Science.gov

Sample records for valerie ooka pang

  1. Mei-Fong, PANG 1 MEI-FONG PANG

    E-print Network

    Nelson, Celeste M.

    of the Lymphatic System in Mice. PLoS ONE 7(5): e37523. (DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0037523) 6. Mei-Fong Pang Fuxe. (2015) TGF-1-induced EMT promotes targeted migration of breast cancer cells through the lymphatic system by activation of CCR7/CCL21- mediated chemotaxis. Oncogene. [In press] #12;Mei-Fong, PANG 2 2

  2. Modeling of Web Robot Navigational Patterns PangNing Tan

    E-print Network

    Kumar, Vipin

    Modeling of Web Robot Navigational Patterns Pang­Ning Tan Department of Computer Science University�cult to ignore the impact of Web robots on both commercial and institu- tional Web sites. Not only do Web robots consume valuable bandwidth and Web server resources, they are also making it more di�cult to apply Web

  3. DCEG Distinguished Lecturer - Dame Valerie Beral, M.D.

    Cancer.gov

    Dame Valerie Beral, M.D. is the 2014 recipient of the NCI Rosalind Franklin Award, which she will receive at the NCI Intramural Scientific Investigators Retreat. Dr. Beral has extended her visit in order to come to NCI Shady Grove to spend a day with her collaborators. As a DCEG Distinguished Lecturer she will present a short talk about her career in epidemiology.

  4. Iraq's Oil Tomorrow Valerie Marcel, Senior Research Fellow

    E-print Network

    O'Donnell, Tom

    Iraq's Oil Tomorrow April 2003 By Valerie Marcel, Senior Research Fellow John V. Mitchell the prior permission of the copyright holder. #12;Iraq's Oil Tomorrow 2 Introduction Public perceptions that the American-led military campaign against Iraq is fuelled by oil are widespread in Europe and in the Middle

  5. Spline-based deconvolution Amir Averbuch , Valery Zheludev

    E-print Network

    Averbuch, Amir

    Spline-based deconvolution Amir Averbuch Ã, Valery Zheludev School of Computer Science, Tel Aviv deconvolution 2D data Noised data Harmonic analysis Approximate solutions a b s t r a c t This paper proposes robust algorithms to perform deconvolution and inversion of the heat equation starting from 1D and 2D

  6. Fangwei Mi-Hee EddieMarisaAmieValerie

    E-print Network

    Yamamoto, Hirosuke

    2015323 301 Fangwei Mi-Hee 9 EddieMarisaAmieValerie AlonJoeyEric 1 Priestley Medal2015Jackie BARTON2249 3030 DNAProteinPeptide 32006 1 DNA 1 2006 2 2015 Priestley Medal #12; 4Hotel and the Pavillon Joseph Armand Bombardier (PJAB) 12h00 ­ 13h55 Lunch with students 13h55 PJAB 1035, Opening remarks

  7. Finding Spatio-Temporal Patterns in Earth Science Data * Pang-Ning Tan+

    E-print Network

    Kumar, Vipin

    1 Finding Spatio-Temporal Patterns in Earth Science Data * Pang-Ning Tan+ Michael Steinbach+ Vipin-temporal patterns from Earth Science data. The data consists of time series measurements for various Earth science of the spatio-temporal issues. Earth Science data has strong seasonal components that need to be removed prior

  8. Modeling of Web Robot Navigational Patterns Pang-Ning Tan 1 and Vipin Kumar 1

    E-print Network

    Kumar, Vipin

    Modeling of Web Robot Navigational Patterns Pang-Ning Tan 1 and Vipin Kumar 1 Department,kumarg@cs.umn.edu Abstract. In recent years, it is becoming increasingly diÃ?cult to ig- nore the impact of Web robots on both commercial and institutional Web sites. Not only do Web robots consume valuable bandwidth and Web server

  9. Fabric defect detection by Fourier analysis Chi-ho Chan and Grantham Pang

    E-print Network

    Pang, Grantham

    1 Fabric defect detection by Fourier analysis Chi-ho Chan and Grantham Pang Dept. of Electrical)-2859-2689 Email: chichan@eee.hku.hk Abstract - Many fabric defects are very small and undistinguishable, which are very difficult to detect by only monitoring the intensity change. Faultless fabric is a repetitive

  10. STS-84 Post Landing - Valery Ryumin greets wife Elena Kondakova

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FL - Veteran cosmonaut Valery Ryumin greets his wife, STS-84 Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova, with some flowers after the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis lands on KSC's Runway 33. STS-84 was the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The nine-day STS-84 mission was Kondakova's second space flight, but her first on the Space Shuttle. She spent 169 days in space as flight engineer of the 17th main mission on Mir from October 1994 to March 1995. Her husband is now director of the Mir-Shuttle program for Russia.

  11. Books in Bloom Garden Bibliography Valerie Bang-Jensen and Children's Literature students

    E-print Network

    Ashline, George

    Books in Bloom Garden Bibliography ©Valerie Bang-Jensen and Children's Literature students Saint, Andrea. (2003). Goldfish and Chrysanthemums. Lee & Low Books, Inc. Chrysanthemums. Cole, H. (1995). Jack Books. Chrysanthemums, delphiniums, lily of the valley, marigolds, carnations. Hopkinson, D. (2004

  12. Kenneth J. Turner, Stephan Reiff-Marganiec, Lynne Blair, Jianxiong Pang, Tom Gray, Peter Perry and Joe Ireland (pre-publication version, copyright Elsevier).

    E-print Network

    Reiff-Marganiec, Stephan

    Kenneth J. Turner, Stephan Reiff-Marganiec, Lynne Blair, Jianxiong Pang, Tom Gray, Peter Perry-Marganiec b , Lynne Blair a , Jianxiong Pang a , Tom Gray c , Peter Perry c and Joe Ireland d a Computing@cs.stir.ac.uk (Kenneth J. Turner), srm13@le.ac.uk (Stephan Reiff- Marganiec), lb@comp.lancs.ac.uk (Lynne Blair), j

  13. DUAL USE OF LEDS: SIGNALING AND COMMUNICATIONS IN ITS Grantham Pang, Chi-ho Chan, Hugh Liu, Thomas Kwan

    E-print Network

    Pang, Grantham

    1 DUAL USE OF LEDS: SIGNALING AND COMMUNICATIONS IN ITS Grantham Pang, Chi-ho Chan, Hugh Liu of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) over incandescent lights is well-supported. This is due to their high. One important characteristic of LEDs is that they are semiconductor devices and are capable of fast

  14. A Robust Panel Extraction Method for Manga Xufang Pang, Ying Cao, Rynson W.H. Lau, and Antoni B. Chan

    E-print Network

    Lau, W. H. Nynson

    A Robust Panel Extraction Method for Manga Xufang Pang, Ying Cao, Rynson W.H. Lau, and Antoni B.com, {rynson.lau,abchan}@cityu.edu.hk ABSTRACT Automatically extracting frames/panels from digital comic pages, au- tomatic panel extraction for manga, i.e., Japanese comics, can be especially challenging, largely

  15. LED Traffic Light as a Communications Device Grantham Pang, Thomas Kwan, Chi-Ho Chan, Hugh Liu.

    E-print Network

    Pang, Grantham

    LED Traffic Light as a Communications Device Grantham Pang, Thomas Kwan, Chi-Ho Chan, Hugh Liu:http://www.eee.hku.hk/~gpang Abstract The visible light from an LED (light emitting diode) traffic light can be modulated and encoded. Essentially, all LED traffic lights can be used as communications devices. This paper focuses

  16. A Tool-free Calibration Method for Turntable-based 3D Scanning Systems Xufang Pang 1

    E-print Network

    Lau, W. H. Nynson

    registration 1. Introduction A 3D model of a real world object can be constructed by capturing multiple partial1 / 14 A Tool-free Calibration Method for Turntable-based 3D Scanning Systems Xufang Pang 1 Rynson, Shenzhen, China 3 Department of Computer Science, Stanford University, U.S.A. Abstract Turntable-based 3D

  17. HKUST Green Mobile App Chan Wai Yu, Chung Kit Wai, Pang Wing Chau, Wong Kin Yee Phoebe

    E-print Network

    Liu, Yunhao

    took advantage of the increasing popularity of mobile technology and developed the HKUST Green AppHKUST Green Mobile App Chan Wai Yu, Chung Kit Wai, Pang Wing Chau, Wong Kin Yee Phoebe Advised, namely energy conservation, recycling, waste minimization and pollution prevention. In this project, we

  18. Multiple sources of lead in soils from a Hawaiian chronosequence Valerie Monastraa,*,1

    E-print Network

    Derry, Louis A.

    Multiple sources of lead in soils from a Hawaiian chronosequence Valerie Monastraa,*,1 , Louis A Received 16 July 2003; accepted 29 April 2004 Abstract We report lead isotopic ratios and concentrations and likely contain some anthropogenic lead of Asian origin. Older soils have undergone extensive leaching

  19. Fully Reflexive Intensional Type Analysis # Valery Trifonov Bratin Saha Zhong Shao

    E-print Network

    Fully Reflexive Intensional Type Analysis # Valery Trifonov Bratin Saha Zhong Shao Department analysis. By fully reflexive, we mean that type­analyzing operations are applicable to the type of any remains decidable. We show how to use reflexive type analysis to support type­safe marshalling and how

  20. Fully Reflexive Intensional Type Analysis # Bratin Saha Valery Trifonov Zhong Shao

    E-print Network

    Fully Reflexive Intensional Type Analysis # Bratin Saha Valery Trifonov Zhong Shao Department the type of any runtime value. We present a typed intermediate language that supports fully reflexive intensional type analysis. By fully reflexive, we mean that type­analyzing operations are applicable

  1. Fully Reflexive Intensional Type Analysis Valery Trifonov Bratin Saha Zhong Shao

    E-print Network

    Fully Reflexive Intensional Type Analysis Valery Trifonov Bratin Saha Zhong Shao Department analysis. By fully reflexive, we mean that type-analyzing operations are applicable to the type of any remains decidable. We show how to use reflexive type analysis to support type-safe marshalling and how

  2. Fully Reflexive Intensional Type Analysis Bratin Saha Valery Trifonov Zhong Shao

    E-print Network

    Fully Reflexive Intensional Type Analysis Bratin Saha Valery Trifonov Zhong Shao Department the type of any runtime value. We present a typed intermediate language that supports fully reflexive intensional type analysis. By fully reflexive, we mean that type-analyzing operations are applicable

  3. All Together Now: Valerie Allen--U.S. Department of Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2005

    2005-01-01

    When Valerie Allen decided she did not want to be a Montessori teacher any longer, she began work on her MLIS. Immediately she learned concepts she could apply to her new job as information specialist for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN. While the LIS…

  4. Slow waves in fractures filled with viscous fluid Valeri Korneev1

    E-print Network

    Korneev, Valeri A.

    Slow waves in fractures filled with viscous fluid Valeri Korneev1 ABSTRACT Stoneley guided waves in a fluid-filled fracture generally have larger amplitudes than other waves; therefore, their properties, a simple dispersion equa- tion for wave-propagation velocity is obtained. This velocity is much smaller

  5. Seismic velocity changes caused by an overburden stress Valeri Korneev1

    E-print Network

    Korneev, Valeri A.

    Seismic velocity changes caused by an overburden stress Valeri Korneev1 and Stanislav Glubokovskikh2 ABSTRACT An increase in seismic velocity with depth is a common rock property, one that can. These relation- ships can be used in velocity "depth trend" removal and in computing offset-dependent corrections

  6. Pressure diffusion waves in porous media Dmitry Silin* and Valeri Korneev, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory,

    E-print Network

    Korneev, Valeri A.

    Pressure diffusion waves in porous media Dmitry Silin* and Valeri Korneev, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Gennady Goloshubin, University of Houston Summary Pressure diffusion wave in porous rocks are under consideration. The pressure diffusion mechanism can provide an explanation of the high

  7. Calibration For Augmented Reality Experimental Testbeds Valerie A. Summers*& Kellogg S. Booth Tom Calvert

    E-print Network

    Calibration For Augmented Reality Experimental Testbeds Valerie A. Summers*& Kellogg S. Booth Tom.3.7[ComputerGraphics]: Three-Dimensional GraphicsandRealism-virtual reality Keywords: augmentedreality "augment" theuser's view of thereal 3D world with computer-generatedvirtual objects. Thesevirtual

  8. Assessment of Impact of Insecticides on Anagrus nilaparvatae (Pang et Wang) (Hymenoptera: Mymanidae), an Egg Parasitoid of the Rice Planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens (Hemiptera: Delphacidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The parasitoid Anagrus Nilaparvatae (Pang et Wang) (Hymenoptera: Mymanidae) is a major natural enemy of the rice planthopper Nilaparvata lugens (Hemiptera: Delphacidae). It plays an important role in the IPM of the rice planthopper. Contact and oral toxicity and residual effect of fourteen pesticide...

  9. Mining Interesting Contrast Rules for a Web-based Educational System Behrouz Minaei-Bidgoli, Pang-Ning Tan, and William F. Punch

    E-print Network

    at Michigan State University called LON-CAPA. Keywords Data mining, association analysis, rule interestingnessMining Interesting Contrast Rules for a Web-based Educational System Behrouz Minaei-Bidgoli, Pang data, data mining and knowledge discovery techniques can be applied to find interesting relationships

  10. Adhesion of Sputtered Nickel Films on Polycarbonate Xueqiang Qian, Xiaolu Pang, Kewei Gao, Huisheng Yang, Jie Jin, and Alex A. Volinsky

    E-print Network

    Volinsky, Alex A.

    Adhesion of Sputtered Nickel Films on Polycarbonate Substrates Xueqiang Qian, Xiaolu Pang, Kewei, 2013; published online December 3, 2013) Nickel films were deposited by radio frequency magnetron and their influence on the critical load between sputtered nickel films and polymer substrate were studied by means

  11. JIMAR PFRP ANNUAL REPORT FOR FY 2007 P.I./Sponsor Name: Jock Young, Robert Olson, Valerie Allain and Jeffrey Dambacher,

    E-print Network

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    JIMAR ­ PFRP ANNUAL REPORT FOR FY 2007 P.I./Sponsor Name: Jock Young, Robert Olson, Valerie Allain. A similar, but more localized study off eastern Australia (Young et al. 2004) is also beginning to reveal statistical comparisons with qualitative models to determine similarities or otherwise of the two regions

  12. Wave-induced chaos in a continuously fed unstirred reactor John H. Merkin,"Valery Petrov,bStephen K. Scottc*and Kenneth Showalterb

    E-print Network

    Showalter, Kenneth

    Wave-induced chaos in a continuously fed unstirred reactor John H. Merkin,"Valery Petrov,bStephen K of a constant-velocity constant-form reaction wave that traverses the reaction domain, leaving behind, allowing further wave events to be initiated, which then propagate into the `recovered' region. The chaotic

  13. Kenneth J. Turner, Stephan Reiff-Marganiec, Lynne Blair, Jianxiong Pang, Tom Gray, Peter Perry and Joe Ireland. Policy Support for Call Control, Computer Standards and Interfaces 28(6):635-649, June 2006

    E-print Network

    Turner, Ken

    Kenneth J. Turner, Stephan Reiff-Marganiec, Lynne Blair, Jianxiong Pang, Tom Gray, Peter Perry 2006 Policy Support for Call Control Kenneth J. Turner a , Stephan Reiff-Marganiec b , Lynne Blair. Turner), srm13@le.ac.uk (Stephan Reiff- Marganiec), lb@comp.lancs.ac.uk (Lynne Blair), j

  14. Redefining the Poet as Healer: Valerie Gillies's Collaborative Role in the Edinburgh Marie Curie Hospice Quiet Room Project.

    PubMed

    Severin, Laura

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the poetic contribution of Valerie Gillies, Edinburgh Makar (or poet of the city) from 2005-2008, to the Edinburgh Marie Curie Hospice Quiet Room, a new contemplation space for patients, families, and staff. In collaboration with others, Gillies created a transitional space for the Quiet Room, centered on the display of her sonnet, "A Place Apart." This space functions to comfort visitors to the Quiet Room by relocating them in their surroundings and offering the solace provided by nature and history. With this project, her first as Edinburgh Makar, Gillies redefines the role of the poet as healer and advocates for newer forms of palliative care that focus on patients' spiritual and emotional, as well as physical, wellbeing. PMID:26095846

  15. Contiguous triple spinal dysraphism associated with Chiari malformation Type II and hydrocephalus: an embryological conundrum between the unified theory of Pang and the unified theory of McLone.

    PubMed

    Dhandapani, Sivashanmugam; Srinivasan, Anirudh

    2016-01-01

    Triple spinal dysraphism is extremely rare. There are published reports of multiple discrete neural tube defects with intervening normal segments that are explained by the multisite closure theory of primary neurulation, having an association with Chiari malformation Type II consistent with the unified theory of McLone. The authors report on a 1-year-old child with contiguous myelomeningocele and lipomyelomeningocele centered on Type I split cord malformation with Chiari malformation Type II and hydrocephalus. This composite anomaly is probably due to select abnormalities of the neurenteric canal during gastrulation, with a contiguous cascading impact on both dysjunction of the neural tube and closure of the neuropore, resulting in a small posterior fossa, probably bringing the unified theory of McLone closer to the unified theory of Pang. PMID:26474100

  16. The birth pangs of monoclonal antibody therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the development and termination of nebacumab (Centoxin®), a human IgM monoclonal antibody (mAb) drug frequently cited as one of the notable failures of the early biopharmaceutical industry. The non-approval of Centoxin in the United States in 1992 generated major concerns at the time about the future viability of any mAb therapeutics. For Centocor, the biotechnology company that developed Centoxin, the drug posed formidable challenges in terms of safety, clinical efficacy, patient selection, the overall economic costs of health care, as well as financial backing. Indeed, Centocor's development of the drug brought it to the brink of bankruptcy. This article shows how many of the experiences learned with Centoxin paved the way for the current successes in therapeutic mAb development. PMID:22531443

  17. Zhulin Pang Azza Al-Mahrouki

    E-print Network

    Krylov, Sergey

    -DNA interactions Protein-DNA interactions play a defining role in many cellular processes. Studying a crucial role in DNA replication, DNA integrity control, DNA damage repair, and many other cellular be a suitable tech- nique for investigating protein-DNA interactions in single cells, as it can facilitate

  18. Stochastic Models for Epidemics Valerie Isham

    E-print Network

    Guillas, Serge

    paper (Isham, 1988) on models of the transmission dynamics of HIV and AIDS for the one-day meeting, malaria and HIV are still major worldwide causes of morbidity and mortality. In 2001, the UK experienced transmission had already taken place before the threat of an epidemic was recognised. In such situations

  19. Short communication Valerie A. Pferdeort1

    E-print Network

    Wood, Thomas K.

    intermediate (TCE epoxide) is gener- ated [3, 4]. Metabolic engineering involves genetic manip- ulations of Chemical Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, USA 2 Departments of Chemical Engineering and Molecular & Cell Biology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA 3 Department

  20. Neutron Star Model Atmospheres Valery Suleimanov

    E-print Network

    - nosity during outburst maximum can reach the Eddington limit (Teff 2.5×107 K) and then decrease, but it is less important at Teff 1.5×107 K (for atmospheres with solar chemical composition). We calculated we divided the SL model in a number of latitude rings with known Teff, effective surface gravity

  1. Valerie A. Hartouni Department of Communication (0503)

    E-print Network

    : "Personhood, Membership and Community: Abortion Politics and the Negotiation of Public Meanings" (Directed on Abortion Politics and the Practices called 'person'" Fetal Positions/ Feminist Practices, ed. Lynn Morgan

  2. An algorithm for solving constraint-satisfaction problems Wanlin Pang

    E-print Network

    Regina, University of

    ;:::;Cmg is a set of constraints. The ith constraint Ci of C is posed on a subset of variables VCi = fXi1 are connected if VCi \\VCj 6= ;. A constraint is isolated in C if it is not connected to any other constraints in C. Given a constraint Ci on VCi and a subset Vk = fXik1 ;:::;Xikl g VCi , there is a constraint Cik

  3. The Gouy phase of Airy beams Xiaoyan Pang,1

    E-print Network

    Visser, Taco D.

    University City Boulevard, Charlotte, North Carolina 28223, USA 3 Department of Physics and Astronomy are the generation of curved plasma channels [13], and the manipulation of particles along bends in labs-on-a- chip

  4. Accelerometer for Mobile Robot Positioning Hugh Liu, Grantham Pang

    E-print Network

    Pang, Grantham

    . Example of an absolute positioning system is the Global Positioning System (GPS). The advantage positioning system, dead reckoning method is employed to find the position. The angle and distance data are used to find the current position. One of the commonly used relative positioning system is Inertial

  5. Verification of Lexicalized Tree Adjoining Grammars Valerie Barr, Ellen Siefring

    E-print Network

    Barr, Valerie

    by and compared by humans). There are also evaluation methods that allow us to determine whether a system conforms, 2001) there are a number of diagnostic evaluation methods that do a validation check on a system, language generation, speech synthesis, information retrieval, information extraction, and inference

  6. UCT RESEARCH 2014-15 1 Director: Professor Valerie Mizrahi

    E-print Network

    Tadross, Mark

    /AIDS and tuberculosis; non-communicable diseases including prevalent cancers; genetic medicine; and molecular medicine areas of research technology, presented by international experts, contributed to staff and student together with the Minister of Science & Technology, Dr Naledi Pandor. Institute Statistics Staff All IDM

  7. Nonlinear volatility of river flux fluctuations Valerie N. Livina,1

    E-print Network

    Ashkenazy, Yossi "Yosef"

    organization; they are long-range power-law correlated and possess scale invariant structure 3 . These power and cause severe damage in life, housing, and agriculture products. Hence, river flow is likely to have. This check would be very helpful, for example, in view of the design of time series models or statistical

  8. The PANG Project. Process Analysis of Non-Grading. Project No. 214.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thelin, Annika Andrae

    1981-01-01

    The quality of instruction may be similar in both traditional/graded and innovative/nongraded classrooms. This essay discusses the results of instruction observed in several nongraded (of varying degrees) Swedish schools serving grades 7-9. A multigraded organization requires more planning by teachers for individualization of instruction, and…

  9. Room temperature ferromagnetism in sputtered Zn1 -xCrxO thin films Xiaolu Pang a

    E-print Network

    Volinsky, Alex A.

    Accepted 19 May 2011 Available online xxxx Keywords: ZnO Ferromagnetism Curie temperature XRD Cr doped Zn concentrations. 8.9 at.% Zn1 - xCrxO film exhibits room temperature ferromagnetism and high 325 K Curie types [9]. However, most DMSs have low Curie temperature, which limits their practical applications

  10. Oxidation of Carbon Nanotubes by Singlet O2 Siu-Pang Chan,1

    E-print Network

    Gong, Xingao

    structure with each of the two oxygen atoms occupying a bridge position. The overall process is exothermic, with a half-life around 5 10ÿ2 sec at atmospheric pressure and a mean diffusion path of 114 20 A in thin

  11. PanG, a new ketopantoate reductase involved in pantothenate synthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pantothenate, commonly referred to as vitamin B5, is an essential molecule in the metabolism of living organisms and forms the core of coenzyme A. Unlike humans, some bacteria and plants are capable of de novo biosynthesis of pantothenate making this pathway a potential target for drug development. ...

  12. SenSec: Mobile Security through Passive Sensing Jiang Zhu, Pang Wu, Xiao Wang, Joy Zhang

    E-print Network

    Tague, Patrick

    Sec constantly collects sensory data from accelerometers, gyroscopes and mag- netometers and constructs application se- curity. SenSec collects data from accelerometer, gyroscope and other sensors and builds its track of sensory reading from accelerometer, gyroscope and magnetometer on device, builds the context

  13. Contested Nationalisms and Propaganda: Birth Pangs of a Malaysian Nation, 1957-1969

    E-print Network

    Gan, Cheong Soon

    2012-01-01

    performative nature of music and its ability to express andability to connect with and evoke a response from citizens through its performative quality. Musicmusic is capable of “expressing as well as inducing emotional states in listeners. ” 25 When this ability

  14. University of Hawai`i at Mnoa Impormasyong Pang-undergraduate para sa

    E-print Network

    baybayin ng O'ahu. Nagtuturo ng mga 25 foreign languages, higit sa alinmang karaniwang unibersidad sa US`I ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROGRAM (HELP) - naghahandog ng mga kurso sa English language, Institutional TOEFL exam programs, bisitahin www.manoa.hawaii.edu/academics/departments.html TAGALOG HAWAI`I HONOLULU KAUA'I MAUI

  15. Defect detection in textured materials using Gabor filters Ajay Kumar, Grantham Pang

    E-print Network

    Pang, Grantham

    Automation Research Laboratory Dept. of Elec. & Electronic Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam-based inspection of industrial materials such as textile webs, paper, or wood requires the development of defect problems deal with textured materials such as textile web, paper and wood. It should be noted

  16. Fault Diagnosis in Mixed-Signal Low Testability System Jing Pang Janusz A. Starzyk

    E-print Network

    Starzyk, Janusz A.

    -0007 jingpang@bobcat.ent.ohiou.edu starzyk@bobcat.ent.ohiou.edu KEY WORDS: ambiguity groups, fault diagnosis University Athens, OH 45701, U. S. A. Tel.(740) 593-1580 Fax (740) 593-0007 jingpang@bobcat.ent.ohiou.edu starzyk@bobcat.ent.ohiou.edu ABSTRACT This paper describes a new approach for fault diagnosis of analog

  17. Diffractive lenses for chromatic confocal imaging Sarah L. Dobson, Pang-chen Sun, and Yeshayahu Fainman

    E-print Network

    Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    are suitable for applications that rely on reflection-mode operation. Existing chromatic confocal microscopes for nonmechanical depth scanning in a confocal microscope. This chromatic confocal microscope, constructed with 40 microscope is consistent with that of the conventional confocal operation of the microscope. © 1997 Optical

  18. Fireclimate interactions in the American West since 1400 CE Valerie Trouet,1

    E-print Network

    Taylor, Alan

    Trouet,1 Alan H. Taylor,2 Eugene R. Wahl,3 Carl N. Skinner,4 and Scott L. Stephens5 Received 6 November in the American West that needs to be accounted for in fire models. Citation: Trouet, V., A. H. Taylor, E. R. Wahl, C. N. Skinner, and S. L. Stephens (2010), Fireclimate interactions in the American West since 1400

  19. ORIGINAL PAPER Valerie A. Bennett Nancy L. Pruitt Richard E. Lee, Jr.

    E-print Network

    Lee Jr., Richard E.

    the effects of temperature on membrane order and the effects of dehydration resulting from decreased water, cell shrinkage due to osmotic water loss following dehydration is accompanied by loss of membrane mate: Tephritidae) survive ex- tended periods in winter during which tissue water is frozen. Both low temperature

  20. Leslie Roche, Lorien Jasny, Mark Lubell, Bethany Cutts, Emily Kachergis, Justin Derner, Valerie Eviner, Kenneth Tate

    E-print Network

    Tate, Kenneth

    , Theresa Becchetti, Josh Davy, Julie Fenzel, Larry Forero, Morgan Doran, Dustin Flavell, John Harper, Roger Ingram, Jeremy James, Royce Larsen, Stephanie Larson, David, Lewis, David Lile, Missy Merrill Service SFREC Adaptive Grazing Management Advisory Team (California) Ranchers & Ranch Managers Audubon

  1. Fully Reflexive Intensional Type Analysis in Type Erasure Semantics Bratin Saha Valery Trifonov Zhong Shao

    E-print Network

    for coding applica- tions like garbage collection, dynamic linking, pickling, etc. On the other hand, and pickling. For example, Java adopts dy- namic linking and garbage collection as central features. Dis- tributed programming requires that code and data on one ma- chine be pickled for transmission

  2. Fully Reflexive Intensional Type Analysis in Type Erasure Semantics # Bratin Saha Valery Trifonov Zhong Shao

    E-print Network

    for coding applica­ tions like garbage collection, dynamic linking, pickling, etc. On the other hand, and pickling. For example, Java adopts dy­ namic linking and garbage collection as central features. Dis­ tributed programming requires that code and data on one ma­ chine be pickled for transmission

  3. A review of "The Renaissance of Lesbianism in Early Modern England." by Valerie Traub 

    E-print Network

    Mario Digangi

    2003-01-01

    ? friend represented the ?chaste? and ?unexceptional? love between (English) women (19), the ?mas- culine? tribade was usually depicted as a foreign woman who pen- etrated another woman with an enlarged clitoris or dildo. Yet as images of female sexuality...

  4. Learning to Think Like Scientists with the PET Curriculum Valerie K. Otero and Kara E. Gray

    E-print Network

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    , but also explicitly address the nature of scientific knowledge, science as a human endeavor and instruction explicitly address epistemology, the nature of science, and the nature of learning. The Physics on the nature of science and the nature of science learning. We show that in PET courses with small and large

  5. Conflict on a Communication Channel Valerie King Jared Saia Maxwell Young

    E-print Network

    Saia, Jared

    , and PayPal, severed ties with the website Wikileaks [42, 62]. In retaliation, the Anonymous group]. Surprisingly, the web pages of both Wikileaks, and all the companies that were attacked by Anonymous emerged relatively unscathed despite the fact that Wikileaks suffered a significant attack on its financial

  6. Talking to Learn Physics and Learning to Talk Physics Danielle B. Harlow & Valerie K. Otero

    E-print Network

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    understanding, while intricately related, are separate processes. Keywords: Education, Physics Education communities that they participate in. Thus, in science classes, students not only gain new understandings development of force for two students in a physics course. #12;DATA AND ANALYSIS We examined video data taken

  7. An Examination of Children's Scientific Argumentation Danielle B. Harlow and Valerie K. Otero

    E-print Network

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    taped each class meeting. We collected forty hours of video tape of student conversation. This video travels through a simple circuit in a whole-class discussion. A model of four distinct patterns of scientific knowledge [1]. Findings from educational research show that elementary students have

  8. BALANCE PROPERTIES OF ARNOUX-RAUZY WORDS VALERIE BERTHE, JULIEN CASSAIGNE, AND WOLFGANG STEINER

    E-print Network

    BALANCE PROPERTIES OF ARNOUX-RAUZY WORDS VAL´ERIE BERTH´E, JULIEN CASSAIGNE, AND WOLFGANG STEINER Abstract. The paper deals with balances and imbalances in Arnoux-Rauzy words. We provide sufficient conditions for C-balancedness, but our results indicate that even a char- acterization of 2-balanced Arnoux

  9. Instabilities in propagating reaction-diffusion fronts DezsU Horv&h and Valery Petrov

    E-print Network

    Showalter, Kenneth

    arising from either quadratic or cubic autocatalysis typically choose the minimum allowable velocity from flame propagation are de- scribed in a recent review.5 In isothermal systems, autocatalytic reaction couples with diffusion to produce self-sustaining fronts that propagate with constant velocity

  10. Up Front with Valerie and Joe: Fair Game and Other Stories of Reprisal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    The movie "Fair Game" (Butterworth et al., 2010) is a fact-based political thriller that calls attention to a process of turning respectable members of established institutions, who are performing their roles properly, into excluded deviants. The result of this transformation may be the creation of a new group initiating its own subculture. The…

  11. FRACTAL TILES ASSOCIATED WITH SHIFT RADIX SYSTEMS VALERIE BERTHE, ANNE SIEGEL, WOLFGANG STEINER, PAUL SURER,

    E-print Network

    FRACTAL TILES ASSOCIATED WITH SHIFT RADIX SYSTEMS VAL´ERIE BERTH´E, ANNE SIEGEL, WOLFGANG STEINER to fractal shapes, such as the classical Rauzy fractal and the twin dragon. These fractals turned out a collection of fractal tiles with shift radix systems. We show that for certain classes of parameters r

  12. Books in Bloom Garden Bibliography Valerie Bang-Jensen and Children's Literature students

    E-print Network

    Ashline, George

    . Illustrated by Kathryn Hewitt. Harcourt. Pansies, daisies, daffodils, geraniums, tulips. Broyles, A. (2008, iris, phlox, morning glory, zinnia, aster, cornflower, marigold, daisy Ehlert, L. (1990). Growing-Jump-Ups), daisies, sunflowers. Heller, R. (1983). The Reason for a Flower, NY: Putnam Penguin. Daffodils

  13. Controlled ultrasonic micro-dissection of thin tissue sections Changhai Ru & Jun Liu & Ming Pang & Yu Sun

    E-print Network

    Sun, Yu

    cutting, the isolated sample is collected using a standard aspiration pipette. The efficiency of PPMD, cells or organisms. However, the laser system needs a high cost of equipment, requires special membranes

  14. Coffee for morning hunger pangs. An examination of coffee and caffeine on appetite, gastric emptying, and energy intake.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Matthew M; Grant, Gary; Horner, Katy; King, Neil; Leveritt, Michael; Sabapathy, Surendran; Desbrow, Ben

    2014-12-01

    Coffee is one of the most widely consumed beverages in the world and has a number of potential health benefits. Coffee may influence energy expenditure and energy intake, which in turn may affect body weight. However, the influence of coffee and its constituents - particularly caffeine - on appetite remains largely unexplored. The objective of this study was to examine the impact of coffee consumption (with and without caffeine) on appetite sensations, energy intake, gastric emptying, and plasma glucose between breakfast and lunch meals. In a double-blind, randomised crossover design. Participants (n?=?12, 9 women; Mean?±?SD age and BMI: 26.3?±?6.3 y and 22.7?±?2.2?kg•m?²) completed 4 trials: placebo (PLA), decaffeinated coffee (DECAF), caffeine (CAF), and caffeine with decaffeinated coffee (COF). Participants were given a standardised breakfast labelled with ¹³C-octanoic acid and 225?mL of treatment beverage and a capsule containing either caffeine or placebo. Two hours later, another 225?mL of the treatment beverage and capsule was administered. Four and a half?hours after breakfast, participants were given access to an ad libitum meal for determination of energy intake. Between meals, participants provided exhaled breath samples for determination of gastric emptying; venous blood and appetite sensations. Energy intake was not significantly different between the trials (Means?±?SD, p>?0.05; Placebo: 2118?±?663?kJ; Decaf: 2128?±?739?kJ; Caffeine: 2287?±?649?kJ; Coffee: 2016?±?750?kJ); Other than main effects of time (p?<0.05), no significant differences were detected for appetite sensations or plasma glucose between treatments (p?>?0.05). Gastric emptying was not significantly different across trials (p?>?0.05). No significant effects of decaffeinated coffee, caffeine or their combination were detected. However, the consumption of caffeine and/or coffee for regulation of energy balance over longer periods of time warrant further investigation. PMID:25218717

  15. Multi-model MJO forecasting during DYNAMO/CINDY period Xiouhua Fu June-Yi Lee Pang-Chi Hsu

    E-print Network

    Wang, Bin

    modeling problems include too slow eastward propagation, the Maritime Continent barrier and weak intensity (MJO) is the dominant mode of tropical convection variability on the intraseasonal timescales (Madden and Julian 1971; Zhang 2005; Lau and Waliser 2011). The MJO convective envelope initiates over This paper

  16. Vehicle Location and Navigation Systems based on LEDs Grantham Pang, Hugh Liu, Chi-Ho Chan, Thomas Kwan

    E-print Network

    Pang, Grantham

    in an indoor environment is given. Prototypes for industrial use have been developed. #12;2 BACKGROUND One, and the bit error rate measurements in an indoor environment. INTRODUCTION As LEDs are increasingly being used

  17. Sustainability criteria for bioenergy systems: results from an expert survey Thomas Buchholz*, Valerie A. Luzadis, Timothy A. Volk

    E-print Network

    Vermont, University of

    Sustainability criteria for bioenergy systems: results from an expert survey Thomas Buchholz in revised form 10 April 2009 Accepted 24 April 2009 Available online 9 May 2009 Keywords: Bioenergy and concerns about regional and national security are driving the development and use of biomass for bioenergy

  18. EDITORIAL: Special issue in honour of Professor Valery V Tuchin’s contribution to the field of biomedical optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruikang K.; Priezzhev, Alexander V.; Fantini, Sergio

    2005-08-01

    This special issue of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics covers some of the applied physics currently being addressed by light source researchers. Most of these papers originate from presentations made at the 10th International Symposium on the Science and Technology of Light Sources, held in Toulouse, France, on 18--22 July 2004. The conference attracted about 400 participants from all over the world. Abstracts of all papers, including extended abstracts of invited papers, were published in the conference book Light Sources 2004 (Institute of Physics Conference Series 182) edited by G Zissis. The full papers published in this issue reflect the wide-ranging nature of research on light sources. These collected full papers survived our rigorous journal review process and they report completed, previously unpublished, pieces of work. This is a research field that has seen many major contributions over the last hundred years; nevertheless it continues to produce new sources and important improvements to existing types. It is evident from these papers just how crucial are the materials used for light sources. Numerous recent lamp developments have depended critically on new or improved materials. Ten or more of the papers are concerned explicitly with materials: for example, an environmentally important and challenging area of research is to find a viable alternative to the use of mercury, particularly in fluorescent lamps. This is difficult because a substitute for Hg in general lighting must match the remarkable efficiency of Hg, or risk doing harm to the environment through increased energy consumption. Large-scale computation of the properties of both high- and low-pressure discharge lamps has become indispensable. A good example is in the paper by Derra et al, which is the first major review of an important lamp type. The lamp of interest is a mercury arc used in data projectors, operating with an arc gap of approximately 1 mm at more than 100 bar pressure. Most of the information needed for design is not accessible experimentally. Computer models were essential tools in many aspects of development, including finding out how the highly stressed materials could be used in ways that ensured acceptable life. Short-arc metal-halide lamps are used for producing white light in commercial premises, but they present numerous challenges to developers. Exceedingly complex chemistry, the many emitters and absorbers, the lack of symmetry, and the increasing influence of electrodes as the arc is shortened—all these pose many design problems that are being tackled with increasing success with the help of computer models. This special issue has many papers that deal with electrode issues, with special emphasis on the experimental verification of model predictions. Radiation transport also continues to be a major issue in constructing realistic discharge models. A number of papers tackle this in a simplified manner, whilst a new ray-tracing scheme offers hope of a realistic calculation of radiation in the complicated short-arc metal-halide lamps mentioned above. Light-emitting diodes are now having a major impact on some areas of lighting; two papers in this issue reflect that trend. The group of papers in this special issue will surely provide an important resource for those researching new and improved lamps.

  19. Parallelizing Pre-rendering Computations on a Net Juggler PC Cluster Jeremie Allard Valerie Gouranton Emmanuel Melin

    E-print Network

    Melin, Emmanuel

    a commodity component cluster running the VR Jug- gler platform on each node into a single VR Juggler image-thread programming requires appropriate mechanisms to hide the distributed memory of the PC cluster (OpenMP [11 developed at LIFO, turns a graphics cluster running the VR Juggler platform [8, 3] on each node

  20. Review Symposium; Dancing on the Ceiling: A Study of Women Managers in Education, by Valerie Hall. London: Paul Chapman, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Valerie; Gronn, Peter; Jenkin, Mazda; Power, Sally; Reynolds, Cecilia

    1999-01-01

    Hall and four colleagues review "Dancing on the Ceiling: A Study of Women Managers in Education" (Paul Chapman, 1996). Reviewers agree that Hall's profiles of six British elementary and secondary women headteachers should improve readers' understanding of female managers' development and their preference for "soft," collaborative leadership…

  1. Seismic imaging of oil production rate Valeri A. Korneev, Dmitry Silin, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    E-print Network

    Korneev, Valeri A.

    National Laboratory, Berkeley, California Gennady M. Goloshubin, University of Houston, Texas, Viacheslav principles of filtration theory and elasticity. In particular, the derivation includes a dynamic version is about 17-18%. From the 15 operating wells, 7 produced oil and 6 produced water. The other two wells

  2. Tree-ring indicators of German summer drought over the last millennium Ulf Buntgen a,b,*, Valerie Trouet a

    E-print Network

    Esper, Jan

    Trouet a , David Frank a , Hanns Hubert Leuschner c , Dagmar Friedrichs d , Ju¨rg Luterbacher e , Jan) data from the contiguous United States of America (Cook et al., 2004) allowed hydro-climatic blueprints of the hydrological cycle, charac- terized by mid-latitudinal precipitation increases and subtropical drought (Cook et

  3. Publikationen 2013 -2014 106. S. Benedetti , F. Stavale , S. Valeri , C. Noguera, H.-J. Freund , J. Goniakowski,* N. Nilius*

    E-print Network

    Peinke, Joachim

    in arbitrarily shaped gold islands on MgO thin films 114. H.-J. Freund, M. Heyde, N. Nilius, S. Schauermann, S. Shaikhutdinov, M.Sterrer, J. Catal. 308 (2013) 154-167. Model studies on heterogeneous catalysts at the atomic. Lett. 111 (2013) 206101 Titration of Ce3+ ions in the CeO2(111) surface by Au ad-atoms 120. H

  4. Resonance Raman scattering in photonic bandgap materials Mesfin Woldeyohannes, 1 Sajeev John, 1 and Valery I. Rupasov 1,2

    E-print Network

    John, Sajeev

    Resonance Raman scattering in photonic band­gap materials Mesfin Woldeyohannes, 1 Sajeev John, 1; published 13 December 2000# We study the resonance Raman scattering of light from a three­level atom a gap due to photon coupling to medium excitations such as excitons and optical phonons. We demonstrate

  5. Virus-Mediated Chemical Changes in Rice Plants Impact the Relationship between Non-Vector Planthopper Nilaparvata lugens Stål and Its Egg Parasitoid Anagrus nilaparvatae Pang et Wang

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Guanchun; Zhou, Xiaojun; Zheng, Xusong; Sun, Yujian; Yang, Yajun; Tian, Junce; Lu, Zhongxian

    2014-01-01

    In order to clarify the impacts of southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV) infection on rice plants, rice planthoppers and natural enemies, differences in nutrients and volatile secondary metabolites between infected and healthy rice plants were examined. Furthermore, the impacts of virus-mediated changes in plants on the population growth of non-vector brown planthopper (BPH), Nilaparvata lugens, and the selectivity and parasitic capability of planthopper egg parasitoid Anagrus nilaparvatae were studied. The results showed that rice plants had no significant changes in amino acid and soluble sugar contents after SRBSDV infection, and SRBSDV-infected plants had no significant effect on population growth of non-vector BPH. A. nilaparvatae preferred BPH eggs both in infected and healthy rice plants, and tended to parasitize eggs on infected plants, but it had no significant preference for infected plants or healthy plants. GC-MS analysis showed that tridecylic aldehyde occurred only in rice plants infected with SRBSDV, whereas octanal, undecane, methyl salicylate and hexadecane occurred only in healthy rice plants. However, in tests of behavioral responses to these five volatile substances using a Y-tube olfactometer, A. nilaparvatae did not show obvious selectivity between single volatile substances at different concentrations and liquid paraffin in the control group. The parasitic capability of A. nilaparvatae did not differ between SRBSDV-infected plants and healthy plant seedlings. The results suggested that SRBSDV-infected plants have no significant impacts on the non-vector planthopper and its egg parasitoid, A. nilaparvatae. PMID:25141278

  6. Adaptively Routing P2P Queries Using Association Analysis Brian D. Connelly, Christopher W. Bowron, Li Xiao, Pang-Ning Tan, and Chen Wang

    E-print Network

    Xiao, Li

    Adaptively Routing P2P Queries Using Association Analysis Brian D. Connelly, Christopher W. Bowron, query messages are flooded to nodes in the network, which results in a large amount of traffic with query messages. In flooding, a query message is sent to all of a peer's neighbors, which, in turn

  7. Cardiac Hypertrophy 713. Ai D, Pang W, Li N, Xu M, Jones PD, Yang J, Zhang Y, Chiamvimonvat N, Shyy JY, Hammock BD, Zhu Y (2009)

    E-print Network

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    2009-01-01

    JY, Hammock BD, Zhu Y (2009) Soluble epoxide hydrolase plays an essential role in angiotensin II JD, Hammock BD, Vanecková I, Cervenka L (2010) Combined inhibition of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, Hammock BD, Chiamvimonvat N (2011) Use of metabolomic profiling in the study of arachidonic acid

  8. Residual Stress and Surface Energy of Sputtered TiN Xiaolu Pang, Liqiang Zhang, Huisheng Yang, Kewei Gao, and Alex A. Volinsky

    E-print Network

    Volinsky, Alex A.

    from compressive 20.3 GPa to tensile with the film thickness reaching 0.3 GPa. Larger grain size the residual stress changes from compressive to tensile, the contact angle reaches 118°, and the corresponding. Introduction Thin TiN films deposited by physical vapor deposition have a wide range of applications in machine

  9. The Dark Side of the Web: An Open Proxy's View Vivek S. Pai, Limin Wang, KyoungSoo Park, Ruoming Pang, and Larry Peterson

    E-print Network

    Park, KyoungSoo

    The Dark Side of the Web: An Open Proxy's View Vivek S. Pai, Limin Wang, KyoungSoo Park, Ruoming with other resources on the Web. While such interaction can easily attract clients and traffic, our expe, deployed on PlanetLab, uses a network of caching Web proxy servers to intelligently dis- tribute and cache

  10. Virus-mediated chemical changes in rice plants impact the relationship between non-vector planthopper Nilaparvata lugens Stål and its egg parasitoid Anagrus nilaparvatae Pang et Wang.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaochan; Xu, Hongxing; Gao, Guanchun; Zhou, Xiaojun; Zheng, Xusong; Sun, Yujian; Yang, Yajun; Tian, Junce; Lu, Zhongxian

    2014-01-01

    In order to clarify the impacts of southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV) infection on rice plants, rice planthoppers and natural enemies, differences in nutrients and volatile secondary metabolites between infected and healthy rice plants were examined. Furthermore, the impacts of virus-mediated changes in plants on the population growth of non-vector brown planthopper (BPH), Nilaparvata lugens, and the selectivity and parasitic capability of planthopper egg parasitoid Anagrus nilaparvatae were studied. The results showed that rice plants had no significant changes in amino acid and soluble sugar contents after SRBSDV infection, and SRBSDV-infected plants had no significant effect on population growth of non-vector BPH. A. nilaparvatae preferred BPH eggs both in infected and healthy rice plants, and tended to parasitize eggs on infected plants, but it had no significant preference for infected plants or healthy plants. GC-MS analysis showed that tridecylic aldehyde occurred only in rice plants infected with SRBSDV, whereas octanal, undecane, methyl salicylate and hexadecane occurred only in healthy rice plants. However, in tests of behavioral responses to these five volatile substances using a Y-tube olfactometer, A. nilaparvatae did not show obvious selectivity between single volatile substances at different concentrations and liquid paraffin in the control group. The parasitic capability of A. nilaparvatae did not differ between SRBSDV-infected plants and healthy plant seedlings. The results suggested that SRBSDV-infected plants have no significant impacts on the non-vector planthopper and its egg parasitoid, A. nilaparvatae. PMID:25141278

  11. Peer and Self Assessment in Massive Online Classes CHINMAY KULKARNI1

    E-print Network

    Klemmer, Scott

    39 Peer and Self Assessment in Massive Online Classes CHINMAY KULKARNI1 , KOH PANG WEI1,2 , HUY LE2, Koh Pang Wei, Huy Le, Daniel Chia, Kathryn Papadopoulos, Justin Cheng, Daphne Koller, Scott R. Klemmer

  12. Aerosol Impacts on the Diurnal Cycle of Marine Stratocumulus IRINA SANDU, JEAN-LOUIS BRENGUIER, OLIVIER GEOFFROY, ODILE THOURON, AND VALERY MASSON

    E-print Network

    industrial pollu- tion and the burning of sugarcane, can increase cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC to either an increase or a decrease of the liquid water path, hence contrasting with the cloud thickening that is expected from a reduction of the precipitation efficiency. In this study, the aerosol impacts on cloud

  13. Quantum phase transition in the four-spin exchange antiferromagnet Valeri N. Kotov, Dao-Xin Yao, A. H. Castro Neto, and D. K. Campbell

    E-print Network

    Yao, Daoxin

    be particularly useful to apply unbiased numerical approaches, such as the quantum Monte Carlo QMC method. External per- turbations such as doping or frustration can also cause quantum transitions between take place. Spontaneous VBS order driven by frustration has been a common theme in quantum

  14. Sediment and vegetation as reservoirs of Vibrio vulnificus in the Tampa Bay Estuary and Gulf of1 Eva Chase*, Suzanne Young* and Valerie J. Harwood1

    E-print Network

    Lajeunesse, Marc J.

