Science.gov

Sample records for variable rate applications

  1. Verification of a variable rate sprayer for nursery liner applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An experimental variable-rate sprayer designed for liner applications was tested by comparing its spray deposit and coverage, and droplet density inside canopies of six nursery liner varieties with constant-rate applications. Spray samplers, including water sensitive papers (WSP) and nylon screens, ...

  2. Development of variable-rate sprayer for nursery liner applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sensor-guided application technologies are needed to achieve constant spray deposition for the rapid growth of nursery liner trees during a growing season. An experimental real-time variable-rate sprayer that implemented 20 Hz ultrasonic sensors and pulse width modulation (PWM) solenoid valve-contro...

  3. Variable Rate Lime Application in Louisiana Sugarcane Production Systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Precision agriculture may offer sugarcane growers a management system that decreases costs and maximizes profits, while minimizing any potential negative environmental impact. The utility of variable-rate (VR) lime application in the initial production year (plant cane) of a 3-yr sugarcane crop cyc...

  4. Variable-Rate Lime Application for Louisiana Sugarcane Production Systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Precision agriculture may offer sugarcane growers a management system that decreases costs and maximizes profits, while minimizing any potential negative environmental impact. Variable rate (VR) application of lime and fertilizers is one area in which significant advantages may be realized. A seri...

  5. Evaluation of Application Accuracy and Performance of a Hydraulically Operated Variable-Rate Aerial Application System

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An aerial variable-rate application system consisting of a DGPS-based guidance system, automatic flow controller, and hydraulically controlled pump/valve was evaluated for response time to rapidly changing flow requirements and accuracy of application. Spray deposition position error was evaluated ...

  6. [Analysis of heart rate variability. Mathematical description and practical application].

    PubMed

    Sammito, S; Bckelmann, I

    2015-03-01

    The analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) has recently become established as a non-invasive measurement for estimation of demands on the cardiovascular system. The HRV reflects the interaction of the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems and allows the influence of the autonomic nervous system on the regulation of the cardiovascular system to be mathematically described. This review explicates the analysis method of HRV for time, frequency and non-linear methods as well as the range of parameters and the demand on acquisition time. The necessity and possibilities of artefact correction and advice for the selection of a reasonable acquisition period are discussed and standard values for selected HRV parameters are presented. PMID:25298003

  7. Mathematic models of water application for a variable rate irrigating hill-seeder

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A variable rate irrigating hill-seeder can adjust water application automatically according to the difference in soil moisture content in the field to alleviate drought and save water. Two key problems to realize variable rate water application are how to determine the right amount of water for the ...

  8. Mathematical models of water application for a variable rate irrigating hill-seeder

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A variable rate irrigating hill-seeder can adjust water application automatically according to the difference in soil moisture content in the field to alleviate drought and save water. Two key problems to realize variable rate water application are how to determine the right amount of water for the ...

  9. Partial budget analysis of variable-rate nitrogen application on dryland spring wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural producers can use variable-rate application technology to vary nitrogen (N) fertilizer within fields. This study was conducted to estimate changes in net returns from implementation of variable-rate N management (VNM) on hard red spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Net return from un...

  10. Crop Sensors for Variable-Rate Nitrogen Application to Cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton yield can be very responsive to nitrogen fertilizer. However, over-application of N can result in excess vegetative growth, which can delay maturity and increase the need for growth regulator, defoliant, and insecticide, in addition to wasting money on fertilizer that does not produce a retu...

  11. A Ferrofluidic Magnetic Micropump for Variable-Flow-Rate Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chia-Yen; Leong, Jik-Chang; Wang, Yao-Nan; Fu, Lung-Ming; Chen, Sih-Jia

    2012-04-01

    A novel micropump is proposed comprising two ferrofluidic plugs contained within a circular poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) microchannel and a permanent magnet positioned beneath one of the plugs and driven by a rotating stepping motor. The ferrofluidic plugs are immiscible with the sample fluid. Thus, as the stepping motor rotates, the sample trapped between the two plugs is driven through the circular microchannel and exits the pump via the outlet diffuser. Meanwhile, more sample fluid is drawn into the microchannel on the inlet side. As a result, a continuous pumping effect is achieved. It is shown that the flow rate in the proposed device can be easily controlled by adjusting the rotational velocity of the stepping motor. In addition, for a constant motor velocity, the flow rate can be improved by increasing the circular channel width. The experimental results show that a maximum flow rate of 93 l/min is obtained given a channel width of 1000 m and a rotational velocity of 8 rpm. In addition, it is shown that the pump is capable of developing a maximum pressure head of 75 mm water (0.66 kPa) with channel width of 500 m.

  12. Performance evaluation of a newly developed variable rate sprayer for nursery liner applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An experimental variable-rate sprayer designed for liner applications was tested by comparing its spray deposit, coverage, and droplet density inside canopies of six nursery liner varieties with constant-rate applications. Spray samplers, including water sensitive papers (WSP) and nylon screens, wer...

  13. A variable rate speech compressor for mobile applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeldener, S.; Kondoz, A. M.; Evans, B. G.

    1990-01-01

    One of the most promising speech coder at the bit rate of 9.6 to 4.8 kbits/s is CELP. Code Excited Linear Prediction (CELP) has been dominating 9.6 to 4.8 kbits/s region during the past 3 to 4 years. Its set back however, is its expensive implementation. As an alternative to CELP, the Base-Band CELP (CELP-BB) was developed which produced good quality speech comparable to CELP and a single chip implementable complexity as reported previously. Its robustness was also improved to tolerate errors up to 1.0 pct. and maintain intelligibility up to 5.0 pct. and more. Although, CELP-BB produces good quality speech at around 4.8 kbits/s, it has a fundamental problem when updating the pitch filter memory. A sub-optimal solution is proposed for this problem. Below 4.8 kbits/s, however, CELP-BB suffers from noticeable quantization noise as a result of the large vector dimensions used. Efficient representation of speech below 4.8 kbits/s is reported by introducing Sinusoidal Transform Coding (STC) to represent the LPC excitation which is called Sine Wave Excited LPC (SWELP). In this case, natural sounding good quality synthetic speech is obtained at around 2.4 kbits/s.

  14. Variable Rate Irrigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Systems are available to producers with the ability to make variable-rate applications of defoliants, fertilizer, lime, pesticides, plant growth regulators, and seed. These systems could potentially offer a producer great cost savings; however, the full potential of these benefits and savings cannot...

  15. Variable rate irrigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Systems are available to producers to make variable-rate applications of defoliants, fertilizer, lime, pesticides, plant growth regulators, and seed. These systems could potentially offer cost savings to a producer; however, the full potential of the benefits and savings cannot be realized if water ...

  16. Variable-rate nitrogen application algorithm based on canopy reflected spectrum and its influence on wheat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Hongxia; Zhao, Chunjiang; Huang, Wenjiang; Liu, Liangyun; Wang, Jihua; Ma, Youhua

    2005-01-01

    This study was to develop the time-specific and time-critical method to overcome the limitations of traditional field sampling methods for variable rate fertilization. Farmers, agricultural managers and grain processing enterprises are interested in measuring and assessing soil and crop status in order to apply adequate fertilizer quantities to crop growth. This paper focused on studying the relationship between vegetation index (OSAVI) and nitrogen content to determine the amount of nitrogen fertilizer recommended for variable rate management in precision agriculture. The traditional even rate fertilizer management was chosen as the CK. The grain yield, ear numbers, 1000-grain weight and grain protein content were measured among the CK, uniform treatments and variable rate fertilizer treatments. It indicated that variable rate fertilization reduced the variability of wheat yield, ear numbers and dry biomass, but it didn't increased crop yield and grain protein content significantly and did not decrease the variety of 1000-grain weight, compared to traditional rate application. The nitrogen fertilizer use efficiency was improved, for this purpose, the variable rate technology based on vegetation index could be used to prevent under ground water pollution and environmental deterioration.

  17. Variable Rate Application of Nematicides on Cotton Fields: A Promising Site-Specific Management Strategy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) lint yield losses associated with southern root-knot nematode [Meloidogyne incognita] (RKN) parasitism have increased during the last 20 years. The hypothesis that variable rate application of nematicides can reduce yield losses and reduce the risk for under- and over-...

  18. A Real-time Variable-Rate Sprayer for Nursery Liner Applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of conventional sprayers for control of pests and diseases with pesticides is excessive for ornamental nursery tree liner applications. A real-time variable-rate experimental sprayer was developed to reduce pesticide usage by coinciding spray outputs with canopy sizes. The sprayer consisted ...

  19. Application of variable-rate selective excitation pulses for spin labeling in perfusion MRI.

    PubMed

    He, Jiabao; Blamire, Andrew M

    2010-03-01

    Arterial spin labeling offers great potential in clinical applications for noninvasive measurement of cerebral blood flow. Arterial spin labeling tagging methods such as the flow sensitive alternating inversion recovery technique require efficient spatial inversion pulses with high inversion accuracy and sharp transition zones between inverted and noninverted magnetization, i.e., require a high performance inversion pulse. This work presents a comprehensive comparison of the advantages offered by a variable-rate selective excitation variant of the hyperbolic secant pulse against the widely used conventional hyperbolic secant pulse and the frequency offset corrected inversion pulses. Pulses were compared using simulation and experimental measurement in phantoms before being used in a flow sensitive alternating inversion recovery-arterial spin labeling perfusion measurement in normal volunteers. Both the hyperbolic secant and frequency offset corrected inversion pulses have small variations in inversion profiles that may lead to unwanted subtraction errors in arterial spin labeling at a level where the residual signal is comparable to the desired perfusion contrast. The variable-rate selective excitation pulse is shown to have improved inversion efficiency indicating its potential in perfusion MRI. The variable-rate selective excitation pulse variant also showed greatest tolerance to radiofrequency variation and off-resonance conditions, making it a robust choice for in vivo arterial spin labeling measurement. PMID:20146373

  20. Variable Thickness Liquid Crystal Films for High Repetition Rate Laser Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poole, Patrick; Willis, Christopher; Cochran, Ginevra; Hanna, Randall; Andereck, C. David; Schumacher, Douglass

    2015-05-01

    The presentation of a clean target or target substrate at high repetition rates is of importance to a number of photoelectron spectroscopy and free electron laser applications, often in high vacuum environments. Additionally, high intensity laser facilities are approaching the 10 Hz shot rate at petawatt powers, but are currently unable to insert targets at these rates. We have developed liquid crystal films to address this need for high rep rate targets while preserving the planar geometry advantageous to many applications. The molecular ordering of liquid crystal is variable with temperature and can be manipulated to form a layered thin film. In this way temperature and volume control can be used to vary film thickness in vacuo and on-demand between 10 nm and over 10 ?m. These techniques were previously applied to a single-shot ion acceleration experiment in, where target thickness critically determines the physics of the acceleration. Here we present an automatic film formation device that utilizes a linear sliding rail to form liquid crystal films within the aforementioned range at rates up to 0.1 Hz. The design ensures film formation location within 2 ?m RMS, well within the Rayleigh range of even short f-number systems. Details of liquid crystal films and this target formation device will be shown as well as recent experimental data from the Scarlet laser facility at OSU. This work was supported by DARPA through a grant from AMRDEC.

  1. Remote sensing and implications for variable-rate application using agricultural aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, Steven J.; Smith, Lowrey A.; Ray, Jeffrey D.; Zimba, Paul V.

    2004-01-01

    Aircraft routinely used for agricultural spray application are finding utility for remote sensing. Data obtained from remote sensing can be used for prescription application of pesticides, fertilizers, cotton growth regulators, and water (the latter with the assistance of hyperspectral indices and thermal imaging). Digital video was used to detect weeds in early cotton, and preliminary data were obtained to see if nitrogen status could be detected in early soybeans. Weeds were differentiable from early cotton at very low altitudes (65-m), with the aid of supervised classification algorithms in the ENVI image analysis software. The camera was flown at very low altitude for acceptable pixel resolution. Nitrogen status was not detectable by statistical analysis of digital numbers (DNs) obtained from images, but soybean cultivar differences were statistically discernable (F=26, p=0.01). Spectroradiometer data are being analyzed to identify narrow spectral bands that might aid in selecting camera filters for determination of plant nitrogen status. Multiple camera configurations are proposed to allow vegetative indices to be developed more readily. Both remotely sensed field images and ground data are to be used for decision-making in a proposed variable-rate application system for agricultural aircraft. For this system, prescriptions generated from digital imagery and data will be coupled with GPS-based swath guidance and programmable flow control.

  2. Variable rate application of nematicides on cotton fields: a promising site-specific management strategy.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Brenda V; Perry, Calvin; Sullivan, Dana; Lu, Ping; Kemerait, Robert; Davis, Richard F; Smith, Amanda; Vellidis, George; Nichols, Robert

    2012-03-01

    Field tests were conducted to determine if differences in response to nematicide application (i.e., root-knot nematode (RKN) populations, cotton yield, and profitability) occurred among RKN management zones (MZ). The MZ were delineated using fuzzy clustering of five terrain (TR) and edaphic (ED) field features related to soil texture: apparent soil electrical conductivity shallow (ECa-shallow) and deep (ECa-deep), elevation (EL), slope (SL), and changes in bare soil reflectance. Zones with lowest mean values of ECa- shallow, ECa- deep, NDVI, and SL were designated as at greater risk for high RKN levels. Nematicide-treated plots (4 rows wide and 30 m long) were established in a randomized complete block design within each zone, but the number of replications in each zone varied from four to six depending on the size of the zone.The nematicides aldicarb (Temik 15 G) and 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D,Telone II) were applied at two rates (0.51 and 1.0 kg a.i./ha for aldicarb, and 33.1 and 66.2 kg a.i./ha for 1,3-D) to RKN MZ in commercial fields between 2007 and 2009. A consolidated analysis over the entire season showed that regardless of the zone, there were not differences between aldicarb rates and 1,3-D rates. The result across zones showed that 1,3-D provided better RKN control than did aldicarb in zones with low ECa values (high RKN risk zones exhibiting more coarse-textured sandy soils). In contrast, in low risk zones with relatively higher ECa values (heavier textured soil), the effects of 1,3-D and aldicarb were equal and application of any of the treatments provided sufficient control. In low RKN risk zones, a farmer would often have lost money if a high rate of 1,3-D was applied. This study showed that the effect of nematicide type and rate on RKN control and cotton yield varied across management zones (MZ) with the most expensive treatment likely to provide economic benefit only in zones with coarser soil texture. This study demonstrates the value of site specific application of nematicides based on management zones, although this approach might not be economically beneficial in fields with little variability in soil texture. PMID:23482903

  3. VARIABLE RATE APPLICATION OF SOIL HERBICIDES IN ARABLE CROPS: FROM THEORY TO PRACTICE.

    PubMed

    Heijting, S; Kempenaar, C

    2014-01-01

    Soil herbicides are applied around crop emergence and kill germinating weeds in the surface layer of the soil. These herbicides play an important role in the chemical management of weeds in major arable crops. From an environmental point of view there is a clear need for smarter application of these chemicals. This paper presents research done in The Netherlands on Variable Rate Application (VRA) of soil herbicides by taking into account spatial variation of the soil. Herbicides adsorbed to soil parameters such as clay or organic matter are not available for herbicidal activity. Decision Support Rules (DSR) describe the relation between the soil parameter and herbicide dosage needed for effectively controlling weeds. Research methods such as greenhouse trials, models and on farm research to develop DSR are discussed and results are presented. Another important ingredient for VRA of soil herbicides is an accurate soil map of the field. Sampling and subsequent interpolation is costly. Soil scans measuring a proxy that is subsequently translated into soil properties such as clay fraction and soil organic matter content offer a quicker way to achieve such maps but validation is needed. DSR is applied to the soil map to get the variable dosage map. The farmer combines this map with the routing, spray volume and spray boom width in the Farm Management Information System (FMIS), resulting in a task file. This task file can subsequently be read by the board computer resulting in a VRA spray map. Reduction in soil herbicide depends on the DSR, the spatial variation and pattern of the soil, the spatial configuration of the routing and the technical advances of the spray equipment. Recently, within the framework the Programma Precisie Landbouw, first steps were made to test and implement this in practice. Currently, theory and practice of VRA of soil herbicides is developed within the research program IJKakker in close cooperation with pioneering farmers in The Netherlands. PMID:26084082

  4. A novel recursive Fourier transform for nonuniform sampled signals: application to heart rate variability spectrum estimation.

    PubMed

    Holland, Alexander; Aboy, Mateo

    2009-07-01

    We present a novel method to iteratively calculate discrete Fourier transforms for discrete time signals with sample time intervals that may be widely nonuniform. The proposed recursive Fourier transform (RFT) does not require interpolation of the samples to uniform time intervals, and each iterative transform update of N frequencies has computational order N. Because of the inherent non-uniformity in the time between successive heart beats, an application particularly well suited for this transform is power spectral density (PSD) estimation for heart rate variability. We compare RFT based spectrum estimation with Lomb-Scargle Transform (LST) based estimation. PSD estimation based on the LST also does not require uniform time samples, but the LST has a computational order greater than Nlog(N). We conducted an assessment study involving the analysis of quasi-stationary signals with various levels of randomly missing heart beats. Our results indicate that the RFT leads to comparable estimation performance to the LST with significantly less computational overhead and complexity for applications requiring iterative spectrum estimations. PMID:19247700

  5. Integrating Spray Plane-Based Remote Sensing and Rapid Image Processing with Variable-Rate Aerial Application.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A remote sensing and variable rate application system was configured for agricultural aircraft. This combination system has the potential of providing a completely integrated solution for all aspects of aerial site-specific application and includes remote sensing, image processing and georegistratio...

  6. Validity of the ithlete™ Smart Phone Application for Determining Ultra-Short-Term Heart Rate Variability

    PubMed Central

    Flatt, Andrew A.; Esco, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to cross-validate the ithlete™ heart rate variability smart phone application with an electrocardiograph for determining ultra-short-term root mean square of successive R-R intervals. The root mean square of successive R-R intervals was simultaneously determined via electrocardiograph and ithlete™ at rest in twenty five healthy participants. There were no significant differences between the electrocardiograph and ithlete™ derived root mean square of successive R-R interval values (p > 0.05) and the correlation was near perfect (r = 0.99, p < 0.001). In addition, the ithlete™ revealed a Standard Error of the Estimate of 1.47 and Bland Altman plot showed that the limits of agreement ranged from 2.57 below to 2.63 above the constant error of −0.03. In conclusion, the ithlete™ appeared to provide a suitably accurate measure of root mean square of successive R-R intervals when compared to the electrocardiograph measures obtained in the laboratory within the current sample of healthy adult participants. The current study lays groundwork for future research determining the efficacy of ithlete™ for reflecting athletic training status over a chronic conditioning period. PMID:24511344

  7. Change rates and prevalence of a dichotomous variable: simulations and applications.

    PubMed

    Brinks, Ralph; Landwehr, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    A common modelling approach in public health and epidemiology divides the population under study into compartments containing persons that share the same status. Here we consider a three-state model with the compartments: A, B and Dead. States A and B may be the states of any dichotomous variable, for example, Healthy and Ill, respectively. The transitions between the states are described by change rates, which depend on calendar time and on age. So far, a rigorous mathematical calculation of the prevalence of property B has been difficult, which has limited the use of the model in epidemiology and public health. We develop a partial differential equation (PDE) that simplifies the use of the three-state model. To demonstrate the validity of the PDE, it is applied to two simulation studies, one about a hypothetical chronic disease and one about dementia in Germany. In two further applications, the PDE may provide insights into smoking behaviour of males in Germany and the knowledge about the ovulatory cycle in Egyptian women. PMID:25749133

  8. Change Rates and Prevalence of a Dichotomous Variable: Simulations and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Brinks, Ralph; Landwehr, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    A common modelling approach in public health and epidemiology divides the population under study into compartments containing persons that share the same status. Here we consider a three-state model with the compartments: A, B and Dead. States A and B may be the states of any dichotomous variable, for example, Healthy and Ill, respectively. The transitions between the states are described by change rates, which depend on calendar time and on age. So far, a rigorous mathematical calculation of the prevalence of property B has been difficult, which has limited the use of the model in epidemiology and public health. We develop a partial differential equation (PDE) that simplifies the use of the three-state model. To demonstrate the validity of the PDE, it is applied to two simulation studies, one about a hypothetical chronic disease and one about dementia in Germany. In two further applications, the PDE may provide insights into smoking behaviour of males in Germany and the knowledge about the ovulatory cycle in Egyptian women. PMID:25749133

  9. Variable rate application of nematicides on cotton fields: A promising site-specific management strategy.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field tests were conducted to determine if differences in response to nematicide application (i.e., root-knot nematode (RKN) population levels, cotton yield, and profitability) occurred among RKN management zones (MZ). The MZ were delineated using variables related to soil texture, including appare...

  10. DYNAMIC TESTING OF GPS RECEIVERS ON AGRICULTURAL AIRCRAFT FOR REMOTE SENSING AND VARIABLE-RATE AERIAL APPLICATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers and GPS-based swath guidance systems are used on agricultural aircraft for remote sensing, airplane guidance, and to support variable-rate aerial application of crop inputs such as insecticides, cotton growth regulators, and defoliants. Agricultural aircraf...

  11. Compensating inherent linear move water application errors using a variable rate irrigation system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Continuous move irrigation systems such as linear move and center pivot irrigate unevenly when applying conventional uniform water rates due to the towers/motors stop/advance pattern. The effect of the cart movement pattern on linear move water application is larger on the first two spans which intr...

  12. Assessment of heart rate variability by application of central tendency measure.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Laurita; Barroso, Joaquim J; Macau, Elbert E N; de Godoy, Moacir F

    2015-11-01

    The heart rate variability (HRV) is an indicator of the subject homeostasis alterations. For a healthy individual, the HRV shows a nonlinear behavior, thus requiring a nonlinear approach to provide additional information about HRV dynamics. In this work, the nonlinear techniques, central tendency measure (CTM) and second-order difference plot, are applied to HRV analysis using the successive difference of RR intervals in a time series. In total are analyzed 170 tachograms collected by Polar monitor and then classified into three groups according to a cardiologist: healthy young adults, adults in preoperative evaluation for coronary artery bypass grafting for severe coronary disease and premature newborns. This approach identified the tachograms with high and low variability, which demonstrates the ability of CTM to classify and quantitatively characterize cardiac RR intervals. PMID:26396120

  13. [Analysis of Pulse Rate Variability and Its Application to Wearable Smart Devices].

    PubMed

    Shi, Bo; Chen, Fasheng; Chen, Jianfang; Tsau, Young

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, a reflection type photoelectric pulse wave sensor was designed for short-term pulse rate variability analysis. Photoplethysmography (PPG) signals and ECG signals (obtained with the Dimetek MicroECG recorder Dicare-m1CP) were recorded synchronously from 20 healthy subjects. The analytical results show a significant correlation (correlation coefficient r > 0.99) between the PPG-derived peak-to-peak (PP) intervals and the ECG-derived RR intervals. Besides, there are no significant differences (P > 0.05) between the HRV measured by ECG and the PRV quantified by the PPG whether in time domain, frequency domain, or the Poincar plot parameters. The experimental results suggest that the PPG-based short-term PRV analysis can be consistent with the ECG-based HRV measurement in wearable smart devices. PMID:26204736

  14. Application of an automatic adaptive filter for Heart Rate Variability analysis.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Laurita; Barroso, Joaquim J; Macau, Elbert E N; de Godoy, Moacir F

    2013-12-01

    The presence of artifacts and noise effects in temporal series can seriously hinder the analysis of Heart Rate Variability (HRV). The tachograms should be carefully edited to avoid erroneous interpretations. The physician should carefully analyze the tachogram in order to detect points that might be associated with unlikely biophysical behavior and manually eliminate them from the data series. However, this is a time-consuming procedure. To facilitate the pre-analysis of the tachogram, this study uses a method of data filtering based on an adaptive filter which is quickly able to analyze a large amount of data. The method was applied to 229 time series from a database of patients with different clinical conditions: premature newborns, full-term newborns, healthy young adults, adults submitted to a very-low-calorie diet, and adults under preoperative evaluation for coronary artery bypass grafting. This proposed method is compared to the demanding conventional method, wherein the corrections of occasional ectopic beats and artifacts are usually manually executed by a specialist. To confirm the reliability of the results obtained, correlation coefficients were calculated, using both automatic and manual methods of ltering for each HRV index selected. A high correlation between the results was found, with highly significant p values, for all cases, except for some parameters analyzed in the premature newborns group, an issue that is thoroughly discussed. The authors concluded that the proposed adaptive filtering method helps to efficiently handle the task of editing temporal series for HRV analysis. PMID:23962726

  15. An experimental variable-rate sprayer for nursery and orchard applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most chemical applications in orchards and ornamental nurseries are not target-oriented, resulting in significant loss of pesticides and contamination of the environment. To avoid over- and under-application of chemicals, sprayers must be designed to apply the appropriate amount of pesticide based o...

  16. Crop Sensors to Control Variable-Rate N Applications: Five Years of On-Farm Demonstrations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Optimal N fertilizer rate often varies widely from year to year, field to field, and place to place within a field. Site-specific N management is needed to meet crop needs without over-fertilizing. Crop sensors are an option for site-specific N management that potentially can account for year-specif...

  17. Evaluation of optical sensing and variable nitrogen rate application in Louisiana sugarcane production systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrogen (N) is the most limiting nutrient and considered the biggest expense among fertilizer inputs in sugarcane production. A need-based N application can be implemented with the use of optical sensor technology allowing acquisition of sugarcane N status in the absence of soil and plant tissue te...

  18. FIELD TESTING OF A VARIABLE RATE SPRINKLER AND CONTROL SYSTEM FOR SITE-SPECIFIC WATER AND NUTRIENT APPLICATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Development and implementation of site-specific sprinkler irrigation management has been limited due to the lack of variable rate sprinklers. Thirty-two prototype variable rate sprinklers were constructed and field tested on a three-span linear-move irrigation system. An algorithm was developed for...

  19. Zone edge effects with variable rate irrigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Variable rate irrigation (VRI) systems may offer solutions to enhance water use efficiency by addressing variability within a field. However, the design of VRI systems should be considered to maximize application uniformity within sprinkler zones, while minimizing edge effects between such zones alo...

  20. Symbolic Dynamics Analysis of Short Data Sets: an Application to Heart Rate Variability from Implantable Defibrillator Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zebrowski, Jan J.; Baranowski, Rafal; Przybylski, Andrzej

    2003-07-01

    A method is described for the assessment of the complexity of short data sets by nonlinear dynamics. The method was devised for and tested on human heart rate recordings approximately 2000 to 9000 RR intervals long which were extracted from the memory of implantable defibrillator devices (ICD). It is, however, applicable in a more general context. The ICDs are meant to control life-threatening episodes of ventricular tachycardia and/or ventricular fibrillation by applying a electric shock to the heart through intracardiac electrodes. It is well known that conventional ICD algorithms yield approximately 20--30 % of spurious interventions. The main aim of this work is to look for nonlinear dynamics methods to enhance the appropriateness of the ICD intervention. We first showed that nonlinear dynamics methods first applied to 24-hour heart rate variability analysis were able to detect the need for the ICD intervention. To be applicable to future ICD use, the methods must also be low in computational requirements. Methods to analyse the complexity of the short and non-stationary sets were devised. We calculated the Shannon entropy of symbolic words obtained in a sliding 50 beat window and analysed the dependence of this complexity measure on the time. Precursors were found extending much earlier time than the time the standard ICD algorithms span.

  1. PERFORMANCE OF AN AERIAL VARIABLE-RATE APPLICATION SYSTEM WITH A HYDRAULICALLY POWERED CHEMICAL PUMP AND SPRAY VALVE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The performance was evaluated for a variable-rate system that consisted of a SATLOC M3 with AirTrac software with WAAS corrected DGPS (5 Hz position update) and an AutoCal II automatic flow controller. This system was installed on an Air Tractor 402B equipped with an auxiliary hydraulic package tha...

  2. Flow variability of an aerial variable-rate nozzle at constant pressures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Variable-rate ground application systems have been in use for the past 15 years, but due to high application speeds, flow requirements, and aerodynamic considerations, variable-rate aerial nozzles have not been available until now. In 2006, Spray Target, Inc. released the VeriRate™ variable-rate aer...

  3. Crop growth and soil water spatial variability under a variable rate center pivot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Precision agriculture has mostly emphasized variable-rate nutrients, seeding, and pesticide applications. More recently, variable-rate irrigation equipment has been developed to explore the potential for managing irrigation spatially. Managing irrigation spatially can enhance water conservation and ...

  4. PERFORMANCE OF A VARIABLE RATE CENTER PIVOT SYSTEM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    US farmers have access to equipment for variable-rate application of most inputs, but some potential benefits of precision agriculture may be masked by uniform application of irrigation water. A system developed at the University of Georgia for variable-rate (VR) water application was installed on a...

  5. Multifractality and heart rate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassi, Roberto; Signorini, Maria Gabriella; Cerutti, Sergio

    2009-06-01

    In this paper, we participate to the discussion set forth by the editor of Chaos for the controversy, "Is the normal heart rate chaotic?" Our objective was to debate the question, "Is there some more appropriate term to characterize the heart rate variability (HRV) fluctuations?" We focused on the ?24 h RR series prepared for this topic and tried to verify with two different techniques, generalized structure functions and wavelet transform modulus maxima, if they might be described as being multifractal. For normal and congestive heart failure subjects, the hq exponents showed to be decreasing for increasing q with both methods, as it should be for multifractal signals. We then built 40 surrogate series to further verify such hypothesis. For most of the series (?75%-80% of cases) multifractality stood the test of the surrogate data employed. On the other hand, series coming from patients in atrial fibrillation showed a small, if any, degree of multifractality. The population analyzed is too small for definite conclusions, but the study supports the use of multifractal series to model HRV. Also it suggests that the regulatory action of autonomous nervous system might play a role in the observed multifractality.

  6. Application of alpha/theta neurofeedback and heart rate variability training to young contemporary dancers: state anxiety and creativity.

    PubMed

    Gruzelier, J H; Thompson, T; Redding, E; Brandt, R; Steffert, T

    2014-07-01

    As one in a series on the impact of EEG-neurofeedback in the performing arts, we set out to replicate a previous dance study in which alpha/theta (A/T) neurofeedback and heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback enhanced performance in competitive ballroom dancers compared with controls. First year contemporary dance conservatoire students were randomised to the same two psychophysiological interventions or a choreology instruction comparison group or a no-training control group. While there was demonstrable neurofeedback learning, there was no impact of the three interventions on dance performance as assessed by four experts. However, HRV training reduced anxiety and the reduction correlated with improved technique and artistry in performance; the anxiety scale items focussed on autonomic functions, especially cardiovascular activity. In line with the putative impact of hypnogogic training on creativity A/T training increased cognitive creativity with the test of unusual uses, but not insight problems. Methodological and theoretical implications are considered. PMID:23684733

  7. Method and system for spatially variable rate application of agricultural chemicals based on remotely sensed vegetation data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, Kenneth Brown (Inventor); Seal, Michael R. (Inventor); Lewis, Mark David (Inventor); Johnson, James William (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Remotely sensed spectral image data are used to develop a Vegetation Index file which represents spatial variations of actual crop vigor throughout a field that is under cultivation. The latter information is processed to place it in a format that can be used by farm personnel to correlate and calibrate it with actually observed crop conditions existing at control points within the field. Based on the results, farm personnel formulate a prescription request, which is forwarded via email or FTP to a central processing site, where the prescription is prepared. The latter is returned via email or FTP to on-side farm personnel, who can load it into a controller on a spray rig that directly applies inputs to the field at a spatially variable rate.

  8. Method and apparatus for spatially variable rate application of agricultural chemicals based on remotely sensed vegetation data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, Kenneth Brown (Inventor); Seal, Michael R. (Inventor); Lewis, Mark David (Inventor); Johnson, James William (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Remotely sensed spectral image data are used to develop a Vegetation Index file which represents spatial variations of actual crop vigor throughout a field that is under cultivation. The latter information is processed to place it in a format that can be used by farm personnel to correlate and calibrate it with actually observed crop conditions existing at control points within the field. Based on the results, farm personnel formulate a prescription request, which is forwarded via email or FTP to a central processing site, where the prescription is prepared. The latter is returned via email or FTP to on-side farm personnel, who can load it into a controller on a spray rig that directly applies inputs to the field at a spatially variable rate.

  9. Association between heart rate variability and manual pulse rate

    PubMed Central

    Hart, John

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: One model for neurological assessment in chiropractic pertains to autonomic variability, tested commonly with heart rate variability (HRV). Since HRV may not be convenient to use on all patient visits, more user-friendly methods may help fill-in the gaps. Accordingly, this study tests the association between manual pulse rate and heart rate variability. The manual rates were also compared to the heart rate derived from HRV. Methods: Forty-eight chiropractic students were examined with heart rate variability (SDNN and mean heart rate) and two manual radial pulse rate measurements. Inclusion criteria consisted of participants being chiropractic students. Exclusion criteria for 46 of the participants consisted of a body mass index being greater than 30, age greater than 35, and history of: a) dizziness upon standing, b) treatment of psychiatric disorders, and c) diabetes. No exclusion criteria were applied to the remaining two participants who were also convenience sample volunteers. Linear associations between the manual pulse rate methods and the two heart rate variability measures (SDNN and mean heart) were tested with Pearsons correlation and simple linear regression. Results: Moderate strength inverse (expected) correlations were observed between both manual pulse rate methods and SDNN (r = ?0.640, 95% CI ?0.781, ?0.435; r = ?0.632, 95% CI ?0.776, ?0.425). Strong direct (expected) relationships were observed between the manual pulse rate methods and heart rate derived from HRV technology (r = 0.934, 95% CI 0.885, 0.962; r = 0.941, 95% CI 0.897, 0.966). Conclusion: Manual pulse rates may be a useful option for assessing autonomic variability. Furthermore, this study showed a strong relationship between manual pulse rates and heart rate derived from HRV technology. PMID:23997250

  10. Rater variables associated with ITER ratings.

    PubMed

    Paget, Michael; Wu, Caren; McIlwrick, Joann; Woloschuk, Wayne; Wright, Bruce; McLaughlin, Kevin

    2013-10-01

    Advocates of holistic assessment consider the ITER a more authentic way to assess performance. But this assessment format is subjective and, therefore, susceptible to rater bias. Here our objective was to study the association between rater variables and ITER ratings. In this observational study our participants were clerks at the University of Calgary and preceptors who completed online ITERs between February 2008 and July 2009. Our outcome variable was global rating on the ITER (rated 1-5), and we used a generalized estimating equation model to identify variables associated with this rating. Students were rated "above expected level" or "outstanding" on 66.4 % of 1050 online ITERs completed during the study period. Two rater variables attenuated ITER ratings: the log transformed time taken to complete the ITER [? = -0.06, 95 % confidence interval (-0.10, -0.02), p = 0.002], and the number of ITERs that a preceptor completed over the time period of the study [? = -0.008 (-0.02, -0.001), p = 0.02]. In this study we found evidence of leniency bias that resulted in two thirds of students being rated above expected level of performance. This leniency bias appeared to be attenuated by delay in ITER completion, and was also blunted in preceptors who rated more students. As all biases threaten the internal validity of the assessment process, further research is needed to confirm these and other sources of rater bias in ITER ratings, and to explore ways of limiting their impact. PMID:22777161

  11. Performance evaluation of a center pivot variable rate irrigation system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Variable Rate Irrigation (VRI) for center pivots offers potential to match specific application rates to non-uniform soil conditions along the length of the lateral. The benefit of such systems is influenced by the areal extent of these variations and the smallest scale to which the irrigation syste...

  12. Rater Variables Associated with ITER Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paget, Michael; Wu, Caren; McIlwrick, Joann; Woloschuk, Wayne; Wright, Bruce; McLaughlin, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Advocates of holistic assessment consider the ITER a more authentic way to assess performance. But this assessment format is subjective and, therefore, susceptible to rater bias. Here our objective was to study the association between rater variables and ITER ratings. In this observational study our participants were clerks at the University of

  13. HEART RATE VARIABILITY AND 24-HOUR MINIMUM HEART RATE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heart rate variability (HRV) indices based on 24-hour electrocardiograph recordings have been used in clinical research studies to assess the aggregate activity of the autonomic nervous system. While 24-hour HRV is generally considered non-invasive, use in research protocols typically involves cons...

  14. Modeling heart rate variability by stochastic feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amaral, L. A.; Goldberger, A. L.; Stanley, H. E.

    1999-01-01

    We consider the question of how the cardiac rhythm spontaneously self-regulates and propose a new mechanism as a possible answer. We model the neuroautonomic regulation of the heart rate as a stochastic feedback system and find that the model successfully accounts for key characteristics of cardiac variability, including the 1/f power spectrum, the functional form and scaling of the distribution of variations of the interbeat intervals, and the correlations in the Fourier phases which indicate nonlinear dynamics.

  15. Multiscale power analysis for heart rate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Peng; Liu, Hongxing; Ni, Huangjing; Zhou, Jing; Xia, Lan; Ning, Xinbao

    2015-06-01

    We first introduce multiscale power (MSP) method to assess the power distribution of physiological signals on multiple time scales. Simulation on synthetic data and experiments on heart rate variability (HRV) are tested to support the approach. Results show that both physical and psychological changes influence power distribution significantly. A quantitative parameter, termed power difference (PD), is introduced to evaluate the degree of power distribution alteration. We find that dynamical correlation of HRV will be destroyed completely when PD>0.7.

  16. Evaluation of a Variable Rate Irrigating Hill-Seeder

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A variable rate irrigating hill-seeder is a drought-alleviating and water-saving agricultural machine that can adjust water application automatically according to the soil moisture content and realize the synchronization between water and seeds through photoelectric-detecting technology. The objecti...

  17. Evaluation of a center pivot variable rate irrigation system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Uniformity of water distribution of a variable rate center pivot irrigation system was evaluated. This 4-span center-pivot system was configured with 10 water application zones along its 766 ft-long lateral. Two experiments were conducted for the uniformity tests. In one test, a constant water appli...

  18. Heart rate variability - a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Billman, George E

    2011-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV), the beat-to-beat variation in either heart rate or the duration of the R-R interval - the heart period, has become a popular clinical and investigational tool. The temporal fluctuations in heart rate exhibit a marked synchrony with respiration (increasing during inspiration and decreasing during expiration - the so called respiratory sinus arrhythmia, RSA) and are widely believed to reflect changes in cardiac autonomic regulation. Although the exact contributions of the parasympathetic and the sympathetic divisions of the autonomic nervous system to this variability are controversial and remain the subject of active investigation and debate, a number of time and frequency domain techniques have been developed to provide insight into cardiac autonomic regulation in both health and disease. It is the purpose of this essay to provide an historical overview of the evolution in the concept of HRV. Briefly, pulse rate was first measured by ancient Greek physicians and scientists. However, it was not until the invention of the "Physician's Pulse Watch" (a watch with a second hand that could be stopped) in 1707 that changes in pulse rate could be accurately assessed. The Rev. Stephen Hales (1733) was the first to note that pulse varied with respiration and in 1847 Carl Ludwig was the first to record RSA. With the measurement of the ECG (1895) and advent of digital signal processing techniques in the 1960s, investigation of HRV and its relationship to health and disease has exploded. This essay will conclude with a brief description of time domain, frequency domain, and non-linear dynamic analysis techniques (and their limitations) that are commonly used to measure HRV. PMID:22144961

  19. Heart Rate Variability A Historical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Billman, George E.

    2011-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV), the beat-to-beat variation in either heart rate or the duration of the RR interval the heart period, has become a popular clinical and investigational tool. The temporal fluctuations in heart rate exhibit a marked synchrony with respiration (increasing during inspiration and decreasing during expiration the so called respiratory sinus arrhythmia, RSA) and are widely believed to reflect changes in cardiac autonomic regulation. Although the exact contributions of the parasympathetic and the sympathetic divisions of the autonomic nervous system to this variability are controversial and remain the subject of active investigation and debate, a number of time and frequency domain techniques have been developed to provide insight into cardiac autonomic regulation in both health and disease. It is the purpose of this essay to provide an historical overview of the evolution in the concept of HRV. Briefly, pulse rate was first measured by ancient Greek physicians and scientists. However, it was not until the invention of the Physicians Pulse Watch (a watch with a second hand that could be stopped) in 1707 that changes in pulse rate could be accurately assessed. The Rev. Stephen Hales (1733) was the first to note that pulse varied with respiration and in 1847 Carl Ludwig was the first to record RSA. With the measurement of the ECG (1895) and advent of digital signal processing techniques in the 1960s, investigation of HRV and its relationship to health and disease has exploded. This essay will conclude with a brief description of time domain, frequency domain, and non-linear dynamic analysis techniques (and their limitations) that are commonly used to measure HRV. PMID:22144961

  20. Air Pollution and Heart Rate Variability

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung Kyun; ONeill, Marie S.; Vokonas, Pantel S.; Sparrow, David; Wright, Robert O.; Coull, Brent; Nie, Huiling; Hu, Howard; Schwartz, Joel

    2009-01-01

    Background Outdoor air pollution and lead exposure can disturb cardiac autonomic function, but the effects of both these exposures together have not been studied. Methods We examined whether higher cumulative lead exposures, as measured by bone lead, modified cross-sectional associations between air pollution and heart rate variability among 384 elderly men from the Normative Aging Study. We used linear regression, controlling for clinical, demographic, and environmental covariates. Results We found graded, significant reductions in both high-frequency and low-frequency powers of heart rate variability in relation to ozone and sulfate across the quartiles of tibia lead. Interquartile range increases in ozone and sulfate were associated respectively, with 38% decrease (95% confidence interval = -54.6% to -14.9%) and 22% decrease (-40.4% to 1.6%) in high frequency, and 38% decrease (-51.9% to -20.4%) and 12% decrease (-28.6% to 9.3%) in low frequency, in the highest quartile of tibia lead after controlling for potential confounders. We observed similar but weaker effect modification by tibia lead adjusted for education and cumulative traffic (residuals of the regression of tibia lead on education and cumulative traffic). Patella lead modified only the ozone effect on heart rate variability. Conclusions People with long-term exposure to higher levels of lead may be more sensitive to cardiac autonomic dysfunction on high air pollution days. Efforts to understand how environmental exposures affect the health of an aging population should consider both current levels of pollution and history of lead exposure as susceptibility factors. PMID:18091001

  1. Comparison of pulse rate variability with heart rate variability during obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Khandoker, Ahsan H; Karmakar, Chandan K; Palaniswami, Marimuthu

    2011-03-01

    We investigate whether pulse rate variability (PRV) extracted from finger photo-plethysmography (Pleth) waveforms can be the substitute of heart rate variability (HRV) from RR intervals of ECG signals during obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Simultaneous measurements (ECG and Pleth) were taken from 29 healthy subjects during normal (undisturbed sleep) breathing and 22 patients with OSA during OSA events. Highly significant (p<0.01) correlations (1.0>r>0.95) were found between heart rate (HR) and pulse rate (PR). Bland-Altman plot of HR and PR shows good agreement (<5% difference). Comparison of 2 min recording epochs demonstrated significant differences (p<0.01) in time, frequency domains and complexity analysis, between normal and OSA events using PRV as well as HRV measures. Results suggest that both HRV and PRV indices could be used to distinguish OSA events from normal breathing during sleep. However, several variability measures (SDNN, RMSSD, HF power, LF/HF and sample entropy) of PR and HR were found to be significantly (p<0.01) different during OSA events. Therefore, we conclude that PRV provides accurate inter-pulse variability to measure heart rate variability under normal breathing in sleep but does not precisely reflect HRV in sleep disordered breathing. PMID:20980188

  2. Within-field variability in optimum nitrogen rate for corn linked to soil moisture variability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding the interaction between yield response to N and other growth-limiting factors is essential to improving spatially dependent N fertilizer applications. Our objective was to evaluate the impact of soil water content variability on the economic optimum N rate (EONR) for corn (Zea mays L.)...

  3. Heart rate variability in the dog: is it too variable?

    PubMed Central

    Minors, S L; O'Grady, M R

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate resting heart rate variability (HRV) as a simple noninvasive screening test for early autonomic derangement, heralding the development of occult dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Time and frequency domain HRV parameters were evaluated in 32 healthy Doberman pinschers, as potential predictors of the development of occult DCM within the following year and correlated with plasma catecholamines, markers of sympathoexcitation. Ten Dobermans with occult DCM and 8 Dobermans with congestive heart failure (CHF) were positive controls. Seven of the 32 "healthy" dogs developed occult DCM over the course of the study. None of the HRV parameters were associated with the development of occcult DCM based on univariate logistic regression. In dogs who developed occult DCM, plasma norepinephrine (NE) was inversely correlated with % fractal power (r = -0.81, P = 0.05). In dogs with occult DCM (positive controls), plasma NE was inversely correlated with fractal power (r = -0.81, r = 0.03), total power (r = -0.08, P = 0.03), high frequency power (r = -0.75, P = 0.05) and the standard deviation of the RR (r = -0.83, P = 0.02). The great inherent variability of the test may have limited our ability to discriminate between physiologic and pathophysiologic data, rendering this methodology inadequate as a screening test for early occult DCM. However, the negative correlations of NE with various forms of spectral power in dogs with occult DCM suggests that early in the natural history of DCM, there is parasympathetic withdrawal. A reduction in the nonharmonic, fractal component may be the first recognizable abnormality in the power spectrum of dogs who will develop DCM. PMID:9114965

  4. Fixed Distortion, Variable Rate Subband Coding Of Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darragh, John C.; Baker, Richard L.

    1988-10-01

    Most image coding systems are designed for transmission over constant bit rate channels. Such systems usually achieve varying coded image quality, depending on the inherent "compressibility" of the transmitted image. From a user's perspective it is desirable to have a codec which achieves a prescribed level of fidelity regardless of the image sent. The encoder output in this case is necessarily variable rate, making it difficult to reconcile with constant bit rate channels. However, the impending availability of high performance packet switched networks compatible with variable rate sources will make variable rate coding feasible. The codec design in this paper is based on a new method of allocating distortion rather than bits among the subbands. Judicious selection of subband quantizers compatible with the allocation procedure produces a simple four band encoder structure. Several four band structures are then nested in a hierarchical fashion for better compression performance; the resulting image codec achieves mean square distortion within 1.5 dB of the user specified value for a variety of images and over a wide range of distortions. Its rate-distortion performance rivals fixed rate systems of similar complexity. The design can be configured to take best advantage of datagram networks or prioritized packet-switched networks and the encoder output is suitable for progressive image transmission applications.

  5. Applications of Reaction Rate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an assignment in which students are to research and report on a chemical reaction whose increased or decreased rate is of practical importance. Specifically, students are asked to represent the reaction they have chosen with an acceptable chemical equation, identify a factor that influences its rate and explain how and why it…

  6. Applications of Reaction Rate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an assignment in which students are to research and report on a chemical reaction whose increased or decreased rate is of practical importance. Specifically, students are asked to represent the reaction they have chosen with an acceptable chemical equation, identify a factor that influences its rate and explain how and why it

  7. Variability analysis in low count rate sources. [in astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collura, A.; Maggio, A.; Sciortino, S.; Serio, S.; Vaiana, G. S.

    1987-01-01

    A method, based on the chi-square statistics, is described for detecting pulselike time variability in low count rate sources observed with photon-counting instruments. This method can be used even in the presence of observational gaps, takes full advantage of the filtering effect due to binning with different bin sizes, and takes into account the arbitrariness introduced by the binning phase. The procedure developed to limit the dependence of the results on the binning phase and ensure statistically correct results is described along with the application of the proposed procedure to a model of a variable source. Monte Carlo simulations are used to show how the method can be used to derive the characteristic variability time scales and that the method is more sensitive than the nonparametric Kolmogorov-Smirnov test in detecting variability to a given confidence level.

  8. Altitude, heart rate variability and aerobic capacities.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, L; Fouillot, J-P; Millet, G P; Robach, P; Nicolet, G; Brugniaux, J; Richalet, J-P

    2008-04-01

    We analyzed the relationship between aerobic capacities and changes in heart rate variability (HRV) in Nordic-skiers during living high-training low (Hi-Lo). Eleven skiers trained for 18 days at 1200 m, sleeping at 1200 m (LL, n = 5) or in hypoxic rooms (HL, n = 6, 3 x 6 days at altitudes of 2500 - 3000 - 3500 m, 11 h . day (-1)). Measurements were performed before, during and two weeks after Hi-Lo. VO(2max), peak power output were not improved in HL nor in LL, whereas VO(2) and power at the respiratory compensation point (VO(2RCP) and PRCP) increased by 7.5 % and 5.0 % only in HL. Significant changes in HRV occurred only in LL, in the standing position, including a 30 % (p < 0.05) increase in resting heart rate (HR), a 50 % (p < 0.05) decrease in total spectral power (TP) and a 77 % (p < 0.05) decrease in high frequency activity (HF). When all the subjects were pooled, the changes in HRV in the supine position were correlated to the changes in aerobic capacities, i.e., HF, LF and TP were correlated to VO(2RCP) and HR, HF and TP were correlated to PRCP. This study confirms the relationship between HRV and changes in aerobic capacity, therefore highlighting the potential value of HRV for monitoring altitude training adaptations. PMID:17687758

  9. Depression and heart rate variability in firefighters

    PubMed Central

    Al-Zaiti, Salah S; Carey, Mary G

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Depression has been found to increase the risk of mortality in patients with coronary artery disease through a mechanism of changing cardiac autonomic tone which is reflected by alteration of heart rate variability indices. This study investigated whether such mechanism existed in firefighters who were at high risk of depression and sudden cardiac death. Methods and results: In total, 107 firefighters were recruited. All completed Beck Depression Inventory and underwent 24-h ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring. The root-mean-square of successive differences, standard deviation of all normal-to-normal intervals index, and the percentage of differences between adjacent normal-to-normal intervals >50?ms were significantly lower in depressed than in non-depressed firefighters after controlling for hypertension, age, and body mass index (40.1??18.8 vs 62.5??77.4, p?

  10. Novel application of multi dynamic trend analysis as a sensitive tool for detecting the effects of aging and congestive heart failure on heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Cheng; Lin, Yu-Hsuan; Lo, Men-Tzung; Peng, Chung-Kang; Huang, Norden E; Yang, Cheryl C H; Kuo, Terry B J

    2016-02-01

    The complex fluctuations in heart rate variability (HRV) reflect cardiac autonomic modulation and are an indicator of congestive heart failure (CHF). This paper proposes a novel nonlinear approach to HRV investigation, the multi dynamic trend analysis (MDTA) method, based on the empirical mode decomposition algorithm of the Hilbert-Huang transform combined with a variable-sized sliding-window method. Electrocardiographic signal data obtained from the PhysioNet database were used. These data were from subjects with CHF (mean age = 59.4 ± 8.4), an age-matched elderly healthy control group (59.3 ± 10.6), and a healthy young group (30.3 ± 4.8); the HRVs of these subjects were processed using the MDTA method, time domain analysis, and frequency domain analysis. Among all HRV parameters, the MDTA absolute value slope (MDTS) and MDTA deviation (MDTD) exhibited the greatest area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristics in distinguishing between the CHF group and the healthy controls (AUC = 1.000) and between the healthy elderly subject group and the young subject group (AUC = 0.834 ± 0.067 for MDTS; 0.837 ± 0.066 for MDTD). The CHF subjects presented with lower MDTA indices than those of the healthy elderly subject group. Furthermore, the healthy elderly subjects exhibited lower MDTA indices than those of the young controls. The MDTA method can adaptively and automatically identify the intrinsic fluctuation on variable temporal and spatial scales when investigating complex fluctuations in the cardiac autonomic regulation effects of aging and CHF. PMID:26931590

  11. Novel application of multi dynamic trend analysis as a sensitive tool for detecting the effects of aging and congestive heart failure on heart rate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu-Cheng; Lin, Yu-Hsuan; Lo, Men-Tzung; Peng, Chung-Kang; Huang, Norden E.; Yang, Cheryl C. H.; Kuo, Terry B. J.

    2016-02-01

    The complex fluctuations in heart rate variability (HRV) reflect cardiac autonomic modulation and are an indicator of congestive heart failure (CHF). This paper proposes a novel nonlinear approach to HRV investigation, the multi dynamic trend analysis (MDTA) method, based on the empirical mode decomposition algorithm of the Hilbert-Huang transform combined with a variable-sized sliding-window method. Electrocardiographic signal data obtained from the PhysioNet database were used. These data were from subjects with CHF (mean age = 59.4 ± 8.4), an age-matched elderly healthy control group (59.3 ± 10.6), and a healthy young group (30.3 ± 4.8); the HRVs of these subjects were processed using the MDTA method, time domain analysis, and frequency domain analysis. Among all HRV parameters, the MDTA absolute value slope (MDTS) and MDTA deviation (MDTD) exhibited the greatest area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristics in distinguishing between the CHF group and the healthy controls (AUC = 1.000) and between the healthy elderly subject group and the young subject group (AUC = 0.834 ± 0.067 for MDTS; 0.837 ± 0.066 for MDTD). The CHF subjects presented with lower MDTA indices than those of the healthy elderly subject group. Furthermore, the healthy elderly subjects exhibited lower MDTA indices than those of the young controls. The MDTA method can adaptively and automatically identify the intrinsic fluctuation on variable temporal and spatial scales when investigating complex fluctuations in the cardiac autonomic regulation effects of aging and CHF.

  12. The Impact of Soil Sampling Errors on Variable Rate Fertilization

    SciTech Connect

    R. L. Hoskinson; R C. Rope; L G. Blackwood; R D. Lee; R K. Fink

    2004-07-01

    Variable rate fertilization of an agricultural field is done taking into account spatial variability in the soil’s characteristics. Most often, spatial variability in the soil’s fertility is the primary characteristic used to determine the differences in fertilizers applied from one point to the next. For several years the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) has been developing a Decision Support System for Agriculture (DSS4Ag) to determine the economically optimum recipe of various fertilizers to apply at each site in a field, based on existing soil fertility at the site, predicted yield of the crop that would result (and a predicted harvest-time market price), and the current costs and compositions of the fertilizers to be applied. Typically, soil is sampled at selected points within a field, the soil samples are analyzed in a lab, and the lab-measured soil fertility of the point samples is used for spatial interpolation, in some statistical manner, to determine the soil fertility at all other points in the field. Then a decision tool determines the fertilizers to apply at each point. Our research was conducted to measure the impact on the variable rate fertilization recipe caused by variability in the measurement of the soil’s fertility at the sampling points. The variability could be laboratory analytical errors or errors from variation in the sample collection method. The results show that for many of the fertility parameters, laboratory measurement error variance exceeds the estimated variability of the fertility measure across grid locations. These errors resulted in DSS4Ag fertilizer recipe recommended application rates that differed by up to 138 pounds of urea per acre, with half the field differing by more than 57 pounds of urea per acre. For potash the difference in application rate was up to 895 pounds per acre and over half the field differed by more than 242 pounds of potash per acre. Urea and potash differences accounted for almost 87% of the cost difference. The sum of these differences could result in a $34 per acre cost difference for the fertilization. Because of these differences, better analysis or better sampling methods may need to be done, or more samples collected, to ensure that the soil measurements are truly representative of the field’s spatial variability.

  13. Soil variability in engineering applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vessia, Giovanna

    2014-05-01

    Natural geomaterials, as soils and rocks, show spatial variability and heterogeneity of physical and mechanical properties. They can be measured by in field and laboratory testing. The heterogeneity concerns different values of litho-technical parameters pertaining similar lithological units placed close to each other. On the contrary, the variability is inherent to the formation and evolution processes experienced by each geological units (homogeneous geomaterials on average) and captured as a spatial structure of fluctuation of physical property values about their mean trend, e.g. the unit weight, the hydraulic permeability, the friction angle, the cohesion, among others. The preceding spatial variations shall be managed by engineering models to accomplish reliable designing of structures and infrastructures. Materon (1962) introduced the Geostatistics as the most comprehensive tool to manage spatial correlation of parameter measures used in a wide range of earth science applications. In the field of the engineering geology, Vanmarcke (1977) developed the first pioneering attempts to describe and manage the inherent variability in geomaterials although Terzaghi (1943) already highlighted that spatial fluctuations of physical and mechanical parameters used in geotechnical designing cannot be neglected. A few years later, Mandelbrot (1983) and Turcotte (1986) interpreted the internal arrangement of geomaterial according to Fractal Theory. In the same years, Vanmarcke (1983) proposed the Random Field Theory providing mathematical tools to deal with inherent variability of each geological units or stratigraphic succession that can be resembled as one material. In this approach, measurement fluctuations of physical parameters are interpreted through the spatial variability structure consisting in the correlation function and the scale of fluctuation. Fenton and Griffiths (1992) combined random field simulation with the finite element method to produce the Random Finite Element Method (RFEM). This method has been used to investigate the random behavior of soils in the context of a variety of classical geotechnical problems. Afterward, some following studies collected the worldwide variability values of many technical parameters of soils (Phoon and Kulhawy 1999a) and their spatial correlation functions (Phoon and Kulhawy 1999b). In Italy, Cherubini et al. (2007) calculated the spatial variability structure of sandy and clayey soils from the standard cone penetration test readings. The large extent of the worldwide measured spatial variability of soils and rocks heavily affects the reliability of geotechnical designing as well as other uncertainties introduced by testing devices and engineering models. So far, several methods have been provided to deal with the preceding sources of uncertainties in engineering designing models (e.g. First Order Reliability Method, Second Order Reliability Method, Response Surface Method, High Dimensional Model Representation, etc.). Nowadays, the efforts in this field have been focusing on (1) measuring spatial variability of different rocks and soils and (2) developing numerical models that take into account the spatial variability as additional physical variable. References Cherubini C., Vessia G. and Pula W. 2007. Statistical soil characterization of Italian sites for reliability analyses. Proc. 2nd Int. Workshop. on Characterization and Engineering Properties of Natural Soils, 3-4: 2681-2706. Griffiths D.V. and Fenton G.A. 1993. Seepage beneath water retaining structures founded on spatially random soil, Géotechnique, 43(6): 577-587. Mandelbrot B.B. 1983. The Fractal Geometry of Nature. San Francisco: W H Freeman. Matheron G. 1962. Traité de Géostatistique appliquée. Tome 1, Editions Technip, Paris, 334 p. Phoon K.K. and Kulhawy F.H. 1999a. Characterization of geotechnical variability. Can Geotech J, 36(4): 612-624. Phoon K.K. and Kulhawy F.H. 1999b. Evaluation of geotechnical property variability. Can Geotech J, 36(4): 625-639. Terzaghi K. 1943. Theoretical Soil Mechanics. New York: John Wiley and Sons. Turcotte D.L. 1986. Fractals and fragmentation. J Geophys Res, 91: 1921-1926. Vanmarcke E.H. 1977. Probabilistic modeling of soil profiles. J Geotech Eng Div, ASCE, 103: 1227-1246. Vanmarcke E.H. 1983. Random fields: analysis and synthesis. MIT Press, Cambridge.

  14. gHRV: Heart rate variability analysis made easy.

    PubMed

    Rodrguez-Liares, L; Lado, M J; Vila, X A; Mndez, A J; Cuesta, P

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, the gHRV software tool is presented. It is a simple, free and portable tool developed in python for analysing heart rate variability. It includes a graphical user interface and it can import files in multiple formats, analyse time intervals in the signal, test statistical significance and export the results. This paper also contains, as an example of use, a clinical analysis performed with the gHRV tool, namely to determine whether the heart rate variability indexes change across different stages of sleep. Results from tests completed by researchers who have tried gHRV are also explained: in general the application was positively valued and results reflect a high level of satisfaction. gHRV is in continuous development and new versions will include suggestions made by testers. PMID:24854108

  15. Smoothing variable-bit-rate video in an internetwork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rexford, Jennifer; Towsley, Don

    1997-10-01

    The burstiness of compressed video complicates the provisioning of network resources for emerging multimedia services. For stored video applications, the server can smooth the variable-bit-rate stream by prefetching frames into the client playback buffer in advanced of each burst. Drawing on a priori knowledge of the frame lengths and client buffer size, such bandwidth smoothing techniques can minimize the peak and variability of the rate requirements while avoiding underflow and overflow of the playback buffer. However, in an internetworking environment, a single service provider typically does not control the entire path from the stored-video server to the client buffer. To develop efficient techniques for transmitting variable-bit- rate video across a portion of the route, we investigate bandwidth smoothing across a tandem of nodes, which may or may not include the server and client sites. We show that it is possible to compute an optimal transmission schedule for the tandem system by solving a collection of independent single-link problems. To develop efficient techniques for minimizing the network bandwidth requirements, we characterize how the peak rate varies as a function of the buffer allocation and the playback delay. Simulation experiments illustrate the subtle interplay between buffer space, playback delay, and bandwidth requirements for a collection of full-length video traces. These analytic and empirical results suggest effective guidelines for provisioning network services for the transmission of compressed video.

  16. Study of time reversibility/irreversibility of cardiovascular data: theoretical results and application to laser Doppler flowmetry and heart rate variability signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humeau-Heurtier, Anne; Mah, Guillaume; Chapeau-Blondeau, Franois; Rousseau, David; Abraham, Pierre

    2012-07-01

    Time irreversibility can be qualitatively defined as the degree of a signal for temporal asymmetry. Recently, a time irreversibility characterization method based on entropies of positive and negative increments has been proposed for experimental signals and applied to heart rate variability (HRV) data (central cardiovascular system (CVS)). The results led to interesting information as a time asymmetry index was found different for young subjects and elderly people or heart disease patients. Nevertheless, similar analyses have not yet been conducted on laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) signals (peripheral CVS). We first propose to further investigate the above-mentioned characterization method. Then, LDF signals, LDF signals reduced to samples acquired during ECG R peaks (LDF_RECG signals) and HRV recorded simultaneously in healthy subjects are processed. Entropies of positive and negative increments for LDF signals show a nonmonotonic pattern: oscillationsmore or less pronounced, depending on subjectsare found with a period matching the one of cardiac activity. However, such oscillations are not found with LDF_RECG nor with HRV. Moreover, the asymmetry index for LDF is markedly different from the ones of LDF_RECG and HRV. The cardiac activity may therefore play a dominant role in the time irreversibility properties of LDF signals.

  17. Sternal pulse rate variability compared with heart rate variability on healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Chreiteh, Shadi S; Belhage, Bo; Hoppe, Karsten; Branebjerg, Jens; Thomsen, Erik V

    2014-01-01

    The heart rate variability (HRV) is a commonly used method to quantify the sympathetic and the parasympathetic modulation of the heart rate. HRV is mainly conducted on electrocardiograms (ECG). However, the use of photo-plethysmography (PPG) as a marker of the autonomic tone is emerging. In this study we investigated the feasibility of deriving pulse rate variability (PRV) using PPG signals recorded by a reflectance PPG sensor attached to the chest bone (sternum) and comparing it to HRV. The recordings were conducted on 9 healthy subjects being in a relaxed supine position and under forced respiration, where the subjects were asked to breathe following a visual scale with a rate of 27 breaths/min. HRV parameters such as the mean intervals (meanNN), the standard deviation of intervals (SDNN), the root mean square of difference of successive intervals (RMSSD), and the proportion of intervals differing more than 50 ms (pNN50) were calculated from the R peak-to-R peak (R-R) and pulse-to-pulse (P-P) intervals. In the frequency domain the low and high frequency ratio of the power spectral density (LF/HF) was also computed. The Pearson correlation coefficient showed significant correlation for all the parameters (r > 0.95 with p < 0.001) and the Bland-Altmann analysis showed close agreement between the two methods for all the parameters during resting and forced respiration condition. Thus, PRV analysis using sternal PPG can be an alternative to HRV analysis on healthy subjects at. PMID:25570719

  18. 26 CFR 1.1275-5 - Variable rate debt instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the fixed rate must be such that the fair market value of the variable rate debt instrument as of the issue date would be approximately the same as the fair market value of an otherwise identical debt..., the variable rate debt instrument has approximately the same fair market value as an...

  19. [Some regularities of the pulse rate variability].

    PubMed

    Dudin, S A; Zandanova, G I

    2011-01-01

    Histograms of heat rate for 878 persons of both sexes aged from 3 to 83 years have been analyzed. The total data sampling was more than one hundred thousand pulse beats. Summary bar charts (variance pulsograms) were built up separately for men and women. Within the range of 60-75 beat/min, the peaks with the beat rates corresponding to 60, 61, 63, 65, 68, and 75 beat/min were observed, their values being twice as big as those of the neighbouring ones. Within the range of 79-99 beat/min, minima were observed with beat rates of 79, 87, 91, 94, 97, and 99 beat/min. The distribution of these beat rates can be approximately described by the members of Fibonacci series from the determining beat rate of about 59-60 beat/min (maximuma) and about 101/102 beat/min towards a decrease in the beat rate (minima). The determining beat rates of about 60, 101, and 162 beat/min may be evidence of the hierarchy, which is also approximately described by the array close to the Fibonacci series. Within the range of 101 to 115 beat/min, the peaks for men are marked that correspond to the harmonic series with a period of 2 beat/min, i.e., 101, 103, 115 beat/min. PMID:21950077

  20. Wearable depression monitoring system with heart-rate variability.

    PubMed

    Roh, Taehwan; Hong, Sunjoo; Yoo, Hoi-Jun

    2014-01-01

    A wearable depression monitoring system is proposed with an application-specific system-on-chip (SoC) solution. The SoC is designed to accelerate the filtering and feature extraction of heart-rate variability (HRV) from the electrocardiogram (ECG). Thanks to the SoC solution and planar-fashionable circuit board (P-FCB), the monitoring system becomes a low-power wearable system. Its dimension is 14cm 7cm with 5mm thickness covering the chest band for convenient usage. In addition, with 3.7V 500mAh battery, its lifetime is at least 10 hours. For user's convenience, the system is interfacing to smart phones through Bluetooth communication. With the features of the HRV and Beck depression inventory (BDI), the smart phone application trains and classifies the user's depression scale with 71% of accuracy. PMID:25570021

  1. Validation of pulse rate variability as a surrogate for heart rate variability in chronically instrumented rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrino, Peter R.; Schiller, Alicia M.

