), and tin crystal formation.

2003-01-01

275

KSC-03PD-1453  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Valerie Cassanto, with Instrumentation Technology Associates, Inc., works on an experiment found during the search for Columbia debris. Included in the Commercial ITA Biomedical Experiments payload on mission STS-107 are urokinase cancer research, microencapsulation of drugs, the Growth of Bacterial Biofilm on Surfaces during Spaceflight (GOBBSS), and tin crystal formation.

2003-01-01

276

Sponsored by The Center for Research in Mathematics and Science Education and the San Diego County Office of Education  

E-print Network

will be on your right. Join K-12 administrators, science education leaders, informal educators and communitySponsored by The Center for Research in Mathematics and Science Education and the San Diego County Office of Education Joseph S. Krajcik and Valerie Otero Supporting Science Teachers in Utilizing Model

Ponce, V. Miguel

277

Game-Based Assessments: A Promising Way to Create Idiographic Perspectives  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Game-Based Assessments: A Promising Way to Create Idiographic Perspectives" (Adrienne Walker and George Englehard) comments on: "How Task Features Impact Evidence from Assessments Embedded in Simulations and Games" by Russell G. Almond, Yoon Jeon Kim, Gertrudes Velasquez, and Valerie J. Shute. Here, Walker and Englehard write

Walker, A. Adrienne; Engelhard, George, Jr.

2014-01-01

278

Surface-to-tunnel seismic tomography studies at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-print Network

Surface-to-tunnel seismic tomography studies at Yucca Mountain, Nevada Roland Gritto, Valeri A in the proposed nuclear waste repository area at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. A 5-km-long source line and a 3-km-long receiver line were located on top of Yucca Mountain ridge and inside the Exploratory Study Facility (ESF

Korneev, Valeri A.

279

Section Sciences et Ingnierie de l'environnement Design Project 2011 (semestre de printemps)  

E-print Network

spatial heterogeneity in demand, which results in out-of-vehicle delays for passengers. The congestion costs, increase passenger satisfaction and possibly attract induced demand. Descriptif tâches Poublan-Attas valerie.attas@veolia-transport.fr Tél.: +33 4 93 16 52 01 ST2N - Veolia Transport 2

280

University of Cincinnati 1 NEWSclips The excerpts presented here are select examples of local, national and  

E-print Network

of the Center for Preventive Science in the College of Education, thanks to a rash of social media attempts to smear and attack their victims. "Parents and schools are really struggling and, with social media, we development, and their bank accounts! By Valerie Strauss Kids Confront Next Generation of Bullies Sept. 4

Papautsky, Ian

281

"Bad Talk" Made Good: Language Variety in Four Caribbean British Children's Poets  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article looks at how four British-based poets born in the Caribbean exploit the rich language repertoire available to them in their work for children and young people. Following initial consideration of questions of definition and terminology, poetry collections by James Berry, John Agard, Grace Nichols and Valerie Bloom are discussed, with a

Lockwood, Michael

2014-01-01

282

Third Edition CEC-300-2007-004-CMF  

E-print Network

Manager RENEWABLE ENERGY OFFICE Valerie Hall Deputy Director EFFICIENCY, RENEWABLES, AND DEMAND ANALYSIS;Abstract The Consumer Education Program provides grants and contracts to promote renewable energy and help build a consumer market in California for renewable energy and emerging renewable technologies

283

Reconciliation of Retailer Claims, 2005 CommissionReport  

E-print Network

B.B. Blevins Executive Director Jason Orta Principal Author Drake Johnson Manager RENEWABLE ENERGY OFFICE Valerie Hall Deputy Director EFFICIENCY, RENEWABLES, AND DEMAND ANALYSIS DIVISION #12 disclose to consumers "accurate, reliable, and simple to understand information on the sources of energy

284

RECONCILIATION OF RETAILER CLAIMS, COMMISSIONREPORT  

E-print Network

Renewable Energy Office Valerie Hall Deputy Director Efficiency, Renewables & Demand Analysis Division #12 to their consumers the actual energy generated for consumption in California. The activities carried out to meetCALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION RECONCILIATION OF RETAILER CLAIMS, 2004 COMMISSIONREPORT October, 2005

285

School of Natural Sciences and PsychologySchool of Natural Sciences and PsychologySchool of Natural Sciences and PsychologySchool of Natural Sciences and Psychology Research Round-up  

E-print Network

The second Rare Breeds Survival Trust vacation scholarship, awarded to NSP Ecology student Nick Golding Stephen Fairclough presented a paper entitled 'monitoring mental overload via the biocybernetic loop://reflect.pst.ifi.lmu.de/ Prize winning poster PhD student Valerie Todd won the 200 prize for best research poster at the Salford

Brown, Richard

286

S E P T E M B E R 2 0 1 4 Upcoming events!  

E-print Network

much to offer, to Faculty, Staff and Alumni. If you have not yet had an opportunity to enjoy a meal rock fish Local corn Assorted salads $13 Then enjoy Sunday Brunch with us! Sunday, October 19th ­ Homecoming Sunday brunch 11am ­ 2pm Wear your Gold, Blue & Red and join us! Contact Valerie for more details

Ellis, Randy

287

96 Int. J. Vehicle Noise and Vibration, Vol. 9, Nos. 1/2, 2013 Copyright 2013 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.  

E-print Network

Enterprises Ltd. The emotional component in perceived quality of noises produced by car engines Valery.samoylenko@gmail.com Abstract: This study dealt with evaluation and paired comparison of noises of seven diesel cars running emotional component in perceived quality of noises produced by car engines', Int. J. Vehicle Noise

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

288

Performance Characteristics of Hybrid MPI/OpenMP Implementations of NAS Parallel Benchmarks SP and BT on Large-scale Multicore Clusters  

E-print Network

Benchmarks SP and BT on Large-scale Multicore Clusters Xingfu Wu and Valerie Taylor Department of Computer be used with the communication between nodes. In this paper, we use SP and BT benchmarks of MPI NPB 3.3 as a basis for a comparative approach to implement hybrid MPI/OpenMP versions of SP and BT. In particular, we

289

Strange Imports: Working-Class Appalachian Women in the Composition Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Valerie Miner muses in "Writing and Teaching with Class:" "I've always carried that Miner suspicion that laboring with words is not real work . . . Should I be doing something useful?" (1993, 74). If working-class academics face uneasy negotiations between their disciplines and their home cultures, which may include deployment of regional dialects

Fedukovich, Casie

2009-01-01

290

COGNITIVE PROCESSES AND THE LEARNING OF PHYSICS PART II: MEDIATED ACTION  

E-print Network

1 COGNITIVE PROCESSES AND THE LEARNING OF PHYSICS PART II: MEDIATED ACTION Valerie K. Otero School "context." One of the fundamental features of the socio- cultural perspective is the notion that cognition theoretical perspectives of cognition where learning is viewed as the process of doing and participating

Colorado at Boulder, University of

291

The Public Assault on America's Children: Poverty, Violence, and Juvenile Injustice. The Teaching for Social Justice Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This collection of papers reveals the systemic violence, poverty, educational neglect, and social disregard that shape the lives of poor children in the United States. After an introduction, "Savage Policies: Systemic Violence and the Lives of Children" (Valerie Polakow), there are eight chapters: (1) "A Crucible of Contradictions: Historical

Polakow, Valerie, Ed.

292

Acoustic detection and classification of river boats Amir Averbuch a,  

E-print Network

Acoustic detection and classification of river boats Amir Averbuch a, , Valery Zheludev a , Pekka September 2010 Available online 13 October 2010 Keywords: Hydro-acoustic signature Wavelet packet Best acoustic signature against an existing database of recorded and processed acoustic signals. We characterize

Averbuch, Amir

293

Surveys for California Red-Legged Frog and Arroyo Toad on the Los Padres  

E-print Network

Surveys for California Red-Legged Frog and Arroyo Toad on the Los Padres National Forest1 Valerie K-listed California red-legged frog (Rana aurora draytonii) and arroyo toad (Bufo californicus). Sites known to have frogs or toads present were monitored for breeding and possible impacts of Forest Service activities

Standiford, Richard B.

294

Controlling a Neuroprosthetic Arm: Real Time Estimation and Prediction  

E-print Network

Controlling a Neuroprosthetic Arm: Real Time Estimation and Prediction Cari Kaufman and Valerie Ventura July 7, 2006 Abstract The development of neuroprosthetic devices promises to allow previ- ously from a series of experiments using a rhesus monkey. 1 Introduction A neuroprosthetic device is a type

295

Teachers Teaching Teachers (T3)[TM]. Volume 5, Number 4  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Teachers Teaching Teachers" ("T3") focuses on coaches' roles in the professional development of teachers. Each issue also explores the challenges and rewards that teacher leaders encounter. This issue includes: (1) Weekend Wisdom: Stimulus Funds Boost Professional Learning and Add Saturday Option (Valerie von Frank); (2) Lessons from a Coach:

Crow, Tracy, Ed.

2009-01-01

296

APS/123-QED Dynamics of crater formation in immersed granular materials  

E-print Network

APS/123-QED Dynamics of crater formation in immersed granular materials German Varas, Valerie Vidal of a crater at the free surface of an immersed granular bed, locally crossed by an ascending gas flow. In 2D, the crater consists of two piles which develop around the location of the gas emission. We observe

Boyer, Edmond

297

Technology and Higher Education: Report from the Front.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Includes two reports on the current integration of technology in postsecondary education. Mara Mayor and Peter Dirr discuss the relationship between technology and access and quality. Valerie Crane presents study results on how students use and evaluate telecourses compared to on-campus courses. (DMM)

Mayor, Mara; And Others

1987-01-01

298

The Chicken: Contributions to Genetic  

E-print Network

. It is one thing to look back, and from it is there advice for predicting? #12;Summary Cont'd "The only way & nutrition Genetics Virology Immunology Physiology #12;The Life Cycle Onset of lay The clutch one gram of breast meat. It now takes only 9 g. ` Valerie Carney Canadian Poultry, 2007 #12;

299

Wellness Program Wellness todayrewards for a lifetime  

E-print Network

've already lost 40 pounds with Weight Watchers, and I want to keep going." ­Valerie A., College of Design "I Watchers® at Work can be completed 3 times annually; 6 times per lifetime. Create Your Weight can want to lose weight and get active, some need help managing a chronic condition, some want to quit

Thomas, David D.

300

Now I Get What It Was Really Like: Reading Historical Fiction to Understand History  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Encouraging students to read historical fiction can lead to greater interest in historical events and fictionalizing history enables young people to feel what it is like to be there. "The Bear that Heard Crying" by Natalie Kinsey-Warnock, "A Lion to Guard Us" by Clyde Robert and "Meet Felicity: An American Girl (Book 1)" by Valerie Tripp are some

Schwab, Watts

2005-01-01

301

Forum on the Future of Academic Medicine: Final Session--Implications of the Information Revolution for Academic Medicine.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Summarizes two speeches. William W. Stead offers three scenarios illustrating typical future interactions of consumers with a medical system based on informatics and information technology and then considers implications for academic medicine. Valerie Florance discusses a program that is exploring ways medical schools and teaching hospitals can

Iglehart, John

2000-01-01

302

Hindawi Publishing Corporation International Journal of Navigation and Observation  

E-print Network

Tracking Loop for GPS-Guided Missiles and Vehicular Applications Ahmed M. Kamel,1,2 Valerie Renaudin,1 is properly cited. Autonomous Navigation Systems used in missiles and other high dynamic platforms are mostly dependent on the Global Positioning System (GPS). GPS users face limitations in terms of missile high

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

303

LASR Seating Plan 14 October 2011  

E-print Network

LeethochawalitTurner Carlstrom(140 sf) Pates · Michael Turner Staff · Ken Aird · Valeri Galtsev · Elena Galtseva Christopher Greer ·Michael Karfunkle · Yeunjin Kim · Monica Mocanu · Tyler Natoli · Kyle Story #12;Faculty · Berk Diler · Alice Griffeth · Evan Hall · Peter Adshead · Eric Carl Dahl · Pedro Facal · Roberto

Collar, Juan I.

304

www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/316/5827/1021/DC1 Supporting Online Material for  

E-print Network

, Paul G. Falkowski, Sarah A. Goldthwait, Dennis A. Hansell, William J. Jenkins, Rodney Johnson, Valery K. Kosnyrev, James R. Ledwell, Qian P. Li, David A. Siegel, Deborah K. Steinberg *To whom correspondence, and export flux was measured at 150m with drifting sediment traps (PITS). Methods for 234 Thorium-based flux

California at Santa Barbara, University of

305

The Process of Designing Task Features  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Malcolm Bauer, from Education Testing Services, provides his comments on the Focus article in this issue of "Measurement" entitled : "How Task Features Impact Evidence from Assessments Embedded in Simulations and Games" (Russell G. Almond, Yoon Jeon Kim, Gertrudes Velasquez, Valerie J. Shute). Bauer begins his remarks by noting

Bauer, Malcolm

2014-01-01

306

A Brief Note on Evidence-Centered Design as a Mechanism for Assessment Development and Evaluation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Lloyd Bond comments here on the Focus article in this issue of "Measurement: Interdisciplinary Research and Perspectives". The Focus article is entitled: "How Task Features Impact Evidence from Assessments Embedded in Simulations and Games" (Russell G. Almond, Yoon Jeon Kim, Gertrudes Velasquez, and Valerie J. Shute). Bond

Bond, Lloyd

2014-01-01

307

J. Anat. (2004) 204, pp165173 Anatomical Society of Great Britain and Ireland 2004  

E-print Network

,1 Ji-Jun Liu,1 Wei-Guo Zhang,3 Xian-Hong Chen,3 Jin-Hua Chen,3 Jian Wang,4 Wei Chen,4 Ming Lu,4 Jian You,4 Xue-Li Pang,5 Hong Xiao,5 Yong-Ming Xie2 and Jack Chun-Yiu Cheng6 1 Department of Anatomy on earlier digital humans Shao-Xiang Zhang,1 Pheng-Ann Heng,2 Zheng-Jin Liu,1 Li-Wen Tan,1 Ming-Guo Qiu,1 Qi

2004-01-01

308

Nightgames  

E-print Network

to touch him in a gentle, loving way. Hooper/Angel hitched both thumbs through his belt loops. "Fifteen bucks for a blow job," he said flatly. Stephen felt a sharp pang of disappointment. So the young god was for sale. How cheaply these blithe spirits... finally, trailing a hand across Harry's flat stomach. Firm muscles quivered in response to the touch. "Good reason." "Yeah." Now his hand hovered somewhere in the vicinity of Harry's groin. "And second, because you love me." Harry nodded. "I do," he...

White, T.; Kurz, R.

1981-01-01

309

A study in photosensitization of cattle in southeast Texas during 1953  

E-print Network

approximately 6 po mds for certain forbs to about, 114 pounds for two of the , . ;r. sees, WEATEEB AJID SOIL CONDITIONS DeWitt County is located on the ooastal plain and, in general, rolling prairie. It is characterized by warm, temperate, sub-humid weather..., . but production was not snout to provide auf icient winter forage ru io& t ra&. geo. In Oct- o'ber 1&)5$ livestock were utili, "ing forcg. th; t, under good manage~ant for ye:". rlong grazing, should not have been used until late minter. Pangs 1 has been stoa...

Hoffman, Garlyn O

1954-01-01

310

Effects of a short duration grazing system on white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in the Rio Grande Plain, Texas  

E-print Network

of the requirement for the degree of YASTER OF SCIENCE Nay 1980 Major Subject: Pange Science EFFECTS OF' A SHORT DURATION GRAZING SYSTEM ON WHITE-TAILED DEER (ODOCOILEUS VIRGINIANUS) IN THE RIO GRANDE PLAIN, TEXAS A Thesis by KEVIN LEIGH ALLRED Approved...EF'FECTS OF A SHCRT DURATION GRAZING SYSIKN ON WHITE-TAILED DEER (ODOCOILEUS VZRGINIANUS) ZN THE RIO GRANDE PLAIN, TEXAS A Thesis by VIN LEIGH ALLRED Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AdH University in partial fulfillment...

Allred, Kevin Leigh

1980-01-01

311

Affinity binding of antibodies to supermacroporous cryogel adsorbents with immobilized protein A for removal of anthrax toxin protective antigen.  

PubMed

Polymeric cryogels are efficient carriers for the immobilization of biomolecules because of their unique macroporous structure, permeability, mechanical stability and different surface chemical functionalities. The aim of the study was to demonstrate the potential use of macroporous monolithic cryogels for biotoxin removal using anthrax toxin protective antigen (PA), the central cell-binding component of the anthrax exotoxins, and covalent immobilization of monoclonal antibodies. The affinity ligand (protein A) was chemically coupled to the reactive hydroxyl and epoxy-derivatized monolithic cryogels and the binding efficiencies of protein A, monoclonal antibodies to the cryogel column were determined. Our results show differences in the binding capacity of protein A as well as monoclonal antibodies to the cryogel adsorbents caused by ligand concentrations, physical properties and morphology of surface matrices. The cytotoxicity potential of the cryogels was determined by an invitro viability assay using V79 lung fibroblast as a model cell and the results reveal that the cryogels are non-cytotoxic. Finally, the adsorptive capacities of PA from phosphate buffered saline (PBS) were evaluated towards a non-glycosylated, plant-derived human monoclonal antibody (PANG) and a glycosylated human monoclonal antibody (Valortim()), both of which were covalently attached via protein A immobilization. Optimal binding capacities of 108 and 117mg/g of antibody to the adsorbent were observed for PANG attached poly(acrylamide-allyl glycidyl ether) [poly(AAm-AGE)] and Valortim() attached poly(AAm-AGE) cryogels, respectively, This indicated that glycosylation status of Valortim() antibody could significantly increase (8%) its binding capacity relative to the PANG antibody on poly(AAm-AGE)-protien-A column (p<0.05). The amounts of PA which remained in the solution after passing PA spiked PBS through PANG or Valortim bound poly(AAm-AGE) cryogel were significantly (p<0.05) decreased relative to the amount of PA remained in the solution after passing through unmodified as well as protein A modified poly(AAm-AGE) cryogel columns, indicates efficient PA removal from spiked PBS over 60min of circulation. The high adsorption capacity towards anthrax toxin PA of the cryogel adsorbents indicated potential application of these materials for treatment of Bacillus anthracis infection. PMID:25736504

Ingavle, Ganesh C; Baillie, Les W J; Zheng, Yishan; Lis, Elzbieta K; Savina, Irina N; Howell, Carol A; Mikhalovsky, Sergey V; Sandeman, Susan R

2015-05-01

312

The Renunciation of Household and Embracing Monkhood By Shariputra and Arya Maudgalyayana  

E-print Network

(jrallgs). and astrology (rTsis) and became an erudite master. lie learned quickly the wisdom of the Vedas and became a mall oftrallscend ent genius in elucidating and overwhelming the opponents. Overwhelmed \\A, ith joy the Brahman Ciru-'Dzin felt... -rgyal and dPang-nas-sKyes were wandering in the \\ alley, the Buddha Sakyamuni who disowned even the slightest of such as not knowing (Mi-mkhyen-pa), not seeing (Ma-gzigs-pa), unawareness (Ma-rig-pa), and completely not knowing (rNam-par Mi-mkhyen-pa) saw...

1997-01-01

313

Qiu Tis Contributions to Juelanshe and the Intersection of Modernist Ideology, Public Receptivity, and Personal Identity for a Woman Oil Painter in Early Twentieth-Century China  

E-print Network

youthful Qiu Ti years before she met Pang Xunqin. From Cheng and Tinari, Schudy. 1.2 Fang Junbi, Nude (Renti ??), Meishu shenghuo 4 (Jul 1934): 5. 1.3 Pan Yuliang, Landscape of the Tsien Tang River, (Qiantang jiangpan ????), The Young Companion..., 260 x 391 cm, The Hermitage, St. Petersburg, Russia. 3.6 Gauguin, Where Do We Come From? What Are We? Where Are We Going?, 1897, oil on canvas, 139.1 x 374.6 cm, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, USA. viii 3.7 Marc Chagall, Red Nude, 1908...

Wright, Amanda Sue

2011-12-31

314

A Concurrency and Time Centered Framework for Certification of Autonomous Space Systems  

E-print Network

in partial ful llment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Chair of Committee, Bjarne Stroustrup Committee Members, Jaakko J arvi Rabi N. Mahapatra Raytcho Lazarov Head of Department, Valerie E. Taylor December 2009 Major... research lab. I am grateful to my committee members, Dr. Jaakko J arvi, Dr. Rabi N. Mahapatra, and Dr. Raytcho Lazarov, for their guidance, helpful advice, patience, and service. I would like to thank my good colleague and friend, Peter Pirkelbauer...

Dechev, Damian

2010-07-14

315

Meta-Metadata: An Information Semantic Language and Software Architecture for Collection Visualization Application  

E-print Network

Members, Rodney Hill Thomas Ioerger Jaakko J?rvi Head of Department, Valerie Taylor December 2009 Major Subject: Computer Science iii ABSTRACT Meta-Metadata: An Information Semantics Language... and experiences from his guidance. I would like to thank my committee members Thomas Ioerger, Jaakko J?rvi and Rodney Hill, for their suggestions and feedback during the course of my research. I express my immense gratefulness to all the members...

Mathur, Abhinav

2011-02-22

316

Randomized location service in Mobile Ad Hoc Networks  

E-print Network

Major Subject: Computer Science RANDOMIZED LOCATION SLrRVICh. ' IN MOBILE AD HOC NETWORKS A Thesis by SANGEETA BHATTACHARYA Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for thc dcgrcc of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved... as to style and content by: I nmfer Welch (Chair of Committee) Donald K. Friesen (Member) A. L. Narasimha Reddy (Member) Valerie E. Taylor (Head of Department) May 2003 Major Subject: Computer Science 111 ABSTRACT Randomized Location Service...

Bhattacharya, Sangeeta

2003-01-01

317

Performance-directed site selection system of AADMLSS  

E-print Network

of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2004 Major Subject: Computer Science PERFORMANCE-DIRECTED SITE SELECTION SYSTEM OF AADMLSS A Thesis By MIEKE PRAJUGO Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial...: Computer Science iii ABSTRACT Performance-Directed Site Selection System of AADMLSS. (December 2004) Mieke Prajugo, B.S., University of Minnesota Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Valerie E. Taylor The popularity of the World Wide Web (WWW...

Prajugo, Mieke

2005-02-17

318

Featured Organism: Schizosaccharomyces pombe, The Fission Yeast  

PubMed Central

Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the fission yeast, has long been a crucial model for the study of the eukaryote cell cycle. We take a look at this important yeast, whose genome has recently been completed, featuring comments from Valerie Wood, Jrg Bhler, Ramsay McFarlane, Susan Forsburg, Iain Hagan and Paul Nurse on the implications of having the complete sequence and future prospects for pombe genomics. PMID:18628834

2002-01-01

319

A novel approach to the study of conformality in the SU(3) theory with multiple flavors  

E-print Network

We investigate the transition between spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking and conformal behavior in the SU(3) theory with multiple fermion flavors. We propose a new strategy for studying this transition. Instead of changing the number of flavors, we lift the mass of a subset of the fermions, keeping the rest of the fermions near to the massless chiral limit in order to probe the transition. Dedicated to the 60th birthday of Academician Valery Rubakov.

Richard Brower; Anna Hasenfratz; Claudio Rebbi; Evan Weinberg; Oliver Witzel

2014-10-16

320

On Binary Methods Kim Bruce, Luca Cardelli, Giuseppe Castagna,  

E-print Network

:kim@cs.williams.edu y Internet: luca@src.dec.com. z Internet: castagna@dmi.ens.fr x Jonathan Eifrig, Scott Smith, Valery Trifonov. Contact Scott Smith. Research partially supported by NSF grant CCR­9301340 and AFOSR grant F49620­93­1­0169. Internet: scott@cs.jhu.edu. -- partially supported by NSF grants CCR­9108654 and CCR­ 9593168. Internet

Trifonov, Valery

321

Generalizations of the Landau-Zener theory in the physics of nanoscale systems  

E-print Network

ABSTRACT Generalizations of the Landau-Zener Theory in the Physics of Nanoscale Systems. (May 2004) Nikolai Sinitsyn, B.S., Belarus State University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Valery L. Pokrovsky Nanoscale systems have sizes intermediate between... at Belarus State University: Professors Eugeny Ushakov, Artur Tregubovich, Andrey Lavrinenko, Vyacheslav Kuvshinov, Leonid Markovich and my school physics and mathematics teachers: Sergei Mikhailovich Karpuk and Natalia Vladimirovna Gurinovich. The support...

Sinitsyn, Nikolai

2004-09-30

322

ActiveSTB: an efficient wireless resource manager in home networks  

E-print Network

of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2006 Major Subject: Computer Science ACTIVESTB: AN EFFICIENT WIRELESS RESOURCE MANAGER IN HOME NETWORKS A Thesis by VARRIAN DURAND HALL Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies... of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved by: Chair of Committee, Eun Jung Kim Committee Members, Anxiao (Andrew) Jiang Deepa Kundur Head of Department, Valerie E...

Hall, Varrian Durand

2009-05-15

323

On traffic analysis attacks and countermeasures  

E-print Network

of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Co-Chairs of Committee, Wei Zhao Riccardo Bettati Committee Members, Narasimha Reddy Dmitri Loguinov Head of Department, Valerie E. Taylor...-Chairs of Advisory Committee: Dr. Wei Zhao Dr. Riccardo Bettati Security and privacy have gained more and more attention with the rapid growth and public acceptance of the Internet as a means of communication...

Fu, Xinwen

2007-04-25

324

Dynamic resource location in peer-to-peer networks  

E-print Network

and content by: Riccardo Bettati (Chair of Committee) Wei Zhao (Member) Narasimha Reddy (Member) Valerie Taylor (Head of Department) May 2003 Major Subject: Computer Engineering iii ABSTRACT Dynamic Resource Location in Peer-to-Peer Networks. (May 2003) Ripal... that is used extensively for le sharing. Its messaging protocol supports the dynamic 5 PONG PING PONG PING PING PONG PONG PING Fig. 1. Gnutella Membership Join Protocol environment that results in peer-to-peer networks. Nodes join a Gnutella network using...

Nathuji, Ripal Babubhai

2004-09-30

325

JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C2, supplment au n2, Tome 46, fvrier 1985 page C2-95  

E-print Network

'effet Rubakov-Callan",catalysé par le monopole de la désintégration du proton ; le rôle de la théorie des champs and spin from isospin; the Rubakov analysis; monopole catalysis of proton decay "the Rubakov-Callan effect such examples. About three years ago, Valerie Rubakov and independently Curt Callan predicted that a remarkable

Boyer, Edmond

326

Soap Opera Video on Handheld Computers to Reduce Young Urban Womens HIV Sex Risk  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to develop a soap opera video, A Story about Toni, Mike, and Valerie, designed to communicate HIV risk reduction themes. The study evaluated viewing the video and responding to audio computer\\u000a assisted self-interview (ACASI) on a handheld computer. The sample was 76 predominately African American women, aged 1829,\\u000a in sexual relationships with men. Data

Rachel Jones

2008-01-01

327

Routing algorithms for large scale wireless sensor networks  

E-print Network

of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content by: Dmitri Loguinov (Chair of Committee) Andreas Klappenecker (Member) Madhav Pappu (Member) Valerie E. Taylor (Head of Department) December 2004 Major Subject: Computer Science iii ABSTRACT Routing... Algorithms for Large Scale Wireless Sensor Networks. (December 2004) Lakshmana Prasanth Nittala Venkata, B.Tech, Andhra University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Dmitri Loguinov Routing in sensor networks is a challenging issue due to inherent constraints...

Nittala Venkata, Lakshmana Prasanth

2005-02-17

328

Dispatch: distributed peer-to-peer simulations  

E-print Network

of Committee, Dmitri Loguinov Committee Members, Donald Friesen Narasimha Reddy Head of Department, Valerie E. Taylor December 2007 Major Subject: Computer Science iii ABSTRACT Dispatch: Distributed Peer-to-Peer Simulations. (December 2007) Kunal S. Patel, B....E., Sardar Patel University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Dmitri Loguinov Recently there has been an increasing demand for efficient mechanisms of carry- ing out computations that exhibit coarse grained parallelism. Examples of this class of problems...

Patel, Kunal S.

2009-05-15

329

Performance analysis and network path characterization for scalable internet streaming  

E-print Network

in partial fulflllment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Chair of Committee, Dmitri Loguinov Committee Members, Riccardo Bettati Yoonsuck Choe Narasimha Reddy Head of Department, Valerie E. Taylor May 2008 Major Subject...: Computer Science iii ABSTRACT Performance Analysis and Network Path Characterization for Scalable Internet Streaming. (May 2008) Seong-Ryong Kang, B.S., Kyungpook National University; M.S., Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dmitri Loguinov...

Kang, Seong-Ryong

2008-10-10

330

Envelope: estimation of bottleneck and available bandwidth over multiple congested links  

E-print Network

of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content by: Dmitri Loguinov (Chair of Committee) Donald K. Friesen (Member) A. L. Narasimha Reddy (Member) Valerie E. Taylor (Head of Department) December 2004 Major Subject: Computer Science iii ABSTRACT... Envelope: Estimation of Bottleneck and Available Bandwidth over Multiple Congested Links. (December 2004) Amit Bhati, B.Tech., Kakatiya University, India Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Dmitri Loguinov Bandwidth estimation has been extensively researched...

Bhati, Amit

2006-04-12

331

Robust and Scalable Sampling Algorithms for Network Measurement  

E-print Network

for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Chair of Committee, Dmitri Loguinov Committee Members, Riccardo Bettati Jennifer L. Welch Narasimha Annapareddy Head of Department, Valerie E. Taylor August 2009 Major Subject: Computer Science iii ABSTRACT... Robust and Scalable Sampling Algorithms for Network Measurement. (August 2009) Xiaoming Wang, B.S., Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications; M.S., Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications Chair of Advisory Committee: Dmitri Loguinov...

Wang, Xiaoming

2010-10-12

332

Understanding Churn in Decentralized Peer-to-Peer Networks  

E-print Network

for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Chair of Committee, Dmitri Loguinov Committee Members, Riccardo Bettati Jennifer L. Welch Narasimha Annapareddy Head of Department, Valerie E. Taylor August 2009 Major Subject: Computer Science iii... ABSTRACT Understanding Churn in Decentralized Peer-to-Peer Networks. (August 2009) Zhongmei Yao, B.S., Donghua University; M.S., Louisiana Tech University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Dmitri Loguinov This dissertation presents a novel modeling...

Yao, Zhongmei

2010-10-12

333

Stable and scalable congestion control for high-speed heterogeneous networks  

E-print Network

of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Chair of Committee, Dmitri Loguinov Committee Members, Riccardo Bettati Jianer Chen A. L. Narasimha Reddy Head of Department, Valerie E. Taylor May 2008 Major Subject: Computer Engineering iii... ABSTRACT Stable and Scalable Congestion Control for High-Speed Heterogeneous Networks. (May 2008) Yueping Zhang, B.S., Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Dmitri Loguinov For any congestion control mechanisms...

Zhang, Yueping

2008-10-10

334

Effective Load Management for the City of College Station  

E-print Network

aspects a. Complete energy survey of all faci- lities whose utilities the city pays to Valerie Bauer Chairman College Station Energy Hanagement Committee College Station, TX establish load reduction possibilities. b. Sub-station load surveillance... and sys- tem voltage control. (3) Personal discussions with the ten largest consumers on short-range load reduction opportunities and long-term conservation. (4) Conunercial customers a. Mailing campaign to 480 commercial demand accounts. b. Two...

Hecox, O. D.; Bauer, V.

1985-01-01

335

KSC-03PD-1467  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Valerie Cassanto, Instrumentation Technology Associates, Inc., studies one of the experiments carried on mission STS-107. Several experiments were found during the search for Columbia debris. Included in the Commercial ITA Biomedical Experiments payload on mission STS-107 are urokinase cancer research, microencapsulation of drugs, the Growth of Bacterial Biofilm on Surfaces during Spaceflight (GOBBSS), and tin crystal formation. The latter was sponsored by the Pembroke Pines Charter Middle School.

2003-01-01

336

KSC-03PD-1462  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - From left, Valerie Cassanto, Instrumentation Technology Associates, Inc., and Dr. Dennis Morrison, NASA Johnson Space Center, analyze one of the experiments carried on mission STS-107. Several experiments were found during the search for Columbia debris. Included in the Commercial ITA Biomedical Experiments payload on mission STS-107 are urokinase cancer research, microencapsulation of drugs, the Growth of Bacterial Biofilm on Surfaces during Spaceflight (GOBBSS), and tin crystal formation.

2003-01-01

337

KSC-03PD-1470  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - From left, Bob McLean, Southwest Texas State University, and Valerie Cassanto, Instrumentation Technology Associates, Inc., study one of the experiments carried on mission STS-107. Several experiments were found during the search for Columbia debris. Included in the Commercial ITA Biomedical Experiments payload on mission STS-107 are urokinase cancer research, microencapsulation of drugs, the Growth of Bacterial Biofilm on Surfaces during Spaceflight (GOBBSS), and tin crystal formation.

2003-01-01

338

KSC-03PD-1454  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Valerie Cassanto, with Instrumentation Technology Associates, Inc., and Bob McLean, from the Southwest Texas State University, work on an experiment found during the search for Columbia debris. Included in the Commercial ITA Biomedical Experiments payload on mission STS-107 are urokinase cancer research, microencapsulation of drugs, the Growth of Bacterial Biofilm on Surfaces during Spaceflight (GOBBSS), and tin crystal formation.

2003-01-01

339

KSC-03PD-1456  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Valerie Cassanto, with Instrumentation Technology Associates, Inc., examines closely the container containing one of the experiments carried on mission STS-107. Several experiments were found during the search for Columbia debris. Included in the Commercial ITA Biomedical Experiments payload on mission STS-107 are urokinase cancer research, microencapsulation of drugs, the Growth of Bacterial Biofilm on Surfaces during Spaceflight (GOBBSS), and tin crystal formation.

2003-01-01

340

KSC-03PD-1459  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - From left, Bob McLean, Southwest Texas State University; Valerie Cassanto, Instrumentation Technology Associates, Inc.; and Dennis Morrison, NASA Johnson Space Center, process one of the experiments carried on mission STS-107. Several experiments were found during the search for Columbia debris. Included in the Commercial ITA Biomedical Experiments payload on mission STS-107 are urokinase cancer research, microencapsulation of drugs, the Growth of Bacterial Biofilm on Surfaces during Spaceflight (GOBBSS), and tin crystal formation.

2003-01-01

341

KSC-03PD-1452  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Valerie Cassanto and Bob McLean talk to a reporter about experiments found during the search for Columbia debris. Cassanto is with Instrumentation Technology Associates Inc. and McLean is with the Southwest Texas State University. Included in the Commercial ITA Biomedical Experiments payload on mission STS-107 are urokinase cancer research, microencapsulation of drugs, the Growth of Bacterial Biofilm on Surfaces during Spaceflight (GOBBSS), and tin crystal formation.

2003-01-01

342

Adapting a delay-based protocol to heterogeneous environments  

E-print Network

of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved by: Co-Chairs of Committee, A. L. Narasimha Reddy Riccardo Bettati Committee Members, Dmitri Loguinov Head of Department, Valerie E. Taylor August 2008 Major Subject: Computer Engineering iii ABSTRACT Adapting a Delay...-based Protocol to Heterogeneous Environments. (August 2008) Kiran Kotla, B.E., Birla Institute of Technology and Science, Pilani, India CoChairs of Advisory Committee: Dr A. L. Narasimha Reddy Dr Riccardo Bettati We investigate the issues in making a delay...

Kotla, Kiran

2008-10-10

343

Reading homoeroticism in early modern England: Imaginations, interpretations, circulations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Valerie Traub, Desire and Anxiety: Circulations of Sexuality in Shakespearean Drama (London and New York: Routledge, 1992), 182 pp., 35.00 (hardback), 9.99 (paperback)Bruce R. Smith, Homosexual Desire in Shakespeare's England: A Cultural Poetics (Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 1991), 329 pp., 29.95 (hardback)Gregory W. Bredbeck, Sodomy and Interpretation: Marlowe to Milton (Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press, 1991),

Mario Digangi

1993-01-01

344

Friends of Zoellner Arts Center LEHIGH UNIVERSITY 1 Leadership funding from  

E-print Network

/S and Anthony Calabrese '84G '07P Joan E. and Bobb Carson 'F/S ++ Maria K. '87 and John R. Chrin '85 '86 '10P and James B. Edwards Nora A. and Mohamed S. El-Aasser 'F/S ++ Valerie Johnson and Patrick V. Farrell 'F '59 '84P '89P 'F/S Susan F. '77G and Robert E. Gadomski ++ Linda L. and Peter M. Gilbert 'F/S Carolyn

Gilchrist, James F.

