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Sample records for vasculogenic erectile dysfunction

  1. Endovascular treatment of vasculogenic erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Edward D; Owen, Ryan C; White, Gregory S; Elkelany, Osama O; Rahnema, Cyrus D

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of erectile dysfunction (ED) has been a fascination involving multiple medical specialities over the past century with urologic, cardiac and surgical experts all contributing knowledge toward this multifactorial disease. With the well-described association between ED and cardiovascular disease, angiography has been utilized to identify vasculogenic impotence. Given the success of endovascular drug-eluting stent (DES) placement for the treatment of coronary artery disease, there has been interest in using this same technology for the treatment of vasculogenic ED. For men with inflow stenosis, DES placement to bypass arterial lesions has recently been reported with a high technical success rate. Comparatively, endovascular embolization as an approach to correct veno-occlusive dysfunction has produced astonishing procedural success rates as well. However, after a thorough literature review, arterial intervention is only recommended for younger patients with isolated vascular injuries, typically from previous traumatic experiences. Short-term functional outcomes are less than optimal with long-term results yet to be determined. In conclusion, the hope for a minimally invasive approach to ED persists but additional investigation is required prior to universal endorsement. PMID:25532580

  2. Can the Mean Platelet Volume Be a Risk Factor for Vasculogenic Erectile Dysfunction?

    PubMed Central

    Yeni, Ercan; Demir, Mehmet; Yagmur, Ismail; Gümü?, Kemal; Celik, Hakim; Savas, Murat; Gulum, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The mean platelet volume (MPV) is a marker of the platelet activity and is reported to increase in vascular diseases. We aimed to investigate the association between MPV and vasculogenic erectile dysfunction (ED). Materials and Methods MPV and platelet (PLT) levels were measured in 50 cases of ED and 40 healthy controls. The diagnosis of vasculogenic ED was based on a detailed sexual history, physical examination, laboratory assessment, and color Doppler ultrasonography. The results are given as mean±standard deviation of the mean. Results The mean ages of the patient and the control groups were 53.70±12.39 years (range 24~77 years) and 53.85±9.5 years (range 30~73 years), respectively (p=0.947). The MPV and PLT values were significantly higher in the patients with ED than those of the controls (7.49±1.4), (6.85±1.2), (262.97±68), (252.89±82) respectively, p<0.001). However, the MPV values were not statistically significantly different in the patients with severe ED according to the International Index of Erectile Function than in those with mild ED, p>0.05), and there was no correlation between MPV and either age of patients (p=0.905) or duration of ED (p=0.583). Conclusions The platelet count and MPV was detected to be increased in patients with vasculogenic ED. This finding suggests a role for platelets in the pathogenesis of vascular complications and that the MPV would be useful in monitoring disease progression. PMID:24459654

  3. Erectile Dysfunction

    MedlinePLUS

    ... sexually aroused, the erectile nerves running alongside the penis stimulate the muscles to relax, allowing blood to ... time, tiny valves at the base of the penis lock shut, preventing the blood from flowing back ...

  4. Erectile Dysfunction (ED)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... age. Is erectile dysfunction just a part of old age? Erectile dysfunction doesn't have to be a ... Atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries) Stress, anxiety or depression Alcohol and tobacco use Some prescription medications, such ...

  5. Nonpharmacologic Treatment of Erectile Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Montague, Drogo K

    2002-01-01

    Nonpharmacologic treatment for erectile dysfunction (ED) includes sex therapy, the use of vacuum erection devices, penile prosthesis implantation, and penile vascular surgery. Sex therapy is indicated for psychogenic ED and is at times a useful adjunct for other treatments in men with mixed psychogenic and organic ED. Vacuum erection devices produce usable erections in over 90% of patients; however, patient and partner acceptability is an issue. Three-piece inflatable penile prostheses create flaccidity and an erection that comes close to that which occurs naturally. Penile vascular surgery has shown greatest efficacy in young men with vasculogenic ED resulting from pelvic or perineal trauma. PMID:16986016

  6. Shockwave treatment of erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Gruenwald, Ilan; Appel, Boaz; Kitrey, Noam D; Vardi, Yoram

    2013-04-01

    Low-intensity extracorporeal shock wave therapy (LI-ESWT) is a novel modality that has recently been developed for treating erectile dysfunction (ED). Unlike other current treatment options for ED, all of which are palliative in nature, LI-ESWT is unique in that it aims to restore the erectile mechanism in order to enable natural or spontaneous erections. Results from basic science experiments have provided evidence that LI-ESWT induces cellular microtrauma, which in turn stimulates the release of angiogenic factors and the subsequent neovascularization of the treated tissue. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) has been clinically investigated and applied in several medical fields with various degrees of success. High-intensity shock wave therapy is used for lithotripsy because of its focused mechanical destructive nature, and medium-intensity shock waves have been shown to have anti-inflammatory properties and are used for treating a wide array of orthopedic conditions, such as non-union fractures, tendonitis, and bursitis. In contrast, LI-ESWT has angiogenetic properties and is therefore used in the management of chronic wounds, peripheral neuropathy, and in cardiac neovascularization. As a result of these characteristics we initiated a series of experiments evaluating the effect of LI-ESWT on the cavernosal tissue of patients with vasculogenic ED. The results of our studies, which also included a double-blind randomized control trial, confirm that LI-ESWT generates a significant clinical improvement of erectile function and a significant improvement in penile hemodynamics without any adverse effects. Although further extensive research is needed, LI-ESWT may create a new standard of care for men with vasculogenic ED. PMID:23554844

  7. [Erectile and Ejaculatory Dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Gross, Oliver; Sulser, Tullio; Eberli, Daniel

    2015-11-25

    The inability to achieve an erection of the penis sufficient for sexual activity is called erectile dysfunction (ED). In most cases, the diagnosis can be made by medical history. The prevalence of ED in men at the age of 65 has been reported to be up to 50%. Premature ejaculation has a prevalence, up to 20% and is the most frequent ejaculatory dysfunction. The etiology of ED can involve psychological, vascular, neurogenic, hormonal or urogenital pathologies. The main pathophysiological mechanisms of ED are vascular disorders such as diabetes mellitus and atherosclerosis. Because of the common pathophysiology, patients diagnosed with ED should have a diagnostic work-up for systemic vascular pathologies to prevent concomitant cardiac events. Treatment options include invasive and non-invasive procedures. PMID:26602851

  8. Investigation of erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Patel, D V; Halls, J; Patel, U

    2012-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) represents a common and debilitating condition with a wide range of organic and non-organic causes. Physical aetiologies can be divided into disorders affecting arterial inflow, the venous occlusion mechanism or the penile structure itself. Various imaging modalities can be utilised to investigate the physical causes of ED, but penile Doppler sonography (PDS) is the most informative technique, indicated in those patients with ED who do not respond to oral pharmacological agents (e.g. phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors). This review will examine the anatomical and physiological basis of penile erection, the method for performing PDS and features of specific causes of ED, and will also consider the alternative imaging modalities available. PMID:23118101

  9. Animal models of erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Mandeep Singh; Khan, Samsroz Ahmad; Gupta, Sanjay Kumar; Choudhary, Rajesh; Bodakhe, Surendra H

    2015-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a prevalent male sexual dysfunction with profound adverse effects on the physical and the psychosocial health of men and, subsequently, on their partners. The expanded use of various types of rodent models has produced some advances in the study of ED, and neurophysiological studies using various animal models have provided important insights into human sexual dysfunction. At present, animal models play a key role in exploring and screening novel drugs designed to treat ED. PMID:26279495

  10. [Sport, infertility and erectile dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Gulino, G; Sasso, F; D'Onofrio, A; Palermo, G; Di Luigi, F; Sacco, E; Pinto, F; Bassi, P F

    2010-01-01

    In the last decades a growing interest has been dedicated to prevention, diagnosis and therapy of male genital pathologies, such as varicocele, infertility and erectile dysfunction in the population involved in sport activities. High incidence (up to 30%) of varicocele has been reported in a population of athletes and up to 60-80% in the subgroup of body-builders. The incidence of varicocele specifically increases with hours of training, in a linear model. Controversial data come from literature about the effects of physical activity on fertility, with prevalence of trials demonstrating worsening of seminal parameters. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that physical stress in healthy male athletes can interfere with LH levels. Bicycling is one of the major risk factors for erectile dysfunction, with incidence of 13-24%. This is due to the prolonged compression of perineal arteries leading to reduced chronic penile perfusion. Bioengineering studies have been the basis for industry to produce specifically shaped saddles that significantly reduce and minimize compressive effects. Finally, high frequency of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in cyclists has been related to increased incidence of erectile dysfunction in comparison with normal population. PMID:20890868

  11. Animal models of erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Gajbhiye, Snehlata V.; Jadhav, Kshitij S.; Marathe, Padmaja A.; Pawar, Dattatray B.

    2015-01-01

    Animal models have contributed to a great extent to understanding and advancement in the field of sexual medicine. Many current medical and surgical therapies in sexual medicine have been tried based on these animal models. Extensive literature search revealed that the compiled information is limited. In this review, we describe various experimental models of erectile dysfunction (ED) encompassing their procedures, variables of assessment, advantages and disadvantages. The search strategy consisted of review of PubMed based articles. We included original research work and certain review articles available in PubMed database. The search terms used were “ED and experimental models,” “ED and nervous stimulation,” “ED and cavernous nerve stimulation,” “ED and central stimulation,” “ED and diabetes mellitus,” “ED and ageing,” “ED and hypercholesteremia,” “ED and Peyronie's disease,” “radiation induced ED,” “telemetric recording,” “ED and mating test” and “ED and non-contact erection test.” PMID:25624570

  12. Effects of cigarette smoking on erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kovac, J R; Labbate, C; Ramasamy, R; Tang, D; Lipshultz, L I

    2015-12-01

    Cigarette smoking is a leading cause of preventable morbidity and mortality in the United States. Although public policies have resulted in a decreased number of new smokers, smoking rates remain stubbornly high in certain demographics with 20% of all American middle-aged men smoking. In addition to the well-established harmful effects of smoking (i.e. coronary artery disease and lung cancer), the past three decades have led to a compendium of evidence being compiled into the development of a relationship between cigarette smoking and erectile dysfunction. The main physiologic mechanism that appears to be affected includes the nitric oxide signal transduction pathway. This review details the recent literature linking cigarette smoking to erectile dysfunction, epidemiological associations, dose dependency and the effects of smoking cessation on improving erectile quality. PMID:25557907

  13. Cognitive-Behavioral Erectile Dysfunction Treatment for Gay Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Trevor A.; Schwartz, Danielle R.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper is to assist cognitive-behavioral therapists who are treating erectile dysfunction among gay men. Little information is available to cognitive-behavioral therapists about the psychological and social effects of erectile dysfunction in this population, or how to incorporate the concerns of gay men with erectile

  14. Case Report: Persistent erectile dysfunction in a man with prolactinoma

    PubMed Central

    Badal, Justin; Ramasamy, Ranjith; Hakky, Tariq; Chandrashekar, Aravind; Lipshultz, Larry

    2015-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction has been explored as a condition secondary to elevated prolactin; however, the mechanisms by which elevated prolactin levels cause erectile dysfunction have not yet been clearly established. We here present a patient with a history of prolactinoma who suffered from persistent erectile dysfunction despite testosterone supplementation and pharmacological and surgical treatment for the prolactinoma.  Patients who have had both prolactinemia and erectile dysfunction have been reported in the literature, but we find no report of a patient with persistent erectile dysfunction in the setting of testosterone supplementation and persistent hyperprolactinemia refractory to treatment. This case provides evidence supporting the idea that suppression of erectile function occurs in both the central and peripheral nervous systems independent of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. PMID:25844161

  15. Management of erectile dysfunction in hypertension: Tips and tricks

    PubMed Central

    Viigimaa, Margus; Vlachopoulos, Charalambos; Lazaridis, Antonios; Doumas, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Arterial hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and affects approximately one third of the adult population worldwide. The vascular origin of erectile dysfunction is now widely accepted in the vast majority of cases. Erectile dysfunction is frequently encountered in patients with arterial hypertension and greatly affects their quality of life of hypertensive patients and their sexual partners. Therefore, the management of erectile dysfunction in hypertensive patients is of paramount importance. Unfortunately, erectile dysfunction remains under-reported, under-recognized, and under-treated in hypertensive patients, mainly due to the lack of familiarity with this clinical entity by treating physicians. This review aims to discuss the more frequent problems in the management of hypertensive patients with erectile dysfunction and propose ways to overcome these problems in everyday clinical practice. PMID:25276292

  16. Diagnosing erectile dysfunction could save your patient’s life

    PubMed Central

    Brock, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction and coronary artery disease are increasingly recognized as different clinical manifestations of the same process. Because the smaller vessels of the penis may be affected by plaque burden much earlier than the larger coronary, internal carotid, and femoral arteries, men may present with symptoms of erectile dysfunction long before signs of cardiovascular disease manifest. This presents an opportunity for the urologist to not only treat the sexual dysfunction and uncover occult coronary disease, but also to screen for cardiac risk, as even men with mild arteriogenic erectile dysfunction may be at risk for cardiovascular disease. PMID:25243040

  17. Penile Low-Intensity Shock Wave Therapy: A Promising Novel Modality for Erectile Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Kitrey, Noam D.; Gruenwald, Ilan; Appel, Boaz; Vardi, Yoram

    2014-01-01

    Penile extracorporeal low-intensity shock wave therapy (LIST) to the penis has recently emerged as a novel and promising modality in the treatment of erectile dysfunction (ED). LIST has angiogenic properties and stimulates neovascularization. If applied to the corpora cavernosa, LIST can improve penile blood flow and endothelial function. In a series of clinical trials, including randomized double-blind sham-controlled studies, LIST has been shown to have a substantial effect on penile hemodynamics and erectile function in patients with vasculogenic ED. LIST is effective in patients who are responsive to phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors (PDE5i) and can also convert PDE5i nonresponders to responders. The response to LIST wanes gradually over time, and after 2 years, about half of the patients maintain their function. Extensive research is needed to understand the effect of LIST on erectile tissue, to modify the treatment protocol to maximize its outcomes, and to identify the patients who will benefit the most from this treatment. PMID:24868332

  18. "All Natural" Alternatives for Erectile Dysfunction: A Risky Proposition

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Products For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates 'All Natural' Alternatives for Erectile Dysfunction: A Risky Proposition ... safe because their labeling often suggests they are “all-natural” or “herbal” alternatives to FDA-approved prescription ...

  19. Current Diagnosis and Management of Erectile Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Pastuszak, Alexander W.

