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Sample records for vascular permeability index

  1. Vascular permeability—the essentials

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The vasculature, composed of vessels of different morphology and function, distributes blood to all tissues and maintains physiological tissue homeostasis. In pathologies, the vasculature is often affected by, and engaged in, the disease process. This may result in excessive formation of new, unstable, and hyperpermeable vessels with poor blood flow, which further promotes hypoxia and disease propagation. Chronic vessel permeability may also facilitate metastatic spread of cancer. Thus, there is a strong incentive to learn more about an important aspect of vessel biology in health and disease: the regulation of vessel permeability. The current review aims to summarize current insights into different mechanisms of vascular permeability, its regulatory factors, and the consequences for disease. PMID:26220421

  2. Vascular permeability in cerebral cavernous malformations.

    PubMed

    Mikati, Abdul G; Khanna, Omaditya; Zhang, Lingjiao; Girard, Romuald; Shenkar, Robert; Guo, Xiaodong; Shah, Akash; Larsson, Henrik B W; Tan, Huan; Li, Luying; Wishnoff, Matthew S; Shi, Changbin; Christoforidis, Gregory A; Awad, Issam A

    2015-10-01

    Patients with the familial form of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are haploinsufficient for the CCM1, CCM2, or CCM3 gene. Loss of corresponding CCM proteins increases RhoA kinase-mediated endothelial permeability in vitro, and in mouse brains in vivo. A prospective case-controlled observational study investigated whether the brains of human subjects with familial CCM show vascular hyperpermeability by dynamic contrast-enhanced quantitative perfusion magnetic resonance imaging, in comparison with CCM cases without familial disease, and whether lesional or brain vascular permeability correlates with CCM disease activity. Permeability in white matter far (WMF) from lesions was significantly greater in familial than in sporadic cases, but was similar in CCM lesions. Permeability in WMF increased with age in sporadic patients, but not in familial cases. Patients with more aggressive familial CCM disease had greater WMF permeability compared to those with milder disease phenotype, but similar lesion permeability. Subjects receiving statin medications for routine cardiovascular indications had a trend of lower WMF, but not lesion, permeability. This is the first demonstration of brain vascular hyperpermeability in humans with an autosomal dominant disease, as predicted mechanistically. Brain permeability, more than lesion permeability, may serve as a biomarker of CCM disease activity, and help calibrate potential drug therapy. PMID:25966944

  3. The clinical usefulness of extravascular lung water and pulmonary vascular permeability index to diagnose and characterize pulmonary edema: a prospective multicenter study on the quantitative differential diagnostic definition for acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Acute lung injury (ALI)/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by features other than increased pulmonary vascular permeability. Pulmonary vascular permeability combined with increased extravascular lung water content has been considered a quantitative diagnostic criterion of ALI/ARDS. This prospective, multi-institutional, observational study aimed to clarify the clinical pathophysiological features of ALI/ARDS and establish its quantitative diagnostic criteria. Methods The extravascular lung water index (EVLWI) and the pulmonary vascular permeability index (PVPI) were measured using the transpulmonary thermodilution method in 266 patients with PaO2/FiO2 ratio ? 300 mmHg and bilateral infiltration on chest radiography, in 23 ICUs of academic tertiary referral hospitals. Pulmonary edema was defined as EVLWI ? 10 ml/kg. Three experts retrospectively determined the pathophysiological features of respiratory insufficiency by considering the patients' history, clinical presentation, chest computed tomography and radiography, echocardiography, EVLWI and brain natriuretic peptide level, and the time course of all preceding findings under systemic and respiratory therapy. Results Patients were divided into the following three categories on the basis of the pathophysiological diagnostic differentiation of respiratory insufficiency: ALI/ARDS, cardiogenic edema, and pleural effusion with atelectasis, which were noted in 207 patients, 26 patients, and 33 patients, respectively. EVLWI was greater in ALI/ARDS and cardiogenic edema patients than in patients with pleural effusion with atelectasis (18.5 ± 6.8, 14.4 ± 4.0, and 8.3 ± 2.1, respectively; P < 0.01). PVPI was higher in ALI/ARDS patients than in cardiogenic edema or pleural effusion with atelectasis patients (3.2 ± 1.4, 2.0 ± 0.8, and 1.6 ± 0.5; P < 0.01). In ALI/ARDS patients, EVLWI increased with increasing pulmonary vascular permeability (r = 0.729, P < 0.01) and was weakly correlated with intrathoracic blood volume (r = 0.236, P < 0.01). EVLWI was weakly correlated with the PaO2/FiO2 ratio in the ALI/ARDS and cardiogenic edema patients. A PVPI value of 2.6 to 2.85 provided a definitive diagnosis of ALI/ARDS (specificity, 0.90 to 0.95), and a value < 1.7 ruled out an ALI/ARDS diagnosis (specificity, 0.95). Conclusion PVPI may be a useful quantitative diagnostic tool for ARDS in patients with hypoxemic respiratory failure and radiographic infiltrates. Trial registration UMIN-CTR ID UMIN000003627 PMID:23232188

  4. Atrial natriuretic factor increases vascular permeability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockette, Warren; Brennaman, Bruce

    1990-01-01

    An increase in central blood volume in microgravity may result in increased plasma levels of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF). In this study, it was determined whether ANF increases capillary permeability to plasma protein. Conscious, bilaterally nephrectomized male rats were infused with either saline, ANF + saline, or hexamethonium + saline over 2 h following bolus injections of (I-125)-albumin and (C-14)-dextran of similar molecular size. Blood pressure was monitored, and serial determinations of hematocrits were made. Animals infused with 1.0 microg/kg per min ANF had significantly higher hematocrits than animals infused with saline vehicle. Infusion of ANF increased the extravasation of (I-125)-albumin, but not (C-14)-dextran from the intravascular compartment. ANF also induced a depressor response in rats, but the change in blood pressure did not account for changes in capillary permeability to albumin; similar depressor responses induced by hexamethonium were not accompanied by increased extravasation of albumin from the intravascular compartment. ANF may decrease plasma volume by increasing permeability to albumin, and this effect of ANF may account for some of the signs and symptoms of space motion sickness.

  5. Wogonin influences vascular permeability via Wnt/?-catenin pathway.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiuming; Zhou, Yuxin; Zhou, Mi; Huang, Yujie; Li, Zhiyu; You, Qidong; Lu, Na; Guo, Qinglong

    2015-07-01

    Wogonin, a flavone from the root of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, has shown various biological activities. In our previous study, it was confirmed that wogonin could decrease the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1? (HIF-1?) by affecting its stability under hypoxia. However, it is still unknown whether wogonin could influence Wnt/?-catenin pathway under hypoxia. In this study, we found that wogonin disrupted Wnt/?-catenin signaling and reduced the secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, also known as vascular permeability factor, VPF), which increased vascular permeability in certain diseases. It was found that wogonin suppressed HUVECs hyperactivity and actin remodeling induced by hypoxia, inhibited transendothelial cell migration of the human breast carcinoma cell MDA-MB-231 and the extravasated Evans in vivo Miles vascular permeability assay. Wogonin-treated cells showed a decrease in the expression of Wnt protein and its co-receptors, as well as a parallel increase in the expression of Axin and GSK-3? in degradation complex, leading to degradation of ?-catenin. In addition, wogonin promoted the binding between Axin and ?-catenin, increased ubiquitination of ?-catenin and promoted its degradation. Interestingly, wogonin decreased the expression of TCF-1, TCF-3, and LEF-1 and inhibited nuclear accumulation of ?-catenin as well as the binding of ?-catenin and TCF-1, TCF-3, or LEF-1. All of the above results showed that wogonin could inhibit the expression of VEGF, which is an important factor regulated by ?-catenin. Taken together, the results suggested that wogonin was a potent inhibitor of Wnt/?-catenin and influenced vascular permeability, and this might provide new therapeutics in certain diseases. PMID:24136474

  6. Fingolimod alters inflammatory mediators and vascular permeability in intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Jing; Chang, Guo-Qiang; Liu, Yuanchu; Gong, Ye; Yang, Chunsheng; Wood, Kristofer; Shi, Fu-Dong; Fu, Ying; Yan, Yaping

    2015-12-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) leads to high rates of death and disability. The pronounced inflammatory reactions that rapidly follow ICH contribute to disease progression. Our recent clinical trial demonstrated that oral administration of an immune modulator fingolimod restrained secondary injury derived from initial hematoma, but the mechanisms remain unknown. In this study, we aim to investigate the effects of fingolimod on inflammatory mediators and vascular permeability in the clinical trial of oral fingolimod for intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). The results showed that fingolimod decreased the numbers of circulating CD4(+) T, CD8(+) T, CD19(+) B, NK, and NKT cells and they recovered quickly after the drug was stopped. The plasma ICAM level was decreased and IL-10 was increased by fingolimod. Interestingly, fingolimod protected vascular permeability as indicated by a decreased plasma level of MMP9 and the reduced rT1%. In conclusion, modulation of systemic inflammation by fingolimod demonstrates that it is an effective therapeutic agent for ICH. Fingolimod may prevent perihematomal edema enlargement by protecting vascular permeability. PMID:25958190

  7. Strategies for improving chemotherapeutic delivery to solid tumors mediated by vascular permeability modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy Chaudhuri, Tista

    An essential mode of distribution of blood-borne chemotherapeutic agents within a solid tumor is via the micro-circulation. Poor tumor perfusion, because of a lack of functional vasculature or a lack of microvessels, as well as low tumor vascular permeability, can prevent adequate deposition of even low molecular-weight agents into the tumor. The modulation of tumor vascular function and density can provides numerous strategies for improving intratumor deposition of chemotherapeutic agents. Here we investigated strategies to improve drug delivery to two tumor types that share in common poor drug delivery, but differ in the underlying cause. First, in an angiogenesis-driven brain tumor model of Glioblastoma, the vascular permeability barrier, along with poorly-functional vasculature, hinders drug delivery. A strategy of nanoparticle-based tumor 'priming' to attack the vascular permeability barrier, employing sterically stabilized liposomal doxorubicin (SSL-DXR), was investigated. Functional and histological evaluation of tumor vasculature revealed that after an initial period of depressed vascular permeability and vascular pruning 3--4 days after SSL-DXR administration, vascular permeability and perfusion were restored and then elevated after 5--7 days. As a result of tumor priming, deposition of subsequently-administered nanoparticles was enhanced, and the efficacy of temozolomide (TMZ), if administered during the window of elevated permeability, was increased. The sequenced regimen resulted in a persistent reduction of the tumor proliferative index and a 40% suppression of tumor volume, compared to animals that received both agents simultaneously. Second, in a hypovascular, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma model, disruption of tumor-stromal communication via sonic hedgehog (sHH) signaling pathway inhibition mediated an indirect vascular proliferation and a more than 2-fold increase in intratumor nanoparticle deposition. Enhanced delivery of SSL-DXR in tumors pre-treated with sHH-inhibitor led to a 90% lifespan extension in animals that received a single cycle of the combined regimen, and a 200% extension in animals receiving 3-cycles of treatment, compared to control animals or those receiving either of the agents alone. We surmise that direct or indirect modulation of tumor vasculature can provide new opportunities for combination therapies that could improve delivery and efficacy of both small- and large- molecular weight agents in treatment-resistant solid tumors.

  8. Mechanism of dexamethasone suppression of brain tumor-associated vascular permeability in rats. Involvement of the glucocorticoid receptor and vascular permeability factor.

    PubMed Central

    Heiss, J D; Papavassiliou, E; Merrill, M J; Nieman, L; Knightly, J J; Walbridge, S; Edwards, N A; Oldfield, E H

    1996-01-01

    Brain tumor-associated cerebral edema arises because tumor capillaries lack normal blood-brain barrier function; vascular permeability factor (VPF, also known as vascular endothelial growth factor, VEGF) is a likely mediator of this phenomenon. Clinically, dexamethasone reduces brain tumor-associated vascular permeability through poorly understood mechanisms. Our goals were to determine if suppression of permeability by dexamethasone might involve inhibition of VPF action or expression, and if dexamethasone effects in this setting are mediated by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). In two rat models of permeability (peripheral vascular permeability induced by intradermal injection of 9L glioma cell-conditioned medium or purified VPF, and intracerebral vascular permeability induced by implanted 9L glioma), dexamethasone suppressed permeability in a dose-dependent manner. Since 80% of the permeability-inducing activity in 9L-conditioned medium was removed by anti-VPF antibodies, we examined dexamethasone effects of VPF expression in 9L cells. Dexamethasone inhibited FCS- and PDGF-dependent induction of VPF expression. At all levels (intradermal, intracranial, and cell culture), dexamethasone effects were reversed by the GR antagonist mifepristone (RU486). Dexamethasone may decrease brain tumor-associated vascular permeability by two GR-dependent mechanisms: reduction of the response of the vasculature to tumor-derived permeability factors (including VPF), and reduction of VPF expression by tumor cells. PMID:8823305

  9. Guinea pig Hageman factor as a vascular permeability enhancement factor.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, T.; Cochrane, C. G.

    1981-01-01

    Hageman factor was purified from guinea pig plasma by successive column chromatography. The guinea pig Hageman factor appeared homogeneous as a single-chain protein on polyacrylamide gels in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and beta-mercaptoethanol. The apparent molecular weight was 76,000 daltons by SDS--polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and 105,000 daltons by gel filtration with a Sephadex G-150 column. Amino acid composition of the guinea pig Hageman factor was similar to that reported for human, bovine, and rabbit Hageman factors. The purified guinea pig Hageman factor, as well as guinea pig plasma, showed strong clotting time correction activity in Hageman-factor--deficient human plasma. The activity could be blocked by the IgG fraction of antiserums against guinea pig Hageman factor raised in rabbits or a goat. The concentration of Hageman factor in guinea pig plasma was determined to be 120 microgram/ml by quantitative radial immunodiffusion assay. The 28,000-dalton active form of Hageman factor (beta-HFa) was prepared from guinea pig Hageman factor by treatment with plasma kallikrein. beta-HFa caused an increase in vascular permeability when injected into guinea pig skin at concentrations as low as 3 x 10(-10) M (0.8 ng). Native, or zymogen Hageman factor did not cause an increase in permeability at concentrations of up to 2 x 10(-7) M. The increased permeability induced by beta-HFa was short lasting, with about a 50% decrease in activity apparent within 6 minutes after intradermal injection. The permeability enhancement activity of beta-HFa was inhibited by pretreatment of beta-HFa with diisopropylfluorophosphate. It may be concluded that active Hageman factor in the interstitial space of guinea pigs acts as a vascular permeability factor of far greater potency than bradykinin. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:6794374

  10. Vascular permeability and late radiation fibrosis in mouse lung

    SciTech Connect

    Law, M.P.

    1985-07-01

    It has been suggested that fibrosis which developed after irradiation is caused by increases in vascular permeability. Plasma proteins leak into irradiated tissue where fibrinogen may be converted into fibrin which is gradually replaced by fibrous tissue. Vascular and fibrotic changes in mouse lung were investigated after X irradiation of the right hemithorax. Blood volume and accumulation of extravascular proteins were measured using indium (/sup 111/In)-labeled red cells, iodinated (/sup 131/I) albumin, and iodinated (/sup 125/I) fibrinogen. During the first few months after X rays, lung blood volume decreased to a plateau which depended on radiation dose (10-25 Gy). Small increases in extravascular albumin and fibrinogen occurred at 1-12 weeks after 10-25 Gy. Hydroxyproline per gram of dry irradiated lung was increased at 18 weeks after 15-25 Gy. Support for the hypothesis was that hydroxyproline per gram only increased after X-ray doses which caused marked extravasation of protein. There was no evidence, however, for deposition of /sup 125/I-fibrin or for a gradual increase in fibrosis corresponding to the prolonged excess of extravascular protein.

  11. Effect of leukotriene receptor antagonists on vascular permeability during endotoxic shock

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, J.A.; Li, E.J.; Spicer, K.M.; Wise, W.C.; Halushka, P.V. )

    1990-11-01

    Evidence has accumulated that sulfidopeptide leukotrienes are significant pathogenic mediators of certain hematologic and hemodynamic sequelae of endotoxic shock. In the present study, the effects of a selective LTD4/E4 receptor antagonist, LY171883 (LY), or a selective LTD4 receptor antagonist, SKF-104353 (SKF), were assessed on splanchnic and pulmonary localization of 99mTechnetium-labeled human serum albumin (99mTc-HSA) in acute endotoxic shock in the rat. Dynamic gamma camera imaging of heart (H), midabdominal (GI), and lung regions of interest generated time activity curves for baseline and at 5-35 min after Salmonella enteritidis endotoxin (10 mg/kg, i.v.). Slopes of GI/H and lung/H activity (permeability index, GI/H or lung/H X 10(-3)/min) provided indices of intestinal and lung localization. Rats received LY (30 mg/kg, i.v.), LY vehicle (LY Veh), SKF (10 mg/kg), or SKF vehicle (SK Veh) 10 min prior to endotoxin or endotoxin vehicle. In rats receiving the LY Veh and endotoxin (n = 8) or SKF Veh and endotoxin (n = 12), the splanchnic permeability indices to 99mTc-HSA were increased 11.2-fold and 5.1-fold, respectively (P less than 0.05) compared to vehicle control groups not given endotoxin (n = 5). Pulmonary permeability index for 99mTc-HSA was increased (P less than 0.05) to a lesser extent (3.2-fold) by endotoxin compared to vehicle controls. Pretreatment with SKF reduced the mesenteric permeability index to control levels (P less than 0.05) during the 5-35 min time interval post-endotoxin. LY reduced the mesenteric permeability index by 70%. Pulmonary relative permeability to 99mTc-HSA was not affected by LY pretreatment. Both splanchnic and lung relative permeability to the isotope was transient; at 135-225 min post-endotoxin, splanchnic localization of 99mTc-HSA (n = 4) was not significantly different from vehicle controls in these vascular beds.

  12. Increased Sheep Lung Vascular Permeability Caused by Pseudomonas Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Brigham, Kenneth L.; Woolverton, William C.; Blake, Lynn H.; Staub, Norman C.

    1974-01-01

    In awake sheep, we compared the responses of lung lymph flow and lymph and plasma protein concentrations to steady state elevations of pulmonary vascular pressures made by inflating a left atrial balloon with those after an intravenous infusion of 105-1010Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Lymph flow increased when pressure was increased, but lymph-plasma protein concentration ratios always fell and lymph protein flow (lymph flow × lymph protein concentration) increased only slightly. After Pseudomonas, sheep had transient chills, fever, leukopenia, hypoxemia, increased pulmonary artery pressure and lymph flow and decreased left atrial pressure and lymph protein concentration, 3-5 h after Pseudomonas, when vascular pressures and lymph protein concentrations had returned to near base line, lymph flow increased further to 3-10 times base line and remained at a steady level for many hours. During this steady state period, lymph-plasma protein concentration ratios were similar to base line and lymph protein flow was higher than in the increased pressure studies. Two sheep died of pulmonary edema 7 and 9 h after Pseudomonas, but in 16 studies, five other sheep appeared well during the period of highest lymph flow and all variables returned to base line in 24-72 h. Six serial indicator dilution lung water studies in five sheep changed insignificantly from base line after Pseudomonas. Postmortem lung water was high in the two sheep dead of pulmonary edema and one other, but six sheep killed 1-6 h after Pseudomonas had normal lung water. Because of the clear difference between the effects of increased pressure and Pseudomonas on lymphplasma protein concentration ratios and lymph protein flow, we conclude that Pseudomonas causes a prolonged increase in lung vessel permeability to protein. Because we saw lung lymph flow as high as 10 times base line without pulmonary edema, we conclude that lung lymphatics are a sensitive high-capacity mechanism for removing excess filtered fluid. An equivalent pore model of sheep lung vessels suggests that the changes we saw after Pseudomonas could result from small changes in the structure of exchanging vessel walls. Images PMID:4430713

  13. Vascular permeability factor/vascular endothelial growth factor, microvascular hyperpermeability, and angiogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Dvorak, H. F.; Brown, L. F.; Detmar, M.; Dvorak, A. M.

    1995-01-01

    VPF/VEGF is a multifunctional cytokine that contributes to angiogenesis by both direct and indirect mechanisms. On the one hand, VPF/VEGF stimulates the ECs lining nearby microvessels to proliferate, to migrate, and to alter their pattern of gene expression. On the other hand, VPF/VEGF renders these same microvascular ECs hyperpermeable so that they spill plasma proteins into the extravascular space, leading to the clotting of extravasated fibrinogen with deposition of a fibrin gel. Extravascular fibrin serves as a provisional matrix that favors and supports the ingrowth of new blood vessels and other mesenchymal cells that generate mature, vascularized stroma. These same principles apply in tumors, in several examples of non-neoplastic pathology, and in physiological processes that involve angiogenesis and new stroma generation. In all of these examples, microvascular hyperpermeability and the introduction of a provisional, plasma-derived matrix precede and accompany the onset of EC division and new blood vessel formation. It would seem, therefore, that tumors have "borrowed" fundamental mechanisms that developed in multicellular organisms for purposes of tissue defense, renewal, and repair. VPF/VEGF, therefore has taught us something new about angiogenesis; namely, that vascular hyperpermeability and consequent plasma protein extravasation are important, perhaps essential, elements in its generation. However, this finding raises a paradox. While VPF/VEGF induces vascular hyperpermeability, other potent angiogenic factors apparently do not, at least in subtoxic concentrations that are more than sufficient to induce angiogenesis. Nonetheless, wherever angiogenesis has been studied, the newly generated vessels have been found to be hyperpermeable. How, therefore, do angiogenic factors other than VPF/VEGF lead to the formation of new and leaky blood vessels? We do not as yet have a complete answer to this question. One possibility is that at least some angiogenic factors mediate their effect by inducing or stimulating the expression of VPF/VEGF. In fact, there is already one clear example of this. TGF-alpha is a potent angiogenic factor but does not itself increase microvascular permeability. However, TGF-alpha strikingly upregulates VPF/VEGF expression in cultured keratinocytes and is thought to be responsible, at least in part, for the overexpression of VPF/VEGF in psoriasis. Moreover, overexpression of TGF-alpha, along with that of the EGF receptor with which it interacts, is characteristic of many malignant tumors, raising the possibility that TGF-alpha acts to stimulate VPF/VEGF expression in other types of epithelial cells and in this manner induces angiogenesis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:7538264

  14. Wogonin inhibits LPS-induced vascular permeability via suppressing MLCK/MLC pathway.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yujie; Luo, Xuwei; Li, Xiaorui; Song, Xiuming; Wei, Libin; Li, Zhiyu; You, Qidong; Guo, Qinglong; Lu, Na

    2015-09-01

    Wogonin, a naturally occurring monoflavonoid extracted from the root of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, has been shown to have anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor activities and inhibits oxidant stress-induced vascular permeability. However, the influence of wogonin on vascular hyperpermeability induced by overabounded inflammatory factors often appears in inflammatory diseases and tumor is not well known. In this study, we evaluate the effects of wogonin on LPS induced vascular permeability in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and investigate the underlying mechanisms. We find that wogonin suppresses the LPS-stimulated hyperactivity and cytoskeleton remodeling of HUVECs, promotes the expression of junctional proteins including VE-Cadherin, Claudin-5 and ZO-1, as well as inhibits the invasion of MDA-MB-231 across EC monolayer. Miles vascular permeability assay proves that wogonin can restrain the extravasated Evans in vivo. The mechanism studies reveal that the expressions of TLR4, p-PLC, p-MLCK and p-MLC are decreased by wogonin without changing the total steady state protein levels of PLC, MLCK and MLC. Moreover, wogonin can also inhibit KCl-activated MLCK/MLC pathway, and further affect vascular permeability. Significantly, compared with wortmannin, the inhibitor of MLCK/MLC pathway, wogonin exhibits similar inhibition effects on the expression of p-MLCK, p-MLC and LPS-induced vascular hyperpermeability. Taken together, wogonin can inhibit LPS-induced vascular permeability by suppressing the MLCK/MLC pathway, suggesting a therapeutic potential for the diseases associated with the development of both inflammatory and tumor. PMID:25956732

  15. Cadmium induces vascular permeability via activation of the p38 MAPK pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Fengyun; Guo, Fang; Li, Liqun; Guo, Ling; Hou, Yinglong; Hao, Enkui; Yan, Suhua; Allen, Thaddeus D.; Liu, Ju

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Low-dose cadmium (Cd) induces vascular hyper-permeability. • p38 MAPK mediates Cd-induced disruption of endothelial cell barrier function. • SB203850 inhibits Cd-induced membrane dissociation of VE-cadherin and ?-catenin. • SB203850 reduces Cd-induced expression and secretion of TNF-?. - Abstract: The vasculature of various organs is a targeted by the environmental toxin, cadmium (Cd). However, mechanisms leading to pathological conditions are poorly understood. In the present study, we examined the effect of cadmium chloride (CdCl{sub 2}) on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). At 4 ?M, CdCl{sub 2} induced a hyper-permeability defect in HUVECs, but not the inhibition of cell growth up to 24 h. This effect of CdCl{sub 2} was dependent on the activation of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. The p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203850 suppressed the CdCl{sub 2}-induced alteration in trans-endothelial electrical resistance in HUVEC monolayers, a model measurement of vascular endothelial barrier integrity. SB203850 also inhibited the Cd-induced membrane dissociation of vascular endothelial (VE) cadherin and ?-catenin, the important components of the adherens junctional complex. In addition, SB203850 reduces the Cd-induced expression and secretion of tumor necrosis factor ? (TNF-?). Taken together, our findings suggest that Cd induces vascular hyper-permeability and disruption of endothelial barrier integrity through stimulation of p38 MAPK signaling.

  16. Differential vascular permeability along the forebrain ventricular neurogenic niche in the adult murine brain.

    PubMed

    Colín-Castelán, Dannia; Ramírez-Santos, Jesús; Gutiérrez-Ospina, Gabriel

    2016-02-01

    Adult neurogenesis is influenced by blood-borne factors. In this context, greater or lesser vascular permeability along neurogenic niches would expose differentially neural stem cells (NSCs), transit amplifying cells (TACs), and neuroblasts to such factors. Here we evaluate endothelial cell morphology and vascular permeability along the forebrain neurogenic niche in the adult brain. Our results confirm that the subventricular zone (SVZ) contains highly permeable, discontinuous blood vessels, some of which allow the extravasation of molecules larger than those previously reported. In contrast, the rostral migratory stream (RMS) and the olfactory bulb core (OBc) display mostly impermeable, continuous blood vessels. These results imply that NSCs, TACs, and neuroblasts located within the SVZ are exposed more readily to blood-borne molecules, including those with very high molecular weights, than those positioned along the RMS and the OBc, subregions in which every stage of neurogenesis also takes place. These observations suggest that the existence of specialized vascular niches is not a precondition for neurogenesis to occur; specialized vascular beds might be essential for keeping high rates of proliferation and/or differential differentiation of neural precursors located at distinct domains. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26492830

  17. Intima modifier locus 2 controls endothelial cell activation and vascular permeability

    PubMed Central

    Smolock, Elaine M.; Burke, Ryan M.; Wang, Chenjing; Thomas, Tamlyn; Batchu, Sri N.; Qiu, Xing; Zettel, Martha; Fujiwara, Keigi; Berk, Bradford C.

    2014-01-01

    Carotid intima formation is a significant risk factor for cardiovascular disease. C3H/FeJ (C3H/F) and SJL/J (SJL) inbred mouse strains differ in susceptibility to immune and vascular traits. Using a congenic approach we demonstrated that the Intima modifier 2 (Im2) locus on chromosome 11 regulates leukocyte infiltration. We sought to determine whether inflammation was due to changes in circulating immune cells or activation of vascular wall cells in genetically pure Im2 (C3H/F.SJL.11.1) mice. Complete blood counts showed no differences in circulating monocytes between C3H/F and C3H/F.SJL.11.1 compared with SJL mice. Aortic vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) total protein levels were dramatically increased in SJL and C3H/F.SJL.11.1 compared with C3H/F mice. Immunostaining of aortic endothelial cells (EC) showed a significant increase in VCAM-1 expression in SJL and C3H/F.SJL.11.1 compared with C3H/F under steady flow conditions. Immunostaining of EC membranes revealed a significant decrease in EC size in SJL and C3H/F.SJL.11.1 vs. C3H/F in regions of disturbed flow. Vascular permeability was significantly higher in C3H/F.SJL.11.1 compared with C3H/F. Our results indicate that Im2 regulation of leukocyte infiltration is mediated by EC inflammation and permeability. RNA sequencing and pathway analyses comparing genes in the Im2 locus to C3H/F provide insight into candidate genes that regulate vascular wall inflammation and permeability highlighting important genetic mechanisms that control vascular intima in response to injury. PMID:24986958

  18. Renal vascular perfusion index in a canine model.

    PubMed

    Shau, Yio-Wha; Pao, Sun-Hua; Chou, Nai-Kuan; Chang, King-Jen; Shyu, Jeou-Jong

    2009-01-01

    Decreased renal perfusion plays an important role in the progression toward renal failure. In this study, a novel measure was proposed to quantify renal perfusion using canine model. Serial renal vascular images at different vascular areas including the whole vascular tree, interlobar, arcuate and interlobular vessels were captured. Image processing software was designed to analyze the changes of power Doppler intensity of colored pixels within regions-of-interest (ROI). For a given ROI, the power Doppler vascular index (PDVI) was found to fluctuate with the cardiac cycle. It was also noted that the power Doppler signals generated by arterial vessels have different fluctuating waveforms and different phase compared with the signal derived from venous vessels. A power Doppler correlation-map was developed to differentiate the arteries and veins in the ROI. Using the serial power Doppler images and the derived flow direction information, the interlobular perfusion can be strongly quantified. The renal vascular perfusion index (RVPI) defined as the ratio of PDVI(max) versus PDVI(min) was significantly higher in the interlobular vessel areas than three other areas for seven healthy dogs. The RVPI resembles the systolic/diastolic (S/D) ratio that commonly reflects arterial hemodynamics. RVPI and power Doppler correlation-map reveal more "dynamic" sense of vascular perfusion and provide a novel approach for the examination of renal function in clinical practice. PMID:18805627

  19. Inhibition of vascular permeability by antisense-mediated inhibition of plasma kallikrein and coagulation factor 12.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Gourab; Revenko, Alexey S; Crosby, Jeffrey R; May, Chris; Gao, Dacao; Zhao, Chenguang; Monia, Brett P; MacLeod, A Robert

    2013-06-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare disorder characterized by recurrent, acute, and painful episodes of swelling involving multiple tissues. Deficiency or malfunction of the serine protease inhibitor C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH) results in HAE types 1 and 2, respectively, whereas mutations in coagulation factor 12 (f12) have been associated with HAE type 3. C1-INH is the primary inhibitor of multiple plasma cascade pathways known to be altered in HAE patients, including the complement, fibrinolytic, coagulation, and kinin-kallikrein pathways. We have selectively inhibited several components of both the kinin-kallikrein system and the coagulation cascades with potent and selective antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) to investigate their relative contributions to vascular permeability. We have also developed ASO inhibitors of C1-INH and characterized their effects on vascular permeability in mice as an inducible model of HAE. Our studies demonstrate that ASO-mediated reduction in C1-INH plasma levels results in increased vascular permeability and that inhibition of proteases of the kinin-kallikrein system, either f12 or prekallikrein (PKK) reverse the effects of C1-INH depletion with similar effects on both basal and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor-induced permeability. In contrast, inhibition of coagulation factors 11 (f11) or 7 (f7) had no effect. These results suggest that the vascular defects observed in C1-INH deficiency are dependent on the kinin-kallikrein system proteases f12 and PKK, and not mediated through the coagulation pathways. In addition, our results highlight a novel therapeutic modality that can potentially be employed prophylactically to prevent attacks in HAE patients. PMID:23582057

  20. Dynamics of neutrophil extravasation and vascular permeability are uncoupled during aseptic cutaneous wounding

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Ho; Curry, Fitz-Roy E.; Simon, Scott I.

    2009-01-01

    Transport of macromolecules and transmigration of leukocytes across vascular endothelium are regulated by a tight molecular junction, but the mechanisms by which these two inflammatory events are differentially controlled in time and magnitude during aseptic cutaneous wounding remain elusive. A real-time fluorescence imaging technique was developed to simultaneously track influx of Alexa 680-labeled albumin and genetically tagged enhanced green fluorescent protein-neutrophils [polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN)] within the wound bed. Vascular permeability increased approximately threefold more rapidly than the rate of PMN influx, reaching a maximum at 12 h, on the order of ?0.15% per minute versus ?0.05% per minute for PMN influx, which peaked at 18 h. Systemic depletion of PMN with antibody blocked their extravasation to the wound but did not alter the increase in vascular permeability. In contrast, pretreatment with antiplatelet GPIb decreased permeability by 25% and PMN influx by 50%. Hyperpermeability stimulated by the endothelium-specific agonists VEGF or thrombin at 24 h postwounding was completely inhibited by blocking Rho-kinase-dependent signaling, whereas less inhibition was observed at 1 h and neutrophil influx was not perturbed. These data suggest that in aseptic wounds, the endothelium maintains a tight junctional barrier to protein leakage that is independent of neutrophil transmigration, partially dependent on circulating platelets, and associated with Rho-kinase-dependent signaling. PMID:19176758

  1. Estimating retinal vascular permeability using the adiabatic approximation to the tissue homogeneity model with fluorescein videoangiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Osswald, Christian R.; Dosmar, Emily; Guthrie, Micah J.; Hones, Logan; Sinha, Lagnojita; Xu, Xiaochun; Mieler, William F.; St. Lawrence, Keith; Kang-Mieler, Jennifer J.

    2015-06-01

    Clinical symptoms of diabetic retinopathy are not detectable until damage to the retina reaches an irreversible stage, at least by today's treatment standards. As a result, there is a push to develop new, "sub-clinical" methods of predicting the onset of diabetic retinopathy before the onset of irreversible damage. With diabetic retinopathy being associated with the accumulation of long-term mild damage to the retinal vasculature, retinal blood vessel permeability has been proposed as a key parameter for detecting preclinical stages of retinopathy. In this study, a kinetic modeling approach used to quantify vascular permeability in dynamic contrast-enhanced medical imaging was evaluated in noise simulations and then applied to retinal videoangiography data in a diabetic rat for the first time to determine the potential for this approach to be employed clinically as an early indicator of diabetic retinopathy. Experimental levels of noise were found to introduce errors of less than 15% in estimates of blood flow and extraction fraction (a marker of vascular permeability), and fitting of rat retinal fluorescein angiography data provided stable maps of both parameters.

  2. Increased pulmonary vascular permeability as a cause of re-expansion edema in rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlin, D.J.; Nessly, M.L.; Cheney, F.W.

    1981-01-01

    In order to study the mechanism(s) underlying re-expansion edema, we measured the concentration of labeled albumin (RISA) in the extravascular, extracellular water (EVECW) of the lung as a measure of pulmonary vascular permeability. Re-expansion edema was first induced by rapid re-expansion of rabbit lungs that had been collapsed for 1 wk by pneumothorax. The RISA in EVECW was expressed as a fraction of its plasma concentration: (RISA)L/(RISA)PL. The volume of EVECW (ml/gm dry lung) was measured using a /sup 24/Na indicator. Results in re-expansion edema were compared with normal control lungs and with oleic acid edema as a model of permeability edema. In re-expanded lungs, EVECW (3.41 +/- SD 1.24 ml/g) and (RISA)L/(RISA)PL 0.84 +/- SD 0.15) were significantly increased when compared with normal control lungs (2.25 +/- 0.41 ml/g and 0.51 +/- 0.20, respectively). Results in oleic acid edema (5.66 +/- 2.23 ml/g and 0.84 +/- 0.23) were similar to re-expansion edema. This suggested that re-expansion edema is due to increased pulmonary vascular permeability caused by mechanical stresses applied to the lung during re-expansion.

  3. Desert Hedgehog/Patch2 Axis Contributes to Vascular Permeability and Angiogenesis in Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Azzi, Sandy; Treps, Lucas; Leclair, Héloïse M.; Ngo, Hai-Mi; Harford-Wright, Elizabeth; Gavard, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) constitutes the most common and the most aggressive type of human tumors affecting the central nervous system. Prognosis remains dark due to the inefficiency of current treatments and the rapid relapse. Paralleling other human tumors, GBM contains a fraction of tumor initiating cells with the capacity to self-renew, initiate and maintain the tumor mass. These cells were found in close proximity to brain vasculature, suggesting functional interactions between brain tumor-initiating cells (BTICs) and endothelial cells within the so-called vascular niche. However, the mechanisms by which these cells impact on the endothelium plasticity and function remain unclear. Using culture of BTICs isolated from a cohort of 14 GBM patients, we show that BTICs secretome promotes brain endothelial cell remodeling in a VEGF-independent manner. Gene array analysis unmasked that BTICs-released factors drove the expression of Ptch2 in endothelial cells. Interestingly, BTICs produce desert hedgehog (DHH) ligand, enabling a paracrine DHH/Ptch2 signaling cascade that conveys elevated permeability and angiogenesis. Finally, DHH silencing in BTICs dramatically reduced tumor growth, as well as vascularization and intra-tumor permeability. Collectively, our data unveil a role for DHH in exacerbated tumor angiogenesis and permeability, which may ultimately favor glioblastoma growth, and thus place the DHH/Ptch2 nexus as a molecular target for novel therapies. PMID:26635611

  4. Effects of Extremely Low Frequency Electromagnetic Fields on Vascular Permeability of Circumventricular Organs in the Adult Rat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez-Mercado, Y. K.; Cañedo-Dorantes, L.; Bañuelos-Pineda, J.; Serrano-Luna, G.; Feria-Velasco, A.

    2008-08-01

    The present work deals with the effects of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) on blood vessels permeability to non liposoluble substances of the circumventricular organs (CVO) of adult rats. Male Wistar adult rats were exposed to ELF-EMF and vascular permeability to colloidal carbon was investigated with the use of histological techniques. Results were compared to corresponding data from sham-exposed and control groups of animals. Exposure to ELF-EMF increased the CVO vascular permeability to colloidal carbon intravascularly injected, particularly in the subfornical organ, the median eminence, the pineal gland and the area postrema.

  5. Role of inflammatory mediators in lipid A analogue (ONO-4007)-induced vascular permeability change in mouse skin

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Hiroyasu; Fujii, Emiko; Irie, Kaoru; Yoshioka, Toshimasa; Muraki, Takamura; Ogawa, Ryou

    2000-01-01

    Endotoxin shock is accompanied by an increase in peripheral vascular permeability. It has been postulated that most biological activities of LPS are derived from lipid A moiety. Here we examined the effect of lipid A analogue ONO-4007 in increasing vascular permeability and the possible mediators in mouse skin by a dye leakage method.Subcutaneous injection of ONO-4007 (1–2?mg?site?1) induced a dose-dependent increase in vascular permeability which was evident after 120?min.ONO-4007-induced dye leakage was significantly attenuated by pretreatments with anti-tumour necrosis factor-? (TNF-?) and anti-interleukin-1? (IL-1?) antibodies, but not with indomethacin (5?mg?kg?1) or diphenhydramine (10?mg?kg?1). ONO-4007-induced dye leakage was significantly inhibited by a pretreatment with NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) (10?mg?kg?1) but not with aminoguanidine (50?mg?kg?1). In inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)-deficient mice, ONO-4007 significantly increased the dye leakage, while ONO-4007 dilated rat thoracic aortic rings pre-contracted with phenylephrine, and the L-NAME pretreatment inhibited the dilation.Thus, TNF-?, IL-1? and constitutive NOSs-derived nitric oxide but not prostaglandins or histamine play a role in ONO-4007-induced increase in vascular permeability. Although ONO-4007 mimics LPS in increasing vascular permeability, mechanisms of permeability change elicited by ONO-4007 were not identical to those of LPS. PMID:10903960

  6. Effect of Ultrasound on the Permeability of Vascular Wall to Nanoemulsion Droplets

    PubMed Central

    Thakkar, Dhaval; Gupta, Roohi; Monson, Kenneth; Rapoport, Natalya

    2013-01-01

    The effect of ultrasound on the permeability of blood vessels to nanoemulsion droplets was investigated using excised mouse carotid arteries as model blood vessels. Perfluorocarbon nanodroplets were formed by perfluoro-15-crown-5-ether (PFCE) and stabilized by poly(ethylene oxide)-co-poly(D,L-lactide) (PEG-PDLA) block copolymer shells. Nanodroplet fluorescence was imparted by interaction with FITC-dextran (molecular weight of 70,000 Da). The permeability of carotid arteries to nanodroplets was studied in the presence or absence of continuous wave (CW) or pulsed therapeutic 1-MHz ultrasound. The data showed that the application of ultrasound resulted in permeabilization of the vascular wall to nanodroplets. The effect of CW ultrasound was substantially stronger than that of pulsed ultrasound of the same total energy. No effect of blood vessel pre-treatment with ultrasound was observed. PMID:23849384

  7. A Neurodegenerative Vascular Burden Index and the Impact on Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Heinzel, Sebastian; Liepelt-Scarfone, Inga; Roeben, Benjamin; Nasi-Kordhishti, Isabella; Suenkel, Ulrike; Wurster, Isabel; Brockmann, Kathrin; Fritsche, Andreas; Niebler, Raphael; Metzger, Florian G.; Eschweiler, Gerhard W.; Fallgatter, Andreas J.; Maetzler, Walter; Berg, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    A wide range of vascular burden factors has been identified to impact vascular function and structure as indicated by carotid intima–media thickness (IMT). On the basis of their impact on IMT, vascular factors may be selected and clustered in a vascular burden index (VBI). Since many vascular factors increase the risk of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), a multifactorial neurodegenerative VBI may be related to early pathological processes in AD and cognitive decline in its preclinical stages. We investigated an elderly cohort at risk for neurodegeneration (TREND study, n?=?1102) for the multifactorial influence of vascular burden factors on IMT measured by ultrasound. To create a VBI for this cohort, vascular factors and their definitions (considering medical history, medication, and/or blood marker data) were selected based on their statistical effects on IMT in multiple regressions including age and sex. The impact of the VBI on cognitive performance was assessed using the Trail-Making Test (TMT) and the consortium to establish a registry for Alzheimer’s disease (CERAD) neuropsychological battery. IMT was significantly predicted by age (standardized ??=?0.26), sex (0.09; males?>?females) and the factors included in the VBI: obesity (0.18), hypertension (0.14), smoking (0.08), diabetes (0.07), and atherosclerosis (0.05), whereas other cardiovascular diseases or hypercholesterolemia were not significant. Individuals with 2 or more VBI factors compared to individuals without had an odds ratio of 3.17 regarding overly increased IMT ( ??1.0?mm). The VBI showed an impact on executive control [log(TMT B?A), p?=?0.047] and a trend toward decreased global cognitive function (CERAD total score, p?=?0.057) independent of age, sex, and education. A VBI established on the basis of IMT may help to identify individuals with overly increased vascular burden linked to decreased cognitive function indicating neurodegenerative processes. The longitudinal study of this risk cohort will reveal the value of the VBI as prodromal marker for cognitive decline and AD. PMID:25071568

  8. Involvement of Protein Kinase C-? in Vascular Permeability in Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jong J.; Jung, Jong P.; Park, Soon E.; Lee, Minhyun

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary edema is a major cause of mortality due to acute lung injury (ALI). The involvement of protein kinase C-? (PKC-?) in ALI has been a controversial topic. Here we investigated PKC-? function in ALI using PKC-? knockout (KO) mice and PKC inhibitors. Our results indicated that although the ability to produce proinflammatory mediators in response to LPS injury in PKC-? KO mice was similar to that of control mice, they showed enhanced recruitment of neutrophils to the lung and more severe pulmonary edema. PKC-? inhibition promoted barrier dysfunction in an endothelial cell layer in vitro, and administration of a PKC-?-specific inhibitor significantly increased steady state vascular permeability. A neutrophil transmigration assay indicated that the PKC-? inhibition increased neutrophil transmigration through an endothelial monolayer. This suggests that PKC-? inhibition induces structural changes in endothelial cells, allowing extravasation of proteins and neutrophils. PMID:26330807

  9. The diaphragms of fenestrated endothelia – gatekeepers of vascular permeability and blood composition

    PubMed Central

    Stan, Radu V.; Tse, Dan; Deharvengt, Sophie J.; Smits, Nicole C.; Xu, Yan; Luciano, Marcus R.; McGarry, Caitlin L.; Buitendijk, Maarten; Nemani, Krishnamurthy V.; Elgueta, Raul; Kobayashi, Takashi; Shipman, Samantha L.; Moodie, Karen L.; Daghlian, Charles P.; Ernst, Patricia A.; Lee, Hong-Kee; Suriawinata, Arief A.; Schned, Alan R.; Longnecker, Daniel S.; Fiering, Steven N.; Noelle, Randolph J.; Gimi, Barjor; Shworak, Nicholas W.; Carrière, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Fenestral and stomatal diaphragms are endothelial subcellular structures of unknown function that form on organelles implicated in vascular permeability: fenestrae, transendothelial channels and caveolae. PV1 protein is required for diaphragm formation in vitro. Here, we report that deletion of the PV1-encoding Plvap gene in mice results in the absence of diaphragms and decreased survival. Loss of diaphragms did not affect the fenestrae and transendothelial channels formation but disrupted the barrier function of fenestrated capillaries causing a major leak of plasma proteins. This disruption results in early death of animals due to severe non-inflammatory protein loosing enteropathy. Deletion of PV1 in endothelium, but not the hematopoietic compartment, recapitulates the phenotype of global PV1 deletion, whereas endothelial reconstitution of PV1 rescues the phenotype. Taken together, these data provide genetic evidence for the critical role of the diaphragms in fenestrated capillaries in the maintenance of blood composition. PMID:23237953

  10. Effect of endotoxin and platelet-activating factor on rat vascular permeability: role of vasoactive mediators.

    PubMed

    Balsa, D; Merlos, M; Giral, M; Ferrando, R; Garcia-Rafanell, J; Forn, J

    1997-09-01

    The contribution of several vasoactive mediators such as histamine, serotonin, bradykinin, arachidonic acid metabolites and PAF to vascular permeability changes was determined in a rat model of acute endotoxemia. Lipopolysaccharide (10-40 mg/kg, i.v.) from E. coli 0127:B8 (LPS) elicited an increase in Evans blue extravasation in trachea, thymus, seminal vesicle and stomach, whereas other organs remained unaffected. LPS (25 mg/kg)-induced extravasation was not inhibited by intravenous pretreatment with histamine (H1) antagonist mepyramine (5 mg/kg) or bradykinin (B2) antagonist HOE-140 (0.1 mg/kg), whereas other standard drugs selectively inhibited leakage in particular tissues, e.g. the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin (5 mg/kg) in trachea (78%) and seminal vesicle (64%), the serotonin and H1 antagonists cyproheptadine (2 mg/kg) in trachea (88%) and stomach (56%) and the dual cyclooxygenase/lipoxygenase inhibitor phenidone (10 mg/kg) in seminal vesicle (87%). PAF antagonists lexipafant and UR-12460 (10 mg/kg), but not apafant, potently inhibited extravasation in trachea (59, 84%) and seminal vesicle (81, 78%) and in stomach only UR-12460 (52%), whereas all of them were ineffective in thymus. When extravasation was induced by PAF (4 micrograms/kg) a low dose (0.1 mg/kg) of the three PAF antagonists strongly reduced extravasation in thymus and seminal vesicle, whereas lexipafant and UR-12460 did so in trachea (82, 100%) and only lexipafant in stomach (100%). Mepyramine, cyproheptadine, HOE-140 and indomethacin did not inhibit the effect of PAF, whereas phenidone inhibited it by 58% in trachea. These results suggest that most of the LPS-induced increase in vascular permeability is mediated by secondary vasoactive mediators among which PAF plays a pivotal role, although their relative contribution may vary from tissue to tissue. PMID:9302653

  11. Differential permeability of uterine and liver vascular beds to estrogens and estrogen conjugates.

    PubMed

    Verheugen, C; Pardridge, W M; Judd, H L; Chaudhuri, G

    1984-12-01

    The role of capillary membrane permeability and the effect of plasma protein binding on the influx of unconjugated and conjugated estrogens into a target organ, the uterus, and a metabolic organ, the liver, were studied in anesthetized rats. In the absence of plasma proteins, estrone (E1) and estradiol (E2) were freely diffusible through the uterine capillaries, but influx was significantly reduced for estriol (E3) and estetrol. In the uterus, the influx of the conjugated estrogens was markedly restricted and approximated the influx of dextran, a vascular space marker. The polarity of the compound (based on the number of hydrogen bond-forming functional groups and the presence of charged groups) appeared to predict uterine endothelial membrane permeability better than the octanol/Ringer's partition coefficient. In contrast to the selective permeability properties of the uterine endothelial barrier, the limiting membrane lining the hepatic microcirculation, the hepatocyte cell membrane, was highly permeable to all unconjugated and conjugated estrogens. The addition of 4% albumin to the injection solution led to a significant inhibition of uterine influx of E2, but not E1 or E3. In the liver, only the influx of E1 sulfate was slightly diminished by 4% albumin. In all cases, the influx of estrogens greatly exceeded the rate that would be expected if only the fraction that was free (dialyzable) in vitro was diffusible in vivo. Human sera containing sex hormone-binding globulin and albumin caused inhibition of influx of E1 and E2 through the uterine capillary barriers, whereas in the liver, the influx of E2 sulfate, and E3 glucuronide were diminished. The results are compatible with a difference in permeability of the microvasculature of the two organs and a differential availability of protein-bound estrogen for influx into liver and uterus. With the exception of E1, which is nearly completely diffusible into both organs, the influx of estrogens and estrogen conjugates into liver is greatly amplified compared to that into a peripheral organ such as the uterus. PMID:6092408

  12. Pirfenidone exhibits cardioprotective effects by regulating myocardial fibrosis and vascular permeability in pressure-overloaded hearts.

    PubMed

    Yamagami, Kiyoshi; Oka, Toru; Wang, Qi; Ishizu, Takamaru; Lee, Jong-Kook; Miwa, Keiko; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Naito, Atsuhiko T; Sakata, Yasushi; Komuro, Issei

    2015-08-01

    Although cardiac fibrosis causes heart failure, its molecular mechanisms remain elusive. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of cardiac fibrosis and examined the effects of the antifibrotic drug pirfenidone (PFD) on chronic heart failure. To understand the responsible mechanisms, we generated an in vivo pressure-overloaded heart failure model via transverse aortic constriction (TAC) and examined the effects of PFD on chronic-phase cardiac fibrosis and function. In the vehicle group, contractile dysfunction and left ventricle fibrosis progressed further from 4 to 8 wk after TAC but were prevented by PFD treatment beginning 4 wk after TAC. We isolated cardiac fibroblasts and vascular endothelial cells from the left ventricles of adult male mice and investigated the cell-type-specific effects of PFD. Transforming growth factor-? induced upregulated collagen 1 expression via p38 phosphorylation and downregulated claudin 5 (Cldn5) expression in cardiac fibroblasts and endothelial cells, respectively; both processes were inhibited by PFD. Moreover, PFD inhibited changes in the collagen 1 and Cldn5 expression levels, resulting in reduced fibrosis and serum albumin leakage into the interstitial space during the chronic phase in TAC hearts. In conclusion, PFD inhibited cardiac fibrosis by suppressing both collagen expression and the increased vascular permeability induced by pressure overload. PMID:26055790

  13. Arsenite induces endothelial cell permeability increase through a reactive oxygen species-vascular endothelial growth factor pathway.

    PubMed

    Bao, Lingzhi; Shi, Honglian

    2010-11-15

    As a potent environmental oxidative stressor, arsenic exposure has been reported to exacerbate cardiovascular diseases and increase vascular endothelial cell monolayer permeability. However, the underlying mechanism of this effect is not well understood. In this paper, we test our hypothesis that reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression may play an important role in an arsenic-caused increase of endothelial cell monolayer permeability. The mouse brain vascular endothelial cell bEnd3 monolayer was exposed to arsenite for 1, 3, and 6 days. The monolayer permeability, VEGF protein release, and ROS generation were determined. In addition, VE-cadherin and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), two membrane structure proteins, were immunostained to elucidate the effects of arsenite on the cell-cell junction. The roles of ROS and VEGF in arsenite-induced permeability was determined by inhibiting ROS with antioxidants and immuno-depleting VEGF with a VEGF antibody. We observed that arsenite increased bEnd3 monolayer permeability, elevated the production of cellular ROS, and increased VEGF release. VE-cadherin and ZO-1 disruptions were also found in cells treated with arsenite. Furthermore, both antioxidant (N-acetyl cysteine and tempol) and the VEGF antibody treatments significantly lowered the arsenite-induced permeability of the bEnd3 monolayer as well as VEGF expression. VE-cadherin and ZO-1 disruptions were also diminished by N-acetyl cysteine and the VEGF antibody. Our data suggest that the increase in VEGF expression caused by ROS may play an important role in the arsenite-induced increase in endothelial cell permeability. PMID:20954712

  14. PIV Measurements of Turbulent Flow Over a Permeable Wall using a Refractive-Index Matching Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, T.; Blois, G.; Best, J. L.; Christensen, K. T.

    2013-11-01

    Turbulent flows over permeable walls occur in a variety of natural environments and engineering applications. Unlike classical and widely-studied flows over impermeable walls, the peculiar dynamics of flow generated by permeable walls are poorly understood. Early studies suggest that the well-known higher energy dissipation induced by permeability (as compared to impermeable walls with similar roughness) can be explained by unveiling the flow interactions within the transition layer that forms at the interface between the overlying flow and the permeable wall. To overcome the challenges associated with quantifying the flow character both above and within a permeable wall, a Refractive-Index-Matching (RIM) approach was employed. Doing so facilitated optical access to the fluid flowing through the permeable wall, thus yielding direct PIV pore-space flow measurements within the transition layer. The permeable wall was formed by packing acrylic spheres in a cubic arrangement and was then immersed in an aqueous solution of sodium iodide at a concentration and temperature that ensured accurate refractive index match with the wall. Measurements were focused on the flow across the wall interface and the turbulent attributes of these surface-subsurface interactions were detailed.

  15. Effect of Melilotus suaveolens extract on pulmonary microvascular permeability by downregulating vascular endothelial growth factor expression in rats with sepsis

    PubMed Central

    LIU, MING-WEI; SU, MEI-XIAN; ZHANG, WEI; WANG, YUN HUI; QIN, LAN-FANG; LIU, XU; TIAN, MAO-LI; QIAN, CHUAN-YUN

    2015-01-01

    A typical indicator of sepsis is the development of progressive subcutaneous and body-cavity edema, which is caused by the breakdown of endothelial barrier function, leading to a marked increase in vascular permeability. Microvascular leakage predisposes to microvascular thrombosis, breakdown of microcirculatory flow and organ failure, which are common events preceding mortality in patients with severe sepsis. Melilotus suaveolens (M. suaveolens) is a Traditional Tibetan Medicine. Previous pharmacological studies have demonstrated that an ethanolic extract of M. suaveolens has powerful anti-inflammatory activity and leads to an improvement in capillary permeability. However, the mechanisms underlying its pharmacological activity remain elusive. The present study aimed to assess the impact of M. suaveolens extract tablets on pulmonary vascular permeability, and their effect on regulating lung inflammation and the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the lung tissue of rats with sepsis. A cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) sepsis model was established for both the control and treatment groups. ~2 h prior to surgery, 25 mg/kg of M. suaveolens extract tablet was administered to the treatment group. Polymerase chain reaction and western blot analyses were used to assess the expression of nuclear factor (NF)-?B and VEGF in the lung tissue, and ELISA was applied to detect changes in serum tumor necrosis factor-? as well as interleukins (IL) -1, -4, -6, and -10. The lung permeability, wet/dry weight ratio and lung pathology were determined. The results demonstrated that in the lung tissue of CLP-rats with sepsis, M. suaveolens extract inhibited the expression of NF-?B, reduced the inflammatory response and blocked the expression of VEGF, and thus significantly decreased lung microvascular permeability. The effects of M. Suaveolens extract may be of potential use in the treatment of CLP-mediated lung microvascular permeability. PMID:25571852

  16. VE-cadherin Y685F knock-in mouse is sensitive to vascular permeability in recurrent angiogenic organs.

    PubMed

    Sidibé, Adama; Polena, Helena; Pernet-Gallay, Karin; Razanajatovo, Jeremy; Mannic, Tiphaine; Chaumontel, Nicolas; Bama, Soumalamaya; Maréchal, Irène; Huber, Philippe; Gulino-Debrac, Danielle; Bouillet, Laurence; Vilgrain, Isabelle

    2014-08-01

    Covalent modifications such as tyrosine phosphorylation are associated with the breakdown of endothelial cell junctions and increased vascular permeability. We previously showed that vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin was tyrosine phosphorylated in vivo in the mouse reproductive tract and that Y685 was a target site for Src in response to vascular endothelial growth factor in vitro. In the present study, we aimed to understand the implication of VE-cadherin phosphorylation at site Y685 in cyclic angiogenic organs. To achieve this aim, we generated a knock-in mouse carrying a tyrosine-to-phenylalanine point mutation of VE-cadherin Y685 (VE-Y685F). Although homozygous VE-Y685F mice were viable and fertile, the nulliparous knock-in female mice exhibited enlarged uteri with edema. This phenotype was observed in 30% of females between 4 to 14 mo old. Histological examination of longitudinal sections of the VE-Y685F uterus showed an extensive disorganization of myometrium and endometrium with highly edematous uterine glands, numerous areas with sparse cells, and increased accumulation of collagen fibers around blood vessels, indicating a fibrotic state. Analysis of cross section of ovaries showed the appearance of spontaneous cysts, which suggested increased vascular hyperpermeability. Electron microscopy analysis of capillaries in the ovary showed a slight but significant increase in the gap size between two adjacent endothelial cell membranes in the junctions of VE-Y685F mice (wild-type, 11.5 ± 0.3, n = 78; and VE-Y685F, 12.48 ± 0.3, n = 65; P = 0.045), as well as collagen fiber accumulation around capillaries. Miles assay revealed that either basal or vascular endothelial growth factor-stimulated permeability in the skin was increased in VE-Y685F mice. Since edema and fibrotic appearance have been identified as hallmarks of initial increased vascular permeability, we conclude that the site Y685 in VE-cadherin is involved in the physiological regulation of capillary permeability. Furthermore, this knock-in mouse model is of potential interest for further studies of diseases that are associated with abnormal vascular permeability. PMID:24858856

  17. Dissociation of cutaneous vascular permeability and the development of cutaneous late-phase allergic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Keahey, T.M.; Indrisano, J.; Kaliner, M.A.

    1989-03-01

    Cutaneous late-phase allergic reactions (LPR) are characterized by an early, immediate hypersensitivity whealing reaction followed by persistent, localized induration that peaks 6 to 8 hours later. In this study we used rodents to examine the relationship between vascular permeability (VP) and induration during LPR. Efflux of macromolecular tracers from the vasculature into skin was measured with the use of radiolabeled albumin and neutral dextran tracers having large molecular radii. To induce LPR immunologically, we used either intradermal injections of antirat IgE or passive cutaneous sensitization with IgE antidinitrophenyl followed 24 hours later by intravenous injection of albumin-dinitrophenyl. (/sup 125/I)albumin and (/sup 3/H)dextran tracers were injected intravenously before and at various intervals after the induction of LPR. Although a marked increase in VP occurred within the first 30 minutes after induction of mast cell degranulation, analysis of radiolabeled tracer accumulation at 2, 4, 8, and 24 hours failed to demonstrate any further increase in VP. These findings indicate that the induration observed in rodent LPR is not associated with increased VP beyond the immediate hypersensitivity stage and suggest that impairment of lymphatic drainage, cellular infiltration, and/or fibrin deposition are contributing factors.

  18. Pharmaco-modulations of induced edema and vascular permeability changes by Vipera lebetina venom: inflammatory mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sebia-Amrane, Fatima; Laraba-Djebari, Fatima

    2013-04-01

    The inflammatory response induced by Vipera lebetina venom (VLV) in the mice hind paw was evaluated by paw edema value and vascular permeability changes. The edema was produced in a dose- and time-dependent manner. This response was maximal within 2 h and disappeared after 24 h The minimum edema-forming dose was estimated at 0.8 ?g/20 g body weight. Microscopic examination confirmed that VLV also induces skin structure alterations with collagen fiber dissociation and polynuclear infiltration, which is characteristic of edema formation. The induced edema with VLV (1 ?g/paw) could be due to the release of pharmacological active substances at the site of injection. Histamine, serotonine, and arachidonate metabolites may play important roles in the vasoactive and edematic effect of VLV since pretreatment of mice with cromoglycate, cyproheptadine, ibuprofen, loratidine, and indomethacin significantly reduced the edema formation (77, 63, 57, 45, and 43 %, respectively). The obtained results demonstrate that the induced edema and vasodilatation by this venom may be triggered and maintained by different pharmacological mechanisms, since cromoglycate and cyproheptadine were the most active inhibitors of the edema. The relationships between histamine and serotonin release from mast cells and arachidonate metabolites activation could be the main step in edema-forming and the induced vasodilatation by the venom. PMID:23108954

  19. Increased vascular permeability of solid tumors causes selectivity of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) induced porphyrins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abels, Christoph; Heil, Peter; Dellian, Marc; Kuhnle, Gerhard E.; Baumgartner, Reinhold; Goetz, Alwin E.

    1995-03-01

    To investigate pharmacokinetics of ALA-induced porphyrins the time course of fluorescence in neoplastic tissue and normal tissue following i.v. administration of ALA (100 mg kg-1, 500 mg kg-1 or 1000 mg kg-1 b.w.) was studied by means of intravital fluorescence microscopy. As a model the amelanotic melanoma (A-Mel- 3) growing in a transparent skin fold chamber preparation was used (n equals 18). Maximal fluorescence intensity was measured after 2.5 h in tumor and after 6 h in surrounding host tissue, highest tumor/host tissue ratio at 90 min (500 mg kg-1 b.w.). Heterogeneity of fluorescence intensity between different tumors ranged from 24% to 361% following injection of 500 mg/kg b.w. Twenty-four hours after systemic administration of ALA fluorescence intensity was decreased to baseline. Based upon these results a three- compartment model was calculated to simulate fluorescence kinetics in solid, well vascularized tumors assuming first-order kinetics. This compartment model supports the experimental findings, that the transient selectivity of ALA-induced fluorescence in tumors is caused by earlier uptake of ALA in tumors due to increased microvascular permeability and diffusion in neoplastic tissue. The heterogeneity might represent the different metabolic capacity of tumors to form porphyrins following exogenous administration of ALA.

  20. Neisseria meningitidis induces platelet inhibition and increases vascular endothelial permeability via nitric oxide regulated pathways.

    PubMed

    Kobsar, Anna; Siauw, Celine; Gambaryan, Stepan; Hebling, Sabrina; Speer, Christian; Schubert-Unkmeir, Alexandra; Eigenthaler, Martin

    2011-12-01

    Despite antibiotic therapy, infections with Neisseria meningitidis still demonstrate a high rate of morbidity and mortality even in developed countries. The fulminant septicaemic course, named Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome, with massive haemorrhage into the adrenal glands and widespread petechial bleeding suggest pathophysiological inhibition of platelet function. Our data show that N. meningitidis produces the important physiological platelet inhibitor and cardiovascular signalling molecule nitric oxide (NO), also known as endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF). N. meningitidis -derived NO inhibited ADP-induced platelet aggregation through the activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) followed by an increase in platelet cyclic nucleotide levels and subsequent activation of platelet cGMP- and cAMP- dependent protein kinases (PKG and PKA). Furthermore, direct measurement of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) passage through a vascular endothelial cell monolayer revealed that N. meningitidis significantly increased endothelial monolayer permeability. Immunfluorescence analysis demonstrated NO dependent disturbances in the structure of endothelial adherens junctions after co-incubation with N. meningitidis . In contrast to platelet inhibition, the NO effects on HBMEC were not mediated by cyclic nucleotides. Our study provides evidence that NO plays an essential role in the pathophysiology of septicaemic meningococcal infection. PMID:22072136

  1. Asef controls vascular endothelial permeability and barrier recovery in the lung

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xinyong; Tian, Yufeng; Gawlak, Grzegorz; Meng, Fanyong; Kawasaki, Yoshihiro; Akiyama, Tetsu; Birukova, Anna A.

    2015-01-01

    Increased levels of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in injured lungs may reflect a compensatory response to diminish acute lung injury (ALI). HGF-induced activation of Rac1 GTPase stimulates endothelial barrier protective mechanisms. This study tested the involvement of Rac-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor Asef in HGF-induced endothelial cell (EC) cytoskeletal dynamics and barrier protection in vitro and in a two-hit model of ALI. HGF induced membrane translocation of Asef and stimulated Asef Rac1-specific nucleotide exchange activity. Expression of constitutively activated Asef mutant mimicked HGF-induced peripheral actin cytoskeleton enhancement. In contrast, siRNA-induced Asef knockdown or expression of dominant-negative Asef attenuated HGF-induced Rac1 activation evaluated by Rac-GTP pull down and FRET assay with Rac1 biosensor. Molecular inhibition of Asef attenuated HGF-induced peripheral accumulation of cortactin, formation of lamellipodia-like structures, and enhancement of VE-cadherin adherens junctions and compromised HGF-protective effect against thrombin-induced RhoA GTPase activation, Rho-dependent cytoskeleton remodeling, and EC permeability. Intravenous HGF injection attenuated lung inflammation and vascular leak in the two-hit model of ALI induced by excessive mechanical ventilation and thrombin signaling peptide TRAP6. This effect was lost in Asef?/? mice. This study shows for the first time the role of Asef in HGF-mediated protection against endothelial hyperpermeability and lung injury. PMID:25518936

  2. Mitnitski et al. June 17, 2005 A VASCULAR RISK FACTOR INDEX IN RELATION TO MORTALITY AND INCIDENT DEMENTIA

    E-print Network

    Mitnitski, Arnold B.

    : Vascular risk indexes in relation to death and dementia Key words: vascular factors, dementia, mortality risks of death and dementia in relation to vascular risk factors the Gothenburg H-70 1901-02 birth vascular risk factor indices were calculated using 23 vascular risk factors to predict: (i) dementia

  3. Expression of vascular permeability factor/vascular endothelial growth factor by human granulosa and theca lutein cells. Role in corpus luteum development.

    PubMed Central

    Kamat, B. R.; Brown, L. F.; Manseau, E. J.; Senger, D. R.; Dvorak, H. F.

    1995-01-01

    Vascular permeability factor/vascular endothelial growth factor (VPF/VEGF) is a cytokine that is overexpressed in many tumors, in healing wounds, and in rheumatoid arthritis. VPF/VEGF is thought to induce angiogenesis and accompanying connective tissue stroma in two ways: 1), by increasing microvascular permeability, thereby modifying the extracellular matrix and 2), as an endothelial cell mitogen. VPF/VEGF has been reported in animal corpora lutea and we investigated the possibility that it might be present in human ovaries and have a role in corpus luteum formation. We here report that VPF/VEGF mRNA and protein are expressed by human ovarian granulosa and theca cells late in follicle development and, subsequent to ovulation, by granulosa and theca lutein cells. Therefore, VPF/VEGF is ideally positioned to provoke the increased permeability of thecal blood vessels that occurs shortly before ovulation. VPF/VEGF likely also contributes to the angiogenesis and connective tissue stroma generation that accompany corpus luteum/corpus albicans formation. Finally, VPF/VEGF was overexpressed in the hyperthecotic ovarian stroma of Stein-Leventhal syndrome in which it may also have a pathophysiological role. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7531945

  4. Inhibitory effects of aloe carboxypeptidase fraction on streptozotocin-induced enhancement of vascular permeability in the pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Beppu, H; Shimpo, K; Chihara, T; Tamai, I; Nomoto-Yamaji, S; Ozaki, S; Ito, S; Kuzuya, H

    2006-01-01

    The protective actions of components isolated from Aloe arborescens Miller var. natalensis Berger (Kidachi aloe in Japanese) on streptozotocin (Sz)-induced necrosis of B cells in the pancreatic islets of the mouse were investigated to clarify its action mechanism involved in anti-diabetic effects. In this experiment, phenol low molecular weight components of aloin and aloin A that were anti-oxidants and derived from the leaf skin or pulp extract, an aloe carboxypeptidase fraction that is a inhibitor of enhanced vascular permeability and a glycoprotein component that decreases blood glucose were tested with mice precedently administered with Sz which is known as a cytotoxin specific to B cells. The results showed that the treatment group receiving Sz followed by the aloe carboxypeptidase fraction increased the inhibition of dye leakage by 75.8% (p<0.001) in the extract of whole pancreas in comparison to the control group and the aloe carboxypeptidase fraction group also increased the inhibition effect by 68.4% (p<0.001) in the extract of pancreatic islets as compared to the control group. The carboxypeptidase is an aloe-derived protease known to inhibit the acetic acid-related enhancement of intraperitoneal vascular permeability in mice. Further, the elevation of blood glucose in Sz-induced diabetic mice intraperitoneally given the aloe carboxypeptitase fraction was significantly (p<0.01-0.001) restrained at 3, 7 and 14 days after the injection as compared to the control group given solvent only. The results of this experiment suggested that the inhibitory effect on the enhancement of vascular permeability related to the vascular acute inflammatory response at Sz-induced lesions of pancreatic islets was involved in the action mechanism of this enzyme. PMID:16360933

  5. Hypoxic retinal Muller cells promote vascular permeability by HIF-1-dependent up-regulation of angiopoietin-like 4.

    PubMed

    Xin, Xiaoban; Rodrigues, Murilo; Umapathi, Mahaa; Kashiwabuchi, Fabiana; Ma, Tao; Babapoor-Farrokhran, Savalan; Wang, Shuang; Hu, Jiadi; Bhutto, Imran; Welsbie, Derek S; Duh, Elia J; Handa, James T; Eberhart, Charles G; Lutty, Gerard; Semenza, Gregg L; Montaner, Silvia; Sodhi, Akrit

    2013-09-01

    Vision loss from ischemic retinopathies commonly results from the accumulation of fluid in the inner retina [macular edema (ME)]. Although the precise events that lead to the development of ME remain under debate, growing evidence supports a role for an ischemia-induced hyperpermeability state regulated, in part, by VEGF. Monthly treatment with anti-VEGF therapies is effective for the treatment of ME but results in a major improvement in vision in a minority of patients, underscoring the need to identify additional therapeutic targets. Using the oxygen-induced retinopathy mouse model for ischemic retinopathy, we provide evidence showing that hypoxic Müller cells promote vascular permeability by stabilizing hypoxia-inducible factor-1? (HIF-1?) and secreting angiogenic cytokines. Blocking HIF-1? translation with digoxin inhibits the promotion of endothelial cell permeability in vitro and retinal edema in vivo. Interestingly, Müller cells require HIF--but not VEGF--to promote vascular permeability, suggesting that other HIF-dependent factors may contribute to the development of ME. Using gene expression analysis, we identify angiopoietin-like 4 (ANGPTL4) as a cytokine up-regulated by HIF-1 in hypoxic Müller cells in vitro and the ischemic inner retina in vivo. ANGPTL4 is critical and sufficient to promote vessel permeability by hypoxic Müller cells. Immunohistochemical analysis of retinal tissue from patients with diabetic eye disease shows that HIF-1? and ANGPTL4 localize to ischemic Müller cells. Our results suggest that ANGPTL4 may play an important role in promoting vessel permeability in ischemic retinopathies and could be an important target for the treatment of ME. PMID:23959876

  6. Sp1-mediated nonmuscle myosin light chain kinase expression and enhanced activity in vascular endothelial growth factor–induced vascular permeability

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Despite the important role played by the nonmuscle isoform of myosin light chain kinase (nmMLCK) in vascular barrier regulation and the implication of both nmMLCK and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the pathogenesis of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), the role played by nmMLCK in VEGF-induced vascular permeability is poorly understood. In this study, the role played by nmMLCK in VEGF-induced vascular hyperpermeability was investigated. Human lung endothelial cell barrier integrity in response to VEGF is examined in both the absence and the presence of nmMLCK small interfering RNAs. Levels of nmMLCK messenger RNA (mRNA), protein, and promoter activity expression were monitored after VEGF stimulation in lung endothelial cells. nmMYLK promoter activity was assessed using nmMYLK promoter luciferase reporter constructs with a series of nested deletions. nmMYLK transcriptional regulation was further characterized by examination of a key transcriptional factor. nmMLCK plays an important role in VEGF-induced permeability. We found that activation of the VEGF signaling pathway in lung endothelial cells increases MYLK gene product at both mRNA and protein levels. Increased nmMLCK mRNA and protein expression is a result of increased nmMYLK promoter activity, regulated in part by binding of the Sp1 transcription factor on triggering by the VEGF signaling pathway. Taken together, these findings suggest that MYLK is an important ARDS candidate gene and a therapeutic target that is highly influenced by excessive VEGF concentrations in the inflamed lung. PMID:26697178

  7. [Estimation of the Index Value of Dielectric Permeability inside the Membranes of Purple Bacteria].