345

Friends of Zoellner Arts Center LEHIGH UNIVERSITY 1 Leadership Funding From  

E-print Network

. Fishman and Paul R. Brown `F/S Kathy N. `F/S and Anthony Calabrese `84G `07P Evelyn and Anthony M Jamie P. Musselman and James B. Edwards `F Nora A. and Mohamed S. El-Aasser `F/S ++ Valerie Johnson. `03H and W. Beall Fowler `59 `84P `89P `F/S Nikola and Todd M. Freeman `82 Susan F. `77G and Robert E

Napier, Terrence

346

those density layers from lighted surface waters. Thus, elemental constituents locked into eddies by  

E-print Network

-Nelson, K. O. Buesseler, D. M. Karl, J. Andrews, Deep-Sea Res. I 48, 2595 (2001). 19. L. W. Juranek, P. D,8 William J. Jenkins,1 Rodney Johnson,2 Valery K. Kosnyrev,1 James R. Ledwell,1 Qian P. Li,8 David A Sensing 28, 466 (2002). 6. M. P. Seki et al., Geophys. Res. Lett. 28, 1583 (2001). 7. R. Vaillancourt, J

California at Santa Barbara, University of

347

Physicochemical, digestibility and structural characteristics of starch isolated from banana cultivars.  

PubMed

Banana starches from diverse varieties (Macho, Morado, Valery and Enano Gigante) were studied in their physicochemical, structural and digestibility features. X-ray diffraction indicated that the banana starches present a B-type crystallinity pattern, with slight difference in the crystallinity level. Macho and Enano Gigante starches showed the highest pasting temperatures (79 and 78C, respectively), whilst Valery and Morado varieties presented a slight breakdown and higher setback than the formers. Morado starch presented the highest solubility value and Valery starch the lowest one. The swelling pattern of the banana starches was in agreement with their pasting profile. All banana starches showed a shear-thinning profile. The resistant starch (RS) fraction was the main fraction in the uncooked banana starches. Morado variety showed the highest amount of slowly digestible starch (SDS) and the lowest RS content reported until now in banana starches. Banana starch cooked samples presented an important amount of SDS and RS. Molecular weight and gyration radius of the four banana starches ranged between 2.88-3.1410(8)g/mol and 286-302nm, respectively. The chain-length distributions of banana amylopectin showed that B1 chains (DP 13-24) is the main fraction, and an important amount of long chains (DP?37) are present. The information generated from this study can be useful to determine banana varieties for starch isolation with specific functionality. PMID:25839789

Agama-Acevedo, Edith; Nuez-Santiago, Maria C; Alvarez-Ramirez, Jos; Bello-Prez, Luis A

2015-06-25

348

Exploring the variability in how educators attend to science classroom interactions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Many researchers assert educators must develop a shared instructional vision in order for schools to be effective. While this research tends to focus on educators' alignment around goals of science classrooms, I argue that we can't assume that educators agree on what they see when they look at science classrooms. In this dissertation, I explore the variability in what teachers and leaders notice in science classroom episodes and how they reason about what they notice. I ground my studies in real classroom practice: a videotaped lesson in the first study and a live classroom observation in the second. In Chapter 2, I discuss the importance of grounding discussions about teaching and learning in classroom artifacts, a commitment that motivates my dissertation: educators may have a shared vision when discussing teaching and learning in the abstract but disagree about whether that vision is being realized in a classroom. I then describe and analyze the video clip I used in my interviews, highlighting moments that I consider to be good teaching and learning. In Chapter 3, I present my first study, in which I showed this episode to 15 different science teachers, science instructional leaders, and principals. I found that participants attended to many different features in the episode, which led to significant disagreement about what is happening in the episode. Additionally, I found that these differences in attention corresponded to differences in how participants were framing the activity of watching the clip. In Chapter 4, I explore the attentional variability of one science instructional leader, Valerie, in multiple contexts. In addition to interviewing Valerie about the videotaped lesson, I also observed Valerie engage in an "observation cycle" with a teacher. Even though Valerie is quite skilled at attending to student thinking in some contexts, I found that Valerie's attention is strongly context-dependent and gets pulled away from students' scientific thinking when she uses a district mandated form. Finally, in Chapter 5 I summarize my findings and describe the implications my work has for both research and practice.

Gillespie, Colleen Elizabeth

349

China Forest Aboveground Biomass Estimation by Fusion of Inventory and Remote Sensing Data: 1st results from Heilongjiang Province and Yunnan Province  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Forests play an irreplaceable role in maintaining regional ecological environment, global carbon balance and mitigating global climate change. Forest aboveground biomass (AGB) is an important indicator of forest carbon stocks. Estimating forest aboveground biomass accurately could significantly reduce the uncertainties in terrestrial ecosystem carbon cycle. LIDAR provides accurate information on the vertical structure of forests (Lefsky et al., 2007; Naesset et al., 2004; Pang et al., 2008). Combining airborne LiDAR and spaceborne LiDAR for regional forest biomass retrieval could provide a more reliable and accurate quantitative information in regional forest biomass estimate (Boudreau et al., 2008; Nelson et al., 2009; Pang et al., 2011; Saatchi et al., 2011). The Heilongjiang Province and Yunnan Province are rich in forest resources and suffers intensive forest management activities for timber products. The Heilongjiang Province is typical in temperate forest and the Yunnan Province contains multiple forest types including tropical forest. These two provinces also have good ground inventory system with thousands of permanent field plots. Two campaign consists of in-situ measurement, airborne Lidar data and spaceborne data fusion were designed and implemented. First results show that i). Both spaceborne lidar and forest inventory data are useful for AGB mapping at province level. ii). The combination of spaceborne lidar and forest inventory data gave better biomass estimation with less bias. iii). A pixel level bias mapping was also proposed and gave spatial explicit map of estimation uncertainties. This method will be investigated further with more reference data and tested in other area.

Pang, Y.; Li, Z.; Huang, G.; Sun, G.; Cheng, Z.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, G.

2013-12-01

350

Performance and muscle architecture comparisons between starters and nonstarters in National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I women's soccer.  

PubMed

This study compared performance and muscle architecture (MA) changes in starters (S) and nonstarters (NS) during a National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I women's soccer season. Twenty-eight women (19.9 1.1 years; 1.71 0.08 m; 64.7 6.4 kg) were monitored for vertical jump power (VJP), repeated line drills (LDs), 3-dimensional multiple object tracking (3D-MOT), and reaction time (RT) at preseason, midseason, and postseason. Muscle architecture changes using ultrasonography were assessed at preseason and postseason. Comparisons between S (n = 11; 70.0 14.6 min per game) and NS (n = 17; 8.4 8.0 min per game) were performed to make magnitude-based inferences. No differences were seen in VJP during the season in either group. Starters were more likely (81.1%) to decrease LD time than NS, with no differences in fatigue rate. Starters and NS improved 3D-MOT (1.14 0.41 to 1.55 0.43) and RT (0.37 0.05 to 0.34 0.33 seconds), with no differences between groups. Rectus femoris (RF) echo intensity improved (65.57 1.50 to 61.26 1.59) in both groups, with no interactions observed. Cross-sectional area (20.84 3.58 to 21.46 3.66 cm) increased and pennation angle (PANG) (12.58 2.56 to 11.78 2.03) decreased for both groups in the vastus lateralis (VL). Muscle architecture comparisons between groups revealed S likely decreased VL muscle thickness (MT) and PANG (81.6 and 79.4%, respectively) and possibly decreased RF MT and PANG (65.7 and 59.4%, respectively) when compared with NS. Results indicate that VJP and LD fatigue rate are not changed during a competitive season, but S become faster than NS. Three-dimensional multiple object tracking and RT improve regardless of playing time. Changes in MA indicate that practices alone provide sufficient stimulus for improving muscle quality during the competitive season. PMID:23719503

Jajtner, Adam R; Hoffman, Jay R; Scanlon, Tyler C; Wells, Adam J; Townsend, Jeremy R; Beyer, Kyle S; Mangine, Gerald T; McCormack, William P; Bohner, Jonathan D; Fragala, Maren S; Stout, Jeffery R

2013-09-01

351

Low LBNP tolerance in men is associated with attenuated activation of the renin-angiotensin system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Plasma vasoactive hormone concentrations [epinephrine (p(Epi)), norepinephrine (p(NE)), ANG II (p(ANG II)), vasopressin (p(VP)), endothelin-1 (p(ET-1))] and plasma renin activity (p(RA)) were measured periodically and compared during lower body negative pressure (LBNP) to test the hypothesis that responsiveness of the renin-angiotensin system, the latter being one of the most powerful vasoconstrictors in the body, is of major importance for LBNP tolerance. Healthy men on a controlled diet (2,822 cal/day, 2 mmol. kg(-1). day(-1) Na(+)) were exposed to 30 min of LBNP from -15 to -50 mmHg. LBNP was uneventful for seven men [25 +/- 2 yr, high-tolerance (HiTol) group], but eight men (26 +/- 3 yr) reached presyncope after 11 +/- 1 min [P < 0.001, low-tolerance (LoTol) group]. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) did not change measurably, but central venous pressure and left atrial diameter decreased similarly in both groups (5-6 mmHg, by approximately 30%, P < 0.05). Control (0 mmHg LBNP) hormone concentrations were similar between groups, however, p(RA) differed between them (LoTol 0.6 +/- 0.1, HiTol 1.2 +/- 0.1 ng ANG I. ml(-1). h(-1), P < 0.05). LBNP increased (P < 0. 05) p(RA) and p(ANG II), respectively, more in the HiTol group (9.9 +/- 2.2 ng ANG I. ml(-1). h(-1) and 58 +/- 12 pg/ml) than in LoTol subjects (4.3 +/- 0.9 ng ANG I. ml(-1). h(-1) and 28 +/- 6 pg/ml). In contrast, the increase in p(VP) was higher (P < 0.05) in the LoTol than in the HiTol group. The increases (P < 0.05) for p(NE) were nonsignificant between groups, and p(ET-1) remained unchanged. Thus there may be a causal relationship between attenuated activation of p(RA) and p(ANG II) and presyncope, with p(VP) being a possible cofactor. Measurement of resting p(RA) may be of predictive value for those with lower hypotensive tolerance.

Greenleaf, J. E.; Petersen, T. W.; Gabrielsen, A.; Pump, B.; Bie, P.; Christensen, N. J.; Warberg, J.; Videbaek, R.; Simonson, S. R.; Norsk, P.

2000-01-01

352

Special issue on Laser Biophotonics, dedicated to the seventieth birthday of V.V. Tuchin  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Prominent Researcher and Educator, Honoured Scientist of the Russian Federation, Professor Valery V. Tuchin celebrated his seventieth birthday this year. V.V. Tuchin heads the Department of Optics and Biophotonics at N.G. Chernyshevsky Saratov State University and the Laboratory of Laser Diagnostics of Technical and Living Systems at the Institute of Precise Mechanics and Control of the Russian Academy of Sciences. He is a Vice-President of the Russian Photobiology Society. V.V. Tuchin is widely known for his achievements in optics of biological tissues, in developing methods of optical and laser measurements in biomedicine and nanobiophotonics, and in many other fields.

Priezzhev, A. V.; Bashkatov, A. N.; Genina, E. A.

2014-07-01

353

Techniques in Active and Generic Software Libraries  

E-print Network

of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Chair of Committee, Jaakko J?arvi Committee Members, Gabriel Dos Reis Thomas Ioerger Paul Gratz Head of Department, Valerie Taylor May 2010 Major Subject: Computer Science iii ABSTRACT Techniques in Active and Generic... at the end of a multiyear journey into computer science ? especially software engineering and the development of software libraries. I would like to thank my adviser Dr. Jaakko J?arvi first and foremost. Little does he know that it was reading his papers (and...

Smith, Jacob N.

2010-07-14

354

STS-96 FD Highlights and Crew Activities Report: Flight Day 01  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

On this first day of the STS-96 Discovery mission, the flight crew, Commander Kent V. Rominger, Pilot Rick D. Husband, and Mission Specialists Ellen Ochoa, Tamara E. Jernigan, Daniel T. Barry, Julie Payette, and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev are seen performing pre-launch activities such as eating the traditional breakfast, crew suit-up, and the ride out to the launch pad. Also, included are various panoramic views of the shuttle on the pad. The crew is readied in the 'white room' for their mission. After the closing of the hatch and arm retraction, launch activities are shown including countdown, engine ignition, launch, and the separation of the Solid Rocket Boosters.

1999-01-01

355

Improved Management of Diabetes Report from the Diabetes Working Group  

E-print Network

The BC Diabetes Business Plan was funded by a public-private partnership of the BC Ministries of Health Planning and Health Services, and Novartis Pharmaceuticals Canada. While this report was prepared by Sierra Systems, it is important to recognize all the partners who without their involvement, this document could not have been produced. We want to thank our partners, the members of the Diabetes Working Group, Novartis, and the BC Ministries of Health. Special acknowledgements to Howard Platt and the Utilization Management Branch, Valerie

Deborah Shera; Epidemiology Branch; Paul Lam; Information Management Branch; Angela Micco

356

Two Case Studies on Vision-based Moving Objects Measurement  

E-print Network

of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved by: Co-Chairs of Committee, Dezhen Song Wei Yan Committee Member, Ricardo Gutierrez-Osuna Head of Department, Valerie Taylor August 2011 Major Subject: Computer Engineering iii ABSTRACT Two Case Studies on Vision...-based Moving Objects Measurement. (August 2011) Ji Zhang, B.E., Tsinghua University Co{Chairs of Advisory Committee: Dr. Dezhen Song Dr. Wei Yan In this thesis, we presented two case studies on vision-based moving objects measure- ment. In the rst case...

Zhang, Ji

2012-10-19

357

STAG UK Newsletter Issue 24  

E-print Network

(:.lmont and thinl.': she's perceptivo to notic" tho similari tics between Kirk and Spock, and. Starsky and Hutch. UFOs This sub;ject has brought in a fair number of oommunts this timiJ, again. Valerie H8.rrison wri tos I saw something strange onco that wus r8... Horse' especially made an improssion on mo, and I passed it on to a couple of friends who also found it 14 intoresting and rathor eerie. Very briefly, tho thorne of tho book is that UFOs, together '1:i th every other strange phetlomlonon, including...

1977-01-01

358

Fine scale mapping of the 5q11.2 breast cancer locus reveals at least three independent risk variants regulating MAP3K1.  

E-print Network

,16 Isabel dos-Santos-Silva,16 Olivia Fletcher,17 Nichola Johnson,17 Paul D.P. Pharoah,2,3 Manjeet K. Bolla3, Qin Wang3, Joe Dennis3, Elinor J. Sawyer18, Ian Tomlinson,19 Michael J. Kerin,20 Nicola Miller,20 Barbara Burwinkel,21 Frederik Marme,21... Jan Lubinski,134 Katarzyna 3 Jaworska,134 Katarzyna Durda,134 Suleeporn Sangrajrang,135 Valerie Gaborieau,136 Paul Brennan,136 James McKay,136 Curtis Olswold,76 Susan Slager,76 Amanda E. Toland,137 Drakoulis Yannoukakos,138 Chen-Yang Shen,139...

Glubb, Dylan M; Maranian, Mel J; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Pooley, Karen A; Meyer, Kerstin B; Kar, Siddhartha; Carlebur, Saskia; O'Reilly, Martin; Betts, Joshua A.; Hillman, Kristine M.; Kaufmann, Susanne; Beesley, Jonathan; Canisius, Sander; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Tsimiklis, Helen; Apicella, Carmel; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Hogervorst, Frans B; van der Schoot, C Ellen; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Fasching, Peter A.; Ruebner, Matthias; Ekic, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Peto, Julian; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J.; Miller, Nicola; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Yang, Rongxi; Surowy, Harald; Gunel, Pascal; Truong, Thrse; Menegaux, Florence; Sanchez, Marie; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Brge G.; Nielsen, Sune F; Flyger, Henrik; Gonzlez-Neira, Anna; Benitez, Javier; Zamora, M. Pilar; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Brning, Thomas; The GENICA Network; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A.; Aittomki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Tanaka, Hideo; Drk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Helbig, Sonja; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; kConFab Investigators; Wu, Anna H.; Tseng, Chiu-chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O.; Lambrechts, Diether; Zhao, Hui; Weltens, Caroline; van Limbergen, Erik; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Barile, Monica; Capra, Fabio; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Hallberg, Emily; Vachon, Celine; Giles, Graham G.; Milne, Roger L.; McLean, Catriona; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Marchand, Loic Le; Simard, Jacques; Goldberg, Mark S.; Labrche, France; Dumont, Martine; Teo, Soo Hwang; YIP, Cheng Har; See, Mee-Hoong; Cornes, Belinda; CHENG, Ching-Yu; Ikram, M. Kamran; Kristensen, Vessela; NBCS; Zheng, Wei; Halverson, Sandra L.; Shrubsole, Martha; Long, Jirong; Winqvist, Robert; Pylks, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kauppila, Saila; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A.E.M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Van Asperen, Christi J.; Garca-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Mikael; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Martens, John W.M.; Colle, J. Margriet; Hall, Per; Li, Jingmei; Humphreys, Keith; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Blot, William; Signorello, Lisa B.; Cai, Qiuyin; Shah, Mitul; Ghoussaini, Maya; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Park, Sue K.; Noh, Dong-Young; Hartman, Mikael; Miao, Hui; Lim, Wei Yen; Tang, Anthony; Hamann, Ute; Torres, Diana; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James; Olswold, Curtis; Slager, Susan; Toland, Amanda E.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Shen, Chen-Yang; Wu, Pei-Ei; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hou, Ming-Feng; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Jones, Michael; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M. Rosario; lvarez, Nuria; Herrero, Daniel; Tessier, Daniel C.; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Ahmed, Shahana; Healey, Catherine S.; Brown, Melissa A.; Ponder, Bruce A.J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Thompson, Deborah J.; Edwards, Stacey L.; Easton, Douglas F.; Dunning, Alison M.; French, Juliet D.

2015-12-18

359

Fine scale mapping of the 5q11.2 breast cancer locus reveals at least three independent risk variants regulating MAP3K1  

E-print Network

,16 Isabel dos-Santos-Silva,16 Olivia Fletcher,17 Nichola Johnson,17 Paul D.P. Pharoah,2,3 Manjeet K. Bolla3, Qin Wang3, Joe Dennis3, Elinor J. Sawyer18, Ian Tomlinson,19 Michael J. Kerin,20 Nicola Miller,20 Barbara Burwinkel,21 Frederik Marme,21... Jan Lubinski,134 Katarzyna 3 Jaworska,134 Katarzyna Durda,134 Suleeporn Sangrajrang,135 Valerie Gaborieau,136 Paul Brennan,136 James McKay,136 Curtis Olswold,76 Susan Slager,76 Amanda E. Toland,137 Drakoulis Yannoukakos,138 Chen-Yang Shen,139...

Glubb, Dylan M.; Maranian, Mel J.; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Pooley, Karen A.; Meyer, Kerstin B.; Kar, Siddhartha; Carlebur, Saskia; O'Reilly, Martin; Betts, Joshua A.; Hillman, Kristine M.; Kaufmann, Susanne; Beesley, Jonathan; Canisius, Sander; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Tsimiklis, Helen; Apicella, Carmel; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Hogervorst, Frans B.; van der Schoot, C. Ellen; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Fasching, Peter A.; Ruebner, Matthias; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Peto, Julian; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J.; Miller, Nicola; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Yang, Rongxi; Surowy, Harald; Gunel, Pascal; Truong, Thrse; Menegaux, Florence; Sanchez, Marie; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Brge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; Gonzlez-Neira, Anna; Benitez, Javier; Zamora, M. Pilar; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Brning, Thomas; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A.; Aittomki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Tanaka, Hideo; Drk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Helbig, Sonja; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Wu, Anna H.; Tseng, Chiu-chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O.; Lambrechts, Diether; Zhao, Hui; Weltens, Caroline; van Limbergen, Erik; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Barile, Monica; Capra, Fabio; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Hallberg, Emily; Vachon, Celine; Giles, Graham G.; Milne, Roger L.; McLean, Catriona; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Simard, Jacques; Goldberg, Mark S.; Labrche, France; Dumont, Martine; Teo, Soo Hwang; Yip, Cheng Har; See, Mee-Hoong; Cornes, Belinda; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Ikram, M. Kamran; Kristensen, Vessela; Zheng, Wei; Halverson, Sandra L.; Shrubsole, Martha; Long, Jirong; Winqvist, Robert; Pylks, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kauppila, Saila; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A. E. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Van Asperen, Christi J.; Garca-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Czene, Kamila; Klevebring, Daniel; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Martens, John W. M.; Colle, J. Margriet; Hall, Per; Li, Jingmei; Humphreys, Keith; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Blot, William; Signorello, Lisa B.; Cai, Qiuyin; Shah, Mitul; Ghoussaini, Maya; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Park, Sue K.; Noh, Dong-Young; Hartman, Mikael; Miao, Hui; Lim, Wei Yen; Tang, Anthony; Hamann, Ute; Torres, Diana; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James; Olswold, Curtis; Slager, Susan; Toland, Amanda E.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Shen, Chen-Yang; Wu, Pei-Ei; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hou, Ming-Feng; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Jones, Michael; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M. Rosario; lvarez, Nuria; Herrero, Daniel; Tessier, Daniel C.; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Ahmed, Shahana; Healey, Catherine S.; Brown, Melissa A.; Ponder, Bruce A. J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Thompson, Deborah J.; Edwards, Stacey L.; Easton, Douglas F.; Dunning, Alison M.; French, Juliet D.

360

KSC-03PD-1466  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - From left, Barry Perlman, Pembroke Pines Charter Middle School in Florida, and Valerie Cassanto, Instrumentation Technology Associates, Inc., analyze one of the experiments carried on mission STS-107. Several experiments were found during the search for Columbia debris. Included in the Commercial ITA Biomedical Experiments payload on mission STS-107 are urokinase cancer research, microencapsulation of drugs, the Growth of Bacterial Biofilm on Surfaces during Spaceflight (GOBBSS), and tin crystal formation. The latter was sponsored by the Pembroke Pines Charter Middle School.

2003-01-01

361

KSC-03PD-1469  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - From left, Barry Perlman, Pembroke Pines Charter Middle School in Florida; Valerie Cassanto, Instrumentation Technology Associates, Inc.; and Dr. Dennis Morrison, NASA Johnson Space Center, process one of the experiments carried on mission STS-107. Several experiments were found during the search for Columbia debris. Included in the Commercial ITA Biomedical Experiments payload on mission STS-107 are urokinase cancer research, microencapsulation of drugs, the Growth of Bacterial Biofilm on Surfaces during Spaceflight (GOBBSS), and tin crystal formation. The latter was sponsored by the Pembroke Pines Charter Middle School.

2003-01-01

362

KSC-03PD-1465  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - From left, Barry Perlman, Pembroke Pines Charter Middle School in Florida, and Valerie Cassanto, Instrumentation Technology Associates, Inc., process one of the experiments carried on mission STS-107. Several experiments were found during the search for Columbia debris. Included in the Commercial ITA Biomedical Experiments payload on mission STS-107 are urokinase cancer research, microencapsulation of drugs, the Growth of Bacterial Biofilm on Surfaces during Spaceflight (GOBBSS), and tin crystal formation. The latter was sponsored by the Pembroke Pines Charter Middle School.

2003-01-01

363

KSC-03PD-1464  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - From left, Barry Perlman, Pembroke Pines Charter Middle School in Florida, and Valerie Cassanto, Instrumentation Technology Associates, Inc., process one of the experiments carried on mission STS-107. Several experiments were found during the search for Columbia debris. Included in the Commercial ITA Biomedical Experiments payload on mission STS-107 are urokinase cancer research, microencapsulation of drugs, the Growth of Bacterial Biofilm on Surfaces during Spaceflight (GOBBSS), and tin crystal formation. The latter was sponsored by the Pembroke Pines Charter Middle School.

2003-01-01

364

STS-91 Day 08 Highlights  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

On this eighth day of the STS-91 mission, the flight crew, Cmdr. Charles J. Precourt, Pilot Dominic L. Pudwill Gorie and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, Janet L. Kavandi, and Valery Victorovitch Ryumin focus on science investigations and participate in several special interviews and phone calls. Following yesterday's undocking with the Russian Mir space station, crew members are given a couple of hours off duty during the day to provide a brief rest break from the hectic pace of their flight.

1998-01-01

365

Imaging and Computational Methods for Exploring Sub-cellular Anatomy  

E-print Network

of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Chair of Committee, John Keyser Committee Members, Yoonsuck Choe Louise Abbott Donald House Head of Department, Valerie Taylor May 2009 Major Subject: Computer Science iii ABSTRACT Imaging... that doesn?t always cooperate; Louise for walking me through everything I?ve ever learned about biology and neuroanatomy; and Don for being the best lecturer I?ve had and teaching me everything I know about Physically Based Modeling. I would also like...

Mayerich, David

2010-01-16

366

STAG UK Newsletter Issue 49  

E-print Network

committee all the best for the future, and He knoH that you Vlill continue to support them as you have supported us. LL&P Janet, Sheila & Valerie Late info: Los Angeles ~'im()s 14.9.81 (info lIierlynn Brown) ~'REKKIE TALK: Nicholas 11eyer, Vlho wrote..., Bristol 7. VlAWrED: iillything to do wi th Gerry Anderson's 1'. V. series, especially: Thunderbirds" Captain Scar18t, Joe 90, and, also T.V, 21 comics, models, books, photos, badges, the lot. Nicholas Luxton, I'he Platt, St John's Rd., 11il1brook...

1981-01-01

367

STS-96 Crew Training  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The training for the crew members of the STS-96 Discovery Shuttle is presented. Crew members are Kent Rominger, Commander; Rick Husband, Pilot; Mission Specialists, Tamara Jernigan, Ellen Ochoa, and Daniel Barry; Julie Payette, Mission Specialist (CSA); and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev, Mission Specialist (RSA). Scenes show the crew sitting and talking about the Electrical Power System; actively taking part in virtual training in the EVA Training VR (Virtual Reality) Lab; using the Orbit Space Vision Training System; being dropped in water as a part of the Bail-Out Training Program; and taking part in the crew photo session.

1999-01-01

368

Ponderable soliton stars  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The theory of Lee and Pang (1987), who obtained solutions for soliton stars composed of zero-temperature fermions and bosons, is applied here to quark soliton stars. Model soliton stars based on a simple physical model of the proton are computed, and the properties of the solitons are discussed, including the important problem of the existence of a limiting mass and thus the possible formation of black holes of primordial origin. It is shown that there is a definite mass limit for ponderable soliton stars, so that during cooling a soliton star might reach a stage beyond which no equilibrium configuration exists and the soliton star probably will collapse to become a black hole. The radiation of ponderable soliton stars may alter the short-wavelength character of the cosmic background radiation, and may be observed as highly redshifted objects at z of about 100,000.

Chiu, Hong-Yee

1990-01-01

369

Insights from Melvin-Kerr-Newman spacetimes  

E-print Network

We examine several aspects of black hole physics using the Melvin-Kerr-Newman (MKN) family of spacetimes. Roughly speaking these are black holes immersed in a distorting background magnetic field and unlike the standard Kerr-Newman (KN) family they are not asymptotically flat. Among other properties we see that their angular momentum and charge are bounded by horizon area in exactly the same way as KN and also that they obey the uniqueness theorems for extremal horizons: these properties are in accord with standard theorems but are seen to be satisfied in interesting and non-trivial ways. Horizon geometries are compared to KN horizons with equal area, charge and angular momentum. Finally we calculate the energy of these distorted black holes using the isolated horizon, Komar and recently proposed Gibbons-Pang-Pope procedures. Disagreements between these methods highlight the inherent ambiguities in attempting to define energy and other physical properties for a non-asymptotically flat spacetime.

Ivan Booth; Matthew Hunt; Alberto Palomo-Lozano; Hari K. Kunduri

2015-02-25

370

Uncertainty estimates for the Bayes Inference Engine, (BIE)  

SciTech Connect

In the fall 2007 meeting of the BIB users group, two approaches to making uncertainty estimates were presented. Ken Hanson asserted that if the BFGS optimizer was used, the inverse Hessian matrix was the same as the covariance matrix representing parameter uncertainties. John Pang presented preliminary results of a Monte Carlo method called Randomized Maximum Likelihood (RML). The BFGS/Hessian matrix approach may be applied to the region of the 'ideal model' Approximately 250 parameters describing the object density patches that are varied to match an image of 1,000,000 pixels. I cast this in terms of least squares analysis, as it is much better understood. This not as large a conceptual jump as some suppose because many of the functional blocks in the BIB are taken directly from existing least squares programs. If a Gaussian (normal) probability density function is assumed for both the observation and parameter errors, the Bayesian and least squares result should be identical.

Beery, Thomas A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01

371

A cell-permeable inhibitor to trap G?q proteins in the empty pocket conformation.  

PubMed

In spite of the crucial role of heterotrimeric G proteins as molecular switches transmitting signals from G protein-coupled receptors, their selective manipulation with small molecule, cell-permeable inhibitors still remains an unmet challenge. Here, we report that the small molecule BIM-46187, previously classified as pan-G protein inhibitor, preferentially silences G?q signaling in a cellular context-dependent manner. Investigations into its mode of action reveal that BIM traps G?q in the empty pocket conformation by permitting GDP exit but interdicting GTP entry, a molecular mechanism not yet assigned to any other small molecule G? inhibitor to date. Our data show that G? proteins may be "frozen" pharmacologically in an intermediate conformation along their activation pathway and propose a pharmacological strategy to specifically silence G? subclasses with cell-permeable inhibitors. PMID:25036778

Schmitz, Anna-Lena; Schrage, Ramona; Gaffal, Evelyn; Charpentier, Thomas H; Wiest, Johannes; Hiltensperger, Georg; Morschel, Julia; Hennen, Stephanie; Huler, Daniela; Horn, Velten; Wenzel, Daniela; Grundmann, Manuel; Bllesbach, Katrin M; Schrder, Ralf; Brewitz, H Henning; Schmidt, Johannes; Gomeza, Jess; Gals, Cline; Fleischmann, Bernd K; Tting, Thomas; Imhof, Diana; Tietze, Daniel; Gtschow, Michael; Holzgrabe, Ulrike; Sondek, John; Harden, T Kendall; Mohr, Klaus; Kostenis, Evi

2014-07-17

372

Spinal Cord Injury without Radiographic Abnormality (SCIWORA) Clinical and Radiological Aspects  

PubMed Central

Summary The acronym SCIWORA (Spinal Cord Injury Without Radiographic Abnormality) was first developed and introduced by Pang and Wilberger who used it to define clinical symptoms of traumatic myelopathy with no radiographic or computed tomographic features of spinal fracture or instability. SCIWORA is a clinical-radiological condition that mostly affects children. SCIWORA lesions are found mainly in the cervical spine but can also be seen, although much less frequently, in the thoracic or lumbar spine. Based on reports from different authors, SCIWORA is responsible for 6 to 19% and 9% to 14% of spinal injuries in children and adults, respectively. Underlying degenerative changes, including spondylosis or spinal canal stenosis, are typically present in adult patients. The level of spinal cord injury corresponds to the location of these changes. With recent advances in neuroimaging techniques, especially in magnetic resonance imaging, and with increasing availability of MRI as a diagnostic tool, the overall detection rate of SCIWORA has significantly improved. PMID:25505497

Szwedowski, Dawid; Walecki, Jerzy

2014-01-01

373

An Analysis of Historical Records of Solar Variability, Volcanic Eruptions, and Climate Change in the Last Millennium  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Studying past climate changes can help us better understand present natural variations and predict future trends. However, various reconstructions of the climate of the last 1000 years have given only broad similarities [Briffa, JGR 106, 2929, 2001]. The variances are partly due to uncertainties in the past radiative and aerosol forcing, and gaps in regional coverage. Another outstanding question is whether we are in a time similar to the Medieval Warm Period. From the frequencies of sunspot and aurora sightings, abundance of carbon-14 in the rings of long-lived trees, and beryllium-10 in the annual layers of polar ice cores, we have reconstructed the recent history of a variable Sun. In the past 1800 years the Sun has gone through nine cycles of changes in brightness. While these long-term changes account for less than 1% of the total irradiance, there is clear evidence that they affect the climate [Pang and Yau, Eos, 83, No. 43, 481, 2002]. We have analyzed Chinese historical weather records to fill the data void in this region. Reports of unseasonable cold are classified by the degree of severity: (1) Late (April-June) or early (July-Sept) killing frosts; (2) Bitter cold/heavy snowfall; and (3) heavy sustained snowfall, bitter cold with frozen wells, lakes, rivers, and icebound seas. The latter cases were often widespread and multi-year. All categories occurred most frequently during the coldest part of the Little Ice Age, with the coldest episodes in 1652-54, 1656, 1664, 1670-72, 1676-77, 1683, 1688-91, 1716 and 1718-19. They thus coincide with Maunder Minimum (1645-1715), when very few sunspots were seen-about one in ten years from China or Europe-indicative of a weakened Sun. There was only one Category 3 episode between the Maunder and Dalton Minima-in 1761, and two in the Dalton Minimum (1795-1825)-in 1796 and 1814-7. Analysis of proxy data has shown that the 1810's were among the coldest years in Europe [Briffa and Jones, in ``The Year Without a Summer,'' C.R. Harrignton, ed., 1992]. Large eruptions, of an unknown volcano in 1809 [Dai, JGR 96, 17361, 1991], at Mayon in 1814, and at Tambora in 1815, with the reduced solar luminosity seem to have been responsible. The Sun has slowly brightened since the Dalton Minimum. However, the climate of China remained cold through the 19th century, consistent with world climate trend [Bradley and Jones, Holocene 3, 367, 1993], possibly due to increased volcanic aerosol loading of the atmosphere [Sato, JGR 98, 22987, 1993]. In the 200 years prior to the Maunder Minimum, there was at least one other major planetwide volcanically forced cold episode-in 1453-54. The climate of China appears to have been warm during the Late 14th-Century Solar Maximum (1350-1410). We have found only one report of early killing frost-in May, 1993. It then turned cold during the Sporer Minimum (140-1590) [Pang and Yau, op. cit.]. Category 3 cold episodes occurred in 1453-54, 1513, 1569, and 1577-78. Lesser ones were also more common. The coldest was in 1453-54, due to a Tamboran class eruption that broke a big island in New Hebrides Arc in two, separated by a 12X6X1 km submarine caldera Kuwae. The volcanic chill was felt worldwide, with extensive reporting in China [Pang, Eos 74, No. 43, 196, 1993]. Reduced solar luminosity may have also contributed to the cold climate of that decade, as was the case in the 1810's. We conclude that the climate of China in the past 650 years generally follows world trend. The major forcing seems to have been changing solar luminosity, perturbed by frequent volcanic eruptions.

Pang, K. D.

2003-12-01

374

STS-90 Pilot Scott Altman is suited up for launch  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-90 Pilot Scott Altman is assisted during suit-up activities by Lockheed Suit Technician Valerie McNeil from Johnson Space Center in KSC's Operations and Checkout Building. Altman and the rest of the STS-90 crew will shortly depart for Launch Pad 39B, where the Space Shuttle Columbia awaits a second liftoff attempt at 2:19 p.m. EDT. His first trip into space, Altman is participating in a life sciences research flight that will focus on the most complex and least understood part of the human body - - the nervous system. Neurolab will examine the effects of spaceflight on the brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerves and sensory organs in the human body.

1998-01-01

375

STS-96 Crew Training, Mission Animation, Crew Interviews, STARSHINE, Discovery Rollout and Repair of Hail Damage  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Live footage shows the crewmembers of STS-96, Commander Kent V. Rominger, Pilot Rick D. Husband, Mission Specialists Ellen Ochoa, Tamara E. Jernigan, Daniel T. Barry, Julie Payette and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev during various training activities. Scenes include astronaut suit-up, EVA training in the Virtual Reality Lab, Orbiter space vision training, bailout training, and crew photo session. Footage also shows individual crew interviews, repair activities to the external fuel tank, and Discovery's return to the launch pad. The engineers are seen sanding, bending, and painting the foam used in repairing the tank. An animation of the deployment of the STARSHINE satellite, International Space Station, and the STS-96 Mission is presented. Footage shows the students from Edgar Allen Poe Middle School sanding, polishing, and inspecting the mirrors for the STARSHINE satellite. Live footage also includes students from St. Michael the Archangel School wearing bunny suits and entering the clean room at Goddard Space Flight Center.

1999-01-01

376

STS-96 FD Highlights and Crew Activities Report: Flight Day 06  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

On this sixth day of the STS-96 Discovery mission, the flight crew, Commander Kent V. Rominger, Pilot Rick D. Husband, and Mission Specialists Ellen Ochoa, Tamara E. Jernigan, Daniel T. Barry, Julie Payette, and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev are seen performing logistics transfer activities within the Discovery/International Space Station orbiting complex. Ochoa, Jernigan, Husband and Barry devote a significant part of their day to the transfer of bags of different sizes and shapes from the SPACEHAB module in Discovery's cargo bay to resting places inside the International Space Station. Payette and Tokarev complete the maintenance on the storage batteries. Barry and Tokarev complete installation of the remaining sound mufflers over the fans in Zarya. Barry then measures the sound levels at different positions inside the module. Rominger and Tokarev conduct a news conference with Russian reporters from the Mission Control Center in Moscow.