    2014-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) is a function of cardiac autonomic tone that is widely used in both clinical and animal studies. In preclinical studies, HRV measures are frequently derived using the arterial pulse waveform from an implanted pressure telemetry device, termed pulse rate variability (PRV), instead of the electrocardiogram signal in accordance with clinical guidelines. The acceptability of PRV as a surrogate for HRV in instrumented animals is unknown. Using rabbits implanted with intracardiac leads and chronically implanted pressure transducers, we investigated the correlation and agreement of time-domain, frequency-domain, and nonlinear indexes of HRV and PRV at baseline. We also investigated the effects of ventricular pacing and autonomic blockade on both measures. At baseline, HRV and PRV time- and frequency-domain parameters showed robust correlations and moderate to high agreement, whereas nonlinear parameters showed slightly weaker correlations and varied agreement. Ventricular pacing almost completely eliminated HRV, and spectral analysis of the PRV signal revealed a HRV-independent rhythm. After cardiac autonomic blockade with atropine or metoprolol, the changes in time- and non-normalized frequency-domain measures of PRV continued to show strong correlations and moderate to high agreement with corresponding changes in HRV measures. Blockade-induced changes in nonlinear PRV indexes correlated poorly with HRV changes and showed weak agreement. These results suggest that time- and frequency-domain measures of PRV are acceptable surrogates for HRV even in the context of changing cardiac autonomic tone, but caution should be used when nonlinear measures are a primary end point or when HRV is very low as HRV-independent rhythms may predominate. PMID:24791786

  2. Development of digital flow control system for multi-channel variable-rate sprayers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Precision modulation of nozzle flow rates is a critical step for variable-rate spray applications in orchards and ornamental nurseries. An automatic flow rate control system activated with microprocessors and pulse width modulation (PWM) controlled solenoid valves was developed to control flow rates...

  3. 26 CFR 1.1275-5 - Variable rate debt instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Variable rate debt instruments. 1.1275-5 Section 1.1275-5 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Special Rules for Determining Capital Gains and Losses 1.1275-5 Variable rate debt instruments....

  4. 26 CFR 1.1275-5 - Variable rate debt instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Variable rate debt instruments. 1.1275-5 Section 1.1275-5 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Special Rules for Determining Capital Gains and Losses § 1.1275-5 Variable rate debt instruments....

  5. 26 CFR 1.1275-5 - Variable rate debt instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Variable rate debt instruments. 1.1275-5 Section 1.1275-5 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Special Rules for Determining Capital Gains and Losses § 1.1275-5 Variable rate debt instruments....

  6. Variable frequency drive applications guide

    SciTech Connect

    Laloudakis, D.J.

    1991-10-01

    Traditionally, fans and pumps have been designed to be capable of handling the maximum demand of the system in which they are installed. However, quite often the actual demand can vary and it can be much lower than the original design capacity. These situations have been corrected in the past through additions of outlet dampers to fans or throttling valves to pumps. While these can be effective and simple controls they severely affect the efficiency of the system. Variable frequency (speed) is the most efficient means of capacity control. The most cost effective method of achieving variable speed capacity control is using AC adjustable frequency drives. AC adjustable frequency controls convert any fixed speed AC motor into an adjustable speed device. Adjusting the speed of a motor, by controlling the frequency of the AC power to that motor, reduces its horsepower requirements. According to pump and fan laws, capacity is proportional to speed while horsepower is proportional to the cube of the speed. Therefore, by reducing the speed of an AC motor by 20 percent the horsepower requirement is reduced by nearly 50 percent. Reduced speed through variable frequency control allows for flexibility of meeting changing weather and comfort requirements without operating costly equipment at full capacity.

  7. An electronic flow control system for a variable-rate tree sprayer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Precise modulation of nozzle flow rates is a critical measure to achieve variable-rate spray applications. An electronic flow rate control system accommodating with microprocessors and pulse width modulation (PWM) controlled solenoid valves was designed to manipulate the output of spray nozzles inde...

  8. Noncontact imaging photoplethysmography to effectively access pulse rate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yu; Hu, Sijung; Azorin-Peris, Vicente; Kalawsky, Roy; Greenwald, Stephen

    2013-06-01

    Noncontact imaging photoplethysmography (PPG) can provide physiological assessment at various anatomical locations with no discomfort to the patient. However, most previous imaging PPG (iPPG) systems have been limited by a low sample frequency, which restricts their use clinically, for instance, in the assessment of pulse rate variability (PRV). In the present study, plethysmographic signals are remotely captured via an iPPG system at a rate of 200 fps. The physiological parameters (i.e., heart and respiration rate and PRV) derived from the iPPG datasets yield statistically comparable results to those acquired using a contact PPG sensor, the gold standard. More importantly, we present evidence that the negative influence of initial low sample frequency could be compensated via interpolation to improve the time domain resolution. We thereby provide further strong support for the low-cost webcam-based iPPG technique and, importantly, open up a new avenue for effective noncontact assessment of multiple physiological parameters, with potential applications in the evaluation of cardiac autonomic activity and remote sensing of vital physiological signs.

  9. Method of Discriminant Gravity Tolerance using Heart Rate Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Yutaka; Yokoyama, Kiyoko; Takada, Hiroki; Iwase, Satoshi

    When returning on the earth by the space flight, the space deconditioning may be developed. As this countermeasure, the artificial gravity load device using the centrifuge is proposed in the space station. But the gravity load might cause the faint, and safe gravity load is uncertainty. We proposed that discriminate strength of gravity tolerance using heart rate variability time series. Step function was inputted to AR model estimated from heart rate variability time series during rest or under light gravity load, and strength of the gravity tolerance was discriminated by the step response function. On the result, discriminant accuracy was 87.5% by using heart rate variability time series when gravity load of 1.0 G was added to the human lying on the supine. Therefore, possibility of discriminant of gravity tolerance was obtained by using heart rate variability time series when sympathetic hyperactivity. Discriminant of the gravity tolerance is expected before countermeasure of space deconditioning is executed.

  10. Factors Accounting for Variability in Superintendent Ratings of Academic Preparation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowalski, Theodore J.; Young, I. Phillip; McCord, Robert S.

    2011-01-01

    This study utilized findings from the 2010 decennial study of the school superintendent to determine the extent to which four predictor variables ("courses," "professor credibility," "size" [enrollment of employing school district], and "gender") accounted for variability in superintendent overall ratings of their academic preparation. The…

  11. Factors Accounting for Variability in Superintendent Ratings of Academic Preparation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowalski, Theodore J.; Young, I. Phillip; McCord, Robert S.

    2011-01-01

    This study utilized findings from the 2010 decennial study of the school superintendent to determine the extent to which four predictor variables ("courses," "professor credibility," "size" [enrollment of employing school district], and "gender") accounted for variability in superintendent overall ratings of their academic preparation. The

  12. Risks and rewards of variable-rate debt.

    PubMed

    Jordahl, Eric A

    2012-05-01

    Hospital and health system finance leaders should position their organizations to participate in the variable-rate market. To this end, one important step is to establish the right baseline variable-rate exposure target for the organization based on its credit and risk profile. Leaders also should be thoroughly familiar with the available products and understand the circumstances (pricing, terms, and embedded risk) under which the organization would be willing to deploy them within the overall capital structure. PMID:22616511

  13. Sympathetic reinnervation and heart rate variability after cardiac transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Lord, S. W.; Clayton, R. H.; Mitchell, L.; Dark, J. H.; Murray, A.; McComb, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Heart rate variability is thought to measure autonomic modulation, but the relation has never been demonstrated directly in humans. AIM: To test the hypothesis that increased low frequency heart rate variability reflects sympathetic reinnervation after cardiac transplantation. PATIENTS: 24 cardiac transplant recipients at the time of routine surveillance coronary angiography two or more years after cardiac transplantation, and 10 controls with normal coronary arteries undergoing angiography for investigation of chest pain. SETTING: Regional cardiothoracic centre. METHODS: Sympathetic effector function at the sinus node was assessed by measuring the fall in cycle length for two minutes after injection of tyramine to the artery supplying the sinus node. Heart rate variability was measured from three-minute RR interval sequences at rest, during metronomic respiration, and before and after atropine. RESULTS: The logarithm of the low frequency component of heart rate variability during metronomic respiration was linearly related to the logarithm of the change in cycle length after injection of tyramine (R2 = 0.28, P = 0.007). Absolute units more accurately reflected sympathetic effector function than did normalised units or the ratio of low frequency to high frequency. Atropine did not affect high frequency heart rate variability in transplant recipients. CONCLUSIONS: The low frequency component of heart rate variability is directly related to sympathetic reinnervation to the sinus node. PMID:9227297

  14. Economic and Environmental Benefits of Canopy Sensing for Variable-Rate Nitrogen Corn Fertilization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrogen (N) available to support corn production can be highly variable within fields. Canopy reflectance sensing for assessing crop N health has been proposed as a technology on which to base top-dress variable-rate N application. The objective of this research in Missouri and Nebraska was to eval...

  15. Ground-Based Canopy Reflectance Sensing for Variable-Rate Nitrogen Corn Fertilization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrogen (N) available to support corn (Zea mays L.) production can be highly variable within fields. Canopy reflectance sensing for assessing crop N health has been proposed as a technology to base top-dress variable-rate N application. Objectives of this research were to evaluate the use of active...

  16. Variable Rate Irrigation Management for Humid Climates Using a Conventional Center Pivot System

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigates suitability of a standard commercial center pivot system for variable-rate water application under Mid-South conditions. The objective was to determine if field variability data can be applied to conventional moving sprinkler systems to optimize irrigation management on non-u...

  17. Factors to consider in developing variable rate seeding prescriptions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The growing number of variable rate seeding (VRS)-enabled planters and wide-spread on-farm use of GPS technology make it easier than ever to deploy a VRS strategy. However, growers still need reliable methods to identify candidate fields, select appropriate seeding rates and evaluate whether their s...

  18. Comparison of TID Effects in Space-Like Variable Dose Rates and Constant Dose Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Richard D.; McClure, Steven S.; Rax, Bernard G.; Evans, Robin W.; Jun, Insoo

    2008-01-01

    The degradation of the LM193 dual voltage comparator has been studied at different TID dose rate profiles, including several different constant dose rates and a variable dose rate that simulates the behavior of a solar flare. A comparison of results following constant dose rate vs. variable dose rates is made to explore how well the constant dose rates used for typical part testing predict the performance during a simulated space-like mission. Testing at a constant dose rate equal to the lowest dose rate seen during the simulated flare provides an extremely conservative estimate of the overall amount of degradation. A constant dose rate equal to the average dose rate is also more conservative than the variable rate. It appears that, for this part, weighting the dose rates by the amount of total dose received at each rate (rather than the amount of time at each dose rate) results in an average rate that produces an amount of degradation that is a reasonable approximation to that received by the variable rate.

  19. Heart rate variability (HRV): an indicator of stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Balvinder; Durek, Joseph J.; O'Kane, Barbara L.; Tran, Nhien; Moses, Sophia; Luthra, Megha; Ikonomidou, Vasiliki N.

    2014-05-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) can be an important indicator of several conditions that affect the autonomic nervous system, including traumatic brain injury, post-traumatic stress disorder and peripheral neuropathy [3], [4], [10] & [11]. Recent work has shown that some of the HRV features can potentially be used for distinguishing a subject's normal mental state from a stressed one [4], [13] & [14]. In all of these past works, although processing is done in both frequency and time domains, few classification algorithms have been explored for classifying normal from stressed RRintervals. In this paper we used 30 s intervals from the Electrocardiogram (ECG) time series collected during normal and stressed conditions, produced by means of a modified version of the Trier social stress test, to compute HRV-driven features and subsequently applied a set of classification algorithms to distinguish stressed from normal conditions. To classify RR-intervals, we explored classification algorithms that are commonly used for medical applications, namely 1) logistic regression (LR) [16] and 2) linear discriminant analysis (LDA) [6]. Classification performance for various levels of stress over the entire test was quantified using precision, accuracy, sensitivity and specificity measures. Results from both classifiers were then compared to find an optimal classifier and HRV features for stress detection. This work, performed under an IRB-approved protocol, not only provides a method for developing models and classifiers based on human data, but also provides a foundation for a stress indicator tool based on HRV. Further, these classification tools will not only benefit many civilian applications for detecting stress, but also security and military applications for screening such as: border patrol, stress detection for deception [3],[17], and wounded-warrior triage [12].

  20. Variable-ratio versus variable-interval schedules: response rate, resistance to change, and preference.

    PubMed

    Nevin, J A; Randolph; Holland, S; McLean, A P

    2001-07-01

    Two experiments asked whether resistance to change depended on variable-ratio as opposed to variable-interval contingencies of reinforcement and the different response rates they establish. In Experiment 1, pigeons were trained on multiple random-ratio random-interval schedules with equated reinforcer rates. Baseline response rates were disrupted by intercomponent food, extinction, and prefeeding. Resistance to change relative to baseline was greater in the interval component, and the difference was correlated with the extent to which baseline response rates were higher in the ratio component. In Experiment 2, pigeons were trained on multiple variable-ratio variable-interval schedules in one half of each session and on concurrent chains in the other half in which the terminal links corresponded to the multiple-schedule components. The schedules were varied over six conditions, including two with equated reinforcer rates. In concurrent chains, preference strongly overmatched the ratio of obtained reinforcer rates. In multiple schedules, relative resistance to response-independent food during intercomponent intervals, extinction, and intercomponent food plus extinction depended on the ratio of obtained reinforcer rates but was less sensitive than was preference. When reinforcer rates were similar, both preference and relative resistance were greater for the variable-interval schedule, and the differences were correlated with the extent to which baseline response rates were higher on the variable-ratio schedule, confirming the results of Experiment 1. These results demonstrate that resistance to change and preference depend in part on response rate as well as obtained reinforcer rate, and challenge the independence of resistance to change and preference with respect to response rate proposed by behavioral momentum theory. PMID:11516115

  1. Universal structures of normal and pathological heart rate variability

    PubMed Central

    Gañán-Calvo, Alfonso M.; Fajardo-López, Juan

    2016-01-01

    The circulatory system of living organisms is an autonomous mechanical system softly tuned with the respiratory system, and both developed by evolution as a response to the complex oxygen demand patterns associated with motion. Circulatory health is rooted in adaptability, which entails an inherent variability. Here, we show that a generalized N-dimensional normalized graph representing heart rate variability reveals two universal arrhythmic patterns as specific signatures of health one reflects cardiac adaptability, and the other the cardiac-respiratory rate tuning. In addition, we identify at least three universal arrhythmic profiles whose presences raise in proportional detriment of the two healthy ones in pathological conditions (myocardial infarction; heart failure; and recovery from sudden death). The presence of the identified universal arrhythmic structures together with the position of the centre of mass of the heart rate variability graph provide a unique quantitative assessment of the health-pathology gradient. PMID:26912108

  2. Universal structures of normal and pathological heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Gañán-Calvo, Alfonso M; Fajardo-López, Juan

    2016-01-01

    The circulatory system of living organisms is an autonomous mechanical system softly tuned with the respiratory system, and both developed by evolution as a response to the complex oxygen demand patterns associated with motion. Circulatory health is rooted in adaptability, which entails an inherent variability. Here, we show that a generalized N-dimensional normalized graph representing heart rate variability reveals two universal arrhythmic patterns as specific signatures of health one reflects cardiac adaptability, and the other the cardiac-respiratory rate tuning. In addition, we identify at least three universal arrhythmic profiles whose presences raise in proportional detriment of the two healthy ones in pathological conditions (myocardial infarction; heart failure; and recovery from sudden death). The presence of the identified universal arrhythmic structures together with the position of the centre of mass of the heart rate variability graph provide a unique quantitative assessment of the health-pathology gradient. PMID:26912108

  3. Automating variable rate irrigation management prescriptions for center pivots from field data maps

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Variable rate irrigation (VRI) enables center pivot systems to match irrigation application to non-uniform field needs. This technology has potential to improve application and water-use efficiency while reducing environmental impacts from excess runoff and poor water quality. Proper management of V...

  4. Fetal heart rate and fetal heart rate variability in Lipizzaner broodmares.

    PubMed

    Baska-Vincze, Boglrka; Baska, Ferenc; Szenci, Ott

    2015-03-01

    Monitoring fetal heart rate (FHR) and fetal heart rate variability (FHRV) helps to understand and evaluate normal and pathological conditions in the foal. The aim of this study was to establish normal heart rate reference values for the ongoing equine pregnancy and to perform a heart rate variability (HRV) time-domain analysis in Lipizzaner mares. Seventeen middle- and late-term (days 121-333) pregnant Lipizzaner mares were examined using fetomaternal electrocardiography (ECG). The mean FHR (P = 0.004) and the standard deviation of FHR (P = 0.012) significantly decreased during the pregnancy. FHR SD values decreased from 115 35 to 79 9 bpm between months 5 and 11. Our data showed that HRV in the foal decreased as the pregnancy progressed, which is in contrast with the findings of earlier equine studies. The standard deviation of normal-normal intervals (SDNN) was higher (70 25 to 166 108 msec) than described previously. The root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD) decreased from 105 69 to 77 37 msec between the 5th and 11th month of gestation. Using telemetric ECG equipment, we could detect equine fetal heartbeat on day 121 for the first time. In addition, the large differences observed in the HR values of four mare-fetus pairs in four consecutive months support the assumption that there might be 'high-HR' and 'low-HR' fetuses in horses. It can be concluded that the analysis of FHR and FHRV is a promising tool for the assessment of fetal well-being but the applicability of these parameters in the clinical setting and in studs requires further investigation. PMID:25655416

  5. Heart rate variability interventions for concussion and rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Conder, Robert L; Conder, Alanna A

    2014-01-01

    The study of heart rate variability (HRV) has emerged as an essential component of cardiovascular health, as well as a physiological mechanism by which one can increase the interactive communication between the cardiac and the neurocognitive systems (i.e., the body and the brain). It is well-established that lack of HRV implies cardiopathology, morbidity, reduced quality-of-life, and precipitous mortality. On the positive, optimal HRV has been associated with good cardiovascular health, autonomic nervous system (ANS) control, emotional regulation, and enhanced neurocognitive processing. In addition to health benefits, optimal HRV has been shown to improve neurocognitive performance by enhancing focus, visual acuity and readiness, and by promoting emotional regulation needed for peak performance. In concussed athletes and soldiers, concussions not only alter brain connectivity, but also alter cardiac functioning and impair cardiovascular performance upon exertion. Altered sympathetic and parasympathetic balance in the ANS has been postulated as a critical factor in refractory post concussive syndrome (PCS). This article will review both the pathological aspects of reduced HRV on athletic performance, as well as the cardiovascular and cerebrovascular components of concussion and PCS. Additionally, this article will review interventions with HRV biofeedback (HRV BFB) training as a promising and underutilized treatment for sports and military-related concussion. Finally, this article will review research and promising case studies pertaining to use of HRV BFB for enhancement of cognition and performance, with applicability to concussion rehabilitation. PMID:25165461

  6. Heart rate variability interventions for concussion and rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Conder, Robert L.; Conder, Alanna A.

    2014-01-01

    The study of heart rate variability (HRV) has emerged as an essential component of cardiovascular health, as well as a physiological mechanism by which one can increase the interactive communication between the cardiac and the neurocognitive systems (i.e., the body and the brain). It is well-established that lack of HRV implies cardiopathology, morbidity, reduced quality-of-life, and precipitous mortality. On the positive, optimal HRV has been associated with good cardiovascular health, autonomic nervous system (ANS) control, emotional regulation, and enhanced neurocognitive processing. In addition to health benefits, optimal HRV has been shown to improve neurocognitive performance by enhancing focus, visual acuity and readiness, and by promoting emotional regulation needed for peak performance. In concussed athletes and soldiers, concussions not only alter brain connectivity, but also alter cardiac functioning and impair cardiovascular performance upon exertion. Altered sympathetic and parasympathetic balance in the ANS has been postulated as a critical factor in refractory post concussive syndrome (PCS). This article will review both the pathological aspects of reduced HRV on athletic performance, as well as the cardiovascular and cerebrovascular components of concussion and PCS. Additionally, this article will review interventions with HRV biofeedback (HRV BFB) training as a promising and underutilized treatment for sports and military-related concussion. Finally, this article will review research and promising case studies pertaining to use of HRV BFB for enhancement of cognition and performance, with applicability to concussion rehabilitation. PMID:25165461

  7. Two-Stage Variable Sample-Rate Conversion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tkacenko, Andre

    2009-01-01

    A two-stage variable sample-rate conversion (SRC) system has been pro posed as part of a digital signal-processing system in a digital com munication radio receiver that utilizes a variety of data rates. The proposed system would be used as an interface between (1) an analog- todigital converter used in the front end of the receiver to sample an intermediatefrequency signal at a fixed input rate and (2) digita lly implemented tracking loops in subsequent stages that operate at v arious sample rates that are generally lower than the input sample r ate. This Two-Stage System would be capable of converting from an input sample rate to a desired lower output sample rate that could be var iable and not necessarily a rational fraction of the input rate.

  8. Heart rate variability in risk stratification of cardiac patients.

    PubMed

    Huikuri, Heikki V; Stein, Phyllis K

    2013-01-01

    Heart rate (HR) variability has been extensively studied in cardiac patients, especially in patients surviving an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and also in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) or left ventricular (LV) dysfunction. The majority of studies have shown that patients with reduced or abnormal HR variability have an increased risk of mortality within a few years after an AMI or after a diagnosis of CHF/LV dysfunction. Various measures of HR dynamics, such as time-domain, spectral, and non-linear measures of HR variability have been used in risk stratification. The prognostic power of various measures, except of those reflecting rapid R-R interval oscillations, has been almost identical, albeit some non-linear HR variability measures, such as short-term fractal scaling exponent have provided somewhat better prognostic information than the others. Abnormal HR variability predicts both sudden and non-sudden cardiac death. Because of remodeling of the arrhythmia substrate after AMI, early measurement of HR variability to identify those at high risk should likely be repeated later in order to assess the risk of fatal arrhythmia events. Future randomized trials using HR variability/turbulence as one of the pre-defined inclusion criteria will show whether routine measurement of HR variability/turbulence will become a routine clinical tool for risk stratification of cardiac patients. PMID:24215747

  9. ARTiiFACT: a tool for heart rate artifact processing and heart rate variability analysis.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Tobias; Stterlin, Stefan; Schulz, Stefan M; Vgele, Claus

    2011-12-01

    The importance of appropriate handling of artifacts in interbeat interval (IBI) data must not be underestimated. Even a single artifact may cause unreliable heart rate variability (HRV) results. Thus, a robust artifact detection algorithm and the option for manual intervention by the researcher form key components for confident HRV analysis. Here, we present ARTiiFACT, a software tool for processing electrocardiogram and IBI data. Both automated and manual artifact detection and correction are available in a graphical user interface. In addition, ARTiiFACT includes time- and frequency-based HRV analyses and descriptive statistics, thus offering the basic tools for HRV analysis. Notably, all program steps can be executed separately and allow for data export, thus offering high flexibility and interoperability with a whole range of applications. PMID:21573720

  10. 5 CFR 337.101 - Rating applicants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... subjects in an examination, and shall assign numerical ratings on a scale of 100. Except as otherwise... earned numerical ratings of applicants who make a passing grade: (1) Five points for applicants who...

  11. Heart Rate Variability and Drawing Impairment in Hypoxemic COPD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Incalzi, Raffaele Antonelli; Corsonello, Andrea; Trojano, Luigi; Pedone, Claudio; Acanfora, Domenico; Spada, Aldo; D'Addio, Gianni; Maestri, Roberto; Rengo, Franco; Rengo, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    We studied 54 patients with hypoxemic chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The Mini Mental State Examination and the Mental Deterioration Battery were used for neuropsychological assessment. Heart rate variability (HRV) was assessed based on 24-h Holter ECG recording. Mann-Whitney test was used to compare HRV parameters of patients

  12. Heart Rate Variability: Effect of Exercise Intensity on Postexercise Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, David V. B.; Munson, Steven C.; Maldonado-Martin, Sara; De Ste Croix, Mark B. A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the influence of two exercise intensities (moderate and severe) on heart rate variability (HRV) response in 16 runners 1 hr prior to (-1 hr) and at +1 hr, +24 hr, +48 hr, and +72 hr following each exercise session. Time domain indexes and a high frequency component showed a significant decrease

  13. Adoption of site-specific variable rate sprinkler irrigation systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    More than twenty years of private and public research on site-specific variable-rate sprinkler irrigation (SS-VRI) technology has resulted in limited commercial adoption of the technology. Competing patents, liability and proprietary software have affected industry’s willingness to move into a new t...

  14. Heart Rate Variability and Drawing Impairment in Hypoxemic COPD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Incalzi, Raffaele Antonelli; Corsonello, Andrea; Trojano, Luigi; Pedone, Claudio; Acanfora, Domenico; Spada, Aldo; D'Addio, Gianni; Maestri, Roberto; Rengo, Franco; Rengo, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    We studied 54 patients with hypoxemic chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The Mini Mental State Examination and the Mental Deterioration Battery were used for neuropsychological assessment. Heart rate variability (HRV) was assessed based on 24-h Holter ECG recording. Mann-Whitney test was used to compare HRV parameters of patients…

  15. Heart Rate Variability: Effect of Exercise Intensity on Postexercise Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, David V. B.; Munson, Steven C.; Maldonado-Martin, Sara; De Ste Croix, Mark B. A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the influence of two exercise intensities (moderate and severe) on heart rate variability (HRV) response in 16 runners 1 hr prior to (-1 hr) and at +1 hr, +24 hr, +48 hr, and +72 hr following each exercise session. Time domain indexes and a high frequency component showed a significant decrease…

  16. A Latent-Variable Causal Model of Faculty Reputational Ratings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Suzanne; Wolfle, Lee M.

    1987-01-01

    A LISREL analysis demonstrates the value of regressing reputational ratings on three latent variables: size, faculty research productivity, and the quality of program graduates. The model was tested using National Research Council data for each of six disciplines: English, French, philosophy, geography, political science, and sociology.

  17. Ordinal pattern statistics for the assessment of heart rate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graff, G.; Graff, B.; Kaczkowska, A.; Makowiec, D.; Amigó, J. M.; Piskorski, J.; Narkiewicz, K.; Guzik, P.

    2013-06-01

    The recognition of all main features of a healthy heart rhythm (the so-called sinus rhythm) is still one of the biggest challenges in contemporary cardiology. Recently the interesting physiological phenomenon of heart rate asymmetry has been observed. This phenomenon is related to unbalanced contributions of heart rate decelerations and accelerations to heart rate variability. In this paper we apply methods based on the concept of ordinal pattern to the analysis of electrocardiograms (inter-peak intervals) of healthy subjects in the supine position. This way we observe new regularities of the heart rhythm related to the distribution of ordinal patterns of lengths 3 and 4.

  18. Large-scale dimension densities for heart rate variability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raab, Corinna; Wessel, Niels; Schirdewan, Alexander; Kurths, Jrgen

    2006-04-01

    In this work, we reanalyze the heart rate variability (HRV) data from the 2002 Computers in Cardiology (CiC) Challenge using the concept of large-scale dimension densities and additionally apply this technique to data of healthy persons and of patients with cardiac diseases. The large-scale dimension density (LASDID) is estimated from the time series using a normalized Grassberger-Procaccia algorithm, which leads to a suitable correction of systematic errors produced by boundary effects in the rather large scales of a system. This way, it is possible to analyze rather short, nonstationary, and unfiltered data, such as HRV. Moreover, this method allows us to analyze short parts of the data and to look for differences between day and night. The circadian changes in the dimension density enable us to distinguish almost completely between real data and computer-generated data from the CiC 2002 challenge using only one parameter. In the second part we analyzed the data of 15 patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), 15 patients with congestive heart failure (CHF), 15 elderly healthy subjects (EH), as well as 18 young and healthy persons (YH). With our method we are able to separate completely the AF (?ls?=0.970.02) group from the others and, especially during daytime, the CHF patients show significant differences from the young and elderly healthy volunteers (CHF, 0.650.13 ; EH, 0.540.05 ; YH, 0.570.05 ; p<0.05 for both comparisons). Moreover, for the CHF patients we find no circadian changes in ?ls? (day, 0.650.13 ; night, 0.660.12 ; n.s.) in contrast to healthy controls (day, 0.540.05 ; night, 0.610.05 ; p=0.002 ). Correlation analysis showed no statistical significant relation between standard HRV and circadian LASDID, demonstrating a possibly independent application of our method for clinical risk stratification.

  19. Heart Rate Conditioning in Newborn Infants: Relationships Among Conditionability, Heart Rate Variability, and Sex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stamps, Leighton E.; Porges, Stephen W.

    1975-01-01

    Trace conditioning was evaluated in newborn infants by measurements of heart rate responses to a conditioned stimulus in anticipation of or in absence of the unconditioned stimulus. Data suggest females have higher levels of heart rate variability than males, which parallels their greater conditionability. (GO)

  20. Monitoring the fetal heart rate variability during labor.

    PubMed

    Moslem, B; Mohydeen, A; Bazzi, O

    2015-08-01

    In respect to the main goal of our ongoing work for estimating the heart rate variability (HRV) from fetal electrocardiogram (FECG) signals for monitoring the health of the fetus, we investigate in this paper the possibility of extracting the fetal heart rate variability (HRV) directly from the abdominal composite recordings. Our proposed approach is based on a combination of two techniques: Periodic Component Analysis (PiCA) and recursive least square (RLS) adaptive filtering. The Fetal HRV of the estimated FECG signal is compared to a reference value extracted from an FECG signal recorded by using a spiral electrode attached directly to the fetal scalp. The results obtained show that the fetal HRV can be directly evaluated from the abdominal composite recordings without the need of recording an external reference signal. PMID:26737621

  1. Qigong Effects on Heart Rate Variability and Peripheral Vasomotor Responses.

    PubMed

    Chang, Mei-Ying

    2015-11-01

    Population aging is occurring worldwide, and preventing cardiovascular event in older people is a unique challenge. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a 12-week qigong (eight-form moving meditation) training program on the heart rate variability and peripheral vasomotor response of middle-aged and elderly people in the community. This was a quasi-experimental study that included the pre-test, post-test, and nonequivalent control group designs. Seventy-seven participants (experimental group = 47; control group = 30) were recruited. The experimental group performed 30 min of eight-form moving meditation 3 times per week for 12 weeks, and the control group continued their normal daily activities. After 12 weeks, the interaction effects indicated that compared with the control group, the experimental group exhibited significantly improved heart rate variability and peripheral vasomotor responses. PMID:24869492

  2. Influence of sickness condition on diurnal rhythms of heart rate and heart rate variability in cows.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Masumi; Onda, Ken; Wada, Yasunori; Kuwahara, Masayoshi

    2015-03-01

    Parameters of heart rate variability would explain changes in heart rate during the disease status in cows and to evaluate whether such changes might provide a more sensitive and quantitative indicator of these conditions than crude indices. For this purpose, we recorded electrocardiograms for 24 hr using a Holter-type electrocardiograph and applied power spectral analysis of heart rate variability in both five clinically healthy and four hospitalized cows. The significant findings of the current investigation were that the diurnal variations of autonomic nervous function are abolished in cows that are sick. This abnormal rhythm was induced by predominant parasympathetic inhibition in these cows. Therefore, the heart rate variability may be a useful indicator of sickness condition in cows. PMID:25648088

  3. Modeling heart rate variability including the effect of sleep stages.

    PubMed

    Soliński, Mateusz; Gierałtowski, Jan; Żebrowski, Jan

    2016-02-01

    We propose a model for heart rate variability (HRV) of a healthy individual during sleep with the assumption that the heart rate variability is predominantly a random process. Autonomic nervous system activity has different properties during different sleep stages, and this affects many physiological systems including the cardiovascular system. Different properties of HRV can be observed during each particular sleep stage. We believe that taking into account the sleep architecture is crucial for modeling the human nighttime HRV. The stochastic model of HRV introduced by Kantelhardt et al. was used as the initial starting point. We studied the statistical properties of sleep in healthy adults, analyzing 30 polysomnographic recordings, which provided realistic information about sleep architecture. Next, we generated synthetic hypnograms and included them in the modeling of nighttime RR interval series. The results of standard HRV linear analysis and of nonlinear analysis (Shannon entropy, Poincaré plots, and multiscale multifractal analysis) show that-in comparison with real data-the HRV signals obtained from our model have very similar properties, in particular including the multifractal characteristics at different time scales. The model described in this paper is discussed in the context of normal sleep. However, its construction is such that it should allow to model heart rate variability in sleep disorders. This possibility is briefly discussed. PMID:26931582

  4. Modeling heart rate variability including the effect of sleep stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soliński, Mateusz; Gierałtowski, Jan; Żebrowski, Jan

    2016-02-01

    We propose a model for heart rate variability (HRV) of a healthy individual during sleep with the assumption that the heart rate variability is predominantly a random process. Autonomic nervous system activity has different properties during different sleep stages, and this affects many physiological systems including the cardiovascular system. Different properties of HRV can be observed during each particular sleep stage. We believe that taking into account the sleep architecture is crucial for modeling the human nighttime HRV. The stochastic model of HRV introduced by Kantelhardt et al. was used as the initial starting point. We studied the statistical properties of sleep in healthy adults, analyzing 30 polysomnographic recordings, which provided realistic information about sleep architecture. Next, we generated synthetic hypnograms and included them in the modeling of nighttime RR interval series. The results of standard HRV linear analysis and of nonlinear analysis (Shannon entropy, Poincaré plots, and multiscale multifractal analysis) show that—in comparison with real data—the HRV signals obtained from our model have very similar properties, in particular including the multifractal characteristics at different time scales. The model described in this paper is discussed in the context of normal sleep. However, its construction is such that it should allow to model heart rate variability in sleep disorders. This possibility is briefly discussed.

  5. [Association between level of intelligence and heart rate variability].

    PubMed

    Mukhin, V N; Iakovlev, N M

    2011-08-01

    Earlier we discovered that heart rate variability was associated with the level of intelligence. The purpose of this study is to confirm this association using more reliable method and to define more precisely the frequency band within which the amplitude of the heart rate modulations is related to intelligence. 13 males (aged 14 to 17) were the study subjects. The total score of the computer game Tetris was taken as a general measure of the intelligence level. Heart rate was recorded electrocardiographically both at rest and during playing Tetris. Frequency analysis of heart rate was carried out with digital Fourier transformation. Correlation analysis showed that there was positive association between the level of intelligence and the amplitude of heart rate modulation at the frequencies 0.30 and 0.15 modulations per RR interval. This association is closer for the heart rate at rest than for the heart rate during mental work and for the frequency 0.30 than for the 0.15 modulations per RR interval. PMID:21961308

  6. Erosion Rate Variability due to Tectonic Reorganization of River Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willett, Sean; Yang, Rong; Chen, Chia-Yu; Goren, Liran

    2015-04-01

    Many tectonically active landscapes show disparate erosion rates and geomorphic characteristics. In particular, elevated low-relief landscapes are often interpreted as "relict" and are assumed to reflect pre-uplift tectonic conditions. We argue that tectonic deformation of the Earth's surface induces changes in the river channel network through capture and divide migration. Loss of drainage area leads to lower erosion rate through lower discharge and thus to higher surface uplift rates as erosion fails to keep up with tectonic uplift. The positive feedback of area loss amplifies these variations producing high-elevation, low relief, low erosion-rate branches of a river network that could be misconstrued as relic landscapes. We demonstrate this process through numerical models. Models that include surface strain increase variance of erosion rate as predicted. We test this idea through analysis of river profiles of tectonically active landscapes in the eastern Tibetan plateau transition and in the Central Range of Taiwan. In every case examined, we find no common uplift history and widespread evidence that divides surrounding relic landscapes are moving inward, pirating drainage area and lowering erosion rates. This argues against temporal changes in uplift rate and supports the model for in situ generation of variability of these landscapes.

  7. Development of variable-rate precision spraying systems for tree crop production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Excessive pesticides are often applied to target and non-target areas in orchards and nurseries, resulting in greater production costs, worker exposure to unnecessary pesticide risks, and adverse contamination of the environment. To improve spray application efficiency, two types of variable-rate pr...

  8. Spray deposition inside tree canopies from a newly developed variable-rate air assisted sprayer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conventional spray applications in orchards and ornamental nurseries are not target-oriented, resulting in significant waste of pesticides and contamination of the environment. To address this problem, a variable-rate air-assisted sprayer implementing laser scanning technology was developed to apply...

  9. What are the Benefits of Canopy Sensing for Variable-Rate Nitrogen Corn Fertilization?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Canopy reflectance sensing for assessing crop nitrogen (N) health has been proposed as a technology on which to base top-dress variable-rate N application. The objective of this research in Missouri was to evaluate the economic and environmental benefit of active-light crop-canopy reflectance sensor...

  10. Heart Rate Variability During Early Adaptation to Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toscano, W. B.; Cowings, P. S.

    1994-01-01

    A recent report hypothesized that episodes of space motion sickness (SMS) were reliably associated with low frequency oscillations (less than 0.03 to less than 0.01 Hz) in heart rate variability. This paper archives a large data set for review of investigators in this field which may facilitate the evaluation of this hypothesis. Continuous recording of Electro-cardiography (ECG) and other measures were made for 6 to 12 hours per day (waking hours) of six Shuttle crewmembers for the first 3 mission days of two separate Shuttle flights. Spectral analyses of heart rate variability during approximately 200 hours of inflight is presented. In addition, nearly 200 hours of data collected on these same individuals during ground tests prior to the mission are presented. The Purpose of this Publication is to document the incidence of low frequency oscillations of heart rate in 4 people exposed to microgravity over a period of five days. In addition, this report contains spectral analyses of heart rate data collected on these same individuals during ground-based mission simulations. By archiving these data in this manner, it is our intention to make this information available to other investigators interested in studying this phenomena.

  11. Circadian Variation of Heart Rate Variability Across Sleep Stages

    PubMed Central

    Boudreau, Philippe; Yeh, Wei-Hsien; Dumont, Guy A.; Boivin, Diane B.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Nocturnal cardiovascular events are more frequent at the beginning and end of the night. It was proposed that this pattern reflects the nocturnal distribution of sleep and sleep stages. Using heart rate variability (HRV), we recently showed an interaction between the circadian system and vigilance states on the regulation of cardiac rhythmicity. Here, we further investigate this interaction in order to clarify the specific effects of sleep stages on the regulation of the heart. Design: Participants underwent a 72-h ultradian sleep-wake cycle procedure in time isolation consisting of alternating 60-min wake episodes in dim light and 60-min nap opportunities in total darkness. Setting: Time isolation suite. Patients or participants: Fifteen healthy young participants; two were subsequently excluded. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: The current study revealed that sleep onset and progression to deeper sleep stages was associated with a shift toward greater parasympathetic modulation, whereas rapid eye movement (REM) sleep was associated with a shift toward greater sympathetic modulation. We found a circadian rhythm of heart rate (HR) and high-frequency power during wakefulness and all non-REM sleep stages. A significant circadian rhythm of HR and sympathovagal balance of the heart was also observed during REM sleep. During slow wave sleep, maximal parasympathetic modulation was observed at ∼02:00, whereas during REM sleep, maximal sympathetic modulation occurred in the early morning. Conclusion: The circadian and sleep stage-specific effects on heart rate variability are clinically relevant and contribute to the understanding of the degree of cardiovascular vulnerability during sleep. Citation: Boudreau P; Yeh WH; Dumont GA; Boivin DB. Circadian variation of heart rate variability across sleep stages. SLEEP 2013;36(12):1919-1928. PMID:24293767

  12. General anesthesia suppresses normal heart rate variability in humans.

    PubMed

    Matchett, Gerald; Wood, Philip

    2014-06-01

    The human heart normally exhibits robust beat-to-beat heart rate variability (HRV). The loss of this variability is associated with pathology, including disease states such as congestive heart failure (CHF). The effect of general anesthesia on intrinsic HRV is unknown. In this prospective, observational study we enrolled 100 human subjects having elective major surgical procedures under general anesthesia. We recorded continuous heart rate data via continuous electrocardiogram before, during, and after anesthesia, and we assessed HRV of the R-R intervals. We assessed HRV using several common metrics including Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA), Multifractal Analysis, and Multiscale Entropy Analysis. Each of these analyses was done in each of the four clinical phases for each study subject over the course of 24 h: Before anesthesia, during anesthesia, early recovery, and late recovery. On average, we observed a loss of variability on the aforementioned metrics that appeared to correspond to the state of general anesthesia. Following the conclusion of anesthesia, most study subjects appeared to regain their normal HRV, although this did not occur immediately. The resumption of normal HRV was especially delayed on DFA. Qualitatively, the reduction in HRV under anesthesia appears similar to the reduction in HRV observed in CHF. These observations will need to be validated in future studies, and the broader clinical implications of these observations, if any, are unknown. PMID:24985443

  13. General anesthesia suppresses normal heart rate variability in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matchett, Gerald; Wood, Philip

    2014-06-01

    The human heart normally exhibits robust beat-to-beat heart rate variability (HRV). The loss of this variability is associated with pathology, including disease states such as congestive heart failure (CHF). The effect of general anesthesia on intrinsic HRV is unknown. In this prospective, observational study we enrolled 100 human subjects having elective major surgical procedures under general anesthesia. We recorded continuous heart rate data via continuous electrocardiogram before, during, and after anesthesia, and we assessed HRV of the R-R intervals. We assessed HRV using several common metrics including Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA), Multifractal Analysis, and Multiscale Entropy Analysis. Each of these analyses was done in each of the four clinical phases for each study subject over the course of 24 h: Before anesthesia, during anesthesia, early recovery, and late recovery. On average, we observed a loss of variability on the aforementioned metrics that appeared to correspond to the state of general anesthesia. Following the conclusion of anesthesia, most study subjects appeared to regain their normal HRV, although this did not occur immediately. The resumption of normal HRV was especially delayed on DFA. Qualitatively, the reduction in HRV under anesthesia appears similar to the reduction in HRV observed in CHF. These observations will need to be validated in future studies, and the broader clinical implications of these observations, if any, are unknown.

  14. Symbolic dynamics marker of heart rate variability combined with clinical variables enhance obstructive sleep apnea screening.

    PubMed

    Ravelo-Garca, A G; Saavedra-Santana, P; Juli-Serd, G; Navarro-Mesa, J L; Navarro-Esteva, J; lvarez-Lpez, X; Gapelyuk, A; Penzel, T; Wessel, N

    2014-06-01

    Many sleep centres try to perform a reduced portable test in order to decrease the number of overnight polysomnographies that are expensive, time-consuming, and disturbing. With some limitations, heart rate variability (HRV) has been useful in this task. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate if inclusion of symbolic dynamics variables to a logistic regression model integrating clinical and physical variables, can improve the detection of subjects for further polysomnographies. To our knowledge, this is the first contribution that innovates in that strategy. A group of 133 patients has been referred to the sleep center for suspected sleep apnea. Clinical assessment of the patients consisted of a sleep related questionnaire and a physical examination. The clinical variables related to apnea and selected in the statistical model were age (p?variable based on non-linear dynamics of HRV (p?variables. For diagnostic rule based only on clinical and physical variables, the corresponding area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.907 (95% confidence interval (CI)?=?0.848, 0.967), (sensitivity 87.10% and specificity 80%). For the model including the average of a symbolic dynamic variable, the area under the ROC curve was increased to 0.941 (95%?=?0.897, 0.985), (sensitivity 88.71% and specificity 82.86%). In conclusion, symbolic dynamics, coupled with significant clinical and physical variables can help to prioritize polysomnographies in patients with a high probability of apnea. In addition, the processing of the HRV is a well established low cost and robust technique. PMID:24985458

  15. Symbolic dynamics marker of heart rate variability combined with clinical variables enhance obstructive sleep apnea screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravelo-García, A. G.; Saavedra-Santana, P.; Juliá-Serdá, G.; Navarro-Mesa, J. L.; Navarro-Esteva, J.; Álvarez-López, X.; Gapelyuk, A.; Penzel, T.; Wessel, N.

    2014-06-01

    Many sleep centres try to perform a reduced portable test in order to decrease the number of overnight polysomnographies that are expensive, time-consuming, and disturbing. With some limitations, heart rate variability (HRV) has been useful in this task. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate if inclusion of symbolic dynamics variables to a logistic regression model integrating clinical and physical variables, can improve the detection of subjects for further polysomnographies. To our knowledge, this is the first contribution that innovates in that strategy. A group of 133 patients has been referred to the sleep center for suspected sleep apnea. Clinical assessment of the patients consisted of a sleep related questionnaire and a physical examination. The clinical variables related to apnea and selected in the statistical model were age (p < 10-3), neck circumference (p < 10-3), score on a questionnaire scale intended to quantify daytime sleepiness (p < 10-3), and intensity of snoring (p < 10-3). The validation of this model demonstrated an increase in classification performance when a variable based on non-linear dynamics of HRV (p < 0.01) was used additionally to the other variables. For diagnostic rule based only on clinical and physical variables, the corresponding area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.907 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.848, 0.967), (sensitivity 87.10% and specificity 80%). For the model including the average of a symbolic dynamic variable, the area under the ROC curve was increased to 0.941 (95% = 0.897, 0.985), (sensitivity 88.71% and specificity 82.86%). In conclusion, symbolic dynamics, coupled with significant clinical and physical variables can help to prioritize polysomnographies in patients with a high probability of apnea. In addition, the processing of the HRV is a well established low cost and robust technique.

  16. Rates of profit as correlated sums of random variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenblatt, R. E.

    2013-10-01

    Profit realization is the dominant feature of market-based economic systems, determining their dynamics to a large extent. Rather than attaining an equilibrium, profit rates vary widely across firms, and the variation persists over time. Differing definitions of profit result in differing empirical distributions. To study the statistical properties of profit rates, I used data from a publicly available database for the US Economy for 2009-2010 (Risk Management Association). For each of three profit rate measures, the sample space consists of 771 points. Each point represents aggregate data from a small number of US manufacturing firms of similar size and type (NAICS code of principal product). When comparing the empirical distributions of profit rates, significant ‘heavy tails’ were observed, corresponding principally to a number of firms with larger profit rates than would be expected from simple models. An apparently novel correlated sum of random variables statistical model was used to model the data. In the case of operating and net profit rates, a number of firms show negative profits (losses), ruling out simple gamma or lognormal distributions as complete models for these data.

  17. Environmental and economic benefits of variable rate nitrogen fertilization in a nitrate vulnerable zone.

    PubMed

    Basso, Bruno; Dumont, Benjamin; Cammarano, Davide; Pezzuolo, Andrea; Marinello, Francesco; Sartori, Luigi

    2016-03-01

    Agronomic input and management practices have traditionally been applied uniformly on agricultural fields despite the presence of spatial variability of soil properties and landscape position. When spatial variability is ignored, uniform agronomic management can be both economically and environmentally inefficient. The objectives of this study were to: i) identify optimal N fertilizer rates using an integrated spatio-temporal analysis of yield and site-specific N rate response; ii) test the sensitivity of site specific N management to nitrate leaching in response to different N rates; and iii) demonstrate the environmental benefits of variable rate N fertilizer in a Nitrate Vulnerable Zone. This study was carried out on a 13.6ha field near the Venice Lagoon, northeast Italy over four years (2005-2008). We utilized a validated crop simulation model to evaluate crop response to different N rates at specific zones in the field based on localized soil and landscape properties under rainfed conditions. The simulated rates were: 50kgNha(-1) applied at sowing for the entire study area and increasing fractions, ranging from 150 to 350kgNha(-1) applied at V6 stage. Based on the analysis of yield maps from previous harvests and soil electrical resistivity data, three management zones were defined. Two N rates were applied in each of these zones, one suggested by our simulation analysis and the other with uniform N fertilization as normally applied by the producer. N leaching was lower and net revenue was higher in the zones where variable rates of N were applied when compared to uniform N fertilization. This demonstrates the efficacy of using crop models to determine variable rates of N fertilization within a field and the application of variable rate N fertilizer to achieve higher profit and reduce nitrate leaching. PMID:26747986

  18. Heart rate variability helps tracking time more accurately.

    PubMed

    Cellini, Nicola; Mioni, Giovanna; Levorato, Ilenia; Grondin, Simon; Stablum, Franca; Sarlo, Michela

    2015-12-01

    Adequate temporal abilities are crucial for adaptive behavior. In time processing, variations in the rate of pulses' emission by the pacemaker are often reported to be an important cause of temporal errors. These variations are often associated with physiological changes, and recently it has also been proposed that physiological changes may not just vary the pulses' emission, but they can work as a timekeeper themselves. In the present study we further explore the relationship between temporal abilities with autonomic activity and interoceptive awareness in a group of thirty healthy young adults (mean age 24.18years; SD=2.1). Using electrocardiogram, impedance cardiography and skin conductance measures, we assessed the relationship between the autonomic profile at rest and temporal abilities in two temporal tasks (time bisection and finger tapping tasks). Results showed that heart rate variability affects time perception. We observed that increased heart rate variability (HRV) was associated with higher temporal accuracy. More specifically, we found that higher vagal control was associated with lower error in producing 1-s tempo, whereas higher overall HRV was related with lower error (measured by the constant error) in the time bisection task. Our results support the idea that bodily signals may shape our perception of time. PMID:26507899

  19. Heart rate variability biofeedback: how and why does it work?

    PubMed Central

    Lehrer, Paul M.; Gevirtz, Richard

    2014-01-01

    In recent years there has been substantial support for heart rate variability biofeedback (HRVB) as a treatment for a variety of disorders and for performance enhancement (Gevirtz, 2013). Since conditions as widely varied as asthma and depression seem to respond to this form of cardiorespiratory feedback training, the issue of possible mechanisms becomes more salient. The most supported possible mechanism is the strengthening of homeostasis in the baroreceptor (Vaschillo et al., 2002; Lehrer et al., 2003). Recently, the effect on the vagal afferent pathway to the frontal cortical areas has been proposed. In this article, we review these and other possible mechanisms that might explain the positive effects of HRVB. PMID:25101026

  20. Resting heart rate, heart rate variability and functional decline in old age

    PubMed Central

    Ogliari, Giulia; Mahinrad, Simin; Stott, David J.; Jukema, J. Wouter; Mooijaart, Simon P.; Macfarlane, Peter W.; Clark, Elaine N.; Kearney, Patricia M.; Westendorp, Rudi G.J.; de Craen, Anton J. M.; Sabayan, Behnam

    2015-01-01

    Background: Heart rate and heart rate variability, markers of cardiac autonomic function, have been linked with cardiovascular disease. We investigated whether heart rate and heart rate variability are associated with functional status in older adults, independent of cardiovascular disease. Methods: We obtained data from the Prospective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk (PROSPER). A total of 5042 participants were included in the present study, and mean follow-up was 3.2 years. Heart rate and heart rate variability were derived from baseline 10-second electrocardiograms. Heart rate variability was defined as the standard deviation of normal-to-normal RR intervals (SDNN). Functional status in basic (ADL) and instrumental (IADL) activities of daily living was measured using Barthel and Lawton scales, at baseline and during follow-up. Results: The mean age of the study population was 75.3 years. At baseline, higher heart rate was associated with worse ADL and IADL, and lower SDNN was related to worse IADL (all p values < 0.05). Participants in the highest tertile of heart rate (range 71–117 beats/min) had a 1.79-fold (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.45–2.22) and 1.35-fold (95% CI 1.12–1.63) higher risk of decline in ADL and IADL, respectively (p for trend < 0.001 and 0.001, respectively). Participants in the lowest tertile of SDNN (range 1.70–13.30 ms) had 1.21-fold (95% CI 1.00–1.46) and 1.25-fold (95% CI 1.05–1.48) higher risk of decline in ADL and IADL, respectively (both p for trends < 0.05). All associations were independent of sex, medications, cardiovascular risk factors and comorbidities. Interpretation: Higher resting heart rate and lower heart rate variability were associated with worse functional status and with higher risk of future functional decline in older adults, independent of cardiovascular disease. This study provides insight into the role of cardiac autonomic function in the development of functional decline. PMID:26323697

  1. Heart rate variability biofeedback improves cardiorespiratory resting function during sleep.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Masahito; Hayano, Junichiro; Oikawa, Leo O; Katsamanis, Maria; Lehrer, Paul

    2013-12-01

    The present study was designed to examine the effect of heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback on the cardiorespiratory resting function during sleep in daily life. Forty-five healthy young adults were randomly assigned to one of three groups: HRV biofeedback, Autogenic Training(AT), and no-treatment control. Participants in the HRV biofeedback were instructed to use a handheld HRV biofeedback device before their habitual bedtime, those in the AT were asked to listen to an audiotaped instruction before bedtime,and those in the control were asked to engage in their habitual activity before bedtime. Pulse wave signal during sleep at their own residences was measured continuously with a wrist watch-type transdermal photoelectric sensor for three time points. Baseline data were collected on the first night of measurements, followed by two successive nights for HRV biofeedback, AT, or control. Cardiorespiratory resting function was assessed quantitatively as the amplitude of high frequency(HF) component of pulse rate variability, a surrogate measure of respiratory sinus arrhythmia. HF component increased during sleep in the HRV biofeedback group,although it remained unchanged in the AT and control groups. These results suggest that HRV biofeedback before sleep may improve cardiorespiratory resting function during sleep. PMID:23959190

  2. Heart rate variability in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Gardim, Camila Balsamo; de Oliveira, Bruno Affonso P.; Bernardo, Aline Fernanda B.; Gomes, Rayana Loch; Pacagnelli, Francis Lopes; Lorençoni, Roselene Modolo R.; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To gather current information about the effects of type 1 diabetes mellitus on children's cardiac autonomic behavior. DATA SOURCES: The search of articles was conducted on PubMed, Ibecs, Medline, Cochrane, Lilacs, SciELO and PEDro databases using the MeSH terms: "autonomic nervous system", "diabetes mellitus", "child", "type 1 diabetes mellitus", "sympathetic nervous system" and "parasympathetic nervous system", and their respective versions in Portuguese (DeCS). Articles published from January 2003 to February 2013 that enrolled children with 9-12 years old with type 1 diabetes mellitus were included in the review. DATA SYNTHESIS: The electronic search resulted in four articles that approached the heart rate variability in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus, showing that, in general, these children present decreased global heart rate variability and vagal activity. The practice of physical activity promoted benefits for these individuals. CONCLUSIONS: Children with type 1 diabetes mellitus present changes on autonomic modulation, indicating the need for early attention to avoid future complications in this group. PMID:25119762

  3. Influence of travel speed on spray deposition uniformity from an air-assisted variable-rate sprayer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A newly developed LiDAR-guided air-assisted variable-rate sprayer for nursery and orchard applications was tested at various travel speeds to compare its spray deposition and coverage uniformity with constant-rate applications. Spray samplers, including nylon screens and water-sensitive papers (WSP)...

  4. An age extended progress variable for conditioning reaction rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grout, R. W.

    2007-10-01

    An aging progress variable (APV) is proposed as a convenient tool for conditioning quantities used to calculate reaction rates in premixed turbulent combustion. The APV is defined to obey an advection-diffusion-reaction equation where the source term is linearly related to the fuel consumption rate when the APV is less than a threshold representative of the trailing edge of the fuel consumption layer. Above this threshold, the APV has a constant source term. To test the proposal, three-dimensional fully compressible direct numerical simulation (DNS) is performed in an inflow-outflow configuration with inlet turbulence forcing using a modified version of the DNS code SENGA. A model chemical mechanism involving two steps and four species is used which has an order of magnitude difference between the time scales associated with the two steps. The inlet Taylor scale Reynolds number is 51 and the Damköhler numbers are 2.0 and 0.29 for the two steps. When conditionally averaged on the proposed APV the scalar fluctuations about the conditional average are negligible. Further, it is shown that the probability density function of the APV can be reasonably approximated based on the first two moments of the APV and the fuel mass fraction. The APV probability density function (PDF) is approximated on rectangular slabs of cells normal to the flow direction using only these moments as a test case. Convolution of the PDF so approximated with conditional mean reaction rates—calculated from conditionally averaged scalar fields where the averaging was carried out over the entire domain—leads to an approximation for the unconditional mean reaction rates on each of these slabs typically within 10% of the true value for both steps. That the correlation between the reaction rates and the APV is strong, and that the PDF can be approximated for a situation where approximating the PDF for a product based progress variable is nontrivial, makes the proposed APV a strong alternative to traditional progress variables for both flamelet models and premixed conditional moment closure (CMC) approaches.

  5. On the Primacy of Molecular Processes in Determining Response Rates under Variable-Ratio and Variable-Interval Schedules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanno, Takayuki; Sakagami, Takayuki

    2008-01-01

    This study focused on variables that may account for response-rate differences under variable-ratio (VR) and variable-interval (VI) schedules of reinforcement. Four rats were exposed to VR, VI, tandem VI differential- reinforcement-of-high-rate, regulated-probability-interval, and negative-feedback schedules of reinforcement that provided the same

  6. Repolarisation descriptors and heart rate variability in hemodialysed patients.

    PubMed

    Poulikakos, D; Banerjee, D; Malik, M

    2015-01-01

    T wave morphology (TWM) descriptors derived from Holter electrocardiograms during hemodialysis (HD) are of potential value for cardiac risk assessment in HD patients. Our knowledge on autonomic regulation of TWM descriptors is limited. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between TWM parameters and heart rate variability (HRV) during intradialytic monitoring. In each of 81 patients on maintenance HD, continuous electrocardiograms were recorded 5 times during HD on alternate weeks. TWM descriptors were calculated every 5 s in overlapping 10-s ECG segments and Low Frequency (LF) (0.04 Hz to 0.15 Hz), High Frequency (HF) (0.15 Hz to 0.40 Hz) powers of the spectrum of HRV were calculated every five min. The calculated values of TWM and HRV were averaged during the first hour of the recordings and subsequently over all recordings in each subject. Analyzable data for HRV and TWM were available in 71 HD patients (aged 61+/-15, 36 % diabetics, 32 % females). LF in normalized units correlated positively with Total Cosine R to T (r=0.374, p=0.001) and negatively with T wave morphology dispersion (r=-0.253, p=0.033) after adjusting for heart rate. A heart rate independent association between repolarisation descriptors and HRV exists in HD patients. Autonomic modulation needs to be considered when using TWM characteristics for risk profiling of HD patients. PMID:25470516

  7. Characterizing heart rate variability by scale-dependent Lyapunov exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jing; Gao, Jianbo; Tung, Wen-wen

    2009-06-01

    Previous studies on heart rate variability (HRV) using chaos theory, fractal scaling analysis, and many other methods, while fruitful in many aspects, have produced much confusion in the literature. Especially the issue of whether normal HRV is chaotic or stochastic remains highly controversial. Here, we employ a new multiscale complexity measure, the scale-dependent Lyapunov exponent (SDLE), to characterize HRV. SDLE has been shown to readily characterize major models of complex time series including deterministic chaos, noisy chaos, stochastic oscillations, random 1/f processes, random Levy processes, and complex time series with multiple scaling behaviors. Here we use SDLE to characterize the relative importance of nonlinear, chaotic, and stochastic dynamics in HRV of healthy, congestive heart failure, and atrial fibrillation subjects. We show that while HRV data of all these three types are mostly stochastic, the stochasticity is different among the three groups.

  8. Spectral components of heart rate variability determined by wavelet analysis.

    PubMed

    Lotric, M B; Stefanovska, A; Stajer, D; Urbancic-Rovan, V

    2000-11-01

    Spectral components of heart rate variability (HRV) are determined in the time-frequency domain using a wavelet transform. Based on the finer estimation of low-frequency content enabled by the logarithmic resolution of the wavelet transform, corrections of spectral intervals, already defined by Fourier and model based methods, are proposed. The characteristic peaks between 0.0095 and 0.6 Hz are traced in time and four spectral intervals are defined, I (0.0095-0.021 Hz), II (0.021-0.052 Hz), III (0.052-0.145 Hz) and IV (0.145-0.6 Hz), within which peaks are located for all subjects included. These intervals are shown to be invariant regardless of the age and the state of the system. We also show that the frequency and power of the spectral components are related to age, AMI and particularly to type II diabetes mellitus. PMID:11110243

  9. [Dynamic analysis of heart rate variability based on wavelet transform].

    PubMed

    Lu, Shan; Yang, Hao; Xiao, Dongping; Huang, Ying

    2006-10-01

    The analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) has become a tool for noninvasively detecting the cardiovascular modulation of autonomic nervous system. Traditional analysis in frequency domain mainly includes calculating the power and detecting the peak frequency of each physiological frequency band. Whether employing the classical method or AR model to estimate the spectrum, the approximate stationarity of HRV is presupposed. Only in short term analysis can data meet this condition, while in long term the nonstationarity of HRV notably appears. A dynamic analysis method based on wavelet transform was proposed in this paper, which not only can obtain the traditional indices in frequency domain, but can compute their dynamic values varying with time, called short-time power and short-time LF/HF ratio. The latter can dynamically evaluate the activity of autonomic nervous. Finally the method was applied to trace the balance of autonomic nervous in Atropin drag experiment. PMID:17121332

  10. Heart Rate Variability Dynamics for the Prognosis of Cardiovascular Risk

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez-Villegas, Juan F.; Lam-Espinosa, Eric; Ramirez-Moreno, David F.; Calvo-Echeverry, Paulo C.; Agredo-Rodriguez, Wilfredo

    2011-01-01

    Statistical, spectral, multi-resolution and non-linear methods were applied to heart rate variability (HRV) series linked with classification schemes for the prognosis of cardiovascular risk. A total of 90 HRV records were analyzed: 45 from healthy subjects and 45 from cardiovascular risk patients. A total of 52 features from all the analysis methods were evaluated using standard two-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test (KS-test). The results of the statistical procedure provided input to multi-layer perceptron (MLP) neural networks, radial basis function (RBF) neural networks and support vector machines (SVM) for data classification. These schemes showed high performances with both training and test sets and many combinations of features (with a maximum accuracy of 96.67%). Additionally, there was a strong consideration for breathing frequency as a relevant feature in the HRV analysis. PMID:21386966

  11. Does Baseline Heart Rate Variability Reflect Stable Positive Emotionality?

    PubMed Central

    Silvia, Paul J.; Jackson, Bryonna A.; Sopko, Rachel S.

    2014-01-01

    Several recent studies have found significant correlations, medium in effect size, between baseline heart rate variability (HRV) and measures of positive functioning, such as extraversion, agreeableness, and trait positive affectivity. Other research, however, has suggested an optimal level of HRV and found nonlinear effects. In the present study, a diverse sample of 239 young adults completed a wide range of measures that reflect positive psychological functioning, including personality traits, an array of positive emotions (measured with the Dispositional Positive Emotions Scale), and depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms (measured with the DASS and CESD). HRV was measured with a 6-minute baseline period and quantified using many common HRV metrics (e.g., respiratory sinus arrhythmia, root mean square of successive differences, and others), and potentially confounding behavioral and lifestyle variables (e.g., BMI, caffeine and nicotine use, sleep quality) were assessed. Neither linear nor non-linear effects were found, and the effect sizes were small and near zero. The findings suggest that the cross-sectional relationship between HRV and positive experience deserves more attention and meta-analytic synthesis. PMID:25147421

  12. Does Baseline Heart Rate Variability Reflect Stable Positive Emotionality?

    PubMed

    Silvia, Paul J; Jackson, Bryonna A; Sopko, Rachel S

    2014-11-01

    Several recent studies have found significant correlations, medium in effect size, between baseline heart rate variability (HRV) and measures of positive functioning, such as extraversion, agreeableness, and trait positive affectivity. Other research, however, has suggested an optimal level of HRV and found nonlinear effects. In the present study, a diverse sample of 239 young adults completed a wide range of measures that reflect positive psychological functioning, including personality traits, an array of positive emotions (measured with the Dispositional Positive Emotions Scale), and depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms (measured with the DASS and CESD). HRV was measured with a 6-minute baseline period and quantified using many common HRV metrics (e.g., respiratory sinus arrhythmia, root mean square of successive differences, and others), and potentially confounding behavioral and lifestyle variables (e.g., BMI, caffeine and nicotine use, sleep quality) were assessed. Neither linear nor non-linear effects were found, and the effect sizes were small and near zero. The findings suggest that the cross-sectional relationship between HRV and positive experience deserves more attention and meta-analytic synthesis. PMID:25147421

  13. Can photoplethysmography variability serve as an alternative approach to obtain heart rate variability information?

    PubMed

    Lu, Sheng; Zhao, He; Ju, Kihwan; Shin, Kunson; Lee, Myoungho; Shelley, Kirk; Chon, Ki H

    2008-02-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV), extracted from an electrocardiogram, is known to be a noninvasive indicator reflecting the dynamic interplay between perturbations to cardiovascular function and the dynamic response of the cardiovascular regulatory system. Photoplethysmography (PPG) is a noninvasive method to monitor arterial oxygen saturation on a continuous basis. Given the rich cardiovascular information in the PPG signal, and the ubiquity and simplicity of pulse oximetry, we are investigating the feasibility of acquiring dynamics pertaining to the autonomic nervous system from PPG waveforms. To do this, we are quantifying PPG variability (PPGV). Detailed algorithmic approaches for extracting accurate PPGV signals are presented. We compare PPGV to HRV by computing time and frequency domain parameters often associated with HRV measurements, as well as approximate entropy calculations. Our results demonstrate that the parameters of PPGV are highly correlated with the parameters of HRV. Thus, our results indicate that PPGV could be used as an alternative measurement of HRV. PMID:17987395

  14. Estimation of heart rate and heart rate variability from pulse oximeter recordings using localized model fitting.

    PubMed

    Wadehn, Federico; Carnal, David; Loeliger, Hans-Andrea

    2015-08-01

    Heart rate variability is one of the key parameters for assessing the health status of a subject's cardiovascular system. This paper presents a local model fitting algorithm used for finding single heart beats in photoplethysmogram recordings. The local fit of exponentially decaying cosines of frequencies within the physiological range is used to detect the presence of a heart beat. Using 42 subjects from the CapnoBase database, the average heart rate error was 0.16 BPM and the standard deviation of the absolute estimation error was 0.24 BPM. PMID:26737125

  15. Heart rate variability (HRV) during virtual reality immersion

    PubMed Central

    Malińska, Marzena; Zużewicz, Krystyna; Bugajska, Joanna; Grabowski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the study was assessment of the hour-long training involving handling virtual environment (sVR) and watching a stereoscopic 3D movie on the mechanisms of autonomic heart rate (HR) regulation among the subjects who were not predisposed to motion sickness. In order to exclude predispositions to motion sickness, all the participants (n=19) underwent a Coriolis test. During an exposure to 3D and sVR the ECG signal was continuously recorded using the Holter method. For the twelve consecutive 5-min epochs of ECG signal, the analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) in time and frequency domains was conducted. After 30 min from the beginning of the training in handling the virtual workstation a significant increase in LF spectral power was noted. The values of the sympathovagal LF/HF index while sVR indicated a significant increase in sympathetic predominance in four time intervals, namely between the 5th and the 10th minute, between the 15th and the 20th minute, between the 35th and 40th minute and between the 55th and the 60th minute of exposure. PMID:26327262

  16. Variable dose rate single-arc IMAT delivered with a constant dose rate and variable angular spacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Grace; Earl, Matthew A.; Yu, Cedric X.

