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Sample records for vancouver general hospital

  1. Screening, detecting and enhancing the yield of previously undiagnosed hepatitis B and C in patients with acute medical admissions to hospital: A pilot project undertaken at the Vancouver General Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Kapeluto, Jordanna E; Kadatz, Matthew; Wormsbecker, Andrew; Sidhu, Kiran; Yoshida, Eric M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) represent an increasing health burden and morbidity in Canada. Viral hepatitis, specifically HCV, has high prevalence among persons born between 1945 and 1965, with 45% to 85% of infected adults asymptomatic and unaware of their infection. Screening has been shown to be cost effective in the detection and treatment of viral hepatitis. OBJECTIVE: To quantify incidence and identify undocumented HBV and HCV infection in hospitalized patients at a single centre with secondary analysis of risk factors as part of a quality improvement initiative. METHODS: A one-time antibody test was conducted in patients admitted to the acute medicine and gastroenterology services. RESULTS: Over a 12-week period, hospital screening for HBV and HCV was performed in 37.3% of 995 admitted patients. There was identification of 15 previously undiagnosed cases of HCV (4%) and 36 undocumented cases of occult (ie, antihepatitis B core antigen seropositive) or active (ie, hepatitis B surface antigen seropositive) HBV (9.7%). Among patients with positive screens, 60% of seropositive HCV patients had no identifiable risk factors. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of HBV and HCV infection among hospitalized patients in Vancouver was higher than that of the general population. Risk factors for contraction are often not identified. These results can be used as part of an ongoing discussion regarding a ‘seek and treat’ approach to the detection and treatment of chronic blood-borne viral illnesses. PMID:24945186

  2. Asthma attack periodicity: A study of hospital emergency visits in Vancouver

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, D.V.; Baker-Anderson, M.; Sizto, R. )

    1990-02-01

    Attendances at the emergency departments of the nine acute care hospitals serving the Vancouver region, with a population of just under a million people, were recorded from July 1, 1984 to October 31, 1986. Of about 25,500 visits a month, 2.7% were for respiratory conditions; and of these, 41.3% were for asthma. Data from 11 air monitoring stations were also tabulated on a daily basis, giving mean maximal hourly values for SO2, NO2, and O3; daily aerosol sulfate measurements from one station were also analyzed, together with daily temperature data and measurements of the coefficient of haze. In 3 consecutive years, a peak in asthma attendances was noted, starting in the last week of September, and continuing for 3 weeks. In these periods, weekly visits for asthma reached 130 patients; during the rest of the year, the weekly visits for asthma varied between 30 and 90. This peak affected children and adults between the ages of 15 and 60, but no increase was seen in those over 60 years. Although pollution levels increased sharply in the fall, a day-by-day analysis showed that the rise in asthma attendances preceded the increase in NO chi and SO2 levels for the region, expressed as the mean of the hourly maxima across all stations. It seems unlikely that a specific pollen is responsible for this, or that house mite replication is the cause. Soya beans are not shipped out of Vancouver. The cause of the peak has not been identified. Variations in emergency visits by day of the week have been recorded; in children and in those aged 15-60, more visits occur on Sundays than on other days, but this does not occur in those over 60. Intercorrelations between environmental variables and emergency visits have been calculated separately for the periods May 1 to October 31, and November 1 to April 30.

  3. [General coordination of hospital activity].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Paz; Serra, José Antonio

    2005-03-01

    The present article describes the organizational and general coordination measures taken by the hospital management to attend the 325 victims who arrived at our hospital after the terrorist attack on the morning of 11 March. Firstly, we summarize the activity performed by the extra-hospital emergency services and the distribution of the victims in centers. Secondly, we describe in greater detail the interventions performed to initiate the External Emergency Action Plan in our hospital, the triage system and identification of patients who used it, as well as the resources in terms of beds, operating rooms and personnel that were used on that day. Lastly, by way of discussion, we provide a critical analysis of our interventions. PMID:15771833

  4. Factors Associated with Leaving Hospital against Medical Advice among People Who Use Illicit Drugs in Vancouver, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Ti, Lianping; Milloy, M-J; Buxton, Jane; McNeil, Ryan; Dobrer, Sabina; Hayashi, Kanna; Wood, Evan; Kerr, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background Leaving hospital against medical advice (AMA) is common among people who use illicit drugs (PWUD) and is associated with severe health-related harms and costs. However, little is known about the prevalence of and factors associated with leaving AMA among PWUD. Methods Data were collected through two Canadian prospective cohort studies involving PWUD between September 2005 and July 2011 and linked to a hospital admission/discharge database. Bivariable and multivariable generalized estimating equations were used to examine factors associated with leaving hospital AMA among PWUD who were hospitalized. Results Among 488 participants who experienced at least one hospitalization, 212 (43.4%) left the hospital AMA at least once during the study period. In multivariable analyses, factors positively and significantly associated with leaving hospital AMA included: unstable employment (AOR = 1.92; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.22–3.03); recent incarceration (AOR = 1.63; 95%CI: 1.07–2.49); ≥ daily heroin injection (AOR = 1.49; 95%CI: 1.05–2.11); and younger age per year younger (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.04; 95%CI: 1.02–1.06). Conclusions We found a substantial proportion of PWUD in this setting left hospital AMA and that various markers of risk and vulnerability were associated with this phenomenon. Our findings highlight the need to address substance abuse issues early following hospital admission. These findings further suggest a need to develop novel interventions to minimize PWUD leaving hospital prematurely. PMID:26509447

  5. 3. Hospital Point, general view toward Portsmouth Naval Hospital Building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Hospital Point, general view toward Portsmouth Naval Hospital Building showing cannon (at left) and Saunders Monument (at right in distance), view to southwest - Portsmouth Naval Hospital, Bounded by Elizabeth River, Crawford Street, Portsmouth General Hospital, Parkview Avenue, & Scotts Creek, Portsmouth, Portsmouth, VA

  6. [Family and psychiatric hospitalization in a general hospital].

    PubMed

    de Mello, Rita Mello; Schneider, Jac Fernando

    2011-06-01

    This study aims to identify the reasons that lead relatives to hospitalize patients in a psychiatric unit of a general hospital. It is a qualitative study based on Alfred Schutz' phenomenological sociology. Fourteen relatives, each with one family member hospitalized, were interviewed from August to October 2009. The guiding question of the phenomenological interview was "What do you expect from psychiatric hospitalization in a general hospital?". Phenomenological sociology was used to understand and interpret the interviews. Statements showed three concrete categories, that lead to the reasons for: treatment guidelines and continuity; prospects for improvement; ideas about normality. This research shows the experiences of relatives, contributing with mental health professionals' reflection about their actions and about the involvement of families in a general hospital's psychiatric unit. PMID:21987981

  7. Examining General Hospitals' Smoke-Free Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitman, Marilyn V.; Harbison, Phillip Adam

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to examine the level of smoke-free policies in general hospitals and the barriers faced in implementing restrictive policies banning smoking inside buildings and on surrounding grounds. Design/methodology/approach; A survey was developed to gather data on hospitals' current smoke-free policies, including the challenges…

  8. 7. Hospital Point, general view from steps of the Portsmouth ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Hospital Point, general view from steps of the Portsmouth Naval Hospital Building showing radiating walks, view to northeast - Portsmouth Naval Hospital, Bounded by Elizabeth River, Crawford Street, Portsmouth General Hospital, Parkview Avenue, & Scotts Creek, Portsmouth, Portsmouth, VA

  9. Hospital Web site 'tops' in Louisiana. Hospital PR, marketing group cites East Jefferson General Hospital.

    PubMed

    Rees, Tom

    2002-01-01

    East Jefferson General Hospital in Metairie, La., launched a new Web site in October 2001. Its user-friendly home page offers links to hospital services, medical staff, and employer information. Its jobline is a powerful tool for recruitment. The site was awarded the 2002 Pelican Award for Best Consumer Web site by the Louisiana Society for Hospital Public Relations & Marketing. PMID:12238238

  10. Acute Gout in Hospitalized patients in Sarawak General Hospital.

    PubMed

    Teh, C L; Chew, K F; Ling, G R

    2014-06-01

    we performed a prospective study of all hospitalized patients with a diagnosis of Gout in Sarawak General hospital from 1st July 2011 to 1st July 2012. There were a total of 126 patients in our study of which 112 (88.9%) were males. The majority of our patients were from the indigenous populations (71.7%). They have a mean age of 60.0 ± 14.2 years. Most of our patients were overweight (68%) with comorbities of hypertension (78.6%), Chronic Kidney Failure (48.4%), Type II diabetes Mellitus (30.2%), dyslipidemia (27.8%) and Ischaemic heart disease (11.9%). Polyarticular gouty arthritis was the main presenting pattern during hospitalization (88.1%). The mean length of stay for our patients was 9.8 ± 6.0 days which was significantly longer than the mean length of stay for other patients without gout (p<0.05). Only 17 patients had gout on admission and the majority developed gout during hospitalizations. Our patients were admitted respectively for medical problems (45.4%), surgical problems (28.6%) and orthopaedic problems (9.2%). Colchicine (73.8%) and steroid (40.5%) were the main stays of treatment for our patients. Our hospitalized gout patients were complicated patients with multiple comorbidities. PMID:25326353

  11. 3. General view of site from Lawrence General Hospital parking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. General view of site from Lawrence General Hospital parking deck (former location of coating mill) showing north side of structures; view to southeast. - Champion-International Paper Company, West bank of Spicket River at Canal Street, Lawrence, Essex County, MA

  12. Tourism, Tolerance, or Hospitality? An Assessment of a Native/Non-Native, Urban/Rural Youth Exchange Program between Fort Good Hope, NWT, and East Vancouver, BC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hern, Matt

    2009-01-01

    This article considers and assesses a youth exchange project between two community-based youth centers: The Purple Thistle Centre in East Vancouver, British Columbia, and the K'asho Got'ine Youth Centre in Fort Good Hope, Northwest Territories. Both centers serve primarily low-income youth, but after that the similarities are very few. The…

  13. Tourism, Tolerance, or Hospitality? An Assessment of a Native/Non-Native, Urban/Rural Youth Exchange Program between Fort Good Hope, NWT, and East Vancouver, BC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hern, Matt

    2009-01-01

    This article considers and assesses a youth exchange project between two community-based youth centers: The Purple Thistle Centre in East Vancouver, British Columbia, and the K'asho Got'ine Youth Centre in Fort Good Hope, Northwest Territories. Both centers serve primarily low-income youth, but after that the similarities are very few. The

  14. Psychiatric inpatient services in general hospitals.

    PubMed

    HUME, P B; RUDIN, E

    1960-10-01

    Traditional asylum care of psychiatric patients leads to the isolation, confinement, and restraint of the patients, and to isolation of psychiatric practice from the rest of medicine. Modern psychiatric advances have demonstrated the disadvantages to both patients and their families of such isolation, confinement and restraint. It is in the best interests of patients and professional workers that inpatient psychiatric services be continuous with, and contiguous to, other medical services and to rehabilitation services of all kinds. Examination of currently available information reveals a shortage of psychiatric beds in California, particularly for diagnosis and brief treatment. Thus, not only is there a need to develop psychiatric inpatient facilities, but also an opportunity to develop them along several different lines. Since both the Hill-Burton Act (federal) and the Short-Doyle Act (state) give financial assistance to only those psychiatric services established in general hospitals or affiliated with general hospitals, this requirement calls for examination in the light of experience with services so operated. At first, the Short-Doyle Act was perceived as a panacea for the psychiatric ills of the state. Now it is beginning to be recognized as one method of providing additional mental health resources, rather than the exclusive method. As more short-term cases are treated in local, tax-supported, psychiatric units in general hospitals, an impact can be expected on the state hospital program. In its administration of the Short-Doyle Act, the Department of Mental Hygiene attempts to respond to community needs as locally determined. It tries to insure local option and encourage local responsibility while furthering high standards of staffing and of service. PMID:13716797

  15. The General Hospital Colombo Rehabilitation Project.

    PubMed

    Jayasuriya, L

    1992-12-01

    The General Hospital Colombo (GHC) Rehabilitation Project was to be implemented in 6 phases in about 25 years. The proposed funding was a grant of 100% from Finland for technical assistance and training, and 85% for investments. The development objective was to reinforce the status of the hospital as the apex of the medical care system. In Phase I (1985-1990) an 8 storeyed accident and orthopaedic services building with modern facilities has been commissioned. A water tower and a 'septic' operating theatre have been built. Infection control and maintenance organizations have been started. Phase I cost Rs.960 million. In the Bridging Phase, the existing six storeyed building is being renovated. Phase II has been drastically curtailed. It will concentrate on infrastructure development such as water supply, kitchen, stores and transport, and the construction of four new medical wards. The project will end in 1993. PMID:1486647

  16. Depression among general hospital patients in Greece.

    PubMed

    Lykouras, E; Loannidis, C; Voulgari, A; Jemos, J; Tzonou, A

    1989-02-01

    We estimated the prevalence of depression in 150 medical and surgical inpatients. Forty-three patients (29%) scoring at 14 or above on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) were classified as depressed. An excess of women and white-collar workers and more stressful life events during the last 12 months were found among the depressed patients. Of the 21 BDI items, 6 differentiated the 43 medical-surgical depressed patients from a group of 43 psychiatric inpatients with a diagnosis of primary or secondary depression (Feighner's criteria). Medically ill depressed patients scored higher in social withdrawal, work inhibition and irritability but lower in loss of libido, sleep disturbance, and lack of satisfaction. Our results show rates of depression in a medical inpatient population in Greece comparable with those in other studies. The use of BDI may help assessment of depression in general hospital patients. PMID:2923008

  17. 20. West Elevation and Section, Ward 'K', Letterman General Hospital, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. West Elevation and Section, Ward 'K', Letterman General Hospital, Presidio of San Francisco, Cal. Sheet No. 2. May 1917. BUILDING 1049. - Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman General Hospital, Building No. 12, Letterman Hospital Complex, Edie Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  18. 19. First and Second Floors. Ward 'K', Letterman General Hospital, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. First and Second Floors. Ward 'K', Letterman General Hospital, Presidio of San Francisco, Cal. Sheet No. 1. May 1917. BUILDING 1049. - Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman General Hospital, Building No. 12, Letterman Hospital Complex, Edie Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  19. Fitzsimons General Hospital, Physiotherapy & Electrocardiograph Department Building, North of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Fitzsimons General Hospital, Physiotherapy & Electrocardiograph Department Building, North of Building No. 516, East of corridor connecting Building No. 511 to Building No. 515, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  20. 42 CFR 412.22 - Excluded hospitals and hospital units: General rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Register citations affecting § 412.22, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Excluded hospitals and hospital units: General... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL...

  1. Right half of CO17229. Fitzsimons General Hospital, Bounded by ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Right half of CO-172-29. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Bounded by East Colfax to south, Peoria Street to west, Denver City/County & Adams County Line to north, & U.S. Route 255 to east, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  2. North side. Fitzsimons General Hospital, Physiotherapy & Electrocardiograph Department ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    North side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Physiotherapy & Electrocardiograph Department Building, North of Building No. 516, East of corridor connecting Building No. 511 to Building No. 515, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  3. East and north sides. Fitzsimons General Hospital, Physiotherapy & ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    East and north sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Physiotherapy & Electrocardiograph Department Building, North of Building No. 516, East of corridor connecting Building No. 511 to Building No. 515, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  4. General Surgery Programs in Small Rural New York State Hospitals: A Pilot Survey of Hospital Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuckerman, Randall; Doty, Brit; Gold, Michael; Bordley, James; Dietz, Patrick; Jenkins, Paul; Heneghan, Steven

    2006-01-01

    Context: Hospitals play a central role in small rural communities and are frequently one of the major contributors to the local economy. Surgical services often account for a substantial proportion of hospital revenues. The current shortage of general surgeons practicing in rural communities may further threaten the financial viability of rural…

  5. General Surgery Programs in Small Rural New York State Hospitals: A Pilot Survey of Hospital Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuckerman, Randall; Doty, Brit; Gold, Michael; Bordley, James; Dietz, Patrick; Jenkins, Paul; Heneghan, Steven

    2006-01-01

    Context: Hospitals play a central role in small rural communities and are frequently one of the major contributors to the local economy. Surgical services often account for a substantial proportion of hospital revenues. The current shortage of general surgeons practicing in rural communities may further threaten the financial viability of rural

  6. The American General Hospital as a Complex Social System

    PubMed Central

    Georgopoulos, Basil S.; Matejko, Aleksander

    1967-01-01

    Based on data from and about the medical, nursing, and administrative staffs in a probability sample of general hospitals, involving 41 institutions and some 2,400 respondents, certain aspects of the hospital social system are examined in each of the following basic problem-areas: organizational and member goal attainment; availability and allocation of organizational resources; organizational coordination; social integration; intraorganizational strain; and organizational adaptation. These areas are examined separately and in relation to one another, as a basis for understanding and assessing the overall effectiveness of the hospital as a complex social organization. Hospital effectiveness is viewed in the context of open system theory, as a joint function of the relative success with which the organization handles its problems in these key areas. Findings concerning a number of social-psychological variables in each area are presented and discussed, with emphasis on the interdependence of the areas and on organizational issues and implications. The results show some of the basic strengths and weaknesses of the system. Important differences associated with hospital size and affiliation are also discussed to illustrate the typical profile of the American general hospital and significant variations from it. Similarly, differences among the principal groups in the system are presented, where appropriate. Finally, promising directions for future organizational research in the hospital field are briefly presented.

  7. Barriers to Early Mobility of Hospitalized General Medicine Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hoyer, Erik H.; Brotman, Daniel J.; Chan, Kitty; Needham, Dale M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Functional status decline commonly accompanies hospitalization making patients vulnerable to complications. Such decline can be mitigated through hospital-based early mobility programs. Success in implementing patient mobility quality improvement processes requires evaluating providers’ knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors. Design A cross-sectional, self-administered survey in two different hospital settings was completed by 120 nurses and physical and occupational therapists (rehabilitation therapists, 38; nurses, 82) from six general medicine units. The survey was developed using published guidelines, literature review, and provider meetings and refined through pilot testing. Psychometric properties were assessed, and regression analyses were conducted to examine barriers to early mobility by hospital site, provider discipline, and years of experience. Results Internal consistency reliability, item consistency, and discriminant validity psychometric characteristics were acceptable. In multivariable regression analysis, overall perceived barriers were similar between the two hospitals (P = 0.25) and significantly higher for staff with less experience (P = 0.02) and for nurses vs. rehabilitation therapists (P < 0.001). The survey identified specific barriers common to both nurses and rehabilitation therapists and other barriers that were discipline specific. Conclusions This novel survey identified important barriers to mobilizing medical inpatients that were similar across two hospital settings. These results can assist with the implementation of quality improvement projects for increasing early hospital-based patient mobility. PMID:25133615

  8. House-fly distribution in certain general hospital in Cairo.

    PubMed

    Radi, M; Merdan, A I; Labib, I

    1991-12-01

    Fly sampling was evaluated under laboratory conditions before starting the field surveys. Three different fly traps were tested, of which the Spiralettes (a commercial one) proved to be the most efficient. Sampling conditions were also considered in this laboratory evaluation, light, air current, swinging, height and temperature were tested, all of them have affected fly trapping except height. Fly density and distribution in two general hospitals and two specialized ones, were estimated in order to evaluate them epidemiologically in relation to hospital bacterial contamination. Results of these surveys revealed the followings: (1) The location of the hospital has no impact on the fly density. (2) Flies are attracted more to swinging hanged ribbon traps than to fixed ones. (3) Fly densities were relatively high in the main kitchens and the main garbages followed by toilets (common ones), patient wards, outpatients investigating rooms, surgical theaters and plasterrooms of the hospitals. (4) Fly density is higher during warm seasons than in cold ones. PMID:1765698

  9. Primary Supervision: Massachusetts General Hospital's child and adolescent psychiatry seminar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jellinek, Michael S.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author describes "Primary Supervision", a seminar he has led for approximately 20 years, which is designed for the entire class of nine first-year residents in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry training at Massachusetts General Hospital. The seminar meets for 1 hour each week throughout the first year. Through 900 hours of…

  10. HOSPITAL STAY OF IN-PATIENTS IN A GENERAL HOSPITAL PSYCHIATRY UNIT

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, S.K.; Varma, V.K.; Malhotra, Savita; Kumar, Pradeep

    1983-01-01

    SUMMARY This report examines the hospital stay of psychiatric in-patients in a general hospital psychiatric setting. The hospital stay days, psychiatric diagnosis, outcome, number of re-admission and some socio-demographic details of patients admitted during one year period were recorded and analysed. The mean hospital stay was 29.39 ± 20.43 days. 60% patients stayed less than 4 weeks. The mean hospital stay of various categories was calculated. Schizophrenics 29.62 ± 25.82 days, manic depressives 35.29 ± 33.04 days and neuroses 24.83±18.43 days. Chronic Schizophrenics stayed longest (43.64±22.56) days. Of the Affective Psychosis group, between manics and depressives no difference was noticed. Good prognosis and relatively benign conditions had a briefer stay. Patients with no improvement stayed for significantly shorter- period (p< .001). Readmission cases tend to stay longer than fresh admissions (p< .05). The implications and interpretations especially in a general hospital psychiatric setting are discussed. PMID:21847306

  11. Psychotropic drug use in an Italian general hospital.

    PubMed

    Magni, G; De Leo, D; Canton, G; Palazzolo, O; Antonielli, F; Rossaro, P

    1984-07-01

    The present study is a survey of psychotropic drug use patterns among 1860 patients admitted to Padova General Hospital in North-East Italy. Our results show that 23% of the patients took psychotropic drugs for almost their entire stay in hospital. The drugs most commonly used are anxiolytics and hypnotics, both of the benzodiazepine class. The use of barbiturates as hypnotics has almost disappeared. Some significant correlations between the use of psychotropic drugs and socio-demographic factors were also found. Women, widows and widowers, retired and elderly persons seem to be at higher risk in the use of psychotropic drugs. The meaning and implications of these results are discussed. PMID:6473509

  12. Comparative Quality Indicators for Hospital Choice: Do General Practitioners Care?

    PubMed Central

    Ferrua, Marie; Sicotte, Claude; Lalloué, Benoît; Minvielle, Etienne

    2016-01-01

    Context The strategy of publicly reporting quality indicators is being widely promoted through public policies as a way to make health care delivery more efficient. Objective To assess general practitioners’ (GPs) use of the comparative hospital quality indicators made available by public services and the media, as well as GPs’ perceptions of their qualities and usefulness. Method A telephone survey of a random sample representing all self-employed GPs in private practice in France. Results A large majority (84.1%–88.5%) of respondents (n = 503; response rate of 56%) reported that they never used public comparative indicators, available in the mass media or on government and non-government Internet sites, to influence their patients’ hospital choices. The vast majority of GPs rely mostly on traditional sources of information when choosing a hospital. At the same time, this study highlights favourable opinions shared by a large proportion of GPs regarding several aspects of hospital quality indicators, such as their good qualities and usefulness for other purposes. In sum, the results show that GPs make very limited use of hospital quality indicators based on a consumer choice paradigm but, at the same time, see them as useful in ways corresponding more to the usual professional paradigms, including as a means to improve quality of care. PMID:26840429

  13. Proximal gastric vagotomy: a district general hospital experience.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, J. J.; Ryan, J. M.; Anders, C. J.

    1983-01-01

    A district general hospital experience with proximal gastric vagotomy over a nine-year period is reported. One hundred and eight patients undergoing the operation for chronic duodenal ulcer were assessed. The follow-up period was 1-9 years (mean 4 years and 7 months). The results were graded using a modification of the classification of Visick (1948). Over 85% of our patients were satisfied with their results. (Visick 1 and 2). Recurrent ulceration was noted in 3.9% of our series (4 cases). There were no deaths and few complications. The technique used by us is described briefly and the role of proximal gastric vagotomy in a district general hospital is discussed. PMID:6859783

  14. Hyperhidrosis Prevalence and Demographical Characteristics in Dermatology Outpatients in Shanghai and Vancouver

    PubMed Central

    Kalia, Sunil; Huang, Rachel Yuanshen; Phillips, Arlie; Su, Mingwan; Yang, Sen; Zhang, Xuejun; Zhou, Pingyu; Zhou, Youwen

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a wide variation in the reported prevalence of primary hyperhidrosis in the literature. Further, it is unknown if primary hyperhidrosis is a lifelong condition, or if demographical factors influence hyperhidrosis prevalence. Objectives This study aims to examine the prevalence of hyperhidrosis in multiple ethnic groups from two ethnically diverse cities and to determine if the prevalence of primary hyperhidrosis changes according to age, gender, ethnicity, body mass index, and geographical locations. Methods In total, 1010 consecutive subjects attending dermatology outpatient clinics in Shanghai Skin Disease Hospital and 1018 subjects in Skin Care Center of Vancouver General Hospital were invited to fill out a questionnaire on their presenting concerns, demographical information, and sweating symptoms. The subjects were then classified to have primary hyperhidrosis using the criteria of International Hyperhidrosis Society, late-onset hyperhidrosis, or no-hyperhidrosis. The prevalence of primary HH and late-onset HH was calculated for the entire study population and in subgroups stratified according to age of examination, sex, ethnicity, presenting diagnosis, body mass index, and specific study cities. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the impact of these factors on HH prevalence. Results The prevalence of primary hyperhidrosis is very similar in Shanghai and in Vancouver, at 14.5% and 12.3% respectively. In addition, 4.0% of subjects in Shanghai and 4.4% subjects in Vancouver suffer from late-onset HH. Primary HH has highest prevalence in those younger than 30 years of age, decreasing dramatically in later years. Caucasian subjects are at least 2.5 times more likely to develop axillary hyperhidrosis compared to Chinese subjects. Obesity does not have much influence on primary HH presentation, although it does increase significantly the development of late-onset HH. Finally, there is no major difference of hyperhidrosis between Chinese subjects in Shanghai and Vancouver. Limitations The data were gathered according to patients’ self-reports only and the sample size was relatively small in some groups after stratification for gender, ethnicity and age. Conclusion Prevalence of primary HH and late-onset HH is similar in dermatology outpatients independent of geographical locations. However, certain specific HH subtypes can show great variations according to ethnicity, age, body mass index and sex. PMID:27105064

  15. Community hospitals and general practice: extended attachments for medical students.

    PubMed

    Grant, J; Ramsay, A; Bain, J

    1997-09-01

    The first year experience of an innovative experiment in undergraduate medical education is described. The study investigated the educational effectiveness of prolonged clinical attachments for medical undergraduates in community hospital-based general practice. It has also assessed the ability of students to take some responsibility for their own learning in a clinically challenging environment. A retrospective evaluation of the experience obtained during the 3 month attachments for a self-selected group of fourth year Dundee medical school undergraduates was made. These undergraduates were placed in 10 mainly rural Scottish general practices with attached community hospitals providing a wide spectrum of inpatient and outpatient medical and surgical care. Students were assessed on the satisfactory completion of a portfolio of learning experiences and a practical clinical skills list. They were also required to submit a clinical project based on some aspect of their work during the attachment. The initial results showed a high degree of student and tutor satisfaction with the attachments. The assessment of all 10 of the students' educational achievements in their attachment were regarded as satisfactory and two were assessed as outstanding. Tutor assessment confirmed the validity of the initiative. Prolonged attachments in community hospital-based general practice for medical undergraduates have proved educationally valid and popular with both students and tutors. The development and dissemination of this model on a wider scale has resource issues which require to be addressed. PMID:9488859

  16. 33 CFR 165.1314 - Safety Zone; Fort Vancouver Fireworks Display, Columbia River, Vancouver, Washington.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Safety Zone; Fort Vancouver Fireworks Display, Columbia River, Vancouver, Washington. 165.1314 Section 165.1314 Navigation and Navigable... Thirteenth Coast Guard District § 165.1314 Safety Zone; Fort Vancouver Fireworks Display, Columbia...

  17. 33 CFR 165.1314 - Safety Zone; Fort Vancouver Fireworks Display, Columbia River, Vancouver, Washington.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety Zone; Fort Vancouver Fireworks Display, Columbia River, Vancouver, Washington. 165.1314 Section 165.1314 Navigation and Navigable... Thirteenth Coast Guard District § 165.1314 Safety Zone; Fort Vancouver Fireworks Display, Columbia...

  18. 33 CFR 165.1314 - Safety Zone; Fort Vancouver Fireworks Display, Columbia River, Vancouver, Washington.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Safety Zone; Fort Vancouver Fireworks Display, Columbia River, Vancouver, Washington. 165.1314 Section 165.1314 Navigation and Navigable... Thirteenth Coast Guard District § 165.1314 Safety Zone; Fort Vancouver Fireworks Display, Columbia...

  19. 33 CFR 165.1314 - Safety Zone; Fort Vancouver Fireworks Display, Columbia River, Vancouver, Washington.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Safety Zone; Fort Vancouver Fireworks Display, Columbia River, Vancouver, Washington. 165.1314 Section 165.1314 Navigation and Navigable... Thirteenth Coast Guard District § 165.1314 Safety Zone; Fort Vancouver Fireworks Display, Columbia...

  20. 33 CFR 165.1314 - Safety Zone; Fort Vancouver Fireworks Display, Columbia River, Vancouver, Washington.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Safety Zone; Fort Vancouver Fireworks Display, Columbia River, Vancouver, Washington. 165.1314 Section 165.1314 Navigation and Navigable... Thirteenth Coast Guard District § 165.1314 Safety Zone; Fort Vancouver Fireworks Display, Columbia...

  1. Tampa General Hospital "blows the whistle on violence".

    PubMed

    1995-01-01

    At Tampa General Hospital, the professionals in the marketing and media relations department know how to stage a press conference and to get the attention of the media. It goes to the adage when you're buying real estate: location, location, location. Once the journalists were assembled, Tampa General launched its campaign to fight street violence: "Blow the Whistle on Violence." Their timing was aided by the release of the FBI's annual Preliminary Crime Report citing Tampa as the second most dangerous city in which to live. Tampa General's news media specialist Stacey Winn reported that "the day went together just like a puzzle with all the pieces coming together." Those pieces and more are detailed in this issue's cover story on community involvement. Street crime and violence are not unique to Tampa, of course. But with so many victims ending up in Tampa General's emergency room, Winn noted that physicians and nurses felt personally responsible for contributing toward the prevention of cases ending up there. One important element in the hospital's press conference was an appearance by one of the victims of the violence they're striving to prevent. Her appearance and statement to the assembled media representatives significantly enhanced the presentation. "Blow the Whistle on Violence" was a low-cost program with a high return. The potential benefits are enormous. PMID:10152841

  2. Recurrence of inguinal hernias repaired in a large hernia surgical specialty hospital and general hospitals in Ontario, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Atiqa; Bell, Chaim M.; Stukel, Thérèse A.; Urbach, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Background The effect of hospital specialization on the risk of hernia recurrence after inguinal hernia repair is not well described. Methods We studied Ontario residents who had primary elective inguinal hernia repair at an Ontario hospital between 1993 and 2007 using population-based, administrative health data. We compared patients from a large hernia specialty hospital (Shouldice Hospital) with those from general hospitals to determine the risk of recurrence. Results We studied 235 192 patients, 27.7% of whom had surgery at Shouldice hospital. The age-standardized proportion of patients who had a recurrence ranged from 5.21% (95% confidence interval [CI] 4.94%–5.49%) among patients who had surgery at the lowest volume general hospitals to 4.79% (95% CI 4.54%–5.04%) who had surgery at the highest volume general hospitals. In contrast, patients who had surgery at the Shouldice Hospital had an age-standardized recurrence risk of 1.15% (95% CI 1.05%–1.25%). Compared with patients who had surgery at the lowest volume hospitals, hernia recurrence among those treated at the Shouldice Hospital was significantly lower after adjustment for the effects of age, sex, comorbidity and income level (adjusted hazard ratio 0.21, 95% CI 0.19–0.23, p < 0.001). Conclusion Inguinal hernia repair at Shouldice Hospital was associated with a significantly lower risk of subsequent surgery for recurrence than repair at a general hospital. While specialty hospitals may have better outcomes for treatment of common surgical conditions than general hospitals, these benefits must be weighed against potential negative impacts on clinical care and the financial sustainability of general hospitals. PMID:26574701

  3. Hospital discharge summary scorecard: a quality improvement tool used in a tertiary hospital general medicine service.

    PubMed

    Singh, G; Harvey, R; Dyne, A; Said, A; Scott, I

    2015-12-01

    We assessed the impact of completion and feedback of discharge summary scorecards on the quality of discharge summaries written by interns in a general medicine service of a tertiary hospital. The scorecards significantly improved summary quality in the first three rotations of the intern year and could be readily adopted by other units as a quality improvement intervention for optimizing clinical handover to primary care providers. PMID:26444698

  4. Financial management challenges for general hospital psychiatry 2001.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, R J

    2001-01-01

    Psychiatry programs are facing significant business and financial challenges. This paper provides an overview of these management challenges in five areas: departmental, hospital, payment system, general finance, and policy. Psychiatric leaders will require skills in a variety of business management areas to ensure their program success. Many programs will need to develop new compensation models with more of an emphasis on revenue collection and overhead management. Programs which cannot master these areas are likely to go out of business. For academic programs, incentive systems must address not only clinical productivity, but academic and teaching output as well. General hospital programs will need to develop increased sophistication in differential cost accounting in order to be able to advocate for their patients and program in the current management climate. Clinical leaders will need the skills (ranging from actuarial to negotiations) to be at the table with contract development, since those decisions are inseparable from clinical care issues. Strategic planning needs to consider the value of improving integration with primary care, along with the ability to understand the advantages and disadvantages of risk-sharing models. Psychiatry leaders need to define and develop useful reports shared with clinical division leadership to track progress and identify problems and opportunities. Leaders should be responsible for a strategy for developing appropriate information system architecture and infrastructure. Finally, it is hoped that some leaders will emerge who can further our needs to address inequities in mental health fee schedules and parity issues which affect our program viability. PMID:11313073

  5. 42 CFR 412.370 - General provisions for hospitals located in Puerto Rico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false General provisions for hospitals located in Puerto... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Prospective Payment System for Inpatient Hospital Capital Costs Special Rules for Puerto Rico Hospitals §...

  6. 42 CFR 412.370 - General provisions for hospitals located in Puerto Rico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false General provisions for hospitals located in Puerto... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Prospective Payment System for Inpatient Hospital Capital Costs Special Rules for Puerto Rico Hospitals §...

  7. Measuring the quality of junior hospital doctors in general medicine.

    PubMed

    Jones, J M; Sanderson, C F; Black, N A

    1992-05-01

    During the course of a larger study aimed at relating staffing levels of junior doctors in general medicine to the safety of the care provided, it became clear that consultant doctors considered the quality of their junior staff as being at least as important as the quantity. This paper describes several attempts to develop a feasible and valid method of measuring the quality of senior house officers (SHOs) and registrars using routinely available data. Having rejected three methods and had difficulties with three other methods, a modified Delphi survey was used to explore the extent to which consultants agreed on the key attributes of a high quality SHO or registrar. Sixty-seven (60%) of all consultants in the South-West Thames and Trent regions responded to two rounds of questionnaires which revealed communication skills as being consistently the most significant factor. This was confirmed in a second, anonymous survey of 198 (78%) SHO and registrar posts in the North-West Thames region. It also became clear that consultants viewed the quality of their own SHOs and registrars as generally high. This being so it is argued that the requirement to adjust for quality, when comparing SHO and registrar levels between hospitals, is of minor importance. These results also suggest that the explicit teaching of communication skills should have a high priority in undergraduate and postgraduate education. PMID:1614348

  8. Prospective multidisciplinary audit of obstetric general anaesthesia in a district general hospital.

    PubMed

    Shroff, R; Thompson, A C D; McCrum, A; Rees, S G O

    2004-09-01

    In the 3 years leading up to March 2001, the general anaesthesia rate for emergency and elective caesarean sections at our hospital was higher than that recommended by the Royal College of Anaesthetists. There were also concerns regarding the quality of communication between surgeon and anaesthetist prior to emergency caesarean section. A multidisciplinary audit was undertaken on both the indications for obstetric general anaesthesia and quality of communication between staff members during the perioperative period between January and August 2002. The results of the audit highlighted potential serious shortfalls in communication and teamworking; however, there was insufficient information to assess the appropriateness of the indication for general anaesthesia. Following this audit recommendations were made to improve communication channels between the personnel on labour ward and this coincided with a reduction in the use of general anaesthesia. PMID:16147603

  9. Comparing the stigma of mental illness in a general hospital with a state mental hospital: a Singapore study.

    PubMed

    Chee, Cornelia Y I; Ng, Tze Pin; Kua, Ee Heok

    2005-08-01

    The stigma faced by psychiatric patients associated with the type of psychiatric facilities is controversial. This study was conducted to compare the stigma faced by patients with schizophrenia and non-schizophrenia psychiatric disorders in the outpatient departments of a state mental hospital with those in a general hospital in Singapore. A cross-sectional study involving two groups of outpatients in a state mental hospital (n=300) and in a university general hospital (n=300) were assessed with a 12-item stigma scale. Components of the scale assessed included social rejection, negative media perception, shame and social discrimination. Among schizophrenia patients, state mental hospital patients had significantly lower stigma scores compared to their counterparts in the general hospital. For other mental illnesses, the reverse was true: state mental hospital patients had significantly higher stigma scores compared to their counterparts in the general hospital. Stigma was also associated with a younger age and being employed though not by gender. The stigma faced by psychiatric patients is complex and may have institutional and disorder-specific elements. Possible reasons for this are discussed. PMID:16091860

  10. Toshiba General Hospital PACS for routine in- and outpatient clinics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toshimitsu, Akihiro; Okazaki, Nobuo; Kura, Hiroyuki; Nishihara, Eitaro; Tsubura, Shinichi

    1996-05-01

    The Toshiba General Hospital introduced a departmental RIS/PACS (Radiology Information System/Picture Archiving and Communication System) in the radiology department in May, 1993. It has been used routinely since that time. In order to provide efficient means for clinicians to find and read many images, the system has been expanded to the neurosurgery and urology clinics and wards since May, 1995, and five image referring workstations now provide digital images to clinicians. In this paper we discuss an algorithm for image migration, one of the key issues to accomplish the expansion to outpatient clinics successfully, and propose the WYWIWYG (what you want is what you get) image transfer logic. This is the logic used to transfer images that physicians require refer without increasing the traffic between the image server and referring workstations. We accomplish the WYWIWYG logic by prioritizing exams the physicians have not yet viewed and by finding historical exams according to the modality, anatomy, and marking. Clinicians gave us comments from their first use of the system and suggested that the PACS enables clinicians to review images more efficiently compared to a film-based system. Our experience suggests that it is a key to the effective application of PACS in outpatient clinics to incorporate consideration patterns of clinicians on the migration algorithm.

  11. A Most Unusual Patient at the Massachusetts General Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Ruhnke, Gregory W.; Warshaw, Andrew L.

    2016-01-01

    This year marks 200 years of patient care at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). In celebration of this milestone, a unique Grand Rounds case is presented. A 450-year-old rotund man admitted 60 times presents with a classic triad of periumbilical pain, bilateral plantar burns, and a frozen scalp. Although this triad may at first strike a cord of familiarity among seasoned clinicians, the disease mechanism is truly noteworthy, being clarified only after a detailed occupational history. Ergo, the lessons hark back to the days of yesteryear, when the history and physical served as the cornerstone of Yuletide clinical diagnosis. A discussion of epidemiology and prognosis accompanies a detailed examination of the pathophysiholiday. Although some consider this patient uncouth, as you will see, he is quite a medical sleuth. The long-standing relationship between this patient and the MGH prompted his family to write a letter of appreciation, which will remind the reader of the meaning that our care brings to patients and their families. Harvey Cushing, who completed his internship at the MGH in 1895, professed “A physician is obligated to consider more than a diseased organ, more even than the whole man—he must view the man in his world.” We hope this unusual Grand Rounds case intrigues you as it reminds you of Cushing’s lesson and wishes you a joyous holiday season. PMID:22107737

  12. 42 CFR 412.22 - Excluded hospitals and hospital units: General rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES... after October 1, 1997— (i) Separate governing body. The hospital has a governing body that is separate from the governing body of the hospital occupying space in the same building or on the same campus....

  13. 42 CFR 412.22 - Excluded hospitals and hospital units: General rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES... after October 1, 1997— (i) Separate governing body. The hospital has a governing body that is separate from the governing body of the hospital occupying space in the same building or on the same campus....

  14. 42 CFR 412.22 - Excluded hospitals and hospital units: General rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES... after October 1, 1997— (i) Separate governing body. The hospital has a governing body that is separate from the governing body of the hospital occupying space in the same building or on the same campus....

  15. 42 CFR 412.22 - Excluded hospitals and hospital units: General rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES... after October 1, 1997— (i) Separate governing body. The hospital has a governing body that is separate from the governing body of the hospital occupying space in the same building or on the same campus....

  16. Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer: Experience of the Philippine General Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Jimeno, Cecilia Alegado; Paz-Pacheco, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Background Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is a rare type of thyroid malignancy and one of the most aggressive solid tumors, responsible for between 14% and 50% of the total annual mortality associated with thyroid cancer. Methods A retrospective study was made of all ATC cases diagnosed by biopsy in the Philippine General Hospital between 2008 and 2013. Results A total of 15 patients were identified, with a median age at diagnosis of 63 years. All tumors were at least 6 cm in size upon diagnosis. All patients had a previous history of thyroid pathology, presenting with an average duration of 11 years. Eleven patients presented with cervical lymphadenopathies, whereas seven exhibited signs of distant metastases, for which the lungs appeared to be the most common site. More than 70% of the patients presented with a rapidly growing neck mass, leading to airway obstruction. Only three patients were treated using curative surgery; the majority received palliative and supportive forms of treatment. In addition, only three patients were offered radiotherapy. Chemotherapy was not offered to any patient. Only two patients were confirmed to still be alive during the study period. The median survival time for the other patients was 3 months; in the majority of cases the patient died within the first year following diagnosis. Conclusion Our experience with ATC demonstrated concordance with other institutions with respect to current clinical profile, presentation, and prognosis. An absence of distant metastases and lymph node involvement was associated with improved survival outcomes, whereas age at diagnosis and tumor size did not affect survival. Curative surgery offers the most effective means of prolonging survival. Radiotherapy and chemotherapy in combination with surgery represents a promising treatment strategy. PMID:26194079

  17. Readmissions due to traffic accidents at a general hospital 1

    PubMed Central

    Paiva, Luciana; Monteiro, Damiana Aparecida Trindade; Pompeo, Daniele Alcalá; Ciol, Márcia Aparecida; Dantas, Rosana Aparecida Spadotti; Rossi, Lídia Aparecida

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to verify the occurrence and the causes of hospital readmissions within a year after discharge from hospitalizations due to traffic accidents. Methods: victims of multiple traumas due to traffic accidents were included, who were admitted to an Intensive Care Unit. Sociodemographic data, accident circumstances, body regions affected and cause of readmission were collected from the patient histories. Results: among the 109 victims of traffic accidents, the majority were young and adult men. Most hospitalizations due to accidents involved motorcycle drivers (56.9%). The causes of the return to the hospital were: need to continue the surgical treatment (63.2%), surgical site infection (26.3%) and fall related to the physical sequelae of the trauma (10.5%). The rehospitalization rate corresponded to 174/1,000 people/year. Conclusion: the hospital readmission rate in the study population is similar to the rates found in other studies. Victims of severe limb traumas need multiple surgical procedures, lengthier hospitalizations and extended rehabilitation. PMID:26444172

  18. 33 CFR 165.1308 - Columbia River, Vancouver, WA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Columbia River, Vancouver, WA..., Vancouver, WA. (a) Location. The following area is a safety zone: All waters of the Columbia River at Vancouver, Washington, bounded by a line commencing at the northern base of the Interstate 5 highway...

  19. 33 CFR 165.1308 - Columbia River, Vancouver, WA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Columbia River, Vancouver, WA..., Vancouver, WA. (a) Location. The following area is a safety zone: All waters of the Columbia River at Vancouver, Washington, bounded by a line commencing at the northern base of the Interstate 5 highway...

  20. 33 CFR 165.1308 - Columbia River, Vancouver, WA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Columbia River, Vancouver, WA..., Vancouver, WA. (a) Location. The following area is a safety zone: All waters of the Columbia River at Vancouver, Washington, bounded by a line commencing at the northern base of the Interstate 5 highway...

  1. 33 CFR 165.1308 - Columbia River, Vancouver, WA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Columbia River, Vancouver, WA..., Vancouver, WA. (a) Location. The following area is a safety zone: All waters of the Columbia River at Vancouver, Washington, bounded by a line commencing at the northern base of the Interstate 5 highway...

  2. 33 CFR 165.1308 - Columbia River, Vancouver, WA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Columbia River, Vancouver, WA..., Vancouver, WA. (a) Location. The following area is a safety zone: All waters of the Columbia River at Vancouver, Washington, bounded by a line commencing at the northern base of the Interstate 5 highway...

  3. Can We Humanize Dying in the General Hospital?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Stephen

    This paper reviews the literature on the behavior and attitudes of medical-nursing personnel toward the dying person and illustrates the frequent conflict between hospital staff and the needs of dying. Inner perturbation stemming from feelings of vicarious suffering, vicarious disintegration, or personal anxiety about death, education deficiencies…

  4. Reducing elective general surgery cancellations at a Canadian hospital

    PubMed Central

    Azari-Rad, Solmaz; Yontef, Alanna L.; Aleman, Dionne M.; Urbach, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Background In Canadian hospitals, which are typically financed by global annual budgets, overuse of operating rooms is a financial risk that is frequently managed by cancelling elective surgical procedures. It is uncertain how different scheduling rules affect the rate of elective surgery cancellations. Methods We used discrete event simulation modelling to represent perioperative processes at a hospital in Toronto, Canada. We tested the effects of the following 3 scenarios on the number of surgical cancellations: scheduling surgeons’ operating days based on their patients’ average length of stay in hospital, sequencing surgical procedures by average duration and variance, and increasing the number of post-surgical ward beds. Results The number of elective cancellations was reduced by scheduling surgeons whose patients had shorter average lengths of stay in hospital earlier in the week, sequencing shorter surgeries and those with less variance in duration earlier in the day, and by adding up to 2 additional beds to the postsurgical ward. Conclusion Discrete event simulation modelling can be used to develop strategies for improving efficiency in operating rooms. PMID:23351498

  5. INTERPOLATING VANCOUVER'S DAILY AMBIENT PM 10 FIELD

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this article we develop a spatial predictive distribution for the ambient space- time response field of daily ambient PM10 in Vancouver, Canada. Observed responses have a consistent temporal pattern from one monitoring site to the next. We exploit this feature of the field b...

  6. A REGIONAL COLLEGE FOR VANCOUVER ISLAND.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MARSH, LEONARD

    AS ENVISIONED, THE REGIONAL COLLEGE IS JUSTIFIED BY THE MANY KINDS OF STUDENTS IT CAN SERVE AND THE VARIETY AND APPROPRIATENESS OF THE EDUCATIONAL SERVICES IT CAN OFFER. VANCOUVER ISLAND HAS TRANSPORTATION DIFFICULTIES, A MARKEDLY UNEVEN POPULATION, AND SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN FORESTRY EXPLOITATION. POPULATION GROWTH ON THE ISLAND HAS BEEN GREAT AND…

  7. The Hospital That Became a College: Sloan U.S. Army General Hospital, Montpelier, Vermont. Norwich University Library Occasional Paper No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepard, William A.

    A historical review is presented of Sloan U.S. Army General Hospital, the second largest Union Army hospital in Vermont, which operated from June 1864 to October 1865. Sloan Hospital later became Vermont College, which in 1972 merged with Norwich University. Sloan Hospital operated during the last year and a half of the Civil War and consisted of…

  8. Water and nutrient budgets for Vancouver Lake, Vancouver, Washington, October 2010-October 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sheibley, Rich W.; Foreman, James R.; Marshall, Cameron A.; Welch, Wendy B.

    2014-01-01

    Vancouver Lake, a large shallow lake in Clark County, near Vancouver, Washington, has been undergoing water-quality problems for decades. Recently, the biggest concern for the lake are the almost annual harmful cyanobacteria blooms that cause the lake to close for recreation for several weeks each summer. Despite decades of interest in improving the water quality of the lake, fundamental information on the timing and amount of water and nutrients entering and exiting the lake is lacking. In 2010, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a 2-year field study to quantify water flows and nutrient loads in order to develop water and nutrient budgets for the lake. This report presents monthly and annual water and nutrient budgets from October 2010–October 2012 to identify major sources and sinks of nutrients. Lake River, a tidally influenced tributary to the lake, flows into and out of the lake almost daily and composed the greatest proportion of both the water and nutrient budgets for the lake, often at orders of magnitude greater than any other source. From the water budget, we identified precipitation, evaporation and groundwater inflow as minor components of the lake hydrologic cycle, each contributing 1 percent or less to the total water budget. Nutrient budgets were compiled monthly and annually for total nitrogen, total phosphorus, and orthophosphate; and, nitrogen loads were generally an order of magnitude greater than phosphorus loads across all sources. For total nitrogen, flow from Lake River at Felida, Washington, made up 88 percent of all inputs into the lake. For total phosphorus and orthophosphate, Lake River at Felida flowing into the lake was 91 and 76 percent of total inputs, respectively. Nutrient loads from precipitation and groundwater inflow were 1 percent or less of the total budgets. Nutrient inputs from Burnt Bridge Creek and Flushing Channel composed 12 percent of the total nitrogen budget, 8 percent of the total phosphorus budget, and 21 percent of the orthophosphate budget. We identified several data gaps and areas for future research, which include the need for better understanding nutrient inputs to the lake from sediment resuspension and better quantification of indirect nutrient inputs to the lake from Salmon Creek.

  9. Implementation of a Prototype Generalized Network Technology for Hospitals *

    PubMed Central

    Tolchin, S. G.; Stewart, R. L.; Kahn, S. A.; Bergan, E. S.; Gafke, G. P.; Simborg, D. W.; Whiting-O'Keefe, Q. E.; Chadwick, M. G.; McCue, G. E.

    1981-01-01

    A demonstration implementation of a distributed data processing hospital information system using an intelligent local area communications network (LACN) technology is described. This system is operational at the UCSF Medical Center and integrates four heterogeneous, stand-alone minicomputers. The applications systems are PID/Registration, Outpatient Pharmacy, Clinical Laboratory and Radiology/Medical Records. Functional autonomy of these systems has been maintained, and no operating system changes have been required. The LACN uses a fiber-optic communications medium and provides extensive communications protocol support within the network, based on the ISO/OSI Model. The architecture is reconfigurable and expandable. This paper describes system architectural issues, the applications environment and the local area network.

  10. Fitzsimons General Hospital, Bachelor Officers' Quarters/Officers' Club, West Harlowe Avenue, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Fitzsimons General Hospital, Bachelor Officers' Quarters/Officers' Club, West Harlowe Avenue, South side, 200 feet West of intersection of West Harlow Avenue & South First Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  11. Satisfaction degree evaluation of the users of "Attikon" University General Hospital's library.

    PubMed

    Stamouli, Maria-Aggeliki; Balis, Charalampos; Georgakopoulou, Konstantina-Maria

    2013-01-01

    The ability of hospital medical libraries to meet users' needs is a complicated issue and has been examined by many surveys. The aim of this study is to evaluate the satisfaction degree of the users of "Attikon" University General Hospital's medical library. A questionnaire was used to collect the necessary information Although, in general, the users seems to be satisfied, some adjustments, such as up-to-date books, journals and computers, have to be made. PMID:23823452

  12. The quality and characteristics of leading general hospitals' websites in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaolei; Bao, Zhen; Liu, Haitao; Wang, Zhenghong

    2011-12-01

    This paper focuses on the evaluation of quality of hospital websites in China. Leading general hospitals' websites in China are increasingly used by the public, but research on the quality of these websites in China is few and far between. In this article, we conducted a cross-sectional descriptive infodemiology study to assess the quality and to describe the characteristics of these websites. Using a pre-defined objective criterion based on content, function, design, and management & usage, two well-trained reviewers independently reviewed and analyzed websites of 23 nationally prominent leading general hospitals of China from April to June 2009. Hospital election is on the basis of the best Chinese hospitals published by official and non-official sources combined with experts' experiences and the research purpose. Results show that websites of most hospitals showed a good performance in website content, showed a normal performance in website function and design, but showed a bad performance in website management & usage. As the public increasingly looks to hospital websites for information and services, leading general hospitals in China need to keep up with increasingly high standards and demands of health-care consumers. PMID:20703762

  13. A methodology model for quality management in a general hospital.

    PubMed

    Stern, Z; Naveh, E

    1997-01-01

    A reappraisal is made of the relevance of industrial modes of quality management to the issues of medical care. Analysis of the nature of medical care, which differentiates it from the supplier-client relationships of industry, presents the main intrinsic characteristics, which create problems in application of the industrial quality management approaches to medical care. Several examples are the complexity of the relationship between the medical action and the result obtained, the client's nonacceptance of economic profitability as a value in his medical care, and customer satisfaction biased by variable standards of knowledge. The real problems unique to hospitals are addressed, and a methodology model for their quality management is offered. Included is a sample of indicator vectors, measurements of quality care, cost of medical care, quality of service, and human resources. These are based on the trilogy of planning quality, quality control, and improving quality. The conclusions confirm the inadequacy of industrial quality management approaches for medical institutions and recommend investment in formulation of appropriate concepts. PMID:10169184

  14. 1. GENERAL VIEW OF PAIRED INTERSTATE BRIDGES FROM NORTH SHORE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GENERAL VIEW OF PAIRED INTERSTATE BRIDGES FROM NORTH SHORE OF THE COLUMBIA RIVER LOOKING WEST - Vancouver-Portland Interstate Bridge, Interstate Route 5 Spanning Columbia River, Vancouver, Clark County, WA

  15. Well-Differentiated Thyroid Cancer: The Philippine General Hospital Experience

    PubMed Central

    Uy, Abigail T.; Maningat, Patricia Deanna D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Well-differentiated thyroid cancer (WDTC) is the most common form of thyroid malignancy. While it is typically associated with good prognosis, it may exhibit higher recurrence and mortality rates in selected groups, particularly Filipinos. This paper aims to describe the experience of a Philippine Hospital in managing patients with differentiated thyroid cancer. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study of 723 patients with WDTC (649 papillary and 79 follicular), evaluating the clinicopathologic profiles, ultrasound features, management received, tumor recurrence, and eventual outcome over a mean follow-up period of 5 years. Results The mean age at diagnosis was 44±13 years (range, 18 to 82), with a majority of cases occurring in the younger age group (<45 years). Most tumors were between 2 and 4 cm in size. The majority of papillary thyroid cancers (PTCs, 63.2%) and follicular thyroid cancers (FTCs, 54.4%) initially presented as stage 1, with a greater proportion of FTC cases (12.7% vs. 3.7%) presenting with distant metastases. Nodal metastases at presentation were more frequent among patients with PTC (29.9% vs. 7.6%). A majority of cases were treated by complete thyroidectomy, followed by radioactive iodine therapy and thyroid stimulating hormone suppression, resulting in a disease-free state. Excluding patients with distant metastases at presentation, the recurrence rates for papillary and FTC were 30.1% and 18.8%, respectively. Conclusion Overall, PTC among Filipinos was associated with a more aggressive and recurrent behavior. FTC among Filipinos appeared to behave similarly with other racial groups. PMID:26754584

  16. Prevalence of delirium in geriatric hospitalized general medical population.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Paramjeet Singh; Sharma, P S V N; Avasthi, Ajit

    2002-01-01

    The present study was carried out on the hospitalised geriatric general medical patients. The assessment of the patients was carried out within 24 hours of admission and on every fourth day thereafter using Mini Mental Status Examination (MMSE), Confusion Assessment Method (CAM), Delirium Symptom Interview (DSI) and ICD-10-Diagnostic Criteria of Research for delirium. An overall rate of delirium of 27% was found in the 100 patients who constituted the sample. 19% was the rate of 'prevalent' delirium and 8% was the rate of 'incident' delirium. It is observed that the CAM is a useful screening method with high sensitivity for diagnosis of delirium at the bedside. PMID:21206880

  17. Risk of hepatitis B infection among medical and paramedical workers in a general hospital in Zimbabwe.

    PubMed Central

    Emmanuel, J C; Bassett, M T; Smith, H J

    1988-01-01

    To evaluate the addition of hepatitis vaccine to health schemes for hospital workers in Zimbabwe we undertook a cross sectional study of viral markers in 226 hospital workers and compared the results with 97 volunteer blood donor controls. One hundred and thirty one (58%) hospital workers had hepatitis markers compared with 45 (46%) of the donor group. Racial group was the strongest risk factor. Blacks were 70% more likely to have markers than whites. This racial difference was not explained by job status or patient contact. Our data suggest that work in a district general hospital does not constitute a clinically important hazard for hepatitis B infection. Because of the high cost of the vaccine, additional studies to assess the risk of hospital work in other settings in Zimbabwe are required before health policy regarding routine hepatitis B vaccination is determined. PMID:3360956

  18. [Pharmaceutical Service after the Fukushima Disaster: A Case Report of Soma General Hospital].

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, Hisanori; Momonoi, Toshiyuki; Kumakawa, Hiromi

    2016-01-01

      Despite being damaged by the 2011 Tohoku earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear disaster, Soma General Hospital, located approximately 40 km north of Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, was able to fulfill its role as a key regional hospital in northeast Fukushima. To elucidate the pharmaceutical service in response to the disaster, we investigated the hospital's operations in 2011 according to the medical records and prescriptions. One of the difficulties that the department of pharmaceutical service faced at that time was the increase in emergency healthcare requests by evacuated patients from other hospitals and clinics. Herein, we propose the following countermeasures to be considered in future disaster preparations: (1) establishing a medical and pharmaceutical service coordinator for disaster relief; (2) sharing all local patients' medical information in emergencies (at least contraindicated drugs or allergy history); and (3) reviewing disaster stockpiles, especially pharmaceuticals (both at the hospital and in nearby locations). PMID:26725681

  19. PREVALENCE OF DELIRIUM IN GERIATRIC HOSPITALIZED GENERAL MEDICAL POPULATION

    PubMed Central

    Khurana, Paramjeet Singh; Sharma, P.S.V.N.; Avasthi, Ajit

    2002-01-01

    The present study was carried out on the hospitalised geriatric general medical patients. The assessment of the patients was carried out within 24 hours of admission and on every fourth day thereafter using Mini Mental Status Examination (MMSE), Confusion Assessment Method (CAM), Delirium Symptom Interview (DSI) and ICD-10-Diagnostic Criteria of Research for delirium. An overall rate of delirium of 27% was found in the 100 patients who constituted the sample. 19% was the rate of ‘prevalent’ delirium and 8% was the rate of ‘incident’ delirium. It is observed that the CAM is a useful screening method with high sensitivity for diagnosis of delirium at the bedside. PMID:21206880

  20. Massachusetts General Hospital participation in Operation Unified Assistance for tsunami relief in Banda Aceh, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Wong, Waichi; Brandt, Lynda; Keenan, M Edward

    2006-10-01

    When Project HOPE invited Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) to participate in a tsunami relief mission aboard the USNS Mercy hospital ship in January 2005, MGH responded swiftly and enthusiastically. Overcoming differences in medical styles and standards, as well as a variety of cultural and institutional differences, MGH volunteers collaborated successfully with Navy personnel and volunteers from other hospitals to deliver excellent care to a large number of tsunami victims. Lessons were learned regarding the need for better initial team orientation, more-open communication, and more-transparent decision-making; still, a rapid response of tertiary medicine, joining public and private resources, proved to be a powerful effective model. PMID:17447621

  1. Discharge, water temperature, and selected meteorological data for Vancouver Lake, Vancouver, Washington, water years 2011-13

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foreman, James R.; Marshall, Cameron A.; Sheibley, Rich W.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey partnered with the Vancouver Lake Watershed Partnership in a 2-year intensive study to quantify the movement of water and nutrients through Vancouver Lake in Vancouver, Washington. This report is intended to assist the Vancouver Lake Watershed Partnership in evaluating potential courses of action to mitigate seasonally driven blooms of harmful cyanobacteria and to improve overall water quality of the lake. This report contains stream discharge, lake water temperature, and selected meteorological data for water years 2011, 2012, and 2013 that were used to develop the water and nutrient budgets for the lake.

  2. Jim Peters' collapse in the 1954 Vancouver Empire Games marathon.

    PubMed

    Noakes, Tim; Mekler, Jackie; Pedoe, Dan Tunstall

    2008-08-01

    On 7 August 1954, the world 42 km marathon record holder, Jim Peters, collapsed repeatedly during the final 385 metres of the British Empire and Commonwealth Games marathon held in Vancouver, Canada. It has been assumed that Peters collapsed from heatstroke because he ran too fast and did not drink during the race, which was held in windless, cloudless conditions with a dry-bulb temperature of 28 degrees C. Hospital records made available to us indicate that Peters might not have suffered from exertional heatstroke, which classically produces a rectal temperature > 42 degrees C, cerebral effects and, usually, a fatal outcome without vigorous active cooling. Although Peters was unconscious on admission to hospital approximately 60 minutes after he was removed from the race, his rectal temperature was 39.4 degrees C and he recovered fully, even though he was managed conservatively and not actively cooled. We propose that Peters' collapse was more likely due to a combination of hyperthermia-induced fatigue which caused him to stop running; exercise-associated postural hypotension as a result of a low peripheral vascular resistance immediately he stopped running; and combined cerebral effects of hyperthermia, hypertonic hypernatraemia associated with dehydration, and perhaps undiagnosed hypoglycaemia. But none of these conditions should cause prolonged unconsciousness, raising the possibility that Peters might have suffered from a transient encephalopathy, the exact nature of which is not understood. PMID:18928034

  3. Attitudes of Malaysian general hospital staff towards patients with mental illness and diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The context of the study is the increased assessment and treatment of persons with mental illness in general hospital settings by general health staff, as the move away from mental hospitals gathers pace in low and middle income countries. The purpose of the study was to examine whether general attitudes of hospital staff towards persons with mental illness, and extent of mental health training and clinical experience, are associated with different attitudes and behaviours towards a patient with mental illness than towards a patients with a general health problem - diabetes. Methods General hospital health professionals in Malaysia were randomly allocated one of two vignettes, one describing a patient with mental illness and the other a patient with diabetes, and invited to complete a questionnaire examining attitudes and health care practices in relation to the case. The questionnaires completed by respondents included questions on demographics, training in mental health, exposure in clinical practice to people with mental illness, attitudes and expected health care behaviour towards the patient in the vignette, and a general questionnaire exploring negative attitudes towards people with mental illness. Questionnaires with complete responses were received from 654 study participants. Results Stigmatising attitudes towards persons with mental illness were common. Those responding to the mental illness vignette (N = 356) gave significantly lower ratings on care and support and higher ratings on avoidance and negative stereotype expectations compared with those responding the diabetes vignette (N = 298). Conclusions Results support the view that, in the Malaysian setting, patients with mental illness may receive differential care from general hospital staff and that general stigmatising attitudes among professionals may influence their care practices. More direct measurement of clinician behaviours than able to be implemented through survey method is required to support these conclusions. PMID:21569613

  4. School Choice in the "Stratilingual" City of Vancouver

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoon, Ee-Seul; Gulson, Kalervo N.

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the links between language, social difference and political domination in the practices of parental school choice at the heart of a global city, Vancouver. Vancouver is a highly diverse city, especially in terms of language. Its inner city is replete with multiple languages whose exchange values are not equal. In this context,…

  5. Preliminary survey report: control technology for ethylene oxide sterilization at Selby General Hospital, Marietta, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Kercher, S.L.; Mortimer, V.D.; Todd, W.F.

    1985-08-01

    A survey of control technology for reducing exposure during ethylene oxide sterilization was conducted at Selby General Hospital, Marietta, Ohio on August 30, 1984. The Central Services Department performed ethylene oxide sterilization for obstetrics, neonatal care, respiratory therapy, cytology, isolation cases, and surgery. Engineering controls consisted of isolation of the sterilizer and aerators, local exhaust ventilation, a continuous fresh air purge on the sterilization cycle, in chamber aeration of the sterilizers, and general exhaust ventilation of the Central Services Department and the sterilizer room. The author concludes that the Central Services Department has instituted control technology that minimizes employee exposure to ethylene-oxide. The hospital should be considered a candidate for an in-depth survey in a NIOSH study of control technology for ethylene oxide sterilization in hospitals.

  6. Association between ozone and respiratory admissions among children and the elderly in Vancouver, Canada.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qiuying; Chen, Yue; Shi, Yuanli; Burnett, Richard T; McGrail, Kimberly M; Krewski, Daniel

    2003-11-01

    In this study, we examine the impact of ozone on daily respiratory admissions in both young children and the elderly in greater Vancouver, British Columbia. Study subjects included children less than 3 yr of age and adults 65 yr of age or over living in greater Vancouver who had acute hospital admissions for any respiratory diseases (ICD-9 codes 460-519) during the 13-yr period 1986-1998. Bidirectional case-crossover analysis was used to investigate associations between ambient ozone and respiratory hospitalizations after adjustment for other pollutants, including carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and coefficient of haze. Potential effect modification by socioeconomic status as measured by household income was also examined. Respiratory admissions were associated with ozone levels 2, 3, 4, and 5 days prior to admission in both children and the elderly, with the strongest association observed at a lag of 4 days. Odds ratios for hospital admission of 1.22 (95% CI: 1.15-1.30) for children and 1.13 (1.09-1.18) for the elderly, respectively, were found, based on an increment in exposure corresponding to the interquartile range for ozone. Adjusting for other pollutants did not attenuate the ozone effect on respiratory admissions. Nor did socioeconomic status appear to modify the association between ozone and respiratory admissions in either children or the elderly. We concluded that ambient ozone is positively associated with respiratory hospital admission among young children and the elderly in Vancouver, British Columbia. These associations persisted after adjustment for both copollutant exposures and socioeconomic status. PMID:14569494

  7. Variables correlated with elderly referral from nursing homes to general hospitals

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Referring patients from nursing homes to general hospitals exposes them to nosocomial diseases, and may result in the development of a broad spectrum of physical, mental and social damages. Therefore, minimizing the referring of nursing home patients to hospitals is an important factor for keeping the elderly healthy and minimizing health expenditures. In this study we examined the variables related to the referral rates from nursing homes to general hospitals and the relationship between the referral and the mortality rates among the elderly who live in nursing homes in the Haifa Sub-district. Methods Thirty-two nursing homes were included in a cross-sectional study. All medical directors and head nurses were interviewed using a structured questionnaire between November 2006 and October 2007. Statistical analysis, including the ANOVA and the nonparametric Spearman tests, were employed to determine the factors that influence referral rates and the correlation between referral rates and mortality rates. Results The referral rate ranged between 18 and 222 per 100 financed elderly in a single year. In the multivariate analysis, the absence of a physician from the nursing home at the time of the referral to general hospitals was the only significant variable related to referral rates. No significant relationships were found between referral rates and mortality rates. Conclusions Absence of a significant relationship between referral rates and mortality rates may indicate that high referral rates do not necessarily protect the elderly from death. Therefore, any recommendations issued by the Ministry of Health (MOH) should emphasize in-house treatment rather than hospitalization. Clear instructions on referral from nursing homes to general hospitals need to be constructed by the MOH. The MOH should increase the presence of physicians in the nursing homes, especially, when the need to refer a patient arises. Further quantitative and epidemiologic studies should be conducted in order to, more fully and reliably, create guidelines for policy recommendations. PMID:24457020

  8. Legal Outcomes of Sexually Abused Children Evaluated at the Philippine General Hospital Child Protection Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugue-Castillo, Mariella

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the legal outcomes and factors associated with case reaching court and conviction for sexual abuse of children seen at the Philippine General Hospital Child Protection Unit (PGH-CPU) from 1997 to 2000. Methods: Mixed transdisciplinary research design combined longitudinal cohort with qualitative methods. Data were obtained…

  9. Stakeholder perspectives on handovers between hospital staff and general practitioners: an evaluation through the microsystems lens

    PubMed Central

    Göbel, Beryl; Zwart, Dorien; Hesselink, Gijs; Pijnenborg, Loes; Barach, Paul; Kalkman, Cor; Johnson, Julie K

    2012-01-01

    Background Much of the research on improving patient handovers has focused on enhancing communication within the hospital system, but there have been relatively few efforts aimed at addressing the challenges at the interface between the hospital and the primary care setting. Methods A qualitative thematic analysis using a clinical microsystems lens applied to 28 semi-structured key stakeholder interviews in the Netherlands. Data were organised into seven ‘virtual’ clinical microsystem datasets composed of patients, hospital-based physicians, hospital-based nurses and community-based general practitioners. Results Five themes that contributed to effective or ineffective handovers emerged from our analysis: (1) lack of adequate information; (2) healthcare professionals’ availability and opportunity for personal contact; (3) feedback, teaching and protocols related to handovers; (4) information technology facilitated communication solutions; and (5) the role and responsibility of patients. Our analysis suggests that each healthcare professional attempted to provide the best care possible, but did this largely in isolation, and without the benefit of the knowledge and expertise of the other members of the microsystem. Conclusions The microsystem approach offers an innovative organisational construct and approach to assess the gaps in ‘hospital to community’ patient handovers, by viewing the hospital to the community interface as a clinical microsystem continuum. Our application of the microsystem approach confirms and extends earlier findings about the impact of barriers on the continuity and safety of patient transitions and their impact on the quality of patient care. PMID:23118408

  10. Acute generalized weakness in patients referred to Amirkola Children’s Hospital from 2005 to 2010

    PubMed Central

    Salehiomran, Mohammad Reza; Naserkhaki, Somayeh; Hajiahmadi, Mahmoud

    2012-01-01

    Background: Diseases that cause acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) often progress rapidly, thus may cause life threatening complications, therefore, their diagnosis and cure are important. This study was carried out to investigate the causes of acute generalized weakness in children referred to Amirkola Children’s Hospital, in Babol, Iran. Methods: In this case series, the epidemiological causes of the disease and clinical features of 15 cases with acute generalized weakness from April 2005 to September 2010 were evaluated. The data were collected and analyzed. Results: The mean age of cases was 4.7±3.5 years. The male/female ratio was 2. Twenty cases had Guillain-Barre syndrome, two with myositis and one with periodic hyperkalemic paralysis. Conclusion: Guillain-Barre syndrome is the most common cause of AFP in children admitted due to acute generalized weakness in Amirkola Children’s Hospital. PMID:24358438

  11. Child and adolescent psychiatry in general children's hospitals. A survey of chairs of psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Campo, J V; Kingsley, R S; Bridge, J; Mrazek, D

    2000-01-01

    This article characterizes the academic, administrative, clinical service, and fiscal characteristics of departments of psychiatry in traditional children's hospitals to determine the characteristics of fiscally successful programs. A survey of chairs of psychiatry from short-term general children's hospitals was conducted based on 38 questions addressing the descriptive characteristics of their respective departments. The characteristics of psychiatry programs identified as fiscally successful were compared to those of programs that required subsidy. Nine of 45 eligible children's hospitals (20%) did not have a department or section of psychiatry, and surveys were returned by 35 of 36 department chairs (97% response). Considerable variation exists in the academic, administrative, clinical services, and fiscal characteristics of programs, although over half are operating at a deficit. Fiscal success was associated with availability of inpatient and intermediate levels of psychiatric care, better integration of the psychiatry program within the children's hospital, and adequate fiscal information being provided to the psychiatry chair. Additional research regarding the potential of psychiatric services to generate clinical success and cost savings is warranted. Pediatric health care professionals and third-party payers should be educated regarding the relevance of psychiatric services within children's hospitals and in physically ill children. PMID:10749950

  12. Patient Safety in Tehran University of Medical Sciences’ General Hospitals, Iran

    PubMed Central

    ARAB, Mohammad; AKBARI SARI, Ali; MOVAHED KOR, Elham; HOSSEINI, Mostafa; TOLOUI RAKHSHAN, Shiva; EZATI, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Background It is important to focus on creating opportunities for patients’ participation at all levels of health systems in order to promote their ability to improve patient safety and quality of services. The general aim of this study was to determine patient safety level in Tehran University of Medical Sciences’ (TUMS) general hospitals, Tehran, Iran from patients’ perspective and to determine the contributory factors on their perspective. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study. In the spring 2011, the list of clinical departments of the six general hospitals affiliated to TUMS was obtained through the Website of TUMS. By using stratified random sampling, the sample size was calculated 300 patients. Data were collected by using a structured questionnaire and its validity and reliability were acceptable. Descriptive statistics, linear regression and logistic regression were used for analyzing the data. Results: Totally, 60% of patients were female. Patient safety was evaluated high by 60% of respondents. The unmarried or educated or employed individuals tend to score lower than others. Conclusion: TUMS’s general hospitals are enough safe from patients’ perspective, patient safety should be improved. In clinical governance, contributing patients’ perspective to the improvement of patient safety reforms is critical in generating new models of good practice. PMID:23641408

  13. CONTENDING WITH SPACE-TIME INTERACTION IN THE SPATIAL PREDICTION OF POLLUTION: VANCOUVER'S HOURLY AMBIENT PM 10 FIELD

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this article we describe an approach for predicting average hourly concentrations of ambient PM10 in Vancouver. We know our solution also applies to hourly ozone fields and believe it may be quite generally applicable. We use a hierarchal Bayesian approach. At the primary ...