1999-01-01

377

STS-96 Press Briefing and MODE-1 Egress Training for TCDT  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Live footage shows the members of the STS-96 crew, Commander Kent V. Rominger, Pilot Rick D. Husband, and Mission Specialists Ellen Ochoa, Tamara E. Jernigan, Daniel T. Barry, Julie Payette and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev participating in a Press Conference and Egress Training for a Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test. Scenes of Capt. Steve Kelly, Fire Services, explaining the emergency egress procedure to the STS-96 crew is presented. Mission Specialist Tokarev is shown releasing a slide-wire basket. Mission Specialist Barry is also seen in the evacuation seat with the Training Officer Gina Tucker behind him. The TCDT activities include simulated countdown exercises and inspection of the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay.

1999-01-01

378

STS-91 Flight Day 1 Highlights and Crew Activities Report  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

On this first day of the STS-91 mission, the flight crew, Cmdr. Charles J. Precourt, Pilot Dominic L. Pudwill Gorie, and Mission Specialists Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, Janet Lynn Kavandi, Wendy B. Lawrence, Valery Victorovitch Ryumin and Andrew S. W. Thomas, can be seen performing pre-launch activities such as eating the traditional breakfast, crew suit-up, and the ride out to the launch pad. Also, included are various panoramic views of the shuttle on the pad. The crew is readied in the 'white room' for their mission. After the closing of the hatch and arm retraction, launch activities are shown including countdown, engine ignition, launch, and the separation of the Solid Rocket Boosters.

1998-01-01

379

KSC-03PD-1400  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Valerie Cassanto holds a piece of the Commercial ITA Biomedical Experiments payload that was carried on mission STS-107 and recently recovered. She is the daughter of John Cassanto of ITA, who is part of a recovery team transferring experiments to alternate containers. One of the experiments was the Growth of Bacterial Biofilm on Surfaces during Spaceflight (GOBBSS), a Planetary Society-sponsored astrobiology experiment developed by the Israeli Aerospace Medical Institute and the Johnson Space Center Astrobiology Center, with joint participation of an Israeli and a Palestinian student. The recovery team also includes Eran Schenker of the Israeli Aerospace Medical Institute; David Warmflash of JSC, and Louis Friedman, executive director of the Planetary Society. The GOBBSS material will be sent to JSC where the science team will analyze the samples, studying the effects of spaceflight on bacterial growth.

2003-01-01

380

KSC-03PD-1398  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - John Cassanto of ITA and his daughter Valerie stand next to the table holding the Growth of Bacterial Biofilm on Surfaces during Spaceflight (GOBBSS) experiment that was carried on mission STS-107 as part of the Commercial ITA Biomedical Experiments payload. He is part of a recovery team transferring experiments to alternate containers. GOBBSS was a Planetary Society-sponsored astrobiology experiment developed by the Israeli Aerospace Medical Institute and the Johnson Space Center Astrobiology Center, with joint participation of an Israeli and a Palestinian student. The recovery team also includes Eran Schenker of the Israeli Aerospace Medical Institute; David Warmflash of JSC, and Louis Friedman, executive director of the Planetary Society. The GOBBSS material will be sent to JSC where the science team will analyze the samples, studying the effects of spaceflight on bacterial growth.

2003-01-01

381

KSC-03PD-1399  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Valerie Cassanto holds a piece of the Commercial ITA Biomedical Experiments payload that was carried on mission STS-107 and recently recovered. She is the daughter of John Cassanto of ITA, who is part of a recovery team transferring experiments to alternate containers. One of the experiments was the Growth of Bacterial Biofilm on Surfaces during Spaceflight (GOBBSS), a Planetary Society-sponsored astrobiology experiment developed by the Israeli Aerospace Medical Institute and the Johnson Space Center Astrobiology Center, with joint participation of an Israeli and a Palestinian student. The recovery team also includes Eran Schenker of the Israeli Aerospace Medical Institute; David Warmflash of JSC, and Louis Friedman, executive director of the Planetary Society. The GOBBSS material will be sent to JSC where the science team will analyze the samples, studying the effects of spaceflight on bacterial growth.

2003-01-01

382

STS-91 Launch of Discovery from Launch Pad 39-A  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Coast's natural foliage frames the Space Shuttle Discovery and the reflection of the intense heat and light of its liftoff from Launch Pad 39A at 6:06:24 p.m. EDT June 2. On board Discovery are Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt; Pilot Dominic L. Gorie; and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, Janet Lynn Kavandi and Valery Victorovitch Ryumin. The nearly 10-day mission will feature the ninth and final Shuttle docking with the Russian space station Mir, the first Mir docking for the Space Shuttle orbiter Discovery, the first on-orbit test of the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), and the first flight of the new Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank. Astronaut Andrew S. W. Thomas will be returning to Earth as an STS-91 crew member after living more than four months aboard Mir.

1998-01-01

383

STS-91 Launch of Discovery from Launch Pad 39-A  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Some of Florida's natural foliage stands silent sentinel to the lift off of the Space Shuttle Discovery from Launch Pad 39A at 6:06:24 p.m. EDT June 2. On board Discovery are Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt; Pilot Dominic L. Gorie; and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, Janet Lynn Kavandi and Valery Victorovitch Ryumin. The nearly 10-day mission will feature the ninth and final Shuttle docking with the Russian space station Mir, the first Mir docking for the Space Shuttle orbiter Discovery, the first on-orbit test of the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), and the first flight of the new Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank. Astronaut Andrew S. W. Thomas will be returning to Earth as an STS-91 crew member after living more than four months aboard Mir.

1998-01-01

384

Final Report: High Energy Physics Program (HEP), Physics Department, Princeton University  

SciTech Connect

The activities of the Princeton Elementary particles group funded through Department of Energy Grant# DEFG02-91 ER40671 during the period October 1, 1991 through January 31, 2013 are summarized. These activities include experiments performed at Brookhaven National Lab; the CERN Lab in Geneva, Switzerland; Fermilab; KEK in Tsukuba City, Japan; the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center; as well as extensive experimental and the- oretical studies conducted on the campus of Princeton University. Funded senior personnel include: Curtis Callan, Stephen Gubser, Valerie Halyo, Daniel Marlow, Kirk McDonald, Pe- ter Meyers, James Olsen, Pierre Pirou#19;e, Eric Prebys, A.J. Stewart Smith, Frank Shoemaker (deceased), Paul Steinhardt, David Stickland, Christopher Tully, and Liantao Wang.

Callan, Curtis G. [Princeton University; Gubser, Steven S. [Princeton University; Marlow, Daniel R. [Princeton University; McDonald, Kirk T. [Princeton University; Meyers, Peter D. [Princeton University; Olsen, James D. [Princeton University; Smith, Arthur J.S. [Princeton University; Steinhardt, Paul J. [Princeton University; Tully, Christopher G. [Princeton University; Stickland, David P. [Princeton University

2013-04-30

385

Fine-scale mapping of the 5q11.2 breast cancer locus reveals at least three independent risk variants regulating MAP3K1  

E-print Network

, Joe Denn is 3 , Elin o r J. Sawye r 18 , Ian Tom lin so n , 19 Micha e l J. Kerin , 20 Nico la Miller, 20 Barba ra Bur winke l, 21 Fred e rik Marm e , 21, 22 Rongxi Yan g, 21, 23 Harald Surowy, 21, 23 Pasca l Gu ne l, 24, 25 Thrse Tru o n... , 135 Valerie Gabo rie a u, 136 Paul Brenn a n, 136 Jame s McKa y, 136 Curtis Olswo ld, 76 Susa n Slage r, 76 Aman da E. Tolan d , 137 Drako u lis Yan no u ka ko s, 138 Chen - Ya n g She n , 139 - 141 Pei - E i W u, 139, 141 Jyh - Che rng Yu...

Glubb, Dylan M.; Maranian, Mel J.; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Pooley, Karen A.; Meyer, Kerstin B.; Kar, Siddhartha; Carlebur, Saskia; O'Reilly, Martin; Betts, Joshua A.; Hillman, Kristine M.; Kaufmann, Susanne; Beesley, Jonathan; Canisius, Sander; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Tsimiklis, Helen; Apicella, Carmel; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Hogervorst, Frans B.; van der Schoot, C. Ellen; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Fasching, Peter A.; Peterlongo, Paolo; Barile, Monica; Capra, Fabio; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Hallberg, Emily; Vachon, Celine; Giles, Graham G.; Milne, Roger L.; McLean, Catriona; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Simard, Jacques; Goldberg, Mark S.; Labrche, France; Dumont, Martine; Teo, Soo Hwang; Yip, Cheng Har; See, Mee-Hoong; Cornes, Belinda; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Ikram, M. Kamran; Kristensen, Vessela; Norwegian Breast Cancer Study; Zheng, Wei; Halverson, Sandra L.; Shrubsole, Martha; Long, Jirong; Winqvist, Robert; Pylks, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kauppila, Saila; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A.E.M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Van Asperen, Christi J.; Garca-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Czene, Kamila; Klevebring, Daniel; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Martens, John W.M.; Colle, J. Margriet; Hall, Per; Li, Jingmei; Humphreys, Keith; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Reed, Malcolm W.R.; Blot, William; Signorello, Lisa B.; Cai, Qiuyin; Shah, Mitul; Ghoussaini, Maya; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Park, Sue K.; Noh, Dong-Young; Hartman, Mikael; Miao, Hui; Lim, Wei Yen; Tang, Anthony; Hamann, Ute; Torres, Diana; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James; Olswold, Curtis; Slager, Susan; Toland, Amanda E.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Shen, Chen-Yang; Wu, Pei-Ei; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hou, Ming-Feng; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Jones, Michael; Pita, Guillermo

2014-01-08

386

Quarantine security of bananas at harvest maturity against Mediterranean and Oriental fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) in Hawaii.  

PubMed

Culled bananas (dwarf 'Brazilian', 'Grand Nain', 'Valery', and 'Williams') sampled from packing houses on the islands of Hawaii, Kauai, Maui, Molokai, and Oahu identified specific "faults" that were at risk from oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), infestation. Faults at risk included bunches with precociously ripened bananas, or bananas with tip rot, fused fingers, or damage that compromised skin integrity to permit fruit fly oviposition into fruit flesh. No Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann), or melon fly, B. cucurbitae (Coquillett), infestations were found in culled banana samples. Field infestation tests indicated that mature green bananas were not susceptible to fruit fly infestation for up to 1 wk past the scheduled harvest date when attached to the plant or within 24 h after harvest. Recommendations for exporting mature green bananas from Hawaii without risk of fruit fly infestation are provided. The research reported herein resulted in a USDA-APHIS protocol for exporting mature green bananas from Hawaii. PMID:11233129

Armstrong, J W

2001-02-01

387

Could the Ways in Which Animals Regenerate Hair and Feathers Lead to Clues for Restoring Human Fingers and Toes?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Press release - The latest issue of the journal Physiology contains a review article that looks at possible routes that unlock cellular regeneration in general, and the principles by which hair and feathers regenerate themselves in particular. The authors apply what is currently known about regenerative biology to the emerging field of regenerative medicine, which is being transformed from fantasy to reality.The Review is entitled ?Physiological Regeneration of Skin Appendages and Implications for Regenerative Medicine? and was written by Cheng-Ming Chuong, Randall B. Widelitz, Ping Wu, and Ting-Xin Jiang of the University of Southern California, and Valerie A. Randall of the University of Bradford. It appears in the current edition of Physiology, published by the American Physiological Society.

APS Communications Office (American Physiological Society Communications Office)

2012-05-10

388

["Non-aging" pearl oyster and aging salmon (about lack of basis for production of medicines based on European pearl oyster Margaritifera margaritifera)].  

PubMed

The article focuses on disproof of the claim by Valery Ziuganov, that pearl oyster infection prolongs the lifespan of salmon and that pearl oyster can be used as a source of medicine. His activity on the production of medicine pretending to care cancer and senescence based on the gills of salmon infected by pearl oyster is blamed. The data on pearl oyster and salmon biology are presented: Atlantic salmon survives after spawning irrespectively of oyster infection. The problem of shady medicines production is discussed. It was shown that even Academic editions and formal attributes of the belonging to scientific community do not provide a necessary barrier to frauds in this field. Adaptationist program popularity contributes such a situation, because it provides "grounds" for any speculation concerning advantages of any biological process. PMID:20405726

Popov, I Iu

2009-01-01

389

STS-91 Mission Specialist Chang-Diaz participates in TCDT activities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-91 Mission Specialist Franklin Chang-Diaz, Ph.D., participates in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The TCDT is a dress rehearsal for launch. STS-91 is scheduled to be launched on June 2 with a launch window opening around 6:10 p.m. EDT. The mission will feature the ninth Shuttle docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, the first Mir docking for Discovery, the conclusion of Phase I of the joint U.S.- Russian International Space Station Program, and the first flight of the new Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank. The STS-91 flight crew also includes Commander Charles Precourt; Pilot Dominic Gorie; and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence; Janet Kavandi, Ph.D.; and Valery Ryumin, with the Russian Space Agency. Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will be returning to Earth with the crew after living more than four months aboard Mir.

1998-01-01

390

Human Embryology Animations  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

For students of human development, the Human Embryology Animations site is a worthy resource. Created by Dr. Valerie O'Loughlin at Indiana University, the goal of this site is to help students "better understand the complex processes that must occur in embryologic development." The animations are divided into five thematic sections, including General Embryology, Development of the Limbs, and Urinary and Reproductive Embryology. Each animation lasts anywhere from 20 seconds to 8 minutes, and they cover heart tube folding, septum development, postnatal circulation, and 30 or so other processes. The site is designed for students and members of the general public with a basic understanding of human biology, and the animations are well-planned and worth a look. Additionally, they could be used for students reviewing materials for a course like AP Biology.

O'Loughlin, Valerie

2012-03-02

391

Discovery launches on STS-91, the last mission of the Shuttle-Mir program!  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

With more than seven million pounds of thrust, the Space Shuttle Discovery lifts off from Launch Pad 39A at 6:06:24 p.m. EDT June 2 on its way to the Mir space station. On board Discovery are Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt; Pilot Dominic L. Gorie; and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Franklin R. Chang- Diaz, Janet Lynn Kavandi and Valery Victorovitch Ryumin. The nearly 10-day mission will feature the ninth and final Shuttle docking with the Russian space station Mir, the first Mir docking for the Space Shuttle orbiter Discovery, the first on-orbit test of the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), and the first flight of the new Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank. Astronaut Andrew S. W. Thomas will be returning to Earth as a STS-91 crew member after living more than four months aboard Mir.

1998-01-01

392

Science Signaling Podcast: 24 May 2011  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Podcast features conversations with authors of articles related to Hippo signaling that appear in Science and Science Signaling. James Martin discusses his groups finding that Hippo signaling regulates the size of the mouse heart by antagonizing Wnt signaling through a mechanism that involves cooperation between the transcription factors Yap and ?-catenin, as described in a Research Report published in the 22 April 2011 issue of Science. Valeri Vasioukhin and Mark Silvis discuss their findings related to Hippo signaling in tumorigenesis, as reported in the 24 May 2011 issue of Science Signaling. They report that the adhesion protein ?E-catenin acts as a tumor suppressor by regulating the localization and activity of the transcriptional coactivator Yap, which is also regulated by Hippo signaling.

James F. Martin (Texas A& M System Health Science Center; Institute of Biosciences and Technology REV)

2011-05-24

393

International Program and Local Organizing Committees  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

International Program Committee Dionisio Bermejo (Spain) Roman Ciurylo (Poland) Elisabeth Dalimier (France) Alexander Devdariani (Russia) Milan S Dimitrijevic (Serbia) Robert Gamache (USA) Marco A Gigosos (Spain) Motoshi Goto (Japan) Magnus Gustafsson (Sweden) Jean-Michel Hartmann (France) Carlos Iglesias (USA) John Kielkopf (USA) John C Lewis (Canada) Valery Lisitsa (Russia) Eugene Oks (USA) Christian G Parigger (USA) Gillian Peach (UK) Adriana Predoi-Cross (Canada) Roland Stamm (Germany) Local Organizing Committee Nikolay G Skvortsov (Chair, St Petersburg State University) Evgenii B Aleksandrov (Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, St Petersburg) Vadim A Alekseev (Scientific Secretary, St Petersburg State University) Sergey F Boureiko (St.Petersburg State University) Yury N Gnedin (Pulkovo Observatory, St Petersburg) Alexander Z Devdariani (Deputy Chair, St Petersburg State University) Alexander P Kouzov (Deputy Chair, St Petersburg State University) Nikolay A Timofeev (St Petersburg State University)

2012-12-01

394

STS-113 Flight Day 7 Highlights  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The STS-113 seventh flight day begins with a view of the Russian Segment of the International Space Station from a camera at the end of the S1 truss. Live footage of Michael Lopez-Alegria and John Herrington are shown aboard the International Space Station. A change of command ceremony is presented to welcome the Expedition Six Crew and to say farewell to the Expedition Five crew. Commander Valery Korzun, Flight Engineer Sergei Treschev, NASA ISS Science Officer Peggy Whitson, Expedition Six Commander Ken Bowersox, Flight Engineer Nikolai Budarin, NASA ISS Science Officer Don Pettit, Commander Jim Wetherbee, Pilot Paul Lockhart and Mission Specialists Michael Lopez-Alegria and John Herrington are all are shown during the ceremony.

2002-11-01

395

Goldin, Manley and CSA President Evans post landing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

(Left to right) Canadian Minister of Industry John Manley, NASA administrator Daniel Goldin, and President of the Canadian Space Agency Mac Evans give a thumbs up to the end of a successful mission after Space Shuttle orbiter Discovery (behind them) touched down on KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility Runway 15. Main gear touchdown occurred at 2:02:43 EDT to complete the 9-day, 19- hour, 13-minute and 1-second long STS-96 mission. Onboard the Shuttle was Mission Specialist Julie Payette, who represents the Canadian Space Agency. At the controls for the landing were Commander Kent V. Rominger and Pilot Rick D. Husband. Others onboard were Mission Specialists Ellen Ochoa (Ph.D.), Tamara E. Jernigan (Ph.D.), Daniel S. Barry (M.D., Ph.D.), and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev, represents the Russian Space Agency. The crew returned from the second flight to the International Space Station on a logistics and resupply mission.

1999-01-01

396

New understanding of the complexity of groundwater flow in Chalk catchments of the UK  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Chalk is the largest aquifer in the UK accounting for more than half the groundwater used and nearly a quarter of the total public water supplied in England and Wales. Although the Chalk is a double porosity and permeability medium, transmission of water in the saturated zone depends largely on flow through fractures, the location and distribution of which are controlled by lithology and geological structure. These features operate on a number of spatial scales and so provide a range of flow pathways that can markedly affect both stream flow and water quality. In addition, overlying Palaeogene or superficial deposits can act as controls on recharge and zones of increased groundwater storage. As part of a major initiative on Lowland Catchment Research in the UK two Chalk sub-catchments, in the River Thames basin, the rivers Pang and Lambourn, have been the focus of an intensive set of studies. The catchments have been characterised using a multidisciplinary approach. This has resulted in an improved understanding of the way such catchments work and the mechanisms that control groundwater flow. The low fracture porosity gives rise to a low specific yield, which means that large fluctuations in water table elevation beneath the interfluves are not uncommon. Consequently, groundwater catchments differ from the topographic catchments and their size varies seasonally. This means, for example, that groundwater might be flowing to the River Pang in winter but to the River Thames in summer. It also means that various flow features in the catchment may be active at different locations and times during the year. Four flow systems have been identified, through a detailed analysis of the data; a shallow, but rapid flow system; a slower, deeper system; a very high velocity system developed in large diameter solution enhanced fractures and a system found in the river valley sediments. The interconnections between and within these systems can be poor and sometimes vary on a scale of a few metres. Dry valleys appear to be groundwater collectors so stream accretion therefore often occurs in a stepwise manner. Groundwater flow models commonly used in the management of Chalk catchments struggle to simulate this kind of complexity, and often utilise data from tests that may not be representative. There is an urgent need to develop models and supporting data that can better represent the local complexity of these natural environments and serve as management tools to help satisfy legislative drivers and inform habitat protection.

Peach, D.; Shand, P.; Gooddy, D.; Abesser, C.; Bloomfield, J.; Mathias, S.; Butler, A.; Williams, A.; Binley, A.; Wheater, H.

2006-12-01

397

Eclipses and the Olympics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Like returns of Halley's comet the Olympic games occur periodically, though not as regularly in antiquity. Dates were also imprecise due to the chaotic calendars in use. Reported sightings of comets and eclipses can be used with game dates to help fix ancient events. However some reported darkening of the sun, e.g., after Julius Caesar's murder in 44 BC, was due to volcanic eruptions. A red comet, visible in daylight, first appeared during the games that year. It was also seen from China and Korea (Pang, Sciences 31, 30). Phlegon's ``Olympiads" (2nd century) says that Christ's crucifixion was in the 4th year of the 202nd Olympiad (AD 29-33), when a total solar eclipse occurred in the 6th hour. Only the Nov. 24, AD 29 eclipse over Asia Minor can match that, and Joel's prophecy (Acts 2, 14-21) that ``the sun will be turned to darkness and moon to blood." However it conflicts with ``the first day of Passover," as recorded by Mathew, Mark and Luke, i.e., full moon in early spring. Humphreys and Waddington (Nature 306, 743) have suggested meteorological darkening and the April 3, AD 33 lunar eclipse instead. Schaefer has questioned the eclipse's visibility from Jerusalem (31.46N, 35.14E). The six computations he cited gave dissimilar answers due to the imprecise rates of the secular lunar acceleration, and lengthening of the day used (Q.Jl.R.astr.Soc. 31, 53). Lunar laser ranging has since fixed the former at -26"/cen2. Analysis of ancient Chinese solar eclipse records, e.g., the April 21, 899 BC and April 4, AD 368 ``double dawns" over Zheng, has given us a delta T (in sec) = 30t2, where t is centuries before 1800 (Pang, Yau and Chou, in ``Dynamics of Ice Age Earth: A Modern Perspective," 1998). Our computations show that the moon rose over Jerusalem, with 1/3 still in the umbra and the rest in penumbra. Holdover meteorological darkening with long absorption air mass could have help reddened the moon also. Finally the first ``eclipse season" (the Aug. 21 lunar, and Sept. 6 solar, eclipses) were recorded in China in 776 BC, the year of the first Olympiad. A total solar eclipse (August 1, 2008) will occur during the 29th modern Olympiad (July 25-Aug. 10), with its path of totality ending in a spectacular ``double sunset" over Zheng, China (34.5N, 110E).

Pang, K. D.; Yau, K. K.

2000-12-01

398

Ancient Observations Reveal How a Variable Sun Has Changed the Earth's Climate  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Sun, once thought to be constant, has actually undergone nine long brightness cycles in the past 1800 years. Although these luminosity changes were < 1%, they have clearly influenced in the Earth's climate. For example, during the Maunder (Solar) Minimum between 1645 and 1715, sunspots were rarely seen, indicative of a weak Sun. Astronomers at Mt. Wilson, e.g., Hale, Nicholson and Wilson, have linked the luminosity changes to solar magnetic cycles, and similar behaviors in Sun-like stars. Others have elucidated the Sun-climate connection. For example, Eddy suggested that the enfeebled Sun was responsible for the cold climate of the Little Ice Age. The estimated average global temperature then was half a degree Centigrade lower than that prevailed in the 1970's (Lean, Geophys. Res. Lett. 22, 3195, 1995). Yau researched East Asian historical sunspot records, and found that there were seven Maunder-like solar minima before 1600 (Quart. J. Roy. Astron. Soc. 29, 175, 1988). The earliest was in the third century, and the Sporer Minimum occurred in 1400-1600. These findings agree with analyses of historical records of aurora sightings. Energetic electrons and protons emitted by an active Sun create auroras on Earth. When sunspots were rare auroras were, likewise, seldom seen. Minima in sunspot/aurora sightings are, in turn, coincident with peaks in long-term carbon-14 and beryllium-10 records. The radioisotopes are made high in atmosphere by cosmic rays. Their production is low when strong solar magnetic storms deflect such rays from the Solar System, and vice versa (Pang and Yau, Eos 83, No. 43, 481, 2002). Pang analyzed Chinese historical weather records, and discovered that periods of severely cold climate coincide with the Maunder and Sporer Minima. Lakes and rivers froze up, seas icebound, unseasonable frosts killed crops, and famines were widespread during these cold spells, consistent with general circulation model hindcast of contemporary winter conditions for China (Shindell, Science 294, 2149, 2001). Although variable solar luminosity is important, other strong forces also drive the Earth's climate system. These include greenhouse warming, volcanic eruptions, and changing ocean current systems, e.g., the El Nino. The solar variations, however, act over periods ranging from decades to centuries.

Pang, K. D.; Yau, K. K.

2004-12-01

399

Do Changes in Muscle Architecture Affect Post-Activation Potentiation?  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this randomized, cross-over design study was to examine the effect of three different muscle potentiation protocols on acute changes in muscle architecture and vertical jump performance. Eleven experienced, resistance trained men (25.23.6y) completed three potentiation squat protocols using moderate intensity (MI; 75%, 3 sets x 10 repetitions), high intensity (HI; 90%, 3 sets x 3 repetitions) and 100% (1RM; 1 set x 1repetition) of their 1RM. In addition, all participants completed a control session (CTL) in which no protocol was performed. During each testing session, muscle architecture and vertical jump testing were assessed at baseline (BL), 8min post (8P) and 20min post (20P) workout. Ultrasound measures included cross sectional area (CSA) and pennation angle (PANG) of both the rectus femoris (RF) and vastus lateralis (VL). Following each ultrasound measure, peak vertical jump power (PVJP) and mean (MVJP) power was assessed using an accelerometer. Magnitude based inferences were used to make comparisons between trials. The MI trial resulted in a likely greater increase from BL to 8P and 20P in RF-CSA and VL-CSA, while the HI trial resulted in a likely greater change from BL to 20P in both RF-CSA and VL-CSA. Meanwhile, changes in PVJP and MVJP for the MI trial was likely decreased at BL-8P and BL20P, while the HI trial was shown to result in a likely or possible decrease compared to CTL at BL-8P and BL20P, respectively. A likely negative relationship was observed between changes in VL-PANG and MVJP (r = -0.35; p , 0.018) at BL-8P, and between changes in PVJP and RF-CSA (r = -0.37; p , 0.014) at BL20P. Results of this study were unable to demonstrate any potentiation response from the trials employed, however these protocols did result in acute muscle architectural changes. Key points Three squat protocols using moderate intensity (75% 1-RM; 3 sets x 10 repetitions), high intensity (90% 1-RM, 3 sets x 3 repetitions) and maximal intensity (100% 1RM; 1 set x 1repetition) were unable to potentiate jump height or jump power in experienced, resistance trained men. Experienced, resistance trained athletes who are not competitive may be limited in regards to potentiation due to a poor level of conditioning. Both the moderate and high intensity potentiation protocols stimulated acute changes in muscle architecture. Greater increases in the CSA of both the RF and VL muscles were noted. A different potentiation protocol may have elicited greater changes in muscle architecture. PMID:25178394

Reardon, Danielle; Hoffman, Jay R.; Mangine, Gerald T.; Wells, Adam J.; Gonzalez, Adam M.; Jajtner, Adam R.; Townsend, Jeremy R.; McCormack, William P.; Stout, Jeffrey R.; Fragala, Maren S.; Fukuda, David H.

2014-01-01

400

Exogenous application of jasmonic acid induces volatile emissions in rice and enhances parasitism of Nilaparvata lugens eggs by the parasitoid Anagrus nilaparvatae.  

PubMed

Jasmonate signaling pathway plays an important role in induced plant defense against herbivores and pathogens, including the emission of volatiles that serve as attractants for natural enemies of herbivores. We studied the volatiles emitted from rice plants that were wounded and treated with jasmonic acid (JA) and their effects on the host-searching behavior of the rice brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens (Stl), and its mymarid egg parasitoid Anagrus nilaparvatae Pang et Wang. Female adults of N. lugens significantly preferred to settle on JA-treated rice plants immediately after release. The parasitoid A. nilaparvatae showed a similar preference and was more attracted to the volatiles emitted from JA-treated rice plants than to volatiles from control plants. This was also evident from greenhouse and field experiments in which parasitism of N. lugens eggs by A. nilaparvatae on plants that were surrounded by JA-treated plants was more than twofold higher than on control plants. Analyses of volatiles collected from rice plants showed that JA treatment dramatically increased the release of volatiles, which included aliphatic aldehydes and alcohols, monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, methyl salicylate, n-heptadecane, and several as yet unidentified compounds. These results confirm an involvement of the JA pathway in induced defense in rice plants and demonstrate that the egg parasitoid A. nilaparvatae exploits plant-provided cues to locate hosts. We explain the use of induced plant volatiles by the egg parasitoid by a reliable association between planthopper feeding damage and egg presence. PMID:16132208

Lou, Yong-Gen; Du, Meng-Hao; Turlings, Ted C J; Cheng, Jia-An; Shan, Wei-Fang

2005-09-01

401

The ethics and regulation of overcharging: issues in the commerciality of the health practitioner-patient relationship.  

PubMed

Overcharging by health practitioners is a difficult issue with few guidelines available for practitioners or patients. For the most part it has not been the subject of disciplinary censure and has been dealt with by conciliation processes. However, during 2013 the Singapore High Court twice addressed the commerciality of the health-practitioner-patient relationship, acknowledging that this is a fundamental attribute of the contemporary dynamic between providers and recipients of health services. In Lim Mey Lee Susan v Singapore Medical Council [2013] SGHC 122, it concluded that the obligation to refrain from overcharging is an inherent ethical responsibility of practitioners and affirmed the suspension for three years of a surgeon with Australian training and tertiary connections for what it classified as grossly excessive charging. In Pang Ah San v Singapore Medical Council [2013] SGHC 266, it observed that medical practitioners have a legitimate right to appropriate levels of remuneration but that the right balance has to be struck between professional virtues and business considerations. The Singapore High Court's decisions raise the question of whether professional associations and practitioner regulators have a responsibility to provide guidelines and, potentially, processes by which practical assistance can be provided to medical and other health care practitioners so that they can avoid unacceptable charging practices. PMID:24804522

Freckelton, Ian

2014-03-01

402

Optical model potential of A =3 projectiles for 1 p -shell nuclei  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A set of global optical potential parameters describing the A =3 particles (3He and 3H ) elastic scattering from 1 p -shell nuclei, HT 1 p , is obtained by simultaneously fitting 118 sets of experimental data of 3He and 3H elastic scattering from 9Be,10B ,11B ,12C ,13C ,14C ,14N ,15N ,16O ,17O , and 18O with incident energies from 4 ?E ?118.5 MeV and 24 sets of elastic scattering data with the 6Li and 7Li targets from 3 ?E ?44 MeV. HT 1 p is found to be superior to GDP08 [D. Y. Pang, P. Roussel-Chomaz, H. Savajols, R. L. Varner, and R. Wolski, Phys. Rev. C 79, 024615 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevC.79.024615], which is a systematic potential designed for the heavy-target region, in the reproduction of the angular distributions of elastic scattering cross sections of 3He and 3H from 1 p -shell nuclei at energies below 100 MeV. At energies above 100 MeV, GDP08 is found to be better than HT1p.

Pang, D. Y.; Dean, W. M.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.

2015-02-01

403

Structural and stratigraphic evolution of the East Georges Bank Basin, offshore Nova Scotia, Canada  

SciTech Connect

The East Georges Bank Basin is located offshore Nova Scotia on the southeastern Canadian continental shelf. The basin covers 2.5 million ac and is one of the last undrilled basins in North America. The geological interpretation is almost entirely based on 16,000 km of seismic data over the basin. Pertinent well control is limited to 10 wells on the US portion of the Georges Bank (West Georges Bank Basin) and two wells on the Scotian shelf. Seismic-stratigraphic analysis of this data has led to a structural and stratigraphic model for the basin. The basin formed during the Triassic when the landmass of Pange began separating along rift zones. A prominent Paleozoic basement high, the Yarmouth Arch separated the East Georges Bank Basin from the West Georges Bank Basin and had a dominant influence on sedimentation until the Middle Jurassic. Early synrift sequences consist of lacustrine clastics and shales. Marine incursions began in the late Triassic resulting in massive salt deposits that reflect the restricted extent of the basin and the arid Triassic and Early Jurassic climate. Further continental separation during the Early Jurassic resulted in deposition of carbonates and evaporites followed by Middle Jurassic continental shelf carbonates and deltaic sands. During the Middle Jurassic, major growth faulting and halokinesis was initiated by progradation of the deltaic sands. Post Middle Jurassic continental spreading in combination with changing climatic conditions resulted in a steady decline of carbonate sedimentation and dominance of clastic deposition throughout the remaining history of the basin.

Carswell, A.B. (Esso Canada Resources Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)); Koning, T. (Texaco Canada Petroleum, Inc., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)); Hibbs, D.C. (Conoco Canada Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada))

1990-05-01

404

Human papillomavirus type 16 E7 perturbs DREAM to promote cellular proliferation and mitotic gene expression.  

PubMed

The study of the small DNA tumor viruses continues to provide valuable new insights into oncogenesis and fundamental biological processes. Although much has already been revealed about how the human papillomaviruses (HPVs) can transform cells and contribute to cervical and oropharyngeal cancer, there clearly is much more to learn. In this issue of Oncogene, Pang et al., doi:10.1038/onc.2013.426, demonstrate that the high-risk HPV16 E7 oncogene can promote cellular proliferation by interacting with the DREAM (DP, RB-like, E2F and MuvB) complex at two distinct phases of the cell cycle. Consistent with earlier work, HPV16 E7 can bind to the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor (RB) family member p130 (RBL2) protein and promote its proteasome-mediated destruction thereby disrupting the DREAM complex and can prevent exit from the cell cycle into quiescence. In addition, they demonstrate that HPV16 E7 can bind to MuvB core complex in association with BMYB and FOXM1 and activate gene expression during the G2 and M phase of the cell cycle. Thus, HPV16 E7 acts to prevent exit from the cell cycle entry and promotes mitotic proliferation and may account for the high levels of FOXM1 often observed in poor-risk cervical cancers. PMID:24166507

DeCaprio, J A

2014-07-31

405

Osteology of Huabeisaurus allocotus (Sauropoda: Titanosauriformes) from the Upper Cretaceous of China  

PubMed Central

Background The Late Cretaceous titanosauriform sauropod Huabeisaurus allocotus Pang and Cheng is known from teeth and much of the postcranial skeleton. Its completeness makes it an important taxon for integrating and interpreting anatomical observations from more fragmentary Cretaceous East Asian sauropods and for understanding titanosauriform evolution in general. Methodology/Principal Findings We present a detailed redescription of Huabeisaurus allocotus and a suite of anatomical comparisons with other titanosauriforms that demonstrate its validity via autapomorphies (e.g., division of some presacral vertebral laminae, reduced development of caudal ribs, the development of fossae relative to one another in caudal vertebral neural arches, high tibia-to-femur ratio). Huabeisaurus shares many features with other Cretaceous East Asian sauropods (e.g., pendant cervical ribs, anterior-middle caudal vertebrae with a nearly flat anterior centrum face and a concave posterior centrum face) that are absent in sauropods from other landmasses and strata, suggesting a close relationship among many of these forms within the clade Somphospondyli. Conclusions/Significance Restudy of Huabeisaurus provides further evidence for the existence of a clade of somphospondylans Euhelopodidae mainly found in the Cretaceous of East Asia. Euhelopodidae represents a fourth example of the evolution of narrow crowns within Sauropoda, along with diplodocoids, brachiosaurids, and advanced titanosaurs (lithostrotians). Despite being known from fewer species than Diplodocoidea, Brachiosauridae, or Lithostrotia, euhelopodids possessed a broader range of tooth shapes than any of these clades, suggesting that euhelopodids exemplified a comparably broad range of feeding strategies and perhaps diets. PMID:23936326

D'Emic, Michael D.; Mannion, Philip D.; Upchurch, Paul; Benson, Roger B. J.; Pang, Qiqing; Zhengwu, Cheng

2013-01-01

406

Measurement of microscopic coupling constants between atoms on a surface: Combination of LEEM observation with lattice model analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a method combining low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM) and lattice model analysis for measuring the microscopic lateral coupling constants between atoms on a surface. The calculated step (interface) stiffness in a honeycomb lattice Ising model with the nearest neighbor and the second nearest neighbor interactions (J1 = 93.8 meV and J2 = 9.38 meV) matched the experimental step quantity values on an Si(111)(1 1) surface reported by Pang et al. and Bartelt et al. based on LEEM measurements. The experimental value of step tension obtained by Williams et al. lies on the calculated step tension curve. The polar graphs of the step tension and a two-dimensional island shape at the temperature T = 1163 K also agree well with the experimental graphs reported by Mtois and Mller. The close agreement between the LEEM observations and the lattice model calculations on a Si(111) surface suggests that our method is also suitable for measuring microscopic lateral coupling constants on the surface of other materials that are less well-studied than Si.

Akutsu, Noriko

2014-12-01

407

Infection of rice plants by rice black streaked dwarf virus improves an egg parasitoid, Anagrus nilaparvatae (Hymenoptera: Mymaridae), of rice planthoppers.  