    2009-11-01

    Single-arc intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT) has gained worldwide interest in both research and clinical implementation due to its superior plan quality and delivery efficiency. Single-arc IMAT techniques such as the Varian RapidArc deliver conformal dose distributions to the target in one single gantry rotation, resulting in a delivery time in the order of 2 min. The segments in these techniques are evenly distributed within an arc and are allowed to have different monitor unit (MU) weightings. Therefore, a variable dose-rate (VDR) is required for delivery. Because the VDR requirement complicates the control hardware and software of the linear accelerators (linacs) and prevents most existing linacs from delivering IMAT, we propose an alternative planning approach for IMAT using constant dose-rate (CDR) delivery with variable angular spacing. We prove the equivalence by converting VDR-optimized RapidArc plans to CDR plans, where the evenly spaced beams in the VDR plan are redistributed to uneven spacing such that the segments with larger MU weighting occupy a greater angular interval. To minimize perturbation in the optimized dose distribution, the angular deviation of the segments was restricted to <= 5. This restriction requires the treatment arc to be broken into multiple sectors such that the local MU fluctuation within each sector is reduced, thereby lowering the angular deviation of the segments during redistribution. The converted CDR plans were delivered with a single gantry sweep as in the VDR plans but each sector was delivered with a different value of CDR. For four patient cases, including two head-and-neck, one brain and one prostate, all CDR plans developed with the variable spacing scheme produced similar dose distributions to the original VDR plans. For plans with complex angular MU distributions, the number of sectors increased up to four in the CDR plans in order to maintain the original plan quality. Since each sector was delivered with a different dose rate, extra mode-up time (xMOT) was needed between the transitions of the successive sectors during delivery. On average, the delivery times of the CDR plans were approximately less than 1 min longer than the treatment times of the VDR plans, with an average of about 0.33 min of xMOT per sector transition. The results have shown that VDR may not be necessary for single-arc IMAT. Using variable angular spacing, VDR RapidArc plans can be implemented into the clinics that are not equipped with the new VDR-enabled machines without compromising the plan quality or treatment efficiency. With a prospective optimization approach using variable angular spacing, CDR delivery times can be further minimized while maintaining the high delivery efficiency of single-arc IMAT treatment.

  17. Isoprene and monoterpene emission rate variability: Observations with Eucalyptus and emission rate algorithm development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenther, Alex B.; Monson, Russell K.; Fall, Ray

    1991-06-01

    Variability in the emission rates of isoprene and monoterpenes from individual leaves of Eucalyptus globulus was investigated with a laboratory gas exchange system and an environmental control leaf cuvette. For individual leaves, with constant environmental conditions, short-term (1 hour) fluctuations in isoprene emission rates were less than 3% while day-to-day fluctuations averaged 14%. Leaf-to-leaf variations were much larger (62%). Fluctuations with time and leaf-to-leaf variability in CO2 assimilation rates were of the same order as isoprene, while monoterpene variations were higher. Leaf age was identified as one of the factors contributing to leaf-to-leaf variability in CO2 assimilation and isoprene and monoterpene emission rates. Monoterpene emission rates were not influenced by light intensity or CO2 mixing ratio. The observed temperature dependence was the same for α-pinene and 1,8-cineole (an oxygenated monoterpene) and is similar to the temperature dependence of monoterpene emission rates reported by other investigators. Isoprene emissions were slightly dependent on humidity (1-3% increase in emission per 10% increase in relative humidity) and responded only to very low (<100 ppm) or very high (>600 ppm) CO2 mixing ratios. Isoprene emission was associated with the abaxial leaf side, which contains stomatal pores, while monoterpenes were emitted primarily from the adaxial side, which lacks stomatal pores. The temperature and light dependence of isoprene emission closely resembles relationships observed for electron transport in plant chloroplasts. For this reason, we have used a mechanistic electron transport model as the basis for an empirical isoprene emission rate model. The emission rate variation predicted by this model was within 10% of observed values for 62% of the 255 observations at light-saturated conditions and temperatures between 23° and 33°C. The entire data base includes over 600 observations at leaf temperatures ranging between 12° and 50°C and light intensities between 0 and 2000 μmol m-2 s-1. Nearly two thirds of the emission rates predicted for the entire data base were within a factor of 1.25, and 89% were within a factor of 2. The algorithms developed in this study provide a solid physiological basis for future efforts to model the biogenic flux of isoprene and monoterpenes into the atmosphere.

  18. Variable beam dose rate and DMLC IMRT to moving body anatomy

    SciTech Connect

    Papiez, Lech; Abolfath, Ramin M.

    2008-11-15

    Derivation of formulas relating leaf speeds and beam dose rates for delivering planned intensity profiles to static and moving targets in dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is presented. The analysis of equations determining algorithms for DMLC IMRT delivery under a variable beam dose rate reveals a multitude of possible delivery strategies for a given intensity map and for any given target motion patterns. From among all equivalent delivery strategies for DMLC IMRT treatments specific subclasses of strategies can be selected to provide deliveries that are particularly suitable for clinical applications providing existing delivery devices are used. Special attention is devoted to the subclass of beam dose rate variable DMLC delivery strategies to moving body anatomy that generalize existing techniques of such deliveries in Varian DMLC irradiation methodology to static body anatomy. Few examples of deliveries from this subclass of DMLC IMRT irradiations are investigated to illustrate the principle and show practical benefits of proposed techniques.

  19. Photoplethysmography variability as an alternative approach to obtain heart rate variability information in chronic pain patient.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Chiung-Cheng; Ye, Jing-Jhao; Lin, Wan-Chun; Lee, Kuan-Ting; Tai, Yu-Ting

    2015-12-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) is a well-known method for the assessment of autonomic nervous function of the heart. Previous study suggested that pulse rate variability (PRV) determined by photoplethysmography could be used instead of HRV to more simply assess autonomic nervous function. However, most research studies included healthy subjects. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility for PRV as a surrogate index for patients with chronic pain. This study investigated the correlation coefficient (by Pearson correlation) and agreement (by Bland-Altman analysis) between PRV and HRV in chronic pain patients in the clinical setting. The results showed high significant correlations (p<0.001, r>0.86) between all the HRV and PRV parameters and good agreements (ratio<0.1) between the parameters in terms of HR, mean RR, VLF, LF, nLF, nHF, and SD1/SD2. Our study suggests that HRV can also be reliably estimated using the photoplethysmography-based PP interval in elderly patients with chronic pain. PMID:25708672

  20. 26 CFR 1.1275-5 - Variable rate debt instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... annually) at (A) One or more qualified floating rates; (B) A single fixed rate and one or more qualified floating rates; (C) A single objective rate; or (D) A single fixed rate and a single objective rate that is a qualified inverse floating rate. (ii) Certain debt instruments bearing interest at a fixed...

  1. Fish Consumption, Sleep, Daily Functioning, and Heart Rate Variability

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Anita L.; Dahl, Lisbeth; Olson, Gina; Thornton, David; Graff, Ingvild E.; Frøyland, Livar; Thayer, Julian F.; Pallesen, Staale

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: This study investigated the effects of fatty fish on sleep, daily functioning and biomarkers such as heart rate variability (HRV), vitamin D status (serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD), and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3) + docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) in red blood cells. Moreover the relationship among sleep, daily functioning, HRV, vitamin D status, and levels of EPA+DHA was investigated. Methods: Ninety-five male forensic patients from a secure forensic inpatient facility in the USA were randomly assigned into a Fish or a Control group. The Fish group received Atlantic salmon three times per week from September to February, and the Control group was provided an alternative meal (e.g., chicken, pork, beef), but with the same nutritional value as their habitual diet, three times per week during the same period. Sleep (sleep latency, sleep efficiency, actual sleep time, and actual wake time), self-perceived sleep quality and daily functioning, as well as vitamin D status, EPA+DHA, and HRV, were assessed pre- and post-intervention period. Results: There was a significant increase in sleep latency from pre- to post-test in the Control group. The Fish group reported better daily functioning than the Control group during post-test. Fish consumption throughout the wintertime had also an effect on resting HRV and EPA+DHA, but not on vitamin D status. However, at post-test, the vitamin D status in the Fish group was still closer to the level regarded as optimal compared to the Control group. Vitamin D status correlated negatively with actual wake time and positively with sleep efficiency during pre-test, as well as positively with daily functioning and sleep quality during post-test. Finally, HRV correlated negatively with sleep latency and positively with daily functioning. Conclusions: Fish consumption seemed to have a positive impact on sleep in general and also on daily functioning, which may be related to vitamin D status and HRV. Citation: Hansen AL, Dahl L, Olson G, Thornton D, Graff IE, Frøyland L, Thayer JF, Pallesen S. Fish consumption, sleep, daily functioning, and heart rate variability. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(5):567-575. PMID:24812543

  2. Heart Rate Variability in Porcine Progressive Peritonitis-Induced Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Jarkovska, Dagmar; Valesova, Lenka; Chvojka, Jiri; Benes, Jan; Sviglerova, Jitka; Florova, Blanka; Nalos, Lukas; Matejovic, Martin; Stengl, Milan

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that heart rate variability (HRV) alterations could serve as an indicator of sepsis progression and outcome, however, the relationships of HRV and major pathophysiological processes of sepsis remain unclear. Therefore, in this experimental study HRV was investigated in a clinically relevant long-term porcine model of severe sepsis/septic shock. HRV was analyzed by several methods and the parameters were correlated with pathophysiological processes of sepsis. In 16 anesthetized, mechanically ventilated, and instrumented domestic pigs of either gender, sepsis was induced by fecal peritonitis. Experimental subjects were screened up to the refractory shock development or death. ECG was continuously recorded throughout the experiment, afterwards RR intervals were detected and HRV parameters computed automatically using custom made measurement and analysis MATLAB routines. In all septic animals, progressive hyperdynamic septic shock developed. The statistical measures of HRV, geometrical measures of HRV and Poincaré plot analysis revealed a pronounced reduction of HRV that developed quickly upon the onset of sepsis and was maintained throughout the experiment. The frequency domain analysis demonstrated a decrease in the high frequency component and increase in the low frequency component together with an increase of the low/high frequency component ratio. The reduction of HRV parameters preceded sepsis-associated hemodynamic changes including heart rate increase or shock progression. In a clinically relevant porcine model of peritonitis-induced progressive septic shock, reduction of HRV parameters heralded sepsis development. HRV reduction was associated with a pronounced parasympathetic inhibition and a shift of sympathovagal balance. Early reduction of HRV may serve as a non-invasive and sensitive marker of systemic inflammatory syndrome, thereby widening the therapeutic window for early interventions. PMID:26779039

  3. Model for variable-bit-rate video transmission over an ATM network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seckin, Gamze; Nguyen, Lana H.; Golshani, Forouzan; Panchanathan, Sethuraman

    1999-01-01

    The transmission of video over variable bit rate channels is a challenging problem. The requirements for an acceptable video quality are typically negotiated between the application layer and the network. The encoder of a variable bit rate video application can adjust several of its parameters to meet the requirements of the network. The main aim is to decrease the loss, delay variation. Network resources have to be properly assigned to meet a required service request. Network buffers need to be controlled carefully, since buffers are responsible for delay and loss distribution. On the other hand, during video transmission, the state of buffers at the encoder output, and decoder input are also very important. Since a buffer overflow or underflow indicates inappropriate resource distribution, it is essential to know when and how buffer overflow and underflows occur. The proposed research is based on the encoder and decoder buffer boundary definitions introduced in Nguyen et al. 97. The bit rate of the video is adjusted so that the encoder and decoder buffers neither overflow or underflow at any instance during the transmission. This is guaranteed by estimating the state of the decoder buffer at a fixed frame rate, which in turn is derived for the variable channel rates for the duration of transmission. Both the encoder and decoder buffer fullness information is used as a feedback to the encoder. The encoder, upon receiving this state information adjusts the bit rate for the subsequent frames. This research uses the analytically proven boundaries for the variable bit rate encoder and decoder provided and the behavior is simulated using several video sequences. Simulation results provide a better understanding of the boundary definitions and their practical applications. In addition to understanding the dynamic behavior in terms of the bit rates, this investigation also addresses the impact of the changes in the frame rate and other scalability factors controlled by the encoder. The results show that the boundary definitions, which in turn are used for rate control of the encoder and decoder, improve the quality of the video received.

  4. Heart rate variability as a transdiagnostic biomarker of psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Beauchaine, Theodore P; Thayer, Julian F

    2015-11-01

    The Research Domain Criteria (RDoC), developed by the National Institute of Mental Health as a neuroscience-informed alternative to traditional psychiatric nosology, is an explicitly dimensional system in which classification of psychopathology is derived inductively (i.e., from basic science), across multiple levels of analysis (e.g., genetic, neural, psychophysiological, and behavioral). Although RDoC is often presented as paradigmatically revolutionary, a review of the history of psychophysiology suggests that roots of RDoC thinking extend at least as far back as the mid-20th Century. In this paper, we briefly and selectively review the historical emergence of neurobiologically-informed dimensional trait models of psychopathology, and we summarize our thinking regarding high frequency heart rate variability (HF-HRV) as a transdiagnostic biomarker of self-regulation and cognitive control. When functional interactions between HF-HRV and systems of behavioral approach and avoidance are considered, diverse patterns of behavioral maladjustment can be subsumed into a single model. This model accommodates the general bifactor structure of psychopathology, and suggests that HF-HRV can be viewed as an autonomic, transdiagnostic biomarker of mental illness. PMID:26272488

  5. Extraction of Heart Rate Variability from Smartphone Photoplethysmograms

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Rong-Chao; Zhou, Xiao-Lin; Lin, Wan-Hua; Zhang, Yuan-Ting

    2015-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) is a useful clinical tool for autonomic function assessment and cardiovascular diseases diagnosis. It is traditionally calculated from a dedicated medical electrocardiograph (ECG). In this paper, we demonstrate that HRV can also be extracted from photoplethysmograms (PPG) obtained by the camera of a smartphone. Sixteen HRV parameters, including time-domain, frequency-domain, and nonlinear parameters, were calculated from PPG captured by a smartphone for 30 healthy subjects and were compared with those derived from ECG. The statistical results showed that 14 parameters (AVNN, SDNN, CV, RMSSD, SDSD, TP, VLF, LF, HF, LF/HF, nLF, nHF, SD1, and SD2) from PPG were highly correlated (r > 0.7, P < 0.001) with those from ECG, and 7 parameters (AVNN, TP, VLF, LF, HF, nLF, and nHF) from PPG were in good agreement with those from ECG within the acceptable limits. In addition, five different algorithms to detect the characteristic points of PPG wave were also investigated: peak point (PP), valley point (VP), maximum first derivative (M1D), maximum second derivative (M2D), and tangent intersection (TI). The results showed that M2D and TI algorithms had the best performance. These results suggest that the smartphone might be used for HRV measurement. PMID:25685174

  6. Nonlinear Control of Heart Rate Variability in Human Infants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugihara, George; Allan, Walter; Sobel, Daniel; Allan, Kenneth D.

    1996-03-01

    Nonlinear analyses of infant heart rhythms reveal a marked rise in the complexity of the electrocardiogram with maturation. We find that normal mature infants (gestation >= 35 weeks) have complex and distinctly nonlinear heart rhythms (consistent with recent reports for healthy adults) but that such nonlinearity is lacking in preterm infants (gestation <= 27 weeks) where parasympathetic-sympathetic interaction and function are presumed to be less well developed. Our study further shows that infants with clinical brain death and those treated with atropine exhibit a similar lack of nonlinear feedback control. These three lines of evidence support the hypothesis championed by Goldberger et al. [Goldberger, A. L., Rigney, D. R. & West, B. J. (1990) Sci. Am. 262, 43-49] that autonomic nervous system control underlies the nonlinearity and possible chaos of normal heart rhythms. This report demonstrates the acquisition of nonlinear heart rate dynamics and possible chaos in developing human infants and its loss in brain death and with the administration of atropine. It parallels earlier work documenting changes in the variability of heart rhythms in each of these cases and suggests that nonlinearity may provide additional power in characterizing physiological states.

  7. Stochastic time series analysis of fetal heart-rate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shariati, M. A.; Dripps, J. H.

    1990-06-01

    Fetal Heart Rate(FHR) is one of the important features of fetal biophysical activity and its long term monitoring is used for the antepartum(period of pregnancy before labour) assessment of fetal well being. But as yet no successful method has been proposed to quantitatively represent variety of random non-white patterns seen in FHR. Objective of this paper is to address this issue. In this study the Box-Jenkins method of model identification and diagnostic checking was used on phonocardiographic derived FHR(averaged) time series. Models remained exclusively autoregressive(AR). Kalman filtering in conjunction with maximum likelihood estimation technique forms the parametric estimator. Diagnosrics perfonned on the residuals indicated that a second order model may be adequate in capturing type of variability observed in 1 up to 2 mm data windows of FHR. The scheme may be viewed as a means of data reduction of a highly redundant information source. This allows a much more efficient transmission of FHR information from remote locations to places with facilities and expertise for doser analysis. The extracted parameters is aimed to reflect numerically the important FHR features. These are normally picked up visually by experts for their assessments. As a result long term FHR recorded during antepartum period could then be screened quantitatively for detection of patterns considered normal or abnonnal. 1.

  8. Nicotine Acutely Inhibits Erectile Tumescence by Altering Heart Rate Variability

    PubMed Central

    Harte, Christopher B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine potential mechanisms underlying nicotines effects on male sexual arousal by exploring the mediating role of heart rate variability (HRV). Methods The sample comprised 22 healthy, nicotine-nave men (Mage = 20.91 years; SD = 2.43). Data were taken from a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover trial previously completed and published elsewhere. During each laboratory visit, time-domain parameters of HRV (standard deviation of normal-to-normal [NN] intervals [SDNN], square root of the mean squared difference of successive NN intervals [RMSSD], percent of NN intervals for which successive heartbeat intervals differed by at least 50 ms [pNN50]) were assessed, as well as objective (via penile plethysmography) and subjective indices of sexual arousal. Results Acute nicotine ingestion (compared to placebo) was associated with dysregulated sympathovagal balance, which in turn was related to relatively reduced erectile tumescence. HRV did not mediate relations between nicotine intake and self-reported indices of sexual arousal. Conclusions HRV mediated the association between nicotine ingestion and erectile capacity. Findings suggest that dysfunctional cardiac autonomic tone may be an underlying mechanism by which nicotine exerts its deleterious effects on erectile health. PMID:24642073

  9. A systematic review on heart rate variability in Bulimia Nervosa.

    PubMed

    Peschel, Stephanie K V; Feeling, Nicole R; Vögele, Claus; Kaess, Michael; Thayer, Julian F; Koenig, Julian

    2016-04-01

    Eating disorders are associated with alterations of the autonomic nervous system (ANS). Among other indices, heart rate variability (HRV) provides a readily available index of ANS function. While ANS dysfunction indexed by HRV in Anorexia Nervosa has been addressed in previous reviews, here we aimed to review the current evidence on HRV in Bulimia Nervosa (BN). A systematic literature search in Web of Science, PsycInfo, Scopus, and PubMed identified 17 studies reporting HRV in patients with BN. Studies described (i) differences in resting state HRV in patients compared to controls, (ii) alterations in the stress response in BN indexed by HRV, and (iii) treatment effects on HRV in patients with BN. Despite a number of conflicting results, we conclude that BN is characterized by increased resting state vagally-mediated HRV and an impaired stress-response. Intervention-studies suggest that altered ANS-activity in BN is at least partially reversible. Future studies on the complex relation between BN and HRV should investigate the effect of comorbid disorders, subtypes of BN, and mechanisms affecting treatment outcome. PMID:26828568

  10. Kubios HRV--heart rate variability analysis software.

    PubMed

    Tarvainen, Mika P; Niskanen, Juha-Pekka; Lipponen, Jukka A; Ranta-Aho, Perttu O; Karjalainen, Pasi A

    2014-01-01

    Kubios HRV is an advanced and easy to use software for heart rate variability (HRV) analysis. The software supports several input data formats for electrocardiogram (ECG) data and beat-to-beat RR interval data. It includes an adaptive QRS detection algorithm and tools for artifact correction, trend removal and analysis sample selection. The software computes all the commonly used time-domain and frequency-domain HRV parameters and several nonlinear parameters. There are several adjustable analysis settings through which the analysis methods can be optimized for different data. The ECG derived respiratory frequency is also computed, which is important for reliable interpretation of the analysis results. The analysis results can be saved as an ASCII text file (easy to import into MS Excel or SPSS), Matlab MAT-file, or as a PDF report. The software is easy to use through its compact graphical user interface. The software is available free of charge for Windows and Linux operating systems at http://kubios.uef.fi. PMID:24054542

  11. Heart rate variability: a tool to explore the sleeping brain?

    PubMed Central

    Chouchou, Florian; Desseilles, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Sleep is divided into two main sleep stages: (1) non-rapid eye movement sleep (non-REMS), characterized among others by reduced global brain activity; and (2) rapid eye movement sleep (REMS), characterized by global brain activity similar to that of wakefulness. Results of heart rate variability (HRV) analysis, which is widely used to explore autonomic modulation, have revealed higher parasympathetic tone during normal non-REMS and a shift toward sympathetic predominance during normal REMS. Moreover, HRV analysis combined with brain imaging has identified close connectivity between autonomic cardiac modulation and activity in brain areas such as the amygdala and insular cortex during REMS, but no connectivity between brain and cardiac activity during non-REMS. There is also some evidence for an association between HRV and dream intensity and emotionality. Following some technical considerations, this review addresses how brain activity during sleep contributes to changes in autonomic cardiac activity, organized into three parts: (1) the knowledge on autonomic cardiac control, (2) differences in brain and autonomic activity between non-REMS and REMS, and (3) the potential of HRV analysis to explore the sleeping brain, and the implications for psychiatric disorders. PMID:25565936

  12. Nonlinear control of heart rate variability in human infants.

    PubMed Central

    Sugihara, G; Allan, W; Sobel, D; Allan, K D

    1996-01-01

    Nonlinear analyses of infant heart rhythms reveal a marked rise in the complexity of the electrocardiogram with maturation. We find that normal mature infants (gestation greater than or equal to 35 weeks) have complex and distinctly nonlinear heart rhythms (consistent with recent reports for healthy adults) but that such nonlinearity is lacking in preterm infants (gestation > or = to 27 weeks) where parasympathetic-sympathetic interaction and function are presumed to be less well developed. Our study further shows that infants with clinical brain death and those treated with atropine exhibit a similar lack of nonlinear feedback control. These three lines of evidence support the hypothesis championed by Goldberger et al. [Goldberger, A.L., Rigney, D.R. & West, B.J. (1990) Sci. Am. 262, 43-49] that autonomic nervous system control underlies the nonlinearity and possible chaos of normal heart rhythms. This report demonstrates the acquisition of nonlinear heart rate dynamics and possible chaos in developing human infants and its loss in brain death and with the administration of atropine. It parallels earlier work documenting changes in the variability of heart rhythms in each of these cases and suggests that nonlinearity may provide additional power in characterizing physiological states. PMID:8637921

  13. Variable-rate irrigation management for peanut in the eastern Coastal Plains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Variable rate irrigation systems provide farmers with a tool to spatially allocate limited water resources while potentially increasing profits. To optimally management these variable rate irrigation systems, we conducted irrigation experiments on peanuts to compare spatial irrigation management usi...

  14. 26 CFR 26.2641-1 - Applicable rate of tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Applicable rate of tax. The rate of tax applicable to any GST (applicable rate) is determined by multiplying the maximum Federal estate tax rate in effect at the time of the GST by the inclusion ratio...

  15. 26 CFR 26.2641-1 - Applicable rate of tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Applicable rate of tax. The rate of tax applicable to any GST (applicable rate) is determined by multiplying the maximum Federal estate tax rate in effect at the time of the GST by the inclusion ratio...

  16. 26 CFR 26.2641-1 - Applicable rate of tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Applicable rate of tax. The rate of tax applicable to any GST (applicable rate) is determined by multiplying the maximum Federal estate tax rate in effect at the time of the GST by the inclusion ratio...

  17. 26 CFR 26.2641-1 - Applicable rate of tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Applicable rate of tax. The rate of tax applicable to any GST (applicable rate) is determined by multiplying the maximum Federal estate tax rate in effect at the time of the GST by the inclusion ratio...

  18. 26 CFR 26.2641-1 - Applicable rate of tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Applicable rate of tax. The rate of tax applicable to any GST (applicable rate) is determined by multiplying the maximum Federal estate tax rate in effect at the time of the GST by the inclusion ratio...

  19. Modulation of Heart Rate Variability During Severe Hemorrhage at Different Rates in Conscious Rats

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Karen; Ahlgren, Joslyn; Stanley, Jessie; Hayward, Linda F.

    2009-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate heart rate (HR) regulation during severe hemorrhage (HEM) at different rates of blood loss. Chronically instrumented male rats underwent HEM at one of three rates: slow (0.5 ml/min/kg; S-HEM), intermediate (1.0 ml/min/kg I-HEM), or 2.0 ml/min/kg (fast; F-HEM) until 30% of the estimated total blood volume (ETBV) was withdrawn. Heart rate variability analysis was performed and the absolute power within the low frequency (LF; 0.16-0.6 Hz) and high frequency (HF; 0.6 - 3 Hz) ranges were evaluated. During the first 15% of ETBV loss, arterial pressure (AP) was maintained while HR increased. The increase in HR was greatest in the S-HEM and I-HEM groups and was associated with a significant reduction in HF power in the S-HEM group only. As blood loss progressed AP and HR declined in all treatment groups. The decrease in HR was associated with a significant increase in HF power in the F-HEM and I-HEM groups only. Parasympathetic blockade with atropine methyl bromide eliminated all decreases in HR, independent of rate of hemorrhage. Blockade of parasympathetic activity also significantly increased the AP at ETBV losses ?20% independent of the rate of hemorrhage. The effect of atropine on AP was most noticeable in the S-HEM and F-HEM groups. These results demonstrate that rate of blood loss has an important impact on autonomic regulation during severe HEM and support previous findings that neural strategies underlying autonomic control may vary depending on the rate of blood loss. PMID:19482559

  20. Electrochemical Corrosion Rate Sensors for Waste Incineration Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Matthes, S.A.; Holcomb, G.R.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Eden, D.A.

    2007-03-01

    Electrochemical corrosion rate sensors work in high temperature waste incineration applications where ash is deposited. The ash serves as the electrolyte for electrochemical measurements, such as liner polarization resistance, electrochemical noise, and harmonic distortion analyses. Results to date have shown that these types of sensors respond qualitatively to changes in temperature, gas composition, alloy composition, and type of ash. Several years of research have shown that high temperature corrosion rate probes need to be better understood before corrosion rate can be used as a process variable by power plant operators. More recent research has shown that electrochemical corrosion probes typically measure lower corrosion rates than those measured by standard mass loss techniques. While still useful for monitoring changes in corrosion rates, absolute probe corrosion rates will need a calibration factor to be useful. Ideas for research that may help resolve these issues are presented.

  1. Air velocity distributions inside tree canopies from a variable-rate air-assisted sprayer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A variable-rate, air assisted, five-port sprayer had been in development to achieve variable discharge rates of both liquid and air. To verify the variable air rate capability by changing the fan inlet diameter of the sprayer, air jet velocities impeded by plant canopies were measured at various loc...

  2. Fetal autonomic brain age scores, segmented heart rate variability analysis, and traditional short term variability

    PubMed Central

    Hoyer, Dirk; Kowalski, Eva-Maria; Schmidt, Alexander; Tetschke, Florian; Nowack, Samuel; Rudolph, Anja; Wallwitz, Ulrike; Kynass, Isabelle; Bode, Franziska; Tegtmeyer, Janine; Kumm, Kathrin; Moraru, Liviu; Gtz, Theresa; Haueisen, Jens; Witte, Otto W.; Schleuner, Ekkehard; Schneider, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    Disturbances of fetal autonomic brain development can be evaluated from fetal heart rate patterns (HRP) reflecting the activity of the autonomic nervous system. Although HRP analysis from cardiotocographic (CTG) recordings is established for fetal surveillance, temporal resolution is low. Fetal magnetocardiography (MCG), however, provides stable continuous recordings at a higher temporal resolution combined with a more precise heart rate variability (HRV) analysis. A direct comparison of CTG and MCG based HRV analysis is pending. The aims of the present study are: (i) to compare the fetal maturation age predicting value of the MCG based fetal Autonomic Brain Age Score (fABAS) approach with that of CTG based Dawes-Redman methodology; and (ii) to elaborate fABAS methodology by segmentation according to fetal behavioral states and HRP. We investigated MCG recordings from 418 normal fetuses, aged between 21 and 40 weeks of gestation. In linear regression models we obtained an age predicting value of CTG compatible short term variability (STV) of R2 = 0.200 (coefficient of determination) in contrast to MCG/fABAS related multivariate models with R2 = 0.648 in 30 min recordings, R2 = 0.610 in active sleep segments of 10 min, and R2 = 0.626 in quiet sleep segments of 10 min. Additionally segmented analysis under particular exclusion of accelerations (AC) and decelerations (DC) in quiet sleep resulted in a novel multivariate model with R2 = 0.706. According to our results, fMCG based fABAS may provide a promising tool for the estimation of fetal autonomic brain age. Beside other traditional and novel HRV indices as possible indicators of developmental disturbances, the establishment of a fABAS score normogram may represent a specific reference. The present results are intended to contribute to further exploration and validation using independent data sets and multicenter research structures. PMID:25505399

  3. Fetal autonomic brain age scores, segmented heart rate variability analysis, and traditional short term variability.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Dirk; Kowalski, Eva-Maria; Schmidt, Alexander; Tetschke, Florian; Nowack, Samuel; Rudolph, Anja; Wallwitz, Ulrike; Kynass, Isabelle; Bode, Franziska; Tegtmeyer, Janine; Kumm, Kathrin; Moraru, Liviu; Gtz, Theresa; Haueisen, Jens; Witte, Otto W; Schleuner, Ekkehard; Schneider, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    Disturbances of fetal autonomic brain development can be evaluated from fetal heart rate patterns (HRP) reflecting the activity of the autonomic nervous system. Although HRP analysis from cardiotocographic (CTG) recordings is established for fetal surveillance, temporal resolution is low. Fetal magnetocardiography (MCG), however, provides stable continuous recordings at a higher temporal resolution combined with a more precise heart rate variability (HRV) analysis. A direct comparison of CTG and MCG based HRV analysis is pending. The aims of the present study are: (i) to compare the fetal maturation age predicting value of the MCG based fetal Autonomic Brain Age Score (fABAS) approach with that of CTG based Dawes-Redman methodology; and (ii) to elaborate fABAS methodology by segmentation according to fetal behavioral states and HRP. We investigated MCG recordings from 418 normal fetuses, aged between 21 and 40 weeks of gestation. In linear regression models we obtained an age predicting value of CTG compatible short term variability (STV) of R (2) = 0.200 (coefficient of determination) in contrast to MCG/fABAS related multivariate models with R (2) = 0.648 in 30 min recordings, R (2) = 0.610 in active sleep segments of 10 min, and R (2) = 0.626 in quiet sleep segments of 10 min. Additionally segmented analysis under particular exclusion of accelerations (AC) and decelerations (DC) in quiet sleep resulted in a novel multivariate model with R (2) = 0.706. According to our results, fMCG based fABAS may provide a promising tool for the estimation of fetal autonomic brain age. Beside other traditional and novel HRV indices as possible indicators of developmental disturbances, the establishment of a fABAS score normogram may represent a specific reference. The present results are intended to contribute to further exploration and validation using independent data sets and multicenter research structures. PMID:25505399

  4. Emissions variability processor (EMVAP): design, evaluation, and application.

    PubMed

    Paine, Robert; Szembek, Carlos; Heinold, David; Knipping, Eladio; Kumar, Naresh

    2014-12-01

    Emissions of pollutants such as SO2 and NOx from external combustion sources can vary widely depending on fuel sulfur content, load, and transient conditions such as startup, shutdown, and maintenance/malfunction. While monitoring will automatically reflect variability from both emissions and meteorological influences, dispersion modeling has been typically conducted with a single constant peak emission rate. To respond to the need to account for emissions variability in addressing probabilistic 1-hr ambient air quality standards for SO2 and NO2, we have developed a statistical technique, the Emissions Variability Processor (EMVAP), which can account for emissions variability in dispersion modeling through Monte Carlo sampling from a specified frequency distribution of emission rates. Based upon initial AERMOD modeling of from 1 to 5 years of actual meteorological conditions, EMVAP is used as a postprocessor to AERMOD to simulate hundreds or even thousands of years of concentration predictions. This procedure uses emissions varied hourly with a Monte Carlo sampling process that is based upon the user-specified emissions distribution, from which a probabilistic estimate can be obtained of the controlling concentration. EMVAP can also accommodate an advanced Tier 2 NO2 modeling technique that uses a varying ambient ratio method approach to determine the fraction of total oxides of nitrogen that are in the form of nitrogen dioxide. For the case of the 1-hr National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS, established for SO2 and NO2), a "critical value" can be defined as the highest hourly emission rate that would be simulated to satisfy the standard using air dispersion models assuming constant emissions throughout the simulation. The critical value can be used as the starting point for a procedure like EMVAP that evaluates the impact of emissions variability and uses this information to determine an appropriate value to use for a longer-term (e.g., 30-day) average emission rate that would still provide protection for the NAAQS under consideration. This paper reports on the design of EMVAP and its evaluation on several field databases that demonstrate that EMVAP produces a suitably modest overestimation of design concentrations. We also provide an example of an EMVAP application that involves a case in which a new emission limitation needs to be considered for a hypothetical emission unit that has infrequent higher-than-normal SO2 emissions. Implications: Emissions of pollutants from combustion sources can vary widely depending on fuel sulfur content, load, and transient conditions such as startup and shutdown. While monitoring will automatically reflect this variability on measured concentrations, dispersion modeling is typically conducted with a single peak emission rate assumed to occur continuously. To realistically account for emissions variability in addressing probabilistic 1-hr ambient air quality standards for SO2 and NO2, the authors have developed a statistical technique, the Emissions Variability Processor (EMVAP), which can account for emissions variability in dispersion modeling through Monte Carlo sampling from a specified frequency distribution of emission rates. PMID:25562935

  5. Short-term heart rate variability (HRV) in healthy dogs.

    PubMed

    Bogucki, Sz; Noszczyk-Nowak, A

    2015-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) is a well established mortality risk factor in both healthy dogs and those with heart failure. While the standards for short-term HRV analysis have been developed in humans, only reference values for HRV parameters determined from 24-hour ECG have been proposed in dogs. The aim of this study was to develop the reference values for short-term HRV parameters in a group of 50 healthy dogs of various breeds (age 4.86 2.74 years, body weight 12.2 3.88 kg). The ECG was recorded continuously for at least 180 min in a dark and quiet room. All electrocardiograms were inspected automatically and manually to eliminate atrial or ventricular premature complexes. Signals were transformed into a spectrum using the fast Fourier transform. The HRV parameters were measured at fixed times from 60-min ECG segments. The following time-domain parameters (ms) were analyzed: mean NN, SDNN, SDANN, SDNN index, rMSSD and pNN50. Moreover, frequency-domain parameters (Hz) were determined, including very low frequency (VLF), low frequency (LF) and high frequency (HF) components, total power (TP) and the LF/HF ratio. The results (means SD) were as follows: mean NN = 677.68 126.89; SDNN = 208.86 77.1; SDANN = 70.75 30.9; SDNN index = 190.75 76.12; rMSSD = 259 120.17, pNN50 = 71.84 13.96; VLF = 984.96 327.7; LF = 1501.24 736.32; HF = 5845.45 2914.20; TP = 11065.31 3866.87; LF/HF = 0.28 0.11. PMID:26172180

  6. Effect of penehyclidine hydrochloride on heart rate variability in hysteroscopy

    PubMed Central

    LIU, XIAO-BO; PAN, SHU; YANG, XI-GE; LI, ZHI-WEN; SUN, QING-SHAN; ZHAO, ZHUANG; MA, HAI-CHUN; CUI, CHENG-RI

    2015-01-01

    In order to evaluate the effect of different doses of penehyclidine hydrochloride (penehyclidine) on heart rate (HR) and HR variability (HRV) in hysteroscopy, 180 patients (American Society of Anesthesiologists grade III) were randomized equally to three groups: 0.5 mg penehyclidine and intravenous anesthesia (group I), 1.0 mg penehyclidine and intravenous anesthesia (group II) and saddle anesthesia combined with intravenous anesthesia (control group). HR and HRV, including total power (TP), low-frequency power (LF), high-frequency power (HF) and the LF to HF ratio (LF/HF), were recorded prior and subsequent to the induction of anesthesia (T0 and T1, respectively), following the start of surgery (T2) and following completion of surgery (T3). HR was lower at T2 than at T0 in the control patients, but no differences were observed in groups I and II. The HR at T2 was increased in group II compared with that in group I. TP in group II was significantly higher compared with that in group I at T2. At T1 and at T2, the LF and HF values were lower in group I than those in the controls. Patients in group II also had higher LF and HF at T2 than patients in group I. The HF was higher at T2 than that at T0 in the controls; however, the HF and LF did not change significantly within groups I and II. No significant differences were observed in the LF/HF ratio among the three groups. At a dose of 0.5 mg, penehyclidine stabilized HRV and did not alter the autonomic nervous modulation of HR. A penehyclidine dose of 1.0 mg may be superior to a dose of 0.5 mg in maintaining HR, but is less effective at balancing sympathetic and parasympathetic activity. PMID:26170932

  7. Estimating mental fatigue based on electroencephalogram and heart rate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chong; Yu, Xiaolin

    2010-01-01

    The effects of long term mental arithmetic task on psychology are investigated by subjective self-reporting measures and action performance test. Based on electroencephalogram (EEG) and heart rate variability (HRV), the impacts of prolonged cognitive activity on central nervous system and autonomic nervous system are observed and analyzed. Wavelet packet parameters of EEG and power spectral indices of HRV are combined to estimate the change of mental fatigue. Then wavelet packet parameters of EEG which change significantly are extracted as the features of brain activity in different mental fatigue state, support vector machine (SVM) algorithm is applied to differentiate two mental fatigue states. The experimental results show that long term mental arithmetic task induces the mental fatigue. The wavelet packet parameters of EEG and power spectral indices of HRV are strongly correlated with mental fatigue. The predominant activity of autonomic nervous system of subjects turns to the sympathetic activity from parasympathetic activity after the task. Moreover, the slow waves of EEG increase, the fast waves of EEG and the degree of disorder of brain decrease compared with the pre-task. The SVM algorithm can effectively differentiate two mental fatigue states, which achieves the maximum classification accuracy (91%). The SVM algorithm could be a promising tool for the evaluation of mental fatigue. Fatigue, especially mental fatigue, is a common phenomenon in modern life, is a persistent occupational hazard for professional. Mental fatigue is usually accompanied with a sense of weariness, reduced alertness, and reduced mental performance, which would lead the accidents in life, decrease productivity in workplace and harm the health. Therefore, the evaluation of mental fatigue is important for the occupational risk protection, productivity, and occupational health.

  8. Hierarchical Structure of Heart Rate Variability in Humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, X. Z.; Ching, E. S. C.; Lin, D. C.

    2004-03-01

    We show a hierarchical structure (HS) of the She-Leveque form in the beat-to-beat RR intervals of heart rate variability (HRV) in humans. This structure, first found as an empirical law in turbulent fluid flows, implies further details in the HRV multifractal scaling. We tested HS using daytime RRi data from healthy subjects and heart diseased patients with congestive heart failure and found a universal law C(b) where b characterizes the multifractality of HRV and C is related to a co-dimension parameter of the most violent events in the fluctuation. The potential of diagnosis is discussed based on the characteristics of this finding. To model the HRV phenomenology, we propose a local-feedback-global-cascade (LFGC) model based on the She-Waymire (SW) cascade solution to the HS in fluid turbulence. This model extends from the previous work in that it integrates additive law multiplicatively into the cascade structure. It is an attempt to relate to the cardiovascular physiology which consists of numerous feedback controls that function primarily on the principle of additive law. In particular, the model is based on the same philosophy as the SW cascade that its multifractal dynamics consists of a singular and a modulating component. In the LFGC model, we introduce local feedback to model the dynamics of the modulating effect. The novelty of our model is to incorporate the cascade structure in the scheduling for the feedback control. This model also represents an alternative solution to the HS. We will present the simulation results by the LFGC model and discuss its implication in physiology terms.

  9. Heart rate variability during cycloergometric exercise or judo wrestling eliciting the same heart rate level.

    PubMed

    Cottin, Franois; Durbin, Franois; Papelier, Yves

    2004-03-01

    This study compared heart rate variability (HRV) in ten male judokas between two types of exercise eliciting the same near-maximal average heart rate (HR): judo wrestling vs. cycloergometric bout. Beat-to-beat RR intervals were recorded during (1) a 4-min judo randori (wrestling); (2) a 4-min cycloergometric exercise eliciting maximal oxygen consumption (VO(2MAX)). Time series were analyzed both by short term Fourier transform (STFT) and Poincar plot (PP). The main results are as follows. First, despite the fact that the same maximal HR was reached during the two exercises, the spectral energy computed from the judo recordings was significantly higher than that recorded from the cycloergometric exercise. Second, according to the PP index of rapid HRV (SD1), the high-frequency spectral energy (HF) was significantly higher during judo than cycloergometric exercise as well. Third, judo spectra show chaotic harmonics in place of the precise HF peak observed during cycloergometric exercise. Fourth, the respective parts of normalized LFn and HFn are not different between the two exercise modes, suggesting that autonomic control during severe exercise cannot depend on the type of exercise. In conclusion, this study shows that it is possible, according to the observed kind of variability from RR time series, to differentiate between two types of effort: steady-state dynamic exercise or conversely exercise made of both isometric and irregular dynamic efforts (wrestling, collective sports, and others). PMID:14557884

  10. Estimating hydraulic properties of volcanic aquifers using constant-rate and variable-rate aquifer tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rotzoll, K.; El-Kadi, A. I.; Gingerich, S.B.

    2007-01-01

    In recent years the ground-water demand of the population of the island of Maui, Hawaii, has significantly increased. To ensure prudent management of the ground-water resources, an improved understanding of ground-water flow systems is needed. At present, large-scale estimations of aquifer properties are lacking for Maui. Seven analytical methods using constant-rate and variable-rate withdrawals for single wells provide an estimate of hydraulic conductivity and transmissivity for 103 wells in central Maui. Methods based on constant-rate tests, although not widely used on Maui, offer reasonable estimates. Step-drawdown tests, which are more abundantly used than other tests, provide similar estimates as constant-rate tests. A numerical model validates the suitability of analytical solutions for step-drawdown tests and additionally provides an estimate of storage parameters. The results show that hydraulic conductivity is log-normally distributed and that for dike-free volcanic rocks it ranges over several orders of magnitude from 1 to 2,500 m/d. The arithmetic mean, geometric mean, and median values of hydraulic conductivity are respectively 520, 280, and 370 m/d for basalt and 80, 50, and 30 m/d for sediment. A geostatistical approach using ordinary kriging yields a prediction of hydraulic conductivity on a larger scale. Overall, the results are in agreement with values published for other Hawaiian islands. ?? 2007 American Water Resources Association.

  11. BIOPHYSICAL CHARACTERISATION OF THE UNDER-APPRECIATED AND IMPORTANT RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN HEART RATE VARIABILITY AND HEART RATE

    PubMed Central

    Monfredi, Oliver; Lyashkov, Alexey E; Johnsen, Anne-Berit; Inada, Shin; Schneider, Heiko; Wang, Ruoxi; Nirmalan, Mahesh; Wisloff, Ulrik; Maltsev, Victor A; Lakatta, Edward G; Zhang, Henggui; Boyett, Mark R

    2014-01-01

    Heart rate variability (beat-to-beat changes in the RR interval) has attracted considerable attention over the last 30+ years (PubMed currently lists >17,000 publications). Clinically, a decrease in heart rate variability is correlated to higher morbidity and mortality in diverse conditions, from heart disease to foetal distress. It is usually attributed to fluctuation in cardiac autonomic nerve activity. We calculated heart rate variability parameters from a variety of cardiac preparations (including humans, living animals, Langendorff-perfused heart and single sinoatrial nodal cell) in diverse species, combining this with data from previously published papers. We show that regardless of conditions, there is a universal exponential decay-like relationship between heart rate variability and heart rate. Using two biophysical models, we develop a theory for this, and confirm that heart rate variability is primarily dependent on heart rate and cannot be used in any simple way to assess autonomic nerve activity to the heart. We suggest that the correlation between a change in heart rate variability and altered morbidity and mortality is substantially attributable to the concurrent change in heart rate. This calls for re-evaluation of the findings from many papers that have not adjusted properly or at all for heart rate differences when comparing heart rate variability in multiple circumstances. PMID:25225208

  12. Bouts of Responding: The Relation between Bout Rate and the Rate of Variable-Interval Reinforcement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shull, Richard L.; Grimes, Julie A.; Bennett, J. Adam

    2004-01-01

    By nose poking a lighted key, rats obtained food pellets on either a variable- interval schedule of reinforcement or a schedule that required an average of four additional responses after the end of the variable-interval component (a tandem variable-interval variable-ratio 4 schedule). With both schedule types, the mean variable interval was

  13. Variable Thermal Conductivity, Slab Mineralogy, and Subduction Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marton, F. C.

    2004-12-01

    Models of subducting slabs have suggested that metastable olivine (MO) in the slabs' cold interiors can act like parachutes and reduce their density (? ), lowering the slabs' velocities by up to 30% [Marton et al., 1999; Schmeling et al., 1999] These models, however, use constant values of thermal conductivity (k)to solve the heat flow equation. Models that use ks that are functions of P, T, and mineralogy have wedges of MO that are 20-30% smaller in cross-sectional area and whose maximum extents are 30-50 km shallower [Hauck et al., 1999; Marton et al., 2004]. As a result of the decreased amount of MO, the parachute effect should also be decreased. Using the same thermo-kinetic model as Marton et al. [2004] I determine the mineralogy of three sets of subducting slabs and calculate the driving forces acting on them. Terminal velocities (vt) are found via balances of the driving forces and the opposing viscous drag forces. For the same two sets of slabs examined using the previous constant k model [Marton et al., 1999] (thermal parameter ?rphi = 3500-12000 km), this model shows reductions that are approximately half those of the former, with maximum reductions of 1-1.25 cm/yr or 15%. A third set, with older lithosphere (100 My) and ?rphi = 5200-17000 km, show reductions of up to 2 cm/yr or 25%. In addition, there should be a negative feedback between the amount of MO and subduction velocity, narrowing the range of subduction rates [Marton et al., 1999; Tetzlaff and Schmeling, 1999]. This is tested by feeding vts back into the model, adjusting the durations of the iterations. The resultant vts and amounts of MO achieve a steady state within a few My after the slabs' tips exit the transition zone. In this case, the size of the parachute effect is dependent on lithospheric age. One set that has constant starting velocities and variable ages shows the same trend as without the feedback, but with vt changes 1% smaller. The other two sets with constant ages each have vt changes that are constant, +2.2% for 70 My old lithosphere, -1.3% for 100 My old lithosphere, that are in-line with the trends of the first group.

  14. Who Uses Physician-Rating Websites? Differences in Sociodemographic Variables, Psychographic Variables, and Health Status of Users and Nonusers of Physician-Rating Websites

    PubMed Central

    Bidmon, Sonja; Rttl, Johanna

    2014-01-01

    Background The number of physician-rating websites (PRWs) is rising rapidly, but usage is still poor. So far, there has been little discussion about what kind of variables influence usage of PRWs. Objective We focused on sociodemographic variables, psychographic variables, and health status of PRW users and nonusers. Methods An online survey of 1006 randomly selected German patients was conducted in September 2012. We analyzed the patients knowledge and use of online PRWs. We also analyzed the impact of sociodemographic variables (gender, age, and education), psychographic variables (eg, feelings toward the Internet, digital literacy), and health status on use or nonuse as well as the judgment of and behavior intentions toward PRWs. The survey instrument was based on existing literature and was guided by several research questions. Results A total of 29.3% (289/986) of the sample knew of a PRW and 26.1% (257/986) had already used a PRW. Younger people were more prone than older ones to use PRWs (t 967=2.27, P=.02). Women used them more than men (?2 1=9.4, P=.002), the more highly educated more than less educated people (?2 4=19.7, P=.001), and people with chronic diseases more than people without (?2 1=5.6, P=.02). No differences were found between users and nonusers in their daily private Internet use and in their use of the Internet for health-related information. Users had more positive feelings about the Internet and other Web-based applications in general (t 489=3.07, P=.002) than nonusers, and they had higher digital literacy (t 520=4.20, P<.001). Users ascribed higher usefulness to PRWs than nonusers (t 612=11.61, P<.001) and users trusted information on PRWs to a greater degree than nonusers (t 559=11.48, P<.001). Users were also more likely to rate a physician on a PRW in the future (t 367=7.63, P<.001) and to use a PRW in the future (t 619=15.01, P<.001). The results of 2 binary logistic regression analyses demonstrated that sociodemographic variables (gender, age, education) and health status alone did not predict whether persons were prone to use PRWs or not. Adding psychographic variables and information-seeking behavior variables to the binary logistic regression analyses led to a satisfying fit of the model and revealed that higher education, poorer health status, higher digital literacy (at the 10% level of significance), lower importance of family and pharmacist for health-related information, higher trust in information on PRWs, and higher appraisal of usefulness of PRWs served as significant predictors for usage of PRWs. Conclusions Sociodemographic variables alone do not sufficiently predict use or nonuse of PRWs; specific psychographic variables and health status need to be taken into account. The results can help designers of PRWs to better tailor their product to specific target groups, which may increase use of PRWs in the future. PMID:24686918

  15. Role of editing of R-R intervals in the analysis of heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Peltola, Mirja A

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews the methods used for editing of the R-R interval time series and how this editing can influence the results of heart rate (HR) variability analyses. Measurement of HR variability from short and long-term electrocardiographic (ECG) recordings is a non-invasive method for evaluating cardiac autonomic regulation. HR variability provides information about the sympathetic-parasympathetic autonomic balance. One important clinical application is the measurement of HR variability in patients suffering from acute myocardial infarction. However, HR variability signals extracted from R-R interval time series from ambulatory ECG recordings often contain different amounts of artifact. These false beats can be either of physiological or technical origin. For instance, technical artifact may result from poorly fastened electrodes or be due to motion of the subject. Ectopic beats and atrial fibrillation are examples of physiological artifact. Since ectopic and other false beats are common in the R-R interval time series, they complicate the reliable analysis of HR variability sometimes making it impossible. In conjunction with the increased usage of HR variability analyses, several studies have confirmed the need for different approaches for handling false beats present in the R-R interval time series. The editing process for the R-R interval time series has become an integral part of these analyses. However, the published literature does not contain detailed reviews of editing methods and their impact on HR variability analyses. Several different editing and HR variability signal pre-processing methods have been introduced and tested for the artifact correction. There are several approaches available, i.e., use of methods involving deletion, interpolation or filtering systems. However, these editing methods can have different effects on HR variability measures. The effects of editing are dependent on the study setting, editing method, parameters used to assess HR variability, type of study population, and the length of R-R interval time series. The purpose of this paper is to summarize these pre-processing methods for HR variability signal, focusing especially on the editing of the R-R interval time series. PMID:22654764

  16. Role of Editing of RR Intervals in the Analysis of Heart Rate Variability

    PubMed Central

    Peltola, Mirja A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews the methods used for editing of the RR interval time series and how this editing can influence the results of heart rate (HR) variability analyses. Measurement of HR variability from short and long-term electrocardiographic (ECG) recordings is a non-invasive method for evaluating cardiac autonomic regulation. HR variability provides information about the sympathetic-parasympathetic autonomic balance. One important clinical application is the measurement of HR variability in patients suffering from acute myocardial infarction. However, HR variability signals extracted from RR interval time series from ambulatory ECG recordings often contain different amounts of artifact. These false beats can be either of physiological or technical origin. For instance, technical artifact may result from poorly fastened electrodes or be due to motion of the subject. Ectopic beats and atrial fibrillation are examples of physiological artifact. Since ectopic and other false beats are common in the RR interval time series, they complicate the reliable analysis of HR variability sometimes making it impossible. In conjunction with the increased usage of HR variability analyses, several studies have confirmed the need for different approaches for handling false beats present in the RR interval time series. The editing process for the RR interval time series has become an integral part of these analyses. However, the published literature does not contain detailed reviews of editing methods and their impact on HR variability analyses. Several different editing and HR variability signal pre-processing methods have been introduced and tested for the artifact correction. There are several approaches available, i.e., use of methods involving deletion, interpolation or filtering systems. However, these editing methods can have different effects on HR variability measures. The effects of editing are dependent on the study setting, editing method, parameters used to assess HR variability, type of study population, and the length of RR interval time series. The purpose of this paper is to summarize these pre-processing methods for HR variability signal, focusing especially on the editing of the RR interval time series. PMID:22654764

  17. A study on energy saving rate for variable speed condition of multistage centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Sang-Ho; Rakibuzzaman; Kim, Kyung-Wuk; Kim, Hyoung-Ho; Yoon, In Sik; Cho, Min-Tae

    2015-11-01

    Centrifugal pumps are being widely used in many industrial and commercial applications. Many of these pumps are being operated at constant speed but could provide energy savings through adjustable speed operations. The purpose of this study was to get the energy saving rates of the multistage centrifugal pump with variable speed conditions. For this investigation an experimental set up of variable flow and pressure system was made to get energy saving rates and numerical analyses are applied to validate the pump performance. The energy saving and therefore the cost saving depends on the specific duty cycle of which the machine operates. Duty cycle is the proportion of time during which a component, device and system is operated. The duty cycle segmented into different flow rates and weighting the average value for each segment by the interval time. The system was operated at 50% or less of the pump capacity. The input power of the system was carried out by pump characteristics curve of each operating point. The energy consumption was done by the product of specific duty cycle and the input power of the system for constant speed and variable speed drive operation. The total energy consumed for constant speed drive pump was 75,770 kW.hr and for variable speed drive pump was 31,700 kW.hr. The total energy saving of the system was 44,070 kW.hr or 58.16% annually. So, this paper suggests a method of implementing an energy saving on variable-flow and pressure system of the multistage centrifugal pump.

  18. SPATIAL VARIABILITY OF OPTIMUM N RATE FOR CORN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Applying only as much N fertilizer as is needed by a crop has economic and environmental benefits. Small plot research has shown that fields can differ substantially in their need for N fertilizer, but the amount of within-field variability is not well understood. Our objective was to characterize t...

  19. On the nature of heart rate variability in a breathing normal subject: A stochastic process analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchner, Teodor; Petelczyc, Monika; ?ebrowski, Jan J.; Prejbisz, Aleksander; Kabat, Marek; Januszewicz, Andrzej; Piotrowska, Anna Justyna; Szelenberger, Waldemar

    2009-06-01

    Human heart rate is moderated by the autonomous nervous system acting predominantly through the sinus node (the main cardiac physiological pacemaker). One of the dominant factors that determine the heart rate in physiological conditions is its coupling with the respiratory rhythm. Using the language of stochastic processes, we analyzed both rhythms simultaneously taking the data from polysomnographic recordings of two healthy individuals. Each rhythm was treated as a sum of a deterministic drift term and a diffusion term (Kramers-Moyal expansion). We found that normal heart rate variability may be considered as the result of a bidirectional coupling of two nonlinear oscillators: the heart itself and the respiratory system. On average, the diffusion (noise) component measured is comparable in magnitude to the oscillatory (deterministic) term for both signals investigated. The application of the Kramers-Moyal expansion may be useful for medical diagnostics providing information on the relation between respiration and heart rate variability. This interaction is mediated by the autonomous nervous system, including the baroreflex, and results in a commonly observed phenomenonrespiratory sinus arrhythmia which is typical for normal subjects and often impaired by pathology.

  20. On the nature of heart rate variability in a breathing normal subject: a stochastic process analysis.

    PubMed

    Buchner, Teodor; Petelczyc, Monika; Zebrowski, Jan J; Prejbisz, Aleksander; Kabat, Marek; Januszewicz, Andrzej; Piotrowska, Anna Justyna; Szelenberger, Waldemar

    2009-06-01

    Human heart rate is moderated by the autonomous nervous system acting predominantly through the sinus node (the main cardiac physiological pacemaker). One of the dominant factors that determine the heart rate in physiological conditions is its coupling with the respiratory rhythm. Using the language of stochastic processes, we analyzed both rhythms simultaneously taking the data from polysomnographic recordings of two healthy individuals. Each rhythm was treated as a sum of a deterministic drift term and a diffusion term (Kramers-Moyal expansion). We found that normal heart rate variability may be considered as the result of a bidirectional coupling of two nonlinear oscillators: the heart itself and the respiratory system. On average, the diffusion (noise) component measured is comparable in magnitude to the oscillatory (deterministic) term for both signals investigated. The application of the Kramers-Moyal expansion may be useful for medical diagnostics providing information on the relation between respiration and heart rate variability. This interaction is mediated by the autonomous nervous system, including the baroreflex, and results in a commonly observed phenomenon--respiratory sinus arrhythmia which is typical for normal subjects and often impaired by pathology. PMID:19566279

  1. Dimensional analysis of heart rate variability in heart transplant recipients

    SciTech Connect

    Zbilut, J.P.; Mayer-Kress, G.; Geist, K.

    1987-01-01

    We discuss periodicities in the heart rate in normal and transplanted hearts. We then consider the possibility of dimensional analysis of these periodicities in transplanted hearts and problems associated with the record.

  2. The application of variable frequency drives to mine fans

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.Z.

    1999-07-01

    During the past several years variable speed drives have become much less expensive for higher horsepower applications. This has created an opportunity to utilize this type of system in variable load mine ventilation applications where the traditional solutions were to use in-flight controllable pitch fans, variable inlet waves or constant load systems and ignore the opportunity for power savings. This paper explores the basic characteristics of each type system and some of the advantages that each system offers for specific mine ventilation applications. The relative capital cost and operating cost of each type systems are also presented.

  3. COMPLEX VARIABLE BOUNDARY ELEMENT METHOD: APPLICATIONS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hromadka, T.V., II; Yen, C.C.; Guymon, G.L.

    1985-01-01

    The complex variable boundary element method (CVBEM) is used to approximate several potential problems where analytical solutions are known. A modeling result produced from the CVBEM is a measure of relative error in matching the known boundary condition values of the problem. A CVBEM error-reduction algorithm is used to reduce the relative error of the approximation by adding nodal points in boundary regions where error is large. From the test problems, overall error is reduced significantly by utilizing the adaptive integration algorithm.

  4. Interaction Between Heart Rate Variability and Heart Rate in Pediatric Population

    PubMed Central

    G?sior, Jakub S.; Sacha, Jerzy; Jele?, Piotr J.; Paw?owski, Mariusz; Werner, Bo?ena; D?browski, Marek J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Heart rate variability (HRV) is primarily heart rate (HR) dependent, and therefore, different HR may exert different impact on HRV. The objectives of the study were to evaluate the effect of HR on HRV in children and to determine whether HRV indices normalized to HR are sex- and age-related. Methods: Short-term ECG recordings were performed in 346 healthy children. Standard time and frequency domain HRV parameters and HR were analyzed in four age subgroups (67, 89, 1011, and 1213 years old). To investigate the HR impact on HRV, standard HRV parameters were normalized to prevailing HR. Results: Standard HRV measures did not differ between age subgroups, however, HR significantly decreased with subjects age and turned out to be the strongest determinant of HRV. The normalization of HRV to prevailing HR allowed to show that sex-related differences in standard HRV resulted from differences in HR between boys and girls. The normalized HRV significantly decreased with agebefore the normalization this effect was masked by age-related HR alterations. Conclusions: HR significantly impacts HRV in pediatric population and turns out to be the strongest determinant of all standard HRV indices. The differences in standard HRV between boys and girls result from differences in their HR. The normalized HRV is decreasing with age in healthy children and it is accompanied by the reduction of HRas a net result, the standard HRV is constant in children at different ages. This may reflect the maturation of the autonomic nervous system. PMID:26733878

  5. An integrated crop- and soil-based strategy for variable-rate nitrogen management in corn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Darrin F.

    Nitrogen (N) management in cereal crops has been the subject of considerable research and debate for several decades. Historic N management practices have contributed to low nitrogen use efficiency (NUE). Low NUE can be caused by such things as poor synchronization between soil N supply and crop demand, uniform application rates of fertilizer N to spatially variable landscapes, and failure to account for temporally variable influences on soil N supply and crop N need. Active canopy reflectance sensors and management zones (MZ) have been studied separately as possible plant- and soil-based N management tools to increase NUE. Recently, some have suggested that the integration of these two approaches would provide a more robust N management strategy that could more effectively account for soil and plant effects on crop N need. For this reason, the goal of this research was to develop an N application strategy that would account for spatial variability in soil properties and use active canopy reflectance sensors to determine in-season, on-the-go N fertilizer rates, thereby increasing NUE and economic return for producers over current N management practices. To address this overall goal, a series of studies were conducted to better understand active canopy sensor use and explore the possibility of integrating spatial soil data with active canopy sensors. Sensor placement to assess crop N status was first examined. It was found that the greatest reduction in error over sensing each individual row for a hypothetical 24-row applicator was obtained with 2-3 sensors estimating an average chlorophyll index for the entire boom width. Next, use of active sensor-based soil organic matter (OM) estimation was compared to more conventional aerial image-based soil OM estimation. By adjusting regression intercept values for each field, OM could be predicted using either a single sensor or image data layer. The final study consisted of validation of the active sensor algorithm developed by Solari (2006), identification of soil variables for MZ delineation, and the possible integration of MZ and active sensors for N application. Crop response (sensor measured sufficiency index and yield) had the highest correlation with soil optical reflectance readings in sandy fields and with apparent soil electrical conductivity in silt loam fields with eroded slopes. Therefore, using these soil variables to delineate MZ allowed characterization of spatial patterns in both in-season crop response (sufficiency index) and yield. Compared to uniform N application, integrating MZ and sensor-based N application resulted in substantial N savings (40--120 kg ha-1) and increases in partial factor productivity (13--75 kg grain (kg N applied)-1) for fine-textured soils with eroded slopes. However, for coarser texture soils the current sensor-based N application algorithm may require further calibration, and for fields with no spatial variability there appears to be no benefit to using the algorithm. Collectively, results from these studies show promise for integrating active sensor-based N application and static soil-based MZ to increase NUE and economic return for producers over current N management strategies, but further research is needed to explore how best to integrate these two N management strategies.

  6. Variable-clock-rate A/D converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipoma, P. C.

    1980-01-01

    Analog-to-digital (A/D) converter operates at two different rates (slow and fast) so that low amplitude noise is reduced without loss of transient response. During tracking, when sensitivity is important, slow clock reduces noise. In search mode, when signal may change rapidly, fast clock ensures rapid response.

  7. Regression Discontinuity Designs with Multiple Rating-Score Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reardon, Sean F.; Robinson, Joseph P.

    2012-01-01

    In the absence of a randomized control trial, regression discontinuity (RD) designs can produce plausible estimates of the treatment effect on an outcome for individuals near a cutoff score. In the standard RD design, individuals with rating scores higher than some exogenously determined cutoff score are assigned to one treatment condition; those…

  8. Variable rate cotton fertilization development in the coastal plain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous research has shown that cotton yields can vary across the landscape based on the management system utilized; however, typical N fertilizer rates for cotton are applied uniformly across the field. The relationship is complicated by how cotton responds to different amounts of N, particularly...

  9. Regression Discontinuity Designs with Multiple Rating-Score Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reardon, Sean F.; Robinson, Joseph P.

    2012-01-01

    In the absence of a randomized control trial, regression discontinuity (RD) designs can produce plausible estimates of the treatment effect on an outcome for individuals near a cutoff score. In the standard RD design, individuals with rating scores higher than some exogenously determined cutoff score are assigned to one treatment condition; those

  10. Loading rate and temperature as variables in amalgam bending.

    PubMed

    Reisbick, M H; Caputo, A A

    1977-08-01

    Three commercial dental amalgams of known dissimilar clinical properties were evaluated in pure blending at widely different loading rates and temperatures. Comparative data of fracture stress at 140 F rank these alloys according to their clinical fracture resistance; the phenomenon of creep may account for early marginal fracture prior to corrosion-induced fracture. PMID:270494

  11. Spatial distribution visualization of PWM continuous variable-rate spray

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chemical application is a dynamic spatial distribution process, during which spray liquid covers the targets with certain thickness and uniformity. Therefore, it is important to study the 2-D and 3-D (dimensional) spray distribution to evaluate spraying quality. The curve-surface generation methods ...