    2015-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) affects a growing number of men in the USA and abroad, with significant impacts on sexual function and overall quality of life. The risk factors for ED are numerous and include a strong link to cardiovascular disease, such that men with ED should be screened for cardiovascular disease. The evaluation of men presenting with ED includes a comprehensive history and physical exam to aid in the identification of comorbidities as well as laboratory testing to evaluate hormone and lipid levels and sugar metabolism. Adjunct studies are also available, though their utility is often limited to specific subtypes of ED. Once the etiology of ED is established, treatment can be initiated using appropriate medical therapies, including phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors, and transurethral or intracavernosal therapies, with surgical intervention via revascularization or penile prosthesis placement in men demonstrating a lack of response to medical therapy. In all cases of ED, a psychogenic component is present and referral for psychological intervention with or without medical therapy should be considered. PMID:25878565

  20. [Nonfarmacological treatment of erectile dysfunction in obese patients].

    PubMed

    glybochko, P V; Shaplygin, L V; Ra?gorodski?, Iu M; Spirin, P V; Alise?ko, S V; Tverdokhleb, S A

    2009-01-01

    An original combined treatment of obese patients with erectile dysfunction including transcranial magnetotherapy and transabdominal electrostimulation in the region of fat deposit for 6 months reduces body weight by up to 17% and elevates testosterone by up to 29%. Erectile function improved to normal in 31.8% patients. This method is pathogenetically sound in minimal use of medicines and low risk of cardiovascular disorders. PMID:20169716

  1. Biochemical and genetic markers of erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Plebani, Mario; Montagnana, Martina; Cervellin, Gianfranco

    2012-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a very common pathology, affecting over 150 million men worldwide. The pathogenesis is typically multifactorial, involving a kaleidoscope of organic, endocrine, and psychogenic factors. In general, ED is divided into organic and psychogenic impotence, but most men with organic etiologies have an associated psychogenic component. Given the high frequency of this pathology, the identification of biochemical and genetic correlates and/or markers is of pivotal interest not only for treating preciously these patients and preventing serious psychological consequences but also for the high risk for occult cardiovascular disease (CVD) that often accompanies or follows this pathology. A variety of cardiovascular risk factors have been associated with both the onset and the severity of ED, including markers of endothelial function, thrombosis, and especially dyslipidemia, so that their measurement should now be considered as an important part of the increased global cardiometabolic risk profile in patients with ED. While nitric oxide (NO), asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), and endothelin (ET) hold some promises as biochemical markers of both CVD and ED, there are several technical and clinical drawbacks that make their measurement overall meaningless in the clinical practice. As regards genetic polymorphisms, controversial results have been provided so far. Although some genetic markers were consistently associated with ED, other studies failed to demonstrate significant associations, highlighting a substantial bias in standardization of methodologies and patient enrolment. Nevertheless, further research in this area should be encouraged, since the first promising evidence that gene therapy might be effective to restore the decline in ED has been provided in the animal model. PMID:22870589

  2. Cialis (Tadalafil) Does Not Prevent Erectile Dysfunction in Prostate Cancer Patients

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Cialis (Tadalafil) Does Not Prevent Erectile Dysfunction in Prostate Cancer Patients Article date: April 4, 2014 By Stacy ... men avoid erectile dysfunction after radiation therapy for prostate cancer . Erection problems are common in men who’ve ...

  3. Risk of Erectile Dysfunction in Transfusion-naive Thalassemia Men

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Guang; Lin, Te-Yu; Lin, Cheng-Li; Dai, Ming-Shen; Ho, Ching-Liang; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Based on the mechanism of pathophysiology, thalassemia major or transfusion-dependent thalassemia patients may have an increased risk of developing organic erectile dysfunction resulting from hypogonadism. However, there have been few studies investigating the association between erectile dysfunction and transfusion-naive thalassemia populations. We constructed a population-based cohort study to elucidate the association between transfusion-naive thalassemia populations and organic erectile dysfunction This nationwide population-based cohort study involved analyzing data from 1998 to 2010 obtained from the Taiwanese National Health Insurance Research Database, with a follow-up period extending to the end of 2011. We identified men with transfusion-naive thalassemia and selected a comparison cohort that was frequency-matched with these according to age, and year of diagnosis thalassemia at a ratio of 1 thalassemia man to 4 control men. We analyzed the risks for transfusion-naive thalassemia men and organic erectile dysfunction by using Cox proportional hazards regression models. In this study, 588 transfusion-naive thalassemia men and 2337 controls were included. Total 12 patients were identified within the thalassaemia group and 10 within the control group. The overall risks for developing organic erectile dysfunction were 4.56-fold in patients with transfusion-naive thalassemia men compared with the comparison cohort after we adjusted for age and comorbidities. Our long-term cohort study results showed that in transfusion-naive thalassemia men, there was a higher risk for the development of organic erectile dysfunction, particularly in those patients with comorbidities. PMID:25837766

  4. Initial experience with linear focused shockwave treatment for erectile dysfunction: a 6-month follow-up pilot study.

    PubMed

    Reisman, Y; Hind, A; Varaneckas, A; Motil, I

    2015-01-01

    Low-intensity shockwaves (LISW) are known to produce revascularization and have been in evaluation and in use to treat erectile dysfunction (ED). The present single-arm pilot study is aimed to assess the safety and efficacy of a dedicated shockwave device (Renova) on vasculogenic ED patients. Fifty-eight patients with mild to severe ED were treated by LISW and their erectile function was evaluated by the International Index of Erectile Function-Erectile Function Domain (IIEF-EF), Sexual Encounter Profile and Global Assessment Questions questionnaires, at baseline and at 1, 3 and 6 months post treatment. The average IIEF-EF increased significantly from 14.78 at baseline to 21.93 at 3 months post treatment and stabilized at 22.26 at 6 months post treatment. Out of 58 patients, 47 (81%) had a successful treatment. No adverse events were reported during the treatment and the follow-up duration. In conclusion, it suggests that the performance of LISW could add a new advanced treatment for ED. PMID:25471316

  5. Nutrients and botanicals for erectile dysfunction: examining the evidence.

    PubMed

    McKay, Douglas

    2004-03-01

    Erectile dysfunction affects 50 percent of men ages 40-70 in the United States and is considered an important public health problem by the National Institutes of Health. Consumers are exposed to a plethora of natural products claiming to restore erection and sexual vitality. A review of the available empirical evidence reveals most naturally occurring compounds lack adequate clinical trials to support efficacy. However, arginine, yohimbine, Panax ginseng, Maca, and Ginkgo biloba all have some degree of evidence they may be helpful for erectile dysfunction. Improvements in penile endothelial L-arginine-nitric oxide activity appear to be a unifying explanation for the actions of these naturally occurring agents. PMID:15005641

  6. The Molecular Basis of Erectile Dysfunction: From Bench to Bedside

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Jesse N; Barqawi, Albaha; Koul, Sweaty; Koul, Hari; Meacham, Randall B

    2005-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction is a common problem affecting many men across all age groups. Its etiology is multifactorial. Hormonal, vascular, neurogenic, lifestyle, and psychological entities have all been implicated as causative agents. The molecular basis underlying its etiology and progression is complex and still challenges researchers in the field. Nonetheless, newly discovered common pathways and targets of its pathogenesis have opened a new era for both prevention and active treatment of the disease. This review describes some of the known molecular mechanisms contributing to erectile dysfunction and discusses the future of gene therapy for the disease. PMID:16985823

  7. Postprostatectomy Erectile Dysfunction: The Role of Penile Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    DeFade, Brian P; Carson, Culley C; Kennelly, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    Radical prostatectomy has become the gold standard for the treatment of prostate cancer in patients who have a longer than 10-year life expectancy. Surgical treatment has led to severe quality-of-life issues in these patients, especially urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction (ED). This article reviews the etiology and pathophysiology of postprostatectomy ED, and current management strategies for these patients. PMID:21826123

  8. ORIGINAL PAPER Recreational Use of Erectile Dysfunction Medications

    E-print Network

    Meston, Cindy

    with illicit drugs and particularly during risky sexual behaviors. Recreational EDM use was inde- pendentlyORIGINAL PAPER Recreational Use of Erectile Dysfunction Medications in Undergraduate Men,anincreasedriskforSTIs,includingincidentHIVinfec- tion, and high rates of concomitant illicit drug use. The aim

  9. Rise of herbal and traditional medicine in erectile dysfunction management.

    PubMed

    Ho, Christopher C K; Tan, Hui Meng

    2011-12-01

    Herbal medicine long has been used in the management of sexual dysfunction, including erectile dysfunction. Many patients have attested to the efficacy of this treatment. However, is it evidence-based medicine? Studies have been done on animal models, mainly in the laboratory. However, randomized controlled trials on humans are scarce. The only herbal medications that have been studied for erectile dysfunction are Panax ginseng, Butea superba, Epimedium herbs (icariin), Tribulus terrestris, Securidaca longipedunculata, Piper guineense, and yohimbine. Of these, only Panax ginseng, B. superb, and yohimbine have published studies done on humans. Unfortunately, these published trials on humans were not robust. Many herbal therapies appear to have potential benefits, and similarly, the health risks of various phytotherapeutic compounds need to be elucidated. Properly designed human trials should be worked out and encouraged to determine the efficacy and safety of potential phytotherapies. PMID:21948222

  10. Recreational Use of Erectile Dysfunction Medications and Its Adverse Effects on Erectile Function in Young Healthy Men

    E-print Network

    Meston, Cindy

    Recreational Use of Erectile Dysfunction Medications and Its Adverse Effects on Erectile Function drug of abuse among young men without a medical indication. In addition to being associated with increased sexual risk behaviors, recreational EDM use may adversely impact psychological aspects of sexual

  11. Diagnosis and treatment of erectile dysfunction--a practical update.

    PubMed

    Persu, C; Cauni, V; Gutue, S; Albu, Elena Simona; Jinga, V; Geavlete, P

    2009-01-01

    During the last decades, erectile dysfunction was considered a direct consequence of aging and, although of a great concern for the affected patient, little was available to evaluate and treat this problem. If aging could not be invoked in all cases, than the psychogenic etiology was the only explanation. Over the coming years, a better understanding of the physiology involved in the penile process of tumescence and detumescence has allowed for better approach of each disease asociated with erectile dysfunction so that adequate treatment modalities can be applied to the pacient. As we all know, every pacient is a particular case. The development of modern PDE-5 inhibiters, along with other more or less invasive therapies, puts a new light on the medical approach of ED. PMID:20108753

  12. Diagnosis and treatment of erectile dysfunction– a practical update

    PubMed Central

    Cauni, V; Gutue, S; Albu, ES; Jinga, V; Geavlete, P

    2009-01-01

    During the last decades, erectile dysfunction was considered a direct consequence of aging and, although of a great concern for the affected patient, little was available to evaluate and treat this problem. If aging could not be invoked in all cases, than the psychogenic etiology was the only explanation. Over the coming years, a better understanding of the physiology involved in the penile process of tumescence and detumescence has allowed for better approach of each disease asociated with erectile dysfunction so that adequate treatment modalities can be applied to the pacient. As we all know, every pacient is a particular case. The development of modern PDE–5 inhibiters, along with other more or less invasive therapies, puts a new light on the medical approach of ED. PMID:20108753

  13. The Challenge of Erectile Dysfunction Management in the Young Man.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Seth D

    2015-12-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) in a young man is an important health problem that significantly impacts the patient's quality of life and can have a detrimental effect on his well-being and relationship with his partner. Erectile dysfunction or impotence is one of the few disorders that will bring a young man into the doctor's office. This review article focuses on the epidemiology, etiology, presentation, work-up, and treatment of young men (age ~20-40 years old) presenting with complaints of ED. It is important to identify the precise etiology of the ED before proceeding with further evaluation and treatment because the work-up can be invasive and costly. ED is estimated to affect 20 % of men above 40 years of age, with the incidence increasing with increasing age. Erectile dysfunction has traditionally been seen as an age-dependent problem; however, approximately 2 % of men are affected at 40 years of age but this may be a gross underestimation secondary to reporting bias. Because ED is traditionally seen in the aging male population, studies regarding ED tend to be more frequently carried out among middle-aged and elderly men rather than in young men. These studies underline how comorbidities such as diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular or neurological pathologies, and medication use are strongly linked with ED. In addition, ED has been described to be associated with obesity or physical inactivity. This review article summarizes the important information that all sexual medicine providers should be familiar with when diagnosing, counseling, and treating young men with erectile dysfunction. PMID:26563194

  14. Penile prosthesis surgery in the management of erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi-Nejad, Hossein; Fam, Mina

    2013-01-01

    Introduction We reviewed retrospectively the use of penile prostheses, including the indications and complications of penile prosthesis surgery. Methods We identified publications and the reported advances in penile prosthesis surgery between 1987 and 2012 in Pub-Med, and published information from American Medical Systems, Inc. (Minnetonka, MN, USA) and Coloplast Corporation (Humlebaek, Denmark), using the keywords ‘penile prosthesis’, ‘erectile dysfunction’, ‘mechanical reliability’, ‘complications’ and ‘infection’. Results We describe the novel indications for the use of penile prostheses, the significant advances in implant designs with improved mechanical reliability, the changing landscape of device infection, and the current management of complications. Sixty-eight publications with a grade A, B and C level of evidence are cited. Conclusion The clinical indications to implant a penile prosthesis have expanded beyond organic erectile dysfunction. With the many different devices currently available, the choice of which device to implant can be tailored based on an individual’s unique medical conditions, manual dexterity and expectations, and surgeon preference. There must be a conscious effort to prevent device infection, in the light of the development of increasingly virulent organisms. Penile prosthesis surgery is an integral part of the treatment of erectile dysfunction when non-surgical options fail or are contraindicated. PMID:26558089

  15. Lifestyle modifications and erectile dysfunction: what can be expected?

    PubMed

    Maiorino, Maria Ida; Bellastella, Giuseppe; Esposito, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common medical disorder whose prevalence is increasing worldwide. Modifiable risk factors for ED include smoking, lack of physical activity, wrong diets, overweight or obesity, metabolic syndrome, and excessive alcohol consumption. Quite interestingly, all these metabolic conditions are strongly associated with a pro-inflammatory state that results in endothelial dysfunction by decreasing the availability of nitric oxide (NO), which is the driving force of the blood genital flow. Lifestyle and nutrition have been recognized as central factors influencing both vascular NO production, testosterone levels, and erectile function. Moreover, it has also been suggested that lifestyle habits that decrease low-grade clinical inflammation may have a role in the improvement of erectile function. In clinical trials, lifestyle modifications were effective in ameliorating ED or restoring absent ED in people with obesity or metabolic syndrome. Therefore, promotion of healthful lifestyles would yield great benefits in reducing the burden of sexual dysfunction. Efforts, in order to implement educative strategies for healthy lifestyle, should be addressed. PMID:25248655