    PubMed

    Borisov, A Y; Kozlovsky, V S

    2015-01-01

    The joint application of the precise X-ray data for isolated bacteriochlorophyll complexes of reaction centers and the fundamental formulae for the energy of interaction between two equal dipoles enabled us to suggest a new methodical approach for determination of the values of the index of dielectric permeability in the micro volume enclosing special pairs in Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction centers. The most probable value for this parameter was thus determined within 1.66-1.76. This approach was generalized for the inner layer of the membranes of purple bacteria and yielded the index value about 1.70-1.85. It is argued that this range of dielectric permeability is adequate for bacterial and plant membranes as well. Low magnitude of this parameter contributes to higher efficiency of energy migration from vast light-harvesting chlorophyll "antenna" to the energy converting reaction centers and hence to higher efficiency of the whole photosynthesis. PMID:26394473

  8. Tumor-secreted vascular permeability factor increases cytosolic Ca2+ and von Willebrand factor release in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Brock, T. A.; Dvorak, H. F.; Senger, D. R.

    1991-01-01

    Vascular permeability factor (VPF), a tumor-secreted heparin-binding protein (Mr approximately 38,000), is responsible for increased vessel permeability and fluid accumulation associated with tumor growth. Vascular permeability factor also promotes the growth of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (EC) and bovine pulmonary ECs in vitro. It is shown for the first time that guinea pig VPF (half-maximal and maximal dose approximately 0.4 and 22 pmol/l (picomolar), respectively), as well as human VPF, are potent stimuli for human ECs resulting in [Ca2+]i increases (maximal three- to fourfold) and inositol triphosphate (IP3) formation. Unlike the maximal responses to thrombin and histamine, the [Ca2+]i response to a maximal VPF dose was preceded by a characteristic 10- to 15-second delay. Guinea pig VPF also selectively increased [Ca2+]i in cultured aortic and pulmonary artery ECs, but not aortic smooth muscle cells, human fibroblasts, or neutrophils. Affinity-purified rabbit antibody (raised to a synthetic peptide representing VPF N-terminal amino acids 1 to 24) adsorbed all vessel permeability-increasing activity, EC growth-promoting activity, and specifically all activity responsible for increasing EC [Ca2+]i. Similar to other mediators that increase [Ca2+]i in cultured ECs, VPF also induced a 200% increase in von Willebrand factor release. Together these data indicate that VPF acts directly on ECs and that rapid cellular events in its in vivo/in vitro actions are likely to involve phospholipase C activation, [Ca2+]i increase, and von Willebrand factor release. PMID:1987767

  9. Role of Staphylococcus aureus Virulence Factors in Inducing Inflammation and Vascular Permeability in a Mouse Model of Bacterial Endophthalmitis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ajay; Kumar, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus (S.) aureus is a common causative agent of bacterial endophthalmitis, a vision threatening complication of eye surgeries. The relative contribution of S. aureus virulence factors in the pathogenesis of endophthalmitis remains unclear. Here, we comprehensively analyzed the development of intraocular inflammation, vascular permeability, and the loss of retinal function in C57BL/6 mouse eyes, challenged with live S. aureus, heat-killed S. aureus (HKSA), peptidoglycan (PGN), lipoteichoic acid (LTA), staphylococcal protein A (SPA), ?-toxin, and Toxic-shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST1). Our data showed a dose-dependent (range 0.01 ?g/eye to 1.0 ?g/eye) increase in the levels of inflammatory mediators by all virulence factors. The cell wall components, particularly PGN and LTA, seem to induce higher levels of TNF-?, IL-6, KC, and MIP2, whereas the toxins induced IL-1?. Similarly, among the virulence factors, PGN induced higher PMN infiltration. The vascular permeability assay revealed significant leakage in eyes challenged with live SA (12-fold) and HKSA (7.3-fold), in comparison to other virulence factors (~2-fold) and controls. These changes coincided with retinal tissue damage, as evidenced by histological analysis. The electroretinogram (ERG) analysis revealed a significant decline in retinal function in eyes inoculated with live SA, followed by HKSA, SPA, and ?-toxin. Together, these findings demonstrate the differential innate responses of the retina to S. aureus virulence factors, which contribute to intraocular inflammation and retinal function loss in endophthalmitis. PMID:26053426

  10. Diesel exhaust particles modulate vascular endothelial cell permeability: implication of ZO-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Li, Rongsong; Ning, Zhi; Cui, Jeffrey; Yu, Fei; Sioutas, Constantinos; Hsiai, Tzung

    2010-09-01

    Exposure to air pollutants increases the incidence of cardiovascular disease. Recent toxicity studies revealed that ultra-fine particles (UFP, d(p)<100-200 nm), the major portion of particulate matter (PM) by numbers in the atmosphere, induced atherosclerosis. In this study, we posited that variations in chemical composition in diesel exhausted particles (DEP) regulated endothelial cell permeability to a different extent. Human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) were exposed to well-characterized DEP (d(p)<100 nm) emitted from a diesel engine in either idling mode (DEP1) or in urban dynamometer driving schedule (UDDS) (DEP2). Horse Radish Peroxidase-Streptavidin activity assay showed that DEP2 increased endothelial permeability to a greater extent than DEP1 (control=0.077+/-0.005, DEP1=0.175+/-0.003, DEP2=0.265+/-0.006, n=3, p<0.01). DEP2 also down-regulated tight junction protein, Zonular Occludin-1 (ZO-1), to a greater extent compared to DEP1. LDH and caspase-3 activities revealed that DEP-mediated increase in permeability was not due to direct cytotoxicity, and DEP-mediated ZO-1 down-regulation was not due to a decrease in ZO-1 mRNA. Hence, our findings suggest that DEP1 vs. DEP2 differentially influenced the extent of endothelial permeability at the post-translational level. This increase in endothelium permeability is implicated in inflammatory cell transmigration into subendothelial layers with relevance to the initiation of atherosclerosis. PMID:20576493

  11. Src inhibitor reduces permeability without disturbing vascularization and prevents bone destruction in steroid-associated osteonecrotic lesions in rabbits.

    PubMed

    He, Yi-Xin; Liu, Jin; Guo, Baosheng; Wang, Yi-Xiang; Pan, Xiaohua; Li, Defang; Tang, Tao; Chen, Yang; Peng, Songlin; Bian, Zhaoxiang; Liang, Zicai; Zhang, Bao-Ting; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2015-01-01

    To examine the therapeutic effect of Src inhibitor on the VEGF mediating vascular hyperpermeability and bone destruction within steroid-associated osteonecrotic lesions in rabbits. Rabbits with high risk for progress to destructive repair in steroid-associated osteonecrosis were selected according to our published protocol. The selected rabbits were systemically administrated with either Anti-VEGF antibody (Anti-VEGF Group) or Src inhibitor (Src-Inhibition Group) or VEGF (VEGF-Supplement Group) or a combination of VEGF and Src inhibitor (Supplement &Inhibition Group) or control vehicle (Control Group) for 4 weeks. At 0, 2 and 4 weeks after administration, in vivo dynamic MRI, micro-CT based-angiography, histomorphometry and immunoblotting were employed to evaluate the vascular and skeletal events in different groups. The incidence of the destructive repair in the Anti-VEGF Group, Src-Inhibition Group and Supplement &Inhibition Group was all significantly lower than that in the Control Group. The angiogenesis was promoted in VEGF-Supplement Group, Src-Inhibition Group and Supplement &Inhibition Group, while the hyperpermeability was inhibited in Anti-VEGF Group, Src-Inhibition Group and Supplement &Inhibition Group. The trabecular structure was improved in Src-Inhibition Group and Supplement &Inhibition Group. Src inhibitor could reduce permeability without disturbing vascularization and prevent destructive repair in steroid-associated osteonecrosis. PMID:25748225

  12. Src inhibitor reduces permeability without disturbing vascularization and prevents bone destruction in steroid-associated osteonecrotic lesions in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    He, Yi-Xin; Liu, Jin; Guo, Baosheng; Wang, Yi-Xiang; Pan, Xiaohua; Li, Defang; Tang, Tao; Chen, Yang; Peng, Songlin; Bian, Zhaoxiang; Liang, Zicai; Zhang, Bao-Ting; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2015-01-01

    To examine the therapeutic effect of Src inhibitor on the VEGF mediating vascular hyperpermeability and bone destruction within steroid-associated osteonecrotic lesions in rabbits. Rabbits with high risk for progress to destructive repair in steroid-associated osteonecrosis were selected according to our published protocol. The selected rabbits were systemically administrated with either Anti-VEGF antibody (Anti-VEGF Group) or Src inhibitor (Src-Inhibition Group) or VEGF (VEGF-Supplement Group) or a combination of VEGF and Src inhibitor (Supplement & Inhibition Group) or control vehicle (Control Group) for 4 weeks. At 0, 2 and 4 weeks after administration, in vivo dynamic MRI, micro-CT based-angiography, histomorphometry and immunoblotting were employed to evaluate the vascular and skeletal events in different groups. The incidence of the destructive repair in the Anti-VEGF Group, Src-Inhibition Group and Supplement & Inhibition Group was all significantly lower than that in the Control Group. The angiogenesis was promoted in VEGF-Supplement Group, Src-Inhibition Group and Supplement & Inhibition Group, while the hyperpermeability was inhibited in Anti-VEGF Group, Src-Inhibition Group and Supplement & Inhibition Group. The trabecular structure was improved in Src-Inhibition Group and Supplement & Inhibition Group. Src inhibitor could reduce permeability without disturbing vascularization and prevent destructive repair in steroid-associated osteonecrosis. PMID:25748225

  13. Resolvin D1 Reverts Lipopolysaccharide-Induced TJ Proteins Disruption and the Increase of Cellular Permeability by Regulating I?B? Signaling in Human Vascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xingcai; Wang, Tingting; Gui, Ping; Yao, Chengye; Sun, Wei; Wang, Linlin; Wang, Huiqing; Xie, Wanli; Yao, Shanglong; Lin, Yun; Wu, Qingping

    2013-01-01

    Tight Junctions (TJ) are important components of paracellular pathways, and their destruction enhances vascular permeability. Resolvin D1 (RvD1) is a novel lipid mediator that has treatment effects on inflammatory diseases, but its effect on inflammation induced increase in vascular permeability is unclear. To understand whether RvD1 counteracts the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced increase in vascular cell permeability, we investigated the effects of RvD1 on endothelial barrier permeability and tight junction reorganization and expression in the presence or absence of LPS stimulation in cultured Human Vascular Endothelial Cells (HUVECs). Our results showed that RvD1 decreased LPS-induced increased in cellular permeability and inhibited the LPS-induced redistribution of zo-1, occludin, and F-actin in HUVECs. Moreover, RvD1 attenuated the expression of I?B? in LPS-induced HUVECs. The NF-?B inhibitor PDTC enhanced the protective effects of RvD1 on restoration of occludin rather than zo-1 expression in LPS-stimulated HUVECs. By contrast, the ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059 had no effect on LPS-induced alterations in zo-1 and occludin protein expressions in HUVECs. Our data indicate that RvD1 protects against impairment of endothelial barrier function induced by LPS through upregulating the expression of TJ proteins in HUVECs, which involves the I?B? pathway but not the ERK1/2 signaling. PMID:24381712

  14. Improved survival and reduced vascular permeability by eliminating or blocking 12/15-lipoxygenase in mouse models of acute lung injury (ALI).5

    PubMed Central

    Zarbock, Alexander; DiStasi, Matthew R.; Smith, Emily; Sanders, John; Kronke, Gerhard; Harry, Brian; von Vietinghoff, Sibylle; Buscher, Konrad; Nadler, Jerry L.; Ley, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a prevalent disease associated with high mortality. 12/15 lipoxygenase (12/15-LO) is an enzyme producing 12-hydroxy-eicosatetraenoic acid (HETE) and 15-HETE from arachidonic acid. To test whether 12/15-LO is involved in increasing vascular permeability in the lung, we investigated the role of 12/15-LO in murine models of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced pulmonary inflammation and clinically relevant acid-induced ALI. The vascular permeability increase upon LPS inhalation was abolished in Alox15?/? mice lacking 12/15-LO and in WT mice after pharmacological blockade of 12/15-LO. Alox15?/? mice also showed improved gas exchange, reduced permeability increase, and prolonged survival in the acid-induced ALI model. Bone marrow chimeras and reconstitution experiments revealed that 12-HETE produced by hematopoietic cells regulates vascular permeability through a CXCR2-dependent mechanism. Our findings suggest that 12/15-LO-derived 12-HETE is a key mediator of vascular permeability in acute lung injury. PMID:19752233

  15. Reversing vascular dysfunction in rheumatoid arthritis: PPAR-? agonist therapy improves augmentation index but not endothelial function

    PubMed Central

    Ormseth, Michelle J; Oeser, Annette M; Cunningham, Andrew; Bian, Aihua; Shintani, Ayumi; Solus, Joseph; Tanner, S Bobo; Stein, C Michael

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the hypothesis that improving insulin sensitivity would improve vascular function in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods We performed a 20-week, single center, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Patients with RA (n=34) and moderate disease activity on stable disease modifying anti-rheumatic drug therapy were randomized to drug sequence, receiving either pioglitazone 45mg daily or matching placebo for 8 weeks, followed by a 4-week washout period and the alternative treatment for 8 weeks. We measured change in vascular stiffness (augmentation index and aortic pulse wave velocity), endothelial function (reactive hyperemia index), and blood pressure. High sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP), and the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA) were also measured. The treatment effect of pioglitazone on outcomes was analyzed using linear mixed effect models. Results Pioglitazone reduced augmentation index by ?4.7% units (95% CI, ?7.9, ?1.5% units) P=0.004 and diastolic blood pressure by ?3.0 mmHg (?5.7, ?0.2 mmHg) P=0.03, but did not change aortic pulse wave velocity (P=0.33), or reactive hyperemia index (P=0.46) significantly. The improvements in augmentation index and diastolic blood pressure were not mediated by pioglitazone's effect on insulin resistance or inflammation. Conclusion Pioglitazone improved some indices of vascular function, including augmentation index and diastolic blood pressure, in patients with RA; this was not mediated by improved insulin sensitivity. PMID:24782291

  16. Mechanotransduction by GEF-H1 as a novel mechanism of ventilator-induced vascular endothelial permeability

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Panfeng; Xing, Junjie; Yakubov, Bakhtiyor; Cokic, Ivan; Birukov, Konstantin G.

    2010-01-01

    Pathological lung overdistention associated with mechanical ventilation at high tidal volumes (ventilator-induced lung injury; VILI) compromises endothelial cell (EC) barrier leading to development of pulmonary edema and increased morbidity and mortality. We have previously shown involvement of microtubule (MT)-associated Rho-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor GEF-H1 in the agonist-induced regulation of EC permeability. Using an in vitro model of human pulmonary EC exposed to VILI-relevant magnitude of cyclic stretch (18% CS) we tested a hypothesis that CS-induced alterations in MT dynamics contribute to the activation of Rho-dependent signaling via GEF-H1 and mediate early EC response to pathological mechanical stretch. Acute CS (30 min) induced disassembly of MT network, cell reorientation, and activation of Rho pathway, which was prevented by MT stabilizer taxol. siRNA-based GEF-H1 knockdown suppressed CS-induced disassembly of MT network, abolished Rho signaling, and attenuated CS-induced stress fiber formation and EC realignment compared with nonspecific RNA controls. Depletion of GEF-H1 in the murine two-hit model of VILI attenuated vascular leak induced by lung ventilation at high tidal volume and thrombin-derived peptide TRAP6. These data show for the first time the critical involvement of microtubules and microtubule-associated GEF-H1 in lung vascular endothelial barrier dysfunction induced by pathological mechanical strain. PMID:20348280

  17. Force control of endothelium permeability in mechanically stressed pulmonary micro-vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Caluch, Adam; Fodil, Redouane; Féréol, Sophie; Zadigue, Patricia; Pelle, Gabriel; Louis, Bruno; Isabey, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical factors play a key role in the pathogenesis of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) and Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury (VILI) as contributing to alveolo-capillary barrier dysfunction. This study aims at elucidating the role of the cytoskeleton (CSK) and cell-matrix adhesion system in the stressed endothelium and more precisely in the loss of integrity of the endothelial barrier. We purposely develop a cellular model made of a monolayer of confluent Human Pulmonary Microvascular Endothelial Cells (HPMVECs) whose cytoskeleton (CSK) is directly exposed to sustained cyclic mechanical stress for 1 and 2 h. We used RGD-coated ferromagnetic beads and measured permeability before and after stress application. We find that endothelial permeability increases in the stressed endothelium, hence reflecting a loss of integrity. Structural and mechanical results suggest that this endothelial barrier alteration would be due to physically-founded discrepancies in latero-basal reinforcement of adhesion sites in response to the global increase in CSK stiffness or centripetal intracellular forces. Basal reinforcement of adhesion is presently evidenced by the marked redistribution of ?v?3 integrin with cluster formation in the stressed endothelium. PMID:22766716

  18. Measurement of canine gastric vascular permeability to plasma proteins in the normal and protein-losing states

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, J.G.; Davenport, H.W.

    1982-04-01

    An isolated segment of the greater curvature of a dog's stomach was perfused at constant flow through a single cannulated artery with donor blood containing 131I-albumin, 125I-fibrinogen, and papaverine. Perfusion pressure was 30-50 mmHg, and venous pressure was set at 15 mmHg. Venous blood was collected in 1-min samples for 60 min. Filtration of fluid and loss of labeled proteins were calculated as the difference between measured arterial inflow and venous outflow. Permeability-surface area products (PS) were calculated for the proteins, and reflection coefficients (sigma) were calculated from solute flux and filtration. Intraarterial infusion of histamine (1.6-1.9 microgram . ml-1) increased filtration and PS and decreased sigma for albumin but not fibrinogen. When protein-losing was established by topical irrigation with 10 mM dithiothreitol in neutral solution, filtration and PS increased, and sigma for albumin but not fibrinogen decreased. Irrigation of the mucosa with 10 mM salicylic acid in 100 mN HCl caused bleeding that was quantitated by addition of 51Cr-erythrocytes to perfusing blood. Filtration and PS increased, and sigma for albumin but not fibrinogen decreased. Hematocrit of blood lost remained low during extensive mucosal damage. Effects of histamine infusion were attenuated or abolished by cimetidine (4 mg . kg-1 loading, 1.4 mg . kg-1 . h-1 continuous infusion) or by pyrilamine maleate (5 mg . kg-1 bolus injection at beginning of irrigation, repeated at 40-50 min). Pyrilamine attenuated or abolished effects of topical dithiothreitol or salicylic acid. We conclude that during protein loss caused by dithiothreitol or salicylic acid, histamine released within the mucosa causes increased vascular permeability for plasma proteins.

  19. Up-Regulation of Pressure-activated Ca2+-permeable Cation Channel in Intact Vascular Endothelium of Hypertensive Rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyer, J.; Kohler, R.; Haase, W.; Distler, A.

    1996-10-01

    In endothelial cells, stretch-activated cation channels have been proposed to act as mechanosensors for changes in hemodynamic forces. We have identified a novel mechanosensitive pressure-activated channel in intact endothelium from rat aorta and mesenteric artery. The 18-pS cation channel responded with a multifold increase in channel activity when positive pressure was applied to the luminal cell surface with the patch pipette and inactivated at negative pipette pressure. Channel permeability ratio for K+, Na+, and Ca2+ ions was 1:0.98:0.23. Ca2+ influx through the channel was sufficient to activate a neighboring Ca2+-dependent K+ channel. Hemodynamic forces are chronically disturbed in arterial hypertension. Endothelial cell dysfunction has been implicated in the pathogenesis of arterial hypertension. In two comparative studies, density of the pressure-activated channel was found to be significantly higher in spontaneously hypertensive rats and renovascular hypertensive rats compared with their respective normotensive controls. Channel activity presumably leads to mechanosensitive Ca2+ influx and induces cell hyperpolarization by K+ channel activity. Both Ca2+ influx and hyperpolarization are known to induce a vasodilatory endothelial response by stimulating endothelial nitric oxide (NO) production. Up-regulation of channel density in hypertension could, therefore, represent a counterregulatory mechanism of vascular endothelium.

  20. Monitoring Vascular Permeability and Remodeling After Endothelial Injury in a Murine Model Using a Magnetic Resonance Albumin-Binding Contrast Agent

    PubMed Central

    Phinikaridou, Alkystis; Lorrio, Silvia; Zaragoza, Carlos; Botnar, René M.

    2015-01-01

    Background— Despite the beneficial effects of vascular interventions, these procedures may damage the endothelium leading to increased vascular permeability and remodeling. Re-endothelialization of the vessel wall, with functionally and structurally intact cells, is controlled by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS3) and is crucial for attenuating adverse effects after injury. We investigated the applicability of the albumin-binding MR contrast agent, gadofosveset, to noninvasively monitor focal changes in vascular permeability and remodeling, after injury, in NOS3-knockout (NOS3?/?) and wild-type (WT) mice in vivo. Methods and Results— WT and NOS3?/? mice were imaged at 7, 15, and 30 days after aortic denudation or sham-surgery. T1 mapping (R1=1/T1, s?1) and delayed-enhanced MRI were used as measurements of vascular permeability (R1) and remodeling (vessel wall enhancement, mm2) after gadofosveset injection, respectively. Denudation resulted in higher vascular permeability and vessel wall enhancement 7 days after injury in both strains compared with sham-operated animals. However, impaired re-endothelialization and increased neovascularization in NOS3?/? mice resulted in significantly higher R1 at 15 and 30 days post injury compared with WT mice that showed re-endothelialization and lack of neovascularization (R1 [s?1]=15 days: NOS3?/?4.02 [interquartile range, IQR, 3.77–4.41] versus WT2.39 [IQR, 2.35–2.92]; 30 days: NOS3?/?4.23 [IQR, 3.94–4.68] versus WT2.64 [IQR, 2.33–2.80]). Similarly, vessel wall enhancement was higher in NOS3?/? but recovered in WT mice (area [mm2]=15 days: NOS3?/?5.20 [IQR, 4.68–6.80] versus WT2.13 [IQR, 0.97–3.31]; 30 days: NOS3?/?7.35 [IQR, 5.66–8.61] versus WT1.60 [IQR, 1.40–3.18]). Ex vivo histological studies corroborated the MRI findings. Conclusions— We demonstrate that increased vascular permeability and remodeling, after injury, can be assessed noninvasively using an albumin-binding MR contrast agent and may be used as surrogate markers for evaluating the healing response of the vessel wall after injury. PMID:25873720

  1. Arterial stiffness evaluated by cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) in adolescent hypertension.

    PubMed

    Mestanik, Michal; Jurko, Alexander; Mestanikova, Andrea; Jurko, Tomas; Tonhajzerova, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    Elevated blood pressure (BP) is a major risk factor for atherosclerosis. As the studies concerning vascular alterations in pediatric patients are rare, we aimed to study the relationship between hypertension and arterial stiffness in adolescence by novel method independent from BP during examination. Twenty nonobese adolescent boys (16.5 ± 0.4 years) with newly diagnosed essential hypertension, 20 adolescent boys (16.7 ± 0.4 years) with newly diagnosed white-coat hypertension, and 20 healthy controls matched to age and body mass index were examined. Cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI), brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV), pre-ejection period (PEP), and ejection time (ET) were evaluated. CAVI was significantly increased in essential hypertension patients compared with controls (p < 0.05) with no significant difference in white-coat hypertension patients. Significantly higher baPWV was found in essential and white-coat hypertension patients compared with controls (both p < 0.001). White-coat hypertension patients showed significantly shortened PEP and ET compared with controls (p < 0.01 and p < 0.001, respectively) and essential hypertension patients (both p < 0.05). For the first time, the arterial stiffness in adolescents with newly diagnosed essential and white-coat hypertension was studied using BP-independent index CAVI combined with conventional baPWV. Our study revealed significantly increased CAVI in adolescents with newly diagnosed essential hypertension compared with controls. Our findings could help to understand hypertension-atherosclerosis interaction. PMID:26588489

  2. Application of the Red List Index for conservation assessment of Spanish vascular plants.

    PubMed

    Saiz, Juan Carlos Moreno; Lozano, Felipe Domínguez; Gómez, Manuel Marrero; Baudet, Ángel Bañares

    2015-06-01

    The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List Index (RLI) is used to measure trends in extinction risk of species over time. The development of 2 red lists for Spanish vascular flora during the past decade allowed us to apply the IUCN RLI to vascular plants in an area belonging to a global biodiversity hotspot. We used the Spanish Red Lists from 2000 and 2010 to assess changes in level of threat at a national scale and at the subnational scales of Canary Islands, Balearic Islands, and peninsular Spain. We assigned retrospective IUCN categories of threat to 98 species included in the Spanish Red List of 2010 but absent in the Spanish Red List of 2000. In addition, we tested the effect of different random and taxonomic and spatial Spanish samples on the overall RLI value. From 2000 to 2010, the IUCN categories of 768 species changed (10% of Spanish flora), mainly due to improved knowledge (63%), modifications in IUCN criteria (14%), and changes in threat status (12%). All measured national and subnational RLI values decreased during this period, indicating a general decline in the conservation status of the Spanish vascular flora. The Canarian RLI value (0.84) was the lowest, although the fastest deterioration in conservation status occurred on peninsular Spain (from 0.93 in 2000 to 0.92 in 2010). The RLI values based on subsamples of the Spanish Red List were not representative of RLI values for the entire country, which would discourage the use of small areas or small taxonomic samples to assess general trends in the endangerment of national biotas. The role of the RLI in monitoring of changes in biodiversity at the global and regional scales needs further reassessment because additional areas and taxa are necessary to determine whether the index is sufficiently sensitive for use in assessing temporal changes in species' risk of extinction. PMID:25580521

  3. Purification and biochemical characterization of a fibrin(ogen)olytic metalloprotease from Macrovipera mauritanica snake venom which induces vascular permeability.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Hee; Park, Jung Eun; Park, Jong Woo; Lee, Jung Sup

    2014-10-01

    In the present study, a novel fibrin(ogen)olytic metalloprotease from Macrovipera mauritanica snake venom was purified and characterized in terms of enzyme kinetics and substrate specificity. The purified enzyme [termed snake venom metalloprotease-Macrovipera mauritanica (SVMP?MM)] was composed of a single polypeptide with an apparent molecular weight of 27 kDa, as shown by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The N-terminus of the enzyme was composed of NH(2)-QRFAPRYIEL-COOH, as determined by N-terminal sequencing. The A?- and the B?-chains of fibrinogen were completely cleaved by SVMP-MM within 20 and 480 min, respectively. However, the ?-chain was much more resistant to digestion by the enzyme. The enzyme also exhibited proteolytic activity, cleaving the ?-? polymer of cross-linked fibrin, but did not effectively digest the ?-? polymer. To determine the kinetic parameters for SVMP-MM, a fluorescence-quenching peptide (termed o-aminobenzoic acid-HTEKLVTS-2,4-dinitrophenyl?NH(2)) containing a K-L sequence for SVMP-MM cleavage was designed and synthesized. The optimal pH and temperature for the enzyme activity were found to be 5.5 and 37?C, respectively, when the fluorogenic substrate was synthesized and used as a substrate. Among the various divalent cations tested, Ni(2+) and Cu(2+) showed strong inhibitory effects on enzyme activity, with an average of 69.6% inhibition. The enzyme activity was also inhibited by treatment with 1,10-phenanthroline, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and glycol-bis-(2?aminoethylether)-N,N,N',N'-tetra-acetic acid, but not with aprotinin, tosyl-lysine chloromethyl ketone and tosyl-phenylalanyl chloromethyl ketone, suggesting that SVMP-MM is a metalloprotease and not a serine protease. The enzymatic parameters, including the K(M), k(cat), and k(cat)/K(M) values were estimated to be 0.015 mM, 0.031 sec(-1), and 20.67 mM(-1)sec(-1), respectively. SVMP-MM induced vascular permeability by digesting type IV collagen. The results obtained in our study demonstrate that SVMP-MM is a fibrin(ogen)olytic P-I class metalloprotease, which can induce a hemorrhagic reaction in vivo. PMID:25069477

  4. Recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator transiently enhances blood-brain barrier permeability during cerebral ischemia through vascular endothelial growth factor-mediated endothelial endocytosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Nagai, Nobuo; Yamakawa, Kasumi; Muranaka, Yoshinori; Hokamura, Kazuya; Umemura, Kazuo

    2015-12-01

    Recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA) modulates cerebrovascular permeability and exacerbates brain injury in ischemic stroke, but its mechanisms remain unclear. We studied the involvement of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-mediated endocytosis in the increase of blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability potentiated by rt-PA after ischemic stroke. The rt-PA treatment at 4 hours after middle cerebral artery occlusion induced a transient increase in BBB permeability after ischemic stroke in mice, which was suppressed by antagonists of either low-density lipoprotein receptor families (LDLRs) or VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR-2). In immortalized bEnd.3 endothelial cells, rt-PA treatment upregulated VEGF expression and VEGFR-2 phosphorylation under ischemic conditions in an LDLR-dependent manner. In addition, rt-PA treatment increased endocytosis and transcellular transport in bEnd.3 monolayers under ischemic conditions, which were suppressed by the inhibition of LDLRs, VEGF, or VEGFR-2. The rt-PA treatment also increased the endocytosis of endothelial cells in the ischemic brain region after stroke in mice. These findings indicate that rt-PA increased BBB permeability via induction of VEGF, which at least partially mediates subsequent increase in endothelial endocytosis. Therefore, inhibition of VEGF induction may have beneficial effects after thrombolytic therapy with rt-PA treatment after stroke. PMID:26219596

  5. Characterization of cutaneous vascular permeability induced by platelet-activating factor in guinea pigs and rats and its inhibition by a platelet-activating factor receptor antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, S.B.; Li, C.L.; Lam, M.H.; Shen, T.Y.

    1985-06-01

    Mechanisms of platelet-activating factor (PAF)-induced increases of cutaneous vascular permeability in guinea pigs and in rats were further explored. PAF so far is the most potent vasoactive mediator, being more than 1000-fold more potent than histamine and bradykinin in both species. In guinea pigs, there is a time delay of 5 to 10 minutes before PAF action, whereas, in the rat, the increased vasopermeability occurs immediately following the intradermal PAF injection. Relative vasoactive potencies of PAF and several structure-related analogues in both species correlate very well with their relative inhibition of the binding of /sup 3/H-PAF to specific receptor sites on isolated rabbit platelet plasma membranes and their aggregatory abilities of rabbit platelets. Furthermore, the PAF-induced cutaneous vascular permeability is inhibitable by a competitive specific PAF receptor antagonist, kadsurenone, suggesting that binding of PAF to its specific receptor site is the first step to initiate its action of increased cutaneous vascular permeability. Several pure cyclooxygenase inhibitors, including indomethacin, diflunisal, and flurbiprofen, and the dual cyclooxygenase/lipoxygenase inhibitor, BW755C, but not the histamine antagonists, inhibit the PAF-induced vasopermeability in guinea pigs. The inhibition by indomethacin or BW755C can be fully reversed by coinjection intradermally with PAF and prostaglandin E1 but not leukotriene B4. Also, prostaglandin E1 but not leukotriene B4 enhances the guinea pig in vivo response to PAF in this model. However, in rats, none of the cyclooxygenase inhibitors, histamine antagonists, or BW755C inhibit the PAF effect of cutaneous phenomena.

  6. Cardio-Ankle Vascular Index and Its Potential Clinical Implications for Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Kotani, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Sleep apnea is a prevalent disorder associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). While arterial stiffness is a surrogate marker for the development of CVD, the cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) is a recently developed metric for evaluating arterial stiffness. Clinical studies have shown that the CAVI is higher in patients with the sleep apnea syndrome. In particular, a reduction in the CAVI can clearly be seen during short-term therapy for these patients. Although clinical evidence on sleep apnea using the CAVI is currently limited, the CAVI is expected to be useful for identifying patients with an increased risk of CVD and for monitoring treatment effectiveness in sleep apnea practice.

  7. Synthetic Analogs of FTY720 [2-Amino-2-(2-[4-octylphenyl]ethyl)-1,3-propanediol] Differentially Regulate Pulmonary Vascular Permeability in Vivo and in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Camp, S. M.; Bittman, R.; Chiang, E. T.; Moreno-Vinasco, L.; Mirzapoiazova, T.; Sammani, S.; Lu, X.; Sun, C.; Harbeck, M.; Roe, M.; Natarajan, V.; Garcia, J. G. N.

    2009-01-01

    Novel therapies are needed to address the vascular endothelial cell (EC) barrier disruption that occurs in inflammatory diseases such as acute lung injury (ALI). We previously demonstrated the potent barrier-enhancing effects of both sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and the structurally similar compound FTY720 [2-amino-2-(2-[4-octylphenyl]ethyl)-1,3-propanediol] in inflammatory lung injury. In this study, we examined the therapeutic potential of several novel FTY720 analogs to reduce vascular leak. Similar to S1P and FTY720, the (R)- and (S)-enantiomers of FTY720 phosphonate and enephosphonate analogs produce sustained EC barrier enhancement in vitro, as seen by increases in transendothelial electrical resistance (TER). In contrast, the (R)- and (S)-enantiomers of FTY720-regioisomeric analogs disrupt EC barrier integrity in a dose-dependent manner. Barrier-enhancing FTY720 analogs demonstrate a wider protective concentration range in vitro (1–50 ?M) and greater potency than either S1P or FTY720. In contrast to FTY720-induced EC barrier enhancement, S1P and the FTY720 analogs dramatically increase TER within minutes in association with cortical actin ring formation. Unlike S1P, these FTY720 analogs exhibit differential phosphorylation effects without altering the intracellular calcium level. Inhibitor studies indicate that barrier enhancement by these analogs involves signaling via Gi-coupled receptors, tyrosine kinases, and lipid rafts. Consistent with these in vitro responses, the (S)-phosphonate analog of FTY720 significantly reduces multiple indices of alveolar and vascular permeability in a lipopolysaccharide-mediated murine model of ALI (without significant alterations in leukocyte counts). These results demonstrate the capacity for FTY720 analogs to significantly decrease pulmonary vascular leakage and inflammation in vitro and in vivo. PMID:19592667

  8. Cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) differentiates pharmacological properties of vasodilators nicardipine and nitroglycerin in anesthetized rabbits.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Tatsuo; Yamanaka, Mari; Takagi, Sachie; Shimizu, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Mao; Shirai, Kohji; Takahara, Akira

    2015-08-01

    Cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) has been developed for measurement of vascular stiffness from the aorta to tibial artery, which is clinically utilized for assessing the progress of arteriosclerosis. In this study, we established measuring system of the CAVI in rabbits, and assessed whether the index could reflect different pharmacological actions of nitroglycerin and nicardipine on the systemic vasculature. Rabbits were anesthetized with halothane, and the CAVI was calculated from the well-established basic equations with variables obtained from brachial and tibial blood pressure and phonocardiogram. Nicardipine (1, 3 and 10 ?g/kg, i.v.) decreased the blood pressure, femoral vascular resistance, and heart-ankle pulse wave velocity (haPWV). Meanwhile, no significant change was detected in the CAVI at the low or middle dose, which reflects the defining feature of the CAVI that is independent of blood pressure. The index increased at the high dose. Nitroglycerin (2, 4 and 8 ?g/kg, i.v.) decreased the blood pressure, femoral vascular resistance, and haPWV. Meanwhile, the CAVI was decreased during the nitroglycerin infusion, which may reflect its well-known pharmacological action dilating conduit arteries. These results suggest that the CAVI differentiates the properties of these vasodilators in vivo. PMID:26238254

  9. Negative real parts of the equivalent permittivity, permeability, and refractive index of sculptured-nanorod arrays of silver

    SciTech Connect

    Jen, Yi-Jun; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh; Yu, Ching-Wei; Wang, Yu-Hsiung

    2010-09-15

    Thin films comprising parallel nanorods were deposited by directing silver vapor obliquely toward a plane substrate. The direction of the vapor flux was varied in two different ways to sculpture the nanorods in different shapes. The reflection and transmission coefficients of the thin films were measured at three wavelengths in the visible regime for normal-illumination conditions for two linear-polarization states, using walk-off interferometry and polarization interferometry. The authors found that sculpturing significantly affects the signs of the real parts of the equivalent permittivity, permeability, and refractive index of the silver thin films for the two polarization states at different wavelengths. Thus, vapor deposition combined with sculpturing can be useful for large-scale production of materials having different equivalent constitutive parameters with negative real parts.

  10. Protective Effects of N-Acetyl Cysteine against Diesel Exhaust Particles-Induced Intracellular ROS Generates Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines to Mediate the Vascular Permeability of Capillary-Like Endothelial Tubes

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Chia-Yi; Chang, Jing-Fen; Wang, Jhih-Syuan; Chang, Yu-Jung; Gordon, Marion K.; Chao, Ming-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) is associated with pulmonary and cardiovascular diseases. Previous studies using in vitro endothelial tubes as a simplified model of capillaries have found that DEP-induced ROS increase vascular permeability with rearrangement or internalization of adherens junctional VE-cadherin away from the plasma membrane. This allows DEPs to penetrate into the cell and capillary lumen. In addition, pro-inflammatory cytokines are up-regulated and mediate vascular permeability in response to DEP. However, the mechanisms through which these DEP-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines increase vascular permeability remain unknown. Hence, we examined the ability of DEP to induce permeability of human umbilical vein endothelial cell tube cells to investigate these mechanisms. Furthermore, supplementation with NAC reduces ROS production following exposure to DEP. HUVEC tube cells contributed to a pro-inflammatory response to DEP-induced intracellular ROS generation. Endothelial oxidative stress induced the release of TNF-? and IL-6 from tube cells, subsequently stimulating the secretion of VEGF-A independent of HO-1. Our data suggests that DEP-induced intracellular ROS and release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF- ? and IL-6, which would contribute to VEGF-A secretion and disrupt cell-cell borders and increase vasculature permeability. Addition of NAC suppresses DEP-induced ROS efficiently and reduces subsequent damages by increasing endogenous glutathione. PMID:26148005

  11. Oxidative Stress and Modification of Renal Vascular Permeability Are Associated with Acute Kidney Injury during P. berghei ANKA Infection

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Rosa Maria; Correa-Costa, Matheus; Barreto, Claudiene Rodrigues; Silva, Reinaldo Correia; Hayashida, Caroline Y.; Castoldi, Ângela; Gonçalves, Giselle Martins; Braga, Tarcio Teodoro; Barboza, Renato; Rios, Francisco José; Keller, Alexandre Castro; Cenedeze, Marcos Antonio; Hyane, Meire Ioshie; D'Império-Lima, Maria Regina; Figueiredo-Neto, Antônio Martins; Reis, Marlene Antônia; Marinho, Cláudio Romero Farias; Pacheco-Silva, Alvaro; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva

    2012-01-01

    Malaria associated-acute kidney injury (AKI) is associated with 45% of mortality in adult patients hospitalized with severe form of the disease. However, the causes that lead to a framework of malaria-associated AKI are still poorly characterized. Some clinical studies speculate that oxidative stress products, a characteristic of Plasmodium infection, as well as proinflammatory response induced by the parasite are involved in its pathophysiology. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the development of malaria-associated AKI during infection by P. berghei ANKA, with special attention to the role played by the inflammatory response and the involvement of oxidative stress. For that, we took advantage of an experimental model of severe malaria that showed significant changes in the renal pathophysiology to investigate the role of malaria infection in the renal microvascular permeability and tissue injury. Therefore, BALB/c mice were infected with P. berghei ANKA. To assess renal function, creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, and ratio of proteinuria and creatininuria were evaluated. The products of oxidative stress, as well as cytokine profile were quantified in plasma and renal tissue. The change of renal microvascular permeability, tissue hypoxia and cellular apoptosis were also evaluated. Parasite infection resulted in renal dysfunction. Furthermore, we observed increased expression of adhesion molecule, proinflammatory cytokines and products of oxidative stress, associated with a decrease mRNA expression of HO-1 in kidney tissue of infected mice. The measurement of lipoprotein oxidizability also showed a significant increase in plasma of infected animals. Together, our findings support the idea that products of oxidative stress, as well as the immune response against the parasite are crucial to changes in kidney architecture and microvascular endothelial permeability of BALB/c mice infected with P. berghei ANKA. PMID:22952850

  12. Simultaneous optical and mr imaging of tissue within implanted window chamber: System development and application in measuring vascular permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shayegan Salek, Mir Farrokh

    Simultaneous optical imaging and MRI of a dorsal skin-fold window chamber mouse model is investigated as a novel methodology to study the tumor microenvironment. Simultaneous imaging with two modalities allows for cross-validation of results, integration of the capabilities of the two modalities in one study and mitigation of invasive factors, such as surgery and anesthesia, in an in-vivo experiment. To make this investigation possible, three optical imaging systems were developed that operated inside the MRI scanner. One of the developed systems was applied to estimate vascular kinetic parameters of tumors in a dorsal skin-fold window chamber mouse model with simultaneous optical and MRI imaging. The target of imaging was a molecular agent that was dual labeled with both optical and MRI contrast agents. The labeling of the molecular agent, characteristics of the developed optical systems, the methodologies of measuring vascular kinetic parameters using optical imaging and MRI data, and the obtained results are described and illustrated.

  13. Temporal Effects of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor and cAMP on the Blood-Brain Barrier Solute permeability in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lingyan; Zeng, Min; Fu, Bingmei M.

    2015-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) can transiently increase the blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability P as for peripheral microvessels, and elevation of 3,5-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) levels can inhibit the VEGF-induced acute hyperpermeability, we employed multiphoton microscopy to quantify the cerebral microvessel permeability P to various-sized solutes under VEGF and cAMP treatments. The cerebral microcirculation was observed through a section of frontoparietal bone thinned with a micro-grinder. Fluorescein (MW 376Da), FITC-dextran-20k, -70k, or Alexa Fluor 488-IgG in 1% BSA mammalian Ringer’s solution was injected into the cerebral circulation via the ipsilateral carotid artery by a syringe pump. Simultaneously, the temporal images were collected from the brain parenchyma ~100–200 µm below pia mater. P was determined from the rate of tissue solute accumulation around individual microvessels. Exposure to 1 nM VEGF transiently increased P to 2.2, 10.5, 9.8, and 12.8 times their control values, for fluorescein, dextran-20k, -70k, and IgG, respectively, within 30 s, and all returned to control in 2 min. After 20 min pretreatment of 2 mM cAMP analog, 8-bromo-cAMP, the initial increase by 1 nM VEGF was completely abolished in P to all solutes. The response pattern of P to VEGF and cAMP and the ratios of the peak to control values for rat cerebral microvessels are similar to those for rat mesenteric (peripheral) microvessels, except the ratios are higher in P of cerebral microvessels for the intermediate and large solutes. These results imply a new approach for delivering large therapeutic agents to brain. PMID:25066133

  14. A selective cysteinyl leukotriene receptor 2 antagonist blocks myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury and vascular permeability in mice.

    PubMed

    Ni, Nathan C; Yan, Dong; Ballantyne, Laurel L; Barajas-Espinosa, Alma; St Amand, Tim; Pratt, Derek A; Funk, Colin D

    2011-12-01

    Cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLTs) are potent inflammatory mediators that predominantly exert their effects by binding to cysteinyl leukotriene receptors of the G protein-coupled receptor family. CysLT receptor 2 (CysLT(2)R), expressed in endothelial cells of some vascular beds, has been implicated in a variety of cardiovascular functions. Endothelium-specific overexpression of human CysLT(2)R in transgenic mice (hEC-CysLT(2)R) greatly increases myocardial infarction damage. Investigation of this receptor, however, has been hindered by the lack of selective pharmacological antagonists. Here, we describe the characterization of 3-(((3-carboxycyclohexyl)amino)carbonyl)-4-(3-(4-(4-phenoxybutoxy)phenyl)-propoxy)benzoic acid (BayCysLT(2)) and explore the selective effects of this compound in attenuating myocardial ischemia/reperfusion damage and vascular leakage. Using a recently developed ?-galactosidase-?-arrestin complementation assay for CysLT(2)R activity (Mol Pharmacol 79:270-278, 2011), we determined BayCysLT(2) to be ?20-fold more potent than the nonselective dual CysLT receptor 1 (CysLT(1)R)/CysLT(2)R antagonist 4-(((1R,2E,4E,6Z,9Z)-1-((1S)-4-carboxy-1-hydroxybutyl)-2,4,6,9-pentadecatetraen-1-yl)thio)benzoic acid (Bay-u9773) (IC(50) 274 nM versus 4.6 ?M, respectively). Intracellular calcium mobilization in response to cysteinyl leukotriene administration showed that BayCysLT(2) was >500-fold more selective for CysLT(2)R compared with CysLT(1)R. Intraperitoneal injection of BayCysLT(2) in mice significantly attenuated leukotriene D(4)-induced Evans blue dye leakage in the murine ear vasculature. BayCysLT(2) administration either before or after ischemia/reperfusion attenuated the aforementioned increased myocardial infarction damage in hEC-CysLT(2)R mice. Finally, decreased neutrophil infiltration and leukocyte adhesion molecule mRNA expression were observed in mice treated with antagonist compared with untreated controls. In conclusion, we present the characterization of a potent and selective antagonist for CysLT(2)R that is useful for discerning biological activities of this receptor. PMID:21903747

  15. The Role of Monitoring Arterial Stiffness with Cardio-Ankle Vascular Index in the Control of Lifestyle-Related Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Shirai, Kohji; Saiki, Atsuhito; Nagayama, Daiji; Tatsuno, Ichiro; Shimizu, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Mao

    2015-01-01

    Arteriosclerosis is a major contributor to cardiovascular diseases. One of the difficulties in controlling those diseases is the lack of a suitable indicator of arteriosclerosis or arterial injury in routine clinical practice. Arterial stiffness was supposed to be one of the monitoring indexes of arteriosclerosis. Cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) is reflecting the stiffness of the arterial tree from the origin of the aorta to the ankle, and one of the features of CAVI is independency from blood pressure at a measuring time. When doxazosin, an ?1-adrenergic blocker, was administered, CAVI decreased, indicating that arterial stiffness is composed of both organic stiffness and functional stiffness, which reflects the contraction of arterial smooth muscle. CAVI shows a high value with aging and in many arteriosclerotic diseases, and is also high in persons possessing main coronary risk factors such as diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, hypertension and smoking. Furthermore, when the most of those risk factors were controlled by proper methods, CAVI improved. Furthermore, the co-relationship between CAVI and heart function was demonstrated during treatment of heart failure. This paper reviews the principle and rationale of CAVI, and discusses the meaning of monitoring CAVI in following up so-called lifestyle-related diseases and cardiac dysfunction in routine clinical practice. PMID:26587461

  16. Capsaicin stimulation of the cochlea and electric stimulation of the trigeminal ganglion mediate vascular permeability in cochlear and vertebro-basilar arteries: a potential cause of inner ear dysfunction in headache.

    PubMed

    Vass, Z; Steyger, P S; Hordichok, A J; Trune, D R; Jancsó, G; Nuttall, A L

    2001-01-01

    Trigeminal neurogenic inflammation is one explanation for the development of vascular migraine. The triggers for this inflammation and pain are not well understood, but are probably vasoactive components acting on the blood vessel wall. Migraine-related inner ear symptoms like phonophobia, tinnitus, fluctuation in hearing perception and increased noise sensitivity provide indirect evidence that cochlear blood vessels are also affected by basilar artery migraine. The purpose of this investigation was to determine if a functional connection exists between the cochlea and the basilar artery. Neuronally mediated permeability changes in the cochlea and basilar artery were measured by colloidal silver and Evans Blue extravasation, following orthodromic and antidromic stimulation of the trigeminal ganglion innervating the cochlea. Capsaicin and electrical stimulation induced both dose- and time-dependent plasma extravasation of colloidal silver and Evans Blue from the basilar artery and anterior inferior cerebellar artery. Both orthodromic and antidromic activation of trigeminal sensory fibers also induced cochlear vascular permeability changes and significant quantitative differences between the treated and control groups in spectrophotometric assays. These results characterize a vasoactive connection between the cochlea and vertebro-basilar system through the trigeminal sensory neurons. We propose that vertigo, tinnitus and hearing deficits associated with basilar migraine could arise by excitation of the trigeminal nerve fibers in the cochlea, resulting in local plasma extravasation. In addition, cochlear "dysfunction" may also trigger basilar and cluster headache by afferent input to the trigeminal system. PMID:11311800

  17. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease as a Risk Factor of Arterial Stiffness Measured by the Cardioankle Vascular Index

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Goh Eun; Choi, Su-Yeon; Kim, Donghee; Kwak, Min-Sun; Park, Hyo Eun; Kim, Min-Kyung; Yim, Jeong Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is associated with risk factors for cardiovascular disease. The cardioankle vascular index (CAVI), a new measure of arterial stiffness, was recently developed and is independent of blood pressure. We investigated whether NAFLD is associated with arterial stiffness as measured using the CAVI in an apparently healthy population. A total of 2954 subjects without any known liver diseases were enrolled. NAFLD was diagnosed via typical ultrasonography. The clinical characteristics examined included age, sex, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and the levels of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol triglycerides, and glucose. Arterial stiffness was defined using an age- and sex-specific threshold of the upper quartile of the CAVI. NAFLD was found in 1249 (42.3%) of the analyzed subjects. Using an age-, sex-, and BMI-adjusted model, NAFLD was associated with a 42% increase in the risk for arterial stiffness (highest quartile of the CAVI). The risk for arterial stiffness increased according to the severity of NAFLD (adjusted odds ratio [95% confidence interval], 1.27 [1.02???1.57] vs 1.78 [1.37???2.31], mild vs moderate-to-severe, respectively). When adjusted for other risk factors, including BMI, WC, smoking status, diabetes, and hypertension, these relationships remained statistically significant. Patients with NAFLD are at a high risk for arterial stiffness regardless of classical risk factors. The presence of cardiometabolic risk factors may attenuate the prediction of arterial stiffness by means of NAFLD presence. Thus, physicians should carefully assess subjects with NAFLD for atherosclerosis and associated comorbidities. PMID:25816034

  18. Role of Krev Interaction Trapped-1 in Prostacyclin-Induced Protection against Lung Vascular Permeability Induced by Excessive Mechanical Forces and Thrombin Receptor Activating Peptide 6.

    PubMed

    Meliton, Angelo; Meng, Fanyong; Tian, Yufeng; Shah, Alok A; Birukova, Anna A; Birukov, Konstantin G

    2015-12-01

    Mechanisms of vascular endothelial cell (EC) barrier regulation during acute lung injury (ALI) or other pathologies associated with increased vascular leakiness are an active area of research. Adaptor protein krev interaction trapped-1 (KRIT1) participates in angiogenesis, lumen formation, and stabilization of EC adherens junctions (AJs) in mature vasculature. We tested a role of KRIT1 in the regulation of Rho-GTPase signaling induced by mechanical stimulation and barrier dysfunction relevant to ventilator-induced lung injury and investigated KRIT1 involvement in EC barrier protection by prostacyclin (PC). PC stimulated Ras-related protein 1 (Rap1)-dependent association of KRIT1 with vascular endothelial cadherin at AJs, with KRIT1-dependent cortical cytoskeletal remodeling leading to EC barrier enhancement. KRIT1 knockdown exacerbated Rho-GTPase activation and EC barrier disruption induced by pathologic 18% cyclic stretch and thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP) 6 and attenuated the protective effects of PC. In the two-hit model of ALI caused by high tidal volume (HTV) mechanical ventilation and TRAP6 injection, KRIT1 functional deficiency in KRIT1(+/-) mice increased basal lung vascular leak and augmented vascular leak and lung injury caused by exposure to HTV and TRAP6. Down-regulation of KRIT1 also diminished the protective effects of PC against TRAP6/HTV-induced lung injury. These results demonstrate a KRIT1-dependent mechanism of vascular EC barrier control in basal conditions and in the two-hit model of ALI caused by excessive mechanical forces and TRAP6 via negative regulation of Rho activity and enhancement of cell junctions. We also conclude that the stimulation of the Rap1-KRIT1 signaling module is a major mechanism of vascular endothelial barrier protection by PC in the injured lung. PMID:25923142

  19. Measurement of absolute cell volume, osmotic membrane water permeability, and refractive index of transmembrane water and solute flux by digital holographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Boss, Daniel; Kühn, Jonas; Jourdain, Pascal; Depeursinge, Christian; Magistretti, Pierre J; Marquet, Pierre

    2013-03-01

    A dual-wavelength digital holographic microscope to measure absolute volume of living cells is proposed. The optical setup allows us to reconstruct two quantitative phase contrast images at two different wavelengths from a single hologram acquisition. When adding the absorbing dye fast green FCF as a dispersive agent to the extracellular medium, cellular thickness can be univocally determined in the full field of view. In addition to the absolute cell volume, the method can be applied to derive important biophysical parameters of living cells including osmotic membrane water permeability coefficient and the integral intracellular refractive index (RI). Further, the RI of transmembrane flux can be determined giving an indication about the nature of transported solutes. The proposed method is applied to cultured human embryonic kidney cells, Chinese hamster ovary cells, human red blood cells, mouse cortical astrocytes, and neurons. PMID:23487181

  20. Measurement of absolute cell volume, osmotic membrane water permeability, and refractive index of transmembrane water and solute flux by digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boss, Daniel; Kühn, Jonas; Jourdain, Pascal; Depeursinge, Christian; Magistretti, Pierre J.; Marquet, Pierre

    2013-03-01

    A dual-wavelength digital holographic microscope to measure absolute volume of living cells is proposed. The optical setup allows us to reconstruct two quantitative phase contrast images at two different wavelengths from a single hologram acquisition. When adding the absorbing dye fast green FCF as a dispersive agent to the extracellular medium, cellular thickness can be univocally determined in the full field of view. In addition to the absolute cell volume, the method can be applied to derive important biophysical parameters of living cells including osmotic membrane water permeability coefficient and the integral intracellular refractive index (RI). Further, the RI of transmembrane flux can be determined giving an indication about the nature of transported solutes. The proposed method is applied to cultured human embryonic kidney cells, Chinese hamster ovary cells, human red blood cells, mouse cortical astrocytes, and neurons.

  1. Determination of permeability index using Stoneley slowness analysis, NMR models, and formation evaluations: a case study from a gas reservoir, south of Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Mirhasan; Javaherian, Abdolrahim; Movahed, Bahram

    2014-10-01

    In hydrocarbon reservoirs, permeability is one of the most critical parameters with a significant role in the production of hydrocarbon resources. Direct determination of permeability using Stoneley waves has always had some difficulties. In addition, some un-calibrated empirical models such as Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) models and petrophysical evaluation model (intrinsic permeability) do not provide reliable estimates of permeability in carbonate formations. Therefore, utilizing an appropriate numerical method for direct determination of permeability using Stoneley waves as well as an appropriate calibration method for the empirical models is necessary to have reliable results. This paper shows the application of a numerical method, called bisection method, in the direct determination of permeability from Stoneley wave slowness. In addition, a linear regression (least squares) method was used to calibrate the NMR models including Schlumberger Doll Research (SDR) and Timur-Coates models as well as the intrinsic permeability equation (permeability from petrophysical evaluations). The Express Pressure Tester (XPT) permeability was considered as an option for the reference permeability. Therefore, all permeability models were validated for the Stoneley permeability and calibrated for the empirical models with the XPT permeability. In order to have a quantitative assessment on the results and compare the results before and after the calibration, the Root Mean Squares Error (RMSE) was calculated for each of the used models. The results for the Stoneley permeability showed that, in many points there was not much difference between the Stoneley permeability calculated by the bisection method and the XPT permeability. Comparing the results showed that the calibration of the empirical models reduced their RMSE values. As a result of the calibration, the RMSE was decreased by about 39% for the SDR model, 18% for the Timur-Coates model, and 91% for the petrophysical evaluations model. Presented bisection method calculates permeability directly without of any inversion or external calibration.

  2. Carbohydrates and Endothelial Function: Is a Low-Carbohydrate Diet or a Low-Glycemic Index Diet Favourable for Vascular Health?

    PubMed Central

    Jovanovski, Elena; Zurbau, Andreea

    2015-01-01

    Low-carbohydrate diets have become increasingly popular in both media and clinical research settings. Although they may improve some metabolic markers, their effects on arterial function remain unclear. Endothelial dysfunction is the well-established response to cardiovascular risk factors and a pivotal feature that precedes atherosclerotic diseases. It has been demonstrated that a high carbohydrate-induced hyperglycemia and subsequent oxidative stress acutely worsen the efficacy of the endothelial vasodilatory system. Thus, in theory, a carbohydrate restricted diet may preserve the integrity of the arterial system. This review attempts to provide insight on whether low-carbohydrate diets have a favorable or detrimental impact on vascular function, or it is perhaps the quality of carbohydrate that should direct dietary recommendations. Research to date suggests that diets low in carbohydrate amount may negatively impact vascular endothelial function. Conversely, it appears that maintaining recommended carbohydrate intake with utilization of low glycemic index foods generates a more favorable vascular profile. Understanding these relationships will aid in deciphering the diverging role of modulating quantity and quality of carbohydrates on cardiovascular risk. PMID:25954727

  3. The Ketogenic Diet Alters the Hypoxic Response and Affects Expression of Proteins Associated with Angiogenesis, Invasive Potential and Vascular Permeability in a Mouse Glioma Model

    PubMed Central

    Woolf, Eric C.; Curley, Kara L.; Liu, Qingwei; Turner, Gregory H.; Charlton, Julie A.; Preul, Mark C.; Scheck, Adrienne C.

    2015-01-01

    Background The successful treatment of malignant gliomas remains a challenge despite the current standard of care, which consists of surgery, radiation and temozolomide. Advances in the survival of brain cancer patients require the design of new therapeutic approaches that take advantage of common phenotypes such as the altered metabolism found in cancer cells. It has therefore been postulated that the high-fat, low-carbohydrate, adequate protein ketogenic diet (KD) may be useful in the treatment of brain tumors. We have demonstrated that the KD enhances survival and potentiates standard therapy in a mouse model of malignant glioma, yet the mechanisms are not fully understood. Methods To explore the effects of the KD on various aspects of tumor growth and progression, we used the immunocompetent, syngeneic GL261-Luc2 mouse model of malignant glioma. Results Tumors from animals maintained on KD showed reduced expression of the hypoxia marker carbonic anhydrase 9, hypoxia inducible factor 1-alpha, and decreased activation of nuclear factor kappa B. Additionally, tumors from animals maintained on KD had reduced tumor microvasculature and decreased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, matrix metalloproteinase-2 and vimentin. Peritumoral edema was significantly reduced in animals fed the KD and protein analyses showed altered expression of zona occludens-1 and aquaporin-4. Conclusions The KD directly or indirectly alters the expression of several proteins involved in malignant progression and may be a useful tool for the treatment of gliomas. PMID:26083629

  4. FECAL CALPROTECTIN AND GASTROINTESTINAL (GI) PERMEABILITY CORRELATE WITH DISEASE ACTIVITY INDEX, AND HISTOLOGIC, ENDOSCOPIC, AND RADIOLOGIC FINDINGS IN CHILDREN WITH CROHN DISEASE (CD)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fecal calprotectin and permeability are noninvasive measures of GI inflammation and damage, respectively. However, there are scant data as to the possible association between the tests and CD disease activity in children. We hypothesized that levels of fecal calprotectin and permeability would corre...

  5. Crustal Permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingebritsen, S.; Gleeson, T.

    2014-12-01

    Existing data and models support a distinction between the hydrodynamics of the brittle upper crust, where topography, permeability contrasts, and magmatic heat sources dominate patterns of flow and externally derived (meteoric) fluids are common, and the ductile lower crust, dominated by devolatilization reactions and internally derived fluids. The permeability structure of the uppermost (~<1 km) crust is highly heterogeneous, and controls include primary lithology, porosity, rheology, geochemistry, and tectonic and time-temperature histories of the rocks. Systematic permeability differences among original lithologies persist to contact-metamorphic depths of 3-10 km, but are not evident at regional-metamorphic depths of 10-30+ km - presumably because, at such depths, metamorphic textures become largely independent of the original lithology. Permeability can vary in time as well as space, and its temporal evolution may be gradual or abrupt: streamflow responses to moderate to large earthquakes demonstrate that dynamic stresses can instantaneously change permeability by factors of up to 20 on a regional scale, whereas a 10-fold decrease in the permeability of a package of shale in a compacting basin may require 107years. Temporal variation is enhanced by strong chemical and thermal disequilibrium; thus lab experiments involving hydrothermal flow in crystalline rocks under pressure, temperature, and chemistry gradients often result in 10-fold permeability decreases over daily to sub-annual time scales. Recent research on enhanced geothermal reservoirs, ore-forming systems, and the hydrologic effects of earthquakes consistently shows that shear dislocation caused by tectonic forcing or fluid injection can increase near-to intermediate-field permeability by factors of 100 to 1000. Nonetheless, considering permeability as static parameter is often a reasonable assumption for low-temperature hydrogeologic investigations with time scales of days to decades.

  6. Vascular Hyperpermeability and Aging

    PubMed Central

    Oakley, Ryan; Tharakan, Binu

    2014-01-01

    Vascular hyperpermeability, the excessive leakage of fluid and proteins from blood vessels to the interstitial space, commonly occurs in traumatic and ischemic injuries. This hyperpermeability causes tissue vasogenic edema, which often leads to multiple organ failure resulting in patient death. Vascular hyperpermeability occurs most readily in small blood vessels as their more delicate physical constitution makes them an easy target for barrier dysfunction. A single layer of endothelial cells, linked to one another by cell adhesion molecules, covers the interior surface of each blood vessel. The cell adhesion molecules play a key role in maintaining barrier functions like the regulation of permeability. Aging is a major risk factor for microvascular dysfunction and hyperpermeability. Apart from age-related remodeling of the vascular wall, endothelial barrier integrity and function declines with the advancement of age. Studies that address the physiological and molecular basis of vascular permeability regulation in aging are currently very limited. There have been many cellular and molecular mechanisms proposed to explain aging-related endothelial dysfunction but their true relationship to barrier dysfunction and hyperpermeability is not clearly known. Among the several mechanisms that promote vascular dysfunction and hyperpermeability, the following are considered major contributors: oxidative stress, inflammation, and the activation of apoptotic signaling pathways. In this review we highlighted (a) the physiological, cellular and molecular changes that occur in the vascular system as a product of aging; (b) the potential mechanisms by which aging leads to barrier dysfunction and vascular hyperpermeability in the peripheral and the blood-brain barrier; (c) the mechanisms by which the age-related increases in oxidative stress, inflammatory markers and apoptotic signaling etc. cause endothelial dysfunction and their relationship to hyperpermeability; and (d) the relationship between aging, vascular permeability and traumatic injuries. PMID:24729937

  7. Vascular hyperpermeability and aging.

    PubMed

    Oakley, Ryan; Tharakan, Binu

    2014-04-01

    Vascular hyperpermeability, the excessive leakage of fluid and proteins from blood vessels to the interstitial space, commonly occurs in traumatic and ischemic injuries. This hyperpermeability causes tissue vasogenic edema, which often leads to multiple organ failure resulting in patient death. Vascular hyperpermeability occurs most readily in small blood vessels as their more delicate physical constitution makes them an easy target for barrier dysfunction. A single layer of endothelial cells, linked to one another by cell adhesion molecules, covers the interior surface of each blood vessel. The cell adhesion molecules play a key role in maintaining barrier functions like the regulation of permeability. Aging is a major risk factor for microvascular dysfunction and hyperpermeability. Apart from age-related remodeling of the vascular wall, endothelial barrier integrity and function declines with the advancement of age. Studies that address the physiological and molecular basis of vascular permeability regulation in aging are currently very limited. There have been many cellular and molecular mechanisms proposed to explain aging-related endothelial dysfunction but their true relationship to barrier dysfunction and hyperpermeability is not clearly known. Among the several mechanisms that promote vascular dysfunction and hyperpermeability, the following are considered major contributors: oxidative stress, inflammation, and the activation of apoptotic signaling pathways. In this review we highlighted (a) the physiological, cellular and molecular changes that occur in the vascular system as a product of aging; (b) the potential mechanisms by which aging leads to barrier dysfunction and vascular hyperpermeability in the peripheral and the blood-brain barrier; (c) the mechanisms by which the age-related increases in oxidative stress, inflammatory markers and apoptotic signaling etc. cause endothelial dysfunction and their relationship to hyperpermeability; and (d) the relationship between aging, vascular permeability and traumatic injuries. PMID:24729937

  8. Neutrophils, nitric oxide, and microvascular permeability in severe sepsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: Alterations in microvascular permeability are prevalent in patients with sepsis; a recent study reported that patients with septic shock had increased capillary filtration coefficient (Kf), a noninvasive index of microvascular permeability. We aimed to determine whether patients wi...

  9. Vascular Dementia

    E-print Network

    O'Brien, John T.; Thomas, Alan

    2015-10-24

    Vascular dementia is one of the most common causes of dementia after Alzheimer's disease, causing around 15% of cases. However, unlike Alzheimer's disease, there are no licensed treatments for vascular dementia. Progress in the specialty has been...

  10. Vascular dementia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... It affects memory, thinking, language, judgment, and behavior. Vascular dementia is caused by a series of small strokes over a long period. Vascular dementia is also called multi-infarct dementia.

  11. Pressure sensitivity of low permeability sandstones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kilmer, N.H.; Morrow, N.R.; Pitman, J.K.

    1987-01-01

    Detailed core analysis has been carried out on 32 tight sandstones with permeabilities ranging over four orders of magnitude (0.0002 to 4.8 mD at 5000 psi confining pressure). Relationships between gas permeability and net confining pressure were measured for cycles of loading and unloading. For some samples, permeabilities were measured both along and across bedding planes. Large variations in stress sensitivity of permeability were observed from one sample to another. The ratio of permeability at a nominal confining pressure of 500 psi to that at 5000 psi was used to define a stress sensitivity ratio. For a given sample, confining pressure vs permeability followed a linear log-log relationship, the slope of which provided an index of pressure sensitivity. This index, as obtained for first unloading data, was used in testing relationships between stress sensitivity and other measured rock properties. Pressure sensitivity tended to increase with increase in carbonate content and depth, and with decrease in porosity, permeability and sodium feldspar. However, scatter in these relationships increased as permeability decreased. Tests for correlations between pressure sensitivity and various linear combinations of variables are reported. Details of pore structure related to diagenetic changes appears to be of much greater significance to pressure sensitivity than mineral composition. ?? 1987.

  12. Diabetes and Retinal Vascular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Eui Seok; Sorenson, Christine M.; Sheibani, Nader

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes predominantly affects the microvascular circulation of the retina resulting in a range of structural changes unique to this tissue. These changes ultimately lead to altered permeability, hyperproliferation of endothelial cells and edema, and abnormal vascularization of the retina with resulting loss of vision. Enhanced production of inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress are primary insults with significant contribution to the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy (DR). We have determined the identity of the retinal vascular cells affected by hyperglycemia, and have delineated the cell autonomous impact of high glucose on function of these cells. We discuss some of the high glucose specific changes in retinal vascular cells and their contribution to retinal vascular dysfunction. This knowledge provides novel insight into the molecular and cellular defects contributing to the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy, and will aid in the development of innovative, as well as target specific therapeutic approaches for prevention and treatment of DR. PMID:25667739

  13. EPA Permeable Surface Research

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA recognizes permeable surfaces as an effective post-construction infiltration-based Best Management Practice to mitigate the adverse effects of stormwater runoff. The professional user community conceptually embraces permeable surfaces as a tool for making runoff more closely...

  14. Permeability of Clay Concretes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, F.; Ekolu, S. O.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the effect of clay addition on water permeability and air permeability of concretes. Clay concrete mixes consisted of 0 to 40% clay content incorporated as cement replacement. Flow methods using triaxial cells and air permeameters were used for measuring the injected water and air flows under pressure. It was found that the higher the clay content in the mixture, the greater the permeability. At higher water-cement ratios (w/c), the paste matrix is less dense and easily allows water to ingress into concrete. But at high clay contents of 30 to 40% clay, the variation in permeability was significantly diminished among different concrete mixtures. It was confirmed that air permeability results were higher than the corresponding water permeability values when all permeability coefficients were converted to intrinsic permeability values.

  15. Selective Permeability Jackie Bonds

    E-print Network

    Alford, Simon

    ;Selective Permeability ­ What · Selective permeability means that the cell membrane has some control overSelective Permeability Jackie Bonds January 23, 2012 Neus 586 Monday, January 30, 2012 #12 what can cross it, so that only certain molecules either enter or leave the cell. Monday, January 30

  16. Vascular Cures

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Patients deserve to be at the center of decision-making. Project Voice provides an online health platform for patients to better manage their health, while offering a unique tool for vascular researchers. Self-care today, cures tomorrow . ...

  17. Vascular Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... network of blood vessels. It includes the arteries, veins and capillaries that carry blood to and from ... the body. You are more likely to have vascular disease as you get older. Other factors that make ...

  18. Ultrasound -- Vascular

    MedlinePLUS

    ... ultrasound uses sound waves to evaluate the body’s circulatory system and help identify blockages and detect blood clots. ... is a useful way of evaluating the body's circulatory system. Vascular ultrasound is performed to: help monitor the ...