  12. Dynamic Crushing Response of Closed-cell Aluminium Foam at Variable Strain Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, M. A.; Kader, M. A.; Escobedo, J. P.; Hazell, P. J.; Appleby-Thomas, G. J.; Quadir, M. Z.

    2015-06-01

    The impact response of aluminium foams is essential for assessing their crashworthiness and energy absorption capacity for potential applications. The dynamic compactions of closed-cell aluminium foams (CYMAT) have been tested at variable strain rates. Microstructural characterization has also been carried out. The low strain rate impact test has been carried out using drop weight experiments while the high strain compaction test has been carried out via plate impact experiments. The post impacted samples have been examined using optical and electron microscopy to observe the microstructural changes during dynamic loading. This combination of dynamic deformation during impact and post impact microstructural analysis helped to evaluate the pore collapse mechanism and impact energy absorption characteristics.

  13. Use of a prototype pulse oximeter for time series analysis of heart rate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Erika; López, Jehú; Hautefeuille, Mathieu; Velázquez, Víctor; Del Moral, Jésica

    2015-05-01

    This work presents the development of a low cost pulse oximeter prototype consisting of pulsed red and infrared commercial LEDs and a broad spectral photodetector used to register time series of heart rate and oxygen saturation of blood. This platform, besides providing these values, like any other pulse oximeter, processes the signals to compute a power spectrum analysis of the patient heart rate variability in real time and, additionally, the device allows access to all raw and analyzed data if databases construction is required or another kind of further analysis is desired. Since the prototype is capable of acquiring data for long periods of time, it is suitable for collecting data in real life activities, enabling the development of future wearable applications.

  14. Variable speed pumping: A guide to successful applications - Executive summary

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2004-05-01

    This document is the result of a collaboration between the Hydraulic Institute, Europump, and the U.S. DOE Industrial Technologies Program, and describes the cost and energy savings potential of pumping applications with variable duty requirements.

  15. 12 CFR 1026.19 - Certain mortgage and variable-rate transactions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... (REGULATION Z) Closed-End Credit 1026.19 Certain mortgage and variable-rate transactions. (a) Mortgage... source of information about the index or formula. (iii) An explanation of how the interest rate...

  16. 12 CFR 1026.19 - Certain mortgage and variable-rate transactions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... (REGULATION Z) Closed-End Credit 1026.19 Certain mortgage and variable-rate transactions. (a) Mortgage... source of information about the index or formula. (iii) An explanation of how the interest rate...

  17. 12 CFR 1026.19 - Certain mortgage and variable-rate transactions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... (REGULATION Z) Closed-End Credit 1026.19 Certain mortgage and variable-rate transactions. (a) Mortgage... source of information about the index or formula. (iii) An explanation of how the interest rate...

  18. Modeling of atmospheric OH reaction rates using newly developed variable distance weighted zero order connectivity index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markelj, Jernej; Pompe, Matevž

    2016-04-01

    A new variable distance weighted zero order connectivity index was used for development of structure-activity relationship for modeling reactivity of OH radical with alkanes and non-conjugated alkenes in the atmosphere. The proposed model is based on the assumptions that the total reaction rate can be obtained by summing all partial reaction rates and that all reaction sites are interrelated by influencing each other. The results suggest that these assumptions are justified. The model was compared with the EPA implemented model in the studied application domain and showed superior prediction capabilities. Further, optimized values of the weights that were used in our model permit some insight into mechanisms that govern the reaction OH + alkane/alkene. The most important conclusion is that the branching degree of the forming radical seems to play a major role in site specific reaction rates. Relative qualitative structural interpretation is possible, e.g. allylic site is suggested to be much more reactive than even tertiary sp3 carbon. Novel modeling software MACI, which was developed in our lab and is now available for research purposes, was used for calculations. Various variable topological indices that are again starting to be recognized because of their great potentials in simplicity, fast calculations, very good correlations and structural information, were implemented in the program.

  19. Variable temperature effects on release rates of readily soluble nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, C.-L.; Light, W.B.; Lee, W.W.-L.; Chambre, P.L.; Pigford, T.H.; Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1988-09-01

    In this paper we study the effect of temperature on the release rate of readily soluble nuclides, as affected by a time-temperature dependent diffusion coefficient. In this analysis ground water fills the voids in the waste package at t = 0 and one percent of the inventories of cesium and iodine are immediately dissolved into the void water. Mass transfer resistance of partly failed container and cladding is conservatively neglected. The nuclides move through the void space into the surrounding rock under a concentration gradient. We use an analytic solution to compute the nuclide concentration in the gap or void, and the mass flux rate into the porous rock. 8 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Multiport solid-state imager characterization at variable pixel rates

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, G.J.; Albright, K.A.; Turko, B.T.

    1993-08-01

    The imaging performance of an 8-port Full Frame Transfer Charge Coupled Device (FFT CCD) as a function of several parameters including pixel clock rate is presented. The device, model CCD- 13, manufactured by English Electric Valve (EEV) is a 512 {times} 512 pixel array designed with four individual programmable bidirectional serial registers and eight output amplifiers permitting simultaneous readout of eight segments (128 horizontal {times} 256 vertical pixels) of the array. The imager was evaluated in Los Alamos National Laboratory`s High-Speed Solid-State Imager Test Station at true pixel rates as high as 50 MHz for effective imager pixel rates approaching 400 MHz from multiporting. Key response characteristics measured include absolute responsivity, Charge-Transfer-Efficiency (CTE), dynamic range, resolution, signal-to-noise ratio, and electronic and optical crosstalk among the eight video channels. Preliminary test results and data obtained from the CCD-13 will be presented and the versatility/capabilities of the test station will be reviewed.

  1. Changes in Heart Rate Variability after Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting and Clinical Importance of These Findings

    PubMed Central

    Lakusic, Nenad; Mahovic, Darija; Cerkez Habek, Jasna; Novak, Miroslav; Cerovec, Dusko

    2015-01-01

    Heart rate variability is a physiological feature indicating the influence of the autonomic nervous system on the heart rate. Association of the reduced heart rate variability due to myocardial infarction and the increased postinfarction mortality was first described more than thirty years ago. Many studies have unequivocally demonstrated that coronary artery bypass grafting surgery generally leads to significant reduction in heart rate variability, which is even more pronounced than after myocardial infarction. Pathophysiologically, however, the mechanisms of heart rate variability reduction associated with acute myocardial infarction and coronary artery bypass grafting are different. Generally, heart rate variability gradually recovers to the preoperative values within six months of the procedure. Unlike the reduced heart rate variability in patients having sustained myocardial infarction, a finding of reduced heart rate variability after coronary artery bypass surgery is not considered relevant in predicting mortality. Current knowledge about changes in heart rate variability in coronary patients and clinical relevance of such a finding in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting are presented. PMID:26078960

  2. Understanding garnet variability: Application of geometallurgy to diamonds and exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoal, K. O.; Appleby, S. K.; Stammer, J. G.

    2009-05-01

    Peridotitic and eclogitic garnets are a fundamental component in understanding mantle petrology, diamond petrogenesis, and the ascent of mantle materials in kimberlites. They are also critical in exploration programs, as the presence of mantle garnets at the earth's surface provides an indication of dispersion from a deeply derived magmatic carrier. The composition of these garnets further is used as an indicator of diamond prospectivity, on the basis of comparison with garnet compositions known to be in some degree of equilibrium with diamonds. For mantle xenoliths and kimberlites, optical microscopy, electron microprobe analysis (EPMA), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are the main tools used for understanding key mineralogical and textural variability relationships. Mineralogy and texture reflect diamond genesis, metasomatic alteration, fluid migration and manifestation, volcanological processes, peridotite disaggregation, and other manifestations of mantle processes that are observable, describable, and applicable in exploration and mining. Mineralogy and texture studies lead to further questions that are better addressed by higher resolution chemical analysis of isotopes and rare earth elements, or luminescence. Understanding mineralogical and textural variability is the primary geological input for geometallurgy (geomet), the field integrating the earth sciences with the extractive industries. The framework for geomet encompasses geology, mineralogy, deposit modeling and extraction methods for the optimum value return of resources, and it relies on the fact that the mineralogy and texture of rocks influence subsequent interpretation and downstream applications. Developments in this area have been made possible by the new generation of high-speed SEM-based quantitative mineralogical instruments, enabling the statistical assessment of thousands of grains or particles, or samples, and their application to models for exploration, ore deposits, or geomet. For diamonds, this means identification and quantification of large mineralogical and textural data sets, and gives the geologist more involvement in model development. In this study, peridotitic and eclogitic garnets were examined in situ and as xenocrysts to gain understanding of the mineralogical and textural variability of the grains using SEM-based quantitative mineralogy. For concentrate garnets, the new technology presented here is the development of mineral definitions that reflect SEM counts and correlate with EPMA data. Internal compositional variability is mapped across individual grains as compared to EPMA spot analysis; designations of G10-G9 compositions, for example, are more complex when viewed in terms of individual internal grain compositional variability. The new mineral lists based on percentages of Ca-Cr count rates are compared to unknown garnets from exploration samples, and digitally categorized into bins reflecting potential diamond prospectivity or secondary alteration, as desired. The high analysis rate (approx. 150 determinations/second) means the SEM-based technique can be faster and produce more statistical information for the geologist who is making the model assessment in the field. Combined with new nontoxic mineral separation methodology in the field and software on the geologist's laptop, a great deal of interpretation can be accommodated in the field, at a reduced cost for shipping large volumes of samples to a central laboratory. Geomet for diamonds provides the mechanism for thinking of the entirety of a project, and using the geological and mineralogical information to predict process implications.

  3. VARIABLE FIRING RATE OIL BURNER USING PULSE FUEL FLOW CONTROL.

    SciTech Connect

    KRISHNA,C.R.; BUTCHER,T.A.; KAMATH,B.R.

    2004-10-01

    The residential oil burner market is currently dominated by the pressure-atomized retention head burner, which has an excellent reputation for reliability and efficiency. In this burner, oil is delivered to a fuel nozzle at pressures from 100 to 150 psi. In addition, to atomizing the fuel, the small, carefully controlled size of the nozzle exit orifice serves to control the burner firing rate. Burners of this type are currently available at firing rates of more than 0.5 gallons-per-hour (70,000 Btu/hr). Nozzles have been made for lower firing rates, but experience has shown that such nozzles suffer rapid fouling of the necessarily small passages, leading to bad spray patterns and poor combustion performance. Also, traditionally burners and the nozzles are oversized to exceed the maximum demand. Typically, this is figured as follows. The heating load of the house on the coldest day for the location is considered to define the maximum heat load. The contractor or installer adds to this to provide a safety margin and for future expansion of the house. If the unit is a boiler that provides domestic hot water through the use of a tankless heating coil, the burner capacity is further increased. On the contrary, for a majority of the time, the heating system is satisfying a much smaller load, as only rarely do all these demands add up. Consequently, the average output of the heating system has to be much less than the design capacity and this is accomplished by start and stop cycling operation of the system so that the time-averaged output equals the demand. However, this has been demonstrated to lead to overall efficiencies lower than the steady-state efficiency. Therefore, the two main reasons for the current practice of using oil burners much larger than necessary for space heating are the unavailability of reliable low firing rate oil burners and the desire to assure adequate input rate for short duration, high draw domestic hot water loads. One approach to solve this problem is to develop a burner, which can operate at two firing rates, with the lower rate being significantly lower than 0.5 gallons per hour. This paper describes the initial results of adopting this approach through a pulsed flow nozzle. It has been shown that the concept of flow modulation with a small solenoid valve is feasible. Especially in the second configuration tested, where the Lee valve was integrated with the nozzle, reasonable modulation in flow of the order of 1.7 could be achieved. For this first prototype, the combustion performance is still not quite satisfactory. Improvements in operation, for example by providing a sharp and positive shut-off so that there is no flow under low pressures with consequent poor atomization could lead to better combustion performance. This could be achieved by using nozzles that have shut off or check valves for example. It is recommended that more work in cooperation with the valve manufacturer could produce a technically viable system. Marketability is of course a far more complex problem to be addressed once a technically viable product is available.

  4. Assessing positive emotional states in dogs using heart rate and heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Zupan, Manja; Buskas, Julia; Altimiras, Jordi; Keeling, Linda J

    2016-03-01

    Since most animal species have been recognized as sentient beings, emotional state may be a good indicator of welfare in animals. The goal of this study was to manipulate the environment of nine beagle research dogs to highlight physiological responses indicative of different emotional experiences. Stimuli were selected to be a more or a less positive food (meatball or food pellet) or social reward (familiar person or less familiar person). That all the stimuli were positive and of different reward value was confirmed in a runway motivation test. Dogs were tested individually while standing facing a display theatre where the different stimuli could be shown by lifting a shutter. The dogs approached and remained voluntarily in the test system. They were tested in four sessions (of 20s each) for each of the four stimuli. A test session consisted of four presentation phases (1st exposure to stimulus, post exposure, 2nd exposure, and access to reward). Heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) responses were recorded during testing in the experimental room and also when lying resting in a quiet familiar room. A new method of 'stitching' short periods of HRV data together was used in the analysis. When testing different stimuli, no significant differences were observed in HR and LF:HF ratio (relative power in low frequency (LF) and the high-frequency (HF) range), implying that the sympathetic tone was activated similarly for all the stimuli and may suggest that dogs were in a state of positive arousal. A decrease of HF was associated with the meatball stimulus compared to the food pellet and the reward phase (interacting with the person or eating the food) was associated with a decrease in HF and RMSSD (root mean square of successive differences of inter-beat intervals) compared to the preceding phase (looking at the person or food). This suggests that parasympathetic deactivation is associated with a more positive emotional state in the dog. A similar reduction in HF and RMSSD was found in the test situation compared to the resting situation. This is congruent with the expected autonomic effects related to postural shift i.e. sympathetic activation and parasympathetic withdrawal, during standing versus lying, but it cannot explain the parasympathetic deactivation in response to the more positive stimuli since the dogs were always standing in the test situation. We discuss the systematic pattern of responses, which support that increased HR and LF:HF ratio are associated with emotional arousal, but add the new proposal that a combined decrease in RMSSD and HF may reflect a more positively valenced emotional state even when an individual is already in a positive psychological state. PMID:26631546

  5. Visual discrimination learning in dwarf goats and associated changes in heart rate and heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Langbein, Jan; Nrnberg, G; Manteuffel, G

    2004-09-30

    We studied visual discrimination learning in a group of Nigerian dwarf goats using a computer-based learning device which was integrated in the animals' home pen. We conducted three consecutive learning tasks (T1, T2 and T3), each of which lasted for 13 days. In each task, a different set of four visual stimuli was presented on a computer screen in a four-choice design. Predefined sequences of stimulus combinations were presented in a pseudorandom order. Animals were rewarded with drinking water when they chose the positive stimulus by pressing a button next to it. Noninvasive measurements of goats' heartbeat intervals were carried out on the first and the last 2 days of each learning task. We analysed heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) of resting animals to study sustained physiological effects related to general learning challenge rather than acute excitement during an actual learning session. The number of trials to reach the learning criterion was 1000 in T1, when visual stimuli were presented to the goats for the first time, but decreased to 210 in T2 and 240 in T3, respectively. A stable plateau of correct choices between 70% and 80% was reached on Day 10 in T1, on Day 8 in T2 and on Day 6 in T3. We found a significant influence of the task and of the interaction between task and day on learning success. Whereas HR increased throughout T1, this relationship was inverted in T2 and T3, indicating different effects on the HR depending on how familiar goats were with the learning task. We found a significant influence of the task and the interaction between task and time within the task on HRV parameters, indicating changes of vagal activity at the heart. The results suggest that changes in HR related to learning were predominantly caused by a withdrawal of vagal activity at the heart. With regard to nonlinear processes in heartbeat regulation, increased deterministic shares of HRV indicated that the animals did not really relax until the end of T3. Comparing changes of HR and HRV in T3 and in a subsequent postexperiment (PE), we assume a positive effect of such cognitive challenges once the task had been learned by the animals. PMID:15327907

  6. Application of variable metric methods to structural synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderplaats, G. N.; Sugimoto, H.

    1985-01-01

    Powell (1977, 1978), Biggs (1972, 1975), and Han (1976, 1977) have developed a class of variable metric methods which create an explicit, quadratic, subproblem which is to be solved for finding a search direction for design improvement. A one-dimensional search is then performed. The present paper has the objective to present this variable metric approach in the context of structural synthesis. The variable metric algorithm is modified for application to the structural synthesis problem. The application of the new procedure is illustrated with the aid of examples, taking into account a 10-bar planar truss, a 17-bar planar tower, and a cantilever beam.

  7. Human heart rate variability relation is unchanged during motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullen, T. J.; Berger, R. D.; Oman, C. M.; Cohen, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    In a study of 18 human subjects, we applied a new technique, estimation of the transfer function between instantaneous lung volume (ILV) and instantaneous heart rate (HR), to assess autonomic activity during motion sickness. Two control recordings of ILV and electrocardiogram (ECG) were made prior to the development of motion sickness. During the first, subjects were seated motionless, and during the second they were seated rotating sinusoidally about an earth vertical axis. Subjects then wore prism goggles that reverse the left-right visual field and performed manual tasks until they developed moderate motion sickness. Finally, ILV and ECG were recorded while subjects maintained a relatively constant level of sickness by intermittent eye closure during rotation with the goggles. Based on analyses of ILV to HR transfer functions from the three conditions, we were unable to demonstrate a change in autonomic control of heart rate due to rotation alone or due to motion sickness. These findings do not support the notion that moderate motion sickness is manifested as a generalized autonomic response.

  8. 12 CFR 226.19 - Certain mortgage and variable-rate transactions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Certain mortgage and variable-rate transactions. 226.19 Section 226.19 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM TRUTH IN LENDING (REGULATION Z) Closed-End Credit § 226.19 Certain mortgage and variable-rate transactions. (a)...

  9. Variable-rate irrigation management for peanut in the eastern Coastal Plain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Variable rate irrigation systems have the potential to conserve water by spatially allocating limited water resources. These water savings become more important as urban, industrial, and environmental sectors compete with agriculture for available water. In this study, we conducted variable rate irr...

  10. Review and classification of variability analysis techniques with clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of patterns of variation of time-series, termed variability analysis, represents a rapidly evolving discipline with increasing applications in different fields of science. In medicine and in particular critical care, efforts have focussed on evaluating the clinical utility of variability. However, the growth and complexity of techniques applicable to this field have made interpretation and understanding of variability more challenging. Our objective is to provide an updated review of variability analysis techniques suitable for clinical applications. We review more than 70 variability techniques, providing for each technique a brief description of the underlying theory and assumptions, together with a summary of clinical applications. We propose a revised classification for the domains of variability techniques, which include statistical, geometric, energetic, informational, and invariant. We discuss the process of calculation, often necessitating a mathematical transform of the time-series. Our aims are to summarize a broad literature, promote a shared vocabulary that would improve the exchange of ideas, and the analyses of the results between different studies. We conclude with challenges for the evolving science of variability analysis. PMID:21985357

  11. Emergence of dynamical complexity related to human heart rate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Mei-Chu; Peng, C.-K.; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2014-12-01

    We apply the refined composite multiscale entropy (MSE) method to a one-dimensional directed small-world network composed of nodes whose states are binary and whose dynamics obey the majority rule. We find that the resulting fluctuating signal becomes dynamically complex. This dynamical complexity is caused (i) by the presence of both short-range connections and long-range shortcuts and (ii) by how well the system can adapt to the noisy environment. By tuning the adaptability of the environment and the long-range shortcuts we can increase or decrease the dynamical complexity, thereby modeling trends found in the MSE of a healthy human heart rate in different physiological states. When the shortcut and adaptability values increase, the complexity in the system dynamics becomes uncorrelated.

  12. A new approach to the correlation of boundary layer mass transfer rates with thermal diffusion and/or variable properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, R.; Rosner, D. E.

    1979-01-01

    A rational approach to the correlation of boundary layer mass transport rates, applicable to many commonly encountered laminar flow conditions with thermal diffusion and/or variable properties, is outlined. The correlation scheme builds upon already available constant property blowing/suction solutions by introducing appropriate correction factors to account for the additional ('pseudo' blowing and source) effects identified with variable properties and thermal diffusion. Applications of the scheme to the particular laminar boundary layer mass transfer problems considered herein (alkali and transition metal compound vapor transport) indicates satisfactory accuracy up to effective blowing factors equivalent to about one third of the 'blow off' value. As a useful by-product of the variable property correlation, we extend the heat-mass transfer analogy, for a wide range of Lewis numbers, to include variable property effects.

  13. The contribution of coping-related variables and heart rate variability to visual search performance under pressure.

    PubMed

    Laborde, Sylvain; Lautenbach, Franziska; Allen, Mark S

    2015-02-01

    Visual search performance under pressure is explored within the predictions of the neurovisceral integration model. The experimental aims of this study were: 1) to investigate the contribution of coping-related variables to baseline, task, and reactivity (task-baseline) high-frequency heart rate variability (HF-HRV), and 2) to investigate the contribution of coping-related variables and HF-HRV to visual search performance under pressure. Participants (n=96) completed self-report measures of coping-related variables (emotional intelligence, coping style, perceived stress intensity, perceived control of stress, coping effectiveness, challenge and threat, and attention strategy) and HF-HRV was measured during a visual search task under pressure. The data show that baseline HF-HRV was predicted by a trait coping-related variable, task HF-HRV was predicted by a combination of trait and state coping-related variables, and reactivity HF-HRV was predicted by a state coping-related variable. Visual search performance was predicted by coping-related variables but not by HF-HRV. PMID:25481358

  14. Rates of elementary reactions - Measurement and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, F.

    1985-01-01

    Techniques used for characterizing elementary chemical reaction kinetics are explored. Flash- or laser-photolysis (FP) involves producing reactive species on the psec time scale and monitoring the changes spectroscopically. In the discharge flow (DF) method, reactive species are produced continuously in a flow of an inert gas containing the reactants. FP avoids surface and transport effects, while DF allows several reactions to be studied in different regions of one flow. Transport and surface boundary layer models are defined for DF calculations and sample calculations are carried out to illustrate the difficulties inherent in theoretically defining the rate constants for elementary reactions. Applications of the models thus far derived in atmospheric science and combustion studies are discussed.

  15. Modeling autonomic regulation of cardiac function and heart rate variability in human endotoxemia

    PubMed Central

    Scheff, Jeremy D.; Mavroudis, Panteleimon D.; Calvano, Steven E.; Lowry, Stephen F.

    2011-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV), the quantification of beat-to-beat variability, has been studied as a potential prognostic marker in inflammatory diseases such as sepsis. HRV normally reflects significant levels of variability in homeostasis, which can be lost under stress. Much effort has been placed in interpreting HRV from the perspective of quantitatively understanding how stressors alter HRV dynamics, but the molecular and cellular mechanisms that give rise to both homeostatic HRV and changes in HRV have received less focus. Here, we develop a mathematical model of human endotoxemia that incorporates the oscillatory signals giving rise to HRV and their signal transduction to the heart. Connections between processes at the cellular, molecular, and neural levels are quantitatively linked to HRV. Rhythmic signals representing autonomic oscillations and circadian rhythms converge to modulate the pattern of heartbeats, and the effects of these oscillators are diminished in the acute endotoxemia response. Based on the semimechanistic model developed herein, homeostatic and acute stress responses of HRV are studied in terms of these oscillatory signals. Understanding the loss of HRV in endotoxemia serves as a step toward understanding changes in HRV observed clinically through translational applications of systems biology based on the relationship between biological processes and clinical outcomes. PMID:21673075

  16. Heart rate variability in left ventricular dysfunction and heart failure: effects and implications of drug treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Tuininga, Y S; van Veldhuisen, D J; Brouwer, J; Haaksma, J; Crijns, H J; Man in't Veld, A J; Lie, K I

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To review the importance of heart rate variability analysis in left ventricular dysfunction and heart failure and to assess the effects of drug treatment. In patients with left ventricular dysfunction or heart failure, a low heart rate variability is a strong predictor of a low probability of survival. Because drug treatment in these patients has rapidly changed over the past two decades, the effect of these drugs on heart rate variability needs special attention. DESIGN--A study of published reports to give an overview of heart rate variability in patients with left ventricular dysfunction or heart failure and how it is affected by drug treatment. RESULTS--Analysis of heart rate variability provides an easily obtained early marker for progression of disease. It seems to be more closely related to the degree of neurohumoral activation than to haemodynamic variables. Cardiovascular drugs may either stimulate or inhibit the degree of neurohumoral activation, and the effects of pharmacological intervention can be closely monitored with this method. CONCLUSIONS--The analysis of heart rate variability, including spectral analysis, is a novel non-invasive way to obtain potentially useful clinical information in patients with reduced left ventricular function. The effects of drug treatment on heart rate variability are in general consistent with their long-term effects in left ventricular dysfunction and heart failure. PMID:7857731

  17. Variability in docking success rates due to dataset preparation.

    PubMed

    Corbeil, Christopher R; Williams, Christopher I; Labute, Paul

    2012-06-01

    The results of cognate docking with the prepared Astex dataset provided by the organizers of the "Docking and Scoring: A Review of Docking Programs" session at the 241st ACS national meeting are presented. The MOE software with the newly developed GBVI/WSA dG scoring function is used throughout the study. For 80% of the Astex targets, the MOE docker produces a top-scoring pose within 2 ? of the X-ray structure. For 91% of the targets a pose within 2 ? of the X-ray structure is produced in the top 30 poses. Docking failures, defined as cases where the top scoring pose is greater than 2 ? from the experimental structure, are shown to be largely due to the absence of bound waters in the source dataset, highlighting the need to include these and other crucial information in future standardized sets. Docking success is shown to depend heavily on data preparation. A "dataset preparation" error of 0.5kcal/mol is shown to cause fluctuations of over 20% in docking success rates. PMID:22566074

  18. Gender differences in the relationship between resting heart rate variability and 24-hour blood pressure variability.

    PubMed

    Thayer, Julian F; Sollers, John J; Friedman, Bruce H; Koenig, Julian

    2016-02-01

    The study explored the relationship between time- and frequency-domain indices of cardiac autonomic control and 24 h blood pressure variability (BPV) in a sample of healthy men and women. Vagally mediated cardiac control was inversely related to 24 h BPV, and measures of cardiac autonomic control were better predictors of systolic BPV in men and better predictors of diastolic BPV in women. These findings may help researchers to understand the disparity in cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality between men and women. PMID:26415550

  19. [Body composition and heart rate variability in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease pulmonary rehabilitation candidates].

    PubMed

    Curilem Gatica, Cristian; Almagi Flores, Atilio; Yuing Faras, Tuillang; Rodrguez Rodrguez, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Body composition is a non-invasive method, which gives us information about the distribution of tissues in the body structure, it is also an indicator of the risk of mortality in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The heart rate variability is a technique that gives us information of autonomic physiological condition, being recognized as an indicator which is decreased in a number of diseases. The purpose of this study was to assess body composition and heart rate variability. The methodology used is that of Debora Kerr (1988) endorsed by the International Society for advances in Cineantropometra for body composition and heart rate variability of the guidelines described by the American Heart Association (1996). Roscraff equipment, caliper Slimguide and watch Polar RS 800CX was used. , BMI 26.7 3.9 kg / m; Muscle Mass 26.1 6.3 kg ; Bone Mass 1.3 kg 8.1 76 9.9 years Age : 14 candidates for pulmonary rehabilitation patients were evaluated , Adipose mass 16.4 3.6 kg ; FEV1 54 14%. Increased waist circumference and waist hip ratio was associated with a lower overall heart rate variability. The bone component was positively related to the variability of heart rate and patients with higher forced expiratory volume in one second had lower high frequency component in heart rate variability. In these patients, the heart rate variability is reduced globally and is associated with cardiovascular risk parameters. PMID:25137278

  20. Conventional heart rate variability analysis of ambulatory electrocardiographic recordings fails to predict imminent ventricular fibrillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vybiral, T.; Glaeser, D. H.; Goldberger, A. L.; Rigney, D. R.; Hess, K. R.; Mietus, J.; Skinner, J. E.; Francis, M.; Pratt, C. M.

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. The purpose of this report was to study heart rate variability in Holter recordings of patients who experienced ventricular fibrillation during the recording. BACKGROUND. Decreased heart rate variability is recognized as a long-term predictor of overall and arrhythmic death after myocardial infarction. It was therefore postulated that heart rate variability would be lowest when measured immediately before ventricular fibrillation. METHODS. Conventional indexes of heart rate variability were calculated from Holter recordings of 24 patients with structural heart disease who had ventricular fibrillation during monitoring. The control group consisted of 19 patients with coronary artery disease, of comparable age and left ventricular ejection fraction, who had nonsustained ventricular tachycardia but no ventricular fibrillation. RESULTS. Heart rate variability did not differ between the two groups, and no consistent trends in heart rate variability were observed before ventricular fibrillation occurred. CONCLUSIONS. Although conventional heart rate variability is an independent long-term predictor of adverse outcome after myocardial infarction, its clinical utility as a short-term predictor of life-threatening arrhythmias remains to be elucidated.

  1. Time-varying spectrum estimation of heart rate variability signals with Kalman smoother algorithm.

    PubMed

    Tarvainen, M P; Georgiadis, S; Lipponen, J A; Hakkarainen, M; Karjalainen, P A

    2009-01-01

    A time-varying parametric spectrum estimation method for analyzing dynamics of heart rate variability (HRV) signals is presented. In the method, HRV signal is first modeled with a time-varying autoregressive model and the model parameters are solved recursively with a Kalman smoother algorithm. Time-varying spectrum estimates are then obtained from the estimated model parameters. The obtained spectrum can be further decomposed into separate components, which is especially advantageous in HRV applications where low frequency (LF) and high frequency (HF) components are generally aimed to be distinguished. As case studies, the dynamics of HRV signals recorded during 1) orthostatic test, 2) exercise test and 3) simulated driving task are analyzed. PMID:19963704

  2. Crop growth and soil water spatial variability under a variable rate center pivot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Managing irrigation spatially can enhance water conservation and optimize water applications. Information and guidelines are needed on how to spatially precision-apply irrigation water with these systems. In this research, we investigated using soil electrical conductivity (EC) to delineate manageme...

  3. General purpose variable-speed drive and motor application considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Lowery, T.F.

    1998-12-31

    Variable-speed drives (VSDs) have changed over the last few years using newer power semiconductors and pulse width modulation (PWM) transistor switching methods. These advancements in drive technology have caused new concerns in their application on induction motors. This paper describes motor/drive operation and presents combination test results that can assist application engineers in designing reliable HVAC fan and pump drive systems. The focus of this paper is in three key areas: (1) PWM drive dv/dt description and its effects on induction motors; (2) motor insulation systems for variable-speed applications; and (3) audible motor noise considerations from drive carrier frequencies. Motor failures are occurring in actual installations due to misapplication of variable-speed systems. These will be investigated and described to help design engineers avoid future application problems. Several alternatives during specification and installation are offered as suggestions to the design engineers. Conclusions based on test data and field experience are summarized as a guide to successful applications of modern variable-speed HVAC drives and motors.

  4. PARTICULATE MATTER AND HEART RATE VARIABILITY AMONG ELDERLY RETIREES: THE BALTIMORE 1998 PM STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study investigates the reported relationship between ambient fine particle pollution and impaired cardiac autonomic control in the elderly. Heart rate variability (HRV) among 56 elderly (mean age 82) nonsmoking residents of a retirement center in Baltimore County, Maryland,...

  5. Economic and Sociocultural Variables Affecting Rates of Youth Unemployment, Delinquency, and Crime.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glaser, Daniel

    1979-01-01

    Surveys social science literature on economic variables affecting law-violation rates. Asserts that social, cultural, and political aspects of the lives of many youths are major determinants of both their unemployment and their offenses. (PR)

  6. Embedded computer controlled premixing inline injection system for air-assisted variable-rate sprayers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improvements to reduce chemical waste and environmental pollution for variable-rate sprayers used in orchards and ornamental nurseries require inline injection techniques. A microprocessor controlled premixing inline injection system implementing a ceramic piston chemical metering pump and two small...

  7. Variable-rate irrigation management using an expert system in the eastern coastal plain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Variable rate irrigation (VRI) systems have the potential to conserve water by spatially allocating limited water resources. These water savings become more important as urban, industrial, and environmental sectors compete with agriculture for available water. In this study, we conducted variable ra...

  8. Effects of head-down bed rest on complex heart rate variability: Response to LBNP testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberger, Ary L.; Mietus, Joseph E.; Rigney, David R.; Wood, Margie L.; Fortney, Suzanne M.

    1994-01-01

    Head-down bed rest is used to model physiological changes during spaceflight. We postulated that bed rest would decrease the degree of complex physiological heart rate variability. We analyzed continuous heart rate data from digitized Holter recordings in eight healthy female volunteers (age 28-34 yr) who underwent a 13-day 6 deg head-down bed rest study with serial lower body negative pressure (LBNP) trials. Heart rate variability was measured on a 4-min data sets using conventional time and frequency domain measures as well as with a new measure of signal 'complexity' (approximate entropy). Data were obtained pre-bed rest (control), during bed rest (day 4 and day 9 or 11), and 2 days post-bed rest (recovery). Tolerance to LBNP was significantly reduced on both bed rest days vs. pre-bed rest. Heart rate variability was assessed at peak LBNP. Heart rate approximate entropy was significantly decreased at day 4 and day 9 or 11, returning toward normal during recovery. Heart rate standard deviation and the ratio of high- to low-power frequency did not change significantly. We conclude that short-term bed rest is associated with a decrease in the complex variability of heart rate during LBNP testing in healthy young adult women. Measurement of heart rate complexity, using a method derived from nonlinear dynamics ('chaos theory'), may provide a sensitive marker of this loss of physiological variability, complementing conventional time and frequency domain statistical measures.

  9. Cooled variable nozzle radial turbine for rotor craft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogo, C.

    1981-01-01

    An advanced, small 2.27 kb/sec (5 lbs/sec), high temperature, variable area radial turbine was studied for a rotor craft application. Variable capacity cycles including single-shaft and free-turbine engine configurations were analyzed to define an optimum engine design configuration. Parametric optimizations were made on cooled and uncooled rotor configurations. A detailed structural and heat transfer analysis was conducted to provide a 4000-hour life HP turbine with material properties of the 1988 time frame. A pivoted vane and a moveable sidewall geometry were analyzed. Cooling and variable geometry penalties were included in the cycle analysis. A variable geometry free-turbine engine configuration with a design 1477K (2200 F) inlet temperature and a compressor pressure ratio of 16:1 was selected. An uncooled HP radial turbine rotor with a moveable sidewall nozzle showed the highest performance potential for a time weighted duty cycle.

  10. Short term Heart Rate Variability to predict blood pressure drops due to standing: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Standing from a bed or chair may cause a significant lowering of blood pressure (ΔBP), which may have severe consequences such as, for example, falls in older subjects. The goal of this study was to develop a mathematical model to predict the ΔBP due to standing in healthy subjects, based on their Heart Rate Variability, recorded in the 5 minutes before standing. Methods Heart Rate Variability was extracted from an electrocardiogram, recorded from 10 healthy subjects during the 5 minutes before standing. The blood pressure value was measured before and after rising. A mathematical model aiming to predict ΔBP based on Heart Rate Variability measurements was developed using a robust multi-linear regression and was validated with the leave-one-subject-out cross-validation technique. Results The model predicted correctly the ΔBP in 80% of experiments, with an error below the measurement error of sphygmomanometer digital devices (±4.5 mmHg), a false negative rate of 7.5% and a false positive rate of 10%. The magnitude of the ΔBP was associated with a depressed and less chaotic Heart Rate Variability pattern. Conclusions The present study showes that blood pressure lowering due to standing can be predicted by monitoring the Heart Rate Variability in the 5 minutes before standing. PMID:26391336

  11. Effects of propellant composition variables on acceleration-induced burning-rate augmentation of solid propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Northam, G. B.

    1972-01-01

    This work was conducted to define further the effects of propellant composition variables on the acceleration-induced burning rate augmentation of solid propellants. The rate augmentation at a given acceleration was found to be a nonlinear inverse function of the reference burning rate and not controlled by binder or catalyst type at a given reference rate. A nonaluminized propellant and a low rate double-base propellant exhibited strong transient rate augmentation due to surface pitting resulting from the retention of hot particles on the propellant surface.

  12. An improved windowing technique for heart rate variability power spectrum estimation.

    PubMed

    Singh, D; Vinod, K; Saxena, S C; Deepak, K K

    2005-01-01

    Spectral analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) is an accepted method for assessment of cardiac autonomic function and its relationship to numerous disorders and diseases. Discrete Fourier transform (DFT) based methods are widely used for their easy applicability, computational speed and the possibility for direct interpretation of results. This study assesses the limitation of windowing of the RR interval series of power spectrum estimation using DFT for heart rate variability studies. The mean value of the RR interval series should be subtracted before windowing. This may leave a small residual DC component after windowing, but the RR interval series is properly tapered to zero at the beginning and end of the window. However, if the windowed RR interval series has a non-zero mean then subtracting this mean will create an abrupt transition between the first and last data points, and the padded zeros. This is equivalent to superimposing upon the RR interval series a rectangular pulse of the same length as the window, with a height equal to the subtracted mean value. In the present paper an approach to overcome the above effects of the window in reducing the signal energy and introducing the low frequency component into spectrum has been suggested and incorporated. Result have been compared for DC biasing of windowed data spectrum, bias of windowed data removed by substraction of mean data, and data processed to remove windowed mean level and to maintain mean power. Thus the preprocessing of RR interval series with this method improves the accuracy of HRV analysis methods. The study was carried out by smoothing the complete RR interval series by single Hann window and by 50% overlapping the data segments of 256 data points followed by the DFT. Overlapping the data segments provides equal weight to all values in the RR interval series and smoothed spectral estimate with clearly dominant peaks in low- and high-frequency regions. PMID:15804859

  13. Speaking Rate Effects on Articulatory Pattern Variability in Talkers with Mild ALS

    PubMed Central

    Mefferd, Antje S.; Green, Jordan R.; Pattee, Gary L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Articulatory pattern variability describes the movement consistency across several repetitions of the same utterance. This study investigated speaking rate effects on articulatory pattern variability in talkers with mild ALS. Fast speech was used to differentiate disease-related and compensatory motor performance changes. Slow speech was used to evaluate therapeutic benefits. Methods Eight talkers with mild ALS and eleven controls participated in this study. Participants produced five repetitions of Buy Bobby a puppy at their typical rate, as fast as possible, and at a slow rate. Lower lip and jaw movements were captured using a motion capture system. Results Talkers with ALS tended to be more variable than controls during fast speech. During typical speech, however, talkers with ALS demonstrated significantly lower articulatory pattern variability than controls. Slow speech elicited elevated levels of articulatory pattern variability in both groups. Conclusions Increased variability during fast speech suggests that ALS negatively affects the ability to produce highly consistent articulatory movements; however, decreased variability during typical speech indicates a successful adaption to disease-related articulatory limitations. Findings of slow speech did not support the use of rate reductions to enhance this aspect of articulatory performance during the early stages of the ALS. PMID:24724615

  14. Holocene activity of an alpine debris-flow catchment: does climate control erosion rate variability?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savi, S.; Norton, K. P.; Brardinoni, F.; Akar, N.; Kubik, P.; Picotti, V.; Schlunegger, F.

    2012-12-01

    The Zielbach catchment is located in the central-eastern Italian Alps. It covers an area of ca. 40 km2 and is characterized by fluvial sediment transport along the main drainage basin, and by the supply of sediment through debris flows, derived from a ca. 10 km2 tributary catchment. A debris-flow database demonstrates that nowadays this latter tributary dominates the sediment budget of the entire Zielbach. In this study, we analyze modern and paleo-erosion rates of the catchment through the application of the cosmogenic nuclides technique. For modern erosion rate, samples of river-born sand were taken from the main river and tributaries along the entire drainage system, while paleo-erosion rates are calculated thanks to cores' samples, which were collected on the alluvial fan and which were likewise dated based on 14C measurements of organic matter. Results obtained from the modern drainage system reveal the spatial erosion rate variability that characterizes the catchment nowadays (values ranging from 2.6 to 0.15 mm/yr). This spatial pattern is characterized by a generally increasing trend of 10Be values where hillslope contributions predominate and by a decreasing concentration trend where sediment has been supplied by debris flows. Results obtained from the cores allow the reconstruction of the Zielbach Holocene evolution and the assignment of the climate role on the temporal erosion rate variability (values ranging between 21 and 0.43 mm/yr). 14C concentrations of organic material collected from the core material indicate a lowermost age of 10'000 yr at ca. 35 m depth. The sedimentary fabric of the deposits indicates that the fan is built up by alternation of alluvial and debris-flow deposits, where the latter ones dominate in volumes. The stratigraphic architecture also infers that alluvial deposits correspond to periods of low activity of the debris-flow catchment. Most important, however, paleo-erosion rates indicate a decreasing trend for the debris-flow activity from ca. 10'000 yr to the present, with values decreasing from ca. 21 to 0.8 mm/yr. During the same time span, the alluvial sediment supplied by the main catchment appears to have been steady, as indicated by a constant basin-averaged denudation rate of 0.45 mm/yr. The comparison of these results with the climatic history of the valley reveals that periods of high activity of the debris flow catchment (associated with higher 10Be-based erosion rates) correspond to periods of a wetter and cooler climate. In particular, the highest value (21 mm/yr) seems to be related to the late glacial phase, which presumably started after the LGM and terminated around 10'000 yr, while a reactivation of the debris-flow activity, with erosion rates around 1.0 mm/yr, corresponds to the Holocene climatic deterioration at ca. 3'500 yr B.P. The alluvial phase of the Zielbach catchment (erosion rate of ca. 0.43 mm/yr), marked by absent or lower debris-flow activity, seems to be related to the Holocene climatic optimum between 8'000 and 4'000 years ago.

  15. A knitted garment using intarsia technique for Heart Rate Variability biofeedback: Evaluation of initial prototype.

    PubMed

    Abtahi, F; Ji, G; Lu, K; Rodby, K; Seoane, F

    2015-08-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback is a method based on paced breathing at specific rate called resonance frequency by giving online feedbacks from user respiration and its effect on HRV. Since the HRV is also influence by different factors like stress and emotions, stress related to an unfamiliar measurement device, cables and skin electrodes may cover the underling effect of such kind of intervention. Wearable systems are usually considered as intuitive solutions which are more familiar to the end-user and can help to improve usability and hence reducing the stress. In this work, a prototype of a knitted garment using intarsia technique is developed and evaluated. Results show the satisfactory level of quality for Electrocardiogram and thoracic electrical bioimpedance i.e. for respiration monitoring as a part of HRV biofeedback system. Using intarsia technique and conductive yarn for making the connection instead of cables will reduce the complexity of fabrication in textile production and hence reduce the final costs in a final commercial product. Further development of garment and Android application is ongoing and usability and efficiency of final prototype will be evaluated in detail. PMID:26736953

  16. Combination of multispectral remote sensing, variable rate technology and environmental modeling for citrus pest management.

    PubMed

    Du, Qian; Chang, Ni-Bin; Yang, Chenghai; Srilakshmi, Kanth R

    2008-01-01

    The Lower Rio Grande Valley (LRGV) of south Texas is an agriculturally rich area supporting intensive production of vegetables, fruits, grain sorghum, and cotton. Modern agricultural practices involve the combined use of irrigation with the application of large amounts of agrochemicals to maximize crop yields. Intensive agricultural activities in past decades might have caused potential contamination of soil, surface water, and groundwater due to leaching of pesticides in the vadose zone. In an effort to promote precision farming in citrus production, this paper aims at developing an airborne multispectral technique for identifying tree health problems in a citrus grove that can be combined with variable rate technology (VRT) for required pesticide application and environmental modeling for assessment of pollution prevention. An unsupervised linear unmixing method was applied to classify the image for the grove and quantify the symptom severity for appropriate infection control. The PRZM-3 model was used to estimate environmental impacts that contribute to nonpoint source pollution with and without the use of multispectral remote sensing and VRT. Research findings using site-specific environmental assessment clearly indicate that combination of remote sensing and VRT may result in benefit to the environment by reducing the nonpoint source pollution by 92.15%. Overall, this study demonstrates the potential of precision farming for citrus production in the nexus of industrial ecology and agricultural sustainability. PMID:17222960

  17. Final Study for Bonneville Power Administration's 1986 Variable Industrial Power Rate Proposal.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1986-06-01

    In this study, BPA is proposing a Variable Industrial Power (VI-86) rate option for its aluminum smelter loads. This rate would provide a predetermined contractual tie between the price of BPA's power and the US market price of aluminum. Establishing such a tie between input price (electricity) and output price (aluminum) will enhance the ability of aluminum producers to operate over the entire business cycle. This should reduce the cyclicality of smelter operations. Increasing the price of power when aluminum prices are high is intended to compensate BPA for any decrease in BPA's revenues when the lower rates occur. Various proposals for and discussions of a variable rate for BPA's direct service industrial (DSI) customers have occurred throughout the region over the past year. This study is the result of analyses conducted and evidence received from the rate hearings conducted on the Variable Rate (VI-86). This study describes the Variable rate proposed by BPA and the analyses conducted in support of the rate.

  18. Variable dual-frequency electrostatic wave launcher for plasma applications.

    PubMed

    Jorns, Benjamin; Sorenson, Robert; Choueiri, Edgar

    2011-12-01

    A variable tuning system is presented for launching two electrostatic waves concurrently in a magnetized plasma. The purpose of this system is to satisfy the wave launching requirements for plasma applications where maximal power must be coupled into two carefully tuned electrostatic waves while minimizing erosion to the launching antenna. Two parallel LC traps with fixed inductors and variable capacitors are used to provide an impedance match between a two-wave source and a loop antenna placed outside the plasma. Equivalent circuit analysis is then employed to derive an analytical expression for the normalized, average magnetic flux density produced by the antenna in this system as a function of capacitance and frequency. It is found with this metric that the wave launcher can couple to electrostatic modes at two variable frequencies concurrently while attenuating noise from the source signal at undesired frequencies. An example based on an experiment for plasma heating with two electrostatic waves is used to demonstrate a procedure for tailoring the wave launcher to accommodate the frequency range and flux densities of a specific two-wave application. This example is also used to illustrate a method based on averaging over wave frequencies for evaluating the overall efficacy of the system. The wave launcher is shown to be particularly effective for the illustrative example--generating magnetic flux densities in excess of 50% of the ideal case at two variable frequencies concurrently--with a high adaptability to a number of plasma dynamics and heating applications. PMID:22225213

  19. Variable dual-frequency electrostatic wave launcher for plasma applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorns, Benjamin; Sorenson, Robert; Choueiri, Edgar

    2011-12-01

    A variable tuning system is presented for launching two electrostatic waves concurrently in a magnetized plasma. The purpose of this system is to satisfy the wave launching requirements for plasma applications where maximal power must be coupled into two carefully tuned electrostatic waves while minimizing erosion to the launching antenna. Two parallel LC traps with fixed inductors and variable capacitors are used to provide an impedance match between a two-wave source and a loop antenna placed outside the plasma. Equivalent circuit analysis is then employed to derive an analytical expression for the normalized, average magnetic flux density produced by the antenna in this system as a function of capacitance and frequency. It is found with this metric that the wave launcher can couple to electrostatic modes at two variable frequencies concurrently while attenuating noise from the source signal at undesired frequencies. An example based on an experiment for plasma heating with two electrostatic waves is used to demonstrate a procedure for tailoring the wave launcher to accommodate the frequency range and flux densities of a specific two-wave application. This example is also used to illustrate a method based on averaging over wave frequencies for evaluating the overall efficacy of the system. The wave launcher is shown to be particularly effective for the illustrative examplegenerating magnetic flux densities in excess of 50% of the ideal case at two variable frequencies concurrentlywith a high adaptability to a number of plasma dynamics and heating applications.

  20. Second-order approximations for variable order fractional derivatives: Algorithms and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xuan; Sun, Zhi-zhong; Karniadakis, George Em

    2015-07-01

    Fractional calculus allows variable-order of fractional operators, which can be exploited in diverse physical and biological applications where rates of change of the quantity of interest may depend on space and/or time. In this paper, we derive two second-order approximation formulas for the variable-order fractional time derivatives involved in anomalous diffusion and wave propagation. We then present numerical tests that verify the theoretical estimates of convergence rate and also simulations of anomalous sub-diffusion and super-diffusion that demonstrate new localized diffusion rates that depend on the curvature of the variable-order function. Finally, we perform simulations of wave propagation in a truncated domain to demonstrate how erroneous wave reflections at the boundaries can be eliminated by super-diffusion, and also simulations of the Burgers equation that serve as a testbed for studying the loss and recovery of monotonicity using again variable rate diffusion as a function of space and/or time. Taken together, our results demonstrate that variable-order fractional derivatives can be used to model the physics of anomalous transport with spatiotemporal variability but also as new effective numerical tools that can deal with the long-standing issues of outflow boundary conditions and monotonicity of integer-order PDEs.

  1. [Changes in heart rate variability after myocardial infarction. Value of Poincareé's diagram].

    PubMed

    Copie, X; Le Heuzey, J Y; Iliou, M C; Pousset, F; Lavergne, T; Guize, L

    1995-11-01

    The variability of the heart rate is reduced after myocardial infarction. It then progressively increases, to return to near normal values after several months. However, these changes in heart rate variability occur at the same time as slowing of the heart rate which makes interpretation difficult. Poincaré's diagram is constructed from a Holter recording plotting each RR interval against the preceding RR interval. The authors have developed a geometric approach to this diagram to evaluate parasympathetic tone for a given heart rate. By measuring the dispersion in height of the Poincaré's diagram, the authors evaluate the shor-term variability for a given RR interval. Two 24 hr Holter recordings were performed in 52 patients at one and two weeks after a myocardial infarction. The dispersion in the height of the Poincaré's diagrams was measured at the 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th and 90th percentiles of the total dispersion. The authors have shown an increase in the short-term variability of the shortest RR intervals (1th, 25th and 50th percentiles) which is not observed in the longer RR intervals (75th and 90th percentiles). In conclusion, theres is an increase in the heart rate variability at the shortest RR intervals. This suggests that the recovery of parasympathic tone after myocardial infarction occurs mainly at the fastest heart rates. PMID:8745997

  2. Heart rate and heart rate variability in pregnant dairy cows and their fetuses determined by fetomaternal electrocardiography.

    PubMed

    Trenk, Lisa; Kuhl, Juliane; Aurich, Jrg; Aurich, Christine; Nagel, Christina

    2015-11-01

    In this study, fetomaternal electrocardiograms were recorded once weekly in cattle during the last 14weeks of gestation. From the recorded beat-to-beat (RR) intervals, heart rate and heart rate variability (HRV) variables standard deviation of the RR interval (SDRR) and root mean square of successive RR differences (RMSSD) were calculated. To differentiate between effects of lactation and gestation, pregnant lactating (PL) cows (n=7) and pregnant nonlactating (PNL) heifers (n=8) were included. We hypothesized that lactation is associated with stress detectable by HRV analysis. We also followed the hypothesis that heart rate and HRV are influenced by growth and maturation of the fetus toward term. Maternal heart rate changed over time in both groups, and in PL cows, it decreased with drying-off. During the last 5weeks of gestation, maternal heart rate increased in both groups but was lower in PL cows than in PNL heifers. Maternal HRV did not change over time, but SDRR was significantly higher in PL cows than in PNL heifers, and significant interactions of group time existed. On the basis of HRV, undisturbed pregnancies are thus no stressor for the dam in cattle. Fetal heart rate decreased from week 14 to week 1 before birth with no difference between groups. Gestational age thus determines heart rate in the bovine fetus. The HRV variables SDRR and RMSSD increased toward the end of gestation in fetuses carried by cows but not in those carried by heifers. The increase in HRV indicates maturation of fetal cardiac regulation which may be overrun by high sympathoadrenal activity in fetuses carried by heifers as suggested by their low HRV. PMID:26279313

  3. An Integrated Account of the Effects of Acoustic Variability in First Language and Second Language: Evidence from Amplitude, Fundamental Frequency, and Speaking Rate Variability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sommers, Mitchell S.; Barcroft, Joe

    2007-01-01

    This study examined how three different sources of stimulus variability--overall amplitude, fundamental frequency, and speaking rate--affect second language (L2) vocabulary learning. Native English speakers learned Spanish words in presentation formats with no variability, moderate variability, and high variability. Dependent measures were…

  4. Associations between Heart Rate Variability Parameters and Housing- and Individual-Related Variables in Dairy Cows Using Canonical Correspondence Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bakony, Mikolt; Hufnágel, Levente; Tőzsér, János; Jurkovich, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the associations between heart rate variability (HRV) parameters and some housing- and individual-related variables using the canonical correspondence analysis (CCOA) method in lactating Holstein-Friesian dairy cows. We collected a total of 5200 5-min interbeat interval (IBI) samples from 260 animals on five commercial dairy farms [smaller-scale farms with 70 (Farm 1, n = 50) and 80 cows per farm (Farm 2, n = 40), and larger-scale farms with 850 (Farm 3, n = 66), 1900 (Farm 4, n = 60) and 1200 (Farm 5, n = 45) cows. Dependent variables included HRV parameters, which reflect the activity of the autonomic nervous system: heart rate (HR), the root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD) in IBIs, the standard deviation 1 (SD1), the high frequency (HF) component of HRV and the ratio between the low frequency (LF) and the HF parameter (LF/HF). Explanatory variables were group size, space allowance, milking frequency, parity, daily milk yield, body condition score, locomotion score, farm, season and physical activity (lying, lying and rumination, standing, standing and rumination and feeding). Physical activity involved in standing, feeding and in rumination was associated with HRV parameters, indicating a decreasing sympathetic and an increasing vagal tone in the following order: feeding, standing, standing and rumination, lying and rumination, lying. Objects representing summer positioned close to HR and LF and far from SD1, RMSSD and HF indicate a higher sympathetic and a lower vagal activity. Objects representing autumn, spring and winter associated with increasing vagal activity, in this order. Time-domain measures of HRV were associated with most of the housing- and individual-related explanatory variables. Higher HR and lower RMSSD and SD1 were associated with higher group size, milking frequency, parity and milk yield, and low space allowance. Higher parity and milk yield were associated with higher sympathetic activity as well (higher LF/HF), while individuals with lower locomotion scores (lower degree of lameness) were characterized with a higher sympathetic and a lower vagal tone (higher HR and LF/HF and lower RMSSD and SD1). Our findings indicate that the CCOA method is useful in demonstrating associations between HRV and selected explanatory variables. We consider physical activity, space allowance, group size, milking frequency, parity, daily milk yield, locomotion score and season to be the most important variables in further HRV studies on dairy cows. PMID:26690578

  5. Effect of flow rate on environmental variables and phytoplankton dynamics: results from field enclosures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haiping; Chen, Ruihong; Li, Feipeng; Chen, Ling

    2015-03-01

    To investigate the effects of flow rate on phytoplankton dynamics and related environment variables, a set of enclosure experiments with different flow rates were conducted in an artificial lake. We monitored nutrients, temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, conductivity, turbidity, chlorophyll- a and phytoplankton levels. The lower biomass in all flowing enclosures showed that flow rate significantly inhibited the growth of phytoplankton. A critical flow rate occurred near 0.06 m/s, which was the lowest relative inhibitory rate. Changes in flow conditions affected algal competition for light, resulting in a dramatic shift in phytoplankton composition, from blue-green algae in still waters to green algae in flowing conditions. These findings indicate that critical flow rate can be useful in developing methods to reduce algal bloom occurrence. However, flow rate significantly enhanced the inter-relationships among environmental variables, in particular by inducing higher water turbidity and vegetative reproduction of periphyton ( Spirogyra). These changes were accompanied by a decrease in underwater light intensity, which consequently inhibited the photosynthetic intensity of phytoplankton. These results warn that a universal critical flow rate might not exist, because the effect of flow rate on phytoplankton is interlinked with many other environmental variables.

  6. Cognitive Performance and Heart Rate Variability: The Influence of Fitness Level

    PubMed Central

    Luque-Casado, Antonio; Zabala, Mikel; Morales, Esther; Mateo-March, Manuel; Sanabria, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the relation between cognitive performance and heart rate variability as a function of fitness level. We measured the effect of three cognitive tasks (the psychomotor vigilance task, a temporal orienting task, and a duration discrimination task) on the heart rate variability of two groups of participants: a high-fit group and a low-fit group. Two major novel findings emerged from this study. First, the lowest values of heart rate variability were found during performance of the duration discrimination task, compared to the other two tasks. Second, the results showed a decrement in heart rate variability as a function of the time on task, although only in the low-fit group. Moreover, the high-fit group showed overall faster reaction times than the low-fit group in the psychomotor vigilance task, while there were not significant differences in performance between the two groups of participants in the other two cognitive tasks. In sum, our results highlighted the influence of cognitive processing on heart rate variability. Importantly, both behavioral and physiological results suggested that the main benefit obtained as a result of fitness level appeared to be associated with processes involving sustained attention. PMID:23437276

  7. Enamel-calibrated lamellar bone reveals long period growth rate variability in humans.

    PubMed

    Bromage, Timothy G; Juwayeyi, Yusuf M; Smolyar, Igor; Hu, Bin; Gomez, Santiago; Chisi, John

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian teeth exhibit incremental structures representing successive forming fronts of enamel at varying time scales, including a short daily increment called a cross striation and a long period called a stria of Retzius, the latter of which, in humans, occurs on average every 8-9 days. The number of daily increments between striae is called the repeat interval, which is the same period as that required to form one increment of bone, i.e. the lamella, the fundamental - if not archetypal - unit of bone. Lamellae of known formation time nevertheless vary in width, and thus their measures provide time-calibrated growth rate variability. We measured growth rate variability for as many as 6 years of continuously forming primary incremental lamellar bone from midshaft femur histological sections of sub-Saharan Africans of Bantu origin and known life history. We observed periodic growth rate variability in approximately 6- to 8-week intervals, and in some cases annual rhythms were visible. Endogenous biological periodicities, cycles manifest in the external environment, and/or perturbations of development are all potentially contained within growth rate variability studies of lamellar incremental patterns. Because lamellae are formed within defined periods of time, quantitative measures of widths of individual lamellae provide time-resolved growth rate variability that may reveal rhythms in human bone growth heretofore unknown. PMID:21525718

  8. Identification of low and high frequency ranges for heart rate variability and blood pressure variability analyses using pharmacological autonomic blockade with atropine and propranolol in swine.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding autonomic nervous system functioning, which mediates behavioral and physiological responses to stress, offers great potential for evaluation of farm animal stress and welfare. Evaluation of heart rate variability (HRV) and blood pressure variability (BPV), using time and frequency doma...

  9. Continuously variable transmission: Assessment of applicability to advance electric vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenthal, S. H.; Parker, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    A brief historical account of the evolution of continuously variable transmissions (CVT) for automotive use is given. The CVT concepts which are potentially suitable for application with electric and hybrid vehicles are discussed. The arrangement and function of several CVT concepts are cited along with their current developmental status. The results of preliminary design studies conducted on four CVT concepts for use in advanced electric vehicles are discussed.

  10. Response rate and changeover performance on concurrent variable-interval schedules1

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, I. W.; Davison, M. C.

    1978-01-01

    Six pigeons were exposed to variable-interval schedules arranged on one, two, three, and four response keys. The reinforcement rate was also varied across conditions. Numbers of responses, the time spent responding, the number of reinforcements, and the number of changeovers between keys were recorded. Response rates on each key were an increasing function of reinforcement rate on that key and a decreasing function of the reinforcement rate on other keys. Response and time-allocation ratios under-matched ratios of obtained reinforcements. Three sets of equations were developed to express changeover rate as a function of response rate, time allocation, and reinforcement rate respectively. These functions were then applied to a broad range of experiments in the literature in order to test their generality. Further expressions were developed to account for changeover rates reported in experiments where changeover delays were varied. PMID:16812076

  11. Analysis and application of variable conductance heat pipe air preheater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Chengming; Wang, Yang; Liao, Quan; Yang, Ying

    2011-09-01

    The heat transfer analysis of variable conductance heat pipe air preheater was carried out. The temperature transfer matrix was obtained for the air preheater that comprises several discrete heat transfer units with same or different heat transfer surface area in a parallel or counter flow mode. By using the temperature transfer matrix, the outlet fluid temperatures could be easily calculated for a given air preheater and inlet fluid temperatures. The active length of condenser in a variable conductance heat pipe is determined according to the flat interface model. With the same initial conditions, the comparisons between variable conductance heat-pipe air preheater and regular heat pipe air preheater has been analyzed and tested in terms of heat pipe wall temperature, heat transfer surface area and outlet fluid temperatures. Based on the real industrial applications, it has been confirmed that the variable conductance heat pipe air preheater has excellent performance of anti-corrosion and anti-ash-deposition especially at the variable working condition and the sulfur coal (5%-6% mass fraction of sulfur) condition.

  12. Variable rate phosphorus fertilization experiment based on on-line visible and near infrared soil sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Boyan; Mouazen, Abdul

    2014-05-01

    Soil phosphorus is an important nutrient particularly for root and seed development, and deficiency of soil P could result in poor crop yield. However, over-application of Phosphorous causes waste of fertilizer and contamination to the environment. Variable rate (VR) fertilization may allow for a better phosphorous management in the soil, if within field variability in soil available P (P_av) can be characterized at a desirable fine scale. Visible and near infrared (vis-NIR) spectroscopy has been proven to be fast, cheap and non-destructive tool for the measurement of P_av. On-line vis-NIR sensors enable the collection of high resolution data on P_av with acceptable accuracy. The aim of this paper was to compare the economic and environmental benefits of VR phosphorous fertilization based on on-line vis-NIR soil sensing (OVR) against uniform rate (UR) and traditional precision farming variable rate (TVR). A trial plot experiment consisting of 9 plots was designed and implemented in a field with spring barely in 2013. Triplication plots (24 m width) for each of the three fertilization methods (OVR, UR and TVR) were randomly laid out in the field. Prior to the fertilization experiment, an on-line vis-NIR measurement was carried out to measure within field variation in P_av. Fertilizer input (P2O5 in kg ha-1) and yield output of each plot was measured to run a basic cost-benefit analysis. The validation of the on-line measurement with an independent validation set showed moderate measurement accuracy of P_av (R2= 0.72, RMSEP = 0.55 mg/100g and RPD = 1.99). The lowest amount of P2O5 was recommended and applied in OVR plots, which indicated a reduction of fertilizer use by 40 and 54 kg ha-1, as compared to UR and TPF method, respectively. Small yield difference was observed between the three treatments, although UR plots showed a slightly higher yield (6.990 kg ha-1). However, ANOVA analysis resulted in a smaller F value of 0.22 than F critical (3.22), which allows the conclusion that the differences of yield between the three treatments are insignificant at 5% confidence (p < 0.05) level. The cost-benefit analysis showed the OVR method to provide comparable margin to TVR method, as only extra 2 per ha was calculated with OVR. A much larger margin of about 31 per ha was obtained with the innovative the OVR method, as compared to the TVR. A longer term experiment is still underway in the same to understand and confirm the mechanism and agronomic link if any between fertilizer input and crop growth and yield, as practical experience indicated that more than one cropping season is needed to record actual crop response to phosphorous application. It can be concluded that a clear environmental benefit can be achieved by using the innovative OVR concept. However, a longer term study is needed to prove the economic benefit, as compared particularly to TVR. .

  13. A guideline for the use of variable rate intravenous insulin infusion in medical inpatients.

    PubMed

    George, S; Dale, J; Stanisstreet, D

    2015-06-01

    The present paper summarizes the key recommendations in a recent publication produced by the Joint British Diabetes Societies for Inpatient Care on the use of variable rate i.v. insulin infusion in 'medical' inpatients. The full guideline is available at http://www.diabetologists-abcd.org.uk/JBDS/JBDS_IP_VRIII.pdf and is designed to be a practical guide that can used by any healthcare professional who manages medical inpatients with hyperglycaemia. Its main aim is to allow variable rate i.v. insulin infusion to be used safely, effectively and efficiently for this specific group of inpatients. PMID:25980646

  14. Probabilistic pipe fracture evaluations for leak-rate-detection applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, S.; Ghadiali, N.; Paul, D.; Wilkowski, G.

    1995-04-01

    Regulatory Guide 1.45, {open_quotes}Reactor Coolant Pressure Boundary Leakage Detection Systems,{close_quotes} was published by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in May 1973, and provides guidance on leak detection methods and system requirements for Light Water Reactors. Additionally, leak detection limits are specified in plant Technical Specifications and are different for Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) and Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). These leak detection limits are also used in leak-before-break evaluations performed in accordance with Draft Standard Review Plan, Section 3.6.3, {open_quotes}Leak Before Break Evaluation Procedures{close_quotes} where a margin of 10 on the leak detection limit is used in determining the crack size considered in subsequent fracture analyses. This study was requested by the NRC to: (1) evaluate the conditional failure probability for BWR and PWR piping for pipes that were leaking at the allowable leak detection limit, and (2) evaluate the margin of 10 to determine if it was unnecessarily large. A probabilistic approach was undertaken to conduct fracture evaluations of circumferentially cracked pipes for leak-rate-detection applications. Sixteen nuclear piping systems in BWR and PWR plants were analyzed to evaluate conditional failure probability and effects of crack-morphology variability on the current margins used in leak rate detection for leak-before-break.

  15. Effect of variables on downhole corrosion inhibitor application

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, J.A.

    1996-08-01

    One inhibitor was studied in detail to determine the effect of solvent, temperature, concentration and contact time on inhibitor application. The laboratory corrosion tests used the rotating cylinder electrode and linear polarization to measure the corrosion rate. The corrosion rate was also verified by iron loss measurements. Inhibitor was extracted from the electrode surface and the quantity determined by gas liquid chromatography. The inhibitor was also detected on the surface of the electrode by Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy. Corrosion rate data monitored in the field and inhibitor residue on field coupons confirm the laboratory test data.

