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Sample records for vancouver general hospital

  1. Screening, detecting and enhancing the yield of previously undiagnosed hepatitis B and C in patients with acute medical admissions to hospital: A pilot project undertaken at the Vancouver General Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Kapeluto, Jordanna E; Kadatz, Matthew; Wormsbecker, Andrew; Sidhu, Kiran; Yoshida, Eric M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) represent an increasing health burden and morbidity in Canada. Viral hepatitis, specifically HCV, has high prevalence among persons born between 1945 and 1965, with 45% to 85% of infected adults asymptomatic and unaware of their infection. Screening has been shown to be cost effective in the detection and treatment of viral hepatitis. OBJECTIVE: To quantify incidence and identify undocumented HBV and HCV infection in hospitalized patients at a single centre with secondary analysis of risk factors as part of a quality improvement initiative. METHODS: A one-time antibody test was conducted in patients admitted to the acute medicine and gastroenterology services. RESULTS: Over a 12-week period, hospital screening for HBV and HCV was performed in 37.3% of 995 admitted patients. There was identification of 15 previously undiagnosed cases of HCV (4%) and 36 undocumented cases of occult (ie, antihepatitis B core antigen seropositive) or active (ie, hepatitis B surface antigen seropositive) HBV (9.7%). Among patients with positive screens, 60% of seropositive HCV patients had no identifiable risk factors. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of HBV and HCV infection among hospitalized patients in Vancouver was higher than that of the general population. Risk factors for contraction are often not identified. These results can be used as part of an ongoing discussion regarding a ‘seek and treat’ approach to the detection and treatment of chronic blood-borne viral illnesses. PMID:24945186

  2. Asthma attack periodicity: A study of hospital emergency visits in Vancouver

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, D.V.; Baker-Anderson, M.; Sizto, R. )

    1990-02-01

    Attendances at the emergency departments of the nine acute care hospitals serving the Vancouver region, with a population of just under a million people, were recorded from July 1, 1984 to October 31, 1986. Of about 25,500 visits a month, 2.7% were for respiratory conditions; and of these, 41.3% were for asthma. Data from 11 air monitoring stations were also tabulated on a daily basis, giving mean maximal hourly values for SO2, NO2, and O3; daily aerosol sulfate measurements from one station were also analyzed, together with daily temperature data and measurements of the coefficient of haze. In 3 consecutive years, a peak in asthma attendances was noted, starting in the last week of September, and continuing for 3 weeks. In these periods, weekly visits for asthma reached 130 patients; during the rest of the year, the weekly visits for asthma varied between 30 and 90. This peak affected children and adults between the ages of 15 and 60, but no increase was seen in those over 60 years. Although pollution levels increased sharply in the fall, a day-by-day analysis showed that the rise in asthma attendances preceded the increase in NO chi and SO2 levels for the region, expressed as the mean of the hourly maxima across all stations. It seems unlikely that a specific pollen is responsible for this, or that house mite replication is the cause. Soya beans are not shipped out of Vancouver. The cause of the peak has not been identified. Variations in emergency visits by day of the week have been recorded; in children and in those aged 15-60, more visits occur on Sundays than on other days, but this does not occur in those over 60. Intercorrelations between environmental variables and emergency visits have been calculated separately for the periods May 1 to October 31, and November 1 to April 30.

  3. Factors Associated with Leaving Hospital against Medical Advice among People Who Use Illicit Drugs in Vancouver, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Ti, Lianping; Milloy, M-J; Buxton, Jane; McNeil, Ryan; Dobrer, Sabina; Hayashi, Kanna; Wood, Evan; Kerr, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background Leaving hospital against medical advice (AMA) is common among people who use illicit drugs (PWUD) and is associated with severe health-related harms and costs. However, little is known about the prevalence of and factors associated with leaving AMA among PWUD. Methods Data were collected through two Canadian prospective cohort studies involving PWUD between September 2005 and July 2011 and linked to a hospital admission/discharge database. Bivariable and multivariable generalized estimating equations were used to examine factors associated with leaving hospital AMA among PWUD who were hospitalized. Results Among 488 participants who experienced at least one hospitalization, 212 (43.4%) left the hospital AMA at least once during the study period. In multivariable analyses, factors positively and significantly associated with leaving hospital AMA included: unstable employment (AOR = 1.92; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.22–3.03); recent incarceration (AOR = 1.63; 95%CI: 1.07–2.49); ≥ daily heroin injection (AOR = 1.49; 95%CI: 1.05–2.11); and younger age per year younger (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.04; 95%CI: 1.02–1.06). Conclusions We found a substantial proportion of PWUD in this setting left hospital AMA and that various markers of risk and vulnerability were associated with this phenomenon. Our findings highlight the need to address substance abuse issues early following hospital admission. These findings further suggest a need to develop novel interventions to minimize PWUD leaving hospital prematurely. PMID:26509447

  4. 3. Hospital Point, general view toward Portsmouth Naval Hospital Building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Hospital Point, general view toward Portsmouth Naval Hospital Building showing cannon (at left) and Saunders Monument (at right in distance), view to southwest - Portsmouth Naval Hospital, Bounded by Elizabeth River, Crawford Street, Portsmouth General Hospital, Parkview Avenue, & Scotts Creek, Portsmouth, Portsmouth, VA

  5. [Family and psychiatric hospitalization in a general hospital].

    PubMed

    de Mello, Rita Mello; Schneider, Jac Fernando

    2011-06-01

    This study aims to identify the reasons that lead relatives to hospitalize patients in a psychiatric unit of a general hospital. It is a qualitative study based on Alfred Schutz' phenomenological sociology. Fourteen relatives, each with one family member hospitalized, were interviewed from August to October 2009. The guiding question of the phenomenological interview was "What do you expect from psychiatric hospitalization in a general hospital?". Phenomenological sociology was used to understand and interpret the interviews. Statements showed three concrete categories, that lead to the reasons for: treatment guidelines and continuity; prospects for improvement; ideas about normality. This research shows the experiences of relatives, contributing with mental health professionals' reflection about their actions and about the involvement of families in a general hospital's psychiatric unit. PMID:21987981

  6. Examining General Hospitals' Smoke-Free Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitman, Marilyn V.; Harbison, Phillip Adam

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to examine the level of smoke-free policies in general hospitals and the barriers faced in implementing restrictive policies banning smoking inside buildings and on surrounding grounds. Design/methodology/approach; A survey was developed to gather data on hospitals' current smoke-free policies, including the challenges

  7. Examining General Hospitals' Smoke-Free Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitman, Marilyn V.; Harbison, Phillip Adam

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to examine the level of smoke-free policies in general hospitals and the barriers faced in implementing restrictive policies banning smoking inside buildings and on surrounding grounds. Design/methodology/approach; A survey was developed to gather data on hospitals' current smoke-free policies, including the challenges…

  8. 7. Hospital Point, general view from steps of the Portsmouth ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Hospital Point, general view from steps of the Portsmouth Naval Hospital Building showing radiating walks, view to northeast - Portsmouth Naval Hospital, Bounded by Elizabeth River, Crawford Street, Portsmouth General Hospital, Parkview Avenue, & Scotts Creek, Portsmouth, Portsmouth, VA

  9. Attitudes to Psychiatry in the General Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Kellett, John M.; Mezey, Alex G.

    1970-01-01

    A survey of consultant attitudes to psychiatry in six general hospitals is presented and compared with reported findings in general practitioners and medical students. Psychological factors were accepted as important in a variety of medical conditions. Different specialties differed little in their attitudes to neurotic patients and to psychiatrists, younger consultants tending to be more critical. Consultants had a lower level of neuroticism than the general population and medical students, and physicians were less extraverted than surgeons; these personality factors were not related to expressed attitudes. The results suggest that other specialties accept the role of psychiatry, and its integration into the general hospital is not likely to meet with antagonism. PMID:5471754

  10. Hospital Web site 'tops' in Louisiana. Hospital PR, marketing group cites East Jefferson General Hospital.

    PubMed

    Rees, Tom

    2002-01-01

    East Jefferson General Hospital in Metairie, La., launched a new Web site in October 2001. Its user-friendly home page offers links to hospital services, medical staff, and employer information. Its jobline is a powerful tool for recruitment. The site was awarded the 2002 Pelican Award for Best Consumer Web site by the Louisiana Society for Hospital Public Relations & Marketing. PMID:12238238

  11. Acute Gout in Hospitalized patients in Sarawak General Hospital.

    PubMed

    Teh, C L; Chew, K F; Ling, G R

    2014-06-01

    we performed a prospective study of all hospitalized patients with a diagnosis of Gout in Sarawak General hospital from 1st July 2011 to 1st July 2012. There were a total of 126 patients in our study of which 112 (88.9%) were males. The majority of our patients were from the indigenous populations (71.7%). They have a mean age of 60.0 ± 14.2 years. Most of our patients were overweight (68%) with comorbities of hypertension (78.6%), Chronic Kidney Failure (48.4%), Type II diabetes Mellitus (30.2%), dyslipidemia (27.8%) and Ischaemic heart disease (11.9%). Polyarticular gouty arthritis was the main presenting pattern during hospitalization (88.1%). The mean length of stay for our patients was 9.8 ± 6.0 days which was significantly longer than the mean length of stay for other patients without gout (p<0.05). Only 17 patients had gout on admission and the majority developed gout during hospitalizations. Our patients were admitted respectively for medical problems (45.4%), surgical problems (28.6%) and orthopaedic problems (9.2%). Colchicine (73.8%) and steroid (40.5%) were the main stays of treatment for our patients. Our hospitalized gout patients were complicated patients with multiple comorbidities. PMID:25326353

  12. Tourism, Tolerance, or Hospitality? An Assessment of a Native/Non-Native, Urban/Rural Youth Exchange Program between Fort Good Hope, NWT, and East Vancouver, BC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hern, Matt

    2009-01-01

    This article considers and assesses a youth exchange project between two community-based youth centers: The Purple Thistle Centre in East Vancouver, British Columbia, and the K'asho Got'ine Youth Centre in Fort Good Hope, Northwest Territories. Both centers serve primarily low-income youth, but after that the similarities are very few. The

  13. Tourism, Tolerance, or Hospitality? An Assessment of a Native/Non-Native, Urban/Rural Youth Exchange Program between Fort Good Hope, NWT, and East Vancouver, BC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hern, Matt

    2009-01-01

    This article considers and assesses a youth exchange project between two community-based youth centers: The Purple Thistle Centre in East Vancouver, British Columbia, and the K'asho Got'ine Youth Centre in Fort Good Hope, Northwest Territories. Both centers serve primarily low-income youth, but after that the similarities are very few. The…

  14. Electrophysiology in a district general hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, A.; Holt, P. M.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate the feasibility of performing electrophysiological studies at a district general hospital and to evaluate the importance of such studies in the management of patients with suspected arrhythmias. DESIGN--Retrospective study of patients having had electrophysiological studies during a three year period. SETTING--District general hospital. SUBJECTS--93 patients (50 men, 43 women, mean age 45.9 years) with suspected arrhythmias. RESULTS--The patients were divided into two groups according to symptoms. Group 1 (34 patients) presented with syncope. Group 2 (59 patients) presented with palpitation. All had previously undergone non-invasive investigations. All had had multiple hospital admissions and outpatient attendances. In group 1 nine patients with no documented arrhythmias had inducible ventricular tachycardia and three of six with suspected bradyarrhythmias had ventricular tachycardia. Fourteen patients had suspected ventricular arrhythmias before electrophysiological studies, which were confirmed in all, four receiving automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillators. Electrophysiological studies were used to guide drug treatment in all patients. Group 2 consisted of 32 patients with reentrant supraventricular tachycardia and 15 with ventricular tachycardia; 12 had no documented arrhythmias. In those with supraventricular tachycardia, accessory pathways were identified in all. In 23 patients drug treatment (guided by electrophysiological studies) was successful. In nine, drug treatment guided by electrophysiological studies were ineffective and radiofrequency ablation was successful. In 15 patients with ventricular tachycardia and palpitations, 10 had their drugs changed after electrophysiological studies and their ventricular tachycardia was suppressed. In five patients electrophysiological studies showed that ventricular tachycardia was unsuppressed and they were referred for an operation or implantation of an automatic cardioverter defibrillator. In 12 patients with no documented arrhythmias electrophysiological studies identified significant arrhythmias in six. There were no complications. CONCLUSIONS--Diagnostic electrophysiological studies can safely and effectively be performed in a district general hospital. These studies are especially effective in investigating patients with syncope, and also provide a strategy for future arrhythmia management. Images PMID:7888268

  15. 19. First and Second Floors. Ward 'K', Letterman General Hospital, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. First and Second Floors. Ward 'K', Letterman General Hospital, Presidio of San Francisco, Cal. Sheet No. 1. May 1917. BUILDING 1049. - Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman General Hospital, Building No. 12, Letterman Hospital Complex, Edie Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  16. 20. West Elevation and Section, Ward 'K', Letterman General Hospital, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. West Elevation and Section, Ward 'K', Letterman General Hospital, Presidio of San Francisco, Cal. Sheet No. 2. May 1917. BUILDING 1049. - Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman General Hospital, Building No. 12, Letterman Hospital Complex, Edie Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  17. Environmental Scanning, Vancouver Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yao, Min

    This 1994 environmental scanning report from Vancouver Community College (VCC) reviews the expected effects of the separation of VCC into a new Vancouver Community College and Langara College (LC). The report examines the projected service area student-intake capacity; student characteristics; population growth trends; other postsecondary

  18. Fitzsimons General Hospital, Physiotherapy & Electrocardiograph Department Building, North of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Fitzsimons General Hospital, Physiotherapy & Electrocardiograph Department Building, North of Building No. 516, East of corridor connecting Building No. 511 to Building No. 515, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  19. Recommended Variables for the Multiple Stratification of General Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Irene; Srikantan, K. S.

    1970-01-01

    Some characteristics of short-term general hospitals are examined in order to determine which variables, among those for which data are readily available, might be most useful for stratification when multipurpose samples of United States hospitals are to be selected. Illustrative tabulations are presented in which 1961 AHA data on 5078 general hospitals, grouped by hospital control and four approval classes, are distributed in six size classes, four geographic regions, three SMSA classifications, and nine geographic divisions. The tables and the recommendations based on them should be of value to those planning hospital studies when resources and time available for designing a sample are limited. PMID:5444867

  20. [High-quality hospital discharge summaries - general practitioners expectations].

    PubMed

    Bally, Klaus; Lingenhel, Sabine; Tschudi, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Hospital discharge summaries ensure treatment continuity after hospital discharge. In Switzerland discharge letters are a celebrated custom and a tool for training young colleagues. The primary purpose is to guarantee high-quality care of patients treated by hospital staff and general practitioners. From the perspective of the patient's general practitioner discharge summaries should convey current and accurate medically important patient data to the physician responsible for follow-up care. In the era of highly developed electronic data transfer and introduction of diagnose related groups (DRGs), it will be necessary to transmit hospital discharge information selectively to different target groups. Nevertheless data protection and medical secret must be complied with. PMID:22198930

  1. Right half of CO17229. Fitzsimons General Hospital, Bounded by ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Right half of CO-172-29. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Bounded by East Colfax to south, Peoria Street to west, Denver City/County & Adams County Line to north, & U.S. Route 255 to east, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  2. North side. Fitzsimons General Hospital, Physiotherapy & Electrocardiograph Department ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    North side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Physiotherapy & Electrocardiograph Department Building, North of Building No. 516, East of corridor connecting Building No. 511 to Building No. 515, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  3. East and north sides. Fitzsimons General Hospital, Physiotherapy & ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    East and north sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Physiotherapy & Electrocardiograph Department Building, North of Building No. 516, East of corridor connecting Building No. 511 to Building No. 515, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  4. General Surgery Programs in Small Rural New York State Hospitals: A Pilot Survey of Hospital Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuckerman, Randall; Doty, Brit; Gold, Michael; Bordley, James; Dietz, Patrick; Jenkins, Paul; Heneghan, Steven

    2006-01-01

    Context: Hospitals play a central role in small rural communities and are frequently one of the major contributors to the local economy. Surgical services often account for a substantial proportion of hospital revenues. The current shortage of general surgeons practicing in rural communities may further threaten the financial viability of rural

  5. General Surgery Programs in Small Rural New York State Hospitals: A Pilot Survey of Hospital Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuckerman, Randall; Doty, Brit; Gold, Michael; Bordley, James; Dietz, Patrick; Jenkins, Paul; Heneghan, Steven

    2006-01-01

    Context: Hospitals play a central role in small rural communities and are frequently one of the major contributors to the local economy. Surgical services often account for a substantial proportion of hospital revenues. The current shortage of general surgeons practicing in rural communities may further threaten the financial viability of rural…

  6. General surgery at rural Tennessee hospitals: a survey of rural Tennessee hospital administrators.

    PubMed

    Cofer, Joseph B; Petros, Tommy J; Burkholder, Hans C; Clarke, P Chris

    2011-07-01

    Rural communities face an impending surgical workforce crisis. The purpose of this study is to describe perceptions of rural Tennessee hospital administrators regarding the importance of surgical services to their hospitals. In collaboration with the Tennessee Hospital Association, we developed and administered a 13-item survey based on a recently published national survey to 80 rural Tennessee hospitals in August 2008. A total of 29 responses were received for an overall 36.3 per cent response rate. Over 44 per cent of rural surgeons were older than 50 years of age, and 27.6 per cent of hospitals reported they would lose at least one surgeon in the next 2 years. The responding hospitals reported losing 10.4 per cent of their surgical workforce in the preceding 2 years. Over 53 per cent were actively recruiting a general surgeon with an average time to recruit a surgeon of 11.8 months. Ninety-seven per cent stated that having a surgical program was very important to their financial viability with the mean and median reported revenue generated by a single general surgeon being $1.8 million and $1.4 million, respectively. Almost 11 per cent of the hospitals stated they would have to close if they lost surgical services. Although rural Tennessee hospitals face similar difficulties to national rural hospitals with regard to retaining and hiring surgeons, slightly more Tennessee hospitals (54 vs 36%) were actively attempting to recruit a general surgeon. The shortage of general surgeons is a threat to the accessibility of comprehensive hospital-based care for rural Tennesseans. PMID:21944341

  7. Pure tone audiometry: comparison of general practice and hospital services

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Michael C.F.; Cable, Hugh R.; Wilmot, John F.

    1988-01-01

    Pure tone audiometry was obtained for both ears of 32 children by a general practitioner using a simple audiometer in his surgery, and by audiometricians in a hospital department on the same day. Comparing the worst hearing threshold at any of the three tested frequencies, the general practitioner did not find any ears to hear more than 10 dB better than the hospital (no false negatives). However, there were six false positives (9%) where the general practitioner identified an apparent hearing loss of greater than 15 dB. It is concluded that pure tone audiometry could be carried out accurately in the practice. PMID:3267745

  8. The American General Hospital as a Complex Social System

    PubMed Central

    Georgopoulos, Basil S.; Matejko, Aleksander

    1967-01-01

    Based on data from and about the medical, nursing, and administrative staffs in a probability sample of general hospitals, involving 41 institutions and some 2,400 respondents, certain aspects of the hospital social system are examined in each of the following basic problem-areas: organizational and member goal attainment; availability and allocation of organizational resources; organizational coordination; social integration; intraorganizational strain; and organizational adaptation. These areas are examined separately and in relation to one another, as a basis for understanding and assessing the overall effectiveness of the hospital as a complex social organization. Hospital effectiveness is viewed in the context of open system theory, as a joint function of the relative success with which the organization handles its problems in these key areas. Findings concerning a number of social-psychological variables in each area are presented and discussed, with emphasis on the interdependence of the areas and on organizational issues and implications. The results show some of the basic strengths and weaknesses of the system. Important differences associated with hospital size and affiliation are also discussed to illustrate the typical profile of the American general hospital and significant variations from it. Similarly, differences among the principal groups in the system are presented, where appropriate. Finally, promising directions for future organizational research in the hospital field are briefly presented.

  9. [Preferences of patients looking for a general practitioner or hospital].

    PubMed

    Kriwy, P; Aumller, H

    2007-01-01

    This paper deals with preferences of the search process of patients looking for new health providers. The analyses are based on the data from a survey in the southern province of Germany (Bavaria) conducted in 2006 and including 970 participants. It showed that private networks are mainly used in the search for general practitioners whereas crucial advice for finding a suitable hospital is usually taken from diagnosing specialists. Modern equipment is more important for hospitals than for general practitioners. Basic aspects of service quality (e.g., friendliness) are more important for patients insured in public health funds and looking for general practitioners than for patients insured in private health schemes. The possibilities provided by the internet should not be overrated. Only young patients use the world-wide web to look for hospitals, but even that portion is not remarkably high. PMID:17926263

  10. A Survey of Psychiatric Units in General Hospitals in Canada

    PubMed Central

    McKerracher, D. G.; Smith, Colin M.

    1964-01-01

    The Canadian Psychiatric Association recently recommended that all general hospitals over 200 beds should have psychiatric in-patient units. Questionnaires were sent to the administrators of the 52 existing general hospital psychiatric units in Canada. Most administrators expressed approval of these units, although some noted the existence of problems. Statistics are given on the staffing of the units. Although the number of beds was small, these facilities accounted for a very large number of admissions. Most had active teaching programs. The advantages of implementing the C.P.A. recommendation are many. General hospital psychiatric units should be encouraged to undertake comprehensive psychiatry, that is, to accept all types of psychiatric patients, and to retain responsibility for long-term care. PMID:14166462

  11. Primary Supervision: Massachusetts General Hospital's child and adolescent psychiatry seminar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jellinek, Michael S.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author describes "Primary Supervision", a seminar he has led for approximately 20 years, which is designed for the entire class of nine first-year residents in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry training at Massachusetts General Hospital. The seminar meets for 1 hour each week throughout the first year. Through 900 hours of

  12. General practice: the DREEM attachment? Comparing the educational environment of hospital and general practice placements.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Martina; Bennett, Deirdre; O'Flynn, Siun

    2012-01-01

    The clinical learning environment is changing. General practice placements are now a fundamental part of undergraduate medical education. There is growing recognition that changes in hospital work practices are altering the breadth of exposure available to students. Surprisingly little work has been done comparing the quality of clinical placements between the hospital and community using validated tools. Such comparisons inform curriculum planning and resource allocation. The aim of this study was to compare the quality of the educational environment experienced by junior medical students during hospital and general practice placements using a widely used tool. Following the introduction of a new integrated curriculum, all Year 3 students (n=108) completed a standardised evaluation instrument, the Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure (DREEM) at the end of each of their clinical attachments (two different hospital sites and one in general practice), giving a total of 324 questionnaires. All forms were analysed and input into Graphpad INSTAT version 3. Total DREEM scores as well as subscale scores were calculated for each site. These were compared across sites using a Mann-Whitney U non-parametric test. By comparison with international standards, clinical attachments in our new integrated curriculum were rated highly. In particular, attachments in general practice scored highly with a mean score of 156.6 and perform significantly better (P < 0.01) when compared with the mean score for hospital rotations of 149.0. Significant differences between general practice and hospital rotations exist in the domains of students' perceptions of atmosphere and students' social self-perceptions. Finally, significant differences also emerged in students' perceptions of teachers in general practice when compared to those in the hospital setting. These findings provide evidence of the high-quality educational environment afforded students in primary care. They challenge the traditional emphasis on hospital-based teaching and preempt the question - Is the community a better place for junior students to learn? PMID:22306143

  13. Comparative Quality Indicators for Hospital Choice: Do General Practitioners Care?

    PubMed Central

    Ferrua, Marie; Sicotte, Claude; Lalloué, Benoît; Minvielle, Etienne

    2016-01-01

    Context The strategy of publicly reporting quality indicators is being widely promoted through public policies as a way to make health care delivery more efficient. Objective To assess general practitioners’ (GPs) use of the comparative hospital quality indicators made available by public services and the media, as well as GPs’ perceptions of their qualities and usefulness. Method A telephone survey of a random sample representing all self-employed GPs in private practice in France. Results A large majority (84.1%–88.5%) of respondents (n = 503; response rate of 56%) reported that they never used public comparative indicators, available in the mass media or on government and non-government Internet sites, to influence their patients’ hospital choices. The vast majority of GPs rely mostly on traditional sources of information when choosing a hospital. At the same time, this study highlights favourable opinions shared by a large proportion of GPs regarding several aspects of hospital quality indicators, such as their good qualities and usefulness for other purposes. In sum, the results show that GPs make very limited use of hospital quality indicators based on a consumer choice paradigm but, at the same time, see them as useful in ways corresponding more to the usual professional paradigms, including as a means to improve quality of care. PMID:26840429

  14. Does labour substitution occur in district general hospitals?

    PubMed

    Jones, J; Sanderson, C; Black, N

    1993-01-01

    A survey of 31 district general hospitals found a large variation in hours of medical and nursing time available per inpatient episode in general medicine and its associated specialties. These differences could not be attributed to case-mix variation or severity. The application of weightings to different grades of nursing and medical staff had little effect on either the rankings of hospitals by staff hours per episode, or the overall degree of variation in staffing levels. The results show no evidence to suggest that hospitals with relatively low levels for one category of staff are compensated by relatively high levels of another. It would appear that those hospitals with high levels for one category of staff are also well provided for the others. This evidence of inequality may reflect historic patterns of resource allocation that recent manpower policies might seek to redress. Studies of the relationship between staffing levels and quality of patient care should be undertaken before adopting a policy of labour redistribution. PMID:10130811

  15. 33 CFR 165.1314 - Safety Zone; Fort Vancouver Fireworks Display, Columbia River, Vancouver, Washington.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Safety Zone; Fort Vancouver Fireworks Display, Columbia River, Vancouver, Washington. 165.1314 Section 165.1314 Navigation and Navigable... Thirteenth Coast Guard District § 165.1314 Safety Zone; Fort Vancouver Fireworks Display, Columbia...

  16. 33 CFR 165.1314 - Safety Zone; Fort Vancouver Fireworks Display, Columbia River, Vancouver, Washington.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Safety Zone; Fort Vancouver Fireworks Display, Columbia River, Vancouver, Washington. 165.1314 Section 165.1314 Navigation and Navigable... Thirteenth Coast Guard District § 165.1314 Safety Zone; Fort Vancouver Fireworks Display, Columbia...

  17. 33 CFR 165.1314 - Safety Zone; Fort Vancouver Fireworks Display, Columbia River, Vancouver, Washington.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Safety Zone; Fort Vancouver Fireworks Display, Columbia River, Vancouver, Washington. 165.1314 Section 165.1314 Navigation and Navigable... Thirteenth Coast Guard District § 165.1314 Safety Zone; Fort Vancouver Fireworks Display, Columbia...

  18. 33 CFR 165.1314 - Safety Zone; Fort Vancouver Fireworks Display, Columbia River, Vancouver, Washington.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Safety Zone; Fort Vancouver Fireworks Display, Columbia River, Vancouver, Washington. 165.1314 Section 165.1314 Navigation and Navigable... Thirteenth Coast Guard District § 165.1314 Safety Zone; Fort Vancouver Fireworks Display, Columbia...

  19. 33 CFR 165.1314 - Safety Zone; Fort Vancouver Fireworks Display, Columbia River, Vancouver, Washington.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety Zone; Fort Vancouver Fireworks Display, Columbia River, Vancouver, Washington. 165.1314 Section 165.1314 Navigation and Navigable... Thirteenth Coast Guard District § 165.1314 Safety Zone; Fort Vancouver Fireworks Display, Columbia...

  20. Improving paediatric high dependency provision at a district general hospital.

    PubMed

    Datt, Colette; Robinson, Kerry

    2007-09-01

    Increased pressure on paediatric facilities and increased demands on staff at a district general hospital led to the development of a paediatric high dependency facility. The objective of the development was to enable more effective and efficient management of resources and to optimise care delivery. The experience of setting up a high dependency facility at the Whittington Hospital is presented in this article along with data from the first nine months of operation. Over that period 57 children needed high dependency care, fewer than were predicted based on average figures. Of these, 49 children were treated in the HDU with one being treated on adult ITU and six on the general paediatric ward. Challenges in establishing the unit included staff concerns about increased workloads, nurses feeling isolated in the HDU area and the HDU label undermining confidence in caring for these children. Education and training, team working, networking with other units and an open management approach were among the strategies used in the development and to overcome challenges. Improved data about HDU patients is essential to support the development of high dependency provision in district general hospitals. PMID:17926769

  1. Cervical cytology screening: experience of a general hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Sargeant, E. J.; Qizilbash, A. H.; Johnson, F. L.

    1977-01-01

    At Henderson General Hospital, Hamilton, a program was introduced whereby cervical smears were taken routinely for cytologic study from all women admitted aged 17 years or older. The procedure was performed by a specially trained nurse. In a 5-year period 53% of eligible patients were screened. Of these, 32% had not had a cervical smear taken before. In 7681 smears nine instances of invasive disease were discovered: three of the cervix, three of the endometrium and three metastatic. There were 20 cases of carcinoma in situ and 2 of severe dysplasia. Evidence of infection was present in a high percentage of the smears. Hospital admission affords an excellent opportunity of applying this valuable screening procedure. PMID:912627

  2. Recurrence of inguinal hernias repaired in a large hernia surgical specialty hospital and general hospitals in Ontario, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Atiqa; Bell, Chaim M.; Stukel, Thérèse A.; Urbach, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Background The effect of hospital specialization on the risk of hernia recurrence after inguinal hernia repair is not well described. Methods We studied Ontario residents who had primary elective inguinal hernia repair at an Ontario hospital between 1993 and 2007 using population-based, administrative health data. We compared patients from a large hernia specialty hospital (Shouldice Hospital) with those from general hospitals to determine the risk of recurrence. Results We studied 235 192 patients, 27.7% of whom had surgery at Shouldice hospital. The age-standardized proportion of patients who had a recurrence ranged from 5.21% (95% confidence interval [CI] 4.94%–5.49%) among patients who had surgery at the lowest volume general hospitals to 4.79% (95% CI 4.54%–5.04%) who had surgery at the highest volume general hospitals. In contrast, patients who had surgery at the Shouldice Hospital had an age-standardized recurrence risk of 1.15% (95% CI 1.05%–1.25%). Compared with patients who had surgery at the lowest volume hospitals, hernia recurrence among those treated at the Shouldice Hospital was significantly lower after adjustment for the effects of age, sex, comorbidity and income level (adjusted hazard ratio 0.21, 95% CI 0.19–0.23, p < 0.001). Conclusion Inguinal hernia repair at Shouldice Hospital was associated with a significantly lower risk of subsequent surgery for recurrence than repair at a general hospital. While specialty hospitals may have better outcomes for treatment of common surgical conditions than general hospitals, these benefits must be weighed against potential negative impacts on clinical care and the financial sustainability of general hospitals. PMID:26574701

  3. Impact of introduction of colposcopy to a district general hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Singer, A; Walker, P; Tay, S K; Dyson, J

    1984-01-01

    During the first 18 months of operation of a new colposcopy clinic, established in a district general hospital, 608 women were seen. Most (568 (93.0%] were referred from within the local district, on the whole by their general practitioner. In 466 cases a repeat cervical smear was taken, and all women underwent colposcopic examination together with directed punch biopsy of any abnormal area. Positive cytology was seen in 356 women, but 85 (23.9%) of these were found to have no histological evidence of malignancy or premalignancy and were consequently discharged from the clinic. Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia was confirmed histologically in 379 women, of whom 259 were under 35 and 175 nulliparous. As a result of the use of colposcopy and local destructive methods of treatment only 42 patients (11.1%) were required to undergo cone biopsy. The initial overall incidence of success in the treatment of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia was 86.2% for cone biopsy, 88.5% for diathermy, and 81.1% for laser ablative treatment. Colposcopy has an important role in the management of cervical neoplasia in the district general hospital. PMID:6435769

  4. Financial management challenges for general hospital psychiatry 2001.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, R J

    2001-01-01

    Psychiatry programs are facing significant business and financial challenges. This paper provides an overview of these management challenges in five areas: departmental, hospital, payment system, general finance, and policy. Psychiatric leaders will require skills in a variety of business management areas to ensure their program success. Many programs will need to develop new compensation models with more of an emphasis on revenue collection and overhead management. Programs which cannot master these areas are likely to go out of business. For academic programs, incentive systems must address not only clinical productivity, but academic and teaching output as well. General hospital programs will need to develop increased sophistication in differential cost accounting in order to be able to advocate for their patients and program in the current management climate. Clinical leaders will need the skills (ranging from actuarial to negotiations) to be at the table with contract development, since those decisions are inseparable from clinical care issues. Strategic planning needs to consider the value of improving integration with primary care, along with the ability to understand the advantages and disadvantages of risk-sharing models. Psychiatry leaders need to define and develop useful reports shared with clinical division leadership to track progress and identify problems and opportunities. Leaders should be responsible for a strategy for developing appropriate information system architecture and infrastructure. Finally, it is hoped that some leaders will emerge who can further our needs to address inequities in mental health fee schedules and parity issues which affect our program viability. PMID:11313073

  5. Countertransference in the general hospital setting: implications for clinical supervision.

    PubMed

    Jimnez, Xavier F; Jimnez, Xavier; Thorkelson, Gregory; Alfonso, Csar A

    2012-09-01

    Psychiatry residents completing their consultation-liaison (CL) rotations are implicitly expected to recognize and consider countertransference reactions when offering clinical recommendations. Residents often lack formal guidance in this role, as there exists limited examination of clinical scenarios from a psychodynamic perspective. The authors present a historical review of the literature on countertransference with the medically ill and describe a clinical vignette illustrating the vicissitudes of liaison work. The case involves a psychotic patient with mental retardation and acute renal failure. Through refusal of care and a tumultuous clinical course, this patient elicited various countertransferential reactions from the primary care and CL teams, in turn adversely impacting treatment. The case illustrates how clinicians' failure to collaborate led to hospital administrators having to take on the liaison role. (1) A review of literature corroborates the importance of CL psychiatrists' assistance in the management of countertransference. At the same time, it is notable for a paucity of guidance in teaching these skills to psychiatry trainees. The psychiatry resident-in-training faces challenges and shortcomings in the management of countertransference. Formal training in this aspect of psychiatric consultation is lacking, as evidenced by extant publications. The authors propose future directions for research and teaching, with emphasis on clarifying the liaison component of CL psychiatry and advocating for establishment of psychodynamic psychotherapy training guidelines in the general hospital setting. PMID:23002703

  6. [Voluntary pregnancy termination during 1998 in a French general hospital].

    PubMed

    Salvat, J; d'Armancourt, C; Vandame, S

    2000-01-01

    The authors analyzed the etiology of voluntary abortions in a general hospital during one year. Age, family situation, nationality, children, previous abortions, type of contraception, and the reasons for aborting were reviewed. The goal is to determine the target population for effective prevention. Teenagers (7%), women under 35 years (78%), women with children (64%), primarily with two children (42%), women with poor use of contraception (pill or condom) (48%) and women without contraception (36%) were concerned. Social and cultural causes (unemployment, wedding difficulties, number of children, habitation) were often associated and different factors are described. Practitioners have little control over these sociocultural situations. A strong plan involving all the educational roles is necessary to modify this difficult situation. PMID:10774114

  7. 42 CFR 412.370 - General provisions for hospitals located in Puerto Rico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Prospective Payment System for Inpatient Hospital Capital Costs Special Rules for Puerto Rico Hospitals 412.370 General provisions for hospitals located in Puerto Rico. Except as provided in 412.374, hospitals located in Puerto Rico are subject to the rules in this subpart governing the prospective...

  8. 42 CFR 412.370 - General provisions for hospitals located in Puerto Rico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Prospective Payment System for Inpatient Hospital Capital Costs Special Rules for Puerto Rico Hospitals 412.370 General provisions for hospitals located in Puerto Rico. Except as provided in 412.374, hospitals located in Puerto Rico are subject to the rules in this subpart governing the prospective...

  9. 42 CFR 412.370 - General provisions for hospitals located in Puerto Rico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Prospective Payment System for Inpatient Hospital Capital Costs Special Rules for Puerto Rico Hospitals 412.370 General provisions for hospitals located in Puerto Rico. Except as provided in 412.374, hospitals located in Puerto Rico are subject to the rules in this subpart governing the prospective...

  10. 42 CFR 412.370 - General provisions for hospitals located in Puerto Rico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Prospective Payment System for Inpatient Hospital Capital Costs Special Rules for Puerto Rico Hospitals 412.370 General provisions for hospitals located in Puerto Rico. Except as provided in 412.374, hospitals located in Puerto Rico are subject to the rules in this subpart governing the prospective...

  11. 42 CFR 412.370 - General provisions for hospitals located in Puerto Rico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Prospective Payment System for Inpatient Hospital Capital Costs Special Rules for Puerto Rico Hospitals 412.370 General provisions for hospitals located in Puerto Rico. Except as provided in 412.374, hospitals located in Puerto Rico are subject to the rules in this subpart governing the prospective...

  12. Paediatric inpatient utilisation in a district general hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Thakker, Y; Sheldon, T A; Long, R; MacFaul, R

    1994-01-01

    Paediatric inpatient utilisation in a district general hospital was studied for 20 general practices covering a population of 26,433 children. The factors influencing the rate and route of admission (general practitioner (GP) or accident and emergency department) were analysed for 894 emergency non-traumatic admissions over a 12 month period. The overall rate of acute, nontraumatic admission was 33.8/1000; 35% of these admissions were via the accident and emergency department. Asthma was the most common reason for admission (16.1%); 56.9% of the admissions resulted from respiratory tract illness and 44% were for an infective illness. There was a significant variation in the route and rate of admission across practices. Admission rates ranged from 10 to 70/1000 children under 15 and the proportion via the accident and emergency department from 19% to 85%. The proportion of admissions via the accident and emergency department for each practice was highly negatively correlated with the number of GPs in the practice, the number of children under 15 registered, and positively correlated with the unemployment rate attributed to the list. Using multiple logistic regression analysis, the risk of being admitted via the accident and emergency department relative to GP admission was shown to be higher for older children (odds ratio for each year of age 1.05) and less for children registered with large practices with more GPs (odds ratio for each extra GP 0.36) or practices with more children under 15 (odds ratio per extra child 0.9991). Access to hospital as measured by isochrone bars and social characteristics of the ward of residence of each child admitted were not associated with the route of admission. The admission rate for each practice was positively, but not statistically significantly, associated with the unemployment rate attributed to the list, the unemployment rate of the ward where the practice was located, and the percentage of admissions via accident and emergency, and negatively associated with the percentage of the list under 15 years. PMID:8048817

  13. A most unusual patient at the Massachusetts General Hospital.

    PubMed

    Ruhnke, Gregory W; Warshaw, Andrew L

    2011-12-01

    This year marks 200 years of patient care at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). In celebration of this milestone, a unique Grand Rounds case is presented. A 450-year-old rotund man admitted 60 times presents with a classic triad of periumbilical pain, bilateral plantar burns, and a frozen scalp. Although this triad may at first strike a cord of familiarity among seasoned clinicians, the disease mechanism is truly noteworthy, being clarified only after a detailed occupational history. Ergo, the lessons hark back to the days of yesteryear, when the history and physical served as the cornerstone of Yuletide clinical diagnosis. A discussion of epidemiology and prognosis accompanies a detailed examination of the pathophysiholiday. Although some consider this patient uncouth, as you will see, he is quite a medical sleuth. The long-standing relationship between this patient and the MGH prompted his family to write a letter of appreciation, which will remind the reader of the meaning that our care brings to patients and their families. Harvey Cushing, who completed his internship at the MGH in 1895, professed "A physician is obligated to consider more than a diseased organ, more even than the whole man-he must view the man in his world." We hope this unusual Grand Rounds case intrigues you as it reminds you of Cushing's lesson and wishes you a joyous holiday season. PMID:22107737

  14. 42 CFR 412.22 - Excluded hospitals and hospital units: General rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... to the governing body for the quality of medical care provided in the hospital, and adopts and... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Hospital Services Subject to and Excluded From the Prospective Payment Systems for Inpatient...

  15. 42 CFR 412.22 - Excluded hospitals and hospital units: General rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... to the governing body for the quality of medical care provided in the hospital, and adopts and... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Hospital Services Subject to and Excluded From the Prospective Payment Systems for Inpatient...

  16. 42 CFR 412.22 - Excluded hospitals and hospital units: General rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... to the governing body for the quality of medical care provided in the hospital, and adopts and... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Hospital Services Subject to and Excluded From the Prospective Payment Systems for Inpatient...

  17. 42 CFR 412.22 - Excluded hospitals and hospital units: General rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... to the governing body for the quality of medical care provided in the hospital, and adopts and... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Hospital Services Subject to and Excluded From the Prospective Payment Systems for Inpatient...

  18. 42 CFR 412.22 - Excluded hospitals and hospital units: General rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... to the governing body for the quality of medical care provided in the hospital, and adopts and... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Hospital Services Subject to and Excluded From the Prospective Payment Systems for Inpatient...

  19. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy: experience in a district general hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, S. J.; Kelly, S. B.; Aly, S. A.; Sharma, V. K.; Bateson, P. G.; Panesar, K. J.

    1992-01-01

    In many centres laparoscopic cholecystectomy has become the procedure of choice for symptomatic gallbladder stones. By comparison with conventional cholecystectomy it appears to be associated with minimal morbidity, shorter hospital stay, earlier return to work and a better cosmetic result. The present study reviews the results of the first 50 laparoscopic cholecystectomies performed at Altnagelvin Area Hospital. PMID:1535742

  20. Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer: Experience of the Philippine General Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Jimeno, Cecilia Alegado; Paz-Pacheco, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Background Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is a rare type of thyroid malignancy and one of the most aggressive solid tumors, responsible for between 14% and 50% of the total annual mortality associated with thyroid cancer. Methods A retrospective study was made of all ATC cases diagnosed by biopsy in the Philippine General Hospital between 2008 and 2013. Results A total of 15 patients were identified, with a median age at diagnosis of 63 years. All tumors were at least 6 cm in size upon diagnosis. All patients had a previous history of thyroid pathology, presenting with an average duration of 11 years. Eleven patients presented with cervical lymphadenopathies, whereas seven exhibited signs of distant metastases, for which the lungs appeared to be the most common site. More than 70% of the patients presented with a rapidly growing neck mass, leading to airway obstruction. Only three patients were treated using curative surgery; the majority received palliative and supportive forms of treatment. In addition, only three patients were offered radiotherapy. Chemotherapy was not offered to any patient. Only two patients were confirmed to still be alive during the study period. The median survival time for the other patients was 3 months; in the majority of cases the patient died within the first year following diagnosis. Conclusion Our experience with ATC demonstrated concordance with other institutions with respect to current clinical profile, presentation, and prognosis. An absence of distant metastases and lymph node involvement was associated with improved survival outcomes, whereas age at diagnosis and tumor size did not affect survival. Curative surgery offers the most effective means of prolonging survival. Radiotherapy and chemotherapy in combination with surgery represents a promising treatment strategy. PMID:26194079

  1. Readmissions due to traffic accidents at a general hospital 1

    PubMed Central

    Paiva, Luciana; Monteiro, Damiana Aparecida Trindade; Pompeo, Daniele Alcalá; Ciol, Márcia Aparecida; Dantas, Rosana Aparecida Spadotti; Rossi, Lídia Aparecida

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to verify the occurrence and the causes of hospital readmissions within a year after discharge from hospitalizations due to traffic accidents. Methods: victims of multiple traumas due to traffic accidents were included, who were admitted to an Intensive Care Unit. Sociodemographic data, accident circumstances, body regions affected and cause of readmission were collected from the patient histories. Results: among the 109 victims of traffic accidents, the majority were young and adult men. Most hospitalizations due to accidents involved motorcycle drivers (56.9%). The causes of the return to the hospital were: need to continue the surgical treatment (63.2%), surgical site infection (26.3%) and fall related to the physical sequelae of the trauma (10.5%). The rehospitalization rate corresponded to 174/1,000 people/year. Conclusion: the hospital readmission rate in the study population is similar to the rates found in other studies. Victims of severe limb traumas need multiple surgical procedures, lengthier hospitalizations and extended rehabilitation. PMID:26444172

  2. INTERPOLATING VANCOUVER'S DAILY AMBIENT PM 10 FIELD

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this article we develop a spatial predictive distribution for the ambient space- time response field of daily ambient PM10 in Vancouver, Canada. Observed responses have a consistent temporal pattern from one monitoring site to the next. We exploit this feature of the field b...

  3. Music in general hospital treatment from 1900 to 1950.

    PubMed

    Taylor, D B

    1981-01-01

    Beginning at the turn of the century, this report examines the effect of the recently invented phonograph on practical and experimental efforts to reconcile the century-old separation of medicine and music. Progressing chronologically, events are examined which affected the use of music in physical medicine during the first half of the 20th century. Topics include the first college course-work in hospital music, important theories regarding the neurological basis of musical effects, early research investigating the influence of music on physiological behavior, the inclusion of permanent musical hardware in hospital construction, social and physical rehabilitation in orthopedic medicine, psychological applications in pediatrics and psychosomatic medicine, and the use of music to combat pain in surgical, dental, obstetrical, and gynecological procedures. PMID:10298285

  4. The Hospital That Became a College: Sloan U.S. Army General Hospital, Montpelier, Vermont. Norwich University Library Occasional Paper No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepard, William A.

    A historical review is presented of Sloan U.S. Army General Hospital, the second largest Union Army hospital in Vermont, which operated from June 1864 to October 1865. Sloan Hospital later became Vermont College, which in 1972 merged with Norwich University. Sloan Hospital operated during the last year and a half of the Civil War and consisted of

  5. Implementation of a Prototype Generalized Network Technology for Hospitals *

    PubMed Central

    Tolchin, S. G.; Stewart, R. L.; Kahn, S. A.; Bergan, E. S.; Gafke, G. P.; Simborg, D. W.; Whiting-O'Keefe, Q. E.; Chadwick, M. G.; McCue, G. E.

    1981-01-01

    A demonstration implementation of a distributed data processing hospital information system using an intelligent local area communications network (LACN) technology is described. This system is operational at the UCSF Medical Center and integrates four heterogeneous, stand-alone minicomputers. The applications systems are PID/Registration, Outpatient Pharmacy, Clinical Laboratory and Radiology/Medical Records. Functional autonomy of these systems has been maintained, and no operating system changes have been required. The LACN uses a fiber-optic communications medium and provides extensive communications protocol support within the network, based on the ISO/OSI Model. The architecture is reconfigurable and expandable. This paper describes system architectural issues, the applications environment and the local area network.

  6. [Josephinism in medicine: the General Hospital in Vienna and the "Narrenturm" (insane asylum)].

    PubMed

    Sablik, K

    1991-01-01

    The spirit of enlightened absolutism was realized through the personal engagement of Emperor Joseph II in the foundation of the Vienna General Hospital, the asylum for the insane called "Narrenturm" and the maternity home. PMID:1949805

  7. Satisfaction degree evaluation of the users of "Attikon" University General Hospital's library.

    PubMed

    Stamouli, Maria-Aggeliki; Balis, Charalampos; Georgakopoulou, Konstantina-Maria

    2013-01-01

    The ability of hospital medical libraries to meet users' needs is a complicated issue and has been examined by many surveys. The aim of this study is to evaluate the satisfaction degree of the users of "Attikon" University General Hospital's medical library. A questionnaire was used to collect the necessary information Although, in general, the users seems to be satisfied, some adjustments, such as up-to-date books, journals and computers, have to be made. PMID:23823452

  8. The quality and characteristics of leading general hospitals' websites in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaolei; Bao, Zhen; Liu, Haitao; Wang, Zhenghong

    2011-12-01

    This paper focuses on the evaluation of quality of hospital websites in China. Leading general hospitals' websites in China are increasingly used by the public, but research on the quality of these websites in China is few and far between. In this article, we conducted a cross-sectional descriptive infodemiology study to assess the quality and to describe the characteristics of these websites. Using a pre-defined objective criterion based on content, function, design, and management & usage, two well-trained reviewers independently reviewed and analyzed websites of 23 nationally prominent leading general hospitals of China from April to June 2009. Hospital election is on the basis of the best Chinese hospitals published by official and non-official sources combined with experts' experiences and the research purpose. Results show that websites of most hospitals showed a good performance in website content, showed a normal performance in website function and design, but showed a bad performance in website management & usage. As the public increasingly looks to hospital websites for information and services, leading general hospitals in China need to keep up with increasingly high standards and demands of health-care consumers. PMID:20703762

  9. Deliveries in teenagers at a Newfoundland general hospital.

    PubMed Central

    McKilligin, H. R.

    1978-01-01

    A study of deliveries in teenagers was undertaken for the year 1975 in a hospital that had recorded 2797 births, 371 (13%) of which were to women under 20 years of age. Conception had occurred out of wedlock in 314 (85%) of the 371 pregnancies; 124 of the 314 women had married during the pregnancy, most often in the 3rd or 4th month of gestation. The peak months for conception out of wedlock were June and December. This was not the first pregnancy for 65 women (18%), 21 of whom had married during a previous pregnancy. Of the "heads of the households" 36% were labourers and 27% were unemployed. Cesarean section was the method of delivery for 51 (14%) of the women, and 63 (17%) were reported as having had toxemia. There were seven perinatal deaths and seven infants had severe congenital abnormalities. The frequency of low birth weight was 6% overall but 13% for the infants of single women. Five women underwent tubal ligation post partum. PMID:647544

  10. Well-Differentiated Thyroid Cancer: The Philippine General Hospital Experience

    PubMed Central

    Uy, Abigail T.; Maningat, Patricia Deanna D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Well-differentiated thyroid cancer (WDTC) is the most common form of thyroid malignancy. While it is typically associated with good prognosis, it may exhibit higher recurrence and mortality rates in selected groups, particularly Filipinos. This paper aims to describe the experience of a Philippine Hospital in managing patients with differentiated thyroid cancer. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study of 723 patients with WDTC (649 papillary and 79 follicular), evaluating the clinicopathologic profiles, ultrasound features, management received, tumor recurrence, and eventual outcome over a mean follow-up period of 5 years. Results The mean age at diagnosis was 44±13 years (range, 18 to 82), with a majority of cases occurring in the younger age group (<45 years). Most tumors were between 2 and 4 cm in size. The majority of papillary thyroid cancers (PTCs, 63.2%) and follicular thyroid cancers (FTCs, 54.4%) initially presented as stage 1, with a greater proportion of FTC cases (12.7% vs. 3.7%) presenting with distant metastases. Nodal metastases at presentation were more frequent among patients with PTC (29.9% vs. 7.6%). A majority of cases were treated by complete thyroidectomy, followed by radioactive iodine therapy and thyroid stimulating hormone suppression, resulting in a disease-free state. Excluding patients with distant metastases at presentation, the recurrence rates for papillary and FTC were 30.1% and 18.8%, respectively. Conclusion Overall, PTC among Filipinos was associated with a more aggressive and recurrent behavior. FTC among Filipinos appeared to behave similarly with other racial groups. PMID:26754584

  11. Coronary arteriography in a district general hospital: feasibility, safety, and diagnostic accuracy.

    PubMed Central

    Ranjadayalan, K; Mills, P G; Sprigings, D C; Mourad, K; Magee, P; Timmis, A D

    1990-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the feasibility, safety, and diagnostic accuracy of coronary arteriography in the radiology department of a district general hospital using conventional fluoroscopy and videotape recording. DESIGN--Observational study of the feasibility and safety of coronary arteriography in a district general hospital and analysis of its diagnostic accuracy by prospective within patient comparison of the video recordings with cinearteriograms obtained in a catheter laboratory. SETTING--Radiology department of a district general hospital and the catheter laboratory of a cardiological referral centre. SUBJECTS--50 Patients with acute myocardial infarction treated with streptokinase who underwent coronary arteriography in a district general hospital three (two to five) days after admission. 45 Of these patients had repeat coronary arteriography after four (three to seven) days in the catheter laboratory of a cardiological referral centre. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Incidence of complications associated with catheterisation and the sensitivity and specificity of video recordings in the district general hospital (judged by two experienced observers) for identifying the location and severity of coronary stenoses. RESULTS--Coronary arteriograms recorded on videotape in the district general hospital were obtained in 47 cases and apart from one episode of ventricular fibrilation (treated successfully by cardioversion) there were no complications of the procedure. 45 Patients were transferred for investigation in the catheter laboratory, providing 45 paired coronary arteriograms recorded on videotape and cine film. The specificity of the video recordings for identifying the location and severity of coronary stenoses was over 90%. Sensitivity, however, was lower and for one observer fell below 40% for lesions in the circumflex artery. A cardiothoracic surgeon judged that only nine of the 47 video recordings were adequate for assessing revascularisation requirements. CONCLUSIONS--Coronary arteriography in the radiology department of a district general hospital is safe and feasible. Nevertheless, the quality of image with conventional fluoroscopy and video film is inadequate and will need to be improved before coronary arteriography in this setting can be recommended. PMID:2182164

  12. Discharge, water temperature, and selected meteorological data for Vancouver Lake, Vancouver, Washington, water years 2011-13

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foreman, James R.; Marshall, Cameron A.; Sheibley, Rich W.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey partnered with the Vancouver Lake Watershed Partnership in a 2-year intensive study to quantify the movement of water and nutrients through Vancouver Lake in Vancouver, Washington. This report is intended to assist the Vancouver Lake Watershed Partnership in evaluating potential courses of action to mitigate seasonally driven blooms of harmful cyanobacteria and to improve overall water quality of the lake. This report contains stream discharge, lake water temperature, and selected meteorological data for water years 2011, 2012, and 2013 that were used to develop the water and nutrient budgets for the lake.

  13. Pharmaceutical Service after the Fukushima Disaster: A Case Report of Soma General Hospital.

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, Hisanori; Momonoi, Toshiyuki; Kumakawa, Hiromi

    2016-01-01

      Despite being damaged by the 2011 Tohoku earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear disaster, Soma General Hospital, located approximately 40 km north of Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, was able to fulfill its role as a key regional hospital in northeast Fukushima. To elucidate the pharmaceutical service in response to the disaster, we investigated the hospital's operations in 2011 according to the medical records and prescriptions. One of the difficulties that the department of pharmaceutical service faced at that time was the increase in emergency healthcare requests by evacuated patients from other hospitals and clinics. Herein, we propose the following countermeasures to be considered in future disaster preparations: (1) establishing a medical and pharmaceutical service coordinator for disaster relief; (2) sharing all local patients' medical information in emergencies (at least contraindicated drugs or allergy history); and (3) reviewing disaster stockpiles, especially pharmaceuticals (both at the hospital and in nearby locations). PMID:26725681

  14. Risk of hepatitis B infection among medical and paramedical workers in a general hospital in Zimbabwe.

    PubMed Central

    Emmanuel, J C; Bassett, M T; Smith, H J

    1988-01-01

    To evaluate the addition of hepatitis vaccine to health schemes for hospital workers in Zimbabwe we undertook a cross sectional study of viral markers in 226 hospital workers and compared the results with 97 volunteer blood donor controls. One hundred and thirty one (58%) hospital workers had hepatitis markers compared with 45 (46%) of the donor group. Racial group was the strongest risk factor. Blacks were 70% more likely to have markers than whites. This racial difference was not explained by job status or patient contact. Our data suggest that work in a district general hospital does not constitute a clinically important hazard for hepatitis B infection. Because of the high cost of the vaccine, additional studies to assess the risk of hospital work in other settings in Zimbabwe are required before health policy regarding routine hepatitis B vaccination is determined. PMID:3360956

  15. Massachusetts General Hospital participation in Operation Unified Assistance for tsunami relief in Banda Aceh, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Wong, Waichi; Brandt, Lynda; Keenan, M Edward

    2006-10-01

    When Project HOPE invited Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) to participate in a tsunami relief mission aboard the USNS Mercy hospital ship in January 2005, MGH responded swiftly and enthusiastically. Overcoming differences in medical styles and standards, as well as a variety of cultural and institutional differences, MGH volunteers collaborated successfully with Navy personnel and volunteers from other hospitals to deliver excellent care to a large number of tsunami victims. Lessons were learned regarding the need for better initial team orientation, more-open communication, and more-transparent decision-making; still, a rapid response of tertiary medicine, joining public and private resources, proved to be a powerful effective model. PMID:17447621

  16. Control Costs, Enhance Quality, and Increase Revenue in Three Top General Public Hospitals in Beijing, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lue-Ping; Yu, Guo-Pei; Liu, Hui; Ma, Xie-Min; Wang, Jing; Kong, Gui-Lan; Li, Yi; Ma, Wen; Cui, Yong; Xu, Beibei; Yu, Na; Bao, Xiao-Yuan; Guo, Yu; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Jun; Li, Yan; Xie, Xue-Qin; Jiang, Bao-Guo; Ke, Yang

    2013-01-01

    Background With market-oriented economic and health-care reform, public hospitals in China have received unprecedented pressures from governmental regulations, public opinions, and financial demands. To adapt the changing environment and keep pace of modernizing healthcare delivery system, public hospitals in China are expanding clinical services and improving delivery efficiency, while controlling costs. Recent experiences are valuable lessons for guiding future healthcare reform. Here we carefully study three teaching hospitals, to exemplify their experiences during this period. Methods We performed a systematic analysis on hospitalization costs, health-care quality and delivery efficiencies from 2006 to 2010 in three teaching hospitals in Beijing, China. The analysis measured temporal changes of inpatient cost per stay (CPS), cost per day (CPD), inpatient mortality rate (IMR), and length of stay (LOS), using a generalized additive model. Findings There were 651,559 hospitalizations during the period analyzed. Averaged CPS was stable over time, while averaged CPD steadily increased by 41.7% (P<0.001), from CNY 1,531 in 2006 to CNY 2,169 in 2010. The increasing CPD seemed synchronous with the steady rising of the national annual income per capita. Surgical cost was the main contributor to the temporal change of CPD, while medicine and examination costs tended to be stable over time. From 2006 and 2010, IMR decreased by 36%, while LOS reduced by 25%. Increasing hospitalizations with higher costs, along with an overall stable CPS, reduced IMR, and shorter LOS, appear to be the major characteristics of these three hospitals at present. Interpretations These three teaching hospitals have gained some success in controlling costs, improving cares, adopting modern medical technologies, and increasing hospital revenues. Effective hospital governance and physicians' professional capacity plus government regulations and supervisions may have played a role. However, purely market-oriented health-care reform could also misguide future healthcare reform. PMID:23977243

  17. Jim Peters' collapse in the 1954 Vancouver Empire Games marathon.

    PubMed

    Noakes, Tim; Mekler, Jackie; Pedoe, Dan Tunstall

    2008-08-01

    On 7 August 1954, the world 42 km marathon record holder, Jim Peters, collapsed repeatedly during the final 385 metres of the British Empire and Commonwealth Games marathon held in Vancouver, Canada. It has been assumed that Peters collapsed from heatstroke because he ran too fast and did not drink during the race, which was held in windless, cloudless conditions with a dry-bulb temperature of 28 degrees C. Hospital records made available to us indicate that Peters might not have suffered from exertional heatstroke, which classically produces a rectal temperature > 42 degrees C, cerebral effects and, usually, a fatal outcome without vigorous active cooling. Although Peters was unconscious on admission to hospital approximately 60 minutes after he was removed from the race, his rectal temperature was 39.4 degrees C and he recovered fully, even though he was managed conservatively and not actively cooled. We propose that Peters' collapse was more likely due to a combination of hyperthermia-induced fatigue which caused him to stop running; exercise-associated postural hypotension as a result of a low peripheral vascular resistance immediately he stopped running; and combined cerebral effects of hyperthermia, hypertonic hypernatraemia associated with dehydration, and perhaps undiagnosed hypoglycaemia. But none of these conditions should cause prolonged unconsciousness, raising the possibility that Peters might have suffered from a transient encephalopathy, the exact nature of which is not understood. PMID:18928034

  18. Intermediate care at a community hospital as an alternative to prolonged general hospital care for elderly patients: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Garsen, Helge; Windspoll, Rolf; Johnsen, Roar

    2007-01-01

    Background Demographic changes together with an increasing demand among older people for hospital beds and other health services make allocation of resources to the most efficient care level a vital issue. The aim of this trial was to study the efficacy of intermediate care at a community hospital compared to standard prolonged care at a general hospital. Methods In a randomised controlled trial 142 patients aged 60 or more admitted to a general hospital due to acute illness or exacerbation of a chronic disease 72 (intervention group) were randomised to intermediate care at a community hospital and 70 (general hospital group) to further general hospital care. Results In the intervention group 14 patients (19.4%) were readmitted for the same disease compared to 25 patients (35.7%) in the general hospital group (p = 0.03). After 26 weeks 18 (25.0%) patients in the intervention group were independent of community care compared to seven (10.0%) in the general hospital group (p = 0.02). There were an insignificant reduction in the number of deaths and an insignificant increase in the number of days with inward care in the intervention group. The number of patients admitted to long-term nursing homes from the intervention group was insignificantly higher than from the general hospital group. Conclusion Intermediate care at a community hospital significantly decreased the number of readmissions for the same disease to general hospital, and a significantly higher number of patients were independent of community care after 26 weeks of follow-up, without any increase in mortality and number of days in institutions. PMID:17475006

  19. Attitudes of Malaysian general hospital staff towards patients with mental illness and diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The context of the study is the increased assessment and treatment of persons with mental illness in general hospital settings by general health staff, as the move away from mental hospitals gathers pace in low and middle income countries. The purpose of the study was to examine whether general attitudes of hospital staff towards persons with mental illness, and extent of mental health training and clinical experience, are associated with different attitudes and behaviours towards a patient with mental illness than towards a patients with a general health problem - diabetes. Methods General hospital health professionals in Malaysia were randomly allocated one of two vignettes, one describing a patient with mental illness and the other a patient with diabetes, and invited to complete a questionnaire examining attitudes and health care practices in relation to the case. The questionnaires completed by respondents included questions on demographics, training in mental health, exposure in clinical practice to people with mental illness, attitudes and expected health care behaviour towards the patient in the vignette, and a general questionnaire exploring negative attitudes towards people with mental illness. Questionnaires with complete responses were received from 654 study participants. Results Stigmatising attitudes towards persons with mental illness were common. Those responding to the mental illness vignette (N = 356) gave significantly lower ratings on care and support and higher ratings on avoidance and negative stereotype expectations compared with those responding the diabetes vignette (N = 298). Conclusions Results support the view that, in the Malaysian setting, patients with mental illness may receive differential care from general hospital staff and that general stigmatising attitudes among professionals may influence their care practices. More direct measurement of clinician behaviours than able to be implemented through survey method is required to support these conclusions. PMID:21569613

  20. Variables correlated with elderly referral from nursing homes to general hospitals

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Referring patients from nursing homes to general hospitals exposes them to nosocomial diseases, and may result in the development of a broad spectrum of physical, mental and social damages. Therefore, minimizing the referring of nursing home patients to hospitals is an important factor for keeping the elderly healthy and minimizing health expenditures. In this study we examined the variables related to the referral rates from nursing homes to general hospitals and the relationship between the referral and the mortality rates among the elderly who live in nursing homes in the Haifa Sub-district. Methods Thirty-two nursing homes were included in a cross-sectional study. All medical directors and head nurses were interviewed using a structured questionnaire between November 2006 and October 2007. Statistical analysis, including the ANOVA and the nonparametric Spearman tests, were employed to determine the factors that influence referral rates and the correlation between referral rates and mortality rates. Results The referral rate ranged between 18 and 222 per 100 financed elderly in a single year. In the multivariate analysis, the absence of a physician from the nursing home at the time of the referral to general hospitals was the only significant variable related to referral rates. No significant relationships were found between referral rates and mortality rates. Conclusions Absence of a significant relationship between referral rates and mortality rates may indicate that high referral rates do not necessarily protect the elderly from death. Therefore, any recommendations issued by the Ministry of Health (MOH) should emphasize in-house treatment rather than hospitalization. Clear instructions on referral from nursing homes to general hospitals need to be constructed by the MOH. The MOH should increase the presence of physicians in the nursing homes, especially, when the need to refer a patient arises. Further quantitative and epidemiologic studies should be conducted in order to, more fully and reliably, create guidelines for policy recommendations. PMID:24457020

  1. Legal Outcomes of Sexually Abused Children Evaluated at the Philippine General Hospital Child Protection Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugue-Castillo, Mariella

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the legal outcomes and factors associated with case reaching court and conviction for sexual abuse of children seen at the Philippine General Hospital Child Protection Unit (PGH-CPU) from 1997 to 2000. Methods: Mixed transdisciplinary research design combined longitudinal cohort with qualitative methods. Data were obtained…

  2. Critical care research in a district general hospital: the first year.

    PubMed

    Camsooksai, Julie; Barnes, Helena; Reschreiter, Henrik

    2013-09-01

    Until recently, research in critical care units has usually taken place in university teaching hospitals. The 'general' critical care unit patient population is broader than this and the research needs to reflect this. As a general critical care unit in a district general hospital we wanted to set-up research within our own department, as part of the critical care team and part of our culture. With extensive background communication, drive and hard work, the support of the hospital Research and Development department was gained and Comprehensive Local Research Network funding successfully applied for. A research team was established and a model for the Research Nurse role was developed and implemented. This model is described. Participation in national trials commenced and the research portfolio is growing. Networking with other teams also proved valuable. Research has been established as part of the 'culture' of the day-to-day work and the staff have embraced this. Dedicated Research Nurse posts and education of the whole team have ensured successful implementation and recruitment of the studies. Experiences of the first year are shared and discussed here. Sharing experience of developing research within a critical care unit in a district general hospital, and a suggested model for a new Research Nurse role, may benefit other similar units in their efforts to establish research. PMID:23968441

  3. Legal Outcomes of Sexually Abused Children Evaluated at the Philippine General Hospital Child Protection Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugue-Castillo, Mariella

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the legal outcomes and factors associated with case reaching court and conviction for sexual abuse of children seen at the Philippine General Hospital Child Protection Unit (PGH-CPU) from 1997 to 2000. Methods: Mixed transdisciplinary research design combined longitudinal cohort with qualitative methods. Data were obtained

  4. Awareness and utilization of peer support programs in Singapore public general hospitals.

    PubMed

    Chan, Angelina O M; Kee, Jass P C; Chan, Yiong Huak

    2012-01-01

    To address the effects of acute, chronic and cumulative stress in the healthcare environment in Singapore, the Ministry of Health provided funding to develop a comprehensive crisis response management system (peer support programs/PSPs) that increases mental health awareness, provides emotional support to affected staff during work-related critical incidents and assists hospital management to better understand the emotional needs of the employees. This paper reports the awareness and utilization of PSPs in Singapore public general hospitals about one year after they were set up. PMID:23894802

  5. Strategies for operational efficiency in a general hospital public inpatient unit.

    PubMed

    Santos, A B; McLeod-Bryant, S

    1991-01-01

    Operational strategies for maximizing efficient utilization of beds were carried out in a 12-bed psychiatric inpatient unit for public patients in a general hospital. Developed through a public-academic collaboration, the unit is part of a community-based system of care. The average length of stay is ten days. Medical staff are university faculty and residents. Treatment focuses on resolution of the symptoms or behavior that led to the patient's hospitalization and includes rapid stabilization using crisis management and somatic therapies and rapid mobilization of aftercare resources. Other strategies for promoting efficient provision of services include clearly defined staff roles and a structured format for discussing clinical information. PMID:2049129

  6. Acute generalized weakness in patients referred to Amirkola Childrens Hospital from 2005 to 2010

    PubMed Central

    Salehiomran, Mohammad Reza; Naserkhaki, Somayeh; Hajiahmadi, Mahmoud

    2012-01-01

    Background: Diseases that cause acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) often progress rapidly, thus may cause life threatening complications, therefore, their diagnosis and cure are important. This study was carried out to investigate the causes of acute generalized weakness in children referred to Amirkola Childrens Hospital, in Babol, Iran. Methods: In this case series, the epidemiological causes of the disease and clinical features of 15 cases with acute generalized weakness from April 2005 to September 2010 were evaluated. The data were collected and analyzed. Results: The mean age of cases was 4.73.5 years. The male/female ratio was 2. Twenty cases had Guillain-Barre syndrome, two with myositis and one with periodic hyperkalemic paralysis. Conclusion: Guillain-Barre syndrome is the most common cause of AFP in children admitted due to acute generalized weakness in Amirkola Childrens Hospital. PMID:24358438

  7. CONTENDING WITH SPACE-TIME INTERACTION IN THE SPATIAL PREDICTION OF POLLUTION: VANCOUVER'S HOURLY AMBIENT PM 10 FIELD

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this article we describe an approach for predicting average hourly concentrations of ambient PM10 in Vancouver. We know our solution also applies to hourly ozone fields and believe it may be quite generally applicable. We use a hierarchal Bayesian approach. At the primary ...

  8. In the 'Grey Battalion': Launceston General Hospital nurses on active service in World War I.

    PubMed

    Harris, Kirsty

    2008-01-01

    Nearly fifty nurses from the Launceston General Hospital served with the Australian Army Nursing Service or the British nursing service during World War I. These nurses served in countries that included Egypt, France, India, Greece, Italy and England. They worked in various roles including as a surgical team nurse close to the front working under fire; nursing on hospital ships carrying the wounded; or managing wards overrun with patients on ships at Gallipoli in 1915, whilst dealing with a lack of hospital necessities. This case study, of one group of nurses, shows that their experiences reflected the skills and roles needed to be a military nurse of the time, significantly different to the skills required to nurse in Australia. PMID:20027738

  9. Adult general psychiatric patients served in Nebraska's state hospitals: patient characteristics and needs.

    PubMed

    Watanabe-Galloway, Shinobu; Watkins, Kate; Ryan, Steve; Harvey, Jim; Shaffer, Blaine

    2015-02-01

    This study identified the characteristics and needs of adults discharged from state psychiatric hospitals. A retrospective analysis of data on patients discharged from adult psychiatric units of three state psychiatric hospitals in Nebraska 2005-2008 was conducted. Diagnoses were classified into six groups, and Axis III data from the state psychiatric hospitals provided information about medical comorbidity. Only 12% of admitted patients had private insurance or could pay for their own treatment. Almost all discharged patients (95%) had a diagnosis of serious mental illness, and substance abuse (68%) and personality disorder (68%) were common, as were significant general health problems. Fourteen percent of patients used emergency services five or more times during the study period. Greater efforts must be made to diagnose, treat, and monitor major somatic illnesses and to better understand the factors that contribute to readmission and emergency service use in this population. PMID:24691573

  10. [Coverage of pointed acute coronary syndromes in the general hospital centers].