  14. The Difference in the Online Medical Information Searching Behaviors of Hospital Patients and Their Relatives versus the General Public

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Hung-Yuan; Liang, Jyh-Chong; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is two-fold: to explore the differences in online medical information searching behaviors, including evaluative standards and search strategies, of the general public (general group) and those of hospital patients and their relatives (hospital group); and to compare the predictive relationship between the evaluative…

  15. Relations between ethnic Croats and ethnic Serbs at Vukovar General Hospital in wartime and peacetime.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Joshua D; Sondorp, Egbert

    2006-01-01

    This article examines war and peacetime ethnic relations at Vukovar General Hospital in Croatia's Eastern Slavonia region. A negotiated peace agreement paved the way for a multi-sectored approach to the reintegration of Eastern Slavonia back into the state and rapprochement between ethnic groups under the supervision of a United Nations transitional administration. This case study provides a glimpse into the realities of those peace-building processes on an institutional level in Eastern Slavonia's healthcare system. The reintegration of Vukovar hospital, the transition of Eastern Slavonia's health sector and peace-building in the region in general received much deserved accolades despite some flaws and minor setbacks. These experiences can still serve as a model for the rest of Croatia and for other countries emerging from civil conflicts. PMID:16749476

  16. Noise at night in hospital general wards: a mapping of the literature.

    PubMed

    Fillary, Julie; Chaplin, Hema; Jones, Gill; Thompson, Angela; Holme, Anita; Wilson, Patricia

    English NHS inpatient surveys consistently identify that noise at night in hospitals and its impact on patients' sleep is a persisting problem that needs addressing. To identify how noise at night in hospital affects patients on general wards and the range of interventions aimed at reducing the problem, a systematic mapping of the literature was undertaken. All primary studies and relevant literature published January 2003-July 2013 were included. Key issues identified in the literature included noise levels and causes, impact on patient experience, and lack of staff awareness. Interventions to reduce noise were targeted at staff education, behaviour modification, care organisation and environmental solutions. The scoping suggested that when compared with specialist units, there is little evidence on effective interventions reducing disturbance from night-time noise on general wards. The available evidence suggests a whole systems approach should be adopted to aid quality sleep and promote recovery. PMID:26018021

  17. [Investigation into drinking problem of patients who visited a general hospital in central and northern Okinawa].

    PubMed

    Nakai, Minori; Hotta, Hiroshi; Ootsuru, Taku; Hiejima, Shigeto; Murakami, Masaru; Yuzuriha, Takefumi; Kondo, Tsuyoshi

    2013-04-01

    In Japan, many problems related to alcohol are pointed out from before. We believe that there is a unique drinking culture in Okinawa, such as a large amount of alcohol. Therefore, we estimate many people in Okinawa have a drinking problem. We conducted a survey of patients who visited general hospital (medical or surgical or orthopedic) in 2007. The purpose of this study is to collect basic data for introducing alcoholics to specialized treatment as early as possible, detecting the person who drink large amounts of alcohol, performing early intervention for people who drink large amount of alcohol, and advancing cooperation with specialized medical agencies of alcohol. As a result, Among the patients who visited general hospital in Okinawa, many problem drinkers are concentrated in the young age. and they have strong fears of health. The possibility of early intervention with intervention techniques, such as brief intervention, has been suggested. PMID:23808321

  18. Laboratory investigation of monoclonal gammopathy during 10 years of screening in a general hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Malacrida, V; De Francesco, D; Banfi, G; Porta, F A; Riches, P G

    1987-01-01

    Protein electrophoresis was carried out on 102,000 samples from the patients of a district general hospital over 10 years, and a monoclonal protein was detected in 730 cases; of these, 114 could be classified as B cell malignancies and 261 as monoclonal gammopathy of undefined significance (MGUS). The various clinical and laboratory features of monoclonal gammopathy were examined with respect to distinguishing the malignant conditions from MGUS at first presentation. PMID:3114329

  19. Syphilitic Aortitis: Autopsy Experience at the Ottawa General Hospital Since 1950

    PubMed Central

    Heggtveit, H. Alexander

    1965-01-01

    Twenty-six cases of syphilitic aortitis were found among 4173 autopsies performed at the Ottawa General Hospital since 1950. Although 10 aortic aneurysms, nine instances of coronary ostial stenosis and five examples of aortic incompetence were present in 20 cases, a clinical diagnosis of syphilitic aortitis had been established in only two patients. It is paradoxical that the clinical diagnosis of syphilitic aortitis is becoming less accurate as surgical techniques for the correction of its complications are being constantly improved. PMID:14282945

  20. Two decades of external peer review of cancer care in general hospitals; the Dutch experience.

    PubMed

    Kilsdonk, Melvin J; Siesling, Sabine; Otter, Rene; van Harten, Wim H

    2016-03-01

    External peer review was introduced in general hospitals in the Netherlands in 1994 to assess and improve the multidisciplinary team approach in cancer care. This paper aims to explore the value, perceived impact, and (future) role of external peer review in cancer care. Semistructured interviews were held with clinicians, oncology nurses, and managers from fifteen general hospitals that participated in three rounds of peer review over a period of 16 years. Interviewees reflected on the goals and expectations, experiences, perceived impact, and future role of external peer review. Transcriptions of the interviews were coded to discover recurrent themes. Improving clinical care and organization were the main motives for participation. Positive impact was perceived on multiple aspects of care such as shared responsibilities, internal prioritization of cancer care, improved communication, and a clear structure and position of cancer care within general hospitals. Establishing a direct relationship between the external peer review and organizational or clinical impact proved to be difficult. Criticism was raised on the content of the program being too theoretical and organization-focussed after three rounds. According to most stakeholders, external peer review can improve multidisciplinary team work in cancer care; however, the acceptance is threatened by a perceived disbalance between effort and visible clinical impact. Leaner and more clinically focused programs are needed to keep repeated peer reviews challenging and worthwhile. PMID:26714788

  1. IRS General Counsel Memorandum threatens some hospital-physician joint ventures.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, T L; Schieble, M T

    1992-03-01

    To defend against the heightened scrutiny of hospital-physician relations expected from the IRS, hospital management should closely examine any activities now conducted with physicians to determine whether each activity, as organized and operated, furthers the hospital's charitable mission of promoting the health of its community, rather than merely enhancing the financial health of the institution itself. Any arrangements that do not appear to satisfy the principles enunciated in GCM 39862 should be examined to see if they should be restructured or dissolved. In structuring new transactions and examining existing arrangements, the following principles should be kept in mind: 1. Transactions should not be premised upon increased utilization or physician referrals. Enhancing or protecting market share, even for the purpose of preserving an institution's presence in the community, will likely no longer be accepted as a justification for pursuing joint venture arrangements. In justifying such ventures, management must distinguish between benefit to the community and benefit to the institution. 2. Transactions whereby existing services or equipment are "spun off" to a hospital-physician joint venture run a serious risk of enhanced IRS scrutiny. 3. Transactions creating or providing new facilities or services should be more favorably perceived, particularly where participants other than the hospital take an active role in managing the venture. Where the hospital is the sole general partner and merely manages what it would have managed had there been no physician investors, the question of why physicians are involved will likely be of greater concern than it has been in the past.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:10118472

  2. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Infections in a General Hospital: Patient Characteristics, Antimicrobial Susceptibility, and Treatment Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Samonis, George; Karageorgopoulos, Drosos E.; Maraki, Sofia; Levis, Panagiotis; Dimopoulou, Dimitra; Spernovasilis, Nikolaos A.; Kofteridis, Diamantis P.; Falagas, Matthew E.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is acquiring increasing importance as a nosocomial pathogen. Methods We retrospectively studied the characteristics and outcome of patients with any type of S. maltophilia infection at the University Hospital of Heraklion, Crete, Greece, between 1/2005–12/2010. S. maltophilia antimicrobial susceptibility was tested with the agar dilution method. Prognostic factors for all-cause in-hospital mortality were assessed with multivariate logistic regression. Results Sixty-eight patients (median age: 70.5 years; 64.7% males) with S. maltophilia infection, not related to cystic fibrosis, were included. The 68 patients were hospitalized in medical (29.4%), surgical (26.5%), hematology/oncology departments (23.5%), or the intensive care units (ICU; 20.6%). The most frequent infection types were respiratory tract (54.4%), bloodstream (16.2%), skin/soft tissue (10.3%), and intra-abdominal (8.8%) infection. The S. maltophilia-associated infection was polymicrobial in 33.8% of the cases. In vitro susceptibility was higher to colistin (91.2%), trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and netilmicin (85.3% each), and ciprofloxacin (82.4%). The empirical and the targeted treatment regimens were microbiologically appropriate for 47.3% and 63.6% of the 55 patients with data available, respectively. Most patients received targeted therapy with a combination of agents other than trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. The crude mortality and the mortality and the S. maltophilia infection-related mortality were 14.7% and 4.4%, respectively. ICU hospitalization was the only independent prognostic factor for mortality. Conclusion S. maltophilia infection in a general hospital can be associated with a good prognosis, except for the patients hospitalized in the ICU. Combination reigmens with fluoroquinolones, colistin, or tigecycline could be alternative treatment options to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. PMID:22624022

  3. Why are family carers of people with dementia dissatisfied with general hospital care? a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Families and other carers report widespread dissatisfaction with general hospital care for confused older people. Methods We undertook a qualitative interviews study of 35 family carers of 34 confused older patients to ascertain their experiences of care on geriatric and general medical, and orthopaedic wards of a large English hospital. Transcripts were analysed using a grounded theory approach. Themes identified in interviews were categorised, and used to build a model explaining dissatisfaction with care. Results The experience of hospital care was often negative. Key themes were events (illness leading to admission, experiences in the hospital, adverse occurrences including deterioration in health, or perceived poor care); expectations (which were sometimes unrealistic, usually unexplored by staff, and largely unmet from the carers’ perspective); and relationships with staff (poor communication and conflict over care). Expectations were influenced by prior experience. A cycle of discontent is proposed. Events (or ‘crises’) are associated with expectations. When these are unmet, carers become uncertain or suspicious, which leads to a period of ‘hyper vigilant monitoring’ during which carers seek out evidence of poor care, culminating in challenge, conflict with staff, or withdrawal, itself a crisis. The cycle could be completed early during the admission pathway, and multiple cycles within a single admission were seen. Conclusion People with dementia who have family carers should be considered together as a unit. Family carers are often stressed and tired, and need engaging and reassuring. They need to give and receive information about the care of the person with dementia, and offered the opportunity to participate in care whilst in hospital. Understanding the perspective of the family carer, and recognising elements of the ‘cycle of discontent’, could help ward staff anticipate carer needs, enable relationship building, to pre-empt or avoid dissatisfaction or conflict. PMID:23006826

  4. Trauma services requirements in a district general hospital serving a rural area.

    PubMed Central

    Kinny, S J; Jones, D H

    1990-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess the demands made on a regional trauma centre by a district trauma unit. DESIGN--Two part study. (1) Prospective analysis of one month's workload. (2) Retrospective analysis of one year's workload by using a computer based records system. Comparison of two sets of results. SETTING--Accident unit in Gwynedd Hospital, Bangor. PATIENTS--(1) All patients who attended the accident unit in August 1988. (2) All patients who attended the accident unit in the calendar year April 1988-April 1989. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Workload of a district trauma unit. RESULTS--In August 1988 there were 2325 attendances; 2302 of these were analysed. In all, 1904 attendances were for trauma; 213 patients were admitted to the trauma ward and 103 required an operation that entailed incision. Patients who attended the unit had a mean (range) injury severity score of 2-13 (0-25). Only two patients had injuries that a district general hospital would not be expected to cope with (injury severity score greater than 20). In the year April 1988-April 1989, 21,007 patients attended the unit. In all, 17,958 attendances were for orthopaedic injuries or injuries caused by an accident; 1966 patients were admitted to the unit. CONCLUSIONS--Most trauma is musculoskeletal and relatively minor according to the injury severity score. All but a few injuries can be managed in district general hospitals. In their recent report the Royal College of Surgeons has overestimated the requirements that a British district general hospital would have of a regional trauma centre. PMID:2107928

  5. Physical Violence against General Practitioners and Nurses in Chinese Township Hospitals: A Cross-Sectional Survey

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Kai; Jiao, Mingli; Ma, Hongkun; Qiao, Hong; Hao, Yanhua; Li, Ye; Gao, Lijun; Sun, Hong; Kang, Zheng; Liang, Libo; Wu, Qunhong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to identify risk factors of physical violence in Chinese township hospitals. Methods A cross-sectional survey was used in a sample of 442 general practitioners and 398 general nurses from 90 township hospitals located in Heilongjiang province, China (response rate = 84.8%). Results A total of 106 of the 840 (12.6%) respondents reported being physically attacked in their workplace in the previous 12 months. Most perpetrators were the patients’ relatives (62.3%), followed by the patient (22.6%); 73.6% of perpetrators were aged between 20 and 40 years. Of the physical violence incidents, about 56.6% (n = 60) resulted in a physical injury, and 45.4% of respondents took two or three days of sick leave. Reporting workplace violence in hospitals to superiors or authorities was low (9.4%). Most respondents (62.8%) did not receive training on how to avoid workplace violence. Logistic regression analyses indicated that general nurses, aged 35 years or younger, and with a higher-level professional title were more likely to experience physical violence. Healthcare workers with direct physical contact (washing, turning, lifting) with patients had a higher risk of physical violence compared to other health care workers. Procedures for reporting workplace violence were a protective factor for physical violence; when in place, reporting after psychological violence (verbal abuse, bullying/mobbing, harassment, and threats) was more protective than waiting until an instance of physical violence (beating, kicking, slapping, stabbing, etc.). Conclusions Physical violence in Chinese township hospitals is an occupational hazard of rural public health concern. Policies, procedures, and intervention strategies should be undertaken to manage this issue. PMID:26571388

  6. Pilot Quality Control Program for Brachytherapy of Low Dose Rate at the General Hospital of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez R., J. T.; Tovar M., V.; Salinas, B.; Hernández O., O.; Santillán B., L.; Molero M., C.; Montoya M., J.

    2004-09-01

    We describe the pilot quality control program for brachytherapy of low dose rate proposed to be used in the Radiotherapy Department at the General Hospital of Mexico. The program consists of three parts: a) development of calibration procedures, performed in terms of air-kerma strength for calibration of 137Cs and 192Ir brachytherapy sources, and for the calibration of well-type ionization chambers for 137Cs, b) performance of localisation and reconstruction techniques for radioactive sources with a Baltas' phantom. The results obtained for the media deviation , are in the optimum level, ± 0.5 mm < ± 1.0 mm; the confidence limit Δ, is in the emergency level, Δ=3.2 mm. c) verification of absorbed dose to water DW, given by the hospital. It consists on the characterisation of a TLD-100 powder dosimetry system at SSDL: The calibration curves for powder response (nC or nC/ mg) vs Dw and the control charts for the Harshaw 3500 reader were obtained. The statistical validation of the calibration curve by normality of the residuals and the lack of fit tests were realised. In the other hand, TLD's were irradiated in the hospital to a nominal Dw = 2 Gy with sources of 137Cs. The percent deviations Δ%, between the Dw imparted by the Hospital and the determined by SSDL, are 1.2% Δ⩽ 6.5 % which are consistent with the expanded uncertainty U% for DW, 5.6 U% 10%.

  7. Prospective funding of general hospitals in Norway--incentives for higher production?

    PubMed

    Kjerstad, Egil

    2003-12-01

    In Norway, a new system of Activity Based Financing (ABF) for general hospitals was introduced on a comprehensive basis in July 1997. The main purpose of the reform was to increase activity so that more patients could receive treatment more quickly without reducing the quality of care. In this paper we analyse whether the reform has had any significant effect using two different performance indicators: number of patients treated and production of DRG points (Diagnosis Related Group). We divide the hospitals into two groups: hospitals owned by counties that have adopted the ABF system, and hospitals owned by counties using other funding systems. The first group then becomes the experiment group, while the second serves as a comparison group. It is argued that fixed-effect models are suitable specifications for this evaluation study, handling selection bias and the influence of unobservable explanatory variables in a consistent manner. We find that the reform has had a significant effect on the number of patients treated and DRG points produced. The results are sensitive as to how the experiment and the comparison group are determined. PMID:14650078

  8. Barriers to the Operation of Patient Safety Incident Reporting Systems in Korean General Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jee-In; Lee, Sang-IL

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to explore the barriers to and factors facilitating the operation of patient safety incident reporting systems. Methods A qualitative study that used a methodological triangulation method was conducted. Participants were those who were involved in or responsible for managing incident reporting at hospitals, and they were recruited via a snowballing sampling method. Data were collected via interviews or emails from 42 nurses at 42 general hospitals. A qualitative content analysis was performed to derive the major themes related to barriers to and factors facilitating incident reporting. Results Participants suggested 96 barriers to incident reporting in their hospitals at the organizational and individual levels. Low reporting rates, especially for near misses, were the most commonly reported issue, followed by poorly designed incident reporting systems and a lack of adequate patient safety leadership by mid-level managers. To resolve and overcome these barriers, 104 recommendations were suggested. The high-priority recommendations included introducing reward systems; improving incident reporting systems, by for instance implementing a variety of reporting channels and ensuring reporter anonymity; and creating a strong safety culture. Conclusions The barriers to and factors facilitating incident reporting include various organizational and individual factors. As an important way to address these challenging issues and to improve the incident reporting systems in hospitals, we suggest several feasible methods of doing so. PMID:23346479

  9. The role of rotavirus associated with pediatric gastroenteritis in a general hospital in Lagos, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Anochie, Philip Ifesinachi; Onyeneke, Edwina Chinwe; Asowata, Emmanuel Osaretin; Afocha, Ebelechukwu; Onyeozirila, Anthony Chidiebere; Ogu, Angelina Chinyere; Onyeneke, Bestman Chukwuemeka

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Bacterial, viral and parasitic agents have been implicated and confirmed as causative agents of gastroenteritis in children with ages below 5 years old. The major role of rotavirus as causative agent is not widely recognized within the public health community, particularly in developing countries. This study examined the role of rotavirus as a causative agent of childhood gastroenteritis in infants and young children below 5 years of age in a General Hospital in Lagos, Nigeria. Methods Parents and caregivers of children admitted to the hospital were interviewed using a structured questionnaire. Viral RNA was extracted from the stool samples collected and analyzed using RT-PCR for genotyping and agarose gel electrophoresis for identification of rotavirus electrophoretypes. Results Out of the 71 samples analyzed, 16 (22.5%) were positive for rotavirus. A total of 12 (75%) males and 4 (25%) females were positive for rotavirus gastroenteritis with most cases (7, 43.8%) distributed to the 13-24 months age group, followed closely by the 1-6 months age group, with 6 cases, 37.5%. Rotavirus G2 genotype was the most prevalent strain in the hospital (10 patients, 62.5%) followed by G1 (6 patients, 37.5%). These were the only rotavirus genotypes detected in the hospital. PMID:24432291

  10. Dying at home or in the hospital? An observational study in German general practice.

    PubMed

    Gágyor, Ildikó; Himmel, Wolfgang; Pierau, Andrea; Chenot, Jean-François

    2016-03-01

    Background Although determinants of place of death have been investigated in several studies, there is a lack of knowledge on factors associated with dying at home from the general practice perspective. Objectives To identify factors associated with dying at home for patients in German general practice. Methods In a retrospective study, general practitioners of 30 general practices were asked to provide data for all patients aged 18 years or older who died within the last 12 months, using a self-developed questionnaire. 'Dying in hospital' was defined as dying in hospital or hospice and 'dying at home' as dying at one's usual residence including the nursing home. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to determine factors associated with 'dying at home'; odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated as measures of effect size. Results Of 439 deceased patients, 52.2% died at home, and 47.8% died in hospital or hospice. Determinants for dying at home were patients' care in the last 48 hours of life by family members (OR: 7.8, 95% CI: 3.4-18.0), by general practitioners (GPs) (OR: 7.3, 4.2-12.9) and living in a nursing home (OR: 3.8, 1.7-8.3). In the adjusted model, low comorbidity was positively associated (OR: 3.2, 1.4-7.0), and low functional health status (Karnofsky performance status) was negatively associated with dying at home (OR: 0.3, 0.1-0.7). Conclusion Apart from patient-related factors such as comorbidity and health status, care by family members and GPs respectively, were determinants of dying at home. PMID:26799953

  11. Water quality improvement plan for Greater Vancouver

    SciTech Connect

    Foellmi, S.N. . Environmental Div.); Neden, D.G. ); Dawson, R.N. )

    1993-10-01

    The Greater Vancouver Regional District commissioned an 18-month planning and predesign study to define the components in a comprehensive water and predesign study to define the components in a comprehensive water quality improvement plan for its 2,500-ML/d (660-mgd) system. The study included three primary tasks: (1) predesign of disinfection and corrosion control facilities, (2) a 12-month pilot testing program using parallel pilot plants at the Seymour and Capilano water supply reservoirs, and (3) planning for future filtration plants. The results of the study identified chlorine, ammonia, sulfur dioxide, soda ash, and carbon dioxide in a two-stage treatment approach as the recommended disinfection and corrosion control scheme for the low-pH, low-alkalinity water supplies. The pilot-plant studies confirmed that direct filtration using deep-bed monomedium filters operating at a loading rate of 22.5 m/h provided excellent treatment performance and productivity over a wide range of raw-water quality. Ozonation was studied extensively and found not to be beneficial in the overall treatment performance. The phased improvement plan for the disinfection, corrosion control, and filtration facilities has an estimated capital cost of about Can$459 million.

  12. Laboratory to Clinical Investigation of Carbapenem Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Outbreak in a General Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Guo-xin, Mo; Dan-yang, She; Xi-zhou, Guan; Jun-chang, Cui; Rui, Wang; Zhi-gang, Cui; Liang-an, Chen

    2014-01-01

    Background: The number of reported cases, infected with carbepenem resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (CRAb) and multi-drug resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter species had gradually increased in most PLA general hospital wards from April to June in 2007. Objectives: We have described the investigation of an outbreak of CRAb and MDR Acinetobacter in PLA general hospital, Beijing. The prospective and retrospective findings were identified and analyzed to study the infection causes. Materials and Methods: A. baumannii samples were collected from the patients and environment in each hospital unit. The onset times were recorded according to their case information. All samples were characterized by genotype and compared using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The microorganism susceptibility was tested using the in vitro minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) breakpoints method. Results: A total of 69 A. baumannii strains were successfully isolated from 53 patients. About 89.1% of them were resistant to ampicillin and 89.2% to cefotaxime and 75.4% to all standard antibiotics. PFGE analysis revealed that nine of the isolates had unique clones and the epidemic clone types were A, B and C. Conclusions: The A. baumannii outbreak, was caused by MDR A. baumannii. The strains had widely spread among 12 departments especially in surgical intensive care unit (SICU), emergency intensive care unit (EICU) and the department of respiratory disease. The outbreak was more likely caused by the A. baumannii infected or carrier patients and EICU was its origin. PMID:25147648

  13. Effects of 'bare below the elbows' policy on hand contamination of 92 hospital doctors in a district general hospital.

    PubMed

    Willis-Owen, C A; Subramanian, P; Kumari, P; Houlihan-Burne, D

    2010-06-01

    Despite a lack of evidence the UK's Department of Health introduced a policy of 'bare below the elbows' attire in order to try to reduce the incidence of nosocomial infection. This study investigates the link between this state of dress and hand contamination. A prospective observational study of doctors working in a district general hospital was carried out. The fingertips of each hand were imprinted onto culture medium, and resultant growth assessed for number of colony-forming units and presence of clinically significant pathogens or multiply resistant organisms. These findings were correlated with attire, grade, sex and specialty. Ninety-two doctors were recruited of whom 49 were 'bare below the elbows' compliant and 43 were not. There was no statistically significant difference between those doctors who were 'bare below the elbows' and those that were not, either for the number of colony-forming units or for the presence of clinically significant organisms. No multiply resistant organisms were cultured from doctors' hands. 'Bare below the elbows' attire is not related to the degree of contamination on doctors' fingertips or the presence of clinically significant pathogens. Further studies are required to establish whether investment in doctors' uniforms and patient education campaigns are worthwhile. PMID:20299128

  14. Is locating acute wards in the general hospital an essential element in psychiatric reform? The U.K. experience.

    PubMed

    Totman, Jonathan; Mann, Farhana; Johnson, Sonia

    2010-01-01

    Locating psychiatric wards in general hospitals has long been seen in many countries as a key element in the reform of services to promote community integration of the mentally ill. In the U.K., however, this is no longer a policy priority, and the recent trend has been towards small freestanding inpatient units, located either within the communities they serve, or on general hospital sites, but separate from the main building. Whether locating the psychiatric wards in the general hospital is essential to psychiatric reform has been little discussed, and we can find no relevant evidence. Perceived strengths of general hospital psychiatric wards are in normalisation of mental health problems, accessibility to local communities, better availability of physical health care resources, and integration of psychiatry with the rest of the medical profession, which may faclilitate recruitment. However, difficulties seem to have been encountered in establishing well-designed psychiatric wards with access to open space in general hospitals. Also, physical proximity may not be enough to achieve the desired reduction in stigma, and complaints from the general hospital may sometimes result in undue restrictions on psychiatric ward patients. There are strong arguments both for and against locating psychiatric wards in general hospitals: an empirical evidence base would be helpful to inform important decisions about the best setting for wards. PMID:21322499

  15. Role conflict and role ambiguity among middle managers in general acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Lynch, J J; Rogers, V L

    1986-05-01

    One hundred ninety-three middle managers in general acute care hospitals participated in a study to measure role conflict and role ambiguity. Middle managers of both direct patient care and supporting services departments reported low levels of role conflict. Nonetheless, role overload and role conflict were significantly higher for managers of patient care departments than service departments. In addition, managers of both types of departments most often experienced intersender role conflict. Direct patient care and supporting services managers also reported low levels of role ambiguity, with no significant differences reported between the two types of departments. The relationship of role conflict and role ambiguity to demographic factors such as the manager's sex, educational level, years of managerial experience, and hospital size was also explored. PMID:3721992

  16. A study of the accumulation of long-stay patients in a general hospital psychiatric department.

    PubMed

    Cumella, S J; Lawrence, R; Robertson, J A

    1988-05-01

    A survey of all admissions of patients under the age of 65 years during the first 6 years of a General Hospital Psychiatric Department identified 16 'long-stay' patients (a year or more of continuous inpatient care) and 8 'medium-stay' patients (at least 6 months inpatient care in any period of a year). The most common diagnoses were organic brain disorders among long-stay patients, and affective disorders among medium-stay patients. There was no consistent accumulation of long-stay patients: those with functional disorders were usually discharged to hostel accommodation, while those with organic brain disorders died or were transferred to inpatient care in other hospitals. PMID:10312604

  17. A survey of neonatal tetanus at a district general hospital in north-east Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Bala; Popoola, Ayo; Olokoba, Abdulfatai; Salawu, Fatai K

    2011-01-01

    Neonatal tetanus (NNT) remains among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in Nigeria and a huge challenge in achieving the fourth goal of the Millennium Development Goals. We reviewed the morbidity and mortality pattern among neonates with NNT admitted to the District General Hospital in north-east Nigeria from 2006 to 2009. Half of the patients were from rural areas and were delivered at home by untrained traditional birth attendants with no prior antenatal health care. Razor blades and scissors were the instruments used to cut the cord in nonhygienic conditions. Spasticity, lack of sucking, trismus, fever, omphalitis, risus sardonicus and opisthotonus were the most common presenting signs and symptoms. Overall, mortality was 56%. Health education of mothers and traditional birth attendants, the promotion of hospital delivery and antenatal tetanus immunization of all pregnant women, particularly in rural areas, are recommended if NNT is to be prevented. PMID:21172902

  18. [Suicidality at the general hospital – perspective of consultation and liaison psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Imboden, Christian; Hatzinger, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Suicidality is a common problem in the general hospital. Patients with comorbid psychiatric disorders or during a psychosocial crisis can develop suicidal ideation during their stay at the general hospital, especially if they suffer from chronic disease. Some somatic disorders, such as cancer, epilepsy, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, stroke and chronic pain conditions are associated with an increased risk of suicide. The fact that (1) a major part of patients are treated in the emergency room (ER) after a suicide attempt and (2) a suicide attempt is the strongest predictor for later completed suicide emphasizes the importance of expertise in dealing with suicidal patients in the ER. In order to improve prevention of suicides and suicide attempts within the general hospital and after discharge it is important to educate staff concerning suicidality and enhance detection of suicidal patients. A consultation and liaison psychiatrist should always be involved when there are suicidal patients on wards and in the ER. Assessment of suicidal patients has always to include clear recommendations concerning patient safety and treatment of the underlying condition as well as specific approaches in dealing with suicidal thoughts. Safety measures can include close monitoring, constant observation, restriction to means of suicide, referral to a psychiatric clinic and treatment with sedatives, generally benzodiazepines. Psychiatric disorders are ideally treated according to guidelines and clear recommendations should be given concerning treatment after discharge. Specific psychotherapy for suicidal behaviour possibly reduces the risk of future suicides. A special situation is created by assisted suicides which attribute to suicides in the elderly with a recent increase in the Swiss population. In some cases, undiagnosed depression may contribute to the decision making process, hence, underlining the importance of improved detection and treatment of depression in the elderly. PMID:26423882

  19. Pathways to psychiatric care in urban north China: a general hospital based study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pathway studies highlight the help-seeking behaviors of patients with physical and mental illnesses. A number of studies in this field have been completed in various parts of the world. The purpose of this study is to explore the characteristics of the help-seeking pathways of patients with mental illness from urban north China at Mental Health Professional (MHP). Methods The pathway diagrams, which accounted for more than five percent of patients, were documented for 441 subjects using the translated version of the World Health Organization (WHO) pathway encounter form. The patterns and durations of care-seeking were analyzed in different diagnostic groups. The ?2-test and the Mann-Whitney U test were employed, as needed. Results Respondents visited the MHP through a variety of pathways. Approximately three-quarters of the patients took an indirect pathway (74.8% vs 25.2%, ?2?=?108.8, p?general hospitals (56.4% vs 4.1%, ?2?=?138.3, p?general hospitals (24.8% vs 4.1%, ?2?=?40.96, p?hospitals. Of the patients who first contacted with psychiatry hospital, 55.6% received a professional diagnosis and finally reached the MHP because of the poor treatment or high-cost medical care. Conclusions The majority of patients seek other pathways than to go to MHP directly and this may be due to stigma, and/or lack of knowledge. The study gives emphasis on the importance of improving skills and knowledge that will facilitate the recognition of psychiatric disorders in the community health centers, the general hospitals system and by private practitioners. The pathway described by this study may be helpful while preparing mental health programs in the future. PMID:24020825

  20. [Forced medical treatment: existent law and its limitations in a general hospital].

    PubMed

    Nitzan, Uri; Lev-Ran, Shaul; Phenig, Shmuel

    2011-04-01

    The conditions in which we can provide medical treatment without informed consent are detailed in the Israeli Law for Treating the Mentally Ill [1991), and the Law of Patient Rights (1996). Our clinicaL experience in a general hospital indicates that the law does not provide a satisfactory solution in cases where the patient is actively resisting emergency treatment. This may be the case for patients suffering from dementia, personality disorders or substance abuse disorders. Not infrequently, the physician finds himself perplexed in face of a genuine ethical/juridical dilemma, without being able to use the law efficiently or, at times, even implement it pragmatically. in this article, we review the array of laws by which Israeli physicians in general, and psychiatrists in particular, operate upon when deciding to treat a patient against his will in a general hospital. We describe and discuss a clinicaL case that raises fundamental questions concerning the existing law. We also discuss other complex cases, such as anorexia, debating the possibility of coercing medical treatment on someone who is not mentally ill--psychotic according to Israeli juridical system. Finally, we raise a few ideas as to how the present condition can be improved. PMID:22164925

  1. Setting Standards of Performance for Program Evaluations: The Case of the Teaching Hospital General Medicine Group Practice Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fink, Arlene; And Others

    1986-01-01

    This article describes standards setting in an evaluation of the structure of 15 of the nation's university hospitals who participated in the Teaching Hospital General Medicine Group Practice Program. Standards were (1) selected from many sources; (2) formed in a participatory, competing forum for discussion; and (3) set in advance of information

  2. Psychiatric crisis intervention in the general emergency service of a Veterans Affairs hospital.

    PubMed

    Lambert, M

    1995-03-01

    An after-hours crisis intervention program staffed by psychiatric residents between 5 p.m. and 11:30 p.m. on weekdays was developed in the general emergency room at a Veterans Affairs hospital to reduce inpatient psychiatric admissions. The program offered medication, family interventions, and referrals to outpatient services. In the programs's first year, inpatient admissions during the hours covered by the program decreased by 34 percent, for a net savings of nearly $400,000 in inpatient treatment costs. PMID:7796219

  3. The incidence of monoclonal proteins during 7 years of screening in a District General Hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, R A; Smith, L; Pickering, P E

    1984-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the incidence of monoclonal proteins, during a 7-year period, in the population served by a typical District General Hospital. 183,300 sera were electrophoresed and 804 monoclonal proteins were detected. Various biochemical prognostic criteria, such as the concentration of monoclonal protein, incidence of Bence-Jones protein and the presence of reduced polyclonal immunoglobulins, were studied in an attempt to assess the benign or malignant nature of the monoclonal protein. In this study, 75% of the patients with monoclonal proteins fulfilled at least one of these criteria, demonstrating the importance of long-term monitoring. PMID:6698575

  4. When Suicide Is Not Suicide: Self-induced Morbidity and Mortality in the General Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Bostwick, J. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Suicidal phenomena in the general hospital can take a variety of forms that can be parsed by taking into account whether or not the patient 1) intended to hasten death, and 2) included collaborators, including family and health care providers, in the decision to act. These two criteria can be used to distinguish entities as diverse as true suicide, non-compliance, euthanasia/physician-assisted suicide, and hospice/palliative care. Characterizing the nature of “suicide” events facilitates appropriate decision-making around management and disposition. PMID:25973265

  5. When Suicide Is Not Suicide: Self-induced Morbidity and Mortality in the General Hospital.

    PubMed

    Bostwick, J Michael

    2015-04-01

    Suicidal phenomena in the general hospital can take a variety of forms that can be parsed by taking into account whether or not the patient 1) intended to hasten death, and 2) included collaborators, including family and health care providers, in the decision to act. These two criteria can be used to distinguish entities as diverse as true suicide, non-compliance, euthanasia/physician-assisted suicide, and hospice/palliative care. Characterizing the nature of "suicide" events facilitates appropriate decision-making around management and disposition. PMID:25973265

  6. The psychiatric nurse specialist: a valuable asset in the general hospital.

    PubMed

    Fife, B; Lemler, S

    1983-04-01

    In summary, what are the ways in which the psychiatric/mental clinical specialist contributes to cost-effectiveness, the professional growth of nursing staff, and quality patient care in the general hospital setting? All services of the psychiatric/mental health clinical specialist are ultimately directed toward increasing the effectiveness with which staff can deliver care. This goal is accomplished by helping staff nurses maximize their knowledge, by providing needed educational opportunities, by promoting the use of a holistic model of care, and by helping staff cope with their own stress. In our experience, high quality care that meets the physiological, psychological, and sociological needs of patients decreases the length of the hospital stay, prevents repeated hospitalizations, and minimizes the development of psychosocial problems secondary to the illness. With the necessary support and cooperation from administration, this clinical specialist role reduces health care costs, promotes a higher level of functioning in patients and their families, and increases the level of job satisfaction for the staff who provide direct bedside care. PMID:6403677

  7. Emergence of an Invasive Clone of Nontoxigenic Corynebacterium diphtheriae in the Urban Poor Population of Vancouver, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Romney, M. G.; Roscoe, D. L.; Bernard, K.; Lai, S.; Efstratiou, A.; Clarke, A. M.

    2006-01-01

    Invasive disease due to Corynebacterium diphtheriae is rare in North America. Here we describe the emergence of a predominant clone of a nontoxigenic strain of C. diphtheriae in the impoverished population of Vancouver's downtown core. This clone has caused significant morbidity and contributed to at least two deaths. Over a 5-year period, seven cases of bacteremia due to C. diphtheriae were detected in patients admitted to Vancouver hospitals. Injection drug use, diabetes mellitus, skin colonization/infection with C. diphtheriae, and homelessness all appeared to be related to the development of bacteremia with the organism. Ribotyping of isolates recovered from blood culture revealed a predominant ribotype pattern that has not previously been reported in North America. PMID:16672385

  8. Principal components and generalized linear modeling in the correlation between hospital admissions and air pollution.

    PubMed

    Souza, Juliana Bottoni de; Reisen, Valdério Anselmo; Santos, Jane Méri; Franco, Glaura Conceição

    2014-06-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the association between concentrations of air pollutants and admissions for respiratory causes in children. METHODS Ecological time series study. Daily figures for hospital admissions of children aged < 6, and daily concentrations of air pollutants (PM10, SO2, NO2, O3 and CO) were analyzed in the Região da Grande Vitória, ES, Southeastern Brazil, from January 2005 to December 2010. For statistical analysis, two techniques were combined: Poisson regression with generalized additive models and principal model component analysis. Those analysis techniques complemented each other and provided more significant estimates in the estimation of relative risk. The models were adjusted for temporal trend, seasonality, day of the week, meteorological factors and autocorrelation. In the final adjustment of the model, it was necessary to include models of the Autoregressive Moving Average Models (p, q) type in the residuals in order to eliminate the autocorrelation structures present in the components. RESULTS For every 10:49 μg/m3 increase (interquartile range) in levels of the pollutant PM10 there was a 3.0% increase in the relative risk estimated using the generalized additive model analysis of main components-seasonal autoregressive - while in the usual generalized additive model, the estimate was 2.0%. CONCLUSIONS Compared to the usual generalized additive model, in general, the proposed aspect of generalized additive model - principal component analysis, showed better results in estimating relative risk and quality of fit. PMID:25119940

  9. Epidemiology of Orthopaedic Trauma Admissions Over One Year in a District General Hospital in England

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, A; Young, A

    2015-01-01

    Introduction : Admission to district general hospitals in England has undergone change in recent years due to both an aging population and the reconfiguration of the major trauma network throughout the United Kingdom. Methods : We utilised a retrospective cohort study to analyse the epidemiology over a 12-month period at a district general hospital. Data was collected and divided into groups: upper limb, lower limb, vertebral disc disease, vertebral fracture, cellulitis without bone involvement and deep infection including metalwork. Results : 2817 patients were admitted over the 12-month period. There were 893 upper limb fractures, 1511 lower limb fractures, 126 vertebral disc disease, 55 vertebral fractures, 108 cellulitis without bone involvement and 124 deep infections with 19 admissions not specified due to coding. AN average of 242 patients were admitted each month with the majority admitted during the summer months. Conclusion : Although fractures make up the majority of the reason for which a person is admitted, there are also many other injuries/morbidities, which may necessitate admission. There is an increasing incidence of elderly osteoporotic fractures in females, which is balancing out the previously more common fractures seen in younger adults and adolescents. PMID:26069514

  10. Risk Factors for 30-Day Hospital Readmission among General Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kassin, Michael T; Owen, Rachel M; Perez, Sebastian; Leeds, Ira; Cox, James C; Schnier, Kurt; Sadiraj, Vjollca; Sweeney, John F

    2012-01-01

    Background Hospital readmission within 30-days of an index hospitalization is receiving increased scrutiny as a marker of poor quality patient care. This study identifies factors associated with 30-day readmission following General Surgery procedures. Study Design Using standard National Surgical Quality Improvement Project (NSQIP) protocol, preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative outcomes were collected on patients undergoing inpatient General Surgery procedures at a single academic center between 2009 and 2011. Data were merged with our institutional clinical data warehouse to identify unplanned 30-day readmissions. Demographics, comorbidities, type of procedure, postoperative complications, and ICD-9 coding data were reviewed for patients who were readmitted. Univariate and multivariate analysis was utilized to identify risk factors associated with 30-day readmission. Results 1442 General Surgery patients were reviewed. 163 (11.3%) were readmitted within 30 days of discharge. The most common reasons for readmission were gastrointestinal complaint/complication (27.6%), surgical infection (22.1%), and failure to thrive/malnutrition (10.4%). Comorbidities associated with risk of readmission included disseminated cancer, dyspnea, and preoperative open wound (p<0.05 for all variables). Surgical procedures associated with higher rates of readmission included pancreatectomy, colectomy, and liver resection. Postoperative occurrences leading to increased risk of readmission were blood transfusion, postoperative pulmonary complication, wound complication, sepsis/shock, urinary tract infection, and vascular complications. Multivariable analysis demonstrates that the most significant independent risk factor for readmission is the occurrence of any postoperative complication (OR 4.20, 95% CI 2.89–6.13). Conclusions Risk factors for readmission after General Surgery procedures are multi-factorial; however, postoperative complications appear to drive readmissions in surgical patients. Taking appropriate steps to minimize postoperative complications will decrease postoperative readmissions. PMID:22726893

  11. End-of-life hospital referrals by out-of-hours general practitioners: a retrospective chart study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Many patients are transferred from home to hospital during the final phase of life and the majority die in hospital. The aim of the study is to explore hospital referrals of palliative care patients for whom an out-of-hours general practitioner was called. Methods A retrospective descriptive chart study was conducted covering a one-year period (1/Nov/2005 to 1/Nov/2006) in all eight out-of-hours GP co-operatives in the Amsterdam region (Netherlands). All symptoms, sociodemographic and medical characteristics were recorded in 529 charts for palliative care patients. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify the variables associated with hospital referrals at the end of life. Results In all, 13% of all palliative care patients for whom an out-of-hours general practitioner was called were referred to hospital. Palliative care patients with cancer (OR 5,1), cardiovascular problems (OR 8,3), digestive problems (OR 2,5) and endocrine, metabolic and nutritional (EMN) problems (OR 2,5) had a significantly higher chance of being referred. Patients receiving professional nursing care (OR 0,2) and patients for whom their own general practitioner had transferred information to the out-of-hours cooperative (OR 0,4) had a significantly lower chance of hospital referral. The most frequent reasons for hospital referral, as noted by the out-of-hours general practitioner, were digestive (30%), EMN (19%) and respiratory (17%) problems. Conclusion Whilst acknowledging that an out-of-hours hospital referral can be the most desirable option in some situations, this study provides suggestions for avoiding undesirable hospital referrals by out-of-hours general practitioners at the end of life. These include anticipating digestive, EMN, respiratory and cardiovascular symptoms in palliative care patients. PMID:22913666

  12. Bone densitometry at a district general hospital: evaluation of service by doctors and patients.

    PubMed Central

    Madhok, R; Kirby, P; Fordham, J; Stamp, P; Green, S; Cooper, C

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess doctors' and patients' views about a district general hospital bone densitometry service and to examine existing practice to influence future provision. DESIGN--Three postal surveys: (a) of doctors potentially using the service, (b) of patients undergoing a bone densitometry test during a six month period, and (c) of the referring doctors of the patients undergoing the test. SETTING--Bone densitometry service at South Cleveland Hospital, Middlesbrough and two district health authorities: South Tees and Northallerton. SUBJECTS--All general practitioners (n=201) and hospital consultants in general medicine, rheumatology, obstetrics and gynaecology, orthopaedics, radio therapy and oncology, haematology, and radiology (n=61); all patients undergoing an initial bone densitometry test (n=309) during a six month period; and their referring doctors. MAIN MEASURES--Service awareness and use, knowledge of clinical indications, test results, influence of test results on patient management, satisfaction with the service and its future provision. RESULTS--The overall response rates for the three surveys were 87%, 70%, and 61%. There was a high awareness of the service among doctors and patients; 219(84%) doctors were aware and 155 of them (71%) had used it, and patients often (40%) suggested the test to their doctor. The test was used for a range of reasons including screening although the general use was consistent with current guidelines. Two hundred (65%) bone densitometry measurements were normal, 71(23%) were low normal, and 38(12%) were low. Although doctors reported that management of patients had been influenced by the test results, the algorithm for decision making was unclear. Patients and doctors were satisfied with the service and most (n=146, 68%) doctors wanted referral guidelines for the service. CONCLUSIONS--There was a high awareness of, use of, and satisfaction with the service. Patients were being referred for a range of reasons and a few of these could not be justified, many tests were normal, and clinical decision making was not always influenced by the test result. It is concluded that bone densitometry services should be provided but only for patients whose management will be influenced by test results and subject to guidelines to ensure appropriate use of the technology. PMID:10157271

  13. Composition and production rate of pharmaceutical and chemical waste from Xanthi General Hospital in Greece

    SciTech Connect

    Voudrias, Evangelos; Goudakou, Lambrini; Kermenidou, Marianthi; Softa, Aikaterini

    2012-07-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We studied pharmaceutical and chemical waste production in a Greek hospital. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pharmaceutical waste comprised 3.9% w/w of total hazardous medical waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unit production rate for total pharmaceutical waste was 12.4 {+-} 3.90 g/patient/d. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemical waste comprised 1.8% w/w of total hazardous medical waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unit production rate for total chemical waste was 5.8 {+-} 2.2 g/patient/d. - Abstract: The objective of this work was to determine the composition and production rates of pharmaceutical and chemical waste produced by Xanthi General Hospital in Greece (XGH). This information is important to design and cost management systems for pharmaceutical and chemical waste, for safety and health considerations and for assessing environmental impact. A total of 233 kg pharmaceutical and 110 kg chemical waste was collected, manually separated and weighed over a period of five working weeks. The total production of pharmaceutical waste comprised 3.9% w/w of the total hazardous medical waste produced by the hospital. Total pharmaceutical waste was classified in three categories, vial waste comprising 51.1%, syringe waste with 11.4% and intravenous therapy (IV) waste with 37.5% w/w of the total. Vial pharmaceutical waste only was further classified in six major categories: antibiotics, digestive system drugs, analgesics, hormones, circulatory system drugs and 'other'. Production data below are presented as average (standard deviation in parenthesis). The unit production rates for total pharmaceutical waste for the hospital were 12.4 (3.90) g/patient/d and 24.6 (7.48) g/bed/d. The respective unit production rates were: (1) for vial waste 6.4 (1.6) g/patient/d and 13 (2.6) g/bed/d, (2) for syringe waste 1.4 (0.4) g/patient/d and 2.8 (0.8) g/bed/d and (3) for IV waste 4.6 (3.0) g/patient/d and 9.2 (5.9) g/bed/d. Total chemical waste was classified in four categories, chemical reagents comprising 18.2%, solvents with 52.3%, dyes and tracers with 18.2% and solid waste with 11.4% w/w of the total. The total production of chemical waste comprised 1.8% w/w of the total hazardous medical waste produced by the hospital. Thus, the sum of pharmaceutical and chemical waste was 5.7% w/w of the total hazardous medical waste produced by the hospital. The unit production rates for total chemical waste for the hospital were 5.8 (2.2) g/patient/d and 1.1 (0.4) g/exam/d. The respective unit production rates were: (1) for reagents 1.7 (2.4) g/patient/d and 0.3 (0.4) g/examination/d, (2) for solvents 248 (127) g/patient/d and 192 (101) g/examination/d, (3) for dyes and tracers 4.7 (1.4) g/patient/d and 2.5 (0.9) g/examination/d and (4) for solid waste 54 (28) g/patient/d and 42 (22) g/examination/d.

  14. Continuing education among Chinese nurses: A general hospital-based study

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Chunping; Hua, Yan; Shao, Pei; Wallen, Gwenyth R.; Xu, Shasha; Li, Lu

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Background Continuing education (CE) is increasingly critical for nurses to keep abreast of rapid changes in patient care due to advancements in knowledge and technology. Objective The objective of this study was to explore Chinese nurses’ perceptions on continuing education, how best CE practices meet their learning needs, and the motivation and barriers nurses face in completing CE. Methods A cross-sectional study of 2727 hospital-employed Chinese nurses from ten general hospitals was conducted from September to October 2010. Nurses’ perceptions on CE, as well as motivational and preventive factors in CE were assessed. Results The majority of nurses (97.3%) attended CE activities in the last twelve months. More than 92.2% of the nurses were familiar with the value of CE. Nurses expected CE activities to take place within a five-day period and to consist of 2 h per activity. The major factors that motivate nurses to participate in CE are the desire to gain and update their knowledge of the newest nursing development and procedures, to improve their practical skills and comprehensive qualities, to maintain professional status and to receive an academic degree. Factors that hindered nurses’ participation in CE included time constraints, work commitments, a lack of opportunity, cost of the courses and previous negative experiences with CE programs. Conclusion Chinese nurses considered CE an extremely important measure to further develop their professional competency. Nurses’ actual expectations for CE and the motivation and barriers for participation in CE from nurses’ individual, family and hospital perspective must be taken into the account in order to make CE programs more effective. PMID:23931929

  15. Non-Invasive Continuous Respiratory Monitoring on General Hospital Wards: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    van Loon, Kim; van Zaane, Bas; Bosch, Els J.; Kalkman, Cor J.; Peelen, Linda M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Failure to recognize acute deterioration in hospitalized patients may contribute to cardiopulmonary arrest, unscheduled intensive care unit admission and increased mortality. Purpose In this systematic review we aimed to determine whether continuous non-invasive respiratory monitoring improves early diagnosis of patient deterioration and reduces critical incidents on hospital wards. Data Sources Studies were retrieved from Medline, Embase, CINAHL, and the Cochrane library, searched from 1970 till October 25, 2014. Study Selection Electronic databases were searched using keywords and corresponding synonyms ‘ward’, ‘continuous’, ‘monitoring’ and ‘respiration’. Pediatric, fetal and animal studies were excluded. Data Extraction Since no validated tool is currently available for diagnostic or intervention studies with continuous monitoring, methodological quality was assessed with a modified tool based on modified STARD, CONSORT, and TREND statements. Data Synthesis Six intervention and five diagnostic studies were included, evaluating the use of eight different devices for continuous respiratory monitoring. Quantitative data synthesis was not possible because intervention, study design and outcomes differed considerably between studies. Outcomes estimates for the intervention studies ranged from RR 0.14 (0.03, 0.64) for cardiopulmonary resuscitation to RR 1.00 (0.41, 2.35) for unplanned ICU admission after introduction of continuous respiratory monitoring, Limitations The methodological quality of most studies was moderate, e.g. ‘before-after’ designs, incomplete reporting of primary outcomes, and incomplete clinical implementation of the monitoring system. Conclusions Based on the findings of this systematic review, implementation of routine continuous non-invasive respiratory monitoring on general hospital wards cannot yet be advocated as results are inconclusive, and methodological quality of the studies needs improvement. Future research in this area should focus on technology explicitly suitable for low care settings and tailored alarm and treatment algorithms. PMID:26658343

  16. 77 FR 10618 - Eric Temple-Control Exemption-Portland Vancouver Junction Railroad, LLC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-22

    ... Surface Transportation Board Eric Temple--Control Exemption--Portland Vancouver Junction Railroad, LLC... direct control of Portland Vancouver Junction Railroad, LLC (PVJR), a wholly owned subsidiary of Columbia..., Columbia Basin R.R., Cent. Wash. R.R. and Portland Vancouver Junction R.R.--Corporate Family...

  17. Socio Economic Status and Traumatic Brain Injury amongst Pediatric Populations: A Spatial Analysis in Greater Vancouver

    PubMed Central

    Amram, Ofer; Schuurman, Nadine; Pike, Ian; Yanchar, Natalie L; Friger, Michael; McBeth, Paul B.; Griesdale, Donald

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Within Canada, injuries are the leading cause of death amongst children fourteen years of age and younger, and also one of the leading causes of morbidity. Low Socio Economic Status (SES) seems to be a strong indicator of a higher prevalence of injuries. This study aims to identify hotspots for pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and examines the relationship between SES and pediatric TBI rates in greater Vancouver, British Columbia (BC), Canada. Methods: Pediatric TBI data from the BC Trauma Registry (BCTR) was used to identify all pediatric TBI patients admitted to BC hospitals between the years 2000 and 2013. Spatial analysis was used to identify hotspots for pediatric TBI. Multivariate analysis was used to distinguish census variables that were correlated with rates of injury. Results: Six hundred and fifty three severe pediatric TBI injuries occurred within the BC Lower Mainland between 2000 and 2013. High rates of injury were concentrated in the East, while low rate clusters were most common in the West of the region (more affluent neighborhoods). A low level of education was the main predictor of a high rate of injury (OR = 1.13, 95% CI = 1.03–1.23, p-Value 0.009). Conclusion: While there was a clear relationship between different SES indicators and pediatric TBI rates in greater Vancouver, income-based SES indicators did not serve as good predictors within this region. PMID:26670241

  18. FOLFIRINOX in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: The Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S.; McDermott, Shaunagh; Guimaraes, Alexander R.; Szymonifka, Jackie; Huynh, Mai Anh; Ferrone, Cristina R.; Wargo, Jennifer A.; Allen, Jill N.; Dias, Lauren E.; Kwak, Eunice L.; Lillemoe, Keith D.; Thayer, Sarah P.; Murphy, Janet E.; Zhu, Andrew X.; Sahani, Dushyant V.; Wo, Jennifer Y.; Clark, Jeffrey W.; Fernandez-del Castillo, Carlos; Ryan, David P.; Hong, Theodore S.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of our retrospective institutional experience is to report the overall response rate, R0 resection rate, progression-free survival, and safety/toxicity of neoadjuvant FOLFIRINOX (5-fluorouracil [5-FU], oxaliplatin, irinotecan, and leucovorin) and chemoradiation in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). Patients with LAPC treated with FOLFIRINOX were identified via the Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center pharmacy database. Demographic information, clinical characteristics, and safety/tolerability data were compiled. Formal radiographic review was performed to determine overall response rates (ORRs). Twenty-two patients with LAPC began treatment with FOLFIRINOX between July 2010 and February 2012. The ORR was 27.3%, and the median progression-free survival was 11.7 months. Five of 22 patients were able to undergo R0 resections following neoadjuvant FOLFIRINOX and chemoradiation. Three of the five patients have experienced distant recurrence within 5 months. Thirty-two percent of patients required at least one emergency department visit or hospitalization while being treated with FOLFIRINOX. FOLFIRINOX possesses substantial activity in patients with LAPC. The use of FOLFIRINOX was associated with conversion to resectability in >20% of patients. However, the recurrences following R0 resection in three of five patients and the toxicities observed with the use of this regimen raise important questions about how to best treat patients with LAPC. PMID:23657686

  19. Development and implementation of a clinical pathway programme in an acute care general hospital in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Cheah, J

    2000-10-01

    A critical or clinical pathway defines the optimal care process, sequencing and timing of interventions by doctors, nurses and other health care professionals for a particular diagnosis or procedure. Clinical pathways are developed through collaborative efforts of clinicians, case managers, nurses, pharmacists, physiotherapists and other allied health care professionals with the aim of improving the quality of patient care, while minimizing cost to the patient. The use of clinical pathways has increased over the past decade in the USA, the UK, Australia, and many other developed countries. However, its use in the developing nations and Asia has been sporadic. To the author's knowledge, there is to date, no published literature on the use and impact of clinical pathways on the quality and cost of patient care in the Asian health care setting. This paper provides a qualitative account of the development and implementation of a clinical pathway programme (using the example of patients with uncomplicated acute myocardial infarction) in an acute care general hospital in Singapore. The paper concludes that clinical pathways, when implemented in the context of an acute care hospital, can result in improvements in the care delivery process. PMID:11079220

  20. Alcohol screening for older adults in an acute general hospital: FAST v. MAST-G assessments

    PubMed Central

    Knightly, Rachel; Tadros, George; Sharma, Juhi; Duffield, Peter; Carnall, Emma; Fisher, Jacqui; Salman, Shaza

    2016-01-01

    Aims and method Documented prevalence of alcohol misuse among older adult patients at Birmingham Heartlands Hospital is significantly lower than the national prevalence. We aimed to evaluate our alcohol misuse screening protocol for older adults to identify possible shortcomings. Hospital protocol is to screen all adults for alcohol misuse in the accident and emergency (A&E) department using the Fast Alcohol Screening Test (FAST). One hundred consecutive consenting in-patients aged 65-94 admitted via A&E subsequently undertook an additional alcohol screening test (Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test-Geriatric version; MAST-G). Results of the two tests were compared. Results FAST screening was completed for 71 patients and none were FAST-positive for alcohol misuse, yet using MAST-G, 18 patients scored positively for alcohol misuse. FAST screening failed to identify 8 patients with a documented history of alcohol misuse. Clinical implications Older adult alcohol misuse prevalence is significantly underreported using FAST. Screening older adults for alcohol problems requires a different approach to screening the general population. PMID:27087989

  1. Alcohol screening for older adults in an acute general hospital: FAST v. MAST-G assessments.

    PubMed

    Knightly, Rachel; Tadros, George; Sharma, Juhi; Duffield, Peter; Carnall, Emma; Fisher, Jacqui; Salman, Shaza

    2016-04-01

    Aims and method Documented prevalence of alcohol misuse among older adult patients at Birmingham Heartlands Hospital is significantly lower than the national prevalence. We aimed to evaluate our alcohol misuse screening protocol for older adults to identify possible shortcomings. Hospital protocol is to screen all adults for alcohol misuse in the accident and emergency (A&E) department using the Fast Alcohol Screening Test (FAST). One hundred consecutive consenting in-patients aged 65-94 admitted via A&E subsequently undertook an additional alcohol screening test (Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test-Geriatric version; MAST-G). Results of the two tests were compared. Results FAST screening was completed for 71 patients and none were FAST-positive for alcohol misuse, yet using MAST-G, 18 patients scored positively for alcohol misuse. FAST screening failed to identify 8 patients with a documented history of alcohol misuse. Clinical implications Older adult alcohol misuse prevalence is significantly underreported using FAST. Screening older adults for alcohol problems requires a different approach to screening the general population. PMID:27087989

  2. Patients' experiences of completing treatment for colorectal cancer in a Scottish District General Hospital.

    PubMed

    Simpson, M F; Whyte, F

    2006-05-01

    A review of the cancer literature from 1990 to 2003 indicated that some patients with cancer felt abandoned by healthcare professionals upon completion of treatment. With this in mind, a small qualitative study was undertaken to explore the experiences of patients completing treatment for colorectal cancer within a Scottish District General Hospital. A small purposeful sample of eight participants (surgery only n = 4 and surgery with adjuvant chemotherapy n = 4) who had completed treatment were recruited. Semi-structured interviews, in a venue chosen by the participants (home n = 7; hospital n = 1), were tape-recorded and transcribed verbatim. The mean time since completion of treatment was 30 weeks (range 9-95 weeks). Transcripts were read and reread several times to identify categories. By thematic analysis, five categories were identified: physical impact of treatment, completion of treatment, support of family and friends, impact of healthcare professionals and coping mechanisms. Despite the significant physical impact of treatment patients returned to their previous lifestyles and status. Although very optimistic and positive when treatment was completed, participants reflected upon their cancer recurring. Family and friends were the main providers of support during their experiences, and healthcare professionals impacted upon participants both positively and negatively. Overall, the completion of treatment was described as a 'great feeling' and 'relief', with patients reporting that they felt adequately supported by healthcare professionals after completion of treatment. PMID:16643265

  3. Continuity of care for orthopaedic patients in a district general hospital.

    PubMed

    Kulloo, Praneta

    2014-01-01

    Continuity of care has been defined as a patient repeatedly consulting the same doctor and forming a therapeutic relationship. There is evidence that not only do patients value continuity of the care they receive but also that provider continuity is related to lower overall total healthcare costs and better healthcare outcomes. A retrospective audit was undertaken in James Paget Hospital, a district general hospital in East Anglia, England, to assess continuity of care from the preoperative clinic to surgery and subsequent postoperative follow-up in the orthopaedic department. Overall continuity of care by individual surgeon was 23% and by orthopaedic team (consultant and middle grade staff) 43% in the first audit cycle of 106 patients in 2008. In the second cycle in 2010, this improved to 24% and 56%, respectively, in a sample of 156 patients. Moreover, the continuity of care for trauma patients improved from 10% to 75%. Interventions which resulted in the improvement were change of on-call rota and the implementation of measures so that, following surgery, patients were allocated to the operating surgeon's clinic postoperatively. This completed audit cycle highlights the importance of continuity of care of patients and how efficient management led to a more patient centred delivery of healthcare. PMID:26734297

  4. Comparison Patients and Staffs Satisfaction in General Versus Special Wards of Hospitals of Jahrom

    PubMed Central

    Taheri, Leila; Jahromi, Marzieh Kargar; Hojat, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Introduction and Aims: Patient satisfaction is the most important indicator of high-quality health care and is used for the assessment and planning of health care. Also, Job satisfaction is an important factor on prediction and perception of organizational manner. The aim of this study is to identify and compare patient and staff satisfaction in general versus special wards. Material and Method: In order to identify the various indicators of satisfaction and dissatisfaction, a descriptive study (cross sectional) was done to assess patients’ satisfaction with in-patient care at Jahrom University of Medical Science hospitals. The sample size was 600 patients that selected by sequential random sampling technique and are close to their discharge from the hospital. Patients were asked to indicate the scale point which best reflected their level of satisfaction with the treatment or service. Also we assess the staff satisfaction (sample size was 408 staffs) in general ward using a researcher made questionnaire. It should be noted that the participants were anonymous and there was no obligation to participation. We tried to set a secure and comfortable environment for filling out the questionnaire. Results: Among 600 patients, 239 (n = 38.67%) were men and 368 (61.33%) were female. Number of nurses was 408, of which 135 (33.08%) were men and 273 (66.92%) female. There was a significant correlation between working experience and professional factors of personnel. The mean total patient satisfaction in general and special wards is (2.75 ± .35, 3.03 ± .53) respectively. Differences of patient satisfaction in domains such respect, care and confidence in general wards versus special ward were statistically significant, but there was no difference in expect time of patients in these wards. Differences Between the mean patient and staff satisfaction in the general wards versus special wards were statistically significant using independent t-tests (p = .018, p = .029). Spearman test showed a statistically significant correlation between patient and staff satisfaction (p = .044). Conclusion: For improving quality of medical services and effective functioning needs maximizing efforts to obtain full patient and staff satisfaction. PMID:26153157

  5. Latex allergy in health-care workers in an English district general hospital.

    PubMed

    Handfield-Jones, S E

    1998-02-01

    Immediate hypersensitivity to latex protein is a serious and potentially life-threatening problem. This study found that eight of 867 (0.9%) medical and nursing staff in a district general hospital were allergic to latex with resultant hand eczema and/or urticaria. Wheezing occurred when latex became airborne, adsorbed to starch powder. Sensitized individuals are at risk of anaphylaxis when they themselves become patients. Measures to prevent latex sensitization include pre-employment advice regarding hand care and glove use, particularly for atopics, who are at increased risk. Gloves made from synthetic latex must be available for a sensitized individual, both to use at work and when undergoing medical examinations, surgery and dentistry. Increased awareness of the problem by health-care workers is important in order to recognize those at risk. PMID:9602873

  6. An audit of blood component therapy in a Canadian general teaching hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Brien, W F; Butler, R J; Inwood, M J

    1989-01-01

    As part of a quality assurance program a retrospective audit of transfusion practices for packed red blood cells, fresh frozen plasma and albumin was undertaken with predetermined criteria in a general teaching hospital. Of 520 transfusion episodes with 1218 units of packed red blood cells given to 297 patients 88% were considered appropriate; of 106 episodes with 405 units of fresh frozen plasma given to 83 patients 90% were deemed appropriate; and of 187 episodes with 320 units of albumin given to 99 patients 64% were considered appropriate. The results of this audit, when compared with those of other surveys of blood use in a similar population, suggest that pretransfusion approval of requested components would reduce the number of inappropriate transfusions. PMID:2924231

  7. A case-control study of singleton low birthweight babies at the Port Moresby General Hospital.

    PubMed

    Klufio, C A; Amoa, A B; Augerea, L; Wurr, F

    1997-01-01

    A retrospective study of 432 consecutive singleton low birthweight babies and 432 unmatched controls was carried out at the Port Moresby General Hospital from January to December 1988. Of the 432 low birthweight babies 65% were preterm, 27% were light for gestational age, 6% were both preterm and light for gestational age and 2.5% could not be classified. The results of the analysis showed low birthweight to be significantly associated with the past delivery of a low birthweight infant, very young and elderly mothers, lack of antenatal care, poor family planning, hypertensive disease in pregnancy and intrauterine death. This study reveals that maternal education and improved antenatal care and family planning would ultimately reduce the incidence of low birthweight babies and perinatal mortality in Papua New Guinea. PMID:10750410

  8. Evaluating the effectiveness of a process medical audit in a teaching general hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Brooks-Hill, R W; Buckingham, R A

    1986-01-01

    Medical auditing has moved beyond the traditional chart review to the process audit, which identifies deficiencies in care and suggests remedies. In 1981 the audit committee of the Department of Psychiatry at Toronto General Hospital audited the use of hypnotic drugs in the inpatient unit. The audit produced two recommendations: that nursing staff record sleep graphs for inpatients more often, and that an educational program be instituted to change the physicians' patterns of prescribing hypnotics. In 1983 the audit was repeated to test the effectiveness of the 1981 auditing process. The 1981 recommendation produced the desired improvement in recording of sleep graphs. However, the medical staff failed to change their patterns of prescribing hypnotics: oxazepam remained the preferred hypnotic. For the process audit to be effective in improving patient care those using it must ensure that the methods reflect the nature and structure of the professional group they are trying to influence. PMID:3942943

  9. [Professional practice of nurses who care for cancer patients in general hospitals].

    PubMed

    da Silva, Josiane Travenolo; Matheus, Maria Clara Cassuli; Fustinoni, Suzete Maria; de Gutirrez, Maria Gaby Rivero

    2012-01-01

    The present article discusses a qualitative study which aimed to understand the typical of nurses' professional practice caring for patient with cancer in general hospitals. In order to find out the reasons that motivate nurse's action, and to put in evidence what is original, significant, specific and typical about this phenomenon, we have taken into consideration the premises of the philosopher Alfred Schtz, which provide us with subsidies to unveil them. The data collected through semi-structured interviews reported that nurses admit not having the required theoretical knowledge and experience or enough practice to take care of a cancer patient. Thus, they don't feel capable of developing actions which may positively influence care on patients and their family members. PMID:23032337

  10. An e-learning portal for nurses in Singapore General Hospital.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lay Geok; Teow, Alvin

    2006-01-01

    Singapore General Hospital (SGH) pioneered e-learning systems in Singapore as a knowledge management initiative for nurses. This paradigm shift in nursing education is a proactive step taken to address the increasing sophistication of healthcare systems, expanding demand and perennial shortage of nursing talent. E-learning has been a success at SGH, through providing systematic sharing of knowledge and capture of experience, through both formal and informal online channels. It also made training more effective and less costly. Formal methods of knowledge sharing comprise online learning through interactive training modules and slides presentation with narration, while informal learning comprises of peer group discussion and journal review. Both elements have been essential in making e-learning a success and in creating a lifelong learning culture in SGH. PMID:17102291

  11. The use of clinical information to help develop new services in a district general hospital.

    PubMed

    Williams, J G

    1999-12-01

    This paper describes a case study of the use of clinical information to improve gastroenterological services in a district general hospital. The clinical information has been derived from aggregation and analysis of operational clinical data collected in coded, structured form on a clinical information system over a period of 8 years. The monitoring of activity, referral patterns and administrative and clinical outcomes, and the use of this information to develop new services to improve access to patients are described. It is concluded that the secondary use of clinical information derived from electronically captured data can have a significant impact on the development of services by a provider organisation, and on professional teamworking. PMID:10659944

  12. The clinical pattern of bronchial asthma in General Hospital, Kandy (Sri Lanka).

    PubMed Central

    Jeyrajah, R.; Wickramasinghe, M. D.

    1983-01-01

    The clinical features and cutaneous hypersensitivity to skin prick tests were studied in 64 asthmatic patients in General Hospital, Kandy (Sri Lanka). The onset of asthma was mostly in adult life; associated atopic disease and family history of allergy were less frequent when compared with asthmatics in industrialised countries in the temperate zone. In these respects the clinical pattern of asthma in our study resembles that described in other tropical countries. Cutaneous hypersensitivity to one or more of the 10 allergens tested was observed in 75% of asthmatics and 55% of non-asthmatic controls. Although there was a higher incidence of associated allergic disorders, family history of allergy and the onset of asthma before the age of 10 years in the skin test positive group when compared with the skin test negative group of asthmatics, this difference was not statistically significant. PMID:6634541

  13. Intestinal helminth infections amongst HIV-infected adults in Mthatha General Hospital, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Yogeswaran, Parimalaranie; Wright, Graham

    2015-01-01

    Background In South Africa, studies on the prevalence of intestinal helminth co-infection amongst HIV-infected patients as well as possible interactions between these two infections are limited. Aim To investigate the prevalence of intestinal helminth infestation amongst adults living with HIV or AIDS at Mthatha General Hospital. Setting Study participants were recruited at the outpatient department of Mthatha General Hospital, Mthatha, South Africa. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted between October and December 2013 amongst consecutive consenting HIV-positive adult patients. Socio-demographic and clinical information were obtained using data collection forms and structured interviews. Stool samples were collected to investigate the presence of helminths whilst blood samples were obtained for the measurement of CD4+ T-cell count and viral load. Results Data were obtained on 231 participants, with a mean age of 34.9 years, a mean CD4 count of 348 cells/µL and a mean viral load of 4.8 log10 copies/mL. Intestinal helminth prevalence was 24.7%, with Ascaris Lumbricoides (42.1%) the most prevalent identified species. Statistically significant association was found between CD4 count of less than 200 cells/µL and helminth infection (p = 0.05). No statistically significant association was found between intestinal helminth infection and the mean CD4 count (p = 0.79) or the mean viral load (p = 0.98). Conclusion A high prevalence of intestinal helminth infections was observed amongst the study population. Therefore, screening and treatment of helminths should be considered as part of the management of HIV and AIDS in primary health care. PMID:26842519

  14. Prevalence trends of oral squamous cell carcinoma. Mexico City’s General Hospital experience

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Guerrero, Juan C.; Jacinto-Alemán, Luís F.; Jiménez-Farfán, María D.; Macario-Hernández, Alejandro; Hernández-Flores, Florentino

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Recent reports suggest an increase in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) frequency. To improve programs in public health, it is necessary to understand the epidemiological conditions. The aim of this study was to analyze the trend in gender, age, anatomic zone and OSCC stage from Mexico City’s General Hospital patients from 1990 to 2008. Study design: A retrospective review of all OSCC cases diagnosed by the Pathology Department of the Mexico City General Hospital was performed. Demographic data, in addition to anatomic zone and histological degree of differentiation were obtained. Central tendency, dispersion and prevalence rate per 100,000 individuals were determined. Results: A total of 531 patients were diagnosed with OSCC; 58.4% were men, giving a male:female ratio of 1.4:1, and the mean age was 62.5 ± 14.9 years. The predominant anatomic zone was the tongue (44.7%), followed by the lips (21.2%) and gums (20.5%). The most frequent histological degree was moderately differentiated in 325 cases (61.2%). The rates of OSCC prevalence showed similar patterns in terms across time. A significant correlation (P = 0.007) between anatomic zone and age was observed. Conclusion: According to our results, the prevalence of OSCC does not show important variations; however, a relationship between age and anatomic zone was observed. These data could be used as parameters for the diagnosis of OSCC as well as for the development and dissemination of preventive programs for the early detection of oral cancer. Key words:Oral squamous cell carcinoma, prevalence, histology degree and anatomic zone. PMID:23385493

  15. Hospital capital funding.

    PubMed

    Hebert, M

    1992-01-01

    It is critical that hospitals have a long-range plan in place to ensure that buildings and equipment are replaced when necessary. A study undertaken in British Columbia contrasted the Greater Vancouver Regional Hospital District's capital plan (past and future) to a proposed capital replacement model. The model, developed using accepted industry standards and criteria, provided an asset value that was used for comparison purposes. Building and equipment expenditures of the Surrey Memorial Hospital were also compared against the model. Findings from both studies are presented in this article. PMID:10123135

  16. Medical psychology services in dutch general hospitals: state of the art developments and recommendations for the future.

