Science.gov

Sample records for variable mass systems

  1. Dynamics of Variable Mass Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eke, Fidelis O.

    1998-01-01

    This report presents the results of an investigation of the effects of mass loss on the attitude behavior of spinning bodies in flight. The principal goal is to determine whether there are circumstances under which the motion of variable mass systems can become unstable in the sense that their transverse angular velocities become unbounded. Obviously, results from a study of this kind would find immediate application in the aerospace field. The first part of this study features a complete and mathematically rigorous derivation of a set of equations that govern both the translational and rotational motions of general variable mass systems. The remainder of the study is then devoted to the application of the equations obtained to a systematic investigation of the effect of various mass loss scenarios on the dynamics of increasingly complex models of variable mass systems. It is found that mass loss can have a major impact on the dynamics of mechanical systems, including a possible change in the systems stability picture. Factors such as nozzle geometry, combustion chamber geometry, propellant's initial shape, size and relative mass, and propellant location can all have important influences on the system's dynamic behavior. The relative importance of these parameters on-system motion are quantified in a way that is useful for design purposes.

  2. Structural/control system optimization with variable actuator masses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Ik M.; Sepulveda, Abdon E.

    1993-01-01

    A method is presented to integrate the design space for structural/control system optimization problems in the case of linear state feedback control. Nonstructural lumped masses and control system design variables as well as structural sizing variables are all treated equally as independent design variables in the optimization process. Structural and control design variable linking schemes are used in order to avoid a prohibitively large increase in the total number of independent design variables. When actuator masses are treated as nonstructural lumped mass design variables, special consideration is given to the relation between the transient peak responses and the required actuator masses which is formulated as a behavior constraint form. The original nonlinear mathematical programming problem based on a finite element formulation and linear state feedback is replaced by a sequence of explicit approximate problems exploiting various approximation concepts such as design variable linkings, temporary constraint deletion and first order Taylor series expansion of nonlinear behavior constraints in terms of intermediate design variables. Examples which involve a variety of dynamic behavior constraints (including constraints on closed-loop eigenvalues, peak transient displacements, peak actuator forces, and relations between the peak responses and the actuator masses) are effectively solved by using the method presented.

  3. On the generalized virial theorem for systems with variable mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganghoffer, Jean-François; Rahouadj, Rachid

    2016-03-01

    We presently extend the virial theorem for both discrete and continuous systems of material points with variable mass, relying on developments presented in Ganghoffer (Int J Solids Struct 47:1209-1220, 2010). The developed framework is applicable to describe physical systems at very different scales, from the evolution of a population of biological cells accounting for growth to mass ejection phenomena occurring within a collection of gravitating objects at the very large astrophysical scales. As a starting basis, the field equations in continuum mechanics are written to account for a mass source and a mass flux, leading to a formulation of the virial theorem accounting for non-constant mass within the considered system. The scalar and tensorial forms of the virial theorem are then written successively in both Lagrangian and Eulerian formats, incorporating the mass flux. As an illustration, the averaged stress tensor in accreting gravitating solid bodies is evaluated based on the generalized virial theorem.

  4. Atwood's Machine as a Tool to Introduce Variable Mass Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Sousa, Celia A.

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses an instructional strategy which explores eventual similarities and/or analogies between familiar problems and more sophisticated systems. In this context, the Atwood's machine problem is used to introduce students to more complex problems involving ropes and chains. The methodology proposed helps students to develop the…

  5. Atwood's machine as a tool to introduce variable mass systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Sousa, Célia A.

    2012-03-01

    This article discusses an instructional strategy which explores eventual similarities and/or analogies between familiar problems and more sophisticated systems. In this context, the Atwood's machine problem is used to introduce students to more complex problems involving ropes and chains. The methodology proposed helps students to develop the ability needed to apply relevant concepts in situations not previously encountered. The pedagogical advantages are relevant for both secondary and high school students, showing that, through adequate examples, the question of the validity of Newton's second law may even be introduced to introductory level students.

  6. Dynamics of variable mass systems with application to the star 48 solid rocket motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eke, F. O.

    1984-01-01

    Existing methods for the derivation of equations of motion of variable mass systems are reviewed and compared, the end product being a system of general dynamical equations for variable mass systems. These equations are used to study the lateral stability problem associated with the Star 48 solid rocket engine. It is shown that the shape of the combustion chamber could have a significant effect on the lateral stability of the rocket; specifically, a short and wide combustion chamber is destabilizing, while a long and narrow chamber is stabilizing.

  7. Deconstructed transverse mass variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Ahmed; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Virzi, Joseph S.; Walker, Devin G. E.

    2015-04-01

    Traditional searches for R-parity conserving natural supersymmetry (SUSY) require large transverse mass and missing energy cuts to separate the signal from large backgrounds. SUSY models with compressed spectra inherently produce signal events with small amounts of missing energy that are hard to explore. We use this difficulty to motivate the construction of "deconstructed" transverse mass variables which are designed preserve information on both the norm and direction of the missing momentum. We demonstrate the effectiveness of these variables in searches for the pair production of supersymmetric top-quark partners which subsequently decay into a final state with an isolated lepton, jets and missing energy. We show that the use of deconstructed transverse mass variables extends the accessible compressed spectra parameter space beyond the region probed by traditional methods. The parameter space can further be expanded to neutralino masses that are larger than the difference between the stop and top masses. In addition, we also discuss how these variables allow for novel searches of single stop production, in order to directly probe unconstrained stealth stops in the small stop- and neutralino-mass regime. We also demonstrate the utility of these variables for generic gluino and stop searches in all-hadronic final states. Overall, we demonstrate that deconstructed transverse variables are essential to any search wanting to maximize signal separation from the background when the signal has undetected particles in the final state.

  8. Falling Chains as Variable-Mass Systems: Theoretical Model and Experimental Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Sousa, Celia A.; Gordo, Paulo M.; Costa, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we revisit, theoretically and experimentally, the fall of a folded U-chain and of a pile-chain. The model calculation implies the division of the whole system into two subsystems of variable mass, allowing us to explore the role of tensional contact forces at the boundary of the subsystems. This justifies, for instance, that the…

  9. A three-mass tethered system for micro-g/variable-g applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzini, E. C.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes a Space-Station attached tethered system for micro-g/variable-g applications. The system consists of three platforms: the Space Station, an end mass anchored at the end of a 10 km long kevlar tether and a micro-g/variable-g laboratory with the capability of crawling along the tether. Control strategies are devised for performing both the deployment and the station-keeping maneuvers of the system. Effective algorithms are identified for damping out the major vibrational modes.

  10. The dynamical mass of a classical Cepheid variable star in an eclipsing binary system.

    PubMed

    Pietrzyński, G; Thompson, I B; Gieren, W; Graczyk, D; Bono, G; Udalski, A; Soszyński, I; Minniti, D; Pilecki, B

    2010-11-25

    Stellar pulsation theory provides a means of determining the masses of pulsating classical Cepheid supergiants-it is the pulsation that causes their luminosity to vary. Such pulsational masses are found to be smaller than the masses derived from stellar evolution theory: this is the Cepheid mass discrepancy problem, for which a solution is missing. An independent, accurate dynamical mass determination for a classical Cepheid variable star (as opposed to type-II Cepheids, low-mass stars with a very different evolutionary history) in a binary system is needed in order to determine which is correct. The accuracy of previous efforts to establish a dynamical Cepheid mass from Galactic single-lined non-eclipsing binaries was typically about 15-30% (refs 6, 7), which is not good enough to resolve the mass discrepancy problem. In spite of many observational efforts, no firm detection of a classical Cepheid in an eclipsing double-lined binary has hitherto been reported. Here we report the discovery of a classical Cepheid in a well detached, double-lined eclipsing binary in the Large Magellanic Cloud. We determine the mass to a precision of 1% and show that it agrees with its pulsation mass, providing strong evidence that pulsation theory correctly and precisely predicts the masses of classical Cepheids. PMID:21107425

  11. Earth System Data Records of Mass Transport from Time-Variable Gravity Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlotnicki, V.; Talpe, M.; Nerem, R. S.; Landerer, F. W.; Watkins, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    Satellite measurements of time variable gravity have revolutionized the study of Earth, by measuring the ice losses of Greenland, Antarctica and land glaciers, changes in groundwater including unsustainable losses due to extraction of groundwater, the mass and currents of the oceans and their redistribution during El Niño events, among other findings. Satellite measurements of gravity have been made primarily by four techniques: satellite tracking from land stations using either lasers or Doppler radio systems, satellite positioning by GNSS/GPS, satellite to satellite tracking over distances of a few hundred km using microwaves, and through a gravity gradiometer (radar altimeters also measure the gravity field, but over the oceans only). We discuss the challenges in the measurement of gravity by different instruments, especially time-variable gravity. A special concern is how to bridge a possible gap in time between the end of life of the current GRACE satellite pair, launched in 2002, and a future GRACE Follow-On pair to be launched in 2017. One challenge in combining data from different measurement systems consists of their different spatial and temporal resolutions and the different ways in which they alias short time scale signals. Typically satellite measurements of gravity are expressed in spherical harmonic coefficients (although expansions in terms of 'mascons', the masses of small spherical caps, has certain advantages). Taking advantage of correlations among spherical harmonic coefficients described by empirical orthogonal functions and derived from GRACE data it is possible to localize the otherwise coarse spatial resolution of the laser and Doppler derived gravity models. This presentation discusses the issues facing a climate data record of time variable mass flux using these different data sources, including its validation.

  12. Video analysis of sliding chains: A dynamic model based on variable-mass systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, R.; Page, A.; Riera, J.; Hueso, J. L.

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of the dynamics of a chain sliding off of a table, using video analysis to test a theoretical model. The model consists of two variable-mass subsystems, with friction between the chain and the table and assumes that all links move at the same speed. In order to check the model, the chain position x(t) is obtained using video analysis. The smoothed function x(t) and its derivatives v(t) and a(t) are numerically computed using a local regression algorithm. In this way, the differential equation governing the motion can be directly tested, instead of comparing the position with the solution of the differential equation. Our procedure is very sensitive to deviations between the model and reality, so we can detect the point at which the chain ceases to be in tension and the model is no longer valid. This experiment shows students the limitations of simplified models and offers an opportunity to assess a model's range of validity.

  13. The initial mass function of stars: evidence for uniformity in variable systems.

    PubMed

    Kroupa, Pavel

    2002-01-01

    The distribution of stellar masses that form in one star formation event in a given volume of space is called the initial mass function (IMF). The IMF has been estimated from low-mass brown dwarfs to very massive stars. Combining IMF estimates for different populations in which the stars can be observed individually unveils an extraordinary uniformity of the IMF. This general insight appears to hold for populations including present-day star formation in small molecular clouds, rich and dense massive star-clusters forming in giant clouds, through to ancient and metal-poor exotic stellar populations that may be dominated by dark matter. This apparent universality of the IMF is a challenge for star formation theory, because elementary considerations suggest that the IMF ought to systematically vary with star-forming conditions. PMID:11778039

  14. DEEP, LOW MASS RATIO OVERCONTACT BINARY SYSTEMS. XIII. DZ PISCIUM WITH INTRINSIC LIGHT VARIABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y.-G.; Dai, H.-F.; Qian, S.-B.; Soonthornthum, B. E-mail: qsb@ynao.ac.cn

    2013-08-01

    New multi-color photometry for the eclipsing binary DZ Psc was performed in 2011 and 2012 using the 85 cm telescope at the Xinglong Station of the National Astronomical Observatories of China. Using the updated Wilson-Devinney (W-D) code, we deduced two sets of photometric solutions. The overcontact degree is f = 89.7({+-} 1.0)%, identifying DZ Psc as a deep, low mass ratio overcontact binary. The asymmetric light curves (i.e., LC{sub 2} in 2012) were modeled by a hot spot on the primary star. Based on all of the available light minimum times, we discovered that the orbital period of DZ Psc may be undergoing a secular period increase with a cyclic variation. The modulated period and semi-amplitude of this oscillation are P{sub mod} = 11.89({+-} 0.19) yr and A = 0.0064({+-} 0.0006) days, which may be possibly attributed to either cyclic magnetic activity or light-time effect due to the third body. The long-term period increases at a rate of dP/dt=+7.43({+-}0.17) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} days yr{sup -1}, which may be interpreted as conserved mass transfer from the less massive component to the more massive one. With mass transferring, DZ Psc will finally merge into a rapid-rotation single star when J{sub spin}/J{sub orb} > 1/3.

  15. Deep, Low Mass Ratio Overcontact Binary Systems. XIII. DZ Piscium with Intrinsic Light Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.-G.; Qian, S.-B.; Zhang, L.-Y.; Dai, H.-F.; Soonthornthum, B.

    2013-08-01

    New multi-color photometry for the eclipsing binary DZ Psc was performed in 2011 and 2012 using the 85 cm telescope at the Xinglong Station of the National Astronomical Observatories of China. Using the updated Wilson-Devinney (W-D) code, we deduced two sets of photometric solutions. The overcontact degree is f = 89.7(± 1.0)%, identifying DZ Psc as a deep, low mass ratio overcontact binary. The asymmetric light curves (i.e., LC2 in 2012) were modeled by a hot spot on the primary star. Based on all of the available light minimum times, we discovered that the orbital period of DZ Psc may be undergoing a secular period increase with a cyclic variation. The modulated period and semi-amplitude of this oscillation are P mod = 11.89(± 0.19) yr and A = 0.0064(± 0.0006) days, which may be possibly attributed to either cyclic magnetic activity or light-time effect due to the third body. The long-term period increases at a rate of dP/dt=+7.43(+/- 0.17)\\times 10^{-7}{\\,days\\, yr^{-1}}, which may be interpreted as conserved mass transfer from the less massive component to the more massive one. With mass transferring, DZ Psc will finally merge into a rapid-rotation single star when J spin/J orb > 1/3.

  16. Mass transfer cycles in cataclysmic variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, A. R.; Frank, J.; Kolb, U.; Ritter, H.

    1995-01-01

    It is well known that in cataclysmic variables the mass transfer rate must fluctuate about the evolutionary mean on timescales too long to be directly observable. We show that limit-cycle behavior can occur if the radius change of the secondary star is sensitive to the instantaneous mass transfer rate. The only reasonable way in which such a dependence can arise is through irradiation of this star by the accreting component. The system oscillates between high states, in which irradiation causes slow expansion of the secondary and drives an elevated transfer rate, and low states, in which this star contracts.

  17. Variable contour securing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zebus, P. P.; Packer, P. N.; Haynie, C. C. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A variable contour securing system has a retaining structure for a member whose surface contains a variable contour. The retaining mechanism includes a spaced array of adjustable spindles mounted on a housing. Each spindle has a base member support cup at one end. A vacuum source is applied to the cups for seating the member adjacent to the cups. A locking mechanism sets the spindles in a predetermined position once the member has been secured to the spindle support cups.

  18. Pulsation and mass loss in Mira variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, P. R.

    1980-01-01

    The behavior of pulsation in the outer layers of a typical Mira variable was studied in the adiabatic and isothermal limits. A shock wave propagates outward once per period and the radial velocity obtained from observations of hydrogen emission lines is identified with the velocity of gas in the post shock region. In the adiabatic case, mass loss in the form of a steady stellar wind was produced. In the isothermal case, no continuous mass loss was produced but occasional ejection of shells occur. Pulsation introduced into a star undergoing steady mass loss as a result of radiation pressure acting on grains caused the mass loss rate to increase by a factor of approximately 40, while the terminal velocity of the flow was almost unaltered.

  19. THE ORIGIN OF VARIABILITY OF THE INTERMEDIATE-MASS BLACK-HOLE ULX SYSTEM HLX-1 IN ESO 243-49

    SciTech Connect

    Lasota, J.-P.; Alexander, T.; Dubus, G.; Farrell, S. A.; Gehrels, N.

    2011-07-10

    The ultra-luminous (L{sub X} {approx}< 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}) intermediate-mass black-hole (IMBH) system HLX-1 in the ESO 243-49 galaxy exhibits variability with a possible recurrence time of a few hundred days. Finding the origin of this variability would constrain the still largely unknown properties of this extraordinary object. Since it exhibits a hardness-intensity behavior characteristic of black-hole X-ray transients, we have analyzed the variability of HLX-1 in the framework of the disk instability model that explains outbursts of such systems. We find that the long-term variability of HLX-1 is unlikely to be explained by a model in which outbursts are triggered by thermal-viscous instabilities in an accretion disk. Possible alternatives include the instability in a radiation-pressure-dominated disk but we argue that a more likely explanation is a modulated mass transfer due to tidal stripping of a star in an eccentric orbit around the IMBH. We consider an evolutionary scenario leading to the creation of such a system and estimate the probability of its observation. We conclude, using a simplified dynamical model of the post-collapse cluster, that no more than 1/100 to 1/10 of M{sub .} {approx}< 10{sup 4} M{sub sun} IMBHs-formed by runaway stellar mergers in the dense collapsed cores of young clusters-could have a few x1 M{sub sun} main-sequence star evolve to an asymptotic giant branch on an orbit eccentric enough for mass transfer at periapse, while avoiding collisional destruction or being scattered into the IMBH by two-body encounters. The finite but low probability of this configuration is consistent with the uniqueness of HLX-1. We note, however, that the actual response of a standard accretion disk to bursts of mass transfer may be too slow to explain the observations unless the orbit is close to parabolic (and hence even rarer). Also, increased heating, presumably linked to the highly time-dependent gravitational potential, could shorten the

  20. Variable reluctance drive system

    SciTech Connect

    Lipo, T.A.; Liang, F.

    1995-10-17

    A variable reluctance drive system including a motor and corresponding converter for improved current commutation is described. The motor incorporates a salient pole rotor and a salient pole stator having one or more full pitch windings which operate by mutual inductance to transfer the current from the active short pitch winding following phase alignment. This increases output torque and/or speed and permits a number of simple and economical converter circuits. 17 figs.

  1. Variable camshaft timing system

    SciTech Connect

    Butterfield, R.P.; Smith, F.R.

    1989-09-05

    This patent describes an improvement in a variable camshaft timing system for an internal combustion engine having intake and exhaust valves and a camshaft for each of the intake and exhaust valves, an intake sprocket and an exhaust sprocket keyed to their respective camshaft, only one of the camshafts being directly driven by an engine crankshaft, and a timing chain engaging both sprockets. The improvement comprising a single bracket carrying at least one idler sprocket engaging the timing chain, the bracket being mounted for movement to alter the timing relationship between the intake and exhaust sprockets.

  2. Ultra High Mass Range Mass Spectrometer System

    DOEpatents

    Reilly, Peter T. A. [Knoxville, TN

    2005-12-06

    Applicant's present invention comprises mass spectrometer systems that operate in a mass range from 1 to 10.sup.16 DA. The mass spectrometer system comprising an inlet system comprising an aerodynamic lens system, a reverse jet being a gas flux generated in an annulus moving in a reverse direction and a multipole ion guide; a digital ion trap; and a thermal vaporization/ionization detector system. Applicant's present invention further comprises a quadrupole mass spectrometer system comprising an inlet system having a quadrupole mass filter and a thermal vaporization/ionization detector system. Applicant's present invention further comprises an inlet system for use with a mass spectrometer system, a method for slowing energetic particles using an inlet system. Applicant's present invention also comprises a detector device and a method for detecting high mass charged particles.

  3. Variable camshaft timing system

    SciTech Connect

    Sapienza, S.J.

    1988-05-17

    A variable camshaft timing system in combination with an internal combustion engine having at least one cylinder, a rotatable member such as a crankshaft, and an intake and exhaust valve coupled to an intake camshaft and an exhaust camshaft respectively, the system is described comprising: a pulley wheel fixedly attached at one end of each of the intake and exhaust camshafts and the crankshaft; belt means interconnecting each of the pulley wheels for transferring rotational motion from the crankshaft to the intake and exhaust camshafts; first and second idler arm means pivotally attached to the engine, each of the idler arm means having a pivoting arm, a cam follower arm and an idler wheel in operative contact with the belt means; positioning cam means operatively coupled to each of the cam follower arms of the idler arm means; a control means responsive to various engine operating parameters for generating motor control signals; and electric motor means responsive to the motor control signals and operatively coupled to rotate the positioning cams means for positioning each of the idler arm means for changing the relative rotational position between the input camshaft and the exhaust camshaft.

  4. Mode Selection Techniques in Variable Mass Flexible Body Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quiocho, Leslie J.; Ghosh, Tushar K.; Frenkel, David; Huynh, An

    2010-01-01

    In developing a flexible body spacecraft simulation for the Launch Abort System of the Orion vehicle, when a rapid mass depletion takes place, the dynamics problem with time varying eigenmodes had to be addressed. Three different techniques were implemented, with different trade-offs made between performance and fidelity. A number of technical issues had to be solved in the process. This paper covers the background of the variable mass flexibility problem, the three approaches to simulating it, and the technical issues that were solved in formulating and implementing them.

  5. Modeling and Simulation of Variable Mass, Flexible Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobbe, Patrick A.; Matras, Alex L.; Wilson, Heath E.

    2009-01-01

    The advent of the new Ares I launch vehicle has highlighted the need for advanced dynamic analysis tools for variable mass, flexible structures. This system is composed of interconnected flexible stages or components undergoing rapid mass depletion through the consumption of solid or liquid propellant. In addition to large rigid body configuration changes, the system simultaneously experiences elastic deformations. In most applications, the elastic deformations are compatible with linear strain-displacement relationships and are typically modeled using the assumed modes technique. The deformation of the system is approximated through the linear combination of the products of spatial shape functions and generalized time coordinates. Spatial shape functions are traditionally composed of normal mode shapes of the system or even constraint modes and static deformations derived from finite element models of the system. Equations of motion for systems undergoing coupled large rigid body motion and elastic deformation have previously been derived through a number of techniques [1]. However, in these derivations, the mode shapes or spatial shape functions of the system components were considered constant. But with the Ares I vehicle, the structural characteristics of the system are changing with the mass of the system. Previous approaches to solving this problem involve periodic updates to the spatial shape functions or interpolation between shape functions based on system mass or elapsed mission time. These solutions often introduce misleading or even unstable numerical transients into the system. Plus, interpolation on a shape function is not intuitive. This paper presents an approach in which the shape functions are held constant and operate on the changing mass and stiffness matrices of the vehicle components. Each vehicle stage or component finite element model is broken into dry structure and propellant models. A library of propellant models is used to describe the

  6. Variability in properties of Salado Mass Concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Wakeley, L.D.; Harrington, P.T.; Hansen, F.D.

    1995-08-01

    Salado Mass Concrete (SMC) has been developed for use as a seal component in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. This concrete is intended to be mixed from pre-bagged materials, have an initial slump of 10 in., and remain pumpable and placeable for two hours after mixing. It is a mass concrete because it will be placed in monoliths large enough that the heat generated during cement hydration has the potential to cause thermal expansion and subsequent cracking, a phenomenon to avoid in the seal system. This report describes effects on concrete properties of changes in ratio of water to cement, batch size, and variations in characteristics of different lots of individual components of the concrete. The research demonstrates that the concrete can be prepared from laboratory-batched or pre-bagged dry materials in batches from 1.5 ft{sup 3} to 5.0 yd{sup 3}, with no chemical admixtures other than the sodium chloride added to improve bonding with the host rock, at a water-to-cement ratio ranging from 0.36 to 0.42. All batches prepared according to established procedures had adequate workability for at least 1.5 hours, and achieved or exceeded the target compressive strength of 4500 psi at 180 days after casting. Portland cement and fly ash from different lots or sources did not have a measurable effect on concrete properties, but variations in a shrinkage-compensating cement used as a component of the concrete did appear to affect workability. A low initial temperature and the water-reducing and set-retarding functions of the salt are critical to meeting target properties.

  7. Doubling down on peptide phosphorylation as a variable mass modification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Some mass spectrometrists believe that searching for variable post-translational modifications like phosphorylation of serine or threonine when using database-search algorithms to interpret peptide tandem mass spectra will increase false positive rates. The basis for this is the premise that the al...

  8. Mass loss and OH maser emission from Mira variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michalitsianos, A. G.; Kafatos, M.

    1978-01-01

    The mass, radius, and luminosity of 26 Mira variables that are known OH sources of radio emission at 1612 MHz have been estimated. The time-independent solution of Salpeter's (1974) stellar-wind equation and a period-density relation are used to solve for basic stellar parameters, with the aid of the terminal expansion velocity of the OH maser cloud. Masses obtained from these calculations are consistent with other estimated values for masses of Mira variables. Good agreement is obtained when comparing the rate of mass loss as determined from Reimers's (1977) semiempirical relation with estimates of the mass-loss rate as deduced from theoretical models involving radiation pressure on grains. These calculations suggest a strong correlation between the mass-loss rate and the pulsation period. Arguments concerning the general properties of silicate grains from radiation-pressure-driven stellar-wind equations are discussed.

  9. A variable acceleration calibration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Thomas H.

    2011-12-01

    A variable acceleration calibration system that applies loads using gravitational and centripetal acceleration serves as an alternative, efficient and cost effective method for calibrating internal wind tunnel force balances. Two proof-of-concept variable acceleration calibration systems are designed, fabricated and tested. The NASA UT-36 force balance served as the test balance for the calibration experiments. The variable acceleration calibration systems are shown to be capable of performing three component calibration experiments with an approximate applied load error on the order of 1% of the full scale calibration loads. Sources of error are indentified using experimental design methods and a propagation of uncertainty analysis. Three types of uncertainty are indentified for the systems and are attributed to prediction error, calibration error and pure error. Angular velocity uncertainty is shown to be the largest indentified source of prediction error. The calibration uncertainties using a production variable acceleration based system are shown to be potentially equivalent to current methods. The production quality system can be realized using lighter materials and a more precise instrumentation. Further research is needed to account for balance deflection, forcing effects due to vibration, and large tare loads. A gyroscope measurement technique is shown to be capable of resolving the balance deflection angle calculation. Long term research objectives include a demonstration of a six degree of freedom calibration, and a large capacity balance calibration.

  10. Theories of Variable Mass Particles and Low Energy Nuclear Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Mark

    2014-02-01

    Variable particle masses have sometimes been invoked to explain observed anomalies in low energy nuclear reactions (LENR). Such behavior has never been observed directly, and is not considered possible in theoretical nuclear physics. Nevertheless, there are covariant off-mass-shell theories of relativistic particle dynamics, based on works by Fock, Stueckelberg, Feynman, Greenberger, Horwitz, and others. We review some of these and we also consider virtual particles that arise in conventional Feynman diagrams in relativistic field theories. Effective Lagrangian models incorporating variable mass particle theories might be useful in describing anomalous nuclear reactions by combining mass shifts together with resonant tunneling and other effects. A detailed model for resonant fusion in a deuterium molecule with off-shell deuterons and electrons is presented as an example. Experimental means of observing such off-shell behavior directly, if it exists, is proposed and described. Brief explanations for elemental transmutation and formation of micro-craters are also given, and an alternative mechanism for the mass shift in the Widom-Larsen theory is presented. If variable mass theories were to find experimental support from LENR, then they would undoubtedly have important implications for the foundations of quantum mechanics, and practical applications may arise.

  11. Identifying Dynamically Induced Variability in Glacier Mass-Balance Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christian, J. E.; Siler, N.; Koutnik, M. R.; Roe, G.

    2015-12-01

    Glacier mass-balance (i.e., accumulation vs. ablation) provides a direct indicator of a glacier's relationship with climate. However, mass-balance records contain noise due to internal climate variability (i.e., from stochastic fluctuations in large-scale atmospheric circulation), which can obscure or bias trends in these relatively short timeseries. This presents a challenge in correctly identifying the signature of anthropogenic change. "Dynamical adjustment" is a technique that identifies patterns of variance shared between a climate timeseries of interest (e.g., mass-balance) and independent "predictor" variables associated with large-scale circulation (e.g., Sea Level Pressure, SLP, or Sea Surface Temperature, SST). Extracting the component of variance due to internal variability leaves a residual timeseries for which trends can more confidently be attributed to external forcing. We apply dynamical adjustments based on Partial Least Squares Regression to mass-balance records from South Cascade Glacier in Washington State and Wolverine and Gulkana Glaciers in Alaska, independently analyzing seasonal balance records to assess the dynamical influences on winter accumulation and summer ablation. Seasonally averaged North Pacific SLP and SST fields perform comparably as predictor variables, explaining 50-60% of the variance in winter balance and 30-40% of variance in summer balance for South Cascade and Wolverine Glaciers. Gulkana glacier, located further inland than the other two glaciers, is less closely linked to North Pacific climate variability, with the predictors explaining roughly one-third of variance in its winter and summer balance. We analyze the significance of linear trends in the raw and adjusted mass-balance records, and find that for all three glaciers, a) summer balance shows a statistically significant downward trend that is not substantially altered when dynamically induced variability is removed, and b) winter balance shows no statistically

  12. Mass properties measurement system dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Keith L.

    1993-01-01

    The MPMS mechanism possess two revolute degrees-of-freedom and allows the user to measure the mass, center of gravity, and the inertia tensor of an unknown mass. The dynamics of the Mass Properties Measurement System (MPMS) from the Lagrangian approach to illustrate the dependency of the motion on the unknown parameters.

  13. Spacecraft telecommunications system mass estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuen, J. H.; Sakamoto, L. L.

    1988-01-01

    Mass is the most important limiting parameter for present-day planetary spacecraft design, In fact, the entire design can be characterized by mass. The more efficient the design of the spacecraft, the less mass will be required. The communications system is an essential and integral part of planetary spacecraft. A study is presented of the mass attributable to the communications system for spacecraft designs used in recent missions in an attempt to help guide future design considerations and research and development efforts. The basic approach is to examine the spacecraft by subsystem and allocate a portion of each subsystem to telecommunications. Conceptually, this is to divide the spacecraft into two parts, telecommunications and nontelecommunications. In this way, it is clear what the mass attributable to the communications system is. The percentage of mass is calculated using the actual masses of the spacecraft parts, except in the case of CRAF. In that case, estimated masses are used since the spacecraft was not yet built. The results show that the portion of the spacecraft attributable to telecommunications is substantial. The mass fraction for Voyager, Galileo, and CRAF (Mariner Mark 2) is 34, 19, and 18 percent, respectively. The large reduction of telecommunications mass from Voyager to Galileo is mainly due to the use of a deployable antenna instead of the solid antenna on Voyager.

  14. Modeling of Fluctuating Mass Flux in Variable Density Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    So, R. M. C.; Mongia, H. C.; Nikjooy, M.

    1983-01-01

    The approach solves for both Reynolds and Favre averaged quantities and calculates the scalar pdf. Turbulent models used to close the governing equations are formulated to account for complex mixing and variable density effects. In addition, turbulent mass diffusivities are not assumed to be in constant proportion to turbulent momentum diffusivities. The governing equations are solved by a combination of finite-difference technique and Monte-Carlo simulation. Some preliminary results on simple variable density shear flows are presented. The differences between these results and those obtained using conventional models are discussed.

  15. Variable frequency microwave furnace system

    DOEpatents

    Bible, D.W.; Lauf, R.J.

    1994-06-14

    A variable frequency microwave furnace system designed to allow modulation of the frequency of the microwaves introduced into a furnace cavity for testing or other selected applications. The variable frequency microwave furnace system includes a microwave signal generator or microwave voltage-controlled oscillator for generating a low-power microwave signal for input to the microwave furnace. A first amplifier may be provided to amplify the magnitude of the signal output from the microwave signal generator or the microwave voltage-controlled oscillator. A second amplifier is provided for processing the signal output by the first amplifier. The second amplifier outputs the microwave signal input to the furnace cavity. In the preferred embodiment, the second amplifier is a traveling-wave tube (TWT). A power supply is provided for operation of the second amplifier. A directional coupler is provided for detecting the direction of a signal and further directing the signal depending on the detected direction. A first power meter is provided for measuring the power delivered to the microwave furnace. A second power meter detects the magnitude of reflected power. Reflected power is dissipated in the reflected power load. 5 figs.

  16. Variable frequency microwave furnace system

    DOEpatents

    Bible, Don W.; Lauf, Robert J.

    1994-01-01

    A variable frequency microwave furnace system (10) designed to allow modulation of the frequency of the microwaves introduced into a furnace cavity (34) for testing or other selected applications. The variable frequency microwave furnace system (10) includes a microwave signal generator (12) or microwave voltage-controlled oscillator (14) for generating a low-power microwave signal for input to the microwave furnace. A first amplifier (18) may be provided to amplify the magnitude of the signal output from the microwave signal generator (12) or the microwave voltage-controlled oscillator (14). A second amplifier (20) is provided for processing the signal output by the first amplifier (18). The second amplifier (20) outputs the microwave signal input to the furnace cavity (34). In the preferred embodiment, the second amplifier (20) is a traveling-wave tube (TWT). A power supply (22) is provided for operation of the second amplifier (20). A directional coupler (24) is provided for detecting the direction of a signal and further directing the signal depending on the detected direction. A first power meter (30) is provided for measuring the power delivered to the microwave furnace (32). A second power meter (26) detects the magnitude of reflected power. Reflected power is dissipated in the reflected power load (28).