  16. Erectile Dysfunction and Constructs of Masculinity and Quality of Life in the Multinational Men's Attitudes to Life Events and

    E-print Network

    Erectile Dysfunction and Constructs of Masculinity and Quality of Life in the Multinational Men, with and without self-reported erectile dysfunction, concerning masculine identity and quality of life. Methods and quality of life in men with and without erectile dysfunction. Results. Men's perceptions of masculinity

  17. Erectile dysfunction and central obesity: an Italian perspective

    PubMed Central

    Corona, Giovanni; Rastrelli, Giulia; Filippi, Sandra; Vignozzi, Linda; Mannucci, Edoardo; Maggi, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a frequent complication of obesity. The aim of this review is to critically analyze the framework of obesity and ED, dissecting the connections between the two pathological entities. Current clinical evidence shows that obesity, and in particular central obesity, is associated with both arteriogenic ED and reduced testosterone (T) levels. It is conceivable that obesity-associated hypogonadism and increased cardiovascular risk might partially justify the higher prevalence of ED in overweight and obese individuals. Conversely, the psychological disturbances related to obesity do not seem to play a major role in the pathogenesis of obesity-related ED. However, both clinical and preclinical data show that the association between ED and visceral fat accumulation is independent from known obesity-associated comorbidities. Therefore, how visceral fat could impair penile microcirculation still remains unknown. This point is particularly relevant since central obesity in ED subjects categorizes individuals at high cardiovascular risk, especially in the youngest ones. The presence of ED in obese subjects might help healthcare professionals in convincing them to initiate a virtuous cycle, where the correction of sexual dysfunction will be the reward for improved lifestyle behavior. Unsatisfying sexual activity represents a meaningful, straightforward motivation for consulting healthcare professionals, who, in turn, should take advantage of the opportunity to encourage obese patients to treat, besides ED, the underlying unfavorable conditions, thus not only restoring erectile function, but also overall health. PMID:24713832

  18. Evaluation of young men with organic erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Papagiannopoulos, Dimitri; Khare, Narenda; Nehra, Ajay

    2015-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) in men under the age of 40 was once thought to be entirely psychogenic. Over the last few decades, advances in our understanding of erectile physiology and improvements in diagnostic testing have restructured our understanding of ED and its etiologies. Although psychogenic ED is more prevalent in the younger population, at least 15%–20% of these men have an organic etiology. Organic ED has been shown to be a predictor of increased future morbidity and mortality. As such, a thorough work-up should be employed for any man with complaints of sexual dysfunction. Oftentimes a treatment plan can be formulated after a focused history, physical exam and basic lab-work are conducted. However, in certain complex cases, more testing can be employed. The major organic etiologies can be subdivided into vascular, neurologic, and endocrine. Specific testing should be directed by clinical clues noted during the preliminary evaluation. These tests vary in degree of invasiveness, precision, and at times may not affect treatment. Results should be integrated into the overall clinical picture to assist in diagnosis and help guide therapy. PMID:25370205

  19. Erectile dysfunction in chronic kidney disease: From pathophysiology to management

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulou, Eirini; Varouktsi, Anna; Lazaridis, Antonios; Boutari, Chrysoula; Doumas, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is encountered in millions of people worldwide, with continuously rising incidence during the past decades, affecting their quality of life despite the increase of life expectancy in these patients. Disturbance of sexual function is common among men with CKD, as both conditions share common pathophysiological causes, such as vascular or hormonal abnormalities and are both affected by similar coexisting comorbid conditions such as cardiovascular disease, hypertension and diabetes mellitus. The estimated prevalence of erectile dysfunction reaches 70% in end stage renal disease patients. Nevertheless, sexual dysfunction remains under-recognized and under-treated in a high proportion of these patients, a fact which should raise awareness among clinicians. A multifactorial approach in management and treatment is undoubtedly required in order to improve patients’ quality of life and cardiovascular outcomes. PMID:26167462

  20. Combination therapy for erectile dysfunction: an update review

    PubMed Central

    Dhir, Rohit R; Lin, Hao-Cheng; Canfield, Steven E; Wang, Run

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of oral phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors (PDE5Is) in the late 1990s and early 2000s revolutionized the field of sexual medicine and PDE5Is are currently first-line monotherapy for erectile dysfunction (ED). However, a significant proportion of patients with complex ED will be therapeutic non-responders to PDE5I monotherapy. Combination therapy has recently been adopted for more refractory cases of ED, but a critical evaluation of current combination therapies is lacking. A thorough PubMed and Cochrane Library search was conducted focusing on the effectiveness of combination therapies for ED in therapeutic non-responders to PDE5I therapy. Journal articles spanning the time period between January 1990 and December 2010 were reviewed. Criteria included all pertinent review articles, randomized controlled trials, cohort studies and retrospective analyses. References from retrieved articles were also manually scanned for additional relevant publications. Published combination therapies include PDE5I plus vacuum erectile device (VED), intraurethral medication, intracavernosal injection (ICI), androgen supplement, ?-blocker or miscellaneous combinations. Based on this review, some of these combination treatments appeared to be quite effective in preliminary testing. Caution must be advised, however, as the majority of combination therapy articles in the last decade have numerous limitations including study biases and small subject size. Regardless of limitations, present combination therapy research provides a solid foundation for future studies in complex ED management. PMID:21423198

  1. Understanding and targeting the Rho kinase pathway in erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Sopko, Nikolai A.; Hannan, Johanna L.; Bivalacqua, Trinity J.

    2015-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common disorder that affects a quarter of US men, and has many causes, including endothelial impairment, low testosterone levels, prior surgical manipulation, and/or psychogenic components. Penile erection is a complex process requiring neurally mediated relaxation of arteriolar smooth muscle and engorgement of cavernosal tissues, mediated by nitric oxide (NO). Current medical therapies for ED largely seek to maximize endogenous NO signalling. Certain aetiologies, including diabetes, are difficult to treat with current modalities, emphasizing the need for new molecular targets. Research has demonstrated the importance of RhoA–Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) signalling in maintaining a flaccid penile state, and inhibition of RhoA–ROCK signalling potentiates smooth-muscle relaxation in an NO-independent manner. The mechanisms and effects of RhoA–ROCK signalling and inhibition suggest that the RhoA–ROCK pathway could prove to be a new therapeutic target for the treatment of ED. PMID:25311680

  2. Effect of erectile dysfunction following prostate cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    McConkey, Robert

    2015-11-18

    Prostate cancer is the most prevalent non-cutaneous cancer in men worldwide. As a result of increased survival rates, men and their partners are living longer with the sexual sequelae of active treatments for prostate cancer, including surgery, radiotherapy and hormone therapy. The effect of erectile dysfunction on the patient and his partner is complex; many men experience psychosocial effects influenced by their hegemonic masculine beliefs. Some men experience difficulties in addressing their needs and require support while they attempt to reframe their beliefs about masculinity. The PLISSIT model can be used to guide healthcare practitioners in assessing and addressing the needs of this group of patients. The man's partner should be included in assessment and interventions where appropriate. PMID:26576913

  3. [Local negative pressure and magnetic field in therapy of patients with erectile dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Karpukhin, I V; Kazantsev, S N

    2007-01-01

    Combined treatment with local negative pressure and pulsating magnetic field conducted in 116 patients with erectile dysfunction aged 20-60 years produced optimal treatment results. Recovery and improvement of the erectile function were achieved in 85.7% patients given local vacuum-magnetotherapy. PMID:17882824

  4. Hyperhomocysteinemia as an Early Predictor of Erectile Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Giovannone, Riccardo; Busetto, Gian Maria; Antonini, Gabriele; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Ferro, Matteo; Tricarico, Stefano; Del Giudice, Francesco; Ragonesi, Giulia; Conti, Simon L.; Lucarelli, Giuseppe; Gentile, Vincenzo; De Berardinis, Ettore

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Erectile dysfunction (ED) is inability to achieve and maintain an erection to permit satisfactory sexual activity. Homocysteine (Hcys) is a sulfur-containing amino acid synthesized from the essential amino acid methionine. Experimental models have elucidated the role of hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcys) as a strong and independent predictor for atherosclerosis progression and impaired cavernosal perfusion. The aim of this study is to investigate the serum levels of Hcys in our cohort of patients with ED, to compare these values with these of control population and to examine Hcys as a predictive marker for those patients who are beginning to complain mild–moderate ED. A total of 431 patients were enrolled in the study. The whole cohort was asked to complete the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) questionnaire. The study population was divided in 3 main groups: Group A: 145 patients with no ED serving as a control group; Group B: 145 patients with mild or mild–moderate ED; Group C: 141 patients with moderate or severe ED. Each participant underwent blood analysis. All patients underwent baseline and dynamic penile Doppler ultrasonography. We found in our cohort mean Hcys plasma concentrations significantly higher than the cut-off point in both groups B and C (18.6?±?4.7 and 28.38?±?7.8, respectively). Mean IIEF score was 27.9?±?1.39, 19.5?±?2.6, and 11.1?±?2.5 for groups A, B, and C, respectively (P?

  5. Diabetes Severity, Metabolic syndrome, and the risk of Erectile Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Aviva E.; Eisenberg, Michael; Patel, Chirag J.; Chertow, Glenn M.; Leppert, John T.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Erectile dysfunction (ED) is more common in men with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), obesity, and/or the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Aim To investigate the associations among proxy measures of diabetic severity and the presence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) with erectile dysfunction (ED) in a nationally representative U.S. data sample. Methods We performed a cross-sectional analysis of adult participants in the 2001–2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Main outcome measures ED was ascertained by self-report. T2DM severity was defined by calculated measures of glycemic control and insulin resistance (IR). Insulin resistance was estimated using fasting plasma insulin (FPI) levels and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) definition. We classified glycemic control using HbA1c and fasting plasma glucose levels (FPG). Metabolic syndrome was defined by the American Heart Association and National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute criteria. Logistic regression models, adjusted for sociodemographics, risk factors and comorbidities, were fitted for each measure of T2DM severity, MetS, and the presence of ED. Results Proxy measures of glycemic control and insulin resistance were associated with ED. Participants with FPG between 100–126mg/dL (5.6–7 mmol/L) and ?126mg/dL (>7mmol/L) had higher odds of ED, OR 1.22 [CI, 0.83–1.80] and OR 2.68 [CI, 1.48–4.86], respectively. Participants with HbA1c 5.7–6.4% (38.8–46.4 mmol/mol) and ?6.5% (47.5 mmol/mol) had higher odds of ED, (OR 1.73 [CI, 1.08–2.76] and 3.70 [CI, 2.19–6.27], respectively). When FPI and HOMA-IR were evaluated by tertiles, there was a graded relation among participants in the top tertile. In multivariable models, a strong association remained between HbA1c and ED (OR 3.19 [CI,1.13–9.01]). MetS was associated with >2.5-fold increased odds of self reported ED (OR 2.55 [CI, 1.85–3.52]). Conclusions Poor glycemic control, impaired insulin sensitivity and the MetS are associated with a heightened risk of ED. PMID:24010555

  6. The treatment of hypertension in patients with erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Mikhailidis, D P; Khan, M A; Milionis, H J; Morgan, R J

    2000-01-01

    Hypertension is another predictor of erectile dysfunction (ED). This is further evidence supporting a link between the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic disease and ED. In one study (TOMHS) involving hypertensive patients, the incidence of ED was 14.4%. The drugs used to treat hypertension may cause ED. However, there is little trial-based evidence to indicate which drugs are more likely to cause this side effect. In general, thiazide diuretics and beta-blockers seem to cause ED more often. In contrast, the alpha-blocker, doxazosin, has not been associated with an increased incidence of ED as a side effect. Doxazosin also improves urinary flow in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). This condition is common in elderly men as is hypertension and ED. Therefore, doxazosin may present a special advantage among this group of patients. This alpha-blocker would also be a good choice in patients with impaired glucose tolerance/diabetes because it improves insulin sensitivity. Moreover, ED and hypertension are more prevalent among diabetics. On a more speculative note, doxazosin may potentiate the therapeutic impact of specific treatments for ED. PMID:11329820

  7. Endothelin and erectile dysfunction: a target for pharmacological intervention?

    PubMed

    Khan, M A; Thompson, C S; Sullivan, M E; Dashwood, M R; Jeremy, J Y; Morgan, R J; Mikhailidis, D P

    1998-11-01

    Although erectile dysfunction (ED) is not life threatening, this common problem can significantly affect the quality of life and psychological and social well-being. The Massachusetts male ageing study (1,290 men aged 40 - 70 years) showed that 52% of men reported some degree of ED (17.1% mild, 25.2% moderate, 9.6% total). In the UK, an estimated 17 - 19% of men are thought to suffer from ED. This problem is more common with advancing age and since this proportion of the population is increasing, the prevalence of ED is expected to rise. Endothelin-1 (ET-1) belongs to a family of potent vasoconstrictor peptides consisting of 21 amino acids. We review the evidence showing that ET-1 plays a role via (ET(A) and ET(B) receptors) in the regulation of cavernosal smooth muscle tone. We also consider the various risk factors that are involved in the pathogenesis of ED and how these relate to the action of ET-1. In particular, the role of diabetes, hypertension, smoking and dyslipidaemia are discussed. The pharmaceutical industry has declared an interest in the development of ET antagonists for use in the treatment of various diseases including ED. We briefly comment on experimental ET-1 antagonists that may be of therapeutic benefit in ED. PMID:15991927

  8. The dosimetry of brachytherapy-induced erectile dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Merrick, Gregory S.; Butler, Wayne M

    2003-12-31

    There is emerging evidence that brachytherapy-induced erectile dysfunction (ED) is technique-related and may be minimized by careful attention to source placement. Herein, we review the relationship between radiation doses to the prostate gland/surrounding structures and the development of brachytherapy-induced ED. The permanent prostate brachytherapy literature was reviewed using MEDLINE searches to ensure completeness. Although the site-specific structure associated with brachytherapy-induced ED remains unknown, there is an increasing body of data implicating the proximal penis. With day 0 CT-based dosimetry, the dose to 50% (D{sub 50}) and 25% (D{sub 25}) of the bulb of the penis should be maintained below 40% and 60% mPD, respectively, while the crura D{sub 50} should be maintained below 28% mPD to maximize post-brachytherapy potency. To date, there is no data to suggest that either radiation doses to the neurovascular bundles or choice of isotope is associated with brachytherapy-induced ED, while conflicting data has been reported regarding radiation dose to the prostate and the use of supplemental external beam radiation therapy. Although the etiology of brachytherapy-induced ED is likely multifactorial, the available data supports the proximal penis as an important site-specific structure. Refinements in implant technique, including preplanning and intraoperative seed placement, will result in lower radiation doses to the proximal penis with potential improvement in potency preservation.