    PubMed

    Soons, Paul; Denollet, Johan

    2009-06-01

    In this article an overview is presented of the emergence of medical psychology in the care of somatically ill patients. The situation in the Netherlands can be considered as prototypical. For 60 years, clinical psychologists have been working in general, teaching and academic hospitals. Nowadays, they are an integrated non-medical specialism working in the medical setting of hospitals in the Netherlands, and are a full-member of the medical board. This paper discusses several topics: the position of the general hospital in the health care system in the Netherlands, the emergence of medical psychology in Dutch hospitals, the role of the professional association of medical psychologists, and the characteristics of patients seen by clinical psychologists. Following the discussion about the situation of medical psychology in other countries, recommendations are formulated for the further development of medical psychology in the Netherlands as well as in other countries. PMID:19266269

  17. Dance K-12 in the Vancouver Schools: Innovating, Advocating, Educating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilsdorf, Rie Algeo

    2004-01-01

    A history of the outstanding K-12 dance program in Vancouver, Washington, is provided, including various strategies used to promote its growth from a few pilot elementary schools through middle schools to an arts magnet high school. Numerous changes have been weathered by the professional dance staff, including certification challenges instigated…

  18. Mini Schools: The New "Global City Communities" of Vancouver

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoon, Ee-Seul

    2011-01-01

    In recent decades, under the mutually constitutive processes of neoliberal urbanization and globalization, Vancouver has radically transformed and become a serious contender for the title of "world-class city". Against the background of this socio-spatial force reconfiguring the city, I explore how the city's unique development of "mini…

  19. 77 FR 24146 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Columbia River, Vancouver, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-23

    ... authorized under 33 CFR 117.35. Dated: April 9, 2012. Randall D. Overton, Bridge Administrator. BILLING CODE... (BNSF) Railway Bridge across the Columbia River, mile 105.6, at Vancouver, WA. This deviation is... deviation allows the bridge to remain in the closed position for the duration of the maintenance...

  20. 78 FR 15293 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Columbia River, Vancouver, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-11

    ... deviation, call or email Randall Overton, Bridge Administrator, Coast Guard Thirteenth District; telephone... regulations is authorized under 33 CFR 117.35. Dated: February 27, 2013. Randall D. Overton, Bridge... (BNSF) Railway Bridge across the Columbia River, mile 105.6, at Vancouver, WA. This deviation...

  1. Vancouver Island Compassion Club president receives absolute discharge.

    PubMed

    Carey, Ruth

    2002-12-01

    On 5 July 2002, the BC Provincial Court released written reasons for sentencing in R v Lucas. The president of the Vancouver Island Compassion Club had been arrested and charged with possession for the purpose of tracking after police searched the club and his home and seized less than three kilograms of marijuana. PMID:14743811

  2. Vancouver's "vision of hell" requires special type of MD

    PubMed Central

    Jones, D

    1998-01-01

    Vancouver's Downtown Eastside, the city's skid row, is in a state of emergency. Some 7000 injection drug users, about 40% of whom are HIV positive, mingle with prostitutes and the city's street people. The doctors who care for them say it is a potent and dangerous mix. PMID:9700334

  3. Mini Schools: The New "Global City Communities" of Vancouver

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoon, Ee-Seul

    2011-01-01

    In recent decades, under the mutually constitutive processes of neoliberal urbanization and globalization, Vancouver has radically transformed and become a serious contender for the title of "world-class city". Against the background of this socio-spatial force reconfiguring the city, I explore how the city's unique development of "mini

  4. Effect of the Iranian hospital grading system on patients' and general practitioners' behaviour: an examination of awareness, belief and choice.

    PubMed

    Aryankhesal, Aidin; Sheldon, Trevor

    2010-08-01

    There is considerable international interest in the use of performance measurement and their public release in order to improve the quality of care. However, few studies have assessed stakeholders' awareness and use of performance data. Iranian hospitals have been graded annually since 1998 and hospital hotel charges vary by grade, but this system has never been evaluated. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 104 outpatients at eight Teheran hospitals and 103 general practitioners (GPs) to assess the awareness of and attitudes towards hospital grading system. Only 5.8% of patients (95% CI: 1.3-10.3%) and 11.7% of GPs (95% CI: 5.5-17.9%) were aware of grading results. Patients' awareness was positively associated with their education level (P = 0.016). No patient used the grading results for choosing a hospital and only one GP (1%, 95% CI: 0-2%) reported using hospital grade to influence referral decisions. Patients were more influenced by hospitals' public reputation and that of their specialists. GPs believed that the grading system did not reflect the quality of care in hospitals. When developing performance measurement systems, public release of data should be accompanied by evaluation of its impact on awareness and health-care choices. PMID:20702891

  5. The Treatment of Anorexia Nervosa in a General Hospital: A Case Vignette of a Multi-Disciplinary General Hospital-Based Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kronenberg, J.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Describes anorexia nervosa as condition variable in etiology and resistant to treatment, which may lead to mortality in 5% of treated cases. Notes that efforts have been made for treating disorder in nonstigmatizing medical units outside psychiatric hospitals. Describes, through presentation of short case vignette, advantages of treating…

  6. The Treatment of Anorexia Nervosa in a General Hospital: A Case Vignette of a Multi-Disciplinary General Hospital-Based Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kronenberg, J.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Describes anorexia nervosa as condition variable in etiology and resistant to treatment, which may lead to mortality in 5% of treated cases. Notes that efforts have been made for treating disorder in nonstigmatizing medical units outside psychiatric hospitals. Describes, through presentation of short case vignette, advantages of treating

  7. Current Status of Management in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus at General Hospitals in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jin-Hee; Lee, Jung-Hwa; Noh, Jin-Won; Park, Jeong-Eun; Kim, Hee-Sook; Yoo, Joo-Wha; Song, Bok-Rye; Lee, Jeong-rim; Hong, Myeong-Hee; Jang, Hyang-Mi; Na, Young; Lee, Hyun-Joo; Lee, Jeong-Mi; Kang, Yang-Gyo; Kim, Sun-Young

    2015-01-01

    Background In Korea, the prevalence, complications, and mortality rate of diabetes are rapidly increasing. However, investigations on the actual condition of diabetes management are very limited due to lack of nation-wide research or multicenter study. Hence, we have minutely inquired the current status of diabetes management and achievement of glucose target goal in general hospital offering education program. That way, we are able to furnish data for policy making of diabetes education and draw up guideline which may allow us to reduce the morbidity and mortality of diabetes. Methods The subjects consisted of 2,610 patients with type 2 diabetes who visited the 13 general hospital in Seoul or Gyeonggi region from March 19 to May 29, 2013. General characteristics, associated diseases, complications, and management status were investigated. Results The mean age was 61.0±11.6 years, body mass index was 25.0±3.3 kg/m2, and family history of diabetes was 50.5%. The mean duration of diabetes was 10.7±7.9 years and 53% received education about diabetes. The prevalence of hypertension and dyslipidemia were 59.2% and 65.5%, respectively, and 18.3% of the subjects were accompanied by liver disease. Diabetic retinopathy appeared in 31.6%, nephropathy in 28.1%, and neuropathy in 19.9% of the subjects. The mean glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level was 7.3%±1.3% and the achieving rate based on Korean Diabetes Association guideline (HbA1c <6.5%) was 24.8%, blood pressure (130/80 mm Hg or less) was 49.4%, and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (<100 mg/dL) was 63.6%. The reaching rate to the target level in four parameters (blood glucose, blood pressure, lipids, and body weight) was 7.8%. Conclusion The blood glucose control rate was lower than other parameters, and the implementation rate of diabetes education was only 53%. Thus more appropriate glucose control and systematic diabetes education are imperative. PMID:26301192

  8. Perceptions of Organizational Justice Among Nurses Working in University Hospitals of Shiraz: A Comparison Between General and Specialty Settings

    PubMed Central

    Hatam, Nahid; Fardid, Mozhgan; Kavosi, Zahra

    2013-01-01

    Background: Justice has gained much attention in social and human studies and has many consequences on employees and the organizations, especially on health system workers such as nurses who are among the key factors in health care systems. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate perception of organizational justice among nurses in educational hospitals of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (SUMS), and to compare the results of general and specialty hospitals. Materials and Methods: In this research, 400 nurses at SUMS hospitals were selected by random sampling method. A 19-item questionnaire was applied to measure distributive, procedural and interactional justice. Data analysis was performed using descriptive statistics, including percentage, frequency, mean, and standard deviation. Also, the t-test and one way ANOVA were used to measure the differences between different hospitals and wards. Results: Of 400 nurses, 66% perceived a high level of organizational justice. In this study the mean scores of total perceived organizational justice (P = 0.035), procedural justice (P = 0.031), and interactional justice (P = 0.046) in specialty hospitals were higher than general ones. Furthermore, the mean score of interactional justice was higher than the other components of organizational justice, respectively 3.58 ± 1.02 for general and 3.76 ± 0.86 for specialty hospitals. Significant differences were observed between overall perceived justice (P = 0.013) and its components (P = 0.024, P = 0.013, and P = 0.036) in different wards. Conclusions: Most nurses who participated in this study had a high perception of organizational justice. The mean score of organizational justice was higher in specialty hospitals. Health care policy makers and hospital managers should support their employees, especially nurses through fairness in distributions, procedures, and interactions. PMID:25414883

  9. Motivation and job satisfaction among medical and nursing staff in a Cyprus public general hospital

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to investigate how medical and nursing staff of the Nicosia General Hospital is affected by specific motivation factors, and the association between job satisfaction and motivation. Furthermore, to determine the motivational drive of socio-demographic and job related factors in terms of improving work performance. Methods A previously developed and validated instrument addressing four work-related motivators (job attributes, remuneration, co-workers and achievements) was used. Two categories of health care professionals, medical doctors and dentists (N = 67) and nurses (N = 219) participated and motivation and job satisfaction was compared across socio-demographic and occupational variables. Results The survey revealed that achievements was ranked first among the four main motivators, followed by remuneration, co-workers and job attributes. The factor remuneration revealed statistically significant differences according to gender, and hospital sector, with female doctors and nurses and accident and emergency (A+E) outpatient doctors reporting greater mean scores (p < 0.005). The medical staff showed statistically significantly lower job satisfaction compared to the nursing staff. Surgical sector nurses and those >55 years of age reported higher job satisfaction when compared to the other groups. Conclusions The results are in agreement with the literature which focuses attention to management approaches employing both monetary and non-monetary incentives to motivate health care professionals. Health care professionals tend to be motivated more by intrinsic factors, implying that this should be a target for effective employee motivation. Strategies based on the survey's results to enhance employee motivation are suggested. PMID:21080954

  10. Client perception of service quality at the outpatient clinics of a General hospital in Lagos, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ogunnowo, Babatunde Enitan; Olufunlayo, Tolulope Florence; Sule, Salami Suberu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Service quality assessments have assumed increasing importance in the last two decades. They are useful in identifying gaps in services been provided with the ultimate aim of guaranteeing quality assurance. The objective of this study was to assess the client perception of service quality at the outpatient clinics of Randle General hospital, Lagos. Methods A descriptive cross sectional study was conducted from March to May 2013. A multistage sampling technique was used to select respondents and data was collected with the aid of modified SERVQUAL questionnaires. The data was analysed with aid of EPI-INFO 2002 and statistical significance was set at a P value 0.05 for statistical significance. Results Total of 400 respondents were interviewed. The mean age was 40 years with a standard deviation of 15.2 yrs. The highest mean score of 4.35 out of a possible maximum of 5 was recorded in assurance domain while the lowest mean score of 4.00 was recorded in the responsiveness domain. The overall mean score of all the domains was 4.20 with standard deviation of 0.51. Overall majority (80.8%) of respondents rated the overall service quality as good/ very good. After linear regression, the assurance domain was the most important predictor of the overall perceived service quality (p< 0.001). Conclusion The overall perceived service quality was good. The major deficiencies were in the responsiveness domain and especially the waiting time. The hospital management should implement measures to improve the responsiveness of services by ensuring prompt delivery of services. PMID:26834921

  11. Trauma patterns in patients attending the Emergency Department of Jazan General Hospital, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Hokkam, Emad; Gonna, Abdelaziz; Zakaria, Ossama; El-shemally, Amany

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Modern civilization and the sharp rise in living standards have led to dramatic changes in trauma pattern in Saudi Arabia. This study aimed to describe the different patterns of injuries of patients attending the Emergency Department of Jazan General Hospital (JGH) in the southwest corner of Saudi Arabia. METHODS: A total number of 1 050 patients were enrolled in the study. A pre-organized data sheet was prepared for each patient attended the Emergency Department of JGH from February 2012 to January 2013. It contains data about socio-demographics, trauma data, clinical evaluation results, investigations as well as treatment strategies. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 25.3±16.8 years. Most (45.1%) of the patients were at age of 18–30 years. Males (64.3%) were affected by trauma more common than females. More than half (60.6%) of the patients were from urban areas. The commonest kind of injury was minor injury (60%), followed by blunt trauma (30.9%) and then penetrating trauma (9.1%). The mean time from the incident to arrival at hospital was 41.3±79.8 minutes. The majority (48.2%) of the patients were discharged after management of trivial trauma, whereas 2.3% were admitted to ICU, 7.7% transferred to inpatient wards, and 17.7% observed and subsequently discharged. The mortality rate of the patients was 2.6%. CONCLUSION: Trauma is a major health problem, especially in the young population in Saudi Arabia. Blunt trauma is more frequent than penetrating trauma, with road traffic accidents accounting for the majority. PMID:25802567

  12. Awareness of Stroke Risk after TIA in Swiss General Practitioners and Hospital Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Streit, Sven; Baumann, Philippe; Barth, Jrgen; Mattle, Heinrich P.; Arnold, Marcel; Bassetti, Claudio L.; Meli, Damian N.; Fischer, Urs

    2015-01-01

    Background Transient ischemic attacks (TIA) are stroke warning signs and emergency situations, and, if immediately investigated, doctors can intervene to prevent strokes. Nevertheless, many patients delay going to the doctor, and doctors might delay urgently needed investigations and preventative treatments. We set out to determine how much general practitioners (GPs) and hospital physicians (HPs) knew about stroke risk after TIA, and to measure their referral rates. Methods We used a structured questionnaire to ask GPs and HPs in the catchment area of the University Hospital of Bern to estimate a patients risk of stroke after TIA. We also assessed their referral behavior. We then statistically analysed their reasons for deciding not to immediately refer patients. Results Of the 1545 physicians, 40% (614) returned the survey. Of these, 75% (457) overestimated stroke risk within 24 hours, and 40% (245) overestimated risk within 3 months after TIA. Only 9% (53) underestimated stroke risk within 24 hours and 26% (158) underestimated risk within 3 months; 78% (473) of physicians overestimated the amount that carotid endarterectomy reduces stroke risk; 93% (543) would rigorously investigate the cause of a TIA, but only 38% (229) would refer TIA patients for urgent investigations very often. Physicians most commonly gave these reasons for not making emergency referrals: patients advanced age; patients preference; patient was multimorbid; and, patient needed long-term care. Conclusions Although physicians overestimate stroke risk after TIA, their rate of emergency referral is modest, mainly because they tend not to refer multimorbid and elderly patients at the appropriate rate. Since old and frail patients benefit from urgent investigations and treatment after TIA as much as younger patients, future educational campaigns should focus on the importance of emergency evaluations for all TIA patients. PMID:26284533

  13. Physical comorbidity and its relevance on mortality in schizophrenia: a naturalistic 12-year follow-up in general hospital admissions.

    PubMed

    Schoepf, Dieter; Uppal, Hardeep; Potluri, Rahul; Heun, Reinhard

    2014-02-01

    Schizophrenia is a major psychotic disorder with significant comorbidity and mortality. Patients with schizophrenia are said to suffer more type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and diabetogenic complications. However, there is little consistent evidence that comorbidity with physical diseases leads to excess mortality in schizophrenic patients. Consequently, we investigated whether the burden of physical comorbidity and its relevance on hospital mortality differed between patients with and without schizophrenia in a 12-year follow-up in general hospital admissions. During 1 January 2000 and 31 June 2012, 1418 adult patients with schizophrenia were admitted to three General Manchester NHS Hospitals. All comorbid diseases with a prevalemce ≥1% were compared with those of 14,180 age- and gender-matched hospital controls. Risk factors, i.e. comorbid diseases that were predictors for general hospital mortality were identified using multivariate logistic regression analyses. Compared with controls, schizophrenic patients had a higher proportion of emergency admissions (69.8 vs. 43.0%), an extended average length of stay at index hospitalization (8.1 vs. 3.4 days), a higher number of hospital admissions (11.5 vs. 6.3), a shorter length of survival (1895 vs. 2161 days), and a nearly twofold increased mortality rate (18.0 vs. 9.7%). Schizophrenic patients suffered more depression, T2DM, alcohol abuse, asthma, COPD, and twenty-three more diseases, many of them diabetic-related complications or other environmentally influenced conditions. In contrast, hypertension, cataract, angina, and hyperlipidaemia were less prevalent in the schizophrenia population compared to the control population. In deceased schizophrenic patients, T2DM was the most frequently recorded comorbidity, contributing to 31.4% of hospital deaths (only 14.4% of schizophrenic patients with comorbid T2DM survived the study period). Further predictors of general hospital mortality in schizophrenia were found to be alcoholic liver disease (OR = 10.3), parkinsonism (OR = 5.0), T1DM (OR = 3.8), non-specific renal failure (OR = 3.5), ischaemic stroke (OR = 3.3), pneumonia (OR = 3.0), iron-deficiency anaemia (OR = 2.8), COPD (OR = 2.8), and bronchitis (OR = 2.6). There were no significant differences in their impact on hospital mortality compared to control subjects with the same diseases except parkinsonism which was associated with higher mortality in the schizophrenia population compared with the control population. The prevalence of parkinsonism was significantly elevated in the 255 deceased schizophrenic patients (5.5 %) than in those 1,163 surviving the study period (0.8 %, OR = 5.0) and deceased schizophrenic patients had significantly more suffered extrapyramidal symptoms than deceased control subjects (5.5 vs. 1.5 %). Therefore patients with schizophrenia have a higher burden of physical comorbidity that is associated with a worse outcome in a 12-year follow-up of mortality in general hospitals compared with hospital controls. However, schizophrenic patients die of the same physical diseases as their peers without schizophrenia. The most relevant physical risk factors of general hospital mortality are T2DM, COPD and infectious respiratory complications, iron-deficiency anaemia, T1DM, unspecific renal failure, ischaemic stroke, and alcoholic liver disease. Additionally, parkinsonism is a major risk factor for general hospital mortality in schizophrenia. Thus, optimal monitoring and management of acute T2DM and COPD with its infectious respiratory complications, as well as the accurate detection and management of iron-deficiency anaemia, of diabetic-related long-term micro- and macrovascular complications, of alcoholic liver disease, and of extrapyramidal symptoms are of utmost relevance in schizophrenia. PMID:23942824

  14. Mortality in a large community-based cohort of inner-city residents in Vancouver, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Raffa, Jesse D.; Lai, Calvin; Fischer, Benedikt; Krajden, Mel; Amin, Janaki; Walter, Scott R.; Dore, Gregory J.; Grebely, Jason; Tyndall, Mark W.

    2013-01-01

    Background The Downtown Eastside is a robust and densely populated neighbourhood in Vancouver, Canada, that is characterized by low-income housing and drug use and a high prevalence of HIV infection. We evaluated mortality and excess mortality among the broader community of individuals living in this neighbourhood. Methods The Community Health and Safety Evaluation is a community-based study of inner-city residents in the Downtown Eastside who were recruited in 2003 and 2004. Participants’ data were linked with data in provincial virology and mortality databases retrospectively and prospectively for the period 1991–2009. Mortality and standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were calculated for the period 2003–2009 to compare death rates in the study population with rates in the population of Vancouver. Results Among 2913 participants, 374 deaths occurred, for an all-cause mortality of 223 per 10 000 person-years (95% confidence interval [CI] 201–247 per 10 000 person-years). Compared with the population of Vancouver, significant excess mortality was observed in the study population (SMR 7.1, 95% CI 6.4–7.9). Excess mortality was higher among women (SMR 15.4, 95% CI 12.8–18.5) than among men (SMR 5.8, 95% CI 5.1–6.6). Although crude mortality increased with age, excess mortality was greatest among participants less than 35 years old (SMR 13.2, 95% CI 9.4–18.5) and those 35–39 years old (SMR 13.3, 95% CI 10.3–17.1). Excess risk was also elevated among participants with hepatitis C virus (HCV), HIV and HCV/HIV infection, with SMRs of 5.9 (95% CI 4.9–7.1), 19.2 (95% CI 12.8–28.9) and 23.0 (95% CI 19.3–27.4), respectively. Interpretation Our study showed high mortality in this inner-city population, particularly when compared with the general population of Vancouver. Excess mortality was highest among women, younger participants and those infected with either HCV or HIV or both. PMID:25077106

  15. The decomposition of cost efficiency: an empirical application of the shadow cost function model to Dutch general hospitals.

    PubMed

    Blank, Jos L T; Eggink, Evelien

    2004-05-01

    This paper investigates the performance of the Dutch general hospital industry by a parametric method. In general, the parametric approaches find more difficulties in distinguishing between technical and allocative efficiencies than DEA. Only recently a class of models is developed based on shadow prices which have possibilities to distinguish between technical and allocative efficiency. However, these models cause some serious computational problems. This paper recommends an approach to overcome these problems by using an iterative two-stage estimation procedure. The estimation is conducted on a panel data set of Dutch general hospitals. Estimation shows that this method is effective. The parameter estimates are plausible, reliable and satisfy all theoretical requirements. In particular we find some reliable estimates for the individual hospitals' shadow prices. According to these shadow prices hospitals should reallocate their resources in favor of material supplies at the cost of other personnel and nursing personnel. The mean technical efficiency is about 86%, whereas the allocative efficiency is about 92%. The outcomes also show that technical progress is very small. Economies of scale are present only for small hospitals. PMID:15152972

  16. The incidence of Cyclospora cayetanensis in stool samples submitted to a district general hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, S. C.; McIntyre, M.

    1996-01-01

    Cyclospora cayetanensis is the cause of a prolonged diarrhoeal syndrome. In the UK most cases are seen in travellers who have returned from countries in which the organism is endemic. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the incidence of C. cayetanensis in stool samples submitted to a district general hospital. A total of 6151 stools from 5374 different patients were screened for the presence of C. cayetanensis over a 1-year period using the modified Ziehl-Neelsen technique. Oocysts of C. cayetanensis were found in 7 stools (0.1%) from 4 patients (0.07%). All four patients were adult travellers who had visited countries in which C. cayetanensis is known to be endemic. In the population of this study, C. cayetanensis was found to be a rare cause of diarrhoea. Although C. cayetanensis infection should be considered in individuals of all ages who have lived in, or have travelled to endemic areas, there is no need to screen stool samples for the organism in those without such a travel history. PMID:8760968

  17. Young people admitted on a Form 1 to a general hospital: A worrisome trend

    PubMed Central

    Smith, W Gary; Collings, Angela; Degraaf, Anabela

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess and analyze the significance of the increase in the number of paediatric psychiatric admissions under a Form 1 (involuntary admission) to the regional paediatric unit of a general hospital. METHODS: The authors retrospectively reviewed the charts of all child psychiatric admissions to the paediatric ward over the years 1998 to 2003. The specific data obtained was that of discharge diagnosis, age and sex of patient, application of Form 1 and transfer to a psychiatric facility. RESULTS: Broad diagnostic categories included: mood disorder with and without suicidal behaviour, suicidal behaviour, psychosis, mood disorder with psychosis, anxiety disorder, eating disorder, behaviour disorder, personality disturbance, substance abuse, situational crisis and psychogenic disorder. Yearly admissions to the unit ranged from 25 per year to 45 per year over the five years studied. In the last three years, the rate of Form 1 application increased from one in 1999 to 2000 to 11 in 2002 to 2003 (a 10 fold increase). DISCUSSION: Possible reasons for this dramatic increase were identified and may be relevant to other nonpsychiatric centres dealing with children. PMID:19655014

  18. Effectivenes of a track-based model for treating eating disorders in a general psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Rebecca; MacCaughelty, Chelsea; Rufino, Katrina; Pack, Tessa; Poplack, Janice; George, Kim; Ruscitti, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Due to comorbid disorders or the degree of severity of their eating disorder, individuals may not warrant treatment at a specialty eating disorder facility. This article examines the effectiveness of a track-based model for treating eating disorders at a general inpatient psychiatric hospital. One hundred seventy-six patients who participated on the Eating Disorder Track and completed the Eating Disorder Inventory-3 (EDI; Garner, 2004) were examined to determine whether their eating disorder symptoms improved over the course of their treatment. Results indicated that patients significantly improved across all eating disorder risk scales and psychological scales measured by the Eating Disorder Inventory. This suggests that patients who may not meet the criteria for attending a specialty eating disorder program may receive an alternative form of treatment for their eating disorder that is effective in reducing their eating disorder symptomatology. The hope is that providing more treatment options will expand the reach of eating disorder treatments to more individuals who need specialized care for these disorders. PMID:27028338

  19. Seasonality of Admissions for Mania: Results From a General Hospital Psychiatric Unit in Pondicherry, India

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Siddharth

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Bipolar disorder is affected by variables that modulate circadian rhythm, including seasonal variations. There is evidence of a seasonal pattern of admissions of mania in various geographical settings, though its timing varies by region and climate. Variables such as age and gender have been shown to affect seasonality in some studies. Methodology: Data on monthly admission patterns for mania at a general hospital psychiatry unit in Pondicherry, India, were collected for 4 years (2010–2013) and analyzed for seasonality and seasonal peaks. The effects of age and gender were analyzed separately. Results: There was overall evidence of a seasonal pattern of admissions for mania (P < .01, Friedman test for seasonality), with a peak beginning during the rainy season and ending before summer (P < .0.1, Ratchet circular scan test). Male sex (P < .005, Ratchet circular scan test) and age > 25 years (P < .005, Ratchet circular scan test) were specifically associated with this seasonal peak. Discussion: The effect of seasons on mania is complex and is modulated by a variety of variables. Our study is consistent with earlier research findings: a greater degree of seasonality for mania in men. It is possible that climatic and individual variables interact to determine seasonal patterns in bipolar disorder in a given setting. PMID:26644962

  20. Evaluation of Potential Drug - Drug Interactions in General Medicine Ward of Teaching Hospital in Southern India

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Akram; Khan, Muhammad Umair; Ivan, Rahul; Dasari, Ram; Revanker, Megha; Pravina, A.; Kuriakose, Sheetal

    2015-01-01

    Background: Polypharmacy is considered as one of the major risk factors in precipitation of drug-drug interactions (DDIs). Patient population at high risk include the elderly and patients with co morbidities as they are usually prescribed with more number of drugs. Critical evaluation of such prescriptions by pharmacist could result in identification and reduction of such problems. Objective: The study aims to assess the prevalence, severity and significance of potential DDI (pDDI) in general medicine wards of South Indian tertiary care teaching hospital. Materials and Method: A prospective observational study was conducted in a general medicine ward for a period of six months (September 2012 to February 2013). The socio-demographic, clinical characteristics and medication prescribed was documented in a specially designed form. Analysis was carried out to assess the prevalence, severity and significance of identified pDDIs using Micromedex. Descriptive and Univariate analysis were used to report the findings. Results: A total of 404 case records reviewed, 78 (19.3%) patients had pDDIs. A total of 139 (34.4%) pDDIs were reported during the study period. Majority (53.95%, n=75) of the interactions were moderate in intensity and significant in nature (53.23%, n=74). Positive association between number of pDDIs and age was observed. Conclusion: The prevalence of pDDIs was 19.3% which is lesser then previously reported studies from India. Patient with more co-morbidities and elders were observed with more pDDIs. The study highlighted the need to effectively monitor and patients prevent pDDIs to improve patient safety. PMID:25859467

  1. An Investigation of Nursing Staff Attitudes and Emotional Reactions towards Patients with Intellectual Disability in a General Hospital Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Sharna; Stenfert-Kroese, Biza

    2010-01-01

    Background: It has been suggested that inequalities in health care for people with intellectual disabilities may be partly explained by negative attitudes of health professionals. This study aimed to investigate the attitudes and emotional reactions reported by nursing staff working in general hospitals towards caring for patients with…

  2. An observational study in psychiatric acute patients admitted to General Hospital Psychiatric Wards in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Ballerini, Andrea; Boccalon, Roberto; Boncompagni, Giancarlo; Casacchia, Massimo; Margari, Francesco; Minervini, Lina; Righi, Roberto; Russo, Federico; Salteri, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    Objectives this Italian observational study was aimed at collecting data of psychiatric patients with acute episodes entering General Hospital Psychiatric Wards (GHPWs). Information was focused on diagnosis (DSM-IV), reasons of hospitalisation, prescribed treatment, outcome of aggressive episodes, evolution of the acute episode. Methods assessments were performed at admission and discharge. Used psychometric scales were the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS), the Modified Overt Aggression Scale (MOAS) and the Nurses' Observation Scale for Inpatient Evaluation (NOSIE-30). Results 864 adult patients were enrolled in 15 GHPWs: 728 (320 M; mean age 43.6 yrs) completed both admission and discharge visits. A severe psychotic episode with (19.1%) or without (47.7%) aggressive behaviour was the main reason of admission. Schizophrenia (42.8% at admission and 40.1% at discharge) and depression (12.9% at admission and 14.7% at discharge) were the predominant diagnoses. The mean hospital stay was 12 days. The mean (± SD) total score of MOAS at admission, day 7 and discharge was, respectively, 2.53 ± 5.1, 0.38 ± 2.2, and 0.21 ± 1.5. Forty-four (6.0%) patients had episodes of aggressiveness at admission and 8 (1.7%) at day 7. A progressive improvement in each domain/item vs. admission was observed for MOAS and BPRS, while NOSIE-30 did not change from day 4 onwards. The number of patients with al least one psychotic drug taken at admission, in the first 7 days of hospitalisation, and prescribed at discharge, was, respectively: 472 (64.8%), 686 (94.2%) and 676 (92.9%). The respective most frequently psychotic drugs were: BDZs (60.6%, 85.7%, 69.5%), typical anti-psychotics (48.3%, 57.0%, 49.6%), atypical anti-psychotics (35.6%, 41.8%, 39.8%) and antidepressants (40.9%, 48.8%, 43.2%). Rates of patients with one, two or > 2 psychotic drugs taken at admission and day 7, and prescribed at discharge, were, respectively: 24.8%, 8.2% and 13.5% in mono-therapy; 22.0%, 20.6% and 26.6% with two drugs, and 53.2%, 57.8% and 59.0% with > two drugs. Benzodiazepines were the most common drugs both at admission (60.0%) and during hospitalisation (85.7%), and 69.5% were prescribed at discharge. Conclusion patients with psychiatric diseases in acute phase experienced a satisfactory outcome following intensified therapeutic interventions during hospitalisation. PMID:17257438

  3. Apparent Temperature and Air Pollution vs. Elderly Population Mortality in Metro Vancouver

    PubMed Central

    Krstić, Goran

    2011-01-01

    Background Meteorological conditions and air pollution in urban environments have been associated with general population and elderly mortality, showing seasonal variation. Objectives This study is designed to evaluate the relationship between apparent temperature (AT) and air pollution (PM2.5) vs. mortality in elderly population of Metro Vancouver. Methods Statistical analyses are performed on moving sum daily mortality rates vs. moving average AT and PM2.5 in 1-, 2-, 3-, 5-, and 7-day models for all seasons, warm temperatures above 15°C, and cold temperatures below 10°C. Results Approximately 37% of the variation in all-season mortality from circulatory and respiratory causes can be explained by the variation in 7-day moving average apparent temperature (r2 = 0.37, p<0.001). Although the analytical results from air pollution models show increasingly better prediction ability of longer time-intervals (r2 = 0.012, p<0.001 in a 7-day model), a very weak negative association between elderly mortality and air pollution is observed. Conclusions Apparent temperature is associated with mortality from respiratory and circulatory causes in elderly population of Metro Vancouver. In a changing climate, one may anticipate to observe potential health impacts from the projected high- and particularly from the low-temperature extremes. PMID:21980381

  4. Prostitution in Vancouver: violence and the colonization of First Nations women.

    PubMed

    Farley, Melissa; Lynne, Jacqueline; Cotton, Ann J

    2005-06-01

    We interviewed 100 women prostituting in Vancouver, Canada. We found an extremely high prevalence of lifetime violence and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Fifty-two percent of our interviewees were women from Canada's First Nations, a significant overrepresentation in prostitution compared with their representation in Vancouver generally (1.7-7%). Eighty-two percent reported a history of childhood sexual abuse, by an average of four perpetrators. Seventy-two percent reported childhood physical abuse, 90% had been physically assaulted in prostitution, 78% had been raped in prostitution. Seventy-two percent met DSM-IV criteria for PTSD. Ninety-five percent said that they wanted to leave prostitution. Eighty-six percent reported current or past homelessness with housing as one of their most urgent needs. Eighty-two percent expressed a need for treatment for drug or alcohol addictions. Findings are discussed in terms of the legacy of colonialism, the intrinsically traumatizing nature of prostitution and prostitution's violations of basic human rights. PMID:16114585

  5. Library Services to Hospital Patients and Handicapped Readers Section. Libraries Serving the General Public Division. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on library services to hospital personnel, hospital patients, and housebound or handicapped persons, which were presented at the 1983 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference, include: (1) "Education and Training for Health Care Librarianship," in which Antonia J. Bunch (United Kingdom) discusses the scope of and…

  6. Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics Land Surface Forecast System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernier, N. B.; Belair, S.; Tong, L.; Abrahamowicz, M.; Mailhot, J.

    2009-04-01

    Environment Canada's land surface forecast system developed for the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics is presented together with an evaluation of its performance for winters 2007-2008 and 2008-2009. The motivation for this work is threefold: it is i) application driven for the 2010 Vancouver Olympics, ii) a testbed for the panCanadian operational land surface forecast model being developed, and iii) the precursor to the fully coupled land-surface model to come. The new high resolution (100m grid size), 2D, and novel imbedded point-based land surface forecast model used to predict hourly snow and surface temperature conditions at Olympic and Paralympic Competition Sites are described. The surface systems are driven by atmospheric forcing provided by the center's operational regional forecast model for the first 48 hours and by the operational global forecast model for hours 49 to 96. The forcing fields are corrected for elevation discrepancies over the rapidly changing and complex mountainous settings of the Vancouver Olympics that arise from resolution differences. Daily 96h land surface forecasts for 2 winters and snow depth and surface air temperature observations collected at several specially deployed competition sites are used to validate the land surface model. We show that the newly implemented surface forecast model refines and improves snow depth and surface temperature forecast issued by the operational weather forecast system throughout the forecast period.

  7. Borderline Personality Disorder and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder at Psychiatric Discharge Predict General Hospital Admission for Self-Harm.

    PubMed

    Mellesdal, Liv; Gjestad, Rolf; Johnsen, Erik; Jørgensen, Hugo A; Oedegaard, Ketil J; Kroken, Rune A; Mehlum, Lars

    2015-12-01

    We investigated whether posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was predictor of suicidal behavior even when adjusting for comorbid borderline personality disorder (BPD) and other salient risk factors. To study this, we randomly selected 308 patients admitted to a psychiatric hospital because of suicide risk. Baseline interviews were performed within the first days of the stay. Information concerning the number of self-harm admissions to general hospitals over the subsequent 6 months was retrieved through linkage with the regional hospital registers. A censored regression analysis of hospital admissions for self-harm indicated significant associations with both PTSD (β = .21, p < .001) and BPD (β = .27, p < .001). A structural model comprising two latent BPD factors, dysregulation and relationship problems, as well as PTSD and several other variables, demonstrated that PTSD was an important correlate of the number of self-harm admissions to general hospitals (B = 1.52, p < .01). Dysregulation was associated directly with self-harm (B = 0.28, p < .05), and also through PTSD. These results suggested that PTSD and related dysregulation problems could be important treatment targets for a reduction in the risk of severe self-harm in high-risk psychiatric patients. PMID:26581019

  8. Breastfeeding policy and practices at the general paediatric outpatient clinic of a teaching hospital in Lagos, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hospitals have a role to play in supporting, protecting and promoting breastfeeding. The aim of this study was to describe hospital breastfeeding policy and practices and breastfeeding rates among mothers attending General Paediatric Outpatient Clinic at a tertiary hospital in Lagos, Nigeria. Methods This was a cross-sectional study involving paediatric nurses and doctors, as well as the mothers who brought their child to the General Paediatric Outpatient Clinic. Two sets of questionnaires, different in content, were administered to doctors and nurses, and to mothers of children aged 6-24 months, to assess hospital policy and breastfeeding rates, respectively. Stepwise multiple logistic regression analysis was used to examine factors associated with duration of breastfeeding. Results Although the hospital had a written breastfeeding policy copies of the policy were not clearly displayed in any of the units in the Paediatric department. Almost half the staff (48%; 60/125) were not aware of the policy. The hospital had no breastfeeding support group. Nearly three quarters (92/125) of the staff had received lactation management training. 36% (112/311) of mothers exclusively breastfed for six months, 42% (129/311) had stopped breastfeeding at the time of the survey. 67% (207/311) of babies were given infant formula, 85% (175/207) before 6 months. Women who had antenatal care in private hospitals and were Christian were more likely to breastfeed exclusively for 6 months. Low maternal education was the only factor associated with breastfeeding longer than 12 months. Conclusion Breastfeeding practices and policy implementation at this outpatient clinic were suboptimal. We have identified a need for interventions to increase knowledge of the benefits of breastfeeding and to provide support for its longer term duration. We suggest that BFHI be considered across all facilities concerned with infant and early child health to disseminate appropriate information and promote an increase in exclusive breastfeeding for six months as well as the duration of breastfeeding. PMID:25018776

  9. Lower respiratory tract infection hospitalizations among American Indian/Alaska Native children and the general United States child population

    PubMed Central

    Foote, Eric M.; Singleton, Rosalyn J.; Holman, Robert C.; Seeman, Sara M.; Steiner, Claudia A.; Bartholomew, Michael; Hennessy, Thomas W.

    2015-01-01

    Background The lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI)-associated hospitalization rate in American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) children aged <5 years declined during 1998–2008, yet remained 1.6 times higher than the general US child population in 2006–2008. Purpose Describe the change in LRTI-associated hospitalization rates for AI/AN children and for the general US child population aged <5 years. Methods A retrospective analysis of hospitalizations with discharge ICD-9-CM codes for LRTI for AI/AN children and for the general US child population <5 years during 2009–2011 was conducted using Indian Health Service direct and contract care inpatient data and the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, respectively. We calculated hospitalization rates and made comparisons to previously published 1998–1999 rates prior to pneumococcal conjugate vaccine introduction. Results The average annual LRTI-associated hospitalization rate declined from 1998–1999 to 2009–2011 in AI/AN (35%, p<0.01) and the general US child population (19%, SE: 4.5%, p<0.01). The 2009–2011 AI/AN child average annual LRTI-associated hospitalization rate was 20.7 per 1,000, 1.5 times higher than the US child rate (13.7 95% CI: 12.6–14.8). The Alaska (38.9) and Southwest regions (27.3) had the highest rates. The disparity was greatest for infant (<1 year) pneumonia-associated and 2009–2010 H1N1 influenza-associated hospitalizations. Conclusions Although the LRTI-associated hospitalization rate declined, the 2009–2011 AI/AN child rate remained higher than the US child rate, especially in the Alaska and Southwest regions. The residual disparity is likely multi-factorial and partly related to household crowding, indoor smoke exposure, lack of piped water and poverty. Implementation of interventions proven to reduce LRTI is needed among AI/AN children. PMID:26547082

  10. The Role of the General Hospital in Health Care: Part Two in a Series on Group Practice

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, W. I.

    1970-01-01

    The aim of this article is to provoke dialogue and to initiate change. Costs of health care are alarming. Our inability to respond effectively to the demand for total health care is frustrating. This is the second article in a series on hospitals. The next article will look at unmet health care needs and underutilized health care resources and seek to identify the group practice of medicine as the logical centre for orientation of other than general hospital health services. Imagesp112-a PMID:20468501

  11. Consultation-liaison service in the general hospital: effects of cognitive-behavioral therapy in patients with physical nonspecific symptoms.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, U; Wagner, D; Lupke, U

    1999-11-01

    Nearly 15% of patients referred to a general hospital psychological medicine consultation service met DSM criteria for somatoform disorders or showed psychological factors affecting physical conditions. In a case-control control study of patients meeting these diagnostic criteria. outcomes were compared of 21 consecutively referred patients who received a course of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) in addition to standard hospital treatment (SHT) and another 21 patients who received SHT alone. Compared with the SHT group, those who received CBT treatment showed significantly decreased bodily complaints and negative mood, better insight into the psychosomatic causes of their complaints, and a high motivation for subsequent psychotherapy. PMID:10624839

  12. Laparoscopic incisional and ventral hernia repair in a district general hospital

    PubMed Central

    Mann, CD; Luther, A; Hart, C

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The laparoscopic approach to repairing ventral and incisional hernias has gained increasing popularity worldwide. We reviewed the experience of laparoscopic ventral hernia repair at a district general hospital in the UK with particular reference to patients with massive defects (diameter ≥15cm) and the morbidly obese. Methods A total of 144 patients underwent laparoscopic ventral (incisional or umbilical/paraumbilical) hernia repair between April 2007 and September 2012. Results The prevalence of conversion to open surgery was 2.8%. The prevalence of postoperative complications was 3.5%. Median postoperative follow-up was 30.2 months. A total of 5.6% cases suffered late complications and 2.8% developed recurrence. Thirty-four patients underwent repair of defects ≥10cm in diameter with a prevalence of recurrence of 5.6%. Sixteen patients underwent repair of ‘massive’ incisional hernia (diameter ≥15cm) with a prevalence of recurrence of 12.5%. Sixteen patients with a body mass index (BMI) ≥40kg/m2 (range, 40–61kg/m2) underwent laparoscopic repair with a prevalence of recurrence of 6.3% (p>0.05 vs BMI <40kg/m2). Conclusions Laparoscopic ventral hernia repair can be carried out safely with a low prevalence of recurrence. It may have advantages in morbidly obese patients in whom open repair would represent a significant undertaking. Laparoscopic ventral hernia repair may be used in cases of large and massive hernias, in which the risk of recurrence increases but is comparable with open repair and associated with low morbidity. PMID:25519261

  13. Improving paediatric prescribing practice in a district general hospital through implementation of a quality improvement programme

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, Peter; Lawson, Sara; Watterson, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Prescribing errors are a well recognised cause of adverse incidents and have a direct effect on patients.[1] This impacts on the doctor-family relationship and results in breakdown of trust and communication.[2] This quality improvement project was carried out in the paediatric ward of a district general hospital in Northern Ireland. A retrospective analysis of paediatric prescribing errors between January and December 2013 identified two errors that were felt to be secondary to under-reporting. A baseline audit was subsequently performed that highlighted 32 errors across 12 drug charts. A driver diagram identified three components contributing to prescribing errors and relevant tests of change were developed. The three primary drivers included: education and communication, practical prescribing changes, and medicine reconciliation. Seven interventions were implemented sequentially over a six month period and their effectiveness assessed by a prospective drug chart audit. Ten drug charts were selected at random by the staff nurse allocated to medications on the day of audit. The charts were audited using a predesigned proforma and the total number of errors counted. These were subcategorised and results displayed in graphical format after each intervention. Seven audit cycles were completed in total after each intervention was put into practice. The number of errors (including percentage change following each intervention) is as follows: intervention 1: 32 (+19%); Intervention 2: 31 (+15%); Intervention 3: 17 (-37%); Intervention 4: 12 (-56%); Intervention 5: 15 (-44%); Intervention 6: 7 (-74%); Intervention 7: 10 (-63%). In conclusion, permanent and successful measures are needed to reduce prescribing errors in order to minimise the impact of staff changeover and knowledge deficits. PMID:26734382

  14. Improving paediatric prescribing practice in a district general hospital through implementation of a quality improvement programme.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Peter; Lawson, Sara; Watterson, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Prescribing errors are a well recognised cause of adverse incidents and have a direct effect on patients.[1] This impacts on the doctor-family relationship and results in breakdown of trust and communication.[2] This quality improvement project was carried out in the paediatric ward of a district general hospital in Northern Ireland. A retrospective analysis of paediatric prescribing errors between January and December 2013 identified two errors that were felt to be secondary to under-reporting. A baseline audit was subsequently performed that highlighted 32 errors across 12 drug charts. A driver diagram identified three components contributing to prescribing errors and relevant tests of change were developed. The three primary drivers included: education and communication, practical prescribing changes, and medicine reconciliation. Seven interventions were implemented sequentially over a six month period and their effectiveness assessed by a prospective drug chart audit. Ten drug charts were selected at random by the staff nurse allocated to medications on the day of audit. The charts were audited using a predesigned proforma and the total number of errors counted. These were subcategorised and results displayed in graphical format after each intervention. Seven audit cycles were completed in total after each intervention was put into practice. The number of errors (including percentage change following each intervention) is as follows: intervention 1: 32 (+19%); Intervention 2: 31 (+15%); Intervention 3: 17 (-37%); Intervention 4: 12 (-56%); Intervention 5: 15 (-44%); Intervention 6: 7 (-74%); Intervention 7: 10 (-63%). In conclusion, permanent and successful measures are needed to reduce prescribing errors in order to minimise the impact of staff changeover and knowledge deficits. PMID:26734382

  15. The profile of patients with obstructive uropathy in Cameroon: case of the Douala General Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Halle, Marie Patrice; Toukep, Linda Njonkam; Nzuobontane, Samuel Ekane; Ebana, Hermine Fouda; Ekane, Gregory Halle; Priso, Eugene Belley

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Obstructive uropathy can lead to irreversible kidney damage. The etiology largely determined by the patient's age can be benign or malignant. This study aimed at determining the profile and outcome of patients with obstructive uropathy in Cameroon. Methods A cross sectional study carried out in the urology unit of the Douala General Hospital, including patients with a diagnosis of obstructive uropathy seen from January 2004 to December 2013. Clinical profile, treatment and outcome data were obtained from patients records. Results Of the 229 patients included 69% were men, mean age 50 ±18 years. Associated comorbidities were hypertension, diabetes, and HIV. Mean haemoglobin 8,40±2,4g/dl, mean GFR 10,3 ±10ml/min, 94 (41%) patients needed emergency dialysis. Symptoms at presentation: asthenia (57%), anorexia (55%), loin pain (37%), vomiting (28%), oedema (20%), and anuria (15%). Urinary tract infection was present in 33 patients. Main aetiologies of obstruction: urolithiasis (35%), begnin prostatic hypertrophy (27%), prostatic cancer (12%), cervical cancer (16%), and congenital malformations (5%). Drainage was effective in 102 (45%) patients, 63 (28%) recovered completely, 91 (41%) were loss to follow up, 49 (22%) died and more women (p = 0.02). Mortality was associated with prostatic cancer (p = 0.000), cervical cancer (p = 0.004) and radiotherapy (p = 0.03). Conclusion Patients with obstructive uropathy presented with significant impaired renal function. Main causes were urinary stones, prostatic hypertrophy, prostatic and cervical cancers. Renal recovery was poor, loss to follow up and mortality high. Specific strategies to target improvement in renal recovery and patient's survival are needed in this patient's group. PMID:27217891

  16. Junior doctor dementia champions in a district general hospital (innovative practice).

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Iain; Coates, Anna; Merrick, Sophie; Lee, Chooi

    2016-03-01

    Dementia is a common condition in the UK with around 25% of patients in acute hospitals having dementia. In the UK, there is national guidance on the assessment of cognitive impairment in acute hospitals. This article is a qualitative study of junior doctors' experiences as part of a dementia and delirium team involved in changing the care of patients with dementia in a hospital in the UK. It draws on data from a focus group and follow-up questionnaire in two hospital trusts. We examine what drives doctors to become involved in such projects and the effects of this experience upon them. We suggest a typology for getting junior doctors involved in projects generating change when working with patients with dementia. Being more actively involved in caring for and developing services for patients with dementia may represent the crossing of an educational threshold for these junior doctors. PMID:25924617

  17. [Companion Diagnostics Sub-Section of Anatomic Pathology Department in a Mid-Sized General Hospital: Start Up and Maintenance].

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Hirofumi; Yasuhara, Mayumi

    2015-07-01

    We introduce the establishment of a companion diagnostics sub-section of an anatomic pathology department in our mid-sized general hospital. Recent cancer pharmacotherapy targets are growth factor receptors and their associated signal transduction molecules. The presence or absence of mutations in these genes influences the effects of drugs on an individual tumor. Gene polymorphisms of anti-cancer drug metabolism-related enzymes are also closely associated with severe toxicity. Medical oncologists must have knowledge of gene alterations of growth factor receptors and associated signal transduction molecules and polymorphisms of anti-cancer drug metabolism-related enzymes in each case. Large numbers of cases with advanced cancers of the colon/rectum or lung are admitted to our mid-sized general hospital. Analyses of KRAS and EGFR gene mutations and UGT1A1 polymorphisms should be performed within an anatomic pathology department, in order to obtain results of genetic analysis and start tailor-made pharmacotherapy as soon as possible. Cost performance is not low. Executive members of the hospital decided to establish a new hospital which will focus on cancer surgery and pharmacotherapy, and it is scheduled to be completed in one year, next to the present building. So we, including the head of medical technologists, immediately proposed the start up of a companion diagnostics sub-section in an anatomic pathology department. The executive members agreed with our proposal, and purchased a fully-automated genotyping system, IS-5320 (idensy IS-5320 ARKRAY). Companion diagnostics regarding molecular targeting pharmacotherapy should be performed even in a mid-sized general hospital. PMID:26591440

  18. The founding of Walter Reed General Hospital and the beginning of modern institutional army medical care in the United States.

    PubMed

    Adler, Jessica L

    2014-10-01

    When Walter Reed United States Army General Hospital opened its doors in 1909, the Spanish-American War had been over for a decade, World War I was in the unforeseeable future, and army hospital admission rates were steadily decreasing. The story of the founding of Walter Reed, which remained one of the flagship military health institutions in the United States until its 2011 closure, is a story about the complexities of the turn of the twentieth century. Broad historical factors-heightened imperial ambitions, a drive to modernize the army and its medical services, and a growing acceptance of hospitals as ideal places for treatment-explain why the institution was so urgently fought for and ultimately won funding at the particular moment it did. The justifications put forth for the establishment of Walter Reed indicate that the provision of publicly funded medical care for soldiers has been predicated not only on a sense of humanitarian commitment to those who serve, but on principles of military efficiency, thrift, pragmatism, and international competition. On a more general level, the story of Walter Reed's founding demonstrates a Progressive Era shift in health services for U.S. soldiers-from temporary, makeshift hospitals to permanent institutions with expansive goals. PMID:23839016

  19. A strategy for enhancing financial performance: a study of general acute care hospitals in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Choi, Mankyu; Lee, Keon-Hyung

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the determinants of hospital profitability were evaluated using a sample of 142 hospitals that had undergone hospital standardization inspections by the South Korea Hospital Association over the 4-year period from 1998 to 2001. The measures of profitability used as dependent variables in this study were pretax return on assets, after-tax return on assets, basic earning power, pretax operating margin, and after-tax operating margin. Among those determinants, it was found that ownership type, teaching status, inventory turnover, and the average charge per adjusted inpatient day positively and statistically significantly affected all 5 of these profitability measures. However, the labor expenses per adjusted inpatient day and administrative expenses per adjusted inpatient day negatively and statistically significantly affected all 5 profitability measures. The debt ratio negatively and statistically significantly affected all 5 profitability measures, with the exception of basic earning power. None of the market factors assessed were shown to significantly affect profitability. In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that the profitability of hospitals can be improved despite deteriorating external environmental conditions by facilitating the formation of sound financial structures with optimal capital supplies, optimizing the management of total assets with special emphasis placed on inventory management, and introducing efficient control of fixed costs including labor and administrative expenses. PMID:19011410

  20. An audit of consenting practices in a district general hospital. Can we improve?

    PubMed Central

    CHOHDA, E.; DODDI, S.; SUNDARAMOORTHY, S.; MANTON, R.N.; AHAD, A.; SINHA, A.; KHAWAJA, H.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Informed consent, as the declaration of patients’ will, forms the basis of legality of medical procedures. A standard form based on the Department of Health model is widely used in the National Health Service (NHS). The aim of this audit process was to assess the current consent practice in comparison to the UK’s General Medical Council guidance and local policy and make any appropriate improvements. Patients and methods 254 adult consent forms were reviewed during the patients’ admission. Data collected included legible documentation, grade of health professional completing the consent form, providing additional written information, use of abbreviations, securing the consent form in the medical records and, providing a copy to the patient. After initial assessment, interventions in an attempt to improve adherence to guidelines were introduced. A repeat audit of a further set of 110 notes was completed to assess the effectiveness of our interventions. Results Our baseline assessment of 254 consent forms comprised of 198 (78%) elective and 56 (22%) emergency procedures. 87 (34%) consent forms were secure in the medical records. Grade of health professional was recorded in 211 (83%). 191 (75%) forms were legible. 48 (19%) patients were given copy of the consent. Only 24 (9%) patients were given additional written information. Abbreviations were used in 68 (27%) forms. Only 12 (5%) of consent forms met all criteria simultaneously. Re-audit after intervention assessed 110 consent forms; 30 (27%) for elective and 80 (72%) for emergency procedures. 52 (47%) of consent forms were secure in medical records, grade of health professional was recorded in 94 (85%), 101 (75%) forms were legible, 42 (38%) patients received copy of consent and 41 (37%) of patients received additional written information. Conclusion Initially only 5% of consent forms completely met GMC guidelines. This demonstrates an alarmingly poor adherence to such guidance that plays a vital role in patient safety, patient ethics autonomy, not to mention potential medico-legal and clinical governance implications for surgical practice. Our intervention has improved the quality of consenting within our hospital according to these guidelines. With these interventions set to continue and further develop, we expect that the quality of the consenting process will continue to provide patients with all that it is designed to. PMID:26888702

  1. Paediatric sedation for CT scanning: the safety and efficacy of quinalbarbitone in a district general hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Simpson, J H; West, C D; Law, P J

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review retrospectively the safety and efficacy of a paediatric sedation protocol in a district general hospital radiology department. 256 children attended for CT scanning over a 40-month period. 40 children required sedation and were given quinalbarbitone. 34 (85%) of this group were adequately sedated. Of the children who received quinalbarbitone, 35 were under 5 years of age. 32 of this group (91.4%) were adequately sedated. Failures in children under 5 years were all caused by problems with administration whilst failures in the older children were due to paradoxical excitement. No problems with respiratory depression were encountered. Sedation can be safely performed in a district general hospital radiology department if a structured protocol is adhered to. Quinalbarbitone is a safe, effective oral agent in children under the age of 5 years. PMID:10721313

  2. Rates of self-harm presenting to general hospitals: a comparison of data from the Multicentre Study of Self-Harm in England and Hospital Episode Statistics

    PubMed Central

    Turnbull, Pauline; Hawton, Keith; Geulayov, Galit; Waters, Keith; Ness, Jennifer; Townsend, Ellen; Khundakar, Kazem; Kapur, Nav

    2016-01-01

    Objective Rates of hospital presentation for self-harm in England were compared using different national and local data sources. Design The study was descriptive and compared bespoke data collection methods for recording self-harm presentations to hospital with routinely collected hospital data. Setting Local area data on self-harm from the 3 centres of the Multicentre Study of Self-harm in England (Oxford, Manchester and Derby) were used along with national and local routinely collected data on self-harm admissions and emergency department attendances from Hospital Episode Statistics (HES). Primary outcome Rate ratios were calculated to compare rates of self-harm generated using different data sources nationally and locally (between 2010 and 2012) and rates of hospital presentations for self-harm were plotted over time (between 2003 and 2012), based on different data sources. Results The total number of self-harm episodes between 2010 and 2012 was 13 547 based on Multicentre Study data, 9600 based on HES emergency department data and 8096 based on HES admission data. Nationally, routine HES data underestimated overall rates of self-harm by approximately 60% compared with rates based on Multicentre Study data (rate ratio for HES emergency department data, 0.41 (95% CI 0.35 to 0.49); rate ratio for HES admission data, 0.42 (95% CI 0.36 to 0.49)). Direct local area comparisons confirmed an overall underascertainment in the HES data, although the difference varied between centres. There was a general increase in self-harm over time according to HES data which contrasted with a fall and then a rise in the Multicentre Study data. Conclusions There was a consistent underestimation of presentations for self-harm recorded by HES emergency department data, and fluctuations in year-on-year figures. HES admission data appeared more reliable but missed non-admitted episodes. Routinely collected data may miss important trends in self-harm and cannot be used in isolation as the basis for a robust national indicator of self-harm. PMID:26883238

  3. Development of a young persons' HIV clinic in a District General Hospital: a case note review resulting in informed change.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Jayne; Norrish, Gabrielle; Elgalib, Ali

    2013-11-01

    In recognition of the increasing number of HIV-infected young people attending the HIV department at a district general hospital, a case note review was conducted. There was a high prevalence of psychosocial problems and medical complexity among this cohort. As a result, tailored young persons' services were developed. Effective utilisation of the existing skill-mix and resources were key to success. PMID:23970600

  4. An urban metabolism and ecological footprint assessment of Metro Vancouver.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jennie; Kissinger, Meidad; Rees, William E

    2013-07-30

    As the world urbanizes, the role of cities in determining sustainability outcomes grows in importance. Cities are the dominant form of human habitat, and most of the world's resources are either directly or indirectly consumed in cities. Sustainable city analysis and management requires understanding the demands a city places on a wider geographical area and its ecological resource base. We present a detailed, integrated urban metabolism of residential consumption and ecological footprint analysis of the Vancouver metropolitan region for the year 2006. Our overall goal is to demonstrate the application of a bottom-up ecological footprint analysis using an urban metabolism framework at a metropolitan, regional scale. Our specific objectives are: a) to quantify energy and material consumption using locally generated data and b) to relate these data to global ecological carrying capacity. Although water is the largest material flow through Metro Vancouver (424,860,000 m(3)), it has the smallest ecological footprint (23,100 gha). Food (2,636,850 tonnes) contributes the largest component to the ecological footprint (4,514,400 gha) which includes crop and grazing land as well as carbon sinks required to sequester emissions from food production and distribution. Transportation fuels (3,339,000 m(3)) associated with motor vehicle operation and passenger air travel comprises the second largest material flow through the region and the largest source of carbon dioxide emissions (7,577,000 tonnes). Transportation also accounts for the second largest component of the EF (2,323,200 gha). Buildings account for the largest electricity flow (17,515,150 MWh) and constitute the third largest component of the EF (1,779,240 gha). Consumables (2,400,000 tonnes) comprise the fourth largest component of the EF (1,414,440 gha). Metro Vancouver's total Ecological Footprint in 2006 was 10,071,670 gha, an area approximately 36 times larger than the region itself. The EFA reveals that cropland and carbon sinks (forested land required to sequester carbon dioxide emissions) account for 90% of Metro Vancouver's overall demand for biocapacity. The per capita ecological footprint is 4.76 gha, nearly three times the per capita global supply of biocapacity. Note that this value excludes national government services that operate outside the region and could account for up to an additional 2 gha/ca. PMID:23603775

  5. Climatic Influences on Cryptoccoccus gattii Populations, Vancouver Island, Canada, 2002-2004.

    PubMed

    Uejio, Christopher K; Mak, Sunny; Manangan, Arie; Luber, George; Bartlett, Karen H

    2015-11-01

    Vancouver Island, Canada, reports the world's highest incidence of Cryptococcus gattii infection among humans and animals. To identify key biophysical factors modulating environmental concentrations, we evaluated monthly concentrations of C. gatti in air, soil, and trees over a 3-year period. The 2 study datasets were repeatedly measured plots and newly sampled plots. We used hierarchical generalized linear and mixed effect models to determine associations. Climate systematically influenced C. gattii concentrations in all environmental media tested; in soil and on trees, concentrations decreased when temperatures were warmer. Wind may be a key process that transferred C. gattii from soil into air and onto trees. C. gattii results for tree and air samples were more likely to be positive during periods of higher solar radiation. These results improve the understanding of the places and periods with the greatest C. gattii colonization. Refined risk projections may help susceptible persons avoid activities that disturb the topsoil during relatively cool summer days. PMID:26484590

  6. Climatic Influences on Cryptoccoccus gattii Populations, Vancouver Island, Canada, 2002–2004

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Sunny; Manangan, Arie; Luber, George; Bartlett, Karen H.

    2015-01-01

    Vancouver Island, Canada, reports the world’s highest incidence of Cryptococcus gattii infection among humans and animals. To identify key biophysical factors modulating environmental concentrations, we evaluated monthly concentrations of C. gatti in air, soil, and trees over a 3-year period. The 2 study datasets were repeatedly measured plots and newly sampled plots. We used hierarchical generalized linear and mixed effect models to determine associations. Climate systematically influenced C. gattii concentrations in all environmental media tested; in soil and on trees, concentrations decreased when temperatures were warmer. Wind may be a key process that transferred C. gattii from soil into air and onto trees. C. gattii results for tree and air samples were more likely to be positive during periods of higher solar radiation. These results improve the understanding of the places and periods with the greatest C. gattii colonization. Refined risk projections may help susceptible persons avoid activities that disturb the topsoil during relatively cool summer days. PMID:26484590

  7. Development of a Likelihood of Survival Scoring System for Hospitalized Equine Neonates Using Generalized Boosted Regression Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Dembek, Katarzyna A.; Hurcombe, Samuel D.; Frazer, Michele L.; Morresey, Peter R.; Toribio, Ramiro E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Medical management of critically ill equine neonates (foals) can be expensive and labor intensive. Predicting the odds of foal survival using clinical information could facilitate the decision-making process for owners and clinicians. Numerous prognostic indicators and mathematical models to predict outcome in foals have been published; however, a validated scoring method to predict survival in sick foals has not been reported. The goal of this study was to develop and validate a scoring system that can be used by clinicians to predict likelihood of survival of equine neonates based on clinical data obtained on admission. Methods and Results Data from 339 hospitalized foals of less than four days of age admitted to three equine hospitals were included to develop the model. Thirty seven variables including historical information, physical examination and laboratory findings were analyzed by generalized boosted regression modeling (GBM) to determine which ones would be included in the survival score. Of these, six variables were retained in the final model. The weight for each variable was calculated using a generalized linear model and the probability of survival for each total score was determined. The highest (7) and the lowest (0) scores represented 97% and 3% probability of survival, respectively. Accuracy of this survival score was validated in a prospective study on data from 283 hospitalized foals from the same three hospitals. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values for the survival score in the prospective population were 96%, 71%, 91%, and 85%, respectively. Conclusions The survival score developed in our study was validated in a large number of foals with a wide range of diseases and can be easily implemented using data available in most equine hospitals. GBM was a useful tool to develop the survival score. Further evaluations of this scoring system in field conditions are needed. PMID:25295600

  8. [Competition between office-based physicians and hospitals--general legal conditions].

    PubMed

    Jansen, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    Before December 31, 2002 hospital options were limited to demand-oriented individual authorisations and ambulatory emergency care, so there was no competition against private practice physicians. For the first time the Healthcare Reform Act (GSG) provided hospitals with the opportunity to offer ambulatory services from January 1, 2003 in individual areas of care (pre- and post inpatient treatments according to Sect. 116a SGB and ambulatory surgical interventions according to Sect. 115b SGB V). Following numerous reform acts the spectrum for hospitals has been considerably extended today, particularly by establishing medical service centres (MVZ) and the authorisation to provide certain ambulatory services according to Sect. 116b para. 2-6 SGB V after special approval. Conversely, an amendment of Sect. 20 para. 2 Aerzte-ZV from January 1, 2007 enabled office-based physicians to be employed in a hospital and provide inpatient care so that today we may speak--at least in important sections--of a competitive situation on different levels. PMID:20120197

  9. Teledermatology via a social networking web site: a pilot study between a general hospital and a rural clinic.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Romero, Maria Teresa; Prado, Fernanda; Dominguez-Cherit, Judith; Hojyo-Tomomka, Maria Teresa; Arenas, Roberto

    2011-10-01

    Teledermatology via a free public social networking Web site is a practical tool to provide attention to patients who do not have access to dermatologic care. In this pilot study, a general practitioner sent consults to a dermatology department at a general hospital via Facebook(®). Forty-four patients were seen and treatment was installed. We identified both simple-to-treat, common skin diseases and rare congenital diseases that require genetic counseling and more complex treatment. The majority of patients (75%) benefited with the diagnoses and treatments offered, thus avoiding unnecessary expenses or transportation to urban areas. PMID:21790270

  10. 77 FR 33267 - Eric Temple-Control Exemption-Portland Vancouver Junction Railroad, LLC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-05

    ... published in the Federal Register (77 FR 10,618). The exemption became effective on March 7, 2012. On April... Surface Transportation Board Eric Temple--Control Exemption--Portland Vancouver Junction Railroad, LLC... verified notice of exemption to acquire direct control of Portland Vancouver Junction Railroad, LLC...

  11. Their Spirits Live within Us: Aboriginal Women in Downtown Eastside Vancouver Emerging into Visibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culhane, Dara

    2003-01-01

    The intersection of Main and Hastings streets--known locally as "Pain and Wastings"--marks the heart of Vancouver's inner-city neighborhood: the Downtown Eastside. Since 1997, when the City of Vancouver Health Department declared a public health emergency in response to reports that HIV infection rates among residents exceeded those anywhere else…

  12. Cutaneous diphtheria in the urban poor population of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada: a 10-year review.

    PubMed

    Lowe, C F; Bernard, K A; Romney, M G

    2011-07-01

    Between 1998 and 2007, records from 33 patients with cutaneous diphtheria from Vancouver's inner city were reviewed. Cases were associated with injection drug use and poverty. Coinfections with Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Arcanobacterium haemolyticum occurred. Corynebacterium diphtheriae is endemic in Vancouver's urban core, with strains of multilocus sequence type (MLST) 76 predominating. PMID:21525220

  13. Going Social at Vancouver Public Library: What the Virtual Branch Did Next

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahill, Kay

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to follow up on the 2009 publication "Building a virtual branch at Vancouver Public Library (VPL) using Web 2.0 tools" and to explore the work that VPL has been doing in the social media space over the past two years. Design/methodology/approach: Following the launch of its new web site in 2008, Vancouver

  14. Emergency Peripartum Hysterectomies at a District General Hospital in United Kingdom: 10-Year Review of Practice

    PubMed Central

    Chester, J.; Sidhu, P.; Sharma, S.; Israfil-Bayli, F.

    2016-01-01

    Peripartum haemorrhage is an obstetric emergency which requires effective and timely management. A retrospective analysis was conducted at a single centre district hospital, over a 10-year period to describe factors that would lead to a peripartum hysterectomy. We sought to establish intraoperative and postoperative risks and review outcomes and complications associated with the procedure. A total of 29 cases (incidence 0.8 per 1000) were reviewed over 2001–2011. The mean parity was 1.8 and the mean maternal age was 33 years. Uterine atony was the most common indication for hysterectomy (12/29) followed by placenta praevia and accreta (4/29 and 5/29 cases, resp.). The commonest postoperative complications were sepsis and paralytic ileus. EPH most commonly occurs due to uterine atony but remains difficult to predict. Hospitals should continue to have robust systems and the necessary resources available to perform EPH where clinically indicated. PMID:27190690

  15. Development of Mobile Electronic Health Records Application in a Secondary General Hospital in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Park, Min Ah; Hong, Eunseok; Kim, Sunhyu; Ahn, Ryeok; Hong, Jungseok; Song, Seungyeol; Kim, Tak; Kim, Jeongkeun; Yeo, Seongwoon

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The recent evolution of mobile devices has opened new possibilities of providing strongly integrated mobile services in healthcare. The objective of this paper is to describe the decision driver, development, and implementation of an integrated mobile Electronic Health Record (EHR) application at Ulsan University Hospital. This application helps healthcare providers view patients' medical records and information without a stationary computer workstation. Methods We developed an integrated mobile application prototype that aimed to improve the mobility and usability of healthcare providers during their daily medical activities. The Android and iOS platform was used to create the mobile EHR application. The first working version was completed in 5 months and required 1,080 development hours. Results The mobile EHR application provides patient vital signs, patient data, text communication, and integrated EHR. The application allows our healthcare providers to know the status of patients within and outside the hospital environment. The application provides a consistent user environment on several compatible Android and iOS devices. A group of 10 beta testers has consistently used and maintained our copy of the application, suggesting user acceptance. Conclusions We are developing the integrated mobile EHR application with the goals of implementing an environment that is user-friendly, implementing a patient-centered system, and increasing the hospital's competitiveness. PMID:24523996

  16. Comparison of three instruments in predicting accidental falls in selected inpatients in a general teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Eagle, D J; Salama, S; Whitman, D; Evans, L A; Ho, E; Olde, J

    1999-07-01

    Accidental patient falls are becoming a major cause of concern for hospitalized inpatients. It is well known that patients who fall once during their hospital stay are more likely to fall again and that fall rates tend to be higher in hospitalized elderly individuals. Concerned health care team personnel recognize that many accidental patient falls may be predicted and, thus, prevented. The best tool to predict falls has not been determined yet. The purpose of this study was to compare the abilities of the Morse Fall Scale (MFS), the Functional Reach (FR) test, and the nurses' clinical judgment in predicting those inpatients on a rehabilitation unit and a geriatric medical ward who were most likely to fall. A total of 98 patients were screened in a 3-month period, with each patient undergoing all three instruments the same day. The results showed that the two objective standardized tests (i.e., MFS, FR) were time consuming and often inconvenient and were no better at prediction than the clinical judgments made by the primary nurses. PMID:10476130

  17. Ten Years, Forty Decision Aids, And Thousands Of Patient Uses: Shared Decision Making At Massachusetts General Hospital.