  17. Guide to transverse projections and mass-constraining variables

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, A. J.; Khoo, T. J.; Lester, C. G.; Konar, P.; Kong, K.; Matchev, K. T.; Park, M.

    2011-11-01

    This paper seeks to demonstrate that many of the existing mass-measurement variables proposed for hadron colliders (m{sub T}, m{sub eff}, m{sub T2}, missing p-vector{sub T}, h{sub T}, {radical}(s-circumflex){sub min}, etc.) are far more closely related to each other than is widely appreciated, and indeed can all be viewed as a common mass-bound specialized for a variety of purposes. A consequence of this is that one may understand better the strengths and weaknesses of each variable, and the circumstances in which each can be used to best effect. In order to achieve this, we find it necessary first to revisit the seemingly empty and infertile wilderness populated by the subscript 'T' (as in 'pe{sub T}') in order to remind ourselves what this process of transversification actually means. We note that, far from being simple, transversification can mean quite different things to different people. Those readers who manage to battle through the barrage of transverse notation distinguishing 'T' from 'v' or or from 'o', and 'early projection' from 'late projection', will find their efforts rewarded towards the end of the paper with (i) a better understanding of how collider mass variables fit together, (ii) an appreciation of how these variables could be generalized to search for things more complicated than supersymmetry, (iii) will depart with an aversion to thoughtless or naieve use of the so-called 'transverse methods' of any of the popular computer Lorentz-vector libraries, and (iv) will take care in their subsequent papers to be explicit about which of the 61 identified variants of the 'transverse mass' they are employing.

  18. Near-infrared Variability in the 2MASS Calibration Fields: A Search for Planetary Transit Candidates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plavchan, Peter; Jura, M.; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Cutri, Roc M.; Gallagher, S. C.

    2008-01-01

    The Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) photometric calibration observations cover approximately 6 square degrees on the sky in 35 'calibration fields,' each sampled in nominal photometric conditions between 562 and 3692 times during the 4 years of the 2MASS mission. We compile a catalog of variables from the calibration observations to search for M dwarfs transited by extrasolar planets. We present our methods for measuring periodic and nonperiodic flux variability. From 7554 sources with apparent K(sub s) magnitudes between 5.6 and 16.1, we identify 247 variables, including extragalactic variables and 23 periodic variables. We have discovered three M dwarf eclipsing systems, including two candidates for transiting extrasolar planets.

  19. Movement simulation of the variable masses in the Gylden-Meshcherskii problem

    SciTech Connect

    Starinova, Olga L.; Salmin, Vadim V.

    2014-12-10

    The Gylden-Meshcherskii problem is used for various cases of dynamics of two points of the variable mass. For example, it describes of double star evolution due to mass loss at the photon expense and the corpuscular activity. Except, it is mathematical model for the movement of spacecraft with propulsion system. In the present work the mass variation laws, allowing a stationary form of the movement differential equations are considered. Movement simulation for all cases was conducted. The relative movement trajectories was constructed as for known Eddington-Jeans laws and for other mass variation laws.

  20. Guide to transverse projections and mass-constraining variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, A. J.; Khoo, T. J.; Konar, P.; Kong, K.; Lester, C. G.; Matchev, K. T.; Park, M.

    2011-11-01

    This paper seeks to demonstrate that many of the existing mass-measurement variables proposed for hadron colliders (mT, meff, mT2, missing p→T, hT, s^min⁡, etc.) are far more closely related to each other than is widely appreciated, and indeed can all be viewed as a common mass-bound specialized for a variety of purposes. A consequence of this is that one may understand better the strengths and weaknesses of each variable, and the circumstances in which each can be used to best effect. In order to achieve this, we find it necessary first to revisit the seemingly empty and infertile wilderness populated by the subscript “T” (as in “p̸T”) in order to remind ourselves what this process of transversification actually means. We note that, far from being simple, transversification can mean quite different things to different people. Those readers who manage to battle through the barrage of transverse notation distinguishing “⊤” from “∨” or from “∘,” and “early projection” from “late projection,” will find their efforts rewarded towards the end of the paper with (i) a better understanding of how collider mass variables fit together, (ii) an appreciation of how these variables could be generalized to search for things more complicated than supersymmetry, (iii) will depart with an aversion to thoughtless or naïve use of the so-called transverse methods of any of the popular computer Lorentz-vector libraries, and (iv) will take care in their subsequent papers to be explicit about which of the 61 identified variants of the “transverse mass” they are employing.

  1. Effects of selected design variables on three ramp, external compression inlet performance. [boundary layer control bypasses, and mass flow rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamman, J. H.; Hall, C. L.

    1975-01-01

    Two inlet performance tests and one inlet/airframe drag test were conducted in 1969 at the NASA-Ames Research Center. The basic inlet system was two-dimensional, three ramp (overhead), external compression, with variable capture area. The data from these tests were analyzed to show the effects of selected design variables on the performance of this type of inlet system. The inlet design variables investigated include inlet bleed, bypass, operating mass flow ratio, inlet geometry, and variable capture area.

  2. Development and Evaluation of a Variable-Temperature Quadrupole Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derkits, David; Wiseman, Alex; Snead, Russell F.; Dows, Martina; Harge, Jasmine; Lamp, Jared A.; Gronert, Scott

    2016-02-01

    A new, variable-temperature mass spectrometer system is described. By applying polyimide heating tape to the end-cap electrodes of a Bruker (Bremen, Germany) Esquire ion trap, it is possible to vary the effective temperature of the system between 40 and 100°C. The modification does not impact the operation of the ion trap and the heater can be used for extended periods without degradation of the system. The accuracy of the ion trap temperatures was assessed by examining two gas-phase equilibrium processes with known thermochemistry. In each case, the variable-temperature ion trap provided data that were in good accord with literature data, indicating the effective temperature in the ion trap environment was being successfully modulated by the changes in the set-point temperatures on the end-cap electrodes. The new design offers a convenient and effective way to convert commercial ion trap mass spectrometers into variable-temperature instruments.

  3. Development and Evaluation of a Variable-Temperature Quadrupole Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Derkits, David; Wiseman, Alex; Snead, Russell F; Dows, Martina; Harge, Jasmine; Lamp, Jared A; Gronert, Scott

    2016-02-01

    A new, variable-temperature mass spectrometer system is described. By applying polyimide heating tape to the end-cap electrodes of a Bruker (Bremen, Germany) Esquire ion trap, it is possible to vary the effective temperature of the system between 40 and 100°C. The modification does not impact the operation of the ion trap and the heater can be used for extended periods without degradation of the system. The accuracy of the ion trap temperatures was assessed by examining two gas-phase equilibrium processes with known thermochemistry. In each case, the variable-temperature ion trap provided data that were in good accord with literature data, indicating the effective temperature in the ion trap environment was being successfully modulated by the changes in the set-point temperatures on the end-cap electrodes. The new design offers a convenient and effective way to convert commercial ion trap mass spectrometers into variable-temperature instruments. PMID:26483183

  4. Disambiguating seesaw models using invariant mass variables at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dev, P. S. Bhupal; Kim, Doojin; Mohapatra, Rabindra N.

    2016-01-01

    We propose ways to distinguish between different mechanisms behind the collider signals of TeV-scale seesaw models for neutrino masses using kinematic endpoints of invariant mass variables. We particularly focus on two classes of such models widely discussed in literature: (i) Standard Model extended by the addition of singlet neutrinos and (ii) Left-Right Symmetric Models. Relevant scenarios involving the same "smoking-gun" collider signature of dilepton plus dijet with no missing transverse energy differ from one another by their event topology, resulting in distinctive relationships among the kinematic endpoints to be used for discerning them at hadron colliders. These kinematic endpoints are readily translated to the mass parameters of the on-shell particles through simple analytic expressions which can be used for measuring the masses of the new particles. A Monte Carlo simulation with detector effects is conducted to test the viability of the proposed strategy in a realistic environment. Finally, we discuss the future prospects of testing these scenarios at the √{s}=14 and 100 TeV hadron colliders.

  5. Modal analysis of a nonuniform string with end mass and variable tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rheinfurth, M. H.; Galaboff, Z. J.

    1983-01-01

    Modal synthesis techniques for dynamic systems containing strings describe the lateral displacements of these strings by properly chosen shape functions. An iterative algorithm is provided to calculate the natural modes of a nonuniform string and variable tension for some typical boundary conditions including one end mass. Numerical examples are given for a string in a constant and a gravity gradient force field.

  6. Newtonian Version of the Variable Mass Theory of Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, J. C.; Lima, J. A. S.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. Se presenta una versi6n Newtoniana de los modelos cosmol6gicos espacialmente e isotr6picos con masa variable. La influencia de la variaci6n de masa en la evoluci6n de la funci6n de escala est establecida para el caso de un Universo lieno de polvo bajo Ia suposici6n de que esta variaci6n es un efecto estrictamente cosmol6jico. Se muestra que el hiperb6lico, parab6lico 0 el#ptico dcl movimiento de puede ser modificado a lo larjo de la expansi6n. ABSTRACT. This paper presents a Newtonian version of the spatially homojeneous and isotropic cosmolojical models with variable mass. The influence of the mass variation on the evolution of the scale function is established for the case of a dust-filled Universe under the assumption that this variation is a strict cosmolojical effect. It is shown that the hyperbolic, parabolic or elliptic character of the fluid motion can be modified alonj the expansion. Keq : COSMOLOGY

  7. Aeroacoutic characteristics of a large, variable-pitch, variable-speed fan system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderman, P. T.; Mort, K. W.

    1983-01-01

    The acoustic and aerodynamic performance of the new drive fans for the NASA Ames 40- by 80-/80- by 120-foot wind tunnel was investigated. Results show that a fan system with variable-speed and variable-pitch rotor blades allows the operator to control noise and energy consumption, at a given mass flow rate, through the choice of blade speed and pitch. A low speed and high blade pitch will generally create the least noise at the least energy cost. An empirical method is described which predicts the sound power of this fan system reasonably well.

  8. Automated mass spectrometer analysis system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuppermann, Aron (Inventor); Dreyer, William J. (Inventor); Giffin, Charles E. (Inventor); Boettger, Heinz G. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    An automated mass spectrometer analysis system is disclosed, in which samples are automatically processed in a sample processor and converted into volatilizable samples, or their characteristic volatilizable derivatives. Each volatilizable sample is sequentially volatilized and analyzed in a double focusing mass spectrometer, whose output is in the form of separate ion beams all of which are simultaneously focused in a focal plane. Each ion beam is indicative of a different sample component or different fragments of one or more sample components and the beam intensity is related to the relative abundance of the sample component. The system includes an electro-optical ion detector which automatically and simultaneously converts the ion beams, first into electron beams which in turn produce a related image which is transferred to the target of a vilicon unit. The latter converts the images into electrical signals which are supplied to a data processor, whose output is a list of the components of the analyzed sample and their abundances. The system is under the control of a master control unit, which in addition to monitoring and controlling various power sources, controls the automatic operation of the system under expected and some unexpected conditions and further protects various critical parts of the system from damage due to particularly abnormal conditions.

  9. Automated mass spectrometer analysis system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boettger, Heinz G. (Inventor); Giffin, Charles E. (Inventor); Dreyer, William J. (Inventor); Kuppermann, Aron (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An automated mass spectrometer analysis system is disclosed, in which samples are automatically processed in a sample processor and converted into volatilizable samples, or their characteristic volatilizable derivatives. Each volatizable sample is sequentially volatilized and analyzed in a double focusing mass spectrometer, whose output is in the form of separate ion beams all of which are simultaneously focused in a focal plane. Each ion beam is indicative of a different sample component or different fragments of one or more sample components and the beam intensity is related to the relative abundance of the sample component. The system includes an electro-optical ion detector which automatically and simultaneously converts the ion beams, first into electron beams which in turn produce a related image which is transferred to the target of a vidicon unit. The latter converts the images into electrical signals which are supplied to a data processor, whose output is a list of the components of the analyzed sample and their abundances. The system is under the control of a master control unit, which in addition to monitoring and controlling various power sources, controls the automatic operation of the system under expected and some unexpected conditions and further protects various critical parts of the system from damage due to particularly abnormal conditions.

  10. Mass loss from interacting close binary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plavec, M. J.

    1981-01-01

    The three well-defined classes of evolved binary systems that show evidence of present and/or past mass loss are the cataclysmic variables, the Algols, and Wolf-Rayet stars. It is thought that the transformation of supergiant binary systems into the very short-period cataclysmic variables must have been a complex process. The new evidence that has recently been obtained from the far ultraviolet spectra that a certain subclass of the Algols (the Serpentids) are undergoing fairly rapid evolution is discussed. It is thought probable that the remarkable mass outflow observed in them is connected with a strong wind powered by accretion. The origin of the circumbinary clouds or flat disks that probably surround many strongly interacting binaries is not clear. Attention is also given to binary systems with hot white dwarf or subdwarf components, such as the symbiotic objects and the BQ stars; it is noted that in them both components may be prone to an enhanced stellar wind.

  11. Binary system parameters and the hibernation model of cataclysmic variables

    SciTech Connect

    Livio, M.; Shara, M.M.

    1987-08-01

    The hibernation model, in which nova systems spend most of the time between eruptions in a state of low mass transfer rate, is examined. The binary systems more likely to undergo hibernation are determined. The predictions of the hibernation scenario are shown to be consistent with available observational data. It is shown how the hibernation scenario provides links between classical novae, dwarf novae, and novalike variables, all of which represent different stages in the cyclic evolution of the same systems. 72 references.

  12. Model atmospheres with periodic shocks. [pulsations and mass loss in variable stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowen, G. H.

    1989-01-01

    The pulsation of a long-period variable star generates shock waves which dramatically affect the structure of the star's atmosphere and produce conditions that lead to rapid mass loss. Numerical modeling of atmospheres with periodic shocks is being pursued to study the processes involved and the evolutionary consequences for the stars. It is characteristic of these complex dynamical systems that most effects result from the interaction of various time-dependent processes.

  13. Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study

    SciTech Connect

    Cappers, Peter; Mills, Andrew; Goldman, Charles; Wiser, Ryan; Eto, Joseph H.

    2011-09-10

    This scoping study focuses on the policy issues inherent in the claims made by some Smart Grid proponents that the demand response potential of mass market customers which is enabled by widespread implementation of Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) through the Smart Grid could be the “silver bullet” for mitigating variable generation integration issues. In terms of approach, we will: identify key issues associated with integrating large amounts of variable generation into the bulk power system; identify demand response opportunities made more readily available to mass market customers through widespread deployment of AMI systems and how they can affect the bulk power system; assess the extent to which these mass market Demand Response (DR) opportunities can mitigate Variable Generation (VG) integration issues in the near-term and what electricity market structures and regulatory practices could be changed to further expand the ability for DR to mitigate VG integration issues over the long term; and provide a qualitative comparison of DR and other approaches to mitigate VG integration issues.

  14. Control system for variable geometry turbocharger

    SciTech Connect

    Abo, T.; Ueno, T.; Sumizawa, A.

    1987-08-11

    A control system is described for a variable geometry turbocharger for an internal combustion engine including a turbine having a variable area inflow passage, the turbine being operated in response to an exhaust gas flow supplied through the variable area inflow passage, and a compressor adapted to be driven by the turbine. The control system consists of means for detecting operating conditions of the engine, a control means including arithmetic means which calculates a first control value for controlling the cross-sectional area of the variable area inflow passage to provide a suitable supercharging pressure of intake air supplied to the engine in response to the detected operating conditions of the engine, a first variable geometry valve means for changing the cross-sectional area of the variable area inflow passage, means for actuating the variable geometry valve means in accordance with the first control value; and a limiter means for changing the first control value so as to restrict a reduction of the cross sectional area of the variable area inflow passage when the calculated control value has reached a predetermined value after being changed to reduce the cross-sectional area of the variable area inflow passage.

  15. Evaluation of Small Mass Spectrometer Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arkin, C. Richard; Griffin, Timothy P.; Ottens, Andrew K.; Diaz, Jorge A.; Follistein, Duke W.; Adams, Fredrick W.; Helms, William R.; Voska, N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Various mass analyzer systems were evaluated. Several systems show promise, including the Stanford Research Systems RGA-100, Inficon XPR-2, the University of Florida's Ion Trap, and the Compact Double Focus Mass Spectrometer. Areas that need improvement are the response time, recovery time, system volume, and system weight. Future work will investigate techniques to improve systems and will evaluate engineering challenges.

  16. Assessment of reservoir system variable forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kistenmacher, Martin; Georgakakos, Aris P.

    2015-05-01

    Forecast ensembles are a convenient means to model water resources uncertainties and to inform planning and management processes. For multipurpose reservoir systems, forecast types include (i) forecasts of upcoming inflows and (ii) forecasts of system variables and outputs such as reservoir levels, releases, flood damage risks, hydropower production, water supply withdrawals, water quality conditions, navigation opportunities, and environmental flows, among others. Forecasts of system variables and outputs are conditional on forecasted inflows as well as on specific management policies and can provide useful information for decision-making processes. Unlike inflow forecasts (in ensemble or other forms), which have been the subject of many previous studies, reservoir system variable and output forecasts are not formally assessed in water resources management theory or practice. This article addresses this gap and develops methods to rectify potential reservoir system forecast inconsistencies and improve the quality of management-relevant information provided to stakeholders and managers. The overarching conclusion is that system variable and output forecast consistency is critical for robust reservoir management and needs to be routinely assessed for any management model used to inform planning and management processes. The above are demonstrated through an application from the Sacramento-American-San Joaquin reservoir system in northern California.

  17. Interesting examples of supervised continuous variable systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, Christopher; Serrano, Joe; Ramadge, Peter

    1990-01-01

    The authors analyze two simple deterministic flow models for multiple buffer servers which are examples of the supervision of continuous variable systems by a discrete controller. These systems exhibit what may be regarded as the two extremes of complexity of the closed loop behavior: one is eventually periodic, the other is chaotic. The first example exhibits chaotic behavior that could be characterized statistically. The dual system, the switched server system, exhibits very predictable behavior, which is modeled by a finite state automaton. This research has application to multimodal discrete time systems where the controller can choose from a set of transition maps to implement.

  18. Temporal variability of mass transport across Canary Islands Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrero-Díaz, Ángeles; Rodríguez-Santana, Ángel; José Machín, Francisco; García-Weil, Luis; Sangrà, Pablo; Vélez-Belchí, Pedro; Fraile-Nuez, Eugenio

    2014-05-01

    The equatorward flowing Canary Current (CC) is the main feature of the circulation in the Canary Islands region. The CC flow perturbation by the Canary Islands originate the Canary Eddy Corridor which is the major pathway for long lived eddies in the subtropical North Atlantic (Sangrà et al., 2009, DSR). Therefore the variability of the CC passing through the Canary Archipelago will have both local and regional importance. Past studies on the CC variability trough the Canary Islands point out a clearly seasonal variability (Fraile-Nuez et al, 2010 (JGR); Hernández-Guerra et al, 2002 (DSR)). However those studies where focused on the eastern islands channels missing the variability through the western island channels which are the main source of long lived eddies. In order to fill this gap from November 2012 until September 2013 we conducted trimonthly surveys crossing the whole islands channels using opportunity ships (Naviera Armas Ferries). XBT and XCTD where launched along the cross channels transects. Additionally a closed box circling the Archipelago was performed on October 2013 as part of the cruise RAPROCAN-2013 (IEO) using also XBT and XCTD. Dynamical variables where derived inferring salinity from S(T,p) analytical relationships for the region updated with new XCTD data. High resolution, vertical sections of temperature, potential density, geostrophic velocity and transport where obtained. Our preliminary results suggest that the CC suffer a noticeable acceleration in those islands channels where eddy shedding is more frequent. They also indicate a clearly seasonal variability of the flows passing the islands channels. With this regard we observed significant differences on the obtained seasonal variability with respect the cited past studies on the eastern islands channel (Lanzarote / Fuerteventura - Africa coast). This work was co-funded by Canary Government (TRAMIC project: PROID20100092) and the European Union (FEDER).

  19. Low-mass Active Galactic Nuclei with Rapid X-Ray Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Luis C.; Kim, Minjin

    2016-04-01

    We present a detailed study of the optical spectroscopic properties of 12 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with candidate low-mass black holes (BHs) selected by Kamizasa et al. through rapid X-ray variability. The high-quality, echellette Magellan spectra reveal broad Hα emission in all the sources, allowing us to estimate robust virial BH masses and Eddington ratios for this unique sample. We confirm that the sample contains low-mass BHs accreting at high rates: the median MBH = 1.2 × 106 M⊙ and median Lbol/LEdd = 0.44. The sample follows the MBH–σ* relation, within the considerable scatter typical of pseudobulges, the probable hosts of these low-mass AGNs. Various lines of evidence suggest that ongoing star formation is prevalent in these systems. We propose a new strategy to estimate star formation rates in AGNs hosted by low-mass, low-metallicity galaxies, based on modification of an existing method using the strength of [O ii] λ3727, [O iii] λ5007, and X-rays.

  20. Variable pressure power cycle and control system

    DOEpatents

    Goldsberry, Fred L.

    1984-11-27

    A variable pressure power cycle and control system that is adjustable to a variable heat source is disclosed. The power cycle adjusts itself to the heat source so that a minimal temperature difference is maintained between the heat source fluid and the power cycle working fluid, thereby substantially matching the thermodynamic envelope of the power cycle to the thermodynamic envelope of the heat source. Adjustments are made by sensing the inlet temperature of the heat source fluid and then setting a superheated vapor temperature and pressure to achieve a minimum temperature difference between the heat source fluid and the working fluid.

  1. Preliminary experimental results on studying possibility of variable mass liner (VML) formation

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The main objective of the present experiment was to study the formation process and initial stage of acceleration of a variable-mass plasma liner (VML). The method is based on magnetic acceleration of a liner with the mass reduced during such acceleration. The experiment was carried out on February 16 at VNIIEF. This report describes the results of measurements obtained in the experiment and preliminary analysis of the results characterizing operation of the test facility main units: helical EMG; 5-module disk EMG 400 mm in diameter (DEMG); ponderomotive unit (PU) with a cylindric condensed liner and a special tooth-cutoff. The first part of the report presents measurement results obtained on the VNIIEF`s diagnostic equipment that are compared with those obtained by American specialists on their diagnostic equipment. Information submitted by American specialists is included in part 2 of this report. The second part of the report presents preliminary computational-theoretic analysis of the main measured results describing operation of DEMG TL system in the experiment; experimental data are compared with theoretical ones obtained before and after the experiment. But more emphasis is placed on the data preliminary analysis indicating that in the experiment a variable mass liner is formed (VML or plasma bubble).

  2. Authority and Mass Media as Variables in Rumor Transmission.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blake, Reed H.; And Others

    This paper offers the hypothesis that in times of low collective excitement rumors in a complex society whose content is beyond normal social discourse (a spectral rumor, for instance) will increasingly exhibit one or the other, or both, of two legitimizing agents--authority and mass media--as a means of gaining greater plausibility and…

  3. Variability in winter mass balance of Northern Hemisphere glaciers and relations with atmospheric circulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCabe, G.J.; Fountain, A.G.; Dyurgerov, M.

    2000-01-01

    An analysis of variability in the winter mass balance (WMB) of 22 glaciers in the Northern Hemisphere indicates two primary modes of variability that explain 46% of the variability among all glaciers. The first mode of variability characterizes WMB variability in Northern and Central Europe and the second mode primarily represents WMB variability in northwestern North America, but also is related to variability in WMB of one glacier in Europe and one in Central Asia. These two modes of WMB variability are explained by variations in mesoscale atmospheric circulation which are driving forces of variations in surface temperature and precipitation. The first mode is highly correlated with the Arctic Oscillation Index, whereas the second mode is highly correlated with the Southern Oscillation Index. In addition, the second mode of WMB variability is highly correlated with variability in global winter temperatures. This result suggests some connection between global temperature trends and WMB for some glaciers.

  4. Variable Acceleration Force Calibration System (VACS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhew, Ray D.; Parker, Peter A.; Johnson, Thomas H.; Landman, Drew

    2014-01-01

    Conventionally, force balances have been calibrated manually, using a complex system of free hanging precision weights, bell cranks, and/or other mechanical components. Conventional methods may provide sufficient accuracy in some instances, but are often quite complex and labor-intensive, requiring three to four man-weeks to complete each full calibration. To ensure accuracy, gravity-based loading is typically utilized. However, this often causes difficulty when applying loads in three simultaneous, orthogonal axes. A complex system of levers, cranks, and cables must be used, introducing increased sources of systematic error, and significantly increasing the time and labor intensity required to complete the calibration. One aspect of the VACS is a method wherein the mass utilized for calibration is held constant, and the acceleration is changed to thereby generate relatively large forces with relatively small test masses. Multiple forces can be applied to a force balance without changing the test mass, and dynamic forces can be applied by rotation or oscillating acceleration. If rotational motion is utilized, a mass is rigidly attached to a force balance, and the mass is exposed to a rotational field. A large force can be applied by utilizing a large rotational velocity. A centrifuge or rotating table can be used to create the rotational field, and fixtures can be utilized to position the force balance. The acceleration may also be linear. For example, a table that moves linearly and accelerates in a sinusoidal manner may also be utilized. The test mass does not have to move in a path that is parallel to the ground, and no re-leveling is therefore required. Balance deflection corrections may be applied passively by monitoring the orientation of the force balance with a three-axis accelerometer package. Deflections are measured during each test run, and adjustments with respect to the true applied load can be made during the post-processing stage. This paper will

  5. Dynamically variable spot size laser system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradl, Paul R. (Inventor); Hurst, John F. (Inventor); Middleton, James R. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A Dynamically Variable Spot Size (DVSS) laser system for bonding metal components includes an elongated housing containing a light entry aperture coupled to a laser beam transmission cable and a light exit aperture. A plurality of lenses contained within the housing focus a laser beam from the light entry aperture through the light exit aperture. The lenses may be dynamically adjusted to vary the spot size of the laser. A plurality of interoperable safety devices, including a manually depressible interlock switch, an internal proximity sensor, a remotely operated potentiometer, a remotely activated toggle and a power supply interlock, prevent activation of the laser and DVSS laser system if each safety device does not provide a closed circuit. The remotely operated potentiometer also provides continuous variability in laser energy output.

  6. Disentanglement in bipartite continuous-variable systems

    SciTech Connect

    Barbosa, F. A. S.; Coelho, A. S.; Nussenzveig, P.; Martinelli, M.; Faria, A. J. de; Cassemiro, K. N.; Villar, A. S.

    2011-11-15

    Entanglement in bipartite continuous-variable systems is investigated in the presence of partial losses such as those introduced by a realistic quantum communication channel, e.g., by propagation in an optical fiber. We find that entanglement can vanish completely for partial losses, in a situation reminiscent of so-called entanglement sudden death. Even states with extreme squeezing may become separable after propagation in lossy channels. Having in mind the potential applications of such entangled light beams to optical communications, we investigate the conditions under which entanglement can survive for all partial losses. Different loss scenarios are examined, and we derive criteria to test the robustness of entangled states. These criteria are necessary and sufficient for Gaussian states. Our study provides a framework to investigate the robustness of continuous-variable entanglement in more complex multipartite systems.

  7. Mobile Variable Depth Sampling System Design Study

    SciTech Connect

    BOGER, R.M.

    2000-08-25

    A design study is presented for a mobile, variable depth sampling system (MVDSS) that will support the treatment and immobilization of Hanford LAW and HLW. The sampler can be deployed in a 4-inch tank riser and has a design that is based on requirements identified in the Level 2 Specification (latest revision). The waste feed sequence for the MVDSS is based on Phase 1, Case 3S6 waste feed sequence. Technical information is also presented that supports the design study.

  8. Moving mass trim control system design

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne, R.H.; Robinett, R.D.; Sturgis, B.R.

    1996-03-01

    This paper describes the design of a moving mass trim control system for maneuvering axisymmetric reentry vehicles. The moving mass trim controller is composed of three equal masses that are independently positioned in order to deliver a desired center of mass position. For a slowly spinning reentry vehicle, the mass offset creates a trim angle-of-attack to generate modest flight path corrections. The control system must maintain the desired position of each mass in the face of large disturbances. A novel algorithm for determining the desired mass positions is developed in conjunction with a preliminary controller design. The controller design is based on classical frequency domain techniques where a bound on the disturbance magnitude is used to formulate the disturbance rejection problem. Simulation results for the controller are presented for a typical reentry vehicle.

  9. Orbital Stability of High Mass Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Sarah J.; Kratter, Kaitlin M.

    2016-05-01

    In light of the observation of systems like HR 8799 that contain several planets with planet-star mass ratios larger than Jupiter's, we explore the relationships between planet separation, mass, and stability timescale for high mass multi-planet systems detectable via direct imaging. We discuss the role of overlap between 1st and sometimes 2nd order mean motion resonances, and show how trends in stability time vary from previous studies of lower mass multi-planet systems. We show that extrapolating empirically derived relationships between planet mass, separation, and stability timescale derived from lower mass planetary systems misestimate the stability timescales for higher mass planetary systems by more than an order of magnitude at separations near the Hill stability limit. We also address what metrics of planet separation are most useful for estimating a system's dynamical stability. We apply these results to young, gapped, debris disk systems of the ScoCen association in order to place limits on the maximum mass and number of planets that could persist for the lifetimes of the disks. These efforts will provide useful constraints for on-going direct imaging surveys. By setting upper limits on the most easily detectable systems, we can better interpret both new discoveries and non-dectections.

  10. Quantum Information with Continuous Variable systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodó, Carles

    2010-05-01

    This thesis deals with the study of quantum communication protocols with Continuous Variable (CV) systems. Continuous Variable systems are those described by canonical conjugated coordinates x and p endowed with infinite dimensional Hilbert spaces, thus involving a complex mathematical structure. A special class of CV states, are the so-called Gaussian states. With them, it has been possible to implement certain quantum tasks as quantum teleportation, quantum cryptography and quantum computation with fantastic experimental success. The importance of Gaussian states is two-fold; firstly, its structural mathematical description makes them much more amenable than any other CV system. Secondly, its production, manipulation and detection with current optical technology can be done with a very high degree of accuracy and control. Nevertheless, it is known that in spite of their exceptional role within the space of all Continuous Variable states, in fact, Gaussian states are not always the best candidates to perform quantum information tasks. Thus non-Gaussian states emerge as potentially good candidates for communication and computation purposes.

  11. Artificial or variable gravity attained by tether systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundquist, C. A.

    1986-01-01

    The simplest orbiting tethered system demands for stability that the mass centers of two end bodies be displaced above and below the position of zero acceleration. Therefore, the contents of the end bodies are subjected necessarily to acceleration fields or artificial gravity whose magnitudes depend on the dimensions and masses of the system. If the length of the tether changes, so do the fields. Even for a fixed tether length, the acceleration field at a location in the system may be somewhat variable unless special means are employed to maintain a constant value. These fundamental properties of a tethered system can be used to advantage if small or variable acceleration fields are desired for experimental or operational reasons. This potential use involves a few expressions from a formulation of tether system dynamics. Some of these formulae were collected for convenient use. Two and three body tethered equilibrium equations are explained. A special application of acceleration field control using a tether system is attainment of near-zero gravity. In this applicaition, even small variations about zero become a critical matter.

  12. Variability properties and masses of central black hole for blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Junhui

    2001-06-01

    In this paper, the compiled long-term optical and infrared measurements of some blazars are used to analyze the variation properties, and the optical data are used to search for periodicity evidence in the lightcurve by means of the Jurkevich technique and the discrete correlation function (DCF) method. The periods are found in the range of 1.5 to 19 years. The short time scales are used to estimate the central black hole masses which are found in the range of (3.8 - 130)×107Msolar for the gamma-ray loud blazars. Some discussions are presented.

  13. Variable/Multispeed Rotorcraft Drive System Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, Mark A.; Handschuh, Robert F.; Lewicki, David G.

    2009-01-01

    Several recent studies for advanced rotorcraft have identified the need for variable, or multispeed-capable rotors. A speed change of up to 50 percent has been proposed for future rotorcraft to improve vehicle performance. Varying rotor speed during flight not only requires a rotor capable of performing effectively over the extended operation speed and load range, but also requires an advanced propulsion system to provide the required speed changes. A study has been completed, which investigated possible drive system arrangements to accommodate up to the 50 percent speed change. These concepts are presented. The most promising configurations are identified and will be developed for future validation testing.