  9. Effect of Endurance Cardiovascular Training Intensity on Erectile Dysfunction Severity in Men With Ischemic Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Kalka, Dariusz; Domagala, Zygmunt A; Kowalewski, Piotr; Rusiecki, Leslaw; Koleda, Piotr; Marciniak, Wojciech; Dworak, Jacek; Adamus, Jerzy; Wojcieszczyk, Joanna; Pyke, Edel; Pilecki, Witold

    2015-09-01

    The protective effect of physical activity on arteries is not limited to coronary vessels, but extends to the whole arterial system, including arteries, in which endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerotic changes are one of the key factors affecting erectile dysfunction development. The objective of this study was to report whether the endurance training intensity and training-induced chronotropic response are linked with a change in erectile dysfunction intensity in men with ischemic heart disease. A total of 150 men treated for ischemic heart disease, who suffered from erectile dysfunction, were analyzed. The study group consisted of 115 patients who were subjected to a cardiac rehabilitation program. The control group consisted of 35 patients who were not subjected to any cardiac rehabilitation. An IIEF-5 (International Index of Erectile Function) questionnaire was used for determining erectile dysfunction before and after cardiac rehabilitation. Cardiac training intensity was objectified by parameters describing work of endurance training. The mean initial intensity of erectile dysfunction in the study group was 12.46 ± 6.01 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 11.35-13.57). Final erectile dysfunction intensity (EDI) assessed after the cardiac rehabilitation program in the study group was 14.35 ± 6.88 (95% CI = 13.08-15.62), and it was statistically significantly greater from initial EDI. Mean final training work was statistically significantly greater than mean initial training work. From among the parameters describing training work, none were related significantly to reduction of EDI. In conclusion, cardiac rehabilitation program-induced improvement in erection severity is not correlated with endurance training intensity. Chronotropic response during exercise may be used for initial assessment of change in cardiac rehabilitation program-induced erection severity. PMID:25077728

  10. Intraurethral alprostadil for erectile dysfunction: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Costa, Pierre; Potempa, Axel-Juerg

    2012-12-01

    The global burden of erectile dysfunction (ED) is increasing. It is estimated that 8-19% of men in Europe have ED and that by 2025 the prevalence of ED worldwide will reach 322 million. The gold standard therapy for ED is an oral phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitor, but they are not suitable for everyone; approximately 25% of patients do not respond to this therapy and it is contraindicated in others, e.g. those with vascular disease. When PDE5 inhibitors are not suitable, available options include intraurethral and intracavernosal alprostadil - a synthetic vasodilator chemically identical to the naturally occurring prostaglandin E(1) indicated for the treatment of ED. Intraurethral alprostadil is delivered by the Medicated System for Erection (MUSE).- a single-use pellet containing alprostadil suspended in polyethylene glycol administered using an applicator. It is recommended that intraurethral alprostadil be initiated at a dose of 500??g, as it has a higher efficacy than the 250??g dose, with minimal differences with regard to adverse events. Data from key clinical studies of intraurethral alprostadil show that it has a fast onset of effect and a good safety profile, with no occurrences of priapism, fibrosis (as seen with intracavernosal injection) or the typical systemic effects observed with oral ED pharmacological treatments. Intraurethral alprostadil has been associated with high patient preference, acceptance rates and quality of life versus intracavernosal injection due to its ease of administration. Evidence has shown that combination treatment with sildenafil may be a possible efficient alternative when single oral or local treatment has failed. Intraurethral alprostadil can be administered in all patients irrespective of ED origin and should be the first option in patients with ED for whom therapy with PDE5 inhibitors has failed or is contraindicated. PMID:23170913

  11. Effect of sildenafil on platelet function and platelet cGMP of patients with erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Akand, M; Gencer, E; Yaman, Ö; Eri?gen, G; Tekin, D; Özdiler, E

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the effect of sildenafil on platelet function and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels in patients with erectile dysfunction, we evaluated the association between erectile function and platelet responses after administration of 100 mg sildenafil. Erectile responses were monitored after 8 daily doses of the drug. Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and collagen-induced platelet aggregation and simultaneous adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release and cGMP levels were determined before and after sildenafil therapy. Basal levels for platelet aggregation, ATP release and cGMP were compared with age-matched controls. There was no difference among basal levels of platelet responses between patients and controls, except for ADP-induced platelet aggregation (P = 0.04). It was significantly higher in the patient group. Analysis of the responses to sildenafil revealed that for the patients who showed a positive erectile response, there was a significant increase in platelet cGMP (P = 0.028) and a decrease in ADP-induced platelet aggregation (P = 0.04). However, for those who showed a negative or poor erectile response, there was no change in platelet cGMP levels and platelet functions. Sildenafil did not affect collagen-induced platelet responses although cGMP levels of the responders increased. It is concluded that sildenafil increases platelet cGMP in the patients with positive erectile response. Therefore, it has been speculated that platelet cGMP may be used as an index for erectile response. PMID:25486996

  12. [Transcranial magneto- and electrostimulation in patients with obesity and erectile dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Ponomarenko, G N; Bin'iash, T G; Ra?gorodski?, Iu M; Guliaev, A S; Shul'diakov, V A; Kiriliuk, A M; Vartanova, L Iu

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate therapeutic efficiency of transcranial magnetotherapy (TcMT) and electric stimulation (ES) included in the combined treatment of 143 patients with erectile dysfunction (ED) and abdominal obesity. The majority of the patients had waist circumference over 102 cm. An AMO-ATOS complex was used to stimulate the hypothalamic region and other brain structures. Transdermal myostimulation of the abdominal and femoral regions was achieved with a Miovolna device. It was shown that both TcM and ES improved lipid metabolism and erectile function; moreover, they exerted hypotensive and sedative action. Specifically, the testosterone level in the patients increased by a mean of 27% compared with the pre-treatment values while the number of patients complaining of erectile dysfunction decreased by 31%. PMID:19886019

  13. Men’s experience of erectile dysfunction after treatment for colorectal cancer: qualitative interview study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To examine the experiences of men after treatment for colorectal cancer, identify barriers to accessing services, and suggest improvements to providing information in primary and secondary care. Design Semistructured, qualitative interview study with purposive sampling and thematic analysis. Participants 28 patients treated for colorectal cancer. Setting West Midlands. Results Most men treated for colorectal cancer experience erectile dysfunction as a consequence. Not all, however, want the same response from health professionals. Although, erectile dysfunction is profoundly stressful for most men, affecting self image, behaviour, and relationships, some do not regard it as a health priority. Many of the men were uninformed about erectile dysfunction and were unprepared for it, and the majority neither helped themselves nor asked for help. Almost none were receiving adequate, effective, and affordable care. Evidence of ageism was strong. Conclusions Unlike patients with prostate cancer, men with colorectal cancer are not routinely offered information and treatment for erectile dysfunction. Greater coordination of care and consistent strategies are needed to tackle the unmet needs of this widely diverse patient group. Currently, clinicians are inadvertently neglecting, misleading, and offending such patients; better training could improve this situation, as might the reorganisation of services. Further research is needed to determine whether trained clinical nurse specialists in colorectal cancer units could coordinate ongoing care. PMID:22010127

  14. Exercise prevents Western diet-associated erectile dysfunction and coronary artery endothelial dysfunction: response to acute apocynin and sepiapterin treatment.

    PubMed

    La Favor, Justin D; Anderson, Ethan J; Dawkins, Jillian T; Hickner, Robert C; Wingard, Christopher J

    2013-08-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate aerobic exercise training as a means to prevent erectile dysfunction (ED) and coronary artery disease (CAD) development associated with inactivity and diet-induced obesity. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a Western diet (WD) or a control diet (CD) for 12 wk. Subgroups within each diet remained sedentary (Sed) or participated in aerobic interval treadmill running throughout the dietary intervention. Erectile function was evaluated under anesthesia by measuring the mean arterial pressure and intracavernosal pressure in response to electrical field stimulation of the cavernosal nerve, in the absence or presence of either apocynin, an NADPH oxidase inhibitor, or sepiapterin, a tetrahydrobiopterin precursor. Coronary artery endothelial function (CAEF) was evaluated ex vivo with cumulative doses of ACh applied to preconstricted segments of the left anterior descending coronary artery. CAEF was assessed in the absence or presence of apocynin or sepiapterin. Erectile function (P < 0.0001) and CAEF (P < 0.001) were attenuated in WD-Sed. Exercise preserved erectile function (P < 0.0001) and CAEF (P < 0.05) within the WD. Erectile function (P < 0.01) and CAEF (P < 0.05) were augmented by apocynin only in WD-Sed, while sepiapterin (P < 0.05) only augmented erectile function in WD-Sed. These data demonstrate that a chronic WD induces impairment in erectile function and CAEF that are commonly partially reversible by apocynin, whereas sepiapterin treatment exerted differential functional effects between the two vascular beds. Furthermore, exercise training may be a practical means of preventing diet-induced ED and CAD development. PMID:23761637

  15. Effects of a Topical Saffron (Crocus sativus L) Gel on Erectile Dysfunction in Diabetics: A Randomized, Parallel-Group, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Mohammadzadeh-Moghadam, Hossein; Nazari, Seyed Mohammad; Shamsa, Ali; Kamalinejad, Mohammad; Esmaeeli, Habibollah; Asadpour, Amir Abbas; Khajavi, Abdoljavad

    2015-10-01

    Erectile dysfunction is a man's persistent or recurrent inability to achieve and maintain erection for a satisfactory sexual relationship. As diabetes is a major risk factor for erectile dysfunction, the prevalence of erectile dysfunction among diabetic men has been reported as 35% to 90%. This randomized, parallel-group, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial investigated the effects of a topical saffron (Crocus sativus L) gel on erectile dysfunction in diabetic men. Patients were randomly allocated to 2 equal groups (with 25 patients each). The intervention group was treated with topical saffron, and the control received a similar treatment with placebo. The 2 groups were assessed using the International Index of Erectile Function Questionnaire before the intervention and 1 month after the intervention. Compared to placebo, the prepared saffron gel could significantly improve erectile dysfunction in diabetic patients (P < .001). This preliminary evidence suggests that saffron can be considered as a treatment option for diabetic men with erectile dysfunction. PMID:25948674

  16. Reconstructive surgery for idealising penile shape and restoring erectile function in patients with penile dysmorphology and erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Geng-Long; Molodysky, Eugen; Liu, Shih-Ping; Chang, Hong-Chiang; Hsieh, Cheng-Hsing; Hsu, Chih-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Objective To report an innovative combination of two surgical procedures to treat patients with erectile dysfunction and penile deviation, arising from advances in penile anatomy. Patients and methods From October 1998 to October 2011, 132 men (aged 23–39 years) underwent penile venous stripping and corporoplasty. Of these, 37 were allocated to a transverse and 95 to a longitudinal group, with an infrapubic transverse or pubic median longitudinal approach, respectively. The abridged five-item version of the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5) and cavernosography were used for assessment, as necessary. Under acupuncture-aided local anaesthesia, and after a circumferential incision, the deep dorsal vein and cavernous veins were completely stripped, with 6-0 Nylon sutures for ligation, followed by tunical surgery for correcting the penile shape. Results In the transverse and longitudinal groups the mean (SD) duration of surgery was 4.6 (0.2) and 4.8 (0.3) h, respectively. Before surgery the mean (SD) IIEF-5 score was 9.4 (2.3) and 9.6 (2.1), which increased to 20.6 (2.4) and 20.8 (2.7), respectively, after surgery. The penile shape (<15°) was deemed satisfactory in 92% (34/37) and 96% (91/95) of patients in the transverse and longitudinal groups, respectively. The cavernosograms consistently showed a good penile shape. There were significant differences in the mean (SD) duration of penile oedema, at 3.2 (1.6) vs. 11.9 (2.1) days, the overall satisfaction rate and the prevalence of hypertrophied scarring (all P < 0.001). Conclusion This combination of unique penile venous stripping with a pubic median longitudinal approach and an anatomy-based corporoplasty is ideally suited to the simultaneous restoration of penile erectile function and morphological reconstruction. PMID:26558108

  17. Bladder and erectile dysfunctions in the Type 2 diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rat.

    PubMed

    Oger-Roussel, Stephanie; Behr-Roussel, Delphine; Caisey, Stephanie; Kergoat, Micheline; Charon, Christine; Audet, Annick; Bernabé, Jacques; Alexandre, Laurent; Giuliano, Francois

    2014-01-15

    Despite the fact that urogenito-sexual complications significantly impact the quality of life of diabetic patients, a robust in vivo experimental model is lacking. Bladder and erectile function in the Type 2 diabetic Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rat and responses to standard-of-care treatments for each disorder have been assessed. GK rats (n = 25, 18-wk-old, GK/Par colony) and age-matched Wistar rats (n = 23), characterized for their metabolic parameters, were used. Bladder function was assessed by cystometry in conscious rats treated by intravenous solifenacin (1 mg/kg). Subsequently, erectile function was assessed under anesthesia following electrical stimulation of the cavernous nerve in presence of intravenous sildenafil (0.3 mg/kg). GK rats displayed detrusor overactivity with a significant increase in frequency/amplitude of nonvoiding contractions during the filling phase, together with an increase in bladder capacity, intercontraction interval, voided volume, and maximal pressure of voiding contraction. Solifenacin significantly decreased parameters characterizing voiding contractions without modifying voiding efficiency. Erectile function in GK rats was markedly impaired and remained so after sildenafil treatment despite a significant improvement. GK rats display both bladder and erectile dysfunctions and respond at least partially to standard-of-care treatments for each disorder, thus representing a suitable model to investigate the pathophysiology and assess the efficacy of new therapeutic agents for Type 2 diabetes-associated bladder and erectile complications. PMID:24305064

  18. Senescent Cells Impair Erectile Function through Induction of Endothelial Dysfunction and Nerve Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Nishimatsu, Hiroaki; Suzuki, Etsu; Saito, Yasuho; Niimi, Aya; Nomiya, Akira; Fukuhara, Hiroshi; Kume, Haruki; Homma, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a major health problem, particularly in the elderly population, which is rapidly increasing. It is necessary to elucidate the mechanism by which ED occurs in the elderly. Cellular senescence is commonly detected in old tissues, and it is well known that senescent cells not only withdraw from the cell cycle but also remain viable and actively produce a variety of cytokines. We examined the effect of senescent cells on erectile function after injection of senescent cells into the penises of mice. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were infected with an adenovirus expressing a constitutively active mutant of Ras to induce senescence, and were injected into the penises of nude mice. These senescent cells expressed proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1? (IL-1?). Injection of senescent cells impaired erectile function, as assessed by the measurement of intracavernous pressure. Although the structure of the cavernous body did not remarkably change, expression of the catalytically active form of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and that of total neural nitric oxide synthase significantly decreased after injection. The penises injected with the senescent cells expressed human IL-1? and subsequently endogenous proinflammatory cytokines such as mouse IL-1? and tumor necrosis factor-?. These results suggested that senescent cells impaired erectile function through induction of endothelial dysfunction and nerve injury. These effects may be mediated by proinflammatory cytokines produced by senescent cells. PMID:25894557