    1 Sediment and vegetation as reservoirs of Vibrio vulnificus in the Tampa Bay Estuary and Gulf of1 Running Head: Alternative habitats of Vibrio vulnificus20 21 AEM Accepted Manuscript Posted Online 30 for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved. #12;2 Abstract22 The opportunistic pathogen Vibrio vulnificus occurs

  15. Auxiliary GABAB Receptor Subunits Uncouple G Protein bg Subunits

    E-print Network

    Just, Armin

    Ivankova,1 Gerd Zolles,3 Lisa Adelfinger,1 Valerie Jacquier,1 Valerie Besseyrias,1 Martin Gassmann,1 Uwe, the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the CNS (Chalifoux and Carter, 2011; Gassmann and Bettler, 2012

  16. Measuring implicit motives 1 RUNNING HEAD: Measuring implicit motives

    E-print Network

    Schultheiss, Oliver C.

    Oliver C. Schultheiss and Joyce S. Pang University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Appeared as: Schultheiss, O. C concerning this chapter should be addressed to Oliver C. Schultheiss or Joyce S. Pang (oliver, the field of personality psychology has seen a resurgence of interest in implicit motives, nonconscious

  17. On the Combinatorics of the Boros-Moll Polynomials William Y.C. Chen1

    E-print Network

    Chen, Bill

    On the Combinatorics of the Boros-Moll Polynomials William Y.C. Chen1 , Sabrina X.M. Pang2 1 chen@nankai.edu.cn, 2 pang@cfc.nankai.edu.cn, 3 xiaoying@cfc.nankai.edu.cn Abstract The Boros not imply the fact that the coefficients of these polyno- mials are positive. Boros and Moll proved

  18. 1. 7084 " The Carbon Matrices Made of Pyrolised Bis-Phtalocyanines as a Base for Encapsulation of the Long-Lived Nuclides of Iodine, Technetium and Minor Actinides" Valeri

    E-print Network

    Titov, Anatoly

    , 1. 7084 " The Carbon Matrices Made of Pyrolised Bis-Phtalocyanines as a Base Conference Center, Bruges, Belgium 2. 7127 "Immobilization Long-Lived Radionuclides in Carbon Matrices, Belgium 3. 7167 "Carbon-Carbon Composite based on Polyimide Binder in a Composition with a Fullerene

  19. Title: A systems analysis of Canada's Boreal forest: the role of improved growing stock Names of collaborators: Kyle Lochhead, Dr. Valerie LeMay (co-supervisor), Dr. Gary Bull (co-

    E-print Network

    British Columbia, University of

    Title: A systems analysis of Canada's Boreal forest: the role of improved growing stock Names to multiple attributes of forest structure are as they provide the ability to forecast the system and project models. To accomplish goal this we are working with Canada's National Forest Inventory (NFI,

  20. 6 SDSU General Catalog 2015-2016 Principal Officers of Administration

    E-print Network

    Gallo, Linda C.

    Vice President for Enrollment Management................................... Sandra A. Cook Director University Controller....................................Christopher Bronsdon Senior Director of Enterprise and Tax ..................................... Valerie Peterson Director of Budget and Finance

  1. Administration and Organization 6 SDSU General Catalog 2015-2016

    E-print Network

    Gallo, Linda C.

    Vice President for Enrollment Management................................... Sandra A. Cook Director University Controller....................................Christopher Bronsdon Senior Director of Enterprise and Tax ..................................... Valerie Peterson Director of Budget and Finance

  2. Erica Ambrogio Rachel Amento

    E-print Network

    Lozano-Robledo, Alvaro

    Carolyn Pearson Brianna Christine Petruccio Lauren Renee Poirier Jorie Predmore Meredith Madelyn Ramsey Ashley Springsteen Peri Emma Stevens Valerie Rose Stickles Thomas Russell Sullivan Nichole Grace

  3. University Faculty Senate Meeting Friday March 19, 2010

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    , William Bosshardt, Ernest Andrew Brewer, Valerie Bryan, Lester Embree, Mary Faraci, Deborah Floyd, Joseph Furner, Stuart Galup, Peggy Goldstein, James Gray, Anthony Guneratne Jerry Haky, Mike Harris, Michelle

  4. Advanced Biometrics, Bangor University Course Materials 2008

    E-print Network

    British Columbia, University of

    1 Advanced Biometrics, Bangor University Course Materials 2008 Instructor: Dr. Valerie LeMay , Professor in Measurements/Biometrics EMAIL: Valerie.LeMay@ubc.ca Home University: Faculty of Forestry for the course. #12;2 Course Content Materials: Course materials for this class can be found on www.forestry.ubc.ca/biometrics

  5. Carbon emissions in China: How far can new efforts bend the curve?

    E-print Network

    Carbon emissions in China: How far can new efforts bend the curve? Xiliang Zhang, Valerie J future; and improve methods to model, monitor and verify greenhouse gas emissions and climatic impacts emissions in China: How far can new efforts bend the curve? Xiliang Zhang§* , Valerie J. Karplus , Tianyu Qi

  6. The Learning Principal[R]. Volume 4, Number 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Frank, Valerie, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "The Learning Principal" is an eight-page newsletter published eight times a year. It focuses on the important and unique work of school principals. This issue includes: (1) A Learning Community Is Built on Trust (Valerie von Frank); (2) School Leadership: Q & A: Turnaround Doesn't Have to Take Years, Just Solid Leadership (Valerie von Frank); (3)…

  7. The Learning Principal[R]. Volume 5, Number 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crow, Tracy, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "The Learning Principal" is an eight-page newsletter published eight times a year. It focuses on the important and unique work of school principals. This issue includes: (1) Data Analysis Is a Courageous Look in the Mirror (Valerie von Frank); (2) Q&A: Opening Doors, Opening Minds (Valerie von Frank); (3) Focus on NSDC's [National Staff…

  8. The Learning Principal[R]. Volume 4, Number 8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Frank, Valerie, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "The Learning Principal" is an eight-page newsletter published eight times a year. It focuses on the important and unique work of school principals. This issue includes: (1) Efficacy Can Overcome Classroom Barriers (Valerie von Frank); (2) Q & A: Leadership, Learning Communities Change School Culture (Valerie von Frank); (3) Focus on NSDC's…

  9. CIAN Forum 3: Re-framing Interdisciplinary Perspectives Facilitators CIAN Fellows Dr Jean Penny & Dr Andrew Blackburn

    E-print Network

    in the physical space. ! ! #12;Valerie Ross (Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia) ­ Composer Valerie is a composer of cross cultural compositions, an ethnomusicologist, and interdisciplinary researcher. She works at the University with a deep fascination surrounding the notion of communicative programming. He sees programming as one

  10. Cultural Conceptions This page intentionally left blank

    E-print Network

    On Reproductive Technologies and the Remaking of Life Valerie Hartouni University of Minnesota Press Minneapolis rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system conceptions : on reproductive technologies and the remaking of life / Valerie Hartouni. p. cm. Includes

  11. Target Audience: Health care professionals

    E-print Network

    Hitchcock, Adam P.

    Target Audience: Health care professionals Workshop Facilitator: Valerie Spironello, MSW, RSW Valerie has been a social worker for over 20 years working in a variety of settings including health care provided workshops and presentations to health care providers on a variety of topics such as compassion

  12. Safety, Health & Environmental Exhibition and General Interest Lectures General Interest Lectures

    E-print Network

    's Occupational Health and Safety Speaker: Mr Pang Kok Lam, Chief Occupational Safety Theme: "Fire Safety & Prevention" - Occupational Safety and Health Council Main Theme: OccupationalSafety, Health & Environmental Exhibition and General Interest Lectures 2007 General Interest

  13. Above Sea: Modern and Contemporary Art from the Ruins of Shanghai's New Heaven on Earth

    E-print Network

    Lin, Jenny Grace

    2012-01-01

    drawing, sketching, watercolor and painting. The academy waswatercolor, cartoon, and woodcut, 1960s mural and socialist realist painting,watercolor speaks to Pang Xunqin’s studies of European avant-garde painting

  14. Asian & Pacific Islander American Health Forum

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Health Care Website! #HC4Me New Health Care Website! Health Care Reform is Important to Me “Health Care reform ... ala Pang Click here to read Jane’s story. Health Care Reform is Important to Me “Health care reform ...

  15. The Tyche CPU Scheduler Andrew C. Bavier

    E-print Network

    Singh, Jaswinder Pal

    Aki Nakao, Tiger Qie, Scott Karlin, Zuki Gottlieb, Ruoming Pang, Tammo Spalink and Mike Wawrzoniak in Uppsala. Warm thanks to Bj¨orn Knutsson, who I believe helped organize my visit in order to prove his

  16. Figure 5. An illustration of photoacoustic microscopy and the use of gold nanocages as a new class of contrast

    E-print Network

    Subramanian, Venkat

    of the brain in vivo. Nature Biotechnology 21, 803­806 (2003) Yang, X., Skrabalak, S. E., Li, Z. Y., Xia, Y molecular and therapeutic imaging in nanomedicine. Wang, X., Pang, Y., Ku, G., Xie, X., Stoica, G. & Wang, L

  17. Control of Superconductivity in Cuprate/Manganite Heterostructures

    E-print Network

    Pang, Brian SiewHan

    . Manganite and Superconductor Heterostructures for Active Control of Superconductivity. B.Pang, R.Tomov, M.G.Blamire Proceedings of European Conference on Applied Superconductivity, 2003. Colossal Magnetoresistive Manganite Thin-films for Infrared Detection... /Manganite Heterostructures Brian SiewHan Pang Hughes Hall University of Cambridge A dissertation submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy at University of Cambridge June 2004 iAbstract Research has shown that the spin alignment in an adjacent ferromagnet is capable...

  18. University Faculty Senate Meeting Friday February 19, 2010

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    , William Bosshardt, Philippe D'Anjou, Ernest Andrew Brewer, Doug Broadfield, Valerie Bryan, Eric Chiang at a meeting at the Majestic Palm. The meeting will be open to the public and webcast. 5. UPC Consent Agenda

  19. International Toys in Space: Hockey - Duration: 2 minutes, 12 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    Cosmonauts Sergi Treschev and Valery Korzun discover ways to adapt the game of hockey while trying to overcome the challenges of playing the game in microgravity. Astronaut Peggy Whitson narrates t...

  20. 76 FR 63908 - Sunshine Act Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-14

    ...Committee Reports: a. Oversight, Governance and Audit Committee b. External Relations...other accommodation should notify Ida Green at igreen@cns.gov or 202- 606-6861...Dated: October 12, 2011. Valerie Green, General Counsel. [FR Doc....

  1. Springer Series in Statistics Trevor Hastie

    E-print Network

    Hastie, Trevor

    this To our parents: Valerie and Patrick Hastie Vera and Sami Tibshirani Florence and Harry Friedman, all others bring data. ­William Edwards Deming (1900-1993)1 We have been gratified by the popularity

  2. International Toys in Space: Jump Rope - Duration: 53 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    Cosmonaut Valery Korzun attempts jumping rope in microgravity. He decides to adapt the activity by taking out the "jumping part," but the act of spinning the rope around him still proves difficult....

  3. 78 FR 66005 - Notice of Sunshine Act Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE... of Directors of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation met in closed session to consider matters...: October 30, 2013. Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. Valerie J. Best, Assistant Executive...

  4. PUBLISHED ONLINE: 17 NOVEMBER 2014 | DOI: 10.1038/NPHYS3142 Topological defects as relics of emergent

    E-print Network

    Loss, Daniel

    ,7 , Valery Kiryukhin2 , Wojciech H. Zurek1 , Cristian D. Batista1 and Sang-Wook Cheong2 * Lars Onsager, Kirkpatrick and Nelson in their seminal work3 . As envisaged by Onsager and Feynman4,5 , the restoration

  5. International Toys in Space: Soccer - Duration: 105 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    Cosmonauts Sergi Treschev and cosmonaut Valery Korzun discover they must change the way they play soccer because of the effects of microgravity. They quickly adapt to accommodate for the increased ...

  6. Women and Heart Disease | Healthy Blood Pressure | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... on. Special Section: Healthy Blood Pressure Women and Heart Disease Past Issues / Winter 2010 Table of Contents ... Spelling, Valerie Bertinelli, and Vivica A. Fox. "The Heart Truth Campaign" Urges Women To Take Good Blood ...

  7. Distribution, variability and sources of tropospheric ozone over south China in spring: Intensive ozonesonde

    E-print Network

    Liu, Hongyu

    . Crawford,3 David B. Considine,3,4 Chuenyu Chan,1 Samuel J. Oltmans,5,6 and Valerie Thouret7 Received 18 National Institute of Aerospace, Hampton, Virginia, USA. 3 Chemistry and Dynamics Branch, NASA Langley

  8. Working Group 3: Teacher Education Summary by Agnes Tuska

    E-print Network

    Spagnolo, Filippo

    . Including Awareness of Assessment Issues in Teacher Content Preparation (Judith H. Hector) 7. I Think I Can Rockwell, Carol Walker, Valerie Wright & Monica Vo) 8. Student Teachers' Experiences with Mathematics

  9. College of Health and Human Sciences Dean's List Spring Semester 2015 Students included on the Dean's List earned a minimum of 3.75 GPA and completed a minimum of 12 credits for traditional grade during the semester indicated. The names are listed alphabe

    E-print Network

    . Eugenio, Valerie J. Griffith, Samuel A. Hurley, Shea P. Lenski, Bianca E. McNeil, Michelle D. Perez, Gina, Madeline M. Ruiz, Daniel Specht, Kalyn S. Wasinger, Robert G. Atchison, Tanner R. Burrow, Grayson W. Cutler

  10. PowerPoint Presentation

    Cancer.gov

    Center for Applied Proteomi cs and Molecular Medicine Co-Directors: Lance Liotta and Chip Petricoin Amy VanMeter, Julia Wulfkuhle, Mark Ross, Valerie Calvert Robyn Araujo, Weidong Zhou, Isela Galla gher, James Cooper, Vikas Chandhoke, Sally Rucker, Sheila

  11. 2002 Participating Schools Academy of the Holy Names

    E-print Network

    Greenberg Tiana Hooks Teasia Johnson Andrea Leonardo Valerie Marshall Meghan McKay Sadé McKenzie Nukira Page. Anne Miller Students: Aasiyah Bell Samantha Coles Robin Gray Tadeja Humbert Rhodesia Jones Sherrell

  12. Near-Ultrahigh Pressure Processing of Continental Crust: Miocene Crustal Xenoliths

    E-print Network

    Hacker, Bradley R.

    BRADLEY HACKER1 *, PETER LUFFI2 , VALERY LUTKOV3 , VLADISLAV MINAEV3 , LOTHAR RATSCHBACHER4 , TERRY PLANK5. Fax: 805 893 2314. E-mail: hacker@geol.ucsb.edu # The Author 2005. Published by Oxford University

  13. International Toys in Space: Kendama - Duration: 87 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    Cosmonaut Valery Korzun attempts to capture the ball in a cup using the Japanese Kendama toy. The game must be adapted for the ball to stay in the cup in microgravity. Astronaut Peggy Whitson narra...

  14. Quantum Mechanics 1 for graduate students

    E-print Network

    Course 606 Quantum Mechanics 1 for graduate students Fall 2010 Instructor Valery Pokrovsky 1 electromagnetic field. Gauge invariance. Landau levels. 7. Semiclassical approximation. 8. Quantum mechanics. Scattering. The main textbook is E. Merzbacher, Quantum Mechanics, third edition, Wiley. Additional

  15. Behavioral/Systems/Cognitive Coding of Apparent Motion in the Thalamic Nucleus of the

    E-print Network

    Shulz, Daniel

    Somatosensory System Vale´rie Ego-Stengel,* Julie Le Cam,* and Daniel E. Shulz Unite´ de Neuroscience; Armstrong-James and Callahan, 1991; Diamond et al., 1992b; Nicolelis and Chapin, 1994; Min- nery and Simons

  16. Dining philosophers with masking tolerance to crash faults 

    E-print Network

    Idimadakala, Vijaya K.

    2009-05-15

    Approved by: Chair of Committee, Scott M. Pike Committee Members, Andreas Klappenecker Madhav Pappu Head of Department, Valerie Taylor December 2006 Major Subject: Computer Science iii ABSTRACT Dining Philosophers with Masking Tolerance to Crash Faults...

  17. Routing algorithms for large scale wireless sensor networks 

    E-print Network

    Nittala Venkata, Lakshmana Prasanth

    2005-02-17

    OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content by: Dmitri Loguinov (Chair of Committee) Andreas Klappenecker (Member) Madhav Pappu (Member) Valerie E. Taylor (Head of Department) December 2004 Major Subject: Computer Science iii ABSTRACT Routing Algorithms...

  18. The China-in-Global Energy Model Tianyu Qi, Niven Winchester, Da Zhang,

    E-print Network

    The China-in-Global Energy Model Tianyu Qi, Niven Winchester, Da Zhang, Xiliang Zhang and Valerie J: globalchange@mit.edu Website: http://globalchange.mit.edu/ #12;1 The China-in-Global Energy Model Tianyu Qi

  19. University Faculty Senate Meeting Friday November 6, 2009

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    , Andrew Brewer, Valerie Bryan, Eric Chiang, Lester Embree, Joseph Furner, James Gray, Stuart Galup, Peggy Goldstein, Jerry Haky, Mike Harris, Fred Hoffman, Mehdi Kaighobadi, Ryan Karr, James Kumi Diaka, Kevin

  20. VRIJE UNIVERSITEIT BRUSSEL FACULTY OF MEDICINE AND PHARMACY

    E-print Network

    Wolf, Aaron

    ..........................................................................................7 1.4 Water scarcity and access Promoter: Prof. Marc Pallemaerts Transboundary Water Disputes in Central Asia: Using Indicators of Water Conflict in Identifying Water Conflict Potential By Valery Votrin A thesis submitted in partial fulfilment

  1. CONGRATULATIONS TO CTHB/TPCP STUDENTS AND STAFF IN 2012 AND EARLY 2013

    E-print Network

    laude) and Angelica Marsberg at FABI who graduated in 2012 and Gugu Khubeka, Valery Molota, Godfrey-Anne Pillay. D. Katrin Fitza. E. Melissa Simpson. F. Angelica Marsberg. G. Barrie Christie H. Johan van der

  2. Technology Transfer Office Organiza onal Chart Paul Sanberg, PhD

    E-print Network

    Arslan, Hüseyin

    Technology Transfer Office Organiza onal Chart Paul Sanberg, PhD Sr. Vice President for Research Compliance Manager Valerie McDevi Associate Vice President Technology Transfer & Business Partnerships Sarah

  3. Elements of Rational and Emotional Appeal in Magazine Advertisements: A Social Cognitive Approach 

    E-print Network

    Costello, Lori Michelle

    2015-05-12

    of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Chair of Committee, Billy McKim Committee Members, Tracy Rutherford Valerie Balester Head of Department, John Elliot May 2015 Major Subject: Agricultural Leadership, Education... to be guided through the research process by someone with a true passion for the discipline. I would also like to thank my committee members, Dr. Tracy Rutherford and Dr. Valerie Balester, for their patience and guidance through the research process...

  4. Author s note: Marie F. Smith, CRA;Valerie T. Eviner, PhD; Kathie Weathers, PhD; Maria Uriarte, PhD; Holly Ewing, PhD; Jonathan M. Jeschke, PhD; Peter Groffman, PhD; Clive G. Jones, PhD; Institute of Ecosystem Studies, 65 Sharon Turnpike (PO

    E-print Network

    Eviner, Valerie

    Uriarte, PhD; Holly Ewing, PhD; Jonathan M. Jeschke, PhD; Peter Groffman, PhD; Clive G. Jones, Ph. Eviner, PhD Kathie C. Weathers, PhD Maria Uriarte, PhD Holly A. Ewing, PhD Jonathan M. Jeschke, PhD Peter

  5. An assessment of the use of characteristic drying curves for the high-temperature drying of softwood timber

    SciTech Connect

    Langrish, T.A.G.

    1999-04-01

    An explicit assessment has been carried out, using the experimental data of Pang (1994), of the applicability of the concept of a characteristic drying curve to the drying of Pinus radiata softwood timber. This concept has been used recently by Pang and Keey (1994) and Nijdam and Keey (1996) when investigating the expected drying behavior of a complete stack of timber. The concept appears to be applicable over the range of wet-bulb depressions which are common inside the stacks of timber, supporting its use in kiln-wide analysis of frying behavior.

  6. cQ&.____i!!B 1 October 1996

    E-print Network

    Hai-Pang Chiang, Jyhpyng Wang * Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica chicken muscle, and demonstrate that the resolution and penetration depth is comparable to that obtained of our method in the diffusive region by random-phase path integration. A scaling relation among

  7. Intermetallic Growth Studies on Sn-Ag-Cu Lead-Free Solder Joints

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Wei

    Intermetallic Growth Studies on Sn-Ag-Cu Lead-Free Solder Joints JOHN H.L. PANG,1,2 LUHUA XU,1 X (IMC) growth behavior plays an important role in solder joint reliability of electronic packaging solders and nickel/gold (Ni/Au) surface finish on BGA solder joint specimen is reported. Digital imaging

  8. Increase of global monsoon area and precipitation under global warming: A robust signal?

    E-print Network

    Li, Tim

    Increase of global monsoon area and precipitation under global warming: A robust signal? Pang 2012; revised 18 February 2012; accepted 20 February 2012; published 16 March 2012. [1] Monsoons of people around the world. The global monsoon precipitation had an increasing trend over the past three

  9. Brittle film-induced cracking of ductile substrates , Lijie Qiao a,

    E-print Network

    Volinsky, Alex A.

    Brittle film-induced cracking of ductile substrates Tao Guo a , Lijie Qiao a, , Xiaolu Pang b 29 May 2015 Revised 22 July 2015 Accepted 23 July 2015 Keywords: Brittle film Ductile substrate Film-induced cracking Dislocations Crack velocity a b s t r a c t Film and substrate mechanical integrity is essential

  10. Distributed Throughput Optimization for ZigBee Cluster-Tree Networks

    E-print Network

    Zhuang, Weihua

    1 Distributed Throughput Optimization for ZigBee Cluster-Tree Networks Yu-Kai Huang§, Ai-Chun Pang connectivity in inexpensive, portable, and mobile devices. Among the well-known ZigBee topologies, ZigBee will be generated. However, the restricted routing of a ZigBee cluster- tree network may not be able to provide

  11. DOI: 10.1002/adem.200700057 Interfacial Microstructure of Chromium Oxide Coatings**

    E-print Network

    Volinsky, Alex A.

    DOI: 10.1002/adem.200700057 Interfacial Microstructure of Chromium Oxide Coatings** By Xiaolu Pang, Kewei Gao,* Huisheng Yang, Lijie Qiao, Yanbin Wang and A. A. Volinsky Chromium oxide coatings was about 14.7 GPa, while a 200 nm thick RF-sputtered chromium oxide coating, stoichiometri- cally close

  12. Inhibition of Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Attenuates High-Fat-DietInduced Hepatic Steatosis by Reduced

    E-print Network

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    . Hammock2 , Yi Zhu1 * 1 Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Key Laboratory of Molecular Cardiovascular Sciences of Education Ministry, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing, China, 2, Dang H, Li D, Pang W, Hammock BD, et al. (2012) Inhibition of Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Attenuates High

  13. General Fibrosis 761. Simpkins AN, Rudic RD, Roy S, Tsai HJ, Hammock BD, Imig JD (2010) Soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibition

    E-print Network

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    2010-01-01

    General Fibrosis 761. Simpkins AN, Rudic RD, Roy S, Tsai HJ, Hammock BD, Imig JD (2010) Soluble SH, Tsai C, Hammock BD, Schaefer L, Geisslinger G, Amann K, Brandes RP (2010) Inhibition11979 880. Wang Q, Pang W, Cui Z, Shi J, Liu Y, Liu B, Zhou Y, Guan Y, Hammock BD, Wang Y, Zhu Y (2013

  14. CURRICULUM VITAE XUEGANG (JEFF) BAN, Ph.D.

    E-print Network

    Ban, Xuegang "Jeff"

    1 CURRICULUM VITAE XUEGANG (JEFF) BAN, Ph.D. Associate Professor Department of Civil Book Chapters 1. Hao, P.*, Sun, Z.*, Ban, X., Guo, D.*, and Ji, Q., 2013. Vehicle index estimation (Hoogendoorn, S.P., Knoop, V.L., and Lint, H. eds), Elsevier, 473-490. 2. Di, X., Liu, H., Pang, J.S., and Ban

  15. Clustering Earth Science Data: Goals, Issues and Results* Michael Steinbach+

    E-print Network

    Kumar, Vipin

    1 Clustering Earth Science Data: Goals, Issues and Results* Michael Steinbach+ Pang-Ning Tan+ Vipin on recent work applying data mining to the task of finding interesting patterns in earth science data of the overall project) is to use clustering to divide the land and ocean areas of the earth into disjoint

  16. Quality-Controlled Motion-Compensated Interpolation

    E-print Network

    Girod, Bernd

    Quality-Controlled Motion-Compensated Interpolation Mina Makar, Derek Pang, Yao-Chung Lin and Bernd the quality of the interpolated frames at the decoder by transmitting a small amount of error control. Our work extends this DSC-based approach to the problem of quality-controlled motion

  17. Microstructure, residual stress, and fracture of sputtered TiN films Liqiang Zhang a

    E-print Network

    Volinsky, Alex A.

    Microstructure, residual stress, and fracture of sputtered TiN films Liqiang Zhang a , Huisheng Yang a , Xiaolu Pang a, , Kewei Gao a , Alex A. Volinsky b a Department of Materials Physics Keywords: TiN films Residual stress Hardness Fracture toughness Morphology, structure, residual stress

  18. Quantitative Study of the Dynamic Tumor-Endothelial Cell Interactions through an Integrated Microfluidic Coculture System

    E-print Network

    Huang, Yanyi

    Microfluidic Coculture System Chunhong Zheng, Liang Zhao, Gui'e Chen, Ying Zhou, Yuhong Pang, and Yanyi Huang of lymphatic or blood circuit and colonize and grow at a new site.1 During this process, the first and foremost. To investigate such interactions in vitro, it is necessary to create a coculture system, in which two types

  19. Image-space Tensor Field Visualization Using a LIC-like Method

    E-print Network

    Hamann, Bernd

    Image-space Tensor Field Visualization Using a LIC-like Method Sebastian Eichelbaum, Mario fields motivated by image-space line integral convolution (LIC). Although, our approach can be applied [11, 24, 23]. Zheng and Pang introduced HyperLIC [31], which makes it possible to display a single

  20. Fast deposition of diamond-like carbon films by radio frequency hollow cathode method

    E-print Network

    Volinsky, Alex A.

    is attributed to high plasma density in RF hollow cathode method, discussed in this paper. Scanning electronFast deposition of diamond-like carbon films by radio frequency hollow cathode method Xiaolu Pang February 2013 Available online 6 March 2013 Keywords: Diamond-like carbon films Hollow cathode Deposition

  1. Host-foraging success of three species of Trichogramma (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae) in a simulated retail environment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three species of trichogrammatid egg parasitoids (Trichogramma deion Pinto and Oatman, T. ostriniae Pang and Chen, and T. pretiosum Riley) were evaluated as potential biological control agents for the Indianmeal moth (Plodia interpunctella (Hübner)) on retail shelves under laboratory conditions. A s...

  2. Calculation of TiO2 Surface and Subsurface Oxygen Vacancy by the Screened Exchange Functional

    E-print Network

    Li, Hongfei; Guo, Yuzheng; Robertson, John

    2015-07-20

    of Conducting Nanofilaments in TiO2 Resistive Switching Memory. Nature Nanotech 2010, 5, 148-153. 5 Yim, C. M.; Pang, C. L.; Thornton, G. Oxygen Vacancy Origin of the Surface Band-Gap State of TiO2 (110). Phys. Rev. Lett. 2010, 104, 036806 1-4. 6 Schaub...

  3. Infants and Toddlers: Discovering and Exploring the Outdoors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honig, Alice Sterling

    2005-01-01

    Babies' interest in the outer world develops very slowly. During the first half year or so, babies are strongly tuned in to themselves. They feel hunger pangs when they need to be fed. Their skin is fragile, and they need help maintaining their body temperature in cold weather. This article discusses outside interests, safe exploration, animal…

  4. Poster Printing Tips Systems Biodynamics Lab, UCSD

    E-print Network

    Hasty, Jeff

    Poster Printing Tips Systems Biodynamics Lab, UCSD Revision 1.0 Wyming Lee Pang February 28, 2006 #12;Poster Printing Tips Rev. 1.0, WLP · DO NOT use Microsoft Powerpoint. Although the status quo for making posters, the initial benefits in ease of use and application familiarity will be far overshadowed

  5. A NEW NEURAL RECORDING ELECTRODE ARRAY WITH PARYLENE INSULATING LAYER

    E-print Network

    Nenadic, Zoran

    A NEW NEURAL RECORDING ELECTRODE ARRAY WITH PARYLENE INSULATING LAYER Changlin Pang1 , Jorge G presents a new electrode array applied with parylene technology, used for recording of high-level cognitive and conduction traces are insulated by parylene, which is a polymer material with high electrical resistivity

  6. Electrolysis-based Parylene Balloon Actuators for Movable Neural Probes

    E-print Network

    Electrolysis-based Parylene Balloon Actuators for Movable Neural Probes Changlin Pang1 , Yu a novel electrolysis-based parylene balloon actuator fabricated with MEMS technology. The actuator a parylene balloon structure with silicon spring structure, electrolysis electrodes and electrolyte inside

  7. INTEGRATED PARYLENE-CABLED SILICON PROBES FOR NEURAL PROSTHETICS

    E-print Network

    INTEGRATED PARYLENE-CABLED SILICON PROBES FOR NEURAL PROSTHETICS R. Huang1 , C. Pang1 , Y.C. Tai1 arrays system with an integrated parylene cable. The greatly reduced flexible rigidity of the parylene on IC expansion capability [1 - 3] In this work, we present a parylene coated silicon probe that has

  8. Block copolymer/ferroelectric nanoparticle nanocomposites

    E-print Network

    Lin, Zhiqun

    Block copolymer/ferroelectric nanoparticle nanocomposites Xinchang Pang,a Yanjie He,a Beibei Jiang and Zhiqun Lin*a Nanocomposites composed of diblock copolymer/ferroelectric nanoparticles were formed of PS-functionalized BaTiO3 NPs in the PS-b-PMMA/BaTiO3 NP nanocomposites. Selective solvent vapor

  9. In a spare hour, I ... exercise on the treadmill. My motto is ... "be low-key, work high-key".

    E-print Network

    Lin, Zhiqun

    for use in hybrid solar cells.) 3. "High Efficiency Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells Based on Hierarchically of nanoparticles with reduced crystal size for use in solar cells with markedly improved performance.) 4 colloidal nanocrystals": X. Pang, L. Zhao, W. Han, X. Xin, Z. Lin, Nature Nanotech 2013, 8, 426 ­ 431. (A

  10. Operations Research Letters 43 (2015) 6568 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-print Network

    Chen, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Available online 3 December 2014 Keywords: L -convexity Dynamic programming Transshipment Inventory control to the structural analysis of the standard, single-item lost-sales in- ventory system with a positive lead time. Huh sales. By showing that the profit function is L -concave in transformed state variables, Pang et al. [8

  11. Reversible Temperature Dependence in Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering of 1-Propanethiol Adsorbed on a Silver Island Film

    E-print Network

    Leung, Pui-Tak "Peter"

    on a Silver Island Film Yoon Soo Pang, Hyun Jin Hwang, and Myung Soo Kim*, Department of Chemistry, Seoul-9 Silver island films are excellent surfaces for the investigation of the EM effect. Both experimental and theoretical evidences suggest that the plasmon resonance on an individual island plays an important role

  12. A Quantum Optical Cheshire Cat Frank Rioux

    E-print Network

    Rioux, Frank

    A Quantum Optical Cheshire Cat Frank Rioux The following is a summary of "Quantum Cheshire Cats, the post-selected state is detected at D1. The evolution of the post-selected state is summarized of the Cheshire cat, a photon property has been separated from the photon. "" "Arm" "Pang" "Left Arm" T kronecker

  13. Design considerations of form birefringent microstructures

    E-print Network

    Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    Design considerations of form birefringent microstructures Ivan Richter, Pang-Chen Sun, Fang Xu on a microscopic scale, form birefringence arises on scales much larger compared with these microscopic dimensions. Richter is on leave from the Depart- ment of Physical Electronics, Faculty of Nuclear Sciences

  14. TESL Reporter, Vol. 3, Nos. 1-4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pack, Alice C., Ed.

    Four issues of "TESL Reporter" are presented. Contents include the following articles: "Feedback: An Anti-Madeirization Compound" by Henry M. Schaafsma; "Using the Personal Pronoun 'I' as a Compound Subject" by G. Pang and D. Chu; "The Consonant'L' in Initial and Final Positions" by Maybelle Chong; "Sentence Expansion for the Elementary Level" by…

  15. A Survey of Some Nonsmooth Equations and Smoothing Newton Liqun Qi and Defeng Sun

    E-print Network

    Sun, Defeng

    A Survey of Some Nonsmooth Equations and Smoothing Newton Methods Liqun Qi and Defeng Sun School. Pang and Qi [PaQ93] reviewed eight problems in the study of complementarity problems, variational is supported by the Australian Research Council. E-mail: L.Qi@unsw.edu.au (Liqun Qi), sun

  16. Monolithic Silicon Probes with Flexible Parylene Cables for Neural Prostheses

    E-print Network

    Monolithic Silicon Probes with Flexible Parylene Cables for Neural Prostheses Changlin Pang1-insulated silicon probes, which are used for neural prostheses to record high-level cognitive neural signals of inorganic materials (e.g. silicon dioxide, silicon nitride), the electrodes and conduction traces

  17. AUTOMATION TECHNOLOGY FOR FABRIC INSPECTION SYSTEM

    E-print Network

    Pang, Grantham

    Pang Dept. of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong, especially in textile industry. Human inspection is generally used in textile industry because the cost of the developed system is used to fully inspect the fabric and weaving products from a textile factory

  18. RUTGERS -THE STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW JERSEY Data Mining (26:198:685)

    E-print Network

    RUTGERS - THE STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW JERSEY Data Mining (26:198:685) Spring 2009 Instructor: Dr · Office Phone: 973-353-5261 · Text Book: "Introduction to Data Mining", by Pang-Ning Tan, Michael, it is difficult for analysts to sift through the data even though it may contain useful information. Data mining

  19. RUTGERS -THE STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW JERSEY 26:198:644 Data Mining

    E-print Network

    RUTGERS - THE STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW JERSEY 26:198:644 Data Mining Fall 2014 Instructor: Professor Text Book: "Introduction to Data Mining", by Pang-Ning Tan, Michael Steinbach, Vipin Kumar, Addison and Tom Fawcett, O'REILLY, ISBN: 978-1- 449-36132-7, 2013. "Data Mining: Concepts and Techniques, Third

  20. RUTGERS -THE STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW JERSEY Data Mining

    E-print Network

    RUTGERS - THE STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW JERSEY Data Mining Spring 2011 Instructor: Dr. Hui Xiong E-353-5261 Text Book: "Introduction to Data Mining", by Pang-Ning Tan, Michael Steinbach, Vipin Kumar, Addison for analysts to sift through the data even though it may contain useful information. Data mining holds great

  1. RUTGERS -THE STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW JERSEY Data Mining

    E-print Network

    RUTGERS - THE STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW JERSEY Data Mining Fall 2012 Instructor: Dr. Hui Xiong E or by appointment Text Book: "Introduction to Data Mining", by Pang-Ning Tan, Michael Steinbach, Vipin Kumar for analysts to sift through the data even though it may contain useful information. Data mining holds great

  2. Exploring Video Streaming in Public Settings: Shared Geocaching Over Distance Using Mobile Video Chat

    E-print Network

    Cortes, Corinna

    Chat Jason Procyk1 , Carman Neustaedter1 , Carolyn Pang1 , Anthony Tang2 , and Tejinder K. Judge3 Simon Mountain View, CA, USA tkjudge@google.com ABSTRACT Our research explores the use of mobile video chat are doing the same activity together at the same time. We prototyped a wearable video chat experience

  3. Proceedings of the COLING/ACL 2006 Main Conference Poster Sessions, pages 627634, Sydney, July 2006. c 2006 Association for Computational Linguistics

    E-print Network

    or speech, such as sen- timent, opinion, emotion or point of view (Pang et al., 2002; Turney, 2002; Dave et-lived feelings, through emotions, to moods, and ultimately to long-lived, slowly-changing personality-grained (but non-ordered) multiple classification (frus- trated/loved/etc.) and coarse-grained binary clas

  4. An Approximation Scheme for Black-Scholes Equations with Mou-Hsiung Chang

    E-print Network

    Pang, Tao

    An Approximation Scheme for Black-Scholes Equations with Delays Mou-Hsiung Chang Tao Pang for an infinite dimensional Black-Scholes equation obtained in Chang and Youree [5]. The equation arises from a consideration of an European option pricing problem in a market in which stock prices and the riskless asset

  5. Understanding fish behavior during typhoon events in real-life underwater environments

    E-print Network

    Fisher, Bob

    Understanding fish behavior during typhoon events in real-life underwater environments Concetto · Fang-Pang Lin · Daniela Giordano · Lynda Hardman · Robert B. Fisher Abstract The study of fish inevitably influenced the behavior of the fish under observation. Recent projects involving the installation

  6. Java Therapy: Web-Based Robotic Rehabilitation

    E-print Network

    Reinkensmeyer, David J.

    Java Therapy: Web-Based Robotic Rehabilitation David J. Reinkensmeyer, Clifton T. Pang, Jeff A. "Java Therapy" is a Web site with a library of evaluation and therapy activities. The activities can acceptable Figure 1: Prototype web-based, force feedback telerehabilitator ("Java Therapy") being used

  7. Tae Kwon Do 

    E-print Network

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    of Committee, Daniel A. Jime´nez Committee Members, Paul V. Gratz Eun Jung Kim Valerie E. Taylor Head of Department, Nancy M. Amato August 2014 Major Subject: Computer Science Copyright 2014 Zhe Wang ABSTRACT Programs exhibit significant performance variance...&M for their insightful feedback on my work. They are Paul V. Gratz, Daniel A. Jime´nez, Eun Jung Kim, Valerie E. Taylor, Dakai Zhu, Hugh Maynard, Rajendra V. Boppana and Byeong Lee. I would like to thank Yuan Xie who was my mentor during my intern at AMD research...

  8. Estimating Permanent and Transitory Components of Economic Recovery: A Case of Banking Crises

    E-print Network

    Wakana, Toshiyuki

    2014-12-31

    of Using Enough Information.” CEPR Discussion Paper. No. DP7508. [6] Cerra, Valerie, and Sweta C. Saxena. 2008. “Growth Dynamics: The Myth of Economic Recovery.” American Economic Review. vol. 98(1). 439-457. [7] Clark, P. K. 1987. “The Cyclical Component... of Using Enough Information.” CEPR Discussion Paper. No. DP7508. [6] Cerra, Valerie, and Sweta C. Saxena. 2008. “Growth Dynamics: The Myth of Economic Recovery.” American Economic Review. vol. 98(1). 439-457. [7] Clark, P. K. 1987. “The Cyclical Component...

  9. The Ethics of Interpretation: The Signifying Chain from Field to Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapping, Claudia

    2008-01-01

    This paper attempts to describe the relationship between the embodied practice of fieldwork and the written articulation of this experience. Starting from Valerie Hey's conceptualization of "rapport" as form of "intersubjective synergy", a moment of recognition of similarity within difference--similar in structure to Laclau and Moufffe's…

  10. Retailers shift strategy as middle class turns away from name brands

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Retailers shift strategy as middle class turns away from name brands By EMILY ROACH Palm Beach Post. Valerie Thomsen recently scored a Duncan Hines cake mix during her regular Dollar Tree stop in Royal Palm William Stronge, professor emeritus of economics at Florida Atlantic University. Retailers adapt Middle

  11. Technology and Higher Education: Report from the Front.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayor, Mara; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Includes two reports on the current integration of technology in postsecondary education. Mara Mayor and Peter Dirr discuss the relationship between technology and access and quality. Valerie Crane presents study results on how students use and evaluate telecourses compared to on-campus courses. (DMM)

  12. D I G E S T Public Works

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    .S.ARMYINSTALLATIONMANAGEMENTCOMMAND Energy and Water Management 3 Tools, Technology and Automation 20 Energy and Water Successes 32, by William F. Eng 19 Army energy, water awards presented, by Valerie D. Hines Tools, TechnologyD I G E S T Public Works Alternative fuels are part of the solution at Fort Hood, Texas, where

  13. "Bad Talk" Made Good: Language Variety in Four Caribbean British Children's Poets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockwood, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This article looks at how four British-based poets born in the Caribbean exploit the rich language repertoire available to them in their work for children and young people. Following initial consideration of questions of definition and terminology, poetry collections by James Berry, John Agard, Grace Nichols and Valerie Bloom are discussed, with a…

  14. Acoustic detection and classification of river boats Amir Averbuch a,

    E-print Network

    Averbuch, Amir

    Acoustic detection and classification of river boats Amir Averbuch a, , Valery Zheludev a , Pekka of a boat of a certain type when other background noises are present. It is done via the analysis of its the acoustic signature of the boat of interest, we use the Best Discriminant Basis method. The decision is made

  15. LETTER OPEN doi:10.1038/nature13668

    E-print Network

    Cooper, Robin L.

    across distant species Alan P. Boyle1 *, Carlos L. Araya1 *, Cathleen Brdlik1 , Philip Cayting1 , Chao Niu3 , E. Jay Rehm9 , Joel Rozowsky2 , Matthew Slattery9 , Rebecca Spokony9 , Robert Terrell4 , Dionne,12 , Valerie Reinke3 , Robert H. Waterston4 , Mark Gerstein2 , Kevin P. White9 1, Manolis Kellis6 1 & Michael

  16. Maximum extent of the Eurasian ice sheets in the Barents and Kara Sea region during the Weichselian

    E-print Network

    Möller, Per

    000 yr BP, whereas the northeastern flank of the Scandinavian Ice Sheet advanced to a maximum position shortly after 17 000 calen- dar years ago. During the Late Weichselian (25 000­10 000 yr BP), much of Geographical Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1SS, U.K.; Valery Gataullin, Oil and Gas Research

  17. Analyzing the Regional Impact of a Fossil Energy Cap in China

    E-print Network

    of China's economy, built on the 2007 regional input-output tables for China and the Global Trade AnalysisAnalyzing the Regional Impact of a Fossil Energy Cap in China Da Zhang, Valerie Karplus, Sebastian Rausch and Xiliang Zhang Report No. 237 January 2013 China Energy & Climate Project TSINGHUA - MIT #12

  18. TSINGHUA -MIT China Energy & Climate Project

    E-print Network

    TSINGHUA - MIT China Energy & Climate Project Will economic restructuring in China reduce trade economic restructuring in China reduce trade-embodied CO2 emissions? Tianyu Qi a,b, , Niven Winchester b , Valerie J. Karplus b , Xiliang Zhang a a Institute of Energy, Environment and Economy, Tsinghua University

  19. Taking a Closer Look at the "Grit" Narratives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Socol, Ira

    2014-01-01

    In this article Ira Socol explores the pros and cons of Paul Tough's "How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity, and the Hidden Power of Character." As Tough told Valerie Strauss, "The book is about two things: first, an emerging body of research that shows the importance of so-called non-cognitive skills in children's…

  20. Bibliography (the html links are live in the on-line pdf version)

    E-print Network

    White, Douglas R.