    PubMed

    Hanssen, M; Monassier, J P; Dujardin, J J; Hoden, S; Pedrazzini, L

    2002-11-01

    This study presents data on the management of acute coronary syndromes collected in a national registry organized by the french Collge national des cardiologues des hpitaux gnraux in September 2000. In all 86 institutions participated and data from 607 patients (mean age: 67 years; 413 men) were analysed. The final diagnosis was unstable angina in 38%, non-Q wave myocardial infarction in 21% and Q-wave myocardial infarction in 40.5%. Median time to admission was 4 h. At symptom onset, patients called their general practitioners in 46% of cases, emergency ambulatory units in 31% of cases and arrived to the hospital on their own in 23% of cases. Observance of the European Society of Cardiology guidelines was good for patients without ST segment elevation. In patients with ST segment elevation, 9% had pre-hospital thrombolysis, 28% hospital thrombolysis, and 27% had angioplasty within 48 h of admission, including 9% with rescue angioplasty. Overall, 57% of patients with ST segment elevation received reperfusion therapy. In hospital mortality was 6% for the whole cohort, and 11% for patients with acute myocardial infarctions. By multivariate analysis, predictors of in-hospital mortality were age, type of acute coronary syndrome, absence of beta-blocker therapy, and absence of coronary angiography. PMID:12515101

  11. Crisis intervention at the general hospital: an appropriate treatment choice for acutely suicidal borderline patients.

    PubMed

    Berrino, Annamaria; Ohlendorf, Pilar; Duriaux, Stphan; Burnand, Yvonne; Lorillard, Solenn; Andreoli, Antonio

    2011-04-30

    This study investigated whether crisis intervention (CI) at the General Hospital is a suitable management strategy among borderline patients referred to the emergency room (ER) for deliberate self-harm. Two patient cohorts (n=200) meeting DSM-IV Borderline Personality Disorder criteria, were prospectively assessed for repeated deliberate self-harm and service consumption. At ER discharge, 100 subjects received CI, while 100 comparison subjects (recruited before the implementation of CI) were assigned to treatment as usual (TAU). At 3-month follow-up, a high proportion of repeated deliberate self-harm and hospitalization in the global study sample was found. However rates were lower in the CI group: 8% repeated deliberate self-harm and 8% psychiatric hospitalization, versus 17% and 56% in the TAU group. The global expenditure for psychiatric hospitalization was 728,840 Swiss Francs (CHF) for CI and 914,340 for TAU. This study indicates that associated with mean hospitalization/relapse rates, CI may be a suitable management strategy for acutely suicidal borderline patients. PMID:20667602

  12. Patient Safety in Tehran University of Medical Sciences General Hospitals, Iran

    PubMed Central

    ARAB, Mohammad; AKBARI SARI, Ali; MOVAHED KOR, Elham; HOSSEINI, Mostafa; TOLOUI RAKHSHAN, Shiva; EZATI, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Background It is important to focus on creating opportunities for patients participation at all levels of health systems in order to promote their ability to improve patient safety and quality of services. The general aim of this study was to determine patient safety level in Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS) general hospitals, Tehran, Iran from patients perspective and to determine the contributory factors on their perspective. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study. In the spring 2011, the list of clinical departments of the six general hospitals affiliated to TUMS was obtained through the Website of TUMS. By using stratified random sampling, the sample size was calculated 300 patients. Data were collected by using a structured questionnaire and its validity and reliability were acceptable. Descriptive statistics, linear regression and logistic regression were used for analyzing the data. Results: Totally, 60% of patients were female. Patient safety was evaluated high by 60% of respondents. The unmarried or educated or employed individuals tend to score lower than others. Conclusion: TUMSs general hospitals are enough safe from patients perspective, patient safety should be improved. In clinical governance, contributing patients perspective to the improvement of patient safety reforms is critical in generating new models of good practice. PMID:23641408

  13. The Difference in the Online Medical Information Searching Behaviors of Hospital Patients and Their Relatives versus the General Public

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Hung-Yuan; Liang, Jyh-Chong; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is two-fold: to explore the differences in online medical information searching behaviors, including evaluative standards and search strategies, of the general public (general group) and those of hospital patients and their relatives (hospital group); and to compare the predictive relationship between the evaluative…

  14. 75 FR 1396 - The General Hospital and Personal Use Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration The General Hospital and Personal Use Devices Panel of the... Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: General Hospital and...

  15. The Difference in the Online Medical Information Searching Behaviors of Hospital Patients and Their Relatives versus the General Public

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Hung-Yuan; Liang, Jyh-Chong; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is two-fold: to explore the differences in online medical information searching behaviors, including evaluative standards and search strategies, of the general public (general group) and those of hospital patients and their relatives (hospital group); and to compare the predictive relationship between the evaluative

  16. [Investigation into drinking problem of patients who visited a general hospital in central and northern Okinawa].

    PubMed

    Nakai, Minori; Hotta, Hiroshi; Ootsuru, Taku; Hiejima, Shigeto; Murakami, Masaru; Yuzuriha, Takefumi; Kondo, Tsuyoshi

    2013-04-01

    In Japan, many problems related to alcohol are pointed out from before. We believe that there is a unique drinking culture in Okinawa, such as a large amount of alcohol. Therefore, we estimate many people in Okinawa have a drinking problem. We conducted a survey of patients who visited general hospital (medical or surgical or orthopedic) in 2007. The purpose of this study is to collect basic data for introducing alcoholics to specialized treatment as early as possible, detecting the person who drink large amounts of alcohol, performing early intervention for people who drink large amount of alcohol, and advancing cooperation with specialized medical agencies of alcohol. As a result, Among the patients who visited general hospital in Okinawa, many problem drinkers are concentrated in the young age. and they have strong fears of health. The possibility of early intervention with intervention techniques, such as brief intervention, has been suggested. PMID:23808321

  17. Laboratory investigation of monoclonal gammopathy during 10 years of screening in a general hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Malacrida, V; De Francesco, D; Banfi, G; Porta, F A; Riches, P G

    1987-01-01

    Protein electrophoresis was carried out on 102,000 samples from the patients of a district general hospital over 10 years, and a monoclonal protein was detected in 730 cases; of these, 114 could be classified as B cell malignancies and 261 as monoclonal gammopathy of undefined significance (MGUS). The various clinical and laboratory features of monoclonal gammopathy were examined with respect to distinguishing the malignant conditions from MGUS at first presentation. PMID:3114329

  18. Syphilitic Aortitis: Autopsy Experience at the Ottawa General Hospital Since 1950

    PubMed Central

    Heggtveit, H. Alexander

    1965-01-01

    Twenty-six cases of syphilitic aortitis were found among 4173 autopsies performed at the Ottawa General Hospital since 1950. Although 10 aortic aneurysms, nine instances of coronary ostial stenosis and five examples of aortic incompetence were present in 20 cases, a clinical diagnosis of syphilitic aortitis had been established in only two patients. It is paradoxical that the clinical diagnosis of syphilitic aortitis is becoming less accurate as surgical techniques for the correction of its complications are being constantly improved. PMID:14282945

  19. Value of the general health questionnaire in detecting psychiatric morbidity in a general hospital out-patient population.

    PubMed

    Bagadia, V N; Ayyar, K S; Lakdawala, P D; Susainathan, U; Pradhan, P V

    1985-10-01

    On administering the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) in English, Gujarati and Marathi, to 500 non-acutely ill adult patients selected randomly from a General Hospital Out-patient Department, it was found that 57% scored high (12 and above), indicating the possibility of psychiatric morbidity in this group. On subjecting 50 of these patients to blind psychiatric evaluation a misclassification rate of 30% was observed with respect to the G. H. Q. 96% of the psychiatrically ill scored high on GHQ, 37% of those scoring high on G. H. Q. were psychiatrically normal. If this misclassification rate is lowered by suitable modifications such as reducing items pertaining to Group A of the G. H. Q., then this test will be very useful as a simple tool to detect psychiatric morbidity. PMID:21927123

  20. Two decades of external peer review of cancer care in general hospitals; the Dutch experience.

    PubMed

    Kilsdonk, Melvin J; Siesling, Sabine; Otter, Rene; van Harten, Wim H

    2016-03-01

    External peer review was introduced in general hospitals in the Netherlands in 1994 to assess and improve the multidisciplinary team approach in cancer care. This paper aims to explore the value, perceived impact, and (future) role of external peer review in cancer care. Semistructured interviews were held with clinicians, oncology nurses, and managers from fifteen general hospitals that participated in three rounds of peer review over a period of 16 years. Interviewees reflected on the goals and expectations, experiences, perceived impact, and future role of external peer review. Transcriptions of the interviews were coded to discover recurrent themes. Improving clinical care and organization were the main motives for participation. Positive impact was perceived on multiple aspects of care such as shared responsibilities, internal prioritization of cancer care, improved communication, and a clear structure and position of cancer care within general hospitals. Establishing a direct relationship between the external peer review and organizational or clinical impact proved to be difficult. Criticism was raised on the content of the program being too theoretical and organization-focussed after three rounds. According to most stakeholders, external peer review can improve multidisciplinary team work in cancer care; however, the acceptance is threatened by a perceived disbalance between effort and visible clinical impact. Leaner and more clinically focused programs are needed to keep repeated peer reviews challenging and worthwhile. PMID:26714788

  1. Low frequency earthquakes below southern Vancouver Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostock, M. G.; Royer, A. A.; Hearn, E. H.; Peacock, S. M.

    2012-11-01

    The nature and distribution of low frequency earthquakes (LFEs) in subduction zones provide insight into plate boundary deformation downdip of the locked seismogenic zone. We employ network autocorrelation detection to identify LFE families beneath southern Vancouver Island and environs. An initial suite of 5775 LFEs detected in 2004 and 2005 at a select set of 7 stations is grouped into 140 families using waveform cluster analysis. These families are used as templates within an iterative network cross correlation scheme to detect LFEs across different tremor episodes, incorporate new stations, and improve LFE template signal-to-noise ratio. As in southwest Japan, representative LFE locations define a relatively tight, dipping surface several km above the locus of intraslab seismicity, within a prominent, dipping low-velocity zone (LVZ). LFE polarizations for near-vertical source-receiver geometries possess a remarkably uniform dipolar signature indicative of point-source, double-couple excitation. Focal mechanisms determined fromP-wave first motions are characterized by a combination of strike-slip and thrust faulting. We suggest that LFEs and regular intraslab seismicity occur in distinct structural and stress regimes. The LVZ, inferred to represent weak, overpressured, porous and mylonitized metabasalts of oceanic crustal Layer 2, separates LFEs manifesting deformation within a plate boundary shear zone from intraslab earthquakes generated by tensional stresses and dehydration embrittlement within a more competent lower oceanic crustal Layer 3 and underlying mantle.

  2. Trauma services requirements in a district general hospital serving a rural area.

    PubMed Central

    Kinny, S J; Jones, D H

    1990-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess the demands made on a regional trauma centre by a district trauma unit. DESIGN--Two part study. (1) Prospective analysis of one month's workload. (2) Retrospective analysis of one year's workload by using a computer based records system. Comparison of two sets of results. SETTING--Accident unit in Gwynedd Hospital, Bangor. PATIENTS--(1) All patients who attended the accident unit in August 1988. (2) All patients who attended the accident unit in the calendar year April 1988-April 1989. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Workload of a district trauma unit. RESULTS--In August 1988 there were 2325 attendances; 2302 of these were analysed. In all, 1904 attendances were for trauma; 213 patients were admitted to the trauma ward and 103 required an operation that entailed incision. Patients who attended the unit had a mean (range) injury severity score of 2-13 (0-25). Only two patients had injuries that a district general hospital would not be expected to cope with (injury severity score greater than 20). In the year April 1988-April 1989, 21,007 patients attended the unit. In all, 17,958 attendances were for orthopaedic injuries or injuries caused by an accident; 1966 patients were admitted to the unit. CONCLUSIONS--Most trauma is musculoskeletal and relatively minor according to the injury severity score. All but a few injuries can be managed in district general hospitals. In their recent report the Royal College of Surgeons has overestimated the requirements that a British district general hospital would have of a regional trauma centre. PMID:2107928

  3. Physical Violence against General Practitioners and Nurses in Chinese Township Hospitals: A Cross-Sectional Survey

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Kai; Jiao, Mingli; Ma, Hongkun; Qiao, Hong; Hao, Yanhua; Li, Ye; Gao, Lijun; Sun, Hong; Kang, Zheng; Liang, Libo; Wu, Qunhong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to identify risk factors of physical violence in Chinese township hospitals. Methods A cross-sectional survey was used in a sample of 442 general practitioners and 398 general nurses from 90 township hospitals located in Heilongjiang province, China (response rate = 84.8%). Results A total of 106 of the 840 (12.6%) respondents reported being physically attacked in their workplace in the previous 12 months. Most perpetrators were the patients’ relatives (62.3%), followed by the patient (22.6%); 73.6% of perpetrators were aged between 20 and 40 years. Of the physical violence incidents, about 56.6% (n = 60) resulted in a physical injury, and 45.4% of respondents took two or three days of sick leave. Reporting workplace violence in hospitals to superiors or authorities was low (9.4%). Most respondents (62.8%) did not receive training on how to avoid workplace violence. Logistic regression analyses indicated that general nurses, aged 35 years or younger, and with a higher-level professional title were more likely to experience physical violence. Healthcare workers with direct physical contact (washing, turning, lifting) with patients had a higher risk of physical violence compared to other health care workers. Procedures for reporting workplace violence were a protective factor for physical violence; when in place, reporting after psychological violence (verbal abuse, bullying/mobbing, harassment, and threats) was more protective than waiting until an instance of physical violence (beating, kicking, slapping, stabbing, etc.). Conclusions Physical violence in Chinese township hospitals is an occupational hazard of rural public health concern. Policies, procedures, and intervention strategies should be undertaken to manage this issue. PMID:26571388

  4. Pilot Quality Control Program for Brachytherapy of Low Dose Rate at the General Hospital of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez R., J. T.; Tovar M., V.; Salinas, B.; Hernández O., O.; Santillán B., L.; Molero M., C.; Montoya M., J.

    2004-09-01

    We describe the pilot quality control program for brachytherapy of low dose rate proposed to be used in the Radiotherapy Department at the General Hospital of Mexico. The program consists of three parts: a) development of calibration procedures, performed in terms of air-kerma strength for calibration of 137Cs and 192Ir brachytherapy sources, and for the calibration of well-type ionization chambers for 137Cs, b) performance of localisation and reconstruction techniques for radioactive sources with a Baltas' phantom. The results obtained for the media deviation , are in the optimum level, ± 0.5 mm < ± 1.0 mm; the confidence limit Δ, is in the emergency level, Δ=3.2 mm. c) verification of absorbed dose to water DW, given by the hospital. It consists on the characterisation of a TLD-100 powder dosimetry system at SSDL: The calibration curves for powder response (nC or nC/ mg) vs Dw and the control charts for the Harshaw 3500 reader were obtained. The statistical validation of the calibration curve by normality of the residuals and the lack of fit tests were realised. In the other hand, TLD's were irradiated in the hospital to a nominal Dw = 2 Gy with sources of 137Cs. The percent deviations Δ%, between the Dw imparted by the Hospital and the determined by SSDL, are 1.2% Δ⩽ 6.5 % which are consistent with the expanded uncertainty U% for DW, 5.6 U% 10%.

  5. Barriers to the Operation of Patient Safety Incident Reporting Systems in Korean General Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jee-In; Lee, Sang-IL

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to explore the barriers to and factors facilitating the operation of patient safety incident reporting systems. Methods A qualitative study that used a methodological triangulation method was conducted. Participants were those who were involved in or responsible for managing incident reporting at hospitals, and they were recruited via a snowballing sampling method. Data were collected via interviews or emails from 42 nurses at 42 general hospitals. A qualitative content analysis was performed to derive the major themes related to barriers to and factors facilitating incident reporting. Results Participants suggested 96 barriers to incident reporting in their hospitals at the organizational and individual levels. Low reporting rates, especially for near misses, were the most commonly reported issue, followed by poorly designed incident reporting systems and a lack of adequate patient safety leadership by mid-level managers. To resolve and overcome these barriers, 104 recommendations were suggested. The high-priority recommendations included introducing reward systems; improving incident reporting systems, by for instance implementing a variety of reporting channels and ensuring reporter anonymity; and creating a strong safety culture. Conclusions The barriers to and factors facilitating incident reporting include various organizational and individual factors. As an important way to address these challenging issues and to improve the incident reporting systems in hospitals, we suggest several feasible methods of doing so. PMID:23346479

  6. The role of rotavirus associated with pediatric gastroenteritis in a general hospital in Lagos, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Anochie, Philip Ifesinachi; Onyeneke, Edwina Chinwe; Asowata, Emmanuel Osaretin; Afocha, Ebelechukwu; Onyeozirila, Anthony Chidiebere; Ogu, Angelina Chinyere; Onyeneke, Bestman Chukwuemeka

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Bacterial, viral and parasitic agents have been implicated and confirmed as causative agents of gastroenteritis in children with ages below 5 years old. The major role of rotavirus as causative agent is not widely recognized within the public health community, particularly in developing countries. This study examined the role of rotavirus as a causative agent of childhood gastroenteritis in infants and young children below 5 years of age in a General Hospital in Lagos, Nigeria. Methods Parents and caregivers of children admitted to the hospital were interviewed using a structured questionnaire. Viral RNA was extracted from the stool samples collected and analyzed using RT-PCR for genotyping and agarose gel electrophoresis for identification of rotavirus electrophoretypes. Results Out of the 71 samples analyzed, 16 (22.5%) were positive for rotavirus. A total of 12 (75%) males and 4 (25%) females were positive for rotavirus gastroenteritis with most cases (7, 43.8%) distributed to the 13-24 months age group, followed closely by the 1-6 months age group, with 6 cases, 37.5%. Rotavirus G2 genotype was the most prevalent strain in the hospital (10 patients, 62.5%) followed by G1 (6 patients, 37.5%). These were the only rotavirus genotypes detected in the hospital. PMID:24432291

  7. Dying at home or in the hospital? An observational study in German general practice.

    PubMed

    Gágyor, Ildikó; Himmel, Wolfgang; Pierau, Andrea; Chenot, Jean-François

    2016-03-01

    Background Although determinants of place of death have been investigated in several studies, there is a lack of knowledge on factors associated with dying at home from the general practice perspective. Objectives To identify factors associated with dying at home for patients in German general practice. Methods In a retrospective study, general practitioners of 30 general practices were asked to provide data for all patients aged 18 years or older who died within the last 12 months, using a self-developed questionnaire. 'Dying in hospital' was defined as dying in hospital or hospice and 'dying at home' as dying at one's usual residence including the nursing home. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to determine factors associated with 'dying at home'; odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated as measures of effect size. Results Of 439 deceased patients, 52.2% died at home, and 47.8% died in hospital or hospice. Determinants for dying at home were patients' care in the last 48 hours of life by family members (OR: 7.8, 95% CI: 3.4-18.0), by general practitioners (GPs) (OR: 7.3, 4.2-12.9) and living in a nursing home (OR: 3.8, 1.7-8.3). In the adjusted model, low comorbidity was positively associated (OR: 3.2, 1.4-7.0), and low functional health status (Karnofsky performance status) was negatively associated with dying at home (OR: 0.3, 0.1-0.7). Conclusion Apart from patient-related factors such as comorbidity and health status, care by family members and GPs respectively, were determinants of dying at home. PMID:26799953

  8. Multidisciplinary management of clubfeet using the Ponseti method in a district general hospital setting

    PubMed Central

    Binks, Katherine; Dunkley, Mia; Coates, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Idiopathic congenital talipes equinovarus (CTEV) is a relatively common complex deformity of the foot that can be successfully managed by the Ponseti method. The purpose of this study was to see if the latter can be effectively administered by non-medical specialists outside a specialist or teaching hospital setting. Method Retrospective review of 24 children (39 feet) with idiopathic congenital talipes equinovarus managed by a physiotherapist-led service in a district general hospital. Results The median Pirani score at presentation was 4.5 (mean 4.2, range 1.56). The median Pirani score for feet requiring tenotomy was 6 (4.56), whereas feet not requiring tenotomy had a median Pirani score of 2.5 (1.55). A total of 18 feet (46%) underwent an Achilles tenotomy. Foot correction was achieved with an average of 3.4 (26) cast changes in the non-tenotomy group, and an average of 7.5 (513) in the tenotomy group. Successful initial correction of the deformity was achieved in 37 (95%) of the feet studied. One patient (2 feet, 5%) failed local conservative management, requiring tertiary referral. Two children (2 feet) have relapsed, requiring further serial casting. No children required open surgical release. Follow-up was for a mean of 31months (1750). Conclusions Early results suggest that a combined consultant/physiotherapist-delivered Ponseti service can be effectively and successfully administered in a district general hospital. PMID:19308543

  9. Laboratory to Clinical Investigation of Carbapenem Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Outbreak in a General Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Guo-xin, Mo; Dan-yang, She; Xi-zhou, Guan; Jun-chang, Cui; Rui, Wang; Zhi-gang, Cui; Liang-an, Chen

    2014-01-01

    Background: The number of reported cases, infected with carbepenem resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (CRAb) and multi-drug resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter species had gradually increased in most PLA general hospital wards from April to June in 2007. Objectives: We have described the investigation of an outbreak of CRAb and MDR Acinetobacter in PLA general hospital, Beijing. The prospective and retrospective findings were identified and analyzed to study the infection causes. Materials and Methods: A. baumannii samples were collected from the patients and environment in each hospital unit. The onset times were recorded according to their case information. All samples were characterized by genotype and compared using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The microorganism susceptibility was tested using the in vitro minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) breakpoints method. Results: A total of 69 A. baumannii strains were successfully isolated from 53 patients. About 89.1% of them were resistant to ampicillin and 89.2% to cefotaxime and 75.4% to all standard antibiotics. PFGE analysis revealed that nine of the isolates had unique clones and the epidemic clone types were A, B and C. Conclusions: The A. baumannii outbreak, was caused by MDR A. baumannii. The strains had widely spread among 12 departments especially in surgical intensive care unit (SICU), emergency intensive care unit (EICU) and the department of respiratory disease. The outbreak was more likely caused by the A. baumannii infected or carrier patients and EICU was its origin. PMID:25147648

  10. Use of a General Level Framework to Facilitate Performance Improvement in Hospital Pharmacists in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Camilla; Coombes, Ian; Cardiff, Lynda; Duggan, Catherine; Yee, Mei-Ling; Wee Lim, Kiat; Bates, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the acceptability and validity of an adapted version of the General Level Framework (GLF) as a tool to facilitate and evaluate performance development in general pharmacist practitioners (those with less than 3 years of experience) in a Singapore hospital. Method. Observational evaluations during daily clinical activities were prospectively recorded for 35 pharmacists using the GLF at 2 time points over an average of 9 months. Feedback was provided to the pharmacists and then individualized learning plans were formulated. Results. Pharmacists mean competency cluster scores improved in all 3 clusters, and significant improvement was seen in all but 8 of the 63 behavioral descriptors (p ? 0.05). Nonsignificant improvements were attributed to the highest level of performance having been attained upon initial evaluation. Feedback indicated that the GLF process was a positive experience, prompting reflection on practice and culminating in needs-based learning and ultimately improved patient care. Conclusions. The General Level Framework was an acceptable tool for the facilitation and evaluation of performance development in general pharmacist practitioners in a Singapore hospital. PMID:22919083

  11. The impact of a 10-year audit cycle on blood usage in a district general hospital.

    PubMed

    James, R M; Brown, S; Parapia, L A; Williams, A T

    2001-10-01

    As clinical governance moves from concept to practice, it is emerging as a realistic strategy to promote and improve quality within the National Health Service, as well as satisfying the demand for external accountability. In the context of blood transfusion, the area of responsibility encompasses product liability, as well as efficient use of blood as a resource and transfusion as an appropriate clinical response. Clinical governance may be a modern catch phrase, but the principles it enshrines have long been established within blood transfusion, and in other aspects of haematology. Here, an audit cycle comprising four audits over a 10-year period to monitor the use of cross-matched blood in a large district general hospital is described. Initially, blood use was considered by hospital site, and by the surgical procedure for which it was requested. Later, the scope of the audit was expanded to consider usage by individual consultant. A standard of efficient use of cross-matched blood was taken to be a cross-match to transfusion ratio of < 1.5. The information was reviewed by the hospital transfusion committee, who have a key role in co-ordinating and assessing the practice of transfusion within a hospital. In this hospital, audit has been one of the main tools for improving practice, in particular by enabling the implementation and continuous revision of a maximum blood order schedule. Further, as the process of audit has developed, problem areas have been highlighted, and strategies to improve usage have been brought in with encouraging results. The audit is now being expanded again to include a greater focus on usage of cross-matched blood in the nonsurgical setting. PMID:11696230

  12. Is locating acute wards in the general hospital an essential element in psychiatric reform? The U.K. experience.

    PubMed

    Totman, Jonathan; Mann, Farhana; Johnson, Sonia

    2010-01-01

    Locating psychiatric wards in general hospitals has long been seen in many countries as a key element in the reform of services to promote community integration of the mentally ill. In the U.K., however, this is no longer a policy priority, and the recent trend has been towards small freestanding inpatient units, located either within the communities they serve, or on general hospital sites, but separate from the main building. Whether locating the psychiatric wards in the general hospital is essential to psychiatric reform has been little discussed, and we can find no relevant evidence. Perceived strengths of general hospital psychiatric wards are in normalisation of mental health problems, accessibility to local communities, better availability of physical health care resources, and integration of psychiatry with the rest of the medical profession, which may faclilitate recruitment. However, difficulties seem to have been encountered in establishing well-designed psychiatric wards with access to open space in general hospitals. Also, physical proximity may not be enough to achieve the desired reduction in stigma, and complaints from the general hospital may sometimes result in undue restrictions on psychiatric ward patients. There are strong arguments both for and against locating psychiatric wards in general hospitals: an empirical evidence base would be helpful to inform important decisions about the best setting for wards. PMID:21322499

  13. A survey of neonatal tetanus at a district general hospital in north-east Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Bala; Popoola, Ayo; Olokoba, Abdulfatai; Salawu, Fatai K

    2011-01-01

    Neonatal tetanus (NNT) remains among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in Nigeria and a huge challenge in achieving the fourth goal of the Millennium Development Goals. We reviewed the morbidity and mortality pattern among neonates with NNT admitted to the District General Hospital in north-east Nigeria from 2006 to 2009. Half of the patients were from rural areas and were delivered at home by untrained traditional birth attendants with no prior antenatal health care. Razor blades and scissors were the instruments used to cut the cord in nonhygienic conditions. Spasticity, lack of sucking, trismus, fever, omphalitis, risus sardonicus and opisthotonus were the most common presenting signs and symptoms. Overall, mortality was 56%. Health education of mothers and traditional birth attendants, the promotion of hospital delivery and antenatal tetanus immunization of all pregnant women, particularly in rural areas, are recommended if NNT is to be prevented. PMID:21172902

  14. A study of the accumulation of long-stay patients in a general hospital psychiatric department.

    PubMed

    Cumella, S J; Lawrence, R; Robertson, J A

    1988-05-01

    A survey of all admissions of patients under the age of 65 years during the first 6 years of a General Hospital Psychiatric Department identified 16 'long-stay' patients (a year or more of continuous inpatient care) and 8 'medium-stay' patients (at least 6 months inpatient care in any period of a year). The most common diagnoses were organic brain disorders among long-stay patients, and affective disorders among medium-stay patients. There was no consistent accumulation of long-stay patients: those with functional disorders were usually discharged to hostel accommodation, while those with organic brain disorders died or were transferred to inpatient care in other hospitals. PMID:10312604

  15. The quality assurance committee in a general hospital: its use in improvement of the medical record.

    PubMed

    Ashkenazi, A; Cooper, M; Chemke, J; Simon, D; Cohen, C; Mass, N; Schattner, A

    1992-10-01

    A twice-yearly audit of a sample of medical records from each department of a general hospital was initiated by a quality assurance committee and pursued for 8 years. Missing entries that were considered obligatory for good medical performance of each service were identified, and the results (expressed as percent of missing entries of the total) were communicated in graphic form to the specific departments and the senior staff of the hospital. This approach led to an improvement in the medical records (decrease of missing entries), which may reflect a higher quality of medical care. Thus, a sequential audit of medical records by a quality assurance committee may constitute a simple and effective method of monitoring and improving physicians' knowledge and performance. PMID:1399501

  16. The final outcome of indeterminate cytology of thyroid nodules in a District General Hospital

    PubMed Central

    DODDI, S.; CHOHDA, E.; MAGHSOUDI, S.; SHEEHAN, L.; SINHA, A.; CHANDAK, P.; SINHA, P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Diagnostic thyroid lobectomy is performed to resolve the dilemma of indeterminate (Thy3) cytology of thyroid nodules. But on final histology most nodules are benign thereby subjecting this group of patients to surgery with its associated risks. Aim To determine the proportion of cancers in patients with indeterminate thyroid nodules. Patients and methods This is a retrospective observational study of 621 patients who underwent fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) of their thyroid nodules over a 60 month period in a district general hospital. Patient demographics, cytology and final histology results were extracted from the hospital database. Results On final analysis, 48 patients had an indeterminate cytology (7.7%) and 12 patients had cancer in this group (25%) following diagnostic lobectomy. Conclusion Till an alternative robust technology becomes widely available we need to continue to perform diagnostic lobectomy in patients with indeterminate cytology in view of the high incidence of thyroid cancer in this group of patients. PMID:26188757

  17. [Suicidality at the general hospital – perspective of consultation and liaison psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Imboden, Christian; Hatzinger, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Suicidality is a common problem in the general hospital. Patients with comorbid psychiatric disorders or during a psychosocial crisis can develop suicidal ideation during their stay at the general hospital, especially if they suffer from chronic disease. Some somatic disorders, such as cancer, epilepsy, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, stroke and chronic pain conditions are associated with an increased risk of suicide. The fact that (1) a major part of patients are treated in the emergency room (ER) after a suicide attempt and (2) a suicide attempt is the strongest predictor for later completed suicide emphasizes the importance of expertise in dealing with suicidal patients in the ER. In order to improve prevention of suicides and suicide attempts within the general hospital and after discharge it is important to educate staff concerning suicidality and enhance detection of suicidal patients. A consultation and liaison psychiatrist should always be involved when there are suicidal patients on wards and in the ER. Assessment of suicidal patients has always to include clear recommendations concerning patient safety and treatment of the underlying condition as well as specific approaches in dealing with suicidal thoughts. Safety measures can include close monitoring, constant observation, restriction to means of suicide, referral to a psychiatric clinic and treatment with sedatives, generally benzodiazepines. Psychiatric disorders are ideally treated according to guidelines and clear recommendations should be given concerning treatment after discharge. Specific psychotherapy for suicidal behaviour possibly reduces the risk of future suicides. A special situation is created by assisted suicides which attribute to suicides in the elderly with a recent increase in the Swiss population. In some cases, undiagnosed depression may contribute to the decision making process, hence, underlining the importance of improved detection and treatment of depression in the elderly. PMID:26423882

  18. A comparison of hospital readmission rates between two general physicians with different outpatient review practices

    PubMed Central

    Rayner, Hugh C; Mark Temple, R; Marshall, Tim; Clarke, Dianne

    2002-01-01

    Background There has been a relentless increase in emergency medical admissions in the UK over recent years. Many of these patients suffer with chronic conditions requiring continuing medical attention. We wished to determine whether conventional outpatient clinic follow up after discharge has any impact on the rate of readmission to hospital. Methods Two consultant general physicians with the same patient case-mix but markedly different outpatient follow-up practice were chosen. Of 1203 patients discharged, one consultant saw twice as many patients in the follow-up clinic than the other (Dr A 9.8% v Dr B 19.6%). The readmission rate in the twelve months following discharge was compared in a retrospective analysis of hospital activity data. Due to the specialisation of the admitting system, patients mainly had cardiovascular or cerebrovascular disease or had taken an overdose. Few had respiratory or infectious diseases. Outpatient follow-up was focussed on patients with cardiac disease. Results Risk of readmission increased significantly with age and length of stay of the original episode and was less for digestive system and musculo-skeletal disorders. 28.7% of patients discharged by Dr A and 31.5 % of those discharged by Dr B were readmitted at least once. Relative readmission risk was not significantly different between the consultants and there was no difference in the length of stay of readmissions. Conclusions Increasing the proportion of patients with this age- and case-mix who are followed up in a hospital general medical outpatient clinic is unlikely to reduce the demand for acute hospital beds. PMID:12084180

  19. Emergence of an Invasive Clone of Nontoxigenic Corynebacterium diphtheriae in the Urban Poor Population of Vancouver, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Romney, M. G.; Roscoe, D. L.; Bernard, K.; Lai, S.; Efstratiou, A.; Clarke, A. M.

    2006-01-01

    Invasive disease due to Corynebacterium diphtheriae is rare in North America. Here we describe the emergence of a predominant clone of a nontoxigenic strain of C. diphtheriae in the impoverished population of Vancouver's downtown core. This clone has caused significant morbidity and contributed to at least two deaths. Over a 5-year period, seven cases of bacteremia due to C. diphtheriae were detected in patients admitted to Vancouver hospitals. Injection drug use, diabetes mellitus, skin colonization/infection with C. diphtheriae, and homelessness all appeared to be related to the development of bacteremia with the organism. Ribotyping of isolates recovered from blood culture revealed a predominant ribotype pattern that has not previously been reported in North America. PMID:16672385

  20. Pathways to psychiatric care in urban north China: a general hospital based study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pathway studies highlight the help-seeking behaviors of patients with physical and mental illnesses. A number of studies in this field have been completed in various parts of the world. The purpose of this study is to explore the characteristics of the help-seeking pathways of patients with mental illness from urban north China at Mental Health Professional (MHP). Methods The pathway diagrams, which accounted for more than five percent of patients, were documented for 441 subjects using the translated version of the World Health Organization (WHO) pathway encounter form. The patterns and durations of care-seeking were analyzed in different diagnostic groups. The ?2-test and the Mann-Whitney U test were employed, as needed. Results Respondents visited the MHP through a variety of pathways. Approximately three-quarters of the patients took an indirect pathway (74.8% vs 25.2%, ?2?=?108.8, p?general hospitals (56.4% vs 4.1%, ?2?=?138.3, p?general hospitals (24.8% vs 4.1%, ?2?=?40.96, p?hospitals. Of the patients who first contacted with psychiatry hospital, 55.6% received a professional diagnosis and finally reached the MHP because of the poor treatment or high-cost medical care. Conclusions The majority of patients seek other pathways than to go to MHP directly and this may be due to stigma, and/or lack of knowledge. The study gives emphasis on the importance of improving skills and knowledge that will facilitate the recognition of psychiatric disorders in the community health centers, the general hospitals system and by private practitioners. The pathway described by this study may be helpful while preparing mental health programs in the future. PMID:24020825

  1. [Consultation-liaison psychiatry and general hospital psychiatry in the Netherlands: on the way to psychosomatic medicine].

    PubMed

    Verwey, B; van Waarde, J A; Huyse, F J; Leentjens, A F G

    2008-01-01

    Consultation-liaison psychiatry and general hospital psychiatry have played a major role in promoting the concept of integrated care. New models for care have been developed and policy assurances about the quality of care have been expressed in the form of guidelines and indicators relating to procedure and performance. General hospital psychiatry is playing an increasingly important role in the training of psychiatrists. Due to the ageing population there is greater awareness of the importance of comorbidity and more support for the concept of integrated care. These changes will promote the further development of general hospital psychiatry. PMID:19067313

  2. Wireless technology in the evolution of patient monitoring on general hospital wards.

    PubMed

    Sahandi, R; Noroozi, S; Roushan, G; Heaslip, V; Liu, Y

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of patient monitoring on general hospital wards is discussed. Patients on general wards are monitored according to the severity of their conditions, which can be subjective at best. A report by the Commission for Healthcare Audit and Inspection in 2008 indicated dissatisfaction with patient monitoring. Commitment to providing quality health service by healthcare organizations encourages the implementation of other mechanisms for patient care. Remote patient monitoring (RPM), by supplementing the role of nurses, can improve efficiency and patient care on general wards. Developments in technology made it possible for wireless sensors to measure and transmit physiological data from patients to a control room for monitoring and recording. Two approaches in the application of wireless ZigBee sensor networks are discussed and their performances compared in a simulation environment. The role of RPM in early detection of deteriorating patients' conditions, reducing morbidity and mortality rates are also discussed. PMID:19929237

  3. Factors associated with suicide method among psychiatric patients in a general hospital in Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Subin; Ahn, Myung Hee; Na, Riji; Kim, Seon-Ok; Yoon, Jin Sang; Park, Jun-Hyuk; Hong, Jin Pyo

    2013-12-30

    This study aims to highlight the factors associated with suicide method among psychiatric patients in a general hospital in Korea. In a sample of 467 suicides by patients who had received mental health care in a general hospital in Korea, the relationship between suicide method and time of death as well as clinical characteristics, including psychiatric adiagnosis, was examined using multinomial logistic regression analysis. Compared with the general population, psychiatric patients, regardless of disorder, committed suicide by jumping from heights more often than by hanging (OR=2.35-8.64). In particular, patients with psychotic disorders and female patients were more likely to use jumping from a height than hanging to kill themselves (OR=2.98 and 1.83, respectively). Patients were more likely to use suicide methods other than hanging (e.g., OR=6.7 for jumping, 5.3 for drowning, and 2.7 for self-poisoning) between midnight and dawn. Possible suicide-prevention strategies suggested by this study include limiting access to or fencing off tall structures in close proximity to psychiatric institutions and residential care homes. At night, limiting access to or instituting heightened supervision of tall structures is specifically indicated. PMID:24055162

  4. Setting Standards of Performance for Program Evaluations: The Case of the Teaching Hospital General Medicine Group Practice Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fink, Arlene; And Others

    1986-01-01

    This article describes standards setting in an evaluation of the structure of 15 of the nation's university hospitals who participated in the Teaching Hospital General Medicine Group Practice Program. Standards were (1) selected from many sources; (2) formed in a participatory, competing forum for discussion; and (3) set in advance of information

  5. When Suicide Is Not Suicide: Self-induced Morbidity and Mortality in the General Hospital.

    PubMed

    Bostwick, J Michael

    2015-04-01

    Suicidal phenomena in the general hospital can take a variety of forms that can be parsed by taking into account whether or not the patient 1) intended to hasten death, and 2) included collaborators, including family and health care providers, in the decision to act. These two criteria can be used to distinguish entities as diverse as true suicide, non-compliance, euthanasia/physician-assisted suicide, and hospice/palliative care. Characterizing the nature of "suicide" events facilitates appropriate decision-making around management and disposition. PMID:25973265

  6. Psychiatric crisis intervention in the general emergency service of a Veterans Affairs hospital.

    PubMed

    Lambert, M

    1995-03-01

    An after-hours crisis intervention program staffed by psychiatric residents between 5 p.m. and 11:30 p.m. on weekdays was developed in the general emergency room at a Veterans Affairs hospital to reduce inpatient psychiatric admissions. The program offered medication, family interventions, and referrals to outpatient services. In the programs's first year, inpatient admissions during the hours covered by the program decreased by 34 percent, for a net savings of nearly $400,000 in inpatient treatment costs. PMID:7796219

  7. The incidence of monoclonal proteins during 7 years of screening in a District General Hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, R A; Smith, L; Pickering, P E

    1984-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the incidence of monoclonal proteins, during a 7-year period, in the population served by a typical District General Hospital. 183,300 sera were electrophoresed and 804 monoclonal proteins were detected. Various biochemical prognostic criteria, such as the concentration of monoclonal protein, incidence of Bence-Jones protein and the presence of reduced polyclonal immunoglobulins, were studied in an attempt to assess the benign or malignant nature of the monoclonal protein. In this study, 75% of the patients with monoclonal proteins fulfilled at least one of these criteria, demonstrating the importance of long-term monitoring. PMID:6698575

  8. When Suicide Is Not Suicide: Self-induced Morbidity and Mortality in the General Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Bostwick, J. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Suicidal phenomena in the general hospital can take a variety of forms that can be parsed by taking into account whether or not the patient 1) intended to hasten death, and 2) included collaborators, including family and health care providers, in the decision to act. These two criteria can be used to distinguish entities as diverse as true suicide, non-compliance, euthanasia/physician-assisted suicide, and hospice/palliative care. Characterizing the nature of suicide events facilitates appropriate decision-making around management and disposition. PMID:25973265

  9. Principal components and generalized linear modeling in the correlation between hospital admissions and air pollution.

    PubMed

    Souza, Juliana Bottoni de; Reisen, Valdério Anselmo; Santos, Jane Méri; Franco, Glaura Conceição

    2014-06-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the association between concentrations of air pollutants and admissions for respiratory causes in children. METHODS Ecological time series study. Daily figures for hospital admissions of children aged < 6, and daily concentrations of air pollutants (PM10, SO2, NO2, O3 and CO) were analyzed in the Região da Grande Vitória, ES, Southeastern Brazil, from January 2005 to December 2010. For statistical analysis, two techniques were combined: Poisson regression with generalized additive models and principal model component analysis. Those analysis techniques complemented each other and provided more significant estimates in the estimation of relative risk. The models were adjusted for temporal trend, seasonality, day of the week, meteorological factors and autocorrelation. In the final adjustment of the model, it was necessary to include models of the Autoregressive Moving Average Models (p, q) type in the residuals in order to eliminate the autocorrelation structures present in the components. RESULTS For every 10:49 μg/m3 increase (interquartile range) in levels of the pollutant PM10 there was a 3.0% increase in the relative risk estimated using the generalized additive model analysis of main components-seasonal autoregressive - while in the usual generalized additive model, the estimate was 2.0%. CONCLUSIONS Compared to the usual generalized additive model, in general, the proposed aspect of generalized additive model - principal component analysis, showed better results in estimating relative risk and quality of fit. PMID:25119940

  10. [Enrichment of the functions of the psychiatric department in a general hospital and collaboration within the area].

    PubMed

    Koishikawa, Hiraki; Ookami, Toshihiko

    2014-01-01

    Psychiatric disease has been included in the five main diseases, and a medical care plan is required. In it, there are many problems, for example, physical complications and which general hospital should chiefly deal with it. Here, we present a way to cope with these problems on the basis of achievements in the psychiatric department of Kameda General Hospital. Specifically, we would like to assert that creating a consultation-liaison team and enriching the section of clinical psychiatry are very important and effective. The activities of the consultation-liaison team, created to address various issues after establishing a psychiatric ward, have led to the possibility of a psychiatric department in a general hospital. Experience to date indicates that, in the context of a general hospital with a psychiatric inpatient unit, the existence of a multidisciplinary liaison team working across departmental boundaries is crucial to determining and managing the treatment of patients with psychiatric emergencies, as well as patients with psychiatric issues and physical complications. Additionally, in order to increase the effectiveness of the hospital liaison team, it is critical to realize seamless, prompt collaboration with facilities outside the hospital. In this respect, the role of a patient care coordinator is expected to become increasingly important. Additionally, enriching and guarding activities of clinical psychologists have contributed to the growth of psychiatric departments in general hospitals and proved to be effective in combination with activities of the consultation-liaison team. PMID:25189042

  11. [Pediatric intermediate care unit in general hospital: recent survey in French Polynesia].

    PubMed

    Gatti, H; Dauger, S; Sommet, J; Chenel, C; Naudin, J

    2014-03-01

    In 2006, decrees relating to pediatric critical care defined the main rules of pediatric intermediate care units (PIMU). These units ensure continuous monitoring of children at risk of critical deterioration without requiring invasive support. In French Polynesia, a PIMU has been integrated into the general pediatric ward since the new hospital opened in November 2010. We conducted a prospective observational study of patients admitted to the PIMU depending on whether they were surgical patients or were secondarily transferred to the ICU or were transferred via long-distance medical air transport for specialized care. For the very first operational year, 199 children (median age, 3 years old) were admitted to the PIMU: for the most part respiratory (31.7%) and neurologic (23.6%) failures were involved. Surgical patients more often required a prosthesis or treatments associated with serious adverse effects than nonsurgical patients (respectively, 46% vs. 16%, P<0.01; 29% vs. 7%, P<0.01) and the length of the hospital stay was longer (5 days vs. 2, P<0.01). Patients who were secondarily transferred to the ICU had a higher admission Pediatric RISk of Mortality (PRISM) score (6 vs. 4, P<0.01) and required more treatments associated with serious adverse effects (50% vs. 20%, P<0.01) than nontransferred patients. The length of the hospital stay was longer (6days) for patients who underwent long-distance medical transport. In addition to PIMU defining criteria, the use of treatments associated with serious adverse effects should be considered risk factors of impaired prognosis in local practical procedures. Assessment of PIMU activity should take into account that intensive surgical care and geographical isolation are closely related to increased length of hospital stay. PMID:24503456

  12. Epidemiology of Orthopaedic Trauma Admissions Over One Year in a District General Hospital in England

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, A; Young, A

    2015-01-01

    Introduction : Admission to district general hospitals in England has undergone change in recent years due to both an aging population and the reconfiguration of the major trauma network throughout the United Kingdom. Methods : We utilised a retrospective cohort study to analyse the epidemiology over a 12-month period at a district general hospital. Data was collected and divided into groups: upper limb, lower limb, vertebral disc disease, vertebral fracture, cellulitis without bone involvement and deep infection including metalwork. Results : 2817 patients were admitted over the 12-month period. There were 893 upper limb fractures, 1511 lower limb fractures, 126 vertebral disc disease, 55 vertebral fractures, 108 cellulitis without bone involvement and 124 deep infections with 19 admissions not specified due to coding. AN average of 242 patients were admitted each month with the majority admitted during the summer months. Conclusion : Although fractures make up the majority of the reason for which a person is admitted, there are also many other injuries/morbidities, which may necessitate admission. There is an increasing incidence of elderly osteoporotic fractures in females, which is balancing out the previously more common fractures seen in younger adults and adolescents. PMID:26069514

  13. Relationships between Depressive Symptoms and Endothelial Function Among Outpatients of a General Hospital in China

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Hui; Feng, Guoshuang; Wang, Zhe; Zhou, Chunlian; Zhong, Guangzhen; Hu, Yongdong; Wang, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Background This study aimed to investigate the endothelial function by reactive hyperemia index (RHI) in patients with depression, subjects recovering from depression, and subjects without a history of depression. Material/Methods Outpatients were recruited from a general hospital in China; 62 patients diagnosed with depression and the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD17) total scores ?17 were enrolled as the depression group, 62 patients with a history of depression, discontinuation of antidepressants therapy at least 3 months ago, and HAMD17 ?7 were recruited as remission group, and 62 subjects without a history of depression served as the control group (HAMD17 ?7). Results The mean RHI was 1.93, 2.34, and 2.19 in depression, control, and remission groups, respectively, showing a significant difference among the 3 groups (P=0.0004). In addition, a marked difference in RHI was found between depression and control groups (P=0.0003) and between depression and remission groups (P=0.0270). However, there was no significant difference between remission and control groups (P=0.3363). Conclusions There is a relationship between depression and endothelial dysfunction in outpatients from a general hospital in China. The improvement of depression is synchronous with the improvement of endothelial function. PMID:26101428

  14. Home care for patients with suspected myocardial infarction: use made by general practitioners of a hospital team for initial management.

    PubMed Central

    Rowley, J M; Hampton, J R; Mitchell, J R

    1984-01-01

    Two hundred and sixty three general practitioners were offered the use of a hospital based service consisting of a medical senior house officer, a nurse attached to a coronary care unit, and a specially equipped ambulance estate car to help with the initial management of patients with suspected myocardial infarction who might be suitable for home care. One hundred and sixty nine general practitioners registered as potential users of this service; during 22 months they called the hospital team to see 271 patients, 235 of whom the team suspected had indeed suffered a myocardial infarction. During the same period, however, these general practitioners also admitted 317 patients with suspected myocardial infarction directly to hospital. Other general practitioners admitted 323 patients and deputising doctors 258. A further 529 patients with suspected infarction were admitted without the intervention of a general practitioner. Of the patients seen by the team, 54 required immediate admission to hospital; 17 of the remaining patients who initially appeared suitable for home care later required admission to hospital. In a large city such as Nottingham the provision of hospital based facilities to help general practitioners with home management is unlikely to make an appreciable impact on the overall pattern of care of patients with suspected myocardial infarction. PMID:6432118

  15. Socio Economic Status and Traumatic Brain Injury amongst Pediatric Populations: A Spatial Analysis in Greater Vancouver

    PubMed Central

    Amram, Ofer; Schuurman, Nadine; Pike, Ian; Yanchar, Natalie L; Friger, Michael; McBeth, Paul B.; Griesdale, Donald

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Within Canada, injuries are the leading cause of death amongst children fourteen years of age and younger, and also one of the leading causes of morbidity. Low Socio Economic Status (SES) seems to be a strong indicator of a higher prevalence of injuries. This study aims to identify hotspots for pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and examines the relationship between SES and pediatric TBI rates in greater Vancouver, British Columbia (BC), Canada. Methods: Pediatric TBI data from the BC Trauma Registry (BCTR) was used to identify all pediatric TBI patients admitted to BC hospitals between the years 2000 and 2013. Spatial analysis was used to identify hotspots for pediatric TBI. Multivariate analysis was used to distinguish census variables that were correlated with rates of injury. Results: Six hundred and fifty three severe pediatric TBI injuries occurred within the BC Lower Mainland between 2000 and 2013. High rates of injury were concentrated in the East, while low rate clusters were most common in the West of the region (more affluent neighborhoods). A low level of education was the main predictor of a high rate of injury (OR = 1.13, 95% CI = 1.03–1.23, p-Value 0.009). Conclusion: While there was a clear relationship between different SES indicators and pediatric TBI rates in greater Vancouver, income-based SES indicators did not serve as good predictors within this region. PMID:26670241

  16. Bone densitometry at a district general hospital: evaluation of service by doctors and patients.

    PubMed Central

    Madhok, R; Kirby, P; Fordham, J; Stamp, P; Green, S; Cooper, C

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess doctors' and patients' views about a district general hospital bone densitometry service and to examine existing practice to influence future provision. DESIGN--Three postal surveys: (a) of doctors potentially using the service, (b) of patients undergoing a bone densitometry test during a six month period, and (c) of the referring doctors of the patients undergoing the test. SETTING--Bone densitometry service at South Cleveland Hospital, Middlesbrough and two district health authorities: South Tees and Northallerton. SUBJECTS--All general practitioners (n=201) and hospital consultants in general medicine, rheumatology, obstetrics and gynaecology, orthopaedics, radio therapy and oncology, haematology, and radiology (n=61); all patients undergoing an initial bone densitometry test (n=309) during a six month period; and their referring doctors. MAIN MEASURES--Service awareness and use, knowledge of clinical indications, test results, influence of test results on patient management, satisfaction with the service and its future provision. RESULTS--The overall response rates for the three surveys were 87%, 70%, and 61%. There was a high awareness of the service among doctors and patients; 219(84%) doctors were aware and 155 of them (71%) had used it, and patients often (40%) suggested the test to their doctor. The test was used for a range of reasons including screening although the general use was consistent with current guidelines. Two hundred (65%) bone densitometry measurements were normal, 71(23%) were low normal, and 38(12%) were low. Although doctors reported that management of patients had been influenced by the test results, the algorithm for decision making was unclear. Patients and doctors were satisfied with the service and most (n=146, 68%) doctors wanted referral guidelines for the service. CONCLUSIONS--There was a high awareness of, use of, and satisfaction with the service. Patients were being referred for a range of reasons and a few of these could not be justified, many tests were normal, and clinical decision making was not always influenced by the test result. It is concluded that bone densitometry services should be provided but only for patients whose management will be influenced by test results and subject to guidelines to ensure appropriate use of the technology. PMID:10157271

  17. Composition and production rate of pharmaceutical and chemical waste from Xanthi General Hospital in Greece

    SciTech Connect

    Voudrias, Evangelos; Goudakou, Lambrini; Kermenidou, Marianthi; Softa, Aikaterini

    2012-07-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We studied pharmaceutical and chemical waste production in a Greek hospital. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pharmaceutical waste comprised 3.9% w/w of total hazardous medical waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unit production rate for total pharmaceutical waste was 12.4 {+-} 3.90 g/patient/d. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemical waste comprised 1.8% w/w of total hazardous medical waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unit production rate for total chemical waste was 5.8 {+-} 2.2 g/patient/d. - Abstract: The objective of this work was to determine the composition and production rates of pharmaceutical and chemical waste produced by Xanthi General Hospital in Greece (XGH). This information is important to design and cost management systems for pharmaceutical and chemical waste, for safety and health considerations and for assessing environmental impact. A total of 233 kg pharmaceutical and 110 kg chemical waste was collected, manually separated and weighed over a period of five working weeks. The total production of pharmaceutical waste comprised 3.9% w/w of the total hazardous medical waste produced by the hospital. Total pharmaceutical waste was classified in three categories, vial waste comprising 51.1%, syringe waste with 11.4% and intravenous therapy (IV) waste with 37.5% w/w of the total. Vial pharmaceutical waste only was further classified in six major categories: antibiotics, digestive system drugs, analgesics, hormones, circulatory system drugs and 'other'. Production data below are presented as average (standard deviation in parenthesis). The unit production rates for total pharmaceutical waste for the hospital were 12.4 (3.90) g/patient/d and 24.6 (7.48) g/bed/d. The respective unit production rates were: (1) for vial waste 6.4 (1.6) g/patient/d and 13 (2.6) g/bed/d, (2) for syringe waste 1.4 (0.4) g/patient/d and 2.8 (0.8) g/bed/d and (3) for IV waste 4.6 (3.0) g/patient/d and 9.2 (5.9) g/bed/d. Total chemical waste was classified in four categories, chemical reagents comprising 18.2%, solvents with 52.3%, dyes and tracers with 18.2% and solid waste with 11.4% w/w of the total. The total production of chemical waste comprised 1.8% w/w of the total hazardous medical waste produced by the hospital. Thus, the sum of pharmaceutical and chemical waste was 5.7% w/w of the total hazardous medical waste produced by the hospital. The unit production rates for total chemical waste for the hospital were 5.8 (2.2) g/patient/d and 1.1 (0.4) g/exam/d. The respective unit production rates were: (1) for reagents 1.7 (2.4) g/patient/d and 0.3 (0.4) g/examination/d, (2) for solvents 248 (127) g/patient/d and 192 (101) g/examination/d, (3) for dyes and tracers 4.7 (1.4) g/patient/d and 2.5 (0.9) g/examination/d and (4) for solid waste 54 (28) g/patient/d and 42 (22) g/examination/d.

  18. Improving the management of sepsis in a district general hospital by implementing the Sepsis Six recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Prashant; Jordan, Mark; Caesar, Jenny; Miller, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a common condition with a major global impact on healthcare resources and expenditure. The Surviving Sepsis Campaign has been vigorous in promoting internationally recognised pathways to improve the management of septic patients and decrease mortality. However, translating recommendations into practice is a challenging and complex task that requires a multi-faceted approach with sustained engagement from local stakeholders. Whilst working at a district general hospital in New Zealand, we were concerned by the seemingly inconsistent management of septic patients, often leading to long delays in the initiation of life-saving measures such as antibiotic, fluid, and oxygen administration. In our hospital there were no clear systems, protocols or guidelines in place for identifying and managing septic patients. We therefore launched the Sepsis Six resuscitation bundle of care in our hospital in an attempt to raise awareness amongst staff and improve the management of septic patients. We introduced a number of simple low-cost interventions that included educational sessions for junior doctors and nursing staff, as well as posters and modifications to phlebotomy trolleys that acted as visual reminders to implement the Sepsis Six bundle. Overall, we found there to a be a steady improvement in the delivery of the Sepsis Six bundle in septic patients with 63% of patients receiving appropriate care within one hour, compared to 29% prior to our interventions. However this did not translate to an improvement in patient mortality. This project forms part of an on going process to instigate a fundamental culture change among local healthcare professionals regarding the management of sepsis. Whilst we have demonstrated improved implementation of the Sepsis Six bundle, the key challenge remains to ensure that momentum of this project continues and forms a platform for sustainable clinical improvement in the long term. PMID:26734403

  19. Non-Invasive Continuous Respiratory Monitoring on General Hospital Wards: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    van Loon, Kim; van Zaane, Bas; Bosch, Els J.; Kalkman, Cor J.; Peelen, Linda M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Failure to recognize acute deterioration in hospitalized patients may contribute to cardiopulmonary arrest, unscheduled intensive care unit admission and increased mortality. Purpose In this systematic review we aimed to determine whether continuous non-invasive respiratory monitoring improves early diagnosis of patient deterioration and reduces critical incidents on hospital wards. Data Sources Studies were retrieved from Medline, Embase, CINAHL, and the Cochrane library, searched from 1970 till October 25, 2014. Study Selection Electronic databases were searched using keywords and corresponding synonyms ‘ward’, ‘continuous’, ‘monitoring’ and ‘respiration’. Pediatric, fetal and animal studies were excluded. Data Extraction Since no validated tool is currently available for diagnostic or intervention studies with continuous monitoring, methodological quality was assessed with a modified tool based on modified STARD, CONSORT, and TREND statements. Data Synthesis Six intervention and five diagnostic studies were included, evaluating the use of eight different devices for continuous respiratory monitoring. Quantitative data synthesis was not possible because intervention, study design and outcomes differed considerably between studies. Outcomes estimates for the intervention studies ranged from RR 0.14 (0.03, 0.64) for cardiopulmonary resuscitation to RR 1.00 (0.41, 2.35) for unplanned ICU admission after introduction of continuous respiratory monitoring, Limitations The methodological quality of most studies was moderate, e.g. ‘before-after’ designs, incomplete reporting of primary outcomes, and incomplete clinical implementation of the monitoring system. Conclusions Based on the findings of this systematic review, implementation of routine continuous non-invasive respiratory monitoring on general hospital wards cannot yet be advocated as results are inconclusive, and methodological quality of the studies needs improvement. Future research in this area should focus on technology explicitly suitable for low care settings and tailored alarm and treatment algorithms. PMID:26658343

  20. Improving the management of sepsis in a district general hospital by implementing the 'Sepsis Six' recommendations.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prashant; Jordan, Mark; Caesar, Jenny; Miller, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a common condition with a major global impact on healthcare resources and expenditure. The Surviving Sepsis Campaign has been vigorous in promoting internationally recognised pathways to improve the management of septic patients and decrease mortality. However, translating recommendations into practice is a challenging and complex task that requires a multi-faceted approach with sustained engagement from local stakeholders. Whilst working at a district general hospital in New Zealand, we were concerned by the seemingly inconsistent management of septic patients, often leading to long delays in the initiation of life-saving measures such as antibiotic, fluid, and oxygen administration. In our hospital there were no clear systems, protocols or guidelines in place for identifying and managing septic patients. We therefore launched the Sepsis Six resuscitation bundle of care in our hospital in an attempt to raise awareness amongst staff and improve the management of septic patients. We introduced a number of simple low-cost interventions that included educational sessions for junior doctors and nursing staff, as well as posters and modifications to phlebotomy trolleys that acted as visual reminders to implement the Sepsis Six bundle. Overall, we found there to a be a steady improvement in the delivery of the Sepsis Six bundle in septic patients with 63% of patients receiving appropriate care within one hour, compared to 29% prior to our interventions. However this did not translate to an improvement in patient mortality. This project forms part of an on going process to instigate a fundamental culture change among local healthcare professionals regarding the management of sepsis. Whilst we have demonstrated improved implementation of the Sepsis Six bundle, the key challenge remains to ensure that momentum of this project continues and forms a platform for sustainable clinical improvement in the long term. PMID:26734403

  1. 77 FR 24146 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Columbia River, Vancouver, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-23

    ...The Coast Guard has issued a temporary deviation from the operating schedule that governs the Burlington Northern Santa Fe (BNSF) Railway Bridge across the Columbia River, mile 105.6, at Vancouver, WA. This deviation is necessary to accommodate maintenance of the train signaling system scheduled for April 30, 2012. This deviation allows the bridge to remain in the closed position for the......

  2. Mini Schools: The New "Global City Communities" of Vancouver

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoon, Ee-Seul

    2011-01-01

    In recent decades, under the mutually constitutive processes of neoliberal urbanization and globalization, Vancouver has radically transformed and become a serious contender for the title of "world-class city". Against the background of this socio-spatial force reconfiguring the city, I explore how the city's unique development of "mini…

  3. 77 FR 66714 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Columbia River, Vancouver, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Columbia River, Vancouver, WA AGENCY... current deviation states the lift span of the Murray Morgan Bridge across Thea Foss Waterway, mile...

  4. 77 FR 38004 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Columbia River, Vancouver, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-26

    ...The Coast Guard has issued a temporary deviation from the operating schedule that governs the Interstate 5 (I-5) Bridges across the Columbia River, mile 106.5, between Portland, Oregon and Vancouver, Washington. This deviation is necessary to facilitate the movement of heavier than normal roadway traffic associated with the Independence Day fireworks show near the I-5 Bridges. This deviation......

  5. 78 FR 23487 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Columbia River, Vancouver, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-19

    ...The Coast Guard has issued a temporary deviation from the operating schedule that governs the Interstate 5 (I-5) Bridges across the Columbia River, mile 106.5, between Portland, Oregon and Vancouver, Washington. This deviation is necessary to facilitate the movement of heavier than normal roadway traffic associated with the Independence Day fireworks show near the I-5 Bridges. This deviation......

  6. Evaluation of Remedial Reading Services in Vancouver Schools. Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Marilyn J.

    In January 1972, questionnaires on remedial reading were sent to all remedial reading teachers in Vancouver public schools. Also, letters were sent to the principals of those schools in which remedial reading programs were operating. They were asked to record their comments, criticisms, and commendations of remedial reading activities. Many

  7. Mini Schools: The New "Global City Communities" of Vancouver

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoon, Ee-Seul

    2011-01-01

    In recent decades, under the mutually constitutive processes of neoliberal urbanization and globalization, Vancouver has radically transformed and become a serious contender for the title of "world-class city". Against the background of this socio-spatial force reconfiguring the city, I explore how the city's unique development of "mini

  8. 78 FR 15293 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Columbia River, Vancouver, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-11

    ...The Coast Guard has issued a temporary deviation from the operating schedule that governs the Burlington Northern Santa Fe (BNSF) Railway Bridge across the Columbia River, mile 105.6, at Vancouver, WA. This deviation is necessary to accommodate maintenance to replace movable bridge joints. This deviation allows the bridge to remain in the closed position during maintenance...

  9. Vancouver's "vision of hell" requires special type of MD

    PubMed Central

    Jones, D

    1998-01-01

    Vancouver's Downtown Eastside, the city's skid row, is in a state of emergency. Some 7000 injection drug users, about 40% of whom are HIV positive, mingle with prostitutes and the city's street people. The doctors who care for them say it is a potent and dangerous mix. PMID:9700334

  10. Sports medicine and coaching inseparable interests for Vancouver physician.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, S

    1995-01-01

    Dr. Doug Clement of Vancouver has devoted his career to sports medicine and the development of athletes. The former Olympic athlete keeps busy as codirector of the Sports Medicine Clinic and professor of medicine at the University of British Columbia, and as coach and mentor to several world-class runners. Images p328-a PMID:7614448

  11. Continuity of care for orthopaedic patients in a district general hospital

    PubMed Central

    Kulloo, Praneta

    2014-01-01

    Continuity of care has been defined as a patient repeatedly consulting the same doctor and forming a therapeutic relationship. There is evidence that not only do patients value continuity of the care they receive but also that provider continuity is related to lower overall total healthcare costs and better healthcare outcomes. A retrospective audit was undertaken in James Paget Hospital, a district general hospital in East Anglia, England, to assess continuity of care from the preoperative clinic to surgery and subsequent postoperative follow-up in the orthopaedic department. Overall continuity of care by individual surgeon was 23% and by orthopaedic team (consultant and middle grade staff) 43% in the first audit cycle of 106 patients in 2008. In the second cycle in 2010, this improved to 24% and 56%, respectively, in a sample of 156 patients. Moreover, the continuity of care for trauma patients improved from 10% to 75%. Interventions which resulted in the improvement were change of on-call rota and the implementation of measures so that, following surgery, patients were allocated to the operating surgeon's clinic postoperatively. This completed audit cycle highlights the importance of continuity of care of patients and how efficient management led to a more patient centred delivery of healthcare.

  12. Development and implementation of a clinical pathway programme in an acute care general hospital in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Cheah, J

    2000-10-01

    A critical or clinical pathway defines the optimal care process, sequencing and timing of interventions by doctors, nurses and other health care professionals for a particular diagnosis or procedure. Clinical pathways are developed through collaborative efforts of clinicians, case managers, nurses, pharmacists, physiotherapists and other allied health care professionals with the aim of improving the quality of patient care, while minimizing cost to the patient. The use of clinical pathways has increased over the past decade in the USA, the UK, Australia, and many other developed countries. However, its use in the developing nations and Asia has been sporadic. To the author's knowledge, there is to date, no published literature on the use and impact of clinical pathways on the quality and cost of patient care in the Asian health care setting. This paper provides a qualitative account of the development and implementation of a clinical pathway programme (using the example of patients with uncomplicated acute myocardial infarction) in an acute care general hospital in Singapore. The paper concludes that clinical pathways, when implemented in the context of an acute care hospital, can result in improvements in the care delivery process. PMID:11079220

  13. Continuity of care for orthopaedic patients in a district general hospital.

    PubMed

    Kulloo, Praneta

    2014-01-01

    Continuity of care has been defined as a patient repeatedly consulting the same doctor and forming a therapeutic relationship. There is evidence that not only do patients value continuity of the care they receive but also that provider continuity is related to lower overall total healthcare costs and better healthcare outcomes. A retrospective audit was undertaken in James Paget Hospital, a district general hospital in East Anglia, England, to assess continuity of care from the preoperative clinic to surgery and subsequent postoperative follow-up in the orthopaedic department. Overall continuity of care by individual surgeon was 23% and by orthopaedic team (consultant and middle grade staff) 43% in the first audit cycle of 106 patients in 2008. In the second cycle in 2010, this improved to 24% and 56%, respectively, in a sample of 156 patients. Moreover, the continuity of care for trauma patients improved from 10% to 75%. Interventions which resulted in the improvement were change of on-call rota and the implementation of measures so that, following surgery, patients were allocated to the operating surgeon's clinic postoperatively. This completed audit cycle highlights the importance of continuity of care of patients and how efficient management led to a more patient centred delivery of healthcare. PMID:26734297

  14. [Consultation-liaison activities in general hospital: strategies to improve their efficacy].

    PubMed

    Fabrissin, Javier H

    2011-01-01

    This review is aimed at identifying strategies that favor compliance with the indications provided by a consultation-liaison team (C-L team). A reference is made to the development of consultation liaison as a psychiatry subspecialty to point out reasons that justify its relevance to the General Hospital (GH) setting. Attention is drawn to the few and late referrals to CLT teams despite the high prevalence of mental disorders among medical inpatients. We propose several strategies that could be useful for improving CLT team functioning: a better integration with physicians and personnel from non-psychiatric wards; use of a more comprehensible language; identification of patients whose characteristics make them more likely to be referred to a CLT team; and optimization of the CLT make-up. Lastly, we emphasize the great importance of liaison activities as the essential and paramount function of CL Teams. PMID:22432097

  15. An audit of blood component therapy in a Canadian general teaching hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Brien, W F; Butler, R J; Inwood, M J

    1989-01-01

    As part of a quality assurance program a retrospective audit of transfusion practices for packed red blood cells, fresh frozen plasma and albumin was undertaken with predetermined criteria in a general teaching hospital. Of 520 transfusion episodes with 1218 units of packed red blood cells given to 297 patients 88% were considered appropriate; of 106 episodes with 405 units of fresh frozen plasma given to 83 patients 90% were deemed appropriate; and of 187 episodes with 320 units of albumin given to 99 patients 64% were considered appropriate. The results of this audit, when compared with those of other surveys of blood use in a similar population, suggest that pretransfusion approval of requested components would reduce the number of inappropriate transfusions. PMID:2924231

  16. A case-control study of singleton low birthweight babies at the Port Moresby General Hospital.

    PubMed

    Klufio, C A; Amoa, A B; Augerea, L; Wurr, F

    1997-01-01

    A retrospective study of 432 consecutive singleton low birthweight babies and 432 unmatched controls was carried out at the Port Moresby General Hospital from January to December 1988. Of the 432 low birthweight babies 65% were preterm, 27% were light for gestational age, 6% were both preterm and light for gestational age and 2.5% could not be classified. The results of the analysis showed low birthweight to be significantly associated with the past delivery of a low birthweight infant, very young and elderly mothers, lack of antenatal care, poor family planning, hypertensive disease in pregnancy and intrauterine death. This study reveals that maternal education and improved antenatal care and family planning would ultimately reduce the incidence of low birthweight babies and perinatal mortality in Papua New Guinea. PMID:10750410

  17. [Professional practice of nurses who care for cancer patients in general hospitals].