PubMed

The effects of rice plants infected by rice black streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV) on the host preference, duration of immature stages, sex ratio, and adult longevity and parasitic capacity of an egg parasitoid, Anagrus nilaparvatae Pang et Wang, of rice brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens Stl, were evaluated. Tests of response to plant volatiles using an olfactometer showed that A. nilaparvatae preferred rice plants harboring rice brown planthopper eggs over plants free of rice brown planthopper eggs. However, both the response to plant volatiles and the host selectivity test showed no significant differences in host preference between RBSDV-infected plants and healthy plants when both contained rice brown planthopper eggs. The developmental duration at immature stage of the male A. nilaparvatae in rice brown planthopper eggs on RBSDV-infected rice plants was significantly prolonged, and the parasitic capacity of rice brown planthopper eggs was significantly increased in comparison with the A. nilaparvatae parasite in rice brown planthopper eggs on healthy rice plants. There were no significant differences between RBSDV-infected rice plants and healthy rice plants in other ecological fitness parameters, including the developmental duration of female adults, female percentage, and adult longevity of A. nilaparvatae. PMID:25199055

Xu, Hongxing; He, Xiaochan; Zheng, Xusong; Yang, Yajun; Tian, Junce; Lu, Zhongxian

2014-10-01

408

A clear case for conscience in healthcare practice.  

PubMed

The value of conscience in healthcare ethics is widely debated. While some sources present it as an unquestionably positive attribute, others question both the veracity of its decisions and the effect of conscientious objection on patient access to health care. This paper argues that the right to object conscientiously should be broadened, subject to certain previsos, as there are many benefits to healthcare practice in the development of the consciences of practitioners. While effects such as the preservation of moral integrity are widely considered to benefit practitioners, this paper draws on the work of Hannah Arendt to offer several original arguments in defence of conscience that may more directly benefit patients, namely that a pang of conscience may be useful in rapidly unfolding situations in which there is no time to reflect satisfactorily upon activities and that, given the hierarchical nature of healthcare institutions, a right to defy authority on the basis of conscience may benefit junior staff who lack the institutional power to challenge the orders of superiors. PMID:21708833

Birchley, Giles

2012-01-01

409

Open standards for cascade models for RHIC: Volume 1. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center workshop  

SciTech Connect

It is widely recognized that cascade models are potentially effective and powerful tools for interpreting and predicting multi-particle observables in heavy ion physics. However, the lack of common standards, documentation, version control, and accessibility have made it difficult to apply objective scientific criteria for evaluating the many physical and algorithmic assumptions or even to reproduce some published results. The first RIKEN Research Center workshop was proposed by Yang Pang to address this problem by establishing open standards for original codes for applications to nuclear collisions at RHIC energies. The aim of this first workshop is: (1) to prepare a WWW depository site for original source codes and detailed documentation with examples; (2) to develop and perform standardized test for the models such as Lorentz invariance, kinetic theory comparisons, and thermodynamic simulations; (3) to publish a compilation of results of the above work in a journal e.g., ``Heavy Ion Physics``; and (4) to establish a policy statement on a set of minimal requirements for inclusion in the OSCAR-WWW depository.

NONE

1997-10-01

410

Fermion frontiers in vector lattice gauge theories: Proceedings. Volume 8  

SciTech Connect

The inclusion of fermions into simulations of lattice gauge theories is very difficult both theoretically and numerically. With the presence of Teraflops-scale computers for lattice gauge theory, the authors wanted a forum to discuss new approaches to lattice fermions. The workshop concentrated on approaches which are ripe for study on such large machines. Although lattice chiral fermions are vitally important to understand, there is not technique at hand which is viable on these Teraflops-scale machines for real-world problems. The discussion was therefore focused on recent developments and future prospects for QCD-like theories. For the well-known fermion formulations, the Aoki phase in Wilson fermions, novelties of U{sub A}(1) symmetry and the {eta}{prime} for staggered fermions and new approaches for simulating the determinant for Wilson fermions were discussed. The newer domain-wall fermion formulation was reviewed, with numerical results given by many speakers. The fermion proposal of Friedberg, Lee and Pang was introduced. They also were able to compare and contrast the dependence of QCD and QCD-like SUSY theories on the number of quark flavors. These proceedings consist of several transparencies and a summary page from each speaker. This should serve to outline the major points made in each talk.

NONE

1998-11-01

411

Extreme Rainfall Impacts in Fractured Permeable Catchments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Serious groundwater flooding events have occurred on Chalk catchments in both the UK and north west Europe in the last decade, causing substantial amounts of disruption and economic damage. These fractured, permeable catchments are characterized by low surface runoff, high baseflow indices and strongly attenuated streamflow hydrographs. They have a general resilience to drought and pluvial/fluvial flooding. The small pore size of the Chalk matrix (~ 1 m) exerts a high suction, such that dynamic storage is primarily due to the fractures, and amounts to ~ 1% of the total volume. As a result, under sustained rainfall the water table can rise up to exceptional levels leading to surface water emergence from springs and valleys. Floodwater may slowly drain with the topography, or, in localized depressions, it may simply pond until the groundwater levels decline. In winter 2000/1, a sequence of individually unexceptional rainfall events over several months led to large scale flooding in the Pang catchment, Berkshire, UK. By contrast, an extreme rainfall event on 20th July 2007 in the same catchment caused a very rapid response at the water table, but due to the antecedent conditions did not lead to flooding. The objective of this study is to quantify how the water table in a fractured permeable catchment responds to different types of rainfall, and the implications of this for groundwater flooding. We make use of measurements from the Pang catchment, including: rainfall (tipping bucket gauges); actual evaporation (eddy flux correlation); soil water content (profile probes and neutron probes); near surface matric potential (tensiometers and equitensiometers); deep (>10m) matric potential (deep jacking tensiometers); and water table elevation (piezometers). Conventional treatment of recharge in Chalk aquifers considers a fixed bypass component of rainfall, normally 15%, to account for the role of the fractures. However, interpretation of the field data suggest three modes of recharge: under low rainfall intensities recharge is slow (lags of > 100 days) and through the matrix; under moderate intensities recharge is via the matrix and partially saturated fractures (lags of 10s of days) and, if sustained, can lead to flooding (as in 2000/1); under high intensity rainfall fractures transmit rainfall preferentially, leading to a large, rapid (<1 day) water table response. Given the expectation that extreme rainfall events are likely to become more frequent and intense, our main focus is the preferential recharge mechanism, which has the potential to cause rapid flooding. By examining rainfall-water table response patterns, we demonstrate how the combined intensity-duration characteristics of rainfall events can be used to predict when preferential recharge is likely to occur. A 2D physically based, dual permeability Richards' equation model of the Chalk, which fully couples the unsaturated/saturated zones was developed and conditioned on field observations. This was used in a sensitivity study of water table response to a wide range of rainfall conditions, such as might be expected under future climate scenarios. The model also demonstrated the importance of the soil and weathered chalk layers on matrix and fracture flow response to rainfall infiltration.

Ireson, A. M.; Butler, A. P.

2009-12-01

412

Physiological relation between respiration activity and heterologous expression of selected benzoylformate decarboxylase variants in Escherichia coli  

PubMed Central

Background The benzoylformate decarboxylase (BFD) from Pseudomonas putida is a biotechnologically interesting biocatalyst. It catalyses the formation of chiral 2-hydroxy ketones, which are important building blocks for stereoselective syntheses. To optimise the enzyme function often the amino acid composition is modified to improve the performance of the enzyme. So far it was assumed that a relatively small modification of the amino acid composition of a protein does not significantly influence the level of expression or media requirements. To determine, which effects these modifications might have on cultivation and product formation, six different BFD-variants with one or two altered amino acids and the wild type BFD were expressed in Escherichia coli SG13009 pKK233-2. The oxygen transfer rate (OTR) as parameter for growth and metabolic activity of the different E. coli clones was monitored on-line in LB, TB and modified PanG mineral medium with the Respiratory Activity MOnitoring System (RAMOS). Results Although the E. coli clones were genetically nearly identical, the kinetics of their metabolic activity surprisingly differed in the standard media applied. Three different types of OTR curves could be distinguished. Whereas the first type (clones expressing Leu476Pro-Ser181Thr or Leu476Pro) had typical OTR curves, the second type (clones expressing the wild type BFD, Ser181Thr or His281Ala) showed an early drop of OTR in LB and TB medium and a drastically reduced maximum OTR in modified PanG mineral medium. The third type (clone expressing Leu476Gln) behaved variable. Depending on the cultivation conditions, its OTR curve was similar to the first or the second type. It was shown, that the kinetics of the metabolic activity of the first type depended on the concentration of thiamine, which is a cofactor of BFD, in the medium. It was demonstrated that the cofactor binding strength of the different BFD-variants correlated with the differences in metabolic activity of their respective host strain. Conclusions The BFD-variants with high cofactor binding affinity (wild type, His281Ala, Ser181Thr) obviously extract thiamine from the medium and bind it tightly to the enzyme. This might explain the hampered growth of these clones. In contrast, growth of clones expressing variants with low cofactor binding affinity (Leu476His, Leu476Pro, Leu476Pro-Ser181Thr) is not impaired. Leu476Gln has an intermediate cofactor binding strength, thus, growth of its host strain depends on the specific cultivation conditions. This paper shows that slight differences of the amino acid composition can affect protein expression and cultivation and might require an adaptation of media components. Effects such as the observed are hardly foreseeable and difficult to detect in conventional screening processes. Via small scale experiments with on-line measurements in shake flasks such effects influencing the cultivation and product formation can be detected and avoided. PMID:20958977

2010-01-01

413

Understanding Sun-Climate Connection by Analysis of Historical Sunspot, Auroral and Weather Records  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fifty years of galactic cosmic ray data show changes with the solar cycle. Deflection of the highly energetic particles from exploding supernovae by the solar wind and associated magnetic field also modulates cosmogenic radioisotope production high in the atmosphere. The same trends are seen in carbon-14 and beryllium-10 abundances from long-lived trees and polar ice cores, respectively. Total solar irradiances measured by satellite radiometers show a 0.1% variance over the last two solar cycles, with only a small effect on global temperatures. A longer view is obviously needed. During the Maunder Minimum (1645-1715) sunspots were rarely seen. Total solar irradiances, reconstructed from historical sunspot data, were 0.24% lower, correlating nicely with an estimated 0.5-degree drop in Northern Hemisphere surface temperatures during the Little Ice Age [Lean and Rind, J. Clim. 11, 3069, 1998]. A longer time series has been reconstructed from even earlier records. From the frequencies of sunspot and auroral sightings in East Asian and European chronicles, C-14 and Be-10 abundances we have reconstructed the recent history of a variable Sun. In the past 1800 years the Sun has gone through nine cycles of brightness change. Although these long-term changes were <1% they have clearly affected the climate [Pang and Yau, Eos 83, No. 43, 481, 2002]. We have also analyzed Chinese historical weather records for comparison. Reports of unseasonable cold are classified by their degree of severity: (1) Late (April-June) or early (July-Sept.) killing frosts; (2) Bitter cold/heavy snowfall; and (3) Heavy sustained snowfall, bitter cold with frozen wells, lakes, rivers and icebound seas. The latter cases were often widespread and multi-year. All categories occurred most often during Maunder Minimum. The Category 3 episodes were in 1652-54, 1656, 1664, 1670-72, 1676-77, 1683, 1688-91, 1716 and 1718-19. The coldest time 1670-1697 coincides with lows in aurora sightings and numerical model simulated temperatures, and highs in radioisotope production. There was only one Category 3 episode between the Maunder and Dalton Minima-in 1761 (due to a big eruption); and two in the Dalton Minimum (1795-1825)-in 1796 and 1814-17. The 1815 Tambora eruption, with the reduced solar luminosity, seem to have been responsible for the "year without summer" and long-cold spell. The Sun has brightened since the Dalton Minimum, but the climate of China stayed cold through the 19th century. However there were only two Category 3 episodes: in 1841 and 1877. The onset of global warming reduced that to just once in the 20th century: 1955. The climate of China seems to have been warm during the Late 14th-Century Maximum (1350-1410). We have found only one Category 1 episode: in 1393. It then turned cold during the Sporer Minimum (1410-1590). Category 3 episodes occurred in 1453-54, 1493, 1513, 1569, and 1577-78. The early 1453 great Kuwae eruption apparently deepened and prolonged the first [Pang, Eos 74, No. 43, 106, 1993; Simarski, Aramco World 47, No.6, 8, 1996]. We conclude that the climate of China in the past 650 years generally follows world trend. The major forcing seems to have been changing solar luminosity, as all but four severe weather episodes coincide with solar minimum. The exact mechanism remains unknown, but could have been increased cloudiness.

Pang, K. D.; Yau, K. K.

2005-12-01

414

Effects of Intra- and Interpatch Host Density on Egg Parasitism by Three Species of Trichogramma  

PubMed Central

Host-foraging responses to different intra- and interpatch densities were used to assess three Trichogramma spp. (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae) Trichogramma deion Pinto and Oatman, T. ostriniae Pang and Chen, and T. pretiosum Riley as potential biological control agents for the Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella Hbner (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae). Single nave females were allowed 6 h to forage in Plexiglas arenas with four different spatial arrangements of host eggs, nine single-egg patches), nine four-egg patches, 36 single-egg patches, and 36 four-egg patches. No significant differences were found among species in the number of patches parasitized. As expected, all three species parasitized the most eggs in the 36 four-egg patch treatment and the least in the nine single-egg patch treatment. T. deion parasitized significantly more eggs than T. pretiosum on the nine four-egg patches. T. ostriniae parasitized significantly more patches when intrapatch density was greater, regardless of interpatch density. In contrast, T. deion only parasitized more patches at the greater intrapatch density when the interpatch density was low. Patch density had no effect on T. pretiosum. The spatial pattern of parasitism was more aggregated for T. deion and T. ostriniae in the 36 four-egg patches treatment compared to the 36 single-egg patches treatment. Therefore, intrapatch density was more important than interpatch density for T. ostriniae, and potentially for T. deion, but not for T. pretiosum. T. deion may be the best candidate for augmentative biological control because it parasitized either slightly or significantly more eggs than the other two species in all four treatments. Furthermore, the pattern of parasitism by T. deion in the 36 four-egg patches treatment was the most aggregated among the three species, suggesting a more thorough searching pattern. In contrast, T. pretiosum had the least aggregated pattern of parasitism and therefore may have used a more random foraging pattern. PMID:20673123

Grieshop, Matthew J.; Flinn, Paul W.; Nechols, James R.

2010-01-01

415

COLOR SUPERCONDUCTIVITY, INSTANTONS AND PARITY (NON?)-CONSERVATION AT HIGH BARYON DENSITY-VOLUME 5.  

SciTech Connect

This one day Riken BNL Research Center workshop was organized to follow-up on the rapidly developing theoretical work on color super-conductivity, instanton dynamics, and possible signatures of parity violation in strong interactions that was stimulated by the talk of Frank Wilczek during the Riken BNL September Symposium. The workshop was held on November 11, 1997 at the center with over 30 participants. The program consisted of four talks on theory in the morning followed by two talks in the afternoon by experimentalists and open discussion. Krishna Rajagopal (MIT) first reviewed the status of the chiral condensate calculations at high baryon density within the instanton model and the percolation transition at moderate densities restoring chiral symmetry. Mark Alford (Princeton) then discussed the nature of the novel color super-conducting diquark condensates. The main result was that the largest gap on the order of 100 MeV was found for the 0{sup +} condensate, with only a tiny gap << MeV for the other possible 1{sup +}. Thomas Schaefer (INT) gave a complete overview of the instanton effects on correlators and showed independent calculations in collaboration with Shuryak (SUNY) and Velkovsky (BNL) confirming the updated results of the Wilczek group (Princeton, MIT). Yang Pang (Columbia) addressed the general question of how breaking of discrete symmetries by any condensate with suitable quantum numbers could be searched for experimentally especially at the AGS through longitudinal A polarization measurements. Nicholas Samios (BNL) reviewed the history of measurements on {Lambda} polarization and suggested specific kinematical variables for such analysis. Brian Cole (Columbia) showed recent E910 measurements of {Lambda} production at the AGS in nuclear collisions and focused on the systematic biases that must be considered when looking for small symmetry breaking effects. Lively discussions led by Robert Jaffe (MIT) focused especially on speculations on the still unknown signatures of 0{sup +} color super-conductivity which of course would not be observable via discrete symmetry breaking.

GYULASSY,M.

1997-11-11

416

Dispersal of Trichogramma ostriniae (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae) in potato fields.  

PubMed

The dispersal ability of Trichogramma ostriniae Pang and Chen, a biological control agent of Ostrinia nubilalis Hbner, was studied in commercial potato fields on the Eastern Shore of Virginia. The purpose was to quantify dispersal of T. ostriniae after an inundative release to aid in determining the number of release points needed per unit area for effective biological control of O. nubilalis in solanaceous crops. A single release of approximately 0.5 million wasps was made in two spatially separate potato fields in summer 2005 and 2006. Each release area contained 25 monitoring points at distances from 5 to 45 m from the release point bearing a yellow sticky card and O. nubilalis egg sentinels to observe for adult parasitoids and parasitism, respectively. Results showed that movement of T. ostriniae adults from the release point was rapid with individuals captured at 45 m within 1 d of emergence. High rates of parasitization (20-50%) also were observed at this distance, but the levels decreased with increasing distance from the release point. The distances that encompassed 98% recaptured T. ostriniae adults (x(98)) were 27.5 and 12.9 m from the release point in 2005 and 2006, respectively. The (x(98)) distances for parasitization of O. nubilalis were 21-26 m in 2005 and 8-10 m in 2006. However, the highest levels of parasitization in both years occurred nearest the release point. T. ostriniae showed uniform dispersal within an area of approximately 0.1 ha, indicating that multiple release points should be used for effective dispersal of T. ostriniae and control of O. nubilalis in solanaceous crops. Based on the assumption that a distance of 16 m represents the radius around a release point in which T. ostriniae activity was at its maximum, we estimate that approximately 12 release points/ha would be required in potato fields. PMID:19508776

Chapman, Anna V; Kuhar, Thomas P; Schultz, Peter B; Brewster, Carlyle C

2009-06-01

417

Dengue virus type 3 isolated from a fatal case with visceral complications induces enhanced proinflammatory responses and apoptosis of human dendritic cells.  

PubMed

A recent (2007 to 2009) dengue outbreak caused by dengue virus (DENV) in Paraguay presented unusual severe clinical outcomes associated with 50% mortality rates. Although it has been reported that inflammatory responses influence the severity of dengue virus infection (T. Pang, M. J. Cardosa, and M. G. Guzman, Immunol. Cell Biol. 85:43-45, 2007), there remains a paucity of information on virus-innate immunity interactions influencing clinical outcome. Using human dendritic cells from a major innate immune cell population as an in vitro model, we have investigated signature cytokine responses as well as infectivity-replicative profiles of DENV clinical isolates from either a nonfatal case of classical dengue fever (strain DENV3/290; isolated in Brazil in 2002) or a fatal case of dengue fever with visceral complications isolated in Paraguay in 2007 (strain DENV3/5532). Strain DENV3/5532 was found to display significantly higher replicative ability than DENV3/290 in monocyte-derived dendritic cells (mdDCs). In addition, compared to DENV3/290 results, mdDCs exposed to DENV3/5532 showed increased production of proinflammatory cytokines associated with higher rates of programmed cell death, as shown by annexin V staining. The observed phenotype was due to viral replication, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-?) appears to exert a protective effect on virus-induced mdDC apoptosis. These results suggest that the DENV3/5532 strain isolated from the fatal case replicates within human dendritic cells, modulating cell survival and synthesis of inflammatory mediators. PMID:21450836

Silveira, Guilherme F; Meyer, Florencia; Delfraro, Adriana; Mosimann, Ana Luiza P; Coluchi, Norma; Vasquez, Cyntia; Probst, Christian M; Bfica, Andr; Bordignon, Juliano; Dos Santos, Claudia N Duarte

2011-06-01

418

Pre-Venus-Transit Dark Lunar Eclipse Reveals a Very Large Volcanic Eruption in 1761  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Kepler's third law states Sun-planet distances in AU. International observations of the solar parallax during the 1761/1769 Venus transits gave us the first AU in miles. Benjamin Franklin promoted American participation in the project. While serving as Ambassador to France he observed that a "dry fog from the 1783 Laki eruption in Iceland had obscured the Sun, and led to a cold summer and winter. Using Benjamin Franklin's method I analyzed photometric observations of the dark lunar eclipse made just before the 1761 Venus transit, ice core, tree ring, and Chinese weather data, and conclude that a very large previously unknown volcanic eruption in early 1761 had cooled the world climate. Observers worldwide found the 18 May 1761 totally eclipsed Moon very dark or invisible, e.g., Wargentin could not see the Moon for 38 minutes even with a 2-ft telescope (Phil. Trans. 52, 208, 1761-1762). Since the totally eclipsed Moon is illuminated only by sunlight refracted by the Earth's atmosphere, the obscuration must have been very severe. Ice cores from Greenland and Antarctica have large sulfuric acid contents in 1761-1762, precipitated from the global volcanic acid cloud (Zeilinski, J. Geophys. Res. 102, 26625, 1997). Frost-damaged rings in American bristlecone pines confirm that 1761 was very cold (LaMarche, Nature 307, 121, 1984). Contemporary Chinese chronicles report that heavy sustained snow fell from the Tropic of Cancer to the Yellow River. Wells and rivers froze, e.g., Taihu "Great Lake and nearby Yangtze tributaries were not navigable. Innumerable trees, birds and livestock perished, etc. All observations are consistent with the above conclusion. Finally Benjamin Franklin's criteria for a climate-altering volcanic eruption are still universally used. Moreover his legacy continues to inspire climate researchers. See Pang, Eos 74, no. 43, 106, 1993; and as cited in "Earth in Balance, Al Gore, p. 379, 1993.

Pang, Kevin

2009-01-01

419

Robust evidence for random fractal scaling of groundwater levels in unconfined aquifers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

SummaryThis study introduces new approaches to improve the statistical robustness of techniques for quantifying the fractal scaling of groundwater levels, and uses these techniques to investigate scaling of groundwater levels from a consolidated permeable carbonate aquifer. Six groundwater level time series and an associated river stage time series from the unconfined Chalk aquifer (a dual-porosity, fractured limestone aquifer) in the Pang-Lambourn catchment, UK, have been analysed. Surrogate data of time series with known scaling properties have been used to estimate the probability distribution of the spectral and geometric scaling exponents determined by detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) and power spectral density (PSD) respectively; robust regression techniques have been used to improve estimates of the scaling exponents; and robust non-parametric techniques have been used to correlate scaling exponents with features of the boreholes and catchments. Strong statistical support has been found for temporal scaling of groundwater levels over a wide range of time scales, however, bootstrap estimates of the scaling exponents indicate a much larger range of exponents than found by previous studies, suggesting that the uncertainty in existing estimates of scaling exponents may be too small. There is robust evidence that geometrical scaling properties at each borehole can be related to the depth of the observation boreholes and distance of those boreholes from the river in the catchment, but no such correlations were found for the spectral scaling exponents. The results build on the body of evidence that groundwater levels, as with many hydrogeological phenomena, may be well modelled with mathematical concepts from statistical mechanics that do not attempt to capture every detail of these highly heterogeneous and complex systems.

Little, Max A.; Bloomfield, John P.

2010-11-01

420

The amino terminus of GLUT4 functions as an internalization motif but not an intracellular retention signal when substituted for the transferrin receptor cytoplasmic domain  

PubMed Central

Previous studies have demonstrated that the amino-terminal cytoplasmic domain of GLUT4 contains a phenylalanine-based targeting motif that determines its steady state distribution between the surface and the interior of cells (Piper, R. C., C. Tai, P. Kuleza, S. Pang, D. Warnock, J. Baenziger, J. W. Slot, H. J. Geuze, C. Puri, and D. E. James. 1993. J. Cell Biol. 121:1221). To directly measure the effect that the GLUT4 amino terminus has on internalization and subsequent recycling back to the cell surface, we constructed chimeras in which this sequence was substituted for the amino-terminal cytoplasmic domain of the human transferrin receptor. The chimeras were stably transfected into Chinese hamster ovary cells and their endocytic behavior characterized. The GLUT4-transferrin receptor chimera was recycled back to the cell surface with a rate similar to the transferrin receptor, indicating that the GLUT4 sequence was not promoting intracellular retention of the chimera. The GLUT4-transferrin receptor chimera was internalized at half the rate of the transferrin receptor. Substitution of an alanine for phenylalanine at position 5 slowed internalization of the chimera by twofold, to a level characteristic of bulk membrane internalization. However, substitution of a tyrosine increased the rate of internalization to the level of the transferrin receptor. Neither of these substitutions significantly altered the rate at which the chimeras were recycled back to the cell surface. These results demonstrate that the major function of the GLUT4 amino-terminal domain is to promote the effective internalization of the protein from the cell surface, via a functional phenylalanine-based internalization motif, rather than retention of the transporter within intracellular structures. PMID:8120093

1994-01-01

421

Unusual relaxation pathway from the two-photon excited first singlet state of carotenoids.  

PubMed

Transient infrared and visible absorption measurements along with density functional theory (DFT) calculations on carotenoids 8'-apo-beta-caroten-8'-al (I) and 7',7'-dicyano-7'-apo-beta-carotene (II) were used to explore the nature of a long-lived species observed in transient infrared absorption measurements following two-photon excitation (Pang et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2009, 113, 13806). The long-lived species of I has a very strong infrared absorption around 1510 cm(-1) and a visible transient absorption band centered at 760 nm. The long-lived species appears on two different time scales of approximately 16 and 140-270 ps. The longer rise component is absent in nonpolar solvents. DFT calculations using the B3LYP functional and the 6-31G(d) basis set were used to investigate the ground-state potential-energy surface of I and II including its conformational isomers, a pi-diradical "kinked" structure, and cation and neutral radicals. From the simulated infrared spectra of all the structures considered, we found a close match in the cation radical spectrum to the experimental infrared spectrum of the long-lived species. However, the visible absorption band does not match that of the monomeric cation radical. On the basis of our experimental and theoretical results, we propose a charge-transfer complex between a carotenoid and a solvent molecule for the origin of the long-lived species formed from the direct two-photon excitation of the S(1) state. PMID:20104845

Pang, Yoonsoo; Jones, Garth A; Prantil, Matthew A; Fleming, Graham R

2010-02-24

422

The retinaldehyde reductase DHRS3 is essential for preventing the formation of excess retinoic acid during embryonic development  

PubMed Central

Oxidation of retinol via retinaldehyde results in the formation of the essential morphogen all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA). Previous studies have identified critical roles in the regulation of embryonic ATRA levels for retinol, retinaldehyde, and ATRA-oxidizing enzymes; however, the contribution of retinaldehyde reductases to ATRA metabolism is not completely understood. Herein, we investigate the role of the retinaldehyde reductase Dhrs3 in embryonic retinoid metabolism using a Dhrs3-deficient mouse. Lack of DHRS3 leads to a 40% increase in the levels of ATRA and a 60% and 55% decrease in the levels of retinol and retinyl esters, respectively, in Dhrs3?/? embryos compared to wild-type littermates. Furthermore, accumulation of excess ATRA is accompanied by a compensatory 3050% reduction in the expression of ATRA synthetic genes and a 120% increase in the expression of the ATRA catabolic enzyme Cyp26a1 in Dhrs3?/? embryos vs. controls. Excess ATRA also leads to alterations (4080%) in the expression of several developmentally important ATRA target genes. Consequently, Dhrs3?/? embryos die late in gestation and display defects in cardiac outflow tract formation, atrial and ventricular septation, skeletal development, and palatogenesis. These data demonstrate that the reduction of retinaldehyde by DHRS3 is critical for preventing formation of excess ATRA during embryonic development.Billings, S. E., Pierzchalski, K., Butler Tjaden, N. E., Pang, X.-Y., Trainor, P. A., Kane, M. A., Moise, A. R. The retinaldehyde reductase DHRS3 is essential for preventing the formation of excess retinoic acid during embryonic development. PMID:24005908

Billings, Sara E.; Pierzchalski, Keely; Butler Tjaden, Naomi E.; Pang, Xiao-Yan; Trainor, Paul A.; Kane, Maureen A.; Moise, Alexander R.

2013-01-01

423

XAS study on copper red in ancient glass beads from Thailand.  

PubMed

Glass has been used in ornaments and decorations in Thailand for thousands of years, being discovered in several archeological sites and preserved in museums throughout the country. To date only a few of them have been examined by conventional methods for their compositions and colorations. In this work we report for the first time an advanced structural analysis of Thai ancient glass beads using synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectrometry. Four samples of ancient glass beads were selected from four different archeological sites in three southern provinces (Ranong, Krabi and Pang-nga) of Thailand. Archaeological dating indicated that they were made more than 1,300 years ago. A historically known method for obtaining a red color is to add compounds containing transition elements such as gold, copper, and chromium. For our samples, EDX spectrometry data revealed existing fractions of iron, copper, zinc, and chromium in ascending order. Thus, copper was selectively studied by XAS as being potentially responsible for the red color in the glass beads. K-shell X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) of copper were recorded in fluorescence mode using an advanced 13-element germanium detector. Comparisons with XANES spectra of reference compounds identified two major forms of copper, monovalent copper and a metallic cluster, dispersed in the glass matrix. The cluster dimension was approximated on the basis of structural modeling and a theoretical XANES calculation. As a complement, EXAFS spectra were analyzed to determine the first-shell coordination around copper. XAS was proven to be an outstanding, advanced technique that can be applied to study nondestructively archaeological objects to understand their characteristics and how they were produced in ancient times. PMID:20890783

Klysubun, Wantana; Thongkam, Yatima; Pongkrapan, Sorapong; Won-in, Krit; T-Thienprasert, Jiraroj; Dararutana, Pisutti

2011-03-01

424

STS-96 Mission Specialist Jernigan arrives at KSC for launch  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-96 Mission Specialist Tamara E. Jernigan smiles in excitement on her arrival at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) aboard a T-38 jet aircraft. She joins other crew members Commander Kent V. Rominger, Pilot Rick D. Husband, and Mission Specialists Ellen Ochoa, Daniel T. Barry, Julie Payette and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev for launch preparations prior to liftoff. Payette represents the Canadian Space Agency and Tokarev represents the Russian Space Agency. STS-96 is a 10-day logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying 5000 pounds of supplies to be stored aboard the station for use by future crews, including laptop computers, cameras, tools, spare parts, and clothing. The mission also includes such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-involved experiment. The mission will include a space walk to attach the cranes to the outside of the ISS for use in future construction. Space Shuttle Discovery is due to launch on May 27 at 6:48 a.m. EDT. Landing is expected at the SLF on June 6 about 3:25 a.m. EDT.

1999-01-01

425

STS-96 crew leaves the O&C Building enroute to Pad 39B  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The STS-96 crew smile and wave at onlookers as they eagerly head for the bus that will take them to Launch Pad 39B for liftoff of Space Shuttle Discovery, targeted for 6:49 a.m. EDT. From left to right in front are Mission Specialists Valery Ivanovich Tokarev, Ellen Ochoa, Julie Payette and Tamara E. Jernigan; in back are Mission Specialist Daniel T. Barry, Pilot Rick D. Husband, and Commander Kent V. Rominger. Payette is with the Canadian Space Agency, and Tokarev is with the Russian Space Agency. STS-96 is a 10-day logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying about 4,000 pounds of supplies, to be stored aboard the station for use by future crews, including laptop computers, cameras, tools, spare parts, and clothing. The mission also includes such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student- involved experiment. It will include a space walk to attach the cranes to the outside of the ISS for use in future construction. Landing is expected at the SLF on June 6 about 1:58 a.m. EDT.

1999-01-01

426

STS-96 crew takes part in payload Interface Verification Test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

At the SPACEHAB Facility, STS-96 Mission Specialist Ellen Ochoa and Commander Kent Rominger smile for the camera during a payload Interface Verification Test (IVT) for their upcoming mission to the International Space Station. Other crew members at KSC for the IVT are Pilot Rick Husband and Mission Specialists Tamara Jernigan, Dan Barry, Julie Payette and Valery Tokarev of Russia. Mission STS-96 carries the SPACEHAB Logistics Double Module, which will have equipment to further outfit the International Space Station service module and equipment that can be off-loaded from the early U.S. assembly flights. It carries internal logistics and resupply cargo for station outfitting, plus an external Russian cargo crane to be mounted to the exterior of the Russian station segment and used to perform space walking maintenance activities. The double module stowage provides capacity of up to 10,000 lbs. with the ability to accommodate powered payloads, four external rooftop stowage locations, four double-rack locations (two powered), up to 61 bulkhead-mounted middeck locker locations, and floor storage for large unique items and Soft Stowage. STS-96 is targeted to launch May 20 about 9:32 a.m. EDT.

1999-01-01

427

STS-96 Commander Rominger arrives at KSC for launch  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-96 Commander Kent V. Rominger smiles on his arrival at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) aboard a T- 38 jet aircraft. He joins other crew members Pilot Rick D. Husband and Mission Specialists Ellen Ochoa, Tamara E. Jernigan, Daniel T. Barry, Julie Payette and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev for launch preparations prior to liftoff. Payette represents the Canadian Space Agency and Tokarev represents the Russian Space Agency. STS-96 is a 10-day logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying 5000 pounds of supplies to be stored aboard the station for use by future crews, including laptop computers, cameras, tools, spare parts, and clothing. The mission also includes such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student- involved experiment. The mission will include a space walk to attach the cranes to the outside of the ISS for use in future construction. Space Shuttle Discovery is due to launch on May 27 at 6:48 a.m. EDT. Landing is expected at the SLF on June 6 about 3:25 a.m. EDT.

1999-01-01

428

Human Embryology Animations  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

One of the most impressive ways to learn about biology, particularly that which we seldom see, is through modeling. Dr. Valerie O'Loughlin and her colleagues at Indiana University have created this thoroughly impressive set of animations so that "students could better understand the complex processes that must occur in embryologic development." The site is arranged into five main areas, including: Cardiovascular Embryology, Development of the Head and Neck, Gastrointestinal Embryology, Development of the Limbs, and Urinary and Reproductive Embryology. However, the only two sections currently loaded with animations are the first two. Presumably, the rest are coming soon. Also, because these animations are part of a study of teaching efficacy, Dr. O'Loughlin asks that users participate in an optional survey. However, all animations can be accessed without taking part. As a great addition to the site, users are presented with a few questions regarding the anatomy which they are about to see, prior to viewing the animation. Undboutedly, this is related to the Indiana University course that these animations are a part of, but they serve as a great addition for visitors other than students, too.

O'Loughlin, Valerie

429

The STS-96 crew get emergency egress training at Pad 39B as part of TCDT  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

At Launch Pad 39B, Capt. Steve Kelly, with Fire Services, explains part of the emergency egress procedure to the STS-96 crew. Mission Specialist Daniel Barry (M.D., Ph.D.) is in the evacuation seat and training officer Gina Tucker behind him. In the background, workers at the pad look on. The STS-96 crew are taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities which also provide simulated countdown exercises and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. The other crew members are Commander Kent V. Rominger, Pilot Rick Douglas Husband and Mission Specialists Ellen Ochoa (Ph.D.), Tamara E. Jernigan (Ph.D.), Julie Payette, with the Canadian Space Agency, and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev, with the Russian Space Agency. STS-96, which is scheduled for liftoff on May 20 at 9:32 a.m., is a logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-led experiment.

1999-01-01

430

STS-96 crew takes part in payload Interface Verification Test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During a payload Interface Verification Test (IVT) in the SPACEHAB Facility, STS-96 Mission Specialist Valery Tokarev of Russia (second from left) and Commander Kent Rominger learn about the Sequential Shunt Unit (SSU) in front of them from Lynn Ashby (far right), with Johnson Space Center. At the far left looking on is TTI interpreter Valentina Maydell. Other crew members at KSC for the IVT are Pilot Rick Husband and Mission Specialists Ellen Ochoa, Tamara Jernigan, Dan Barry and Julie Payette. The SSU is part of the cargo on Mission STS-96, which carries the SPACEHAB Logistics Double Module, with equipment to further outfit the International Space Station service module and equipment that can be off-loaded from the early U.S. assembly flights. The SPACEHAB carries internal logistics and resupply cargo for station outfitting, plus an external Russian cargo crane to be mounted to the exterior of the Russian station segment and used to perform space walking maintenance activities. The double module stowage provides capacity of up to 10,000 lbs. with the ability to accommodate powered payloads, four external rooftop stowage locations, four double-rack locations (two powered), up to 61 bulkhead-mounted middeck locker locations, and floor storage for large unique items and Soft Stowage. STS-96 is targeted to launch May 20 about 9:32 a.m.

1999-01-01

431

The STS-91 crew participate in the CEIT for their mission  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The STS-91 crew participate in the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) for their upcoming Space Shuttle mission at the SPACEHAB Payload Processing Facility in Cape Canaveral. The CEIT gives astronauts an opportunity to get a hands-on look at the payloads with which they will be working on-orbit. STS-91 will be the ninth and final scheduled Mir docking and will include a single module of SPACEHAB, used mainly as a large pressurized cargo container for science, logistical equipment and supplies to be exchanged between the orbiter Discovery and the Russian Space Station Mir. The nearly 10-day flight of STS-91 also is scheduled to include the return of the last astronaut to live and work aboard the Russian orbiting outpost, Mission Specialist Andy Thomas, Ph.D. Liftoff of Discovery and its six-member crew is targeted for May 28, 1998, at 8:05 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A. From left to right are Mission Specialist Janet Kavandi, Ph.D., Pilot Dominic Gorie, Mission Specialist Franklin Chang-Diaz, Ph.D., Commander Charles Precourt, Russian Interpreter Olga Belozerova, and Mission Specialist Valery Ryumin with the Russian Space Agency.