  19. Senescent Cells Impair Erectile Function through Induction of Endothelial Dysfunction and Nerve Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Yasuho; Niimi, Aya; Nomiya, Akira; Fukuhara, Hiroshi; Kume, Haruki; Homma, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a major health problem, particularly in the elderly population, which is rapidly increasing. It is necessary to elucidate the mechanism by which ED occurs in the elderly. Cellular senescence is commonly detected in old tissues, and it is well known that senescent cells not only withdraw from the cell cycle but also remain viable and actively produce a variety of cytokines. We examined the effect of senescent cells on erectile function after injection of senescent cells into the penises of mice. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were infected with an adenovirus expressing a constitutively active mutant of Ras to induce senescence, and were injected into the penises of nude mice. These senescent cells expressed proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1? (IL-1?). Injection of senescent cells impaired erectile function, as assessed by the measurement of intracavernous pressure. Although the structure of the cavernous body did not remarkably change, expression of the catalytically active form of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and that of total neural nitric oxide synthase significantly decreased after injection. The penises injected with the senescent cells expressed human IL-1? and subsequently endogenous proinflammatory cytokines such as mouse IL-1? and tumor necrosis factor-?. These results suggested that senescent cells impaired erectile function through induction of endothelial dysfunction and nerve injury. These effects may be mediated by proinflammatory cytokines produced by senescent cells. PMID:25894557

  20. Doppler Characteristics of Cavernosal-Spongiosal Communications in Patients with Erectile Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qiang; Li, Jinbing; Zheng, Dequan; Lv, Liguo; Yang, Gewen; He, Qingkun

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this work was to characterize the blood flow in cavernosal-spongiosal communications (CSCs) in patients with erectile dysfunction using color Doppler ultrasound. Peak systolic velocity was measured in the CSCs, cavernosal artery and urethral artery in 72 erectile dysfunction patients of the Han ethnic group in southern China. Blood in the CSCs was observed to flow from the cavernosal artery to the urethral artery in all except 5 patients with arteriogenic insufficiency whose blood flow was bidirectional. Peak systolic velocity in erectile dysfunction patients with normal vascular function or veno-occlusive dysfunction was significantly lower in the CSCs than in the cavernosal artery (p < 0.01), but significantly higher than in the urethral artery (p < 0.05). Peak systolic velocities in CSCs in patients with arteriogenic insufficiency were significantly lower than those in the cavernosal (p < 0.01) and urethral (p < 0.01) arteries. The direction of blood flow in the CSCs is determined by the pressure gradient between the cavernosal and urethral arteries. PMID:26493238

  1. Transition Stages in Adjustment of Wives With Their Husbands’ Erectile Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Ozgoli, Giti; Ziaei, Saeideh; Ahmadi, Fazlollah; Azar, Mahyar

    2014-01-01

    Background: No study has been conducted yet on the process of adjustment of wives with their husbands’ erectile dysfunction in the transitional stages, and there is lack of understanding of this process in Iran. Objectives: A qualitative, grounded-theory study was designed to examine the process of adjustment of wives with their husbands’ erectile dysfunction in transitional stages. Materials and Methods: Purposive sampling was carried out in Tehran, Iran. Data collection occurred until the theoretical saturation was reached. A total of 16 semi structured in-depth interviews were conducted with 15 woman participants. The constant comparative method of data analysis was used. Results: The women were 29-53 years old and duration of marriage was 2-40 years. They had different educational status ranging from Illiterate to Master’s degree. The present study showed the process of adjustment of wives with husbands’ erectile dysfunction in categories of husband broken role, ups and downs in woman’s sexual life, passing through failure, and end of transition. Following erectile dysfunction (event) and the man’s reaction, broken role occurs (change). In response to this change, reactions due to loss of intimacy occur in the ups and downs of woman’s life. Some women, unable to get through the failure, continue low quality life with sexual and communicational problems (limbo). By the end of transition, some women manage to overcome this unpleasant state of limbo, and begin to experience a new life, with increased intimacy, with or without sexual intercourse (new beginning). Conclusions: If the process of transitional adjustment occurs in women, it will be effective in improving the relationship and increased intimacy, even sexual intimacy. With this understanding, better counseling and therapeutic interventions can be planned for these couples. PMID:24829790

  2. [Erectile dysfunction following pelvic fracture and pelvic trauma].

    PubMed

    Henning, F; Kirsch, N; Klein, P

    1989-01-01

    In the course of this research a questionnaire was submitted to 209 male patients who had been treated in the surgical university clinic of Erlangen between 1976 and 1985, in order to get knowledge about possible complications in the form of erectile non-functioning. 29 of these patients had died in the meanwhile, 32 had moved to an unknown address. Among the other 148, 86 were willing to give some information. 44% of these people turned out to be suffering from an impotentia coeundi. Furthermore, we were able to prove that 40% of those patients for whom a large haematoma of the pelvis had been diagnosed were impotent. Finally, 73% of the patients who had additionally suffered an injury of the urogenital canal turned out to be impotent. On closer examination of the urogenital side-effect case of rupture of the bladder and as much as 87.5% in the case of lesions of the urethra. In connection with the urethra lesions reference is made to the controversial discussion about their therapy, with dichronous recanalling clearly being given preference as it involves considerably fewer complications compared to primary recanalling. PMID:2601528

  3. Effect of testosterone administration on sexual behavior and mood in men with erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Schiavi, R C; White, D; Mandeli, J; Levine, A C

    1997-06-01

    This double-blind placebo controlled, cross-over study was carried out to assess the effect of testosterone administration on sexual behavior mood, and psychological symptoms in healthy men with erectile dysfunction. Biweekly injections of 200 mg of testosterone enanthate were given over a period of 6 weeks separated by a washout period of 4 weeks. Blood samples for hormonal assessment, behavioral and psychological ratings were obtained prior to each injection. Luteinizing hormone remained significantly depressed but circulating testosterone had returned to baseline levels by 2 weeks following each hormonal injection. The ejaculatory frequency during the testosterone phase was statistically higher than during the placebo phase. There were marked, although statistically nonsignificant, increases in median frequency of reported sexual desire, masturbation, sexual experiences with partner, and sleep erections during the testosterone period. Testosterone did not have demonstrable effects on ratings of penile rigidity and sexual satisfaction. Mood variables and psychological symptoms did not change following hormonal administration. Results suggest that androgen administration to eugonadal men with erectile dysfunction may activate their sexual behavior without enhancing erectile capacity and without effects on mood and psychological symptoms. PMID:9146812

  4. Nanoparticles as a Novel Delivery Vehicle for Therapeutics Targeting Erectile Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Han, George; Tar, Moses; Kuppam, Dwaraka S. R.; Friedman, Adam; Melman, Arnold; Friedman, Joel; Davies, Kelvin P.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Nanoparticles represent a potential novel mechanism for transdermal delivery of erectogenic agents directly to the penis. Aim To determine if nanoparticles encapsulating known erectogenic agents (tadalafil, sialorphin, and nitric oxide [NO]) can improve erectile function in a rat model of erectile dysfunction (ED) as a result of aging (the Sprague-Dawley retired breeder rat). Methods Nanoparticles encapsulating the erectogenic agents were applied as a gel to the glans and penile shaft of anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats and the intracorporal pressure/blood pressure (ICP/BP) monitored for up to 2 hours with or without stimulation of the cavernous nerve. Control nanoparticles were made without encapsulating erectogenic agents and applied in a similar manner in separate experiments. Results Nanoparticles encapsulating NO caused spontaneous visible erections in the rat, with an average time of onset of 4.5 minutes, duration of 1.42 minutes, and ICP/BP of 0.67 ± 0.14. The sialorphin nanoparticles also caused visible spontaneous erections after an average of 4.5 minutes, with a duration of 8 minutes and ICP/BP ratio of 0.72 ± 0.13. The difference in the erectile response between groups of animals treated with NO or sialorphin nanoparticles was significantly different from the control group treated with empty nanoparticles (P < 0.05) Tadalafil nanoparticles showed a significant increase in the mean ICP/BP (0.737 ± 0.029) following stimulation of the cavernous nerve (4 mA) 1 hour after application of the nanoparticles with a visibly improved erectile response. Conclusions Nanoparticles encapsulating three different erectogenic agents resulted in increased erectile function when applied to the penis of a rat model of ED. Nanoparticles represent a potential novel route for topical delivery of erectogenic agents which could improve the safety profile for existing orally administered drugs by avoiding effects of absorption and first-pass metabolism, and would be less hazardous than injection. PMID:19765204

  5. Erectile dysfunction and premature ejaculation in men who have sex with men

    PubMed Central

    Shindel, Alan W.; Vittinghoff, Eric; Breyer, Benjamin N.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Quantitative research into sexual function and dysfunction in men who have sex with men (MSM) has been sparse due in large part to a lack of validated, quantitative instruments for the assessment of sexuality in this population. Aim To assess prevalence and associations of erectile problems and premature ejaculation in MSM. Methods MSM were invited to complete an online survey of sexual function. Ethnodemographic, sexuality, and health related factors were assessed. Main Outcome Measure Participants completed a version of the International Index of Erectile Function modified for use in MSM (IIEF-MSM) and the Premature Ejaculation Diagnostic Tool. Total score on the erectile function domain of the IIEF-EF (IIEF-MSM-EF) was used to stratify erectile dysfunction (ED) severity (25–30=no ED, 16–24 mild or mild moderate ED, 11–15 moderate ED, and ? 10 severe ED). PEDT scores were used to stratify risk of premature ejaculation (PE, diagnosed as PEDT score ?9). Results Nearly 80% of the study cohort of 2,640 men resided in North America. The prevalence of ED was higher in older men whereas the prevalence of PE was relatively constant across age groups. Multivariate logistic regression revealed that increasing age, HIV seropositivity, prior use of erectogenic therapy, lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), and lack of a stable sexual partner were associated with greater odds of ED. A separate multivariate analysis revealed that younger age, LUTS, and lower number of lifetime sexual partners were associated with greater odds of PE. Conclusions Risk factors for sexual problems in MSM are similar to what has been observed in quantitative studies of non-MSM males. Urinary symptoms are associated with poorer sexual function in MSM. PMID:22214402

  6. [Vascular surgery, implant surgery and vacuum erectile aids. Review-overview-prospects of 3 therapy options in erectile dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Manning, M; Spahn, M; Jünemann, K P

    1998-09-01

    Vascular surgery or penile prosthesis implantation are the main surgical options for erectile dysfunction. In this category, penile revascularization is the only causal therapy for selected patients: males younger than 50 years of age at time of surgery, maximum of two risk factors, exclusion of diabetes mellitus. Long-term success decreased to 53% to 55% in comparison to first encouraging reports of 80% success. Venous surgery resulted in an even more distinct decline of success the longer the elapse of time after surgery. Long-term success dropped under 40%, leaving only a few indications for penile venous ligation. In contrast, penile prosthesis implantation results in high satisfaction rates. Despite this, it is not generally recommended as first choice surgical management as it is linked to irreversible damage of the cavernosal bodies. Among numerous types of penile implants, preference is nowadays mostly given to the three-piece hydraulic models. However, such complications as defective or perforated cylinders in up to 35% after 5 years have arisen, depending on the type of implant. In a selected patient group, vacuum constriction devices with a mean patient acceptance of 75% (50% to 90%) seldom result in complications and are thus considered to be a well-established therapeutical option. PMID:9796032

  7. A new potential risk factor in patients with erectile dysfunction and premature ejaculation: folate deficiency.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wen-Jie; Yu, Nan; Yin, Tai-Lang; Zou, Yu-Jie; Yang, Jing

    2014-01-01

    We investigated serum folic acid (FA) levels in patients with erectile dysfunction (ED) and/or premature ejaculation (PE). Fasting serum samples were obtained from 42 patients with ED, 36 with PE, 25 ED patients with PE, and 30 healthy men; the mean intravaginal ejaculation latency time (IELT) was measured during a 4 weeks baseline period. Levels of sex hormones (follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, total testosterone), homocysteine (Hcys), and FA were measured using chemiluminescent immunoassays. The sexual functions of PE patients and normal control men were evaluated using the Chinese Index of Premature Ejaculation (CIPE). The abridged International Index of Erectile Function-5 (IIEF-5) questionnaire was used to gauge erectile quality for ED patients and for normal controls. Serum FA concentrations were lower in ED (7.61 ± 3.97 ng ml?¹), PE (9.37 ± 3.40 ng ml?¹), and ED/PE (8.84 ± 4.28 ng ml?¹) patients than in healthy men (12.23 ± 5.76 ng ml -1 , P < 0.05). No significant differences in sex hormone levels were found between patients with sexual dysfunction and healthy controls (P > 0.05). There were positive correlations between serum FA concentrations and CIPE scores (r = 0.530, P < 0.01), IIEF-5 scores (r = 0.589, P < 0.01), and IELT (r = 0.445, P < 0.01); negative correlations with Hcys concentrations (r = -0.487, P < 0.01) were found in all participants. These findings showed a strong relationship between serum FA levels and sexual dysfunction, possibly due to an effect of FA on the metabolism of nitric oxide, Hcys, and 5-hydroxytryptamine. PMID:25080932

  8. A new potential risk factor in patients with erectile dysfunction and premature ejaculation: folate deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Wen-Jie; Yu, Nan; Yin, Tai-Lang; Zou, Yu-Jie; Yang, Jing

    2014-01-01

    We investigated serum folic acid (FA) levels in patients with erectile dysfunction (ED) and/or premature ejaculation (PE). Fasting serum samples were obtained from 42 patients with ED, 36 with PE, 25 ED patients with PE, and 30 healthy men; the mean intravaginal ejaculation latency time (IELT) was measured during a 4 weeks baseline period. Levels of sex hormones (follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, total testosterone), homocysteine (Hcys), and FA were measured using chemiluminescent immunoassays. The sexual functions of PE patients and normal control men were evaluated using the Chinese Index of Premature Ejaculation (CIPE). The abridged International Index of Erectile Function-5 (IIEF-5) questionnaire was used to gauge erectile quality for ED patients and for normal controls. Serum FA concentrations were lower in ED (7.61 ± 3.97 ng ml?1), PE (9.37 ± 3.40 ng ml?1), and ED/PE (8.84 ± 4.28 ng ml?1) patients than in healthy men (12.23 ± 5.76 ng ml?1, P < 0.05). No significant differences in sex hormone levels were found between patients with sexual dysfunction and healthy controls (P > 0.05). There were positive correlations between serum FA concentrations and CIPE scores (r = 0.530, P < 0.01), IIEF-5 scores (r = 0.589, P < 0.01), and IELT (r = 0.445, P < 0.01); negative correlations with Hcys concentrations (r = ?0.487, P < 0.01) were found in all participants. These findings showed a strong relationship between serum FA levels and sexual dysfunction, possibly due to an effect of FA on the metabolism of nitric oxide, Hcys, and 5-hydroxytryptamine. PMID:25080932