    PubMed

    da Silva, Josiane Travenolo; Matheus, Maria Clara Cassuli; Fustinoni, Suzete Maria; de Gutirrez, Maria Gaby Rivero

    2012-01-01

    The present article discusses a qualitative study which aimed to understand the typical of nurses' professional practice caring for patient with cancer in general hospitals. In order to find out the reasons that motivate nurse's action, and to put in evidence what is original, significant, specific and typical about this phenomenon, we have taken into consideration the premises of the philosopher Alfred Schtz, which provide us with subsidies to unveil them. The data collected through semi-structured interviews reported that nurses admit not having the required theoretical knowledge and experience or enough practice to take care of a cancer patient. Thus, they don't feel capable of developing actions which may positively influence care on patients and their family members. PMID:23032337

  18. Evaluating the effectiveness of a process medical audit in a teaching general hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Brooks-Hill, R W; Buckingham, R A

    1986-01-01

    Medical auditing has moved beyond the traditional chart review to the process audit, which identifies deficiencies in care and suggests remedies. In 1981 the audit committee of the Department of Psychiatry at Toronto General Hospital audited the use of hypnotic drugs in the inpatient unit. The audit produced two recommendations: that nursing staff record sleep graphs for inpatients more often, and that an educational program be instituted to change the physicians' patterns of prescribing hypnotics. In 1983 the audit was repeated to test the effectiveness of the 1981 auditing process. The 1981 recommendation produced the desired improvement in recording of sleep graphs. However, the medical staff failed to change their patterns of prescribing hypnotics: oxazepam remained the preferred hypnotic. For the process audit to be effective in improving patient care those using it must ensure that the methods reflect the nature and structure of the professional group they are trying to influence. PMID:3942943

  19. His own private hospital

    PubMed Central

    Jones, D

    1997-01-01

    Dr. Brian Day had a simple solution when it became increasingly difficult to book operating room time in Vancouver. He built his own hospital. The Cambie Surgical Centre, which treats patients from BC and around the world, has 2 main operating rooms, 10 recovery beds and 5 private rooms for extended stays. "What I've done," says Day, "is say that if there are no operating rooms at UBC, I'll build my own." PMID:9269202

  20. Prevalence trends of oral squamous cell carcinoma. Mexico Citys General Hospital experience

    PubMed Central

    Hernndez-Guerrero, Juan C.; Jacinto-Alemn, Lus F.; Jimnez-Farfn, Mara D.; Macario-Hernndez, Alejandro; Hernndez-Flores, Florentino

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Recent reports suggest an increase in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) frequency. To improve programs in public health, it is necessary to understand the epidemiological conditions. The aim of this study was to analyze the trend in gender, age, anatomic zone and OSCC stage from Mexico Citys General Hospital patients from 1990 to 2008. Study design: A retrospective review of all OSCC cases diagnosed by the Pathology Department of the Mexico City General Hospital was performed. Demographic data, in addition to anatomic zone and histological degree of differentiation were obtained. Central tendency, dispersion and prevalence rate per 100,000 individuals were determined. Results: A total of 531 patients were diagnosed with OSCC; 58.4% were men, giving a male:female ratio of 1.4:1, and the mean age was 62.5 14.9 years. The predominant anatomic zone was the tongue (44.7%), followed by the lips (21.2%) and gums (20.5%). The most frequent histological degree was moderately differentiated in 325 cases (61.2%). The rates of OSCC prevalence showed similar patterns in terms across time. A significant correlation (P = 0.007) between anatomic zone and age was observed. Conclusion: According to our results, the prevalence of OSCC does not show important variations; however, a relationship between age and anatomic zone was observed. These data could be used as parameters for the diagnosis of OSCC as well as for the development and dissemination of preventive programs for the early detection of oral cancer. Key words:Oral squamous cell carcinoma, prevalence, histology degree and anatomic zone. PMID:23385493

  1. Intestinal helminth infections amongst HIV-infected adults in Mthatha General Hospital, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Yogeswaran, Parimalaranie; Wright, Graham

    2015-01-01

    Background In South Africa, studies on the prevalence of intestinal helminth co-infection amongst HIV-infected patients as well as possible interactions between these two infections are limited. Aim To investigate the prevalence of intestinal helminth infestation amongst adults living with HIV or AIDS at Mthatha General Hospital. Setting Study participants were recruited at the outpatient department of Mthatha General Hospital, Mthatha, South Africa. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted between October and December 2013 amongst consecutive consenting HIV-positive adult patients. Socio-demographic and clinical information were obtained using data collection forms and structured interviews. Stool samples were collected to investigate the presence of helminths whilst blood samples were obtained for the measurement of CD4+ T-cell count and viral load. Results Data were obtained on 231 participants, with a mean age of 34.9 years, a mean CD4 count of 348 cells/L and a mean viral load of 4.8 log10 copies/mL. Intestinal helminth prevalence was 24.7%, with Ascaris Lumbricoides (42.1%) the most prevalent identified species. Statistically significant association was found between CD4 count of less than 200 cells/L and helminth infection (p = 0.05). No statistically significant association was found between intestinal helminth infection and the mean CD4 count (p = 0.79) or the mean viral load (p = 0.98). Conclusion A high prevalence of intestinal helminth infections was observed amongst the study population. Therefore, screening and treatment of helminths should be considered as part of the management of HIV and AIDS in primary health care. PMID:26842519

  2. Retrospective audit of the value of the pancreolauryl test in a district general hospital

    PubMed Central

    Murray, I; Clenton, S; McGeorge, B; Safe, A

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To audit the specificity and value of the pancreolauryl test (PLT) for the diagnosis of pancreatic insufficiency. Design: A retrospective case note review of 47 patients who had a PLT during three consecutive years. Setting: A 650 bedded district general hospital. Main outcome measures: Patient demographics, symptoms, baseline blood, endoscopic and radiological investigations, and alcohol consumption were related to the results of the PLT to determine if the test could be better targeted. Response to therapy and final diagnoses were noted to determine the specificity of the test. Results: Forty seven patients had a PLT during the three years studied. All successfully performed the test as outpatients. Seven inconclusive tests were repeated. Thirty eight patients (81%) had diarrhoea, of whom 10 (21%) described steatorrhoea; 23 (49%) had an abnormal PLT. All with an abnormal test had diarrhoea, more frequently describing watery stools than steatorrhoea. Those treated with pancreatic enzyme supplements had an excellent response, although two of these had a final diagnosis of coeliac disease. Nineteen patients with an abnormal PLT were thought to be suffering from pancreatic insufficiency. All patients with a normal PLT were clinically thought not to have pancreatic insufficiency. Age, sex, and alcohol intake correlated poorly with final diagnosis. Conclusions: The PLT can be used in a district general hospital setting as an outpatient test for pancreatic insufficiency and has a specificity of 83%91%. Its use should be restricted to thse presenting with diarrhoea, not necessarily steatorrhoea, and not restricted to those with a history of high alcohol consumption. PMID:12954962

  3. The Treatment of Anorexia Nervosa in a General Hospital: A Case Vignette of a Multi-Disciplinary General Hospital-Based Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kronenberg, J.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Describes anorexia nervosa as condition variable in etiology and resistant to treatment, which may lead to mortality in 5% of treated cases. Notes that efforts have been made for treating disorder in nonstigmatizing medical units outside psychiatric hospitals. Describes, through presentation of short case vignette, advantages of treating

  4. The Treatment of Anorexia Nervosa in a General Hospital: A Case Vignette of a Multi-Disciplinary General Hospital-Based Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kronenberg, J.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Describes anorexia nervosa as condition variable in etiology and resistant to treatment, which may lead to mortality in 5% of treated cases. Notes that efforts have been made for treating disorder in nonstigmatizing medical units outside psychiatric hospitals. Describes, through presentation of short case vignette, advantages of treating…

  5. Current Status of Management in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus at General Hospitals in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jin-Hee; Lee, Jung-Hwa; Noh, Jin-Won; Park, Jeong-Eun; Kim, Hee-Sook; Yoo, Joo-Wha; Song, Bok-Rye; Lee, Jeong-rim; Hong, Myeong-Hee; Jang, Hyang-Mi; Na, Young; Lee, Hyun-Joo; Lee, Jeong-Mi; Kang, Yang-Gyo; Kim, Sun-Young

    2015-01-01

    Background In Korea, the prevalence, complications, and mortality rate of diabetes are rapidly increasing. However, investigations on the actual condition of diabetes management are very limited due to lack of nation-wide research or multicenter study. Hence, we have minutely inquired the current status of diabetes management and achievement of glucose target goal in general hospital offering education program. That way, we are able to furnish data for policy making of diabetes education and draw up guideline which may allow us to reduce the morbidity and mortality of diabetes. Methods The subjects consisted of 2,610 patients with type 2 diabetes who visited the 13 general hospital in Seoul or Gyeonggi region from March 19 to May 29, 2013. General characteristics, associated diseases, complications, and management status were investigated. Results The mean age was 61.011.6 years, body mass index was 25.03.3 kg/m2, and family history of diabetes was 50.5%. The mean duration of diabetes was 10.77.9 years and 53% received education about diabetes. The prevalence of hypertension and dyslipidemia were 59.2% and 65.5%, respectively, and 18.3% of the subjects were accompanied by liver disease. Diabetic retinopathy appeared in 31.6%, nephropathy in 28.1%, and neuropathy in 19.9% of the subjects. The mean glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level was 7.3%1.3% and the achieving rate based on Korean Diabetes Association guideline (HbA1c <6.5%) was 24.8%, blood pressure (130/80 mm Hg or less) was 49.4%, and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (<100 mg/dL) was 63.6%. The reaching rate to the target level in four parameters (blood glucose, blood pressure, lipids, and body weight) was 7.8%. Conclusion The blood glucose control rate was lower than other parameters, and the implementation rate of diabetes education was only 53%. Thus more appropriate glucose control and systematic diabetes education are imperative. PMID:26301192

  6. Mortality in a large community-based cohort of inner-city residents in Vancouver, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Raffa, Jesse D.; Lai, Calvin; Fischer, Benedikt; Krajden, Mel; Amin, Janaki; Walter, Scott R.; Dore, Gregory J.; Grebely, Jason; Tyndall, Mark W.

    2013-01-01

    Background The Downtown Eastside is a robust and densely populated neighbourhood in Vancouver, Canada, that is characterized by low-income housing and drug use and a high prevalence of HIV infection. We evaluated mortality and excess mortality among the broader community of individuals living in this neighbourhood. Methods The Community Health and Safety Evaluation is a community-based study of inner-city residents in the Downtown Eastside who were recruited in 2003 and 2004. Participants data were linked with data in provincial virology and mortality databases retrospectively and prospectively for the period 19912009. Mortality and standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were calculated for the period 20032009 to compare death rates in the study population with rates in the population of Vancouver. Results Among 2913 participants, 374 deaths occurred, for an all-cause mortality of 223 per 10000 person-years (95% confidence interval [CI] 201247 per 10000 person-years). Compared with the population of Vancouver, significant excess mortality was observed in the study population (SMR 7.1, 95% CI 6.47.9). Excess mortality was higher among women (SMR 15.4, 95% CI 12.818.5) than among men (SMR 5.8, 95% CI 5.16.6). Although crude mortality increased with age, excess mortality was greatest among participants less than 35 years old (SMR 13.2, 95% CI 9.418.5) and those 3539 years old (SMR 13.3, 95% CI 10.317.1). Excess risk was also elevated among participants with hepatitis C virus (HCV), HIV and HCV/HIV infection, with SMRs of 5.9 (95% CI 4.97.1), 19.2 (95% CI 12.828.9) and 23.0 (95% CI 19.327.4), respectively. Interpretation Our study showed high mortality in this inner-city population, particularly when compared with the general population of Vancouver. Excess mortality was highest among women, younger participants and those infected with either HCV or HIV or both. PMID:25077106

  7. Awareness of Stroke Risk after TIA in Swiss General Practitioners and Hospital Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Streit, Sven; Baumann, Philippe; Barth, Jrgen; Mattle, Heinrich P.; Arnold, Marcel; Bassetti, Claudio L.; Meli, Damian N.; Fischer, Urs

    2015-01-01

    Background Transient ischemic attacks (TIA) are stroke warning signs and emergency situations, and, if immediately investigated, doctors can intervene to prevent strokes. Nevertheless, many patients delay going to the doctor, and doctors might delay urgently needed investigations and preventative treatments. We set out to determine how much general practitioners (GPs) and hospital physicians (HPs) knew about stroke risk after TIA, and to measure their referral rates. Methods We used a structured questionnaire to ask GPs and HPs in the catchment area of the University Hospital of Bern to estimate a patients risk of stroke after TIA. We also assessed their referral behavior. We then statistically analysed their reasons for deciding not to immediately refer patients. Results Of the 1545 physicians, 40% (614) returned the survey. Of these, 75% (457) overestimated stroke risk within 24 hours, and 40% (245) overestimated risk within 3 months after TIA. Only 9% (53) underestimated stroke risk within 24 hours and 26% (158) underestimated risk within 3 months; 78% (473) of physicians overestimated the amount that carotid endarterectomy reduces stroke risk; 93% (543) would rigorously investigate the cause of a TIA, but only 38% (229) would refer TIA patients for urgent investigations very often. Physicians most commonly gave these reasons for not making emergency referrals: patients advanced age; patients preference; patient was multimorbid; and, patient needed long-term care. Conclusions Although physicians overestimate stroke risk after TIA, their rate of emergency referral is modest, mainly because they tend not to refer multimorbid and elderly patients at the appropriate rate. Since old and frail patients benefit from urgent investigations and treatment after TIA as much as younger patients, future educational campaigns should focus on the importance of emergency evaluations for all TIA patients. PMID:26284533

  8. Client perception of service quality at the outpatient clinics of a General hospital in Lagos, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ogunnowo, Babatunde Enitan; Olufunlayo, Tolulope Florence; Sule, Salami Suberu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Service quality assessments have assumed increasing importance in the last two decades. They are useful in identifying gaps in services been provided with the ultimate aim of guaranteeing quality assurance. The objective of this study was to assess the client perception of service quality at the outpatient clinics of Randle General hospital, Lagos. Methods A descriptive cross sectional study was conducted from March to May 2013. A multistage sampling technique was used to select respondents and data was collected with the aid of modified SERVQUAL questionnaires. The data was analysed with aid of EPI-INFO 2002 and statistical significance was set at a P value 0.05 for statistical significance. Results Total of 400 respondents were interviewed. The mean age was 40 years with a standard deviation of 15.2 yrs. The highest mean score of 4.35 out of a possible maximum of 5 was recorded in assurance domain while the lowest mean score of 4.00 was recorded in the responsiveness domain. The overall mean score of all the domains was 4.20 with standard deviation of 0.51. Overall majority (80.8%) of respondents rated the overall service quality as good/ very good. After linear regression, the assurance domain was the most important predictor of the overall perceived service quality (p< 0.001). Conclusion The overall perceived service quality was good. The major deficiencies were in the responsiveness domain and especially the waiting time. The hospital management should implement measures to improve the responsiveness of services by ensuring prompt delivery of services. PMID:26834921

  9. Motivation and job satisfaction among medical and nursing staff in a Cyprus public general hospital

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to investigate how medical and nursing staff of the Nicosia General Hospital is affected by specific motivation factors, and the association between job satisfaction and motivation. Furthermore, to determine the motivational drive of socio-demographic and job related factors in terms of improving work performance. Methods A previously developed and validated instrument addressing four work-related motivators (job attributes, remuneration, co-workers and achievements) was used. Two categories of health care professionals, medical doctors and dentists (N = 67) and nurses (N = 219) participated and motivation and job satisfaction was compared across socio-demographic and occupational variables. Results The survey revealed that achievements was ranked first among the four main motivators, followed by remuneration, co-workers and job attributes. The factor remuneration revealed statistically significant differences according to gender, and hospital sector, with female doctors and nurses and accident and emergency (A+E) outpatient doctors reporting greater mean scores (p < 0.005). The medical staff showed statistically significantly lower job satisfaction compared to the nursing staff. Surgical sector nurses and those >55 years of age reported higher job satisfaction when compared to the other groups. Conclusions The results are in agreement with the literature which focuses attention to management approaches employing both monetary and non-monetary incentives to motivate health care professionals. Health care professionals tend to be motivated more by intrinsic factors, implying that this should be a target for effective employee motivation. Strategies based on the survey's results to enhance employee motivation are suggested. PMID:21080954

  10. Trauma patterns in patients attending the Emergency Department of Jazan General Hospital, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Hokkam, Emad; Gonna, Abdelaziz; Zakaria, Ossama; El-shemally, Amany

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Modern civilization and the sharp rise in living standards have led to dramatic changes in trauma pattern in Saudi Arabia. This study aimed to describe the different patterns of injuries of patients attending the Emergency Department of Jazan General Hospital (JGH) in the southwest corner of Saudi Arabia. METHODS: A total number of 1 050 patients were enrolled in the study. A pre-organized data sheet was prepared for each patient attended the Emergency Department of JGH from February 2012 to January 2013. It contains data about socio-demographics, trauma data, clinical evaluation results, investigations as well as treatment strategies. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 25.3±16.8 years. Most (45.1%) of the patients were at age of 18–30 years. Males (64.3%) were affected by trauma more common than females. More than half (60.6%) of the patients were from urban areas. The commonest kind of injury was minor injury (60%), followed by blunt trauma (30.9%) and then penetrating trauma (9.1%). The mean time from the incident to arrival at hospital was 41.3±79.8 minutes. The majority (48.2%) of the patients were discharged after management of trivial trauma, whereas 2.3% were admitted to ICU, 7.7% transferred to inpatient wards, and 17.7% observed and subsequently discharged. The mortality rate of the patients was 2.6%. CONCLUSION: Trauma is a major health problem, especially in the young population in Saudi Arabia. Blunt trauma is more frequent than penetrating trauma, with road traffic accidents accounting for the majority. PMID:25802567

  11. Physical comorbidity and its relevance on mortality in schizophrenia: a naturalistic 12-year follow-up in general hospital admissions.

    PubMed

    Schoepf, Dieter; Uppal, Hardeep; Potluri, Rahul; Heun, Reinhard

    2014-02-01

    Schizophrenia is a major psychotic disorder with significant comorbidity and mortality. Patients with schizophrenia are said to suffer more type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and diabetogenic complications. However, there is little consistent evidence that comorbidity with physical diseases leads to excess mortality in schizophrenic patients. Consequently, we investigated whether the burden of physical comorbidity and its relevance on hospital mortality differed between patients with and without schizophrenia in a 12-year follow-up in general hospital admissions. During 1 January 2000 and 31 June 2012, 1418 adult patients with schizophrenia were admitted to three General Manchester NHS Hospitals. All comorbid diseases with a prevalemce ?1% were compared with those of 14,180 age- and gender-matched hospital controls. Risk factors, i.e. comorbid diseases that were predictors for general hospital mortality were identified using multivariate logistic regression analyses. Compared with controls, schizophrenic patients had a higher proportion of emergency admissions (69.8 vs. 43.0%), an extended average length of stay at index hospitalization (8.1 vs. 3.4 days), a higher number of hospital admissions (11.5 vs. 6.3), a shorter length of survival (1895 vs. 2161 days), and a nearly twofold increased mortality rate (18.0 vs. 9.7%). Schizophrenic patients suffered more depression, T2DM, alcohol abuse, asthma, COPD, and twenty-three more diseases, many of them diabetic-related complications or other environmentally influenced conditions. In contrast, hypertension, cataract, angina, and hyperlipidaemia were less prevalent in the schizophrenia population compared to the control population. In deceased schizophrenic patients, T2DM was the most frequently recorded comorbidity, contributing to 31.4% of hospital deaths (only 14.4% of schizophrenic patients with comorbid T2DM survived the study period). Further predictors of general hospital mortality in schizophrenia were found to be alcoholic liver disease (OR = 10.3), parkinsonism (OR = 5.0), T1DM (OR = 3.8), non-specific renal failure (OR = 3.5), ischaemic stroke (OR = 3.3), pneumonia (OR = 3.0), iron-deficiency anaemia (OR = 2.8), COPD (OR = 2.8), and bronchitis (OR = 2.6). There were no significant differences in their impact on hospital mortality compared to control subjects with the same diseases except parkinsonism which was associated with higher mortality in the schizophrenia population compared with the control population. The prevalence of parkinsonism was significantly elevated in the 255 deceased schizophrenic patients (5.5 %) than in those 1,163 surviving the study period (0.8 %, OR = 5.0) and deceased schizophrenic patients had significantly more suffered extrapyramidal symptoms than deceased control subjects (5.5 vs. 1.5 %). Therefore patients with schizophrenia have a higher burden of physical comorbidity that is associated with a worse outcome in a 12-year follow-up of mortality in general hospitals compared with hospital controls. However, schizophrenic patients die of the same physical diseases as their peers without schizophrenia. The most relevant physical risk factors of general hospital mortality are T2DM, COPD and infectious respiratory complications, iron-deficiency anaemia, T1DM, unspecific renal failure, ischaemic stroke, and alcoholic liver disease. Additionally, parkinsonism is a major risk factor for general hospital mortality in schizophrenia. Thus, optimal monitoring and management of acute T2DM and COPD with its infectious respiratory complications, as well as the accurate detection and management of iron-deficiency anaemia, of diabetic-related long-term micro- and macrovascular complications, of alcoholic liver disease, and of extrapyramidal symptoms are of utmost relevance in schizophrenia. PMID:23942824

  12. Investigating Elastic Anisotropy of the Leech River Complex, Vancouver Island using finite-frequency sensitivity kernels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matharu, G.; Bostock, M. G.; Christensen, N. I.; Tromp, J.; Peter, D. B.

    2012-12-01

    The Leech River Complex (LRC) of southern Vancouver Island is part of a once continuous belt of Cretaceous sandstone, mudstone and volcanics that formed an accretionary wedge along the northwestern margin of North America. Metamorphism at 50 Ma to prehnite-pumpellyite, greenschist, amphibolite and blueschist facies produced pervasive foliations with strong phyllosilicate lattice preferred orientations. Laboratory measurements and in-situ S-wave splitting analysis of tectonic tremor wavetrains indicate that this fabric produces substantial S-wave anisotropy of up to 30%. In this study we seek to gain further understanding on the nature of anisotropy within the LRC using high signal to noise ratio low frequency earthquake (LFE) templates and 3-D simulations from the spectral element method (SEM). The LFEs are characterized by impulsive, double couple, point sources and lie along a surface between 27 and 37 km depth that is inferred to be the plate boundary, immediately underlying the LRC. The SEM modelling employs a regional mesh that incorporates realistic topography, bathymetry and a 3-D tomographic P-wave velocity model of southern Vancouver Island. It allows us to readily simulate wave propagation in general anisotropic media with up to 21 independent elastic constants. We will investigate the orientation and distribution of anisotropy within the LRC by employing sensitivity kernels determined using adjoint methods in conjunction with SEM.

  13. Apparent Temperature and Air Pollution vs. Elderly Population Mortality in Metro Vancouver

    PubMed Central

    Krsti?, Goran

    2011-01-01

    Background Meteorological conditions and air pollution in urban environments have been associated with general population and elderly mortality, showing seasonal variation. Objectives This study is designed to evaluate the relationship between apparent temperature (AT) and air pollution (PM2.5) vs. mortality in elderly population of Metro Vancouver. Methods Statistical analyses are performed on moving sum daily mortality rates vs. moving average AT and PM2.5 in 1-, 2-, 3-, 5-, and 7-day models for all seasons, warm temperatures above 15C, and cold temperatures below 10C. Results Approximately 37% of the variation in all-season mortality from circulatory and respiratory causes can be explained by the variation in 7-day moving average apparent temperature (r2?=?0.37, p<0.001). Although the analytical results from air pollution models show increasingly better prediction ability of longer time-intervals (r2?=?0.012, p<0.001 in a 7-day model), a very weak negative association between elderly mortality and air pollution is observed. Conclusions Apparent temperature is associated with mortality from respiratory and circulatory causes in elderly population of Metro Vancouver. In a changing climate, one may anticipate to observe potential health impacts from the projected high- and particularly from the low-temperature extremes. PMID:21980381

  14. [Treatment of renal anemia in hemodialysis patients in General Hospital Bjelovar from 2007 to 2010].

    PubMed

    Lovci?, Vesna; Vuji?, Jovana; Basi?-Juki?, Nikolina; Kurtovi?, Ivana; Jankovi?, Renata Ivanac; Lovci?, Petra; Dzapo, Marko

    2011-10-01

    Renal anemia is complication of chronic kidney disease. It is caused by crythropoietin deficency and is associated with adverse outcomes in CKD patients. Renal anemia should be treated with erythropoesis-stimulating agents (ESAs), supplementary iron, adequate dialysis, and if necessary with red blood cells transfusions. The main problem of treatment is how to determine target hemoglobin value and keep it within the constant range. Current guidelines recommend target hemoglobin level 110 - 120 g/l, but optimal value need to be adjusted for every patient individualy keeping in mind primary kidney disease, age, gender and comorbidities. In Department of Dialysis of General Hospital Bjelovar we carried out a retrospective study about treating renal anemia in 67 patients on chronic hemodialysis program during 36 months in a period from 2007. til 2010. We monitored hemoglobin, feritin, saturation of transferin (TSAT), dose of LSE, number of change in dosage and number of transfusion. Mean hemoglobin level was 107.8 g/l, feritin level 196.8 mcg/l, TSAT 24.16%, weekly dose of ESAs 5951.9 IU. in 53.7% patiens dose was changed 11 - 20 times during that period, and 34% of patiens was treated with at least 1 dose of transfusion of red blood cells. We conclude that better iron supplementation and moderately higher doses of FSAs correlate with higher hemoglobin value, and hemoglobin variations is still big problem in renal anemia treatment. PMID:23120816

  15. [Treatment of renal anemia with iron in hemodialysis patients in General Hospital Bjelovar].

    PubMed

    Lovci?, Vesna; Vuji?, Jovana; Basi?-Juki?, Nikolina; Jankovi?, Renata Ivanac; Kurtovi?, Ivana; Dzapo, Marko; Lovci?, Petra

    2011-10-01

    Renal anemia is caused by a lack of erythropoietin and iron, and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease. Iron deficiency is more common than previously thought. Diagnosis of absolute and relative iron deficiency is difficult because of the lack of an ideal diagnostic method. Adequate supplementation of iron in patients with renal anemia at a certain percentage of patients corrects anemia, while the other reduces the required doses of erythropoesis stimulating agents (ESAs), which can reduce treatment costs. In Department of Dialysis of General Hospital Bjelovar we carried out a retrospective study about treating renal anemia with iron during 36 months in 67 patients on chronic hemodialysis program in a period from 2007. to 2010. Our goal was to see if we adequately treat renal anemia with iron and to show the connection between the level of hemoglobin (Hb), ferritin and transferrin saturation (TSAT). The average value of ferritin in the 36 months follow-up was 196.8mcg/l, TSAT 24.16%, 107.8 g Hb/l. We conclude that the elevation of ferritin and TSAT correlates with the increase of Hb values in patients with renal anemia. Ferritin and TSAT values in our center are above the minimum criteria recommended by guidelines, but not within the target values for the treated population. PMID:23120815

  16. Seasonality of Admissions for Mania: Results From a General Hospital Psychiatric Unit in Pondicherry, India

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Siddharth

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Bipolar disorder is affected by variables that modulate circadian rhythm, including seasonal variations. There is evidence of a seasonal pattern of admissions of mania in various geographical settings, though its timing varies by region and climate. Variables such as age and gender have been shown to affect seasonality in some studies. Methodology: Data on monthly admission patterns for mania at a general hospital psychiatry unit in Pondicherry, India, were collected for 4 years (20102013) and analyzed for seasonality and seasonal peaks. The effects of age and gender were analyzed separately. Results: There was overall evidence of a seasonal pattern of admissions for mania (P < .01, Friedman test for seasonality), with a peak beginning during the rainy season and ending before summer (P < .0.1, Ratchet circular scan test). Male sex (P < .005, Ratchet circular scan test) and age > 25 years (P < .005, Ratchet circular scan test) were specifically associated with this seasonal peak. Discussion: The effect of seasons on mania is complex and is modulated by a variety of variables. Our study is consistent with earlier research findings: a greater degree of seasonality for mania in men. It is possible that climatic and individual variables interact to determine seasonal patterns in bipolar disorder in a given setting. PMID:26644962

  17. Young people admitted on a Form 1 to a general hospital: A worrisome trend

    PubMed Central

    Smith, W Gary; Collings, Angela; Degraaf, Anabela

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess and analyze the significance of the increase in the number of paediatric psychiatric admissions under a Form 1 (involuntary admission) to the regional paediatric unit of a general hospital. METHODS: The authors retrospectively reviewed the charts of all child psychiatric admissions to the paediatric ward over the years 1998 to 2003. The specific data obtained was that of discharge diagnosis, age and sex of patient, application of Form 1 and transfer to a psychiatric facility. RESULTS: Broad diagnostic categories included: mood disorder with and without suicidal behaviour, suicidal behaviour, psychosis, mood disorder with psychosis, anxiety disorder, eating disorder, behaviour disorder, personality disturbance, substance abuse, situational crisis and psychogenic disorder. Yearly admissions to the unit ranged from 25 per year to 45 per year over the five years studied. In the last three years, the rate of Form 1 application increased from one in 1999 to 2000 to 11 in 2002 to 2003 (a 10 fold increase). DISCUSSION: Possible reasons for this dramatic increase were identified and may be relevant to other nonpsychiatric centres dealing with children. PMID:19655014

  18. Evaluation of Potential Drug - Drug Interactions in General Medicine Ward of Teaching Hospital in Southern India

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Akram; Khan, Muhammad Umair; Ivan, Rahul; Dasari, Ram; Revanker, Megha; Pravina, A.; Kuriakose, Sheetal

    2015-01-01

    Background: Polypharmacy is considered as one of the major risk factors in precipitation of drug-drug interactions (DDIs). Patient population at high risk include the elderly and patients with co morbidities as they are usually prescribed with more number of drugs. Critical evaluation of such prescriptions by pharmacist could result in identification and reduction of such problems. Objective: The study aims to assess the prevalence, severity and significance of potential DDI (pDDI) in general medicine wards of South Indian tertiary care teaching hospital. Materials and Method: A prospective observational study was conducted in a general medicine ward for a period of six months (September 2012 to February 2013). The socio-demographic, clinical characteristics and medication prescribed was documented in a specially designed form. Analysis was carried out to assess the prevalence, severity and significance of identified pDDIs using Micromedex. Descriptive and Univariate analysis were used to report the findings. Results: A total of 404 case records reviewed, 78 (19.3%) patients had pDDIs. A total of 139 (34.4%) pDDIs were reported during the study period. Majority (53.95%, n=75) of the interactions were moderate in intensity and significant in nature (53.23%, n=74). Positive association between number of pDDIs and age was observed. Conclusion: The prevalence of pDDIs was 19.3% which is lesser then previously reported studies from India. Patient with more co-morbidities and elders were observed with more pDDIs. The study highlighted the need to effectively monitor and patients prevent pDDIs to improve patient safety. PMID:25859467

  19. Vancouver ­ A Century of Self-organized Rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skermer, Nigel; Skermer, Nycolas; Barber, Tony; Olive, Ken

    Vancouver in British Columbia is a young city. It borders on steep mountainous terrain where landslides are relatively frequent. As the city expands onto hazardous terrain more is at risk. The landslides usually follow periods of prolonged rainfall culminating in short periods of high intensity. The frequency of heavy rainfall is therefore important in knowing when to expect and prepare for landlides and in issuing warnings. Vancouver has about a century of rainfall records for the airport station on the Fraser River delta where the incoming weather from the Pacific Ocean is relatively unaffected by orographic effects. Precipitation data is presented in both annual and monthly totals. The cumulative departure from the mean shows a drying trend for the first part of the last century, more or less average conditions for the middle part and finally a pronounced increase in wetness in the last part of the century. Two very wet periods in the early eighties and mid-nineties caused more landslide damage than at any time since settlement began in this part of Canada. Individual storm events on the North Shore mountains of Vancouver are also examined as power law distributions. Despite the complexity of precipitation, both annual and monthly values follow power law distributions. This remarkable finding allows estimates to be made of the probability of occurrence of damaging amounts of precipitation which is useful for risk management and engineering purposes. The probability of even more extreme events is predictable and is of interest to insurance companies.

  20. Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics Land Surface Forecast System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernier, N. B.; Belair, S.; Tong, L.; Abrahamowicz, M.; Mailhot, J.

    2009-04-01

    Environment Canada's land surface forecast system developed for the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics is presented together with an evaluation of its performance for winters 2007-2008 and 2008-2009. The motivation for this work is threefold: it is i) application driven for the 2010 Vancouver Olympics, ii) a testbed for the panCanadian operational land surface forecast model being developed, and iii) the precursor to the fully coupled land-surface model to come. The new high resolution (100m grid size), 2D, and novel imbedded point-based land surface forecast model used to predict hourly snow and surface temperature conditions at Olympic and Paralympic Competition Sites are described. The surface systems are driven by atmospheric forcing provided by the center's operational regional forecast model for the first 48 hours and by the operational global forecast model for hours 49 to 96. The forcing fields are corrected for elevation discrepancies over the rapidly changing and complex mountainous settings of the Vancouver Olympics that arise from resolution differences. Daily 96h land surface forecasts for 2 winters and snow depth and surface air temperature observations collected at several specially deployed competition sites are used to validate the land surface model. We show that the newly implemented surface forecast model refines and improves snow depth and surface temperature forecast issued by the operational weather forecast system throughout the forecast period.

  1. An observational study in psychiatric acute patients admitted to General Hospital Psychiatric Wards in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Ballerini, Andrea; Boccalon, Roberto; Boncompagni, Giancarlo; Casacchia, Massimo; Margari, Francesco; Minervini, Lina; Righi, Roberto; Russo, Federico; Salteri, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    Objectives this Italian observational study was aimed at collecting data of psychiatric patients with acute episodes entering General Hospital Psychiatric Wards (GHPWs). Information was focused on diagnosis (DSM-IV), reasons of hospitalisation, prescribed treatment, outcome of aggressive episodes, evolution of the acute episode. Methods assessments were performed at admission and discharge. Used psychometric scales were the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS), the Modified Overt Aggression Scale (MOAS) and the Nurses' Observation Scale for Inpatient Evaluation (NOSIE-30). Results 864 adult patients were enrolled in 15 GHPWs: 728 (320 M; mean age 43.6 yrs) completed both admission and discharge visits. A severe psychotic episode with (19.1%) or without (47.7%) aggressive behaviour was the main reason of admission. Schizophrenia (42.8% at admission and 40.1% at discharge) and depression (12.9% at admission and 14.7% at discharge) were the predominant diagnoses. The mean hospital stay was 12 days. The mean (± SD) total score of MOAS at admission, day 7 and discharge was, respectively, 2.53 ± 5.1, 0.38 ± 2.2, and 0.21 ± 1.5. Forty-four (6.0%) patients had episodes of aggressiveness at admission and 8 (1.7%) at day 7. A progressive improvement in each domain/item vs. admission was observed for MOAS and BPRS, while NOSIE-30 did not change from day 4 onwards. The number of patients with al least one psychotic drug taken at admission, in the first 7 days of hospitalisation, and prescribed at discharge, was, respectively: 472 (64.8%), 686 (94.2%) and 676 (92.9%). The respective most frequently psychotic drugs were: BDZs (60.6%, 85.7%, 69.5%), typical anti-psychotics (48.3%, 57.0%, 49.6%), atypical anti-psychotics (35.6%, 41.8%, 39.8%) and antidepressants (40.9%, 48.8%, 43.2%). Rates of patients with one, two or > 2 psychotic drugs taken at admission and day 7, and prescribed at discharge, were, respectively: 24.8%, 8.2% and 13.5% in mono-therapy; 22.0%, 20.6% and 26.6% with two drugs, and 53.2%, 57.8% and 59.0% with > two drugs. Benzodiazepines were the most common drugs both at admission (60.0%) and during hospitalisation (85.7%), and 69.5% were prescribed at discharge. Conclusion patients with psychiatric diseases in acute phase experienced a satisfactory outcome following intensified therapeutic interventions during hospitalisation. PMID:17257438

  2. An Investigation of Nursing Staff Attitudes and Emotional Reactions towards Patients with Intellectual Disability in a General Hospital Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Sharna; Stenfert-Kroese, Biza

    2010-01-01

    Background: It has been suggested that inequalities in health care for people with intellectual disabilities may be partly explained by negative attitudes of health professionals. This study aimed to investigate the attitudes and emotional reactions reported by nursing staff working in general hospitals towards caring for patients with…

  3. An Investigation of Nursing Staff Attitudes and Emotional Reactions towards Patients with Intellectual Disability in a General Hospital Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Sharna; Stenfert-Kroese, Biza

    2010-01-01

    Background: It has been suggested that inequalities in health care for people with intellectual disabilities may be partly explained by negative attitudes of health professionals. This study aimed to investigate the attitudes and emotional reactions reported by nursing staff working in general hospitals towards caring for patients with

  4. Library Services to Hospital Patients and Handicapped Readers Section. Libraries Serving the General Public Division. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on library services to hospital personnel, hospital patients, and housebound or handicapped persons, which were presented at the 1983 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference, include: (1) "Education and Training for Health Care Librarianship," in which Antonia J. Bunch (United Kingdom) discusses the scope of and…

  5. Library Services to Hospital Patients and Handicapped Readers Section. Libraries Serving the General Public Division. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on library services to hospital personnel, hospital patients, and housebound or handicapped persons, which were presented at the 1983 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference, include: (1) "Education and Training for Health Care Librarianship," in which Antonia J. Bunch (United Kingdom) discusses the scope of and

  6. Borderline Personality Disorder and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder at Psychiatric Discharge Predict General Hospital Admission for Self-Harm.

    PubMed

    Mellesdal, Liv; Gjestad, Rolf; Johnsen, Erik; Jrgensen, Hugo A; Oedegaard, Ketil J; Kroken, Rune A; Mehlum, Lars

    2015-12-01

    We investigated whether posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was predictor of suicidal behavior even when adjusting for comorbid borderline personality disorder (BPD) and other salient risk factors. To study this, we randomly selected 308 patients admitted to a psychiatric hospital because of suicide risk. Baseline interviews were performed within the first days of the stay. Information concerning the number of self-harm admissions to general hospitals over the subsequent 6 months was retrieved through linkage with the regional hospital registers. A censored regression analysis of hospital admissions for self-harm indicated significant associations with both PTSD (? = .21, p < .001) and BPD (? = .27, p < .001). A structural model comprising two latent BPD factors, dysregulation and relationship problems, as well as PTSD and several other variables, demonstrated that PTSD was an important correlate of the number of self-harm admissions to general hospitals (B = 1.52, p < .01). Dysregulation was associated directly with self-harm (B = 0.28, p < .05), and also through PTSD. These results suggested that PTSD and related dysregulation problems could be important treatment targets for a reduction in the risk of severe self-harm in high-risk psychiatric patients. PMID:26581019

  7. Breastfeeding policy and practices at the general paediatric outpatient clinic of a teaching hospital in Lagos, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hospitals have a role to play in supporting, protecting and promoting breastfeeding. The aim of this study was to describe hospital breastfeeding policy and practices and breastfeeding rates among mothers attending General Paediatric Outpatient Clinic at a tertiary hospital in Lagos, Nigeria. Methods This was a cross-sectional study involving paediatric nurses and doctors, as well as the mothers who brought their child to the General Paediatric Outpatient Clinic. Two sets of questionnaires, different in content, were administered to doctors and nurses, and to mothers of children aged 6-24 months, to assess hospital policy and breastfeeding rates, respectively. Stepwise multiple logistic regression analysis was used to examine factors associated with duration of breastfeeding. Results Although the hospital had a written breastfeeding policy copies of the policy were not clearly displayed in any of the units in the Paediatric department. Almost half the staff (48%; 60/125) were not aware of the policy. The hospital had no breastfeeding support group. Nearly three quarters (92/125) of the staff had received lactation management training. 36% (112/311) of mothers exclusively breastfed for six months, 42% (129/311) had stopped breastfeeding at the time of the survey. 67% (207/311) of babies were given infant formula, 85% (175/207) before 6 months. Women who had antenatal care in private hospitals and were Christian were more likely to breastfeed exclusively for 6 months. Low maternal education was the only factor associated with breastfeeding longer than 12 months. Conclusion Breastfeeding practices and policy implementation at this outpatient clinic were suboptimal. We have identified a need for interventions to increase knowledge of the benefits of breastfeeding and to provide support for its longer term duration. We suggest that BFHI be considered across all facilities concerned with infant and early child health to disseminate appropriate information and promote an increase in exclusive breastfeeding for six months as well as the duration of breastfeeding. PMID:25018776

  8. The seasonal variation of Achilles tendon ruptures in Vancouver, Canada: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Alex; Grewal, Navdeep; Guy, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the seasonal distribution of tendon ruptures in a large cohort of patients from Vancouver, Canada. Design Retrospective chart review. Setting Acute Achilles tendon rupture cases that occurred from 1987 to 2010 at an academic hospital in Vancouver, Canada. Information was extracted from an orthopaedic database. Participants No direct contact was made with the participants. The following information was extracted from the OrthoTrauma database: age, sex, date of injury and season (winter, spring, summer and autumn), date of surgery if date of injury was unknown and type of injury (sport related or non-sport related/unspecified). Only acute Achilles tendon rupture cases were included; chronic cases were excluded along with those that were conservatively managed. Primary and secondary outcomes The primary outcome was to determine the seasonal pattern of Achilles tendon rupture. Secondary outcomes, such as differences in gender and mechanism of sport (non-sport vs sport related), were also assessed. Results There were 543 cases in total; 83% of the cases were men (average age 39.3) and 17% were women (average age 37.3). In total, 76% of cases were specified as sport related. The distribution of injuries varied significantly across seasons (?2, p<0.05), with significantly more cases occurring in spring. The increase in the number of cases in spring was due to sport-related injuries, whereas non-sport-related cases were distributed evenly throughout the year. Conclusions The seasonality of sport-related Achilles tendon ruptures should be considered when developing preventive strategies and when timing their delivery. PMID:24519875

  9. [The pattern of fresh frozen plasma transfusion in Veterans General Hospital-Taichung].

    PubMed

    Tsai, C S; Jour, J H; Lirn, J Y

    1992-09-01

    Conducted a survey at Veterans General Hospital in Taichung, to compile a statistical analysis on the usage of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) transfusions. The investigation was conducted from July 1st to September 30, 1991. According to the distribution of usage of FFP, we investigated 726 transfusions (4,216 units) based on our grouping criteria. We found the following: 532 units were used for clotting support which accounts for 12.6% of total, 815 units (19.3%) for blood pressure support, 148 units (3.5%) for combination of clotting and blood pressure support, 681 units (16.2%) for albumin replacement, 436 units (10.3%) for therapeutic pheresis, 396 units (9.4%) for packed red cell concurrently, 819 units (19.4%) for burn cases, and the remaining (9.2%) for other or unidentified reasons. If it was classified by the departments applying FFP; 76% (3,200 units) were used by surgery, 22.4% (947 units) by internal medicine, and 1.6% (69 units) by other departments. Having classified all the reasons for FFP transfusion, we found that FFP was commonly used as a volume expander, for nutrition support, and reconstituted whole blood. These reasons are out of the range of indications for FFP transfusion. This misuse of FFP transfusion increases the chance of transmission infections therefore, we will thoroughly investigate these treatment modalities in order to ensure our blood source is being used in an appropriate manner. This will allow patients the best possible treatment available. PMID:1330252

  10. Improving e-discharge letters for Permanent pacemaker insertions at Wansbeck General Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    670 patients attend Wansbeck General Hospital each year for elective and emergency permanent pacemaker insertion or modification. Elective patients for new devices attend the cardiology department on the day of procedure and are clerked onto the cardiology ward after insertion. Patients are discharged home the following day with a letter typed by a junior doctor. Prior to October 2011, junior doctors were unaware of any guidelines regarding content of discharge letters due to poor accessibility. Vital information such as pacemaker model and indication for implantation were frequently absent from the typed summaries. In October 2011, the cardiology department reviewed the guidelines establishing the information required in all discharge summaries for pacemaker implantation and these guidelines were published on the ward in an easy to follow proforma for any junior doctor typing letters. Eight essential criteria should be included in each letter; date and indication for insertion, pacemaker type, make and model, access route, complications, chest x-ray and device check results, and follow-up details. Finally, a copy of the letter was to be sent to the cardiology department for clinic follow-up. Ten letters were audited prior to the proforma being issued. 0 letters contained 100% of the required information. Main criteria missing in most letters included indication for insertion (50%), make of device (0%), the route of access (10%) and cc to cardiology department (0%). 70 letters were audited in October 2012, one year following introduction of the discharge proforma.100% of letters contained all of the eight essential criteria required by the departmental guidelines. 53% of the letters were also received by the cardiology department. In conclusion, a set of easy to follow guidelines in the form of a published document on the cardiology ward has produced dramatic improvement in the quality of e-discharge letters for patients undergoing permanent pacemaker implantation.

  11. Improving the quality of the surgical preoperative assessment in a district general hospital

    PubMed Central

    Koris, Jacob; Hopkins, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    At Leicester General Hospital, England, patients are assessed by a team of junior doctors for elective colorectal and hepatobiliary procedures. After a number of same day cancellations, a large discrepancy was identified between the findings at the preoperative assessment clinic and the anaesthetic assessment on the day of surgery. After a multidisciplinary meeting was held, three interventions were decided on with an aim to bring the preoperative assessment in line with the anaesthetic assessment. Firstly, a set of guidelines was written and introduced for the junior doctors to use as a reference when assessing patients. Secondly, a proforma was designed specifically to prompt users to include essential details which were being missed in the assessment, having audited 100 patients' notes. Thirdly, a preoperative investigation calculator was recommended for each patient to simplify compliance with the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidance for preoperative assessment. Before and after each intervention was introduced, a cohort of 50 patients were followed looking for differences in findings in the history, examination, investigations, and fitness for surgery between the preoperative assessment in clinic and the anaesthetic assessment on the day of surgery. Initially 68% of patients were compliant for details in the history, 76% for examination, 32% for choice of preoperative investigations, and 100% for fitness for surgery decision. After all three interventions had been introduced, 96% of patients were compliant for history, 94% for examination findings, 88% had the correct choice of preoperative investigations, and 100% had the same decision on fitness for surgery. The interventions described proved to be cheap and effective methods of improving the quality of the preoperative assessment, bringing it in line with the anaesthetic assessment and reducing the risk of same day cancellations.

  12. Current Status of Prescription in Type 2 Diabetic Patients from General Hospitals in Busan

    PubMed Central

    Suk, Ji Hye; Lee, Chang Won; Son, Sung Pyo; Kim, Min Cheol; Ahn, Jun Hyeob; Lee, Kwang Jae; Park, Ja Young; Shin, Sun Hye; Kwon, Min Jeong; Kim, Sang Soo; Kim, Bo Hyun; Lee, Soon Hee; Park, Jeong Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Background Data regarding the prescription status of individuals with diabetes are limited. This study was an analysis of participants from the relationship between cardiovascular disease and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity in patients with type 2 diabetes (REBOUND) Study, which was a prospective multicenter cohort study recruited from eight general hospitals in Busan, Korea. We performed this study to investigate the current status of prescription in Korean type 2 diabetic patients. Methods Type 2 diabetic patients aged 30 years or more were recruited and data were collected for demographics, medical history, medications, blood pressure, and laboratory tests. Results Three thousands and fifty-eight type 2 diabetic patients were recruited. Mean age, duration of diabetes, and HbA1c were 59 years, 7.6 years, and 7.2%, respectively. Prevalence of hypertension was 66%. Overall, 7.3% of patients were treated with diet and exercise only, 68.2% with oral hypoglycemic agents (OHAs) only, 5.3% with insulin only, and 19.2% with both insulin and OHA. The percentage of patients using antihypertensive, antidyslipidemic, antiplatelet agents was similar as about 60%. The prevalence of statins and aspirin users was 52% and 32%, respectively. Conclusion In our study, two thirds of type 2 diabetic patients were treated with OHA only, and one fifth with insulin plus OHA, and 5% with insulin only. More than half of the patients were using each of antihypertensive, antidyslipidemic, or antiplatelet agents. About a half of the patients were treated with statins and one third were treated with aspirin. PMID:25003077

  13. Characteristics of patients with shingles admitted to a district general hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, R.; King, D.

    1998-01-01

    Little is known about why some patients with shingles are admitted to hospital. We reviewed 72 case notes from a list of 80 patients admitted to hospital with shingles over a six-year period. Pain was the main complaint of the patients admitted, most of whom were elderly and lived alone. The commonest site of involvement in hospital admissions was the eye (herpes zoster ophthalmicus). Diagnosis of shingles was made after admission in 12 patients, eight of whom had originally been diagnosed as having an acute medical or surgical condition. We conclude that the prodromal phase of shingles may lead to misdiagnosis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9616491

  14. Lower respiratory tract infection hospitalizations among American Indian/Alaska Native children and the general United States child population

    PubMed Central

    Foote, Eric M.; Singleton, Rosalyn J.; Holman, Robert C.; Seeman, Sara M.; Steiner, Claudia A.; Bartholomew, Michael; Hennessy, Thomas W.

    2015-01-01

    Background The lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI)-associated hospitalization rate in American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) children aged <5 years declined during 1998–2008, yet remained 1.6 times higher than the general US child population in 2006–2008. Purpose Describe the change in LRTI-associated hospitalization rates for AI/AN children and for the general US child population aged <5 years. Methods A retrospective analysis of hospitalizations with discharge ICD-9-CM codes for LRTI for AI/AN children and for the general US child population <5 years during 2009–2011 was conducted using Indian Health Service direct and contract care inpatient data and the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, respectively. We calculated hospitalization rates and made comparisons to previously published 1998–1999 rates prior to pneumococcal conjugate vaccine introduction. Results The average annual LRTI-associated hospitalization rate declined from 1998–1999 to 2009–2011 in AI/AN (35%, p<0.01) and the general US child population (19%, SE: 4.5%, p<0.01). The 2009–2011 AI/AN child average annual LRTI-associated hospitalization rate was 20.7 per 1,000, 1.5 times higher than the US child rate (13.7 95% CI: 12.6–14.8). The Alaska (38.9) and Southwest regions (27.3) had the highest rates. The disparity was greatest for infant (<1 year) pneumonia-associated and 2009–2010 H1N1 influenza-associated hospitalizations. Conclusions Although the LRTI-associated hospitalization rate declined, the 2009–2011 AI/AN child rate remained higher than the US child rate, especially in the Alaska and Southwest regions. The residual disparity is likely multi-factorial and partly related to household crowding, indoor smoke exposure, lack of piped water and poverty. Implementation of interventions proven to reduce LRTI is needed among AI/AN children. PMID:26547082

  15. Junior doctor dementia champions in a district general hospital (innovative practice).

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Iain; Coates, Anna; Merrick, Sophie; Lee, Chooi

    2016-03-01

    Dementia is a common condition in the UK with around 25% of patients in acute hospitals having dementia. In the UK, there is national guidance on the assessment of cognitive impairment in acute hospitals. This article is a qualitative study of junior doctors' experiences as part of a dementia and delirium team involved in changing the care of patients with dementia in a hospital in the UK. It draws on data from a focus group and follow-up questionnaire in two hospital trusts. We examine what drives doctors to become involved in such projects and the effects of this experience upon them. We suggest a typology for getting junior doctors involved in projects generating change when working with patients with dementia. Being more actively involved in caring for and developing services for patients with dementia may represent the crossing of an educational threshold for these junior doctors. PMID:25924617

  16. What is the current state of care for older people with dementia in general hospitals? A literature review.

    PubMed

    Dewing, Jan; Dijk, Saskia

    2016-01-01

    This paper summarises a literature review focusing on the literature directly pertaining to the acute care of older people with dementia in general hospitals from 2007 onwards. Following thematic analysis, one overarching theme emerged: the consequences of being in hospital with seven related subthemes. Significantly, this review highlights that overall there remains mostly negative consequences and outcomes for people with dementia when they go into general hospitals. Although not admitted to hospital directly due to dementia, there are usually negative effects on the dementia condition from hospitalisation. The review suggests this is primarily because there is a tension between prioritisation of acute care for existing co-morbidities and person-centred dementia care. This is complicated by insufficient understanding of what constitutes person-centred care in an acute care context and a lack of the requisite knowledge and skills set in health care practitioners. The review also reveals a worrying lack of evidence for the effectiveness of mental health liaison posts and dementia care specialist posts in nursing. Finally, although specialist posts such as liaison and clinical nurse specialists and specialist units/shared care wards can enhance quality of care and reduce adverse consequences of hospitalisation (they do not significantly) impact on reducing length of stay or the cost of care. PMID:24459188

  17. An audit of consenting practices in a district general hospital. Can we improve?

    PubMed Central

    CHOHDA, E.; DODDI, S.; SUNDARAMOORTHY, S.; MANTON, R.N.; AHAD, A.; SINHA, A.; KHAWAJA, H.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Informed consent, as the declaration of patients’ will, forms the basis of legality of medical procedures. A standard form based on the Department of Health model is widely used in the National Health Service (NHS). The aim of this audit process was to assess the current consent practice in comparison to the UK’s General Medical Council guidance and local policy and make any appropriate improvements. Patients and methods 254 adult consent forms were reviewed during the patients’ admission. Data collected included legible documentation, grade of health professional completing the consent form, providing additional written information, use of abbreviations, securing the consent form in the medical records and, providing a copy to the patient. After initial assessment, interventions in an attempt to improve adherence to guidelines were introduced. A repeat audit of a further set of 110 notes was completed to assess the effectiveness of our interventions. Results Our baseline assessment of 254 consent forms comprised of 198 (78%) elective and 56 (22%) emergency procedures. 87 (34%) consent forms were secure in the medical records. Grade of health professional was recorded in 211 (83%). 191 (75%) forms were legible. 48 (19%) patients were given copy of the consent. Only 24 (9%) patients were given additional written information. Abbreviations were used in 68 (27%) forms. Only 12 (5%) of consent forms met all criteria simultaneously. Re-audit after intervention assessed 110 consent forms; 30 (27%) for elective and 80 (72%) for emergency procedures. 52 (47%) of consent forms were secure in medical records, grade of health professional was recorded in 94 (85%), 101 (75%) forms were legible, 42 (38%) patients received copy of consent and 41 (37%) of patients received additional written information. Conclusion Initially only 5% of consent forms completely met GMC guidelines. This demonstrates an alarmingly poor adherence to such guidance that plays a vital role in patient safety, patient ethics autonomy, not to mention potential medico-legal and clinical governance implications for surgical practice. Our intervention has improved the quality of consenting within our hospital according to these guidelines. With these interventions set to continue and further develop, we expect that the quality of the consenting process will continue to provide patients with all that it is designed to. PMID:26888702

  18. Climatic Influences on Cryptoccoccus gattii Populations, Vancouver Island, Canada, 2002–2004

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Sunny; Manangan, Arie; Luber, George; Bartlett, Karen H.

    2015-01-01

    Vancouver Island, Canada, reports the world’s highest incidence of Cryptococcus gattii infection among humans and animals. To identify key biophysical factors modulating environmental concentrations, we evaluated monthly concentrations of C. gatti in air, soil, and trees over a 3-year period. The 2 study datasets were repeatedly measured plots and newly sampled plots. We used hierarchical generalized linear and mixed effect models to determine associations. Climate systematically influenced C. gattii concentrations in all environmental media tested; in soil and on trees, concentrations decreased when temperatures were warmer. Wind may be a key process that transferred C. gattii from soil into air and onto trees. C. gattii results for tree and air samples were more likely to be positive during periods of higher solar radiation. These results improve the understanding of the places and periods with the greatest C. gattii colonization. Refined risk projections may help susceptible persons avoid activities that disturb the topsoil during relatively cool summer days. PMID:26484590

  19. Climatic Influences on Cryptoccoccus gattii Populations, Vancouver Island, Canada, 2002-2004.

    PubMed

    Uejio, Christopher K; Mak, Sunny; Manangan, Arie; Luber, George; Bartlett, Karen H

    2015-11-01

    Vancouver Island, Canada, reports the world's highest incidence of Cryptococcus gattii infection among humans and animals. To identify key biophysical factors modulating environmental concentrations, we evaluated monthly concentrations of C. gatti in air, soil, and trees over a 3-year period. The 2 study datasets were repeatedly measured plots and newly sampled plots. We used hierarchical generalized linear and mixed effect models to determine associations. Climate systematically influenced C. gattii concentrations in all environmental media tested; in soil and on trees, concentrations decreased when temperatures were warmer. Wind may be a key process that transferred C. gattii from soil into air and onto trees. C. gattii results for tree and air samples were more likely to be positive during periods of higher solar radiation. These results improve the understanding of the places and periods with the greatest C. gattii colonization. Refined risk projections may help susceptible persons avoid activities that disturb the topsoil during relatively cool summer days. PMID:26484590

  20. Anxiety disorders and physical comorbidity: increased prevalence but reduced relevance of specific risk factors for hospital-based mortality during a 12.5-year observation period in general hospital admissions.

    PubMed

    Schoepf, Dieter; Heun, Reinhard

    2015-08-01

    Anxiety disorders (AD) are associated with an increase in physical comorbidities, but the effects of these diseases on hospital-based mortality are unclear. Consequently, we investigated whether the burden of physical comorbidity and its relevance on hospital-based mortality differed between individuals with and without AD during a 12.5-year observation period in general hospital admissions. During 1 January 2000 and 30 June 2012, 11,481 AD individuals were admitted to seven General Manchester Hospitals. All comorbidities with a prevalence ? 1 % were compared with those of 114,810 randomly selected and group-matched hospital controls of the same age and gender, regardless of priority of diagnoses or specialized treatments. Comorbidities that increased the risk of hospital-based mortality (but not mortality outside of the hospital) were identified using multivariate logistic regression analyses. AD individuals compared to controls had a substantial excess comorbidity, but a reduced hospital-based mortality rate. Twenty-two physical comorbidities were increased in AD individuals compared with controls, which included cardiovascular diseases and their risk factors. The most frequent physical comorbidities in AD individuals were hypertension, asthma, cataract, and ischaemic heart disease. Risk factors for hospital-based mortality in AD individuals were lung cancer, alcoholic liver disease, respiratory failure, heart failure, pneumonia, bronchitis, non-specific dementia, breast cancer, COPD, gallbladder calculus, atrial fibrillation, and angina. The impact of atrial fibrillation, angina, and gallbladder calculus on hospital-based mortality was higher in AD individuals than in controls. In contrast, other mortality risk factors had an equal or lower impact on hospital-based mortality in sample comparisons. Therefore AD individuals have a higher burden of physical comorbidity that is associated with a reduced risk of general hospital-based mortality. Atrial fibrillation, angina, and gallbladder calculus are major risk factors for general hospital-based mortality in AD individuals. PMID:25472881

  1. An urban metabolism and ecological footprint assessment of Metro Vancouver.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jennie; Kissinger, Meidad; Rees, William E

    2013-07-30

    As the world urbanizes, the role of cities in determining sustainability outcomes grows in importance. Cities are the dominant form of human habitat, and most of the world's resources are either directly or indirectly consumed in cities. Sustainable city analysis and management requires understanding the demands a city places on a wider geographical area and its ecological resource base. We present a detailed, integrated urban metabolism of residential consumption and ecological footprint analysis of the Vancouver metropolitan region for the year 2006. Our overall goal is to demonstrate the application of a bottom-up ecological footprint analysis using an urban metabolism framework at a metropolitan, regional scale. Our specific objectives are: a) to quantify energy and material consumption using locally generated data and b) to relate these data to global ecological carrying capacity. Although water is the largest material flow through Metro Vancouver (424,860,000m(3)), it has the smallest ecological footprint (23,100gha). Food (2,636,850 tonnes) contributes the largest component to the ecological footprint (4,514,400gha) which includes crop and grazing land as well as carbon sinks required to sequester emissions from food production and distribution. Transportation fuels (3,339,000m(3)) associated with motor vehicle operation and passenger air travel comprises the second largest material flow through the region and the largest source of carbon dioxide emissions (7,577,000 tonnes). Transportation also accounts for the second largest component of the EF (2,323,200gha). Buildings account for the largest electricity flow (17,515,150MWh) and constitute the third largest component of the EF (1,779,240gha). Consumables (2,400,000 tonnes) comprise the fourth largest component of the EF (1,414,440gha). Metro Vancouver's total Ecological Footprint in 2006 was 10,071,670gha, an area approximately 36 times larger than the region itself. The EFA reveals that cropland and carbon sinks (forested land required to sequester carbon dioxide emissions) account for 90% of Metro Vancouver's overall demand for biocapacity. The per capita ecological footprint is 4.76gha, nearly three times the per capita global supply of biocapacity. Note that this value excludes national government services that operate outside the region and could account for up to an additional 2gha/ca. PMID:23603775

  2. Optimizing triage and hospitalization in adult general medical emergency patients: the triage project

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) currently face inacceptable delays in initial treatment, and long, costly hospital stays due to suboptimal initial triage and site-of-care decisions. Accurate ED triage should focus not only on initial treatment priority, but also on prediction of medical risk and nursing needs to improve site-of-care decisions and to simplify early discharge management. Different triage scores have been proposed, such as the Manchester triage system (MTS). Yet, these scores focus only on treatment priority, have suboptimal performance and lack validation in the Swiss health care system. Because the MTS will be introduced into clinical routine at the Kantonsspital Aarau, we propose a large prospective cohort study to optimize initial patient triage. Specifically, the aim of this trial is to derive a three-part triage algorithm to better predict (a) treatment priority; (b) medical risk and thus need for in-hospital treatment; (c) post-acute care needs of patients at the most proximal time point of ED admission. Methods/design Prospective, observational, multicenter, multi-national cohort study. We will include all consecutive medical patients seeking ED care into this observational registry. There will be no exclusions except for non-adult and non-medical patients. Vital signs will be recorded and left over blood samples will be stored for later batch analysis of blood markers. Upon ED admission, the post-acute care discharge score (PACD) will be recorded. Attending ED physicians will adjudicate triage priority based on all available results at the time of ED discharge to the medical ward. Patients will be reassessed daily during the hospital course for medical stability and readiness for discharge from the nurses and if involved social workers perspective. To assess outcomes, data from electronic medical records will be used and all patients will be contacted 30 days after hospital admission to assess vital and functional status, re-hospitalization, satisfaction with care and quality of life measures. We aim to include between 5000 and 7000 patients over one year of recruitment to derive the three-part triage algorithm. The respective main endpoints were defined as (a) initial triage priority (high vs. low priority) adjudicated by the attending ED physician at ED discharge, (b) adverse 30 day outcome (death or intensive care unit admission) within 30 days following ED admission to assess patients risk and thus need for in-hospital treatment and (c) post acute care needs after hospital discharge, defined as transfer of patients to a post-acute care institution, for early recognition and planning of post-acute care needs. Other outcomes are time to first physician contact, time to initiation of adequate medical therapy, time to social worker involvement, length of hospital stay, reasons for discharge delays, patients satisfaction with care, overall hospital costs and patients care needs after returning home. Discussion Using a reliable initial triage system for estimating initial treatment priority, need for in-hospital treatment and post-acute care needs is an innovative and persuasive approach for a more targeted and efficient management of medical patients in the ED. The proposed interdisciplinary , multi-national project has unprecedented potential to improve initial triage decisions and optimize resource allocation to the sickest patients from admission to discharge. The algorithms derived in this study will be compared in a later randomized controlled trial against a usual care control group in terms of resource use, length of hospital stay, overall costs and patients outcomes in terms of mortality, re-hospitalization, quality of life and satisfaction with care. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier, NCT01768494 PMID:23822525

  3. Rates of self-harm presenting to general hospitals: a comparison of data from the Multicentre Study of Self-Harm in England and Hospital Episode Statistics

    PubMed Central

    Turnbull, Pauline; Hawton, Keith; Geulayov, Galit; Waters, Keith; Ness, Jennifer; Townsend, Ellen; Khundakar, Kazem; Kapur, Nav

    2016-01-01

    Objective Rates of hospital presentation for self-harm in England were compared using different national and local data sources. Design The study was descriptive and compared bespoke data collection methods for recording self-harm presentations to hospital with routinely collected hospital data. Setting Local area data on self-harm from the 3 centres of the Multicentre Study of Self-harm in England (Oxford, Manchester and Derby) were used along with national and local routinely collected data on self-harm admissions and emergency department attendances from Hospital Episode Statistics (HES). Primary outcome Rate ratios were calculated to compare rates of self-harm generated using different data sources nationally and locally (between 2010 and 2012) and rates of hospital presentations for self-harm were plotted over time (between 2003 and 2012), based on different data sources. Results The total number of self-harm episodes between 2010 and 2012 was 13 547 based on Multicentre Study data, 9600 based on HES emergency department data and 8096 based on HES admission data. Nationally, routine HES data underestimated overall rates of self-harm by approximately 60% compared with rates based on Multicentre Study data (rate ratio for HES emergency department data, 0.41 (95% CI 0.35 to 0.49); rate ratio for HES admission data, 0.42 (95% CI 0.36 to 0.49)). Direct local area comparisons confirmed an overall underascertainment in the HES data, although the difference varied between centres. There was a general increase in self-harm over time according to HES data which contrasted with a fall and then a rise in the Multicentre Study data. Conclusions There was a consistent underestimation of presentations for self-harm recorded by HES emergency department data, and fluctuations in year-on-year figures. HES admission data appeared more reliable but missed non-admitted episodes. Routinely collected data may miss important trends in self-harm and cannot be used in isolation as the basis for a robust national indicator of self-harm. PMID:26883238

  4. Development of a young persons' HIV clinic in a District General Hospital: a case note review resulting in informed change.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Jayne; Norrish, Gabrielle; Elgalib, Ali

    2013-11-01

    In recognition of the increasing number of HIV-infected young people attending the HIV department at a district general hospital, a case note review was conducted. There was a high prevalence of psychosocial problems and medical complexity among this cohort. As a result, tailored young persons' services were developed. Effective utilisation of the existing skill-mix and resources were key to success. PMID:23970600

  5. Their Spirits Live within Us: Aboriginal Women in Downtown Eastside Vancouver Emerging into Visibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culhane, Dara

    2003-01-01

    The intersection of Main and Hastings streets--known locally as "Pain and Wastings"--marks the heart of Vancouver's inner-city neighborhood: the Downtown Eastside. Since 1997, when the City of Vancouver Health Department declared a public health emergency in response to reports that HIV infection rates among residents exceeded those anywhere else…

  6. Their Spirits Live within Us: Aboriginal Women in Downtown Eastside Vancouver Emerging into Visibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culhane, Dara

    2003-01-01

    The intersection of Main and Hastings streets--known locally as "Pain and Wastings"--marks the heart of Vancouver's inner-city neighborhood: the Downtown Eastside. Since 1997, when the City of Vancouver Health Department declared a public health emergency in response to reports that HIV infection rates among residents exceeded those anywhere else

  7. Cutaneous diphtheria in the urban poor population of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada: a 10-year review.

    PubMed

    Lowe, C F; Bernard, K A; Romney, M G

    2011-07-01

    Between 1998 and 2007, records from 33 patients with cutaneous diphtheria from Vancouver's inner city were reviewed. Cases were associated with injection drug use and poverty. Coinfections with Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Arcanobacterium haemolyticum occurred. Corynebacterium diphtheriae is endemic in Vancouver's urban core, with strains of multilocus sequence type (MLST) 76 predominating. PMID:21525220

  8. Going Social at Vancouver Public Library: What the Virtual Branch Did Next

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahill, Kay

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to follow up on the 2009 publication "Building a virtual branch at Vancouver Public Library (VPL) using Web 2.0 tools" and to explore the work that VPL has been doing in the social media space over the past two years. Design/methodology/approach: Following the launch of its new web site in 2008, Vancouver

  9. Counseling Psychologists in General Hospital Settings: The Continued Quest for Balance and Challenge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernard, Carole B.

    1992-01-01

    Claims Veterans Administration (VA) hospitals can provide rich and varied work experiences for psychologists. These settings have eased the way for counseling psychologists into behavioral medicine, neuropsychology, and health psychology, as well as maintaining role of vocational assessment. Notes VA psychology positions are geared toward

  10. [Competition between office-based physicians and hospitals--general legal conditions].

    PubMed

    Jansen, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    Before December 31, 2002 hospital options were limited to demand-oriented individual authorisations and ambulatory emergency care, so there was no competition against private practice physicians. For the first time the Healthcare Reform Act (GSG) provided hospitals with the opportunity to offer ambulatory services from January 1, 2003 in individual areas of care (pre- and post inpatient treatments according to Sect. 116a SGB and ambulatory surgical interventions according to Sect. 115b SGB V). Following numerous reform acts the spectrum for hospitals has been considerably extended today, particularly by establishing medical service centres (MVZ) and the authorisation to provide certain ambulatory services according to Sect. 116b para. 2-6 SGB V after special approval. Conversely, an amendment of Sect. 20 para. 2 Aerzte-ZV from January 1, 2007 enabled office-based physicians to be employed in a hospital and provide inpatient care so that today we may speak--at least in important sections--of a competitive situation on different levels. PMID:20120197

  11. Teledermatology via a social networking web site: a pilot study between a general hospital and a rural clinic.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Romero, Maria Teresa; Prado, Fernanda; Dominguez-Cherit, Judith; Hojyo-Tomomka, Maria Teresa; Arenas, Roberto

    2011-10-01

    Teledermatology via a free public social networking Web site is a practical tool to provide attention to patients who do not have access to dermatologic care. In this pilot study, a general practitioner sent consults to a dermatology department at a general hospital via Facebook(). Forty-four patients were seen and treatment was installed. We identified both simple-to-treat, common skin diseases and rare congenital diseases that require genetic counseling and more complex treatment. The majority of patients (75%) benefited with the diagnoses and treatments offered, thus avoiding unnecessary expenses or transportation to urban areas. PMID:21790270

  12. Distributions and Types of Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in Different Departments of a General Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Yaner; Dong, Xuejun; Wang, Zongxin; Yang, Guocan; Liu, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acinetobacter baumannii is the most prevalent strain in hospitals and different clinical departments. Objectives: The current study aimed to investigate the genetic characteristics and resistance mechanisms of A. baumannii isolated from clinical samples in Shaoxing people’s hospital affiliated to Zhejiang University, Shaoxing, China. Patients and Methods: Acinetobacter baumannii strains were isolated from blood, phlegm and skin of the patients hospitalized in different departments as respiratory medicine, plastic surgery and intensive care unit (ICU). Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) was used to characterize the isolates. Kirby-Bauer test was used to evaluate antibiotic resistance of the bacteria. The expression of resistance inducing genes was detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The results were analyzed and compared. Results: Two bacterial types, ST208, and ST218, were identified in all 140 samples. The ST208 mainly came from ICU and department of respiratory medicine, while ST218 from department of plastic surgery; 70.21% of ST208 and 84.78% of ST218 were carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (CRAB) and carbapenem-susceptible Acinetobacter baumannii (CSAB), respectively. Multidrug-resistance genes in CRAB isolated from the hospital mainly included, oxa-23, oxa-5, intl 1 and qaceΔ1-sul 1. Besides, the highest and lowest antibiotic resistance was observed in the strains isolated from blood samples and wounds, respectively. Conclusions: The distribution of AB varies in different clinical departments and samples. In the hospital under study, the main types of AB were ST208 and ST218. The genes which affect the ability of antibiotic-resistance were oxa-23, oxa-51, intl 1 and qaceΔ1-sul 1. PMID:26487921

  13. Salmon Poisoning Disease in Dogs on Southern Vancouver Island

    PubMed Central

    Booth, A. J.; Stogdale, L.; Grigor, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    Salmon poisoning disease in dogs has previously been reported in North America only along the western coast of the U.S.A. This paper presents the findings from eight affected dogs recently diagnosed on Vancouver Island, Canada. The clinical signs shown by these dogs were lethargy, anorexia, pyrexia and lymph node enlargement. The causative agent, Neorickettsia helminthoeca was observed in macrophages obtained from lymph node aspirates. This organism is transmitted to dogs in cysts of the fluke Nanophyetus salmincola salmincola within the tissues of the salmon or trout. The presence of fluke eggs in the feces of dogs showing typical signs is very suggestive of a diagnosis of salmon poisoning disease. Appropriate treatment, including chloramphenicol or oxytetracycline and fluid therapy, resulted in recovery. Prevention of salmon poisoning disease in endemic areas can be achieved by advising owners against allowing their dogs to eat raw salmon or trout. We suggest, based on the diagnoses made in these eight dogs, that Vancouver Island now be considered an endemic area for salmon poisoning disease. ImagesFigure 2.Figure 3. PMID:17422349

  14. Nonmethane Hydrocarbons Measurements in Vancouver Region during Pacific 2001 Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D.; Fuentes, J. D.; Dann, T.; Connolly, T.; Aktas, Y.