1998-01-01

432

The STS-91 crew participate in the CEIT for their mission  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The STS-91 crew participate in the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) for their upcoming Space Shuttle mission at the SPACEHAB Payload Processing Facility in Cape Canaveral. The CEIT gives astronauts an opportunity to get a hands-on look at the payloads with which they will be working on-orbit. STS-91 will be the ninth and final scheduled Mir docking and will include a single module of SPACEHAB, used mainly as a large pressurized cargo container for science, logistical equipment and supplies to be exchanged between the orbiter Discovery and the Russian Space Station Mir. The nearly 10-day flight of STS-91 also is scheduled to include the return of the last astronaut to live and work aboard the Russian orbiting outpost, Mission Specialist Andy Thomas, Ph.D. Liftoff of Discovery and its six-member crew is targeted for May 28, 1998, at 8:05 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A. Seen here are STS-91 Mission Specialist Valery Ryumin with the Russian Space Agency and his Russian Interpreter Olga Belozerova.

1998-01-01

433

The STS-91 crew participate in the CEIT for their mission  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The STS-91 crew participate in the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) for their upcoming Space Shuttle mission at the SPACEHAB Payload Processing Facility in Cape Canaveral. The CEIT gives astronauts an opportunity to get a hands-on look at the payloads with which they will be working on-orbit. STS-91 will be the ninth and final scheduled Mir docking and will include a single module of SPACEHAB, used mainly as a large pressurized cargo container for science, logistical equipment and supplies to be exchanged between the orbiter Discovery and the Russian Space Station Mir. The nearly 10-day flight of STS-91 also is scheduled to include the return of the last astronaut to live and work aboard the Russian orbiting outpost, Mission Specialist Andy Thomas, Ph.D. Liftoff of Discovery and its six-member crew is targeted for May 28, 1998, at 8:05 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A. From left to right are STS-91 Pilot Dominic Gorie, Russian Interpreter Olga Belozerova, STS-91 Commander Charles Precourt, and STS-91 Mission Specialist Valery Ryumin with the Russian Space Agency.

1998-01-01

434

STS-96 crew takes part in payload Interface Verification Test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the SPACEHAB Facility, the STS-96 crew looks at equipment as part of a payload Interface Verification Test (IVT) for their upcoming mission to the International Space Station . From left are Mission Specialist Ellen Ochoa (behind the opened storage cover ), Commander Kent Rominger, Pilot Rick Husband (holding a lithium hydroxide canister) and Mission Specialists Dan Barry, Valery Tokarev of Russia and Julie Payette. In the background is TTI interpreter Valentina Maydell. The other crew member at KSC for the IVT is Mission Specialist Tamara Jernigan. Mission STS-96 carries the SPACEHAB Logistics Double Module, which has equipment to further outfit the International Space Station service module and equipment that can be off-loaded from the early U.S. assembly flights. The SPACEHAB carries internal logistics and resupply cargo for station outfitting, plus an external Russian cargo crane to be mounted to the exterior of the Russian station segment and used to perform space walking maintenance activities. The double module stowage provides capacity of up to 10,000 lbs. with the ability to accommodate powered payloads, four external rooftop stowage locations, four double-rack locations (two powered), up to 61 bulkhead-mounted middeck locker locations, and floor storage for large unique items and Soft Stowage. STS-96 is targeted to launch May 20 about 9:32 a.m.

1999-01-01

435

The STS-91 crew participate in the CEIT for their mission  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The STS-91 crew participate in the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) for their upcoming Space Shuttle mission at the SPACEHAB Payload Processing Facility in Cape Canaveral. The CEIT gives astronauts an opportunity to get a hands-on look at the payloads with which they will be working on-orbit. STS-91 will be the ninth and final scheduled Mir docking and will include a single module of SPACEHAB, used mainly as a large pressurized cargo container for science, logistical equipment and supplies to be exchanged between the orbiter Discovery and the Russian Space Station Mir. The nearly 10-day flight of STS-91 also is scheduled to include the return of the last astronaut to live and work aboard the Russian orbiting outpost, Mission Specialist Andy Thomas, Ph.D. Liftoff of Discovery and its six-member crew is targeted for May 28, 1998, at 8:05 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A. From left to right are STS-91 Pilot Dominic Gorie, STS-91 Commander Charles Precourt, Boeing SPACEHAB Payload Operations Senior Engineer Jim Behling, Boeing SPACEHAB Program Senior Engineer Shawn Hicks, Boeing SPACEHAB Program Specialist in Engineering Ed Saenger, STS-91 Mission Specialist Valery Ryumin with the Russian Space Agency, Boeing SPACEHAB Program Manager in Engineering Brad Reid, and Russian Interpreter Olga Belozerova.

1998-01-01

436

STS-96 crew takes part in payload Interface Verification Test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the SPACEHAB Facility, STS-96 Mission Specialist Valery Tokarev of Russia (left) and Commander Kent Rominger (second from right) listen to Lynn Ashby (far right), with JSC, talking about the SPACEHAB equipment in front of them during a payload Interface Verification Test (IVT). In the background behind Tokarev is TTI interpreter Valentina Maydell. Other STS-96 crew members at KSC for the IVT are Pilot Rick Husband and Mission Specialists Dan Barry, Ellen Ochoa, Tamara Jernigan and Julie Payette. Mission STS-96 carries the SPACEHAB Logistics Double Module, which will have equipment to further outfit the International Space Station service module and equipment that can be off-loaded from the early U.S. assembly flights. It carries internal logistics and resupply cargo for station outfitting, plus an external Russian cargo crane to be mounted to the exterior of the Russian station segment and used to perform space walking maintenance activities. The double module stowage provides capacity of up to 10,000 lbs. with the ability to accommodate powered payloads, four external rooftop stowage locations, four double-rack locations (two powered), up to 61 bulkhead-mounted middeck locker locations, and floor storage for large unique items and Soft Stowage. STS-96 is targeted to launch May 20 about 9:32 a.m.

1999-01-01

437

The STS-91 crew participate in the CEIT for their mission  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The STS-91 crew participate in the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) for their upcoming Space Shuttle mission at the SPACEHAB Payload Processing Facility in Cape Canaveral. The CEIT gives astronauts an opportunity to get a hands-on look at the payloads with which they will be working on-orbit. STS-91 will be the ninth and final scheduled Mir docking and will include a single module of SPACEHAB, used mainly as a large pressurized cargo container for science, logistical equipment and supplies to be exchanged between the orbiter Discovery and the Russian Space Station Mir. The nearly 10-day flight of STS-91 also is scheduled to include the return of the last astronaut to live and work aboard the Russian orbiting outpost, Mission Specialist Andy Thomas, Ph.D. Liftoff of Discovery and its six-member crew is targeted for May 28, 1998, at 8:05 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A. From left to right are STS-91 Pilot Dominic Gorie, STS-91 Mission Specialist Franklin Chang-Diaz, Ph.D., STS-91 Commander Charles Precourt, Boeing SPACEHAB Program Senior Engineer Shawn Hicks, Russian Interpreter Olga Belozerova, and STS-91 Mission Specialist Valery Ryumin with the Russian Space Agency.

1998-01-01

438

University of Kentucky Agricultural Information Center  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

If you're just starting to learn about agriculture, biology, animal welfare or human environmental sciences, it can be a bit daunting. There are hundreds of online resources dealing with such matters, and separating the wheat from the chaff can be taxing and time-consuming. Valerie Perry and Jo Staggs-Neel at the University of Kentucky Library's Agricultural Information Center have created these three excellent research guides to the aforementioned subjects. The guides contain seven or eight separate subsections, including "Electronic Resources", "Best Databases", and "Frequently Cited Journals". Each guide also contains a "New Resource" area which profiles a newly added resource that complements the existing set of resources. A number of the links lead to resources that require a password or subscription, but there are enough here with open access to pique the interest of persons new to the field. Overall, it's a good way to get a basic grounding in the important online and offline resources in these three scholarly subjects.

439

STS-111 crew breakfast before launch  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-111 crew gather for the traditional pre-launch meal before the second launch attempt aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour. Seated left to right are Mission Specialists Franklin Chang-Diaz and Philippe Perrin (CNES); the Expedition 5 crew cosmonauts Sergei Treschev (RSA) and Valeri Korzun (RSA) and astronaut Peggy Whitson; Pilot Paul Lockhart and Commander Kenneth Cockrell. In front of them is the traditional cake. This mission marks the 14th Shuttle flight to the International Space Station and the third Shuttle mission this year. Mission STS-111 is the 18th flight of Endeavour and the 110th flight overall in NASA's Space Shuttle program. On mission STS-111, astronauts will deliver the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, the Mobile Base System (MBS), and the Expedition Five crew to the Space Station. During the seven days Endeavour will be docked to the Station, three spacewalks will be performed dedicated to installing MBS and the replacement wrist-roll joint on the Station's Canadarm2 robotic arm. Liftoff is scheduled for 5:22 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A.

2002-01-01

440

The STS-96 crew pose for a group photo on Launch Pad 39B  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The STS-96 crew pose for a group photo after emergency egress training at Launch Pad 39B. From left are Mission Specialist Ellen Ochoa (Ph.D.); Pilot Rick Douglas Husband; Mission Specialists Julie Payette, Daniel Barry (M.D., Ph.D.), amd Tamara E. Jernigan (Ph.D.); Commander Kent V. Rominger; and Mission Specialist Valery Ivanovich Tokarev. Payette is with the Canadian Space Agency, and Ivanovich Tokarev with the Russian Space Agency. Behind them is the tip of the external tank, which is 153.8 feet high. The external tank provides fuel to the three space shuttle main engines in the orbiter during liftoff and ascent. It is eventually jettisoned, entering the Earth's atmosphere, breaking up and impacting a remote ocean area. STS- 96, scheduled for liftoff on May 20 at 9:32 a.m., is a logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.- built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-led experiment.

1999-01-01

441

Physicists for Human Rights in the Former Soviet Union  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In his 1940 paper `Freedom and Science' Albert Einstein emphasized that ``intellectual independence is a primary necessity for the scientific inquirer'' and that ``political liberty is also extraordinarily important for his work.'' Raised in the tradition of intellectual independence and dedicated to the scientific truth, physicists were among the first to stand up for freedom in the USSR. It was no coincidence that the founders of the first independent Human Rights Committee (1970) were physicists: Andrei Sakharov, Valery Chalidze and Andrei Tverdokhlebov. In 1973 a physicist, Alexander Voronel, founded a Moscow Sunday (refusenik) Seminar -- the first openly independent scientific body in the history of the USSR. In 1976 physicists Andrei Sakharov, Yuri Orlov and a mathematician Natan Sharansky were the leading force in founding the famous Moscow Helsinki Human Rights Watch group. This talk briefly describes the special position of physicists (often viewed as Einstein's colleagues) in Soviet society, as well as their unique role in the struggle for human rights. It describes in some detail the Moscow Sunday Seminar, and extensions thereof such as International Conferences, the Computer School and the Computer Database of Refuseniks. The Soviet government considered such truly independent organizations as a challenge to Soviet authority and tried to destroy them. The Seminar's success and its very existence owed much to the support of Western scientific organizations, who persuaded their members to attend the Seminar and visit scientist-refuseniks. The human rights struggle led by physicists contributed substantially to the demise of the Soviet system.

Chernyak, Yuri

2005-03-01

442

STS-91 Mission Specialist Chang-Diaz visits KSC to participate in the TCDT  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-91 Mission Specialist Franklin Chang-Diaz, Ph.D., arrives at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard a T-38 jet. He is here to participate in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. The STS- 91 launch is targeted for June 2 with a launch window opening around 6:10 p.m. EDT. The mission will conclude Phase I of the joint U.S.-Russian International Space Station Program. Although it will be the ninth Shuttle docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, it will be the first Mir docking for the Space Shuttle orbiter Discovery. Chang-Diaz is making his sixth space flight. The STS-91 mission will also be the first flight for the new Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank. The STS-91 flight crew also includes Mission Commander Charles Precourt; Pilot Dominic Gorie; and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence; Janet Lynn Kavandi, Ph.D.; and Valery Ryumin, with the Russian Space Agency. Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will be returning to Earth with the crew after living aboard Mir since January 25, 1998.

1998-01-01

443

STS-111 Astronaut Chang-Diaz Performs Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The STS-111 mission, the 14th Shuttle mission to visit the International Space Station (ISS), was launched on June 5, 2002 aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavour. On board were the STS-111 and Expedition Five crew members. Astronauts Kerneth D. Cockrell, commander; Paul S. Lockhart, pilot; and mission specialists Franklin R. Chang-Diaz and Philippe Perrin were the STS-111 crew members. Expedition Five crew members included Cosmonaut Valery G. Korzun, commander; and Astronaut Peggy A. Whitson and Cosmonaut Sergei Y. Treschev, flight engineers. Three space walks enabled the STS-111 crew to accomplish the delivery and installation of the Mobile Remote Servicer Base System (MBS), an important part of the Station's Mobile Servicing System that allows the robotic arm to travel the length of the Station, which is necessary for future construction tasks. In this photograph, Astronaut Franklin R. Chang-Diaz participates in the first scheduled session of extra vehicular activity (EVA) for the STS-111 mission. During the space walk, Chang-Diaz and Perrin attached a Power and Data Grapple Fixture onto the ISS's P6 Truss, setting the stage for the future relocation of the P6. The next major task was to remove Service Module Debris Panels from Space Shuttle Endeavour's payload bay and attach them to their temporary location on Pressurized Mating Adapter 1 (PMA-1). The space walkers also removed thermal blankets to prepare the MBS for installation onto the station's Mobile Transporter (MT).

2002-01-01

444

STS-91 Mission Specialist Chang-Diaz pauses at the pad following TCDT activities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-91 Mission Specialist Franklin Chang-Diaz, Ph.D., pauses on the 217-foot level of Launch Complex 39A after the completion of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. Behind him, the Space Shuttle Discovery is being prepared for flight. The TCDT is held at KSC prior to each Space Shuttle flight to provide crews with an opportunity to participate in simulated countdown activities. STS-91 is scheduled to be launched on June 2 with a launch window opening around 6:10 p.m. EDT. The mission will feature the ninth Shuttle docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, the first Mir docking for Discovery, the conclusion of Phase I of the joint U.S.-Russian International Space Station Program, and the first flight of the new Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank. The STS-91 flight crew also includes Commander Charles Precourt; Pilot Dominic Gorie; and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence; Janet Kavandi, Ph.D.; and Valery Ryumin, with the Russian Space Agency. Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will be returning to Earth with the crew after living more than four months aboard Mir.

1998-01-01

445

STS-91 Mission Specialist Ryumin visits KSC to participate in the TCDT  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-91 Mission Specialist and Russian cosmonaut Valery Victorovitch Ryumin, arrives at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard a T-38 jet. He is here to participate in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. The STS-91 launch is targeted for June 2 with a launch window opening around 6:10 p.m. EDT. The mission will conclude Phase I of the joint U.S.-Russian International Space Station Program. Although it will be the ninth Shuttle docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, it will be the first Mir docking for the Space Shuttle orbiter Discovery. Ryumin is a veteran of three space flights and has logged 362 days in space. The STS-91 mission will also be the first flight for the new Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank. The STS-91 flight crew also includes Mission Commander Charles Precourt; Pilot Dominic Gorie; and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence; Franklin Chang-Diaz, Ph.D.; and Janet Kavandi, Ph.D. Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will be returning to Earth with the crew after living aboard Mir since January 25, 1998.

1998-01-01

446

STS-91 Mission Specialist Ryumin suits up for launch  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-91 Mission Specialist and Russian cosmonaut Valery Victorovitch Ryumin is outfitted with his ascent/reentry flight suit and helmet by two suit technicians in the Operations and Checkout (O&C) Building. The final suit fitting and checkout takes place prior to the crew walkout and transport to Launch Pad 39A. He has been director of the Russian Shuttle-Mir program and flight director for the Salyut-7 and Mir space stations and is a veteran of three space flights with a total of 362 days in space. This will be Ryumin's first visit to Mir. However, his experience with Russian spacecraft in orbit will prove extremely valuable as he helps the crew with Mir equipment transfer operations. He will also be assessing the condition of the station for the Russian space program. STS-91 is scheduled to be launched on June 2 with a launch window opening around 6:10 p.m. EDT. The mission will feature the ninth and final Shuttle docking with the Russian space station Mir, the first Mir docking for Discovery, the first on-orbit test of the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), and the first flight of the new Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank. Astronaut Andrew S. W. Thomas will return to Earth as a STS- 91 crew member after living more than four months aboard Mir.

1998-01-01

447

STS-96 M.S. Julie Payette and Tamara Jernigan check equipment during a CEIT  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1, STS-96 Mission Specialists (left) Julie Payette, with the Canadian Space Agency, and Tamara Jernigan, Ph.D., look over the foot restraint used during space walks. The STS-96 crew is at KSC to take part in a Crew Equipment Interface Test. The other crew members are Commander Kent V. Rominger, Pilot Rick Douglas Husband, and Mission Specialists Ellen Ochoa (Ph.D), Daniel Barry (M.D., Ph.D.), and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev, who represents the Russian Space Agency. The primary payload of STS-96 is the SPACEHAB Double Module. In addition, the Space Shuttle will carry unpressurized cargo such as the external Russian cargo crane known as STRELA; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), which is a logistics items carrier; and an ORU Transfer Device (OTD), a U.S.-built crane that will be stowed on the station for use during future ISS assembly missions. These cargo items will be stowed on the International Cargo Carrier, fitted inside the payload bay behind the SPACEHAB module. STS-96 is targeted for launch on May 24 from Launch Pad 39B.

1999-01-01

448

STS-96 Crew Breakfast in O&C Building before launch  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The STS-96 crew gathers in the early morning for a snack in the Operations and Checkout Building before suiting up for launch. Space Shuttle Discovery is due to launch today at 6:49 a.m. EDT. Seated from left are Mission Specialists Daniel T. Barry and Ellen Ochoa, Pilot Rick D. Husband, Mission Commander Kent V. Rominger, and Mission Specialists Julie Payette, Valery Ivanovich Tokarev, and Tamara E. Jernigan. Tokarev represents the Russian Space Agency and Payette the Canadian Space Agency. STS-96 is a 10-day logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying about 4,000 pounds of supplies to be stored aboard the station for use by future crews, including laptop computers, cameras, tools, spare parts, and clothing. The mission also includes such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student- involved experiment. It will include a space walk to attach the cranes to the outside of the ISS for use in future construction. Landing is expected at the SLF on June 6 about 1:58 a.m. EDT.

1999-01-01

449

Two Shuttle crews check equipment at SPACEHAB to be used on ISS Flights  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

At Astrotech in Titusville, Fla., STS-96 Mission Speciaists Daniel T. Barry (left), Julie Payette (center, with camera), and Tamara E. Jernigan (right, pointing) get a close look at one of the payloads on their upcoming mission. Other crew members are Commander Kent V. Rominger, and Mission Specialists Ellen Ochoa and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev, with the Russian Space Agency. Payette is with the Canadian Space Agency. For the first time, STS-96 will include an Integrated Cargo Carrier (ICC) that will carry a Russian cargo crane, the Strela, to be mounted to the exterior of the Russian station segment on the International Space Station (ISS); the SPACEHAB Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), which is a logistics items carrier; and a U.S.-built crane (ORU Transfer Device, or OTD) that will be stowed on the station for use during future ISS assembly missions. The ICC can carry up to 6,000 lb of unpressurized payload. It was built for SPACEHAB by DaimlerChrysler and RSC Energia of Korolev, Russia. STS-96 is targeted for launch on May 24 from Launch Pad 39B. STS-101 is scheduled to launch in early December 1999.

1999-01-01

450

Two Shuttle crews check equipment at SPACEHAB to be used on ISS Flights  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

At Astrotech in Titusville, Fla., STS-96 Mission Specialists Tamara E. Jernigan and Daniel T. Barry take turns working with a Russian cargo crane, the Strela, which is to be mounted to the exterior of the Russian station segment on the International Space Station (ISS). Technicians around the table observe. The STS-96 crew is taking part in a Crew Equipment Interface Test. Other members participating are Commander Kent V. Rominger, Pilot Rick Douglas Husband, and Mission Specialists Julie Payette, with the Canadian Space Agency, and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev, with the Russian Space Agency. For the first time, STS-96 will include an Integrated Cargo Carrier (ICC) that will carry the Russian cargo crane; the SPACEHAB Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), which is a logistics items carrier; and a U.S.-built crane (ORU Transfer Device, or OTD) that will be stowed on the station for use during future ISS assembly missions. The ICC can carry up to 6,000 lb of unpressurized payload. It was built for SPACEHAB by DaimlerChrysler Aerospace and RSC Energia of Korolev, Russia. STS-96 is targeted for launch on May 24 from Launch Pad 39B. STS-101 is scheduled to launch in early December 1999.

1999-01-01

451

STS-84 M.S. Kondakova with husband Ryumin at SLF  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-84 Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova, a cosmonaut with the Russian Space Agency, and her husband, Valery Ryumin, greet press represenatives and other well wishers after her arrival at KSCs Shuttle Landing Facility. Ryumin is director of the Mir- Shuttle program for RSC Energia in Russia. This will be Kondakovas first flight on a U.S. Space Shuttle, but her second trip into space. She spent 169 days in space as flight engineer of the 17th main mission on Mir from October 1994 to March 1995. STS-84 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. During the docking, STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale will transfer to the Russian space station to become a member of the Mir 23 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is scheduled to remain on Mir about four months until his replacement arrives on STS-86 in September.

1997-01-01

452

Goldin congratulates Culbertson on successful completion of Phase I Shuttle/Mir  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA Administrator Dan Goldin congratulates Phase I Shuttle/Mir Program Manager Frank Culbertson on the successful conclusion of Phase I of the joint U.S.-Russian International Space Station Program at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility following Discovery's landing, as Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt (applauding) and the other members of the STS-91 flight crew look on. Culbertson is holding an American flag, a special tool, and an optical disc, which he had just been presented by Goldin. The flag rode aboard Mir from the beginning of the Phase I program and was brought back to Earth by the STS-91 crew. Discovery's main gear touchdown on Runway 15 was at 2:00:00 p.m. EDT on June 12, 1998, on orbit 155 of the mission. The wheels stopped at 2:01:00 p.m. EDT, for a total mission-elapsed time of 9 days, 19 hours, 55 minutes and 1 second. The 91st Shuttle mission was the 44th KSC landing in the history of the Space Shuttle program and the 15th consecutive landing at KSC. Besides Commander Precourt, the STS-91 flight crew also included Pilot Dominic L. Gorie and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, Janet Lynn Kavandi and Valery Victorovitch Ryumin of the Russian Space Agency. Astronaut Andrew S. W. Thomas also returned to Earth from Mir as an STS-91 crew member after 141 days in space.

1998-01-01

453

Precourt presents a flag, flown on Mir to NASA Administrator Goldin  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-91 Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt (at microphone) presents an American flag, a special tool, and an optical disc to NASA Administrator Dan Goldin following Discovery's landing at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility, as Phase I Shuttle/Mir Program Manager Frank Culbertson and the other members of the STS-91 flight crew look on. This landing not only concluded the STS-91 mission, but Phase I of the joint U.S.-Russian International Space Station Program as well. The flag rode aboard Mir from the beginning of the Phase I program and was brought back to Earth by the STS-91 crew. Discovery's main gear touchdown on Runway 15 was at 2:00:00 p.m. EDT on June 12, 1998, on orbit 155 of the mission. The wheels stopped at 2:01:00 p.m. EDT, for a total mission-elapsed time of 9 days, 19 hours, 55 minutes and 1 second. The 91st Shuttle mission was the 44th KSC landing in the history of the Space Shuttle program and the 15th consecutive landing at KSC. Besides Commander Precourt, the STS-91 flight crew also included Pilot Dominic L. Gorie and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, Janet Lynn Kavandi and Valery Victorovitch Ryumin of the Russian Space Agency. Astronaut Andrew S. W. Thomas also returned to Earth from Mir as an STS-91 crew member after 141 days in space.

1998-01-01

454

STS-111 Flight Day 2 Highlights  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

On Flight Day 2 of STS-111, the crew of Endeavour (Kenneth Cockrell, Commander; Paul Lockhart, Pilot; Franklin Chang-Diaz, Mission Specialist; Philippe Perrin, Mission Specialist) and the Expedition 5 crew (Valery Korzun, Commander; Peggy Whitson, Flight Engineer; Sergei Treschev, Flight Engineer), having successfully entered orbit around the Earth, begin to maneuver towards the International Space Station (ISS), where the Expedition 5 crew will replace the Expedition 4 crew. Live video is shown of the Earth from several vantage points aboard the Shuttle. The center-line camera, which will allow Shuttle pilots to align the docking apparatus with that on the ISS, provides footage of the Earth. Chang-Diaz participates in an interview, in Spanish, conducted from the ground via radio communications, with Cockrell also appearing. Footage of the Earth includes: Daytime video of the Eastern United States with some cloud cover as Endeavour passes over the Florida panhandle, Georgia, and the Carolinas; Daytime video of Lake Michigan unobscured by cloud cover; Nighttime low-light camera video of Madrid, Spain.

2002-01-01

455

STS-113 Post Flight Presentation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The STS-113 post-flight presentation begins with a view of Mission Specialists Michael E. Lopez-Alegria and John B. Herrington getting suited for the space mission. The STS-113 crew consists of: Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Paul Lockhart, Mission Specialists Michael Lopez-Alegria and John Herrington. Cosmonauts Valery Korzun, and Sergei Treschev, and astronaut Peggy Whitson who are all members of the expedition five crew, and Commander Kenneth Bowersox, Flight Engineers Nikolai Budarin and Donald Pettit, members of Expedition Six. The main goal of this mission is to take Expedition Six up to the International Space Station and Return Expedition Five to the Earth. The second objective is to install the P(1) Truss segment. Three hours prior to launch, the crew of Expedition Six along with James Wetherbee, Paul Lockhart, Michael Lopez-Alegria and John Herrington are shown walking to an astrovan, which takes them to the launch pad. The actual liftoff is presented. Three Extravehicular Activities (EVA)'s are performed on this mission. Michael Lopez-Alegria and John Herrington are shown performing EVA 1 and EVA 2 which include making connections between the P1 and S(0) Truss segments, and installing fluid jumpers. A panoramic view of the ISS with the Earth in the background is shown. The grand ceremony of the crew exchange is presented. The astronauts performing everyday duties such as brushing teeth, washing hair, sleeping, and eating pistachio nuts are shown. The actual landing of the Space Shuttle is presented.

2002-01-01

456

Computational study of lattice models  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This dissertation is composed of the descriptions of a few projects undertook to complete my doctorate at the University of California, Davis. Different as they are, the common feature of them is that they all deal with simulations of lattice models, and physics which results from interparticle interactions. As an example, both the Feynman-Kikuchi model (Chapter 3) and Bose-Fermi mixture (Chapter 4) deal with the conditions under which superfluid transitions occur. The dissertation is divided into two parts. Part I (Chapters 1-2) is theoretical. It describes the systems we study - superfluidity and particularly superfluid helium, and optical lattices. The numerical methods of working with them are described. The use of Monte Carlo methods is another unifying theme of the different projects in this thesis. Part II (Chapters 3-6) deals with applications. It consists of 4 chapters describing different projects. Two of them, Feynman-Kikuchi model, and Bose-Fermi mixture are finished and published. The work done on t - J model, described in Chapter 5, is more preliminary, and the project is far from complete. A preliminary report on it was given on 2009 APS March meeting. The Isentropic project, described in the last chapter, is finished. A report on it was given on 2010 APS March meeting, and a paper is in preparation. The quantum simulation program used for Bose-Fermi mixture project was written by our collaborators Valery Rousseau and Peter Denteneer. I had written my own code for the other projects.

Zujev, Aleksander

457

STS-91 Mission Specialist Ryumin practices slidewire basket procedures  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-91 Mission Specialist Valery Ryumin, with the Russian Space Agency, reaches for a lever which releases a slidewire basket as Mission Commander Charles Precourt looks on during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) training activities at the 195-foot level of Launch Complex 39A. The crew is practicing emergency egress procedures during the TCDT, a dress rehearsal for launch. STS-91 is scheduled to be launched on June 2 with a launch window opening around 6:10 p.m. EDT. The mission will feature the ninth Shuttle docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, the first Mir docking for Discovery, the conclusion of Phase I of the joint U.S.-Russian International Space Station Program, and the first flight of the new Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank. The STS-91 flight crew also includes Pilot Dominic Gorie and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence; Franklin Chang- Diaz, Ph.D.; and Janet Kavandi, Ph.D. Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will be returning to Earth with the crew after living more than four months aboard Mir.

1998-01-01

458

PREFACE: Rusnanotech 2010 International Forum on Nanotechnology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Rusnanotech 2010 International Forum on Nanotechnology was held from November 1-3, 2010, in Moscow, Russia. It was the third forum organized by RUSNANO (Russian Corporation of Nanotechnologies) since 2008. In March 2011 RUSNANO was established as an open joint-stock company through the reorganization of the state corporation Russian Corporation of Nanotechnologies. RUSNANO's mission is to develop the Russian nanotechnology industry through co-investment in nanotechnology projects with substantial economic potential or social benefit. Within the framework of the Forum Science and Technology Program, presentations on key trends of nanotechnology development were given by foreign and Russian scientists, R&D officers of leading international companies, universities and scientific centers. The science and technology program of the Forum was divided into eight sections as follows (by following hyperlinks you may find each section's program including videos of all oral presentations): Catalysis and Chemical Industry Nanobiotechnology Nanodiagnostics Nanoelectronics Nanomaterials Nanophotonics Nanotechnolgy In The Energy Industry Nanotechnology in Medicine The scientific program of the forum included 115 oral presentations by leading scientists from 15 countries. Among them in the "Nanomaterials" section was the lecture by Dr Konstantin Novoselov, winner of the Nobel Prize in Physics 2010. The poster session consisted of over 500 presentations, 300 of which were presented in the framework of the young scientists' nanotechnology papers competition. This volume of the Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes a selection of 57 submissions. The scientific program committee: Prof Zhores Alferov, AcademicianVice-president of Russian Academy of Sciences, Nobel Prize winner, Russia, Chairman of the Program CommitteeProf Sergey Deev, Corresponding Member of Russian Academy of SciencesHead of the Laboratory of Molecular Immunology, M M Shemyakin and Yu A Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia, Deputy Chairman of the Program CommitteeProf Alexander Aseev, AcademicianVice-president of Russian Academy of Sciences Director, A V Rzhanov-Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, RussiaProf Sergey Bagaev, AcademicianDirector, Institute of Laser Physics, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, RussiaProf Alexander Gintsburg, Ademician, Russian Academy of Medical SciencesDirector Gamaleya Research Institute of Epidemiology and Microbiology, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, RussiaProf Anatoly Grigoryev, Academician, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russian Academy of Medical SciencesVice-president, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, RussiaProf Michael Kovalchuk, RAS Corresponding MemberDirector, Kurchatov Institute Russian Scientific Center, RussiaProf Valery Lunin, AcademicianDean, Department of Chemistry, Lomonosov Moscow State University, RussiaProf Valentin Parmon, Academician, DirectorBoreskov Institute of Catalysis, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, RussiaProf Rem Petrov, AcademicianAdvisor, Russian Academy of Sciences, RussiaProf Konstantin Skryabin, AcademicianDirector, Bioinzheneriya Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, RussiaProf Vsevolod Tkachuk, Academician, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russian Academy of Medical SciencesDean, Faculty of Fundamental Medicine, Lomonosov Moscow State University, RussiaProf Vladimir Fortov, AcademicianDirector, Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, RussiaProf Alexey Khokhlov, AcademicianVice Principal, Head of Innovation, Information and International Scientific Affairs Department, Lomonosov Moscow State University, RussiaProf Valery Bukhtiyarov, RAS Corresponding MemberDirector, Physicochemical Research Methods Dept., Boreskov Institute of Catalysis, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, RussiaProf Anatoly Dvurechensky, RAS Corresponding MemberDeputy Director, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of S

Kazaryan, Konstantin

2011-03-01

459

Intrastorm Isotopic Variation in Precipitation in Midlatitude Cyclones  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Variation of stable isotopes in precipitation has been used to understand the earths climate for many decades. Typically, these measurements are made on monthly or even annual accumulations of precipitation. Large intrastorm variation in isotopic ratio was observed during the very early days of isotopic research (Epstein, 1954), and the focus of a limited number of studies (e.g. Gedzelman and Lawrence, 1982; Lawrence et al, 1998; Coplen et al, 2008; Rao et al, 2008; Barras and Simmonds, 2009), but the mechanisms controlling this variation are not well characterized. Measuring isotopic variation on intrastorm timescales will allow for a better understanding of atmospheric and hydrologic processes occurring on the comparable scale both spatially and temporally. As an annual record of precipitation is made up of individual storms, it is important to understand what controls the variation. Although there is a correlation between temperature and isotopic ratios over yearly timescales at mid- to high-latitudes, that relationship is weak or breaks down on smaller timescales. Several studies have observed links between synoptic frontal systems and changes in the isotopic ratio of precipitation on daily or whole event timescales (Lawrence et al 1982; Gedzelman et al, 1997; Trebel et al 2005; Pang et al, 2006; Zhang et al, 2007; Price et al, 2008). This work intended to build on earlier understanding of within storm isotopic variations by extending both sampling and conceptual analysis to a larger number of storms collected over a nearly two-year period. Precipitation samples were collected in Hanover, NH every 0.16 inch of rain. Extremely large changes in the isotopic ratio are seen within the span of several hours. Variation within storms is as large as the seasonal variation observed. We have examined the frontal systems present during the storms to understand the causes of these isotopic shifts. Our analysis has shown that storms with the largest isotopic changes are related to frontal type and geometry in association with the sampling site. The proximity of a frontal system determines the altitude at which precipitation forms and has a direct control on the isotopic composition. This simple relationship does not fully explain the isotopic variation for all storms. The effects of local uplift, evaporation of falling raindrops, and isotopic variation within the structure and intensity of a storm also seem to be significant.

Faiia, A. M.; Vishnevskiy, M.; Feng, X.; Posmentier, E. S.

2010-12-01

460

Oligopolistic competition in wholesale electricity markets: Large-scale simulation and policy analysis using complementarity models  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This dissertation conducts research into the large-scale simulation of oligopolistic competition in wholesale electricity markets. The dissertation has two parts. Part I is an examination of the structure and properties of several spatial, or network, equilibrium models of oligopolistic electricity markets formulated as mixed linear complementarity problems (LCP). Part II is a large-scale application of such models to the electricity system that encompasses most of the United States east of the Rocky Mountains, the Eastern Interconnection. Part I consists of Chapters 1 to 6. The models developed in this part continue research into mixed LCP models of oligopolistic electricity markets initiated by Hobbs [67] and subsequently developed by Metzler [87] and Metzler, Hobbs and Pang [88]. Hobbs' central contribution is a network market model with Cournot competition in generation and a price-taking spatial arbitrage firm that eliminates spatial price discrimination by the Cournot firms. In one variant, the solution to this model is shown to be equivalent to the "no arbitrage" condition in a "pool" market, in which a Regional Transmission Operator optimizes spot sales such that the congestion price between two locations is exactly equivalent to the difference in the energy prices at those locations (commonly known as locational marginal pricing). Extensions to this model are presented in Chapters 5 and 6. One of these is a market model with a profit-maximizing arbitrage firm. This model is structured as a mathematical program with equilibrium constraints (MPEC), but due to the linearity of its constraints, can be solved as a mixed LCP. Part II consists of Chapters 7 to 12. The core of these chapters is a large-scale simulation of the U.S. Eastern Interconnection applying one of the Cournot competition with arbitrage models. This is the first oligopolistic equilibrium market model to encompass the full Eastern Interconnection with a realistic network representation (using a DC load flow approximation). Chapter 9 shows the price results. In contrast to prior market power simulations of these markets, much greater variability in price-cost margins is found when using a realistic model of hourly conditions on such a large network. Chapter 10 shows that the conventional concentration indices (HHIs) are poorly correlated with PCMs. Finally, Chapter 11 proposes that the simulation models are applied to merger analysis and provides two large-scale merger examples. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

Helman, E. Udi

461

The reduction effects of mangrove forest on a tsunami based on field surveys at Pakarang Cape, Thailand and numerical analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using an integrated approach including satellite imagery analysis, field measurements, and numerical modeling, we investigated the damage to mangroves caused by the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami at Pakarang Cape in Pang Nga Province, Thailand. Comparing pre- and post-tsunami satellite imagery of the study area, we found that approximately 70% of the mangrove forest was destroyed by the tsunami. Based on field observations, we found that the survival rate of mangroves increased with increasing stem diameter. Specifically, we found that 72% of Rhizophora trees with a 25-30 cm stem diameter survived the tsunami impact, whereas only 19% with a 15-20 cm stem diameter survived. We simulated the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami using the nonlinear shallow-water wave theory to reproduce the tsunami inundation flow and investigated the bending moment acting on the mangrove trees. Results of the numerical model showed that the tsunami inundated areas along the mangrove creeks, and its current velocity reached 5.0 m s -1. Based on the field measurements and numerical results, we proposed a fragility function for mangroves, which is the relationship between the probability of damage and the bending stress caused by the maximum bending moment. We refined the numerical model to include the damage probability of mangrove forests using the obtained fragility function to investigate the tsunami reduction effect of mangrove forest. Under simple numerical conditions related to the mangrove forest, ground level, and incident wave, the model showed that a mangrove forest of Rhizophora sp. with a density of 0.2 trees m -2 and a stem diameter of 15 cm in a 400 m wide area can reduce the tsunami inundation depth by 30% when the incident wave is assumed to have a 3.0 m inundation depth and a wave period of 30 min at the shoreline. However, 50% of the mangrove forest is destroyed by a 4.5 m tsunami inundation depth, and most of the mangrove forest is destroyed by a tsunami inundation depth greater than 6 m. The reduction effect of tsunami inundation depth decreased when the tsunami inundation depth exceeded 3 m, and was mostly lost when the tsunami inundation depth exceeded 6 m.