    Bibliography (the html links are live in the on-line pdf version) Ahl, Valerie, and T. F. H. Allen. Barabási, Albert-László. 2002. Linked: The New Science of Networks. Cam- bridge, MA: Perseus Publishing. http://www.nd.edu/~networks/linked. Barabási, Albert-László, and Reka Albert. 1999. Science 286

  1. Kinetic Modeling of Non-thermal Escape: Planets and Exoplanets

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Robert E.

    Kinetic Modeling of Non-thermal Escape: Planets and Exoplanets Valery I. Shematovich Institute are populated by the atoms and molecules with both thermal and suprathermal kinetic energies (Johnson et al photochemical and plasmachemical reactions, and etc. · Such kinetic systems with the non-thermal processes

  2. Single Machine Scheduling with Deadlines, Release and Due Dates

    E-print Network

    Magdeburg, Universität

    Single Machine Scheduling with Deadlines, Release and Due Dates Valery Gordon, Elena Potapneva the weighted number of late jobs. There are given n jobs and for each job we have a release date, a processing time and a due date. It is assumed that certain specified jobs have to be completed on time. The due

  3. Reforming Chicago's High Schools: Research Perspectives on School and System Level Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Valerie E., Ed.

    This collection of papers describes research on school and system level change in Chicago's high schools. Papers include "Introduction: Setting Chicago High School Reform within the National Context" (Valerie E. Lee); (1) "The Effort to Redesign Chicago High Schools: Effects on Schools and Achievement" (G. Alfred Hess, Jr. and Solomon Cytrynbaum);…

  4. Survey of the Mutagenicity of Surface Water, Sediments, and Drinking Water from the Penobscot Indian Nation.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Survey of the Mutagenicity of Surface Water, Sediments, andDrinking Water from the Penobscot Indian NationSarah H. Warren, Larry D. Claxton,1, Thomas J. Hughes,*, Adam Swank,Janet Diliberto, Valerie Marshall, Daniel H. Kusnierz, Robert Hillger, David M. DeMariniNational Health a...

  5. Tools for Schools. Volume 13, Number 1, August-September 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Frank, Valerie, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    This newsletter is published four times a year. It offers articles on school improvement, organizational planning, training, and managing change. This issue contains: (1) Leadership Teams Create Lasting Change (Valerie von Frank); (2) NSDC Tool: Force-Field Analysis; (3) NSDC Tool: Identify Your Internal and External Foci; (4) NSDC Tool: Assess…

  6. Tools for Schools. Volume 12, Number 4, May-June 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Frank, Valerie, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    This newsletter is published four times a year. It offers articles on school improvement, organizational planning, training, and managing change. This issue contains: (1) Link Up & Learn: Use Technology to Create a Personal Learning Network to Connect with Experts and Mentors Everywhere (Valerie von Frank); (2) NSDC Tool: Get Connected with…

  7. Parental Perspectives on Nurture Groups: The Potential for Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Valerie M.; Gulliford, Anthea

    2011-01-01

    Nurture groups have been identified as supportive and potentially effective provision for young people with troubled patterns of social, emotional and behavioural development, and a specific literature has emerged in relation to understanding their functioning. The work outlined here derives from an exploratory study by Valerie Taylor, a senior…

  8. 75 FR 80812 - Sunshine Act Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE... of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation met in closed session to consider matters related to the.... Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. Valerie J. Best, Assistant Executive Secretary. BILLING CODE P...

  9. 29/07/2006 5:27 PM DATA MOdel for Call Center Analysis

    E-print Network

    Mandelbaum, Avishai

    and Introduction to User Interface Dr Valery Trofimov Professor Paul D. Feigin Professor Avishai Mandelbaum Ms Eva-MOCCA DATA MOdel for Call Center Analysis The Data-MOCCA Project is an initiative of researchers from of the project is to collect, pre-process, organize and analyze data from Telephone Call/Contact Centers. The raw

  10. Harlem on Our Minds: Place, Race, and the Literacies of Urban Youth. Language & Literacy Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinloch, Valerie

    2009-01-01

    In her new book, Valerie Kinloch investigates how the lives and literacies of youth in New York City's historic Harlem are affected by public attempts to gentrify the community. Kinloch draws connections between race, place, and students' literate identity through collaborative interviews between youth, teachers, longtime black residents, and…

  11. 2:40pm Jad AbiMansour Impact of Bile Acids on Colonic Epithelium

    E-print Network

    Sherman, S. Murray

    Summer Research Forum 20th Annual 2:40pm Jad AbiMansour Impact of Bile Acids on Colonic Epithelium and Activity of ADAM17 in Lipid Rafts Exposed to Omega-3 or Omega-6 Fatty Acids Mentor: Marc Bissonnette, MD 3 · Candi Gard Student Programs Administrator · Kirsten Dickins Scholarship & Discovery Manager · Valerie

  12. MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change

    E-print Network

    Reynaldo Sandoval, Valerie J. Karplus, Sergey Paltsev and John M. Reilly* Abstract Hydrogen fueled the capital, labor, fuel and other costs of hydrogen production and hydrogen powered vehicles in the economic model. We examine scenarios where the hydrogen fuel price and vehicle cost are varied over a wide range

  13. Measurement of the five-parameter grain boundary distribution from planar sections

    E-print Network

    Rohrer, Gregory S.

    . Rohrer+ and Valerie Randle* + Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213-3890, USA. *Materials Research Centre, School of Engineering, Swansea University influence on grain boundary properties such as energy, mobility, corrosion resist- ance and segregation

  14. ERNESTORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONALLABORATORY

    E-print Network

    Korneev, Valeri A.

    . Department of Commerce 5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, VA 22161 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National-domainsolutionsfor nonlinear elastic 1-Dplane wave propagation Valeri A Korneev Earth Sciences Division Ernest OrlandoLawrenceERNESTORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONALLABORATORY TimeDomain Solutions for Nodhear Elastic 1=D

  15. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEYNATIONALLABORATORY

    E-print Network

    Korneev, Valeri A.

    LBNL-41914 ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEYNATIONALLABORATORY Nonlinear Interaction of Plane Port Royal Road, Springfield, VA 22161 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is an equalInteractionof Plane Elastic Waves Valeri A Korneev, Kurt T Nihei and Larry RMyer Earth Sciences Division Ernest

  16. Understanding the long-term effects of species invasions

    E-print Network

    Eviner, Valerie

    Understanding the long-term effects of species invasions David L. Strayer1 , Valerie T. Eviner1 Laboratory of Ecological and Evolutionary Dynamics, Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Helsinki, 00014 Helsinki, Finland 3 Evolutionary Ecology Unit, Department of Biological

  17. 76 FR 20651 - Application To Export Electric Energy; Cargill Power Markets, LLC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-13

    ... Application To Export Electric Energy; Cargill Power Markets, LLC AGENCY: Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, DOE. ACTION: Notice of application. SUMMARY: Cargill Power Markets, LLC (CPM) has.... EA-378. An additional copy is be filed directly with Valerie L. Ege, Compliance Manager,...

  18. Game-Based Assessments: A Promising Way to Create Idiographic Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, A. Adrienne; Engelhard, George, Jr.

    2014-01-01

    "Game-Based Assessments: A Promising Way to Create Idiographic Perspectives" (Adrienne Walker and George Englehard) comments on: "How Task Features Impact Evidence from Assessments Embedded in Simulations and Games" by Russell G. Almond, Yoon Jeon Kim, Gertrudes Velasquez, and Valerie J. Shute. Here, Walker and Englehard write…

  19. The Process of Designing Task Features

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Malcolm

    2014-01-01

    Malcolm Bauer, from Education Testing Services, provides his comments on the Focus article in this issue of "Measurement" entitled : "How Task Features Impact Evidence from Assessments Embedded in Simulations and Games" (Russell G. Almond, Yoon Jeon Kim, Gertrudes Velasquez, Valerie J. Shute). Bauer begins his remarks by noting…

  20. A Brief Note on Evidence-Centered Design as a Mechanism for Assessment Development and Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, Lloyd

    2014-01-01

    Lloyd Bond comments here on the Focus article in this issue of "Measurement: Interdisciplinary Research and Perspectives". The Focus article is entitled: "How Task Features Impact Evidence from Assessments Embedded in Simulations and Games" (Russell G. Almond, Yoon Jeon Kim, Gertrudes Velasquez, and Valerie J. Shute). Bond…

  1. Variable Azimuthal Anisotropy in Earth's Lowermost Mantle

    E-print Network

    Garnero, Ed

    in the Dµ layer. The Dµ layer is located at the base of Earth_s silicate lower mantle, where it meets the liquid iron outer core. The Dµ layer plays a critical role in Earth_s dynamical evolution because it actsVariable Azimuthal Anisotropy in Earth's Lowermost Mantle Edward J. Garnero,1 * Vale´rie Maupin,2

  2. A higher-level phylogenetic classification of the Fungi David S. HIBBETTa,

    E-print Network

    Lutzoni, François M.

    , Joseph F. BISCHOFFb , Meredith BLACKWELLc , Paul F. CANNONd , Ove E. ERIKSSONe , Sabine HUHNDORFf PARMASTOah , Vale´rie REEBg , Jack D. ROGERSai , Claude ROUXaj , Leif RYVARDENak , Jose´ Paulo SAMPAIOal , Arthur SCHU¨ ßLERam , Junta SUGIYAMAan , R. Greg THORNao , Leif TIBELLap , Wendy A. UNTEREINERaq

  3. Synapse-specific reconsolidation of distinct fear memories in the

    E-print Network

    Schafe, Glenn

    retrieval triggers a new phase of lability, during which the memory may be updated and stabilized againSynapse-specific reconsolidation of distinct fear memories in the lateral amygdala Vale´rie Doye`re1,2, Jacek Debiec2, Marie-H Monfils2, Glenn E Schafe3 & Joseph E LeDoux2 When reactivated, memories

  4. NEW ACQUISITIONS (NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2010)

    E-print Network

    , Mark The stillborn God GENERAL BL 783 .W37 2009 Warrior, Valerie M. Greek religion GENERAL BL 85 .H35 Dieu GENERAL CB 311 .M92 1979 Mysteries of the ancient world GENERAL CS 90 .F592 2006 Caron, Caroline 1977 Woodcock, George Peoples of the Coast GENERAL E 78 .R63 W48 1985 Whyte, Jon Indians in the Rockies

  5. InsideIllinoisDec. 2, 2010 Vol. 30, No. 11

    E-print Network

    Bashir, Rashid

    by Krannert staff photographer Valerie Oliveiro. Poppen used software to animate colors, layer lighting an animated aurora borealis display that will swirl above the Great Hall upper foyer, which is about 35-feetBrickman,ajuniorincivilengineeringandaboardmemberoftheKrannert CenterStudentAssociation,helpsdecoratetheKrannertCenterlobbyonNov.29. SEE KRANNeRT ceNTe

  6. Influencing Students' Relationships With Physics Through Culturally Relevant Tools

    E-print Network

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    and Valerie Otero School of Education, University of Colorado, Boulder, 80309, USA Abstract. This study investigates how an urban, high school physics class responded to the inclusion of a classroom set of i that the iPad provided a connection between physics, social status, and play. Videos, observations

  7. SUSS-EX CLUB Steering Group Meeting no. 8

    E-print Network

    Sussex, University of

    Conway, Mike English, Steve Pavey, Ken Wheeler. (Resignations: Valerie Cromwell, Christine Glasson's membership invitation to Nancy Holmes to be sent by Gill, p.p. GB 3 Gill reported orally on the Registrar and catering costs of business meetings to continue be met by DARO. 2. Administration/Clerical. Up to 1.5 days

  8. Crossing Boundaries: Teaching and Learning with Urban Youth. Teaching for Social Justice Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinloch, Valerie

    2012-01-01

    In her new book, Valerie Kinloch, award-winning author of "Harlem on Our Minds", sheds light on the ways urban youth engage in "meaning-making" experiences as a way to assert critical, creative, and highly sophisticated perspectives on teaching, learning, and survival. Kinloch rejects deficit models that have traditionally defined the literacy…

  9. Finance & Administrative Services Office of Accounting Services

    E-print Network

    Harms, Kyle E.

    Finance & Administrative Services Office of Accounting Services Accounts Payable & Travel 217 above should be sent directly to Valery Sonnier in Accounts Payable, 217 Thomas Boyd Hall. Please note... if applying for a W-7, this form must be completed and signed in the Accounts Payable office. Any questions

  10. Reid Rosnick/DC/USEPA/US 07/06/2010 09:15 AM

    E-print Network

    .xls" deleted by Reid Rosnick/DC/USEPA/US] Val ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Valerie Daigler U

  11. Expedition Five crew is ready to leave KSC for Houston

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Expedition Five crew are ready to leave KSC for Houston. From left are Science Officer Peggy Whitson, Commander Valery Korzun and Flight Engineer Sergei Treschev. The three returned to Earth on Endeavour Dec. 7, with the STS-113 crew, after six months on the International Space Station.

  12. Expedition Five crew members wave to onlookers as they leave KSC for Houston

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Expedition Five crew members wave to onlookers as they leave KSC for Houston. From left are Science Officer Peggy Whitson and Commander Valery Korzun. Not seen is Flight Engineer Sergei Treschev. The three returned to Earth Dec. 7 on Endeavour, with the STS-113 crew, after six months on the International Space Station.

  13. STS-91: Flight Crew Meets with Family and Friends at Launch Complex 39A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The crew (Commander Charles J. Precourt, Pilot Dominic L. Pudwill Gorie, Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, Janet L. Kavandi and Valery Victorovitch Ryumin) take time from their busy schedule to chat with friends and family, at a distance. They also pose for group and single pictures.

  14. MARGARET C. LEVENSTEIN Michigan Census Research Data Center

    E-print Network

    Cafarella, Michael J.

    on Bork's Antitrust Paradox and twenty-first century cartels" with Valerie Y. Suslow, Journal of Law and Society, 13(4) December. 2012 "Antitrust and Business History" Southern California Law Review 85(3), 451 Antitrust Economics, Roger D. Blair and D. Daniel Sokol, editors. Ross School of Business Paper No. 1182

  15. Contrast Agent-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Skeletal Muscle Damage in Animal Models

    E-print Network

    Campbell, Kevin P.

    in the degeneration of skeletal muscle fibers in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients is the breakdown of the sar of Muscular Dystrophy Volker Straub,1 Kathleen M. Donahue,2,3 Vale´rie Allamand,1 Robin L. Davisson,4 Young R for muscular dystrophy was studied by MRI. Intravenously injected MS-325 does not enter skeletal muscle

  16. Florida Atlantic University University Graduate Council

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    : William McDaniel (Chair), Business Presiding; Deborah Floyd, Education; Valerie Bryan, Education; Elwood a centralized Graduate College at FAU. #12;- 2 - Kian addressed the council about the constitutional foundation start by looking at individual college policies. Nyhan shared that approach had been pursued in the past

  17. Climate Co-benefits of Tighter SO2 Regulations in China

    E-print Network

    pollution has been recognized as a significant problem in China. In its Twelfth Five Year Plan (FYP), ChinaClimate Co-benefits of Tighter SO2 and NOx Regulations in China Kyung-Min Nam, Caleb J. Waugh, Sergey Paltsev, John M. Reilly, and Valerie J. Karplus Report No. 233 October 2012 China Energy & Climate

  18. www.waterboards.ca.gov/swamp CONTAMINANTS IN FISH FROM

    E-print Network

    Water Board Karen Taberski, Region 2 Water Board Jennifer Doherty, State Water Board Jay Davis, SFEI San Francisco estuary Institute Project Management Support: Lawrence Leung, Rainer Hoenicke, Frank: Kathleen Regalado, Gary Munoz Data entry and QA: Loc Nguyen SWAMP Staff Valerie Connor, Jennifer Doherty

  19. www.osa-opn.org22 | OPN Optics & Photonics News Researchers at the

    E-print Network

    California at San Diego, University of

    ;1047-6938/11/01/0022/6-$15.00 ©OSA January 2011 | 23 Valerie C. Coffey The use of solar energy requires optimizing each part a small area. A CPV system incorporates solar con- centrator components such as lenses, mirrors or other Diego, have designed a planar solar concentrator with millimeter- sized lenses that focus sunlight onto

  20. Multigrid Method for a Global Hall Conductor in the Earth's Ionosphere

    E-print Network

    Multigrid Method for a Global Hall Conductor in the Earth's Ionosphere Valeri V. Denissenko Since conductivity is an asymmetric tensor in the ionosphere the elliptical operators of the boundary value problems elements, multigrid method 1 Introduction Mathematical models of ionospherical electric field are boundary

  1. Changing Identities and Evolving Conceptions of Inquiry through Teacher-

    E-print Network

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    Development Ben Van Dusen, Mike Ross, and Valerie Otero, CU Boulder Abstract This STEM education study they established. Implications for professional development in STEM education are discussed. Our country is in dire are teaching outside of their content areas, with only 35% holding a major in physics or physics education

  2. ORIGINAL PAPER Species-specific climate sensitivity of tree growth

    E-print Network

    Esper, Jan

    . Friedrichs Æ Valerie Trouet Æ Ulf Bu¨ntgen Æ David C. Frank Æ Jan Esper Æ Burkhard Neuwirth Æ Jo¨rg Lo species have resulted in considerable differences in response to past climatic variability (e.g., Cook et. Bu¨ntgen Á D. C. Frank Á J. Esper Swiss Federal Research Institute WSL, Zuercherstrasse 111, 8903

  3. PII S0016-7037(02)00964-X Leaf cellulose D and 18

    E-print Network

    . Knowledge of factors affecting responses of individual plant species to environment may be required to infer co-occurring, semiarid plant species VALERY J. TERWILLIGER,1, * JULIO L. BETANCOURT,2 STEVEN W differed in morphology (Pinus edulis vs. Yucca glauca), photosynthetic pathway (C3 Y. glauca vs. CAM Yucca

  4. Consumption-Based Adjustment of China's Emissions-Intensity Targets: An

    E-print Network

    Economic Effects Marco Springmann, Da Zhang, and Valerie Karplus Report No. 241 March 2013 China Energy provinces for energy-intensive imports. This study develops a consistent methodology to adjust regionalConsumption-Based Adjustment of China's Emissions-Intensity Targets: An Analysis of its Potential

  5. The Energy and CO2 Emissions Impact of

    E-print Network

    The Energy and CO2 Emissions Impact of Renewable Energy Development in China Xiliang Zhang, Tianyu Qi, and Valerie J. Karplus Report No. 242 April 2013 China Energy & Climate Project TSINGHUA - MIT scale in China and relative to existing global installations. An important question is how far

  6. The Energy and Economic Impacts of Expanding International Emissions Trading

    E-print Network

    Winchester, Valerie Karplus and Xiliang Zhang Report No. 248 August 2013 China Energy & Climate Project. China exports emissions rights while other regions import permits. When China joins the EUThe Energy and Economic Impacts of Expanding International Emissions Trading Tianyu Qi, Niven

  7. Higher Prices from Entry: Pricing of Brand-Name Drugs

    E-print Network

    Perloff, Jeffrey M.

    Higher Prices from Entry: Pricing of Brand-Name Drugs Jeffrey M. Perloffa Valerie Y. Suslowb,* Paul or collusive game. We find support for our theory using data on brand-name entry in the anti-ulcer drug market; Pharmaceutical drugs #12;1. Introduction When a new firm starts marketing a product that is spatially

  8. Higher Prices from Entry: Pricing of Brand-Name Drugs

    E-print Network

    Perloff, Jeffrey M.

    Higher Prices from Entry: Pricing of Brand-Name Drugs Jeffrey M. Perloff* Valerie Y. Suslow** Paul anti-ulcer drugs rose as new products entered the market. #12;Higher Prices from Entry: Pricing of Brand-Name Drugs When a new firm starts marketing a product that is spatially differentiated from

  9. Plant colonizers shape early N-dynamics in gopher-mounds Rosa M. Canals1,2,5

    E-print Network

    Eviner, Valerie

    Plant colonizers shape early N-dynamics in gopher-mounds Rosa M. Canals1,2,5 , Valerie T. Eviner1, Cerastium glomeratum, Aphanes occidentalis and Lupinus bicolor) on the pools and fluxes of N in mounds differed among plant species. In mounds colonized by Cerastium, Aphanes and Lupinus, the microbial N pool

  10. We Are All Adult Educators Now: The Implications of Adult Learning Theory for the Continuing Professional Development of Educational Leaders and Managers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Valerie

    2004-01-01

    This article was written, but never published, by Dr. Valerie Hall, who died in 2002. Its existence was brought to my attention by Professor Ron Glatter at the memorial event for her held at the University of Bristol. It was presented at a seminar in Milton Keynes in 1998 as part of an ESRC series on "Redefining Educational Management"--a field in…

  11. U.S./EUROPEAN PARTNERSHIPS IN COASTAL ATLASES AND COASTAL/OCEAN INFORMATICS

    E-print Network

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    State University, Department of Geosciences Valerie Cummins, Coastal and Marine Resources Centre, UCC, Ireland Liz O'Dea, Coastal and Marine Resources Centre, UCC, Ireland Ned Dwyer, Coastal and Marine Resources Centre, UCC, Ireland Tanya Haddad, Ocean Coastal Management Program Oregon DLCD Paul Klarin, Ocean

  12. Hydrogen production from continuous flow, microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cells treating fermentation

    E-print Network

    treating fermentation wastewater Valerie J. Watson a , Marta Hatzell a,b , Bruce E. Logan a, a Department, USA h i g h l i g h t s Fermentation effluent fed MREC produced hydrogen without grid energy-electrodialysis electrolysis cell Hydrogen Fermentation Wastewater treatment Ammonium bicarbonate a b s t r a c t A microbial

  13. Surface-to-tunnel seismic tomography studies at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    E-print Network

    Korneev, Valeri A.

    Surface-to-tunnel seismic tomography studies at Yucca Mountain, Nevada Roland Gritto, Valeri A in the proposed nuclear waste repository area at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. A 5-km-long source line and a 3-km-long receiver line were located on top of Yucca Mountain ridge and inside the Exploratory Study Facility (ESF

  14. 75 FR 26938 - Notice of Vacancies on the U.S. Section of the U.S.-Iraq Business Dialogue

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-13

    ... International Trade Administration Notice of Vacancies on the U.S. Section of the U.S.-Iraq Business Dialogue.... Secretary of Commerce and the Iraq Minister of Trade established the U.S.-Iraq Business Dialogue (Business... Valerie Dees, Acting Director, Iraq Investment and Reconstruction Task Force, U.S. Department of...

  15. Spline-based nonparametric regression for periodic functions and its application to directional tuning of neurons

    E-print Network

    Ventura, Valérie

    tuning of neurons Cari G. Kaufman, Val´erie Ventura and Robert E. Kass October 6, 2004 Abstract The activity of neurons in the brain often varies systematically with some quantitative feature of a stimulus or action. A well-known example is the tendency of the firing rates of neurons in the primary motor cortex

  16. General soliton matrices in the RiemannHilbert problem for integrable nonlinear equations

    E-print Network

    Yang, Jianke

    . The reader familiar with the inverse scattering transform method knows that it is zeros of the Riemann multisoliton so- lutions, which describe the interaction scattering of individual solitons. As farGeneral soliton matrices in the Riemann­Hilbert problem for integrable nonlinear equations Valery S

  17. Surveys for California Red-Legged Frog and Arroyo Toad on the Los Padres

    E-print Network

    Surveys for California Red-Legged Frog and Arroyo Toad on the Los Padres National Forest1 Valerie K-listed California red-legged frog (Rana aurora draytonii) and arroyo toad (Bufo californicus). Sites known to have frogs or toads present were monitored for breeding and possible impacts of Forest Service activities

  18. Comments on episodic superposition of memory States.

    PubMed

    Lambert-Mogiliansky, Ariane

    2014-01-01

    This article develops a commentary to Charles Brainerd, Zheng Wang and Valerie F. Reyna's article entitled "Superposition of episodic memories: Overdistribution and quantum models" published in a special number of topiCS 2013 devoted to quantum modelling in cognitive sciences. PMID:24259305

  19. Human land use and patterns of parasitism in tropical amphibian hosts

    E-print Network

    McKenzie, Valerie

    Human land use and patterns of parasitism in tropical amphibian hosts Valerie J. Mc: Amphibian Parasite Land use Tropics Forest Pasture A B S T R A C T Landscape alterations by humans can amphibians was associated with land use change, I studied three species of amphibians, Rana vaillanti

  20. The Learning System. Volume 4, Number 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Frank, Valerie, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "The Learning System" is a newsletter designed for superintendents and central office staff with professional learning responsibilities. This issue includes: (1) District Pulls Together in Pursuit of Excellence: Creating Collaboration Systemwide Requires Commitment (Valerie von Frank); (2) Scheduling Time for Teacher Learning Is Key for Both…

  1. Tools for Schools. Volume 13, Number 2. October-November 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crow, Tracy, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    This newsletter is published four times a year. It offers articles on school improvement, organizational planning, training, and managing change. This issue contains: (1) Let Data Do the Talking: Clarify Goals and Roles by Examining Data (Valerie von Frank); (2) NSDC Tool: The Responsive School Scan Tool; and (3) NSDC Tool: Data Conversations Put…

  2. Teachers Teaching Teachers (T3)[TM]. Volume 4, Number 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Frank, Valerie, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "Teachers Teaching Teachers" ("T3") focuses on coaches' roles in the professional development of teachers. Each issue also explores the challenges and rewards that teacher leaders encounter. This issue includes: (1) Learning Cycle Spins Individuals into a Team (Valerie von Frank); (2) NSDC Tool: The Professional Teaching and Learning Cycle; (3)…

  3. Teachers Teaching Teachers (T3)[TM]. Volume 5, Number 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crow, Tracy, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "Teachers Teaching Teachers" ("T3") focuses on coaches' roles in the professional development of teachers. Each issue also explores the challenges and rewards that teacher leaders encounter. This issue includes: (1) Weekend Wisdom: Stimulus Funds Boost Professional Learning and Add Saturday Option (Valerie von Frank); (2) Lessons from a Coach:…

  4. The Learning Principal[R]. Volume 4, Number 6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Frank, Valerie, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "The Learning Principal" is an eight-page newsletter published eight times a year. It focuses on the important and unique work of school principals. This issue includes: (1) Talking "the" Walk Renews Schools: The Transformational Leader Links Values to Actions (Valerie von Frank); (2) School Leadership: Q&A Teacher Learning Turns School from F to…

  5. The Learning System. Volume 5, Number 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Frank, Valerie, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "The Learning System" is an eight-page newsletter published eight times a year. Designed for superintendents and central office staff with professional learning responsibilities. This issue includes: (1) Superintendent Stays on Course with Personal Learning Plan (Valerie von Frank); (2) District Leadership: Permit, Don't Proscribe, to Build…

  6. The Learning System. Volume 4, Number 8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Frank, Valerie, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "The Learning System" is a newsletter designed for superintendents and central office staff with professional learning responsibilities. This issue includes: (1) Principal-Coaches Transform Teachers and Schools (Valerie von Frank); (2) District Leadership: Delve into NSDC's [National Staff Development Council's] New Definition of Professional…

  7. Teachers Teaching Teachers (T3)[TM]. Volume 4, Number 6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Frank, Valerie, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "Teachers Teaching Teachers" ("T3") focuses on coaches' roles in the professional development of teachers. Each issue also explores the challenges and rewards that teacher leaders encounter. This issue includes: (1) Values and Clarity Build Classroom Language (Valerie von Frank); (2) Tools: Identifying and Clarifying Beliefs about Learning; (3)…

  8. Teachers Teaching Teachers (T3)[TM]. Volume 5, Number 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Frank, Valerie, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "Teachers Teaching Teachers" ("T3") focuses on coaches' roles in the professional development of teachers. Each issue also explores the challenges and rewards that teacher leaders encounter. This issue includes: (1) Districts Harness the Expertise of Classroom Teachers (Valerie von Frank); (2) Tool: Measuring Collaborative Norms; (3) Lessons from…

  9. Teachers Teaching Teachers (T3)[TM]. Volume 4, Number 8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Frank, Valerie, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "Teachers Teaching Teachers" ("T3") focuses on coaches' roles in the professional development of teachers. Each issue also explores the challenges and rewards that teacher leaders encounter. This issue includes: (1) Tackling Behavior from All Sides (Valerie von Frank); (2) Tools: Effective Behavior Support Self-Assessment Survey; (3) Lessons from…

  10. Teachers Teaching Teachers (T3)[TM]. Volume 4, Number 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Frank, Valerie, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Teachers Teaching Teachers" ("T3") focuses on coaches' role in the professional development of teachers, exploring challenges and rewards that teacher leaders encounter. This issue includes: (1) Making a Serious Study of Classroom Scenes: High School Faculty Develops Away to Observe and Learn from Each Other (Valerie von Frank); (2) Tools for…

  11. The Learning System. Volume 4, Number 6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Frank, Valerie, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    Ensuring quality teaching in every classroom across an entire system of schools--that's what a district leader's job is all about. A district leader's challenges are unique so "The Learning System" was created with that in mind. This issue contains: (1) Competing Values Form Obstacles to Change: Deep Conversations Uncover Invisible Goals (Valerie

  12. Teachers Teaching Teachers (T3)[TM]. Volume 5, Number 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crow, Tracy, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "Teachers Teaching Teachers" ("T3") focuses on coaches' roles in the professional development of teachers. Each issue also explores the challenges and rewards that teacher leaders encounter. This issue includes: (1) Sharpening Skills for Our Century (Valerie von Frank); (2) Lessons from a Coach: First, I Assess How Teachers Learn (Julie…

  13. The Learning Principal[R]. Volume 5, Number 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Frank, Valerie, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "The Learning Principal" is an eight-page newsletter published eight times a year. It focuses on the important and unique work of school principals. This issue includes: (1) Framework "for" Improvement: Effective School Leadership Translates into Increased Student Learning (Valerie von Frank); (2) Q & A: Instructional Leader Creates Culture of…

  14. Astrophysical Sciences & Technology Ph.D. Dissertation Defense

    E-print Network

    Richmond, Michael W.

    Astrophysical Sciences & Technology Ph.D. Dissertation Defense Valerie Rapson Infrared, May 19th , 10:00am Location: Gosnell Hall 8 - 1250 Abstract: Near- to far-infrared imaging an infrared imaging and spectral analysis of the young star-disk systems V4046 Sgr, T Cha and MP Mus. V4046

  15. UNIVERSIDAD AUTNOMA DE ZACATECAS "FRANCISCO GARCA SALINAS"

    E-print Network

    EN FÍSICA PRESENTA: MARÍA DE GUADALUPE CALDERA CABRAL ASESOR DR. VALERI V. DVOEGLAZOV 15 de Abril de familia, a mi papá José Germán Caldera Perales, a mi mamá María del Refugio Cabral Álvarez y a mis hermanas María Libertad Caldera Cabral y Gabriela Alejandra Caldera Cabral por siempre creer que podía

  16. Supported Employment Handbook: A Customer-Driven Approach for Persons with Significant Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooke, Valerie, Ed.; And Others

    This manual provides training information for implementing supported employment by using a customer-driven approach. Chapter 1, "Supported Employment: A Customer-Driven Approach" (Valerie Brooke and others), describes current best practices, a new customer-driven approach to supported employment, and the role of the employment specialist. Chapter…

  17. Innovative Higher Education, Vol. 30, No. 1, 2005 (C 2005) DOI: 10.1007/s10755-005-3297-z

    E-print Network

    Chapman, Michael S.

    , Valerie Giddings, Katherine Allen, Benjamin Dixon, Peggy Meszaros, and Karen Joest ABSTRACT: We report . . . maybe they are just too busy. Tenure-track faculty member at Banneker State University (Johnson & Harvey in IT majors. Benjamin Dixon, Ed.D. (University of Massachusetts), M.A.T. (Harvard University), B

  18. Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 20, 40434058, September 15, 2009

    E-print Network

    Forbes, Douglass

    envelope fusion and nuclear pore assembly in Xenopus egg extracts. We show that transportin--and importin Mitotic Assembly Events: From Spindle to Nuclear Pore Assembly Corine K. Lau,* Valerie A. Delmar,* Rene C: the mitotic spindle and the nucleus. Nuclear assembly itself requires the precise formation of both nuclear

  19. November 2014 WAYNE STATE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE

    E-print Network

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    UNIFIED STRATEGIC PLAN November 2014 #12;2 WAYNE STATE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE In 2012,Valerie M. Parisi, M.D., M.P.H., M.B.A., dean of the Wayne State University School of Medicine, asked. (The specific objectives by which the Wayne State University School of Medicine will enact

  20. New Endowments PMI Houston Endowed College Professorship in

    E-print Network

    Paulsen, Vern

    New Endowments PMI Houston Endowed College Professorship in Project Management Kitty King Powell Scholarship Endowment Susan Diane Jackson Scholarship Endowment to support the College of Education Jay and Dr. Kathryn Jenkins Football Scholarship Endowment Valerie King Freeman and Greg King UH Tier One Scholarship

  1. Electronic Portfolios. [SITE 2002 Section].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Helen C., Ed.

    This document contains the following papers on electronic portfolios from the SITE (Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education) 2002 conference: (1) "What Is the Perceived Value of Creating Electronic Portfolios to Teacher Credential Candidates?" (Valerie Amber and Brenda Czech); (2) "Development and Use of Electronic Portfolios in…

  2. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 28, NO. 11, PAGES 2253-2256, JUNE 1, 2001 A giant landslide on the southern flank of Tahiti Island,

    E-print Network

    Clouard, Valerie

    on the southern flank of Tahiti Island, French Polynesia Val´erie Clouard and Alain Bonneville,1 Jeune Equipe for an ancient and volu- minous subaerial landslide of the southern flank of Tahiti, Society Islands. During the southern shore of the island. Acoustic im- agery reveals a surface of 2950 km2 of debris avalanche

  3. TMS Agents: Enabling Dynamic Distributed Supply Chain Management

    E-print Network

    Wagner, Thomas

    TÆMS Agents: Enabling Dynamic Distributed Supply Chain Management Tom Wagner Valerie Guralnik John of a discrete distributed dynamic supply chain management problem and specify how TAEMS agents, equipped with new coordination mechanisms, are being used to automate and manage the supply chain. Key words: agent

  4. Strange Imports: Working-Class Appalachian Women in the Composition Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fedukovich, Casie

    2009-01-01

    Valerie Miner muses in "Writing and Teaching with Class:" "I've always carried that Miner suspicion that laboring with words is not real work . . . Should I be doing something useful?" (1993, 74). If working-class academics face uneasy negotiations between their disciplines and their home cultures, which may include deployment of regional dialects…

  5. Conversation Currents: Create Partnerships, Not Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, JoBeth; Kinloch, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    This "Conversation Currents" features JoBeth Allen and Valerie Kinloch discussing their thoughts and experiences working with families and communities. Allen bases her comments on the belief that programs have to be adaptable to many different constituencies and demographics, and so must be recreated every year with every teacher and…

  6. Crossing Boundaries: Collaborative Solutions to Urban Problems. Selected Proceedings of the National Conference on Urban Issues (1st, Buffalo, New York, November 11-13, 1994).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koritz, Douglas, Ed.; And Others

    Selected papers are presented from a national conference on urban issues. They are: (1) "Collaboration as a Social Process: Inter-Institutional Cooperation and Educational Change" (Charles F. Underwood and Hardy T. Frye); (2) "Mobilizing the Village To Educate the Child" (Valerie Maholmes); (3) "Pathways to Teaching: An Urban Teacher Licensure…

  7. Cell, Vol. 113, 755766, June 13, 2003, Copyright 2003 by Cell Press Drosophila Clock Can Generate

    E-print Network

    Allada, Ravi

    Valerie L. Kilman,2 Kevin P. Keegan,2 Ying Peng,1 Patrick Emery,1,3 Michael Rosbash,1 and Ravi Allada2 (DNs)Circadian rhythms of behavior, physiology, and gene and lateral neuron (LNs). Indeed, the most prominentexpression are present in diverse tissues and organ- circadian rhythm in fruit flies, the daily rhythm

  8. Mechanism of Fibrin(ogen) Forced Unfolding Artem Zhmurov,1,2 Andre E.X. Brown,3,5 Rustem I. Litvinov,3 Ruxandra I. Dima,4,* John W. Weisel,3

    E-print Network

    Barsegov, Valeri

    Structure Article Mechanism of Fibrin(ogen) Forced Unfolding Artem Zhmurov,1,2 Andre E.X. Brown,3,5 Rustem I. Litvinov,3 Ruxandra I. Dima,4,* John W. Weisel,3 and Valeri Barsegov1,2,* 1Department distinct globular domains (Yee et al., 1997; Spraggon et al., 1997; Brown et al., 2000; Madrazo et al

  9. DEPARTMENTALCITATIONS 20082009DEPARTMENTALCITATIONWINNERS 2008

    E-print Network

    Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    &NATURAL Matthew Hughes LITERATURE RESOURCES SOCIETY&ENVIRONMENT Valerie Suzanne Jaffee FRENCH William Gavino Vega SOCIOLOGY D. Daphne Owen GENDER&WOMEN'SSTUDIES Tulay Furrow SOUTH&SOUTHEASTASIAN Rebecca Whittington Ruch GERMAN Susan Rebecca Hunsicker STATISTICS Daniel Abizeid HISTORY Rhae Lynn Barnes THEATER

  10. CONNECTING INVENTORY INFORMATION SOURCES FOR LANDSCAPE LEVEL ANALYSES

    E-print Network

    British Columbia, University of

    in the extreme west of the country, deciduous forests in the south-centre, and tundra in the North. As a result and HAILEMARIAM TEMESGEN2 1 Department of Forest Resources Management, University of British Columbia, 2045-2424 Main Mall, Vancouver, BC, Canada Valerie.LeMay@ubc.ca, 2 Department of Forest Resources, 237 Peavy Hall

  11. Specialist Herbivores Reduce Their Susceptibility to Predation by Feeding on the Chemically Defended Seaweed Avrainvillea longicaulis

    E-print Network

    Duffy, J. Emmett

    Defended Seaweed Avrainvillea longicaulis Author(s): Mark E. Hay, J. Emmett Duffy, Valerie J. Paul, Paul E the chemicallydefended seaweedAvrainvillealongicaulis Mark E. Hay and J. Emmett Duffy Institute of Marine Sciences Jolla 92093-0228 Abstract The tropical green seaweed Avrainvillea longicaulis is a low preference food

  12. This article has been accepted for publication and undergone full peer review but has not been through the copyediting, typesetting, pagination and proofreading process, which may

    E-print Network

    Chuong, Cheng-Ming

    University, New Haven, CT 06511, USA1 Centre for Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine, King's College London-filled cells with the skin is found in many invertebrate and vertebrate species. Historically, this layer-Ming Chuong4, Fiona Watt2 and Valerie Horsley1 Department of Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology, Yale

  13. Cigarette smoking and cognitive function in human immunodeficiency virus seropositive women Short running title: Smoking and cognition in women with HIV

    E-print Network

    Lasalde Dominicc, Jose A. - Department of Biology, Universidad de Puerto Rico

    Cigarette smoking and cognitive function in human immunodeficiency virus seropositive women Short running title: Smoking and cognition in women with HIV Valerie Wojna1,2 , Lizbeth Robles1 , Richard L the official views of NCRR or NIH. #12;Abstract Cigarette smoking alters the immune system and may improve

  14. Excited-State Dynamics of Diindenoperylene in Liquid Solution and in Solid Films

    E-print Network

    Schreiber, Frank

    Excited-State Dynamics of Diindenoperylene in Liquid Solution and in Solid Films Valerie M. Nichols%) survives in longer-lived trap or defect states. The rapid internal conversion leads to transient heating that results in a derivative line shape in the transient absorption signal at longer delays. DIP does

  15. Minutes for Graduate English Society (GES) Officer Meeting from Friday, October 10, 2008, held at the 4th

    E-print Network

    Rock, Chris

    Association of Commonwealth Litearture and Language Studies and Texas Tech University Comparative Literature Program, schedule for April 9 ­ 11, 2009 at Texas Tech. Valerie Carroll organized the annual softball game, NOV 20 James Golsan (MA, fiction) Adam Houle (PhD, poetry) GES Constitution: The GES Constitution

  16. LuxU connects quorum sensing to biofilm formation in Vibrio fischeri

    E-print Network

    McFall-Ngai, Margaret

    LuxU connects quorum sensing to biofilm formation in Vibrio fischeri Valerie A. Ray and Karen L, USA. Summary Biofilm formation by Vibrio fischeri is a complex process involving multiple regulators integration via two-component regula- tors is the Lux pathway in the marine bioluminescent bacterium Vibrio

  17. The Future Energy and GHG Emissions Impact of Alternative Personal

    E-print Network

    The Future Energy and GHG Emissions Impact of Alternative Personal Transportation Pathways in China://globalchange.mit.edu/ Printed on recycled paper #12;The Future Energy and GHG Emissions Impact of Alternative Personal Paul N. Kishimoto, Sergey Paltsev and Valerie J. Karplus Report No. 231 September 2012 China Energy

  18. world cultures Journal of Comparative and Cross-Cultural Research Vol 15 No 2 Spring 2006

    E-print Network

    White, Douglas R.

    : Darya Khalturina A Reconsideration Andrey Korotayev Altruism in Marx and in Sociobiology George Huaco. Munroe Carol R. Ember Dennis O'Neil Pertti J. Pelto Karl Reitz J. Jerome Smith Donald Tuzin Valerie.............................................209 Darya Khalturina and Andre Korotayev Altruism in Marx and Sociobiology

  19. N C N e w M u s i c I n i t i a t i v e , e s t . 2 0 0 1 edward jacobs, founding director

    E-print Network

    Gopalakrishnan, K.

    of Music Faculty) SOLO ARTISTS (featured solo recital) Christine Gustafson, flute Christopher Grymes William Louden, piano Lazara Nelson, violin Michael Wagner, bass Imani Winds Valerie Coleman, flute (2010, cello (2002) Margaret Kampmeier, piano Tara O'Connor, flute Prism Saxophone Quartet Matt Levy, tenor

  20. Key Themes in Intercultural Communication Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodin, Jane

    2010-01-01

    The seminar, organised by Jane Woodin, Gibson Ferguson, Valerie Hobbs and Lesley Walker (School of Modern Languages & Linguistics and School of English, University of Sheffield), aimed to bring together those working in intercultural communication (IC) pedagogy largely--though not exclusively--in the higher education sector. It drew inspiration…

  1. Charles Baily Department of Physics!

    E-print Network

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    Dubson Noah Finkelstein Valerie Otero Kathy Perkins Steven Pollock Carl Wieman (on leave) Postdocs Colorado UppeR-division ElectrodyNamics Test CURrENT Assessment A: 38% B: 43% C: 45% D: 36% E: 14% (all correct) #12;3/3/13 3 x J 3.a) Electric field zero or nonzero

  2. 10/26/12 Charles Baily

    E-print Network

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    2 + y2 + z + d( )2 ( ) 1/2 Boundary Condi:ons: E r( ) = - r( ) x, y( ) = -0 z z=0 #12;10/26/12 3 What is the electric force on +Q ? A) 0 B) C) D) Something more complicated -kQ2 Noah Finkelstein Valerie Otero Kathy Perkins Steven Pollock Carl Wieman (on leave) Postdocs/ Scientists

  3. de novo Synthesis of a Bacterial Toxin/ Antitoxin System

    E-print Network

    Wood, Thomas K.

    de novo Synthesis of a Bacterial Toxin/ Antitoxin System Valerie W. C. Soo1 , Hsin-Yao Cheng1 in mobile genetic elements (e.g., plasmids) and in chromosomes. The role of plasmid- derived TA systems in stabilizing plasmid copies has been clear since their first discovery11 ; however, the role of chromosomal

  4. Laneway Revitalization Through The Lens

    E-print Network

    , my love, hero, and best friend; and to Raine, Valerie, and Walter, whose love is my foundation. #12 provided support, advice and laughs as required. Most of all, I would like to thank Hector for his steady support, encouragement, wisdom and love and Raine, for always being there for me. #12;viii Table

  5. Educational Restructuring and the Community Education Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decker, Larry E., Ed.; Romney, Valerie A., Ed.

    This document explores the application of the community education process to restructuring activities at both the state and local level. The monograph contains the following papers: "In the Forefront of Restructuring" (Larry Decker, Valerie Romney); "Building Learning Communities: Realities of Educational Restructuring" (Larry Decker); "The…

  6. VOLUME 77, NUMBER 8 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 19 AUGUST 1996 Two-Channel Kondo Lattice: An Incoherent Metal

    E-print Network

    Jarrell, Mark

    Lattice: An Incoherent Metal Mark Jarrell,1 Hanbin Pang,1 D. L. Cox,2,3 and K. H. Luk4 1 Department is finite. We label our model system in this phase an "incoherent metal." We discuss the relevance of our numbers: 75.30.Mb, 71.27.+a, 75.10.Dg The Fermi liquid theory of Landau has provided a re- markably robust

  7. A Case Study of Five Urban Middle School Teachers Involved In A Culturally Responsive Teaching Teacher Study Group 

    E-print Network

    Kerr, Alicia Ann

    2011-08-08

    system (Gay & Howard, 2000). This array of cultural and linguistic diversity can be overwhelming to teachers, particularly those who have not had meaningful interactions with people different from themselves and for those who have not had... diverse learners (Milner, 2005; Ukpokodu, 2004). Unfamiliar groups, cultures, traditions and languages can produce anxiety and prejudicial behaviors to those who do not understand them or to those that perceive them as a threat (Gay, 2003). Pang...

  8. Case Study of Continuous Commissioning in an Office Building 

    E-print Network

    Pang, X.; Zheng, B.; Liu, M.

    2006-01-01

    , Shenzhen, China Building Commissioning for Energy Efficiency and Comfort, Vol.VI-9-3 Case Study of Continuous Commissioning® in an Office Building Xiufeng Pang Bin Zheng Mingsheng Liu Graduate Student Graduate Student Professor... operations in a number of newly retrofitted buildings and found that optimizing the system can double energy savings and improve building comfort [Liu et al.]. In 1996, the CC® process was first developed. While most commissioning processes focus...