    2002-12-01

    Nonmethane hydrocarbons \\(NMHCs\\) and carbonyl compounds constitute important precursors of free radicals, which govern atmospheric photochemical processes. To investigate the impact of these radical precursors on regional photochemistry, diurnal cycles of NMHCs and carbonyls were studies during 10-31 August at several sites as part of the Pacific 2001 field study in the Vancouver region, British Columbia, Canada. The mixing ratios for total NMHCs exhibited strong diurnal patterns and varied from 1 to 20 parts per billion \\(ppb\\). For sites near forests, the dominant NMHCs were isoprene and the monoterpenes of alpha-pinene and beta-pinene. The maximum values reached nearly 3 ppb These species exhibited strong diel cycles, owing to the interactions between local emissions and chemical sinks. In this presentation, the focus will be on these biogenic hydrocarbons to ascertain their relative importance on the photochemical activity experienced in the airshed of Vancouver. Results from the 2001 field campaign will be integrated with long-term records of biogenic hydrocarbons for the region with the view to elucidate the time of year when biogenic compounds can be more effective in contributing to regional oxidant production.

  15. The treatment outcomes of tuberculosis among health care workers in a general hospital in the Mpumalanga province, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Blitz, Julia; Hugo, Jannie; Nkosi, Ralph; Mpangane, Thembi; McLaren, Sharon

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background South Africa is one of the countries in the world with a high burden of tuberculosis (TB). High rates of unfavourable treatment outcomes have remained a feature of TB control in the country. The objective of the current study was to examine the treatment outcomes of TB among health care workers (HCWs) at a rural general hospital in the Mpumalanga province of the country, as well as the clinical care that was provided to the HCWs. The purpose of the study was to identify possible areas for improvement in the TB care services provided to HCWs in the hospital, especially with regard to their clinical management. Method The research described in this article consists of a retrospective descriptive study. Relevant data on HCWs diagnosed with TB in the hospital during 2007, the TB care services offered to the HCWs, and the treatment outcomes of the HCWs were captured from the occupational health and TB control programme registers at the hospital onto a data capture sheet for the study and were subsequently analysed manually. Results Nine HCWs, eight females and one male, were diagnosed and treated for TB in the hospital during 2007, an incidence rate of 941/100 000. Their ages ranged from 39 to 54 years, with a mean age of 48 years. By occupation, the nine HCWs consisted of six nurses (67%), one porter (11%), one general assistant (11%), and one clerk (11%). Of those treated for TB, seven (78%) had smear- positive pulmonary TB (PTB) and two (22%) had extra-pulmonary TB (EPTB). TB culture and drug susceptibility testing (DST) was undertaken for only one HCW. The HIV status was known for only two (22%) of the nine HCWs under review. Neither of the two HCWs with EPTB had the diagnosis confirmed by bacteriological or histopathological method. The seven HCWs with smear- positive PTB achieved a cure, and the two HCWs with EPTB successfully completed treatment, resulting in a treatment success rate of 100% for the nine HCWs. Conclusion The HCWs at Themba Hospital in the Mpumalanga province of South Africa who were diagnosed and treated for TB during 2007 all achieved favourable treatment outcomes. However, in view of the high rate of HIV/TB co-infection and the increasing problem of drug-resistant TB in the country, the clinical care provided to HCWs with TB by the hospital should be improved with regard to routine HIV counselling and testing and the routine early provision of DST. A protocol for the comprehensive management of HCWs with TB is currently undergoing development.

  16. Needle Exchange and the HIV Epidemic in Vancouver: Lessons Learned from 15 years of research

    PubMed Central

    Hyshka, Elaine; Strathdee, Steffanie; Wood, Evan; Kerr, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    During the mid-1990s, Vancouver experienced a well characterized HIV outbreak among injection drug users (IDU) and many questioned how this could occur in the presence of a high volume needle exchange program (NEP). Specific concerns were fuelled by early research demonstrating that frequent needle exchange program attendees were more likely to be HIV positive than those who attended the NEP less frequently. Since then, some have misinterpreted this finding as evidence that NEPs are ineffective or potentially harmful. In light of continuing questions about the Vancouver HIV epidemic, we review 15 years of peer-reviewed research on Vancouvers NEP to describe what has been learned through this work. Our review demonstrates that: 1) NEP attendance is not causally associated with HIV infection, 2) frequent attendees of Vancouvers NEP have higher risk profiles which explain their increased risk of HIV seroconversion, and 3) a number of policy concerns, as well as the high prevalence of cocaine injecting contributed to the failure of the NEP to prevent the outbreak. Additionally, we highlight several improvements to Vancouvers NEP that contributed to declines in syringe sharing and HIV incidence. Vancouvers experience provides a number of important lessons regarding NEP. Keys to success include refocusing the NEP away from an emphasis on public order objectives by separating distribution and collection functions, removing syringe distribution limits and decentralizing and diversifying NEP services. Additionally, our review highlights the importance of context when implementing NEPs, as well as ongoing evaluation to identify factors that constrain or improve access to sterile syringes. PMID:22579215

  17. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Vancouver Lowlands Shillapoo Wildlife Area, 1994-1995 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Calkins, Brian; Anderson, Eric; Ashley, Paul

    1995-01-01

    This project was conducted as part of a comprehensive planning effort for the Vancouver Lowlands project area. The study was funded by The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and carried out by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). The Vancouver Lowlands is considered an area of high priority by WDFW and is being considered as a potential site for wildlife mitigation activities by BPA. The objectives of this study were to collect baseline information and determine current habitat values for the study area. A brief discussion of potential future management and a proposed listing of priorities for habitat protection are found near the end of this report. This report is a companion to a programmatic management plan being drafted for the area which will outline specific, management programs to improve habitat conditions based, in part, on this study. The following narratives, describing limiting habitat variables, carry recurring themes for each indicator species and habitat type. These recurring variables that limited habitat value include: Waterbodies that lack emergent and submerged vegetation; forest areas that lack natural shrub layers; a predominance of non-hydrophytic and less desirable non-native plants where shrubs are present; a general lack of cover for ground nesting and secure waterfowl nest sites (island type). Human disturbance was the variable that varied more than any other from site to site in the study area. One issue that the models we used do not truly deal with is the quantity and connectivity of habitat. The mallard and heron models deal with spatial relationships but for other species this may be as critical. Observation of habitat maps easily show that forested habitats are in short supply. Their continuity along Lake river and the Columbia has been broken by past development. Wetland distribution has also been affected by past development.

  18. Providing primary general medical care in university hospitals: efficiency and cost.

    PubMed

    Kosecoff, J; Brook, R H; Fink, A; Kamberg, C; Roth, C P; Goldberg, G A; Linn, L S; Clark, V A; Newhouse, J P; Delbanco, T L

    1987-09-01

    Data on efficiency, costs, and profits of 15 internal medicine outpatient group practices in university hospitals were collected for 9 months from interviews, a time-motion study, observations, and reviews of bills. Charges for a follow-up visit were about 25% higher than Medicare's allowable charges, but differed threefold across practices. Physicians spent more than half their allocated patient care or supervision time in other activities and 14% of nursing time was used for direct patient care. Visits to second- and third-year residents cost one half of those to faculty. Faculty supervision of second- and third-year residents was limited; it was, on average, 2 minutes per follow-up visit. Despite these inefficiencies, bad debts, and educational costs, practices appeared to break even financially. We conclude it is financially feasible for university hospitals to provide primary care to disadvantaged populations. PMID:3619226

  19. Physical symptoms in outpatients with psychiatric disorders consulting the general internal medicine division at a Japanese university hospital

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Yukiko; Takeshima, Taro; Mise, Junichi; Ishikawa, Shizukiyo; Matsumura, Masami

    2015-01-01

    Purpose General practitioners have an important role in diagnosing a variety of patients, including psychiatric patients with complicated symptoms. We evaluated the relationship between physical symptoms and psychiatric disorders in general internal medicine (GIM) outpatients in a Japanese university hospital. Materials and methods We coded the symptoms and diagnoses of outpatients from medical documents using the International Classification of Primary Care, second edition (ICPC-2). The participants were new outpatients who consulted the GIM outpatient division at Jichi Medical University Hospital in Tochigi, Japan from JanuaryJune, 2012. We reviewed all medical documents and noted symptoms and diagnoses. These were coded using ICPC-2. Results A total of 1,194 participants were evaluated, 148 (12.4%) of whom were diagnosed as having psychiatric disorders. The prevalence of depression, anxiety disorder, and somatization was 19.6% (number [n] =29), 14.9% (n=22), and 14.2% (n=21), respectively, among the participants with psychiatric disorders. The presence of several particular symptoms was associated with having a psychiatric disorder as compared with the absence of these symptoms after adjusting for sex, age, and the presence of multiple symptoms (odds ratio [OR] =4.98 [95% confidence interval {CI}: 1.6614.89] for palpitation; OR =4.36 [95% CI: 2.059.39] for dyspnea; OR =3.46 [95% CI: 1.438.36] for tiredness; and OR =2.99 [95% CI: 1.755.13] for headache). Conclusion Not only the psychiatric symptoms, but also some physical symptoms, were associated with psychiatric disorders in GIM outpatients at our university hospital. These results may be of help to general practitioners in appropriately approaching and managing patients with psychiatric disorders. PMID:26316801

  20. Toward evidence-based interventions for diverse populations: The San Francisco General Hospital prevention and treatment manuals.

    PubMed

    Muoz, Ricardo F; Mendelson, Tamar

    2005-10-01

    Clinical trials have seldom included adequate samples of people of color. Therefore, practitioners serving ethnic minorities often do not have access to readily available evidence-based interventions. This article summarizes the development and empirical evaluation of prevention and treatment manuals designed for low-income ethnic minority populations at San Francisco General Hospital. The manuals were often designed by people of color familiar with the communities for which they were developed. Independent research teams in multi-site national and international clinical trials have evaluated many of these manuals with encouraging results. PMID:16287379

  1. The Monitoring Network of the Vancouver 2010 Olympics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joe, Paul; Scott, Bill; Doyle, Chris; Isaac, George; Gultepe, Ismail; Forsyth, Douglas; Cober, Stewart; Campos, Edwin; Heckman, Ivan; Donaldson, Norman; Hudak, David; Rasmussen, Roy; Kucera, Paul; Stewart, Ron; Thriault, Julie M.; Fisico, Teresa; Rasmussen, Kristen L.; Carmichael, Hannah; Laplante, Alex; Bailey, Monika; Boudala, Faisal

    2014-01-01

    An innovative monitoring network was implemented to support the operational and science programs for the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics. It consisted of in situ weather stations on custom-designed platforms. The sensors included an HMP45C for temperature, humidity and pressure, a tipping bucket rain gauge, an acoustic snow depth sensor, a Pluvio 1 precipitation gauge and an anemometer placed at gauge height and at 10 m height. Modifications to commercial automated precipitation gauges were necessary for the heavy snowfall conditions. Advanced or emerging technologies were deployed to support scientific and nowcasting studies into precipitation intensity, typing, visibility and wind. The sensors included an FD12P visibility and precipitation sensor, a precipitation occurrence sensing system (POSS) present weather sensor, a Hotplate precipitation sensor and a Parsivel disdrometer. Data were collected at 1 min sampling intervals. A Doppler weather radar was deployed in a valley location and provided critical detailed low-level data. An X-band dual-polarized radar was deployed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to monitor Vancouver and Cypress Mountain. Three remote sensing stations for vertical profiling were established. At the base of Whistler Mountain, a micro-rain radar, a 22-channel radiometer, a ceilometer, a Parsivel and a POSS were installed. At the base of Cypress Mountain, a micro-rain radar, a ceilometer, a low cost rain sensor (LCR by ATTEX) and a POSS were installed. At Squamish, a wind profiler and a POSS were installed. Weather sensors were mounted on the Whistler Village Gondola and on the Peak to Peak gondola. Sites were established along the Whistler Mountain slope and at other key locations. The combination of sites and instruments formed a comprehensive network to provide observations appropriate for nowcasting in winter complex terrain and investigate precipitation, visibility and wind processes. The contribution provides a detailed description of the network, their sensors, the innovations and some examples.

  2. Perioperative risk factors for mortality and length of hospitalization in mares with dystocia undergoing general anesthesia: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Rioja, Eva; Cernicchiaro, Natalia; Costa, Maria Carolina; Valverde, Alexander

    2012-05-01

    This study investigated associations between perioperative factors and probability of death and length of hospitalization of mares with dystocia that survived following general anesthesia. Demographics and perioperative characteristics from 65 mares were reviewed retrospectively and used in a risk factor analysis. Mortality rate was 21.5% during the first 24 h post-anesthesia. The mean standard deviation number of days of hospitalization of surviving mares was 6.3 5.4 d. Several factors were found in the univariable analysis to be significantly associated (P < 0.1) with increased probability of perianesthetic death, including: low preoperative total protein, high temperature and severe dehydration on presentation, prolonged dystocia, intraoperative hypotension, and drugs used during recovery. Type of delivery and day of the week the surgery was performed were significantly associated with length of hospitalization in the multivariable mixed effects model. The study identified some risk factors that may allow clinicians to better estimate the probability of mortality and morbidity in these mares. PMID:23115362

  3. Quality of care for people with dementia in general hospitals: national cross-sectional audit of patient assessment.

    PubMed

    Souza, Renata; Gandesha, Aarti; Hood, Chloe; Chaplin, Robert; Young, John; Crome, Peter; Crawford, Mike J

    2014-10-01

    There have been recent reports of poor quality care in the National Health Service in the UK, and older people with dementia are particularly vulnerable. This study aims to examine the quality of assessment of people with dementia admitted to hospital. Cross-sectional case-note audit of key physical and psychosocial assessments was carried out in 7,934 people with dementia who were discharged from 206 general hospitals. Most people had no record of a standardised assessment of their cognitive state (56.8%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 55.8-58.0) or functioning (74.2%, 95% CI = 73.2-75.1). Information from carers was documented in 39.0% of cases (95% CI = 37.9-40.1). There was considerable variation across hospital sites. Key assessments were less likely when people were admitted to surgical wards. Assessments fall well below recommended standards especially with regard to social and cognitive functioning. Problems are particularly marked on surgical wards. PMID:25301908

  4. Exploring an Olympic "Legacy": Sport Participation in Canada before and after the 2010 Vancouver Winter Olympics.

    PubMed

    Perks, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Guided by the notion of a trickle-down effect, the present study examines whether sport participation in Canada increased following the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver. Comparing rates of sport participation prior to and following the Games using nationally representative data, the results suggest that the Olympics had almost no impact on sport participation in Canada, although there does appear to be a modest "bounce" in sport participation in the Vancouver area immediately following the Vancouver Games. As such, if the trickle-down effect did occur, the analysis suggests that the effect was locally situated, short-lived, and small. PMID:26577884

  5. Vancouver At Home: pragmatic randomized trials investigating Housing First for homeless and mentally ill adults

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Individuals with mental illnesses are overrepresented among the homeless. Housing First (HF) has been shown to promote positive outcomes in this population. However, key questions remain unresolved, including: how to match support services to client needs, the benefits of housing in scattered sites versus single congregate building, and the effectiveness of HF with individuals actively using substances. The present study aimed to recruit two samples of homeless mentally ill participants who differed in the complexity of their needs. Study details, including recruitment, randomization, and follow-up, are presented. Methods Eligibility was based on homeless status and current mental disorder. Participants were classified as either moderate needs (MN) or high needs (HN). Those with MN were randomized to HF with Intensive Case Management (HF-ICM) or usual care. Those with HN were randomized to HF with Assertive Community Treatment (HF-ACT), congregate housing with support, or usual care. Participants were interviewed every 3 months for 2 years. Separate consent was sought to access administrative data. Results Participants met eligibility for either MN (n = 200) or HN (n = 297) and were randomized accordingly. Both samples were primarily male and white. Compared to participants designated MN, HN participants had higher rates of hospitalization for psychiatric reasons prior to randomization, were younger at the time of recruitment, younger when first homeless, more likely to meet criteria for substance dependence, and less likely to have completed high school. Across all study arms, between 92% and 100% of participants were followed over 24 months post-randomization. Minimal significant differences were found between study arms following randomization. 438 participants (88%) provided consent to access administrative data. Conclusion The study successfully recruited participants meeting criteria for homelessness and current mental disorder. Both MN and HN groups had high rates of substance dependence, suicidality, and physical illness. Randomization resulted in no meaningful detectable differences between study arms. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials: ISRCTN57595077 (Vancouver at Home study: Housing First plus Assertive Community Treatment versus congregate housing plus supports versus treatment as usual) and ISRCTN66721740 (Vancouver At Home study: Housing First plus Intensive Case Management versus treatment as usual). PMID:24176253

  6. Impact of Influenza on Outpatient Visits, Hospitalizations, and Deaths by Using a Time Series Poisson Generalized Additive Model

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ru-ning; Zheng, Hui-zhen; Ou, Chun-quan; Huang, Li-qun; Zhou, Yong; Zhang, Xin; Liang, Can-kun; Lin, Jin-yan; Zhong, Hao-jie; Song, Tie; Luo, Hui-ming

    2016-01-01

    Background The disease burden associated with influenza in developing tropical and subtropical countries is poorly understood owing to the lack of a comprehensive disease surveillance system and information-exchange mechanisms. The impact of influenza on outpatient visits, hospital admissions, and deaths has not been fully demonstrated to date in south China. Methods A time series Poisson generalized additive model was used to quantitatively assess influenza-like illness (ILI) and influenza disease burden by using influenza surveillance data in Zhuhai City from 2007 to 2009, combined with the outpatient, inpatient, and respiratory disease mortality data of the same period. Results The influenza activity in Zhuhai City demonstrated a typical subtropical seasonal pattern; however, each influenza virus subtype showed a specific transmission variation. The weekly ILI case number and virus isolation rate had a very close positive correlation (r = 0.774, P < 0.0001). The impact of ILI and influenza on weekly outpatient visits was statistically significant (P < 0.05). We determined that 10.7% of outpatient visits were associated with ILI and 1.88% were associated with influenza. ILI also had a significant influence on the hospitalization rates (P < 0.05), but mainly in populations <25 years of age. No statistically significant effect of influenza on hospital admissions was found (P > 0.05). The impact of ILI on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) was most significant (P < 0.05), with 33.1% of COPD-related deaths being attributable to ILI. The impact of influenza on the mortality rate requires further evaluation. Conclusions ILI is a feasible indicator of influenza activity. Both ILI and influenza have a large impact on outpatient visits. Although ILI affects the number of hospital admissions and deaths, we found no consistent influence of influenza, which requires further assessment. PMID:26894876

  7. [High prevalence of undernutrition in Spanish elders admitted to a general hospital and associated factors].

    PubMed

    Gmez Ramos, M Jesus; Gonzlez Valverde, F Miguel

    2005-03-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the nutritional status of the hospitalised elderly patients using the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA) and nutritional classic parameters, to estimate the prevalence of undernutrition among them and to value the correlation of undernutrition with epidemiological characteristics of the sample for determine the highest risk's group among the malnourished patients. A cross sectional survey was done among a sample of 200 elderly patients admitted to the USP San Carlos Hospital (Murcia, Spain) during a period of 3 months. Patients answered a questionnaire including demographic data and the MNA clinical tool. Lymphocyte concentration and albumin and transferrin serum levels were also collected. Statistical analyses were performed with the Student t and chi 2 tests. For the MNA, the Spearman's coefficient was employed. Mean age of the 200 patients was 80.72 SD 7.43 years. Mean weight was 63.41 SD 19.57 kg and mean height was 160.93 SD 8.36 cm, with a mean Body Mass Index of 24.27 SD 7.31. The serum values of albumin and transferrin and total lymphocytes in blood were 3.09 SD 0.5 g/l, 1.69 SD 0.37 mg/dl and 1412 mm3 respectively. Average score of the MNA was 15.9 SD 6.21 and, according to this scale, 50% (n=100) of the patients were malnourished. Correlation analyses resulted in significant association (p < 0.001) between values of undernutrition in the MNA and measurements under normality of the biochemical and immunological parameters. The patients who presents chronic diseases, advanced physical or mental deterioration and minor self-sufficiency are either malnourished or at high risk of being. The individualized nutritional evaluation must be performed routinely when the patient is admitted to the hospital for detect and treat early signs of malnutrition. PMID:16187681

  8. The Toronto General Hospital Transitional Pain Service: development and implementation of a multidisciplinary program to prevent chronic postsurgical pain

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Joel; Weinrib, Aliza; Fashler, Samantha R; Katznelzon, Rita; Shah, Bansi R; Ladak, Salima SJ; Jiang, Jiao; Li, Qing; McMillan, Kayla; Mina, Daniel Santa; Wentlandt, Kirsten; McRae, Karen; Tamir, Diana; Lyn, Sheldon; de Perrot, Marc; Rao, Vivek; Grant, David; Roche-Nagle, Graham; Cleary, Sean P; Hofer, Stefan OP; Gilbert, Ralph; Wijeysundera, Duminda; Ritvo, Paul; Janmohamed, Tahir; O’Leary, Gerald; Clarke, Hance

    2015-01-01

    Chronic postsurgical pain (CPSP), an often unanticipated result of necessary and even life-saving procedures, develops in 5–10% of patients one-year after major surgery. Substantial advances have been made in identifying patients at elevated risk of developing CPSP based on perioperative pain, opioid use, and negative affect, including depression, anxiety, pain catastrophizing, and posttraumatic stress disorder-like symptoms. The Transitional Pain Service (TPS) at Toronto General Hospital (TGH) is the first to comprehensively address the problem of CPSP at three stages: 1) preoperatively, 2) postoperatively in hospital, and 3) postoperatively in an outpatient setting for up to 6 months after surgery. Patients at high risk for CPSP are identified early and offered coordinated and comprehensive care by the multidisciplinary team consisting of pain physicians, advanced practice nurses, psychologists, and physiotherapists. Access to expert intervention through the Transitional Pain Service bypasses typically long wait times for surgical patients to be referred and seen in chronic pain clinics. This affords the opportunity to impact patients’ pain trajectories, preventing the transition from acute to chronic pain, and reducing suffering, disability, and health care costs. In this report, we describe the workings of the Transitional Pain Service at Toronto General Hospital, including the clinical algorithm used to identify patients, and clinical services offered to patients as they transition through the stages of surgical recovery. We describe the role of the psychological treatment, which draws on innovations in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy that allow for brief and effective behavioral interventions to be applied transdiagnostically and preventatively. Finally, we describe our vision for future growth. PMID:26508886

  9. General surgery in a district hospital in Tajikistan: clinical impact of a partnership between visiting volunteers and host specialists.

    PubMed

    Kassum, Diamond A; Valji, Azim; Gulyazov, Shodi

    2003-10-01

    After the collapse of the Soviet Union and 5 years of civil war, health care services in Tajikistan are in disarray. Nongovernmental organizations are playing a key role in recovery programs. A group of volunteer physicians from the West went to Khorog General Hospital in the Pamiri mountains to establish a dialogue with their physician counterparts, recommend evidence-based best practice appropriate for local conditions, and reintroduce a culture of continuing medical education. The arrangements included a group visit to Khorog for 3 weeks annually over 3 years. In this article we describe the experiences of the 2 general surgeons attached to the group in the second year and the status of the partnership 1 year later. PMID:14577704

  10. Low Serum Vitamin C Status Among Pregnant Women Attending Antenatal Care at General Hospital Dawakin Kudu, Northwest Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ugwa, Emmanuel Ajuluchukwu; Iwasam, Elemi Agbor; Nwali, Matthew Igwe

    2016-01-01

    Background: Vitamin C levels are low in pregnancy. The purpose of this study was to determine serum Vitamins C levels among pregnant women attending antenatal care at a General Hospital in Dawakin Kudu, Kano, and this can help further research to determine the place of Vitamin C supplementation in pregnancy. Methods: This was a prospective study of 400 pregnant women who presented for antenatal care in General Hospital Dawakin Kudu, Kano, Nigeria. Research structured questionnaire was administered to 400 respondents. Determination of serum Vitamin C was done using appropriate biochemical methods. Results: Vitamin C deficiency was found in 79.5% of the participants. The values for Vitamin C were 0.20 ± 0.18 mg/dl during the first trimester, 0.50 ± 0.99 mg/dl in the second trimester, and 0.35 ± 0.36 mg/dl in the third trimester and P = 0.001. Conclusions: There is a significant reduction in the serum Vitamins C concentration throughout the period of pregnancy with the highest levels in the second trimester. Therefore, Vitamin C supplementation is suggested during pregnancy, especially for those whose fruit and vegetable consumption is inadequate. PMID:27014432

  11. MOLECULAR EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES ON TWO CYCLOSPORIASIS OUTBREAKS IN VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two cyclosporiasis outbreaks in Vancouver, British Columbia (BC) were investigated using molegular epidemiology. The cause of the 1999 outbreak has not been identiifed whereas the 2001 oubreak has been linked epidemiologically to the consumption of Thai basil. The internal tran...

  12. Cost accounting of radiological examinations. Cost analysis of radiological examinations of intermediate referral hospitals and general practice.

    PubMed

    Lääperi, A L

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the cost structure of radiological procedures in the intermediary referral hospitals and general practice and to develop a cost accounting system for radiological examinations that takes into consideration all relevant cost factors and is suitable for management of radiology departments and regional planning of radiological resources. The material comprised 174,560 basic radiological examinations performed in 1991 at 5 intermediate referral hospitals and 13 public health centres in the Pirkanmaa Hospital District in Finland. All radiological departments in the hospitals were managed by a specialist in radiology. The radiology departments at the public health care centres operated on a self-referral basis by general practitioners. The data were extracted from examination lists, inventories and balance sheets; parts of the data were estimated or calculated. The radiological examinations were compiled according to the type of examination and equipment used: conventional, contrast medium, ultrasound, mammography and roentgen examinations with mobile equipment. The majority of the examinations (87%) comprised conventional radiography. For cost analysis the cost items were grouped into 5 cost factors: personnel, equipment, material, real estate and administration costs. The depreciation time used was 10 years for roentgen equipment, 5 years for ultrasound equipment and 5 to 10 years for other capital goods. An annual interest rate of 10% was applied. Standard average values based on a sample at 2 hospitals were used for the examination-specific radiologist time, radiographer time and material costs. Four cost accounting versions with varying allocation of the major cost items were designed. Two-way analysis of variance of the effect of different allocation methods on the costs and cost structure of the examination groups was performed. On the basis of the cost analysis a cost accounting program containing both monetary and nonmonetary variables was developed. In it the radiologist, radiographer and examination-specific equipment costs were allocated to the examinations applying estimated cost equivalents. Some minor cost items were replaced by a general cost factor (GCF). The program is suitable for internal cost accounting of radiological departments as well as regional planning. If more accurate cost information is required, cost assignment employing the actual consumption of the resources and applying the principles of activity-based cost accounting is recommended. As an application of the cost accounting formula the average costs of the radiological examinations were calculated. In conventional radiography the average proportion of the cost factors in the total material was: personnel costs 43%, equipment costs 26%, material costs 7%, real estate costs 11%, administration and overheads 14%. The average total costs including radiologist costs in the hospitals were (FIM): conventional roentgen examinations 188, contrast medium examinations 695, ultrasound 296, mammography 315, roentgen examinations with mobile equipment 1578. The average total costs without radiologist costs in the public health centres were (FIM): conventional roentgen examinations 107, contrast medium examinations 988, ultrasound 203, mammography 557. The average currency rate of exchange in 1991 was USD 1 = FIM 4.046. The following formula is proposed for calculating the cost of a radiological examination (or a group of examinations) performed with a certain piece of equipment during a period of time (e.g. 1 year): a2/ sigma ax*ax+ b2/ sigma bx*bx+ d1/d5*dx+ e1 + [(c1+ c2) + d4 + (e2 - e3) + f5 + g1+ g2+ i]/n. PMID:8804226

  13. Assessment of leadership training needs of internal medicine residents at the Massachusetts General Hospital.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Traci N; Blumenthal, Daniel M; Bernard, Kenneth; Iyasere, Christiana

    2015-07-01

    Internal medicine (IM) physicians, including residents, assume both formal and informal leadership roles that significantly impact clinical and organizational outcomes. However, most internists lack formal leadership training. In 2013 and 2014, we surveyed all rising second-year IM residents at a large northeastern academic medical center about their need for, and preferences regarding, leadership training. Fifty-five of 113 residents (49%) completed the survey. Forty-four residents (80% of respondents) reported a need for additional formal leadership training. A self-reported need for leadership training was not associated with respondents' gender or previous leadership training and experience. Commonly cited leadership skill needs included "leading a team" (98% of residents), "confronting problem employees" (93%), "coaching and developing others" (93%), and "resolving interpersonal conflict" (84%). Respondents preferred to learn about leadership using multiple teaching modalities. Fifty residents (91%) preferred to have a physician teach them about leadership, while 19 (35%) wanted instruction from a hospital manager. IM residents may not receive adequate leadership development education during pregraduate and postgraduate training. IM residents may be more likely to benefit from leadership training interventions that are physician-led, multimodal, and occur during the second year of residency. These findings can help inform the design of effective leadership development programs for physician trainees. PMID:26130876

  14. Assessment of leadership training needs of internal medicine residents at the Massachusetts General Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Blumenthal, Daniel M.; Bernard, Kenneth; Iyasere, Christiana

    2015-01-01

    Internal medicine (IM) physicians, including residents, assume both formal and informal leadership roles that significantly impact clinical and organizational outcomes. However, most internists lack formal leadership training. In 2013 and 2014, we surveyed all rising second-year IM residents at a large northeastern academic medical center about their need for, and preferences regarding, leadership training. Fifty-five of 113 residents (49%) completed the survey. Forty-four residents (80% of respondents) reported a need for additional formal leadership training. A self-reported need for leadership training was not associated with respondents' gender or previous leadership training and experience. Commonly cited leadership skill needs included “leading a team” (98% of residents), “confronting problem employees” (93%), “coaching and developing others” (93%), and “resolving interpersonal conflict” (84%). Respondents preferred to learn about leadership using multiple teaching modalities. Fifty residents (91%) preferred to have a physician teach them about leadership, while 19 (35%) wanted instruction from a hospital manager. IM residents may not receive adequate leadership development education during pregraduate and postgraduate training. IM residents may be more likely to benefit from leadership training interventions that are physician-led, multimodal, and occur during the second year of residency. These findings can help inform the design of effective leadership development programs for physician trainees. PMID:26130876

  15. Recent trends in clinically significant nontuberculous Mycobacteria isolates at a Korean general hospital.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Soo; Lee, Yangsoon; Lee, Sangsun; Kim, Young Ah; Sun, Young-Kyu

    2014-01-01

    Lung disease caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) represents an increasing proportion of all mycobacterial diseases. We investigated recent occurrences of NTM and evaluated the clinical significance of NTM isolates from 752 respiratory specimens collected from patients at National Health Insurance Service Ilsan Hospital between January 2007 and May 2011. Specimens were incubated on solid and liquid media (BACTEC MGIT 960, BD, USA) for 6-8 weeks, and PCR and reverse blot hybridization were performed (REBA Myco-ID, Molecules & Diagnostics, Korea). Clinical features of the patients were reviewed through medical records. The most frequently isolated organism was Mycobacterium avium (46.7%), followed by M. intracellulare (14.8%), M. fortuitum (7.2%), and M. abscessus (6.6%). The most common mycobacteria among definitive cases of NTM lung disease were M. avium (42/351, 12.0%), M. intracellulare (19/111, 17.1%), M. abscessus (11/50, 22.0%), M. massiliense (4/13, 30.8%), and M. fortuitum (4/54, 7.4%). Clinically significant cases of NTM lung disease increased from 4 patients in 2007 to 32 in 2011. The mean patient age was 64 yr (range: 35-88 yr), and 58 (64%) patients were women. Patients suffered from cough, productive sputum, and hemoptysis. In summary, the most common mycobacteria causing NTM lung disease were M. avium and M. intracellulare; however, cases of M. massiliense and M. abscessus infection are on the rise in Korea. PMID:24422197

  16. Experience of shoulder dystocia in a district general hospital: what have we learnt?

    PubMed

    Soleymani Majd, H; Ismail, L; Iqbal, R

    2008-05-01

    Shoulder dystocia is an obstetric emergency that currently affects 0.6% of all deliveries in the UK. This potentially serious obstetric emergency requires early recognition and prompt involvement of appropriately trained personnel to deliver the baby safely and without delay. Failure to do so may result in significant neonatal and maternal morbidity, with ensuing litigation. As part of clinical governance, hospital trusts are under pressure to continually improve the quality of service provided to their patients. Meticulous and accurate documentation is the crucial first step. The second step is preparedness and practice. Although we are still not very good at being able to prevent or predict shoulder dystocia, when it occurs, we must be ready and able to deal with it effectively. This can best be accomplished through re-education and re-training of obstetric staff and the updating of Trust management protocols. By promptly acting in accordance with established evidence-based guidelines, we will improve our ability to carefully and competently manage deliveries complicated by shoulder dystocia. However, failing to do so will inevitably have dire repercussions for all. PMID:18604669

  17. A Comparison of Outpatients with Intellectual Disability Receiving Specialised and General Services in Ontario's Psychiatric Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunsky, Y.; Gracey, C.; Bradley, E.; Koegl, C.; Durbin, J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: This study compares outpatients with intellectual disability (ID) receiving specialised services to outpatients with ID receiving general services in Ontario's tertiary mental healthcare system in terms of demographics, symptom profile, strengths and resources, and clinical service needs. Methods: A secondary analysis of Colorado

  18. Improving the management of acute pancreatitis in a district general hospital.

    PubMed

    Crowther, Nicola; Kahvo, Mia; Chana, Prem

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a common problem seen in the United Kingdom, with an incidence of 56.6 per 100,000 population.[1,2,3] Optimising management has been shown to reduce mortality and morbidity, and the British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG) published revised guidelines in 2005 to standardise treatment for this potentially life threatening condition.[4] The aim of this quality improvement project was to investigate and improve the initial management of acute pancreatitis in patients presenting to the Great Western Hospital (GWH) in Swindon between November 2012 and July 2013. Patients presenting to the surgical team during this time with a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis were identified for the initial data collection. Notes were prospectively reviewed and data collected allowing a comparison between management in GWH against BSG guidelines. Following this stage, a pro forma based on the 2005 guidelines was created and implemented, with the aim of raising awareness and standardising care among surgical staff. Following implementation of the pro forma, data collection was repeated between May and June 2013 to assess the impact of the intervention. Results revealed an improvement from 93% to 100% of patients receiving the correct diagnosis within 24 hours of presentation. Severity stratification within 48 hours of diagnosis improved from 75% to 88% and identification of aetiology also improved from 64% to 74%. The implementation of an acute pancreatitis management protocol and education of junior surgical staff has been shown to improve compliance with BSG guidelines at the GWH, and ultimately aims to improves patient care and outcomes. PMID:26734376

  19. Diagnosis and Treatment Procedures for Patients With Anxiety Disorders by the Psychiatric Consultation Liaison Service in a General Hospital in Germany: A Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Christina; Tauch, Deborah; Quante, Arnim

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the population of patients with anxiety disorders in a general hospital in Germany who required treatment by a consultation psychiatrist. Method: A retrospective investigation of psychiatric consultations concerning 119 patients with anxiety disorders (DSM-IV criteria) from January 1, 2011, to December 31, 2012, was conducted in a general hospital of the Charité Berlin, Berlin, Germany. The frequency of different anxiety disorders, the distribution of anxiety disorders among the departments of the general hospital, and the recommended treatment procedure were investigated. Results: The largest group of patients with anxiety symptoms presented panic attacks. Many of these patients sought treatment in the emergency department of the hospital primarily due to their anxiety symptoms. Within the group of somatically ill patients, panic attacks were prominent, especially in patients with cardiac or respiratory diseases. Treatment procedures comprised pharmacologic and psychotherapeutic interventions. Benzodiazepines and psychoeducation were common acute treatments; antidepressants, pregabalin, and psychotherapy were recommended for long-term treatment. Conclusions: Many patients who primarily suffer from symptoms of anxiety seek treatment in a general hospital, especially in the emergency department. It is therefore very important for the individual patient as well as the health care system that the correct treatment is initiated. The consultation-liaison psychiatric service within a general hospital is important to ensure the best possible diagnostic procedures as well as treatment for patients with anxiety disorders. PMID:26835174

  20. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease hospital admissions and drugsunexpected positive associations: a retrospective general practice cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Harries, Timothy H; Seed, Paul T; Jones, Simon; Schofield, Peter; White, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Background: Increased prescribing of inhaled long-acting anti-muscarinic (LAMA) and combined inhaled long-acting ?2-agonist and corticosteroid (LABA+ICS) drugs for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has led to hopes of reduced hospital admissions from this disease. Aims: To investigate the impact of rising primary care prescribing of LAMA and LABA+ICS drugs on COPD admissions. Methods: This retrospective cohort study of general practice COPD admission and prescribing data between 2007 and 2010 comprised a representative group of 806 English general practices (population 5,264,506). Outcome measures were practice rates of COPD patient admissions and prescription costs of LAMA and LABA+ICS. General practice characteristics were based on the UK quality and outcomes framework. Results: Rates of COPD admissions remained stable from 2001 to 2010. Practice-prescribing volumes of LAMA per practice patient and LABA+ICS per practice patient increased by 61 and 26%, respectively, between 2007 and 2010. Correlation between costs of LAMA and those of LABA+ICS increased year on year, and was the highest in 2010 (Pearsons r=0.68; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.640.72). Practice COPD admission rates were positively predicted by practice-prescribing volumes of LAMA (2010: B=1.23, 95% CI, 0.611.85) and of LABA+ICS (2010: B=0.32, 95% CI, 0.120.52) when controlling for practice list size, COPD prevalence and deprivation. Conclusion: The increase in the prescribing of LAMA and LABA+ICS inhalers was not associated with the predicted fall in hospital admission rates for COPD patients. The positive correlation between high practice COPD prescribing and high practice COPD admissions was not explained. PMID:24842126

  1. Geriatric day hospital: opportunity or threat? A qualitative exploratory study of the referral behaviour of Belgian general practitioners

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In order to address the challenges of an ageing population the Belgian government decided to allocate resources to the creation of geriatric day hospitals (GDHs). Although GDHs are meant to be a strategy to support general practitioners (GPs) caring for the frail elderly, few Belgian GPs seem to refer to a GDH. This study aims to explore the barriers and facilitating factors of GPs' referral to GDHs. Methods A qualitative study using focus group discussions (FGDs) was conducted. Fifteen FGDs were organized in the different Belgian regions (Flanders, Wallonia, Brussels). Results Contextual factors such as the unsatisfactory cooperation between hospital and GPs and organizational barriers such as the lack of communication on referral procedures between hospital and primary health care (PHC) were identified. Lack of basic knowledge about the concept or the local organization of GDH seemed to be a problem. Unclear task descriptions, responsibilities and activities of a GDH formed prominent points of discussion in all FGDs. Nevertheless a lot of possible advantages and disadvantages of GDHs for the patient and for the GP were mentioned. Conclusions In the case of poor referral to GDHs, focusing on improving overall collaboration between primary and secondary health care is essential. This can be achieved by actively delivering adequate information, permanent communication and more involvement of PHC in the organization and functioning of GDHs. The absence of a transparent health care system with delineated role definitions, seems to hinder the integration of new initiatives like GDHs in the care process. Strategies to enhance referral to GDHs should use a comprehensive approach. PMID:20619001

  2. Vitamins A and E Deficiencies among Pregnant Women Attending Antenatal Care at General Hospital Dawakin Kudu, North-West Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ugwa, Emmanuel Ajuluchukwu

    2015-01-01

    Background: Vitamins A and E deficiency is prevalent in developing countries, and plasma levels are low in pregnancy. This study was undertaken to determine the serum Vitamins A and E status among pregnant women attending antenatal care at a General Hospital in Dawakin Kudu, Kano and to provide the necessary information needed to suggest the supplementation of Vitamins A and E during pregnancy. Methods: The study was done in General Hospital Dawakin Kudu Local Government Area. Dawakin Kudu, a rural community in Kano State is about 12 km from Kano metropolis which is the most populous city in Nigeria and commercial nerve center of Northern Nigeria. Most of the women are housewives, however, some engage in subsistent farming and petty trading. This was a prospective study of 200 pregnant women at various maternal ages, gestational ages, and parities. Informed consent was obtained from the participants. Research structured questionnaire was administered to 200 respondents which showed age and parity distributions. Determination of Serum Vitamins A and E was done using methods of Bessey, et al. and Tsen. Ethical approval for the research was obtained from General Hospital, Dawakin Kudu, Kano. Statistical Analysis Used: Data obtained were analyzed using SPSS version 17 statistical software (SPSS Inc., IL, Chicago, USA). Descriptive statistics was done. Mean serum Vitamins A and E concentration between trimesters were compared using two-way ANOVA and P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Majority of the women were aged 20–39 years with mean of 23.67 ± 6.11. Most were in the 1–4 parity range. Mean birth weight was 2.42 ± 0.74 kg. Above 65% were deficient while 34.5% had normal levels of Vitamin A and 51% were deficient of serum Vitamin E. Serum Vitamins A and E levels showed a marked reduction from first through third trimester. The differences were statistically significant (P < 0.05). Conclusions: There is a significant reduction in the serum Vitamins A and E concentration throughout the period of pregnancy with the highest levels in the first trimester. Therefore, further studies should evaluate the value of Vitamins A and E supplementation during pregnancy especially for those whose fruit and vegetable consumption is inadequate. PMID:26288709

  3. Are patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer getting appropriate DEXA scans? A District General Hospital experience

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Huan; Dayananda, Pete; Preece, Shay-Anne; Carmichael, Amtul

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer patients are often at high risk of fragility fractures partly due to adjuvant endocrine therapy such as aromatase inhibitors and chemotherapy. Baseline dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scanning is recommended as a standard of care in identifying patients who are at risk so they can be commenced on bone protective therapy. NICE guideline 80 Early and locally advanced breast cancer[1] states that patients with early invasive breast cancer should have a baseline DEXA scan to assess BMD before the commencement of aromatase inhibitor treatment; if patients have treatment-induced menopause or are starting ovarian ablation/suppression therapy. We have audited the performance of a DGH against these guidelines with a target of 100% concordance. During a one year period (April 2012-April 2013), 100 patients with a new diagnosis of breast cancer were selected at random from the hospital coding database. 100 patients were chosen as this was a convenient sample size. We gathered information for these patients using electronic records, letters, and imaging. This showed a poor compliance of 38% against NICE guidelines. This in turn means that patients with low BMD at diagnosis of breast cancer are being under diagnosed and under treated, resulting in increased potential morbidity associated with fragility fractures. The interventions that resulted from this audit were: dissemination of these results to surgical and oncology departments, posters summarising the guidelines put up in breast clinics, and breast MDTs to discuss the need for DEXA scans for patients with breast cancer. A re-audit was performed for patients diagnosed with early, invasive breast cancer in January 2014 where a compliance of 90% was achieved. This represents a huge improvement in compliance from the baseline measure of 38%. In order to show that this improvement could be sustained, two further cycles were performed in February and March 2014, where the compliance was 92% and 100% respectively. Therefore the improvement in compliance was not only maintained but in fact the compliance increased even further during subsequent cycles. Hence we have achieved a large improvement in the quality of assessment of bone quality in breast cancer patients. Moreover, we have demonstrated the importance of the dissemination of information and education within a multidisciplinary setting.

  4. Knowledge of Community General Practitioners and Nurses on Pre-Hospital Stroke Prevention and Treatment in Chongqing, China

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Juan; Zhang, Jie; Ou, Shu; Wang, Ni; Wang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose This study aimed to investigate the knowledge of community general practitioners (GPs) and nurses about pre-hospital stroke recognition, treatment and management and secondary stroke prevention; to identify the sociodemographic and educational factors influencing knowledge. Methods A self-designed test questionnaire was applied in a self-administered close-exam setting among 480 GPs and nurses working in community health centers (stations) in eight urban districts of Chongqing. Results A total of 331 (69%) valid test questionnaires were returned. Of the 331 participants, 39% were aware of the clinical guidelines for cerebrovascular diseases, whereas 48% considered themselves to have stroke management capabilities. The correct rate of answering questions of pre-hospital recognition and management knowledge was as low as 24%, the correct rate of secondary stroke prevention knowledge was only 38%. In terms of the total score for stroke prevention and treatment knowledge, there were significant differences between the medical staff with different specialties before engaging in community health services and whether they have received GP training (P <0.05). Conclusion The community GPs and nurses in the urban districts of Chongqing clearly lack knowledge of stroke, and the levels of stroke prevention and treatment urgently need to be improved. PMID:26384330

  5. An audit of lamotrigine, levetiracetam and topiramate usage for epilepsy in a district general hospital.

    PubMed

    Chappell, Brian; Crawford, Pamela

    2005-09-01

    The aim of this audit was to ascertain outcomes for people who had taken or who were still taking three "new generation" broad-spectrum antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), namely lamotrigine, levetiracetam and topiramate. Thirteen percent of people became seizure free and approximately, one-third had a reduction of greater than 50% in their seizures. Two-thirds of people were still taking their audit AED. In addition, approximately one-third of people with a learning disability derived substantial benefit, although the rate of seizure freedom was lower. All three AEDs were most successful at treating primary generalised epilepsy and least successful with symptomatic generalised epilepsy. With some reservations the data suggests that levetiracetam and topiramate are the most efficacious AEDs, but topiramate is the least well tolerated. These results mean consideration of a "general prescribing policy" is important when using and choosing these AEDs. We conclude that lamotrigine, levetiracetam and topiramate are useful additions to the armamentarium of AEDs. PMID:16087359

  6. The diagnostic value and cost effectiveness of routine fungal stains in a dermatopathology service of a district general hospital

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, J K; ODonohue, L

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the use and effectiveness of fungal stains in a dermatopathology service of a district general hospital. Methods: A retrospective analysis of skin biopsies submitted over three years, where fungal stains were used; the results were correlated with clinical history and case notes. Results: In total, 99 cases were studied for fungi with the periodic acid Schiff stain with diastase. Fungi were present in seven cases; fungi had been suggested in the differential diagnosis of three of these cases but were an unexpected finding in four cases. Conclusion: Non-specific clinical details should prompt early fungal staining and non-specific microscopic findings or inappropriate well recognised skin reaction patterns should warrant the exclusion of fungal infection. The finding of at least one case of unexpected fungal infection is justified financially and for patient best management where clinical and microscopic findings are non-specific or inappropriate. PMID:14747436

  7. Waiting times before dental care under general anesthesia in children with special needs in the Children's Hospital of Casablanca

    PubMed Central

    Badre, Bouchra; Serhier, Zineb; El Arabi, Samira

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Oral diseases may have an impact on quality of children's life. The presence of severe disability requires the use of care under general anesthesia (GA). However, because of the limited number of qualified health personnel, waiting time before intervention can be long. Aim: To evaluate the waiting time before dental care under general anesthesia for children with special needs in Morocco. Methods A retrospective cohort study was carried out in pediatric dentistry unit of the University Hospital of Casablanca. Data were collected from records of patients seen for the first time between 2006 and 2011. The waiting time was defined as the time between the date of the first consultation and intervention date. Results 127 children received dental care under general anesthesia, 57.5% were male and the average age was 9.2 (SD = 3.4). Decay was the most frequent reason for consultation (48%), followed by pain (32%). The average waiting time was 7.6 months (SD = 4.2 months). The average number of acts performed per patient was 13.5. Conclusion Waiting times were long, it is necessary to take measures to reduce delays and improve access to oral health care for this special population. PMID:25328594

  8. Attitudes and Relationship between Physicians and the Pharmaceutical Industry in a Public General Hospital in Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    De Ferrari, Aldo; Gentille, Cesar; Davalos, Long; Huayanay, Leandro; Malaga, German

    2014-01-01

    Background The interaction between physicians and the pharmaceutical industry influences physicians' attitudes and prescribing behavior. Although largely studied in the US, this topic has not been well studied in resource-poor settings, where a close relationship between physicians and industry still exists. Objective To describe physician interactions with and attitudes towards the pharmaceutical industry in a public general hospital in Lima, Peru. Design Descriptive, cross-sectional study through an anonymous, self-filled questionnaire distributed among faculty and trainee physicians of five different clinical departments working in a Peruvian public general hospital. A transcultural validation of an existing Spanish questionnaire was performed. Exposure to marketing activities, motivations to contact pharmaceutical representatives and attitudes towards industry were studied. Collected data was analyzed by degree of training, clinical department, gender and teaching status. Attitudes were measured on a four-point LIKERT scale. Results 155 physicians completed the survey, of which 148 were included in the study sample. 94.5% of attending physicians reported ongoing encounters with pharmaceutical representatives. The most common industry-related activities were receiving medical samples (91.2%), promotional material (87.8%) and attending meetings in restaurants (81.8%). Respondents considered medical samples and continuing medical education the most ethically acceptable benefits. We found significant differences between attendings and residents, and teaching and non-teaching attendings. An association between the amount of encounters with pharmaceutical representatives, and attitudes towards industry and acceptance of medical samples was found. Conclusions A close physician-industry relationship exists in the population under study. The contact is established mainly through pharmaceutical representatives. Medical samples are the most received and ethically accepted benefit. The attitudes of physicians on the ethical standards of acceptance of medical samples and other benefits are closely related with their exposure to the pharmaceutical industry. Future studies could explore the motivations of physicians working in resource-poor settings to maintain a close relationship with industry. PMID:24978481

  9. Economic Evaluation of a General Hospital Unit for Older People with Delirium and Dementia (TEAM Randomised Controlled Trial)

    PubMed Central

    Tanajewski, Lukasz; Franklin, Matthew; Gkountouras, Georgios; Berdunov, Vladislav; Harwood, Rowan H.; Goldberg, Sarah E.; Bradshaw, Lucy E.; Gladman, John R. F.; Elliott, Rachel A.

    2015-01-01

    Background One in three hospital acute medical admissions is of an older person with cognitive impairment. Their outcomes are poor and the quality of their care in hospital has been criticised. A specialist unit to care for older people with delirium and dementia (the Medical and Mental Health Unit, MMHU) was developed and then tested in a randomised controlled trial where it delivered significantly higher quality of, and satisfaction with, care, but no significant benefits in terms of health status outcomes at three months. Objective To examine the cost-effectiveness of the MMHU for older people with delirium and dementia in general hospitals, compared with standard care. Methods Six hundred participants aged over 65 admitted for acute medical care, identified on admission as cognitively impaired, were randomised to the MMHU or to standard care on acute geriatric or general medical wards. Cost per quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained, at 3-month follow-up, was assessed in trial-based economic evaluation (599/600 participants, intervention: 309). Multiple imputation and complete-case sample analyses were employed to deal with missing QALY data (55%). Results The total adjusted health and social care costs, including direct costs of the intervention, at 3 months was £7714 and £7862 for MMHU and standard care groups, respectively (difference -£149 (95% confidence interval [CI]: -298, 4)). The difference in QALYs gained was 0.001 (95% CI: -0.006, 0.008). The probability that the intervention was dominant was 58%, and the probability that it was cost-saving with QALY loss was 39%. At £20,000/QALY threshold, the probability of cost-effectiveness was 94%, falling to 59% when cost-saving QALY loss cases were excluded. Conclusions The MMHU was strongly cost-effective using usual criteria, although considerably less so when the less acceptable situation with QALY loss and cost savings were excluded. Nevertheless, this model of care is worthy of further evaluation. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01136148 PMID:26684872

  10. Risk factors associated with calcium oxalate urolithiasis in dogs evaluated at general care veterinary hospitals in the United States.

    PubMed

    Okafor, Chika C; Lefebvre, Sandra L; Pearl, David L; Yang, Mingyin; Wang, Mansen; Blois, Shauna L; Lund, Elizabeth M; Dewey, Cate E

    2014-08-01

    Calcium oxalate urolithiasis results from the formation of aggregates of calcium salts in the urinary tract. Difficulties associated with effectively treating calcium oxalate urolithiasis and the proportional increase in the prevalence of calcium oxalate uroliths relative to other urolith types over the last 2 decades has increased the concern of clinicians about this disease. To determine factors associated with the development of calcium oxalate urolithiasis in dogs evaluated at general care veterinary hospitals in the United States, a retrospective case-control study was performed. A national electronic database of medical records of all dogs evaluated between October 1, 2007 and December 31, 2010 at 787 general care veterinary hospitals in the United States was reviewed. Dogs were selected as cases at the first-time diagnosis of a laboratory-confirmed urolith comprised of at least 70% calcium oxalate (n=452). Two sets of control dogs with no history of urolithiasis diagnosis were randomly selected after the medical records of all remaining dogs were reviewed: urinalysis examination was a requirement in the selection of one set (n=1808) but was not required in the other set (n=1808). Historical information extracted included urolith composition, dog's diet, age, sex, neuter status, breed size category, hospital location, date of diagnosis, and urinalysis results. Multivariable analysis showed that the odds of first-time diagnosis of calcium oxalate urolithiasis were significantly (P<0.05) greater for dogs<7 years, males (OR: 7.77, 95% CI: 4.93-12.26), neutered (OR: 2.58, 1.44-4.63), toy- vs. medium-sized breeds (OR: 3.15, 1.90-5.22), small- vs. medium-sized breeds (OR: 3.05, 1.83-5.08), large- vs. medium-sized breeds (OR: 0.05, 0.01-0.19), and those with a diagnosis of cystitis within the previous year (OR: 6.49, 4.14-10.16). Urinary factors significantly associated with first-time diagnosis of calcium oxalate urolithiasis were acidic vs. basic pH (OR: 1.94, 1.22-3.10), presence of RBCs (OR: 6.20, 3.91-9.83) or WBCs (OR: 1.62, 1.03-2.54), and protein concentration>30 mg/dL (OR: 1.55, 1.04-2.30). Patient demographics and urinalysis results are important factors that can support risk assessment and early identification of canine oxalate urolithiasis. Therefore, periodic urolith screening and monitoring of urine parameters should be encouraged for dogs at risk of developing these uroliths. PMID:24834804

  11. Forest harvesting is associated with increased landslide activity during an extreme rainstorm on Vancouver Island, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, J. N.; Guthrie, R. H.; Brenning, A.

    2014-08-01

    Safe operations of forest practices in mountainous regions require effective development planning to mitigate hazards posed by landslides. British Columbia, Canada, has for the past two decades implemented landslide risk management policies aimed at reducing the impacts of the forest industry on landslides; it is required that timber harvesting sites are evaluated for their potential or existing impacts on terrain stability. Statistical landslide susceptibility modelling can enhance this evaluation by geographically highlighting potential hazardous areas. In addition, these statistical models can also improve our understanding of regional landslide controlling factors. The purpose of this research was to explore the regional effects of forest harvesting activities, topography, precipitation and geology on landslides initiated during an extreme rainfall event in November 2006 on Vancouver Island, British Columbia. These effects were analysed with a nonparametric statistical method, the generalized additive model (GAM). Although topography was the strongest predictor of landslide initiation, low density forest interpreted as regrowth areas and proximity to forest service roads were jointly associated with a six- to nine-fold increase in the odds of landslide initiation, while accounting for other environmental cofounders. This result highlights the importance of continuing proper landslide risk management to control the effects of forest practices on landslide initiation.

  12. An Experimental High-Resolution Forecast System During the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mailhot, J.; Milbrandt, J. A.; Gigure, A.; McTaggart-Cowan, R.; Erfani, A.; Denis, B.; Glazer, A.; Valle, M.

    2014-01-01

    Environment Canada ran an experimental numerical weather prediction (NWP) system during the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games, consisting of nested high-resolution (down to 1-km horizontal grid-spacing) configurations of the GEM-LAM model, with improved geophysical fields, cloud microphysics and radiative transfer schemes, and several new diagnostic products such as density of falling snow, visibility, and peak wind gust strength. The performance of this experimental NWP system has been evaluated in these winter conditions over complex terrain using the enhanced mesoscale observing network in place during the Olympics. As compared to the forecasts from the operational regional 15-km GEM model, objective verification generally indicated significant added value of the higher-resolution models for near-surface meteorological variables (wind speed, air temperature, and dewpoint temperature) with the 1-km model providing the best forecast accuracy. Appreciable errors were noted in all models for the forecasts of wind direction and humidity near the surface. Subjective assessment of several cases also indicated that the experimental Olympic system was skillful at forecasting meteorological phenomena at high-resolution, both spatially and temporally, and provided enhanced guidance to the Olympic forecasters in terms of better timing of precipitation phase change, squall line passage, wind flow channeling, and visibility reduction due to fog and snow.

  13. Harmful microinjecting practices among a cohort of injection drug users in Vancouver Canada

    PubMed Central

    Rachlis, Beth; Lloyd-Smith, Elisa; Small, Will; Tobin, Diane; Stone, Dave; Li, Kathy; Wood, Evan; Kerr, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Objectives We sought to identify factors associated with harmful microinjecting practices in a longitudinal cohort of IDU. Methods Using data from the Vancouver Injection Drug Users Study (VIDUS) between January 2004 and December 2005, generalized estimating equations (GEE) logistic regression was performed to examine sociodemographic and behavioral factors associated with four harmful microinjecting practices (frequent rushed injecting, frequent syringe borrowing, frequently injecting with a used water capsule, frequently injecting alone). Results In total, 620 participants were included in the present analysis. Our study included 251 (40.5%) women and 203 (32.7%) self-identified Aboriginal participants. The median age was 31.9 (interquartile range: 23.439.3). GEE analyses found that each harmful microinjecting practice was associated with a unique profile of sociodemographic and behavioral factors. Discussion We observed high rates of harmful microinjecting practices among IDU. The present study describes the epidemiology of harmful microinjecting practices and points to the need for strategies that target higher risk individuals including the use of peer-driven programs and drug-specific approaches in an effort to promote safer injecting practices. PMID:20509739

  14. Forest harvesting is associated with increased landslide activity during an extreme rainstorm on Vancouver Island, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, J. N.; Guthrie, R. H.; Brenning, A.

    2015-06-01

    Safe operations of forest practices in mountainous regions require effective development planning to mitigate hazards posed by landslides. British Columbia, Canada, has for the past 2 decades implemented landslide risk management policies aimed at reducing the impacts of the forestry industry on landslides. Consequently, it is required that timber harvesting sites be evaluated for their potential or existing impacts on terrain stability. Statistical landslide susceptibility modelling can enhance this evaluation by geographically highlighting potential hazardous areas. In addition, these statistical models can also improve our understanding of regional landslide controlling factors. The purpose of this research was to explore the regional effects of forest harvesting activities, topography, precipitation and geology on landslides initiated during an extreme rainfall event in November 2006 on Vancouver Island, British Columbia. These effects were analyzed with a nonparametric statistical method, the generalized additive model (GAM). Although topography was the strongest predictor of landslide initiation, low density forest interpreted as regrowth areas and proximity to forest service roads were jointly associated with a 6- to 9-fold increase in the odds of landslide initiation, while accounting for other environmental confounders. This result highlights the importance of continuing proper landslide risk management to control the effects of forest practices on landslide initiation.

  15. Hip resurfacing in a district general hospital: 6-year clinical results using the ReCap hip resurfacing system

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of our study was to prospectively report the clinical results of 280 consecutive hips (240 patients) who received a ReCap Hip Resurfacing System implant (Biomet Inc., Warsaw, USA) in a single district general hospital. Literature reports a large variation in clinical results between different resurfacing designs and published results using this particular design are scarce. Methods Mean follow up was 3.3 years (1.0 to 6.3) and four patients were lost to follow-up. All patients were diagnosed with end-stage hip osteoarthritis, their mean age was 54 years and 76.4% of all patients were male. Results There were 16 revisions and four patients reported a Harris Hip Score <70 points at their latest follow up. There were no pending revisions. Kaplan-Meier implant survival probability, with revision for any reason as endpoint, was 93.5% at six years follow-up (95%-CI: 88.8-95.3). There were no revisions for Adverse Reactions to Metal Debris (ARMD) and no indications of ARMD in symptomatic non-revised patients, although diagnostics were limited to ultrasound scans. Conclusions This independent series confirms that hip resurfacing is a demanding procedure, and that implant survival of the ReCap hip resurfacing system is on a critical level in our series. In non-revised patients, reported outcomes are generally excellent. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00603395 PMID:23234268

  16. Secondary stroke in patients with polytrauma and traumatic brain injury treated in an Intensive Care Unit, Karlovac General Hospital, Croatia.

    PubMed

    Belavi?, M; Jan?i?, E; Mikovi?, P; Brozovi?-Krijan, A; Bakota, B; uni?, J

    2015-11-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is divided into primary and secondary brain injury. Primary brain injury occurs at the time of injury and is the direct consequence of kinetic energy acting on the brain tissue. Secondary brain injury occurs several hours or days after primary brain injury and is the result of factors including shock, systemic hypotension, hypoxia, hypothermia or hyperthermia, intracranial hypertension, cerebral oedema, intracranial bleeding or inflammation. The aim of this retrospective analysis of a prospective database was to determine the prevalence of secondary stroke and stroke-related mortality, causes of secondary stroke, treatment and length of stay in the ICU and hospital. This study included patients with TBI with or without other injuries who were hospitalised in a general ICU over a five-year period. The following parameters were assessed: demographics (age, sex), scores (Glasgow Coma Score, APACHE II, SOFA), secondary stroke (prevalence, time of occurrence after primary brain injury, causes of stroke and associated mortality), length of stay in the ICU and hospital, vital parameters (state of consciousness, cardiac function, respiration, circulation, thermoregulation, diuresis) and laboratory values (leukocytes, C-reactive protein [CRP], blood glucose, blood gas analysis, urea, creatinine). Medical data were analysed for 306 patients with TBI (median age 56 years, range 18-93 years) who were treated in the general ICU. Secondary stroke occurred in 23 patients (7.5%), 10 of whom died, which gives a mortality rate of 43.4%. Three patients were excluded as the cause of the injury was missile trauma. The study data indicate that inflammation is the most important cause of secondary insults. Levels of CRP were elevated in 65% of patients with secondary brain injury; leukocytosis was present in 87% of these patients, and blood glucose was elevated in 73%. The lungs and urinary tract were the most common sites of infection. In conclusion, elevated inflammatory markers (white blood cell count and CRP) and hyperglycaemia are associated with secondary brain injury. The lack of routine use of intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring may explain the high mortality rate and the occurrence of secondary stroke in patients with TBI. PMID:26620118

  17. Massachusetts General Hospital

    Cancer.gov

    The overall goal of this U24 application is to continue supporting a team of investigators to develop new and provide established, state-of-the-art high resolution mouse imaging techniques to local cancer investigators. The Harvard Small Animal Imaging Resource (SAIR) has a proven track record for innovation in molecular imaging and clinical translation, has served over 70 regional cancer investigators and currently performs imaging studies for over 40 cancer related base grants.

  18. Massachusetts General Hospital

    Cancer.gov

    Imaging sciences are at a stage at which in vivo imaging can occur at near micron resolutions with image specificity at the physiological, cellular and molecular level. Although the molecular basis of may diseases are well defined, we do not have a full understanding of the mechanism by which they develop in vivo nor have we fully harnessed the potential for translating advances in molecular science into clinical practice of imaging.

  19. Traveling to Canada for the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games.

    PubMed

    Heggie, Travis W

    2009-07-01

    The 21st Winter Olympic Games will be held in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada from February 12 to 28, 2010. Following the Winter Olympic Games, the Winter Paralympic Games will be held from March 12 to 21, 2010. There will be 86 winter sporting events hosted in Vancouver with 5500 athletes staying in two Olympic Villages. Another 2800 members of the media, 25,000 volunteers, and 1 million spectators are expected in attendance. This paper reviews health and safety issues for all travelers to Canada for the 2010 Vancouver Winter Olympic Games with a specific focus on pre-travel planning, road and transportation safety in British Columbia, natural and environmental hazards, Olympic medical facilities, safety and security, and infectious disease. PMID:19717101

  20. Specificity and sensitivity of SPECT myocardial perfusion studies at the Nuclear Medicine Department of the Limassol General Hospital in Cyprus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koumna, S.; Yiannakkaras, Ch; Avraamides, P.; Demetriadou, O.

    2011-09-01

    The aim is to determine the sensitivity and specificity of Myocardial Perfusion Imaging (MPI) performed at the Nuclear Medicine Department of the Limassol General Hospital in Cyprus. Through a retrospective analysis, patient results obtained by MPI were compared to results obtained by Invasive Angiography. We analyzed data from 96 patients that underwent both MPI and Angiography during the years 2009-2010, with a maximum time interval of 9 months between the two types of medical exams. For 51 patients, the indication was the detection of CAD. For 45 patients, the indication was to assess viability and/or ischemia after MI, PCI or CABG. Out of 84 patients with CAD confirmed by angiography, 80 patients resulted in abnormal MPI (sensitivity of 95% and positive predictive value of 98%). Out of 12 patients with normal coronaries, 10 patients resulted in normal MPI (specificity of 83% and negative predictive value of 71%).In conclusion, for the patients with abnormal MPI and confirmed CAD, MPI was a useful aid for further therapy management.

  1. Generation of Leukemia Inhibitory Factor-Dependent Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from the Massachusetts General Hospital Miniature Pig

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Dae-Jin; Jeon, Hyelena; Oh, Keon Bong; Ock, Sun-A; Im, Gi-Sun; Lee, Sung-Soo; Im, Seok Ki; Lee, Jeong-Woong; Oh, Sung-Jong; Park, Jin-Ki; Hwang, Seongsoo

    2013-01-01

    The generation and application of porcine induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) may enable the testing for safety and efficacy of therapy in the field of human regenerative medicine. Here, the generation of iPSCs from the Massachusetts General Hospital miniature pig (MGH minipig) established for organ transplantation studies is reported. Fibroblasts were isolated from the skin of the ear of a 10-day-old MGH minipig and transduced with a cocktail of six human factors: POU5F1, NANOG, SOX2, C-MYC, KLF4, and LIN28. Two distinct types of iPSCs were generated that were positive for alkaline phosphatase activity, as well as the classical pluripotency markers: Oct4, Nanog, Sox2, and the surface marker Ssea-1. Only one of two porcine iPSC lines differentiated into three germ layers both in vitro and in vivo. Western blot analysis showed that the porcine iPSCs were dependent on LIF or BMP-4 to sustain self-renewal and pluripotency. In conclusion, the results showed that human pluripotent factors could reprogram porcine ear fibroblasts into the pluripotent state. These cells may provide a useful source of cells that could be used for the treatment of degenerative and genetic diseases and agricultural research and application. PMID:24371815

  2. Analysis of the Clonality of Candida tropicalis Strains from a General Hospital in Beijing Using Multilocus Sequence Typing

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yuan; Zhou, Haijian; Wang, Jing; Li, Lianqing; Li, Wenge; Cui, Zhigang; Chen, Xia; Cen, Ruiqi; Lu, Jinxing; Cheng, Ying

    2012-01-01

    Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) based on six loci was used to analyze the relationship of 58 Candida tropicalis isolates from individual patients in a general hospital in Beijing, China. A total of 52 diploid sequence types (DSTs) were generated by the MLST, all of which were new to the central database. Unweighted Pair Group Method with Arithmetic Mean (UPGMA) dendrograms were constructed, which showed that the 58 isolates were distributed robustly and 6 main groups were clustered regardless of the specimen source and medical department. The minimum spanning tree (MST) of the 58 isolates (52 DSTs) and all 401 isolates (268 DSTs) in the C. tropicalis central database (http://pubmlst.org/ctropicalis/) indicated that the isolates in this study clustered in three relative pure clonal complexes, and 2 clustered with isolates from Taiwan, Belgium, Brazil, and the US. This study presents the first MLST analysis of C. tropicalis isolates from Mainland China, which may be useful for further studies on the similarity, genetic relationship, and molecular epidemiology of C. tropicalis strains worldwide. PMID:23152759

  3. Changing frequency of parotid gland neoplasms--analysis of 560 tumours treated in a district general hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Ethunandan, M.; Pratt, C. A.; Macpherson, D. W.

    2002-01-01

    An analysis of all parotidectomies performed for neoplastic lesions in the maxillofacial unit at a district general hospital during a 26-year period between 1974-1999 was undertaken. The details analysed were age, sex, histology and temporal variations in the frequency of specific tumour types during the study period. A total of 538 parotidectomies performed on 529 patients in whom 560 tumours were present, formed the basis of this study. Marked variations were present in the age and sex distribution and relative frequency of specific tumour types in this study, when compared to previous reports. There were also differences in the age and sex distribution of pleomorphic adenoma and adenolymphoma (P <0.0001) in this study. The relative frequency of benign tumours and adenolymphoma increased, whereas that of pleomorphic adenoma decreased during the study period. In addition, there was a statistically significant decrease in the relative frequency of pleomorphic adenoma (P <0.0001) and an increase in adenolymphoma (P <0.0001) when comparisons were made with previous studies. This study from a defined population may be more representative of the true proportion of specific tumours in this population. The potential implications of the results on the investigation and treatment of parotid neoplasms is highlighted. PMID:11890618

  4. Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis in Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital Bandung, Indonesia from 2009-2013

    PubMed Central

    Suwarsa, Oki; Dharmadji, Hartati Purbo; Sutedja, Endang

    2016-01-01

    Background Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCAR) with high mortality and have a significant public health impact because of high mortality and morbidity. Objective To describe data the epidemiological features, etiology, and treatment of retrospectively reviewed data of all patients with SJS and TEN. Methods Retrospective study was conducted in patients with SJS and TEN treated from January 1, 2009 to December 31, 2013 in Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital Bandung, Indonesia. Results A total of 57 patients were enrolled in the study. Thirty-nine cases of SJS (21 males and 18 females), 7 cases of SJS overlapping TEN (4 males and 3 females), and 11 cases of TEN (5 males and 6 females) were reported. All cases of SJS and TEN were caused by drugs, such as paracetamol (16.56%), carbamazepine (7%), amoxicillin (5.73%), ibuprofen (4.46%), rifampicin (3.18%), and trihexyphenidyl (3.18%). All cases were treated systemically with corticosteroid alone (100%). Seven from 57 patients (12,28%) died; 5 cases developed sepsis and 2 cases developed respiratory failure. The mortality rate was 7.69% in SJS, 0% in SJS/TEN overlap, and 36.36% in TEN. Conclusion The role of systemic corticosteroids in SJS and TEN are still controversial, but with a prompt and earlier treatment reduces mortality and improves outcomes of SJS and TEN patients. PMID:26844219

  5. Stigma, medication adherence and coping mechanism among people living with HIV attending General Hospital, Lagos Island, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Obidike, Obinna R.; Balogun, Mobolanle R.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background People living with HIV and AIDS (PLWHA) experience some form of stigma which could lead to poor medication adherence. Objectives This study assessed the various domains of stigma experienced by PLWHAs attending an HIV clinic at General Hospital, Lagos Island, their medication adherence patterns and their coping mechanisms for ensuring adherence to antiretroviral therapy. Method A cross-sectional study design with a sample size of 200 was used. Respondents were selected using systematic random sampling. Interviewers administered structured questionnaires were used to collect information on the domains of stigma. Data was analysed using EPI info. This was followed by a focus group discussion (FGD) with seven participants at the clinic using an interview guide with open-ended questions. Results Overall, stigma was experienced by 35% of the respondents. Within this group, 6.6%, 37.1%, 43.1% and 98.0% of the respondents reported experiencing negative self image stigma, personalised stigma, disclosure stigma and public attitude stigma respectively. Almost 90% of the respondents were adherent. The FGD revealed that disclosure was usually confined to family members and the coping mechanism for achieving adherence was to put antiretroviral (ARVs) in unlabelled pill boxes. Conclusion This study found that stigma was low and that the most common domain of stigma experienced was public attitude stigma. Medication adherence of respondents was good as a result of the coping mechanism, which involves putting ARVs in unlabelled pill boxes.