  14. Mass balance study of gravitational mass movements in proglacial systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohn, Joachim; Vehling, Lucas; Moser, Michael

    2013-04-01

    In the framework of the DFG joint research project PROSA (high resoluted measurements of morphodynamics in rapidly changing PROglacial Systems of the Alps), mass movements are investigated geotechnically and process rates will be determined. As result, the actual mass balance for gravitational mass movements will be investigated exemplarily in an alpine glacier foreland in this PROSA sub-project. Alpine glacier forelands are defined as the area between the edge of the glacier and the moraines of the latest maximum in 1850. Since then, the region has become ice free due to the retreat of the glaciers. Because of this recent development, the glacier foreland differs considerably from the surrounding landscape and exhibits a rapid morphodynamic development. Mass movements like landslides and rock falls contribute a remarkable portion to total sediment transport in this area. As study area the region between Gepatschferner and Gepatsch backwater was choosen. The study area encompasses 62,5 km², lies at altitudes between 1759 and 3539 m a.s.l. and around 30 % are covered by glacier. Basic prerequisite is the geotechnical inventory-taking including the production of a geotechnical map. All mass balance studies for gravitational mass movements will base on this data collection. Short term behaviour during extreme meteorological events will be investigated as well, as the long term behaviour of the alpine slopes. The results of repeated high-resolution airborne laser scanning will contribute to a complete area-wide detection of surface changes. Detailed periodical terrestrial laser scanning of steep rock walls and their scree cones, as well as of slopes with soft rock will complete the data set. Spot tests with nets collecting the rock fall material, constructed on elected scree cones, allow the control and verification of the collected data. Mass movements in hard rock apart from rock fall processes, like rock creep, rock sliding and sagging will be monitored

  15. Variable stars in the VVV globular clusters. I. 2MASS-GC 02 and Terzan 10

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso-García, Javier; Dékány, István; Catelan, Márcio; Ramos, Rodrigo Contreras; Gran, Felipe; Leyton, Paul; Minniti, Dante; Amigo, Pía E-mail: idekany@astro.puc.cl E-mail: rcontrer@astro.puc.cl E-mail: pia.amigo@uv.cl E-mail: dante@astrofisica.cl

    2015-03-01

    The VISTA Variables in the Vía Láctea (VVV) ESO Public Survey is opening a new window to study inner Galactic globular clusters (GCs) using their variable stars. These GCs have been neglected in the past due to the difficulties caused by the presence of elevated extinction and high field stellar densities in their lines of sight. However, the discovery and study of any present variables in these clusters, especially RR Lyrae stars, can help to greatly improve the accuracy of their physical parameters. It can also help to shed some light on the questions raised by the intriguing Oosterhoff dichotomy in the Galactic GC system. In a series of papers we plan to explore variable stars in the GCs falling inside the field of the VVV survey. In this first paper, we search for and study the variables present in two highly reddened, moderately metal-poor, faint, inner Galactic GCs: 2MASS-GC 02 and Terzan 10. We report the discovery of sizable populations of RR Lyrae stars in both GCs. We use near-infrared period–luminosity relations to determine the color excess of each RR Lyrae star, from which we obtain both accurate distances to the GCs and the ratios of the selective-to-total extinction in their directions. We find the extinction toward both clusters to be elevated, non-standard, and highly differential. We also find both clusters to be closer to the Galactic center than previously thought, with Terzan 10 being on the far side of the Galactic bulge. Finally, we discuss their Oosterhoff properties, and conclude that both clusters stand out from the dichotomy followed by most Galactic GCs.

  16. MASS: An automated accountability system

    SciTech Connect

    Erkkila, B.H.; Kelso, F.

    1994-08-01

    All Department of Energy contractors who manage accountable quantities of nuclear materials are required to implement an accountability system that tracks, and records the activities associated with those materials. At Los Alamos, the automated accountability system allows data entry on computer terminals and data base updating as soon as the entry is made. It is also able to generate all required reports in a timely Fashion. Over the last several years, the hardware and software have been upgraded to provide the users with all the capability needed to manage a large variety of operations with a wide variety of nuclear materials. Enhancements to the system are implemented as the needs of the users are identified. The system has grown with the expanded needs of the user; and has survived several years of changing operations and activity. The user community served by this system includes processing, materials control and accountability, and nuclear material management personnel. In addition to serving the local users, the accountability system supports the national data base (NMMSS). This paper contains a discussion of several details of the system design and operation. After several years of successful operation, this system provides an operating example of how computer systems can be used to manage a very dynamic data management problem.

  17. Air Pressure Controlled Mass Measurement System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Ruilin; Wang, Jian; Cai, Changqing; Yao, Hong; Ding, Jin'an; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Xiaolei

    Mass measurement is influenced by air pressure, temperature, humidity and other facts. In order to reduce the influence, mass laboratory of National Institute of Metrology, China has developed an air pressure controlled mass measurement system. In this system, an automatic mass comparator is installed in an airtight chamber. The Chamber is equipped with a pressure controller and associate valves, thus the air pressure can be changed and stabilized to the pre-set value, the preferred pressure range is from 200 hPa to 1100 hPa. In order to keep the environment inside the chamber stable, the display and control part of the mass comparator are moved outside the chamber, and connected to the mass comparator by feed-throughs. Also a lifting device is designed for this system which can easily lift up the upper part of the chamber, thus weights can be easily put inside the mass comparator. The whole system is put on a marble platform, and the temperature and humidity of the laboratory is very stable. The temperature, humidity, and carbon dioxide content inside the chamber are measured in real time and can be used to get air density. Mass measurement cycle from 1100 hPa to 200 hPa and back to 1100 hPa shows the effective of the system.

  18. Equations of motion for the variable mass flow-variable exhaust velocity rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tempelman, W. H.

    1972-01-01

    An equation of motion for a one dimensional rocket is derived as a function of the mass flow rate into the acceleration chamber and the velocity distribution along the chamber, thereby including the transient flow changes in the chamber. The derivation of the mass density requires the introduction of the special time coordinate. The equation of motion is derived from both classical force and momentum approaches and is shown to be consistent with the standard equation expressed in terms of flow parameters at the exit to the acceleration chamber.

  19. Global Trends and Variability In the Mass Balance of Mountain and Valley Glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medwedeff, W. G.; Roe, G.

    2015-12-01

    Glacier mass balance (i.e., accumulation and ablation) is the most direct connection between climate and glaciers. We perform a comprehensive evaluation of the available global network of mass-balance measurements, with a particular interest given to mountain and valley glaciers. Each mass-balance time series is decomposed into a trend and the variability about that trend. Observed variability ranges by an order of magnitude, depending on climate setting (i.e., maritime vs. continental). For the great majority of glaciers, variability is well characterized by normally distributed, random fluctuations that are uncorrelated between seasons, or in subsequent years. The magnitude of variability for both summer and winter is well correlated with mean wintertime balance, which reflects the climatic setting. Collectively, summertime variability exceeds wintertime variability, except for maritime glaciers. Trends in annual mass balance are generally negative, driven primarily by summertime changes. Approximately 25% of annual-mean records show statistically significant negative trends when judged in isolation. In aggregate, the global trend is negative and significant. We further evaluate the magnitude of trends relative to the variability. We find that, on average, trends are approximately -0.2 standard deviations per decade, although there is a broad spread among individual glaciers. Finally, for two long records we also compare mass-balance trends and variability with nearby meteorological stations. We find significant differences among stations meaning caution is warranted in interpreting any point measurement (such as mass balance) as representative of region-wide behavior. By placing observed trends in the context of natural variability, the results are useful for interpreting past glacial history, and for placing constraints on future predictability.

  20. Trends and variability in the global dataset of glacier mass balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medwedeff, William G.; Roe, Gerard H.

    2016-06-01

    Glacier mass balance (i.e., accumulation and ablation) is the most direct connection between climate and glaciers. We perform a comprehensive evaluation of the available global network of mass-balance measurements. Each mass-balance time series is decomposed into a trend and the variability about that trend. Observed variability ranges by an order of magnitude, depending on climate setting (i.e., maritime vs continental). For the great majority of glaciers, variability is well characterized by normally distributed, random fluctuations that are uncorrelated between seasons, or in subsequent years. The magnitude of variability for both summer and winter is well correlated with mean wintertime balance, which reflects the climatic setting. Collectively, summertime variability exceeds wintertime variability, except for maritime glaciers. Trends in annual mass balance are generally negative, driven primarily by summertime changes. Approximately 25 % of annual-mean records show statistically significant negative trends when judged in isolation. In aggregate, the global trend is negative and significant. We further evaluate the magnitude of trends relative to the variability. We find that, on average, trends are approximately -0.2 standard deviations per decade, although there is a broad spread among individual glaciers. Finally, for two long records we also compare mass-balance trends and variability with nearby meteorological stations. We find significant differences among stations meaning caution is warranted in interpreting any point measurement (such as mass balance) as representative of region-wide behavior. By placing observed trends in the context of natural variability, the results are useful for interpreting past glacial history, and for placing constraints on future predictability.

  1. Gas sampling system for a mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Charles E; Ladner, Edward P

    2003-12-30

    The present invention relates generally to a gas sampling system, and specifically to a gas sampling system for transporting a hazardous process gas to a remotely located mass spectrometer. The gas sampling system includes a capillary tube having a predetermined capillary length and capillary diameter in communication with the supply of process gas and the mass spectrometer, a flexible tube surrounding and coaxial with the capillary tube intermediate the supply of process gas and the mass spectrometer, a heat transfer tube surrounding and coaxial with the capillary tube, and a heating device in communication the heat transfer tube for substantially preventing condensation of the process gas within the capillary tube.

  2. Mass Storage Performance Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheuermann, Peter

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this task is to develop a data warehouse to enable system administrators and their managers to gather information by querying the data logs of the MDSDS. Currently detailed logs capture the activity of the MDSDS internal to the different systems. The elements to be included in the data warehouse are requirements analysis, data cleansing, database design, database population, hardware/software acquisition, data transformation, query and report generation, and data mining.

  3. Spatial and temporal variability in distribution of water masses in Hornsund, Spitsbergen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Promińska, Agnieszka; Falck, Eva; Walczowski, Waldemar; Sundfjord, Arild

    2016-04-01

    Arctic fjords constitute an important part of many recent investigations because this is the place where different water masses meet, mix, and transform, influencing the stability of glaciers. Hornsund, the southernmost fjord of West Spitsbergen, has been studied during the past 15 years. Observations were based primarily on high resolution measurements of water temperature and salinity along fixed sections, that have been performed every July between 2001-2015. Research carried out in years 2010 - 2015 under Polish - Norwegian projects AWAKE and AWAKE-2 allowed for expansion of the database with data covering the period from spring to autumn. During this time measurements were also conducted from a small boat in the vicinity of glaciers with a time resolution of 1-2 weeks in addition to a mooring system deployed in the fjord and on the shelf just outside Hornsund. Synthesis of our measurements give an overview of water masses observed in the fjord. From summer to summer observations reveal high variability in water temperature and salinity giving a distinct division into an area influenced by oceanic factors (Main Basin) and an area which is more influenced by local factors (Brepollen). The chronology of water mass transformation has been obtained indicating a time of transition between winter (Arctic type), additionally interrupted by temporary inflow of waters of Atlantic origin, and summer (Atlantic type) conditions.

  4. Long-term optical variability of high-mass X-ray binaries. II. Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reig, P.; Nersesian, A.; Zezas, A.; Gkouvelis, L.; Coe, M. J.

    2016-05-01

    Context. High-mass X-ray binaries are bright X-ray sources. The high-energy emission is caused by the accretion of matter from the massive companion onto a neutron star. The accreting material comes from either the strong stellar wind in binaries with supergiant companions or the cirscumstellar disk in Be/X-ray binaries. In either case, the Hα line stands out as the main source of information about the state of the accreting material. Aims: We present the results of our monitoring program to study the long-term variability of the Hα line in high-mass X-ray binaries. Our aim is to characterise the optical variability timescales and study the interaction between the neutron star and the accreting material. Methods: We fitted the Hα line with Gaussian profiles and obtained the line parameters and equivalent width. The peak separation in split profiles was used to determine the disk velocity law and estimate the disk radius. The relative intensity of the two peaks (V/R ratio) allowed us to investigate the distribution of gas particles in the disk. The equivalent width was used to characterise the degree of variability of the systems. We also studied the variability of the Hα line in correlation with the X-ray activity. Results: Our results can be summarised as follows: i) we find that Be/X-ray binaries with narrow orbits are more variable than systems with long orbital periods; ii) we show that a Keplerian distribution of gas particles provides a good description of the disks in Be/X-ray binaries, as it does in classical Be stars; iii) a decrease in the Hα equivalent width is generally observed after major X-ray outbursts; iv) we confirm that the Hα equivalent width correlates with disk radius; v) while systems with supergiant companions display multi-structured profiles, most of the Be/X-ray binaries show, at some epoch, double-peak asymmetric profiles, which indicates that density inhomogeneities is a common property in the disk of Be/X-ray binaries; vi) the

  5. Variable temperature seat climate control system

    DOEpatents

    Karunasiri, Tissa R.; Gallup, David F.; Noles, David R.; Gregory, Christian T.

    1997-05-06

    A temperature climate control system comprises a variable temperature seat, at least one heat pump, at least one heat pump temperature sensor, and a controller. Each heat pump comprises a number of Peltier thermoelectric modules for temperature conditioning the air in a main heat exchanger and a main exchanger fan for passing the conditioned air from the main exchanger to the variable temperature seat. The Peltier modules and each main fan may be manually adjusted via a control switch or a control signal. Additionally, the temperature climate control system may comprise a number of additional temperature sensors to monitor the temperature of the ambient air surrounding the occupant as well as the temperature of the conditioned air directed to the occupant. The controller is configured to automatically regulate the operation of the Peltier modules and/or each main fan according to a temperature climate control logic designed both to maximize occupant comfort during normal operation, and minimize possible equipment damage, occupant discomfort, or occupant injury in the event of a heat pump malfunction.

  6. Variable acuity remote viewing system flight demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, R. W.

    1983-01-01

    The Variable Acuity Remote Viewing System (VARVS), originally developed under contract to the Navy (ONR) as a laboratory brassboard, was modified for flight demonstration. The VARVS system was originally conceived as a technique which could circumvent the acuity/field of view/bandwidth tradeoffs that exists in remote viewing to provide a nearly eye limited display in both field of view (160 deg) and resolution (2 min arc) while utilizing conventional TV sensing, transmission, and display equipment. The modifications for flight demonstration consisted of modifying the sensor so it could be installed and flow in a Piper PA20 aircraft, equipped for remote control and modifying the display equipment so it could be integrated with the NASA Research RPB (RPRV) remote control cockpit.

  7. A SEMI-EMPIRICAL MASS-LOSS RATE IN SHORT-PERIOD CATACLYSMIC VARIABLES

    SciTech Connect

    Sirotkin, Fedir V.; Kim, Woong-Tae E-mail: wkim@astro.snu.ac.k

    2010-10-01

    The mass-loss rate of donor stars in cataclysmic variables (CVs) is of paramount importance in the evolution of short-period CVs. Observed donors are oversized in comparison with those of isolated single stars of the same mass, which is thought to be a consequence of the mass loss. Using the empirical mass-radius relation of CVs and the homologous approximation for changes in effective temperature T{sub 2}, orbital period P, and luminosity of the donor with the stellar radius, we find the semi-empirical mass-loss rate M-dot{sub 2} of CVs as a function of P. The derived M-dot{sub 2} is at {approx}10{sup -9.5}-10{sup -10} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} and weakly depends on P when P>90 minutes, while it declines very rapidly toward the minimum period when P < 90 minutes, emulating the P-T{sub 2} relation. Due to strong deviation from thermal equilibrium caused by the mass loss, the semi-empirical M-dot{sub 2} is significantly different from and has a less-pronounced turnaround behavior with P than suggested by previous numerical models. The semi-empirical P- M-dot{sub 2} relation is consistent with the angular momentum loss due to gravitational wave emission and strongly suggests that CV secondaries with 0.075 M{sub sun} < M{sub 2} < 0.2 M{sub sun} are less than 2 Gyr old. When applied to selected eclipsing CVs, our semi-empirical mass-loss rates are in good agreement with the accretion rates derived from the effective temperatures T{sub 1} of white dwarfs, suggesting that M-dot{sub 2} can be used to reliably infer T{sub 2} from T{sub 1}. Based on the semi-empirical M-dot{sub 2}, SDSS 1501 and 1433 systems that were previously identified as post-bounce CVs have yet to reach the minimal period.

  8. The Importance of Continued Satellite Gravity Missions for Understanding Ocean Mass Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, Don

    2010-05-01

    Global gravity observations from satellite missions such as GRACE are unique in the way that they observe mass exchanges among the ocean, cryosphere, and land, as well as mass exchanges from one ocean basin to another. No longer does one need to patch together disparate measurements (e.g., sea level, in situ temperature measurements, glacier and ice sheet surface mass balances, unknown land hydrology) to infer changes in the global ocean mass. For the first time, we can directly measure it. We can also observe local fluctuations in the ocean mass caused by changes in wind stress and ocean circulation, not all of which can be modeled accurately. We will review recent results for global ocean mass variability and ocean mass exchange between basins and point out problems with inferring these by other means, such as combinations of altimetry and in situ temperature profilers and from global ocean models. We have only recently been able to appreciate the unique information on low-frequency fluctuations in local and global ocean mass that can be gained from satellite gravity missions. It would be a shame to loose this important new data in the coming years and return to process of inferring ocean mass variability rather than measuring it.

  9. THE MASS-RICHNESS RELATION OF MaxBCG CLUSTERS FROM QUASAR LENSING MAGNIFICATION USING VARIABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Anne H.

    2012-04-10

    Accurate measurement of galaxy cluster masses is an essential component not only in studies of cluster physics but also for probes of cosmology. However, different mass measurement techniques frequently yield discrepant results. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey MaxBCG catalog's mass-richness relation has previously been constrained using weak lensing shear, Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ), and X-ray measurements. The mass normalization of the clusters as measured by weak lensing shear is {approx}>25% higher than that measured using SZ and X-ray methods, a difference much larger than the stated measurement errors in the analyses. We constrain the mass-richness relation of the MaxBCG galaxy cluster catalog by measuring the gravitational lensing magnification of type I quasars in the background of the clusters. The magnification is determined using the quasars' variability and the correlation between quasars' variability amplitude and intrinsic luminosity. The mass-richness relation determined through magnification is in agreement with that measured using shear, confirming that the lensing strength of the clusters implies a high mass normalization and that the discrepancy with other methods is not due to a shear-related systematic measurement error. We study the dependence of the measured mass normalization on the cluster halo orientation. As expected, line-of-sight clusters yield a higher normalization; however, this minority of haloes does not significantly bias the average mass-richness relation of the catalog.

  10. An analysis of space power system masses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Barbara H.; Cull, Ronald C.; Kankam, M. David

    1990-01-01

    Various space electrical power system masses are analyzed with particular emphasis on the power management and distribution (PMAD) portion. The electrical power system (EPS) is divided into functional blocks: source, interconnection, storage, transmission, distribution, system control and load. The PMAD subsystem is defined as all the blocks between the source, storage and load, plus the power conditioning equipment required for the source, storage and load. The EPS mass of a wide range of spacecraft is then classified as source, storage or PMAD and tabulated in a database. The intent of the database is to serve as a reference source for PMAD masses of existing and in-design spacecraft. The PMAD masses in the database range from 40 kg/kW to 183 kg/kW across the spacecraft systems studied. Factors influencing the power system mass are identified. These include the total spacecraft power requirements, total amount of load capacity and physical size of the spacecraft. It is found that a new utility class of power systems, represented by Space Station Freedom, is evolving.

  11. Comparative glacio-climatological analysis of mass balance variability along the geographical margin of Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehoczky, Annamária; Kern, Zoltán; Pongrácz, Rita

    2014-05-01

    Glacio-climatological studies recognise glacier mass balance changes as high-confident climate indicators. The climatic sensitivity of a glacier does not simply depend on regional climate variability but also influenced via large- and mesoscale atmospheric circulation patterns. This study focuses on recent changes in the mass balance using records from three border regions of Europe, and investigates the relationships between the seasonal mass balance components, regional climatic conditions, and distant atmospheric forcing. Since glaciers in different macro-climatological conditions (i.e., mid-latitudes or high-latitudes, dry-continental or maritime regions) may present strongly diverse mass balance characteristics, the three analysed regions were selected from different glacierised macroregions (using the database of the World Glacier Monitoring Service). These regions belong to the Caucasus Mountains (Central Europe macroregion), the Polar Ural (Northern Asia macroregion), and Svalbard (Arctic Islands macroregion). The analysis focuses on winter, summer, and annual mass balance series of eight glaciers. The climatic variables (atmospheric pressure, air temperature, precipitation) and indices of teleconnection patterns (e.g., North Atlantic Oscillation, Pacific Decadal Oscillation) are used from the gridded databases of the University of East Anglia, Climatic Research Unit and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Center for Environmental Prediction. However, the period and length of available mass balance data in the selected regions vary greatly (the first full record is in 1958, Polar Ural; the last is in 2010, Caucasus Mountains), a comparative analysis can be carried out for the period of 1968-1981. Since glaciers from different regions respond to large- and mesoscale climatic forcings differently, and because the mass balance of glaciers within a region often co-vary, our specific objectives are (i) to examine the variability and the

  12. Online mass storage system detailed requirements document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The requirements for an online high density magnetic tape data storage system that can be implemented in a multipurpose, multihost environment is set forth. The objective of the mass storage system is to provide a facility for the compact storage of large quantities of data and to make this data accessible to computer systems with minimum operator handling. The results of a market survey and analysis of candidate vendor who presently market high density tape data storage systems are included.

  13. Control system for an infinitely variable transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Morimoto, Y.

    1987-07-21

    A system is described for controlling an infinitely variable transmission for transmitting the power of an internal combustion engine through a clutch for driving a motor vehicle. The transmission comprises a drive pulley having a hydraulically shiftable disc and a hydraulic cylinder for shifting the disc, a driven pulley having a hydraulically shiftable disc and a hydraulic cylinder for operating the disc of the driven pulley, and a belt engaged with both pulleys. The system includes a pressure oil circuit having a pump for supplying pressurized oil, and a transmission ratio control valve having a spool for controlling the pressurized oil so as to move the disc of the drive pulley to change the actual transmission ratio of the transmission. The improvement in the system comprises: first means for moving the spool of the transmission ratio control valve; second means responsive to disengagement of the clutch, when speed of the vehicle is below a predetermined speed, for producing a coasting signal; third means responsive to the coasting signal for producing a drive pulley speed set signal; fourth means responsive to the drive pulley speed set signal for producing a shifting signal representing a quantity of shifting the spool of the transmission ratio control valve in upshifting direction, and fifth means responsive to the shifting signal for shifting the spool of the transmission ratio control valve in the upshifting direction via the first means thereby decreasing the drive pulley speed.

  14. System-Level Integration of Mass Memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Brian; Mellstrom, Jeffrey; Wysocky, Terry

    2008-01-01

    A report discusses integrating multiple memory modules on the high-speed serial interconnect (IEEE 1393) that is used by a spacecraft?s inter-module communications in order to ease data congestion and provide for a scalable, strong, flexible system that can meet new system-level mass memory requirements.

  15. INFRARED VARIABILITY OF THE GLIESE 569B SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Kenworthy, Matthew A.; Scuderi, Louis J.

    2012-06-20

    Gliese 569B is a multiple brown dwarf system whose exact nature has been the subject of several investigations over the past few years. Interpretation has partially relied on infrared photometry and spectroscopy of the resolved components of the system. We present seeing-limited K{sub s} photometry over four nights, searching for variability in this young low-mass substellar system. Our photometry is consistent with other reported photometry, and we report the tentative detection of several periodic signals consistent with rotational modulation due to spots on their surfaces. The five significant periods range from 2.90 hr to 12.8 hr, with peak-to-peak variabilities from 28 mmag to 62 mmag in the K{sub s} band. If both components are rotating with the shortest periods, then their rotation axes are not parallel with each other, and the rotation axis of the Bb component is not perpendicular to the Ba-Bb orbital plane. If Bb has one of the longer rotational periods, then the Bb rotation axis is consistent with being parallel to the orbital axis of the Ba-Bb system.

  16. Dynamical limits on dark mass in the outer solar system

    SciTech Connect

    Hogg, D.W.; Quinlan, G.D.; Tremaine, S. MIT, Cambridge, MA )

    1991-06-01

    Simplified model solar systems with known observational errors are considered in conducting a dynamical search for dark mass and its minimum detectable amount, and in determining the significance of observed anomalies. The numerical analysis of the dynamical influence of dark mass on the orbits of outer planets and comets is presented in detail. Most conclusions presented are based on observations of the four giant planets where the observational errors in latitude and longitude are independent Gaussian variables with a standard deviation. Neptune's long orbital period cannot be predicted by modern ephemerides, and no evidence of dark mass is found in considering this planet. Studying the improvement in fit when observations are fitted to models that consider dark mass is found to be an efficient way to detect dark mass. Planet X must have a mass of more than about 10 times the minimum detectable mass to locate the hypothetical planet. It is suggested that the IRAS survey would have already located the Planet X if it is so massive and close that it dynamically influences the outer planets. Orbital residuals from comets are found to be more effective than those from planets in detecting the Kuiper belt. 35 refs.

  17. Control system for an infinitely variable transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Y.

    1986-12-09

    This patent describes a control system for an infinitely variable belt-drive transmission having a selector device including a drive range position and a neutral position, a drive pulley having a hydraulically shiftable disc and a servo chamber for shifting the disc, and a driven pulley having a hydraulically shiftable disc and a servo chamber for shifting the disc. It also has a belt engaged with both the pulleys, a hydraulic control circuit for supplying oil to the servo chambers and for draining the servo chambers. The hydraulic control circuit is provided with a pressure regulator valve for providing a line pressure and a transmission ratio control valve for applying the line pressure to the servo chamber of the drive pulley. The improvement described here comprises: a lubricating oil circuit provided in the hydraulic control circuit for supplying lubricating oil to the drive and driven pulleys; a passage for supplying a part of the lubricating oil to the servo chamber of the drive pulley; a check valve provided in the passage for preventing the reverse flow of the lubricating oil; and a select position detecting valve for enabling the supply of the lubricating oil to the servo chamber at the selection of the neutral position.

  18. Control system for a continuously variable transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Y.

    1987-11-03

    This patent describes a control system for a continuously variable belt-drive transmission having a selector device including a drive range position, a drive pulley having a hydraulically shiftable disc and a servo chamber for shifting the disc, a driven pulley having a hydraulically shiftable disc and a servo chamber for shifting the disc, and a belt engaged with both the pulleys, an hydraulic control circuit for supplying oil to the servo chambers and for draining the servo chambers, the hydraulic control circuit being provided with a pressure regulator valve for providing a line pressure and a transmission ratio control valve for applying the line pressure to the servo chamber of the drive pulley. The improvement comprises: a first drain passage from the pressure regulator valve; a second drain passage from the transmission ratio control valve; a first check valve provided in the first drain passage and a second check valve provided in the second drain passage for building up supplementary low pressure in both drain passages at upstream of both the check valves; a supplementary oil passage communicating both the first and second drain passages at upstream of the check valves for supplying a part of drain oil to the servo chamber of the drive pulley.

  19. High Temperature Variable Conductance Heat Pipes for Radioisotope Stirling Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarau, Calin; Walker, Kara L.; Anderson, William G.

    2009-01-01

    In a Stirling radioisotope system, heat must continually be removed from the GPHS modules, to maintain the GPHS modules and surrounding insulation at acceptable temperatures. Normally, the Stirling convertor provides this cooling. If the Stirling convertor stops in the current system, the insulation is designed to spoil, preventing damage to the GPHS, but also ending the mission. An alkali-metal Variable Conductance Heat Pipe (VCHP) is under development to allow multiple stops and restarts of the Stirling convertor. The status of the ongoing effort in developing this technology is presented in this paper. An earlier, preliminary design had a radiator outside the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) casing, used NaK as the working fluid, and had the reservoir located on the cold side adapter flange. The revised design has an internal radiator inside the casing, with the reservoir embedded inside the insulation. A large set of advantages are offered by this new design. In addition to reducing the overall size and mass of the VCHP, simplicity, compactness and easiness in assembling the VCHP with the ASRG are significantly enhanced. Also, the permanently elevated temperatures of the entire VCHP allows the change of the working fluid from a binary compound (NaK) to single compound (Na). The latter, by its properties, allows higher performance and further mass reduction of the system. Preliminary design and analysis shows an acceptable peak temperature of the ASRG case of 140 C while the heat losses caused by the addition of the VCHP are 1.8 W.

  20. Apparent mass of the human body in the vertical direction: Inter-subject variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toward, Martin G. R.; Griffin, Michael J.

    2011-02-01

    The biodynamic responses of the seated human body to whole-body vibration vary considerably between people, but the reasons for the variability are not well understood. This study was designed to determine how the physical characteristics of people affect their apparent mass and whether inter-subject variability is influenced by the magnitude of vibration and the support of a seat backrest. The vertical apparent masses of 80 seated adults (41 males and 39 females aged 18-65) were measured at frequencies between 0.6 and 20 Hz with four backrest conditions (no backrest, upright rigid backrest, reclined rigid backrest, reclined foam backrest) and with three magnitudes of random vibration (0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 m s -2 rms). Relationships between subject physical characteristics (age, gender, weight, and anthropometry) and subject apparent mass were investigated with multiple regression models. The strongest predictor of the modulus of the vertical apparent mass at 0.6 Hz, at resonance, and at 12 Hz was body weight, with other factors having only a marginal effect. After correction for other variables, the principal resonance frequency was most consistently associated with age and body mass index. As age increased from 18 to 65 years, the resonance frequency increased by up to 1.7 Hz, and when the body mass index was increased from 18 to 34 kg m -2 the resonance frequency decreased by up to 1.7 Hz. These changes were greater than the 0.9-Hz increase in resonance frequency between sitting without a backrest and sitting with a reclined rigid backrest, and greater than the 1.0-Hz reduction in resonance frequency when the magnitude of vibration increased from 0.5 to 1.5 m s -2 rms. It is concluded that the effects of age, body mass index, posture, vibration magnitude, and weight should be taken into account when defining the vertical apparent mass of the seated human body.

  1. Compositional Variability of the Solar Wind: The Need for an Ultra-High Temporal Resolution Mass Spectrometer for Studies of Solar Wind and Coronal Mass Ejection Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adrian, M. L.; Sheldon, R. B.; Vaisberg, O.; Suess, S. T.; Gallagher, D. L.; Craven, P. D.; Hamilton, D. C.

    2004-05-01

    Current state-of-the-art solar wind mass spectroscopy has clearly demonstrated the compositional uniqueness between slow/fast solar wind streams and slow/fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs). As such, solar wind composition measurements serve as an indicator of the sub-coronal and coronal processes responsible for the formation of these heliospheric features. While current instrumentation have identified temporal variations in solar wind/CME composition on the order of 10's of minutes, these detections have occurred during relatively quiescent periods, such as within the magnetic cloud portion of a CME, when temporal variations of the collective solar wind (including magnetic field variations) occur over periods in excess of the current minimum instrumental duty cycle of 5-minutes. Consequently, the compositional markers of the microphysics responsible for the formation of highly variable solar wind flows and for CME/prominence formation remain overlooked. To address the need for greater temporal resolution in solar wind compositional measurements, we have undertaken the development of a novel ultra-high temporal resolution ion mass spectrometer utilizing a helical ion path time-of-flight (TOF) system within a compact, low-mass, low-power instrument. The instrument is designed specifically to measure solar wind 3He+2 < M/q < 56Fe+6 ion plasmas from 0.3-20.0 keV/q with an order of magnitude greater geometric factor than current solar wind ion mass spectrometers, and produce 1-10 ms mass spectra with a mass resolution of M/Δ M ~ 200 or greater, all within a duty cycle of < 90-s. These characteristics achieve a resolution sufficient to probe spatial/temporal dimensions down to an ion gyroradius in solar wind flow boundaries at 1 AU. This paper presents an overview of solar wind mass spectroscopy results to date, justification for solar wind composition measurements of greater temporal resolution, and an introduction to the helical ion path mass spectrometer (HIPS

  2. Quality control technique to reduce the variability of longitudinal measurement of hemoglobin mass.

    PubMed

    Gough, C E; Sharpe, K; Ashenden, M J; Anson, J M; Saunders, P U; Garvican, L A; Bonetti, D L; Gore, C J; Prommer, N

    2011-12-01

    The sensitivity of the athlete blood passport to detect blood doping may be improved by the inclusion of total hemoglobin mass (Hb(mass)), but the comparability of Hb(mass) from different laboratories is unknown. To optimize detection sensitivity, the analytical variability associated with Hb(mass) measurement must be minimized. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of using quality controls to minimize the variation in Hb(mass) between laboratories. Three simulated laboratories were set up in one location. Nine participants completed three carbon monoxide (CO) re-breathing tests in each laboratory. One participant completed two CO re-breathing tests in each laboratory. Simultaneously, quality controls containing Low (1-3%) and High (8-11%) concentrations of percent carboxyhemoglobin (%HbCO) were measured to compare hemoximeters in each laboratory. Linear mixed modeling was used to estimate the within-subject variation in Hb(mass), expressed as the coefficient of variation, and to estimate the effect of different laboratories. The analytic variation of Hb(mass) was 2.4% when tests were conducted in different laboratories, which reduced to 1.6% when the model accounted for between-laboratory differences. Adjustment of Hb(mass) values using quality controls achieved a comparable analytic variation of 1.7%. The majority of between-laboratory variation in Hb(mass) originated from the difference between hemoximeters, which could be eliminated using appropriate quality controls. PMID:21535184

  3. Toward Scalable Benchmarks for Mass Storage Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Ethan L.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents guidelines for the design of a mass storage system benchmark suite, along with preliminary suggestions for programs to be included. The benchmarks will measure both peak and sustained performance of the system as well as predicting both short- and long-term behavior. These benchmarks should be both portable and scalable so they may be used on storage systems from tens of gigabytes to petabytes or more. By developing a standard set of benchmarks that reflect real user workload, we hope to encourage system designers and users to publish performance figures that can be compared with those of other systems. This will allow users to choose the system that best meets their needs and give designers a tool with which they can measure the performance effects of improvements to their systems.