  9. Preparation and clinical evaluation of nano-transferosomes for treatment of erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Maha Fadel M; Salem, Heba F; Abdelmohsen, Hany F; Attia, Sameh K

    2015-01-01

    Objective The goal of the present study was to formulate topical nanocarriers of the low-cost vasodilator, papaverine hydrochloride (PH), as an alternative to the painful penile injections. The injections are used for both diagnosis and treatment of erectile dysfunction. Transdermal nano-transferosome (T), the ultraflexible nanoliposome, was used as a nanocarrier to enhance the penetration of the papaverine to the penis. Methods Different nano formulas were prepared and characterized for their encapsulation efficiency, particle size, zeta potential, and cumulative drug release. The formula acquired the best characteristics was incorporated into 2% (w/v) hydroxypropyl methylcellulose hydrogel base. The gel containing transferosomal papaverine hydrochloride (PH) and that containing free PH were clinically compared using color flow Doppler measurements. Results The results revealed that transferosome 3 (T3) had the highest entrapment efficiency approaching 72%, low particle size of 220 nm, and zeta potential of ?33.4 mV. The formula released 73% of its initial drug content within 2 hours. The clinical evaluation showed the increase in the cavernous artery diameter from 0.53 mm to 0.78 mm and the increase in the peak systolic flow velocity from 5.95 cm/second to 12.2 cm/second, both of which were found to be significant at P<0.05. Conclusion It is evident from the study that the transferosomes can be used as a carrier of papaverine hydrochloride for both diagnosis and treatment of the erectile dysfunction. This new strategy could be used successfully in the treatment of erectile dysfunction and in male impotency. PMID:25995616

  10. Irritable bowel syndrome is associated not only with organic but also psychogenic erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hsu, C-Y; Lin, C-L; Kao, C-H

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated the correlation between irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and organic erectile dysfunction (OED) and psychogenic erectile dysfunction (PED), and analyzed the influence of various comorbidities. Data were obtained from reimbursement claims of the National Health Insurance Program in Taiwan. We selected male patients aged >20 years, who were diagnosed with IBS during the 2000-2011 period as the IBS cohort. The index date for patients with IBS was the date of their first medical visit. We excluded patients with a diagnosis of OED and PED at baseline and those without information on age and sex. The IBS to non-IBS cohorts were estimated using univariable and multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model. Adjusted hazard ratios were determined after adjusting for age and comorbidities. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to plot the cumulative incidence of OED and PED, and a log-rank test was used to compare the cohorts. A total of 15?533 IBS patients and 62?124 controls without IBS were enrolled in our study. Among the study participants, 48.2% were 49 years of age or younger. Patients with IBS were more likely to develop erectile dysfunction (ED) than those without IBS. Patients with IBS were 2.12 times more likely to develop OED and 2.38 times more likely to develop PED than the controls. There is an increased risk of both PED and OED in patients with IBS. Not only with organic but also PED should be considered when patients with IBS complain of ED. PMID:26548409

  11. Erectile Dysfunction in the Elderly: An Old Widespread Issue with Novel Treatment Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    De Fazio, Pasquale

    2014-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is one of the most common chronic diseases affecting men and its prevalence increases with aging. It is also the most frequently diagnosed sexual dysfunction in the older male population. A number of different diseases potentially worsening sexual function may occur in elderly people, together with polypharmacy. Related causes of ED are variable and can include arterial, neurogenic, hormonal, cavernosal, iatrogenic, and psychogenic causes. The aim of the present review was to examine the main aspects of erectile dysfunction going through epidemiology and pathophysiology and revise most of ED in elderly disabled men and in those affected with psychiatric disorders. Lastly we tried to focus on the main aspects of nonpharmacological and pharmacological treatments of ED and the recreational use in the elderly. Phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors (PDE5-I) are commonly used for on-demand or chronic treatment of ED. It is widely known that PDE5-I have lower response rates in older men than in younger patients, but they have the advantages of ease of use and excellent safety profile, also in the elderly. The old and new PDE5-I as well as the alternative treatments for ED are extensively discussed. PMID:24744785

  12. Pudendal somatosensory evoked potential and bulbocavernosus reflex testing in erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Moon, J H; Kang, S W; Chun, S I

    1993-03-01

    Pudenal somatosensory evoked potential (PSEP) and bulbocavernosus reflex (BCR) testing have been reported to be useful in the evaluation of erectile dysfunction and neurogenic bladder. 461 patients with sexual dysfunction were studied to determine the usefulness of the above tests. Abnormality of PSEP was found significantly in upper motor neuron (UMN) type spinal cord patients and average prolonged P1 latency was 47.4 +/- 9.8 msec. Lower motor neuron (LMN) type spinal cord patients revealed great abnormality in BCR latency with an average value of 44.9 +/- 14.5 msec on the right and 44.2 +/- 15.6 msec on the left. Additionally significant differences were obtained in patients with diabetes mellitus, pelvic trauma and spinal cord lesion of the UMN type in the study of PSEP. There was also a significant difference in the patients with diabetes mellitus, pelvic trauma and spinal cord lesion of the LMN type in the BCR study. The findings of our study suggest that PSEP together with BCR study is useful in assessing the integrity of the sacral reflex arc and the central afferent pathway, in differentiating the lesion site and in providing basic data for the management plan in sexual rehabilitation. Furthermore, because erection is under the influence of both the somatic and autonomic nervous system, BCR study and PSEP combined with currently studied electrical activity of the corpus cavernosum would provide a more accurate evaluation of the neurogenic erectile dysfunction patients. PMID:8379185

  13. Penile Prosthesis Implantation for End-Stage Erectile Dysfunction after Radical Prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Montague, Drogo K

    2005-01-01

    When erectile dysfunction occurs after radical prostatectomy and phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor therapy fails, second-line therapies such as vacuum constriction devices, intraurethral prostaglandins, and penile injection therapy should be offered. When second-line therapies are not effective or acceptable to the man and his partner, penile prosthesis implantation becomes the treatment of choice. Today’s 3-piece inflatable devices offer flaccidity and erection that approach the natural state. Design improvements have resulted in devices that have freedom from mechanical failure ranging from 92% to 94%. Antibiotic and hydrophilic coatings have reduced infection rates. PMID:16985898

  14. Microvascular endothelial dysfunction predicts the development of erectile dysfunction in men with coronary atherosclerosis without critical stenoses

    PubMed Central

    Reriani, Martin; Flammer, Andreas J.; Li, Jing; Prasad, Megha; Rihal, Charanjit; Prasad, Abhiram; Lennon, Ryan; Lerman, Lilach O; Lerman, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Background Erectile dysfunction (ED) is associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular (CV) disease, stroke and all-cause mortality, independent of conventional CV risk factors. Coronary endothelial dysfunction is independently associated with ED in men with early coronary atherosclerosis. We aimed to investigate if coronary microvascular dysfunction predicts development of ED in patients presenting with coronary atherosclerosis without critical stenoses. Methods Coronary microvascular function was evaluated in 130 men with coronary atherosclerosis without critical stenoses by administration of intracoronary acetylcholine at the time of diagnostic study. After a mean follow-up of 8.4 years, patients were assessed for the development of ED by administration of a questionnaire. Results 68 (50%) of the men had microvascular endothelial dysfunction at baseline. 35 (51%) of men with microvascular endothelial dysfunction developed ED on follow-up compared to 19 (31%) of men without microvascular endothelial dysfunction. Men who developed ED had a lower CBF response (% ? CBF) compared to men who did not develop ED; mean ± SD 25.4 ± 71.3 vs. 81.7 ± 120 p=0.003 In univariate analysis, microvascular endothelial dysfunction was a predictor for the development of ED; relative risk 2.4 (1.2 to 4.9) p=0.016. In multivariate logistic regression adjusting for traditional CV risk factors (age, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, vascular disease and family history of CAD), only microvascular endothelial dysfunction p=0.027 and age p=0.044 remained significant predictors of development of ED. Conclusion Coronary microvascular dysfunction is a predictor of the development of ED in men with coronary atherosclerosis without critical stenoses. This study underscores the systemic involvement of the endothelial function in vascular disease. PMID:25028978

  15. Penile vascular surgery for treating erectile dysfunction: Current role and future direction

    PubMed Central

    Molodysky, Eugen; Liu, Shi-Ping; Huang, Sheng-Jean; Hsu, Geng-Long

    2013-01-01

    Penile vascular surgery for treating erectile dysfunction (ED) is still regarded cautiously. Thus we reviewed relevant publications from the last decade, summarising evidence-based reports consistent with the pessimistic consensus and, by contrast, the optimistically viable options for vascular reconstruction for ED published after 2003. Recent studies support a revised model of the tunica albuginea of the corpora cavernosa as a bi-layered structure with a 360° complete inner circular layer and a 300° incomplete outer longitudinal coat. Additional studies show a more sophisticated venous drainage system than previously understood, and most significantly, that the emissary veins can be easily occluded by the shearing action elicited by the inner and outer layers of the tunica albuginea. Pascal’s law has been shown to be a significant, if not the major, factor in erectile mechanics, with recent haemodynamic studies on fresh and defrosted human cadavers showing rigid erections despite the lack of endothelial activity. Reports on revascularisation surgery support its utility in treating arterial trauma in young males, and with localised arterial occlusive disease in the older man. Penile venous stripping surgery has been shown to be beneficial in correcting veno-occlusive dysfunction, with outstanding results. The traditional complications of irreversible penile numbness and deformity have been virtually eliminated, with the venous ligation technique superseding venous cautery. Penile vascular reconstructive surgery is viable if, and only if, the surgical handling is appropriate using a sound method. It should be a promising option in the near future. PMID:26558090

  16. Penile vascular surgery for treating erectile dysfunction: Current role and future direction.

    PubMed

    Molodysky, Eugen; Liu, Shi-Ping; Huang, Sheng-Jean; Hsu, Geng-Long

    2013-09-01

    Penile vascular surgery for treating erectile dysfunction (ED) is still regarded cautiously. Thus we reviewed relevant publications from the last decade, summarising evidence-based reports consistent with the pessimistic consensus and, by contrast, the optimistically viable options for vascular reconstruction for ED published after 2003. Recent studies support a revised model of the tunica albuginea of the corpora cavernosa as a bi-layered structure with a 360° complete inner circular layer and a 300° incomplete outer longitudinal coat. Additional studies show a more sophisticated venous drainage system than previously understood, and most significantly, that the emissary veins can be easily occluded by the shearing action elicited by the inner and outer layers of the tunica albuginea. Pascal's law has been shown to be a significant, if not the major, factor in erectile mechanics, with recent haemodynamic studies on fresh and defrosted human cadavers showing rigid erections despite the lack of endothelial activity. Reports on revascularisation surgery support its utility in treating arterial trauma in young males, and with localised arterial occlusive disease in the older man. Penile venous stripping surgery has been shown to be beneficial in correcting veno-occlusive dysfunction, with outstanding results. The traditional complications of irreversible penile numbness and deformity have been virtually eliminated, with the venous ligation technique superseding venous cautery. Penile vascular reconstructive surgery is viable if, and only if, the surgical handling is appropriate using a sound method. It should be a promising option in the near future. PMID:26558090

  17. Distal corpus cavernosum fibrosis and erectile dysfunction secondary to non-ischaemic priapism.

    PubMed

    Zacharakis, Evangelos; Ralph, David J; Walkden, Miles; Muneer, Asif

    2015-09-01

    Non-ischaemic priapism is a rare type of priapism and is associated with penile or perineal trauma. The absence of ischaemia should theoretically prevent smooth muscle necrosis and corporal fibrosis which occurs in ischaemic priapism. The aim of this study was to first report a patient series with non-ischaemic priapism that developed distal corpus cavernosum fibrosis and erectile dysfunction. Over a 5 year period, a cohort of 6 patients diagnosed with non-ischaemic priapism presented to a single centre. The diagnosis was based on a clinical history, penile examination with confirmation using a combination of cavernosal blood gas analysis, colour duplex ultrasonography of the penis and angiography. Patients were followed up in clinic at regular intervals with clinical examination and repeat imaging. Following a median follow up of 4 weeks (range 2-12) the patients reported either the development of erectile dysfunction with distal penile flaccidity. Five patients required the use of PDE-5 inhibitors to achieve full tumescence. The remaining patient eventually underwent insertion of a penile prosthesis due to the failure of pharmacotherapies. Based on these findings we suggest that superselective embolisation of non-ischaemic priapism cases occasionally should be performed after a shorter period of conservative treatment. PMID:26428655

  18. Serum testosterone levels in diabetic men with and without erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Ghazi, S; Zohdy, W; Elkhiat, Y; Shamloul, R

    2012-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a common chronic disease, affecting 0.5-2% worldwide. The Massachusetts Male Aging Study reported that up to 75% of men with diabetes have a lifetime risk of developing ED. Type 2 diabetes is associated with low total serum testosterone (TT) identified in several cross-sectional studies and systemic analyses. There is a lack of consensus regarding what constitutes the lowest level of testosterone within the boundaries of normality. In this retrospective study, we sought to evaluate the effect of associated co-morbidities on serum total testosterone (TT) level in men with type 2 diabetes DM, either with or without erectile dysfunction (ED). Three hundred and ninety-one patients were evaluated for erectile function using an abridged, five-item version of the International Index of Erectile Function-5. Measurements of TT, fasting lipid profile, blood sugar and glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) were conducted. Penile hemodynamics was assessed using intracavernosal injection and penile duplex study. Hypogonadism was found in 126 cases (33.2%), and normal TT was observed in 254 (66.8%). ED was detected in 119 cases in the hypogonadal group (94.4%) as compared to 155/254 (61.0%) in eugonadal group, P = 0.0001. TT was lower in diabetic men with ED as compared to those with normal erectile function (EF), 392.4 ± 314.9 versus 524.3 ± 140.2 ng dl(-1) , respectively, P < 0.0001. After exclusion of patients with hypertension and dyslipidaemia, 185 men were evaluated, and there was no difference in the mean TT level among men with ED 490.6 ± 498.2 ng dl(-1) versus normal EF 540.6 ± 133.4 ng dl(-1) although, HbA1c remained lower in men with normal erectile function. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of TT in men without associated co-morbidities showed that EF was compromised at TT = 403.5 ng dl(-1) or less. Sensitivity of 63.3% and a specificity of 94.0% were detected. At this level, ED was found in 33/38 (86.8%) men with TT 403.5 ng dl(-1) , whereas ED was observed in 57/147 (38.8%) men with TT ? 403.5 ng dl(-1) (P < 0.0001). We propose a cut-off value of 403.5 ng dl(-1) of TT blood levels as an indicator for initiation of testosterone replacement therapy in diabetic men with ED. Further prospective controlled trials are recommended. PMID:22471752

  19. Erectile Dysfunction

    MedlinePLUS

    ... go untreated. Your doctor can offer several new treatments for ED. For many men, the answer is as simple as taking a pill. Getting more exercise, losing weight, or stopping smoking may also help. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  20. Erectile Dysfunction

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Over time, blood vessels and nerves in the penis can become damaged. ED can also be caused ... prescription pills Putting medicine called prostaglandins into your penis Using a vacuum tube and pump to draw ...