Yanagisawa, Hideaki; Koshimura, Shunichi; Goto, Kazuhisa; Miyagi, Toyohiko; Imamura, Fumihiko; Ruangrassamee, Anat; Tanavud, Charlchai

2009-01-01

462

Atomically Precise Bottom-up Fabrication of Graphene Nanoribbons  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) -- narrow stripes of graphene -- are predicted to exhibit remarkable properties making them suitable for future electronic applications. Contrary to their two-dimensional (2D) parent material graphene, which exhibits semimetallic behavior, GNRs with widths smaller than 10 nm are predicted to be semiconductors due to quantum confinement and edge effects. Despite significant advances in GNR fabrication using chemical, sonochemical and lithographic methods as well as recent reports on the successful unzipping of carbon nanotubes into GNRs, the production of sub-10 nm GNRs with chemical precision remains a major challenge. In this talk, we will present a simple GNR fabrication method that allows for the production of atomically precise GNRs of different topologies and widths [1]. Our bottom-up approach consists in the surface-assisted coupling of suitably designed molecular precursors into linear polyphenylenes and their subsequent cyclodehydrogenation, and results in GNRs whose topology, width and edge periphery are defined by the precursor monomers. By means of STM and Raman characterization, we demonstrate that this fabrication process allows for the atomically precise fabrication of complex GNR topologies. Furthermore, we have developed a reliable procedure to transfer GNRs fabricated on metal surfaces onto other substrates. It will for example be shown that millimeter sized sheets of crosslinked GNRs can be transferred onto silicon wafers, making them available for further processing, e.g. by lithography, prototype device fabrication and characterization. [4pt] Coauthors: Pascal Ruffieux, Rached Jaafar, Marco Bieri, Thomas Braun, and Stephan Blankenburg, Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, 3602 Thun and 8600 D"ubendorf, Switzerland; Matthias Muoth, ETH Zurich, Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering, 8092 Zurich, Switzerland; Ari P. Seitsonen, University of Zurich, Physical Chemistry Institute, 8057 Zurich, Switzerland; Moussa Saleh, Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, 55124 Mainz, Germany; Ivan Shorubalko, Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, 3602 Thun and 8600 D"ubendorf, Switzerland; Shuping Pang, Xinliang Feng, and Klaus M"ullen, Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, 55124 Mainz, Germany; and Roman Fasel, Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, 3602 Thun and 8600 D"ubendorf, Switzerland and University of Bern, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, 3012 Bern, Switzerland. [4pt] [1] J. Cai et.al, Nature 466, 470-473 (2010)

Cai, Jinming

2011-03-01

463

Basal testosterone moderates responses to anger faces in humans.  

PubMed

Prior research [van Honk J, Tuiten A, Verbaten R, van den Hout M, Koppeschaar H, Thijssen J, de Haan E. Correlations among salivary testosterone, mood, and selective attention to threat in humans. Horm Behav 1999;36(1):17-24; van Honk J, Tuiten A, Hermans E, Putman P, Koppeschaar H, Thijssen J, Verbaten R, van Doornen L. A single administration of testosterone induces cardiac accelerative responses to angry faces in healthy young women. Behav Neurosci 2001;115(1):238-42.] showed relationships in humans between testosterone (T) and vigilance to facial expressions of anger, which are considered signals of an impending dominance challenge. In Study 1, we used a differential implicit learning task (DILT) (see [Schultheiss OC, Pang JS, Torges CM, Wirth MM, Treynor W. Perceived facial expressions of emotion as motivational incentives: evidence from a differential implicit learning paradigm. Emotion 2005;5(1):41-54.]) to investigate the degree to which subjects find anger faces reinforcing. In the DILT, separate sequences of actions were paired with presentations of anger faces, neutral faces or a blank screen. After training, performance on the three sequences was measured in the absence of face stimuli. Saliva was collected for T measurement. Higher T predicted better learning on sequences paired with sub-threshold (i.e., presented too fast for conscious awareness) anger faces, suggesting that T is related to reinforcing qualities of these faces. In Study 2, we examined whether morning or afternoon T better predicted attention and vigilance to anger faces. Participants were tested at 9:00 and 15:00. At each session, saliva was collected for T measurement, and participants completed a Stroop task and a dot-probe task [Mogg K, Bradley BP, Hallowell N. Attentional bias to threat: roles of trait anxiety, stressful events, and awareness. Q J Exp Psychol A 1994;47(4):841-64.] with facial expression stimuli. Morning (peak) T was a better predictor of responses to anger faces than afternoon T. Morning T predicted greater Stroop-like interference to sub-threshold anger faces, as well as attentional orienting away from sub-threshold anger faces. These effects were not present for joy faces or for supraliminal anger faces. T may generally decrease aversion to threatening stimuli, and/or may specifically facilitate approach towards signals of dominance challenge. PMID:17174989

Wirth, Michelle M; Schultheiss, Oliver C

2007-02-28

464

Using Distributed-Hydrology-Soil-Vegetation Model to Study Road Effects on Stream flow and Soil Moisture  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The distributed-hydrology-soil-vegetation model (DHSVM) was applied in Pang Khum Experimental Watershed (PKEW), located near 19.05\\deg N, 98.65\\deg E in the mountainous region of northern Thailand, headwaters of the Chao Phraya River system. PKEW has a highly seasonal rainfall regime, with 90% of the annual 1200-1400 mm rainfall occurring during the southwest summer monsoon. The elevation of PKEW ranges from approximately 1100 to 1500 m. Total road area including road banks is about 1.2% of the basin area. About 57% of the road area occurs on slopes steeper than 10%. All roads are unpaved. Land cover in PKEW is affected by swidden agriculture. Six land cover and nine soil classes are identified in the basin. We have been working in the area since 1997 as part of the Thailand Roads Project (TRP). Within the basin, we are monitoring microclimate at two sites, soil moisture at four sites, and rainfall at five sites. Streamflow is measured at the outlet. Based on digital elevation data, DHSVM explicitly accounts for the spatial distribution of the stream and road networks, soil depth, soil and vegetation types. The model run period, including warm up, calibration and validation, is from August 1997 to January 2001. Field measurements provide forcing data, calibration data, and guidance in parameter selection. Model calibration and validation were done by aggregating simulated hourly soil moisture and stream flow into daily values and comparing them with aggregated daily measurements. For the calibration period, RMSEs of soil moisture and streamflow were lower than the observed variability as represented by the standard deviation, median absolute deviation, and (for stream flow) interquartile range. Model performance drops in validation period, but RMSEs remain near or lower than observed variability. We ran DHSVM with and without roads to examine their effects. Significant effects of roads were found despite the very low proportion of the watershed covered by roads and road banks. Streamflow for road and non-road cases was significantly different (p < 0.0001) based on the Wilcoxon signed rank test. In general, roads increase peak volume for short, intense storms, but reduced whole-period discharge by about 5.5%. Soil moisture was affected in cells where roads occur. In cells where water exited the road onto the hillslope, soil moisture was higher than it was without the road. In cells with roads, but without water flowing onto the hillslope, soil moisture was higher in some cases and lower in others.

Cuo, L.; Giambelluca, T. W.; Ziegler, A. D.; Nullet, M. A.

2003-12-01

465

List of participants at SIDE IV meeting, Tokyo, 27 November--1 December 2000  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mark J Ablowitz, Vsevolod Adler, Mark Alber, Said Belmehdi, Marco Boiti, Claude Brezinski, R Bullough, Y M Chiang, Theodore Chihara, Peter A Clarkson, Robert Conte, Adam Doliwa, Vladimir Dorodnitsyn, Mitsuaki Eguchi, Claire Gilson, Basil Grammaticos, Valeri Gromak, Rod Halburd, Koji Hasegawa, Jarmo Hietarinta, Ryogo Hirota, Xing Biao Hu, M Idzumi, J Inoguchi, Hiroya Ishikara, Mourad Ismail, Shin Isojima, Kenichi Ito, Yoshiaki Itoh, Masashi Iwasaki, Klara Janglajew, Michio Jimbo, Nalini Joshi, Kenji Kajiwara, Saburo Kakei, Masaru Kamata, Satoshi Kamei, Rinat Kashaev, Shingo Kawai, Taeko Kimijima, K Kimura, Anatol Kirillov, Koichi Kondo, Boris Konopelchenko, Martin Kruskal, Atsuo Kuniba, Wataru Kunishima, Franklin Lambert, Serguei Leble, Decio Levi, Shigeru Maeda, Manuel Manas, Ken-Ichi Maruno, Tetsu Masuda, J Matsukidaira, Atsushi Matsumiya, Shigeki Matsutani, Yukitaka Minesaki, Mikio Murata, Micheline Musette, Atsushi Nagai, Katsuya Nakagawa, Atsushi Nakamula, Akira Nakamura, Yoshimasa Nakamura, Frank Nijhoff, J J C Nimmo, Katsuhiro Nishinari, Michitomo Nishizawa, A Nobe, Masatoshi Noumi, Yaeko Ohsaki, Yasuhiro Ohta, Kazuo Okamoto, Alexandre Orlov, Naoki Osada, Flora Pempinelli, Spiro Pyrlis, Reinout Quispel, Orlando Ragnisco, Alfred Ramani, Jean-Pierre Ramis, Andreas Ruffing, Simon Ruijsenaars, Satoru Saito, Noriko Saitoh, Hidetaka Sakai, Paulo Santini, Narimasa Sasa, Ryu Sasaki, Yoshikatsu Sasaki, Junkichi Satsuma, Sergei Sergeev, Nobuhiko Shinzawa, Evgueni Sklyanin, Juris Suris, Norio Suzuki, Yukiko Tagami, Katsuaki Takahashi, Daisuke Takahashi, Tomoyuki Takenawa, Yoshiro Takeyama, K M Tamizhmani, T Tamizhmani, Kouichi Toda, Morikatsu Toda, Tetsuji Tokihiro, Takayuki Tsuchida, Yohei Tsuchiya, Teruhisa Tsuda, Satoru Tsujimoto, Walter Van Assche, Claude Viallet, Luc Vinet, Shinsuke Watanabe, Yoshihida Watanabe, Ralph Willox, Pavel Winternitz, Yasuhiko Yamada, Yuji Yamada, Jin Yoneda, Haruo Yoshida, Katsuhiko Yoshida, Daisuke Yoshihara, Fumitaka Yura, J Zagrodzinski, Alexei Zhedanov

2001-12-01

466

Radiolytic Model for Chemical Composition of Europa's Atmosphere and Surface  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The overall objective of the present effort is to produce models for major and selected minor components of Europa s neutral atmosphere in 1-D versus altitude and in 2-D versus altitude and longitude or latitude. A 3-D model versus all three coordinates (alt, long, lat) will be studied but development on this is at present limited by computing facilities available to the investigation team. In this first year we have focused on 1-D modeling with Co-I Valery Shematovich s Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code for water group species (H2O, O2, O, OH) and on 2-D with Co-I Mau Wong's version of a similar code for O2, O, CO, CO2, and Na. Surface source rates of H2O and O2 from sputtering and radiolysis are used in the 1-D model, while observations for CO2 at the Europa surface and Na detected in a neutral cloud ejected from Europa are used, along with the O2 sputtering rate, to constrain source rates in the 2-D version. With these separate approaches we are investigating a range of processes important to eventual implementation of a comprehensive 3-D atmospheric model which could be used to understand present observations and develop science requirements for future observations, e.g. from Earth and in Europa orbit. Within the second year we expect to merge the full water group calculations into the 2-D version of the DSMC code which can then be extended to 3-D, pending availability of computing resources. Another important goal in the second year would be the inclusion of sulk and its more volatile oxides (SO, SO2).

Cooper, John F.

2004-01-01

467

Potentiating effect of pure oxygen on the enhancement of respiration by ethylene in plant storage organs: a comparative study.  

PubMed

A number of fruits and bulky storage organs were studied with respect to the effect of pure O(2) on the extent and time-course of the respiratory rise induced by ethylene. In one group, of which potato (Solanum tuberosum var. Russet) and carrot (Daucus carota) are examples, the response to ethylene in O(2) is much greater than in air. In a second group, of which avocado (Persea americana Mill. var. Hass) and banana (Musa cavendishii Lambert var. Valery) are examples, air and O(2) are equally effective. When O(2)-responsive organs are peeled, air and O(2) synergize the ethylene response to the same extent in parsnip (Pastinaca sativa), whereas O(2) is more stimulatory than air in carrots. In the latter instance, carrot flesh is considered to contribute significantly to diffusion resistance. The release of CO(2), an ethylene antagonist, is recognized as another element in the response to peeling.The potentiating effect of O(2) is considered to be primarily on ethylene action in the development of the respiratory rise rather than on the respiration process per se. On the assumption that diffusion controls O(2) movement into bulky organs and the peel represents the major diffusion barrier, simple calculations indicate that the O(2) concentration in untreated organs in air readily sustains respiration. Furthermore, in ethylene-treated organs in pure O(2), the internal O(2) concentration is more than enough to maintain the high respiration rates. Skin conductivity to O(2) is the fundamental parameter differentiating O(2)-responsive from O(2)-nonresponsive fruits and bulky storage organs. The large preceding the earliest response to ethylene, as well as the magnitude of the ethylene-induced respiratory rise, is also controlled by permeability characteristics of the peel. PMID:16662339

Theologis, A; Laties, G G

1982-05-01

468

Potentiating Effect of Pure Oxygen on the Enhancement of Respiration by Ethylene in Plant Storage Organs: A Comparative Study 1  

PubMed Central

A number of fruits and bulky storage organs were studied with respect to the effect of pure O2 on the extent and time-course of the respiratory rise induced by ethylene. In one group, of which potato (Solanum tuberosum var. Russet) and carrot (Daucus carota) are examples, the response to ethylene in O2 is much greater than in air. In a second group, of which avocado (Persea americana Mill. var. Hass) and banana (Musa cavendishii Lambert var. Valery) are examples, air and O2 are equally effective. When O2-responsive organs are peeled, air and O2 synergize the ethylene response to the same extent in parsnip (Pastinaca sativa), whereas O2 is more stimulatory than air in carrots. In the latter instance, carrot flesh is considered to contribute significantly to diffusion resistance. The release of CO2, an ethylene antagonist, is recognized as another element in the response to peeling. The potentiating effect of O2 is considered to be primarily on ethylene action in the development of the respiratory rise rather than on the respiration process per se. On the assumption that diffusion controls O2 movement into bulky organs and the peel represents the major diffusion barrier, simple calculations indicate that the O2 concentration in untreated organs in air readily sustains respiration. Furthermore, in ethylene-treated organs in pure O2, the internal O2 concentration is more than enough to maintain the high respiration rates. Skin conductivity to O2 is the fundamental parameter differentiating O2-responsive from O2-nonresponsive fruits and bulky storage organs. The large preceding the earliest response to ethylene, as well as the magnitude of the ethylene-induced respiratory rise, is also controlled by permeability characteristics of the peel. PMID:16662339

Theologis, Athanasios; Laties, George G.

1982-01-01

469

Crustaceans from a tropical estuarine sand-mud flat, Pacific, Costa Rica, (1984-1988) revisited.  

PubMed

The availability of data sets for time periods of more than a year is scarce for tropical environments. Advances in hardware and software speed-up the re-analysis of old data sets and facilitates the description of population oscillations. Using recent taxonomic literature and software we have updated and re-analized the information on crustacean diversity and population fluctuations from a set of cores collected at a mud-sand flat in the mid upper Gulf of Nicoya estuary, Pacific coast of Costa Rica (1984-1988). A total of 112 morphological species of macroinvertebrates was found, of which 29 were crustaceans. Taxonomic problems, maily with the peracarids, prevented the identification of a group of species. The abundance patterns of the crab Pinnixa valerii, the ostracod Cyprideis pacifica, and the cumacean Coricuma nicoyensis were analized with the Generalized Additive Models of the free software R. The models evidenced a variety of population oscillations during the sampling period. These oscillations probably included perturbations induced by external factors, like the strong red tide events of 1985. In additon, early on 1984 the populations might have been at an altered state due to the inpact of El Nio 1982-83. Thus, the oscillations observed during the study period departed from the expected seasonality (dry vs rainy) pattern and are thus considered atypical for this tropical estuarine tidal-flat. Crustacean diversity and population peaks were within the range of examples found in worldwide literature. However, abundances of the cumacean C. nicoyensis, an endemic species, are the highest reported for a tropical estuary. Comparative data from tropical tidal flat crustaceans continues to be scarce. Crustaceans (total vs groups) had population changes in response to the deployment of predator exclusion cages during the dry and rainy seasons of 1985. Temporal and spatial patchiness characterized the abundances of P. valeri, C. pacifica and C. nicoyenis. PMID:23342527

Vargas-Zamora, Jos A; Sibaja-Cordero, Jeffrey A; Vargas-Castillo, Rita

2012-12-01

470

STS-112 Flight Day 4 Highlights  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

On the fourth day of STS-112, its crew (Jeffrey Ashby, Commander; Pamela Melroy, Pilot; David Wolf, Mission Specialist; Piers Sellers, Mission Specialist; Sandra Magnus, Mission Specialist; Fyodor Yurchikhin, Mission Specialist) onboard Atlantis and the Expedition 5 crew (Valery Korzun, Commander; Peggy Whitson, Flight Engineer; Sergei Treschev, Flight Engineer) onboard the International Space Station (ISS) are seen preparing for the installation of the S1 truss structure. Inside the Destiny Laboratory Module, Korzun and other crewmembers are seen as they busily prepare for the work of the day. Sellers dons an oxygen mask and uses an exercise machine in order to purge the nitrogen from his bloodstream, in preparation for an extravehicular activity (EVA). Whitson uses the ISS's Canadarm 2 robotic arm to grapple the S1 truss and remove it from Atlantis' payload bay, with the assistance of Magnus. Using the robotic arm, Whitson slowly maneuvers the 15 ton truss structure into alignment with its attachment point on the starboard side of the S0 truss structure, where the carefully orchestrated mating procedures take place. There is video footage of the entire truss being rotated and positioned by the arm, and ammonia tank assembly on the structure is visible, with Earth in the background. Following the completion of the second stage capture, the robotic arm is ungrappled from truss. Sellers and Wolf are shown exiting the the Quest airlock hatch to begin their EVA. They are shown performing a variety of tasks on the now attached S1 truss structure, including work on the Crew Equipment Translation Cart (CETA), the S-band Antenna Assembly, and umbilical cables that provide power and remote operation capability to cameras. During their EVA, they are shown using a foot platform on the robotic arm. Significant portions of their activities are shown from the vantage of helmet mounted video cameras. The video closes with a final shot of the ISS and its new S1 truss.

2002-10-01

471

STS-111 Flight Day 7 Highlights  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

On Flight Day 7 of STS-111 (Space Shuttle Endeavour crew includes: Kenneth Cockrell, Commander; Paul Lockhart, Pilot; Franklin Chang-Diaz, Mission Specialist; Philippe Perrin, Mission Specialist; International Space Station (ISS) Expedition 5 crew includes Valery Korzun, Commander; Peggy Whitson, Flight Engineer; Sergei Treschev, Flight Engineer; ISS Expedition 4 crew includes: Yury Onufrienko, Commander; Daniel Bursch, Flight Engineer; Carl Walz, Flight Engineer), this video opens with answers to questions asked by the public via e-mail about the altitude of the space station, the length of its orbit, how astronauts differentiate between up and down in the microgravity environment, and whether they hear wind noise during the shuttle's reentry. In video footage shot from inside the Quest airlock, Perrin is shown exiting the station to perform an extravehicular activity (EVA) with Chang-Diaz. Chang-Diaz is shown, in helmet mounted camera footage, attaching cable protection booties to a fish-stringer device with multiple hooks, and Perrin is seen loosening bolts that hold the replacement unit accomodation in launch position atop the Mobile Base System (MBS). Perrin then mounts a camera atop the mast of the MBS. During this EVA, the astronauts installed the MBS on the Mobile Transporter (MT) to support the Canadarm 2 robotic arm. A camera in the Endeavour's payload bay provides footage of the Pacific Ocean, the Baja Peninsula, and Midwestern United States. Plumes from wildfires in Nevada, Idaho, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, and Montana are visible. The station continues over the Great Lakes and the Eastern Provinces of Canada.

2002-06-01

472

Spin transistor action via tunable Landau-Zener transitions in magnetic semiconductor quantum wells  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Spin-transistors, employing spin-orbit interaction like Datta-Das prototypes [1], principally suffer from low signal levels due to limitations in spin injection efficiency, fast spin relaxation and dephasing processes. Here we present an alternative concept to implement spin transistor action where efficiency is improved by keeping spin transport adiabatic [2]. To this end a helical stray field B, generated by ferromagnetic Dysprosium stripes, is superimposed upon a two-dimensional electron system in (Cd,Mn)Te, containing Mn ions with spin 5/2. Due to the giant spin splitting, occurring at low temperatures and small B in (Cd,Mn)Te quantum wells, the B-helix translates into a spin-helix and the electron spins follow adiabatically the imposed spin texture. Within this approach the transmission of spin-polarized electrons between two contacts is regulated by changing the degree of adiabaticity, i.e. an electron's ability to follow the spin helix. This is done by means of a small applied homogeneous magnetic field while the degree of adiabaticity is monitored by the channel resistance. Our scheme allows spin information to propagate efficiently over typical device distances and provides an alternative route to realize spintronics applications. We note that our concept is not restricted to a particular choice of materials, temperature, methods of spin injection, manipulation as well as detection. [4pt] Work done in cooperation with Christian Betthausen, Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, University of Regensburg, D-93040 Regensburg, Germany; Tobias Dollinger, Henri Saarikosi, Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Regensburg, D-93040 Regensburg, Germany; Valeri Kolkovsky, Grzegorz Karczewski, Tomasz Wojtowicz, Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, PL-02668 Warsaw, Poland; and Klaus Richter, Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Regensburg. [4pt] [1] H. C. Koo et al., Control of spin precession in a spin-injected field effect transistor. Science 325, 1515 (2009). [0pt] [2] C. Betthausen et al., Spin-Transistor Action via Tunable Landau-Zener Transitions. Science 337, 324 (2012).

Weiss, Dieter

2013-03-01

473

Respiratory Contribution of the Alternate Path during Various Stages of Ripening in Avocado and Banana Fruits 1  

PubMed Central

The respiration of fresh slices of preclimacteric avocado (Persea americana Mill. var. Hass) and banana (Musa cavendishii var. Valery) fruits is stimulated by cyanide and antimycin. The respiration is sensitive to m-chlorobenzhydroxamic acid in the presence of cyanide but much less so in the presence of antimycin. In the absence of cyanide the contribution of the cyanide-resistant pathway to the coupled preclimacteric respiration is zero. In uncoupled slices, by contrast, the alternate path is engaged and utilized fully in avocado, and extensively in banana. Midclimacteric and peak climacteric slices are also cyanide-resistant and, in the presence of cyanide, sensitive to m-chlorobenzhydroxamic acid. In the absence of uncoupler there is no contribution by the alternate path in either tissue. In uncoupled midclimacteric avocado slices the alternate path is fully engaged. Midclimacteric banana slices, however, do not respond to uncouplers, and the alternate path is not engaged. Avocado and banana slices at the climacteric peak neither respond to uncouplers nor utilize the alternate path in the presence or absence of uncoupler. The maximal capacities of the cytochrome and alternate paths, Vcyt and Valt, respectively, have been estimated in slices from preclimacteric and climacteric avocado fruit and found to remain unchanged. The total respiratory capacity in preclimacteric and climacteric slices exceeds the respiratory rise which attends fruit ripening. In banana Valt decreases slightly with ripening. The aging of thin preclimacteric avocado slices in moist air results in ripening with an accompanying climacteric rise. In this case the alternate path is fully engaged at the climacteric peak, and the respiration represents the total potential respiratory capacity present in preclimacteric tissue. The respiratory climacteric in intact avocado and banana fruits is cytochrome path-mediated, whereas the respiratory climacteric of ripened thin avocado slices comprises the alternate as well as the cytochrome path. The ripening of intact fruits is seemingly independent of the nature of the electron transport path. Uncouplers are thought to stimulate glycolysis to the point where the glycolytic flux exceeds the oxidative capacity of the cytochrome path, with the result that the alternate path is engaged. PMID:16660495

Theologis, Athanasios; Laties, George G.

1978-01-01

474

PREFACE: XI Conference on Beauty, Charm, Hyperons in Hadronic Interactions BEACH  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This volume contains the invited and contributed papers presented at the 11th International Conference on Hyperons, Charm and Beauty Hadrons, currently known as the BEACH Conferences. The BEACH conferences cover a broad range of physics topics in the field of Hyperon and heavy-flavor physics. This conference continues the BEACH series, which began with a meeting in Strasbourg in 1995 and since then offers a biennial opportunity for both theorists and experimentalists from the high-energy physics community to discuss all aspects of flavour physics. The 11th Conference took place in the Lecture Theatre of the Physics West Building of the University of Birmingham (United Kingdom) from July 22nd to July 26th and was attended by 107 participants. All of the sessions were plenary sessions accommodating review talks and shorter contributions discussing both theory and recent experiments. At the end of the conference Valerie Gibson (Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, UK) and Sebastian Jaeger (School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sussex, UK) summarized and put in context all the presentations of the conference giving two very interesting Summary talks. These Conference Proceedings are particularly interesting since, due to the long shutdown of the LHC in Geneva (CH), most of the data presented were from the entire data set available. This volume in fact offers an interesting panorama of the present situation and allows a comparison of the experimental data and the theory in a field that is always in continuous evolution. The conference was impeccably organized by the Local Organizing Committee chaired by Cristina Lazzeroni (Birmingham Univeristy, Birmingham, UK) that I want to thank particularly here. Many from the University Staff have contributed to the smooth running of the conference. We would like to thank the Local Scientific Secretariat for their invaluable help in making the conference a truly enjoyable and unforgettable event; a special thanks goes also to Maria Hobbs, our local secretary, who worked tirelessly in the organization of every detail. Finally we would like thank the European Organization for Nuclear Research, the European Research Council, the UK Science and Technology Facility Council, the UK Institute of Particle Physics Phenomenology and the University of Birmingham for their generous support. The next BEACH Conference will be held at George Mason University, George Mason University Fairfax, Virginia (USA) at the beginning of summer 2016 and I hope that we will all meet again there.

Bozzo, Marco

2014-11-01

475

Sensitivity analyses of a colloid-facilitated contaminant transport model for unsaturated heterogeneous soil conditions.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Certain contaminants may travel faster through soils when they are sorbed to subsurface colloidal particles. Indeed, subsurface colloids may act as carriers of some contaminants accelerating their translocation through the soil into the water table. This phenomenon is known as colloid-facilitated contaminant transport. It plays a significant role in contaminant transport in soils and has been recognized as a source of groundwater contamination. From a mechanistic point of view, the attachment/detachment of the colloidal particles from the soil matrix or from the air-water interface and the straining process may modify the hydraulic properties of the porous media. im?nek et al. (2006) developed a model that can simulate the colloid-facilitated contaminant transport in variably saturated porous media. The model is based on the solution of a modified advection-dispersion equation that accounts for several processes, namely: straining, exclusion and attachement/detachement kinetics of colloids through the soil matrix. The solutions of these governing, partial differential equations are obtained using a standard Galerkin-type, linear finite element scheme, implemented in the HYDRUS-2D/3D software (im?nek et al., 2012). Modeling colloid transport through the soil and the interaction of colloids with the soil matrix and other contaminants is complex and requires the characterization of many model parameters. In practice, it is very difficult to assess actual transport parameter values, so they are often calibrated. However, before calibration, one needs to know which parameters have the greatest impact on output variables. This kind of information can be obtained through a sensitivity analysis of the model. The main objective of this work is to perform local and global sensitivity analyses of the colloid-facilitated contaminant transport module of HYDRUS. Sensitivity analysis was performed in two steps: (i) we applied a screening method based on Morris' elementary effects and the one-at-a-time approach (O.A.T); and (ii), we applied Sobol's global sensitivity analysis method which is based on variance decompositions. Results illustrate that ?m (maximum sorption rate of mobile colloids), kdmc (solute desorption rate from mobile colloids), and Ks (saturated hydraulic conductivity) are the most sensitive parameters with respect to the contaminant travel time. The analyses indicate that this new module is able to simulate the colloid-facilitated contaminant transport. However, validations under laboratory conditions are needed to confirm the occurrence of the colloid transport phenomenon and to understand model prediction under non-saturated soil conditions. Future work will involve monitoring of the colloidal transport phenomenon through soil column experiments. The anticipated outcome will provide valuable information on the understanding of the dominant mechanisms responsible for colloidal transports, colloid-facilitated contaminant transport and, also, the colloid detachment/deposition processes impacts on soil hydraulic properties. References: im?nek, J., C. He, L. Pang, & S. A. Bradford, Colloid-Facilitated Solute Transport in Variably Saturated Porous Media: Numerical Model and Experimental Verification, Vadose Zone Journal, 2006, 5, 1035-1047 im?nek, J., M. ejna, & M. Th. van Genuchten, The C-Ride Module for HYDRUS (2D/3D) Simulating Two-Dimensional Colloid-Facilitated Solute Transport in Variably-Saturated Porous Media, Version 1.0, PC Progress, Prague, Czech Republic, 45 pp., 2012.

Priard, Yann; Jos Gumiere, Silvio; Rousseau, Alain N.; Caron, Jean

2013-04-01

476

Long-Term Sun Climate Connections, Revealed by the Analyses of Historical and Other Proxy Records  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Sun, once considered constant, actually goes through 11-year, decadal, centennial, and even longer cycles. Our analysis of historical sunspot and aurora records, carbon-14 and beryllium-10 abundances from long-lived trees and deep polar ice cores, respectively, shows that it has gone through nine long cycles in the past 1800 years. Although these changes amounted to <1% of the total irradiance there is clear evidence they produced corresponding changes in the climate [Pang and Yau, Eos, 83, No. 43, 481, 2002]. For example during the Maunder Minimum (1645-1715) sunspots were rarely seen (about once in ten years from Europe or China). Total solar irradiances, reconstructed from historical sunspot records, were 0.25% lower then. This correlates nicely with an estimated 0.5-degree drop in Northern Hemisphere summer surface temperatures during the Little Ice Age [Lean, GRL 22, 3195, 1995]. We have also analyzed Chinese historical weather records for comparison. Reports of unseasonable cold are classified by the degree of severity: (1) Late (April-June) or early (July-September) killing frosts; (2) Bitter cold/heavy snowfall; and (3) Heavy sustained snowfall, bitter cold with frozen wells, rivers and icebound seas. The latter cases were often widespread and multi-year. All categories occurred most frequently during the coldest part of the Little Ice Age. The Category 3 episodes were in 1652-54, 1656, 1664, 1670-72, 1676-77, 1683, 1688-91, 1716, and 1718-19. For example the Yangtze River and its lakes froze up to 3-4 times in 1650-1700. The coldest period thus coincides with the Maunder Minimum, and is consistent with general circulation model hindcast winter conditions for China [Shindell, Science, 294, 2149, 2001]. There was only one Category 3 episode between the Maunder and Dalton Minima--in 1761 (due to a large volcanic eruption); and two in the Dalton Minimum (1795-1825)--in 1796 and 1814-17. The Sun has gradually brightened since the Dalton Minimum. But the climate of China remained cold through the 19th century, as in the rest of the world, probably due to increased volcanic aerosol loading of the atmosphere [Sato, JGR 98, 22987, 1993]. The climate of China seems to have been warm during the Late 14th-Century Maximum (1350-1410). We have found only one Category 1 episode--in 1393. It then turned cold during the Sporer Minimum (1410-1590). Category 3 episodes occurred in 1453-54, 1493, 1513, 1569, and 1577-78. Lesser ones were also common. Some scientists suggest that the Little Ice Age actually began in the 13th Century, and is comprised of the Wolf (1280-1350), Sporer, Maunder, and Dalton Minima. It and the Little Climate Optimum make up a millennium-long cycle [Broecker, Natural History 101, 6, 4/1992]. The warm Classical Age and cool Dark Ages, the cold Iron Age (1st millennium BC), and warm Bronze Age (2nd and 3rd millennia BC) could be considered still earlier millennial cycles. These trends are generally consistent with carbon-14 deviations from its long-term variations. There is also some historical and archaeological evidence for the early trends, as rhinoceros and elephant herds were abundant along the Yellow River during the Shang dynasty (1600-1100 BC). The tropical fauna and flora have since disappeared, as North China gradually turned cold and arid. We conclude that the climate of China generally follows world trend. The major forcing seems to have been changing solar luminosity on a decadal to millennial timescale. Volcanic eruptions and changing ocean currents also frequently perturbed the climate.

Pang, K. D.; Yau, K.

2004-12-01

477

Potassic magma genesis and the Ailao Shan-Red River fault  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two types of K-rich magma of Eocene to Early Oligocene (ca. 40-30) and Plio-Pleistocene (ca. 5-0.1 Ma) age were emplaced prior to and following left-lateral slip on the Ailao Shan-Red River (ASRR) fault, a regional shear zone extending between southwest China and the Tonkin Gulf (South China Sea) that accommodated 'escape' of the Indochina block. The first type is exposed in the Dali-Lijiang and adjacent regions of western Yunnan and Sichuan and comprises ultramafic potassic to ultrapotassic 'absarokites' and their shoshonite, banakite, and SiO2-rich derivatives which were emplaced immediately prior to activation of the ASRR fault. They are characterized by high Mg.-nos, and low contents of fusible oxides (FeO*, CaO, Al2O3), for equivalent MgO content, and pronounced primitive mantle-normalized high-field strength element (HFSE) depletions. In contrast, 'post-escape' K-rich magmas were erupted in the Puer, Maguan-Pingbian regions of south and southeast Yunnan. Apart from their relative enrichments in potassium they show typical HFSE-rich intra-plate compositional affinity. Geological and geomorphic evidence, and thermochronologic age dating of metamorphisc events, suggest that left-lateral shearing occurred between ca. 30 and 17 Ma; thereby accommodating the southeastward 'escape' of Indochina and (possibly) two episodes of spreading in the South China Sea. The southwestern part of Dali-Lijiang magmatic products was detached and offset by ca. 600 km and are now located in Phan Xi Pang in northern Viet Nam. The same is true for the Permo-Triassic Emeishan flood basalts, whose western exposures were likewise displaced by the same amount and are now represented by the Song Da complex, also in northern Viet Nam. Here, we report geochemical, isotopic, and 40Ar/39Ar age data for samples from both the 'pre-escape' Dali-Lijiang magmas and the 'post-escape' K-rich Puer, Maguan-Pingbian basalts and basanites, with a view to comparing and contrasting their interpolated source compositions, estimated conditions of upper mantle melt segregation and, by inference, their mantle dynamic and contamination histories insofar as these were conditioned by the India-Asia collision. Our interpretations yielded two complementary conclusions. The first contends that the pre-escape magmas result from adiabatic melting of crust-contaminated asthenosphere comprising a 'mlange' of continental lithospheric mantle (CLM) (hydrated by sab-derived hysdrous fluids released at 0.2-0.5 GPa) and lower crust, delaminated from the overriding plate during mantle wedge corner flow and further enriched by metasomatic melts of subducted continental crust. We postulate that incipient H2O-saturated melting of the 'mlange' occurs at depths of between ca. 100 and 200 km after being 'dragged' down by relict oceanic slab fragments, in response to the dehydration of supra-subduction amphibole- and phlogopite. The ensuing viscosity 'crisis' and buoyancy relative to ambient 'fertile' convecting mantle of such asthenospheric 'pockets', and the collision-related change from lithospheric compression to extension, almost certainly predisposes such a refractory yet crust-contaminated 'pockets' to rapid adiabatic melting. The second conclusion concerns the post-escape K-rich basalts and basanites and is based on the contention that decompression melting of thermally anomalous K-rich asthenospheric occurred in response to regional post-escape transtension, concomitant with the cessation Indochina escape and contiguous seafloor spreading. However, although these magmas share the HFSE-rich fertile source character of other, widely dispersed, post-escape Cenozoic basalts they more specifically resemble relatively rare examples of intra-plate, K-rich activity observed in northeast China, central Spain, and elsewhere in Asia and Europe, arguably (indirectly) reflecting mantle perturbations caused by major continental collisions.