  4. Power extraction from vortex-induced vibration of dual mass system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Yoshiki

    2013-01-01

    This study theoretically examines energy extraction through the vortex-induced vibration (VIV) of a dual mass system. The theory involves a dynamic system comprising two cylinders connected with a few springs, dampers, and a generator. The governing equation for the system is composed of equations of translational motion for the two cylinders and an equation of rotation for the wake oscillator, which is introduced for describing a hydrodynamic lift force acting on a primary cylinder. The harmonic solution of the equations is derived by adopting an averaging method. The analytical solution obtained for a dual mass case is reduced to one for a single mass case by considering a limit of infinite in-between damping and zero mass of secondary cylinder. The calculation shows enhancement of power extraction by the dual mass system, surpassing that by single mass system. This advantage of the dual mass system holds under both constant and variable flow velocities.

  5. Effect of body mass and midsole hardness on kinetic and perceptual variables during basketball landing manoeuvres.

    PubMed

    Nin, Darren Z; Lam, Wing K; Kong, Pui W

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of body mass and shoe midsole hardness on kinetic and perceptual variables during the performance of three basketball movements: (1) the first and landing steps of layup, (2) shot-blocking landing and (3) drop landing. Thirty male basketball players, assigned into "heavy" (n = 15, mass 82.7 ± 4.3 kg) or "light" (n = 15, mass 63.1 ± 2.8 kg) groups, performed five trials of each movement in three identical shoes of varying midsole hardness (soft, medium, hard). Vertical ground reaction force (VGRF) during landing was sampled using multiple wooden-top force plates. Perceptual responses on five variables (forefoot cushioning, rearfoot cushioning, forefoot stability, rearfoot stability and overall comfort) were rated after each movement condition using a 150-mm Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). A mixed factorial analysis of variance (ANOVA) (Body Mass × Shoe) was applied to all kinetic and perceptual variables. During the first step of the layup, the loading rate associated with rearfoot contact was 40.7% higher in the "heavy" than "light" groups (P = .014) and 12.4% higher in hard compared with soft shoes (P = .011). Forefoot peak VGRF in a soft shoe was higher (P = .011) than in a hard shoe during shot-block landing. Both "heavy" and "light" groups preferred softer to harder shoes. Overall, body mass had little effect on kinetic or perceptual variables. PMID:26211423

  6. Neutral particle mass spectrometry with nanomechanical systems

    PubMed Central

    Sage, Eric; Brenac, Ariel; Alava, Thomas; Morel, Robert; Dupré, Cécilia; Hanay, Mehmet Selim; Roukes, Michael L.; Duraffourg, Laurent; Masselon, Christophe; Hentz, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    Current approaches to mass spectrometry (MS) require ionization of the analytes of interest. For high-mass species, the resulting charge state distribution can be complex and difficult to interpret correctly. Here, using a setup comprising both conventional time-of-flight MS (TOF-MS) and nano-electromechanical systems-based MS (NEMS-MS) in situ, we show directly that NEMS-MS analysis is insensitive to charge state: the spectrum consists of a single peak whatever the species’ charge state, making it significantly clearer than existing MS analysis. In subsequent tests, all the charged particles are electrostatically removed from the beam, and unlike TOF-MS, NEMS-MS can still measure masses. This demonstrates the possibility to measure mass spectra for neutral particles. Thus, it is possible to envisage MS-based studies of analytes that are incompatible with current ionization techniques and the way is now open for the development of cutting-edge system architectures with unique analytical capability. PMID:25753929

  7. Using System Mass (SM), Equivalent Mass (EM), Equivalent System Mass (ESM) or Life Cycle Mass (LCM) in Advanced Life Support (ALS) Reporting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry

    2003-01-01

    The Advanced Life Support (ALS) has used a single number, Equivalent System Mass (ESM), for both reporting progress and technology selection. ESM is the launch mass required to provide a space system. ESM indicates launch cost. ESM alone is inadequate for technology selection, which should include other metrics such as Technology Readiness Level (TRL) and Life Cycle Cost (LCC) and also consider perfom.arxe 2nd risk. ESM has proven difficult to implement as a reporting metric, partly because it includes non-mass technology selection factors. Since it will not be used exclusively for technology selection, a new reporting metric can be made easier to compute and explain. Systems design trades-off performance, cost, and risk, but a risk weighted cost/benefit metric would be too complex to report. Since life support has fixed requirements, different systems usually have roughly equal performance. Risk is important since failure can harm the crew, but it is difficult to treat simply. Cost is not easy to estimate, but preliminary space system cost estimates are usually based on mass, which is better estimated than cost. Amass-based cost estimate, similar to ESM, would be a good single reporting metric. The paper defines and compares four mass-based cost estimates, Equivalent Mass (EM), Equivalent System Mass (ESM), Life Cycle Mass (LCM), and System Mass (SM). EM is traditional in life support and includes mass, volume, power, cooling and logistics. ESM is the specifically defined ALS metric, which adds crew time and possibly other cost factors to EM. LCM is a new metric, a mass-based estimate of LCC measured in mass units. SM includes only the factors of EM that are originally measured in mass, the hardware and logistics mass. All four mass-based metrics usually give similar comparisons. SM is by far the simplest to compute and easiest to explain.

  8. Linking the spatial variability of glacier mass loss to fjord geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, D. F.; Tinto, K. J.; Boghosian, A.; Cochran, J. R.; Csatho, B. M.; Bell, R. E.

    2015-12-01

    There is compelling evidence of increasing mass loss of the ice sheets using a diverse set of observations, including increased thinning rates measured from both airborne and satellite altimeters, elevated mass fluxes resulting from the acceleration of outlet glaciers, and mass changes measured directly from satellite gravimetry. A dominant characteristic of observed change in Greenland outlet glaciers is that it is locally random. Numerous studies have revealed a high degree of spatial and temporal variability of outlet glacier mass change. Modeling studies suggest that increased ocean temperatures may be responsible for the observed glacial retreat in Greenland through increased basal melting, leading to increased calving rates, terminus retreat, glacier speedup, and eventually thinning of inland ice. Knowledge of fjord geometry is crucial for ice-ocean interaction because the availability of ocean heat to the ice will be restricted by narrow sills and shallow grounding lines. We investigate whether the variability in observed changes among Greenland glaciers can be partially explained by variation in fjord geometry. Using statistical techniques commonly employed to detect patterns in complex spatial data, we objectively show that mass change in Greenland tidewater glaciers between 2003 and 2009 is indeed mostly spatially incoherent. Except for a few clusters of similar change in the NW and Scoresby Sund regions, there is significant glacier-scale variability in mass loss rates. To understand the drivers of this local variability, we compare fjord bathymetries from all regions of Greenland, modeled using airborne gravimetry measurements from NASA Operation IceBridge flights, to estimates of glaciological change. Specifically, we investigate the correlation between water depths at the grounding line and the dynamic mass loss of tidewater glaciers. In theory, a deep grounding line will allow greater interaction with the warm Atlantic Water observed in most fjords

  9. Planetary mass function and planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominik, M.

    2011-02-01

    With planets orbiting stars, a planetary mass function should not be seen as a low-mass extension of the stellar mass function, but a proper formalism needs to take care of the fact that the statistical properties of planet populations are linked to the properties of their respective host stars. This can be accounted for by describing planet populations by means of a differential planetary mass-radius-orbit function, which together with the fraction of stars with given properties that are orbited by planets and the stellar mass function allows the derivation of all statistics for any considered sample. These fundamental functions provide a framework for comparing statistics that result from different observing techniques and campaigns which all have their very specific selection procedures and detection efficiencies. Moreover, recent results both from gravitational microlensing campaigns and radial-velocity surveys of stars indicate that planets tend to cluster in systems rather than being the lonely child of their respective parent star. While planetary multiplicity in an observed system becomes obvious with the detection of several planets, its quantitative assessment however comes with the challenge to exclude the presence of further planets. Current exoplanet samples begin to give us first hints at the population statistics, whereas pictures of planet parameter space in its full complexity call for samples that are 2-4 orders of magnitude larger. In order to derive meaningful statistics, however, planet detection campaigns need to be designed in such a way that well-defined fully deterministic target selection, monitoring and detection criteria are applied. The probabilistic nature of gravitational microlensing makes this technique an illustrative example of all the encountered challenges and uncertainties.

  10. Expert overseer for mass spectrometer system

    DOEpatents

    Filby, Evan E.; Rankin, Richard A.

    1991-01-01

    An expert overseer for the operation and real-time management of a mass spectrometer and associated laboratory equipment. The overseer is a computer-based expert diagnostic system implemented on a computer separate from the dedicated computer used to control the mass spectrometer and produce the analysis results. An interface links the overseer to components of the mass spectrometer, components of the laboratory support system, and the dedicated control computer. Periodically, the overseer polls these devices and as well as itself. These data are fed into an expert portion of the system for real-time evaluation. A knowledge base used for the evaluation includes both heuristic rules and precise operation parameters. The overseer also compares current readings to a long-term database to detect any developing trends using a combination of statistical and heuristic rules to evaluate the results. The overseer has the capability to alert lab personnel whenever questionable readings or trends are observed and provide a background review of the problem and suggest root causes and potential solutions, or appropriate additional tests that could be performed. The overseer can change the sequence or frequency of the polling to respond to an observation in the current data.

  11. Australian water mass variations from GRACE data linked to Indo-Pacific climate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Garcia, D.; Ummenhofer, C. C.; Zlotnicki, V.

    2011-12-01

    Time-variable gravity data from the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission are used to 22 study total water content over Australia for the period 2002-2010. A time-varying annual signal explains 61% 23 of the variance of the data, in good agreement with two independent estimates of the same quantity from 24 hydrological models. Water mass content variations across Australia are linked to Pacific and Indian Ocean 25 variability, associated with El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD), 26 respectively.From1989,positive(negative)IODphaseswererelatedtoanomalouslylow(high)precipitation 27 in southeastern Australia, associated with a reduced (enhanced) tropical moisture flux. In particular, the 28 sustained water mass content reduction over central and southern regions of Australia during the period 29 2006-2008 is associated with three consecutive positive IOD events. Acknowledgments: We thank the research project for emergent groups from the University of Alicante, GRE10-13.

  12. A fully mass conservative variable parameter McCarthy-Muskingum method: Theory and verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perumal, Muthiah; Price, Roland K.

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents the hydraulic derivation of a fully mass conservative, variable parameter McCarthy-Muskingum (VPMM) method derived directly from the Saint-Venant equations for routing flood waves in prismatic channels having any cross-section shape, and using the Manning's friction law. The approach employed in the development of the method theoretically justifies the heuristic assumption made by McCarthy in 1938 in expressing the channel reach storage of the Muskingum method in terms of prism and wedge storages. The approach advocated in this paper also provides a solution to the mass conservation problem associated with the variable parameter Muskingum routing method, which has been a major issue in the hydrological literature for the last three decades. Moreover, the VPMM method enables the simultaneous computation of the stage hydrograph corresponding to a given inflow or routed discharge hydrograph. The verification of the methodology and the evaluation of its performance in routing floods in three different shapes of a hypothetical channels are presented by reproducing the corresponding numerical solutions of the Saint-Venant equations. The results are also compared with the corresponding results of the mass conservative variable parameter Muskingum-Cunge-Todini method proposed by Todini in 2007 with and without the inclusion of the correction introduced by Cappelaere in 1997 for diffusion.

  13. Implications of the X-Ray Variability for the Mass of MCG -6-30-15.

    PubMed

    Nowak; Chiang

    2000-03-01

    The bright Seyfert 1 galaxy MCG -6-30-15 shows large variability on a variety of timescales. We study the less, similar3 day timescale variability using a set of simultaneous archival observations that were obtained from the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) and the Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA). The RXTE observations span nearly 106 s and indicate that the X-ray Fourier power spectral density has an rms variability of 16%, is flat from approximately 10-6 to 10-5 Hz, and then steepens into a power law proportional to f-alpha with alpha greater, similar1. A further steepening to alpha approximately 2 occurs between 10-4 and 10-3 Hz. The shape and rms amplitude are comparable to what has been observed in NGC 5548 and Cyg X-1, albeit with break frequencies that differ by a factor of 10-2 and 104, respectively. If the break frequencies are indicative of the central black hole mass, then this mass may be as low as 106 M middle dot in circle. An upper limit of approximately 2 ks for the relative lag between the 0.5-2 keV ASCA band compared to the 8-15 keV RXTE band was also found. Again by analogy with NGC 5548 and Cyg X-1, this limit is consistent with a relatively low central black hole mass. PMID:10673403

  14. Stronger steerability criterion for more uncertain continuous-variable systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Priyanka; Pramanik, Tanumoy; Majumdar, A. S.

    2015-10-01

    We derive a fine-grained uncertainty relation for the measurement of two incompatible observables on a single quantum system of continuous variables, and show that continuous-variable systems are more uncertain than discrete-variable systems. Using the derived fine-grained uncertainty relation, we formulate a stronger steering criterion that is able to reveal the steerability of NOON states that has hitherto not been possible using other criteria. We further obtain a monogamy relation for our steering inequality which leads to an, in principle, improved lower bound on the secret key rate of a one-sided device independent quantum key distribution protocol for continuous variables.

  15. Stellar modelling of Spica, a high-mass spectroscopic binary with a β Cep variable primary component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkachenko, A.; Matthews, J. M.; Aerts, C.; Pavlovski, K.; Pápics, P. I.; Zwintz, K.; Cameron, C.; Walker, G. A. H.; Kuschnig, R.; Degroote, P.; Debosscher, J.; Moravveji, E.; Kolbas, V.; Guenther, D. B.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Rowe, J. F.; Rucinski, S. M.; Sasselov, D.; Weiss, W. W.

    2016-05-01

    Binary stars provide a valuable test of stellar structure and evolution, because the masses of the individual stellar components can be derived with high accuracy and in a model-independent way. In this work, we study Spica, an eccentric double-lined spectroscopic binary system with a β Cep type variable primary component. We use state-of-the-art modelling tools to determine accurate orbital elements of the binary system and atmospheric parameters of both stellar components. We interpret the short-period variability intrinsic to the primary component, detected on top of the orbital motion both in the photometric and spectroscopic data. The non-local thermodynamic equilibrium based spectrum analysis reveals two stars of similar atmospheric chemical composition consistent with the present-day cosmic abundance standard. The masses and radii of the stars are found to be 11.43 ± 1.15 M⊙ and 7.21 ± 0.75 M⊙, and 7.47 ± 0.54 R⊙ and 3.74 ± 0.53 R⊙ for the primary and secondary, respectively. We find the primary component to pulsate in three independent modes, of which one is identified as a radial mode, while the two others are found to be non-radial, low degree l modes. The frequency of one of these modes is an exact multiple of the orbital frequency, and the l = m = 2 mode identification suggests a tidal nature for this particular mode. We find a very good agreement between the derived dynamical and evolutionary masses for the Spica system to within the observational errors of the measured masses. The age of the system is estimated to be 12.5 ± 1 Myr.

  16. Mass spectrometer vacuum housing and pumping system

    DOEpatents

    Coutts, G.W.; Bushman, J.F.; Alger, T.W.

    1996-07-23

    A vacuum housing and pumping system is described for a portable gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS). The vacuum housing section of the system has minimum weight for portability while designed and constructed to utilize metal gasket sealed stainless steel to be compatible with high vacuum operation. The vacuum pumping section of the system consists of a sorption (getter) pump to remove atmospheric leakage and outgassing contaminants as well as the gas chromatograph carrier gas (hydrogen) and an ion pump to remove the argon from atmospheric leaks. The overall GC/MS system has broad application to contaminants, hazardous materials, illegal drugs, pollution monitoring, etc., as well as for use by chemical weapon treaty verification teams, due to the light weight and portability thereof. 7 figs.

  17. Mass spectrometer vacuum housing and pumping system

    DOEpatents

    Coutts, Gerald W.; Bushman, John F.; Alger, Terry W.

    1996-01-01

    A vacuum housing and pumping system for a portable gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS). The vacuum housing section of the system has minimum weight for portability while designed and constructed to utilize metal gasket sealed stainless steel to be compatible with high vacuum operation. The vacuum pumping section of the system consists of a sorption (getter) pump to remove atmospheric leakage and outgassing contaminants as well as the gas chromatograph carrier gas (hydrogen) and an ion pump to remove the argon from atmospheric leaks. The overall GC/MS system has broad application to contaminants, hazardous materials, illegal drugs, pollution monitoring, etc., as well as for use by chemical weapon treaty verification teams, due to the light weight and portability thereof.

  18. Mass Properties for Space Systems Standards Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beech, Geoffrey

    2013-01-01

    Current Verbiage in S-120 Applies to Dry Mass. Mass Margin is difference between Required Mass and Predicted Mass. Performance Margin is difference between Predicted Performance and Required Performance. Performance estimates and corresponding margin should be based on Predicted Mass (and other inputs). Contractor Mass Margin reserved from Performance Margin. Remaining performance margin allocated according to mass partials. Compliance can be evaluated effectively by comparison of three areas (preferably on a single sheet). Basic and Predicted Mass (including historical trend). Aggregate potential changes (threats and opportunities) which gives Mass Forecast. Mass Maturity by category (Estimated/Calculated/Actual).

  19. Characterizing spatial and temporal variability of dissolved gases in aquatic environments with in situ mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Camilli, Richard; Duryea, Anthony N

    2009-07-01

    The TETHYS mass spectrometer is intended for long-term in situ observation of dissolved gases and volatile organic compounds in aquatic environments. Its design maintains excellent low mass range sensitivity and stability during long-term operations, enabling characterization of low-frequency variability in many trace dissolved gases. Results are presented from laboratory trials and a 300-h in situ trial in a shallow marine embayment in Massachusetts, U.S.A. This time series consists of over 15000 sample measurements and represents the longest continuous record made by an in situ mass spectrometer in an aquatic environment. These measurements possess sufficient sampling density and duration to apply frequency analysis techniques for study of temporal variability in dissolved gases. Results reveal correlations with specific environmental periodicities. Numerical methods are presented for converting mass spectrometer ion peak ratios to absolute-scale dissolved gas concentrations across wide temperature regimes irrespective of ambient pressure, during vertical water column profiles in a hypoxic deep marine basin off the coast of California, U.S.A. Dissolved oxygen concentration values obtained with the TETHYS instrument indicate close correlation with polarographic oxygen sensor data across the entire depth range. These methods and technology enable observation of aquatic environmental chemical distributions and dynamics at appropriate scales of resolution. PMID:19673300

  20. Mass and Reliability System (MaRS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The Safety and Mission Assurance (S&MA) Directorate is responsible for mitigating risk, providing system safety, and lowering risk for space programs from ground to space. The S&MA is divided into 4 divisions: The Space Exploration Division (NC), the International Space Station Division (NE), the Safety & Test Operations Division (NS), and the Quality and Flight Equipment Division (NT). The interns, myself and Arun Aruljothi, will be working with the Risk & Reliability Analysis Branch under the NC Division's. The mission of this division is to identify, characterize, diminish, and communicate risk by implementing an efficient and effective assurance model. The team utilizes Reliability and Maintainability (R&M) and Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) to ensure decisions concerning risks are informed, vehicles are safe and reliable, and program/project requirements are realistic and realized. This project pertains to the Orion mission, so it is geared toward a long duration Human Space Flight Program(s). For space missions, payload is a critical concept; balancing what hardware can be replaced by components verse by Orbital Replacement Units (ORU) or subassemblies is key. For this effort a database was created that combines mass and reliability data, called Mass and Reliability System or MaRS. The U.S. International Space Station (ISS) components are used as reference parts in the MaRS database. Using ISS components as a platform is beneficial because of the historical context and the environment similarities to a space flight mission. MaRS uses a combination of systems: International Space Station PART for failure data, Vehicle Master Database (VMDB) for ORU & components, Maintenance & Analysis Data Set (MADS) for operation hours and other pertinent data, & Hardware History Retrieval System (HHRS) for unit weights. MaRS is populated using a Visual Basic Application. Once populated, the excel spreadsheet is comprised of information on ISS components including

  1. High Temperature Variable Conductance Heat Pipes for Radioisotope Stirling Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tarau, Calin; Walker, Kara L.; Anderson, William G.

    2009-03-16

    In a Stirling radioisotope system, heat must continually be removed from the GPHS modules, to maintain the GPHS modules and surrounding insulation at acceptable temperatures. Normally, the Stirling converter provides this cooling. If the Stirling engine stops in the current system, the insulation is designed to spoil, preventing damage to the GPHS, but also ending the mission. An alkali-metal Variable Conductance Heat Pipe (VCHP) is under development to allow multiple stops and restarts of the Stirling engine. The status of the ongoing effort in developing this technology is presented in this paper. An earlier, preliminary design had a radiator outside the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) casing, used NaK as the working fluid, and had the reservoir located on the cold side adapter flange. The revised design has an internal radiator inside the casing, with the reservoir embedded inside the insulation. A large set of advantages are offered by this new design. In addition to reducing the overall size and mass of the VCHP, simplicity, compactness and easiness in assembling the VCHP with the ASRG are significantly enhanced. Also, the permanently elevated temperatures of the entire VCHP allows the change of the working fluid from a binary compound (NaK) to single compound (Na). The latter, by its properties, allows higher performance and further mass reduction of the system. Preliminary design and analysis shows an acceptable peak temperature of the ASRG case of 140 deg. C while the heat losses caused by the addition of the VCHP are 1.8 W.

  2. High Temperature Variable Conductance Heat Pipes for Radioisotope Stirling Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarau, Calin; Walker, Kara L.; Anderson, William G.

    2009-03-01

    In a Stirling radioisotope system, heat must continually be removed from the GPHS modules, to maintain the GPHS modules and surrounding insulation at acceptable temperatures. Normally, the Stirling converter provides this cooling. If the Stirling engine stops in the current system, the insulation is designed to spoil, preventing damage to the GPHS, but also ending the mission. An alkali-metal Variable Conductance Heat Pipe (VCHP) is under development to allow multiple stops and restarts of the Stirling engine. The status of the ongoing effort in developing this technology is presented in this paper. An earlier, preliminary design had a radiator outside the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) casing, used NaK as the working fluid, and had the reservoir located on the cold side adapter flange. The revised design has an internal radiator inside the casing, with the reservoir embedded inside the insulation. A large set of advantages are offered by this new design. In addition to reducing the overall size and mass of the VCHP, simplicity, compactness and easiness in assembling the VCHP with the ASRG are significantly enhanced. Also, the permanently elevated temperatures of the entire VCHP allows the change of the working fluid from a binary compound (NaK) to single compound (Na). The latter, by its properties, allows higher performance and further mass reduction of the system. Preliminary design and analysis shows an acceptable peak temperature of the ASRG case of 140° C while the heat losses caused by the addition of the VCHP are 1.8 W.

  3. A NEW SAMPLE OF CANDIDATE INTERMEDIATE-MASS BLACK HOLES SELECTED BY X-RAY VARIABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Kamizasa, Naoya; Terashima, Yuichi; Awaki, Hisamitsu

    2012-05-20

    We present the results of X-ray variability and spectral analysis of a sample of 15 new candidates for active galactic nuclei with relatively low-mass black holes (BHs). They are selected from the Second XMM-Newton Serendipitous Source Catalogue based on strong variability quantified by normalized excess variances. Their BH masses are estimated to be (1.1-6.6) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} M{sub Sun} by using a correlation between excess variance and BH mass. Seven sources have estimated BH masses smaller than 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} M{sub Sun }, which are in the range for intermediate-mass black holes. Eddington ratios of sources with known redshifts range from 0.07 to 0.46 and the mean Eddington ratio is 0.24. These results imply that some of our sources are growing supermassive black holes, which are expected to have relatively low masses with high Eddington ratios. X-ray photon indices of the 15 sources are in the range of Almost-Equal-To 0.57-2.57 and 5 among them have steep (>2) photon indices, which are the range for narrow-line Seyfert 1s. Soft X-ray excess is seen in 12 sources and is expressed by a blackbody model with kT Almost-Equal-To 83-294 eV. We derive a correlation between X-ray photon indices and Eddington ratios, and find that the X-ray photon indices of about a half of our sources are flatter than the positive correlation suggested previously.

  4. Variability in young very low mass stars: two surprises from spectrophotometric monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozhinova, I.; Scholz, A.; Eislöffel, J.

    2016-05-01

    We present simultaneous photometric and spectroscopic observations of seven young and highly variable M dwarfs in star-forming regions in Orion, conducted in four observing nights with FOcal Reducer and low dispersion Spectrograph2 at European Southern Observatory/VLT. All seven targets show significant photometric variability in the I band, with amplitudes between 0.1-0.8 mag, The spectra, however, remain remarkably constant, with spectral type changes less than 0.5 subtypes. Thus, the brightness changes are not caused by veiling that `fills in' absorption features. Three objects in the σ Ori cluster (age ˜3 Myr) exhibit strong Hα emission and Hα variability, in addition to the continuum variations. Their behaviour is mostly consistent with the presence of spots with temperature of ˜300 K above the photosphere and filling factors between 0.2-0.4, in contrast to typical hotspots observed in more massive stars. The remaining targets near ɛ Ori, likely to be older, show eclipse-like light curves, no significant Hα activity and are better represented by variable extinction due to circumstellar material. Interestingly, two of them show no evidence of infrared excess emission. Our study shows that high-amplitude variability in young very low mass stars can be caused by different phenomena than in more massive T Tauri stars and can persist when the disc has disappeared and accretion has ceased.

  5. The Properties of Low-Luminosity AGN: Variability, Accretion Rate, Black Hole Mass and Color

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oleas, Juan; Podjed, Stephanie; Sarajedini, Vicki

    2016-01-01

    We present the results from a study of ~5000 Broad-Line selected AGN from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7. Galaxy and AGN templates have been fit to the SDSS spectra to isolate the AGN component. The sources have absolute magnitudes in the range -23 < Mi < -18 and lie at redshifts less than z ~ 0.8. A variability analysis reveals that the anti-correlation between luminosity and variability amplitude continues to the faintest AGN in our sample (Gallastegui-Aizpun & Sarajedini 2014), though the underlying cause of the relation is still poorly understood. To address this, we further explore the connection between AGN luminosity and variability through measurement of the Hβ line width to determine black hole mass and accretion rate. We find that AGN with the highest variability amplitudes at a given luminosity appear to have lower accretion rates compared to low amplitude variables. We also investigate correlations with AGN color and accretion rate among these low-luminosity AGN.

  6. Variable neural adaptive robust control: a switched system approach.

    PubMed

    Lian, Jianming; Hu, Jianghai; Żak, Stanislaw H

    2015-05-01

    Variable neural adaptive robust control strategies are proposed for the output tracking control of a class of multiinput multioutput uncertain systems. The controllers incorporate a novel variable-structure radial basis function (RBF) network as the self-organizing approximator for unknown system dynamics. It can determine the network structure online dynamically by adding or removing RBFs according to the tracking performance. The structure variation is systematically considered in the stability analysis of the closed-loop system using a switched system approach with the piecewise quadratic Lyapunov function. The performance of the proposed variable neural adaptive robust controllers is illustrated with simulations. PMID:25881366

  7. Variables Affecting Two Electron Transport System Assays

    PubMed Central

    Burton, G. Allen; Lanza, Guy R.

    1986-01-01

    Several methodological variables were critical in two commonly used electron transport activity assays. The dehydrogenase assay based on triphenyl formazan production exhibited a nonlinear relationship between formazan production (dehydrogenase activity) and sediment dilution, and linear formazan production occurred for 1 h in sediment slurries. Activity decreased with increased time of sediment storage at 4°C. Extraction efficiencies of formazan from sediment varied with alcohol type; methanol was unsatisfactory. Phosphate buffer (0.06 M) produced higher activity than did either U.S. Environmental Protection Agency reconstituted hard water or Tris buffer sediment diluents. Intracellular formazan crystals were dissolved within minutes when in contact with immersion oil. Greater crystal production (respiration) detected by a tetrazolium salt assay occurred at increased substrate concentrations. Test diluents containing macrophyte exudates produced greater activity than did phosphate buffer, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency water, or ultrapure water diluents. Both assays showed decreases in sediment or bacterial activity through time. PMID:16347067

  8. Surface Time-Variable Gravity Signals and Possible Sources Including Core Mass Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Benjamin F.; Kuang, Weijia

    2003-01-01

    Over two decades of geodetic satellite-laser-ranging (SLR) data show that the variation of the Earth's oblateness parameter J2 has a clear seasonal signal of amplitude of about 3e-10 and a secular decrease of about -2.8e-11/year, superimposed on some interesting interannual fluctuations. Physically, any change in mass distribution or/inside the Earth will be reflected in the time-variable gravity signal obtained outside the Earth, according to Newton s gravitational law. Therefore, such signal contains contributions from all geophysical sources that redistribute mass, on all temporal and spatial scales, including those from the core. Besides Earth rotation and geomagnetic field variations, the time-variable gravity also contains information linking Earth surface observations with internal core dynamical processes. The time scales of the gravity signal are critical in helping differentiate different contributions. The atmosphere and hydrosphere are responsible for the seasonal and much of the interannual and intraseasoanl fluctuations, while the secular trend is due mainly to the post-glacial rebound but possibly core mass flow. To estimate the latter effect, we use our MoSST (Modular, Scalable, Self-consistent, Three-dimensional) core dynamics model to forward simulate the core flow, and density variation due to the core convection. Our results suggest that, when upward continued to the surface, the J2 component of the core mass redistribution can reach an overall amplitude of e-11/year, approaching the SLR detectability and significant in geophysical terms. We also find a general westward drift of the mass flow, with a speed comparable to that of the geomagnetic westward drift.

  9. Greenland Ice Sheet seasonal and spatial mass variability from model simulations and GRACE (2003-2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Patrick M.; Tedesco, Marco; Schlegel, Nicole-Jeanne; Luthcke, Scott B.; Fettweis, Xavier; Larour, Eric

    2016-06-01

    Improving the ability of regional climate models (RCMs) and ice sheet models (ISMs) to simulate spatiotemporal variations in the mass of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) is crucial for prediction of future sea level rise. While several studies have examined recent trends in GrIS mass loss, studies focusing on mass variations at sub-annual and sub-basin-wide scales are still lacking. At these scales, processes responsible for mass change are less well understood and modeled, and could potentially play an important role in future GrIS mass change. Here, we examine spatiotemporal variations in mass over the GrIS derived from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites for the January 2003-December 2012 period using a "mascon" approach, with a nominal spatial resolution of 100 km, and a temporal resolution of 10 days. We compare GRACE-estimated mass variations against those simulated by the Modèle Atmosphérique Régionale (MAR) RCM and the Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM). In order to properly compare spatial and temporal variations in GrIS mass from GRACE with model outputs, we find it necessary to spatially and temporally filter model results to reproduce leakage of mass inherent in the GRACE solution. Both modeled and satellite-derived results point to a decline (of -178.9 ± 4.4 and -239.4 ± 7.7 Gt yr-1 respectively) in GrIS mass over the period examined, but the models appear to underestimate the rate of mass loss, especially in areas below 2000 m in elevation, where the majority of recent GrIS mass loss is occurring. On an ice-sheet-wide scale, the timing of the modeled seasonal cycle of cumulative mass (driven by summer mass loss) agrees with the GRACE-derived seasonal cycle, within limits of uncertainty from the GRACE solution. However, on sub-ice-sheet-wide scales, some areas exhibit significant differences in the timing of peaks in the annual cycle of mass change. At these scales, model biases, or processes not accounted for by models related

  10. Predicting and Disentangling Stellar Variability in Quiet Stars: Implications for Low-mass Planet Confirmation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cegla, Heather; Watson, Chris; Stassun, Keivan; Shelyag, Sergiy; Mathioudakis, Mihalis; Bastien, Fabienne; Pepper, Josh

    2015-08-01

    Stellar variability is one of the main limiting factors in the detection and confirmation of low-mass planets. Even for magnetically quiet stars, astrophysical noise could be present at the 10m/s level. For these stars we demonstrate, using Kepler and GALEX data, that it may be possible to use photometric variability to predict the RV noise. Such a relationship creates a filtering mechanism to prioritize planetary candidates in transit surveys that are ideal for RV follow-up. Going beyond this, we use 3D magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) simulations to create Sun-as-a-star observations, focusing on stellar surface magneto-convection. Using these model observations we have identified correlations between the stellar line shape, brightness, and RV variability. We demonstrate that photometric observations may be key in disentangling stellar and planetary induced RV signals. Disentangling these signals allows us to reach the 10 cm/s noise level in our model star, indicating significant promise for the confirmation of low-mass planet candidates in the future.