  16. Low-frequency heart rate variability is related to the breath-to-breath variability in the respiratory pattern.

    PubMed

    Beda, Alessandro; Simpson, David M; Carvalho, Nadja C; Carvalho, Alysson Roncally S

    2014-02-01

    Changes in heart rate variability (HRV) at "respiratory" frequencies (0.15-0.5?Hz) may result from changes in respiration rather than autonomic control. We now investigate if the differences in HRV power in the low-frequency (LF) band (0.05-0.15?Hz, HRV(LF)) can also be predicted by respiration variability, quantified by the fraction of tidal volume power in the LF (V(LF,n)). Three experimental protocols were considered: paced breathing, mental effort tasks, and a repeated attentional task. Significant intra- and interindividual correlations were found between changes in HRV(LF) and V(LF,n) despite all subjects having a respiratory frequency above the LF band. Respiratory parameters (respiratory period, tidal volume, and V(LF,n)) could predict up to 79% of HRV(LF) differences in some cases. This suggests that respiratory variability is another mechanism of HRV(LF) generation, which should be always monitored, assessed, and considered in the interpretation of HRV changes. PMID:24423137

  17. Nonparametric spectral analysis of heart rate variability through penalized sum of squares.

    PubMed

    Krafty, Robert T; Zhao, Mengyuan; Buysse, Daniel J; Thayer, Julian F; Hall, Martica

    2014-04-15

    Researchers in a variety of biomedical fields have utilized frequency domain properties of heart rate variability (HRV), or the elapsed time between consecutive heart beats. HRV is measured from the electrocardiograph signal through the interbeat interval series. Popular approaches for estimating power spectra from these interval data apply common spectral analysis methods that are designed for the analysis of evenly sampled time series. The application of these methods to the interbeat interval series, which is indexed over an uneven time grid, requires a bias-inducing transformation. The goal of this article is to explore the use of penalized sum of squares for nonparametric estimation of the spectrum of HRV directly from the interbeat intervals. A novel cross-validation procedure is introduced for smoothing parameter selection. Empirical properties of the proposed estimation procedure are explored and compared with popular methods in a simulation study. The proposed method is used in an analysis of data from an insomnia study, which seeks to illuminate the association between the power spectrum of HRV during different periods of sleep with response to behavioral therapy. PMID:24254401

  18. Nonparametric Spectral Analysis of Heart Rate Variability Through Penalized Sum of Squares

    PubMed Central

    Krafty, Robert T.; Zhao, Mengyuan; Buysse, Daniel J.; Thayer, Julian F.; Hall, Martica

    2014-01-01

    Frequency domain properties of heart rate variability (HRV), or the elapsed time between consecutive heart beats, are utilized by biomedical researchers in a variety of fields. HRV is measured from the electrocardiograph signal through the interbeat interval series. Popular approaches for estimating power spectra from these interval data apply common spectral analysis methods that are designed for the analysis of evenly sampled time series. The application of these methods to the interbeat interval series, which is indexed over an uneven time grid, requires a bias inducing transformation. The goal of this article is to explore the use of penalized sum of squares for nonparametric estimation of the spectrum of HRV directly from the interbeat intervals. A novel cross-validation procedure is introduced for smoothing parameter selection. Empirical properties of the proposed estimation procedure are explored and compared to popular methods in a simulation study. The proposed method is used in an analysis of data from an insomnia study which seeks to illuminate the association between the power spectrum of HRV during different periods of sleep with response to behavioral therapy. PMID:24254401

  19. smRithm: Graphical user interface for heart rate variability analysis.

    PubMed

    Nara, Sanjeev; Kaur, Manvinder; Datta, Saurav

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 25 years, Heart rate variability (HRV) has become a non-invasive research and clinical tool for indirectly carrying out investigation of both cardiac and autonomic system function in both healthy and diseased. It provides valuable information about a wide range of cardiovascular disorders, pulmonary diseases, neurological diseases, etc. Its primary purpose is to access the functioning of the nervous system. The source of information for HRV analysis is the continuous beat to beat measurement of inter-beat intervals. The electrocardiography (ECG or EKG) is considered as the best way to measure inter-beat intervals. This paper proposes an open source Graphical User Interface (GUI): smRithm developed in MATLAB for HRV analysis that will apply effective techniques on the raw ECG signals to process and decompose it in a simpler manner to obtain more useful information out of signals that can be utilized for more powerful and efficient applications in the near future related to HRV. PMID:26219643

  20. Heart rate variability: response following a single bout of interval training.

    PubMed

    James, D V B; Barnes, A J; Lopes, P; Wood, D M

    2002-05-01

    We investigated the effect of exercise on heart rate variability by analysing the heart rate power spectrum prior to, and 1 and 72 h following, an interval training session. Subjects initially performed a graded test to exhaustion to determine maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2) max) and the running speed at which VO(2) max was first attained (vVO(2) max). The training session was completed on a separate day and comprised six 800 m runs at 1 km x h (-1) below vVO(2) max. Prior to the training session (pre), 1 h following the training session (+ 1h), and 72 h following the training session (+ 72 h), subjects sat quietly in the laboratory for 20 min whilst breathing frequency was maintained at 12 breath x min (-1). Cardiac cycle R-R interval data were collected over the final 5 min of each 20 min period and analysed by means of autoregressive power spectral analysis to determine the high frequency (HF) and low frequency (LF) components of heart rate variability. Heart rate was higher, and the standard deviation of the R-R intervals was lower, at + 1 h than for pre or + 72 h (p < 0.05). The HF and the LF components of heart rate variability were also lower (p < 0.05) for + 1 h than for pre or + 72 h when the data were expressed in ms(2). However, no changes in the LF:HF ratio were observed, and the changes in the HF and LF components disappeared when the data were expressed as a fraction of the total power. Whilst these findings illustrate the importance of controlling the timing of exercise prior to the determination of heart rate variability, the time course of the post-exercise heart rate variability response remains to be quantified. PMID:12015624

  1. Stochastic analysis of heart rate variability and its relation to echocardiography parameters in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients.

    PubMed

    Petelczyc, M; Zebrowski, J J; Baranowski, R; Chojnowska, L

    2010-12-01

    The heart rate variability of 10 healthy males (age 26 - 4/+ 3 y) and 49 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) (25 males, 24 females, age 29.5 - 11.5/+ 10.5 y) was studied. We applied Kramers-Moyal expansion to extract the drift and diffusion terms of the Langevin equation for the RR interval time series. These terms may be used for a stochastic reconstruction of the time series and for description of the properties of heart rate variability. New parameters characterizing the diffusion term are proposed: the coefficients of the linear fit to the left (LCF) and right (RCF) branch of the dependence of the diffusion term on the rescaled heart rate. Relations of the new parameters to classical echocardiography parameters were studied. Using the relation between the difference LCF-RCF and the left ventricular systolic diameter, the HCM patients studied were divided into three groups. In addition, comparison of the properties of the heart rate variability in the HCM group with that obtained for the healthy young men showed that the parameter LCF-RCF may be treated as a measure of the effect of HCM on heart rate variability and may have diagnostic value. PMID:21071828

  2. Automatic Prediction of Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Events Using Heart Rate Variability Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Melillo, Paolo; Izzo, Raffaele; Orrico, Ada; Scala, Paolo; Attanasio, Marcella; Mirra, Marco; De Luca, Nicola; Pecchia, Leandro

    2015-01-01

    Background There is consensus that Heart Rate Variability is associated with the risk of vascular events. However, Heart Rate Variability predictive value for vascular events is not completely clear. The aim of this study is to develop novel predictive models based on data-mining algorithms to provide an automatic risk stratification tool for hypertensive patients. Methods A database of 139 Holter recordings with clinical data of hypertensive patients followed up for at least 12 months were collected ad hoc. Subjects who experienced a vascular event (i.e., myocardial infarction, stroke, syncopal event) were considered as high-risk subjects. Several data-mining algorithms (such as support vector machine, tree-based classifier, artificial neural network) were used to develop automatic classifiers and their accuracy was tested by assessing the receiver-operator characteristics curve. Moreover, we tested the echographic parameters, which have been showed as powerful predictors of future vascular events. Results The best predictive model was based on random forest and enabled to identify high-risk hypertensive patients with sensitivity and specificity rates of 71.4% and 87.8%, respectively. The Heart Rate Variability based classifier showed higher predictive values than the conventional echographic parameters, which are considered as significant cardiovascular risk factors. Conclusions Combination of Heart Rate Variability measures, analyzed with data-mining algorithm, could be a reliable tool for identifying hypertensive patients at high risk to develop future vascular events. PMID:25793605

  3. The association of resting state heart rate variability and 24-hour blood pressure variability in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Thayer, Julian F; Sollers, John J; Clamor, Annika; Koenig, Julian; Hagglund, Kristofer J

    2016-02-15

    Patients with high cervical complete spinal cord injuries (tetraplegia) sustain damage to the autonomic neural pathways that influence cardiovascular functioning and produce variability in the heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP). In non-injured individuals, an inverse relationship exists between resting autonomic control of the heart (as evidenced by HR variability (HRV)) and BP variability (BPV). This study examined the relationship between HRV, BP and BPV in individuals with tetraplegic (n=10) and paraplegic (n=10) spinal cord injuries, and a group of healthy controls (n=14). Resting HRV at baseline and 24-hour ambulatory BP measurements were collected from electrocardiogram measures of each participant. HRV was quantified using time- and frequency-domain measures. The standard deviation of the BP measurements was used as an index of BPV. Multivariate analyses of variance were performed to examine group differences for laboratory-based and 24-h dependent variables. The MANOVAs for HRV parameters (?(14,50)=.352, p=.010, ?(2)=.407) and for BP indices and HR (?(16,48)=.318, p=.013, ?(2)=.436) were significant. Furthermore, in line with existing evidence, we found that vagally mediated HRV was inversely related to BPV in healthy controls. However, this relationship did not hold for the tetraplegia group (?<|.42|), and mixed results were found for the paraplegia group (e.g., ?<|.29| for time domain HRV, ?>|.65| for low-frequency power). These results support the conclusion that the damage to the spinal sympathetic pathways to the heart found in people with tetraplegia causes a significant disruption in baroreflex control of BP. PMID:26810517

  4. Buffer control for variable-bit-rate video over wireless ATM LAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Lana H.; Panchanathan, Sethuraman

    1998-02-01

    The derivation of the constraints on the encoded bit rate of a video signal imposed by a channel, encoder and decoder buffers is important in the context of video transmission over a wireless channel. In this paper, we derive the conditions for buffer control to ensure that the buffers do not overflow or underflow when video is transmitted over a variable bit rate channel. Using these conditions and a commonly proposed network-user contract, the effect of a network policing function on the allowable variability of the encoded video bit rate is examined. The details of how these effects might be implemented in a system that controls both the encoded and transmitted bit rates is also presented.

  5. Electrowetting Variable Optics for Visible and Infrared Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Alexander Maxwell

    Miniaturized variable optical devices are important for the fields of medical technology, optical communication, and consumer imaging devices. Areas ranging from endoscopy and optogenetics to atomic clocks and imaging all benefit from versatile optical systems. These applications all require precise and rapid control of imaging focal depth and lateral scanning. Electrowetting variable optics is one emergent technology that has the capability to provide focus tuning, beam steering, and even phase modulation in a small and robust package which requires no moving parts. Furthermore, electrowetting based devices there are attractive due to their transmissive nature, polarization insensitivity, low insertion loss, low electrical power requirements, and high optical quality. These features mean that electrowetting adaptive optical components are an attractive solution, compared with MEMS and liquid crystal optical components. Electrowetting is a technique that enables control of the shape of a liquid droplet with applied voltage. A conductive droplet on a dielectric surface alters its contact angle due to charges that build up between an underlying electrode and the surface of the droplet. This effect can be used to tune the curvature and tilt of liquids within cavities. The liquid boundary creates a high quality surface to use for lensing or steering applications. This thesis will focus on the development of electrowetting based lenses and prisms and applications in imaging for both visible and infrared wavelengths. Within this dissertation is the first demonstration of electrowetting lenses for phase control, as well as the investigation of non-aqueous electrowetting lens liquids for electrowetting lenses operation in the infrared. Key considerations that affect the performance and reliability are dielectric material and thickness, liquid selection and source of ionic conduction. The optical devices presented herein utilize judicious selection of dielectric material and electrowetting liquids to enable low voltage variable optics and demonstrate applications in microscopy and microendoscopy.

  6. Does fractality in heart rate variability indicate the development of fetal neural processes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echeverra, J. C.; Woolfson, M. S.; Crowe, J. A.; Hayes-Gill, B. R.; Piri, Jean F.; Spencer, C. J.; James, D. K.

    2004-10-01

    By using an improved detrended fluctuation analysis we studied the scaling behaviour of 53 long-term series of fetal heart rate fluctuations. Our results suggest that fractality begins to arise around 24 weeks of normal human gestation and that this condition, showing some additional developments, seems to be preserved during gestation. This may provide new evidence of a role played by cortical-to-subcortical pathways in the long-term fractal nature of heart rate variability data.

  7. Optimal Spray Application Rates for Ornamental Nursery Liner Production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spray deposition and coverage at different application rates for nursery liners of different sizes were investigated to determine the optimal spray application rates. Experiments were conducted on two and three-year old red maple liners. A traditional hydraulic sprayer with vertical booms was used t...

  8. Human drivers of variability in the atmospheric CO2 growth rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krol, M. C.; Randerson, J. T.; Davis, S. J.; Mu, M.; Keppel-Aleks, G.; Morton, D. C.; van der Werf, G.; DeFries, R. S.

    2014-12-01

    Humans directly or indirectly influence atmospheric carbon dioxide variability on multiple time scales. While fossil fuel combustion and land use emissions are known to be the primary agents driving the long-term secular increase in atmospheric CO2, variability on interannual time scales has been attributed primarily to canopy-scale responses of terrestrial ecosystems to temperature and drought stress. Recent work by Wang et al. (2014) identifies a 2-fold increase in the sensitivity of the CO2 growth rate to interannual variations in temperature and attributes this trend to changing interactions between temperature and soil moisture. Here we provide an independent assessment of this trend using a different filtering approach, and describe several novel mechanisms by which humans have exerted direct control on changes in the CO2 growth rate variability over the past 50 years. These mechanisms include: 1) increasing use of fire by humans in dry and wet tropical forests, where fire behavior and fire spread is sensitive to El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and other climate modes, 2) modifications to ecosystems that increase their vulnerability to fire and drought stress, 3) land use responses to economic growth cycles, and 4) covariance between atmospheric transport variability and increasing regional (and interhemispheric) gradients of fossil fuel CO2. We conclude by reviewing how human and climate controls on CO2 growth rate variability are likely to change in future decades for different climate change scenarios.

  9. The Properties of Low-Luminosity AGN: Variability, Accretion Rate, Black Hole Mass and Color

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oleas, Juan; Podjed, Stephanie; Sarajedini, Vicki

    2016-01-01

    We present the results from a study of ~5000 Broad-Line selected AGN from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7. Galaxy and AGN templates have been fit to the SDSS spectra to isolate the AGN component. The sources have absolute magnitudes in the range -23 < Mi < -18 and lie at redshifts less than z ~ 0.8. A variability analysis reveals that the anti-correlation between luminosity and variability amplitude continues to the faintest AGN in our sample (Gallastegui-Aizpun & Sarajedini 2014), though the underlying cause of the relation is still poorly understood. To address this, we further explore the connection between AGN luminosity and variability through measurement of the Hβ line width to determine black hole mass and accretion rate. We find that AGN with the highest variability amplitudes at a given luminosity appear to have lower accretion rates compared to low amplitude variables. We also investigate correlations with AGN color and accretion rate among these low-luminosity AGN.

  10. Heart rate variability and turbulence in hyperthyroidism before, during, and after treatment.

    PubMed

    Osman, Faizel; Franklyn, Jayne A; Daykin, Jacqueline; Chowdhary, Saqib; Holder, Roger L; Sheppard, Michael C; Gammage, Michael D

    2004-08-15

    Patients with subclinical and treated overt hyperthyroidism have an excess vascular mortality rate. Several symptoms and signs in overt hyperthyroidism suggest abnormality of cardiac autonomic function that may account in part for this excess mortality rate, but few studies have examined cardiac autonomic function in untreated and treated hyperthyroidism. We assessed heart rate turbulence (HRT) and time-domain parameters of heart rate variability in a large, unselected cohort of patients with overt hyperthyroidism referred to our thyroid clinic (n = 259) and compared findings with a group of normal subjects with euthyroidism (n = 440). These measures were also evaluated during antithyroid therapy (when serum-free thyroxine and triiodothyronine concentrations returned to normal but thyrotropin remained suppressed (i.e., subclinical hyperthyroidism, n = 110) and when subjects were rendered clinically and biochemically euthyroid (normal serum thyrotropin, free thyroxine and triiodothyronine concentrations, n = 219). We found that overall measures of heart rate variability and those specific for cardiac vagal modulation were attenuated in patients with overt hyperthyroidism compared with normal subjects; measurements of overall heart rate variability remained low in those with low levels of serum thyrotropin but returned to normal in patients with biochemical euthyroidism. Measurements of HRT (onset and slope) were also decreased in patients with overt hyperthyroidism, but HRT slope returned to normal values with antithyroid treatment. This study is the first to evaluate HRT in overt and treated hyperthyroidism. PMID:15325930

  11. Estimation of heart rate variability using a compact radiofrequency motion sensor.

    PubMed

    Sugita, Norihiro; Matsuoka, Narumi; Yoshizawa, Makoto; Abe, Makoto; Homma, Noriyasu; Otake, Hideharu; Kim, Junghyun; Ohtaki, Yukio

    2015-12-01

    Physiological indices that reflect autonomic nervous activity are considered useful for monitoring peoples' health on a daily basis. A number of such indices are derived from heart rate variability, which is obtained by a radiofrequency (RF) motion sensor without making physical contact with the user's body. However, the bulkiness of RF motion sensors used in previous studies makes them unsuitable for home use. In this study, a new method to measure heart rate variability using a compact RF motion sensor that is sufficiently small to fit in a user's shirt pocket is proposed. To extract a heart rate related component from the sensor signal, an algorithm that optimizes a digital filter based on the power spectral density of the signal is proposed. The signals of the RF motion sensor were measured for 29 subjects during the resting state and their heart rate variability was estimated from the measured signals using the proposed method and a conventional method. A correlation coefficient between true heart rate and heart rate estimated from the proposed method was 0.69. Further, the experimental results showed the viability of the RF sensor for monitoring autonomic nervous activity. However, some improvements such as controlling the direction of sensing were necessary for stable measurement. PMID:26603507

  12. Alternate Nostril Breathing at Different Rates and its Influence on Heart Rate Variability in Non Practitioners of Yoga

    PubMed Central

    P.R, Devaki; P., Saikumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Heart rate variability is a measure of modulation in autonomic input to the heart and is one of the markers of autonomic functions. Though there are many studies on the long term influence of breathing on HRV (heart rate variability) there are only a few studies on the immediate effect of breathing especially alternate nostril breathing on HRV. This study focuses on the immediate effects of alternate nostril breathing and the influence of different breathing rates on HRV. Materials and Methods The study was done on 25 subjects in the age group of 17-35 years. ECG and respiration were recorded before intervention and immediately after the subjects were asked to perform alternate nostril breathing for five minutes. Results Low frequency (LF) which is a marker of sympathetic activity increased, high frequency (HF) which is a marker of parasympathetic activity decreased and their ratio LF/HF which is a marker of sympatho/vagal balance increased immediately after 6 and 12 minutes in comparison to baseline values whereas there was no significant difference in the means of these components when both 6 and 12 minutes were compared. Conclusion Immediate effects of alternate nostril breathing on HRV in non practitioners of yogic breathing are very different from the long term influence of yogic breathing on HRV which show a predominant parasympathetic influence on the heart. PMID:26894062

  13. Translational applications of evaluating physiologic variability in human endotoxemia

    PubMed Central

    Scheff, Jeremy D.; Mavroudis, Panteleimon D.; Calvano, Steve E.; Androulakis, Ioannis P.

    2012-01-01

    Dysregulation of the inflammatory response is a critical component of many clinically challenging disorders such as sepsis. Inflammation is a biological process designed to lead to healing and recovery, ultimately restoring homeostasis; however, the failure to fully achieve those beneficial results can leave a patient in a dangerous persistent inflammatory state. One of the primary challenges in developing novel therapies in this area is that inflammation is comprised of a complex network of interacting pathways. Here, we discuss our approaches towards addressing this problem through computational systems biology, with a particular focus on how the presence of biological rhythms and the disruption of these rhythms in inflammation may be applied in a translational context. By leveraging the information content embedded in physiologic variability, ranging in scale from oscillations in autonomic activity driving short-term heart rate variability (HRV) to circadian rhythms in immunomodulatory hormones, there is significant potential to gain insight into the underlying physiology. PMID:23203205

  14. [Application of variable magnetic fields in medicine--15 years experience].

    PubMed

    Siero?, Aleksander; Cie?lar, Grzegorz

    2003-01-01

    The results of 15-year own experimental and clinical research on application of variable magnetic fields in medicine were presented. In experimental studies analgesic effect (related to endogenous opioid system and nitrogen oxide activity) and regenerative effect of variable magnetic fields with therapeutical parameters was observed. The influence of this fields on enzymatic and hormonal activity, free oxygen radicals, carbohydrates, protein and lipid metabolism, dielectric and rheological properties of blood as well as behavioural reactions and activity of central dopamine receptor in experimental animals was proved. In clinical studies high therapeutic efficacy of magnetotherapy and magnetostimulation in the treatment of osteoarthrosis, abnormal ossification, osteoporosis, nasosinusitis, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, spastic paresis, diabetic polyneuropathy and retinopathy, vegetative neurosis, peptic ulcers, colon irritable and trophic ulcers was confirmed. PMID:15049208

  15. The Effect of Listening to Specific Musical Genre Selections on Measures of Heart Rate Variability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orman, Evelyn K.

    2011-01-01

    University students (N = 30) individually listened to the Billboard 100 top-ranked musical selection for their most and least liked musical genre. Two minutes of silence preceded each musical listening condition, and heart rate variability (HRV) was recorded throughout. All HRV measures decreased during music listening as compared with silence.…

  16. Heart Rate Variability – a Tool to Differentiate Positive and Negative Affective States in Pigs?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The causal neurophysiological processes, such as autonomic nervous system activity, that mediate behavioral and physiological reactivity to an environment have largely been ignored. Heart rate variability (HRV) analysis is a clinical diagnostic tool used to assess affective states (stressful and ple...

  17. Evaluation of Ultrasonic Sensors for the Variable Rate Tree Liner Sprayer Development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sensors functioning reliably under harsh field conditions are needed for the development of variable-rate sprayers to apply pest control agents for tree liners in ornamental nurseries. Two ultrasonic sensors were tested to determine how their durability and detection stability would be influenced by...

  18. Metabolic Syndrome and Short-Term Heart Rate Variability in Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Yaw-Wen; Lin, Jin-Ding; Chen, Wei-Liang; Yen, Chia-Feng; Loh, Ching-Hui; Fang, Wen-Hui; Wu, Li-Wei

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) increases the risk of cardiovascular events. Heart rate variability (HRV) represents autonomic functioning, and reduced HRV significantly increases cardiovascular mortality. The aims of the present paper are to assess the prevalence of MetS in adults with intellectual disabilities (ID), the difference in short-term HRV

  19. HEART RATE VARIABILITY IN RODENTS USES AND CAVEATS IN TOXICOLOGICAL STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Heart rate variability (HRV) is a measure of cardiac pacing dynamics that has recently garnered a great deal of interest in environmental health studies. While the use of these measures has become popular, much uncertainty remains in the interpretation of results, both in terms ...

  20. Response-Time Variability Is Related to Parent Ratings of Inattention, Hyperactivity, and Executive Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomez-Guerrero, Lorena; Martin, Cristina Dominguez; Mairena, Maria Angeles; Di Martino, Adriana; Wang, Jing; Mendelsohn, Alan L.; Dreyer, Benard P.; Isquith, Peter K.; Gioia, Gerard; Petkova, Eva; Castellanos, F. Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Individuals with ADHD are often characterized as inconsistent across many contexts. ADHD is also associated with deficits in executive function. We examined the relationships between response time (RT) variability on five brief computer tasks to parents' ratings of ADHD-related features and executive function in a group of children with

  1. Atypical Pupillary Light Reflex and Heart Rate Variability in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daluwatte, Chathuri; Miles, Judith H.; Christ, Shawn E.; Beversdorf, David Q.; Takahashi, T. Nicole; Yao, Gang

    2013-01-01

    We investigated pupillary light reflex (PLR) in 152 children with ASD, 116 typically developing (TD) children, and 36 children with non-ASD neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs). Heart rate variability (HRV) was measured simultaneously to study potential impairments in the autonomic nervous system (ANS) associated with ASD. The results showed that

  2. Heart Rate Variability during Social Interactions in Children with and without Psychopathology: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shahrestani, Sara; Stewart, Elizabeth M.; Quintana, Daniel S.; Hickie, Ian B.; Guastella, Adam J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The inability to regulate autonomic activity during social interactions is believed to contribute to social and emotional dysregulation in children. Research has employed heart rate variability (HRV) during both socially engaging and socially disengaging dyadic tasks between children and adults to assess this. Methods: We conducted a

  3. Atypical Pupillary Light Reflex and Heart Rate Variability in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daluwatte, Chathuri; Miles, Judith H.; Christ, Shawn E.; Beversdorf, David Q.; Takahashi, T. Nicole; Yao, Gang

    2013-01-01

    We investigated pupillary light reflex (PLR) in 152 children with ASD, 116 typically developing (TD) children, and 36 children with non-ASD neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs). Heart rate variability (HRV) was measured simultaneously to study potential impairments in the autonomic nervous system (ANS) associated with ASD. The results showed that…

  4. Variability in Observed and Sensor Based Estimated Optimum N Rates in Corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent research showed that active sensors such as Crop Circle can be used to estimate in-season N requirements for corn. The objective of this research was to identify sources of variability in the observed and Crop Circle-estimated optimum N rates. Field experiments were conducted at two locations...

  5. Heart rate variability and particulate exposure in vehicle maintenance workers: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Eninger, Robert M; Rosenthal, Frank S

    2004-08-01

    The association between occupational exposure to PM(2.5) and heart rate variability was investigated in a repeated measures, longitudinal study of vehicle maintenance workers occupationally exposed to automobile emissions. Five subjects were monitored for occupational exposure to fine particulate matter (PM(2.5)) on 6 workdays using an aerosol photometer, validated with side-by-side sampling with a gravimetric method. End-of-day heart rate variability statistics were derived using short-term electrocardiogram recordings for each participant. Workplace carbon monoxide and outdoor, ambient fine particulate matter were also monitored. Regression statistics were used to investigate associations between same-day PM(2.5) levels and heart rate variability statistics using mixed-effects multiple regression of pooled data. No statistically significant associations were observed between occupational PM(2.5) and measures of heart rate variability. A statistically significant increase in total spectral power was associated with ambient PM(2.5) (p < 0.05). The data suggest a threshold below which no degradation in cardiac autonomic control of healthy workers occurs when challenged by occupational PM(2.5) exposure. This study was limited in population, exposure level, and type of particulate exposures. Additional studies are recommended on broader occupational populations. PMID:15238301

  6. Fetal Heart Rate and Variability: Stability and Prediction to Developmental Outcomes in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiPietro, Janet A.; Bornstein, Marc H.; Hahn, Chun-Shin; Costigan, Kathleen; Achy-Brou, Aristide

    2007-01-01

    Stability in cardiac indicators before birth and their utility in predicting variation in postnatal development were examined. Fetal heart rate and variability were measured longitudinally from 20 through 38 weeks gestation (n = 137) and again at age 2 (n = 79). Significant within-individual stability during the prenatal period and into childhood

  7. The use of intraallelic variability for testing neutrality and estimating population growth rate.

    PubMed Central

    Slatkin, M; Bertorelle, G

    2001-01-01

    To better understand the forces affecting individual alleles, we introduce a method for finding the joint distribution of the frequency of a neutral allele and the extent of variability at closely linked marker loci (the intraallelic variability). We model three types of intraallelic variability: (a) the number of nonrecombinants at a linked biallelic marker locus, (b) the length of a conserved haplotype, and (c) the number of mutations at a linked marker locus. If the population growth rate is known, the joint distribution provides the basis for a test of neutrality by testing whether the observed level of intraallelic variability is consistent with the observed allele frequency. If the population growth rate is unknown but neutrality can be assumed, the joint distribution provides the likelihood of the growth rate and leads to a maximum-likelihood estimate. We apply the method to data from published data sets for four loci in humans. We conclude that the Delta32 allele at CCR5 and a disease-associated allele at MLH1 arose recently and have been subject to strong selection. Alleles at PAH appear to be neutral and we estimate the recent growth rate of the European population to be approximately 0.027 per generation with a support interval of (0.017-0.037). Four of the relatively common alleles at CFTR also appear to be neutral but DeltaF508 appears to be significantly advantageous to heterozygous carriers. PMID:11404347

  8. Identifying Genetic Variants for Heart Rate Variability in the Acetylcholine Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Riese, Harritte; Muoz, Loretto M.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Ding, Xiuhua; Su, Shaoyong; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; van Roon, Arie M.; van der Most, Peter J.; Lefrandt, Joop; Gansevoort, Ron T.; van der Harst, Pim; Verweij, Niek; Licht, Carmilla M. M.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Willemsen, Gonneke; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Nolte, Ilja M.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Wang, Xiaoling; Snieder, Harold

    2014-01-01

    Heart rate variability is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. The acetylcholine pathway plays a key role in explaining heart rate variability in humans. We assessed whether 443 genotyped and imputed common genetic variants in eight key genes (CHAT, SLC18A3, SLC5A7, CHRNB4, CHRNA3, CHRNA, CHRM2 and ACHE) of the acetylcholine pathway were associated with variation in an established measure of heart rate variability reflecting parasympathetic control of the heart rhythm, the root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD) of normal RR intervals. The association was studied in a two stage design in individuals of European descent. First, analyses were performed in a discovery sample of four cohorts (n?=?3429, discovery stage). Second, findings were replicated in three independent cohorts (n?=?3311, replication stage), and finally the two stages were combined in a meta-analysis (n?=?6740). RMSSD data were obtained under resting conditions. After correction for multiple testing, none of the SNPs showed an association with RMSSD. In conclusion, no common genetic variants for heart rate variability were identified in the largest and most comprehensive candidate gene study on the acetylcholine pathway to date. Future gene finding efforts for RMSSD may want to focus on hypothesis free approaches such as the genome-wide association study. PMID:25384021

  9. Evaluation of a laser scanning sensor for variable-rate tree sprayer development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate canopy measurement capabilities are prerequisites to automate variable-rate sprayers. A 270° radial range laser scanning sensor was tested for its scanning accuracy to detect tree canopy profiles. Signals from the laser sensor and a ground speed sensor were processed with an embedded comput...

  10. Spray droplet sizes with additives discharged from an air-assisted variable-rate nozzle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding droplet size distributions is essential to achieve constant spray quality for real-time variable-rate sprayers that synchronize spray outputs with canopy structures. Droplet sizes were measured for a custom-designed, air-assisted, five-port nozzle coupled with a pulse width modulated (...

  11. Field Validity of Heart Rate Variability Metrics Produced by QRSTool and CMetX

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hibbert, Anita S.; Weinberg, Anna; Klonsky, E. David

    2012-01-01

    Interest in heart rate variability (HRV) metrics as markers of physiological and psychological health continues to grow beyond those with psychophysiological expertise, increasing the importance of developing suitable tools for researchers new to the field. Allen, Chambers, and Towers (2007) developed QRSTool and CMetX software as simple,

  12. The Effect of Listening to Specific Musical Genre Selections on Measures of Heart Rate Variability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orman, Evelyn K.

    2011-01-01

    University students (N = 30) individually listened to the Billboard 100 top-ranked musical selection for their most and least liked musical genre. Two minutes of silence preceded each musical listening condition, and heart rate variability (HRV) was recorded throughout. All HRV measures decreased during music listening as compared with silence.

  13. Metabolic Syndrome and Short-Term Heart Rate Variability in Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Yaw-Wen; Lin, Jin-Ding; Chen, Wei-Liang; Yen, Chia-Feng; Loh, Ching-Hui; Fang, Wen-Hui; Wu, Li-Wei

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) increases the risk of cardiovascular events. Heart rate variability (HRV) represents autonomic functioning, and reduced HRV significantly increases cardiovascular mortality. The aims of the present paper are to assess the prevalence of MetS in adults with intellectual disabilities (ID), the difference in short-term HRV…

  14. Field Validity of Heart Rate Variability Metrics Produced by QRSTool and CMetX

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hibbert, Anita S.; Weinberg, Anna; Klonsky, E. David

    2012-01-01

    Interest in heart rate variability (HRV) metrics as markers of physiological and psychological health continues to grow beyond those with psychophysiological expertise, increasing the importance of developing suitable tools for researchers new to the field. Allen, Chambers, and Towers (2007) developed QRSTool and CMetX software as simple,…

  15. Use of heart rate variability differentiates between physical and psychological states

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The major goal of animal welfare scientists is to determine when animals are experiencing a state of good welfare or poor welfare. The goal of this research was to determine if measures of heart rate variability can be used to differentiate whether animals are experiencing differing states of physi...

  16. Heart Rate Variability during Social Interactions in Children with and without Psychopathology: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shahrestani, Sara; Stewart, Elizabeth M.; Quintana, Daniel S.; Hickie, Ian B.; Guastella, Adam J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The inability to regulate autonomic activity during social interactions is believed to contribute to social and emotional dysregulation in children. Research has employed heart rate variability (HRV) during both socially engaging and socially disengaging dyadic tasks between children and adults to assess this. Methods: We conducted a…

  17. VARIABILITY IN OBSERVED AND SENSOR BASED ESTIMATED OPTIMUM N RATES IN CORN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent research showed that active sensors such as Crop Circle can be used to estimate in-season N requirements in corn. The objective of this research was to identify the sources of variability in the observed and estimated economic optimum N rates (EONR) using Crop Circle. Field experiments were c...

  18. Dynamic prescription maps for site-specific variable rate irrigation of cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A prescription map is a set of instructions that controls a variable rate irrigation (VRI) system. These maps, which may be based on prior yield, soil texture, topography, or soil electrical conductivity data, are often manually applied at the beginning of an irrigation season and remain static. The...

  19. [Heart rate variability in chronic cardiac failure insufficiency. Effect of severity and etiology].

    PubMed

    Gibelin, P; Dadoun-Dybal, M; Morand, P

    1994-09-01

    The variability of the heart rate is a sign of the activation of the autonomic nervous system. This parameter was studied in 21 control subjects and 72 patients with chronic cardiac failure (20 stage II, 37 stage III and 15 stage IV of the NYHA) due to ischaemic heart disease in 48 cases and idiopathic in 24 cases. Spectral and non-spectral analysis of the variability of the heart rate recorded during 24 hour Holter monitoring was performed with the Marquette Electronics 8000 software. Plasma noradrenaline was measured in whole blood by HPLC. The left ventricular ejection fraction was measured by echocardiography. There was a superior to 40% decrease in non-spectral and over 50% decrease in spectral parameters in patients with cardiac failure. This was more pronounced when the cardiac failure was in an advanced stage. The decrease in sinus rhythm variability was proportional to the functional class (SDANN stage II: 96 +/- 34 ms; stage III: 63 +/- 34 ms; stage IV: 54 +/- 33 ms). Moreover, the non-spectral parameters were correlated to the ejection fraction and plasma noradrenaline levels (p < 0.01). In addition, with the same NYHA stage, plasma noradrenaline concentration, ejection fraction and heart rate, the SDNN and the pNN50 were over 50% lower in idiopathic cardiomyopathy than in ischaemic cardiomyopathy. In conclusion, the variability of the heart rate is reduced in chronic cardiac failure in relation with the severity and aetiology of the underlying disease. PMID:7646235

  20. Multiscale multifractal analysis of heart rate variability recordings with a large number of occurrences of arrhythmia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giera?towski, J.; ?ebrowski, J. J.; Baranowski, R.

    2012-02-01

    Human heart rate variability, in the form of time series of intervals between heart beats, shows complex, fractal properties. Recently, it was demonstrated many times that the fractal properties vary from point to point along the series, leading to multifractality. In this paper, we concentrate not only on the fact that the human heart rate has multifractal properties but also that these properties depend on the time scale in which the multifractality is measured. This time scale is related to the frequency band of the signal. We find that human heart rate variability appears to be far more complex than hitherto reported in the studies using a fixed time scale. We introduce a method called multiscale multifractal analysis (MMA), which allows us to extend the description of heart rate variability to include the dependence on the magnitude of the variability and time scale (or frequency band). MMA is relatively immune to additive noise and nonstationarity, including the nonstationarity due to inclusions into the time series of events of a different dynamics (e.g., arrhythmic events in sinus rhythm). The MMA method may provide new ways of measuring the nonlinearity of a signal, and it may help to develop new methods of medical diagnostics.

  1. The Use of Heart Rate Variability as a Novel Method to Differentiate between Affective States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The major goal of animal welfare scientists is to determine when animals are experiencing a state of good welfare or poor welfare. The goal of this research was to determine if measures of heart rate variability can be used to differentiate whether animals are experiencing ‘unpleasant’ versus ‘pleas...

  2. EXPOSURE TO CONCENTRATED AMBIENT PARTICLES IN DETROIT ALTERS HEART RATE VARIABILITY IN SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Elevations in airborne particulate matter (PM) are linked to increased mortality and morbidity in humans with cardiopulmonary disease. Clinical studies show that PM is associated with altered heart rate variability (HRV) and suggests that loss of autonomic control may underlie ca...

  3. Childhood Psychopathology and Autonomic Dysregulation: Exploring the Links Using Heart Rate Variability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srinivasan, Krishnamachari

    2007-01-01

    Changes in cardiovascular reactivity have been used as a psychophysiological marker of various emotional states in both children and adults. Recent decades have seen increasing use of heart rate variability as a non-invasive marker of cardiac autonomic function and of central processes involved in autonomic function regulation. Developmental…

  4. Will Variable-Rate Nitrogen Fertilization Using Corn Canopy Reflectance Sensing Deliver Environmental Benefits?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Within-field variability of corn N need calls for development of site-specific fertilizer application strategies. One approach many are investigating is in-season canopy reflectance sensing. Justification for this strategy partly rests with the premise that it will improve N use and in turn reduce N...

  5. Results of Propellant Mixing Variable Study Using Precise Pressure-Based Burn Rate Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanski, Philip L.

    2014-01-01

    A designed experiment was conducted in which three mix processing variables (pre-curative addition mix temperature, pre-curative addition mixing time, and mixer speed) were varied to estimate their effects on within-mix propellant burn rate variability. The chosen discriminator for the experiment was the 2-inch diameter by 4-inch long (2x4) Center-Perforated (CP) ballistic evaluation motor. Motor nozzle throat diameters were sized to produce a common targeted chamber pressure. Initial data analysis did not show a statistically significant effect. Because propellant burn rate must be directly related to chamber pressure, a method was developed that showed statistically significant effects on chamber pressure (either maximum or average) by adjustments to the process settings. Burn rates were calculated from chamber pressures and these were then normalized to a common pressure for comparative purposes. The pressure-based method of burn rate determination showed significant reduction in error when compared to results obtained from the Brooks' modification of the propellant web-bisector burn rate determination method. Analysis of effects using burn rates calculated by the pressure-based method showed a significant correlation of within-mix burn rate dispersion to mixing duration and the quadratic of mixing duration. The findings were confirmed in a series of mixes that examined the effects of mixing time on burn rate variation, which yielded the same results.

  6. School Counselors as Social Capital: The Effects of High School College Counseling on College Application Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryan, Julia; Moore-Thomas, Cheryl; Day-Vines, Norma L.; Holcomb-McCoy, Cheryl

    2011-01-01

    Using social capital theory as a framework, the authors examined data from the Educational Longitudinal Study of 2002 (Ingels, Pratt, Rogers, Siegel, & Stutts, 2004) to investigate how student contact with high school counselors about college information and other college-related variables influence students' college application rates. In addition

  7. School Counselors as Social Capital: The Effects of High School College Counseling on College Application Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryan, Julia; Moore-Thomas, Cheryl; Day-Vines, Norma L.; Holcomb-McCoy, Cheryl

    2011-01-01

    Using social capital theory as a framework, the authors examined data from the Educational Longitudinal Study of 2002 (Ingels, Pratt, Rogers, Siegel, & Stutts, 2004) to investigate how student contact with high school counselors about college information and other college-related variables influence students' college application rates. In addition…

  8. Arterial baroreflex influence on heart rate variability: a mathematical model-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, S

    2000-03-01

    The influence of the arterial baroreflex on the heart rate variability is analysed by using a mathematical model of heart rate baroreceptor control. The basic mechanisms of the model, sufficient to elicit heart rate variability include: systemic circulation, a non-pulsatile cardiac pump and nonlinear negative feedback simulating arterial baroreflex closed-loop control of the heart rate (-3 bpm/mmHg as maximum reflex sensitivity). The latter reproduces, through two distinct delayed branches (0.8 and 2.8 s), the short-term autonomic control effected respectively by sympathetic and parasympathetic divisions on the sinus node. By means of this model, two distinct self-sustained oscillatory components with incommensurate frequencies (0.1 and 0.26 Hz) are reproduced. Frequencies of these two oscillatory components closely agree with the main heart rate rhythms in humans (0.09 +/- 0.01 Hz and 0.26 +/- 0.01 Hz). When sympathetic-mediated regulation prevails over parasympathetic activity, simulated heart rate oscillation is characterised by a low frequency (approximately 0.1 Hz). On the other hand, a high-frequency oscillatory component (approximately 0.26 Hz) appears when enhanced vagal activation or partial inhibition of the sympathetic control is simulated. When both autonomic divisions are operative, both low- and high-frequency components are present and the heart rate oscillates quasi-periodically. This variability in heart rate at different frequencies is reproduced without including outside perturbations and is due to the nonlinear delayed structure of the closed-loop control. Bifurcation theory of nonlinear system is used to explain the high sensitivity of the heart rate oscillatory pattern to model parameter changes. PMID:10829412

  9. Variability of Phyllochron, Plastochron and Rate of Increase in Height in Photoperiod-sensitive Sorghum Varieties

    PubMed Central

    Clerget, B.; Dingkuhn, M.; Gozé, E.; Rattunde, H. F. W.; Ney, B.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims West African sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) varieties are generally highly photoperiod-sensitive, which is a necessary adaptation to the variable onset date of the rainy season and the variable dates of sowing in the savannah zone. Depending on sowing date, plants can produce from 12 to >40 leaves on the main culm, with height varying from 1 m to more than 5 m. The present study aimed to better understand the complex phenology of these variables. Methods A 2-year series of monthly sowings of three West African sorghum varieties was conducted near Bamako, Mali. Drought stress was avoided by supplemental irrigation. Rate of initiation of primordia at the stem apex was recorded, together with rate of leaf emergence and increase in plant height. Key Results Leaf initiation and appearance rates (plastochron−1 and phyllochron−1) were constant for a given sowing date in cases where less than 20 leaves were produced (generally observed with late sowing dates). In contrast, rates were bilinear for early sowing dates, for which plants produced more than 20 leaves. The secondary rates, which occurred from the 20th leaf onwards, were only half of the initial rate. Plastochron and phyllochron showed large variations among sowing dates, and were correlated with the rate of plant height increase. The initial plastochron and phyllochron were positively correlated with soil temperature and negatively correlated with both day length and day-to-day change of day length prevailing at plant emergence, but these factors explained only half of the variation observed. Conclusions Although they belong to different genetic groups and have different height and photoperiod sensitivity, the three varieties studied exhibited similar response patterns of development rates among phenological phases and seasons, with the local landrace showing the greatest variation due to its longer vegetative phase and longer stem internodes. The possible adaptive advantages in African savannah environments of bilinear development rates and the associated limitation in height increase are discussed. PMID:18230624

  10. Heart Rate and Blood Pressure Variability under Moon, Mars and Zero Gravity Conditions During Parabolic Flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aerts, Wouter; Joosen, Pieter; Widjaja, Devy; Varon, Carolina; Vandeput, Steven; Van Huffel, Sabine; Aubert, Andre E.

    2013-02-01

    Gravity changes during partial-G parabolic flights (0g -0.16g - 0.38g) lead to changes in modulation of the autonomic nervous system (ANS), studied via the heart rate variability (HRV) and blood pressure variability (BPV). HRV and BPV were assessed via classical time and frequency domain measures. Mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure show both increasing trends towards higher gravity levels. The parasympathetic and sympathetic modulation show both an increasing trend with decreasing gravity, although the modulation is sympathetic predominant during reduced gravity. For the mean heart rate, a non-monotonic relation was found, which can be explained by the increased influence of stress on the heart rate. This study shows that there is a relation between changes in gravity and modulations in the ANS. With this in mind, countermeasures can be developed to reduce postflight orthostatic intolerance.

  11. Impact of Blow/Fill/Seal process variables in determining rate of vial contamination by air dispersed microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Leo, Frank; Poisson, Patrick; Sinclair, Colin S; Tallentire, Alan

    2005-01-01

    Controlled challenges of air dispersed spores of Bacillus subtilis NCIMB 8649 have been generated in a custom-built challenge room housing a Blow/Fill/Seal machine filling filter-sterilized trypticase soy broth into 5.5 cm3 low density polyethylene vials. The effects on the rate of vial contamination of systematic changes in the process variables, rate of provision of ballooning air, delay in the application of mould vacuum and duration of transfer of the open vial, have been examined. Overall, the findings show that the conditions of vial formation can affect appreciably the rate of vial contamination from airborne spores. The indications are that heat lethality, associated with the elevated temperature required for polymer extrusion and vial formation, has a role in determining such contamination. PMID:16316067

  12. A Longitudinal Study of Academic Progress Rate as a Result of Team and Institutional Variables at NCAA Division I Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Jimmie Edwin

    2014-01-01

    This study explained Academic Progress Rate (APR) levels and differences in APR (DAPR) with team and institutional variables. Team variables included team gender, sport profile, and squad size. Institutional variables included individual variables aggregated to the institutional level. The data analyzed in this study was derived from the National…

  13. A Conceptual Evaluation of Sustainable Variable-Rate Agricultural Residue Removal

    SciTech Connect

    David J. Muth, Jr.; K. M. Bryden

    2012-10-01

    Agricultural residues have near-term potential as a feedstock for bioenergy production, but their removal must be managed carefully to maintain soil health and productivity. Recent studies have shown that subfield scale variability in soil properties (e.g., slope, texture, and organic matter content) that affect grain yield significantly affect the amount of residue that can be sustainably removed from different areas within a single field. This modeling study examines the concept of variable-rate residue removal equipment that would be capable of on-the-fly residue removal rate adjustments ranging from 0 to 80%. Thirteen residue removal rates (0% and 2580% in 5% increments) were simulated using a subfield scale integrated modeling framework that evaluates residue removal sustainability considering wind erosion, water erosion, and soil carbon constraints. Three Iowa fields with diverse soil, slope, and grain yield characteristics were examined and showed sustainable, variable-rate agricultural residue removal that averaged 2.35, 7.69, and 5.62 Mg ha-1, respectively. In contrast, the projected sustainable removal rates using rake and bale removal for the entire field averaged 0.0, 6.40, and 5.06 Mg ha-1, respectively. The modeling procedure also projected that variable-rate residue harvest would result in 100% of the land area in all three fields being managed in a sustainable manner, whereas Field 1 could not be sustainably managed using rake and bale removal, and only 83 and 62% of the land area in Fields 2 and 3 would be managed sustainably using a rake and bale operation for the entire field. In addition, it was found that residue removal adjustments of 40 to 65% are sufficient to collect 90% of the sustainably available agricultural residue.

  14. Sensor-based nitrogen applications out-performed producer-chosen rates for corn in on-farm demonstrations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Optimal nitrogen (N) fertilizer rate for corn can vary substantially within and among fields. Crop reflectance sensors offer the potential to diagnose crop N need and control N application rates at a fine spatial scale. Our objective was to evaluate the performance of sensor-based variable-rate N ap...

  15. The effects of auditory stimulation with music on heart rate variability in healthy women

    PubMed Central

    Roque, Adriano L.; Valenti, Vitor E.; Guida, Heraldo L.; Campos, Mnica F.; Knap, Andr; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos M.; Ferreira, Lucas L.; Ferreira, Celso; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: There are no data in the literature with regard to the acute effects of different styles of music on the geometric indices of heart rate variability. In this study, we evaluated the acute effects of relaxant baroque and excitatory heavy metal music on the geometric indices of heart rate variability in women. METHODS: We conducted this study in 21 healthy women ranging in age from 18 to 35 years. We excluded persons with previous experience with musical instruments and persons who had an affinity for the song styles. We evaluated two groups: Group 1 (n?=?21), who were exposed to relaxant classical baroque musical and excitatory heavy metal auditory stimulation; and Group 2 (n?=?19), who were exposed to both styles of music and white noise auditory stimulation. Using earphones, the volunteers were exposed to baroque or heavy metal music for five minutes. After the first music exposure to baroque or heavy metal music, they remained at rest for five minutes; subsequently, they were re-exposed to the opposite music (70-80 dB). A different group of women were exposed to the same music styles plus white noise auditory stimulation (90 dB). The sequence of the songs was randomized for each individual. We analyzed the following indices: triangular index, triangular interpolation of RR intervals and Poincar plot (standard deviation of instantaneous beat-by-beat variability, standard deviation of the long-term RR interval, standard deviation of instantaneous beat-by-beat variability and standard deviation of the long-term RR interval ratio), low frequency, high frequency, low frequency/high frequency ratio, standard deviation of all the normal RR intervals, root-mean square of differences between the adjacent normal RR intervals and the percentage of adjacent RR intervals with a difference of duration greater than 50 ms. Heart rate variability was recorded at rest for 10 minutes. RESULTS: The triangular index and the standard deviation of the long-term RR interval indices were reduced during exposure to both music styles in the first group and tended to decrease in the second group whereas the white noise exposure decreased the high frequency index. We observed no changes regarding the triangular interpolation of RR intervals, standard deviation of instantaneous beat-by-beat variability and standard deviation of instantaneous beat-by-beat variability/standard deviation in the long-term RR interval ratio. CONCLUSION: We suggest that relaxant baroque and excitatory heavy metal music slightly decrease global heart rate variability because of the equivalent sound level. PMID:23917660

  16. A New Method for Quantifying Compaction Rates and Their Spatial Variability in the Mississippi Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlain, E. L.; Shen, Z.; Tornqvist, T. E.; Mauz, B.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the rates and drivers of subsidence in deltas is essential to manage subaerial land in these naturally ephemeral settings. Subsidence in deltaic settings may be driven by deep crustal processes including isostasy and faulting, compaction of Holocene deposits, and anthropogenic activities such as groundwater management and fluid withdrawal. Here, we offer a new method to measure compaction rates and their spatial variability in the Mississippi Delta (MD) to test the null hypotheses that compaction increases seaward and is a major driver of subsidence. Late Holocene compaction rates are measured using the mouthbar-overbank stratigraphic boundary. This boundary generally corresponds to mean low tide level; therefore its present-day height relative to coeval mean low tide level is a measure of compaction since the formation of this boundary. The age of this boundary is established through quartz OSL dating, and Holocene relative sea level history in the MD has been well-established. The common occurrence of the mouthbar-overbank boundary in progradational fluviodeltaic successions in the MD makes it possible to study the spatial variability of compaction rates. We also compare displacement rates for this boundary directly north and south of two coast-parallel normal faults. Results show that late Holocene compaction rates in the Lafourche subdelta of the MD are on the order of a few mm/yr, significantly lower than historical surface subsidence rates for the region. Therefore, the elevated historical surface subsidence rates are likely the result of human alteration of the delta such as fluid withdrawal and groundwater management. Compaction rates do not increase seaward as generally assumed, and instead seem to be driven primarily by the thickness of sediments overlying the mouthbar sands. Thus, the highest rates are documented relatively inland. In addition, we do not find a significant increase in subsidence across normal faults in our study area, suggesting that the contribution of faulting to subsidence has been minimal over the past millennium.

  17. Reducing Application Runtime Variability on Jaguar XT5

    SciTech Connect

    Oral, H Sarp; Wang, Feiyi; Dillow, David A; Miller, Ross G; Shipman, Galen M; Maxwell, Don E; Becklehimer, Jeffrey L; Larkin, Jeffrey M; Henseler, David

    2010-01-01

    Operating system (OS) noise is defined as interference generated by the OS that prevents a compute core from performing ``useful'' work. Compute node kernel daemons, network interfaces, and other OS related services are major sources of such interference. This interference on individual compute cores can vary in duration and frequency, and can cause de-synchronization (jitter) in collective communication tasks and thus results in variable (degraded) overall parallel application performance. This behavior is more observable in large-scale applications using certain types of collective communication primitives, such as MPI\\_Allreduce. This paper presents our effort towards reducing the overall effect of OS noise on our large-scale parallel applications. Our tests were performed on the quad-core Jaguar, the Cray XT5 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF). At the time of these tests, Jaguar was a 1.4 PFLOPS supercomputer with 149,504 compute cores and 8 cores per node. We aggregated OS noise sources onto a single core for each node. The scientific application was then run on six of the remaining cores in each node. Our results show that we were able to improve the MPI_Allreduce performance by two orders of magnitude. We demonstrated up to a 30% boost in the performance of the Parallel Ocean Program (POP) using this technique.

  18. Short-Term Heart Rate VariabilityInfluence of Gender and Age in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Voss, Andreas; Schroeder, Rico; Heitmann, Andreas; Peters, Annette; Perz, Siegfried

    2015-01-01

    In the recent years, short-term heart rate variability (HRV) describing complex variations of beat-to-beat interval series that are mainly controlled by the autonomic nervous system (ANS) has been increasingly analyzed to assess the ANS activity in different diseases and under various conditions. In contrast to long-term HRV analysis, short-term investigations (<30 min) provide a test result almost immediately. Thus, short-term HRV analysis is suitable for ambulatory care, patient monitoring and all those applications where the result is urgently needed. In a previous study, we could show significant variations of 5-min HRV indices according to age in almost all domains (linear and nonlinear) in 1906 healthy subjects from the KORA S4 cohort. Based on the same group of subjects, general gender-related influences on HRV indices are to be determined in this study. Short-term 5-min HRV indices from linear time and frequency domain and from nonlinear methods (compression entropy, detrended fluctuation analysis, traditional and segmented Poincar plot analysis, irreversibility analysis, symbolic dynamics, correlation and mutual information analysis) were determined from 782 females and 1124 males. First, we examined the gender differences in two age clusters (2549 years and 5074 years). Secondly, we investigated the gender-specific development of HRV indices in five age decade categories, namely for ages 2534, 3544, 4554, 5564 and 6574 years. In this study, significant modifications of the indices according to gender could be obtained, especially in the frequency domain and correlation analyses. Furthermore, there were significant modifications according to age in nearly all of the domains. The gender differences disappeared within the last two age decades and the age dependencies disappeared in the last decade. To summarize gender and age influences need to be considered when performing HRV studies even if these influences only partly differ. PMID:25822720

  19. Non-linear indices of heart rate variability during endodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Santana, Milana Drumond Ramos; Pita Neto, Ivo Cavalcante; Martiniano, Eli Carlos; Monteiro, Larissa Raylane Lucas; Ramos, José Lucas Souza; Garner, David M; Valenti, Vitor Engácia; Abreu, Luiz Carlos de

    2016-01-01

    Dental treatment promotes psychosomatic change that can influence the procedure and compromise the general well-being of the patient. In this context, it highlights the importance of evaluating the function of the autonomic nervous system in individuals undergoing endodontic treatment. Thus, this manuscript aimed to analyse cardiac autonomic modulation, through non-linear indices of heart rate variability (HRV) during endodontic treatment. Analysis of 50 subjects of either sex aged between 18 and 40 years diagnosed with irreversible pulp necrosis of lower molars undergoing endodontic treatment was undertaken. We carried out fractal and symbolic analysis of HRV, which was recorded in the first session of the endodontic treatment at four intervals: T1: 0-10 min before the onset of the treatment session; T2: 0-10 min after the application of anaesthesia; T3: throughout the period of treatment; and T4: 0-30 min after the end of the treatment session. There was reduction of α1 in T2 compared to T1 and T4 (p < 0.0001). The α2 index also reduced in T2 compared to T3 (p = 0.0035). There was an increase in the α1/α2 ratio in T4 compared to T2 and T3 (p = 0.0003). It was found that 0V% was significantly lower in T2 (p = 0.002), while 2UV% was significantly higher (p < 0.0001) when compared to other points in time. In conclusion, HRV is reduced during endodontic treatment, and after applying local anaesthetic the parasympathetic component of HRV increases. These data indicate that endodontic treatment acutely overcharges the heart, supporting the stress involved in this situation. PMID:26910016

  20. Characterization of air profiles impeded by plant canopies for a variable-rate air-assisted sprayer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The preferential design for variable-rate orchard and nursery sprayers relies on tree structure to control liquid and air flow rates. Demand for this advanced feature has been incremental as the public demand on reduction of pesticide use. A variable-rate, air assisted, five-port sprayer had been in...

  1. Heart Rate and Heart Rate Variability in Dairy Cows with Different Temperament and Behavioural Reactivity to Humans

    PubMed Central

    Tőzsér, János; Szenci, Ottó; Póti, Péter; Pajor, Ferenc

    2015-01-01

    From the 1990s, extensive research was started on the physiological aspects of individual traits in animals. Previous research has established two extreme (proactive and reactive) coping styles in several animal species, but the means of reactivity with the autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity has not yet been investigated in cattle. The aim of this study was the characterization of cardiac autonomic activity under different conditions in cows with different individual characteristics. For this purpose, we investigated heart rate and ANS-related heart rate variability (HRV) parameters of dairy cows (N = 282) on smaller- and larger-scale farms grouped by (1) temperament and (2) behavioural reactivity to humans (BRH). Animals with high BRH scores were defined as impulsive, while animals with low BRH scores were defined as reserved. Cardiac parameters were calculated for undisturbed lying (baseline) and for milking bouts, the latter with the presence of an unfamiliar person (stressful situation). Sympathetic tone was higher, while vagal activity was lower in temperamental cows than in calm animals during rest both on smaller- and larger-scale farms. During milking, HRV parameters were indicative of a higher sympathetic and a lower vagal activity of temperamental cows as compared to calm ones in farms of both sizes. Basal heart rate did not differ between BRH groups either on smaller- or larger-scale farms. Differences between basal ANS activity of impulsive and reserved cows reflected a higher resting vagal and lower sympathetic activity of reserved animals compared to impulsive ones both on smaller- and larger-scale farms. There was no difference either in heart rate or in HRV parameters between groups during milking neither in smaller- nor in larger-scale farms. These two groupings allowed to draw possible parallels between personality and cardiac autonomic activity during both rest and milking in dairy cows. Heart rate and HRV seem to be useful for characterisation of physiological differences related to temperament and BRH. PMID:26291979

  2. Analysis of heart rate variability dynamics during propofol and dexmedetomidine anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Tarvainen, M P; Georgiadis, S; Lipponen, J A; Laitio, T; Karjalainen, P A; Scheinin, H; Kaskinoro, K

    2010-01-01

    It has been observed that heart rate variability (HRV) diminishes during anesthesia, but the exact mechanisms causing it are not completely understood. The aim of this paper was to study the dynamics of HRV during low dose propofol (N=9) and dexmedetomidine (N=8) anesthesia by using state-of-the-art time-varying methods, and thereby ultimately try to improve the safety of anesthesia. The time-varying spectrum is estimated by using a Kalman smoother approach. The results show that there is an overall increase in HRV and decrease in heart rate prior to loss of consciousness. For dexmedetomidine these changes are more considerable than for propofol. For dexmedetomidine the variability also seems to start decreasing right after loss of consciousness, whereas for propofol HRV continues increasing. PMID:21096389

  3. Analysis of heart rate variability during short-term space flight.

    PubMed

    Stoilova, I; Yanev, T

    1997-01-01

    The heart rate (h.r.) of normal healthy subjects varies in rest, under high-load conditions and in pathology. The heart rate variability (h.r.v.) integrates many mechanisms in- and outside the central nervous system, which influence and regulate the h.r. Statistical methods have been used to obtain additional information concerning the diagnostic capabilities h.r.v., the correlation between ECG R-R intervals and their variability and the prognostic significance of h.r.v. The benefits of modification of h.r.v. are not well known. In our previous study the h.r.v. of astronauts before, during and after long-term space flight (seven months) was examined. In this study we make analysis of h.r.v. in wake and sleep in different phases during a short-time space flight (9 days) of the Bulgarian astronaut A.A. in 1988. PMID:11547711

  4. Necessary conditions for the optimality of variable rate residual vector quantizers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kossentini, Faouzi; Smith, Mark J. T.; Barnes, Christopher F.

    1993-01-01

    Residual vector quantization (RVQ), or multistage VQ, as it is also called, has recently been shown to be a competitive technique for data compression. The competitive performance of RVQ reported in results from the joint optimization of variable rate encoding and RVQ direct-sum code books. In this paper, necessary conditions for the optimality of variable rate RVQ's are derived, and an iterative descent algorithm based on a Lagrangian formulation is introduced for designing RVQ's having minimum average distortion subject to an entropy constraint. Simulation results for these entropy-constrained RVQ's (EC-RVQ's) are presented for memory less Gaussian, Laplacian, and uniform sources. A Gauss-Markov source is also considered. The performance is superior to that of entropy-constrained scalar quantizers (EC-SQ's) and practical entropy-constrained vector quantizers (EC-VQ's), and is competitive with that of some of the best source coding techniques that have appeared in the literature.

  5. A New Approach to Detect Congestive Heart Failure Using Short-Term Heart Rate Variability Measures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; Zhou, GuangMin; Wang, Ying; Jiang, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) analysis has quantified the functioning of the autonomic regulation of the heart and heart's ability to respond. However, majority of studies on HRV report several differences between patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) and healthy subjects, such as time-domain, frequency domain and nonlinear HRV measures. In the paper, we mainly presented a new approach to detect congestive heart failure (CHF) based on combination support vector machine (SVM) and three nonstandard heart rate variability (HRV) measures (e.g. SUM_TD, SUM_FD and SUM_IE). The CHF classification model was presented by using SVM classifier with the combination SUM_TD and SUM_FD. In the analysis performed, we found that the CHF classification algorithm could obtain the best performance with the CHF classification accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of 100%, 100%, 100%, respectively. PMID:24747432

  6. Heart Rate Variability in Nonlinear Rats with Different Orientation and Exploratory Activity in the Open Field.

    PubMed

    Kur'yanova, E V; Teplyi, D L; Zhukova, Yu D; Zhukovina, N V

    2015-12-01

    The basic behavioral activity of nonlinear rats was evaluated from the sum of crossed peripheral and central squares and peripheral and central rearing postures in the open fi eld test. This index was low (<20 episodes), intermediate (20-29 episodes), or high (>30 episodes). Male rats with high score of orientation and exploratory activity were characterized by higher indexes of total heart rate variability than rats with low or intermediate activity. Specimens with a greater contribution of VLF waves into the total power spectrum of heart rate variability were shown to dominate among the rats with high behavioral activity. Our results are consistent with the notions of a suprasegmental nature of VLF waves. PMID:26621279

  7. [Anti-arrhythmic therapy: diagnostic possibilities of signal-averaged electrocardiography and heart rate variability].

    PubMed

    Tatarchenko, I P; Pozdniakova, N V; Shevyrev, V A; Morozova, O I

    2003-01-01

    Effects of monotherapy with class IC, II and III antiarrhythmic drugs on parameters of signal averaged (SA) ECG and heart rate variability were studied in 88 patients (mean age 45.6+/-7.8 years). Class IC drugs (ethacizine, disopyramide) caused worsening of qualitative parameters of SA ECG and appearance of ventricular late potentials. Therapy with beta-adrenoblockers, amiodarone and sotalol in patients with ventricular arrhythmias was associated with improvement of parameters of SA ECG, lowering of sympathetic and augmentation of parasympathetic activity without sings of arrhrythmogenic and negative inotropic effects. Combination of noninvasive diagnostic methods including SA ECG, temporal and spectral analysis of heart rate variability, Holter ECG monitoring can facilitate selection of appropriate antiarrhythmic therapy and control of its efficacy. PMID:12891276

  8. Effects of Variable Inflationary Conditions on AN Inventory Model with Inflation-Proportional Demand Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzazadeh, Abolfazl

    2009-08-01

    The inflation rate in the most of the previous researches has been considered constant and well-known over the time horizon, although the future rate of inflation is inherently uncertain and unstable, and is difficult to predict it accurately. Therefore, A time varying inventory model for deteriorating items with allowable shortages is developed in this paper. The inflation rates (internal and external) are time-dependent and demand rate is inflation-proportional. The inventory level is described by differential equations over the time horizon and present value method is used. The numerical example is given to explain the results. Some particular cases, which follow the main problem, will discuss and the results will compare with the main model by using the numerical examples. It has been achieved which shortages increases considerably in comparison with the case of without variable inflationary conditions.

  9. Assessment of heart rate variability based on mobile device for planning physical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svirin, I. S.; Epishina, E. V.; Voronin, V. V.; Semenishchev, E. A.; Solodova, E. N.; Nabilskaya, N. V.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper we present a method for the functional analysis of human heart based on electrocardiography (ECG) signals. The approach using the apparatus of analytical and differential geometry and correlation and regression analysis. ECG contains information on the current condition of the cardiovascular system as well as on the pathological changes in the heart. Mathematical processing of the heart rate variability allows to obtain a great set of mathematical and statistical characteristics. These characteristics of the heart rate are used when solving research problems to study physiological changes that determine functional changes of an individual. The proposed method implemented for up-to-date mobile Android and iOS based devices.