  19. Metoclopramide and renal vascular resistance.

    PubMed

    Manara, A R; Bolsin, S; Monk, C R; Hartnell, G; Harris, R A

    1991-01-01

    We have studied the effect of i.v. metoclopramide on renal vascular resistance in nine healthy volunteers. Peak systolic and end-diastolic frequencies were measured using duplex Doppler ultrasound of a renal interlobar artery, before and after the administration of i.v. metoclopramide 10 mg, and the resistance index derived. There was no significant change in mean arterial pressure or resistance index following metoclopramide. PMID:1997046

  20. Increased endothelial cell permeability in endoglin-deficient cells.

    PubMed

    Jerkic, Mirjana; Letarte, Michelle

    2015-09-01

    Endoglin (ENG) is a TGF-? superfamily coreceptor essential for vascular endothelium integrity. ENG mutations lead to a vascular dysplasia associated with frequent hemorrhages in multiple organs, whereas ENG null mouse embryos die at midgestation with impaired heart development and leaky vasculature. ENG interacts with several proteins involved in cell adhesion, and we postulated that it regulates vascular permeability. The current study assessed the permeability of ENG homozygous null (Eng(-/-)), heterozygous (Eng(+/-)), and normal (Eng(+/+)) mouse embryonic endothelial cell (EC) lines. Permeability, measured by passage of fluorescent dextran through EC monolayers, was increased 2.9- and 1.7-fold for Eng(-/-) and Eng(+/-) ECs, respectively, compared to control ECs and was not increased by TGF-?1 or VEGF. Prolonged starvation increased Eng(-/-) EC permeability by 3.7-fold with no effect on control ECs; neutrophils transmigrated faster through Eng(-/-) than Eng(+/+) monolayers. Using a pull-down assay, we demonstrate that Ras homolog gene family (Rho) A is constitutively active in Eng(-/-) and Eng(+/-) ECs. We show that the endothelial barrier destabilizing factor thrombospondin-1 and its receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatase are increased, whereas stabilizing factors VEGF receptor 2, vascular endothelial-cadherin, p21-activated kinase, and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 2 are decreased in Eng(-/-) cells. Our findings indicate that ENG deficiency leads to EC hyperpermeability through constitutive activation of RhoA and destabilization of endothelial barrier function. PMID:25972355

  1. Tunable permeability of magnetic wires at microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panina, L. V.; Makhnovskiy, D. P.; Morchenko, A. T.; Kostishin, V. G.

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents the analysis into microwave magnetic properties of magnetic microwires and their composites in the context of applications in wireless sensors and tunable microwave materials. It is demonstrated that the intrinsic permeability of wires has a wide frequency dispersion with relatively large values in the GHz band. In the case of a specific magnetic anisotropy this results in a tunable microwave impedance which could be used for distributed wireless sensing networks in functional composites. The other range of applications is related with developing the artificial magnetic dielectrics with large and tunable permeability. The composites with magnetic wires with a circumferential anisotropy have the effective permeability which differs substantially from unity for a relatively low concentration (less than 10%). This can make it possible to design the wire media with a negative and tunable index of refraction utilising natural magnetic properties of wires.

  2. Permeability of edible coatings.

    PubMed

    Mishra, B; Khatkar, B S; Garg, M K; Wilson, L A

    2010-01-01

    The permeabilities of water vapour, O2 and CO2 were determined for 18 coating formulations. Water vapour transmission rate ranged from 98.8 g/m(2).day (6% beeswax) to 758.0 g/m(2).day (1.5% carboxymethyl cellulose with glycerol). O2 permeability at 14 ± 1°C and 55 ± 5% RH ranged from 1.50 to 7.95 cm(3)cm cm(-2)s(-1)Pa(-1), with CO2 permeability 2 to 6 times as high. Permeability to noncondensable gases (O2 and CO2) was higher for hydrophobic (peanut oil followed by beeswax) coatings as compared to hydrophilic (whey protein concentrate and carboxymethyl cellulose). PMID:23572611

  3. What Is Vascular Disease?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Chronic Venous Insufficiency Congenital Vascular Malformation Critical Limb Ischemia (CLI) Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) Diabetes and Vascular ... and foot, and may progress to critical limb ischemia (CLI). Vascular disease affects the entire body and ...

  4. Brief Communication Determination of vascular permeability coefficients under slow

    E-print Network

    Tien, Joe

    an error of ~10% across a wide range of filling times and noise levels, and is particularly well, and that the concentration of solute within the tissue is negligible compared to that in the vessel. For a single cylindrical

  5. Intraocular Hemorrhage Causes Retinal Vascular Dysfunction via Plasma Kallikrein

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jia; Clermont, Allen C.; Gao, Ben-Bo; Feener, Edward P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Retinal hemorrhages occur in a variety of sight-threatening conditions including ocular trauma, high altitude retinopathy, and chronic diseases such as diabetic and hypertensive retinopathies. The goal of this study is to investigate the effects of blood in the vitreous on retinal vascular function in rats. Methods. Intravitreal injections of autologous blood, plasma kallikrein (PK), bradykinin, and collagenase were performed in Sprague-Dawley and Long-Evans rats. Retinal vascular permeability was measured using vitreous fluorophotometry and Evans blue dye permeation. Leukostasis was measured by fluorescein isothiocyanate–coupled concanavalin A lectin and acridine orange labeling. Retinal hemorrhage was examined on retinal flatmounts. Primary cultures of bovine retinal pericytes were cultured in the presence of 25 nM PK for 24 hours. The pericyte-conditioned medium was collected and the collagen proteome was analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry. Results. Intravitreal injection of autologous blood induced retinal vascular permeability and retinal leukostasis, and these responses were ameliorated by PK inhibition. Intravitreal injections of exogenous PK induced retinal vascular permeability, leukostasis, and retinal hemorrhage. Proteomic analyses showed that PK increased collagen degradation in pericyte-conditioned medium and purified type IV collagen. Intravitreal injection of collagenase mimicked PK's effect on retinal hemorrhage. Conclusions. Intraocular hemorrhage increases retinal vascular permeability and leukostasis, and these responses are mediated, in part, via PK. Intravitreal injections of either PK or collagenase, but not bradykinin, induce retinal hemorrhage in rats. PK exerts collagenase-like activity that may contribute to blood–retinal barrier dysfunction. PMID:23299478

  6. Catalpol downregulates vascular endothelial?cadherin expression and induces vascular hyperpermeability.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Caiqing; Liu, Qingfa; Dong, Fengyun; Li, Liqun; Du, Juan; Xie, Qi; Hu, Hesheng; Yan, Suhua; Zhou, Xia; Li, Changsheng; Lobe, Corrinne G; Liu, Ju

    2016-01-01

    Catalpol, an iridiod glucoside isolated from Rehmannia glutinosa, has been reported to possess anti?inflammatory properties. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this effect have not been fully elucidated. This study aimed to investigate the effects of catalpol on vascular permeability. Using Transwell permeability assays and measurements of trans?endothelial electrical resistance (TEER), it was demonstrated that 1 mM catalpol induces a significant increase in the permeability of the monolayers of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Western blotting and immunofluorescence demonstrated that catalpol inhibits the expression of vascular endothelial (VE)?cadherin, the key component of adherens junctions, but not occludin, the major constituent of tight junctions. In addition, catalpol inhibits the ETS transcription factor ERG, a positive regulator of VE?cadherin. Knockdown of ERG expression compromised the catalpol?induced reduction of TEER in HUVECs. The present study revealed a novel effect of catalpol on vascular permeability and gave insight into the multifaceted roles of catalpol in inflammation. PMID:26549479

  7. Fractal Analysis of Stress Sensitivity of Permeability in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xiao-Hua; Li, Xiao-Ping; Liu, Jian-Yi; Zhang, Lie-Hui; Cai, Jianchao

    2015-12-01

    A permeability model for porous media considering the stress sensitivity is derived based on mechanics of materials and the fractal characteristics of solid cluster size distribution. The permeability of porous media considering the stress sensitivity is related to solid cluster fractal dimension, solid cluster fractal tortuosity dimension, solid cluster minimum diameter and solid cluster maximum diameter, Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, as well as power index. Every parameter has clear physical meaning without the use of empirical constants. The model predictions of permeability show good agreement with those obtained by the available experimental expression. The proposed model may be conducible to a better understanding of the mechanism for flow in elastic porous media.

  8. Vascular Disease Foundation

    MedlinePLUS

    The Faces of Vascular Disease Kipp had an abdominal aortic aneurysm. Learn how vascular research saved his life here . Project Voice Patients deserve to ... nonprofit organization representing the millions of patients with vascular disease. To learn about vascular disease click here . @ 2014 ...

  9. EPA Permeable Surface Research - Poster

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA recognizes permeable surfaces as an effective post-construction infiltration-based Best Management Practice to mitigate the adverse effects of stormwater runoff. The professional user community conceptually embraces permeable surfaces as a tool for making runoff more closely...

  10. Permeability anisotropy of resedimented mudrocks

    E-print Network

    Nordquist, Taylor James

    2015-01-01

    Permeability anisotropy (ratio of horizontal to vertical permeability) is an important but uncertain parameter used in characterizing underground formations. While it is a fairly unknown parameter, it is integral for the ...

  11. Changes in mast cells and in permeability of mesenteric microvessels under the effect of immobilization and electrostimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorizontova, M. P.

    1980-01-01

    It was shown that a reduction in the amount of mast cells in the mesentery and an increase in their degranulation was accompanied by an increase in vascular permeability of rat mesentery. It is supposed that immobilization and electrostimulation causing degranulation of mast cells prompted histamine and serotonin release from them, thus increasing the permeability of the venular portion of the microvascular bed. Prophylactic use of esculamin preparation with P-vitaminic activity decreased mast cell degranulation, which apparently prolonged the release of histamine and serotonin from them and normalized vascular permeability.

  12. Liquid-permeable electrode

    DOEpatents

    Folser, George R. (Lower Burrell, PA)

    1980-01-01

    Electrodes for use in an electrolytic cell, which are liquid-permeable and have low electrical resistance and high internal surface area are provided of a rigid, porous, carbonaceous matrix having activated carbon uniformly embedded throughout. The activated carbon may be catalyzed with platinum for improved electron transfer between electrode and electrolyte. Activated carbon is mixed with a powdered thermosetting phenolic resin and compacted to the desired shape in a heated mold to melt the resin and form the green electrode. The compact is then heated to a pyrolyzing temperature to carbonize and volatilize the resin, forming a rigid, porous structure. The permeable structure and high internal surface area are useful in electrolytic cells where it is necessary to continuously remove the products of the electrochemical reaction.

  13. Stainless Steel Permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Buchenauer, Dean A.; Karnesky, Richard A.

    2015-09-01

    An understanding of the behavior of hydrogen isotopes in materials is critical to predicting tritium transport in structural metals (at high pressure), estimating tritium losses during production (fission environment), and predicting in-vessel inventory for future fusion devices (plasma driven permeation). Current models often assume equilibrium diffusivity and solubility for a class of materials (e.g. stainless steels or aluminum alloys), neglecting trapping effects or, at best, considering a single population of trapping sites. Permeation and trapping studies of the particular castings and forgings enable greater confidence and reduced margins in the models. For FY15, we have continued our investigation of the role of ferrite in permeation for steels of interest to GTS, through measurements of the duplex steel 2507. We also initiated an investigation of the permeability in work hardened materials, to follow up on earlier observations of unusual permeability in a particular region of 304L forgings. Samples were prepared and characterized for ferrite content and coated with palladium to prevent oxidation. Issues with the poor reproducibility of measurements at low permeability were overcome, although the techniques in use are tedious. Funding through TPBAR and GTS were secured for a research grade quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and replacement turbo pumps, which should improve the fidelity and throughput of measurements in FY16.

  14. Design and development of multilayer vascular graft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhavan, Krishna

    2011-07-01

    Vascular graft is a widely-used medical device for the treatment of vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis and aneurysm as well as for the use of vascular access and pediatric shunt, which are major causes of mortality and morbidity in this world. Dysfunction of vascular grafts often occurs, particularly for grafts with diameter less than 6mm, and is associated with the design of graft materials. Mechanical strength, compliance, permeability, endothelialization and availability are issues of most concern for vascular graft materials. To address these issues, we have designed a biodegradable, compliant graft made of hybrid multilayer by combining an intimal equivalent, electrospun heparin-impregnated poly-epsilon-caprolactone nanofibers, with a medial equivalent, a crosslinked collagen-chitosan-based gel scaffold. The intimal equivalent is designed to build mechanical strength and stability suitable for in vivo grafting and to prevent thrombosis. The medial equivalent is designed to serve as a scaffold for the activity of the smooth muscle cells important for vascular healing and regeneration. Our results have shown that genipin is a biocompatible crosslinker to enhance the mechanical properties of collagen-chitosan based scaffolds, and the degradation time and the activity of smooth muscle cells in the scaffold can be modulated by the crosslinking degree. For vascular grafting and regeneration in vivo, an important design parameter of the hybrid multilayer is the interface adhesion between the intimal and medial equivalents. With diametrically opposite affinities to water, delamination of the two layers occurs. Physical or chemical modification techniques were thus used to enhance the adhesion. Microscopic examination and graft-relevant functional characterizations have been performed to evaluate these techniques. Results from characterization of microstructure and functional properties, including burst strength, compliance, water permeability and suture strength, showed that the multilayer graft possessed properties mimicking those of native vessels. Achieving these FDA-required functional properties is essential because they play critical roles in graft performances in vivo such as thrombus formation, occlusion, healing, and bleeding. In addition, cell studies and animal studies have been performed on the multilayer graft. Our results show that the multilayer graft support mimetic vascular culture of cells and the acellular graft serves as an artery equivalent in vivo to sustain the physiological conditions and promote appropriate cellular activity. In conclusion, the newly-developed hybrid multilayer graft provides a proper balance of biomechanical and biochemical properties and demonstrates the potential for the use of vascular tissue engineering and regeneration.

  15. Microcirculation-on-a-Chip: A Microfluidic Platform for Assaying Blood- and Lymphatic-Vessel Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Miwa; Sasaki, Naoki; Ato, Manabu; Hirakawa, Satoshi; Sato, Kiichi; Sato, Kae

    2015-01-01

    We developed a microfluidic model of microcirculation containing both blood and lymphatic vessels for examining vascular permeability. The designed microfluidic device harbors upper and lower channels that are partly aligned and are separated by a porous membrane, and on this membrane, blood vascular endothelial cells (BECs) and lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) were cocultured back-to-back. At cell-cell junctions of both BECs and LECs, claudin-5 and VE-cadherin were detected. The permeability coefficient measured here was lower than the value reported for isolated mammalian venules. Moreover, our results showed that the flow culture established in the device promoted the formation of endothelial cell-cell junctions, and that treatment with histamine, an inflammation-promoting substance, induced changes in the localization of tight and adherens junction-associated proteins and an increase in vascular permeability in the microdevice. These findings indicated that both BECs and LECs appeared to retain their functions in the microfluidic coculture platform. Using this microcirculation device, the vascular damage induced by habu snake venom was successfully assayed, and the assay time was reduced from 24 h to 30 min. This is the first report of a microcirculation model in which BECs and LECs were cocultured. Because the micromodel includes lymphatic vessels in addition to blood vessels, the model can be used to evaluate both vascular permeability and lymphatic return rate. PMID:26332321

  16. Society for Vascular Medicine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Submit an Abstract Patient Information Pages from Vascular Medicine December 2015 Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) More info ... 1, 2014 Archive Submit a Case New! Vascular Medicine Videos Geoff Barnes talks about the article, VTE: ...

  17. Tubedown regulation of retinal endothelial permeability signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Nhu; Gendron, Robert L.; Grozinger, Kindra; Whelan, Maria A.; Hicks, Emily Anne; Tennakoon, Bimal; Gardiner, Danielle; Good, William V.; Paradis, Hélène

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tubedown (Tbdn; Naa15), a subunit of the N-terminal acetyltransferase NatA, complexes with the c-Src substrate Cortactin and supports adult retinal homeostasis through regulation of vascular permeability. Here we investigate the role of Tbdn expression on signaling components of retinal endothelial permeability to understand how Tbdn regulates the vasculature and supports retinal homeostasis. Tbdn knockdown-induced hyperpermeability to Albumin in retinal endothelial cells was associated with an increase in the levels of activation of the Src family kinases (SFK) c-Src, Fyn and Lyn and phospho-Cortactin (Tyr421). The knockdown of Cortactin expression reduced Tbdn knockdown-induced permeability to Albumin and the levels of activated SFK. Inhibition of SFK in retinal endothelial cells decreased Tbdn knockdown-induced permeability to Albumin and phospho-Cortactin (Tyr421) levels. Retinal lesions of endothelial-specific Tbdn knockdown mice, with tissue thickening, fibrovascular growth, and hyperpermeable vessels displayed an increase in the levels of activated c-Src. Moreover, the retinal lesions of patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) associated with a loss of Tbdn expression and hyperpermeability to Albumin displayed increased levels of activated SFK in retinal blood vessels. Taken together, these results implicate Tbdn as an important regulator of retinal endothelial permeability and homeostasis by modulating a signaling pathway involving c-Src and Cortactin. PMID:26142315

  18. Endothelial glycocalyx: permeability barrier and mechanosensor.

    PubMed

    Curry, F E; Adamson, R H

    2012-04-01

    Endothelial cells are covered with a polysaccharide rich layer more than 400 nm thick, mechanical properties of which limit access of circulating plasma components to endothelial cell membranes. The barrier properties of this endothelial surface layer are deduced from the rate of tracer penetration into the layer and the mechanics of red and white cell movement through capillary microvessels. This review compares the mechanosensor and permeability properties of an inner layer (100-150 nm, close to the endothelial membrane) characterized as a quasi-periodic structure which accounts for key aspects of transvascular exchange and vascular permeability with those of the whole endothelial surface layers. We conclude that many of the barrier properties of the whole surface layer are not representative of the primary fiber matrix forming the molecular filter determining transvascular exchange. The differences between the properties of the whole layer and the inner glycocalyx structures likely reflect dynamic aspects of the endothelial surface layer including tracer binding to specific components, synthesis and degradation of key components, activation of signaling pathways in the endothelial cells when components of the surface layer are lost or degraded, and the spatial distribution of adhesion proteins in microdomains of the endothelial cell membrane. PMID:22009311

  19. Permeabilities of radiation cured materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sax, J. E.; Thalacker, V. P.; Boettcher, T. E.; Larson, E. G.

    The permeability of radiation cured materials to oxygen and water molecules was investigated. Several classes of radiation curable materials were studied, including: epoxy, urethane, polyether, polyester, and aliphatic acrylates. Permeabilities were measured as a function of irradiation dose for Ultra-Violet and Electron Beam sources. The effect of cross-link density on permeability was examined by varying the functionality of the molecule and the degree of cure. The results were interpreted in terms of structure/property relationships.

  20. Sphingolipids affect fibrinogen-induced caveolar transcytosis and cerebrovascular permeability

    PubMed Central

    Muradashvili, Nino; Khundmiri, Syed Jalal; Tyagi, Reeta; Gartung, Allison; Dean, William L.; Lee, Menq-Jer

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction can allow plasma proteins to cross the vascular wall, causing edema. Proteins may traverse the vascular wall through two main pathways, the paracellular and transcellular transport pathways. Paracellular transport involves changes in endothelial cell junction proteins, while transcellular transport involves caveolar transcytosis. Since both processes are associated with filamentous actin formation, the two pathways are interconnected. Therefore, it is difficult to differentiate the prevailing role of one or the other pathway during various pathologies causing an increase in vascular permeability. Using a newly developed dual-tracer probing method, we differentiated transcellular from paracellular transport during hyperfibrinogenemia (HFg), an increase in fibrinogen (Fg) content. Roles of cholesterol and sphingolipids in formation of functional caveolae were assessed using a cholesterol chelator, methyl-?-cyclodextrin, and the de novo sphingolipid synthesis inhibitor myriocin. Fg-induced formation of functional caveolae was defined by association and colocalization of Na+-K+-ATPase and plasmalemmal vesicle-associated protein-1 with use of Förster resonance energy transfer and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, respectively. HFg increased permeability of the endothelial cell layer mainly through the transcellular pathway. While M?CD blocked Fg-increased transcellular and paracellular transport, myriocin affected only transcellular transport. Less pial venular leakage of albumin was observed in myriocin-treated HFg mice. HFg induced greater formation of functional caveolae, as indicated by colocalization of Na+-K+-ATPase with plasmalemmal vesicle-associated protein-1 by Förster resonance energy transfer and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. Our results suggest that elevated blood levels of Fg alter cerebrovascular permeability mainly by affecting caveolae-mediated transcytosis through modulation of de novo sphingolipid synthesis. PMID:24829496

  1. Pathophysiology of Vascular Calcification.

    PubMed

    Chen, Neal X; Moe, Sharon M

    2015-12-01

    Vascular calcification can lead to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The initiating factors and clinical consequences depend on the underlying disease state and location of the calcification. The pathogenesis of vascular calcification is complex and involves a transformation of vascular smooth muscle cells to an osteo/chondrocytic cell that expresses RUNX2 and produces matrix vesicles. The imbalance of promoters (such as hyperphosphatemia and hypercalcemia) and inhibitors (e.g., fetuin-A) is critical in the development of vascular calcification. The altered mineral metabolism and deficiency in inhibitors are common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is one reason why vascular calcification is so prevalent in that population. PMID:26409849

  2. Neuroprotective effect of selective DPP-4 inhibitor in experimental vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Jain, Swati; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2015-12-01

    Vascular risk factors are associated with a higher incidence of dementia. Diabetes mellitus is considered as a main risk factor for Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia. Both forms of dementia are posing greater risk to the world population and are increasing at a faster rate. In the past we have reported the induction of vascular dementia by experimental diabetes. This study investigates the role of vildagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor in the pharmacological interdiction of pancreatectomy diabetes induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and subsequent vascular dementia in rats. Attentional set shifting and Morris water-maze test were used for assessment of learning and memory. Vascular endothelial function, blood brain barrier permeability, serum glucose, serum nitrite/nitrate, oxidative stress (viz. aortic superoxide anion, brain thiobarbituric acid reactive species and brain glutathione), brain calcium and inflammation (myeloperoxidase) were also estimated. Pancreatectomy diabetes rats have shown impairment of endothelial function, blood brain barrier permeability, learning and memory along with increase in brain inflammation, oxidative stress and calcium. Administration of vildagliptin has significantly attenuated pancreatectomy induced impairment of learning, memory, endothelial function, blood brain barrier permeability and biochemical parameters. It may be concluded that vildagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor may be considered as potential pharmacological agents for the management of pancreatectomy induced endothelial dysfunction and subsequent vascular dementia. The selective modulators of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 may further be explored for their possible benefits in vascular dementia. PMID:26382939

  3. Permeability and Relative Permeability in Rocks Stephen C. Blair

    E-print Network

    Permeability and Relative Permeability in Rocks Stephen C. Blair James G. Berryman University features of the topology of the pore space of rocks can be usefully quantified by analyzing digitized images of rock cross sections. One approach computes statistical cor­ relation functions using modern

  4. Validation of biomarkers in subcortical ischaemic vascular disease of the Binswanger type: approach to targeted treatment trials

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Gary A; Prestopnik, Jillian; Adair, John C; Huisa, Branko N; Knoefel, Janice; Caprihan, Arvind; Gasparovic, Charles; Thompson, Jeffrey; Erhardt, Erik B; Schrader, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) is a heterogeneous group of cerebrovascular diseases secondary to large and small vessel disease. We hypothesised that biomarkers obtained early in the disease could identify a homogeneous subpopulation with small vessel disease. Methods We obtained disease markers in 62 patients with VCI that included neurological findings, neuropsychological tests, multimodal MR and cerebrospinal fluid measurements of albumin ratio, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), amyloid-?1–42 and phosphorylated-?181. Proton MR spectroscopic imaging showed ischaemic white matter and permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) was measured with dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. We constructed a 10-point Binswanger disease score (BDS) with subjective and objective disease markers. In addition, an objective set of biomarkers was used for an exploratory factor analysis (EFA) to select patients with BD. Patients were followed for an average of 2 years to obtain clinical consensus diagnoses. Results An initial BDS of 6 or greater was significantly correlated with a final diagnosis of BD (p<0.05; area under the curve (AUC)=0.79). EFA reduced nine objective biomarkers to four factors. The most predictive of BD was the factor containing the inflammatory biomarkers of increased BBB permeability, elevated albumin index and reduced MMP-2 index (factor 2; AUC=0.78). Both measures independently predicted a diagnosis of BD, and combining them improved the diagnostic accuracy. Conclusions Biomarkers predicted the diagnosis of the BD type of subcortical ischaemic vascular disease. Using pathophysiological biomarkers to select homogeneous groups of patients needs to be tested in targeted treatment trials. PMID:25618903

  5. Loss of the Endothelial Glycocalyx Links Albuminuria and Vascular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Joanne K.; Burford, James L.; Gevorgyan, Haykanush; Nakano, Daisuke; Harper, Steven J.; Bates, David O.; Peti-Peterdi, Janos

    2012-01-01

    Patients with albuminuria and CKD frequently have vascular dysfunction but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Because the endothelial surface layer, a meshwork of surface-bound and loosely adherent glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans, modulates vascular function, its loss could contribute to both renal and systemic vascular dysfunction in proteinuric CKD. Using Munich-Wistar-Fromter (MWF) rats as a model of spontaneous albuminuric CKD, multiphoton fluorescence imaging and single-vessel physiology measurements revealed that old MWF rats exhibited widespread loss of the endothelial surface layer in parallel with defects in microvascular permeability to both water and albumin, in both continuous mesenteric microvessels and fenestrated glomerular microvessels. In contrast to young MWF rats, enzymatic disruption of the endothelial surface layer in old MWF rats resulted in neither additional loss of the layer nor additional changes in permeability. Intravenous injection of wheat germ agglutinin lectin and its adsorption onto the endothelial surface layer significantly improved glomerular albumin permeability. Taken together, these results suggest that widespread loss of the endothelial surface layer links albuminuric kidney disease with systemic vascular dysfunction, providing a potential therapeutic target for proteinuric kidney disease. PMID:22797190

  6. Vascular tracers alter hemodynamics and airway pressure in anesthetized sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Albertine, K.H.; Staub, N.C.

    1986-11-01

    The technique of vascular labeling was developed to mark sites of increased microvascular permeability. We used the vascular labeling technique in anesthetized sheep and found that hemodynamics and airway pressure were adversely affected by intraarterial infusions of two vascular tracers. Monastral blue (nine sheep) immediately caused systemic arterial hypotension, pulmonary arterial hypertension, and bronchoconstriction. All three physiological responses were partially blocked by a cyclooxygenase inhibitor (indomethacin) but not by an H1-antihistamine (chlorpheniramine). Colloidal gold (nine sheep) caused immediate, but less dramatic, pulmonary arterial hypertension which was not attenuated by the blocking agents. We conclude that these two vascular tracers caused detrimental physiological side effects in sheep at the usual doses used to label injured microvessels in other species.

  7. Imaging Pediatric Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tuyet A.; Krakowski, Andrew C.; Naheedy, John H.; Kruk, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are commonly encountered in pediatric and dermatology practices. Most of these lesions are benign and easy to diagnose based on history and clinical exam alone. However, in some cases the diagnosis may not be clear. This may be of particular concern given that vascular anomalies may occasionally be associated with an underlying syndrome, congenital disease, or serious, life-threatening condition. Defining the type of vascular lesion early and correctly is particularly important to determine the optimal approach to management and treatment of each patient. The care of pediatric patients often requires collaboration from a multitude of specialties including pediatrics, dermatology, plastic surgery, radiology, ophthalmology, and neurology. Although early characterization of vascular lesions is important, consensus guidelines regarding the evaluation and imaging of vascular anomalies does not exist to date. Here, the authors provide an overview of pediatric vascular lesions, current classification systems for characterizing these lesions, the various imaging modalities available, and recommendations for appropriate imaging evaluation. PMID:26705446

  8. Relative Permeability of Fractured Rock

    SciTech Connect

    Mark D. Habana

    2002-06-30

    Contemporary understanding of multiphase flow through fractures is limited. Different studies using synthetic fractures and various fluids have yielded different relative permeability-saturation relations. This study aimed to extend the understanding of multiphase flow by conducting nitrogen-water relative permeability experiments on a naturally-fractured rock from The Geysers geothermal field. The steady-state approach was used. However, steady state was achieved only at the endpoint saturations. Several difficulties were encountered that are attributed to phase interference and changes in fracture aperture and surface roughness, along with fracture propagation/initiation. Absolute permeabilities were determined using nitrogen and water. The permeability values obtained change with the number of load cycles. Determining the absolute permeability of a core is especially important in a fractured rock. The rock may change as asperities are destroyed and fractures propagate or st rain harden as the net stresses vary. Pressure spikes occurred in water a solute permeability experiments. Conceptual models of an elastic fracture network can explain the pressure spike behavior. At the endpoint saturations the water relative permeabilities obtained are much less than the nitrogen gas relative permeabilities. Saturations were determined by weighing and by resistivity calculations. The resistivity-saturation relationship developed for the core gave saturation values that differ by 5% from the value determined by weighing. Further work is required to complete the relative permeability curve. The steady-state experimental approach encountered difficulties due to phase interference and fracture change. Steady state may not be reached until an impractical length of time. Thus, unsteady-state methods should be pursued. In unsteady-state experiments the challenge will be in quantifying rock fracture change in addition to fluid flow changes.

  9. Histamine Induces Vascular Hyperpermeability by Increasing Blood Flow and Endothelial Barrier Disruption In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ashina, Kohei; Tsubosaka, Yoshiki; Nakamura, Tatsuro; Omori, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Koji; Hori, Masatoshi; Ozaki, Hiroshi; Murata, Takahisa

    2015-01-01

    Histamine is a mediator of allergic inflammation released mainly from mast cells. Although histamine strongly increases vascular permeability, its precise mechanism under in vivo situation remains unknown. We here attempted to reveal how histamine induces vascular hyperpermeability focusing on the key regulators of vascular permeability, blood flow and endothelial barrier. Degranulation of mast cells by antigen-stimulation or histamine treatment induced vascular hyperpermeability and tissue swelling in mouse ears. These were abolished by histamine H1 receptor antagonism. Intravital imaging showed that histamine dilated vasculature, increased blood flow, while it induced hyperpermeability in venula. Whole-mount staining showed that histamine disrupted endothelial barrier formation of venula indicated by changes in vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin) localization at endothelial cell junction. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis (NOS) by L-NAME or vasoconstriction by phenylephrine strongly inhibited the histamine-induced blood flow increase and hyperpermeability without changing the VE-cadherin localization. In vitro, measurements of trans-endothelial electrical resistance of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMECs) showed that histamine disrupted endothelial barrier. Inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC) or Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK), NOS attenuated the histamine-induced barrier disruption. These observations suggested that histamine increases vascular permeability mainly by nitric oxide (NO)-dependent vascular dilation and subsequent blood flow increase and maybe partially by PKC/ROCK/NO-dependent endothelial barrier disruption. PMID:26158531

  10. Fibrin endothelial interaction increases pulmonary endothelial permeability in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, S.K.; Del Vecchio, P.J.; Malik, A.B.

    1986-03-05

    Fibrin has been implicated in the genesis of lung vascular injury. They examined the effect of adherence of fibrin to endothelial cells on endothelial permeability to protein. Bovine pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (EC) were grown to confluence on a gelatinized polycarbonate micropore filter and mounted in a chamber in which the luminal and abluminal media could be sampled. Fibrin was deposited on the endothelium by adding sheep fibrinogen (0.5 mg/ml) in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM) to the luminal surface of the endothelium, and then clotting the fibrinogen with 1 U/ml ..cap alpha..-thrombin. The fibrin was kept in contact with the endothelium for 3 hrs in an incubator at 37/sup 0/C plus 5% CO/sub 2/. The endothelial permeability to albumin was assessed by measurement of /sup 125/I-albumin clearance after removal of the fibrin clot from the endothelium. Therefore, fibrin contact with the endothelium independently induces an increase in endothelial permeability to albumin. The reversibility implies a transient change in the permeability dependent on the fibrin endothelial interaction.

  11. Geothermal Permeability Enhancement - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Joe Beall; Mark Walters

    2009-06-30

    The overall objective is to apply known permeability enhancement techniques to reduce the number of wells needed and demonstrate the applicability of the techniques to other undeveloped or under-developed fields. The Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) concept presented in this project enhances energy extraction from reduced permeability zones in the super-heated, vapor-dominated Aidlin Field of the The Geysers geothermal reservoir. Numerous geothermal reservoirs worldwide, over a wide temperature range, contain zones of low permeability which limit the development potential and the efficient recovery of heat from these reservoirs. Low permeability results from poorly connected fractures or the lack of fractures. The Enhanced Geothermal System concept presented here expands these technologies by applying and evaluating them in a systematic, integrated program.

  12. Regulation of Vascular Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Masahiro; Simons, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The integrity of blood vessels is critical to vascular homeostasis. Maintenance of vascular integrity has been conventionally regarded as a passive process that is largely dependent on continuous blood flow. Recent studies, however, have begun unveiling molecular processes essential for maintenance of vascular integrity and homeostasis under physiological conditions, leading to the notion that maintenance of the vasculature is an active biological process that requires continuous, basal cellular signaling. Failure of this system results in serious consequences such as hemorrhage, edema, inflammation and tissue ischemia. In this review, we will discuss the emerging concepts in regulation of vascular integrity with the emphasis on structural components of blood vessels that are essential for vascular maintenance. PMID:19337719

  13. Permeability of soils in Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Hara, Charles G.

    1994-01-01

    The permeability of soils in Mississippi was determined and mapped using a geographic information system (GIS). Soil permeabilities in Mississippi were determined to range in value from nearly 0.0 to values exceeding 5.0 inches per hour. The U.S. Soil Conservation Service's State Soil Geographic Data Base (STATSGO) was used as the primary source of data for the determination of area-weighted soil permeability. STATSGO provides soil layer properties that are spatially referenced to mapped areas. These mapped areas are referred to as polygons in the GIS. The polygons arc boundaries of soils mapped as a group and are given unique Map Unit Identifiers (MUIDs). The data describing the physical characteristics of the soils within each polygon are stored in a tabular data base format and are referred to as attributes. The U.S. Soil Conservation Service developed STATSGO to be primarily used as a guide for regional resource planning, management, and monitoring. STATSGO was designed so that soil information could be extracted from properties tables at the layer level, combined by component, and statistically expanded to cover the entire map unit. The results of this study provide a mapped value for permeability which is representative of the vertical permeability of soils in that area. The resultant permeability map provides a representative vertical soil permeability for a given area sufficient for county, multi- county, and area planning, and will be used as the soil permeability data component in the evaluation of the susceptibility of major aquifers to contami- nation in Mississippi.

  14. Constraining Fault-Zone Permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, S.; Ball, L. B.; Caine, J. S.; Revil, A.

    2011-12-01

    Faults are known to behave as hydrologic barriers, conduits, or combined barrier-conduits to fluid flow. On the basis of hydrological and geophysical data, this study presents a possible fault-zone permeability model for a buried reverse fault that juxtaposes Precambrian crystalline rocks against Tertiary sedimentary strata, the Elkhorn fault zone in South Park, Colorado. Permeameter tests and thin section analyses were performed on several samples taken from a 300-foot interval of core from the sedimentary footwall and yielded permeability values on the order of 10E-16 m^2. In-situ slug tests and single-well pumping tests conducted in both the footwall and hanging wall yielded larger permeability values, varying between 10E-14 to 10E-11 m^2, indicating a substantial change in permeability in the vicinity of the fault. Geophysical interpretations from electrical resistivity tomography and self-potential measurements suggest that these permeability estimates may be representative of a lithologically and hydrologically distinct fault zone. Permeability estimates, resistivity structure, and interpreted changes in groundwater flow direction near the fault are consistent with combined conduit-barrier behavior at the meter to tens-of-meters scale.

  15. Permeabilities of Subduction Zone Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Screaton, E.; Gamage, K. R.; Daigle, H.; Harris, R. N.

    2013-12-01

    Permeabilities of subseafloor sediments control fluid expulsion from sediments as they are subducted or accreted and thus, compaction state, fluid overpressures, and deformation. We compare results from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program samples to compare to previously-developed permeability-porosity relationships for subduction zone sediments. Hemipelagic clay samples obtained from the incoming plate Kumano transect of the Nankai Trough (NanTroSEIZE) yield slightly lower permeability for a given porosity than previously reported results from Nankai Trough's Muroto transect and are lower than clay-rich sediments from the upper plate of CRISP offshore the Osa Peninsula of Costa Rica (CRISP). Samples from the Pacific Equatorial Transect (PEAT) and the South Pacific Gyre provide further insight to permeability behavior of sediments deposited in the Pacific basin. South Pacific Gyre sediments consist of slowly deposited pelagic clay with little biogenic or coarse clastic input. Measured permeabilities for given porosities are consistently lower than values reported for clay-rich sediments of Nankai and Costa Rica. PEAT samples comprise biogenic oozes and yield inconsistent results, with some of the highest permeabilities (10-14 m2) as well as some results similar to clay-rich sediments.

  16. Small intestinal permeability in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Valentini, Luzia; Ramminger, Sara; Haas, Verena; Postrach, Elisa; Werich, Martina; Fischer, André; Koller, Michael; Swidsinski, Alexander; Bereswill, Stefan; Lochs, Herbert; Schulzke, Jörg?Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Abstract It is not yet clear whether intestinal mucosal permeability changes with advancing age in humans. This question is of high importance for drug and nutrition approaches for older adults. Our main objective was to answer the question if small intestinal barrier integrity deteriorates with healthy aging. We conducted a cross?sectional study including the pooled data of 215 nonsmoking healthy adults (93 female/122 male), 84 of whom were aged between 60 and 82 years. After a 12?h fast, all participants ingested 10 g of lactulose and 5 g of mannitol. Urine was collected for 5 h afterwards and analyzed for test sugars. The permeability index (PI = lactulose/mannitol) was used to assess small intestinal permeability. Low?grade inflammation defined by high?sensitivity C?reactive protein ?1 mL/L and kidney function (estimated glomerular filtration rate) were determined in the older age group. The PI was similar in older compared to younger adults (P =0.887). However, the urinary recovery of lactulose and mannitol was lower in the older adults and this change was neither associated with urinary volume nor glomerular filtration rate. The PI was not significantly correlated with low?grade inflammation or presence of noninsulin?dependent type 2 diabetes. However, it significantly deteriorated in the copresence of both conditions compared to low?grade inflammation alone (P =0.043) or type 2 diabetes alone (P =0.015). Small intestinal mucosal barrier does not deteriorate with age per se. But low?grade inflammation coupled with minor disease challenges, such as type 2 diabetes, can compromise the small intestinal barrier. PMID:24771689

  17. Role of connexin 43 in vascular hyperpermeability and relationship to Rock1-MLC20 pathway in septic rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Yang, Guang-Ming; Zhu, Yu; Peng, Xiao-Yong; Li, Tao; Liu, Liang-Ming

    2015-12-01

    Connexin (Cx)43 has been shown to participate in several cardiovascular diseases. Increased vascular permeability is a common and severe complication in sepsis or septic shock. Whether or not Cx43 takes part in the regulation of vascular permeability in severe sepsis is not known, and the underlying mechanism has not been described. With cecal ligation and puncture-induced sepsis in rats and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated vascular endothelial cells (VECs) from pulmonary veins, the role of Cx43 in increased vascular permeability and its relationship to the RhoA/Rock1 pathway were studied. It was shown that vascular permeability in the lungs, kidneys, and mesentery in sepsis rats and LPS-stimulated monolayer pulmonary vein VECs was significantly increased and positively correlated with the increased expression of Cx43 and Rock1 in these organs and cultured pulmonary vein VECs. The connexin inhibitor carbenoxolone (10 mg/kg iv) and the Rock1 inhibitor Y-27632 (2 mg/kg iv) alleviated the vascular leakage of lung, mesentery, and kidney in sepsis rats. Overexpressed Cx43 increased the phosphorylation of 20-kDa myosin light chain (MLC20) and the expression of Rock1 and increased the vascular permeability and decreased the transendothelial electrical resistance of pulmonary vein VECs. Cx43 RNA interference decreased the phosphorylation of MLC20 and the expression of Rock1 and decreased LPS-stimulated hyperpermeability of cultured pulmonary vein VECs. The Rock1 inhibitor Y-27632 alleviated LPS- and overexpressed Cx43-induced hyperpermeability of monolayer pulmonary vein VECs. This report shows that Cx43 participates in the regulation of vascular permeability in sepsis and that the mechanism is related to the Rock1-MLC20 phosphorylation pathway. PMID:26342084

  18. Hypertonic saline reduces vascular leakage in a mouse model of severe dengue.

    PubMed

    Tan, Grace Kai Xin; Ng, Jowin Kai Wei; Tan, Kar Wai; Angeli, Veronique; Moochhala, Shabbir; Ooi, Eng Eong; Alonso, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    Dengue (DEN) is a mosquito-borne viral disease and represents a serious public health threat and an economical burden throughout the tropics. Dengue clinical manifestations range from mild acute febrile illness to severe DEN hemorrhagic fever/DEN shock syndrome (DHF/DSS). Currently, resuscitation with large volumes of isotonic fluid remains the gold standard of care for DEN patients who develop vascular leakage and shock. Here, we investigated the ability of small volume of hypertonic saline (HTS) suspensions to control vascular permeability in a mouse model of severe DEN associated with vascular leakage. Several HTS treatment regimens were considered and our results indicated that a single bolus of 7.5% NaCl at 4 mL per kg of body weight administered at the onset of detectable vascular leakage rapidly and significantly reduced vascular leak for several days after injection. This transient reduction of vascular leakage correlated with reduced intestine and liver damage with restoration of the hepatic functions, and resulted in delayed death of the infected animals. Mechanistically, we showed that HTS did not directly impact on the viral titers but resulted in lower immune cells counts and decreased systemic levels of soluble mediators involved in vascular permeability. In addition, we demonstrated that neutrophils do not play a critical role in DEN-associated vascular leakage and that the therapeutic effect of HTS is not mediated by its impact on the neutrophil counts. Together our data indicate that HTS treatment can transiently but rapidly reduce dengue-associated vascular leakage, and support the findings of a recent clinical trial which evaluated the efficacy of a hypertonic suspension to impact on vascular permeability in DSS children. PMID:23637867

  19. Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging assessment of vascular targeting agent effects in rat intracerebral tumor models.

    PubMed

    Muldoon, Leslie L; Gahramanov, Seymur; Li, Xin; Marshall, Deborah J; Kraemer, Dale F; Neuwelt, Edward A

    2011-01-01

    We used dynamic MRI to evaluate the effects of monoclonal antibodies targeting brain tumor vasculature. Female athymic rats with intracerebral human tumor xenografts were untreated or treated with intetumumab, targeting ?(V)-integrins, or bevacizumab, targeting vascular endothelial growth factor (n = 4-6 per group). Prior to treatment and at 1, 3, and 7 days after treatment, we performed standard MRI to assess tumor volume, dynamic susceptibility-contrast MRI with the blood-pool iron oxide nanoparticle ferumoxytol to evaluate relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV), and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI to assess tumor vascular permeability. Tumor rCBV increased by 27 ± 13% over 7 days in untreated rats; intetumumab increased tumor rCBV by 65 ± 10%, whereas bevacizumab reduced tumor rCBV by 31 ± 10% at 7 days (P < .001 for group and day). Similarly, intetumumab increased brain tumor vascular permeability compared with controls at 3 and 7 days after treatment, whereas bevacizumab decreased tumor permeability within 24 hours (P = .0004 for group, P = .0081 for day). All tumors grew over the 7-day assessment period, but bevacizumab slowed the increase in tumor volume on MRI. We conclude that the vascular targeting agents intetumumab and bevacizumab had diametrically opposite effects on dynamic MRI of tumor vasculature in rat brain tumor models. Targeting ?(V)-integrins increased tumor vascular permeability and blood volume, whereas bevacizumab decreased both measures. These findings have implications for chemotherapy delivery and antitumor efficacy. PMID:21123368

  20. Vascular Access in Children

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnamurthy, Ganesh Keller, Marc S.

    2011-02-15

    Establishment of stable vascular access is one of the essential and most challenging procedures in a pediatric hospital. Many clinical specialties provide vascular service in a pediatric hospital. At the top of the 'expert procedural pyramid' is the pediatric interventional radiologist, who is best suited and trained to deliver this service. Growing awareness regarding the safety and high success rate of vascular access using image guidance has led to increased demand from clinicians to provide around-the-clock vascular access service by pediatric interventional radiologists. Hence, the success of a vascular access program, with the pediatric interventional radiologist as the key provider, is challenging, and a coordinated multidisciplinary team effort is essential for success. However, there are few dedicated pediatric interventional radiologists across the globe, and also only a couple of training programs exist for pediatric interventions. This article gives an overview of the technical aspects of pediatric vascular access and provides useful tips for obtaining vascular access in children safely and successfully using image guidance.

  1. Permeability extraction: A sonic log inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Akbar, N.; Kim, J.J.

    1994-12-31

    In this paper the authors provide the missing important link between permeability and acoustic velocities by generating a permeability-dependent synthetic sonic log in a carbonate reservoir. The computations are based on Akbar`s theory that relates wave velocity to frequency, rock properties (e.g., lithology, permeability, and porosity), and fluid saturation and properties (viscosity, density, and compressibility). An inverted analytical expression of the theory is used to extract permeability from sonic velocity. The synthetic sonic and the computed permeability are compared with the observed sonic log and with plug permeability, respectively. The results demonstrate, as predicted by theory, that permeability can be related directly to acoustic velocities.

  2. Vascular endothelial cell Toll-like receptor pathways in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Khakpour, Samira; Wilhelmsen, Kevin; Hellman, Judith

    2015-11-01

    The endothelium forms a vast network that dynamically regulates vascular barrier function, coagulation pathways and vasomotor tone. Microvascular endothelial cells are uniquely situated to play key roles during infection and injury, owing to their widespread distribution throughout the body and their constant interaction with circulating blood. While not viewed as classical immune cells, endothelial cells express innate immune receptors, including the Toll-like receptors (TLRs), which activate intracellular inflammatory pathways mediated through NF-?B and the MAP kinases. TLR agonists, including LPS and bacterial lipopeptides, directly upregulate microvascular endothelial cell expression of inflammatory mediators. Intriguingly, TLR activation also modulates microvascular endothelial cell permeability and the expression of coagulation pathway intermediaries. Microvascular thrombi have been hypothesized to trap microorganisms thereby limiting the spread of infection. However, dysregulated activation of endothelial inflammatory pathways is also believed to lead to coagulopathy and increased vascular permeability, which together promote sepsis-induced organ failure. This article reviews vascular endothelial cell innate immune pathways mediated through the TLRs as they pertain to sepsis, highlighting links between TLRs and coagulation and permeability pathways, and their role in healthy and pathologic responses to infection and sepsis. PMID:26403174

  3. The matrikine N-?-PGP couples extracellular matrix fragmentation to endothelial permeability

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Cornelia S.; Scott, David W.; Xu, Xin; Roda, Mojtaba Abdul; Payne, Gregory A.; Wells, J. Michael; Viera, Liliana; Winstead, Colleen J.; Bratcher, Preston; Sparidans, Rolf W.; Redegeld, Frank A.; Jackson, Patricia L.; Folkerts, Gert; Blalock, J. Edwin; Patel, Rakesh P.; Gaggar, Amit

    2015-01-01

    The compartmentalization and transport of proteins and solutes across the endothelium is a critical biologic function altered during inflammation and disease, leading to pathology in multiple disorders. The impact of tissue damage and subsequent extracellular matrix (ECM) fragmentation in regulating this process is unknown. We demonstrate that the collagen-derived matrikine acetylated proline-glycine-proline (N-?-PGP) serves as a critical regulator of endothelial permeability. N-?-PGP activates human endothelial cells via CXC-chemokine receptor 2 (CXCR2), triggering monolayer permeability through a discrete intracellular signaling pathway. In vivo, N-?-PGP induces local vascular leak after subcutaneous administration and pulmonary vascular permeability after systemic administration. Furthermore, neutralization of N-?-PGP attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced lung leak. Finally, we demonstrate that plasma from patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) induces VE-cadherin phosphorylation in human endothelial cells, and this activation is attenuated by N-?-PGP blockade with a concomitant improvement in endothelial monolayer impedance. These results identify N-?-PGP as a novel ECM-derived matrikine regulating paracellular permeability during inflammatory disease and demonstrate the potential to target this ligand in various disorders characterized by excessive matrix turnover and vascular leak such as ARDS. PMID:26229981

  4. Thromboxane A{sub 2} increases endothelial permeability through upregulation of interleukin-8

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Su-Ryun; Medical Research Center for Ischemic Tissue Regeneration and School of Medicine, Pusan National University, Yangsan 626-870 ; Bae, Soo-Kyung; Park, Hyun-Joo; Kim, Mi-Kyoung; Kim, Koanhoi; Park, Shi-Young; Jang, Hye-Ock; Yun, Il; Kim, Yung-Jin; Yoo, Mi-Ae; Bae, Moon-Kyoung

    2010-07-02

    Thromboxane A{sub 2} (TXA{sub 2}), a major prostanoid formed from prostaglandin H{sub 2} by thromboxane synthase, is involved in the pathogenesis of a variety of vascular diseases. In this study, we report that TXA{sub 2} mimetic U46619 significantly increases the endothelial permeability both in vitro and in vivo. U46619 enhanced the expression and secretion of interleukin-8 (IL-8), a major inducer of vascular permeability, in endothelial cells. Promoter analysis showed that the U46619-induced expression of IL-8 was mainly regulated by nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B). U46619 induced the activation of NF-{kappa}B through I{kappa}B kinase (IKK) activation, I{kappa}B phosphorylation and NF-{kappa}B nuclear translocation. Furthermore, the inhibition of IL-8 or blockade of the IL-8 receptor attenuated the U46619-induced endothelial cell permeability by modulating the cell-cell junctions. Overall, these results suggest that U46619 promotes vascular permeability through the production of IL-8 via NF-{kappa}B activation in endothelial cells.

  5. Assessing vascular endothelial function using frequency and rank order statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hsien-Tsai; Hsu, Po-Chun; Sun, Cheuk-Kwan; Liu, An-Bang; Lin, Zong-Lin; Tang, Chieh-Ju; Lo, Men-Tzung

    2013-08-01

    Using frequency and rank order statistics (FROS), this study analyzed the fluctuations in arterial waveform amplitudes recorded from an air pressure sensing system before and after reactive hyperemia (RH) induction by temporary blood flow occlusion to evaluate the vascular endothelial function of aged and diabetic subjects. The modified probability-weighted distance (PWD) calculated from the FROS was compared with the dilatation index (DI) to evaluate its validity and sensitivity in the assessment of vascular endothelial function. The results showed that the PWD can provide a quantitative determination of the structural changes in the arterial pressure signals associated with regulation of vascular tone and blood pressure by intact vascular endothelium after the application of occlusion stress. Our study suggests that the use of FROS is a reliable noninvasive approach to the assessment of vascular endothelial degeneration in aging and diabetes.

  6. Reinforcing endothelial junctions prevents microvessel permeability increase and tumor cell adhesion in microvessels in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Bingmei M.; Yang, Jinlin; Cai, Bin; Fan, Jie; Zhang, Lin; Zeng, Min

    2015-10-01

    Tumor cell adhesion to the microvessel wall is a critical step during tumor metastasis. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a secretion of tumor cells, can increase microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion in the microvessel. To test the hypothesis that inhibiting permeability increase can reduce tumor cell adhesion, we used in vivo fluorescence microscopy to measure both microvessel permeability and adhesion rates of human mammary carcinoma MDA-MB-231 cells in post-capillary venules of rat mesentery under the treatment of VEGF and a cAMP analog, 8-bromo-cAMP, which can decrease microvessel permeability. By immunostaining adherens junction proteins between endothelial cells forming the microvessel wall, we further investigated the structural mechanism by which cAMP abolishes VEGF-induced increase in microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion. Our results demonstrate that 1) Pretreatment of microvessels with cAMP can abolish VEGF-enhanced microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion; 2) Tumor cells prefer to adhere to the endothelial cell junctions instead of cell bodies; 3) VEGF increases microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion by compromising endothelial junctions while cAMP abolishes these effects of VEGF by reinforcing the junctions. These results suggest that strengthening the microvessel wall integrity can be a potential approach to inhibiting hematogenous tumor metastasis.

  7. Reinforcing endothelial junctions prevents microvessel permeability increase and tumor cell adhesion in microvessels in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Bingmei M.; Yang, Jinlin; Cai, Bin; Fan, Jie; Zhang, Lin; Zeng, Min

    2015-01-01

    Tumor cell adhesion to the microvessel wall is a critical step during tumor metastasis. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a secretion of tumor cells, can increase microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion in the microvessel. To test the hypothesis that inhibiting permeability increase can reduce tumor cell adhesion, we used in vivo fluorescence microscopy to measure both microvessel permeability and adhesion rates of human mammary carcinoma MDA-MB-231 cells in post-capillary venules of rat mesentery under the treatment of VEGF and a cAMP analog, 8-bromo-cAMP, which can decrease microvessel permeability. By immunostaining adherens junction proteins between endothelial cells forming the microvessel wall, we further investigated the structural mechanism by which cAMP abolishes VEGF-induced increase in microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion. Our results demonstrate that 1) Pretreatment of microvessels with cAMP can abolish VEGF-enhanced microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion; 2) Tumor cells prefer to adhere to the endothelial cell junctions instead of cell bodies; 3) VEGF increases microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion by compromising endothelial junctions while cAMP abolishes these effects of VEGF by reinforcing the junctions. These results suggest that strengthening the microvessel wall integrity can be a potential approach to inhibiting hematogenous tumor metastasis. PMID:26507779

  8. Pyrotechnic deflagration velocity and permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Begeal, D R; Stanton, P L

    1982-01-01

    Particle size, porosity, and permeability of the reactive material have long been considered to be important factors in propellant burning rates and the deflagration-to-detonation transition in explosives. It is reasonable to assume that these same parameters will also affect the deflagration velocity of pyrotechnics. This report describes an experimental program that addresses the permeability of porous solids (particulate beds), in terms of particle size and porosity, and the relationship between permeability and the behavior of pyrotechnics and explosives. The experimental techniques used to acquire permeability data and to characterize the pyrotechnic burning are discussed. Preliminary data have been obtained on the burning characteristics of titanium hydride/potassium perchlorate (THKP) and boron/calcium chromate (BCCR). With THKP, the velocity of a pressure wave (from hot product gases) in the unburned region shows unsteady behavior which is related to the initial porosity or permeability. Simultaneous measurements with pressure gauges and ion gauges reveal that the pressure wave precedes the burn front. Steady burning of BCCR was observed with pressure gauge diagnostics and with a microwave interferometry technique.

  9. Uterine Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, Abhishek; Srinivas, Amruthashree; Chandrashekar, Babitha Moogali; Vijayakumar, Avinash

    2013-01-01

    Vascular lesions of the uterus are rare; most reported in the literature are arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Uterine AVMs can be congenital or acquired. In recent years, there has been an increasing number of reports of acquired vascular lesions of the uterus following pregnancy, abortion, cesarean delivery, and curettage. It can be seen from these reports that there is confusion concerning the terminology of uterine vascular lesions. There is also a lack of diagnostic criteria and management guidelines, which has led to an increased number of unnecessary invasive procedures (eg, angiography, uterine artery embolization, hysterectomy for abnormal vaginal bleeding). This article familiarizes readers with various vascular lesions of the uterus and their management. PMID:24340126

  10. Collagen vascular disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... developed these disorders were previously said to have "connective tissue" or "collagen vascular" disease. We now have names ... be used. These include as undifferentiated systemic rheumatic (connective tissue) diseases or overlap syndromes.

  11. Heterogeneous Blood-Tumor Barrier Permeability Determines Drug Efficacy in Experimental Brain Metastases of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lockman, Paul R.; Mittapalli, Rajendar K.; Taskar, Kunal S.; Rudraraju, Vinay; Gril, Brunilde; Bohn, Kaci A.; Adkins, Chris E.; Roberts, Amanda; Thorsheim, Helen R.; Gaasch, Julie A.; Huang, Suyun; Palmieri, Diane; Steeg, Patricia S.; Smith, Quentin R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Brain metastases of breast cancer appear to be increasing in incidence, confer significant morbidity, and threaten to compromise gains made in systemic chemotherapy. The blood-tumor barrier (BTB) is compromised in many brain metastases, however, the extent to which this influences chemotherapeutic delivery and efficacy is unknown. Herein, we answer this question by measuring BTB passive integrity, chemotherapeutic drug uptake, and anticancer efficacy in vivo in two breast cancer models that metastasize preferentially to brain. Experimental Design Experimental brain metastasis drug uptake and BTB permeability were simultaneously measured using novel fluorescent and phosphorescent imaging techniques in immune compromised mice. Drug-induced apoptosis and vascular characteristics were assessed using immunofluorescent microscopy. Results Analysis of >2000 brain metastases from two models (human 231-BR-Her2 and murine 4T1-BR5) demonstrated partial BTB permeability compromise in >89% lesions, varying in magnitude within and between metastases. Brain metastasis uptake of 14C- paclitaxel and 14C- doxorubicin was generally greater than normal brain but <15% of that of other tissues or peripheral metastases, and only reached cytotoxic concentrations in a small subset (~10%) of the most permeable metastases. Neither drug significantly decreased the experimental brain metastatic ability of 231-BR-Her2 tumor cells. BTB permeability was associated with vascular remodeling and correlated with over expression of the pericyte protein, desmin. Conclusions This work demonstrates that the BTB remains a significant impediment to standard chemotherapeutic delivery and efficacy in experimental brain metastases of breast cancer. New brain permeable drugs will be needed. Evidence is presented for vascular remodeling in BTB permeability alterations. PMID:20829328

  12. Vascular structures in dermoscopy*

    PubMed Central

    Ayhan, Erhan; Ucmak, Derya; Akkurt, ZeynepMeltem

    2015-01-01

    Dermoscopy is an aiding method in the visualization of the epidermis and dermis. It is usually used to diagnose melanocytic lesions. In recent years, dermoscopy has increasingly been used to diagnose non-melanocytic lesions. Certain vascular structures, their patterns of arrangement and additional criteria may demonstrate lesion-specific characteristics. In this review, vascular structures and their arrangements are discussed separately in the light of conflicting views and an overview of recent literature. PMID:26375224

  13. Permeability enhancement by shock cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Luke; Heap, Michael; Reuschlé, Thierry; Baud, Patrick; Schmittbuhl, Jean

    2015-04-01

    The permeability of an efficient reservoir, e.g. a geothermal reservoir, should be sufficient to permit the circulation of fluids. Generally speaking, permeability decreases over the life cycle of the geothermal system. As a result, is usually necessary to artificially maintain and enhance the natural permeability of these systems. One of the methods of enhancement -- studied here -- is thermal stimulation (injecting cold water at low pressure). This goal of this method is to encourage new thermal cracks within the reservoir host rocks, thereby increasing reservoir permeability. To investigate the development of thermal microcracking in the laboratory we selected two granites: a fine-grained (Garibaldi Grey granite, grain size = 0.5 mm) and a course-grained granite (Lanhelin granite, grain size = 2 mm). Both granites have an initial porosity of about 1%. Our samples were heated to a range of temperatures (100-1000 °C) and were either cooled slowly (1 °C/min) or shock cooled (100 °C/s). A systematic microstructural (2D crack area density, using standard stereological techniques, and 3D BET specific surface area measurements) and rock physical property (porosity, P-wave velocity, uniaxial compressive strength, and permeability) analysis was undertaken to understand the influence of slow and shock cooling on our reservoir granites. Microstructurally, we observe that the 2D crack surface area per unit volume and the specific surface area increase as a result of thermal stressing, and, for the same maximum temperature, crack surface area is higher in the shock cooled samples. This observation is echoed by our rock physical property measurements: we see greater changes for the shock cooled samples. We can conclude that shock cooling is an extremely efficient method of generating thermal microcracks and modifying rock physical properties. Our study highlights that thermal treatments are likely to be an efficient method for the "matrix" permeability enhancement of granitic geothermal reservoirs.

  14. Different contributions of clathrin- and caveolae-mediated endocytosis of vascular endothelial cadherin to lipopolysaccharide-induced vascular hyperpermeability.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ye; Zhang, Lianyang; Li, Yang; Sun, Shijin; Tan, Hao

    2014-01-01

    Vascular hyperpermeability induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a common pathogenic process in cases of severe trauma and sepsis. Vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cad) is a key regulatory molecule involved in this process, although the detailed mechanism through which this molecule acts remains unclear. We assessed the role of clathrin-mediated and caveolae-mediated endocytosis of VE-cad in LPS-induced vascular hyperpermeability in the human vascular endothelial cell line CRL-2922 and determined that vascular permeability and VE-cad localization at the plasma membrane were negatively correlated after LPS treatment. Additionally, the loss of VE-cad at the plasma membrane was caused by both clathrin-mediated and caveolae-mediated endocytosis. Clathrin-mediated endocytosis was dominant early after LPS treatment, and caveolae-mediated endocytosis was dominant hours after LPS treatment. The caveolae-mediated endocytosis of VE-cad was activated through the LPS-Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-Src signaling pathway. Structural changes in the actin cytoskeleton, specifically from polymerization to depolymerization, were important reasons for the switching of the VE-cad endocytosis pathway from clathrin-mediated to caveolae-mediated. Our findings suggest that clathrin-mediated and caveolae-mediated endocytosis of VE-cad contribute to LPS-induced vascular hyperpermeability, although they contribute via different mechanism. The predominant means of endocytosis depends on the time since LPS treatment. PMID:25180771

  15. Radiation Effects on the Cytoskeleton of Endothelial Cells and Endothelial Monolayer Permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Gabrys, Dorota; Greco, Olga; Patel, Gaurang; Prise, Kevin M.; Tozer, Gillian M.; Kanthou, Chryso

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effects of radiation on the endothelial cytoskeleton and endothelial monolayer permeability and to evaluate associated signaling pathways, which could reveal potential mechanisms of known vascular effects of radiation. Methods and Materials: Cultured endothelial cells were X-ray irradiated, and actin filaments, microtubules, intermediate filaments, and vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin junctions were examined by immunofluorescence. Permeability was determined by the passage of fluorescent dextran through cell monolayers. Signal transduction pathways were analyzed using RhoA, Rho kinase, and stress-activated protein kinase-p38 (SAPK2/p38) inhibitors by guanosine triphosphate-RhoA activation assay and transfection with RhoAT19N. The levels of junction protein expression and phosphorylation of myosin light chain and SAPK2/p38 were assessed by Western blotting. The radiation effects on cell death were verified by clonogenic assays. Results: Radiation induced rapid and persistent actin stress fiber formation and redistribution of VE-cadherin junctions in microvascular, but not umbilical vein endothelial cells, and microtubules and intermediate filaments remained unaffected. Radiation also caused a rapid and persistent increase in microvascular permeability. RhoA-guanosine triphosphatase and Rho kinase were activated by radiation and caused phosphorylation of downstream myosin light chain and the observed cytoskeletal and permeability changes. SAPK2/p38 was activated by radiation but did not influence either the cytoskeleton or permeability. Conclusion: This study is the first to show rapid activation of the RhoA/Rho kinase by radiation in endothelial cells and has demonstrated a link between this pathway and cytoskeletal remodeling and permeability. The results also suggest that the RhoA pathway might be a useful target for modulating the permeability and other effects of radiation for therapeutic gain.

  16. Permeability of compacting porous lavas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashwell, P. A.; Kendrick, J. E.; Lavallée, Y.; Kennedy, B. M.; Hess, K.-U.; Aulock, F. W.; Wadsworth, F. B.; Vasseur, J.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2015-03-01

    The highly transient nature of outgassing commonly observed at volcanoes is in part controlled by the permeability of lava domes and shallow conduits. Lava domes generally consist of a porous outer carapace surrounding a denser lava core with internal shear zones of variable porosity. Here we examine densification using uniaxial compression experiments on variably crystalline and porous rhyolitic dome lavas from the Taupo Volcanic Zone. Experiments were conducted at 900°C and an applied stress of 3 MPa to 60% strain, while monitoring acoustic emissions to track cracking. The evolution of the porous network was assessed via X-ray computed tomography, He-pycnometry, and relative gas permeability. High starting connected porosities led to low apparent viscosities and high strain rates, initially accompanied by abundant acoustic emissions. As compaction ensued, the lavas evolved; apparent viscosity increased and strain rate decreased due to strain hardening of the suspensions. Permeability fluctuations resulted from the interplay between viscous flow and brittle failure. Where phenocrysts were abundant, cracks had limited spatial extent, and pore closure decreased axial and radial permeability proportionally, maintaining the initial anisotropy. In crystal-poor lavas, axial cracks had a more profound effect, and permeability anisotropy switched to favor axial flow. Irrespective of porosity, both crystalline samples compacted to a threshold minimum porosity of 17-19%, whereas the crystal-poor sample did not achieve its compaction limit. This indicates that unconfined loading of porous dome lavas does not necessarily form an impermeable plug and may be hindered, in part by the presence of crystals.

  17. Baicalin, baicalein and wogonin inhibits high glucose-induced vascular inflammation in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Sae-Kwang; Bae, Jong-Sup

    2015-01-01

    Vascular inflammatory process has been suggested to play a key role in initiation and progression of atherosclerosis, a major complication of diabetes mellitus. Thus, in this study, we attempted to determine whether three structurally related polyphenols found in the Chinese herb Huang Qui, namely baicalin, baicalein, and wogonin, can suppress vascular inflammatory processes induced by high glucose (HG) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and mice. Data showed that HG induced markedly increased vascular permeability, monocyte adhesion, expressions of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activation of nuclear factor (NF)-?B. Remarkably, all of the above mentioned vascular inflammatory effects of HG were attenuated by pretreatment with baicalin, baicalein, and wogonin. Vascular inflammatory responses induced by HG are critical events underlying development of various diabetic complications, therefore, our results suggest that baicalin, baicalein, and wogonin may have significant therapeutic benefits against diabetic complications and atherosclerosis. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(9): 519-524] PMID:25739393

  18. Endothelial Cell Permeability and Adherens Junction Disruption Induced by Junín Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lander, Heather M.; Grant, Ashley M.; Albrecht, Thomas; Hill, Terence; Peters, Clarence J.

    2014-01-01

    Junín virus (JUNV) is endemic to the fertile Pampas of Argentina, maintained in nature by the rodent host Calomys musculinus, and the causative agent of Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF), which is characterized by vascular dysfunction and fluid distribution abnormalities. Clinical as well as experimental studies implicate involvement of the endothelium in the pathogenesis of AHF, although little is known of its role. JUNV has been shown to result in productive infection of endothelial cells (ECs) in vitro with no visible cytopathic effects. In this study, we show that direct JUNV infection of primary human ECs results in increased vascular permeability as measured by electric cell substrate impedance sensing and transwell permeability assays. We also show that EC adherens junctions are disrupted during virus infection, which may provide insight into the role of the endothelium in the pathogenesis of AHF and possibly, other viral hemorrhagic fevers. PMID:24710609

  19. Dissolution-Driven Permeability Reduction of a Fractured Carbonate Caprock

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, Brian R.; Fitts, Jeffrey P.; Bromhal, Grant S.; McIntyre, Dustin L.; Tappero, Ryan; Peters, Catherine

    2013-04-01

    Geochemical reactions may alter the permeability of leakage pathways in caprocks, which serve a critical role in confining CO{sub 2} in geologic carbon sequestration. A caprock specimen from a carbonate formation in the Michigan sedimentary Basin was fractured and studied in a high-pressure core flow experiment. Inflowing brine was saturated with CO{sub 2} at 40°C and 10?MPa, resulting in an initial pH of 4.6, and had a calcite saturation index of ?0.8. Fracture permeability decreased during the experiment, but subsequent analyses did not reveal calcite precipitation. Instead, experimental observations indicate that calcite dissolution along the fracture pathway led to mobilization of less soluble mineral particles that clogged the flow path. Analyses of core sections via electron microscopy, synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction imaging, and the first application of microbeam Ca K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure, provided evidence that these occlusions were fragments from the host rock rather than secondary precipitates. X-ray computed tomography showed a significant loss of rock mass within preferential flow paths, suggesting that dissolution also removed critical asperities and caused mechanical closure of the fracture. The decrease in fracture permeability despite a net removal of material along the fracture pathway demonstrates a nonintuitive, inverse relationship between dissolution and permeability evolution in a fractured carbonate caprock.

  20. Dissolution-Driven Permeability Reduction of a Fractured Carbonate Caprock

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Brian R.; Fitts, Jeffrey P.; Bromhal, Grant S.; McIntyre, Dustin L.; Tappero, Ryan; Peters, Catherine A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Geochemical reactions may alter the permeability of leakage pathways in caprocks, which serve a critical role in confining CO2 in geologic carbon sequestration. A caprock specimen from a carbonate formation in the Michigan sedimentary Basin was fractured and studied in a high-pressure core flow experiment. Inflowing brine was saturated with CO2 at 40°C and 10?MPa, resulting in an initial pH of 4.6, and had a calcite saturation index of ?0.8. Fracture permeability decreased during the experiment, but subsequent analyses did not reveal calcite precipitation. Instead, experimental observations indicate that calcite dissolution along the fracture pathway led to mobilization of less soluble mineral particles that clogged the flow path. Analyses of core sections via electron microscopy, synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction imaging, and the first application of microbeam Ca K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure, provided evidence that these occlusions were fragments from the host rock rather than secondary precipitates. X-ray computed tomography showed a significant loss of rock mass within preferential flow paths, suggesting that dissolution also removed critical asperities and caused mechanical closure of the fracture. The decrease in fracture permeability despite a net removal of material along the fracture pathway demonstrates a nonintuitive, inverse relationship between dissolution and permeability evolution in a fractured carbonate caprock. PMID:23633894

  1. Dissolution-Driven Permeability Reduction of a Fractured Carbonate Caprock.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Brian R; Fitts, Jeffrey P; Bromhal, Grant S; McIntyre, Dustin L; Tappero, Ryan; Peters, Catherine A

    2013-04-01

    Geochemical reactions may alter the permeability of leakage pathways in caprocks, which serve a critical role in confining CO2 in geologic carbon sequestration. A caprock specimen from a carbonate formation in the Michigan sedimentary Basin was fractured and studied in a high-pressure core flow experiment. Inflowing brine was saturated with CO2 at 40°C and 10?MPa, resulting in an initial pH of 4.6, and had a calcite saturation index of -0.8. Fracture permeability decreased during the experiment, but subsequent analyses did not reveal calcite precipitation. Instead, experimental observations indicate that calcite dissolution along the fracture pathway led to mobilization of less soluble mineral particles that clogged the flow path. Analyses of core sections via electron microscopy, synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction imaging, and the first application of microbeam Ca K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure, provided evidence that these occlusions were fragments from the host rock rather than secondary precipitates. X-ray computed tomography showed a significant loss of rock mass within preferential flow paths, suggesting that dissolution also removed critical asperities and caused mechanical closure of the fracture. The decrease in fracture permeability despite a net removal of material along the fracture pathway demonstrates a nonintuitive, inverse relationship between dissolution and permeability evolution in a fractured carbonate caprock. PMID:23633894

  2. Quantifying Evaporation in a Permeable Pavement System

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies quantifying evaporation from permeable pavement systems are limited to a few laboratory studies and one field application. This research quantifies evaporation for a larger-scale field application by measuring the water balance from lined permeable pavement sections. Th...

  3. Permeable Pavement Research - Edison, New Jersey

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation provides the background and summary of results collected at the permeable pavement parking lot monitored at the EPA facility in Edison, NJ. This parking lot is surfaced with permeable interlocking concrete pavers (PICP), pervious concrete, and porous asphalt. ...