  9. Whispering gallery modes in quantum dot-embedded dielectric microspheres for tagless remote refractometric sensing 

    E-print Network

    Pang, Shuo

    2008-10-10

    stream_source_info Shuo.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 66833 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name Shuo.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 WHISPERING GALLERY MODES IN QUANTUM DOT... August 2008 Major Subject: Biomedical Engineering WHISPERING GALLERY MODES IN QUANTUM DOT-EMBEDDED DIELECTRIC MICROSPHERES FOR TAGLESS REMOTE REFRACTOMETRIC SENSING A Thesis by SHUO PANG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies...

  10. Intracavity wavelength modulation of an optical parametric oscillator for coherent Raman

    E-print Network

    Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney

    ," IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 15(12), 1418­1432 (1979). 3. M. D. Levenson, W. E. Moerner, and D. E. Horne. Freudiger, W. Min, B. G. Saar, S. Lu, G. R. Holtom, C. He, J. C. Tsai, J. X. Kang, and X. S. Xie, "Label 6442, 64421J (2007). 9. D. J. Jones, E. O. Potma, J.-X. Cheng, B. Burfeindt, Y. Pang, J. Ye, and X. S

  11. Supersymmetric Curvature Squared Invariants in Five and Six Dimensions 

    E-print Network

    Ozkan, Mehmet

    2013-07-24

    by Mehmet Ozkan and Yi Pang, 2013. JHEP 1303, 158 (2013), Copyright 2013, with permission from SISSA. 1 Aside from Einstein supergravites, e ective superstring actions also originate higher curvature terms in all orders in 0, the small slope parameter... xing conditions for the dilaton Weyl multiplet. The rst choice give rise to canonical Einstein-Hilbet term, whereas the second choice leads us to a Poincar e theory that is of Brans- Dicke type. We introduce a detailed analysis of both cases...

  12. 404 Cell 141, April 30, 2010 2010 Elsevier Inc. CED-3 caspase dimer resides inside the

    E-print Network

    Ungermann, Christian

    22, 269­275. Qi, S., Pang, Y., Hu, Q., Liu, Q., Li, H., Zhou, Y., He, T., Liang, Q., Liu, Y., Yuan, X., et al. (2010). Cell, this issue. Riedl, S.J., Li, W., Chao, Y., Schwarzenbacher, R., and Shi, Y., Li, H., Hao, Q., et al. (2005). Nature 437, 831­837. Yin, Q., Park, H.H., Chung, J.Y., Lin, S.C., Lo

  13. Comparison of edit history clustering techniques for spatial hypertext 

    E-print Network

    Mandal, Bikash

    2006-04-12

    OF SCIENCE December 2005 Major Subject: Computer Science COMPARISON OF EDIT HISTORY CLUSTERING TECHNIQUES FOR SPATIAL HYPERTEXT A Thesis by BIKASH MANDAL Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A...&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved by: Chair of Committee, Frank Shipman Committee Members, Richard Furuta Michael G Messina Head of Department, Valerie E. Taylor...

  14. On strong fault tolerance (or strong Menger-connectivity) of multicomputer networks 

    E-print Network

    Oh, Eunseuk

    2004-11-15

    of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved as to style and content by: Jianer Chen (Chair of Committee) Donald K. Friesen (Member) Jennifer L. Welch (Member) Gwan Choi (Member) Valerie E. Taylor (Head of Department) August 2004 Major Subject: Computer Science iii... ABSTRACT On Strong Fault Tolerance (or Strong Menger-Connectivity) of Multicomputer Networks. (August 2004) Eunseuk Oh, B.S., Hallym University, Korea; M.S., Ewha Womans University, Korea Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Jianer Chen As the size of networks...

  15. Alexandra Ernst Abteilungsleiterin

    E-print Network

    Heermann, Dieter W.

    , Tel. 54-2456 L.Hennig@stud.uni-heidelberg.de Frau Carolin Ott 13.12.2011 Büro Studierendenrat 16.04.2014 Albert-Ueberle-Str. 3-5, 69120 Heidelberg, Tel. 54-2456 Carolin.Ott@stud.uni-heidelberg.de 1-Ueberle-Str. 3-5, 69120 Heidelberg, Tel. 54-2456 Cosima-Valerie.Steck@stud.uni-heidelberg.de #12;

  16. New Hire Orientation Agenda* Day 1 Otowi -Casa Grande Drive

    E-print Network

    New Hire Orientation Agenda* Day 1 Otowi - Casa Grande Drive TA-03-261, Room F200W Main Gate Conference Room, Contact # 667-1555 Time Event Presented By 10:15 ­ 10:30 New Hire Orientation Check-In 10:30 ­ 10:40 Welcome Laboratory Management 10:40 ­ 11:00 Complete New Hire Forms Pam Padilla/Valerie Maestas

  17. Investigators Retreat: A Forum to Bridge Frederick and Bethesda Cancer Research | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Andrea Frydl, Contributing Writer Nearly 700 researchers, scientists, and laboratory technicians convened in the Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center in Washington, DC, for the 2014 NCI Intramural Scientific Investigators Retreat on Jan. 14. The event featured presentations and posters exploring topics in cancer research from KRAS signaling to animal care. One of the highlights of the event was a presentation made by Valerie Beral, Ph.D., from University of Oxford, discussing “Rosalind Franklin and Cancer in Women.” 

  18. Capacity Proportional Unstructured Peer-to-Peer Networks 

    E-print Network

    Reddy, Chandan Rama

    2010-10-12

    of Committee, Dmitri Loguinov Committee Members, Riccardo Bettati A. L. Narasimha Reddy Head of Department, Valerie Taylor August 2009 Major Subject: Computer Engieering iii ABSTRACT Capacity Proportional Unstructured Peer-to-Peer Networks. (August 2009...) Chandan Rama Reddy, B.E., National Institute of Technology Karnataka Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Dmitri Loguinov Existing methods to utilize capacity-heterogeneity in a P2P system either rely on constructing special overlays with capacity...

  19. Stable and scalable congestion control for high-speed heterogeneous networks 

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Yueping

    2008-10-10

    : Chair of Committee, Dmitri Loguinov Committee Members, Riccardo Bettati Jianer Chen A. L. Narasimha Reddy Head of Department, Valerie E. Taylor May 2008 Major Subject: Computer Engineering iii ABSTRACT Stable and Scalable Congestion Control for High...-Speed Heterogeneous Networks. (May 2008) Yueping Zhang, B.S., Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Dmitri Loguinov For any congestion control mechanisms, the most fundamental design objectives are stability...

  20. Performance analysis and network path characterization for scalable internet streaming 

    E-print Network

    Kang, Seong-Ryong

    2008-10-10

    of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Chair of Committee, Dmitri Loguinov Committee Members, Riccardo Bettati Yoonsuck Choe Narasimha Reddy Head of Department, Valerie E. Taylor May 2008 Major Subject: Computer Science iii ABSTRACT Performance Analysis... and Network Path Characterization for Scalable Internet Streaming. (May 2008) Seong-Ryong Kang, B.S., Kyungpook National University; M.S., Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dmitri Loguinov Delivering high-quality of video to end users over...

  1. Eta Kappa Nu 

    E-print Network

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    Major Subject: Computer Science TECHNIQUES FOR MODELING AND ANALYZING RNA AND PROTEIN FOLDING ENERGY LANDSCAPES A Dissertation by XINYU TANG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Chair of Committee, Nancy M. Amato Committee Members, David Giedroc Sing-hoi Sze Jennifer Welch Head of Department, Valerie E. Taylor December 2007 Major Subject: Computer Science iii ABSTRACT Techniques...

  2. The Best Man in the Play: Female Agency in a Gender-Inclusive Comedia

    E-print Network

    Bayliss, Robert

    2008-01-01

    , but thankfully we now have nuestras queridas dramaturgas to set us straight. NOTES I. Among those most directly responsible for our canonization of the dramaturgas is Teresa Soufas, whose anthology Women's Acts remains a primary source for women-authored comedias...; her Dramas of Distinction contributed to an emerging field of dramaturga scholarship that also included Barbara Mujica, Sharon Voros, Catherine Larson, Anita Stoll, Valerie Hegstrom, and Amy Williamsen. For examples of the continued critical focus...

  3. Implausible Plausible Future event

    E-print Network

    Addis, Donna Rose

    0 1 2 3 4 Implausible Plausible RT(sec) Future event RT benefit 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 Implausible Plausible detail Future event Detail Addition Examining the effects of plausibility on the construction of future events Valerie van Mulukom1,2, Reece P. Roberts1,2, Donna Rose Addis1,2 1Department of Psychology

  4. Improvements in communication complexity using quantum entanglement 

    E-print Network

    Kamat, Angad Mohandas

    2008-10-10

    : Chair of Committee, Andreas Klappenecker Committee Members, Jennifer L. Welch Alexander Sprintson Head of Department, Valerie E. Taylor August 2008 Major Subject: Computer Science iii ABSTRACT Improvements in Communication Complexity Using Quantum... Entanglement. (August 2008) Angad Mohandas Kamat, B. Tech., National Institute of Technology, Warangal, India Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Andreas Klappenecker Quantum computing resources have been known to provide speed-ups in com- putational complexity...

  5. Two algorithms for leader election and network size estimation in mobile ad hoc networks 

    E-print Network

    Neumann, Nicholas Gerard

    2005-02-17

    of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content by: Jennifer Welch (Chair of Committee) David Larson (Member) Andreas Klappenecker (Member) Valerie Taylor (Head of Department) December 2004 Major Subject: Computer Science iii... of this work. I would also like to thank Andreas Klappenecker for his suggestions and comments on early versions of the network size estimation portion of this work. This work was supported in part by an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship, NSF Grant 0098305...

  6. Preconditioned solenoidal basis method for incompressible fluid flows 

    E-print Network

    Wang, Xue

    2006-04-12

    and content by: Vivek Sarin (Chair of Committee) Andreas Klappenecker (Member) Hamn-Ching Chen (Member) Valerie E. Taylor (Head of Department) December 2004 Major Subject: Computer Science iii ABSTRACT Preconditioned Solenoidal Basis Method for Incompressible... of this research and thesis. This thesis would not have been completed without his help. I would also like to thank my committee members Dr. Hamn-Ching Chen and Dr. Andreas Klappenecker for their help, support and valuable suggestions. A special thank...

  7. Code constructions and code families for nonbinary quantum stabilizer code 

    E-print Network

    Ketkar, Avanti Ulhas

    2005-11-01

    OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content by: Andreas Klappenecker (Chair of Committee) Rabi Mahapatra (Member) Sue Geller (Member) Valerie Taylor (Head of Department) August 2004 Major Subject: Computer Science iii ABSTRACT Code Constructions and Code... Families for Nonbinary Quantum Stabilizer Codes. (August 2004) Avanti Ulhas Ketkar, B.E., Pune University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Andreas Klappenecker Stabilizer codes form a special class of quantum error correcting codes. Nonbi- nary quantum...

  8. Upper bounds on minimum distance of nonbinary quantum stabilizer codes 

    E-print Network

    Kumar, Santosh

    2005-11-01

    Approved as to style and content by: Andreas Klappenecker (Chair of Committee) Rabi Mahapatra (Member) Sue Geller (Member) Valerie Taylor (Head of Department) August 2004 Major Subject: Computer Science iii ABSTRACT Upper Bounds on Minimum Distance... of Nonbinary Quantum Stabilizer Codes. (August 2004) Santosh Kumar, B.E., Mumbai University, India Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Andreas Klappenecker The most popular class of quantum error correcting codes is stabilizer codes. Binary quantum stabilizer...

  9. Threshold analysis with fault-tolerant operations for nonbinary quantum error correcting codes 

    E-print Network

    Kanungo, Aparna

    2005-11-01

    fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved by: Chair of Committee, Andreas Klappenecker Committee Members, Rabi Mahapatra Suhail Zubairy Head of Department, Valerie Taylor August 2005 Major Subject: Computer Science iii... ABSTRACT Threshold Analysis with Fault-Tolerant Operations for Nonbinary Quantum Error Correcting Codes. (August 2005) Aparna Kanungo, B.E., Anna University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Andreas Klappenecker Quantum error correcting codes have been...

  10. San Augustine Court House 

    E-print Network

    Raiford Stripling Associates, Inc.; Stripling, Raiford L.

    1973-01-01

    of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved by: Chair of Committee, Bjarne Stroustrup Committee Members, Scott Pike Tom Wehrly Head of Department, Valerie Taylor May 2007 Major Subject: Computer Science... and offering many suggestions. I would also like to thank Dr. Wehrly for his efforts and being a part of my committee. Peter Pirkelbauer, Damian Dechev, Yuri Solodkyy, and Luke Wagner who are students in Dr. Stroustrup’s Programming Tools, Techniques...

  11. Models of Impulsivity with a Focus on Waiting Impulsivity: Translational Potential for Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    E-print Network

    Voon, Valerie

    2014-10-03

    IMPULSIVITY (FG MOELLER AND D RAMESH, SECTION EDITORS) Models of Impulsivity with a Focus on Waiting Impulsivity: Translational Potential for Neuropsychiatric Disorders Valerie Voon Published online: 3 October 2014 # The Author(s) 2014. This article... effects. High levels of premorbid premature responding in rodents predicts greater addiction-like behavior to cocaine defined operationally as: increased motiva- tion to take cocaine; inability to inhibit drug seeking; and con- tinued drug use despite...

  12. The role of phonological alternation in speech production: evidence from Mandarin tone sandhi

    E-print Network

    Politzer-Ahles, Stephen; Zhang, Jie

    2012-01-01

    "receive" (Zhang, 2010).1 Chen and colleagues (2002; see also O'Seaghdha et al., 2010; Zhang, 2008) have shown that tone is relevant for implicit priming. They obtained a facilitation effect for sets in which the segmentals and tones of all the target..., the set fei1ji1 ??, fei2pang4 ??, fei3cui4 ??, fei4yan2 ??), the facilitation effect was still present but was substantially reduced. In other words, tone is part of the linguistic representation that must be phonologically encoded; tonal heterogeneity...

  13. Second highly modified hypogean species of the genus Morimotoidius Habu from western Jiangxi Province, China, with a new locality for M. zhushandong (Coleoptera: Carabidae: Platynini).

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinhui; Pang, Jianmei; Tian, Mingyi

    2015-01-01

    Morimotoidius cavicola sp. n. is described and illustrated from a limestone cave called Guanfeng Dong in Yichun City of western Jiangxi Province, China. It is the second hypogean and highly morphologically modified species of the genus Morimotoidius recorded in China. M. cavicola sp. n. is easily recognized by its shorter pronotum which is less expanded medially than that in M. zhushandong Pang & Tian, 2014. M. zhushandong is also recorded from the cave Zhuangxi Dong. A distribution map, together with a modified key to Chinese species of the genus are also provided. PMID:26624460

  14. Affinity binding of antibodies to supermacroporous cryogel adsorbents with immobilized protein A for removal of anthrax toxin protective antigen.

    PubMed

    Ingavle, Ganesh C; Baillie, Les W J; Zheng, Yishan; Lis, Elzbieta K; Savina, Irina N; Howell, Carol A; Mikhalovsky, Sergey V; Sandeman, Susan R

    2015-05-01

    Polymeric cryogels are efficient carriers for the immobilization of biomolecules because of their unique macroporous structure, permeability, mechanical stability and different surface chemical functionalities. The aim of the study was to demonstrate the potential use of macroporous monolithic cryogels for biotoxin removal using anthrax toxin protective antigen (PA), the central cell-binding component of the anthrax exotoxins, and covalent immobilization of monoclonal antibodies. The affinity ligand (protein A) was chemically coupled to the reactive hydroxyl and epoxy-derivatized monolithic cryogels and the binding efficiencies of protein A, monoclonal antibodies to the cryogel column were determined. Our results show differences in the binding capacity of protein A as well as monoclonal antibodies to the cryogel adsorbents caused by ligand concentrations, physical properties and morphology of surface matrices. The cytotoxicity potential of the cryogels was determined by an in vitro viability assay using V79 lung fibroblast as a model cell and the results reveal that the cryogels are non-cytotoxic. Finally, the adsorptive capacities of PA from phosphate buffered saline (PBS) were evaluated towards a non-glycosylated, plant-derived human monoclonal antibody (PANG) and a glycosylated human monoclonal antibody (Valortim(®)), both of which were covalently attached via protein A immobilization. Optimal binding capacities of 108 and 117 mg/g of antibody to the adsorbent were observed for PANG attached poly(acrylamide-allyl glycidyl ether) [poly(AAm-AGE)] and Valortim(®) attached poly(AAm-AGE) cryogels, respectively, This indicated that glycosylation status of Valortim(®) antibody could significantly increase (8%) its binding capacity relative to the PANG antibody on poly(AAm-AGE)-protien-A column (p < 0.05). The amounts of PA which remained in the solution after passing PA spiked PBS through PANG or Valortim bound poly(AAm-AGE) cryogel were significantly (p < 0.05) decreased relative to the amount of PA remained in the solution after passing through unmodified as well as protein A modified poly(AAm-AGE) cryogel columns, indicates efficient PA removal from spiked PBS over 60 min of circulation. The high adsorption capacity towards anthrax toxin PA of the cryogel adsorbents indicated potential application of these materials for treatment of Bacillus anthracis infection. PMID:25736504

  15. Commissioning, Operation, Real Time Monitoring and Evaluation of Pilot: Achieving Optimal Performance through Building Commissioning 

    E-print Network

    Pang,X.; Piette, M.A.; Hao,B.

    2014-01-01

    of Design Build Services for TXU Energy • Stacey Lin, P.E., the Mechanical Principal in Interface Engineering • Joseph Deringer, AIA, LEED AP, the Executive Director of the Institute for the Sustainable performance of Buildings • Xiufeng Pang, Ph.D, P.E. 5... Engineering, PG&E, WattWise, CABR, Xingye Presented By Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory November 11, 2014 ESL-IC-14-09-30 Proceedings of the 14th International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Beijing, China, September 14-17, 2014 • Promote...

  16. Metal-chelating plastic MALDI (pMALDI) chips for the enhancement of phosphorylated-peptide/protein signals.

    PubMed

    Ibañez, Alfredo J; Muck, Alexander; Svatos, Ales

    2007-09-01

    A disposable polymeric pMALDI array with a universal metal cation-chelatable surface for pretreatment/signal enhancement of phosphoproteins and/or phosphopeptides in complex samples was developed. Acrylic acid N-hydroxysuccinimide ester and methyl methacrylate monomers were copolymerized in thin layer molds in a 1:13.3 molar ratio and subsequently treated with Nalpha,Nalpha-bis(carboxymethyl)-l-lysine to obtain a structured planar MALDI array. The prepared NTA pMALDI chip array was activated with metal cations (e.g., Ga(III), Ni(II)), and the selectivities for phosphopeptides (e.g., trypsin-digested alpha-casein (alpha-Cas), and phospho-angiotensin II (p-Ang)) were evaluated using MALDI-TOF/MS. The highest selectivity for proteins was observed for the Ni(II)-NTA chip. The p-Ang was enriched in the presence of BSA tryptic peptides ca. 5 times and represented the major peak after sample adsorption/washing on Ga(III)-NTA chip. The performance of the Ga(III)-chip, tested on alpha-Cas tryptic digest, is fully comparable to commercial systems. Additionally, higher MW peptides and limited methionine oxidation were observed with the chip. A combination of selective absorption of phosphoproteins on Ni(II)-chips and the further enrichment of digested phosphopeptides on the Ga(III)-chip can prove to be very useful for fast identification of unknown proteins using MALDI-TOF/MS. PMID:17655346

  17. STS-96 Crew Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The training for the crew members of the STS-96 Discovery Shuttle is presented. Crew members are Kent Rominger, Commander; Rick Husband, Pilot; Mission Specialists, Tamara Jernigan, Ellen Ochoa, and Daniel Barry; Julie Payette, Mission Specialist (CSA); and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev, Mission Specialist (RSA). Scenes show the crew sitting and talking about the Electrical Power System; actively taking part in virtual training in the EVA Training VR (Virtual Reality) Lab; using the Orbit Space Vision Training System; being dropped in water as a part of the Bail-Out Training Program; and taking part in the crew photo session.

  18. Congestion control schemes for single and parallel TCP flows in high bandwidth-delay product networks 

    E-print Network

    Cho, Soohyun

    2006-08-16

    &M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Chair of Committee, Riccardo Bettati Committee Members, Wei Zhao A. L. Narasimha Reddy Dmitri Loguinov Head of Department, Valerie E. Taylor May 2006... been successful. I am greatly indebted to him for all of his support. I would also like to thank my Ph.D. committee members: Dr. Wei Zhao, Dr. A.L. Narasimha Reddy, and Dr. Dmitri Loguinov. Dr. Zhao allowed me to work with his students in the Real...

  19. Commercial Biomedical Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Experiments to seek solutions for a range of biomedical issues are at the heart of several investigations that will be hosted by the Commercial Instrumentation Technology Associates (ITA), Inc. Biomedical Experiments (CIBX-2) payload. CIBX-2 is unique, encompassing more than 20 separate experiments including cancer research, commercial experiments, and student hands-on experiments from 10 schools as part of ITA's ongoing University Among the Stars program. Valerie Cassanto of ITA checks the Canadian Protein Crystallization Experiment (CAPE) carried by STS-86 to Mir in 1997. The experiments are sponsored by NASA's Space Product Development Program (SPD).

  20. Infectious disease ecology: Effects of ecosystems on disease and of disease on ecosystems: A Review

    E-print Network

    Peterson, A. Townsend

    2009-11-01

    . It is this innate curiosity that drives us. ALAN BERRYMAN, Medical Lake, Washington INFECTIOUS DISEASE ECOLOGY: EFFECTS OF ECO- SYSTEMS ON DISEASE AND OF DISEASE ON ECOSYS- TEMS. Based on a conference held in Millbrook, New York, May 2005. Edited by Richard S.... Ostfeld, Felicia Keesing, and Valerie T. Eviner. Princeton (New Jersey): Princeton University Press. $99.50 (hardcover); $45.00 (paper), xiv + 506 p.; ill; index. ISBN: 97S-0-691-12484-1 (he); 978-0^91-12485-8 (pb). 2008. Infectious disease ecology is a...

  1. Expedition 5 Crew Portrait

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    JOHNSON SPACE CENTER, HOUSTON, TEXAS -- EXPEDITION FIVE CREW PORTRAIT --- (JSC ISS05-5-002) -- Cosmonaut Valeri G. Korzun (left), Expedition Five mission commander; astronaut Peggy A. Whitson and cosmonaut Sergei Y. Treschev, both flight engineers, attired in training versions of the shuttle launch and entry suit, pause from their training schedule for a crew portrait. The three will be launched to the International Space Station (ISS) in early spring of this year aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis. Korzun and Treschev represent the Russian Aviation and Space Agency (Rosaviakosmos)

  2. Andrei Ivanovich Negru (1934-1995)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaina, Alex

    2008-06-01

    A short biography with an account of scientific dead by Andrei I. Negru (1934, Chisinau- ?, Chisinau), engineer, a graduated from the Moscow Aviation Institute, doctor in technical sciences, translator is given. An incomplete list of his publications is given, which reffer to forecasting and automation of mechanical engineering with full list of coauthors. The biography is based on Archive documents as well as on the own recollections by the author, which knew him personally. A number of his friends are mentioned throughout the article: Gennady Khatin, aviator, doctor of technical sciences, graduated from the Moscow Aviation Institute, Valery Gaina (rock musician), and other.

  3. 'El escribirlo no parte de la osadía': Tradición y mímica en la loa para El divino Narciso de Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz

    E-print Network

    Benoist, Valé rie

    1999-10-01

    escribirlo no parte de la osadía": Tradición y mímica en la loa para El divino Narciso de Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz Valerie Benoist Generalmente se le atribuye a Calderón de la Barca la transformación de la loa en un género dramático autónomo sin... compleja y autónoma (43). En este artículo mi objetivo es llevar más allá el estudio iniciado por Daniel sobre la imprescindible participación de Sor Juana en el desarrollo de la loa como género, analizando la dialéctica entre la obra sacramental de Sor...

  4. Low LBNP tolerance in men is associated with attenuated activation of the renin-angiotensin system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Petersen, T. W.; Gabrielsen, A.; Pump, B.; Bie, P.; Christensen, N. J.; Warberg, J.; Videbaek, R.; Simonson, S. R.; Norsk, P.

    2000-01-01

    Plasma vasoactive hormone concentrations [epinephrine (p(Epi)), norepinephrine (p(NE)), ANG II (p(ANG II)), vasopressin (p(VP)), endothelin-1 (p(ET-1))] and plasma renin activity (p(RA)) were measured periodically and compared during lower body negative pressure (LBNP) to test the hypothesis that responsiveness of the renin-angiotensin system, the latter being one of the most powerful vasoconstrictors in the body, is of major importance for LBNP tolerance. Healthy men on a controlled diet (2,822 cal/day, 2 mmol. kg(-1). day(-1) Na(+)) were exposed to 30 min of LBNP from -15 to -50 mmHg. LBNP was uneventful for seven men [25 +/- 2 yr, high-tolerance (HiTol) group], but eight men (26 +/- 3 yr) reached presyncope after 11 +/- 1 min [P < 0.001, low-tolerance (LoTol) group]. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) did not change measurably, but central venous pressure and left atrial diameter decreased similarly in both groups (5-6 mmHg, by approximately 30%, P < 0.05). Control (0 mmHg LBNP) hormone concentrations were similar between groups, however, p(RA) differed between them (LoTol 0.6 +/- 0.1, HiTol 1.2 +/- 0.1 ng ANG I. ml(-1). h(-1), P < 0.05). LBNP increased (P < 0. 05) p(RA) and p(ANG II), respectively, more in the HiTol group (9.9 +/- 2.2 ng ANG I. ml(-1). h(-1) and 58 +/- 12 pg/ml) than in LoTol subjects (4.3 +/- 0.9 ng ANG I. ml(-1). h(-1) and 28 +/- 6 pg/ml). In contrast, the increase in p(VP) was higher (P < 0.05) in the LoTol than in the HiTol group. The increases (P < 0.05) for p(NE) were nonsignificant between groups, and p(ET-1) remained unchanged. Thus there may be a causal relationship between attenuated activation of p(RA) and p(ANG II) and presyncope, with p(VP) being a possible cofactor. Measurement of resting p(RA) may be of predictive value for those with lower hypotensive tolerance.

  5. Advances in Continuous Mass Measurement Technology: TEOM Mass Monitor at 30° C with a Nafion Dryer at Rural and Urban New York State Locations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwab, J. J.; Felton, H. D.; Ambs, J.; Spicer, J.; Demerjian, K. L.

    2002-12-01

    The National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for particulate matter (both PM10 and PM2.5) are expressed in terms of mass concentrations in micrograms per cubic meter of air. While there is tremendous interest in measuring chemically speciated concentrations of PM, bulk mass concentration will clearly be the regulated quantity for the foreseeable future. With this in mind, it is critically important to establish the quality of data collected under current promulgated PM2.5 mass measurement techniques; to identify any significant sources of error associated with the techniques; as well as to evaluate newer technologies that are capable of measuring PM continuously and in real time. The well-known problems inherent in the measurement of ambient particulate matter include evaporation (and condensation) of semi-volatile compounds from (or onto) the collection medium; and the condensation and adsorption of reactive gases from the atmosphere. Recent work quantifying the sources of artifact errors for the Federal Reference Method (Pang, et al., 2002a; 2002b) showed significant evaporative losses from FRM filters. Similar losses are observed for the TEOM mass monitor, where evaporation of material from the filter head occurs at the default sensor temperature setting of 50° C. The TEOM SES (Sample Equilibration System) was developed to reduce the transient measurement errors reported by the TEOM instrument due to water vapor, the most abundant condensable gas in the atmosphere; and to allow instrument operation at temperatures lower than 50° C. The SES TEOM has been operated at a site in rural SW New York State (Addison, NY) for more than two years and at a site in Queens, New York City for more than a year. Each site also has a co-located standard TEOM (operated at 50° C without a Nafion dryer) and an FRM filter sampler. For these sites, the summer data from all three instruments agrees quite well, typically to better than 10%. Significant differences, on the order of 40% or more, are apparent during the winter months. We will present these year round data sets and draw conclusions on the status of continuous mass concentration measurements using the TEOM mass monitor. Pang, Y., Eatough, N. L., Wilson, J., and Eatough, D. J. (2002a) Effect of Semivolatile Material on PM2.5 Measurement by the PM2.5 Federal Reference Method Sampler at Bakersfield, California. Aerosol Sci. Technol. 36:289-299 Pang, Y., Eatough, N. L., and Eatough, D. J. (2002b) PM2.5 Semivolatile Organic Material at Riverside, California: Implications for the PM2.5 Federal Reference Method Sampler. Aerosol Sci. Technol. 36:277-288

  6. Impact of Spatial LAI Heterogeneity on Estimate of Directional Gap Fraction from SPOT-Satellite Data

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lingling; Li, Chuanrong; Tang, Bohui; Tang, Lingli; Bi, Yuyin; Zhou, Beiyan; Li, Zhao-Liang

    2008-01-01

    Directional gap probability or gap fraction is a basic parameter in the optical remote sensing modeling. Although some approaches have been proposed to estimate this gap probability from remotely sensed measurements, few efforts have been made to investigate the scaling effects of this parameter. This paper analyzes the scaling effect through aggregating the high-resolution directional gap probability (pixel size of 20 meters) estimated from leaf area index (LAI) images of VALERI database by means of Beer's law and introduces an extension of clumping index, ?, to compensate the scaling bias. The results show that the scaling effect depends on both the surface heterogeneity and the nonlinearity degree of the retrieved function. Analytical expressions for the scaling bias of gap probability and ? are established in function of the variance of LAI and the mean value of LAI in a coarse pixel. With the VALERI dataset, the study in this paper shows that relative scaling bias of gap probability increases with decreasing spatial resolution for most of land cover types. Large relative biases are found for most of crops sites and a mixed forest site due to their relative large variance of LAI, while very small biases occur over grassland and shrubs sites. As for ?, it varies slowly in the pure forest, grassland and shrubs sites, while more significantly in crops and mixed forest.

  7. Burnei's disease: teratological spondylolysis.

    PubMed

    Gavriliu, S T; Ghi??, R A; El Nayef, T; Burnei, A; Olaru-Barbilian, C R

    2015-01-01

    Teratological spondylolysis is a pathological entity noted for the first time in the specialty literature by Gh. Burnei in "The Spine Journal", in September 25, 2014. This disease was described in a short presentation of the first case treated by the author. The aim of this paper was to expose in a didactic manner the main characteristic aspects of Burnei's disease: embryological, clinical, imaging and treatment data and also to make known this pathological entity with all its pathognomonic diagnostic elements. This paper was based on data obtained after analyzing 2 cases of teratological spondylolysis: a 18-year-old patient with triple L3-L5 teratological spondylolysis with Pang 1 spinal dysraphism and a 1-year-old child with teratological spondylolysis and retrospondylolisthesis. PMID:26664464

  8. Burnei’s disease: teratological spondylolysis

    PubMed Central

    Gavriliu, ST; Ghi??, RA; El Nayef, T; Burnei, A; Olaru-Barbilian, CR

    2015-01-01

    Teratological spondylolysis is a pathological entity noted for the first time in the specialty literature by Gh. Burnei in “The Spine Journal”, in September 25, 2014. This disease was described in a short presentation of the first case treated by the author. The aim of this paper was to expose in a didactic manner the main characteristic aspects of Burnei’s disease: embryological, clinical, imaging and treatment data and also to make known this pathological entity with all its pathognomonic diagnostic elements. This paper was based on data obtained after analyzing 2 cases of teratological spondylolysis: a 18-year-old patient with triple L3-L5 teratological spondylolysis with Pang 1 spinal dysraphism and a 1-year-old child with teratological spondylolysis and retrospondylolisthesis.

  9. Spinal Cord Injury without Radiographic Abnormality (SCIWORA) – Clinical and Radiological Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Szwedowski, Dawid; Walecki, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    Summary The acronym SCIWORA (Spinal Cord Injury Without Radiographic Abnormality) was first developed and introduced by Pang and Wilberger who used it to define “clinical symptoms of traumatic myelopathy with no radiographic or computed tomographic features of spinal fracture or instability”. SCIWORA is a clinical-radiological condition that mostly affects children. SCIWORA lesions are found mainly in the cervical spine but can also be seen, although much less frequently, in the thoracic or lumbar spine. Based on reports from different authors, SCIWORA is responsible for 6 to 19% and 9% to 14% of spinal injuries in children and adults, respectively. Underlying degenerative changes, including spondylosis or spinal canal stenosis, are typically present in adult patients. The level of spinal cord injury corresponds to the location of these changes. With recent advances in neuroimaging techniques, especially in magnetic resonance imaging, and with increasing availability of MRI as a diagnostic tool, the overall detection rate of SCIWORA has significantly improved. PMID:25505497

  10. A Cell-Permeable Inhibitor to Trap G?q Proteins in the Empty Pocket Conformation

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Anna-Lena; Schrage, Ramona; Gaffal, Evelyn; Charpentier, Thomas H.; Wiest, Johannes; Hiltensperger, Georg; Morschel, Julia; Hennen, Stephanie; Häußler, Daniela; Horn, Velten; Wenzel, Daniela; Grundmann, Manuel; Büllesbach, Katrin M.; Schröder, Ralf; Brewitz, H. Henning; Schmidt, Johannes; Gomeza, Jesús; Galés, Céline; Fleischmann, Bernd K.; Tüting, Thomas; Imhof, Diana; Tietze, Daniel; Gütschow, Michael; Holzgrabe, Ulrike; Sondek, John; Harden, T. Kendall; Mohr, Klaus; Kostenis, Evi

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY In spite of the crucial role of heterotrimeric G proteins as molecular switches transmitting signals from G protein-coupled receptors, their selective manipulation with small molecule, cell-permeable inhibitors still remains an unmet challenge. Here, we report that the small molecule BIM-46187, previously classified as pan-G protein inhibitor, preferentially silences G?q signaling in a cellular context-dependent manner. Investigations into its mode of action reveal that BIM traps G?q in the empty pocket conformation by permitting GDP exit but interdicting GTP entry, a molecular mechanism not yet assigned to any other small molecule G? inhibitor to date. Our data show that G? proteins may be “frozen” pharmacologically in an intermediate conformation along their activation pathway and propose a pharmacological strategy to specifically silence G? subclasses with cell-permeable inhibitors. PMID:25036778

  11. Ponderable soliton stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Hong-Yee

    1990-01-01

    The theory of Lee and Pang (1987), who obtained solutions for soliton stars composed of zero-temperature fermions and bosons, is applied here to quark soliton stars. Model soliton stars based on a simple physical model of the proton are computed, and the properties of the solitons are discussed, including the important problem of the existence of a limiting mass and thus the possible formation of black holes of primordial origin. It is shown that there is a definite mass limit for ponderable soliton stars, so that during cooling a soliton star might reach a stage beyond which no equilibrium configuration exists and the soliton star probably will collapse to become a black hole. The radiation of ponderable soliton stars may alter the short-wavelength character of the cosmic background radiation, and may be observed as highly redshifted objects at z of about 100,000.

  12. Parasitism and Suitability of Different Egg Ages of the Leguminivora glycinivorella (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) for Three Indigenous Trichogramma Species.

    PubMed

    Song, Li-Wei; Wen, Xuan-Ye; Zang, Lian-Sheng; Ruan, Chang-Chun; Shi, Shu-Sen; Shao, Xi-Wen; Zhang, Fan

    2015-06-01

    Pod borers are economically important soybean pests in temperate and tropical regions. However, the biological control of these pests using their natural insect enemies has been poorly studied to date. Indigenous natural populations of three Trichogramma (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae) species, Trichogramma chilonis Ishii, Trichogramma ostriniae Pang & Chen, and Trichogramma leucaniae Pang & Chen, were collected from Leguminivora glycinivorella (Matsumura) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) eggs in soybean fields in China. In this study, we compare the parasitic capacities and suitabilities of three indigenous Trichogramma species on L. glycinivorella eggs at various ages. Host eggs of all ages were accepted by T. chilonis, T. ostriniae, and T. leucaniae. T. chilonis tended to parasitize 0-2-d-old eggs more than 3-4-d-old eggs. There were no significant differences in parasitism between the 0-2-d-old eggs and the 1-4-d-old eggs for T. ostriniae and T. leucaniae. For eggs at various ages, T. chilonis parasitized the smallest number of eggs, while T. leucaniae and T. ostriniae exhibited similar parasitic capacities. With 0-d-old host eggs, T. ostriniae developed over the longest time period (8.7?d), and T. leucaniae produced the most female progeny (87.9%). Both T. leucaniae and T. ostriniae had similar developmental times, survival rates and percentages of female progeny with 1-3-d-old eggs. These results show that T. leucaniae can parasitize host eggs at varying ages with the best development and suggest that it may be a valuable biological control agent for soybean pod borers. PMID:26470213

  13. Anthocyanin and Carotenoid Contents in Different Cultivars of Chrysanthemum (Dendranthema grandiflorum Ramat.) Flower.

    PubMed

    Park, Chang Ha; Chae, Soo Cheon; Park, Soo-Yun; Kim, Jae Kwang; Kim, Yong Joo; Chung, Sun Ok; Arasu, Mariadhas Valan; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Park, Sang Un

    2015-01-01

    The flowers of twenty-three cultivars of Dendranthema grandiflorum Ramat. were investigated to determine anthocyanin and carotenoid levels and to confirm the effects of the pigments on the flower colors using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The cultivars contained the anthocyanins cyanidin 3-glucoside (C3g) and cyanidin 3-(3"-malonoyl) glucoside (C3mg) and the following carotenoids: lutein, zeaxanthin, ?-cryptoxanthin, 13-cis-?-carotene, ?-carotene, trans-?-carotene, and 9-cis-?-carotene. The cultivar "Magic" showed the greatest accumulation of total and individual anthocyanins, including C3g and C3gm. On the other hand, the highest level of lutein and zeaxanthin was noted in the cultivar "Il Weol". The cultivar "Anastasia" contained the highest amount of carotenoids such as trans-?-carotene, 9-cis-?-carotene, and 13-cis-?-carotene. The highest accumulation of ?-cryptoxanthin and ?-carotene was noted in the cultivar "Anastasia" and "Il Weol". Our results suggested that 'Magic", "Angel" and "Relance' had high amounts of anthocyanins and showed a wide range of red and purple colors in their petals, whereas "Il Weol', "Popcorn Ball' and "Anastasia" produced higher carotenoid contents and displayed yellow or green petal colors. Interestingly, "Green Pang Pang", which contained a high level of anthocyanins and a medium level of carotenoids, showed the deep green colored petals. "Kastelli", had high level of carotenoids as well as a medium level of anthocyanins and showed orange and red colored petals. It was concluded that each pigment is responsible for the petal's colors and the compositions of the pigments affect their flower colors and that the cultivars could be a good source for pharmaceutical, floriculture, and pigment industries. PMID:26083041

  14. STS-96 M.S. Tokarev tries gas mask as part of a TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    STS-96 Mission Specialist Valery Ivanovich Tokarev, with the Russian Space Agency, tries on an oxygen gas mask during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities at Launch Pad 39B. The TCDT provides the crew with simulated countdown exercises, emergency egress training and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. Other crew members taking part in the TCDT are Commander Kent V. Rominger, Pilot Rick Douglas Husband, and Mission Specialists Tamara E. Jernigan (Ph.D.), Daniel Barry (M.D., Ph.D.), Ellen Ochoa (Ph.D.) and Julie Payette, with the Canadian Space Agency. Scheduled for liftoff on May 20 at 9:32 a.m., STS-96 is a logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-led experiment.

  15. STS-96 M.S. Payette and Pilot Husband try on gas masks as part of a TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At Launch Pad 39B, STS-96 Mission Specialist Julie Payette, with the Canadian Space Agency, and Pilot Rick Douglas Husband practice putting on oxygen gas masks as part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The TCDT provides the crew with emergency egress traiing, simulated countdown exercises and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. Other crew members taking part in the TCDT are Commander Kent V. Rominger and Mission Specialists Tamara E. Jernigan (Ph.D.), Daniel Barry (M.D., Ph.D.), Ellen Ochoa (Ph.D.) and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev, with the Russian Space Agency. Scheduled for liftoff on May 20 at 9:32 a.m., STS- 96 is a logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student- led experiment.

  16. International Program and Local Organizing Committees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-12-01

    International Program Committee Dionisio Bermejo (Spain) Roman Ciurylo (Poland) Elisabeth Dalimier (France) Alexander Devdariani (Russia) Milan S Dimitrijevic (Serbia) Robert Gamache (USA) Marco A Gigosos (Spain) Motoshi Goto (Japan) Magnus Gustafsson (Sweden) Jean-Michel Hartmann (France) Carlos Iglesias (USA) John Kielkopf (USA) John C Lewis (Canada) Valery Lisitsa (Russia) Eugene Oks (USA) Christian G Parigger (USA) Gillian Peach (UK) Adriana Predoi-Cross (Canada) Roland Stamm (Germany) Local Organizing Committee Nikolay G Skvortsov (Chair, St Petersburg State University) Evgenii B Aleksandrov (Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, St Petersburg) Vadim A Alekseev (Scientific Secretary, St Petersburg State University) Sergey F Boureiko (St.Petersburg State University) Yury N Gnedin (Pulkovo Observatory, St Petersburg) Alexander Z Devdariani (Deputy Chair, St Petersburg State University) Alexander P Kouzov (Deputy Chair, St Petersburg State University) Nikolay A Timofeev (St Petersburg State University)

  17. Final Report: High Energy Physics Program (HEP), Physics Department, Princeton University

    SciTech Connect

    Callan, Curtis G.; Gubser, Steven S.; Marlow, Daniel R.; McDonald, Kirk T.; Meyers, Peter D.; Olsen, James D.; Smith, Arthur J.S.; Steinhardt, Paul J.; Tully, Christopher G.; Stickland, David P.

    2013-04-30

    The activities of the Princeton Elementary particles group funded through Department of Energy Grant# DEFG02-91 ER40671 during the period October 1, 1991 through January 31, 2013 are summarized. These activities include experiments performed at Brookhaven National Lab; the CERN Lab in Geneva, Switzerland; Fermilab; KEK in Tsukuba City, Japan; the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center; as well as extensive experimental and the- oretical studies conducted on the campus of Princeton University. Funded senior personnel include: Curtis Callan, Stephen Gubser, Valerie Halyo, Daniel Marlow, Kirk McDonald, Pe- ter Meyers, James Olsen, Pierre Pirou#19;e, Eric Prebys, A.J. Stewart Smith, Frank Shoemaker (deceased), Paul Steinhardt, David Stickland, Christopher Tully, and Liantao Wang.

  18. STS-91 Launch of Discovery from Launch Pad 39-A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Some of Florida's natural foliage stands silent sentinel to the lift off of the Space Shuttle Discovery from Launch Pad 39A at 6:06:24 p.m. EDT June 2. On board Discovery are Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt; Pilot Dominic L. Gorie; and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, Janet Lynn Kavandi and Valery Victorovitch Ryumin. The nearly 10-day mission will feature the ninth and final Shuttle docking with the Russian space station Mir, the first Mir docking for the Space Shuttle orbiter Discovery, the first on-orbit test of the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), and the first flight of the new Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank. Astronaut Andrew S. W. Thomas will be returning to Earth as an STS-91 crew member after living more than four months aboard Mir.

  19. STS-96 Mission Specialist Tokarev prepares to enter Discovery as part of TCDT activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the white room, an environmental chamber, at Launch Pad 39B, STS-96 Mission Specialist Valery Ivanovich Tokarev, with the Russian Space Agency, gets help with equipment from Chris Menard, Jean Alexander and James Davis before entering the orbiter Discovery at Launch Pad 39B. The crew are taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities, which provide opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay, as well as simulated countdown exercises and emergency egress training. STS-96, scheduled for liftoff on May 20 at 9:32 a.m., is a logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-led experiment.

  20. STS-90 Pilot Scott Altman is suited up for launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    STS-90 Pilot Scott Altman is assisted during suit-up activities by Lockheed Suit Technician Valerie McNeil from Johnson Space Center in KSC's Operations and Checkout Building. Altman and the rest of the STS-90 crew will shortly depart for Launch Pad 39B, where the Space Shuttle Columbia awaits a second liftoff attempt at 2:19 p.m. EDT. His first trip into space, Altman is participating in a life sciences research flight that will focus on the most complex and least understood part of the human body - - the nervous system. Neurolab will examine the effects of spaceflight on the brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerves and sensory organs in the human body.

  1. STS-96 Crew Training, Mission Animation, Crew Interviews, STARSHINE, Discovery Rollout and Repair of Hail Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Live footage shows the crewmembers of STS-96, Commander Kent V. Rominger, Pilot Rick D. Husband, Mission Specialists Ellen Ochoa, Tamara E. Jernigan, Daniel T. Barry, Julie Payette and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev during various training activities. Scenes include astronaut suit-up, EVA training in the Virtual Reality Lab, Orbiter space vision training, bailout training, and crew photo session. Footage also shows individual crew interviews, repair activities to the external fuel tank, and Discovery's return to the launch pad. The engineers are seen sanding, bending, and painting the foam used in repairing the tank. An animation of the deployment of the STARSHINE satellite, International Space Station, and the STS-96 Mission is presented. Footage shows the students from Edgar Allen Poe Middle School sanding, polishing, and inspecting the mirrors for the STARSHINE satellite. Live footage also includes students from St. Michael the Archangel School wearing bunny suits and entering the clean room at Goddard Space Flight Center.