  1. Erectile Dysfunction

    MedlinePLUS

    ... priorities, and trends Funding Process Tips for applicants; human subjects research information; grant review and management resources; and commonly used funding mechanisms, including diversity and ...

  2. Efficacies of Papaverine and Sildenafil in the Treatment of Erectile Dysfunction in Early-Stage Paraplegic Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yildiz, Necmettin; Gokkaya, Nilufer Kutay Ordu; Koseoglu, Fusun; Gokkaya, Serkan; Comert, Didem

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine which vasoactive agent was more efficacious for erectile dysfunction (ED), intracavernosal papaverine or oral sildenafil, in paraplegic men within the first year after injury by using a penile color Doppler ultrasound as a quantitative imaging method and to determine the association between responses to these…

  3. Erectile Dysfunction in Chronic Hemodialysis Patients in Dakar: a Cross-Sectional Study in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Ka, Elhadj Fary; Seck, Sidy Mohamed; Cisse, Mouhamadou Moustapha; Lemraboot, Ahmeth Tall Ould; Faye, Maria; Niang, Abdou; Diouf, Boucar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) experience multiple complications including erectile dysfunction (ED). It involves more than 50% of patients on dialysis or transplant. In Africa, the true extent of ED in CKD is unknown although some studies have been done in this regard. Objectives: This study aimed to determine the prevalence and identify risk factors of ED in patients on hemodialysis. Patients and Methods: This cross-sectional multicenter study was conducted from January 2, 2012 through April 30, 2012 in four hemodialysis centers in Dakar. We included all patients on chronic hemodialysis who aged ? 18 years old and freely consented to participate in the study. Sociodemographic, clinical, and hemodialysis data were collected through a questionnaire. Erectile function was assessed by a short version of International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5). Results: Among a target of 80 patients, 73 met the inclusion criteria and were included in this study. Mean dialysis vintage was 27.3 months (range, 1-156). Their mean age was 53.81 ± 12.52 years, with a higher proportion of age group of 50 to 69 years old. Fifty-six patients were married (37 monogamous and 19 polygamous) and six were singles. Overall prevalence of ED was 84.9% and it was severe in 14 patients (19.2%). Hypertension and diabetes were the most frequent etiologies and antihypertensive treatment was used in 95.5%. The main factors associated with ED were age > 50 years old and polygamy. Conclusions: ED is a common problem among patients on hemodialysis in Dakar with a high prevalence. Aging and diabetes represent most common causes. More efforts are needed for its early detection, prevention, and multidisciplinary management. PMID:25738113

  4. Relationship between Arginase 1 and Arginase 2 levels and genetic polymorphisms with erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Lacchini, Riccardo; Muniz, Jaqueline J; Nobre, Yuri T D A; Cologna, Adauto J; Martins, Antonio C P; Tanus-Santos, Jose E

    2015-12-01

    Arginase 1 and Arginase 2 are homologous enzymes that convert l-Arginine to Urea and l-ornithine and compete with nitric oxide synthases for l-Arginine. Increased Arginase 1 and 2 activity may reduce nitric oxide production by the endothelium in disease states, including erectile dysfunction (ED). Here we aimed at assessing whether Arginase 1 and 2 plasma levels, plasma arginase activity, or genetic factors are associated with ED risk and severity. Blood samples were collected from healthy controls (n = 106) and from patients with ED (n = 110) after completion of the IIEF questionnaire (international index of erectile function). Plasma Arginase 1 and 2 concentrations were assessed by ELISA, while plasma arginase activity was measured by spectrophotometry. Genotypes of ARG1 (rs2781659, rs2781667, rs2246012 and rs17599586) and ARG2 (rs3742879 and rs10483801) were determined by Taqman genotyping assays by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Increased Arginase 2 concentrations were found in clinical ED and are associated with increased risk for ED. ARG1 rs2781659 AA and rs2781667 TT genotypes are associated with lower IIEF scores (higher severity) only in clinical ED. Similarly, the ARG1 GTCC haplotype is associated with higher IIEF scores in clinical ED. This study shows that plasma Arginase 2 concentrations may serve as risk factor for ED. Besides, Arginase 1 genetic variations affect ED severity. PMID:26537638

  5. Erectile dysfunction and sexual health after radical prostatectomy: impact of sexual motivation.

    PubMed

    Messaoudi, R; Menard, J; Ripert, T; Parquet, H; Staerman, F

    2011-01-01

    The life expectancy of patients with localized prostate cancer at treatment initiation has increased, and post-treatment quality of life has become a key issue. The aim of this study is to assess the impact of Radical prostatectomy (RP) on patients' sexual health and satisfaction according to sexual motivation using a self-administered questionnaire completed by two groups of RP patients, with high or lower levels of sexual motivation. A total of 63 consecutive patients were included (mean age, 63.9 years), of whom 74.6% were being treated for erectile dysfunction (ED). After RP, patients reported lower sexual desire (52.4%), reduced intercourse frequency (79.4%), anorgasmia (39.7%), less satisfying orgasm (38.1%), climacturia (25.4%), greater distress (68.3%) and/or lower partner satisfaction (56.5%). Among the most sexually motivated patients, 76.0% reported loss of masculine identity, 52% loss of self-esteem and 36.0% anxiety about performance. These rates were lower among less motivated patients (52.6, 28.9, and 18.4%, respectively). Mean overall satisfaction score was 4.8 ± 2.9. The score was significantly lowered in motivated than less motivated patients (3.4 vs 5.8) (P = 0.001). In conclusion, RP adversely affected erectile and orgasmic functions but also sexual desire, self-esteem and masculinity. The more motivated patients experienced greater distress and were less satisfied. PMID:21471982

  6. Development of UK recommendations on treatment for post-surgical erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, M G; White, I D; Butcher, J; Challacombe, B; Coe, J; Grover, L; Hegarty, P; Jackson, G; Lowndes, A; Payne, H; Rees, J; Sangar, V; Thompson, A

    2014-01-01

    Aim To develop a management strategy (rehabilitation programme) for postsurgical erectile dysfunction (ED) among men experiencing ED associated with treatment of prostate, bladder or rectal cancer that is suitable for use in a UK NHS healthcare context. Methods PubMed literature searches of ED management together with a survey of 13 experts in the management of ED from across the UK were conducted. Results Data from 37 articles and completed questionnaires were collated. The results discussed in this study demonstrate improved objective and subjective clinical outcomes for physical parameters, sexual satisfaction, and rates of both spontaneous erections and those associated with ED treatment strategies. Conclusion Based on the literature and survey analysis, recommendations are proposed for the standardisation of management strategies employed for postsurgical ED. PMID:24188207

  7. Investigating the effect of erectile dysfunction on the lives of men: a qualitative research study.

    PubMed

    Pontin, David; Porter, Tim; McDonagh, Ruraidh

    2002-03-01

    1. The aim of this project was to identify and explore the issues facing men who live with erectile dysfunction (ED), in particular men's' relationships with women partners and men's interactions with the wider world. 2. In order to gain an understanding of their everyday lives, a qualitative research design was used. This is an account of the interpretation and analysis of nine interviews with men living with ED that were carried out during the autumn of 1997. 3. The analysis identified two main themes, 'loss' and 'being alone with it'; with meta-categories 'making sense of it' and 'telling other people', and 'place of sex'. The latter acts as a bridge between the two themes. 4. The implications for nursing practice are considered and recommendations are made for practice, education and research. PMID:11903726

  8. Korean Society for Sexual Medicine and Andrology (KSSMA) Guideline on Erectile Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Ji Kan; Cho, Kang Su; Kim, Su Jin; Oh, Kyung Jin; Kam, Sung Chul; Seo, Kyung Keun; Shin, Hong Seok

    2013-01-01

    In February 2011, the Korean Society for Sexual Medicine and Andrology (KSSMA) realized the necessity of developing a guideline on erectile dysfunction (ED) appropriate for the local context, and established a committee for the development of a guideline on ED. As many international guidelines based on objective evidence are available, the committee decided to adapt these guidelines for local needs instead of developing a new guideline. Considering the extensive research activities on ED in Korea, data with a high level of evidence among those reported by Korean researchers have been collected and included in the guideline development process. The latest KSSMA guideline on ED has been developed for urologists. The KSSMA hopes that this guideline will help urologists in clinical practice. PMID:24044105

  9. A proteomic analysis using an animal model for hyperlipidemia-related erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Y-G; Lee, H; Lee, S; Chung, H K; Kang, K K; Kim, S H

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the pathogenesis of hyperlipidemia-related erectile dysfunction and the effects of DA-8159, a new phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor, on protein expression, we performed a proteomic analysis of differentially expressed proteins in the corpus cavernosum of hyperlipidemic rats by two-dimensional electrophoresis-mass spectrometry. Rats were fed high-cholesterol diet and treated with 5?mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) DA-8159 concurrently. After 5 months apparent hyperlipidemia and significantly decreased maximal intra-cavernous pressure were observed in the control group with the alteration of 8 proteins, which were restored by DA-8159 treatment. The proteins whose levels decreased >2-fold and attenuated by DA-8159 were determined alcohol dehydrogenase, aldolase A, annexin 1, and tropomyosin-rat, whereas proteins increased>2-fold and recovered by DA-8159 were found to be aldehyde dehydrogenase complex, guanine deaminase, creatine kinase-B, and phosphoglycerate mutase type B subunit. PMID:24452518

  10. Erectile dysfunction and the internet: drug company manipulation of public and professional opinion.

    PubMed

    Read, John; Mati, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Given that the Internet is now a major source of information regarding health and mental health problems, and that it is in the interest of the pharmaceutical industry to influence public and professional opinion, this study evaluated 70 websites about erectile dysfunction. The 31 drug company-funded websites (44%) were, compared with the 39 websites that are not industry funded, significantly more biased toward biological factors in general, and toward medication in particular (p < .01). The high proportion of websites that are industry sponsored, and the bias of those websites, confirms previous studies on depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, schizophrenia, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and demonstrates that drug companies are using their financial might to manipulate public and professional opinion on the Internet. PMID:23672238

  11. [Treatment of erectile dysfunction in patients with chronic prostatitis using vibromagnetic lazer].

    PubMed

    Tereshin, A T; Sosnovski?, I B; Dmitrenko, G D; Tret'iakov, A A

    2012-01-01

    The study was aimed to evaluation of the effectiveness of vibromagnitic lazer therapy (VMLT) of erectile dysfunction (ED) in patients with chronic prostatitis (CP). The study included 40 patients with CP, aged 22 to 45 years. CP duration ranged from 6 months to 9 years, ED--from 6 months to 7 years. All the patients underwent a survey on "Chart of sexological examination of man" with the calculation of sex constitution index, an transrectal ultrasonography of prostate gland (PG), uroflowmetry, clinical and functional assessment of components of the copulatory interval, and assessment of blood plasma concentrations of peptide and steroid hormones. All patients underwent a psychotherapeutic correction of sexual disadaptation, sex therapy using Masters-Johnson, Kaplan, and Lo Piccolo methods, and VMLT using "Matrix-Urologist" device. The control group included 20 healthy men aged 22 to 45 years. All studies were performed Before and 30 days after the end of the last VMLT session. As a result of the treatment, integral IIEF indicators were normalized in 60% of patients, the volume of the prostate--in 70%, hemodynamics in the phase of relaxation and erection--in 70%, venous blood flow in the PG--in 70%, dorsal artery hemodynamics in the phase of relaxation and erection--in 60%, and penile hemodynamics--in 60% of patients. Voiding bladder function was optimized in 75% of patients. The functional activity of the pituitary-adrenal-testicular system returned to normal level in 60% of patients. 1 year after treatment, sexual function was maintained at attained levels in 47.5% of patients. As a matter of findings, it was concluded that VMLT is high effective method of combined non-pharmacological correction of erectile dysfunction in CP patients with strong and medium sex constitution. PMID:23342618

  12. Preserved fertility despite erectile dysfunction in mice lacking the nitric oxide receptor

    PubMed Central

    Groneberg, Dieter; Lies, Barbara; König, Peter; Jäger, Ronald; Friebe, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and cGMP have been shown to be important mediators of penile erection. Erectile dysfunction may result from reduced or non-functional signal transduction within this cascade. There is, however, some inconsistency in the available data as mice lacking NO synthases (endothelial and neuronal nitric oxide synthase, or both) appear to be fertile whereas mice deficient in cGMP-dependent protein kinase I (PKGI) suffer from erectile dysfunction. To clarify this discrepancy we performed studies on mice lacking the NO receptor NO-sensitive guanylyl cyclase (NO-GC). In addition, we generated cell-specific NO-GC knockout (KO) lines to investigate the function of NO in individual cell types. NO-GC was specifically deleted in smooth muscle or endothelial cells (SM-guanylyl cyclase knockout (SM-GCKO) and EC-GCKO, respectively) and these KO lines were compared with total knockouts (GCKO) and wild-type animals. We investigated expression of NO-GC, NO-induced relaxation of corpus cavernosum smooth muscle and their ability to generate offspring. NO-GC-positive immunostaining was detected in smooth muscle and endothelial cells of murine corpus cavernosum but not in interstitial cells of Cajal. NO released from NO donors as well as from nitrergic neurons failed to relax precontracted corpus cavernosum from GCKO mice in organ bath experiments. Similar results were obtained in corpus cavernosum from SM-GCKO mice whereas deletion of NO-GC in endothelial cells did not affect relaxation. The lack of NO-induced relaxation in GCKO animals was not compensated for by guanosine 3?,5?-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) signalling. To our surprise, GCKO males were fertile although their ability to produce offspring was decreased. Our data show that deletion of NO-GC specifically in smooth muscle cells abolishes NO-induced corpus cavernosum relaxation but does not lead to infertility. PMID:23129789

  13. Association between erectile dysfunction and coronary artery disease and it's severity

    PubMed Central

    Sai Ravi Shanker, A.; Phanikrishna, B.; Bhaktha Vatsala Reddy, C.