  4. INTRODUCTION Permeability is a critical geologic parameter,

    E-print Network

    Manning, Craig

    of in situ sampling of permeability by direct hydraulic measurements is ~10 km (Bayuk et al., 1987; Huenges permeability, but not permeability during the event that formed the rock. As an alternative to in situ or core-based hydraulic measurements, the variation in per- meability with depth can be probed indirectly by (1

  5. Novel additives to retard permeable flow

    SciTech Connect

    Golombok, Michael; Crane, Carel; Ineke, Erik; Welling, Marco; Harris, Jon

    2008-09-15

    Low concentrations of surfactant and cosolute in water, can selectively retard permeable flow in high permeability rocks compared to low permeability ones. This represents a way forward for more efficient areal sweep efficiency when water flooding a reservoir during improved oil recovery. (author)

  6. Regulation of endothelial permeability in the primate corpora lutea: implications for ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Herr, Daniel; Bekes, Inga; Wulff, Christine

    2015-02-01

    In a developing human corpus luteum, a closely regulated cellular communication system exists between the luteal steroidogenic cells and endothelial cells. This system guaranties the vascularization process during luteal formation. The process is combined with rapid release of large amounts of progesterone into the bloodstream. The regulation of endothelial proliferation and permeability by LH and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is integral to this process. On the cellular level, endothelial permeability is regulated by intercellular junctions, such as adherens junctions (AJ) and tight junctions (TJ), which act as zipper-like structures between interacting endothelial cells. Several cell junctional proteins are localized to the corpus luteum, including Occludin, Nectin 2, Claudin 1, and Claudin 5, as well as, vascular endothelial (VE)-Cadherin. It has been assumed that regulation of AJ- and TJ-proteins is of particular importance for permeability, and accordingly, for the functionality of the corpus luteum in early pregnancy, because treatment with hCG induces downregulation of juntional proteins in the luteal vessels. The effect of hCG on the adhesive molecules is mediated by VE growth factor (VEGF). On a functional level, the hCG-dependent and VEGF-mediated decrease in junctional proteins causes a decrease in the density of cell-cell closure and, accordingly, an increase in endothelial permeability. In doing so, the different junctional proteins are not only directly influenced by VEGF but also interact among themselves and influence each other reciprocally. Disturbances in this strictly, regulated interactions may explain the development of pathologies with increased vascular permeability, such as the ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. PMID:25301969

  7. Mechanisms of Microgravity Effect on Vascular Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purdy, Ralph E.

    1995-01-01

    The overall goal of the project is to characterize the effects of simulated microgravity on vascular function. Microgravity is simulated using the hindlimb unweighted (HU) rat, and the following vessels are removed from HU and paired control rats for in vitro analysis: abdominal aorta, carotid and femoral arteries, jugular and femoral veins. These vessels are cut into 3 mm long rings and mounted in tissue baths for the measurement of either isometric contraction, or relaxation of pre- contracted vessels. The isolated mesenteric vascular bed is perfused for the measurement of changes in perfusion pressure as an index of arteriolar constriction or dilation. This report presents, in addition to the statement of the overall goal of the project, a summary list of the specific hypotheses to be tested. These are followed by sections on results, conclusions, significance and plans for the next year.

  8. Potassium permeability of Rickettsia prowazekii.

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, H H

    1984-01-01

    The potassium permeability of Rickettsia prowazekii was characterized by chemical measurement of the intracellular sodium and potassium pools and isotopic flux measurements with 86Rb+ as a tracer. R. prowazekii, in contrast to Escherichia coli, did not maintain a high potassium-to-sodium ratio in their cytoplasm except when the potassium-to-sodium ratio in the extracellular medium was high or when the extracellular concentrations of both cations were low (ca. 1 mM). Both influx and efflux assays with 86Rb+ demonstrated that the rickettsial membrane had limited permeability to potassium and that incorporation of valinomycin into these cells increased these fluxes at least 10-fold. The transport of potassium showed specificity and dependence on rickettsial metabolism. The increased flux of potassium which results from the incorporation of valinomycin into the rickettsial membrane was detrimental to both lysine transport and lysis of erythrocytes by the rickettsiae. PMID:6317650

  9. Permeability enhancement using explosive techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, T.F.; Schmidt, S.C.; Carter, W.J.

    1980-01-01

    In situ recovery methods for many of our hydrocarbon and mineral resources depend on the ability to create or enhance permeability in the resource bed to allow uniform and predictable flow. To meet this need, a new branch of geomechanics devoted to computer prediction of explosive rock breakage and permeability enhancement has developed. The computer is used to solve the nonlinear equations of compressible flow, with the explosive behavior and constitutive properties of the medium providing the initial/boundary conditions and material response. Once the resulting computational tool has been verified and calibrated with appropriate large-scale field tests, it can be used to develop and optimize commercially useful explosive techniques for in situ resource recovery.

  10. Role of vascular endothelial cell growth factor in Ovarian Hyperstimulation Syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Levin, E R; Rosen, G F; Cassidenti, D L; Yee, B; Meldrum, D; Wisot, A; Pedram, A

    1998-01-01

    Controlled ovarian hyperstimulation with gonadotropins is followed by Ovarian Hyperstimulation Syndrome (OHSS) in some women. An unidentified capillary permeability factor from the ovary has been implicated, and vascular endothelial cell growth/permeability factor (VEGF) is a candidate protein. Follicular fluids (FF) from 80 women who received hormonal induction for infertility were studied. FFs were grouped according to oocyte production, from group I (0-7 oocytes) through group IV (23-31 oocytes). Group IV was comprised of four women with the most severe symptoms of OHSS. Endothelial cell (EC) permeability induced by the individual FF was highly correlated to oocytes produced (r2 = 0.73, P < 0.001). Group IV FF stimulated a 63+/-4% greater permeability than FF from group I patients (P < 0. 01), reversed 98% by anti-VEGF antibody. Group IV fluids contained the VEGF165 isoform and significantly greater concentrations of VEGF as compared with group I (1,105+/-87 pg/ml vs. 353+/-28 pg/ml, P < 0. 05). Significant cytoskeletal rearrangement of F-actin into stress fibers and a destruction of ZO-1 tight junction protein alignment was caused by group IV FF, mediated in part by nitric oxide. These mechanisms, which lead to increased EC permeability, were reversed by the VEGF antibody. Our results indicate that VEGF is the FF factor responsible for increased vascular permeability, thereby contributing to the pathogenesis of OHSS. PMID:9835623

  11. Angioplasty and Vascular Stenting

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to the heart muscle. venous narrowings involving the central veins (in the chest, abdomen or pelvis). In some ... checked for bleeding or swelling and your blood pressure and heart rate will be monitored. Bleeding risk at the vascular entry site when veins are treated is less likely, therefore, you may ...

  12. Amputation in vascular disease.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, K.

    1980-01-01

    The management of vascular amputees in the Roehampton Limb Surgery Unit since its opening in 1975 is outlined and the results in 167 cases presented. Of the 35 patients over the age of 80, 57% were walking independently at the time of their discharge from the unit. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7377693

  13. Regular Article VASCULAR BIOLOGY

    E-print Network

    Gleeson, Joseph G.

    ) on lymphatic endothelial cells is critical for the separation of blood and lymphatic systems by interacting and maintenance of an independent lymphatic vascular system. PDPN consists of 172 amino acids in mice and 163 on lymphatic endothelial cells and for interaction with platelets Yanfang Pan,1-3 Tadayuki Yago,1 Jianxin Fu,1

  14. Synthetic vascular prostheses.

    PubMed

    Struszczyk, Marcin H; Bednarek, Pawe?; Raczy?ski, Krzysztof

    2002-01-01

    Polyethyleneterephthalate (PET), and to a lesser extent Teflon have become the major synthetic grafting material. Unlike nylon, Ivalon, and Vinyon-N which lose their tensile strength after implantation, PET and Teflon remain essentially unchanged even after long periods. TRICOMED S.A. produces the family of the knitted vascular implants Dallon made from PET fibres including: Dallon, Dallon H, Tricogel. Both Dallon and Dallon H are manufactured in a form of double (external and internal) velour surface using multifilament yarn and having optimal graft design (a variety of sizes and lengths). The velour surface gives the surface a velvety, plush texture, which improves tissue in--growth. Moreover, Dallon H is a unique vascular prostheses showing the increase in the blood susceptibility that is useful for 4 times less blood demand during preclotting as compared with standard prosthesis. Tricogel graft is made of thin-wall prostheses sealed with the porcine gelatin that provides intraoperative tightness (without preclotting) and the optimal healing process. Hydrophilic behavior of the graft is observed as an instant moistening of the surface with patient's blood and as sweating. The blood stream does not dissolve nor washes away the gelatin but causes the gelatin film to swell, which makes a better tightness. The work will describe the properties of manmade vascular grafts as well as their applications in the vascular surgery. PMID:12391780

  15. Permeability relation for periodic structures.

    PubMed

    Dunn, K J; LaTorraca, G A; Bergman, D J

    1998-01-01

    The permeability relation for periodic porous media is studied with respect to other petrophysical parameters such as formation factor, porosity, surface-to-volume ratio, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation time. All these quantities were computed for periodic structures of simple, body-centered, and face-centered cubic arrays of touching and overlapping spheres. The formation factors were calculated by using a method which is based on a Fourier-space representation of an integral equation for the electric potential in a two-component composite. The nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation time for the case where surface-enchanced relaxation plays a dominant role is known to be V P/rho S (VP is the pore volume, S is the pore surface, is the surface relaxation strength) when rho is not too large. Previously calculated permeabilities for these structures from the literature were used for correlation studies with other petrophysical parameters. Various correlation schemes among these quantities, such as k = aTbFc, and k = aTb phi c, were investigated, where k is permeability, T is the NMR relaxation time, phi is the porosity, and F is the formation factor. PMID:9803908

  16. Angiopoietin-4 increases permeability of blood vessels and promotes lymphatic dilation.

    PubMed

    Kesler, Cristina T; Pereira, Ethel R; Cui, Cheryl H; Nelson, Gregory M; Masuck, David J; Baish, James W; Padera, Timothy P

    2015-09-01

    The angiopoietin (Ang) ligands are potential therapeutic targets for lymphatic related diseases, which include lymphedema and cancer. Ang-1 and Ang-2 functions are established, but those of Ang-4 are poorly understood. We used intravital fluorescence microscopy to characterize Ang-4 actions on T241 murine fibrosarcoma-associated vessels in mice. The diameters of lymphatic vessels draining Ang-4- or VEGF-C (positive control)-expressing tumors increased to 123 and 135 ?m, respectively, and parental, mock-transduced (negative controls) and tumors expressing Ang-1 or Ang-2 remained at baseline (?60 ?m). Ang-4 decreased human dermal lymphatic endothelial cell (LEC) monolayer permeability by 27% while increasing human dermal blood endothelial cell (BEC) monolayer permeability by 200%. In vivo, Ang-4 stimulated a 4.5-fold increase in tumor-associated blood vessel permeability compared with control when measured using intravital quantitative multiphoton microscopy. Ang-4 activated receptor signaling in both LECs and BECs, evidenced by tyrosine kinase with Ig and endothelial growth factor homology domains-2 (TIE2) receptor, protein kinase B, and Erk1,2 phosphorylation detectable by immunoblotting. These data suggest that Ang-4 actions are mediated through cell-type-specific networks and that lymphatic vessel dilation occurs secondarily to increased vascular leakage. Ang-4 also promoted survival of LECs. Thus, blocking Ang-4 may prune the draining lymphatic vasculature and decrease interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) by reducing vascular permeability. PMID:25977256

  17. Seeking a blood pressure-independent measure of vascular properties.

    PubMed

    Steppan, Jochen; Sikka, Gautam; Hori, Daijiro; Nyhan, Daniel; Berkowitz, Dan E; Gottschalk, Allan; Barodka, Viachaslau

    2016-01-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) and pulse pressure (PP) are blood pressure (BP)-dependent surrogates for vascular stiffness. Considering that there are no clinically useful markers for arterial stiffness that are BP-independent, our objective was to identify novel indices of arterial stiffness and compare them with previously described markers. PWV and PP were measured in young and old male Fisher rats and in young and old male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) over a wide range of BPs. The BP dependence of these and several other indices of vascular stiffness were evaluated. An index incorporating PWV and PP was also constructed. Both PWV and PP increase in a non-linear manner with rising BP for both strains of animals (Fisher and SHRs). Age markedly changes the relationship between PWV or PP and BP. The previously described Ambulatory Arterial Stiffness Index (AASI) was able to differentiate between young and old vasculature, whereas the Cardio-Ankle Vascular Index (CAVI) did not reliably differentiate between the two. The novel Arterial Stiffness Index (ASI) differentiated stiffer from more compliant vasculature. Considering the limitations of the currently available indices of arterial stiffness, we propose a novel index of intrinsic arterial stiffness, the ASI, which is robust over a range of BPs and allows one to distinguish between compliant and stiff vasculature in both Fisher rats and SHRs. Further studies are necessary to validate this index in other settings. PMID:26490088

  18. Vascular endothelial dysfunction and pharmacological treatment

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jin Bo

    2015-01-01

    The endothelium exerts multiple actions involving regulation of vascular permeability and tone, coagulation and fibrinolysis, inflammatory and immunological reactions and cell growth. Alterations of one or more such actions may cause vascular endothelial dysfunction. Different risk factors such as hypercholesterolemia, homocystinemia, hyperglycemia, hypertension, smoking, inflammation, and aging contribute to the development of endothelial dysfunction. Mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction are multiple, including impaired endothelium-derived vasodilators, enhanced endothelium-derived vasoconstrictors, over production of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species, activation of inflammatory and immune reactions, and imbalance of coagulation and fibrinolysis. Endothelial dysfunction occurs in many cardiovascular diseases, which involves different mechanisms, depending on specific risk factors affecting the disease. Among these mechanisms, a reduction in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability plays a central role in the development of endothelial dysfunction because NO exerts diverse physiological actions, including vasodilation, anti-inflammation, antiplatelet, antiproliferation and antimigration. Experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated that a variety of currently used or investigational drugs, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin AT1 receptors blockers, angiotensin-(1-7), antioxidants, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, endothelial NO synthase enhancers, phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, sphingosine-1-phosphate and statins, exert endothelial protective effects. Due to the difference in mechanisms of action, these drugs need to be used according to specific mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction of the disease. PMID:26635921

  19. Factors affecting relative permeabilities during simultaneous flow of oil and polymer solution through porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Salman, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    Buckley-Leverett theory has been modified for power-law fluids and modified fractional flow curves were obtained. The Johnson, Bossler, and Nauman method was modified to calculate individual relative permeabilities in multiphase systems from experimental data obtained for fired Berea sandstone cores using kerosene and polymer solutions. Two polyacrylamide polymers, having different molecular weights, were used to prepare polymer solutions at various concentrations (500-1500 ppm). Analytical results indicate that for a constant flow rate, the polymer solution fractional flow curve is an increasing function of power-law index (n). Fractional flow curves shift to the left as the flow rate increases for shear-thinning (n < 1) fluids and to the right for shear-thickening (n > 1) fluids. The experimental results show that, in relative permeability calculations, the use of a reference permeability that is decreased by the effect of adsorbed polymer leads to overestimating the non-wetting phase relative permeability. On the other hand, a reference permeability that neglects this adsorbed layer effect leads to underestimating the relative permeability of the wetting phase. The adsorbed layer has little or no effect on the relative permeability of the non-wetting phase. Comparison of relative permeabilities with and without polymer flow suggest that the presence of an adsorbed polymer layer increases the apparent water preferential wettability of the rock. The second drainage unsteady-state data showed that the relative permeability of the wetting phase was reduced, but no effect was observed on the non-wetting phase relative permeability.

  20. Aspirin for vascular dementia

    PubMed Central

    Rands, Gianetta; Orrell, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Background Aspirin is widely prescribed for patients with a diagnosis of vascular dementia. In a survey of UK geriatricians and psychiatrists 80% of patients with clinical diagnoses of vascular dementia were prescribed aspirin. However, a number of queries remain unanswered. Is there convincing evidence that aspirin benefits patients with vascular dementia? Does aspirin affect cognition and behaviour, or improve prognosis? Does the risk of cerebral or gastric haemorrhage outweigh any benefit? Objectives To assess the randomised trial evidence for efficacy and safety of aspirin in the treatment of vascular dementia. Search methods We searched ALOIS: the Cochrane Dementia and Cognitive Improvement Group’s Specialized Register on 12 March 2012 using the terms: aspirin OR “acetylsalicylic acid”. ALOIS contains records of clinical trials identified from monthly searches of a number of major healthcare databases, numerous trial registries and grey literature sources. In addition, relevant websites were searched and some journals were handsearched. Specialists in the field were approached for unpublished material and any publications found were searched for additional references. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials investigating the effect of aspirin for vascular dementia were eligible for inclusion. Data collection and analysis Retrieved studies were analysed independently by both review authors. Methodology and results were critically appraised and outcomes scanned included cognition, behavioural change, mortality and institutionalisation. Main results No trials were eligible for inclusion in this review. Authors’ conclusions The most recent search for references to relevant research was carried out in March 2012. No trials were found for inclusion in this systematic review. Low-dose aspirin is frequently used as ‘treatment as normal’ in control groups and as a baseline treatment in pharmacological trials. There is still no good evidence that aspirin is effective in treating patients with a diagnosis of vascular dementia. There is increasing concern that low-dose aspirin is associated with increased risk of haemorrhages. Further research is needed to assess the effect of aspirin on cognition, and on other outcomes such as haemorrhages, mortality, institutionalisation and behaviour. However, the feasibility of such research is limited by a number of factors, including the widespread use of low-dose aspirin for secondary prevention of cerebrovascular and cardiovascular conditions, and its low cost and lack of patent, which limit commercial interest in investing in these studies. In addition, there is increasing evidence of its potential to cause harm from haemorrhages, especially gastric and cerebral haemorrhages that can be fatal. PMID:11034710

  1. Pelvic Vascular Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Christenson, Brian M.; Gipson, Matthew G.; Smith, Mitchell T.

    2013-01-01

    Vascular malformations (VMs) comprise a wide spectrum of lesions that are classified by content and flow characteristics. These lesions, occurring in both focal and diffuse forms, can involve any organ and tissue plane and can cause significant morbidity in both children and adults. Since treatment strategy depends on the type of malformation, correct diagnosis and classification of a vascular lesion are crucial. Slow-flow VMs (venous and lymphatic malformations) are often treated by sclerotherapy, whereas fast-flow lesions (arteriovenous malformations) are generally managed with embolization. In addition, some cases of VMs are best treated surgically. This review will present an overview of VMs in the female pelvis as well as a discussion of endovascular therapeutic techniques. PMID:24436563

  2. Plant Vascular Biology 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Biao

    2014-11-17

    This grant supported the Second International Conference on Plant Vascular Biology (PVB 2010) held July 24-28, 2010 on the campus of Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. Biao Ding (Ohio State University; OSU) and David Hannapel (Iowa State University; ISU) served as co-chairs of this conference. Biao Ding served as the local organizer. PVB is defined broadly here to include studies on the biogenesis, structure and function of transport systems in plants, under conditions of normal plant growth and development as well as of plant interactions with pathogens. The transport systems cover broadly the xylem, phloem, plasmodesmata and vascular cell membranes. The PVB concept has emerged in recent years to emphasize the integrative nature of the transport systems and approaches to investigate them.

  3. Noncontact monitoring of vascular lesion phototherapy efficiency by RGB multispectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakovels, Dainis; Kuzmina, Ilona; Berzina, Anna; Valeine, Lauma; Spigulis, Janis

    2013-12-01

    A prototype low-cost RGB imaging system consisting of a commercial RGB CMOS sensor, RGB light-emitting diode ring light illuminator, and a set of polarizers was designed and tested for mapping the skin erythema index, in order to monitor skin recovery after phototherapy of vascular lesions, such as hemangiomas and telangiectasias. The contrast of erythema index (CEI) was proposed as a parameter for quantitative characterization of vascular lesions. Skin recovery was characterized as a decrease of the CEI value relative to the value before the treatment. This approach was clinically validated by examining 31 vascular lesions before and after phototherapy.

  4. Vascular Lumen Formation

    PubMed Central

    Lammert, Eckhard; Axnick, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    The vascular system developed early in evolution. It is required in large multicellular organisms for the transport of nutrients, oxygen, and waste products to and from tissues. The vascular system is composed of hollow tubes, which have a high level of complexity in vertebrates. Vasculogenesis describes the de novo formation of blood vessels, e.g., aorta formation in vertebrate embryogenesis. In contrast, angiogenesis is the formation of blood vessels from preexisting ones, e.g., sprouting of intersomitic blood vessels from the aorta. Importantly, the lumen of all blood vessels in vertebrates is lined and formed by endothelial cells. In both vasculogenesis and angiogenesis, lumen formation takes place in a cord of endothelial cells. It involves a complex molecular mechanism composed of endothelial cell repulsion at the cell–cell contacts within the endothelial cell cords, junctional rearrangement, and endothelial cell shape change. As the vascular system also participates in the course of many diseases, such as cancer, stroke, and myocardial infarction, it is important to understand and make use of the molecular mechanisms of blood vessel formation to better understand and manipulate the pathomechanisms involved. PMID:22474612

  5. Vascular Cambium Development

    PubMed Central

    Nieminen, Kaisa; Blomster, Tiina; Helariutta, Ykä; Mähönen, Ari Pekka

    2015-01-01

    Secondary phloem and xylem tissues are produced through the activity of vascular cambium, the cylindrical secondary meristem which arises among the primary plant tissues. Most dicotyledonous species undergo secondary development, among them Arabidopsis. Despite its small size and herbaceous nature, Arabidopsis displays prominent secondary growth in several organs, including the root, hypocotyl and shoot. Together with the vast genetic resources and molecular research methods available for it, this has made Arabidopsis a versatile and accessible model organism for studying cambial development and wood formation. In this review, we discuss and compare the development and function of the vascular cambium in the Arabidopsis root, hypocotyl, and shoot. We describe the current understanding of the molecular regulation of vascular cambium and compare it to the function of primary meristems. We conclude with a look at the future prospects of cambium research, including opportunities provided by phenotyping and modelling approaches, complemented by studies of natural variation and comparative genetic studies in perennial and woody plant species. PMID:26078728

  6. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for assessing tumor vascularity and vascular effects of targeted therapies in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Mark A; Schnall, Mitchell D

    2007-01-15

    Traditional cross-sectional tumor imaging focuses solely on tumor morphology. With the introduction of targeted biological therapies in human trials, morphologic change may lag behind other physiologic measures of response on clinical images. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is a new imaging method for assessing the physiologic state of tumor vascularity in vivo. DCE-MRI, which uses available imaging techniques and contrast agents, assays the kinetics of tumor enhancement during bolus i.v. contrast administration. Modeling of the temporal enhancement pattern yields physiologic variables related to tumor blood flow and microvessel permeability. Changes in these variables after vascular-targeted therapy can then be quantified to evaluate the tumor vascular response. As these responses may precede morphologic tumor shrinkage, DCE-MRI might serve as a noninvasive means of monitoring early tumor response to vascular-targeted therapy. Renal cell carcinoma provides an excellent model for assessing the effect on DCE-MRI in clinical trials. The vascular richness of renal tumors provides a large dynamic scale of DCE-MRI measures. Patients with disseminated renal cell carcinoma frequently present with one or several large tumors, creating an easy imaging target for DCE-MRI evaluation. Finally, renal cell carcinoma is clearly susceptible to therapies that target tumor angiogenesis. DCE-MRI can be used to monitor the vascular changes induced by such therapies. Future efforts must be directed to standardizing image acquisition and analysis techniques to quantify tumor vascular responses. PMID:17255308

  7. Evaluation of Test Methods for Permeability (Transport) and Development of Performance Guidelines for Durability

    E-print Network

    Tests Rapid Index Tests RCP (ASTM C 1202) RMT (AASHTO TP 64) Sorptivity (ASTM C 1585) Gas Permeability (RILEM-CEMBUREAU) Science-based Tests Chloride Diffusion (ASTM C 1556) Modified Chloride Diffusion (ASTM Standard AASHTO or ASTM tests Step 2 Transform Test Results into Material Properties Step 4 Use Service

  8. Dynamic permeability of the lacunar–canalicular system in human cortical bone

    PubMed Central

    Benalla, M.; Palacio-Mancheno, P. E.; Fritton, S. P.; Cardoso, L.

    2013-01-01

    A new method for the experimental determination of the permeability of a small sample of a fluid-saturated hierarchically structured porous material is described and applied to the determination of the lacunar–canalicular permeability (KLC) in bone. The interest in the permeability of the lacunar–canalicular pore system (LCS) is due to the fact that the LCS is considered to be the site of bone mechanotransduction due to the loading-driven fluid flow over cellular structures. The permeability of this space has been estimated to be anywhere from 10?17 to 10?25 m2. However, the vascular pore system and LCS are intertwined, rendering the permeability of the much smaller-dimensioned LCS challenging to measure. In this study, we report a combined experimental and analytical approach that allowed the accurate determination of the KLC to be on the order of 10?22 m2 for human osteonal bone. It was found that the KLC has a linear dependence on loading frequency, decreasing at a rate of 2 × 10?24 m2/Hz from 1 to 100 Hz, and using the proposed model, the porosity alone was able to explain 86 % of the KLC variability. PMID:24146291

  9. Vortex rings impinging on permeable boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mujal-Colilles, Anna; Dalziel, Stuart B.; Bateman, Allen

    2015-01-01

    Experiments with vortex rings impinging permeable and solid boundaries are presented in order to investigate the influence of permeability. Utilizing Particle Image Velocimetry, we compared the behaviour of a vortex ring impinging four different reticulated foams (with permeability k ˜ 26 - 85 × 10-8 m2) and a solid boundary. Results show how permeability affects the stretching phenomena of the vortex ring and the formation and evolution of the secondary vortex ring with opposite sign. Moreover, permeability also affects the macroscopic no-slip boundary condition found on the solid boundary, turning it into an apparent slip boundary condition for the most permeable boundary. The apparent slip-boundary condition and the flux exchange between the ambient fluid and the foam are jointly responsible for both the modified formation of the secondary vortex and changes on the vortex ring diameter increase.

  10. [Vascular Lesions of Vocal Folds - Part 2: Perpendicular Vascular Lesions].

    PubMed

    Arens, C; Glanz, H; Voigt-Zimmermann, S

    2015-11-01

    The present work aims at a systematic pathogenetic description of perpendicular vascular changes in the vocal folds. Unlike longitudinal vascular changes, like ectasia and meander, perpendicular vascular changes can be observed in bening lesions. They predominantly occur as typical vascular loops in exophytic lesions, especially in recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP), pre-cancerous and cancerous diseases of the larynx and vocal folds. Neoangiogenesis is caused by an epithelial growth stimulus in the early phase of cancerous genesis. In RRP the VVC impress by a single, long vessel loop with a narrow angle turning point in the each single papilla of the papilloma. In pre- and cancerous lesions the vascular loop is located directly underneath the epithelium. During progressive tumor growth, vascular loops develop an increasingly irregular, convoluted, spirally shape. The arrangement of the vascular loops is primarily still symmetrical. In the preliminary stage of tumor development occurs by neoangiogenesis to a microvascular compression. In advanced vocal fold carcinoma the regular vascular vocal fold structure is destroyed. The various stages of tumor growth are also characterized by typical primary epithelial and secondary connective tissue changes. The characteristic triad of vascular, epithelial and connective tissue changes therefore plays an important role in differential diagnosis. PMID:26575722

  11. The pathobiology of vascular dementia

    PubMed Central

    Iadecola, Costantino

    2013-01-01

    Vascular cognitive impairment defines alterations in cognition, ranging from subtle deficits to full-blown dementia, attributable to cerebrovascular causes. Often coexisting with Alzheimer’s disease, mixed vascular and neurodegenerative dementia has emerged as the leading cause of age-related cognitive impairment. Central to the disease mechanism is the crucial role that cerebral blood vessels play in brain health, not only for the delivery of oxygen and nutrients, but also for the trophic signaling that links inextricably the well being of neurons and glia to that of cerebrovascular cells. This review will examine how vascular damage disrupts these vital homeostatic interactions, focusing on the hemispheric white matter, a region at heightened risk for vascular damage, and on the interplay between vascular factors and Alzheimer’s disease. Finally, preventative and therapeutic prospects will be examined, highlighting the importance of midlife vascular risk factor control in the prevention of late-life dementia. PMID:24267647

  12. [Classification of vascular neoplasms].

    PubMed

    Hundeiker, M

    1978-11-01

    Neoplasms of blood and lymph vessels differ from angiectatic and angiokeratotic nevi by real proliferating growth. According to their features of growth and their wall structures, they are classified into three main groups: angiomas, glomangiomas and malignant vascular tumors. Within the angiomas on the one hand, capillary angiomas are classified into: planotuberous and tuberonodous angiomas of childhood and Kasabach-Merritt syndrome, multilocular hemangiomatosis, progressive multiple angiomas, tardive ("senile") angiomas, eruptive angiomas (granulomata pediculata), papular angioplasia, gemmangioma, and benign juvenile hemangioendothelioma. On the other hand, cavernous angiomas, i.e. arterial and venous cavernomas, as well as blue rubberbleb nevus, Mafucci's syndrome, angioleiomyoma, benign juvenile hemangiopericytoma and cavernous lymphangioma, form thick walled structures without involution. Glomangiomas occur as solitary, multiple systematized, and multiple disseminated and familiar forms. Within the group of malignant vascular tumors--Kaposi sarcoma, lymphangiosarcoma in lymphedema, hemangioendothelioma and angioplastic reticulosarcoma, hemangio- or lymphangiosarcoma, angioendotheliomastosis proliferans, rarity and increasing loss of characteristic differentiated structures give rise to difficulties in nosologic classification. PMID:214413

  13. Vascular Distribution of Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, Phoebe A.; Nurkiewicz, Timothy R.

    2014-01-01

    Once considered primarily occupational, novel nanotechnology innovation and application has led to widespread domestic use and intentional biomedical exposures. With these exciting advances, the breadth and depth of toxicological considerations must also be expanded. The vascular system interacts with every tissue in the body, striving to homeostasis. Engineered nanomaterials (ENM) have been reported to distribute in many different organs and tissues. However, these observations have tended to use approaches requiring tissue homogenization and/or gross organ analyses. These techniques, while effective in establishing presence, preclude an exact determination of where ENM are deposited within a tissue. It is necessary to identify this exact distribution and deposition of ENM throughout the cardiovascular system, with respect to vascular hemodynamics and in vivo/ in vitro ENM modifications taken into account if nanotechnology is to achieve its full potential. Distinct levels of the vasculature will first be described as individual compartments. Then the vasculature will be considered as a whole. These unique compartments and biophysical conditions will be discussed in terms of their propensity to favor ENM deposition. Understanding levels of the vasculature will also be discussed. Ultimately, future studies must verify the mechanisms speculated on and presented herein. PMID:24777845

  14. Influence of fiber packing structure on permeability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cai, Zhong; Berdichevsky, Alexander L.

    1993-01-01

    The study on the permeability of an aligned fiber bundle is the key building block in modeling the permeability of advanced woven and braided preforms. Available results on the permeability of fiber bundles in the literature show that a substantial difference exists between numerical and analytical calculations on idealized fiber packing structures, such as square and hexagonal packing, and experimental measurements on practical fiber bundles. The present study focuses on the variation of the permeability of a fiber bundle under practical process conditions. Fiber bundles are considered as containing openings and fiber clusters within the bundle. Numerical simulations on the influence of various openings on the permeability were conducted. Idealized packing structures are used, but with introduced openings distributed in different patterns. Both longitudinal and transverse flow are considered. The results show that openings within the fiber bundle have substantial effect on the permeability. In the longitudinal flow case, the openings become the dominant flow path. In the transverse flow case, the fiber clusters reduce the gap sizes among fibers. Therefore the permeability is greatly influenced by these openings and clusters, respectively. In addition to the porosity or fiber volume fraction, which is commonly used in the permeability expression, another fiber bundle status parameter, the ultimate fiber volume fraction, is introduced to capture the disturbance within a fiber bundle.

  15. Effect of Dead Algae on Soil Permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, R.S.

    2003-02-21

    Since existing basins support heavy growths of unicellular green algae which may be killed by temperature variation or by inadvertent pH changes in waste and then deposited on the basin floor, information on the effects of dead algae on soil permeability was needed. This study was designed to show the effects of successive algal kills on the permeability of laboratory soil columns.

  16. Permeable Pavements, Green Roofs, and Cisterns

    E-print Network

    Hunt, William F.

    ), such as bioretention (see AGW- within low-impact development (LID). 588-05 for more information), permeable LID uses Permeable Pavements, Green Roofs, and Cisterns Stormwater Treatment Practices for Low-Impact Development Stormwater runoff continues to be a concern in communities large and small across North Carolina

  17. Broadband dielectric terahertz metamaterials with negative permeability

    E-print Network

    Ku?el, Petr

    Broadband dielectric terahertz metamaterials with negative permeability R. Yahiaoui,1 H. Nemec,2 P effective permeability in the terahertz spectral region. The investigated structures consist of an array.6495. Metamaterials (MM) are man-made composite struc- tures with unit cell dimensions tailored for the tar- geted

  18. SOIL-AIR PERMEABILITY METHOD EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The feasibility of soil vapor extraction (SVE) is, in part, based on vadose zone soil-air permeability. ield, laboratory and empirical correlation methods for estimating soil-air permeability have been reviewed for their appropriateness in determining SVE feasibility, and the dev...

  19. A method of determination of permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, S.V.; Trofimov, V.A.

    2007-11-15

    A method is proposed for determining permeability of coals under conditions of steady-state deformation and stationary filtration mode by employing a reference core made of gas-non-sorbing material with a known permeability. The approach has been developed to assess the time of transition to the stable filtration.

  20. Permeability-porosity data sets for sandstones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, P.H.

    2004-01-01

    Due to the variable nature of permeability-porosity relations, core should be obtained and permeability (k) and porosity (??) should be determined on core plugs in the laboratory for the formation of interest. A catalog of k versus (??) data sets is now available on the Web. Examples from the catalog are considered to illustrate some aspects of k versus ?? dependencies in siliciclastic reservoirs.

  1. Real-time estimation of paracellular permeability of cerebral endothelial cells by capacitance sensor array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun Jo, Dong; Lee, Rimi; Hyoung Kim, Jin; Oh Jun, Hyoung; Geol Lee, Tae; Hun Kim, Jeong

    2015-06-01

    Vascular integrity is important in maintaining homeostasis of brain microenvironments. In various brain diseases including Alzheimer’s disease, stroke, and multiple sclerosis, increased paracellular permeability due to breakdown of blood-brain barrier is linked with initiation and progression of pathological conditions. We developed a capacitance sensor array to monitor dielectric responses of cerebral endothelial cell monolayer, which could be utilized to evaluate the integrity of brain microvasculature. Our system measured real-time capacitance values which demonstrated frequency- and time-dependent variations. With the measurement of capacitance at the frequency of 100?Hz, we could differentiate the effects of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a representative permeability-inducing factor, on endothelial cells and quantitatively analyse the normalized values. Interestingly, we showed differential capacitance values according to the status of endothelial cell monolayer, confluent or sparse, evidencing that the integrity of monolayer was associated with capacitance values. Another notable feature was that we could evaluate the expression of molecules in samples in our system with the reference of real-time capacitance values. We suggest that this dielectric spectroscopy system could be successfully implanted as a novel in vitro assay in the investigation of the roles of paracellular permeability in various brain diseases.

  2. Opposing Effects of the Angiopoietins on the Thrombin-Induced Permeability of Human Pulmonary Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    van der Heijden, Melanie; van Nieuw Amerongen, Geerten P.; van Bezu, Jan; Paul, Marinus A.; Groeneveld, A. B. Johan; van Hinsbergh, Victor W. M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) is associated with lung injury in ALI/ARDS. As endothelial activation by thrombin plays a role in the permeability of acute lung injury and Ang-2 may modulate the kinetics of thrombin-induced permeability by impairing the organization of vascular endothelial (VE-)cadherin, and affecting small Rho GTPases in human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HPMVECs), we hypothesized that Ang-2 acts as a sensitizer of thrombin-induced hyperpermeability of HPMVECs, opposed by Ang-1. Methodology/Principal Findings Permeability was assessed by measuring macromolecule passage and transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER). Angiopoietins did not affect basal permeability. Nevertheless, they had opposing effects on the thrombin-induced permeability, in particular in the initial phase. Ang-2 enhanced the initial permeability increase (passage, P?=?0.010; TEER, P?=?0.021) in parallel with impairment of VE-cadherin organization without affecting VE-cadherin Tyr685 phosphorylation or increasing RhoA activity. Ang-2 also increased intercellular gap formation. Ang-1 preincubation increased Rac1 activity, enforced the VE-cadherin organization, reduced the initial thrombin-induced permeability (TEER, P?=?0.027), while Rac1 activity simultaneously normalized, and reduced RhoA activity at 15 min thrombin exposure (P?=?0.039), but not at earlier time points. The simultaneous presence of Ang-2 largely prevented the effect of Ang-1 on TEER and macromolecule passage. Conclusions/Significance Ang-1 attenuated thrombin-induced permeability, which involved initial Rac1 activation-enforced cell-cell junctions, and later RhoA inhibition. In addition to antagonizing Ang-1, Ang-2 had also a direct effect itself. Ang-2 sensitized the initial thrombin-induced permeability accompanied by destabilization of VE-cadherin junctions and increased gap formation, in the absence of increased RhoA activity. PMID:21858121

  3. Serum Superoxide Dismutase Is Associated with Vascular Structure and Function in Hypertensive and Diabetic Patients.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Marcos, Manuel A; Blázquez-Medela, Ana M; Gamella-Pozuelo, Luis; Recio-Rodriguez, José I; García-Ortiz, Luis; Martínez-Salgado, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is associated with cardiac and vascular defects leading to hypertension and atherosclerosis, being superoxide dismutase (SOD) one of the main intracellular antioxidant defence mechanisms. Although several parameters of vascular function and structure have a predictive value for cardiovascular morbidity-mortality in hypertensive patients, there are no studies on the involvement of SOD serum levels with these vascular parameters. Thus, we assessed if SOD serum levels are correlated with parameters of vascular function and structure and with cardiovascular risk in hypertensive and type 2 diabetic patients. We enrolled 255 consecutive hypertensive and diabetic patients and 52 nondiabetic and nonhypertensive controls. SOD levels were measured with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. Vascular function and structure were evaluated by pulse wave velocity, augmentation index, ambulatory arterial stiffness index, and carotid intima-media thickness. We detected negative correlations between SOD and pressure wave velocity, peripheral and central augmentation index and ambulatory arterial stiffness index, pulse pressure, and plasma HDL-cholesterol, as well as positive correlations between SOD and plasma uric acid and triglycerides. Our study shows that SOD is a marker of cardiovascular alterations in hypertensive and diabetic patients, since changes in its serum levels are correlated with alterations in vascular structure and function. PMID:26635913

  4. Serum Superoxide Dismutase Is Associated with Vascular Structure and Function in Hypertensive and Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Marcos, Manuel A.; Blázquez-Medela, Ana M.; Gamella-Pozuelo, Luis; Recio-Rodriguez, José I.; García-Ortiz, Luis; Martínez-Salgado, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is associated with cardiac and vascular defects leading to hypertension and atherosclerosis, being superoxide dismutase (SOD) one of the main intracellular antioxidant defence mechanisms. Although several parameters of vascular function and structure have a predictive value for cardiovascular morbidity-mortality in hypertensive patients, there are no studies on the involvement of SOD serum levels with these vascular parameters. Thus, we assessed if SOD serum levels are correlated with parameters of vascular function and structure and with cardiovascular risk in hypertensive and type 2 diabetic patients. We enrolled 255 consecutive hypertensive and diabetic patients and 52 nondiabetic and nonhypertensive controls. SOD levels were measured with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. Vascular function and structure were evaluated by pulse wave velocity, augmentation index, ambulatory arterial stiffness index, and carotid intima-media thickness. We detected negative correlations between SOD and pressure wave velocity, peripheral and central augmentation index and ambulatory arterial stiffness index, pulse pressure, and plasma HDL-cholesterol, as well as positive correlations between SOD and plasma uric acid and triglycerides. Our study shows that SOD is a marker of cardiovascular alterations in hypertensive and diabetic patients, since changes in its serum levels are correlated with alterations in vascular structure and function. PMID:26635913

  5. Optical methods for measuring plasma membrane osmotic water permeability in cell layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farinas, Javier Anibal

    Optical methods were developed to measure water permeability in cell layers and used to characterize water channel transfected cells and measure individual plasma membrane water permeabilities of epithelial cells. The general approach was to measure the rate of change of cell volume in response to osmotic gradients. Changes in solute concentration resulting from cell volume changes were used to generate optical signals. Because of the high data acquisition rates obtainable with optical instruments, very high water permeabilities found in cells containing water channels can be measured. Total internal reflection microfluorimetry was used to measure water permeability in cells grown on transparent, solid supports. The fluorescence measured from cells containing a cytosolic fluorophore was inversely proportional to cell volume. The method was applied to transfected cells which expressed water channels and to investigate a cell model of the vasopressin-regulated shuttling of AQP2. Interferometry was used to measure cell volume and water permeability in adherent or non-adherent epithelial cell layers. Volume changes were shown to alter the optical path length of light passing through a cell layer. An interferometer was used to convert the small changes in optical path length to measurable changes in intensity. Cell membrane osmotic water permeability was determined from the time course of interference signal in response to osmotic gradients. Individual plasma membrane water permeabilities of epithelial cells were measured. To overcome the difficulties associated with interferometry, a spatial filtering microscopy method was developed based on changes in transmitted light intensity in a phase contrast microscope occurring after volume changes induced by osmotic gradients. A theory based on the refractive index changes observed in cells by interferometry was developed to explain the dependence of transmitted light intensity on cell volume. The method was applied to measure water permeability in epithelial cells from human trachea and to study the vasopressin response in intact toad bladder. Together, these methods will allow the elucidation of the role of water channels in fluid transport.

  6. Selective irradiation of the vascular endothelium

    E-print Network

    Schuller, Bradley W

    2007-01-01

    We developed a unique methodology to selectively irradiate the vascular endothelium in vivo to better understand the role of vascular damage in causing normal tissue radiation side-effects.The relationship between vascular ...

  7. Caffeine's Vascular Mechanisms of Action

    PubMed Central

    Echeverri, Darío; Montes, Félix R.; Cabrera, Mariana; Galán, Angélica; Prieto, Angélica

    2010-01-01

    Caffeine is the most widely consumed stimulating substance in the world. It is found in coffee, tea, soft drinks, chocolate, and many medications. Caffeine is a xanthine with various effects and mechanisms of action in vascular tissue. In endothelial cells, it increases intracellular calcium stimulating the production of nitric oxide through the expression of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase enzyme. Nitric oxide is diffused to the vascular smooth muscle cell to produce vasodilation. In vascular smooth muscle cells its effect is predominantly a competitive inhibition of phosphodiesterase, producing an accumulation of cAMP and vasodilation. In addition, it blocks the adenosine receptors present in the vascular tissue to produce vasoconstriction. In this paper the main mechanisms of action of caffeine on the vascular tissue are described, in which it is shown that caffeine has some cardiovascular properties and effects which could be considered beneficial. PMID:21188209

  8. 21 CFR 886.5916 - Rigid gas permeable contact lens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Rigid gas permeable contact lens. 886.5916 Section 886.5916...Devices § 886.5916 Rigid gas permeable contact lens. (a) Identification. A rigid gas permeable contact lens is a device intended to...

  9. Effect of pressure-dependent permeability on tight gas wells 

    E-print Network

    Franquet Barbara, Mariela

    2005-08-29

    of production data alone, it is impossible to determine the correct permeability value for tight gas reservoirs with pressure-dependent permeability. For the cases studied, the transient performance was similar for both constant permeability and pressure...

  10. Permeability profiles -- key to reservoir management

    SciTech Connect

    Georgi, D.; Kasap, E.; Tang, X.; Cheng, A.

    1998-06-01

    Three-dimensional seismic data being collected routinely today offer those responsible for reservoir management a detailed picture of the configuration of the subsurface. Often, the porosity of reservoir rocks can also be deduced. However, knowing porosity exists, i.e., that there is pore space and vugs for the storage of hydrocarbons, is important but valueless if hydrocarbons cannot be made to flow into wells. Permeability is the quantity that measures flow capability. Having a permeability profile is the key to reservoir management. Accurate values can be obtained from cores taken during drilling; however, cutting cores is expensive and cores taken to the surface may be damaged or not representative of the reservoir rock of interest. Rotary coring can provide limited permeability data but, generally, insufficient data are available to develop a permeability profile. Here, the authors are concerned with measuring permeability with instruments placed in a well or used for logging a well. They shall discuss permeability-measuring methods available from Western Atlas Logging Services (WALS). Together, they make it possible to obtain continuous permeability in any well without coring or extensive well testing.

  11. Fluid permeability of deformable fracture networks

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.R.; Bruhn, R.L.

    1997-04-01

    The authors consider the problem of defining the fracture permeability tensor for each grid lock in a rock mass from maps of natural fractures. For this purpose they implement a statistical model of cracked rock due to M. Oda [1985], where the permeability tensor is related to the crack geometry via a volume average of the contribution from each crack in the population. In this model tectonic stress is implicitly coupled to fluid flow through an assumed relationship between crack aperture and normal stress across the crack. The authors have included the following enhancements to the basic model: (1) a realistic model of crack closure under stress has been added along with the provision to apply tectonic stresses to the fracture system in any orientation, the application of stress results in fracture closure and consequently a reduction in permeability; (2) the fracture permeability can be superimposed onto an arbitrary anisotropic matrix permeability; (3) the fracture surfaces are allowed to slide under the application of shear stress, causing fractures to dilate and result in a permeability increase. Through an example, the authors demonstrate that significant changes in permeability magnitudes and orientations are possible when tectonic stress is applied to a fracture system.

  12. Using magnetic permeability bits to store information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmerwilke, John; Petrie, J. R.; Wieland, K. A.; Mencia, Raymond; Liou, Sy-Hwang; Cress, C. D.; Newburgh, G. A.; Edelstein, A. S.

    2015-10-01

    Steps are described in the development of a new magnetic memory technology, based on states with different magnetic permeability, with the capability to reliably store large amounts of information in a high-density form for decades. The advantages of using the permeability to store information include an insensitivity to accidental exposure to magnetic fields or temperature changes, both of which are known to corrupt memory approaches that rely on remanent magnetization. The high permeability media investigated consists of either films of Metglas 2826 MB (Fe40Ni38Mo4B18) or bilayers of permalloy (Ni78Fe22)/Cu. Regions of films of the high permeability media were converted thermally to low permeability regions by laser or ohmic heating. The permeability of the bits was read by detecting changes of an external 32 Oe probe field using a magnetic tunnel junction 10 ?m away from the media. Metglas bits were written with 100 ?s laser pulses and arrays of 300?nm diameter bits were read. The high and low permeability bits written using bilayers of permalloy/Cu are not affected by 10 Mrad(Si) of gamma radiation from a 60Co source. An economical route for writing and reading bits as small at 20?nm using a variation of heat assisted magnetic recording is discussed.

  13. 21 CFR 870.4450 - Vascular clamp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Surgical Devices § 870.4450 Vascular clamp. (a) Identification. A vascular clamp...

  14. NOVEL ATYPICAL PKC INHIBITORS PREVENT VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH FACTOR-INDUCED BLOOD-RETINAL BARRIER DYSFUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Titchenell, Paul M.; Lin, Cheng-Mao; Keil, Jason M.; Sundstrom, Jeffrey M.; Smith, Charles D.; Antonetti, David A.

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Pro-inflammatory cytokines and growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) contribute to the loss of the blood-retinal barrier (BRB) and subsequent macular edema in various retinal pathologies. VEGF signaling requires conventional PKC (PKC?) activity; however, PKC? inhibition only partially prevents VEGF-induced endothelial permeability and does not affect pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced permeability suggesting the involvement of alternative signaling pathways. Here, we provide evidence for the involvement of atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) signaling in VEGF-induced endothelial permeability and identify a novel class of inhibitors of aPKC that prevent BRB breakdown in vivo. Genetic and pharmacological manipulations of aPKC isoforms were used to assess their contribution to endothelial permeability in culture. A chemical library was screened using an in vitro kinase assay to identify novel small molecule inhibitors and further medicinal chemistry was performed to delineate a novel pharmacophore. We demonstrate that aPKC isoforms are both sufficient and required for VEGF-induced endothelial permeability. Furthermore, these specific, potent, non-competitive, small molecule inhibitors prevented VEGF-induced tight junction internalization and retinal endothelial permeability in response to VEGF in both primary culture and in rodent retina. These data suggest that aPKC inhibition with 2-amino-4-phenyl-thiophene derivatives may be developed to preserve the BRB in retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy or uveitis and the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in the presence of brain tumors. PMID:22721706

  15. Permeability Barrier Generation in the Martian Lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schools, Joe; Montési, Laurent

    2015-11-01

    Permeability barriers develop when a magma produced in the interior of a planet rises into the cooler lithosphere and crystallizes more rapidly than the lithosphere can deform (Sparks and Parmentier, 1991). Crystallization products may then clog the porous network in which melt is propagating, reducing the permeability to almost zero, i.e., forming a permeability barrier. Subsequent melts cannot cross the barrier. Permeability barriers have been useful to explain variations in crustal thickness at mid-ocean ridges on Earth (Magde et al., 1997; Hebert and Montési, 2011; Montési et al., 2011). We explore here under what conditions permeability barriers may form on Mars.We use the MELTS thermodynamic calculator (Ghiorso and Sack, 1995; Ghiorso et al., 2002; Asimow et al., 2004) in conjunction with estimated Martian mantle compositions (Morgan and Anders, 1979; Wänke and Dreibus, 1994; Lodders and Fegley, 1997; Sanloup et al., 1999; Taylor 2013) to model the formation of permeability barriers in the lithosphere of Mars. In order to represent potential past and present conditions of Mars, we vary the lithospheric thickness, mantle potential temperature (heat flux), oxygen fugacity, and water content.Our results show that permeability layers can develop in the thermal boundary layer of the simulated Martian lithosphere if the mantle potential temperature is higher than ~1500°C. The various Martian mantle compositions yield barriers in the same locations, under matching variable conditions. There is no significant difference in barrier location over the range of accepted Martian oxygen fugacity values. Water content is the most significant influence on barrier development as it reduces the temperature of crystallization, allowing melt to rise further into the lithosphere. Our lower temperature and thicker lithosphere model runs, which are likely the most similar to modern Mars, show no permeability barrier generation. Losing the possibility of having a permeability barrier likely changed the character of volcanism on Mars, maybe preventing the formation of new localized volcanic edifices in the Amazonian.

  16. Behçet Disease With Vascular Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Alibaz-Oner, Fatma; Karadeniz, Asl?; Y?lmaz, Sema; Balkarl?, Ay?e; Kimyon, Gezmi?; Yaz?c?, Ayten; Ç?nar, Muhammet; Y?lmaz, Sedat; Y?ld?z, Fatih; Bilge, ?ule Ya?ar; Bilgin, Emre; Coskun, Belkis Nihan; Omma, Ahmet; Çetin, Gözde Y?ld?r?m; Ça?atay, Yonca; Karaaslan, Ya?ar; Sayarl?o?lu, Mehmet; Pehlivan, Yavuz; Kalyoncu, Umut; Karada?, Ömer; Ka?ifo?lu, Timuçin; Erken, Eren; Pay, Salih; Çefle, Ay?e; K?sac?k, Bünyamin; Onat, Ahmet Mesut; Çobankara, Veli; Direskeneli, Haner

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Vascular involvement is one of the major causes of mortality and morbidity in Behçet disease (BD). There are no controlled studies for the management of vascular BD (VBD), and according to the EULAR recommendations, only immunosuppressive (IS) agents are recommended. In this study, we aimed to investigate the therapeutic approaches chosen by Turkish physicians during the initial event and relapses of VBD and the association of different treatment options with the relapses retrospectively. Patients with BD (n?=?936, female/male: 347/589, mean age: 37.6?±?10.8) classified according to ISG criteria from 15 rheumatology centers in Turkey were included. The demographic data, clinical characteristics of the first vascular event and relapses, treatment protocols, and data about complications were acquired. VBD was observed in 27.7% (n?=?260) of the patients during follow-up. In 57.3% of the VBD patients, vascular involvement was the presenting sign of the disease. After the first vascular event, ISs were given to 88.8% and AC treatment to 59.8% of the patients. Median duration of AC treatment was 13 months (1–204) and ISs, 22 months (1–204). Minor hemorrhage related to AC treatment was observed in 7 (4.7%) patients. A second vascular event developed in 32.9% (n?=?86) of the patients. The vascular relapse rate was similar between patients taking only ISs and AC plus IS treatments after the first vascular event (29.1% vs 22.4%, P?=?0.28) and was significantly higher in group taking only ACs than taking only ISs (91.6% vs 29.1%, P?vascular event developed in 17 (n?=?6.5%) patients. The relapse rate was also similar between the patients taking only ISs and AC plus IS treatments after second vascular event (25.3% vs 20.8%, P?=?0.93). When multivariate analysis was performed, development of vascular relapse negatively correlated with only IS treatments. We did not find any additional positive effect of AC treatment used in combination with ISs in the course of vascular involvement in patients with BD. Severe complications related to AC treatment were also not detected. Our results suggest that short duration of IS treatments and compliance issues of treatment are the major problems in VBD associated with vascular relapses during follow-up. PMID:25674739

  17. Vascular and cellular responses to pro-inflammatory stimuli in rat dental pulp.

    PubMed

    Maltos, Kátia L M; Menezes, Gustavo B; Caliari, Marcelo V; Rocha, Orivaldo A; Santos, Júlia M M; Alves, Dalton L F; Duarte, Igor D G; Francischi, Janetti N

    2004-06-01

    Dental pulp reactivity to various pro-inflammatory stimuli was independently evaluated in rats in terms of a vascular permeability increase and leukocyte recruitment. Substance P, calcitonin-gene related peptide (CGRP) and prostaglandin E(2) (in the picomol range) were applied to the exposed pulp from anesthetised animals and the plasma extravasation measured by the Evans blue content in the tissue following 10 min of administration. Leukocyte recruitment was evaluated morphometrically by counting the cell number present in serial sections of 1:3 4 microm pulp tissue 6 h after bacterial endotoxin (LPS; 0.06-1.2 microg/site) administration. Increase in pulp vascular permeability and cellular recruitment due to the injection of mentioned mediators in the skin or LPS in the peritoneal cavity were used as positive controls. Increase in vascular permeability in the pulp occurred in the same dose-range as observed in the skin, being CGRP the most active substance in both cases. However, it was necessary a higher dose of LPS (1.2 microg) to induce a similar cell recruitment in the pulp as that observed in the rat peritoneal cavity (0.3 microg). These data indicate that dental pulp reactivity presents the same pattern of increase in vascular permeability to other tissues in the rat, being CGRP the most potent mediator in this respect. In addition, they suggest the presence of CGRP receptors in the dental pulp. However, an adequate leukocyte recruitment response to bacterial endotoxin was not mounted, suggesting a deficiency in adhesion molecules in blood vessels in the rat dental pulp. PMID:15099801

  18. Infrared Fluorescence for Vascular Barrier Breach In Vivo – A Novel Method for Quantitation of Albumin Efflux

    PubMed Central

    von Drygalski, Annette; Furla-Freguia, Christian; Mosnier, Laurent O.; Yegneswaran, Subramanian; Ruf, Wolfram; Griffin, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Vascular hyperpermeability contributes to morbidity in inflammation. Current methodologies for in vivo assessment of permeability based on extravasation of Evans Blue (EB)-bound albumin are cumbersome and often lack sensitivity. We developed a novel infrared fluorescence (IRF) methodology for measurement of EB-albumin extravasation to quantify vascular permeability in murine models. Vascular permeability induced by endotoxemia was examined for all solid organs, brain, skin and peritoneum by IRF and the traditional absorbance-based measurement of EB in tissue extracts. Organ IRF increased linearly with increasing concentrations of i.v. EB (2.5-25 mg/kg). Tissue IRF was more sensitive for EB accumulation compared to the absorbance-based method. Accordingly, differences in vascular permeability and organ EB accumulation between lipopolysaccharide-treated and saline-treated mice were often significant when analyzed by IRF-based detection but not by absorbance-based detection. EB was detected in all 353 organs analyzed with IRF but only in 67% (239/353) of organs analyzed by absorbance-based methodology, demonstrating improved sensitivity of EB detection in organs with IRF. In contrast, EB in plasma after EB administration was readily measured by both methods with high correlation between the two methods (n=116, r2=0.86). Quantitation of organ-specific EB-IRF differences due to endotoxin was optimal when IRF was compared between mice matched for weight, gender, and age, and with appropriate corrections for organ weight and EB plasma concentrations. Notably, EB-IRF methodology leaves organs intact for subsequent histopathology. In summary, EB-IRF is a novel, highly sensitive, rapid, and convenient method for the relative quantification of EB in intact organs of treatment versus control mice. PMID:23052565

  19. Gas Permeable Chemochromic Compositions for Hydrogen Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokerman, Gary (Inventor); Mohajeri, Nahid (Inventor); Muradov, Nazim (Inventor); Tabatabaie-Raissi, Ali (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A (H2) sensor composition includes a gas permeable matrix material intermixed and encapsulating at least one chemochromic pigment. The chemochromic pigment produces a detectable change in color of the overall sensor composition in the presence of H2 gas. The matrix material provides high H2 permeability, which permits fast permeation of H2 gas. In one embodiment, the chemochromic pigment comprises PdO/TiO2. The sensor can be embodied as a two layer structure with the gas permeable matrix material intermixed with the chemochromic pigment in one layer and a second layer which provides a support or overcoat layer.

  20. General Surgery Resident Vascular Operative Experience in the Era of Endovascular Surgery and Vascular Fellowships.

    PubMed

    Yan, Huan; Maximus, Steven; Kim, Jerry J; Smith, Brian; Kim, Dennis; Koopmann, Matthew; DeVirgilio, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Advances in endovascular surgery have resulted in a decline in major open arterial reconstructions nationwide. Our objective is to investigate the effect of endovascular surgery on general surgery resident experience with open vascular surgery. Between 2004 and 2014, 112 residents graduated from two academic institutions in Southern California. Residents were separated into those who graduated in 2004 to 2008 (period 1) and in 2009 to 2014 (period 2). Case volumes of vascular procedures were compared using two-sample t test. A total of 43 residents were in period 1 and 59 residents were in period 2. In aggregate, there was no significant difference in open cases recorded between the two periods (84 vs 87, P = 0.194). Subgroup analysis showed period 2 recorded significantly fewer cases of open aneurysm repair (5 vs 3, P < 0.001), cerebrovascular (14 vs 10, P = 0.007), and peripheral obstructive procedures (16 vs 13, P = 0.017). Dialysis access procedures constituted the largest group of procedures and remained similar between the two periods (35 vs 42, P = 0.582). General surgery residents experienced a significant decline in several index open major arterial reconstruction cases. This decline was offset by maintenance of dialysis access procedures. If the trend continues, future general surgeons will not be proficient in open vascular procedures. PMID:26595111

  1. Nanomedicine for drug targeting: strategies beyond the enhanced permeability and retention effect

    PubMed Central

    Nehoff, Hayley; Parayath, Neha N; Domanovitch, Laura; Taurin, Sebastien; Greish, Khaled

    2014-01-01

    The growing research interest in nanomedicine for the treatment of cancer and inflammatory-related pathologies is yielding encouraging results. Unfortunately, enthusiasm is tempered by the limited specificity of the enhanced permeability and retention effect. Factors such as lack of cellular specificity, low vascular density, and early release of active agents prior to reaching their target contribute to the limitations of the enhanced permeability and retention effect. However, improved nanomedicine designs are creating opportunities to overcome these problems. In this review, we present examples of the advances made in this field and endeavor to highlight the potential of these emerging technologies to improve targeting of nanomedicine to specific pathological cells and tissues. PMID:24904213

  2. Intermedin/adrenomedullin-2 is a hypoxia-induced endothelial peptide that stabilizes pulmonary microvascular permeability

    PubMed Central

    Aslam, Muhammad; Paddenberg, Renate; Quanz, Karin; Chang, Chia L.; Park, Jae-Il; Gries, Barbara; Rafiq, Amir; Faulhammer, Petra; Goldenberg, Anna; Papadakis, Tamara; Noll, Thomas; Hsu, Sheau Y. T.; Weissmann, Norbert; Kummer, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests a pivotal role of the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR) signaling pathway in preventing damage of the lung by stabilizing pulmonary barrier function. Intermedin (IMD), also termed adrenomedullin-2, is the most recently identified peptide targeting this receptor. Here we investigated the effect of hypoxia on the expression of IMD in the murine lung and cultured murine pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMEC) as well as the role of IMD in regulating vascular permeability. Monoclonal IMD antibodies were generated, and transcript levels were assayed by quantitative RT-PCR. The promoter region of IMD gene was analyzed, and the effect of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1? on IMD expression was investigated in HEK293T cells. Isolated murine lungs and a human lung microvascular endothelial cell monolayer model were used to study the effect of IMD on vascular permeability. IMD was identified as a pulmonary endothelial peptide by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. Hypoxia caused an upregulation of IMD mRNA in the murine lung and PMEC. As shown by these results, HIF-1? enhances IMD promoter activity. Our functional studies showed that IMD abolished the increase in pressure-induced endothelial permeability. Moreover, IMD decreased basal and thrombin-induced hyperpermeability of an endothelial cell monolayer in a receptor-dependent manner and activated PKA in these cells. In conclusion, IMD is a novel hypoxia-induced gene and a potential interventional agent for the improvement of endothelial barrier function in systemic inflammatory responses and hypoxia-induced vascular leakage. PMID:19684198

  3. The evolution of vascular changes in the spontaneously hypertensive rat.

    PubMed Central

    Limas, C.; Westrum, B.; Limas, C. J.

    1980-01-01

    A longitudinal study on the development of vascular lesions was carried out in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) of the Aoki-Okamoto strain. The aorta and intrarenal arterial vessels were examined at different ages, from 5 to 48 weeks, by light and electron microscopy. Endothelial permeability to injected horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was evaluated in 20-week-old animals. Morphologic differences between vessels of SHRs and age-matched normotensive controls (Wistar-Kyoto strain) were first noted at 10 weeks of age and became more pronounced with time. Vascular pathology involved both intima and media. Medial thickening was seen in both aorta and peripheral arteries and, in the latter, was associated with decreased luminal diameters. These medial changes may contribute to the maintenance of the elevated blood pressure. Intimal lesions affected predominantly the aorta and were characterized by an expansion of the subendothelial space with deposition of acid mucopolysaccharides. There was increased accumulation of tracer HRP in the expanded subendothelium, which suggested enhanced permeability and/or retention of the tracer. In animal species susceptible to atherosclerosis, these intimal changes could serve as the structural basis for the higher propensity for atheromatous lesions in hypertensive individuals. In the SHR, despite stabilization of systolic blood pressure at about 20 weeks of age, both intimal and medial lesions continue to progress and become more extensive and severe; this suggests that not only the severity of hypertension but also its duration are significant determinants of the degree of vascular damage. Images Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 15 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 18 Figure 19 Figure 20 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:7355987

  4. Vascular Injuries: Trends in Management

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Mohd Lateef; Ahangar, Ab Gani; Ganie, Farooq Ahmad; Wani, Shadab Nabi; Wani, Nasir-ud-din

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Vascular injury presents a great challenge to the emergency resident because these injuries require urgent intervention to prevent loss of life or limb. Sometimes serious vascular injury presents with only subtle or occult signs or symptoms. The patient may present weeks or months after initial injury with symptoms of vascular insufficiency, embolization, pseudoaneurysm, arteriovenous fistula etc. Although the majority of vascular injuries are caused by penetrating trauma from gunshot wounds, stabbing or blast injury, the possibility of vascular injury needs to be considered in patients presenting with displaced long bone fractures, crush injury, prolonged immobilization in a fixed position by tight casts or bandages and various invasive procedures. iatrogenic vascular injuries constitute about 10% of cases in most series; however the incidence is an increasing trend because more endovascular procedures such as angioplasty and cardiac catheterization are being performed routinely. Civilian trauma is more frequently seen in young males. However, it can occur at any age due to road accidents, firearms, bomb blasts and diagnostic procedures. Most of the time, civilian trauma causes less tissue damage. There is an epidemic of vascular injuries in Kashmir valley because of problems in law and order in the past two decades. This review deals with the topic in detail. PMID:24350103

  5. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in Eye Disease

    PubMed Central

    Penn, J.S.; Madan, A.; Caldwell, R.B.; Bartoli, M.; Caldwell, R.W.; Hartnett, M.E.

    2012-01-01

    Collectively, angiogenic ocular conditions represent the leading cause of irreversible vision loss in developed countries. In the U.S., for example, retinopathy of prematurity, diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration are the principal causes of blindness in the infant, working age and elderly populations, respectively. Evidence suggests that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a 40 kDa dimeric glycoprotein, promotes angiogenesis in each of these conditions, making it a highly significant therapeutic target. However, VEGF is pleiotropic, affecting a broad spectrum of endothelial, neuronal and glial behaviors, and confounding the validity of anti-VEGF strategies, particularly under chronic disease conditions. In fact, among other functions VEGF can influence cell proliferation, cell migration, proteolysis, cell survival and vessel permeability in a wide variety of biological contexts. This article will describe the roles played by VEGF in the pathogenesis of retinopathy of prematurity, diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration. The potential disadvantages of inhibiting VEGF will be discussed, as will the rationales for targeting other VEGF-related modulators of angiogenesis. PMID:18653375

  6. NADPH Oxidases in Vascular Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Konior, Anna; Schramm, Agata; Czesnikiewicz-Guzik, Marta

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a critical role in vascular disease. While there are many possible sources of ROS, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases play a central role. They are a source of “kindling radicals,” which affect other enzymes, such as nitric oxide synthase endothelial nitric oxide synthase or xanthine oxidase. This is important, as risk factors for atherosclerosis (hypertension, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, and smoking) regulate the expression and activity of NADPH oxidases in the vessel wall. Recent Advances: There are seven isoforms in mammals: Nox1, Nox2, Nox3, Nox4, Nox5, Duox1 and Duox2. Nox1, Nox2, Nox4, and Nox5 are expressed in endothelium, vascular smooth muscle cells, fibroblasts, or perivascular adipocytes. Other homologues have not been found or are expressed at very low levels; their roles have not been established. Nox1/Nox2 promote the development of endothelial dysfunction, hypertension, and inflammation. Nox4 may have a role in protecting the vasculature during stress; however, when its activity is increased, it may be detrimental. Calcium-dependent Nox5 has been implicated in oxidative damage in human atherosclerosis. Critical Issues: NADPH oxidase-derived ROS play a role in vascular pathology as well as in the maintenance of normal physiological vascular function. We also discuss recently elucidated mechanisms such as the role of NADPH oxidases in vascular protection, vascular inflammation, pulmonary hypertension, tumor angiogenesis, and central nervous system regulation of vascular function and hypertension. Future Directions: Understanding the role of individual oxidases and interactions between homologues in vascular disease is critical for efficient pharmacological regulation of vascular NADPH oxidases in both the laboratory and clinical practice. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2794–2814. PMID:24180474

  7. Nitric Oxide Increases Arterial Endotheial Permeability through Mediating VE-Cadherin Expression during Arteriogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaoqiong; Guan, Yinglu; Zhang, Bin; Cai, Weijun; Schaper, Jutta; Schaper, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage invasion is an important event during arteriogenesis, but the underlying mechanism is still only partially understood. The present study tested the hypothesis that nitric oxide (NO) and VE-cadherin, two key mediators for vascular permeability, contribute to this event in a rat ischemic hindlimb model. In addition, the effect of NO on expression of VE-caherin and endothelial permeability was also studied in cultured HUVECs. We found that: 1) in normal arteriolar vessels (NAV), eNOS was moderately expressed in endothelial cells (EC) and iNOS was rarely detected. In contrast, in collateral vessels (CVs) induced by simple femoral artery ligation, both eNOS and iNOS were significantly upregulated (P<0.05). Induced iNOS was found mainly in smooth muscle cells, but also in other vascular cells and macrophages; 2) in NAV VE-cadherin was strongly expressed in EC. In CVs, VE-cadherin was significantly downregulated, with a discontinuous and punctate pattern. Administration of nitric oxide donor DETA NONOate (NONOate) further reduced the amounts of Ve-cadherin in CVs, whereas NO synthase inhibitor L-NAME inhibited downregulation of VE-cadherin in CVs; 3) in normal rats Evans blue extravasation (EBE) was low in the musculus gracilis, FITC-dextron leakage was not detected in the vascular wall and few macrophages were observed in perivascular space. In contrast, EBE was significantly increased in femoral artery ligation rats, FITC-dextron leakage and increased amounts of macrophages were detected in CVs, which were further enhanced by administration of NONOate, but inhibited by L-NAME supplement; 4) in vitro experiments confirmed that an increase in NO production reduced VE-cadherin expression, correlated with increases in the permeability of HUVECs. In conclusion, our data for the first time reveal the expression profile of VE-cadherin and alterations of vascular permeability in CVs, suggesting that NO-mediated VE-cadherin pathway may be one important mechanism responsible, at least in part, for macrophage invasion during arteriogenesis. PMID:26133549

  8. Vascular Reactivity is Impaired and Associated With Walking Ability in Patients With Intermittent Claudication.

    PubMed

    Silva, Rita de Cassia Gengo E; Wolosker, Nelson; Yugar-Toledo, Juan Carlos; Consolim-Colombo, Fernanda Marciano

    2015-08-01

    We verified whether vascular reactivity is impaired and whether there is any association between vascular reactivity, walking ability, and peripheral artery disease (PAD) severity in patients with intermittent claudication (IC). We studied 63 patients and 17 age- and sex-matched volunteers without PAD. Vascular reactivity was evaluated in the brachial artery during reactive hyperemia (flow-mediated dilation [FMD]) and after a sublingual single dose of nitroglycerin (nitroglycerin-induced vasodilation [NID]). Walking ability was verified by a 6-minute walk test. Vascular reactivity and walking ability were significantly worse in patients with IC compared with control participants. The ankle-brachial index correlated with FMD, NID, as well as total and pain-free distances. The NID and walking ability progressively decreased as PAD severity increased. Walking ability correlated with NID but not with FMD. In patients with IC, vascular reactivity is impaired and is related to the severity of PAD and to walking ability. PMID:25100750

  9. Towards a characteristic equation for permeability 

    E-print Network

    Siddiqui, Adil Ahmed

    2008-10-10

    The characterization of reservoir permeability (k) remains the elusive challenge in reservoir engineering. This work considers prior developments in an evolutionary sense, and, as with prior work, our goal is the development ...

  10. Improved permeability prediction using multivariate analysis methods 

    E-print Network

    Xie, Jiang

    2009-05-15

    Predicting rock permeability from well logs in uncored wells is an important task in reservoir characterization. Due to the high costs of coring and laboratory analysis, typically cores are acquired in only a few wells. Since most wells are logged...

  11. NASA In-step: Permeable Membrane Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on the Permeable Membrane Experiment are presented. An experiment overview is given. The Membrane Phase Separation Experiment, Membrane Diffusion Interference Experiment, and Membrane Wetting Experiment are described. Finally, summary and conclusions are discussed.