    PubMed

    Sepucha, Karen R; Simmons, Leigh H; Barry, Michael J; Edgman-Levitan, Susan; Licurse, Adam M; Chaguturu, Sreekanth K

    2016-04-01

    Shared decision making is a core component of population health strategies aimed at improving patient engagement. Massachusetts General Hospital's integration of shared decision making into practice has focused on the following three elements: developing a culture receptive to, and health care providers skilled in, shared decision making conversations; using patient decision aids to help inform and engage patients; and providing infrastructure and resources to support the implementation of shared decision making in practice. In the period 2005-15, more than 900 clinicians and other staff members were trained in shared decision making, and more than 28,000 orders for one of about forty patient decision aids were placed to support informed patient-centered decisions. We profile two different implementation initiatives that increased the use of patient decision aids at the hospital's eighteen adult primary care practices, and we summarize key elements of the shared decision making program. PMID:27044963

  18. [The Asahi Model-Regional Mental Health Services at Department of Psychiatry and Child Psychiatry, Asahi General Hospital].

    PubMed

    Aoki, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    The Asahi model, Psychiatric Services of Department of Psychiatry and Child Psychiatry, Asahi General Hospital, is characterized by multiple dimensions of mental health services, such as multidisciplinary team approach, medical cooperation, specialized psychiatric treatment of acute care, clozapine and modified ECT, outreach services of home nursing and assertive community treatment, and the close and mutual coordination with housing services and social welfare services. The Asahi Model makes it possible to be deinstitutionalized, to improve patients satisfaction, to shorten hospitalization, to decrease psychiatric emergency visits and to be of service in a natural disaster. It also might prevent the relapse of schizophrenics within twelve months after discharge and improve the quality of mental health staffs trainings to support patients better. In the future, we will need to work on providing sectorized care, early psychosis intervention programs, to construct networking systems of clozapine and modified ECT, to strengthen growth of home nursing, and to take place mental health anti-stigma campaigns. PMID:26552318

  19. Shifts in Mortality During a Hot Weather Event in Vancouver, British Columbia: Rapid Assessment With Case-Only Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Sarah B.; Pollock, Sue L.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We assessed shifts in patterns of mortality during a hot weather event in greater Vancouver, British Columbia. Methods. We used a case-only analysis to compare characteristics of individuals who died during the hottest week of 2009 with those who died (1) during earlier summer weeks in 2009 and (2) during the same calendar weeks in the summers of 2001 through 2008. Results. Compared with the 8 previous weeks of 2009, odds of mortality during the summer’s hottest week were highest in the 65 to 74 years age category, compared with the 85 years and older category (odds ratio [OR] = 1.47; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.06, 2.03). The number of deaths at home increased over deaths in hospitals or institutions (OR = 1.43; 95% CI = 1.10, 1.86). Densely populated administrative health areas were more affected. Conclusions. A shift toward deaths at home suggests that in-home–based protective measures should be part of planning for hot weather events in greater Vancouver. Targeting should be considered for those aged 65 to 74 years. The case-only approach is quick and easy to apply and can provide useful information about localized, time-limited events. PMID:23078510

  20. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Vancouver Lowlands Shillapoo Wildlife Area, 1994-1995 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Calkins, Brian; Anderson, Eric; Ashley, Paul

    1995-01-01

    This project was conducted as part of a comprehensive planning effort for the Vancouver Lowlands project area. The study was funded by The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and carried out by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). The Vancouver Lowlands is considered an area of high priority by WDFW and is being considered as a potential site for wildlife mitigation activities by BPA. The objectives of this study were to collect baseline information and determine current habitat values for the study area. A brief discussion of potential future management and a proposed listing of priorities for habitat protection are found near the end of this report. This report is a companion to a programmatic management plan being drafted for the area which will outline specific, management programs to improve habitat conditions based, in part, on this study. The following narratives, describing limiting habitat variables, carry recurring themes for each indicator species and habitat type. These recurring variables that limited habitat value include: Waterbodies that lack emergent and submerged vegetation; forest areas that lack natural shrub layers; a predominance of non-hydrophytic and less desirable non-native plants where shrubs are present; a general lack of cover for ground nesting and secure waterfowl nest sites (island type). Human disturbance was the variable that varied more than any other from site to site in the study area. One issue that the models we used do not truly deal with is the quantity and connectivity of habitat. The mallard and heron models deal with spatial relationships but for other species this may be as critical. Observation of habitat maps easily show that forested habitats are in short supply. Their continuity along Lake river and the Columbia has been broken by past development. Wetland distribution has also been affected by past development.

  1. Influence of relatively low level of particulate ar pollution on hospitalization for COPD in elderly people.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yue; Yang, Qiuying; Krewski, Daniel; Shi, Yuanli; Burnett, Richard T; McGrail, Kimberly

    2004-01-01

    To assess the association between relatively low levels of size-fractioned particulate matter (PM) and hospitalization for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), we conducted a time-series analysis among elderly people 65 yr of age or more living in Vancouver between June 1995 and March 1999. Measures of thoracic PM (PM(10)), fine PM (PM(2.5)), coarse PM (PM(10-2.5)), and coefficient of haze (COH) were examined over periods varying from 1 to 7 days prior to hospital admissions. Generalized additive models (GAMs; general linear models, GLMs) were used, and temporal trends and seasonal and subseasonal cycles in COPD hospitalizations were removed by using GLM with parametric natural cubic splines. The relative risks were calculated based on an incremental exposure corresponding to the interquartile range of these measures, and were adjusted for daily weather conditions and gaseous pollutants. PM measures had a positive effect on COPD hospitalization, especially 0 to 2 days prior to the admissions, before copollutants were accounted for. For 3-day average levels of exposure the relative risk estimates were 1.13 (95% confidence interval: 1.05-1.21) for PM(10), 1.08 (1.02-1.15) for PM(2.5), 1.09 (1.03-1.16) for PM(10-2.5), and 1.05 (1.01-1.09) for COH. The associations were no longer significant when NO(2) was included in the models. We concluded that the particle-related measures were significantly associated with COPD hospitalization in the Vancouver area, where the level of air pollution is relatively low, but the effects were not independent of other air pollutants. PMID:14744661

  2. Generalization of the Right Acute Stroke Prevention Strategies in Reducing in-Hospital Delays

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Xun-ming; Cheng, Wei-yang; Feng, Juan; Wu, Jian; Ma, Qing-feng

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to reduce the door-to-needle (DTN) time of intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) through a comprehensive, hospital-based implementation strategy. The intervention involved a systemic literature review, identifying barriers to rapid IVT treatment at our hospital, setting target DTN time intervals, and building an evolving model for IVT candidate selection. The rate of non-in-hospital delay (DTN time ≤ 60 min) was set as the primary endpoint. A total of 348 IVT cases were enrolled in the study (202 and 146 in the pre- and post-intervention group, respectively). The median age was 61 years in both groups; 25.2% and 26.7% of patients in the pre- and post-intervention groups, respectively, were female. The post-intervention group had higher rates of dyslipidemia and minor stroke [defined as National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) ≤ 3]; less frequent atrial fibrillation; higher numbers of current smokers, heavy drinkers, referrals, and multi-model head imaging cases; and lower NIHSS scores and blood sugar level (all P < 0.05). All parameters including DTN, door-to-examination, door-to-imaging, door-to-laboratory, and final-test-to-needle times were improved post-intervention (all P < 0.05), with net reductions of 63, 2, 4, 28, and 23 min, respectively. The rates of DTN time ≤ 60 min and onset-to-needle time ≤ 180 min were significantly improved by the intervention (pre: 9.9% vs. post: 60.3%; P < 0.001 and pre: 23.3% vs. post: 53.4%; P < 0.001, respectively), which was accompanied by an increase in the rate of neurological improvement (pre: 45.5% vs. post: 59.6%; P = 0.010), while there was no change in incidence of mortality or systemic intracranial hemorrhage at discharge (both P > 0.05). These findings indicate that it is possible to achieve a DTN time ≤ 60 min for up to 60% of hospitals in the current Chinese system, and that this logistical change can yield a notable improvement in the outcome of IVT patients. PMID:27152854

  3. Physical symptoms in outpatients with psychiatric disorders consulting the general internal medicine division at a Japanese university hospital

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Yukiko; Takeshima, Taro; Mise, Junichi; Ishikawa, Shizukiyo; Matsumura, Masami

    2015-01-01

    Purpose General practitioners have an important role in diagnosing a variety of patients, including psychiatric patients with complicated symptoms. We evaluated the relationship between physical symptoms and psychiatric disorders in general internal medicine (GIM) outpatients in a Japanese university hospital. Materials and methods We coded the symptoms and diagnoses of outpatients from medical documents using the International Classification of Primary Care, second edition (ICPC-2). The participants were new outpatients who consulted the GIM outpatient division at Jichi Medical University Hospital in Tochigi, Japan from JanuaryJune, 2012. We reviewed all medical documents and noted symptoms and diagnoses. These were coded using ICPC-2. Results A total of 1,194 participants were evaluated, 148 (12.4%) of whom were diagnosed as having psychiatric disorders. The prevalence of depression, anxiety disorder, and somatization was 19.6% (number [n] =29), 14.9% (n=22), and 14.2% (n=21), respectively, among the participants with psychiatric disorders. The presence of several particular symptoms was associated with having a psychiatric disorder as compared with the absence of these symptoms after adjusting for sex, age, and the presence of multiple symptoms (odds ratio [OR] =4.98 [95% confidence interval {CI}: 1.6614.89] for palpitation; OR =4.36 [95% CI: 2.059.39] for dyspnea; OR =3.46 [95% CI: 1.438.36] for tiredness; and OR =2.99 [95% CI: 1.755.13] for headache). Conclusion Not only the psychiatric symptoms, but also some physical symptoms, were associated with psychiatric disorders in GIM outpatients at our university hospital. These results may be of help to general practitioners in appropriately approaching and managing patients with psychiatric disorders. PMID:26316801

  4. Bare Below the Elbows: A comparative study of a tertiary and district general hospital.

    PubMed

    Collins, A M; Connaughton, J; Ridgway, P F

    2013-10-01

    A 'Bare Below the Elbows' (BBTE) dress code policy has been introduced by the majority of NHS trusts in the UK. The aim of this Irish study was to evaluate the impact of an educational intervention on perception of medical attire. The study was carried out in two centres: a tertiary referral centre (Beaumont Hospital) and a district hospital (MRH, Portlaoise). Two questionnaires, incorporating photographic evaluation of appropriate attire for consultants and junior doctors, were completed pre and post BBTE education. One hundred and five patients participated. Analysis pre BBTE education indicated patients considered formal attire and white coats most appropriate for consultants and junior doctors respectively. Post-intervention analysis revealed a significant reduction in the popularity of both (p <0.001), with scrubs and smart casual attire gaining significant support in both cohorts (p <0.001). Our findings demonstrated that patient opinion on medical attire is malleable. The support of such a policy may be achieved if patients are informed that the aim is to reduce the spread of healthcare-associated infections. PMID:24416849

  5. Changing sociodemographic and clinical profile of patients attending a general hospital psychiatric clinic: some indications of community acceptance.

    PubMed

    Kala, A K; Kala, R; Bathia, J C

    1981-01-01

    Demographic and clinical variables of first one thousand new patients attending a general hospital psychiatric clinic during each of the two years 1967 and 1977, were compared. The profile of a typical patient seems to have undergone a marked change over the decade. More patients are low drawn from lower income and occupational categories and the proportion of rural patients has increased. Proportion or acute psychiatric presentation particularly acute psychosis has increased markedly. Follow up rate has improved. All these indicate an increasing acceptance of this facility by the community and a better psychiatric awareness. PMID:22065520

  6. Pain, agitation, and behavioural problems in people with dementia admitted to general hospital wards: a longitudinal cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, Elizabeth L.; White, Nicola; Lord, Kathryn; Leurent, Baptiste; Vickerstaff, Victoria; Scott, Sharon; Jones, Louise

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pain is underdetected and undertreated in people with dementia. We aimed to investigate the prevalence of pain in people with dementia admitted to general hospitals and explore the association between pain and behavioural and psychiatric symptoms of dementia (BPSD). We conducted a longitudinal cohort study of 230 people, aged above 70, with dementia and unplanned medical admissions to 2 UK hospitals. Participants were assessed at baseline and every 4 days for self-reported pain (yes/no question and FACES scale) and observed pain (Pain Assessment in Advanced Dementia scale [PAINAD]) at movement and at rest, for agitation (Cohen–Mansfield Agitating Inventory [CMAI]) and BPSD (Behavioural Pathology in Alzheimer Disease Scale [BEHAVE-AD]). On admission, 27% of participants self-reported pain rising to 39% on at least 1 occasion during admission. Half of them were able to complete the FACES scale, this proportion decreasing with more severe dementia. Using the PAINAD, 19% had pain at rest and 57% had pain on movement on at least 1 occasion (in 16%, this was persistent throughout the admission). In controlled analyses, pain was not associated with CMAI scores but was strongly associated with total BEHAVE-AD scores, both when pain was assessed on movement (β = 0.20, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.07-0.32, P = 0.002) and at rest (β = 0.41, 95% CI = 0.14-0.69, P = 0.003). The association was the strongest for aggression and anxiety. Pain was common in people with dementia admitted to the acute hospital and associated with BPSD. Improved pain management may reduce distressing behaviours and improve the quality of hospital care for people with dementia. PMID:25790457

  7. Pain, agitation, and behavioural problems in people with dementia admitted to general hospital wards: a longitudinal cohort study.

    PubMed

    Sampson, Elizabeth L; White, Nicola; Lord, Kathryn; Leurent, Baptiste; Vickerstaff, Victoria; Scott, Sharon; Jones, Louise

    2015-04-01

    Pain is underdetected and undertreated in people with dementia. We aimed to investigate the prevalence of pain in people with dementia admitted to general hospitals and explore the association between pain and behavioural and psychiatric symptoms of dementia (BPSD). We conducted a longitudinal cohort study of 230 people, aged above 70, with dementia and unplanned medical admissions to 2 UK hospitals. Participants were assessed at baseline and every 4 days for self-reported pain (yes/no question and FACES scale) and observed pain (Pain Assessment in Advanced Dementia scale [PAINAD]) at movement and at rest, for agitation (Cohen-Mansfield Agitating Inventory [CMAI]) and BPSD (Behavioural Pathology in Alzheimer Disease Scale [BEHAVE-AD]). On admission, 27% of participants self-reported pain rising to 39% on at least 1 occasion during admission. Half of them were able to complete the FACES scale, this proportion decreasing with more severe dementia. Using the PAINAD, 19% had pain at rest and 57% had pain on movement on at least 1 occasion (in 16%, this was persistent throughout the admission). In controlled analyses, pain was not associated with CMAI scores but was strongly associated with total BEHAVE-AD scores, both when pain was assessed on movement (β = 0.20, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.07-0.32, P = 0.002) and at rest (β = 0.41, 95% CI = 0.14-0.69, P = 0.003). The association was the strongest for aggression and anxiety. Pain was common in people with dementia admitted to the acute hospital and associated with BPSD. Improved pain management may reduce distressing behaviours and improve the quality of hospital care for people with dementia. PMID:25790457

  8. Impact of Influenza on Outpatient Visits, Hospitalizations, and Deaths by Using a Time Series Poisson Generalized Additive Model

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ru-ning; Zheng, Hui-zhen; Ou, Chun-quan; Huang, Li-qun; Zhou, Yong; Zhang, Xin; Liang, Can-kun; Lin, Jin-yan; Zhong, Hao-jie; Song, Tie; Luo, Hui-ming

    2016-01-01

    Background The disease burden associated with influenza in developing tropical and subtropical countries is poorly understood owing to the lack of a comprehensive disease surveillance system and information-exchange mechanisms. The impact of influenza on outpatient visits, hospital admissions, and deaths has not been fully demonstrated to date in south China. Methods A time series Poisson generalized additive model was used to quantitatively assess influenza-like illness (ILI) and influenza disease burden by using influenza surveillance data in Zhuhai City from 2007 to 2009, combined with the outpatient, inpatient, and respiratory disease mortality data of the same period. Results The influenza activity in Zhuhai City demonstrated a typical subtropical seasonal pattern; however, each influenza virus subtype showed a specific transmission variation. The weekly ILI case number and virus isolation rate had a very close positive correlation (r = 0.774, P < 0.0001). The impact of ILI and influenza on weekly outpatient visits was statistically significant (P < 0.05). We determined that 10.7% of outpatient visits were associated with ILI and 1.88% were associated with influenza. ILI also had a significant influence on the hospitalization rates (P < 0.05), but mainly in populations <25 years of age. No statistically significant effect of influenza on hospital admissions was found (P > 0.05). The impact of ILI on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) was most significant (P < 0.05), with 33.1% of COPD-related deaths being attributable to ILI. The impact of influenza on the mortality rate requires further evaluation. Conclusions ILI is a feasible indicator of influenza activity. Both ILI and influenza have a large impact on outpatient visits. Although ILI affects the number of hospital admissions and deaths, we found no consistent influence of influenza, which requires further assessment. PMID:26894876

  9. Urban policy engagement with social sustainability in metro Vancouver.

    PubMed

    Holden, Meg

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an analysis of social sustainability in comparative theoretical context and as a challenge to the post-political interpretation of sustainability in policy practice at the urban and regional scales. Metro Vancouver provides a case study for improving our understanding of the meaning of social sustainability as a framework for social policy in that it is among the handful of cities around the world currently working to define and enact social sustainability in governance terms. Results of this participant research provide evidence that some cities are politically engaging alternative development pathways using the concept of social sustainability. For sustainable development to retain its promise as an alternative policy framework for cities, social sustainability must be at the forefront. PMID:22500345

  10. The Monitoring Network of the Vancouver 2010 Olympics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joe, Paul; Scott, Bill; Doyle, Chris; Isaac, George; Gultepe, Ismail; Forsyth, Douglas; Cober, Stewart; Campos, Edwin; Heckman, Ivan; Donaldson, Norman; Hudak, David; Rasmussen, Roy; Kucera, Paul; Stewart, Ron; Thériault, Julie M.; Fisico, Teresa; Rasmussen, Kristen L.; Carmichael, Hannah; Laplante, Alex; Bailey, Monika; Boudala, Faisal

    2014-01-01

    An innovative monitoring network was implemented to support the operational and science programs for the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics. It consisted of in situ weather stations on custom-designed platforms. The sensors included an HMP45C for temperature, humidity and pressure, a tipping bucket rain gauge, an acoustic snow depth sensor, a Pluvio 1 precipitation gauge and an anemometer placed at gauge height and at 10 m height. Modifications to commercial automated precipitation gauges were necessary for the heavy snowfall conditions. Advanced or emerging technologies were deployed to support scientific and nowcasting studies into precipitation intensity, typing, visibility and wind. The sensors included an FD12P visibility and precipitation sensor, a precipitation occurrence sensing system (POSS) present weather sensor, a Hotplate precipitation sensor and a Parsivel disdrometer. Data were collected at 1 min sampling intervals. A Doppler weather radar was deployed in a valley location and provided critical detailed low-level data. An X-band dual-polarized radar was deployed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to monitor Vancouver and Cypress Mountain. Three remote sensing stations for vertical profiling were established. At the base of Whistler Mountain, a micro-rain radar, a 22-channel radiometer, a ceilometer, a Parsivel and a POSS were installed. At the base of Cypress Mountain, a micro-rain radar, a ceilometer, a low cost rain sensor (LCR by ATTEX) and a POSS were installed. At Squamish, a wind profiler and a POSS were installed. Weather sensors were mounted on the Whistler Village Gondola and on the Peak to Peak gondola. Sites were established along the Whistler Mountain slope and at other key locations. The combination of sites and instruments formed a comprehensive network to provide observations appropriate for nowcasting in winter complex terrain and investigate precipitation, visibility and wind processes. The contribution provides a detailed description of the network, their sensors, the innovations and some examples.

  11. The Toronto General Hospital Transitional Pain Service: development and implementation of a multidisciplinary program to prevent chronic postsurgical pain

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Joel; Weinrib, Aliza; Fashler, Samantha R; Katznelzon, Rita; Shah, Bansi R; Ladak, Salima SJ; Jiang, Jiao; Li, Qing; McMillan, Kayla; Mina, Daniel Santa; Wentlandt, Kirsten; McRae, Karen; Tamir, Diana; Lyn, Sheldon; de Perrot, Marc; Rao, Vivek; Grant, David; Roche-Nagle, Graham; Cleary, Sean P; Hofer, Stefan OP; Gilbert, Ralph; Wijeysundera, Duminda; Ritvo, Paul; Janmohamed, Tahir; O’Leary, Gerald; Clarke, Hance

    2015-01-01

    Chronic postsurgical pain (CPSP), an often unanticipated result of necessary and even life-saving procedures, develops in 5–10% of patients one-year after major surgery. Substantial advances have been made in identifying patients at elevated risk of developing CPSP based on perioperative pain, opioid use, and negative affect, including depression, anxiety, pain catastrophizing, and posttraumatic stress disorder-like symptoms. The Transitional Pain Service (TPS) at Toronto General Hospital (TGH) is the first to comprehensively address the problem of CPSP at three stages: 1) preoperatively, 2) postoperatively in hospital, and 3) postoperatively in an outpatient setting for up to 6 months after surgery. Patients at high risk for CPSP are identified early and offered coordinated and comprehensive care by the multidisciplinary team consisting of pain physicians, advanced practice nurses, psychologists, and physiotherapists. Access to expert intervention through the Transitional Pain Service bypasses typically long wait times for surgical patients to be referred and seen in chronic pain clinics. This affords the opportunity to impact patients’ pain trajectories, preventing the transition from acute to chronic pain, and reducing suffering, disability, and health care costs. In this report, we describe the workings of the Transitional Pain Service at Toronto General Hospital, including the clinical algorithm used to identify patients, and clinical services offered to patients as they transition through the stages of surgical recovery. We describe the role of the psychological treatment, which draws on innovations in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy that allow for brief and effective behavioral interventions to be applied transdiagnostically and preventatively. Finally, we describe our vision for future growth. PMID:26508886

  12. General surgery in a district hospital in Tajikistan: clinical impact of a partnership between visiting volunteers and host specialists

    PubMed Central

    Kassum, Diamond A.; Valji, Azim; Gulyazov, Shodi

    2003-01-01

    After the collapse of the Soviet Union and 5 years of civil war, health care services in Tajikistan are in disarray. Nongovernmental organizations are playing a key role in recovery programs. A group of volunteer physicians from the West went to Khorog General Hospital in the Pamiri mountains to establish a dialogue with their physician counterparts, recommend evidence-based best practice appropriate for local conditions, and reintroduce a culture of continuing medical education. The arrangements included a group visit to Khorog for 3 weeks annually over 3 years. In this article we describe the experiences of the 2 general surgeons attached to the group in the second year and the status of the partnership1 year later. PMID:14577704

  13. Low Serum Vitamin C Status Among Pregnant Women Attending Antenatal Care at General Hospital Dawakin Kudu, Northwest Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ugwa, Emmanuel Ajuluchukwu; Iwasam, Elemi Agbor; Nwali, Matthew Igwe

    2016-01-01

    Background: Vitamin C levels are low in pregnancy. The purpose of this study was to determine serum Vitamins C levels among pregnant women attending antenatal care at a General Hospital in Dawakin Kudu, Kano, and this can help further research to determine the place of Vitamin C supplementation in pregnancy. Methods: This was a prospective study of 400 pregnant women who presented for antenatal care in General Hospital Dawakin Kudu, Kano, Nigeria. Research structured questionnaire was administered to 400 respondents. Determination of serum Vitamin C was done using appropriate biochemical methods. Results: Vitamin C deficiency was found in 79.5% of the participants. The values for Vitamin C were 0.20 ± 0.18 mg/dl during the first trimester, 0.50 ± 0.99 mg/dl in the second trimester, and 0.35 ± 0.36 mg/dl in the third trimester and P = 0.001. Conclusions: There is a significant reduction in the serum Vitamins C concentration throughout the period of pregnancy with the highest levels in the second trimester. Therefore, Vitamin C supplementation is suggested during pregnancy, especially for those whose fruit and vegetable consumption is inadequate. PMID:27014432

  14. Vancouver At Home: pragmatic randomized trials investigating Housing First for homeless and mentally ill adults

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Individuals with mental illnesses are overrepresented among the homeless. Housing First (HF) has been shown to promote positive outcomes in this population. However, key questions remain unresolved, including: how to match support services to client needs, the benefits of housing in scattered sites versus single congregate building, and the effectiveness of HF with individuals actively using substances. The present study aimed to recruit two samples of homeless mentally ill participants who differed in the complexity of their needs. Study details, including recruitment, randomization, and follow-up, are presented. Methods Eligibility was based on homeless status and current mental disorder. Participants were classified as either moderate needs (MN) or high needs (HN). Those with MN were randomized to HF with Intensive Case Management (HF-ICM) or usual care. Those with HN were randomized to HF with Assertive Community Treatment (HF-ACT), congregate housing with support, or usual care. Participants were interviewed every 3 months for 2 years. Separate consent was sought to access administrative data. Results Participants met eligibility for either MN (n = 200) or HN (n = 297) and were randomized accordingly. Both samples were primarily male and white. Compared to participants designated MN, HN participants had higher rates of hospitalization for psychiatric reasons prior to randomization, were younger at the time of recruitment, younger when first homeless, more likely to meet criteria for substance dependence, and less likely to have completed high school. Across all study arms, between 92% and 100% of participants were followed over 24 months post-randomization. Minimal significant differences were found between study arms following randomization. 438 participants (88%) provided consent to access administrative data. Conclusion The study successfully recruited participants meeting criteria for homelessness and current mental disorder. Both MN and HN groups had high rates of substance dependence, suicidality, and physical illness. Randomization resulted in no meaningful detectable differences between study arms. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials: ISRCTN57595077 (Vancouver at Home study: Housing First plus Assertive Community Treatment versus congregate housing plus supports versus treatment as usual) and ISRCTN66721740 (Vancouver At Home study: Housing First plus Intensive Case Management versus treatment as usual). PMID:24176253

  15. Cost accounting of radiological examinations. Cost analysis of radiological examinations of intermediate referral hospitals and general practice.

    PubMed

    Lääperi, A L

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the cost structure of radiological procedures in the intermediary referral hospitals and general practice and to develop a cost accounting system for radiological examinations that takes into consideration all relevant cost factors and is suitable for management of radiology departments and regional planning of radiological resources. The material comprised 174,560 basic radiological examinations performed in 1991 at 5 intermediate referral hospitals and 13 public health centres in the Pirkanmaa Hospital District in Finland. All radiological departments in the hospitals were managed by a specialist in radiology. The radiology departments at the public health care centres operated on a self-referral basis by general practitioners. The data were extracted from examination lists, inventories and balance sheets; parts of the data were estimated or calculated. The radiological examinations were compiled according to the type of examination and equipment used: conventional, contrast medium, ultrasound, mammography and roentgen examinations with mobile equipment. The majority of the examinations (87%) comprised conventional radiography. For cost analysis the cost items were grouped into 5 cost factors: personnel, equipment, material, real estate and administration costs. The depreciation time used was 10 years for roentgen equipment, 5 years for ultrasound equipment and 5 to 10 years for other capital goods. An annual interest rate of 10% was applied. Standard average values based on a sample at 2 hospitals were used for the examination-specific radiologist time, radiographer time and material costs. Four cost accounting versions with varying allocation of the major cost items were designed. Two-way analysis of variance of the effect of different allocation methods on the costs and cost structure of the examination groups was performed. On the basis of the cost analysis a cost accounting program containing both monetary and nonmonetary variables was developed. In it the radiologist, radiographer and examination-specific equipment costs were allocated to the examinations applying estimated cost equivalents. Some minor cost items were replaced by a general cost factor (GCF). The program is suitable for internal cost accounting of radiological departments as well as regional planning. If more accurate cost information is required, cost assignment employing the actual consumption of the resources and applying the principles of activity-based cost accounting is recommended. As an application of the cost accounting formula the average costs of the radiological examinations were calculated. In conventional radiography the average proportion of the cost factors in the total material was: personnel costs 43%, equipment costs 26%, material costs 7%, real estate costs 11%, administration and overheads 14%. The average total costs including radiologist costs in the hospitals were (FIM): conventional roentgen examinations 188, contrast medium examinations 695, ultrasound 296, mammography 315, roentgen examinations with mobile equipment 1578. The average total costs without radiologist costs in the public health centres were (FIM): conventional roentgen examinations 107, contrast medium examinations 988, ultrasound 203, mammography 557. The average currency rate of exchange in 1991 was USD 1 = FIM 4.046. The following formula is proposed for calculating the cost of a radiological examination (or a group of examinations) performed with a certain piece of equipment during a period of time (e.g. 1 year): a2/ sigma ax*ax+ b2/ sigma bx*bx+ d1/d5*dx+ e1 + [(c1+ c2) + d4 + (e2 - e3) + f5 + g1+ g2+ i]/n. PMID:8804226

  16. Assessment of leadership training needs of internal medicine residents at the Massachusetts General Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Blumenthal, Daniel M.; Bernard, Kenneth; Iyasere, Christiana

    2015-01-01

    Internal medicine (IM) physicians, including residents, assume both formal and informal leadership roles that significantly impact clinical and organizational outcomes. However, most internists lack formal leadership training. In 2013 and 2014, we surveyed all rising second-year IM residents at a large northeastern academic medical center about their need for, and preferences regarding, leadership training. Fifty-five of 113 residents (49%) completed the survey. Forty-four residents (80% of respondents) reported a need for additional formal leadership training. A self-reported need for leadership training was not associated with respondents' gender or previous leadership training and experience. Commonly cited leadership skill needs included “leading a team” (98% of residents), “confronting problem employees” (93%), “coaching and developing others” (93%), and “resolving interpersonal conflict” (84%). Respondents preferred to learn about leadership using multiple teaching modalities. Fifty residents (91%) preferred to have a physician teach them about leadership, while 19 (35%) wanted instruction from a hospital manager. IM residents may not receive adequate leadership development education during pregraduate and postgraduate training. IM residents may be more likely to benefit from leadership training interventions that are physician-led, multimodal, and occur during the second year of residency. These findings can help inform the design of effective leadership development programs for physician trainees. PMID:26130876

  17. Assessment of leadership training needs of internal medicine residents at the Massachusetts General Hospital.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Traci N; Blumenthal, Daniel M; Bernard, Kenneth; Iyasere, Christiana

    2015-07-01

    Internal medicine (IM) physicians, including residents, assume both formal and informal leadership roles that significantly impact clinical and organizational outcomes. However, most internists lack formal leadership training. In 2013 and 2014, we surveyed all rising second-year IM residents at a large northeastern academic medical center about their need for, and preferences regarding, leadership training. Fifty-five of 113 residents (49%) completed the survey. Forty-four residents (80% of respondents) reported a need for additional formal leadership training. A self-reported need for leadership training was not associated with respondents' gender or previous leadership training and experience. Commonly cited leadership skill needs included "leading a team" (98% of residents), "confronting problem employees" (93%), "coaching and developing others" (93%), and "resolving interpersonal conflict" (84%). Respondents preferred to learn about leadership using multiple teaching modalities. Fifty residents (91%) preferred to have a physician teach them about leadership, while 19 (35%) wanted instruction from a hospital manager. IM residents may not receive adequate leadership development education during pregraduate and postgraduate training. IM residents may be more likely to benefit from leadership training interventions that are physician-led, multimodal, and occur during the second year of residency. These findings can help inform the design of effective leadership development programs for physician trainees. PMID:26130876

  18. The implosion of the Calgary General Hospital: ambient air quality issues.

    PubMed

    Stefani, Dennis; Wardman, Dennis; Lambert, Timothy

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses the implosion of a large inner-city hospital in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, on October 4, 1998. Stationary and mobile air monitoring conducted after the implosion indicated there were several short-term air quality issues, including significant temporal increases in total suspended particles, particulate matter (PM) with aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to 10 microm (PM10), PM with aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to 2.5 microm (PM2.5), asbestos, and airborne and settled lead. In addition, the implosion created a dust cloud that traveled much further than expected, out to 20 km. The ability of an implosion to effectively aerosolize building materials requires the removal of all friable and nonfriable forms of asbestos and all Pb-containing painted surfaces during pre-implosion preparatory work. Public advisories to mitigate personal exposure and indoor migration of the implosion dust cloud constituents should extend to 10 or 20 km around an implosion site. These findings point to a number of complex and problematic issues regarding implosions and safeguarding human health and suggest that implosions in metropolitan areas should be prohibited. Further work to characterize the public health risks of conventional versus implosion demolition is recommended. PMID:15704539

  19. Diagnosis and Treatment Procedures for Patients With Anxiety Disorders by the Psychiatric Consultation Liaison Service in a General Hospital in Germany: A Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Christina; Tauch, Deborah; Quante, Arnim

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the population of patients with anxiety disorders in a general hospital in Germany who required treatment by a consultation psychiatrist. Method: A retrospective investigation of psychiatric consultations concerning 119 patients with anxiety disorders (DSM-IV criteria) from January 1, 2011, to December 31, 2012, was conducted in a general hospital of the Charité Berlin, Berlin, Germany. The frequency of different anxiety disorders, the distribution of anxiety disorders among the departments of the general hospital, and the recommended treatment procedure were investigated. Results: The largest group of patients with anxiety symptoms presented panic attacks. Many of these patients sought treatment in the emergency department of the hospital primarily due to their anxiety symptoms. Within the group of somatically ill patients, panic attacks were prominent, especially in patients with cardiac or respiratory diseases. Treatment procedures comprised pharmacologic and psychotherapeutic interventions. Benzodiazepines and psychoeducation were common acute treatments; antidepressants, pregabalin, and psychotherapy were recommended for long-term treatment. Conclusions: Many patients who primarily suffer from symptoms of anxiety seek treatment in a general hospital, especially in the emergency department. It is therefore very important for the individual patient as well as the health care system that the correct treatment is initiated. The consultation-liaison psychiatric service within a general hospital is important to ensure the best possible diagnostic procedures as well as treatment for patients with anxiety disorders. PMID:26835174

  20. [Quality and general practice development in Swiss acute hospitals as a result of study results - a follow-up survey of nursing directors of RN4CAST hospitals].

    PubMed

    Ausserhofer, Dietmar; Gehri, Beatrice; De Geest, Sabina; Fierz, Katharina; Schwendimann, René

    2015-02-01

    In the RN4CAST (Nurse forecasting in Europe) study all 35 participating Swiss hospitals received a study report, which allowed them to anonymously compare findings in relation to structure, process and outcome variables. Thus, this benchmarking allowed the hospitals to identify potentials for improvement and to plan counter measures for developing the quality of their practice environment. We surveyed the RN4CAST hospitals 18 months after submitting the study report and asked chief nursing officers if the results of the RN4CAST study report had been discussed and analysed within their hospitals and if the results had led to any quality improvement or practice development projects. Out of 35 questionnaires 30 were returned (response rate = 85 %). The study report was discussed and analysed in 27 hospitals (90 %), whereby the quality (n = 27) and the usefulness (n = 22) were rated as good or very good. Less then half of the hospitals (41 %) discussed the results with the hospital units. The study report stimulated practice development and quality improvement efforts in view of the nurses' work environment (n = 20) and safety culture/climate (n = 16). Replicating the RN4CAST study in the participating hospital would allow evaluating changes on the measured variables, e. g., due to this quality improvement and practice development projects. PMID:25631959

  1. DELirium Prediction Based on Hospital Information (Delphi) in General Surgery Patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Young; Park, Ui Jun; Kim, Hyoung Tae; Cho, Won Hyun

    2016-03-01

    To develop a simple and accurate delirium prediction score that would allow identification of individuals with a high probability of postoperative delirium on the basis of preoperative and immediate postoperative data.Postoperative delirium, although transient, is associated with adverse outcomes after surgery. However, there has been no appropriate tool to predict postoperative delirium.This was a prospective observational single-center study, which consisted of the development of the DELirium Prediction based on Hospital Information (Delphi) score (n = 561) and its validation (n = 533). We collected potential risk factors for postoperative delirium, which were identified by conducting a comprehensive review of the literatures.Age, low physical activity, hearing impairment, heavy alcoholism, history of prior delirium, intensive care unit (ICU) admission, emergency surgery, open surgery, and increased preoperative C-reactive protein were identified as independent predictors of postoperative delirium. The Delphi score was generated using logistic regression coefficients. The maximum Delphi score was 15 and the optimal cut-off point identified with the Youden index was 6.5. Generated area under the (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.911 (95% CI: 0.88-0.94). In the validation study, the calculated AUC of the ROC curve based on the Delphi score was 0.938 (95% Cl: 0.91-0.97). We divided the validation cohort into the low-risk group (Delphi score 0-6) and high-risk group (7-15). Sensitivity of Delphi score was 80.8% and specificity 92.5%.Our proposed Delphi score could help health-care provider to predict the development of delirium and make possible targeted intervention to prevent delirium in high-risk surgery patients. PMID:27015177

  2. Loss and Maintenance of First Language Skills: Case Studies of Hispanic Families in Vancouver.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guardado, Martin

    2002-01-01

    Explores the loss and maintenance of Spanish in Hispanic children in Vancouver from the perspective of parents. Focuses on the experiences of Hispanic parents of children either developing bilingually (Spanish-English) or monolingually (English).(Author/VWL)

  3. MOLECULAR EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES ON TWO CYCLOSPORIASIS OUTBREAKS IN VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two cyclosporiasis outbreaks in Vancouver, British Columbia (BC) were investigated using molegular epidemiology. The cause of the 1999 outbreak has not been identiifed whereas the 2001 oubreak has been linked epidemiologically to the consumption of Thai basil. The internal tran...

  4. A randomised trial deploying a simulation to investigate the impact of hospital discharge letters on patient care in general practice

    PubMed Central

    Jiwa, Moyez; Meng, Xingqiong; O'Shea, Carolyn; Magin, Parker; Dadich, Ann; Pillai, Vinita

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine how the timing and length of hospital discharge letters impact on the number of ongoing patient problems identified by general practitioners (GPs). Trial design GPs were randomised into four groups. Each viewed a video monologue of an actor-patient as he might present to his GP following a hospital admission with 10 problems. GPs were provided with a medical record as well as a long or short discharge letter, which was available when the video was viewed or 1 week later. GPs indicated if they would prescribe, refer or order tests for the patient's problems. Methods Setting Primary care. Participants Practising Australian GPs. Intervention A short or long hospital discharge letter enumerating patient problems. Outcome measure Number of ongoing patient problems out of 10 identified for management by the GPs. Randomisation 1:1 randomisation. Blinding (masking) Single-blind. Results Numbers randomised 59 GPs. Recruitment GPs were recruited from a network of 102 GPs across Australia. Numbers analysed 59 GPs. Outcome GPs who received the long letter immediately were more satisfied with this information (p<0.001). Those who received the letter immediately identified significantly more health problems (p=0.001). GPs who received a short, delayed discharge letter were less satisfied than those who received a longer delayed letter (p=0.03); however, both groups who received the delayed letter identified a similar number of health problems. GPs who were older, who practised in an inner regional area or who offered more patient sessions per week identified fewer health problems (p values <0.01, <0.05 and <0.05, respectively). Harms Nil. Conclusions Receiving information during patient consultation, as well as GP characteristics, influences the number of patient problems addressed. Trial registration number ACTRN12614000403639. PMID:25005597

  5. Vitamins A and E Deficiencies among Pregnant Women Attending Antenatal Care at General Hospital Dawakin Kudu, North-West Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ugwa, Emmanuel Ajuluchukwu

    2015-01-01

    Background: Vitamins A and E deficiency is prevalent in developing countries, and plasma levels are low in pregnancy. This study was undertaken to determine the serum Vitamins A and E status among pregnant women attending antenatal care at a General Hospital in Dawakin Kudu, Kano and to provide the necessary information needed to suggest the supplementation of Vitamins A and E during pregnancy. Methods: The study was done in General Hospital Dawakin Kudu Local Government Area. Dawakin Kudu, a rural community in Kano State is about 12 km from Kano metropolis which is the most populous city in Nigeria and commercial nerve center of Northern Nigeria. Most of the women are housewives, however, some engage in subsistent farming and petty trading. This was a prospective study of 200 pregnant women at various maternal ages, gestational ages, and parities. Informed consent was obtained from the participants. Research structured questionnaire was administered to 200 respondents which showed age and parity distributions. Determination of Serum Vitamins A and E was done using methods of Bessey, et al. and Tsen. Ethical approval for the research was obtained from General Hospital, Dawakin Kudu, Kano. Statistical Analysis Used: Data obtained were analyzed using SPSS version 17 statistical software (SPSS Inc., IL, Chicago, USA). Descriptive statistics was done. Mean serum Vitamins A and E concentration between trimesters were compared using two-way ANOVA and P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Majority of the women were aged 20–39 years with mean of 23.67 ± 6.11. Most were in the 1–4 parity range. Mean birth weight was 2.42 ± 0.74 kg. Above 65% were deficient while 34.5% had normal levels of Vitamin A and 51% were deficient of serum Vitamin E. Serum Vitamins A and E levels showed a marked reduction from first through third trimester. The differences were statistically significant (P < 0.05). Conclusions: There is a significant reduction in the serum Vitamins A and E concentration throughout the period of pregnancy with the highest levels in the first trimester. Therefore, further studies should evaluate the value of Vitamins A and E supplementation during pregnancy especially for those whose fruit and vegetable consumption is inadequate. PMID:26288709

  6. Implementation of a combined Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Treatment Escalation Plan document in a District General Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Stockdale, Claire; Trivedi, Bhavi; Jerome, Ellen; Salih, Samir; Huntley, Christopher; Cooke, Eleanor; Massey, Yolanda; Mella, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    Documentation of appropriate escalation of treatment was identified as a problem for junior doctors and Critical Care Outreach Nurses at Musgrove Park Hospital. An audit of resuscitation and escalation documentation of all wards found that of the patients who were not for Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (and therefore not for full escalation of care), 78.4% had no documentation of the appropriate level of escalation of treatment should they deteriorate. The majority of junior doctors had experienced cases where they felt that inappropriate treatment had been given, where no escalation plan was documented. Using several Plan, Do, Study, Act (PDSA) cycles, drawing tools used in other trusts and departments, and the views of clinicians, we developed a treatment escalation plan (TEP) tool, to be included in the resuscitation form. This included consideration of referral to critical care, ward based non-invasive ventilation, and appropriate use of intravenous or oral antibiotics. This then prompted the responsible clinician to consider and document appropriate escalation of treatment. The CPR-TEP form was trialed using a quasi-experiment design allowing the aim to be tested using two groups - intervention and control. All patients in the intervention group were not for CPR and therefore had their TEP-CPR form filled in fully (n=68). The control group consisted of patients who were not for CPR but who did not have a TEP form filled in (n=36). The appropriateness of OOH (out of hours) treatment in those patients who experienced clinical deterioration was judged by questionnaire-based feedback from the in-hours team the following morning. Levels of inappropriate treatment between the two groups were compared to test the aim. At the end of the study period, questionnaire feedback indicated that 11.1% of patients in the group with the new CPR-TEP document had received inappropriate OOH care compared to 44.4% of patients in the group without the document. Using the TEP alongside resuscitation documentation prompts the responsible clinician to consistently consider and document the appropriate escalation of care for their patient, improving communication with the out of hours team and appropriate escalation of care in the event of patient deterioration. PMID:26734225

  7. Implementation of a combined Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Treatment Escalation Plan document in a District General Hospital.

    PubMed

    Stockdale, Claire; Trivedi, Bhavi; Jerome, Ellen; Salih, Samir; Huntley, Christopher; Cooke, Eleanor; Massey, Yolanda; Mella, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    Documentation of appropriate escalation of treatment was identified as a problem for junior doctors and Critical Care Outreach Nurses at Musgrove Park Hospital. An audit of resuscitation and escalation documentation of all wards found that of the patients who were not for Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (and therefore not for full escalation of care), 78.4% had no documentation of the appropriate level of escalation of treatment should they deteriorate. The majority of junior doctors had experienced cases where they felt that inappropriate treatment had been given, where no escalation plan was documented. Using several Plan, Do, Study, Act (PDSA) cycles, drawing tools used in other trusts and departments, and the views of clinicians, we developed a treatment escalation plan (TEP) tool, to be included in the resuscitation form. This included consideration of referral to critical care, ward based non-invasive ventilation, and appropriate use of intravenous or oral antibiotics. This then prompted the responsible clinician to consider and document appropriate escalation of treatment. The CPR-TEP form was trialed using a quasi-experiment design allowing the aim to be tested using two groups - intervention and control. All patients in the intervention group were not for CPR and therefore had their TEP-CPR form filled in fully (n=68). The control group consisted of patients who were not for CPR but who did not have a TEP form filled in (n=36). The appropriateness of OOH (out of hours) treatment in those patients who experienced clinical deterioration was judged by questionnaire-based feedback from the in-hours team the following morning. Levels of inappropriate treatment between the two groups were compared to test the aim. At the end of the study period, questionnaire feedback indicated that 11.1% of patients in the group with the new CPR-TEP document had received inappropriate OOH care compared to 44.4% of patients in the group without the document. Using the TEP alongside resuscitation documentation prompts the responsible clinician to consistently consider and document the appropriate escalation of care for their patient, improving communication with the out of hours team and appropriate escalation of care in the event of patient deterioration. PMID:26734225

  8. Cross-infection of gentamicin-methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a male surgical ward at Rajavithi General Hospital.

    PubMed

    Rahule, S; Naidoo, J; Surapatana, N; Yosapol, P

    1992-03-01

    Between January and December 1987, gentamicin-methicillin-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus (GMRSA) were isolated from 7 patients in a male surgical ward at Rajavithi General Hospital. Six patients developed significant infection which included sepsis (2), pneumonia (1), infection in the eye, ear and wound (1), wound infection (2), and one patient had GMRSA isolated from his sputum. The strains were untypable with standard phage type and were resistant to methicillin, gentamicin, amikacin, kanamycin, streptomycin, tetracycline, erythromycin and chloramphenicol, but susceptible o vancomycin and cotrimoxazole. GMRSA were also isolated from bed-rail and the used rubber gloves left in the affected room. The GMRSA strains contained 5 plasmids of molecular weight of 18, 11, 2, 1.8 and 1.7 Md. The 2Md plasmid coded for chloramphenicol resistance and the 1.8 Md plasmid for erythromycin resistance. PMID:1402496

  9. Routes of hysterectomy in women with benign uterine disease in the Vancouver Coastal Health and Providence Health Care regions: a retrospective cohort analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lisonkova, Sarka; Allaire, Catherine; Williams, Christina; Yong, Paul; Joseph, K.S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Minimally invasive hysterectomies performed vaginally or laparoscopically are associated with decreased perioperative morbidity. We examined temporal trends and patient and hospital factors associated with the routes of hysterectomy used in the Vancouver Coastal Health and Providence Health Care regions in British Columbia. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study of all women who had an elective hysterectomy for a benign indication between 2007 and 2011 in 8 hospitals in the region. Logistic regression modeling with mixed effects was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for patient and hospital characteristics associated with the route of hysterectomy. Results The study involved 4372 women who underwent abdominal (52.3%), vaginal (25.5%) or laparoscopic (22.3%) hysterectomy. From 2007 to 2011, the number of abdominal hysterectomies performed decreased from 58.4% to 47.7%, the number of vaginal hysterectomies performed decreased from 27.5% to 21.1% and the number of laparoscopic hysterectomies performed increased from 14.2% to 31.2% (p < 0.001 for all trends). Patient factors associated with laparoscopic versus abdominal hysterectomy included young age, pain or prolapse indication, absence of fibroid indication, absence of concurrent gynecologic procedure, rural residence and lower socioeconomic status. Patient factors associated with vaginal hysterectomy included older age, prolapse indication and concurrent procedure for prolapse. Hospital location and size were not significantly associated with vaginal hysterectomy, but urban hospital location was associated with laparoscopic hysterectomy. Interpretation The proportion of minimally invasive hysterectomies is increasing and represents approximately half of all hysterectomies performed in the Vancouver Coastal Health and Providence Health Care regions. Vaginal hysterectomies are associated with patient characteristics, whereas laparoscopic hysterectomies are associated with patient and hospital characteristics. PMID:25485254

  10. Waiting times before dental care under general anesthesia in children with special needs in the Children's Hospital of Casablanca

    PubMed Central

    Badre, Bouchra; Serhier, Zineb; El Arabi, Samira

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Oral diseases may have an impact on quality of children's life. The presence of severe disability requires the use of care under general anesthesia (GA). However, because of the limited number of qualified health personnel, waiting time before intervention can be long. Aim: To evaluate the waiting time before dental care under general anesthesia for children with special needs in Morocco. Methods A retrospective cohort study was carried out in pediatric dentistry unit of the University Hospital of Casablanca. Data were collected from records of patients seen for the first time between 2006 and 2011. The waiting time was defined as the time between the date of the first consultation and intervention date. Results 127 children received dental care under general anesthesia, 57.5% were male and the average age was 9.2 (SD = 3.4). Decay was the most frequent reason for consultation (48%), followed by pain (32%). The average waiting time was 7.6 months (SD = 4.2 months). The average number of acts performed per patient was 13.5. Conclusion Waiting times were long, it is necessary to take measures to reduce delays and improve access to oral health care for this special population. PMID:25328594

  11. Economic Evaluation of a General Hospital Unit for Older People with Delirium and Dementia (TEAM Randomised Controlled Trial)

    PubMed Central

    Tanajewski, Lukasz; Franklin, Matthew; Gkountouras, Georgios; Berdunov, Vladislav; Harwood, Rowan H.; Goldberg, Sarah E.; Bradshaw, Lucy E.; Gladman, John R. F.; Elliott, Rachel A.

    2015-01-01

    Background One in three hospital acute medical admissions is of an older person with cognitive impairment. Their outcomes are poor and the quality of their care in hospital has been criticised. A specialist unit to care for older people with delirium and dementia (the Medical and Mental Health Unit, MMHU) was developed and then tested in a randomised controlled trial where it delivered significantly higher quality of, and satisfaction with, care, but no significant benefits in terms of health status outcomes at three months. Objective To examine the cost-effectiveness of the MMHU for older people with delirium and dementia in general hospitals, compared with standard care. Methods Six hundred participants aged over 65 admitted for acute medical care, identified on admission as cognitively impaired, were randomised to the MMHU or to standard care on acute geriatric or general medical wards. Cost per quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained, at 3-month follow-up, was assessed in trial-based economic evaluation (599/600 participants, intervention: 309). Multiple imputation and complete-case sample analyses were employed to deal with missing QALY data (55%). Results The total adjusted health and social care costs, including direct costs of the intervention, at 3 months was £7714 and £7862 for MMHU and standard care groups, respectively (difference -£149 (95% confidence interval [CI]: -298, 4)). The difference in QALYs gained was 0.001 (95% CI: -0.006, 0.008). The probability that the intervention was dominant was 58%, and the probability that it was cost-saving with QALY loss was 39%. At £20,000/QALY threshold, the probability of cost-effectiveness was 94%, falling to 59% when cost-saving QALY loss cases were excluded. Conclusions The MMHU was strongly cost-effective using usual criteria, although considerably less so when the less acceptable situation with QALY loss and cost savings were excluded. Nevertheless, this model of care is worthy of further evaluation. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01136148 PMID:26684872

  12. Risk factors associated with calcium oxalate urolithiasis in dogs evaluated at general care veterinary hospitals in the United States.

    PubMed

    Okafor, Chika C; Lefebvre, Sandra L; Pearl, David L; Yang, Mingyin; Wang, Mansen; Blois, Shauna L; Lund, Elizabeth M; Dewey, Cate E

    2014-08-01

    Calcium oxalate urolithiasis results from the formation of aggregates of calcium salts in the urinary tract. Difficulties associated with effectively treating calcium oxalate urolithiasis and the proportional increase in the prevalence of calcium oxalate uroliths relative to other urolith types over the last 2 decades has increased the concern of clinicians about this disease. To determine factors associated with the development of calcium oxalate urolithiasis in dogs evaluated at general care veterinary hospitals in the United States, a retrospective case-control study was performed. A national electronic database of medical records of all dogs evaluated between October 1, 2007 and December 31, 2010 at 787 general care veterinary hospitals in the United States was reviewed. Dogs were selected as cases at the first-time diagnosis of a laboratory-confirmed urolith comprised of at least 70% calcium oxalate (n=452). Two sets of control dogs with no history of urolithiasis diagnosis were randomly selected after the medical records of all remaining dogs were reviewed: urinalysis examination was a requirement in the selection of one set (n=1808) but was not required in the other set (n=1808). Historical information extracted included urolith composition, dog's diet, age, sex, neuter status, breed size category, hospital location, date of diagnosis, and urinalysis results. Multivariable analysis showed that the odds of first-time diagnosis of calcium oxalate urolithiasis were significantly (P<0.05) greater for dogs<7 years, males (OR: 7.77, 95% CI: 4.93-12.26), neutered (OR: 2.58, 1.44-4.63), toy- vs. medium-sized breeds (OR: 3.15, 1.90-5.22), small- vs. medium-sized breeds (OR: 3.05, 1.83-5.08), large- vs. medium-sized breeds (OR: 0.05, 0.01-0.19), and those with a diagnosis of cystitis within the previous year (OR: 6.49, 4.14-10.16). Urinary factors significantly associated with first-time diagnosis of calcium oxalate urolithiasis were acidic vs. basic pH (OR: 1.94, 1.22-3.10), presence of RBCs (OR: 6.20, 3.91-9.83) or WBCs (OR: 1.62, 1.03-2.54), and protein concentration>30 mg/dL (OR: 1.55, 1.04-2.30). Patient demographics and urinalysis results are important factors that can support risk assessment and early identification of canine oxalate urolithiasis. Therefore, periodic urolith screening and monitoring of urine parameters should be encouraged for dogs at risk of developing these uroliths. PMID:24834804

  13. Age-based differences in hair zinc of Vancouver preschoolers.

    PubMed

    Vaghri, Ziba; Barr, Susan; Wong, Hubert; Chapman, Gwen; Hertzman, Clyde

    2008-12-01

    Marginal zinc deficiency (MZD), the subclinical stage of zinc deficiency, is common in industrialized societies. Serum zinc, the most common biomarker of zinc status, lacks sensitivity and specificity to diagnose this deficiency. Hair zinc, however, is sensitive and specific enough to detect MZD in children. Differences in hair zinc associated with age and sex have been reported. These differences have not been investigated thoroughly; therefore, interpretation of the results of hair analyses is difficult. This cross-sectional study was designed to examine the hair zinc status of a group of Vancouver preschoolers (24-71 months) and assess the age- and sex-based differences in their hair zinc. Hair samples were obtained (n = 719) and analyzed for zinc using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Our results indicated a mean hair zinc of 115 +/- 43 microg/g with 17% below the low hair zinc cutoff (70 microg/g). Boys and girls had comparable mean hair zinc, while girls had a significantly higher occurrence of low hair zinc than boys (21% vs. 12%). Children <4 years of age had significantly lower mean hair zinc and higher rate of low hair zinc compared to children > or =4. Our study provides important reference values for the hair zinc of healthy North American preschoolers. PMID:18806933

  14. Hip resurfacing in a district general hospital: 6-year clinical results using the ReCap hip resurfacing system

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of our study was to prospectively report the clinical results of 280 consecutive hips (240 patients) who received a ReCap Hip Resurfacing System implant (Biomet Inc., Warsaw, USA) in a single district general hospital. Literature reports a large variation in clinical results between different resurfacing designs and published results using this particular design are scarce. Methods Mean follow up was 3.3 years (1.0 to 6.3) and four patients were lost to follow-up. All patients were diagnosed with end-stage hip osteoarthritis, their mean age was 54 years and 76.4% of all patients were male. Results There were 16 revisions and four patients reported a Harris Hip Score <70 points at their latest follow up. There were no pending revisions. Kaplan-Meier implant survival probability, with revision for any reason as endpoint, was 93.5% at six years follow-up (95%-CI: 88.8-95.3). There were no revisions for Adverse Reactions to Metal Debris (ARMD) and no indications of ARMD in symptomatic non-revised patients, although diagnostics were limited to ultrasound scans. Conclusions This independent series confirms that hip resurfacing is a demanding procedure, and that implant survival of the ReCap hip resurfacing system is on a critical level in our series. In non-revised patients, reported outcomes are generally excellent. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00603395 PMID:23234268

  15. Forest harvesting is associated with increased landslide activity during an extreme rainstorm on Vancouver Island, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, J. N.; Guthrie, R. H.; Brenning, A.

    2014-08-01

    Safe operations of forest practices in mountainous regions require effective development planning to mitigate hazards posed by landslides. British Columbia, Canada, has for the past two decades implemented landslide risk management policies aimed at reducing the impacts of the forest industry on landslides; it is required that timber harvesting sites are evaluated for their potential or existing impacts on terrain stability. Statistical landslide susceptibility modelling can enhance this evaluation by geographically highlighting potential hazardous areas. In addition, these statistical models can also improve our understanding of regional landslide controlling factors. The purpose of this research was to explore the regional effects of forest harvesting activities, topography, precipitation and geology on landslides initiated during an extreme rainfall event in November 2006 on Vancouver Island, British Columbia. These effects were analysed with a nonparametric statistical method, the generalized additive model (GAM). Although topography was the strongest predictor of landslide initiation, low density forest interpreted as regrowth areas and proximity to forest service roads were jointly associated with a six- to nine-fold increase in the odds of landslide initiation, while accounting for other environmental cofounders. This result highlights the importance of continuing proper landslide risk management to control the effects of forest practices on landslide initiation.

  16. Capillaria hepatica in wild Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) from Vancouver, Canada.

    PubMed

    Rothenburger, Jamie L; Himsworth, Chelsea G; Chang, Victoria; LeJeune, Manigandan; Leighton, Frederick A

    2014-07-01

    Capillaria hepatica is a parasitic nematode that infects the liver of rats (Rattus spp.), and occasionally other mammalian species, including humans. Despite its broad geographic distribution and host range, the ecology of this parasite remains poorly understood. We characterized the ecology of C. hepatica in urban Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) in Vancouver, Canada. The overall prevalence of C. hepatica among Norway rats was 36% (241/671); however, there was significant variation in prevalence among city blocks. Using a generalized linear mixed model to control for clustering by block (where OR is odds ratio and CI is confidence interval), we found C. hepatica infection was negatively associated with season (spring [OR=0.14, 95% CI=0.05-0.39]; summer [OR=0.14, 95% CI=0.03-0.61]; winter [OR=0.34, 95% CI=0.13-0.84], compared to fall) and positively associated with sexual maturity (OR: 7.29, 95% CI=3.98-13.36) and presence of cutaneous bite wounds (OR=1.87, 95% CI=1.11-3.16). Our understanding of the ecology of C. hepatica in rats is hindered by a paucity of data regarding the main mechanisms of transmission (e.g., environmental exposure vs. active cannibalism). However, associations among infection, season, maturity, and bite wounds could suggest that social interactions, possibly including cannibalism, may be important in transmission. PMID:24807174

  17. Harmful microinjecting practices among a cohort of injection drug users in Vancouver Canada

    PubMed Central

    Rachlis, Beth; Lloyd-Smith, Elisa; Small, Will; Tobin, Diane; Stone, Dave; Li, Kathy; Wood, Evan; Kerr, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Objectives We sought to identify factors associated with harmful microinjecting practices in a longitudinal cohort of IDU. Methods Using data from the Vancouver Injection Drug Users Study (VIDUS) between January 2004 and December 2005, generalized estimating equations (GEE) logistic regression was performed to examine sociodemographic and behavioral factors associated with four harmful microinjecting practices (frequent rushed injecting, frequent syringe borrowing, frequently injecting with a used water capsule, frequently injecting alone). Results In total, 620 participants were included in the present analysis. Our study included 251 (40.5%) women and 203 (32.7%) self-identified Aboriginal participants. The median age was 31.9 (interquartile range: 23.439.3). GEE analyses found that each harmful microinjecting practice was associated with a unique profile of sociodemographic and behavioral factors. Discussion We observed high rates of harmful microinjecting practices among IDU. The present study describes the epidemiology of harmful microinjecting practices and points to the need for strategies that target higher risk individuals including the use of peer-driven programs and drug-specific approaches in an effort to promote safer injecting practices. PMID:20509739

  18. Forest harvesting is associated with increased landslide activity during an extreme rainstorm on Vancouver Island, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, J. N.; Guthrie, R. H.; Brenning, A.

    2015-06-01

    Safe operations of forest practices in mountainous regions require effective development planning to mitigate hazards posed by landslides. British Columbia, Canada, has for the past 2 decades implemented landslide risk management policies aimed at reducing the impacts of the forestry industry on landslides. Consequently, it is required that timber harvesting sites be evaluated for their potential or existing impacts on terrain stability. Statistical landslide susceptibility modelling can enhance this evaluation by geographically highlighting potential hazardous areas. In addition, these statistical models can also improve our understanding of regional landslide controlling factors. The purpose of this research was to explore the regional effects of forest harvesting activities, topography, precipitation and geology on landslides initiated during an extreme rainfall event in November 2006 on Vancouver Island, British Columbia. These effects were analyzed with a nonparametric statistical method, the generalized additive model (GAM). Although topography was the strongest predictor of landslide initiation, low density forest interpreted as regrowth areas and proximity to forest service roads were jointly associated with a 6- to 9-fold increase in the odds of landslide initiation, while accounting for other environmental confounders. This result highlights the importance of continuing proper landslide risk management to control the effects of forest practices on landslide initiation.

  19. Association between gaseous ambient air pollutants and adverse pregnancy outcomes in Vancouver, Canada.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shiliang; Krewski, Daniel; Shi, Yuanli; Chen, Yue; Burnett, Richard T

    2003-01-01

    The association between ambient air pollution and adverse health effects, such as emergency room visits, hospitalizations, and mortality from respiratory and cardiovascular diseases, has been studied extensively in many countries, including Canada. Recently, studies conducted in China, the Czech Republic, and the United States have related ambient air pollution to adverse pregnancy outcomes. In this study, we examined association between preterm birth, low birth weight, and intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) among singleton live births and ambient concentrations of sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and ozone in Vancouver, Canada, for 1985-1998. Multiple logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for such effects. Low birth weight was associated with exposure to SO2 during the first month of pregnancy (OR = 1.11, 95% CI, 1.01-1.22, for a 5.0 ppb increase). Preterm birth was associated with exposure to SO2 (OR = 1.09, 95% CI, 1.01-1.19, for a 5.0 ppb increase) and to CO (OR = 1.08, 95% CI, 1.01-1.15, for a 1.0 ppm increase) during the last month of pregnancy. IUGR was associated with exposure to SO2 (OR = 1.07, 95% CI, 1.01-1.13, for a 5.0 ppb increase), to NO2 (OR = 1.05, 95% CI, 1.01-1.10, for a 10.0 ppb increase), and to CO (OR = 1.06, 95% CI, 1.01-1.10, for a 1.0 ppm increase) during the first month of pregnancy. In conclusion, relatively low concentrations of gaseous air pollutants are associated with adverse effects on birth outcomes in populations experiencing diverse air pollution profiles. PMID:14594630

  20. Secondary stroke in patients with polytrauma and traumatic brain injury treated in an Intensive Care Unit, Karlovac General Hospital, Croatia.

    PubMed

    Belavić, M; Jančić, E; Mišković, P; Brozović-Krijan, A; Bakota, B; Žunić, J

    2015-11-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is divided into primary and secondary brain injury. Primary brain injury occurs at the time of injury and is the direct consequence of kinetic energy acting on the brain tissue. Secondary brain injury occurs several hours or days after primary brain injury and is the result of factors including shock, systemic hypotension, hypoxia, hypothermia or hyperthermia, intracranial hypertension, cerebral oedema, intracranial bleeding or inflammation. The aim of this retrospective analysis of a prospective database was to determine the prevalence of secondary stroke and stroke-related mortality, causes of secondary stroke, treatment and length of stay in the ICU and hospital. This study included patients with TBI with or without other injuries who were hospitalised in a general ICU over a five-year period. The following parameters were assessed: demographics (age, sex), scores (Glasgow Coma Score, APACHE II, SOFA), secondary stroke (prevalence, time of occurrence after primary brain injury, causes of stroke and associated mortality), length of stay in the ICU and hospital, vital parameters (state of consciousness, cardiac function, respiration, circulation, thermoregulation, diuresis) and laboratory values (leukocytes, C-reactive protein [CRP], blood glucose, blood gas analysis, urea, creatinine). Medical data were analysed for 306 patients with TBI (median age 56 years, range 18-93 years) who were treated in the general ICU. Secondary stroke occurred in 23 patients (7.5%), 10 of whom died, which gives a mortality rate of 43.4%. Three patients were excluded as the cause of the injury was missile trauma. The study data indicate that inflammation is the most important cause of secondary insults. Levels of CRP were elevated in 65% of patients with secondary brain injury; leukocytosis was present in 87% of these patients, and blood glucose was elevated in 73%. The lungs and urinary tract were the most common sites of infection. In conclusion, elevated inflammatory markers (white blood cell count and CRP) and hyperglycaemia are associated with secondary brain injury. The lack of routine use of intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring may explain the high mortality rate and the occurrence of secondary stroke in patients with TBI. PMID:26620118

  1. Cretaceous and Eocene poroid hymenophores from Vancouver Island, British Columbia.

    PubMed

    Smith, Selena Y; Currah, Randolph S; Stockey, Ruth A

    2004-01-01

    Two fossil poroid hymenophore fragments, one from the Cretaceous Period and the other from the Eocene Epoch, are described. The permineralized specimens were obtained from marine calcareous concretions on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada, and were studied using the cellulose acetate peel technique. Size and distribution of pores in the hymenophores, as well as the hyphal anatomy of the dissepiments and some hymenial elements, were examined. In the Cretaceous specimen, Quatsinoporites cranhamii sp. nov., pores are round to elliptical, three per mm, and 130-540 μm diam. Dissepiments consist of narrow, simple septate, hyphae. Neither basidia nor basidiospores are present, but acuminate hymenial cystidia, up to 54 μm in length, are common. The Eocene specimen, Appianoporites vancouverensis sp. nov., has a pore density of six per mm and pores are 130-163 μm in diam. Dissepiments consist of narrow, simple septate, thin-walled hyphae. Neither basidia nor basidiospores are present, but acuminate, thick-walled hymenial cystidia, up to 32 μm in length, are common. The poroid hymenophore is a characteristic of a number of extant basidiomycete taxa, including the Boletales, Polyporales and Hymenochaetales. It is unlikely that the fleshy, ephemeral, terrestrial basidiomata of the Boletales would be preserved in a marine environment, and thus the specimens are interpreted as belonging to basidiomycete lineages, with persistent, leathery or corky basidiomata. The simple septate hyphae, the minute pores and presence of cystidia most closely resemble taxa of the Hymenochaetales. These fossils unequivocally push back the minimum age of homobasidiomycetes and extend their paleogeographical range. PMID:21148842

  2. Stigma, medication adherence and coping mechanism among people living with HIV attending General Hospital, Lagos Island, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Obidike, Obinna R.; Balogun, Mobolanle R.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background People living with HIV and AIDS (PLWHA) experience some form of stigma which could lead to poor medication adherence. Objectives This study assessed the various domains of stigma experienced by PLWHAs attending an HIV clinic at General Hospital, Lagos Island, their medication adherence patterns and their coping mechanisms for ensuring adherence to antiretroviral therapy. Method A cross-sectional study design with a sample size of 200 was used. Respondents were selected using systematic random sampling. Interviewers administered structured questionnaires were used to collect information on the domains of stigma. Data was analysed using EPI info. This was followed by a focus group discussion (FGD) with seven participants at the clinic using an interview guide with open-ended questions. Results Overall, stigma was experienced by 35% of the respondents. Within this group, 6.6%, 37.1%, 43.1% and 98.0% of the respondents reported experiencing negative self image stigma, personalised stigma, disclosure stigma and public attitude stigma respectively. Almost 90% of the respondents were adherent. The FGD revealed that disclosure was usually confined to family members and the coping mechanism for achieving adherence was to put antiretroviral (ARVs) in unlabelled pill boxes. Conclusion This study found that stigma was low and that the most common domain of stigma experienced was public attitude stigma. Medication adherence of respondents was good as a result of the coping mechanism, which involves putting ARVs in unlabelled pill boxes.

  3. Esthesioneuroblastoma: The Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and Massachusetts General Hospital Experience with Craniofacial Resection, Proton Beam Radiation, and Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Anthony C.; Chan, Annie W.; Curry, William T.; Barker, Fred G.; Deschler, Daniel G.; Lin, Derrick T.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the efficacy of craniofacial resection and proton radiation for the management of esthesioneuroblastoma (ENB). Design: A retrospective chart review was performed of all patients presenting with ENB and completely managed at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary (MEEI) from 1997 to 2006. Setting: A tertiary referral center. Main Outcome Measures: Disease-free and overall survival. Participants: All patients presenting with ENB and completely managed at the MGH and the MEEI from 1997 to 2006. Results: Ten patients were identified with a median follow-up time of 52.8 months. Average age at presentation was 45 years. Nasal obstruction was the most common presenting symptom. Three patients presented with Kadish stage B disease and seven with stage C. No patient had evidence of cervical or metastatic disease at presentation. Seven patients were treated with craniofacial resections (CFR) followed by proton beam radiation with or without chemotherapy. Three patients were treated with initial chemotherapy with no response. They subsequently underwent CFR followed by proton beam radiation. The 5-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 90% and 85.7%, respectively, by Kaplan-Meier analysis. No patient suffered any severe radiation toxicity. Conclusion: ENB can be safely and effectively treated with CFR followed by proton beam irradiation. Proton irradiation may be associated with less toxicity than photon irradiation. The role of chemotherapy remains unclear. PMID:19240832

  4. Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis in Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital Bandung, Indonesia from 2009-2013

    PubMed Central

    Suwarsa, Oki; Dharmadji, Hartati Purbo; Sutedja, Endang

    2016-01-01

    Background Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCAR) with high mortality and have a significant public health impact because of high mortality and morbidity. Objective To describe data the epidemiological features, etiology, and treatment of retrospectively reviewed data of all patients with SJS and TEN. Methods Retrospective study was conducted in patients with SJS and TEN treated from January 1, 2009 to December 31, 2013 in Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital Bandung, Indonesia. Results A total of 57 patients were enrolled in the study. Thirty-nine cases of SJS (21 males and 18 females), 7 cases of SJS overlapping TEN (4 males and 3 females), and 11 cases of TEN (5 males and 6 females) were reported. All cases of SJS and TEN were caused by drugs, such as paracetamol (16.56%), carbamazepine (7%), amoxicillin (5.73%), ibuprofen (4.46%), rifampicin (3.18%), and trihexyphenidyl (3.18%). All cases were treated systemically with corticosteroid alone (100%). Seven from 57 patients (12,28%) died; 5 cases developed sepsis and 2 cases developed respiratory failure. The mortality rate was 7.69% in SJS, 0% in SJS/TEN overlap, and 36.36% in TEN. Conclusion The role of systemic corticosteroids in SJS and TEN are still controversial, but with a prompt and earlier treatment reduces mortality and improves outcomes of SJS and TEN patients. PMID:26844219

  5. Prevalence of Depression among Type 2 Diabetic Outpatients in Black Lion General Specialized Hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Dejenie Habtewold, Tesfa; Radie, Yosef Tsige; Sharew, Nigussie Tadesse

    2015-01-01

    Background. The emotional consequences of diabetes have been scrutinized by a number of investigative teams and there are varying reports about the association of depression with type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, there is limited data about this in Ethiopia. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of comorbid depression among type 2 diabetic outpatients. Methods and Materials. Institution based cross-sectional study design was conducted on a random sample of 276 type 2 diabetic outpatients from Black Lion General Specialized Hospital. Systematic random sampling technique was used to get these individual patients from 920 type 2 diabetic outpatients who have an appointment during the data collection period. Patients' depression status was measured using Patient Health Questionnaire 9 (PHQ 9). Result. Totally 264 type 2 diabetic outpatients were interviewed with a response rate of 95.6%. The prevalence of depression among type 2 diabetic outpatients was 13%. Based on PHQ 9 score, 28.4% (75) fulfilled the criteria for mild depression, 12.1% (32) for moderate depression, 2.7% (7) for moderately severe depression, and 1.5% (4) for severe depression. But 45.8% (121) of patients had no clinically significant depression. Conclusion. This study demonstrated that depression is a common comorbid health problem in type 2 diabetic outpatients with a prevalence rate of 13%. PMID:25789172

  6. Supplement use by women during pregnancy: data from the Massachusetts General Hospital National Pregnancy Registry for Atypical Antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Marlene P; Sosinsky, Alexandra Z; Moustafa, Danna; Viguera, Adele C; Cohen, Lee S

    2016-06-01

    Women of reproductive age commonly use integrative treatments. However, the reproductive safety for most complementary products lacks systematic study. We aimed to study the use of supplements by women in a prospective pregnancy registry. The Massachusetts General Hospital National Pregnancy Registry for Atypical Antipsychotics was established to evaluate the reproductive safety of atypical antipsychotics. Exposed and control participants were systematically queried about the use of vitamins and supplements. Slightly greater than half (53.2 %) of the participants eligible for analysis (N = 534) were using at least one vitamin or supplement at the time of enrollment, not including prenatal vitamins or folic acid. The most common supplements used were omega-3 fatty acids (38.0 %), vitamin D (11.0 %), calcium (8.2 %), and iron (4.7 %). Probiotics and melatonin were used by 2.6 and 0.9 %, respectively. In this prospective pregnancy registry, we found that over half of the participants were taking supplements or vitamins other than prenatal vitamins and folic acid. These findings underscore the need for active query on the part of health care providers about the use of supplements during pregnancy, and the need to obtain rigorous reproductive safety and efficacy data for supplements used by pregnant women and reproductive aged women. PMID:26472040

  7. Building better healthcare facilities through evidence-based design: breaking new ground at Vancouver Island Health Authority.