  10. Common multifractality in the heart rate variability and brain activity of healthy humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, D. C.; Sharif, A.

    2010-06-01

    The influence from the central nervous system on the human multifractal heart rate variability (HRV) is examined under the autonomic nervous system perturbation induced by the head-up-tilt body maneuver. We conducted the multifractal factorization analysis to factor out the common multifractal factor in the joint fluctuation of the beat-to-beat heart rate and electroencephalography data. Evidence of a central link in the multifractal HRV was found, where the transition towards increased (decreased) HRV multifractal complexity is associated with a stronger (weaker) multifractal correlation between the central and autonomic nervous systems.

  11. Picosecond supercontinuum laser with consistent emission parameters over variable repetition rates from 1 to 40 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schönau, Thomas; Siebert, Torsten; Härtel, Romano; Klemme, Dietmar; Lauritsen, Kristian; Erdmann, Rainer

    2013-02-01

    An freely triggerable picosecond visible supercontinuum laser source is presented that allows for a uniform spectral profile and equivalent pulse characteristics over variable repetition rates from 1 to 40MHz. The system features PM Yb3+-doped fiber amplification of a picosecond gain-switched seed diode at 1062 nm. The pump power in the multi-stage amplifier is actively adjusted by a microcontroller for a consistent peak power of the amplified signal in the full range of repetition rates. The length of the PCF is scaled to deliver a homogeneous spectrum and minimized distortion of the temporal pulse shape.

  12. Increase in the embedding dimension in the heart rate variability associated with left ventricular abnormalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrs, D. S.; Irurzun, I. M.; Mitelman, J.; Mola, E. E.

    2006-10-01

    In the present study, the authors report evidence that the existence of premature ventricular contractions increases the embedding dimension of the cardiac dynamics. They also analyze patients with congestive heart failure, a severe clinical condition associated with abnormal left ventricular function. Results also show an increase in the embedding dimension of the heart rate variability. They used electrocardiograms collected by themselves with quality standards that make them comparable with other databases.

  13. Pilot study employing heart rate variability biofeedback training to decrease anxiety in patients with eating disorders

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback, a technique which encourages slow meditative breathing, was offered to 25 in-patients with various eating disorder diagnoses-anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder. We found that this modality had no serious side effects, and was subjectively useful to most participants. An enhanced ability to generate highly coherent HRV patterns in patients with recent onset anorexia nervosa was observed. PMID:24917934

  14. Analysis of long term heart rate variability: methods, 1/f scaling and implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saul, J. P.; Albrecht, P.; Berger, R. D.; Cohen, R. J.

    1988-01-01

    The use of spectral techniques to quantify short term heart rate fluctuations on the order of seconds to minutes has helped define the autonomic contributions to beat-to-beat control of heart rate. We used similar techniques to quantify the entire spectrum (0.00003-1.0 Hz) of heart rate variability during 24 hour ambulatory ECG monitoring. The ECG from standard Holter monitor recordings from normal subjects was sampled with the use of a phase locked loop, and a heart rate time series was constructed at 3 Hz. Frequency analysis of the heart rate signal was performed after a nonlinear filtering algorithm was used to eliminate artifacts. A power spectrum of the entire 24 hour record revealed power that was inversely proportional to frequency, 1/f, over 4 decades from 0.00003 to 0.1 Hz (period approximately 10 hours to 10 seconds). Displaying consecutive spectra calculated at 5 minute intervals revealed marked variability in the peaks at all frequencies throughout the 24 hours, probably accounting for the lack of distinct peaks in the spectra of the entire records.

  15. Bridgman Solidification of Concentrated GaInSb Alloys with Variable Growth Rate

    SciTech Connect

    Stelian, C.; Mitric, A.; Duffar, T.; Corregidor, V.; Alves, L.C.; Barradas, N.P.

    2004-11-30

    Experimental works and numerical simulations on concentrated Ga1-xInxSb alloys directional solidification at high crucible pulling rates, show a damping solutal effect on the thermally driven convection which leads to a significant increase of the chemical heterogeneity of the sample and of the solid-liquid interface curvature. Analytical calculations which give a quantitative description of the solutal effect, show that the melt convection damping can be avoided if low pulling rates of the crucible are used for the growth process. A Bridgman growth method, which uses a variable pulling rate in order to reduce the damping solutal effect and to improve the axial chemical homogeneity of the sample, is numerically investigated. The growth process can be started at high pulling rates which are reduced progressively during the solidification. From the numerical modeling, it is found that the axial and radial variations of solute concentration as well as the interface curvature are maintained at lower values when variables pulling rates are used for Bridgman solidification of high doped alloys.

  16. Association of auricular pressing and heart rate variability in pre-exam anxiety students

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wocao; Chen, Junqi; Zhen, Erchuan; Huang, Huanlin; Zhang, Pei; Wang, Jiao; Ou, Yingyi; Huang, Yong

    2013-01-01

    A total of 30 students scoring between 12 and 20 on the Test Anxiety Scale who had been exhibiting an anxious state > 24 hours, and 30 normal control students were recruited. Indices of heart rate variability were recorded using an Actiheart electrocardiogram recorder at 10 minutes before auricular pressing, in the first half of stimulation and in the second half of stimulation. The results revealed that the standard deviation of all normal to normal intervals and the root mean square of standard deviation of normal to normal intervals were significantly increased after stimulation. The heart rate variability triangular index, very-low-frequency power, low-frequency power, and the ratio of low-frequency to high-frequency power were increased to different degrees after stimulation. Compared with normal controls, the root mean square of standard deviation of normal to normal intervals was significantly increased in anxious students following auricular pressing. These results indicated that auricular pressing can elevate heart rate variability, especially the root mean square of standard deviation of normal to normal intervals in students with pre-exam anxiety. PMID:25206734

  17. Timing and Variability of Galactose Metabolic Gene Activation Depend on the Rate of Environmental Change

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Bo; Ott, William; Josić, Krešimir; Bennett, Matthew R.

    2015-01-01

    Modulation of gene network activity allows cells to respond to changes in environmental conditions. For example, the galactose utilization network in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is activated by the presence of galactose but repressed by glucose. If both sugars are present, the yeast will first metabolize glucose, depleting it from the extracellular environment. Upon depletion of glucose, the genes encoding galactose metabolic proteins will activate. Here, we show that the rate at which glucose levels are depleted determines the timing and variability of galactose gene activation. Paradoxically, we find that Gal1p, an enzyme needed for galactose metabolism, accumulates more quickly if glucose is depleted slowly rather than taken away quickly. Furthermore, the variability of induction times in individual cells depends non-monotonically on the rate of glucose depletion and exhibits a minimum at intermediate depletion rates. Our mathematical modeling suggests that the dynamics of the metabolic transition from glucose to galactose are responsible for the variability in galactose gene activation. These findings demonstrate that environmental dynamics can determine the phenotypic outcome at both the single-cell and population levels. PMID:26200924

  18. Resistance to Extinction following Variable-Interval Reinforcement: Reinforcer Rate and Amount

    PubMed Central

    Shull, Richard L; Grimes, Julie A

    2006-01-01

    Rats obtained food-pellet reinforcers by nose poking a lighted key. Experiment 1 examined resistance to extinction following single-schedule training with different variable-interval schedules, ranging from a mean interval of 16?min to 0.25?min. That is, for each schedule, the rats received 20 consecutive daily baseline sessions and then a session of extinction (i.e., no reinforcers). Resistance to extinction (decline in response rate relative to baseline) was negatively related to the rate of reinforcers obtained during baseline, a relation analogous to the partial-reinforcement-extinction effect. A positive relation between these variables emerged, however, when the unit of extinction was taken as the mean interreinforcer interval that had been in effect during training (i.e., as an omitted reinforcer during extinction). In a second experiment, rats received blocks of training sessions, all with the same variable-interval schedule but with a reinforcer of four pellets for some blocks and one pellet for others. Resistance to extinction was greater following training with the larger (four pellets) than with the smaller (one pellet) reinforcer. Taken together, these results support the principle that greater reinforcement during training (e.g., higher rate or larger amount) engenders greater resistance to extinction even when the different conditions of reinforcement are varied between blocks of sessions. PMID:16602374

  19. Cepheid variables and their application to the cosmological distance scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Samantha Leigh

    In the current era of "precision cosmology", measuring the expansion rate of the Universe (Hubble constant, or H 0) more accurately and precisely helps to better constrain the properties of dark energy. Cepheid-based distances are a critical step in the Extragalactic Distance Scale and have been recently used to measure H 0 with a total uncertainty of only 3.4%. I will present my work on Cepheid variables in three different galaxies as part of this effort. NGC 4258 is a galaxy with a very precise and accurate distance (3% uncertainty) based on radio interferometric observations of water masers orbiting its central massive black hole. Therefore, it can be used to obtain a robust absolute calibration of the Cepheid Period-Luminosity relation. I analyzed observations of NGC 4258 obtained at Gemini North over four years and increased the number of long-period Cepheids (P>45 days) known in this galaxy. NGC 5584 was the host of type Ia SN 2007af. I applied a difference imaging technique to Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of this galaxy and discovered several hundred Cepheids. I compared my results with previous work based on traditional PSF photometry. The distance estimates of the two samples matched within the errors of the measurements, and so the difference imaging technique was a success. Additionally, I validated the first "white-light" variability search with the HST F350LP filter for discovering Cepheids. NGC 4921 is located in the heart of the Coma cluster at a distance of about 100Mpc. I conducted a search for Cepheid variables using HST, extending the reach of Hubble by a factor of 3 relative to previous Cepheid work. Since Coma is in the Hubble flow, this approach eliminates the need for a secondary distance indicator and enables a direct determination of H0 based exclusively on a Cepheid distance. I present preliminary results from this challenging project.

  20. Design of rate control for wireless video telephony applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhifeng; Reznik, Yuriy A.

    2012-10-01

    We propose a design of a rate control algorithm for low-delay video transmission over wireless channels. Our objective is to meet delay constraints and to make sure that the decoder buffer does not overflow or underflow. We approach this problem analytically, by studying the leaky bucket model in the variable rate transmission scenario, and deriving sufficient conditions for meeting our objective. We then employ these conditions in the design of the rate control algorithm. We report results obtained by using this algorithm with an MPEG-4 AVC/H.264 encoder and LTE channel simulator as a test platform.

  1. Sleep-Mediated Heart Rate Variability after Bilateral Carotid Body Tumor Resection

    PubMed Central

    Niemeijer, Nicolasine D.; Corssmit, Eleonora P.M.; Reijntjes, Robert H.A.M.; Lammers, Gert Jan; van Dijk, J. Gert; Thijs, Roland D.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: The carotid bodies are thought to play an important role in sleep-dependent autonomic changes. Patients who underwent resection of bilateral carotid body tumors have chronically attenuated baroreflex sensitivity. These subjects provide a unique opportunity to investigate the role of the baroreflex during sleep. Design: One-night ambulatory polysomnography (PSG) recording. Setting: Participants' homes. Participants: Nine patients with bilateral carotid body tumor resection (bCBR) (four women, mean age 50.4 7.2 years) and nine controls matched for age, gender, and body mass index. Interventions: N/A. Measurements: Sleep parameters were obtained from PSG. Heart rate (HR) and its variability were calculated using 30-s epochs. Results: In bCBR patients, HR was slightly but not significantly increased during wake and all sleep stages. The effect of sleep on HR was similar for patients and controls. Low frequency (LF) power of the heart rate variability spectrum was significantly lower in bCBR patients in active wakefulness, sleep stage 1 and REM sleep. No differences were found between patients and controls for high frequency (HF) power and the LF/HF ratio. Conclusions: Bilateral carotid body tumor resection (bCBR) is associated with decreased low frequency power during sleep, suggesting impaired baroreflex function. Despite this, sleep-related heart rate changes were similar between bCBR patients and controls. These findings suggest that the effects of sleep on heart rate are predominantly generated through central, non-baroreflex mediated pathways. Citation: Niemeijer ND, Corssmit EP, Reijntjes RH, Lammers GJ, van Dijk JG, Thijs RD. Sleep-mediated heart rate variability after bilateral carotid body tumor resection. SLEEP 2015;38(4):633639. PMID:25325476

  2. Experiences with leak rate calculations methods for LBB application

    SciTech Connect

    Grebner, H.; Kastner, W.; Hoefler, A.; Maussner, G.

    1997-04-01

    In this paper, three leak rate computer programs for the application of leak before break analysis are described and compared. The programs are compared to each other and to results of an HDR Reactor experiment and two real crack cases. The programs analyzed are PIPELEAK, FLORA, and PICEP. Generally, the different leak rate models are in agreement. To obtain reasonable agreement between measured and calculated leak rates, it was necessary to also use data from detailed crack investigations.

  3. Identification of building applications for a variable-conductance insulation

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, T.F.; Tuluca, A.

    1992-07-01

    Recent experiments have confirmed the feasibility of controllable, reversible disabling of a vacuum insulation panel, which may result in the development of energy-efficient building envelope components. These components could extend the managed energy exchange through the building envelope from about 30% (typical with fenestration systems in commercial buildings), to as much as 90% of the gross wall and roof areas. Further investigation will be required to optimized the thermal response and the magnitude of the R-value swing (from a difference between insulating and conducting insulating values of 4 to as high as a factor of 100). The potential for energy reduction by using the variable-conductance insulation in the building envelope is discussed, and other potential building applications are mentioned.

  4. Next generation of variable frequency drives and application guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, P.K.; Gjorvad, S.

    1999-11-01

    With the advent in power electronics, increase in power handling capacity of silicone controlled rectifiers and other power electronic devices and the use of high speed digital signal processor (DSP), new and better control principles are now utilized for the design of numerous variable frequency drives (VFDs) for large induction motors. One of the latest technologies developed is the direct torque control (DTC) devices which utilizes the electromagnetic state of the motor to control the flux in the magnetic core and hence, the torque. The response of the drive to changes in the required torque is dramatically improved. DTC provides a precise torque control without the need for a feedback device, such as an encoder or tachogenerator. This paper will discuss the next generation of VFDs utilizing DTC and its application considerations in electric power industry.

  5. Variability of the Cosmic-Ray Ionization Rate in Diffuse Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indriolo, Nick; Geballe, Thomas R.; Oka, Takeshi; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2009-06-01

    The energy spectrum of cosmic-rays - a product of particle acceleration and subsequent diffusion - is generally assumed to be uniform throughout the Galaxy. As a result, the cosmic-ray ionization rate inferred in similar environments (e.g. in several diffuse clouds) should also be relatively constant. However, current estimates of the ionization rate in diffuse molecular clouds vary over the range (1-8)10^{-16} s^{-1}. In addition, there are a few sight lines with 3? upper limits of ?_2<110^{-16} s^{-1}, suggesting even lower ionization rates in some clouds. This roughly order of magnitude difference in the cosmic-ray ionization rate between sight lines contradicts the concept of a spatially uniform cosmic-ray flux. We present cosmic-ray ionization rates derived from several published and unpublished spectroscopic observations of H_3^+ in diffuse cloud sight lines. These ionization rates are then compared with various other parameters (Galactic latitude, Galactic longitude, hydrogen column density) in a search for correlations. Also, sight lines in close proximity are compared to each other to determine the variability of the ionization rate on small spatial scales. Webber, W. R. 1998, ApJ, 506, 329 Indriolo, N., Geballe, T. R., Oka, T., & McCall, B. J. 2007, ApJ, 671, 1736 McCall B. J., et al. 2002, ApJ, 567, 391

  6. Twenty-four hour variation in heart rate variability indices derived from fractional differintegration.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Michael J; McNarry, Melitta A

    2015-01-01

    Assuming that RR time-series behave as a fractionally differintegrated Gaussian process, García-González et al. (2003) recently proposed new indices for quantifying variability and structure in RR data. One of these was the 'fractional noise quantifier' (fnQ), measuring the departure of an RR time-series from a monofractal structure (i.e. a measure of its multifractality). Sixty-nine participants (aged = 34·5 ± 12·4 years, body mass index (BMI) = 23·9 ± 2·9 kg m(-2) , maximal oxygen uptake rate (V˙O2peak ) = 42·4 ± 10·9 ml min(-1)  kg(-1) , 39 males) provided continuous beat-to-beat ECG recordings for a 24-h period. Fractional differintegration was used to quantify fnQ, and heart rate variability was calculated in the time domain. All variables were evaluated during consecutive 1-h periods and also during four 6-h blocks corresponding to morning, afternoon, evening and night periods. Apart from RR, circadian trends in all variables were independent of gender (P = 0·11-0·59). Apart from fnQ, all variables exhibited circadian variation (0·0005

  7. Effect of changes in sympathovagal balance on the accuracy of heart rate variability obtained from photoplethysmography

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, XIANG; HUANG, YUAN-YUAN; YUN, FENG; CHEN, TIAN-JUN; LI, JIN

    2015-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) obtained using photoplethysmography (PPG), which is also known as pulse rate variability (PRV), has already been used in clinical practice. However, it is uncertain whether PRV reflects changes in autonomic nervous function accurately. The aim of the present study was to evaluate quantitatively the effect of alterations in the sympathovagal balance on the agreement between PRV and HRV from electrocardiographs (ECG). Healthy subjects (male, 26; female, 7; age, 22–25 years old) participated in the present study. Paced respiration with 15 breathes/min and breath holding (apnea) were performed to alter the autonomic nervous states of patients. The changes in the low-to-high frequency power ratio (LF/HF) of HRV indicated that there was a sympathovagal balance shift toward vagal predominance during paced respiration, but toward sympathetic predominance during apnea. The results demonstrated that, during paced respiration, all indices had an acceptable agreement [Bland-Altman ratio (BAr)<0.2] between PRV and HRV, with the exception of LF/HF that had an insufficient agreement (BAr=0.25). All indices had very strong correlations [Pearson's correlation coefficients (CC)>0.99] and PRV had a minor but highly significant (P<0.001) increase for the majority of the variability indices, when compared with HRV. During apnea, the discrepancy of the short-term variability indices between PRV and HRV became sizeable with a BAr>0.3 and a minimum CC of 0.96. In conclusion, a decrease of LF/HF caused a marginal inaccuracy of PRV in the indication of sympathovagal balance, while sympathetic activation increased differences in short-term variability between PRV and HRV. PMID:26668634

  8. Heart Rate Variability and Skin Conductance During Repetitive TMS Course in Children with Autism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yao; Hensley, Marie K; Tasman, Allan; Sears, Lonnie; Casanova, Manuel F; Sokhadze, Estate M

    2016-03-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a developmental disorder marked by difficulty in social interactions and communication. ASD also often present symptoms of autonomic nervous system (ANS) functioning abnormalities. In individuals with autism the sympathetic branch of the ANS presents an over-activation on a background of the parasympathetic activity deficits, creating an autonomic imbalance, evidenced by a faster heart rate with little variation and increased tonic electrodermal activity. The objective of this study was to explore the effect of 12 sessions of 0.5 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) on autonomic activity in children with ASD. Electrocardiogram and skin conductance level (SCL) were recorded and analyzed during each session of rTMS. The measures of interest were time domain (i.e., R-R intervals, standard deviation of cardiac intervals, NN50-cardio-intervals >50 ms different from preceding interval) and frequency domain heart rate variability (HRV) indices [i.e., power of high frequency (HF) and low frequency (LF) components of HRV spectrum, LF/HF ratio]. Based on our prior pilot studies it was proposed that the course of 12 weekly inhibitory low-frequency rTMS bilaterally applied to the DLPFC will improve autonomic balance probably through improved frontal inhibition of the ANS activity, and will be manifested in an increased length of cardiointervals and their variability, and in higher frequency-domain HRV in a form of increased HF power, decreased LF power, resulting in decreased LF/HF ratio, and in decreased SCL. Our post-12 TMS results showed significant increases in cardiac intervals variability measures and decrease of tonic SCL indicative of increased cardiac vagal control and reduced sympathetic arousal. Behavioral evaluations showed decreased irritability, hyperactivity, stereotype behavior and compulsive behavior ratings that correlated with several autonomic variables. PMID:26341093

  9. The interpretation of very high frequency band of instantaneous pulse rate variability during paced respiration

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pulse rate (PR) indicates heart beat rhythm and contains various intrinsic characteristics of peripheral regulation. Pulse rate variability (PRV) is a reliable method to assess autonomic nervous system function quantitatively as an effective alternative to heart rate variability. However, the frequency range of PRV is limited by the temporal resolution of PR based on heart rate and it is further restricted the exploration of optimal autoregulation frequency based on spectral analysis. Methods Recently, a new novel method, called instantaneous PRV (iPRV), was proposed. iPRV breaks the limitation of temporal resolution and extends the frequency band. Moreover, iPRV provides a new frequency band, called very high frequency band (VHF; 0.4-0.9 Hz). Results The results showed that the VHF indicated the influences of respiratory maneuvers (paced respiration at 6-cycle and 30-cycle) and the nonstationary condition (head-up tilt; HUT). Conclusions VHF is as a potential indication of autoregulation in higher frequency range and with peripheral regulation. It helps for the frequency exploration of cardiovascular autoregulation. PMID:24750578

  10. A study of heart rate variablity tests and lipid profile in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Arunima; Borade, Nirmala Gopal; Hazra, Samir Kumar

    2012-04-01

    This study was designed to test the hypothesis of alteration of cardiovascular autonomic functions in healthy postmenopausal women and relation of lipid metabolism. Sixty postmenopausal women without any gross systemic disease were selected. The parameters recorded were, Valsalva ratio, heart rate variation with deep breath test, heart rate response to postural change (30:15 R-R interval ratio) and lipid profile. Significant differences in all test results were noticed among the premenopausal and postmenopausal groups. Thirty-seven subjects in postmenopusal group were found to have abnormal autonomic functions while 23 had normal autonomic functions. Results of heart rate variability tests showed significant decrease in values of Valsalva ratio, deep breath test, and 30:15 R-R interval ratio in subjects having abnormal autonomic functions. Results of lipid profile showed significant increase in values of total cholesterol (TC), low density lipoprotein (LDL), triglyceride (TG), cholesterol/ high density lipoprotein (HDL) ratio and insignificant decrease in HDL values in subjects having abnormal autonomic functions. The findings showed that the changes in sex hormone levels, after menopause may alter the autonomic nervous system response and lipid metabolism. It was found that postmenopausal women who had significantly decreased values of heart rate variability tests also had significant increase in values of TC, LDL, TG, cholesterol/HDL ratio and insignificant decrease in values of HDL, suggesting that dyslipidaemia may be an important factor for development of autonomic dysfunction. PMID:23025222

  11. Blood Pressure and Heart Rate Variability to Detect Vascular Dysregulation in Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Eva Charlotte; Staab, Johanna; Fuest, Matthias; Witt, Katharina; Voss, Andreas; Plange, Niklas

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate blood pressure and heart rate variability in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) to detect disturbed blood pressure regulation. Methods. Thirty-one patients with POAG (mean age 68 10 years) and 48 control subjects (mean age 66 10 years) were included in a prospective study. Continuous blood pressure and heart rate were simultaneously and noninvasively recorded over 30?min (Glaucoscreen, aviant GmbH, Jena, Germany). Data were analyzed calculating univariate linear (time domain and frequency domain), nonlinear (Symbolic Dynamics, SD) and bivariate (Joint Symbolic Dynamics, JSD) indices. Results. Using nonlinear methods, glaucoma patients were separated with more parameters compared to linear methods. In POAG, nonlinear univariate indices (pW113 and pW120_Sys) were increased while the indices pTH10_Sys and pTH11_Sys reflect a reduction of dominant patterns. Bivariate indices (JSDdia29, JSDdia50, and JSDdia52; coupling between heart rate and diastolic blood pressure) were increased in POAG. The optimum set consisting of six parameters (JSDdia29, JSDdia58, pTH9_Sys, pW231, pW110_Sys and pW120_Sys) revealed a sensitivity of 83.3% and specificity of 80.6%. Conclusions. Nonlinear uni- and bivariate indices of continuous recordings of blood pressure and heart rate are altered in glaucoma. Abnormal blood pressure variability suggests disturbed autonomic regulation in patients with glaucoma. PMID:26495136

  12. Strength training, but not endurance training, reduces motor unit discharge rate variability.

    PubMed

    Vila-Ch, Carolina; Falla, Deborah

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluates and compares the effects of strength and endurance training on motor unit discharge rate variability and force steadiness of knee extensor muscles. Thirty sedentary healthy men (age, 26.03.8yrs) were randomly assigned to strength training, endurance training or a control group. Conventional endurance and strength training was performed 3days per week, over a period of 6weeks. Maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), time to task failure (at 30% MVC), coefficient of variation (CoV) of force and of the discharges rates of motor units from the vastus medialis obliquus and vastus lateralis were determined as subjects performed 20% and 30% MVC knee extension contractions before and after training. CoV of motor unit discharges rates was significantly reduced for both muscles following strength training (P<0.001), but did not change in the endurance (P=0.875) or control group (P=0.995). CoV of force was reduced after the strength training intervention only (P<0.01). Strength training, but not endurance training, reduces motor unit discharge rate variability and enhances force steadiness of the knee extensors. These results provide new insights into the neuromuscular adaptations that occur with different training methods. PMID:26586649

  13. Usefulness of the heart-rate variability complex for predicting cardiac mortality after acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous studies indicate that decreased heart-rate variability (HRV) is related to the risk of death in patients after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). However, the conventional indices of HRV have poor predictive value for mortality. Our aim was to develop novel predictive models based on support vector machine (SVM) to study the integrated features of HRV for improving risk stratification after AMI. Methods A series of heart-rate dynamic parameters from 208 patients were analyzed after a mean follow-up time of 28 months. Patient electrocardiographic data were classified as either survivals or cardiac deaths. SVM models were established based on different combinations of heart-rate dynamic variables and compared to left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), standard deviation of normal-to-normal intervals (SDNN) and deceleration capacity (DC) of heart rate. We tested the accuracy of predictors by assessing the area under the receiver-operator characteristics curve (AUC). Results We evaluated a SVM algorithm that integrated various electrocardiographic features based on three models: (A) HRV complex; (B) 6 dimension vector; and (C) 8 dimension vector. Mean AUC of HRV complex was 0.8902, 0.8880 for 6 dimension vector and 0.8579 for 8 dimension vector, compared with 0.7424 for LVEF, 0.7932 for SDNN and 0.7399 for DC. Conclusions HRV complex yielded the largest AUC and is the best classifier for predicting cardiac death after AMI. PMID:24886422

  14. Spatial and temporal variability in sedimentation rates associated with cutoff channel infill deposits: Ain River, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PiGay, H.; Hupp, C. R.; Citterio, A.; Dufour, S.; Moulin, B.; Walling, D. E.

    2008-05-01

    Floodplain development is associated with lateral accretion along stable channel geometry. Along shifting rivers, the floodplain sedimentation is more complex because of changes in channel position but also cutoff channel presence, which exhibit specific overflow patterns. In this contribution, the spatial and temporal variability of sedimentation rates in cutoff channel infill deposits is related to channel changes of a shifting gravel bed river (Ain River, France). The sedimentation rates estimated from dendrogeomorphic analysis are compared between and within 14 cutoff channel infills. Detailed analyses along a single channel infill are performed to assess changes in the sedimentation rates through time by analyzing activity profiles of the fallout radionuclides 137Cs and unsupported 210Pb. Sedimentation rates are also compared within the channel infills with rates in other plots located in the adjacent floodplain. Sedimentation rates range between 0.65 and 2.4 cm a-1 over a period of 10 to 40 years. The data provide additional information on the role of distance from the bank, overbank flow frequency, and channel geometry in controlling the sedimentation rate. Channel infills, lower than adjacent floodplains, exhibit higher sedimentation rates and convey overbank sediment farther away within the floodplain. Additionally, channel degradation, aggradation, and bank erosion, which reduce or increase the distance between the main channel and the cutoff channel aquatic zone, affect local overbank flow magnitude and frequency and therefore sedimentation rates, thereby creating a complex mosaic of sedimentation zones within the floodplain and along the cutoff channel infills. Last, the dendrogeomorphic and 137Cs approaches are cross validated for estimating the sedimentation rate within a channel infill.

  15. Welfare implication of measuring heart rate and heart rate variability in dairy cattle: literature review and conclusions for future research.

    PubMed

    Kovács, L; Jurkovich, V; Bakony, M; Szenci, O; Póti, P; Tőzsér, J

    2014-02-01

    Heart rate (HR) measurements have been used to determine stress in livestock species since the beginning of the 1970s. However, according to the latest studies in veterinary and behaviour-physiological sciences, heart rate variability (HRV) proved to be more precise for studying the activity of the autonomic nervous system. In dairy cattle, HR and HRV indices have been used to detect stress caused by routine management practices, pain or milking. This review provides the significance of HR and HRV measurements in dairy cattle by summarising current knowledge and research results in this area. First, the biological background and the interrelation of the autonomic regulation of cardiovascular function, stress, HR and HRV are discussed. Equipment and methodological approaches developed to measure interbeat intervals and estimate HRV in dairy cattle are described. The methods of HRV analysis in time, frequency and non-linear domains are also explained in detail emphasising their physiological background. Finally, the most important scientific results and potential possibilities for future research are presented. PMID:24308850

  16. Real-time Continuous Assessment Method for Mental and Physiological Condition using Heart Rate Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Yutaka; Yokoyama, Kiyoko; Ishii, Naohiro

    It is necessary to monitor the daily health condition for preventing stress syndrome. In this study, it was proposed the method assessing the mental and physiological condition, such as the work stress or the relaxation, using heart rate variability at real time and continuously. The instantanuous heart rate (HR), and the ratio of the number of extreme points (NEP) and the number of heart beats were calculated for assessing mental and physiological condition. In this method, 20 beats heart rate were used to calculate these indexes. These were calculated in one beat interval. Three conditions, which are sitting rest, performing mental arithmetic and watching relaxation movie, were assessed using our proposed algorithm. The assessment accuracies were 71.9% and 55.8%, when performing mental arithmetic and watching relaxation movie respectively. In this method, the mental and physiological condition was assessed using only 20 regressive heart beats, so this method is considered as the real time assessment method.

  17. Variable firing rate power burner for high efficiency gas furnaces. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, H.H.; Demler, R.L.; Poulin, E.

    1980-02-01

    One method for increasing the efficiency of residential furnaces and boilers is to retrofit a burner capable of firing rate (FR) modulation. While maximum FR is still attainable, the average FR is significantly lower, resulting in more effective heat exchanger performance. Equally important is the capability for continuous firing at a very low rate (simmering) which eliminates off-cycle loss, a heavy contributor to inefficiency. Additional performance can be gained by reducing the excess air required by a burner. Based on its previous experience, Foster-Miller Associates, Inc. has designed and tested a low excess air (about 15%) variable firing rate (VFR) burner. The theory of operation and the construction of the test burner are described. Test results are given along with a conclusion/recommendation. A Phase II plan is outlined which suggests methods and steps for fabrication and field testing of a number of prototype units.

  18. A paleogeodetic record of variable interseismic rates and megathrust coupling at Simeulue Island, Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, Louisa L. H.; Meltzner, Aron J.; Hill, Emma M.; Freymueller, Jeffrey T.; Sieh, Kerry

    2015-12-01

    An 1100 year long paleogeodetic record of land-height change along the Simeulue section of the Sumatran subduction zone reveals significant variations in vertical motion rates. From an 267 year long record, we develop models to explain rate variations in the decades before the 1861, 2004, and 2005 great earthquakes. The record shows that rates accelerated by a factor of 4 to 10 in the decades before the 1861 earthquake; one plausible explanation is a significant increase in the depth of interseismic coupling on the Sunda megathrust under Simeulue. Despite similarity of the 1861 and 2005 coseismic rupture patterns, the pattern of coupling during the decades before the two earthquakes may have been different. Most GPS observations of interseismic deformation at subduction zones span only a decade or two; our results highlight the need to treat GPS-derived coupling maps as only a snapshot of fault conditions that are temporally variable.

  19. Controlling Variable Emittance (MEMS) Coatings for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrar, D.; Schneider, W.; Osiander, R.; Champion, J. L.; Darrin, A. G.; Douglas, Donya; Swanson, Ted D.

    2003-01-01

    Small spacecraft, including micro and nanosats, as they are envisioned for future missions, will require an alternative means to achieve thermal control due to their small power and mass budgets. One of the proposed alternatives is Variable Emittance (Vari-E) Coatings for spacecraft radiators. Space Technology-5 (ST-5) is a technology demonstration mission through NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) that will utilize Vari-E Coatings. This mission involves a constellation of three (3) satellites in a highly elliptical orbit with a perigee altitude of approximately 200 kilometers and an apogee of approximately 38,000 kilometers. Such an environment will expose the spacecraft to a wide swing in the thermal and radiation environment of the earth's atmosphere. There are three (3) different technologies associated with this mission. The three technologies are electrophoretic, electrochromic, and Micro ElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS). The ultimate goal is to make use of Van-E coatings, in order to achieve various levels of thermal control. The focus of this paper is to highlight the Vari-E Coating MEMS instrument, with an emphasis on the Electronic Control Unit responsible for operating the MEMS device. The Test & Evaluation approach, along with the results, is specific for application on ST-5, yet the information provides a guideline for future experiments and/or thermal applications on the exterior structure of a spacecraft.

  20. Rates of ingestion and their variability between individual calanoid copepods: Direct observations

    SciTech Connect

    Paffenhoefer, G.A.; Lewis, K.D.; Bundy, M.H. |; Metz, C.

    1995-12-01

    The goals of this study were to determine rates of ingestion and fecal pellet release, and their variability, for individual planktonic copepods over extended periods of time (>20 min). Ingestions and rejections of individual cells of the diatom Thalassiosira eccentrica by a adult females of the calanoid Paracalanus aculeatus were directly quantified by observing individual copepods continuously at cell concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 1.2 mm{sup 3} l{sup {minus}1}. Average ingestion rates increased with increasing food concentration, but were not significantly different between 0.3 and 1.0 mm{sup 3} l{sup {minus}1} (9.8 and 32.7 {mu}g Cl{sup {minus}1}) of T.eccentrica. Rates of cell rejections were low and similar at 0.1 and 0.3. but were significantly higher at 1.0 mm{sup 3} l{sup {minus}1}. The coefficients of variation for average ingestion rates of individual copepods hardly differed between food concentrations, ranging from 17 to 22%, and were close to those for average fecal pellet release intervals which ranged from 15 to 21%. A comparison between individuals at each food concentration found no significant differences at 1.0; at 0.1 and 0.3 mm{sup 3} l{sup {minus}1}, respectively, ingestion rates of four out of five females did not differ significantly from each other. Average intervals between fecal pellet releases were similar at 0.3 and 1.0 mm{sup 3} l{sup {minus}1}. Fecal pellet release intervals between individuals were significantly different at each food concentration; these significant differences were attributed to rather narrow ranges of pellet release intervals of each individual female. Potential sources/causes of variability in the sizes and rates of copepods in the ocean are evaluated.

  1. Microgravity alters respiratory sinus arrhythmia and short-term heart rate variability in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Migeotte, P-F; Prisk, G. Kim; Paiva, M.; West, J. B. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    We studied heart rate (HR), heart rate variability (HRV), and respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) in four male subjects before, during, and after 16 days of spaceflight. The electrocardiogram and respiration were recorded during two periods of 4 min controlled breathing at 7.5 and 15 breaths/min in standing and supine postures on the ground and in microgravity. Low (LF)- and high (HF)-frequency components of the short-term HRV (< or =3 min) were computed through Fourier spectral analysis of the R-R intervals. Early in microgravity, HR was decreased compared with both standing and supine positions and had returned to the supine value by the end of the flight. In microgravity, overall variability, the LF-to-HF ratio, and RSA amplitude and phase were similar to preflight supine values. Immediately postflight, HR increased by approximately 15% and remained elevated 15 days after landing. LF/HF was increased, suggesting an increased sympathetic control of HR standing. The overall variability and RSA amplitude in supine decreased postflight, suggesting that vagal tone decreased, which coupled with the decrease in RSA phase shift suggests that this was the result of an adaptation of autonomic control of HR to microgravity. In addition, these alterations persisted for at least 15 days after return to normal gravity (1G).

  2. The use of heart rate variability in assessing precompetitive stress in high-standard judo athletes.

    PubMed

    Morales, J; Garcia, V; Garca-Mass, X; Salv, P; Escobar, R; Busc, B

    2013-02-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the sensitivity to and changes in heart rate variability (HRV) in stressful situations before judo competitions and to observe the differences among judo athletes according to their competitive standards in both official and unofficial competitions. 24 (10 male and 14 female) national- and international-standard athletes were evaluated. Each participant answered the Revised Competitive State Anxiety Inventory (CSAI-2R) and their HRV was recorded both during an official and unofficial competition. The MANOVA showed significant main effects of the athlete's standard and the type of competition in CSAI-2R, in HRV time domain, in HRV frequency domain and in HRV nonlinear analysis (p<0.05). International-standard judo athletes have lower somatic anxiety, cognitive anxiety, heart rate and low-high frequency ratio than national-standard athletes (p<0.05). International-standard athletes have a higher confidence, mean RR interval, standard deviation of RR, square root of the mean squared difference of successive RR intervals, number of consecutive RR that differ by more than 5 ms, short-term variability, long-term variability, long-range scaling exponents and short-range scaling exponent than national-standard judo athletes. In conclusion, international-standard athletes show less pre-competitive anxiety than the national-standard athletes and HRV analysis is sensitive to changes in pre-competitive anxiety. PMID:22972248

  3. Students' Ways of Thinking about Two-Variable Functions and Rate of Change in Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Eric David

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation describes an investigation of four students' ways of thinking about functions of two variables and rate of change of those two-variable functions. Most secondary, introductory algebra, pre-calculus, and first and second semester calculus courses do not require students to think about functions of more than one variable. Yet

  4. Students' Ways of Thinking about Two-Variable Functions and Rate of Change in Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Eric David

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation describes an investigation of four students' ways of thinking about functions of two variables and rate of change of those two-variable functions. Most secondary, introductory algebra, pre-calculus, and first and second semester calculus courses do not require students to think about functions of more than one variable. Yet…

  5. Monitoring and Identification of Sepsis Development through a Composite Measure of Heart Rate Variability

    PubMed Central

    Bravi, Andrea; Green, Geoffrey; Longtin, Andr; Seely, Andrew J. E.

    2012-01-01

    Tracking the physiological conditions of a patient developing infection is of utmost importance to provide optimal care at an early stage. This work presents a procedure to integrate multiple measures of heart rate variability into a unique measure for the tracking of sepsis development. An early warning system is used to illustrate its potential clinical value. The study involved 17 adults (age median 51 (interquartile range 4662)) who experienced a period of neutropenia following chemoradiotherapy and bone marrow transplant; 14 developed sepsis, and 3 did not. A comprehensive panel (N?=?92) of variability measures was calculated for 5 min-windows throughout the period of monitoring (124 days). Variability measures underwent filtering and two steps of data reduction with the objective of enhancing the information related to the greatest degree of change. The proposed composite measure was capable of tracking the development of sepsis in 12 out of 14 patients. Simulating a real-time monitoring setting, the sum of the energy over the very low frequency range of the composite measure was used to classify the probability of developing sepsis. The composite revealed information about the onset of sepsis about 60 hours (median value) before of sepsis diagnosis. In a real monitoring setting this quicker detection time would be associated to increased efficacy in the treatment of sepsis, therefore highlighting the potential clinical utility of a composite measure of variability. PMID:23029171

  6. Studying radon exhalation rates variability from phosphogypsum piles in the SW of Spain.

    PubMed

    Lpez-Coto, I; Mas, J L; Vargas, A; Bolvar, J P

    2014-09-15

    Nearly 1.0 10(8) tonnes of phosphogypsum were accumulated during last 50 years on a 1,200 ha disposal site near Huelva town (SW of Spain). Previous measurements of exhalation rates offered very variable values, in such a way that a worst case scenario could not be established. Here, new experimental data coupled to numerical simulations show that increasing the moisture contents or the temperature reduces the exhalation rate whilst increasing the radon potential or porosity has the contrary effect. Once the relative effects are compared, it can be drawn that the most relevant parameters controlling the exhalation rate are radon potential (product of emanation factor by (226)Ra concentration) and moisture saturation of PG. From wastes management point of view, it can be concluded that piling up the waste increasing the height instead of the surface allows the reduction of the exhalation rate. Furthermore, a proposed cover here is expected to allow exhalation rates reductions up to 95%. We established that the worst case scenario corresponds to a situation of extremely dry winter. Under these conditions, the radon exhalation rate (0.508 Bqm(-2)s(-1)) would be below though close to the upper limit established by U.S.E.P.A. for inactive phopsphogypsum piles (0.722 Bqm(-2)s(-1)). PMID:25194815

  7. Validity of (Ultra-)Short Recordings for Heart Rate Variability Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Munoz, M. Loretto; van Roon, Arie; Riese, Harritte; Thio, Chris; Oostenbroek, Emma; Westrik, Iris; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Gansevoort, Ron; Lefrandt, Joop

    2015-01-01

    Objectives In order to investigate the applicability of routine 10s electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings for time-domain heart rate variability (HRV) calculation we explored to what extent these (ultra-)short recordings capture the actual HRV. Methods The standard deviation of normal-to-normal intervals (SDNN) and the root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD) were measured in 3,387 adults. SDNN and RMSSD were assessed from (ultra)short recordings of 10s(3x), 30s, and 120s and compared to 240s300s (gold standard) measurements. Pearsons correlation coefficients (r), Bland-Altman 95% limits of agreement and Cohens d statistics were used as agreement analysis techniques. Results Agreement between the separate 10s recordings and the 240s-300s recording was already substantial (r = 0.7580.764/Bias = 0.3980.416/d = 0.8550.894 for SDNN; r = 0.8530.862/Bias = 0.0790.096/d = 0.1500.171 for RMSSD), and improved further when three 10s periods were averaged (r = 0.863/Bias = 0.406/d = 0.874 for SDNN; r = 0.941/Bias = 0.088/d = 0.167 for RMSSD). Agreement increased with recording length and reached near perfect agreement at 120s (r = 0.956/Bias = 0.064/d = 0.137 for SDNN; r = 0.986/Bias = 0.014/d = 0.027 for RMSSD). For all recording lengths and agreement measures, RMSSD outperformed SDNN. Conclusions Our results confirm that it is unnecessary to use recordings longer than 120s to obtain accurate measures of RMSSD and SDNN in the time domain. Even a single 10s (standard ECG) recording yields a valid RMSSD measurement, although an average over multiple 10s ECGs is preferable. For SDNN we would recommend either 30s or multiple 10s ECGs. Future research projects using time-domain HRV parameters, e.g. genetic epidemiological studies, could calculate HRV from (ultra-)short ECGs enabling such projects to be performed at a large scale. PMID:26414314

  8. Changes in fractal structure of heart rate variability during a nap in one case.

    PubMed

    Shono, H; Shono, M; Takasaki, M; Iwasaka, T; Sugimori, H

    2001-06-01

    The objective of the present study was to analyze fractal structures of adult heart rate (HR) variability during a nap. Fractal analysis was carried out in one case over consecutive 10-min time series of HR, which were simultaneously recorded with electroencephalogram. Scaling relationships showed cross-over patterns characterized by alphas and alphal (i.e. slopes above and below a cross-over point). The alphas and alphal were black and white noise at Stage 4 of NREM sleep, and black and 1/f noise in REM sleep. Cross-over points changed from the first to second sleep cycle. We demonstrate the multifractal structures of HR variability during a nap in the present case. PMID:11422830

  9. Distribution and variability of the 24-h average air exchange rates and interzonal flow rates in 26 Japanese residences in 5 seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, Naohide; Kataoka, Toshiyuki; Takamine, Koichi; Gamo, Masashi

    2011-07-01

    In this study, to evaluate the distribution of air exchange rates in Japan, daily, seasonal, and inter-residence variabilities were determined as well as the air exchange rate itself. In addition, airflows among multiple zones were also evaluated. For this purpose, the 24 h average air exchange rates and interzonal air flow rates were measured using a passive perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) method with three kinds of tracer gases for 1 week in three rooms of 26 Japanese residences over five seasons: summer and autumn of 2005, and winter, spring, and summer of 2006. During these seasons, the weekly average air exchange rates were found to be 1.6 1.7, 0.58 0.94, 0.61 0.93, 1.2 2.5, and 1.7 1.8 h -1, respectively. Two-way repeated measure analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed that the air exchange rates differed significantly with respect to the seasons, residences, and interaction of seasons and residences ( p < 0.01). In addition, the air exchange rates in both summers and spring were statistically higher than those in autumn and winter (Sheffe test, p < 0.01). According to the ANOVA, the percentage contribution of inter-residence variability, seasonal variability, interaction of seasonal and inter-residence variabilities, and daily variability to the total variability of the 24 h average air exchange rates in the present survey was 51%, 44%, 3.7%, and 1.0%, respectively.

  10. C-fuzzy variable-branch decision tree with storage and classification error rate constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shiueng-Bien

    2009-10-01

    The C-fuzzy decision tree (CFDT), which is based on the fuzzy C-means algorithm, has recently been proposed. The CFDT is grown by selecting the nodes to be split according to its classification error rate. However, the CFDT design does not consider the classification time taken to classify the input vector. Thus, the CFDT can be improved. We propose a new C-fuzzy variable-branch decision tree (CFVBDT) with storage and classification error rate constraints. The design of the CFVBDT consists of two phases-growing and pruning. The CFVBDT is grown by selecting the nodes to be split according to the classification error rate and the classification time in the decision tree. Additionally, the pruning method selects the nodes to prune based on the storage requirement and the classification time of the CFVBDT. Furthermore, the number of branches of each internal node is variable in the CFVBDT. Experimental results indicate that the proposed CFVBDT outperforms the CFDT and other methods.

  11. National Lung Screening Trial: Variability in Nodule Detection Rates in Chest CT Studies

    PubMed Central

    Pinsky, Paul F.; Gierada, David S.; Nath, P. Hrudaya; Kazerooni, Ella; Amorosa, Judith

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize the variability in radiologists interpretations of computed tomography (CT) studies in the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) (including assessment of false-positive rates [FPRs] and sensitivity), to examine factors that contribute to variability, and to evaluate trade-offs between FPRs and sensitivity among different groups of radiologists. Materials and Methods: The HIPAA-compliant NLST was approved by the institutional review board at each screening center; all participants provided informed consent. NLST radiologists reported overall screening results, nodule-specific findings, and recommendations for diagnostic follow-up. A noncalcified nodule of 4 mm or larger constituted a positive screening result. The FPR was defined as the rate of positive screening examinations in participants without a cancer diagnosis within 1 year. Descriptive analyses and mixed-effects models were utilized. The average odds ratio (OR) for a false-positive result across all pairs of radiologists was used as a measure of variability. Results: One hundred twelve radiologists at 32 screening centers each interpreted 100 or more NLST CT studies, interpreting 72 160 of 75 126 total NLST CT studies in aggregate. The mean FPR for radiologists was 28.7% 13.7 (standard deviation), with a range of 3.8%69.0%. The model yielded an average OR of 2.49 across all pairs of radiologists and an OR of 1.83 for pairs within the same screening center. Mean FPRs were similar for academic versus nonacademic centers (27.9% and 26.7%, respectively) and for centers inside (25.0%) versus outside (28.7%) the U.S. histoplasmosis belt. Aggregate sensitivity was 96.5% for radiologists with FPRs higher than the median (27.1%), compared with 91.9% for those with FPRs lower than the median (P = .02). Conclusion: There was substantial variability in radiologists FPRs. Higher FPRs were associated with modestly higher sensitivity. RSNA, 2013 PMID:23592767

  12. Applicability and efficacy of variable light in schools.

    PubMed

    Barkmann, Claus; Wessolowski, Nino; Schulte-Markwort, Michael

    2012-02-01

    There is a range of reliable, empirical data on the effects of special lighting techniques on the performance of adults in the work environment in the literature. However, these studies have not adequately addressed the effects of lighting on school children in the classroom environment. In the present study, the effect of variable lighting (VL) i.e., lighting that is variable in illuminance and color temperature, was studied in the classroom using a variety of student performance and attitude measures. Two classrooms each in two separate schools were studied over a period of nine months; one class in each school served as an intervention group, and a parallel class in each school served as a control group. The effects of the individual VL programs were assessed using standardized test modules. The overall effect was measured using standardized surveys of students and teachers given at the beginning and the end of the project. The results showed that the students made fewer errors, particularly fewer errors of omission, on a standardized test of attention under the VL "Concentrate" program. Reading speed, as measured using standardized reading tests, rose significantly. Reading comprehension also improved, but this improvement was not statistically significant. In contrast, the achievement motivation of the students and the classroom atmosphere did not change over the nine-month period. Overall, the students and teachers rated VL positively and found it useful during lessons. These results are in line with previous research findings. Thus, VL represents an environmental factor that can be useful to optimize general learning conditions in schools in the future. PMID:22001491

  13. Effect of immersion, submersion, and scuba diving on heart rate variability

    PubMed Central

    Schipke, J; Pelzer, M

    2001-01-01

    BackgroundHeart rate variability (HRV) describes the cyclic variations in heart rate and offers a non-invasive tool for investigating the modulatory effects of neural mechanisms elicited by the autonomic nervous system on intrinsic heart rate. ObjectiveTo introduce the HRV concept to healthy volunteers under control conditions and during scuba diving. In contrast with more established manoeuvres, diving probably activates both the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system through various stimulifor example, through cardiac stretch receptors, respiration pattern, psychological stress, and diving reflex. A further aim of the study was to introduce a measure for determining a candidate's ability to scuba dive by providing (a) standard values for HRV measures (three from the time domain and three from the frequency domain) and (b) physiological responses to a strenuous manoeuvre such as scuba diving. MethodsTwenty five trained scuba divers were investigated while diving under pool conditions (27C) after the effects of head out immersion and submersion on HRV had been studied. Results and conclusions(a) Immersion under pool conditions is a powerful stimulus for both the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system. (b) As neither the heart rate nor the HRV changed on going from immersion to submersion, the parasympathetic activation was probably due to haemodynamic alterations. (c) All HRV measures showed an increase in the parasympathetic activity. (d) If a physiological HRV is a mechanism for providing adaptability and flexibility, diving should not provoke circulatory problems in healthy subjects. (e) Either a lower than normal HRV under control conditions or a reduction in HRV induced by diving would be unphysiological, and a scuba diving candidate showing such characteristics should be further investigated. Key Words: immersion; submersion; scuba diving; autonomous nervous system; heart rate variability PMID:11375876

  14. Maturation of Heart Rate and Blood Pressure Variability during Sleep in Term-Born Infants

    PubMed Central

    Yiallourou, Stephanie R.; Sands, Scott A.; Walker, Adrian M.; Horne, Rosemary S.C.

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: Abnormal blood pressure control is implicated in the sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). However, no data exist on normal development of blood pressure control during infancy. This study assessed maturation of autonomic control of blood pressure and heart rate during sleep within the first 6 months of life. Participants: Term infants (n = 31) were studied longitudinally at 2-4 weeks, 2-3 months, and 5-6 months postnatal age. Interventions: Infants underwent daytime polysomnography at each age studied. Blood pressure and heart rate were recorded during quiet (QS) and active (AS) sleep in undisturbed baseline and head-up tilt conditions. Measurements and Results: Autonomic control was assessed using spectral indices of blood pressure and heart rate variability (BPV and HRV) in ranges of low frequency (LF, reflecting sympathetic + parasympathetic activity) and high frequency (HF, parasympathetic activity), total power (LF+HF), and LF/HF ratio (sympathovagal balance). With increasing postnatal age and predominantly during QS, HRV-LF, HRV-HF, and HRV total power increased, while HRV-LF/HF decreased. BPV-LF/HF also decreased with postnatal age. All changes were evident in both baseline and head-up tilt conditions. BPV-LF and BPV total power during tilts were markedly reduced in QS versus AS at each age. Conclusions: In sleeping infants, sympathetic vascular modulation of the circulation decreases with age, while parasympathetic control of heart rate is strengthened. These normative data will aid in the early identification of conditions where autonomic function is impaired, such as in SIDS. Citation: Yiallourou SR; Sands SA; Walker AM; Horne RSC. Maturation of heart rate and blood pressure variability during sleep in term-born infants. SLEEP 2012;35(2):177-186. PMID:22294807

  15. High-Frequency Heart Rate Variability Linked to Affiliation with a New Group

    PubMed Central

    Sahdra, Baljinder K.; Ciarrochi, Joseph; Parker, Philip D.

    2015-01-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that high levels of high-frequency heart rate variability (HF-HRV) predisposes individuals to affiliate with new groups. Resting cardiac physiological recordings were taken before and after experimental sessions to measure trait high-frequency heart rate variability as an index of dispositional autonomic influence on heart rate. Following an experimental manipulation of priming of caring-related words, participants engaged in a minimal group paradigm, in which they imagined being a member of one of two arbitrary groups, allocated money to members of the two groups, and rated their affiliation with the groups. High levels of HF-HRV were associated with ingroup favouritism while allocating money, an effect largely attributable to a positive relationship between HF-HRV and allocation of money to the ingroup, and less due to a negative relationship between HF-HRV and money allocation to the outgroup. HF-HRV was also associated with increased self-reported affiliation feelings for the ingroup but was unrelated to feelings towards the outgroup. These effects remained substantial even after controlling for age, gender, BMI, mood, caffeine consumption, time of day of data collection, smoking and alcohol behaviour, and respiration rate. Further, the effects were observed regardless of whether participants were primed with caring-related words or not. This study is the first to bridge a long history of research on ingroup favouritism to the relatively recent body of research on cardiac vagal tone by uncovering a positive association between HF-HRV and affiliation with a novel group. PMID:26106891

  16. High-Frequency Heart Rate Variability Linked to Affiliation with a New Group.

    PubMed

    Sahdra, Baljinder K; Ciarrochi, Joseph; Parker, Philip D

    2015-01-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that high levels of high-frequency heart rate variability (HF-HRV) predisposes individuals to affiliate with new groups. Resting cardiac physiological recordings were taken before and after experimental sessions to measure trait high-frequency heart rate variability as an index of dispositional autonomic influence on heart rate. Following an experimental manipulation of priming of caring-related words, participants engaged in a minimal group paradigm, in which they imagined being a member of one of two arbitrary groups, allocated money to members of the two groups, and rated their affiliation with the groups. High levels of HF-HRV were associated with ingroup favouritism while allocating money, an effect largely attributable to a positive relationship between HF-HRV and allocation of money to the ingroup, and less due to a negative relationship between HF-HRV and money allocation to the outgroup. HF-HRV was also associated with increased self-reported affiliation feelings for the ingroup but was unrelated to feelings towards the outgroup. These effects remained substantial even after controlling for age, gender, BMI, mood, caffeine consumption, time of day of data collection, smoking and alcohol behaviour, and respiration rate. Further, the effects were observed regardless of whether participants were primed with caring-related words or not. This study is the first to bridge a long history of research on ingroup favouritism to the relatively recent body of research on cardiac vagal tone by uncovering a positive association between HF-HRV and affiliation with a novel group. PMID:26106891

  17. Sampling Rate of Heart Rate Variability Impacts the Ability to Detect Acidemia in Ovine Fetuses Near-Term

    PubMed Central

    Durosier, L. Daniel; Green, Geoffrey; Batkin, Izmail; Seely, Andrew J.; Ross, Michael G.; Richardson, Bryan S.; Frasch, Martin G.

    2014-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the impact of sampling rate on the predictive capability of continuous fetal heart rate (FHR) variability (fHRV) monitoring for detecting fetal acidemia during labor, we tested the performance of the root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD) in R–R intervals from the ECG when acquired with the sampling rate of 4 Hz currently available in FHR monitors, in comparison to the gold standard of 1000 Hz. Methods: Near-term ovine fetuses (N = 9) were chronically prepared with precordial electrodes for recording ECG, vascular catheters for blood sampling, and an umbilical cord occluder. For 1 min every 2.5 min, animals underwent mild partial umbilical cord occlusions (UCO) × 1 h, moderate partial UCO × 1 h, then complete UCO × 2 h, or until arterial pH reached <7.00. Arterial blood samples were drawn at baseline and every 20 min during the UCO series. RMSSD was calculated continuously in 5 min windows using an automated, standardized system (CIMVA.com). Results are presented as mean ± SEM with significance assumed for p < 0.05. Results: Repetitive UCO resulted in pH decreasing from 7.35 ± 0.01 to 7.00 ± 0.03. In all nine animals, RMSSD increased from 16.7 ± 1.0 ms at baseline to 44.4 ± 2.3 ms, 70 ± 15 min prior to reaching the pH nadir when sampled at 1000 Hz. When sampled at 4 Hz, RMSSD at baseline measured 36.1 ± 6.0 ms and showed no significant increase during the UCO series until the pH nadir was reached. Consequently, early detection of severe hypoxic-acidemia would have been missed in all fetuses. Conclusion: RMSSD as a measure of fHRV when calculated from FHR sampled at 1000 Hz allowed for the early detection of worsening hypoxic-acidemia in each fetus. However, when calculated at the low sampling rate of 4 Hz used clinically, RMSSD remained unchanged until terminally when the nadir pH was reached. For early detection of fetal acidemia during labor, more sensitive means of acquiring FHR are therefore recommended than currently deployed, e.g., trans-abdominal fetal ECG. PMID:24829897

  18. Short-Term Heart Rate Variability in a Population-Based Sample of 10-Year-Old Children

    PubMed Central

    Jarrin, Denise C.; Poirier, Paul; Séguin, Louise; Tremblay, Richard E.; Montplaisir, Jacques Y.; Paradis, Gilles; Séguin, Jean R.

    2014-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) is a non-invasive quantitative marker of cardiac autonomic function derived from continuous electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings. Normative HRV values and development factors have not been established in pediatric populations. The objective was to derive referent time- and frequency-domain HRV values for a population-based sample of children. Children aged 9–11 years (N = 1,036) participated in the Québec Longitudinal Study of Child Development cohort cardiovascular health screening. Registered nurses measured anthropometrics (height, weight) and children wore an ambulatory Holter monitor to continuously record an ECG signal. HRV variables included time (SDNN, pNN50, RMSSD, SDANN) and frequency (HF, LF, LF/HF ratio) domain variables. Normative HRV values, stratified by age, sex, and heart rate, are presented. Greater heart rate (βavg = −0.60, Ravg2=0.39), pubertal maturation (βavg = −0.11, Ravg2=0.01), later ECG recording times (βavg = −0.19, Ravg2=0.07), and higher diastolic blood pressure (βavg = −0.11, Ravg2=0.01) were significantly associated with reduced HRV in 10-year-old children. The normative HRV values permit clinicians to monitor, describe, and establish pediatric nosologies in primary care and research settings, which may improve treatment of diseases associated with HRV in children. By better understanding existing values, the practical applicability of HRV among clinicians will be enhanced. Lastly, developmental (e.g., puberty) and procedural (e.g., recording time) factors were identified that will improve recording procedures and interpretation of results. PMID:25056158

  19. Evaluating Individual Training Adaptation With Smartphone-Derived Heart Rate Variability in a Collegiate Female Soccer Team.

    PubMed

    Flatt, Andrew A; Esco, Michael R

    2016-02-01

    Flatt, AA and Esco, MR. Evaluating individual training adaptation with Smartphone-derived heart rate variability in a collegiate female soccer team. J Strength Cond Res 30(2): 378-385, 2016-Monitoring individual responses throughout training may provide insight to coaches regarding how athletes are coping to the current program. It is unclear if the evolution of heart rate variability (HRV) throughout training in team-sport athletes can be useful in providing early indications of individual adaptation. This study evaluated relationships between changes in resting cardiac autonomic markers derived from a novel smartphone device within the first 3 weeks of a 5-week conditioning program and the eventual change in intermittent running performance at week 5 among 12 collegiate female soccer players. Change variables from weeks 1 to 3 of the weekly mean and weekly coefficient of variation for resting heart rate ([INCREMENT]RHRmean and [INCREMENT]RHRcv, respectively) and log-transformed root mean square of successive R-R intervals multiplied by 20 ([INCREMENT]Ln rMSSDmean and [INCREMENT]Ln rMSSDcv, respectively) were compared with changes in Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test Level 1 performance ([INCREMENT]Yo-Yo). A very large and significant correlation was found between [INCREMENT]Yo-Yo and [INCREMENT]Ln rMSSDcv (r = -0.74; p = <0.01) and a large nonsignificant correlation was found with [INCREMENT]Ln rMSSDmean (r = 0.50; p = 0.096). This study suggests that a decrease in Ln rMSSDcv within the first 3 weeks of training is a favorable response, indicative of positive adaptation. Collecting daily HRV data with a smartphone application using ultrashort HRV measures seems useful for athlete monitoring. PMID:26200192

  20. Short-term heart rate variability in a population-based sample of 10-year-old children.

    PubMed

    Jarrin, Denise C; McGrath, Jennifer J; Poirier, Paul; Séguin, Louise; Tremblay, Richard E; Montplaisir, Jacques Y; Paradis, Gilles; Séguin, Jean R

    2015-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) is a non-invasive quantitative marker of cardiac autonomic function derived from continuous electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings. Normative HRV values and development factors have not been established in pediatric populations. The objective was to derive referent time- and frequency-domain HRV values for a population-based sample of children. Children aged 9-11 years (N = 1,036) participated in the Québec Longitudinal Study of Child Development cohort cardiovascular health screening. Registered nurses measured anthropometrics (height, weight) and children wore an ambulatory Holter monitor to continuously record an ECG signal. HRV variables included time (SDNN, pNN50, RMSSD, SDANN) and frequency (HF, LF, LF/HF ratio) domain variables. Normative HRV values, stratified by age, sex, and heart rate, are presented. Greater heart rate (β avg  = -0.60, R avg (2)  = 0.39), pubertal maturation (β avg = -0.11, R avg (2)  = 0.01), later ECG recording times (β avg = -0.19, R avg (2)  = 0.07), and higher diastolic blood pressure (β avg = -0.11, R avg (2)  = 0.01) were significantly associated with reduced HRV in 10-year-old children. The normative HRV values permit clinicians to monitor, describe, and establish pediatric nosologies in primary care and research settings, which may improve treatment of diseases associated with HRV in children. By better understanding existing values, the practical applicability of HRV among clinicians will be enhanced. Lastly, developmental (e.g., puberty) and procedural (e.g., recording time) factors were identified that will improve recording procedures and interpretation of results. PMID:25056158

  1. A variable fork rate affects timing of origin firing and S phase dynamics in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Supady, Adriana; Klipp, Edda; Barberis, Matteo

    2013-10-20

    Activation (in the following referred to as firing) of replication origins is a continuous and irreversible process regulated by availability of DNA replication molecules and cyclin-dependent kinase activities, which are often altered in human cancers. The temporal, progressive origin firing throughout S phase appears as a characteristic replication profile, and computational models have been developed to describe this process. Although evidence from yeast to human indicates that a range of replication fork rates is observed experimentally in order to complete a timely S phase, those models incorporate velocities that are uniform across the genome. Taking advantage of the availability of replication profiles, chromosomal position and replication timing, here we investigated how fork rate may affect origin firing in budding yeast. Our analysis suggested that patterns of origin firing can be observed from a modulation of the fork rate that strongly correlates with origin density. Replication profiles of chromosomes with a low origin density were fitted with a variable fork rate, whereas for the ones with a high origin density a constant fork rate was appropriate. This indeed supports the previously reported correlation between inter-origin distance and fork rate changes. Intriguingly, the calculated correlation between fork rate and timing of origin firing allowed the estimation of firing efficiencies for the replication origins. This approach correctly retrieved origin efficiencies previously determined for chromosome VI and provided testable prediction for other chromosomal origins. Our results gain deeper insights into the temporal coordination of genome duplication, indicating that control of the replication fork rate is required for the timely origin firing during S phase. PMID:23850861

  2. The effect of heart rate variability biofeedback on performance psychology of basketball players.

    PubMed

    Paul, Maman; Garg, Kanupriya

    2012-06-01

    Coping with pressure and anxiety is an ineluctable demand of sports performance. Heart rate variability (HRV) Biofeedback (BFB) shall be used as a tool for self regulating physiological responses resulting in improved psycho physiological interactions. For further analysis, the present study has been designed to examine the relationship between anxiety and performance and also effectiveness of biofeedback protocol to create stress-eliciting situation in basketball players. Thirty basketball players of university level and above (both male and female) aged 18-28 years, who scored a minimum of 20 in state trait anxiety inventory, were randomly divided into three equal groups- Experimental (Biofeedback) group, Placebo group and Control (No Treatment) group. The BFB group received HRV BFB training for 10 consecutive days for 20 min that included breathing at individual's resonant frequency through a pacing stimulus; Placebo group was shown motivational video clips for 10 consecutive days for 10 min, whereas No Treatment Control group was not given any intervention. Two way repeated measure ANOVA was applied to analyze the differences within and between the groups. Anxiety, coping self-efficacy, heart rate variability, respiration rate, and performance (dribbling, passing and shooting) at session 1, 10 and 1 month follow up were statistically significant in each group along with interaction of group and time (p < 0.001). Also, all the measures showed statistically significant inter group difference (p < 0.05). The findings are harmonious with existing data on HRV BFB as a strategy for dealing with anxiety. The Placebo group showed improvement in self efficacy and performance post training. The Control group showed no change in any variable except performance. The results of the study support the idea that HRV BFB lowers the anxiety and thus there seems to be a potential association between HRV BFB and performance optimization. PMID:22402913

  3. Not so fast! Talker variability in serial recall at standard presentation rates.

    PubMed

    Mogensen, Claire; Miller, Leonie M; Roodenrys, Steven

    2015-03-01

    In serial recall tasks, presenting items in alternating female and male voices impairs performance relative to the single-voice presentation. This phenomenon, termed the talker-variability effect (TVE), was recently reexamined by Hughes, Marsh, and Jones (2009, 2011), who used the effect as confirmatory evidence for their perceptual-gestural account of serial recall performance. Despite the authors' claim of generalisability, the serial recall paradigm employed did not reflect the standard parameters more generally adopted in verbal short-term memory research. Specifically, the presentation rate of the stimuli was almost 3 times that typically used. We sought to determine if the TVE, as observed by Hughes et al., was generalisable to the standard serial recall task by directly comparing recall performance in talker-variable conditions at fast and slow stimulus presentation rates. Experiment 1 employed a systematic replication of the foundational study undertaken by Hughes et al. (2009). Utilising a novel stimulus set, Experiment 2 provided a subsequent test of the generalisability of the TVE, examining the influence of item properties. Both experiments showed a robust TVE at the atypical fast presentation rate; however, for the slower item presentation, the TVE was unreliable. Furthermore, error analysis suggests that item recall also contributes to the TVE, contrary to the current explanation proposed by Hughes et al. (2009, 2011). The challenge of the present data to the perceptual-gestural account of the TVE is explored. Alternative accounts that focus on the resource cost of categorical speech perception in the context of talker variability are posited. PMID:25730639

  4. Heart rate variability as a predictor of hypotension after spinal anesthesia in hypertensive patients

    PubMed Central

    Kweon, Tae Dong; Kim, So Yeon; Cho, Sung Ah; Kim, Ji Hoon; Kang, Young Ran

    2013-01-01

    Background Hypotension is a common phenomenon after spinal anesthesia in hypertensive patients. We investigated whether heart rate variability could predict the occurrence of hypotension after spinal anesthesia in hypertensive patients. Methods Forty-one patients undergoing spinal anesthesia were included. Heart rate variability was measured at five different time points such as before fluid loading (baseline), after fluid loading as well as 5 min, 15 min and 30 min after spinal anesthesia. Fluid loading was performed using 5 ml/kg of a crystalloid solution. Baseline total power and low to high frequency ratio (LF/HF) in predicting hypotension after spinal anesthesia were analyzed by calculating the area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC). Results Moderate hypotension, defined as a decrease of mean arterial pressure to below 20-30% of the baseline, occurred in 13 patients and severe hypotension, defined as a decrease of mean arterial pressure greater than 30% below the baseline, occurred in 7 patients. LF/HF ratiosand total powers did not significantly change after spinal anesthesia. AUCs of LF/HF ratio for predicting moderate hypotension was 0.685 (P = 0.074), severe hypotension was 0.579 (P = 0.560) and moderate or severe hypotension was 0.652 (P = 0.101), respectively. AUCs of total power for predicting moderate hypotension was 0.571 (P = 0.490), severe hypotension was 0.672 (P = 0.351) and moderate or severe hypotension was 0.509 (P = 0.924), respectively. Conclusions Heart rate variability is not a reliable predictor of hypotension after spinal block in hypertensive patients whose sympathetic activity is already depressed. PMID:24228144

  5. Temporal variability of transformation, formation, and subduction rates of upper Southern Ocean waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Eun Young

    2013-11-01

    Kinematic and thermodynamic approaches are employed to diagnose the time-dependent transformation, formation, and subduction rates of upper Southern Ocean waters in a multidecadal simulation within an eddy-permitting coupled climate model. In the Subantarctic Mode Water (SAMW) density class, a convergence of diapycnal volume fluxes leads to the formation and inflation of mixed layer waters during winter. A portion of this water is detrained into the pycnocline during early spring, when surface heating restratifies the deep winter mixed layer. The annually averaged subduction rate of SAMW shows pronounced interannual variability, partly controlled by the temporal tendency of the winter mixed layer depth from one year to the next. No significant correlation between the Southern Annular Mode (SAM) and the isopycnally integrated SAMW subduction rate is apparent. However, Ekman downwelling/upwelling intensities modulated by the SAM influence interannual variations in the subduction rates of water masses lighter and heavier than SAMW with an opposing sign: during positive phases of the SAM, more pycnocline waters are entrained into the mixed layer and transformed into lighter densities within the Antarctic Intermediate Water density class, whereas more mixed layer waters are subducted into the pycnocline within the Subtropical Mode Water density class. Such distinct responses of upper Southern Ocean water masses to the SAM are qualitatively consistent with observational constraints. Based on a comparison between offline kinematic and thermodynamic diagnostics, we infer that diapycnal mixing within the mixed layer may contribute up to 50% of the formation rate of SAMW on interannual timescales.