Flower, Martin F. J.; Hong, Nguy?n; Lo, Chinh-hua; Ch, Cung Thu'?'ng; Cu''ng, Nguy?n Qu?c; Liu, Fu-tian; Deng, Jin-fu; Mo, Xuan-xue

2013-09-01

478

Discovery of a Large Volcanic Eruption in 1761 From Pre-Venus-Transit and Other Proxy Data, Using Benjamin Franklin's Method of Linking the 1783-1784 Cold Weather to the Laki Eruption  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Observations of the 1761 and 1769 transits of Venus were crucial to the early development of American geoscience. Accurate longitude measurements were needed for that, the Mason-Dixon survey, the 1804-1806 Lewis and Clark expedition to Oregon, and the westward expansion of the new republic [Woolf, "The Transits of Venus: A Study of 18th Century Science," Princeton, 1959]. As founder of the American Philosophical Society Benjamin Franklin promoted the transit observations, and procured a large telescope for the Philadelphia group. While serving as ambassador to France he observed that a "dry fog" from the 1783 Laki eruption in Iceland had obscured the Sun, and suggested that as a cause of the unseasonably cold weather of that summer and winter. Although the longitude, solar parallax and Sun-Earth distance measurements have long since been improved on, observations of the dark lunar eclipse just before the June 6, 1761 transit are still valuable for identifying a very large volcanic eruption that spring, using Benjamin Franklin's method. Many observers worldwide, while making a final check on their clock/longitude, found the May 18, 1761 totally eclipsed Moon very dark or even invisible, e.g., Wargentin (Stockholm Observatory) could not see the Moon for 38 minutes even with a 2-ft telescope [Phil. Trans. 52, 208, 1761-1762]. Whereas the totally eclipsed Moon is illuminated only by sunlight refracted by the Earth's atmosphere, I conclude that it was severely obscured, thus meeting Benjamin Franklin's first condition. Ice cores from Greenland and Antarctica show a large sulfuric acid peak at 1762 [Crowley, Geophys. Res. Lett. 20, 209, 1993; and Karlof, J. Geophys. Res. 105, D10, 12471, 2000], also satisfying Benjamin Franklin's second condition that the obscuration be due to a "dry fog" (sulfuric acid mist). The weather of 1761-1762 was indeed very cold, as recorded in chronicles, and frost-damaged rings of North American bristlecone pines [LaMarche and Hirschboeck, Nature 307, 121, 1984]. Annual weather reviews in imperial, provincial and county histories in China have been examined. Unseasonable cold are classified by their degree of severity: (1) Late (April-June) or early (July-Sept.) killing frosts; (2) Bitter cold/heavy snowfall; and (3) Heavy sustained snowfall, bitter cold with frozen wells, lakes and rivers. The latter cases were often widespread and multi-year, with the coast icebound also. The weather of 1761-1762 was a "3." Heavy sustained snow fell over many sites from the Tropic of Cancer to the Yellow River. In the north wells and rivers froze. Taihu (Great Lake near Shanghai) and nearby rivers froze over and were not navigable. Innumerable trees, birds and livestock perished, etc. Whereas all three of Benjamin Franklin's conditions have been met I conclude that a very large volcanic eruption early in 1761 had a major impact on the Earth's climate. Its location is unknown, but was probably low- or mid-latitude, as sulfuric acid from the volcanic cloud settled onto both poles. Finally Benjamin Franklin's criteria for a climate-altering volcanic eruption are still universally used (the appearance of brilliant red twilight displays have since been added). Moreover his legacy continues to inspire climate researchers. See, for example, "Climatic Impact of the mid-15th-Century Kuwae Caldera Formation...," Pang, Eos 74, No. 43, 106, 1993; and as cited in "Earth in Balance," Al Gore, p. 379, Penguin, 1993. See also "Constantinople's Volcanic Twilight," Lynn Simarski, Aramco World 47, No. 6, 8-13, 1996.

Pang, K. D.

2006-12-01

479

Goals of care in advanced dementia: quality of life, dignity and comfort.  

PubMed

Prolongation of human lifespan is increasing the number of individuals suffering from Alzheimer's disease and other progressive dementia worldwide. There are about 5 million of these individuals in both United States and European Union and many more in other countries of the world (1). Because there is no curative treatment for these diseases, most individuals with dementia survive to an advanced stage of dementia at which time many of them require institutional care. Home care for individuals with advanced dementia and especially institutional care are very expensive and are becoming major public health problems. The cost of care for advanced dementia is often increased by the use of aggressive medical interventions that may not be in the best interest of the patient. Because advanced dementia is currently incurable, it should be considered a terminal illness, similar to terminal cancer. Therefore, palliative care may be the most appropriate strategy for management of advanced dementia (2). The goals of palliative care are maintenance of quality of life, dignity and comfort and the four articles in this special issue are addressing these goals. Enhancement of quality of life in dementia requires attention to three main domains: provision of meaningful activities, appropriate medical care, and treatment of behavioral symptoms (3). Individuals with advanced dementia may not be able to participate in many activity programs but they still may maintain some quality of life if they are provided care in a pleasant environment with constant presence of a caregiver. Simard describes a program, Namaste Care, which is specifically tailored for individuals with advanced dementia. This program requires neither major expenditure nor increased staffing and should be instituted in all facilities that care for individuals with advanced dementia. Maintaining functional status of individuals with advanced dementia is important because it improves their self esteem and facilitates provision of care. Van der Steen et al. present evidence that lower respiratory tract infection leads frequently but not always to functional decline. However, it is significant that the Dutch participants in this study were never hospitalized and always treated in a nursing home. Hospitalization leads to functional deterioration even in cognitively intact elderly individuals (4). In addition, treatment of lower respiratory infection is more effective when provided in a nursing home than when the resident is transferred to an acute care setting (5). It should also be considered that antibiotic treatment of lower respiratory tract infections in individuals with terminal dementia does not increase their comfort and lifespan (6). Dignity is an often invoked goal of care in dementia but it is often poorly defined and characterized. Holmerova et al. provide a detailed description of the concept of dignity and its application in dementia care. They also present two specific examples of problems encountered when individuals with advanced dementia are treated insensitively in an acute care setting. Dignity oriented care should treat everybody as an individual and provide care according to the goals of care determined before any crisis situation (7). Namaste Care is an example of care setting that respects individual's dignity until death; respecting "the spirit within". Tube feeding in individuals with advanced progressive dementia does not promote quality of life, dignity or comfort. Tube feeding deprives individuals from contact with the caregiver during hand feeding and from enjoyment of the taste of food. Tube feeding often requires use of restraints that decreases an individual's dignity and comfort. Despite the lack of beneficial effects and the burdens that the tube feeding imposes (8), it is still widely used in individuals with advanced dementia. Pang et al. compare the use of tube feeding in two different settings of dementia care, one in which tube feeding is not used and one in which everybody dies with some form of artificial feeding. She documents

Volicer, L

2007-01-01

480

Introduction and Committees  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This volume contains contributions to the XXVIIIth International Colloquium on Group-Theoretical Methods in Physics, the GROUP 28 conference, which took place in Newcastle upon Tyne from 26-30 July 2010. All plenary and contributed papers have undergone an independent review; as a result of this review and the decisions of the Editorial Board most but not all of the contributions were accepted. The volume is organised as follows: it starts with notes in memory of Marcos Moshinsky, followed by contributions related to the Wigner Medal and Hermann Weyl prize. Then the invited talks at the plenary sessions and the public lecture are published followed by contributions in the parallel and poster sessions in alphabetical order. The Editors:Maia Angelova, Wojciech Zakrzewski, Vronique Hussin and Bernard Piette International Advisory Committee Michael BaakeUniversity of Bielefeld, Germany Gerald DunneUniversity of Connecticut, USA J F (Frank) GomesUNESP, Sao Paolo, Brazil Peter HanggiUniversity of Augsburg, Germany Jeffrey C LagariasUniversity of Michigan, USA Michael MackeyMcGill University, Canada Nicholas MantonCambridge University, UK Alexei MorozovITEP, Moscow, Russia Valery RubakovINR, Moscow, Russia Barry SandersUniversity of Calgary, Canada Allan SolomonOpen University, Milton Keynes, UK Christoph SchweigertUniversity of Hamburg, Germany Standing Committee Twareque AliConcordia University, Canada Luis BoyaSalamanca University, Spain Enrico CeleghiniFirenze University, Italy Vladimir DobrevBulgarian Academy of Sciences, Bulgaria Heinz-Dietrich DoebnerHonorary Member, Clausthal University, Germany Jean-Pierre GazeauChairman, Paris Diderot University, France Mo-Lin GeNankai University. China Gerald GoldinRutgers University, USA Francesco IachelloYale University, USA Joris Van der JeugtGhent University, Belgium Richard KernerPierre et Marie Curie University, France Piotr KielanowskiCINVESTAV, Mexico Alan KosteleckyIndiana University, USA Mariano del OlmoValladolid University, Spain George PogosyanUNAM, Mexico, JINR, Dubna, Russia Christoph SchweigertUniversity of Hamburg, Germany Reidun TwarockYork University, UK Luc VinetMontral University, Canada Apostolos VourdasBradford University, UK Kurt WolfUNAM, Mexico Local Organising Committee Maia Angelova - ChairNorthumbria University, Newcastle Wojtek Zakrzewski - ChairDurham University, Durham Sarah Howells - SecretaryNorthumbria University, Newcastle Jeremy Ellman - WebNorthumbria University, Newcastle Vronique HussinNorthumbria, Durham and University of Montral Safwat MansiNorthumbria University, Newcastle James McLaughlinNorthumbria University, Newcastle Bernard PietteDurham University, Durham Ghanim PutrusNorthumbria University, Newcastle Sarah ReesNewcastle University, Newcastle Petia SiceNorthumbria University, Newcastle Anne TaorminaDurham University, Durham Rosemary ZakrzewskiAccompanying persons programme Lighthouse Photograph by Bernard Piette: Souter Lighthouse, Marsden, Tyne and Wear, England

Angelova, Maia; Zakrzewski, Wojciech; Hussin, Vronique; Piette, Bernard

2011-03-01

481

EDITORIAL: Invited review and topical lectures from the 13th International Congress on Plasma Physics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The 13th International Congress on Plasma Physics (ICPP 2006) was organized, on behalf of the International Advisory Committee of the ICPP series, by the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine and the Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics (BITP) and held in Kiev, Ukraine, 22 26 May 2006. The Congress Program included the topics: fundamental problems of plasma physics; fusion plasmas; plasmas in astrophysics and space physics; plasmas in applications and technologies; complex plasmas. A total of 305 delegates from 30 countries took part in the Congress. The program included 9 invited review lectures, 32 invited topical and 313 contributed papers (60 of which were selected for oral presentation). The Congress Program was the responsibility of the International Program Committee: Anatoly Zagorodny (Chairman) Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics, Ukraine Olha Kocherga (Scientific Secretary) Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics, Ukraine Boris Breizman The University of Texas at Austin, USA Iver Cairns School of Physics, University of Sydney, Australia Tatiana Davydova Institute for Nuclear Research, Ukraine Tony Donne FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics, Rijnhuizen, The Netherlands Nikolai S Erokhin Space Research Institute of RAS, Russia Xavier Garbet CEA, France Valery Godyak OSRAM SYLVANIA, USA Katsumi Ida National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan Alexander Kingsep Russian Research Centre `Kurchatov Institute', Russia E P Kruglyakov Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Russia Gregor Morfill Max-Planck-Institut fr extraterrestrische Physik, Germany Osamu Motojima National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan Jef Ongena ERM-KMS, Brussels and EFDA-JET, UK Konstantyn Shamrai Institute for Nuclear Research, Ukraine Raghvendra Singh Institute for Plasma Research, India Konstantyn Stepanov Kharkiv Institute of Physics and Technology, Ukraine Masayoshi Tanaka National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan Nodar Tsintsadze Physics Institute, Georgia The four-page texts of the contributed papers are presented as a CD, `ICPP 2006. Contributed Papers' which was distributed among the delegates. They are also available at the Congress website http://icpp2006.kiev.ua. A major part of the review and topical lectures is published in this special issue which has been sent to the Congress delegates. The papers were refereed to the usual high standard of the journal Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion. The Guest Editors of the special issue are grateful to the Publishers for their cooperation. Recognizing the role of Professor Alexej Sitenko (12 February 1927 11 February 2002) in the initiation and organization of the International (Kiev) Conferences on Plasma Theory which, after having been combined with the International Congresses on Waves and Instabilities in Plasma in 1980, created the series of International Congresses on Plasma Physics, and taking into account the contribution of Professor Sitenko to the progress of plasma theory, the Program Committee decided to open ICPP 2006 with the Sitenko memorial lecture. This memorial lecture is available as supplementary data (PDF) at stacks.iop.org/PPCF/49/i=5A.

Zagorodny, A.; Kocherga, O.

2007-05-01

482

The Geochemistry and Hydrography of Lake Tanganyika  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

John Edmond was a key member of the scientific group that participated in the two SIO expeditions on Lake Tanganyika, involved in both the water sampling on the lake and the operations in the potable chemical laboratory used ashore. Much of his data on the nutrient chemistry of the lake has been published in summary form (Limnol.Oceanog.1993). The present paper, which describes some of the other studies made on the lake, is dedicated to John, who was both a close personal friend and a brilliant colleague. Along the ~650 km length of the lake we occupied 18 stations and sampled the major inflowing streams. The CI concentration of the lake waters below ~150m (depth of the epilimnion) is constant (27.8ppm), so that temperature is the only hydrographic variable, and distinctive profiles occur in the two major deep basins (North & South, = NB and SB). In the NB from 100 to 1200m, T C decreases smoothly to 400m, below which are two ~ isothermal layers extending down to a sharp discontinuity at 700m, followed by a decrease to an nderline{in-situ} minimum (23.32 C at 870m, the coldest water in Lake Tanganyika). The lower-most 300m of the profile is essentially adiabatic, with a bottom T = 23.32 C. The 700m T discontinuity is associated witha sharp cusp in methane concentration, which increases smoothly with depth from zero at the base of the mixed layer to 2.5 cc/kg at 700m, and then increases rapidly to 5.0 cc/kg at 1200m. In the SB, T decreases smoothly to 600m depth, below which is an almost isothermal layer to 1100m, followed by an ~ adiabatic gradient for 300m, to 23.40 C at 1400m. In this basin the CH4 profile is a smoothly continuous curve from 100-1200m, showing that the effective sill-depth between the two basins is at ~700m. Helium isotope profiles also show distinctive profiles in the two deep basins. In the NB, the 4He profile increases downward from atmospheric saturation to a smooth maximum at 450m (2.26 x saturation) and a 3He/4He ratio anomaly ? (3He) = -40% of atmospheric value). In the SB there is a similar though less marked He maximum at 900m. These extrema show the depths of injection of He from crustal sources, which in both basins has a 3He/4He ratio of 0.28 x atmospheric, close to the ratio in radiogenic helium. The He concentration requires a saturation T of 15 C at the present level of 773m above sealevel. If the deep water has not changed and was saturated at the present 23 C, the required lake level is ~250m below the present level. Co2 and 13C data show production of light CO2 at 220m, the depth of a ? (13C) minimum, and on the lake bottom where heavy CO2 is produced by CH4 production. Other data to be discussed as time permits include stable isotopes (D and 18O, enriched in deep water), 14C, tritium, 226Ra, 210Pb, and dissolved N2, Ne, and Ar. Our logistical work was supported by UNDP-FAO. G.W. Coulter (UNDP, Burundi), Ray Weiss (SIO), and Valerie Craig (SIO) participated in the expedition work at sea and on land.

Craig, H.

2001-12-01

483

Obituary for Moshe Shapiro  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Moshe Shapiro, a pioneer in the area of quantum control of molecular dynamics, whose research opened new pathways for directing the course of chemical reactions and creating matter in unique, often quantum-specified states of aggregation, died on 3 December 2013 in Rehovot, Israel. He was 69 years old. Professor Shapiro is perhaps best known for his work with Paul Brumer of the University of Toronto. In 1986, the pair developed theoretical models predicting the control of unimolecular reactions following excitation by coherent fields of laser light. The reaction dynamics community immediately recognized the Brumer-Shapiro approach as distinct from ideas prevailing at the time to use sequences of short laser pulses timed to impulsively direct wavepacket motion in molecules. Many experimental groups devised strategies to apply this principle of phase control of molecular dynamics, and the results provided some of the earliest and most robust demonstrations of coherent control. The field has matured since to employ emerging electro-optic techniques to shape the phase and frequency characteristics of laser sources in time, and achieve degrees of control that rely simultaneously on interference and impulse. This is well demonstrated by the technique of step-wise adiabatic passage, introduced by Shapiro's group at the University of British Columbia, which enables the controlled transport of an ensemble of molecules to a selected level of excitation, and ultracold atoms to bound, ground-state molecules. Shapiro introduced a number of other new ideas to chemical dynamics. Working with Richard Bersohn, he performed early quantum scattering calculations that traced the multidimensional relaxation of potential energy in the photofragmentation of methyl iodide leading to vibrational excitation of the umbrella bend of the methyl radical product. He also described general conditions characterizing chaos in an isolated energy eigenstate, developed a theory for controlled photon induced symmetry breaking to form chiral products from achiral precursors, and showed how to use phase-coherent laser excitation to launch directional currents in semiconductors, in the absence of bias voltage. He has also contributed to important advances in laser catalysis, quantum computing and decoherence, transition state spectroscopy, potential inversion and wavefunction imaging, the theory of strong field phenomena in atoms and molecules, quantum theory of elementary exchange reactions and foundations of quantum mechanics. His most recent research focused on the control of molecular, atomic, and photonic processes with coherent light, quantum pattern recognition, coherent chiral separation and the coherent suppression of spontaneous emission, decoherence and other decay processes. At UBC, Moshe is remembered for his perceptiveness, broad vision and collegiality. 'One day he came to a group meeting with the idea of a solar-pumped living laser,' said physics colleague, Valery Milner. 'After thinking about this for two months, we designed an experiment using a random laser cavity that produced gain with milliwatts of pumping power applied to a fluorescent protein. We have now only to get lasing with the bacterium we engineered to express this protein.' Moshe studied for his PhD guided by Professor Raphael D Levine, in theoretical chemistry at the Hebrew University, focusing on photodissociation and molecular collisions. In 1970, he moved to Harvard University as a postdoctoral fellow, where he worked in reaction dynamics with Martin Karplus, a 2013 Nobel laureate in chemistry. In 1972, Moshe joined the faculty of the Department of Chemical Physics at the Weizmann Institute. There, he served as a department chair and was named the Jacques Mimran Professor of Chemical Physics. In 2002, he was appointed to a Canada Research Chair in Quantum Control in the Department of Chemistry at UBC. He won the Willis E Lamb Medal for achievements in the Physics of Quantum Electronics (2007), the John C Polanyi Award of The Canadian Society of Chemistry (2011), the Israel Ch

Grant, Edward R.

2014-04-01

484

Soil moisture changes in two experimental sites in Eastern Spain. Irrigation versus rainfed orchards under organic farming  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Within the Soil Erosion and Degradation Research Group Experimental Stations, soil moisture is being researched as a key factor of the soil hydrology and soil erosion (Cerd, 1995; Cerda, 1997; Cerd 1998). This because under semiarid conditions soil moisture content plays a crucial role for agriculture, forest, groundwater recharge and soil chemistry and scientific improvement is of great interest in agriculture, hydrology and soil sciences. Soil moisture has been seeing as the key factor for plant photosynthesis, respiration and transpiration in orchards (Schneider and Childers, 1941) and plant growth (Veihmeyer and Hendrickson, 1950). Moreover, soil moisture determine the root growth and distribution (Levin et al., 1979) and the soil respiration ( Velerie and Orchard, 1983). Water content is expressed as a ratio, ranging from 0 (dry) to the value of soil porosity at saturation (wet). In this study we present 1-year of soil moisture measurements at two experimental sites in the Valencia region, Eastern Spain: one representing rainfed orchard typical from the Mediterranean mountains (El Teularet-Sierra de Enguera), and a second site corresponding to an irrigated orange crop (Alcoleja). The EC-5 soil moisture smart sensor S-SMC-M005 integrated with the field-proven ECH2O Sensor and a 12-bit A/D has been choosen for measuring soil water content providing 3% accuracy in typical soil conditions. Soil moisture measurements were carried out at 5-minute intervals from January till December 2012. In addition, soil moisture was measured at two depths in each landscape: 2 and 20 cm depth - in order to retrieve a representative vertical cross-section of soil moisture. Readings are provided directly from 0 (dry) to 0.450 m3/m3 (wet) volumetric water content. The soil moisture smart sensor is conected to a HOBO U30 Station - GSM-TCP which also stored 5-minute temperature, relative humidity, dew point, global solar radiation, precipitation, wind speed and wind direction data. These complementary atmospheric measurements will serve to explain the intraannual and vertical variations observed in the soil moisture content in both experimental landscapes. This kind of study is aimed to understand the soil moisture content in two different environments such as irrigated rainfed orchards in a semi-arid region. For instance, these measurements have a direct impact on water availability for crops, plant transpiration and could have practical applications to schedule irrigation. Additionally, soil water content has also implications for erosion processes. Key Words: Water, Agriculture, Irrigation, Eastern Spain, Citrus. Acknowledgements The research projects GL2008-02879/BTE and LEDDRA 243857 supported this research. References Cerd, A. 1995. Soil moisture regime under simulated rainfall in a three years abandoned field in Southeast Spain. Physics and Chemistry of The Earth, 20 (3-4), 271-279. Cerd, A. 1997. Seasonal Changes of the Infiltration Rates in a Typical Mediterranean Scrubland on Limestone in Southeast Spain. Journal of Hydrology, 198 (1-4) 198-209 Cerd, A. 1998. Effect of climate on surface flow along a climatological gradient in Israel. A field rainfall simulation approach. Journal of Arid Environments, 38, 145-159. Levin, I., Assaf, R., and Bravdo, B. 1979. Soil moisture and root distribution in an apple orchard irrigated by tricklers. Plant and Soil, 52, 31-40. Schneider, G. W. And Childers, N.F. 1941. Influence of soil moisture on photosynthesis, respiration and transpiration of apples leaves. Plant Physiol., 16, 565-583. Valerie, A. and Orchard, F.J. Cook. 1983. Relationship between soil respiration and soil moisture. Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 15, 447-453. Veihmeyer, F. J. and Hendrickson, A. H. 1950. Soil Moisture in Relation to Plant Growth. Annual Review of Plant Physiology, 1, 285-304.

Azorin-Molina, Cesar; Vicente-Serrano, Sergio M.; Cerd, Artemi

2013-04-01

485

News and Announcements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

New Source of Information from Advertisers The Journal has a new feature effective with the June 1999 issue. If you would like additional information about our advertisers or their products, the quickest and easiest way to get it is via JCE Online: go to http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu click on Ad Index This will take you to the list of advertisers, each conveniently linked to their home page. When you do contact our advertisers, be sure to tell them that you saw their ad in the Journal of Chemical Education. This is important to them, and to us. JCE Software Receives Award The Journal recently received notice that JCE Software portion of JCE Online has been selected as a Links2Go Key Resource for the topic of chemistry software. According to Links2Go (www.links2go.com), JCE Software's home page is one of the top fifty most accessed online resources in the area of chemistry software (currently ranked 45). Thanks to all of you who have visited JCE Online and the JCE Software area to make this possible. If you haven't visited the site yet, you can go there directly (http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/JCESoft/index.html ) as well as via our JCE Online home page. You will be greeted with a short video of nitrogen triiodide exploding and be able to get a wealth of information about our latest releases, software, CD-ROMs/Video, student resources, materials for authors and software developers. You can see color graphics from our CD-ROMs, video, and software,... Actually, if you are familiar with our Catalog, this is much better. 1999 Welch Chemistry Prize Richard N. Zare, the Marguerite Blake Wilbur Professor of Natural Science at Stanford University, has been named the 1999 recipient of the Welch Award in Chemistry for his lifetime achievements in physical and analytical chemistry. Zare's interests focus on the development and application of lasers and other novel instruments to explore chemical frontiers, ranging from molecules to chemical processes, from the inside of cells to the inside of meteorites. Zare and colleague Andrew Alexander are contributors to the Journal's Viewpoints series, sponsored by the Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation: "Anatomy of Elementary Chemical Reactions", JCE, 1998, 75, 1105. The Welch Award in Chemistry has been given by the Welch Foundation since 1972 to honor lifetime achievements in the field. Zare will be honored and presented with a $300,000 prize and gold medallion during the Foundation's annual award banquet held in Houston in October. NEACT Conference: Chemistry of Materials and Material Science The 61st Summer Conference of NEACT, the New England Association of Chemistry Teachers, will be held from Monday, August 9, through Thursday, August 12, at Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, MA. The four-day conference will feature an exploration of the chemistry of materials and material science and effective methods of presenting these in the classroom and laboratory. The keynote address is "Teaching Solid State Chemistry at MIT" by Ron Latanision of MIT's Department of Material Science. Other presentations include "Driving Force", James Livingston; "The Colorful Nanoworld", Moungi Bawendi; "Molecular Wire-Based Amplification in Chemical Sensors", Timothy Swager; "Putting Solids in the Foundation", Arthur Ellis, George Lisensky, and Karen Nordell; "Miracle Materials", Valerie Wilcox; "Teaching About Polymers to Chemistry Students", Richard Stein; and "Using Software in Teaching About Polymers to Chemistry Students", William Vining. There will be a selection of workshops on the conference theme as well. The conference is open to all. The program chairperson is Peter J. Nassiff, Science Department Chairperson at Burlington High School. For further information contact Nassiff at 80 Gregory Road, Framingham, MA 01701; email: pnassiff@massed.net. Call for Symposia, Papers, & Workshops: 16th BCCE The Web site for the 16th Biennial Conference on Chemical Education, July 30-August 3, 2000, at the Un

1999-07-01

486

PREFACE: Preface  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The 9th International Conference on Photonics and Imaging in Biology and Medicine (PIBM 2010), combined with the 3rd Photonics and Optoelectronics Meetings (POEM 2010), was held from November 2-5, 2010, at Wuhan Science & Technology Convention & Exhibition Center, Wuhan, PR China. The present volume contains papers from a selection from the invited, oral, and poster presentations. PIBM is the largest international biomedical photonics conference series in Asia. It was initially held at HUST bi-yearly from 1999. After being held three times in Wuhan (1999, 2001 and 2003), it was hosted once in Tianjin (2005), before returning to Wuhan every year since 2006. PIBM is designed to bring together scientists, engineers and clinical researchers from a variety of disciplines engaged in applying optical science, photonics and imaging technologies to problems in biology and medicine. The scope of this conference ranges from basic research to instrumentation engineering, and biological and clinical studies. It is recognized as one of the largest and most comprehensive international conferences in China, and represents the highest level of worldwide research in this field. In the past ten years, 7 volumes of proceedings with a total of 672 papers were published by SPIE (International Society for Optical Engineering), and a volume with 75 papers was published by World Scientific Publishing Co. in 2007. Proceedings of PIBM 1999, 2001, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2008 and 2009 were indexed by EI Compendex, while proceedings of PIBM 1999, 2001, 2003, 2005, 2006, and 2007 were indexed by SCI. Some excellent papers were recommended for publication in the peer-reviewed Journal of Innovative Optical Health Sciences (JIOHS). An increasing number of young researchers present and exchange their innovative ideas on this friendly and professional platform, which has made PIBM an unforgettable annual meeting in Wuhan. This year PIBM attracted distinguished scholars in the field of biomedical photonics and imaging from all over the world, including the United States, Russia, Australia, Canada, Israel, France, Ireland, Japan, Korea and China. The major topics covered at the conference and presented in this volume include: Photonic Therapeutics, Diagnostics and Instrumentations; Tissue Optics and Laser Tissue Interaction; Biomedical Spectroscopy and Microscopy; Multimodal and Hybrid Biomedical Imaging; and Optical Molecular Imaging. The conference voted for the three best student papers; awards were presented to the participant students whose posters were recognized as excellent and who took part in the oral presentation competition. The conference received 133 submitted abstracts, and this volume of the Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes a selection of 53 excellent submissions. The Conference Secretariat and Local Organizing Committee deserve recognition for planning a smoothly run and productive conference with comprehensive, instructive lectures and innovative work displayed in poster presentations. The faculties and students from Britton Chance Center for Biomedical Photonics were dedicated to their work in reception and service during the conference. It is a pleasure to thank all of them for their efficient and hard work. We are also grateful for the financial support from 111 Project (B07038), and the assistance in organization and coordination from Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics and Huazhong University of Science and Technology. Finally, we would like to thank all the authors for their contributions to PIBM 2010 and all the members of the Committees for their cooperation and time spent reviewing submissions. Special thanks are due to the Advisory Committee members Shu Chien, Aaron Ciechanover, Steve Dahms, Da Hsuan Feng, Steven R Goodman, Brian Salzberg, Fujia Yang, Jianquan Yao, Baoyong Zheng and Olivia Ho Cheng for their participation on-site, and their significant contributions to the conference. Wuhan, PR ChinaDecember, 2010 Qingming LuoLihong V WangValery V TuchinConference Chairs 9th International Conference on P

Luo, Qingming; Wang, Lihong V.; Tuchin, Valery V.

2011-02-01

487

PREFACE: Seventh International Conference on Dissociative Recombination: Theory, Experiments and Applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Dissociative Recombination is one of the outcomes of collisions between electrons and molecular ions. This reaction dominates many plasmas, dense as well as dilute. Therefore, knowledge about this reaction is highly relevant for astrophysics, atmospheric sciences, (non-)reactive plasmas, and fusion plasmas. A theoretical description of this process requires intensive ab initio quantum chemistry calculations as well as a detailed description of the electron collision process. The high density of states near the ionization energy of molecules renders calculations extremely difficult and complex. In experiments, both discharge and flowing afterglow experiments and fast beam and ion storage ring experiments, a steady development can be seen towards more detailed studies often at the quantum state resolved level including product internal state identification and very recently detailed vector properties such as fragment angular distributions. Thanks to an efficient interplay between experiment and theory dissociative recombination has progressed significantly over the last few years. The Seventh International Conference on Dissociative Recombination: Theory, Experiments, and Applications (DR2007) was organized by the Institute of Molecules and Materials at the Radboud University Nijmegen, The Netherlands and was held on the Wadden Island of Ameland. Earlier conferences in this series were held at Lake Louise, Alberta, Canada (1988), Saint Jacut, Bretagne, France (1992), Ein Gedi, Israel (1995), Nsslingen, Stockholm Archipelago, Sweden (1999), Chicago, USA, as part of the American Chemical Society meeting (2001), and in Mosbach, Germany (2004). Ameland and the Resort d'Amelander Kaap was chosen in the spirit of previous dissociative recombination conferences. It turned out to be a venue where discussions about dissociative recombination could take place around the clock both inside and outside while walking through dunes and on the beach. The conference was made possible by generous sponsors, whom we thank wholeheartedly: The Radboud University Nijmegen, The Institute for Molecules and Materials of the Radboud University Nijmegen, The Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (Stichting FOM), The Foundation PHYSICA (Stichting Physica), and The Netherlands Royal Academy of Sciences (KNAW). The organisational support by Erna Gouwens van Oss before and during the conference was essential for its success. The help of Thanja Lambrechts and Vitali Zhaunerchyk during the preparation of the proceedings is greatly appreciated. The delay in the publication of these proceedings is entirely caused by the editor. The authors of the contributions are thanked for the quality of their contributions, Wim J van der Zande, Editor Institute for Molecules and Materials, Radboud University Nijmegen, PO Box 9010, NL-6500 GL Nijmegen, The Netherlands Email: w.vanderzande@science.ru.nl Conference photograph Participants of the 7th International Conference on Dissociative Recombination: Theory, Experiments and Applications, taken in front of d'Amelander Kaap, the conference venue in Ameland, one of the Wadden Islands in the North of the Netherlands. 1. Dror Shafir21. Annemieke Petrignani41. Oumanou Motopan 2. Ioan Scheider22. Johanna Roos42. Max Berg 3. Nigel Adams23. Erna Gouwens van Oss43. Henrik Buhr 4. Hajime Tanuma24. Natalie de Ruette44. Ilya Fabrikant 5. Jonathan Tennyson25. Francois Wameu Tamo45. Claude Krantz 6. Vitali Zhaunerchyk26. Rainer Johnsen46. Michael Stenrup 7. Robert Continetti27. Viatcheslav Kokoouline47. Xavier Urbain 8. Stefan Rosn28. Hidekazu Takagi48. Evelyne Roueff 9. Erik Vigren29. Hans-Jakob Wrner49. Dirk Schwalm 10. Magdalena Kaminska30. Oskar Asvany50. Valery Ngassam 11. Chris Greene31. Lutz Lammich51. Julien Lecointre 12. Steffen Novotny32. Brandon Jordon-Thaden52. Ann Orel 13. Amy Schumak33. Wolf Diettrich Geppert53. Ihor Korolov 14. Gerard van Rooij34. Alexander Faure54. Romain Guerot 15. Wim van der Zande35. Mathias Hamberg55. Peet Hickman 16. Daan Schram36. Oldrich Novotny56. Christiaan Jungen 17. Dahbia Talb

van der Zande, Wim J.

2009-09-01

488

PREFACE: Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This special issue contains papers presented at the International Conference on Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems (SCCS) which was held during the week of 20 24 June 2005 in Moscow, Russia. The Moscow conference was the tenth in a series of conferences. The previous conferences were organized as follows. 1977: Orleans-la-Source, France, as a NATO Advanced Study Institute on Strongly Coupled Plasmas (organized by Marc Feix and Gabor J Kalman) 1982: Les Houches, France (organized by Marc Baus and Jean-Pierre Hansen) 1986: Santa Cruz, California, USA (hosted by Forrest J Rogers and Hugh E DeWitt) 1989: Tokyo, Japan (hosted by Setsuo Ichimaru) 1992: Rochester, NY, USA (hosted by Hugh M Van Horn and Setsuo Ichimaru) 1995: Binz, Germany (hosted by Wolf Dietrich Kraeft and Manfred Schlanges) 1997: Boston, Massachusetts, USA (hosted by Gabor J Kalman) 1999: St Malo, France (hosted by Claude Deutsch and Bernard Jancovici) 2002: Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA (hosted by John F Benage and Michael S Murillo) After 1995 the name of the series was changed from `Strongly Coupled Plasmas' to the present name in order to extend the topics of the conferences. The planned frequency for the future is once every three years. The purpose of these conferences is to provide an international forum for the presentation and discussion of research accomplishments and ideas relating to a variety of plasma liquid and condensed matter systems, dominated by strong Coulomb interactions between their constituents. Strongly coupled Coulomb systems encompass diverse many-body systems and physical conditions. Each meeting has seen an evolution of topics and emphasis as new discoveries and new methods appear. This year, sessions were organized for invited presentations and posters on dense plasmas and warm matter, astrophysics and dense hydrogen, non-neutral and ultracold plasmas, dusty plasmas, condensed matter 2D and layered charged-particle systems, Coulomb liquids, and statistical theory of SCCS. Within each area new results from theory, simulations and experiments were presented. In addition, a special symposium was held one evening to explore the questions on high-energy-density matter generated by intense heavy ion beams and to discuss the outlook for applications to industry. As this special issue illustrates, the field remains vibrant and challenging, being driven to a great extent by new experimental tools and access to new strongly coupled conditions. This is illustrated by the inclusion of developments in the areas of warm matter, dusty plasmas, condensed matter and ultra-cold plasmas. In total, 200 participants from 17 countries attended the conference, including 42 invited speakers. The individuals giving presentations at the conference, including invited plenary and topical talks and posters, were asked to contribute to this special issue and most have done so. We trust that this special issue will accurately record the contents of the conference, and provide a valuable resource for researchers in this rapidly evolving field. We would like to thank the members of the International Advisory Board and all members of the Programme Committee for their contributions to the conference. Of course, nothing would have been possible without the dedicated efforts of the Local Organizing Committee, in particular Igor Morozov and Valery Sultanov. We wish to thank the Russian Academy of Sciences, the Institute for High Energy Densities, the Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, the Ministry of Education and Science of the Russian Federation, the Russian Foundation for Basic Research, the Moscow Committee of Science and Technologies, the Russian Joint Stock Company `Unified Energy System of Russia', and The International Association for the Promotion of Co-operation with Scientists from the New Independent States (NIS) of the Former Soviet Union for sponsoring this conference.

Fortov, Vladimir E.; Golden, Kenneth I.; Norman, Genri E.