    PubMed

    Waldner, Howard; Johnson, Bart; Sadler, Blair

    2012-01-01

    Many of today's healthcare facilities were constructed at least 50 years ago, and a growing number have outlived their useful lives. Despite renovations and renewals, they often fall short of providing an appropriate care setting. Clinicians and staff develop a mixture of compromises and workarounds simply to make things function. Evidence-based design principles are often absent from new healthcare facilities, perhaps because of lack of awareness of the principles or because implementing them may fall foul of short-term and short-sighted budgetary decisions. In planning a new healthcare facility in 2008, the executive team at Vancouver Island Health Authority decided to adopt the evidence-based design approach. They conducted site visits to newly constructed hospitals across North America and beyond, to determine best practices in terms of design and construction. These engagements resulted in the implementation of 102 evidence-based design principles and attributes in Victoria's Royal Jubilee hospital, a 500-bed Patient Care Centre. This $350M project was completed on time and on budget, showing that using evidence need not result in delays or higher costs. To date, the results of the evidence-based design are promising, with accolades coming from patients, staff and clinical partners, and a number of immediate and practical benefits for patients, families and care teams alike. PMID:24863125

  8. Mechanical ventilation in patients in the intensive care unit of a general university hospital in southern Brazil: an epidemiological study

    PubMed Central

    Fialkow, Léa; Farenzena, Maurício; Wawrzeniak, Iuri Christmann; Brauner, Janete Salles; Vieira, Sílvia Regina Rios; Vigo, Alvaro; Bozzetti, Mary Clarisse

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the characteristics, the frequency and the mortality rates of patients needing mechanical ventilation and to identify the risk factors associated with mortality in the intensive care unit (ICU) of a general university hospital in southern Brazil. METHOD: Prospective cohort study in patients admitted to the ICU who needed mechanical ventilation for at least 24 hours between March 2004 and April 2007. RESULTS: A total of 1,115 patients admitted to the ICU needed mechanical ventilation. The mortality rate was 51%. The mean age (± standard deviation) was 57±18 years, and the mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score was 22.6±8.3. The variables independently associated with mortality were (i) conditions present at the beginning of mechanical ventilation, age (hazard ratio: 1.01; p<0.001); the APACHE II score (hazard ratio: 1.01; p<0.005); acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (hazard ratio: 1.38; p=0.009), sepsis (hazard ratio: 1.33; p=0.003), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (hazard ratio: 0.58; p=0.042), and pneumonia (hazard ratio: 0.78; p=0.013) as causes of mechanical ventilation; and renal (hazard ratio: 1.29; p=0.011) and neurological (hazard ratio: 1.25; p=0.024) failure, and (ii) conditions occurring during the course of mechanical ventilation, acute lung injuri/acute respiratory distress syndrome (hazard ratio: 1.31; p<0.010); sepsis (hazard ratio: 1.53; p<0.001); and renal (hazard ratio: 1.75; p<0.001), cardiovascular (hazard ratio: 1.32; p≤0.009), and hepatic (hazard ratio: 1.67; p≤0.001) failure. CONCLUSIONS: This large cohort study provides a comprehensive profile of mechanical ventilation patients in South America. The mortality rate of patients who required mechanical ventilation was higher, which may have been related to the severity of illness of the patients admitted to our ICU. Risk factors for hospital mortality included conditions present at the start of mechanical ventilation conditions that occurred during mechanical support. PMID:27074175

  9. Traveling to Canada for the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games.

    PubMed

    Heggie, Travis W

    2009-07-01

    The 21st Winter Olympic Games will be held in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada from February 12 to 28, 2010. Following the Winter Olympic Games, the Winter Paralympic Games will be held from March 12 to 21, 2010. There will be 86 winter sporting events hosted in Vancouver with 5500 athletes staying in two Olympic Villages. Another 2800 members of the media, 25,000 volunteers, and 1 million spectators are expected in attendance. This paper reviews health and safety issues for all travelers to Canada for the 2010 Vancouver Winter Olympic Games with a specific focus on pre-travel planning, road and transportation safety in British Columbia, natural and environmental hazards, Olympic medical facilities, safety and security, and infectious disease. PMID:19717101

  10. The role of the Director Zmago Slokan in the development of Maribor General Hospital in the first period after the Second World War (1953-1970).

    PubMed

    Pivec, Gregor

    2015-12-01

    The author explores and explains the role of the director of Maribor General Hospital in the first period after Second World War. The period was problematic on account of the difficult economic situation and changes in the political system. On one hand the hospital suffered relatively large damage due to bombing attacks during the war and on the other it had to face numerous staffing problems, especially with a lack of physicians and trained nursing staff (from 1948 an executive order entered into force forbidding the nursing nuns from performing nursing care in hospitals). The change in the political system required the management of the hospital to be taken over by an individual who enjoyed the political, professional and economic trust of the then authorities. Based on his engagement during the Second World War, the director, Zmago Slokan, represented a form of guarantee for the political system of that time, which nevertheless wanted the quality-based, professional and economic progress of the hospital. Using his personal characteristics, professional medical and economic knowledge as well as political experience, he was able to manage different tendencies to continue the quality-based progress of the institution. Thus, he set a proper foundation for its development in the periods that followed, in the Socialist Federative Republic of Yugoslavia as well as in the independent Republic of Slovenia (after 1991). The author discusses the role of the director in the hospital's progress chronologically. PMID:26659911

  11. Needle exchange and the HIV epidemic in Vancouver: lessons learned from 15 years of research.

    PubMed

    Hyshka, Elaine; Strathdee, Steffanie; Wood, Evan; Kerr, Thomas

    2012-07-01

    During the mid-1990s, Vancouver experienced a well characterized HIV outbreak among injection drug users (IDU) and many questioned how this could occur in the presence of a high volume needle exchange program (NEP). Specific concerns were fuelled by early research demonstrating that frequent needle exchange program attendees were more likely to be HIV positive than those who attended the NEP less frequently. Since then, some have misinterpreted this finding as evidence that NEPs are ineffective or potentially harmful. In light of continuing questions about the Vancouver HIV epidemic, we review 15 years of peer-reviewed research on Vancouver's NEP to describe what has been learned through this work. Our review demonstrates that: (1) NEP attendance is not causally associated with HIV infection, (2) frequent attendees of Vancouver's NEP have higher risk profiles which explain their increased risk of HIV seroconversion, and (3) a number of policy concerns, as well as the high prevalence of cocaine injecting contributed to the failure of the NEP to prevent the outbreak. Additionally, we highlight several improvements to Vancouver's NEP that contributed to declines in syringe sharing and HIV incidence. Vancouver's experience provides a number of important lessons regarding NEP. Keys to success include refocusing the NEP away from an emphasis on public order objectives by separating distribution and collection functions, removing syringe distribution limits and decentralizing and diversifying NEP services. Additionally, our review highlights the importance of context when implementing NEPs, as well as ongoing evaluation to identify factors that constrain or improve access to sterile syringes. PMID:22579215

  12. Cutaneous Diphtheria in the Urban Poor Population of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada: a 10-Year Review ▿

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, C. F.; Bernard, K. A.; Romney, M. G.

    2011-01-01

    Between 1998 and 2007, records from 33 patients with cutaneous diphtheria from Vancouver's inner city were reviewed. Cases were associated with injection drug use and poverty. Coinfections with Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Arcanobacterium haemolyticum occurred. Corynebacterium diphtheriae is endemic in Vancouver's urban core, with strains of multilocus sequence type (MLST) 76 predominating. PMID:21525220

  13. First Contemporary Case of Human Infection with Cryptococcus gattii in Puget Sound: Evidence for Spread of the Vancouver Island Outbreak▿

    PubMed Central

    Upton, Arlo; Fraser, James A.; Kidd, Sarah E.; Bretz, Camille; Bartlett, Karen H.; Heitman, Joseph; Marr, Kieren A.

    2007-01-01

    We report a case of cryptococcosis due to C. gattii which appears to have been acquired in the Puget Sound region, Washington State. Genotyping confirmed identity to the predominant Vancouver Island genotype. This is the first documented case of human disease by the major Vancouver Island emergence strain acquired within the United States. PMID:17596366

  14. Prevalence and Correlates of Nonmedical Prescription Opioid Use Among a Cohort of Sex Workers in Vancouver, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Argento, Elena; Chettiar, Jill; Nguyen, Paul; Montaner, Julio; Shannon, Kate

    2014-01-01

    Background The nonmedical use of prescription opioids (POs) is a major public health concern, causing extensive morbidity and mortality in North America. Canada has the second highest consumption rate of POs globally and data indicate nonmedical PO use (NPOU) is growing among key populations and increasingly available in street-level drug markets. Despite accumulating evidence documenting the rise of NPOU, few studies have systematically examined NPOU in Canada among key vulnerable populations, such as sex workers. This study prospectively evaluated the prevalence and correlates of NPOU within a Vancouver cohort of sex workers over three-years follow-up. Methods Data were drawn from an open prospective cohort, AESHA (An Evaluation of Sex Workers Health Access) in Metro Vancouver, Canada (2010-2013). Women were recruited through outreach from outdoor street locations and indoor venues. Bivariate and multivariable logistic regression using Generalized Estimating Equations (GEE) were used to examine social and structural correlates of NPOU over 36 months. Results Of the 692 sex workers at baseline, close to one-fifth (n=130, 18.8%) reported NPOU (injection or non-injection) in the last six months. In multivariable GEE analyses, factors independently correlated with recent NPOU were: exchanging sex while high (AOR 3.26, 95%CI 2.29-4.64), police harassment/arrest (AOR 1.83, 95%CI 1.43-2.35), intimate partner injects drugs (AOR 1.66, 95%CI 1.11-2.49), and recent physical/sexual intimate partner violence (AOR 1.65, 95%CI 1.21-2.24). Conclusion Our results demonstrate that nearly one-fifth of sex workers in Metro Vancouver report NPOU. Factors independently statistically associated with NPOU included exchanging sex while high, police harassment/arrest, a drug injecting intimate partner and recent physical/sexual intimate partner violence. The high prevalence of NPOU use among sex workers underscores the need for further prevention and management strategies tailored to this key population. The correlates of NPOU uncovered here suggest that structural interventions may be further implemented to ameliorate this growing concern. PMID:25148695

  15. Bayesian inversion of marine controlled source electromagnetic data offshore Vancouver Island, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrmann, Romina A. S.; Schwalenberg, Katrin; Riedel, Michael; Spence, George D.; Spieß, Volkhard; Dosso, Stan E.

    2016-01-01

    This paper applies nonlinear Bayesian inversion to marine controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) data collected near two sites of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 311 on the northern Cascadia Margin to investigate subseafloor resistivity structure related to gas hydrate deposits and cold vents. The Cascadia margin, off the west coast of Vancouver Island, Canada, has a large accretionary prism where sediments are under pressure due to convergent plate boundary tectonics. Gas hydrate deposits and cold vent structures have previously been investigated by various geophysical methods and seabed drilling. Here, we invert time-domain CSEM data collected at Sites U1328 and U1329 of IODP Expedition 311 using Bayesian methods to derive subsurface resistivity model parameters and uncertainties. The Bayesian information criterion is applied to determine the amount of structure (number of layers in a depth-dependent model) that can be resolved by the data. The parameter space is sampled with the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm in principal-component space, utilizing parallel tempering to ensure wider and efficient sampling and convergence. Nonlinear inversion allows analysis of uncertain acquisition parameters such as time delays between receiver and transmitter clocks as well as input electrical current amplitude. Marginalizing over these instrument parameters in the inversion accounts for their contribution to the geophysical model uncertainties. One-dimensional inversion of time-domain CSEM data collected at measurement sites along a survey line allows interpretation of the subsurface resistivity structure. The data sets can be generally explained by models with 1 to 3 layers. Inversion results at U1329, at the landward edge of the gas hydrate stability zone, indicate a sediment unconformity as well as potential cold vents which were previously unknown. The resistivities generally increase upslope due to sediment erosion along the slope. Inversion results at U1328 on the middle slope suggest several vent systems close to Bullseye vent in agreement with ongoing interdisciplinary observations.

  16. Depression and suicide risk of outpatients at specialized hospitals for substance use disorder: comparison with depressive disorder patients at general psychiatric clinics.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Toshihiko; Matsushita, Sachio; Okudaira, Kenichi; Naruse, Nobuya; Cho, Tetsuji; Muto, Takeo; Ashizawa, Takeshi; Konuma, Kyohei; Morita, Nobuaki; Ino, Aro

    2011-12-01

    The present study used a self-reporting questionnaire to compare suicide risk in outpatients being treated for substance use disorder at specialized hospitals to suicide risk in outpatients being treated for depressive disorder at general psychiatric clinics. Although patients in both groups exhibited an equal severity of depression, the patients with drug use disorder had a higher suicide risk than those with depressive disorder. These findings indicate that drug-abusing patients at specialized hospitals may have a severe risk of committing suicide, suggesting that carefully assessing the comorbidity of depression with drug abuse may be required for preventing suicide in drug-abusing patients. PMID:22413563

  17. Nonadherence and factors affecting adherence of diabetic patients to anti-diabetic medication in Assela General Hospital, Oromia Region, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Kassahun, Ashebir; Gashe, Fanta; Mulisa, Eshetu; Rike, Wote Amelo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus is a major global health problem covering approximately 347 million persons worldwide. Glycemic control has a main role in its management which mainly depends upon patient adherence to the treatment plan. Accurate assessment of medication adherence is necessary for effective management of diabetes. Objective: To assess nonadherence and factors affecting adherence of diabetic patients to anti-diabetic medication in Assela General Hospital (AGH), Oromia Region, Ethiopia. Materials and Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on patients seeking anti-diabetic drug treatment and follow-up at AGH using structured questionnaire and reviewing the patient record card using check list from January 24, 2014 to February 7, 2014. Descriptive analysis was used to describe the percentages and number of distributions of the variables in the study; and association was identified for categorical data. P ≤ 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Result: Of all respondents, 149 (52.3%) and 136 (47.7%) were female and male, respectively. The majority of the study participants 189 (66.3%) were in the age group of 30–60 years. Two-hundred nineteen (76.8%) of respondents were married currently. The majority, 237 (83.2%) of respondents did not have blood glucose self-monitoring equipment (glucometer). A total of 196 (68.8%) respondents were adhered to anti-diabetic medication. There was a significant association between adherence to the medication and side effect, level of education, monthly income and presence of glucometer at home (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The participants in the area of study were moderately adherent to their anti-diabetic medications with nonadherence rate of 31.2%. Different factors of medication nonadherence were identified such as side effect and complexity of regimen, failure to remember, and sociodemographic factors such as educational level and monthly income. PMID:27134464

  18. Epidemiology of Suicide and Associated Socio-Demographic Factors in Emergency Department Patients in 7 General Hospitals in Northwestern China

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Cheng-jin; Dang, Xing-bo; Su, Xiao-li; Bai, Jia; Ma, Long-yang

    2015-01-01

    Background This study aimed to illustrate the characteristics of suicide attempters treated in the Emergency Departments of 7 general hospitals in Xi’an and to provide relevant data for early psychological treatment. Material/Methods Between October 2010 and September 2014, 155 suicide attempters were treated in the Emergency Departments. Data were collected using a semi-structured questionnaire. Descriptive statistics, chi-square tests, and multivariate analyses were used to identify the factors associated with suicidal behaviors. Results Females outnumbered males at a ratio of 3.7 to 1. The greatest proportion of cases was in the age group of 21 to 30 years (52.9%). Patients who finished middle school or high school accounted for most of the suicide attempters (50.3%). The most common method used for attempted suicide was drug ingestion (86.5%). The majority of cases attempted suicide at home (74.8%) during the night. Marriage frustration, work and study problems, family fanaticism and conflict, somatic disease, and history of mental disorders were all significantly associated with suicide attempts. The ratio of patients to be discharged or to die were similar in occupation, marital status, and the place of suicide attempt; however, the results were different in gender, age, educational level, methods used for suicide, time of day, and reason. Conclusions Suicide is an important public health problem and is multidimensional in nature. Future studies with larger samples are expected to provide more specific knowledge of the effect of each social factor on the suicide risk in Chinese in order to improve the prevention of suicides. PMID:26369363

  19. Time and Cost Analysis: Pediatric Dental Rehabilitation with General Anesthesia in the Office and the Hospital Settings

    PubMed Central

    Rashewsky, Stephanie; Parameswaran, Ashish; Sloane, Carole; Ferguson, Fred; Epstein, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    Pediatric dental patients who cannot receive dental care in the clinic due to uncooperative behavior are often referred to receive dental care under general anesthesia (GA). At Stony Brook Medicine, dental patients requiring treatment with GA receive dental care in our outpatient facility at the Stony Brook School of Dental Medicine (SDM) or in the Stony Brook University Hospital ambulatory setting (SBUH). This study investigates the time and cost for ambulatory American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) Class I pediatric patients receiving full-mouth dental rehabilitation using GA in these 2 locations, along with a descriptive analysis of the patients and dental services provided. In this institutional review board–approved cross-sectional retrospective study, ICD-9 codes for dental caries (521.00) were used to collect patient records between July 2009 and May 2011. Participants were limited to ASA I patients aged 36–60 months. Complete records from 96 patients were reviewed. There were significant differences in cost, total anesthesia time, and recovery room time (P < .001). The average total time (anesthesia end time minus anesthesia start time) to treat a child at SBUH under GA was 222 ± 62.7 minutes, and recovery time (time of discharge minus anesthesia end time) was 157 ± 97.2 minutes; the average total cost was $7,303. At the SDM, the average total time was 175 ± 36.8 minutes, and recovery time was 25 ± 12.7 minutes; the average total cost was $414. After controlling for anesthesia time and procedures, we found that SBUH cost 13.2 times more than SDM. This study provides evidence that ASA I pediatric patients can receive full-mouth dental rehabilitation utilizing GA under the direction of dentist anesthesiologists in an office-based dental setting more quickly and at a lower cost. This is very promising for patients with the least access to care, including patients with special needs and lack of insurance. PMID:23241037

  20. Hypokalaemia: Improving the investigation, management and therapeutic monitoring of hypokalaemic medical inpatients at a district general hospital.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Mark; Caesar, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    Hypokalaemia is prevalent in 20% of hospitalised patients. Furthermore, inadequate management of hypokalemia was identified in 24% of these patients. Associated with significant patient morbidity and mortality, the identification, investigation, and treatment of hypokalaemia was identified as an area for improvement in the management of medical inpatients. The project aims to measure the assessment, management, and therapeutic monitoring of medical inpatients with hypokalaemia in a district general hospital. All medical inpatients over a one week period who met the criteria for hypokalaemia (serum potassium <3.5 mmol/L on standard biochemical sample) were included in the audit. Patient's notes were located and evaluated to identify if they had mild, moderate, or severe hypokalaemia. Further data on ECG requests, repeat U&Es, serum magnesium analysis, treatment prescribed, and medication review dates was collated. A re-audit was completed after the introduction of a set of interventions which included a hypokalaemia treatment algorithm. Pre-intervention analysis of all medical inpatients, who met our inclusion criteria for hypokalaemia, identified 32 patients. 25 of these patients met the criteria for mild hypokalaemia (3.1-3.4 mmol/L) and 7 met the criteria for moderate hypokalaemia (2.5-3.0 mmol/L). Only 7/32 (22 %) patients were receiving adequate treatment based on trust guidelines. Post intervention results showed marked improvement in the management of patients with hypokalaemia. A total of 30 patients were identified in this post-intervention group. There were 16/30 patients who qualified as mild hypokalaemia (3.1-3.4 mmol/L) and 14/30 with moderate hypokalaemia (2.5-3.0 mmol/L). 19/30 (63%) patients in the post-intervention group were correctly prescribed appropriate medication doses consistent with the treatment algorithm. Following the initial success of the project, analysis at 3 months showed a positive trend for sustained improvement when compared to the pre-intervention results. PMID:26734439

  1. Extraintestinal Salmonellosis in a General Hospital (1991 to 1996): Relationships between Salmonella Genomic Groups and Clinical Presentations

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Mercedes; de Diego, Isabel; Mendoza, M. Carmen

    1998-01-01

    Episodes of extraintestinal salmonellosis treated at a general hospital (1,522 beds) over a 6-year period (1991 to 1996) were characterized by the analysis of phenotypic and genotypic traits of Salmonella organisms and clinical data from medical reports. Extraintestinal salmonellosis accounted for 8% of all salmonellosis episodes. Fifty-two medical reports, dealing with 6 cases of typhoid fever, 32 cases of bacteremia, and 14 focal infections, were reviewed. All cases of typhoid fever except 1, 7 cases of bacteremia, and 5 focal infections were not related to any underlying disease or predisposing factors, while 25 cases of bacteremia and 9 focal infections were associated with some of these risk factors. All typhoid isolates and 65.4% of the nontyphoid isolates were susceptible to antimicrobials. Fifty-one nontyphoid strains were analyzed and assigned to 21 genomic groups, which were defined by serotype, combined ribotype, and combined randomly amplified polymorphic DNA type (each genomic group could include organisms differing in some phenotypic traits). The relationships between genomic groups and clinical presentations were traced. Organisms causing 22 episodes (17 episodes of bacteremia, 2 of pneumonia, 1 of peritonitis, 1 of pyelonephritis, and 1 of cystitis) belonged to a prevalent Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis genomic group, which included organisms assigned to four phage types, five biotypes, and four resistance patterns, causing infections in patients with and without risk factors. Seven other genomic groups, 4 Enteritidis groups (associated with both bacteremia and focal infections), 2 Typhimurium groups (one associated with bacteremia and the other with focal infections) and 1 Brandenburg group (associated with bacteremia) included two or more strains, and the remaining 13 genomic groups consisted of only one strain each. PMID:9774581

  2. Improving the quality of discharge summaries: implementing updated Academy of Medical Royal Colleges standards at a district general hospital

    PubMed Central

    May-Miller, Hannah; Hayter, Joanne; Loewenthal, Lola; Hall, Louis; Hilbert, Rebecca; Quinn, Michael; Pearson, Nicola; Patel, Alisha; Law, Rebekah

    2015-01-01

    Quality of documentation is harder to quantify and incentivise, but it has a significant impact on patient care. Good discharge summaries facilitate continuity between secondary and primary care. The junior doctors’ forum led this project to improve the quality of electronic discharge summaries (eDS). Baseline measurement revealed significant room for improvement. We measured the quality of 10 summaries per month (across all inpatient specialties), against 23 indicators from the revised Academy of Medical Royal Colleges (AoMRC) standards (2013) that were prioritised by GPs as a “minimum dataset”. Junior doctors felt that the Trust's dual eDS systems were responsible for great variation in quality. This was confirmed by the results of a comparison audit of the systems in April 2014: one system greatly outperformed the other (57% mean compliance with iSoft clinical management (iCM) based system vs. 77% with InfoPath-based system). We recommended that the Trust move to a single eDS system, decommissioning the iCM-based system, and this proposal was approved by several Trust committees. We worked with information services, junior doctors, general practitioners and hospital physicians to develop and implement a generic template to further improve compliance with AoMRC standards. In August 2014, the iCM-based system was withdrawn, the new template went live, and training was delivered, coinciding with the changeover of junior doctors to minimise disruption. Median compliance increased from 66.7% to 77.8%. Quality of discharge summaries had improved across the specialties. There was a reduction in the number of complaints and positive qualitative feedback from general practitioners and junior doctors. Completion of discharge summaries within 24 hours was not affected by this change. There is still more to be done to improve quality; average compliance with the full AoMRC standards (39 indicators) is 59.5%. With the approval of the Trust executive committee further plan, do, study, act (PDSA) cycles are underway, working to improve the remaining specialty-specific templates. PMID:26734325

  3. Improving the quality of discharge summaries: implementing updated Academy of Medical Royal Colleges standards at a district general hospital.

    PubMed

    May-Miller, Hannah; Hayter, Joanne; Loewenthal, Lola; Hall, Louis; Hilbert, Rebecca; Quinn, Michael; Pearson, Nicola; Patel, Alisha; Law, Rebekah

    2015-01-01

    Quality of documentation is harder to quantify and incentivise, but it has a significant impact on patient care. Good discharge summaries facilitate continuity between secondary and primary care. The junior doctors' forum led this project to improve the quality of electronic discharge summaries (eDS). Baseline measurement revealed significant room for improvement. We measured the quality of 10 summaries per month (across all inpatient specialties), against 23 indicators from the revised Academy of Medical Royal Colleges (AoMRC) standards (2013) that were prioritised by GPs as a "minimum dataset". Junior doctors felt that the Trust's dual eDS systems were responsible for great variation in quality. This was confirmed by the results of a comparison audit of the systems in April 2014: one system greatly outperformed the other (57% mean compliance with iSoft clinical management (iCM) based system vs. 77% with InfoPath-based system). We recommended that the Trust move to a single eDS system, decommissioning the iCM-based system, and this proposal was approved by several Trust committees. We worked with information services, junior doctors, general practitioners and hospital physicians to develop and implement a generic template to further improve compliance with AoMRC standards. In August 2014, the iCM-based system was withdrawn, the new template went live, and training was delivered, coinciding with the changeover of junior doctors to minimise disruption. Median compliance increased from 66.7% to 77.8%. Quality of discharge summaries had improved across the specialties. There was a reduction in the number of complaints and positive qualitative feedback from general practitioners and junior doctors. Completion of discharge summaries within 24 hours was not affected by this change. There is still more to be done to improve quality; average compliance with the full AoMRC standards (39 indicators) is 59.5%. With the approval of the Trust executive committee further plan, do, study, act (PDSA) cycles are underway, working to improve the remaining specialty-specific templates. PMID:26734325

  4. Too Much French? Not Enough French?: The Vancouver Olympics and a Very Canadian Language Ideological Debate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vessey, Rachelle

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses a language ideological debate that took place in Canadian national newspapers following the opening ceremonies for the 2011 Vancouver Olympics. Reports on the insufficient use of French during the opening ceremonies sparked protest from politicians, official commentators, citizens and online newsreaders alike. Previous…

  5. How Much Do Multicultural Residents of Greater Vancouver Know about the Internet?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boshier, Roger; Kow, Janet Kushner; Huang, Yan

    2006-01-01

    Vancouver high school honors and university award lists are crowded with Asian names. But do these abilities in face-to-face settings extend to the Internet, which is the centerpiece of distributed learning? The purpose of this study was to measure the extent to which Internet knowledge varied as a function of age, sex, and language spoken at…

  6. Implications for Counselling Asian Transnational Youth: The Experiences of Taiwanese Youth in Vancouver

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Leah; Park-Saltzman, Jeeseon

    2010-01-01

    Using a phenomenological approach, this study sought to explore the long-term psychological impact of families' transnational separation on children through the lenses of Taiwanese youth in Vancouver. Over time, most participants found themselves in a position of an "ambivalent outsider," with an increased sense of uncertainty about their…

  7. Going Social at Vancouver Public Library: What the Virtual Branch Did Next

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahill, Kay

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to follow up on the 2009 publication "Building a virtual branch at Vancouver Public Library (VPL) using Web 2.0 tools" and to explore the work that VPL has been doing in the social media space over the past two years. Design/methodology/approach: Following the launch of its new web site in 2008, Vancouver…

  8. Educational Inclusion/Exclusion of Turkish Immigrant Youth in Vancouver, Canada: A Critical Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kayaalp, Dilek

    2014-01-01

    This empirical research analyses an understudied population, Turkish immigrant youths' educational experiences of inclusion/exclusion in Vancouver. My information was gathered from in-depth interviews and participant observation with the first- and second-generation, Muslim and non-religious female and male Turkish immigrant youth from

  9. Evaluation of Projects in Vancouver Schools Funded By the Local Initiatives Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leslie, Susan

    In the Spring of 1973, The Vancouver School Board operated three projects funded by the Local Initiatives Program (LIP) of the Department of Immigration and Manpower. The projects were: Physical Education Assistant Program; One-to-One Tutoring Program; and Teacher Aids for Learning Assistance Centres. To assess the projects, questionnaires were…

  10. Building a Virtual Branch at Vancouver Public Library Using Web 2.0 Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahill, Kay

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the work undertaken by Vancouver Public Library (VPL) in an effort to convert its website into a true virtual branch, both through the functionality of the website itself and by extending its web presence on to external social networking sites. Design/methodology/approach: VPL worked with its…

  11. The Contrasting Discourses in the Professional Lives of Educators in Vancouver, Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimmett, Peter P.; Dagenais, Diane; D'Amico, Laura; Jacquet, Marianne; Ilieva, Roumi

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between education policy changes and the working conditions of teachers and school leaders in Vancouver, Canada. We found that policy does shape educators' discourse about their work conditions. This shaping manifested itself in the emotions teachers experience as they attempt to construct their identity as…

  12. Engaging Language and Cultural Spaces: Latin American Parents' Reflections on Language Loss and Maintenance in Vancouver

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guardado, Martin

    2006-01-01

    This qualitative study aims to explore the loss and maintenance of Spanish in Latin American children in Vancouver from the perspective of parents. It focuses on the experiences of children either developing bilingually (Spanish-English) or monolingually (English). The participating families were from Colombia, Guatemala, and El Salvador, and had…

  13. Building a Virtual Branch at Vancouver Public Library Using Web 2.0 Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahill, Kay

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the work undertaken by Vancouver Public Library (VPL) in an effort to convert its website into a true virtual branch, both through the functionality of the website itself and by extending its web presence on to external social networking sites. Design/methodology/approach: VPL worked with its

  14. Embracing a New Understanding of the City: The Museum of Vancouver's Vision in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gosselin, Viviane

    2013-01-01

    The Museum of Vancouver recently undertook a major rethinking of its role in the city. New interplays are being proposed between emerging conceptions of urbanity and civic participation, and the museum's collection and function as facilitator and advocate. This short paper provides a brief overview of the museum's recent transformation, situates

  15. Embracing a New Understanding of the City: The Museum of Vancouver's Vision in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gosselin, Viviane

    2013-01-01

    The Museum of Vancouver recently undertook a major rethinking of its role in the city. New interplays are being proposed between emerging conceptions of urbanity and civic participation, and the museum's collection and function as facilitator and advocate. This short paper provides a brief overview of the museum's recent transformation, situates…

  16. The electrical conductivity distribution beneath Vancouver Island: A region of active plate subduction

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, R.D.; Gupta, J.C. ); DeLaurier, J.M. )

    1990-07-10

    Magnetotelluric (MT) and geomagnetic depth sounding (GDS) data were recorded at 25 locations across Vancouver Island, Canada, over the subducting Juan de Fuca plate. The GDS data respond to a number of local conductive features at frequencies above 10 Hz while at longer periods, the in-phase and quadrature induction arrows are colinear and are aligned approximately normal to the continental shelf with a maximum amplitude response near the southwest coast. Interpretation of the MT data show the presence of a conducting zone at depths greater than 20 km beneath Vancouver Island and correlating with a strong seismic reflector. Extensive testing with two dimensional models shows the MT and GDS data are consistent with a proposed geoelectrical structure containing a conducting layer extending from the Pacific Ocean, dipping beneath Vancouver Island, and in electrical contact with the mainland conductive region. The layer has a horizontal conductance of 200 S that may decrease to 100 S beneath the northeast side of Vancouver Island. Related geophysical studies suggest the conductive zone is above the actual thrust surface of the Juan de Fuca plate. The conducting layer is most likely the result of cracks and pores filled with saline fluids which are supplied by water subducted with the oceanic crust and by dehydration reactions. The presence of fluids has significant implications for thrust earthquakes and for metamorphic reactions that occur in subduction zones. The conductance of the upper mantle (between 90 and 390 km) is best modeled at approximately 1,500 S.

  17. Adventure Education and the Acculturation of First-Generation Chinese Canadians in Vancouver, Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lo, Simon; Gidlow, Bob; Cushman, Grant

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on research that demonstrates how parents in first-generation Chinese families in Vancouver, Canada, most of them from Hong Kong, control their children's involvement in local adventure education (AE) programs and in so doing minimize the likelihood of intergenerational culture conflict involving those children. The research…

  18. Immigrants as Active Citizens: Exploring the Volunteering Experience of Chinese Immigrants in Vancouver

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guo, Shibao

    2014-01-01

    Despite the fact that immigration has played an important role in transforming Canada into an ethno-culturally diverse and economically prosperous nation, immigrants themselves are often criticised as passive citizens. This study attempts to deconstruct this myth by investigating the volunteering experiences of Chinese immigrants in Vancouver. The

  19. Educational Inclusion/Exclusion of Turkish Immigrant Youth in Vancouver, Canada: A Critical Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kayaalp, Dilek

    2014-01-01

    This empirical research analyses an understudied population, Turkish immigrant youths' educational experiences of inclusion/exclusion in Vancouver. My information was gathered from in-depth interviews and participant observation with the first- and second-generation, Muslim and non-religious female and male Turkish immigrant youth from…

  20. Immigrants as Active Citizens: Exploring the Volunteering Experience of Chinese Immigrants in Vancouver

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guo, Shibao

    2014-01-01

    Despite the fact that immigration has played an important role in transforming Canada into an ethno-culturally diverse and economically prosperous nation, immigrants themselves are often criticised as passive citizens. This study attempts to deconstruct this myth by investigating the volunteering experiences of Chinese immigrants in Vancouver. The…

  1. An assessment of readiness for pre-implementation of electronic health record in Iran: a practical approach to implementation in general and teaching hospitals.

    PubMed

    Ghazisaeidi, Marjan; Ahmadi, Maryam; Sadoughi, Farahnaz; Safdari, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Readiness assessment provides a proper image of the existing conditions and an explanation of facilitated operational plans and functional approaches to successful implementation of electronic health record. Readiness assessment requires indices adjusted to particular conditions in each country. Therefore, the present study attempts to provide an acceptable model in Iran and to provide an assessment of public and teaching hospitals in medical education university. After reviewing related papers and descriptive study of five selected countries, the initial model was designed in the form of a questionnaire for analysis through Delphi and distributed among 30 experts nationwide. Along identification of components in the proposed method, a 7-point Likert scale was used to determine priority of each component. Then, all general -education hospitals at Tehran University of Medical Education were examined based on this model in terms of total, relative, or no readiness. The final model was designed in five dimensions: cultural, leadership and management, technical infrastructure, governance and operational dimensions; Educational Hospitals were evaluated in this dimension. 28.6 % of general--teaching hospitals are ready for pre-implementation. It seems to establish uniform strategic and executive team in Health center is essential for the preparation them in abovementioned area in the least possible time. PMID:25135263

  2. Racial Differences in Length of Stay for Patients Who Leave Against Medical Advice from U.S. General Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Tawk, Rima; Dutton, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    There is a paucity of published literature on the length of hospital stays (LOS) for patients who leave against medical advice (AMA) and on the factors that predict their LOS. The purpose of the study is to examine the relationship between race and the LOS for AMA patients after adjusting for patient and hospital characteristics. National Hospital Discharge Survey (NHDS) data were used to describe LOS for AMA patients aged 18 years or older. Patient characteristics included age, sex, race, marital status, insurance, and diagnosis (ICD-9-CM). Hospital characteristics consisted of ownership, region and bed size. LOS was the major outcome measure. Using data from all years 1988–2006, the expected time to AMA discharge was first examined as a function of race, then adjusting for year terms, patient and hospital characteristics, and major medical diagnoses and mental illness. The unadjusted effect of race on the expected time of leaving AMA was about twice the adjusted effect. After controlling for the other covariates, the expected time to AMA discharge is 20% shorter for Blacks than Whites. The most significant predictors included age, insurance coverage, mental illness, gender, and region. Factors identified in this study offer insights into directions for evidence based- health policy to reduce AMA discharges. PMID:26729149

  3. [Satisfaction survey in general hospital personnel involved in blood transfusion: implementation of the ISO 9001: 2000 standard].

    PubMed

    Chord-Auger, S; de Bouchony, E Tron; Moll, M-C; Boudart, D; Folléa, G

    2004-07-01

    As part of its policy of constant quality improvement, Etablissement Français du Sang (EFS) des Pays de la Loire (Pays de la Loire Regional blood transfusion institution) carried out a satisfaction survey among the hospital personnel involved in prescribing and using immuno-hematological tests and labile blood products. The polling tool selected by agreement between the hospital management and quality assurance department was a questionnaire that permitted item rating and free commentary. It addressed the personnel's perception of the quality of erythrocyte immuno-hematological (EIH) testing and of the products administered, as well as their perception of the quality of communications with the local EFS. The questionnaire was sent to 26 physicians and 32 senior nurses in 15 hospital departments. The reply rate was 60% and expressed a 85% overall satisfaction level. Dissatisfaction causes were more specifically analysed, the main one involving labile blood product distribution in emergency situations. A joint undertaking by the EFS and the hospital led to the implementation of corrective measures, including the writing and implementation of a common standard operating procedure for emergency transfusion management. The results obtained demonstrated the feasibility of this type of survey and the interest, to a blood transfusion centre and the hospital personnel involved in transfusion, of assessing their very own perception of service quality. PMID:15488729

  4. Nutritional Practices and Taboos Among Pregnant Women Attending Antenatal Care at General Hospital in Kano, Northwest Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ugwa, EA

    2016-01-01

    Background: Food taboos among rural women have been identified as one of the factors contributing to maternal undernutrition in pregnancy. Aim: The aim of this study was to explore some of the taboos and nutritional practices among pregnant women attending antenatal care at a General Hospital in Dawakin Kudu LGA, Kano, Nigeria. Subjects and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study involving 220 pregnant women. Interviewer-administered structured questionnaire was used to interview the respondents, which showed various sociodemographic information, cultural nutritional processes, taboos of the community, and a 24 h food recall. The ages, parities, and gestational ages of the women were collated. Descriptive statistics was used. Data were analyzed using SPSS statistical software Version 17.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Association between sociodemographic factors and nutritional practices and taboos was determined using Chi-square test and P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: At the end of the study, 200 participants (91%) gave complete information. Most of the women, 70% (140/200) were in the 20–39 years age range with mean (standard deviation [SD]) age of 23.7 (6.1) years, mostly uneducated, 70% (140/200), and unemployed, 51% (102/200). Most of the women did a child spacing of 12–24 months, 62% (124/200) with mean (SD) child spacing interval of 26.32 (10.19) months. Gestational age at booking was mostly 13–26 weeks, 48% (96/200) with an average of 26.60 (8.01). Most of the women had 1–4 children, 54.5% (109/200) with mean (SD) of 2.47 (2.50). Most of the women agreed that they had adequate intake of oil, 86% (172/200), meat/fish, 92% (194/200), fruit/vegetables 56% (112/200), and had 3 meals/day 80% (152/200), and did not practice pica 83% (166/200). All of the women, 100% (200/200) believe that women should eat more during pregnancy in order to have healthy babies. They were mostly supported by their husbands, 53% (106/200) and less likely by the community, 34% (17/200). The nutritional practices and taboos of the women showed a statistically significant association with age, parity, and support received from husband and community (P < 0.05). Educational status is not associated with their nutritional practices and taboos. Conclusion: Although sociocultural indices of the respondents were poor, their intake of good nutrition and abstinence from nutrition taboos were satisfactory. Further studies are intended to objectively study the nutritional practices/taboos in pregnancy. PMID:27213094

  5. Winter distribution, movements, and annual survival of radiomarked Vancouver Canada geese in Southeast Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hupp, J.W.; Hodges, J.I., Jr.; Conant, B.P.; Meixell, B.W.; Groves, D.J.

    2010-01-01

    Management of Pacific Flyway Canada geese (Branta canadensis) requires information on winter distribution of different populations. Recoveries of tarsus bands from Vancouver Canada geese (B. canadensis fulva) marked in southeast Alaska, USA, ???4 decades ago suggested that ???83% of the population was non-migratory and that annual adult survival was high (?? = 0.836). However, recovery distribution of tarsus bands was potentially biased due to geographic differences in harvest intensity in the Pacific Flyway. Also, winter distribution of Vancouver Canada geese could have shifted since the 1960s, as has occurred for some other populations of Canada geese. Because winter distribution and annual survival of this population had not recently been evaluated, we surgically implanted very high frequency radiotransmitters in 166 adult female Canada geese in southeast Alaska. We captured Vancouver Canada geese during molt at 2 sites where adults with goslings were present (breeding areas) and 2 sites where we observed nonbreeding birds only. During winter radiotracking flights in southeast Alaska, we detected 98% of 85 females marked at breeding areas and 83% of 70 females marked at nonbreeding sites, excluding 11 females that died prior to the onset of winter radiotracking. We detected no radiomarked females in coastal British Columbia, or western Washington and Oregon, USA. Most (70%) females moved ???30 km between November and March. Our model-averaged estimate of annual survival (?? = 0.844, SE = 0.050) was similar to the estimate of annual survival of geese marked from 1956 to 1960. Likely <2% of Vancouver Canada geese that nest in southeast Alaska migrate to winter areas in Oregon or Washington where they could intermix with Canada geese from other populations in the Pacific Flyway. Because annual survival of adult Vancouver Canada geese was high and showed evidence of long-term consistency, managers should examine how reproductive success and recruitment may affect the population. ?? The Wildlife Society.

  6. Transgenic oilseed rape along transportation routes and port of Vancouver in western Canada.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Yasuyuki; Beckie, Hugh J; Matsuo, Kazuhito

    2006-01-01

    The occurrence of transgenic herbicide-resistant oilseed rape (Brassica napus) in ruderal (non-crop disturbed) areas has not been investigated previously in Canada. The primary objective of this study was to document their occurrence in two main ruderal areas (along railways and roads) in the province of Saskatchewan, where half of all oilseed rape is grown, and at the port of Vancouver, British Columbia on the west coast of Canada, where most oilseed rape destined for export is transported by rail. During the 2005 growing season, leaf samples of oilseed rape plants were collected at randomly-selected sites along railways and roads across Saskatchewan ecoregions and at Vancouver; infestation area, density, and plant height of oilseed rape were measured at each site. The presence of the glyphosate and glufosinate resistance traits was determined using test strips. The infestation area of oilseed rape, averaged across 155 sampled sites in the Saskatchewan survey, was markedly smaller in populations along railways than roads; in contrast, infestation area averaged across 54 sites in the Vancouver survey was greater for populations along railways than roads. In both surveys, mean plant density was greater for populations found along railways than roads. Two-thirds of oilseed rape plants sampled across Saskatchewan ecoregions and at Vancouver were transgenic, although the relative proportion of plants with the glyphosate or glufosinate resistance trait varied between surveys. Frequency of occurrence of transgenic plants in ruderal areas was similar to the proportion of the oilseed rape area planted with transgenic cultivars in the recent preceding years. A single transgenic B. rapa x B. napus hybrid was found along a road in Vancouver, confirming the relatively high probability of hybridization between these two Brassica species. With current control measures, transgenic oilseed rape populations may persist and spread in these ruderal areas. PMID:17328853

  7. Winter distribution, movements, and annual survival of radiomarked Vancouver Canada geese in southeast Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hupp, Jerry W.; Hodges, John I., Jr.; Conant, Bruce P.; Meixell, Brandt W.; Groves, Debbie J.

    2010-01-01

    Management of Pacific Flyway Canada geese (Branta canadensis) requires information on winter distribution of different populations. Recoveries of tarsus bands from Vancouver Canada geese (B. canadensis fulva) marked in southeast Alaska, USA, ≥4 decades ago suggested that ≥83% of the population was non-migratory and that annual adult survival was high (Ŝ = 0.836). However, recovery distribution of tarsus bands was potentially biased due to geographic differences in harvest intensity in the Pacific Flyway. Also, winter distribution of Vancouver Canada geese could have shifted since the 1960s, as has occurred for some other populations of Canada geese. Because winter distribution and annual survival of this population had not recently been evaluated, we surgically implanted very high frequency radiotransmitters in 166 adult female Canada geese in southeast Alaska. We captured Vancouver Canada geese during molt at 2 sites where adults with goslings were present (breeding areas) and 2 sites where we observed nonbreeding birds only. During winter radiotracking flights in southeast Alaska, we detected 98% of 85 females marked at breeding areas and 83% of 70 females marked at nonbreeding sites, excluding 11 females that died prior to the onset of winter radiotracking. We detected no radiomarked females in coastal British Columbia, or western Washington and Oregon, USA. Most (70%) females moved ≤30 km between November and March. Our model-averaged estimate of annual survival (Ŝ = 0.844, SE = 0.050) was similar to the estimate of annual survival of geese marked from 1956 to 1960. Likely <2% of Vancouver Canada geese that nest in southeast Alaska migrate to winter areas in Oregon or Washington where they could intermix with Canada geese from other populations in the Pacific Flyway. Because annual survival of adult Vancouver Canada geese was high and showed evidence of long-term consistency, managers should examine how reproductive success and recruitment may affect the population.

  8. [Human hydatidosis: general aspects and epidemiological situation in Chile according to hospital discharge and mandatory reporting from 2001 to 2005].

    PubMed

    Cortés, Sandra; Valle, Carla

    2010-08-01

    Human hydatidosis in Chile is described using as a source of information the Disease Notification Systems and hospital discharges between 2001 and 2005. To assess the extent of human infection we calculated incidence rates and hospital discharges during this period by geographical region. Incidence rate for the period was 2.2 per 100,000 inhabitants with higher rates in the regions of Coquimbo, La Araucania and Magallanes. The hospital discharge rate for the period was 6 per 100.000 inhabitants, being the most affected regions: La Araucania, Aysén and Magallanes. 58.8% of cases reported are from Echinococcus granulosus, while 43.6% were registered as unspecified echinococcosis. The notification system provides a real estimate of the magnitude of this disease, reporting cases with diagnostic confirmation. The rates obtained from the discharge system overestimate the magnitude of this disease. The improvement of the notification system and seroprevalence studies are recommended. PMID:21046718

  9. Starting a General Surgery Program at a Small Rural Critical Access Hospital: A Case Study from Southeastern Oregon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doty, Brit Cruse; Heneghan, Steven; Zuckerman, Randall

    2007-01-01

    Context: Surgical services are frequently unavailable in rural American communities. Therefore, rural residents often must travel long distances to receive surgical care. Rural hospitals commonly have difficulty providing surgical services despite potential economic benefits. Purpose: The purpose of this project was to identify the key challenges

  10. Starting a General Surgery Program at a Small Rural Critical Access Hospital: A Case Study from Southeastern Oregon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doty, Brit Cruse; Heneghan, Steven; Zuckerman, Randall

    2007-01-01

    Context: Surgical services are frequently unavailable in rural American communities. Therefore, rural residents often must travel long distances to receive surgical care. Rural hospitals commonly have difficulty providing surgical services despite potential economic benefits. Purpose: The purpose of this project was to identify the key challenges…

  11. Investigation of the Distributions and Types of Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in Different Departments in a General Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Yaner; Dong, Xuejun; Wang, Zongxin; Yang, Guocan; Liu, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acinetobacter baumannii is the most prevalent strain in hospitals and different clinical departments. Objectives: The current study aimed to investigate the genetic characteristics and resistance mechanisms of A. baumannii isolated from clinical samples in Shaoxing people’s hospital affiliated to Zhejiang University, Shaoxing, China. Patients and Methods: Acinetobacter baumannii strains were isolated from blood, phlegm and skin of the patients hospitalized in different departments as respiratory medicine, plastic surgery and intensive care unit (ICU). Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) was used to characterize the isolates. Kirby-Bauer test was used to evaluate antibiotic resistance of the bacteria. The expression of resistance inducing genes was detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The results were analyzed and compared. Results: Two bacterial types, ST208, and ST218, were identified in all 140 samples. The ST208 mainly came from ICU and department of respiratory medicine, while ST218 from department of plastic surgery; 70.21% of ST208 and 84.78% of ST218 were carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (CRAB) and carbapenem-susceptible Acinetobacter baumannii (CSAB), respectively. Multidrug-resistance genes in CRAB isolated from the hospital mainly included, oxa-23, oxa-5, intl 1 and qaceΔ1-sul 1. Besides, the highest and lowest antibiotic resistance was observed in the strains isolated from blood samples and wounds, respectively. Conclusions: The distribution of AB varies in different clinical departments and samples. In the hospital under study, the main types of AB were ST208 and ST218. The genes which affect the ability of antibiotic-resistance were oxa-23, oxa-51, intl 1 and qaceΔ1-sul 1. PMID:26487921

  12. [Access, use and preferences of Information and Communication Technologies by physicians in a general hospital in Peru].

    PubMed

    Vásquez-Silva, Luis; Ticse, Ray; Alfaro-Carballido, Luz; Guerra-Castañon, Felix

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the access, use and preferences of information and communication technology (ICT) by physicians who practice at Cayetano Heredia National Hospital. The questionnaire explored the availability and skills of ICT, time, educational activities, search engines and technological applications most used as well as ICT preferences in education.211 physicians were surveyed; laptop use was 93%, tablet and smartphone use was 66% and 88%.68% have mobile Internet. Differences were evident in the frequency of use of ICT in 25-34 year old age group as well as a higher level of skills (p<0.05). 86% use PubMed, Facebook and WhatsApp as a means of exchanging images and data related to health, 50% participated in medical blogs, online courses or videoconferences. The use and access of ICT is common among doctors in this hospital and there is positive interest in its use in education. PMID:26338389

  13. Where should obstetric vesico-vaginal fistulas be repaired: at the district general hospital or a specialized fistula center?

    PubMed

    Wall, L L

    2007-11-01

    Expanded surgical capacities are required to treat obstetric fistulas. Achieving a balance between relative ease of access to services and use of the appropriate clinical setting is difficult. This article asks, "Are obstetric fistulas best repaired locally, at the district hospital where more women would have greater access, or is it necessary to provide these services at a tertiary referral or fistula center, where specialized surgical procedures can be conducted? Each possibility has advantages and disadvantages. The author concludes that 3 critical factors are necessary to provide safe and effective fistula repair services: adequate, long-term funding to cover the costs of all aspects of the care; the presence of a surgeon who is a "fistula champion"; and adequate operating theatre time and supplies. Without external funding, these prerequisites are almost impossible to meet at rural district hospitals. PMID:17727855

  14. Utilization of the Emergency Department and Predicting Factors Associated With Its Use at the Saudi Ministry of Health General Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Dawoud, Sundus O; Ahmad, Alaeddin Mohammad K; Alsharqi, Omar Z; Al-Raddadi, Rajaa M

    2016-01-01

    Overuse of emergency rooms (ER) is a public health problem. To investigate this issue, a cross-sectional survey was conducted at the ERs of King Abdul-Aziz Hospital, King Fahd Hospital, and Al-Thaghor Hospital in November 2013 with the aims of estimating emergency service utilization for non-urgent cases, identifying the predictors of ER utilization for non-urgent cases, and measuring patients' knowledge of primary healthcare centers (PHCCs). Patients were interviewed using a structured questionnaire and the data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences. We recruited 300 patients; males comprised 50.7% of the sample. A higher proportion of patients with non-urgent cases visited the ER three to four times a year (P=0.001). A higher proportion of patients without emergencies had not attempted to visit an outpatient clinic before the ER (P=0.003). Most patients without emergencies thought the ER was the first place to consult in case of illness. Most patients who visited the ER were single, <15 years, and had lower incomes. Patients requested ER services for primary care-treatable conditions because of limited services and resources as well as limited working hours at PHCCs. Most patients (90.0%) were knowledgeable about PHCCs, with those of lower education being more knowledgeable. Patients reported long ER waiting times (≥3 hours), no organization (85.9%), and lack of medical staff. Overall, overuse of ER services is high at the Ministry of Health hospitals in Jeddah. The risk factors for ER overuse are age<15 years, singlehood, and low incomes. Policy makers and health providers have a challenging task to control ER overuse. We recommend developing strategies to implement policies aimed at reducing non-urgent ER use as well as making healthcare services more available to the population. PMID:26234993

  15. Utilization of the Emergency Department and Predicting Factors Associated With Its Use at the Saudi Ministry of Health General Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Dawoud, Sundus O.; Ahmad, Alaeddin Mohammad K.; Alsharqi, Omar Z.; Al-Raddadi, Rajaa M.

    2016-01-01

    Overuse of emergency rooms (ER) is a public health problem. To investigate this issue, a cross-sectional survey was conducted at the ERs of King Abdul-Aziz Hospital, King Fahd Hospital, and Al-Thaghor Hospital in November 2013 with the aims of estimating emergency service utilization for non-urgent cases, identifying the predictors of ER utilization for non-urgent cases, and measuring patients’ knowledge of primary healthcare centers (PHCCs). Patients were interviewed using a structured questionnaire and the data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences. We recruited 300 patients; males comprised 50.7% of the sample. A higher proportion of patients with non-urgent cases visited the ER three to four times a year (P=0.001). A higher proportion of patients without emergencies had not attempted to visit an outpatient clinic before the ER (P=0.003). Most patients without emergencies thought the ER was the first place to consult in case of illness. Most patients who visited the ER were single, < 15 years, and had lower incomes. Patients requested ER services for primary care-treatable conditions because of limited services and resources as well as limited working hours at PHCCs. Most patients (90.0%) were knowledgeable about PHCCs, with those of lower education being more knowledgeable. Patients reported long ER waiting times (≥ 3 hours), no organization (85.9%), and lack of medical staff. Overall, overuse of ER services is high at the Ministry of Health hospitals in Jeddah. The risk factors for ER overuse are age < 15 years, singlehood, and low incomes. Policy makers and health providers have a challenging task to control ER overuse. We recommend developing strategies to implement policies aimed at reducing non-urgent ER use as well as making healthcare services more available to the population. PMID:26234993

  16. Perspectives on the provision of GDM screening in general practice versus the hospital setting: a qualitative study of providers and patients

    PubMed Central

    Tierney, Marie; O'Dea, Angela; Danyliv, Andrii; Carmody, Louise; McGuire, Brian E; Glynn, Liam G; Dunne, Fidelma

    2016-01-01

    Objective A novel gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) screening programme which involved offering screening at the patient's general practitioner (GP) compared with the traditional hospital setting was trialled. This study investigates perspectives of involved stakeholders on the provision of GDM screening at both settings. Design Thematic analysis of the perspectives of stakeholders involved in the receiving and provision of GDM screening in both the GP and hospital settings drawn from focus groups and interviews. Participants 3 groups of participants are included in this research—patient participants, GP screening providers and hospital screening providers. All were recruited from a larger sample who participated in a randomised controlled screening trial. Purposeful sampling was utilised to select participants with a wide variety of perspectives on the provision of GDM screening. Setting Participants were recruited from a geographical area covered by 3 hospitals in Ireland. Results 4 themes emerged from thematic analysis—namely (1) travel distance, (2) best care provision, (3) sense of ease created and (4) optimal screening. Conclusions The influence of travel distance from the screening site is the most important factor influencing willingness to attend for GDM screening among women who live a considerable distance from the hospital setting. For patients who live equidistance from both settings, other factors are important; namely the waiting facilities including parking, perceived expertise of screening provider personnel, access to emergency treatment if necessary, accuracy of tests and access to timely results and treatment. Optimal screening for GDM should be specialist led, incorporate expert advice of GDM screening, treatment and management, should be provided locally, offer adequate parking and comfort levels, provide accurate tests, and timely access to results and treatment. Such a service should result in improved rates of GDM screening uptake. Trial registration number ISRCTN41202110. PMID:26888724

  17. An Elder-Friendly Hospital: translating a dream into reality.

    PubMed

    Parke, Belinda; Brand, Penny

    2004-03-01

    The complex health profile of an older adult entering a hospital presents staff and administrators with a new challenge. This paper documents the Vancouver Island Health Authority's (VIHA) move towards an Elder-Friendly Hospital (EFH). A new approach to hospital care is described, one that takes account not only of an acute healthcare crisis, but also the developmental phenomena associated with aging, with the likelihood of chronic illnesses compounding both diagnosis and treatment. Customized strategies and suggestions for implementation that may be useful to other healthcare agencies are explained. PMID:15503917

  18. Risk, citizenship, and public discourse: coeval dialogues on war and health in Vancouver's Downtown Eastside.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Leslie A

    2006-01-01

    This article is about September 11, 2001, and its narrated effects on the lives of nine street-involved women in Vancouver's Downtown Eastside. I outline the locations from which they spoke about war and health: as consumers and economic agents whose bodies are linked to transnational economic processes; as residents in a local community of shared knowledge and practices; and as marginalized citizens of a nation-state. I hope to emphasize the value of engaging research subjects in coeval dialogues that work against essentializing, state-sanctioned discourses narrated in the context of armed conflict and a public health crisis. To women drug users in Vancouver's Downtown Eastside, the "War against Terror" evokes particular sites of knowledge: the body, the local community, and transnational processes. Their repertoires of war stimulate questions about citizenship and perceptions of risk, challenging dominating medical and political discourses that tend to temporally and spatially localize their engagement with the world. PMID:17101508

  19. Alcohol and Drug Use Among Vancouver Secondary School Students: 1970, 1974 and 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollander, Marcus J.; Macurdy, E. Ann

    In 1970, 1974 and 1978 similar surveys of alcohol and drug use were conducted using 10% random samples of Vancouver secondary school students (grades 8-12). The reported use of alcohol increased from 61% in 1970 to 71% in 1974 and 78% in 1978, while the use of cannabis increased from 39% in 1970 to 42% in 1974 and 47% in 1978. The use of tobacco,…

  20. Methodological issues of an epidemiological study: from the results of a study on psychological problems seen in outpatients visiting the internal medicine departments of general hospitals.

    PubMed

    Utsunomiya, H; Yoshitake, K; Otsuka, T; Sugasakl, H; Sata, M; Hatada, K; Nakane, Y

    1999-02-01

    The frequency and type of psychological problems of outpatients in general healthcare settings, the recognition and management of those problems by physicians, and the course of the problems were investigated using a two-stage sampling design method. The subjects were outpatients visiting the department of internal medicine of two general hospitals in Nagasaki prefecture. For the first-stage investigation, the General Health Questionnaire 12-item version (GHQ-12) was used. A second-stage investigation was then conducted, which used many instruments containing the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) and Groningen Social Disability Scale (GSDS). As a result, 1555 patients participated in the first-stage, 483 were selected and 336 (69.5%) participated in the second-stage investigation. No significant differences were seen in age or sex between the GHQ score groups among the 1555 subjects of the core sample. The background factors of the two hospital samples differed significantly in the distribution of age, sex and physical diseases. There were some differences in the participation between men and women in age and GHQ score. It was then suggested that variances should be considered in such an epidemiological study. PMID:10201280

  1. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SELF-REPORTED HEALTH STATUS AND SPIRITUALITY AMONG ADULT PATIENTS ATTENDING GENERAL OUTPATIENT CLINIC OF TERTIARY HOSPITAL IN IBADAN

    PubMed Central

    Ibraheem, A.B.; Ibraheem, W.A.; Adebusoye, L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Spirituality is an important aspect of health that is not always addressed in modern day medical practice. This is related to lack of clarity about the nature of the concept, however its role in researches and health service provision is being revisited because of the evergreen importance. Objective: To determine the relationship between spirituality and selfreported health status of adult patients attending general outpatient clinic of University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria. Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study wherein interviewer administered questionnaire was applied on randomly selected 422 eligible and consenting adult patients attending general outpatient clinic of University College Hospital between 1st November, 2010 and 31st January, 2011. Their Spirituality and Heath status were assessed using spirituality scale and self reported health questionnaire respectively. Result: Of all the respondents, 270(64.0%) were females while 152(36.0%) were males with a ratio of 1.8:1, and mean age of 42.8±15.9. The overall mean spirituality score was 125.7 ± 12.1, the maximum obtainable score was 138. A total of 63(15.0%) respondents rated their health as excellent, 114 (27.0%) rated theirs as very good while 150 (35.5%) respondents considered theirs as good. Respondents who rated their health as good had significantly higher mean scores when compared with those who rated theirs as poor or fair (mean difference = 3.347, 95% C I = 0.552 to -6.142 p=0.019) Conclusion: The study revealed that perceived spiritual wellbeing is positively related to the patient's sense of general wellbeing. Therefore, there is need to give attention to patient's spiritual wellbeing during medical encounter in the hospital. PMID:25332698

  2. Frequent Prescription of Antibiotics and High Burden of Antibiotic Resistance among Deceased Patients in General Medical Wards of Acute Care Hospitals in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Yee Gyung; Moon, Chisook; Kim, Eu Suk; Kim, Baek-Nam

    2016-01-01

    Background Antibiotics are often administered to terminally ill patients until death, and antibiotic use contributes to the emergence of multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs). We investigated antibiotic use and the isolation of MDROs among patients who died in general medical wards. Methods All adult patients who died in the general internal medicine wards at four acute care hospitals between January and June 2013 were enrolled. For comparison with these deceased patients, the same number of surviving, discharged patients was selected from the same divisions of internal medicine subspecialties during the same period. Results During the study period, 303 deceased patients were enrolled; among them, 265 (87.5%) had do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders in their medical records. Antibiotic use was more common in patients who died than in those who survived (87.5% vs. 65.7%, P<0.001). Among deceased patients with DNR orders, antibiotic use was continued in 59.6% of patients after obtaining their DNR orders. Deceased patients received more antibiotic therapy courses (two [interquartile range (IQR) 1–3] vs. one [IQR 0–2], P<0.001). Antibiotics were used for longer durations in deceased patients than in surviving patients (13 [IQR 5–23] vs. seven days [IQR 0–18], P<0.001). MDROs were also more common in deceased patients than in surviving patients (25.7% vs. 10.6%, P<0.001). Conclusions Patients who died in the general medical wards of acute care hospitals were exposed to more antibiotics than patients who survived. In particular, antibiotic prescription was common even after obtaining DNR orders in patients who died. The isolation of MDROs during the hospital stay was more common in these patients who died. Strategies for judicious antibiotic use and appropriate infection control should be applied to these patient populations. PMID:26761461

  3. A Novel early pregnancy assessment unit/Gynaecology assessment unit dashboard: An experience from a UK district general hospital.

    PubMed

    Wahba, K; Shah, A; Hill, K; Hosni, M M

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of early pregnancy assessment units (EPAUs)/Gynaecology assessment units (GAUs) started more than 20 years ago in the UK to decrease hospital admissions of patients with early pregnancy problems. However, there are still wide variations in the quality of services provided by these units. The objective of this study was to create a method that can be used for continuous assessment of these units on a regular basis. We designed a dashboard covering all aspects of EPAU/GAU activities depending upon the early pregnancy unit association guidelines, and the department of health data and statistics. The EPAU/GAU dashboard has been used successfully in the early assessment pregnancy unit of Yeovil District hospital for few years and is still implemented until now. It is an excellent tool for continuous audit. It is a simple method that should be adopted by different EPAUs/GAUs for their objective assessment in order to improve the services provided by these units. PMID:25543529

  4. Risk of Post-Discharge Venous Thromboembolism and Associated Mortality in General Surgery: A Population-Based Cohort Study Using Linked Hospital and Primary Care Data in England

    PubMed Central

    Bouras, George; Burns, Elaine Marie; Howell, Ann-Marie; Bottle, Alex; Athanasiou, Thanos; Darzi, Ara

    2015-01-01

    Background Trends towards day case surgery and enhanced recovery mean that postoperative venous thromboembolism (VTE) may increasingly arise after hospital discharge. However, hospital data alone are unable to capture adverse events that occur outside of the hospital setting. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence has suggested the use of primary care data to quantify hospital care-related VTE. Data in surgical patients using these resources is lacking. The aim of this study was to measure VTE risk and associated mortality in general surgery using linked primary care and hospital databases, to improve our understanding of harm from VTE that arises beyond hospital stay. Methods This was a longitudinal cohort study using nationally linked primary care (Clinical Practice Research Datalink, CPRD), hospital administrative (Hospital Episodes Statistics, HES), population statistics (Office of National Statistics, ONS) and National Cancer Intelligence Network databases. Routinely collected information was used to quantify 90-day in-hospital VTE, 90-day post-discharge VTE and 90-day mortality in adults undergoing one of twelve general surgical procedures between 1st April 1997 and 31st March 2012. The earliest postoperative recording of deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism in CPRD, HES and ONS was counted in each patient. Covariates from multiple datasets were combined to derive detailed prediction models for VTE and mortality. Limitation included the capture of VTE presenting to healthcare only and the lack of information on adherence to pharmacological thromboprophylaxis as there was no data linkage to hospital pharmacy records. Results There were 981 VTE events captured within 90 days of surgery in 168005 procedures (23.7/1000 patient-years). Overall, primary care data increased the detection of postoperative VTE by a factor of 1.38 (981/710) when compared with using HES and ONS only. Total VTE rates ranged between 3.2/1000 patient-years in haemorrhoidectomy to 118.3/1000 patient-years in esophagogastric resection. Predictors of VTE included emergency surgery (OR = 1.91 95%CI 1.60–2.28, p<0.001), age (OR = 1.02 95%CI 1.02–1.03, p<0.001), body mass index (OR = 1.03 95%CI 1.01–1.04, p<0.001), previous VTE (OR = 8.07 95%CI 6.61–9.83, p<0.001), length of stay (OR = 1.00 95%CI 1.00–1.00, p = 0.007) and cancer stages II (OR = 1.38 95%CI 1.03–1.87, p = 0.033), III (OR = 1.50 95%CI 1.11–2.01, p = 0.008) and IV (OR = 1.63 95%CI 1.03–2.59, p = 0.038). Major organ resections had the greatest odds of VTE when adjusted for other risk factors including length of hospital stay. Post-discharge VTE accounted for 64.8% (636/981) of all recorded VTE. In-hospital VTE (165.4/1000 patient-years) was recorded more frequently than post-discharge VTE (16.2/1000 patient-years). Both in-hospital (OR = 2.07 95%CI 1.51–2.85, p<0.001) and post-discharge (OR = 4.03 95%CI 2.95–5.51, p<0.001) VTE independently predicted 90-day mortality. In patients who died and VTE was recorded on HES or CPRD (n = 56), VTE was one of the causes of death in 37.5% (21/56) of cases. Conclusions A large proportion of postoperative VTE was detected in primary care. Evaluation of linked databases was a useful way of measuring postoperative VTE at population level. These resources identified a significant association between post-discharge VTE and mortality in general surgery. PMID:26713434

  5. Automated red blood cell exchange as an adjunctive treatment for severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria at the Vienna General Hospital in Austria: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Severe falciparum malaria is associated with considerable rates of mortality, despite the administration of appropriate anti-malarial treatment. Since overall survival is associated with total parasite biomass, blood exchange transfusion has been proposed as a potential method to rapidly reduce peripheral parasitaemia. However, current evidence suggests that this treatment modality may not improve outcome. Automated red blood cell exchange (also referred to as “erythrocytapheresis”) has been advocated as an alternative method to rapidly remove parasites from circulating blood without affecting patients’ volume and electrolyte status. However, only limited evidence from case reports and case series is available for this adjunctive treatment. This retrospective cohort study describes the use of automated red blood cell exchange for the treatment of severe malaria at the Medical University of Vienna. Methods Epidemiologic data for imported malaria cases in Austria are reported and data of patients treated for malaria at the General Hospital/Medical University of Vienna were extracted from electronic hospital records. Results Between 2000 and 2010, 146 patients were hospitalized at the Medical University of Vienna due to malaria and 16 of those were classified as severe malaria cases. Eleven patients of this cohort were potentially eligible for an adjunctive treatment with automated red blood cell exchange. Five patients eventually underwent this procedure within a period of seven hours (range: 3–19 hours) after hospital admission. Six patients did not undergo this adjunctive treatment following the decision of the treating physician. The procedure was well tolerated in all cases and rapid reduction in parasite counts was achieved without occurrence of haemodynamic complications. One patient died within seven days, whereas four patients survived without any sequelae. Discussion and conclusion Automated red blood cell exchange was a safe and efficient procedure to rapidly clear peripheral parasitaemia. Whether the fast reduction in parasite biomass may ultimately improve patient survival remains however unclear. Randomized controlled trials are needed to conclusively appreciate the value of this adjunctive treatment. PMID:22564543

  6. Universal Coverage without Universal Access: Institutional Barriers to Health Care among Women Sex Workers in Vancouver, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Socías, M. Eugenia; Shoveller, Jean; Bean, Chili; Nguyen, Paul; Montaner, Julio; Shannon, Kate

    2016-01-01

    Background Access to health care is a crucial determinant of health. Yet, even within settings that purport to provide universal health coverage (UHC), sex workers’ experiences reveal systematic, institutionally ingrained barriers to appropriate quality health care. The aim of this study was to assess prevalence and correlates of institutional barriers to care among sex workers in a setting with UHC. Methods Data was drawn from an ongoing community-based, prospective cohort of women sex workers in Vancouver, Canada (An Evaluation of Sex Workers’ Health Access). Multivariable logistic regression analyses, using generalized estimating equations (GEE), were employed to longitudinally investigate correlates of institutional barriers to care over a 44-month follow-up period (January 2010-August 2013). Results In total, 723 sex workers were included, contributing to 2506 observations. Over the study period, 509 (70.4%) women reported one or more institutional barriers to care. The most commonly reported institutional barriers to care were long wait times (54.6%), limited hours of operation (36.5%), and perceived disrespect by health care providers (26.1%). In multivariable GEE analyses, recent partner- (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.46, % 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 1.10–1.94), workplace- (AOR = 1.31, 95% CI 1.05–1.63), and community-level violence (AOR = 1.41, 95% CI 1.04–1.92), as well as other markers of vulnerability, such as self-identification as a gender/sexual minority (AOR = 1.32, 95% CI 1.03–1.69), a mental illness diagnosis (AOR = 1.66, 95% CI 1.34–2.06), and lack of provincial health insurance card (AOR = 3.47, 95% CI 1.59–7.57) emerged as independent correlates of institutional barriers to health services. Discussion Despite Canada’s UHC, women sex workers in Vancouver face high prevalence of institutional barriers to care, with highest burden among most marginalized women. These findings underscore the need to explore new models of care, alongside broader policy changes to fulfill sex workers’ health and human rights. PMID:27182736

  7. Structural Barriers to Antiretroviral Therapy Among Sex Workers Living with HIV: Findings of a Longitudinal Study in Vancouver, Canada.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, Shira M; Montaner, Julio; Duff, Putu; Nguyen, Paul; Dobrer, Sabina; Guillemi, Silvia; Shannon, Kate

    2016-05-01

    In light of limited data on structural determinants of access and retention in antiretroviral therapy (ART) among sex workers, we examined structural correlates of ART use among sex workers living with HIV over time. Longitudinal data were drawn from a cohort of 646 female sex workers in Vancouver, Canada (2010-2012) and linked pharmacy records on ART dispensation. We used logistic regression with generalized estimating equations (GEE) to examine correlates of gaps in ART use (i.e., treatment interruptions or delayed ART initiation), among HIV seropositive participants (n = 74). Over a 2.5-year period, 37.8 % of participants experienced gaps in ART use (i.e., no ART dispensed in a 6-month period). In a multivariable GEE model, younger age, migration/mobility, incarceration, and non-injection drug use independently correlated with gaps in ART use. In spite of successes scaling-up ART in British Columbia, younger, mobile, or incarcerated sex workers face persistent gaps in access and retention irrespective of drug use. Community-based, tailored interventions to scale-up entry and retention in ART for sex workers should be further explored in this setting. PMID:26148850

  8. Rheumatology at the general practitioner/hospital interface: a study of prevalence and access to specialist care.

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, F M; Barber, J H; Sturrock, R D

    1990-01-01

    Four general practices with a combined population of 23,300 in the west of Scotland participated in a record research and questionnaire assessment of 551 patients with rheumatic diseases. The study describes the prevalence, levels of disability found, and the types of service used. Even with this number of patients it was not possible to detect any significant differences in disability levels, use of second line drugs, or aids/appliances when comparing practices with adequate or inadequate access to rheumatological facilities (general practitioner perception). General practice is an appropriate setting in which to investigate the effect of service provision, but larger studies will be needed to reach more definite conclusions. PMID:2270971

  9. The Epidemiology of Pulmonary Nontuberculous Mycobacteria: Data from a General Hospital in Athens, Greece, 2007–2013

    PubMed Central

    Papaioannou, Andriana I.; Paraskeua, Maria; Velentza, Ekaterini; Kanellopoulou, Maria; Filaditaki, Vasiliki; Karagiannidis, Napoleon

    2014-01-01

    Background. The epidemiology of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) in Greece is largely unknown. Objectives. To determine the incidence and the demographic, microbiological, and clinical characteristics of patients with pulmonary NTM infection and pulmonary NTM disease. Methods. A retrospective review of the demographic, microbiological, and clinical characteristics of patients with NTM culture-positive respiratory specimens from January 2007 to May 2013. Results. A total of 120 patients were identified with at least one respiratory NTM isolate and 56 patients (46%) fulfilled the microbiological ATS/IDSA criteria for NTM disease. Of patients with adequate data, 16% fulfilled the complete ATS/IDSA criteria for NTM disease. The incidence of pulmonary NTM infection and disease was 18.9 and 8.8 per 100.000 inpatients and outpatients, respectively. The spectrum of NTM species was high (13 species) and predominated by M. avium-intracellulare complex (M. avium (13%), M. intracellulare (10%)), M. gordonae (14%), and M. fortuitum (12%). The ratio of isolation of NTM to M. tuberculosis in all hospitalized patients was 0.59. Conclusions. The first data on the epidemiology of pulmonary NTM in Athens, Greece, are presented. NTM infection is common in patients with chronic respiratory disease. However, only a significantly smaller proportion of patients fulfill the criteria for NTM disease. PMID:25132991

  10. Association between Severe Dehydration in Rotavirus Diarrhea and Exclusive Breastfeeding among Infants at Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital, Bandung, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Prasetyo, Dwi; Sabaroedin, Iesje Martiza; Ermaya, Yudith Setiati; Soenarto, Yati

    2015-01-01

    Background. Rotavirus is the leading cause of severe acute diarrhea in children. Infants who are exclusively breastfed develop fewer infections and have less severe illnesses. This study aimed to determine association between severe dehydration in rotavirus diarrhea and exclusive breastfeeding. Methods. This is a cross-sectional study in infants ≤ 6 months old with acute diarrhea in Dr. Hasan Sadikin Hospital, Bandung, Indonesia. Results. From 134 infants ≤ 6 months old with acute diarrhea enrolled from April 2009 to December 2012, there were 88 (65.6%) boys and 46 (34.4%) girls in this study. Rotavirus was detected in 60 (44.8 %), 32 (53.3%) of whom were exclusively breastfed. From rotavirus positive subjects, severe dehydration occurred in 4 (12.6%) exclusively breastfed infants and 6 (21.5%) not exclusively breastfed infants. No significant association was found between severe dehydration and exclusive breastfeeding (p = 0.491) in rotavirus diarrhea. Conclusions. In rotavirus diarrhea, there was no significant association between exclusive breastfeeding and severe dehydration. PMID:26612990

  11. Treatment of locally advanced pancreatic cancer by percutaneous and intraoperative irreversible electroporation: general hospital cancer center experience.