  6. Cutaneous Diphtheria in the Urban Poor Population of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada: a 10-Year Review ▿

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, C. F.; Bernard, K. A.; Romney, M. G.

    2011-01-01

    Between 1998 and 2007, records from 33 patients with cutaneous diphtheria from Vancouver's inner city were reviewed. Cases were associated with injection drug use and poverty. Coinfections with Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Arcanobacterium haemolyticum occurred. Corynebacterium diphtheriae is endemic in Vancouver's urban core, with strains of multilocus sequence type (MLST) 76 predominating. PMID:21525220

  7. Needle exchange and the HIV epidemic in Vancouver: lessons learned from 15 years of research.

    PubMed

    Hyshka, Elaine; Strathdee, Steffanie; Wood, Evan; Kerr, Thomas

    2012-07-01

    During the mid-1990s, Vancouver experienced a well characterized HIV outbreak among injection drug users (IDU) and many questioned how this could occur in the presence of a high volume needle exchange program (NEP). Specific concerns were fuelled by early research demonstrating that frequent needle exchange program attendees were more likely to be HIV positive than those who attended the NEP less frequently. Since then, some have misinterpreted this finding as evidence that NEPs are ineffective or potentially harmful. In light of continuing questions about the Vancouver HIV epidemic, we review 15 years of peer-reviewed research on Vancouver's NEP to describe what has been learned through this work. Our review demonstrates that: (1) NEP attendance is not causally associated with HIV infection, (2) frequent attendees of Vancouver's NEP have higher risk profiles which explain their increased risk of HIV seroconversion, and (3) a number of policy concerns, as well as the high prevalence of cocaine injecting contributed to the failure of the NEP to prevent the outbreak. Additionally, we highlight several improvements to Vancouver's NEP that contributed to declines in syringe sharing and HIV incidence. Vancouver's experience provides a number of important lessons regarding NEP. Keys to success include refocusing the NEP away from an emphasis on public order objectives by separating distribution and collection functions, removing syringe distribution limits and decentralizing and diversifying NEP services. Additionally, our review highlights the importance of context when implementing NEPs, as well as ongoing evaluation to identify factors that constrain or improve access to sterile syringes. PMID:22579215

  8. Prevalence and Correlates of Nonmedical Prescription Opioid Use Among a Cohort of Sex Workers in Vancouver, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Argento, Elena; Chettiar, Jill; Nguyen, Paul; Montaner, Julio; Shannon, Kate

    2014-01-01

    Background The nonmedical use of prescription opioids (POs) is a major public health concern, causing extensive morbidity and mortality in North America. Canada has the second highest consumption rate of POs globally and data indicate nonmedical PO use (NPOU) is growing among key populations and increasingly available in street-level drug markets. Despite accumulating evidence documenting the rise of NPOU, few studies have systematically examined NPOU in Canada among key vulnerable populations, such as sex workers. This study prospectively evaluated the prevalence and correlates of NPOU within a Vancouver cohort of sex workers over three-years follow-up. Methods Data were drawn from an open prospective cohort, AESHA (An Evaluation of Sex Workers Health Access) in Metro Vancouver, Canada (2010-2013). Women were recruited through outreach from outdoor street locations and indoor venues. Bivariate and multivariable logistic regression using Generalized Estimating Equations (GEE) were used to examine social and structural correlates of NPOU over 36 months. Results Of the 692 sex workers at baseline, close to one-fifth (n=130, 18.8%) reported NPOU (injection or non-injection) in the last six months. In multivariable GEE analyses, factors independently correlated with recent NPOU were: exchanging sex while high (AOR 3.26, 95%CI 2.29-4.64), police harassment/arrest (AOR 1.83, 95%CI 1.43-2.35), intimate partner injects drugs (AOR 1.66, 95%CI 1.11-2.49), and recent physical/sexual intimate partner violence (AOR 1.65, 95%CI 1.21-2.24). Conclusion Our results demonstrate that nearly one-fifth of sex workers in Metro Vancouver report NPOU. Factors independently statistically associated with NPOU included exchanging sex while high, police harassment/arrest, a drug injecting intimate partner and recent physical/sexual intimate partner violence. The high prevalence of NPOU use among sex workers underscores the need for further prevention and management strategies tailored to this key population. The correlates of NPOU uncovered here suggest that structural interventions may be further implemented to ameliorate this growing concern. PMID:25148695

  9. Bayesian inversion of marine controlled source electromagnetic data offshore Vancouver Island, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrmann, Romina A. S.; Schwalenberg, Katrin; Riedel, Michael; Spence, George D.; Spieß, Volkhard; Dosso, Stan E.

    2016-01-01

    This paper applies nonlinear Bayesian inversion to marine controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) data collected near two sites of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 311 on the northern Cascadia Margin to investigate subseafloor resistivity structure related to gas hydrate deposits and cold vents. The Cascadia margin, off the west coast of Vancouver Island, Canada, has a large accretionary prism where sediments are under pressure due to convergent plate boundary tectonics. Gas hydrate deposits and cold vent structures have previously been investigated by various geophysical methods and seabed drilling. Here, we invert time-domain CSEM data collected at Sites U1328 and U1329 of IODP Expedition 311 using Bayesian methods to derive subsurface resistivity model parameters and uncertainties. The Bayesian information criterion is applied to determine the amount of structure (number of layers in a depth-dependent model) that can be resolved by the data. The parameter space is sampled with the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm in principal-component space, utilizing parallel tempering to ensure wider and efficient sampling and convergence. Nonlinear inversion allows analysis of uncertain acquisition parameters such as time delays between receiver and transmitter clocks as well as input electrical current amplitude. Marginalizing over these instrument parameters in the inversion accounts for their contribution to the geophysical model uncertainties. One-dimensional inversion of time-domain CSEM data collected at measurement sites along a survey line allows interpretation of the subsurface resistivity structure. The data sets can be generally explained by models with 1 to 3 layers. Inversion results at U1329, at the landward edge of the gas hydrate stability zone, indicate a sediment unconformity as well as potential cold vents which were previously unknown. The resistivities generally increase upslope due to sediment erosion along the slope. Inversion results at U1328 on the middle slope suggest several vent systems close to Bullseye vent in agreement with ongoing interdisciplinary observations.

  10. Mechanical ventilation in patients in the intensive care unit of a general university hospital in southern Brazil: an epidemiological study

    PubMed Central

    Fialkow, Léa; Farenzena, Maurício; Wawrzeniak, Iuri Christmann; Brauner, Janete Salles; Vieira, Sílvia Regina Rios; Vigo, Alvaro; Bozzetti, Mary Clarisse

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the characteristics, the frequency and the mortality rates of patients needing mechanical ventilation and to identify the risk factors associated with mortality in the intensive care unit (ICU) of a general university hospital in southern Brazil. METHOD: Prospective cohort study in patients admitted to the ICU who needed mechanical ventilation for at least 24 hours between March 2004 and April 2007. RESULTS: A total of 1,115 patients admitted to the ICU needed mechanical ventilation. The mortality rate was 51%. The mean age (± standard deviation) was 57±18 years, and the mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score was 22.6±8.3. The variables independently associated with mortality were (i) conditions present at the beginning of mechanical ventilation, age (hazard ratio: 1.01; p<0.001); the APACHE II score (hazard ratio: 1.01; p<0.005); acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (hazard ratio: 1.38; p=0.009), sepsis (hazard ratio: 1.33; p=0.003), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (hazard ratio: 0.58; p=0.042), and pneumonia (hazard ratio: 0.78; p=0.013) as causes of mechanical ventilation; and renal (hazard ratio: 1.29; p=0.011) and neurological (hazard ratio: 1.25; p=0.024) failure, and (ii) conditions occurring during the course of mechanical ventilation, acute lung injuri/acute respiratory distress syndrome (hazard ratio: 1.31; p<0.010); sepsis (hazard ratio: 1.53; p<0.001); and renal (hazard ratio: 1.75; p<0.001), cardiovascular (hazard ratio: 1.32; p≤0.009), and hepatic (hazard ratio: 1.67; p≤0.001) failure. CONCLUSIONS: This large cohort study provides a comprehensive profile of mechanical ventilation patients in South America. The mortality rate of patients who required mechanical ventilation was higher, which may have been related to the severity of illness of the patients admitted to our ICU. Risk factors for hospital mortality included conditions present at the start of mechanical ventilation conditions that occurred during mechanical support.

  11. The role of the Director Zmago Slokan in the development of Maribor General Hospital in the first period after the Second World War (1953-1970).

    PubMed

    Pivec, Gregor

    2015-12-01

    The author explores and explains the role of the director of Maribor General Hospital in the first period after Second World War. The period was problematic on account of the difficult economic situation and changes in the political system. On one hand the hospital suffered relatively large damage due to bombing attacks during the war and on the other it had to face numerous staffing problems, especially with a lack of physicians and trained nursing staff (from 1948 an executive order entered into force forbidding the nursing nuns from performing nursing care in hospitals). The change in the political system required the management of the hospital to be taken over by an individual who enjoyed the political, professional and economic trust of the then authorities. Based on his engagement during the Second World War, the director, Zmago Slokan, represented a form of guarantee for the political system of that time, which nevertheless wanted the quality-based, professional and economic progress of the hospital. Using his personal characteristics, professional medical and economic knowledge as well as political experience, he was able to manage different tendencies to continue the quality-based progress of the institution. Thus, he set a proper foundation for its development in the periods that followed, in the Socialist Federative Republic of Yugoslavia as well as in the independent Republic of Slovenia (after 1991). The author discusses the role of the director in the hospital's progress chronologically. PMID:26659911

  12. Epidemiology of Suicide and Associated Socio-Demographic Factors in Emergency Department Patients in 7 General Hospitals in Northwestern China

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Cheng-jin; Dang, Xing-bo; Su, Xiao-li; Bai, Jia; Ma, Long-yang

    2015-01-01

    Background This study aimed to illustrate the characteristics of suicide attempters treated in the Emergency Departments of 7 general hospitals in Xian and to provide relevant data for early psychological treatment. Material/Methods Between October 2010 and September 2014, 155 suicide attempters were treated in the Emergency Departments. Data were collected using a semi-structured questionnaire. Descriptive statistics, chi-square tests, and multivariate analyses were used to identify the factors associated with suicidal behaviors. Results Females outnumbered males at a ratio of 3.7 to 1. The greatest proportion of cases was in the age group of 21 to 30 years (52.9%). Patients who finished middle school or high school accounted for most of the suicide attempters (50.3%). The most common method used for attempted suicide was drug ingestion (86.5%). The majority of cases attempted suicide at home (74.8%) during the night. Marriage frustration, work and study problems, family fanaticism and conflict, somatic disease, and history of mental disorders were all significantly associated with suicide attempts. The ratio of patients to be discharged or to die were similar in occupation, marital status, and the place of suicide attempt; however, the results were different in gender, age, educational level, methods used for suicide, time of day, and reason. Conclusions Suicide is an important public health problem and is multidimensional in nature. Future studies with larger samples are expected to provide more specific knowledge of the effect of each social factor on the suicide risk in Chinese in order to improve the prevention of suicides. PMID:26369363

  13. Hypokalaemia: Improving the investigation, management and therapeutic monitoring of hypokalaemic medical inpatients at a district general hospital

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Mark; Caesar, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    Hypokalaemia is prevalent in 20% of hospitalised patients. Furthermore, inadequate management of hypokalemia was identified in 24% of these patients. Associated with significant patient morbidity and mortality, the identification, investigation, and treatment of hypokalaemia was identified as an area for improvement in the management of medical inpatients. The project aims to measure the assessment, management, and therapeutic monitoring of medical inpatients with hypokalaemia in a district general hospital. All medical inpatients over a one week period who met the criteria for hypokalaemia (serum potassium <3.5 mmol/L on standard biochemical sample) were included in the audit. Patient's notes were located and evaluated to identify if they had mild, moderate, or severe hypokalaemia. Further data on ECG requests, repeat U&Es, serum magnesium analysis, treatment prescribed, and medication review dates was collated. A re-audit was completed after the introduction of a set of interventions which included a hypokalaemia treatment algorithm. Pre-intervention analysis of all medical inpatients, who met our inclusion criteria for hypokalaemia, identified 32 patients. 25 of these patients met the criteria for mild hypokalaemia (3.13.4 mmol/L) and 7 met the criteria for moderate hypokalaemia (2.53.0 mmol/L). Only 7/32 (22 %) patients were receiving adequate treatment based on trust guidelines. Post intervention results showed marked improvement in the management of patients with hypokalaemia. A total of 30 patients were identified in this post-intervention group. There were 16/30 patients who qualified as mild hypokalaemia (3.13.4 mmol/L) and 14/30 with moderate hypokalaemia (2.53.0 mmol/L). 19/30 (63%) patients in the post-intervention group were correctly prescribed appropriate medication doses consistent with the treatment algorithm. Following the initial success of the project, analysis at 3 months showed a positive trend for sustained improvement when compared to the pre-intervention results. PMID:26734439

  14. Incidence of tuberculous and non-tuberculous mycobacteria, differentiated by multiplex PCR, in clinical specimens of a large general hospital

    PubMed Central

    Bensi, Eliane Picoli Alves; Panunto, Patricia Costa; de Carvalho Ramos, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the incidence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and non-tuberculous mycobacterial isolates in the routine setting of a large general hospital using an "in-house" multiplex polymerase chain reaction method and to establish a paradigm for the definitive identification of mycobacteria isolated using semi-automated equipment. METHODS: Established tests, including polymerase chain reaction restriction enzyme analysis, PNB, and NAP inhibition tests as the gold standard, showed 100% agreement with an IS6110/hsp65 multiplex polymerase chain reaction when used to identify stock strains (n?=?117). RESULTS: In a subsequent study, 8,790 clinical specimens producing 476 isolates were evaluated with multiplex PCR and also showed 100% agreement in identification using PRA-polymerase chain reaction as the gold standard. The application of this technique to routine analysis was demonstrated in this study. A method was established with the initial application of multiplex PCR for all positive liquid cultures and the subsequent identification of non-tuberculous mycobacteria by polymerase chain reaction restriction enzyme analysis. In total, 77% of isolates belonged to the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, and 23% were non-tuberculous mycobacteria. CONCLUSIONS: Several non-tuberculous mycobacterial species were identified, primarily M. avium, but other potentially pathogenic species were also frequently observed, including M. fortuitum, M. abscessus, and M. kansasii. The expeditious communication of these data to the clinical staff was fundamental for the diagnosis of clinical cases. Even in settings where tuberculosis is of major importance, the incidence of non-tuberculous mycobacteria infection is substantial. PMID:23525313

  15. Extraintestinal Salmonellosis in a General Hospital (1991 to 1996): Relationships between Salmonella Genomic Groups and Clinical Presentations

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Mercedes; de Diego, Isabel; Mendoza, M. Carmen

    1998-01-01

    Episodes of extraintestinal salmonellosis treated at a general hospital (1,522 beds) over a 6-year period (1991 to 1996) were characterized by the analysis of phenotypic and genotypic traits of Salmonella organisms and clinical data from medical reports. Extraintestinal salmonellosis accounted for 8% of all salmonellosis episodes. Fifty-two medical reports, dealing with 6 cases of typhoid fever, 32 cases of bacteremia, and 14 focal infections, were reviewed. All cases of typhoid fever except 1, 7 cases of bacteremia, and 5 focal infections were not related to any underlying disease or predisposing factors, while 25 cases of bacteremia and 9 focal infections were associated with some of these risk factors. All typhoid isolates and 65.4% of the nontyphoid isolates were susceptible to antimicrobials. Fifty-one nontyphoid strains were analyzed and assigned to 21 genomic groups, which were defined by serotype, combined ribotype, and combined randomly amplified polymorphic DNA type (each genomic group could include organisms differing in some phenotypic traits). The relationships between genomic groups and clinical presentations were traced. Organisms causing 22 episodes (17 episodes of bacteremia, 2 of pneumonia, 1 of peritonitis, 1 of pyelonephritis, and 1 of cystitis) belonged to a prevalent Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis genomic group, which included organisms assigned to four phage types, five biotypes, and four resistance patterns, causing infections in patients with and without risk factors. Seven other genomic groups, 4 Enteritidis groups (associated with both bacteremia and focal infections), 2 Typhimurium groups (one associated with bacteremia and the other with focal infections) and 1 Brandenburg group (associated with bacteremia) included two or more strains, and the remaining 13 genomic groups consisted of only one strain each. PMID:9774581

  16. Improving the quality of discharge summaries: implementing updated Academy of Medical Royal Colleges standards at a district general hospital.

    PubMed

    May-Miller, Hannah; Hayter, Joanne; Loewenthal, Lola; Hall, Louis; Hilbert, Rebecca; Quinn, Michael; Pearson, Nicola; Patel, Alisha; Law, Rebekah

    2015-01-01

    Quality of documentation is harder to quantify and incentivise, but it has a significant impact on patient care. Good discharge summaries facilitate continuity between secondary and primary care. The junior doctors' forum led this project to improve the quality of electronic discharge summaries (eDS). Baseline measurement revealed significant room for improvement. We measured the quality of 10 summaries per month (across all inpatient specialties), against 23 indicators from the revised Academy of Medical Royal Colleges (AoMRC) standards (2013) that were prioritised by GPs as a "minimum dataset". Junior doctors felt that the Trust's dual eDS systems were responsible for great variation in quality. This was confirmed by the results of a comparison audit of the systems in April 2014: one system greatly outperformed the other (57% mean compliance with iSoft clinical management (iCM) based system vs. 77% with InfoPath-based system). We recommended that the Trust move to a single eDS system, decommissioning the iCM-based system, and this proposal was approved by several Trust committees. We worked with information services, junior doctors, general practitioners and hospital physicians to develop and implement a generic template to further improve compliance with AoMRC standards. In August 2014, the iCM-based system was withdrawn, the new template went live, and training was delivered, coinciding with the changeover of junior doctors to minimise disruption. Median compliance increased from 66.7% to 77.8%. Quality of discharge summaries had improved across the specialties. There was a reduction in the number of complaints and positive qualitative feedback from general practitioners and junior doctors. Completion of discharge summaries within 24 hours was not affected by this change. There is still more to be done to improve quality; average compliance with the full AoMRC standards (39 indicators) is 59.5%. With the approval of the Trust executive committee further plan, do, study, act (PDSA) cycles are underway, working to improve the remaining specialty-specific templates. PMID:26734325

  17. Embracing a New Understanding of the City: The Museum of Vancouver's Vision in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gosselin, Viviane

    2013-01-01

    The Museum of Vancouver recently undertook a major rethinking of its role in the city. New interplays are being proposed between emerging conceptions of urbanity and civic participation, and the museum's collection and function as facilitator and advocate. This short paper provides a brief overview of the museum's recent transformation, situates…

  18. Adventure Education and the Acculturation of First-Generation Chinese Canadians in Vancouver, Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lo, Simon; Gidlow, Bob; Cushman, Grant

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on research that demonstrates how parents in first-generation Chinese families in Vancouver, Canada, most of them from Hong Kong, control their children's involvement in local adventure education (AE) programs and in so doing minimize the likelihood of intergenerational culture conflict involving those children. The research…

  19. Engaging Language and Cultural Spaces: Latin American Parents' Reflections on Language Loss and Maintenance in Vancouver

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guardado, Martin

    2006-01-01

    This qualitative study aims to explore the loss and maintenance of Spanish in Latin American children in Vancouver from the perspective of parents. It focuses on the experiences of children either developing bilingually (Spanish-English) or monolingually (English). The participating families were from Colombia, Guatemala, and El Salvador, and had

  20. Educational Inclusion/Exclusion of Turkish Immigrant Youth in Vancouver, Canada: A Critical Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kayaalp, Dilek

    2014-01-01

    This empirical research analyses an understudied population, Turkish immigrant youths' educational experiences of inclusion/exclusion in Vancouver. My information was gathered from in-depth interviews and participant observation with the first- and second-generation, Muslim and non-religious female and male Turkish immigrant youth from…

  1. Implications for Counselling Asian Transnational Youth: The Experiences of Taiwanese Youth in Vancouver

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Leah; Park-Saltzman, Jeeseon

    2010-01-01

    Using a phenomenological approach, this study sought to explore the long-term psychological impact of families' transnational separation on children through the lenses of Taiwanese youth in Vancouver. Over time, most participants found themselves in a position of an "ambivalent outsider," with an increased sense of uncertainty about their…

  2. Immigrants as Active Citizens: Exploring the Volunteering Experience of Chinese Immigrants in Vancouver

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guo, Shibao

    2014-01-01

    Despite the fact that immigration has played an important role in transforming Canada into an ethno-culturally diverse and economically prosperous nation, immigrants themselves are often criticised as passive citizens. This study attempts to deconstruct this myth by investigating the volunteering experiences of Chinese immigrants in Vancouver. The

  3. Educational Inclusion/Exclusion of Turkish Immigrant Youth in Vancouver, Canada: A Critical Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kayaalp, Dilek

    2014-01-01

    This empirical research analyses an understudied population, Turkish immigrant youths' educational experiences of inclusion/exclusion in Vancouver. My information was gathered from in-depth interviews and participant observation with the first- and second-generation, Muslim and non-religious female and male Turkish immigrant youth from

  4. Embracing a New Understanding of the City: The Museum of Vancouver's Vision in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gosselin, Viviane

    2013-01-01

    The Museum of Vancouver recently undertook a major rethinking of its role in the city. New interplays are being proposed between emerging conceptions of urbanity and civic participation, and the museum's collection and function as facilitator and advocate. This short paper provides a brief overview of the museum's recent transformation, situates

  5. The Contrasting Discourses in the Professional Lives of Educators in Vancouver, Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimmett, Peter P.; Dagenais, Diane; D'Amico, Laura; Jacquet, Marianne; Ilieva, Roumi

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between education policy changes and the working conditions of teachers and school leaders in Vancouver, Canada. We found that policy does shape educators' discourse about their work conditions. This shaping manifested itself in the emotions teachers experience as they attempt to construct their identity as

  6. Demography, Ethnic Identity, and Decision-Making: The Case of the Vancouver Sikhs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chadney, James G.

    1977-01-01

    This article contends that an urban ethnic community is capable of developing coinciding spatial and sociocultural boundaries. This correspondence will be strengthened when the leaders of the ethnic community perceive that demographic concentration is politically advantageous. The case of the Sikh population of Vancouver supports this contention.

  7. Adventure Education and the Acculturation of First-Generation Chinese Canadians in Vancouver, Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lo, Simon; Gidlow, Bob; Cushman, Grant

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on research that demonstrates how parents in first-generation Chinese families in Vancouver, Canada, most of them from Hong Kong, control their children's involvement in local adventure education (AE) programs and in so doing minimize the likelihood of intergenerational culture conflict involving those children. The research

  8. The Developmental Centre--Lord Tennyson Elementary School, Vancouver, B.C.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Debbie

    1979-01-01

    The reorganization of the Developmental Centre program at the Lord Tennyson Elementary School in Vancouver, British Columbia is described. The component for autistic children is described in terms of the referral procedure, staffing and consultant services, organization, program development, integration, and parent involvement. (DB)

  9. Too Much French? Not Enough French?: The Vancouver Olympics and a Very Canadian Language Ideological Debate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vessey, Rachelle

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses a language ideological debate that took place in Canadian national newspapers following the opening ceremonies for the 2011 Vancouver Olympics. Reports on the insufficient use of French during the opening ceremonies sparked protest from politicians, official commentators, citizens and online newsreaders alike. Previous

  10. The electrical conductivity distribution beneath Vancouver Island: A region of active plate subduction

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, R.D.; Gupta, J.C. ); DeLaurier, J.M. )

    1990-07-10

    Magnetotelluric (MT) and geomagnetic depth sounding (GDS) data were recorded at 25 locations across Vancouver Island, Canada, over the subducting Juan de Fuca plate. The GDS data respond to a number of local conductive features at frequencies above 10 Hz while at longer periods, the in-phase and quadrature induction arrows are colinear and are aligned approximately normal to the continental shelf with a maximum amplitude response near the southwest coast. Interpretation of the MT data show the presence of a conducting zone at depths greater than 20 km beneath Vancouver Island and correlating with a strong seismic reflector. Extensive testing with two dimensional models shows the MT and GDS data are consistent with a proposed geoelectrical structure containing a conducting layer extending from the Pacific Ocean, dipping beneath Vancouver Island, and in electrical contact with the mainland conductive region. The layer has a horizontal conductance of 200 S that may decrease to 100 S beneath the northeast side of Vancouver Island. Related geophysical studies suggest the conductive zone is above the actual thrust surface of the Juan de Fuca plate. The conducting layer is most likely the result of cracks and pores filled with saline fluids which are supplied by water subducted with the oceanic crust and by dehydration reactions. The presence of fluids has significant implications for thrust earthquakes and for metamorphic reactions that occur in subduction zones. The conductance of the upper mantle (between 90 and 390 km) is best modeled at approximately 1,500 S.

  11. Building a Virtual Branch at Vancouver Public Library Using Web 2.0 Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahill, Kay

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the work undertaken by Vancouver Public Library (VPL) in an effort to convert its website into a true virtual branch, both through the functionality of the website itself and by extending its web presence on to external social networking sites. Design/methodology/approach: VPL worked with its

  12. 77 FR 10618 - Eric Temple-Control Exemption-Portland Vancouver Junction Railroad, LLC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-22

    ... Surface Transportation Board Eric Temple--Control Exemption--Portland Vancouver Junction Railroad, LLC Eric Temple (applicant), a noncarrier individual, has filed a verified notice of exemption to acquire...% ownership interest in CBRW and a 45% ownership interest in CWA. \\2\\ See Nicholas B. Temple, Eric...

  13. Going Social at Vancouver Public Library: What the Virtual Branch Did Next

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahill, Kay

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to follow up on the 2009 publication "Building a virtual branch at Vancouver Public Library (VPL) using Web 2.0 tools" and to explore the work that VPL has been doing in the social media space over the past two years. Design/methodology/approach: Following the launch of its new web site in 2008, Vancouver…

  14. Winter distribution, movements, and annual survival of radiomarked Vancouver Canada geese in Southeast Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hupp, J.W.; Hodges, J.I., Jr.; Conant, B.P.; Meixell, B.W.; Groves, D.J.

    2010-01-01

    Management of Pacific Flyway Canada geese (Branta canadensis) requires information on winter distribution of different populations. Recoveries of tarsus bands from Vancouver Canada geese (B. canadensis fulva) marked in southeast Alaska, USA, ???4 decades ago suggested that ???83% of the population was non-migratory and that annual adult survival was high (?? = 0.836). However, recovery distribution of tarsus bands was potentially biased due to geographic differences in harvest intensity in the Pacific Flyway. Also, winter distribution of Vancouver Canada geese could have shifted since the 1960s, as has occurred for some other populations of Canada geese. Because winter distribution and annual survival of this population had not recently been evaluated, we surgically implanted very high frequency radiotransmitters in 166 adult female Canada geese in southeast Alaska. We captured Vancouver Canada geese during molt at 2 sites where adults with goslings were present (breeding areas) and 2 sites where we observed nonbreeding birds only. During winter radiotracking flights in southeast Alaska, we detected 98% of 85 females marked at breeding areas and 83% of 70 females marked at nonbreeding sites, excluding 11 females that died prior to the onset of winter radiotracking. We detected no radiomarked females in coastal British Columbia, or western Washington and Oregon, USA. Most (70%) females moved ???30 km between November and March. Our model-averaged estimate of annual survival (?? = 0.844, SE = 0.050) was similar to the estimate of annual survival of geese marked from 1956 to 1960. Likely <2% of Vancouver Canada geese that nest in southeast Alaska migrate to winter areas in Oregon or Washington where they could intermix with Canada geese from other populations in the Pacific Flyway. Because annual survival of adult Vancouver Canada geese was high and showed evidence of long-term consistency, managers should examine how reproductive success and recruitment may affect the population. ?? The Wildlife Society.

  15. Winter distribution, movements, and annual survival of radiomarked Vancouver Canada geese in southeast Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hupp, Jerry W.; Hodges, John I., Jr.; Conant, Bruce P.; Meixell, Brandt W.; Groves, Debbie J.

    2010-01-01

    Management of Pacific Flyway Canada geese (Branta canadensis) requires information on winter distribution of different populations. Recoveries of tarsus bands from Vancouver Canada geese (B. canadensis fulva) marked in southeast Alaska, USA, ?4 decades ago suggested that ?83% of the population was non-migratory and that annual adult survival was high (? = 0.836). However, recovery distribution of tarsus bands was potentially biased due to geographic differences in harvest intensity in the Pacific Flyway. Also, winter distribution of Vancouver Canada geese could have shifted since the 1960s, as has occurred for some other populations of Canada geese. Because winter distribution and annual survival of this population had not recently been evaluated, we surgically implanted very high frequency radiotransmitters in 166 adult female Canada geese in southeast Alaska. We captured Vancouver Canada geese during molt at 2 sites where adults with goslings were present (breeding areas) and 2 sites where we observed nonbreeding birds only. During winter radiotracking flights in southeast Alaska, we detected 98% of 85 females marked at breeding areas and 83% of 70 females marked at nonbreeding sites, excluding 11 females that died prior to the onset of winter radiotracking. We detected no radiomarked females in coastal British Columbia, or western Washington and Oregon, USA. Most (70%) females moved ?30 km between November and March. Our model-averaged estimate of annual survival (? = 0.844, SE = 0.050) was similar to the estimate of annual survival of geese marked from 1956 to 1960. Likely <2% of Vancouver Canada geese that nest in southeast Alaska migrate to winter areas in Oregon or Washington where they could intermix with Canada geese from other populations in the Pacific Flyway. Because annual survival of adult Vancouver Canada geese was high and showed evidence of long-term consistency, managers should examine how reproductive success and recruitment may affect the population.

  16. Racial Differences in Length of Stay for Patients Who Leave Against Medical Advice from U.S. General Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Tawk, Rima; Dutton, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    There is a paucity of published literature on the length of hospital stays (LOS) for patients who leave against medical advice (AMA) and on the factors that predict their LOS. The purpose of the study is to examine the relationship between race and the LOS for AMA patients after adjusting for patient and hospital characteristics. National Hospital Discharge Survey (NHDS) data were used to describe LOS for AMA patients aged 18 years or older. Patient characteristics included age, sex, race, marital status, insurance, and diagnosis (ICD-9-CM). Hospital characteristics consisted of ownership, region and bed size. LOS was the major outcome measure. Using data from all years 1988-2006, the expected time to AMA discharge was first examined as a function of race, then adjusting for year terms, patient and hospital characteristics, and major medical diagnoses and mental illness. The unadjusted effect of race on the expected time of leaving AMA was about twice the adjusted effect. After controlling for the other covariates, the expected time to AMA discharge is 20% shorter for Blacks than Whites. The most significant predictors included age, insurance coverage, mental illness, gender, and region. Factors identified in this study offer insights into directions for evidence based- health policy to reduce AMA discharges. PMID:26729149

  17. Racial Differences in Length of Stay for Patients Who Leave Against Medical Advice from U.S. General Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Tawk, Rima; Dutton, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    There is a paucity of published literature on the length of hospital stays (LOS) for patients who leave against medical advice (AMA) and on the factors that predict their LOS. The purpose of the study is to examine the relationship between race and the LOS for AMA patients after adjusting for patient and hospital characteristics. National Hospital Discharge Survey (NHDS) data were used to describe LOS for AMA patients aged 18 years or older. Patient characteristics included age, sex, race, marital status, insurance, and diagnosis (ICD-9-CM). Hospital characteristics consisted of ownership, region and bed size. LOS was the major outcome measure. Using data from all years 1988–2006, the expected time to AMA discharge was first examined as a function of race, then adjusting for year terms, patient and hospital characteristics, and major medical diagnoses and mental illness. The unadjusted effect of race on the expected time of leaving AMA was about twice the adjusted effect. After controlling for the other covariates, the expected time to AMA discharge is 20% shorter for Blacks than Whites. The most significant predictors included age, insurance coverage, mental illness, gender, and region. Factors identified in this study offer insights into directions for evidence based- health policy to reduce AMA discharges. PMID:26729149

  18. Starting a General Surgery Program at a Small Rural Critical Access Hospital: A Case Study from Southeastern Oregon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doty, Brit Cruse; Heneghan, Steven; Zuckerman, Randall

    2007-01-01

    Context: Surgical services are frequently unavailable in rural American communities. Therefore, rural residents often must travel long distances to receive surgical care. Rural hospitals commonly have difficulty providing surgical services despite potential economic benefits. Purpose: The purpose of this project was to identify the key challenges

  19. Starting a General Surgery Program at a Small Rural Critical Access Hospital: A Case Study from Southeastern Oregon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doty, Brit Cruse; Heneghan, Steven; Zuckerman, Randall

    2007-01-01

    Context: Surgical services are frequently unavailable in rural American communities. Therefore, rural residents often must travel long distances to receive surgical care. Rural hospitals commonly have difficulty providing surgical services despite potential economic benefits. Purpose: The purpose of this project was to identify the key challenges…

  20. [Access, use and preferences of Information and Communication Technologies by physicians in a general hospital in Peru].

    PubMed

    Vsquez-Silva, Luis; Ticse, Ray; Alfaro-Carballido, Luz; Guerra-Castaon, Felix

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the access, use and preferences of information and communication technology (ICT) by physicians who practice at Cayetano Heredia National Hospital. The questionnaire explored the availability and skills of ICT, time, educational activities, search engines and technological applications most used as well as ICT preferences in education.211 physicians were surveyed; laptop use was 93%, tablet and smartphone use was 66% and 88%.68% have mobile Internet. Differences were evident in the frequency of use of ICT in 25-34 year old age group as well as a higher level of skills (p<0.05). 86% use PubMed, Facebook and WhatsApp as a means of exchanging images and data related to health, 50% participated in medical blogs, online courses or videoconferences. The use and access of ICT is common among doctors in this hospital and there is positive interest in its use in education. PMID:26338389

  1. Utilization of the Emergency Department and Predicting Factors Associated With Its Use at the Saudi Ministry of Health General Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Dawoud, Sundus O; Ahmad, Alaeddin Mohammad K; Alsharqi, Omar Z; Al-Raddadi, Rajaa M

    2016-01-01

    Overuse of emergency rooms (ER) is a public health problem. To investigate this issue, a cross-sectional survey was conducted at the ERs of King Abdul-Aziz Hospital, King Fahd Hospital, and Al-Thaghor Hospital in November 2013 with the aims of estimating emergency service utilization for non-urgent cases, identifying the predictors of ER utilization for non-urgent cases, and measuring patients' knowledge of primary healthcare centers (PHCCs). Patients were interviewed using a structured questionnaire and the data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences. We recruited 300 patients; males comprised 50.7% of the sample. A higher proportion of patients with non-urgent cases visited the ER three to four times a year (P=0.001). A higher proportion of patients without emergencies had not attempted to visit an outpatient clinic before the ER (P=0.003). Most patients without emergencies thought the ER was the first place to consult in case of illness. Most patients who visited the ER were single, <15 years, and had lower incomes. Patients requested ER services for primary care-treatable conditions because of limited services and resources as well as limited working hours at PHCCs. Most patients (90.0%) were knowledgeable about PHCCs, with those of lower education being more knowledgeable. Patients reported long ER waiting times (≥3 hours), no organization (85.9%), and lack of medical staff. Overall, overuse of ER services is high at the Ministry of Health hospitals in Jeddah. The risk factors for ER overuse are age<15 years, singlehood, and low incomes. Policy makers and health providers have a challenging task to control ER overuse. We recommend developing strategies to implement policies aimed at reducing non-urgent ER use as well as making healthcare services more available to the population. PMID:26234993

  2. Risk, citizenship, and public discourse: coeval dialogues on war and health in Vancouver's Downtown Eastside.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Leslie A

    2006-01-01

    This article is about September 11, 2001, and its narrated effects on the lives of nine street-involved women in Vancouver's Downtown Eastside. I outline the locations from which they spoke about war and health: as consumers and economic agents whose bodies are linked to transnational economic processes; as residents in a local community of shared knowledge and practices; and as marginalized citizens of a nation-state. I hope to emphasize the value of engaging research subjects in coeval dialogues that work against essentializing, state-sanctioned discourses narrated in the context of armed conflict and a public health crisis. To women drug users in Vancouver's Downtown Eastside, the "War against Terror" evokes particular sites of knowledge: the body, the local community, and transnational processes. Their repertoires of war stimulate questions about citizenship and perceptions of risk, challenging dominating medical and political discourses that tend to temporally and spatially localize their engagement with the world. PMID:17101508

  3. An Elder-Friendly Hospital: translating a dream into reality.

    PubMed

    Parke, Belinda; Brand, Penny

    2004-03-01

    The complex health profile of an older adult entering a hospital presents staff and administrators with a new challenge. This paper documents the Vancouver Island Health Authority's (VIHA) move towards an Elder-Friendly Hospital (EFH). A new approach to hospital care is described, one that takes account not only of an acute healthcare crisis, but also the developmental phenomena associated with aging, with the likelihood of chronic illnesses compounding both diagnosis and treatment. Customized strategies and suggestions for implementation that may be useful to other healthcare agencies are explained. PMID:15503917

  4. Perspectives on the provision of GDM screening in general practice versus the hospital setting: a qualitative study of providers and patients

    PubMed Central

    Tierney, Marie; O'Dea, Angela; Danyliv, Andrii; Carmody, Louise; McGuire, Brian E; Glynn, Liam G; Dunne, Fidelma

    2016-01-01

    Objective A novel gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) screening programme which involved offering screening at the patient's general practitioner (GP) compared with the traditional hospital setting was trialled. This study investigates perspectives of involved stakeholders on the provision of GDM screening at both settings. Design Thematic analysis of the perspectives of stakeholders involved in the receiving and provision of GDM screening in both the GP and hospital settings drawn from focus groups and interviews. Participants 3 groups of participants are included in this research—patient participants, GP screening providers and hospital screening providers. All were recruited from a larger sample who participated in a randomised controlled screening trial. Purposeful sampling was utilised to select participants with a wide variety of perspectives on the provision of GDM screening. Setting Participants were recruited from a geographical area covered by 3 hospitals in Ireland. Results 4 themes emerged from thematic analysis—namely (1) travel distance, (2) best care provision, (3) sense of ease created and (4) optimal screening. Conclusions The influence of travel distance from the screening site is the most important factor influencing willingness to attend for GDM screening among women who live a considerable distance from the hospital setting. For patients who live equidistance from both settings, other factors are important; namely the waiting facilities including parking, perceived expertise of screening provider personnel, access to emergency treatment if necessary, accuracy of tests and access to timely results and treatment. Optimal screening for GDM should be specialist led, incorporate expert advice of GDM screening, treatment and management, should be provided locally, offer adequate parking and comfort levels, provide accurate tests, and timely access to results and treatment. Such a service should result in improved rates of GDM screening uptake. Trial registration number ISRCTN41202110. PMID:26888724

  5. A Novel early pregnancy assessment unit/Gynaecology assessment unit dashboard: An experience from a UK district general hospital.

    PubMed

    Wahba, K; Shah, A; Hill, K; Hosni, M M

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of early pregnancy assessment units (EPAUs)/Gynaecology assessment units (GAUs) started more than 20 years ago in the UK to decrease hospital admissions of patients with early pregnancy problems. However, there are still wide variations in the quality of services provided by these units. The objective of this study was to create a method that can be used for continuous assessment of these units on a regular basis. We designed a dashboard covering all aspects of EPAU/GAU activities depending upon the early pregnancy unit association guidelines, and the department of health data and statistics. The EPAU/GAU dashboard has been used successfully in the early assessment pregnancy unit of Yeovil District hospital for few years and is still implemented until now. It is an excellent tool for continuous audit. It is a simple method that should be adopted by different EPAUs/GAUs for their objective assessment in order to improve the services provided by these units. PMID:25543529

  6. Methodological issues of an epidemiological study: from the results of a study on psychological problems seen in outpatients visiting the internal medicine departments of general hospitals.

    PubMed

    Utsunomiya, H; Yoshitake, K; Otsuka, T; Sugasakl, H; Sata, M; Hatada, K; Nakane, Y

    1999-02-01

    The frequency and type of psychological problems of outpatients in general healthcare settings, the recognition and management of those problems by physicians, and the course of the problems were investigated using a two-stage sampling design method. The subjects were outpatients visiting the department of internal medicine of two general hospitals in Nagasaki prefecture. For the first-stage investigation, the General Health Questionnaire 12-item version (GHQ-12) was used. A second-stage investigation was then conducted, which used many instruments containing the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) and Groningen Social Disability Scale (GSDS). As a result, 1555 patients participated in the first-stage, 483 were selected and 336 (69.5%) participated in the second-stage investigation. No significant differences were seen in age or sex between the GHQ score groups among the 1555 subjects of the core sample. The background factors of the two hospital samples differed significantly in the distribution of age, sex and physical diseases. There were some differences in the participation between men and women in age and GHQ score. It was then suggested that variances should be considered in such an epidemiological study. PMID:10201280

  7. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SELF-REPORTED HEALTH STATUS AND SPIRITUALITY AMONG ADULT PATIENTS ATTENDING GENERAL OUTPATIENT CLINIC OF TERTIARY HOSPITAL IN IBADAN

    PubMed Central

    Ibraheem, A.B.; Ibraheem, W.A.; Adebusoye, L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Spirituality is an important aspect of health that is not always addressed in modern day medical practice. This is related to lack of clarity about the nature of the concept, however its role in researches and health service provision is being revisited because of the evergreen importance. Objective: To determine the relationship between spirituality and selfreported health status of adult patients attending general outpatient clinic of University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria. Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study wherein interviewer administered questionnaire was applied on randomly selected 422 eligible and consenting adult patients attending general outpatient clinic of University College Hospital between 1st November, 2010 and 31st January, 2011. Their Spirituality and Heath status were assessed using spirituality scale and self reported health questionnaire respectively. Result: Of all the respondents, 270(64.0%) were females while 152(36.0%) were males with a ratio of 1.8:1, and mean age of 42.815.9. The overall mean spirituality score was 125.7 12.1, the maximum obtainable score was 138. A total of 63(15.0%) respondents rated their health as excellent, 114 (27.0%) rated theirs as very good while 150 (35.5%) respondents considered theirs as good. Respondents who rated their health as good had significantly higher mean scores when compared with those who rated theirs as poor or fair (mean difference = 3.347, 95% C I = 0.552 to -6.142 p=0.019) Conclusion: The study revealed that perceived spiritual wellbeing is positively related to the patient's sense of general wellbeing. Therefore, there is need to give attention to patient's spiritual wellbeing during medical encounter in the hospital. PMID:25332698

  8. Frequent Prescription of Antibiotics and High Burden of Antibiotic Resistance among Deceased Patients in General Medical Wards of Acute Care Hospitals in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Yee Gyung; Moon, Chisook; Kim, Eu Suk; Kim, Baek-Nam

    2016-01-01

    Background Antibiotics are often administered to terminally ill patients until death, and antibiotic use contributes to the emergence of multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs). We investigated antibiotic use and the isolation of MDROs among patients who died in general medical wards. Methods All adult patients who died in the general internal medicine wards at four acute care hospitals between January and June 2013 were enrolled. For comparison with these deceased patients, the same number of surviving, discharged patients was selected from the same divisions of internal medicine subspecialties during the same period. Results During the study period, 303 deceased patients were enrolled; among them, 265 (87.5%) had do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders in their medical records. Antibiotic use was more common in patients who died than in those who survived (87.5% vs. 65.7%, P<0.001). Among deceased patients with DNR orders, antibiotic use was continued in 59.6% of patients after obtaining their DNR orders. Deceased patients received more antibiotic therapy courses (two [interquartile range (IQR) 1–3] vs. one [IQR 0–2], P<0.001). Antibiotics were used for longer durations in deceased patients than in surviving patients (13 [IQR 5–23] vs. seven days [IQR 0–18], P<0.001). MDROs were also more common in deceased patients than in surviving patients (25.7% vs. 10.6%, P<0.001). Conclusions Patients who died in the general medical wards of acute care hospitals were exposed to more antibiotics than patients who survived. In particular, antibiotic prescription was common even after obtaining DNR orders in patients who died. The isolation of MDROs during the hospital stay was more common in these patients who died. Strategies for judicious antibiotic use and appropriate infection control should be applied to these patient populations. PMID:26761461

  9. Risk of Post-Discharge Venous Thromboembolism and Associated Mortality in General Surgery: A Population-Based Cohort Study Using Linked Hospital and Primary Care Data in England

    PubMed Central

    Bouras, George; Burns, Elaine Marie; Howell, Ann-Marie; Bottle, Alex; Athanasiou, Thanos; Darzi, Ara

    2015-01-01

    Background Trends towards day case surgery and enhanced recovery mean that postoperative venous thromboembolism (VTE) may increasingly arise after hospital discharge. However, hospital data alone are unable to capture adverse events that occur outside of the hospital setting. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence has suggested the use of primary care data to quantify hospital care-related VTE. Data in surgical patients using these resources is lacking. The aim of this study was to measure VTE risk and associated mortality in general surgery using linked primary care and hospital databases, to improve our understanding of harm from VTE that arises beyond hospital stay. Methods This was a longitudinal cohort study using nationally linked primary care (Clinical Practice Research Datalink, CPRD), hospital administrative (Hospital Episodes Statistics, HES), population statistics (Office of National Statistics, ONS) and National Cancer Intelligence Network databases. Routinely collected information was used to quantify 90-day in-hospital VTE, 90-day post-discharge VTE and 90-day mortality in adults undergoing one of twelve general surgical procedures between 1st April 1997 and 31st March 2012. The earliest postoperative recording of deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism in CPRD, HES and ONS was counted in each patient. Covariates from multiple datasets were combined to derive detailed prediction models for VTE and mortality. Limitation included the capture of VTE presenting to healthcare only and the lack of information on adherence to pharmacological thromboprophylaxis as there was no data linkage to hospital pharmacy records. Results There were 981 VTE events captured within 90 days of surgery in 168005 procedures (23.7/1000 patient-years). Overall, primary care data increased the detection of postoperative VTE by a factor of 1.38 (981/710) when compared with using HES and ONS only. Total VTE rates ranged between 3.2/1000 patient-years in haemorrhoidectomy to 118.3/1000 patient-years in esophagogastric resection. Predictors of VTE included emergency surgery (OR = 1.91 95%CI 1.60–2.28, p<0.001), age (OR = 1.02 95%CI 1.02–1.03, p<0.001), body mass index (OR = 1.03 95%CI 1.01–1.04, p<0.001), previous VTE (OR = 8.07 95%CI 6.61–9.83, p<0.001), length of stay (OR = 1.00 95%CI 1.00–1.00, p = 0.007) and cancer stages II (OR = 1.38 95%CI 1.03–1.87, p = 0.033), III (OR = 1.50 95%CI 1.11–2.01, p = 0.008) and IV (OR = 1.63 95%CI 1.03–2.59, p = 0.038). Major organ resections had the greatest odds of VTE when adjusted for other risk factors including length of hospital stay. Post-discharge VTE accounted for 64.8% (636/981) of all recorded VTE. In-hospital VTE (165.4/1000 patient-years) was recorded more frequently than post-discharge VTE (16.2/1000 patient-years). Both in-hospital (OR = 2.07 95%CI 1.51–2.85, p<0.001) and post-discharge (OR = 4.03 95%CI 2.95–5.51, p<0.001) VTE independently predicted 90-day mortality. In patients who died and VTE was recorded on HES or CPRD (n = 56), VTE was one of the causes of death in 37.5% (21/56) of cases. Conclusions A large proportion of postoperative VTE was detected in primary care. Evaluation of linked databases was a useful way of measuring postoperative VTE at population level. These resources identified a significant association between post-discharge VTE and mortality in general surgery. PMID:26713434

  10. Diagnoses of suicidum and tentamen suicidi in the registers of patients of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia's Banovina Public General Hospital in Bjelovar from 1931-1940.

    PubMed

    Sklebar, Duska; Vrabec-Matkovi?, Dragica; Catipovi?, Marija; Sklebar, Ivan

    2012-12-01

    Suicide has been a subject of research of philosophy, ethics, religion and medicine for centuries. Attitudes towards it changed during the history, from condemnation of suicide as an unethical act to the theory of suicide as the utmost expression of a human as an individual. Croatia, with the annual suicide rate above 20 percent belongs to the high-risk countries. Suicide frequency varies from region to region, while the suicide rates for the County Bjelovarsko-bilogorska have been well above Croatia's average for decades. The aim of this retrospective study was to establish some epidemiological features of hospital patients with the diagnoses of "suicidum" and "tentamen suicidi" on the basis of records available in the registers of patients of General Hospital in Bjelovar in the period between 1931 and 1940. In the observed period, thirty-three people were treated in hospital for suicide attempt, seven of them dying. An equal number of men and women attempted suicide (13:13), while in the group of those who died, the ratio was more in favour of women (4:3). Suicide incidence was highest in November, followed by May and June, with the most common method for suicide being acetic acid. PMID:23390812

  11. Audit of 149 consecutive carotid endarterectomies performed by a single surgeon in a district general hospital over a 12-year period.

    PubMed Central

    Tan, L. C.; Sutton, G. L.; Taffinder, N. J.; Perry, M.; Fail, T.

    1996-01-01

    Carotid endarterectomy has been established by two large randomised controlled trials (European Carotid Surgery Trial (ECST) and North American Symptomatic Carotid Endarterectomy Trial (NASCET)) as an important surgical procedure for the prevention of ischaemic strokes in patients presenting with transient cerebral ischaemia or non-disabling strokes attributable to severe ipsilateral carotid artery stenosis. The operation carries significant risk of death and stroke and it has been advocated by some that carotid endarterectomy should only be performed in a small number of designated regional centres in order to achieve good surgical results. It is doubtful that the regional centres alone can cope with the increasing numbers of patients requiring carotid endarterectomy and there is therefore a requirement for the procedure to be carried out by vascular surgeons in district general hospitals. It is important that surgical results are audited to ensure that comparable outcomes are achieved. We present an audit of our experience of carotid endarterectomy since 1981. A total of 149 consecutive carotid endarterectomies were performed by a single surgeon with a special interest in carotid surgery. The results are comparable to ECST with a 30-day mortality of 0% and an overall 30-day stroke rate of 5.7% (major strokes) for patients with severe, ie 70-99%, ipsilateral carotid artery stenoses. We have shown that carotid endarterectomy is an operation that can be performed safely and with good results by suitably trained surgeons in district general hospitals. PMID:8712647

  12. Evaluation of extremity pain in children using technetium-99m MDP bone scan: A general hospital experience

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H.M.; Rothschild, P.A.; Kernek, C.B.

    1984-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of three-phase bone scan in detection of significant pathology i.e., osteomyelitis (OM), septic joint, cellulitis, etc., in children with symptoms of extremity pain. A total of 100 consecutive patients (age 9 days - 16 yrs, 63 boys and 37 girls) were studied. The authors reviewed their scans, x-rays and hospital records. The final diagnoses were based on the findings of needle aspiration, surgical drainage, biopsy, culture, and on the therapeutic response. In 87%, sufficiently long clinical follow-up was available to confirm the final diagnoses. In the remaining 13%, the symptoms resolved quickly and follow-up was not felt necessary. The scan was essential in pinpointing the lesions in pts with referred or nonlocalizing extremity pain. The +ve and -ve predictive values of the scan and OM were 89% and 96% respectively. One spiral fracture was misinterpreted as diffuse OM. One ''Subacute epiphyseal OM'' was not detected. In two cases, cellulitis and septic joint obscured underlying OM. Prior antibotic therapy resulted in one equivocal scan. Although less sensitive (29%) in early OM, radiographs play an important complimentary role. Bone scans detected underlying pathology for extremity pain in 61% of all pts studied.

  13. Knowledge and attitude of women on the available PMTCT services at the antenatal clinic of the Coast Province General Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Kevin, Adam; Mutugi, Marion; Wanzala, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Several high profile events of the last decade have served as catalysts for the now widely available prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV services. However, Kenya continues to face challenges in assuring that all women in need of PMTCT services receive the full package. Methods A cross sectional survey was undertaken. Systematic sampling method was used for sample selection. Data was collected using pretested structured questionnaires. Data was analyzed in SPSS and Epi Info using bivariate and multivariate logistic regression. Results Approximately 75% of participants were seeking PMTCT services in CPGH for the first time, 71% knew of their HIV status. About 95% of participants were satisfied with privacy during testing. Clients who had never delivered in CPGH had a significantly (p<0.001) higher odds compared to those who had previously delivered in CPGH and had their first PMTCT visit. participants who had never lost a pregnancy in CPGH and were in the hospital for the first time were 3 times likely to seek PMTCT services compared to those who had lost a pregnancy in CPGH. There was a significant association between family planning use before pregnancy and first PMTCT. Conclusion Participants seeking PMTCT services had poor HIV knowledge; but reported positive experiences and good provider client relationship. However for a successful PMTCT program in CPGH attention needs to be paid in the patient experiences as they seek other reproductive services. PMID:25360188

  14. Association between Severe Dehydration in Rotavirus Diarrhea and Exclusive Breastfeeding among Infants at Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital, Bandung, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Prasetyo, Dwi; Sabaroedin, Iesje Martiza; Ermaya, Yudith Setiati; Soenarto, Yati

    2015-01-01

    Background. Rotavirus is the leading cause of severe acute diarrhea in children. Infants who are exclusively breastfed develop fewer infections and have less severe illnesses. This study aimed to determine association between severe dehydration in rotavirus diarrhea and exclusive breastfeeding. Methods. This is a cross-sectional study in infants ≤ 6 months old with acute diarrhea in Dr. Hasan Sadikin Hospital, Bandung, Indonesia. Results. From 134 infants ≤ 6 months old with acute diarrhea enrolled from April 2009 to December 2012, there were 88 (65.6%) boys and 46 (34.4%) girls in this study. Rotavirus was detected in 60 (44.8 %), 32 (53.3%) of whom were exclusively breastfed. From rotavirus positive subjects, severe dehydration occurred in 4 (12.6%) exclusively breastfed infants and 6 (21.5%) not exclusively breastfed infants. No significant association was found between severe dehydration and exclusive breastfeeding (p = 0.491) in rotavirus diarrhea. Conclusions. In rotavirus diarrhea, there was no significant association between exclusive breastfeeding and severe dehydration. PMID:26612990

  15. Surgical emergencies in Ireland. An audit of the emergency surgical caseload of an Irish district general hospital.

    PubMed

    Davies, M G; Shine, M F; Lennon, F

    1991-10-01

    Emergency cases are an increasing part of the workload of a general surgical unit. Little accurate quantitative data is presently available on the nature and impact of this workload on a typical district general surgical service. This study reports the results of a prospective one year audit of the emergency cases dealt with by a typical Irish district general surgical service. The general surgical service admitted 2,278 patients acutely, which represented 58% of the total number of admissions to the service. Eighteen patients required immediate transfer for specialist neurosurgical (11), vascular (6) or plastics (1) treatment. Of those cases admitted 1,396 (61.3%) were males and 882 (38.7%) were females. There were 1,786 (78%) adults and 492 (21.6%) paediatric cases. Abdominal pain (48.0%), head injury (23.8%) and urological problems (11.0%) accounted for the majority of the caseload. Within the abdominal pain group, the pre-dominant diagnoses were non-specific abdominal pain (36.0%), appendicitis (19.5%), cholecystitis/obstructive jaundice (10.8%) and peptic ulcer disease (10.0%). There were 456 emergency operations performed, representing 19.5% of all the inpatient general surgical procedures. 328 (72%) of these were performed out of normal working hours. Only 12% of the procedures were major. The commonest operations were appendicectomy (51%), abscess drainage (13%), wound toilet (13%) and laparotomy (11%). The emergency peri-operative mortality was 1.1%. The positive appendicectomy rate was 92%. PMID:1810893

  16. Provision of gastrointestinal endoscopy and related services for a district general hospital. Working Party of the Clinical Services Committee of the British Society of Gastroenterology.

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    (1) The number of endoscopic examinations performed is rising. Epidemiological data and the workload of well developed units show that annual requirements per head of population are approaching: Upper gastrointestinal 1 in 100 Flexible sigmoidoscopy 1 in 500 Colonoscopy 1 in 500 ERCP 1 in 2000 (2) Open access endoscopy to general practitioners is desirable and increasingly sought. For a district general hospital serving a population of 250,000, this workload entails about 3500 procedures annually, performed during 10 half day routine sessions plus emergency work. (3) High standards of training and experience are needed by all staff, who must work in purpose built accommodation designed to promote efficient and safe practice. (4) The endoscopy unit should be adjacent to day care facilities and near the x ray department. There should be easy access to wards. (5) An endoscopy unit needs at least two endoscopy rooms; a fully ventilated cleaning/disinfection area; rooms for patient reception, preparation, and recovery; and accommodation for administration, storage, and staff amenities. (6) The service should be consultant based. At least 10 clinical sessions are required, made up of six or more consultant sessions and two to four clinical assistant, hospital practitioner, or staff specialist sessions. Each consultant should be expected to commit at least two sessions weekly to endoscopy. Extra consultant sessions may be needed to provide an efficient service. (7) A specially trained nursing sister (grade G or H) and five other endoscopy nurses are needed to care for the patients; their work may be supplemented by care assistants. (8) A new post of endoscopy department assistant (analogous to an operating department assistant) is proposed to maintain and prepare instruments, and to give technical assistance during procedures. (9) A full time secretary should be employed. Records, appointments, and audit should be computer based. (10) ERCP needs the collaboration of an interventional radiologist working with high quality x ray equipment in a specially prepared radiology screening room. This facility may need to serve more than one hospital. (11) A gastrointestinal measurement laboratory can conveniently be combined with the endoscopy unit. In some hospitals one or more gastrointestinal measurement technicians may staff this laboratory. (12) An endoscopy unit is a service department analogous to a radiology department. It needs an annual budget. PMID:1991644

  17. Difficult decisions in times of constraint: Criteria based Resource Allocation in the Vancouver Coastal Health Authority

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the project was to develop a plan to address a forecasted deficit of approximately $4.65 million for fiscal year 2010/11 in the Vancouver Communities division of the Vancouver Coastal Health Authority. For disinvestment opportunities identified beyond the forecasted deficit, a commitment was made to consider options for resource re-allocation within the Vancouver Communities division. Methods A standard approach to program budgeting and marginal analysis (PBMA) was taken with a priority setting working committee and a broader advisory panel. An experienced, non-vested internal project manager worked closely with the two-member external research team throughout the process. Face to face evaluation interviews were held with 10 decision makers immediately following the process. Results The recommendations of the working committee included the implementation of 44 disinvestment initiatives with an annualized value of CAD $4.9 million, as well as consideration of possible investments if the realized savings match expectations. Overall, decision makers viewed the process favorably and the primary aim of addressing the deficit gap was met. Discussion A key challenge was the tight timeline which likely lead to less evidence informed decision making then one would hope for. Despite this, decision makers felt that better decisions were made then had the process not been in place. In the end, this project adds value in finding that PBMA can be used to cover a deficit and minimize opportunity cost through systematic application of criteria whilst ensuring process fairness through focusing on communication, transparency and decision maker engagement. PMID:21756357

  18. Opportunities and obstacles to collecting wildlife disease data for public health purposes: Results of a pilot study on Vancouver Island, British Columbia

    PubMed Central

    Stitt, Tyler; Mountifield, Julie; Stephen, Craig

    2007-01-01

    Existing sources of wildlife morbidity and mortality data were evaluated and 3 pilot active surveillance projects were undertaken to compare and contrast methods for collecting wildlife disease data on Vancouver Island for public health purposes. Few organizations could collect samples for diagnostic evaluation, fewer still maintained records, and none regularly characterized or reported wildlife disease for public health purposes. Wildlife rehabilitation centers encountered the greatest variety of wildlife from the largest geographic area and frequently received submissions from other organizations. Obstacles to participation included the following: permit restrictions; financial disincentives; staff safety; no mandate to collect relevant data; and lack of contact between wildlife and public health agencies. Despite these obstacles, modest investments in personnel allowed novel pathogens of public health concern to be tracked. Targeted surveillance for known pathogens in specific host species, rather than general surveys for unspecified pathogens, was judged to be a more effective and efficient way to provide useful public health data. PMID:17310627

  19. Variation in Ground Shaking on the Fraser River Delta (Greater Vancouver, Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassidy, J. F.; Rogers, G. R.

    2003-04-01

    The thick, soft soils of the Fraser River delta, just south of Vancouver, Canada, are home to critical infrastructure such as one of North America's busiest port facilities, Canada's second busiest airport, and key transportation and power-transmission facilities for 2-3 million people. This area is also one of the most seismically active regions in Canada. We have utilised recent three-component, digital records of recent moderate (1996 M=5.1 at 200 km distance, 1997 M=4.3 at 40 km distance) and large (2001 M=6.8 at 300 km distance) earthquakes to examine the response to seismic shaking in the greater Vancouver, region, with an emphasis on the site response of the Fraser River delta. These suites of accelerograms have relatively low amplitudes (maximums of 0.015g for the 1996 records, 0.024g for the 1997 records, and 0.035g for the 2001 records). The 1997 data set is significant as it contains the first three-component recordings made on bedrock in greater Vancouver, and the 2001 data set is significant as it contains long-period signal (1-10 second energy). Using the method of spectral ratios, we estimate the site response for each of the strong motion instrument soil sites. Our results show frequency-dependent amplification, with factors of up to 12 times (relative to competent bedrock) near the edge of the delta. Here, the amplification is observed over a relatively narrow frequency range of 1.5-4 Hz (0.25-0.67 s period). Near the centre of the delta(where the soft soils are thickest) peak amplification of 4-10 times(relative to competent bedrock) is measured. Relative to firm soil, the peak amplification ranges from 2-5 for the thick soil delta centre sites, and 2-6 for the delta edge sites. At higher frequencies, little or no amplification, and in many cases slight attenuation is observed. The more distant earthquakes (200-300 km) present a simpler and more predictable picture of ground motion variation than that of the 1997 earthquake (40 km distant). The Geological Survey of Canada is currently deploying a demonstration dense urban seismograph network (~1km spacing) which crosses the northern edge of the Fraser delta in the greater Vancouver area to address varying site response in more detail.

  20. Rainfall-runoff data for selected basins, Portland, Oregon, and Vancouver, Washington, 1973-77

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laenen, Antonius; Solin, Gary L.

    1978-01-01

    In the Portland-Vancouver area, storms and floods are presently being studied in 16 basins with drainage areas ranging from 0.21 to 6.63 square miles and with various basin slopes, degrees of imperviousness, and mixes of land use. Fanno Creek basin in Portland has the longest period of rainfall-runoff record, starting in 1973; Tryon Creek basin in Portland is next with a record starting in 1974. Records in all other basins began in 1975. For each basin, data are tabulated for daily precipitation on a yearly basis and for 5-minute precipitation and 5-minute streamflow for selected storms. (Woodard-USGS)

  1. The use of the partograph in labor monitoring: a cross-sectional study among obstetric caregivers in General Hospital, Calabar, Cross River State, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Asibong, Udeme; Okokon, Ita B; Agan, Thomas U; Oku, Affiong; Opiah, Margaret; Essien, E James; Monjok, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Background Prolonged and obstructed labor is a significant cause of maternal morbidity and mortality in Nigeria, one of the six countries contributing significantly to the global maternal mortality crisis. The use of the partograph would engender a remarkable reduction in the number of these deaths since abnormal markers in the progress of labor would be identified early on. Objective This study aimed to evaluate the non-physician obstetric caregivers’ (OCGs) knowledge of partograph use, assess the extent of its use, determine the factors that impede its usage, and unravel the relationship between years of experience and partograph use among the respondents (OCGs) in General Hospital, Calabar, Nigeria. Methodology Using a self-administered semi-structured questionnaire, a cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted among 130 purposely selected and consenting OCGs working in the General Hospital, Calabar, Nigeria. Results The majority of the respondents (70.8%) had good general knowledge of the partograph but lacked detailed and in-depth knowledge of the component parts of the partograph. Knowledge of partograph (χ2=12.05, P=0.0001) and partograph availability (χ2=56.5, P=0.0001) had a significant relationship with its utilization. Previous training (χ2=9.43, P=0.002) was significantly related to knowledge of partograph. Factors affecting utilization were: little or no knowledge of the partograph (85.4%), nonavailability (70%), shortage of staff (61.5%), and the fact that it is time-consuming to use (30%). Conclusion Lack of detailed knowledge of the partograph, nonavailability of the partograph, poor staff numbers, and inadequate training are factors that work against the effective utilization of the partograph in the study facility. Usage of this tool for labor monitoring can be enhanced by periodic training, making partographs available in labor wards, provision of reasonable staff numbers, and mandatory institutional policy. PMID:25342920

  2. Cost-effectiveness of collaborative care for chronically ill patients with comorbid depressive disorder in the general hospital setting, a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Eva K; van Benthem, Tjeerd B; Hakkaart-van Roijen, Leona; van Marwijk, Harm WJ; Beekman, Aartjan TF; Rutten, Frans F; van der Feltz-Cornelis, Christina M

    2007-01-01

    Background Depressive disorder is one of the most common disorders, and is highly prevalent in chronically ill patients. The presence of comorbid depression has a negative influence on quality of life, health care costs, self-care, morbidity, and mortality. Early diagnosis and well-organized treatment of depression has a positive influence on these aspects. Earlier research in the USA has reported good results with regard to the treatment of depression with a collaborative care approach and an antidepressant algorithm. In the UK 'Problem Solving Treatment' has proved to be feasible. However, in the general hospital setting this approach has not yet been evaluated. Methods/Design CC: DIM (Collaborative Care: Depression Initiative in the Medical setting) is a two-armed randomised controlled trial with randomisation at patient level. The aim of the trial is to evaluate the treatment of depressive disorder in general hospitals in the Netherlands based on a collaborative care framework, including contracting, 'Problem Solving Treatment', antidepressant algorithm, and manual-guided self-help. 126 outpatients with diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or cardiovascular diseases will be randomised to either the intervention group or the control group. Patients will be included if they have been diagnosed with moderate to severe depression, based on the DSM-IV criteria in a two-step screening method. The intervention group will receive treatment based on the collaborative care approach; the control group will receive 'care as usual'. Baseline and follow-up measurements (after 3, 6, 9, and 12 months) will be performed by means of questionnaires. The primary outcome measure is severity of depressive symptoms, as measured with the PHQ-9. The secondary outcome measure is the cost-effectiveness of these treatments according to the TiC-P, the EuroQol and the SF-36. Discussion Earlier research has indicated that depressive disorder is a chronic, mostly recurrent illness, which tends to cluster with physical comorbidity. Even though the treatment of depressive disorder based on the guidelines for depression is proven effective, these guidelines are often insufficiently adhered to. Collaborative care and 'Problem Solving Treatment' will be specifically tailored to patients with depressive disorders and evaluated in a general hospital setting in the Netherlands. PMID:17324283

  3. Pneumomediastinum: a rare manifestation of hypersensitivity pneumonitis in a patient presenting with unexplained breathlessness at the Borders General Hospital.

    PubMed

    Grecian, Robert; Faccenda, Jakki; Ferrando, Luis

    2015-01-01

    A 48-year-old woman from the Scottish Borders presented to her general practitioner with exertional dyspnoea. There was a delay in diagnosis of the underlying respiratory condition, due to initial investigations being suggestive of cardiac disease. Subsequently, the patient developed clinical symptoms and signs of pneumomediastinum, which was discovered on radiological imaging. Detailed history-taking and further clinical testing confirmed the cause of this to be hypersensitivity pneumonitis due to sensitisation to pet birds. The patient was treated with high dose steroids and went on to make a good recovery. The birds were rehomed. PMID:26446316

  4. The intended and unintended consequences of communication systems on general internal medicine inpatient care delivery: a prospective observational case study of five teaching hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Robert C; Lo, Vivian; Morra, Dante; Wong, Brian M; Sargeant, Robert; Locke, Ken; Cavalcanti, Rodrigo; Quan, Sherman D; Rossos, Peter; Tran, Kim; Cheung, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Background Effective clinical communication is critical to providing high-quality patient care. Hospitals have used different types of interventions to improve communication between care teams, but there have been few studies of their effectiveness. Objectives To describe the effects of different communication interventions and their problems. Design Prospective observational case study using a mixed methods approach of quantitative and qualitative methods. Setting General internal medicine (GIM) inpatient wards at five tertiary care academic teaching hospitals. Participants Clinicians consisting of residents, attending physicians, nurses, and allied health (AH) staff working on the GIM wards. Methods Ethnographic methods and interviews with clinical staff (doctors, nurses, medical students, and AH professionals) were conducted over a 16-month period from 2009 to 2010. Results We identified four categories that described the intended and unintended consequences of communication interventions: impacts on senders, receivers, interprofessional collaboration, and the use of informal communication processes. The use of alphanumeric pagers, smartphones, and web-based communication systems had positive effects for senders and receivers, but unintended consequences were seen with all interventions in all four categories. Conclusions Interventions that aimed to improve clinical communications solved some but not all problems, and unintended effects were seen with all systems. PMID:23355461

  5. "Gentlemen! This Is No Humbug": Did John Collins Warren, M.D., Proclaim These Words on October 16, 1846, at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston?