  6. Gas Pressure Profile Prediction from Variable Strain Rate Deformation Paths in AA5083 Bulge Forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarrar, F. S.; Hector, L. G.; Khraisheh, M. K.; Deshpande, K.

    2012-11-01

    Two approaches to gas pressure profile prediction for bulge forming of AA5083 sheet under Quick Plastic Forming (QPF) conditions at 450 C were investigated. The first was based on an algorithm internal to ABAQUS wherein the gas pressure results from maintaining a constant effective target strain rate at the dome pole. In the second, the nonlinear long wavelength stability analysis was combined with a single creep mechanism material model that accounts for hardening/softening. A series of stability curves, which denote combinations of strain and strain rate for unmitigated thinning and, ultimately, rupture of an AA5083 bar, were computed. These are based on a parameter that characterizes an assumed geometric non-uniformity, ?. The associated uniaxial strains and strain rates were expressed in terms of von Mises effective strains and strains rates, and pressure profiles were computed. An ancillary approach to variable strain rate path prediction based on a thinning factor was used to suggest a suitable value of ? in the stability analysis for a reasonable thinning level at the end of forming. Key advantages and disadvantages of both approaches to pressure profile prediction are examined relative to bulge forming time and thinning at a 50-mm dome displacement.

  7. Do heart and respiratory rate variability improve prediction of extubation outcomes in critically ill patients?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Prolonged ventilation and failed extubation are associated with increased harm and cost. The added value of heart and respiratory rate variability (HRV and RRV) during spontaneous breathing trials (SBTs) to predict extubation failure remains unknown. Methods We enrolled 721 patients in a multicenter (12 sites), prospective, observational study, evaluating clinical estimates of risk of extubation failure, physiologic measures recorded during SBTs, HRV and RRV recorded before and during the last SBT prior to extubation, and extubation outcomes. We excluded 287 patients because of protocol or technical violations, or poor data quality. Measures of variability (97 HRV, 82 RRV) were calculated from electrocardiogram and capnography waveforms followed by automated cleaning and variability analysis using Continuous Individualized Multiorgan Variability Analysis (CIMVA) software. Repeated randomized subsampling with training, validation, and testing were used to derive and compare predictive models. Results Of 434 patients with high-quality data, 51 (12%) failed extubation. Two HRV and eight RRV measures showed statistically significant association with extubation failure (P <0.0041, 5% false discovery rate). An ensemble average of five univariate logistic regression models using RRV during SBT, yielding a probability of extubation failure (called WAVE score), demonstrated optimal predictive capacity. With repeated random subsampling and testing, the model showed mean receiver operating characteristic area under the curve (ROC AUC) of 0.69, higher than heart rate (0.51), rapid shallow breathing index (RBSI; 0.61) and respiratory rate (0.63). After deriving a WAVE model based on all data, training-set performance demonstrated that the model increased its predictive power when applied to patients conventionally considered high risk: a WAVE score >0.5 in patients with RSBI >105 and perceived high risk of failure yielded a fold increase in risk of extubation failure of 3.0 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2 to 5.2) and 3.5 (95% CI 1.9 to 5.4), respectively. Conclusions Altered HRV and RRV (during the SBT prior to extubation) are significantly associated with extubation failure. A predictive model using RRV during the last SBT provided optimal accuracy of prediction in all patients, with improved accuracy when combined with clinical impression or RSBI. This model requires a validation cohort to evaluate accuracy and generalizability. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01237886. Registered 13 October 2010. PMID:24713049

  8. Assessment of variable camber for application to transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The potential benefits were determined for the variable camber of commercial transport airplanes designed for intercontinental and domestic missions. A variable camber concept was developed and incorporated into airplanes designed for the two missions. Benefits were evaluated by comparing the mission performance and direct operating costs for the variable camber airplanes with those for reference airplanes designed for the same missions but having fixed geometry high speed wings. Several technical uncertainties associated with implementing variable camber were also examined.

  9. Heart Rate Variability Is Associated with Exercise Capacity in Patients with Cardiac Syndrome X.

    PubMed

    Lu, Dai-Yin; Yang, Albert C; Cheng, Hao-Min; Lu, Tse-Min; Yu, Wen-Chung; Chen, Chen-Huan; Sung, Shih-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) reflects the healthiness of autonomic nervous system, which is associated with exercise capacity. We therefore investigated whether HRV could predict the exercise capacity in the adults with cardiac syndrome X (CSX). A total of 238 subjects (5712 years, 67.8% men), who were diagnosed as CSX by the positive exercise stress test and nearly normal coronary angiogram were enrolled. Power spectrum from the 24-hour recording of heart rate was analyzed in frequency domain using total power (TP) and spectral components of the very low frequency (VLF), low frequency (LF) and high frequency (HF) ranges. Among the study population, 129 subjects with impaired exercise capacity during the treadmill test had significantly lower HRV indices than those with preserved exercise capacity (?90% of the age predicted maximal heart rate). After accounting for age, sex, and baseline SBP and heart rate, VLF (odds ratio per 1SD and 95% CI: 2.02, 1.19-3.42), LF (1.67, 1.10-2.55), and TP (1.82, 1.17-2.83) remained significantly associated with preserved exercise capacity. In addition, increased HRV indices were also associated with increased exercise duration, rate-pressure product, and heart rate recovery, independent of age, body mass index, and baseline SBP and heart rate. In subgroup analysis, HRV indices demonstrated similar predictive values related to exercise capacity across various subpopulations, especially in the young. In patients with CSX, HRV was independently associated with exercise capacity, especially in young subjects. The healthiness of autonomic nervous system may have a role in modulating the exercise capacity in patients with CSX. PMID:26812652

  10. Heart Rate Variability Is Associated with Exercise Capacity in Patients with Cardiac Syndrome X

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Hao-Min; Yu, Wen-Chung; Chen, Chen-Huan

    2016-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) reflects the healthiness of autonomic nervous system, which is associated with exercise capacity. We therefore investigated whether HRV could predict the exercise capacity in the adults with cardiac syndrome X (CSX). A total of 238 subjects (57±12 years, 67.8% men), who were diagnosed as CSX by the positive exercise stress test and nearly normal coronary angiogram were enrolled. Power spectrum from the 24-hour recording of heart rate was analyzed in frequency domain using total power (TP) and spectral components of the very low frequency (VLF), low frequency (LF) and high frequency (HF) ranges. Among the study population, 129 subjects with impaired exercise capacity during the treadmill test had significantly lower HRV indices than those with preserved exercise capacity (≥90% of the age predicted maximal heart rate). After accounting for age, sex, and baseline SBP and heart rate, VLF (odds ratio per 1SD and 95% CI: 2.02, 1.19–3.42), LF (1.67, 1.10–2.55), and TP (1.82, 1.17–2.83) remained significantly associated with preserved exercise capacity. In addition, increased HRV indices were also associated with increased exercise duration, rate-pressure product, and heart rate recovery, independent of age, body mass index, and baseline SBP and heart rate. In subgroup analysis, HRV indices demonstrated similar predictive values related to exercise capacity across various subpopulations, especially in the young. In patients with CSX, HRV was independently associated with exercise capacity, especially in young subjects. The healthiness of autonomic nervous system may have a role in modulating the exercise capacity in patients with CSX. PMID:26812652

  11. Continuous-variable quantum key distribution with 1 Mbps secure key rate.

    PubMed

    Huang, Duan; Lin, Dakai; Wang, Chao; Liu, Weiqi; Fang, Shuanghong; Peng, Jinye; Huang, Peng; Zeng, Guihua

    2015-06-29

    We report the first continuous-variable quantum key distribution (CVQKD) experiment to enable the creation of 1 Mbps secure key rate over 25 km standard telecom fiber in a coarse wavelength division multiplexers (CWDM) environment. The result is achieved with two major technological advances: the use of a 1 GHz shot-noise-limited homodyne detector and the implementation of a 50 MHz clock system. The excess noise due to noise photons from local oscillator and classical data channels in CWDM is controlled effectively. We note that the experimental verification of high-bit-rate CVQKD in the multiplexing environment is a significant step closer toward large-scale deployment in fiber networks. PMID:26191758

  12. Atypical pupillary light reflex and heart rate variability in children with autism spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    Daluwatte, Chathuri; Miles, Judith H.; Christ, Shawn E.; Beversdorf, David Q.; Takahashi, T. Nicole; Yao, Gang

    2012-01-01

    We investigated pupillary light reflex (PLR) in 152 children with ASD, 116 typically developing (TD) children, and 36 children with non-ASD neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs). Heart rate variability (HRV) was measured simultaneously to study potential impairments in the autonomic nervous system (ANS) associated with ASD. The results showed that the ASD group had significantly longer PLR latency, reduced relative constriction amplitude, and shorter constriction/redilation time than those of the TD group. Similar atypical PLR parameters were observed in the NDD group. A significant age effect on PLR latency was observed in children younger than 9 years in the TD group, but not in the ASD and NDD groups. Atypical HRV parameters were observed in the ASD and NDD groups. A significant negative correlation existed between the PLR constriction amplitude and average heart rate in children with an ASD, but not in children with typical development. PMID:23248075

  13. Differences between breeds of dog in a measure of heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Doxey, S; Boswood, A

    2004-06-01

    The vasovagal tonus index (VVTI), a time-domain indicator of heart rate variability, was measured in 92 dogs of six breeds (German shepherd dogs, labrador retrievers, cocker spaniels, boxers, bulldogs and cavalier King Charles spaniels). There was a significant difference in VVTI between the six breeds (P = 0.003). Brachycephalic dogs had a higher VVTI than other types of dog (P < 0.005), and when comparing individual breeds brachycephalic breeds tended to have a higher VVTI than non-brachycephalic breeds, although the difference was not always significant. The VVTI was negatively correlated with heart rate (P < 0.01) and dogs suffering from congestive heart failure had a lower VVTI than other dogs, whether compared within or between breeds (P < 0.01). PMID:15214514

  14. Individual differences in heart rate variability are associated with the avoidance of negative emotional events.

    PubMed

    Katahira, Kentaro; Fujimura, Tomomi; Matsuda, Yoshi-Taka; Okanoya, Kazuo; Okada, Masato

    2014-12-01

    Although the emotional outcome of a choice generally affects subsequent decisions, humans can inhibit the influence of emotion. Heart rate variability (HRV) has emerged as an objective measure of individual differences in the capacity for inhibitory control. In the present study, we investigated how individual differences in HRV at rest are associated with the emotional effects of the outcome of a choice on subsequent decision making using a decision-making task in which emotional pictures appeared as decision outcomes. We used a reinforcement learning model to characterize the observed behaviors according to several parameters, namely, the learning rate and the motivational value of positive and negative pictures. Consequently, we found that individuals with a lower resting HRV exhibited a greater negative motivational value in response to negative pictures, suggesting that these individuals tend to avoid negative pictures compared with individuals with a higher resting HRV. PMID:25457639

  15. Considerations in the assessment of heart rate variability in biobehavioral research

    PubMed Central

    Quintana, Daniel S.; Heathers, James A. J.

    2014-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) refers to various methods of assessing the beat-to-beat variation in the heart over time, in order to draw inference on the outflow of the autonomic nervous system. Easy access to measuring HRV has led to a plethora of studies within emotion science and psychology assessing autonomic regulation, but significant caveats exist due to the complicated nature of HRV. Firstly, both breathing and blood pressure regulation have their own relationship to social, emotional, and cognitive experiments if this is the case are we observing heart rate (HR) changes as a consequence of breathing changes? Secondly, experiments often have poor internal and external controls. In this review we highlight the interrelationships between HR and respiration, as well as presenting recommendations for researchers to use when collecting data for HRV assessment. Namely, we highlight the superior utility of within-subjects designs along with the importance of establishing an appropriate baseline and monitoring respiration. PMID:25101047

  16. Towards an objective measurement of emotional stress: Preliminary analysis based on heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Arza, A; Garzon, J M; Hemando, A; Aguilo, J; Bailon, R

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a study performed in 25 young healthy subjects measuring the evolution of heart rate variability (HRV) indices during emotional stress. Acute emotional stress was generated with a modified version of Trier Social Stress Test (TSST). The TSST comprises several tasks which include a memory test, anticipation of stress, public exposition, and an arithmetic task. Each task has different demanding conditions, carrying subjects' emotional stress to different states. An autogenic relaxation was done before TSST. Significant differences in HRV indices were observed in the arithmetic and memory task with respect to the relaxation stage. In particular during the arithmetic task, mean heart rate increased 22% (p-value <;0.00001) the power in the very low frequency band increased 47% (p-value <;0.00001 and normalized power in the low frequency (LF) band increased 19% (p-value <;0.04). These results support a sympathetic activation during these tasks. PMID:26737005

  17. Synoptic-scale variability of satellite-derived sea-ice deformation rates in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, A.; G?owacki, O.

    2012-04-01

    Observational data show that deformation of the compact sea ice covering the central Arctic takes place within elongated, narrow zones separating semi-rigid floes. Localization of deformation, and a related intermittent character of internal stress in the ice, cannot be satisfactorily reproduced with present state-of-the-art numerical models, especially those based on various versions of viscous-plastic rheology. Similarly, sea-ice models do not reproduce properly the observed power-law tails of deformation-rate probability distributions (pdfs), with a slope depending on the scale of the observation. In order to be able to improve the models, one needs: (i) relevant quantitative measures of ice deformation rates that the models should aim to reproduce; (ii) a better understanding of the time variability of those measures (existing studies are usually limited to the analysis of single events) and their dependence on changes of the external forcing and of the properties of the ice itself. In this study, we use gridded sea-ice total deformation rates from the RGPS data provided by the RADARSAT-1 satellite, available for 11 winter seasons with a time resolution of 3 days and a spatial resolution of 12.55 km. The analysis is based on deformation-rate pdfs obtained by means of a rank-order analysis of the data for each snapshot in the dataset. We analyze the time variability of: (i) the slope of the power-law tails of the pdfs, estimated with a maximum-likelihood method; and (ii) the moments of the pdfs for a range of exponents q and spatial scales L from the original mesh size to approximately 1000 km. In all analyzed cases, the slope of the moments as a function of the length scale L increases (faster than linearly) with increasing power q. However, the tempo of this increase can be very different. Generally, there are two distinct, dominating patterns of variability, with the first pattern describing the overall level of deformation, and the second one being generally small, but peaking a number of times during a typical winter, during short periods of intense deformation. Further, we demonstrate that the moments of sea-ice deformation pdfs are highly correlated (with correlation coefficients in the order of 0.6-0.7) with a very simple quantity characterizing the strength of the atmospheric forcing on the ice, namely with the area-averaged 10-m wind speed over the Arctic Ocean. Finally, we sketch a theoretical explanation for the observed relationships between the sea-ice deformation rates and the wind forcing, based on simplified momentum equations and a very general rheology model of sea ice.

  18. Changing Geomagnetic Field and Heart Rates Variability in Healthy Volunteers: A Pilot Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordanova, Malina; Zenchenko, Tatiana; Poskotinova, Lilia; Medvedeva, Anna; Uzunov, Todor; Alenikova, Alexandra

    Space Climate is an interdisciplinary science that deals with the long-term change in the Sun, and its effects in the near-Earth environment, including possible effects on human health. This paper will present the first results from simultaneous experiments performed at 3 different locations - Sofia, Bulgaria 42° 40' N 23° 20' E; Moscow, Russia 55° 45' N 37° 36‘ E and Arkhangelsk, Russia 64° 34' N / 40° 32' E. Subjects are 5 healthy volunteers, women, mean age 39,4 years. The experiments are part of the project “Heliobiology” (2011 - 2015) that reflects the intense interest towards the influence of solar activity and meteorology on the human health. The aim of the experiments is to study the degree of conjugation of the heart rate variability and the variations of the geomagnetic field. To minimize the experimental bias one and the same hard- and software were applied during the testing. ECG signals were recorder via "KARDI-2", the software package is "Ecosan-2007", both developed by "Medical Computer Systems", Zelenograd, Russia. The duration of the observations ranged from 60 to 120 minutes. A comparison of the dynamics of the minute variations of the heart rate with the horizontal components of the geomagnetic field vector revealed a synchronization of some of the research parameters as well as specific individual differences. Despite of the small sample size (5 subjects per 8 measures), in over 70% of the experimental data a similar patterns of variation of geophysical and heart rate variability were recorded. The experiments discussed involved healthy volunteers, i.e. people that have good adaptation reserves, and the response to variation of geomagnetic field will not push them beyond the physiological norms. The observed effect of synchronization of heart rate fluctuations of healthy subjects with fluctuations of geomagnetic field may give an effective tool to address further one especially interesting problems - the mechanism of geomagnetic sensitivity.

  19. 78 FR 17724 - Ivy Funds Variable Insurance Portfolios, et al.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Ivy Funds Variable Insurance Portfolios, et al.; Notice of Application March 15, 2013 . AGENCY... Variable Insurance Portfolios (the ``Trust''), Waddell & Reed Investment Management Company...

  20. Periodic spectral components of fetal heart rate variability reflect the changes in cord arterial base deficit values: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Rantonen, T; Ekholm, E; Siira, S; Metsl, T; Leino, R; Ekblad, U; Vlimki, I

    2001-01-01

    Fetal distress changes the function of the autonomic nervous system. These changes are reflected in the fetal heart rate and can be quantified with power spectrum analysis of heart rate variability. The purpose of this study was to find out whether spectral components of fetal heart rate variability (FHRV) during labor are associated with fetal cord arterial base deficit values at birth. The association between FHRV and umbilical cord arterial base deficit was studied in 14 singleton fetuses with normal pregnancy at 35-40 weeks of gestation. Fetal ECG was recorded by scalp-electrode using a STAN Fetal ECG monitor (Cinventa Ab, Mlndal, Sweden). FHRV was quantified by computing Fast-Fourier-transformed heart rate (HR) spectra at three frequency bands: low-frequency (LF) 0.03-0.07 Hz, mid-frequency (MF) 0.07-0.13 Hz and high-frequency (HF) 0.13-1.0 Hz. We found that total FHRV and MF FHRV were lower in fetuses with cord arterial base deficit 8 to 12 mmol/L in comparison to the fetuses with normal cord arterial base deficit value (P=0.02 and P=0.01, respectively). A linear correlation was found between the spectral densities and the cord arterial base deficit values (r=0.4 and r=0.6, respectively). We conclude that the results suggest changes in the autonomic nervous cardiac control in fetuses with cord arterial base deficit between 8 to 12 mmol/L. The clinical applicability of our observations on FHRV in predicting fetal distress remains to be further studied. PMID:11146242

  1. Heart rate variability dynamics during low-dose propofol and dexmedetomidine anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Tarvainen, Mika P; Georgiadis, Stefanos; Laitio, Timo; Lipponen, Jukka A; Karjalainen, Pasi A; Kaskinoro, Kimmo; Scheinin, Harry

    2012-08-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) has been observed to decrease during anesthesia, but changes in HRV during loss and recovery of consciousness have not been studied in detail. In this study, HRV dynamics during low-dose propofol (N = 10) and dexmedetomidine (N = 9) anesthesia were estimated by using time-varying methods. Standard time-domain and frequency-domain measures of HRV were included in the analysis. Frequency-domain parameters like low frequency (LF) and high frequency (HF) component powers were extracted from time-varying spectrum estimates obtained with a Kalman smoother algorithm. The Kalman smoother is a parametric spectrum estimation approach based on time-varying autoregressive (AR) modeling. Prior to loss of consciousness, an increase in HF component power indicating increase in vagal control of heart rate (HR) was observed for both anesthetics. The relative increase of vagal control over sympathetic control of HR was overall larger for dexmedetomidine which is in line with the known sympatholytic effect of this anesthetic. Even though the inter-individual variability in the HRV parameters was substantial, the results suggest the usefulness of HRV analysis in monitoring dexmedetomidine anesthesia. PMID:22419196

  2. Heart Rate Variability in Sleeping Preterm Neonates Exposed to Cool and Warm Thermal Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Stphan-Blanchard, Erwan; Chardon, Karen; Lk, Andr; Delanaud, Stphane; Bach, Vronique; Telliez, Frdric

    2013-01-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) remains the main cause of postneonatal infant death. Thermal stress is a major risk factor and makes infants more vulnerable to SIDS. Although it has been suggested that thermal stress could lead to SIDS by disrupting autonomic functions, clinical and physiopathological data on this hypothesis are scarce. We evaluated the influence of ambient temperature on autonomic nervous activity during sleep in thirty-four preterm neonates (mean SD gestational age: 31.41.5 weeks, postmenstrual age: 36.20.9 weeks). Heart rate variability was assessed as a function of the sleep stage at three different ambient temperatures (thermoneutrality and warm and cool thermal conditions). An elevated ambient temperature was associated with a higher basal heart rate and lower short- and long-term variability in all sleep stages, together with higher sympathetic activity and lower parasympathetic activity. Our study results showed that modification of the ambient temperature led to significant changes in autonomic nervous system control in sleeping preterm neonates. The latter changes are very similar to those observed in infants at risk of SIDS. Our findings may provide greater insight into the thermally-induced disease mechanisms related to SIDS and may help improve prevention strategies. PMID:23840888

  3. Spatiotemporal variability of the organic matter and the rates of its transformation in the Ob Inlet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agatova, A. I.; Lapina, N. M.; Torgunova, N. I.

    2013-03-01

    The data on the qualitative and quantitative variability of the organic matter (OM) and its transformation rates in the waters of the Ob Inlet during different seasons are considered. The OM distribution was quite nonuniform over the entire Ob Inlet aquatic area: the concentrations of Corg varied from 2.8 to 14.1 mg/L and from 0.32 to 4.59 mg/L for the dissolved and particulate forms, respectively. The maximum concentrations of dissolved OM were registered in the main flow of the Ob River water supplied to the bay, whereas the minimum concentrations were characteristic for the near-bottom layers formed by the Kara Sea waters of high salinity in the northern part of the bay. Both in the summer and in the autumn, the fraction of particulate matter within the total OM reached its maximum values in the mixing zone of the Taz and Ob riverine waters, as well as in the mixing zone of the Ob River and Kara Sea waters. These boundary zones were characterized by the widest variability of the elemental (C: N: P) and biochemical (proteins and carbohydrates) composition of the OM, as well as of its transformation rates measured by the activities of the enzymes (alkaline phosphatase and the electron transport system).

  4. Heart Rate Variability Correlates to Functional Aerobic Impairment in Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Carreira, Maria Angela Magalhes de Queiroz; Nogueira, Andr Barros; Pena, Felipe Montes; Kiuchi, Marcio Galindo; Rodrigues, Ronaldo Campos; Rodrigues, Rodrigo da Rocha; de Matos, Jorge Paulo Strogoff; Lugon, Jocemir Ronaldo

    2015-01-01

    Background Autonomic dysfunction (AD) is highly prevalent in hemodialysis (HD) patients and has been implicated in their increased risk of cardiovascular mortality. Objective To correlate heart rate variability (HRV) during exercise treadmill test (ETT) with the values obtained when measuring functional aerobic impairment (FAI) in HD patients and controls. Methods Cross-sectional study involving HD patients and a control group. Clinical examination, blood sampling, transthoracic echocardiogram, 24-hour Holter, and ETT were performed. A symptom-limited ramp treadmill protocol with active recovery was employed. Heart rate variability was evaluated in time domain at exercise and recovery periods. Results Forty-one HD patients and 41 controls concluded the study. HD patients had higher FAI and lower HRV than controls (p<0.001 for both). A correlation was found between exercise HRV (SDNN) and FAI in both groups. This association was independent of age, sex, smoking, body mass index, diabetes, and clonidine or beta-blocker use, but not of hemoglobin levels. Conclusion No association was found between FAI and HRV on 24-hour Holter or at the recovery period of ETT. Of note, exercise HRV was inversely correlated with FAI in HD patients and controls. PMID:26131705

  5. Analysis of heart rate variability signal in meditation using second-order difference plot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Damodar Prasad; Tibarewala, Dewaki Nandan; Bhattacharya, Dilip Kumar

    2011-06-01

    In this article, the heart rate variability signal taken from subjects practising different types of meditations have been investigated to find the underlying similarity among them and how they differ from the non-meditative condition. Four different groups of subjects having different meditation techniques are involved. The data have been obtained from the Physionet and also collected with our own ECG machine. For data analysis, the second order difference plot is applied. Each of the plots obtained from the second order differences form a single cluster which is nearly elliptical in shape except for some outliers. In meditation, the axis of the elliptical cluster rotates anticlockwise from the cluster formed from the premeditation data, although the amount of rotation is not of the same extent in every case. This form study reveals definite and specific changes in the heart rate variability of the subjects during meditation. All the four groups of subjects followed different procedures but surprisingly the resulting physiological effect is the same to some extent. It indicates that there is some commonness among all the meditative techniques in spite of their apparent dissimilarity and it may be hoped that each of them leads to the same result as preached by the masters of meditation. The study shows that meditative state has a completely different physiology and that it can be achieved by any meditation technique we have observed. Possible use of this tool in clinical setting such as in stress management and in the treatment of hypertension is also mentioned.

  6. Sleep Quality Estimation based on Chaos Analysis for Heart Rate Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Toshio; Wakuda, Yuki; Hasegawa, Yasuhisa; Arai, Fumihito; Kawaguchi, Mitsuo; Noda, Akiko

    In this paper, we propose an algorithm to estimate sleep quality based on a heart rate variability using chaos analysis. Polysomnography(PSG) is a conventional and reliable system to diagnose sleep disorder and to evaluate its severity and therapeatic effect, by estimating sleep quality based on multiple channels. However, a recording process requires a lot of time and a controlled environment for measurement and then an analyzing process of PSG data is hard work because the huge sensed data should be manually evaluated. On the other hand, it is focused that some people make a mistake or cause an accident due to lost of regular sleep and of homeostasis these days. Therefore a simple home system for checking own sleep is required and then the estimation algorithm for the system should be developed. Therefore we propose an algorithm to estimate sleep quality based only on a heart rate variability which can be measured by a simple sensor such as a pressure sensor and an infrared sensor in an uncontrolled environment, by experimentally finding the relationship between chaos indices and sleep quality. The system including the estimation algorithm can inform patterns and quality of own daily sleep to a user, and then the user can previously arranges his life schedule, pays more attention based on sleep results and consult with a doctor.

  7. Physical Activity, Mindfulness Meditation, or Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback for Stress Reduction: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    van der Zwan, Judith Esi; de Vente, Wieke; Huizink, Anja C; Bgels, Susan M; de Bruin, Esther I

    2015-12-01

    In contemporary western societies stress is highly prevalent, therefore the need for stress-reducing methods is great. This randomized controlled trial compared the efficacy of self-help physical activity (PA), mindfulness meditation (MM), and heart rate variability biofeedback (HRV-BF) in reducing stress and its related symptoms. We randomly allocated 126 participants to PA, MM, or HRV-BF upon enrollment, of whom 76 agreed to participate. The interventions consisted of psycho-education and an introduction to the specific intervention techniques and 5weeks of daily exercises at home. The PA exercises consisted of a vigorous-intensity activity of free choice. The MM exercises consisted of guided mindfulness meditation. The HRV-BF exercises consisted of slow breathing with a heart rate variability biofeedback device. Participants received daily reminders for their exercises and were contacted weekly to monitor their progress. They completed questionnaires prior to, directly after, and 6weeks after the intervention. Results indicated an overall beneficial effect consisting of reduced stress, anxiety and depressive symptoms, and improved psychological well-being and sleep quality. No significant between-intervention effect was found, suggesting that PA, MM, and HRV-BF are equally effective in reducing stress and its related symptoms. These self-help interventions provide easily accessible help for people with stress complaints. PMID:26111942

  8. Second ventilatory threshold from heart-rate variability: valid when the upper body is involved?

    PubMed

    Mourot, Laurent; Fabre, Nicolas; Savoldelli, Aldo; Schena, Federico

    2014-07-01

    To determine the most accurate method based on spectral analysis of heart-rate variability (SA-HRV) during an incremental and continuous maximal test involving the upper body, the authors tested 4 different methods to obtain the heart rate (HR) at the second ventilatory threshold (VT(2)). Sixteen ski mountaineers (mean SD; age 25 3 y, height 177 8 cm, mass 69 10 kg) performed a roller-ski test on a treadmill. Respiratory variables and HR were continuously recorded, and the 4 SA-HRV methods were compared with the gas-exchange method through Bland and Altman analyses. The best method was the one based on a time-varying spectral analysis with high frequency ranging from 0.15 Hz to a cutoff point relative to the individual's respiratory sinus arrhythmia. The HR values were significantly correlated (r(2) = .903), with a mean HR difference with the respiratory method of 0.1 3.0 beats/min and low limits of agreements (around -6 /+6 beats/min). The 3 other methods led to larger errors and lower agreements (up to 5 beats/min and around -23/+20 beats/min). It is possible to accurately determine VT(2) with an HR monitor during an incremental test involving the upper body if the appropriate HRV method is used. PMID:24231307

  9. Scattering transform for intrapartum fetal heart rate variability fractal analysis: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Chud?ek, Vclav; Andn, Joakim; Mallat, Stphane; Abry, Patrice; Doret, Muriel

    2014-04-01

    Intrapartum fetal heart rate monitoring, aiming at early acidosis detection, constitutes an important public health stake. Scattering transform is proposed here as a new tool to analyze intrapartum fetal heart rate (FHR) variability. It consists of a nonlinear extension of the underlying wavelet transform, that thus preserves its multiscale nature. Applied to an FHR signal database constructed in a French academic hospital, the scattering transform is shown to permit to efficiently measure scaling exponents characterizing the fractal properties of intrapartum FHR temporal dynamics, that relate not only to the sole covariance (correlation scaling exponent), but also to the full dependence structure of data (intermittency scaling exponent). Such exponents are found to satisfactorily discriminate temporal dynamics of healthy subjects (from that of nonhealthy ones) and to emphasize the role of the highest frequencies (around and above 1 Hz) in intrapartum FHR variability. This permits us to achieve satisfactory classification performance that improves on those obtained from the analysis of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) criteria, notably by classifying as healthy a number of subjects that were incorrectly classified as nonhealthy by classical clinically used FIGO criteria. Combined to obstetrician annotations, these scaling exponents enable us to sketch a typology of these FIGO-false positive subjects. Also, they permit us to monitor the evolution along time of the intrapartum health status of the fetuses and to estimate an optimal detection time-frame. PMID:24658235

  10. Study of Heart Rate Variability in Bipolar Disorder: Linear and Non-Linear Parameters during Sleep.

    PubMed

    Migliorini, Matteo; Mendez, Martin O; Bianchi, Anna M

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study is to define physiological parameters and vital signs that may be related to the mood and mental status in patients affected by bipolar disorder. In particular we explored the autonomic nervous system through the analysis of the heart rate variability. Many different parameters, in the time and in the frequency domain, linear and non-linear were evaluated during the sleep in a group of normal subject and in one patient in four different conditions. The recording of the signals was performed through a wearable sensorized T-shirt. Heart rate variability (HRV) signal and movement analysis allowed also obtaining sleep staging and the estimation of REM sleep percentage over the total sleep time. A group of eight normal females constituted the control group, on which normality ranges were estimated. The pathologic subject was recorded during four different nights, at time intervals of at least 1?week, and during different phases of the disturbance. Some of the examined parameters (MEANNN, SDNN, RMSSD) confirmed reduced HRV in depression and bipolar disorder. REM sleep percentage was found to be increased. Lempel-Ziv complexity and sample entropy, on the other hand, seem to correlate with the depression level. Even if the number of examined subjects is still small, and the results need further validation, the proposed methodology and the calculated parameters seem promising tools for the monitoring of mood changes in psychiatric disorders. PMID:22291638

  11. Automated detection of perinatal hypoxia using time-frequency-based heart rate variability features.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shiying; Boashash, Boualem; Azemi, Ghasem; Lingwood, Barbara E; Colditz, Paul B

    2014-02-01

    Perinatal hypoxia is a cause of cerebral injury in foetuses and neonates. Detection of foetal hypoxia during labour based on the pattern recognition of heart rate signals suffers from high observer variability and low specificity. We describe a new automated hypoxia detection method using time-frequency analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) signals. This approach uses features extracted from the instantaneous frequency and instantaneous amplitude of HRV signal components as well as features based on matrix decomposition of the signals' time-frequency distributions using singular value decomposition and non-negative matrix factorization. The classification between hypoxia and non-hypoxia data is performed using a support vector machine classifier. The proposed method is tested on a dataset obtained from a newborn piglet model with a controlled hypoxic insult. The chosen HRV features show strong performance compared to conventional spectral features and other existing methods of hypoxia detection with a sensitivity 93.3 %, specificity 98.3 % and accuracy 95.8 %. The high predictive value of this approach to detecting hypoxia is a substantial step towards developing a more accurate and reliable hypoxia detection method for use in human foetal monitoring. PMID:24272142

  12. Heart rate variability (HRV) in adolescent females with anxiety disorders and major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Henje Blom, E; Olsson, EM; Serlachius, E; Ericson, M; Ingvar, M

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate heart rate variability (HRV) in a clinical sample of female adolescents with anxiety disorders (AD) and/or major depressive disorder (MDD) compared with healthy controls and to assess the effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) on HRV. Methods: Heart rate variability was measured in adolescent female psychiatric patients with AD and/or MDD (n = 69), mean age 16.8 years (range: 14.518.4), from 13 out-patient clinics and in healthy controls (n = 65), mean age 16.5 years (range: 15.917.7). HRV was registered in the sitting position during 4 min with no interventions. Results: Logarithmically transformed high frequency HRV (HF), low frequency HRV (LF) and standard deviation of inter beat intervals (SDNN) were lower in the clinical sample compared with the controls (Cohens d for HF = 0.57, LF = 0.55, SDNN = 0.60). This was not explained by body mass index, blood pressure or physical activity. Medication with SSRI explained 15.5% of the total variance of HF, 3.0% of LF and 6.5% of SDNN. Conclusions: Adolescent female psychiatric patients with AD and/or MDD show reduced HRV compared with healthy controls. Medication with SSRI explained a part of this difference. PMID:20121706

  13. Acute physical activity on cognitive function: a heart rate variability examination.

    PubMed

    Murray, Nicholas P; Russoniello, Carmen

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of physical activity and cognitive function (as determined by reaction time and the trail-making test) in active versus non-active participants. Participants were divided into one of four groups: active experimental, active control, non-active experimental and non-active control. All groups completed a complex cognitive task (the trail-making test) as well as a set of reaction time tasks both before and after the experimental session. The experimental groups completed a 30-min exercise session while the control groups monitored the physical activity of the experimental group. In addition to the measures of cognitive function, heart rate variability was recorded during the pre- and post-tests. There was significant cognitive performance improvement in tasks with a higher cognitive and perceptual component. Heart rate variability data indicated that a moderate level of arousal based on sympathetic nervous system activity post exercise was associated with an increase in cognitive performance. The findings are discussed in light of the inverted-U hypothesis. PMID:22543813

  14. Variability in venom volume, flow rate and duration in defensive stings of five scorpion species.

    PubMed

    van der Meijden, Arie; Coelho, Pedro; Rasko, Mykola

    2015-06-15

    Scorpions have been shown to control their venom usage in defensive encounters, depending on the perceived threat. Potentially, the venom amount that is injected could be controlled by reducing the flow speed, the flow duration, or both. We here investigated these variables by allowing scorpions to sting into an oil-filled chamber, and recording the accreting venom droplets with high-speed video. The size of the spherical droplets on the video can then be used to calculate their volume. We recorded defensive stings of 20 specimens representing 5 species. Significant differences in the flow rate and total expelled volume were found between species. These differences are likely due to differences in overall size between the species. Large variation in both venom flow speed and duration are described between stinging events of single individuals. Both venom flow rate and flow duration correlate highly with the total expelled volume, indicating that scorpions may control both variables in order to achieve a desired end volume of venom during a sting. PMID:25911958

  15. Calculation of vaporization rates assuming various rate determining steps: Application to the resistojet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, C. E.

    1984-01-01

    The various steps that could control the vaporization rate of a material are discussed. These steps include the actual vaporization, flow rate of matrix gas, chemical reaction, gas diffusion, and solid state diffusion. The applicable equations have been collected from diverse appropriate sources, and their use is explained. Rate equations are derived for conditions where more than one step is rate controlling. Calculations are made for two model materials: rhenium which vaporizes congruently, and tantalum carbide which vaporizes incongruently. The case of vaporization under thermal gradient conditions is also treated. The existence of a thermal gradient in the resistojet means that the vaporization rate of a material may be only one thousandth of that predicted under isothermal conditions. Calculations show that rhenium might have a 100,000 hr lifetime at temperature in a 2500 C resistojet. Tantalum carbide would have a life of only 660 sec under similar conditions.

  16. Effect of Icodextrin on Heart Rate Variability in Diabetic Patients on Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Orihuela, Oscar; de Jess Ventura, Mara; vila-Daz, Marcela; Cisneros, Alejandra; Vicent-Martnez, Marln; Furlong, Mara-del-Carmen; Garca-Gonzlez, Zuzel; Villanueva, Diana; Alcntara, Guadalupe; Lindholm, Bengt; Garca-Lpez, Elvia; Villanueva, Cleva; Paniagua, Ramn

    2014-01-01

    ? Introduction: Spectral analysis of heart rate variability is a noninvasive method for evaluating autonomic cardiovascular dysfunction under various clinical conditions, such as in dialysis patients, in whom an imbalance between the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system appears to be an important risk factor for sudden cardiovascular death and arrhythmia. ? Objective: We compared the effect of icodextrin-based dialysis solution, an option that allows for better metabolic and fluid overload control, with that of glucose-based dialysis fluid on sympathetic and parasympathetic activity in the heart, as assessed by heart rate variability, in diabetic patients on peritoneal dialysis (PD). ? Methods: This secondary analysis uses data from a randomized controlled trial in diabetic PD patients with high or high-average peritoneal transport using icodextrin-based (ICO group, n = 30) or glucose-based (GLU group, n = 29) solutions for the long dwell. All patients underwent 24-hour electrocardiographic Holter monitoring at baseline, and at 6 and 12 months of follow-up. ? Results: We observed no significant differences between the groups in most of the variables analyzed, although values were, in general, below reference values. In the ICO group, total power and both low- and high-frequency power in normalized units increased, but the percentage of RR intervals with variation of more than 50 ms declined over time; in the GLU group, all those values declined. Plasma catecholamine levels were higher at baseline and declined over time. ? Conclusions: These results indicate a partial recovery of sympathetic activity in the ICO group, probably because of better extracellular fluid control and lower exposure to glucose with the use of icodextrin-based dialysis solutions. PMID:24525598

  17. Cortisol release and heart rate variability in horses during road transport.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Alice; Mstl, Erich; Wehnert, Christiane; Aurich, Jrg; Mller, Jrgen; Aurich, Christine

    2010-02-01

    Based on plasma cortisol concentrations it is widely accepted that transport is stressful to horses. So far, cortisol release during transport has not been evaluated in depth by non-invasive techniques such as analysis of salivary cortisol and faecal cortisol metabolites. Transport also causes changes in heart rate and heart rate variability (HRV). In this study, salivary cortisol, faecal cortisol metabolites, heart rate and HRV in horses transported by road for short (one and 3.5 h) and medium duration (8 h) were determined. With the onset of transport, salivary cortisol increased immediately but highest concentrations were measured towards the end of transport (4.1+/-1.6, 4.5+/-2.6, 6.5+/-1.8 ng/ml in horses transported for one, 3.5 and 8 h, respectively). Faecal cortisol metabolite concentrations did not change during transport, but 1 day after transport for 3.5 and 8 h had increased significantly (p<0.01), reflecting intestinal passage time. Compared to salivary cortisol, changes in faecal cortisol metabolites were less pronounced. Heart rate increased and beat-to-beat (RR) interval decreased (p<0.05) with the onset of transport. Standard deviation of heart rate increased while root mean square of successive RR differences (RMSSD) decreased in horses transported for 3.5 (from 74+/-5 to 45+/-6 ms) and 8 h (from 89.7+/-7 to 59+/-7 ms), indicating a reduction in vagal tone. In conclusion, transport of horses over short and medium distances leads to increased cortisol release and changes in heart rate and HRV indicative of stress. The degree of these changes is related to the duration of transport. Salivary cortisol is a sensitive parameter to detect transient changes in cortisol release. PMID:19944105

  18. Inferring clocks when lacking rocks: the variable rates of molecular evolution in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Chih-Horng; Ochman, Howard

    2009-01-01

    Background Because bacteria do not have a robust fossil record, attempts to infer the timing of events in their evolutionary history requires comparisons of molecular sequences. This use of molecular clocks is based on the assumptions that substitution rates for homologous genes or sites are fairly constant through time and across taxa. Violation of these conditions can lead to erroneous inferences and result in estimates that are off by orders of magnitude. In this study, we examine the consistency of substitution rates among a set of conserved genes in diverse bacterial lineages, and address the questions regarding the validity of molecular dating. Results By examining the evolution of 16S rRNA gene in obligate endosymbionts, which can be calibrated by the fossil record of their hosts, we found that the rates are consistent within a clade but varied widely across different bacterial lineages. Genome-wide estimates of nonsynonymous and synonymous substitutions suggest that these two measures are highly variable in their rates across bacterial taxa. Genetic drift plays a fundamental role in determining the accumulation of substitutions in 16S rRNA genes and at nonsynonymous sites. Moreover, divergence estimates based on a set of universally conserved protein-coding genes also exhibit low correspondence to those based on 16S rRNA genes. Conclusion Our results document a wide range of substitution rates across genes and bacterial taxa. This high level of variation cautions against the assumption of a universal molecular clock for inferring divergence times in bacteria. However, by applying relative-rate tests to homologous genes, it is possible to derive reliable local clocks that can be used to calibrate bacterial evolution. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Adam Eyre-Walker, Simonetta Gribaldo and Tal Pupko (nominated by Dan Graur). PMID:19788732

  19. Statistical variability and confidence intervals for planar dose QA pass rates

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Daniel W.; Nelms, Benjamin E.; Attwood, Kristopher; Kumaraswamy, Lalith; Podgorsak, Matthew B.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The most common metric for comparing measured to calculated dose, such as for pretreatment quality assurance of intensity-modulated photon fields, is a pass rate (%) generated using percent difference (%Diff), distance-to-agreement (DTA), or some combination of the two (e.g., gamma evaluation). For many dosimeters, the grid of analyzed points corresponds to an array with a low areal density of point detectors. In these cases, the pass rates for any given comparison criteria are not absolute but exhibit statistical variability that is a function, in part, on the detector sampling geometry. In this work, the authors analyze the statistics of various methods commonly used to calculate pass rates and propose methods for establishing confidence intervals for pass rates obtained with low-density arrays. Methods: Dose planes were acquired for 25 prostate and 79 head and neck intensity-modulated fields via diode array and electronic portal imaging device (EPID), and matching calculated dose planes were created via a commercial treatment planning system. Pass rates for each dose plane pair (both centered to the beam central axis) were calculated with several common comparison methods: %Diff/DTA composite analysis and gamma evaluation, using absolute dose comparison with both local and global normalization. Specialized software was designed to selectively sample the measured EPID response (very high data density) down to discrete points to simulate low-density measurements. The software was used to realign the simulated detector grid at many simulated positions with respect to the beam central axis, thereby altering the low-density sampled grid. Simulations were repeated with 100 positional iterations using a 1 detector/cm{sup 2} uniform grid, a 2 detector/cm{sup 2} uniform grid, and similar random detector grids. For each simulation, %/DTA composite pass rates were calculated with various %Diff/DTA criteria and for both local and global %Diff normalization techniques. Results: For the prostate and head/neck cases studied, the pass rates obtained with gamma analysis of high density dose planes were 2%-5% higher than respective %/DTA composite analysis on average (ranging as high as 11%), depending on tolerances and normalization. Meanwhile, the pass rates obtained via local normalization were 2%-12% lower than with global maximum normalization on average (ranging as high as 27%), depending on tolerances and calculation method. Repositioning of simulated low-density sampled grids leads to a distribution of possible pass rates for each measured/calculated dose plane pair. These distributions can be predicted using a binomial distribution in order to establish confidence intervals that depend largely on the sampling density and the observed pass rate (i.e., the degree of difference between measured and calculated dose). These results can be extended to apply to 3D arrays of detectors, as well. Conclusions: Dose plane QA analysis can be greatly affected by choice of calculation metric and user-defined parameters, and so all pass rates should be reported with a complete description of calculation method. Pass rates for low-density arrays are subject to statistical uncertainty (vs. the high-density pass rate), but these sampling errors can be modeled using statistical confidence intervals derived from the sampled pass rate and detector density. Thus, pass rates for low-density array measurements should be accompanied by a confidence interval indicating the uncertainty of each pass rate.

  20. Kramers-Moyal coefficients in the analysis and modeling of heart rate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petelczyc, M.; ?ebrowski, J. J.; Baranowski, R.

    2009-09-01

    Modeling of recorded time series may be used as a method of analysis for heart rate variability studies. In particular, the extraction of the first two Kramers-Moyal coefficients has been used in this context. Recently, the method was applied to a wide range of signal analysis: from financial data to physiological and biological time series. Modeling of the signal is important for the prediction and interpretation of the dynamics underlying the process. The method requires the determination of the Markov time. Obtaining the drift and diffusion term of the Kramers-Moyal expansion is crucial for the modeling of the original time series with the Langevin equation. Both Tabar [Comput. Sci. Eng. 8, 54 (2006)] and T. Kuusela [Phys. Rev. E 69, 031916 (2004)] suggested that these terms may be used to distinguish healthy subjects from those with heart failure. The research groups applied a somewhat different methodology and obtained substantially different ranges of the Markov time. We show that the two studies may be considered consistent with each other as Kuusela analyzed 24 h recordings while Tabar analyzed daytime and nighttime recordings, separately. However, both groups suggested using the Langevin equation for modeling of time series which requires the fluctuation force to be a Gaussian. We analyzed heart rate variability recordings for ten young male (age 26-4+3y ) healthy subjects. 24 h recordings were analyzed and 6-h-long daytime and nighttime fragments were selected. Similar properties of the data were observed in all recordings but all the nighttime data and seven of the ten 24 h series exhibited higher-order, non-negligible Kramers-Moyal coefficients. In such a case, the reconstruction of the time series using the Langevin equation is impossible. The non-negligible higher-order coefficients are due to autocorrelation in the data. This effect may be interpreted as a result of a physiological phenomenon (especially occurring for nighttime data): respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA). We detrended the nighttime recordings for the healthy subjects and obtained an asymmetry in the dependence of the diffusion term on the rescaled heart rate. This asymmetry seems to be an effect of different time scales during the inspiration and the expiration phase of breathing. The asymmetry was significantly decreased in the diffusion term found for detrended nighttime recordings obtained from five hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) patients. We conclude that the effect of RSA is decreased in the heart rate variability of HCM patientsa result which may contribute to a better medical diagnosis by supplying a new quantitative measure of RSA.

  1. Kramers-Moyal coefficients in the analysis and modeling of heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Petelczyc, M; Zebrowski, J J; Baranowski, R

    2009-09-01

    Modeling of recorded time series may be used as a method of analysis for heart rate variability studies. In particular, the extraction of the first two Kramers-Moyal coefficients has been used in this context. Recently, the method was applied to a wide range of signal analysis: from financial data to physiological and biological time series. Modeling of the signal is important for the prediction and interpretation of the dynamics underlying the process. The method requires the determination of the Markov time. Obtaining the drift and diffusion term of the Kramers-Moyal expansion is crucial for the modeling of the original time series with the Langevin equation. Both Tabar [Comput. Sci. Eng. 8, 54 (2006)] and T. Kuusela [Phys. Rev. E 69, 031916 (2004)] suggested that these terms may be used to distinguish healthy subjects from those with heart failure. The research groups applied a somewhat different methodology and obtained substantially different ranges of the Markov time. We show that the two studies may be considered consistent with each other as Kuusela analyzed 24 h recordings while Tabar analyzed daytime and nighttime recordings, separately. However, both groups suggested using the Langevin equation for modeling of time series which requires the fluctuation force to be a Gaussian. We analyzed heart rate variability recordings for ten young male (age 26-4+3 y ) healthy subjects. 24 h recordings were analyzed and 6-h-long daytime and nighttime fragments were selected. Similar properties of the data were observed in all recordings but all the nighttime data and seven of the ten 24 h series exhibited higher-order, non-negligible Kramers-Moyal coefficients. In such a case, the reconstruction of the time series using the Langevin equation is impossible. The non-negligible higher-order coefficients are due to autocorrelation in the data. This effect may be interpreted as a result of a physiological phenomenon (especially occurring for nighttime data): respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA). We detrended the nighttime recordings for the healthy subjects and obtained an asymmetry in the dependence of the diffusion term on the rescaled heart rate. This asymmetry seems to be an effect of different time scales during the inspiration and the expiration phase of breathing. The asymmetry was significantly decreased in the diffusion term found for detrended nighttime recordings obtained from five hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) patients. We conclude that the effect of RSA is decreased in the heart rate variability of HCM patients-a result which may contribute to a better medical diagnosis by supplying a new quantitative measure of RSA. PMID:19905082

  2. How variable is a spontaneous mutation rate in cultured mammalian cells?

    PubMed

    Boesen, J J; Niericker, M J; Dieteren, N; Simons, J W

    1994-05-01

    The Luria-Delbrck fluctuation analysis provides a method to estimate mutation rates and is commonly applied in somatic cell genetics and in cancer biology. We developed an assay for a Luria-Delbrck fluctuation analysis using the mouse lymphoma cell line, GRSL13. As these cells grow in suspension, one can handle hundreds of parallel cultures using multiwell dishes and dispensers. This assay thereby allows not only an accurate determination of the mutation rate per cell generation but also makes it possible to determine at which time after seeding mutations take place. Using approx. 8000 parallel cultures it has been possible to test whether the mutation rate is constant during the assay. It has been found that the spontaneous mutation rate of GRSL13 cells decreases in the course of a fluctuation test from 2 x 10(-6) to about 2 x 10(-7)/cell/generation. It was shown that this increased replication fidelity may partly be caused by cell density: maintenance of cells at high cell density resulted in a spontaneous mutation rate of 0.7 +/- 4.0 x 10(-7) compared to 4.0 +/- 3.1 x 10(-7) for the standard protocol. In contrast, growing the cells at extremely low cell density resulted in an enhanced mutation rate of 7.7 +/- 1.3 x 10(-7). Thus altogether the mutation rate can vary from 2 x 10(-6) to 0.7 x 10(-7) (approx. 30-fold). These results show that the spontaneous mutation rate is not constant, but highly dependent on experimental conditions. As incomplete expression and metabolic cooperation cannot explain the findings, the data suggest that the fidelity of DNA replication is not fixed but open to variation. Hence, determination of replication infidelity in cultured cells needs rigorous standardization or/and application of controlled variation in culture conditions. PMID:7513788

  3. Effect of Different Phases of Menstrual Cycle on Heart Rate Variability (HRV)

    PubMed Central

    Singh, K. D.; Kumar, Avnish

    2015-01-01

    Background Heart Rate Variability (HRV), which is a measure of the cardiac autonomic tone, displays physiological changes throughout the menstrual cycle. The functions of the ANS in various phases of the menstrual cycle were examined in some studies. Aims and Objectives The aim of our study was to observe the effect of menstrual cycle on cardiac autonomic function parameters in healthy females. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional (observational) study was conducted on 50 healthy females, in the age group of 18-25 years. Heart Rate Variability (HRV) was recorded by Physio Pac (PC-2004). The data consisted of Time Domain Analysis and Frequency Domain Analysis in menstrual, proliferative and secretory phase of menstrual cycle. Data collected was analysed statistically using students pair t-test. Results The difference in mean heart rate, LF power%, LFnu and HFnu in menstrual and proliferative phase was found to be statistically significant. The difference in mean RR, Mean HR, RMSSD (the square root of the mean of the squares of the successive differences between adjacent NNs.), NN50 (the number of pairs of successive NNs that differ by more than 50 ms), pNN50 (the proportion of NN50 divided by total number of NNs.), VLF (very low frequency) power, LF (low frequency) power, LF power%, HF power %, LF/HF ratio, LFnu and HFnu was found to be statistically significant in proliferative and secretory phase. The difference in Mean RR, Mean HR, LFnu and HFnu was found to be statistically significant in secretory and menstrual phases. Conclusion From the study it can be concluded that sympathetic nervous activity in secretory phase is greater than in the proliferative phase, whereas parasympathetic nervous activity is predominant in proliferative phase. PMID:26557512

  4. Do lambs perceive regular human stroking as pleasant? Behavior and heart rate variability analyses.

    PubMed

    Coulon, Marjorie; Nowak, Raymond; Peyrat, Julie; Chandèze, Hervé; Boissy, Alain; Boivin, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Stroking by humans is beneficial to the human-animal relationship and improves welfare in many species that express intraspecific allogrooming, but very few studies have looked at species like sheep that do not express such contact except around parturition. This study investigated the way lambs perceive regular human tactile contact using behavioral and physiological responses. Twenty-four lambs were reared and bucket-fed in groups of four. All were stroked daily by their familiar caregiver. At 8 weeks of age, the lambs were individually tested in their home pen but in a 1×1m open-barred pen after a 15 h period of habituation to physical separation from peers while remaining in visual and auditory contact. Half of the lambs received stroking by their caregiver for 8 min and half were exposed to their caregiver's immobile presence. Heart rate and heart rate variability were recorded and analyzed by 2-min slots over the same interval based on three measures: mean heart rate value (HR), root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD) and standard deviation of all intervals measured between consecutive sinus beats (SDNN). Behavioral responses (ear postures of the lamb and time spent in contact with the familiar caregiver, on the knees of the familiar caregiver, and moving) were recorded throughout the test. Lamb HR decreased continuously while in the presence of their caregiver. Lambs being stroked showed slower HR and higher RMSSD which reflected positive emotional states compared to lambs left unstroked. All behavioral variables were highly correlated with the main component axis of the PCA analyses: the more the animals stayed in contact with their caregiver, the less they moved and the more their ears were hanging. This first component clearly differentiates lambs being stroked or not. Behavioral and physiological observations support the hypothesis that gentle physical contact with the caregiver is perceived positively by lambs. PMID:25714604

  5. Heart Rate Variability for Evaluating Vigilant Attention in Partial Chronic Sleep Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Henelius, Andreas; Sallinen, Mikael; Huotilainen, Minna; Mller, Kiti; Virkkala, Jussi; Puolamki, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Examine the use of spectral heart rate variability (HRV) metrics in measuring sleepiness under chronic partial sleep restriction, and identify underlying relationships between HRV, Karolinska Sleepiness Scale ratings (KSS), and performance on the Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT). Design: Controlled laboratory study. Setting: Experimental laboratory of the Brain Work Research Centre of the Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland. Participants: Twenty-three healthy young males (mean age SD = 23.77 2.29). Interventions: A sleep restriction group (N = 15) was subjected to chronic partial sleep restriction with 4 h sleep for 5 nights. A control group (N = 8) had 8 h sleep on all nights. Measurements and Results: Based on a search over all HRV frequency bands in the range [0.00, 0.40] Hz, the band [0.01, 0.08] Hz showed the highest correlation for HRVPVT (0.60, 95% confidence interval [0.49, 0.69]) and HRVKSS (0.33, 95% confidence interval [0.16, 0.46]) for the sleep restriction group; no correlation was found for the control group. We studied the fraction of variance in PVT explained by HRV and a 3-component alertness model, containing circadian and homeostatic processes coupled with sleep inertia, respectively. HRV alone explained 33% of PVT variance. Conclusions: The findings suggest that HRV spectral power reflects vigilant attention in subjects exposed to partial chronic sleep restriction. Citation: Henelius A, Sallinen M, Huotilainen M, Mller K, Virkkala J, Puolamki K. Heart rate variability for evaluating vigilant attention in partial chronic sleep restriction. SLEEP 2014;37(7):1257-1267. PMID:24987165

  6. Do Lambs Perceive Regular Human Stroking as Pleasant? Behavior and Heart Rate Variability Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Coulon, Marjorie; Nowak, Raymond; Peyrat, Julie; Chandèze, Hervé; Boissy, Alain; Boivin, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Stroking by humans is beneficial to the human-animal relationship and improves welfare in many species that express intraspecific allogrooming, but very few studies have looked at species like sheep that do not express such contact except around parturition. This study investigated the way lambs perceive regular human tactile contact using behavioral and physiological responses. Twenty-four lambs were reared and bucket-fed in groups of four. All were stroked daily by their familiar caregiver. At 8 weeks of age, the lambs were individually tested in their home pen but in a 1×1m open-barred pen after a 15h period of habituation to physical separation from peers while remaining in visual and auditory contact. Half of the lambs received stroking by their caregiver for 8min and half were exposed to their caregiver’s immobile presence. Heart rate and heart rate variability were recorded and analyzed by 2-min slots over the same interval based on three measures: mean heart rate value (HR), root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD) and standard deviation of all intervals measured between consecutive sinus beats (SDNN). Behavioral responses (ear postures of the lamb and time spent in contact with the familiar caregiver, on the knees of the familiar caregiver, and moving) were recorded throughout the test. Lamb HR decreased continuously while in the presence of their caregiver. Lambs being stroked showed slower HR and higher RMSSD which reflected positive emotional states compared to lambs left unstroked. All behavioral variables were highly correlated with the main component axis of the PCA analyses: the more the animals stayed in contact with their caregiver, the less they moved and the more their ears were hanging. This first component clearly differentiates lambs being stroked or not. Behavioral and physiological observations support the hypothesis that gentle physical contact with the caregiver is perceived positively by lambs. PMID:25714604

  7. Reserve lithium batteries for missiles and other high rate applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giattino, L. R.; Irwin, L. J.

    The development, characteristics, and performance of lithium thionyl chloride batteries for applications as reserve cells for military missile applications are described. The batteries were constructed of various cell elements and electrolytes, tested under no load, varying loads, and different temperatures, and it was found that lower drain rates and higher temperatures provide better voltage regulation and higher voltage levels. Cell rise time was less than 1 sec, and could be reduced by changing temperatures from 70 to 110 C; operation at -40 C was successful at 10 mA/cm sq drain rate and 2.86 V. The cells are also able to operate on load for powering equipment with well regulated voltage rather than for short time period weapons applications, such as missile launching.

  8. An infiltration model based on flow variability in macropores: development, sensitivity analysis and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiler, Markus

    2005-08-01

    Simulating infiltration in soils containing macropores still provides unsatisfactory results, as existing models seem not to capture all relevant processes. Recent studies of macropore flow initiation in natural soils containing earthworm channels revealed a distinct flow rate variability in the macropores depending on the initiation process. When macropore flow was initiated at the soil surface, most of the macropores received very little water while a few macropores received a large proportion of the total inflow. In contrast, when macropore flow was initiated from a saturated or nearly saturated soil layer, macropore flow rate variation was much lower. The objective of this study was to develop, evaluate, and test a model, which combines macropore flow variability with several established approaches to model dual permeability soils. We then evaluate the INfiltration-INitiation-INteraction Model (IN 3M) to explore the influence of macropore flow variability on infiltration behavior by performing a sensitivity analysis and applying IN 3M to sprinkling and dye tracer experiments at three field sites with different macropore and soil matrix properties. The sensitivity analysis showed that the flow variability in macropores reduces interaction between the macropores and the surrounding soil matrix and thus increases bypass flow, especially for surface initiation of macropore flow and at higher rainfall intensities. The model application shows reasonable agreement between IN 3M simulations and field data in terms of water balance, water content change, and dye patterns. The influence of macropore flow variability on the hydrological response of the soil was considerable and especially pronounced for soils where initiation occurs at the soil surface. In future, the model could be applied to explore other types of preferential flow and hence to get a generally better understanding of macropore flow.

  9. A Variable Turbulent Schmidt Number Formulation for Scramjet Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiao, X.; Edwards, J. R.; Hassan, H. A.; Cutler, A. D.

    2004-01-01

    In high speed engines, thorough turbulent mixing of fuel and air is required to obtain high performance and high efficiency. Thus, the ability to predict turbulent mixing is crucial in obtaining accurate numerical simulation of an engine and its performance. Current state of the art in CFD simulation is to assume both turbulent Prandtl number and Schmidt numbers to be constants. However, since the mixing of fuel and air is inversely proportional to the Schmidt number, a value of 0.45 for the Schmidt number will produce twice as much diffusion as that with a value of 0.9. Because of this, current CFD tools and models have not been able to provide the needed guidance required for the efficient design of a scramjet engine. The goal of this investigation is to develop the framework needed to calculate turbulent Prandtl and Schmidt numbers as part of the solution. This requires four additional equations: two for the temperature variance and its dissipation rate and two for the concentration variance and its dissipation rate. In the current investigation emphasis will be placed on studying mixing without reactions. For such flows, variable Prandtl number does not play a major role in determining the flow. This, however, will have to be addressed when combustion is present. The approach to be used is similar to that used to develop the k-zeta model. In this approach, relevant equations are derived from the exact Navier-Stokes equations and each individual correlation is modeled. This ensures that relevant physics is incorporated into the model equations. This task has been accomplished. The final set of equations have no wall or damping functions. Moreover, they are tensorially consistent and Galilean invariant. The derivation of the model equations is rather lengthy and thus will not be incorporated into this abstract, but will be included in the final paper. As a preliminary to formulating the proposed model, the original k-zeta model with constant turbulent Prandtl and Schmidt numbers is used to model the supersonic coaxial jet mixing experiments involving He, O2 and air.