  12. Permeable Reactive Zones for Groundwater Remediation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation will cover aspects of the application of permeable reactive zones to treat contaminated ground water. Specific field studies will be discussed covering both granular iron-based and organic carbon-based reactive barriers. Specific contaminants addressed include:...

  13. Tailoring wall permeabilities for enhanced filtration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herterich, J. G.; Vella, D.; Field, R. W.; Hankins, N. P.; Griffiths, I. M.

    2015-05-01

    The build-up of contaminants at the wall of cross-flow membrane filtration systems can be detrimental to the operation of such systems because of, amongst other things, the osmotic backflow it may induce. In this paper, we propose a strategy to avoid the negative effects of backflow due to osmosis by using 2D channels bounded by walls with a combination of permeable and impermeable segments. We show that preventing flow through the final portion of the channel can increase the efficiency of filtration and we determine the optimal fraction occupied by the permeable wall that maximizes efficiency. Our analysis uses a combination of numerical techniques and asymptotic analysis in the limit of low wall permeabilities. Finally, we consider how the energy cost of filtration depends on the Péclet number and show that the energy cost per unit of filtered water may be minimized by appropriately choosing both the Péclet number and the permeable-region fraction.

  14. Fracture permeability and seismic wave scattering ŒPoroelastic ...

    E-print Network

    Seiji Nakagawa

    2010-02-03

    Jun 18, 2010 ... services to the University of California and delivers a dynamic ... extended model results in no impact of the in-plane fracture permeability on the scattering. Recently, we ..... US Symposium on Rock Mechanics, 549-556.

  15. PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS FOR GROUNDWATER REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRB's) are an emerging, alternative in-situ approach for remediating groundwater contamination that combine subsurface fluid flow management with a passive chemical treatment zone. Removal of contaminants from the groundwater plume is achieved by alt...

  16. The Edison Environmental Center Permeable Pavement Site

    EPA Science Inventory

    This a presentation for a Community Outreach Event called "Chemistry Works and Celebration of International Year of Chemistry." It will review the permeable pavement research project at the Edison Environmental center.

  17. Permeability After Impact Testing of Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A.T.; Munafo, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Since composite laminates are beginning to be identified for use in reusable launch vehicle propulsion systems, an understanding of their permeance is needed. A foreign object impact event can cause a localized area of permeability (leakage) in a polymer matrix composite and it is the aim of this study to assess a method of quantifying permeability-after-impact results. A simple test apparatus is presented and variables that could affect the measured values of permeability-after-impact were assessed. Once it was determined that valid numbers were being measured, a fiber/resin system was impacted at various impact levels and the resulting permeability measured, first with a leak check solution (qualitative) then using the new apparatus (quantitative). The results showed that as the impact level increased, so did the measured leakage. As the pressure to the specimen was increased, the leak rate was seen to increase in a non-linear fashion for almost all of the specimens tested.

  18. Permeability After Impact Testing of Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.

    2003-01-01

    Since composite laminates are beginning to be identified for use in reusable launch vehicle propulsion systems, an understanding of their permeance is needed. A foreign object impact event can cause a localized area of permeability (leakage) in a polymer matrix composite and it is the aim of this study to assess a method of quantifying permeability-after-impact results. A simple test apparatus is presented and variables that could affect the measured values of permeability-after-impact were assessed. Once it was determined that valid numbers were being measured, a fiber/resin system was impacted at various impact levels and the resulting permeability measured, first with a leak check solution (qualitative) then using the new apparatus (quantitative). The results showed that as the impact level increased, so did the measured leakage. As the pressure to the specimen was increased, the leak rate was seen to increase in a non-linear fashion for almost all of the specimens tested.

  19. Flexible Sandwich Diaphragms Are Less Permeable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michalovic, John G.; Vassallo, Franklin A.

    1993-01-01

    Diaphragms for use in refrigerator compressors made as laminates of commercially available elastomers and metals. Diaphragms flexible, but less permeable by chlorofluorocarbon refrigerant fluids than diaphragms made of homogeneous mixtures of materials.

  20. Permeability of rayon based polymer composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokes, E. H.

    1992-01-01

    Several types of anomalous rayon based phenolic behavior have been observed in post-fired nozzles and exit cones. Many of these events have been shown to be related to the development of internal gas pressure within the material. The development of internal gas pressure is a function of the amount of gas produced within the material and the rate at which that gas is allowed to escape. The latter property of the material is referred to as the material's permeability. The permeability of two dimensional carbonized rayon based phenolic composites is a function of material direction, temperature, and stress/strain state. Recently significant differences in the permeability of these materials has been uncovered which may explain their inconsistent performance. This paper summarizes what is known about the permeability of these materials to date and gives possible implications of these finding to the performance of these materials in an ablative environment.

  1. Hydraulic tests in highly permeable aquifers

    E-print Network

    Butler, James J. Jr.

    2004-12-04

    [1] A semianalytical solution is presented for a mathematical model describing the flow of groundwater in response to a slug or pumping test in a highly permeable, confined aquifer. This solution, which is appropriate for ...

  2. Piezo1 integration of vascular architecture with physiological force

    PubMed Central

    Tumova, Sarka; Muraki, Katsuhiko; Bruns, Alexander; Ludlow, Melanie J; Sedo, Alicia; Hyman, Adam J; McKeown, Lynn; Young, Richard S; Yuldasheva, Nadira Y; Majeed, Yasser; Wilson, Lesley A; Rode, Baptiste; Bailey, Marc A; Kim, Hyejeong R; Fu, Zhaojun; Carter, Deborah AL; Bilton, Jan; Imrie, Helen; Ajuh, Paul; Dear, T Neil; Cubbon, Richard M; Kearney, Mark T; Prasad, Raj K; Evans, Paul C; Ainscough, Justin FX; Beech, David J

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms by which physical forces regulate endothelial cells to determine the complexities of vascular structure and function are enigmatic1-5. Studies of sensory neurons have suggested Piezo proteins as subunits of Ca2+-permeable non-selective cationic channels for detection of noxious mechanical impact6-8. Here we show Piezo1 (FAM38A) channels as sensors of frictional force (shear stress) and determinants of vascular structure in both development and adult physiology. Global or endothelial-specific disruption of mouse Piezo1 profoundly disturbed the developing vasculature and was embryonic lethal within days of the heart beating. Haploinsufficiency was not lethal but endothelial abnormality was detected in mature vessels. Importance of Piezo1 channels as sensors of blood flow was shown by Piezo1 dependence of shear stress-evoked ionic current and calcium influx in endothelial cells and the ability of exogenous Piezo1 to confer sensitivity to shear stress on otherwise resistant cells. Downstream of this calcium influx was protease activity and spatial organization of endothelial cells to the polarity of the applied force. The data suggest Piezo1 channels as pivotal integrators in vascular biology. PMID:25119035

  3. Digital image processing of vascular angiograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selzer, R. H.; Beckenbach, E. S.; Blankenhorn, D. H.; Crawford, D. W.; Brooks, S. H.

    1975-01-01

    The paper discusses the estimation of the degree of atherosclerosis in the human femoral artery through the use of a digital image processing system for vascular angiograms. The film digitizer uses an electronic image dissector camera to scan the angiogram and convert the recorded optical density information into a numerical format. Another processing step involves locating the vessel edges from the digital image. The computer has been programmed to estimate vessel abnormality through a series of measurements, some derived primarily from the vessel edge information and others from optical density variations within the lumen shadow. These measurements are combined into an atherosclerosis index, which is found in a post-mortem study to correlate well with both visual and chemical estimates of atherosclerotic disease.

  4. Constructal vascularized structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cetkin, Erdal

    2015-06-01

    Smart features such as self-healing and selfcooling require bathing the entire volume with a coolant or/and healing agent. Bathing the entire volume is an example of point to area (or volume) flows. Point to area flows cover all the distributing and collecting kinds of flows, i.e. inhaling and exhaling, mining, river deltas, energy distribution, distribution of products on the landscape and so on. The flow resistances of a point to area flow can be decreased by changing the design with the guidance of the constructal law, which is the law of the design evolution in time. In this paper, how the flow resistances (heat, fluid and stress) can be decreased by using the constructal law is shown with examples. First, the validity of two assumptions is surveyed: using temperature independent Hess-Murray rule and using constant diameter ducts where the duct discharges fluid along its edge. Then, point to area types of flows are explained by illustrating the results of two examples: fluid networks and heating an area. Last, how the structures should be vascularized for cooling and mechanical strength is documented. This paper shows that flow resistances can be decreased by morphing the shape freely without any restrictions or generic algorithms.

  5. Vascular imaging in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Levitt, K; Vivas, L; Courtney, B; Connelly, K A

    2014-04-01

    Diabetes is a global epidemic affecting individuals of all socioeconomic backgrounds. Despite intensive efforts, morbidity and mortality secondary to the micro- and macrovascular complications remain unacceptably high. As a result, the use of imaging modalities to determine the underlying pathophysiology, early onset of complications, and disease progression has become an integral component of the management of such individuals. Echocardiography, stress echocardiography, and nuclear imaging have been the mainstay of noninvasive cardiovascular imaging tools to detect myocardial ischemia, but newer modalities such as cardiac MRI, cardiac CT, and PET imaging provide incremental information not available with standard imaging. While vascular imaging to detect cerebrovascular and peripheral arterial disease non-invasively has traditionally used ultrasound, CT- and MRI-based techniques are increasingly being employed. In this review, we will provide an outline of recent studies utilizing non-invasive imaging techniques to assist in disease diagnosis as well as monitoring disease progression. In addition, we will review the evidence for newer modalities such as MR spectroscopy, 3D intravascular ultrasound, and optical coherence tomography that provide exquisite detail of metabolic function and coronary anatomy not available with standard imaging, but that have not yet become mainstream. PMID:24493479

  6. Fracture-permeability behavior of shale

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, J. William; Lei, Zhou; Rougier, Esteban; Mori, Hiroko; Viswanathan, Hari

    2015-05-08

    The fracture-permeability behavior of Utica shale, an important play for shale gas and oil, was investigated using a triaxial coreflood device and X-ray tomography in combination with finite-discrete element modeling (FDEM). Fractures generated in both compression and in a direct-shear configuration allowed permeability to be measured across the faces of cylindrical core. Shale with bedding planes perpendicular to direct-shear loading developed complex fracture networks and peak permeability of 30 mD that fell to 5 mD under hydrostatic conditions. Shale with bedding planes parallel to shear loading developed simple fractures with peak permeability as high as 900 mD. In addition to the large anisotropy in fracture permeability, the amount of deformation required to initiate fractures was greater for perpendicular layering (about 1% versus 0.4%), and in both cases activation of existing fractures are more likely sources of permeability in shale gas plays or damaged caprock in CO? sequestration because of the significant deformation required to form new fracture networks. FDEM numerical simulations were able to replicate the main features of the fracturing processes while showing the importance of fluid penetration into fractures as well as layering in determining fracture patterns.

  7. Fracture-permeability behavior of shale

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Carey, J. William; Lei, Zhou; Rougier, Esteban; Mori, Hiroko; Viswanathan, Hari

    2015-05-08

    The fracture-permeability behavior of Utica shale, an important play for shale gas and oil, was investigated using a triaxial coreflood device and X-ray tomography in combination with finite-discrete element modeling (FDEM). Fractures generated in both compression and in a direct-shear configuration allowed permeability to be measured across the faces of cylindrical core. Shale with bedding planes perpendicular to direct-shear loading developed complex fracture networks and peak permeability of 30 mD that fell to 5 mD under hydrostatic conditions. Shale with bedding planes parallel to shear loading developed simple fractures with peak permeability as high as 900 mD. In addition tomore »the large anisotropy in fracture permeability, the amount of deformation required to initiate fractures was greater for perpendicular layering (about 1% versus 0.4%), and in both cases activation of existing fractures are more likely sources of permeability in shale gas plays or damaged caprock in CO? sequestration because of the significant deformation required to form new fracture networks. FDEM numerical simulations were able to replicate the main features of the fracturing processes while showing the importance of fluid penetration into fractures as well as layering in determining fracture patterns.« less

  8. Biomaterials for vascular tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, Swathi; Chaikof, Elliot L

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality in the USA. The limited availability of healthy autologous vessels for bypass grafting procedures has led to the fabrication of prosthetic vascular conduits. While synthetic polymers have been extensively studied as substitutes in vascular engineering, they fall short of meeting the biological challenges at the blood–material interface. Various tissue engineering strategies have emerged to address these flaws and increase long-term patency of vascular grafts. Vascular cell seeding of scaffolds and the design of bioactive polymers for in situ arterial regeneration have yielded promising results. This article describes the advances made in biomaterials design to generate suitable materials that not only match the mechanical properties of native vasculature, but also promote cell growth, facilitate extracellular matrix production and inhibit thrombogenicity. PMID:20017698

  9. Social media in vascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Indes, Jeffrey E; Gates, Lindsay; Mitchell, Erica L; Muhs, Bart E

    2013-04-01

    There has been a tremendous growth in the use of social media to expand the visibility of various specialties in medicine. The purpose of this paper is to describe the latest updates on some current applications of social media in the practice of vascular surgery as well as existing limitations of use. This investigation demonstrates that the use of social networking sites appears to have a positive impact on vascular practice, as is evident through the incorporation of this technology at the Cleveland Clinic and by the Society for Vascular Surgery into their approach to patient care and physician communication. Overall, integration of social networking technology has current and future potential to be used to promote goals, patient awareness, recruitment for clinical trials, and professionalism within the specialty of vascular surgery. PMID:23321344

  10. Experimental Branch Retinal Vein Occlusion Induces Upstream Pericyte Loss and Vascular Destabilization

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, Elisa; Raoul, William; Calippe, Bertrand; Sahel, José-Alain; Guillonneau, Xavier; Paques, Michel; Sennlaub, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Aims Branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) leads to extensive vascular remodeling and is important cause of visual impairment. Although the vascular morphological changes following experimental vein occlusion have been described in a variety of models using angiography, the underlying cellular events are ill defined. Methods and Results We here show that laser-induced experimental BRVO in mice leads to a wave of TUNEL-positive endothelial cell (EC) apoptosis in the upstream vascular network associated with a transient edema and hemorrhages. Subsequently, we observe an induction of EC proliferation within the dilated vein and capillaries, detected by EdU incorporation, and the edema resolves. However, the pericytes of the upstream capillaries are severely reduced, which was associated with continuing EC apoptosis and proliferation. The vascular remodeling was associated with increased expression of TGF?, TSP-1, but also FGF2 expression. Exposure of the experimental animals to hypoxia, when pericyte (PC) dropout had occurred, led to a dramatic increase in endothelial cell proliferation, confirming the vascular instability induced by the experimental BRVO. Conclusion Experimental BRVO leads to acute endothelial cells apoptosis and increased permeability. Subsequently the upstream vascular network remains destabilized, characterized by pericyte dropout, un-physiologically high endothelial cells turnover and sensitivity to hypoxia. These early changes might pave the way for capillary loss and subsequent chronic ischemia and edema that characterize the late stage disease. PMID:26208283

  11. Infrared Imaging Of Vascular Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Colin H.

    1988-10-01

    Infrared thermography is a useful method of recording skin temperature distributions. It can be shown that the thermal pattern of an individual is a complex function of surface topography, anatomy, blood perfusion in subcutaneous tissues, superficial vascularity and environmental temperature. A variety of physiological and pathological factors can also affect skin temperature. Three examples are illustrated: the scrotal varicocele, vascular changes associated with malignancy and the effect of large doses of ionizing radiation on the skin.

  12. Measurement of retinal vascular permeability in a rat model using spectroscopic optical coherence tomography

    E-print Network

    Choi, Woo Jhon

    2011-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT), a diagnostic tool which can perform non-contact, noninvasive, cross-sectional imaging of the retina and anterior eye in real time, has dramatically improved in its resolution and speed ...

  13. Permeability of the blood-ocular barrier in adolescent and adult diabetic patients.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, A; Ishiko, S; Kojima, M; Ogasawara, H

    1993-01-01

    The permeability of the blood-ocular barrier was examined by fluorophotometry in adolescent and adult diabetic patients before the onset of retinopathy. The adolescent group consisted of 52 eyes of 52 insulin dependent diabetic patients aged 11 to 19 years and a control group of 10 eyes of 10 normal adolescents. The adult group consisted of 74 eyes of 74 non-insulin dependent diabetics and a control group of 30 eyes of 30 normal adults. The increase in lens autofluorescence in the adolescent diabetic patients compared with the controls was striking and showed a significant positive correlation (r = 0.79, p < 0.0001) with the duration of diabetes. Anterior chamber (AQ) values, an index of the permeability of the blood-aqueous barrier (BAB), increased in the adolescent diabetic patients compared with the controls and showed a significant positive correlation with glycosylated haemoglobin levels. No significant differences from the controls were observed regarding the permeability of the blood-retinal barrier (BRB). In the adult group there was no significant difference in either the permeability of the BRB or the AQ values between the diabetic and the control groups. Our results suggest that adolescent diabetic patients differ from adults in that BAB permeability is increased before the onset of retinopathy, suggesting that this is the cause of the striking increase in lens autofluorescence. PMID:8457507

  14. Dynamic MRI using iron oxide nanoparticles to assess early vascular effects of antiangiogenic versus corticosteroid treatment in a glioma model.

    PubMed

    Varallyay, Csanad G; Muldoon, Leslie L; Gahramanov, Seymur; Wu, Yingjen J; Goodman, James A; Li, Xin; Pike, Martin M; Neuwelt, Edward A

    2009-04-01

    The vascular effects of antiangiogenic treatment may pose problems for evaluating brain tumor response based on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We used serial dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI at 12 T to assess vascular responses to antiangiogenic versus steroid therapy. Athymic rats with intracerebral U87MG human glioma (n=17) underwent susceptibility-weighted perfusion MRI with ferumoxytol, a solely intravascular ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) nanoparticle, followed by T1-weighted dynamic gadodiamide-enhanced MRI to measure vascular permeability. Rats were imaged before and after 24, 48, and 72 h of treatment with the antiangiogenic agent bevacizumab or the corticosteroid dexamethasone. Contrast agent extravasation was seen rapidly after gadodiamide, but not with ferumoxytol administration. Bevacizumab significantly decreased the blood volume and decreased permeability in tumors as determined by increased time-to-peak enhancement. A single dose of 45 mg/kg bevacizumab resulted in changes analogous to dexamethasone given in an extremely high dose (12 mg/kg per day), and was significantly more effective than dexamethasone at 2 mg/kg per day. We conclude that dynamic perfusion MRI measurements with ferumoxytol USPIO to assess cerebral blood volume, along with dynamic gadodiamide-enhanced MR to assess vascular permeability, hold promise in more accurately detecting therapeutic responses to antiangiogenic therapy. PMID:19142191

  15. The effect of interstitial pressure on therapeutic agent transport: coupling with the tumor blood and lymphatic vascular systems

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Min; Frieboes, Hermann B.; Chaplain, Mark A.J.; McDougall, Steven R.; Cristini, Vittorio; Lowengrub, John

    2014-01-01

    Vascularized tumor growth is characterized by both abnormal interstitial fluid flow and the associated interstitial fluid pressure (IFP). Here, we study the effect that these conditions have on the transport of therapeutic agents during chemotherapy. We apply our recently developed vascular tumor growth model which couples a continuous growth component with a discrete angiogenesis model to show that hypertensive IFP is a physical barrier that may hinder vascular extravasation of agents through transvascular fluid flux convection, which drives the agents away from the tumor. This result is consistent with previous work using simpler models without blood flow or lymphatic drainage. We consider the vascular/interstitial/lymphatic fluid dynamics to show that tumors with larger lymphatic resistance increase the agent concentration more rapidly while also experiencing faster washout. In contrast, tumors with smaller lymphatic resistance accumulate less agents but are able to retain them for a longer time. The agent availability (area-under-the curve, or AUC) increases for less permeable agents as lymphatic resistance increases, and correspondingly decreases for more permeable agents. We also investigate the effect of vascular pathologies on agent transport. We show that elevated vascular hydraulic conductivity contributes to the highest AUC when the agent is less permeable, but leads to lower AUC when the agent is more permeable. We find that elevated interstitial hydraulic conductivity contributes to low AUC in general regardless of the transvascular agent transport capability. We also couple the agent transport with the tumor dynamics to simulate chemotherapy with the same vascularized tumor under different vascular pathologies. We show that tumors with an elevated interstitial hydraulic conductivity alone require the strongest dosage to shrink. We further show that tumors with elevated vascular hydraulic conductivity are more hypoxic during therapy and that the response slows down as the tumor shrinks due to the heterogeneity and low concentration of agents in the tumor interior compared with the cases where other pathological effects may combine to flatten the IFP and thus reduce the heterogeneity. We conclude that dual normalizations of the micronevironment - both the vasculature and the interstitium - are needed to maximize the effects of chemotherapy, while normalization of only one of these may be insufficient to overcome the physical resistance and thus leads to sub-optimal outcomes. PMID:24751927

  16. The effect of interstitial pressure on therapeutic agent transport: coupling with the tumor blood and lymphatic vascular systems.

    PubMed

    Wu, Min; Frieboes, Hermann B; Chaplain, Mark A J; McDougall, Steven R; Cristini, Vittorio; Lowengrub, John S

    2014-08-21

    Vascularized tumor growth is characterized by both abnormal interstitial fluid flow and the associated interstitial fluid pressure (IFP). Here, we study the effect that these conditions have on the transport of therapeutic agents during chemotherapy. We apply our recently developed vascular tumor growth model which couples a continuous growth component with a discrete angiogenesis model to show that hypertensive IFP is a physical barrier that may hinder vascular extravasation of agents through transvascular fluid flux convection, which drives the agents away from the tumor. This result is consistent with previous work using simpler models without blood flow or lymphatic drainage. We consider the vascular/interstitial/lymphatic fluid dynamics to show that tumors with larger lymphatic resistance increase the agent concentration more rapidly while also experiencing faster washout. In contrast, tumors with smaller lymphatic resistance accumulate less agents but are able to retain them for a longer time. The agent availability (area-under-the curve, or AUC) increases for less permeable agents as lymphatic resistance increases, and correspondingly decreases for more permeable agents. We also investigate the effect of vascular pathologies on agent transport. We show that elevated vascular hydraulic conductivity contributes to the highest AUC when the agent is less permeable, but to lower AUC when the agent is more permeable. We find that elevated interstitial hydraulic conductivity contributes to low AUC in general regardless of the transvascular agent transport capability. We also couple the agent transport with the tumor dynamics to simulate chemotherapy with the same vascularized tumor under different vascular pathologies. We show that tumors with an elevated interstitial hydraulic conductivity alone require the strongest dosage to shrink. We further show that tumors with elevated vascular hydraulic conductivity are more hypoxic during therapy and that the response slows down as the tumor shrinks due to the heterogeneity and low concentration of agents in the tumor interior compared with the cases where other pathological effects may combine to flatten the IFP and thus reduce the heterogeneity. We conclude that dual normalizations of the micronevironment - both the vasculature and the interstitium - are needed to maximize the effects of chemotherapy, while normalization of only one of these may be insufficient to overcome the physical resistance and may thus lead to sub-optimal outcomes. PMID:24751927

  17. Vascular endothelial growth factor coordinates islet innervation via vascular scaffolding

    PubMed Central

    Reinert, Rachel B.; Cai, Qing; Hong, Ji-Young; Plank, Jennifer L.; Aamodt, Kristie; Prasad, Nripesh; Aramandla, Radhika; Dai, Chunhua; Levy, Shawn E.; Pozzi, Ambra; Labosky, Patricia A.; Wright, Christopher V. E.; Brissova, Marcela; Powers, Alvin C.

    2014-01-01

    Neurovascular alignment is a common anatomical feature of organs, but the mechanisms leading to this arrangement are incompletely understood. Here, we show that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling profoundly affects both vascularization and innervation of the pancreatic islet. In mature islets, nerves are closely associated with capillaries, but the islet vascularization process during embryonic organogenesis significantly precedes islet innervation. Although a simple neuronal meshwork interconnects the developing islet clusters as they begin to form at E14.5, the substantial ingrowth of nerve fibers into islets occurs postnatally, when islet vascularization is already complete. Using genetic mouse models, we demonstrate that VEGF regulates islet innervation indirectly through its effects on intra-islet endothelial cells. Our data indicate that formation of a VEGF-directed, intra-islet vascular plexus is required for development of islet innervation, and that VEGF-induced islet hypervascularization leads to increased nerve fiber ingrowth. Transcriptome analysis of hypervascularized islets revealed an increased expression of extracellular matrix components and axon guidance molecules, with these transcripts being enriched in the islet-derived endothelial cell population. We propose a mechanism for coordinated neurovascular development within pancreatic islets, in which endocrine cell-derived VEGF directs the patterning of intra-islet capillaries during embryogenesis, forming a scaffold for the postnatal ingrowth of essential autonomic nerve fibers. PMID:24574008

  18. Transport in Cement:Transport in Cement: Relating Permeability and PoreRelating Permeability and Pore

    E-print Network

    Petta, Jason

    Transport in Cement:Transport in Cement: Relating Permeability and PoreRelating Permeability, 2004 #12;OutlineOutline Cement Manufacturing and StructureCement Manufacturing and Structure ofofCalcinated in rotaryin rotary kiln at 1500 C for 30kiln at 1500 C for 30-- 40 minutes40 minutes Produces Cement

  19. Permeability-controlled optical modulator with Tri-gate metamaterial: control of permeability on InP-based photonic integration platform

    PubMed Central

    Amemiya, Tomohiro; Ishikawa, Atsushi; Kanazawa, Toru; Kang, JoonHyung; Nishiyama, Nobuhiko; Miyamoto, Yasuyuki; Tanaka, Takuo; Arai, Shigehisa

    2015-01-01

    Metamaterials are artificially structured materials that can produce innovative optical functionalities such as negative refractive index, invisibility cloaking, and super-resolution imaging. Combining metamaterials with semiconductors enables us to develop novel optoelectronic devices based on the new concept of operation. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of a permeability-controlled waveguide optical modulator consisting of an InGaAsP/InP Mach-Zehnder interferometer with ‘tri-gate’ metamaterial attached on its arms. The tri-gate metamaterial consists of metal resonator arrays and triple-gate field effect elements. It changes its permeability with a change in the controlling gate voltage, thereby changing the refractive index of the interferometer arm to switch the modulator with an extinction ratio of 6.9?dB at a wavelength of 1.55??m. The result shows the feasibility of InP-based photonic integrated devices that can produce new functions by controlling their permeability as well as their permittivity. PMID:25797041

  20. The long noncoding RNA TUG1 regulates blood-tumor barrier permeability by targeting miR-144

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Heng; Xue, Yixue; Wang, Ping; Wang, Zhenhua; Li, Zhen; Hu, Yi; Li, Zhiqing; Shang, Xiuli; Liu, Yunhui

    2015-01-01

    Blood-tumor barrier (BTB) limits the delivery of chemotherapeutic agent to brain tumor tissues. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been shown to play critical regulatory roles in various biologic processes of tumors. However, the role of lncRNAs in BTB permeability is unclear. LncRNA TUG1 (taurine upregulated gene 1) was highly expressed in glioma vascular endothelial cells from glioma tissues. It also upregulated in glioma co-cultured endothelial cells (GEC) from BTB model in vitro. Knockdown of TUG1 increased BTB permeability, and meanwhile down-regulated the expression of the tight junction proteins ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-5. Both bioinformatics and luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that TUG1 influenced BTB permeability via binding to miR-144. Furthermore, Knockdown of TUG1 also down-regulated Heat shock transcription factor 2 (HSF2), a transcription factor of the heat shock transcription factor family, which was defined as a direct and functional downstream target of miR-144. HSF2 up-regulated the promoter activities and interacted with the promoters of ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-5 in GECs. In conclusion, our results indicate that knockdown of TUG1 increased BTB permeability via binding to miR-144 and then reducing EC tight junction protein expression by targeting HSF2. Thus, TUG1 may represent a useful future therapeutic target for enhancing BTB permeability. PMID:26078353

  1. The long noncoding RNA TUG1 regulates blood-tumor barrier permeability by targeting miR-144.

    PubMed

    Cai, Heng; Xue, Yixue; Wang, Ping; Wang, Zhenhua; Li, Zhen; Hu, Yi; Li, Zhiqing; Shang, Xiuli; Liu, Yunhui

    2015-08-14

    Blood-tumor barrier (BTB) limits the delivery of chemotherapeutic agent to brain tumor tissues. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been shown to play critical regulatory roles in various biologic processes of tumors. However, the role of lncRNAs in BTB permeability is unclear. LncRNA TUG1 (taurine upregulated gene 1) was highly expressed in glioma vascular endothelial cells from glioma tissues. It also upregulated in glioma co-cultured endothelial cells (GEC) from BTB model in vitro. Knockdown of TUG1 increased BTB permeability, and meanwhile down-regulated the expression of the tight junction proteins ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-5. Both bioinformatics and luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that TUG1 influenced BTB permeability via binding to miR-144. Furthermore, Knockdown of TUG1 also down-regulated Heat shock transcription factor 2 (HSF2), a transcription factor of the heat shock transcription factor family, which was defined as a direct and functional downstream target of miR-144. HSF2 up-regulated the promoter activities and interacted with the promoters of ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-5 in GECs. In conclusion, our results indicate that knockdown of TUG1 increased BTB permeability via binding to miR-144 and then reducing EC tight junction protein expression by targeting HSF2. Thus, TUG1 may represent a useful future therapeutic target for enhancing BTB permeability. PMID:26078353

  2. Analysis of Basis Weight Uniformity of Microfiber Nonwovens and Its Impact on Permeability and Filtration Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirnasr, Elham

    It is widely recognized that nonwoven basis weight non-uniformity affects various properties of nonwovens. However, few studies can be found in this topic. The development of uniformity definition and measurement methods and the study of their impact on various web properties such as filtration properties and air permeability would be beneficial both in industrial applications and in academia. They can be utilized as a quality control tool and would provide insights about nonwoven behaviors that cannot be solely explained by average values. Therefore, for quantifying nonwoven web basis weight uniformity we purse to develop an optical analytical tool. The quadrant method and clustering analysis was utilized in an image analysis scheme to help define "uniformity" and its spatial variation. Implementing the quadrant method in an image analysis system allows the establishment of a uniformity index that can be used to quantify the degree of uniformity. Clustering analysis has also been modified and verified using uniform and random simulated images with known parameters. Number of clusters and cluster properties such as cluster size, member and density was determined. We also utilized this new measurement method to evaluate uniformity of nonwovens produced with different processes and investigated impacts of uniformity on filtration and permeability. The results of quadrant method shows that uniformity index computed from quadrant method demonstrate a good range for non-uniformity of nonwoven webs. Clustering analysis is also been applied on reference nonwoven with known visual uniformity. From clustering analysis results, cluster size is promising to be used as uniformity parameter. It is been shown that non-uniform nonwovens has provide lager cluster size than uniform nonwovens. It was been tried to find a relationship between web properties and uniformity index (as a web characteristic). To achieve this, filtration properties, air permeability, solidity and uniformity index of meltblown and spunbond samples was measured. Results for filtration test show some deviation between theoretical and experimental filtration efficiency by considering different types of fiber diameter. This deviation can occur due to variation in basis weight non-uniformity. So an appropriate theory is required to predict the variation of filtration efficiency with respect to non-uniformity of nonwoven filter media. And the results for air permeability test showed that uniformity index determined by quadrant method and measured properties have some relationship. In the other word, air permeability decreases as uniformity index on nonwoven web increase.

  3. Brain perfusion and permeability in patients with advanced, refractory glioblastoma treated with lomustine and the transforming growth factor-? receptor I kinase inhibitor LY2157299 monohydrate

    PubMed Central

    SEPULVEDA-SANCHEZ, JUAN; RAMOS, ANA; HILARIO, AMAYA; DE VELASCO, GUILLERMO; CASTELLANO, DANIEL; GARCIA DE LA TORRE, MARTA; RODON, JORDI; LAHN, MICHAEL F.

    2015-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-? (TGF-?) signaling is associated with tumor progression and vascularization in malignant glioma. In the present study, magnetic resonance imaging was used to evaluate changes in the size and vascularity of glioblastomas in 12 patients who were treated with lomustine and the novel inhibitor of TGF-? signaling, LY2157299 monohydrate. A response in tumor size was observed in 2 of the 12 patients; in 1 of these 2 patients, a reduction in vascular permeability and perfusion was also detected. The effect was observed following 4 cycles of treatment (~3 months). Changes in vascularity have not previously been attributed to treatment with lomustine; therefore, the effect may be associated with LY2157299 treatment. LY2157299 does not appear to have an anti-angiogenic effect when combined with lomustine, and hence may have a different mechanism of action profile compared with anti-angiogenic drugs. PMID:26137087

  4. Intestinal permeability is increased in bronchial asthma

    PubMed Central

    Hijazi, Z; Molla, A; Al-Habashi, H; Muawad, W; Molla, A; Sharma, P

    2004-01-01

    Background: Increased intestinal permeability has been reported in one study of adult asthmatics. Aim: To determine whether children with asthma have altered intestinal permeability. Methods: Thirty two asthmatic children, and 32 sex and age matched controls were recruited. The dual sugar (lactulose and mannitol) test was used to evaluate intestinal permeability, and the percentage of ingested lactulose (L) and mannitol (M) in the urine, and the L:M ratio were determined. All patients were skin prick tested for common aeroallergens, and specific IgE to some food items was determined. Results: The median value of L in asthmatic children (2.29, IQR 0.91–4.07) was significantly higher than that in controls (0.69, IQR 0.45–1.08), and that of M was almost similar. The ratio L:M was significantly higher in asthmatic children (0.20, IQR 0.11–0.40) than in controls (0.06, IQR 0.04–0.09). Intestinal permeability did not correlate with eczema, inhaled steroids, positive skin prick test to aeroallergens, or severity of asthma. Conclusions: Intestinal permeability is increased in children with asthma, suggesting that the whole mucosal system may be affected. PMID:14977697

  5. Honeycomb Core Permeability Under Mechanical Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, David E.; Raman, V. V.; Venkat, Venki S.; Sankaran, Sankara N.

    1997-01-01

    A method for characterizing the air permeability of sandwich core materials as a function of applied shear stress was developed. The core material for the test specimens was either Hexcel HRP-3/16-8.0 and or DuPont Korex-1/8-4.5 and was nominally one-half inch thick and six inches square. The facesheets where made of Hercules' AS4/8552 graphite/epoxy (Gr/Ep) composites and were nominally 0.059-in. thick. Cytec's Metalbond 1515-3M epoxy film adhesive was used for co-curing the facesheets to the core. The permeability of the specimens during both static (tension) and dynamic (reversed and non-reversed) shear loads were measured. The permeability was measured as the rate of air flow through the core from a circular 1-in2 area of the core exposed to an air pressure of 10.0 psig. In both the static and dynamic testing, the Korex core experienced sudden increases in core permeability corresponding to a core catastrophic failure, while the URP core experienced a gradual increase in the permeability prior to core failure. The Korex core failed at lower loads than the HRP core both in the transverse and ribbon directions.

  6. Adverse Outcome Pathways for Embryonic Vascular Disruption and Alternative Methods to Identify Chemical Vascular Disruptor

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemically induced vascular toxicity during embryonic development can result in a wide range of adverse prenatal outcomes. We used information from genetic mouse models linked to phenotypic outcomes and a vascular toxicity knowledge base to construct an embryonic vascular disrupt...

  7. Vascular changes in hard palate sialolipoma: Sialoangiolipoma or vascular malformation?

    PubMed Central

    Handra-Luca, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Palate sialolipomas are rare. Less than 10 cases located in the hard palate are reported to our knowledge. We report a case of hard palate sialolipoma, peculiar by the intratumor vascular patterns. A 67-year-old man presented with a 1.5 cm lesion of the oral hard palate. The lesion was surgically resected. On microscopy, the lesion, partly encapsulated, consisted of a proliferation of mature adipocytes containing normal minor salivary gland tissue and branching intratumoral vessels of varied size with irregularly thickened wall and papillary projections or tufts. The microscopic features of the tumor we report suggest that vascular malformation-like patterns may occur in sialolipomas of the hard palate. This morphological vascular peculiarity should be acknowledged since it may represent source of hemorrhage. PMID:26604516

  8. Interstitial Fluid Flow and Drug Delivery in Vascularized Tumors: A Computational Model

    PubMed Central

    Welter, Michael; Rieger, Heiko

    2013-01-01

    Interstitial fluid is a solution that bathes and surrounds the human cells and provides them with nutrients and a way of waste removal. It is generally believed that elevated tumor interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) is partly responsible for the poor penetration and distribution of therapeutic agents in solid tumors, but the complex interplay of extravasation, permeabilities, vascular heterogeneities and diffusive and convective drug transport remains poorly understood. Here we consider–with the help of a theoretical model–the tumor IFP, interstitial fluid flow (IFF) and its impact upon drug delivery within tumor depending on biophysical determinants such as vessel network morphology, permeabilities and diffusive vs. convective transport. We developed a vascular tumor growth model, including vessel co-option, regression, and angiogenesis, that we extend here by the interstitium (represented by a porous medium obeying Darcy's law) and sources (vessels) and sinks (lymphatics) for IFF. With it we compute the spatial variation of the IFP and IFF and determine its correlation with the vascular network morphology and physiological parameters like vessel wall permeability, tissue conductivity, distribution of lymphatics etc. We find that an increased vascular wall conductivity together with a reduction of lymph function leads to increased tumor IFP, but also that the latter does not necessarily imply a decreased extravasation rate: Generally the IF flow rate is positively correlated with the various conductivities in the system. The IFF field is then used to determine the drug distribution after an injection via a convection diffusion reaction equation for intra- and extracellular concentrations with parameters guided by experimental data for the drug Doxorubicin. We observe that the interplay of convective and diffusive drug transport can lead to quite unexpected effects in the presence of a heterogeneous, compartmentalized vasculature. Finally we discuss various strategies to increase drug exposure time of tumor cells. PMID:23940570

  9. Immunohistochemical vascular factor expression in canine inflammatory mammary carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Camacho, L; Peña, L; Gil, A González; Martín-Ruiz, A; Dunner, S; Illera, J C

    2014-07-01

    Human inflammatory breast carcinoma (IBC) and canine inflammatory mammary carcinoma (IMC) are considered the most malignant types of breast cancer. IMC has similar characteristics to IBC; hence, IMC has been suggested as a model to study the human disease. To compare the angiogenic and angioinvasive features of IMC with non-IMC, 3 canine mammary tumor xenograft models in female SCID mice were developed: IMC, comedocarcinoma, and osteosarcoma. Histopathological and immunohistochemical characterization of both primary canine tumors and xenografts using cellular markers pancytokeratin, cytokeratin 14, vimentin, and ?-smooth muscle actin and vascular factors (VEGF-A, VEGF-D, VEGFR-3, and COX-2) was performed. Tumor cell proliferation index was measured by the Ki-67 marker. The xenograft models reproduced histological features found in the primary canine tumor and preserved the original immunophenotype. IMC xenografts showed a high invasive character with tumor emboli in the dermis, edema, and occasional observations of ulceration. In addition, compared with osteosarcoma and comedocarcinoma, the IMC model showed the highest vascular factor expression associated with a high proliferation index. Likewise, IMC xenografts showed higher COX-2 expression associated with VEGF-D and VEGFR-3, as well as a higher presence of dermal lymphatic tumor emboli, suggesting COX-2 participation in IMC lymphangiogenesis. These results provide additional evidence to consider vascular factors, their receptors, and COX-2 as therapeutic targets for IBC. PMID:24048323

  10. The effect of heat on skin permeability

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung-Hwan; Lee, Jeong-Woo; Kim, Yeu-Chun; Prausnitz, Mark R.

    2008-01-01

    Although the effects of long exposure (? 1 s) to moderate temperatures (? 100 °C) have been well characterized, recent studies suggest that shorter exposure (< 1 s) to higher temperatures (> 100 °C) can dramatically increase skin permeability. Previous studies suggest that by keeping exposures short, thermal damage can be localized to the stratum corneum without damaging deeper tissue. Initial clinical trials have progressed to Phase II (see http://clinicaltrials.gov), which indicates the procedure can be safe. Because the effect of heating under these conditions has received little systematic or mechanistic study, we heated full-thickness skin, epidermis and stratum corneum samples from human and porcine cadavers to temperatures ranging from 100°C to 315°C for times ranging from 100 ms to 5 s. Tissue samples were analyzed using skin permeability measurements, differential scanning calorimetry, thermomechanical analysis, thermal gravimetric analysis, brightfield and confocal microscopy, and histology. Skin permeability was shown to be a very strong function of temperature and a less strong function of the duration of heating. At optimal conditions used in this study, transdermal delivery of calcein was increased up to 760-fold by rapidly heating the skin at high temperature. More specifically, skin permeability was increased (I) by a few fold after heating to approximately 100°C – 150°C, (II) by one to two orders of magnitude after heating to approximately 150°C – 250°C and (III) by three orders of magnitude after heating above 300°C. These permeability changes were attributed to (I) disordering of stratum corneum lipid structure, (II) disruption of stratum corneum keratin network structure and (III) decomposition and vaporization of keratin to create micron-scale holes in the stratum corneum, respectively. We conclude that heating the skin with short, high temperature pulses can increase skin permeability by orders of magnitude due to structural disruption and removal of stratum corneum. PMID:18455889

  11. Three-dimensional dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI for the accurate, extensive quantification of microvascular permeability in atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed

    Calcagno, Claudia; Lobatto, Mark E; Dyvorne, Hadrien; Robson, Philip M; Millon, Antoine; Senders, Max L; Lairez, Olivier; Ramachandran, Sarayu; Coolen, Bram F; Black, Alexandra; Mulder, Willem J M; Fayad, Zahi A

    2015-10-01

    Atherosclerotic plaques that cause stroke and myocardial infarction are characterized by increased microvascular permeability and inflammation. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) has been proposed as a method to quantify vessel wall microvascular permeability in?vivo. Until now, most DCE-MRI studies of atherosclerosis have been limited to two-dimensional (2D) multi-slice imaging. Although providing the high spatial resolution required to image the arterial vessel wall, these approaches do not allow the quantification of plaque permeability with extensive anatomical coverage, an essential feature when imaging heterogeneous diseases, such as atherosclerosis. To our knowledge, we present the first systematic evaluation of three-dimensional (3D), high-resolution, DCE-MRI for the extensive quantification of plaque permeability along an entire vascular bed, with validation in atherosclerotic rabbits. We compare two acquisitions: 3D turbo field echo (TFE) with motion-sensitized-driven equilibrium (MSDE) preparation and 3D turbo spin echo (TSE). We find 3D TFE DCE-MRI to be superior to 3D TSE DCE-MRI in terms of temporal stability metrics. Both sequences show good intra- and inter-observer reliability, and significant correlation with ex?vivo permeability measurements by Evans Blue near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF). In addition, we explore the feasibility of using compressed sensing to accelerate 3D DCE-MRI of atherosclerosis, to improve its temporal resolution and therefore the accuracy of permeability quantification. Using retrospective under-sampling and reconstructions, we show that compressed sensing alone may allow the acceleration of 3D DCE-MRI by up to four-fold. We anticipate that the development of high-spatial-resolution 3D DCE-MRI with prospective compressed sensing acceleration may allow for the more accurate and extensive quantification of atherosclerotic plaque permeability along an entire vascular bed. We foresee that this approach may allow for the comprehensive and accurate evaluation of plaque permeability in patients, and may be a useful tool to assess the therapeutic response to approved and novel drugs for cardiovascular disease. PMID:26332103

  12. Water Permeability of Asymmetric Planar Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Krylov, Andrey V.; Pohl, Peter; Zeidel, Mark L.; Hill, Warren G.

    2001-01-01

    To understand how plasma membranes may limit water flux, we have modeled the apical membrane of MDCK type 1 cells. Previous experiments demonstrated that liposomes designed to mimic the inner and outer leaflet of this membrane exhibited 18-fold lower water permeation for outer leaflet lipids than inner leaflet lipids (Hill, W.G., and M.L. Zeidel. 2000. J. Biol. Chem. 275:30176–30185), confirming that the outer leaflet is the primary barrier to permeation. If leaflets in a bilayer resist permeation independently, the following equation estimates single leaflet permeabilities: 1/PAB = 1/PA + 1/PB (Eq. l), where PAB is the permeability of a bilayer composed of leaflets A and B, PA is the permeability of leaflet A, and PB is the permeability of leaflet B. Using for the MDCK leaflet–specific liposomes gives an estimated value for the osmotic water permeability (Pf) of 4.6 × 10?4 cm/s (at 25°C) that correlated well with experimentally measured values in intact cells. We have now constructed both symmetric and asymmetric planar lipid bilayers that model the MDCK apical membrane. Water permeability across these bilayers was monitored in the immediate membrane vicinity using a Na+-sensitive scanning microelectrode and an osmotic gradient induced by addition of urea. The near-membrane concentration distribution of solute was used to calculate the velocity of water flow (Pohl, P., S.M. Saparov, and Y.N. Antonenko. 1997. Biophys. J. 72:1711–1718). At 36°C, Pf was 3.44 ± 0.35 × 10?3 cm/s for symmetrical inner leaflet membranes and 3.40 ± 0.34 × 10?4 cm/s for symmetrical exofacial membranes. From , the estimated permeability of an asymmetric membrane is 6.2 × 10?4 cm/s. Water permeability measured for the asymmetric planar bilayer was 6.7 ± 0.7 × 10?4 cm/s, which is within 10% of the calculated value. Direct experimental measurement of Pf for an asymmetric planar membrane confirms that leaflets in a bilayer offer independent and additive resistances to water permeation and validates the use of . PMID:11585847

  13. Predicting the permeability of sediments entering subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daigle, Hugh; Screaton, Elizabeth J.

    2015-07-01

    Using end-member permeabilities defined by a worldwide compilation of sediment permeabilities at convergent margins, we compare permeability predictions using a geometric mean and a two-component effective medium theory (EMT). Our implementation of EMT includes a threshold fraction of the high-permeability component that determines whether flow occurs dominantly in the high- or low-permeability component. We find that this threshold fraction in most cases is equal to the silt + sand-sized fraction of the sediment. This suggests that sediments undergoing primary consolidation tend to exhibit flow equally distributed between the high- and low-permeability components. We show that the EMT method predicts permeability better than the weighted geometric mean of the end-member values for clay fractions <0.6. This work provides insight into the microstructural controls on permeability in subducting sediments and valuable guidance for locations which lack site-specific permeability results but have available grain-size information.

  14. Where vascular meets neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Julie A; Bennett, David A

    2010-10-01

    Vascular and neurodegenerative disease commonly cooccur in older persons. We review findings from the Rush Religious Orders Study and Memory and Aging Project. Both studies enroll subjects without diagnosed dementia, perform annual evaluations, and obtain autopsies proximate to death. We found that macroscopic infarcts are common, lower the threshold for cognitive impairment, and often coexist with Alzheimer's disease pathology. We also found that vascular pathology may be associated with memory impairment and may be difficult to distinguish from clinical Alzheimer's disease. Finally, because dementia in older persons often results from mixed pathology and the clinical phenotypes overlap, some risk factors may increase risk for clinical Alzheimer's disease through an increase in vascular pathology. PMID:20876491

  15. Vascularization Strategies for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Lovett, Michael; Lee, Kyongbum; Edwards, Aurelie

    2009-01-01

    Tissue engineering is currently limited by the inability to adequately vascularize tissues in vitro or in vivo. Issues of nutrient perfusion and mass transport limitations, especially oxygen diffusion, restrict construct development to smaller than clinically relevant dimensions and limit the ability for in vivo integration. There is much interest in the field as researchers have undertaken a variety of approaches to vascularization, including material functionalization, scaffold design, microfabrication, bioreactor development, endothelial cell seeding, modular assembly, and in vivo systems. Efforts to model and measure oxygen diffusion and consumption within these engineered tissues have sought to quantitatively assess and improve these design strategies. This review assesses the current state of the field by outlining the prevailing approaches taken toward producing vascularized tissues and highlighting their strengths and weaknesses. PMID:19496677

  16. Laminins and retinal vascular development

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Malia M.; Lefebvre, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms controlling vascular development, both normal and pathological, are not yet fully understood. Many diseases, including cancer and diabetic retinopathy, involve abnormal blood vessel formation. Therefore, increasing knowledge of these mechanisms may help develop novel therapeutic targets. The identification of novel proteins or cells involved in this process would be particularly useful. The retina is an ideal model for studying vascular development because it is easy to access, particularly in rodents where this process occurs post-natally. Recent studies have suggested potential roles for laminin chains in vascular development of the retina. This review will provide an overview of these studies, demonstrating the importance of further research into the involvement of laminins in retinal blood vessel formation. PMID:23154403

  17. Fetal origin of vascular aging

    PubMed Central

    Pitale, Shailesh; Sahasrabuddhe, Anagha

    2011-01-01

    Aging is increasingly regarded as an independent risk factor for development of cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis and hypertension and their complications (e.g. MI and Stroke). It is well known that vascular disease evolve over decades with progressive accumulation of cellular and extracellular materials and many inflammatory processes. Metabolic syndrome, obesity and diabetes are conventionally recognized as risk factors for development of coronary vascular disease (CVD). These conditions are known to accelerate ageing process in general and vascular ageing in particular. Adverse events during intrauterine life may programme organ growth and favour disease later in life, popularly known as, ‘Barker's Hypothesis’. The notion of fetal programming implies that during critical periods of prenatal growth, changes in the hormonal and nutritional milieu of the conceptus may alter the full expression of the fetal genome, leading to permanent effects on a range of physiological. PMID:22145131

  18. Predicting Delirium After Vascular Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Böhner, Hinrich; Hummel, Thomas C.; Habel, Ute; Miller, Caesar; Reinbott, Stefan; Yang, Qin; Gabriel, Andrea; Friedrichs, Ralf; Müller, Eckhard E.; Ohmann, Christian; Sandmann, Wilhelm; Schneider, Frank

    2003-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study was to determine pre- and intraoperative risk factors for the development of postoperative delirium among patients undergoing aortic, carotid, and peripheral vascular surgery to predict the risk for postoperative delirium. Summary Background Data: Although postoperative delirium after vascular surgery is a frequent complication and is associated with the need for more inpatient hospital care and longer length of hospital stay, little is known about risk factors for delirium in patients undergoing vascular surgery. Methods: Pre-, intra-, and postoperative data were prospectively collected, including the first 7 postoperative days with daily follow-up by a surgeon and a psychiatrist of 153 patients undergoing elective vascular surgery. Delirium (Diagnostic and statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV) was diagnosed by the psychiatrist. Multivariate linear logistic regression and a cross validation analysis were performed to find a set of parameters to predict postoperative delirium. Results: Sixty patients (39.2%) developed postoperative delirium. The best set of predictors included the absence of supraaortic occlusive disease and hypercholesterinemia, history of a major amputation, age over 65 years, a body size of less than 170 cm, preoperative psychiatric parameters and intraoperative parameters correlated to increased blood loss. The combination of these parameters allows the estimation of an individual patients’ risk for postoperative delirium already at the end of vascular surgery with an overall accuracy of 69.9%. Conclusions: Postoperative delirium after vascular surgery is a frequent complication. A model based on pre- and intraoperative somatic and psychiatric risk factors allows prediction of the patient’s risk for developing postoperative delirium. PMID:12832977

  19. Vascular ultrasound for atherosclerosis imaging

    PubMed Central

    de Korte, Chris L.; Hansen, Hendrik H. G.; van der Steen, Anton F. W.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death in the Western world. Therefore, detection and quantification of atherosclerotic disease is of paramount importance to monitor treatment and possible prevention of acute events. Vascular ultrasound is an excellent technique to assess the geometry of vessel walls and plaques. The high temporal as well as spatial resolution allows quantification of luminal area and plaque size and volume. While carotid arteries can be imaged non-invasively, scanning of coronary arteries requires invasive intravascular catheters. Both techniques have already demonstrated their clinical applicability. Using linear array technology, detection of disease as well as monitoring of pharmaceutical treatment in carotid arteries are feasible. Data acquired with intravascular ultrasound catheters have proved to be especially beneficial in understanding the development of atherosclerotic disease in coronary arteries. With the introduction of vascular elastography not only the geometry of plaques but also the risk for rupture of plaques might be identified. These so-called vulnerable plaques are frequently not flow-limiting and rupture of these plaques is responsible for the majority of cerebral and cardiac ischaemic events. Intravascular ultrasound elastography studies have demonstrated a high correlation between high strain and vulnerable plaque features, both ex vivo and in vivo. Additionally, pharmaceutical intervention could be monitored using this technique. Non-invasive vascular elastography has recently been developed for carotid applications by using compound scanning. Validation and initial clinical evaluation is currently being performed. Since abundance of vasa vasorum (VV) is correlated with vulnerable plaque development, quantification of VV might be a unique tool to even prevent this from happening. Using ultrasound contrast agents, it has been demonstrated that VV can be identified and quantified. Although far from routine clinical application, non-invasive and intravascular ultrasound VV imaging might pave the road to prevent atherosclerotic disease in an early phase. This paper reviews the conventional vascular ultrasound techniques as well as vascular ultrasound strain and vascular ultrasound VV imaging. PMID:22866231

  20. [Damage control in vascular trauma].

    PubMed

    Henzan, Eisei

    2002-07-01

    During the era of frequent occurrence of motor vehicle accidents and criminal injuries with lethal weapons, trauma surgeons have accumulated much experience in managing severely injured victims. Very often, efforts to proceed with definitive repair at initial surgery led to patient death despite the control of anatomic bleeding. Damage control methods were thus developed to save patients who otherwise would hove died. Damage control treatment for vascular trauma patients is still in its infancy in Japan. This paper presents an overview of the relevant reports form international journals dealing with the present status of damage control methods in vascular trauma patients. PMID:12143290

  1. Intimal permeability evaluated in a short-term organ culture of diabetic guinea pig aorta

    SciTech Connect

    Schlosser, M.J.; Verlangieri, A.J.

    1988-01-01

    A novel short-term organ culture system was used to evaluate intimal permeability changes by measuring aortic (/sup 14/C)methylated albumin accumulation. Aortic plugs were removed from the upper thoracic aorta of male guinea pigs and maintained in serum-free media. The accumulation of (/sup 14/C)albumin in the intimal-medial layer was determined after a 5 h incubation. In preliminary studies, albumin recovered from intimal-injured aortic plugs was significantly greater than those from non-injured plugs. Aortic plugs from streptozotocin-treated guinea pigs, diabetic for 3 weeks, also accumulated significantly more (/sup 14/C)albumin than plugs from nondiabetic controls. Histological changes were not observed in the aorta of either the diabetic or control group. A strong significant inverse correlation was found between plasma ascorbic acid levels and (/sup 14/C)-activity recovered from aortic plugs. This study demonstrates a simple and rapid method for assessing aortic permeability changes under a well-defined in vitro system, and suggests that vascular permeability changes in the streptozotocin-diabetic guinea pig may be associated with an ascorbic acid deficit.

  2. Lipoxygenase inhibition decreases neointimal formation following vascular injury.

    PubMed

    Fujita, H; Saito, F; Sawada, T; Kushiro, T; Yagi, H; Kanmatsuse, K

    1999-11-01

    Our aim was to assess the potential role of lipoxygenase (LO) products in neointimal formation following vascular injury. We investigated the effect of LO pathway inhibition, by phenidone, on the concentration of 12- and 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12- and 5-HETE) in rat whole blood and in aortic tissue. We also examined the effect of phenidone on myoneointimal formation in balloon-injured rat carotid arteries. Phenidone significantly decreases the concentration of HETEs in aortic tissue, and decreases neointimal size even though there is no difference in the BrdU index. These data indicate that the LO product participates in developing neointima following balloon-induced vascular injury, and that the LO blocker phenidone decreases neointimal size possibly by suppressing migration of smooth muscle cells. PMID:10525127

  3. The Endothelial Transcription Factor ERG Promotes Vascular Stability and Growth through Wnt/?-Catenin Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Birdsey, Graeme M.; Shah, Aarti V.; Dufton, Neil; Reynolds, Louise E.; Osuna Almagro, Lourdes; Yang, Youwen; Aspalter, Irene M.; Khan, Samia T.; Mason, Justin C.; Dejana, Elisabetta; Göttgens, Berthold; Hodivala-Dilke, Kairbaan; Gerhardt, Holger; Adams, Ralf H.; Randi, Anna M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Blood vessel stability is essential for embryonic development; in the adult, many diseases are associated with loss of vascular integrity. The ETS transcription factor ERG drives expression of VE-cadherin and controls junctional integrity. We show that constitutive endothelial deletion of ERG (ErgcEC-KO) in mice causes embryonic lethality with vascular defects. Inducible endothelial deletion of ERG (ErgiEC-KO) results in defective physiological and pathological angiogenesis in the postnatal retina and tumors, with decreased vascular stability. ERG controls the Wnt/?-catenin pathway by promoting ?-catenin stability, through signals mediated by VE-cadherin and the Wnt receptor Frizzled-4. Wnt signaling is decreased in ERG-deficient endothelial cells; activation of Wnt signaling with lithium chloride, which stabilizes ?-catenin levels, corrects vascular defects in ErgcEC-KO embryos. Finally, overexpression of ERG in vivo reduces permeability and increases stability of VEGF-induced blood vessels. These data demonstrate that ERG is an essential regulator of angiogenesis and vascular stability through Wnt signaling. PMID:25584796

  4. Broadband reflectance spectroscopy for establishing a quantitative metric of vascular leak using the Miles assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMurdy, John; Reichner, Jonathan; Mathews, Zara; Markey, Mary; Intwala, Sunny; Crawford, Gregory

    2009-09-01

    Monitoring the physiological effects of biological mediators on vascular permeability is important for identifying potential targets for antivascular leak therapy. This therapy is relevant to treatments for pulmonary edema and other disorders. Current methods of quantifying vascular leak are in vitro and do not allow repeated measurement of the same animal. Using an in vivo diffuse reflectance optical method allows pharmacokinetic analysis of candidate antileak molecules. Here, vascular leak is assessed in mice and rats by using the Miles assay and introducing irritation both topically using mustard oil and intradermally using vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The severity of the leak is assessed using broadband diffuse reflectance spectroscopy with a fiber reflectance probe. Postprocessing techniques are applied to extract an artificial quantitative metric of leak from reflectance spectra at vascular leak sites on the skin of the animal. This leak metric is calculated with respect to elapsed time from irritation in both mustard oil and VEGF treatments on mice and VEGF treatments on rats, showing a repeatable increase in leak metric with leak severity. Furthermore, effects of pressure on the leak metric are observed to have minimal effect on the reflectance spectra, while spatial positioning showed spatially nonuniform leak sites.

  5. Changes in the vascular network of the oral epithelium and reduced enamel epithelium during tooth eruption.

    PubMed

    Kishi, Y; Takahashi, K; Trowbridge, H O

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the vascular network beneath the reduced enamel epithelium (REE) and oral epithelium (OE) during tooth eruption. Using the corrosive-resin casting method, vascular resin casts were prepared from premolar and molar teeth of the dog and examined by scanning electron microscopy. The vascular network beneath the REE is arranged in two layers, an inner layer consisting of a dense capillary network and an outer layer composed primarily of arterioles and venules. Throughout tooth eruption, the configuration of the vessels of the inner layer is continually changing from a network of capillary loops to a fishnet pattern, whereas the arrangement of the vessels of the outer layer remains fairly constant. When the crown emerges into the oral cavity, leakage of resin from the vessels provides evidence of increased vascular permeability, suggesting the presence of inflammation within the marginal gingiva. When root development is nearly complete, the vascular network adjacent to the REE becomes continuous with that of the OE. The inner margin of the free gingiva receives its blood supply from this network, and the vessels of this network also give off branches which anastomose with the capillary network of the periodontal ligament. PMID:8984826

  6. Estimating Plastic Film Permeability Under Field Conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fumigant emission is an important air quality and human health concern. Plastic films are used to reduce emissions. Laboratory tests have shown large differences in permeability between various films, including the typical polyethylene films (PEs), virtually impermeable films (VIFs), and semi-impe...

  7. EVALUATION OF PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER PERFORMANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The permeable reactive barrier (PRB) technology represents a passive option for long-term treatment of ground-water contamination. PRBs are a potentially more cost-effective treatment option for a variety of dissolved contaminants, such as certain types of chlorinated solvents, ...

  8. PRECISION AND RELIABILITY OF LABORATORY PERMEABILITY MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A limited set of laboratory test data on clay liner permeabilities was gathered from six sources to create a data bank suitable for a preliminary statistical analysis. The collected data were also used to survey the most commonly used permeameters and testing methods for clay lin...

  9. Permeable pavement research – Edison, New Jersey

    EPA Science Inventory

    These are the slides for the New York City Concrete Promotional Council Pervious Concrete Seminar presentation. The basis for the project, the monitoring design and some preliminary monitoring data from the permeable pavement parking lot at the Edison Environmental Center are pre...

  10. SINGLE-INTERVAL GAS PERMEABILITY ESTIMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Single-interval, steady-steady-state gas permeability testing requires estimation of pressure at a screened interval which in turn requires measurement of friction factors as a function of mass flow rate. Friction factors can be obtained by injecting air through a length of pipe...

  11. Enhanced Antitumor Efficacy of a Vascular Disrupting Agent Combined with an Antiangiogenic in a Rat Liver Tumor Model Evaluated by Multiparametric MRI

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Feng; Feng, Yingmei; Zheng, Kaier; De Keyzer, Frederik; Li, Junjie; Feng, Yuanbo; Cona, Marlein Miranda; Wang, Huaijun; Jiang, Yansheng; Yu, Jie; Marchal, Guy; Verfaillie, Catherine; De Geest, Bart; Oyen, Raymond; Ni, Yicheng

    2012-01-01

    A key problem in solid tumor therapy is tumor regrowth from a residual viable rim after treatment with a vascular disrupting agent (VDA). As a potential solution, we studied a combined treatment of a VDA and antiangiogenic. This study was approved by the institutional ethical committee for the use and care of laboratory animals. Rats with implanted liver tumors were randomized into four treatment groups: 1) Zd6126 (Zd); 2) Thalidomide (Tha); 3) Zd in combination with Tha (ZdTha); and 4) controls. Multiparametric MRIs were performed and quantified before and after treatment. Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and plasma stromal cell-derived factor-1? (SDF-1?) were monitored. Tumor apoptosis, necrosis, and microvessels were verified by histopathology. A single use of Zd or Tha did not significantly delay tumor growth. The combined ZdTha showed enhanced antitumor efficacy due to synergistic effects; it induced a cumulative tumor apoptosis or necrosis, which resulted in significant delay in tumor growth and reduction in the viable tumor rim; it also reduced tumor vessel permeability; and it improved tumor hemodynamic indexes, most likely via a transient normalization of tumor vasculature induced by Tha. A stepwise linear regression analysis showed that the apparent diffusion coefficient was an independent predictor of tumor growth. We found no significant increases in Zd-induced circulating EPCs or plasma SDF-1?. ZdTha showed improved therapeutic efficacy in solid tumors compared to either agent alone. The therapeutic effects were successfully tracked in vivo with multiparametric MRI. PMID:22815943

  12. Peripheral vascular imaging and intervention

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, D. ); Orron, D.E. )

    1990-01-01

    This reference addresses the entire clinical approach to the vascular system from the diagnosis of pathology to surgery or interventional radiological management. All diagnostic imaging modalities currently available are included with specific information on how to interpret various results. It features discussions of the latest therapeutic techniques, including laser angioplasty, intravascular stents, and transluminal embolization.

  13. PPAR-? pathway to vascular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Lombard, Julian H; Cowley, Allen W

    2012-10-01

    Humans with dominant-negative (DN) mutations in PPAR-? develop early onset hypertension. A recent study by Pelham et al. (2012) shows that loss of PPAR-? repression of the Rho kinase pathway leads to altered vascular function via a smooth-muscle-dependent pathway that is independent of NO and oxidant stress. PMID:23040065

  14. Vascular effects of intermittent hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Kanagy, Nancy L

    2009-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea is characterized by repeated upper airway obstruction during sleep and affects between 5% and 20% of the population. Epidemiological studies reveal that sleep apnea and associated intermittent hypoxemia increase the risk for hypertension and vascular disease but the mechanisms underlying these effects are incompletely understood. This review reports the results of rodent models of intermittent hypoxia (IH) and relates them to the observed hemodynamic and vascular consequences of sleep apnea. These animal studies have demonstrated that IH exposure in the absence of any other comorbidity causes hypertension, endothelial dysfunction, and augmented constrictor sensitivity, all due at least in part to increased vascular oxidative stress. Animal studies have used a variety of exposure paradigms to study intermittent hypoxia and these different exposure protocols can cause hypocapnia or hypercapnia-or maintain eucapnia-with accompanying alterations in plasma pH. It appears that these different profiles of arterial blood gases can lead to divergent results but the impact of these differences is still being investigated. Overall, the studies in rodents have clearly demonstrated that the vascular and hemodynamic impact of intermittent hypoxia provides a strong rationale for treating clinical sleep apnea to prevent the resulting cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:19506314

  15. The primary vascular dysregulation syndrome: implications for eye diseases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Vascular dysregulation refers to the regulation of blood flow that is not adapted to the needs of the respective tissue. We distinguish primary vascular dysregulation (PVD, formerly called vasospastic syndrome) and secondary vascular dysregulation (SVD). Subjects with PVD tend to have cold extremities, low blood pressure, reduced feeling of thirst, altered drug sensitivity, increased pain sensitivity, prolonged sleep onset time, altered gene expression in the lymphocytes, signs of oxidative stress, slightly increased endothelin-1 plasma level, low body mass index and often diffuse and fluctuating visual field defects. Coldness, emotional or mechanical stress and starving can provoke symptoms. Virtually all organs, particularly the eye, can be involved. In subjects with PVD, retinal vessels are stiffer and more irregular, and both neurovascular coupling and autoregulation capacity are reduced while retinal venous pressure is often increased. Subjects with PVD have increased risk for normal-tension glaucoma, optic nerve compartment syndrome, central serous choroidopathy, Susac syndrome, retinal artery and vein occlusions and anterior ischaemic neuropathy without atherosclerosis. Further characteristics are their weaker blood–brain and blood-retinal barriers and the higher prevalence of optic disc haemorrhages and activated astrocytes. Subjects with PVD tend to suffer more often from tinnitus, muscle cramps, migraine with aura and silent myocardial ischaemic and are at greater risk for altitude sickness. While the main cause of vascular dysregulation is vascular endotheliopathy, dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system is also involved. In contrast, SVD occurs in the context of other diseases such as multiple sclerosis, retrobulbar neuritis, rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia and giant cell arteritis. Taking into consideration the high prevalence of PVD in the population and potentially linked pathologies, in the current article, the authors provide recommendations on how to effectively promote the field in order to create innovative diagnostic tools to predict the pathology and develop more efficient treatment approaches tailored to the person. PMID:23742177

  16. Glial Vascular Degeneration in CADASIL

    PubMed Central

    Brennan-Krohn, Thea; Salloway, Stephen; Correia, Stephen; Dong, Matthew; de la Monte, Suzanne M.

    2010-01-01

    Background CADASIL is a genetic vascular dementia caused by mutations in the Notch 3 gene on Chromosome 19. However, little is known about the mechanisms of vascular degeneration. Methods We characterized upstream components of Notch signaling pathways that may be disrupted in CADASIL, by measuring expression of insulin, IGF-1, and IGF-2 receptors, Notch 1, Notch 3, and aspartyl-(asparaginyl)-?-hydroxylase (AAH) in cortex and white matter from 3 CADASIL and 6 control brains. We assessed CADASIL-associated cell loss by measuring mRNA corresponding to neurons, oligodendroglia, and astrocytes, and indices of vascular degeneration by measuring smooth muscle actin (SMA) and endothelin-1 (ET-1) expression in isolated vessels. Immunohistochemical staining was used to assess SMA degeneration. Results Significant abnormalities including reduced cerebral white matter mRNA levels of Notch 1, Notch 3, AAH, SMA, IGF receptors, myelin-associated glycoproteins, and glial fibrillary acidic protein, and reduced vascular expression of SMA, IGF receptors, Notch 1 and Notch 3 were detected in CADASIL-lesioned brains. In addition, we found CADASIL-associated reductions in SMA, and increases in ubiquitin immunoreactivity in the media of white matter and meningeal vessels. No abnormalities in gene expression or immunoreactivity were observed in CADASIL cerebral cortex. Conclusions Molecular abnormalities in CADASIL are largely restricted to white matter and white matter vessels, corresponding to the distribution of neuropathological lesions. These preliminary findings suggest that CADASIL is mediated by both glial and vascular degeneration with reduced expression of IGF receptors and AAH, which regulate Notch expression and function. PMID:21504125

  17. Cumulative Index

    E-print Network

    stream_size 22105 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Auslegung.v08.n03.317-332.pdf.txt stream_source_info Auslegung.v08.n03.317-332.pdf.txt Content-Encoding UTF-8 Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 CUMULATIVE... INDEX I. Articles (i) By Author Abate, Charles J. "Has Dretske Really Refuted Skepticism?", v.4, n.3 (June, 1977), pp. 169- 175. Abugattas, Juan A. "On the Relation Between Morality and the Notion of God". v.7, n.l (November, 1979), pp. 47...

  18. Factor VIIa binding to endothelial cell protein C receptor protects vascular barrier integrity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    SUNDARAM, J.; KESHAVA, S.; GOPALAKRISHNAN, R.; ESMON, C. T.; PENDURTHI, U. R.; RAO, L . V. M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Recent studies have shown that factor VIIa binds to endothelial cell protein C receptor (EPCR), a cellular receptor for protein C and activated protein C. At present, the physiologic significance of FVIIa interaction with EPCR in vivo remains unclear. Objective: To investigate whether exogenously administered FVIIa, by binding to EPCR, induces a barrier protective effect in vivo. Methods Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced vascular leakage in the lung and kidney, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced vascular leakage in the skin, were used to evaluate the FVIIa-induced barrier protective effect. Wild-type, EPCR-deficient, EPCR-overexpressing and hemophilia A mice were used in the studies. Results Administration of FVIIa reduced LPS-induced vascular leakage in the lung and kidney; the FVIIa-induced barrier protective effect was attenuated in EPCR-deficient mice. The extent of VEGF-induced vascular leakage in the skin was highly dependent on EPCR expression levels. Therapeutic concentrations of FVIIa attenuated VEGF-induced vascular leakage in control mice but not in EPCR-deficient mice. Blockade of FVIIa binding to EPCR with a blocking mAb completely attenuated the FVIIa-induced barrier protective effect. Similarly, administration of protease-activated receptor 1 antagonist blocked the FVIIa-induced barrier protective effect. Hemophilic mice showed increased vascular permeability, and administration of therapeutic concentrations of FVIIa improved barrier integrity in these mice. Conclusions This is the first study to demonstrate that FVIIa binding to EPCR leads to a barrier protective effect in vivo. This finding may have clinical relevance, as it indicates additional advantages of using FVIIa in treating hemophilic patients. PMID:24977291

  19. Amplatzer Vascular Plug: Expanding the Applications Spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Rimon, Uri; Heldenberg, Eitan; Golan, Gil; Shinfeld, Amichai; Garniek, Alexander

    2008-07-15

    The Amplatzer Vascular Plug is a new embolization device which has been used in different vascular anomalies, especially by cardiologists in the cardiac and pulmonary circulations. It is underused by interventional radiologists. We used this device in three different vascular conditions, which we present here.