2006-04-01

489

PREFACE New developments in nanopore researchfrom fundamentals to applications New developments in nanopore researchfrom fundamentals to applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Biological and solid-state nanopores are an exciting field of research, which has seen a rapid development over the last 10 to 20 years. Activities in this area range from theoretical and experimental work on the underlying fundamental (bio)physics to applications in single-molecule biosensing. And while the prospect of DNA sequencing continues to be a major driving force, other applications with potentially similar impact begin to emerge, for example the detection of small molecules, proteins, protein/protein and protein/DNA complexes, and RNA to name just a few. It has also become apparent that both classes of nanopore devices have intrinsic advantages and disadvantages; hybrid structures combining the better of the two worlds would be a logical consequence and are beginning to appear in the literature. Many other highly innovative ideas and concepts continue to emerge and the number of nanopore-related publications has increased drastically over recent years. We found that more than 100 research groups worldwide are active in this area; several commercial settings are in the process of translating fundamental research into real-life applications. We therefore felt that now is the right time to showcase these new developments in a special issue: to inspire researchers active in the field, to liberate inherent synergies, and not least, to demonstrate to the outside world the current state-of-the-art and future opportunities. The title 'New developments in nanopore researchfrom fundamentals to applications' in some way reflects these ambitions and, even though not everyone invited was able to contribute, we were able to assemble 34 high-quality research papers from all over the world. We would like to acknowledge and thank all the contributors for their submissions, which made this special issue possible in the first place. Moreover, we would like to thank the staff at IOP Publishing for helping us with the administrative aspects and for coordinating the refereeing process, and Ms Natalia Goehring for the beautiful cover artwork. Finally, to the readers, we hope you find this special issue a valuable source of information and insight into the field of nanopores. New developments in nanopore researchfrom fundamentals to applications contents Mathematical modeling and simulation of nanopore blocking by precipitation M-T Wolfram, M Burger and Z S Siwy Protein conducting nanopores Anke Harsman, Vivien Krger, Philipp Bartsch, Alf Honigmann, Oliver Schmidt, Sanjana Rao, Christof Meisinger and Richard Wagner Electrically sensing protease activity with nanopores Mikiembo Kukwikila and Stefan Howorka Electrical characterization of DNA-functionalized solid state nanopores for bio-sensing V Mussi, P Fanzio, L Repetto, G Firpo, P Scaruffi, S Stigliani, M Menotta, M Magnani, G P Tonini and U Valbusa Automatable lipid bilayer formation and ion channel measurement using sessile droplets J L Poulos, S A Portonovo, H Bang and J J Schmidt Critical assessment of OmpF channel selectivity: merging information from different experimental protocols M L Lpez, E Garca-Gimnez, V M Aguilella and A Alcaraz Chemically modified solid state nanopores for high throughput nanoparticle separation Anmiv S Prabhu, Talukder Zaki N Jubery, Kevin J Freedman, Rafael Mulero, Prashanta Dutta and Min Jun Kim Changes in ion channel geometry resolved to sub-ngstrm precision via single molecule mass spectrometry Joseph W F Robertson, John J Kasianowicz and Joseph E Reiner Entropic transport of finite size particles W Riefler, G Schmid, P S Burada and P Hnggi Osmotic stress regulates the strength and kinetics of sugar binding to the maltoporin channel Philip A Gurnev, Daniel Harries, V Adrian Parsegian and Sergey M Bezrukov Detection of urea-induced internal denaturation of dsDNA using solid-state nanoporesn Alon Singer, Heiko Kuhn, Maxim Frank-Kamenetskii and Amit Meller Translocation events in a single-walled carbon nanotube Jin He, Hao Liu, Pei Pang, Di Cao and Stuart Lindsay Probing DNA with micro- and nanocapillaries and optical tweezers L J

Albrecht, Tim; Edel, Joshua B.; Winterhalter, Mathias

2010-11-01

490

Physical Biology : challenges for our second decade.  

PubMed

It is quite an honor to be asked to become the third editor-in-chief of Physical Biology . I am following in the footsteps of Tim Newman, who served with energy and enthusiasm. Hopefully, the entire community fully appreciates his contributions to moving the field forward. Thank you, Tim! With the honor, however, goes a clear responsibility. Our journal has survived its birth pangs and emerged as a serious venue for publishing quality research papers using physical science to address the workings of living matter. With the support of scientists in this field and with the ongoing commitment of the IOP, we have successfully reached adolescence. Yet, there is clearly much room to grow and there are clear challenges in defining and maintaining our special niche in the publishing landscape. In this still-developing state, the journal very much mimics the state of the field of physical biology itself. Few scientists continue to question the relevance of physical science for the investigation of the living world. But, will our new perspective and the methods that come with it really lead to radically new principles of how life works? Or, will breakthroughs continue to come from experimental biology (perhaps aided by the traditional physicist-as-tool-builder paradigm), leaving us to put quantitative touches on established fundamentals? In thinking about these questions for the field and for the journal, I have tried to understand what is really unique about our joint endeavors. I have become convinced that living matter represents a new challenge to our physical-science based conceptual framework. Not only is it far from equilibrium, as has been generally recognized, but it violates our simple notions of the separability of constituents, their interactions and the resulting large-scale behavior. Unlike, say, atomic physicists who can do productive research while safely ignoring the latest developments in QCD (let alone particle physics at higher energies), we do not yet understand when the details of proteins and nucleic acids structure and function can be assumed constant when considering the cell. This problem is even more serious as we try to set higher sights and think of cells as constituents of tissue, organ and organism. Trying to understand higher-order biological systems is a bit like trying to play a board game where the pieces and rules are constantly changing, somehow in concert with what is happening at the scale of the game. Others will undoubtedly have their own view of what is really difficult and different about living systems. One of the roles of Physical Biology should therefore be to provide a needed forum to address some of these really difficult questions. Of course, most papers will operate with the safety-setting on, and will use established ideas in physics, either experimental or theoretical, to further our quantitative appreciation of living systems. These papers are without doubt an absolutely necessary part of the field, and we hope that our journal can serve as a home for the best of these. But, my real hope is that we can attract papers that really try to break new ground, that suggest ways in which the living world is not just an extremely messy example of the same phenomena that can be studied in non-biological contexts. Amazingly, this hope is actually shared by many leading biologists. In one of the most influential papers on cancer research in the past decades. Hanahan and Weinberg argue that 'one day, we imagine that cancer biology and treatment-at present, a patchwork quilt of cell biology, genetics, histopathology, biochemistry, immunology, and pharmacology-will become a science with a conceptual structure and logical coherence that rivals that of chemistry or physics.' We should take up the challenge, not just for cancer, and Physical Biology should help. Figuring out exactly how best to do this is now my responsibility, and I look forward to hearing from you and working with all of you, in order to make it happen. PMID:24732666

Levine, Herbert

2014-06-01

491

Physical Biology : challenges for our second decade  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is quite an honor to be asked to become the third editor-in-chief of Physical Biology . I am following in the footsteps of Tim Newman, who served with energy and enthusiasm. Hopefully, the entire community fully appreciates his contributions to moving the field forward. Thank you, Tim! With the honor, however, goes a clear responsibility. Our journal has survived its birth pangs and emerged as a serious venue for publishing quality research papers using physical science to address the workings of living matter. With the support of scientists in this field and with the ongoing commitment of the IOP, we have successfully reached adolescence. Yet, there is clearly much room to grow and there are clear challenges in defining and maintaining our special niche in the publishing landscape. In this still-developing state, the journal very much mimics the state of the field of physical biology itself. Few scientists continue to question the relevance of physical science for the investigation of the living world. But, will our new perspective and the methods that come with it really lead to radically new principles of how life works? Or, will breakthroughs continue to come from experimental biology (perhaps aided by the traditional physicist-as-tool-builder paradigm), leaving us to put quantitative touches on established fundamentals? In thinking about these questions for the field and for the journal, I have tried to understand what is really unique about our joint endeavors. I have become convinced that living matter represents a new challenge to our physical-science based conceptual framework. Not only is it far from equilibrium, as has been generally recognized, but it violates our simple notions of the separability of constituents, their interactions and the resulting large-scale behavior. Unlike, say, atomic physicists who can do productive research while safely ignoring the latest developments in QCD (let alone particle physics at higher energies), we do not yet understand when the details of proteins and nucleic acids structure and function can be assumed constant when considering the cell. This problem is even more serious as we try to set higher sights and think of cells as constituents of tissue, organ and organism. Trying to understand higher-order biological systems is a bit like trying to play a board game where the pieces and rules are constantly changing, somehow in concert with what is happening at the scale of the game. Others will undoubtedly have their own view of what is really difficult and different about living systems. One of the roles of Physical Biology should therefore be to provide a needed forum to address some of these really difficult questions. Of course, most papers will operate with the safety-setting on, and will use established ideas in physics, either experimental or theoretical, to further our quantitative appreciation of living systems. These papers are without doubt an absolutely necessary part of the field, and we hope that our journal can serve as a home for the best of these. But, my real hope is that we can attract papers that really try to break new ground, that suggest ways in which the living world is not just an extremely messy example of the same phenomena that can be studied in non-biological contexts. Amazingly, this hope is actually shared by many leading biologists. In one of the most influential papers on cancer research in the past decades. Hanahan and Weinberg argue that 'one day, we imagine that cancer biology and treatmentat present, a patchwork quilt of cell biology, genetics, histopathology, biochemistry, immunology, and pharmacologywill become a science with a conceptual structure and logical coherence that rivals that of chemistry or physics.' We should take up the challenge, not just for cancer, and Physical Biology should help. Figuring out exactly how best to do this is now my responsibility, and I look forward to hearing from you and working with all of you, in order to make it happen.

Levine, Herbert

2014-06-01

492

EDITORIAL: Colloidal suspensions Colloidal suspensions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Special issue in honour of Henk Lekkerkerker's 65th birthday Professor Henk N W Lekkerkerker is a world-leading authority in the field of experimental and theoretical soft condensed matter. On the occasion of his 65th birthday in the summer of 2011, this special issue celebrates his many contributions to science. Henk Lekkerkerker obtained his undergraduate degree in chemistry at the University of Utrecht (1968) and moved to Calgary where he received his PhD in 1971. He moved to Brussels as a NATO fellow at the Universit Libre de Bruxelles and was appointed to an assistant professorship (1974), an associate professorship (1977) and a full professorship (1980) in physical chemistry at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel. In 1985 he returned to The Netherlands to take up a professorship at the Van 't Hoff Laboratory, where he has been ever since. He has received a series of awards during his career, including the Onsager Medal (1999) of the University of Trondheim, the Bakhuys Roozeboom Gold Medal (2003) of the Royal Dutch Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW), the ECIS-Rhodia European Colloid and Interface Prize (2003), and the Liquid Matter Prize of the European Physical Society (2008). He was elected a member of KNAW in 1996, was awarded an Academy Chair position in 2005, and has held several visiting lectureships. Henk's work focuses on phase transitions in soft condensed matter, and he has made seminal contributions to both the theoretical and experimental aspects of this field. Here we highlight three major themes running through his work, and a few selected publications. So-called depletion interactions may lead to phase separation in colloid-polymer mixtures, and Henk realised that the partitioning of polymer needs to be taken into account to describe the phase behaviour correctly [1]. Colloidal suspensions can be used as model fluids, with the time- and length-scales involved leading to novel opportunities, notably the direct observation of capillary waves at a fluid-fluid interface [2]. Together with Remco Tuinier, Henk has recently completed a book in this area which is to appear later this year. A major theme in Henk's research is that of phase transitions in lyotropic liquid crystals. Henk, together with Daan Frenkel and Alain Stroobants, realized in the 1980s that a smectic phase in dispersions of rod-like particles can be stable without the presence of attractive interactions, similar to nematic ordering as predicted earlier by Onsager [3]. Together with Gert-Jan Vroege he wrote a seminal review in this area [4]. Henk once said that 'one can only truly develop one colloidal model system in one's career' and in his case this must be that of gibbsite platelets. Initially Henk's group pursued another polymorph of aluminium hydroxide, boehmite, which forms rod-like particles [5], which already displayed nematic liquid crystal phases. The real breakthrough came when the same precursors treated the produced gibbsite platelets slightly differently. These reliably form a discotic nematic phase [6] and, despite the polydispersity in their diameter, a columnar phase [7]. A theme encompassing a wide range of soft matter systems is that of colloidal dynamics and phase transition kinetics. Many colloidal systems have a tendency to get stuck in metastable states, such as gels or glasses. This is a nuisance if one wishes to study phase transitions, but it is of great practical significance. Such issues feature in many of Henk's publications, and with Valerie Anderson he wrote a highly cited review in this area [8]. Henk Lekkerkerker has also invested significant effort into the promotion of synchrotron radiation studies of colloidal suspensions. He was one of the great supporters of the Dutch-Belgian beamline 'DUBBLE' project at the ESRF [9]. He attended one of the very first experiments in Grenoble in 1999, which led to a Nature publication [7]. He was strongly involved in many other experiments which followed and also has been a member of the beam line board. The most recent synchotron data are reported in this issue and Henk

Petukhov, Andrei; Kegel, Willem; van Duijneveldt, Jeroen

2011-05-01

493

Obituary: John Beverley Oke, 1928-2004  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

John Beverley (Bev) Oke passed away of heart failure early on 2 March 2004 at his Victoria, B.C. home. Bev's insatiable scientific curiosity led to fundamental contributions in many areas of stellar and extragalactic astronomy, including the development of advanced instrumentation for the largest optical telescopes and the mentoring of scores of grateful students and colleagues. Bev Oke was born in Sault Ste. Marie, ON, Canada on 23 March 1928, the son of Lyla Parteshuk and the Rev. C. Clare Oke. He entered the University of Toronto in 1945 to study physics with a steadily increasing fraction of astronomy, receiving his BA in 1949. Summer employment at the David Dunlap Observatory (DDO, 1948) and at the Dominion Observatory (Ottawa, 1949, 1950) sealed his interest in astronomy as a career. For his MA thesis (1950, Toronto), performed under theoretician Ralph Williamson, he made interior models of the Sun, and was proud to have proved that the proton-proton cycle was indeed the source of solar energy. Upon entering Princeton University he worked with Martin Schwarzschild on stellar interiors models and Lyman Spitzer on interstellar lines. A lifelong friendship with Alan Sandage began during Bev's second year while Alan was a post-doc at Princeton. During Bev's third year he spent three months in Pasadena with Lyman obtaining data for his thesis on Of stars. While in Pasadena he began a second life-long collaboration with Jesse Greenstein, an astronomer whose approach to science Bev deeply respected. In the small field of astronomy in that era, Bev wrote to DDO Director Jack Heard indicating the nearing completion of his PhD studies and his interest in a position. This led to a lectureship at the University of Toronto (1953-1956), followed by an Assistant Professorship (1956-1958). Bev's interest in instruments began at this time, when he built a device to convert photographic density to intensity, and worked with DDO engineer-machinist Jerry Longworth to implement one of the first two photoelectric scanners ever built. His main interests at the time were the classification of the thousands of stellar spectra in the DDO archives, and studies of Cepheids using his new spectrum scanner. At a Halloween party in 1954 he met Nancy Sparling. Together they initiated a life partnership factually punctuated by their August, 1955 marriage and the arrival of their children, Christopher (1957), Kevin (1958), Jennifer (1961) and Valerie (1966). Their home was notable to all for the deep aura of familial love and joy in the pursuit of knowledge and accomplishments. In winter 1957-58 Jesse Greenstein invited Bev to join Cal Tech, where he became an Associate Professor (1958) and then Professor (1964); during the period 1970-1978 he was Hale Observatories Director. With the large telescopes at Mount Wilson and Mount Palomar, astronomy there could aspire to be the best in the world, but this required instrumentation of the highest capabilities. Bev soon began to contribute in a major way to their instrumentation excellence following examples established, among others, by Ira Bowen and Horace Babcock. His began by improving the DC amplifiers then in use; constructing a high-spectral-resolution, scanning spectrophotometer; designing vacuum Dewars for astronomical applications; creating pulse counting systems for photoelectric devices; and building the innovative 32-channel spectrum scanner for the Palomar 5-m telescope that was completed in 1968. Bev built instruments to advance astronomy and to satisfy his wide-ranging curiosity about nature. With the first single-channel spectrum scanner he built at Cal Tech he played a key role in the discovery of the redshift of 3C273. Using his multi-channel spectrometer with students and colleagues, he pursued a highly successful quest to establish accurate spectral-energy distributions for diverse classes of stars and galaxies, based upon rigorous calibration against physical standards. Through this painstaking work he enabled the advances of astronomers worldwide for subsequent generations and extend

Hesser, James Edward

2004-12-01

494

Sensitivity of ocean model simulation in the coastal ocean to the resolution of the meteorological forcing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The quality of ocean simulations depends on a number of factors such as approximations in governing equations, errors introduced by the numerical scheme, uncertainties in input parameters, and atmospheric forcing. The identification of relations between the uncertainties in input and output data is still a challenge for the development of numerical models. The impacts of ocean variables on ocean models are still not well known (e.g., Kara et al., 2009). Given the considerable importance of the atmospheric forcing to the air-sea interaction, it is essential that researchers in ocean modelling work need a good understanding about how sensitive the atmospheric forcing is to variations of model results, which is beneficial to the development of ocean models. Also, it provides a proper way to choose the atmospheric forcing in ocean modelling applications. Our previous study (Shapiro et al, 2011) has shown that the basin-wide circulation pattern and the temperature structure in the Black Sea produced by the same model is significantly dependent on the source of the meteorological input, giving remarkably different responses. For the purpose of this study we have chosen the Celtic Sea where high resolution meteo data are available from the UK Met office since 2006. The Celtic Sea is tidally dominated water basin, with the tidal stream amplitude varying from 0.25m/s in the southwest to 2 m/s in the Bristol Channel. It is also filled with mesoscale eddies which contribute to the formation of the residual (tidally averaged) circulation pattern (Young et al, 2003). The sea is strongly stratified from April to November, which adds to the formation of density driven currents. In this paper we analyse how sensitive the model output is to variations in the spatial resolution of meteorological using low (1.6) and high (0.11) resolution meteo forcing, giving the quantitative relation between variations of met forcing and the resulted differences of model results, as well as identifying the causes. The length scales of most energetic dynamic features in both ocean and atmosphere are defined by the Rossby radius of deformation, which is about 1000 km (a typical size of a cyclone) in the atmosphere while only 10-20 km (a size of a mesoscale eddy) in a shallow sea. However sub-mesoscale atmospheric patterns such as patchiness in the cloud cover could result in smaller scale variations of both the wind and solar radiation hence creating a direct link of these smaller atmospheric features with the ocean mesoscale variability. The simulation has been performed using a version of POLCOMS numerical model (Enriquez et al, 2005). Tidal boundary conditions were taken from the Oregon State University European Shelf Tidal Model (Egbert et al, 2010) and the temperature/ salinity initial fields and boundary conditions were taken from the World Ocean Database (Boyer et al, 2004). The paper discusses what elements of the circulation and water column structure are mostly sensitive to the meteo-fields resolution. References Kara, A.B., Wallcraft, A.J., Hurlburt, H.E., Loh, W.-Y., 2009. Which surface atmospheric variable drives the seasonal cycle of sea surface temperature over the global ocean? Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 114, D05101. Boyer, .T, S. Levitus, H. Garcia, R. Locarnini, C. Stephens, and J. Antonov, T. Boyer, S. Levitus, H. Garcia, R. Locarnini, C. Stephens, and J. Antonov, 2004. Objective Analyses of Annual, Seasonal, and Monthly Temperature and Salinity for the World Ocean on a Grid. International Journal of Climatology, 25, 931-945. Egbert, G. D., S. Y. Erofeeva, and R. D. Ray, 2010. Assimilation of altimetry data for nonlinear shallow-water tides: quarter-diurnal tides of the Northwest European Shelf, Continental Shelf Research, 30, 668-679. Enriquez, C. E., G. I. Shapiro, A. J. Souza, and A. G. Zatsepin, 2005. Hydrodynamic modelling of mesoscale eddies in the Black Sea. Ocean Dyn., 55, 476-489. Georgy Shapiro, Dmitry Aleynik , Andrei Zatsepin , Valentina Khan, Valery Prostakishin , Tatiana Akivis , Vladimir Belokopytov , Ant

Chen, Feng; Shapiro, Georgy; Thain, Richard

2013-04-01

495

Verochka Zingan or recollections from the Physics Department of the Moscow University  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The author recollects his studentship during 70-th years at the Physics Department of the Moscow University. He was graduated from the theoretical Physics Department in 1977. The Rectors of the University that times were I.G. Petrovskii, R.V. Khokhlov and A.A. Logunov. The dean of the Physics Department was V.S. Fursov. As a particular event a meet with the former prime-minister of the USSR A.N. Kosygin is reported. Between professors mentioned throughout the recollections are A.I.Kitaigorodskii, Ya. B. Zel'dovich, D.D. Ivanenko, A.A. Sokolov, A.A. Vlasov, V.B. Braginsky, I.M. Ternov, L.A. Artsimovich, E.P. Velikhov and other, including that which became University professors later. A great number of colleagues from the Physics, Chemistry, Phylological and Historical Departments of the Moscow University are mentioned. Particularly, the students which entered the group 113 in 1971 and finished the group 601 in 1977 are listed. The recollections include 5 parts. Persons cited throughout the paper: A.N. Kosygin, A.S. Golovin, V. Kostyukevich, I.M. Ternov, E.G. Pozdnyak, A. N. Matveev, V.P. Elyutin, V.V. Kerzhentsev, 113 academic group (1971), V. Topala, E.A. Marinchuk, P.Paduraru, A.I. Kitaygorodski, A. Leahu, S. Berzan, B. Ursu, I. Coanda (Koade), M. Stefanovici, O. Bulgaru, A. Iurie-Apostol, A.S. Davydov, M.I. Kaganov, I.M. Lifshitz, Ya. B. Zel'dovich, A.Zhukov, A.I. Buzdin, N.S. Perov, V. Dolgov, P. Vabishchevich, A.A. Samarskii, V. Makarov, Irina Kamenskih, A.A. Arsen'ev, L.A. Artsimovich, A.A. Tyapkin, B.M. Pontecorvo, D.I. Blokhintsev, I.G. Petrovskii, R.V. Khokhlov, V.N. Rudenko, A.A. Sokolov, D.D. Ivanenko (Iwanenko), A.A. Vlasov, V.N. Ponomarev, N.N. Bogolyubov, N.N. Bogolyubov (Jr), V.Ch. Zhukovskii, Tamara Tarasova, Zarina Radzhabova (Malovekova), V.Malovekov, Tatiana Shmeleva, Alexandra C.Nicolescu, Tatiana Nicolescu, Rano Mahkamova, Miriam Yandieva, Natalia Germaniuk (Grigor'eva), E. Grigor'ev, A. Putro, Elena Nikiforova, B. Kostrykin, Galia Laufer, K. Laufer, Yu. El'nitskii, Gh. Nemtoi, Yu. Oprunenko, N.N. Semenov, Varun Sahni, A.A. Starobinskii, Liusea Burca, Serge Rollet, Tatyana Davydova, Zinaida Uglichina (Khafizova), T.Filippova, V.S. Filippov, Vera Zingan (Stefanovici), B.A. Gaina, E.F. Gaina, Valeri Gaina, A. Kirnitskii, M. Kavalerchik, Margarita Kavalerchik, Mark Rainis, L.I. Sedov, D. Mangeron, S. Taltu (Coanda), Z. Sali(Chitoroaga, Kitoroage), Raisa M. Gorbachova, Maria Bulgaru, S. Pavlichenko, Nadezhda Shishkan, A.N. Matveev, N.Ya. Tyapunina, D.F. Kiselev, V.A. Petukhov, N.Ch. Krutitskaya, G.N. Medvedev, A.A. Shishkin,I.A. Shishmarev,A.G. Sveshnikov, A.B. Vasil'eva, A.G. Yagola, I.I. Ol'hovskii, V.V. Kravtsov, V.V.Petkevich, V.I. Grigor'ev, V.S. Rostovskii, V.V. Balashov, B.I. Spasskii, V.D. Krivchenkov, M.B. Menskii, V.Ya. Fainberg, V.G. Kadyshevskii, B.K. Kerimov, V.A. Matveev, I.A. Kvasnikov, D.V. Gal'tsov, V.R. Khalilov, G.A. Chizhov,I.A. Obukhov, V.N. Melnikov, A.A. Logunov, A.N. Tavkhelidze,Yu.S. Vladimirov, N.F. Florea (Floria), B.A. Lysov, V.D. Kukin, 601-academic group (1977), A.R. Khokhlov, P.L. Kapitza, S.P. Kapitza, Ion C. Inculet, Ion I. Inculet,W. Bittner, Nikolay Florea (Floria), M.M. Heraskov, N.V. Sklifosovskii, N.N. Bantysh-Kamenskii, N.D. Zelinskii, Olga Crusevan (Krushevan), Eugenia Crusevan (Krushevan),L.S. Berg, I. Buzdugan (Buzdyga),S.G. Lazo, M.K. Grebenchya (Grebencea), V.T. Kondurar (Conduraru), E.A. Grebenikov, K.F. Teodorchik, V.A. Albitzky, M.V. Nazarov, Tatiana Nazarova, V. P. Oleinikov, O.V. Bolshakov, D.M. Nikolaev, V. Afanas'ev, Olga Tatarinskaya, Yu.V. Karaganchou, B.A. Volkov, V.K. Turta, S. Varzar, C. Sochichiu, V.B. Braginsky, V.S. Fursov, L.I. Brezhnev, V.I. Sobolev (INP MSU), V.A. Smirnov (INP MSU), L.D. Landau, M.A. Leontovich, A.G. Loskutova, Yu.M. Loskutov, N.S. Akulov, V.B. Gostev, A.R. Frenkin, N.N. Kolesnikov, A. Vasil'ev, V.N. Tsytovich, Ya.A. Frenkel, N.V. Mitskievich, E.A. Grebenikov, A.N. Prokopenya, A. Einstein, L.I. Sedov, A.N. Kolmogorov, V.I. Arnold, G.I.Popov, R.Z. Sagdeev, A.A. Kokoshin, A.E. Marinchuk, D.V. Gal'tsov, V.I. Petukhov, S.I. Vacaru,

Gaina, Alex

496

Obituary: Ronald N. Bracewell, 1921-2007  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ronald N. Bracewell, Professor Emeritus (since 1991) of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University, and a true renaissance man of science, died of a heart attack on 12 August 2007 at his home. Ron Bracewell was born in Sydney, Australia, on 22 July 1921, one of the two sons of Cecil and Valerie Bracewell. He graduated from the University of Sydney in 1941 and received his doctorate degree in physics from Cambridge University in 1949. During World War II, Ron worked in the Australian National Radar Establishment, where he designed and developed microwave radar equipment. Like several other World War II radar scientists, after the war he used this experience to pioneer the new field of radio astronomy. With J. L. Pawsey, in 1955 he published the first comprehensive textbook in this field entitled, Radio Astronomy. Bracewell joined the Stanford Electrical Engineering faculty in 1955, and from 1974 on he held the first prestigious Lewis Terman professorship. He was awarded the Outstanding Service Award of the department in 1984. In 1988, he was named an officer of the Order of Australia--the Australian equivalent of Order of the British Empire. Soon after his arrival at Stanford, Bracewell designed and began building a solar spectroheliograph, consisting of thirty-two dish antennas in the form of a cross. This was completed in 1961 and provided daily maps of the Sun for more than a decade encompassing more than one solar activity cycle of eleven years. These maps were useful in predicting magnetic storms caused by solar activity and were used by NASA during the first landing on the Moon. In 1971 he started the building of a five-element radio interferometer, for observation of extragalactic radio sources, with the novel design of unequal spacing that gave the resolution of a ten-element array. Both telescopes are now dismantled. The common characteristics of these and other projects were that they were all built in-house with a limited budget, often a small fraction of what a national laboratory would spend on a comparable project. As a result they provided an excellent arena for training future radio astronomers. Many prominent radio astronomers were indeed trained by Bracewell as graduate students or postdoctoral researchers. An excellent example is the often-forgotten, simple-but-elegant experiment of the first detection of the dipole (or the so-called 24-hour) anisotropy of the then-recently discovered cosmic microwave background radiation. This was done by installing a small horn microwave antenna on top of the Durand building at Stanford, which scanned the sky once every 24 hours as the Earth rotated around its axis. The result of this experiment, incorporated in Dave Conklin's Ph.D. thesis, was instrumental in establishing the Big Bang origin of this radiation and provided the first measurement of the velocity of the Earth (and our Solar System and Galaxy) with respect to the fundamental rest frame of the universe defined by this radiation. The techniques and mathematical algorithms that Ron developed for radio interferometry have been applied to medical imaging such as X-ray tomography for detecting tumors. Bracewell, not directly involved with such experiments, often acted as a consultant to medical practitioners. Another outcome of Bracewell's research was a book published first in 1965 titled, The Fourier Transform and its Applications, which has become the gold standard of this subject and can be found in the personal libraries of many astronomers, engineers, physicists, and medical researchers. Many years ago, before an observing run at Kitt Peak, I needed to refer to this book. I looked for it in the shelves of the library at the National Optical Astronomical Observatory in Tucson, Arizona, but could not find it. The librarian informed me that the book had been signed out. I told her that this is a very useful book, and they should have more than one copy. She agreed and said that there were indeed eleven copies; all were in use by the resident astronomers. A further interest of Ron was the discovery of and

Petrosian, Vah

2009-01-01

497

List of Posters  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

List of Posters: Dark matter annihilation in the Galactic galo, by Dokuchaev Vyacheslav, et al. NEMO developments towards km3 telescope in the Mediterranean Sea. The NEMO project. Neutrino Mediterranean Observatory By Antonio Capone, NEMO Collaboration. Alignment as a result from QCD jet production or new still unknown physics at LHC? By Alexander Snigirev. Small-scale fluctuations of extensive air showers: systematics in energy and muon density estimation By Grigory Rubtsov. SHINIE: Simulation of High-Energy Neutrino Interacting with the Earth By Lin Guey-Lin, et al.. Thermodynamics of rotating solutions in n+1 dimensional Einstein - Maxwell -dilation gravity By Ahmad Sheykhi, et al.. Supernova neutrino physics with future large Cherenkov detectors By Daniele Montanino. Crossing of the Cosmological Constant Barrier in the string Inspired Dark Energy Model By S. Yu. Vernov. Calculations of radio signals produced by ultra-high and extremely high energy neutrino induced cascades in Antarctic ice By D. Besson, et al.. Inflation, Cosmic Acceleration and string Gravity By Ischwaree Neupane. Neutrino Physics: Charm and J/Psi production in the atmosphere By Liudmila Volkova. Three generation flavor transitions and decays of supernova relic neutrinos By Daniele Montanino. Lattice calculations & computational quantum field theory: Sonification of Quark and Baryon Spectra By Markum Harald, et al.. Generalized Kramers-Wannier Duality for spin systems with non-commutative symmetry By V. M. Buchstaber, et al.. Heavy ion collisions & quark matter: Nuclear matter jets and multifragmentation By Danut Argintaru, et al.. QCD hard interactions: The qT-spectrum of the Higgs and Slepton-pairs at the LHC By Guiseppe Bozzi. QCD soft interactions: Nonperturbative effects in Single-Spin Asymmetries: Instantons and TMD-parton distributions By Igor Cherednikov, et al.. Gluon dominance model and high multiplicity By Elena Kokoulina. Resonances in eta pi- pi- pi+ system By Dmitry Ryabchikov. Saturation effects in diffractive scattering at LHC By Oleg Selugin. A nonperturbative expansion method in QCD and R-related quantities By Igor Solovtsov. Z-scaling and high multiplicity particle Production in bar pp/pp & AA collisions at Tevatron and RHIC By Mikhail Tokarev. Scaling behaviour of the reactionsdd - > p? /3H and pd - > pd with pT at energy I-2 GeV By Yuri Uzikov. [ADS Note: Title formula can not be rendered correctly in ASCII.] CP violation, rare decays, CKM: Precision Measurements of the Mass of the Top Quark at CDF (Precision Top Mass Measurements at CDF) By Daniel Whiteson. Measurement of the Bs Oscillation at CDF By Luciano Ristori. The Bs mixing phase at LHCb By J. J. van Hunen. ATLAS preparations for precise measurements of semileptonic rare B decays By K. Toms. Hadron spectroscopy & exotics: Searches for radial excited states of charmonium in experiments using cooled antiproton beams By M. Yu. Barabanov. Retardation effects in the rotating string model By Fabien Buisseret and Claude Semay. Final results from VEPP-2M (CMD-2 and SND) By G. V. Fedotovich. Heavy Quark Physics: Prospects for B physics measurements using the CMS detector at the LHC By Andreev Valery. Heavy flavour production at HERA-B By Andrey Bogatyrev. B-Meson subleading form factors in the Heavy Quark Effective Theory (HQET) By Frederic Jugeau. Beyond the Standard Model: Monopole Decay in a Variable External Field By Andrey Zayakin. Two-Loop matching coefficients for the strong coupling in the MSSM By Mihaila Luminita. Test of lepton flavour violation at LHC By Hidaka Keisho. Looking at New Physics through 4 jets and no ET By Maity Manas. Are Preons Dyons? Naturalness of Three Generations By Das Chitta Ranjan. SUSY Dark Matter at Linear Collider By Sezen Sekmen, Mehmet Zeyrek. MSSM light Higgs boson scenario and its test at hadron colliders By Alexander Belyaev. Antiscalar Approach to Gravity and Standard Model By E. Mychelkin. GRID distributed analysis in high energy physics: PAX: Physics Analysis Design and Application on the GRID By Martin Erdmann

498

EDITORIAL: Focus on Plasma Medicine  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

'Plasma Healthcare' is an emerging interdisciplinary research topic of rapidly growing importance, exploring considerable opportunities at the interface of plasma physics, chemistry and engineering with life sciences. Some of the scientific discoveries reported so far have already demonstrated clear benefits for healthcare in areas of medicine, food safety, environmental hygiene, and cosmetics. Examples include ongoing studies of prion inactivation, chronic wound treatment and plasma-mediated cancer therapy. Current research ranges from basic physical processes, plasma chemical design, to the interaction of plasmas with (i) eukaryotic (mammalian) cells; (ii) prokaryotic (bacteria) cells, viruses, spores and fungi; (iii) DNA, lipids, proteins and cell membranes; and (iv) living human, animal and plant tissues in the presence of biofluids. Of diverse interests in this new field is the need for hospital disinfection, in particular with respect to the alarming increase in bacterial resistance to antibiotics, the concomitant needs in private practices, nursing homes etc, the applications in personal hygieneand the enticing possibility to 'design' plasmas as possible pharmaceutical products, employing ionic as well as molecular agents for medical treatment. The 'delivery' of the reactive plasma agents occurs at the gaseous level, which means that there is no need for a carrier medium and access to the treatment surface is optimal. This focus issue provides a close look at the current state of the art in Plasma Medicine with a number of forefront research articles as well as an introductory review. Focus on Plasma Medicine Contents Application of epifluorescence scanning for monitoring the efficacy of protein removal by RF gas-plasma decontamination Helen C Baxter, Patricia R Richardson, Gaynor A Campbell, Valeri I Kovalev, Robert Maier, James S Barton, Anita C Jones, Greg DeLarge, Mark Casey and Robert L Baxter Inactivation factors of spore-forming bacteria using low-pressure microwave plasmas in an N2 and O2 gas mixture M K Singh, A Ogino and M Nagatsu Degradation of adhesion molecules of G361 melanoma cells by a non-thermal atmospheric pressure microplasma H J Lee, C H Shon, Y S Kim, S Kim, G C Kim and M G Kong The acidification of lipid film surfaces by non-thermal DBD at atmospheric pressure in air A Helmke, D Hoffmeister, N Mertens, S Emmert, J Schuette and W Vioel Reduction and degradation of amyloid aggregates by a pulsed radio-frequency cold atmospheric plasma jet D L Bayliss, J L Walsh, G Shama, F Iza and M G Kong The effect of low-temperature plasma on bacteria as observed by repeated AFM imaging Ren Pompl, Ferdinand Jamitzky, Tetsuji Shimizu, Bernd Steffes, Wolfram Bunk, Hans-Ulrich Schmidt, Matthias Georgi, Katrin Ramrath, Wilhelm Stolz, Robert W Stark, Takuya Urayama, Shuitsu Fujii and Gregor Eugen Morfill Removal and sterilization of biofilms and planktonic bacteria by microwave-induced argon plasma at atmospheric pressure Mi Hee Lee, Bong Joo Park, Soo Chang Jin, Dohyun Kim, Inho Han, Jungsung Kim, Soon O Hyun, Kie-Hyung Chung and Jong-Chul Park Cell permeabilization using a non-thermal plasma M Leduc, D Guay, R L Leask and S Coulombe Physical and biological mechanisms of direct plasma interaction with living tissue Danil Dobrynin, Gregory Fridman, Gary Friedman and Alexander Fridman Nosocomial infections-a new approach towards preventive medicine using plasmas G E Morfill, T Shimizu, B Steffes and H-U Schmidt Generation and transport mechanisms of chemical species by a post-discharge flow for inactivation of bacteria Takehiko Sato, Shiroh Ochiai and Takuya Urayama Low pressure plasma discharges for the sterilization and decontamination of surfaces F Rossi, O Kylin, H Rauscher, M Hasiwa and D Gilliland Contribution of a portable air plasma torch to rapid blood coagulation as a method of preventing bleeding S P Kuo, O Tarasenko, J Chang, S Popovic, C Y Chen, H W Fan, A Scott, M Lahiani, P Alusta, J D Drake and M Nikolic A two-dimensional cold atmospheric plasma jet array for uniform treatment of large-area

Morfill, G. E.; Kong, M. G.; Zimmermann, J. L.

2009-11-01