    PubMed

    Haridas, Rajesh P

    2016-03-01

    The proclamation, "Gentlemen! this is no humbug," attributed to John Collins Warren, M.D., was not identified in any contemporaneous eyewitness report of William T. G. Morton's October 16, 1846, demonstration of ether at Massachusetts General Hospital. The earliest known documentation of the proclamation is in Nathan P. Rice's biography of Morton, first published in 1859. Only three eyewitnesses, Washington Ayer, M.D., Robert Thompson Davis, M.D., and Isaac Francis Galloupe, M.D., reported Warren's alleged proclamation. However, their accounts first appeared in 1896, 50 yr after Morton's demonstration of etherization. Although Warren's alleged proclamation appears plausible, the overall impression from eyewitness statements and publications relating to the October 16, 1846, demonstration of etherization is that it may not have been made. PMID:26566280

  6. Restructuring within an academic health center to support quality and safety: the development of the Center for Quality and Safety at the Massachusetts General Hospital.

    PubMed

    Bohmer, Richard M J; Bloom, Jonathan D; Mort, Elizabeth A; Demehin, Akinluwa A; Meyer, Gregg S

    2009-12-01

    Recent focus on the need to improve the quality and safety of health care has created new challenges for academic health centers (AHCs). Whereas previously quality was largely assumed, today it is increasingly quantifiable and requires organized systems for improvement. Traditional structures and cultures within AHCs, although well suited to the tripartite missions of teaching, research, and clinical care, are not easily adaptable to the tasks of measuring, reporting, and improving quality. Here, the authors use a case study of Massachusetts General Hospital's efforts to restructure quality and safety to illustrate the value of beginning with a focus on organizational culture, using a systematic process of engaging clinical leadership, developing an organizational framework dependent on proven business principles, leveraging focus events, and maintaining executive dedication to execution of the initiative. The case provides a generalizable example for AHCs of how applying explicit management design can foster robust organizational change with relatively modest incremental financial resources. PMID:19940570

  7. Environmental factors associated with reproductive barrier breakdown in sympatric trout populations on Vancouver Island

    PubMed Central

    Heath, Daniel; Bettles, Cory M; Roff, Derek

    2010-01-01

    The incidence of hybridization between coastal cutthroat (Oncorhynchus clarki clarki) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) varies widely among populations. The breakdown of reproductive isolation is of concern to managers, and raises the question: how have the two species retained their genetic and morphological divergence? Using a combination of mitochondrial DNA and nuclear DNA markers coupled with watershed attribute and disturbance data, we determined the distribution and frequency of trout hybridization on Vancouver Island, BC and the environmental factors associated with the hybridization. We found 284 hybrids (among 1004 fish) in 29 of 36 sampled populations. High variation in levels of hybridization was observed among populations, and no single environmental factor was found to dominate in determining hybridization levels. However, logging activity, urban infrastructure development, and stocking of hatchery rainbow trout played significant roles in determining hybridization levels, and populations in small watersheds are more at risk of reproductive barrier breakdown. This study illustrates that cutthroatrainbow trout reproductive barrier breakdown is widespread on Vancouver Island and that anthropogenic disturbance plays a role in the process. As similar environmental disturbance is common in much of coastal trout habitat, large-scale hybridization may be occurring elsewhere and thus may represent a critical management issue for Pacific trout species. PMID:25567905

  8. Introduced bullfrogs and their parasites: Haematoloechus longiplexus (Trematoda) exploits diverse damselfly intermediate hosts on Vancouver Island.

    PubMed

    Novak, Colin W; Goater, Timothy M

    2013-02-01

    The lung fluke, Haematoloechus longiplexus, is the most prevalent and abundant parasite of introduced bullfrogs on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada. The ecological success of this trematode in invasive bullfrogs is related to the fluke's ability to utilize native intermediate hosts for transmission. The purpose of this study was to identify the odonate (dragonfly/damselfly) species involved in the transmission of H. longiplexus to the introduced bullfrog. The prevalences and mean intensities of 21 species of odonates (nymphs and adults) were examined for metacercariae infections. Haematoloechus longiplexus is a second intermediate host specialist, being found only in damselflies. Six damselfly species exhibiting the "climber" ecological habit were identified as second intermediate hosts of H. longiplexus. Enallagma carunculatum (prevalence = 75.0%, mean intensity = 17.2 ± 10.8), Ischnura cervula (65.2%, 8.9 ± 4.3), Ischnura perparva (45.5%, 15.4 ± 10.3), and Enallagma boreale (40.7%, 4.8 ± 7.8) were the most commonly infected damselfly species. Metacercariae were absent in damselflies collected from sites lacking bullfrogs. Haematoloechus longiplexus was likely introduced along with the bullfrog, and subsequently adapted to the physid snail and diverse damselfly intermediate hosts present in ponds on Vancouver Island. PMID:22924931

  9. Age and significance of earthquake-induced liquefaction near Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clague, J.J.; Naesgaard, E.; Nelson, A.R.

    1997-01-01

    In late 1994, sand dykes, large sand blows, and deformed strata were exposed in the walls of an excavation at Annacis Island on the Fraser River delta near Vancouver, British Columbia. The features record liquefaction during a large earthquake about 1700 years ago; this was perhaps the largest earthquake to affect the Vancouver area in the last 3500 years. Similar, less well-dated features have been reported from several other sites on the Fraser delta and may be products of the same earthquake. Three radiocarbon ages that closely delimit the time of liquefaction on Annacis Island are similar to the most precise radiocarbon ages on coseismically subsided marsh soils at estuaries in southern Washington and Oregon. Both the liquefaction and the subsidence may have been produced by a single great plate-boundary earthquake at the Cascadia subduction zone. Alternatively, liquefaction at Annacis Island may have been caused by a large crustal or subcrustal earthquake of about the same age as a plate-boundary earthquake farther west. The data from Annacis Island and other sites on the Fraser delta suggest that earthquakes capable of producing extensive liquefaction in this area are rare events. Further, liquefaction analysis using historical seismicity suggests that current assessment procedures may overestimate liquefaction risk.

  10. Analysis of the Vancouver lung nodule malignancy model with respect to manual and automated segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiemker, Rafael; Boroczky, Lilla; Bergtholdt, Martin; Klinder, Tobias

    2015-03-01

    The recently published Vancouver model for lung nodule malignancy prediction holds great promise as a practically feasible tool to mitigate the clinical decision problem of how to act on a lung nodule detected at baseline screening. It provides a formula to compute a probability of malignancy from only nine clinical and radiologic features. The feature values are provided by user interaction but in principle could also be automatically pre-filled by appropriate image processing algorithms and RIS requests. Nodule diameter is a feature with crucial influence on the predicted malignancy, and leads to uncertainty caused by inter-reader variability. The purpose of this paper is to analyze how strongly the malignancy prediction of a lung nodule found with CT screening is affected by the inter-reader variation of the nodule diameter estimation. To this aim we have estimated the magnitude of the malignancy variability by applying the Vancouver malignancy model to the LIDC-IDRI database which contains independent delineations from several readers. It can be shown that using fully automatic nodule segmentation can significantly lower the variability of the estimated malignancy, while demonstrating excellent agreement with the expert readers.

  11. Rates and risk of hospitalisation among patients with type 2 diabetes: retrospective cohort study using the UK General Practice Research Database linked to English Hospital Episode Statistics

    PubMed Central

    Khalid, J M; Raluy-Callado, M; Curtis, B H; Boye, K S; Maguire, A; Reaney, M

    2014-01-01

    Aims To investigate the rates and risk of hospitalisations in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) mellitus in England. Methods This retrospective population-based cohort study used computerised records from the General Practice Research Database linked to Hospital Episode Statistics data in England. Patients with T2D from January 2006 to December 2010 were selected. Primary outcome measures were all-cause, non-diabetes-related, diabetes-related and hypoglycaemia-related hospitalisations. Factors associated with all-cause and diabetes-related hospitalisations were investigated with Cox's proportional hazards models. Results Amongst 97,689 patients with T2D, approximately 60% had at least one hospitalisation during the 4-year study period. Rates of hospitalisation were as follows: all-cause, 33.9 per 100 patient-years (pt-yrs); non-diabetes-related, 29.1 per 100 pt-yrs; diabetes-related, 18.8 per 100 pt-yrs and hypoglycaemia, 0.3 per 100 pt-yrs. The risk of all-cause hospitalisation increased with hospitalisation in the previous year, insulin use and the presence of major comorbidities. The risk of a diabetes-related hospitalisation increased with age, female gender, insulin use, chronic renal insufficiency, hypoglycaemia (as diagnosed by a general practitioner) and diabetes-related hospitalisation in the previous year. Conclusions Patients with T2D are hospitalised at a considerably high rate for causes directly related with diabetes complications and stay longer in hospital. History of hospitalisation and complications of diabetes were found to be predictive of inpatient hospitalisations suggesting previous hospitalisation episodes could serve as points of intervention. This study highlights important areas for healthcare intervention and provides a reminder for vigilance when risk factors for hospitalisation in patients with T2D are present. PMID:24112108

  12. Measuring Adverse Drug Events on Hospital Medicine Units with the Institute for Healthcare Improvement Trigger Tool: A Chart Review

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Iris; Kirkwood, Allison

    2014-01-01

    Background: An adverse drug event (ADE) is a noxious, unintended response to a drug, occurring at doses used in humans for prophylaxis, diagnosis, or treatment of disease or for modification of physiological function. ADEs account for about one-quarter of all adverse events in Canadian hospitals. Canadian data on specific types of ADEs and commonly implicated drugs are lacking. In particular, there is a paucity of data on ADEs that occur during hospital admissions. Objectives: The primary objective was to identify the incidence of ADEs in a sample of adult general medicine inpatients over a 1-year period. The secondary objective was to identify the 5 drugs most frequently responsible for ADEs in this setting. Methods: A retrospective chart analysis was conducted for general medicine patients discharged from St Pauls Hospital in Vancouver, British Columbia, from January to December 2011. ADEs were identified using the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) Trigger Tool for Measuring Adverse Drug Events. The Naranjo criteria were applied to assess causality, and a physician independently authenticated the ADEs for preventability and harm using the categories of harm set out by the US National Coordinating Council for Medication Error Reporting and Prevention. Results: Of the 204 patient encounters reviewed, 15 involved ADEs, which represented an incidence of 7% over the 1-year study period. The 5 drugs most frequently implicated in ADEs were vancomycin, ciprofloxacin, ceftriaxone, piperacillintazobactam, and moxifloxacin. Conclusions: The rate of ADEs during hospital admissions was substantial. These events may necessitate additional investigations and interventions and may prolong the hospital stay. The authors do not recommend the IHI Trigger Tool for Measuring Adverse Drug Events for efficient prospective detection of ADEs in manual chart reviews. Possible modifications to improve the utility of this tool might include incorporating it into a compatible electronic health record system with automated trigger detection. PMID:25548399

  13. Effect of recycling activities on the heating value of solid waste: case study of the Greater Vancouver Regional District (Metro Vancouver).

    PubMed

    Abedini, Ali R; Atwater, James W; Fu, George Yuzhu

    2012-08-01

    Two main goals of the integrated solid waste management system (ISWMS) of Metro Vancouver (MV) include further recycling of waste and energy recovery via incineration of waste. These two very common goals, however, are not always compatible enough to fit in an ISWMS depending on waste characteristics and details of recycling programs. This study showed that recent recycling activities in MV have negatively affected the net heating value (NHV) of municipal solid waste (MSW) in this regional district. Results show that meeting MV's goal for additional recycling of MSW by 2015 will further reduce the NHV of waste, if additional recycling activities are solely focused on more extensive recycling of packaging materials (e.g. paper and plastic). It is concluded that 50% additional recycling of paper and plastic in MV will increase the overall recycling rate to 70% (as targeted by the MV for 2015) and result in more than 8% reduction in NHV of MSW. This reduction translates to up to 2.3 million Canadian dollar (CAD$) less revenue at a potential waste-to-energy (WTE) plant with 500 000 tonnes year(-1) capacity. Properly designed recycling programmes, however, can make this functional element of ISWMS compatible with green goals of energy recovery from waste. Herein an explanation of how communities can increase their recycling activities without affecting the feasibility of potential WTE projects is presented. PMID:22700857

  14. High-resolution imaging of rapid tremor migrations beneath southern Vancouver Island using cross-station cross correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yajun; Rubin, Allan M.; Bostock, Michael G.; Armbruster, John G.

    2015-06-01

    We develop a cross-station method to detect and locate tremor and low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs), based on the original work of Armbruster et al. (2014) that compares waveforms from the same time window at stations separated by roughly 10 km. To improve the signal-to-noise ratio, we first rotate the horizontal components into the empirical shear wave particle motion direction. The large-scale "rapid tremor reversals" beneath southern Vancouver Island are best recorded by stations that exhibit pronounced shear wave splitting, which obscures this optimal direction. We correct for splitting using the stacked templates of 11 low-frequency earthquake families obtained in this region by Bostock et al. (2012). We find that the style of rapid tremor migrations (RTMs) evolves as the main front passes over a region. Very close to the main front, numerous small-scale migrations occur with recurrence intervals far shorter than tidal periods. These usually propagate along the main front even when that is not parallel to dip. Several larger RTMs propagating along the main front have prominent elongation orthogonal to the propagation direction, inconsistent with the interpretation that their large propagation speed is an "apparent" velocity caused by the slow main front intersecting a preexisting linear structure on the plate interface. Farther behind the main front, RTMs gradually progress to being tidally modulated and have generally slower propagation speeds. Many reversal-like RTMs are observed, some of which evolve from fronts initially propagating along the main front. These reversals are sometimes coherent across regions of low tremor density.

  15. Vitamin D supplementation is associated with higher serum 25OHD in Asian and White infants living in Vancouver, Canada.

    PubMed

    Green, Tim J; Li, Wangyang; Barr, Susan I; Jahani, Mitra; Chapman, Gwen E

    2015-04-01

    To prevent rickets, the Health Canada and the American Academy of Pediatrics recommend that breastfed infants receive a daily vitamin D supplement of 10 ?g d(-1) . Compliance with this recommendation is variable and its effect on infant vitamin D status is unclear. We measured serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) in Asian immigrant (n=28) and White (n=37) mothers and their infants aged 2-4 months living in Vancouver (49N). Mothers completed health and demographic questionnaires. All subjects were term infants who were primarily breastfed. Analysis of variance, ?(2) , multiple regression and logistic regression analysis were performed as appropriate. Mean 25OHD of the infants was 31 (95% confidence interval 28-34) ng mL(-1) . Only two infants had a 25OHD concentration indicative of deficiency, <10?ng mL(-1) . Of the infants, 14% (n=9) and 49% (n=32) were vitamin D insufficient based on two commonly used cut-offs of 20 and 30?ng mL(-1) , respectively. Fifty-eight (89%) infants had been given a vitamin D supplement. Mean 25OHD was 9.4?ng mL(-1) higher in infants consuming ?10??g?d(-1) of vitamin D from supplements vs. those consuming less (P=0.003). Mother's 25OHD, season, skin colour or ethnicity (Asian vs. White) did not influence infant 25OHD. The infants in our study, most of whom received vitamin D supplements, were generally protected against low 25OHD. The study was limited by sample size and the nature of the cross-sectional study design. PMID:23061469

  16. A Search for Decolonizing Place-Based Pedagogies: An Exploration of Unheard Histories in Kitsilano Vancouver, B.C.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Elizabeth Ruth

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the ways that place-based pedagogies can facilitate dialogue on colonization, or some of the "dark matters" of environmental education, specifically by engaging non-Indigenous adults in decolonizing dialogues. I share findings from an action research project with Kitsilano Neighbourhood House in Vancouver, British…

  17. Survey of Achievement in Composition in Grade 11 of Vancouver Schools, February 18, 1975. Research Report 75-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, E. N.

    Concern over the reading and writing programs in Vancouver, British Columbia Schools culminated in the establishment in June 1974 of a Task Force on English. In response to the request from the Task Force for a survey of the writing ability of Grade 11 students, a committee of English Department Heads assisted in developing an instrument and the

  18. A Search for Decolonizing Place-Based Pedagogies: An Exploration of Unheard Histories in Kitsilano Vancouver, B.C.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Elizabeth Ruth

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the ways that place-based pedagogies can facilitate dialogue on colonization, or some of the "dark matters" of environmental education, specifically by engaging non-Indigenous adults in decolonizing dialogues. I share findings from an action research project with Kitsilano Neighbourhood House in Vancouver, British

  19. Occupational stress and mental health among nurses in a medical intensive care unit of a general hospital in Bandar Abbas in 2013

    PubMed Central

    Tajvar, Abdolhamid; Saraji, Gebraeil Nasl; Ghanbarnejad, Amin; Omidi, Leila; Hosseini, Seyed Sodabeh Seyed; Abadi, Ali Salehi Sahl

    2015-01-01

    Background: Many nurses have reported experiencing high levels of occupational stress in their work environment. Stress, as an outcome of stressful workplaces and tasks, affects nursing behavior in hospital wards. The objectives of this research were to determine the prevalence of occupational stress and mental health problems in nurses in the intensive care unit (ICU) at Shahid Mohammadi Hospital in Bandar Abbas in 2013 and to determine the relationship between occupational stress and mental health. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2013 on all of the nurses working in ICU at Shahid Mohammadi Hospital located in Bandar Abbas, Iran. Seventy-two nurses were selected as the population for this study, and all of them were female. Two questionnaires were used in this study, i.e., General Health Questionnaire-28 (GHQ-28) for assessing mental health and an occupational stress test for assessing job stress. Furthermore, the relationship between occupational stress and mental health was examined. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), independent samples t-test, and Pearsons product-moment correlation test were used to analyze the data. Results: High and moderate levels of occupational stress were experienced by 83.9% and 10.7% of ICU nurses, respectively. The prevalence of mental disorders, somatic symptoms, anxiety, social dysfunction, and depression were 58.9, 60.7, 62.5, 71.4, and 10.7%, respectively. The findings of the independent samples t-test showed that somatic symptoms had significant relationships with age and working experience (p = 0.01). According to the independent samples t-test, there were no significant differences between somatic symptoms and working different shifts (p > 0.05). Conclusions: There was a high prevalence of occupational stress among ICU nurses. There was a significant relationship between occupational stress and mental health. Future interventions are needed to codify a comprehensive health program in this field to reduce occupational stress and enhance nurses levels of mental health. PMID:26388976

  20. Prevalence of psychiatric co-morbidity among patients attending dental OPD and the role of consultation-liaison psychiatry in dental practice in a tertiary care general hospital

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Pradip K; Ray (Bhattacharya), Sampa; Makhal, Manabendra; Majumder, Uttam; De, Shantanu; Ghosh, Subhankar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Psychiatric co-morbidities are frequent among patients attending dental OPD, some of which go unrecognized and hence untreated. Aims: The present study has been carried out to detect the psychiatric co-morbidities among dental patients and determine the scope of consultation-liaison (C-L) psychiatry in a rural teaching hospital regarding comprehensive management of the patients. Settings and Design: This cross-sectional, descriptive type study was conducted in a multi-speciality tertiary care teaching hospital in the northern part of West Bengal, India. Materials and Methods: One hundred patients attending the dental OPD were randomly included in the study and every patient was consecutively referred to psychiatry department for assessment, during the period from 1st November 2013 to 30th April 2014. All referred patients were clinically examined and psychiatric co-morbidity was assessed by the help of General Health Questionnaire (GHQ)-28 and Mental Status Examination. Statistical analysis used: The data were subjected to statistical package for social sciences (SPSS), version 16, and statistically analyzed using Cross tab and Chi test. P <0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results: The commonest dental illness was dental caries (22%). More than two-third of the patients had psychiatric co-morbidity according to GHQ-28 total score. Sixty-eight patients were diagnosed to have mental disorder on mental status examination. Somatoform disorder (25%) was the commonest type of mental disorder, followed by mixed anxiety and depression (14%). Conclusions: This study has pointed the need for psychological examination of patients visiting dental specialty with unexplained physical symptoms. Such patients can be identified and treated, provided a psychiatric consultation service exists. PMID:25767358

  1. Suicide attempts and related factors in patients admitted to a general hospital: a ten-year cross-sectional study (1997-2007)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Suicide and suicide attempts represent a severe problem for public health services. The aim of this study is to determine the socio-demographic and psychopathological variables associated with suicide attempts in the population admitted to a General Hospital. Methods An observational-descriptive study of patients admitted to the A Corua University Hospital (Spain) during the period 1997-2007, assessed by the Consultation and Liaison Psychiatric Unit. We include n = 5,234 admissions from 4,509 patients. Among these admissions, n = 361 (6.9%) were subsequent to a suicide attempt. Admissions arising from a suicide attempt were compared with admissions occurring due to other reasons. Multivariate generalised estimating equation logistic regression models were used to examine factors associated with suicide attempts. Results Adjusting by age, gender, educational level, cohabitation status, being employed or unemployed, the psychiatric diagnosis at the time of the interview and the information on previous suicide attempts, we found that the variables associated with the risk of a suicide attempt were: age, psychiatric diagnosis and previous suicide attempts. The risk of suicide attempts decreases with age (OR = 0.969). Psychiatric diagnosis was associated with a higher risk of suicide attempts, with the highest risk being found for Mood or Affective Disorders (OR = 7.49), followed by Personality Disorders (OR = 7.31), and Schizophrenia and Other Psychotic Disorders (OR = 5.03). The strongest single predictive factor for suicide attempts was a prior history of attempts (OR = 23.63). Conclusions Age, psychopathological diagnosis and previous suicide attempts are determinants of suicide attempts. PMID:21453478

  2. Human papillomavirus genotypes distribution by cervical cytologic status among women attending the General Hospital of Loandjili, Pointe-Noire, Southwest Congo (Brazzaville).

    PubMed

    Boumba, Luc Magloire Anicet; Qmichou, Zineb; Mouallif, Mustapha; Attaleb, Mohammed; El Mzibri, Mohammed; Hilali, Lahoucine; Donatien, Moukassa; Ennaji, Moulay Mustapha

    2015-10-01

    HPV infection is associated with cervical cancer, one of the major public health problems in developing countries. In the Republic of Congo, despite of the high age-standardized incidence rate estimated at 25.2 per 100,000 women, molecular epidemiology data on HPV infections are very limited. We investigated HPV genotypes distribution in cervical smears among patients attending the General Hospital of Loandjili, Southwest Congo. A cross-sectional hospital-based study was conducted on 321 women. Liquid-based cytology samples were collected for cytological diagnosis and HPV detection. Nested-PCR was performed using MY09/MY11 and GP5+/GP6+ primers with genotyping by direct sequencing. Type-specific PCR for HPV-6, -11, -16, -18, -31 and -33 was also used to assess multiple infections. Out of 321 women examined, 189 (58.8%) had normal cytology, 16 (5.0%) had ASCUS and 116 (36.1%) had cytological abnormalities. HPV-DNA was detected in 22 (11.6%), 6 (37.5%), and 104 (89.6%) normal cytology, ASCUS and cytological abnormalities respectively. HPV16 was the most prevalent genotype regardless of cytological status followed by HPV70 in women without lesions and HPV33 among those with lesions. HR-HPV prevalence varied significantly according to the cervical cytology (P?=?0.000). Among women without lesions, two peaks of HPV infections were observed in age group less than 30 years (60.0%) and in age group 50-59 years (7.1%). Age, age of first sex, multiple sexual partners and pregnancies were the risk factors for HPV infection in women without lesions. Our findings could be used as evidence data base for future epidemiological monitoring in this region. PMID:25963674

  3. The clinical pattern of renal diseases in the nephrology in-patient unit of the Yaounde General Hospital in Cameroon: a five-year audit

    PubMed Central

    Kaze, Francois Folefack; Ekokobe, Forbin Elias; Halle, Marie Patrice; Fouda, Hermine; Menanga, Alain Patrick; Ashuntantang, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Kidney diseases are a growing worldwide problem and one of the major public health threats. We analyzed the spectrum of kidney diseases seen over a five-year period in the nephrology in-patient unit of the Yaounde general hospital. Methods This was a retrospective analysis of 225 medical records of patients admitted from January 2005 to December 2009 in the unit with a discharge diagnosis of kidney and urinary tract diseases. The first hospitalization was considered for patients admitted several times for the same disease. Socio-demographic and clinical patient data were recorded. Results The patients mean age was 44.816 years with 135 (60%) males and 211 (93.8%) emergency admissions. All 139 (61.8%) patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) had chronic renal failure. Acute kidney injury (AKI) (28%), nephrotic syndrome (7.6%), renal colic (1.3%) and acute pyelonephritis (1.3%) were other patterns observed. Chronic glomerulonephritis (25.9%), hypertension (22.3%) and diabetes (20.1%) were the main etiological factors of CKD. All AKI patients were in stage RIFLE-F. AKI was secondary to parenchymal (58.7%), functional (25.4%) and obstructive (15.9%) etiologies. Black water fever (36.4%), sepsis (22.7%), drugs (18.2%), eclampsia (13.6%) and herbal concoctions (9.1%) were the etiologies of acute tubular necrosis while enterocolitis (56.2%), heart failure (31.3%) and digestive hemorrhage (12.5%) were the etiologies of functional AKI. Conclusion The clinical pattern of renal diseases is dominated by advanced CKD and AKI secondary to preventable causes. This study suggests a need for an array of actions including sensitization, continuous medical education and strengthening of the health system. PMID:26421100

  4. Demographics, Clinical Characteristics, and Treatment of Aggressive Patients Admitted to the Acute Behavioral Unit of a Community General Hospital: A Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Reade, Cynthia; Stoltzfus, Jill; Mittal, Vikrant

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Aggressive patients are not uncommon in acute inpatient behavioral health units of general hospitals. Prior research identifies various predictors associated with aggressive inpatient behavior. This prospective observational study examines the demographic and clinical characteristics of aggressive inpatients and the routine medications these patients were receiving at discharge. Method: Thirty-six adults diagnosed with a DSM-IV mental disorder who met 2 of 6 established inclusion criteria for high violence risk and a Clinical Global Impressions–Severity of Illness (CGI-S) scale score ≥ 4 were observed for a maximum of 28 days on the 23-bed case mix acute behavioral health unit of St Luke’s University Hospital, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, from January 2012 to May 2013. Primary outcome measures were the Modified Overt Aggression Scale (MOAS) and CGI-S; secondary measures were symptom outcome measures and demographic and clinical characteristics data. Analysis was conducted using repeated measures methodology. Results: Younger males with a history of previous violence, psychiatric admissions, and symptoms of severe agitation were more at risk for aggressive behavior. Positive psychotic symptoms, a diagnosis of bipolar disorder, substance use, and comorbid personality disorders also increased risk. Significant improvements from baseline to last visit were observed for the CGI-S and MOAS (P < .001 for both), with a significant correlation between the MOAS and CGI-S at last visit (P < .001). Only the symptom of agitation was significantly correlated to MOAS scores at both baseline and last visit (P < .001). Conclusion: Patients significantly improved over time in both severity of illness and level of aggression. PMID:25317364

  5. AVTA Federal Fleet PEV Readiness Data Logging and Characterization Study for the National Park Service: Fort Vancouver National Historic Site

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen Schey; Jim Francfort

    2014-03-01

    Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, managing and operating contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory, is the lead laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing. Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC contracted with Intertek Testing Services, North America (ITSNA) to collect data on federal fleet operations as part of the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity’s Federal Fleet Vehicle Data Logging and Characterization study. The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity study seeks to collect data to validate the use of advanced electric drive vehicle transportation. This report focuses on the Fort Vancouver National Historic Site (FVNHS) fleet to identify daily operational characteristics of select vehicles and report findings on vehicle and mission characterizations to support the successful introduction of electric vehicles (EVs) into the agencies’ fleet. Individual observations of the selected vehicles provided the basis for recommendations related to EV adoption and whether a battery electric vehicle (BEV) or plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) (collectively plug-in electric vehicles) could fulfill the mission requirements. FVNHS identified three vehicles in its fleet for consideration. While the FVNHS vehicles conduct many different missions, only two (i.e., support and pool missions) were selected by agency management to be part of this fleet evaluation. The logged vehicles included a pickup truck and a minivan. This report will show that BEVs and PHEVs are capable of performing the required missions and providing an alternative vehicle for both mission categories, because each has sufficient range for individual trips and time available each day for charging to accommodate multiple trips per day. These charging events could occur at the vehicle’s home base, high-use work areas, or in intermediate areas along routes that the vehicles frequently travel. Replacement of vehicles in the current fleet would result in significant reductions in emission of greenhouse gases and petroleum use, while also reducing fuel costs. The Vancouver, Washington area and neighboring Portland, Oregon are leaders in adoption of PEVs in the United States1. PEV charging stations, or more appropriately identified as electric vehicle supply equipment, located on the FVNHS facility would be a benefit for both FVNHS fleets and general public use. Fleet drivers and park visitors operating privately owned plug-in electric vehicles benefit by using the charging infrastructure. ITSNA recommends location analysis of the FVNHS site to identify the optimal station placement for electric vehicle supply equipment. ITSNA recognizes the support of Idaho National Laboratory and ICF International for their efforts to initiate communication with the National Parks Service and FVNHS for participation in this study. ITSNA is pleased to provide this report and is encouraged by the high interest and support from the National Park Service and FVNHS personnel

  6. 4. Hospital Point, Saunders Monument, view to northeast Portsmouth ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Hospital Point, Saunders Monument, view to northeast - Portsmouth Naval Hospital, Bounded by Elizabeth River, Crawford Street, Portsmouth General Hospital, Parkview Avenue, & Scotts Creek, Portsmouth, Portsmouth, VA

  7. 1. OVERVIEW OF MAIN HOSPITAL, NORTHEAST CORNER. Presidio of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. OVERVIEW OF MAIN HOSPITAL, NORTHEAST CORNER. - Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman General Hospital, Building No. 27, Letterman Hospital Complex, Edie Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  8. 5. Hospital Point, northeast bulkhead (typical), view to northwest ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Hospital Point, northeast bulkhead (typical), view to northwest - Portsmouth Naval Hospital, Bounded by Elizabeth River, Crawford Street, Portsmouth General Hospital, Parkview Avenue, & Scotts Creek, Portsmouth, Portsmouth, VA

  9. Primary deforestation and regrowth on limestone slopes on Vancouver Island, British Columbia

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, K.A.; Ford, D.C. . Dept. of Geography)

    1992-01-01

    Limestones, well bedded and steeply dipping, are common in northern Vancouver Island. They have been glaciated and host a high density of postglacial karren (dissolution pits, grooves and troughs linked to underlying caves). There is rich, mature forest cover of western hemlock, silver fir and red cedar that is rooted in the karren or in overlying glacial deposits. Logging commenced around 1900 AD, intensifying after 1960 with clear cutting and (often) burning of slash. Impacts were investigated quantitatively by comparing sixteen limestone sites with eight on adjoining volcanic rocks. Some sites on each retained original forest, other were cleared. It was found that soil losses following logging are significantly greater on the limestones because of wash into karren (the epikarst zone). Regrowth is retarded on the limestones also; one site cleared in 1911 had regained approximately 17% of its original volume of timber 75 years later.

  10. [Declarations issued by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors in conjunction with the Vancouver standards].

    PubMed

    1998-04-01

    These statements, which are published by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors in conjunction with the Vancouver standards, cover some of the legal, ethical, and practical aspects of the publication of research papers, and of the comments generated by them, in biomedical journals. Following a definition of what constitutes a peer-reviewed journal, the roles of journal owners and editors are described, along with those of members of an editorial board, and procedural norms are set forth in connection with conflicts of interests, retractions or corrections, fraud, and breaches of confidentiality. Among the last topics explored are the problems involved in the dissemination of research results by the popular media, the handling of advertising within the journal, and the simultaneous acceptance of manuscripts whose authors have arrived at opposite conclusions regarding the results of a particular study. PMID:9608815

  11. Home Oxygen Program review: Regionalization in Vancouver Coastal Health and British Columbia

    PubMed Central

    Sandberg, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Since its inception in the 1980s, the Home Oxygen Program in British Columbia was centrally managed by the Ministry of Health. Initially a small program with few clients across the province, it soon became a large program with many clients and increasing expenditures. A pilot program started in Victoria (British Columbia) in 1996 demonstrated that managing the program locally could offer better client care, better contract management and significant cost savings. In 2002, the pilot’s model and recommendations were implemented in British Columbia’s five health authorities. The present review details the experiences of regionalizing the program in the Vancouver Coastal Health authority. After fine adjustments to the model were developed and new contracts and criteria changes made, better care for clients was provided than the previous centralized model at a reduced cost to the taxpayer. PMID:26078624

  12. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 85-462-1748, Boise Cascade, Vancouver, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Apol, A.; Thoburn, T.W.

    1986-11-01

    An authorized representative of the Association of Western Pulp and Paper Workers requested an investigation be made of employee exposure to diethylenetriamine (DETA), hexamethylene-diisocyante (HDI), and other chemicals in use during the production of carbonless paper at the Boise Cascade facility in Vancouver, Washington. This facility makes paper from pulp and carbonless paper by applying the appropriate coatings to the paper. Possible exposures to biphenyl and butyl biphenyls, formaldehyde, phenol, and petroleum solvents were also investigated. Medical interviews were conducted with 65 employees. In four cases, pulmonary problems were determined that may have been related to past diisocyanate exposure. The authors recommend that workers with asthma sensitization be medically monitored and evaluated, and that contact and inhalation exposures be reduced by the use of personal protective clothing and increased ventilation.

  13. The Impact of Healthcare Workers Job Environment on Their Mental-emotional Health. Coping Strategies: The Case of a Local General Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Koinis, Aristotelis; Giannou, Vasiliki; Drantaki, Vasiliki; Angelaina, Sophia; Stratou, Elpida; Saridi, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Workplace stress can influence healthcare professionals’ physical and emotional well-being by curbing their efficiency and having a negative impact on their overall quality of life. The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact that work environment in a local public general hospital can have on the health workers’ mental-emotional health and find strategies in order to cope with negative consequences. The study took place from July 2010 to October 2010. Our sample consisted of 200 healthcare professionals aged 21-58 years working in a 240-bed general hospital and the response rate was 91.36%). Our research protocol was first approved by the hospital’s review board. A standardized questionnaire that investigates strategies for coping with stressful conditions was used. A standardized questionnaire was used in the present study Coping Strategies for Stressful Events, evaluating the strategies that persons employ in order to overcome a stressful situation or event. The questionnaire was first tested for validity and reliability which were found satisfactory (Cronbach’s α=0.862). Strict anonymity of the participants was guaranteed. The SPSS 16.0 software was used for the statistical analysis. Regression analysis showed that health professionals’ emotional health can be influenced by strategies for dealing with stressful events, since positive re-assessment, quitting and seeking social support are predisposing factors regarding the three first quality of life factors of the World Health Organization Quality of Life - BREF. More specifically, for the physical health factor, positive re-assessment (t=3.370, P=0.001) and quitting (t=−2.564, P=0.011) are predisposing factors. For the ‘mental health and spirituality’ regression model, positive re-assessment (t=5.528, P=0.000) and seeking social support (t=−1.991, P=0.048) are also predisposing factors, while regarding social relationships positive re-assessment (t=4.289, P=0.000) is a predisposing factor. According to our findings, there was a notable lack of workplace stress management strategies, which the participants usually perceive as a lack of interest on behalf of the management regarding their emotional state. Some significant factors for lowering workplace stress were found to be the need to encourage and morally reward the staff and also to provide them with opportunities for further or continuous education. PMID:26973958

  14. Social influences upon injection initiation among street-involved youth in Vancouver, Canada: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Small, Will; Fast, Danya; Krusi, Andrea; Wood, Evan; Kerr, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Background Street-involved youth are a population at risk of adopting injection as a route of administration, and preventing the transition to injection drug use among street youth represents a public health priority. In order to inform epidemiological research and prevention efforts, we conducted a qualitative study to investigate the initiation of injection drug use among street-involved youth in Vancouver, Canada. Methods Qualitative interviews with street youth who inject drugs elicited descriptions of the adoption of injection as a route of administration. Interviewees were recruited from the At-Risk Youth Study (ARYS), a cohort of street-involved youth who use illicit drugs in Vancouver, Canada. Audio recorded interviews were transcribed verbatim and a thematic analysis was conducted. Results 26 youth aged 16 to 26 participated in this study, including 12 females. Among study participants the first injection episode frequently featured another drug user who facilitated the initiation of injecting. Youth narratives indicate that the transition into injecting is influenced by social interactions with drug using peers and evolving perceptions of injecting, and rejecting identification as an injector was important among youth who did not continue to inject. It appears that social conventions discouraging initiating young drug users into injection exist among established injectors, although this ethic is often ignored. Conclusion The importance of social relationships with other drug users within the adoption of injection drug use highlights the potential of social interventions to prevent injection initiation. Additionally, developing strategies to engage current injectors who are likely to initiate youth into injection could also benefit prevention efforts. PMID:19405977

  15. Reversed Contralateral LISS Plate for Vancouver B1 Periprosthetic Femoral Shaft Fractures.

    PubMed

    Russo, Matthew; Malekzadeh, A Stephen; Hampton, Chadwick; Hymes, Robert; Schwartzbach, Cary; Schulman, Jeffrey

    2015-06-01

    The authors reviewed all patients treated for periprosthetic femur fractures between March 1, 2007, and January 31, 2010 at the senior author's institution. Demographic features, mechanism of injury, radiographs, and computed tomography scans were reviewed to determine the type and stability of the femoral implant at the time of injury. All Vancouver B1 fractures were treated with a novel technique that used a contoured distal femoral locking plate intended for the contralateral femur and reversed to accommodate the ipsilateral femoral bow and contour of the proximal femur. Fixation was achieved around the implant with percutaneously placed unicortical and/or bicortical screws. Radiographs were reviewed for fracture healing, malunion, implant failure, and prosthetic loosening. Fifteen patients were identified and underwent the procedure as described. One patient died soon after surgery of complications from a ruptured preexisting esophageal ulcer. Of the remaining 14 patients, the average duration of follow-up was 25 months (range, 6-31 months). Two patients did not achieve union; however, repeat interpretation of the presenting radiographs showed likely misdiagnosed Vancouver B2 fractures. The first patient had late aseptic loosening and underwent revision surgery 22 weeks postoperatively. The other had early loss of fixation that required revision with a long stem prosthesis. Other complications included 1 deep venous thrombosis and 2 superficial wound infections. The infections were successfully treated with a single formal irrigation and debridement, primary closure, and a short course of oral antibiotics. Ultimately, in 86% of patients (12/14), fracture healing occurred with this biologically friendly technique. PMID:26091218

  16. Experimental High-Resolution Land Surface Prediction System for the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympic Games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belair, S.; Bernier, N.; Tong, L.; Mailhot, J.

    2008-05-01

    The 2010 Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games will take place in Vancouver, Canada, from 12 to 28 February 2010 and from 12 to 21 March 2010, respectively. In order to provide the best possible guidance achievable with current state-of-the-art science and technology, Environment Canada is currently setting up an experimental numerical prediction system for these special events. This system consists of a 1-km limited-area atmospheric model that will be integrated for 16h, twice a day, with improved microphysics compared with the system currently operational at the Canadian Meteorological Centre. In addition, several new and original tools will be used to adapt and refine predictions near and at the surface. Very high-resolution two-dimensional surface systems, with 100-m and 20-m grid size, will cover the Vancouver Olympic area. Using adaptation methods to improve the forcing from the lower-resolution atmospheric models, these 2D surface models better represent surface processes, and thus lead to better predictions of snow conditions and near-surface air temperature. Based on a similar strategy, a single-point model will be implemented to better predict surface characteristics at each station of an observing network especially installed for the 2010 events. The main advantage of this single-point system is that surface observations are used as forcing for the land surface models, and can even be assimilated (although this is not expected in the first version of this new tool) to improve initial conditions of surface variables such as snow depth and surface temperatures. Another adaptation tool, based on 2D stationnary solutions of a simple dynamical system, will be used to produce near-surface winds on the 100-m grid, coherent with the high- resolution orography. The configuration of the experimental numerical prediction system will be presented at the conference, together with preliminary results for winter 2007-2008.

  17. Improving Metabolic and Cardiovascular Health at an Early Psychosis Intervention Program in Vancouver, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Fredrikson, Diane H.; Boyda, Heidi N.; Tse, Lurdes; Whitney, Zachary; Pattison, Mark A.; Ott, Fred J.; Hansen, Laura; Barr, Alasdair M.

    2014-01-01

    Psychotic disorders most commonly appear during the late teenage years and early adulthood. A focused and rapid clinical response by an integrated health team can help to improve the quality of life of the patient, leading to a better long-term prognosis. The Vancouver Coastal Health early psychosis intervention program covers a catchment area of approximately 800,000 people in the cities of Vancouver and Richmond, Canada. The program provides a multidisciplinary approach to supporting patients under the age of 30 who have recently experienced first-break psychosis. The program addresses the needs of the treatment environment, medication, and psychological therapies. A critical part of this support includes a program to specifically improve patients physical health. Physical health needs are addressed through a two-pronged, parallel approach. Patients receive routine metabolic health assessments during their first year in the program, where standard metabolic parameters are recorded. Based on the results of clinical interviews and laboratory tests, specific actionable interventions are recommended. The second key strategy is a program that promotes healthy lifestyle goal development. Patients work closely with occupational therapists to develop goals to improve cardiometabolic health. These programs are supported by an active research environment, where patients are able to engage in studies with a focus on improving their physical health. These studies include a longitudinal evaluation of the effects of integrated health coaching on maintaining cardiometabolic health in patients recently admitted to the program, as well as a clinical study that evaluates the effects of low versus higher metabolic risk antipsychotic drugs on central adiposity. An additional pharmacogenomic study is helping to identify genetic variants that may predict cardiometabolic changes following treatment with antipsychotic drugs. PMID:25249985

  18. Migration to the Downtown Eastside neighbourhood of Vancouver and changes in service use in a cohort of mentally ill homeless adults: a 10-year retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Somers, Julian M; Moniruzzaman, Akm; Rezansoff, Stefanie N

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Little research has investigated the role of migration as a potential contributor to the spatial concentration of homeless people with complex health and social needs. In addition, little is known concerning the relationship between possible migration and changes in levels of service use over time. We hypothesised that homeless, mentally ill individuals living in a concentrated urban setting had migrated from elsewhere over a 10-year period, in association with significant increases in the use of public services. Setting Recruitment was concentrated in the Downtown Eastside neighbourhood of Vancouver, Canada. Participants Participants (n=433) met criteria for chronic homelessness and serious mental illness, and provided consent to access administrative data. Methods Linked administrative data were used to retrospectively examine geographic relocation as well as rates of health, justice, and social welfare service utilisation in each of the 10 years prior to recruitment. Generalised estimating equations were used to estimate the effect of migration on service use. Results Over a 10-year period there was significant movement into Vancouver's Downtown Eastside neighbourhood (from 17% to 52% of the cohort). During the same period, there were significant annual increases in community medical services (adjusted rate ratio (ARR) per year=1.08; 95% CI 1.06 to 1.10), hospital admissions (ARR=1.08; 95% CI 1.04 to 1.11), criminal convictions (ARR=1.08; 95% CI 1.03 to 1.13), and financial assistance payments (ARR=1.04; 95% CI 1.03 to 1.06). Migration was significantly associated with financial assistance, but not with other types of services. Conclusions Significant increases in service use over a 10-year period coincided with significant migration into an urban area where relevant services were concentrated. These results highlight opportunities for early intervention in spatially diverse neighbourhoods to interrupt trajectories marked by worsening health and extremely high service involvement. Further research is urgently needed to investigate the causal relationships between physical migration, health and social welfare, and escalating use of public services. Trial registration numbers ISRCTN57595077 and ISRCTN66721740; Post-results. PMID:26739726

  19. Female Genital Mutilation in Infants and Young Girls: Report of Sixty Cases Observed at the General Hospital of Abobo (Abidjan, Cote D'Ivoire, West Africa)

    PubMed Central

    Plo, Kouie; Asse, Kouadio; Seï, Dohagneron; Yenan, John

    2014-01-01

    The practice of female genital mutilations continues to be recurrent in African communities despite the campaigns, fights, and laws to ban it. A survey was carried out in infants and young girls at the General Hospital of Abobo in Cote D'Ivoire. The purpose of the study was to describe the epidemiological aspects and clinical findings related to FGM in young patients. Four hundred nine (409) females aged from 1 to 12 years and their mothers entered the study after their consent. The results were that 60/409 patients (15%) were cut. The majority of the young females came from Muslim families (97%); the earlier age at FGM procedure in patients is less than 5 years: 87%. Amongst 409 mothers, 250 women underwent FGM which had other daughters cut. Women were mainly involved in the FGM and their motivations were virginity, chastity, body cleanliness, and fear of clitoris similar to penis. Only WHO types I and II were met. If there were no incidental events occurred at the time of the procedure, the obstetrical future of these young females would be compromised. With FGM being a harmful practice, health professionals and NGOs must unite their efforts in people education to abandon the procedure. PMID:24729789

  20. Descriptive analysis of total medical admissions and common medical disorders in 1987 Kuantan General Hospital, using computerized in-patients' discharge record.

    PubMed

    Lim, T O; Looi, H W; Harun, K; Marzida

    1991-09-01

    Using computerized in-patients' discharge records, a descriptive analysis was carried out of all medical admission in 1987 in a general hospital. The survey found that there were a total of 4053 admissions in 1987. A wide range of medical disorders were seen reflecting the lack of subspecialization. Cardiovascular disorders topped accounting for 25.6% of all admissions, followed by gastrointestinal and hepatobiliary disorders 12.8% and respiratory disorders 10.7%. The commonest specific medical disorders seen were hypertension 13.8%, diabetes mellitus 10.2%, ischaemic heart disease 7% and asthma 4.5%. The age, sex, ethnic and geographical distributions of the common medical disorders seen appear to conform to two broad pattern; hypertension, diabetes, ischaemic heart disease and cerebrovascular disease affected the older patients, had even ethic distribution and predominantly urban. Malaria, non-specific fever, viral hepatitis and acute gastroenteritis affected the younger patients, predominantly rural and Malay. Information from such surveys may be useful for planning and organization of medical services. PMID:1839919

  1. An eight-year survey of the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of 85,971 bacteria isolated from patients in a district general hospital and the local community.

    PubMed

    MacGowan, A P; Brown, N M; Holt, H A; Lovering, A M; McCulloch, S Y; Reeves, D S

    1993-04-01

    Antimicrobial susceptibilities were determined for 85,971 bacteria isolated from clinical specimens in the microbiology department of a single district general hospital during the eight-year period between 1984 and 1991. The isolates included 45,786 coliforms, 4483 Proteus spp. and 2644 Pseudomonas spp. from urine and 13,324 Staphylococcus aureus, 7311 beta-haemolytic streptococci, 4741 coliforms, 3643 Pseudomonas spp., 2778 Haemophilus influenzae, 638 Proteus spp. and 623 Streptococcus pneumoniae from other sites (excluding blood). Patterns of susceptibility remained largely unchanged during the study period, except for a decline in the susceptibility of Proteus spp. to trimethoprim between 1984 and 1988 which had reversed itself by 1990 and a reduction in the susceptibilities of Pseudomonas spp. and S. aureus to ciprofloxacin between 1986 and 1991. The susceptibilities of coliforms which had been isolated from sites other than the urinary tract to ampicillin, cefazolin and cefuroxime decreased between 1984 and 1988 but a more variable pattern was noted in subsequent years. Susceptibility of S. aureus to penicillin fell during the first five years of the study but has remained stable since. No change was observed in the susceptibility pattern of H. influenzae. In our experience, gentimicin-resistant Gram-negative bacilli, methicillin-resistant S. aureus and penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae were rarely isolated. PMID:8514649

  2. Female sexual dysfunction: A comparative study in drug naive 1st episode of depression in a general hospital of South Asia

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Payel; Manohar, Shivananda; Raman, Rajesh; Sathyanarayana Rao, T. S.; Darshan, M. S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Women's sexual dysfunction is found to be highly prevalent in western and Indian literature. Limited studies are available on drug naive depression in western literature and in Indian population. Aim: To determine the prevalence rate and symptom profile of female sexual dysfunctions in patients with untreated depression. Design: A cross-sectional study in the psychiatry out-patient department of general hospital in South India. Materials and Methods: Following written informed consent female sexual functioning index (FSFI) and Arizona Sexual Experience Scale (ASEX) female version and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD - 17 item) on 30 cases and 30 controls was administered. Sociodemographic data, pattern and type of sexual dysfunctions were enquired. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, contingency co-efficient analysis and stepwise multiple regression. Results: The mean score of HAMD 17 item in study group was 19.13. The study showed that female sexual dysfunction was 70.3% in study group compared to 43.3% in control FSFI scores above 16 in HAMD had dysfunction of 76% with FSFI in study group. With ASEX-F sexual dysfunction was 73.3% in study compared to 20% in control. Scores above 16 in HAMD had 80% of sexual dysfunction with ASEX-F in study group. Conclusion: The study found that ASEX-F co-related better with HAMD 17 item. Following the onset of depression, the incidence of sexual dysfunction started at an early age in women. PMID:26600576

  3. Lack of knowledge about mother-to-child HIV transmission prevention in pregnant women at Tijuana General Hospital, Baja California, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Becka, Chandra M; Chacn-Cruz, Enrique; Araneta, Maria Rosario; Viani, Rolando M

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify determinants of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) knowledge regarding mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) among pregnant women at Tijuana General Hospital, Baja California, Mexico. Between March and November 2003, patients from the prenatal care (n = 1294) and labor and delivery (L&D) units (n = 495) participated in a cross-sectional study to measure HIV knowledge. Less than one-third (30%) knew that HIV could be transmitted to a child during delivery, and 36% knew that HIV could be transmitted by breast-feeding. Only 27% knew that an MTCT could be prevented. Prenatal patients were more likely to know that MTCT was preventable (prenatal: 31% versus L&D 25%; P = .02). Logistic regression indicated that prenatal patients (odds ratio = 1.49, confidence interval 1.07-2.07) were more likely to know that HIV could be transmitted through breast-feeding. Overall, both groups had poor knowledge regarding MTCT of HIV. PMID:25361556

  4. Parasuicide and drug self-poisoning: analysis of the epidemiological and clinical variables of the patients admitted to the Poisoning Treatment Centre (CAV), Niguarda General Hospital, Milan

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Epidemiological knowledge of parasuicides and drug self-poisoning is still limited by a lack of data. A number of preliminary studies, which require further analysis, evidenced that parasuicidal acts occur more often among females, that the peak rate is generally recorded between the ages of 15 and 34 years and psychotropic medications seems to be the most frequently used. The aim of this study was to describe the demographic and clinical variables of a sample of subjects admitted to the Posisoning Treatment Centre (CAV), Niguarda General Hospital, Milan, following drug self-poisoning. Furthermore, this study is aimed to identify the risk factors associated to parasuicidal gestures, with special care for the used drugs, the presence of psychiatric or organic disorders, alcoholism and drug addiction. The study included the 201 patients attending the CAV in 1999 and 2000 who satisfied the criteria of self-poisoning attempts: 106 cases in 1999 and 95 in 2000. The sample had a prevalence of females (64%). The peak rates of parasuicides from drug self-poisoning were reached between 21 and 30 years among the females, and 31 and 40 years among the males. 81.6% of the patients used one or more psychoactive drugs, the most frequent being the benzodiazepines (58.7%), classic neuroleptics (16.9%) and new-generation antidepressants (SSRIs, SNRIs, NARIs) (12.9%). The prevalence of mood disorders was higher among females (64% vs 42%), whereas schizophrenia was more frequently diagnosed in males (22% vs 10%). 61% (33%) had a history of previous attempted suicides. The presence of clinically relevant organic diseases was observed in 24.9% of the sample. PMID:15967050

  5. The association between work ethics and attitudes towards organizational changes among the administrative, financial and support employees of general teaching hospitals.

    PubMed

    Ravangard, Ramin; Sajjadnia, Zahra; Jafari, Abdosaleh; Shahsavan, Najme; Bahmaie, Jamshid; Bahadori, Mohammadkarim

    2014-01-01

    In order to achieve success in today's competitive world, organizations should adapt to environmental changes. On the other hand, managers should have a set of values and ethical guidelines for their administrative and organizational functions. This study aimed to investigate the association between work ethics and attitudes towards organizational changes among the administrative, financial and support employees of general teaching hospitals affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. This was an applied, cross-sectional and descriptive-analytic study conducted in 2013. A sample of 124 employees was selected using stratified sampling proportional to size and simple random sampling methods. Data were collected using 2 questionnaires measuring the dimensions of employees' work ethics (four dimensions) and attitudes towards organizational changes (three dimensions). The collected data were analyzed using SPSS 18.0 and statistical tests, including ANOVA, independent samples t-test, and Pearson's correlation coefficient. A P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. The maximum and minimum score of work ethic dimensions were related to being cooperative (4.60 0.38) and dependable (4.29 0.39) respectively. On the other hand, the maximum and minimum score of attitudes towards the various dimensions of organizational changes were related to the behavioral (3.83 0.70) and the affective (3.55 0.88) dimensions respectively. Furthermore, there was a significant relationship between the work ethics and education levels of the employees in this study (P = 0.003). Also, among work s dimensions, only being considerate had a significant association with attitudes towards organizational changes (P = 0.014) and their cognitive dimension (P = 0.005). To improve employees' work ethics and attitudes towards organizational changes, the following suggestions can be offered: training hospitals managers in participative management style and its application, as well as the importance of meeting the employees' needs and expectations based on their characteristics; familiarizing employees with the Islamic work ethic; educating employees on the importance of being considerate towards their colleagues and subordinates in the workplace, and reinforcing this desirable quality; and finally, clarifying the need for changes in the organization for all employees. PMID:25512831

  6. The association between work ethics and attitudes towards organizational changes among the administrative, financial and support employees of general teaching hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Ravangard, Ramin; Sajjadnia, Zahra; Jafari, Abdosaleh; Shahsavan, Najme; Bahmaie, Jamshid; Bahadori, Mohammadkarim

    2014-01-01

    In order to achieve success in today’s competitive world, organizations should adapt to environmental changes. On the other hand, managers should have a set of values and ethical guidelines for their administrative and organizational functions. This study aimed to investigate the association between work ethics and attitudes towards organizational changes among the administrative, financial and support employees of general teaching hospitals affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. This was an applied, cross-sectional and descriptive-analytic study conducted in 2013. A sample of 124 employees was selected using stratified sampling proportional to size and simple random sampling methods. Data were collected using 2 questionnaires measuring the dimensions of employees' work ethics (four dimensions) and attitudes towards organizational changes (three dimensions). The collected data were analyzed using SPSS 18.0 and statistical tests, including ANOVA, independent samples t-test, and Pearson’s correlation coefficient. A P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. The maximum and minimum score of work ethic dimensions were related to being cooperative (4.60 ± 0.38) and dependable (4.29 ± 0.39) respectively. On the other hand, the maximum and minimum score of attitudes towards the various dimensions of organizational changes were related to the behavioral (3.83 ± 0.70) and the affective (3.55 ± 0.88) dimensions respectively. Furthermore, there was a significant relationship between the work ethics and education levels of the employees in this study (P = 0.003). Also, among work s dimensions, only being considerate had a significant association with attitudes towards organizational changes (P = 0.014) and their cognitive dimension (P = 0.005). To improve employees' work ethics and attitudes towards organizational changes, the following suggestions can be offered: training hospitals managers in participative management style and its application, as well as the importance of meeting the employees' needs and expectations based on their characteristics; familiarizing employees with the Islamic work ethic; educating employees on the importance of being considerate towards their colleagues and subordinates in the workplace, and reinforcing this desirable quality; and finally, clarifying the need for changes in the organization for all employees. PMID:25512831

  7. Intensification of the oxygen minimum zone in the northeast Pacific off Vancouver Island during the last deglaciation: Ventilation and/or export production?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, J. L.; Pedersen, T. F.; Southon, J.

    2005-12-01

    The oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) off Vancouver Island was more oxygen depleted relative to modern conditions during the Allerd (13.5 to 12.6 calendar kyr) and again from 11 to 10 kyr. The timing of OMZ intensification is similar to that seen throughout the North Pacific, although the onset appears to have been delayed by 1500 years off Vancouver Island. Radiocarbon dating of coeval benthic and planktonic foraminifera shows that between 16.0 and 12.6 kyr the age contrast between surface and intermediate waters (920 m depth) off Vancouver Island was similar to, or slightly less than, that today. There is no evidence of an increased age difference (i.e., decreased ventilation) during the deglaciation, particularly during the Allerd. However, sedimentary marine organic carbon concentration and mass accumulation rate increased substantially in the Allerd, suggesting that increased organic matter export was the principal cause of late Pleistocene OMZ intensification off Vancouver Island.

  8. Cement-in-cement revision for selected Vancouver Type B1 femoral periprosthetic fractures: a biomechanical analysis.

    PubMed

    Brew, Christopher J; Wilson, Lance J; Whitehouse, Sarah L; Hubble, Matthew J W; Crawford, Ross W

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to perform a biomechanical analysis of the cement-in-cement (c-in-c) technique for fixation of selected Vancouver Type B1 femoral periprosthetic fractures and to assess the degree of cement interposition at the fracture site. Six embalmed cadaveric femora were implanted with a cemented femoral stem. Vancouver Type B1 fractures were created by applying a combined axial and rotational load to failure. The femora were repaired using the c-in-c technique and reloaded to failure. The mean primary fracture torque was 117 Nm (SD 16.6, range 89-133). The mean revision fracture torque was 50 Nm (SD 16.6, range 29-74), which is above the torque previously observed for activities of daily living. Cement interposition at the fracture site was found to be minimal. PMID:23146585

  9. Slip Partitioning, Crustal Tectonics and Deformation of the Queen Charlotte Margin and Northern Vancouver Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hippchen, Sabine

    Part I of this thesis investigates current deformation in western British Columbia from northern Vancouver Island in the south to Haida Gwaii in the north. The area is characterized by transition from the Cascadia subduction zone to the Queen Charlotte transform fault. The tectonic setting involves interactions between the Pacific, North America, Juan de Fuca, and Explorer plates, and the Winona block, involving a number of plate boundaries: the mainly strike-slip Queen Charlotte, Revere-Dellwood-Wilson and Nootka faults, the Explorer ridge, and the Cascadia subduction zone. Using GPS campaign data from 1993 to 2008 I derive a new crustal velocity field for Northern Vancouver Island and the adjacent mainland, and integrate it with previous velocity fields developed for Haida Gwaii, southern Vancouver Island and the adjacent mainland. The northern limit of the subduction zone is confirmed to be at Brooks Peninsula, where the direction of the crustal motion changes abruptly from ENE to NNE. I use viscoelastic models to explore what percentage of the observed deformation is transient, related to the earthquake cycle, and how much is permanent ongoing deformation, distributed off the continental margin. Previous authors have developed two competing end-member models that can each explain how the Pacific/North America plate convergence is accommodated off Haida Gwaii. These models assume either internal crustal shortening or underthrusting of the Pacific plate. These new GPS data allow me to conclude that underthrusting does occur, and that a small component (<15%) of the observed data reflects long-term deformation. South of Haida Gwaii the distinction between transient and long-term deformation is not as clear; however, I conclude that transient deformation alone cannot fully explain the observed velocities, and so long-term deformation likely must also occur. Part II of the thesis investigates the updip and downdip limits of the seismogenic zone of the Sumatra megathrust fault. Temperature and downdip changes in formation composition are controls proposed for these limits. To examine the thermal control I developed 2-D finite element models of the Sumatra subduction zone with smoothly varying subduction dip, variable thermal properties of the rock units, frictional heating along the rupture plane, and an appropriate thermal state for the incoming plate. The common updip thermal limit for seismic behaviour of 100-150°C occurs close to or at the trench in agreement with the rupture limit of the 2004 earthquake. Off central Sumatra the common downdip thermal limit range of 350-450°C occurs at 30-60 km depth. The 350°C isotherm location is in agreement with the earthquake limits but 450°C is deeper. North of Sumatra, 350°C occurs ˜14 km deeper than the earthquake rupture limit. The proposed composition control for the downdip limit, the intersection of the subduction thrust with the forearc mantle, is at a depth of ˜30 km, 140-200 km from the trench, in good agreement with the earthquake limits. These results support the conclusion that the Sumatra updip seismogenic limit is thermally controlled, but the downdip limit is governed by the intersection of the downgoing plate with the forearc Moho.

  10. Perceived organizational support and job involvement in the Iranian health care system: A case study of emergency room nurses in general hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Gorji, Hassan Abolghasem; Etemadi, Manal; Hoseini, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Researchers believe that there are social exchanges between the employers and employees, because the employees would be interested in their organization and trust it based on how the organization values them and their welfare, comfort, and security. This belief is known as perceived organizational support that makes employees consider themselves as a part of their organization and have a commitment to it. The literature review is very limited in both variables in Iran and thus few studies also report the perceived organizational support and job involvement at the lower levels in our country. This research aimed at studying the levels of perceived organizational support and job involvement, relationship between this two, and the demographic factors relationship with both of them. Materials and Methods: This research was a descriptive analytical study conducted in 2012. The population included 123 emergency nurses in General Hospitals of Qom. Data were collected through Perceived Organizational Support and Job Involvement Questionnaires and analyzed using SPSS software, descriptive statistics and Spearman correlation and Chi-square test. Results: Both mean scores for perceived organizational support and job involvement were in average level, 146/12 and 35/38, respectively. There was a significant relationship between perceived organizational support and age, education, tenure, organizational position, and job shift. There was also a significant relationship between job involvement and age and education and finally between perceived organizational support and job involvement (P = 0/029). Discussion: The high correlation between perceived organizational support and job involvement indicates that the improvement of perceived organizational support are necessary through motivating the employees, showing interest in them, paying attention to them, respecting them, and providing development opportunity in the organization. These should be always considered by managers to improve job involvement PMID:25077151

  11. Combined proton and photon irradiation for craniopharyngioma: Long-term results of the early cohort of patients treated at Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory and Massachusetts General Hospital

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzek, Markus M.; Linggood, Rita M.; Adams, Judy; Munzenrider, John E. . E-mail: jmunzenrider@partners.org

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: We report the results of the early cohort of patients treated for craniopharyngioma with combined proton-photon irradiation at the Massachusetts General Hospital and the Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory. Methods and Materials: Between 1981 and 1988, 15 patients with craniopharyngioma were treated in part or entirely with fractionated 160 MeV proton beam therapy. The group consisted of 5 children (median age, 15.9 years) and 10 adults (median age, 36.2 years). Median dose prescribed to the tumor was 56.9 cobalt Gray equivalent (CGE; 1 proton Gray = 1.1 CGE). The median proton component was 26.9 CGE. Patients were treated after documented recurrence after initial surgery (n = 6) or after subtotal resection or biopsy (n = 9). None had had prior radiation therapy. Results: Median observation period of surviving patients (n = 11) was 13.1 years from radiotherapy. One patient was lost to follow-up with tumor control after 5.2 years. Actuarial 10-year survival rate was 72%. Four patients have died 5-9.1 years after treatment, two from local failure. Actuarial 5- and 10-year local control rates were 93% and 85%, respectively. The functional status of the living adult patients is unaltered from their preradiotherapy status; all of them continued leading normal or near normal working lives. None of the patients treated as a child had experienced recurrence of tumor. One child shows learning difficulties and slight retardation, comparable to his preradiotherapy status. The others have professional achievements within the normal range. Conclusion: Results in terms of survival and local control are comparable with other contemporary series. Although no formal neuropsychological testing was performed, the surrogate measures of lifestyle and professional accomplishments appear to be satisfactory.

  12. A temporal comparison of PBDEs, OH-PBDEs, PCBs, and OH-PCBs in the serum of second trimester pregnant women recruited from San Francisco General Hospital, California

    PubMed Central

    Zota, Ami R.; Linderholm, Linda; Park, June-Soo; Petreas, Myrto; Guo, Tan; Privalsky, Martin L.; Zoeller, R. Thomas; Woodruff, Tracey J.

    2013-01-01

    Prenatal exposures to polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) can harm neurodevelopment in humans and animals. In 20032004, PentaBDE and OctaBDE were banned in California and phased-out of US production; resulting impacts on human exposures are unknown. We previously reported that median serum concentrations of PBDEs and their metabolites (OH-PBDEs) among second trimester pregnant women recruited from San Francisco General Hospital (20082009; n=25) were the highest among pregnant women worldwide. We recruited another cohort from the same clinic in 20112012 (n=36) and now compare serum concentrations of PBDEs, OH-PBDEs, polychlorinated biphenyl ethers (PCBs) (structurally similar compounds banned in 1979), and OH-PCBs between two demographically similar cohorts. Between 20082009 and 20112012, adjusted least square geometric mean (LSGM) concentrations of ?PBDEs decreased 65% (95% CI: 18, 130) from 90.0 ng/g lipid (95% CI: 64.7,125.2) to 54.6 ng/g lipid (95% CI: 39.2, 76.2) (p=0.004); ? OH-PBDEs decreased six-fold (p<0.0001); and BDE-47, -99, and -100 declined more than BDE-153. There was a modest, non-significant (p=0.13) decline in LSGM concentrations of ?PCBs and minimal differences in ?OH-PCBs between 20082009 and 20112012. PBDE exposures are likely declining due to regulatory action, but the relative stability in PCB exposures suggests PBDE exposures may eventually plateau and persist for decades. PMID:24066858

  13. Comparison of hysterosalpingograms with laparoscopy in the diagnostic of tubal factor of female infertility at the Yaoundé General Hospital, Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Ngowa, Jean Dupont Kemfang; Kasia, Jean Marie; Georges, NGuefack-Tsague; Nkongo, Victorine; Sone, Charles; Fongang, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The objectives were to assess the diagnostic value of hysterosalpingography (HSG) with laparoscopy as gold standard in the evaluation of tubal patency and pelvic adhesions in women suffering from infertility. Methods We conducted a comparative cross sectional study on 208 medical files of infertile women followed up at the Yaoundé General Hospital during a period of five years (December 2007 to December 2012). Tubal patency, hydrosalpinx and pelvic adhesions detected at HSG were compared with laparoscopic findings as the gold standard. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and diagnostic accuracy of HSG were calculated with 95% confidence interval (CI). Results Mean age of the patients was 31.4± 6.45 years. Secondary infertility was the most frequent type of infertility (66.82%). HSG had a moderate sensitivity (51.0%; 95% IC. 37.5-64.4), high specificity (90.0%; 95% IC.74.4-96.5), high PPV (89.3%; 95% IC. 72.8-96.3) and a moderate NPV (52.9%; 95% IC. 39.5-65.9) in the diagnosis of bilateral proximal tubal occlusion. Concerning, distal tubal patency, HSG had a high sensitivity (86.8%; 95% IC. 76.7-92.9), low specificity (42.2%; 95% CI. 29.0-56.7), moderate PPV (69.4%; 95% IC. 58.9-78.2) and a moderate NPV (67.9%; 95% IC. 49.3-82.0) in the diagnosis of bilateral or unilateral distal tubal occlusion. However, HSG had a low diagnostic value (27.8%; 95%IC.18.8-39.0) in the pelvic adhesions. Conclusion HSG is of limited diagnostic value in tubal factor infertility and is of low diagnostic value for pelvic adhesions.