  20. Intestinal absorptive capacity, intestinal permeability and jejunal histology in HIV and their relation to diarrhoea.

    PubMed Central

    Keating, J; Bjarnason, I; Somasundaram, S; Macpherson, A; Francis, N; Price, A B; Sharpstone, D; Smithson, J; Menzies, I S; Gazzard, B G

    1995-01-01

    Intestinal function is poorly defined in patients with HIV infection. Absorptive capacity and intestinal permeability were assessed using 3-O-methyl-D-glucose, D-xylose, L-rhamnose, and lactulose in 88 HIV infected patients and the findings were correlated with the degree of immunosuppression (CD4 counts), diarrhoea, wasting, intestinal pathogen status, and histomorphometric analysis of jejunal biopsy samples. Malabsorption of 3-O-methyl-D-glucose and D-xylose was prevalent in all groups of patients with AIDS but not in asymptomatic, well patients with HIV. Malabsorption correlated significantly (r = 0.34-0.56, p < 0.005) with the degree of immune suppression and with body mass index. Increased intestinal permeability was found in all subgroups of patients. The changes in absorption-permeability were of comparable severity to those found in patients with untreated coeliac disease. Jejunal histology, however, showed only mild changes in the villus height/crypt depth ratio as compared with subtotal villus atrophy in coeliac disease. Malabsorption and increased intestinal permeability are common in AIDS patients. Malabsorption, which has nutritional implications, relates more to immune suppression than jejunal morphological changes. PMID:8549936

  1. The functions of TRPP2 in the vascular system.

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; Fu, Jie; Xia, Xian-Ming; Shen, Bing

    2016-01-01

    TRPP2 (polycystin-2, PC2 or PKD2), encoded by the PKD2 gene, is a non-selective cation channel with a large single channel conductance and high Ca(2+) permeability. In cell membrane, TRPP2, along with polycystin-1, TRPV4 and TRPC1, functions as a mechanotransduction channel. In the endoplasmic reticulum, TRPP2 modulates intracellular Ca(2+) release associated with IP3 receptors and the ryanodine receptors. Noteworthily, TRPP2 is widely expressed in vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells of all major vascular beds, and contributes to the regulation of vessel function. The mutation of the PKD2 gene is a major cause of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), which is not only a common genetic disease of the kidney but also a systemic disorder associated with abnormalities in the vasculature; cardiovascular complications are the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in ADPKD patients. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge regarding the TRPP2 protein and its possible role in cardiovascular function and related diseases. PMID:26725733

  2. PERMEABILITY OF SOILS TO FOUR ORGANIC LIQUIDS AND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Saturated hydraulic conductivities and intrinsic permeabilities were evaluated for eight contrasting soils with four organic liquids and water. The organic liquids were kerosene, ethylene glycol, isopropyl alcohol and xylene. Intrinsic permeability for any given soil varied inver...

  3. Moisture Durability of Vapor Permeable Insulating Sheathing (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-10-01

    In this project, Building America team Building Science Corporation researched some of the ramifications of using exterior, vapor permeable insulation on retrofit walls with vapor permeable cavity insulation. Retrofit strategies are a key factor in reducing exterior building stock consumption.

  4. Permeability anisotropy and resistivity anisotropy of mechanically compressed mudrocks

    E-print Network

    Adams, Amy Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Permeability anisotropy (the ratio of the horizontal to vertical permeability) is an important parameter used in sedimentary basin models and geotechnical design to model fluid flow, locate hydrocarbon reserves and estimate ...

  5. Association Between Vascular Access Dysfunction and Subsequent Major Adverse Cardiovascular Events in Patients on Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Te-Hui; Tseng, Chien-Tzu; Lin, Wei-Hung; Chao, Jo-Yen; Wang, Wei-Ming; Li, Chung-Yi; Wang, Ming-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The association between dialysis vascular access dysfunction and the risk of developing major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) in hemodialysis patients is unclear and has not yet been investigated. We analyzed data from the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan to quantify this association. Adopting a case–control design nested within a cohort of patients who received hemodialysis from 2001 to 2010, we identified 9711 incident cases of MACE during the stage of stable maintenance dialysis and 19,422 randomly selected controls matched to cases on age, gender, and duration of dialysis. Events of vascular access dysfunction in the 6-month period before the date of MACE onset (ie, index date) for cases and before index dates for controls were evaluated retrospectively. The presence of vascular access dysfunction was associated with a 1.385-fold higher odds of developing MACE as estimated from the logistic regression analysis. This represents a significantly increased adjusted odds ratio (OR) at 1.268 (95% confidence interval [CI]?=?1.186–1.355) after adjustment for comorbidities and calendar years of initiating dialysis. We also noted a significant exposure–response trend (P?vascular access dysfunction and MACE, with the greatest risk (adjusted OR?=?1.840, 95% CI?=?1.549–2.186) noted in patients with ?3 vascular access events. We concluded that dialysis vascular access dysfunction was significantly associated with an increased risk of MACE. Hence, vascular access failure can be an early sign for MACE in patients receiving maintenance hemodialysis. Active monitoring and treatment of cardiovascular risk factors and related diseases, not merely managing vascular access dysfunction, would be required to reduce the risk of MACE. PMID:26131808

  6. NITRIC OXIDE DELIVERY VIA A PERMEABLE BALLOON CATHETER INHIBITS NEOINTIMAL GROWTH AFTER ARTERIAL INJURY

    PubMed Central

    Havelka, GE; Moreira, ES; Rodriguez, MP; Tsihlis, ND; Wang, Z; Martinez, J; Hrabie, J; Keefer, L; Kibbe, MR

    2012-01-01

    Background Neointimal hyperplasia limits the longevity of vascular interventions. Nitric oxide (NO) is well known to inhibit neointimal hyperplasia. However, delivery of NO to the vasculature is challenging. Our study aims to evaluate the efficacy of delivering NO to the site of injury using a permeable balloon catheter. Our hypothesis is that ultra-short duration of NO delivery using a permeable balloon catheter will inhibit neointimal hyperplasia. Materials and Methods 10-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent carotid artery balloon injury. Groups included: 1) control, 2) injury, 3) injury + periadventitial NO, and 4) injury + endoluminal NO via permeable balloon catheter. The catheter was inflated to 5 atmospheres of pressure for 5 minutes. Arteries were harvested 2 weeks following injury. Morphometric assessment for neointimal hyperplasia and immunhistochemical staining for inflammatory markers were performed. Results Injury increased neointimal hyperplasia compared to control (intima/media area [I/M] ratio 1.07 vs. 0.11, respectively, p<0.001). Periadventitial delivery of NO reduced the I/M area ratio compared to injury alone (55% decrease, p<0.001). Endoluminal delivery of NO also reduced the I/M area ratio compared to injury alone (65% decrease; p<0.001). Both endoluminal and periadventitial NO affected the I/M ratio by reducing the intimal area (64% and 46%, respectively, p<0.001) whereas neither affected the medial area. Periadventital NO delivery increased lumen area (p<0.05), whereas endoluminal NO delivery increased circumference (p<0.05). Periadventitial NO delivery inhibited macrophage intimal infiltration compared to injury alone (p<0.05). Conclusion These data demonstrate that short duration endoluminal NO delivery via permeable balloon catheters inhibits neointimal hyperplasia following arterial interventions. Endoluminal delivery of NO could become a focus for future clinical interventions. PMID:23164361

  7. Effects of radiofrequency radiation exposure on blood-brain barrier permeability in male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Sirav, Bahriye; Seyhan, Nesrin

    2011-12-01

    During the last several decades, numerous studies have been performed aiming at the question of whether or not exposure to radiofrequency radiation (RFR) influences the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of RFR on the permeability of BBB in male and female Wistar albino rats. Right brain, left brain, cerebellum, and total brain were analyzed separately in the study. Rats were exposed to 0.9 and 1.8 GHz continuous-wave (CW) RFR for 20 min (at SARs of 4.26 mW/kg and 1.46 mW/kg, respectively) while under anesthesia. Control rats were sham-exposed. Disruption of BBB integrity was detected spectrophotometrically using the Evans-blue dye, which has been used as a BBB tracer and is known to be bound to serum albumin. Right brain, left brain, cerebellum, and total brain were evaluated for BBB permeability. In female rats, no albumin extravasation was found in in the brain after RFR exposure. A significant increase in albumin was found in the brains of the RF-exposed male rats when compared to sham-exposed male brains. These results suggest that exposure to 0.9 and 1.8 GHz CW RFR at levels below the international limits can affect the vascular permeability in the brain of male rats. The possible risk of RFR exposure in humans is a major concern for the society. Thus, this topic should be investigated more thoroughly in the future. PMID:22047463

  8. Multimodal imaging enables early detection and characterization of changes in tumor permeability of brain metastases

    PubMed Central

    Thorsen, Frits; Fite, Brett; Mahakian, Lisa M.; Seo, Jai W.; Qin, Shengping; Harrison, Victoria; Johnson, Sarah; Ingham, Elizabeth; Caskey, Charles; Sundstrøm, Terje; Meade, Thomas J.; Harter, Patrick N.; Skaftnesmo, Kai Ove; Ferrara, Katherine W.

    2013-01-01

    Our goal was to develop strategies to quantify the accumulation of model therapeutics in small brain metastases using multimodal imaging, in order to enhance the potential for successful treatment. Human melanoma cells were injected into the left cardiac ventricle of immunodeficient mice. Bioluminescent, MR and PET imaging were applied to evaluate the limits of detection and potential for contrast agent extravasation in small brain metastases. A pharmacokinetic model was applied to estimate vascular permeability. Bioluminescent imaging after injecting D-Luciferin (molecular weight (MW) 320D) suggested tumor cell extravasation had already occurred at week 1, which was confirmed by histology. 7T T1w MRI at week 4 was able to detect non-leaky 100 ?m sized lesions and leaky tumors with diameters down to 200 ?m after contrast injection at week 5. PET imaging showed that 18F-FLT (MW 244D) accumulated in the brain at week 4. Gadolinium-based MRI tracers (MW 559D and 2.066kD) extravasated after 5 weeks (tumor diameter 600 ?m), and the lower MW agent cleared more rapidly from the tumor (mean apparent permeabilities 2.27×10-5 cm/s versus 1.12×10-5 cm/s). PET imaging further demonstrated tumor permeability to 64Cu-BSA (MW 65.55kD) at week 6 (tumor diameter 700 ?m). In conclusion, high field T1w MRI without contrast may improve the detection limit of small brain metastases, allowing for earlier diagnosis of patients, although the smallest lesions detected with T1w MRI were permeable only to D-Luciferin and the amphipathic small molecule 18F-FLT. Different-sized MR and PET contrast agents demonstrated the gradual increase in leakiness of the blood tumor barrier during metastatic progression, which could guide clinicians in choosing tailored treatment strategies. PMID:24161382

  9. The conditional inactivation of the ?-catenin gene in endothelial cells causes a defective vascular pattern and increased vascular fragility

    PubMed Central

    Cattelino, Anna; Liebner, Stefan; Gallini, Radiosa; Zanetti, Adriana; Balconi, Giovanna; Corsi, Alessandro; Bianco, Paolo; Wolburg, Hartwig; Moore, Robert; Oreda, Boussadia; Kemler, Rolf; Dejana, Elisabetta

    2003-01-01

    Using the Cre/loxP system we conditionally inactivated ?-catenin in endothelial cells. We found that early phases of vasculogenesis and angiogenesis were not affected in mutant embryos; however, vascular patterning in the head, vitelline, umbilical vessels, and the placenta was altered. In addition, in many regions, the vascular lumen was irregular with the formation of lacunae at bifurcations, vessels were frequently hemorrhagic, and fluid extravasation in the pericardial cavity was observed. Cultured ?-catenin ?/? endothelial cells showed a different organization of intercellular junctions with a decrease in ?-catenin in favor of desmoplakin and marked changes in actin cytoskeleton. These changes paralleled a decrease in cell–cell adhesion strength and an increase in paracellular permeability. We conclude that in vivo, the absence of ?-catenin significantly reduces the capacity of endothelial cells to maintain intercellular contacts. This may become more marked when the vessels are exposed to high or turbulent flow, such as at bifurcations or in the beating heart, leading to fluid leakage or hemorrhages. PMID:12975353

  10. 46 CFR 172.140 - Permeability of spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Permeability of spaces. 172.140 Section 172.140 Shipping... Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.140 Permeability of spaces. (a) When doing the calculations required in § 172.130, the permeability of a floodable space other than a machinery space must be as listed in...

  11. 46 CFR 172.140 - Permeability of spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Permeability of spaces. 172.140 Section 172.140 Shipping... Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.140 Permeability of spaces. (a) When doing the calculations required in § 172.130, the permeability of a floodable space other than a machinery space must be as listed in...

  12. 46 CFR 172.185 - Permeability of spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Permeability of spaces. 172.185 Section 172.185 Shipping... Under Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.185 Permeability of spaces. (a) When doing the calculations required in § 172.170, the permeability of a floodable space other than a machinery space must be as...

  13. 46 CFR 172.240 - Permeability of spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Permeability of spaces. 172.240 Section 172.240 Shipping... Permeability of spaces. When doing the calculations required in § 172.225, (a) The permeability of a floodable space, other than a machinery or cargo space, must be assumed as listed in Table 172.240;...

  14. 46 CFR 172.240 - Permeability of spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Permeability of spaces. 172.240 Section 172.240 Shipping... Permeability of spaces. When doing the calculations required in § 172.225, (a) The permeability of a floodable space, other than a machinery or cargo space, must be assumed as listed in Table 172.240;...

  15. 46 CFR 172.185 - Permeability of spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Permeability of spaces. 172.185 Section 172.185 Shipping... Under Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.185 Permeability of spaces. (a) When doing the calculations required in § 172.170, the permeability of a floodable space other than a machinery space must be as...

  16. 46 CFR 172.140 - Permeability of spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Permeability of spaces. 172.140 Section 172.140 Shipping... Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.140 Permeability of spaces. (a) When doing the calculations required in § 172.130, the permeability of a floodable space other than a machinery space must be as listed in...

  17. 46 CFR 172.185 - Permeability of spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Permeability of spaces. 172.185 Section 172.185 Shipping... Under Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.185 Permeability of spaces. (a) When doing the calculations required in § 172.170, the permeability of a floodable space other than a machinery space must be as...

  18. 46 CFR 174.090 - Permeability of spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Permeability of spaces. 174.090 Section 174.090 Shipping... Permeability of spaces. When doing the calculations required in § 174.065— (a) The permeability of a floodable space, other than a machinery space, must be as listed in Table 174.090; and (b) Calculations in which...

  19. 46 CFR 174.090 - Permeability of spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Permeability of spaces. 174.090 Section 174.090 Shipping... Permeability of spaces. When doing the calculations required in § 174.065— (a) The permeability of a floodable space, other than a machinery space, must be as listed in Table 174.090; and (b) Calculations in which...

  20. 46 CFR 174.090 - Permeability of spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Permeability of spaces. 174.090 Section 174.090 Shipping... Permeability of spaces. When doing the calculations required in § 174.065— (a) The permeability of a floodable space, other than a machinery space, must be as listed in Table 174.090; and (b) Calculations in which...

  1. 46 CFR 172.240 - Permeability of spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Permeability of spaces. 172.240 Section 172.240 Shipping... Permeability of spaces. When doing the calculations required in § 172.225, (a) The permeability of a floodable space, other than a machinery or cargo space, must be assumed as listed in Table 172.240;...

  2. RESEARCH PAPER Calculating the effective permeability of sandstone with

    E-print Network

    Borja, Ronaldo I.

    is treated as a sub-cell and assigned permeabilities calculated from subcontinuum simulations using the LBRESEARCH PAPER Calculating the effective permeability of sandstone with multiscale lattice microtomography Á Upscaling 1 Introduction Quantifying the permeability of geomaterials poses a challenging task

  3. 46 CFR 172.240 - Permeability of spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Permeability of spaces. 172.240 Section 172.240 Shipping... Permeability of spaces. When doing the calculations required in § 172.225, (a) The permeability of a floodable space, other than a machinery or cargo space, must be assumed as listed in Table 172.240;...

  4. 46 CFR 174.090 - Permeability of spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permeability of spaces. 174.090 Section 174.090 Shipping... Permeability of spaces. When doing the calculations required in § 174.065— (a) The permeability of a floodable space, other than a machinery space, must be as listed in Table 174.090; and (b) Calculations in which...

  5. 46 CFR 172.240 - Permeability of spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permeability of spaces. 172.240 Section 172.240 Shipping... Permeability of spaces. When doing the calculations required in § 172.225, (a) The permeability of a floodable space, other than a machinery or cargo space, must be assumed as listed in Table 172.240;...

  6. 46 CFR 172.140 - Permeability of spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Permeability of spaces. 172.140 Section 172.140 Shipping... Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.140 Permeability of spaces. (a) When doing the calculations required in § 172.130, the permeability of a floodable space other than a machinery space must be as listed in...

  7. 46 CFR 172.185 - Permeability of spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permeability of spaces. 172.185 Section 172.185 Shipping... Under Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.185 Permeability of spaces. (a) When doing the calculations required in § 172.170, the permeability of a floodable space other than a machinery space must be as...

  8. 46 CFR 174.090 - Permeability of spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Permeability of spaces. 174.090 Section 174.090 Shipping... Permeability of spaces. When doing the calculations required in § 174.065— (a) The permeability of a floodable space, other than a machinery space, must be as listed in Table 174.090; and (b) Calculations in which...

  9. 46 CFR 172.140 - Permeability of spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permeability of spaces. 172.140 Section 172.140 Shipping... Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.140 Permeability of spaces. (a) When doing the calculations required in § 172.130, the permeability of a floodable space other than a machinery space must be as listed in...

  10. 46 CFR 172.185 - Permeability of spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Permeability of spaces. 172.185 Section 172.185 Shipping... Under Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.185 Permeability of spaces. (a) When doing the calculations required in § 172.170, the permeability of a floodable space other than a machinery space must be as...

  11. Changes in endothelial connexin 43 expression inversely correlate with microvessel permeability and VE-cadherin expression in endotoxin-challenged lungs.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Kathirvel; Escue, Rachel; Manna, Jayeeta; Adebiyi, Adebowale; Parthasarathi, Kaushik

    2015-09-15

    Endothelial barrier restoration reverses microvessel hyperpermeability and facilitates recovery from lung injury. Because inhibiting connexin 43 (Cx43)-dependent interendothelial communication blunts hyperpermeability in single microvessels, we determined whether endothelial Cx43 levels correlate with changes in microvessel permeability during recovery from lung injury. Toward this, bacterial endotoxin was instilled intratracheally into rat lungs, and at different durations postinstillation the lungs were isolated and blood perfused. Microvessel Cx43 expression was quantified by in situ immunofluorescence and microvessel permeability via a fluorescence method. To supplement the immunofluorescence data, protein levels were determined by immunoblots of lung tissue from endotoxin-instilled rats. Immunofluorescence and immunoblot together revealed that both Cx43 expression and microvessel permeability increased above baseline within a few hours after endotoxin instillation but declined progressively over the next few days. On day 5 postendotoxin, microvessel Cx43 declined to negligible levels, resulting in complete absence of intermicrovessel communication determined by photolytic uncaging of Ca(2+). However, by day 14, both Cx43 expression and microvessel permeability returned to baseline levels. In contrast to Cx43, expression of microvessel vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin, a critical determinant of vascular barrier integrity, exhibited an inverse trend by initially declining below baseline and then returning to baseline at a longer duration. Knockdown of vascular Cx43 by tail vein injection of Cx43 shRNA increased VE-cadherin expression, suggesting that reduction in Cx43 levels may modulate VE-cadherin levels in lung microvessels. Together, the data suggest that endotoxin challenge initiates interrelated changes in microvessel Cx43, VE-cadherin, and microvessel permeability, with changes in Cx43 temporally leading the other responses. PMID:26163513

  12. The use of in situ perfusion of the rat mesentery as a model to investigate vascular injury directly induced by drugs.

    PubMed

    Knapton, A D; Zhang, J; Sistare, F D; Hanig, J P

    2010-09-01

    Exposure of the vasculature to vasodilators, pharmaceuticals and industrial chemicals may lead to injury of the blood vessel wall in animals. Vascular injury may begin with changes in the permeability of vascular endothelial cell and vessels, resulting in possible hemorrhage and edema leading subsequently to immune cell infiltration. The present study was undertaken to determine if the direct exposure of the Sprague Dawley rat mesenteric vasculature through the perfusion of aminophylline, fenoldopam, compound 48/80, histamine or serotonin has any such effects on the blood vessels, and if the two vital dyes Monastral blue B and Evans blue can be used to enhance the visualization of the vascular damage. Microscopic visualization was enhanced by the use of dyes and a variety of alterations of the perfused mesenteric vessels were detected, including varying degrees of mast cell degranulation, microvascular vasodilatation and increased vascular permeability. Macroscopic evidence of vascular damage was minimal. This study demonstrates that in situ perfusion of the rat mesentery is a simple and useful method to eliminate the influence of a variety of physiologic influences or homeostatic responses and can be used to further investigate drug-induced vascular damage. PMID:21069100

  13. Dual-Energy Micro-Computed Tomography Imaging of Radiation-Induced Vascular Changes in Primary Mouse Sarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Moding, Everett J.; Clark, Darin P.; Qi, Yi; Li, Yifan; Ma, Yan; Ghaghada, Ketan; Johnson, G. Allan; Kirsch, David G.; Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina ; Badea, Cristian T.

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effects of radiation therapy on primary tumor vasculature using dual-energy (DE) micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). Methods and Materials: Primary sarcomas were generated with mutant Kras and p53. Unirradiated tumors were compared with tumors irradiated with 20 Gy. A liposomal-iodinated contrast agent was administered 1 day after treatment, and mice were imaged immediately after injection (day 1) and 3 days later (day 4) with DE micro-CT. CT-derived tumor sizes were used to assess tumor growth. After DE decomposition, iodine maps were used to assess tumor fractional blood volume (FBV) at day 1 and tumor vascular permeability at day 4. For comparison, tumor vascularity and vascular permeability were also evaluated histologically by use of CD31 immunofluorescence and fluorescently-labeled dextrans. Results: Radiation treatment significantly decreased tumor growth from day 1 to day 4 (P<.05). There was a positive correlation between CT measurement of tumor FBV on day 1 and extravasated iodine on day 4 with microvascular density (MVD) on day 4 (R{sup 2}=0.53) and dextran accumulation (R{sup 2}=0.63) on day 4, respectively. Despite no change in MVD measured by histology, tumor FBV significantly increased after irradiation as measured by DE micro-CT (0.070 vs 0.091, P<.05). Both dextran and liposomal-iodine accumulation in tumors increased significantly after irradiation, with dextran fractional area increasing 5.2-fold and liposomal-iodine concentration increasing 4.0-fold. Conclusions: DE micro-CT is an effective tool for noninvasive assessment of vascular changes in primary tumors. Tumor blood volume and vascular permeability increased after a single therapeutic dose of radiation treatment.

  14. Vascular access management 1: an overview.

    PubMed

    McCann, Margaret; Einarsdóttir, Hildur; Van Waeleghem, Jean-Pierre; Murphy, F; Sedgewick, J

    2008-06-01

    Vascular access for renal replacement therapy (RRT) is seen as one of the most challenging areas confronting the nephrology multidisciplinary team. The vascular access of choice is the arterio-venous fistula (AVF) followed by the arterio-venous graft (AVG) and central venous catheter (CVC). A successful vascular access programme requires forward planning ensuring that enough time is available for the preservation of the access site, its creation and maturation. Successful cannulation of the vascular access requires on the part of the nephrology nurse, clinical expertise and knowledge on the management of different types of vascular access including different cannulation techniques. PMID:18498572

  15. Isolation and characterization of cellulose nanocrystals from parenchyma and vascular bundle of oil palm trunk (Elaeis guineensis).

    PubMed

    Lamaming, Junidah; Hashim, Rokiah; Leh, Cheu Peng; Sulaiman, Othman; Sugimoto, Tomoko; Nasir, Mohammed

    2015-12-10

    In this study cellulose nanocrystals were isolated through acid hydrolysis process from parenchyma and vascular bundle of oil palm trunk (Elaeis guineensis). The morphological properties of obtained cellulose nanocrystals were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The microscopy images showed smoother and cleaner surface of parenchyma cellulose nanocrystals when compared to vascular bundle cellulose nanocrystals. The TEM image shows a higher length and diameter for parenchyma cellulose nanocrystals compared to vascular bundle cellulose nanocrystals. The Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra showed changes in functional groups after acid hydrolysis due to removal of lignin, hemicelluloses and other impurities in both type of cellulose nanocrystals. Crystallinity index of cellulose nanocrystals was observed higher for vascular bundle as compared to parenchyma. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was performed to study the thermal stability of cellulose nanocrystals and it was observed higher for parenchyma cellulose nanocrystals compared to vascular bundle. PMID:26428155

  16. The European experience with vascular injuries.

    PubMed

    Fingerhut, Abe; Leppäniemi, Ari K; Androulakis, George A; Archodovassilis, F; Bouillon, Bertil; Cavina, Enrico; Chaloner, Eddie; Chiarugi, Massimo; Davidovic, Lazar; Delgado-Millan, Miguel Angel; Goris, Jan; Gunnlaugsson, Gunnar H; Jover, Jose Maria; Konstandoulakis, Manoussos M; Kurtoglu, Mehmet; Lepäntalo, Mauri; Llort-Pont, Carme; Meneu-Diaz, Juan Carlos; Moreno-Gonzales, Enrique; Navarro-Soto, Salvador; Panoussis, P; Ryan, James M; Salenius, Juha P; Seccia, Massimo; Takolander, Rabbe; Taviloglu, Korhan; Tiesenhausen, Kurt; Torfason, Bjarni; Uranüs, Selman

    2002-02-01

    The rich and diverse heritage of the management of vascular injuries in the 45 independent European countries prevents the authors from revealing a uniform picture of the European experience, but some trends are clearly emerging. In countries with a low incidence of penetrating trauma and increasing use of interventional vascular procedures, the proportion of iatrogenic vascular trauma exceeds 40% of all vascular injuries, whereas on other parts of the continent, armed conflicts are still a major cause of vascular trauma. National vascular registries, mostly in the Scandinavian countries, produce useful, nationwide data about vascular trauma and its management but suffer still from inadequate data collection. Despite a relatively low incidence of vascular trauma in most European countries, the results are satisfactory, probably in most cases because of active and early management by surgeons on call, whether with vascular training or not, treating all kinds of vascular surgical emergencies. In some countries, attempts at developing a trauma and emergency surgical specialty, including expertise in the management of vascular injuries, are on their way. PMID:11905944

  17. Vascular Pathophysiology in Hearing Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Trune, Dennis R.; Nguyen-Huynh, Anh

    2014-01-01

    The inner ear vasculature is responsible for maintenance of the blood-labyrinth barrier, transport of systemic hormones for ion homeostasis, and supplying nutrients for metabolic functions. Unfortunately, these blood vessels also expose the ear to circulating inflammatory factors resulting from systemic diseases. Thus, while the inner ear blood vessels are critical for normal function, they also are facilitating pathologic mechanisms that result in hearing and vestibular dysfunction. In spite of these numerous critical roles of inner ear vasculature, little is known of its normal homeostatic functions and how these are compromised in disease. The objective of this review is to discuss the current concepts of vascular biology, how blood vessels naturally respond to circulating inflammatory factors, and how such mechanisms of vascular pathophysiology may cause hearing loss. PMID:25346568

  18. Systems Biology of Vascular Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Sage, Andrew; Tintut, Yin; Garfinkel, Alan; Demer, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Vascular calcification, a prevalent and progressive disorder, involves numerous interactive, autocrine, paracrine, and endocrine regulatory mechanisms and is thus ideally suited for analysis using a systems approach. This approach focuses on creating quantitative, testable models of complex biological systems that take into consideration the time dimension. They are usually expressed as mathematical models, and because of their time dependence and complexity, they usually require computer simulation to determine predicted outcomes. Here, we provide an example of such a model used to analyze self-organization and mineralization of vascular stem cells, using partial differential equations capable of accurately predicting experimental outcomes. Such systems-based models are useful in many aspects of cardiovascular medicine. PMID:19818947

  19. [Vascular tumors in the aged].

    PubMed

    Hundeiker, M

    1989-11-15

    In elderly people, we find other vascular malformations and neoplasms to be frequent and important than during the first decades of life. The features of malformations change in the course of the years due to degenerative processes (e.g., venous lakes in solar degeneration, Pasini's ectasias of the lower lip). True angiomas are relatively rare in old people (except "senile" or tardive angiomas). Most of the malignant vascular tumors do not develop until very late in life (e.g., the sporadic type of Kaposi's sarcoma, Stewart-Treves syndrome, multicentric angiosarcoma of the scalp). Except for these malignancies, there is a greater range of therapeutic means in the elderly, since aged skin is more extensible and late sequelae of X-ray therapy are of minor importance. PMID:2692331

  20. Vascular elastography: a validation study.

    PubMed

    Lopata, Richard G P; Peters, Mathijs F J; Nijs, Jan; Oomens, Cees W J; Rutten, Marcel C M; van de Vosse, Frans N

    2014-08-01

    Vascular elastography techniques are promising tools for mechanical characterization of diseased arteries. These techniques are usually validated with simulations or phantoms or by comparing results with histology or other imaging modalities. In the study described here, vascular elastography was applied to porcine aortas in vitro during inflation testing (n = 10) and results were compared with those of standard bi-axial tensile testing, a technique that directly measures the force applied to the tissue. A neo-Hookean model was fit to the stress-strain data, valid for large deformations. Results indicated good correspondence between the two techniques, with GUS = 110 ± 11 kPa and GTT = 108 ± 10 kPa for ultrasound and tensile testing, respectively. Bland-Altman analysis revealed little bias (GUS-GTT = 2 ± 20 kPa). The next step will be the application of a non-linear material model that is also adaptable for in vivo measurements. PMID:24798385

  1. Enhancement of scleral macromolecular permeability with prostaglandins.

    PubMed Central

    Weinreb, R N

    2001-01-01

    PURPOSE: It is proposed that the sclera is a metabolically active and pharmacologically responsive tissue. These studies were undertaken to determine whether prostaglandin exposure can enhance scleral permeability to high-molecular-weight substances. METHODS: Topical prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha) was administered to monkeys to determine if this altered the amount of scleral matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Experiments also were performed to determine whether the prostaglandin F (FP) receptor and gene transcripts are expressed in normal human sclera. Permeability of organ-cultured human sclera following prostaglandin exposure then was studied and the amount of MMP released into the medium measured. Finally, the permeability of human sclera to basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) was determined following prostaglandin exposure. RESULTS: Topical prostaglandin administration that reduced scleral collagen also increased scleral MMP-1, MMP-2, and MMP-3 by 63 +/- 35%, 267 +/- 210%, and 729 +/- 500%, respectively. FP receptor protein was localized in scleral fibroblasts, and FP receptor gene transcript was identified in sclera. Exposure to prostaglandin F2 alpha, 17-phenyltrinor, PGF2 alpha, or latanoprost acid increased scleral permeability by up to 124%, 183%, or 213%, respectively. In these cultures, MMP-1, MMP-2, and MMP-3 were increased by up to 37%, 267%, and 96%, respectively. Finally, transscleral absorption of FGF-2 was increased by up to 126% with scleral exposure to latanoprost. CONCLUSIONS: These studies demonstrate that the sclera is metabolically active and pharmacologically responsive to prostaglandins. Further, they demonstrate the feasibility of cotreatment with prostaglandin to enhance transscleral delivery of peptides, such as growth factors and high-molecular-weight substances, to the posterior segment of the eye. PMID:11797317

  2. Inorganic nitrogen transformations within permeable carbonate sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erler, Dirk V.; Santos, Isaac R.; Eyre, Bradley D.

    2014-04-01

    A combination of in-situ push pull tests and a flow through reactor trial were used to quantify the inorganic nitrogen sinks in the permeable carbonate sands of a tropical coral cay (Heron Island - Great Barrier Reef). Addition of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN in the form of nitrate - NO3-, and ammonium - NH4+) directly into sediment porewater resulted in uptake of up to 97% and 60% of added DIN respectively. The initial push pull experiment qualitatively showed that dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonia (DNRA), denitrification and nitrification were all active in the sediments. A flow through reactor experiment provided a more detailed approach to quantify these processes and showed that both denitrification and DNRA occurred within the sands at rates of 7.3 and 5.5 ?mol N cm-3 d-1, respectively. Unexpectedly the addition of labile organic material (fresh coral spawn) to the permeable sands did not result in the release of DIN from the reactors, on the contrary it resulted in the increased uptake of both NO3- and NH4+. This was most likely because of the stimulated N uptake associated with the addition of high C:N coral spawn material. The bulk of NH4+ produced via DNRA was found to be adsorbed to sediments within the reactor and was not released with the outlet water. A mass balance over the entire experimental period showed that more inorganic N was retained within the sediments than lost as gaseous products. Our results point to permeable carbonate sands acting as reservoirs of N under the influence of advective flow, even during sudden enrichment periods such as those following coral mass spawning. This implies that permeable carbonate sands may help to buffer coral reefs during periods of extreme oligotrophy.

  3. [Jaboulay, vascular surgeon at Lyon].

    PubMed

    Bouchet, Mathieu

    2010-01-01

    Mathieu Jaboulay was an excellent surgeon. He was the first to come up with the principles of vascular surgery as he made a surgical anastomosis between two arteries of a dog by an eversion circular suture. In 1902, he implemented a suture between an artery and a vein in an arteritis by obliteration. Jaboulay also tried the graft of an animal kidney on the crease of a human elbow in 1906. Jaboulay was an initiator for Alexis Carrel. PMID:20527332

  4. A catalog of porosity and permeability from core plugs in siliciclastic rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Philip H.; Kibler, Joyce E.

    2003-01-01

    Porosity and permeability measurements on cored samples from siliciclastic formations are presented for 70 data sets, taken from published data and descriptions. Data sets generally represent specific formations, usually from a limited number of wells. Each data set is represented by a written summary, a plot of permeability versus porosity, and a digital file of the data. The summaries include a publication reference, the geologic age of the formation, location, well names, depth range, various geologic descriptions, and core measurement conditions. Attributes such as grain size or depositional environment are identified by symbols on the plots. An index lists the authors and date, geologic age, formation name, sandstone classification, location, basin or structural province, and field name.

  5. Porosity and Permeability of Chondritic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, Michael E.; Corrigan, Catherine M.; Dahl, Jason; Long, Michael

    1996-01-01

    We have investigated the porosity of a large number of chondritic interplanetary dust particles and meteorites by three techniques: standard liquid/gas flow techniques, a new, non-invasive ultrasonic technique, and image processing of backscattered images . The latter technique is obviously best suited to sub-kg sized samples. We have also measured the gas and liquid permeabilities of some chondrites by two techniques: standard liquid/gas flow techniques, and a new, non-destructive pressure release technique. We find that chondritic IDP's have a somewhat bimodal porosity distribution. Peaks are present at 0 and 4% porosity; a tail then extends to 53%. These values suggest IDP bulk densities of 1.1 to 3.3 g/cc. Type 1-3 chondrite matrix porosities range up to 30%, with a peak at 2%. The bulk porosities for type 1-3 chondrites have the same approximate range as exhibited by matrix, indicating that other components of the bulk meteorites (including chondrules and aggregates) have the same average porosity as matrix. These results reveal that the porosity of primitive materials at scales ranging from nanogram to kilogram are similar, implying similar accretion dynamics operated through 12 orders of size magnitude. Permeabilities of the investigated chondrites vary by several orders of magnitude, and there appears to be no simple dependence of permeability with degree of aqueous alteration, or chondrite type.

  6. Pigment epithelium-derived factor regulates microvascular permeability through adipose triglyceride lipase in sepsis.

    PubMed

    He, Ting; Hu, Jiongyu; Yan, Guangning; Li, Lingfei; Zhang, Dongxia; Zhang, Qiong; Chen, Bing; Huang, Yuesheng

    2015-07-01

    The integrity of the vascular barrier, which is essential to blood vessel homoeostasis, can be disrupted by a variety of soluble permeability factors during sepsis. Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), a potent endogenous anti-angiogenic molecule, is significantly increased in sepsis, but its role in endothelial dysfunction has not been defined. To assess the role of PEDF in the vasculature, we evaluated the effects of exogenous PEDF in vivo using a mouse model of cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis and in vitro using human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMECs). In addition, PEDF was inhibited using a PEDF-monoclonal antibody (PEDF-mAb) or recombinant lentivirus vectors targeting PEDF receptors, including adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) and laminin receptor (LR). Our results showed that exogenous PEDF induced vascular hyperpermeability, as measured by extravasation of Evan's Blue (EB), dextran and microspheres in the skin, blood, trachea and cremaster muscle, both in a normal state and under conditions of sepsis. In control and LR-shRNA-treated HDMECs, PEDF alone or in combination with inflammatory mediators resulted in activation of RhoA, which was accompanied by actin rearrangement and disassembly of intercellular junctions, impairing endothelial barrier function. But in ATGL-shRNA-treated HDMECs, PEDF failed to induce the aforementioned alterations, suggesting that PEDF-induced hyperpermeability was mediated through the ATGL receptor. These results reveal a novel role for PEDF as a potential vasoactive substance in septic vascular hyperpermeability. Furthermore, our results suggest that PEDF and ATGL may serve as therapeutic targets for managing vascular hyperpermeability in sepsis. PMID:25700221

  7. A Model Relating Root Permeability to Flux and Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Burlyn E.

    1977-01-01

    A model that relates hydraulic permeability to water flux and to gradients in pressure potential and solute potential was tested using soybean (Glycine max) plants. Water flux was varied by additions of polyethylene glycol 6,000 around one portion of a divided root system and by changing the light intensity and CO2 concentration around the plants. The data are compatible with the model only if the hydraulic permeability varies with flux; however, the data were insufficient for rigorous testing. Three sets of published data fit the model only if hydraulic permeability varies. Evidence originally presented as involving constant hydraulic permeability is shown, rather, to require variable hydraulic permeability. PMID:16660071

  8. Changes in rock salt permeability due to nearby excavation

    SciTech Connect

    Stormont, J C; Howard, C L

    1991-07-01

    Changes in brine and gas permeability of rock salt as a result of nearby excavation (mine-by) have been measured from the underground workings of the WIPP facility. Prior to the mine-by, the formation responds as a porous medium with a very low brine permeability, a significant pore (brine) pressure and no measurable gas permeability. The mine-by excavation creates a dilated, partially saturated zone in the immediate vicinity of the excavation with an increased permeability to brine and a measurable permeability to gas. The changes in hydrologic properties are discussed in the context of pore structure changes.

  9. Tumor vascular volume determines photosensitizer uptake in MATLyLu prostate tumor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaodong; Chen, Bin; Hoopes, P. Jack; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2007-02-01

    The parameters which limit supply of photosensitizer to the cancer cells in a solid tumor were systematically analyzed using microvascular transport modeling and histology data from frozen sections. In particular the vascular permeability transport coefficient and the effective interstitial diffusion coefficient were quantified for verteporfin-for-injection delivery of benzoporphyrin derivative (BPD). Orthotopic tumors had a higher permeability and diffusion coefficients (P d= 0.036 ?m/s and D = 1.6 ?m2/s, respectively) as compared to subcutaneously grown tumors (P d = 0.025 ?m/s and D = 0.9 ?m2/s, respectively), likely due to the fact that the vessel patterns are more homogeneous orthotopically. In general, large inter-subject and intra-tumor variability exist in the verteporfin concentration, in the range of 25% in plasma concentration and in the range of 20% for tissue concentrations, predominantly due to these micro-regional variations in transport. However, the average individual uptake of photosensitizer in tumor tissue was only correlated to the total vascular area within the tumor (R2 = 64.1%, p < 0.001). The data is consistent with a view that micro-regional variation in the vascular permeability, interstitial diffusion rate, all contributes the spatial heterogeneity observed in verteporfin uptake, but that average supply to the tissue is limited by the total area of perfused blood vessels. This study presents a method to systematically analyze microheterogeneity as well as possible methods to increase delivery and homogeneity of photosensitizer within tumor tissue.

  10. [Effect of tobacco smoke on permeability of capillary of pregnant and non-pregnant rats].

    PubMed

    Florek, Tewa; Ignatowicz, Ewa; Piekoszewski, Wojciech; Wachowiak, Anna; Wrzosek, Jagna

    2006-01-01

    From among 4200 chemical compounds contained in the tobacco smoke, nicotine and carbon monoxide are responsible for changes in the heart-vessel system to the greatest extent. Additionally, other toxic compounds, including the carcinogenic ones, have a significant impact on the biological activity in the tissues of blood vessels. A particularly complex picture of the detrimental impact of the tobacco smoke is presented in case of pregnant women, fetuses and newborns. The aim of the research was to assess the impact of tobacco smoke on the permeability of capillaries in different tissues of rats (lungs, brain, liver, kidneys) and testing of the potentially protective impact of rutine (3-rutinozide of quercetin). The research on the permeability of capillaries has been carried out applying Evans blue. The animals were divided into 8 research groups: pregnant animals--"control", "rutine", "tobacco smoke", "rutine+tobacco smoke", and non-pregnant animals--"control", "rutine", "tobacco smoke", "rutine+tobacco smoke". In the first stage of research (pregnant, non-pregnant-- groups: "rutine" and "rutine+tobacco smoke"), the water rutine solution in a dose of 40 mg/kg of body weight was administered. The non-pregnant and pregnant animals from groups "tobacco smoke" and "rutine+tobacco smoke" were exposed to tobacco smoke via inhalation (1500 mg CO/m3 of air) for 21 days. All the animals were injected with the water Evans blue solution in a dose of 30 mg/kg of body weight. After 30 minutes, the animals were killed by cutting the abdominal aorta, and lungs, brain, liver and kidneys were taken for further testing. The cotinine in the urine was determined by the HPLC method, using norephedrine as the internal standard, after the preceding extraction by means of the liquid-liquid technique. The concentration of cotinine in case of non-pregnant and pregnant females was respectively 11.8 +/- 1.9 pg/ml of urine and 12.0 +/- 2.5 microg/ml of urine. In case of the rats, which received the rutine, the concentration of rutine in the group of non-pregnant females was 9.3 +/- 1.0 microg/ml of urine, and in the group of the pregnant ones 8.5 +/- 1.1 microg/ml of urine. In the lungs of non-pregnant animals exposed to tobacco smoke, the decreased permeability of vessels for the albumin-Evans blue complex was proven. The administration of rutine to non-pregnant and pregnant animals did not exert influence on the permeability of vessels in lungs. A similar result was obtained for the lungs of rats receiving the rutine, as well as those exposed to tobacco smoke. In the brain tissue of non-pregnant and pregnant animals, a slight decrease in the content of Evans blue was declared as a consequence of tobacco smoke impact. In the groups receiving the rutine, this flavonoid was declared to influence the blood supply of the brain tissue, and the permeability of the vascular walls. In the liver tissue of animals inhaling the tobacco smoke, the permeability of vascular walls for albumin-Evans blue complex was increased. The rutine did not affect significantly the permeability of vessels, whereas the exposure of pregnant females, which received rutine, to smoke decreased the content of Evans blue in the liver tissue. In the tissues of all tested females, no significant differences between the control groups and groups exposed to tobacco smoke as well as rutine+tobacco smoke were detected. The obtained results do not indicate, however, that in case of chronic exposure to tobacco smoke, the rutine has insignificant protective meaning. PMID:17288177

  11. Effective stress law for the permeability of a limestone

    E-print Network

    Ghabezloo, Siavash; Guédon, Sylvine; Martineau, François

    2008-01-01

    The effective stress law for the permeability of a limestone is studied experimentally by performing constant head permeability tests in a triaxial cell with different conditions of confining pressure and pore pressure. Test results have shown that a pore pressure increase and a confining pressure decrease both result in an increase of the permeability, and that the effect of the pore pressure change on the variation of the permeability is more important than the effect of a change of the confining pressure. A power law is proposed for the variation of the permeability with the effective stress. The permeability effective stress coefficient increases linearly with the differential pressure and is greater than one as soon the differential pressure exceeds few bars. The test results are well reproduced using the proposed permeability-effective stress law. A conceptual pore-shell model based on a detailed observation of the microstructure of the studied limestone is proposed. This model is able to explain the ex...

  12. Evaluating Permeability Enchancement Using Electrical Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    John W. Pritchett

    2008-09-01

    Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) development projects involve the artificial stimulation of relatively impermeable high-temperature underground regions (at depths of 2-4 kilometers or more) to create sufficient permeability to permit underground fluid circulation, so that hot water can be withdrawn from production wells and used to generate electric power. Several major research projects of this general type have been undertaken in the past in New Mexico (Fenton Hill), Europe, Japan and Australia. Recent U.S. activities along these lines focus mainly on stimulating peripheral areas of existing operating hydrothermal fields rather than on fresh 'greenfield' sites, but the long-term objective of the Department of Energy's EGS program is the development of large-scale power projects based on EGS technology (MIT, 2006; NREL, 2008). Usually, stimulation is accomplished by injecting water into a well at high pressure, enhancing permeability by the creation and propagation of fractures in the surrounding rock (a process known as 'hydrofracturing'). Beyond just a motivation, low initial system permeability is also an essential prerequisite to hydrofracturing. If the formation permeability is too high, excessive fluid losses will preclude the buildup of sufficient pressure to fracture rock. In practical situations, the actual result of injection is frequently to re-open pre-existing hydrothermally-mineralized fractures, rather than to create completely new fractures by rupturing intact rock. Pre-existing fractures can often be opened using injection pressures in the range 5-20 MPa. Creation of completely new fractures will usually require pressures that are several times higher. It is preferable to undertake development projects of this type in regions where tectonic conditions are conducive to shear failure, so that when pre-existing fractures are pressurized they will fail by shearing laterally. If this happens, the fracture will often stay open afterwards even if injection subsequently ceases. The principal barrier to EGS utilization for electricity generation is project economics. Costs for geothermal electricity obtained from conventional hydrothermal systems are just marginally competitive. Unless and until the costs of routinely and reliably creating and exploiting artificial subterranean fracture networks that can deliver useful quantities of hot fluid to production wells for long periods of time (years) are reduced to levels comparable to those of a conventional geothermal development project, EGS will be of little interest to the electrical power industry. A significant obstacle to progress in projects of this general type is the difficulty of appraising the properties (geometry, fluid transmissivity, etc.) of the fracture(s) created/re-opened by injection. Sustainability of power production is critically dependent upon reservoir thermal sweep efficiency, which depends in turn on the geometry of the fracture network and its interconnections with the various production and injection wells used to circulate fluid underground. If no permeable connections are created between the wells, fluid flow will be too slow for practical utility. If the connections are too good, however (such as a production/injection well pair connected by a single very permeable fracture), production wellhead temperatures will decline rapidly. Unless the permeable fractures created by hydrofracturing can be accurately mapped, the cost of subsequent trial-and-error drilling to try to establish a suitable fluid circulation system is likely to dominate project economics and render EGS impractical.

  13. Elevation of Interleukin-18 Correlates With Cardiovascular, Cerebrovascular, and Peripheral Vascular Events

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chih-Hsiang; Fan, Pei-Chun; Lin, Chan-Yu; Yang, Chia-Hung; Chen, Yi-Ting; Chang, Su-Wei; Yang, Huang-Yu; Jenq, Chang-Chyi; Hung, Cheng-Chieh; Yang, Chih-Wei; Chen, Yung-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cardiocerebral vascular events are the major cause of mortality among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Subclinical inflammation and atherosclerosis have been implicated in the pathophysiology of ESRD. Evidence has shown the crucial role of interleukin-18 (IL-18) in inflammation. Interleukin-18 has been markedly upregulated in ESRD patients. Nevertheless, the ability of the IL-18 level to predict cardiocerebral vascular events and the correlation between IL-18 levels and cardiocerebral vascular events have not been established in hemodialysis patients. To determine whether the serum IL-18 level predicts cardiocerebral vascular events, the authors studied 171 ESRD patients. Samples were collected and patients were followed for 24 months. Demographic data, the duration of hemodialysis, nutrition status, inflammatory parameters, dialysis adequacy, and lipid profiles were analyzed to predict the outcome by using multivariate logistic regression. Cutoff points were calculated by acquiring the highest Youden index. The Kaplan–Meier method was used to scrutinize the cumulative proportion of events. The multivariate logistic regression model revealed that serum creatinine, C-reactive protein, and IL-18 levels were independent predictors for cardiocerebral vascular events. The odds ratio of events for each increase in IL-18 (pg/mL) was 1.008 for cardiocerebral vascular events. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of IL-18 was 0.779?±?0.039, the overall correctness was 73%, and the Youden index was highest at a cutoff of 463?pg/mL. In the Kaplan–Meier model, patients with an IL-18 level higher than 463?pg/mL exhibited the highest probability of experiencing an adverse event during the entire follow-up period. Increased serum IL-18 could be considered as a predictor of cardiocerebral vascular events in dialysis patients. It is noteworthy that various comorbidities might interfere the expression of IL-18; therefore, further validation study is required to incorporate IL-18 in clinical use. PMID:26496326

  14. Vascular and Inflammatory Factors in the Pathophysiology of Blast-Induced Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Elder, Gregory A.; Gama Sosa, Miguel A.; De Gasperi, Rita; Stone, James Radford; Dickstein, Dara L.; Haghighi, Fatemeh; Hof, Patrick R.; Ahlers, Stephen T.

    2015-01-01

    Blast-related traumatic brain injury (TBI) has received much recent attention because of its frequency in the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. This renewed interest has led to a rapid expansion of clinical and animal studies related to blast. In humans, high-level blast exposure is associated with a prominent hemorrhagic component. In animal models, blast exerts a variety of effects on the nervous system including vascular and inflammatory effects that can be seen with even low-level blast exposures which produce minimal or no neuronal pathology. Acutely, blast exposure in animals causes prominent vasospasm and decreased cerebral blood flow along with blood-brain barrier breakdown and increased vascular permeability. Besides direct effects on the central nervous system, evidence supports a role for a thoracically mediated effect of blast; whereby, pressure waves transmitted through the systemic circulation damage the brain. Chronically, a vascular pathology has been observed that is associated with alterations of the vascular extracellular matrix. Sustained microglial and astroglial reactions occur after blast exposure. Markers of a central and peripheral inflammatory response are found for sustained periods after blast injury and include elevation of inflammatory cytokines and other inflammatory mediators. At low levels of blast exposure, a microvascular pathology has been observed in the presence of an otherwise normal brain parenchyma, suggesting that the vasculature may be selectively vulnerable to blast injury. Chronic immune activation in brain following vascular injury may lead to neurobehavioral changes in the absence of direct neuronal pathology. Strategies aimed at preventing or reversing vascular damage or modulating the immune response may improve the chronic neuropsychiatric symptoms associated with blast-related TBI. PMID:25852632

  15. Genome Wide Expression Analysis Suggests Perturbation of Vascular Homeostasis during High Altitude Pulmonary Edema

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Manish; Singh, Shashi Bala; Sarkar, Soma

    2014-01-01

    Background High altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) is a life-threatening form of non-cardiogenic edema which occurs in unacclimatized but otherwise normal individuals within two to four days after rapid ascent to altitude beyond 3000 m. The precise pathoetiology and inciting mechanisms regulating HAPE remain unclear. Methodology/Principle findings We performed global gene expression profiling in individuals with established HAPE compared to acclimatized individuals. Our data suggests concurrent modulation of multiple pathways which regulate vascular homeostasis and consequently lung fluid dynamics. These pathways included those which regulate vasoconstriction through smooth muscle contraction, cellular actin cytoskeleton rearrangements and endothelial permeability/dysfunction. Some notable genes within these pathways included MYLK; rho family members ARGEF11, ARHGAP24; cell adhesion molecules such as CLDN6, CLDN23, PXN and VCAM1 besides other signaling intermediates. Further, several important regulators of systemic/pulmonary hypertension including ADRA1D, ECE1, and EDNRA were upregulated in HAPE. We also observed significant upregulation of genes involved in paracrine signaling through chemokines and lymphocyte activation pathways during HAPE represented by transcripts of TNF, JAK2, MAP2K2, MAP2K7, MAPK10, PLCB1, ARAF, SOS1, PAK3 and RELA amongst others. Perturbation of such pathways can potentially skew vascular homeostatic equilibrium towards altered vascular permeability. Additionally, differential regulation of hypoxia-sensing, hypoxia-response and OXPHOS pathway genes in individuals with HAPE were also observed. Conclusions/Significance Our data reveals specific components of the complex molecular circuitry underlying HAPE. We show concurrent perturbation of multiple pathways regulating vascular homeostasis and suggest multi-genic nature of regulation of HAPE. PMID:24465776

  16. In Vitro Evaluation of Carbon-Nanotube-Reinforced Bioprintable Vascular Conduits

    PubMed Central

    Dolati, Farzaneh; Yu, Yin; Zhang, Yahui; De Jesus, Aribet M; Sander, Edward A.; Ozbolat, Ibrahim T.

    2014-01-01

    Vascularization of thick engineered tissue and organ constructs like the heart, liver, pancreas or kidney remains a major challenge in tissue engineering. Vascularization is needed to supply oxygen and nutrients and remove waste in living tissues and organs through a network that should possess high perfusion ability and significant mechanical strength and elasticity. In this paper, we introduce a fabrication process to print vascular conduits directly, where conduits were reinforced with carbon-nanotubes (CNTs) to enhance their mechanical properties and bioprintability. In vitro evaluation of printed conduits encapsulated in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMCs) was performed to characterize the effects of CNT reinforcement on the mechanical, perfusion and biological performance of the conduits. Perfusion and permeability, cell viability, extracellular matrix formation and tissue histology were assessed and discussed, and it was concluded that CNT-reinforced vascular conduits provided a foundation for mechanically appealing constructs where CNTs could be replaced with natural protein nanofibers for further integration of these conduits in large-scale tissue fabrication. PMID:24632802

  17. Preliminary Evidence That High-Dose Vitamin C has a Vascular Disrupting Action in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Baguley, Bruce C.; Ding, Qi; Richardson, Emma

    2014-01-01

    High intravenous doses of vitamin C (ascorbic acid) have been reported to benefit cancer patients, but the data are controversial and there is incomplete knowledge of what physiological mechanisms might be involved in any response. Vitamin C is taken up efficiently by cells expressing SVCT2 transporters and since vascular endothelial cells express SVCT2, we explored the hypothesis that administration of high-dose vitamin C (up to 5?g/kg) to mice might affect vascular endothelial function. A single administration of vitamin C to mice induced time- and dose-dependent increases in plasma concentrations of the serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid (5-HIAA), a marker for vascular disrupting effects. Responses were comparable to those for the tumor vascular disrupting agents, vadimezan and fosbretabulin. High-dose vitamin C administration decreased tumor serotonin concentrations, consistent with the release of serotonin from platelets and its metabolism to 5-HIAA. High-dose vitamin C also significantly increased the degree of hemorrhagic necrosis in tumors removed after 24?h, and significantly decreased tumor volume after 2?days. However, the effect on tumor growth was temporary. The results support the concept that vitamin C at high dose increases endothelial permeability, allowing platelets to escape and release serotonin. Plasma 5-HIAA concentrations could provide a pharmacodynamic biomarker for vitamin C effects in clinical studies. PMID:25414833

  18. In vitro evaluation of carbon-nanotube-reinforced bioprintable vascular conduits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolati, Farzaneh; Yu, Yin; Zhang, Yahui; De Jesus, Aribet M.; Sander, Edward A.; Ozbolat, Ibrahim T.

    2014-04-01

    Vascularization of thick engineered tissue and organ constructs like the heart, liver, pancreas or kidney remains a major challenge in tissue engineering. Vascularization is needed to supply oxygen and nutrients and remove waste in living tissues and organs through a network that should possess high perfusion ability and significant mechanical strength and elasticity. In this paper, we introduce a fabrication process to print vascular conduits directly, where conduits were reinforced with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to enhance their mechanical properties and bioprintability. In vitro evaluation of printed conduits encapsulated in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells was performed to characterize the effects of CNT reinforcement on the mechanical, perfusion and biological performance of the conduits. Perfusion and permeability, cell viability, extracellular matrix formation and tissue histology were assessed and discussed, and it was concluded that CNT-reinforced vascular conduits provided a foundation for mechanically appealing constructs where CNTs could be replaced with natural protein nanofibers for further integration of these conduits in large-scale tissue fabrication.

  19. Plectin reinforces vascular integrity by mediating crosstalk between the vimentin and the actin networks.

    PubMed

    Osmanagic-Myers, Selma; Rus, Stefanie; Wolfram, Michael; Brunner, Daniela; Goldmann, Wolfgang H; Bonakdar, Navid; Fischer, Irmgard; Reipert, Siegfried; Zuzuarregui, Aurora; Walko, Gernot; Wiche, Gerhard

    2015-11-15

    Mutations in the cytoskeletal linker protein plectin result in multisystemic diseases affecting skin and muscle with indications of additional vascular system involvement. To study the mechanisms underlying vascular disorders, we established plectin-deficient endothelial cell and mouse models. We show that apart from perturbing the vimentin cytoskeleton of endothelial cells, plectin deficiency leads to severe distortions of adherens junctions (AJs), as well as tight junctions, accompanied by an upregulation of actin stress fibres and increased cellular contractility. Plectin-deficient endothelial cell layers were more leaky and showed reduced mechanical resilience in fluid-shear stress and mechanical stretch experiments. We suggest that the distorted AJs and upregulated actin stress fibres in plectin-deficient cells are rooted in perturbations of the vimentin cytoskeleton, as similar phenotypes could be mimicked in wild-type cells by disruption of vimentin filaments. In vivo studies in endothelium-restricted conditional plectin-knockout mice revealed significant distortions of AJs in stress-prone aortic arch regions and increased pulmonary vascular leakage. Our study opens a new perspective on cytoskeleton-controlled vascular permeability, where a plectin-organized vimentin scaffold keeps actomyosin contractility 'in-check' and maintains AJ homeostasis. PMID:26519478

  20. Preliminary Evidence That High-Dose Vitamin C has a Vascular Disrupting Action in Mice.

    PubMed

    Baguley, Bruce C; Ding, Qi; Richardson, Emma

    2014-01-01

    High intravenous doses of vitamin C (ascorbic acid) have been reported to benefit cancer patients, but the data are controversial and there is incomplete knowledge of what physiological mechanisms might be involved in any response. Vitamin C is taken up efficiently by cells expressing SVCT2 transporters and since vascular endothelial cells express SVCT2, we explored the hypothesis that administration of high-dose vitamin C (up to 5?g/kg) to mice might affect vascular endothelial function. A single administration of vitamin C to mice induced time- and dose-dependent increases in plasma concentrations of the serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid (5-HIAA), a marker for vascular disrupting effects. Responses were comparable to those for the tumor vascular disrupting agents, vadimezan and fosbretabulin. High-dose vitamin C administration decreased tumor serotonin concentrations, consistent with the release of serotonin from platelets and its metabolism to 5-HIAA. High-dose vitamin C also significantly increased the degree of hemorrhagic necrosis in tumors removed after 24?h, and significantly decreased tumor volume after 2?days. However, the effect on tumor growth was temporary. The results support the concept that vitamin C at high dose increases endothelial permeability, allowing platelets to escape and release serotonin. Plasma 5-HIAA concentrations could provide a pharmacodynamic biomarker for vitamin C effects in clinical studies. PMID:25414833

  1. A complicated case of vascular Pythium insidiosum infection treated with limb-sparing surgery

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Jenny H.; Kerkar, Sid P.; Siegenthaler, Michael P.; Hughes, Marybeth; Pandalai, Prakash K.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Pythiosis is a serious life- and limb-threatening infection endemic to Thailand, but rarely seen in the Western hemisphere. Here, we present a unique case of vascular pythiosis initially managed with limb-sparing vascular bypass grafts complicated by a pseudoaneurysm in our repair. PRESENTATION OF CASE The patient is a 17 year-old Jamaican male with severe aplastic anemia. He sustained a minor injury to his left leg while fishing in Jamaica, which evolved to become an exquisitely tender inguinal swelling. His physical exam and imaging were significant for arteriovenous fistula with limb ischemia. Pathology obtained during surgery for an extra-anatomic vascular bypass showed extensive invasion by Pythium insidiosum. He later developed a pseudoaneurysm at the site of proximal anastomosis and required urgent intervention. DISCUSSION This patient presented with a rare, but classic case of vascular pythiosis, which was unrecognized at the time of presentation. A variety of therapeutic modalities have been used to treat this disease, including antibiotics, antifungals, and immunotherapy, but the ultimate management of vascular pythiosis is surgical source control. CONCLUSION A high index of suspicion in susceptible patients is needed for timely diagnosis of vascular pythiosis to achieve optimal source control. PMID:25194603

  2. Clinical Considerations for the Association between Vascular Damage and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tomiyama, Hirofumi; Yamashina, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Recently, noninvasive and simple morphological and functional methods have been introduced to assess atherosclerotic vascular damage. This review describes the association of CKD with vascular damage as assessed by these methods. Carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and coronary artery calcium score (CACS) are morphological parameters of vascular damage, and an ankle-brachial index (ABI) <0.90 suggests the presence of peripheral arterial disease (i.e., it represents advanced atherosclerosis). Several prospective studies have demonstrated that CKD is a risk factor for an increased IMT, an increased CACS and a decreased ABI. While it has not been clarified whether measuring the IMT or CACS might be useful to predict the progression of renal function decline, a reduced ABI has been demonstrated as a predictor of accelerated renal function decline. On the other hand, pulse wave velocity (PWV) is a marker of arterial stiffness rather than atherosclerosis, reflecting functional abnormalities caused by vascular damage, and moderate-to-severe CKD may be a risk factor for the progression of arterial stiffness. The measurement of functional markers, especially of PWV or pulse pressure, has been demonstrated to be useful to predict the rate of progression of renal function decline. Thus, renal dysfunction and atherogenic states may be components of a vicious cycle, and vascular function abnormalities associated with atherosclerosis may accelerate this cycle. As the next step, we propose to examine whether improvement of vascular function abnormalities can interrupt this vicious cycle.

  3. A Novel Ovine ex vivo Arteriovenous Shunt Model to Test Vascular Implantability

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Haofan; Schlaich, Evan M.; Row, Sindhu; Andreadis, Stelios T.; Swartz, Daniel D.

    2011-01-01

    The major objective of successful development of tissue-engineered vascular grafts is long-term in vivo patency. Optimization of matrix, cell source, surface modifications, and physical preconditioning are all elements of attaining a compatible, durable, and functional vascular construct. In vitro model systems are inadequate to test elements of thrombogenicity and vascular dynamic functional properties while in vivo implantation is complicated, labor-intensive, and cost-ineffective. We proposed an ex vivo ovine arteriovenous shunt model in which we can test the patency and physical properties of vascular grafts under physiologic conditions. The pressure, flow rate, and vascular diameter were monitored in real-time in order to evaluate the pulse wave velocity, augmentation index, and dynamic elastic modulus, all indicators of graft stiffness. Carotid arteries, jugular veins, and small intestinal submucosa-based grafts were tested. SIS grafts demonstrated physical properties between those of carotid arteries and jugular veins. Anticoagulation properties of grafts were assessed via scanning electron microscopy imaging, en face immunostaining, and histology. Luminal seeding with endothelial cells greatly decreased the attachment of thrombotic components. This model is also suture free, allowing for multiple samples to be stably processed within one animal. This tunable (pressure, flow, shear) ex vivo shunt model can be used to optimize the implantability and long-term patency of tissue-engineered vascular constructs. PMID:22005667

  4. Major vascular injuries complicating knee arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bancu, Serban; Muresan, Mircea; Sala, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Starting with a case report, we made a detailed review of the literature, with the purpose of identifying and analyzing the type of iatrogenic vascular lesion following knee arthroscopy and the method of vascular repair. A PubMed literature search was undertaken to locate all reported cases of major vascular iatrogenic injuries during arthroscopic knee procedures. We identified 39 papers which report a total of 62 cases of major iatrogenic popliteal lesions after knee arthroscopy, between 1985 and 2014. The type of arthroscopic intervention performed, the type of iatrogenic vascular lesion encountered, the time passed until its discovery and treatment, the method of vascular reconstruction, and the postoperative course are presented. Postarthroscopy vascular complications are infrequent but potentially disastrous for the condition of the affected inferior limb. An early diagnosis and reintervention are mandatory for a good postoperative outcome. PMID:26240627

  5. Modeling Hysteresis Effect in Three-Phase Relative Permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kianinejad, A.; Chen, X.; DiCarlo, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    Simulation and fluid flow prediction of many petroleum enhanced oil recovery methods as well as environmental processes such as carbon dioxide (CO2) geological storage requires accurate modeling and determination of relative permeability under different saturation histories. Based on this critical need, there has been several different three-phase relative permeability models developed to predict the hysteresis effects in relative permeability, most of which requiring many different parameters which introduce extreme complexity to the models for practical purposes. In this work, we experimentally measured three-phase, water/oil/gas, relative permeability in a 1-m long water-wet sand pack, under several different flow histories. We measured the in-situ saturations along the sand pack using a CT scanner. We then determined the relative permeabilities directly from the measured in-situ saturations, using unsteady-state method. Based on our results, good estimation of residual saturations yields in excellent three-phase relative permeability estimations by just using the simple, standard relative permeability models such as, Saturation Weighted Interpolation (SWI), Corey's and Stones. Our results show that, the key parameter to model the hysteresis in three-phase relative permeability (effect of saturation history) is the residual saturations. Once the residual saturations were correctly determined for each specific saturation path, the standard relative permeability models can predict the three-phase relative permeabilities perfectly.