  11. Has Natural Variability Masked the Expected Increase in Antarctic Surface Mass Balance with Global Warming?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Previdi, Michael; Polvani, Lorenzo M.

    2016-04-01

    One of the expected and rather paradoxical consequences of anthropogenic global warming is an increase in Antarctic surface mass balance (or net snow accumulation), as robustly simulated by both global and regional climate models. This surface mass balance (SMB) increase occurs because the higher moisture content of a warmer atmosphere leads to increases in precipitation, with this precipitation falling in the form of snow over Antarctica. Despite these robust model projections, however, observations indicate that there has been no significant change in Antarctic SMB during the past several decades. Here, we show that this apparent discrepancy between models and observations can be explained by the fact that the anthropogenic climate change signal is still relatively small compared to the noise associated with natural climate variability. Using an ensemble of 35 global coupled climate models to separate signal and noise, we find that the forced SMB increase due to global warming in recent decades is unlikely to be detectable in a statistical sense as a result of large natural SMB variability on interannual-to-multidecadal timescales. However, our analysis reveals that if the world continues to follow the present trajectory of greenhouse gas emissions, the anthropogenic impact on Antarctic SMB will emerge from natural variability by the middle of the current century. With this, SMB increases over Antarctica will begin to mitigate global sea-level rise, partially offsetting the effects of dynamic ice loss.

  12. Variable Conductance Heat Pipes for Radioisotope Stirling Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, William G.; Tarau, Calin

    2008-01-01

    In a Stirling radioisotope system, heat must continually be removed from the GPHS modules, to maintain the GPHS modules and surrounding insulation at acceptable temperatures. Normally, the Stirling convertor provides this cooling. If the Stirling engine stops in the current system, the insulation is designed to spoil, preventing damage to the GPHS, but also ending the mission. An alkali-metal Variable Conductance Heat Pipe (VCHP) was designed to allow multiple stops and restarts of the Stirling engine. A VCHP turns on with a delta T of 30 C, which is high enough to not risk standard ASRG operation but low enough to save most heater head life. This VCHP has a low mass, and low thermal losses for normal operation. In addition to the design, a proof-of-concept NaK VCHP was fabricated and tested. While NaK is normally not used in heat pipes, it has an advantage in that it is liquid at the reservoir operating temperature, while Na or K alone would freeze. The VCHP had two condensers, one simulating the heater head, and the other simulating the radiator. The experiments successfully demonstrated operation with the simulated heater head condenser off and on, while allowing the reservoir temperature to vary over 40 to 120 C, the maximum range expected. In agreement with previous NaK heat pipe tests, the evaporator delta T was roughly 70 C, due to distillation of the NaK in the evaporator.

  13. Evaluation of Small Mass Spectrometer Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arkin, C. Richard; Griffin, Timothy P.; Ottens, Andrew K.; Diaz, Jorge A.; Follistein, Duke W.; Adams, Fredrick W.; Helms, William R.; Voska, N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This work is aimed at understanding the aspects of designing a miniature mass spectrometer (MS) system. A multitude of commercial and government sectors, such as the military, environmental agencies and industrial manufacturers of semiconductors, refrigerants, and petroleum products, would find a small, portable, rugged and reliable MS system beneficial. Several types of small MS systems are evaluated and discussed, including linear quadrupole, quadrupole ion trap, time of flight and sector. The performance of each system in terms of accuracy, precision, limits of detection, response time, recovery time, scan rate, volume and weight is assessed. A performance scale is setup to rank each systems and an overall performance score is given to each system. All experiments involved the analysis of hydrogen, helium, oxygen and argon in a nitrogen background with the concentrations of the components of interest ranging from 0-5000 part-per-million (ppm). The relative accuracies of the systems vary from < 1% to approx. 40% with an average below 10%. Relative precisions varied from 1% to 20%, with an average below 5%. The detection limits had a large distribution, ranging from 0.2 to 170 ppm. The systems had a diverse response time ranging from 4 s to 210 s as did the recovery time with a 6 s to 210 s distribution. Most instruments had scan times near, 1 s, however one instrument exceeded 13 s. System weights varied from 9 to 52 kg and sizes from 15 x 10(exp 3)cu cm to 110 x 10(exp 3) cu cm.

  14. Surface Mass Balance of the Greenland Ice Sheet: Connections to Mechanisms of Climate Variability on Decadal to Centennial Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andres, H.; Peltier, W. R.

    2011-12-01

    The role of natural forcing in generating variability in the surface mass balance of the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) remains unclear. Furthermore, mass variations in the GrIS over the past several centuries are poorly constrained. Until the impact of natural climate variations is better understood, it will be difficult to isolate the role anthropogenic greenhouse gases have had on GrIS-induced sea level rise, and to make predictions of GrIS changes in the future. To begin to address these issues, we have performed a suite of global, atmosphere-ocean general circulation model simulations of the past millennium. These runs are long enough to establish the connection between Arctic climate conditions and surface mass balance changes over the Greenland ice sheet over a wide range of timescales. We have created five historical simulations from years 850 to 2000 using the Community Climate System Model 3 and boundary conditions consistent with the Paleoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project Phase 3. Over this preindustrial period, we have examined how average temperatures and total precipitation over regions of the GrIS varied with Arctic sea ice extent, NAO/NAM, Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation, Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation, ENSO, volcanic aerosol loading, and total solar irradiance changes. Overall, we find that variations on timescales longer than 30 years correlate well with several of these sources of climate variability, and that variations on shorter timescales are less well-connected. We also find that there are clear regional differences in the temperature and precipitation responses. Thus, in this presentation we focus on the sources of climate variability that we find to be most important to Greenland regional temperatures and precipitation in our suite of millennium simulations. Finally, we extended these simulations into the future using representative concentration pathways from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5. We

  15. Variable emissivity laser thermal control system

    DOEpatents

    Milner, Joseph R.

    1994-01-01

    A laser thermal control system for a metal vapor laser maintains the wall mperature of the laser at a desired level by changing the effective emissivity of the water cooling jacket. This capability increases the overall efficiency of the laser.

  16. A variable-collimation display system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batchko, Robert; Robinson, Sam; Schmidt, Jack; Graniela, Benito

    2014-03-01

    Two important human depth cues are accommodation and vergence. Normally, the eyes accommodate and converge or diverge in tandem; changes in viewing distance cause the eyes to simultaneously adjust both focus and orientation. However, ambiguity between accommodation and vergence cues is a well-known limitation in many stereoscopic display technologies. This limitation also arises in state-of-the-art full-flight simulator displays. In current full-flight simulators, the out-the-window (OTW) display (i.e., the front cockpit window display) employs a fixed collimated display technology which allows the pilot and copilot to perceive the OTW training scene without angular errors or distortions; however, accommodation and vergence cues are limited to fixed ranges (e.g., ~ 20 m). While this approach works well for long-range, the ambiguity of depth cues at shorter range hinders the pilot's ability to gauge distances in critical maneuvers such as vertical take-off and landing (VTOL). This is the first in a series of papers on a novel, variable-collimation display (VCD) technology that is being developed under NAVY SBIR Topic N121-041 funding. The proposed VCD will integrate with rotary-wing and vertical take-off and landing simulators and provide accurate accommodation and vergence cues for distances ranging from approximately 3 m outside the chin window to ~ 20 m. A display that offers dynamic accommodation and vergence could improve pilot safety and training, and impact other applications presently limited by lack of these depth cues.

  17. Control system for a continuously variable transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Vahabzadeh, H.

    1986-08-26

    A hydraulic control is described for a continuously variable transmission having hydraulically adjustable axially movable pulley members and a gearing arrangement for the transmitting of torque between an input shaft and a output shaft. The control consists of: a source of fluid pressure; first valve means connected with the source and being operable to supply control fluid to one of the first valve means to impose a force thereon; feedback means for imposing a force proportional to the axial position of the one adjustable pulley member on the first valve means in addition to the control fluid imposed force; torque sensing means operatively connected with the gearing arrangement for transmitting a force proportional to the torque transmitted by the gearing arrangement; servo motor means operatively connected with the torque sensing means; second valve means connected with the torque sensing means and being operable on a change of torque transmission to distribute a pressure signal from the source to the servo motor means and the servo motor means being responsive to the pressure fluid to balance the force on the torque to balance the force on the torque sensing means and discontinue fluid distribution thereto; and means for directing the pressure signal from the second valve means to the first valve means.

  18. FTO genotype is associated with phenotypic variability of body mass index

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jian; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Powell, Joseph E.; Medland, Sarah E.; Speliotes, Elizabeth K.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Rose, Lynda M.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Mägi, Reedik; Waite, Lindsay; Smith, Albert Vernon; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M.; Monda, Keri L.; Hadley, David; Mahajan, Anubha; Li, Guo; Kapur, Karen; Vitart, Veronique; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Wang, Sophie R.; Palmer, Cameron; Esko, Tõnu; Fischer, Krista; Zhao, Jing Hua; Demirkan, Ayşe; Isaacs, Aaron; Feitosa, Mary F.; Luan, Jian’an; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; White, Charles; Jackson, Anne U.; Preuss, Michael; Ziegler, Andreas; Eriksson, Joel; Kutalik, Zoltán; Frau, Francesca; Nolte, Ilja M.; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Verweij, Niek; Goel, Anuj; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Estrada, Karol; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer Lynn; Sanna, Serena; Sidore, Carlo; Tyrer, Jonathan; Teumer, Alexander; Prokopenko, Inga; Mangino, Massimo; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Hui, Jennie; Beilby, John P.; McArdle, Wendy L.; Hall, Per; Haritunians, Talin; Zgaga, Lina; Kolcic, Ivana; Polasek, Ozren; Zemunik, Tatijana; Oostra, Ben A.; Junttila, M. Juhani; Grönberg, Henrik; Schreiber, Stefan; Peters, Annette; Hicks, Andrew A.; Stephens, Jonathan; Foad, Nicola S.; Laitinen, Jaana; Pouta, Anneli; Kaakinen, Marika; Willemsen, Gonneke; Vink, Jacqueline M.; Wild, Sarah H.; Navis, Gerjan; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Homuth, Georg; John, Ulrich; Iribarren, Carlos; Harris, Tamara; Launer, Lenore; Gudnason, Vilmundur; O’Connell, Jeffrey R.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Cadby, Gemma; Palmer, Lyle J.; James, Alan L.; Musk, Arthur W.; Ingelsson, Erik; Psaty, Bruce M.; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Waeber, Gerard; Vollenweider, Peter; Hayward, Caroline; Wright, Alan F.; Rudan, Igor; Groop, Leif C.; Metspalu, Andres; Khaw, Kay Tee; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Province, Michael A.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Huikuri, Heikki V.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Atwood, Larry D.; Fox, Caroline S.; Boehnke, Michael; Collins, Francis S.; Mohlke, Karen L.; Erdmann, Jeanette; Schunkert, Heribert; Hengstenberg, Christian; Stark, Klaus; Lorentzon, Mattias; Ohlsson, Claes; Cusi, Daniele; Staessen, Jan A.; Van der Klauw, Melanie M.; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Jolley, Jennifer D.; Ripatti, Samuli; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Penninx, Brenda; Wilson, James F.; Campbell, Harry; Chanock, Stephen J.; van der Harst, Pim; Hamsten, Anders; Watkins, Hugh; Hofman, Albert; Witteman, Jacqueline C.; Zillikens, M. Carola; Uitterlinden, André G.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Zillikens, M. Carola; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Vermeulen, Sita H.; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Schlessinger, David; Schipf, Sabine; Stumvoll, Michael; Tönjes, Anke; Spector, Tim D.; North, Kari E.; Lettre, Guillaume; McCarthy, Mark I.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Heath, Andrew C.; Madden, Pamela A. F.; Nyholt, Dale R.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Martin, Nicholas G.; McKnight, Barbara; Strachan, David P.; Hill, William G.; Snieder, Harold; Ridker, Paul M.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Stefansson, Kari; Frayling, Timothy M.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Goddard, Michael E.; Visscher, Peter M.

    2013-01-01

    There is evidence across several species for genetic control of phenotypic variation of complex traits1–4, such that the variance among phenotypes is genotype dependent. Understanding genetic control of variability is important in evolutionary biology, agricultural selection programmes and human medicine, yet for complex traits, no individual genetic variants associated with variance, as opposed to the mean, have been identified. Here we perform a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of phenotypic variation using 170,000 samples on height and body mass index (BMI) in human populations. We report evidence that the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs7202116 at the FTO gene locus, which is known to be associated with obesity (as measured by mean BMI for each rs7202116 genotype)5–7, is also associated with phenotypic variability. We show that the results are not due to scale effects or other artefacts, and find no other experiment-wise significant evidence for effects on variability, either at loci other than FTO for BMI or at any locus for height. The difference in variance for BMI among individuals with opposite homozygous genotypes at the FTO locus is approximately 7%, corresponding to a difference of 0.5 kilograms in the standard deviation of weight. Our results indicate that genetic variants can be discovered that are associated with variability, and that between-person variability in obesity can partly be explained by the genotype at the FTO locus. The results are consistent with reported FTO by environment interactions for BMI8, possibly mediated by DNA methylation9,10. Our BMI results for other SNPs and our height results for all SNPs suggest that most genetic variants, including those that influence mean height or mean BMI, are not associated with phenotypic variance, or that their effects on variability are too small to detect even with samples sizes greater than 100,000. PMID:22982992

  19. Variability and mass loss in IA O-B-A supergiants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schild, R. E.; Garrison, R. F.; Hiltner, W. A.

    1983-01-01

    Recently completed catalogs of MK spectral types and UBV photometry of 1227 OB stars in the southern Milky Way have been analyzed to investigate brightness and color variability among the Ia supergiants. It is found that brightness variability is common among the O9-B1 supergiants with typical amplitudes about 0.1 and time scales longer than a week and shorter than 1000 days. Among the A supergiants fluctuations in U-B color are found on similar time scales and with amplitude about 0.1. For many early Ia supergiants there is a poor correlation between Balmer jump and spectral type, as had been known previously. An attempt to correlate the Balmer jump deficiency with mass loss rate yielded uncertain results.

  20. Bubble mass center and fluid feedback force fluctuations activated by constant lateral impulse with variable thrust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Long, Y. T.

    1995-01-01

    Sloshing dynamics within a partially filled rotating dewar of superfluid helium 2 are investigated in response to constant lateral impulse with variable thrust. The study, including how the rotating bubble of superfluid helium 2 reacts to the constant impulse with variable time period of thrust action in microgravity, how amplitudes of bubble mass center fluctuates with growth and decay of disturbances, and how fluid feedback forces fluctuates in activating on the rotating dewar through the dynamics of sloshing waves are investigated. The numerical computation of sloshing dynamics is based on the non-inertial frame spacecraft bound coordinate with lateral impulses actuating on the rotating dewar in both inertial and non-inertial frames of thrust. Results of the simulations are illustrated.

  1. Mass balance and streamflow variability at Place Glacier, Canada, in relation to recent climate fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, R. D.; Demuth, M. N.

    2001-12-01

    Although a great deal of research has focused on the hydrologic effects of climate variability and change, relatively little research has examined the effects on streamflow of interactions between climate variability and change and resulting glacier response. Place Glacier, in the southern Coast Mountains of British Columbia, Canada, has been monitored for mass balance since 1965, and a stream gauge was operated just below the glacier terminus from 1969 to 1989. This paper presents analyses of the mass balance history and streamflow variations in relation to recorded climatic variability.Place Glacier's winter and net balances are correlated with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). Summer balance is positively correlated with summer temperature and negatively with the preceding winter balance, which enhances the effects of changes in winter balance on net balance. The well-documented post-1976 shift from the PDO cold phase to the present warm phase initiated a significant and persistent period of more negative net balance and terminal retreat. A reconstruction of net balance extending back to the 1890s, based on a regression with winter precipitation and summer temperature, displays decadal-scale fluctuations consistent with the PDO. Summer streamflow responded to interannual variations in winter snow accumulation and summer temperatures, which control the rate of rise of the glacier snowline and melt rates. After accounting for these influences via regression analysis, August streamflow displayed a negative trend in total runoff. Examination of air photographs and the reconstructed mass balance history suggest that significant firn depletion had occurred prior to 1965, such that the dominant effect of glacier changes was a reduction in ice area, resulting in decreased meltwater production.

  2. Error response test system and method using test mask variable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gender, Thomas K. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    An error response test system and method with increased functionality and improved performance is provided. The error response test system provides the ability to inject errors into the application under test to test the error response of the application under test in an automated and efficient manner. The error response system injects errors into the application through a test mask variable. The test mask variable is added to the application under test. During normal operation, the test mask variable is set to allow the application under test to operate normally. During testing, the error response test system can change the test mask variable to introduce an error into the application under test. The error response system can then monitor the application under test to determine whether the application has the correct response to the error.

  3. Variability of local PM10 mass concentrations in connection with blocking air circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ştefan, Sabina; Roman, Iuliana

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyze the temporal variability of Particulate Matter mass concentrations in connection with air circulation, for eight rural sites situated in the Central and Eastern parts of Europe. The stations from Poland, Hungary and Romania are rural stations without sources of pollutants. The analysis covers four winters, between December 2004 and February 2008. The pollution episodes were selected to explain air circulation influence. The results show that the causes of pollution were local, due to high mean sea level pressure and the blocking, as air circulation on large scale, was dominant in the cases of enhanced pollution in the selected area.

  4. Southern Hemisphere water mass conversion linked with North Atlantic climate variability.

    PubMed

    Pahnke, Katharina; Zahn, Rainer

    2005-03-18

    Intermediate water variability at multicentennial scales is documented by 340,000-year-long isotope time series from bottom-dwelling foraminifers at a mid-depth core site in the southwest Pacific. Periods of sudden increases in intermediate water production are linked with transient Southern Hemisphere warm episodes, which implies direct control of climate warming on intermediate water conversion at high southern latitudes. Coincidence with episodes of climate cooling and minimum or halted deepwater convection in the North Atlantic provides striking evidence for interdependence of water mass conversion in both hemispheres, with implications for interhemispheric forcing of ocean thermohaline circulation and climate instability. PMID:15774752

  5. Applications of internal translating mass technologies to smart weapons systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Jonathan

    The field of guided projectile research has continually grown over the past several decades. Guided projectiles, typically encompassing bullets, mortars, and artillery shells, incorporate some sort of guidance and control mechanism to generate trajectory alterations. This serves to increase accuracy and decrease collateral damage. Control mechanisms for smart weapons must be able to withstand extreme acceleration loads at launch while remaining simple to reduce cost and enhance reliability. Controllable internal moving masses can be incorporated into the design of smart weapons as a mechanism to directly apply control force, to actively alter static stability in flight, and to protect sensitive components within sensor packages. This dissertation examined techniques for using internal translating masses (ITM's) for smart weapon flight control. It was first shown that oscillating a mass orthogonal to the projectile axis of symmetry generates reasonable control force in statically-stable rounds. Trade studies examined the impact of mass size, mass offset from the center of gravity, and reductions in static stability on control authority. A more detailed analysis followed in which a physical internal translating mass control mechanism was designed that minimizes force and power required using a vibrating beam as the internal moving mass. Results showed that this relatively simple mechanism provides adequate control authority while requiring low on-board power. Trade studies revealed the affect of varying beam lengths, stiffness, and damping properties. Then, the topic of static margin control through mass center modification was explored. This is accomplished by translating a mass in flight along the projectile axis of symmetry. Results showed that this system allows for greater control authority and reduced throw-off error at launch. Finally, a nonlinear sliding mode controller was designed for a projectile equipped with an internal moving mass as well as for a

  6. The Barents Sea frontal zones and water masses variability (1980-2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oziel, L.; Sirven, J.; Gascard, J.-C.

    2016-01-01

    The polar front separates the warm and saline Atlantic Water entering the southern Barents Sea from the cold and fresh Arctic Water located in the north. These water masses can mix together (mainly in the center of the Barents Sea), be cooled by the atmosphere and receive salt because of brine release; these processes generate dense water in winter, which then cascades into the Arctic Ocean to form the Arctic Intermediate Water. To study the interannual variability and evolution of the frontal zones and the corresponding variations of the water masses, we have merged data from the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea and the Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute and have built a new database, which covers the 1980-2011 period. The summer data were interpolated on a regular grid. A probability density function is used to show that the polar front splits into two branches east of 32° E where the topographic constraint weakens. Two fronts can then be identified: the Northern Front is associated with strong salinity gradients and the Southern Front with temperature gradients. Both fronts enclose the denser Barents Sea Water. The interannual variability of the water masses is apparent in the observed data and is linked to that of the ice cover. The frontal zones variability is found by using data from a general circulation model. The link with the atmospheric variability, represented here by the Arctic Oscillation, is not clear. However, model results suggest that such a link could be validated if winter data were taken into account. A strong trend appears: the Atlantic Water (Arctic Water) occupies a larger (smaller) volume of the Barents Sea. This trend amplifies during the last decade and the model study suggests that this could be accompanied by a northwards displacement of the Southern Front in the eastern part of the Barents Sea. The results are less clear for the Northern Front. The observations show that the volume of the Barents Sea Water

  7. Variable emissivity laser thermal control system

    DOEpatents

    Milner, J.R.

    1994-10-25

    A laser thermal control system for a metal vapor laser maintains the wall temperature of the laser at a desired level by changing the effective emissivity of the water cooling jacket. This capability increases the overall efficiency of the laser. 8 figs.

  8. Spatial variability of hailfalls in France: an analysis of air mass retro-trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermida, Lucía; Merino, Andrés; Sánchez, José Luis; Berthet, Claude; Dessens, Jean; López, Laura; Fernández-González, Sergio; Gascón, Estíbaliz; García-Ortega, Eduardo

    2014-05-01

    Hail is the main meteorological risk in south-west France, with the strongest hailfalls being concentrated in just a few days. Specifically, this phenomenon occurs most often and with the greatest severity in the Midi-Pyrénées area. Previous studies have revealed the high spatial variability of hailfall in this part of France, even leading to different characteristics being recorded on hailpads that were relatively close together. For this reason, an analysis of the air mass trajectories was carried out at ground level and at altitude, which subsequently led to the formation of the hail recorded by these hailpads. It is already known that in the study zone, the trajectories of the storms usually stretch for long distances and are oriented towards the east, leading to hailstones with diameters in excess of 3 cm, and without any change in direction above 3 km. We analysed different days with hail precipitation where there was at least one stone with a diameter of 3 cm or larger. Using the simulations from these days, an analysis of the backward trajectories of the air masses was carried out. We used the HYSPLIT (Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory Model) to determine the origin of the air masses, and tracked them toward each of the hailpads that were hit during the day studied. The height of the final points was the height of the impacted hailpads. Similarly, the backward trajectories for different heights were also established. Finally, the results show how storms that affect neighbouring hailpads come from very different air masses; and provide a deeper understanding of the high variability that affects the characteristics of hailfalls. Acknowledgements The authors would like to thank the Regional Government of Castile-León for its financial support through the project LE220A11-2. This study was supported by the following grants: GRANIMETRO (CGL2010-15930); MICROMETEO (IPT-310000-2010-22).

  9. Greenland Ice Sheet seasonal and spatial mass variability from model simulations and GRACE (2003-2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, P. M.; Tedesco, M.; Schlegel, N.-J.; Luthcke, S. B.; Fettweis, X.; Larour, E.

    2015-11-01

    Improving the ability of regional climate models (RCMs) and ice sheet models (ISMs) to simulate spatiotemporal variations in the mass of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) is crucial for prediction of future sea level rise. While several studies have examined recent trends in GrIS mass loss, studies focusing on mass variations at sub-annual and sub-basin-wide scales are still lacking. Here, we examine spatiotemporal variations in mass over the GrIS derived from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites for the 2003-2012 period using a "mascon" approach, with a nominal spatial resolution of 100 km, and a temporal resolution of 10 days. We compare GRACE-estimated mass variations against those simulated by the Modèle Atmosphérique Régionale (MAR) RCM and the Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM). In order to properly compare spatial and temporal variations in GrIS mass from GRACE with model outputs, we find it necessary to spatially and temporally filter model results to reproduce leakage of mass inherent in the GRACE solution. Both modeled and satellite-derived results point to a decline (of -179 and -240 Gt yr-1 respectively) in GrIS mass over the period examined, but the models appear to underestimate the rate of mass loss, especially in areas below 2000 m in elevation, where the majority of recent GrIS mass loss is occurring. On an ice-sheet wide scale, the timing of the modeled seasonal cycle of cumulative mass (driven by summer mass loss) agrees with the GRACE-derived seasonal cycle, within limits of uncertainty from the GRACE solution. However, on sub-ice-sheet-wide scales, there are significant differences in the timing of peaks in the annual cycle of mass change. At these scales, model biases, or unaccounted-for processes related to ice dynamics or hydrology may lead to the observed differences. This highlights the need for further evaluation of modelled processes at regional and seasonal scales, and further study of ice sheet processes not

  10. Holonomic Quantum Control with Continuous Variable Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Victor V.; Shu, Chi; Krastanov, Stefan; Shen, Chao; Liu, Ren-Bao; Yang, Zhen-Biao; Schoelkopf, Robert J.; Mirrahimi, Mazyar; Devoret, Michel H.; Jiang, Liang

    2016-04-01

    Universal computation of a quantum system consisting of superpositions of well-separated coherent states of multiple harmonic oscillators can be achieved by three families of adiabatic holonomic gates. The first gate consists of moving a coherent state around a closed path in phase space, resulting in a relative Berry phase between that state and the other states. The second gate consists of "colliding" two coherent states of the same oscillator, resulting in coherent population transfer between them. The third gate is an effective controlled-phase gate on coherent states of two different oscillators. Such gates should be realizable via reservoir engineering of systems that support tunable nonlinearities, such as trapped ions and circuit QED.

  11. New RR Lyrae variables in binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajdu, G.; Catelan, M.; Jurcsik, J.; Dékány, I.; Drake, A. J.; Marquette, J.-B.

    2015-04-01

    Despite their importance, very few RR Lyrae (RRL) stars have been known to reside in binary systems. We report on a search for binary RRL in the OGLE-III Galactic bulge data. Our approach consists in the search for evidence of the light-travel time effect in so-called observed minus calculated (O-C) diagrams. Analysis of 1952 well-observed fundamental-mode RRL in the OGLE-III data revealed an initial sample of 29 candidates. We used the recently released OGLE-IV data to extend the baselines up to 17 yr, leading to a final sample of 12 firm binary candidates. We provide O-C diagrams and binary parameters for this final sample, and also discuss the properties of eight additional candidate binaries whose parameters cannot be firmly determined at present. We also estimate that ≳ 4 per cent of the RRL reside in binary systems.

  12. Modeling the Motion of an Increasing Mass System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunkel, William; Harrington, Randal

    2010-01-01

    Problems on the dynamics of changing mass systems often call for the more general form of Newton's second law Fnet = dp/dt. These problems usually involve situations where the mass of the system decreases, such as in rocket propulsion. In contrast, this experiment examines a system where the mass "increases" at a constant rate and the net force…

  13. Development of Variable Camber Continuous Trailing Edge Flap System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urnes, Jim, Sr.; Nguyen, Nhan T.; Dykman, John

    2012-01-01

    This presentation describes the current status of the joint NASA/Boeing collaboration on the development of a variable camber continuous trailing edge flap system for use in wing shaping control for cruise drag reduction.

  14. Variable Neural Adaptive Robust Control: A Switched System Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Lian, Jianming; Hu, Jianghai; Zak, Stanislaw H.

    2015-05-01

    Variable neural adaptive robust control strategies are proposed for the output tracking control of a class of multi-input multi-output uncertain systems. The controllers incorporate a variable-structure radial basis function (RBF) network as the self-organizing approximator for unknown system dynamics. The variable-structure RBF network solves the problem of structure determination associated with fixed-structure RBF networks. It can determine the network structure on-line dynamically by adding or removing radial basis functions according to the tracking performance. The structure variation is taken into account in the stability analysis of the closed-loop system using a switched system approach with the aid of the piecewise quadratic Lyapunov function. The performance of the proposed variable neural adaptive robust controllers is illustrated with simulations.

  15. Effects of Mass and Volume Fraction Skewness in Variable Density Mixing Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachtor, Adam J.; Bakosi, Jozsef; Ristorcelli, Raymond

    2015-11-01

    Among the parameters characterizing mixing by variable density turbulence of fluids involving density variations of a factor of 5 to 10 are the Atwood, Froude, Schmidt, and Reynolds numbers. There is evidence that the amount of each fluid present when the two pure fluids mix, as described by the probability density function of the mass or molar (volume) fraction, also strongly affects the mixing process. To investigate this phenomena, implicit large-eddy simulations (ILES) are performed for binary fluid mixtures in statistically homogenous environments under constant acceleration. These coarse grained simulations are used as data for theory validation and mix model development. ILES has been demonstrated to accurately capture the mixing behavior of a passive scalar field through stirring and advection by a turbulent velocity field. The present work advances that research and studies the extent to which an under-resolved active scalar drives the subsequent fluid motion and determines the nature of the mixing process. Effects of initial distributions of the mass and molar (volume) fraction probability density function on the resulting variable density turbulence and mixing are investigated and compared to direct numerical simulations from the Johns Hopkins Turbulence Database. Funded by the LANL LDRD-ER on ``Inserting Nonlinear N-Material Coupling PDF Information into Turbulent Mixing Models'' through exploratory research project number 20150498ER.

  16. Global Variability of Mesoscale Convective System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, J.; Houze, R. A., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) in the tropics produce extensive anvil clouds, which significantly affect the transfer of radiation. This study develops an objective method to identify MCSs and their anvils by combining data from three A-train satellite instruments: Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) for cloud-top size and coldness, Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) for rain area size and intensity, and CloudSat for horizontal and vertical dimensions of anvils. The authors distinguish three types of MCSs: small and large separated MCSs and connected MCSs. The latter are MCSs sharing a contiguous rain area. Mapping of the objectively identified MCSs shows patterns of MCSs that are consistent with previous studies of tropical convection, with separated MCSs dominant over Africa and the Amazon regions and connected MCSs favored over the warm pool of the Indian and west Pacific Oceans. By separating the anvil from the raining regions of MCSs, this study leads to quantitative global maps of anvil coverage. These maps are consistent with the MCS analysis, and they lay the foundation for estimating the global radiative effects of anvil clouds. CloudSat radar data show that the modal thickness of MCS anvils is about 4--5 km. Anvils are mostly confined to within 1.5--2 times the equivalent radii of the primary rain areas of the MCSs. Over the warm pool, they may extend out to about 5 times the rain area radii. The warm ocean MCSs tend to have thicker non-raining and lightly raining anvils near the edges of their actively raining regions, indicating that anvils are generated in and spread out from the primary raining regions of the MCSs. Thicker anvils are nearly absent over continental regions.

  17. Variable-Speed Wind System Design : Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Lauw, Hinan K.; Weigand, Claus H.; Marckx, Dallas A.; Electronic Power Conditioning, Inc.

    1993-10-01

    Almost from the onset of the development of wind energy conversion systems (WECS), it was known that variable-speed operation of the turbine would maximize energy capture. This study was commissioned to assess the cost, efficiency gain, reduction of the cost of energy (COE), and other operating implications of converting the existing hardware of a modern fixed-speed wind energy conversion system to variable-speed operation. The purpose of this study was to develop a preliminary design for the hardware required to allow variable-speed operation using a doubly-fed generator with an existing fixed-speed wind turbine design. The turbine selected for this study is the AWT-26 designed and built by Advanced Wind Turbines Inc. of Redmond, Washington. The lowest projected COE using this variable-speed generation system is projected to be $0.0499/kWh, compared to the lowest possible COE with fixed-speed generation which is projected to be $0.0546/kWh. This translates into a 8.6% reduction of the COE using this variable-speed generation option. The preliminary system design has advanced to where the printed circuit boards can be physically laid out based on the schematics and the system software can be written based on the control flow-charts. The core of hardware and software has been proven to be successful in earlier versions of VSG systems. The body of this report presents the results of the VSWG system development. Operation under normal and fault conditions is described in detail, the system performance for variable-speed operation is estimated and compared to the original fixed-speed system performance, and specifications for all system components (generator, power electronic converter, and system controller) are given. Costs for all components are estimated, and incremental system cost is compared to incremental energy production. Finally, operational features of the VSWG which are not available in the existing FSWG system are outlined.