    PubMed

    Lambert, L; Horejs, J; Krska, Z; Hoskovec, D; Petruzelka, L; Krechler, T; Kriz, P; Briza, J

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety of irreversible electroporation (IRE) and the outcome of patients undergoing IRE of locally advanced pancreatic cancer (PC). Twenty-one patients with unresectable PC underwent open (n=19) or percutaneous (n=2) IRE of the tumor using the Nanoknife system with two electrodes that were repositioned several times to affect the whole mass. The size of the tumor was 39±10mm with a range from 21 to 65mm. Five patients underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy and seven patients were treated with chemotherapy after IRE. Complications occurred in five patients, which resulted in prolongation of the average hospital stay from 10 to 34 days. There was no mortality in the first postoperative month. Median survival after IRE was 10.2 months compared to 9.3 months in a matched cohort (hazard ratio = .54, p = .053). The quality of life was declining slowly. 81% of time after IRE the Karnofsky performance status was ≥70 and sharp decline occurred approximately 8 weeks before death.In conclusion, IRE is a safe palliative treatment option for a percentage of patients with locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma. The patients treated with open IRE lived a decent life until 8 weeks before their death. We believe that IRE of pancreatic carcinoma can be regarded as an option, if imaging or explorative laparotomy show that R0 resection in not possible. PMID:26774149

  12. Evaluation of extremity pain in children using technetium-99m MDP bone scan: A general hospital experience

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H.M.; Rothschild, P.A.; Kernek, C.B.

    1984-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of three-phase bone scan in detection of significant pathology i.e., osteomyelitis (OM), septic joint, cellulitis, etc., in children with symptoms of extremity pain. A total of 100 consecutive patients (age 9 days - 16 yrs, 63 boys and 37 girls) were studied. The authors reviewed their scans, x-rays and hospital records. The final diagnoses were based on the findings of needle aspiration, surgical drainage, biopsy, culture, and on the therapeutic response. In 87%, sufficiently long clinical follow-up was available to confirm the final diagnoses. In the remaining 13%, the symptoms resolved quickly and follow-up was not felt necessary. The scan was essential in pinpointing the lesions in pts with referred or nonlocalizing extremity pain. The +ve and -ve predictive values of the scan and OM were 89% and 96% respectively. One spiral fracture was misinterpreted as diffuse OM. One ''Subacute epiphyseal OM'' was not detected. In two cases, cellulitis and septic joint obscured underlying OM. Prior antibotic therapy resulted in one equivocal scan. Although less sensitive (29%) in early OM, radiographs play an important complimentary role. Bone scans detected underlying pathology for extremity pain in 61% of all pts studied.

  13. 75 FR 1396 - The General Hospital and Personal Use Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-11

    ... Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION... Use Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To... a disability, please contact AnnMarie Williams at 301-796-5966 at least 7 days in advance of...

  14. Surgical emergencies in Ireland. An audit of the emergency surgical caseload of an Irish district general hospital.

    PubMed

    Davies, M G; Shine, M F; Lennon, F

    1991-10-01

    Emergency cases are an increasing part of the workload of a general surgical unit. Little accurate quantitative data is presently available on the nature and impact of this workload on a typical district general surgical service. This study reports the results of a prospective one year audit of the emergency cases dealt with by a typical Irish district general surgical service. The general surgical service admitted 2,278 patients acutely, which represented 58% of the total number of admissions to the service. Eighteen patients required immediate transfer for specialist neurosurgical (11), vascular (6) or plastics (1) treatment. Of those cases admitted 1,396 (61.3%) were males and 882 (38.7%) were females. There were 1,786 (78%) adults and 492 (21.6%) paediatric cases. Abdominal pain (48.0%), head injury (23.8%) and urological problems (11.0%) accounted for the majority of the caseload. Within the abdominal pain group, the pre-dominant diagnoses were non-specific abdominal pain (36.0%), appendicitis (19.5%), cholecystitis/obstructive jaundice (10.8%) and peptic ulcer disease (10.0%). There were 456 emergency operations performed, representing 19.5% of all the inpatient general surgical procedures. 328 (72%) of these were performed out of normal working hours. Only 12% of the procedures were major. The commonest operations were appendicectomy (51%), abscess drainage (13%), wound toilet (13%) and laparotomy (11%). The emergency peri-operative mortality was 1.1%. The positive appendicectomy rate was 92%. PMID:1810893

  15. Provision of gastrointestinal endoscopy and related services for a district general hospital. Working Party of the Clinical Services Committee of the British Society of Gastroenterology.

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    (1) The number of endoscopic examinations performed is rising. Epidemiological data and the workload of well developed units show that annual requirements per head of population are approaching: Upper gastrointestinal 1 in 100 Flexible sigmoidoscopy 1 in 500 Colonoscopy 1 in 500 ERCP 1 in 2000 (2) Open access endoscopy to general practitioners is desirable and increasingly sought. For a district general hospital serving a population of 250,000, this workload entails about 3500 procedures annually, performed during 10 half day routine sessions plus emergency work. (3) High standards of training and experience are needed by all staff, who must work in purpose built accommodation designed to promote efficient and safe practice. (4) The endoscopy unit should be adjacent to day care facilities and near the x ray department. There should be easy access to wards. (5) An endoscopy unit needs at least two endoscopy rooms; a fully ventilated cleaning/disinfection area; rooms for patient reception, preparation, and recovery; and accommodation for administration, storage, and staff amenities. (6) The service should be consultant based. At least 10 clinical sessions are required, made up of six or more consultant sessions and two to four clinical assistant, hospital practitioner, or staff specialist sessions. Each consultant should be expected to commit at least two sessions weekly to endoscopy. Extra consultant sessions may be needed to provide an efficient service. (7) A specially trained nursing sister (grade G or H) and five other endoscopy nurses are needed to care for the patients; their work may be supplemented by care assistants. (8) A new post of endoscopy department assistant (analogous to an operating department assistant) is proposed to maintain and prepare instruments, and to give technical assistance during procedures. (9) A full time secretary should be employed. Records, appointments, and audit should be computer based. (10) ERCP needs the collaboration of an interventional radiologist working with high quality x ray equipment in a specially prepared radiology screening room. This facility may need to serve more than one hospital. (11) A gastrointestinal measurement laboratory can conveniently be combined with the endoscopy unit. In some hospitals one or more gastrointestinal measurement technicians may staff this laboratory. (12) An endoscopy unit is a service department analogous to a radiology department. It needs an annual budget. PMID:1991644

  16. The use of the partograph in labor monitoring: a cross-sectional study among obstetric caregivers in General Hospital, Calabar, Cross River State, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Asibong, Udeme; Okokon, Ita B; Agan, Thomas U; Oku, Affiong; Opiah, Margaret; Essien, E James; Monjok, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Background Prolonged and obstructed labor is a significant cause of maternal morbidity and mortality in Nigeria, one of the six countries contributing significantly to the global maternal mortality crisis. The use of the partograph would engender a remarkable reduction in the number of these deaths since abnormal markers in the progress of labor would be identified early on. Objective This study aimed to evaluate the non-physician obstetric caregivers’ (OCGs) knowledge of partograph use, assess the extent of its use, determine the factors that impede its usage, and unravel the relationship between years of experience and partograph use among the respondents (OCGs) in General Hospital, Calabar, Nigeria. Methodology Using a self-administered semi-structured questionnaire, a cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted among 130 purposely selected and consenting OCGs working in the General Hospital, Calabar, Nigeria. Results The majority of the respondents (70.8%) had good general knowledge of the partograph but lacked detailed and in-depth knowledge of the component parts of the partograph. Knowledge of partograph (χ2=12.05, P=0.0001) and partograph availability (χ2=56.5, P=0.0001) had a significant relationship with its utilization. Previous training (χ2=9.43, P=0.002) was significantly related to knowledge of partograph. Factors affecting utilization were: little or no knowledge of the partograph (85.4%), nonavailability (70%), shortage of staff (61.5%), and the fact that it is time-consuming to use (30%). Conclusion Lack of detailed knowledge of the partograph, nonavailability of the partograph, poor staff numbers, and inadequate training are factors that work against the effective utilization of the partograph in the study facility. Usage of this tool for labor monitoring can be enhanced by periodic training, making partographs available in labor wards, provision of reasonable staff numbers, and mandatory institutional policy. PMID:25342920

  17. Hospital demand for physicians.

    PubMed

    Morrisey, M A; Jensen, G A

    1990-01-01

    This article develops a derived demand for physicians that is general enough to encompass physician control, simple profit maximization and hospital utility maximization models of the hospital. The analysis focuses on three special aspects of physician affiliations: the price of adding a physician to the staff is unobserved; the physician holds appointments at multiple hospitals, and physicians are not homogeneous. Using 1983 American Hospital Association data, a system of specialty-specific demand equations is estimated. The results are consistent with the model and suggest that physicians should be concerned about reduced access to hospitals, particularly as the stock of hospitals declines. PMID:10104050

  18. Periprosthetic Vancouver type B1 and C fractures treated by locking-plate osteosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose Historically, the treatment of periprosthetic femoral fractures (PFFs) has been associated with a high frequency of complications and reoperations. The preferred treatment is internal fixation, a revision of the femoral stem, or a combination of both. An improved understanding of plate use during internal fixation, and the introduction of locking-plate osteosynthesis may lead to improved outcome. We evaluated the outcome of Vancouver type B1 and C PFFs treated by locking-plate osteosynthesis, by assessing rates of fracture union and reoperations and by analyzing failure cases. Patients and methods From 2002 through 2011, 58 consecutive patients (60 fractures) with low-energy PFF around or below a stable femoral stem, i.e. Vancouver type B1 and C fractures, underwent osteosynthesis with a locking plate. All patients had a total hip replacement (THR). They were followed up clinically and radiographically, with 6 weeks between visits, until fracture union or until death. Fracture union was evaluated 6 months postoperatively. Results At a median follow-up time of 23 (0–121) months after PFF, 8 patients (8 fractures) had been reoperated due either to infection (n = 4), failure of fixation (n = 3), or loosening of the femoral stem (n = 1). All the patients who had been followed up for at least 6 months—and who did not undergo reoperation or die—went on to fracture union (n = 43). Interpretation Locking-plate osteosynthesis of periprosthetic Vancouver type B1 and C fractures gives good results regarding fracture union. It appears that spanning of the prosthesis to avoid stress-rising areas is important for successful treatment. Infection is the major cause of failure. PMID:23140109

  19. Difficult decisions in times of constraint: Criteria based Resource Allocation in the Vancouver Coastal Health Authority

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the project was to develop a plan to address a forecasted deficit of approximately $4.65 million for fiscal year 2010/11 in the Vancouver Communities division of the Vancouver Coastal Health Authority. For disinvestment opportunities identified beyond the forecasted deficit, a commitment was made to consider options for resource re-allocation within the Vancouver Communities division. Methods A standard approach to program budgeting and marginal analysis (PBMA) was taken with a priority setting working committee and a broader advisory panel. An experienced, non-vested internal project manager worked closely with the two-member external research team throughout the process. Face to face evaluation interviews were held with 10 decision makers immediately following the process. Results The recommendations of the working committee included the implementation of 44 disinvestment initiatives with an annualized value of CAD $4.9 million, as well as consideration of possible investments if the realized savings match expectations. Overall, decision makers viewed the process favorably and the primary aim of addressing the deficit gap was met. Discussion A key challenge was the tight timeline which likely lead to less evidence informed decision making then one would hope for. Despite this, decision makers felt that better decisions were made then had the process not been in place. In the end, this project adds value in finding that PBMA can be used to cover a deficit and minimize opportunity cost through systematic application of criteria whilst ensuring process fairness through focusing on communication, transparency and decision maker engagement. PMID:21756357

  20. Sea-level change and paleogeographic reconstructions, southern Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Thomas; Gowan, Evan J.; Hutchinson, Ian; Clague, John J.; Barrie, J. Vaughn; Conway, Kim W.

    2009-06-01

    Forty-eight new and previously published radiocarbon ages constrain deglacial and postglacial sea levels on southern Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Sea level fell rapidly from its high stand of about +75 m elevation just before 14 000 cal BP (12 000 radiocarbon yrs BP) to below the present shoreline by 13 200 cal BP (11 400 radiocarbon years BP). The sea fell below its present level 1000 years later in the central Strait of Georgia and 2000 years later in the northern Strait of Georgia, reflecting regional differences in ice sheet retreat and downwasting. Direct observations only constrain the low stand to be below -11 m and above -40 m. Analysis of the crustal isostatic depression with equations utilizing exponential decay functions appropriate to the Cascadia subduction zone, however, places the low stand at -30 ± 5 m at about 11 200 cal BP (9800 BP). The inferred low stand for southern Vancouver Island, when compared to the sea-level curve previously derived for the central Strait of Georgia to the northwest, generates differential isostatic depression that is consistent with the expected crustal response between the two regions. Morphologic and sub-bottom features previously interpreted to indicate a low stand of -50 to -65 m are re-evaluated and found to be consistent with a low stand of -30 ± 5 m. Submarine banks in eastern Juan de Fuca Strait were emergent at the time of the low stand, but marine passages persisted between southern Vancouver Island and the mainland. The crustal uplift presently occurring in response to the Late Pleistocene collapse of the southwestern sector of the Cordilleran Ice Sheet amounts to about 0.1 mm/yr. The small glacial isostatic adjustment rate is a consequence of low-viscosity mantle in this tectonically active region.

  1. Low oxygen and high inorganic carbon on the Vancouver Island Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianucci, L.; Denman, K. L.; Ianson, D.

    2011-07-01

    Recently, independent concerns about declining oxygen and pH conditions in the coastal ocean have emerged. In coastal upwelling regions, hypoxia can be driven by onshore advection of oxygen-depleted offshore waters as well as by local biological consumption triggered by high productivity. As both mechanisms can also decrease pH and carbonate saturation states, coupled studies of oxygen and carbon are imperative. A quasi two-dimensional model coupling carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen was developed for the summer wind-driven upwelling region off southern Vancouver Island, using the Regional Ocean Modeling System. The physical model is coupled to an ecosystem module that tracks 11 state variables and allows nonfixed C:N ratios for detritus and dissolved organic matter. Given uncertainties in sediment parameterizations in biophysical models, three sediment models are compared and discussed. Results demonstrate that sediment-associated processes play a dominant role in consuming oxygen from, and releasing inorganic carbon to, the bottom waters over the shelf. This study also examines the unique characteristics of the southern Vancouver Island shelf. Two key features distinguish this region from other shelves in the California Current System and protect inner shelf waters from severe hypoxia and corrosive (i.e., undersaturated in aragonite) conditions. First, the near-shore Vancouver Island Coastal Current provides a source of oxygen and nutrients and forms a barrier that prevents upwelled waters (depleted in oxygen and rich in carbon) from penetrating the inner shelf. Second, the greater width of the shelf dilutes these upwelled offshore waters and reduces their penetration onto the shallower shelf region.

  2. Cost-effectiveness of collaborative care for chronically ill patients with comorbid depressive disorder in the general hospital setting, a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Eva K; van Benthem, Tjeerd B; Hakkaart-van Roijen, Leona; van Marwijk, Harm WJ; Beekman, Aartjan TF; Rutten, Frans F; van der Feltz-Cornelis, Christina M

    2007-01-01

    Background Depressive disorder is one of the most common disorders, and is highly prevalent in chronically ill patients. The presence of comorbid depression has a negative influence on quality of life, health care costs, self-care, morbidity, and mortality. Early diagnosis and well-organized treatment of depression has a positive influence on these aspects. Earlier research in the USA has reported good results with regard to the treatment of depression with a collaborative care approach and an antidepressant algorithm. In the UK 'Problem Solving Treatment' has proved to be feasible. However, in the general hospital setting this approach has not yet been evaluated. Methods/Design CC: DIM (Collaborative Care: Depression Initiative in the Medical setting) is a two-armed randomised controlled trial with randomisation at patient level. The aim of the trial is to evaluate the treatment of depressive disorder in general hospitals in the Netherlands based on a collaborative care framework, including contracting, 'Problem Solving Treatment', antidepressant algorithm, and manual-guided self-help. 126 outpatients with diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or cardiovascular diseases will be randomised to either the intervention group or the control group. Patients will be included if they have been diagnosed with moderate to severe depression, based on the DSM-IV criteria in a two-step screening method. The intervention group will receive treatment based on the collaborative care approach; the control group will receive 'care as usual'. Baseline and follow-up measurements (after 3, 6, 9, and 12 months) will be performed by means of questionnaires. The primary outcome measure is severity of depressive symptoms, as measured with the PHQ-9. The secondary outcome measure is the cost-effectiveness of these treatments according to the TiC-P, the EuroQol and the SF-36. Discussion Earlier research has indicated that depressive disorder is a chronic, mostly recurrent illness, which tends to cluster with physical comorbidity. Even though the treatment of depressive disorder based on the guidelines for depression is proven effective, these guidelines are often insufficiently adhered to. Collaborative care and 'Problem Solving Treatment' will be specifically tailored to patients with depressive disorders and evaluated in a general hospital setting in the Netherlands. PMID:17324283

  3. Pneumomediastinum: a rare manifestation of hypersensitivity pneumonitis in a patient presenting with unexplained breathlessness at the Borders General Hospital.

    PubMed

    Grecian, Robert; Faccenda, Jakki; Ferrando, Luis

    2015-01-01

    A 48-year-old woman from the Scottish Borders presented to her general practitioner with exertional dyspnoea. There was a delay in diagnosis of the underlying respiratory condition, due to initial investigations being suggestive of cardiac disease. Subsequently, the patient developed clinical symptoms and signs of pneumomediastinum, which was discovered on radiological imaging. Detailed history-taking and further clinical testing confirmed the cause of this to be hypersensitivity pneumonitis due to sensitisation to pet birds. The patient was treated with high dose steroids and went on to make a good recovery. The birds were rehomed. PMID:26446316

  4. Rainfall-runoff data for selected basins, Portland, Oregon, and Vancouver, Washington, 1973-77

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laenen, Antonius; Solin, Gary L.

    1978-01-01

    In the Portland-Vancouver area, storms and floods are presently being studied in 16 basins with drainage areas ranging from 0.21 to 6.63 square miles and with various basin slopes, degrees of imperviousness, and mixes of land use. Fanno Creek basin in Portland has the longest period of rainfall-runoff record, starting in 1973; Tryon Creek basin in Portland is next with a record starting in 1974. Records in all other basins began in 1975. For each basin, data are tabulated for daily precipitation on a yearly basis and for 5-minute precipitation and 5-minute streamflow for selected storms. (Woodard-USGS)

  5. The intended and unintended consequences of communication systems on general internal medicine inpatient care delivery: a prospective observational case study of five teaching hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Robert C; Lo, Vivian; Morra, Dante; Wong, Brian M; Sargeant, Robert; Locke, Ken; Cavalcanti, Rodrigo; Quan, Sherman D; Rossos, Peter; Tran, Kim; Cheung, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Background Effective clinical communication is critical to providing high-quality patient care. Hospitals have used different types of interventions to improve communication between care teams, but there have been few studies of their effectiveness. Objectives To describe the effects of different communication interventions and their problems. Design Prospective observational case study using a mixed methods approach of quantitative and qualitative methods. Setting General internal medicine (GIM) inpatient wards at five tertiary care academic teaching hospitals. Participants Clinicians consisting of residents, attending physicians, nurses, and allied health (AH) staff working on the GIM wards. Methods Ethnographic methods and interviews with clinical staff (doctors, nurses, medical students, and AH professionals) were conducted over a 16-month period from 2009 to 2010. Results We identified four categories that described the intended and unintended consequences of communication interventions: impacts on senders, receivers, interprofessional collaboration, and the use of informal communication processes. The use of alphanumeric pagers, smartphones, and web-based communication systems had positive effects for senders and receivers, but unintended consequences were seen with all interventions in all four categories. Conclusions Interventions that aimed to improve clinical communications solved some but not all problems, and unintended effects were seen with all systems. PMID:23355461

  6. [Prevalence and susceptibility patterns of extended-spectrum betalactamase-producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae in a general university hospital in Beirut, Lebanon].

    PubMed

    Daoud, Z; Hakime, N

    2003-06-01

    Extended-spectrum betalactamases (ESBLs) are recognized worldwide as a problem in hospitalized patients. Their prevalence among clinical isolates of Enterobacteriaceae varies between countries and institutions. We studied the evolution of ESBL production by clinical isolates of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae and analyzed the patterns of susceptibility of these isolates to different antimicrobial agents in a general university hospital in Beirut. Of the 4299 isolates of E. coli and 1248 isolates of K. pneumoniae tested over the five years, 2.0% of the E. coli and 20.0% of K. pneumoniae were ESBL producing. A clear decrease in the susceptibility to all antibiotics was observed between 1999 and 2001, and no resistance to imipenem was detected. The isolates were distributed between the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), medical wards, outpatients, and other origins. The highest numbers were found in the ICU (E. coli 28.1% and K. pneumoniae 34.8%). Three phenotypes of resistance to cefotaxime and ceftazidime were observed on the basis of microbiological results. The present study was the first to assess the occurrence and susceptibility patterns of extended-spectrum betalactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in Lebanon. PMID:12973463

  7. [A patient on clozapine in the general hospital: the need for discussion between specialists from different disciplines and for close monitoring of the patient's plasma level].

    PubMed

    van Zuilekom, S; Gijsman, H J

    2013-01-01

    A 49-year-old man being treated with clozapine for schizophrenia was prescribed ciprofloxacin because of bile spill following cholecystectomy. Four days after surgery he showed symptoms of clozapine intoxication, probably because the ciprofloxacin had inhibited CYP1A2. Over the next few days the patient's plasma level was measured frequently but without any real sense of urgency. As a result, the patient's plasma level remained too high for a long period, then decreased, the decrease being accompanied by the recurrence of psychotic symptoms. Our advice, therefore, is that if a patient on clozapine is in a general hospital there needs to be pro-active discussion of the case between a psychiatrist and other medical specialists and the patient's clozapine plasma level should be measured whenever the patient's condition appears to be deteriorating. PMID:24366834

  8. Restructuring within an academic health center to support quality and safety: the development of the Center for Quality and Safety at the Massachusetts General Hospital.

    PubMed

    Bohmer, Richard M J; Bloom, Jonathan D; Mort, Elizabeth A; Demehin, Akinluwa A; Meyer, Gregg S

    2009-12-01

    Recent focus on the need to improve the quality and safety of health care has created new challenges for academic health centers (AHCs). Whereas previously quality was largely assumed, today it is increasingly quantifiable and requires organized systems for improvement. Traditional structures and cultures within AHCs, although well suited to the tripartite missions of teaching, research, and clinical care, are not easily adaptable to the tasks of measuring, reporting, and improving quality. Here, the authors use a case study of Massachusetts General Hospital's efforts to restructure quality and safety to illustrate the value of beginning with a focus on organizational culture, using a systematic process of engaging clinical leadership, developing an organizational framework dependent on proven business principles, leveraging focus events, and maintaining executive dedication to execution of the initiative. The case provides a generalizable example for AHCs of how applying explicit management design can foster robust organizational change with relatively modest incremental financial resources. PMID:19940570

  9. "Gentlemen! This Is No Humbug": Did John Collins Warren, M.D., Proclaim These Words on October 16, 1846, at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston?

    PubMed

    Haridas, Rajesh P

    2016-03-01

    The proclamation, "Gentlemen! this is no humbug," attributed to John Collins Warren, M.D., was not identified in any contemporaneous eyewitness report of William T. G. Morton's October 16, 1846, demonstration of ether at Massachusetts General Hospital. The earliest known documentation of the proclamation is in Nathan P. Rice's biography of Morton, first published in 1859. Only three eyewitnesses, Washington Ayer, M.D., Robert Thompson Davis, M.D., and Isaac Francis Galloupe, M.D., reported Warren's alleged proclamation. However, their accounts first appeared in 1896, 50 yr after Morton's demonstration of etherization. Although Warren's alleged proclamation appears plausible, the overall impression from eyewitness statements and publications relating to the October 16, 1846, demonstration of etherization is that it may not have been made. PMID:26566280

  10. Troponin I, laboratory issues, and clinical outcomes in a district general hospital: crossover study with “traditional” markers of myocardial infarction in a total of 1990 patients

    PubMed Central

    Jishi, F; Hudson, P R; Williams, C P; Jones, R P; Davies, G K; Yousef, Z R; Trent, R J; Cowell, R P W

    2004-01-01

    Aims: Review of the clinical outcomes and practical issues of replacing traditional cardiac enzymes with troponin I (cTnI) in a district general hospital. Methods: Crossover study of three sequential three month stages during which serial cardiac enzymes were replaced with a single cTnI measurement available at three set times within 24 hours for the duration of the second three month stage. The study was carried out in a 630 bed district general hospital with 1990 admissions of suspected cardiac ischaemia over the study period as a whole. Account was taken of seasonal factors. Results: The introduction of troponin was associated with 8.5% more patients with non-ischaemic heart disease (IHD) being discharged on the day after admission, saving approximately 107 bed days each year. Approximately 50% more patients were diagnosed with myocardial infarction during the cTnI stage. There was no increase in readmission within one month or early death with cTnI. Approximately 3% false positive and 1.5% false negative cTnI results were recorded. All false positive cTnI results were coding errors or attributable to known assay interference effects. All false negatives were potentially explained by sample timing factors. The lack of standardisation in troponin assay services impacts clinically. Conclusion: Younger patients without IHD were discharged earlier during the cTnI stage in apparent safety. Blood sample timing needs to be verified when cTnI is used as an adjunct to early discharge. There were no unexplained false positives or negatives. Standardisation related issues arose. PMID:15452154

  11. The Impact of Healthcare Workers Job Environment on Their Mental-emotional Health. Coping Strategies: The Case of a Local General Hospital.

    PubMed

    Koinis, Aristotelis; Giannou, Vasiliki; Drantaki, Vasiliki; Angelaina, Sophia; Stratou, Elpida; Saridi, Maria

    2015-04-13

    Workplace stress can influence healthcare professionals' physical and emotional well-being by curbing their efficiency and having a negative impact on their overall quality of life. The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact that work environment in a local public general hospital can have on the health workers' mental-emotional health and find strategies in order to cope with negative consequences. The study took place from July 2010 to October 2010. Our sample consisted of 200 healthcare professionals aged 21-58 years working in a 240-bed general hospital and the response rate was 91.36%). Our research protocol was first approved by the hospital's review board. A standardized questionnaire that investigates strategies for coping with stressful conditions was used. A standardized questionnaire was used in the present study Coping Strategies for Stressful Events, evaluating the strategies that persons employ in order to overcome a stressful situation or event. The questionnaire was first tested for validity and reliability which were found satisfactory (Cronbach's α=0.862). Strict anonymity of the participants was guaranteed. The SPSS 16.0 software was used for the statistical analysis. Regression analysis showed that health professionals' emotional health can be influenced by strategies for dealing with stressful events, since positive re-assessment, quitting and seeking social support are predisposing factors regarding the three first quality of life factors of the World Health Organization Quality of Life - BREF. More specifically, for the physical health factor, positive re-assessment (t=3.370, P=0.001) and quitting (t=-2.564, P=0.011) are predisposing factors. For the 'mental health and spirituality' regression model, positive re-assessment (t=5.528, P=0.000) and seeking social support (t=-1.991, P=0.048) are also predisposing factors, while regarding social relationships positive re-assessment (t=4.289, P=0.000) is a predisposing factor. According to our findings, there was a notable lack of workplace stress management strategies, which the participants usually perceive as a lack of interest on behalf of the management regarding their emotional state. Some significant factors for lowering workplace stress were found to be the need to encourage and morally reward the staff and also to provide them with opportunities for further or continuous education. PMID:26973958

  12. A prospective study of incidence of medication-related problems in general medicine ward of a tertiary care hospital

    PubMed Central

    Movva, Ramya; Jampani, Anusha; Nathani, Jyothsna; Pinnamaneni, Sri Harsha; Challa, Siva Reddy

    2015-01-01

    The study is aimed to assess the incidence of drug-related problems (DRPs) and provide pharmacist interventions for identified DRPs. A prospective, observational study was conducted among 189 patients with cardiovascular disease who were aged 18 years or older and admitted to the general medicine in-patient ward. During the 6 months study period, the incidence of DRPs was identified using Pharmaceutical Care Network Europe Foundation classification system version 6.2. A total of 189 patients were screened for DRPs. Among them, 130 patients have at least one DRP. A total of 416 DRPs were identified (on average, 2.2 DRPs per each patient). Of the 416 DRPs, 125 (30.04%) interventions were accepted, 7 (1.68%) interventions were not accepted, while remaining (68.26%) accepted but no action taken. The results of the study indicate that incidence of DRPs is substantial and pharmacist-led interventions resulted in resolution of DRPs. This represents the need for the active role of the clinical pharmacist in the developing countries like India. PMID:26605161

  13. Analysis of the Vancouver lung nodule malignancy model with respect to manual and automated segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiemker, Rafael; Boroczky, Lilla; Bergtholdt, Martin; Klinder, Tobias

    2015-03-01

    The recently published Vancouver model for lung nodule malignancy prediction holds great promise as a practically feasible tool to mitigate the clinical decision problem of how to act on a lung nodule detected at baseline screening. It provides a formula to compute a probability of malignancy from only nine clinical and radiologic features. The feature values are provided by user interaction but in principle could also be automatically pre-filled by appropriate image processing algorithms and RIS requests. Nodule diameter is a feature with crucial influence on the predicted malignancy, and leads to uncertainty caused by inter-reader variability. The purpose of this paper is to analyze how strongly the malignancy prediction of a lung nodule found with CT screening is affected by the inter-reader variation of the nodule diameter estimation. To this aim we have estimated the magnitude of the malignancy variability by applying the Vancouver malignancy model to the LIDC-IDRI database which contains independent delineations from several readers. It can be shown that using fully automatic nodule segmentation can significantly lower the variability of the estimated malignancy, while demonstrating excellent agreement with the expert readers.

  14. Age and significance of earthquake-induced liquefaction near Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clague, J.J.; Naesgaard, E.; Nelson, A.R.

    1997-01-01

    In late 1994, sand dykes, large sand blows, and deformed strata were exposed in the walls of an excavation at Annacis Island on the Fraser River delta near Vancouver, British Columbia. The features record liquefaction during a large earthquake about 1700 years ago; this was perhaps the largest earthquake to affect the Vancouver area in the last 3500 years. Similar, less well-dated features have been reported from several other sites on the Fraser delta and may be products of the same earthquake. Three radiocarbon ages that closely delimit the time of liquefaction on Annacis Island are similar to the most precise radiocarbon ages on coseismically subsided marsh soils at estuaries in southern Washington and Oregon. Both the liquefaction and the subsidence may have been produced by a single great plate-boundary earthquake at the Cascadia subduction zone. Alternatively, liquefaction at Annacis Island may have been caused by a large crustal or subcrustal earthquake of about the same age as a plate-boundary earthquake farther west. The data from Annacis Island and other sites on the Fraser delta suggest that earthquakes capable of producing extensive liquefaction in this area are rare events. Further, liquefaction analysis using historical seismicity suggests that current assessment procedures may overestimate liquefaction risk.

  15. Environmental factors associated with reproductive barrier breakdown in sympatric trout populations on Vancouver Island

    PubMed Central

    Heath, Daniel; Bettles, Cory M; Roff, Derek

    2010-01-01

    The incidence of hybridization between coastal cutthroat (Oncorhynchus clarki clarki) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) varies widely among populations. The breakdown of reproductive isolation is of concern to managers, and raises the question: how have the two species retained their genetic and morphological divergence? Using a combination of mitochondrial DNA and nuclear DNA markers coupled with watershed attribute and disturbance data, we determined the distribution and frequency of trout hybridization on Vancouver Island, BC and the environmental factors associated with the hybridization. We found 284 hybrids (among 1004 fish) in 29 of 36 sampled populations. High variation in levels of hybridization was observed among populations, and no single environmental factor was found to dominate in determining hybridization levels. However, logging activity, urban infrastructure development, and stocking of hatchery rainbow trout played significant roles in determining hybridization levels, and populations in small watersheds are more at risk of reproductive barrier breakdown. This study illustrates that cutthroatrainbow trout reproductive barrier breakdown is widespread on Vancouver Island and that anthropogenic disturbance plays a role in the process. As similar environmental disturbance is common in much of coastal trout habitat, large-scale hybridization may be occurring elsewhere and thus may represent a critical management issue for Pacific trout species. PMID:25567905

  16. Introduced bullfrogs and their parasites: Haematoloechus longiplexus (Trematoda) exploits diverse damselfly intermediate hosts on Vancouver Island.

    PubMed

    Novak, Colin W; Goater, Timothy M

    2013-02-01

    The lung fluke, Haematoloechus longiplexus, is the most prevalent and abundant parasite of introduced bullfrogs on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada. The ecological success of this trematode in invasive bullfrogs is related to the fluke's ability to utilize native intermediate hosts for transmission. The purpose of this study was to identify the odonate (dragonfly/damselfly) species involved in the transmission of H. longiplexus to the introduced bullfrog. The prevalences and mean intensities of 21 species of odonates (nymphs and adults) were examined for metacercariae infections. Haematoloechus longiplexus is a second intermediate host specialist, being found only in damselflies. Six damselfly species exhibiting the "climber" ecological habit were identified as second intermediate hosts of H. longiplexus. Enallagma carunculatum (prevalence = 75.0%, mean intensity = 17.2 ± 10.8), Ischnura cervula (65.2%, 8.9 ± 4.3), Ischnura perparva (45.5%, 15.4 ± 10.3), and Enallagma boreale (40.7%, 4.8 ± 7.8) were the most commonly infected damselfly species. Metacercariae were absent in damselflies collected from sites lacking bullfrogs. Haematoloechus longiplexus was likely introduced along with the bullfrog, and subsequently adapted to the physid snail and diverse damselfly intermediate hosts present in ponds on Vancouver Island. PMID:22924931

  17. Hardware scale modelling of summertime patterns of urban dew and surface moisture in Vancouver, BC, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, K.

    There is growing interest in dew as a potential source of fresh water, and also in the study of urban dew. In this research, a 1:8 scale, out-of-doors hardware model was constructed in Vancouver, BC, Canada, to study dew in an urban residential landscape. It consisted of three wooden houses (1.08 m tall), a paved street, small trees and a grassed urban park. The internal thermal mass (ITM) approach was used to scale the buildings. The model was validated to a first approximation using data from full-scale sites in Vancouver. It performed well. Results indicate that, while the primary control on dew deposition is weather, weather effects are modified by substrate type and site geometry. On nights with abundant dew (0.1-0.3 mm day -1), association was seen in the model between the distributions of surface temperature, sky view, and surface moisture (dew+guttation) accumulation on grass. The model roof was often a site of significant accumulation with a mean dewfall of 0.09 mm day -1. The amount of water that could potentially be collected from a roof is far less than that which may be collected from dense fog using fog nets. Nevertheless, dew is not a negligible term in the urban water balance and its potential for collection should not be lightly dismissed.

  18. Statistical and spatial analysis of land cover impact on selected Metro Vancouver, British Columbia watersheds.

    PubMed

    Shupe, Scott

    2013-01-01

    The Greater Vancouver area has undergone significant land use and land cover (LULC) change over the past several decades, often adversely affecting stream health and water quality, particularly in those areas that have undergone the most urbanization. In this study 30 years of historical LULC and water quality data were examined using GIS and statistical analysis to better understand these impacts and to help build a broader understanding of cause and effect relationships of changing LULC, especially since urbanization is increasingly occurring within sensitive watersheds at greater distances from the City of Vancouver. Urban, agriculture, and disturbed LULC data from 1976, 1986, and 2000 were examined within a number of watersheds and related to historical water quality data sampled from streams during similar time frames. Additional higher resolution 2006 LULC data from a smaller number of watersheds were then examined and compared to stream health data to investigate the sensitivity of LULC data resolution on monitoring watershed impact. While LULC impact can be clearly seen at both high and lower resolutions, issues of ambiguous land cover and land use designations can potentially affect the magnitude of the relationship. PMID:23076660

  19. Numerical Simulations of Tsunami Waves and Currents for Southern Vancouver Island from a Cascadia Megathrust Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniawsky, Josef Y.; Titov, Vasily V.; Wang, Kelin; Li, Jing-Yang

    2007-03-01

    The 1700 great Cascadia earthquake (M = 9) generated widespread tsunami waves that affected the entire Pacific Ocean and caused damage as distant as Japan. Similar catastrophic waves may be generated by a future Cascadia megathrust earthquake. We use three rupture scenarios for this earthquake in numerical experiments to study propagation of tsunami waves off the west coast of North America and to predict tsunami heights and currents in several bays and harbours on southern Vancouver Island, British Columbia, including Ucluelet, located on the west coast of the island, and Victoria and Esquimalt harbours inside Juan de Fuca Strait. The earthquake scenarios are: an 1100-km long rupture over the entire length of the subduction zone and separate ruptures of its northern or southern segments. As expected, the southern earthquake scenario has a limited effect over most of the Vancouver Island coast, with waves in the harbours not exceeding 1 m. The other two scenarios produce large tsunami waves, higher than 16 m at one location near Ucluelet and over 4 m inside Esquimalt and Victoria harbours, and very strong currents that reach 17 m/s in narrow channels and near headlands. Because the assumed rupture scenarios are based on a previous earthquake, direct use of the model results to estimate the effect of a future earthquake requires appropriate qualification.

  20. Compare Hospitals

    MedlinePlus

    ... Talking to Your Doctor Hospital Ratings and reports Survey Content Reports on Hospital Performance How Our Ratings are Used ... and Tools Talking to Your Doctor Hospital Ratings Survey Content Reports on Hospital Performance How Our Ratings are Used ...

  1. Improving Hospital Care and Collaborative Communications for the 21st Century: Key Recommendations for General Internal Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Vivian; Rossos, Peter; Kuziemsky, Craig; O’Leary, Kevin J; Cafazzo, Joseph A; Reeves, Scott; Wong, Brian M; Morra, Dante

    2012-01-01

    Background Communication and collaboration failures can have negative impacts on the efficiency of both individual clinicians and health care system delivery as well as on the quality of patient care. Recognizing the problems associated with clinical and collaboration communication, health care professionals and organizations alike have begun to look at alternative communication technologies to address some of these inefficiencies and to improve interprofessional collaboration. Objective To develop recommendations that assist health care organizations in improving communication and collaboration in order to develop effective methods for evaluation. Methods An interprofessional meeting was held in a large urban city in Canada with 19 nationally and internationally renowned experts to discuss suitable recommendations for an ideal communication and collaboration system as well as a research framework for general internal medicine (GIM) environments. Results In designing an ideal GIM communication and collaboration system, attendees believed that the new system should possess attributes that aim to: a) improve workflow through prioritization of information and detection of individuals’ contextual situations; b) promote stronger interprofessional relationships with adequate exchange of information; c) enhance patient-centered care by allowing greater patient autonomy over their health care information; d) enable interoperability and scalability between and within institutions; and e) function across different platforms. In terms of evaluating the effects of technology in GIM settings, participants championed the use of rigorous scientific methods that span multiple perspectives and disciplines. Specifically, participants recommended that consistent measures and definitions need to be established so that these impacts can be examined across individual, group, and organizational levels. Conclusions Discussions from our meeting demonstrated the complexities of technological implementations in GIM settings. Recommendations on the design principles and research paradigms for an improved communication system are described. PMID:23612055

  2. The management of children with cancer in Papua New Guinea: a review of children with cancer at Port Moresby General Hospital.

    PubMed

    Kiromat, M; Vince, J D; Oswyn, G; Tefuarani, N

    2004-01-01

    In the period of three and a half years between January 1998 and June 2001, 64 children with cancer were seen at the Paediatric Unit of Port Moresby General Hospital (PMGH). 62 children presented for the first time, whilst 2 were under review, having started treatment in 1996. The male:female ratio was 1.8:1. The median age was 60 months with an interquartile range of 36-84 months. 50% of the children were from the Port Moresby area, 15% from Central Province and 35% were referred from other provinces. Lymphoma, with Burkitt's lymphoma predominating, was as common as leukaemia. 20 (31%) of the children presented either at an advanced stage of disease or with cancer associated with a poor prognosis with available treatment, and were not offered curative treatment. 2 children transferred overseas for treatment. Of 42 families offered treatment 38 accepted and continued. At review 5 years after the start of the study 19 of the 20 children not offered treatment were known to have died and the outcome for 1 was unknown. Of the 38 children who underwent treatment at PMGH 24 (63%) were known to have died, 2 (5%) were still under treatment, 7 (18%) were in remission and the outcome for 5 (13%) was unknown. Of the 24 known to have died, remission induction failed in 16, relapse followed remission in 3 and 5 died from infection. The mean (SD) survival of those who died was 3.9 (3.4) months. 24 (51%) of the 47 known deceased children died in hospital, including 7 (32%) of the 22 referred patients. Significant problems were encountered in patient treatment. Infections occurred in 74% of treated children and drug shortages were experienced in 26%. The substantial problems faced by the families included marital discord, major financial hardship and, for those referred from other provinces whose children died, major delays and difficulties in repatriation. It is suggested that in Papua New Guinea the most appropriate approach to treatment for most children with cancer is the model in which paediatricians at the child's nearest appropriately staffed hospital take responsibility. Appropriate drug regimens, readily available drugs, ongoing advice and data collection should be coordinated through a central source. Accurate data should facilitate rational decisions. PMID:16862938

  3. Occupational stress and mental health among nurses in a medical intensive care unit of a general hospital in Bandar Abbas in 2013

    PubMed Central

    Tajvar, Abdolhamid; Saraji, Gebraeil Nasl; Ghanbarnejad, Amin; Omidi, Leila; Hosseini, Seyed Sodabeh Seyed; Abadi, Ali Salehi Sahl

    2015-01-01

    Background: Many nurses have reported experiencing high levels of occupational stress in their work environment. Stress, as an outcome of stressful workplaces and tasks, affects nursing behavior in hospital wards. The objectives of this research were to determine the prevalence of occupational stress and mental health problems in nurses in the intensive care unit (ICU) at Shahid Mohammadi Hospital in Bandar Abbas in 2013 and to determine the relationship between occupational stress and mental health. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2013 on all of the nurses working in ICU at Shahid Mohammadi Hospital located in Bandar Abbas, Iran. Seventy-two nurses were selected as the population for this study, and all of them were female. Two questionnaires were used in this study, i.e., General Health Questionnaire-28 (GHQ-28) for assessing mental health and an occupational stress test for assessing job stress. Furthermore, the relationship between occupational stress and mental health was examined. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), independent samples t-test, and Pearsons product-moment correlation test were used to analyze the data. Results: High and moderate levels of occupational stress were experienced by 83.9% and 10.7% of ICU nurses, respectively. The prevalence of mental disorders, somatic symptoms, anxiety, social dysfunction, and depression were 58.9, 60.7, 62.5, 71.4, and 10.7%, respectively. The findings of the independent samples t-test showed that somatic symptoms had significant relationships with age and working experience (p = 0.01). According to the independent samples t-test, there were no significant differences between somatic symptoms and working different shifts (p > 0.05). Conclusions: There was a high prevalence of occupational stress among ICU nurses. There was a significant relationship between occupational stress and mental health. Future interventions are needed to codify a comprehensive health program in this field to reduce occupational stress and enhance nurses levels of mental health. PMID:26388976

  4. Prevalence of psychiatric co-morbidity among patients attending dental OPD and the role of consultation-liaison psychiatry in dental practice in a tertiary care general hospital

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Pradip K; Ray (Bhattacharya), Sampa; Makhal, Manabendra; Majumder, Uttam; De, Shantanu; Ghosh, Subhankar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Psychiatric co-morbidities are frequent among patients attending dental OPD, some of which go unrecognized and hence untreated. Aims: The present study has been carried out to detect the psychiatric co-morbidities among dental patients and determine the scope of consultation-liaison (C-L) psychiatry in a rural teaching hospital regarding comprehensive management of the patients. Settings and Design: This cross-sectional, descriptive type study was conducted in a multi-speciality tertiary care teaching hospital in the northern part of West Bengal, India. Materials and Methods: One hundred patients attending the dental OPD were randomly included in the study and every patient was consecutively referred to psychiatry department for assessment, during the period from 1st November 2013 to 30th April 2014. All referred patients were clinically examined and psychiatric co-morbidity was assessed by the help of General Health Questionnaire (GHQ)-28 and Mental Status Examination. Statistical analysis used: The data were subjected to statistical package for social sciences (SPSS), version 16, and statistically analyzed using Cross tab and Chi test. P <0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results: The commonest dental illness was dental caries (22%). More than two-third of the patients had psychiatric co-morbidity according to GHQ-28 total score. Sixty-eight patients were diagnosed to have mental disorder on mental status examination. Somatoform disorder (25%) was the commonest type of mental disorder, followed by mixed anxiety and depression (14%). Conclusions: This study has pointed the need for psychological examination of patients visiting dental specialty with unexplained physical symptoms. Such patients can be identified and treated, provided a psychiatric consultation service exists. PMID:25767358

  5. The clinical pattern of renal diseases in the nephrology in-patient unit of the Yaounde General Hospital in Cameroon: a five-year audit

    PubMed Central

    Kaze, Francois Folefack; Ekokobe, Forbin Elias; Halle, Marie Patrice; Fouda, Hermine; Menanga, Alain Patrick; Ashuntantang, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Kidney diseases are a growing worldwide problem and one of the major public health threats. We analyzed the spectrum of kidney diseases seen over a five-year period in the nephrology in-patient unit of the Yaounde general hospital. Methods This was a retrospective analysis of 225 medical records of patients admitted from January 2005 to December 2009 in the unit with a discharge diagnosis of kidney and urinary tract diseases. The first hospitalization was considered for patients admitted several times for the same disease. Socio-demographic and clinical patient data were recorded. Results The patients mean age was 44.8±16 years with 135 (60%) males and 211 (93.8%) emergency admissions. All 139 (61.8%) patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) had chronic renal failure. Acute kidney injury (AKI) (28%), nephrotic syndrome (7.6%), renal colic (1.3%) and acute pyelonephritis (1.3%) were other patterns observed. Chronic glomerulonephritis (25.9%), hypertension (22.3%) and diabetes (20.1%) were the main etiological factors of CKD. All AKI patients were in stage RIFLE-F. AKI was secondary to parenchymal (58.7%), functional (25.4%) and obstructive (15.9%) etiologies. Black water fever (36.4%), sepsis (22.7%), drugs (18.2%), eclampsia (13.6%) and herbal concoctions (9.1%) were the etiologies of acute tubular necrosis while enterocolitis (56.2%), heart failure (31.3%) and digestive hemorrhage (12.5%) were the etiologies of functional AKI. Conclusion The clinical pattern of renal diseases is dominated by advanced CKD and AKI secondary to preventable causes. This study suggests a need for an array of actions including sensitization, continuous medical education and strengthening of the health system. PMID:26421100

  6. Demographics, Clinical Characteristics, and Treatment of Aggressive Patients Admitted to the Acute Behavioral Unit of a Community General Hospital: A Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Reade, Cynthia; Stoltzfus, Jill; Mittal, Vikrant

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Aggressive patients are not uncommon in acute inpatient behavioral health units of general hospitals. Prior research identifies various predictors associated with aggressive inpatient behavior. This prospective observational study examines the demographic and clinical characteristics of aggressive inpatients and the routine medications these patients were receiving at discharge. Method: Thirty-six adults diagnosed with a DSM-IV mental disorder who met 2 of 6 established inclusion criteria for high violence risk and a Clinical Global Impressions–Severity of Illness (CGI-S) scale score ≥ 4 were observed for a maximum of 28 days on the 23-bed case mix acute behavioral health unit of St Luke’s University Hospital, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, from January 2012 to May 2013. Primary outcome measures were the Modified Overt Aggression Scale (MOAS) and CGI-S; secondary measures were symptom outcome measures and demographic and clinical characteristics data. Analysis was conducted using repeated measures methodology. Results: Younger males with a history of previous violence, psychiatric admissions, and symptoms of severe agitation were more at risk for aggressive behavior. Positive psychotic symptoms, a diagnosis of bipolar disorder, substance use, and comorbid personality disorders also increased risk. Significant improvements from baseline to last visit were observed for the CGI-S and MOAS (P < .001 for both), with a significant correlation between the MOAS and CGI-S at last visit (P < .001). Only the symptom of agitation was significantly correlated to MOAS scores at both baseline and last visit (P < .001). Conclusion: Patients significantly improved over time in both severity of illness and level of aggression. PMID:25317364

  7. Effect of recycling activities on the heating value of solid waste: case study of the Greater Vancouver Regional District (Metro Vancouver).

    PubMed

    Abedini, Ali R; Atwater, James W; Fu, George Yuzhu

    2012-08-01

    Two main goals of the integrated solid waste management system (ISWMS) of Metro Vancouver (MV) include further recycling of waste and energy recovery via incineration of waste. These two very common goals, however, are not always compatible enough to fit in an ISWMS depending on waste characteristics and details of recycling programs. This study showed that recent recycling activities in MV have negatively affected the net heating value (NHV) of municipal solid waste (MSW) in this regional district. Results show that meeting MV's goal for additional recycling of MSW by 2015 will further reduce the NHV of waste, if additional recycling activities are solely focused on more extensive recycling of packaging materials (e.g. paper and plastic). It is concluded that 50% additional recycling of paper and plastic in MV will increase the overall recycling rate to 70% (as targeted by the MV for 2015) and result in more than 8% reduction in NHV of MSW. This reduction translates to up to 2.3 million Canadian dollar (CAD$) less revenue at a potential waste-to-energy (WTE) plant with 500 000 tonnes year(-1) capacity. Properly designed recycling programmes, however, can make this functional element of ISWMS compatible with green goals of energy recovery from waste. Herein an explanation of how communities can increase their recycling activities without affecting the feasibility of potential WTE projects is presented. PMID:22700857

  8. 1. OVERVIEW OF MAIN HOSPITAL, NORTHEAST CORNER. Presidio of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. OVERVIEW OF MAIN HOSPITAL, NORTHEAST CORNER. - Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman General Hospital, Building No. 27, Letterman Hospital Complex, Edie Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  9. 4. Hospital Point, Saunders Monument, view to northeast Portsmouth ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Hospital Point, Saunders Monument, view to northeast - Portsmouth Naval Hospital, Bounded by Elizabeth River, Crawford Street, Portsmouth General Hospital, Parkview Avenue, & Scotts Creek, Portsmouth, Portsmouth, VA

  10. 5. Hospital Point, northeast bulkhead (typical), view to northwest ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Hospital Point, northeast bulkhead (typical), view to northwest - Portsmouth Naval Hospital, Bounded by Elizabeth River, Crawford Street, Portsmouth General Hospital, Parkview Avenue, & Scotts Creek, Portsmouth, Portsmouth, VA

  11. High-resolution imaging of rapid tremor migrations beneath southern Vancouver Island using cross-station cross correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yajun; Rubin, Allan M.; Bostock, Michael G.; Armbruster, John G.

    2015-06-01

    We develop a cross-station method to detect and locate tremor and low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs), based on the original work of Armbruster et al. (2014) that compares waveforms from the same time window at stations separated by roughly 10 km. To improve the signal-to-noise ratio, we first rotate the horizontal components into the empirical shear wave particle motion direction. The large-scale "rapid tremor reversals" beneath southern Vancouver Island are best recorded by stations that exhibit pronounced shear wave splitting, which obscures this optimal direction. We correct for splitting using the stacked templates of 11 low-frequency earthquake families obtained in this region by Bostock et al. (2012). We find that the style of rapid tremor migrations (RTMs) evolves as the main front passes over a region. Very close to the main front, numerous small-scale migrations occur with recurrence intervals far shorter than tidal periods. These usually propagate along the main front even when that is not parallel to dip. Several larger RTMs propagating along the main front have prominent elongation orthogonal to the propagation direction, inconsistent with the interpretation that their large propagation speed is an "apparent" velocity caused by the slow main front intersecting a preexisting linear structure on the plate interface. Farther behind the main front, RTMs gradually progress to being tidally modulated and have generally slower propagation speeds. Many reversal-like RTMs are observed, some of which evolve from fronts initially propagating along the main front. These reversals are sometimes coherent across regions of low tremor density.

  12. Vitamin D supplementation is associated with higher serum 25OHD in Asian and White infants living in Vancouver, Canada.

    PubMed

    Green, Tim J; Li, Wangyang; Barr, Susan I; Jahani, Mitra; Chapman, Gwen E

    2015-04-01

    To prevent rickets, the Health Canada and the American Academy of Pediatrics recommend that breastfed infants receive a daily vitamin D supplement of 10 μg d(-1) . Compliance with this recommendation is variable and its effect on infant vitamin D status is unclear. We measured serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) in Asian immigrant (n=28) and White (n=37) mothers and their infants aged 2-4 months living in Vancouver (49°N). Mothers completed health and demographic questionnaires. All subjects were term infants who were primarily breastfed. Analysis of variance, χ(2) , multiple regression and logistic regression analysis were performed as appropriate. Mean 25OHD of the infants was 31 (95% confidence interval 28-34) ng mL(-1) . Only two infants had a 25OHD concentration indicative of deficiency, <10 ng mL(-1) . Of the infants, 14% (n=9) and 49% (n=32) were vitamin D insufficient based on two commonly used cut-offs of 20 and 30 ng mL(-1) , respectively. Fifty-eight (89%) infants had been given a vitamin D supplement. Mean 25OHD was 9.4 ng mL(-1) higher in infants consuming ≥10 μg d(-1) of vitamin D from supplements vs. those consuming less (P=0.003). Mother's 25OHD, season, skin colour or ethnicity (Asian vs. White) did not influence infant 25OHD. The infants in our study, most of whom received vitamin D supplements, were generally protected against low 25OHD. The study was limited by sample size and the nature of the cross-sectional study design. PMID:23061469

  13. Side-scan sonar estimates of the utilization of gray whale feeding grounds along Vancouver Island, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvitek, Rikk G.; Oliver, John S.

    Infaunal prey communities and gray whale feeding excavations were found at three sites along the west coast of Vancouver Island: Ahous Bay, Pachena Bay and Port San Juan. Side-scan sonar records indicated that whales disturbed up to 36% of the sea floor. The mean percentage of the bottom covered with feeding excavations was > 17% in each of the three feeding grounds. There was a positive relationship between the biomass of ampeliscid amphipod prey and the total quantity of prey consumed by gray whales from the three feeding grounds. There also was considerable annual variation in the size of feeding excavations, the total area covered by excavations, and the dispersion of excavations over the entire prey community during 3 years of observations at Pachena Bay. In general, two types of gray whale feeding records occurred in the Ampelisca tube mats. One record was composed of large complex excavations (mean > 20.5 m 2): the other contained only small features(mean < 4 m 2). Gray whales expanded the small feeding excavations into large, complex features by feeding along the edges of existing depressions. Edge feeding may increase the energy yield per dive as whales avoid low biomass areas inside existing excavations. It may also require less energy to lift the bottom by suction along the edge of an exposed tube mat. Gray whale feeding suspended over 1000 m 3 of sediment per day. Since sediment grain size was coarser inside feeding excavations (mean = 0.160 mm) compared to outside (mean = 0.124 mm), gray whales may help to maintain the mud poor fine sand habitat of its primary benthic prey, Ampelisca, by winnowing away finer sediments. Certain infaunal prey types (e.g. onuphid polychaetes) are less resilient to gray whale predation than others (e.g. Ampelisca) as a result of their local distribution patterns and life history.

  14. Double Bagged or Fries with That: Adolescents' Perceptions of the Job Market in Four Urban Vancouver Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Amanda

    2009-01-01

    This article critically examines adolescents' perceptions of the job market in Vancouver, British Columbia. Employing document analysis, interviews with teachers and students, and classroom observations, the article explores how adolescents in four urban schools understood the difference between having a job and a career in the context of the…

  15. A Search for Decolonizing Place-Based Pedagogies: An Exploration of Unheard Histories in Kitsilano Vancouver, B.C.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Elizabeth Ruth

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the ways that place-based pedagogies can facilitate dialogue on colonization, or some of the "dark matters" of environmental education, specifically by engaging non-Indigenous adults in decolonizing dialogues. I share findings from an action research project with Kitsilano Neighbourhood House in Vancouver, British

  16. A Search for Decolonizing Place-Based Pedagogies: An Exploration of Unheard Histories in Kitsilano Vancouver, B.C.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Elizabeth Ruth

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the ways that place-based pedagogies can facilitate dialogue on colonization, or some of the "dark matters" of environmental education, specifically by engaging non-Indigenous adults in decolonizing dialogues. I share findings from an action research project with Kitsilano Neighbourhood House in Vancouver, British…

  17. The Impact of Healthcare Workers Job Environment on Their Mental-emotional Health. Coping Strategies: The Case of a Local General Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Koinis, Aristotelis; Giannou, Vasiliki; Drantaki, Vasiliki; Angelaina, Sophia; Stratou, Elpida; Saridi, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Workplace stress can influence healthcare professionals’ physical and emotional well-being by curbing their efficiency and having a negative impact on their overall quality of life. The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact that work environment in a local public general hospital can have on the health workers’ mental-emotional health and find strategies in order to cope with negative consequences. The study took place from July 2010 to October 2010. Our sample consisted of 200 healthcare professionals aged 21-58 years working in a 240-bed general hospital and the response rate was 91.36%). Our research protocol was first approved by the hospital’s review board. A standardized questionnaire that investigates strategies for coping with stressful conditions was used. A standardized questionnaire was used in the present study Coping Strategies for Stressful Events, evaluating the strategies that persons employ in order to overcome a stressful situation or event. The questionnaire was first tested for validity and reliability which were found satisfactory (Cronbach’s α=0.862). Strict anonymity of the participants was guaranteed. The SPSS 16.0 software was used for the statistical analysis. Regression analysis showed that health professionals’ emotional health can be influenced by strategies for dealing with stressful events, since positive re-assessment, quitting and seeking social support are predisposing factors regarding the three first quality of life factors of the World Health Organization Quality of Life - BREF. More specifically, for the physical health factor, positive re-assessment (t=3.370, P=0.001) and quitting (t=−2.564, P=0.011) are predisposing factors. For the ‘mental health and spirituality’ regression model, positive re-assessment (t=5.528, P=0.000) and seeking social support (t=−1.991, P=0.048) are also predisposing factors, while regarding social relationships positive re-assessment (t=4.289, P=0.000) is a predisposing factor. According to our findings, there was a notable lack of workplace stress management strategies, which the participants usually perceive as a lack of interest on behalf of the management regarding their emotional state. Some significant factors for lowering workplace stress were found to be the need to encourage and morally reward the staff and also to provide them with opportunities for further or continuous education. PMID:26973958

  18. AVTA Federal Fleet PEV Readiness Data Logging and Characterization Study for the National Park Service: Fort Vancouver National Historic Site

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen Schey; Jim Francfort

    2014-03-01

    Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, managing and operating contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory, is the lead laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing. Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC contracted with Intertek Testing Services, North America (ITSNA) to collect data on federal fleet operations as part of the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity’s Federal Fleet Vehicle Data Logging and Characterization study. The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity study seeks to collect data to validate the use of advanced electric drive vehicle transportation. This report focuses on the Fort Vancouver National Historic Site (FVNHS) fleet to identify daily operational characteristics of select vehicles and report findings on vehicle and mission characterizations to support the successful introduction of electric vehicles (EVs) into the agencies’ fleet. Individual observations of the selected vehicles provided the basis for recommendations related to EV adoption and whether a battery electric vehicle (BEV) or plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) (collectively plug-in electric vehicles) could fulfill the mission requirements. FVNHS identified three vehicles in its fleet for consideration. While the FVNHS vehicles conduct many different missions, only two (i.e., support and pool missions) were selected by agency management to be part of this fleet evaluation. The logged vehicles included a pickup truck and a minivan. This report will show that BEVs and PHEVs are capable of performing the required missions and providing an alternative vehicle for both mission categories, because each has sufficient range for individual trips and time available each day for charging to accommodate multiple trips per day. These charging events could occur at the vehicle’s home base, high-use work areas, or in intermediate areas along routes that the vehicles frequently travel. Replacement of vehicles in the current fleet would result in significant reductions in emission of greenhouse gases and petroleum use, while also reducing fuel costs. The Vancouver, Washington area and neighboring Portland, Oregon are leaders in adoption of PEVs in the United States1. PEV charging stations, or more appropriately identified as electric vehicle supply equipment, located on the FVNHS facility would be a benefit for both FVNHS fleets and general public use. Fleet drivers and park visitors operating privately owned plug-in electric vehicles benefit by using the charging infrastructure. ITSNA recommends location analysis of the FVNHS site to identify the optimal station placement for electric vehicle supply equipment. ITSNA recognizes the support of Idaho National Laboratory and ICF International for their efforts to initiate communication with the National Parks Service and FVNHS for participation in this study. ITSNA is pleased to provide this report and is encouraged by the high interest and support from the National Park Service and FVNHS personnel

  19. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 85-462-1748, Boise Cascade, Vancouver, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Apol, A.; Thoburn, T.W.

    1986-11-01

    An authorized representative of the Association of Western Pulp and Paper Workers requested an investigation be made of employee exposure to diethylenetriamine (DETA), hexamethylene-diisocyante (HDI), and other chemicals in use during the production of carbonless paper at the Boise Cascade facility in Vancouver, Washington. This facility makes paper from pulp and carbonless paper by applying the appropriate coatings to the paper. Possible exposures to biphenyl and butyl biphenyls, formaldehyde, phenol, and petroleum solvents were also investigated. Medical interviews were conducted with 65 employees. In four cases, pulmonary problems were determined that may have been related to past diisocyanate exposure. The authors recommend that workers with asthma sensitization be medically monitored and evaluated, and that contact and inhalation exposures be reduced by the use of personal protective clothing and increased ventilation.

  20. Home Oxygen Program review: Regionalization in Vancouver Coastal Health and British Columbia.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Since its inception in the 1980s, the Home Oxygen Program in British Columbia was centrally managed by the Ministry of Health. Initially a small program with few clients across the province, it soon became a large program with many clients and increasing expenditures. A pilot program started in Victoria (British Columbia) in 1996 demonstrated that managing the program locally could offer better client care, better contract management and significant cost savings. In 2002, the pilot's model and recommendations were implemented in British Columbia's five health authorities. The present review details the experiences of regionalizing the program in the Vancouver Coastal Health authority. After fine adjustments to the model were developed and new contracts and criteria changes made, better care for clients was provided than the previous centralized model at a reduced cost to the taxpayer. PMID:26078624

  1. [Declarations issued by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors in conjunction with the Vancouver standards].

    PubMed

    1998-04-01

    These statements, which are published by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors in conjunction with the Vancouver standards, cover some of the legal, ethical, and practical aspects of the publication of research papers, and of the comments generated by them, in biomedical journals. Following a definition of what constitutes a peer-reviewed journal, the roles of journal owners and editors are described, along with those of members of an editorial board, and procedural norms are set forth in connection with conflicts of interests, retractions or corrections, fraud, and breaches of confidentiality. Among the last topics explored are the problems involved in the dissemination of research results by the popular media, the handling of advertising within the journal, and the simultaneous acceptance of manuscripts whose authors have arrived at opposite conclusions regarding the results of a particular study. PMID:9608815

  2. Home Oxygen Program review: Regionalization in Vancouver Coastal Health and British Columbia

    PubMed Central

    Sandberg, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Since its inception in the 1980s, the Home Oxygen Program in British Columbia was centrally managed by the Ministry of Health. Initially a small program with few clients across the province, it soon became a large program with many clients and increasing expenditures. A pilot program started in Victoria (British Columbia) in 1996 demonstrated that managing the program locally could offer better client care, better contract management and significant cost savings. In 2002, the pilot’s model and recommendations were implemented in British Columbia’s five health authorities. The present review details the experiences of regionalizing the program in the Vancouver Coastal Health authority. After fine adjustments to the model were developed and new contracts and criteria changes made, better care for clients was provided than the previous centralized model at a reduced cost to the taxpayer. PMID:26078624

  3. Primary deforestation and regrowth on limestone slopes on Vancouver Island, British Columbia

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, K.A.; Ford, D.C. . Dept. of Geography)

    1992-01-01

    Limestones, well bedded and steeply dipping, are common in northern Vancouver Island. They have been glaciated and host a high density of postglacial karren (dissolution pits, grooves and troughs linked to underlying caves). There is rich, mature forest cover of western hemlock, silver fir and red cedar that is rooted in the karren or in overlying glacial deposits. Logging commenced around 1900 AD, intensifying after 1960 with clear cutting and (often) burning of slash. Impacts were investigated quantitatively by comparing sixteen limestone sites with eight on adjoining volcanic rocks. Some sites on each retained original forest, other were cleared. It was found that soil losses following logging are significantly greater on the limestones because of wash into karren (the epikarst zone). Regrowth is retarded on the limestones also; one site cleared in 1911 had regained approximately 17% of its original volume of timber 75 years later.

  4. Detection and Evaluation of Episodic Tremor and Slip on Vancouver Island with a Superconducting Gravimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumeyer, J.; Kim, J.; Kao, R.; Kabirzadeh, H.; Henton, J.; Dragert, H.

    2012-12-01

    In July 2012, the superconducting gravimeter (SG) iGrav001 was installed at the Pacific Geoscience Centre in Sidney, British Columbia, on Vancouver Island. This site is located at the northern part of the Cascadia Subduction Zone where transient surface deformation accompanied by tremor-like seismic signals has been documented with a recurrence interval of 13 to 16 months. This phenomenon, named Episodic Tremor and Slip (ETS), has been interpreted to be associated with slow slip events (silent earthquakes) on the deeper (25-45 km) part of the Cascadia Subduction Zone. Geodetically, these slip events have been indentified primarily via transient horizontal displacements at continuous GPS sites and shear-strain transients recorded by borehole strainmeters of the Plate Boundary Observatory. Absolute gravimeter (AG) measurements have also suggested coincident offsets of several μGals (10-8 m/s2) to be associated with ETS. With continuous and high resolution SG monitoring, new insights into the physical processes involved in ETS are expected. Compared to the AG measurements, continuous SG has a higher resolution in recording gravity (about 0.01μGal in time domain and 1nGal (10-11 m/s2) in frequency domain). With this increased precision and with the fundamental stability of the SG, we hope to resolve low-level gravity transients that may be indicative of mass migration. The next prolonged ETS episode in southern Vancouver Island is expected this fall and the SG will provide the first continuous, stable, high-precision gravity record for an ETS event.