  14. Trend in admissions, clinical features and outcome of preeclampsia and eclampsia as seen from the intensive care unit of the Douala General Hospital, Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Priso, Eugene Belley; Njamen, Theophile Nana; Tchente, Charlotte Nguefack; Kana, Albert Justin; Landry, Tchuenkam; Tchawa, Ulrich Flore Nyaga; Hentchoya, Romuald; Beyiha, Gerard; Halle, Marie Patrice; Aminde, Leopold; Dzudie, Anastase

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Hypertensive disorders in pregnancy (HDP) are a major cause of maternal morbidity and mortality. We aimed at determining the trends in admission, profiles and outcomes of women admitted for preeclampsia and eclampsia to an intensive care unit (ICU) in Cameroon. Methods A retrospective study involving 74 women admitted to the ICU of the Douala General Hospital for severe preeclampsia and eclampsia from January 2007 to December 2014. Clinical profiles and outcome data were obtained from patient records. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 20. Results Of the 74 women admitted to ICU (72.5% for eclampsia), mean age was 30.2years and the majority (90.5%) were aged 20-39 years. While overall trend in admission for HDP increased over the years, mortality remained stable. Mean gestational age (GA) on admission was 34.0 weeks (33.5 for preeclampsia vs 35.4 for eclampsia). Most patients presented with complications of which acute kidney injury was most frequent (66.7%). Visual problems were more common in patients with eclampsia compared to preeclampsia (p = 0.01). HELLP syndrome and acute pulmonary oedema (APO) were predominant in patients with preeclampsia, while cerebrovascular accidents (CVA) occurred more in patients with eclampsia. Overall mortality was 24.3%. Presence of APO was associated with mortality in multivariable analysis (O.R.= 0.03, p = 0,01). Conclusion Trends in admission for HDP were increasing with high but stable mortality rate. Patients presented late most of whom with complications. Interventions improving antenatal care services and multidisciplinary management approach may improve maternal outcome in patients with HDP. PMID:26523163

  15. HIV infection and risk behaviours among young gay and bisexual men in Vancouver

    PubMed Central

    Strathdee, S A; Martindale, S L; Cornelisse, P G; Miller, M L; Craib, K J; Schechter, M T; O'Shaughnessy, M V; Hogg, R S

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Young gay and bisexual men may perceive that the consequences of HIV infection have dramatically improved with the availability of highly active antiretroviral therapy. We therefore sought to identify trends in HIV infection rates and associated risk behaviours among young gay and bisexual men in Vancouver. METHODS: Prospective cohort study involving gay and bisexual men aged 18-30 years who had not previously tested HIV positive. Subjects were recruited through physicians, clinics and community outreach in Vancouver. Annually participants were tested for HIV antibodies and asked to complete a self-administered questionnaire pertaining to sociodemographic characteristics, sexual behaviours and substance use. Prevalence of HIV infection and risk behaviours were determined for eligible participants who completed a baseline questionnaire and HIV testing as of May 1998. The primary outcome was the proportion of men who reported having protected sex during the year before enrollment and who reported any episode of unprotected sex by the time of the first follow-up visit. RESULTS: A total of 681 men completed a baseline questionnaire and HIV testing as of May 1998. The median duration between baseline and the first follow-up visit was 14 months. The median age was 25 years. Most of the subjects were white and of high socioeconomic status. The majority (549 [80.6%]) reported having sex only with men; 81 (11.9%) reported bisexual activity. Of the 503 men who had one or more regular male partners, 245 (48.7%) reported at least one episode of unprotected anal sex in the year before enrollment; the corresponding number among the 537 who had one or more casual male partners was 140 (26.1%). The prevalence and incidence of HIV seropositivity were 1.8% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.8%-2.8%) and 1.7 per 100 person-years [95% CI 0.7-2.7], respectively. Fifty-two (26.5%) of the 196 and 55 (29.7%) of the 185 men with regular partners who reported having practiced protected insertive and receptive anal sex in the year before the baseline visit reported engaging in these activities without a condom at the follow-up visit; the corresponding numbers among the 232 and 242 men with causal partners who had practiced protected insertive and receptive anal sex before the baseline visit were 43 (15.5%) and 26 (9.4%) respectively at follow-up. INTERPRETATION: The incidence of HIV infection is unacceptably high among this cohort of young gay and bisexual men. Preliminary results suggest a disturbing trend toward increasing levels of unprotected anal intercourse. PMID:11216194

  16. Phylogenetic clustering of hepatitis C virus among people who inject drugs in Vancouver, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Jacka, B; Applegate, T; Krajden, M; Olmstead, A; Harrigan, PR; Marshall, BDL; DeBeck, K; Milloy, M-J; Lamoury, F; Pybus, OG; Lima, VD; Magiorkinis, G; Montoya, V; Montaner, J; Joy, J; Woods, C; Dobrer, S; Dore, GJ

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about factors associated with HCV transmission among people who inject drugs (PWID). Phylogenetic clustering and associated factors were evaluated among PWID in Vancouver, Canada. Data were derived from the Vancouver Injection Drug Users Study. Participants who were HCV antibody positive at enrolment and those with HCV antibody seroconversion during follow-up (1996 to 2012) were tested for HCV RNA and sequenced (Core-E2 region). Phylogenetic trees were inferred using maximum likelihood analysis and clusters were identified using ClusterPicker (90% bootstrap threshold, 0.05 genetic distance threshold). Factors associated with clustering were assessed using logistic regression. Among 655 eligible participants, HCV genotype prevalence was: G1a: 48% (n=313), G1b: 6% (n=41), G2a: 3% (n=20), G2b: 7% (n=46), G3a: 33% (n=213), G4a: <1% (n=4), G6a: 1% (n=8), G6e: <1% (n=1) and unclassifiable: 1% (n=9). The mean age was 36 years, 162 (25%) were female and 164 (25%) were HIV+. Among 501 participants with HCV G1a and G3a, 31% (n=156) were in a pair/cluster. Factors independently associated with phylogenetic clustering included: age <40 (vs. age ?40, adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.64; 95% CI 1.03, 2.63), HIV infection (AOR = 1.82; 95% CI 1.18, 2.81), HCV seroconversion (AOR = 3.05; 95% CI 1.40, 6.66) and recent syringe borrowing (AOR 1.59; 95% CI 1.07, 2.36). Conclusion In this sample of PWID, one-third demonstrated phylogenetic clustering. Factors independently associated with phylogenetic clustering included younger age, recent HCV seroconversion, prevalent HIV infection, and recent syringe borrowing. Strategies to enhance the delivery of prevention and/or treatment strategies to those with HIV and recent HCV seroconversion should be explored, given an increased likelihood of HCV transmission in these sub-populations. PMID:25042607

  17. Opioid analgesic prescribing and use an audit of analgesic prescribing by general practitioners and The Multidisciplinary Pain Centre at Royal Brisbane Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Nissen, L M; Tett, S E; Cramond, T; Williams, B; Smith, M T

    2001-01-01

    Aims This study evaluated the use of and need for opioids in patients attending the Multidisciplinary Pain Centre at the Royal Brisbane Hospital (RBH). Methods All consecutive in-patient admissions in 1998 were reviewed. A 10-point scoring system based on the World Health Organization (WHO) analgesic ladder was devised to facilitate comparison of analgesic prescribing on admission and at the time of discharge. A conversion table was used to standardize opioid analgesic doses to an oral morphine equivalent. Results Of the 370 patients reviewed, 233 (81%) were by their general practitioners. Records of 288 (78%) were available for full review and 270 (94%) of these had noncancer pain. On admission, 239 (83%) were taking an opioid analgesic, with 135 (47%) taking strong opioids (e.g. morphine, oxycodone, methadone). There was a significant decrease in the mean total daily oral morphine equivalent prescribed on discharge 36.9 mg (95% CI: 33.4, 40.4) compared with that on admission 88.7 mg (95% CI: 77.6, 99.8) (P < 0.001). There was a significant decrease (P < 0.05) in the proportion of patients taking a primary opioid on discharge 153 (58%) compared with admission 239 (83%), although the proportion of patients taking a strong opioid on discharge 150 (52%) compared with admission 135 (47%) was not significantly different (P > 0.05). The proportion of patients taking a laxative showed a significant increase on discharge 110 (73%) compared with admission 38 (28%) (P < 0.05). Conclusions Our analgesic prescribing scoring system and opioid conversion table have the potential to be developed further as tools for assessing opioid analgesic prescribing. The significant decrease in total daily oral morphine equivalents signifies the value of prescribing in accordance with the WHO analgesic ladder, and the necessity of general practitioner education. The management of chronic pain is complex, and it requires interventions additional to pharmacological therapy. Evaluation by a multidisciplinary team, coupled with experience in and an understanding of analgesic prescribing and rehabilitation provides an effective basis for improving the management of patients with chronic pain. PMID:11736881

  18. "We have worked while we played and played while we worked": discipline and disobedience at the Kingston General Hospital Training School for Nurses, 1923-1939.

    PubMed

    Wishart, James M

    2004-01-01

    Drawing on evidence found in nurses' journals, oral accounts, yearbooks and other cultural productions as well as in hospital records, this paper considers the experiences of apprentices in a hospital nursing training school in the interwar period. By combining elements of scientific management with an older paternalist ethos, hospital administrators sought to imprint student nurse "material" with standards of work and behaviour valued by the hospital institution and the community that supported it. Students, whose expectations for nursing school often conflicted with those of management, developed a culture of mutuality that provided them with valuable resources to subvert and/or ameliorate the effects of disciplinary technologies and to re-appropriate the spaces and discourses of nursing training. PMID:15568265

  19. Lifelines and Earthquake Hazards Along the Interstate 5 Urban Corridor: Cottage Grove, Oregon, to Vancouver, B.C.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, E. A.; Weaver, C. S.; Haugerud, R. A.; Ballantyne, D. B.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Z.; Madin, I. P.; Wells, R. E.; Darienzo, M.; Meagher, K. L.

    2002-12-01

    A new map series provides basic graphical representations of lifeline systems in relation to earthquake hazards along the economic and residential artery of the Pacific Northwest: the I-5 corridor from Cottage Grove, Oregon, to Vancouver, B.C. The lifeline systems that support the communities as well as local and regional commerce form a complex web of highways, railroads, pipelines, electrical power facilities, and ports, that cross areas of varying levels of earthquake hazards. This web depends on many components working together to make a functional system. Failure of one critical system component due to a large earthquake or other natural disaster can disable the system. Earthquakes tend to affect many systems at once, and the failure of one system, such as a highway, can impede the recovery of another system, such as an electrical power line. Therefore, understanding the geographical relationships between the lifeline systems, local communities, and earthquake hazards is an important element in the process of not only determining recovery priorities and strategies after an earthquake, but also for future planning purposes. The lifeline maps have a shaded-relief topographic background with integrated regional geology categorized as ground relatively susceptible or not susceptible to ground amplification, liquefaction and/or landslides in the event of an earthquake. The maps also show recent and historically important earthquakes estimated to be greater than magnitude 5. Lifeline systems superimposed on the geologic base are: major electrical transmission lines, water supply pipelines, major sewer pipelines and treatment plants, liquid fuel pipelines, natural gas pipelines, and major ports and airports. Map data are generalized in order to suit the needs of map users, ranging from the specialist to non-specialist. Accordingly, the maps do not provide site-specific information. The map presentation stresses the system nature of lifelines, as opposed to highlighting individual key structures and is meant to serve as an initial step in understanding the complex nature of lifeline systems. The four maps in this series are produced by the collective efforts of the authors and lifeline map users from local, state, and federal agencies, and private lifeline companies in the I-5 Urban Corridor of the Pacific Northwest.

  20. Evolving Healthcare Quality in Top Tertiary General Hospitals in China during the China Healthcare Reform (2010–2012) from the Perspective of Inpatient Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xie-Min; Chen, Xiao-Hong; Wang, Ji-Shan; Lyman, Gary H.; Qu, Zhi; Ma, Wen; Song, Jing-Chen; Zhou, Chuan-Kun; Zhao, Lue Ping

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare reforms (HR) initiated by many countries impacts on healthcare systems worldwide. Being one of fast developing countries, China launched HR in 2009. Better understanding of its impact is helpful for China and others in further pursuit of HR. Here we evaluate inpatient mortality, a proxy to healthcare quality, in 43 top tertiary hospitals in China during this critical period. This is a hospital-based observational study with 8 million discharge summary reports (DSR) from 43 Chinese hospitals from 2010–2012. Using DSRs, we extract the vita status as the outcome, in addition to age, gender, diagnostic codes, and surgical codes. Nearly all hospitals have expanded their hospitalization capacities during this period. As of year 2010, inpatient mortality (IM) across hospitals varies widely from 2‰ to 20‰. Comparing IM of year 2011 and 2012 with 2010, the overall IM has been substantially reduced (OR = 0.883 and 0.766, p-values<0.001), showing steady improvements in healthcare quality. Surgical IM correlates with the overall IM (correlation = 0.60, p-value <0.001), but is less uniform. Over these years, surgical IM has also been steadily reduced (OR = 0.890 and 0.793, p-values<0.001). Further analyses of treatments on five major diseases and six major surgeries revealed that treatments of myocardial infarction, cerebral hemorrhage and cerebral infarction have significant improvement. Observed temporal and spatial variations demonstrate that there is a substantial disparity in healthcare quality across tertiary hospitals, and that these hospitals are rapidly improving healthcare quality. Evidence-based assessment shed light on the reform impact. Lessons learnt here are relevant to further refining HR. PMID:26624005

  1. IAHS General Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Helen J.

    The International Association of Hydrological Sciences (IAHS) General Assembly, held as part of the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics (IUGG) Assembly, August 9-22, 1987, in Vancouver, Canada, had an estimated 500 attendees. At least 20 countries were represented by official delegates. Attendance from the United States is estimated at 120, with Helen J. Peters (California Department of Water Resources, Sacramento) as chief delegate and Marshall E. Moss (U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Reston, Va.) as alternate delegate and future chief delegate for the 1991 General Assembly.The Canadian Organizing Committee had done a masterful job of organizing the assembly, with excellent housing and meeting facilities on the University of British Columbia campus. In addition to five symposia and nine workshops, the IAHS Bureau and all commissions and the committees held several meetings. Some excellent social events and tours were included.

  2. Self-management of pain among people who inject drugs in Vancouver

    PubMed Central

    Voon, Pauline; Callon, Cody; Nguyen, Paul; Dobrer, Sabina; Montaner, Julio; Wood, Evan; Kerr, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Aims To evaluate factors and methods associated with self-management of pain among people who inject drugs (IDUs) in Vancouver (Canada). Patients & methods This cross-sectional study used bivariate statistics and multivariate logistic regression to analyze self-reported responses among 483 IDUs reporting moderate-to-extreme pain in two prospective cohort studies from 1 December 2012 to 31 May 2013. Results Median age was 49.6 years (interquartile range: 43.9–54.6 years), 33.1% of IDUs were female and 97.5% reported self-management of pain. Variables independently and positively associated with self-managed pain included having been refused a prescription for pain medication (adjusted odds ratio: 7.83; 95% CI: 1.64–37.3) and having ever been homeless (adjusted odds ratio: 3.70; 95% CI: 1.00–13.7). Common methods of self-management of pain included injecting heroin (52.7%) and obtaining diverted prescription pain medication from the street (65.0%). Conclusion Self-management of pain was common among IDUs who reported moderate-to-extreme pain in this setting, particularly among those who had been refused a prescription for pain medication and those who had ever been homeless. These data highlight the challenges of adequate pain management among IDUs. PMID:24641341

  3. Biomechanical Comparison of 2 Different Locking Plate Fixation Methods in Vancouver B1 Periprosthetic Femur Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Pletka, Joshua D.; Marsland, Daniel; Belkoff, Stephen M.; Mears, Simon C.; Kates, Stephen L.

    2011-01-01

    Locking plates are commonly used to treat fractures around a well-fixed femoral component. The optimal construct should provide sufficient fixation while minimizing soft-tissue dissection. The purpose of the current study was to determine whether plate length, working length, or bone mineral density affects survival of locking plate fixation for Vancouver type B1 periprosthetic hip fractures. A transverse osteotomy was created just distal to cemented femoral prostheses in 9 pairs of cadaveric femurs. Fractures were stabilized with long (20-hole) or short (12-hole) locking plates that were secured proximally with cables and screws and distally with screws only. Specimens were then cycled 10000 times at 2500 N of axial force and 15 Nm of torque to simulate full weightbearing. A motion capture system was used to record fracture displacement during cycling. Failure occurred in 5 long and 3 short plates, with no significant differences found in the number of cycles to failure. For the specimens that survived, there were no significant differences found between long and short plates for displacement or rotation observed at the fracture site. A shorter working length was not associated with increased failure rate. Lower bone mineral density was significantly associated with failure (P = .02). We concluded that long locked plates do not appear to offer a biomechanical advantage over short locking plates in terms of fixation survival, and that bone mineral density was a better predictor of failure than was the fixation construct type. PMID:23569670

  4. Prediction of noise levels and annoyance from aircraft run-ups at Vancouver International Airport.

    PubMed

    Scherebnyj, Katrina; Hodgson, Murray

    2007-10-01

    Annoyance complaints resulting from engine run-ups have been increasing at Vancouver International Airport for several years. To assist the Airport in managing run-up noise levels, a prediction tool based on a Green's function parabolic equation (GFPE) model has been consolidated, evaluated, and applied. It was extended to include more realistic atmospheric and ground input parameters. Measurements were made of the noise-radiation characteristics of a CRJ200 jet aircraft. The GFPE model was validated by comparing predictions with results in the literature. A sensitivity analysis showed that predicted levels are relatively insensitive to small variations in geometry and ground impedance, but relatively sensitive to variations in wind speed, atmosphere type, and aircraft heading and power setting. Predicted noise levels were compared with levels measured at noise monitoring terminals. For the four cases for which all input information was available, agreement was within 10 dBA. For events for which some information had to be estimated, predictions were within 20 dBA. The predicted annoyance corresponding to the run-up events considered ranged from 1.8% to 9.5% of people awoken, suggesting that noise complaints can be expected. PMID:17902830

  5. Kelp forest size alters microbial community structure and function on Vancouver Island, Canada.

    PubMed

    Clasen, J L; Shurin, J B

    2015-03-01

    Bacteria are ubiquitous and important components of marine ecosystems, yet the interaction between bacteria and higher trophic levels remain poorly understood. The trophic cascade involving sea otters, urchins, and kelp in the North Pacific is a classic case of altered ecosystem states; however, its impacts on microbial communities are unknown. We investigated the response of microbial communities to variation in kelp abundance between regions with and without sea otter populations along the west coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada. We compared bacterial community structure and function between regions with large and small kelp forests, including an subset of the bacterial community that produces alginate lyase, which allows direct utilization of kelp carbon. The abundance and activity of alginate-lyase-producing bacteria were 3.2 and 1.4 times higher, respectively, in the region with large kelp forests, and declined rapidly with increasing distance from kelp. Total bacterial abundance was 2.7 times greater, and bacteria grew faster and experienced more zooplankton grazing and viral-mediated mortality in the presence of large kelp forests. These patterns suggest that larger kelp forests produce more detritus and dissolved organic matter, which stimulate microbial activity. Our results indicate that variation in kelp forest size alters the community structure and productivity of microbes and contributes to the growing evidence that top predators interact with microbes and ecosystem processes through a cascade of indirect effects. PMID:26236881

  6. Application of transmission reliability assessment in probabilistic planning of BC Hydro Vancouver South Metro system

    SciTech Connect

    Li, W.; Mansour, Y.; Korczynski, J.K.; Mills, B.J.

    1995-05-01

    This paper presents a basic method of probabilistic transmission planning used in BC Hydro. The method is based on transmission system reliability evaluation and an overall economic analysis including damage cost due to system unreliability. Four alternatives for the Vancouver South Metro system of BC Hydro have been evaluated using the method. The first one is addition of a 230 kV line, the second one local configuration changes (cuts and ties) in the 69 kV subsystem, the third one operational manipulation and the fourth one curtailable industrial load management. The third and the fourth alternatives can be considered as non-investment reinforcements. The results indicate that the cut-and-tie alternative in the 69 kv subsystem can provide the same reliability level as the 230 kV line addition but with much lower investment and therefore the initial 230 kV line addition could be deferred by 10 years. This deferral allows a major capital expenditure of $26.4 million (1997 $) to be avoided. The studies show that the application of quantitative transmission reliability assessment in power system planning can provide utilities with significant economic benefits.

  7. Opportunities to learn and barriers to change: crack cocaine use in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Susan; Johnson, Joy L; Moffat, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    In 2004, a team comprised of researchers and service providers launched the Safer Crack Use, Outreach, Research and Education (SCORE) project in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. The project was aimed at developing a better understanding of the harms associated with crack cocaine smoking and determining the feasibility of introducing specific harm reduction strategies. Specifically, in partnership with the community, we constructed and distributed kits that contained harm reduction materials. We were particularly interested in understanding what people thought of these kits and how the kits contents were used. To obtain this information, we conducted 27 interviews with women and men who used crack cocaine and received safer crack kits. Four broad themes were generated from the data: 1) the context of crack use practices; 2) learning/transmission of harm reducon education; 3) changing practice; 4) barriers to change. This project suggests that harm reduction education is most successful when it is informed by current practices with crack use. In addition it is most effectively delivered through informal interactions with people who use crack and includes repeated demonstrations of harm reduction equipment by peers and outreach workers. This paper also suggests that barriers to harm reduction are systemic: lack of safe housing and private space shape crack use practices. PMID:19014696

  8. Multi-millennial streamflow dynamics in two forested watersheds on Vancouver Island, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Kendrick J.; Schoups, Gerrit

    2015-05-01

    Holocene streamflow was reconstructed for two rivers on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada in 500-yr intervals. The San Juan River watershed is located on the wetter western side of the island, whereas the Koksilah River watershed is positioned on the drier eastern side. Both watersheds are forested. To reconstruct streamflow, temporal changes in precipitation (estimated using a pollen-based transfer function) and evapotranspiration were established for each watershed and integrated into a water balance model, calibrated using modern data. While seasonal streamflow variability was maintained throughout the Holocene, with greater flow in the winter relative to the summer, the amount of discharge has changed markedly through time. Lowest simulated flow occurred in the earliest Holocene, with low-flow conditions beginning earlier in the year and extending later into the fall. Such conditions may have inhibited salmon from using many of the smaller rivers in the region. Streamflow steadily increased throughout the early Holocene so that by ca. 6500 cal yr before present near-modern flow regimes were established. As climate changes in the future, the San Juan and Koksilah watersheds are expected to remain as pluvial hydroclimatic regimes, though with an extended season of low flow similar to conditions during the early Holocene.

  9. Shape memory embracing fixator for Vancouver type B and type C periprosthetic femoral fractures.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Y; Du, Q; Wang, Z; Wang, A

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze clinical and radiographical results of a group of patients with periprosthetic femoral fractures treated with the shape memory embracing fixator. We retrospectively reviewed twelve patients in whom a total of twelve periprosthetic femoral fractures were treated with the shape memory embracing fixator between August 2004 and February 2013. The patients were 3 men and 9 women (mean age, 69.9 years; range 42-92 years). The average duration of follow-up was 39.3 months (range 4-103 months). In one case, bone grafting was used. Postoperative evaluation was based on radiographs and Harris hip scores. All fractures healed at on average 4.4 months (range: 3 to 6 months) after surgery. None of the patients developed nonunion or malunion during the follow up. And there was no implant failure and no infection during follow up. The average Harris hip score at the final follow-up examination was 84.8 points. Results show that the shape memory embracing fixator is a safe and effective means for Vancouver type B and type C periprosthetic femoral fractures following hip arthroplasty. PMID:26280610

  10. Controlling Chaos: The Perceptions of Long-Term Crack Cocaine Users in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Margot; Bungay, Vicky; Buxton, Jane A.

    2013-01-01

    People who smoke crack cocaine are described as chaotic and more likely to engage in risky sex, polysubstance use and contract infectious diseases. However, little is known about how individuals perceive smoking crack as compared to other forms of cocaine use, especially injection. We explored the lived experience of people who smoke crack cocaine. Six gender-specific focus groups (n = 31) of individuals who currently smoke crack in Vancouver, Canada, were conducted using a semi-structured interview guide. Focus groups were transcribed and analyzed by constant comparative methodology. We applied Rhodes' risk environment to the phenomenological understanding that individuals have regarding how crack has affected their lives. Subjects reported that smoking rather than injecting cocaine allows them to begin “controlling chaos” in their lives. Controlling chaos was self-defined using nontraditional measures such as the ability to maintain day-to-day commitments and housing stability. The phenomenological lens of smoking crack instead of injecting cocaine “to control chaos” contributes a novel perspective to our understanding of the crack-smoking population. This study examines narratives which add to prior reports of the association of crack smoking and increased chaos and suggests that, for some, inhaled crack may represent efforts towards self-directed harm reduction. PMID:24826370

  11. Biological characterization of a whale-fall near Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundsten, Lonny; Paull, Charles K.; Schlining, Kyra L.; McGann, Mary; Ussler, William, III

    2010-07-01

    Video analysis of a whale-fall discovered in the northeast Pacific Ocean, off Vancouver Island at a depth of 1288 m during ROV diving operations has identified 26 taxa of deep-sea benthic organisms inhabiting the seafloor immediately surrounding remnants of the whale skeleton. A photo-mosaic derived from high-definition video provides a quantitative visual record of the present condition of the site, the species richness, and substrate preference. Only the skull and caudal vertebrae remains of this large whale skeleton are estimated to have been approximately 16.5 m in length. Most organisms identified near the whale-fall are common benthic deep-sea fauna, typical of this water depth and seafloor composition. Much of this species richness comes from sessile suspension feeding cnidarians attached to the numerous glacial dropstones found throughout the area rather than the presence of the whale skeleton. Seep and bone specialists are rare (4 taxa) and may be, in part, a remnant population from a sulphophilic stage of whale-fall decomposition. Evidence of past colonization by Osedax sp. is visible on the remaining bones and we conclude that rapid degradation of the missing bones has occurred at this site as has been observed at whale-falls off central California in Monterey Canyon.

  12. Decision maker views on priority setting in the Vancouver Island Health Authority

    PubMed Central

    Dionne, Francois; Mitton, Craig; Smith, Neale; Donaldson, Cam

    2008-01-01

    Background Decisions regarding the allocation of available resources are a source of growing dissatisfaction for healthcare decision-makers. This dissatisfaction has led to increased interest in research on evidence-based resource allocation processes. An emerging area of interest has been the empirical analysis of the characteristics of existing and desired priority setting processes from the perspective of decision-makers. Methods We conducted in-depth, face-to-face interviews with 18 senior managers and medical directors with the Vancouver Island Health Authority, an integrated health care provider in British Columbia responsible for a population of approximately 730,000. Interviews were transcribed and content-analyzed, and major themes and sub-themes were identified and reported. Results Respondents identified nine key features of a desirable priority setting process: inclusion of baseline assessment, use of best evidence, clarity, consistency, clear and measurable criteria, dissemination of information, fair representation, alignment with the strategic direction and evaluation of results. Existing priority setting processes were found to be lacking on most of these desired features. In addition, respondents identified and explicated several factors that influence resource allocation, including political considerations and organizational culture and capacity. Conclusion This study makes a contribution to a growing body of knowledge which provides the type of contextual evidence that is required if priority setting processes are to be used successfully by health care decision-makers. PMID:18644152

  13. [International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Vancouver Classification of Renal Neoplasia 2012].

    PubMed

    Hes, Ond?ej

    2014-01-01

    Kidney tumours form a broad spectrum of distinguished histopathological and molecular genetic entities. The last WHO classification is dated to 2004. Current classification has been published in October 2013 by ISUP (International Society of Urological Pathology). There were 5 new epithelials tumours: tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma (RCC), acquired cystic disease-associated RCC, clear cell (tubulo-)papillary RCC, the MiT family translocation RCCs (in particular t(6;11) RCC), and hereditary leiomyomatosis RCC syndrome-associated RCC. Another 3 subtypes of RCC were added as "provisional" entities: thyroid-like follicular RCC; succinate dehydrogenase B deficiency-associated RCC; and ALK translocation RCC. Modifications were performed in already existing entities: multicystic clear cell RCC (formerly multilocular cystic RCC) is newly included as a subcategory of clear cell RCC with low malignant potential. Oncocytic papillary RCC (PRCC) has not been recognized as a distinctive subcategory of PRCC yet. Hybrid oncocytic-chromophobe tumour was placed within the chromophobe RCC category. Recent advances related to collecting duct carcinoma, renal medullary carcinoma, and mucinous spindle cell and tubular RCC were elucidated. Outside of the epithelial category, current approach to our understanding of angiomyolipoma, including the epithelioid variant and angiomyolipoma with epithelial cysts was clarified. Cystic nephroma and mixed epithelial and stromal tumour were considered as a spectrum of one entity. Synovial sarcoma was placed within the sarcoma group. The new classification is to be referred to as the International Society of Urological Pathology Vancouver Classification of Renal Neoplasia. PMID:25418900

  14. Multidisciplinary difficult airway simulation training: two year evaluation and validation of a novel training approach at a District General Hospital based in the UK.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Nishchay; Boynton, Claire; Boss, Laurence; Morris, Heather; Tatla, Taran

    2013-01-01

    Our objective was to devise and assess a multidisciplinary simulated course in training junior doctors for possible difficult airway scenarios. The authors have run a multi-disciplinary difficult airway simulation that was designed to simulate the stresses and complications of a live situation. The course comprised of six to eight difficult airway simulations (using a Laerdal SimMan2 mannequin remote controlled by a "driver") with two teams moving through the simulations over half a day. The simulation lasted 20 min and was followed by 40 min of in-depth structured facilitated debrief. The course was set in the anaesthetic room of a district general hospital theatre. Seventy-eight candidates (28 anaesthetic trainees, 18 ENT trainees, 19 theatre nurses and 13 operating theatre practitioners) attended this course over 6 training days set over 2 years. The main outcome measures of candidate feedback scored for eight questions on a 1-6 Likert scale. From the results, Audit of Trust inpatient airway fatalities revealed three deaths in 2 years leading up to the introduction of the simulation course. Re-audit of the subsequent 2 years, during which time the course was running, has shown no airway fatalities. A 100 % candidate feedback response rate was obtained. Delegates gave an average score of 4.8 to the simulator replicating the stress of 'live' situations; 5.5 to the simulator addressing training needs; 5.6 to the course improving clinical knowledge, teamwork, leadership and non-technical skills. In our conclusions, successful management of a difficult airway situation requires rapid evaluation, effective communication, strong leadership and teamwork, as well as knowledge of local environment and equipment. The results show that candidates felt an improvement in clinical knowledge, teamwork, leadership and non-technical skills, as well as the mutual understanding and respect between related medical and non-medical team members. In addition, audit of airway mortality showed a Trust-wide reduction in inpatient airway related mortality following the course. The results emphatically demonstrate the universal success of this multi-disciplinary training method for all team members, regardless of hierarchical position or background. PMID:22869021

  15. First-trimester pregnancy scanning as a screening tool for high-risk and abnormal pregnancies in a district general hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Drysdale, Karen; Ridley, D; Walker, Karry; Higgins, B; Dean, Taraneh

    2002-03-01

    This study set out to evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of routine early ultrasound (12-14 weeks) within a district general hospital (DGH) for identifying high-risk and abnormal pregnancies. This was a pilot study for screening by ultrasound examination all women who presented to their community midwife before 12 weeks' gestation. The study involved 991 women who presented clinically pregnant before 12 weeks' gestation between May 1998 and May 1999. Women were offered routinely two ultrasound examinations during their pregnancy, the first at 12-14 weeks' gestation and the second at 20-21 weeks' gestation. The main outcome measures were: range and number of abnormal/high-risk pregnancies identified during an ultrasound scan at 12-14 weeks' gestation; range and number of abnormalities diagnosed during scans at later gestations; outcomes of the pregnancies; questionnaires assessing how the women viewed early pregnancy ultrasound as a method of screening. Nine hundred and eighty-four (99%) women accepted the offer of an early ultrasound scan at 12-14 weeks' gestation; of these 840(85%) women accepted screening for trisomy 21 (T21) by fetal nuchal translucency thickness (NT) and maternal age (fetal medicine foundation risk assessment programme) and this was completed successfully in 797(80%) of cases. Twenty-four women (2%) had a failed pregnancy and where necessary an ERPC was performed following a planned admission. Thirty pregnancies (3%) were diagnosed as abnormal or having high risk of abnormality at the early scan. A major abnormality was confirmed before the expected anomaly scan at 20 weeks in five (17%) pregnancies; all of these patients opted for an elective termination. Twenty-six (3%) pregnancies had a diagnosis of abnormality at their anomaly scan. Of these, three pregnancies were diagnosed as major abnormalities with two resulting in termination of the affected pregnancy before 24 weeks' gestation. Eight hundred and thirty-seven women (85%) completed questionnaires, 833 women (84.5%) were satisfied with the counselling they received before the ultrasound scan and 827 women (84%) answered that they would accept an early pregnancy scan if offered during their next pregnancy. Early pregnancy ultrasound at 12-14 weeks' gestation can be used as an effective method of identifying and screening for major abnormalities of pregnancy within a DGH setting, but it is appropriate to use this in conjunction with an anomaly scan at around 20 weeks' gestation. Women found this method of screening acceptable. PMID:12521697

  16. Risk Factors Associated with Disease Recurrence among Patients with Low-Risk Papillary Thyroid Cancer Treated at the University of the Philippines-Philippine General Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Buenaluz-Sedurante, Myrna; Jimeno, Cecilia Alegado

    2016-01-01

    Background The management of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) in high-risk patients is well-standardized. However, this is not the case for low-risk patients. Filipinos show a high incidence of recurrence of thyroid cancer. Thus, the identification of risk factors for recurrence in this population could potentially identify individuals for whom radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy might be beneficial. Methods We reviewed the medical records of adult Filipinos with low-risk PTC who underwent near-total or total thyroidectomy at the University of the Philippines-Philippine General Hospital. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to determine risk factors for recurrence. Results Recurrence was documented in 51/145 of patients (35.17%) included in this study. Possible risk factors such as age, sex, family history, smoking history, tumor size, multifocality, prophylactic lymph node dissection, initial thyroglobulin (Tg) level, initial anti-thyroglobulin (anti-Tg) antibody concentration, suppression of thyroid stimulating hormone production, and RAI therapy were analyzed. Multivariate analysis revealed that a tumor diameter 2 to 4 cm (odds ratio [OR], 9.17; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.62 to 51.88; P=0.012), a tumor diameter >4 cm (OR, 16.46; 95% CI, 1.14 to 237.31; P=0.04), and a family history of PTC (OR, 67.27; 95% CI, 2.03 to 2228.96; P=0.018) were significant predictors of recurrence. In addition, RAI therapy (OR, 0.026; 95% CI, 0.01 to 0.023; P≤0.005), an initial Tg level ≤2 ng/mL (OR, 0.049; 95% CI, 0.01 to 0.23; P≤0.005), and an anti-Tg antibody level ≤50 U/mL (OR, 0.087; 95% CI, 0.011 to 0.67; P=0.019) were significant protective factors. Conclusion A tumor diameter ≥2 cm and a family history of PTC are significant predictors of recurrence. RAI therapy and low initial titers of Tg and anti-Tg antibody are significant protective factors against disease recurrence among low-risk PTC patients. PMID:26676333

  17. Vancouver AIDS conference: special report. The global business response to AIDS: what is a "business-like" response, and is business responding enough?

    PubMed

    Whiteside, A

    1996-01-01

    Approximately 40 businesses were represented at a 2-day meeting held immediately before the main Vancouver conference on the Global Business Response to AIDS. Only three companies were from the developing world, with the overwhelming majority being from Canada and the US. Companies in countries where many people are infected with HIV and where the number of AIDS cases is rapidly growing must be concerned about HIV/AIDS. However, in countries of low-level HIV prevalence and infection incidence, businesses may have less concern about HIV/AIDS unless their own employees are infected. Even then, the priority a company gives to coping with the HIV/AIDS pandemic will be determined largely by the importance of the positions of the infected employees. Businesses discussed whether HIV/AIDS merits special attention, the undesirability of screening prospective employees for HIV infection, company size and the ability to respond to the needs of sick employees, the roles of business in society, the general failure of businesses to incorporate HIV/AIDS issues into the mainstream of company operations, how businesses are coping with the HIV/AIDS epidemic, and the need for governments to form a regulatory framework in which businesses can work. Conference participants discussed which steps should be taken next and prepared a declaration for conference organizers, including a mission statement for the global business response to AIDS. PMID:12347384

  18. Analysis of Phytosterols and N-Alkanols in Atmospheric Organic Particulate Matter Collected in Vancouver During the Pacific 2001 Air Quality Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leithead, A.; Li, S.

    2002-12-01

    As part of Pacific 2001, HiVol samples were collected from 5 sites in the Vancouver area. The samples were extracted by accelerated solvent extraction (ACE), concentrated with nitrogen blow down, and separated into fractions by silica gel chromatography. For this portion of the study, an aliquot of one of the polar fraction was derivatized with BSTFA and analyzed by GC-FID and GC-MS. The results for n-alkanols and phytosterols will be reported and discussed. Previous studies have shown that the biogenic components of particulate matter are major constituents of the total organic material in atmospheric samples. Phytosterols are present in wood smoke, epicuticular waxes of many plants and microbial sources. In addition, cholesterol has been proposed as a potential tracer for emissions from cooking. The most abundant phytosterols are cholesterol, campesterol, stigmasterol and beta-sitosterol. It has been hypothesized that the phytosterol signature may be useful in identifying particulate matter from different source areas. The phytosterol signature for these samples will be reported and compared. The n-alkanol CPI and Cmax will also be reported. N-alkanols in atmospheric samples generally show a strong even to odd predominance indicating that their main source in particulate matter is biogenic. The n-alkanol signature for each sampling site will be compared.

  19. Compare Hospitals

    MedlinePLUS

    ... visit Hospital Safety Score Home Employers & Purchasers Policy Leadership Hospitals Patients Licenses & Permissions About Leapfrog Search 2015 ... fare, resources used in caring for patients, and leadership and structures that promote patient safety. The Leapfrog ...

  20. Hospital Patients and Handicapped Readers Section and Round Table of Libraries for the Blind. Libraries Serving the General Public Division. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on hospital and health libraries and library services to the blind and deaf which were presented at the 1982 International Federation of Library Associations conference include: (1) "Leisure Pursuits of the Blind" by Antun Lastric (Yugoslavia); (2) "Library Services for the Handicapped in Canada: An Overview" by Francoise Hebert (Canada);…

  1. The Energy Conservation Program for Schools and Hospitals Can Be More Effective. Report to the Congress of the United States by the Comptroller General.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comptroller General of the U.S., Washington, DC.

    The Schools and Hospital Program, funded through the National Energy Conservation Policy Act, is not an effective use of federal monies when compared to other Department of Energy (DOE) conservation programs. It is among the highest in cost, yet among the lowest in yielding energy savings. This report identifies changes which could increase

  2. Hospital Patients and Handicapped Readers Section and Round Table of Libraries for the Blind. Libraries Serving the General Public Division. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on hospital and health libraries and library services to the blind and deaf which were presented at the 1982 International Federation of Library Associations conference include: (1) "Leisure Pursuits of the Blind" by Antun Lastric (Yugoslavia); (2) "Library Services for the Handicapped in Canada: An Overview" by Francoise Hebert (Canada);

  3. Storm runoff as related to urbanization in the Portland, Oregon-Vancouver, Washington area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laenen, Antonius

    1980-01-01

    A series of equations was developed to provide a better method of determining flood frequencies in the Portland-Vancouver urban area than is now available. The resulting regression equations can be used to compute peak discharge and storm runoff with a standard error of estimate of approximately 30 percent. Basins used to define the regression equations ranged in size from 0.2 to 26 square miles. Those physical basin parameters that proved to be significant are: drainage area, effective impervious area, storage, rainfall intensity, basin slope, and soil infiltration. The equations indicate that total urbanization of an undeveloped basin can increase peak discharge as much as 3? times and almost double the volume of storm runoff. Impervious area, as delineated by mapping techniques, proved to be an inadequate physical parameter for use in the regression equations because builders and planners have devised many methods of routing storm runoff from impervious areas to the main channel (in effect, speeding up or slowing down the response to the storm). In some parts of the study area, storm runoff was diverted into dry wells and never entered the main channel. To define the effect of this rerouting, the digital model was used to find an effective impervious area that would 'best fit' the rainfall-runoff data. Field estimates to verify the effectiveness of the impervious area for two of the basins showed that optimizations were within 20 percent of those shown by the digital model. Users of these data who may find the effective impervious area a difficult, expensive, and time-consuming parameter to obtain have an alternative. The combination of land-use type I (parks, forests, and vacant lots) and Type II (agriculture) proved to be an excellent inverse indicator of impervious area. Land-use types I and II, coupled with the street-gutter density, an indication of effective routing, provide the user with alternative indices of urbanization.

  4. The reproductive endocrinology and behavior of Vancouver Island marmot (Marmota vancouverensis).

    PubMed

    Keeley, T; Goodrowe, K L; Graham, L; Howell, C; MacDonald, S E

    2012-01-01

    The Vancouver Island marmot (Marmota vancouverensis; VIM) is one of North America's most endangered species with fewer than 150 individuals remaining in the wild. A captive breeding program was established across four facilities in Canada as an insurance population and source of animals for reintroduction to the wild. The purpose of this study was to gather information about the basic reproductive biology and behavior of this species, which is essential to improve captive breeding programs. Regular fecal samples were obtained from adult female (n = 14) and male (n = 10) marmots, 2 years of age and older, over 1-3 breeding seasons (2-3 months duration posthibernation) for steroid hormone analysis. Enzyme immunoassays were validated for quantifying fecal testosterone metabolite concentrations for males, and fecal estrogen and progesterone metabolite concentrations for females. Results indicated that fecal progesterone metabolite concentrations can be used to monitor ovulation and pregnancy. Behavioral monitoring through infrared video surveillance was conducted in four breeding pairs over a 2-year period (n = 7 behavioral profiles). Breeding behaviors correlated strongly with changes in reproductive endocrine profiles. A high frequency of play behavior or "wrestling" was observed in conjunction with breeding activity before an elevation in progesterone metabolite concentrations. Impending parturition was associated with increased aggression and exclusion of the male from the maternal nestbox as well as an increase in nesting activity. Observational data combined with hormonal analysis suggest that female VIMs are induced ovulators and that multiple breeding attempts may be required for ovulation and conception. Gestation appears to be approximately 34 days from peak breeding activity (32 days from estimated ovulation). Fecal testosterone concentrations suggest that testicular activity is seasonal with the reproductive activity occurring immediately posthibernation. Monitoring breeding behavior is a useful means of indicating estrus, conception and pregnancy, which can also be supported by the hormonal analysis of daily fecal samples of individual animals. PMID:21404327

  5. Mid-Mountain Clouds at Whistler During the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics and Paralympics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Ruping; Joe, Paul; Isaac, George A.; Gultepe, Ismail; Rasmussen, Roy; Milbrandt, Jason; McTaggart-Cowan, Ron; Mailhot, Jocelyn; Brugman, Melinda; Smith, Trevor; Scott, Bill

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive study of mid-mountain clouds and their impacts on the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics and Paralympics is presented. Mid-mountain clouds were frequently present on the Whistler alpine venue, as identified in an extensive archive of webcam images over a 45-day period from February 5 to March 21, 2010. These clouds posed serious forecast challenges and had significant impacts on some Olympic and Paralympic alpine skiing competitions. Under fair weather conditions, a diurnal upslope (anabatic) flow can work in concert with a diurnal temperature inversion aloft to produce a localized phenomenon known as "Harvey's Cloud" at Whistler. Two detailed case studies in this paper suggest that mid-mountain clouds can also develop in the area as a result of a moist valley flow interacting with a downslope flow descending from the mountaintop. A southerly inflow through the Sea-to-Sky corridor can be channeled by the local topography into a westerly upslope flow toward Whistler Mountain, resulting in orographic clouds on the alpine venue. Under favorable circumstances, these clouds are trapped to the mid-mountain zone by the leeward subsidence of an elevated southerly flow. The presence of the downslope subsidence was manifested by a distinguished dry layer observed on the top of the mid-mountain clouds in both cases. It is the subsidence-induced adiabatic warming that imposes a strong buoyant suppression to trap the mid-mountain cloud. On the other hand, the subsidence-induced dry layer has the potential to trigger evaporative instability to periodically breakup the mid-mountain cloud.

  6. Magnitudes and moment-duration scaling of low-frequency earthquakes beneath southern Vancouver Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostock, M. G.; Thomas, A. M.; Savard, G.; Chuang, L.; Rubin, A. M.

    2015-09-01

    We employ 130 low-frequency earthquake (LFE) templates representing tremor sources on the plate boundary below southern Vancouver Island to examine LFE magnitudes. Each template is assembled from hundreds to thousands of individual LFEs, representing over 269,000 independent detections from major episodic-tremor-and-slip (ETS) events between 2003 and 2013. Template displacement waveforms for direct P and S waves at near epicentral distances are remarkably simple at many stations, approaching the zero-phase, single pulse expected for a point dislocation source in a homogeneous medium. High spatiotemporal precision of template match-filtered detections facilitates precise alignment of individual LFE detections and analysis of waveforms. Upon correction for 1-D geometrical spreading, attenuation, free surface magnification and radiation pattern, we solve a large, sparse linear system for 3-D path corrections and LFE magnitudes for all detections corresponding to a single-ETS template. The spatiotemporal distribution of magnitudes indicates that typically half the total moment release occurs within the first 12-24 h of LFE activity during an ETS episode when tidal sensitivity is low. The remainder is released in bursts over several days, particularly as spatially extensive rapid tremor reversals (RTRs), during which tidal sensitivity is high. RTRs are characterized by large-magnitude LFEs and are most strongly expressed in the updip portions of the ETS transition zone and less organized at downdip levels. LFE magnitude-frequency relations are better described by power law than exponential distributions although they exhibit very high b values ≥˜5. We examine LFE moment-duration scaling by generating templates using detections for limiting magnitude ranges (MW<1.5, MW≥2.0). LFE duration displays a weaker dependence upon moment than expected for self-similarity, suggesting that LFE asperities are limited in fault dimension and that moment variation is dominated by slip. This behavior implies that LFEs exhibit a scaling distinct from both large-scale slow earthquakes and regular seismicity.

  7. 42 CFR 447.280 - Hospital providers of NF services (swing-bed hospitals).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hospital providers of NF services (swing-bed... Inpatient Hospital and Long-Term Care Facility Services Swing-Bed Hospitals 447.280 Hospital providers of NF services (swing-bed hospitals). (a) General rule. If the State plan provides for NF...

  8. Availability of hospital dental care services under sedation or general anesthesia for individuals with special needs in the Unified Health System for the State of Minas Gerais (SUS-MG), Brazil.

    PubMed

    Santos, Jacqueline Silva; Valle, Déborah Andrade; Palmier, Andréa Clemente; do Amaral, João Henrique Lara; de Abreu, Mauro Henrique Nogueira Guimarães

    2015-02-01

    This study identified the demographic characteristics of individuals and dental treatment care under sedation/general anesthesia in a hospital environment in the Unified Health System in the State of Minas Gerais (SUS-MG). All Hospitalization Authorizations (AIHs) for Dental Treatment for Patients with Special Needs procedures were evaluated between July 2011 and June 2012. Demographic and health care variables for treatment were also assessed. Hospitalization rates per 10,000 inhabitants, and health care coverage provided in the state of Minas Gerais and in each of the Broader Health Regions were calculated. Descriptive analysis of data was carried out by calculating the central trend and variability frequency and measurements. All 1,063 AIHs paid during the study period were evaluated, which is equivalent to a rate of 0.54 hospitalizations per 10,000 individuals. The majority of the patients were adult, male, diagnosed with mental or behavioral disorders and resident in 27.7% of the municipalities in Minas Gerais. The procedures were performed in 39 municipalities and the care coverage was equal to 1.58%. The study reveals a classic demographic and clinical profile of patient attendance. Difficulties in establishing a network of dental care were identified. PMID:25715145

  9. [The founding of Zemun Hospital].

    PubMed

    Milanović, Jasmina; Milenković, Sanja; Pavlović, Momcilo; Stojanović, Dragos

    2014-01-01

    This year Zemun Hospital--Clinical Hospital Center Zemun celebrates 230th anniversary of continuous work, thus becoming the oldest medical facility in Serbia.The exact date of the hospital founding has been often questioned in history. Various dates appeared in the literature, but the most frequent one was 25th of February 1784. Until now, the document which confirms this has never been published. This article represents the first official publication of the document which confirms that Zemun Hospital was indeed founded on this date. The first hospitals started emerging in Zemun when the town became a part of the Habsburg Monarchy. The first sanitary facility ever formed was the"Kontumac"--a quarantine established in 1730. Soon after, two more confessional hospitals were opened.The Serbian (Orthodox) Hospital was founded before 1769, whereas the German (Catholic) Hospital started working in 1758. Both hospitals were financed, amongst others, by the Town Hall--the Magistrate. In order to improve efficiency of these hospitals, a decision was made to merge them into a single City Hospital. It was founded on 25th February 1784, when the General Command ordered the Magistrate of Zemun to merge the financess of all existing hospitals and initiate the construction of a new building. Although financially united, the hospitals continued working in separate buildings over a certain period of time.The final, physical merging of these hospitals was completed in 1795. PMID:25233701

  10. Late-Quaternary paleovegetation, paleoclimate and fire disturbance records from subalpine sites on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitton, R. J.; Brown, K. J.; Hebda, R. J.

    2003-04-01

    Analyses of pollen, macrofossils and charcoal from subalpine lakes provide insight into past climatic changes as well as local factors affecting the sites, especially since steep precipitation and temperature gradients typify mountainous regions. Lake and bog cores collected from three sites on southern and central Vancouver Island (Porphyry and Walker lakes and Harris Lake Ridge Bog) were analysed for pollen, macrofossils and charcoal and the resulting data were used to reveal post-glacial changes in vegetation, climate and fire disturbance. The paleovegetation, paleoclimate, and fire disturbance records from Porphyry and Walker Lakes parallel those from low elevations during the post-glacial interval, suggesting that these sites responded strongly to regional forcing and were somewhat less sensitive to local forcing. Of notable interest is the upward migration of lowland taxa to these lakes during the warm dry early-Holocene. A change to cooler and moister conditions in the mid- and late-Holocene is subsequently characterised by downslope movement of species ranges and the establishment of modern subalpine communities. In contrast, Harris Lake Ridge Bog from central Vancouver Island has a more complicated history that exhibits strong local and regional influences. This site is less similar to lowland records despite a relatively similar ecotonal position as the other two sites. In the early-Holocene upslope movement of low elevation species is less obvious than at Porphyry and Walker lakes. In the mid- and late-Holocene forest composition changed around Harris Lake Ridge Bog as conditions cooled and moistened and taxa better suited to nutrient poor soils, such as Tsuga mertensiana and T. heterophylla expanded. At the same time, there is evidence to suggest that local switches between forest and heather communities were initiated by fire. Consequently, records from subalpine wetlands may provide more potential for detailed reconstruction of local in-stand vegetation dynamics than those from lakes. Studies from subalpine sites have application in forestry management, wildlife conservation, and archaeological reconstruction. For example, on Vancouver Island, the Vancouver Island marmot (Marmota vancouverensis) is near extinction and conservation of the species can benefit from understanding habitat dynamic at high elevations.

  11. Tectonic setting of the Portland-Vancouver area, Oregon and Washington: constraints from low-altitude aeromagnetic data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blakely, R.J.; Wells, R.E.; Yelin, T.S.; Madin, I.P.; Beeson, M.H.

    1995-01-01

    Seismic activity in the Portland-Vancouver metropolitan area may be associated with various mapped faults that locally offset volcanic basement of Eocene age and younger. This volcanic basement is concealed in most places by young deposits, vegetation, and urban development. The US Geological Survey conducted an aeromagnetic survey in September 1992 to investigate the extent of these mapped faults and possibly to help identify other seismic and volcanic hazards in the area. The survey was flown approximately 240 m above terrain, along flight lines spaced 460 m apart, and over an area about 50 ?? 50 km. -from Authors

  12. Globally dispersed mobile drug-resistance genes in Gram-negative bacterial isolates from patients with bloodstream infections in a US urban general hospital

    PubMed Central

    Adams-Sapper, S.; Sergeevna-Selezneva, J.; Tartof, S.; Raphael, E.; Diep, B. An; Perdreau-Remington, F.

    2012-01-01

    Mobile drug-resistance genes with identical nucleic acid sequences carried by multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli strains that cause community-acquired infections are becomingly increasingly dispersed worldwide. Over a 2-year period, we analysed Gram-negative bacterial (GNB) pathogens from the blood of inpatients at an urban public hospital to determine what proportion of these isolates carried such globally dispersed drug-resistance genes. Of 376 GNB isolates, 167 (44 %) were Escherichia coli, 50 (13 %) were Klebsiella pneumoniae, 25 (7 %) were Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 25 (7 %) were Proteus mirabilis and 20 (5 %) were Enterobacter cloacae; the remainder (24 %) comprised 26 different GNB species. Among E. coli isolates, class 1 integrons were detected in 64 (38 %). The most common integron gene cassette configuration was dfrA17-aadA5, found in 30 (25 %) of 119 drug-resistant E. coli isolates and in one isolate of Moraxella morganii. Extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) genes were found in 16 E. coli isolates (10 %). These genes with identical sequences were found in nearly 40 % of bloodstream E. coli isolates in the study hospital, as well as in a variety of bacterial species from clinical and non-clinical sources worldwide. Thus, a substantial proportion of bloodstream infections among hospitalized patients were caused by E. coli strains carrying drug-resistance genes that are dispersed globally in a wide variety of bacterial species. PMID:22493279

  13. Hospital service recovery.

    PubMed

    Gutbezahl, Cary; Haan, Perry

    2006-01-01

    An organization's ability to correct service errors is an important factor in achieving success in today's service economy. This paper examines service recovery in hospitals in the U.S. First is a general review of service recovery theories. Next is a discussion of specific service issues related to the hospital environment. The literature on service recovery is used to make specific recommendations to hospitals for ways to improve their ability to remedy service errors when they occur. Suggestions for future research in the field of service recovery are also made. PMID:17194683

  14. Mental hospitals in India.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, K; Venugopal, D; Alimchandani, A K

    2000-04-01

    This review traces the history of the mental hospital movement, initially on the world stage, and later in India, in relation to advances in psychiatric care. Mental hospitals have played a significant role in the evolution of psychiatry to its present statusThe earliest hospital in India were established during the British colonial rule. They served as a means to isolate mentally ill persons from the societal mainstream and provide treatments that were in vogue at the time. Following India's independence, there has been a trend towards establishing general hospital psychiatry units and deinstitutionalization, while at the same time improving conditions in the existing mental hospitals.Since 1947, a series of workshops of superintendents was conducted to review the prevailing situations in mental hospitals and to propose recommendations to improve the same. Implementation of the Mental Health Act, 1987, and grovernmental focus upon mental hospital reform have paved way for a more specific and futuristic role for mental hospitals in planning psychiatric services for the new millenium, especially for severe mental illnesses. PMID:21407925

  15. Quantifying non-indigenous species in accumulated ballast slurry residuals (swish) arriving at Vancouver, British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, T. F.; Levings, C. D.

    2013-08-01

    Ballast tank swish samples were collected from ships following their arrival at Vancouver (British Columbia, Canada) after undergoing either a trans-oceanic or a Pacific-coastal voyage. The ballast swish consisted of a residual slurry mixture of sediment and water that remained trapped in ballast tanks following water discharge at port. The ballast tanks of 27 ships were sampled and ballast swish was found on 19 of the 27 ships. These ships were categorized according to ballast water management type: (1) Trans-oceanic = 7 trans-oceanic ships undergoing ballast water exchange (BWE) > 200 nm from shore; (2) Coastal-exchange = 7 Pacific-coastal ships traveling from ports south of Cape Blanco, Oregon undergoing coastal exchange > 50 nm from shore south of Cape Blanco; and (3) Coastal-no-exchange = 5 Pacific-coastal ships traveling from ports north of Cape Blanco, Oregon, without undergoing BWE. Invertebrate abundance and taxa richness were directly correlated with ballast-swish turbidity suggesting that highly-productive coastal source waters and ballast tank retention processes contributed to this trend. In turn, invertebrate taxa diversity increased with increasing invertebrate abundance. A Principal Component Analysis of the trans-oceanic data revealed that length of voyage showed a strong inverse relationship with invertebrate abundance for this category. Within the coastal-exchange voyage category, voyage length and ballast water age tended to be of the same magnitude and were directly correlated with both crustacean and nematode taxa. Finally, the coastal-no-exchange PCA results revealed that voyage length and salinity were inversely related due to the high number of river ports located at the southern border of the regulatory BWE exemption zone. Coastal voyages not undergoing BWE and undertaking a direct river-to-river route should be considered risky for the introduction of non-indigenous species, if the source waters contain potentially invasive species. Non-indigenous species were found in all 3 vector pathways, with the highest number of propagules and survivability potential arising from the coastal-no-exchange zone. Ballast swish may act as a repository for ballast water organisms within ballast water tanks and may be retained in the tanks over several discharge cycles.

  16. Superconducting Gravity Effects of Earthquake at Cascadia Subduction Zone on Vancouver Island, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong Woo; Neumeyer, Juergen; Kao, Ricky; Kabirzadeh, Hojjat; Henton, Joseph; Dragert, Herb; Lambert, Anthony

    2013-04-01

    Superconducting gravimeter (SG) iGrav #01 was deployed at NRCan's Pacific Geoscience Centre (PGC) on Vancouver Island near Sidney in British Columbia, Canada, in July 2012. The PGC is situated in the forearc of the northern Cascadia Subduction Zone (CSZ) and is equipped with FG-5 and A-10 absolute gravimeters, a borehole strainmeter, and a GPS network. In this area, a transient surface deformation accompanied by tremor-like seismic signals has been documented with a recurrence interval of 13 to 16 months. This phenomenon, named Episodic Tremor and Slip (ETS), has been interpreted to be associated with slow slip events (silent earthquakes) in the deeper (25-45 km) part of the CSZ. These slip events have been detected by transient horizontal displacements. The SG is not sensitive to horizontal displacements but it has the largest sensitivity in vertical direction. For detecting of ETS, the continuous SG recordings at the PGC site were reduced for the Earth and ocean tides, polar motion, atmospheric pressure and soil moisture, and, then were band-pass filtered and analyzed in the time and frequency domains and compared with the GPS-detected ETS. Furthermore, we present the gravity effect of the Haida Gwaii earthquake, which occurred near the plate boundary between the Pacific and North America plates (52.788N, 132.101W, 136 km south of Masset, Canada, on October 28th 2012 at 03:04:09 GMT with a magnitude 7.8 at a depth of 14 km). During the observation, a large co-seismic gravity change of -2.6 microGal was recorded at the onset of the Haida Gwaii earthquake. In addition, a significant decrease of gravity was observed from the 15 days prior to the earthquake, and the decrease lasted for 11 days after the earthquake. The analysis of other earthquakes, e.g. the southwestern Alaska earthquake (55.28N, 134.87W, January 5th 2013 with a magnitude 7.5) is also presented.

  17. A 3D, finite element model for baroclinic circulation on the Vancouver Island continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, R.A.; Foreman, M.G.G.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the development and application of a 3-dimensional model of the barotropic and baroclinic circulation on the continental shelf west of Vancouver Island, Canada. A previous study with a 2D barotropic model and field data revealed that several tidal constituents have a significant baroclinic component (the K1 in particular). Thus we embarked on another study with a 3D model to study the baroclinic effects on the residual and several selected tidal constituents. The 3D model uses a harmonic expansion in time and a finite element discretization in space. All nonlinear terms are retained, including quadratic bottom stress, advection and wave transport (continuity nonlinearity). The equations are solved as a global and a local problem, where the global problem is the solution of the wave equation formulation of the shallow water equations, and the local problem is the solution of the momentum equation for the vertical velocity profile. These equations are coupled to the advection-diffusion equation for density so that density gradient forcing is included in the momentum equations. However, the study presented here describes diagnostic calculations for the baroclinic residual circulation only. The model is sufficiently efficient that it encourages sensitivity testing with a large number of model runs. In this sense, the model is akin to an extension of analytical solutions to the domain of irregular geometry and bottom topography where this parameter space can be explored in some detail. In particular, the consequences of the sigma coordinate system used by the model are explored. Test cases using an idealized representation of the continental shelf, shelf break and shelf slope, lead to an estimation of the velocity errors caused by interpolation errors inherent in the sigma coordinate system. On the basis of these estimates, the computational grid used in the 2D model is found to have inadequate resolution. Thus a new grid is generated with increased accuracy in the region of the shelf break. However, even with increased resolution, spurious baroclinic circulation seaward of the shelf break and in the vicinity of Juan de Fuca canyon remained a significant problem when the pressure gradient terms were evaluated using the ?? coordinate system and using a realistic density profile. With the new grid, diagnostic calculations of the barotropic and baroclinic residual circulation are performed using forcing from the observed ??t (density) field and from the gradient of this field. ?? 1992.

  18. The International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Vancouver Classification of Renal Neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Srigley, John R; Delahunt, Brett; Eble, John N; Egevad, Lars; Epstein, Jonathan I; Grignon, David; Hes, Ondrej; Moch, Holger; Montironi, Rodolfo; Tickoo, Satish K; Zhou, Ming; Argani, Pedram

    2013-10-01

    The classification working group of the International Society of Urological Pathology consensus conference on renal neoplasia was in charge of making recommendations regarding additions and changes to the current World Health Organization Classification of Renal Tumors (2004). Members of the group performed an exhaustive literature review, assessed the results of the preconference survey and participated in the consensus conference discussion and polling activities. On the basis of the above inputs, there was consensus that 5 entities should be recognized as new distinct epithelial tumors within the classification system: tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma (RCC), acquired cystic disease-associated RCC, clear cell (tubulo) papillary RCC, the MiT family translocation RCCs (in particular t(6;11) RCC), and hereditary leiomyomatosis RCC syndrome-associated RCC. In addition, there are 3 rare carcinomas that were considered as emerging or provisional new entities: thyroid-like follicular RCC; succinate dehydrogenase B deficiency-associated RCC; and ALK translocation RCC. Further reports of these entities are required to better understand the nature and behavior of these highly unusual tumors. There were a number of new concepts and suggested modifications to the existing World Health Organization 2004 categories. Within the clear cell RCC group, it was agreed upon that multicystic clear cell RCC is best considered as a neoplasm of low malignant potential. There was agreement that subtyping of papillary RCC is of value and that the oncocytic variant of papillary RCC should not be considered as a distinct entity. The hybrid oncocytic chromophobe tumor, which is an indolent tumor that occurs in 3 settings, namely Birt-Hogg-Dub Syndrome, renal oncocytosis, and as a sporadic neoplasm, was placed, for the time being, within the chromophobe RCC category. Recent advances related to collecting duct carcinoma, renal medullary carcinoma, and mucinous spindle cell and tubular RCC were elucidated. Outside of the epithelial category, advances in our understanding of angiomyolipoma, including the epithelioid and epithelial cystic variants, were considered. In addition, the apparent relationship between cystic nephroma and mixed epithelial and stromal tumor was discussed, with the consensus that these tumors form a spectrum of neoplasia. Finally, it was thought that the synovial sarcoma should be removed from the mixed epithelial and mesenchymal category and placed within the sarcoma group. The new classification is to be referred to as the International Society of Urological Pathology Vancouver Classification of Renal Neoplasia. PMID:24025519

  19. A content analysis of media coverage of the introduction of a smoke-free bylaw in Vancouver parks and beaches.

    PubMed

    Moshrefzadeh, Arezu; Rice, Wendy; Pederson, Ann; Okoli, Chizimuzo T C

    2013-09-01

    The Board of Parks and Recreation in Vancouver, BC approved a smoke-free bylaw in the city's parks, beaches and recreational facilities, effective 1 September 2010. We analyzed local news coverage and portrayal of the bylaw to understand the potential influence of news media on public perception of the bylaw in order to inform the media advocacy work of public health interest groups. We compiled a data set of newspaper articles (n = 90) and conducted a quantitative content analysis to examine content related to the outdoor smoke-free policy, including article slant, topics related to smoking and tobacco control, and any equity-related concerns raised. Newspaper coverage in Vancouver was largely supportive of the outdoor smoke-free bylaw. However, concerns over rights were frequently discussed in letters to the editor. Such equity concerns were rarely discussed in news articles, showing a potential disconnect between the concerns expressed in the media by members of the public and the coverage provided by print media. PMID:24052134

  20. Sex-Based Differences in Rates, Causes, and Predictors of Death Among Injection Drug Users in Vancouver, Canada.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kanna; Dong, Huiru; Marshall, Brandon D L; Milloy, Michael-John; Montaner, Julio S G; Wood, Evan; Kerr, Thomas

    2016-03-15

    In the present study, we sought to identify rates, causes, and predictors of death among male and female injection drug users (IDUs) in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, during a period of expanded public health interventions. Data from prospective cohorts of IDUs in Vancouver were linked to the provincial database of vital statistics to ascertain rates and causes of death between 1996 and 2011. Mortality rates were analyzed using Poisson regression and indirect standardization. Predictors of mortality were identified using multivariable Cox regression models stratified by sex. Among the 2,317 participants, 794 (34.3%) of whom were women, there were 483 deaths during follow-up, with a rate of 32.1 (95% confidence interval (CI): 29.3, 35.0) deaths per 1,000 person-years. Standardized mortality ratios were 7.28 (95% CI: 6.50, 8.14) for men and 15.56 (95% CI: 13.31, 18.07) for women. During the study period, mortality rates related to infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) declined among men but remained stable among women. In multivariable analyses, HIV seropositivity was independently associated with mortality in both sexes (all P < 0.05). The excess mortality burden among IDUs in our cohorts was primarily attributable to HIV infection; compared with men, women remained at higher risk of HIV-related mortality, indicating a need for sex-specific interventions to reduce mortality among female IDUs in this setting. PMID:26865265

  1. Outdoor brothel culture: the un/making of a transsexual stroll in Vancouver's West End, 19751984.

    PubMed

    Ross, Becki

    2012-01-01

    In the mid-1970s, following a series of police raids on prostitution inside downtown nightclubs, a community of approximately 200 sex workers moved into Vancouver's West End neighborhood, where a small stroll had operated since the early 1970s. This paper examines the contributions made by three male-to-female (MTF) transsexuals of color to the culture of on-street prostitution in the West End. The trans women's stories address themes of fashion, working conditions, money, community formation, violence, and resistance to well-organized anti-prostitution forces. These recollections enable me to bridge and enrich trans history and prostitution history two fields of inquiry that have under-represented the participation of trans women in the sex industry across the urban West. Acutely familiar with the hazards inherent in a criminalized, stigmatized trade, trans sex workers in the West End manufactured efficacious strategies of harm reduction, income generation, safety planning, and community building. Eschewing the label of victim, they leveraged their physical size and style, charisma, contempt towards pimps, earning capacity, and seniority as the first workers on the stroll to assume leadership within the broader constituency of hookers on Davie Street. I discover that their short-lived outdoor brothel culture offered only a temporary bulwark against the inevitability of eviction via legal injunction in July 1984, and the subsequent rise in lethal violence against all prostitutes in Vancouver, including MTF transsexuals. PMID:22611581

  2. Realizing User-Relevant Conceptual Model for the Ski Jump Venue of the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teakles, Andrew; Mo, Ruping; Dierking, Carl F.; Emond, Chris; Smith, Trevor; McLennan, Neil; Joe, Paul I.

    2014-01-01

    As was the case for most other Olympic competitions, providing weather guidance for the ski jump and Nordic combined events involved its own set of unique challenges. The extent of these challenges was brought to light before the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics during a series of outflow wind events in the 2008/2009 winter season. The interactions with the race officials during the difficult race conditions brought on by the outflows provided a new perspective on the service delivery requirements for the upcoming Olympic Games. In particular, the turbulent nature of the winds and its impact on the ski jump practice events that season highlighted the need of race officials for nowcasting advice at very short time scales (from 2 min to 1 h) and forecast products tailored to their decision-making process. These realizations resulted in last minute modifications to the monitoring strategy leading up to the Olympic Games and required forecasters' conceptual models for flow within the Callaghan Valley to be downscaled further to reflect the evolution of turbulence at the ski jump site. The SNOW-V10 (Science of Nowcasting Olympic Weather for Vancouver 2010) team provided support for these efforts by supplying diagnostic case analyses of important events using numerical weather data and by enhancing the real-time monitoring capabilities at the ski jump venue.

  3. A GIS-based spatiotemporal analysis of violent trauma hotspots in Vancouver, Canada: identification, contextualisation and intervention

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Blake Byron; Schuurman, Nadine; Hameed, S Morad

    2014-01-01

    Background In 2002, the WHO declared interpersonal violence to be a leading public health problem. Previous research demonstrates that urban spaces with a high incidence of violent trauma (hotspots) correlate with features of built environment and social determinants. However, there are few studies that analyse injury data across the axes of both space and time to characterise injury–environment relationships. This paper describes a spatiotemporal analysis of violent injuries in Vancouver, Canada, from 2001 to 2008. Methods Using geographic information systems, 575 violent trauma incidents were mapped and analysed using kernel density estimation to identify hotspot locations. Patterns between space, time, victim age and sex and mechanism of injury were investigated with an exploratory approach. Results Several patterns in space and time were identified and described, corresponding to distinct neighbourhood characteristics. Violent trauma hotspots were most prevalent in Vancouver's nightclub district on Friday and Saturday nights, with higher rates in the most socioeconomically deprived neighbourhoods. Victim sex, age and mechanism of injury also formed strong patterns. Three neighbourhood profiles are presented using the dual axis of space/time to describe the hotspot environments. Conclusions This work posits the value of exploratory spatial data analysis using geographic information systems in trauma epidemiology studies and further suggests that using both space and time concurrently to understand urban environmental correlates of injury provides a more granular or higher resolution picture of risk. We discuss implications for injury prevention and control, focusing on education, regulation, the built environment and injury surveillance. PMID:24556240

  4. A Content Analysis of Media Coverage of the Introduction of a Smoke-Free Bylaw in Vancouver Parks and Beaches

    PubMed Central

    Moshrefzadeh, Arezu; Rice, Wendy; Pederson, Ann; Okoli, Chizimuzo T. C.

    2013-01-01

    The Board of Parks and Recreation in Vancouver, BC approved a smoke-free bylaw in the citys parks, beaches and recreational facilities, effective 1 September 2010. We analyzed local news coverage and portrayal of the bylaw to understand the potential influence of news media on public perception of the bylaw in order to inform the media advocacy work of public health interest groups. We compiled a data set of newspaper articles (n = 90) and conducted a quantitative content analysis to examine content related to the outdoor smoke-free policy, including article slant, topics related to smoking and tobacco control, and any equity-related concerns raised. Newspaper coverage in Vancouver was largely supportive of the outdoor smoke-free bylaw. However, concerns over rights were frequently discussed in letters to the editor. Such equity concerns were rarely discussed in news articles, showing a potential disconnect between the concerns expressed in the media by members of the public and the coverage provided by print media. PMID:24052134

  5. Unacceptable attrition among WHO stages 1 and 2 patients in a hospital-based setting in rural Malawi: can we retain such patients within the general health system?

    PubMed

    Tayler-Smith, Katie; Zachariah, Rony; Massaquoi, Moses; Manzi, Marcel; Pasulani, Olesi; van den Akker, Thomas; Bemelmans, Marielle; Bauernfeind, Ariane; Mwagomba, Beatrice; Harries, Anthony D

    2010-05-01

    A study conducted among HIV-positive adults in WHO clinical stages 1 and 2 was followed up at Thyolo District Hospital (rural Malawi) to report on: (1) retention and attrition before and while on antiretroviral treatment (ART); and (2) the criteria used for initiating ART. Between June 2008 and January 2009, 1633 adults in WHO stages 1 and 2 were followed up for a total of 282 person-years. Retention in care at 1, 2, 3 and 6 months for those not on ART (n=1078) was 25, 18, 11 and 4% vs. 99, 97, 95 and 90% for patients who started ART (n=555, P=0.001). Attrition rates were 31 times higher among patients not started on ART compared with those started on ART (adjusted hazard ratio, 31.0, 95% CI 22-44). Ninety-two patients in WHO stage 1 or 2 were started on ART without the guidance of a CD4 count, and 11 were incorrectly started on ART with CD4 count > or = 250 cells/mm(3). In a rural district hospital setting in Malawi, attrition of individuals in WHO stages 1 and 2 is unacceptably high, and specific operational strategies need to be considered to retain such patients in the health system. PMID:20138323

  6. Hospital 360.

    PubMed

    Giraldo Valencia, Juan Carlos; Delgado, Liliana Claudia

    2015-01-01

    There are forces that are greater than the individual performance of each hospital institution and of the health system structural of each country. The world is changing and to face up to the future in the best possible way, we need to understand how contexts and emerging trends link up and how they affect the hospital sector. The Columbian Association of Hospitals and Clinics, ACHC, has thus come up with the Hospital 360 concept which uses hospitals capable of anticipating changing contexts by means of the transition between present and future and takes on board the experience of global, socio-economic, demographic, political, environmental and technological fields as its model. Hospital 360 is an invitation to reinvent processes and institution themselves allowing them to adapt and incorporate a high degree of functional flexibility. Hospital 360 purses goals of efficiency, effectiveness and relevance, but also of impact and sustainability, and is coherent with the internal needs of hospital institutions and society for long-term benefits. PMID:26521380

  7. Reduced in-hospital mortality from acute myocardial infarction with general adoption of thrombolytic treatment in the North West Thames health region 1979-1991.