  2. KSC-03PD-1399

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Valerie Cassanto holds a piece of the Commercial ITA Biomedical Experiments payload that was carried on mission STS-107 and recently recovered. She is the daughter of John Cassanto of ITA, who is part of a recovery team transferring experiments to alternate containers. One of the experiments was the Growth of Bacterial Biofilm on Surfaces during Spaceflight (GOBBSS), a Planetary Society-sponsored astrobiology experiment developed by the Israeli Aerospace Medical Institute and the Johnson Space Center Astrobiology Center, with joint participation of an Israeli and a Palestinian student. The recovery team also includes Eran Schenker of the Israeli Aerospace Medical Institute; David Warmflash of JSC, and Louis Friedman, executive director of the Planetary Society. The GOBBSS material will be sent to JSC where the science team will analyze the samples, studying the effects of spaceflight on bacterial growth.

  3. KSC-03PD-1400

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Valerie Cassanto holds a piece of the Commercial ITA Biomedical Experiments payload that was carried on mission STS-107 and recently recovered. She is the daughter of John Cassanto of ITA, who is part of a recovery team transferring experiments to alternate containers. One of the experiments was the Growth of Bacterial Biofilm on Surfaces during Spaceflight (GOBBSS), a Planetary Society-sponsored astrobiology experiment developed by the Israeli Aerospace Medical Institute and the Johnson Space Center Astrobiology Center, with joint participation of an Israeli and a Palestinian student. The recovery team also includes Eran Schenker of the Israeli Aerospace Medical Institute; David Warmflash of JSC, and Louis Friedman, executive director of the Planetary Society. The GOBBSS material will be sent to JSC where the science team will analyze the samples, studying the effects of spaceflight on bacterial growth.

  4. KSC-03PD-1398

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - John Cassanto of ITA and his daughter Valerie stand next to the table holding the Growth of Bacterial Biofilm on Surfaces during Spaceflight (GOBBSS) experiment that was carried on mission STS-107 as part of the Commercial ITA Biomedical Experiments payload. He is part of a recovery team transferring experiments to alternate containers. GOBBSS was a Planetary Society-sponsored astrobiology experiment developed by the Israeli Aerospace Medical Institute and the Johnson Space Center Astrobiology Center, with joint participation of an Israeli and a Palestinian student. The recovery team also includes Eran Schenker of the Israeli Aerospace Medical Institute; David Warmflash of JSC, and Louis Friedman, executive director of the Planetary Society. The GOBBSS material will be sent to JSC where the science team will analyze the samples, studying the effects of spaceflight on bacterial growth.

  5. An Analysis of Historical Records of Solar Variability, Volcanic Eruptions, and Climate Change in the Last Millennium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, K. D.

    2003-12-01

    Studying past climate changes can help us better understand present natural variations and predict future trends. However, various reconstructions of the climate of the last 1000 years have given only broad similarities [Briffa, JGR 106, 2929, 2001]. The variances are partly due to uncertainties in the past radiative and aerosol forcing, and gaps in regional coverage. Another outstanding question is whether we are in a time similar to the Medieval Warm Period. From the frequencies of sunspot and aurora sightings, abundance of carbon-14 in the rings of long-lived trees, and beryllium-10 in the annual layers of polar ice cores, we have reconstructed the recent history of a variable Sun. In the past 1800 years the Sun has gone through nine cycles of changes in brightness. While these long-term changes account for less than 1% of the total irradiance, there is clear evidence that they affect the climate [Pang and Yau, Eos, 83, No. 43, 481, 2002]. We have analyzed Chinese historical weather records to fill the data void in this region. Reports of unseasonable cold are classified by the degree of severity: (1) Late (April-June) or early (July-Sept) killing frosts; (2) Bitter cold/heavy snowfall; and (3) heavy sustained snowfall, bitter cold with frozen wells, lakes, rivers, and icebound seas. The latter cases were often widespread and multi-year. All categories occurred most frequently during the coldest part of the Little Ice Age, with the coldest episodes in 1652-54, 1656, 1664, 1670-72, 1676-77, 1683, 1688-91, 1716 and 1718-19. They thus coincide with Maunder Minimum (1645-1715), when very few sunspots were seen-about one in ten years from China or Europe-indicative of a weakened Sun. There was only one Category 3 episode between the Maunder and Dalton Minima-in 1761, and two in the Dalton Minimum (1795-1825)-in 1796 and 1814-7. Analysis of proxy data has shown that the 1810's were among the coldest years in Europe [Briffa and Jones, in ``The Year Without a Summer,'' C.R. Harrignton, ed., 1992]. Large eruptions, of an unknown volcano in 1809 [Dai, JGR 96, 17361, 1991], at Mayon in 1814, and at Tambora in 1815, with the reduced solar luminosity seem to have been responsible. The Sun has slowly brightened since the Dalton Minimum. However, the climate of China remained cold through the 19th century, consistent with world climate trend [Bradley and Jones, Holocene 3, 367, 1993], possibly due to increased volcanic aerosol loading of the atmosphere [Sato, JGR 98, 22987, 1993]. In the 200 years prior to the Maunder Minimum, there was at least one other major planetwide volcanically forced cold episode-in 1453-54. The climate of China appears to have been warm during the Late 14th-Century Solar Maximum (1350-1410). We have found only one report of early killing frost-in May, 1993. It then turned cold during the Sporer Minimum (140-1590) [Pang and Yau, op. cit.]. Category 3 cold episodes occurred in 1453-54, 1513, 1569, and 1577-78. Lesser ones were also more common. The coldest was in 1453-54, due to a Tamboran class eruption that broke a big island in New Hebrides Arc in two, separated by a 12X6X1 km submarine caldera Kuwae. The volcanic chill was felt worldwide, with extensive reporting in China [Pang, Eos 74, No. 43, 196, 1993]. Reduced solar luminosity may have also contributed to the cold climate of that decade, as was the case in the 1810's. We conclude that the climate of China in the past 650 years generally follows world trend. The major forcing seems to have been changing solar luminosity, perturbed by frequent volcanic eruptions.

  6. Do Changes in Muscle Architecture Affect Post-Activation Potentiation?

    PubMed Central

    Reardon, Danielle; Hoffman, Jay R.; Mangine, Gerald T.; Wells, Adam J.; Gonzalez, Adam M.; Jajtner, Adam R.; Townsend, Jeremy R.; McCormack, William P.; Stout, Jeffrey R.; Fragala, Maren S.; Fukuda, David H.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this randomized, cross-over design study was to examine the effect of three different muscle potentiation protocols on acute changes in muscle architecture and vertical jump performance. Eleven experienced, resistance trained men (25.2±3.6y) completed three potentiation squat protocols using moderate intensity (MI; 75%, 3 sets x 10 repetitions), high intensity (HI; 90%, 3 sets x 3 repetitions) and 100% (1RM; 1 set x 1repetition) of their 1RM. In addition, all participants completed a control session (CTL) in which no protocol was performed. During each testing session, muscle architecture and vertical jump testing were assessed at baseline (BL), 8min post (8P) and 20min post (20P) workout. Ultrasound measures included cross sectional area (CSA) and pennation angle (PANG) of both the rectus femoris (RF) and vastus lateralis (VL). Following each ultrasound measure, peak vertical jump power (PVJP) and mean (MVJP) power was assessed using an accelerometer. Magnitude based inferences were used to make comparisons between trials. The MI trial resulted in a likely greater increase from BL to 8P and 20P in RF-CSA and VL-CSA, while the HI trial resulted in a likely greater change from BL to 20P in both RF-CSA and VL-CSA. Meanwhile, changes in PVJP and MVJP for the MI trial was likely decreased at BL-8P and BL–20P, while the HI trial was shown to result in a likely or possible decrease compared to CTL at BL-8P and BL–20P, respectively. A likely negative relationship was observed between changes in VL-PANG and MVJP (r = -0.35; p , 0.018) at BL-8P, and between changes in PVJP and RF-CSA (r = -0.37; p , 0.014) at BL–20P. Results of this study were unable to demonstrate any potentiation response from the trials employed, however these protocols did result in acute muscle architectural changes. Key points Three squat protocols using moderate intensity (75% 1-RM; 3 sets x 10 repetitions), high intensity (90% 1-RM, 3 sets x 3 repetitions) and maximal intensity (100% 1RM; 1 set x 1repetition) were unable to potentiate jump height or jump power in experienced, resistance trained men. Experienced, resistance trained athletes who are not competitive may be limited in regards to potentiation due to a poor level of conditioning. Both the moderate and high intensity potentiation protocols stimulated acute changes in muscle architecture. Greater increases in the CSA of both the RF and VL muscles were noted. A different potentiation protocol may have elicited greater changes in muscle architecture. PMID:25178394

  7. Ancient Observations Reveal How a Variable Sun Has Changed the Earth's Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, K. D.; Yau, K. K.

    2004-12-01

    The Sun, once thought to be constant, has actually undergone nine long brightness cycles in the past 1800 years. Although these luminosity changes were < 1%, they have clearly influenced in the Earth's climate. For example, during the Maunder (Solar) Minimum between 1645 and 1715, sunspots were rarely seen, indicative of a weak Sun. Astronomers at Mt. Wilson, e.g., Hale, Nicholson and Wilson, have linked the luminosity changes to solar magnetic cycles, and similar behaviors in Sun-like stars. Others have elucidated the Sun-climate connection. For example, Eddy suggested that the enfeebled Sun was responsible for the cold climate of the Little Ice Age. The estimated average global temperature then was half a degree Centigrade lower than that prevailed in the 1970's (Lean, Geophys. Res. Lett. 22, 3195, 1995). Yau researched East Asian historical sunspot records, and found that there were seven Maunder-like solar minima before 1600 (Quart. J. Roy. Astron. Soc. 29, 175, 1988). The earliest was in the third century, and the Sporer Minimum occurred in 1400-1600. These findings agree with analyses of historical records of aurora sightings. Energetic electrons and protons emitted by an active Sun create auroras on Earth. When sunspots were rare auroras were, likewise, seldom seen. Minima in sunspot/aurora sightings are, in turn, coincident with peaks in long-term carbon-14 and beryllium-10 records. The radioisotopes are made high in atmosphere by cosmic rays. Their production is low when strong solar magnetic storms deflect such rays from the Solar System, and vice versa (Pang and Yau, Eos 83, No. 43, 481, 2002). Pang analyzed Chinese historical weather records, and discovered that periods of severely cold climate coincide with the Maunder and Sporer Minima. Lakes and rivers froze up, seas icebound, unseasonable frosts killed crops, and famines were widespread during these cold spells, consistent with general circulation model hindcast of contemporary winter conditions for China (Shindell, Science 294, 2149, 2001). Although variable solar luminosity is important, other strong forces also drive the Earth's climate system. These include greenhouse warming, volcanic eruptions, and changing ocean current systems, e.g., the El Nino. The solar variations, however, act over periods ranging from decades to centuries.

  8. Eclipses and the Olympics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, K. D.; Yau, K. K.

    2000-12-01

    Like returns of Halley's comet the Olympic games occur periodically, though not as regularly in antiquity. Dates were also imprecise due to the chaotic calendars in use. Reported sightings of comets and eclipses can be used with game dates to help fix ancient events. However some reported darkening of the sun, e.g., after Julius Caesar's murder in 44 BC, was due to volcanic eruptions. A red comet, visible in daylight, first appeared during the games that year. It was also seen from China and Korea (Pang, Sciences 31, 30). Phlegon's ``Olympiads" (2nd century) says that Christ's crucifixion was in the 4th year of the 202nd Olympiad (AD 29-33), when a total solar eclipse occurred in the 6th hour. Only the Nov. 24, AD 29 eclipse over Asia Minor can match that, and Joel's prophecy (Acts 2, 14-21) that ``the sun will be turned to darkness and moon to blood." However it conflicts with ``the first day of Passover," as recorded by Mathew, Mark and Luke, i.e., full moon in early spring. Humphreys and Waddington (Nature 306, 743) have suggested meteorological darkening and the April 3, AD 33 lunar eclipse instead. Schaefer has questioned the eclipse's visibility from Jerusalem (31.46N, 35.14E). The six computations he cited gave dissimilar answers due to the imprecise rates of the secular lunar acceleration, and lengthening of the day used (Q.Jl.R.astr.Soc. 31, 53). Lunar laser ranging has since fixed the former at -26"/cen2. Analysis of ancient Chinese solar eclipse records, e.g., the April 21, 899 BC and April 4, AD 368 ``double dawns" over Zheng, has given us a delta T (in sec) = 30t2, where t is centuries before 1800 (Pang, Yau and Chou, in ``Dynamics of Ice Age Earth: A Modern Perspective," 1998). Our computations show that the moon rose over Jerusalem, with 1/3 still in the umbra and the rest in penumbra. Holdover meteorological darkening with long absorption air mass could have help reddened the moon also. Finally the first ``eclipse season" (the Aug. 21 lunar, and Sept. 6 solar, eclipses) were recorded in China in 776 BC, the year of the first Olympiad. A total solar eclipse (August 1, 2008) will occur during the 29th modern Olympiad (July 25-Aug. 10), with its path of totality ending in a spectacular ``double sunset" over Zheng, China (34.5N, 110E).

  9. Open standards for cascade models for RHIC: Volume 1. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center workshop

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-01

    It is widely recognized that cascade models are potentially effective and powerful tools for interpreting and predicting multi-particle observables in heavy ion physics. However, the lack of common standards, documentation, version control, and accessibility have made it difficult to apply objective scientific criteria for evaluating the many physical and algorithmic assumptions or even to reproduce some published results. The first RIKEN Research Center workshop was proposed by Yang Pang to address this problem by establishing open standards for original codes for applications to nuclear collisions at RHIC energies. The aim of this first workshop is: (1) to prepare a WWW depository site for original source codes and detailed documentation with examples; (2) to develop and perform standardized test for the models such as Lorentz invariance, kinetic theory comparisons, and thermodynamic simulations; (3) to publish a compilation of results of the above work in a journal e.g., ``Heavy Ion Physics``; and (4) to establish a policy statement on a set of minimal requirements for inclusion in the OSCAR-WWW depository.

  10. Structural and stratigraphic evolution of the East Georges Bank Basin, offshore Nova Scotia, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Carswell, A.B. ); Koning, T. ); Hibbs, D.C. )

    1990-05-01

    The East Georges Bank Basin is located offshore Nova Scotia on the southeastern Canadian continental shelf. The basin covers 2.5 million ac and is one of the last undrilled basins in North America. The geological interpretation is almost entirely based on 16,000 km of seismic data over the basin. Pertinent well control is limited to 10 wells on the US portion of the Georges Bank (West Georges Bank Basin) and two wells on the Scotian shelf. Seismic-stratigraphic analysis of this data has led to a structural and stratigraphic model for the basin. The basin formed during the Triassic when the landmass of Pange began separating along rift zones. A prominent Paleozoic basement high, the Yarmouth Arch separated the East Georges Bank Basin from the West Georges Bank Basin and had a dominant influence on sedimentation until the Middle Jurassic. Early synrift sequences consist of lacustrine clastics and shales. Marine incursions began in the late Triassic resulting in massive salt deposits that reflect the restricted extent of the basin and the arid Triassic and Early Jurassic climate. Further continental separation during the Early Jurassic resulted in deposition of carbonates and evaporites followed by Middle Jurassic continental shelf carbonates and deltaic sands. During the Middle Jurassic, major growth faulting and halokinesis was initiated by progradation of the deltaic sands. Post Middle Jurassic continental spreading in combination with changing climatic conditions resulted in a steady decline of carbonate sedimentation and dominance of clastic deposition throughout the remaining history of the basin.

  11. Massive soliton stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Hong-Yee

    1990-01-01

    The structure of nontopological solutions of Einstein field equations as proposed by Friedberg, Lee, and Pang (1987) is examined. This analysis incorporates finite temperature effects and pair creation. Quarks are assumed to be the only species that exist in interior of soliton stars. The possibility of primordial creation of soliton stars in the incomplete decay of the degenerate vacuum in early universe is explored. Because of dominance of pair creation inside soliton stars, the luminosity of soliton stars is not determined by its radiative transfer characteristics, and the surface temperature of soliton stars can be the same as its interior temperature. It is possible that soliton stars are intense X-ray radiators at large distances. Soliton stars are nearly 100 percent efficient energy converters, converting the rest energy of baryons entering the interior into radiation. It is possible that a sizable number of baryons may also be trapped inside soliton stars during early epochs of the universe. In addition, if soliton stars exist they could assume the role played by massive black holes in galactic centers.

  12. Identifying Pathways for Improving Household Food Self-Sufficiency Outcomes in the Hills of Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Karki, Tika B.; Sah, Shrawan K.; Thapa, Resam B.; McDonald, Andrew J.; Davis, Adam S.

    2015-01-01

    Maintaining and improving household food self-sufficiency (FSS) in mountain regions is an ongoing challenge. There are many facets to the issue, including comparatively high levels of land fragmentation, challenging terrain and transportation bottlenecks, declining labor availability due to out-migration, and low technical knowledge, among others. Using a nonparametric multivariate approach, we quantified primary associations underlying current levels of FSS in the mid-hills of Nepal. A needs assessment survey was administered to 77 households in Lungaun (Baglung District), Pang (Parbat District), and Pathlekhet (Myagdi District), with a total of 80 variables covering five performance areas; resulting data were analyzed using Classification and Regression Trees. The most parsimonious statistical model for household FSS highlighted associations with agronomic management, including yields of maize and fingermillet within a relay cropping system and adoption of improved crop cultivars. Secondary analyses of the variables retained in the first model again focused primarily on crop and livestock management. It thus appears that continued emphasis on technical agricultural improvements is warranted, independent of factors such as land holding size that, in any case, are very difficult to change through development interventions. Initiatives to increase household FSS in the mid-hills of Nepal will benefit from placing a primary focus on methods of agricultural intensification to improve crop yields and effective technology transfer to increase adoption of these methods. PMID:26047508

  13. The mechanism and properties of bio-photon emission and absorption in protein molecules in living systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Xiao-feng

    2012-05-01

    The mechanism and properties of bio-photon emission and absorption in bio-tissues were studied using Pang's theory of bio-energy transport, in which the energy spectra of protein molecules are obtained from the discrete dynamic equation. From the energy spectra, it was determined that the protein molecules could both radiate and absorb bio-photons with wavelengths of <3 ?m and 5-7 ?m, consistent with the energy level transitions of the excitons. These results were consistent with the experimental data; this consisted of infrared absorption data from collagen, bovine serum albumin, the protein-like molecule acetanilide, plasma, and a person's finger, and the laser-Raman spectra of acidity I-type collagen in the lungs of a mouse, and metabolically active Escherichia coli. We further elucidated the mechanism responsible for the non-thermal biological effects produced by the infrared light absorbed by the bio-tissues, using the above results. No temperature rise was observed; instead, the absorbed infrared light promoted the vibrations of amides as well the transport of the bio-energy from one place to other in the protein molecules, which changed their conformations. These experimental results, therefore, not only confirmed the validity of the mechanism of bio-photon emission, and the newly developed theory of bio-energy transport mentioned above, but also explained the mechanism and properties of the non-thermal biological effects produced by the absorption of infrared light by the living systems.

  14. Infection of rice plants by rice black streaked dwarf virus improves an egg parasitoid, Anagrus nilaparvatae (Hymenoptera: Mymaridae), of rice planthoppers.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hongxing; He, Xiaochan; Zheng, Xusong; Yang, Yajun; Tian, Junce; Lu, Zhongxian

    2014-10-01

    The effects of rice plants infected by rice black streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV) on the host preference, duration of immature stages, sex ratio, and adult longevity and parasitic capacity of an egg parasitoid, Anagrus nilaparvatae Pang et Wang, of rice brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens Stål, were evaluated. Tests of response to plant volatiles using an olfactometer showed that A. nilaparvatae preferred rice plants harboring rice brown planthopper eggs over plants free of rice brown planthopper eggs. However, both the response to plant volatiles and the host selectivity test showed no significant differences in host preference between RBSDV-infected plants and healthy plants when both contained rice brown planthopper eggs. The developmental duration at immature stage of the male A. nilaparvatae in rice brown planthopper eggs on RBSDV-infected rice plants was significantly prolonged, and the parasitic capacity of rice brown planthopper eggs was significantly increased in comparison with the A. nilaparvatae parasite in rice brown planthopper eggs on healthy rice plants. There were no significant differences between RBSDV-infected rice plants and healthy rice plants in other ecological fitness parameters, including the developmental duration of female adults, female percentage, and adult longevity of A. nilaparvatae. PMID:25199055

  15. Suppressing technical noise in weak measurements by entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Shengshi; Brun, Todd A.

    2015-07-01

    Postselected weak measurement has aroused broad interest for its distinctive ability to amplify small physical quantities. However, the low postselection efficiency to obtain a large weak value has been a big obstacle to its application in practice since it may waste resources, and reduce the measurement precision. An improved protocol was proposed in Pang et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 030401 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.030401 to make the postselected weak measurement dramatically more efficient by using entanglement. Such a protocol can increase the Fisher information of the measurement to approximately saturate the well-known Heisenberg limit. In this paper, we review the entanglement-assisted protocol of postselected weak measurement in detail, and study its robustness against technical noises. We focus on readout errors. Readout errors can greatly degrade the performance of postselected weak measurement, especially when the readout error probability is comparable to the postselection probability. We show that entanglement can significantly reduce the two main detrimental effects of readout errors: inaccuracy in the measurement result and the loss of Fisher information. We extend the protocol by introducing a majority vote scheme to postselection to further compensate for readout errors. With a proper threshold, almost no Fisher information will be lost. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of entanglement in protecting postselected weak measurement against readout errors.

  16. Horton overland flow contribution to runoff on unpaved mountain roads: A case study in northern Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Alan D.; Giambelluca, Thomas W.; Sutherland, Ross A.; Vana, Thomas T.; Nullet, Mike A.

    2001-11-01

    Two indirect methods are used to detect evidence of intercepted subsurface flow (ISSF) by the road prism in the Pang Khum Experimental Watershed (PKEW) in northern Thailand. During the 12-month study period we failed to observe a soil moisture change that corresponds with ISSF being generated by the water table rising above the road surface. In support of the soil moisture data, 18O signatures of rain water, road runoff, and stream water (a proxy for soil water) suggest Horton overland flow (HOF) generated on the road surface, not ISSF, is the dominant source of observed road runoff during typical rainfall events in the study area. This finding, which is contrary to the ISSF-dominant road runoff regime found typically on unpaved mountain roads in the US Pacific NW, suggests that the use of a HOF-based model to simulate runoff and sediment transport on unpaved roads in PKEW provides not only lower bound estimates of these processes, but realistic approximations for typical events.

  17. Identifying Pathways for Improving Household Food Self-Sufficiency Outcomes in the Hills of Nepal.

    PubMed

    Karki, Tika B; Sah, Shrawan K; Thapa, Resam B; McDonald, Andrew J; Davis, Adam S

    2015-01-01

    Maintaining and improving household food self-sufficiency (FSS) in mountain regions is an ongoing challenge. There are many facets to the issue, including comparatively high levels of land fragmentation, challenging terrain and transportation bottlenecks, declining labor availability due to out-migration, and low technical knowledge, among others. Using a nonparametric multivariate approach, we quantified primary associations underlying current levels of FSS in the mid-hills of Nepal. A needs assessment survey was administered to 77 households in Lungaun (Baglung District), Pang (Parbat District), and Pathlekhet (Myagdi District), with a total of 80 variables covering five performance areas; resulting data were analyzed using Classification and Regression Trees. The most parsimonious statistical model for household FSS highlighted associations with agronomic management, including yields of maize and fingermillet within a relay cropping system and adoption of improved crop cultivars. Secondary analyses of the variables retained in the first model again focused primarily on crop and livestock management. It thus appears that continued emphasis on technical agricultural improvements is warranted, independent of factors such as land holding size that, in any case, are very difficult to change through development interventions. Initiatives to increase household FSS in the mid-hills of Nepal will benefit from placing a primary focus on methods of agricultural intensification to improve crop yields and effective technology transfer to increase adoption of these methods. PMID:26047508

  18. Tevatron reverse injection

    SciTech Connect

    Saritepe, S.; Annala, G.

    1993-06-25

    In the new injection scenario antiprotons are injected onto a helical orbit in the Tevatron in order to avoid the detrimental effects of the beam-beam interaction at 150 GeV. The new scenario required changes in the tuning procedure. Antiprotons are too precious to be used for tuning, therefore the antiproton injection line has to be tuned with protons by reverse injecting them from the Tevatron into the Main Pang (MR). Previously, the reverse injection was performed in one supercycle. One batch of uncoalesced bunches was injected into the Tevatron and ejected after 40 seconds. Then the orbit closure was performed in the MR. In the new scheme the lambertson magnets have to be moved and separator polarities have to be switched, activities that cannot be completed in one supercycle. Therefore, the reverse injection sequence was changed. This involved the redefinition of TVBS dock event $D8 as MRBS $D8 thus marking it possible to inject 6 proton batches and eject them one at a time on command, performing orbit closure each time in the MR.

  19. The Paleointensity Dataset: Strengths and Weaknesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, M.

    2001-05-01

    Initiated by IAGA Working Group I-3 (Paleomagnetism) and I-4 (Rock Magnetism) the paleointensity database was initially constructed by Masaru Kono and Hidefumi Tanaka. Since 1995, Mireille Perrin took in charge the keeping of the database with the help of Elisabeth Schnepp for the update of the 0-5 Ma interval and Valeri Shcherbakov (Russia) for Russian data. Only absolute paleointensity determinations from igneous rocks and baked contacts are registered in the database and each entry corresponds to a mean result for a given cooling unit. Archaeological artifacts are not included. All methods of paleointensity determinations are taken into account as well as all field configurations (normal, reverse or transitional polarity). More than 2000 data are now available from almost 200 references. Although the number of entries in the paleointensity database almost doubled in the past 5 years which indicates a renewed interest in this type of studies, the quality of the data as well as their temporal and geographic distributions remains extremely uneven and a proper time-averaging of the paleomagnetic field cannot yet be expected, except maybe for the first Ma. However long term features of the dipole field as the existence of a period of low field during most of the Mesozoic are now firmly established even though the transition mode between this Mesozoic low and the Quaternary high field remains unclear.

  20. Resistance and host-response of selected plants to Meloidogyne megadora.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, A M S F; de A Santos, M S N

    2002-06-01

    Fourteen plant species, including 30 genotypes, were assessed for host suitability to Meloidogyne megadora in a growth room at 20 to 28 degrees C. Host suitability was based on the gall index (GI) and the reproduction factor (Rf):final population density (Pf)/initial population density (Pi). The presence of distinct galling was observed on roots of six plant species, and reproduction occurred on five of the 14 species tested. Three cultivars of cantaloupe (cvs. Branco do Ribatejo, Concerto, and Galia), three of cucumber (cvs. LM 809, Half Long Palmetto, and Market More), six of banana (cvs. Maçá, Ouro Branco, Ouro Roxo, Prata, Páo, and Valery), and one of broad bean (cv. Algarve) were considered susceptible (Pf/Pi > 1). Resistant cultivars (Pf/Pi = 0) included beet (cv, Crosby), pepper (cv. LM 204), watermelon (cvs. Black Magic and Crimson Sweet), tomato (cvs. Moneymaker and Rossol), radish (cv. Cherry Belle), and corn (cv. Dunia); sunn hemp and black velvetbean genotypes were also resistant. All Brassica cultivars were galled, although no egg masses were observed (Pf/Pi = 0), and classified as resistant/hypersensitive. PMID:19265922

  1. Physicists for Human Rights in the Former Soviet Union

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyak, Yuri

    2005-03-01

    In his 1940 paper `Freedom and Science' Albert Einstein emphasized that ``intellectual independence is a primary necessity for the scientific inquirer'' and that ``political liberty is also extraordinarily important for his work.'' Raised in the tradition of intellectual independence and dedicated to the scientific truth, physicists were among the first to stand up for freedom in the USSR. It was no coincidence that the founders of the first independent Human Rights Committee (1970) were physicists: Andrei Sakharov, Valery Chalidze and Andrei Tverdokhlebov. In 1973 a physicist, Alexander Voronel, founded a Moscow Sunday (refusenik) Seminar -- the first openly independent scientific body in the history of the USSR. In 1976 physicists Andrei Sakharov, Yuri Orlov and a mathematician Natan Sharansky were the leading force in founding the famous Moscow Helsinki Human Rights Watch group. This talk briefly describes the special position of physicists (often viewed as Einstein's colleagues) in Soviet society, as well as their unique role in the struggle for human rights. It describes in some detail the Moscow Sunday Seminar, and extensions thereof such as International Conferences, the Computer School and the Computer Database of Refuseniks. The Soviet government considered such truly independent organizations as a challenge to Soviet authority and tried to destroy them. The Seminar's success and its very existence owed much to the support of Western scientific organizations, who persuaded their members to attend the Seminar and visit scientist-refuseniks. The human rights struggle led by physicists contributed substantially to the demise of the Soviet system.

  2. STS-96 Mission Highlights. Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In this first part of a three-part video mission-highlights set, the flight of the STS-96 Space Shuttle Orbiter Discovery is reviewed. The flight crew consists of Kent V. Rominger, Commander; Rick D. Husband, Pilot; and Mission Specialists Ellen Ochoa, Tamara E. Jernigan, Daniel T. Barry, Julie Payette (Canadian), and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev (Russian). The primary goals of this mission were to work on logistics and resupply the International Space Station (ISS). This is the first flight to dock to the International Space Station. The primary payloads are the Russian cargo crane, known as STRELA, which the astronauts mount to the exterior of the Russian station segment, the SPACEHAB Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), and a U.S. built crane called the ORU Transfer Device (OTD). Other payloads include the Student Tracked Atmospheric Research Satellite for Heuristic International Networking Equipment (STARSHINE), the Shuttle Vibration Forces Experiment (SVF), and the Orbiter Integrated Vehicle Health Monitoring - HEDS Technology Demonstration (IVHM HTD). The traditional pre-launch breakfast, being suited up, entry into the Shuttle, and views of the liftoff from several different vantage points are shown. In-flight footage includes views from the robot arm conducting a television survey of Discovery's payload bay and the flawless docking of the Unity module with the International Space Station. During the docking, camera views from both the ISS and Discovery are presented. These activities make up the first three Flight Days of STS-96.

  3. STS-91 Mission Specialist Ryumin suits up for launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    STS-91 Mission Specialist and Russian cosmonaut Valery Victorovitch Ryumin is outfitted with his ascent/reentry flight suit and helmet by two suit technicians in the Operations and Checkout (O&C) Building. The final suit fitting and checkout takes place prior to the crew walkout and transport to Launch Pad 39A. He has been director of the Russian Shuttle-Mir program and flight director for the Salyut-7 and Mir space stations and is a veteran of three space flights with a total of 362 days in space. This will be Ryumin's first visit to Mir. However, his experience with Russian spacecraft in orbit will prove extremely valuable as he helps the crew with Mir equipment transfer operations. He will also be assessing the condition of the station for the Russian space program. STS-91 is scheduled to be launched on June 2 with a launch window opening around 6:10 p.m. EDT. The mission will feature the ninth and final Shuttle docking with the Russian space station Mir, the first Mir docking for Discovery, the first on-orbit test of the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), and the first flight of the new Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank. Astronaut Andrew S. W. Thomas will return to Earth as a STS- 91 crew member after living more than four months aboard Mir.

  4. STS-91 Mission Specialist Ryumin visits KSC to participate in the TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    STS-91 Mission Specialist and Russian cosmonaut Valery Victorovitch Ryumin, arrives at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard a T-38 jet. He is here to participate in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. The STS-91 launch is targeted for June 2 with a launch window opening around 6:10 p.m. EDT. The mission will conclude Phase I of the joint U.S.-Russian International Space Station Program. Although it will be the ninth Shuttle docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, it will be the first Mir docking for the Space Shuttle orbiter Discovery. Ryumin is a veteran of three space flights and has logged 362 days in space. The STS-91 mission will also be the first flight for the new Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank. The STS-91 flight crew also includes Mission Commander Charles Precourt; Pilot Dominic Gorie; and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence; Franklin Chang-Diaz, Ph.D.; and Janet Kavandi, Ph.D. Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will be returning to Earth with the crew after living aboard Mir since January 25, 1998.

  5. Chemosensory Factors Influencing Alcohol Perception, Preferences, and Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Bachmanov, Alexander A.; Kiefer, Stephen W.; Molina, Juan Carlos; Tordoff, Michael G.; Duffy, Valerie B.; Bartoshuk, Linda M.; Mennella, Julie A.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the proceedings of a symposium at the 2002 RSA/ISBRA Meeting in San Francisco, California, co-organized by Julie A. Mennella and Alexander A. Bachmanov of the Monell Chemical Senses Center. The goal of this symposium was to review the role that chemosensory factors (taste, smell, and chemical irritation) play in the perception, preference, and consumption of alcohol. The presented research focused on both humans and laboratory animals and used a variety of approaches including genetic, developmental, pharmacological, behavioral, and psychophysical studies. The presentations were as follows: (1) Introduction and overview of the chemical senses (Julie A. Mennella and Alexander A. Bachmanov); (2) Taste reactivity as a measure of alcohol palatability and its relation to alcohol consumption in rats (Stephen W. Kiefer); (3) Early learning about the sensory properties of alcohol in laboratory animals (Juan Carlos Molina); (4) Early learning about the sensory properties of alcohol in humans (Julie A. Mennella); (5) Genetic dissection of the ethanol-sweet taste relationship in mice (Alexander A. Bachmanov and Michael Tordoff); and (6) Human genetic variation in taste: connections with alcohol sensation and intake (Valerie B. Duffy and Linda M. Bartoshuk). The symposium concluded with a general discussion. PMID:12605071

  6. STS-113 Post Flight Presentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-01-01

    The STS-113 post-flight presentation begins with a view of Mission Specialists Michael E. Lopez-Alegria and John B. Herrington getting suited for the space mission. The STS-113 crew consists of: Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Paul Lockhart, Mission Specialists Michael Lopez-Alegria and John Herrington. Cosmonauts Valery Korzun, and Sergei Treschev, and astronaut Peggy Whitson who are all members of the expedition five crew, and Commander Kenneth Bowersox, Flight Engineers Nikolai Budarin and Donald Pettit, members of Expedition Six. The main goal of this mission is to take Expedition Six up to the International Space Station and Return Expedition Five to the Earth. The second objective is to install the P(1) Truss segment. Three hours prior to launch, the crew of Expedition Six along with James Wetherbee, Paul Lockhart, Michael Lopez-Alegria and John Herrington are shown walking to an astrovan, which takes them to the launch pad. The actual liftoff is presented. Three Extravehicular Activities (EVA)'s are performed on this mission. Michael Lopez-Alegria and John Herrington are shown performing EVA 1 and EVA 2 which include making connections between the P1 and S(0) Truss segments, and installing fluid jumpers. A panoramic view of the ISS with the Earth in the background is shown. The grand ceremony of the crew exchange is presented. The astronauts performing everyday duties such as brushing teeth, washing hair, sleeping, and eating pistachio nuts are shown. The actual landing of the Space Shuttle is presented.

  7. Expedition 5 Commander Korzun before STS-111 launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Wearing a cap with the New York Fire Department logo, Expedition 5 Commander Valeri Korzun suits up for the second launch attempt aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on mission STS-111 to the International Space Station. This is Korzun's first Shuttle flight. Expedition 5 will replace Expedition 4 on board the Station. Expedition 4 crew members will return to Earth with the STS-111 crew on Endeavour. This mission marks the 14th Shuttle flight to the International Space Station and the third Shuttle mission this year. Mission STS-111 is the 18th flight of Endeavour and the 110th flight overall in NASA's Space Shuttle program. On mission STS-111, astronauts will deliver the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, the Mobile Base System (MBS), and the Expedition Five crew to the Space Station. During the seven days Endeavour will be docked to the Station, three spacewalks will be performed dedicated to installing MBS and the replacement wrist-roll joint on the Station's Canadarm2 robotic arm. Liftoff is scheduled for 5:22 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A.

  8. STS-113 Flight Day 6 Highlights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-11-01

    This video shows the activities of the STS-113 crew (Jim Wetherbee, Commander; Paul Lockhart, Pilot; Michael Lopez-Alegria, John Herrington, Mission Specialists) during flight day 6. Also shown are the Expedition 5 (Valeri Korzun, Commander; Peggy Whitsun, ISS Science Officer/Flight Engineer; Sergei Treschev, Flight Engineer) and Expedition 6 (Kenneth Bowersox, Commander; Donald Pettit, Nikolai Budarin, Flight Engineers) crews of the ISS (International Space Station). The primary activity of flight day 6 is the outfitting of the P1 (Port 1) Truss Structure. The suiting up and departure of Lopez-Alegria and Herrington through the ISS Quest airlock is shown. The departure is shown through sequential still video. The ISS CETA handrail cart is shown in use, as is a pistol-grip space tool. At the end of the EVA, the astronauts are shown cleaning up outside the ISS. The video also contains a Thanksgiving message about the importance of technological advances in spaceflight, and footage of the Moon disappearing behind the Earth's limb.

  9. Generation and Properties of Large-Scale Non-axisymmetric Magnetic Fields by Solar Dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pipin, Valery; Kosovichev, Alexander

    2015-08-01

    Large-scale non-axisymmetric magnetic fields generated by the solar dynamo, and presumably responsible for the phenomenon of "active longitudes", play an important role in the distribution of solar activity and flares. By calculating 3D mean-field dynamo models, we show that nonlinear coupling between axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric modes, e.g. due to the magnetic feedback on the alpha-effect (see, e.g., [1]), can maintain a large-scale non-axisymmetric dynamo process. Non-axisymmetric random fluctuations of dynamo parameters can be another source for the non-axisymmetric magnetic fields on the Sun. Such fluctuations can provide a mechanism of the magnetic energy transfer from the global field to the non-axisymmetric modes. It is shown that the rotational periods of the non-axisymmetric field correspond to the dynamo process operating in the subsurface shear layer which is located in the range of depths 0.85-0.95R. We find that the magnetic helicity conservation quenches generation of the non-axisymmetric dynamo modes as well as it does for the axisymmetric dynamo. It is concluded that the 3D mean-field non-axisymmetric dynamo models can potentially explain the observed distribution of the solar magnetic activity.1. Moss, D.,Non-axisymmetric solar magnetic fields, 1999, MNRAS, 306, 300On 3/18/2015 2:29 PM, Valery Pipin wrote:

  10. STS-113 landing guests after landing at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Mrs. Daniel R. Mulville shakes hands with Kent V. Rominger, Deputy Director of Flight Crew Operations, on the runway of the Shuttle Landing Facility following the landing of Endeavour. Mrs. Mulville is the wife of Dr. Daniel R. Mulville, NASA Associate Deputy Administrator. In the group, from left are KSC Director Roy D. Bridges; Mrs. Mulville; Dr. Mulville (back to camera); James D. Halsell Jr., Manager of Launch Integration at KSC, Space Shuttle Program; Rominger; and STS-113 Commander James Wetherbee. Commander Wetherbee earlier guided Space Shuttle Endeavour to a flawless touchdown on runway 33 at the Shuttle Landing Facility after completing the 13-day, 18-hour, 48-minute, 5.74-million mile STS-113 mission to the International Space Station. Main gear touchdown was at 2:37:12 p.m. EST, nose gear touchdown was at 2:37:23 p.m., and wheel stop was at 2:38:25 p.m. Poor weather conditions thwarted landing opportunities until a fourth day, the first time in Shuttle program history that a landing has been waved off for three consecutive days. The orbiter also carried the other members of the STS-113 crew, Pilot Paul Lockhart and Mission Specialists Michael Lopez-Alegria and John Herrington, as well as the returning Expedition Five crew, Commander Valeri Korzun, ISS Science Officer Peggy Whitson and Flight Engineer Sergei Treschev. The installation of the P1 truss on the International Space Station was accomplished during the mission.

  11. STS-113 Commander James Wetherbee after landing at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-113 Commander James Wetherbee shakes hands with KSC Director Roy D. Bridges Jr. following landing at the Shuttle Landing Facility. From left are Kent Rominger, Deputy Director of Flight Crew Operations, Wetherbee, Dr. Daniel R. Mulville, NASA Associate Deputy Administrator, and Bridges. Commander Wetherbee earlier guided Space Shuttle Endeavour to a flawless touchdown on runway 33 at the Shuttle Landing Facility after completing the 13-day, 18-hour, 48-minute, 5.74-million mile STS-113 mission to the International Space Station. Main gear touchdown was at 2:37:12 p.m. EST, nose gear touchdown was at 2:37:23 p.m., and wheel stop was at 2:38:25 p.m. Poor weather conditions thwarted landing opportunities until a fourth day, the first time in Shuttle program history that a landing has been waved off for three consecutive days. The orbiter also carried the other members of the STS-113 crew, Pilot Paul Lockhart and Mission Specialists Michael Lopez-Alegria and John Herrington, as well as the returning Expedition Five crew, Commander Valeri Korzun, ISS Science Officer Peggy Whitson and Flight Engineer Sergei Treschev. The installation of the P1 truss on the International Space Station was accomplished during the mission.

  12. STS-113 Flight Day 6 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This video shows the activities of the STS-113 crew (Jim Wetherbee, Commander; Paul Lockhart, Pilot; Michael Lopez-Alegria, John Herrington, Mission Specialists) during flight day 6. Also shown are the Expedition 5 (Valeri Korzun, Commander; Peggy Whitsun, ISS Science Officer/Flight Engineer; Sergei Treschev, Flight Engineer) and Expedition 6 (Kenneth Bowersox, Commander; Donald Pettit, Nikolai Budarin, Flight Engineers) crews of the ISS (International Space Station). The primary activity of flight day 6 is the outfitting of the P1 (Port 1) Truss Structure. The suiting up and departure of Lopez-Alegria and Herrington through the ISS Quest airlock is shown. The departure is shown through sequential still video. The ISS CETA handrail cart is shown in use, as is a pistol-grip space tool. At the end of the EVA, the astronauts are shown cleaning up outside the ISS. The video also contains a Thanksgiving message about the importance of technological advances in spaceflight, and footage of the Moon disappearing behind the Earth's limb.

  13. STS-111 Flight Day 8 Highlights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-06-01

    On Flight Day 8 of STS-111 (Space Shuttle Endeavour crew includes: Kenneth Cockrell, Commander; Paul Lockhart, Pilot; Franklin Chang-Diaz, Mission Specialist; Philippe Perrin, Mission Specialist; International Space Station (ISS) Expedition 5 crew includes Valery Korzun, Commander; Peggy Whitson, Flight Engineer; Sergei Treschev, Flight Engineer; ISS Expedition 4 crew includes: Yury Onufrienko, Commander; Daniel Bursch, Flight Engineer; Carl Walz, Flight Engineer), the Leonardo Multi Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) is shown from the outside of the ISS. The MPLM, used to transport goods to the station for the Expedition 5 crew, and to return goods used by the Expedition 4 crew, is being loaded and unloaded by crewmembers. Live video from within the Destiny Laboratory Module shows Whitson and Chang-Diaz. They have just completed the second of three reboosts planned for this mission, in each of which the station will gain an additional statutory mile in altitude. Following this there is an interview conducted by ground-based reporters with some members from each of the three crews, answering various questions on their respective missions including sleeping in space and conducting experiments. Video of Earth and space tools precedes a second interview much like the first, but with the crews in their entirety. Topics discussed include the feelings of Bursch and Walz on their breaking the US record for continual days spent in space. The video ends with footage of the Southern California coastline.

  14. STS-96 Discovery Night Landing with Drag chute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    With its drag chute fully deployed, Space Shuttle Discovery lands on KSC's brightly lighted Shuttle Landing Facility runway 15, completing the 9-day, 19-hour, 13-minute and 1-second long STS-96 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 2:02:43 EDT June 6 , landing on orbit 154 of the mission. Nose gear touchdown was at 2:02:59 a.m. EDT, and the wheels stopped at 2:03:39 a.m. EDT. At the controls were Commander Kent V. Rominger and Pilot Rick D. Husband. Also onboard the orbiter were Mission Specialists Ellen Ochoa (Ph.D.), Tamara E. Jernigan (Ph.D.), Daniel S. Barry (M.D., Ph.D.), Julie Payette and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev. Payette represents the Canadian Space Agency and Tokarev the Russian Space Agency. The crew returned from the second flight to the International Space Station on a logistics and resupply mission. This was the 94th flight in the Space Shuttle program and the 26th for Discovery, also marking the 47th landing at KSC, the 24th in the last 25 missions, 11th at night, and the 18th consecutive landing in Florida.

  15. STS-112 Mission Highlights Resource Tape Part 2 of 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    An overview of the STS-112 Mission is presented. The fourth flight day begins with a view inside of the Destiny Laboratory of the International Space Station where Expedition Five Commander Valery Korzun is shown. The robotics workstation where Mission Specialist Sandra Mangus and Flight Engineer Peggy Whitson operate Canadarm 2 to lift the S(1) Truss segment out of the payload bay of the Space Shuttle Atlantis and maneuver it for installation onto the S(1) Truss is presented. Mission Specialist Piers Sellers is shown preparing for his six and one half hour spacewalk by performing breathing exercises. Animation of the installation of the S(1) Truss, and also the unbirthing of the S(1) truss is also presented. Mission Specialists David Wolf and Piers Sellers are shown getting suited for their spacewalks. During the spacewalk, David Wolf is removing the antenna assembly from its launched position and Piers Sellers is releasing launch restraints from the Radiator Beam Assembly. A beautiful view of the coast of Texas is captured during this spacewalk. Flight day five shows pilot Pam Melroy and Mission Specialist Dave Wolf working inside of the International Space Station's Quest Airlock. Flight day six is shown with Dave Wolf and Piers Sellers exiting their spacesuits inside of the Quest Airlock Module after a successful spacewalk. This presentation ends with views of the International Space Station's installed S(1) Truss, rotation of the radiator assembly and the radiator's coolant tubing.