  5. Potential use of safer injecting facilities among injection drug users in Vancouver's Downtown Eastside

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Thomas; Wood, Evan; Small, Dan; Palepu, Anita; Tyndall, Mark W.

    2003-01-01

    Background The Vancouver Coastal Health Authority will initiate North America's first sanctioned safer injecting facility, as a pilot project, on Sept. 15, 2003. The analyses presented here were conducted to estimate the potential use of safer injecting facilities by local illicit injection drug users (IDUs) and to evaluate the potential impact of newly established Health Canada restrictions and current police activities on the use of the proposed facility. Methods During April and May 2003, we recruited active IDUs in Vancouver's Downtown Eastside to participate in a feasibility study. We used descriptive and univariate statistics to determine potential use of a safer injecting facility and to explore factors associated with willingness to use such a facility with and without federal restrictions and police presence. Results Overall, 458 street-recruited IDUs completed an interviewer-administered survey, of whom 422 (92%) reported a willingness to use a safer injecting facility. Those expressing willingness were more likely to inject in public (odds ratio [OR] 3.9, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.9–8.0). When the restrictions in the Health Canada guidelines were considered, only 144 (31%) participants were willing to use a safer injecting facility. IDUs who inject alone were more likely (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.0–3.1) and women were less likely (OR 0.6, 95% CI 0.4–0.9) to be willing to use a safer injecting facility operating under these restrictions. Only 103 (22%) of the participants said they would be willing to use a safer injecting facility if police were stationed near the entrance. Interpretation Most IDUs participating in this study expressed a willingness to use a safer injecting facility. However, willingness declined substantially when the IDUs were asked about using a facility operating under selected Health Canada restrictions and in the event that police were stationed near the entrance. PMID:14557313

  6. Needle Exchange and the HIV Epidemic in Vancouver: Lessons Learned from 15 years of research

    PubMed Central

    Hyshka, Elaine; Strathdee, Steffanie; Wood, Evan; Kerr, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    During the mid-1990s, Vancouver experienced a well characterized HIV outbreak among injection drug users (IDU) and many questioned how this could occur in the presence of a high volume needle exchange program (NEP). Specific concerns were fuelled by early research demonstrating that frequent needle exchange program attendees were more likely to be HIV positive than those who attended the NEP less frequently. Since then, some have misinterpreted this finding as evidence that NEPs are ineffective or potentially harmful. In light of continuing questions about the Vancouver HIV epidemic, we review 15 years of peer-reviewed research on Vancouver’s NEP to describe what has been learned through this work. Our review demonstrates that: 1) NEP attendance is not causally associated with HIV infection, 2) frequent attendees of Vancouver’s NEP have higher risk profiles which explain their increased risk of HIV seroconversion, and 3) a number of policy concerns, as well as the high prevalence of cocaine injecting contributed to the failure of the NEP to prevent the outbreak. Additionally, we highlight several improvements to Vancouver’s NEP that contributed to declines in syringe sharing and HIV incidence. Vancouver’s experience provides a number of important lessons regarding NEP. Keys to success include refocusing the NEP away from an emphasis on public order objectives by separating distribution and collection functions, removing syringe distribution limits and decentralizing and diversifying NEP services. Additionally, our review highlights the importance of context when implementing NEPs, as well as ongoing evaluation to identify factors that constrain or improve access to sterile syringes. PMID:22579215

  7. Improving Metabolic and Cardiovascular Health at an Early Psychosis Intervention Program in Vancouver, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Fredrikson, Diane H.; Boyda, Heidi N.; Tse, Lurdes; Whitney, Zachary; Pattison, Mark A.; Ott, Fred J.; Hansen, Laura; Barr, Alasdair M.

    2014-01-01

    Psychotic disorders most commonly appear during the late teenage years and early adulthood. A focused and rapid clinical response by an integrated health team can help to improve the quality of life of the patient, leading to a better long-term prognosis. The Vancouver Coastal Health early psychosis intervention program covers a catchment area of approximately 800,000 people in the cities of Vancouver and Richmond, Canada. The program provides a multidisciplinary approach to supporting patients under the age of 30 who have recently experienced first-break psychosis. The program addresses the needs of the treatment environment, medication, and psychological therapies. A critical part of this support includes a program to specifically improve patients physical health. Physical health needs are addressed through a two-pronged, parallel approach. Patients receive routine metabolic health assessments during their first year in the program, where standard metabolic parameters are recorded. Based on the results of clinical interviews and laboratory tests, specific actionable interventions are recommended. The second key strategy is a program that promotes healthy lifestyle goal development. Patients work closely with occupational therapists to develop goals to improve cardiometabolic health. These programs are supported by an active research environment, where patients are able to engage in studies with a focus on improving their physical health. These studies include a longitudinal evaluation of the effects of integrated health coaching on maintaining cardiometabolic health in patients recently admitted to the program, as well as a clinical study that evaluates the effects of low versus higher metabolic risk antipsychotic drugs on central adiposity. An additional pharmacogenomic study is helping to identify genetic variants that may predict cardiometabolic changes following treatment with antipsychotic drugs. PMID:25249985

  8. Improving metabolic and cardiovascular health at an early psychosis intervention program in vancouver, Canada.

    PubMed

    Fredrikson, Diane H; Boyda, Heidi N; Tse, Lurdes; Whitney, Zachary; Pattison, Mark A; Ott, Fred J; Hansen, Laura; Barr, Alasdair M

    2014-01-01

    Psychotic disorders most commonly appear during the late teenage years and early adulthood. A focused and rapid clinical response by an integrated health team can help to improve the quality of life of the patient, leading to a better long-term prognosis. The Vancouver Coastal Health early psychosis intervention program covers a catchment area of approximately 800,000 people in the cities of Vancouver and Richmond, Canada. The program provides a multidisciplinary approach to supporting patients under the age of 30 who have recently experienced first-break psychosis. The program addresses the needs of the treatment environment, medication, and psychological therapies. A critical part of this support includes a program to specifically improve patients' physical health. Physical health needs are addressed through a two-pronged, parallel approach. Patients receive routine metabolic health assessments during their first year in the program, where standard metabolic parameters are recorded. Based on the results of clinical interviews and laboratory tests, specific actionable interventions are recommended. The second key strategy is a program that promotes healthy lifestyle goal development. Patients work closely with occupational therapists to develop goals to improve cardiometabolic health. These programs are supported by an active research environment, where patients are able to engage in studies with a focus on improving their physical health. These studies include a longitudinal evaluation of the effects of integrated health coaching on maintaining cardiometabolic health in patients recently admitted to the program, as well as a clinical study that evaluates the effects of low versus higher metabolic risk antipsychotic drugs on central adiposity. An additional pharmacogenomic study is helping to identify genetic variants that may predict cardiometabolic changes following treatment with antipsychotic drugs. PMID:25249985

  9. Social influences upon injection initiation among street-involved youth in Vancouver, Canada: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Small, Will; Fast, Danya; Krusi, Andrea; Wood, Evan; Kerr, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Background Street-involved youth are a population at risk of adopting injection as a route of administration, and preventing the transition to injection drug use among street youth represents a public health priority. In order to inform epidemiological research and prevention efforts, we conducted a qualitative study to investigate the initiation of injection drug use among street-involved youth in Vancouver, Canada. Methods Qualitative interviews with street youth who inject drugs elicited descriptions of the adoption of injection as a route of administration. Interviewees were recruited from the At-Risk Youth Study (ARYS), a cohort of street-involved youth who use illicit drugs in Vancouver, Canada. Audio recorded interviews were transcribed verbatim and a thematic analysis was conducted. Results 26 youth aged 16 to 26 participated in this study, including 12 females. Among study participants the first injection episode frequently featured another drug user who facilitated the initiation of injecting. Youth narratives indicate that the transition into injecting is influenced by social interactions with drug using peers and evolving perceptions of injecting, and rejecting identification as an injector was important among youth who did not continue to inject. It appears that social conventions discouraging initiating young drug users into injection exist among established injectors, although this ethic is often ignored. Conclusion The importance of social relationships with other drug users within the adoption of injection drug use highlights the potential of social interventions to prevent injection initiation. Additionally, developing strategies to engage current injectors who are likely to initiate youth into injection could also benefit prevention efforts. PMID:19405977

  10. Esthesioneuroblastoma: An Update on the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and Massachusetts General Hospital Experience with Craniofacial Resection, Proton Beam Radiation, and Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Herr, Marc W.; Sethi, Rosh K. V.; Meier, Joshua C.; Chambers, Kyle J.; Remenschneider, Aaron; Chan, Annie; Curry, William T.; Barker, Fred G.; Deschler, Daniel G.; Lin, Derrick T.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To update the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary (MEEI) experience in the management of esthesioneuroblastoma (ENB) with multimodality therapy and to reassess treatment outcomes and complications in a larger cohort with longer follow-up times. Design A retrospective chart review. Setting A tertiary referral center. Participants All patients presenting with ENB and managed at the MGH and MEEI from 1997 to 2013. Main Outcome Measures Disease-free and overall survival. Results Twenty-two patients were identified with an average follow-up of 73 months. Ten patients presented with Kadish stage B disease and 12 with stage C disease. A total of six patients (27%) developed regional metastases. Treatment for all patients included craniofacial resection (CFR) followed by proton beam irradiation with or without chemotherapy. The 5-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 86.4% and 95.2%, respectively, by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Negative margins were a significant factor in disease-free survival. One patient experienced severe late-radiation toxicity. Conclusions ENB is safely and effectively treated with CFR followed by proton beam irradiation. The high incidence of regional metastases warrants strong consideration for elective neck irradiation. Proton beam radiation is associated with lower rates of severe late-radiation toxicity than conventional radiotherapy. PMID:24498591

  11. Descriptive analysis of total medical admissions and common medical disorders in 1987 Kuantan General Hospital, using computerized in-patients' discharge record.

    PubMed

    Lim, T O; Looi, H W; Harun, K; Marzida

    1991-09-01

    Using computerized in-patients' discharge records, a descriptive analysis was carried out of all medical admission in 1987 in a general hospital. The survey found that there were a total of 4053 admissions in 1987. A wide range of medical disorders were seen reflecting the lack of subspecialization. Cardiovascular disorders topped accounting for 25.6% of all admissions, followed by gastrointestinal and hepatobiliary disorders 12.8% and respiratory disorders 10.7%. The commonest specific medical disorders seen were hypertension 13.8%, diabetes mellitus 10.2%, ischaemic heart disease 7% and asthma 4.5%. The age, sex, ethnic and geographical distributions of the common medical disorders seen appear to conform to two broad pattern; hypertension, diabetes, ischaemic heart disease and cerebrovascular disease affected the older patients, had even ethic distribution and predominantly urban. Malaria, non-specific fever, viral hepatitis and acute gastroenteritis affected the younger patients, predominantly rural and Malay. Information from such surveys may be useful for planning and organization of medical services. PMID:1839919

  12. Female Genital Mutilation in Infants and Young Girls: Report of Sixty Cases Observed at the General Hospital of Abobo (Abidjan, Cote D'Ivoire, West Africa)

    PubMed Central

    Plo, Kouie; Asse, Kouadio; Seï, Dohagneron; Yenan, John

    2014-01-01

    The practice of female genital mutilations continues to be recurrent in African communities despite the campaigns, fights, and laws to ban it. A survey was carried out in infants and young girls at the General Hospital of Abobo in Cote D'Ivoire. The purpose of the study was to describe the epidemiological aspects and clinical findings related to FGM in young patients. Four hundred nine (409) females aged from 1 to 12 years and their mothers entered the study after their consent. The results were that 60/409 patients (15%) were cut. The majority of the young females came from Muslim families (97%); the earlier age at FGM procedure in patients is less than 5 years: 87%. Amongst 409 mothers, 250 women underwent FGM which had other daughters cut. Women were mainly involved in the FGM and their motivations were virginity, chastity, body cleanliness, and fear of clitoris similar to penis. Only WHO types I and II were met. If there were no incidental events occurred at the time of the procedure, the obstetrical future of these young females would be compromised. With FGM being a harmful practice, health professionals and NGOs must unite their efforts in people education to abandon the procedure. PMID:24729789

  13. Migration to the Downtown Eastside neighbourhood of Vancouver and changes in service use in a cohort of mentally ill homeless adults: a 10-year retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Somers, Julian M; Moniruzzaman, Akm; Rezansoff, Stefanie N

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Little research has investigated the role of migration as a potential contributor to the spatial concentration of homeless people with complex health and social needs. In addition, little is known concerning the relationship between possible migration and changes in levels of service use over time. We hypothesised that homeless, mentally ill individuals living in a concentrated urban setting had migrated from elsewhere over a 10-year period, in association with significant increases in the use of public services. Setting Recruitment was concentrated in the Downtown Eastside neighbourhood of Vancouver, Canada. Participants Participants (n=433) met criteria for chronic homelessness and serious mental illness, and provided consent to access administrative data. Methods Linked administrative data were used to retrospectively examine geographic relocation as well as rates of health, justice, and social welfare service utilisation in each of the 10 years prior to recruitment. Generalised estimating equations were used to estimate the effect of migration on service use. Results Over a 10-year period there was significant movement into Vancouver's Downtown Eastside neighbourhood (from 17% to 52% of the cohort). During the same period, there were significant annual increases in community medical services (adjusted rate ratio (ARR) per year=1.08; 95% CI 1.06 to 1.10), hospital admissions (ARR=1.08; 95% CI 1.04 to 1.11), criminal convictions (ARR=1.08; 95% CI 1.03 to 1.13), and financial assistance payments (ARR=1.04; 95% CI 1.03 to 1.06). Migration was significantly associated with financial assistance, but not with other types of services. Conclusions Significant increases in service use over a 10-year period coincided with significant migration into an urban area where relevant services were concentrated. These results highlight opportunities for early intervention in spatially diverse neighbourhoods to interrupt trajectories marked by worsening health and extremely high service involvement. Further research is urgently needed to investigate the causal relationships between physical migration, health and social welfare, and escalating use of public services. Trial registration numbers ISRCTN57595077 and ISRCTN66721740; Post-results. PMID:26739726

  14. The association between work ethics and attitudes towards organizational changes among the administrative, financial and support employees of general teaching hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Ravangard, Ramin; Sajjadnia, Zahra; Jafari, Abdosaleh; Shahsavan, Najme; Bahmaie, Jamshid; Bahadori, Mohammadkarim

    2014-01-01

    In order to achieve success in today’s competitive world, organizations should adapt to environmental changes. On the other hand, managers should have a set of values and ethical guidelines for their administrative and organizational functions. This study aimed to investigate the association between work ethics and attitudes towards organizational changes among the administrative, financial and support employees of general teaching hospitals affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. This was an applied, cross-sectional and descriptive-analytic study conducted in 2013. A sample of 124 employees was selected using stratified sampling proportional to size and simple random sampling methods. Data were collected using 2 questionnaires measuring the dimensions of employees' work ethics (four dimensions) and attitudes towards organizational changes (three dimensions). The collected data were analyzed using SPSS 18.0 and statistical tests, including ANOVA, independent samples t-test, and Pearson’s correlation coefficient. A P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. The maximum and minimum score of work ethic dimensions were related to being cooperative (4.60 ± 0.38) and dependable (4.29 ± 0.39) respectively. On the other hand, the maximum and minimum score of attitudes towards the various dimensions of organizational changes were related to the behavioral (3.83 ± 0.70) and the affective (3.55 ± 0.88) dimensions respectively. Furthermore, there was a significant relationship between the work ethics and education levels of the employees in this study (P = 0.003). Also, among work s dimensions, only being considerate had a significant association with attitudes towards organizational changes (P = 0.014) and their cognitive dimension (P = 0.005). To improve employees' work ethics and attitudes towards organizational changes, the following suggestions can be offered: training hospitals managers in participative management style and its application, as well as the importance of meeting the employees' needs and expectations based on their characteristics; familiarizing employees with the Islamic work ethic; educating employees on the importance of being considerate towards their colleagues and subordinates in the workplace, and reinforcing this desirable quality; and finally, clarifying the need for changes in the organization for all employees. PMID:25512831

  15. Radiation Dose in the Thyroid and the Thyroid Cancer Risk Attributable to CT Scans for Pediatric Patients in One General Hospital of China

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yin-Ping; Niu, Hao-Wei; Chen, Jun-Bo; Fu, Ying-Hua; Xiao, Guo-Bing; Sun, Quan-Fu

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To quantify the radiation dose in the thyroid attributable to different CT scans and to estimate the thyroid cancer risk in pediatric patients. Methods: The information about pediatric patients who underwent CT scans was abstracted from the radiology information system in one general hospital between 1 January 2012 and 31 December 2012. The radiation doses were calculated using the ImPACT Patient Dosimetry Calculator and the lifetime attributable risk (LAR) of thyroid cancer incidence was estimated based on the National Academies Biologic Effects of Ionizing Radiation VII model. Results: The subjects comprised 922 children, 68% were males, and received 971 CT scans. The range of typical radiation dose to the thyroid was estimated to be 0.61–0.92 mGy for paranasal sinus CT scans, 1.10–2.45 mGy for head CT scans, and 2.63–5.76 mGy for chest CT scans. The LAR of thyroid cancer were as follows: for head CT, 1.1 per 100,000 for boys and 8.7 per 100,000 for girls; for paranasal sinus CT scans, 0.4 per 100,000 for boys and 2.7 per 100,000 for girls; for chest CT scans, 2.1 per 100,000 for boys and 14.1 per 100,000 for girls. The risk of thyroid cancer was substantially higher for girls than for the boys, and from chest CT scans was higher than that from head or paransal sinus CT scans. Conclusions: Chest CT scans caused higher thyroid dose and the LAR of thyroid cancer incidence, compared with paransal sinus or head CT scans. Therefore, physicians should pay more attention to protect the thyroid when children underwent CT scans, especially chest CT scans. PMID:24608902

  16. Updated Long-Term Outcomes and Prognostic Factors for Patients With Unresectable Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Treated With Intraoperative Radiotherapy at the Massachusetts General Hospital, 1978 to 2010

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Sophie; Hong, Theodore S.; Goldberg, Saveli I.; Castillo, Carlos Fernandez-del; Thayer, Sarah P.; Ferrone, Cristina R.; Ryan, David P.; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S.; Kwak, Eunice L.; Willett, Christopher G.; Lillemoe, Keith D.; Warshaw, Andrew L.; Wo, Jennifer Y.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND In the current study, the authors evaluated long-term outcomes, intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT)-related toxicity, and prognostic factors for overall survival (OS) among patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) who received IORT as part of their treatment at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). METHODS Medical records were reviewed for 194 consecutive patients with unresectable LAPC who were treated with IORT at MGH between 1978 and 2010. OS was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Prognostic factors were evaluated at the univariate level by the log-rank test and at the multivariate level by the Cox proportional hazards model. Rates of disease progression and treatment toxicity were calculated. RESULTS The 1-year, 2-year, and 3-year survival rates were 49%, 16%, and 6%, respectively. Six patients (3%) survived for > 5 years. The median OS was 12.0 months. Among 183 patients with known post-IORT disease status, the 2-year local progression-free survival and distant metastasis-free survival rates were 41% and 28%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, an IORT applicator diameter ≤ 8 cm (hazards ratio [HR], 0.51; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.30–0.84 [P = .009]), a Charlson age-comorbidity index ≤3 (HR, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.31–0.73 [P = .001]), and receipt of chemotherapy (HR, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.33–0.66 [P < .001]) predicted improved OS. The median OS for patients with all 3 positive prognostic factors was 21.2 months. CONCLUSIONS Well-selected patients with LAPC with small tumors and low Charlson age-comorbidity indices can achieve good long-term survival outcomes with a treatment regimen that incorporates chemotherapy and IORT. PMID:24006012

  17. Visual inspection with acetic acid and Lugol's iodine in cervical cancer screening at the general referral hospital Kayembe in Mbuji-Mayi, Democratic Republic of Congo

    PubMed Central

    Desire, Banza Kamba; Philippe, Cilundika Mulenga; Thierry, Kabengele; Félix, Kitenge Wa Momat; Wembodinga, Gilbert Utshudienyema; Prosper, Kakudji Luhete; Oscar, Luboya Numbi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cervical cancer is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality of women from cancer in the developing World. It is the primary cause of reduced life expectancy in Sub-Saharan countries such as Democratic Republic of Congo. The aim of this work was to determinate the socio-demographic profile of women with precancerous and cancerous lesions of the cervix, to determinate the frequency of VIA and VILI positive cases and to show the challenges that can be faced in managing patients with abnormalities in the city of Mbuji-Mayi in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Methods As part of its activities, the “Association de Lutte contre le Cancer du Col utérin” (ALCC) organized a community outreach followed by free voluntary testing for cervical cancer for two weeks (26thMarch to 10th April 2011) at the General Referral Hospital Kayembe in Mbuji-Mayi (Democratic Republic of Congo). Results A total of 229 women were examined. 38% of tests (VIA + VILI) were positive with 6 clinically suspected cases of invasive cancer at stage 1 (7% of cases). Nearly 70% of patients were still of childbearing age and had started their first sexual intercourse before 18 years of age and 86% of cases were multiparous. Given the material, financial and technical constraints, 75% of patients were placed in a monitoring program of 9 months to 1 year (= expectation and another test) while 11% of them were selected for a biopsy to be locally practiced and sent to the pathologist. Nearly 8% of the cases were candidates for hysterectomy. Conclusion Given the difficulties encountered and the frequency of positive tests, we recommend another study with a larger sample, improved working conditions (mainly equipment) and the association of another test such as the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) test.

  18. Comparison of hysterosalpingograms with laparoscopy in the diagnostic of tubal factor of female infertility at the Yaoundé General Hospital, Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Ngowa, Jean Dupont Kemfang; Kasia, Jean Marie; Georges, NGuefack-Tsague; Nkongo, Victorine; Sone, Charles; Fongang, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The objectives were to assess the diagnostic value of hysterosalpingography (HSG) with laparoscopy as gold standard in the evaluation of tubal patency and pelvic adhesions in women suffering from infertility. Methods We conducted a comparative cross sectional study on 208 medical files of infertile women followed up at the Yaoundé General Hospital during a period of five years (December 2007 to December 2012). Tubal patency, hydrosalpinx and pelvic adhesions detected at HSG were compared with laparoscopic findings as the gold standard. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and diagnostic accuracy of HSG were calculated with 95% confidence interval (CI). Results Mean age of the patients was 31.4± 6.45 years. Secondary infertility was the most frequent type of infertility (66.82%). HSG had a moderate sensitivity (51.0%; 95% IC. 37.5-64.4), high specificity (90.0%; 95% IC.74.4-96.5), high PPV (89.3%; 95% IC. 72.8-96.3) and a moderate NPV (52.9%; 95% IC. 39.5-65.9) in the diagnosis of bilateral proximal tubal occlusion. Concerning, distal tubal patency, HSG had a high sensitivity (86.8%; 95% IC. 76.7-92.9), low specificity (42.2%; 95% CI. 29.0-56.7), moderate PPV (69.4%; 95% IC. 58.9-78.2) and a moderate NPV (67.9%; 95% IC. 49.3-82.0) in the diagnosis of bilateral or unilateral distal tubal occlusion. However, HSG had a low diagnostic value (27.8%; 95%IC.18.8-39.0) in the pelvic adhesions. Conclusion HSG is of limited diagnostic value in tubal factor infertility and is of low diagnostic value for pelvic adhesions. PMID:26958127

  19. Anxiety Status and its Relationship with General Health Related Quality of Life among Prostate Cancer Patients in Two University Hospitals in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    ISA, Mohamad Rodi; MOY, Foong Ming; ABDUL RAZACK, Azad Hassan; MD ZAINUDDIN, Zulkifli; ZAINAL, Nur Zuraida

    2013-01-01

    Background This study aimed to determine the prevalence of anxiety among prostate cancer patients, and to ascertain the association between stress status, socio-demographic, medical and surgical illness, current urinary problem and cancer status with general health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among these patients. Methods: A hospital based, cross sectional study was conducted at Surgical Clinic, University Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC) and Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre (UKMMC) using universal sampling. Result: A total of 193 patients were recruited. The prevalence of anxiety was 25.4% (95%CI: 19.2 – 31.6). The anxiety ratings were mild anxiety (10.4%), moderate anxiety (13.6%) and severe anxiety (1.6%). The total quality of life among stress group was 59.2 ± 14.7 and among non-stress group was 73.9 ± 12.7. There was a significant negative weak correlation between anxiety score and total quality of life (rs=−0.534, P<0.001). In multivariable analysis, there was a significant difference in the total quality of life (QOL) among anxiety status [adj. mean diff. = −9.1 (95%CI: −15.2, −4.7)]. The adjusted mean difference was associated by age category of the patients (P<0.001); living partner (P<0.001); intermittency (P=0.035) and problem of hematuria during micturition (P=0.005). Conclusion: The prevalence of anxiety among prostate cancer was moderately high. Treating the urination problem as well as encouraging living with spouse/family may improve the quality of life among anxiety condition of these patients. PMID:23641401

  20. Perceived organizational support and job involvement in the Iranian health care system: A case study of emergency room nurses in general hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Gorji, Hassan Abolghasem; Etemadi, Manal; Hoseini, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Researchers believe that there are social exchanges between the employers and employees, because the employees would be interested in their organization and trust it based on how the organization values them and their welfare, comfort, and security. This belief is known as perceived organizational support that makes employees consider themselves as a part of their organization and have a commitment to it. The literature review is very limited in both variables in Iran and thus few studies also report the perceived organizational support and job involvement at the lower levels in our country. This research aimed at studying the levels of perceived organizational support and job involvement, relationship between this two, and the demographic factors relationship with both of them. Materials and Methods: This research was a descriptive analytical study conducted in 2012. The population included 123 emergency nurses in General Hospitals of Qom. Data were collected through Perceived Organizational Support and Job Involvement Questionnaires and analyzed using SPSS software, descriptive statistics and Spearman correlation and Chi-square test. Results: Both mean scores for perceived organizational support and job involvement were in average level, 146/12 and 35/38, respectively. There was a significant relationship between perceived organizational support and age, education, tenure, organizational position, and job shift. There was also a significant relationship between job involvement and age and education and finally between perceived organizational support and job involvement (P = 0/029). Discussion: The high correlation between perceived organizational support and job involvement indicates that the improvement of perceived organizational support are necessary through motivating the employees, showing interest in them, paying attention to them, respecting them, and providing development opportunity in the organization. These should be always considered by managers to improve job involvement PMID:25077151

  1. AB114. Change in bone mineral density of patients with osteogenesis imperfecta after 6 months of pamidronate therapy in the philippine general hospital: a retrospective review

    PubMed Central

    Abacan, Mary Ann; Boquiren, Ryan Albert Leonard; Elepano, Imarzen; Alcausin, Maria Melanie

    2015-01-01

    Background Osteogenesis imperfecta is a heritable disorder due to a collagen gene mutation causing a structural abnormality leading to brittle bones and osteopenia. To address the osteopenia, intravenous bisphosphonates (pamidronate) act by temporarily halting the action of osteoclasts giving time for osteoblasts to build bone. To date, there has been no local data regarding the improvement in bone mineral density of Filipino patients with osteogenesis imperfecta following treatment. Methods This study is a retrospective review that included six patients aged 1 year and 10 months to 9 years and 9 months old at the Philippine General Hospital with moderate to severe osteogenesis imperfecta who have undergone 6 months of pamidronate infusions at 1 mg/kg/dose monthly or a total dose of 6 mg/kg. Chart review was done. Hand radiographs taken at baseline and after 6 months of therapy were reviewed by a radiologist who was blinded, to determine metacarpal indices. Results There was an increasing trend in the metacarpal index from baseline to 6 months post-treatment with a mean difference of 0.053 mm (CI, −0.0112 to 0.117). However, the increase was not statistically significant (P value 0.0874) when analyzed using the paired t-test at a 95% confidence interval. No adverse events were noted and only one patient reported a fracture after starting therapy. Conclusions Bisphosphonate infusions among the six pediatric patients with moderate to severe osteogenesis imperfecta are well tolerated and although the increase in the metacarpal index from baseline after six months of treatment is not statistically significant, the trend shows improvement of the osteopenia from baseline.

  2. Trend in admissions, clinical features and outcome of preeclampsia and eclampsia as seen from the intensive care unit of the Douala General Hospital, Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Priso, Eugene Belley; Njamen, Theophile Nana; Tchente, Charlotte Nguefack; Kana, Albert Justin; Landry, Tchuenkam; Tchawa, Ulrich Flore Nyaga; Hentchoya, Romuald; Beyiha, Gerard; Halle, Marie Patrice; Aminde, Leopold; Dzudie, Anastase

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Hypertensive disorders in pregnancy (HDP) are a major cause of maternal morbidity and mortality. We aimed at determining the trends in admission, profiles and outcomes of women admitted for preeclampsia and eclampsia to an intensive care unit (ICU) in Cameroon. Methods A retrospective study involving 74 women admitted to the ICU of the Douala General Hospital for severe preeclampsia and eclampsia from January 2007 to December 2014. Clinical profiles and outcome data were obtained from patient records. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 20. Results Of the 74 women admitted to ICU (72.5% for eclampsia), mean age was 30.2years and the majority (90.5%) were aged 20-39 years. While overall trend in admission for HDP increased over the years, mortality remained stable. Mean gestational age (GA) on admission was 34.0 weeks (33.5 for preeclampsia vs 35.4 for eclampsia). Most patients presented with complications of which acute kidney injury was most frequent (66.7%). Visual problems were more common in patients with eclampsia compared to preeclampsia (p = 0.01). HELLP syndrome and acute pulmonary oedema (APO) were predominant in patients with preeclampsia, while cerebrovascular accidents (CVA) occurred more in patients with eclampsia. Overall mortality was 24.3%. Presence of APO was associated with mortality in multivariable analysis (O.R.= 0.03, p = 0,01). Conclusion Trends in admission for HDP were increasing with high but stable mortality rate. Patients presented late most of whom with complications. Interventions improving antenatal care services and multidisciplinary management approach may improve maternal outcome in patients with HDP. PMID:26523163

  3. Combined proton and photon irradiation for craniopharyngioma: Long-term results of the early cohort of patients treated at Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory and Massachusetts General Hospital

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzek, Markus M.; Linggood, Rita M.; Adams, Judy; Munzenrider, John E. . E-mail: jmunzenrider@partners.org

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: We report the results of the early cohort of patients treated for craniopharyngioma with combined proton-photon irradiation at the Massachusetts General Hospital and the Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory. Methods and Materials: Between 1981 and 1988, 15 patients with craniopharyngioma were treated in part or entirely with fractionated 160 MeV proton beam therapy. The group consisted of 5 children (median age, 15.9 years) and 10 adults (median age, 36.2 years). Median dose prescribed to the tumor was 56.9 cobalt Gray equivalent (CGE; 1 proton Gray = 1.1 CGE). The median proton component was 26.9 CGE. Patients were treated after documented recurrence after initial surgery (n = 6) or after subtotal resection or biopsy (n = 9). None had had prior radiation therapy. Results: Median observation period of surviving patients (n = 11) was 13.1 years from radiotherapy. One patient was lost to follow-up with tumor control after 5.2 years. Actuarial 10-year survival rate was 72%. Four patients have died 5-9.1 years after treatment, two from local failure. Actuarial 5- and 10-year local control rates were 93% and 85%, respectively. The functional status of the living adult patients is unaltered from their preradiotherapy status; all of them continued leading normal or near normal working lives. None of the patients treated as a child had experienced recurrence of tumor. One child shows learning difficulties and slight retardation, comparable to his preradiotherapy status. The others have professional achievements within the normal range. Conclusion: Results in terms of survival and local control are comparable with other contemporary series. Although no formal neuropsychological testing was performed, the surrogate measures of lifestyle and professional accomplishments appear to be satisfactory.

  4. Intensification of the oxygen minimum zone in the northeast Pacific off Vancouver Island during the last deglaciation: Ventilation and/or export production?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, J. L.; Pedersen, T. F.; Southon, J.

    2005-12-01

    The oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) off Vancouver Island was more oxygen depleted relative to modern conditions during the Allerd (13.5 to 12.6 calendar kyr) and again from 11 to 10 kyr. The timing of OMZ intensification is similar to that seen throughout the North Pacific, although the onset appears to have been delayed by 1500 years off Vancouver Island. Radiocarbon dating of coeval benthic and planktonic foraminifera shows that between 16.0 and 12.6 kyr the age contrast between surface and intermediate waters (920 m depth) off Vancouver Island was similar to, or slightly less than, that today. There is no evidence of an increased age difference (i.e., decreased ventilation) during the deglaciation, particularly during the Allerd. However, sedimentary marine organic carbon concentration and mass accumulation rate increased substantially in the Allerd, suggesting that increased organic matter export was the principal cause of late Pleistocene OMZ intensification off Vancouver Island.

  5. 24 CFR 242.4 - Eligible hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Eligible hospitals. 242.4 Section... INSURANCE FOR HOSPITALS General Eligibility Requirements § 242.4 Eligible hospitals. (a) The hospital to be financed with a mortgage insured under this part shall involve the construction of a new hospital,...

  6. 24 CFR 242.4 - Eligible hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Eligible hospitals. 242.4 Section... INSURANCE FOR HOSPITALS General Eligibility Requirements § 242.4 Eligible hospitals. (a) The hospital to be financed with a mortgage insured under this part shall involve the construction of a new hospital,...

  7. Slip Partitioning, Crustal Tectonics and Deformation of the Queen Charlotte Margin and Northern Vancouver Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hippchen, Sabine

    Part I of this thesis investigates current deformation in western British Columbia from northern Vancouver Island in the south to Haida Gwaii in the north. The area is characterized by transition from the Cascadia subduction zone to the Queen Charlotte transform fault. The tectonic setting involves interactions between the Pacific, North America, Juan de Fuca, and Explorer plates, and the Winona block, involving a number of plate boundaries: the mainly strike-slip Queen Charlotte, Revere-Dellwood-Wilson and Nootka faults, the Explorer ridge, and the Cascadia subduction zone. Using GPS campaign data from 1993 to 2008 I derive a new crustal velocity field for Northern Vancouver Island and the adjacent mainland, and integrate it with previous velocity fields developed for Haida Gwaii, southern Vancouver Island and the adjacent mainland. The northern limit of the subduction zone is confirmed to be at Brooks Peninsula, where the direction of the crustal motion changes abruptly from ENE to NNE. I use viscoelastic models to explore what percentage of the observed deformation is transient, related to the earthquake cycle, and how much is permanent ongoing deformation, distributed off the continental margin. Previous authors have developed two competing end-member models that can each explain how the Pacific/North America plate convergence is accommodated off Haida Gwaii. These models assume either internal crustal shortening or underthrusting of the Pacific plate. These new GPS data allow me to conclude that underthrusting does occur, and that a small component (<15%) of the observed data reflects long-term deformation. South of Haida Gwaii the distinction between transient and long-term deformation is not as clear; however, I conclude that transient deformation alone cannot fully explain the observed velocities, and so long-term deformation likely must also occur. Part II of the thesis investigates the updip and downdip limits of the seismogenic zone of the Sumatra megathrust fault. Temperature and downdip changes in formation composition are controls proposed for these limits. To examine the thermal control I developed 2-D finite element models of the Sumatra subduction zone with smoothly varying subduction dip, variable thermal properties of the rock units, frictional heating along the rupture plane, and an appropriate thermal state for the incoming plate. The common updip thermal limit for seismic behaviour of 100-150°C occurs close to or at the trench in agreement with the rupture limit of the 2004 earthquake. Off central Sumatra the common downdip thermal limit range of 350-450°C occurs at 30-60 km depth. The 350°C isotherm location is in agreement with the earthquake limits but 450°C is deeper. North of Sumatra, 350°C occurs ˜14 km deeper than the earthquake rupture limit. The proposed composition control for the downdip limit, the intersection of the subduction thrust with the forearc mantle, is at a depth of ˜30 km, 140-200 km from the trench, in good agreement with the earthquake limits. These results support the conclusion that the Sumatra updip seismogenic limit is thermally controlled, but the downdip limit is governed by the intersection of the downgoing plate with the forearc Moho.

  8. Evolving Healthcare Quality in Top Tertiary General Hospitals in China during the China Healthcare Reform (2010-2012) from the Perspective of Inpatient Mortality.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xie-Min; Chen, Xiao-Hong; Wang, Ji-Shan; Lyman, Gary H; Qu, Zhi; Ma, Wen; Song, Jing-Chen; Zhou, Chuan-Kun; Zhao, Lue Ping

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare reforms (HR) initiated by many countries impacts on healthcare systems worldwide. Being one of fast developing countries, China launched HR in 2009. Better understanding of its impact is helpful for China and others in further pursuit of HR. Here we evaluate inpatient mortality, a proxy to healthcare quality, in 43 top tertiary hospitals in China during this critical period. This is a hospital-based observational study with 8 million discharge summary reports (DSR) from 43 Chinese hospitals from 2010-2012. Using DSRs, we extract the vita status as the outcome, in addition to age, gender, diagnostic codes, and surgical codes. Nearly all hospitals have expanded their hospitalization capacities during this period. As of year 2010, inpatient mortality (IM) across hospitals varies widely from 2‰ to 20‰. Comparing IM of year 2011 and 2012 with 2010, the overall IM has been substantially reduced (OR = 0.883 and 0.766, p-values<0.001), showing steady improvements in healthcare quality. Surgical IM correlates with the overall IM (correlation = 0.60, p-value <0.001), but is less uniform. Over these years, surgical IM has also been steadily reduced (OR = 0.890 and 0.793, p-values<0.001). Further analyses of treatments on five major diseases and six major surgeries revealed that treatments of myocardial infarction, cerebral hemorrhage and cerebral infarction have significant improvement. Observed temporal and spatial variations demonstrate that there is a substantial disparity in healthcare quality across tertiary hospitals, and that these hospitals are rapidly improving healthcare quality. Evidence-based assessment shed light on the reform impact. Lessons learnt here are relevant to further refining HR. PMID:26624005

  9. Evolving Healthcare Quality in Top Tertiary General Hospitals in China during the China Healthcare Reform (2010–2012) from the Perspective of Inpatient Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xie-Min; Chen, Xiao-Hong; Wang, Ji-Shan; Lyman, Gary H.; Qu, Zhi; Ma, Wen; Song, Jing-Chen; Zhou, Chuan-Kun; Zhao, Lue Ping

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare reforms (HR) initiated by many countries impacts on healthcare systems worldwide. Being one of fast developing countries, China launched HR in 2009. Better understanding of its impact is helpful for China and others in further pursuit of HR. Here we evaluate inpatient mortality, a proxy to healthcare quality, in 43 top tertiary hospitals in China during this critical period. This is a hospital-based observational study with 8 million discharge summary reports (DSR) from 43 Chinese hospitals from 2010–2012. Using DSRs, we extract the vita status as the outcome, in addition to age, gender, diagnostic codes, and surgical codes. Nearly all hospitals have expanded their hospitalization capacities during this period. As of year 2010, inpatient mortality (IM) across hospitals varies widely from 2‰ to 20‰. Comparing IM of year 2011 and 2012 with 2010, the overall IM has been substantially reduced (OR = 0.883 and 0.766, p-values<0.001), showing steady improvements in healthcare quality. Surgical IM correlates with the overall IM (correlation = 0.60, p-value <0.001), but is less uniform. Over these years, surgical IM has also been steadily reduced (OR = 0.890 and 0.793, p-values<0.001). Further analyses of treatments on five major diseases and six major surgeries revealed that treatments of myocardial infarction, cerebral hemorrhage and cerebral infarction have significant improvement. Observed temporal and spatial variations demonstrate that there is a substantial disparity in healthcare quality across tertiary hospitals, and that these hospitals are rapidly improving healthcare quality. Evidence-based assessment shed light on the reform impact. Lessons learnt here are relevant to further refining HR. PMID:26624005

  10. Cement-in-cement revision for selected Vancouver Type B1 femoral periprosthetic fractures: a biomechanical analysis.

    PubMed

    Brew, Christopher J; Wilson, Lance J; Whitehouse, Sarah L; Hubble, Matthew J W; Crawford, Ross W

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to perform a biomechanical analysis of the cement-in-cement (c-in-c) technique for fixation of selected Vancouver Type B1 femoral periprosthetic fractures and to assess the degree of cement interposition at the fracture site. Six embalmed cadaveric femora were implanted with a cemented femoral stem. Vancouver Type B1 fractures were created by applying a combined axial and rotational load to failure. The femora were repaired using the c-in-c technique and reloaded to failure. The mean primary fracture torque was 117 Nm (SD 16.6, range 89-133). The mean revision fracture torque was 50 Nm (SD 16.6, range 29-74), which is above the torque previously observed for activities of daily living. Cement interposition at the fracture site was found to be minimal. PMID:23146585

  11. Mapping the environmental limitations to growth of coastal Douglas-fir stands on Vancouver Island, British Columbia.

    PubMed

    Coops, Nicholas C; Coggins, Sam B; Kurz, Werner A

    2007-06-01

    Coastal Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii spp. menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) occurs over a wide range of environmental conditions on Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Although ecological zones have been drawn, no formal spatial analysis of environmental limitations on tree growth has been carried out. Such an exercise is desirable to identify areas that may warrant intensive management and to evaluate the impacts of predicted climate change this century. We applied a physiologically based forest growth model, 3-PG (Physiological Principles Predicting Growth), to interpret and map current limitations to Douglas-fir growth across Vancouver Island at 100-m cell resolution. We first calibrated the model to reproduce the regional productivity estimates reported in yield table growth curves. Further analyses indicated that slope exposure is important; southwest slopes of 30 degrees receive 40% more incident radiation than similarly inclined northeast slopes. When combined with other environmental differences associated with aspect, the model predicted 60% more growth on southwest exposures than on northeast exposures. The model simulations support field observations that drought is rare in the wetter zones, but common on the eastern side of Vancouver Island at lower elevations and on more exposed slopes. We illustrate the current limitations on growth caused by suboptimal temperature, high vapor pressure deficits and other factors. The modeling approach complements ecological classifications and offers the potential to identify the most favorable sites for management of other native tree species under current and future climatic conditions. PMID:17331899

  12. Lifelines and Earthquake Hazards Along the Interstate 5 Urban Corridor: Cottage Grove, Oregon, to Vancouver, B.C.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, E. A.; Weaver, C. S.; Haugerud, R. A.; Ballantyne, D. B.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Z.; Madin, I. P.; Wells, R. E.; Darienzo, M.; Meagher, K. L.

    2002-12-01

    A new map series provides basic graphical representations of lifeline systems in relation to earthquake hazards along the economic and residential artery of the Pacific Northwest: the I-5 corridor from Cottage Grove, Oregon, to Vancouver, B.C. The lifeline systems that support the communities as well as local and regional commerce form a complex web of highways, railroads, pipelines, electrical power facilities, and ports, that cross areas of varying levels of earthquake hazards. This web depends on many components working together to make a functional system. Failure of one critical system component due to a large earthquake or other natural disaster can disable the system. Earthquakes tend to affect many systems at once, and the failure of one system, such as a highway, can impede the recovery of another system, such as an electrical power line. Therefore, understanding the geographical relationships between the lifeline systems, local communities, and earthquake hazards is an important element in the process of not only determining recovery priorities and strategies after an earthquake, but also for future planning purposes. The lifeline maps have a shaded-relief topographic background with integrated regional geology categorized as ground relatively susceptible or not susceptible to ground amplification, liquefaction and/or landslides in the event of an earthquake. The maps also show recent and historically important earthquakes estimated to be greater than magnitude 5. Lifeline systems superimposed on the geologic base are: major electrical transmission lines, water supply pipelines, major sewer pipelines and treatment plants, liquid fuel pipelines, natural gas pipelines, and major ports and airports. Map data are generalized in order to suit the needs of map users, ranging from the specialist to non-specialist. Accordingly, the maps do not provide site-specific information. The map presentation stresses the system nature of lifelines, as opposed to highlighting individual key structures and is meant to serve as an initial step in understanding the complex nature of lifeline systems. The four maps in this series are produced by the collective efforts of the authors and lifeline map users from local, state, and federal agencies, and private lifeline companies in the I-5 Urban Corridor of the Pacific Northwest.

  13. Skin growths of the head and neck region in elderly patients--analysis of two five-year periods in General Hospital Karlovac, Croatia.

    PubMed

    Alerić, Zorica; Bauer, Vladimir

    2011-09-01

    Skin lesions, benign and malignant, are more common in the older than younger people. Due to the aging of the skin and greater exposure to the impact of ultraviolet rays, their long-term cumulative negative effect, skin lesions are more common in the head and neck area than on other parts of the skin. This paper analyses the pathohistological diagnosis of material after the surgical excision of tumors of the skin on the head and neck of persons older than 60, at the General Hospital Karlovac through two five-year period. The first period is the period from 2006 to 2010 and the second one from 1996 to 2000. The aim was to determine for each period the type and variety of skin lesions, the prevalence of the disease, the age and gender structure, and finally to compare the two periods. The total number of excisions in the first period was 1200, and in the second 513. In both periods more excisions was done in women than men, if compared it comes to 1.4:1. The ratio of malignant (basocellular carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and melanomas), and benign tumors (seborrheic keratoses, moles and others) in the first period was 49.3 to 46.3%, and in the second 56.7 to 42.1%. Precancerous lesions (actinic keratoses and Mb Bowen's disease) accounted for 4.3% of lesions in the first and 1.2% in the second period. The total number of basocellular carcinoma was 481/232, which makes 81.3% of all malignant tumors in the first, or 79.7% in the second period. Our results showed that around half of all skin lesions removed in both periods consisted of malignant tumors, among which the most common were basal cell carcinomas. High prevalence of malignant non-melanoma skin cancers, 48.7 and 56%, indicate the importance of protection from UV radiation, and early detection and treatment of skin cancer and precancerous lesions. PMID:22220434

  14. Risk Factors Associated with Disease Recurrence among Patients with Low-Risk Papillary Thyroid Cancer Treated at the University of the Philippines-Philippine General Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Buenaluz-Sedurante, Myrna; Jimeno, Cecilia Alegado

    2016-01-01

    Background The management of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) in high-risk patients is well-standardized. However, this is not the case for low-risk patients. Filipinos show a high incidence of recurrence of thyroid cancer. Thus, the identification of risk factors for recurrence in this population could potentially identify individuals for whom radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy might be beneficial. Methods We reviewed the medical records of adult Filipinos with low-risk PTC who underwent near-total or total thyroidectomy at the University of the Philippines-Philippine General Hospital. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to determine risk factors for recurrence. Results Recurrence was documented in 51/145 of patients (35.17%) included in this study. Possible risk factors such as age, sex, family history, smoking history, tumor size, multifocality, prophylactic lymph node dissection, initial thyroglobulin (Tg) level, initial anti-thyroglobulin (anti-Tg) antibody concentration, suppression of thyroid stimulating hormone production, and RAI therapy were analyzed. Multivariate analysis revealed that a tumor diameter 2 to 4 cm (odds ratio [OR], 9.17; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.62 to 51.88; P=0.012), a tumor diameter >4 cm (OR, 16.46; 95% CI, 1.14 to 237.31; P=0.04), and a family history of PTC (OR, 67.27; 95% CI, 2.03 to 2228.96; P=0.018) were significant predictors of recurrence. In addition, RAI therapy (OR, 0.026; 95% CI, 0.01 to 0.023; P≤0.005), an initial Tg level ≤2 ng/mL (OR, 0.049; 95% CI, 0.01 to 0.23; P≤0.005), and an anti-Tg antibody level ≤50 U/mL (OR, 0.087; 95% CI, 0.011 to 0.67; P=0.019) were significant protective factors. Conclusion A tumor diameter ≥2 cm and a family history of PTC are significant predictors of recurrence. RAI therapy and low initial titers of Tg and anti-Tg antibody are significant protective factors against disease recurrence among low-risk PTC patients. PMID:26676333

  15. A six-month audit of the isolation of Fusobacterium necrophorum from patients with sore throat in a district general hospital.

    PubMed

    Amess, J A; O'Neill, W; Giollariabhaigh, C Ni; Dytrych, J K

    2007-01-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum is an obligate anaerobe believed to be a member of the normal flora of the human oropharangeal and urogenital tract. It has been associated with deep-seated infections and was first described in 1936 by Lemierre, a French microbiologist. There is now strong evidence to suggest that it is also a cause of recurrent sore throat and persistent sore throat syndrome (PSTS) without leading to full systemic infection. It is considered to be the second most common cause of sore throat after group A beta-haemolytic streptococci. This study was performed over a six-month period (October 2004 to March 2005) at the Eastbourne District General Hospital. All throat swabs received in the laboratory are cultured routinely for haemolytic group A streptococci and pathogenic Corynebacteria spp. During the study period an extra fastidious anaerobic blood agar plate with neomycin was inoculated, with a 30 microg vancomycin disc placed at the junction of the second and third streaks. This was examined after 48 h for the presence of F. necrophorum. A total of 1157 swabs were processed during the study period: 156 were positive for haemolytic group A streptococci, 57 were positive for F. necrophorum, 47 for group C haemolytic streptococci, nine for group G haemolytic streptococci, and one was positive for C. ulcerans. Patient age ranged from less than a year old to 88. The majority of F. necrophorum isolates were from patients in the 11-25 age group, with an isolation rate of 9.48% (44/464). This age group accounted for 40% (464/1157) of the swabs received during the study period and 77% (44/57) of these were positive for F. necrophorum. Group A haemolytic streptococci showed an overall isolation rate of 13.5%, with peaks of 23% in the 0-10 and 26-35 age ranges. Together, these two organisms were responsible for 18.4% (213/1157) of all throat infections in this study. The results presented here indicate that F. necrophorum is second to group A haemolytic streptococci as a cause of sore throat, especially in the young adult, and introduction of routine culture should be considered. PMID:17633139

  16. Vancouver AIDS conference: special report. The role of the military: to protect society -- and themselves.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, A; Winsbury, R

    1996-01-01

    Military personnel are at particularly high risk of becoming infected with HIV because they are in the age group at highest risk for infection, age 15-24 years; they are away from home for long periods of time; many feel invulnerable and ready to take risks; there are usually prostitutes and drugs in military areas; and troops have cash, but maybe not condoms, in their pockets. The level of attention given to HIV/AIDS in the military has grown over the course of the last few international AIDS conferences. One roundtable on HIV/AIDS in the armed forces was held at the 11th International Conference on AIDS held in Vancouver during July 7-12, 1996. A large-scale survey reported at the conference found the level of sexual activity to be significantly higher among US military personnel than in the civilian population. Even the oldest soldiers reported higher levels of multiple partner sex habits than the most sexually active young men in the UK and France. The data further indicate that significant numbers of those men who were infected continued to knowingly have unprotected sex. Data from Angola, Cambodia, Cameroon, the Central African Republic, Congo, Cote d'Ivoire, Thailand, and Zimbabwe show significantly higher levels of HIV infection among military personnel compared to the civilian populations. The authors stress the important role the military can play in preventing the spread of HIV and the need to involve military personnel in AIDS prevention programs. PMID:12347381

  17. Kelp forest size alters microbial community structure and function on Vancouver Island, Canada.

    PubMed

    Clasen, J L; Shurin, J B

    2015-03-01

    Bacteria are ubiquitous and important components of marine ecosystems, yet the interaction between bacteria and higher trophic levels remain poorly understood. The trophic cascade involving sea otters, urchins, and kelp in the North Pacific is a classic case of altered ecosystem states; however, its impacts on microbial communities are unknown. We investigated the response of microbial communities to variation in kelp abundance between regions with and without sea otter populations along the west coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada. We compared bacterial community structure and function between regions with large and small kelp forests, including an subset of the bacterial community that produces alginate lyase, which allows direct utilization of kelp carbon. The abundance and activity of alginate-lyase-producing bacteria were 3.2 and 1.4 times higher, respectively, in the region with large kelp forests, and declined rapidly with increasing distance from kelp. Total bacterial abundance was 2.7 times greater, and bacteria grew faster and experienced more zooplankton grazing and viral-mediated mortality in the presence of large kelp forests. These patterns suggest that larger kelp forests produce more detritus and dissolved organic matter, which stimulate microbial activity. Our results indicate that variation in kelp forest size alters the community structure and productivity of microbes and contributes to the growing evidence that top predators interact with microbes and ecosystem processes through a cascade of indirect effects. PMID:26236881

  18. [International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Vancouver Classification of Renal Neoplasia 2012].

    PubMed

    Hes, Ondřej

    2014-01-01

    Kidney tumours form a broad spectrum of distinguished histopathological and molecular genetic entities. The last WHO classification is dated to 2004. Current classification has been published in October 2013 by ISUP (International Society of Urological Pathology). There were 5 new epithelials tumours: tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma (RCC), acquired cystic disease-associated RCC, clear cell (tubulo-)papillary RCC, the MiT family translocation RCCs (in particular t(6;11) RCC), and hereditary leiomyomatosis RCC syndrome-associated RCC. Another 3 subtypes of RCC were added as "provisional" entities: thyroid-like follicular RCC; succinate dehydrogenase B deficiency-associated RCC; and ALK translocation RCC. Modifications were performed in already existing entities: multicystic clear cell RCC (formerly multilocular cystic RCC) is newly included as a subcategory of clear cell RCC with low malignant potential. Oncocytic papillary RCC (PRCC) has not been recognized as a distinctive subcategory of PRCC yet. Hybrid oncocytic-chromophobe tumour was placed within the chromophobe RCC category. Recent advances related to collecting duct carcinoma, renal medullary carcinoma, and mucinous spindle cell and tubular RCC were elucidated. Outside of the epithelial category, current approach to our understanding of angiomyolipoma, including the epithelioid variant and angiomyolipoma with epithelial cysts was clarified. Cystic nephroma and mixed epithelial and stromal tumour were considered as a spectrum of one entity. Synovial sarcoma was placed within the sarcoma group. The new classification is to be referred to as the International Society of Urological Pathology Vancouver Classification of Renal Neoplasia. PMID:25418900

  19. Controlling Chaos: The Perceptions of Long-Term Crack Cocaine Users in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Margot; Bungay, Vicky; Buxton, Jane A.

    2013-01-01

    People who smoke crack cocaine are described as chaotic and more likely to engage in risky sex, polysubstance use and contract infectious diseases. However, little is known about how individuals perceive smoking crack as compared to other forms of cocaine use, especially injection. We explored the lived experience of people who smoke crack cocaine. Six gender-specific focus groups (n = 31) of individuals who currently smoke crack in Vancouver, Canada, were conducted using a semi-structured interview guide. Focus groups were transcribed and analyzed by constant comparative methodology. We applied Rhodes' risk environment to the phenomenological understanding that individuals have regarding how crack has affected their lives. Subjects reported that smoking rather than injecting cocaine allows them to begin “controlling chaos” in their lives. Controlling chaos was self-defined using nontraditional measures such as the ability to maintain day-to-day commitments and housing stability. The phenomenological lens of smoking crack instead of injecting cocaine “to control chaos” contributes a novel perspective to our understanding of the crack-smoking population. This study examines narratives which add to prior reports of the association of crack smoking and increased chaos and suggests that, for some, inhaled crack may represent efforts towards self-directed harm reduction. PMID:24826370

  20. Electromagnetic induction in the San Juan Bay region of Vancouver Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, G. H.; Dosso, H. W.; Law, L. K.

    1981-11-01

    The response of the electric and magnetic field variations over the San Juan Bay region of Vancouver Island is studied using a scaled laboratory analogue model. The laboratory frequencies simulate periods of 10 and 100 s in the geophysical problem. The model results indicate that, for both E- and H-polarization of the source field, induced current in the ocean is deflected around Cape Flattery and channelled into the Juan de Fuca Strait. With increasing period, the proportion of current channelled into the Strait decreases sharply. Induced current in the strait is also funnelled into San Juan Bay, a finger-shaped bay ca. 4 km wide and 7.5 km long, for both polarizations of the source field. The effect of the Bay on the field response is confined to the local region, within approximately 6 km of the centre of the Bay. Good agreement between field station and analogue model Hz results was obtained for the San Juan Bay. The behaviour of the Parkinson arrow for these two stations is examined with the aid of the analogue model results.

  1. Application of transmission reliability assessment in probabilistic planning of BC Hydro Vancouver South Metro system

    SciTech Connect

    Li, W.; Mansour, Y.; Korczynski, J.K.; Mills, B.J.

    1995-05-01

    This paper presents a basic method of probabilistic transmission planning used in BC Hydro. The method is based on transmission system reliability evaluation and an overall economic analysis including damage cost due to system unreliability. Four alternatives for the Vancouver South Metro system of BC Hydro have been evaluated using the method. The first one is addition of a 230 kV line, the second one local configuration changes (cuts and ties) in the 69 kV subsystem, the third one operational manipulation and the fourth one curtailable industrial load management. The third and the fourth alternatives can be considered as non-investment reinforcements. The results indicate that the cut-and-tie alternative in the 69 kv subsystem can provide the same reliability level as the 230 kV line addition but with much lower investment and therefore the initial 230 kV line addition could be deferred by 10 years. This deferral allows a major capital expenditure of $26.4 million (1997 $) to be avoided. The studies show that the application of quantitative transmission reliability assessment in power system planning can provide utilities with significant economic benefits.

  2. A real time debris flow forecasting system for North Vancouver, British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakob, M.

    2009-04-01

    This paper details the scientific basis and results for the development of a real-time operational hydro-meteorological debris flow warning system for the North Shore Mountains of Vancouver. The main component of the warning system is a multivariate statistical model that demonstrates that the 4 week antecedent rainfall, the two day antecedent rainfall and the 48 hour storm rainfall intensity explain if a given storm will result in a debris flow or not. Discriminant functions were developed that allow real-time calculation of discriminant scores and thus the relative likelihood of a storm resulting in shallow landslides. A 48 hour forecast of spatially distributed rainfall on the North Shore Mountains is made through a high resolution climatic model generated by the Geophysical Disaster Computational Fluid Dynamic Centre at the University of British Columbia. This step is an integral part in predicting threshold exceedence well before debris flows would likely occur and thus allowing sufficient time to provide warning. The system would have two levels of warning. The first is based on a lower threshold exceedences and is called ‘Debris Flow Watch'. The second would be based on a higher threshold and is called ‘Debris Flow Warning". There will be at least several hours time to react to those exceedences before shallow landsliding is likely to occur.

  3. Decision maker views on priority setting in the Vancouver Island Health Authority

    PubMed Central

    Dionne, Francois; Mitton, Craig; Smith, Neale; Donaldson, Cam

    2008-01-01

    Background Decisions regarding the allocation of available resources are a source of growing dissatisfaction for healthcare decision-makers. This dissatisfaction has led to increased interest in research on evidence-based resource allocation processes. An emerging area of interest has been the empirical analysis of the characteristics of existing and desired priority setting processes from the perspective of decision-makers. Methods We conducted in-depth, face-to-face interviews with 18 senior managers and medical directors with the Vancouver Island Health Authority, an integrated health care provider in British Columbia responsible for a population of approximately 730,000. Interviews were transcribed and content-analyzed, and major themes and sub-themes were identified and reported. Results Respondents identified nine key features of a desirable priority setting process: inclusion of baseline assessment, use of best evidence, clarity, consistency, clear and measurable criteria, dissemination of information, fair representation, alignment with the strategic direction and evaluation of results. Existing priority setting processes were found to be lacking on most of these desired features. In addition, respondents identified and explicated several factors that influence resource allocation, including political considerations and organizational culture and capacity. Conclusion This study makes a contribution to a growing body of knowledge which provides the type of contextual evidence that is required if priority setting processes are to be used successfully by health care decision-makers. PMID:18644152

  4. Multi-millennial streamflow dynamics in two forested watersheds on Vancouver Island, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Kendrick J.; Schoups, Gerrit

    2015-05-01

    Holocene streamflow was reconstructed for two rivers on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada in 500-yr intervals. The San Juan River watershed is located on the wetter western side of the island, whereas the Koksilah River watershed is positioned on the drier eastern side. Both watersheds are forested. To reconstruct streamflow, temporal changes in precipitation (estimated using a pollen-based transfer function) and evapotranspiration were established for each watershed and integrated into a water balance model, calibrated using modern data. While seasonal streamflow variability was maintained throughout the Holocene, with greater flow in the winter relative to the summer, the amount of discharge has changed markedly through time. Lowest simulated flow occurred in the earliest Holocene, with low-flow conditions beginning earlier in the year and extending later into the fall. Such conditions may have inhibited salmon from using many of the smaller rivers in the region. Streamflow steadily increased throughout the early Holocene so that by ca. 6500 cal yr before present near-modern flow regimes were established. As climate changes in the future, the San Juan and Koksilah watersheds are expected to remain as pluvial hydroclimatic regimes, though with an extended season of low flow similar to conditions during the early Holocene.

  5. Isotopic and elemental evidence for Scabland Flood sediments offshore Vancouver Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gombiner, Joel H.; Hemming, Sidney R.; Hendy, Ingrid L.; Bryce, Julia G.; Blichert-Toft, Janne

    2016-05-01

    Geological records contain evidence for catastrophic ice-sheet processes such as megafloods and massive ice discharges. Such large-scale phenomena, associated with ice sheet collapse, rapid sea-level rise, and disruptions to ocean circulation, have never been directly observed, but are forecast as a consequence of global warming. Here we use potassium-argon (K/Ar) ages and neodymium (Nd) isotopes as provenance tools to show that cyclical megafloods from the Cordilleran Ice Sheet of western North America traveled through the Channeled Scabland of Washington and transported sediments to the continental slope of Vancouver Island during the last glacial, laying down a sequence of rhythmically bedded sediments in deep-sea core MD02-2496. This work addresses longstanding questions about the absolute timing of Scabland Floods, their cyclicity, and the fate of their sediments and freshwater in the marine realm. Our data suggest that, between ˜19.3 and ˜14.9 ka, Scabland Floods repeatedly generated far-traveled sediment-water plumes in the NE Pacific Ocean, requiring a hydrologically active ice sheet system capable of producing catastrophic megafloods for about 4500 years.

  6. Biological characterization of a whale-fall near Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundsten, Lonny; Paull, Charles K.; Schlining, Kyra L.; McGann, Mary; Ussler, William, III

    2010-07-01

    Video analysis of a whale-fall discovered in the northeast Pacific Ocean, off Vancouver Island at a depth of 1288 m during ROV diving operations has identified 26 taxa of deep-sea benthic organisms inhabiting the seafloor immediately surrounding remnants of the whale skeleton. A photo-mosaic derived from high-definition video provides a quantitative visual record of the present condition of the site, the species richness, and substrate preference. Only the skull and caudal vertebrae remains of this large whale skeleton are estimated to have been approximately 16.5 m in length. Most organisms identified near the whale-fall are common benthic deep-sea fauna, typical of this water depth and seafloor composition. Much of this species richness comes from sessile suspension feeding cnidarians attached to the numerous glacial dropstones found throughout the area rather than the presence of the whale skeleton. Seep and bone specialists are rare (4 taxa) and may be, in part, a remnant population from a sulphophilic stage of whale-fall decomposition. Evidence of past colonization by Osedax sp. is visible on the remaining bones and we conclude that rapid degradation of the missing bones has occurred at this site as has been observed at whale-falls off central California in Monterey Canyon.

  7. Opportunities to learn and barriers to change: crack cocaine use in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Susan; Johnson, Joy L; Moffat, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    In 2004, a team comprised of researchers and service providers launched the Safer Crack Use, Outreach, Research and Education (SCORE) project in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. The project was aimed at developing a better understanding of the harms associated with crack cocaine smoking and determining the feasibility of introducing specific harm reduction strategies. Specifically, in partnership with the community, we constructed and distributed kits that contained harm reduction materials. We were particularly interested in understanding what people thought of these kits and how the kits contents were used. To obtain this information, we conducted 27 interviews with women and men who used crack cocaine and received safer crack kits. Four broad themes were generated from the data: 1) the context of crack use practices; 2) learning/transmission of harm reducon education; 3) changing practice; 4) barriers to change. This project suggests that harm reduction education is most successful when it is informed by current practices with crack use. In addition it is most effectively delivered through informal interactions with people who use crack and includes repeated demonstrations of harm reduction equipment by peers and outreach workers. This paper also suggests that barriers to harm reduction are systemic: lack of safe housing and private space shape crack use practices. PMID:19014696

  8. Self-management of pain among people who inject drugs in Vancouver

    PubMed Central

    Voon, Pauline; Callon, Cody; Nguyen, Paul; Dobrer, Sabina; Montaner, Julio; Wood, Evan; Kerr, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Aims To evaluate factors and methods associated with self-management of pain among people who inject drugs (IDUs) in Vancouver (Canada). Patients & methods This cross-sectional study used bivariate statistics and multivariate logistic regression to analyze self-reported responses among 483 IDUs reporting moderate-to-extreme pain in two prospective cohort studies from 1 December 2012 to 31 May 2013. Results Median age was 49.6 years (interquartile range: 43.9–54.6 years), 33.1% of IDUs were female and 97.5% reported self-management of pain. Variables independently and positively associated with self-managed pain included having been refused a prescription for pain medication (adjusted odds ratio: 7.83; 95% CI: 1.64–37.3) and having ever been homeless (adjusted odds ratio: 3.70; 95% CI: 1.00–13.7). Common methods of self-management of pain included injecting heroin (52.7%) and obtaining diverted prescription pain medication from the street (65.0%). Conclusion Self-management of pain was common among IDUs who reported moderate-to-extreme pain in this setting, particularly among those who had been refused a prescription for pain medication and those who had ever been homeless. These data highlight the challenges of adequate pain management among IDUs. PMID:24641341

  9. Do specialty hospitals promote price competition?

    PubMed

    Berenson, Robert A; Bazzoli, Gloria J; Au, Melanie

    2006-01-01

    Policy makers continue to debate the correct public policy toward physician-owned heart, orthopedic and surgical specialty hospitals. Do specialty hospitals offer desirable competition for general hospitals and foster improved quality, efficiency and service? Or do specialty hospitals add unneeded capacity and increased costs while threatening the ability of general hospitals to deliver community benefits? In three Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC) sites with significant specialty hospital development--Indianapolis, Little Rock and Phoenix--recent site visits found that purchasers generally believe specialty hospitals are contributing to a medical arms race that is driving up costs without demonstrating clear quality advantages. PMID:16465700

  10. Southern hospitality.

    PubMed

    Parsons, H

    1992-03-01

    Self Memorial Hospital's hostesses are the embodiment of a patient-oriented service philosophy instituted by Bob Borland when he created the $5-million-a-year Hospitality Services department. PMID:10117979

  11. A PERMISSION SYSTEM FOR CARBAPENEM USE REDUCED INCIDENCE OF DRUG-RESISTANT BACTERIA AND COST OF ANTIMICROBIALS AT A GENERAL HOSPITAL IN JAPAN

    PubMed Central

    IKEDA, YOSHIAKI; MAMIYA, TAKAYOSHI; NISHIYAMA, HIDEKI; NARUSAWA, SHIHO; KOSEKI, TAKENAO; MOURI, AKIHIRO; NABESHIMA, TOSHITAKA

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Some drug management systems have been established in Japanese hospitals to reduce medical costs and regulate drug usage. Among the many available prescription drugs, antimicrobials should be given special attention because their inappropriate use often leads to sudden outbreaks of resistant bacteria. As drug specialists, pharmacists should monitor the use of all drugs, particularly antimicrobials. Carbapenems are a class of broad-spectrum antimicrobials that are widely used to treat infections worldwide. However, their inappropriate use has led to an increase in the incidence of drug-resistant bacteria and consequently, medical costs, at hospitals. To reduce inappropriate use and drug resistance, we have established a permission system to control the use of carbapenems at the Japanese Red Cross Nagoya Daiichi Hospital. In this study, we retrospectively evaluated the applicability of the new permission system compared to that of the notification system and the non control system for 14 months each. The two management systems were able to maintain total antibiotic use density and control the outbreak of drug-resistant bacteria (P. aeruginosa, E. coli, and K. pneumoniae). The number of carbapenem prescriptions was decreased dramatically when this permission system was enforced. Compared to the non control system, the cost of antimicrobials was reduced by $757,470 for the 14-month study period using the permission system. These results suggest that our system to control the use of antimicrobials can efficiently suppress the incidence of drug-resistant bacteria and medical costs at hospitals. PMID:22515115

  12. Hospital Patients and Handicapped Readers Section and Round Table of Libraries for the Blind. Libraries Serving the General Public Division. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on hospital and health libraries and library services to the blind and deaf which were presented at the 1982 International Federation of Library Associations conference include: (1) "Leisure Pursuits of the Blind" by Antun Lastric (Yugoslavia); (2) "Library Services for the Handicapped in Canada: An Overview" by Francoise Hebert (Canada);…

  13. The Energy Conservation Program for Schools and Hospitals Can Be More Effective. Report to the Congress of the United States by the Comptroller General.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comptroller General of the U.S., Washington, DC.

    The Schools and Hospital Program, funded through the National Energy Conservation Policy Act, is not an effective use of federal monies when compared to other Department of Energy (DOE) conservation programs. It is among the highest in cost, yet among the lowest in yielding energy savings. This report identifies changes which could increase

  14. Hospital Patients and Handicapped Readers Section and Round Table of Libraries for the Blind. Libraries Serving the General Public Division. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on hospital and health libraries and library services to the blind and deaf which were presented at the 1982 International Federation of Library Associations conference include: (1) "Leisure Pursuits of the Blind" by Antun Lastric (Yugoslavia); (2) "Library Services for the Handicapped in Canada: An Overview" by Francoise Hebert (Canada);

  15. Analysis of Phytosterols and N-Alkanols in Atmospheric Organic Particulate Matter Collected in Vancouver During the Pacific 2001 Air Quality Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leithead, A.; Li, S.

    2002-12-01

    As part of Pacific 2001, HiVol samples were collected from 5 sites in the Vancouver area. The samples were extracted by accelerated solvent extraction (ACE), concentrated with nitrogen blow down, and separated into fractions by silica gel chromatography. For this portion of the study, an aliquot of one of the polar fraction was derivatized with BSTFA and analyzed by GC-FID and GC-MS. The results for n-alkanols and phytosterols will be reported and discussed. Previous studies have shown that the biogenic components of particulate matter are major constituents of the total organic material in atmospheric samples. Phytosterols are present in wood smoke, epicuticular waxes of many plants and microbial sources. In addition, cholesterol has been proposed as a potential tracer for emissions from cooking. The most abundant phytosterols are cholesterol, campesterol, stigmasterol and beta-sitosterol. It has been hypothesized that the phytosterol signature may be useful in identifying particulate matter from different source areas. The phytosterol signature for these samples will be reported and compared. The n-alkanol CPI and Cmax will also be reported. N-alkanols in atmospheric samples generally show a strong even to odd predominance indicating that their main source in particulate matter is biogenic. The n-alkanol signature for each sampling site will be compared.

  16. Availability of hospital dental care services under sedation or general anesthesia for individuals with special needs in the Unified Health System for the State of Minas Gerais (SUS-MG), Brazil.