  18. Luminous Blue Variables are Antisocial: Their Isolation Implies they are Kicked Mass Gainers in Binary Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tombleson, Ryan; Smith, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    Based on their relatively isolated environments, we argue that luminous blue variables (LBVs) must be primarily the product of binary evolution, challenging the traditional single-star view wherein LBVs mark a brief transition between massive O-type stars and Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars. If the latter were true, then LBVs should be concentrated in young massive clusters like early O-type stars. This is decidedly not the case. Examining locations of LBVs in our Galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds reveals that, with few exceptions, LBVs systematically avoid clusters of O-type stars. In the Large Magellanic Cloud, LBVs are statistically much more isolated than O-type stars, and (perhaps most surprisingly) even more isolated than WR stars. This makes it impossible for LBVs to be single 'massive stars in transition' to WR stars. Instead, we propose that massive stars and supernova (SN) subtypes are dominated by bifurcated evolutionary paths in interacting binaries, wherein most WR stars and SNe Ibc correspond to the mass donors, while LBVs (and their lower-mass analogs like B[e] supergiants, which are even more isolated) are the mass gainers. In this view, LBVs are evolved massive blue stragglers. Through binary mass transfer, rejuvinated mass gainers get enriched, spun up, and sometimes kicked far from their clustered birthsites by their companion's SN. This scenario agrees better with LBVs exploding as Type IIn SNe in isolation, and it predicts that many massive runaway stars may be rapid rotators. Mergers or Thorne-Zykow objects might also give rise to LBVs, but these scenarios may have a harder time explaining why LBVs avoid clusters.

  19. GRACE measurements of mass variability in the Earth system.

    PubMed

    Tapley, Byron D; Bettadpur, Srinivas; Ries, John C; Thompson, Paul F; Watkins, Michael M

    2004-07-23

    Monthly gravity field estimates made by the twin Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites have a geoid height accuracy of 2 to 3 millimeters at a spatial resolution as small as 400 kilometers. The annual cycle in the geoid variations, up to 10 millimeters in some regions, peaked predominantly in the spring and fall seasons. Geoid variations observed over South America that can be largely attributed to surface water and groundwater changes show a clear separation between the large Amazon watershed and the smaller watersheds to the north. Such observations will help hydrologists to connect processes at traditional length scales (tens of kilometers or less) to those at regional and global scales. PMID:15273390

  20. Variability in the 2MASS calibration fields: a search for transient obscuration events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quillen, Alice C.; Ciocca, Marco; Carlin, Jeffrey L.; Bell, Cameron P. M.; Meng, Zeyang

    2014-07-01

    We searched the light curves of over 40 000 stars in the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) calibration data base, spanning approximately 4 yr, for objects that have significant day-long dimming events. We also searched the multi-colour light curves for red-dimming events that could be due to transient extinction. In the colour-independent sigma-limited search, we found 46 previously unrecognized eclipsing binaries, 6 previously unrecognized periodic variable stars likely to be intrinsic pulsators and 21 young stellar objects in the ρ Ophiuchus star formation region previously studied by Parks et al. An additional 11 objects exhibited dimming events, and most of these are unclassified. The search for red-dimming events primarily reveals a population of low-luminosity active galaxies that become bluer when they are brighter, and variable young stellar objects exhibiting high cross-correlation coefficients between colour and brightness. The young stellar objects primarily exhibit brightness and colour variations in the direction of interstellar extinction whereas the active galaxies can have a bowed distribution in colour and magnitude with reduced variation in colour when the object is brightest. Among the objects that are usually quiescent (not strongly variable), we failed to find any dimming events deeper than 0.2 mag and lasting longer than a day. Two of the young stellar objects, however, dimmed by 0.2 mag for longer than a day without strong colour variation.

  1. Long Period Variables in the LMC: Results from MACHO and 2Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, O J; Cook, K H; Keller, S C; Hawley, S L

    2004-07-19

    We use the eight year light curve database from the MACHO (MAssive Compact Halo Objects) project together with infrared colors and magnitudes from 2MASS (the Two Micron All Sky Survey) to identify a sample of 22,000 long period variables in the Large Magellanic Cloud (referred to hereafter as LMC LPVs). A period luminosity diagram of these stars reveals six well defined sequences, in substantial agreement with previous analyses of samples from OGLE (Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment). In our analysis we identify analogues to galactic LPVs in the LMC LPV sample. We find that carbon dominated AGB stars populate only two of the sequences, one of which includes the Mira variables. The high luminosity end of the same two sequences are also the location of the only stars with J K{sub s} > 2, indicating that they are enshrouded in dust. The unknown mechanism that produces the variability of the last sequence--those stars with long secondary periods--produces different morphology in the period luminosity diagram than what is seen in the first four sequences, which are thought to be caused by pulsation. In particular, the last sequence extends to lower luminosity RGB stars and the luminosity function does not peak among the AGB stars. We point out several features which will constrain new models of the period luminosity sequences.

  2. The Barents Sea polar front and water masses variability (1980-2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oziel, L.; Sirven, J.; Gascard, J.-C.

    2015-03-01

    The polar front separates the warm and saline Atlantic Waters encountered in the western part of the Barents Sea from the cold and fresh Arctic Waters situated in the northern part. These water masses can mix together, mainly in the eastern part of the Barents Sea, generating dense waters in winter which can cascade into the Arctic Ocean to form the Artic Intermediate Waters. To study the interannual variability and evolution of these water masses and the fronts, we have merged data from the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea and the Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute and have built a new database which covers the period 1980-2011. The summer data is interpolated on a regular grid and a "Probability Density Function" method is used to show that the polar front splits into two branches east of 32° E where the topographic constraint weakens. Two fronts can then be defined: the "Northern Polar Front" is associated with strong salinity gradients and the "Southern Polar Front" with temperature gradients. They enclose the dense Barents Sea Water. The interannual variability of the water masses is apparent in the observed data and is linked to that of the ice cover. In contrast, the link with the Arctic Oscillation is not clear. However, results from a general circulation model suggest that such a link could be found if winter data were taken into account. A strong trend, which amplifies during the last decade, is also found: the Atlantic Water occupies a larger volume of the Barents Sea. This "Atlantification" could be accompanied by a northwards displacement of the southern polar front in the eastern part of the Barents Sea (which is suggested by a model based study) and a decrease of the volume occupied by the Arctic Waters.

  3. Mass Uncertainty and Application For Space Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beech, Geoffrey

    2013-01-01

    Expected development maturity under contract (spec) should correlate with Project/Program Approved MGA Depletion Schedule in Mass Properties Control Plan. If specification NTE, MGA is inclusive of Actual MGA (A5 & A6). If specification is not an NTE Actual MGA (e.g. nominal), then MGA values are reduced by A5 values and A5 is representative of remaining uncertainty. Basic Mass = Engineering Estimate based on design and construction principles with NO embedded margin MGA Mass = Basic Mass * assessed % from approved MGA schedule. Predicted Mass = Basic + MGA. Aggregate MGA % = (Aggregate Predicted - Aggregate Basic) /Aggregate Basic.

  4. Mass loss from Luminous Blue Variables and Quasi-periodic Modulations of Radio Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vink, J. S.; Kotak, R.

    2007-08-01

    Massive stars, supernovae (SNe), and long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have a huge impact on their environment. Despite their importance, a comprehensive knowledge of which massive stars produce which SN/GRB is hitherto lacking. We present a brief overview about our knowledge of mass loss in the Hertzsprung-Russell Diagram (HRD) covering evolutionary phases of the OB main sequence, the unstable Luminous Blue Variable (LBV) stage, and the Wolf-Rayet (WR) phase. Despite the fact that metals produced by ``self-enrichment'' in WR atmospheres exceed the initial - host galaxy - metallicity, by orders of magnitude, a particularly strong dependence of the mass-loss rate on the initial metallicity is found for WR stars at sub-solar metallicities (1/10 - 1/100 solar). This provides a significant boost to the collapsar model for GRBs, as it may present a viable mechanism to prevent the loss of angular momentum by stellar winds at low metallicity, whilst strong Galactic WR winds may inhibit GRBs occurring at solar metallicities. Furthermore, we discuss recently reported quasi-sinusoidal modulations in the radio lightcurves of SNe 2001ig and 2003bg. We show that both the sinusoidal behaviour and the recurrence timescale of these modulations are consistent with the predicted mass-loss behaviour of LBVs, and we suggest LBVs may be the progenitors of some core-collapse SNe.

  5. Variable Conductance Heat Pipes for Radioisotope Stirling Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, William G.; Tarau, Calin

    2008-01-01

    In a Stirling radioisotope system, heat must continually be removed from the GPHS modules, to maintain the GPHS modules and surrounding insulation at acceptable temperatures. Normally, the Stirling convertor provides this cooling. If the Stirling engine stops in the current system, the insulation is designed to spoil, preventing damage to the GPHS, but also ending the mission. An alkali-metal Variable Conductance Heat Pipe (VCHP) was designed to allow multiple stops and restarts of the Stirling engine. A VCHP was designed for the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator, with a 850 °C heater head temperature. The VCHP turns on with a ΔT of 30 °C, which is high enough to not risk standard ASRG operation but low enough to save most heater head life. This VCHP has a low mass, and low thermal losses for normal operation. In addition to the design, a proof-of-concept NaK VCHP was fabricated and tested. While NaK is normally not used in heat pipes, it has an advantage in that it is liquid at the reservoir operating temperature, while Na or K alone would freeze. The VCHP had two condensers, one simulating the heater head, and the other simulating the radiator. The experiments successfully demonstrated operation with the simulated heater head condenser off and on, while allowing the reservoir temperature to vary over 40 to 120 °C, the maximum range expected. In agreement with previous NaK heat pipe tests, the evaporator ΔT was roughly 70 °C, due to distillation of the NaK in the evaporator.

  6. Variable selection for QSAR by artificial ant colony systems.

    PubMed

    Izrailev, S; Agrafiotis, D K

    2002-01-01

    Derivation of quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) usually involves computational models that relate a set of input variables describing the structural properties of the molecules for which the activity has been measured to the output variable representing activity. Many of the input variables may be correlated, and it is therefore often desirable to select an optimal subset of the input variables that results in the most predictive model. In this paper we describe an optimization technique for variable selection based on artificial ant colony systems. The algorithm is inspired by the behavior of real ants, which are able to find the shortest path between a food source and their nest using deposits of pheromone as a communication agent. The underlying basic self-organizing principle is exploited for the construction of parsimonious QSAR models based on neural networks for several classical QSAR data sets. PMID:12184383

  7. A new active variable stiffness suspension system using a nonlinear energy sink-based controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anubi, Olugbenga Moses; Crane, Carl D.

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents the active case of a variable stiffness suspension system. The central concept is based on a recently designed variable stiffness mechanism which consists of a horizontal control strut and a vertical strut. The horizontal strut is used to vary the load transfer ratio by actively controlling the location of the point of attachment of the vertical strut to the car body. The control algorithm, effected by a hydraulic actuator, uses the concept of nonlinear energy sink (NES) to effectively transfer the vibrational energy in the sprung mass to a control mass, thereby reducing the transfer of energy from road disturbance to the car body at a relatively lower cost compared to the traditional active suspension using the skyhook concept. The analyses and simulation results show that a better performance can be achieved by subjecting the point of attachment of a suspension system, to the chassis, to the influence of a horizontal NES system.

  8. Modeling the spatial variability of dispersivity to deal with anomalous mass transport in the subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capilla, J. E.; Sanchez Fuster, I.; Sanchez Barrero, L.

    2012-12-01

    The limitations of the classical Advection-Dispersion Equation (ADE) approach to model mass transport remain a subject of research. The term anomalous transport is usually applied when the ADE fails to reproduce real field or lab experiments tracer tests data. Some authors address this limitation using high-resolution heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity (K) fields. Besides, the non-Fickian behavior of transport is another issue addressed. However, the effects of the spatial variability of dispersivity, and the influence of the model support scale on this property, have been rarely studied. The lack of experimental knowledge on the dispersivity behavior leads to model this basic parameter as an averaged calibrated parameter highly dependent on the model discretization size. In order to study the local behavior of the dispersivity a porous medium tank was designed and built at the Technical University of Valencia (Spain). This paper presents new results and conclusions obtained from the experiments conducted in this lab prototype. The steady flow through the porous medium tank lab is quasi-2D, and the K field imitates the patterns of spatial variability found in a real and highly heterogeneous formation (MADE2 site). The tracer tests are run using a conservative dye tracer and the tank is monitored by a grid of pressure transducers and taking digital images that are processed to map the evolution of solute concentrations in the tank. The set of exhaustive head and concentration data is used to compute detail local information of the effective dispersivity field at different time steps, and at different support scales. The analysis of results shows that the dispersivity field displays patterns of spatial variability related with the physical nature of the local material and also with the local evolution of concentrations at every grid block. We have found that the anomalous transport behavior observed in the lab tank can be accurately modeled using the classical ADE

  9. Fractal variability: an emergent property of complex dissipative systems.

    PubMed

    Seely, Andrew J E; Macklem, Peter

    2012-03-01

    The patterns of variation of physiologic parameters, such as heart and respiratory rate, and their alteration with age and illness have long been under investigation; however, the origin and significance of scale-invariant fractal temporal structures that characterize healthy biologic variability remain unknown. Quite independently, atmospheric and planetary scientists have led breakthroughs in the science of non-equilibrium thermodynamics. In this paper, we aim to provide two novel hypotheses regarding the origin and etiology of both the degree of variability and its fractal properties. In a complex dissipative system, we hypothesize that the degree of variability reflects the adaptability of the system and is proportional to maximum work output possible divided by resting work output. Reductions in maximal work output (and oxygen consumption) or elevation in resting work output (or oxygen consumption) will thus reduce overall degree of variability. Second, we hypothesize that the fractal nature of variability is a self-organizing emergent property of complex dissipative systems, precisely because it enables the system's ability to optimally dissipate energy gradients and maximize entropy production. In physiologic terms, fractal patterns in space (e.g., fractal vasculature) or time (e.g., cardiopulmonary variability) optimize the ability to deliver oxygen and clear carbon dioxide and waste. Examples of falsifiability are discussed, along with the need to further define necessary boundary conditions. Last, as our focus is bedside utility, potential clinical applications of this understanding are briefly discussed. The hypotheses are clinically relevant and have potential widespread scientific relevance. PMID:22462984

  10. Fractal variability: An emergent property of complex dissipative systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seely, Andrew J. E.; Macklem, Peter

    2012-03-01

    The patterns of variation of physiologic parameters, such as heart and respiratory rate, and their alteration with age and illness have long been under investigation; however, the origin and significance of scale-invariant fractal temporal structures that characterize healthy biologic variability remain unknown. Quite independently, atmospheric and planetary scientists have led breakthroughs in the science of non-equilibrium thermodynamics. In this paper, we aim to provide two novel hypotheses regarding the origin and etiology of both the degree of variability and its fractal properties. In a complex dissipative system, we hypothesize that the degree of variability reflects the adaptability of the system and is proportional to maximum work output possible divided by resting work output. Reductions in maximal work output (and oxygen consumption) or elevation in resting work output (or oxygen consumption) will thus reduce overall degree of variability. Second, we hypothesize that the fractal nature of variability is a self-organizing emergent property of complex dissipative systems, precisely because it enables the system's ability to optimally dissipate energy gradients and maximize entropy production. In physiologic terms, fractal patterns in space (e.g., fractal vasculature) or time (e.g., cardiopulmonary variability) optimize the ability to deliver oxygen and clear carbon dioxide and waste. Examples of falsifiability are discussed, along with the need to further define necessary boundary conditions. Last, as our focus is bedside utility, potential clinical applications of this understanding are briefly discussed. The hypotheses are clinically relevant and have potential widespread scientific relevance.

  11. Variability of Mass Dependence of Auroral Acceleration Processes with Solar Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghielmetti, Arthur G.

    1997-01-01

    The objectives of this investigation are to improve understanding of the mass dependent variability of the auroral acceleration processes and so to clarify apparent discrepancies regarding the altitude and local time variations with solar cycle by investigating: (1) the global morphological relationships between auroral electric field structures and the related particle signatures under varying conditions of solar activity, and (2) the relationships between the electric field structures and particle signatures in selected events that are representative of the different conditions occurring during a solar cycle. The investigation is based in part on the Lockheed UFI data base of UpFlowing Ion (UFI) events in the 5OO eV to 16keV energy range and associated electrons in the energy range 7O eV to 24 keV. This data base was constructed from data acquired by the ion mass spectrometer on the S3-3 satellite in the altitude range of I to 1.3 Re. The launch of the POLAR spacecraft in early 1996 and successful operation of its TIMAS ion mass spectrometer has provided us with data from within the auroral acceleration regions during the current solar minimum. The perigee of POLAR is at about 1 Re, comparable to that of S3-3. The higher sensitivity and time resolution of TIMAS compared to the ion mass spectrometer on S3-3 together with its wider energy range, 15 eV to 33 keV, facilitate more detailed studies of upflowing ions.

  12. Mesoscale variability of water masses in the Arabian Sea as revealed by ARGO floats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carton, X.; L'Hegaret, P.

    2011-06-01

    By analysing ARGO float data over the last four years, some aspects of the mesoscale variability of water masses in the Arabian Sea are described. The Red Sea Water outflow is strong in the Southwestern Gulf of Aden, in particular when a cyclonic gyre predominates in this region. Salinities of 36.5 and temperatures of 16 °C are found there between 600 and 1000 m depths. The Red Sea Water is more dilute in the eastern part of the Gulf, and fragments of this water mass can be advected offshore across the gulf or towards its northern coast by the regional gyres. The Red Sea Water outflow is also detected along the northeastern coast of Socotra, and fragments of RSW are found between one and three degrees of latitude north of this island. In the whole Gulf of Aden, the correlation between the deep motions of the floats and the SSH measured by altimetry is strong, at regional scale. The finer scale details of the float trajectories are more often related to the anomalous water masses that they encounter. The Persian Gulf Water (PGW) is found in the float profiles near Ras ash Sharbatat (near 57° E, 18° N), again with 36.5 in salinity and about 18-19 °C in temperature. These observations were achieved in winter when the southwestward monsoon currents can advect PGW along the South Arabian coast. Fragments of PGW are found in the Arabian Sea between 18 and 20° N and 63 and 65° E, showing that this water mass can escape the Gulf of Oman southeastward, in particular during summer.

  13. Secular dynamics in hierarchical three-body systems with mass loss and mass transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Michaely, Erez; Perets, Hagai B.

    2014-10-20

    Recent studies have shown that secular evolution of triple systems can play a major role in the evolution and interaction of their inner binaries. Very few studies explored the stellar evolution of triple systems, and in particular the mass-loss phase of the evolving stellar components. Here we study the dynamical secular evolution of hierarchical triple systems undergoing mass loss. We use the secular evolution equations and include the effects of mass loss and mass transfer, as well as general relativistic effects. We present various evolutionary channels taking place in such evolving triples, and discuss both the effects of mass loss and mass transfer in the inner binary system, as well as the effects of mass loss/transfer from an outer third companion. We discuss several distinct types/regimes of triple secular evolution, where the specific behavior of a triple system can sensitively depend on its hierarchy and the relative importance of classical and general relativistic effects. We show that the orbital changes due to mass-loss and/or mass-transfer processes can effectively transfer a triple system from one dynamical regime to another. In particular, mass loss/transfer can both induce and quench high-amplitude (Lidov-Kozai) variations in the eccentricity and inclination of the inner binaries of evolving triples. They can also change the system dynamics from an orderly periodic behavior to a chaotic one, and vice versa.

  14. Stability theorems for multidimensional linear systems with variable parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shrivastava, S. K.

    1981-01-01

    A Liapunov-type approach is used to derive two equivalent theorems which govern the stability of coupled linear systems with varying multiple parameters. The theorems generalize some of the existing theorems applicable to systems with constant parameters and the Sonin-Polya theorem applicable to a single-degree-of-freedom system with variable coefficients. As an illustration, the proposed theorems are applied to mechanical systems with varying inertia, stiffness, gyroscopic, and damping terms, and velocity and position-dependent forces.

  15. Mass Distribution and Mass Transport in the Earth System: Recent Scientific Progress Due to Interdisciplinary Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusche, Jürgen; Klemann, Volker; Sneeuw, Nico

    2014-11-01

    This Special Issue on "Mass Distribution and Mass Transport in the Earth System: Recent Scientific Progress due to Interdisciplinary Research" reports a number of findings resulting from a collaborative effort run from 2006 until 2013, in the framework of the DFG Priority Program 1257 "Mass Distribution and Mass Transport in the Earth System". Contributions have been arranged along five lines, i.e. (1) improvements in geodesy: satellite mass monitoring through gravimetry and altimetry, (2) applications in large-scale hydrology, (3) applications in solid Earth research, (4) applications in cryospheric research, (5) applications in ocean sciences.

  16. Evaluation of a center pivot variable rate irrigation system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Uniformity of water distribution of a variable rate center pivot irrigation system was evaluated. This 4-span center-pivot system was configured with 10 water application zones along its 766 ft-long lateral. Two experiments were conducted for the uniformity tests. In one test, a constant water appli...

  17. Interannual salinity variability of the Northern Yellow Sea Cold Water Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ang; Yu, Fei; Diao, Xinyuan

    2015-05-01

    This paper discusses the interannual variability of the Northern Yellow Sea Cold Water Mass (NYSCWM) and the factors that influence it, based on survey data from the 1976-2006 national standard section and the Korea Oceanographic Data Center, monthly E-P flux data from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, and meridional wind speed data from the International Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set. The results show that: 1) the mean salinity of the NYSCWM center has a slightly decreasing trend, which is not consistent with the high salinity center; 2) both the southern salinity front and the halocline of the NYSCWM display a weakening trend, which indicates that the difference between the NYSCWM and coastal water decreases; 3) the Yellow Sea Warm Current intrusion, the E-P flux of the northern Yellow Sea, and the strength of the winter monsoon will affect the NYSCWM salinity during the following summer.

  18. Mass spectrometric investigation of molecular variability of grass pollen group 1 allergens.

    PubMed

    Fenaille, François; Nony, Emmanuel; Chabre, Henri; Lautrette, Aurélie; Couret, Marie-Noëlle; Batard, Thierry; Moingeon, Philippe; Ezan, Eric

    2009-08-01

    Natural grass pollen allergens exhibit a wide variety of isoforms. Precise characterization of such microheterogeneity is essential to improve diagnosis and design appropriate immunotherapies. Moreover, standardization of allergen vaccine production is a prerequisite for product safety and efficiency. Both qualitative and quantitative analytical methods are thus required to monitor and control the huge natural variability of pollens, as well as final product quality. A proteomic approach has been set up to investigate in depth the structural variability of five group 1 allergens originating from distinct grass species (Ant o 1, Dac g 1, Lol p 1, Phl p 1, and Poa p 1). Whereas group 1 is the most conserved grass pollen allergen, great variations were shown between the various isoforms found in these five species using mass spectrometry, with many amino acid exchanges, as well as variations in proline hydroxylation level and in main N-glycan motifs. The presence of O-linked pentose residues was also demonstrated, with up to three consecutive units on the first hydroxyproline of Ant o 1. In addition, species-specific peptides were identified that might be used for product authentication or individual allergen quantification. Lastly, natural or process-induced modifications (deamidation, oxidation, glycation) were evidenced, which might constitute useful indicators of product degradation. PMID:19572759

  19. Factorial experimental designs elucidate significant variables affecting data acquisition on a quadrupole Orbitrap mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Randall, Shan M; Cardasis, Helene L; Muddiman, David C

    2013-10-01

    Instrument parameter values for a quadrupole Orbitrap mass spectrometer were optimized for performing global proteomic analyses. Fourteen factors were evaluated for their influence on data-dependent acquisition with an emphasis on both the rate of sequencing and spectral quality by maximizing two individually tested response variables (unique peptides and protein groups). Of the 14 factors, 12 factors were assigned significant contrast values (P < 0.05) for both response variables. Fundamentally, when optimizing parameters, a balance between spectral quality and duty cycle needs to be reached in order to maximize proteome coverage. This is especially true when using a data-dependent approach for sequencing complex proteomes. For example, maximum ion injection time, automatic gain control settings, and minimum threshold settings for triggering MS/MS isolation and activation all heavily influence ion signal, the number of spectra collected, and spectral quality. To better assess the effect these parameters have on data acquisition, all MS/MS data were parsed according to ion abundance by calculating the percent of the AGC target reached for each MS/MS event and then compared with successful peptide-spectrum matches. This proved to be an effective approach for understanding the effect of ion abundance on successful peptide-spectrum matches and establishing minimum ion abundance thresholds for triggering MS/MS isolation and activation. PMID:23913023

  20. Factorial Experimental Designs Elucidate Significant Variables Affecting Data Acquisition on a Quadrupole Orbitrap Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randall, Shan M.; Cardasis, Helene L.; Muddiman, David C.

    2013-10-01

    Instrument parameter values for a quadrupole Orbitrap mass spectrometer were optimized for performing global proteomic analyses. Fourteen factors were evaluated for their influence on data-dependent acquisition with an emphasis on both the rate of sequencing and spectral quality by maximizing two individually tested response variables (unique peptides and protein groups). Of the 14 factors, 12 factors were assigned significant contrast values ( P < 0.05) for both response variables. Fundamentally, when optimizing parameters, a balance between spectral quality and duty cycle needs to be reached in order to maximize proteome coverage. This is especially true when using a data-dependent approach for sequencing complex proteomes. For example, maximum ion injection time, automatic gain control settings, and minimum threshold settings for triggering MS/MS isolation and activation all heavily influence ion signal, the number of spectra collected, and spectral quality. To better assess the effect these parameters have on data acquisition, all MS/MS data were parsed according to ion abundance by calculating the percent of the AGC target reached for each MS/MS event and then compared with successful peptide-spectrum matches. This proved to be an effective approach for understanding the effect of ion abundance on successful peptide-spectrum matches and establishing minimum ion abundance thresholds for triggering MS/MS isolation and activation.

  1. Time-Variable Gravity Signal Due to Extratropic Pacific Water Mass Redistribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Benjamin F.; Au, A. Y.; Cox, C. M.

    2002-01-01

    Cox and Chao [2002] reported the detection of a large anomaly in the form of a positive "jump" in the time series of Earth's lowest-degree gravity harmonic J2, or the dynamic oblateness, during 1998. This prompted us to examine the mass redistribution in the global oceans. We report here a seesaw of the sea-surface height (SSH) in the extratropic north + south Pacific basins -- the leading (nonseasonal) EOF/PC mode in SSH derived from the 10-year TOPEX/Poseidon altimetry data in the extratropic Pacific region. The mode underwent a step-like jump with time evolution that match remarkably well with the observed J2 anomaly. However, the magnitude is several times too small to explain the observed J2, even if assuming the SSH jump was all mass-induced (as opposed to any steric effect which causes no time-variable gravity signal). If one accepts the notion that this extratropic Pacific seesaw is part of the geophysical process that produced the observed 1998 J2 anomaly, then this finding suggests strong geophysical connection of the interannual-to-decadal variation of J2 with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), as the time series of the above EOF/PC mode is actually a formally defined PDO Index series.

  2. Nutrient characteristics of the water masses and their seasonal variability in the eastern equatorial Indian Ocean.

    PubMed

    Sardessai, S; Shetye, Suhas; Maya, M V; Mangala, K R; Prasanna Kumar, S

    2010-01-01

    Nutrient characteristics of four water masses in the light of their thermohaline properties are examined in the eastern Equatorial Indian Ocean during winter, spring and summer monsoon. The presence of low salinity water mass with "Surface enrichments" of inorganic nutrients was observed relative to 20 m in the mixed layer. Lowest oxygen levels of 19 microM at 3 degrees N in the euphotic zone indicate mixing of low oxygen high salinity Arabian Sea waters with the equatorial Indian Ocean. The seasonal variability of nutrients was regulated by seasonally varying physical processes like thermocline elevation, meridional and zonal transport, the equatorial undercurrent and biological processes of uptake and remineralization. Circulation of Arabian Sea high salinity waters with nitrate deficit could also be seen from low N/P ratio with a minimum of 8.9 in spring and a maximum of 13.6 in winter. This large deviation from Redfield N/P ratio indicates the presence of denitrified high salinity waters with a seasonal nitrate deficit ranging from -4.85 to 1.52 in the Eastern Equatorial Indian Ocean. PMID:20547419

  3. Direct measurement of sub-surface mass change using the variable-baseline gravity gradient method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kennedy, Jeffrey; Ferré, Ty P. A.; Güntner, Andreas; Abe, Maiko; Creutzfeldt, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Time-lapse gravity data provide a direct, non-destructive method to monitor mass changes at scales from cm to km. But, the effectively infinite spatial sensitivity of gravity measurements can make it difficult to isolate the signal of interest. The variable-baseline gravity gradient method, based on the difference of measurements between two gravimeters, is an alternative to the conventional approach of individually modeling all sources of mass and elevation change. This approach can improve the signal-to-noise ratio for many applications by removing the contributions of Earth tides, loading, and other signals that have the same effect on both gravimeters. At the same time, this approach can focus the support volume within a relatively small user-defined region of the subsurface. The method is demonstrated using paired superconducting gravimeters to make for the first time a large-scale, non-invasive measurement of infiltration wetting front velocity and change in water content above the wetting front.

  4. Seasonal variability of black carbon mass in the tropical tropopause layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spackman, J. R.; Gao, R. S.; Schwarz, J. P.; Watts, L. A.; Fahey, D. W.; Pfister, L.; Bui, T. P.

    2011-05-01

    While most black carbon (BC)-containing particles are removed in the lower troposphere in the tropics, some are lofted to higher altitudes via convection where they may be distributed globally throughout the tropical tropopause layer (TTL). Single-particle measurements of BC aerosol were made from the NASA WB-57F aircraft during both the dry (February 2006) and wet (August 2007) seasons in Central America. BC mass loadings declined sharply with increasing altitude from the ground to 5 km. In the TTL, they were up to six times higher in the wet relative to the dry season. The variability in BC mass was examined using convective-influence back trajectories to determine the source regions. The seasonal differences in the vertical profiles are explained by long-range transport of (1) low-BC air from the southern hemisphere in the dry season and (2) high-BC air from biomass-burning or pollution sources in Africa and Asia advected by the Asian monsoon circulation in the wet season.

  5. A Black Hole Mass-Variability Timescale Correlation at Submillimeter Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bower, Geoffrey C.; Dexter, Jason; Markoff, Sera; Gurwell, Mark A.; Rao, Ramprasad; McHardy, Ian

    2015-09-01

    We analyze the light curves of 413 radio sources at submillimeter wavelengths using data from the Submillimeter Array calibrator database. The database includes more than 20,000 observations at 1.3 and 0.8 mm that span 13 years. We model the light curves as a damped random walk and determine a characteristic timescale τ at which the variability amplitude saturates. For the vast majority of sources, primarily blazars and BL Lac objects, we find only lower limits on τ. For two nearby low-luminosity active galactic nuclei, M81 and M87, however, we measure τ ={1.6}-0.9+3.0 {days} and τ ={45}-24+61 {days}, respectively (2σ errors). Including the previously measured τ =0.33+/- 0.16 {days} for Sgr A*, we show an approximately linear correlation between τ and black hole mass for these nearby low-luminosity AGNs (LLAGNs). Other LLAGNs with spectra that peak in the submillimeter are expected to follow this correlation. These characteristic timescales are comparable to the minimum timescale for emission processes close to an event horizon and suggest that the underlying physics may be independent of black hole mass, accretion rate, and jet luminosity.

  6. Modelling aperiodic X-ray variability in black hole binaries as propagating mass accretion rate fluctuations: A short review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingram, A. R.

    2016-05-01

    Black hole binary systems can emit very bright and rapidly varying X-ray signals when material from the companion accretes onto the black hole, liberating huge amounts of gravitational potential energy. Central to this process of accretion is turbulence. In the propagating mass accretion rate fluctuations model, turbulence is generated throughout the inner accretion flow, causing fluctuations in the accretion rate. Fluctuations from the outer regions propagate towards the black hole, modulating the fluctuations generated in the inner regions. Here, I present the theoretical motivation behind this picture before reviewing the array of statistical variability properties observed in the light curves of black hole binaries that are naturally explained by the model. I also discuss the remaining challenges for the model, both in terms of comparison to data and in terms of including more sophisticated theoretical considerations.

  7. Probing Cloud-Driven Variability on Two of the Youngest, Lowest-Mass Brown Dwarfs in the Solar Neighborhood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Adam; Cushing, Michael; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy

    2016-08-01

    Young, late-type brown dwarfs share many properties with directly imaged giant extrasolar planets. They therefore provide unique testbeds for investigating the physical conditions present in this critical temperature and mass regime. WISEA 1147-2040 and 2MASS 1119-1137, two recently discovered late-type (~L7) brown dwarfs, have both been determined to be members of the ~10 Myr old TW Hya Association (Kellogg et al. 2016, Schneider et al. 2016). Each has an estimated mass of 5-6 MJup, making them two of the youngest and lowest-mass free floating objects yet found in the solar neighborhood. As such, these two planetary mass objects provide unparalleled laboratories for investigating giant planet-like atmospheres far from the contaminating starlight of a host sun. Condensate clouds play a critical role in shaping the emergent spectra of both brown dwarfs and gas giant planets, and can cause photometric variability via their non-uniform spatial distribution. We propose to photometrically monitor WISEA 1147-2040 and 2MASS 1119-1137 in order to search for the presence of cloud-driven variability to 1) investigate the potential trend of low surface gravity with high-amplitude variability in a previously unexplored mass regime and 2) explore the angular momentum evolution of isolated planetary mass objects.