  16. STS-112 Flight Day 10 Highlights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-10-01

    On Flight Day 10 of the STS-112 mission, its crew (Jeffrey Ashby, Commander; Pamela Melroy, Pilot; David Wolf, Mission Specialist; Piers Sellers, Mission Specialist; Sandra Magnus, Mission Specialist; Fyodor Yurchikhin, Mission Specialist) on the Atlantis and the Expedition 5 crew on the International Space Station (ISS) (Valery Korzun, Commander; Peggy Whitson, Flight Engineer; Sergei Treschev, Flight Engineer) are shown exchanging farewells in the ISS's Destiny Laboratory Module following the completion of a week-long period of docked operations. The Expedition 5 crew is nearing the end of five and a half continuous months aboard the space station. Following the closing of the hatches, the Atlantis Orbiter undocks from the station, and Melroy pilots the shuttle slowly away from the ISS, and engages in a radial fly-around of the station. During the fly-around cameras aboard Atlantis shows ISS from a number of angles. ISS cameras also show Atlantis. There are several shots of each craft with a variety of background settings including the Earth, its limb, and open space. The video concludes with a live interview of Ashby, Melroy and Yurchikhin, still aboard Atlantis, conducted by a reporter on the ground. Questions range from feelings on the conclusion of the mission to the experience of being in space. The primary goal of the mission was the installation of the Integrated Truss Structure S1 on the ISS.

  17. Two Shuttle crews check equipment at SPACEHAB to be used on ISS Flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At Astrotech in Titusville, Fla., STS-96 Mission Specialists Tamara E. Jernigan and Daniel T. Barry take turns working with a Russian cargo crane, the Strela, which is to be mounted to the exterior of the Russian station segment on the International Space Station (ISS). Technicians around the table observe. The STS-96 crew is taking part in a Crew Equipment Interface Test. Other members participating are Commander Kent V. Rominger, Pilot Rick Douglas Husband, and Mission Specialists Julie Payette, with the Canadian Space Agency, and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev, with the Russian Space Agency. For the first time, STS-96 will include an Integrated Cargo Carrier (ICC) that will carry the Russian cargo crane; the SPACEHAB Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), which is a logistics items carrier; and a U.S.-built crane (ORU Transfer Device, or OTD) that will be stowed on the station for use during future ISS assembly missions. The ICC can carry up to 6,000 lb of unpressurized payload. It was built for SPACEHAB by DaimlerChrysler Aerospace and RSC Energia of Korolev, Russia. STS-96 is targeted for launch on May 24 from Launch Pad 39B. STS-101 is scheduled to launch in early December 1999.

  18. STS-84 M.S. Kondakova with husband Ryumin at SLF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-84 Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova, a cosmonaut with the Russian Space Agency, and her husband, Valery Ryumin, greet press represenatives and other well wishers after her arrival at KSCs Shuttle Landing Facility. Ryumin is director of the Mir- Shuttle program for RSC Energia in Russia. This will be Kondakovas first flight on a U.S. Space Shuttle, but her second trip into space. She spent 169 days in space as flight engineer of the 17th main mission on Mir from October 1994 to March 1995. STS-84 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. During the docking, STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale will transfer to the Russian space station to become a member of the Mir 23 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is scheduled to remain on Mir about four months until his replacement arrives on STS-86 in September.

  19. Two Shuttle crews check equipment at SPACEHAB to be used on ISS Flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At Astrotech in Titusville, Fla., STS-96 Mission Speciaists Daniel T. Barry (left), Julie Payette (center, with camera), and Tamara E. Jernigan (right, pointing) get a close look at one of the payloads on their upcoming mission. Other crew members are Commander Kent V. Rominger, and Mission Specialists Ellen Ochoa and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev, with the Russian Space Agency. Payette is with the Canadian Space Agency. For the first time, STS-96 will include an Integrated Cargo Carrier (ICC) that will carry a Russian cargo crane, the Strela, to be mounted to the exterior of the Russian station segment on the International Space Station (ISS); the SPACEHAB Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), which is a logistics items carrier; and a U.S.-built crane (ORU Transfer Device, or OTD) that will be stowed on the station for use during future ISS assembly missions. The ICC can carry up to 6,000 lb of unpressurized payload. It was built for SPACEHAB by DaimlerChrysler and RSC Energia of Korolev, Russia. STS-96 is targeted for launch on May 24 from Launch Pad 39B. STS-101 is scheduled to launch in early December 1999.

  20. STS-112 Flight Day 10 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On Flight Day 10 of the STS-112 mission, its crew (Jeffrey Ashby, Commander; Pamela Melroy, Pilot; David Wolf, Mission Specialist; Piers Sellers, Mission Specialist; Sandra Magnus, Mission Specialist; Fyodor Yurchikhin, Mission Specialist) on the Atlantis and the Expedition 5 crew on the International Space Station (ISS) (Valery Korzun, Commander; Peggy Whitson, Flight Engineer; Sergei Treschev, Flight Engineer) are shown exchanging farewells in the ISS's Destiny Laboratory Module following the completion of a week-long period of docked operations. The Expedition 5 crew is nearing the end of five and a half continuous months aboard the space station. Following the closing of the hatches, the Atlantis Orbiter undocks from the station, and Melroy pilots the shuttle slowly away from the ISS, and engages in a radial fly-around of the station. During the fly-around cameras aboard Atlantis shows ISS from a number of angles. ISS cameras also show Atlantis. There are several shots of each craft with a variety of background settings including the Earth, its limb, and open space. The video concludes with a live interview of Ashby, Melroy and Yurchikhin, still aboard Atlantis, conducted by a reporter on the ground. Questions range from feelings on the conclusion of the mission to the experience of being in space. The primary goal of the mission was the installation of the Integrated Truss Structure S1 on the ISS.

  1. Resistance and Host-response of Selected Plants to Meloidogyne megadora

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, A. M. S. F.; de A. Santos, M. S. N.

    2002-01-01

    Fourteen plant species, including 30 genotypes, were assessed for host suitability to Meloidogyne megadora in a growth room at 20 to 28°C. Host suitability was based on the gall index (GI) and the reproduction factor (Rf):final population density (Pf)/initial population density (Pi). The presence of distinct galling was observed on roots of six plant species, and reproduction occurred on five of the 14 species tested. Three cultivars of cantaloupe (cvs. Branco do Ribatejo, Concerto, and Galia), three of cucumber (cvs. LM 809, Half Long Palmetto, and Market More), six of banana (cvs. Maçá, Ouro Branco, Ouro Roxo, Prata, Páo, and Valery), and one of broad bean (cv. Algarve) were considered susceptible (Pf/Pi > 1). Resistant cultivars (Pf/Pi = 0) included beet (cv, Crosby), pepper (cv. LM 204), watermelon (cvs. Black Magic and Crimson Sweet), tomato (cvs. Moneymaker and Rossol), radish (cv. Cherry Belle), and corn (cv. Dunia); sunn hemp and black velvetbean genotypes were also resistant. All Brassica cultivars were galled, although no egg masses were observed (Pf/Pi = 0), and classified as resistant/hypersensitive. PMID:19265922

  2. Understanding the Spectral Signature Characterization of Cropland Burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boren, E. J.; Boschetti, L.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate and reliable cropland burned area products are essential for aiding estimates of trace atmospheric gases and particles which influence atmospheric chemistry dynamics and air quality. Cropland residue burning has been estimated to account for approximately 8-11% of all global fires (Korontzi et al. 2006). Cropland residue burning is also a significant fraction of atmospheric emissions at the local level. Timely and accurate assessments of cropland fire activity are needed by local and regional administrators involved in carbon emission, human health, and air quality regulations. Remote sensing systems used for monitoring fire activity have significant detection uncertainty due to ambiguous spectral characteristics of cropland burning. The present research is focused on the quantitative characterization of the spectral signature of cropland burning by monitoring the spectral signal throughout the full growing, harvest, and burning periods. Field data collection was conducted in the southern Palouse region of Idaho and Washington. Reflectance was measured on a test area of spring wheat fields with an analytical spectral device (ASD) spectrometer. All the dates for field data collections are coincident with Landsat 8 overpasses, and the spatial sampling of field measurements were performed following the VALERI protocol for upscaling to 30 meter pixels (Baret et al. 2005).

  3. Goldin congratulates Culbertson on successful completion of Phase I Shuttle/Mir

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    NASA Administrator Dan Goldin congratulates Phase I Shuttle/Mir Program Manager Frank Culbertson on the successful conclusion of Phase I of the joint U.S.-Russian International Space Station Program at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility following Discovery's landing, as Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt (applauding) and the other members of the STS-91 flight crew look on. Culbertson is holding an American flag, a special tool, and an optical disc, which he had just been presented by Goldin. The flag rode aboard Mir from the beginning of the Phase I program and was brought back to Earth by the STS-91 crew. Discovery's main gear touchdown on Runway 15 was at 2:00:00 p.m. EDT on June 12, 1998, on orbit 155 of the mission. The wheels stopped at 2:01:00 p.m. EDT, for a total mission-elapsed time of 9 days, 19 hours, 55 minutes and 1 second. The 91st Shuttle mission was the 44th KSC landing in the history of the Space Shuttle program and the 15th consecutive landing at KSC. Besides Commander Precourt, the STS-91 flight crew also included Pilot Dominic L. Gorie and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, Janet Lynn Kavandi and Valery Victorovitch Ryumin of the Russian Space Agency. Astronaut Andrew S. W. Thomas also returned to Earth from Mir as an STS-91 crew member after 141 days in space.

  4. STS-96 Mission Specialist Ochoa prepares to enter Discovery as part of TCDT activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the white room, an environmental chamber at Launch Pad 39B, Mission Specialist Ellen Ochoa (Ph.D.) gets help with her equipment from Al Schmidt, Chris Menard and Travis Thompson before she enters the orbiter Discovery. The STS-96 crew are taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities, which provide opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay, as well as simulated countdown exercises and emergency egress training. Other crew members are Commander Kent V. Rominger, Pilot Rick Douglas Husband, and Mission Specialists Tamara E. Jernigan (Ph.D.), Daniel Barry (M.D., Ph.D.), Julie Payette, who is with the Canadian Space Agency, and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev, who is with the Russian Space Agency. STS-96, scheduled for liftoff on May 20 at 9:32 a.m., is a logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-led experiment.

  5. STS-96 Mission Specialist Jernigan prepares to enter Discovery as part of TCDT activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the white room, an environmental chamber at Launch Pad 39B, Mission Specialist Tamara E. Jernigan (Ph.D.) gets ready to enter the orbiter Discovery. Helping her with her equipment are (left to right) Mike Birkenscher, Travis Thompson and James Davis. The STS-96 crew are taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities, which provide opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay, as well as simulated countdown exercises and emergency egress training. Other crew members are Commander Kent V. Rominger, Pilot Rick Douglas Husband, and Mission Specialists Ellen Ochoa (Ph.D.), Daniel Barry (M.D., Ph.D.), Julie Payette, who is with the Canadian Space Agency, and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev, who is with the Russian Space Agency. STS-96, scheduled for liftoff on May 20 at 9:32 a.m., is a logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-led experiment.

  6. STS-96 Mission Specialist Payette prepares to enter Discovery as part of TCDT activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the white room, an environmental chamber at Launch Pad 39B, STS-96 Mission Specialist Julie Payette, with the Canadian Space Agency, is helped with her flight suit before entering the orbiter Discovery. The crew are taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities, which provide opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay, as well as simulated countdown exercises and emergency egress training. Other crew members are Commander Kent V. Rominger, Pilot Rick Douglas Husband, and Mission Specialists Ellen Ochoa (Ph.D.), Tamara E. Jernigan (Ph.D.), Daniel Barry (M.D., Ph.D.) and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev, who is with the Russian Space Agency. STS-96, scheduled for liftoff on May 20 at 9:32 a.m., is a logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-led experiment.

  7. STS-91 Mission Specialist Ryumin practices slidewire basket procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    STS-91 Mission Specialist Valery Ryumin, with the Russian Space Agency, reaches for a lever which releases a slidewire basket as Mission Commander Charles Precourt looks on during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) training activities at the 195-foot level of Launch Complex 39A. The crew is practicing emergency egress procedures during the TCDT, a dress rehearsal for launch. STS-91 is scheduled to be launched on June 2 with a launch window opening around 6:10 p.m. EDT. The mission will feature the ninth Shuttle docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, the first Mir docking for Discovery, the conclusion of Phase I of the joint U.S.-Russian International Space Station Program, and the first flight of the new Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank. The STS-91 flight crew also includes Pilot Dominic Gorie and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence; Franklin Chang- Diaz, Ph.D.; and Janet Kavandi, Ph.D. Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will be returning to Earth with the crew after living more than four months aboard Mir.

  8. Understanding Sun-Climate Connection by Analysis of Historical Sunspot, Auroral and Weather Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, K. D.; Yau, K. K.

    2005-12-01

    Fifty years of galactic cosmic ray data show changes with the solar cycle. Deflection of the highly energetic particles from exploding supernovae by the solar wind and associated magnetic field also modulates cosmogenic radioisotope production high in the atmosphere. The same trends are seen in carbon-14 and beryllium-10 abundances from long-lived trees and polar ice cores, respectively. Total solar irradiances measured by satellite radiometers show a 0.1% variance over the last two solar cycles, with only a small effect on global temperatures. A longer view is obviously needed. During the Maunder Minimum (1645-1715) sunspots were rarely seen. Total solar irradiances, reconstructed from historical sunspot data, were 0.24% lower, correlating nicely with an estimated 0.5-degree drop in Northern Hemisphere surface temperatures during the Little Ice Age [Lean and Rind, J. Clim. 11, 3069, 1998]. A longer time series has been reconstructed from even earlier records. From the frequencies of sunspot and auroral sightings in East Asian and European chronicles, C-14 and Be-10 abundances we have reconstructed the recent history of a variable Sun. In the past 1800 years the Sun has gone through nine cycles of brightness change. Although these long-term changes were <1% they have clearly affected the climate [Pang and Yau, Eos 83, No. 43, 481, 2002]. We have also analyzed Chinese historical weather records for comparison. Reports of unseasonable cold are classified by their degree of severity: (1) Late (April-June) or early (July-Sept.) killing frosts; (2) Bitter cold/heavy snowfall; and (3) Heavy sustained snowfall, bitter cold with frozen wells, lakes, rivers and icebound seas. The latter cases were often widespread and multi-year. All categories occurred most often during Maunder Minimum. The Category 3 episodes were in 1652-54, 1656, 1664, 1670-72, 1676-77, 1683, 1688-91, 1716 and 1718-19. The coldest time 1670-1697 coincides with lows in aurora sightings and numerical model simulated temperatures, and highs in radioisotope production. There was only one Category 3 episode between the Maunder and Dalton Minima-in 1761 (due to a big eruption); and two in the Dalton Minimum (1795-1825)-in 1796 and 1814-17. The 1815 Tambora eruption, with the reduced solar luminosity, seem to have been responsible for the "year without summer" and long-cold spell. The Sun has brightened since the Dalton Minimum, but the climate of China stayed cold through the 19th century. However there were only two Category 3 episodes: in 1841 and 1877. The onset of global warming reduced that to just once in the 20th century: 1955. The climate of China seems to have been warm during the Late 14th-Century Maximum (1350-1410). We have found only one Category 1 episode: in 1393. It then turned cold during the Sporer Minimum (1410-1590). Category 3 episodes occurred in 1453-54, 1493, 1513, 1569, and 1577-78. The early 1453 great Kuwae eruption apparently deepened and prolonged the first [Pang, Eos 74, No. 43, 106, 1993; Simarski, Aramco World 47, No.6, 8, 1996]. We conclude that the climate of China in the past 650 years generally follows world trend. The major forcing seems to have been changing solar luminosity, as all but four severe weather episodes coincide with solar minimum. The exact mechanism remains unknown, but could have been increased cloudiness.

  9. Changes in urinary excretion of water and sodium transporters during amiloride and bendroflumethiazide treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Janni M; Mose, Frank H; Kulik, Anna-Ewa O; Bech, Jesper N; Fenton, Robert A; Pedersen, Erling B

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To quantify changes in urinary excretion of aquaporin2 water channels (u-AQP2), the sodium-potassium-chloride co-transporter (u-NKCC2) and the epithelial sodium channels (u-ENaC) during treatment with bendroflumethiazide (BFTZ), amiloride and placebo. METHODS: In a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, 3-way crossover study we examined 23 healthy subjects on a standardized diet and fluid intake. The subjects were treated with amiloride 5 mg, BFTZ 1.25 mg or placebo twice a day for 4.5 d before each examination day. On the examination day, glomerular filtration rate was measured by the constant infusion clearance technique with 51Cr-EDTA as reference substance. To estimate the changes in water transport via AQP2 and sodium transport via NKCC2 and ENaC, u-NKCC2, the gamma fraction of ENaC (u-ENaC?), and u-AQP2 were measured at baseline and after infusion with 3% hypertonic saline. U-NKCC2, u-ENaC?, u-AQP2 and plasma concentrations of vasopressin (p-AVP), renin (PRC), angiotensin II (p-ANG II) and aldosterone (p-Aldo) were measured, by radioimmunoassay. Central blood pressure was estimated by applanation tonometry and body fluid volumes were estimated by bio-impedance spectroscopy. General linear model with repeated measures or related samples Friedman’s two-way analysis was used to compare differences. Post hoc Bonferroni correction was used for multiple comparisons of post infusion periods to baseline within each treatment group. RESULTS: At baseline there were no differences in u-NKCC2, u-ENaC? and u-AQP2. PRC, p-Ang II and p-Aldo were increased during active treatments (P < 0.001). After hypertonic saline, u-NKCC2 increased during amiloride (6% ± 34%; P = 0.081) and increased significantly during placebo (17% ± 24%; P = 0.010). U-AQP2 increased significantly during amiloride (31% ± 22%; P < 0.001) and placebo (34% ± 27%; P < 0.001), while u-NKCC2 and u-AQP2 did not change significantly during BFTZ (-7% ± 28%; P = 0.257 and 5% ± 16%; P = 0.261). U- ENaC? increased in all three groups (P < 0.050). PRC, AngII and p-Aldo decreased to the same extent, while AVP increased, but to a smaller degree during BFTZ (P = 0.048). cDBP decreased significantly during BFTZ (P < 0.001), but not during amiloride or placebo. There were no significant differences in body fluid volumes. CONCLUSION: After hypertonic saline, u-NKCC2 and u-AQP2 increased during amiloride, but not during BFTZ. Lower p-AVP during BFTZ potentially caused less stimulation of NKCC2 and AQP2 and subsequent lower reabsorption of water and sodium. PMID:26167467

  10. Physiological relation between respiration activity and heterologous expression of selected benzoylformate decarboxylase variants in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The benzoylformate decarboxylase (BFD) from Pseudomonas putida is a biotechnologically interesting biocatalyst. It catalyses the formation of chiral 2-hydroxy ketones, which are important building blocks for stereoselective syntheses. To optimise the enzyme function often the amino acid composition is modified to improve the performance of the enzyme. So far it was assumed that a relatively small modification of the amino acid composition of a protein does not significantly influence the level of expression or media requirements. To determine, which effects these modifications might have on cultivation and product formation, six different BFD-variants with one or two altered amino acids and the wild type BFD were expressed in Escherichia coli SG13009 pKK233-2. The oxygen transfer rate (OTR) as parameter for growth and metabolic activity of the different E. coli clones was monitored on-line in LB, TB and modified PanG mineral medium with the Respiratory Activity MOnitoring System (RAMOS). Results Although the E. coli clones were genetically nearly identical, the kinetics of their metabolic activity surprisingly differed in the standard media applied. Three different types of OTR curves could be distinguished. Whereas the first type (clones expressing Leu476Pro-Ser181Thr or Leu476Pro) had typical OTR curves, the second type (clones expressing the wild type BFD, Ser181Thr or His281Ala) showed an early drop of OTR in LB and TB medium and a drastically reduced maximum OTR in modified PanG mineral medium. The third type (clone expressing Leu476Gln) behaved variable. Depending on the cultivation conditions, its OTR curve was similar to the first or the second type. It was shown, that the kinetics of the metabolic activity of the first type depended on the concentration of thiamine, which is a cofactor of BFD, in the medium. It was demonstrated that the cofactor binding strength of the different BFD-variants correlated with the differences in metabolic activity of their respective host strain. Conclusions The BFD-variants with high cofactor binding affinity (wild type, His281Ala, Ser181Thr) obviously extract thiamine from the medium and bind it tightly to the enzyme. This might explain the hampered growth of these clones. In contrast, growth of clones expressing variants with low cofactor binding affinity (Leu476His, Leu476Pro, Leu476Pro-Ser181Thr) is not impaired. Leu476Gln has an intermediate cofactor binding strength, thus, growth of its host strain depends on the specific cultivation conditions. This paper shows that slight differences of the amino acid composition can affect protein expression and cultivation and might require an adaptation of media components. Effects such as the observed are hardly foreseeable and difficult to detect in conventional screening processes. Via small scale experiments with on-line measurements in shake flasks such effects influencing the cultivation and product formation can be detected and avoided. PMID:20958977

  11. The retinaldehyde reductase DHRS3 is essential for preventing the formation of excess retinoic acid during embryonic development

    PubMed Central

    Billings, Sara E.; Pierzchalski, Keely; Butler Tjaden, Naomi E.; Pang, Xiao-Yan; Trainor, Paul A.; Kane, Maureen A.; Moise, Alexander R.

    2013-01-01

    Oxidation of retinol via retinaldehyde results in the formation of the essential morphogen all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA). Previous studies have identified critical roles in the regulation of embryonic ATRA levels for retinol, retinaldehyde, and ATRA-oxidizing enzymes; however, the contribution of retinaldehyde reductases to ATRA metabolism is not completely understood. Herein, we investigate the role of the retinaldehyde reductase Dhrs3 in embryonic retinoid metabolism using a Dhrs3-deficient mouse. Lack of DHRS3 leads to a 40% increase in the levels of ATRA and a 60% and 55% decrease in the levels of retinol and retinyl esters, respectively, in Dhrs3?/? embryos compared to wild-type littermates. Furthermore, accumulation of excess ATRA is accompanied by a compensatory 30–50% reduction in the expression of ATRA synthetic genes and a 120% increase in the expression of the ATRA catabolic enzyme Cyp26a1 in Dhrs3?/? embryos vs. controls. Excess ATRA also leads to alterations (40–80%) in the expression of several developmentally important ATRA target genes. Consequently, Dhrs3?/? embryos die late in gestation and display defects in cardiac outflow tract formation, atrial and ventricular septation, skeletal development, and palatogenesis. These data demonstrate that the reduction of retinaldehyde by DHRS3 is critical for preventing formation of excess ATRA during embryonic development.—Billings, S. E., Pierzchalski, K., Butler Tjaden, N. E., Pang, X.-Y., Trainor, P. A., Kane, M. A., Moise, A. R. The retinaldehyde reductase DHRS3 is essential for preventing the formation of excess retinoic acid during embryonic development. PMID:24005908

  12. [Obstetric medical book and women's childbirth in Qing dynasty: the case of the treatise on easy childbirth].

    PubMed

    Yu, Yon Sil

    2015-04-01

    Ye Feng composed what was to become one of the most famous and widely-circulating medical works of the late imperial period, the Treatise on Easy Childbirth. Ye Feng proposed the idea of natural childbirth, When the correct moment for birth had arrived, the child would leave its mother's body as easily as "a ripe melon drops from the stem". He argued attempts to facilitate birth were therefore not only unnecessary, and female midwives artificial intervention was not required. However, this view is to overlook the pangs of childbirth, and women bear responsibility for the failure of delivery. So his views reflect the gender order in male-dominated. Also he constructed the negative image of the midwife and belittle her childbirth techniques. As a result, midwife are excluded from the childbirth field, male doctors grasp guardianship rights of the female body. Ye Feng declared that the key to safe and successful delivery could be summed up in just a few words: "sleep, endure the pain, delay approaching the birthing tub". This view must be consistent with the Confucian norms, women to export to equip the 'patience' and 'self-control'. These norms were exposed desire men want to monitor and control the female body, effect on consolidation of patriarchal family order. In sum, the discourse of "a ripe melon drops from the stem"and "sleep, endure the pain, delay approaching the birthing tub" comprised an important intellectual resource that male doctors drew on to legitimate themselves as superior overseers of women's gestational bodies. PMID:25985779

  13. Pre-Venus-Transit Dark Lunar Eclipse Reveals a Very Large Volcanic Eruption in 1761

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    Kepler's third law states Sun-planet distances in AU. International observations of the solar parallax during the 1761/1769 Venus transits gave us the first AU in miles. Benjamin Franklin promoted American participation in the project. While serving as Ambassador to France he observed that a "dry fog” from the 1783 Laki eruption in Iceland had obscured the Sun, and led to a cold summer and winter. Using Benjamin Franklin's method I analyzed photometric observations of the dark lunar eclipse made just before the 1761 Venus transit, ice core, tree ring, and Chinese weather data, and conclude that a very large previously unknown volcanic eruption in early 1761 had cooled the world climate. Observers worldwide found the 18 May 1761 totally eclipsed Moon very dark or invisible, e.g., Wargentin could not see the Moon for 38 minutes even with a 2-ft telescope (Phil. Trans. 52, 208, 1761-1762). Since the totally eclipsed Moon is illuminated only by sunlight refracted by the Earth's atmosphere, the obscuration must have been very severe. Ice cores from Greenland and Antarctica have large sulfuric acid contents in 1761-1762, precipitated from the global volcanic acid cloud (Zeilinski, J. Geophys. Res. 102, 26625, 1997). Frost-damaged rings in American bristlecone pines confirm that 1761 was very cold (LaMarche, Nature 307, 121, 1984). Contemporary Chinese chronicles report that heavy sustained snow fell from the Tropic of Cancer to the Yellow River. Wells and rivers froze, e.g., Taihu "Great Lake” and nearby Yangtze tributaries were not navigable. Innumerable trees, birds and livestock perished, etc. All observations are consistent with the above conclusion. Finally Benjamin Franklin's criteria for a climate-altering volcanic eruption are still universally used. Moreover his legacy continues to inspire climate researchers. See Pang, Eos 74, no. 43, 106, 1993; and as cited in "Earth in Balance,” Al Gore, p. 379, 1993.

  14. Spin transistor action via tunable Landau-Zener transitions in magnetic semiconductor quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Dieter

    2013-03-01

    Spin-transistors, employing spin-orbit interaction like Datta-Das prototypes, principally suffer from low signal levels due to limitations in spin injection efficiency, fast spin relaxation and dephasing processes. Here we present an alternative concept to implement spin transistor action where efficiency is improved by keeping spin transport adiabatic. To this end a helical stray field B, generated by ferromagnetic Dysprosium stripes, is superimposed upon a two-dimensional electron system in (Cd,Mn)Te, containing Mn ions with spin 5/2. Due to the giant spin splitting, occurring at low temperatures and small B in (Cd,Mn)Te quantum wells, the B-helix translates into a spin-helix and the electron spins follow adiabatically the imposed spin texture. Within this approach the transmission of spin-polarized electrons between two contacts is regulated by changing the degree of adiabaticity, i.e. an electron's ability to follow the spin helix. This is done by means of a small applied homogeneous magnetic field while the degree of adiabaticity is monitored by the channel resistance. Our scheme allows spin information to propagate efficiently over typical device distances and provides an alternative route to realize spintronics applications. We note that our concept is not restricted to a particular choice of materials, temperature, methods of spin injection, manipulation as well as detection. Work done in cooperation with Christian Betthausen, Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, University of Regensburg, D-93040 Regensburg, Germany; Tobias Dollinger, Henri Saarikosi, Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Regensburg, D-93040 Regensburg, Germany; Valeri Kolkovsky, Grzegorz Karczewski, Tomasz Wojtowicz, Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, PL-02668 Warsaw, Poland; and Klaus Richter, Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Regensburg. Spin-transistors, employing spin-orbit interaction like Datta-Das prototypes, principally suffer from low signal levels due to limitations in spin injection efficiency, fast spin relaxation and dephasing processes. Here we present an alternative concept to implement spin transistor action where efficiency is improved by keeping spin transport adiabatic. To this end a helical stray field B, generated by ferromagnetic Dysprosium stripes, is superimposed upon a two-dimensional electron system in (Cd,Mn)Te, containing Mn ions with spin 5/2. Due to the giant spin splitting, occurring at low temperatures and small B in (Cd,Mn)Te quantum wells, the B-helix translates into a spin-helix and the electron spins follow adiabatically the imposed spin texture. Within this approach the transmission of spin-polarized electrons between two contacts is regulated by changing the degree of adiabaticity, i.e. an electron's ability to follow the spin helix. This is done by means of a small applied homogeneous magnetic field while the degree of adiabaticity is monitored by the channel resistance. Our scheme allows spin information to propagate efficiently over typical device distances and provides an alternative route to realize spintronics applications. We note that our concept is not restricted to a particular choice of materials, temperature, methods of spin injection, manipulation as well as detection. Work done in cooperation with Christian Betthausen, Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, University of Regensburg, D-93040 Regensburg, Germany; Tobias Dollinger, Henri Saarikosi, Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Regensburg, D-93040 Regensburg, Germany; Valeri Kolkovsky, Grzegorz Karczewski, Tomasz Wojtowicz, Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, PL-02668 Warsaw, Poland; and Klaus Richter, Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Regensburg. Financial support from the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft through SFB 689, WE 247618, and FOR 1483 is gratefully acknowledged

  15. PREFACE: Rusnanotech 2010 International Forum on Nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazaryan, Konstantin

    2011-03-01

    The Rusnanotech 2010 International Forum on Nanotechnology was held from November 1-3, 2010, in Moscow, Russia. It was the third forum organized by RUSNANO (Russian Corporation of Nanotechnologies) since 2008. In March 2011 RUSNANO was established as an open joint-stock company through the reorganization of the state corporation Russian Corporation of Nanotechnologies. RUSNANO's mission is to develop the Russian nanotechnology industry through co-investment in nanotechnology projects with substantial economic potential or social benefit. Within the framework of the Forum Science and Technology Program, presentations on key trends of nanotechnology development were given by foreign and Russian scientists, R&D officers of leading international companies, universities and scientific centers. The science and technology program of the Forum was divided into eight sections as follows (by following hyperlinks you may find each section's program including videos of all oral presentations): Catalysis and Chemical Industry Nanobiotechnology Nanodiagnostics Nanoelectronics Nanomaterials Nanophotonics Nanotechnolgy In The Energy Industry Nanotechnology in Medicine The scientific program of the forum included 115 oral presentations by leading scientists from 15 countries. Among them in the "Nanomaterials" section was the lecture by Dr Konstantin Novoselov, winner of the Nobel Prize in Physics 2010. The poster session consisted of over 500 presentations, 300 of which were presented in the framework of the young scientists' nanotechnology papers competition. This volume of the Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes a selection of 57 submissions. The scientific program committee: Prof Zhores Alferov, AcademicianVice-president of Russian Academy of Sciences, Nobel Prize winner, Russia, Chairman of the Program CommitteeProf Sergey Deev, Corresponding Member of Russian Academy of SciencesHead of the Laboratory of Molecular Immunology, M M Shemyakin and Yu A Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia, Deputy Chairman of the Program CommitteeProf Alexander Aseev, AcademicianVice-president of Russian Academy of Sciences Director, A V Rzhanov-Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, RussiaProf Sergey Bagaev, AcademicianDirector, Institute of Laser Physics, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, RussiaProf Alexander Gintsburg, Ademician, Russian Academy of Medical SciencesDirector Gamaleya Research Institute of Epidemiology and Microbiology, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, RussiaProf Anatoly Grigoryev, Academician, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russian Academy of Medical SciencesVice-president, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, RussiaProf Michael Kovalchuk, RAS Corresponding MemberDirector, Kurchatov Institute Russian Scientific Center, RussiaProf Valery Lunin, AcademicianDean, Department of Chemistry, Lomonosov Moscow State University, RussiaProf Valentin Parmon, Academician, DirectorBoreskov Institute of Catalysis, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, RussiaProf Rem Petrov, AcademicianAdvisor, Russian Academy of Sciences, RussiaProf Konstantin Skryabin, AcademicianDirector, Bioinzheneriya Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, RussiaProf Vsevolod Tkachuk, Academician, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russian Academy of Medical SciencesDean, Faculty of Fundamental Medicine, Lomonosov Moscow State University, RussiaProf Vladimir Fortov, AcademicianDirector, Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, RussiaProf Alexey Khokhlov, AcademicianVice Principal, Head of Innovation, Information and International Scientific Affairs Department, Lomonosov Moscow State University, RussiaProf Valery Bukhtiyarov, RAS Corresponding MemberDirector, Physicochemical Research Methods Dept., Boreskov Institute of Catalysis, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, RussiaProf Anatoly Dvurechensky, RAS Corresponding MemberDeputy Director, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of S

  16. STS-111 Flight Day 7 Highlights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-06-01

    On Flight Day 7 of STS-111 (Space Shuttle Endeavour crew includes: Kenneth Cockrell, Commander; Paul Lockhart, Pilot; Franklin Chang-Diaz, Mission Specialist; Philippe Perrin, Mission Specialist; International Space Station (ISS) Expedition 5 crew includes Valery Korzun, Commander; Peggy Whitson, Flight Engineer; Sergei Treschev, Flight Engineer; ISS Expedition 4 crew includes: Yury Onufrienko, Commander; Daniel Bursch, Flight Engineer; Carl Walz, Flight Engineer), this video opens with answers to questions asked by the public via e-mail about the altitude of the space station, the length of its orbit, how astronauts differentiate between up and down in the microgravity environment, and whether they hear wind noise during the shuttle's reentry. In video footage shot from inside the Quest airlock, Perrin is shown exiting the station to perform an extravehicular activity (EVA) with Chang-Diaz. Chang-Diaz is shown, in helmet mounted camera footage, attaching cable protection booties to a fish-stringer device with multiple hooks, and Perrin is seen loosening bolts that hold the replacement unit accomodation in launch position atop the Mobile Base System (MBS). Perrin then mounts a camera atop the mast of the MBS. During this EVA, the astronauts installed the MBS on the Mobile Transporter (MT) to support the Canadarm 2 robotic arm. A camera in the Endeavour's payload bay provides footage of the Pacific Ocean, the Baja Peninsula, and Midwestern United States. Plumes from wildfires in Nevada, Idaho, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, and Montana are visible. The station continues over the Great Lakes and the Eastern Provinces of Canada.

  17. STS-112 Flight Day 4 Highlights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-10-01

    On the fourth day of STS-112, its crew (Jeffrey Ashby, Commander; Pamela Melroy, Pilot; David Wolf, Mission Specialist; Piers Sellers, Mission Specialist; Sandra Magnus, Mission Specialist; Fyodor Yurchikhin, Mission Specialist) onboard Atlantis and the Expedition 5 crew (Valery Korzun, Commander; Peggy Whitson, Flight Engineer; Sergei Treschev, Flight Engineer) onboard the International Space Station (ISS) are seen preparing for the installation of the S1 truss structure. Inside the Destiny Laboratory Module, Korzun and other crewmembers are seen as they busily prepare for the work of the day. Sellers dons an oxygen mask and uses an exercise machine in order to purge the nitrogen from his bloodstream, in preparation for an extravehicular activity (EVA). Whitson uses the ISS's Canadarm 2 robotic arm to grapple the S1 truss and remove it from Atlantis' payload bay, with the assistance of Magnus. Using the robotic arm, Whitson slowly maneuvers the 15 ton truss structure into alignment with its attachment point on the starboard side of the S0 truss structure, where the carefully orchestrated mating procedures take place. There is video footage of the entire truss being rotated and positioned by the arm, and ammonia tank assembly on the structure is visible, with Earth in the background. Following the completion of the second stage capture, the robotic arm is ungrappled from truss. Sellers and Wolf are shown exiting the the Quest airlock hatch to begin their EVA. They are shown performing a variety of tasks on the now attached S1 truss structure, including work on the Crew Equipment Translation Cart (CETA), the S-band Antenna Assembly, and umbilical cables that provide power and remote operation capability to cameras. During their EVA, they are shown using a foot platform on the robotic arm. Significant portions of their activities are shown from the vantage of helmet mounted video cameras. The video closes with a final shot of the ISS and its new S1 truss.

  18. Revisiting Lake Hämelsee: reconstructing abrupt Lateglacial climate transitions using state- of-the-art palaeoclimatological proxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engels, Stefan; Hoek, Wim; Lane, Christine; Sachse, Dirk; Wagner-Cremer, Friederike

    2015-04-01

    Lake Hämelsee (Germany) is one of the northernmost sites in NW Europe that has varved sediments throughout large parts of its Lateglacial and Early Holocene sediment sequence. Previous research on this site has shown its potential, in terms of chronological resolution and palaeoecological reconstructions, for reconstructing the abrupt transitions into and out of the Younger Dryas, the last cold period of the last glacial. The site was revisited during a 1-week summer school for Early Stage Researchers (2013), within the INTIMATE Example training and research project, supported by EU Cost Action ES0907. Two overlapping sediment sequences were retrieved from the centre of the lake during the summer school. These sediments have since formed the basis for follow-up research projects, which have sparked the collaboration of around 30 researchers in 12 laboratories across Europe. A chronological framework for the core has been composed from a combination of varve counting, radiocarbon dating and tephrochronology. Tephrostratigraphic correlations allow direct correlation and precise comparison of the record to marine and ice core records from the North Atlantic region, and other terrestrial European archives. Furthermore, the core is has been subjected to multiple sedimentological (e.g. XRF, loss-on-ignition), geochemical (e.g. lipid biomarkers, GDGTs) and palaeoecological (e.g. pollen, chironomids) proxy-based reconstructions of past environmental and climatic conditions. The results provide important insights into the nature of the abrupt climate transitions of the Lateglacial and Early Holocene, both locally and on a continental scale. The INTIMATE Example participants: Illaria Baneschi, Achim Brauer, Christopher Bronk Ramsey, Renee de Bruijn, Siwan Davies, Aritina Haliuc, Katalin Hubay, Gwydion Jones, Meike Müller, Johanna Menges, Josef Merkt, Tom Peters, Francien Peterse, Anneke ter Schure, Kathrin Schuetrumpf, Richard Staff, Falko Turner, Valerie van den Bos.

  19. Effects of Candida norvegensis Live Cells on In vitro Oat Straw Rumen Fermentation.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Oscar; Castillo, Yamicela; Arzola, Claudio; Burrola, Eduviges; Salinas, Jaime; Corral, Agustín; Hume, Michael E; Murillo, Manuel; Itza, Mateo

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluated the effect of Candida norvegensis (C. norvegensis) viable yeast culture on in vitro ruminal fermentation of oat straw. Ruminal fluid was mixed with buffer solution (1:2) and anaerobically incubated with or without yeast at 39°C for 0, 4, 8, 16, and 24 h. A fully randomized design was used. There was a decrease in lactic acid (quadratic, p = 0.01), pH, (quadratic, p = 0.02), and yeasts counts (linear, p<0.01) across fermentation times. However, in vitro dry matter disappearance (IVDMD) and ammonia-N increased across fermentation times (quadratic; p<0.01 and p<0.02, respectively). Addition of yeast cells caused a decrease in pH values compared over all fermentation times (p<0.01), and lactic acid decreased at 12 h (p = 0.05). Meanwhile, yeast counts increased (p = 0.01) at 12 h. C. norvegensis increased ammonia-N at 4, 8, 12, and 24 h (p<0.01), and IVDMD of oat straw increased at 8, 12, and 24 h (p<0.01) of fermentation. Yeast cells increased acetate (p<0.01), propionate (p<0.03), and butyrate (p<0.03) at 8 h, while valeriate and isovaleriate increased at 8, 12, and 24 h (p<0.01). The yeast did not affect cellulolytic bacteria (p = 0.05), but cellulolytic fungi increased at 4 and 8 h (p<0.01), whereas production of methane decreased (p<0.01) at 8 h. It is concluded that addition of C. norvegensis to in vitro oat straw fermentation increased ruminal fermentation parameters as well as microbial growth with reduction of methane production. Additionally, yeast inoculum also improved IVDMD. PMID:26732446

  20. Potentiating Effect of Pure Oxygen on the Enhancement of Respiration by Ethylene in Plant Storage Organs: A Comparative Study 1

    PubMed Central

    Theologis, Athanasios; Laties, George G.

    1982-01-01

    A number of fruits and bulky storage organs were studied with respect to the effect of pure O2 on the extent and time-course of the respiratory rise induced by ethylene. In one group, of which potato (Solanum tuberosum var. Russet) and carrot (Daucus carota) are examples, the response to ethylene in O2 is much greater than in air. In a second group, of which avocado (Persea americana Mill. var. Hass) and banana (Musa cavendishii Lambert var. Valery) are examples, air and O2 are equally effective. When O2-responsive organs are peeled, air and O2 synergize the ethylene response to the same extent in parsnip (Pastinaca sativa), whereas O2 is more stimulatory than air in carrots. In the latter instance, carrot flesh is considered to contribute significantly to diffusion resistance. The release of CO2, an ethylene antagonist, is recognized as another element in the response to peeling. The potentiating effect of O2 is considered to be primarily on ethylene action in the development of the respiratory rise rather than on the respiration process per se. On the assumption that diffusion controls O2 movement into bulky organs and the peel represents the major diffusion barrier, simple calculations indicate that the O2 concentration in untreated organs in air readily sustains respiration. Furthermore, in ethylene-treated organs in pure O2, the internal O2 concentration is more than enough to maintain the high respiration rates. Skin conductivity to O2 is the fundamental parameter differentiating O2-responsive from O2-nonresponsive fruits and bulky storage organs. The large preceding the earliest response to ethylene, as well as the magnitude of the ethylene-induced respiratory rise, is also controlled by permeability characteristics of the peel. PMID:16662339

  1. List of participants at SIDE IV meeting, Tokyo, 27 November--1 December 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-12-01

    Mark J Ablowitz, Vsevolod Adler, Mark Alber, Said Belmehdi, Marco Boiti, Claude Brezinski, R Bullough, Y M Chiang, Theodore Chihara, Peter A Clarkson, Robert Conte, Adam Doliwa, Vladimir Dorodnitsyn, Mitsuaki Eguchi, Claire Gilson, Basil Grammaticos, Valeri Gromak, Rod Halburd, Koji Hasegawa, Jarmo Hietarinta, Ryogo Hirota, Xing Biao Hu, M Idzumi, J Inoguchi, Hiroya Ishikara, Mourad Ismail, Shin Isojima, Kenichi Ito, Yoshiaki Itoh, Masashi Iwasaki, Klara Janglajew, Michio Jimbo, Nalini Joshi, Kenji Kajiwara, Saburo Kakei, Masaru Kamata, Satoshi Kamei, Rinat Kashaev, Shingo Kawai, Taeko Kimijima, K Kimura, Anatol Kirillov, Koichi Kondo, Boris Konopelchenko, Martin Kruskal, Atsuo Kuniba, Wataru Kunishima, Franklin Lambert, Serguei Leble, Decio Levi, Shigeru Maeda, Manuel Manas, Ken-Ichi Maruno, Tetsu Masuda, J Matsukidaira, Atsushi Matsumiya, Shigeki Matsutani, Yukitaka Minesaki, Mikio Murata, Micheline Musette, Atsushi Nagai, Katsuya Nakagawa, Atsushi Nakamula, Akira Nakamura, Yoshimasa Nakamura, Frank Nijhoff, J J C Nimmo, Katsuhiro Nishinari, Michitomo Nishizawa, A Nobe, Masatoshi Noumi, Yaeko Ohsaki, Yasuhiro Ohta, Kazuo Okamoto, Alexandre Orlov, Naoki Osada, Flora Pempinelli, Spiro Pyrlis, Reinout Quispel, Orlando Ragnisco, Alfred Ramani, Jean-Pierre Ramis, Andreas Ruffing, Simon Ruijsenaars, Satoru Saito, Noriko Saitoh, Hidetaka Sakai, Paulo Santini, Narimasa Sasa, Ryu Sasaki, Yoshikatsu Sasaki, Junkichi Satsuma, Sergei Sergeev, Nobuhiko Shinzawa, Evgueni Sklyanin, Juris Suris, Norio Suzuki, Yukiko Tagami, Katsuaki Takahashi, Daisuke Takahashi, Tomoyuki Takenawa, Yoshiro Takeyama, K M Tamizhmani, T Tamizhmani, Kouichi Toda, Morikatsu Toda, Tetsuji Tokihiro, Takayuki Tsuchida, Yohei Tsuchiya, Teruhisa Tsuda, Satoru Tsujimoto, Walter Van Assche, Claude Viallet, Luc Vinet, Shinsuke Watanabe, Yoshihida Watanabe, Ralph Willox, Pavel Winternitz, Yasuhiko Yamada, Yuji Yamada, Jin Yoneda, Haruo Yoshida, Katsuhiko Yoshida, Daisuke Yoshihara, Fumitaka Yura, J Zagrodzinski, Alexei Zhedanov

  2. Radiolytic Model for Chemical Composition of Europa's Atmosphere and Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, John F.

    2004-01-01

    The overall objective of the present effort is to produce models for major and selected minor components of Europa s neutral atmosphere in 1-D versus altitude and in 2-D versus altitude and longitude or latitude. A 3-D model versus all three coordinates (alt, long, lat) will be studied but development on this is at present limited by computing facilities available to the investigation team. In this first year we have focused on 1-D modeling with Co-I Valery Shematovich s Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code for water group species (H2O, O2, O, OH) and on 2-D with Co-I Mau Wong's version of a similar code for O2, O, CO, CO2, and Na. Surface source rates of H2O and O2 from sputtering and radiolysis are used in the 1-D model, while observations for CO2 at the Europa surface and Na detected in a neutral cloud ejected from Europa are used, along with the O2 sputtering rate, to constrain source rates in the 2-D version. With these separate approaches we are investigating a range of processes important to eventual implementation of a comprehensive 3-D atmospheric model which could be used to understand present observations and develop science requirements for future observations, e.g. from Earth and in Europa orbit. Within the second year we expect to merge the full water group calculations into the 2-D version of the DSMC code which can then be extended to 3-D, pending availability of computing resources. Another important goal in the second year would be the inclusion of sulk and its more volatile oxides (SO, SO2).