  6. Migraine and Stroke: “Vascular” Comorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Guidetti, Donata; Rota, Eugenia; Morelli, Nicola; Immovilli, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Several comorbidities are associated to migraine. Recent meta-analyses have consistently demonstrated a relationship between migraine and stroke, which is well-defined for ischemic stroke and migraine with aura (MA), even stronger in females on oral contraceptives or smokers. However, there seems to be no clear-cut association between stroke in migraineurs and the common vascular risk factors, at least in the young adult population. Migraineurs also run an increased risk of hemorrhagic stroke, while the association between migraine and cardiovascular disease remains poorly defined. Another aspect is the relationship between migraine and the presence of silent brain lesions. It has been demonstrated that there is an increased frequency of ischemic lesions in the white matter of migraineurs, especially silent infarcts in the posterior circulation territory in patients with at least 10 attacks per month. Although there is a higher prevalence of patent foramen ovale (PFO) in migraineurs, the relationship between migraine and PFO remains controversial and PFO closure is not a recommended procedure to prevent migraine. As an increased frequency of cervical artery dissections has been observed in migrainous patients, it has been hypothesized that migraine may represent a predisposing factor for cervical artery dissection. There still remains the question as to whether migraine should be considered a true “vascular disease” or if the comorbidity between migraine and cerebrovascular disease may have underlying shared risk factors or pathophysiological mechanisms. Although further studies are required to clarify this issue, current evidence supports a clinical management where MA patients should be screened for other concomitant vascular risk factors and treated accordingly. PMID:25339937

  7. Vascular thalamic amnesia: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Carlesimo, Giovanni Augusto; Lombardi, Maria Giovanna; Caltagirone, Carlo

    2011-04-01

    In humans lacunar infarcts in the mesial and anterior regions of the thalami are frequently associated with amnesic syndromes. In this review paper, we scrutinized 41 papers published between 1983 and 2009 that provided data on a total of 83 patients with the critical ischemic lesions (i.e. 17 patients with right-sided lesions, 25 with left-sided lesions and 41 with bilateral lesions). We aimed to find answers to the following questions concerning the vascular thalamic amnesia syndrome: (i) Which qualitative pattern of memory impairment (and associated cognitive and behavioral deficits) do these patients present? (ii) Which lesioned intrathalamic structures are primarily responsible for the amnesic syndrome? (iii) Are the recollection and familiarity components of declarative memory underlain by the same or by different thalamic structures? Results of the review indicate that, similar to patients with amnesic syndromes due to mesio-temporal lobe damage, patients with vascular thalamic amnesia display a prevalent deficit of declarative anterograde long-term memory, a less consistent deficit of declarative retrograde long-term memory and substantially spared short-term and implicit memory. Unlike mesio-temporal lobe patients, however, vascular thalamic amnesics often present dysexecutive and behavioral deficits similar to those observed in patients with frontal damage. The presence of an amnesic syndrome in patients with thalamic lacunar infarcts is strongly predicted by involvement of the mammillo-thalamic tract, which connects the anterior nuclei complex to the hippocampus proper via the fornix and the mammillary bodies. Finally, data reported in a few single cases provide support for the hypothesis that thalamic regions connected to distinct areas of the mesio-temporal lobe play differential roles in recollection and familiarity processes. The mammillo-thalamic tract/anterior nuclei axis seems primarily implicated in recollective processes, whereas the ventroamygdalofugal pathway/medio-dorsal axis primarily underlies familiarity processes. PMID:21255590

  8. Chemical modulation of airway epithelial permeability.

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, R C

    1980-01-01

    The mucosal surface of the conducting airways has specialized structures for respiratory defense. Glands secret mucus that may act as a barrier to particle penetration and participate in particle clearance. Intraepithelial irritant receptors aid in particle clearance through airway constriction and cough. The epithelium acts as a barrier to the penetration of inhaled material into the airway wall. Morphologic studies have identified the tight junctions adjoining respiratory epithelial cells as the principal barrier to passive solute translocation across the airway. New approaches have been used to study airway epithelial function. Use of excised canine trachea mounted in Ussing chambers has permitted quantitative estimates of probe molecule permeation, the correlation of permeability with bioelectric properties, and estimation of equivalent pore radii. Probe molecule diffusion across canine trachea [mean transmucosal electric potential difference (PD) = 33 mV, lumen negative] is directly related to conductance (2.9 mS/cm2) and is compatible with an equivalent pore radius of 7.5 nm. Direct measurement of tracheal PD in vivo (-29 mV) facilitates study of the genesis of the biopotential in intact animals. Measurement of the movement of HRP by radioimmunoassay has allowed correlation of the rate of probe flow across airway walls in vivo with ultrastructure. These approaches lend themselves to the study of pharmacologic and toxicologic effects on epithelial function. Antigen challenge, diethyl ether, and unfractionated cigarette smoke have been shown to increase epithelial permeability to HRP accompanied by ultrastructural evidence of tight junctional damage. Application of pharmacologic agents, e.g. amphotericin, ouabain, onto the respiratory epithelium induces similar changes in in vitro and in vivo PD. We conclude that techniques that have been used to measure permeability and transport in other epithelia may help elucidate modes of action of environmental agents on airways. PMID:6250812

  9. Engineered Trehalose Permeable to Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Abazari, Alireza; Meimetis, Labros G; Budin, Ghyslain; Bale, Shyam Sundhar; Weissleder, Ralph; Toner, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Trehalose is a naturally occurring disaccharide which is associated with extraordinary stress-tolerance capacity in certain species of unicellular and multicellular organisms. In mammalian cells, presence of intra- and extracellular trehalose has been shown to confer improved tolerance against freezing and desiccation. Since mammalian cells do not synthesize nor import trehalose, the development of novel methods for efficient intracellular delivery of trehalose has been an ongoing investigation. Herein, we studied the membrane permeability of engineered lipophilic derivatives of trehalose. Trehalose conjugated with 6 acetyl groups (trehalose hexaacetate or 6-O-Ac-Tre) demonstrated superior permeability in rat hepatocytes compared with regular trehalose, trehalose diacetate (2-O-Ac-Tre) and trehalose tetraacetate (4-O-Ac-Tre). Once in the cell, intracellular esterases hydrolyzed the 6-O-Ac-Tre molecules, releasing free trehalose into the cytoplasm. The total concentration of intracellular trehalose (plus acetylated variants) reached as high as 10 fold the extracellular concentration of 6-O-Ac-Tre, attaining concentrations suitable for applications in biopreservation. To describe this accumulation phenomenon, a diffusion-reaction model was proposed and the permeability and reaction kinetics of 6-O-Ac-Tre were determined by fitting to experimental data. Further studies suggested that the impact of the loading and the presence of intracellular trehalose on cellular viability and function were negligible. Engineering of trehalose chemical structure rather than manipulating the cell, is an innocuous, cell-friendly method for trehalose delivery, with demonstrated potential for trehalose loading in different types of cells and cell lines, and can facilitate the wide-spread application of trehalose as an intracellular protective agent in biopreservation studies. PMID:26115179

  10. Aerobic denitrification in permeable Wadden Sea sediments.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hang; Schreiber, Frank; Collins, Gavin; Jensen, Marlene M; Svitlica, Olivera; Kostka, Joel E; Lavik, Gaute; de Beer, Dirk; Zhou, Huai-yang; Kuypers, Marcel M M

    2010-03-01

    Permeable or sandy sediments cover the majority of the seafloor on continental shelves worldwide, but little is known about their role in the coastal nitrogen cycle. We investigated the rates and controls of nitrogen loss at a sand flat (Janssand) in the central German Wadden Sea using multiple experimental approaches, including the nitrogen isotope pairing technique in intact core incubations, slurry incubations, a flow-through stirred retention reactor and microsensor measurements. Results indicate that permeable Janssand sediments are characterized by some of the highest potential denitrification rates (> or =0.19 mmol N m(-2) h(-1)) in the marine environment. Moreover, several lines of evidence showed that denitrification occurred under oxic conditions. In intact cores, microsensor measurements showed that the zones of nitrate/nitrite and O(2) consumption overlapped. In slurry incubations conducted with (15)NO(3)(-) enrichment in gas-impermeable bags, denitrification assays revealed that N(2) production occurred at initial O(2) concentrations of up to approximately 90 microM. Initial denitrification rates were not substantially affected by O(2) in surficial (0-4 cm) sediments, whereas rates increased by twofold with O(2) depletion in the at 4-6 cm depth interval. In a well mixed, flow-through stirred retention reactor (FTSRR), (29)N(2) and (30)N(2) were produced and O(2) was consumed simultaneously, as measured online using membrane inlet mass spectrometry. We hypothesize that the observed high denitrification rates in the presence of O(2) may result from the adaptation of denitrifying bacteria to recurrent tidally induced redox oscillations in permeable sediments at Janssand. PMID:20010631

  11. Engineered Trehalose Permeable to Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Abazari, Alireza; Meimetis, Labros G.; Budin, Ghyslain; Bale, Shyam Sundhar; Weissleder, Ralph; Toner, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Trehalose is a naturally occurring disaccharide which is associated with extraordinary stress-tolerance capacity in certain species of unicellular and multicellular organisms. In mammalian cells, presence of intra- and extracellular trehalose has been shown to confer improved tolerance against freezing and desiccation. Since mammalian cells do not synthesize nor import trehalose, the development of novel methods for efficient intracellular delivery of trehalose has been an ongoing investigation. Herein, we studied the membrane permeability of engineered lipophilic derivatives of trehalose. Trehalose conjugated with 6 acetyl groups (trehalose hexaacetate or 6-O-Ac-Tre) demonstrated superior permeability in rat hepatocytes compared with regular trehalose, trehalose diacetate (2-O-Ac-Tre) and trehalose tetraacetate (4-O-Ac-Tre). Once in the cell, intracellular esterases hydrolyzed the 6-O-Ac-Tre molecules, releasing free trehalose into the cytoplasm. The total concentration of intracellular trehalose (plus acetylated variants) reached as high as 10 fold the extracellular concentration of 6-O-Ac-Tre, attaining concentrations suitable for applications in biopreservation. To describe this accumulation phenomenon, a diffusion-reaction model was proposed and the permeability and reaction kinetics of 6-O-Ac-Tre were determined by fitting to experimental data. Further studies suggested that the impact of the loading and the presence of intracellular trehalose on cellular viability and function were negligible. Engineering of trehalose chemical structure rather than manipulating the cell, is an innocuous, cell-friendly method for trehalose delivery, with demonstrated potential for trehalose loading in different types of cells and cell lines, and can facilitate the wide-spread application of trehalose as an intracellular protective agent in biopreservation studies. PMID:26115179

  12. Clamshell excavation of a permeable reactive barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molfetta, Antonio Di; Sethi, Rajandrea

    2006-06-01

    Nowadays, permeable reactive barriers (PRB) are one of the most widespread techniques for the remediation of contaminated aquifers. Over the past 10 years, the use of iron-based PRBs has evolved from innovative to accepted standard practice for the treatment of a variety of groundwater contaminants (ITRC in: Permeable reactive barriers: lessons learned/new directions. The Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council, Permeable Reactive Barriers Team 2005). Although, a variety of excavation methods have been developed, backhoe excavators are often used for the construction of PRBs. The aim of this study is to describe the emplacement of a full-scale PRB and the benefits deriving from the use of a crawler crane equipped with a hydraulic grab (also known as clamshell excavator) in the excavation phases. The studied PRB was designed to remediate a chlorinated hydrocarbons plume at an old industrial landfill site, in Avigliana, near the city of Torino, in Italy. The continuous reactive barrier was designed to be 120 m long, 13 m deep, and 0.6 m thick. The installation of the barrier was accomplished using a clamshell for the excavation of the trench and a guar-gum slurry to support the walls. The performance of this technique was outstanding and allowed the installation of the PRB in 7 days. The degree of precision of the excavation was very high because of the intrinsic characteristics of this excavation tool and of the use of a concrete curb to guide the hydraulic grab. Moreover, the adopted technique permitted a saving of bioslurry thus minimizing the amount of biocide required.

  13. Evaluation of permeable fractures in rock aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bok Lee, Hang

    2015-04-01

    In this study, the practical usefulness and fundamental applicability of a self-potential (SP) method for identifying the permeable fractures were evaluated by a comparison of SP methods with other geophysical logging methods and hydraulic tests. At a 10 m-shallow borehole in the study site, the candidates of permeable fractures crossing the borehole were first determined by conventional geophysical methods such as an acoustic borehole televiwer, temperature, electrical conductivity and gamma-gamma loggings, which was compared to the analysis by the SP method. Constant pressure injection and recovery tests were conducted for verification of the hydraulic properties of the fractures identified by various logging methods. The acoustic borehole televiwer and gamma-gamma loggings detected the open space or weathering zone within the borehole, but they cannot prove the possibility of a groundwater flow through the detected fractures. The temperature and electrical conductivity loggings had limitations to detect the fractured zones where groundwater in the borehole flows out to the surrounding rock aquifers. Comparison of results from different methods showed that there is a best correlation between the distribution of hydraulic conductivity and the variation of the SP signals, and the SP logging can estimate accurately the hydraulic activity as well as the location of permeable fractures. Based on the results, the SP method is recommended for determining the hydraulically-active fractures rather than other conventional geophysical loggings. This self-potential method can be effectively applied in the initial stage of a site investigation which selects the optimal location and evaluates the hydrogeological property of fractures in target sites for the underground structure including the geothermal reservoir and radioactive waste disposal.

  14. Cryptic vascular malformations involving the brainstem

    SciTech Connect

    Yeates, A.; Enzmann, D.

    1983-01-01

    Six patients with angiographically cryptic vascular malformations involving the brainstem were examined with computed tomography (CT). The clinical and CT findings of cryptic vascular malformations of the brainstem are described and distinguished from those of brainstem glioma and multiple sclerosis. Calcification within a brainstem lesion that displays relatively little mass effect and shows little contrast enhancement, particularly when associated with a long history of waxing and waning brainstem symptoms, should suggest a vascular malformation.

  15. Direct intratumoral embolization of intranasal vascular tumors.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyun-Uk; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Park, Chang-Mook; Kim, Jung-Soo

    2013-02-01

    Embolization is a well established technique that facilitates the subsequent surgical removal of vascularized tumors such as juvenile angiofibroma. Preoperative transarterial embolization has proven beneficial for decreasing intraoperative blood loss. However, the procedure is often incomplete owing to extensive vascular structure. Direct intratumoral embolization may help overcome this limitation. We report our experience with embolization of nasal vascular tumors by means of direct intratumoral injection of n-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA). PMID:22341928

  16. Vascular ring complicates accidental button battery ingestion.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Ronald W; Schwartz, Matthew C; Stephany, Joshua; Donnelly, Lane F; Franciosi, James P; Epelman, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Button battery ingestion can lead to dangerous complications, including vasculoesophageal fistula formation. The presence of a vascular ring may complicate battery ingestion if the battery lodges at the level of the ring and its important vascular structures. We report a 4-year-old boy with trisomy 21 who was diagnosed with a vascular ring at the time of button battery ingestion and died 9 days after presentation due to massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding from esophageal erosion and vasculoesophageal fistula formation. PMID:25662210

  17. Continental Portuguese Territory Flood Susceptibility Index - contribution to a vulnerability index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacinto, R.; Grosso, N.; Reis, E.; Dias, L.; Santos, F. D.; Garrett, P.

    2015-08-01

    This work defines a national flood susceptibility index for the Portuguese continental territory, by proposing the aggregation of different variables which represent natural conditions for permeability, runoff and accumulation. This index is part of the national vulnerability index developed in the scope of Flood Maps in Climate Change Scenarios (CIRAC) project, supported by the Portuguese Association of Insurers (APS). This approach expands on previous works by trying to bridge the gap between different flood mechanisms (e.g. progressive and flash floods) occurring at different spatial scales in the Portuguese territory through (a) selecting homogeneously processed data sets and (b) aggregating their values to better translate the spatially continuous and cumulative influence in floods at multiple spatial scales. Results show a good ability to capture, in the higher susceptibility classes, different flood types: fluvial floods and flash floods. Lower values are usually related to mountainous areas, low water accumulation potential and more permeable soils. Validation with independent flood data sets confirmed these index characteristics, although some overestimation can be seen in the southern region of Alentejo where, due to a dense hydrographic network and an overall low slope, floods are not as frequent as a result of lower precipitation mean values. Future work will focus on (i) including extreme precipitation data sets to represent the triggering factor, (ii) improving representation of smaller and stepper basins, (iii) optimizing variable weight definition process and (iii) developing more robust independent flood validation data sets.

  18. Hedgehog signalling in vascular development.

    PubMed

    Nagase, Takashi; Nagase, Miki; Machida, Masafumi; Fujita, Toshiro

    2008-01-01

    The Hedgehog family of proteins are powerful morphogens mediating embryonic development as well as adult morphogenesis and carcinogenesis. For example, excess hedgehog activity has been implicated in basal cell carcinoma, medulloblastoma and rhabdomyosarcoma. More recently, hedgehog signalling has been implicated in angiogenesis. While hedgehog signalling in adult angiogenesis may constitute a simple recapitulation of that in embryonic development, it should be appreciated that Hedgehog signalling occurs in embryonic angiogenesis in different developmental contexts. This article reviews the role of Hedgehog signalling in both embryonic and postnatal vascular development. The temporal importance of a window of hedgehog dependent angiogenesis during development is emphasised and illustrated using a whole mouse embryo culture system. PMID:18301996

  19. Gas permeability measurements for film envelope materials

    DOEpatents

    Ludtka, Gerard M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Kollie, Thomas G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Watkin, David C. (Clinton, TN); Walton, David G. (Knoxville, TN)

    1998-01-01

    Method and apparatus for measuring the permeability of polymer film materials such as used in super-insulation powder-filled evacuated panels (PEPs) reduce the time required for testing from several years to weeks or months. The method involves substitution of a solid non-outgassing body having a free volume of between 0% and 25% of its total volume for the usual powder in the PEP to control the free volume of the "body-filled panel". Pressure versus time data for the test piece permit extrapolation to obtain long term performance of the candidate materials.

  20. Gas permeability measurements for film envelope materials

    DOEpatents

    Ludtka, G.M.; Kollie, T.G.; Watkin, D.C.; Walton, D.G.

    1998-05-12

    Method and apparatus for measuring the permeability of polymer film materials such as used in super-insulation powder-filled evacuated panels (PEPs) reduce the time required for testing from several years to weeks or months. The method involves substitution of a solid non-outgassing body having a free volume of between 0% and 25% of its total volume for the usual powder in the PEP to control the free volume of the ``body-filled panel.`` Pressure versus time data for the test piece permit extrapolation to obtain long term performance of the candidate materials. 4 figs.

  1. Gas permeable electrode for electrochemical system

    DOEpatents

    Ludwig, Frank A. (Rancho Palos Verdes, CA); Townsend, Carl W. (Los Angeles, CA)

    1989-01-01

    An electrode apparatus adapted for use in electrochemical systems having an anode compartment and a cathode compartment in which gas and ions are produced and consumed in the compartments during generation of electrical current. The electrode apparatus includes a membrane for separating the anode compartment from the cathode compartment wherein the membrane is permeable to both ions and gas. The cathode and anode for the assembly are provided on opposite sides of the membrane. During use of the membrane-electrode apparatus in electrochemical cells, the gas and ions generated at the cathode or anode migrate through the membrane to provide efficient transfer of gas and ions between the anode and cathode compartments.

  2. PERMEABILITY OF SALTSTONE MEASUREMENT BY BEAM BENDING

    SciTech Connect

    Harbour, J; Tommy Edwards, T; Vickie Williams, V

    2008-01-30

    One of the goals of the Saltstone variability study is to identify (and, quantify the impact of) the operational and compositional variables that control or influence the important processing and performance properties of Saltstone mixes. A performance property for Saltstone mixes that is important but not routinely measured is the liquid permeability or saturated hydraulic conductivity of the cured Saltstone mix. The value for the saturated hydraulic conductivity is an input into the Performance Assessment for the SRS Z-Area vaults. Therefore, it is important to have a method available that allows for an accurate and reproducible measurement of permeability quickly and inexpensively. One such method that could potentially meet these requirements for the measurement of saturated hydraulic conductivity is the technique of beam bending, developed by Professor George Scherer at Princeton University. In order to determine the feasibility of this technique for Saltstone mixes, a summer student, David Feliciano, was hired to work at Princeton under the direction of George Scherer. This report details the results of this study which demonstrated the feasibility and applicability of the beam bending method to measurement of permeability of Saltstone samples. This research effort used samples made at Princeton from a Modular Caustic side solvent extraction Unit based simulant (MCU) and premix at a water to premix ratio of 0.60. The saturated hydraulic conductivities for these mixes were measured by the beam bending technique and the values determined were of the order of 1.4 to 3.4 x 10{sup -9} cm/sec. These values of hydraulic conductivity are consistent with independently measured values of this property on similar MCU based mixes by Dixon and Phifer. These values are also consistent with the hydraulic conductivity of a generic Saltstone mix measured by Langton in 1985. The high water to premix ratio used for Saltstone along with the relatively low degree of hydration for MCU based mixes leads to high total and capillary porosities. These two conditions generally lead to higher permeabilities as has been well documented in the literature for typical cementitious pastes in water. Therefore, it is not unexpected that the hydraulic conductivities of these Saltstone mixes are relatively high.

  3. Scaffolds in vascular regeneration: current status

    PubMed Central

    Thottappillil, Neelima; Nair, Prabha D

    2015-01-01

    An ideal vascular substitute, especially in <6 mm diameter applications, is a major clinical essentiality in blood vessel replacement surgery. Blood vessels are structurally complex and functionally dynamic tissue, with minimal regeneration potential. These have composite extracellular matrix (ECM) and arrangement. The interplay between ECM components and tissue specific cells gives blood vessels their specialized functional attributes. The core of vascular tissue engineering and regeneration relies on the challenges in creating vascular conduits that match native vessels and adequately regenerate in vivo. Out of numerous vascular regeneration concerns, the relevance of ECM emphasizes much attention toward appropriate choice of scaffold material and further scaffold development strategies. The review is intended to be focused on the various approaches of scaffold materials currently in use in vascular regeneration and current state of the art. Scaffold of choice in vascular tissue engineering ranges from natural to synthetic, decellularized, and even scaffold free approach. The applicability of tubular scaffold for in vivo vascular regeneration is under active investigation. A patent conduit with an ample endothelial luminal layer that can regenerate in vivo remains an unanswered query in the field of small diameter vascular tissue engineering. Besides, scaffolds developed for vascular regeneration, should aim at providing functional substitutes for use in a regenerative approach from the laboratory bench to patient bedside. PMID:25632236

  4. What about temperature? Measuring permeability at magmatic conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushnir, Alexandra R. L.; Martel, Caroline; Champallier, Rémi; Reuschlé, Thierry

    2015-04-01

    The explosive potential of volcanoes is intimately linked to permeability, which is governed by the connectivity of the porous structure of the magma and surrounding edifice. As magma ascends, volatiles exsolve from the melt and expand, creating a gas phase within the conduit. In the absence of a permeable structure capable of dissipating these gases, the propulsive force of an explosive eruption arises from the gas expansion and the build up of subsurface overpressures. Thus, characterizing the permeability of volcanic rocks under in-situ conditions (high temperature and pressure) allows us to better understand the outgassing potential and explosivity of volcanic systems. Current studies of the permeabilities of volcanic rocks generally measure permeability at room temperature using gas permeameters or model permeability using analytic imaging. Our goal is to perform and assess permeability measurements made at high temperature and high pressure in the interest of approaching the permeability of the samples at magmatic conditions. We measure the permeability of andesitic samples expelled during the 2010 Mt. Merapi eruption. We employ and compare two protocols for measuring permeability at high temperature and under high pressure using argon gas in an internally heated Paterson apparatus with an isolated pore fluid system. We first use the pulse decay method to measure the permeability of our samples, then compare these values to permeability measurements performed under steady state flow. We consider the steady state flow method the more rigorous of the two protocols, as we are more capable of accounting for the temperature gradient within the entire pore fluid system. At temperatures in excess of 700°C and pressures of 100 MPa, permeability values plummet by several orders of magnitude. These values are significantly lower than those commonly reported for room temperature permeameter measurements. The reduction in permeability at high temperature is a combination of pressure and possible viscous healing. Importantly, at temperatures above the glass transition temperature (the temperature above which the glass within the sample begins to behave viscously) the permeable structure of the sample becomes increasingly transient. This changeable structure, as well as the technical nuances of high pressure-temperature measurements makes the measurement and interpretation of permeability at high temperatures challenging. Indeed, a re-evaluation of the use of the term 'permeability' when discussing magmas is necessary.

  5. CIRSE Vascular Closure Device Registry

    SciTech Connect

    Reekers, Jim A.; Mueller-Huelsbeck, Stefan; Libicher, Martin; Atar, Eli; Trentmann, Jens; Goffette, Pierre; Borggrefe, Jan; Zelenak, Kamil; Hooijboer, Pieter; Belli, Anna-Maria

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: Vascular closure devices are routinely used after many vascular interventional radiology procedures. However, there have been no major multicenter studies to assess the safety and effectiveness of the routine use of closure devices in interventional radiology. Methods: The CIRSE registry of closure devices with an anchor and a plug started in January 2009 and ended in August 2009. A total of 1,107 patients were included in the registry. Results: Deployment success was 97.2%. Deployment failure specified to access type was 8.8% [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 5.0-14.5] for antegrade access and 1.8% (95% CI 1.1-2.9) for retrograde access (P = 0.001). There was no difference in deployment failure related to local PVD at the access site. Calcification was a reason for deployment failure in only <0.5% of patients. Postdeployment bleeding occurred in 6.4%, and most these (51.5%) could be managed with light manual compression. During follow-up, other device-related complications were reported in 1.3%: seven false aneurysms, three hematoma >5.9 cm, and two vessel occlusions. Conclusion: The conclusion of this registry of closure devices with an anchor and a plug is that the use of this device in interventional radiology procedures is safe, with a low incidence of serious access site complications. There seems to be no difference in complications between antegrade and retrograde access and other parameters.

  6. Leaf hydraulics II: vascularized tissues.

    PubMed

    Rockwell, Fulton E; Holbrook, N Michele; Stroock, Abraham D

    2014-01-01

    Current models of leaf hydration employ an Ohm's law analogy of the leaf as an ideal capacitor, neglecting the resistance to flow between cells, or treat the leaf as a plane sheet with a source of water at fixed potential filling the mid-plane, neglecting the discrete placement of veins as well as their resistance. We develop a model of leaf hydration that considers the average conductance of the vascular network to a representative areole (region bounded by the vascular network), and represent the volume of tissue within the areole as a poroelastic composite of cells and air spaces. Solutions to the 3D flow problem are found by numerical simulation, and these results are then compared to 1D models with exact solutions for a range of leaf geometries, based on a survey of temperate woody plants. We then show that the hydration times given by these solutions are well approximated by a sum of the ideal capacitor and plane sheet times, representing the time for transport through the vasculature and tissue respectively. We then develop scaling factors relating this approximate solution to the 3D model, and examine the dependence of these scaling factors on leaf geometry. Finally, we apply a similar strategy to reduce the dimensions of the steady state problem, in the context of peristomatal transpiration, and consider the relation of transpirational gradients to equilibrium leaf water potential measurements. PMID:24012489

  7. Bioinspired Tuning of Hydrogel Permeability-Rigidity Dependency for 3D Cell Culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Min Kyung; Rich, Max H.; Baek, Kwanghyun; Lee, Jonghwi; Kong, Hyunjoon

    2015-03-01

    Hydrogels are being extensively used for three-dimensional immobilization and culture of cells in fundamental biological studies, biochemical processes, and clinical treatments. However, it is still a challenge to support viability and regulate phenotypic activities of cells in a structurally stable gel, because the gel becomes less permeable with increasing rigidity. To resolve this challenge, this study demonstrates a unique method to enhance the permeability of a cell-laden hydrogel while avoiding a significant change in rigidity of the gel. Inspired by the grooved skin textures of marine organisms, a hydrogel is assembled to present computationally optimized micro-sized grooves on the surface. Separately, a gel is engineered to preset aligned microchannels similar to a plant's vascular bundles through a uniaxial freeze-drying process. The resulting gel displays significantly increased water diffusivity with reduced changes of gel stiffness, exclusively when the microgrooves and microchannels are aligned together. No significant enhancement of rehydration is achieved when the microgrooves and microchannels are not aligned. Such material design greatly enhances viability and neural differentiation of stem cells and 3D neural network formation within the gel.

  8. A rice high-affinity potassium transporter (HKT) conceals a calcium-permeable cation channel.

    PubMed

    Lan, Wen-Zhi; Wang, Wei; Wang, Suo-Min; Li, Le-Gong; Buchanan, Bob B; Lin, Hong-Xuan; Gao, Ji-Ping; Luan, Sheng

    2010-04-13

    Plant high-affinity K(+) transport (HKT) proteins are so named because of their relation to bacterial and fungal transporters that mediate high-affinity K(+) uptake. The view that HKT family members are sodium-selective uniporters or sodium-potassium symporters is widely held. We have found that one of the rice HKT proteins also functions as a Ca(2+)-permeable cation channel that conducts current carried by a wide range of monovalent and divalent cations. The HKT rice gene, named OsHKT2;4, is expressed in several cell types, including root hairs and vascular parenchyma cells. The protein is localized to the plasma membrane, thereby providing a mechanism for cation uptake and extrusion. This finding goes against firmly entrenched dogma in showing that HKT proteins can function as both ion carriers and channels. The study further extends the function of HKT proteins to Ca(2+)-linked processes and, in so doing, defines a previously undescribed type of Ca(2+)-permeable cation channels in plants. The work also raises questions about the evolutionary changes in this protein family following the divergence of monocots and dicots. PMID:20351263

  9. Tight junction, selective permeability, and related diseases.

    PubMed

    Krug, Susanne M; Schulzke, Jörg D; Fromm, Michael

    2014-12-01

    The tight junction forms a barrier against unlimited paracellular passage but some of the tight junction proteins just do the opposite, they form extracellular channels zigzagging between lateral membranes of neighboring cells. All of these channel-forming proteins and even some of the barrier formers exhibit selectivity, which means that they prefer certain substances over others. All channel formers exhibit at least one of the three types of selectivity: for cations (claudin-2, -10b, -15), for anions (claudin-10a, -17) or for water (claudin-2). Also some, but not all, barrier-forming claudins are charge-selective (claudin-4, -8, -14). Moreover, occludin and tricellulin turned out to be relevant for barrier formation against macromolecule passage. Tight junction proteins are dysregulated or can be genetically defective in numerous diseases, which may lead to three effects: (i) impaired paracellular transport e.g. causing magnesium loss in the kidney, (ii) increased paracellular transport of solutes and water e.g. causing leak-flux diarrhea in the intestine, and (iii) increased permeability to large molecules e.g. unwanted intestinal pathogen uptake fueling inflammatory processes. This review gives an overview on the properties of tight junction proteins featuring selective permeability, and in this context explains how these proteins induce or aggravate diseases. PMID:25220018

  10. Salt-saturated concrete strength and permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeifle, T.W.

    1996-11-01

    Laboratory-scale experiments applicable to the use of salt-saturated concrete as a seal material for a transuranic waste repository have been completed. Nitrogen gas permeability measurements were made using a flexible-wall permeameter, a confining pressure of 1 MPa, and gas pressure gradients ranging from 0.3 MPa to 0.75 MPa. Results show that salt-saturated concrete has very low intrinsic permeability with values ranging from 9.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}22} m{sup 2} to 9.7 {times} 10{sup {minus}17} m{sup 2}. Strength and deformation characteristics were investigated under conditions of triaxial compression with confining pressures ranging from 0 to 15 MPa using either axial strain-rate or axial stress-rate control and show that the failure strength of concrete increases with confining pressure which can be adequately described through pressure-sensitive failure criteria. Axial, radial, and volumetric strains were also measured during each test and these data were used to determine elastic properties. Experimental results are applicable in the design and analysis of scale-related functions and apply to other concrete structures subjected to compressive loadings such as dams and prestressed structural members.

  11. Reservoir permeability from seismic attribute analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Silin, Dmitriy; Goloshubin, G.; Silin, D.; Vingalov, V.; Takkand, G.; Latfullin, M.

    2008-02-15

    In case of porous fluid-saturated medium the Biot's poroelasticity theory predicts a movement of the pore fluid relative to the skeleton on seismic wave propagation through the medium. This phenomenon opens an opportunity for investigation of the flow properties of the hydrocarbon-saturated reservoirs. It is well known that relative fluid movement becomes negligible at seismic frequencies if porous material is homogeneous and well cemented. In this case the theory predicts an underestimated seismic wave velocity dispersion and attenuation. Based on Biot's theory, Helle et al. (2003) have numerically demonstrated the substantial effects on both velocity and attenuation by heterogeneous permeability and saturation in the rocks. Besides fluid flow effect, the effects of scattering (Gurevich, et al., 1997) play very important role in case of finely layered porous rocks and heterogeneous fluid saturation. We have used both fluid flow and scattering effects to derive a frequency-dependent seismic attribute which is proportional to fluid mobility and applied it for analysis of reservoir permeability.

  12. Modelling of Longwall Mining-Induced Strata Permeability Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikary, D. P.; Guo, H.

    2015-01-01

    The field measurement of permeability within the strata affected by mining is a challenging and expensive task, thus such tests may not be carried out in large numbers to cover all the overburden strata and coal seams being affected by mining. However, numerical modelling in conjunction with a limited number of targeted field measurements can be used efficiently in assessing the impact of mining on a regional scale. This paper presents the results of underground packer testing undertaken at a mine site in New South Wales in Australia and numerical simulations conducted to assess the mining-induced strata permeability change. The underground packer test results indicated that the drivage of main headings (roadways) had induced a significant change in permeability into the solid coal barrier. Permeability increased by more than 50 times at a distance of 11.2-11.5 m from the roadway rib into the solid coal barrier. The tests conducted in the roof strata above the longwall goaf indicated more than 1,000-fold increase in permeability. The measured permeability values varied widely and strangely on a number of occasions; for example the test conducted from the main headings at the 8.2-8.5 m test section in the solid coal barrier showed a decline in permeability value as compared to that at the 11.2-11.5 m section contrary to the expectations. It is envisaged that a number of factors during the tests might have had affected the measured values of permeability: (a) swelling and smearing of the borehole, possibly lowering the permeability values; (b) packer bypass by larger fractures; (c) test section lying in small but intact (without fractures) rock segment, possibly resulting in lower permeability values; and (d) test section lying right at the extensive fractures, possibly measuring higher permeability values. Once the anomalous measurement data were discarded, the numerical model results could be seen to match the remaining field permeability measurement data reasonably well.

  13. Diffusional water permeability of human erythrocytes and their ghosts

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    The diffusional water permeability of human red cells and ghosts was determined by measuring the rate of tracer efflux by means of an improved version of the continuous flow tube method, having a time resolution of 2-3 ms. At 25 degrees C, the permeability was 2.4 x 10(3) and 2.9 x 10(3) cm s-1 for red cells and ghosts, respectively. Permeability was affected by neither a change in pH from 5.5 to 9.5, nor by osmolality up to 3.3 osmol. Manganous ions at an extracellular concentration of 19 mM did not change diffusional water permeability, as recently suggested by NMR measurements. A "ground" permeability of 1 x 10(3) cm s-1 was obtained by inhibition with 1 mM of either p- chloromercuribenzoate (PCMB) or p-chloromercuribenzene sulfonate (PCMBS). Inhibition increased temperature dependence of water permeability for red cells and ghosts from 21 to 30 kJ mol-1 to 60 kJ mol-1. Although diffusional water permeability is about one order of magnitude lower than osmotic permeability, inhibition with PCMB and PCMBS, temperature dependence both before and after inhibition, and independence of osmolality showed that diffusional water permeability has qualitative features similar to those reported for osmotic permeability, which indicates that the same properties of the membrane determine both types of transport. It is suggested that the PCMB(S)- sensitive permeability above the ground permeability takes place through the intermediate phase between integral membrane proteins and their surrounding lipids. PMID:7097244

  14. Microwave permeability of Y-type hexaferrites in zero field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obol, Mahmut; Vittoria, Carmine

    2003-09-01

    We have investigated the permeability at microwave frequencies of Y-type hexaferrites in zero-magnetic field. The permeability was measured from 0.045 to 10 GHz and it was correlated with multidomain and domain-wall resonances in zero-magnetic field. The basal plane anisotropy field, H?A, magnetic remanence, 4?M, domain-wall thickness ?, and length L of the domain wall were estimated from resonances and permeability data.

  15. Calculation of large scale relative permeabilities from stochastic properties of the permeability field and fluid properties

    SciTech Connect

    Lenormand, R.; Thiele, M.R.

    1997-08-01

    The paper describes the method and presents preliminary results for the calculation of homogenized relative permeabilities using stochastic properties of the permeability field. In heterogeneous media, the spreading of an injected fluid is mainly sue to the permeability heterogeneity and viscosity fingering. At large scale, when the heterogeneous medium is replaced by a homogeneous one, we need to introduce a homogenized (or pseudo) relative permeability to obtain the same spreading. Generally, is derived by using fine-grid numerical simulations (Kyte and Berry). However, this operation is time consuming and cannot be performed for all the meshes of the reservoir. We propose an alternate method which uses the information given by the stochastic properties of the field without any numerical simulation. The method is based on recent developments on homogenized transport equations (the {open_quotes}MHD{close_quotes} equation, Lenormand SPE 30797). The MHD equation accounts for the three basic mechanisms of spreading of the injected fluid: (1) Dispersive spreading due to small scale randomness, characterized by a macrodispersion coefficient D. (2) Convective spreading due to large scale heterogeneities (layers) characterized by a heterogeneity factor H. (3) Viscous fingering characterized by an apparent viscosity ration M. In the paper, we first derive the parameters D and H as functions of variance and correlation length of the permeability field. The results are shown to be in good agreement with fine-grid simulations. The are then derived a function of D, H and M. The main result is that this approach lead to a time dependent . Finally, the calculated are compared to the values derived by history matching using fine-grid numerical simulations.

  16. Enhancement by endothelin-1 of microvascular permeability via the activation of ETA receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Filep, J. G.; Sirois, M. G.; Földes-Filep, E.; Rousseau, A.; Plante, G. E.; Fournier, A.; Yano, M.; Sirois, P.

    1993-01-01

    1. The objective of the present experiments was to assess the involvement of endothelin-A (ETA) receptors in mediating the effects of endothelin-1 on microvascular permeability in conscious rats. 2. Bolus injection of endothelin-1 (0.1 and 1 nmol kg-1, i.v.) resulted in a dose-dependent prolonged pressor effect preceded by a transient depressor response. These changes were accompanied by a dose-dependent loss of plasma volume. Endothelin-1 (1 nmol kg-1) enhanced the vascular permeability of the upper and lower bronchi, kidney, stomach, duodenum and spleen (up to 270%) as measured by the extravasation of Evans blue dye. 3. Pretreatment of the animals with the selective ETA receptor antagonist, BQ-123 (1 mg kg-1, i.v.) significantly blunted the pressor response to endothelin-1 without affecting the depressor response. BQ-123 inhibited by 87% the endothelin-1 (1 nmol kg-1)-induced plasma volume loss. BQ-123 markedly attenuated protein extravasation elicited by endothelin-1 in the upper and lower bronchi and kidney, whereas it completely inhibited the permeability effect of endothelin-1 in the stomach and duodenum. BQ-123 by itself had no significant effect on the parameters studied. 4. The endothelin-1 analogue, [Trp(For)21]-endothelin-1, in which Trp21 is formylated, was as potent a pressor agent as endothelin-1, but had no depressor action. Bolus injection of [Trp(For)21]-endothelin-1 (0.1 and 1 nmol kg-1, i.v.) evoked similar plasma volume losses to those observed following administration of equimolar doses of endothelin-1.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8358577

  17. Cerebral Vascular Control and Metabolism in Heat Stress.

    PubMed

    Bain, Anthony R; Nybo, Lars; Ainslie, Philip N

    2015-07-01

    This review provides an in-depth update on the impact of heat stress on cerebrovascular functioning. The regulation of cerebral temperature, blood flow, and metabolism are discussed. We further provide an overview of vascular permeability, the neurocognitive changes, and the key clinical implications and pathologies known to confound cerebral functioning during hyperthermia. A reduction in cerebral blood flow (CBF), derived primarily from a respiratory-induced alkalosis, underscores the cerebrovascular changes to hyperthermia. Arterial pressures may also become compromised because of reduced peripheral resistance secondary to skin vasodilatation. Therefore, when hyperthermia is combined with conditions that increase cardiovascular strain, for example, orthostasis or dehydration, the inability to preserve cerebral perfusion pressure further reduces CBF. A reduced cerebral perfusion pressure is in turn the primary mechanism for impaired tolerance to orthostatic challenges. Any reduction in CBF attenuates the brain's convective heat loss, while the hyperthermic-induced increase in metabolic rate increases the cerebral heat gain. This paradoxical uncoupling of CBF to metabolism increases brain temperature, and potentiates a condition whereby cerebral oxygenation may be compromised. With levels of experimentally viable passive hyperthermia (up to 39.5-40.0 °C core temperature), the associated reduction in CBF (? 30%) and increase in cerebral metabolic demand (? 10%) is likely compensated by increases in cerebral oxygen extraction. However, severe increases in whole-body and brain temperature may increase blood-brain barrier permeability, potentially leading to cerebral vasogenic edema. The cerebrovascular challenges associated with hyperthermia are of paramount importance for populations with compromised thermoregulatory control--for example, spinal cord injury, elderly, and those with preexisting cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26140721

  18. Synthesis, in silico and in vivo blood brain barrier permeability of ginkgolide B cinnamate.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yong-Ming; Pan, Jian; Zhang, Wen-Na; Hui, Ai-Ling; Guo, Wen-Qiang; Huang, Li; Zhu, Qin-Jun; Chen, Yan

    2015-10-01

    Ginkgolide B, one of the important components of Ginkgo biloba extracts, has been revealed to exhibit great potential in therapy of cerebrovascular diseases. However the lack of permeability greatly limited it from further clinical application. Based on the prediction model for blood brain barrier (BBB) permeation, herein a potential brain-targeting analog ginkgolide B cinnamate (GBC) was successfully synthesized and characterized. After intravenous administration of GBC or GB, liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was conducted to determine the analog in rat plasma and brain. The results showed that GBC had a significant increase in BBB permeability. A significant 1.61-times increase in half-life was observed for GBC and the drug targeting index (DTI) value was calculated to be 9.91. The experiment results matched well with the predicted one, which revealed that BBB permeability prediction model combined with in vivo study could be used as a quick, feasible and efficient tool for brain-targeting drug design. PMID:26327588

  19. Experimental water vapor permeability results for common wall materials

    SciTech Connect

    Sipes, J.M.; Hosni, M.H.

    2000-07-01

    This paper presents the experimental water vapor permeability results for gypsum board, latex paint, permeable vinyl wallpaper, vinyl wallpaper, and elastomeric stucco. For each material, a series of modified cup tests was conducted, and the material water vapor permeability was obtained as a function of relative humidity across the specimen. This test method was a modification of the ASTM Standard Test Method E 96-93. The permeability values for the materials tested in this study were compared to the limited available data from literature and were found to be in good agreement.

  20. Variation assessment for in vitro permeabilities through Yucatan micropig skin.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Hiroyuki; Terasaka, Shuichi; Sakurai, Takanobu; Furuya, Atsushi; Urano, Hidetoshi; Sugibayashi, Kenji

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the variations in the in vitro Yucatan micropig (YMP) skin permeabilities of drugs and to clarify whether YMP skin can be used to predict human skin permeability. In vitro permeation studies of the three model drugs, nicorandil, isosorbide dinitrate and flurbiprofen, through YMP skin were performed using Franz-type diffusion cells. The permeation rates of the three model drugs were determined, and their variations were evaluated. The inter-individual variations in YMP skin permeability for the three model drugs were smaller than that in human skin permeability, and the permeation rates of the three model drugs through the YMP skin were approximately half that through human skin. In addition, the intra-individual variations in YMP skin permeability for nicorandil and flurbiprofen were much smaller than the inter-individual variations in YMP skin. The inter- and intra-regional variations in YMP skin permeability were very small. The markedly smaller variation in the permeability through YMP skin as compared with that through human skin indicated that in vitro permeation studies using YMP skin would be particularly useful for evaluating differences in the skin permeability of the three model drugs as well as for predicting human skin permeability. PMID:21467645

  1. Concentration-Dependent Vascularization of Adipose Stromal Vascular Fraction Cells.

    PubMed

    Maijub, John G; Boyd, Nolan L; Dale, Jacob R; Hoying, James B; Morris, Marvin E; Williams, Stuart K

    2015-01-01

    Adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction (SVF) cells have been shown to self-associate to form vascular structures under both in vitro and in vivo conditions. The angiogenic (new vessels from existing vessels) and vasculogenic (new vessels through self-assembly) potential of the SVF cell population may provide a cell source for directly treating (i.e., point of care without further cell isolation) ischemic tissues. However the correct dosage of adipose SVF cells required to achieve a functional vasculature has not been established. Accordingly, in vitro and in vivo dose response assays were performed evaluating the SVF cell vasculogenic potential. Serial dilutions of freshly isolated rat adipose SVF cells were plated on growth factor reduced Matrigel and vasculogenesis, assessed as cellular tube-like network assembly, was quantified after 3 days of culture. This in vitro vasculogenesis assay indicated that rat SVF cells reached maximum network length at a concentration of 2.5?×?10(5) cells/ml and network maintained at the higher concentrations tested. The same concentrations of rat and human SVF cells were used to evaluate vasculogenesis in vivo. SVF cells were incorporated into collagen gels and subcutaneously implanted into Rag1 immunodeficient mice. The 3D confocal images of harvested constructs were evaluated to quantify dose dependency of SVF cell vasculogenesis potential. Rat- and human-derived SVF cells yielded a maximum vasculogenic potential at 1?×?10(6) and 4?×?10(6) cells/ml, respectively. No adverse reactions (e.g., toxicity, necrosis, tumor formation) were observed at any concentration tested. In conclusion, the vasculogenic potential of adipose-derived SVF cell populations is dose dependent. PMID:25397993

  2. Modeling Forest Structure and Vascular Plant Diversity in Piedmont Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakkenberg, C.

    2014-12-01

    When the interacting stressors of climate change and land cover/land use change (LCLUC) overwhelm ecosystem resilience to environmental and climatic variability, forest ecosystems are at increased risk of regime shifts and hyperdynamism in process rates. To meet the growing range of novel biotic and environmental stressors on human-impacted ecosystems, the maintenance of taxonomic diversity and functional redundancy in metacommunities has been proposed as a risk spreading measure ensuring that species critical to landscape ecosystem functioning are available for recruitment as local systems respond to novel conditions. This research is the first in a multi-part study to establish a dynamic, predictive model of the spatio-temporal dynamics of vascular plant diversity in North Carolina Piedmont mixed forests using remotely sensed data inputs. While remote sensing technologies are optimally suited to monitor LCLUC over large areas, direct approaches to the remote measurement of plant diversity remain a challenge. This study tests the efficacy of predicting indices of vascular plant diversity using remotely derived measures of forest structural heterogeneity from aerial LiDAR and high spatial resolution broadband optical imagery in addition to derived topo-environmental variables. Diversity distribution modelling of this sort is predicated upon the idea that environmental filtering of dispersing species help define fine-scale (permeable) environmental envelopes within which biotic structural and compositional factors drive competitive interactions that, in addition to background stochasticity, determine fine-scale alpha diversity. Results reveal that over a range of Piedmont forest communities, increasing structural complexity is positively correlated with measures of plant diversity, though the nature of this relationship varies by environmental conditions and community type. The diversity distribution model is parameterized and cross-validated using three high quality vegetation survey datasets, including Duke Forest Korstian permanent plots, Forest Inventory Analysis (FIA), and the scale transgressive, nested module Carolina Vegetation Survey (CVS).

  3. A matrix metalloprotease-PAR1 system regulates vascular integrity, systemic inflammation and death in sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Tressel, Sarah L; Kaneider, Nicole C; Kasuda, Shogo; Foley, Caitlin; Koukos, Georgios; Austin, Karyn; Agarwal, Anika; Covic, Lidija; Opal, Steven M; Kuliopulos, Athan

    2011-01-01

    Sepsis is a deadly disease characterized by the inability to regulate the inflammatory–coagulation response in which the endothelium plays a key role. The cause of this perturbation remains poorly understood and has hampered the development of effective therapeutics. Matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) are involved in the host response to pathogens, but can also cause uncontrolled tissue damage and contribute to mortality. We found that human sepsis patients had markedly elevated plasma proMMP-1 and active MMP-1 levels, which correlated with death at 7 and 28 days after diagnosis. Likewise, septic mice had increased plasma levels of the MMP-1 ortholog, MMP-1a. We identified mouse MMP-1a as an agonist of protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) on endothelial cells. MMP-1a was released from endothelial cells in septic mice. Blockade of MMP-1 activity suppressed endothelial barrier disruption, disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), lung vascular permeability as well as the cytokine storm and improved survival, which was lost in PAR1-deficient mice. Infusion of human MMP-1 increased lung vascular permeability in normal wild-type mice but not in PAR1-deficient mice. These findings implicate MMP-1 as an important activator of PAR1 in sepsis and suggest that therapeutics that target MMP1-PAR1 may prove beneficial in the treatment of sepsis. PMID:21591259

  4. [Vascular nevi and tumors of the skin].

    PubMed

    Hundeiker, M

    1979-09-20

    Diagnosis and classification of dysontogenetic and neoplastic lesions of blood- and lymph-vessels depend upon the presence or absence of proliferating vascular elements and of non-involutive connective tissue and muscular wall structures. Angiectatic and angiokeratotic nevi, capillary and cavernous angiomas, glomangiomas and malignant vascular tumors are presented in a survey with special reference to frequent diagnoses. PMID:535843

  5. Vascular tumors of the choroid and retina

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, P Mahesh; Ramanjulu, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Vascular tumors of the retina and choroid can be seen occasionally. In the following article, the key clinical and diagnostic features of the major retinal and choroidal vascular tumors, their systemic associations, and the literature pertaining to the most currently available treatment strategies are reviewed. PMID:25827544

  6. Covariance of lichen and vascular plant floras

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennett, J.P.; Wetmore, C.M.

    1999-01-01

    The geographic relationships among taxonomic groups are important to study to determine patterns of biodiversity and whether or not associations occur between large groups, e.g., birds and vascular plants. This study was undertaken to determine relationships between higher plants and lower plants, specifically vascular plant and lichen floras in nine national parks of the Great Lakes region. No significant relationship was found between vascular plant floras and lichen floras in this area, which spans 1200 km longitudinally, or between an additional 19 areas from North America that were less than 1000 km(2) in area. For areas larger than 1000 km(2), however, a significant positive relationship existed for 33 areas that span one to approximately 150 million km(2). The ratio of numbers of vascular plants to lichens appeared to average just over 6 across the 33 areas. In the Great Lakes parks, between 28-30% of either the vascular plant or lichen species were singletons (occurring in only one park), but the parks that contained the most singletons were not congruent: Isle Royale had the most singleton lichens, while Indiana Dunes had the most vascular plant singletons. Fewer lichen species (2%) than vascular plants (4%) occurred in all nine parks. Latitude appeared to explain some of the variation between the two groups: vascular plants decreased with increasing latitude, while lichens increased.

  7. Functional preservation of vascular smooth muscle tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, W. C.; Hutchins, P. M.; Kimzey, S. L.

    1973-01-01

    The ionic and cellular feedback relationships operating to effect the vascular decompensatory modifications were examined to reveal procedures for implementing protective measures guarding against vascular collapse when returning from a weightless environment to that of the earth's gravity. The surgical procedures for preparing the rat cremaster, and the fixation methods are described. Abstracts of publications resulting from this research are included.

  8. Purinergic regulation of vascular tone and remodelling

    E-print Network

    Burnstock, Geoffrey

    in sympathetic, parasympathetic, sensory-motor and enteric nerves (Burnstock, 1976). There was early resistance of vascular tone In the vascular system, short-term purinergic sig- nalling events associated with the dual as a cotrans- mitter with noradrenaline (NA) from perivascular sympathetic nerves acts mainly on P2X1 receptors

  9. Elec 331 -Circulatory System Pulmonary / Vascular System

    E-print Network

    Pulfrey, David L.

    Elec 331 - Circulatory System 1 Pulmonary / Vascular System · Red ­ O2 Rich (CO2 Poor) ­ Vascular - Circulatory System 2 2 1 4 8 L P P r Fluid Pressure & Flow Poiseuille's Eqn (Incompressible Fluid) 1P L 3 331 - Circulatory System 3 Design Problem #1 Left Lung Right Lung Liver Kidneys Head Trunk & Limbs

  10. Validation/enhancement of the "Jones-Owens" technique for the prediction of permeability in low permeability gas sands 

    E-print Network

    Florence, Francois-Andre

    2007-09-17

    VALIDATION/ENHANCEMENT OF THE "JONES-OWENS" TECHNIQUE FOR THE PREDICTION OF PERMEABILITY IN LOW PERMEABILITY GAS SANDS A Thesis by FRANCOIS-ANDRE FLORENCE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... IN LOW PERMEABILITY GAS SANDS A Thesis by FRANCOIS-ANDRE FLORENCE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE...

  11. Optically transparent fluoro-containing polyimide films with low dielectric permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravtsova, V.; Umersakova, M.; Iskakov, R.; Prikhodko, O.; Korobova, N.

    2014-12-01

    Optical, dielectric, thermal, physico-mechanical properties of new fluoro-containing alicyclic polyimides were investigated. High optical transparency in visible and UV ranges of the films with thickness 10-25 ?m, which lower boundary was registered at 125-260 nm; as well as reflectivity index being 1.492-1.515 were recorded. Dielectric permeability was characterized with low rates and stability up to 300 °C depending on chemical structure. Polyimides were stable with heating in air up to 320-380 °C. Prepared films show break tensile at 145 MPa with elongation up to 50% due to the excellent film-forming properties. Films based on polyimides with polyaniline composition demonstrates reflectivity index 1.60.

  12. The Vasculature 1 CIRCULATORY PHYSIOLOGY SECTION 4: THE VASCULAR SYSTEM*

    E-print Network

    Prestwich, Ken

    The Vasculature 1 CIRCULATORY PHYSIOLOGY SECTION 4: THE VASCULAR SYSTEM* I. Anatomy and Histology of the Vascular System A. Arterial (High that the heart faces) in the vascular system, -- second only to the arterioles

  13. The Vascular Medicine Training Application Evanthia Tripoliti1

    E-print Network

    Petrakis, Euripides G.M.

    The Vascular Medicine Training Application Evanthia Tripoliti1 , Antonios Sakellarios1 , Michael, Department of Surgery, Vascular Surgery Unit, Ioannina, Greece Purpose: We present a surgical training application enabling experts in vascular medicine prepare educational, training content

  14. Assessing Direct Vascular Actions of Estrogens.

    PubMed

    Martin, Douglas S; Eyster, Kathleen M

    2016-01-01

    Estrogens are known to affect vascular function. In order to decipher the underlying mechanisms, it is essential to study the direct actions of estrogenic substances on blood vessels. There are two widely used approaches to assess the effects of estrogenic substances directly on blood vessels, the isolated perfused intact mesenteric vascular bed (McGregor preparation) and the isolated perfused/pressurized vessel approach. The McGregor preparation relies on constant flow with vascular reactivity assessed as changes in perfusion pressure. The isolated perfused/pressurized vessel approach uses a single vessel mounted on glass micropipettes. The main readout in this approach is vascular diameter. This chapter describes these approaches which remain cornerstones in the investigation of direct vascular actions of estrogenic substances. PMID:26585162

  15. Hedgehog and Resident Vascular Stem Cell Fate

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, Ciaran J.; Hakimjavadi, Roya; Fitzpatrick, Emma; Kennedy, Eimear; Walls, Dermot; Morrow, David; Redmond, Eileen M.; Cahill, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    The Hedgehog pathway is a pivotal morphogenic driver during embryonic development and a key regulator of adult stem cell self-renewal. The discovery of resident multipotent vascular stem cells and adventitial progenitors within the vessel wall has transformed our understanding of the origin of medial and neointimal vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) during vessel repair in response to injury, lesion formation, and overall disease progression. This review highlights the importance of components of the Hh and Notch signalling pathways within the medial and adventitial regions of adult vessels, their recapitulation following vascular injury and disease progression, and their putative role in the maintenance and differentiation of resident vascular stem cells to vascular lineages from discrete niches within the vessel wall. PMID:26064136

  16. Vascular stiffness in insulin resistance and obesity

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Guanghong; Aroor, Annayya R.; DeMarco, Vincent G.; Martinez-Lemus, Luis A.; Meininger, Gerald A.; Sowers, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes are associated with a substantially increased prevalence of vascular fibrosis and stiffness, with attendant increased risk of cardiovascular and chronic kidney disease. Although the underlying mechanisms and mediators of vascular stiffness are not well understood, accumulating evidence supports the role of metabolic and immune dysregulation related to increased adiposity, activation of the renin angiotensin aldosterone system, reduced bioavailable nitric oxide, increased vascular extracellular matrix (ECM) and ECM remodeling in the pathogenesis of vascular stiffness. This review will give a brief overview of the relationship between obesity, insulin resistance and increased vascular stiffness to provide a contemporary understanding of the proposed underlying mechanisms and potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:26321962

  17. Engineering clinically relevant volumes of vascularized bone

    PubMed Central

    Roux, Brianna M; Cheng, Ming-Huei; Brey, Eric M

    2015-01-01

    Vascularization remains one of the most important challenges that must be overcome for tissue engineering to be consistently implemented for reconstruction of large volume bone defects. An extensive vascular network is needed for transport of nutrients, waste and progenitor cells required for remodelling and repair. A variety of tissue engineering strategies have been investigated in an attempt to vascularize tissues, including those applying cells, soluble factor delivery strategies, novel design and optimization of bio-active materials, vascular assembly pre-implantation and surgical techniques. However, many of these strategies face substantial barriers that must be overcome prior to their ultimate translation into clinical application. In this review recent progress in engineering vascularized bone will be presented with an emphasis on clinical feasibility. PMID:25877690

  18. Vascular compliance in the cardiometabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ganne, Sudha; Winer, Nathaniel

    2008-01-01

    Elevated systolic blood pressure and increased pulse pressure are important predictors of vascular stiffening (compliance), left ventricular hypertrophy, coronary heart disease, heart failure, stroke, vascular dementia, and chronic kidney disease. Advances in noninvasive methods that measure arterial stiffness have led to increased understanding of the mechanisms underlying vascular dysfunction and the development of associated risk factors. The ability to detect and monitor changes in the physical properties of arteries has the potential to allow early interventions that may prevent disease or attenuate its progression. In this paper, the authors briefly review the various methods available to measure vascular compliance and review pathologic processes that lead to insulin resistance, endothelial dysfunction, inflammation, and sympathetic activation, all of which may contribute to increased arterial stiffness in the cardiometabolic syndrome. Strategies to improve vascular compliance are also discussed. PMID:18326978

  19. Permeability of alkaline magmas: a study from Campi Flegrei, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polacci, M.; Bouvet de Maissoneuve, C.; Giordano, D.; Piochi, M.; Degruyter, W.; Bachmann, O.; Mancini, L.

    2012-04-01

    Knowledge of permeability is of paramount importance for understanding the evolution of magma degassing during pre-, syn- and post-eruptive volcanic processes. Most permeability estimates existing to date refer to magmas of calc-alkaline compositions. We report here the preliminary results of permeability measurements performed on alkali-trachyte products erupted from the Campanian Ignimbrite (CI) and Monte Nuovo (MTN), two explosive eruptions from Campi Flegrei (CF), an active, hazardous caldera west of Naples, Southern Italy. Darcian (viscous) permeability spans a wide range between 10^-11 and 10^-14 m^2. We observe that the most permeable samples are the scoria clasts from the upper units of MTN; pumice samples from the Breccia Museo facies of CI are instead the least permeable. Non-Darcian (inertial) permeability follows the same trend as Darcian permeability. The first implication of this study is that porosity in alkaline as well as calc-alkaline magmas does not exert a first order control on permeability (e.g. the MTN samples are the most permeable but not the most porous). Second, sample geometry exhibits permeability anisotropy (higher permeability in the direction of vesicle elongation), suggesting stronger degassing in the vertical direction in the conduit. In addition, inertial effects are higher across the sample. As inertial effects are potentially generated by tortuosity (or tortuous vesicle paths), tortuosity is likely higher horizontally than vertically in the conduit. Finally, the measured CF permeability values overlap with those of rhyolitic pumice clasts from the Kos Plateau Tuff (Bouvet de Maisonneuve et al., 2009), together with CI one of the major Quaternary explosive eruptions of the Mediterranean region. This indicates that gas flow is strongly controlled by the geometry of the porous media, which is generated by the bubble dynamics during magma ascent. Therefore, permeability will depend on composition through the rheological properties of the magma. Preliminary results indicate in fact that there are variations in the correlation between permeability of magmas with different composition and viscosity and the style of eruptive activity.

  20. Cocaine-related vascular headaches.

    PubMed Central

    Dhuna, A; Pascual-Leone, A; Belgrade, M

    1991-01-01

    The records of 21 patients admitted to hospital from January 1985 to December 1988 for acute headache associated with cocaine intoxication were reviewed. Fifteen patients were identified who experienced headaches with migrainous features in the absence of neurological or systemic complications. None of them had a history of cocaine-unrelated headaches or a family history of migraine, and all had a favourable outcome. Three possible mechanisms of cocaine-related vascular headaches are discussed which depend on the interval between cocaine ingestion and development of the headache. We postulate that acute headaches following cocaine use may relate to the sympathomimetic or vasoconstrictive effects of cocaine, while headaches following cocaine withdrawal or exacerbated during a cocaine "binge" may relate to cocaine-induced alteration of the serotoninergic system. PMID:1955899

  1. Vascular calcification and fracture risk

    PubMed Central

    Szulc, Pawel

    2015-01-01

    Summary Osteoporosis and cardiovascular diseases are public health problems. Fragility fractures are associated with high risk of cardiovascular event and patients with cardiovascular diseases have higher risk of fracture. Severe abdominal aortic calcification (AAC) is associated with higher cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. Severe AAC is associated with higher risk of fracture. In cross-sectional studies severe AAC was associated with greater prevalence, higher number and greater severity of vertebral fractures after adjustment for confounders including bone mineral density (BMD). Prospective studies confirm the association between baseline AAC severity and prospectively assessed fracture risk in both sexes. Data on the link between AAC and BMD are discordant. Age, smoking, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and low grade systemic inflammation are possible risk factors of severe AAC and fracture risk. However, in clinical studies, the link between AAC and fracture was significant after adjustment for these factors. Data on the association between calcification in other vascular beds and BMD are limited and discordant. PMID:26604939

  2. Clinical assessment of vascular calcification.

    PubMed

    Raggi, Paolo; Bellasi, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Cardiovascular calcification poses an increased risk for cardiovascular events in advanced phases of chronic kidney disease. This evidence has brought many investigators to focus their attention on the importance of detection of calcification and avoidance of further development of it with appropriate therapeutic choices. Physicians can use a variety of noninvasive imaging tools to identify cardiovascular calcification, some with merely qualitative and others with both qualitative and quantitative capabilities. Plain x-rays and ultrasonography can be used to identify macroscopic calcification of aorta and peripheral arteries, echocardiography is helpful for assessment of valvular calcification, and computed tomography technologies constitute the gold standard for quantification of cardiovascular calcification. The latter is also useful to monitor calcification progression and to assess the effect of different therapeutic strategies directed at modifying calcification progression. In this article, we review the clinical significance of vascular calcification and some of the evidence surrounding the most commonly employed noninvasive imaging techniques. PMID:17200042

  3. Hepatic Injury in Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis Contributes to Altered Intestinal Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Luther, Jay; Garber, John J.; Khalili, Hamed; Dave, Maneesh; Bale, Shyam Sundhar; Jindal, Rohit; Motola, Daniel L.; Luther, Sanjana; Bohr, Stefan; Jeoung, Soung Won; Deshpande, Vikram; Singh, Gurminder; Turner, Jerrold R.; Yarmush, Martin L.; Chung, Raymond T.; Patel, Suraj J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Emerging data suggest that changes in intestinal permeability and increased gut microbial translocation contribute to the inflammatory pathway involved in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) development. Numerous studies have investigated the association between increased intestinal permeability and NASH. Our meta-analysis of this association investigates the underlying mechanism. METHODS A meta-analysis was performed to compare the rates of increased intestinal permeability in patients with NASH and healthy controls. To further address the underlying mechanism of action, we studied changes in intestinal permeability in a diet-induced (methionine-and-choline-deficient; MCD) murine model of NASH. In vitro studies were also performed to investigate the effect of MCD culture medium at the cellular level on hepatocytes, Kupffer cells, and intestinal epithelial cells. RESULTS Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) patients, and in particular those with NASH, are more likely to have increased intestinal permeability compared with healthy controls. We correlate this clinical observation with in vivo data showing mice fed an MCD diet develop intestinal permeability changes after an initial phase of liver injury and tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF?) induction. In vitro studies reveal that MCD medium induces hepatic injury and TNF? production yet has no direct effect on intestinal epithelial cells. Although these data suggest a role for hepatic TNF? in altering intestinal permeability, we found that mice genetically resistant to TNF?-myosin light chain kinase (MLCK)–induced intestinal permeability changes fed an MCD diet still develop increased permeability and liver injury. CONCLUSIONS Our clinical and experimental results strengthen the association between intestinal permeability increases and NASH and also suggest that an early phase of hepatic injury and inflammation contributes to altered intestinal permeability in a fashion independent of TNF? and MLCK. PMID:26405687

  4. Microvascular geometry and differential permeability in the eye during inflammation revealed with dual channel multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bateman, Ryon M.; Hodgson, Kevin; Van Breemen, Casey; Walley, Keith R.

    2006-02-01

    Microvascular permeability is a serious complication of systemic inflammation in critically ill patients; yet, no direct techniques exist to quantify this in vivo. To overcome this limitation, we investigated the use of multiphoton microscopy to evaluate fluorescent macromolecular gradients in the eye. Following the induction of systemic inflammation in a CD1 mouse, a bolus of high (250 KD FITC-dextran) and low (70 KD rhodamine-dextran) molecular weight fluorescent macromolecules was injected via the tail vein. The anesthetized mouse was positioned in such a way that different microvessels in the eye could be imaged directly using an upright microscope. The fluorophores were simultaneously excited at 840nm and a series of images including a spectral scan (480 to 680nm), an xt line scan (96 lines) and an x,y,z image stack were collected from the iris, cornea and limbal plexus at one hour intervals for four hours. A simple fluorescent gradient across the vessel wall was used as an index of microvascular permeability. In all microvessels, the LMW dye was more permeable. We found that the fluorescent gradient increased dramatically in the limbal plexus up to three hours then declined. This may indicate that circulating fluid pooled near the limbal plexus. Consistent with the thick walls and tight junctions of the iris microvessels, no significant fluorescent gradients were detected in this area. The cornea, containing a collagen filled stroma layer, was found to have both lateral and perpendicular fluorescent gradients. This work demonstrates that inflammation causes differential microvascular permeability in the mouse eye.

  5. Osmotic Flow through Fully Permeable Nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C.; Cottin-Bizonne, C.; Biance, A.-L.; Joseph, P.; Bocquet, L.; Ybert, C.

    2014-06-01

    Osmosis across membranes is intrinsically associated with the concept of semipermeability. Here, however, we demonstrate that osmotic flow can be generated by solute gradients across nonselective, fully permeable nanochannels. Using a fluorescence imaging technique, we are able to measure the water flow rate inside single nanochannels to an unprecedented sensitivity of femtoliters per minute flow rates. Our results indicate the onset of a convective liquid motion under salinity gradients, from the higher to lower electrolyte concentration, which is attributed to diffusio-osmotic transport. To our knowledge, this is the first experimental evidence and quantitative investigation of this subtle interfacially driven transport, which need to be accounted for in nanoscale dynamics. Finally, diffusio-osmotic transport under a neutral polymer gradient is also demonstrated. The experiments highlight the entropic depletion of polymers that occurs at the nanochannel surface, resulting in convective flow in the opposite direction to that seen for electrolytes.

  6. Gas permeable electrode for electrochemical system

    DOEpatents

    Ludwig, F.A.; Townsend, C.W.

    1989-09-12

    An electrode apparatus is described which is adapted for use in electrochemical systems having an anode compartment and a cathode compartment in which gas and ions are produced and consumed in the compartments during generation of electrical current. The electrode apparatus includes a membrane for separating the anode compartment from the cathode compartment wherein the membrane is permeable to both ions and gas. The cathode and anode for the assembly are provided on opposite sides of the membrane. During use of the membrane-electrode apparatus in electrochemical cells, the gas and ions generated at the cathode or anode migrate through the membrane to provide efficient transfer of gas and ions between the anode and cathode compartments. 3 figs.

  7. Composite Crew Module (CCM) Permeability Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirsch, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    In January 2007, the NASA Administrator chartered the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) to form an Agency team to design and build a composite crew module in 18 months in order to gain hands-on experience in anticipation that future exploration systems may be made of composite materials. One of the conclusions from this Composite Crew Module Primary Structure assessment was that there was a lack of understanding regarding the ability for composite pressure shells to contain consumable gases, which posed a technical risk relative to the use of a metallic design. After the completion of the Composite Crew Module test program, the test article was used in a new program to assess the overall leakage/permeability and identify specific features associated with high leak rates. This document contains the outcome of the leakage assessment.

  8. Fluid permeability measurement system and method

    DOEpatents

    Hallman, Jr., Russell Louis (Knoxville, TN); Renner, Michael John (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2008-02-05

    A system for measuring the permeance of a material. The permeability of the material may also be derived. The system provides a liquid or high concentration fluid bath on one side of a material test sample, and a gas flow across the opposing side of the material test sample. The mass flow rate of permeated fluid as a fraction of the combined mass flow rate of gas and permeated fluid is used to calculate the permeance of the material. The material test sample may be a sheet, a tube, or a solid shape. Operational test conditions may be varied, including concentration of the fluid, temperature of the fluid, strain profile of the material test sample, and differential pressure across the material test sample.

  9. Osmotic flow through fully permeable nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Lee, C; Cottin-Bizonne, C; Biance, A-L; Joseph, P; Bocquet, L; Ybert, C

    2014-06-20

    Osmosis across membranes is intrinsically associated with the concept of semipermeability. Here, however, we demonstrate that osmotic flow can be generated by solute gradients across nonselective, fully permeable nanochannels. Using a fluorescence imaging technique, we are able to measure the water flow rate inside single nanochannels to an unprecedented sensitivity of femtoliters per minute flow rates. Our results indicate the onset of a convective liquid motion under salinity gradients, from the higher to lower electrolyte concentration, which is attributed to diffusio-osmotic transport. To our knowledge, this is the first experimental evidence and quantitative investigation of this subtle interfacially driven transport, which need to be accounted for in nanoscale dynamics. Finally, diffusio-osmotic transport under a neutral polymer gradient is also demonstrated. The experiments highlight the entropic depletion of polymers that occurs at the nanochannel surface, resulting in convective flow in the opposite direction to that seen for electrolytes. PMID:24996091

  10. Diabetic Stroke Severity: Epigenetic Remodeling and Neuronal, Glial, and Vascular Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kalani, Anuradha; Kamat, Pradip Kumar; Tyagi, Neetu

    2015-12-01

    We determined the mechanism of severity during type 1 diabetic (T1D) stroke (ischemia-reperfusion [IR] injury) that affects potential markers associated with epigenetics, neuronal, glial, and vascular components of the brain with regard to nondiabetic stroke. The study used male genetic T1D Ins2(+/-) Akita and wild-type (C57BL/6J) mice. The experimental mice groups were 1) sham, 2) IR, 3) sham(Akita), and 4) IR(Akita). Mice were subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion for 40 min, followed by reperfusion for 24 h. Brain tissues were analyzed for inflammation, neuro-glio-vascular impairments, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 expression, and epigenetic alterations (DNA methyltransferase-3a [DNMT-3a]; DNA methyltransferase-1 [DNMT-1]; 5-methylcytosine [5-mC]; and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine [5-hmC]). Intracarotid fluorescein isothiocyanate-BSA infusion was used to determine pial-venular permeability. IR(Akita) mice showed more infarct volume, edema, inflammation, and vascular MMP-9 expression compared with IR and sham groups. Sham(Akita) mice showed the highest DNMT-1 and DNMT-3a levels compared with the other groups. Reduced tight and adherent junction expressions and severe venular leakage exemplified intense cerebrovascular impairment in IR(Akita) mice compared with the other groups. Interestingly, we found differential regulations (downregulated expression) of epigenetic (5-mC, DNMTs), vascular (endothelial nitric oxide synthase), glial (connexin-43, glial fibrillary acidic protein, CD11b), and neuronal (neuron-specific enolase, neuronal nitric oxide synthase) markers in IR(Akita) compared with the IR group. These findings suggest that IR injury in T1D is more severe because it intensifies differential epigenetic markers and neuro-glio-vascular changes compared with nondiabetic mice. PMID:26470785

  11. Preferential Effect of Synchrotron Microbeam Radiation Therapy on Intracerebral 9L Gliosarcoma Vascular Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchet, Audrey; Lemasson, Benjamin; Le Duc, Geraldine; Maisin, Cecile; Braeuer-Krisch, Elke; Siegbahn, Erik Albert; Renaud, Luc; Khalil, Enam; Remy, Chantal; Poillot, Cathy; Bravin, Alberto; Laissue, Jean A.; Barbier, Emmanuel L.; Serduc, Raphael

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: Synchrotron microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) relies on spatial fractionation of the incident photon beam into parallel micron-wide beams. Our aim was to analyze the effects of MRT on normal brain and 9L gliosarcoma tissues, particularly on blood vessels. Methods and Materials: Responses to MRT (two arrays, one lateral, one anteroposterior (2 x 400 Gy), intersecting orthogonally in the tumor region) were studied during 6 weeks using MRI, immunohistochemistry, and vascular endothelial growth factor Western blot. Results: MRT increased the median survival time of irradiated rats (x3.25), significantly increased blood vessel permeability, and inhibited tumor growth; a cytotoxic effect on 9L cells was detected 5 days after irradiation. Significant decreases in tumoral blood volume fraction and vessel diameter were measured from 8 days after irradiation, due to loss of endothelial cells in tumors as detected by immunochemistry. Edema was observed in the normal brain exposed to both crossfired arrays about 6 weeks after irradiation. This edema was associated with changes in blood vessel morphology and an overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor. Conversely, vascular parameters and vessel morphology in brain regions exposed to one of the two arrays were not damaged, and there was no loss of vascular endothelia. Conclusions: We show for the first time that preferential damage of MRT to tumor vessels versus preservation of radioresistant normal brain vessels contributes to the efficient palliation of 9L gliosarcomas in rats. Molecular pathways of repair mechanisms in normal and tumoral vascular networks after MRT may be essential for the improvement of such differential effects on the vasculature.

  12. Highly Compliant Vascular Grafts with Gelatin-Sheathed Coaxially Structured Nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Nagiah, Naveen; Johnson, Richard; Anderson, Roy; Elliott, Winston; Tan, Wei

    2015-12-01

    We have developed three types of materials composed of polyurethane-gelatin, polycaprolactone-gelatin, or polylactic acid-gelatin nanofibers by coaxially electrospinning the hydrophobic core and gelatin sheath with a ratio of 1:5 at fixed concentrations. Results from attenuated total reflection-Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy demonstrated the gelatin coating around nanofibers in all of the materials. Transmission electron microscopy images further displayed the core-sheath structures showing the core-to-sheath thickness ratio varied greatly with the highest ratio found in polyurethane-gelatin nanofibers. Scanning electron microscopy images revealed similar, uniform fibrous structures in all of the materials, which changed with genipin cross-linking due to interfiber interactions. Thermal analyses revealed varied interactions between the hydrophilic sheath and hydrophobic core among the three materials, which likely caused different core-sheath structures, and thus physicomechanical properties. The addition of gelatin around the hydrophobic polymer and their interactions led to the formation of graft scaffolds with tissue-like viscoelasticity, high compliance, excellent swelling capability, and absence of water permeability while maintaining competent tensile modulus, burst pressure, and suture retention. The hydrogel-like characteristics are advantageous for vascular grafting use, because of the capability of bypassing preclotting prior to implantation, retaining vascular fluid volume, and facilitating molecular transport across the graft wall, as shown by coculturing vascular cells sandwiched over a thick-wall scaffold. Varied core-sheath interactions within scaffolding nanofibers led to differences in graft functional properties such as water swelling ratio, compliance, and supporting growth of cocultured vascular cells. The PCL-gelatin scaffold with thick gelatin-sheathed nanofibers demonstrated a more compliant structure, elastic mechanics, and high water swelling property. Our results demonstrate a feasible approach to produce new hybrid, biodegradable nanofibrous scaffold biomaterials with interactive core-sheath structure, good biocompatibility, and tissue-like viscoelasticity, which may reduce potential problems with the use of individual polymers for vascular grafts. PMID:26529143

  13. Hormonal regulation of hepatocyte tight junctional permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, P.J.; Miyai, K.; Steinbach, J.H.; Hardison, W.G.M. Univ. of California, San Diego )

    1988-10-01

    The authors have investigated the effects of hormones on the permeability of the hepatocyte tight junction to two probes, ({sup 14}C)sucrose and horseradish peroxidase, using one-pass perfused rat livers. Using a single injection of horseradish peroxidase the authors have demonstrated that this probe can enter bile by two pathways that are kinetically distinct, a fast pathway, which corresponds to the passage of the probe through the hepatocyte tight junctions, and a slow pathway, which corresponds to the transcytotic entry into bile. The passage of horseradish peroxidase through the hepatocyte tight junctions was confirmed by electron microscopic histochemistry. Vasopressin, epinephrine, and angiotensin II, hormones that act in the hepatocyte through the intracellular mediators calcium, the inositol polyphosphates, and diacylglycerol, increased the bile-to-perfusion fluid ratio of ({sup 14}C)sucrose and the rapid entry of horseradish peroxidase into bile, indicating that the permeability of the tight junctions to these probes was increased. The effect of these hormones was dose dependent and in the cases of angiotensin II and epinephrine was inhibited by the specific inhibitors (Sar{sup 1},Thr{sup 8})angiotensin II and prazosin, respectively. Dibutyryl adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate did not affect the ({sup 14}C)sucrose bile-to-perfusion fluid ratio or the fast entry of horseradish peroxidase into bile. These results suggest that the hepatocyte tight junction can no longer be considered a static system of pores separating blood from bile. It is rather a dynamic barrier potentially capable of influencing the composition of the bile.