    PubMed Central

    Greenbaum, R. A.; Morris, R.; Sritara, P.; Shanit, D.; Chan, K. L.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the impact of studies of thrombolytic treatment in acute myocardial infarction on inhospital mortality. DESIGN--Retrospective study. SETTING--All 21 major hospitals in the North West Thames health region. PATIENTS--63,903 patients with acute myocardial infarction. STUDY PERIOD--1979-1991. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--in-hospital mortality. RESULTS--Overall mortality decreased by 5.2% from 25.4% to 20.2% (P < 0.0001) (95% confidence interval (CI) 3.4 to 6.6). Male mortality decreased by 6.5% from 22.3% to 15.8% (P < 0.0001) (95% CI 4.8 to 8.4); female mortality decreased by 4.3% from 32.6% to 28.3% (P < 0.01) (95% CI 1.3 to 7.4). Reductions in mortality occurred in all age and sex groups but were greater in younger patients. Logistic regression analysis of death rates showed that the odds ratio of death in 1991 compared with that in 1979 was 0.75 (95% CI 0.69 to 0.82). After allowing for the effects of age and sex, this odds ratio became 0.54 (95% CI 0.49 to 0.59), as more elderly patients were treated in 1991. Purchase of streptokinase increased 31-fold from 116 doses in 1983 to 3554 doses in 1991. There was a pronounced negative association between annual purchases of streptokinase and mortality (Kendall's rank correlation = -0.86, P = 0.003). Changes in clinical practice resulted in the saving of the lives of an estimated 600 patients with acute myocardial infarction in 1991. This extrapolates to an annual saving of 10,500 lives in the United Kingdom. CONCLUSIONS--In the past few years thrombolytic treatment has been widely adopted for the management of acute myocardial infarction. This has been paralleled by a substantial reduction in in-hospital mortality. PMID:8562232

  8. A simple measure to improve the rates of thromboprophylaxis prescription post surgical fixation of neck of femur fractures in a district general hospital

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Pranab; Najefi, Ali-Asgar; Hambidge, John

    2014-01-01

    Neck of femur (NOF) fractures are a major public health concern because of the ageing population and higher incidence of fragility fractures. NOF fractures are associated with high mortality and morbidity rates, and there is a high risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) after hip fractures (Ref 1). Therefore thromboprophylaxis is vital. Current NICE guidelines advocate 28 35 days of thromboprophylaxis after NOF fractures (Ref 1, 2). It came to our attention that patients post NOF fixation were getting variable prescriptions in regards to their thromboprophylaxis. Therefore a retrospective study on prescription of thromboprophylaxis was conducted from October 2012 to February 2013 within the trauma and orthopaedics department at Queens Hospital, Romford. Data was collected on all NOF fractures from electronic discharge summaries. Basic descriptive statistics were used to analysis the data. There were 110 cases of NOF fractures during this period. 100 patients were included since two were discounted as they were already on long term anticoagulants and eight patients died in hospital. No thromboprophylaxis was prescribed for 15 patients (15%). Three patients (3%) were prescribed less than 28 days (mean 14 days, range (14 14 days)). 69 patients (69%) received 28 - 35 days of thromprophylaxis, whilst five patients (5%) received more than 35 days (mean 42 days, range 40 42 days). Formal departmental teaching and presentation of the findings was given after the initial study and a small label with the message, POST NOF #: 28-35 days Enoxaparin, was attached to the back of all the junior doctor work phones. After the intervention, data was collected from the period of 7th of January to 7th of February 2013. The second study showed that 50 patients were admitted with NOF fractures in this time period. Four patients died in hospital and three patients were discounted as they were on Warfarin. Two patients were not prescribed thromboprophylaxis (5%). 34 (79%) patients received 28 - 35 days, whereas seven patients (16%) received 42 days of thromboprophylaxis. The older patients with multiple co-morbidities and reduced mobility are at high risk of developing thromboembolism post NOF fixation. Our initial study identified inadequate prescription of thromboprophylaxis post NOF fractures. After introduction of simple measures such as the reminder label attached to phones, our repeat study found that there was improvement in prescription rates. Our study highlights that simple measures can increase awareness and improve patient safety.

  9. Air sampling in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Gröschel, D H

    1980-01-01

    Air sampling in hospitals is performed for the epidemiologic investigation of nosocomial infections, for the elucidation of spread and control of airborn microorganisms, for assessing biohazards associated with instruments, equipment and procedures and for controlling the performance of devices and techniques used for the reduction of airborne contaminants. Many different air-sampling devices are available but only a few have found use in hospitals. Certain samplers are used for special studies such as the Andersen stacked-sieve impactor or the liquid impingers. Lately, samplers have been developed which due to their size and weight are more useful to the hospital microbiologist and epidemiologist than the older slit samplers. the Ross Microban sieve sampler and the Biotest Reuter Centrifugal Sampler were tested in comparison with the Casella slit sampler and found to show comparable results. The hand-held, battery-operated Biotest RCS sample is the most versatile for general sampling of hospital air. PMID:6939388

  10. The impact of maternal age over forty years on the caesarean section rate: six year experience at a busy district general hospital.

    PubMed

    Moore, E K; Irvine, L M

    2014-04-01

    A retrospective study over a 6-year period was undertaken to determine the trend in age at booking for antenatal care at West Hertfordshire Hospitals NHS Trust and to investigate the relationship between maternal age at booking for antenatal care and mode of delivery. Between 2006 and 2011, there was an 80% increase in the number of women over the age of 40 years booking for antenatal care. The overall caesarean section rate in this cohort of women increased from 34.6% in 2006 to 53.7% in 2011, comprising of an increase in both elective and emergency caesarean sections. It appears that increasing maternal age may explain a significant proportion of the rising caesarean section rate in our unit. PMID:24483167

  11. [Mortality in the surgical unit of a general hospital. Study of 27 postoperative deaths among patients operated on during 1990-1492].

    PubMed

    Proye, C; Martinot, J C; Triboulet, J P; Carnaille, B; Sautier, M; Dromer, D; Camp, D

    1991-11-01

    This study takes in account all post operative deaths during the year 1990 in one surgical Professorial unit of Lille academic hospital (France). During this year, 1492 consecutive patients underwent surgery. The mean age of deceased patients was 63.7 years. 15 died after emergency procedure and 12 after elective surgery. Lastly 2 patients died without any operation. The most common condition encountered in those cases was oesophageal carcinoma, thereafter gastric or duodenal complicated peptic ulcer, and finally colonic carcinoma and diverticular disease. 13 patients had neoplasia (45%). From a critical point of view, 14 patients died after surgical indication or procedure of questionable legitimacy. The comparison with a similar study conducted five years ago and the analysis of these charts allow us to reaffirm some basic principles of surgery. PMID:1761598

  12. [Trend in the susceptibility of the most frequent bacterial pathogens isolated at Hospital General La Mancha Centro over 2010-2012 period].

    PubMed

    Asencio, Mara ngeles; Huertas, Mara; Carranza, Rafael; Franco, Mara; Castellanos, Jess; Barber, Jos Ramn; Conde, Mara del Carmen; Tenas, Jos Mara

    2014-12-01

    Introduction. Our objective was to determine the trend of the antimicrobial susceptibility of the most common bacterial pathogens isolated in La Mancha Centro Hospital (MCH) between 2010-2012. Material and methods. Isolates of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa from patients admitted to MCH were studied. These data and their antibiotic susceptibility were obtained from the database OBSERVA (BioMrieux). Results. The percentages of susceptibility for S. aureus were: 50% methicillin-resistant-S. aureus (MRSA) (higher co-resistance to erythromycin and levofloxacin), 46% erythromycin, 73% clindamycin, 45% levofloxacin, 99% rifampin and 100% cotrimoxazole, glycopeptides, linezolid and daptomycin. Increased resistance in ICU was observed (63% MRSA), with 50% of S. aureus (susceptible and methicillin-resistant strains) with vancomycin MIC values ? 0.5 mg/L. E. coli susceptibility: 62% amoxicillin-clavulanate, 55% ciprofloxacin, 60% cotrimoxazole, 84% gentamicin and 95% fosfomycin. K. pneumoniae susceptibility: 74% amoxicillin-clavulanate, 71% ciprofloxacin, 78% cotrimoxazole, 94% gentamicin and 87% fosfomycin. The percentage of BLEE strains was 17% and 21% for E. coli and K. pneumoniae, respectively, without detection of resistance to carbapenems. P. aeruginosa susceptibility: 80% ceftazidime and carbapenems, 63% ciprofloxacin and higher than 90% aminoglycosides. A decreasing trend of susceptibility to ceftazidime and carbapenems was observed in ICU and increasing trend to ciprofloxacin. Conclusions. Resistance percentages were higher in ICU than in the rest of the hospital, highlighting 63% of MRSA strains. Our percentage of BLEE and MRSA strains were higher than the Spanish media. Rifampicin and cotrimoxazole maintain good susceptibility to S. aureus, fosfomycin and aminoglycosides to Enterobacteriaceae and carbapenems to P. aeruginosa. PMID:25536430

  13. The Boring Volcanic Field of the Portland-Vancouver area, Oregon and Washington: tectonically anomalous forearc volcanism in an urban setting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evarts, Russell C.; Conrey, Richard M.; Fleck, Robert J.; Hagstrum, Jonathan T.

    2009-01-01

    More than 80 small volcanoes are scattered throughout the Portland-Vancouver metropolitan area of northwestern Oregon and southwestern Washington. These volcanoes constitute the Boring Volcanic Field, which is centered in the Neogene Portland Basin and merges to the east with coeval volcanic centers of the High Cascade volcanic arc. Although the character of volcanic activity is typical of many monogenetic volcanic fields, its tectonic setting is not, being located in the forearc of the Cascadia subduction system well trenchward of the volcanic-arc axis. The history and petrology of this anomalous volcanic field have been elucidated by a comprehensive program of geologic mapping, geochemistry, 40Ar/39Ar geochronology, and paleomag-netic studies. Volcanism began at 2.6 Ma with eruption of low-K tholeiite and related lavas in the southern part of the Portland Basin. At 1.6 Ma, following a hiatus of ~0.8 m.y., similar lavas erupted a few kilometers to the north, after which volcanism became widely dispersed, compositionally variable, and more or less continuous, with an average recurrence interval of 15,000 yr. The youngest centers, 50–130 ka, are found in the northern part of the field. Boring centers are generally monogenetic and mafic but a few larger edifices, ranging from basalt to low-SiO2 andesite, were also constructed. Low-K to high-K calc-alkaline compositions similar to those of the nearby volcanic arc dominate the field, but many centers erupted magmas that exhibit little influence of fluids derived from the subducting slab. The timing and compositional characteristics of Boring volcanism suggest a genetic relationship with late Neogene intra-arc rifting.

  14. Complex and Conflicting Social Norms: Implications for Implementation of Future HIV Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) Interventions in Vancouver, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Small, Will; Carson, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Background HIV Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) has been found to be efficacious in preventing HIV acquisition among seronegative individuals in a variety of risk groups, including men who have sex with men and people who inject drugs. To date, however, it remains unclear how socio-cultural norms (e.g., attitudes towards HIV; social understandings regarding HIV risk practices) may influence the scalability of future PrEP interventions. The objective of this study is to assess how socio-cultural norms may influence the implementation and scalability of future HIV PrEP interventions in Vancouver, Canada. Methods We conducted 50 interviews with young men (ages 18–24) with a variety of HIV risk behavioural profiles (e.g., young men who inject drugs; MSM). Interviews focused on participants’ experiences and perceptions with various HIV interventions and policies, including PrEP. Results While awareness of PrEP was generally low, perceptions about the potential personal and public health gains associated with PrEP were interconnected with expressions of complex and sometimes conflicting social norms. Some accounts characterized PrEP as a convenient form of reliable protection against HIV, likening it to the female birth control pill. Other accounts cast PrEP as a means to facilitate ‘socially unacceptable’ behaviour (e.g., promiscuity). Stigmatizing rhetoric was used to position PrEP as a tool that could promote some groups’ proclivities to take ‘risks’. Conclusion Stigma regarding ‘risky’ behaviour and PrEP should not be underestimated as a serious implementation challenge. Pre-implementation strategies that concomitantly aim to improve knowledge about PrEP, while addressing associated social prejudices, may be key to effective implementation and scale-up. PMID:26756474

  15. Assessing beliefs and risk perceptions on smoking and smoking cessation in immigrant Chinese adult smokers residing in Vancouver, Canada: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    FitzGerald, J Mark; Poureslami, Iraj; Shum, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to conduct culturally-based participatory research to assess cultural and belief contexts for smoking behaviours within Mandarin and Cantonese communities. Outcome variables were smoking-related knowledge, smoking patterns, attitudes and beliefs, and perceived barriers and facilitators to successful cessation. Design A community-based approach was applied involving smokers, community key-informants and professionals in study design and implementation. Initially, focus groups were conducted and findings were used to develop study instrument. Participants responded once to study questionnaire after informed consent. Setting Community based in the Greater Vancouver Area, Canada. Participants 16 Chinese smokers participated in focus groups and subsequently, 167 current Chinese immigrant (137 males and 30 females) smokers from Mandarin and Cantonese communities, recruited with the help of community agencies and collaborating physicians, were enrolled in a cross-sectional study. Results We found that a majority believed smoking was harmful on their health. Younger smokers (<35?years of age) did not mind smoking in front of young children compared to older smokers (?35?years of age) (p<0.001). People with high school or lower levels of education believed that they would benefit more from smoking than suffering from withdrawal symptoms compared to better educated smokers (p<0.05). Mandarin smokers were significantly more likely to encourage others to quit than Cantonese smokers (p<0.05). Many indicated not receiving adequate support from care providers and lack of access to culturally and linguistically appropriate cessation programmes impacted on their ability to quit smoking. Conclusions Our study highlighted the importance of tobacco beliefs and perceptions among Mandarin and Cantonese speaking immigrants with limited access to healthcare information and for younger smokers whose attention to health consequences of smoking may be limited as well. Study participants were generally aware of the health risks and were willing to quit. Access to appropriate cessation programmes would fulfil their willingness. PMID:25649211

  16. Verification of an ENSO-Based Long-Range Prediction of Anomalous Weather Conditions During the Vancouver 2010 Olympics and Paralympics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Ruping; Joe, Paul I.; Doyle, Chris; Whitfield, Paul H.

    2014-01-01

    A brief review of the anomalous weather conditions during the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games and the efforts to predict these anomalies based on some preceding El Nio-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) signals are presented. It is shown that the Olympic Games were held under extraordinarily warm conditions in February 2010, with monthly mean temperature anomalies of +2.2 C in Vancouver and +2.8 C in Whistler, ranking respectively as the highest and the second highest in the past 30 years (1981-2010). The warm conditions continued, but became less anomalous, in March 2010 for the Paralympic Games. While the precipitation amounts in the area remained near normal through this winter, the lack of snow due to warm conditions created numerous media headlines and practical problems for the alpine competitions. A statistical model was developed on the premise that February and March temperatures in the Vancouver area could be predicted using an ENSO signal with considerable lead time. This model successfully predicted the warmer-than-normal, lower-snowfall conditions for the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics and Paralympics.

  17. Reflection on 10 Years of Community-Engaged Scholarship in the Faculty of Land and Food Systems at the University of British Columbia-Vancouver

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rojas, Alejandro; Sipos, Yona; Valley, Will

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe a cultural transformation to embrace community-engaged scholarship by faculty members in the Faculty of Land and Food Systems at the University of British Columbia-Vancouver. They describe a transition from community-inquiry faculty projects to community-engaged action research projects achieved through…

  18. Hospital fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Althausen, Peter L; Hill, Austin D; Mead, Lisa

    2014-07-01

    Under the current system, orthopaedic trauma surgeons must work in some form of hospital setting as our primary service involves treatment of the trauma patient. We must not forget that just as a trauma center cannot exist without our services, we cannot function without their support. As a result, a clear understanding of the balance between physicians and hospitals is paramount. Historical perspective enables physicians and hospital personnel alike to understand the evolution of hospital-physician relationship. This process should be understood upon completion of this chapter. The relationship between physicians and hospitals is becoming increasingly complex and multiple forms of integration exist such as joint ventures, gain sharing, and co-management agreements. For the surgeon to negotiate well, an understanding of hospital governance and the role of the orthopaedic traumatologist is vital to success. An understanding of the value provided by the traumatologist includes all aspects of care including efficiency, availability, cost effectiveness, and research activities. To create effective and sustainable healthcare institutions, physicians and hospitals must be aligned over a sustained period of time. Unfortunately, external forces have eroded the historical basis for the working relationship between physicians and hospitals. Increased competition and reimbursement cuts, coupled with the increasing demands for quality, efficiency, and coordination and the payment changes outlined in healthcare reform, have left many organizations wondering how to best rebuild the relationship. The principal goal for the physician when partnering with a hospital or healthcare entity is to establish a sustainable model of service line management that protects or advances the physician's ability to make impactful improvements in quality of patient care, decreases in healthcare costs, and improvements in process efficiency through evidence-based practices and protocols. PMID:24918827

  19. Welfare Checks, Drug Consumption, and Health: Evidence from Vancouver Injection Drug Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riddell, Chris; Riddell, Rosemarie

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigates the link between welfare payments and drug use among injection drug users. The authors find an increase in the likelihood of an overdose in the days following check arrival, and in the probability of leaving the hospital against medical advice (AMA) on check day. Using the check arrival date as an instrument, we estimate

  20. Going to the Hospital

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and other resources: • General anesthesia can have side effects, so see if local anesthesia is an option. • Ask if regular medications can be continued during the hospital stay. • Ask for a private room, with a ... such as fever, infection, medication side effects, and dehydration can cause delirium, a state of ...

  1. Knowledge and Attitude of Patients, and Practice of the Arrest of Breast Cancer in Outpatient Consultations in Mastology at the General Hospital of Huambo, Angola.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Hamilton Dos Prazeres; Tavares, Suelma Beatriz Marques Prata; Natanel, Felizardo Abrao; Capingana, Daniel Pires

    2015-01-01

    This work aims to understand the knowledge and perceptions of women aged over 40 years with breast cancer seen in mastology outpatients at the Maternity Hospital of Huambo, central Angola, from February to August 2010. It also examines the clinical practice of prevention and detection of breast cancer. The research consisted of a collection of descriptive, cross-sectional data through a questionnaire. Statistical analysis of the data was performed using Epi Info, version 6.04b. In our sample, half of the women were single, all had history of breast cancer in the family, and most had heard of breast self-examination, with the primary source of information being the mass media. Almost all women reported that it was important to perform self-examination and that they were aware of the seriousness of breast cancer, and although most of them had not been taught how to do breast self-examination, almost all knew the basics of how to do it. Some 17.6% had heard of mammography, but none had ever had a mammogram. PMID:26379452

  2. Suicidal Intent and Method of Self-Harm: A Large-scale Study of Self-Harm Patients Presenting to a General Hospital.

    PubMed

    Haw, Camilla; Casey, Deborah; Holmes, Jane; Hawton, Keith

    2015-12-01

    Data from the Oxford Monitoring System for Attempted Suicide (2004-2011) were used to study hospital presentations for self-harm in which Suicidal Intent Scale (SIS) scores were obtained (N=4,840). Regression of medians was used to control for the confounding effect of age and gender. Higher estimated median SIS scores were associated with increasing age, male gender, self-poisoning versus self-injury, multiple methods of self-harm versus self-injury alone, use of gas (mainly carbon monoxide), dangerous methods of self-injury (including hanging, gunshot), and use of alcohol as part of the act. For self-poisoning patients, there was a correlation between the number of tablets taken and the total SIS score. Compared with self-poisoning with paracetamol and paracetamol-containing compounds, self-poisoning with antipsychotics was associated with a lower median SIS score while antidepressants had the same estimated median as paracetamol. Use of alcohol within 6hours of self-harm was associated with lower SIS scores. In conclusion, certain methods of self-harm, particularly dangerous methods of self-injury and self-poisoning with gas, were associated with high intent and should alert clinicians to potential higher risk of suicide. However, apart from use of gas, suicidal intent cannot be inferred from type of drugs used for self-poisoning. PMID:25916308

  3. 45 CFR 211.10 - Termination of hospitalization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... of the hospital finds that the eligible person hospitalized for mental illness (whether or not... accordance with laws governing hospitalization for mental illness as may be in force and generally...

  4. 45 CFR 211.10 - Termination of hospitalization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... of the hospital finds that the eligible person hospitalized for mental illness (whether or not... accordance with laws governing hospitalization for mental illness as may be in force and generally...

  5. 45 CFR 211.10 - Termination of hospitalization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... of the hospital finds that the eligible person hospitalized for mental illness (whether or not... accordance with laws governing hospitalization for mental illness as may be in force and generally...

  6. 45 CFR 211.10 - Termination of hospitalization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... of the hospital finds that the eligible person hospitalized for mental illness (whether or not... accordance with laws governing hospitalization for mental illness as may be in force and generally...

  7. 45 CFR 211.10 - Termination of hospitalization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... of the hospital finds that the eligible person hospitalized for mental illness (whether or not... accordance with laws governing hospitalization for mental illness as may be in force and generally...

  8. 15. Photographic copy of historic photograph, Portsmouth Naval Hospital Building, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Photographic copy of historic photograph, Portsmouth Naval Hospital Building, view of southeast elevation, 1901. (Portsmouth Naval Shipyard Museum, Portsmouth, VA) - Portsmouth Naval Hospital, Bounded by Elizabeth River, Crawford Street, Portsmouth General Hospital, Parkview Avenue, & Scotts Creek, Portsmouth, Portsmouth, VA

  9. 13. Photographic copy of historic photograph, Portsmouth Naval Hospital Building, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Photographic copy of historic photograph, Portsmouth Naval Hospital Building, ca. 1875-1876. (Portsmouth Naval Shipyard Museum, Portsmouth, VA) - Portsmouth Naval Hospital, Bounded by Elizabeth River, Crawford Street, Portsmouth General Hospital, Parkview Avenue, & Scotts Creek, Portsmouth, Portsmouth, VA

  10. 3. MAIN HOSPITAL, VIEW OF EAST SIDE AND NORTHEAST CORNER. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. MAIN HOSPITAL, VIEW OF EAST SIDE AND NORTHEAST CORNER. - Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman General Hospital, Building No. 27, Letterman Hospital Complex, Edie Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  11. 8. Hospital Point, pier and boat house (now Visiting Officer's ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Hospital Point, pier and boat house (now Visiting Officer's Quarters), view to east - Portsmouth Naval Hospital, Bounded by Elizabeth River, Crawford Street, Portsmouth General Hospital, Parkview Avenue, & Scotts Creek, Portsmouth, Portsmouth, VA

  12. 2. MAIN HOSPITAL, VIEW OF SURVIVING PORTION OF QUADRANGLE LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. MAIN HOSPITAL, VIEW OF SURVIVING PORTION OF QUADRANGLE LOOKING SOUTHEAST FROM EDIE STREET. - Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman General Hospital, Building No. 27, Letterman Hospital Complex, Edie Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  13. 6. Hospital Point, stairs at northwest bulkhead, view to north ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Hospital Point, stairs at northwest bulkhead, view to north - Portsmouth Naval Hospital, Bounded by Elizabeth River, Crawford Street, Portsmouth General Hospital, Parkview Avenue, & Scotts Creek, Portsmouth, Portsmouth, VA

  14. 12. 1960 highrise hospital, front (south) facade, view to northwest ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. 1960 high-rise hospital, front (south) facade, view to northwest - Portsmouth Naval Hospital, Bounded by Elizabeth River, Crawford Street, Portsmouth General Hospital, Parkview Avenue, & Scotts Creek, Portsmouth, Portsmouth, VA

  15. Hospital philanthropy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Dean G; Clement, Jan P

    2013-01-01

    It remains an open question whether hospital spending on fundraising efforts to garner philanthropy is a good use of funds. Research and industry reports provide conflicting results. We describe the accounting and data challenges in analysis of hospital philanthropy, which include measurement of donations, measurement of fundraising expenses, and finding the relationships among organizations where these cash flows occur. With these challenges, finding conflicting results is not a surprise. PMID:23614267

  16. Safety and Danger in Downtown Vancouver: Understandings of Place among Young People Entrenched in an Urban Drug Scene

    PubMed Central

    Fast, Danya; Shoveller, Jean; Shannon, Kate; Kerr, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    We undertook this qualitative study to examine young people's understandings of the physical and social landscape of the downtown drug scene in Vancouver, Canada. In-depth interviews were conducted with 38 young people ranging from 16 to 26 years of age. Using the concept of symbolic violence, we describe how one downtown neighborhood in particular powerfully symbolizes ‘risk’ among local youth, and how the idea of this neighborhood (and what happens when young people go there) informs experiences of marginalization in society's hierarchies. We also discuss the complex role played by social networks in transcending the geographical and conceptual boundaries between distinct downtown drug-using neighborhoods. Finally, we emphasize that young people's spatial tactics within this downtown landscape – the everyday movements they employ in order to maximize their safety – must be understood in the context of everyday violence and profound social suffering. PMID:19733496

  17. Evidence for a Large Earthquake and Tsunami 100-400 Years Ago on Western Vancouver Island, British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clague, John J.; Bobrowsky, Peter T.

    1994-03-01

    A peaty marsh soil is sharply overlain by a sand sheet and intertidal mud at tidal marshes near Tofino and Ucluelet, Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Foraminifera and vascular plant fossils show that the buried soil was submerged suddenly and was covered quickly by sand. Radiocarbon ages place this event between 100 and 400 yr ago. The coastal subsidence suggested by the submergence occurred in an area of net late Holocene emergence, perhaps during the most recent great earthquake on the northern part of the Cascadia subduction zone. The sand sheet overlying the peaty soil records the tsunami triggered by this earthquake. Similar stratigraphic sequences of about the same age have been reported from estuaries along the outer coasts of Washington and northern Oregon, suggesting that hundreds of kilometers of the Cascadia subduction zone may have ruptured during one, or a series of plate-boundary earthquakes less than 400 yr ago.

  18. Tapered fluted modular titanium stems in the management of Vancouver B2 and B3 peri-prosthetic fractures.

    PubMed

    Munro, J T; Masri, B A; Garbuz, D S; Duncan, C P

    2013-11-01

    Tapered, fluted, modular, titanium stems are increasingly popular in the operative management of Vancouver B2 and selected B3 peri-prosthetic femoral fractures. We have reviewed the results at our institution looking at stem survival and clinical outcomes and compared this with reported outcomes in the literature. Stem survival at a mean of 54 months was 96% in our series and 97% for combined published cases. Review of radiology showed maintenance or improvement of bone stock in 89% of cases with high rates of femoral union. Favourable clinical outcome scores have reported by several authors. No difference in survival or clinical scores was observed between B2 and B3 fractures. Tapered stems are a useful option in revision for femoral fracture across the spectrum of femoral bone deficiency. PMID:24187345

  19. Science of Nowcasting Olympic Weather for Vancouver 2010 (SNOW-V10): a World Weather Research Programme Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaac, G. A.; Joe, P. I.; Mailhot, J.; Bailey, M.; Bélair, S.; Boudala, F. S.; Brugman, M.; Campos, E.; Carpenter, R. L.; Crawford, R. W.; Cober, S. G.; Denis, B.; Doyle, C.; Reeves, H. D.; Gultepe, I.; Haiden, T.; Heckman, I.; Huang, L. X.; Milbrandt, J. A.; Mo, R.; Rasmussen, R. M.; Smith, T.; Stewart, R. E.; Wang, D.; Wilson, L. J.

    2014-01-01

    A World Weather Research Programme (WWRP) project entitled the Science of Nowcasting Olympic Weather for Vancouver 2010 (SNOW-V10) was developed to be associated with the Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games conducted between 12 February and 21 March 2010. The SNOW-V10 international team augmented the instrumentation associated with the Winter Games and several new numerical weather forecasting and nowcasting models were added. Both the additional observational and model data were available to the forecasters in real time. This was an excellent opportunity to demonstrate existing capability in nowcasting and to develop better techniques for short term (0-6 h) nowcasts of winter weather in complex terrain. Better techniques to forecast visibility, low cloud, wind gusts, precipitation rate and type were evaluated. The weather during the games was exceptionally variable with many periods of low visibility, low ceilings and precipitation in the form of both snow and rain. The data collected should improve our understanding of many physical phenomena such as the diabatic effects due to melting snow, wind flow around and over terrain, diurnal flow reversal in valleys associated with daytime heating, and precipitation reductions and increases due to local terrain. Many studies related to these phenomena are described in the Special Issue on SNOW-V10 for which this paper was written. Numerical weather prediction and nowcast models have been evaluated against the unique observational data set now available. It is anticipated that the data set and the knowledge learned as a result of SNOW-V10 will become a resource for other World Meteorological Organization member states who are interested in improving forecasts of winter weather.

  20. Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy in Ambulatory Patients with Type 2 Diabetes in a General Hospital in a Middle Income Country: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Lazo, María de los Angeles; Bernabé-Ortiz, Antonio; Pinto, Miguel E.; Ticse, Ray; Malaga, German; Sacksteder, Katherine; Miranda, J. Jaime; Gilman, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    Aim We aimed to estimate the morbidity rate and associated factors for diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) in a low-middle income country setting. Methods Cross-sectional study, data was gathered at Peru's Ministry of Health national specialized hospital for endocrinological conditions through standardized interviews, anthropometric measurements and blood tests for glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c). DPN was evaluated using two techniques: the Semmes-Weinstein monofilament test and the diabetic neuropathy symptom score. Overall prevalence and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated. Potential factors related to DPN explored included body mass index, years with disease (<10 vs. ≥10 years), glycaemic control (HbA1c <7% vs. ≥7%), microalbuminuria, retinopathy, and current pharmacological treatment. Multivariable analysis was performed using Poisson analysis to calculate prevalence ratios. Results DPN was observed in 73/129 (56.6%) patients. In multivariable analysis adjusted by age and sex, the prevalence ratio of neuropathy was 1.4 times higher (95% CI 1.07–1.88) in patients who took insulin plus metformin compared to patients who used one treatment alone, and 1.4 higher (95% CI 1.02–1.93) in patients with ≥10 years of disease compared to those with a shorter duration of disease. Also we found some characteristics in foot evaluation associated to neuropathy such as deformities (p<0.001), onychomycosis (p = 0.012), abnormal Achilles reflex (p<0.001), pain perception (p<0.001) and vibration perception (p<0.001). Conclusion DPN is highly frequent among patients with diabetes in a national specialized facility from Peru. Associated factors to DPN included being a diabetic patient for over ten years, and receiving insulin plus metformin PMID:24789071

  1. Simple interventions can greatly improve clinical documentation: a quality improvement project of record keeping on the surgical wards at a district general hospital.

    PubMed

    Glen, Peter; Earl, Naomi; Gooding, Felix; Lucas, Emily; Sangha, Nicole; Ramcharitar, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Clinical documentation is an integral part of the healthcare professional's job. Good record keeping is essential for patient care, accurate recording of consultations and for effective communication within the multidisciplinary team. Within the surgical department at the Great Western Hospital, Swindon, the case notes were deemed to be bulky and cumbersome, inhibiting effective record keeping, potentially putting patients' at risk. The aim of this quality improvement project was therefore to improve the standard of documentation, the labelling of notes and the overall filing. A baseline audit was firstly undertaken assessing the notes within the busiest surgical ward. A number of variables were assessed, but notably, only 12% (4/33) of the case notes were found to be without loose pages. Furthermore, less than half of the pages with entries written within the last 72 hours contained adequate patient identifiers on them. When assessing these entries further, the designation of the writer was only recorded in one third (11/33) of the cases, whilst the printed name of the writer was only recorded in 65% (21/33) of the entries. This project ran over a 10 month period, using a plan, do study, act methodology. Initial focus was on simple education. Afterwards, single admission folders were introduced, to contain only information required for that admission, in an attempt to streamline the notes and ease the filing. This saw a global improvement across all data subsets, with a sustained improvement of over 80% compliance seen. An educational poster was also created and displayed in clinical areas, to remind users to label their notes with patient identifying stickers. This saw a 4-fold increase (16%-68%) in the labelling of notes. In conclusion, simple, cost effective measures in streamlining medical notes, improves the quality of documentation, facilitates the filing and ultimately improves patient care. PMID:26734440

  2. Simple interventions can greatly improve clinical documentation: a quality improvement project of record keeping on the surgical wards at a district general hospital

    PubMed Central

    Glen, Peter; Earl, Naomi; Gooding, Felix; Lucas, Emily; Sangha, Nicole; Ramcharitar, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Clinical documentation is an integral part of the healthcare professional's job. Good record keeping is essential for patient care, accurate recording of consultations and for effective communication within the multidisciplinary team. Within the surgical department at the Great Western Hospital, Swindon, the case notes were deemed to be bulky and cumbersome, inhibiting effective record keeping, potentially putting patients' at risk. The aim of this quality improvement project was therefore to improve the standard of documentation, the labelling of notes and the overall filing. A baseline audit was firstly undertaken assessing the notes within the busiest surgical ward. A number of variables were assessed, but notably, only 12% (4/33) of the case notes were found to be without loose pages. Furthermore, less than half of the pages with entries written within the last 72 hours contained adequate patient identifiers on them. When assessing these entries further, the designation of the writer was only recorded in one third (11/33) of the cases, whilst the printed name of the writer was only recorded in 65% (21/33) of the entries. This project ran over a 10 month period, using a plan, do study, act methodology. Initial focus was on simple education. Afterwards, single admission folders were introduced, to contain only information required for that admission, in an attempt to streamline the notes and ease the filing. This saw a global improvement across all data subsets, with a sustained improvement of over 80% compliance seen. An educational poster was also created and displayed in clinical areas, to remind users to label their notes with patient identifying stickers. This saw a 4-fold increase (16%-68%) in the labelling of notes. In conclusion, simple, cost effective measures in streamlining medical notes, improves the quality of documentation, facilitates the filing and ultimately improves patient care. PMID:26734440

  3. [Collaboration between Fukushimura Brain Bank,based in a private geriatric hospital and a national/international network].

    PubMed

    Akatsu, Hiroyasu

    2010-10-01

    Fukushimura Brain Bank (FBB) was established in 1994, and to date, has accumulated 477 fresh frozen brain tissue samples. Our brain bank is based in Choju Medical Institute, Fukushimura Hospital, Toyohashi in Japan. At the time of its foundation, the institute could not establish working relationships with clinicopathological investigators and others engaged in basic neuroscience research. At this stage, we received the assistance of Yokohama City University in setting up standards for neuropathological diagnosis as well as the aid of Chiba University in establishing a method for Vancouver style snap-frozen sampling of brain tissue. However, both systems require considerable manpower and time. We now plan to introduce several improvements in these systems. At its inception, the Brain Bank operated without financial support from grants or foundation funding and was managed only as a hospital expense. However, since 1998, we have collaborated with researchers from several institutes, and the results of our labors have been presented at congresses, in journal publications and in foundation reports. In 2004, we obtained the status required to apply for a grant from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. Fukushimura Hospital is a geriatric institution that specializes in dementia. There are no other hospitals or nursing homes in the Toyohashi area that specialize in this field. Half of our patients have Alzheimer's disease,and a number of them have enormous plaques and huge neurofibrillary tangles patient for over 10 years. In general,private geriatric hospitals that care for such patients with severe AD lack the systems required for performing autopsies. Research carried out with animal models are not comparable with neuropathological and biochemical investigations using human tissues,and in terms of the quality,the range and size of our collection at FBB is unique. In the future,we intend to expand our network in order to share samples of interest,and to optimize the network by establishing similar sampling protocols and diagnostic standards. It is with great pleasure that we at the FBB look forward to our collaboration with the Comprehensive Brain Science. PMID:20940503

  4. 21 CFR 880.5120 - Manual adjustable hospital bed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Manual adjustable hospital bed. 880.5120 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital and Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5120 Manual adjustable hospital bed. (a) Identification. A manual...

  5. 21 CFR 880.5120 - Manual adjustable hospital bed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Manual adjustable hospital bed. 880.5120 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital and Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5120 Manual adjustable hospital bed. (a) Identification. A manual...

  6. 21 CFR 880.5120 - Manual adjustable hospital bed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manual adjustable hospital bed. 880.5120 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital and Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5120 Manual adjustable hospital bed. (a) Identification. A manual...

  7. 21 CFR 880.5120 - Manual adjustable hospital bed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Manual adjustable hospital bed. 880.5120 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital and Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5120 Manual adjustable hospital bed. (a) Identification. A manual...

  8. Use of general practice, diagnostic investigations and hospital services before and after cancer diagnosis - a population-based nationwide registry study of 127,000 incident adult cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Knowledge of patterns in cancer patients’ health care utilisation around the time of diagnosis may guide health care resource allocation and provide important insights into this groups’ demand for health care services. The health care need of patients with comorbid conditions far exceeds the oncology capacity and it is therefore important to elucidate the role of both primary and secondary care. The aim of this paper is to describe the use of health care services amongst incident cancer patients in Denmark one year before and one year after cancer diagnosis. Methods The present study is a national population-based case–control (1:10) registry study. All incident cancer patients (n = 127,210) diagnosed between 2001 and 2006 aged 40 years or older were identified in the Danish Cancer Registry. Data from national health registries were provided for all cancer patients and for 1,272,100 controls. Monthly consultation frequencies, monthly proportions of persons receiving health services and three-month incidence rate ratios for one year before and one year after the cancer diagnosis were calculated. Data were analysed separately for women and men. Results Three months before their diagnosis, cancer patients had twice as many general practitioner (GP) consultations, ten to eleven times more diagnostic investigations and five times more hospital contacts than the reference population. The demand for GP services peaked one month before diagnosis, the demand for diagnostic investigations one month after diagnosis and the number of hospital contacts three months after diagnosis. The proportion of cancer patients receiving each of these three types of health services remained more than 10% above that of the reference population from two months before diagnosis until the end of the study period. Conclusions Cancer patients’ health service utilisation rose dramatically three months before their diagnosis. This increase applied to all services in general throughout the first year after diagnosis and to the patients’ use of hospital contacts in particular. Cancer patients’ heightened demand for GP services one year after their diagnosis highlights the importance of close coordination and communication between the primary and the secondary healthcare sector. PMID:22838741

  9. Hospital structures guidelines for coping with snowstorms.

    PubMed

    Bander, K W

    1978-11-01

    When a snowstorm not only paralyzes a community but also isolates its hospital or hospitals, contingency plans and procedures ensure the effective administration and operation of a health care facility during the emergency. In retrospect, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, has developed specific policies, procedures, and mechanisms to identify and deal with logistical and organizational problems that MGH experienced during the 1978 blizzard. PMID:700621

  10. Academic Hospitality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phipps, Alison; Barnett, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    Academic hospitality is a feature of academic life. It takes many forms. It takes material form in the hosting of academics giving papers. It takes epistemological form in the welcome of new ideas. It takes linguistic form in the translation of academic work into other languages, and it takes touristic form through the welcome and generosity with

  11. Hospitality Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College of the Canyons, Valencia, CA.

    A project was conducted at College of the Canyons (Valencia, California) to initiate a new 2-year hospitality program with career options in hotel or restaurant management. A mail and telephone survey of area employers in the restaurant and hotel field demonstrated a need for, interest in, and willingness to provide internships for such a program.

  12. Oversight Hearing on the Reauthorization of the Higher Education Act of 1965: Vancouver, Washington. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Postsecondary Education of the Committee on Education and Labor. House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session (Vancouver, WA, May 13, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and Labor.

    One of 17 field hearings on the reauthorization of the Higher Education Act of 1965 occurred in Vancouver, Washington, with testimony provided by students, a parent, and educational administrators from the northwest region. The topic for the hearing was particular to the Act's Title IV which provides loans to students to enable them to attend the…

  13. Cost of Information Handling in Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Jydstrup, Ronald A.; Gross, Malvern J.

    1966-01-01

    Cost of information handling (noncomputerized) in hospitals was studied in detail from an industrial engineering point of view at Rochester General, Highland, and Geneva General hospitals. Activities were observed, personnel questioned, and time studies carried out. It was found that information handling comprises about one fourth of the hospitals' operating costa finding strongly recommending revision and streamlining of both forms and inefficient operations. In an Appendix to this study are presented 15 items that would improve information handling in one area of the hospital, nursing units, where this activity is greater than in any other in a hospital. PMID:5971636

  14. Single specialty hospitals and nurse staffing patterns.

    PubMed

    Carey, Kathleen; Burgess, James F; Young, Gary J

    2009-06-01

    Advocates of physician-owned single specialty hospitals (SSHs) maintain that, through healthy competition, SSHs pressure competitor hospitals in local markets to improve performance. This paper investigates data trends on the effects of SSH entry on a potential indicator of quality of care in general hospital competitors: nurse staffing levels. We examined registered nurse (RN) staffing from 1997 to 2004 in ten states in which there was considerable SSH entry during this period. Regression estimates used longitudinal panel data models with hospital fixed effects to compare changes in numbers of RNs in general hospitals located in markets with SSHs with general hospitals located in markets where there were no SSHs. Results indicate that hospitals located in markets with orthopedic/surgical SSH presence raised their RN nurse staffing levels. Whether or not these changes are associated with improved patient outcomes is unknown. PMID:19168683

  15. Correlated Paleoseismic Interpretation of Turbidites from 3 Distinct Sedimentary Environments in the Cascadia Subduction Zone Off Vancouver Island Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enkin, R. J.; Hamilton, T. S.; Rogers, G. C.

    2014-12-01

    Sedimentary sequences containing turbidites can provide important paleoseismic records. We present sedimentary records from 3 distinct sedimentary systems which provide a reliable well-dated paleseismic record. All 3 sites are subject to strong ground shaking in the event of a megathrust earthquake along the Cascadia Subduction Zone near Vancouver Island, Canada. Effingham Inlet is an anoxic fjord on the west coast of Vancouver Island with an age model based on radiocarbon dates from terrestrial plant material (no marine correction), the Mazama Ash, and sedimentation rates constrained by annual laminations [Dallimore et al. 2008, Enkin et al., 2013]. Barkley Canyon [Goldfinger et al., 2012], 150 km SW, has been sampled at the abyssal plain fan in front of a submarine canyon. Slipstream Slump [ms submitted], 40 km north of Barkley Canyon, is a well-preserved 3 km wide sedimentary failure from the frontal ridge of the Cascadia accretionary wedge. At Slipstream, given the 2300 m water depth and the thin weak crust at the outer edge of the accretionary wedge, megathrust earthquake shaking is the most likely trigger for the turbidity currents, with sediments sourced exclusively from the exposed slide scar. Correlations based on sedimentology and physical property logging are made between turbidites observed at Barkley Canyon and Slipstream Slump, and a mutually consistent age model is defined using only planktonic foraminiferal dates and Bayesian analysis with a Poisson-process sedimentation model. A young marine reservoir age of ΔR=0 yr brings the top to the present and produces age correlations consistent with the thickest (>10 cm) Effingham Inlet turbidites. Correlations of physical property logs tie the Effingham Inlet record to the offshore, despite the extreme differences in the sedimentology. Having good marine geophysical data and well positioned core transects allows the facies analysis needed to interpret the turbidite record. This study provides a much needed link between the marine and terrestrial paleoseismic records. The combined paleoseismic record has 10 turbidites between 10.8 and 6.6 ka, after which the offshore sites became sediment-starved and only 2 or 3 more turbidites were deposited. The recurrence interval for the inferred Early Holocene megathrust earthquakes is 460 ± 140 years.

  16. Toward a cardiovascular pathology training report on the forum held in Vancouver, March 6, 2004, Society for Cardiovascular Pathology.

    PubMed

    Thiene, Gaetano; Becker, Anton E; Buja, L Maximilian; Fallon, John T; McManus, Bruce M; Schoen, Frederick J; Winters, Gayle L

    2005-01-01

    Cardiovascular pathology is a subspecialty of anatomic pathology that requires both clinical education and expertise in contemporary physiopathology. The Society for Cardiovascular Pathology sponsored a special workshop within the frame of the USCAP Annual Meeting, held in Vancouver, March 6-12, 2004, to address the present and future role of cardiovascular pathology in research, clinical care, and education. Clearly, the recruitment and training of young pathologists are crucial to this aim. The forum tried to answer a series of questions. First, is there room for cardiovascular pathologists and clinicopathologic correlations in the era of extraordinary advances of in vivo human body imaging? What is the evolving role of the autopsy? How can the cardiovascular pathologist simultaneously be an autopsy prosector, a surgical pathologist, a molecular pathologist, and an experimental pathologist? Is there a specific domain content for training in cardiovascular pathology and does it meet the constellation of market needs and demands? What are the experiences in Europe, North America and elsewhere? What is the influence of cardiovascular pathology in departments of pathology? Is the subdiscipline still a Cinderella in the anatomic theatre or a Princess with a double helix coat of arms? The Society for Cardiovascular Pathology is strongly committed to optimizing the academic and professional profile of the future generation of cardiovascular pathologists. This article reports the outcome of the forum and directions that may lead to a vibrant future for well-trained cardiovascular pathologists. PMID:16286040

  17. Community mapping and respondent-driven sampling of gay and bisexual mens communities in Vancouver, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Forrest, Jamie I; Stevenson, Benjamin; Rich, Ashleigh; Michelow, Warren; Pai, Jayaram; Jollimore, Jody; Raymond, H. Fisher; Moore, David; Hogg, Robert S; Roth, Eric A

    2014-01-01

    Literature suggests formative research is vital for those using respondent-driven sampling (RDS) to study hidden populations of interest. However, few authors have described in detail how different qualitative methodologies can address the objectives of formative research for understanding the social network properties of the study population, selecting seeds, and adapting survey logistics to best fit the population. In this paper we describe the use of community mapping exercises as a tool within focus groups to collect data on social and sexual network characteristics of gay and bisexual men in the metropolitan area of Vancouver, Canada. Three key themes emerged from analyzing community maps along with other formative research data: (a) connections between physical spaces and social networks of gay and bisexual men, (b) diversity in communities, and (c) substance use connected with formation of sub-communities. We discuss how these themes informed the planning and operations of a longitudinal epidemiological cohort study recruited by RDS. We argue that using community mapping within formative research is a valuable qualitative tool for characterizing network structures of a diverse and differentiated population of gay and bisexual men in a highly developed urban setting. PMID:24512070

  18. Assimilation and High Resolution Forecasts of Surface and Near Surface Conditions for the 2010 Vancouver Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernier, Natacha B.; Blair, Stphane; Bilodeau, Bernard; Tong, Linying

    2014-01-01

    A dynamical model was experimentally implemented to provide high resolution forecasts at points of interests in the 2010 Vancouver Olympics and Paralympics Region. In a first experiment, GEM-Surf, the near surface and land surface modeling system, is driven by operational atmospheric forecasts and used to refine the surface forecasts according to local surface conditions such as elevation and vegetation type. In this simple form, temperature and snow depth forecasts are improved mainly as a result of the better representation of real elevation. In a second experiment, screen level observations and operational atmospheric forecasts are blended to drive a continuous cycle of near surface and land surface hindcasts. Hindcasts of the previous day conditions are then regarded as today's optimized initial conditions. Hence, in this experiment, given observations are available, observation driven hindcasts continuously ensure that daily forecasts are issued from improved initial conditions. GEM-Surf forecasts obtained from improved short-range hindcasts produced using these better conditions result in improved snow depth forecasts. In a third experiment, assimilation of snow depth data is applied to further optimize GEM-Surf's initial conditions, in addition to the use of blended observations and forecasts for forcing. Results show that snow depth and summer temperature forecasts are further improved by the addition of snow depth data assimilation.

  19. Substance use, sexual behaviour and prevention strategies of Vancouver gay and bisexual men who recently attended group sex events.

    PubMed

    Rich, Ashleigh J; Lachowsky, Nathan J; Cui, Zishan; Sereda, Paul; Lal, Allan; Birch, Robert; Montaner, Julio; Moore, David; Hogg, Robert S; Roth, Eric A

    2016-04-01

    Group sex events are an epidemiologically important part of some gay and bisexual men's sexual culture in Canada. Associated with condomless anal intercourse and polysubstance use, such events have been cited as disproportionally contributing to HIV infection rates. We analysed questionnaire data from the Momentum Health Study in Vancouver, Canada, to understand substance use, sexual behaviour, psychosocial variables (Sexual Sensation Seeking, Sexual Escape Motivation, Treatment Optimism) and HIV prevention strategies (sero-sorting, strategic positioning, avoiding anal sex, disclosure, treatment as prevention) of men attending such events, which were defined as group (n ≥ 4 partners) sex parties, blackout events and darkrooms. Analysis by multivariable logistic regression compared men attending group sex events within the past six months (n = 180) with non-attendees (n = 539). Results showed that attendees reported: (1) significantly higher use of sex drugs and alcohol consumption, (2) higher scores on the Sexual Sensation Scale, more anal sex partners, greater odds of any condomless anal sex with sero-discordant partners and greater odds of reporting fisting and sex toy use and (3) different prevention practices that varied by HIV-serostatus. Findings are interpreted in light of the importance of pleasure, sociality and HIV/STI prevention strategies associated with group sex events. Findings contribute to the development of appropriate education and intervention for attendees. PMID:26443295

  20. Medical Care Before and During the Winter Paralympic Games in Turin 2006, Vancouver 2010 and Sochi 2014

    PubMed Central

    Gawro?ski, Wojciech; Sobiecka, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Medical care in disabled sports is crucial both as prophylaxis and as ongoing medical intervention. The aim of this paper was to present changes in the quality of medical care over the consecutive Paralympic Games (PG). The study encompassed 31 paralympians: Turin (11), Vancouver (12), and Sochi (8) competing in cross-country skiing, alpine skiing, biathlon and snowboarding. The first, questionnaire-based, part of the study was conducted in Poland before the PG. The athletes assessed the quality of care provided by physicians, physiologists, dieticians, and physiotherapists, as well as their cooperation with the massage therapist and the psychologist. The other part of the study concerned the athletes health before leaving for the PG, as well as their diseases and injuries during the PG. The quality of medical care was poor before the 2006 PG, but satisfactory before the subsequent PG. Only few athletes made use of psychological support, assessing it as poor before the 2006 PG and satisfactory before the 2010 and 2014 PG. The athletes health condition was good during all PG. The health status of cross-country skiers was confirmed by a medical fitness certificate before all PG, while that of alpine skiers only before the 2014 PG. There were no serious diseases; training injuries precluded two athletes from participation. The quality of medical care before the PG was poor, however, became satisfactory during the actual PG. The resulting ad hoc pattern deviates from the accepted standards in medical care in disabled sports. PMID:26834868

  1. Medical Care Before and During the Winter Paralympic Games in Turin 2006, Vancouver 2010 and Sochi 2014.

    PubMed

    Gawro?ski, Wojciech; Sobiecka, Joanna

    2015-11-22

    Medical care in disabled sports is crucial both as prophylaxis and as ongoing medical intervention. The aim of this paper was to present changes in the quality of medical care over the consecutive Paralympic Games (PG). The study encompassed 31 paralympians: Turin (11), Vancouver (12), and Sochi (8) competing in cross-country skiing, alpine skiing, biathlon and snowboarding. The first, questionnaire-based, part of the study was conducted in Poland before the PG. The athletes assessed the quality of care provided by physicians, physiologists, dieticians, and physiotherapists, as well as their cooperation with the massage therapist and the psychologist. The other part of the study concerned the athletes' health before leaving for the PG, as well as their diseases and injuries during the PG. The quality of medical care was poor before the 2006 PG, but satisfactory before the subsequent PG. Only few athletes made use of psychological support, assessing it as poor before the 2006 PG and satisfactory before the 2010 and 2014 PG. The athletes' health condition was good during all PG. The health status of cross-country skiers was confirmed by a medical fitness certificate before all PG, while that of alpine skiers only before the 2014 PG. There were no serious diseases; training injuries precluded two athletes from participation. The quality of medical care before the PG was poor, however, became satisfactory during the actual PG. The resulting ad hoc pattern deviates from the accepted standards in medical care in disabled sports. PMID:26834868

  2. Occurrence and characterization of Listeria spp. in ready-to-eat retail foods from Vancouver, British Columbia.

    PubMed

    Kovačević, Jovana; Mesak, Lili R; Allen, Kevin J

    2012-06-01

    The occurrence of Listeria spp. and Listeria monocytogenes in retail RTE meat and fish products in Vancouver, British Columbia (B.C.) was investigated. To assess potential consumer health risk, recovered L. monocytogenes isolates were subjected to genotypic and phenotypic characterization. Conventional methods were used to recover Listeria spp. from deli meat (n = 40) and fish (n = 40) samples collected from 17 stores. Listeria spp. were recovered only from fish samples (20%); 5% harboured Listeria innocua, 5% had L. monocytogenes and 10% contained Listeria welshimeri. L. monocytogenes isolates serotyped as 1/2a and 1/2b, possessed dissimilar PFGE patterns, and had full-length InlA. Three 1/2a clonal isolates encoded the 50 kb genomic island, LGI1. Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) profiling showed all Listeria spp. possessed resistance to cefoxitin and nalidixic acid. L. monocytogenes were resistant to clindamycin, two were resistant to streptomycin, and one to amikacin. Reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin was seen in all L. monocytogenes, L. innocua and three L. welshimeri isolates. Reduced susceptibility to amikacin and chloramphenicol was also observed in one L. monocytogenes and three L. welshimeri isolates, respectively. Recovery of L. monocytogenes in fish samples possessing AMR, full-length InlA, LGI1, and serotypes frequently associated with listeriosis suggest B.C. consumers are exposed to high-risk strains. PMID:22365350

  3. Occurrence and characterization of Listeria spp. in ready-to-eat retail foods from Vancouver, British Columbia.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Kovačević J; Mesak LR; Allen KJ

    2012-06-01

    The occurrence of Listeria spp. and Listeria monocytogenes in retail RTE meat and fish products in Vancouver, British Columbia (B.C.) was investigated. To assess potential consumer health risk, recovered L. monocytogenes isolates were subjected to genotypic and phenotypic characterization. Conventional methods were used to recover Listeria spp. from deli meat (n = 40) and fish (n = 40) samples collected from 17 stores. Listeria spp. were recovered only from fish samples (20%); 5% harboured Listeria innocua, 5% had L. monocytogenes and 10% contained Listeria welshimeri. L. monocytogenes isolates serotyped as 1/2a and 1/2b, possessed dissimilar PFGE patterns, and had full-length InlA. Three 1/2a clonal isolates encoded the 50 kb genomic island, LGI1. Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) profiling showed all Listeria spp. possessed resistance to cefoxitin and nalidixic acid. L. monocytogenes were resistant to clindamycin, two were resistant to streptomycin, and one to amikacin. Reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin was seen in all L. monocytogenes, L. innocua and three L. welshimeri isolates. Reduced susceptibility to amikacin and chloramphenicol was also observed in one L. monocytogenes and three L. welshimeri isolates, respectively. Recovery of L. monocytogenes in fish samples possessing AMR, full-length InlA, LGI1, and serotypes frequently associated with listeriosis suggest B.C. consumers are exposed to high-risk strains.

  4. Siliceous microfossil record of late Holocene oceanography and climate along the west coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia (Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hay, Murray B.; Dallimore, Audrey; Thomson, Richard E.; Calvert, Stephen E.; Pienitz, Reinhard

    2007-01-01

    Diatoms, silicoflagellates, and biogenic silica (BSi) were analyzed from two piston cores recovered from Effingham Inlet, British Columbia. Relatively productive marine conditions from 4850 to 4000 cal yr BP were followed by a transition to the modern ocean-climate regime marked by a decreased siliceous microfossil production since 2800 cal yr BP. This change in the northeast Pacific climate was characterized by an apparent cooling associated with higher rainfall and lower light levels. The reduced abundance of most spring-summer bloom diatom taxa ( Skeletonema-Thalassiosira-Chaetoceros) was coupled with a decreased abundance of diatoms normally associated with incursions of offshore water into coastal inlets. This pattern reflected a weaker summer upwelling along Vancouver Island associated with the insolation-related increase in the strength of the Aleutian Low and a weakened North Pacific High. After ca. 2800 cal yr BP, diatom assemblages also indicated more frequent periods of relatively low spring-summer surface water salinity and a disruption of the typical bloom sequence, indicative of increased climatic variability. A period of warmer and drier climate conditions and possibly increased coastal upwelling offshore occurred ca. 1450-1050 cal yr BP. The most recent 500 yr are marked by reduced diatom production and the appearance of three distinct diatom biomarkers in the stratigraphic record ( Rhizosolenia setigera ca. AD 1940; Minidiscus chilensis ca. AD 1860; Thalassionema nitzschioides morphotype A, ca. AD 1550). The oceanographic changes recorded in Effingham Inlet are correlative with other marine and terrestrial paleoenvironmental records in the northeast Pacific Ocean.

  5. Setting the stage for chronic health problems: cumulative childhood adversity among homeless adults with mental illness in Vancouver, British Columbia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background It is well documented that childhood abuse, neglect and household dysfunction are disproportionately present in the backgrounds of homeless adults, and that these experiences adversely impact child development and a wide range of adult outcomes. However, few studies have examined the cumulative impact of adverse childhood experiences on homeless adults with mental illness. This study examines adverse events in childhood as predictors of duration of homelessness, psychiatric and substance use disorders, and physical health in a sample of homeless adults with mental illness. Methods This study was conducted using baseline data from a randomized controlled trial in Vancouver, British Columbia for participants who completed the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) scale at 18 months follow-up (n = 364). Primary outcomes included current mental disorders; substance use including type, frequency and severity; physical health; duration of homelessness; and vocational functioning. Results In multivariable regression models, ACE total score independently predicted a range of mental health, physical health, and substance use problems, and marginally predicted duration of homelessness. Conclusions Adverse childhood experiences are overrepresented among homeless adults with complex comorbidities and chronic homelessness. Our findings are consistent with a growing body of literature indicating that childhood traumas are potent risk factors for a number of adult health and psychiatric problems, particularly substance use problems. Results are discussed in the context of cumulative adversity and self-trauma theory. Trials registration This trial has been registered with the International Standard Randomized Control Trial Number Register and assigned ISRCTN42520374. PMID:24726046

  6. The Impact of Weather Forecasts of Various Lead Times on Snowmaking Decisions Made for the 2010 Vancouver Olympic Winter Games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Chris

    2014-01-01

    The Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics were held from 12 to 28 February 2010, and the Paralympic events followed 2 weeks later. During the Games, the weather posed a grave threat to the viability of one venue and created significant complications for the event schedule at others. Forecasts of weather with lead times ranging from minutes to days helped organizers minimize disruptions to sporting events and helped ensure all medal events were successfully completed. Of comparable importance, however, were the scenarios and forecasts of probable weather for the winter in advance of the Games. Forecasts of mild conditions at the time of the Games helped the Games' organizers mitigate what would have been very serious potential consequences for at least one venue. Snowmaking was one strategy employed well in advance of the Games to prepare for the expected conditions. This short study will focus on how operational decisions were made by the Games' organizers on the basis of both climatological and snowmaking forecasts during the pre-Games winter. An attempt will be made to quantify, economically, the value of some of the snowmaking forecasts made for the Games' operators. The results obtained indicate that although the economic value of the snowmaking forecast was difficult to determine, the Games' organizers valued the forecast information greatly. This suggests that further development of probabilistic forecasts for applications like pre-Games snowmaking would be worthwhile.

  7. Condom use as situated in a risk context: women's experiences in the massage parlour industry in Vancouver, Canada.

    PubMed

    Handlovsky, Ingrid; Bungay, Vicky; Kolar, Kat

    2012-10-01

    Investigation into condom use in sex work has aroused interest in health promotion and illness prevention. Yet there remains a dearth of inquiry into condom use practices in the indoor sex industry, particularly in North America. We performed a thematic analysis of one aspect of the indoor sex work by drawing on data from a larger mixed-methods study that investigated women's health issues in the massage parlour industry in Vancouver, Canada. Using a risk context framework, condom use was approached as a socially situated practice constituted by supportive and constraining dynamics. Three analytic categories were identified: (1) the process of condom negotiation, (2) the availability of condoms and accessibility to information on STI and (3) financial vulnerability. Within these categories, several supportive dynamics (industry experience and personal ingenuity) and constraining dynamics (lack of agency support, client preferences, limited language proficiency and the legal system) were explored as interfacing influences on condom use. Initiatives to encourage condom use must recognise the role of context in order to more effectively support the health-promoting efforts of women in sex work. PMID:22900640

  8. Hospitals as a `risk environment: An ethno-epidemiological study of voluntary and involuntary discharge from hospital against medical advice among people who inject drugs

    PubMed Central

    McNeil, Ryan; Small, Will; Wood, Evan; Kerr, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    People who inject drugs (PWID) experience high levels of HIV/AIDS and hepatitis C (HCV) infection that, together with injection-related complications such as non-fatal overdose and injection-related infections, lead to frequent hospitalizations. However, injection drug-using populations are among those most likely to be discharged from hospital against medical advice, which significantly increases their likelihood of hospital readmission, longer overall hospital stays, and death. In spite of this, little research has been undertaken examining how social-structural forces operating within hospital settings shape the experiences of PWID in receiving care in hospitals and contribute to discharges against medical advice. This ethno-epidemiological study was undertaken in Vancouver, Canada to explore how the social-structural dynamics within hospitals function to produce discharges against medical advice among PWID. In-depth interviews were conducted with thirty PWID recruited from among participants in ongoing observational cohort studies of people who inject drugs who reported that they had been discharged from hospital against medical advice within the previous two years. Data were analyzed thematically, and by drawing on the `Risk Environment' framework and concepts of social violence. Our findings illustrate how intersecting social and structural factors led to inadequate pain and withdrawal management, which led to continued drug use in hospital settings. In turn, diverse forms of social control operating to regulate and prevent drug use in hospital settings amplified drug-related risks and increased the likelihood of discharge against medical advice. Given the significant morbidity and health care costs associated with discharge against medical advice among drug-using populations, there is an urgent need to reshape the social-structural contexts of hospital care for PWID by shifting emphasis toward evidence-based pain and drug treatment augmented by harm reduction supports, including supervised drug consumption services. PMID:24508718

  9. Conceptual Change and Killer Whales: Constructing Ecological Values for Animals at the Vancouver Aquarium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelsey, Elin

    1991-01-01

    Examines how the aquarium has attempted to move from a transfer view of knowledge to a constructivist approach in its most popular general public program--the killer whale presentation. The process of change that staff underwent is similar to conceptual change processes among learners of science. Describes constructivist strategies of conceptual

  10. Conceptual Change and Killer Whales: Constructing Ecological Values for Animals at the Vancouver Aquarium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelsey, Elin

    1991-01-01

    Examines how the aquarium has attempted to move from a transfer view of knowledge to a constructivist approach in its most popular general public program--the killer whale presentation. The process of change that staff underwent is similar to conceptual change processes among learners of science. Describes constructivist strategies of conceptual…

  11. Cost characteristics of hospitals.

    PubMed

    Smet, Mike

    2002-09-01

    Modern hospitals are complex multi-product organisations. The analysis of a hospital's production and/or cost structure should therefore use the appropriate techniques. Flexible functional forms based on the neo-classical theory of the firm seem to be most suitable. Using neo-classical cost functions implicitly assumes minimisation of (variable) costs given that input prices and outputs are exogenous. Local and global properties of flexible functional forms and short-run versus long-run equilibrium are further issues that require thorough investigation. In order to put the results based on econometric estimations of cost functions in the right perspective, it is important to keep these considerations in mind when using flexible functional forms. The more recent studies seem to agree that hospitals generally do not operate in their long-run equilibrium (they tend to over-invest in capital (capacity and equipment)) and that it is therefore appropriate to estimate a short-run variable cost function. However, few studies explicitly take into account the implicit assumptions and restrictions embedded in the models they use. An alternative method to explain differences in costs uses management accounting techniques to identify the cost drivers of overhead costs. Related issues such as cost-shifting and cost-adjusting behaviour of hospitals and the influence of market structure on competition, prices and costs are also discussed shortly. PMID:12220092

  12. [Hospital discharge summary (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Escorihuela, R; Quero, J; Arbelo Curbelo, A; Rubio, D; Prez Rodrguez, J; Escriv, R M; Lpez De Letona, A A

    1976-01-01

    A form to fill up, hospital discharge summary is presented. Main characteristics are: special framework, shortness and conciseness. It can be filled up since patient is admitted to hospital on the base of problem oriented medical record. Quantity and quality of information has been favourably evaluated either by our own medical staff or general pediatrician who watches out for baby after hospital discharge. In 84% of patients it was given at the same moment of discharge and before two weeks for the rest. It's time and work saving and from the point of view of education has been considered very useful for both author and reader. PMID:942135

  13. Calibration of a TLD-100 powder dosimetric system to verify the absorbed dose to water imparted by 137Cs sources in low dose rate brachytherapy at the oncology unit in the Hospital General de Mexico.

    PubMed

    Alvarez Romero, J T; Tovar Muñoz, V M; de León, B Salinas; Oviedo, J O Hernández; Barcenas, L Santillán; Milo, C Molero; Monterrubio, J Montoya

    2006-01-01

    A thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) system was characterised at SSDL-ININ to verify the air-kerma strength (S(K)) and dose-to-water (D(W)) values for (137)Cs sources used in low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy treatments at the Hospital General de Mexico (HGM). It consists of a Harshaw 3500 reader and a set of TLD-100 powder capsules. The samples of TLD-100 powder were calibrated in terms of D(W) vs. nC or nC mg(-1), and their dose response curves were corrected for supralinearity. The D(W) was calculated using the AAPM TG-43 formalism using S(K) for a CDCSM4 (137)Cs reference source. The S(K) value was obtained by using a NE 2611 chamber, and with two well chambers. The angular anisotropy factor was measured with the NE 2611 chamber for this source. The HGM irradiated TLD-100 powder capsules to a reference dose D(W) of 2 Gy with their (137)Cs sources. The percent deviations between the imparted and reference doses were 1.2% < or = Delta < or = 6.5%, which are consistent with the combined uncertainties: 5.6% < or = u(c) < or = 9.8% for D(W). PMID:16644958

  14. Outcome of late second trimester emergency cerclage in patients with advanced cervical dilatation with bulging amniotic membranes: a report of six cases managed at the douala general hospital, cameroon.

    PubMed

    Egbe, Thomas Obinchemti; Nana Njamen, Theophile; Halle Ekane, Gregory; Tsingaing, Jacques Kamgaing; Tchente, Charlotte Nguefack; Beyiha, Gerard; Barla, Esther; Nyemb, Ernest

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To show the feasibility of emergency late second trimester cerclage with advanced cervical dilatation and bulging of amniotic membranes. Setting. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology of the Douala General Hospital. Method. This is a retrospective study of case files of patients who underwent emergency late second trimester cerclage with advanced cervical dilatation, some with bulging of fetal membranes between June 2003 and June 2010. The modified Shirodkar technique was employed in all the cases. Results. Altogether, six patients (100%) underwent late second trimester cervical cerclage between 24 and 26 weeks of gestational age. Four cases (66.7%) carried on their pregnancies to term that resulted in healthy live-born babies all delivered vaginally. The other two cases (33.3%) presented with preterm premature rupture of fetal membranes (PPROM) which led us to undo the stitch with eventual delivery of live-born premature fetuses which died in the neonatal intensive care unit because of complications of prematurity and neonatal infection. Conclusion. In experienced hands and in the absence of other risk factors like infection, the success rates of this procedure are encouraging with improved prognosis. Finally, the modified Shirodkar technique yielded excellent results in our series. PMID:24371527

  15. Outcome of Late Second Trimester Emergency Cerclage in Patients with Advanced Cervical Dilatation with Bulging Amniotic Membranes: A Report of Six Cases Managed at the Douala General Hospital, Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Egbe, Thomas Obinchemti; Nana Njamen, Theophile; Halle Ekane, Gregory; Tsingaing, Jacques Kamgaing; Tchente, Charlotte Nguefack; Beyiha, Gerard; Barla, Esther; Nyemb, Ernest

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To show the feasibility of emergency late second trimester cerclage with advanced cervical dilatation and bulging of amniotic membranes. Setting. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology of the Douala General Hospital. Method. This is a retrospective study of case files of patients who underwent emergency late second trimester cerclage with advanced cervical dilatation, some with bulging of fetal membranes between June 2003 and June 2010. The modified Shirodkar technique was employed in all the cases. Results. Altogether, six patients (100%) underwent late second trimester cervical cerclage between 24 and 26 weeks of gestational age. Four cases (66.7%) carried on their pregnancies to term that resulted in healthy live-born babies all delivered vaginally. The other two cases (33.3%) presented with preterm premature rupture of fetal membranes (PPROM) which led us to undo the stitch with eventual delivery of live-born premature fetuses which died in the neonatal intensive care unit because of complications of prematurity and neonatal infection. Conclusion. In experienced hands and in the absence of other risk factors like infection, the success rates of this procedure are encouraging with improved prognosis. Finally, the modified Shirodkar technique yielded excellent results in our series. PMID:24371527

  16. Use of specialty hospitals by Medicare beneficiaries, 1985

    PubMed Central

    Helbing, Charles; Latta, Viola B.

    1988-01-01

    Information is provided on the use and cost of inpatient services for Medicare beneficiaries discharged from participating specialty hospitals during 1985. Specialty hospitals include: psychiatric, general long-term, rehabilitation, children's, alcohol and drug, and Christian Science sanatoriums. Specialty units of short-stay hospitals are not included in the specialty hospital data presented in this article. PMID:10312520

  17. 14. Photographic copy of historic photograph, Portsmouth Naval Hospital Building, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Photographic copy of historic photograph, Portsmouth Naval Hospital Building, view from Hospital Point, 23 March 1901. (Portsmouth Naval Shipyard Museum, Portsmouth, VA) - Portsmouth Naval Hospital, Bounded by Elizabeth River, Crawford Street, Portsmouth General Hospital, Parkview Avenue, & Scotts Creek, Portsmouth, Portsmouth, VA

  18. 23. Photographic copy of historic photograph, view of the hospital ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Photographic copy of historic photograph, view of the hospital complex grounds to the east, showing World War I emergency buildings behind the Portsmouth Naval Hospital Building, 29 November 1918. (Portsmouth Naval Shipyard Museum, Portsmouth, VA) - Portsmouth Naval Hospital, Bounded by Elizabeth River, Crawford Street, Portsmouth General Hospital, Parkview Avenue, & Scotts Creek, Portsmouth, Portsmouth, VA

  19. 22. Photographic copy of historic photograph, view of the hospital ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Photographic copy of historic photograph, view of the hospital complex grounds to the west, showing World War I emergency buildings behind the Portsmouth Naval Hospital Building, 14 November 1918. (Portsmouth Naval Shipyard Museum, Portsmouth, VA) - Portsmouth Naval Hospital, Bounded by Elizabeth River, Crawford Street, Portsmouth General Hospital, Parkview Avenue, & Scotts Creek, Portsmouth, Portsmouth, VA

  20. 11. Hospital Point, view to southwest from southeast bulkhead; background ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Hospital Point, view to southwest from southeast bulkhead; background left to right: 1960 high-rise hospital, Medical Officer's Quarters B, and Medical Officer's Quarters C - Portsmouth Naval Hospital, Bounded by Elizabeth River, Crawford Street, Portsmouth General Hospital, Parkview Avenue, & Scotts Creek, Portsmouth, Portsmouth, VA