  8. The ratio initial mass/payload mass - How good are launch systems?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornik, Alexander

    1992-04-01

    The growth factor G, defined as the ratio of initial mass/payload mass, is used here to evaluate various rocket launch systems. The qualities of the propulsion, structure, environmental loading, and costs of the Saturn 5, Space Shuttle, Titan III, Saenger Horus C and M, and various Ariane rockets are assessed. The results are used to evaluate the reusability of these propulsion systems.

  9. Long Period Variables in the Magellanic Clouds: OGLE + 2 MASS + DENIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groenewegen, M. A. T.

    2004-10-01

    The 68 000 I-band light curves of variable stars detected by the OGLE survey in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (MCs) are fitted by Fourier series, and also correlated with the DENIS and 2MASS all-sky release databases and with lists of spectroscopically confirmed M-, S- and C-stars. Lightcurves and the results of the lightcurve fitting (periods and amplitudes) and DENIS and 2MASS magnitudes are presented for 2277 M-, S-, C-stars in the MCs. The following aspects are discussed: the K-band period-luminosity relations for the spectroscopically confirmed AGB stars, period changes over a timespan of about 17 years in a subset of about 400 LPVs, and candidate obscured AGB stars. The use of a sample of spectroscopically confirmed variables shows specifically that almost all carbon stars are brighter than the tip of the RGB, and occupy sequences A+, B+, C and D. It is shown (for the LMC where there is a sufficient number of spectroscopically identified M-stars) that for sequences A+, B+, C the M-stars are on average fainter than the C-stars, as expected from an evolutionary point of view and previously observed in MC clusters. However, this is not so for sequence ``D'', suggesting that the origin of the so-called Long Secondary Periods is not related to an evolutionary effect. The fraction of objects that has a period in sequence ``D'' is also independent of chemical type. Three stars are identified that have been classified as oxygen-rich in the 1970s and carbon-rich in 1990s. Possibly they underwent a thermal pulse in the last 20 years, and dredged-up enough carbon to switch spectral type. The observations over almost two decades seem to suggest that up to 10% of AGB variables changed pulsation mode over that time span. More robust estimates will come from the ongoing and future (microlensing) photometric surveys. A sample of 570 variable red objects ((J-K) > 2.0 or (I-K) > 4.0) is presented in which most stars are expected to be dust-obscured AGB stars. Estimates

  10. A method for linearizing a nonlinear system with six state variables and three control variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsia, W. S.

    1986-01-01

    A nonlinear system governed by x = f(x,u) with six state variables and three control variables is considered in this project. A set of transformations from (x,u) - space to (z,v) - space is defined such that the linear tangent model is independent of the operating point in the z-space. Therefore, it is possible to design a control law satisfying all operating points in the transformed space. An algorithm to construct the above transformations and to obtain the associated linearized system is described in this report. This method is applied to a rigid body using pole placement for the control law. Results are verified by numerical simulation. Closed loop poles in x-space using traditional local linearization are compared with those pole placements in the z-space.

  11. Synthesis of structural/control systems robust with respect to design variable tolerances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, H. L.; Schmit, L. A.

    1991-01-01

    A methodology is presented for the synthesis of control augmented structures which can be modeled as an assemblage of beam, truss, and nonstructural mass elements augmented by a robust noncollocated direct output feedback control system. The control system is robust in the sense that it can tolerate manufacturing and realization errors. The robust control system is synthesized using a constraint buffering technique in conjunction with the approximation concepts approach to system synthesis. All of the design constraints on the system, including the dynamic stability, are buffered by a nonlinear quantity that is a function of acceptable tolerances on the design variables and the sensitivity of the constraints to changes in these design variables. Numerical results which illustrate the effectiveness of the method presented are given.

  12. Confirmation of mass-independent Ni isotopic variability in iron meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, Robert C. J.; Elliott, Tim; Coath, Christopher D.; Regelous, Marcel

    2011-12-01

    We report high-precision analyses of internally-normalised Ni isotope ratios in 12 bulk iron meteorites. Our measurements of 60Ni/ 61Ni, 62Ni/ 61Ni and 64Ni/ 61Ni normalised to 58Ni/ 61Ni and expressed in parts per ten thousand (‱) relative to NIST SRM 986 as ɛ60Ni,ɛ62Ni and ɛ64Ni, vary by 0.146, 0.228 and 0.687, respectively. The precision on a typical analysis is 0.03‱, 0.05‱ and 0.08‱ for ɛ60Ni, ɛ62Ni and ɛ64Ni, respectively, which is comparable to our sample reproducibility. We show that this 'mass-independent' Ni isotope variability cannot be ascribed to interferences, inaccurate correction of instrumental or natural mass-dependent fractionation, fractionation controlled by nuclear field shift effects, nor the influence of cosmic ray spallation. These results thus document the presence of mass-independent Ni isotopic heterogeneity in bulk meteoritic samples, as previously proposed by Regelous et al. (2008) (EPSL 272, 330-338), but our new analyses are more precise and include determination of 64Ni. Intriguingly, we find that terrestrial materials do not yield homogenous internally-normalised Ni isotope compositions, which, as pointed out by Young et al. (2002) (GCA 66, 1095-1104), may be the expected result of using the exponential (kinetic) law and atomic masses to normalise all fractionation processes. The certified Ni isotope reference material NIST SRM 986 defines zero in this study, while appropriate ratios for the bulk silicate Earth are given by the peridotites JP-1 and DTS-2 and, relative to NIST SRM 986, yield deviations in ɛ60Ni, ɛ62Ni and ɛ64Ni of -0.006‱, 0.036‱ and 0.119‱, respectively. There is a strong positive correlation between ɛ64Ni and ɛ62Ni in iron meteorites analyses, with a slope of 3.03 ± 0.71. The variations of Ni isotope anomalies in iron meteorites are consistent with heterogeneous distribution of a nucleosynthetic component from a type Ia supernova into the proto-solar nebula.

  13. Action-angle variables and novel superintegrable systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakobyan, T.; Lechtenfeld, O.; Nersessian, A.; Saghatelian, A.; Yeghikyan, V.

    2012-09-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the effectiveness of the action-angle variables in the study of superintegrable systems. As an example, we construct the spherical and pseu-dospherical generalizations of the two-dimensional superintegrable models introduced by Tremblay, Turbiner and Winternitz and by Post and Winternitz.

  14. Variable-Rate Lime Application for Louisiana Sugarcane Production Systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Precision agriculture may offer sugarcane growers a management system that decreases costs and maximizes profits, while minimizing any potential negative environmental impact. Variable rate (VR) application of lime and fertilizers is one area in which significant advantages may be realized. A seri...

  15. Variable rate lime application in Louisiana sugarcane production systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Precision agriculture may offer sugarcane growers a management system that decreases costs and maximizes profits, while minimizing any potential negative environmental impact. The utility of variable-rate (VR) lime application in the initial production year (plant cane) of a 3-yr sugarcane crop cyc...

  16. Performance evaluation of a center pivot variable rate irrigation system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Variable Rate Irrigation (VRI) for center pivots offers potential to match specific application rates to non-uniform soil conditions along the length of the lateral. The benefit of such systems is influenced by the areal extent of these variations and the smallest scale to which the irrigation syste...

  17. Field Assessment of A Variable-rate Aerial Application System

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several experiments were conducted to evaluate the system response of a variable-rate aerial application controller to changing flow rates. The research is collaboration between the USDA, ARS, APTRU and Houma Avionics, USA, manufacturer of a widely used flow controller designed for agricultural airc...

  18. RSVP [Response System with Variable Prescriptions]: Instructional Capabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anandam, Kamala; Myers, Donald E.

    This report provides information on the operation and potential uses of the Response System with Variable Prescriptions (RSVP), a computer-based program of individualized instruction implemented at Miami-Dade Community College (MDCC). Following introductory material, Section A describes RSVP and outlines its uses in maintaining records on each…

  19. The Rorschach Comprehensive System (CS) Psychometric Validity of Individual Variables.

    PubMed

    Tibon Czopp, Shira; Zeligman, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Since the publication of the Rorschach Inkblot Method (Rorschach, 1921/1942 ), theorists, researchers, and practitioners have been debating the nature of the task, its conceptual foundation, and most important its psychometric properties. The validity of the Rorschach Comprehensive System (CS; Exner, 1974 , 2003; Exner & Weiner, 1995 ) has been supported by several meta-analyses that used different types of nontest external criterion for validating individual variables. In a recent meta-analysis, Mihura, Meyer, Dumitrascu, and Bombel ( 2013 ) found coefficients ranging from modest to excellent for most of the selected CS variables, with 13 of them reported as showing "little to no support." This article focuses on these variables. Although endorsing Mihura et al.'s mainly validating findings, we also suggest that the evidence presented for the little or no validity of these 13 variables is not quite compelling enough to warrant changing their definition or coding, or removing them from the system. We point to some issues concerning the description and interpretation of these variables and the appropriateness of the external criteria used for exploring their validity, and suggest considering these issues in further CS research. Implications of Mihura et al.'s meta-analysis for clinical and forensic practice are discussed. PMID:27153465

  20. Effect of environmental variables on body size evolution of crinoids between periods of mass extinctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jani, T.; Heim, N. A.; Payne, J.

    2013-12-01

    Body size plays a major role in determining whether or not an organism can sustain in its local environment. The ecosystem of an animal has a major effect on the fitness of organisms, and it would be interesting to note the degree to which various environmental factors alter body size. In my project, I identify three environmental factors that seem to affect body size of crinoids, marine invertebrates from phylum Echinodermata, and explore how these variables play out in the intervals between the five mass extinctions. The particular factors I study include atmospheric CO2 concentration (proxy for temperature), O2 concentration, and sea level. Although the r and p values for all of these factors were statistically insignificant to definitively make any correlation, there was a visual correlation. For O2, I noted a generally positive correlation with body size over time. CO2 trends suggested a negative correlation until the K-T boundary, but a positive correlation afterwards. Correlation with sea level was a little more complicated: correlation was positive from the start of the Phanerozoic to the Permian extinction; it turned negative until the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary; afterwards, it again became positive. However, for all three variables, statistical values are too low to say definitively mark any correlation. Out of all three factors, CO2 levels had the highest correlation and lowest p-values in the most time intervals: from the start of the Phanerozoic to Ordovician-Silurian Extinction, from the Late Devonian to the Permian Extinction, and from the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary to the present. When considering first differences, CO2 levels also had the highest correlation from the Permian Extinction to Triassic-Jurassic Extinction and from the Triassic-Jurassic Extinction to Cretaceous-Tertiary Extinction. Using PaleoTS, I found that body size evolution patterns either seemed to follow either an unbiased random walk (URW) or stasis in the intervals between

  1. Time-variable ice mass redistribution and consequences for solid Earth geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivins, E. R.; Wu, X.; James, T. S.

    2009-05-01

    Long wavelength gravity changes associated with imbalance of the cryosphere and other interannual and secular processes are now being mapped from space using GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) mission data. The gravity changes are supplemented by constraints that come from bounds on Earth rotation and the drift between the Earth's center-of-mass and center-of-figure. Although the main features of northern hemispheric post-glacial rebound are clearly recovered from GRACE, there is much to be gained from improving the modeled hydrology and ocean tides. In addition, a great deal of uncertainty exists in the forward ice models that are responsible for driving predictions of the present-day signatures arising from viscoelastic relaxation of the Earth's mantle. There is a link between the uncertainties associated with glacial isostasy and the extraction of present-day ice mass changes in Greenland, the Devon Ice Cap and land ice of Canada's Arctic archipelago from space-borne gravity observations. For example, model gravity changes associated with the long-wavelength components of the collapse of the Laurentide forebulge have far greater uncertainty in the northeastern Canadian Arctic archipelago than south of Hudson Bay. This spatially variable uncertainty can now be quantified with increasing confidence, in part, due to constraints that come from tide gauge and GPS measurements. Here we examine and discuss the implications of uncertainties in the timing and size of ice sheet collapse in eastern Canada and we quantify the errors caused in estimating ice loss in Greenland and the Canadian Arctic. The uncertainty is a sensitive function of ice dome size, location, collapse history, lithospheric thickness and mantle viscosity structure.

  2. The Ionized and Variable Outflow in the Low-Mass X-Ray Binary GX 13+1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Jessamyn; Schulz, Norbert S.; Homan, Jeroen; Chakrabarty, Deepto

    2016-04-01

    We present the analysis of 7 Chandra HETG and 16 simultaneous RXTE PCA observations of GX 13+1, a persistent neutron star low-mass X-ray binary. The observations cover activity between 2002 and 2011. The 0.5-10 keV continuum was consistent with a two component model, either a blackbody plus power law or multicolor disk and blackbody across luminosities of (5-7)x1037 erg sec-1, modified by a neutral absorption column requiring a silicon overabundance. We have identified significantly blue-shifted (voutflow > 500 km sec-1) Kα Fe, Ca, S, and Si hydrogen-like lines in all HETG observations, as well hydrogen-like Ar and Mg lines in the majority of observations. The significant outflow can be modeled as a photoionized plasma with an ionization parameter ≥ 3.5. For the first time we map the occurrence of these wind outflows onto the color-color diagram of GX 13+1 and compare their location with that of the jet outflows in this system. We will further present variable X-ray properties of the wind in GX 13+1 and discuss suggested launching mechanisms as well as how its properties relate to the wind-accretion state in low-mass X-ray binaries.

  3. Variable stiffness and damping suspension system for train

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shuaishuai; Deng, Huaxia; Li, Weihua

    2014-03-01

    As the vibration of high speed train becomes fierce when the train runs at high speed, it is crucial to develop a novel suspension system to negotiate train's vibration. This paper presents a novel suspension based on Magnetorheological fluid (MRF) damper and MRF based smart air spring. The MRF damper is used to generate variable damping while the smart air spring is used to generate field-dependent stiffness. In this paper, the two kind smart devices, MRF dampers and smart air spring, are developed firstly. Then the dynamic performances of these two devices are tested by MTS. Based on the testing results, the two devices are equipped to a high speed train which is built in ADAMS. The skyhook control algorithm is employed to control the novel suspension. In order to compare the vibration suppression capability of the novel suspension with other kind suspensions, three other different suspension systems are also considered and simulated in this paper. The other three kind suspensions are variable damping with fixed stiffness suspension, variable stiffness with fixed damping suspension and passive suspension. The simulation results indicate that the variable damping and stiffness suspension suppresses the vibration of high speed train better than the other three suspension systems.

  4. Mesoscale variability of water masses in the Arabian Sea as revealed by ARGO floats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carton, X.; L'Hegaret, P.; Baraille, R.

    2012-03-01

    By analysing ARGO float data over the last four years, a few aspects of the mesoscale variability of water masses in the Arabian Sea are described. The Red Sea Outflow Water (RSOW) is concentrated in the Southwestern Gulf of Aden, in particular when a cyclonic gyre predominates in this region. Salinities of 36.5 and temperatures of 16 °C are found in this area at depths between 600 and 1000 m. RSOW is more dilute in the eastern part of the Gulf, where intense and relatively barotropic gyres mix it with Indian ocean Central Water. RSOW is also detected along the northeastern coast of Socotra, and fragments of RSOW are found between one and three degrees of latitude north of this island. In the whole Gulf of Aden, the correlation between the deep motions of the floats and the sea-level anomaly measured by altimetry is strong, at regional scale. The finer scale details of the float trajectories are not sampled by altimetry and are often related to the anomalous water masses that the floats encounter. The Persian Gulf Water (PGW) is found in the float profiles near Ras ash Sharbatat (near 57° E, 18° N), again with 36.5 in salinity and about 18-19 °C in temperature. These observations were achieved in winter when the southwestward monsoon currents can advect PGW along the South Arabian coast. Fragments of PGW were also observed in the Arabian Sea between 18 and 20° N and 63 and 65° E in summer, showing that this water mass can escape the Gulf of Oman southeastward, during that season. Kinetic energy distributions of floats with respect to distance or angle share common features between the two regions (Gulf of Aden and Arabian Sea), in particular peaks at 30, 50 and 150 km scales and along the axis of monsoon currents. Hydrological measurements by floats are also influenced by the seasonal variations of PGW and RSOW in these regions.

  5. Evaluation of a variable dose acquisition technique for microcalcification and mass detection in digital breast tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Mini; Gifford, Howard C.; O'Connor, J. Michael; Glick, Stephen J.

    2009-06-15

    In this article the authors evaluate a recently proposed variable dose (VD)-digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) acquisition technique in terms of the detection accuracy for breast masses and microcalcification (MC) clusters. With this technique, approximately half of the total dose is used for one center projection and the remaining dose is split among the other tomosynthesis projection views. This acquisition method would yield both a projection view and a reconstruction view. One of the aims of this study was to evaluate whether the center projection alone of the VD acquisition can provide equal or superior MC detection in comparison to the 3D images from uniform dose (UD)-DBT. Another aim was to compare the mass-detection capabilities of 3D reconstructions from VD-DBT and UD-DBT. In a localization receiver operating characteristic (LROC) observer study of MC detection, the authors compared the center projection of a VD acquisition scheme (at 2 mGy dose) with detector pixel size of 100 {mu}m with the UD-DBT reconstruction (at 4 mGy dose) obtained with a voxel size of 100 {mu}m. MCs with sizes of 150 and 180 {mu}m were used in the study, with each cluster consisting of seven MCs distributed randomly within a small volume. Reconstructed images in UD-DBT were obtained from a projection set that had a total of 4 mGy dose. The current study shows that for MC detection, using the center projection alone of VD acquisition scheme performs worse with area under the LROC curve (A{sub L}) of 0.76 than when using the 3D reconstructed image using the UD acquisition scheme (A{sub L}=0.84). A 2D ANOVA found a statistically significant difference (p=0.038) at a significance level of 0.05. In the current study, although a reconstructed image was also available using the VD acquisition scheme, it was not used to assist the MC detection task which was done using the center projection alone. In the case of evaluation of detection accuracy of masses, the reconstruction with VD-DBT (A

  6. Mass balance and exergy analysis of a fast pyrolysis system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mass balance closure and exergetic efficiency is evaluated for a bench scale fast pyrolysis system. The USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) has developed this system for processing energy crops and agricultural residues for bio-oil (pyrolysis oil or pyrolysis liquids) production. Mass balance c...

  7. Equilibria and vibration of a buckled beam with attached masses or spring-mass systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaut, Raymond H.; Virgin, Lawrence N.

    2016-09-01

    A buckled beam with immovable pinned ends is considered. Attached to the beam are either one concentrated mass, two concentrated masses, a spring-mass system (that could model a human, robot, or passive vibration absorber), or a horizontal rigid bar with two vertical end springs (a "bounce-pitch" system that could model an animal or a vehicle). In the theoretical analysis, the beam is modeled as an inextensible elastica. Equilibrium configurations are determined first. Then small free vibrations about equilibrium are examined, and the lowest frequencies and corresponding modes are computed. The effects of various parameters are investigated, such as the ratio of the span to the total arc length of the beam, the locations and weights of the attached masses and systems, and the stiffnesses of the springs. For the case of a single attached mass, experiments are conducted and the results are compared to the theoretical ones.

  8. Search for Low-mass Objects in the Globular Cluster M4. I. Detection of Variable Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safonova, M.; Mkrtichian, D.; Hasan, P.; Sutaria, F.; Brosch, N.; Gorbikov, E.; Joseph, P.

    2016-02-01

    With every new discovery of an extrasolar planet, the absence of planets in globular clusters (GCs) becomes more and more conspicuous. Null detection of transiting hot Jupiters in GCs 47 Tuc, ω Cen, and NGC 6397 presents an important puzzle, raising questions about the role played by cluster metallicity and environment on formation and survival of planetary systems in densely populated stellar clusters. GCs were postulated to have many free-floating planets, for which microlensing (ML) is an established tool for detection. Dense environments, well-constrained distances and kinematics of lenses and sources, and photometry of thousands of stars simultaneously make GCs the ideal targets to search for ML. We present first results of a multisite, 69-night-long campaign to search for ML signatures of low-mass objects in the GC M4, which was chosen because of its proximity, location, and the actual existence of a planet. M4 was observed in R and I bands by two telescopes, 1 m T40 and 18-inch C18, of the Wise Observatory, Tel Aviv, Israel, from 2011 April to July. Observations on the 1 m telescope were carried out in service mode, gathering 12 to 48 20 s exposures per night for a total of 69 nights. C18 observations were done for about 4 hr a night for six nights in 2011 May. We employ a semiautomated pipeline to calibrate and reduce the images to the light curves that our group is developing for this purpose, which includes the differential photometry package DIAPL, written by Wozniak and modified by W. Pych. Several different diagnostics are employed for search of variability/transients. While no high-significance ML event was found in this observational run, we have detected more than 20 new variables and variable candidates in the M4 field, which we present here.

  9. Performance of Thermal Mass Flow Meters in a Variable Gravitational Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooker, John E.; Ruff, Gary A.

    2004-01-01

    The performance of five thermal mass flow meters, MKS Instruments 179A and 258C, Unit Instruments UFM-8100, Sierra Instruments 830L, and Hastings Instruments HFM-200, were tested on the KC-135 Reduced Gravity Aircraft in orthogonal, coparallel, and counterparallel orientations relative to gravity. Data was taken throughout the parabolic trajectory where the g-level varied from 0.01 to 1.8 times normal gravity. Each meter was calibrated in normal gravity in the orthogonal position prior to flight followed by ground testing at seven different flow conditions to establish a baseline operation. During the tests, the actual flow rate was measured independently using choked-flow orifices. Gravitational acceleration and attitude had a unique effect on the performance of each meter. All meters operated within acceptable limits at all gravity levels in the calibrated orthogonal position. However, when operated in other orientations, the deviations from the reference flow became substantial for several of the flow meters. Data analysis indicated that the greatest source of error was the effect of orientation, followed by the gravity level. This work emphasized that when operating thermal flow meters in a variable gravity environment, it is critical to orient the meter in the same direction relative to gravity in which it was calibrated. Unfortunately, there was no test in normal gravity that could predict the performance of a meter in reduced gravity. When operating in reduced gravity, all meters indicated within 5 percent of the full scale reading at all flow conditions and orientations.

  10. 2MASS J17112318-2724315: A DEEPLY EMBEDDED LOW-MASS PROTOSTELLAR SYSTEM IN THE B59 MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Riaz, B.; Martin, E. L.; Bouy, H.; Tata, R.

    2009-08-01

    We present near-infrared observations of the low-mass deeply embedded Class 0/I system 2MASS J17112318-2724315 (2M171123) in the B59 molecular cloud. Bright scattered light nebulosity is observed toward this source in the K{sub s} images, that seems to trace the edges of an outflow cavity. We report the detection of a low-luminosity protostar 2M17112255-27243448 (2M17112255) that lies {approx}8'' ({approx}1000 AU) from 2M171123. This is a Class I system, as indicated by its 2-8 {mu}m slope and Infrared Array Camera colors, with an estimated internal luminosity of {approx}0.3 L{sub sun}. We estimate a mass of {approx}0.12-0.25 M{sub sun} for this source, at an age of 0.1-1 Myr. Also presented is detailed modeling of the 2M171123 system. The best-fit parameters indicate a large envelope density of the order of {approx}10{sup -13} g cm{sup -3}, and an intermediate inclination between 53 deg. and 59 deg. The observed K{sub s} -band variability for this system could be explained by slight variability in the mass infall rate between 2.5E-5 and 1.8E-5 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}. The protostar 2M171123 exhibits a rarely observed absorption feature near 11.3 {mu}m within its 10 {mu}m silicate band. We find a strong correlation between the strength in this 11.3 {mu}m 'edge' and the H{sub 2}O-ice column density, indicating the origin of this feature in the thickness of the ice mantle over the silicate grains.

  11. Complex systems and the technology of variability analysis.

    PubMed

    Seely, Andrew J E; Macklem, Peter T

    2004-12-01

    Characteristic patterns of variation over time, namely rhythms, represent a defining feature of complex systems, one that is synonymous with life. Despite the intrinsic dynamic, interdependent and nonlinear relationships of their parts, complex biological systems exhibit robust systemic stability. Applied to critical care, it is the systemic properties of the host response to a physiological insult that manifest as health or illness and determine outcome in our patients. Variability analysis provides a novel technology with which to evaluate the overall properties of a complex system. This review highlights the means by which we scientifically measure variation, including analyses of overall variation (time domain analysis, frequency distribution, spectral power), frequency contribution (spectral analysis), scale invariant (fractal) behaviour (detrended fluctuation and power law analysis) and regularity (approximate and multiscale entropy). Each technique is presented with a definition, interpretation, clinical application, advantages, limitations and summary of its calculation. The ubiquitous association between altered variability and illness is highlighted, followed by an analysis of how variability analysis may significantly improve prognostication of severity of illness and guide therapeutic intervention in critically ill patients. PMID:15566580

  12. Inclusive B-meson production at the LHC in the general-mass variable-flavor-number scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Kniehl, B. A.; Kramer, G.; Schienbein, I.

    2011-11-01

    We calculate the next-to-leading-order cross section for the inclusive production of B mesons in pp collisions in the general-mass variable-flavor-number scheme, an approach that takes into account the finite mass of the b quarks. We use realistic evolved nonperturbative fragmentation functions obtained from fits to e{sup +}e{sup -} data and compare our results for the transverse-momentum and rapidity distributions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV with recent data from the CMS Collaboration at the CERN LHC. We find good agreement, in particular, at large values of p{sub T}.

  13. MEASURING THE MASS OF SOLAR SYSTEM PLANETS USING PULSAR TIMING

    SciTech Connect

    Champion, D. J.; Hobbs, G. B.; Manchester, R. N.; Edwards, R. T.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Sarkissian, J. M.; Backer, D. C.; Bailes, M.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Van Straten, W.; Coles, W.; Demorest, P. B.; Ferdman, R. D.; Purver, M. B.; Folkner, W. M.; Hotan, A. W.; Kramer, M.; Lommen, A. N.; Nice, D. J.; Stairs, I. H.

    2010-09-10

    High-precision pulsar timing relies on a solar system ephemeris in order to convert times of arrival (TOAs) of pulses measured at an observatory to the solar system barycenter. Any error in the conversion to the barycentric TOAs leads to a systematic variation in the observed timing residuals; specifically, an incorrect planetary mass leads to a predominantly sinusoidal variation having a period and phase associated with the planet's orbital motion about the Sun. By using an array of pulsars (PSRs J0437-4715, J1744-1134, J1857+0943, J1909-3744), the masses of the planetary systems from Mercury to Saturn have been determined. These masses are consistent with the best-known masses determined by spacecraft observations, with the mass of the Jovian system, 9.547921(2) x10{sup -4} M {sub sun}, being significantly more accurate than the mass determined from the Pioneer and Voyager spacecraft, and consistent with but less accurate than the value from the Galileo spacecraft. While spacecraft are likely to produce the most accurate measurements for individual solar system bodies, the pulsar technique is sensitive to planetary system masses and has the potential to provide the most accurate values of these masses for some planets.

  14. Managing variability in the IO performance of petascale storage systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Matthew; Zheng, Fang; Klasky, Scott; Schwan, Karsten; Oldfield, Ron A.; Lofstead, Gerald Fredrick, II; Liu, Qing; Kordenbrock, Todd

    2010-11-01

    Significant challenges exist for achieving peak or even consistent levels of performance when using IO systems at scale. They stem from sharing IO system resources across the processes of single large-scale applications and/or multiple simultaneous programs causing internal and external interference, which in turn, causes substantial reductions in IO performance. This paper presents interference effects measurements for two different file systems at multiple supercomputing sites. These measurements motivate developing a 'managed' IO approach using adaptive algorithms varying the IO system workload based on current levels and use areas. An implementation of these methods deployed for the shared, general scratch storage system on Oak Ridge National Laboratory machines achieves higher overall performance and less variability in both a typical usage environment and with artificially introduced levels of 'noise'. The latter serving to clearly delineate and illustrate potential problems arising from shared system usage and the advantages derived from actively managing it.

  15. Analysis of a Linear System for Variable-Thrust Control in the Terminal Phase of Rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hord, Richard A.; Durling, Barbara J.

    1961-01-01

    A linear system for applying thrust to a ferry vehicle in the 3 terminal phase of rendezvous with a satellite is analyzed. This system requires that the ferry thrust vector per unit mass be variable and equal to a suitable linear combination of the measured position and velocity vectors of the ferry relative to the satellite. The variations of the ferry position, speed, acceleration, and mass ratio are examined for several combinations of the initial conditions and two basic control parameters analogous to the undamped natural frequency and the fraction of critical damping. Upon making a desirable selection of one control parameter and requiring minimum fuel expenditure for given terminal-phase initial conditions, a simplified analysis in one dimension practically fixes the choice of the remaining control parameter. The system can be implemented by an automatic controller or by a pilot.

  16. Association of Body Mass Index with Depression, Anxiety and Suicide—An Instrumental Variable Analysis of the HUNT Study

    PubMed Central

    Bjørngaard, Johan Håkon; Carslake, David; Lund Nilsen, Tom Ivar; Linthorst, Astrid C. E.; Davey Smith, George; Gunnell, David; Romundstad, Pål Richard

    2015-01-01

    Objective While high body mass index is associated with an increased risk of depression and anxiety, cumulative evidence indicates that it is a protective factor for suicide. The associations from conventional observational studies of body mass index with mental health outcomes are likely to be influenced by reverse causality or confounding by ill-health. In the present study, we investigated the associations between offspring body mass index and parental anxiety, depression and suicide in order to avoid problems with reverse causality and confounding by ill-health. Methods We used data from 32,457 mother-offspring and 27,753 father-offspring pairs from the Norwegian HUNT-study. Anxiety and depression were assessed using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and suicide death from national registers. Associations between offspring and own body mass index and symptoms of anxiety and depression and suicide mortality were estimated using logistic and Cox regression. Causal effect estimates were estimated with a two sample instrument variable approach using offspring body mass index as an instrument for parental body mass index. Results Both own and offspring body mass index were positively associated with depression, while the results did not indicate any substantial association between body mass index and anxiety. Although precision was low, suicide mortality was inversely associated with own body mass index and the results from the analysis using offspring body mass index supported these results. Adjusted odds ratios per standard deviation body mass index from the instrumental variable analysis were 1.22 (95% CI: 1.05, 1.43) for depression, 1.10 (95% CI: 0.95, 1.27) for anxiety, and the instrumental variable estimated hazard ratios for suicide was 0.69 (95% CI: 0.30, 1.63). Conclusion The present study’s results indicate that suicide mortality is inversely associated with body mass index. We also found support for a positive association between body mass index

  17. Quantification and scaling of multipartite entanglement in continuous variable systems.

    PubMed

    Adesso, Gerardo; Serafini, Alessio; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2004-11-26

    We present a theoretical method to determine the multipartite entanglement between different partitions of multimode, fully or partially symmetric Gaussian states of continuous variable systems. For such states, we determine the exact expression of the logarithmic negativity and show that it coincides with that of equivalent two-mode Gaussian states. Exploiting this reduction, we demonstrate the scaling of the multipartite entanglement with the number of modes and its reliable experimental estimate by direct measurements of the global and local purities. PMID:15601075

  18. Balloon borne optical disk mass storage system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanek, M. D.; Jennings, D. A.

    1991-01-01

    An on-board data recording system for balloon-borne interferometer using a vacuum operable, ruggedized WORM optical drive is presented. This system, as presently under development, provides 320 Mbytes of data storage (or approximately 11 hrs at the 64 kbits/sec telemetry rate of the experiment). It has the capability of recording the unmodified telemetry bit system as transmitted or doing some preprocessing of the data onboard. The system is compact and requires less than 28 watts of battery power to operate.

  19. Time-variable gravity signal due to extratropic Pacific water mass redistribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, B. F.; Boy, J.-P.; Cox, C.; Au, A.

    2003-04-01

    Using the satellite-laser-ranging (SLR) data, Cox and Chao [2002] reported the detection of a large post-1998 anomaly (in the form of a positive "jump") in the time series of Earth's lowest-degree gravity harmonic J2, or the dynamic oblateness. Among several groups now examining the mass redistribution in the global geophysical fluids in search of the cause(s), we report here a temporally coinciding anomalies found in the extratropic north + south Pacific basins. Clearly seen in the leading EOF/PC mode for extratropic Pacific, these anomalies occurred in sea-surface height, sea-surface temperature, and temperature- and salinity-depth profiles. We based our analysis on two different data sources: TOPEX/Poseidon altimetry, and the ECCO ocean general circulation model output assimilating T/P data. The magnitude of these changes, when converted to equivalent J2 change, appears to be a few times too small to explain the observed J2 directly. These findings, and the fact that the anomalies occurred following the strong 1997-98 El Nino, suggest strong geophysical connection of the interannual-to-decadal variation of J2 with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and the ultimate global-change processes that cause PDO. More work is underway, and additional independent data sources are examined, paying close attention to the fact that the J2 anomaly has been reversing back to "normal" since 2001. These include: (1) cryospheric contributions (melting of glaciers and ice sheets); (2) land hydrological contributions; (3) polar sea influences (e.g., via deep flow); (4) fluid flow in Earth's core; (5) time-variable gravity signals from SLR in higher harmonic degree/order, including J3, J4, (2,1), and (2,2) coefficients, considering their lower signal-to-noise ratios; (6) Earth rotation data in terms of length-of-day and polar motion.