  10. Discriminative variable subsets in Bayesian classification with mixture models, with application in flow cytometry studies.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin; Chan, Cliburn; West, Mike

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the evaluation of subsets of variables for the discriminative evidence they provide in multivariate mixture modeling for classification. The novel development of Bayesian classification analysis presented is partly motivated by problems of design and selection of variables in biomolecular studies, particularly involving widely used assays of large-scale single-cell data generated using flow cytometry technology. For such studies and for mixture modeling generally, we define discriminative analysis that overlays fitted mixture models using a natural measure of concordance between mixture component densities, and define an effective and computationally feasible method for assessing and prioritizing subsets of variables according to their roles in discrimination of one or more mixture components. We relate the new discriminative information measures to Bayesian classification probabilities and error rates, and exemplify their use in Bayesian analysis of Dirichlet process mixture models fitted via Markov chain Monte Carlo methods as well as using a novel Bayesian expectation-maximization algorithm. We present a series of theoretical and simulated data examples to fix concepts and exhibit the utility of the approach, and compare with prior approaches. We demonstrate application in the context of automatic classification and discriminative variable selection in high-throughput systems biology using large flow cytometry datasets. PMID:26040910

  11. Discriminative variable subsets in Bayesian classification with mixture models, with application in flow cytometry studies

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lin; Chan, Cliburn; West, Mike

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the evaluation of subsets of variables for the discriminative evidence they provide in multivariate mixture modeling for classification. The novel development of Bayesian classification analysis presented is partly motivated by problems of design and selection of variables in biomolecular studies, particularly involving widely used assays of large-scale single-cell data generated using flow cytometry technology. For such studies and for mixture modeling generally, we define discriminative analysis that overlays fitted mixture models using a natural measure of concordance between mixture component densities, and define an effective and computationally feasible method for assessing and prioritizing subsets of variables according to their roles in discrimination of one or more mixture components. We relate the new discriminative information measures to Bayesian classification probabilities and error rates, and exemplify their use in Bayesian analysis of Dirichlet process mixture models fitted via Markov chain Monte Carlo methods as well as using a novel Bayesian expectation–maximization algorithm. We present a series of theoretical and simulated data examples to fix concepts and exhibit the utility of the approach, and compare with prior approaches. We demonstrate application in the context of automatic classification and discriminative variable selection in high-throughput systems biology using large flow cytometry datasets. PMID:26040910

  12. Bivalve growth rate and isotopic variability across the Barents Sea Polar Front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Michael L.; Ambrose, William G.; Locke V, William L.; Ryan, Stuart K.; Johnson, Beverly J.

    2014-02-01

    Analysis of bivalve shell increments provides a means to reconstruct long-term patterns in growth histories and assess factors that regulate marine ecosystems, while tissue stable isotopes are indicators of food sources and trophic dynamics. We examined shell growth patterns and tissue stable isotopic composition (δ13C and δ15N) of the hairy cockle (Ciliatocardium ciliatum) in the northwest Barents Sea to evaluate the influence of different water masses and the Polar Front on growth rates and food sources and to assess the influence of climatic variability on ecological processes over seasonal to decadal scales. Shell growth rates were highest in Atlantic water, intermediate in Arctic water, and lowest at the Polar Front. Temporal patterns of ontogenetically-adjusted growth (SGI) were negatively correlated with the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO), local precipitation and ice-free days. The highest growth occurred during colder periods with more sea ice, while lower growth was associated with warmer periods and less sea ice. Stable isotope values of lipid-extracted tissues from Atlantic water cockles were enriched in δ13C by up to 2.1‰ and δ15N by 1.5‰ compared to animals from Arctic waters. Distinct seasonal and water mass variations in stable isotopic values reflect spatial and temporal variability in food supplies to the bivalves in this region on small spatial scales. Overall, Atlantic waters supported the highest growth rates, the most complex trophic webs, and the greatest sensitivity to interannual variability in environmental conditions. Bivalves from Arctic waters were the most distinct of the three groups in their response to regional climate forcing and local environmental manifestations of those conditions. The Polar Front exhibits growth and isotopic characteristics predominantly of the Atlantic domain. These results demonstrate that integrating results of sclerochronological and stable isotopic analyses of benthic bivalves provide independent, corroborative lines of evidence and added insight into the ecological function of these systems when assessing potential effects of changes in water mass distributions in the Barents Sea.

  13. Level of operator control and changes in heart rate variability during simulated flight maintenance.

    PubMed

    Tattersall, A J; Hockey, G R

    1995-12-01

    The demands of dynamic monitoring and fault diagnosis for flight engineer trainees were examined in relation to changes in heart rate (HR) and two spectral analysis measures (midfrequency: 0.07-0.14 Hz; high frequency: 0.15-0.40 Hz) of heart rate variability (HRV). Eleven trainee flight engineers were studied, as part of their training and assessment, over three 3-h sessions in a cockpit simulator. During each session, faults and incidents programmed into the system had to be detected, diagnosed, and corrected. Electrocardiograms were taken, and each session was recorded on videotape. Work phases were classified from video analysis of flight maintenance activities, using Rasmussen's cognitive control taxonomy, into monitoring, routine (rule-based), and problem-solving (knowledge-based) phases. HR and HRV were found to be sensitive to different phases of the work environment. HRV was suppressed during the mentally demanding problem-solving mode of the level flight phase, but only for the midfrequency component. Elevated heart rate, in contrast, was associated with the more generally stressful takeoff and landing phases. The findings support both the use of HRV as a physiological index of mental effort and its value in operational contexts, and the value of ecologically derived methods of evaluating differences in work demands in complex systems. PMID:8851773

  14. Using heart rate variability for automated identification of exercise exertion levels.

    PubMed

    Finkelstein, Joseph; Jeong, In Cheol

    2015-01-01

    Heart rate monitoring is being used to estimate activity of autonomous nervous system by analysing heart rate variability (HRV). HRV has been recently shown to be effective means to monitor efficacy of exercise in patients with cardiovascular conditions and older adults. Whether HRV can be used to identify exercise exertion levels is unknown. There are multiple approaches to analyse HRV however it is not clear which approach is optimal in assessing cycling exercise. Previous studies demonstrated potential of analysis of short-term sequences of beat-by-beat heart rate data in a time domain for continuous monitoring of levels of physiological stress. The goal of this study was to assess the potential value of short-term HRV analysis during cycling exercise for automated identification of exercise exertion level. HRV indices were compared during rest, height of exercise exertion, and exercise recovery. Comparative analysis of HRV during cycling exercise demonstrated responsiveness of time-domain indices to different phases of an exercise program. Using discriminant analysis, canonical discriminant functions were built which correctly identified 100% of 'highest level of exertion' and 80.0% of 'rest' episodes. HRV demonstrated high potential in monitoring autonomic balance and exercise exertion during cycling exercise program. PMID:25676962

  15. Changes in heart-rate variability of survivors of nasopharyngeal cancer during Tai Chi Qigong practice

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Shirley S.M.; Wong, Janet Y.H.; Chung, Louisa M.Y.; Yam, Timothy T.T.; Chung, Joanne W.Y.; Lee, Y.M.; Chow, Lina P.Y.; Luk, W.S.; Ng, Shamay S.M.

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] To explore the changes in heart-rate variability (HRV) of survivors of nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) before, during, and after a Tai Chi (TC) Qigong exercise. [Subjects and Methods] Eleven survivors of NPC participated voluntarily in the study. The heart rate of each participant was measured continuously for 1 minute before the TC Qigong intervention, during the 5-minute TC Qigong intervention, and for 1 minute after the intervention, using a Polar heart-rate monitor. Spectral HRV was expressed in terms of normalised low frequency (LF) power, normalised high frequency (HF) power, and the low frequency/high frequency (LF/HF) power ratio. [Results] Both the LF-power and the HF-power components had significant time effects. However, the time effect of the LF/HF power ratio was not significant. Post hoc contrast analysis revealed a significant decrease in LF power and a concomitant increase in HF power during the 4th minute and 5th minute of the TC Qigong exercise. [Conclusion] Five minutes of TC Qigong exercise was found to improve HRV by increasing HF power and decreasing LF power, but these effects were transient. TC Qigong might be an appropriate exercise for improving the ANS function and psychological and cardiac health of survivors of NPC. PMID:26157266

  16. Changes in heart-rate variability of survivors of nasopharyngeal cancer during Tai Chi Qigong practice.

    PubMed

    Fong, Shirley S M; Wong, Janet Y H; Chung, Louisa M Y; Yam, Timothy T T; Chung, Joanne W Y; Lee, Y M; Chow, Lina P Y; Luk, W S; Ng, Shamay S M

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] To explore the changes in heart-rate variability (HRV) of survivors of nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) before, during, and after a Tai Chi (TC) Qigong exercise. [Subjects and Methods] Eleven survivors of NPC participated voluntarily in the study. The heart rate of each participant was measured continuously for 1 minute before the TC Qigong intervention, during the 5-minute TC Qigong intervention, and for 1 minute after the intervention, using a Polar heart-rate monitor. Spectral HRV was expressed in terms of normalised low frequency (LF) power, normalised high frequency (HF) power, and the low frequency/high frequency (LF/HF) power ratio. [Results] Both the LF-power and the HF-power components had significant time effects. However, the time effect of the LF/HF power ratio was not significant. Post hoc contrast analysis revealed a significant decrease in LF power and a concomitant increase in HF power during the 4th minute and 5th minute of the TC Qigong exercise. [Conclusion] Five minutes of TC Qigong exercise was found to improve HRV by increasing HF power and decreasing LF power, but these effects were transient. TC Qigong might be an appropriate exercise for improving the ANS function and psychological and cardiac health of survivors of NPC. PMID:26157266

  17. Emotion state identification based on heart rate variability and genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Sung-Nien Yu; Shu-Feng Chen

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study is to develop an effective emotion recognition system based on ECG. The proposed emotion recognition system is capable of differentiating four kinds of emotions, namely neutral, happiness, stress, and sadness, based on the heart rate variability (HRV). Ten male subjects were involved in the study. Both visual and auditory stimuli were used to stimulate the emotions. Four categories of HRV features, namely time-domain, frequency-domain, Poincare plot, and differential features, were exploited to characterize the physiological changes during the affective stimuli. The support vector machine (SVM) was employed as the classifier. The genetic algorithm (GA) was exploited as feature selector. Without feature selector, only 52.2% recognition rate was achieved. However, with the GA feature selector, an optimal recognition rate of 90% was achieved. Compared with other user-independent systems published in the literature, the proposed method achieves an accuracy of 90% which is demonstrated to be the most effective for discriminating four kinds of emotions with user-independent design policy. PMID:26736318

  18. Transverse spatiotemporal variability of lowland river properties and effects on metabolic rate estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villamizar, Sandra R.; Pai, Henry; Butler, Christopher A.; Harmon, Thomas C.

    2014-01-01

    Variability of river properties such as temperature, velocity, dissolved oxygen (DO), and light at small scales (centimeters to meters) can play an important role in the local exchanges of energy and mass. We hypothesize that significant transverse cross-sectional DO variation is observable within a river. Such variation may influence conventional single-station metabolic rate (primary production and respiration) estimates with respect to DO probe location, and reveal important connections between physical and biogeochemical processes and their drivers in rivers. Using a mobile sensor system, we measured river properties across a bend in the lower Merced River in Central California under stationary flow conditions in April and September. Cross-sectional temperature, DO, and chlorophyll-a concentrations exhibited modest but significant gradients, which varied in magnitude and direction on a diel basis. The spatiotemporal variation was consistent with reach geomorphology and incident light patterns. Gross primary production (GPP), community respiration (CR24), and net ecosystem production (NEP) rates estimates derived from local DO and temperature time series varied by 3-10% over the river cross section, with greater variation in late summer. The presence of transverse metabolic rate gradients in this relatively simple reach implies the existence of substantial gradients in more complex river regimes, such as those spanning distinctively different microhabitats, transient storage zones, and related distributed biogeochemical zones.

  19. Heart rate variability in athletes and nonathletes at rest and during head-up tilt.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, F S; Chacon-Mikahil, M P T; Martins, L E B; Lima-Filho, E C; Golfetti, R; Paschoal, M A; Gallo-Junior, L

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine if autonomic heart rate modulation, indicated by heart rate variability (HRV), differs during supine rest and head-up tilt (HUT) when sedentary and endurance-trained cyclists are compared. Eleven sedentary young men (S) and 10 trained cyclists (C) were studied. The volunteers were submitted to a dynamic ECG Holter to calculate HRV at rest and during a 70 masculine HUT. The major aerobic capacity of athletes was expressed by higher values of VO2 at anaerobic threshold and peak conditions (P < 0.05). At rest the athletes had lower heart rates (P < 0.05) and higher values in the time domain of HRV compared with controls (SD of normal RR interval, SDNN, medians): 59.1 ms (S) vs 89.9 ms (C), P < 0.05. During tilt athletes also had higher values in the time domain of HRV compared with controls (SDNN, medians): 55.7 ms (S) vs 69.7 ms (C), P < 0.05. No differences in power spectral components of HRV at rest or during HUT were detected between groups. Based on the analysis of data by the frequency domain method, we conclude that in athletes the resting bradycardia seems to be much more related to changes in intrinsic mechanisms than to modifications in autonomic control. Also, HUT caused comparable changes in sympathetic and parasympathetic modulation of the sinus node in both groups. PMID:15962191

  20. A Variable Stability Test Vehicle for ITS Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Daniel C.; Lee, Allan Y.

    1996-01-01

    A variable stability test bed is under development for the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). The Variable Dynamic Testbed Vehicle (VDTV) is being designed for research and testing of advanced collision warning and avoidance technologies being developed by industry and most likely being made available to consumers in the near future.

  1. The Sensitivity of Response Rate to the Rate of Variable-Interval Reinforcement for Pigeons and Rats: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shull, Richard L.

    2005-01-01

    The relation between the rate of a response ("B") and the rate of its reinforcement ("R") is well known to be approximately hyperbolic: B = kR/(R + R[subscript o]), where k represents the maximum response rate, and R[subscript o] indicates the rate of reinforcers that will engender a response rate equal to half its maximum value. A review of data…

  2. The Sensitivity of Response Rate to the Rate of Variable-Interval Reinforcement for Pigeons and Rats: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shull, Richard L.

    2005-01-01

    The relation between the rate of a response ("B") and the rate of its reinforcement ("R") is well known to be approximately hyperbolic: B = kR/(R + R[subscript o]), where k represents the maximum response rate, and R[subscript o] indicates the rate of reinforcers that will engender a response rate equal to half its maximum value. A review of data

  3. Individual Variability in Sensorimotor Network Functional Connectivity Correlates With the Rate of Early Visuomotor Adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassady, K.; Ruitenberg, M.; Koppelmans, V.; DeDios, Y.; Gadd, N.; Wood, S.; Reuter-Lorenz, P.; Riascos, R.; Kofman, I.; Bloomberg, J.; Mulavara, A.; Seidler, R.

    2016-01-01

    Sensorimotor adaptation is a type of procedural motor learning that enables individuals to preserve accurate movements in the presence of external or internal perturbations. Adaptation learning can be divided into an early, more cognitively demanding stage, and a later, more automatic stage. In recent years, several investigations have identified significant associations between sensorimotor adaptation and brain structure and function. However, the question of whether individual variability in functional connectivity strength is predictive of sensorimotor adaptation performance has been largely unaddressed. In the present study, we investigate whether such variability in early sensorimotor adaptation is associated with individual differences in resting-state functional connectivity. We used resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) to estimate functional connectivity strength using hypothesis-driven (seed-to-voxel) and hypothesis-free (voxel-to-voxel) approaches. For the hypothesis-driven analysis, we selected several regions of interest (ROIs) from sensorimotor and default mode networks of the brain. We then correlated these connectivity measures with the rate of early learning during a visuomotor adaptation task in 16 healthy participants. For this task, participants lay supine in the MRI scanner and moved an MRI-compatible dual axis joystick with their right hand to hit targets presented on a screen. Each movement was initiated from the central position on the display screen. Participants were instructed to move the cursor to the target as quickly as possible by moving the joystick, and to hold the cursor within the target until it disappeared. They were then instructed to release the joystick handle after target disappearance, allowing the cursor to re-center for the next trial. Performance was assessed by measuring direction error (DE), defined as the angle between the line from the start to the target position, and the line from the start to the position at peak velocity. Each participant's rate of learning was determined by calculating the slope of DE across adaptation trials. This slope was used as the primary outcome measure for the rate of early adaptation. Seed-to-voxel results revealed that bilateral putamen and bilateral insular cortex connectivity strength were correlated with the rate of early adaptation, such that faster learners exhibited greater connectivity strength than slower learners. Furthermore, voxel-to-voxel results indicated that left insular cortex connectivity and right postcentral gyrus connectivity were correlated with the rate of early adaptation, such that faster learners exhibited greater connectivity strength within left insular cortex and weaker connectivity strength within right postcentral gyrus. These results demonstrate that the learning rate in an early adaptation task is associated with sensorimotor network functional connectivity strength. The findings from this study provide novel insights into the neural processes underlying individual variability in early sensorimotor adaptation.

  4. iHeartLift: a closed loop system with bio-feedback that uses music tempo variability to improve heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Ho, Thomas C T; Chen, Xiang

    2011-01-01

    "Musica delenit bestiam feram" translates into "Music soothes the savage beast". There is a hidden truth in this ancient quip passed down from generations. Besides soothing the heart, it also incites the heart to a healthier level of heart rate variability (HRV). In this paper, an approach to use and test music and biofeedback to increase the heart rate variability for people facing daily stress is discussed. By determining the music tempo variability (MTV) of a piece of music and current heart rate variability, iHeartLift is able to compare the 2 trends and locate a musical piece that is suited to increase the user's heart rate variability to a healthier level. With biofeedback, the 2 trends are continuously compared in real-time and the musical piece is changed in accordance with the current comparisons. A study was conducted and it was generally found that HRV can be uplifted by music regardless of language and meaning of musical lyrics but with limitations to musical genre. PMID:22254526

  5. Application of semiclassical methods to reaction rate theory

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, R.

    1993-11-01

    This work is concerned with the development of approximate methods to describe relatively large chemical systems. This effort has been divided into two primary directions: First, we have extended and applied a semiclassical transition state theory (SCTST) originally proposed by Miller to obtain microcanonical and canonical (thermal) rates for chemical reactions described by a nonseparable Hamiltonian, i.e. most reactions. Second, we have developed a method to describe the fluctuations of decay rates of individual energy states from the average RRKM rate in systems where the direct calculation of individual rates would be impossible. Combined with the semiclassical theory this latter effort has provided a direct comparison to the experimental results of Moore and coworkers. In SCTST, the Hamiltonian is expanded about the barrier and the ``good`` action-angle variables are obtained perturbatively; a WKB analysis of the effectively one-dimensional reactive direction then provides the transmission probabilities. The advantages of this local approximate treatment are that it includes tunneling effects and anharmonicity, and it systematically provides a multi-dimensional dividing surface in phase space. The SCTST thermal rate expression has been reformulated providing increased numerical efficiency (as compared to a naive Boltzmann average), an appealing link to conventional transition state theory (involving a ``prereactive`` partition function depending on the action of the reactive mode), and the ability to go beyond the perturbative approximation.

  6. Heart Rate Variability for Preclinical Detection of Secondary Complications after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, J. Michael; Sow, Daby; Crimmins, Michael; Albers, David; Agarwal, Sachin; Claassen, Jan; Connolly, E. Sander; Elkind, Mitchell S. V.; Hripcsak, George; Mayer, Stephan A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We sought to determine if monitoring heart rate variability (HRV) would enable preclinical detection of secondary complications after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Methods We studied 236 SAH patients admitted within the first 48 hours of bleed onset, discharged after SAH day 5, and had continuous electrocardiogram records available. The diagnosis and date of onset of infections and DCI events were prospectively adjudicated and documented by the clinical team. Continuous ECG was collected at 240 Hz using a high-resolution data acquisition system. The Tompkins Hamilton algorithm was used to identify R-R intervals excluding ectopic and abnormal beats. Time, frequency, and regularity domain calculations of HRV were generated over the first 48 hours of ICU admission and 24 hours prior to the onset of each patient's first complication, or SAH day 6 for control patients. Clinical prediction rules to identify infection and DCI events were developed using bootstrap aggregation and cost sensitive meta-classifiers. Results The combined infection and DCI model predicted events 24 hours prior to clinical onset with high sensitivity (87%) and moderate specificity (66%), and was more sensitive than models that predicted either infection or DCI. Models including clinical and HRV variables together substantially improved diagnostic accuracy (AUC 0.83) compared to models with only HRV variables (AUC 0.61). Conclusions Changes in HRV after SAH reflect both delayed ischemic and infectious complications. Incorporation of concurrent disease severity measures substantially improves prediction compared to using HRV alone. Further research is needed to refine and prospectively evaluate real-time bedside HRV monitoring after SAH. PMID:24610353

  7. Pan-Svalbard growth rate variability and environmental regulation in the Arctic bivalve Serripes groenlandicus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Michael L.; Ambrose, William G.; Levin, Benjamin S.; Locke V, William L.; Henkes, Gregory A.; Hop, Haakon; Renaud, Paul E.

    2011-11-01

    Growth histories contained in the shells of bivalves provide continuous records of environmental and biological information over lifetimes spanning decades to centuries, thereby linking ecosystem responses to both natural and anthropogenic climatic variations over a range of scales. We examined growth rates and temporal growth patterns of 260 individuals of the circumpolar Greenland Smooth Cockle ( Serripes groenlandicus) collected between 1997 and 2009 from 11 sites around the Svalbard Archipelago. These sites encompass a range of oceanographic and environmental conditions, from strongly Atlantic-influenced conditions on the west coast to high-Arctic conditions in northeast Svalbard. Absolute growth was up to three times greater at the most strongly Atlantic-influenced locations compared to the most Arctic-influenced areas, and growth performance was highest at sites closest to the West Spitsbergen Current. We also developed growth chronologies up to 34 years in length extending back to 1974. Standardized growth indices (SGI) exhibited substantial inter-site variability, but there were also common temporal features including steadily increasing growth from the late 1980's to the mid-1990's followed by a marked shift from relatively greater to poorer growth in the mid-1990's and from 2004 to 2008. This pattern was consistent with phase-shifts in large-scale climatic drivers. Interannual variability in SGI was also related to local manifestations of the large-scale drivers, including sea temperature and sea ice extent. The temporal growth pattern at Rijpfjorden, on northeast Svalbard, was broadly representative (R = 0.81) of the entire dataset. While there were site-related differences in the specific relationships between growth and environmental parameters, the aggregated dataset indicated an overriding regional driver of bivalve growth: the Arctic Climate Regime Index (ACRI). These results demonstrate that sclerochronological proxies can be useful retrospective analytical tools for establishing baselines of ecosystem variability and for identifying key ecosystem drivers across spatial and temporal scales.

  8. Heart rate variability of human in hypoxic oxygen-argon environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khayrullina, Rezeda; Smoleevskiy, Alexandr; Bubeev, Yuri

    Human adaptive capacity, reliability and stability in extreme environments depend primarily on the individual resistance to stresses, includes both innate and acquired components. We have conducted studies in six healthy subjects - men aged between 24 to 42 years who psychophysiological indicators acterizing the severity of stress reactions studied directly during an emergency situation, before and after it. The subjects were in a hypoxic oxygen-argon atmosphere 10 days. Cardiovascular system is one of the first to respond to stressful reaction. The method of heart rate variability (HRV) allows us to estimate balance of sympathetic and parasympathetic parts of vegetative nervous system. In the course of the baseline study it was found that resting heart rate (HR) in the examined individuals is within normal limits. During the experiment in all subjects there was a trend towards more frequent heartbeat. Each subject at one stage or another stay in a hypoxic oxygen-argon environment heart rate go beyond the group norm, but the extent and duration of these abnormalities were significantly different. Marked increase in middle heart rate during of subjects experiment, fluctuating within a wide range (from 2.3% to 29.1%). Marked increase in middle heart rate during of subjects experiment, fluctuating within a wide range (from 2.3% to 29.1%). This suggests that the ability to adapt to living in the investigated gas environment have marked individual differences. SDNN (mean square deviation of all R-R intervals) is the integral indicator of the total effect of the sinus node to the sympathetic and parasympathetic parts of vegetative nervous system, as well as indicating the higher functional reserves of the cardiovascular systems. Increase in heart rate in the majority of subject was accompanied by an increase in individual SDNN. This suggests that the parasympathetic system is able to balance the increase in activity of the sympathetic system, and functional reserves are sufficient. However, the opposite dynamic test 02 - accompanied by a decrease heart rate increase SDNN. The survey detected that all subjects marked signs of increased activity of the sympathetic nervous system. Besides when short-term exposure (up to 10 days) in most researched factor in the majority of patients was enough functional reserves to adapt to the conditions of a changed atmosphere. However, the adaptation process was accompanied by severe stress and compensatory mechanisms for longer stay in hypoxic conditions, oxygen-argon environment may develop adverse effects associated with sympathicotony.

  9. Focusing neurovisceral integration: Cognition, heart rate variability, and cerebral blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, J. Richard; Allen, Ben; Gianaros, Peter J.; Thayer, Julian F.; Manuck, Stephen B.

    2015-01-01

    The neurovisceral integration hypothesis suggests in part that cerebral control of autonomic function conveys comparable control of executive function and, hence, correlation among vagally determined high frequency heart rate variability (HF-HRV), executive function, and regional cerebral blood flow (CBF). In 440 middle-aged men and women, resting HF-HRV was related to regional CBF derived from a resting arterial spin-labeled MRI scan and to seven neuropsychological tests of executive function. Despite some intercorrelations, regression modeling failed to support integrated central control of HF-HRV and executive function. Integration between autonomic and cognitive control appears more circumscribed than the general integration suggested by the neurovisceral integration hypothesis. PMID:25160649

  10. Cardiac Sympathetic Activity Assessed by Heart Rate Variability Indicates Myocardial Ischemia on Cold Exposure in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Measurement of heart rate variability (HRV) is a non-invasive technique that can be used to investigate functioning of the autonomic nervous system, especially the balance between sympathetic and vagal activities. It is reported that dilatation of coronary microcirculation by augmentation of sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) caused by cold exposure was impaired in diabetes. The question of whether or not SNA in HRV could respond to coronary ischemia was evaluated by cold exposure in diabetic rats. It was found that diabetes with weight loss significantly increased SNA both in baseline and cold exposure, compared with control. A correspondence was also found with coronary ischemia. It can be concluded that measurement of HRV may provide useful information regarding the coronary risk of cold exposure in diabetes. (*English translation of J Jpn Coll Angiol 2012; 52: 295-301) PMID:24130613

  11. Affective Instability in Daily Life Is Predicted by Resting Heart Rate Variability

    PubMed Central

    Kuppens, Peter; Van den Bergh, Omer; Tuerlinckx, Francis; Stterlin, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has shown that being affectively unstable is an indicator of several forms of psychological maladjustment. However, little is known about the mechanisms underlying affective instability. Our research aims to examine the possibility that being prone to extreme fluctuations in ones feelings is related to maladaptive emotion regulation. We investigated this hypothesis by relating affective instability, assessed in daily life using the experience sampling method, to self-reported emotion regulation strategies and to parasympathetically mediated heart rate variability (HRV), a physiological indicator of emotion regulation capacity. Results showed that HRV was negatively related to instability of positive affect (as measured by mean square successive differences), indicating that individuals with lower parasympathetic tone are emotionally less stable, particularly for positive affect. PMID:24312315

  12. From Prediction to Prescription: Intelligent Decision Support for Variable Rate Fertilization

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, Raymond Keith; Hoskinson, Reed Louis; Hess, John Richard

    2001-07-01

    We describe the use of machine learning methods in the analysis of spatial soil fertility, soil physical characteristics, and yield data, with a particular objective of determining local (field- to farm-scale) crop response patterns. For effective prescriptive use, the output of these tools is augmented with economic data and operational constraints, and recast as a rulebased decision support tool to maximize economic return in variable rate fertilization systems. We describe some of the practical issues addressed in development of one such system, including data preparation, adaptation of regression tree output for use in a rule-based expert system, and incorporation of real-world limits on system recommendations. Results from various field trials of this system are summarized.

  13. Fully-integrated heart rate variability monitoring system with an efficient memory.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyue; Chen, Mingqi; Macchiarulo, L; Boric-Lubecke, O

    2006-01-01

    Heart rate variability is a strong indicator of a number of medical conditions. Current HRV systems typically determine R-R intervals from pre-recorded ECG signals, which include a large amount of redundant data. In this paper we describe a more efficient HRV monitoring and assessment system on chip. By applying digital techniques to store the difference between every two adjacent R-R intervals in a single-port synchronous, high-performance SRAM, up to 24 hours of continuous ECG data can be stored on chip with a fixed resolution of 1 ms. The system has been tested for functionality, synthesized and laid out in a commercial 0.18 microm CMOS process in a 2.5 x 2.5 mm2 hardware core with less than 155 microW power consumption. Such a system can enable HRV monitoring with home based health care and implantable devices. PMID:17946281

  14. The Effect of Chicken Extract on Mood, Cognition and Heart Rate Variability

    PubMed Central

    Young, Hayley; Benton, David; Carter, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Chicken extract, which is rich in anserine and carnosine, has been widely taken in Asian countries as a traditional remedy with various aims, including attenuation of psychological fatigue. The effects of consuming BRAND’S Essence of Chicken (EOC) or a placebo on 46 young adults’ responses to a standard psychological “stressor” were considered. Heart rate variability (HRV), cortisol responses, mood and cognition were measured at baseline and after ten days supplementation. EOC resulted in feeling less anxious, depressed and confused and more agreeable and clearheaded. A decrease in HRV was observed after EOC but only in females. Cognition and cortisol levels were not influenced by EOC. Findings suggest that EOC may be a promising supplement to improve mood in a healthy population. PMID:25642970

  15. Resting high-frequency heart rate variability is related to resting brain perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Ben; Jennings, J. Richard; Gianaros, Peter J.; Thayer, Julian F.; Manuck, Stephen B.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the neural correlates of resting cardiac vagal activity in a sample of 432 participants (206 male; 61 African American; mean age 42 years). Pulsed arterial spin labeling was used to quantify whole brain and regional cerebral blood flow at rest. High-frequency heart rate variability (HF-HRV) was used to measure cardiac vagal activity at rest. The primary aim was to determine whether brain regions implicated in regulating cardiac vagal reactions were also related to cardiac vagal activity at rest, and whether these associations varied by sex or race. Brain areas previously related to vagal reactivity were related to resting HF-HRV. Directionality of relationships differed between overall and regional flows. Some relationships were only observed in women and African Americans. There appears to be communality between brain regions associated with task-induced vagal reactivity and those associated with resting cardiac vagal activity. PMID:25174686

  16. Automatic stress-relieving music recommendation system based on photoplethysmography-derived heart rate variability analysis.

    PubMed

    Shin, Il-Hyung; Cha, Jaepyeong; Cheon, Gyeong Woo; Lee, Choonghee; Lee, Seung Yup; Yoon, Hyung-Jin; Kim, Hee Chan

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an automatic stress-relieving music recommendation system (ASMRS) for individual music listeners. The ASMRS uses a portable, wireless photoplethysmography module with a finger-type sensor, and a program that translates heartbeat signals from the sensor to the stress index. The sympathovagal balance index (SVI) was calculated from heart rate variability to assess the user's stress levels while listening to music. Twenty-two healthy volunteers participated in the experiment. The results have shown that the participants' SVI values are highly correlated with their prespecified music preferences. The sensitivity and specificity of the favorable music classification also improved as the number of music repetitions increased to 20 times. Based on the SVI values, the system automatically recommends favorable music lists to relieve stress for individuals. PMID:25571461

  17. A methodology to quantify the differences between alternative methods of heart rate variability measurement.

    PubMed

    García-González, M A; Fernández-Chimeno, M; Guede-Fernández, F; Ferrer-Mileo, V; Argelagós-Palau, A; Álvarez-Gómez, L; Parrado, E; Moreno, J; Capdevila, L; Ramos-Castro, J

    2016-01-01

    This work proposes a systematic procedure to report the differences between heart rate variability time series obtained from alternative measurements reporting the spread and mean of the differences as well as the agreement between measuring procedures and quantifying how stationary, random and normal the differences between alternative measurements are. A description of the complete automatic procedure to obtain a differences time series (DTS) from two alternative methods, a proposal of a battery of statistical tests, and a set of statistical indicators to better describe the differences in RR interval estimation are also provided. Results show that the spread and agreement depend on the choice of alternative measurements and that the DTS cannot be considered generally as a white or as a normally distributed process. Nevertheless, in controlled measurements the DTS can be considered as a stationary process. PMID:26657196

  18. Spectral analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) may predict the future development of essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Pal, G K; Pal, Pravati; Nanda, Nivedita; Amudharaj, D; Karthik, S

    2009-02-01

    Presently, essential hypertension (EH) is among the most common morbid disorders of mankind. The fundamental pathophysiology of EH is sympathetic overactivity. It has been observed that the people having common risk factors for hypertension such as obesity, insulin resistance and stress generally have increased sympathetic activity. Therefore, it is presumed that patients suffering from EH develop some degree of increased sympathetic activity much before they clinically develop hypertension. Spectral analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) has been demonstrated to accurately assess change in sympathovagal balance (autonomic activity) even when the alteration is in its minimal form. Therefore, in the present paper we hypothesize that spectral analysis of HRV could be utilized for early prediction of EH. We also suggest that the predictive knowledge of sympathovagal imbalance in the development of EH should be employed in elucidating the mechanisms for prevention of this dysfunction. PMID:18851902

  19. The role of physical activity and heart rate variability for the control of work related stress

    PubMed Central

    Tonello, Las; Rodrigues, Fbio B.; Souza, Jeniffer W. S.; Campbell, Carmen S. G.; Leicht, Anthony S.; Boullosa, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) and exercise are often used as tools to reduce stress and therefore the risk for developing cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Meanwhile, heart rate variability (HRV) has been utilized to assess both stress and PA or exercise influences. The objective of the present review was to examine the current literature in regards to workplace stress, PA/exercise and HRV to encourage further studies. We considered original articles from known databases (PubMed, ISI Web of Knowledge) over the last 10 years that examined these important factors. A total of seven studies were identified with workplace stress strongly associated with reduced HRV in workers. Longitudinal workplace PA interventions may provide a means to improve worker stress levels and potentially cardiovascular risk with mechanisms still to be clarified. Future studies are recommended to identify the impact of PA, exercise, and fitness on stress levels and HRV in workers and their subsequent influence on cardiovascular health. PMID:24600407

  20. On heart rate variability and autonomic activity in homeostasis and in systemic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Scheff, Jeremy D; Griffel, Benjamin; Corbett, Siobhan A; Calvano, Steve E; Androulakis, Ioannis P

    2014-06-01

    Analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) is a promising diagnostic technique due to the noninvasive nature of the measurements involved and established correlations with disease severity, particularly in inflammation-linked disorders. However, the complexities underlying the interpretation of HRV complicate understanding the mechanisms that cause variability. Despite this, such interpretations are often found in literature. In this paper we explored mathematical modeling of the relationship between the autonomic nervous system and the heart, incorporating basic mechanisms such as perturbing mean values of oscillating autonomic activities and saturating signal transduction pathways to explore their impacts on HRV. We focused our analysis on human endotoxemia, a well-established, controlled experimental model of systemic inflammation that provokes changes in HRV representative of acute stress. By contrasting modeling results with published experimental data and analyses, we found that even a simple model linking the autonomic nervous system and the heart confound the interpretation of HRV changes in human endotoxemia. Multiple plausible alternative hypotheses, encoded in a model-based framework, equally reconciled experimental results. In total, our work illustrates how conventional assumptions about the relationships between autonomic activity and frequency-domain HRV metrics break down, even in a simple model. This underscores the need for further experimental work towards unraveling the underlying mechanisms of autonomic dysfunction and HRV changes in systemic inflammation. Understanding the extent of information encoded in HRV signals is critical in appropriately analyzing prior and future studies. PMID:24680646

  1. Depression as an independent determinant of decreased heart rate variability in patients post myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, M.P.; Spijkerman, T.A.; van Melle, J.P.; van den Brink, R.H.S.; Winter, J.B.; Veeger, N.J.; Ormel, J.

    2005-01-01

    Objective Depression is associated with an increased risk of cardiac morbidity and mortality in patients following myocardial infarction (MI). Our objective was to investigate the potential role of the autonomic nervous system in mediating this detrimental effect. Methods The study group consisted of 95 consecutive post-MI patients without depression and 53 post-MI patients with depression. Depressive symptoms were assessed by the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Activity of the autonomic nervous system was assessed by analysing heart rate variability (HRV) using 24-hour ambulatory electrocardiographic recordings as obtained three months post MI. Results Higher age, female gender and left ventricular ejection fraction <0.40 were associated with lower HRV (SDANN, and very-low-frequency and low-frequency power, but not RMSSD and high-frequency power), as was depression. In the multivariate analysis, age and left ventricular ejection fraction but not gender emerged to be independently associated with HRV. After adjustment for these two covariates, depression remained significantly associated with low HRV. Conclusions Patients with depression in the present post-MI study are characterised by decreased longer-range HRV compared with the patients without depression, independent of other clinical variables. This observation supports the concept that one of the mechanisms underlying the detrimental effect of depression on post-MI prognosis may be that depression adds to the autonomic derangement post MI. PMID:25696482

  2. Haptic feedback enhances rhythmic motor control by reducing variability, not improving convergence rate.

    PubMed

    Ankarali, M Mert; Tutkun Sen, H; De, Avik; Okamura, Allison M; Cowan, Noah J

    2014-03-01

    Stability and performance during rhythmic motor behaviors such as locomotion are critical for survival across taxa: falling down would bode well for neither cheetah nor gazelle. Little is known about how haptic feedback, particularly during discrete events such as the heel-strike event during walking, enhances rhythmic behavior. To determine the effect of haptic cues on rhythmic motor performance, we investigated a virtual paddle juggling behavior, analogous to bouncing a table tennis ball on a paddle. Here, we show that a force impulse to the hand at the moment of ball-paddle collision categorically improves performance over visual feedback alone, not by regulating the rate of convergence to steady state (e.g., via higher gain feedback or modifying the steady-state hand motion), but rather by reducing cycle-to-cycle variability. This suggests that the timing and state cues afforded by haptic feedback decrease the nervous system's uncertainty of the state of the ball to enable more accurate control but that the feedback gain itself is unaltered. This decrease in variability leads to a substantial increase in the mean first passage time, a measure of the long-term metastability of a stochastic dynamical system. Rhythmic tasks such as locomotion and juggling involve intermittent contact with the environment (i.e., hybrid transitions), and the timing of such transitions is generally easy to sense via haptic feedback. This timing information may improve metastability, equating to less frequent falls or other failures depending on the task. PMID:24371296

  3. Emotionally excited eyeblink-rate variability predicts an experience of transportation into the narrative world

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Ryota; Hino, Kojun; Shimazu, Makoto; Liang, Yingzong; Okada, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Collective spectator communications such as oral presentations, movies, and storytelling performances are ubiquitous in human culture. This study investigated the effects of past viewing experiences and differences in expressive performance on an audience’s transportive experience into a created world of a storytelling performance. In the experiment, 60 participants (mean age = 34.12 years, SD = 13.18 years, range 18–63 years) were assigned to watch one of two videotaped performances that were played (1) in an orthodox way for frequent viewers and (2) in a modified way aimed at easier comprehension for first-time viewers. Eyeblink synchronization among participants was quantified by employing distance-based measurements of spike trains, Dspike and Dinterval (Victor and Purpura, 1997). The results indicated that even non-familiar participants’ eyeblinks were synchronized as the story progressed and that the effect of the viewing experience on transportation was weak. Rather, the results of a multiple regression analysis demonstrated that the degrees of transportation could be predicted by a retrospectively reported humor experience and higher real-time variability (i.e., logarithmic transformed SD) of inter blink intervals during a performance viewing. The results are discussed from the viewpoint in which the extent of eyeblink synchronization and eyeblink-rate variability acts as an index of the inner experience of audience members. PMID:26029123

  4. On heart rate variability and autonomic activity in homeostasis and in systemic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Scheff, Jeremy D.; Griffel, Benjamin; Corbett, Siobhan A.; Calvano, Steve E.; Androulakis, Ioannis P.

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) is a promising diagnostic technique due to the noninvasive nature of the measurements involved and established correlations with disease severity, particularly in inflammation-linked disorders. However, the complexities underlying the interpretation of HRV complicate understanding the mechanisms that cause variability. Despite this, such interpretations are often found in literature. In this paper we explored mathematical modeling of the relationship between the autonomic nervous system and the heart, incorporating basic mechanisms such as perturbing mean values of oscillating autonomic activities and saturating signal transduction pathways to explore their impacts on HRV. We focused our analysis on human endotoxemia, a well-established, controlled experimental model of systemic inflammation that provokes changes in HRV representative of acute stress. By contrasting modeling results with published experimental data and analyses, we found that even a simple model linking the autonomic nervous system and the heart confound the interpretation of HRV changes in human endotoxemia. Multiple plausible alternative hypotheses, encoded in a model-based framework, equally reconciled experimental results. In total, our work illustrates how conventional assumptions about the relationships between autonomic activity and frequency-domain HRV metrics break down, even in a simple model. This underscores the need for further experimental work towards unraveling the underlying mechanisms of autonomic dysfunction and HRV changes in systemic inflammation. Understanding the extent of information encoded in HRV signals is critical in appropriately analyzing prior and future studies. PMID:24680646

  5. Complexity of Heart Rate Variability Can Predict Stroke-In-Evolution in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chih-Hao; Huang, Pei-Wen; Tang, Sung-Chun; Shieh, Jiann-Shing; Lai, Dar-Ming; Wu, An-Yu; Jeng, Jiann-Shing

    2015-01-01

    About one-third of acute stroke patients may experience stroke-in-evolution, which is often associated with a worse outcome. Recently, we showed that multiscale entropy (MSE), a non-linear method for analysis of heart rate variability (HRV), is an early outcome predictor in non-atrial fibrillation (non-AF) stroke patients. We aimed to further investigate MSE as a predictor of SIE. We included 90 non-AF ischemic stroke patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). Nineteen (21.1%) patients met the criteria of SIE, which was defined as an increase in the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score of ?2 points within 3 days of admission. The MSE of HRV was analyzed from 1-hour continuous ECG signals during the first 24?hours of admission. The complexity index was defined as the area under the MSE curve. Compared with patients without SIE, those with SIE had a significantly lower complexity index value (21.3??8.5 vs 26.5??7.7, P?=?0.012). After adjustment for clinical variables, patients with higher complexity index values were significantly less likely to have SIE (odds ratio?=?0.897, 95% confidence interval 0.8180.983, P?=?0.020). In summary, early assessment of HRV by MSE can be a potential predictor of SIE in ICU-admitted non-AF ischemic stroke patients. PMID:26619945

  6. Posttraumatic Stress, Heart-Rate Variability, and the Mediating Role of Behavioral Health Risks

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, Paul A.; Watkins, Lana; Calhoun, Patrick S.; Oddone, Ania; Sherwood, Andrew; Dennis, Michelle F.; Rissling, Michelle B.; Beckham, Jean C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been linked to reduced heart-rate variability (HRV), which is in turn a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and death. Although hyperarousal and anxiety are thought to underlie this association, behavioral health risks, including smoking, alcohol dependence, obesity, and sleep disturbance, represent potential mechanisms linking PTSD and HRV. Methods To test this hypothesis, a combination of short-term laboratory-based and 24-hour ambulatory measures of HRV were collected from 227 young adults (18-39 years old), 107 of whom were diagnosed with PTSD. Latent variable modeling was used to assess the relationship of PTSD symptoms with HRV along with potential behavioral health mediators. Results PTSD symptoms were associated with reduced HRV, ? = -.21, p = .002. However, this association was reduced in models that adjusted for cigarette consumption and history of alcohol dependence, and was rendered non-significant in a model adjusting for sleep disturbance. Independent mediation effects were deemed significant via bootstrapping analysis. Together the three behavioral health factors (cigarette consumption, history of alcohol dependence, and sleep disturbance) accounted for 94% of the shared variance between PTSD symptoms and HRV. Abdominal obesity was not a significant mediator. Conclusions These results indicate that behavioral factorsspecifically smoking, alcohol overuse, and sleep disturbancemediate the association between PTSD and HRV-based indices of autonomic nervous system dysregulation. Benefits from psychiatric and psychological interventions in PTSD may therefore be enhanced by including modification of health behaviors. PMID:25264973

  7. Spectral analysis of heart rate variability in the assessment of autonomic diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Pagani, M; Malfatto, G; Pierini, S; Casati, R; Masu, A M; Poli, M; Guzzetti, S; Lombardi, F; Cerutti, S; Malliani, A

    1988-08-01

    We studied heart rate variability in 49 uncomplicated diabetics (27 with insulin therapy; 22 with oral hypoglycemic agents) and in 40 age-matched controls. An automatic autoregressive algorithm was used to compute the power spectral density (PSD) of beat by beat RR variability derived from the surface ECG. The PSD contains two major components (a low frequency approximately 0.1 Hz (LF) and a high frequency, respiratory linked, approximately 0.25 Hz (HF] that provide, respectively, quantitative markers of sympathetic and vagal modulatory activities and of their balance. As compared to controls, in diabetics, besides a reduced RR variance at rest (2722 +/- 300 and 1436 +/- 241 ms2, respectively), we observed during passive tilt an altered response of spectral indices of sympathetic activation and vagal withdrawal, suggestive of a complex modification in the neural control activities. In addition, we compared this approach to the commonly used clinical tests score, and observed that the latter provides overall results similar to those obtained with spectral changes induced by tilt (r = 0.42; P less than 0.01). Of potential clinical importance is that the data obtained with spectral analysis appear more thoroughly quantifiable and do not require the active collaboration of the patients. PMID:3049759

  8. Entropy information of heart rate variability and its power spectrum during day and night

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Li; Jun, Wang

    2013-07-01

    Physiologic systems generate complex fluctuations in their output signals that reflect the underlying dynamics. We employed the base-scale entropy method and the power spectral analysis to study the 24 hours heart rate variability (HRV) signals. The results show that such profound circadian-, age- and pathologic-dependent changes are accompanied by changes in base-scale entropy and power spectral distribution. Moreover, the base-scale entropy changes reflect the corresponding changes in the autonomic nerve outflow. With the suppression of the vagal tone and dominance of the sympathetic tone in congestive heart failure (CHF) subjects, there is more variability in the date fluctuation mode. So the higher base-scale entropy belongs to CHF subjects. With the decrease of the sympathetic tone and the respiratory frequency (RSA) becoming more pronounced with slower breathing during sleeping, the base-scale entropy drops in CHF subjects. The HRV series of the two healthy groups have the same diurnal/nocturnal trend as the CHF series. The fluctuation dynamics trend of data in the three groups can be described as “HF effect”.

  9. Complexity of Heart Rate Variability Can Predict Stroke-In-Evolution in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Hao; Huang, Pei-Wen; Tang, Sung-Chun; Shieh, Jiann-Shing; Lai, Dar-Ming; Wu, An-Yu; Jeng, Jiann-Shing

    2015-01-01

    About one-third of acute stroke patients may experience stroke-in-evolution, which is often associated with a worse outcome. Recently, we showed that multiscale entropy (MSE), a non-linear method for analysis of heart rate variability (HRV), is an early outcome predictor in non-atrial fibrillation (non-AF) stroke patients. We aimed to further investigate MSE as a predictor of SIE. We included 90 non-AF ischemic stroke patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). Nineteen (21.1%) patients met the criteria of SIE, which was defined as an increase in the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score of ?2 points within 3 days of admission. The MSE of HRV was analyzed from 1-hour continuous ECG signals during the first 24?hours of admission. The complexity index was defined as the area under the MSE curve. Compared with patients without SIE, those with SIE had a significantly lower complexity index value (21.3??8.5 vs 26.5??7.7, P?=?0.012). After adjustment for clinical variables, patients with higher complexity index values were significantly less likely to have SIE (odds ratio?=?0.897, 95% confidence interval 0.818-0.983, P?=?0.020). In summary, early assessment of HRV by MSE can be a potential predictor of SIE in ICU-admitted non-AF ischemic stroke patients. PMID:26619945

  10. Heart Rate and Systolic Blood Pressure Variability on Recently Diagnosed Diabetics

    PubMed Central

    Michel-Chávez, Anaclara; Estañol, Bruno; Gien-López, José Antonio; Robles-Cabrera, Adriana; Huitrado-Duarte, María Elena; Moreno-Morales, René; Becerra-Luna, Brayans

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetes affects approximately 250 million people in the world. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes that leads to severe postural hypotension, exercise intolerance, and increased incidence of silent myocardial infarction. Objective To determine the variability of heart rate (HR) and systolic blood pressure (SBP) in recently diagnosed diabetic patients. Methods The study included 30 patients with a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes of less than 2 years and 30 healthy controls. We used a Finapres® device to measure during five minutes beat-to-beat HR and blood pressure in three experimental conditions: supine position, standing position, and rhythmic breathing at 0.1 Hz. The results were analyzed in the time and frequency domains. Results In the HR analysis, statistically significant differences were found in the time domain, specifically on short-term values such as standard deviation of NN intervals (SDNN), root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD), and number of pairs of successive NNs that differ by more than 50 ms (pNN50). In the BP analysis, there were no significant differences, but there was a sympathetic dominance in all three conditions. The baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) decreased in patients with early diabetes compared with healthy subjects during the standing maneuver. Conclusions There is a decrease in HR variability in patients with early type 2 diabetes. No changes were observed in the BP analysis in the supine position, but there were changes in BRS with the standing maneuver, probably due to sympathetic hyperactivity. PMID:26176187

  11. Heart Rate Variability: a Follow-up in Elite Soccer Players Throughout the Season.

    PubMed

    Naranjo, J; De la Cruz, B; Sarabia, E; De Hoyo, M; Domnguez-Cobo, S

    2015-11-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) can provide useful information on physiological adaptations to training, but its role is unknown in professional soccer. The aim of this study was to determine an HRV profile in professional soccer over a season. A total of 504 records were made of the heart beat signal throughout a season from 22 professional soccer players. HRV was recorded in a sitting position, early morning and fasting for a period of 10?min. Standard deviation 1 and 2 (SD1, SD2), standard deviation of normal to normal R-R intervals (SDNN), Root Mean Square of the Successive Differences (rMSSD), percentage of RR intervals >?50?ms (pNN50), Sample Entropy (SampEn), Stress Score (SS) and sympathetic/parasympathetic ratio (S/PS ratio) were calculated. SDNN, rMSSD, pNN50, SD1 and SD2 showed an identical behaviour throughout the season, with lower values in the pre-season and the end of the season. SS and S/PS ratio indicated a sympathetic stress alert in the same periods. A weekly recording of the HRV over a 10?min period that includes a Poincar plot with SS and S/PS ratio and at least one variable of the time domain is a useful tool for the follow-up of the individual assimilation of weekly workloads, including the game. PMID:26140687

  12. Emotionally excited eyeblink-rate variability predicts an experience of transportation into the narrative world.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Ryota; Hino, Kojun; Shimazu, Makoto; Liang, Yingzong; Okada, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Collective spectator communications such as oral presentations, movies, and storytelling performances are ubiquitous in human culture. This study investigated the effects of past viewing experiences and differences in expressive performance on an audience's transportive experience into a created world of a storytelling performance. In the experiment, 60 participants (mean age = 34.12 years, SD = 13.18 years, range 18-63 years) were assigned to watch one of two videotaped performances that were played (1) in an orthodox way for frequent viewers and (2) in a modified way aimed at easier comprehension for first-time viewers. Eyeblink synchronization among participants was quantified by employing distance-based measurements of spike trains, D (spike) and D (interval) (Victor and Purpura, 1997). The results indicated that even non-familiar participants' eyeblinks were synchronized as the story progressed and that the effect of the viewing experience on transportation was weak. Rather, the results of a multiple regression analysis demonstrated that the degrees of transportation could be predicted by a retrospectively reported humor experience and higher real-time variability (i.e., logarithmic transformed SD) of inter blink intervals during a performance viewing. The results are discussed from the viewpoint in which the extent of eyeblink synchronization and eyeblink-rate variability acts as an index of the inner experience of audience members. PMID:26029123

  13. Analysis of heart rate variability signal during meditation using deterministic-chaotic quantifiers.

    PubMed

    Kamath, Chandrakar

    2013-10-01

    This study investigated the level of chaos and the existence of fractal patterns in the heart rate variability (HRV) signal prior to meditation and during meditation using two quantifiers adapted from non-linear dynamics and deterministic chaos theory: (1) component central tendency measures (CCTMs) and (2) Higuchi fractal dimension (HFD). CCTM quantifies degree of variability/chaos in the specified quadrant of the second-order difference plot for HRV time series, while HFD quantifies dimensional complexity of the HRV series. Both the quantifiers yielded excellent results in discriminating the different psychophysiological states. The study found (1) significantly higher first quadrant CCTM values and (2) significantly lower HFD values during meditation state compared to pre-meditation state. Both of these can be attributed to the respiratory-modulated oscillations shifting to the lower frequency region by parasympathetic tone during meditation. It is thought that these quantifiers are most promising in providing new insight into the evolution of complexity of underlying dynamics in different physiological states. PMID:24044586

  14. Slip rate variability along the Kunlun Fault using PS-InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nockles, V.; Parsons, B.; Wright, T. J.; Holley, R.; Shan, X.

    2013-12-01

    Variability in slip rate along the left-lateral Kunlun Fault in Tibet has been investigated spatially, using geological observations, by a number of previous authors notably Van der Woerd et al, 2002 and Kirby et al, 2007 and the results interpreted as a systematic decrease eastwards towards the fault tip. To investigate further whether systematic trends can be observed we use satellite radar interferometry (InSAR) to estimate apparent slip rates along the Eastern Kunlun fault. We processed a total of 108 passes, each 400km in length, on 5 tracks along a 900km section of the eastern part of the Kunlun Fault running from the end of the Kokoxili rupture, at the intersection with the Kunlun Pass, to the tip of the fault at Maqu, on the eastern margin of Tibet. We compare the results for PS-InSAR and standard InSAR on two of the tracks and find them to be both consistent and complementary. Standard InSAR effectively delineates long wavelength features, whilst PS-InSAR provides valuable data in regions that are incoherent using standard techniques. Using PS-InSAR enables us to reduce decorrelation effects and extend our data set by including larger perpendicular baselines. For example, the response to a magnitude 6.1 earthquake on the right lateral Elashan Fault, just north of the Kunlun fault, is incoherent close to the fault in standard InSAR creating unwrapping problems. PS-InSAR, however, is coherent and shows a clear signal related to this event. In general, in a non-urban setting, where data is coherent using standard InSAR the noise levels are lower than for PS-InSAR due to the spatial averaging of the data and the inclusion of only small baseline interferograms, whereas PS-InSAR performs better in less coherent areas. We construct profiles of the mean line-of-sight velocity for 5 sections of the fault, then invert to solve for the best fitting model parameters using an elastic dislocation model of a strike slip fault. We obtain slip rates along the Kunlun Fault, for a locking depth of 10km, of 12-15mm/yr at Burdan Budai Shan (95.5E), reducing to 7mm/yr where the fault is offset by a pull apart basin (98.8E), increasing back to 9mm/yr (100.16E), and then reducing to less than 6mm/yr at the fault tip (102.1E). Our results match the overall trends seen with geological data but are seen to be a few mm lower along the middle section of the fault. These differences can possibly be attributed to variations through the earthquake cycle as geological slip rates average over the earthquake cycle, whilst geodetic slip rates represent a snap shot at a given time within it. For example, near the end of the Kokoxili rupture, where a post seismic signal might be expected, the apparent slip rates are seen to be higher than for geological slip rates. In addition, we consider the interaction of the main fault with off-shoots to the south of the Kunlun fault, and the effect of thrust faulting to the north, by looking for spatial variability in the shape of the profiles. References: Kirby et al (2007), Slip rate gradients along the Eastern Kunlun fault, Tectonics, 26, doi:10.1029/2006TC002033 Van der Woer ,J., et al. (2002), The 14 November 2001, Mw = 7.8 Kokxili earthquake in northern Tibet (Qinghai Province, China), Seismol. Res. Lett., 73, 125-135

  15. Integrated Central-Autonomic Multifractal Complexity in the Heart Rate Variability of Healthy Humans

    PubMed Central

    Lin, D. C.; Sharif, A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of Study: The aim of this study was to characterize the central-autonomic interaction underlying the multifractality in heart rate variability (HRV) of healthy humans. Materials and Methods: Eleven young healthy subjects participated in two separate ~40 min experimental sessions, one in supine (SUP) and one in, head-up-tilt (HUT), upright (UPR) body positions. Surface scalp electroencephalography (EEG) and electrocardiogram (ECG) were collected and fractal correlation of brain and heart rate data was analyzed based on the idea of relative multifractality. The fractal correlation was further examined with the EEG, HRV spectral measures using linear regression of two variables and principal component analysis (PCA) to find clues for the physiological processing underlying the central influence in fractal HRV. Results: We report evidence of a central-autonomic fractal correlation (CAFC) where the HRV multifractal complexity varies significantly with the fractal correlation between the heart rate and brain data (P = 0.003). The linear regression shows significant correlation between CAFC measure and EEG Beta band spectral component (P = 0.01 for SUP and P = 0.002 for UPR positions). There is significant correlation between CAFC measure and HRV LF component in the SUP position (P = 0.04), whereas the correlation with the HRV HF component approaches significance (P = 0.07). The correlation between CAFC measure and HRV spectral measures in the UPR position is weak. The PCA results confirm these findings and further imply multiple physiological processes underlying CAFC, highlighting the importance of the EEG Alpha, Beta band, and the HRV LF, HF spectral measures in the supine position. Discussion and Conclusion: The findings of this work can be summarized into three points: (i) Similar fractal characteristics exist in the brain and heart rate fluctuation and the change toward stronger fractal correlation implies the change toward more complex HRV multifractality. (ii) CAFC is likely contributed by multiple physiological mechanisms, with its central elements mainly derived from the EEG Alpha, Beta band dynamics. (iii) The CAFC in SUP and UPR positions is qualitatively different, with a more predominant central influence in the fractal HRV of the UPR position. PMID:22403548

  16. Evaluation of Heart Rate Variability by means of Laser Doppler Vibrometry measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosoli, G.; Casacanditella, L.; Tomasini, EP; Scalise, L.

    2015-11-01

    Heart Rate Variability (HRV) analysis aims to study the physiological variability of the Heart Rate (HR), which is related to the health conditions of the subject. HRV is assessed measuring heart periods (HP) on a time window of >5 minutes (1)-(2). HPs are determined from signals of different nature: electrocardiogram (ECG), photoplethysmogram (PPG), phonocardiogram (PCG) or vibrocardiogram (VCG) (3)-(4)-(5). The fundamental aspect is the identification of a feature in each heartbeat that allows to accurately compute cardiac periods (such as R peaks in ECG), in order to make possible the measurement of all the typical HRV evaluations on those intervals. VCG is a non-contact technique (4), very favourable in medicine, which detects the vibrations on the skin surface (e.g. on the carotid artery) resulting from vascular blood motion consequent to electrical signal (ECG). In this paper, we propose the use of VCG for the measurement of a signal related to HRV and the use of a novel algorithm based on signal geometry (7) to detect signal peaks, in order to accurately determine cardiac periods and the Poincare plot (9)-(10). The results reported are comparable to the ones reached with the gold standard (ECG) and in literature (3)-(5). We report mean values of HP of 832±54 ms and 832±55 ms by means of ECG and VCG, respectively. Moreover, this algorithm allow us to identify particular features of ECG and VCG signals, so that in the future we will be able to evaluate specific correlations between the two.

  17. Evaluation of a technique to measure heart rate variability in anaesthetised cats.

    PubMed

    Khor, Kuan Hua; Shiels, Ian A; Campbell, Fiona E; Greer, Ristan M; Rose, Annie; Mills, Paul C

    2014-02-01

    Analysis of heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) are powerful tools to investigate cardiac diseases, but current methods, including 24-h Holter monitoring, can be cumbersome and may be compromised by movement artefact. A commercially available data capture and analysis system was used in anaesthetised healthy cats to measure HR and HRV during pharmacological manipulation of HR. Seven healthy cats were subjected to a randomised crossover study design with a 7 day washout period between two treatment groups, placebo and atenolol (1mg/kg, IV), with the efficacy of atenolol to inhibit ?1 adrenoreceptors challenged by epinephrine. Statistical significance for the epinephrine challenge was set at P<0.0027 (Holm-Bonferroni correction), whereas a level of significance of P<0.05 was set for other variables. Analysis of the continuous electrocardiography (ECG) recordings showed that epinephrine challenge increased HR in the placebo group (P=0.0003) but not in the atenolol group. The change in HR was greater in the placebo group than in the atenolol group (P=0.0004). Therefore, compared to cats pre-treated with placebo, pre-treatment with atenolol significantly antagonised the tachycardia while not significantly affecting HRV. The increased HR in the placebo group following epinephrine challenge was consistent with a shift of the sympathovagal balance towards a predominantly sympathetic tone. However, the small (but not significant at the critical value) decrease in the normalised high-frequency component (HFnorm) in both groups of cats suggested that epinephrine induced a parasympathetic withdrawal in addition to sympathetic enhancement (increased normalised low frequency component or LFnorm). In conclusion, this model is a highly sensitive and repeatable model to investigate HRV in anaesthetised cats that would be useful in the laboratory setting for short-term investigation of cardiovascular disease and subtle responses to pharmacological agents in this species. PMID:24321367

  18. Relationship between brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity and heart rate variability in young Japanese men.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Mutsuhiro; Nomura, Kyoko; Karita, Kanae; Nishikitani, Mariko; Yano, Eiji

    2004-12-01

    This study examined the relationship between arterial stiffness and autonomic nervous function in a young population. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 382 Japanese males, aged 24 to 39 years, who worked at the same information service company. Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) was measured using an automatic waveform analyzer, and the spectral power of heart rate variability in the low frequency (LF: 0.04-0.15 Hz) and the high frequency (HF: 0.15-0.40 Hz) band was evaluated by the maximum entropy method. LF/HF and HF were used as the indicators of sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous activity, respectively. Psycho-hormonal responses were examined by the Profile of Mood State (tension-anxiety and anger-hostility scales) and Hamilton's Depression Scale with serum cortisol and catecholamine levels. In a univariate analysis, baPWV was positively associated with the following variables (all p <0.05): LF/HF, age, body mass index, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, heart rate, serum total cholesterol and triglycerides, blood glucose, and plasma cortisol and noradrenaline. Multiple regression analysis indicated that LF/HF was an independent predictor of baPWV (p <0.05), after controlling for significant effects of age, systolic blood pressure, and plasma noradrenaline levels. There was no significant effect of HF on baPWV in this multivariate analysis. Neither mood state nor health-related lifestyle factors such as smoking were significant. It was suggested that baPWV is closely associated with sympathetic nervous activity in young men. PMID:15894832

  19. Limbic Dysregulation is Associated With Lowered Heart Rate Variability and Increased Trait Anxiety in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Mujica-Parodi, Lilianne R.; Korgaonkar, Mayuresh; Ravindranath, Bosky; Greenberg, Tsafrir; Tomasi, Dardo; Wagshul, Mark; Ardekani, Babak; Guilfoyle, David; Khan, Shilpi; Zhong, Yuru; Chon, Ki; Malaspina, Dolores

    2010-01-01

    Objectives We tested whether dynamic interaction between limbic regions supports a control systems model of excitatory and inhibitory components of a negative feedback loop, and whether dysregulation of those dynamics might correlate with trait differences in anxiety and their cardiac characteristics among healthy adults. Experimental Design Sixty-five subjects received fMRI scans while passively viewing angry, fearful, happy, and neutral facial stimuli. Subjects also completed a trait anxiety inventory, and were monitored using ambulatory wake ECG. The ECG data were analyzed for heart rate variability, a measure of autonomic regulation. The fMRI data were analyzed with respect to six limbic regions (bilateral amygdala, bilateral hippocampus, Brodmann Areas 9, 45) using limbic time-series cross-correlations, maximum BOLD amplitude, and BOLD amplitude at each point in the time-series. Principal Observations Diminished coupling between limbic time-series in response to the neutral, fearful, and happy faces was associated with greater trait anxiety, greater sympathetic activation, and lowered heart rate variability. Individuals with greater levels of trait anxiety showed delayed activation of Brodmann Area 45 in response to the fearful and happy faces, and lowered Brodmann Area 45 activation with prolonged left amygdala activation in response to the neutral faces. Conclusions The dynamics support limbic regulation as a control system, in which dysregulation, as assessed by diminished coupling between limbic time-series, is associated with increased trait anxiety and excitatory autonomic outputs. Trait-anxious individuals showed delayed inhibitory activation in response to overt-affect stimuli and diminished inhibitory activation with delayed extinction of excitatory activation in response to ambiguous-affect stimuli. PMID:18041716

  20. Anxiety, attention, and decision making: The moderating role of heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Ramrez, Encarnacin; Ortega, Ana Raquel; Reyes Del Paso, Gustavo A

    2015-12-01

    The current exploratory research examined whether high frequency heart rate variability (HF-HRV) modulates the association between anxiety and (1) executive attentional control during situations involving neutral stimuli, in which the distractor stimuli are in conflict with the target stimulus, and (2) risk aversion in decision making. Forty-five participants (21 with low and 24 with high trait-anxiety) performed a modified version of the Attention Network Test to measure attentional control, and the Balloon Analog Risk Task to measure risk aversion. HF-HRV was recorded during a rest period before completion of the tasks. Results showed that individuals with high anxiety and low HF-HRV have worse attentional control in the face of conflicting information as well as greater risk aversion, in comparison with individuals with both high anxiety and high HF-HRV or low anxiety (regardless of HF-HRV). HF-HRV was positively associated with attentional control and negatively associated with risk aversion. Furthermore, a strong negative association was observed between attentional control and risk aversion. These results suggest that HF-HRV modulates the influence of anxiety on both attentional control to neutral stimuli, and risk aversion in decision making. Greater HF-HRV appears to fulfill a protective role in highly anxious individuals. The associations observed also suggest that executive control of attention plays a relevant role in decision making. These results support the relevance of the autonomic nervous system in sustained cognition and are in accordance with theories in which vagal-mediated heart rate variability is taken as an indicator of prefrontal cortex inhibitory influences. PMID:26555079