  14. Incidence and Predictors of Cardiovascular Complications and Death after Vascular Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Smeili, Luciana Andrea Avena; Lotufo, Paulo Andrade

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients undergoing arterial vascular surgery are considered at increased risk for post-operative complications. Objective To assess the incidence and predictors of complications and death, as well as the performance of two models of risk stratification, in vascular surgery. Methods This study determined the incidence of cardiovascular complications and deaths within 30 days from surgery in adults. Univariate comparison and logistic regression assessed the risk factors associated with the outcomes, and the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve assessed the discriminatory capacity of the revised cardiac risk index (RCRI) and vascular study group of New England cardiac risk index (VSG-CRI). Results 141 patients (mean age, 66 years; 65% men) underwent the following surgeries: carotid (15); lower limbs (65); abdominal aorta (56); and others (5). Cardiovascular complications and death occurred within 30 days in 28 (19.9%) and 20 (14.2%) patients, respectively. The risk predictors were: age, obesity, stroke, poor functional capacity, altered scintigraphy, surgery of the aorta, and troponin change. The scores RCRI and VSG-CRI had area under the curve of 0.635 and 0.639 for early cardiovascular complications, and 0.562 and 0.610 for death in 30 days. Conclusion In this small and selected group of patients undergoing arterial vascular surgery, the incidence of adverse events was elevated. The risk assessment indices RCRI and VSG-CRI did not perform well for complications within 30 days. PMID:26421535

  15. Adverse Outcome Pathway for Embryonic Vascular Disruption and Alternative Methods to Identify Chemical Vascular Disruptors During Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemically induced vascular toxicity during embryonic development can result in a wide range of adverse prenatal outcomes. We used information from genetic mouse models linked to phenotypic outcomes and a vascular toxicity knowledge base to construct an embryonic vascular disrupt...

  16. Hydraulic Permeability of Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Paul Allen

    2010-01-01

    An ion exchange process using spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resin is the baseline process for removing cesium from the dissolved salt solution in the high-level waste tanks at the Hanford Site, using large scale columns as part of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). The RF resin is also being evaluated for use in the proposed small column ion exchange (SCIX) system, which is an alternative treatment option at Hanford and at the Savannah River Site (SRS). A recirculating test loop with a small ion exchange column was used to measure the effect of oxygen uptake and radiation exposure on the permeability of a packed bed of the RF resin. The lab-scale column was designed to be prototypic of the proposed Hanford columns at the WTP. Although the test equipment was designed to model the Hanford ion exchange columns, the data on changes in the hydraulic permeability of the resin will also be valuable for determining potential pressure drops through the proposed SCIX system. The superficial fluid velocity in the lab-scale test (3.4-5.7 cm/s) was much higher than is planned for the full-scale Hanford columns to generate the maximum pressure drop expected in those columns (9.7 psig). The frictional drag from this high velocity produced forces on the resin in the lab-scale tests that matched the design basis of the full-scale Hanford column. Any changes in the resin caused by the radiation exposure and oxygen uptake were monitored by measuring the pressure drop through the lab-scale column and the physical properties of the resin. Three hydraulic test runs were completed, the first using fresh RF resin at 25 C, the second using irradiated resin at 25 C, and the third using irradiated resin at 45 C. A Hanford AP-101 simulant solution was recirculated through a test column containing 500 mL of Na-form RF resin. Known amounts of oxygen were introduced into the primary recirculation loop by saturating measured volumes of the simulant solution with oxygen and reintroducing the oxygenated simulant into the feed tank. The dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration of the recirculating simulant was monitored, and the amount of oxygen that reacted with the resin was determined from the change in the DO concentration of the recirculating simulant solution. Prior to hydraulic testing the resin for runs 2 and 3 was covered with the simulant solution and irradiated in a spent fuel element at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Both batches of resin were irradiated to a total gamma dose of 177 Mrad, but the resin for run 2 reached a maximum temperature during irradiation of 51 C, while the resin for run 3 reached a temperature of 38 C. The different temperatures were the result of the operating status of HFIR at the time of the irradiation and were not part of the test plan; however, the results clearly show the impact of the higher-temperature exposure during irradiation. The flow rate and pressure drop data from the test loop runs show that irradiating the RF resin reduces both the void fraction and the permeability of the resin bed. The mechanism for the reduction in permeability is not clear because irradiation increases the particle size of the resin beads and makes them deform less under pressure. Microscopic examination of the resin beads shows that they are all smooth regular spheres and that irradiation or oxygen uptake did not change the shape of the beads. The resin reacts rapidly with DO in the simulant solution, and the reaction with oxygen reduces the permeability of a bed of new resin by about 10% but has less impact on the permeability of irradiated resin. Irradiation increases the toughness of the resin beads, probably by initiating cross-linking reactions in them. Oxygen uptake reduces the crush strength of both new and irradiated resin; however, the pressures that caused the beads to crush are much higher than would be expected during the operation of an ion exchange column. There was no visible evidence of broken beads in any of the resin samples taken from the test loop. Reaction with oxygen red

  17. Epidermal Permeability Barrier Recovery Is Delayed in Vitiligo-Involved Sites

    PubMed Central

    Liu, J.; Man, W.Y.; Lv, C.Z.; Song, S.P.; Shi, Y.J.; Elias, P.M.; Man, M.Q.

    2010-01-01

    Background/Objectives Prior studies have demonstrated that both the skin surface pH and epidermal permeability barrier function vary with skin pigmentation types. Although melanin deficiency is the main feature of vitiligo, alterations in cutaneous biophysical properties in vitiligo have not yet been well defined. In the present study, stratum corneum (SC) hydration, the skin surface pH and epidermal permeability barrier function in vitiligo were evaluated. Methods A total of 30 volunteers with vitiligo comprising 19 males and 11 females aged 13–51 years (mean age: 27.91 ± 2.06 years) were enrolled in this study. The skin surface pH, SC hydration, melanin/erythema index and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) were measured by respective probes connected to a Courage-Khazaka MPA5. SC integrity was determined by measuring the TEWL following each D-Squame application. The barrier recovery rate was assessed at 5 h following barrier disruption by repeated tape stripping. Results In addition to SC hydration, both melanin and erythema index were significantly lower in vitiligo lesions than in contralateral, nonlesional sites, while no difference in skin surface pH between vitiligo-involved and uninvolved areas was observed. In addition, neither the basal TEWL nor SC integrity in the involved areas differed significantly from that in the uninvolved areas. However, barrier recovery in vitiligo-involved sites was significantly delayed in comparison with uninvolved sites (40.83 ± 5.39% vs. 58.30 ± 4.71%; t = 2.441; p < 0.02). Conclusion Barrier recovery following tape stripping of the SC is delayed in vitiligo. Therefore, improvement in epidermal permeability barrier function may be an important unrecognized factor to be considered in treating patients with vitiligo. PMID:20185976

  18. Nucleic acid indexing

    DOEpatents

    Guilfoyle, Richard A. (Madison, WI); Guo, Zhen (Bellevue, WA)

    2001-01-01

    A restriction site indexing method for selectively amplifying any fragment generated by a Class II restriction enzyme includes adaptors specific to fragment ends containing adaptor indexing sequences complementary to fragment indexing sequences near the termini of fragments generated by Class II enzyme cleavage. A method for combinatorial indexing facilitates amplification of restriction fragments whose sequence is not known.

  19. Nucleic acid indexing

    DOEpatents

    Guilfoyle, Richard A. (Madison, WI); Guo, Zhen (Bellevue, WA)

    1999-01-01

    A restriction site indexing method for selectively amplifying any fragment generated by a Class II restriction enzyme includes adaptors specific to fragment ends containing adaptor indexing sequences complementary to fragment indexing sequences near the termini of fragments generated by Class II enzyme cleavage. A method for combinatorial indexing facilitates amplification of restriction fragments whose sequence is not known.

  20. Lobby index in networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korn, A.; Schubert, A.; Telcs, A.

    2009-06-01

    We propose a new node centrality measure in networks, the lobby index, which is inspired by Hirsch’s h-index. It is shown that in scale-free networks with exponent ? the distribution of the l-index has power tail with exponent ?(?+1). Properties of the l-index and extensions are discussed.

  1. Radionuclide ventriculography and two dimensional echocardiography as predictors of left ventricular performance during aortic vascular surgery.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, D P; Quill, D; Peyton, M; Barton, J; Bouchier-Hayes, D; Cunningham, A J

    1988-10-01

    Sixteen consecutive patients scheduled for elective aortic vascular surgery underwent preoperative LVEF determination employing two dimensional echocardiography (2DE) and radionuclide ventriculography (RNV). Measured and derived indices of cardiac function were recorded before and after induction of anaesthesia, aortic cross-clamping and aortic unclamping. Induction of anaesthesia was associated with significant decreases in mean arterial pressure (MAP), pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP), cardiac index (CI) and with a highly significant decrease in left ventricular stroke work index (LVSWI). Aortic cross-clamping was associated with significant increases in MAP and systemic vascular resistance (SVR) whereas aortic unclamping was associated with a significant decrease in SVR. Preoperative LVEF, as measured by RNV and 2DE, were similar. Resting ejection fractions correlated poorly with both preoperative cardiac indices and with changes in indices of left ventricular performance seen intraoperatively. Preoperative ejection fraction determination did not predict intraoperative left ventricular performance. Preoperative exercise scanning may prove more informative. PMID:3234553

  2. Enhanced permeability and retention of macromolecular drugs in solid tumors: a royal gate for targeted anticancer nanomedicines.

    PubMed

    Greish, Khaled

    2007-01-01

    Over the past two decades cancer has ascended the causes of human death to be number one or two in many nations world wide. A major limitation inherent to most conventional anticancer chemotherapeutic agents is their lack of tumor selectivity. One way to achieve selective drug targeting to solid tumors is to exploit abnormalities of tumor vasculature, namely, hypervascularisation; aberrant vascular architecture; extensive production of vascular permeability factors stimulating extravasation within tumor tissues; and lack of lymphatic drainage. Maeda and his colleagues have extensively studied tumor vascular abnormalities in terms of active and selective delivery of anticancer drugs to tumor tissues, notably defining the enhanced permeability and retention effect (EPR effect) of macromolecular drugs in solid tumors. Due to their large molecular size, nanosized macromolecular anticancer drugs administered intravenously (i.v.) escape renal clearance. Often they can not penetrate the tight endothelial junctions of normal blood vessels, but they can extravasate in tumour vasculature and become trapped in the tumor vicinity. With time the tumor concentration will build up reaching several folds higher than that of the plasma due to lack of efficient lymphatic drainage in solid tumor; an ideal application for EPR-based selective anticancer drug delivery. Establishing this principle hastened development of various polymer conjugates and polymeric micelles as well as multifunctional nanoparticles for targeted cancer chemotherapy. Indeed this selective high local concentration of nanosized anticancer drugs in tumor tissues has proven superior in therapeutic effect with minimal side effects in both preclinical and clinical settings. In this review the mechanisms and factors involved in the EPR effect, as well as the uniqueness of nanoscale drugs for tumor targeting through EPR effect, will be discussed in detail. PMID:17671892

  3. Regulation and localization of vascular endothelial growth factor within the mammary glands during the transition from late gestation to lactation.

    PubMed

    VanKlompenberg, M K; Manjarín, R; Donovan, C E; Trott, J F; Hovey, R C

    2016-01-01

    The vascular network within the developing mammary gland (MG) grows in concert with the epithelium to prepare for lactation, although the mechanisms coordinating this vascular development are unresolved. Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) mediates angiogenesis and vascular permeability in the MG during pregnancy and lactation, where its expression is upregulated by prolactin. Given our previous finding that late-gestational hyperprolactinemia induced by domperidone (DOM) increased subsequent milk yield from gilts, we sought to establish changes in vascular development during late gestation and lactation in the MGs of these pigs and determine whether DOM altered MG angiogenesis and the factors regulating it. Gilts received either no treatment (n = 6) or DOM (n = 6) during late gestation, then had their MG biopsied from late gestation through lactation to assess microvessel density, VEGF-A distribution and messenger RNA expression, and aquaporin (AQP) gene expression. Microvessel density in the MG was unchanged during gestation then increased between days 2 and 21 of lactation (P < 0.05). The local expression of messenger RNA for VEGF-A120, VEGF-A147, VEGF-A164, VEGF-A164b, VEGF-A188, VEGF receptors-1 and -2, and AQP1 and AQP3 all generally increased during the transition from gestation to lactation (P < 0.05). Immunostaining localized VEGF-A to the apical cytoplasm of secretory epithelial cells, consistent with a far greater concentration of VEGF-A in colostrum and/or milk vs plasma (P < 0.0001). There was no effect of DOM on any of the variables analyzed. In summary, we found that vascular development in the MG increases during lactation in first-parity gilts and that VEGF-A is a part of the mammary secretome. Although late-gestational hyperprolactinemia increases milk yield, there was no evidence that it altered vascular development. PMID:26490114

  4. Nitrogen Transformations in Three Types of Permeable Pavement

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 2009, USEPA constructed a 0.4-ha (1-ac) parking lot at the Edison Environmental Center in Edison, NJ, that incorporated three different permeable pavement types - permeable interlocking concrete pavers (PICP), pervious concrete (PC), and porous asphalt (PA). The driving lanes...

  5. Permeability of small nonelectrolytes through lipid bilayer membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, A.; Gutknecht, J.

    1986-01-01

    Diffusion of small nonelectrolytes through planar lipid bilayer membranes (egg phosphatidylcholine-decane) was examined by correlating the permeability coefficients of 22 solutes with their partition coefficients between water and four organic solvents. High correlations were observed with hexadecane and olive oil (r = 0.95 and 0.93), but not octanol and ether (r = 0.75 and 0.74). Permeabilities of the seven smallest molecules (mol wt less than 50) (water, hydrofluoric acid, hydrochloric acid, ammonia, methylamine, formic acid and formamide) were 2- to 15-fold higher than the values predicted by the permeabilities of the larger molecules (50 less than mol wt less than 300). The extra permeabilities of the seven smallest molecules were not correlated with partition coefficients but were inversely correlated with molecular volumes. The larger solute permeabilities also decreased with increasing molecular volume, but the relationship was neither steep nor significant. The permeability pattern cannot be explained by the molecular volume dependence of partitioning into the bilayer or by the existence of transient aqueous pores. The molecular volume dependence of solute permeability suggests that the membrane barrier behaves more like a polymer than a liquid hydrocarbon. All the data are consistent with the solubility-diffusion model, which can explain both the hydrophobicity dependence and the molecular volume dependence of nonelectrolyte permeability.

  6. Capillary permeability in normal and hypertensive human pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Hunyor, S N; McEniery, P T; Roberts, K A; Bellamy, G R; Roffe, D J; Gallery, E D; Gyory, A Z; Boyce, E S

    1983-01-01

    Capillary permeability (CP) is elevated in late normal pregnancy, when compared to postpartum values. In women with pregnancy associated hypertension (PAH), pregnancy CP levels are not different from postpartum and are less than in normal pregnancy. These changes in capillary permeability are not explained by alterations in serum albumin. PMID:6627750

  7. Determination of Coal Permeability Using Pressure Transient Methods

    SciTech Connect

    McLendon, T.R.; Siriwardane, H.; Haljasmaa, I.V.; Bromhal, G.S.; Soong, Y.; Irdi, G.A.

    2007-05-01

    Coalbed methane is a significant natural resource in the Appalachian region. It is believed that coalbed methane production can be enhanced by injection of carbon dioxide into coalbeds. However, the influence of carbon dioxide injection on coal permeability is not yet well understood. Competitive sorption of carbon dioxide and methane gases onto coal is a known process. Laboratory experiments and limited field experience indicate that coal will swell during sorption of a gas and shrink during desorption of a gas. The swelling and shrinkage may change the permeability of the coal. In this study, the permeability of coal was determined by using carbon dioxide as the flowing fluid. Coal samples with different dimensions were prepared for laboratory permeability tests. Carbon dioxide was injected into the coal and the permeability was determined by using pressure transient methods. The confining pressure was variedto cover a wide range of depths. The permeability was also determined as a function of exposure time of carbon dioxide while the confining stress was kept constant. CT scans were taken before and after the introduction of carbon dioxide. Results show that the porosity and permeability of the coal matrix was very low. The paper presents experimental data and theoretical aspects of the flow of carbon dioxide through a coal sample during pressure transient tests. The suitability of the pressure transient methods for determining permeability of coal during carbon dioxide injection is discussed in the paper.

  8. Selective Permeability of PVA Membranes. I: Radiation-Crosslinked Membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Moshe G.; Wydeven, Theodore, Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The water and salt transport properties of ionizing radiation crosslinked poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) membranes were investigated. The studied membranes showed high permeabilities and low selectivities for both water and salt. The results were found to be in accord with a modified solution-diffusion model for transport across the membranes, in which pressure-dependent permeability coefficients are employed.

  9. Unsaturated and Saturated Permeabilities of Fiber Reinforcement: Critics and Suggestions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Chung Hae; Krawczak, Patricia

    2015-04-01

    In general, permeability measurement results show a strong scattering according to the measurement method, the type of test fluid and the fluid injection condition, even though permeability is regarded as a unique property of porous medium. In particular, the discrepancy between the unsaturated and saturated permeabilities for the same fabric has been widely reported. In the literature, relative permeability has been adopted to model the unsaturated flow. This approach has some limits in the modeling of double-scale porosity medium. We address this issue of permeability measurement by rigorously examining the mass conservation condition. Finally, we identify that the pressure gradient is non-linear with positive curvature in the unsaturated flow and a misinterpretation of pressure gradient is the main reason for the difference between the saturated and unsaturated permeabilities of the same fiber reinforcement. We propose to use a fixed value of permeability and to modify the mass conservation equation if there are air voids which are entrapped inside the fiber tow. Finally, we also suggest some guidelines and future perspectives to obtain more consistent permeability measurement results.

  10. Permeable Pavement Research at the Edison Environmental Center

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are few detailed studies of full-scale, replicated, actively-used permeable pavement systems. Practitioners need additional studies of permeable pavement systems in its intended application (parking lot, roadway, etc.) across a range of climatic events, daily usage conditio...

  11. Tailoring The Microwave Permittivity And Permeability Of Composite Materials

    E-print Network

    Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

    1 Tailoring The Microwave Permittivity And Permeability Of Composite Materials Kenneth M. Bober/Lowell, Lowell, MA 01854 ABSTRACT The microwave permittivity( r ) and permeability( r ) of composite materials the permittivity of a composite material has not been established. The MG theory presented in 1904 by J. C. Maxwell

  12. Hydrogen-permeable composite metal membrane and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Edlund, D.J.; Friesen, D.T.

    1993-06-08

    Various hydrogen production and hydrogen sulfide decomposition processes are disclosed that utilize composite metal membranes that contain an intermetallic diffusion barrier separating a hydrogen-permeable base metal and a hydrogen-permeable coating metal. The barrier is a thermally stable inorganic proton conductor.

  13. INTRODUCTION The evolution of permeability and porosity in porous, sedimentary

    E-print Network

    INTRODUCTION The evolution of permeability and porosity in porous, sedimentary rocks-sample dilatancy due to microcracking and is associated with an increase in permeability. For sedimentary rocks sedimentary rocks (Aydin and Johnson, 1978; Underhill and Woodcock, 1987;Antonellini et al., 1994; Cashman

  14. PERMEABILITY OF POLYMERIC MEMBRANE LINING MATERIALS FOR WASTE MANAGEMENT FACILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the types of materials used in the manufacture of polymeric liners for waste management and the permeability of such liners. It also presents experimental permeability results for a range of commercial polymeric membranes to gases, water vapor, and solvent vap...

  15. An Immersed Boundary Method for Computing Anisotropic Permeability of

    E-print Network

    Al Hanbali, Ahmad

    An Immersed Boundary Method for Computing Anisotropic Permeability of Structured Porous Media David Research & Development, Neuch^atel, Switzerland PhD-TW Colloquium June 11, 2009 An Immersed Boundary Method remarks & outlook An Immersed Boundary Method for Computing Anisotropic Permeability of Structured Porous

  16. Xenon NMR measurements of permeability and tortuosity in reservoir rocks

    E-print Network

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    Xenon NMR measurements of permeability and tortuosity in reservoir rocks Ruopeng Wanga,b , Tina of permeability, effective porosity and tortuosity on a variety of rock samples using NMR/MRI of thermal and laser of laser-polarized xenon into the rock core. Tortuosity is determined from measurements of the time

  17. Permeable Textual Discussion in Tracked Language Arts Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gritter, Kristine

    2012-01-01

    Permeable textual discussion occurs when the unofficial texts and discursive practices and personal histories that are already recognized and valued in students' cultures are scaffolds to academically sanctioned literacies. Ideally, permeable textual discussions are safe havens where students' identities (racial, gender, world views) are…

  18. PREFERENTIAL RADON TRANSPORT THROUGH HIGHLY PERMEABLE CHANNELS IN SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses preferential radon transport through highly permeable channels in soils. Indoor radon levels (that can pose a serious health risk) can be dramatically increased by air that is drawn into buildings through pipe penetrations that connect to permeable channels in...

  19. An equivalent complex permeability model for litz-wire windings

    E-print Network

    An equivalent complex permeability model for litz-wire windings Xi Nan C. R. Sullivan Found in Fortieth IEEE Industry Applications Society Annual Meet- ing, Oct. 2005, pp. 2229­2235. c 2005 IEEE the IEEE. #12;An Equivalent Complex Permeability Model for Litz-Wire Windings Xi Nan and Charles R

  20. Modeling the Hydrologic Processes of a Permeable Pavement System

    EPA Science Inventory

    A permeable pavement system can capture stormwater to reduce runoff volume and flow rate, improve onsite groundwater recharge, and enhance pollutant controls within the site. A new unit process model for evaluating the hydrologic performance of a permeable pavement system has be...

  1. Vascular responses to endothelin-1 following inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis in the conscious rat.

    PubMed Central

    Filep, J. G.; Földes-Filep, E.; Rousseau, A.; Sirois, P.; Fournier, A.

    1993-01-01

    1. The objectives of the present experiments were to assess the role of endogenous nitric oxide (NO) in mediating and/or modulating the effects of endothelin-1 (ET-1) on blood pressure and microvascular permeability in conscious rats. 2. Intravenous administration of the NO synthesis inhibitors, NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) or NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) at a dose (25 mg kg-1 or 2 mg kg-1, respectively) which evoked maximum increase in mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) significantly attenuated (by about 40%) the vasodepressor response and potentiated (by 100-180%) the pressor response to ET-1 (1 nmol kg-1, i.v.) compared to the effects of ET-1 in animals where the peripheral vasoconstrictor effects of L-arginine analogues were mimicked by an infusion of noradrenaline (620-820 ng kg-1 min-1). Similar inhibition of the depressor and potentiation of the pressor actions of ET-1 were observed when the MABP which had been elevated by L-NMMA or L-NAME was titrated to normotensive levels with hydralazine or diazoxide before injection of ET-1. 3. L-NAME (2 mg kg-1) increased the vascular permeability of the large airways, stomach, duodenum, pancreas, liver, kidney and spleen (up to 280%) as measured by the extravasation of Evans blue dye. The permeability of pulmonary parenchyma, skeletal muscle and skin was not affected significantly by L-NAME treatment. Elevation of MABP by noradrenaline infusion did not evoke protein extravasation in the vascular beds studied with the exception of the lung.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8298811

  2. Differences in argon and water permeability of phyllosilicate powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behnsen, J.; Faulkner, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    Phyllosilicates, such as clays and micas, are abundant throughout the upper crust. They are commonly found in upper crustal faults and constitute a large percentage of the sediments that make up accretionary wedges. Phyllosilicate-rich rocks are known to have low permeability, but the influence of the mineralogy on the permeability is poorly characterized. We present results of water and argon permeability measurements of eight phyllosilicate powders at room temperature. Phyllosilicates included talc, pyrophyllite, kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite (all particle size <2 ?m), and muscovite, phlogopite, and biotite (particle size <20 ?m). Tests were performed under hydrostatic conditions, with a constant pore pressure of 10 MPa (water or argon) and varying confining pressure up to 160 MPa. Results show that phyllosilicate powders have very low permeabilities between 10-19 m2 and 10-24 m2, depending on mineral, pore fluid, and effective pressure. Lowest permeabilities were found for montmorillonite and talc, while muscovite was the most permeable phyllosilicate powder. Permeability decreases with increased compaction of powders, and for fully compacted powders (after 10 pressure cycles), pressure dependency of permeability follows an exponential relationship with a pressure sensitive gradient of 0.004 MPa-1 to 0.015 MPa-1. Permeability for water is always lower (up to 1.8 orders of magnitude) than for argon. The difference in argon-water permeability can be related to the hydrophobicity and hydrogen-bonding surface properties of minerals tested. Talc, the most hydrophobic mineral tested, showed the smallest difference between argon and water permeability, while montmorillonite showed the largest. Permeability might also be affected by packing controlled by frictional strength of particles, as well as by particle size and shape. Additional tests of the frictional strength of those phyllosilicate powders show a relationship between dry or wet friction coefficients of the powders and their argon or water permeability. The results indicate that type of phyllosilicate, pore water chemistry and grain size distribution will strongly affect permeability in phyllosilicate-rich regions of the upper crust such as faults.

  3. Atrial natriuretic peptide attenuates LPS-induced lung vascular leak: role of PAK1

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Junjie; Fu, Panfeng; Yakubov, Bakhtiyor; Dubrovskyi, Oleksii; Fortune, Jennifer A.; Klibanov, Alexander M.; Birukov, Konstantin G.

    2010-01-01

    Increased levels of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) in the models of sepsis, pulmonary edema, and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) suggest its potential role in the modulation of acute lung injury. We have recently described ANP-protective effects against thrombin-induced barrier dysfunction in pulmonary endothelial cells (EC). The current study examined involvement of the Rac effector p21-activated kinase (PAK1) in ANP-protective effects in the model of lung vascular permeability induced by bacterial wall LPS. C57BL/6J mice or ANP knockout mice (Nppa?/?) were treated with LPS (0.63 mg/kg intratracheal) with or without ANP (2 ?g/kg iv). Lung injury was monitored by measurements of bronchoalveolar lavage protein content, cell count, Evans blue extravasation, and lung histology. Endothelial barrier properties were assessed by morphological analysis and measurements of transendothelial electrical resistance. ANP treatment stimulated Rac-dependent PAK1 phosphorylation, attenuated endothelial permeability caused by LPS, TNF-?, and IL-6, decreased LPS-induced cell and protein accumulation in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and suppressed Evans blue extravasation in the murine model of acute lung injury. More severe LPS-induced lung injury and vascular leak were observed in ANP knockout mice. In rescue experiments, ANP injection significantly reduced lung injury in Nppa?/? mice caused by LPS. Molecular inhibition of PAK1 suppressed the protective effects of ANP treatment against LPS-induced lung injury and endothelial barrier dysfunction. This study shows that the protective effects of ANP against LPS-induced vascular leak are mediated at least in part by PAK1-dependent signaling leading to EC barrier enhancement. Our data suggest a direct role for ANP in endothelial barrier regulation via modulation of small GTPase signaling. PMID:20729389

  4. Mechanical and biocompatible characterizations of a readily available multilayer vascular graft

    PubMed Central

    Madhavan, Krishna; Elliott, Winston H; Bonani, Walter; Monnet, Eric; Tan, Wei

    2013-01-01

    There is always a considerable clinical need for vascular grafts. Considering the availability, physical and mechanical properties, and regenerative potential, we have developed and characterized readily available, strong, and compliant multilayer grafts that support cell culture and ingrowth. The grafts were made from heterogeneous materials and structures, including a thin, dense, nanofibrous core composed of poly-?-caprolactone (PCL), and a thick, porous, hydrogel sleeve composed of genipin-crosslinked collagen–chitosan (GCC). Because the difference in physicochemical properties between PCL and GCC caused layer separation, the layer adhesion was identified as a determinant to graft property and integrity under physiological conditions. Thus, strategies to modify the layer interface, including increasing porosity of the PCL surface, decreasing hydrophobicity, and increasing interlayer crosslinking, were developed. Results from microscopic images showed that increasing PCL porosity was characterized by improved layer adhesion. The resultant graft was characterized by high compliance (4.5%), and desired permeability (528 mL/cm2/min), burst strength (695 mmHg), and suture strength (2.38 N) for readily grafting. Results also showed that PCL mainly contributed to the graft mechanical properties, whereas GCC reduced the water permeability. In addition to their complementary contributions to physical and mechanical properties, the distinct graft layers also provided layer-specific structures for seeding and culture of vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells in vitro. Acellular graft constructs were readily used to replace abdominal aorta of rabbits, resulting in rapid cell ingrowth and flow reperfusion. The multilayer constructs capable of sustaining physiological conditions and promoting cellular activities could serve as a platform for future development of regenerative vascular grafts. PMID:23165922

  5. Vascular leak ensues a vigorous proinflammatory cytokine response to Tacaribe arenavirus infection in AG129 mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tacaribe virus (TCRV) is a less biohazardous relative of the highly pathogenic clade B New World arenaviruses that cause viral hemorrhagic fever syndromes and require handling in maximum containment facilities not readily available to most researchers. AG129 type I and II interferon receptor knockout mice have been shown to be susceptible to TCRV infection, but the pathogenic mechanisms contributing to the lethal disease are unclear. Methods To gain insights into the pathogenesis of TCRV infection in AG129 mice, we assessed hematologic and cytokine responses during the course of infection, as well as changes in the permeability of the vascular endothelium. We also treated TCRV-challenged mice with MY-24, a compound that prevents mortality without affecting viral loads during the acute infection, and measured serum and tissue viral titers out to 40 days post-infection to determine whether the virus is ultimately cleared in recovering mice. Results We found that the development of viremia and splenomegaly precedes an elevation in white blood cells and the detection of high levels of proinflammatory mediators known to destabilize the endothelial barrier, which likely contributes to the increased vascular permeability and weight loss that was observed several days prior to when the mice generally succumb to TCRV challenge. In surviving mice treated with MY-24, viremia and liver virus titers were not cleared until 2–3 weeks post-infection, after which the mice began to recover lost weight. Remarkably, substantial viral loads were still present in the lung, spleen, brain and kidney tissues at the conclusion of the study. Conclusions Our findings suggest that vascular leak may be a contributing factor in the demise of TCRV-infected mice, as histopathologic findings are generally mild to moderate in nature, and as evidenced with MY-24 treatment, animals can survive in the face of high viral loads. PMID:23816343

  6. Current perioperative practice in Canadian vascular surgery

    PubMed Central

    Rockley, Mark; Chu, Kathleen; Bayne, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Background The Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) Society has set out to improve patient recovery by developing evidence-based perioperative practices. Many institutions and other specialties have begun to apply their principles with great success; however, ERAS principles focus mostly on general surgery, and their applicability to other specialties, such as vascular surgery, is less clear. We sought to investigate the current standard of perioperative care in Canadian vascular surgery by assessing surgeons’ perceptions of evidence supporting ERAS practices, identifying barriers to aligning them and identifying aspects of perioperative care that require research specific to vascular surgery before they could be broadly applied. Methods We administered an online survey with 26 questions to all Canadian Society for Vascular Surgery members. Results Respondents varied largely in perioperative practice, most notably in the use of nasogastric tubes, Foley catheters and neck drains. Familiarity with supporting evidence was poor. Approximately half (44%) of respondents were not familiar with contrary evidence, while those who were often perceived institutional barriers to change. Finally, one-third (30%) of respondents felt that relevant evidence did not exist to support changing their practice. Conclusion The variability of perioperative practice in Canadian vascular surgery is likely due to multiple factors, including a lack of specific evidence. Further research in areas of perioperative vascular care where the current standard of practice varies most greatly may help improve recovery after vascular surgery in Canada over simply adopting existing ERAS principles. PMID:26424688

  7. Intrauterine nutrition: long-term consequences for vascular health.

    PubMed

    Szostak-Wegierek, Dorota

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence that improper intrauterine nutrition may negatively influence vascular health in later life. Maternal malnutrition may result in intrauterine growth retardation and, in turn, metabolic disorders such as insulin resistance, diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidemia, and also enhanced risk of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular death in the offspring. Energy and/or protein restriction is the most critical determinant for fetal programming. However, it has also been proposed that intrauterine n-3 fatty acid deficiency may be linked to later higher blood pressure levels and reduced insulin sensitivity. Moreover, it has been shown that inadequate supply of micronutrients such as folate, vitamin B12, vitamin A, iron, magnesium, zinc, and calcium may contribute to impaired vascular health in the progeny. In addition, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy that are linked to impaired placental blood flow and suboptimal fetal nutrition may also contribute to intrauterine growth retardation and aggravated cardiovascular risk in the offspring. On the other hand, maternal overnutrition, which often contributes to obesity and/or diabetes, may result in macrosomia and enhanced cardiometabolic risk in the offspring. Progeny of obese and/or diabetic mothers are relatively more prone to develop obesity, insulin resistance, diabetes, and hypertension. It was demonstrated that they may have permanently enhanced appetites. Their atheromatous lesions are usually more pronounced. It seems that, particularly, a maternal high-fat/junk food diet may be detrimental for vascular health in the offspring. Fetal exposure to excessive levels of saturated fatty and/or n-6 fatty acids, sucrose, fructose and salt, as well as a maternal high glycemic index diet, may also contribute to later enhanced cardiometabolic risk. PMID:25050077

  8. Maternal Uterine Vascular Remodeling During Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Osol, George; Mandala, Maurizio

    2009-01-01

    Sufficient uteroplacental blood flow is essential for normal pregnancy outcome and is accomplished by the coordinated growth and remodeling of the entire uterine circulation, as well as the creation of a new fetal vascular organ: the placenta. The process of remodeling involves a number of cellular processes, including hyperplasia and hypertrophy, rearrangement of existing elements, and changes in extracellular matrix. In this review, we provide information on uterine blood flow increases during pregnancy, the influence of placentation type on the distribution of uterine vascular resistance, consideration of the patterns, nature, and extent of maternal uterine vascular remodeling during pregnancy, and what is known about the underlying cellular mechanisms. PMID:19196652

  9. BMP SIGNALING IN VASCULAR DEVELOPMENT AND DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Lowery, Jonathan W.; deCaestecker, Mark P.

    2010-01-01

    Genetic and functional studies indicate that common components of the Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) signaling pathway play critical roles in regulating vascular development in the embryo, and in promoting vascular homeostasis and disease in the adult. However, discrepancies between in vitro and in vivo findings, and distinct functional properties of the BMP signaling pathway in different vascular beds have led to controversies in the field that have been difficult to reconcile. This review attempts to clarify some of these issues by providing an up to date overview of the biology and genetics of BMP signaling relevant to the intact vasculature. PMID:20674464

  10. Vascular Malformations: Approach by an Interventional Radiologist

    PubMed Central

    Pimpalwar, Sheena

    2014-01-01

    Children with vascular malformations are best managed with a multidisciplinary team of specialists. Interventional radiology may deliver primary treatment such as staged sclerotherapy and embolization for malformations that are poor candidates for primary surgical resection or play a supportive role such as preoperative or intraoperative embolization. A thorough understanding of vascular morphology and flow dynamics is imperative to choosing the best treatment tool and technique. In this review, the author discusses the selection of techniques and tools used to treat vascular malformations based on their angiographic morphology. PMID:25045335

  11. Near-Infrared Light Modulated Photothermal Effect Increases Vascular Perfusion and Enhances Polymeric Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Melancon, Marites P.; Elliott, Andrew M.; Shetty, Anil; Huang, Qian; Stafford, R. Jason; Li, Chun

    2011-01-01

    Hyperthermia, which is heating of the tumors above 43 °C for about 30 min, has been known to modulate vascular permeability for enhanced chemotherapy. However, it is not clear whether similar effects exists when temperature at tumor sites is elevated above 43 °C, such as temperature achieved in laser-induced photothermal ablation (PTA) therapy. Also, the effect of timing of chemotherapeutic drug administration following heating in the efficiency of drug delivery is not established. In this study, we investigated the impact of near infrared (NIR) laser irradiated anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody C225-conjugated hollow gold nanospheres (C225-HAuNS)on vascular permeability and subsequent tumor uptake of a water-soluble polymer using combined MRI, ultrasound and optical imaging approaches. Magnetic temperature imaging showed a maximum temperature of 65.2 ± 0.10 °C in A431 tumor xenograft of mice treated with C225-HAuNS plus laser and 47.0 ± 0.33 °C in tumors of mice treated with saline plus laser at 4W/cm2 for 3 min (control) at 2 mm from the light incident surface. Dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI demonstrated greater than 2-fold increase of DTPA-Gd in the initial area under the curve (IAUC90) in mice injected with C225-HAuNS and exposed to NIR laser compared with control mice at 3 min after laser treatment. Similarly, Power Doppler (PD) ultrasound revealed a 4- to 6-fold increase in percentage vascularization in mice treated with C225-HAuNS plus NIR laser compared to control mice and confirmed increased vascular perfusion immediately after laser treatment. Twenty-four hours later, the blood perfusion was shut down. On optical imaging, tumor uptake of PG-Gd-NIR813, which is the model polymeric drug used, was significantly higher (p-value < 0.05) in mice injected with PG-Gd-NIR813 at 5 min after laser treatment than in mice injected with PG-Gd-NIR813 at 24 h after laser treatment and the saline-treated mice. In conclusion, laser irradiation of tumors after intravenous injection of C255-HAuNS induces a thermally mediated modulation of the vascular perfusion, which enhances the delivery of polymeric drugs to the tumors at the time phototherapy is initiated. PMID:21763373

  12. Predicting the extent of metabolism using in vitro permeability rate measurements and in silico permeability rate predictions

    PubMed Central

    Hosey, Chelsea M; Benet, Leslie Z

    2015-01-01

    The Biopharmaceutics Drug Disposition Classification System (BDDCS) can be utilized to predict drug disposition, including interactions with other drugs and transporter or metabolizing enzyme effects based on the extent of metabolism and solubility of a drug. However, defining the extent of metabolism relies upon clinical data. Drugs exhibiting high passive intestinal permeability rates are extensively metabolized. Therefore, we aimed to determine if in vitro measures of permeability rate or in silico permeability rate predictions could predict the extent of metabolism, to determine a reference compound representing the permeability rate above which compounds would be expected to be extensively metabolized, and to predict the major route of elimination of compounds in a two-tier approach utilizing permeability rate and a previously published model predicting the major route of elimination of parent drug. Twenty-two in vitro permeability rate measurement data sets in Caco-2 and MDCK cell lines and PAMPA were collected from the literature, while in silico permeability rate predictions were calculated using ADMET Predictor™ or VolSurf+. The potential for permeability rate to differentiate between extensively and poorly metabolized compounds was analyzed with receiver operating characteristic curves. Compounds that yielded the highest sensitivity-specificity average were selected as permeability rate reference standards. The major route of elimination of poorly permeable drugs was predicted by our previously published model and the accuracies and predictive values were calculated. The areas under the receiver operating curves were >0.90 for in vitro measures of permeability rate and >0.80 for the VolSurf+ model of permeability rate, indicating they were able to predict the extent of metabolism of compounds. Labetalol and zidovudine predicted greater than 80% of extensively metabolized drugs correctly and greater than 80% of poorly metabolized drugs correctly in Caco-2 and MDCK, respectively, while theophylline predicted greater than 80% of extensively and poorly metabolized drugs correctly in PAMPA. A two-tier approach predicting elimination route predicts 72±9%, 49±10%, and 66±7% of extensively metabolized, biliarily eliminated, and renally eliminated parent drugs correctly when the permeability rate is predicted in silico and 74±7%, 85±2%, and 73±8% of extensively metabolized, biliarily eliminated, and renally eliminated parent drugs correctly, respectively when the permeability rate is determined in vitro. PMID:25816851

  13. Enhanced specific delivery and targeting of oncolytic Sindbis viral vectors by modulating vascular leakiness in tumor.

    PubMed

    Tseng, J-C; Granot, T; DiGiacomo, V; Levin, B; Meruelo, D

    2010-04-01

    Genetic instability of cancer cells generates resistance after initial responses to chemotherapeutic agents. Several oncolytic viruses have been designed to exploit specific signatures of cancer cells, such as important surface markers or pivotal signaling pathways for selective replication. It is less likely for cancer cells to develop resistance given that mutations in these cancer signatures would negatively impact tumor growth and survival. However, as oncolytic viral vectors are large particles, they suffer from inefficient extravasation from tumor blood vessels. Their ability to reach cancer cells is an important consideration in achieving specific oncolytic targeting and potential vector replication. Our previous studies indicated that the Sindbis viral vectors target tumor cells by the laminin receptor. Here, we present evidence that modulating tumor vascular leakiness, using VEGF and/or metronomic chemotherapy regimens, significantly enhances tumor vascular permeability and directly enhances oncolytic Sindbis vector targeting in tumor models. Because host-derived vascular endothelium cells are genetically stable and less likely to develop resistance to chemotherapeutics, a combined metronomic chemotherapeutics and oncolytic vector regimen should provide a new approach for cancer therapy. This mechanism could explain the synergistic treatment outcomes observed in clinical trials of combined therapies. PMID:19798121

  14. Gastric Antral Vascular Ectasia in Systemic Sclerosis: Current Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Parrado, Raphael Hernando; Lemus, Hernan Nicolas; Coral-Alvarado, Paola Ximena; Quintana López, Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Gastric antral vascular ectasia (GAVE) is a rare entity with unique endoscopic appearance described as “watermelon stomach.” It has been associated with systemic sclerosis but the pathophysiological changes leading to GAVE have not been explained and still remain uncertain. Methods. Databases Medline, Scopus, Embase, PubMed, and Cochrane were searched for relevant papers. The main search words were “Gastric antral vascular ectasia,” “Watermelon Stomach,” “GAVE,” “Scleroderma,” and “Systemic Sclerosis.” Fifty-four papers were considered for this review. Results. GAVE is a rare entity in the spectrum of manifestations of systemic sclerosis with unknown pathogenesis. Most patients with systemic sclerosis and GAVE present with asymptomatic anemia, iron deficiency anemia, or heavy acute gastrointestinal bleeding. Symptomatic therapy and endoscopic ablation are the first-line of treatment. Surgical approach may be recommended for patients who do not respond to medical or endoscopic therapies. Conclusion. GAVE can be properly diagnosed and treated. Early diagnosis is key in the management of GAVE because it makes symptomatic therapies and endoscopic approaches feasible. A high index of suspicion is critical. Future studies and a critical review of the current findings about GAVE are needed to understand the role of this condition in systemic sclerosis. PMID:26633973

  15. 21 CFR 886.5918 - Rigid gas permeable contact lens care products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Rigid gas permeable contact lens care products. 886.5918... § 886.5918 Rigid gas permeable contact lens care products. (a) Identification. A rigid gas permeable contact lens care product is a device...

  16. Mebendazole Reduces Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation and Neointimal Formation Following Vascular Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jintao; Wang, Hui; Guo, Chiao; Luo, Wei; Lawler, Alyssa; Reddy, Aswin; Wang, Julia; Sun, Eddy B.; Eitzman, Daniel T.

    2014-01-01

    Mebendazole is an antihelminthic drug that exerts its effects via interference with microtubule function in parasites. To determine the utility of mebendazole as a potential treatment for vascular diseases involving proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells, the effects of mebendazole on vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation were tested in vitro and in a mouse model of arterial injury. In vitro, mebendazole inhibited proliferation and migration of murine vascular smooth muscle cells and this was associated with altered intracellular microtubule organization. To determine in vivo effects of mebendazole following vascular injury, femoral arterial wire injury was induced in wild-type mice treated with either mebendazole or placebo control. Compared with placebo-treated mice, mebendazole-treated mice formed less neointima at the site of injury. Mebendazole is effective at inhibiting vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration, and neointimal formation following arterial injury in mice. PMID:24587248

  17. Active metamaterials: sign of refraction index and gain-assisted dispersion management

    E-print Network

    Alexander A. Govyadinov; Mikhail A. Noginov; Viktor A. Podolskiy

    2007-04-27

    We derive an approach to define the causal direction of the wavevector of modes in optical metamaterials, which in turn, determines signs of refractive index and impedance as a function of {\\it real and imaginary} parts of dielectric permittivity and magnetic permeability. We use the developed technique to demonstrate that the interplay between resonant response of constituents of metamaterials can be used to achieve efficient dispersion management. Finally we demonstrate broadband dispersion-less index and impedance matching in active nanowire-based negative index materials. Our work opens new practical applications of negative index composites for broadband lensing, imaging, and pulse-routing.

  18. Relationship between the Kramers-Kronig relations and negative index of refraction

    E-print Network

    Hickey, Mark C; Kussow, Adil-Gerai

    2010-01-01

    The condition for a negative index of refraction with respect to the vacuum index is established in terms of permittivity and permeability susceptibilities. It is found that the imposition of analyticity to satisfy the Kramers-Kronig relations is a sufficiently general criterion for a physical negative index. The satisfaction of the Kramers-Kronig relations is a manifestation of the principle of causality and the predicted frequency region of negative index agrees with the Depine-Lakhtakia condition for the phase velocity being anti-directed to the Poynting vector, although the conditions presented here do not assume {\\it a priori} a negative solution branch for n.

  19. Relationship between the Kramers-Kronig relations and negative index of refraction

    SciTech Connect

    Akyurtlu, Alkim; Kussow, Adil-Gerai

    2010-11-15

    The condition for a negative index of refraction with respect to the vacuum index is established in terms of permittivity and permeability susceptibilities. It is found that the imposition of analyticity to satisfy the Kramers-Kronig relations is a sufficiently general criterion for a physical negative index. The satisfaction of the Kramers-Kronig relations is a manifestation of the principle of causality and the predicted frequency region of negative index agrees with the Depine-Lakhtakia condition for the phase velocity being antidirected to the Poynting vector, although the conditions presented here do not assume a priori a negative solution branch for n.

  20. Placental development during early pregnancy in sheep: vascular growth and expression of angiogenic factors in maternal placenta.

    PubMed

    Grazul-Bilska, Anna T; Borowicz, Pawel P; Johnson, Mary Lynn; Minten, Megan A; Bilski, Jerzy J; Wroblewski, Robert; Redmer, Dale A; Reynolds, Lawrence P

    2010-07-01

    Placental vascular development (angiogenesis) is critical for placental function and thus for normal embryonic/fetal growth and development. Specific environmental factors or use of assisted reproductive techniques may result in poor placental angiogenesis, which may contribute to embryonic losses and/or fetal growth retardation. Uterine tissues were collected on days 14, 16, 18, 20, 22, 24, 26, 28, and 30 after mating and on day 10 after estrus (nonpregnant controls) to determine vascular development and expression of several factors involved in the regulation of angiogenesis in the endometrium. Compared with controls, several measurements of endometrial vascularity increased (P<0.001) including vascular labeling index (LI; proportion of proliferating cells), the tissue area occupied by capillaries, area per capillary (capillary size), total capillary circumference per unit of tissue area, and expression of factor VIII (marker of endothelial cells), but capillary number decreased (P<0.001). Compared with controls, mRNA for placental growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor receptors, angiopoietins (ANGPT) 1 and 2, ANGPT receptor TEK, endothelial nitric oxide synthase, and hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha increased (P<0.05) during early pregnancy. Vascular LI was positively correlated (P<0.05) with several measurements of vascularity and with mRNA expression of angiogenic factors. These data indicate that endometrial angiogenesis, manifested by increased vascularity and increased expression of several factors involved in the regulation of angiogenesis, is initiated very early in pregnancy. This more complete description of early placental angiogenesis may provide the foundation for determining whether placental vascular development is altered in compromised pregnancies. PMID:20400519

  1. Vascularization of bioprosthetic valve material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boughner, Derek R.; Dunmore-Buyze, Joy; Heenatigala, Dino; Lohmann, Tara; Ellis, Chris G.

    1999-04-01

    Cell membrane remnants represent a probable nucleation site for calcium deposition in bioprosthetic heart valves. Calcification is a primary failure mode of both bovine pericardial and porcine aortic heterograft bioprosthesis but the nonuniform pattern of calcium distribution within the tissue remains unexplained. Searching for a likely cellular source, we considered the possibility of a previously overlooked small blood vessel network. Using a videomicroscopy technique, we examined 5 matched pairs of porcine aortic and pulmonary valves and 14 samples from 6 bovine pericardia. Tissue was placed on a Leitz Metallux microscope and transilluminated with a 75 watt mercury lamp. Video images were obtained using a silicon intensified target camera equipped with a 431 nm interference filter to maximize contrast of red cells trapped in a capillary microvasculature. Video images were recorded for analysis on a Silicon Graphics Image Analysis work station equipped with a video frame grabber. For porcine valves, the technique demonstrated a vascular bed in the central spongiosa at cusp bases with vessel sizes from 6-80 micrometers . Bovine pericardium differed with a more uniform distribution of 7-100 micrometers vessels residing centrally. Thus, small blood vessel endothelial cells provide a potential explanation patterns of bioprosthetic calcification.

  2. Fascia and Primo Vascular System

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chun; Du, Yi-kuan; Wu, Jian-bin; Wang, Jun; Luan, Ping; Yang, Qin-lao; Yuan, Lin

    2015-01-01

    The anatomical basis for the concept of acupuncture points/meridians in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has not been resolved. This paper reviews the fascia research progress and the relationship among acupuncture points/meridians, primo vascular system (PVS), and fascia. Fascia is as a covering, with common origins of layers of the fascial system despite diverse names for individual parts. Fascia assists gliding and fluid flow and holds memory and is highly innervated. Fascia is intimately involved with nourishment of all cells of the body, including those of disease and cancer. The human body's fascia network may be the physical substrate represented by the meridians of TCM. The PVS is a newly found circulatory system; recent increased interest has led to new research and new discoveries in the anatomical and functional aspects of the PVS. The fasciology theory provides new insights into the physiological effects of acupuncture needling on basic cellular mechanisms including connective tissue mechanotransduction and regeneration. This view represents a theoretical basis and means for applying modern biomedical research to examining TCM principles and therapies, and it favors a holistic approach to diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26379741

  3. Evidence for accelerated vascular aging in bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Sodhi, Simrit K.; Linder, Jonathan; Chenard, Catherine A.; Miller, Del D.; Haynes, William G.; Fiedorowicz, Jess G.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Persons with bipolar disorder face excess risk of cardiovascular disease, although the biobehavioral mechanisms and time course are unclear. We measured vascular stiffness in a cross-sectional sample of participants with bipolar disorder and compared results to published normative data to assess time-course and relationship to behavioral risk factors. Methods 62 individuals with bipolar disorder (33±6.7 years; 64% female) underwent non-invasive assessment of arterial stiffness through arterial applanation tonometry. Lifetime tobacco exposure was estimated on clinical interview. Physical activity was assessed using the long-version of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ). A food frequency questionnaire was used to compute Alternate Healthy Eating Index (AHEI), a measure of overall dietary quality. Medication histories were systematically abstracted from pharmacy records. Results Participants over the age of 32 (median split) had greater arterial stiffness than expected from age-based population norms for pulse wave velocity (PWV) (7.6 vs. 7.0 m/s, p=0.02) and estimated aortic augmentation pressure (AIx) (14.2 vs. 8.2%, p=0.0002). The younger portion of the sample did not differ from population norms on these measures (PWV 6.3 vs. 6.4 m/s, p=0.45 and AIx 7.6 vs. 7.4%, p=0.60). In the older half of the sample, physical activity was inversely associated with AIx and poorer diet marginally associated with PWV. These findings were independent of body mass index (BMI), which was strongly related to arterial stiffness. Conclusion Risk for vascular disease may be acquired over the long-term course of affective illness. This risk appears to reflect maladaptive health behaviors, which may be amenable to intervention. PMID:22850256

  4. CENDI Indexing Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The CENDI Indexing Workshop held at NASA Headquarters, Two Independence Square, 300 E Street, Washington, DC, on September 21-22, 1994 focused on the following topics: machine aided indexing, indexing quality, an indexing pilot project, the MedIndEx Prototype, Department of Energy/Office of Scientific and Technical Information indexing activities, high-tech coding structures, category indexing schemes, and the Government Information Locator Service. This publication consists mostly of viewgraphs related to the above noted topics. In an appendix is a description of the Government Information Locator Service.

  5. Lipidomics in vascular health: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Kolovou, Genovefa; Kolovou, Vana; Mavrogeni, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Identifying the mechanisms that convert a healthy vascular wall to an atherosclerotic wall is of major importance since the consequences may lead to a shortened lifespan. Classical risk factors (age, smoking, obesity, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and dyslipidemia) may result in the progression of atherosclerotic lesions by processes including inflammation and lipid accumulation. Thus, the evaluation of blood lipids and the full lipid complement produced by cells, organisms, or tissues (lipidomics) is an issue of importance. In this review, we shall describe the recent progress in vascular health research using lipidomic advances. We will begin with an overview of vascular wall biology and lipids, followed by a short analysis of lipidomics. Finally, we shall focus on the clinical implications of lipidomics and studies that have examined lipidomic approaches and vascular health. PMID:26109865

  6. The vascular flora of Madison County, Texas 

    E-print Network

    Neill, Amanda Kathryn

    2000-01-01

    Vascular plants were collected in Madison County, Texas from 1996-2000 to create a vouchered record of species occurance, abundance, and habitat preference. Plants were collected from 233 sites in the county that are described by thirteen major...

  7. Hydrogels for Engineering of Perfusable Vascular Networks

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Juan; Zheng, Huaiyuan; Poh, Patrina S. P.; Machens, Hans-Günther; Schilling, Arndt F.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogels are commonly used biomaterials for tissue engineering. With their high-water content, good biocompatibility and biodegradability they resemble the natural extracellular environment and have been widely used as scaffolds for 3D cell culture and studies of cell biology. The possible size of such hydrogel constructs with embedded cells is limited by the cellular demand for oxygen and nutrients. For the fabrication of large and complex tissue constructs, vascular structures become necessary within the hydrogels to supply the encapsulated cells. In this review, we discuss the types of hydrogels that are currently used for the fabrication of constructs with embedded vascular networks, the key properties of hydrogels needed for this purpose and current techniques to engineer perfusable vascular structures into these hydrogels. We then discuss directions for future research aimed at engineering of vascularized tissue for implantation. PMID:26184185

  8. Biodegradable microfluidic scaffolds for vascular tissue engineering

    E-print Network

    Bettinger, Christopher John, 1981-

    2004-01-01

    This work describes the integration of novel microfabrication techniques for vascular tissue engineering applications in the context of a novel biodegradable elastomer. The field of tissue engineering and organ regeneration ...

  9. Extracellular Matrix Molecules Facilitating Vascular Biointegration

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Steven G.; Waterhouse, Anna; Michael, Praveesuda; Ng, Martin K.C.

    2012-01-01

    All vascular implants, including stents, heart valves and graft materials exhibit suboptimal biocompatibility that significantly reduces their clinical efficacy. A range of biomolecules in the subendothelial space have been shown to play critical roles in local regulation of thrombosis, endothelial growth and smooth muscle cell proliferation, making these attractive candidates for modulation of vascular device biointegration. However, classically used biomaterial coatings, such as fibronectin and laminin, modulate only one of these components; enhancing endothelial cell attachment, but also activating platelets and triggering thrombosis. This review examines a subset of extracellular matrix molecules that have demonstrated multi-faceted vascular compatibility and accordingly are promising candidates to improve the biointegration of vascular biomaterials. PMID:24955633

  10. Splanchnic Hemodynamics and Intestinal Vascularity in Crohn's Disease: An In Vivo Evaluation Using Doppler and Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound and Biochemical Parameters.

    PubMed

    Maconi, Giovanni; Asthana, Anil K; Bolzacchini, Elena; Dell'Era, Alessandra; Furfaro, Federica; Bezzio, Cristina; Salvatore, Veronica; Maier, Jeanette A M

    2016-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is characterized by inflammation and angiogenesis of affected bowel. We evaluated the correlation among vascularity of intestinal wall in CD, splanchnic hemodynamics, clinical activity and biochemical parameters of inflammation and angiogenesis. Sixteen patients with ileal CD and 10 healthy controls were investigated by means of Doppler ultrasound of the superior mesenteric artery and color Doppler and contrast-enhanced ultrasound of the ileal wall. In parallel, serum levels of vascular endothelial growth factor, tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?) and nitric oxide, before and 30 min after a standard meal, were evaluated. In CD patients, there was a significant post-prandial reduction in the resistance index and pulsatility index of the superior mesenteric artery, associated with increased levels of nitric oxide and decreased amounts of TNF-?. A correlation was observed between vascular endothelial growth factor and contrast-enhanced ultrasound parameters of intestinal wall vascularity (r = 0.63-0.71, p < 0.05) and between these parameters and superior mesenteric artery blood flow after fasting (resistance and pulsatility indexes: r = -0.64 and -0.72, p < 0.05). Our results revealed a post-prandial increase in nitric oxide and decrease in TNF-? in CD patients in vivo. They also confirm the role of vascular endothelial growth factor in angiogenesis and in pathologic vascular remodeling of CD and its effect on splanchnic blood flow. PMID:26514286

  11. Permeability of WIPP Salt During Damage Evolution and Healing

    SciTech Connect

    BODNER,SOL R.; CHAN,KWAI S.; MUNSON,DARRELL E.

    1999-12-03

    The presence of damage in the form of microcracks can increase the permeability of salt. In this paper, an analytical formulation of the permeability of damaged rock salt is presented for both initially intact and porous conditions. The analysis shows that permeability is related to the connected (i.e., gas accessible) volumetric strain and porosity according to two different power-laws, which may be summed to give the overall behavior of a porous salt with damage. This relationship was incorporated into a constitutive model, known as the Multimechanism Deformation Coupled Fracture (MDCF) model, which has been formulated to describe the inelastic flow behavior of rock salt due to coupled creep, damage, and healing. The extended model was used to calculate the permeability of rock salt from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site under conditions where damage evolved with stress over a time period. Permeability changes resulting from both damage development under deviatoric stresses and damage healing under hydrostatic pressures were considered. The calculated results were compared against experimental data from the literature, which indicated that permeability in damaged intact WIPP salt depends on the magnitude of the gas accessible volumetric strain and not on the total volumetric strain. Consequently, the permeability of WIPP salt is significantly affected by the kinetics of crack closure, but shows little dependence on the kinetics of crack removal by sintering.

  12. Characterization and estimation of permeability correlation structure from performance data

    SciTech Connect

    Ershaghi, I.; Al-Qahtani, M.

    1997-08-01

    In this study, the influence of permeability structure and correlation length on the system effective permeability and recovery factors of 2-D cross-sectional reservoir models, under waterflood, is investigated. Reservoirs with identical statistical representation of permeability attributes are shown to exhibit different system effective permeability and production characteristics which can be expressed by a mean and variance. The mean and variance are shown to be significantly influenced by the correlation length. Detailed quantification of the influence of horizontal and vertical correlation lengths for different permeability distributions is presented. The effect of capillary pressure, P{sub c1} on the production characteristics and saturation profiles at different correlation lengths is also investigated. It is observed that neglecting P{sub c} causes considerable error at large horizontal and short vertical correlation lengths. The effect of using constant as opposed to variable relative permeability attributes is also investigated at different correlation lengths. Next we studied the influence of correlation anisotropy in 2-D reservoir models. For a reservoir under five-spot waterflood pattern, it is shown that the ratios of breakthrough times and recovery factors of the wells in each direction of correlation are greatly influenced by the degree of anisotropy. In fully developed fields, performance data can aid in the recognition of reservoir anisotropy. Finally, a procedure for estimating the spatial correlation length from performance data is presented. Both the production performance data and the system`s effective permeability are required in estimating the correlation length.

  13. Urea and water permeability in dogfish (Squalus acanthias) gills.

    PubMed

    Pärt, P; Wright, P A; Wood, C M

    1998-01-01

    We used a perfused gill preparation from dogfish to investigate the origin of low branchial permeability to urea. Urea permeability (14C-urea) was measured simultaneously with diffusional water permeability (3H2O). Permeability coefficients for urea and ammonia in the perfused preparation were almost identical to in vivo values. The permeability coefficient of urea was 0.032 x 10(-6) cm/sec and of 3H2O 6.55 x 10(-6) cm/sec. Adrenalin (1 x 10(-6) M) increased water and ammonia effluxes by a factor of 1.5 and urea efflux by a factor of 3.1. Urea efflux was almost independent of the urea concentration in the perfusion medium. The urea analogue thiourea in the perfusate had no effect on urea efflux, whereas the non-competitive inhibitor of urea transport, phloretin, increased efflux markedly. The basolateral membrane is approximately 14 times more permeable to urea than the apical membrane. We conclude that the dogfish apical membrane is extremely tight to urea, but the low apparent branchial permeability may also relate to the presence of an active urea transporter on the basolateral membrane that returns urea to the blood and hence reduces the apical urea gradient. PMID:11253775

  14. Drainage hydraulics of permeable friction courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbeneau, Randall J.; Barrett, Michael E.

    2008-04-01

    This paper describes solutions to the hydraulic equations that govern flow in permeable friction courses (PFC). PFC is a layer of porous asphalt approximately 50 mm thick that is placed as an overlay on top of an existing conventional concrete or asphalt road surface to help control splash and hydroplaning, reduce noise, and enhance quality of storm water runoff. The primary objective of this manuscript is to present an analytical system of equations that can be used in design and analysis of PFC systems. The primary assumptions used in this analysis are that the flow can be modeled as one-dimensional, steady state Darcy-type flow and that slopes are sufficiently small so that the Dupuit-Forchheimer assumptions apply. Solutions are derived for cases where storm water drainage is confined to the PFC bed and for conditions where the PFC drainage capacity is exceeded and ponded sheet flow occurs across the pavement surface. The mathematical solutions provide the drainage characteristics (depth and residence time) as a function of rainfall intensity, PFC hydraulic conductivity, pavement slope, and maximum drainage path length.

  15. Heat transfer about a vertical permeable membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Kaviany, M. )

    1988-05-01

    The natural convection heat transfer about both sides of vertical walls without any seepage has been studied and the effects of the wall thickness and thermal conductivity on the local and average heat transfer rates have been determined. Viskanta and Lankford have concluded that in predicting the heat transfer rate through the wall, for low-thermal-conductivity walls the a priori unknown wall surface temperatures can be walls the a priori unknown wall surface temperatures can be estimated as the arithmetic average of the reservoir temperatures without loss of accuracy (for most practical situations). Sparrow and Prakash treated the surface temperature as variable but used the local temperature along with the available isothermal boundary-layer analysis for determination of the local heat transfer rate and found this to be reasonable at relatively low Grashof numbers. In this study the heat trasnfer rate between two reservoirs of different temperature connected in part through a permeable membrane is analyzed. Rather than solving the complete problem numerically for the three domains (fluid-wall-fluid), the available results on the effects of suction and blowing on the natural convection boundary layer are used in an analysis of the membranes with low thermal conductivity and small seepage velocities, which are characteristic of membranes considered. This will lead to rather simple expressions for the determination of the heat transfer rate.

  16. Intrinsic delay of permeable base transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wenchao; Guo, Jing; So, Franky

    2014-07-28

    Permeable base transistors (PBTs) fabricated by vacuum deposition or solution process have the advantages of easy fabrication and low power operation and are a promising device structure for flexible electronics. Intrinsic delay of PBT, which characterizes the speed of the transistor, is investigated by solving the three-dimensional Poisson equation and drift-diffusion equation self-consistently using finite element method. Decreasing the emitter thickness lowers the intrinsic delay by improving on-current, and a thinner base is also preferred for low intrinsic delay because of fewer carriers in the base region at off-state. The intrinsic delay exponentially decreases as the emitter contact Schottky barrier height decreases, and it linearly depends on the carrier mobility. With an optimized emitter contact barrier height and device geometry, a sub-nano-second intrinsic delay can be achieved with a carrier mobility of ?10?cm{sup 2}/V/s obtainable in solution processed indium gallium zinc oxide, which indicates the potential of solution processed PBTs for GHz operations.

  17. Second law violations, continuum mechanics, and permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostoja-Starzewski, Martin

    2015-06-01

    The violations of the second law are relevant as the length and/or time scales become very small. The second law then needs to be replaced by the fluctuation theorem and mathematically, the irreversible entropy is a submartingale. First, we discuss the consequences of these results for the axioms of continuum mechanics, arguing in favor of a framework relying on stochastic functionals of energy and entropy. We next determine a Lyapunov function for diffusion-type problems governed by stochastic rather than deterministic functionals of internal energy and entropy, where the random field coefficients of diffusion are not required to satisfy the positive definiteness everywhere. Next, a formulation of micropolar fluid mechanics is developed, accounting for the lack of symmetry of stress tensor on molecular scales. This framework is then applied to employed to show that spontaneous random fluctuations of the microrotation field will arise in Couette—and Poiseuille-type flows in the absence of random (turbulence-like) fluctuations of the classical velocity field. Finally, while the permeability is classically modeled by the Darcy law or its modifications, besides considering the violations of the second law, one also needs to account for the spatial randomness of the channel network, implying a modification of the hierarchy of scale-dependent bounds on the macroscopic property of the network.

  18. Patterns of effective permeability of leaf cuticles to acids

    SciTech Connect

    Hauser, H.D.; Walters, K.D.; Berg, V.S. )

    1993-01-01

    Plants in the field are frequently exposed to anthropogenic acid precipitation with pH values of 4 and below. For the acid to directly affect leaf tissues, it must pass through the leaf cuticle, but little is known about the permeability of cuticles to protons, of about the effect of different anions on this permeability. We investigated the movement of protons through isolated astomatous leaf cuticles of grapefruit (Citrus x paradisi Macfady.), rough lemon (Citrus limon [L.] Burm. fils cv Ponderosa), and pear (Pyrus communis L.) using hydrochloric, sulfuric, and nitric acids. Cuticles were enzymically isolated from leaves and placed in a diffusion apparatus with pH 4 acid on the morphological outer surface of the cuticle and degassed distilled water on the inner surface. Changes in pH of the solution on the inner surface were used to determine rates of effective permeability of the cuticles to the protons of these acids. Most cuticles exhibited an initial low permeability, lasting hours to days, then after a short transition displayed a significant higher permeability, which persisted until equilibrium was approached. The change in effective permeability appears to be reversible. Effective permeabilities were higher for sulfuric acid than for the others. A model of the movement of protons through the cuticle is presented, proposing that dissociated acid groups in channels within the cutin are first protonated by the acid, accounting for the low initial effective permeability; then protons pass freely through the channels, resulting in a higher effective permeability. 26 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Fractal Theory for Permeability Prediction, Venezuelan and USA Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldana, Milagrosa; Altamiranda, Dignorah; Cabrera, Ana

    2014-05-01

    Inferring petrophysical parameters such as permeability, porosity, water saturation, capillary pressure, etc, from the analysis of well logs or other available core data has always been of critical importance in the oil industry. Permeability in particular, which is considered to be a complex parameter, has been inferred using both empirical and theoretical techniques. The main goal of this work is to predict permeability values on different wells using Fractal Theory, based on a method proposed by Pape et al. (1999). This approach uses the relationship between permeability and the geometric form of the pore space of the rock. This method is based on the modified equation of Kozeny-Carman and a fractal pattern, which allows determining permeability as a function of the cementation exponent, porosity and the fractal dimension. Data from wells located in Venezuela and the United States of America are analyzed. Employing data of porosity and permeability obtained from core samples, and applying the Fractal Theory method, we calculated the prediction equations for each well. At the beginning, this was achieved by training with 50% of the data available for each well. Afterwards, these equations were tested inferring over 100% of the data to analyze possible trends in their distribution. This procedure gave excellent results in all the wells in spite of their geographic distance, generating permeability models with the potential to accurately predict permeability logs in the remaining parts of the well for which there are no core samples, using even porority logs. Additionally, empirical models were used to determine permeability and the results were compared with those obtained by applying the fractal method. The results indicated that, although there are empirical equations that give a proper adjustment, the prediction results obtained using fractal theory give a better fit to the core reference data.

  20. Vascular Anomalies Classification: Recommendations From the International Society for the Study of Vascular Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Wassef, Michel; Blei, Francine; Adams, Denise; Alomari, Ahmad; Baselga, Eulalia; Berenstein, Alejandro; Burrows, Patricia; Frieden, Ilona J; Garzon, Maria C; Lopez-Gutierrez, Juan-Carlos; Lord, David J E; Mitchel, Sally; Powell, Julie; Prendiville, Julie; Vikkula, Miikka

    2015-07-01

    Vascular anomalies represent a spectrum of disorders from a simple "birthmark" to life- threatening entities. Incorrect nomenclature and misdiagnoses are commonly experienced by patients with these anomalies. Accurate diagnosis is crucial for appropriate evaluation and management, often requiring multidisciplinary specialists. Classification schemes provide a consistent terminology and serve as a guide for pathologists, clinicians, and researchers. One of the goals of the International Society for the Study of Vascular Anomalies (ISSVA) is to achieve a uniform classification. The last classification (1997) stratified vascular lesions into vascular malformations and proliferative vascular lesions (tumors). However, additional disease entities have since been identified that are complex and less easily classified by generic headings, such as capillary malformation, venous malformation, lymphatic malformation, etc. We hereby present the updated official ISSVA classification of vascular anomalies. The general biological scheme of the classification is retained. The section on tumors has been expanded and lists the main recognized vascular tumors, classified as benign, locally aggressive or borderline, and malignant. A list of well-defined diseases is included under each generic heading in the "Simple Vascular Malformations" section. A short definition is added for eponyms. Two new sections were created: one dealing with the malformations of individually named vessels (previously referred to as "truncular" malformations); the second groups lesions of uncertain or debated nature (tumor versus malformation). The known genetic defects underlying vascular anomalies are included in an appendix. This classification is meant to be a framework, acknowledging that it will require modification as new scientific information becomes available. PMID:26055853