    PubMed

    Santos, Jacqueline Silva; Valle, Déborah Andrade; Palmier, Andréa Clemente; do Amaral, João Henrique Lara; de Abreu, Mauro Henrique Nogueira Guimarães

    2015-02-01

    This study identified the demographic characteristics of individuals and dental treatment care under sedation/general anesthesia in a hospital environment in the Unified Health System in the State of Minas Gerais (SUS-MG). All Hospitalization Authorizations (AIHs) for Dental Treatment for Patients with Special Needs procedures were evaluated between July 2011 and June 2012. Demographic and health care variables for treatment were also assessed. Hospitalization rates per 10,000 inhabitants, and health care coverage provided in the state of Minas Gerais and in each of the Broader Health Regions were calculated. Descriptive analysis of data was carried out by calculating the central trend and variability frequency and measurements. All 1,063 AIHs paid during the study period were evaluated, which is equivalent to a rate of 0.54 hospitalizations per 10,000 individuals. The majority of the patients were adult, male, diagnosed with mental or behavioral disorders and resident in 27.7% of the municipalities in Minas Gerais. The procedures were performed in 39 municipalities and the care coverage was equal to 1.58%. The study reveals a classic demographic and clinical profile of patient attendance. Difficulties in establishing a network of dental care were identified. PMID:25715145

  17. [The founding of Zemun Hospital].

    PubMed

    Milanović, Jasmina; Milenković, Sanja; Pavlović, Momcilo; Stojanović, Dragos

    2014-01-01

    This year Zemun Hospital--Clinical Hospital Center Zemun celebrates 230th anniversary of continuous work, thus becoming the oldest medical facility in Serbia.The exact date of the hospital founding has been often questioned in history. Various dates appeared in the literature, but the most frequent one was 25th of February 1784. Until now, the document which confirms this has never been published. This article represents the first official publication of the document which confirms that Zemun Hospital was indeed founded on this date. The first hospitals started emerging in Zemun when the town became a part of the Habsburg Monarchy. The first sanitary facility ever formed was the"Kontumac"--a quarantine established in 1730. Soon after, two more confessional hospitals were opened.The Serbian (Orthodox) Hospital was founded before 1769, whereas the German (Catholic) Hospital started working in 1758. Both hospitals were financed, amongst others, by the Town Hall--the Magistrate. In order to improve efficiency of these hospitals, a decision was made to merge them into a single City Hospital. It was founded on 25th February 1784, when the General Command ordered the Magistrate of Zemun to merge the financess of all existing hospitals and initiate the construction of a new building. Although financially united, the hospitals continued working in separate buildings over a certain period of time.The final, physical merging of these hospitals was completed in 1795. PMID:25233701

  18. Mid-Mountain Clouds at Whistler During the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics and Paralympics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Ruping; Joe, Paul; Isaac, George A.; Gultepe, Ismail; Rasmussen, Roy; Milbrandt, Jason; McTaggart-Cowan, Ron; Mailhot, Jocelyn; Brugman, Melinda; Smith, Trevor; Scott, Bill

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive study of mid-mountain clouds and their impacts on the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics and Paralympics is presented. Mid-mountain clouds were frequently present on the Whistler alpine venue, as identified in an extensive archive of webcam images over a 45-day period from February 5 to March 21, 2010. These clouds posed serious forecast challenges and had significant impacts on some Olympic and Paralympic alpine skiing competitions. Under fair weather conditions, a diurnal upslope (anabatic) flow can work in concert with a diurnal temperature inversion aloft to produce a localized phenomenon known as "Harvey's Cloud" at Whistler. Two detailed case studies in this paper suggest that mid-mountain clouds can also develop in the area as a result of a moist valley flow interacting with a downslope flow descending from the mountaintop. A southerly inflow through the Sea-to-Sky corridor can be channeled by the local topography into a westerly upslope flow toward Whistler Mountain, resulting in orographic clouds on the alpine venue. Under favorable circumstances, these clouds are trapped to the mid-mountain zone by the leeward subsidence of an elevated southerly flow. The presence of the downslope subsidence was manifested by a distinguished dry layer observed on the top of the mid-mountain clouds in both cases. It is the subsidence-induced adiabatic warming that imposes a strong buoyant suppression to trap the mid-mountain cloud. On the other hand, the subsidence-induced dry layer has the potential to trigger evaporative instability to periodically breakup the mid-mountain cloud.

  19. The reproductive endocrinology and behavior of Vancouver Island marmot (Marmota vancouverensis).

    PubMed

    Keeley, T; Goodrowe, K L; Graham, L; Howell, C; MacDonald, S E

    2012-01-01

    The Vancouver Island marmot (Marmota vancouverensis; VIM) is one of North America's most endangered species with fewer than 150 individuals remaining in the wild. A captive breeding program was established across four facilities in Canada as an insurance population and source of animals for reintroduction to the wild. The purpose of this study was to gather information about the basic reproductive biology and behavior of this species, which is essential to improve captive breeding programs. Regular fecal samples were obtained from adult female (n = 14) and male (n = 10) marmots, 2 years of age and older, over 1-3 breeding seasons (2-3 months duration posthibernation) for steroid hormone analysis. Enzyme immunoassays were validated for quantifying fecal testosterone metabolite concentrations for males, and fecal estrogen and progesterone metabolite concentrations for females. Results indicated that fecal progesterone metabolite concentrations can be used to monitor ovulation and pregnancy. Behavioral monitoring through infrared video surveillance was conducted in four breeding pairs over a 2-year period (n = 7 behavioral profiles). Breeding behaviors correlated strongly with changes in reproductive endocrine profiles. A high frequency of play behavior or "wrestling" was observed in conjunction with breeding activity before an elevation in progesterone metabolite concentrations. Impending parturition was associated with increased aggression and exclusion of the male from the maternal nestbox as well as an increase in nesting activity. Observational data combined with hormonal analysis suggest that female VIMs are induced ovulators and that multiple breeding attempts may be required for ovulation and conception. Gestation appears to be approximately 34 days from peak breeding activity (32 days from estimated ovulation). Fecal testosterone concentrations suggest that testicular activity is seasonal with the reproductive activity occurring immediately posthibernation. Monitoring breeding behavior is a useful means of indicating estrus, conception and pregnancy, which can also be supported by the hormonal analysis of daily fecal samples of individual animals. PMID:21404327

  20. Landslide Sediment Flux and Forest Management in Northeastern Vancouver Island, Coastal British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brardinoni, F.; Maynard, D.; Rollerson, T.

    2012-04-01

    To evaluate landslide response of mountain drainage basins to forest management we examine a historical inventory in northeastern Vancouver Island. The study area is underlain by extrusive (upper Triassic Karmutsen Formation) and intrusive rocks (Jurassic Island Intrusions). The dataset, compiled via interpretation of sequential aerial photosets, helicopter traverses, and extensive fieldwork, comprises a total of 1961 sediment sources, including 798 field-measured events. Field- and photo-based data cover a time window of approximately 70 years. The effects of forest management on landslide activity are assessed in terms of landslide density, sediment production, landslide geometry, landslide magnitude-frequency relations, topographic conditions of landslide initiation and deposition, and sediment redistribution across landscape components. Results indicate that forest management alters natural landslide dynamics in many respects. Logging-related debris avalanches are typically smaller. Consequently, the magnitude-frequency relation in logged terrain occupies the small-medium magnitude spectrum (< 6000 m3), with frequencies increasing by over an order of magnitude. Lithologic effects on sediment production appear amplified, in that terrain underlain by extrusive rocks become increasingly more unstable than intrusive ones. Analysis of landslide initiation and deposition zones reveals that forest management promotes colluvial aggradation on mid and lower hillslopes and in gullies. This pattern, which accelerates sediment recharge of gully systems, has the potential of increasing the frequency of channelized debris-flows, hence cause an extended period of disturbance, before sediment dynamics recover to pre-logging conditions. The effects of forest clearing on hillslope-channel coupling are composite: in cutblocks the percentage of sediment delivered to streams is reduced by 20-60% whereas road-related landslides are associated with highest connectivity to streams.

  1. Magnitudes and moment-duration scaling of low-frequency earthquakes beneath southern Vancouver Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostock, M. G.; Thomas, A. M.; Savard, G.; Chuang, L.; Rubin, A. M.

    2015-09-01

    We employ 130 low-frequency earthquake (LFE) templates representing tremor sources on the plate boundary below southern Vancouver Island to examine LFE magnitudes. Each template is assembled from hundreds to thousands of individual LFEs, representing over 269,000 independent detections from major episodic-tremor-and-slip (ETS) events between 2003 and 2013. Template displacement waveforms for direct P and S waves at near epicentral distances are remarkably simple at many stations, approaching the zero-phase, single pulse expected for a point dislocation source in a homogeneous medium. High spatiotemporal precision of template match-filtered detections facilitates precise alignment of individual LFE detections and analysis of waveforms. Upon correction for 1-D geometrical spreading, attenuation, free surface magnification and radiation pattern, we solve a large, sparse linear system for 3-D path corrections and LFE magnitudes for all detections corresponding to a single-ETS template. The spatiotemporal distribution of magnitudes indicates that typically half the total moment release occurs within the first 12-24 h of LFE activity during an ETS episode when tidal sensitivity is low. The remainder is released in bursts over several days, particularly as spatially extensive rapid tremor reversals (RTRs), during which tidal sensitivity is high. RTRs are characterized by large-magnitude LFEs and are most strongly expressed in the updip portions of the ETS transition zone and less organized at downdip levels. LFE magnitude-frequency relations are better described by power law than exponential distributions although they exhibit very high b values ≥˜5. We examine LFE moment-duration scaling by generating templates using detections for limiting magnitude ranges (MW<1.5, MW≥2.0). LFE duration displays a weaker dependence upon moment than expected for self-similarity, suggesting that LFE asperities are limited in fault dimension and that moment variation is dominated by slip. This behavior implies that LFEs exhibit a scaling distinct from both large-scale slow earthquakes and regular seismicity.

  2. Storm runoff as related to urbanization in the Portland, Oregon-Vancouver, Washington area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laenen, Antonius

    1980-01-01

    A series of equations was developed to provide a better method of determining flood frequencies in the Portland-Vancouver urban area than is now available. The resulting regression equations can be used to compute peak discharge and storm runoff with a standard error of estimate of approximately 30 percent. Basins used to define the regression equations ranged in size from 0.2 to 26 square miles. Those physical basin parameters that proved to be significant are: drainage area, effective impervious area, storage, rainfall intensity, basin slope, and soil infiltration. The equations indicate that total urbanization of an undeveloped basin can increase peak discharge as much as 3? times and almost double the volume of storm runoff. Impervious area, as delineated by mapping techniques, proved to be an inadequate physical parameter for use in the regression equations because builders and planners have devised many methods of routing storm runoff from impervious areas to the main channel (in effect, speeding up or slowing down the response to the storm). In some parts of the study area, storm runoff was diverted into dry wells and never entered the main channel. To define the effect of this rerouting, the digital model was used to find an effective impervious area that would 'best fit' the rainfall-runoff data. Field estimates to verify the effectiveness of the impervious area for two of the basins showed that optimizations were within 20 percent of those shown by the digital model. Users of these data who may find the effective impervious area a difficult, expensive, and time-consuming parameter to obtain have an alternative. The combination of land-use type I (parks, forests, and vacant lots) and Type II (agriculture) proved to be an excellent inverse indicator of impervious area. Land-use types I and II, coupled with the street-gutter density, an indication of effective routing, provide the user with alternative indices of urbanization.

  3. Hospital service recovery.

    PubMed

    Gutbezahl, Cary; Haan, Perry

    2006-01-01

    An organization's ability to correct service errors is an important factor in achieving success in today's service economy. This paper examines service recovery in hospitals in the U.S. First is a general review of service recovery theories. Next is a discussion of specific service issues related to the hospital environment. The literature on service recovery is used to make specific recommendations to hospitals for ways to improve their ability to remedy service errors when they occur. Suggestions for future research in the field of service recovery are also made. PMID:17194683

  4. Mental hospitals in India.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, K; Venugopal, D; Alimchandani, A K

    2000-04-01

    This review traces the history of the mental hospital movement, initially on the world stage, and later in India, in relation to advances in psychiatric care. Mental hospitals have played a significant role in the evolution of psychiatry to its present statusThe earliest hospital in India were established during the British colonial rule. They served as a means to isolate mentally ill persons from the societal mainstream and provide treatments that were in vogue at the time. Following India's independence, there has been a trend towards establishing general hospital psychiatry units and deinstitutionalization, while at the same time improving conditions in the existing mental hospitals.Since 1947, a series of workshops of superintendents was conducted to review the prevailing situations in mental hospitals and to propose recommendations to improve the same. Implementation of the Mental Health Act, 1987, and grovernmental focus upon mental hospital reform have paved way for a more specific and futuristic role for mental hospitals in planning psychiatric services for the new millenium, especially for severe mental illnesses. PMID:21407925

  5. Globally dispersed mobile drug-resistance genes in Gram-negative bacterial isolates from patients with bloodstream infections in a US urban general hospital

    PubMed Central

    Adams-Sapper, S.; Sergeevna-Selezneva, J.; Tartof, S.; Raphael, E.; Diep, B. An; Perdreau-Remington, F.

    2012-01-01

    Mobile drug-resistance genes with identical nucleic acid sequences carried by multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli strains that cause community-acquired infections are becomingly increasingly dispersed worldwide. Over a 2-year period, we analysed Gram-negative bacterial (GNB) pathogens from the blood of inpatients at an urban public hospital to determine what proportion of these isolates carried such globally dispersed drug-resistance genes. Of 376 GNB isolates, 167 (44 %) were Escherichia coli, 50 (13 %) were Klebsiella pneumoniae, 25 (7 %) were Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 25 (7 %) were Proteus mirabilis and 20 (5 %) were Enterobacter cloacae; the remainder (24 %) comprised 26 different GNB species. Among E. coli isolates, class 1 integrons were detected in 64 (38 %). The most common integron gene cassette configuration was dfrA17-aadA5, found in 30 (25 %) of 119 drug-resistant E. coli isolates and in one isolate of Moraxella morganii. Extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) genes were found in 16 E. coli isolates (10 %). These genes with identical sequences were found in nearly 40 % of bloodstream E. coli isolates in the study hospital, as well as in a variety of bacterial species from clinical and non-clinical sources worldwide. Thus, a substantial proportion of bloodstream infections among hospitalized patients were caused by E. coli strains carrying drug-resistance genes that are dispersed globally in a wide variety of bacterial species. PMID:22493279

  6. 21 CFR 880.5140 - Pediatric hospital bed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pediatric hospital bed. 880.5140 Section 880.5140...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital and Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5140 Pediatric hospital bed. (a) Identification. A pediatric hospital bed is a...

  7. 21 CFR 880.5140 - Pediatric hospital bed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pediatric hospital bed. 880.5140 Section 880.5140...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital and Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5140 Pediatric hospital bed. (a) Identification. A pediatric hospital bed is a...

  8. 21 CFR 880.5140 - Pediatric hospital bed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pediatric hospital bed. 880.5140 Section 880.5140...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital and Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5140 Pediatric hospital bed. (a) Identification. A pediatric hospital bed is a...

  9. 21 CFR 880.5140 - Pediatric hospital bed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pediatric hospital bed. 880.5140 Section 880.5140...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital and Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5140 Pediatric hospital bed. (a) Identification. A pediatric hospital bed is a...

  10. Social structural factors that shape assisted injecting practices among injection drug users in Vancouver, Canada: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Injection drug users (IDU) commonly seek manual assistance with illicit drug injections, a practice known to be associated with various health-related harms. We investigated the social structural factors that shape risks related to assisted injection and the harms that may result. Methods Twenty semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with IDU enrolled in the ACCESS or Vancouver Injection Drug Users Study (VIDUS) who reported requiring assistance injecting in the past six months. Audio-recorded interviews were transcribed verbatim and a thematic analysis was conducted. Results Barriers to self-injecting included a lack of knowledge of proper injecting technique, a loss of accessible veins, and drug withdrawal. The exchange of money or drugs for assistance with injecting was common. Harms experienced by IDU requiring assistance injecting included theft of the drug, missed injections, overdose, and risk of blood-borne disease transmission. Increased vulnerability to HIV/HCV infection within the context of intimate relationships was represented in participant narratives. IDU identified a lack of services available for those who require assistance injecting, with notable mention of restricted use of Vancouver's supervised injection facility. Conclusions This study documents numerous severe harms that arise from assisted injecting. Social structural factors that shape the risks related to assisted injection in the Vancouver context included intimate partner relations and social conventions requiring an exchange of goods for provision of injecting assistance. Health services for IDU who need help injecting should include targeted interventions, and supervised injection facilities should attempt to accommodate individuals who require assistance with injecting. PMID:20807442

  11. Tectonic setting of the Portland-Vancouver area, Oregon and Washington: constraints from low-altitude aeromagnetic data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blakely, R.J.; Wells, R.E.; Yelin, T.S.; Madin, I.P.; Beeson, M.H.

    1995-01-01

    Seismic activity in the Portland-Vancouver metropolitan area may be associated with various mapped faults that locally offset volcanic basement of Eocene age and younger. This volcanic basement is concealed in most places by young deposits, vegetation, and urban development. The US Geological Survey conducted an aeromagnetic survey in September 1992 to investigate the extent of these mapped faults and possibly to help identify other seismic and volcanic hazards in the area. The survey was flown approximately 240 m above terrain, along flight lines spaced 460 m apart, and over an area about 50 ?? 50 km. -from Authors

  12. Late-Quaternary paleovegetation, paleoclimate and fire disturbance records from subalpine sites on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitton, R. J.; Brown, K. J.; Hebda, R. J.

    2003-04-01

    Analyses of pollen, macrofossils and charcoal from subalpine lakes provide insight into past climatic changes as well as local factors affecting the sites, especially since steep precipitation and temperature gradients typify mountainous regions. Lake and bog cores collected from three sites on southern and central Vancouver Island (Porphyry and Walker lakes and Harris Lake Ridge Bog) were analysed for pollen, macrofossils and charcoal and the resulting data were used to reveal post-glacial changes in vegetation, climate and fire disturbance. The paleovegetation, paleoclimate, and fire disturbance records from Porphyry and Walker Lakes parallel those from low elevations during the post-glacial interval, suggesting that these sites responded strongly to regional forcing and were somewhat less sensitive to local forcing. Of notable interest is the upward migration of lowland taxa to these lakes during the warm dry early-Holocene. A change to cooler and moister conditions in the mid- and late-Holocene is subsequently characterised by downslope movement of species ranges and the establishment of modern subalpine communities. In contrast, Harris Lake Ridge Bog from central Vancouver Island has a more complicated history that exhibits strong local and regional influences. This site is less similar to lowland records despite a relatively similar ecotonal position as the other two sites. In the early-Holocene upslope movement of low elevation species is less obvious than at Porphyry and Walker lakes. In the mid- and late-Holocene forest composition changed around Harris Lake Ridge Bog as conditions cooled and moistened and taxa better suited to nutrient poor soils, such as Tsuga mertensiana and T. heterophylla expanded. At the same time, there is evidence to suggest that local switches between forest and heather communities were initiated by fire. Consequently, records from subalpine wetlands may provide more potential for detailed reconstruction of local in-stand vegetation dynamics than those from lakes. Studies from subalpine sites have application in forestry management, wildlife conservation, and archaeological reconstruction. For example, on Vancouver Island, the Vancouver Island marmot (Marmota vancouverensis) is near extinction and conservation of the species can benefit from understanding habitat dynamic at high elevations.

  13. Hospital diversification.

    PubMed

    Eastaugh, Steven R

    2005-01-01

    Hospital diversification and its impact on the operating ratio are studied for 168 hospitals during the period from 1999 to 2004. Diversification and the operating ratio are modeled in a two-stage least squares (TSLS) framework as being jointly dependent. Institutional diversification is found to yield a better financial position, and the better operating ratio allows the institution the wherewithal to diversify. The impact of external government planning and hospital competition are also measured. An institution lifecycle hypothesis is advanced to explain hospital behavior: boom and bust, diversification and divestiture, occasionally leading to closure or merger. Management's attitude concerning risk and reward is considered. PMID:18972998

  14. Superconducting Gravity Effects of Earthquake at Cascadia Subduction Zone on Vancouver Island, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong Woo; Neumeyer, Juergen; Kao, Ricky; Kabirzadeh, Hojjat; Henton, Joseph; Dragert, Herb; Lambert, Anthony

    2013-04-01

    Superconducting gravimeter (SG) iGrav #01 was deployed at NRCan's Pacific Geoscience Centre (PGC) on Vancouver Island near Sidney in British Columbia, Canada, in July 2012. The PGC is situated in the forearc of the northern Cascadia Subduction Zone (CSZ) and is equipped with FG-5 and A-10 absolute gravimeters, a borehole strainmeter, and a GPS network. In this area, a transient surface deformation accompanied by tremor-like seismic signals has been documented with a recurrence interval of 13 to 16 months. This phenomenon, named Episodic Tremor and Slip (ETS), has been interpreted to be associated with slow slip events (silent earthquakes) in the deeper (25-45 km) part of the CSZ. These slip events have been detected by transient horizontal displacements. The SG is not sensitive to horizontal displacements but it has the largest sensitivity in vertical direction. For detecting of ETS, the continuous SG recordings at the PGC site were reduced for the Earth and ocean tides, polar motion, atmospheric pressure and soil moisture, and, then were band-pass filtered and analyzed in the time and frequency domains and compared with the GPS-detected ETS. Furthermore, we present the gravity effect of the Haida Gwaii earthquake, which occurred near the plate boundary between the Pacific and North America plates (52.788N, 132.101W, 136 km south of Masset, Canada, on October 28th 2012 at 03:04:09 GMT with a magnitude 7.8 at a depth of 14 km). During the observation, a large co-seismic gravity change of -2.6 microGal was recorded at the onset of the Haida Gwaii earthquake. In addition, a significant decrease of gravity was observed from the 15 days prior to the earthquake, and the decrease lasted for 11 days after the earthquake. The analysis of other earthquakes, e.g. the southwestern Alaska earthquake (55.28N, 134.87W, January 5th 2013 with a magnitude 7.5) is also presented.

  15. Quantifying non-indigenous species in accumulated ballast slurry residuals (swish) arriving at Vancouver, British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, T. F.; Levings, C. D.

    2013-08-01

    Ballast tank “swish” samples were collected from ships following their arrival at Vancouver (British Columbia, Canada) after undergoing either a trans-oceanic or a Pacific-coastal voyage. The ballast swish consisted of a residual slurry mixture of sediment and water that remained trapped in ballast tanks following water discharge at port. The ballast tanks of 27 ships were sampled and ballast swish was found on 19 of the 27 ships. These ships were categorized according to ballast water management type: (1) Trans-oceanic = 7 trans-oceanic ships undergoing ballast water exchange (BWE) > 200 nm from shore; (2) Coastal-exchange = 7 Pacific-coastal ships traveling from ports south of Cape Blanco, Oregon undergoing coastal exchange > 50 nm from shore south of Cape Blanco; and (3) Coastal-no-exchange = 5 Pacific-coastal ships traveling from ports north of Cape Blanco, Oregon, without undergoing BWE. Invertebrate abundance and taxa richness were directly correlated with ballast-swish turbidity suggesting that highly-productive coastal source waters and ballast tank retention processes contributed to this trend. In turn, invertebrate taxa diversity increased with increasing invertebrate abundance. A Principal Component Analysis of the trans-oceanic data revealed that length of voyage showed a strong inverse relationship with invertebrate abundance for this category. Within the coastal-exchange voyage category, voyage length and ballast water age tended to be of the same magnitude and were directly correlated with both crustacean and nematode taxa. Finally, the coastal-no-exchange PCA results revealed that voyage length and salinity were inversely related due to the high number of river ports located at the southern border of the regulatory BWE exemption zone. Coastal voyages not undergoing BWE and undertaking a direct river-to-river route should be considered risky for the introduction of non-indigenous species, if the source waters contain potentially invasive species. Non-indigenous species were found in all 3 vector pathways, with the highest number of propagules and survivability potential arising from the coastal-no-exchange zone. Ballast “swish” may act as a repository for ballast water organisms within ballast water tanks and may be retained in the tanks over several discharge cycles.

  16. The International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Vancouver Classification of Renal Neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Srigley, John R; Delahunt, Brett; Eble, John N; Egevad, Lars; Epstein, Jonathan I; Grignon, David; Hes, Ondrej; Moch, Holger; Montironi, Rodolfo; Tickoo, Satish K; Zhou, Ming; Argani, Pedram

    2013-10-01

    The classification working group of the International Society of Urological Pathology consensus conference on renal neoplasia was in charge of making recommendations regarding additions and changes to the current World Health Organization Classification of Renal Tumors (2004). Members of the group performed an exhaustive literature review, assessed the results of the preconference survey and participated in the consensus conference discussion and polling activities. On the basis of the above inputs, there was consensus that 5 entities should be recognized as new distinct epithelial tumors within the classification system: tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma (RCC), acquired cystic disease-associated RCC, clear cell (tubulo) papillary RCC, the MiT family translocation RCCs (in particular t(6;11) RCC), and hereditary leiomyomatosis RCC syndrome-associated RCC. In addition, there are 3 rare carcinomas that were considered as emerging or provisional new entities: thyroid-like follicular RCC; succinate dehydrogenase B deficiency-associated RCC; and ALK translocation RCC. Further reports of these entities are required to better understand the nature and behavior of these highly unusual tumors. There were a number of new concepts and suggested modifications to the existing World Health Organization 2004 categories. Within the clear cell RCC group, it was agreed upon that multicystic clear cell RCC is best considered as a neoplasm of low malignant potential. There was agreement that subtyping of papillary RCC is of value and that the oncocytic variant of papillary RCC should not be considered as a distinct entity. The hybrid oncocytic chromophobe tumor, which is an indolent tumor that occurs in 3 settings, namely Birt-Hogg-Dubé Syndrome, renal oncocytosis, and as a sporadic neoplasm, was placed, for the time being, within the chromophobe RCC category. Recent advances related to collecting duct carcinoma, renal medullary carcinoma, and mucinous spindle cell and tubular RCC were elucidated. Outside of the epithelial category, advances in our understanding of angiomyolipoma, including the epithelioid and epithelial cystic variants, were considered. In addition, the apparent relationship between cystic nephroma and mixed epithelial and stromal tumor was discussed, with the consensus that these tumors form a spectrum of neoplasia. Finally, it was thought that the synovial sarcoma should be removed from the mixed epithelial and mesenchymal category and placed within the sarcoma group. The new classification is to be referred to as the International Society of Urological Pathology Vancouver Classification of Renal Neoplasia. PMID:24025519

  17. Slope failure of continental frontal ridges offshore Vancouver Island, British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, N.; Riedel, M.; Spence, G.; Dugan, B.; Daigle, H.; Hyndman, R. D.; James, T. S.; Naegeli, K.

    2010-12-01

    Bathymetric data from the Northern Cascadia margin offshore Vancouver Island reveal several submarine landslide features on the seaward slopes of frontal ridges. The slides occur just landward of the deformation front of the subducting Juan de Fuca and Explorer plates. Possible trigger mechanisms for the slope failures include earthquakes, pore pressure changes induced by sea-level changes, and the dissociation of gas hydrates. Evidence of gas hydrate has been found beneath the frontal ridges. A bottom simulating reflection (BSR) has been identified in regional seismic data and logging data showed gas hydrate indicators including sonic velocity and high electrical resistivity. The influence of gas hydrate formation and dissociation on slope stability is of special interest since previous studies showed coincident depths of BSRs and failure planes. We investigate two slope failure events in detail using numerical modeling techniques such as finite and discrete element modeling. Hybrid techniques provide a means to model processes ranging from grain-scale interactions up to movements of the sliding body by addressing both the continuous and discontinuous aspects of the problem. These include the internal forces, the evaluation of material failure criterion, deformation, and interaction forces. Furthermore, tensile failure and crack propagation, for example caused by gas hydrate or by the gradual breakdown of the slope material, can be characterized. Particle flow using different shapes and properties can be simulated. By examining the effect of local sea-level changes, glacial rebound, and gas hydrate formation or dissociation on stresses and fluid pressures, the work involves modeling the failure conditions associated with a decrease in shear strength, an increase in pore pressure, and the possible development or re-opening of cracks. Beyond describing the trigger mechanism, we also have interest in reconstructing the dynamics of the slide events to explain their different morphologies (e.g., blocky or smooth) observed in the bathymetric data. The results of this study have potential to contribute to the assessment of local tsunami hazard by evaluating the present state of slope stability and by estimating the impact of the dynamic slope failure events on the movements of the water body.

  18. A 3D, finite element model for baroclinic circulation on the Vancouver Island continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, R.A.; Foreman, M.G.G.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the development and application of a 3-dimensional model of the barotropic and baroclinic circulation on the continental shelf west of Vancouver Island, Canada. A previous study with a 2D barotropic model and field data revealed that several tidal constituents have a significant baroclinic component (the K1 in particular). Thus we embarked on another study with a 3D model to study the baroclinic effects on the residual and several selected tidal constituents. The 3D model uses a harmonic expansion in time and a finite element discretization in space. All nonlinear terms are retained, including quadratic bottom stress, advection and wave transport (continuity nonlinearity). The equations are solved as a global and a local problem, where the global problem is the solution of the wave equation formulation of the shallow water equations, and the local problem is the solution of the momentum equation for the vertical velocity profile. These equations are coupled to the advection-diffusion equation for density so that density gradient forcing is included in the momentum equations. However, the study presented here describes diagnostic calculations for the baroclinic residual circulation only. The model is sufficiently efficient that it encourages sensitivity testing with a large number of model runs. In this sense, the model is akin to an extension of analytical solutions to the domain of irregular geometry and bottom topography where this parameter space can be explored in some detail. In particular, the consequences of the sigma coordinate system used by the model are explored. Test cases using an idealized representation of the continental shelf, shelf break and shelf slope, lead to an estimation of the velocity errors caused by interpolation errors inherent in the sigma coordinate system. On the basis of these estimates, the computational grid used in the 2D model is found to have inadequate resolution. Thus a new grid is generated with increased accuracy in the region of the shelf break. However, even with increased resolution, spurious baroclinic circulation seaward of the shelf break and in the vicinity of Juan de Fuca canyon remained a significant problem when the pressure gradient terms were evaluated using the ?? coordinate system and using a realistic density profile. With the new grid, diagnostic calculations of the barotropic and baroclinic residual circulation are performed using forcing from the observed ??t (density) field and from the gradient of this field. ?? 1992.

  19. Unacceptable attrition among WHO stages 1 and 2 patients in a hospital-based setting in rural Malawi: can we retain such patients within the general health system?

    PubMed

    Tayler-Smith, Katie; Zachariah, Rony; Massaquoi, Moses; Manzi, Marcel; Pasulani, Olesi; van den Akker, Thomas; Bemelmans, Marielle; Bauernfeind, Ariane; Mwagomba, Beatrice; Harries, Anthony D

    2010-05-01

    A study conducted among HIV-positive adults in WHO clinical stages 1 and 2 was followed up at Thyolo District Hospital (rural Malawi) to report on: (1) retention and attrition before and while on antiretroviral treatment (ART); and (2) the criteria used for initiating ART. Between June 2008 and January 2009, 1633 adults in WHO stages 1 and 2 were followed up for a total of 282 person-years. Retention in care at 1, 2, 3 and 6 months for those not on ART (n=1078) was 25, 18, 11 and 4% vs. 99, 97, 95 and 90% for patients who started ART (n=555, P=0.001). Attrition rates were 31 times higher among patients not started on ART compared with those started on ART (adjusted hazard ratio, 31.0, 95% CI 22-44). Ninety-two patients in WHO stage 1 or 2 were started on ART without the guidance of a CD4 count, and 11 were incorrectly started on ART with CD4 count > or = 250 cells/mm(3). In a rural district hospital setting in Malawi, attrition of individuals in WHO stages 1 and 2 is unacceptably high, and specific operational strategies need to be considered to retain such patients in the health system. PMID:20138323

  20. Mopping up hospital infection.

    PubMed

    Dancer, S J

    1999-10-01

    Hospital cleaning is a neglected component of infection control. In the UK, financial constraints have forced managers to re-evaluate domestic services and general cleaning has been reduced to the bare minimum. Services have been contracted out in some hospitals, which has further lowered standards of hygiene. Control of infection personnel believe that cleaning is important in preventing hospital-acquired infections but they do not manage domestic budgets and have failed to stop their erosion. It is difficult to defend high levels of hygiene when there is little scientific evidence to support cleaning practices. This review examines the common micro-organisms associated with hospital-acquired infection and their ability to survive in the hospital environment. It also describes studies which suggest that comprehensive cleaning disrupts the chain of infection between these organisms and patients. It is likely that restoring hygienic standards in hospitals would be a cost-effective method of controlling hospital-acquired infection. Furthermore, good cleaning is achievable whereas the enforcement of hand washing and good antibiotic prescribing are not. PMID:10549308

  1. Sex-Based Differences in Rates, Causes, and Predictors of Death Among Injection Drug Users in Vancouver, Canada.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kanna; Dong, Huiru; Marshall, Brandon D L; Milloy, Michael-John; Montaner, Julio S G; Wood, Evan; Kerr, Thomas

    2016-03-15

    In the present study, we sought to identify rates, causes, and predictors of death among male and female injection drug users (IDUs) in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, during a period of expanded public health interventions. Data from prospective cohorts of IDUs in Vancouver were linked to the provincial database of vital statistics to ascertain rates and causes of death between 1996 and 2011. Mortality rates were analyzed using Poisson regression and indirect standardization. Predictors of mortality were identified using multivariable Cox regression models stratified by sex. Among the 2,317 participants, 794 (34.3%) of whom were women, there were 483 deaths during follow-up, with a rate of 32.1 (95% confidence interval (CI): 29.3, 35.0) deaths per 1,000 person-years. Standardized mortality ratios were 7.28 (95% CI: 6.50, 8.14) for men and 15.56 (95% CI: 13.31, 18.07) for women. During the study period, mortality rates related to infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) declined among men but remained stable among women. In multivariable analyses, HIV seropositivity was independently associated with mortality in both sexes (all P < 0.05). The excess mortality burden among IDUs in our cohorts was primarily attributable to HIV infection; compared with men, women remained at higher risk of HIV-related mortality, indicating a need for sex-specific interventions to reduce mortality among female IDUs in this setting. PMID:26865265

  2. Realizing User-Relevant Conceptual Model for the Ski Jump Venue of the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teakles, Andrew; Mo, Ruping; Dierking, Carl F.; Emond, Chris; Smith, Trevor; McLennan, Neil; Joe, Paul I.

    2014-01-01

    As was the case for most other Olympic competitions, providing weather guidance for the ski jump and Nordic combined events involved its own set of unique challenges. The extent of these challenges was brought to light before the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics during a series of outflow wind events in the 2008/2009 winter season. The interactions with the race officials during the difficult race conditions brought on by the outflows provided a new perspective on the service delivery requirements for the upcoming Olympic Games. In particular, the turbulent nature of the winds and its impact on the ski jump practice events that season highlighted the need of race officials for nowcasting advice at very short time scales (from 2 min to 1 h) and forecast products tailored to their decision-making process. These realizations resulted in last minute modifications to the monitoring strategy leading up to the Olympic Games and required forecasters' conceptual models for flow within the Callaghan Valley to be downscaled further to reflect the evolution of turbulence at the ski jump site. The SNOW-V10 (Science of Nowcasting Olympic Weather for Vancouver 2010) team provided support for these efforts by supplying diagnostic case analyses of important events using numerical weather data and by enhancing the real-time monitoring capabilities at the ski jump venue.

  3. A content analysis of media coverage of the introduction of a smoke-free bylaw in Vancouver parks and beaches.

    PubMed

    Moshrefzadeh, Arezu; Rice, Wendy; Pederson, Ann; Okoli, Chizimuzo T C

    2013-09-01

    The Board of Parks and Recreation in Vancouver, BC approved a smoke-free bylaw in the city's parks, beaches and recreational facilities, effective 1 September 2010. We analyzed local news coverage and portrayal of the bylaw to understand the potential influence of news media on public perception of the bylaw in order to inform the media advocacy work of public health interest groups. We compiled a data set of newspaper articles (n = 90) and conducted a quantitative content analysis to examine content related to the outdoor smoke-free policy, including article slant, topics related to smoking and tobacco control, and any equity-related concerns raised. Newspaper coverage in Vancouver was largely supportive of the outdoor smoke-free bylaw. However, concerns over rights were frequently discussed in letters to the editor. Such equity concerns were rarely discussed in news articles, showing a potential disconnect between the concerns expressed in the media by members of the public and the coverage provided by print media. PMID:24052134

  4. A GIS-based spatiotemporal analysis of violent trauma hotspots in Vancouver, Canada: identification, contextualisation and intervention

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Blake Byron; Schuurman, Nadine; Hameed, S Morad

    2014-01-01

    Background In 2002, the WHO declared interpersonal violence to be a leading public health problem. Previous research demonstrates that urban spaces with a high incidence of violent trauma (hotspots) correlate with features of built environment and social determinants. However, there are few studies that analyse injury data across the axes of both space and time to characterise injury–environment relationships. This paper describes a spatiotemporal analysis of violent injuries in Vancouver, Canada, from 2001 to 2008. Methods Using geographic information systems, 575 violent trauma incidents were mapped and analysed using kernel density estimation to identify hotspot locations. Patterns between space, time, victim age and sex and mechanism of injury were investigated with an exploratory approach. Results Several patterns in space and time were identified and described, corresponding to distinct neighbourhood characteristics. Violent trauma hotspots were most prevalent in Vancouver's nightclub district on Friday and Saturday nights, with higher rates in the most socioeconomically deprived neighbourhoods. Victim sex, age and mechanism of injury also formed strong patterns. Three neighbourhood profiles are presented using the dual axis of space/time to describe the hotspot environments. Conclusions This work posits the value of exploratory spatial data analysis using geographic information systems in trauma epidemiology studies and further suggests that using both space and time concurrently to understand urban environmental correlates of injury provides a more granular or higher resolution picture of risk. We discuss implications for injury prevention and control, focusing on education, regulation, the built environment and injury surveillance. PMID:24556240

  5. Outdoor brothel culture: the un/making of a transsexual stroll in Vancouver's West End, 1975–1984.

    PubMed

    Ross, Becki

    2012-01-01

    In the mid-1970s, following a series of police raids on prostitution inside downtown nightclubs, a community of approximately 200 sex workers moved into Vancouver's West End neighborhood, where a small stroll had operated since the early 1970s. This paper examines the contributions made by three male-to-female (MTF) transsexuals of color to the culture of on-street prostitution in the West End. The trans women's stories address themes of fashion, working conditions, money, community formation, violence, and resistance to well-organized anti-prostitution forces. These recollections enable me to bridge and enrich trans history and prostitution history – two fields of inquiry that have under-represented the participation of trans women in the sex industry across the urban West. Acutely familiar with the hazards inherent in a criminalized, stigmatized trade, trans sex workers in the West End manufactured efficacious strategies of harm reduction, income generation, safety planning, and community building. Eschewing the label of “victim”, they leveraged their physical size and style, charisma, contempt towards pimps, earning capacity, and seniority as the first workers on the stroll to assume leadership within the broader constituency of “hookers on Davie Street”. I discover that their short-lived outdoor brothel culture offered only a temporary bulwark against the inevitability of eviction via legal injunction in July 1984, and the subsequent rise in lethal violence against all prostitutes in Vancouver, including MTF transsexuals. PMID:22611581

  6. Air sampling in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Gröschel, D H

    1980-01-01

    Air sampling in hospitals is performed for the epidemiologic investigation of nosocomial infections, for the elucidation of spread and control of airborn microorganisms, for assessing biohazards associated with instruments, equipment and procedures and for controlling the performance of devices and techniques used for the reduction of airborne contaminants. Many different air-sampling devices are available but only a few have found use in hospitals. Certain samplers are used for special studies such as the Andersen stacked-sieve impactor or the liquid impingers. Lately, samplers have been developed which due to their size and weight are more useful to the hospital microbiologist and epidemiologist than the older slit samplers. the Ross Microban sieve sampler and the Biotest Reuter Centrifugal Sampler were tested in comparison with the Casella slit sampler and found to show comparable results. The hand-held, battery-operated Biotest RCS sample is the most versatile for general sampling of hospital air. PMID:6939388

  7. [Mortality in the surgical unit of a general hospital. Study of 27 postoperative deaths among patients operated on during 1990-1492].

    PubMed

    Proye, C; Martinot, J C; Triboulet, J P; Carnaille, B; Sautier, M; Dromer, D; Camp, D

    1991-11-01

    This study takes in account all post operative deaths during the year 1990 in one surgical Professorial unit of Lille academic hospital (France). During this year, 1492 consecutive patients underwent surgery. The mean age of deceased patients was 63.7 years. 15 died after emergency procedure and 12 after elective surgery. Lastly 2 patients died without any operation. The most common condition encountered in those cases was oesophageal carcinoma, thereafter gastric or duodenal complicated peptic ulcer, and finally colonic carcinoma and diverticular disease. 13 patients had neoplasia (45%). From a critical point of view, 14 patients died after surgical indication or procedure of questionable legitimacy. The comparison with a similar study conducted five years ago and the analysis of these charts allow us to reaffirm some basic principles of surgery. PMID:1761598

  8. [Trend in the susceptibility of the most frequent bacterial pathogens isolated at Hospital General La Mancha Centro over 2010-2012 period].

    PubMed

    Asencio, María Ángeles; Huertas, María; Carranza, Rafael; Franco, María; Castellanos, Jesús; Barberá, José Ramón; Conde, María del Carmen; Tenías, José María

    2014-12-01

    Introduction. Our objective was to determine the trend of the antimicrobial susceptibility of the most common bacterial pathogens isolated in La Mancha Centro Hospital (MCH) between 2010-2012. Material and methods. Isolates of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa from patients admitted to MCH were studied. These data and their antibiotic susceptibility were obtained from the database OBSERVA (BioMérieux). Results. The percentages of susceptibility for S. aureus were: 50% methicillin-resistant-S. aureus (MRSA) (higher co-resistance to erythromycin and levofloxacin), 46% erythromycin, 73% clindamycin, 45% levofloxacin, 99% rifampin and 100% cotrimoxazole, glycopeptides, linezolid and daptomycin. Increased resistance in ICU was observed (63% MRSA), with 50% of S. aureus (susceptible and methicillin-resistant strains) with vancomycin MIC values ≥ 0.5 mg/L. E. coli susceptibility: 62% amoxicillin-clavulanate, 55% ciprofloxacin, 60% cotrimoxazole, 84% gentamicin and 95% fosfomycin. K. pneumoniae susceptibility: 74% amoxicillin-clavulanate, 71% ciprofloxacin, 78% cotrimoxazole, 94% gentamicin and 87% fosfomycin. The percentage of BLEE strains was 17% and 21% for E. coli and K. pneumoniae, respectively, without detection of resistance to carbapenems. P. aeruginosa susceptibility: 80% ceftazidime and carbapenems, 63% ciprofloxacin and higher than 90% aminoglycosides. A decreasing trend of susceptibility to ceftazidime and carbapenems was observed in ICU and increasing trend to ciprofloxacin. Conclusions. Resistance percentages were higher in ICU than in the rest of the hospital, highlighting 63% of MRSA strains. Our percentage of BLEE and MRSA strains were higher than the Spanish media. Rifampicin and cotrimoxazole maintain good susceptibility to S. aureus, fosfomycin and aminoglycosides to Enterobacteriaceae and carbapenems to P. aeruginosa. PMID:25536430

  9. Hospital fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Althausen, Peter L; Hill, Austin D; Mead, Lisa

    2014-07-01

    Under the current system, orthopaedic trauma surgeons must work in some form of hospital setting as our primary service involves treatment of the trauma patient. We must not forget that just as a trauma center cannot exist without our services, we cannot function without their support. As a result, a clear understanding of the balance between physicians and hospitals is paramount. Historical perspective enables physicians and hospital personnel alike to understand the evolution of hospital-physician relationship. This process should be understood upon completion of this chapter. The relationship between physicians and hospitals is becoming increasingly complex and multiple forms of integration exist such as joint ventures, gain sharing, and co-management agreements. For the surgeon to negotiate well, an understanding of hospital governance and the role of the orthopaedic traumatologist is vital to success. An understanding of the value provided by the traumatologist includes all aspects of care including efficiency, availability, cost effectiveness, and research activities. To create effective and sustainable healthcare institutions, physicians and hospitals must be aligned over a sustained period of time. Unfortunately, external forces have eroded the historical basis for the working relationship between physicians and hospitals. Increased competition and reimbursement cuts, coupled with the increasing demands for quality, efficiency, and coordination and the payment changes outlined in healthcare reform, have left many organizations wondering how to best rebuild the relationship. The principal goal for the physician when partnering with a hospital or healthcare entity is to establish a sustainable model of service line management that protects or advances the physician's ability to make impactful improvements in quality of patient care, decreases in healthcare costs, and improvements in process efficiency through evidence-based practices and protocols. PMID:24918827

  10. 45 CFR 211.10 - Termination of hospitalization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... of the hospital finds that the eligible person hospitalized for mental illness (whether or not... accordance with laws governing hospitalization for mental illness as may be in force and generally...

  11. 45 CFR 211.10 - Termination of hospitalization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... of the hospital finds that the eligible person hospitalized for mental illness (whether or not... accordance with laws governing hospitalization for mental illness as may be in force and generally...

  12. 45 CFR 211.10 - Termination of hospitalization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... of the hospital finds that the eligible person hospitalized for mental illness (whether or not... accordance with laws governing hospitalization for mental illness as may be in force and generally...

  13. 45 CFR 211.10 - Termination of hospitalization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... of the hospital finds that the eligible person hospitalized for mental illness (whether or not... accordance with laws governing hospitalization for mental illness as may be in force and generally...

  14. 6. Hospital Point, stairs at northwest bulkhead, view to north ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Hospital Point, stairs at northwest bulkhead, view to north - Portsmouth Naval Hospital, Bounded by Elizabeth River, Crawford Street, Portsmouth General Hospital, Parkview Avenue, & Scotts Creek, Portsmouth, Portsmouth, VA

  15. 3. MAIN HOSPITAL, VIEW OF EAST SIDE AND NORTHEAST CORNER. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. MAIN HOSPITAL, VIEW OF EAST SIDE AND NORTHEAST CORNER. - Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman General Hospital, Building No. 27, Letterman Hospital Complex, Edie Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  16. 13. Photographic copy of historic photograph, Portsmouth Naval Hospital Building, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Photographic copy of historic photograph, Portsmouth Naval Hospital Building, ca. 1875-1876. (Portsmouth Naval Shipyard Museum, Portsmouth, VA) - Portsmouth Naval Hospital, Bounded by Elizabeth River, Crawford Street, Portsmouth General Hospital, Parkview Avenue, & Scotts Creek, Portsmouth, Portsmouth, VA

  17. 12. 1960 highrise hospital, front (south) facade, view to northwest ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. 1960 high-rise hospital, front (south) facade, view to northwest - Portsmouth Naval Hospital, Bounded by Elizabeth River, Crawford Street, Portsmouth General Hospital, Parkview Avenue, & Scotts Creek, Portsmouth, Portsmouth, VA

  18. 8. Hospital Point, pier and boat house (now Visiting Officer's ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Hospital Point, pier and boat house (now Visiting Officer's Quarters), view to east - Portsmouth Naval Hospital, Bounded by Elizabeth River, Crawford Street, Portsmouth General Hospital, Parkview Avenue, & Scotts Creek, Portsmouth, Portsmouth, VA

  19. 2. MAIN HOSPITAL, VIEW OF SURVIVING PORTION OF QUADRANGLE LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. MAIN HOSPITAL, VIEW OF SURVIVING PORTION OF QUADRANGLE LOOKING SOUTHEAST FROM EDIE STREET. - Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman General Hospital, Building No. 27, Letterman Hospital Complex, Edie Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  20. 15. Photographic copy of historic photograph, Portsmouth Naval Hospital Building, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Photographic copy of historic photograph, Portsmouth Naval Hospital Building, view of southeast elevation, 1901. (Portsmouth Naval Shipyard Museum, Portsmouth, VA) - Portsmouth Naval Hospital, Bounded by Elizabeth River, Crawford Street, Portsmouth General Hospital, Parkview Avenue, & Scotts Creek, Portsmouth, Portsmouth, VA

  1. The Boring Volcanic Field of the Portland-Vancouver area, Oregon and Washington: tectonically anomalous forearc volcanism in an urban setting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evarts, Russell C.; Conrey, Richard M.; Fleck, Robert J.; Hagstrum, Jonathan T.

    2009-01-01

    More than 80 small volcanoes are scattered throughout the Portland-Vancouver metropolitan area of northwestern Oregon and southwestern Washington. These volcanoes constitute the Boring Volcanic Field, which is centered in the Neogene Portland Basin and merges to the east with coeval volcanic centers of the High Cascade volcanic arc. Although the character of volcanic activity is typical of many monogenetic volcanic fields, its tectonic setting is not, being located in the forearc of the Cascadia subduction system well trenchward of the volcanic-arc axis. The history and petrology of this anomalous volcanic field have been elucidated by a comprehensive program of geologic mapping, geochemistry, 40Ar/39Ar geochronology, and paleomag-netic studies. Volcanism began at 2.6 Ma with eruption of low-K tholeiite and related lavas in the southern part of the Portland Basin. At 1.6 Ma, following a hiatus of ~0.8 m.y., similar lavas erupted a few kilometers to the north, after which volcanism became widely dispersed, compositionally variable, and more or less continuous, with an average recurrence interval of 15,000 yr. The youngest centers, 50–130 ka, are found in the northern part of the field. Boring centers are generally monogenetic and mafic but a few larger edifices, ranging from basalt to low-SiO2 andesite, were also constructed. Low-K to high-K calc-alkaline compositions similar to those of the nearby volcanic arc dominate the field, but many centers erupted magmas that exhibit little influence of fluids derived from the subducting slab. The timing and compositional characteristics of Boring volcanism suggest a genetic relationship with late Neogene intra-arc rifting.

  2. Complex and Conflicting Social Norms: Implications for Implementation of Future HIV Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) Interventions in Vancouver, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Small, Will; Carson, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Background HIV Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) has been found to be efficacious in preventing HIV acquisition among seronegative individuals in a variety of risk groups, including men who have sex with men and people who inject drugs. To date, however, it remains unclear how socio-cultural norms (e.g., attitudes towards HIV; social understandings regarding HIV risk practices) may influence the scalability of future PrEP interventions. The objective of this study is to assess how socio-cultural norms may influence the implementation and scalability of future HIV PrEP interventions in Vancouver, Canada. Methods We conducted 50 interviews with young men (ages 18–24) with a variety of HIV risk behavioural profiles (e.g., young men who inject drugs; MSM). Interviews focused on participants’ experiences and perceptions with various HIV interventions and policies, including PrEP. Results While awareness of PrEP was generally low, perceptions about the potential personal and public health gains associated with PrEP were interconnected with expressions of complex and sometimes conflicting social norms. Some accounts characterized PrEP as a convenient form of reliable protection against HIV, likening it to the female birth control pill. Other accounts cast PrEP as a means to facilitate ‘socially unacceptable’ behaviour (e.g., promiscuity). Stigmatizing rhetoric was used to position PrEP as a tool that could promote some groups’ proclivities to take ‘risks’. Conclusion Stigma regarding ‘risky’ behaviour and PrEP should not be underestimated as a serious implementation challenge. Pre-implementation strategies that concomitantly aim to improve knowledge about PrEP, while addressing associated social prejudices, may be key to effective implementation and scale-up. PMID:26756474

  3. The Neogene Alert Bay Volcanic Belt of northern Vancouver Island, Canada: Descending-plate-edge volcanism in the arc-trench gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, R. L.; Muller, J. E.; Harakal, J. E.; Muehlenbachs, K.

    1985-10-01

    The Alert Bay Volcanic Belt trends northeasterly across northern Vancouver Island, coincident with the trace of the subducted Juan de Fuca—Explorer plate edge. Volcanism began in the west, at Brooks Peninsula, about 8 Ma ago, but occurred in most centers 3.5 ± 1 Ma ago. There is a suggestion of eastward migration of activity and shift from basalt to dacite or rhyolite with time. Most of the volcanism was coincident with a time of rapid changes in the geometry of subduction, as inferred from offshore magnetic patterns, and with a hiatus in mainland, Cascade volcanic arc activity. Geometry and chronometry suggest this is a descending-plate-edge volcanic belt, where disruption of steady-state plate-consumption patterns triggered magma genesis. Chemically the rocks are quite variable, with divergent fractionation trends. One trend resembles that of Mull (Hebrides), with a plagiophyric basalt of transitional alkaline-subalkaline, mildly tholeiitic, and aluminous character which differentiated to clinopyroxene andesite, and eventually to tholeiitic rhyolite and mildly tholeiitic calc-alkaline dacite, both of K-poor magma type. The other trend is like the Cascades, with aluminous, aphyric, calc-alkaline basalt, hornblende and/or hypersthene andesite, and K-poor dacite. This divergent character is also evident in Ba, Rb, Nb, and Zr fractionation trends. Major- and trace-element discriminant diagrams generally identify the basalts as within-plate types. The 87Sr/ 86Sr isotope ratio is relatively low, averaging 0.70325, and shows no trend with rock type or differentiation series. Oxygen in the entire suite is relatively heavy, δ 18O averaging 7.1%. Even the basalts are 18O enriched. Oxygen shows no trend with degree of hydration, rock type, or series. These isotopic and chemical data are compatible with minor crustal contamination of mafic primary magmas, followed by fractional crystallization under different oxidation and hydration conditions.

  4. Assessing beliefs and risk perceptions on smoking and smoking cessation in immigrant Chinese adult smokers residing in Vancouver, Canada: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    FitzGerald, J Mark; Poureslami, Iraj; Shum, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to conduct culturally-based participatory research to assess cultural and belief contexts for smoking behaviours within Mandarin and Cantonese communities. Outcome variables were smoking-related knowledge, smoking patterns, attitudes and beliefs, and perceived barriers and facilitators to successful cessation. Design A community-based approach was applied involving smokers, community key-informants and professionals in study design and implementation. Initially, focus groups were conducted and findings were used to develop study instrument. Participants responded once to study questionnaire after informed consent. Setting Community based in the Greater Vancouver Area, Canada. Participants 16 Chinese smokers participated in focus groups and subsequently, 167 current Chinese immigrant (137 males and 30 females) smokers from Mandarin and Cantonese communities, recruited with the help of community agencies and collaborating physicians, were enrolled in a cross-sectional study. Results We found that a majority believed smoking was harmful on their health. Younger smokers (<35?years of age) did not mind smoking in front of young children compared to older smokers (?35?years of age) (p<0.001). People with high school or lower levels of education believed that they would benefit more from smoking than suffering from withdrawal symptoms compared to better educated smokers (p<0.05). Mandarin smokers were significantly more likely to encourage others to quit than Cantonese smokers (p<0.05). Many indicated not receiving adequate support from care providers and lack of access to culturally and linguistically appropriate cessation programmes impacted on their ability to quit smoking. Conclusions Our study highlighted the importance of tobacco beliefs and perceptions among Mandarin and Cantonese speaking immigrants with limited access to healthcare information and for younger smokers whose attention to health consequences of smoking may be limited as well. Study participants were generally aware of the health risks and were willing to quit. Access to appropriate cessation programmes would fulfil their willingness. PMID:25649211

  5. Welfare Checks, Drug Consumption, and Health: Evidence from Vancouver Injection Drug Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riddell, Chris; Riddell, Rosemarie

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigates the link between welfare payments and drug use among injection drug users. The authors find an increase in the likelihood of an overdose in the days following check arrival, and in the probability of leaving the hospital against medical advice (AMA) on check day. Using the check arrival date as an instrument, we estimate…

  6. Hospital Hints

    MedlinePlus

    ... Division of Geriatrics and Clinical Gerontology Division of Neuroscience FAQs Funding Opportunities Intramural Research Program Office of ... have to spend the night in the hospital. Learning more about what to expect and about people ...

  7. Hospitality Management Education and Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brotherton, Bob, Ed.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Seven articles on hospitality management training discuss the following: computerized management games for restaurant manager training, work placement, real-life exercises, management information systems in hospitality degree programs, modular programming, service quality concepts in the curriculum, and General National Vocational Qualifications…

  8. Vancouver Community College: Final Report of the 1985/86 Institutional Evaluation Steering Committee and Report of the External Review Team.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vancouver Community Coll., British Columbia.

    These two reports present the results of internal and external evaluations of Vancouver Community College (VCC). First, the self-study report identifies ways of improving the college's effectiveness, including: (1) the clarification of VCC's priorities and their relationship to external pressures and aspirations for the future; (2) the enhancement…

  9. Reflection on 10 Years of Community-Engaged Scholarship in the Faculty of Land and Food Systems at the University of British Columbia-Vancouver

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rojas, Alejandro; Sipos, Yona; Valley, Will

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe a cultural transformation to embrace community-engaged scholarship by faculty members in the Faculty of Land and Food Systems at the University of British Columbia-Vancouver. They describe a transition from community-inquiry faculty projects to community-engaged action research projects achieved through…

  10. Hospital philanthropy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Dean G; Clement, Jan P

    2013-01-01

    It remains an open question whether hospital spending on fundraising efforts to garner philanthropy is a good use of funds. Research and industry reports provide conflicting results. We describe the accounting and data challenges in analysis of hospital philanthropy, which include measurement of donations, measurement of fundraising expenses, and finding the relationships among organizations where these cash flows occur. With these challenges, finding conflicting results is not a surprise. PMID:23614267

  11. Knowledge and Attitude of Patients, and Practice of the Arrest of Breast Cancer in Outpatient Consultations in Mastology at the General Hospital of Huambo, Angola

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Hamilton dos Prazeres; Tavares, Suelma Beatriz Marques Prata; Natanel, Felizardo Abraão; Capingana, Daniel Pires

    2015-01-01

    This work aims to understand the knowledge and perceptions of women aged over 40 years with breast cancer seen in mastology outpatients at the Maternity Hospital of Huambo, central Angola, from February to August 2010. It also examines the clinical practice of prevention and detection of breast cancer. The research consisted of a collection of descriptive, cross-sectional data through a questionnaire. Statistical analysis of the data was performed using Epi Info, version 6.04b. In our sample, half of the women were single, all had history of breast cancer in the family, and most had heard of breast self-examination, with the primary source of information being the mass media. Almost all women reported that it was important to perform self-examination and that they were aware of the seriousness of breast cancer, and although most of them had not been taught how to do breast self-examination, almost all knew the basics of how to do it. Some 17.6% had heard of mammography, but none had ever had a mammogram. PMID:26379452

  12. Obvious and Hidden Anxiety and the Related Factors in Operating Room Nurses Employed in General Hospital, Qazvin, Iran: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Kayalha, Hamid; Yazdi, Zohreh; Rastak, Shahram; Dizaniha, Mojtaba

    2013-01-01

    Background: Health promotion and security of manpower in a society is one of the pillars to progress a society. Anxiety, is the most common psychological disorder in societies and occupations like nursing, anesthesia technicians and operation room technicians. The aim of this study was to investigate prevalence of anxiety, and its severity in Iranian nurses working in operation room. Also, we determined the most important associated factors with anxiety. Methods: In this cross sectional study, 152 nurses working in operating room participated. The tool to gather the data was a questionnaire, that included three parts; demographic information, obvious anxiety questions and hidden anxiety questions of Spielburger. Obtained data was analysed with SPSS 16 software. Results: The majority of participants were females (94.7%) with experience at work less than 10 years (84.9%). The average scores of participants in obvious and hidden anxiety were 41.9±39.4 (range 20 to 75) and 39.4±8.2 (range 20 to 70), respectively. Anxiety level was significantly higher in females than males (P=0.04). The most prevalent cause of anxiety, was contact with infected biological factors (23% of nurses). The less important cause was concern about retirement (42.8% of nurses). Conclusion: Our results suggest that, anxiety disorders is prevalent in Iranian nurses working in public city hospitals, which warrants immediate programs for intervention to improve working situations in work place. PMID:24171889

  13. Knowledge and Attitude of Patients, and Practice of the Arrest of Breast Cancer in Outpatient Consultations in Mastology at the General Hospital of Huambo, Angola.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Hamilton Dos Prazeres; Tavares, Suelma Beatriz Marques Prata; Natanel, Felizardo Abraão; Capingana, Daniel Pires

    2015-01-01

    This work aims to understand the knowledge and perceptions of women aged over 40 years with breast cancer seen in mastology outpatients at the Maternity Hospital of Huambo, central Angola, from February to August 2010. It also examines the clinical practice of prevention and detection of breast cancer. The research consisted of a collection of descriptive, cross-sectional data through a questionnaire. Statistical analysis of the data was performed using Epi Info, version 6.04b. In our sample, half of the women were single, all had history of breast cancer in the family, and most had heard of breast self-examination, with the primary source of information being the mass media. Almost all women reported that it was important to perform self-examination and that they were aware of the seriousness of breast cancer, and although most of them had not been taught how to do breast self-examination, almost all knew the basics of how to do it. Some 17.6% had heard of mammography, but none had ever had a mammogram. PMID:26379452

  14. Financing hospital disaster preparedness.

    PubMed

    De Lorenzo, Robert A

    2007-01-01

    Disaster preparedness and response have gained increased attention in the United States as a result of terrorism and disaster threats. However, funding of hospital preparedness, especially surge capacity, has lagged behind other preparedness priorities. Only a small portion of the money allocated for national preparedness is directed toward health care, and hospitals receive very little of that. Under current policy, virtually the entire funding stream for hospital preparedness comes from general tax revenues. Medical payers (e.g., Medicare, Medicaid, and private insurance) directly fund little, if any, of the current bill. Funding options to improve preparedness include increasing the current federal grants allocated to hospitals, using payer fees or a tax to subsidize preparedness, and financing other forms of expansion capability, such as mobile hospitals. Alternatively, the status quo of marginal preparedness can be maintained. In any event, achieving higher levels of preparedness likely will take the combined commitment of the hospital industry, public and private payers, and federal, state, and local governments. Ultimately, the costs of preparedness will be borne by the public in the form of taxes, higher healthcare costs, or through the acceptance of greater risk. PMID:18087914

  15. A review of geological records of large tsunamis at Vancouver Island, British Columbia, and implications for hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clague, John J.; Bobrowsky, Peter T.; Hutchinson, Ian

    2000-05-01

    Large tsunamis strike the British Columbia coast an average of once every several hundred years. Some of the tsunamis, including one from Alaska in 1964, are the result of distant great earthquakes. Most, however, are triggered by earthquakes at the Cascadia subduction zone, which extends along the Pacific coast from Vancouver Island to northern California. Evidence of these tsunamis has been found in tidal marshes and low-elevation coastal lakes on western Vancouver Island. The tsunamis deposited sheets of sand and gravel now preserved in sequences of peat and mud. These sheets commonly contain marine fossils, and they thin and fine landward, consistent with deposition by landward surges of water. They occur in low-energy settings where other possible depositional processes, such as stream flooding and storm surges, can be ruled out. The most recent large tsunami generated by an earthquake at the Cascadia subduction zone has been dated in Washington and Japan to AD 1700. The spatial distribution of the deposits of the 1700 tsunami, together with theoretical numerical modelling, indicate wave run-ups of up to 5 m asl along the outer coast of Vancouver Island and up to 15-20 m asl at the heads of some inlets. The waves attenuated as they moved eastward along Juan de Fuca Strait and into Puget Sound and the Strait of Georgia. No deposits of the 1700 event or, for that matter, any other tsunami, have yet been found in the Strait of Georgia, suggesting that waves were probably no more than 1 m high in this area. If a tsunami like the 1700 event were to occur today, communities along the outer Pacific coast from southern British Columbia to northern California would be severely damaged. There would be little time to evacuate these communities because the tsunami would strike the outer coast within minutes of the first ground shaking. Fortunately, such tsunamis are infrequent — perhaps as few as seven have occurred in the last 3500 yr. Other tsunamis that are much smaller and more localized, although probably more frequent, are caused by local crustal earthquakes and landslides along the British Columbia coast. Two such tsunamis have occurred in British Columbia in recent years, one in 1946 in the Strait of Georgia and another in 1975 at the head of a fiord on the northern mainland coast.

  16. Mexican hospitals.

    PubMed

    Loyo-Varela, Mauro; Díaz-Chazaro, Horacio

    2009-01-01

    In order to understand current medical and hospital care in Mexico, we need to know first their past and then compare that past to their present situation. We can attempt to glimpse into what their future should be. The evolution of Mexican health services from the time of the Spanish Conquest until the the post-revolutionary period involved the creation of hospitals for both the poor and the rich. This continues to be the present goal. Public and private medical institutions evolved in part along with the legal reforms that were enacted through the passage of the Reform Laws in 1937. The Public Assistance Secretariat was established, which was dedicated to assist hospitals, nurseries, asylums and orphanages. In 1943, this Public Assistance Secretariat joined with the Public Health Department, forming what today is the actual Secretary of Health. The formation of private social health care for major medical needs together with governmental Social Security Health Care brought about a radical improvement in medical and hospital care; however, it is insufficient, overpopulated and outdated. It will be necessary during the coming decades that other alternatives to the models of hospitals and medical care that exist today in Mexico be enacted. The present models have not been able to satisfy the medical and hospital demands for present-day needs of the population. PMID:20433794

  17. ADAPTA: A pilot randomised controlled trial of an alcohol-focused intervention versus a healthy living intervention for problem drinkers identified in a general hospital setting☆

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Judith M.; Fairhurst, Caroline; Li, Jinshuo; Tober, Gillian; Crosby, Helen; Lloyd, Charlie; Godfrey, Christine; Mdege, Noreen D.; Dale, Veronica; Toner, Paul; Parrott, Steve; Raistrick, Duncan

    2015-01-01

    Aim To examine the relative feasibility, acceptability, applicability, effectiveness and explore cost-effectiveness of a healthy living focused intervention (HL) compared to an alcohol-focused intervention (AF) for problem drinkers identified in hospital. Methods A pragmatic, randomised, controlled, open pilot trial. Feasibility and acceptability were measured by recruitment, attrition, follow-up rates and number of treatment sessions attended. Effectiveness was measured using the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test score at six months. Additional economic and secondary outcome measures were collected. Results Eighty-six participants were randomised and 72% (n = 62) were retained in full participation. Forty-one participants attended at least one treatment session (48%). A greater proportion in the HL group attended all four treatment sessions (33% vs 19%). Follow-up rates were 29% at six months and 22% at twelve months. There was no evidence of a difference in AUDIT score between treatment groups at six months. Mean cost of health care and social services, policing and the criminal justice system use decreased while EQ-5D scores indicated minor improvement in both arms. However, this pilot trial was not powered to detect differences in either measure between groups. Conclusions While no treatment effect was observed, this study demonstrated a potential to engage patients drinking at harmful or dependent levels in a healthy living intervention. However, recruitment proved challenging and follow-up rates were poor. Better ways need to be found to help these patients recognise the harms associated with their drinking and overcome the evident barriers to their engagement with specialist treatment. PMID:26194955

  18. Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy in Ambulatory Patients with Type 2 Diabetes in a General Hospital in a Middle Income Country: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Lazo, María de los Angeles; Bernabé-Ortiz, Antonio; Pinto, Miguel E.; Ticse, Ray; Malaga, German; Sacksteder, Katherine; Miranda, J. Jaime; Gilman, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    Aim We aimed to estimate the morbidity rate and associated factors for diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) in a low-middle income country setting. Methods Cross-sectional study, data was gathered at Peru's Ministry of Health national specialized hospital for endocrinological conditions through standardized interviews, anthropometric measurements and blood tests for glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c). DPN was evaluated using two techniques: the Semmes-Weinstein monofilament test and the diabetic neuropathy symptom score. Overall prevalence and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated. Potential factors related to DPN explored included body mass index, years with disease (<10 vs. ≥10 years), glycaemic control (HbA1c <7% vs. ≥7%), microalbuminuria, retinopathy, and current pharmacological treatment. Multivariable analysis was performed using Poisson analysis to calculate prevalence ratios. Results DPN was observed in 73/129 (56.6%) patients. In multivariable analysis adjusted by age and sex, the prevalence ratio of neuropathy was 1.4 times higher (95% CI 1.07–1.88) in patients who took insulin plus metformin compared to patients who used one treatment alone, and 1.4 higher (95% CI 1.02–1.93) in patients with ≥10 years of disease compared to those with a shorter duration of disease. Also we found some characteristics in foot evaluation associated to neuropathy such as deformities (p<0.001), onychomycosis (p = 0.012), abnormal Achilles reflex (p<0.001), pain perception (p<0.001) and vibration perception (p<0.001). Conclusion DPN is highly frequent among patients with diabetes in a national specialized facility from Peru. Associated factors to DPN included being a diabetic patient for over ten years, and receiving insulin plus metformin PMID:24789071

  19. Simple interventions can greatly improve clinical documentation: a quality improvement project of record keeping on the surgical wards at a district general hospital.

    PubMed

    Glen, Peter; Earl, Naomi; Gooding, Felix; Lucas, Emily; Sangha, Nicole; Ramcharitar, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Clinical documentation is an integral part of the healthcare professional's job. Good record keeping is essential for patient care, accurate recording of consultations and for effective communication within the multidisciplinary team. Within the surgical department at the Great Western Hospital, Swindon, the case notes were deemed to be bulky and cumbersome, inhibiting effective record keeping, potentially putting patients' at risk. The aim of this quality improvement project was therefore to improve the standard of documentation, the labelling of notes and the overall filing. A baseline audit was firstly undertaken assessing the notes within the busiest surgical ward. A number of variables were assessed, but notably, only 12% (4/33) of the case notes were found to be without loose pages. Furthermore, less than half of the pages with entries written within the last 72 hours contained adequate patient identifiers on them. When assessing these entries further, the designation of the writer was only recorded in one third (11/33) of the cases, whilst the printed name of the writer was only recorded in 65% (21/33) of the entries. This project ran over a 10 month period, using a plan, do study, act methodology. Initial focus was on simple education. Afterwards, single admission folders were introduced, to contain only information required for that admission, in an attempt to streamline the notes and ease the filing. This saw a global improvement across all data subsets, with a sustained improvement of over 80% compliance seen. An educational poster was also created and displayed in clinical areas, to remind users to label their notes with patient identifying stickers. This saw a 4-fold increase (16%-68%) in the labelling of notes. In conclusion, simple, cost effective measures in streamlining medical notes, improves the quality of documentation, facilitates the filing and ultimately improves patient care. PMID:26734440

  20. Simple interventions can greatly improve clinical documentation: a quality improvement project of record keeping on the surgical wards at a district general hospital

    PubMed Central

    Glen, Peter; Earl, Naomi; Gooding, Felix; Lucas, Emily; Sangha, Nicole; Ramcharitar, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Clinical documentation is an integral part of the healthcare professional's job. Good record keeping is essential for patient care, accurate recording of consultations and for effective communication within the multidisciplinary team. Within the surgical department at the Great Western Hospital, Swindon, the case notes were deemed to be bulky and cumbersome, inhibiting effective record keeping, potentially putting patients' at risk. The aim of this quality improvement project was therefore to improve the standard of documentation, the labelling of notes and the overall filing. A baseline audit was firstly undertaken assessing the notes within the busiest surgical ward. A number of variables were assessed, but notably, only 12% (4/33) of the case notes were found to be without loose pages. Furthermore, less than half of the pages with entries written within the last 72 hours contained adequate patient identifiers on them. When assessing these entries further, the designation of the writer was only recorded in one third (11/33) of the cases, whilst the printed name of the writer was only recorded in 65% (21/33) of the entries. This project ran over a 10 month period, using a plan, do study, act methodology. Initial focus was on simple education. Afterwards, single admission folders were introduced, to contain only information required for that admission, in an attempt to streamline the notes and ease the filing. This saw a global improvement across all data subsets, with a sustained improvement of over 80% compliance seen. An educational poster was also created and displayed in clinical areas, to remind users to label their notes with patient identifying stickers. This saw a 4-fold increase (16%-68%) in the labelling of notes. In conclusion, simple, cost effective measures in streamlining medical notes, improves the quality of documentation, facilitates the filing and ultimately improves patient care. PMID:26734440