  20. Time-Variable Gravity Signal due to Extratropic Pacific Water Mass Redistribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, B. F.; Boy, J. -P.; Cox, C. M.; Au, A. Y.

    2003-01-01

    Using the satellite-laser-ranging (SLR) data, Cox and Chao [2002] reported the detection of a large post-1998 anomaly (in the form of a positive jump) in the time series of Earth s lowest-degree gravity harmonic 52, or the dynamic oblateness. Among several groups now examining the mass redistribution in the global geophysical fluids in search of the cause(s), we report here a temporally coinciding anomalies found in the extratropic north + south Pacific basins. Clearly seen in the leading EOFPC mode for extratropic Pacific, these anomalies occurred in sea-surface height, sea-surface temperature, and temperature- and salinity-depth profiles. We based our analysis on two different data sources: TOPEX/Poseidon altimetry, and the ECCO ocean general circulation model output assimilating T/P data. The magnitude of these changes, when converted to equivalent J2 change, appears to be a few times too small to explain the observed J2 directly. These findings, and the fact that the anomalies occurred following the strong 1997-98 El Nino, suggest strong geophysical connection of the interannual-to-decadal variation of 52 with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and the ultimate global-change processes that cause PDO. More work is underway, and additional independent data sources are examined, paying close attention to the fact that the J2 anomaly has been reversing back to normal since 2001. These include: (1) cryospheric contributions (melting of glaciers and ice sheets); (2) land hydrological contributions; (3) polar sea influences ( e g , via deep flow); (4) fluid flow in Earth's core; (5) time-variable gravity signals from SLR in higher harmonic degree/order, including J3,J4, (2,1), and (2,2) coefficients, considering their lower signal-to-noise ratios; (6) Earth rotation data in terms of length-of-day and polar motion.

  1. Year-to-year variability in haemoglobin mass response to two altitude training camps

    PubMed Central

    McLean, Blake D; Buttifant, David; Gore, Christopher J; White, Kevin; Kemp, Justin

    2013-01-01

    Aim To quantify the year-to-year variability of altitude-induced changes in haemoglobin mass (Hbmass) in elite team-sport athletes. Methods 12 Australian-Footballers completed a 19-day (ALT1) and 18-day (ALT2) moderate altitude (∼2100 m), training camp separated by 12 months. An additional 20 participants completed only one of the two training camps (ALT1 additional n=9, ALT2 additional n=11). Total Hbmass was assessed using carbon monoxide rebreathing before (PRE), after (POST1) and 4 weeks after each camp. The typical error of Hbmass for the pooled data of all 32 participants was 2.6%. A contemporary statistics analysis was used with the smallest worthwhile change set to 2% for Hbmass. Results POST1 Hbmass was very likely increased in ALT1 (3.6±1.6%, n=19; mean±∼90 CL) as well as ALT2 (4.4±1.3%, n=23) with an individual responsiveness of 1.3% and 2.2%, respectively. There was a small correlation between ALT1 and ALT2 (R=0.21, p=0.59) for a change in Hbmass, but a moderately inverse relationship between the change in Hbmass and initial relative Hbmass (g/kg (R=−0.51, p=0.04)). Conclusions Two preseason moderate altitude camps 1 year apart yielded a similar (4%) mean increase in Hbmass of elite footballers, with an individual responsiveness of approximately half the group mean effect, indicating that most players gained benefit. Nevertheless, the same individuals generally did not change their Hbmass consistently from year to year. Thus, a ‘responder’ or ‘non-responder’ to altitude for Hbmass does not appear to be a fixed trait. PMID:24282208

  2. Wearable depression monitoring system with heart-rate variability.

    PubMed

    Roh, Taehwan; Hong, Sunjoo; Yoo, Hoi-Jun

    2014-01-01

    A wearable depression monitoring system is proposed with an application-specific system-on-chip (SoC) solution. The SoC is designed to accelerate the filtering and feature extraction of heart-rate variability (HRV) from the electrocardiogram (ECG). Thanks to the SoC solution and planar-fashionable circuit board (P-FCB), the monitoring system becomes a low-power wearable system. Its dimension is 14cm × 7cm with 5mm thickness covering the chest band for convenient usage. In addition, with 3.7V 500mAh battery, its lifetime is at least 10 hours. For user's convenience, the system is interfacing to smart phones through Bluetooth communication. With the features of the HRV and Beck depression inventory (BDI), the smart phone application trains and classifies the user's depression scale with 71% of accuracy. PMID:25570021

  3. Quantifying Interannual Variability for Photovoltaic Systems in PVWatts

    SciTech Connect

    Ryberg, David Severin; Freeman, Janine; Blair, Nate

    2015-10-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) PVWatts is a relatively simple tool used by industry and individuals alike to easily estimate the amount of energy a photovoltaic (PV) system will produce throughout the course of a typical year. PVWatts Version 5 has previously been shown to be able to reasonably represent an operating system's output when provided with concurrent weather data, however this type of data is not available when estimating system output during future time frames. For this purpose PVWatts uses weather data from typical meteorological year (TMY) datasets which are available on the NREL website. The TMY files represent a statistically 'typical' year which by definition excludes anomalous weather patterns and as a result may not provide sufficient quantification of project risk to the financial community. It was therefore desired to quantify the interannual variability associated with TMY files in order to improve the understanding of risk associated with these projects. To begin to understand the interannual variability of a PV project, we simulated two archetypal PV system designs, which are common in the PV industry, in PVWatts using the NSRDB's 1961-1990 historical dataset. This dataset contains measured hourly weather data and spans the thirty years from 1961-1990 for 239 locations in the United States. To note, this historical dataset was used to compose the TMY2 dataset. Using the results of these simulations we computed several statistical metrics which may be of interest to the financial community and normalized the results with respect to the TMY energy prediction at each location, so that these results could be easily translated to similar systems. This report briefly describes the simulation process used and the statistical methodology employed for this project, but otherwise focuses mainly on a sample of our results. A short discussion of these results is also provided. It is our hope that this quantification of the

  4. Measures of quantum synchronization in continuous variable systems.

    PubMed

    Mari, A; Farace, A; Didier, N; Giovannetti, V; Fazio, R

    2013-09-01

    We introduce and characterize two different measures which quantify the level of synchronization of coupled continuous variable quantum systems. The two measures allow us to extend to the quantum domain the notions of complete and phase synchronization. The Heisenberg principle sets a universal bound to complete synchronization. The measure of phase synchronization is, in principle, unbounded; however, in the absence of quantum resources (e.g., squeezing) the synchronization level is bounded below a certain threshold. We elucidate some interesting connections between entanglement and synchronization and, finally, discuss an application based on quantum optomechanical systems. PMID:25166668

  5. Measures of Quantum Synchronization in Continuous Variable Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mari, A.; Farace, A.; Didier, N.; Giovannetti, V.; Fazio, R.

    2013-09-01

    We introduce and characterize two different measures which quantify the level of synchronization of coupled continuous variable quantum systems. The two measures allow us to extend to the quantum domain the notions of complete and phase synchronization. The Heisenberg principle sets a universal bound to complete synchronization. The measure of phase synchronization is, in principle, unbounded; however, in the absence of quantum resources (e.g., squeezing) the synchronization level is bounded below a certain threshold. We elucidate some interesting connections between entanglement and synchronization and, finally, discuss an application based on quantum optomechanical systems.

  6. Low-Mass Inflation Systems for Inflatable Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thunnissen, Daniel P.; Webster, Mark S.; Engelbrecht, Carl S.

    1995-01-01

    The use of inflatable space structures has often been proposed for aerospace and planetary applications. Communication, power generation, and very-long-baseline interferometry are just three potential applications of inflatable technology. The success of inflatable structures depends on the development of an applications of inflatable technology. This paper describes two design studies performed to develop a low mass inflation system. The first study takes advantage of existing onboard propulsion gases to reduce the overall system mass. The second study assumes that there is no onboard propulsion system. Both studies employ advanced components developed for the Pluto fast flyby spacecraft to further reduce mass. The study examined four different types of systems: hydrazine, nitrogen and water, nitrogen, and xenon. This study shows that all of these systems can be built for a small space structure with masses lower than 0.5 kilograms.

  7. Free vibrations of beam-mass-spring systems: analytical analysis with numerical confirmation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darabi, Mohammad A.; Kazemirad, Siavash; Ghayesh, Mergen H.

    2012-04-01

    Free vibrations of a beam-mass-spring system with different boundary conditions are analyzed both analytically and numerically. In the analytical analysis, the system is divided into three subsystems and the effects of the spring and the point mass are considered as internal boundary conditions between any two neighboring subsystems. The partial differential equations governing the motion of the subsystems and internal boundary conditions are then solved using the method of separation of variables. In the numerical analysis, the whole system is considered as a single system and the effects of the spring and point mass are introduced using the Dirac delta function. The Galerkin method is then employed to discretize the equation of motion and the resulting set of ordinary differential equations are solved via eigenvalue analysis. Analytical and numerical results are shown to be in very good agreement.

  8. Using GRACE measurements of time variable gravity, elevation changes from ICESat, OIB and ENVISAT and surface mass balance outputs from RACMO to improve ice mass balance estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutterley, T. C.; Velicogna, I.; Csatho, B. M.; van den Broeke, M. R.; Wahr, J. M.; Flament, T.; Rezvan-Behbahani, S.; Babonis, G. S.; A, G.

    2013-12-01

    The glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) correction represents a source of uncertainty for ice sheet mass balance estimates from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) time variable gravity measurements. We evaluate Greenland and Antarctic GIA corrections by comparing the spatial patterns of GRACE-derived ice mass trends corrected for glacial isostatic adjustment with volume changes from ICESat (Ice, Cloud, and Land Elevation Satellite), OIB (Operation IceBridge) and ENVISAT altimetry missions, and surface mass balance (SMB) products from the Regional Atmospheric Climate Model (RACMO). We show that using the spatial and temporal characteristics of the different contributions to the ice mass balance estimates that it is possible to evaluate different GIA corrections. In Greenland, the GRACE ice mass changes obtained using the Simpson et al. (2009) and Geruo et al. (2013) GIA corrections show good agreement in the spatial patterns and amplitude. The GRACE estimate corrected using the Wu et al. (2010) GIA shows similar spatial patterns to the other two, but produces an average ice mass loss for the entire ice sheet that is 50% smaller. In Antarctica, the total magnitude and spatial structure of the GRACE-estimated ice mass change is highly dependent on the GIA correction. In key basins of East Antarctica, the interpretation of regional ice mass changes can reflect the GIA model selection as the ice mass to GIA signal ratio is smaller. We apply the same methodology used for the Greenland ice sheet in Antarctica to evaluate the different GIA corrections and check for consistency between the different techniques at a regional scale.

  9. Mass properties measurement system: Dynamics and statics measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Keith L.

    1993-01-01

    This report presents and interprets experimental data obtained from the Mass Properties Measurement System (MPMS). Statics measurements yield the center-of-gravity of an unknown mass and dynamics measurements yield its inertia matrix. Observations of the MPMS performance has lead us to specific design criteria and an understanding of MPMS limitations.

  10. GROUNDWATER MASS TRANSPORT AND EQUILIBRIUM CHEMISTRY MODEL FOR MULTICOMPONENT SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A mass transport model, TRANQL, for a multicomponent solution system has been developed. The equilibrium interaction chemistry is posed independently of the mass transport equations which leads to a set of algebraic equations for the chemistry coupled to a set of differential equ...

  11. Masses and ages of Delta Scuti stars in eclipsing binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetkov, Ts. G.; Petrova, Ts. C.

    1993-05-01

    By using data mainly from Frolov et al. (1982) for four Delta Scuti stars in eclipsing binary systems, AB Cas, Y Cam, RS Cha, and AI Hya, their physical parameters, distances, and radial pulsation modes are determined. The evolutionary track systems of Iben (1967), Paczynski (1970), and Maeder and Meynet (1988) are interpolated in order to estimate evolutionary masses Me and ages t of these variables. Their pulsation masses MQ are estimated from the fitting formulae of Faulkner (1977) and Fitch (1981). Our estimates of evolutionary masses M(e) and pulsation masses M(Q) are close to the masses M determined by Frolov et al. from the star binarity. The only exception is AB Cas, for which there is no agreement between certain star parameters. Another, independent approach is also applied to the stars RS Cha and AI Hya: by using their photometric indices b - y and c(1) from the catalog of Lopez de Coca et al. (1990) and appropriate photometric calibrations, other sets of physical parameters, distances, modes, ages, and evolutionary and pulsation masses of both variables are obtained.

  12. Luminous Blue Variables, Cool Hypergiants, and Supernova Impostors: The Role of Episodic Mass Loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehner, A.; de Wit, W. J.; Baade, D.; Boffin, H. M. J.; Davidson, K.; Groh, J.; Humphreys, R. M.; Martayan, C.; Oudmaijer, R. D.; Rivinius, T.; Selman, F.; Steffen, W.

    2015-12-01

    The role of mass loss, especially episodic mass loss, in evolved massive stars is one of the outstanding questions in stellar evolution theory. IFU observations can provide superb information on the recent mass-loss history and the evolutionary stages. With VLT MUSE we have observed a representative sample of massive stars from different evolved stellar classes that underwent episodic mass loss, which gave rise to extended nebulae. The structural inhomogeneities and associated velocity differences in the nebulae are tracers of the mass-loss history. The simultaneous observation of all lines at each position in the nebulae provides very accurate line ratios for physical diagnostics.

  13. Extremal entanglement and mixedness in continuous variable systems

    SciTech Connect

    Adesso, Gerardo; Serafini, Alessio; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2004-08-01

    We investigate the relationship between mixedness and entanglement for Gaussian states of continuous variable systems. We introduce generalized entropies based on Schatten p norms to quantify the mixedness of a state and derive their explicit expressions in terms of symplectic spectra. We compare the hierarchies of mixedness provided by such measures with the one provided by the purity (defined as tr {rho}{sup 2} for the state {rho}) for generic n-mode states. We then review the analysis proving the existence of both maximally and minimally entangled states at given global and marginal purities, with the entanglement quantified by the logarithmic negativity. Based on these results, we extend such an analysis to generalized entropies, introducing and fully characterizing maximally and minimally entangled states for given global and local generalized entropies. We compare the different roles played by the purity and by the generalized p entropies in quantifying the entanglement and the mixedness of continuous variable systems. We introduce the concept of average logarithmic negativity, showing that it allows a reliable quantitative estimate of continuous variable entanglement by direct measurements of global and marginal generalized p entropies.

  14. Two-Stage Variable Sample-Rate Conversion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tkacenko, Andre

    2009-01-01

    A two-stage variable sample-rate conversion (SRC) system has been pro posed as part of a digital signal-processing system in a digital com munication radio receiver that utilizes a variety of data rates. The proposed system would be used as an interface between (1) an analog- todigital converter used in the front end of the receiver to sample an intermediatefrequency signal at a fixed input rate and (2) digita lly implemented tracking loops in subsequent stages that operate at v arious sample rates that are generally lower than the input sample r ate. This Two-Stage System would be capable of converting from an input sample rate to a desired lower output sample rate that could be var iable and not necessarily a rational fraction of the input rate.

  15. Variable buoyancy system for unmanned multi-domain vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, Marc; Bryant, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the system design, construction, and testing of an active variable buoyancy system (VBS) actuator with applications to unmanned multi-domain vehicles. Unmanned multi-domain vehicles require nontraditional VBS designs because of their unique operation requirements. We present a VBS actuator design that targets multi-domain vehicle design objectives of high endurance, stealth, and underwater loitering. The design features a rigid ballast tank with an inner elastic bladder connected to a hydraulic pump and a proportionally controlled vent valve. The system working fluid is obtained from the ambient surrounding water and the elastic bladder separates the water from pressurized gas, thus preventing any gas from escaping during a venting operation. An analytic model of the VBS characterizing the system dynamics is derived. Ballast tank prototype design and construction is discussed. A VBS test platform vehicle is presented, featuring two ballast tanks, motor, pump, and RF receiver for control.

  16. Dramatic variability of the carbonate system of the coastal ocean is regulated by physical and biogeochemical processes on multiple timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Z. I.; Hunt, D.

    2013-12-01

    Increased atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) from anthropogenic sources is acidifying marine environments with potentially dramatic implications for the physical, chemical and biological functioning of these ecosystems. If current trends continue, mean ocean pH is expected to decrease by ~0.2 units over the next ~50 years. Yet, at the same time there is substantial spatial and temporal variability in pH and other carbon system parameters in the ocean resulting in regions that already exceed long term projected pH changes, suggesting that short-term variability is an important layer of complexity on top of long term acidification. Thus, in order to develop predictions of future climate change impacts including ocean acidification, there is a critical need to characterize the natural range and variability of the marine CO2 system and the mechanisms responsible for this variability. Here we examine pH and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) variability at time intervals spanning 1 hour to >1 year in a dynamic coastal marine system to quantify variability of the carbon system at multiple time scales. Daily and seasonal variability of the carbon system is largely driven by temperature, alkalinity and the balance between primary production and respiration, but high frequency variability (hours to days) is further influenced by water mass movement (e.g. tides) and stochastic events (e.g. storms). Both annual variability (~0.3 units) and diurnal variability (~0.1 units) in coastal ocean acidity are similar in magnitude to long term projections associated with increasing atmospheric CO2 and their drivers highlight the importance of characterizing the complete carbonate system (and not just pH). Short term variability of ocean carbon parameters may already exert significant pressure on some coastal marine ecosystems with implications for ecology, biogeochemistry and evolution and this shorter term variability layers additive effects and complexity, including extreme values, on

  17. Small system for tritium accelerator mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Roberts, M.L.; Davis, J.C.

    1993-02-23

    Apparatus for ionizing and accelerating a sample containing isotopes of hydrogen and detecting the ratios of hydrogen isotopes contained in the sample is disclosed. An ion source generates a substantially linear ion beam including ions of tritium from the sample. A radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator is directly coupled to and axially aligned with the source at an angle of substantially zero degrees. The accelerator accelerates species of the sample having different mass to different energy levels along the same axis as the ion beam. A spectrometer is used to detect the concentration of tritium ions in the sample. In one form of the invention, an energy loss spectrometer is used which includes a foil to block the passage of hydrogen, deuterium and [sup 3]He ions, and a surface barrier or scintillation detector to detect the concentration of tritium ions. In another form of the invention, a combined momentum/energy loss spectrometer is used which includes a magnet to separate the ion beams, with Faraday cups to measure the hydrogen and deuterium and a surface barrier or scintillation detector for the tritium ions.

  18. Small system for tritium accelerator mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Roberts, Mark L.; Davis, Jay C.

    1993-01-01

    Apparatus for ionizing and accelerating a sample containing isotopes of hydrogen and detecting the ratios of hydrogen isotopes contained in the sample is disclosed. An ion source generates a substantially linear ion beam including ions of tritium from the sample. A radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator is directly coupled to and axially aligned with the source at an angle of substantially zero degrees. The accelerator accelerates species of the sample having different mass to different energy levels along the same axis as the ion beam. A spectrometer is used to detect the concentration of tritium ions in the sample. In one form of the invention, an energy loss spectrometer is used which includes a foil to block the passage of hydrogen, deuterium and .sup.3 He ions, and a surface barrier or scintillation detector to detect the concentration of tritium ions. In another form of the invention, a combined momentum/energy loss spectrometer is used which includes a magnet to separate the ion beams, with Faraday cups to measure the hydrogen and deuterium and a surface barrier or scintillation detector for the tritium ions.

  19. Realtime Multichannel System for Beat to Beat QT Interval Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starc, Vito; Schlegel, Todd T.

    2006-01-01

    The measurement of beat-to-beat QT interval variability (QTV) shows clinical promise for identifying several types of cardiac pathology. However, until now, there has been no device capable of displaying, in real time on a beattobeat basis, changes in QTV in all 12 conventional leads in a continuously monitored patient. While several software programs have been designed to analyze QTV, heretofore, such programs have all involved only a few channels (at most) and/or have required laborious user interaction or offline calculations and postprocessing, limiting their clinical utility. This paper describes a PC-based ECG software program that in real time, acquires, analyzes and displays QTV and also PQ interval variability (PQV) in each of the eight independent channels that constitute the 12lead conventional ECG. The system also processes certain related signals that are derived from singular value decomposition and that help to reduce the overall effects of noise on the realtime QTV and PQV results.

  20. NASA Langley Research Center's distributed mass storage system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pao, Juliet Z.; Humes, D. Creig

    1993-01-01

    There is a trend in institutions with high performance computing and data management requirements to explore mass storage systems with peripherals directly attached to a high speed network. The Distributed Mass Storage System (DMSS) Project at NASA LaRC is building such a system and expects to put it into production use by the end of 1993. This paper presents the design of the DMSS, some experiences in its development and use, and a performance analysis of its capabilities. The special features of this system are: (1) workstation class file servers running UniTree software; (2) third party I/O; (3) HIPPI network; (4) HIPPI/IPI3 disk array systems; (5) Storage Technology Corporation (STK) ACS 4400 automatic cartridge system; (6) CRAY Research Incorporated (CRI) CRAY Y-MP and CRAY-2 clients; (7) file server redundancy provision; and (8) a transition mechanism from the existent mass storage system to the DMSS.

  1. Model-Based Systems Engineering Approach to Managing Mass Margin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Seung H.; Bayer, Todd J.; Cole, Bjorn; Cooke, Brian; Dekens, Frank; Delp, Christopher; Lam, Doris

    2012-01-01

    When designing a flight system from concept through implementation, one of the fundamental systems engineering tasks ismanaging the mass margin and a mass equipment list (MEL) of the flight system. While generating a MEL and computing a mass margin is conceptually a trivial task, maintaining consistent and correct MELs and mass margins can be challenging due to the current practices of maintaining duplicate information in various forms, such as diagrams and tables, and in various media, such as files and emails. We have overcome this challenge through a model-based systems engineering (MBSE) approach within which we allow only a single-source-of-truth. In this paper we describe the modeling patternsused to capture the single-source-of-truth and the views that have been developed for the Europa Habitability Mission (EHM) project, a mission concept study, at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL).

  2. Parsing interindividual drug variability: an emerging role for systems pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Richard M; Park, B Kevin; Pirmohamed, Munir

    2015-01-01

    There is notable interindividual heterogeneity in drug response, affecting both drug efficacy and toxicity, resulting in patient harm and the inefficient utilization of limited healthcare resources. Pharmacogenomics is at the forefront of research to understand interindividual drug response variability, but although many genotype-drug response associations have been identified, translation of pharmacogenomic associations into clinical practice has been hampered by inconsistent findings and inadequate predictive values. These limitations are in part due to the complex interplay between drug-specific, human body and environmental factors influencing drug response and therefore pharmacogenomics, whilst intrinsically necessary, is by itself unlikely to adequately parse drug variability. The emergent, interdisciplinary and rapidly developing field of systems pharmacology, which incorporates but goes beyond pharmacogenomics, holds significant potential to further parse interindividual drug variability. Systems pharmacology broadly encompasses two distinct research efforts, pharmacologically-orientated systems biology and pharmacometrics. Pharmacologically-orientated systems biology utilizes high throughput omics technologies, including next-generation sequencing, transcriptomics and proteomics, to identify factors associated with differential drug response within the different levels of biological organization in the hierarchical human body. Increasingly complex pharmacometric models are being developed that quantitatively integrate factors associated with drug response. Although distinct, these research areas complement one another and continual development can be facilitated by iterating between dynamic experimental and computational findings. Ultimately, quantitative data-derived models of sufficient detail will be required to help realize the goal of precision medicine. WIREs Syst Biol Med 2015, 7:221–241. doi: 10.1002/wsbm.1302 PMID:25950758

  3. Earth System Science Education Centered on Natural Climate Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, P. C.; Ladochy, S.; Patzert, W. C.; Willis, J. K.

    2009-12-01

    Several new courses and many educational activities related to climate change are available to teachers and students of all grade levels. However, not all new discoveries in climate research have reached the science education community. In particular, effective learning tools explaining natural climate change are scarce. For example, the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) is a main cause of natural climate variability spanning decades. While most educators are familiar with the shorter-temporal events impacting climate, El Niño and La Niña, very little has trickled into the climate change curriculum on the PDO. We have developed two online educational modules, using an Earth system science approach, on the PDO and its role in climate change and variability. The first concentrates on the discovery of the PDO through records of salmon catch in the Pacific Northwest and Alaska. We present the connection between salmon abundance in the North Pacific to changing sea surface temperature patterns associated with the PDO. The connection between sea surface temperatures and salmon abundance led to the discovery of the PDO. Our activity also lets students explore the role of salmon in the economy and culture of the Pacific Northwest and Alaska and the environmental requirements for salmon survival. The second module is based on the climate of southern California and how changes in the Pacific Ocean , such as the PDO and ENSO (El Niño-Southern Oscillation), influence regional climate variability. PDO and ENSO signals are evident in the long-term temperature and precipitation record of southern California. Students are guided in the module to discover the relationships between Pacific Ocean conditions and southern California climate variability. The module also provides information establishing the relationship between climate change and variability and the state's water, energy, agriculture, wildfires and forestry, air quality and health issues. Both modules will be

  4. Aerosol mass spectrometry systems and methods

    SciTech Connect

    Fergenson, David P.; Gard, Eric E.

    2013-08-20

    A system according to one embodiment includes a particle accelerator that directs a succession of polydisperse aerosol particles along a predetermined particle path; multiple tracking lasers for generating beams of light across the particle path; an optical detector positioned adjacent the particle path for detecting impingement of the beams of light on individual particles; a desorption laser for generating a beam of desorbing light across the particle path about coaxial with a beam of light produced by one of the tracking lasers; and a controller, responsive to detection of a signal produced by the optical detector, that controls the desorption laser to generate the beam of desorbing light. Additional systems and methods are also disclosed.

  5. Exoplanetary System Dynamics: Planetary Multiplicity and Mass Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isoe, Mari; Kokubo, Eiichiro; Turner, Edwin

    2015-12-01

    Recently numerous systems consisting of multiple exoplanets have been discovered. Using a dataset of 375 systems (500 planets) discovered by the radial velocity method and 365 systems (899 planets) containing planet candidates found by the Kepler Mission, we investigate the dependence of the dynamical structure of planetary systems on their multiplicity and the masses of the member planets. We classify the planetary system by three parameters: planetary multiplicity, planetary mass, and the evolutionary stage of the central star. We normalize planetary masses by the mass of the central star and divide the planets into small and large categories by a cut at $10^{-4}$. The central star is classified into main-sequence or giant according to its evolutionary stage. We focus on the angular momentum deficit (AMD) of the systems and the orbital separation between adjacent planets normalized by their Hill radii. We find that in all categories the system AMD decreases with increasing multiplicity. This suggests that in order for multiple systems to be stable, each planet's orbit must be relatively circular. In addition, we find that the distribution of orbital eccentricities of the massive planets and low-mass planets differs. In particular, only high-mass planets have eccentricities larger than 0.4. In the low-mass systems around main sequence stars, we find that the orbital separation decreases with increasing multiplicity. In addition, the orbital separation around main-sequence stars is wider than that around giants. Furthermore, the minimum orbital separation is about 6.4 for non-resonant pairs. This paper presents the statistical properties of the dynamical structure of multiple planetary systems and discusses their formation.

  6. Continuous variable tangle, monogamy inequality, and entanglement sharing in Gaussian states of continuous variable systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adesso, Gerardo; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2006-01-01

    For continuous-variable (CV) systems, we introduce a measure of entanglement, the CV tangle (contangle), with the purpose of quantifying the distributed (shared) entanglement in multimode, multipartite Gaussian states. This is achieved by a proper convex-roof extension of the squared logarithmic negativity. We prove that the contangle satisfies the Coffman Kundu Wootters monogamy inequality in all three-mode Gaussian states, and in all fully symmetric N-mode Gaussian states, for arbitrary N. For three-mode pure states, we prove that the residual entanglement is a genuine tripartite entanglement monotone under Gaussian local operations and classical communication. We show that pure, symmetric three-mode Gaussian states allow a promiscuous entanglement sharing, having both maximum tripartite residual entanglement and maximum couplewise entanglement between any pair of modes. These states are thus simultaneous CV analogues of both the GHZ and the W states of three qubits: in CV systems monogamy does not prevent promiscuity, and the inequivalence between different classes of maximally entangled states, holding for systems of three or more qubits, is removed.

  7. Satellite-based global-ocean mass balance estimates of interannual variability and emerging trends in continental freshwater discharge

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Tajdarul H.; Famiglietti, James S.; Chambers, Don P.; Willis, Josh K.; Hilburn, Kyle

    2010-01-01

    Freshwater discharge from the continents is a key component of Earth’s water cycle that sustains human life and ecosystem health. Surprisingly, owing to a number of socioeconomic and political obstacles, a comprehensive global river discharge observing system does not yet exist. Here we use 13 years (1994–2006) of satellite precipitation, evaporation, and sea level data in an ocean mass balance to estimate freshwater discharge into the global ocean. Results indicate that global freshwater discharge averaged 36,055 km3/y for the study period while exhibiting significant interannual variability driven primarily by El Niño Southern Oscillation cycles. The method described here can ultimately be used to estimate long-term global discharge trends as the records of sea level rise and ocean temperature lengthen. For the relatively short 13-year period studied here, global discharge increased by 540 km3/y2, which was largely attributed to an increase of global-ocean evaporation (768 km3/y2). Sustained growth of these flux rates into long-term trends would provide evidence for increasing intensity of the hydrologic cycle. PMID:20921364

  8. Satellite-based global-ocean mass balance estimates of interannual variability and emerging trends in continental freshwater discharge.

    PubMed

    Syed, Tajdarul H; Famiglietti, James S; Chambers, Don P; Willis, Josh K; Hilburn, Kyle

    2010-10-19

    Freshwater discharge from the continents is a key component of Earth's water cycle that sustains human life and ecosystem health. Surprisingly, owing to a number of socioeconomic and political obstacles, a comprehensive global river discharge observing system does not yet exist. Here we use 13 years (1994-2006) of satellite precipitation, evaporation, and sea level data in an ocean mass balance to estimate freshwater discharge into the global ocean. Results indicate that global freshwater discharge averaged 36,055 km(3)/y for the study period while exhibiting significant interannual variability driven primarily by El Niño Southern Oscillation cycles. The method described here can ultimately be used to estimate long-term global discharge trends as the records of sea level rise and ocean temperature lengthen. For the relatively short 13-year period studied here, global discharge increased by 540 km(3)/y(2), which was largely attributed to an increase of global-ocean evaporation (768 km(3)/y(2)). Sustained growth of these flux rates into long-term trends would provide evidence for increasing intensity of the hydrologic cycle. PMID:20921364

  9. Design of a variable-focal-length optical system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricks, D.; Shannon, R. R.

    1984-01-01

    Requirements to place an entire optical system with a variable focal length ranging from 20 to 200 cm within a overall length somewhat less than 100 cm placed severe restrictions on the design of a zoom lens suitable for use on a comet explorer. The requirements of a wavelength range of 0.4 to 1.0 microns produced even greater limitations on the possibilities for a design that included a catadioptric (using mirrors and glass) front and followed by a zooming refractive portion. Capabilities available commercial zoom lenses as well as patents of optical systems are reviewed. Preliminary designs of the refractive optics zoom lens and the catadioptric system are presented and evaluated. Of the two, the latter probably has the best chance of success, so long as the shortest focal lengths are not really needed.

  10. Variable speed, condensing steam turbine and power system

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, D.A.

    1980-09-30

    The variable speed condensing steam turbine is a simplified and effective steam expander which is built mainly of simple, lowcost sheet metal parts and is designed to provide a variable speed/torque output range. The turbine concept is based on the past tesla turbine principle of equally spaced rotor discs to provide a long helical path for steam expansion with high operating efficiency and minimum friction. Unlike the cylindrical tesla turbine this unit is in conical form with uniformly varying diameter discs used to provide a variable speed/torque power output range. A further purpose of having a uniform conical housing and uniformly increasing diameter discs is to achieve maximum steam expansion which will lead to rapid steam condensation, or a precondensation condition for the expended steam passing through the conical turbine. A fuel conservation feature of the condensing turbine is a provision for separating hydrogen gas from a portion of the expanded/expended steam which will be conducted to the external fuel burner of the vapor generator, as part of the complete power system.