  3. Phobos' Low Bulk Density: Evidence Against a Capture Origin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalle Ore, C.; Pajola, M.; Lazzarin, M.; Roush, T. L.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Pendleton, Y. J.; Carli, C.; Bertini, I.; Magrin, S.; La Forgia, F.; Barbieri, C.

    2014-12-01

    Phobos' low density of 1.876 ± 0.02 g/cm3 (Andert et al., 2010, Witasse et al., 2013, Paetzold et al., 2013) supports its formation from a disk of debris (Peale 2007). The disk would either be a remnant of the formation of Mars (Safronov et al., 1986) or the result of a collision between Mars and a large body (Craddock 1994, 2011; Singer 2007). Within this scenario a large interior porosity would be responsible for the low density of the re-accreted material forming Phobos. Thermal emission spectra of Phobos suggest an ultramafic composition with the presence of phyllosilicates and feldspathoids in some regions (Giuranna et al., 2011), consistent with Phobos' in situ formation (Giuranna et al., 2011). However, the 0.3-4.0 ?m surface spectra taken from multiple areas of the body in more than 43 years of observations (Duxbury et al., 2013), show physical characteristics similar to low-albedo asteroids such as C-type (Masursky et al., 1972, Pang et al., 1980) or D-type (Murchie 1999, Rivkin et al., 2002, Lynch et al., 2007, Pajola et al., 2012). They argue in favor of an asteroidal capture scenario that could be explained by binary asteroid dissociation (Landis 2009) or by collisional capture in the Martian orbital region (Pajola et al., 2012). Finally recent work by Schmedemann et al., (2014) indicates Phobos' surface to be ~ 4.3 - 3.7 Ga, dating back to a period where there was an intensification in the number of impactors in the inner Solar System (Gomes et al., 2005), and supporting both the in-situ and the capture scenario. Pajola et al. (2013) match the surface reflectance of Phobos from 0.4 to 4.0 ?m with a mineralogical model composed of a mixture of Tagish Lake meteorite (TL) and Pyroxene Glass (PM80). Based on the published model, we adopted the weighted TL and PM80 densities to investigate if the low bulk density of Phobos could conform with these components reconciling both inner properties and surface spectra. While the TL density is available from measurements by Hildebrand et al. (2006), that of PM80 (Jager et al., 1994) has not been measured. In its stead, we have adopted density values of different pyroxene glasses from the literature (Karamanov and Pelino, 1999, and Smithsonian Physical Tables 1921) along with the density of mafic-rich glasses with VNIR spectra similar to PM80. We present our results.

  4. Oligopolistic competition in wholesale electricity markets: Large-scale simulation and policy analysis using complementarity models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helman, E. Udi

    This dissertation conducts research into the large-scale simulation of oligopolistic competition in wholesale electricity markets. The dissertation has two parts. Part I is an examination of the structure and properties of several spatial, or network, equilibrium models of oligopolistic electricity markets formulated as mixed linear complementarity problems (LCP). Part II is a large-scale application of such models to the electricity system that encompasses most of the United States east of the Rocky Mountains, the Eastern Interconnection. Part I consists of Chapters 1 to 6. The models developed in this part continue research into mixed LCP models of oligopolistic electricity markets initiated by Hobbs [67] and subsequently developed by Metzler [87] and Metzler, Hobbs and Pang [88]. Hobbs' central contribution is a network market model with Cournot competition in generation and a price-taking spatial arbitrage firm that eliminates spatial price discrimination by the Cournot firms. In one variant, the solution to this model is shown to be equivalent to the "no arbitrage" condition in a "pool" market, in which a Regional Transmission Operator optimizes spot sales such that the congestion price between two locations is exactly equivalent to the difference in the energy prices at those locations (commonly known as locational marginal pricing). Extensions to this model are presented in Chapters 5 and 6. One of these is a market model with a profit-maximizing arbitrage firm. This model is structured as a mathematical program with equilibrium constraints (MPEC), but due to the linearity of its constraints, can be solved as a mixed LCP. Part II consists of Chapters 7 to 12. The core of these chapters is a large-scale simulation of the U.S. Eastern Interconnection applying one of the Cournot competition with arbitrage models. This is the first oligopolistic equilibrium market model to encompass the full Eastern Interconnection with a realistic network representation (using a DC load flow approximation). Chapter 9 shows the price results. In contrast to prior market power simulations of these markets, much greater variability in price-cost margins is found when using a realistic model of hourly conditions on such a large network. Chapter 10 shows that the conventional concentration indices (HHIs) are poorly correlated with PCMs. Finally, Chapter 11 proposes that the simulation models are applied to merger analysis and provides two large-scale merger examples. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  5. Characterising groundwater-dominated lowland catchments: the UK Lowland Catchment Research Programme (LOCAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheater, H. S.; Peach, D.; Binley, A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on a major UK initiative to address deficiencies in understanding the hydro-ecological response of groundwater-dominated lowland catchments. The scope and objectives of this national programme are introduced and focus on one of three sets of research basins - the Pang/Lambourn Chalk catchments, tributaries of the river Thames in southern England. The motivation for the research is the need to support integrated management of river systems that have high ecological value and are subject to pressures that include groundwater abstraction for water supply, diffuse pollution, and land use and climate change. An overview of the research programme is provided together with highlights of some current research findings concerning the hydrological functioning of these catchments. Despite the importance of the Chalk as a major UK aquifer, knowledge of the subsurface movement of water and solutes is poor. Solute transport in the dual porosity unsaturated zone depends on fracture/matrix interactions that are difficult to observe; current experimental and modelling research supports the predominance of matrix flow and suggests that slow migration of a time-history of decades of nutrient loading is occurring. Groundwater flows are complex; catchments vary seasonally and are ill-defined and karst features are locally important. Groundwater flow pathways are being investigated using natural and artificial geochemical tracers based on experimental borehole arrays; stream-aquifer interaction research is using a combination of geophysics, borehole array geochemistry and longitudinal profiles of stream flow and solutes. A complex picture of localised subsurface inflows, linked to geological controls and karst features, and significant longitudinal groundwater flow below the river channel is emerging. Management implications are discussed. Strategies to control surface application of nutrients are expected to have little effect on groundwater quality for several decades, and new modelling tools for decision support have been developed to represent these effects. Conventional modelling approaches are limited by the complexities of the subsurface system; catchment areas are difficult to define, hence tracking pollutant pathways to stream receptors is also problematic. Conventional distributed groundwater models have difficulty in capturing key aspects of the groundwater system. This raises important questions concerning the confidence that can be placed in models as routinely used for decision support and the level of knowledge required for catchment management to be placed on a secure scientific foundation.

  6. Characterising Groundwater-dominated Lowland Catchments - the UK Lowland Catchment Research Programme (LOCAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheater, H. S.; Peach, D.; Binley, A.

    2005-12-01

    This paper reports on a major 10million UK initiative to address deficiencies in understanding the hydro-ecological response of groundwater-dominated lowland catchments. We focus here on one of three sets of research basins - the Pang/Lambourn Chalk catchments, tributaries of the river Thames in southern England. The motivation for the research is the need to support integrated management of river systems that have high ecological value and are subject to pressures that include groundwater abstraction for water supply, diffuse pollution, and land use and climate change. We give an overview of the experimental approach and highlight some current research findings. Despite the importance of the Chalk as a major UK aquifer, knowledge of the subsurface movement of water and solutes is poor. Solute transport in the dual porosity unsaturated zone depends on fracture/matrix interactions that are difficult to observe; current experimental and modelling research supports the predominance of matrix flow and suggests that slow migration of a time-history of decades of nutrient loading is occurring. Groundwater flows are complex; catchments vary seasonally and are ill-defined and Karst features are locally important. Groundwater flow pathways are being investigated using natural and artificial geochemical tracers based on experimental borehole arrays; stream-aquifer interaction research is using a combination of geophysics, borehole array geochemistry and longitudinal profiles of stream flow and solutes. A complex picture is emerging of localised subsurface inflows, linked to structural geological controls and karst features, and significant longitudinal groundwater flow below the river channel. Hyporheic zone research has shown significant areas of methanogenesis and denitrification - the catchment-scale significance of this remains to be determined. Similarly, analysis of nutrient transformations in riparian wetlands is being linked to analysis of groundwater flowpaths to determine their catchment-scale significance. Models of surface water quality have been used to interpret catchment-scale response through mixing analyses and longer term nutrient simulation. A new approach has been required to represent unsaturated zone nutrient storage. A conventional distributed groundwater model has been developed outside this research programme to aid the management of riparian ecosystems. The new experimental data has clearly shown that this fails to represent key hydrogeological features. This raises important questions concerning the confidence that can be placed in models as routinely used for decision support and the level of knowledge required for catchment management to be placed on a secure scientific foundation. We argue that major investment in integrated monitoring and modelling is essential to develop an adequate basis for management of the hydroecological functioning of catchment systems.

  7. U.S. high school curriculum: three phases of contemporary research and reform.

    PubMed

    Lee, Valerie E; Ready, Douglas D

    2009-01-01

    Valerie Lee and Douglas Ready explore the influences of the high school curriculum on student learning and the equitable distribution of that learning by race and socioeconomic status. They begin by tracing the historical development of the U.S. comprehensive high school and then examine the curricular reforms of the past three decades. During the first half of the twentieth century, the authors say, public high schools typically organized students into rigid curricular "tracks" based largely on students' past academic performance and future occupational and educational plans. During the middle of the century, however, high schools began to provide students with a choice among courses that varied in both content and academic rigor. Although the standards movement of the 1980s limited these curricular options somewhat, comprehensive curricula remained, with minority and low-income students less often completing college-prep courses. During the 1990s, say the authors, researchers who examined the associations between course-taking and student learning reported that students completing more advanced coursework learned more, regardless of their social or academic backgrounds. Based largely on this emerging research consensus favoring college-prep curriculum, in 1997 public high schools in Chicago began offering exclusively college-prep courses. To address the needs of the city's many low-performing ninth graders, schools added extra coursework in subjects in which their performance was deficient. A recent study of this reform, however, found that these approaches made little difference in student achievement. Lee and Ready hypothesize that "selection bias" may explain the divergent conclusions reached by the Chicago study and previous research. Earlier studies rarely considered the unmeasured characteristics of students who completed college-prep courses-characteristics such as motivation, access to academic supports, and better teachers-that are also positively related to student learning. Although the Chicago evaluation is only one study of one city, its findings raise the worrisome possibility that the recent push for "college-prep for all" may not generate the improvements for which researchers and policy makers had hoped. PMID:21141708

  8. Discovery of a Large Volcanic Eruption in 1761 From Pre-Venus-Transit and Other Proxy Data, Using Benjamin Franklin's Method of Linking the 1783-1784 Cold Weather to the Laki Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, K. D.

    2006-12-01

    Observations of the 1761 and 1769 transits of Venus were crucial to the early development of American geoscience. Accurate longitude measurements were needed for that, the Mason-Dixon survey, the 1804-1806 Lewis and Clark expedition to Oregon, and the westward expansion of the new republic [Woolf, "The Transits of Venus: A Study of 18th Century Science," Princeton, 1959]. As founder of the American Philosophical Society Benjamin Franklin promoted the transit observations, and procured a large telescope for the Philadelphia group. While serving as ambassador to France he observed that a "dry fog" from the 1783 Laki eruption in Iceland had obscured the Sun, and suggested that as a cause of the unseasonably cold weather of that summer and winter. Although the longitude, solar parallax and Sun-Earth distance measurements have long since been improved on, observations of the dark lunar eclipse just before the June 6, 1761 transit are still valuable for identifying a very large volcanic eruption that spring, using Benjamin Franklin's method. Many observers worldwide, while making a final check on their clock/longitude, found the May 18, 1761 totally eclipsed Moon very dark or even invisible, e.g., Wargentin (Stockholm Observatory) could not see the Moon for 38 minutes even with a 2-ft telescope [Phil. Trans. 52, 208, 1761-1762]. Whereas the totally eclipsed Moon is illuminated only by sunlight refracted by the Earth's atmosphere, I conclude that it was severely obscured, thus meeting Benjamin Franklin's first condition. Ice cores from Greenland and Antarctica show a large sulfuric acid peak at 1762 [Crowley, Geophys. Res. Lett. 20, 209, 1993; and Karlof, J. Geophys. Res. 105, D10, 12471, 2000], also satisfying Benjamin Franklin's second condition that the obscuration be due to a "dry fog" (sulfuric acid mist). The weather of 1761-1762 was indeed very cold, as recorded in chronicles, and frost-damaged rings of North American bristlecone pines [LaMarche and Hirschboeck, Nature 307, 121, 1984]. Annual weather reviews in imperial, provincial and county histories in China have been examined. Unseasonable cold are classified by their degree of severity: (1) Late (April-June) or early (July-Sept.) killing frosts; (2) Bitter cold/heavy snowfall; and (3) Heavy sustained snowfall, bitter cold with frozen wells, lakes and rivers. The latter cases were often widespread and multi-year, with the coast icebound also. The weather of 1761-1762 was a "3." Heavy sustained snow fell over many sites from the Tropic of Cancer to the Yellow River. In the north wells and rivers froze. Taihu (Great Lake near Shanghai) and nearby rivers froze over and were not navigable. Innumerable trees, birds and livestock perished, etc. Whereas all three of Benjamin Franklin's conditions have been met I conclude that a very large volcanic eruption early in 1761 had a major impact on the Earth's climate. Its location is unknown, but was probably low- or mid-latitude, as sulfuric acid from the volcanic cloud settled onto both poles. Finally Benjamin Franklin's criteria for a climate-altering volcanic eruption are still universally used (the appearance of brilliant red twilight displays have since been added). Moreover his legacy continues to inspire climate researchers. See, for example, "Climatic Impact of the mid-15th-Century Kuwae Caldera Formation...," Pang, Eos 74, No. 43, 106, 1993; and as cited in "Earth in Balance," Al Gore, p. 379, Penguin, 1993. See also "Constantinople's Volcanic Twilight," Lynn Simarski, Aramco World 47, No. 6, 8-13, 1996.

  9. Sensitivity analyses of a colloid-facilitated contaminant transport model for unsaturated heterogeneous soil conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Périard, Yann; José Gumiere, Silvio; Rousseau, Alain N.; Caron, Jean

    2013-04-01

    Certain contaminants may travel faster through soils when they are sorbed to subsurface colloidal particles. Indeed, subsurface colloids may act as carriers of some contaminants accelerating their translocation through the soil into the water table. This phenomenon is known as colloid-facilitated contaminant transport. It plays a significant role in contaminant transport in soils and has been recognized as a source of groundwater contamination. From a mechanistic point of view, the attachment/detachment of the colloidal particles from the soil matrix or from the air-water interface and the straining process may modify the hydraulic properties of the porous media. Šim?nek et al. (2006) developed a model that can simulate the colloid-facilitated contaminant transport in variably saturated porous media. The model is based on the solution of a modified advection-dispersion equation that accounts for several processes, namely: straining, exclusion and attachement/detachement kinetics of colloids through the soil matrix. The solutions of these governing, partial differential equations are obtained using a standard Galerkin-type, linear finite element scheme, implemented in the HYDRUS-2D/3D software (Šim?nek et al., 2012). Modeling colloid transport through the soil and the interaction of colloids with the soil matrix and other contaminants is complex and requires the characterization of many model parameters. In practice, it is very difficult to assess actual transport parameter values, so they are often calibrated. However, before calibration, one needs to know which parameters have the greatest impact on output variables. This kind of information can be obtained through a sensitivity analysis of the model. The main objective of this work is to perform local and global sensitivity analyses of the colloid-facilitated contaminant transport module of HYDRUS. Sensitivity analysis was performed in two steps: (i) we applied a screening method based on Morris' elementary effects and the one-at-a-time approach (O.A.T); and (ii), we applied Sobol's global sensitivity analysis method which is based on variance decompositions. Results illustrate that ?m (maximum sorption rate of mobile colloids), kdmc (solute desorption rate from mobile colloids), and Ks (saturated hydraulic conductivity) are the most sensitive parameters with respect to the contaminant travel time. The analyses indicate that this new module is able to simulate the colloid-facilitated contaminant transport. However, validations under laboratory conditions are needed to confirm the occurrence of the colloid transport phenomenon and to understand model prediction under non-saturated soil conditions. Future work will involve monitoring of the colloidal transport phenomenon through soil column experiments. The anticipated outcome will provide valuable information on the understanding of the dominant mechanisms responsible for colloidal transports, colloid-facilitated contaminant transport and, also, the colloid detachment/deposition processes impacts on soil hydraulic properties. References: Šim?nek, J., C. He, L. Pang, & S. A. Bradford, Colloid-Facilitated Solute Transport in Variably Saturated Porous Media: Numerical Model and Experimental Verification, Vadose Zone Journal, 2006, 5, 1035-1047 Šim?nek, J., M. Šejna, & M. Th. van Genuchten, The C-Ride Module for HYDRUS (2D/3D) Simulating Two-Dimensional Colloid-Facilitated Solute Transport in Variably-Saturated Porous Media, Version 1.0, PC Progress, Prague, Czech Republic, 45 pp., 2012.

  10. The Small Bodies Thermal Mapper: An Instrument for Future Missions to Study the Compositional and Thermal Properties of Phobos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donaldson Hanna, Kerri; Bowles, Neil; Calcutt, Simon; Greenhagen, Benjamin; Glotch, Timothy; Edwards, Christopher

    2015-04-01

    The surface of Phobos holds many keys for understanding its formation and evolution as well as the history and dynamics of the Mars-Phobos system. Phobos has been the target for numerous flyby and sample return missions in the past (e.g. Rosetta [Pajola et al., 2012] and Phobos Grunt [Kuzmin et al., 2003]). Previous telescopic and spacecraft observations have revealed a surface that is compositionally heterogeneous [e.g. Pang et al., 1978; Pollack et al., 1978, Lunine et al., 1982; Murchie and Erard, 1996; Roush and Hogan, 2001; Rivkin et al., 2002; Giuranna et al., 2011; Fraeman et al., 2014] and with large variations in surface topography [e.g. Shi et al., 2011; 2012; Willner et al., 2014]. For any future sample return mission, remote sensing observations, in particular thermal infrared observations, will be key in characterising possible landing/sampling sites and placing returned samples into their geological context. The European Space Agency has identified Phootprint, a European sample return mission to Phobos, as a candidate mission of the Mars Robotic Exploration Preparation Programme 2 (MREP-2). Using this mission concept as a baseline, we have studied the options for a simple multichannel radiometer to provide thermal mapping and compositional remote sensing data. By mapping Phobos' diurnal thermal response, a thermal imaging instrument will provide key information on the nature of the surface and near sub-surface (the thermal inertia) and composition. These measurements will support visible imaging observations to determine landing sites that are compatible with the spacecraft's sampling mechanisms. Remotely sensed thermal maps of the surface will also prevent otherwise unpredictable thermal loads on the spacecraft due to variations in local topography and albedo. The instrument design resulting from this study, the Small Bodies Thermal Mapper (SBTM), is a compact multichannel radiometer and thermal imager. The SBTM is based on the Compact Modular Sounder (CMS) instrument currently flying on the UK's TechDemoSat-1 spacecraft in low Earth orbit. This gives a significant level of flight heritage with optimisations for the expected Phobos environment. The SBTM instrument uses a two-dimensional uncooled thermal detector array to provide imaging of Phobos. In addition, ten narrow-band infrared filters located around diagnostic mineral spectral features provide additional compositional discrimination. For the SBTM, the optimisations studied include options for the detector and filters required to cover the wide range of diurnal temperatures expected at Phobos (e.g. 130 to > 300 K) [e.g. Kuzmin et al., 2003]. Options studied include the use of a broadband micro bolometer array (e.g. http://www.ulis-ir.com/uploads/Products/PICO640E-041-BroadBand.pdf) or a thermopile detector [Foote et al., 1998] array. Optimisation of filter band passes for remote measurement of composition is also considered, based on mineral spectra measured under simulated Phobos environment [e.g. Glotch et al., 2014].

  11. Potassic magma genesis and the Ailao Shan-Red River fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flower, Martin F. J.; Hoàng, Nguy?n; Lo, Chinh-hua; Chí, Cung Thu'?'ng; Cu'ò'ng, Nguy?n Qu?c; Liu, Fu-tian; Deng, Jin-fu; Mo, Xuan-xue

    2013-09-01

    Two types of K-rich magma of Eocene to Early Oligocene (ca. 40-30) and Plio-Pleistocene (ca. 5-0.1 Ma) age were emplaced prior to and following left-lateral slip on the Ailao Shan-Red River (ASRR) fault, a regional shear zone extending between southwest China and the Tonkin Gulf (South China Sea) that accommodated 'escape' of the Indochina block. The first type is exposed in the Dali-Lijiang and adjacent regions of western Yunnan and Sichuan and comprises ultramafic potassic to ultrapotassic 'absarokites' and their shoshonite, banakite, and SiO2-rich derivatives which were emplaced immediately prior to activation of the ASRR fault. They are characterized by high Mg.-nos, and low contents of fusible oxides (FeO*, CaO, Al2O3), for equivalent MgO content, and pronounced primitive mantle-normalized high-field strength element (HFSE) depletions. In contrast, 'post-escape' K-rich magmas were erupted in the Puer, Maguan-Pingbian regions of south and southeast Yunnan. Apart from their relative enrichments in potassium they show typical HFSE-rich intra-plate compositional affinity. Geological and geomorphic evidence, and thermochronologic age dating of metamorphisc events, suggest that left-lateral shearing occurred between ca. 30 and 17 Ma; thereby accommodating the southeastward 'escape' of Indochina and (possibly) two episodes of spreading in the South China Sea. The southwestern part of Dali-Lijiang magmatic products was detached and offset by ca. 600 km and are now located in Phan Xi Pang in northern Viet Nam. The same is true for the Permo-Triassic Emeishan flood basalts, whose western exposures were likewise displaced by the same amount and are now represented by the Song Da complex, also in northern Viet Nam. Here, we report geochemical, isotopic, and 40Ar/39Ar age data for samples from both the 'pre-escape' Dali-Lijiang magmas and the 'post-escape' K-rich Puer, Maguan-Pingbian basalts and basanites, with a view to comparing and contrasting their interpolated source compositions, estimated conditions of upper mantle melt segregation and, by inference, their mantle dynamic and contamination histories insofar as these were conditioned by the India-Asia collision. Our interpretations yielded two complementary conclusions. The first contends that the pre-escape magmas result from adiabatic melting of crust-contaminated asthenosphere comprising a 'mélange' of continental lithospheric mantle (CLM) (hydrated by sab-derived hysdrous fluids released at 0.2-0.5 GPa) and lower crust, delaminated from the overriding plate during mantle wedge corner flow and further enriched by metasomatic melts of subducted continental crust. We postulate that incipient H2O-saturated melting of the 'mélange' occurs at depths of between ca. 100 and 200 km after being 'dragged' down by relict oceanic slab fragments, in response to the dehydration of supra-subduction amphibole- and phlogopite. The ensuing viscosity 'crisis' and buoyancy relative to ambient 'fertile' convecting mantle of such asthenospheric 'pockets', and the collision-related change from lithospheric compression to extension, almost certainly predisposes such a refractory yet crust-contaminated 'pockets' to rapid adiabatic melting. The second conclusion concerns the post-escape K-rich basalts and basanites and is based on the contention that decompression melting of thermally anomalous K-rich asthenospheric occurred in response to regional post-escape transtension, concomitant with the cessation Indochina escape and contiguous seafloor spreading. However, although these magmas share the HFSE-rich fertile source character of other, widely dispersed, post-escape Cenozoic basalts they more specifically resemble relatively rare examples of intra-plate, K-rich activity observed in northeast China, central Spain, and elsewhere in Asia and Europe, arguably (indirectly) reflecting mantle perturbations caused by major continental collisions.

  12. Long-Term Sun Climate Connections, Revealed by the Analyses of Historical and Other Proxy Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, K. D.; Yau, K.

    2004-12-01

    The Sun, once considered constant, actually goes through 11-year, decadal, centennial, and even longer cycles. Our analysis of historical sunspot and aurora records, carbon-14 and beryllium-10 abundances from long-lived trees and deep polar ice cores, respectively, shows that it has gone through nine long cycles in the past 1800 years. Although these changes amounted to <1% of the total irradiance there is clear evidence they produced corresponding changes in the climate [Pang and Yau, Eos, 83, No. 43, 481, 2002]. For example during the Maunder Minimum (1645-1715) sunspots were rarely seen (about once in ten years from Europe or China). Total solar irradiances, reconstructed from historical sunspot records, were 0.25% lower then. This correlates nicely with an estimated 0.5-degree drop in Northern Hemisphere summer surface temperatures during the Little Ice Age [Lean, GRL 22, 3195, 1995]. We have also analyzed Chinese historical weather records for comparison. Reports of unseasonable cold are classified by the degree of severity: (1) Late (April-June) or early (July-September) killing frosts; (2) Bitter cold/heavy snowfall; and (3) Heavy sustained snowfall, bitter cold with frozen wells, rivers and icebound seas. The latter cases were often widespread and multi-year. All categories occurred most frequently during the coldest part of the Little Ice Age. The Category 3 episodes were in 1652-54, 1656, 1664, 1670-72, 1676-77, 1683, 1688-91, 1716, and 1718-19. For example the Yangtze River and its lakes froze up to 3-4 times in 1650-1700. The coldest period thus coincides with the Maunder Minimum, and is consistent with general circulation model hindcast winter conditions for China [Shindell, Science, 294, 2149, 2001]. There was only one Category 3 episode between the Maunder and Dalton Minima--in 1761 (due to a large volcanic eruption); and two in the Dalton Minimum (1795-1825)--in 1796 and 1814-17. The Sun has gradually brightened since the Dalton Minimum. But the climate of China remained cold through the 19th century, as in the rest of the world, probably due to increased volcanic aerosol loading of the atmosphere [Sato, JGR 98, 22987, 1993]. The climate of China seems to have been warm during the Late 14th-Century Maximum (1350-1410). We have found only one Category 1 episode--in 1393. It then turned cold during the Sporer Minimum (1410-1590). Category 3 episodes occurred in 1453-54, 1493, 1513, 1569, and 1577-78. Lesser ones were also common. Some scientists suggest that the Little Ice Age actually began in the 13th Century, and is comprised of the Wolf (1280-1350), Sporer, Maunder, and Dalton Minima. It and the Little Climate Optimum make up a millennium-long cycle [Broecker, Natural History 101, 6, 4/1992]. The warm Classical Age and cool Dark Ages, the cold Iron Age (1st millennium BC), and warm Bronze Age (2nd and 3rd millennia BC) could be considered still earlier millennial cycles. These trends are generally consistent with carbon-14 deviations from its long-term variations. There is also some historical and archaeological evidence for the early trends, as rhinoceros and elephant herds were abundant along the Yellow River during the Shang dynasty (1600-1100 BC). The tropical fauna and flora have since disappeared, as North China gradually turned cold and arid. We conclude that the climate of China generally follows world trend. The major forcing seems to have been changing solar luminosity on a decadal to millennial timescale. Volcanic eruptions and changing ocean currents also frequently perturbed the climate.

  13. PREFACE: Seventh International Conference on Dissociative Recombination: Theory, Experiments and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Zande, Wim J.

    2009-09-01

    Dissociative Recombination is one of the outcomes of collisions between electrons and molecular ions. This reaction dominates many plasmas, dense as well as dilute. Therefore, knowledge about this reaction is highly relevant for astrophysics, atmospheric sciences, (non-)reactive plasmas, and fusion plasmas. A theoretical description of this process requires intensive ab initio quantum chemistry calculations as well as a detailed description of the electron collision process. The high density of states near the ionization energy of molecules renders calculations extremely difficult and complex. In experiments, both discharge and flowing afterglow experiments and fast beam and ion storage ring experiments, a steady development can be seen towards more detailed studies often at the quantum state resolved level including product internal state identification and very recently detailed vector properties such as fragment angular distributions. Thanks to an efficient interplay between experiment and theory dissociative recombination has progressed significantly over the last few years. The Seventh International Conference on Dissociative Recombination: Theory, Experiments, and Applications (DR2007) was organized by the Institute of Molecules and Materials at the Radboud University Nijmegen, The Netherlands and was held on the Wadden Island of Ameland. Earlier conferences in this series were held at Lake Louise, Alberta, Canada (1988), Saint Jacut, Bretagne, France (1992), Ein Gedi, Israel (1995), Nässlingen, Stockholm Archipelago, Sweden (1999), Chicago, USA, as part of the American Chemical Society meeting (2001), and in Mosbach, Germany (2004). Ameland and the Resort d'Amelander Kaap was chosen in the spirit of previous dissociative recombination conferences. It turned out to be a venue where discussions about dissociative recombination could take place around the clock both inside and outside while walking through dunes and on the beach. The conference was made possible by generous sponsors, whom we thank wholeheartedly: The Radboud University Nijmegen, The Institute for Molecules and Materials of the Radboud University Nijmegen, The Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (Stichting FOM), The Foundation PHYSICA (Stichting Physica), and The Netherlands Royal Academy of Sciences (KNAW). The organisational support by Erna Gouwens van Oss before and during the conference was essential for its success. The help of Thanja Lambrechts and Vitali Zhaunerchyk during the preparation of the proceedings is greatly appreciated. The delay in the publication of these proceedings is entirely caused by the editor. The authors of the contributions are thanked for the quality of their contributions, Wim J van der Zande, Editor Institute for Molecules and Materials, Radboud University Nijmegen, PO Box 9010, NL-6500 GL Nijmegen, The Netherlands Email: w.vanderzande@science.ru.nl Conference photograph Participants of the 7th International Conference on Dissociative Recombination: Theory, Experiments and Applications, taken in front of d'Amelander Kaap, the conference venue in Ameland, one of the Wadden Islands in the North of the Netherlands. 1. Dror Shafir21. Annemieke Petrignani41. Oumanou Motopan 2. Ioan Scheider22. Johanna Roos42. Max Berg 3. Nigel Adams23. Erna Gouwens van Oss43. Henrik Buhr 4. Hajime Tanuma24. Natalie de Ruette44. Ilya Fabrikant 5. Jonathan Tennyson25. Francois Wameu Tamo45. Claude Krantz 6. Vitali Zhaunerchyk26. Rainer Johnsen46. Michael Stenrup 7. Robert Continetti27. Viatcheslav Kokoouline47. Xavier Urbain 8. Stefan Rosén28. Hidekazu Takagi48. Evelyne Roueff 9. Erik Vigren29. Hans-Jakob Wörner49. Dirk Schwalm 10. Magdalena Kaminska30. Oskar Asvany50. Valery Ngassam 11. Chris Greene31. Lutz Lammich51. Julien Lecointre 12. Steffen Novotny32. Brandon Jordon-Thaden52. Ann Orel 13. Amy Schumak33. Wolf Diettrich Geppert53. Ihor Korolov 14. Gerard van Rooij34. Alexander Faure54. Romain Guerot 15. Wim van der Zande35. Mathias Hamberg55. Peet Hickman 16. Daan Schram36. Oldrich Novotny56. Christiaan Jungen 17. Dahbia Talb

  14. PREFACE: Preface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Qingming; Wang, Lihong V.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2011-02-01

    The 9th International Conference on Photonics and Imaging in Biology and Medicine (PIBM 2010), combined with the 3rd Photonics and Optoelectronics Meetings (POEM 2010), was held from November 2-5, 2010, at Wuhan Science & Technology Convention & Exhibition Center, Wuhan, PR China. The present volume contains papers from a selection from the invited, oral, and poster presentations. PIBM is the largest international biomedical photonics conference series in Asia. It was initially held at HUST bi-yearly from 1999. After being held three times in Wuhan (1999, 2001 and 2003), it was hosted once in Tianjin (2005), before returning to Wuhan every year since 2006. PIBM is designed to bring together scientists, engineers and clinical researchers from a variety of disciplines engaged in applying optical science, photonics and imaging technologies to problems in biology and medicine. The scope of this conference ranges from basic research to instrumentation engineering, and biological and clinical studies. It is recognized as one of the largest and most comprehensive international conferences in China, and represents the highest level of worldwide research in this field. In the past ten years, 7 volumes of proceedings with a total of 672 papers were published by SPIE (International Society for Optical Engineering), and a volume with 75 papers was published by World Scientific Publishing Co. in 2007. Proceedings of PIBM 1999, 2001, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2008 and 2009 were indexed by EI Compendex, while proceedings of PIBM 1999, 2001, 2003, 2005, 2006, and 2007 were indexed by SCI. Some excellent papers were recommended for publication in the peer-reviewed Journal of Innovative Optical Health Sciences (JIOHS). An increasing number of young researchers present and exchange their innovative ideas on this friendly and professional platform, which has made PIBM an unforgettable annual meeting in Wuhan. This year PIBM attracted distinguished scholars in the field of biomedical photonics and imaging from all over the world, including the United States, Russia, Australia, Canada, Israel, France, Ireland, Japan, Korea and China. The major topics covered at the conference and presented in this volume include: Photonic Therapeutics, Diagnostics and Instrumentations; Tissue Optics and Laser Tissue Interaction; Biomedical Spectroscopy and Microscopy; Multimodal and Hybrid Biomedical Imaging; and Optical Molecular Imaging. The conference voted for the three best student papers; awards were presented to the participant students whose posters were recognized as excellent and who took part in the oral presentation competition. The conference received 133 submitted abstracts, and this volume of the Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes a selection of 53 excellent submissions. The Conference Secretariat and Local Organizing Committee deserve recognition for planning a smoothly run and productive conference with comprehensive, instructive lectures and innovative work displayed in poster presentations. The faculties and students from Britton Chance Center for Biomedical Photonics were dedicated to their work in reception and service during the conference. It is a pleasure to thank all of them for their efficient and hard work. We are also grateful for the financial support from 111 Project (B07038), and the assistance in organization and coordination from Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics and Huazhong University of Science and Technology. Finally, we would like to thank all the authors for their contributions to PIBM 2010 and all the members of the Committees for their cooperation and time spent reviewing submissions. Special thanks are due to the Advisory Committee members Shu Chien, Aaron Ciechanover, Steve Dahms, Da Hsuan Feng, Steven R Goodman, Brian Salzberg, Fujia Yang, Jianquan Yao, Baoyong Zheng and Olivia Ho Cheng for their participation on-site, and their significant contributions to the conference. Wuhan, PR ChinaDecember, 2010 Qingming LuoLihong V WangValery V TuchinConference Chairs 9th International Conference on P

  15. Soil moisture changes in two experimental sites in Eastern Spain. Irrigation versus rainfed orchards under organic farming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azorin-Molina, Cesar; Vicente-Serrano, Sergio M.; Cerdà, Artemi

    2013-04-01

    Within the Soil Erosion and Degradation Research Group Experimental Stations, soil moisture is being researched as a key factor of the soil hydrology and soil erosion (Cerdà, 1995; Cerda, 1997; Cerdà 1998). This because under semiarid conditions soil moisture content plays a crucial role for agriculture, forest, groundwater recharge and soil chemistry and scientific improvement is of great interest in agriculture, hydrology and soil sciences. Soil moisture has been seeing as the key factor for plant photosynthesis, respiration and transpiration in orchards (Schneider and Childers, 1941) and plant growth (Veihmeyer and Hendrickson, 1950). Moreover, soil moisture determine the root growth and distribution (Levin et al., 1979) and the soil respiration ( Velerie and Orchard, 1983). Water content is expressed as a ratio, ranging from 0 (dry) to the value of soil porosity at saturation (wet). In this study we present 1-year of soil moisture measurements at two experimental sites in the Valencia region, Eastern Spain: one representing rainfed orchard typical from the Mediterranean mountains (El Teularet-Sierra de Enguera), and a second site corresponding to an irrigated orange crop (Alcoleja). The EC-5 soil moisture smart sensor S-SMC-M005 integrated with the field-proven ECH2O™ Sensor and a 12-bit A/D has been choosen for measuring soil water content providing ±3% accuracy in typical soil conditions. Soil moisture measurements were carried out at 5-minute intervals from January till December 2012. In addition, soil moisture was measured at two depths in each landscape: 2 and 20 cm depth - in order to retrieve a representative vertical cross-section of soil moisture. Readings are provided directly from 0 (dry) to 0.450 m3/m3 (wet) volumetric water content. The soil moisture smart sensor is conected to a HOBO U30 Station - GSM-TCP which also stored 5-minute temperature, relative humidity, dew point, global solar radiation, precipitation, wind speed and wind direction data. These complementary atmospheric measurements will serve to explain the intraannual and vertical variations observed in the soil moisture content in both experimental landscapes. This kind of study is aimed to understand the soil moisture content in two different environments such as irrigated rainfed orchards in a semi-arid region. For instance, these measurements have a direct impact on water availability for crops, plant transpiration and could have practical applications to schedule irrigation. Additionally, soil water content has also implications for erosion processes. Key Words: Water, Agriculture, Irrigation, Eastern Spain, Citrus. Acknowledgements The research projects GL2008-02879/BTE and LEDDRA 243857 supported this research. References Cerdà, A. 1995. Soil moisture regime under simulated rainfall in a three years abandoned field in Southeast Spain. Physics and Chemistry of The Earth, 20 (3-4), 271-279. Cerdà, A. 1997. Seasonal Changes of the Infiltration Rates in a Typical Mediterranean Scrubland on Limestone in Southeast Spain. Journal of Hydrology, 198 (1-4) 198-209 Cerdà, A. 1998. Effect of climate on surface flow along a climatological gradient in Israel. A field rainfall simulation approach. Journal of Arid Environments, 38, 145-159. Levin, I., Assaf, R., and Bravdo, B. 1979. Soil moisture and root distribution in an apple orchard irrigated by tricklers. Plant and Soil, 52, 31-40. Schneider, G. W. And Childers, N.F. 1941. Influence of soil moisture on photosynthesis, respiration and transpiration of apples leaves. Plant Physiol., 16, 565-583. Valerie, A. and Orchard, F.J. Cook. 1983. Relationship between soil respiration and soil moisture. Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 15, 447-453. Veihmeyer, F. J. and Hendrickson, A. H. 1950. Soil Moisture in Relation to Plant Growth. Annual Review of Plant Physiology, 1, 285-304.

  16. EDITORIAL: Invited review and topical lectures from the 13th International Congress on Plasma Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagorodny, A.; Kocherga, O.

    2007-05-01

    The 13th International Congress on Plasma Physics (ICPP 2006) was organized, on behalf of the International Advisory Committee of the ICPP series, by the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine and the Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics (BITP) and held in Kiev, Ukraine, 22 26 May 2006. The Congress Program included the topics: fundamental problems of plasma physics; fusion plasmas; plasmas in astrophysics and space physics; plasmas in applications and technologies; complex plasmas. A total of 305 delegates from 30 countries took part in the Congress. The program included 9 invited review lectures, 32 invited topical and 313 contributed papers (60 of which were selected for oral presentation). The Congress Program was the responsibility of the International Program Committee: Anatoly Zagorodny (Chairman) Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics, Ukraine Olha Kocherga (Scientific Secretary) Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics, Ukraine Boris Breizman The University of Texas at Austin, USA Iver Cairns School of Physics, University of Sydney, Australia Tatiana Davydova Institute for Nuclear Research, Ukraine Tony Donne FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics, Rijnhuizen, The Netherlands Nikolai S Erokhin Space Research Institute of RAS, Russia Xavier Garbet CEA, France Valery Godyak OSRAM SYLVANIA, USA Katsumi Ida National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan Alexander Kingsep Russian Research Centre `Kurchatov Institute', Russia E P Kruglyakov Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Russia Gregor Morfill Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Germany Osamu Motojima National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan Jef Ongena ERM-KMS, Brussels and EFDA-JET, UK Konstantyn Shamrai Institute for Nuclear Research, Ukraine Raghvendra Singh Institute for Plasma Research, India Konstantyn Stepanov Kharkiv Institute of Physics and Technology, Ukraine Masayoshi Tanaka National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan Nodar Tsintsadze Physics Institute, Georgia The four-page texts of the contributed papers are presented as a CD, `ICPP 2006. Contributed Papers' which was distributed among the delegates. They are also available at the Congress website http://icpp2006.kiev.ua. A major part of the review and topical lectures is published in this special issue which has been sent to the Congress delegates. The papers were refereed to the usual high standard of the journal Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion. The Guest Editors of the special issue are grateful to the Publishers for their cooperation. Recognizing the role of Professor Alexej Sitenko (12 February 1927 11 February 2002) in the initiation and organization of the International (Kiev) Conferences on Plasma Theory which, after having been combined with the International Congresses on Waves and Instabilities in Plasma in 1980, created the series of International Congresses on Plasma Physics, and taking into account the contribution of Professor Sitenko to the progress of plasma theory, the Program Committee decided to open ICPP 2006 with the Sitenko memorial lecture. This memorial lecture is available as supplementary data (PDF) at stacks.iop.org/PPCF/49/i=5A.

  17. PREFACE: Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortov, Vladimir E.; Golden, Kenneth I.; Norman, Genri E.

    2006-04-01

    This special issue contains papers presented at the International Conference on Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems (SCCS) which was held during the week of 20 24 June 2005 in Moscow, Russia. The Moscow conference was the tenth in a series of conferences. The previous conferences were organized as follows. 1977: Orleans-la-Source, France, as a NATO Advanced Study Institute on Strongly Coupled Plasmas (organized by Marc Feix and Gabor J Kalman) 1982: Les Houches, France (organized by Marc Baus and Jean-Pierre Hansen) 1986: Santa Cruz, California, USA (hosted by Forrest J Rogers and Hugh E DeWitt) 1989: Tokyo, Japan (hosted by Setsuo Ichimaru) 1992: Rochester, NY, USA (hosted by Hugh M Van Horn and Setsuo Ichimaru) 1995: Binz, Germany (hosted by Wolf Dietrich Kraeft and Manfred Schlanges) 1997: Boston, Massachusetts, USA (hosted by Gabor J Kalman) 1999: St Malo, France (hosted by Claude Deutsch and Bernard Jancovici) 2002: Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA (hosted by John F Benage and Michael S Murillo) After 1995 the name of the series was changed from `Strongly Coupled Plasmas' to the present name in order to extend the topics of the conferences. The planned frequency for the future is once every three years. The purpose of these conferences is to provide an international forum for the presentation and discussion of research accomplishments and ideas relating to a variety of plasma liquid and condensed matter systems, dominated by strong Coulomb interactions between their constituents. Strongly coupled Coulomb systems encompass diverse many-body systems and physical conditions. Each meeting has seen an evolution of topics and emphasis as new discoveries and new methods appear. This year, sessions were organized for invited presentations and posters on dense plasmas and warm matter, astrophysics and dense hydrogen, non-neutral and ultracold plasmas, dusty plasmas, condensed matter 2D and layered charged-particle systems, Coulomb liquids, and statistical theory of SCCS. Within each area new results from theory, simulations and experiments were presented. In addition, a special symposium was held one evening to explore the questions on high-energy-density matter generated by intense heavy ion beams and to discuss the outlook for applications to industry. As this special issue illustrates, the field remains vibrant and challenging, being driven to a great extent by new experimental tools and access to new strongly coupled conditions. This is illustrated by the inclusion of developments in the areas of warm matter, dusty plasmas, condensed matter and ultra-cold plasmas. In total, 200 participants from 17 countries attended the conference, including 42 invited speakers. The individuals giving presentations at the conference, including invited plenary and topical talks and posters, were asked to contribute to this special issue and most have done so. We trust that this special issue will accurately record the contents of the conference, and provide a valuable resource for researchers in this rapidly evolving field. We would like to thank the members of the International Advisory Board and all members of the Programme Committee for their contributions to the conference. Of course, nothing would have been possible without the dedicated efforts of the Local Organizing Committee, in particular Igor Morozov and Valery Sultanov. We wish to thank the Russian Academy of Sciences, the Institute for High Energy Densities, the Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, the Ministry of Education and Science of the Russian Federation, the Russian Foundation for Basic Research, the Moscow Committee of Science and Technologies, the Russian Joint Stock Company `Unified Energy System of Russia', and The International Association for the Promotion of Co-operation with Scientists from the New Independent States (NIS) of the Former Soviet Union for sponsoring this conference.

  18. European Plate Observing System - the Arctic dimension and the Nordic collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atakan, K.; Heikkinen, P.; Juhlin, C.; Thybo, H.; Vogfjord, K.

    2012-04-01

    Within the framework of the EPOS project, Nordic interests are significant, not only in fundamental scientific issues related to geodynamic processes, but also in terms of the application of these to several central problems such as, hydrocarbon exploration and production including the related environmental issues, CO2 storage (or other toxic waste repositories) in geological formations, geothermal energy (natural and hot-dry rock) utilization and mining, geohazards (earthquakes, landslides and volcanic eruptions) and their consequences to the society. The Arctic dimension including Fennoscandia, the northern North Atlantic and the Arctic Sea constitutes an area of considerable geographical extent within the European plate. The region also contains a significant part of the European plate boundary submerged under the North Atlantic and the Arctic sea, where geodynamic processes such as rifting and fracturing are especially energetic. In particular, where the plate boundary is exposed on land in the South Iceland seismic zone, large earthquakes are frequently observed including two Mw6.5 events in 2000 and one Mw6.3 event in 2008. But, seismic hazard is not confined to the plate boundary. Significant intra-plate earthquakes have recently occurred in the region (Mw6.1 in the continental shelf near Spitsbergen in 2008, Mw5.0 in Southern Sweden in 2008, Mw5.2 near Kaliningrad in 2004) showing that there is considerable seismic hazard in the region. In addition, submarine landslide earthquakes are always of concern due to possible tsunami generation. Volcanic activity occurs on the plate boundary and is particularly strong in the rift zones of Iceland, where on average two volcanic eruptions occur per decade. subaerial volcanic eruptions also occur on Jan Mayen island, farther north on the Mid Atlantic ridge. Together, the Danish seismic network in Greenland, the Norwegian seismic arrays and national network traversing the length of Norway and the Icelandic seismic and strong motion networks monitor seismic activity and hazard in the North Atlantic. Vigorous volcanic activity along the plate boundary in Iceland and associated hazards are monitored by the Icelandic, seismic, geodetic, meteorological and hydrological networks. Recent eruptions, like the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruptions have demonstrated the far-reaching hazard to aviation caused by volcanic eruptions in Iceland. The high-sensitivity seismic and geodetic networks of Sweden monitor isostatic rebound of Fennoscandia. In this context, the varied Nordic monitoring networks provide a significant contribution to the main objectives of EPOS. There are already existing links with the other ESFRI initiatives where strong Nordic participation is established, such as SIOS and EMSO. As such EPOS provides the necessary platform to collaborate and develop an important Nordic dimension in the European Research Area. There is a long tradition of collaboration at the governmental level between the Nordic countries, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland and Iceland. Within the fields of research and education, the Nordic Ministries have a dedicated program, where research networks are being promoted. Recently a Nordic collaborative network in seismology, "NordQuake" (coordinated by Denmark) was established within this program. This collaboration which is now formalized and supported by the Nordic Ministries is based on a cooperation which was initiated more than 40 years ago, where annual Nordic Seminars in seismology (previously on detection seismology) was the central element. EPOS Nordic collaboration, building upon a long lasting history, has a significant potential for synergy effects in the region and therefore represents an important dimension within EPOS. Nordic EPOS Team: Lars Ottemöller (UiB), Mathilde B. Sørensen (UiB), Louise W. Bjerrum (UiB), Conrad Lindholm (Norsar), Halfdan Kjerulf (SK), Amir Kaynia (NGI), Valerie Maupin (UiO), Tor Langeland (CMR), Joerg Ebbing (NGU), John Dehls (NGU), Øystein Nordgulen (NGU), Roland Roberts (UU), Reynir Bødvarsson (UU),

  19. News and Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-07-01

    New Source of Information from Advertisers The Journal has a new feature effective with the June 1999 issue. If you would like additional information about our advertisers or their products, the quickest and easiest way to get it is via JCE Online: go to http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu click on Ad Index This will take you to the list of advertisers, each conveniently linked to their home page. When you do contact our advertisers, be sure to tell them that you saw their ad in the Journal of Chemical Education. This is important to them, and to us. JCE Software Receives Award The Journal recently received notice that JCE Software portion of JCE Online has been selected as a Links2Go Key Resource for the topic of chemistry software. According to Links2Go (www.links2go.com), JCE Software's home page is one of the top fifty most accessed online resources in the area of chemistry software (currently ranked 45). Thanks to all of you who have visited JCE Online and the JCE Software area to make this possible. If you haven't visited the site yet, you can go there directly (http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/JCESoft/index.html ) as well as via our JCE Online home page. You will be greeted with a short video of nitrogen triiodide exploding and be able to get a wealth of information about our latest releases, software, CD-ROMs/Video, student resources, materials for authors and software developers. You can see color graphics from our CD-ROMs, video, and software,... Actually, if you are familiar with our Catalog, this is much better. 1999 Welch Chemistry Prize Richard N. Zare, the Marguerite Blake Wilbur Professor of Natural Science at Stanford University, has been named the 1999 recipient of the Welch Award in Chemistry for his lifetime achievements in physical and analytical chemistry. Zare's interests focus on the development and application of lasers and other novel instruments to explore chemical frontiers, ranging from molecules to chemical processes, from the inside of cells to the inside of meteorites. Zare and colleague Andrew Alexander are contributors to the Journal's Viewpoints series, sponsored by the Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation: "Anatomy of Elementary Chemical Reactions", JCE, 1998, 75, 1105. The Welch Award in Chemistry has been given by the Welch Foundation since 1972 to honor lifetime achievements in the field. Zare will be honored and presented with a $300,000 prize and gold medallion during the Foundation's annual award banquet held in Houston in October. NEACT Conference: Chemistry of Materials and Material Science The 61st Summer Conference of NEACT, the New England Association of Chemistry Teachers, will be held from Monday, August 9, through Thursday, August 12, at Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, MA. The four-day conference will feature an exploration of the chemistry of materials and material science and effective methods of presenting these in the classroom and laboratory. The keynote address is "Teaching Solid State Chemistry at MIT" by Ron Latanision of MIT's Department of Material Science. Other presentations include "Driving Force", James Livingston; "The Colorful Nanoworld", Moungi Bawendi; "Molecular Wire-Based Amplification in Chemical Sensors", Timothy Swager; "Putting Solids in the Foundation", Arthur Ellis, George Lisensky, and Karen Nordell; "Miracle Materials", Valerie Wilcox; "Teaching About Polymers to Chemistry Students", Richard Stein; and "Using Software in Teaching About Polymers to Chemistry Students", William Vining. There will be a selection of workshops on the conference theme as well. The conference is open to all. The program chairperson is Peter J. Nassiff, Science Department Chairperson at Burlington High School. For further information contact Nassiff at 80 Gregory Road, Framingham, MA 01701; email: pnassiff@massed.net. Call for Symposia, Papers, & Workshops: 16th BCCE The Web site for the 16th Biennial Conference on Chemical Education, July 30-August 3, 2000, at the Un

  20. Obituary for Moshe Shapiro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Edward R.

    2014-04-01

    Moshe Shapiro, a pioneer in the area of quantum control of molecular dynamics, whose research opened new pathways for directing the course of chemical reactions and creating matter in unique, often quantum-specified states of aggregation, died on 3 December 2013 in Rehovot, Israel. He was 69 years old. Professor Shapiro is perhaps best known for his work with Paul Brumer of the University of Toronto. In 1986, the pair developed theoretical models predicting the control of unimolecular reactions following excitation by coherent fields of laser light. The reaction dynamics community immediately recognized the Brumer-Shapiro approach as distinct from ideas prevailing at the time to use sequences of short laser pulses timed to impulsively direct wavepacket motion in molecules. Many experimental groups devised strategies to apply this principle of phase control of molecular dynamics, and the results provided some of the earliest and most robust demonstrations of coherent control. The field has matured since to employ emerging electro-optic techniques to shape the phase and frequency characteristics of laser sources in time, and achieve degrees of control that rely simultaneously on interference and impulse. This is well demonstrated by the technique of step-wise adiabatic passage, introduced by Shapiro's group at the University of British Columbia, which enables the controlled transport of an ensemble of molecules to a selected level of excitation, and ultracold atoms to bound, ground-state molecules. Shapiro introduced a number of other new ideas to chemical dynamics. Working with Richard Bersohn, he performed early quantum scattering calculations that traced the multidimensional relaxation of potential energy in the photofragmentation of methyl iodide leading to vibrational excitation of the umbrella bend of the methyl radical product. He also described general conditions characterizing chaos in an isolated energy eigenstate, developed a theory for controlled photon induced symmetry breaking to form chiral products from achiral precursors, and showed how to use phase-coherent laser excitation to launch directional currents in semiconductors, in the absence of bias voltage. He has also contributed to important advances in laser catalysis, quantum computing and decoherence, transition state spectroscopy, potential inversion and wavefunction imaging, the theory of strong field phenomena in atoms and molecules, quantum theory of elementary exchange reactions and foundations of quantum mechanics. His most recent research focused on the control of molecular, atomic, and photonic processes with coherent light, quantum pattern recognition, coherent chiral separation and the coherent suppression of spontaneous emission, decoherence and other decay processes. At UBC, Moshe is remembered for his perceptiveness, broad vision and collegiality. 'One day he came to a group meeting with the idea of a solar-pumped living laser,' said physics colleague, Valery Milner. 'After thinking about this for two months, we designed an experiment using a random laser cavity that produced gain with milliwatts of pumping power applied to a fluorescent protein. We have now only to get lasing with the bacterium we engineered to express this protein.' Moshe studied for his PhD guided by Professor Raphael D Levine, in theoretical chemistry at the Hebrew University, focusing on photodissociation and molecular collisions. In 1970, he moved to Harvard University as a postdoctoral fellow, where he worked in reaction dynamics with Martin Karplus, a 2013 Nobel laureate in chemistry. In 1972, Moshe joined the faculty of the Department of Chemical Physics at the Weizmann Institute. There, he served as a department chair and was named the Jacques Mimran Professor of Chemical Physics. In 2002, he was appointed to a Canada Research Chair in Quantum Control in the Department of Chemistry at UBC. He won the Willis E Lamb Medal for achievements in the Physics of Quantum Electronics (2007), the John C Polanyi Award of The Canadian Society of Chemistry (2011), the Israel Ch

  1. Introduction and Committees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelova, Maia; Zakrzewski, Wojciech; Hussin, Véronique; Piette, Bernard

    2011-03-01

    This volume contains contributions to the XXVIIIth International Colloquium on Group-Theoretical Methods in Physics, the GROUP 28 conference, which took place in Newcastle upon Tyne from 26-30 July 2010. All plenary and contributed papers have undergone an independent review; as a result of this review and the decisions of the Editorial Board most but not all of the contributions were accepted. The volume is organised as follows: it starts with notes in memory of Marcos Moshinsky, followed by contributions related to the Wigner Medal and Hermann Weyl prize. Then the invited talks at the plenary sessions and the public lecture are published followed by contributions in the parallel and poster sessions in alphabetical order. The Editors:Maia Angelova, Wojciech Zakrzewski, Véronique Hussin and Bernard Piette International Advisory Committee Michael BaakeUniversity of Bielefeld, Germany Gerald DunneUniversity of Connecticut, USA J F (Frank) GomesUNESP, Sao Paolo, Brazil Peter HanggiUniversity of Augsburg, Germany Jeffrey C LagariasUniversity of Michigan, USA Michael MackeyMcGill University, Canada Nicholas MantonCambridge University, UK Alexei MorozovITEP, Moscow, Russia Valery RubakovINR, Moscow, Russia Barry SandersUniversity of Calgary, Canada Allan SolomonOpen University, Milton Keynes, UK Christoph SchweigertUniversity of Hamburg, Germany Standing Committee Twareque AliConcordia University, Canada Luis BoyaSalamanca University, Spain Enrico CeleghiniFirenze University, Italy Vladimir DobrevBulgarian Academy of Sciences, Bulgaria Heinz-Dietrich DoebnerHonorary Member, Clausthal University, Germany Jean-Pierre GazeauChairman, Paris Diderot University, France Mo-Lin GeNankai University. China Gerald GoldinRutgers University, USA Francesco IachelloYale University, USA Joris Van der JeugtGhent University, Belgium Richard KernerPierre et Marie Curie University, France Piotr KielanowskiCINVESTAV, Mexico Alan KosteleckyIndiana University, USA Mariano del OlmoValladolid University, Spain George PogosyanUNAM, Mexico, JINR, Dubna, Russia Christoph SchweigertUniversity of Hamburg, Germany Reidun TwarockYork University, UK Luc VinetMontréal University, Canada Apostolos VourdasBradford University, UK Kurt WolfUNAM, Mexico Local Organising Committee Maia Angelova - ChairNorthumbria University, Newcastle Wojtek Zakrzewski - ChairDurham University, Durham Sarah Howells - SecretaryNorthumbria University, Newcastle Jeremy Ellman - WebNorthumbria University, Newcastle Véronique HussinNorthumbria, Durham and University of Montréal Safwat MansiNorthumbria University, Newcastle James McLaughlinNorthumbria University, Newcastle Bernard PietteDurham University, Durham Ghanim PutrusNorthumbria University, Newcastle Sarah ReesNewcastle University, Newcastle Petia SiceNorthumbria University, Newcastle Anne TaorminaDurham University, Durham Rosemary ZakrzewskiAccompanying persons programme Lighthouse Photograph by Bernard Piette: Souter Lighthouse, Marsden, Tyne and Wear, England

  2. PREFACE New developments in nanopore research—from fundamentals to applications New developments in nanopore research—from fundamentals to applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, Tim; Edel, Joshua B.; Winterhalter, Mathias

    2010-11-01

    Biological and solid-state nanopores are an exciting field of research, which has seen a rapid development over the last 10 to 20 years. Activities in this area range from theoretical and experimental work on the underlying fundamental (bio)physics to applications in single-molecule biosensing. And while the prospect of DNA sequencing continues to be a major driving force, other applications with potentially similar impact begin to emerge, for example the detection of small molecules, proteins, protein/protein and protein/DNA complexes, and RNA to name just a few. It has also become apparent that both classes of nanopore devices have intrinsic advantages and disadvantages; hybrid structures combining the better of the two worlds would be a logical consequence and are beginning to appear in the literature. Many other highly innovative ideas and concepts continue to emerge and the number of nanopore-related publications has increased drastically over recent years. We found that more than 100 research groups worldwide are active in this area; several commercial settings are in the process of translating fundamental research into real-life applications. We therefore felt that now is the right time to showcase these new developments in a special issue: to inspire researchers active in the field, to liberate inherent synergies, and not least, to demonstrate to the outside world the current state-of-the-art and future opportunities. The title 'New developments in nanopore research—from fundamentals to applications' in some way reflects these ambitions and, even though not everyone invited was able to contribute, we were able to assemble 34 high-quality research papers from all over the world. We would like to acknowledge and thank all the contributors for their submissions, which made this special issue possible in the first place. Moreover, we would like to thank the staff at IOP Publishing for helping us with the administrative aspects and for coordinating the refereeing process, and Ms Natalia Goehring for the beautiful cover artwork. Finally, to the readers, we hope you find this special issue a valuable source of information and insight into the field of nanopores. New developments in nanopore research—from fundamentals to applications contents Mathematical modeling and simulation of nanopore blocking by precipitation M-T Wolfram, M Burger and Z S Siwy Protein conducting nanopores Anke Harsman, Vivien Krüger, Philipp Bartsch, Alf Honigmann, Oliver Schmidt, Sanjana Rao, Christof Meisinger and Richard Wagner Electrically sensing protease activity with nanopores Mikiembo Kukwikila and Stefan Howorka Electrical characterization of DNA-functionalized solid state nanopores for bio-sensing V Mussi, P Fanzio, L Repetto, G Firpo, P Scaruffi, S Stigliani, M Menotta, M Magnani, G P Tonini and U Valbusa Automatable lipid bilayer formation and ion channel measurement using sessile droplets J L Poulos, S A Portonovo, H Bang and J J Schmidt Critical assessment of OmpF channel selectivity: merging information from different experimental protocols M L López, E García-Giménez, V M Aguilella and A Alcaraz Chemically modified solid state nanopores for high throughput nanoparticle separation Anmiv S Prabhu, Talukder Zaki N Jubery, Kevin J Freedman, Rafael Mulero, Prashanta Dutta and Min Jun Kim Changes in ion channel geometry resolved to sub-ångström precision via single molecule mass spectrometry Joseph W F Robertson, John J Kasianowicz and Joseph E Reiner Entropic transport of finite size particles W Riefler, G Schmid, P S Burada and P Hänggi Osmotic stress regulates the strength and kinetics of sugar binding to the maltoporin channel Philip A Gurnev, Daniel Harries, V Adrian Parsegian and Sergey M Bezrukov Detection of urea-induced internal denaturation of dsDNA using solid-state nanoporesn Alon Singer, Heiko Kuhn, Maxim Frank-Kamenetskii and Amit Meller Translocation events in a single-walled carbon nanotube Jin He, Hao Liu, Pei Pang, Di Cao and Stuart Lindsay Probing DNA with micro- and nanocapillaries and optical tweezers L J

  3. Physical Biology : challenges for our second decade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Herbert

    2014-06-01

    It is quite an honor to be asked to become the third editor-in-chief of Physical Biology . I am following in the footsteps of Tim Newman, who served with energy and enthusiasm. Hopefully, the entire community fully appreciates his contributions to moving the field forward. Thank you, Tim! With the honor, however, goes a clear responsibility. Our journal has survived its birth pangs and emerged as a serious venue for publishing quality research papers using physical science to address the workings of living matter. With the support of scientists in this field and with the ongoing commitment of the IOP, we have successfully reached adolescence. Yet, there is clearly much room to grow and there are clear challenges in defining and maintaining our special niche in the publishing landscape. In this still-developing state, the journal very much mimics the state of the field of physical biology itself. Few scientists continue to question the relevance of physical science for the investigation of the living world. But, will our new perspective and the methods that come with it really lead to radically new principles of how life works? Or, will breakthroughs continue to come from experimental biology (perhaps aided by the traditional physicist-as-tool-builder paradigm), leaving us to put quantitative touches on established fundamentals? In thinking about these questions for the field and for the journal, I have tried to understand what is really unique about our joint endeavors. I have become convinced that living matter represents a new challenge to our physical-science based conceptual framework. Not only is it far from equilibrium, as has been generally recognized, but it violates our simple notions of the separability of constituents, their interactions and the resulting large-scale behavior. Unlike, say, atomic physicists who can do productive research while safely ignoring the latest developments in QCD (let alone particle physics at higher energies), we do not yet understand when the details of proteins and nucleic acids structure and function can be assumed constant when considering the cell. This problem is even more serious as we try to set higher sights and think of cells as constituents of tissue, organ and organism. Trying to understand higher-order biological systems is a bit like trying to play a board game where the pieces and rules are constantly changing, somehow in concert with what is happening at the scale of the game. Others will undoubtedly have their own view of what is really difficult and different about living systems. One of the roles of Physical Biology should therefore be to provide a needed forum to address some of these really difficult questions. Of course, most papers will operate with the safety-setting on, and will use established ideas in physics, either experimental or theoretical, to further our quantitative appreciation of living systems. These papers are without doubt an absolutely necessary part of the field, and we hope that our journal can serve as a home for the best of these. But, my real hope is that we can attract papers that really try to break new ground, that suggest ways in which the living world is not just an extremely messy example of the same phenomena that can be studied in non-biological contexts. Amazingly, this hope is actually shared by many leading biologists. In one of the most influential papers on cancer research in the past decades. Hanahan and Weinberg argue that 'one day, we imagine that cancer biology and treatment—at present, a patchwork quilt of cell biology, genetics, histopathology, biochemistry, immunology, and pharmacology—will become a science with a conceptual structure and logical coherence that rivals that of chemistry or physics.' We should take up the challenge, not just for cancer, and Physical Biology should help. Figuring out exactly how best to do this is now my responsibility, and I look forward to hearing from you and working with all of you, in order to make it happen.

  4. Obituary: Ronald N. Bracewell, 1921-2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosian, Vahé

    2009-01-01

    Ronald N. Bracewell, Professor Emeritus (since 1991) of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University, and a true renaissance man of science, died of a heart attack on 12 August 2007 at his home. Ron Bracewell was born in Sydney, Australia, on 22 July 1921, one of the two sons of Cecil and Valerie Bracewell. He graduated from the University of Sydney in 1941 and received his doctorate degree in physics from Cambridge University in 1949. During World War II, Ron worked in the Australian National Radar Establishment, where he designed and developed microwave radar equipment. Like several other World War II radar scientists, after the war he used this experience to pioneer the new field of radio astronomy. With J. L. Pawsey, in 1955 he published the first comprehensive textbook in this field entitled, Radio Astronomy. Bracewell joined the Stanford Electrical Engineering faculty in 1955, and from 1974 on he held the first prestigious Lewis Terman professorship. He was awarded the Outstanding Service Award of the department in 1984. In 1988, he was named an officer of the Order of Australia--the Australian equivalent of Order of the British Empire. Soon after his arrival at Stanford, Bracewell designed and began building a solar spectroheliograph, consisting of thirty-two dish antennas in the form of a cross. This was completed in 1961 and provided daily maps of the Sun for more than a decade encompassing more than one solar activity cycle of eleven years. These maps were useful in predicting magnetic storms caused by solar activity and were used by NASA during the first landing on the Moon. In 1971 he started the building of a five-element radio interferometer, for observation of extragalactic radio sources, with the novel design of unequal spacing that gave the resolution of a ten-element array. Both telescopes are now dismantled. The common characteristics of these and other projects were that they were all built in-house with a limited budget, often a small fraction of what a national laboratory would spend on a comparable project. As a result they provided an excellent arena for training future radio astronomers. Many prominent radio astronomers were indeed trained by Bracewell as graduate students or postdoctoral researchers. An excellent example is the often-forgotten, simple-but-elegant experiment of the first detection of the dipole (or the so-called 24-hour) anisotropy of the then-recently discovered cosmic microwave background radiation. This was done by installing a small horn microwave antenna on top of the Durand building at Stanford, which scanned the sky once every 24 hours as the Earth rotated around its axis. The result of this experiment, incorporated in Dave Conklin's Ph.D. thesis, was instrumental in establishing the Big Bang origin of this radiation and provided the first measurement of the velocity of the Earth (and our Solar System and Galaxy) with respect to the fundamental rest frame of the universe defined by this radiation. The techniques and mathematical algorithms that Ron developed for radio interferometry have been applied to medical imaging such as X-ray tomography for detecting tumors. Bracewell, not directly involved with such experiments, often acted as a consultant to medical practitioners. Another outcome of Bracewell's research was a book published first in 1965 titled, The Fourier Transform and its Applications, which has become the gold standard of this subject and can be found in the personal libraries of many astronomers, engineers, physicists, and medical researchers. Many years ago, before an observing run at Kitt Peak, I needed to refer to this book. I looked for it in the shelves of the library at the National Optical Astronomical Observatory in Tucson, Arizona, but could not find it. The librarian informed me that the book had been signed out. I told her that this is a very useful book, and they should have more than one copy. She agreed and said that there were indeed eleven copies; all were in use by the resident astronomers. A further interest of Ron was the discovery of and

  5. Obituary: John Beverley Oke, 1928-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesser, James Edward

    2004-12-01

    John Beverley (Bev) Oke passed away of heart failure early on 2 March 2004 at his Victoria, B.C. home. Bev's insatiable scientific curiosity led to fundamental contributions in many areas of stellar and extragalactic astronomy, including the development of advanced instrumentation for the largest optical telescopes and the mentoring of scores of grateful students and colleagues. Bev Oke was born in Sault Ste. Marie, ON, Canada on 23 March 1928, the son of Lyla Parteshuk and the Rev. C. Clare Oke. He entered the University of Toronto in 1945 to study physics with a steadily increasing fraction of astronomy, receiving his BA in 1949. Summer employment at the David Dunlap Observatory (DDO, 1948) and at the Dominion Observatory (Ottawa, 1949, 1950) sealed his interest in astronomy as a career. For his MA thesis (1950, Toronto), performed under theoretician Ralph Williamson, he made interior models of the Sun, and was proud to have proved that the proton-proton cycle was indeed the source of solar energy. Upon entering Princeton University he worked with Martin Schwarzschild on stellar interiors models and Lyman Spitzer on interstellar lines. A lifelong friendship with Alan Sandage began during Bev's second year while Alan was a post-doc at Princeton. During Bev's third year he spent three months in Pasadena with Lyman obtaining data for his thesis on Of stars. While in Pasadena he began a second life-long collaboration with Jesse Greenstein, an astronomer whose approach to science Bev deeply respected. In the small field of astronomy in that era, Bev wrote to DDO Director Jack Heard indicating the nearing completion of his PhD studies and his interest in a position. This led to a lectureship at the University of Toronto (1953-1956), followed by an Assistant Professorship (1956-1958). Bev's interest in instruments began at this time, when he built a device to convert photographic density to intensity, and worked with DDO engineer-machinist Jerry Longworth to implement one of the first two photoelectric scanners ever built. His main interests at the time were the classification of the thousands of stellar spectra in the DDO archives, and studies of Cepheids using his new spectrum scanner. At a Halloween party in 1954 he met Nancy Sparling. Together they initiated a life partnership factually punctuated by their August, 1955 marriage and the arrival of their children, Christopher (1957), Kevin (1958), Jennifer (1961) and Valerie (1966). Their home was notable to all for the deep aura of familial love and joy in the pursuit of knowledge and accomplishments. In winter 1957-58 Jesse Greenstein invited Bev to join Cal Tech, where he became an Associate Professor (1958) and then Professor (1964); during the period 1970-1978 he was Hale Observatories Director. With the large telescopes at Mount Wilson and Mount Palomar, astronomy there could aspire to be the best in the world, but this required instrumentation of the highest capabilities. Bev soon began to contribute in a major way to their instrumentation excellence following examples established, among others, by Ira Bowen and Horace Babcock. His began by improving the DC amplifiers then in use; constructing a high-spectral-resolution, scanning spectrophotometer; designing vacuum Dewars for astronomical applications; creating pulse counting systems for photoelectric devices; and building the innovative 32-channel spectrum scanner for the Palomar 5-m telescope that was completed in 1968. Bev built instruments to advance astronomy and to satisfy his wide-ranging curiosity about nature. With the first single-channel spectrum scanner he built at Cal Tech he played a key role in the discovery of the redshift of 3C273. Using his multi-channel spectrometer with students and colleagues, he pursued a highly successful quest to establish accurate spectral-energy distributions for diverse classes of stars and galaxies, based upon rigorous calibration against physical standards. Through this painstaking work he enabled the advances of astronomers worldwide for subsequent generations and extend

  6. EDITORIAL: Colloidal suspensions Colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petukhov, Andrei; Kegel, Willem; van Duijneveldt, Jeroen

    2011-05-01

    Special issue in honour of Henk Lekkerkerker's 65th birthday Professor Henk N W Lekkerkerker is a world-leading authority in the field of experimental and theoretical soft condensed matter. On the occasion of his 65th birthday in the summer of 2011, this special issue celebrates his many contributions to science. Henk Lekkerkerker obtained his undergraduate degree in chemistry at the University of Utrecht (1968) and moved to Calgary where he received his PhD in 1971. He moved to Brussels as a NATO fellow at the Université Libre de Bruxelles and was appointed to an assistant professorship (1974), an associate professorship (1977) and a full professorship (1980) in physical chemistry at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel. In 1985 he returned to The Netherlands to take up a professorship at the Van 't Hoff Laboratory, where he has been ever since. He has received a series of awards during his career, including the Onsager Medal (1999) of the University of Trondheim, the Bakhuys Roozeboom Gold Medal (2003) of the Royal Dutch Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW), the ECIS-Rhodia European Colloid and Interface Prize (2003), and the Liquid Matter Prize of the European Physical Society (2008). He was elected a member of KNAW in 1996, was awarded an Academy Chair position in 2005, and has held several visiting lectureships. Henk's work focuses on phase transitions in soft condensed matter, and he has made seminal contributions to both the theoretical and experimental aspects of this field. Here we highlight three major themes running through his work, and a few selected publications. So-called depletion interactions may lead to phase separation in colloid-polymer mixtures, and Henk realised that the partitioning of polymer needs to be taken into account to describe the phase behaviour correctly [1]. Colloidal suspensions can be used as model fluids, with the time- and length-scales involved leading to novel opportunities, notably the direct observation of capillary waves at a fluid-fluid interface [2]. Together with Remco Tuinier, Henk has recently completed a book in this area which is to appear later this year. A major theme in Henk's research is that of phase transitions in lyotropic liquid crystals. Henk, together with Daan Frenkel and Alain Stroobants, realized in the 1980s that a smectic phase in dispersions of rod-like particles can be stable without the presence of attractive interactions, similar to nematic ordering as predicted earlier by Onsager [3]. Together with Gert-Jan Vroege he wrote a seminal review in this area [4]. Henk once said that 'one can only truly develop one colloidal model system in one's career' and in his case this must be that of gibbsite platelets. Initially Henk's group pursued another polymorph of aluminium hydroxide, boehmite, which forms rod-like particles [5], which already displayed nematic liquid crystal phases. The real breakthrough came when the same precursors treated the produced gibbsite platelets slightly differently. These reliably form a discotic nematic phase [6] and, despite the polydispersity in their diameter, a columnar phase [7]. A theme encompassing a wide range of soft matter systems is that of colloidal dynamics and phase transition kinetics. Many colloidal systems have a tendency to get stuck in metastable states, such as gels or glasses. This is a nuisance if one wishes to study phase transitions, but it is of great practical significance. Such issues feature in many of Henk's publications, and with Valerie Anderson he wrote a highly cited review in this area [8]. Henk Lekkerkerker has also invested significant effort into the promotion of synchrotron radiation studies of colloidal suspensions. He was one of the great supporters of the Dutch-Belgian beamline 'DUBBLE' project at the ESRF [9]. He attended one of the very first experiments in Grenoble in 1999, which led to a Nature publication [7]. He was strongly involved in many other experiments which followed and also has been a member of the beam line board. The most recent synchotron data are reported in this issue and Henk

  7. Verochka Zingan or recollections from the Physics Department of the Moscow University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaina, Alex

    The author recollects his studentship during 70-th years at the Physics Department of the Moscow University. He was graduated from the theoretical Physics Department in 1977. The Rectors of the University that times were I.G. Petrovskii, R.V. Khokhlov and A.A. Logunov. The dean of the Physics Department was V.S. Fursov. As a particular event a meet with the former prime-minister of the USSR A.N. Kosygin is reported. Between professors mentioned throughout the recollections are A.I.Kitaigorodskii, Ya. B. Zel'dovich, D.D. Ivanenko, A.A. Sokolov, A.A. Vlasov, V.B. Braginsky, I.M. Ternov, L.A. Artsimovich, E.P. Velikhov and other, including that which became University professors later. A great number of colleagues from the Physics, Chemistry, Phylological and Historical Departments of the Moscow University are mentioned. Particularly, the students which entered the group 113 in 1971 and finished the group 601 in 1977 are listed. The recollections include 5 parts. Persons cited throughout the paper: A.N. Kosygin, A.S. Golovin, V. Kostyukevich, I.M. Ternov, E.G. Pozdnyak, A. N. Matveev, V.P. Elyutin, V.V. Kerzhentsev, 113 academic group (1971), V. Topala, E.A. Marinchuk, P.Paduraru, A.I. Kitaygorodski, A. Leahu, S. Berzan, B. Ursu, I. Coanda (Koade), M. Stefanovici, O. Bulgaru, A. Iurie-Apostol, A.S. Davydov, M.I. Kaganov, I.M. Lifshitz, Ya. B. Zel'dovich, A.Zhukov, A.I. Buzdin, N.S. Perov, V. Dolgov, P. Vabishchevich, A.A. Samarskii, V. Makarov, Irina Kamenskih, A.A. Arsen'ev, L.A. Artsimovich, A.A. Tyapkin, B.M. Pontecorvo, D.I. Blokhintsev, I.G. Petrovskii, R.V. Khokhlov, V.N. Rudenko, A.A. Sokolov, D.D. Ivanenko (Iwanenko), A.A. Vlasov, V.N. Ponomarev, N.N. Bogolyubov, N.N. Bogolyubov (Jr), V.Ch. Zhukovskii, Tamara Tarasova, Zarina Radzhabova (Malovekova), V.Malovekov, Tatiana Shmeleva, Alexandra C.Nicolescu, Tatiana Nicolescu, Rano Mahkamova, Miriam Yandieva, Natalia Germaniuk (Grigor'eva), E. Grigor'ev, A. Putro, Elena Nikiforova, B. Kostrykin, Galia Laufer, K. Laufer, Yu. El'nitskii, Gh. Nemtoi, Yu. Oprunenko, N.N. Semenov, Varun Sahni, A.A. Starobinskii, Liusea Burca, Serge Rollet, Tatyana Davydova, Zinaida Uglichina (Khafizova), T.Filippova, V.S. Filippov, Vera Zingan (Stefanovici), B.A. Gaina, E.F. Gaina, Valeri Gaina, A. Kirnitskii, M. Kavalerchik, Margarita Kavalerchik, Mark Rainis, L.I. Sedov, D. Mangeron, S. Taltu (Coanda), Z. Sali(Chitoroaga, Kitoroage), Raisa M. Gorbachova, Maria Bulgaru, S. Pavlichenko, Nadezhda Shishkan, A.N. Matveev, N.Ya. Tyapunina, D.F. Kiselev, V.A. Petukhov, N.Ch. Krutitskaya, G.N. Medvedev, A.A. Shishkin,I.A. Shishmarev,A.G. Sveshnikov, A.B. Vasil'eva, A.G. Yagola, I.I. Ol'hovskii, V.V. Kravtsov, V.V.Petkevich, V.I. Grigor'ev, V.S. Rostovskii, V.V. Balashov, B.I. Spasskii, V.D. Krivchenkov, M.B. Menskii, V.Ya. Fainberg, V.G. Kadyshevskii, B.K. Kerimov, V.A. Matveev, I.A. Kvasnikov, D.V. Gal'tsov, V.R. Khalilov, G.A. Chizhov,I.A. Obukhov, V.N. Melnikov, A.A. Logunov, A.N. Tavkhelidze,Yu.S. Vladimirov, N.F. Florea (Floria), B.A. Lysov, V.D. Kukin, 601-academic group (1977), A.R. Khokhlov, P.L. Kapitza, S.P. Kapitza, Ion C. Inculet, Ion I. Inculet,W. Bittner, Nikolay Florea (Floria), M.M. Heraskov, N.V. Sklifosovskii, N.N. Bantysh-Kamenskii, N.D. Zelinskii, Olga Crusevan (Krushevan), Eugenia Crusevan (Krushevan),L.S. Berg, I. Buzdugan (Buzdyga),S.G. Lazo, M.K. Grebenchya (Grebencea), V.T. Kondurar (Conduraru), E.A. Grebenikov, K.F. Teodorchik, V.A. Albitzky, M.V. Nazarov, Tatiana Nazarova, V. P. Oleinikov, O.V. Bolshakov, D.M. Nikolaev, V. Afanas'ev, Olga Tatarinskaya, Yu.V. Karaganchou, B.A. Volkov, V.K. Turta, S. Varzar, C. Sochichiu, V.B. Braginsky, V.S. Fursov, L.I. Brezhnev, V.I. Sobolev (INP MSU), V.A. Smirnov (INP MSU), L.D. Landau, M.A. Leontovich, A.G. Loskutova, Yu.M. Loskutov, N.S. Akulov, V.B. Gostev, A.R. Frenkin, N.N. Kolesnikov, A. Vasil'ev, V.N. Tsytovich, Ya.A. Frenkel, N.V. Mitskievich, E.A. Grebenikov, A.N. Prokopenya, A. Einstein, L.I. Sedov, A.N. Kolmogorov, V.I. Arnold, G.I.Popov, R.Z. Sagdeev, A.A. Kokoshin, A.E. Marinchuk, D.V. Gal'tsov, V.I. Petukhov, S.I. Vacaru,

  8. Sensitivity of ocean model simulation in the coastal ocean to the resolution of the meteorological forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Feng; Shapiro, Georgy; Thain, Richard

    2013-04-01

    The quality of ocean simulations depends on a number of factors such as approximations in governing equations, errors introduced by the numerical scheme, uncertainties in input parameters, and atmospheric forcing. The identification of relations between the uncertainties in input and output data is still a challenge for the development of numerical models. The impacts of ocean variables on ocean models are still not well known (e.g., Kara et al., 2009). Given the considerable importance of the atmospheric forcing to the air-sea interaction, it is essential that researchers in ocean modelling work need a good understanding about how sensitive the atmospheric forcing is to variations of model results, which is beneficial to the development of ocean models. Also, it provides a proper way to choose the atmospheric forcing in ocean modelling applications. Our previous study (Shapiro et al, 2011) has shown that the basin-wide circulation pattern and the temperature structure in the Black Sea produced by the same model is significantly dependent on the source of the meteorological input, giving remarkably different responses. For the purpose of this study we have chosen the Celtic Sea where high resolution meteo data are available from the UK Met office since 2006. The Celtic Sea is tidally dominated water basin, with the tidal stream amplitude varying from 0.25m/s in the southwest to 2 m/s in the Bristol Channel. It is also filled with mesoscale eddies which contribute to the formation of the residual (tidally averaged) circulation pattern (Young et al, 2003). The sea is strongly stratified from April to November, which adds to the formation of density driven currents. In this paper we analyse how sensitive the model output is to variations in the spatial resolution of meteorological using low (1.6°) and high (0.11°) resolution meteo forcing, giving the quantitative relation between variations of met forcing and the resulted differences of model results, as well as identifying the causes. The length scales of most energetic dynamic features in both ocean and atmosphere are defined by the Rossby radius of deformation, which is about 1000 km (a typical size of a cyclone) in the atmosphere while only 10-20 km (a size of a mesoscale eddy) in a shallow sea. However sub-mesoscale atmospheric patterns such as patchiness in the cloud cover could result in smaller scale variations of both the wind and solar radiation hence creating a direct link of these smaller atmospheric features with the ocean mesoscale variability. The simulation has been performed using a version of POLCOMS numerical model (Enriquez et al, 2005). Tidal boundary conditions were taken from the Oregon State University European Shelf Tidal Model (Egbert et al, 2010) and the temperature/ salinity initial fields and boundary conditions were taken from the World Ocean Database (Boyer et al, 2004). The paper discusses what elements of the circulation and water column structure are mostly sensitive to the meteo-fields resolution. References Kara, A.B., Wallcraft, A.J., Hurlburt, H.E., Loh, W.-Y., 2009. Which surface atmospheric variable drives the seasonal cycle of sea surface temperature over the global ocean? Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 114, D05101. Boyer, .T, S. Levitus, H. Garcia, R. Locarnini, C. Stephens, and J. Antonov, T. Boyer, S. Levitus, H. Garcia, R. Locarnini, C. Stephens, and J. Antonov, 2004. Objective Analyses of Annual, Seasonal, and Monthly Temperature and Salinity for the World Ocean on a ¼ Grid. International Journal of Climatology, 25, 931-945. Egbert, G. D., S. Y. Erofeeva, and R. D. Ray, 2010. Assimilation of altimetry data for nonlinear shallow-water tides: quarter-diurnal tides of the Northwest European Shelf, Continental Shelf Research, 30, 668-679. Enriquez, C. E., G. I. Shapiro, A. J. Souza, and A. G. Zatsepin, 2005. Hydrodynamic modelling of mesoscale eddies in the Black Sea. Ocean Dyn., 55, 476-489. Georgy Shapiro, Dmitry Aleynik , Andrei Zatsepin , Valentina Khan, Valery Prostakishin , Tatiana Akivis , Vladimir Belokopytov , Ant

  9. List of Posters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    List of Posters: Dark matter annihilation in the Galactic galo, by Dokuchaev Vyacheslav, et al. NEMO developments towards km3 telescope in the Mediterranean Sea. The NEMO project. Neutrino Mediterranean Observatory By Antonio Capone, NEMO Collaboration. Alignment as a result from QCD jet production or new still unknown physics at LHC? By Alexander Snigirev. Small-scale fluctuations of extensive air showers: systematics in energy and muon density estimation By Grigory Rubtsov. SHINIE: Simulation of High-Energy Neutrino Interacting with the Earth By Lin Guey-Lin, et al.. Thermodynamics of rotating solutions in n+1 dimensional Einstein - Maxwell -dilation gravity By Ahmad Sheykhi, et al.. Supernova neutrino physics with future large Cherenkov detectors By Daniele Montanino. Crossing of the Cosmological Constant Barrier in the string Inspired Dark Energy Model By S. Yu. Vernov. Calculations of radio signals produced by ultra-high and extremely high energy neutrino induced cascades in Antarctic ice By D. Besson, et al.. Inflation, Cosmic Acceleration and string Gravity By Ischwaree Neupane. Neutrino Physics: Charm and J/Psi production in the atmosphere By Liudmila Volkova. Three generation flavor transitions and decays of supernova relic neutrinos By Daniele Montanino. Lattice calculations & computational quantum field theory: Sonification of Quark and Baryon Spectra By Markum Harald, et al.. Generalized Kramers-Wannier Duality for spin systems with non-commutative symmetry By V. M. Buchstaber, et al.. Heavy ion collisions & quark matter: Nuclear matter jets and multifragmentation By Danut Argintaru, et al.. QCD hard interactions: The qT-spectrum of the Higgs and Slepton-pairs at the LHC By Guiseppe Bozzi. QCD soft interactions: Nonperturbative effects in Single-Spin Asymmetries: Instantons and TMD-parton distributions By Igor Cherednikov, et al.. Gluon dominance model and high multiplicity By Elena Kokoulina. Resonances in eta pi- pi- pi+ system By Dmitry Ryabchikov. Saturation effects in diffractive scattering at LHC By Oleg Selugin. A nonperturbative expansion method in QCD and R-related quantities By Igor Solovtsov. Z-scaling and high multiplicity particle Production in bar pp/pp & AA collisions at Tevatron and RHIC By Mikhail Tokarev. Scaling behaviour of the reactionsdd - > p? /3H and pd - > pd with pT at energy I-2 GeV By Yuri Uzikov. [ADS Note: Title formula can not be rendered correctly in ASCII.] CP violation, rare decays, CKM: Precision Measurements of the Mass of the Top Quark at CDF (Precision Top Mass Measurements at CDF) By Daniel Whiteson. Measurement of the Bs Oscillation at CDF By Luciano Ristori. The Bs mixing phase at LHCb By J. J. van Hunen. ATLAS preparations for precise measurements of semileptonic rare B decays By K. Toms. Hadron spectroscopy & exotics: Searches for radial excited states of charmonium in experiments using cooled antiproton beams By M. Yu. Barabanov. Retardation effects in the rotating string model By Fabien Buisseret and Claude Semay. Final results from VEPP-2M (CMD-2 and SND) By G. V. Fedotovich. Heavy Quark Physics: Prospects for B physics measurements using the CMS detector at the LHC By Andreev Valery. Heavy flavour production at HERA-B By Andrey Bogatyrev. B-Meson subleading form factors in the Heavy Quark Effective Theory (HQET) By Frederic Jugeau. Beyond the Standard Model: Monopole Decay in a Variable External Field By Andrey Zayakin. Two-Loop matching coefficients for the strong coupling in the MSSM By Mihaila Luminita. Test of lepton flavour violation at LHC By Hidaka Keisho. Looking at New Physics through 4 jets and no ET By Maity Manas. Are Preons Dyons? Naturalness of Three Generations By Das Chitta Ranjan. SUSY Dark Matter at Linear Collider By Sezen Sekmen, Mehmet Zeyrek. MSSM light Higgs boson scenario and its test at hadron colliders By Alexander Belyaev. Antiscalar Approach to Gravity and Standard Model By E. Mychelkin. GRID distributed analysis in high energy physics: PAX: Physics Analysis Design and Application on the GRID By Martin Erdmann

  10. EDITORIAL: Focus on Plasma Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morfill, G. E.; Kong, M. G.; Zimmermann, J. L.

    2009-11-01

    'Plasma Healthcare' is an emerging interdisciplinary research topic of rapidly growing importance, exploring considerable opportunities at the interface of plasma physics, chemistry and engineering with life sciences. Some of the scientific discoveries reported so far have already demonstrated clear benefits for healthcare in areas of medicine, food safety, environmental hygiene, and cosmetics. Examples include ongoing studies of prion inactivation, chronic wound treatment and plasma-mediated cancer therapy. Current research ranges from basic physical processes, plasma chemical design, to the interaction of plasmas with (i) eukaryotic (mammalian) cells; (ii) prokaryotic (bacteria) cells, viruses, spores and fungi; (iii) DNA, lipids, proteins and cell membranes; and (iv) living human, animal and plant tissues in the presence of biofluids. Of diverse interests in this new field is the need for hospital disinfection, in particular with respect to the alarming increase in bacterial resistance to antibiotics, the concomitant needs in private practices, nursing homes etc, the applications in personal hygiene—and the enticing possibility to 'design' plasmas as possible pharmaceutical products, employing ionic as well as molecular agents for medical treatment. The 'delivery' of the reactive plasma agents occurs at the gaseous level, which means that there is no need for a carrier medium and access to the treatment surface is optimal. This focus issue provides a close look at the current state of the art in Plasma Medicine with a number of forefront research articles as well as an introductory review. Focus on Plasma Medicine Contents Application of epifluorescence scanning for monitoring the efficacy of protein removal by RF gas-plasma decontamination Helen C Baxter, Patricia R Richardson, Gaynor A Campbell, Valeri I Kovalev, Robert Maier, James S Barton, Anita C Jones, Greg DeLarge, Mark Casey and Robert L Baxter Inactivation factors of spore-forming bacteria using low-pressure microwave plasmas in an N2 and O2 gas mixture M K Singh, A Ogino and M Nagatsu Degradation of adhesion molecules of G361 melanoma cells by a non-thermal atmospheric pressure microplasma H J Lee, C H Shon, Y S Kim, S Kim, G C Kim and M G Kong The acidification of lipid film surfaces by non-thermal DBD at atmospheric pressure in air A Helmke, D Hoffmeister, N Mertens, S Emmert, J Schuette and W Vioel Reduction and degradation of amyloid aggregates by a pulsed radio-frequency cold atmospheric plasma jet D L Bayliss, J L Walsh, G Shama, F Iza and M G Kong The effect of low-temperature plasma on bacteria as observed by repeated AFM imaging René Pompl, Ferdinand Jamitzky, Tetsuji Shimizu, Bernd Steffes, Wolfram Bunk, Hans-Ulrich Schmidt, Matthias Georgi, Katrin Ramrath, Wilhelm Stolz, Robert W Stark, Takuya Urayama, Shuitsu Fujii and Gregor Eugen Morfill Removal and sterilization of biofilms and planktonic bacteria by microwave-induced argon plasma at atmospheric pressure Mi Hee Lee, Bong Joo Park, Soo Chang Jin, Dohyun Kim, Inho Han, Jungsung Kim, Soon O Hyun, Kie-Hyung Chung and Jong-Chul Park Cell permeabilization using a non-thermal plasma M Leduc, D Guay, R L Leask and S Coulombe Physical and biological mechanisms of direct plasma interaction with living tissue Danil Dobrynin, Gregory Fridman, Gary Friedman and Alexander Fridman Nosocomial infections-a new approach towards preventive medicine using plasmas G E Morfill, T Shimizu, B Steffes and H-U Schmidt Generation and transport mechanisms of chemical species by a post-discharge flow for inactivation of bacteria Takehiko Sato, Shiroh Ochiai and Takuya Urayama Low pressure plasma discharges for the sterilization and decontamination of surfaces F Rossi, O Kylián, H Rauscher, M Hasiwa and D Gilliland Contribution of a portable air plasma torch to rapid blood coagulation as a method of preventing bleeding S P Kuo, O Tarasenko, J Chang, S Popovic, C Y Chen, H W Fan, A Scott, M Lahiani, P Alusta, J D Drake and M Nikolic A two-dimensional cold atmospheric plasma jet array for uniform treatment of large-area