    2013-01-01

    Background/aims To investigate the prevalence of erectile dysfunction (ED) in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), its relationship between the severity of ED and the extent of coronary vessel involvement and to register the mean time interval between them. Methods 240 patients with CAD divided into three age-matched groups: Group 1 (n = 60), ACS with one-vessel disease (1VD); group 2 (n = 60), ACS with 2,3VD; group 3 (n = 60), CSA. Control group (C, n = 60) was composed of patients with suspected CAD who were found to have entirely normal coronary arteries by angiography. ED as any value <26 according to the Gensini's scores and according to the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF). Results ED prevalence was 76%. ED prevalence was lower in G1 vs. G3 (22 vs.65%). G2 ED rate [55%, P < 0.0001] IIEF = 24 (17–29) & Gensini's scores-21 (12.5–32) were significantly different from G1 and similar to G3, ED in ACS differs according to the extent of CAD. G3 patients who had ED symptoms prior to CAD symptoms and time interval between ED and CAD symptom onset in CCS according to number of vessels. Onset of sexual dysfunction occurred before CAD onset with a mean time interval of 24 m [12–36]. Conclusion Early diagnosis of ED, cardiovascular assessment and aggressive treatment of cardiovascular risk factors might have contributed to prevent the acute events of this patient. Patients should be systematically screened for ED as a part of periodic examination programs. This would lead to early detection of modifiable vascular risk factors, or already existing vascular disease and to prevent ED and vascular disease progression through pharmacological and life style modifications. PMID:23647898

  14. Abnormal Cytokine Profile in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea-Hypopnea Syndrome and Erectile Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Bouloukaki, Izolde; Papadimitriou, Vaios; Sofras, Frank; Mermigkis, Charalampos; Moniaki, Violeta; Siafakas, Nikolaos M.; Schiza, Sophia E.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) show a high prevalence of erectile dysfunction (ED). Although the underlying pathogenesis is still unknown, endothelial dysfunction, induced by inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and adhesion molecules, has been proposed as a possible mechanism. The aim of this study was to assess whether OSAHS is associated with activation of the inflammatory cytokine system in patients with ED compared to the matched OSAHS patients with normal sexual function. Thirty-one patients with severe OSAHS and ED were included. Fifteen patients with severe OSAHS and without ED served as controls. Serum concentrations of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-a), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8), and adiponectin were measured after the diagnostic polysomnography. We found that hsCRP levels were significantly elevated in OSAHS patients with ED compared to controls. Similarly, TNF-a levels, IL-6, and IL-8 were elevated in OSAHS patients with ED compared to controls. Serum adiponectin levels were lower in OSAHS-ED patients, but the difference did not reach statistical significance. The presence of ED in patients with severe OSAHS is associated with elevated levels of inflammatory markers, underlining a possible involvement of endothelial dysfunction in the pathogenesis of ED. PMID:24966468

  15. The future is today: emerging drugs for the treatment of erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Albersen, Maarten; Shindel, Alan; Mwamukonda, Kuwong; Lue, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Erectile Dysfunction (ED) is the most common male sexual dysfunction presented for treatment, and the most thoroughly studied sexual dysfunction in men. In the late 20th century, important discoveries were made regarding both the physiologic processes of penile erection and the pathophysiology of ED. These discoveries led to the commercial introduction of the phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (PDE5I), a class of medications which now accounts for the largest segment of the ED market. While these drugs are highly efficacious for many men, a relatively large subset of ED patients who do not respond to PDE5I has been identified. Recognition of this subset of the ED population and the ageing of the population has driven researchers to investigate novel treatment targets for ED. Increased research efforts have resulted in the development of several orally available compounds that combine high efficacy with low rates of adverse events. In this review we report on various compounds that regulate penile erection both centrally (Clavulanic acid, Dopamine and Melanocortin receptor agonists) and peripherally (novel PDE5I, soluble and particulate Guanylil Cyclase activators, Rho-kinase inhibitors and Maxi-K channel openers), and discuss the preclinical and clinical evidence supporting the development of these emerging drugs for ED. PMID:20415601

  16. Structural insights into aberrant cortical morphometry and network organization in psychogenic erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lu; Guan, Min; Zhang, Xiangsheng; Karama, Sherif; Khundrakpam, Budhachandra; Wang, Meiyun; Dong, Minghao; Qin, Wei; Tian, Jie; Evans, Alan C; Shi, Dapeng

    2015-11-01

    Functional neuroimaging studies have revealed abnormal brain dynamics of male sexual arousal (SA) in psychogenic erectile dysfunction (pED). However, the neuroanatomical correlates of pED are still unclear. In this work, we obtained cortical thickness (CTh) measurements from structural magnetic resonance images of 40 pED patients and 39 healthy control subjects. Abnormalities in CTh related to pED were explored using a scale space search based brain morphometric analysis. Organizations of brain structural covariance networks were analyzed as well. Compared with healthy men, pED patients showed significantly decreased CTh in widespread cortical regions, most of which were previously reported to show abnormal dynamics of male SA in pED, such as the medial prefrontal, orbitofrontal, cingulate, inferotemporal, and insular cortices. CTh reductions in these areas were found to be significantly correlated with male sexual functioning degradation. Moreover, pED patients showed decreased interregional CTh correlations from the right lateral orbitofrontal cortex to the right supramarginal gyrus and the left angular cortex, implying disassociations between the cognitive, motivational, and inhibitory networks of male SA in pED. This work provides structural insights on the complex phenomenon of psychogenic sexual dysfunction in men, and suggests a specific vulnerability factor, possibly as an extra "organic" factor, that may play an important role in pED. Hum Brain Mapp 36:4469-4482, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26264575

  17. Low-Intensity Shock Wave Therapy and Its Application to Erectile Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Hongen; Liu, Jing; Li, Huixi; Wang, Lin; Xu, Yongde; Tian, Wenjie; Lin, Guiting

    2013-01-01

    Although phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (PDE5Is) are a revolution in the treatment of erectile dysfunction (ED) and have been marketed since 1998, they cannot restore pathological changes in the penis. Low-energy shock wave therapy (LESWT) has been developed for treating ED, and clinical studies have shown that LESWT has the potential to affect PDE5I non-responders with ED with few adverse effects. Animal studies have shown that LESWT significantly improves penile hemodynamics and restores pathological changes in the penis of diabetic ED animal models. Although the mechanisms remain to be investigated, recent studies have reported that LESWT could partially restore corpus cavernosum fibromuscular pathological changes, endothelial dysfunction, and peripheral neuropathy. LESWT could be a novel modality for treating ED, and particularly PDE5I non-responders with organic ED, in the near future. However, further extensive evidence-based basic and clinical studies are needed. This review intends to summarize the scientific background underlying the effect of LESWT on ED. PMID:24459653

  18. Lichen Simplex Chronicus Associated With Erectile Dysfunction: A Population-Based Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Juan, Chao-Kuei; Chen, Hsuan-Ju; Shen, Jui-Lung; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Background An association between lichen simplex chronicus (LSC) and sexual dysfunction was explored. However, no data are available from investigations into the relationship between erectile dysfunction (ED) and LSC. Objectives This retrospective population-based cohort study aimed to clarify the risk of ED associated with LSC. Methods By using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research dataset, we identified 5611 male patients who had been newly diagnosed with LSC from 2000 to 2004. The date of diagnosis was identified as the index date. LSC patients with incomplete demographic information or with a history of ED before the index date were excluded. In total, 22444 age-matched patients without LSC were randomly selected as the non-LSC group based on a 1:4 ratio. Subsequence occurrence of ED was measured until 2011. The association between LSC and the risk of developing ED was estimated using Cox proportional hazard regression model. Results After adjusting for age and comorbidities, patients with LSC had a 1.74-fold greater risk of developing ED compared with those without LSC (95% confidence interval=1.44–2.10). LSC patients with comorbidities including diabetes, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, peripheral arterial disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, chronic kidney disease, depression, and anxiety were at a higher risk of ED compared with the non-LSC patients without comorbidities. Conclusions LSC confers a greater risk in the development of ED. Physicians should be aware of the potential of ED occurrence in LSC patients. PMID:26076496

  19. A double blind, randomised study of sildenafil citrate for erectile dysfunction in men with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, C; Miller, J; Sharief, M; Hussain, I; Stecher, V; Sweeney, M

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Identifying and effectively treating erectile dysfunction (ED) can result in an improvement of the quality of life (QoL) in men with multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods: This randomised, double blind (DB), placebo controlled, flexible dose study with an open label extension (OLE) assessed efficacy, QoL, and safety of sildenafil citrate in men with MS and ED. Overall, 217 men received sildenafil (25–100 mg; n = 104) or placebo (n = 113) for 12 weeks. Efficacy was assessed by the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) questionnaire that includes questions on achieving (Q3) and maintaining (Q4) an erection as well as a global efficacy question (GEQ). QoL was also assessed. Results: After 12 weeks, patients receiving sildenafil had higher mean scores for IIEF Q3 and Q4 compared with those receiving placebo (p<0.0001), and 89% (92/103) reported improved erections compared with 24% (27/112) of patients receiving placebo (p<0.0001). At the end of the OLE phase, 95% of men reported improved erections. Patients receiving placebo during the DB phase showed a nearly fourfold increase in improved erections (97% v 26%). Men receiving sildenafil also showed improvements in five of the eight general QoL questions compared with men receiving placebo (p<0.05). The total mean score for the QoL questionnaire improved by 43% for the sildenafil group versus 13% for the placebo group (p<0.0001). Treatment related AEs were predominantly mild in nature, and no patient discontinued due to an AE. Conclusion: Sildenafil treatment for ED in men with MS was effective and well tolerated, and resulted in significant improvements in both general and disease specific QoL variables. PMID:15834030

  20. Can Erectile Dysfunction in Young Patients Serve as a Surrogate Marker for Coronary Artery Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Dattatrya, Kaje Yogesh; Gorakhnath, Wagaska Vinayak; kiran, Patwardhan Sujata

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Early diagnosis and expeditious management of coronary artery disease (CAD) has a rewarding survival benefit. Aim To study whether erectile dysfunction (ED) serves as a surrogate marker for CAD in a young patient. Settings and Design Males (n=207) between ages 20-60 years with ED were evaluated prospectively for risk factors for CAD. Materials and Methods Blood Glucose Levels (BGL) fasting and post meal), lipid profile (LP) and 12 lead electrocardiogram (ECG) was done in all of them. International Index of Erectile Function-5 (IEF-5) was used for the evaluation of ED. Those with abnormal parameters were assessed by cardiologists by echocardiography, stress test and if necessary coronary angiography (Non-Invasive or Invasive). Statistical Analysis All the data were analysed using SPSS. 16 statistical software (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). All data are expressed as mean and standard deviation. The Student’s t-test was used to compare means between groups, and the chi-square test was used to compare proportions between the groups. P-value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. All confidence intervals (CIs) are two tailed and calculated at the 0.05 level. Results Out of 207, 149 patients had at least one abnormal screening parameter. All underwent cardiology consultation and 2D ECHO and Stress test. Thirty six patients underwent coronary angiography. CAD was found in 22 patients. Of these, 19 patients had severe ED. Nine patients were between 20-40 years of age (13.23%). All 9 young patients had deranged LP; severe ED. Six patients were smokers while nobody was hypertensive. Conclusion ED serves as a surrogate marker for CAD in young patients (p=0.001). Presence of risk factors and lab abnormalities in young patients with ED warrants a cardiology referral to detect CAD. PMID:26674799

  1. Tadalafil for Prevention of Erectile Dysfunction After Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group [0831] Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Pisansky, Thomas M.; Pugh, Stephanie L.; Greenberg, Richard E.; Pervez, Nadeem; Reed, Daniel R.; Rosenthal, Seth A.; Mowat, Rex B.; Raben, Adam; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Kachnic, Lisa A.; Bruner, Deborah W.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Tadalafil is used to treat erectile dysfunction after prostate cancer treatment, but its role as a preventive agent is undefined. OBJECTIVES To determine primarily whether tadalafil preserved erectile function in men treated with radiotherapy for prostate cancer, and secondarily to determine whether participant- or partner-reported overall sexual function and sexual and marital satisfaction were affected. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Stratified, placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel-group study with 1:1 randomization at 76 community-based and tertiary medical sites in the United States and Canada. Two hundred forty-two participants with intact erectile function scheduled to receive radiotherapy for prostate cancer were recruited between November 2009 and February 2012 with follow-up through March 2013. INTERVENTIONS One hundred twenty-one participants were assigned 5 mg of tadalafil daily and 121 were assigned placebo for 24 weeks starting with external radiotherapy (63%) or brachytherapy (37%). Participant-reported International Index of Erectile Function response before radiotherapy and at weeks 2 and 4, between weeks 20 and 24, between weeks 28 and 30, and 1 year thereafter. Participants and partners could respond also to the Sexual Adjustment Questionnaire and to the Locke Marital Adjustment Test before radiotherapy, between weeks 20 and 24 and weeks 28 and 30, and at 1 year. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Primary outcome was off-drug spontaneous erectile function 28 to 30 weeks after radiotherapy started. Secondary end points were spontaneous erection at 1 year; overall sexual function and satisfaction; marital adjustment; and partner-reported satisfaction and marital adjustment at 28 to 30 weeks and 1 year, predictors of tadalafil response; and adverse events. RESULTS Among 221 evaluable participants, 80 (79%; 95% CI, 70%–88%) assigned to receive tadalafil retained erectile function between weeks 28 and 30 compared with 61 (74%; 95% CI, 63%–85%) assigned to receive placebo (P = .49); an absolute difference of 5% (95% CI, ?9% to 19%). A significant difference was also not observed at 1 year (72%; 95% CI, 60%–84% vs 71%; 95% CI, 59%–84%; P = .93). Tadalafil was not associated with significantly improved overall sexual function or satisfaction; a significant difference was not observed in any domain subscale. Partners of men assigned tadalafil noted no significant effect on sexual satisfaction, and marital adjustment was not significantly improved in participants or partners. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Amongmen undergoing radiotherapy for prostate cancer, daily use of tadalafil compared with placebo did not result in improved erectile function. These findings do not support daily use of tadalafil to prevent erectile dysfunction in these patients. TRIAL REGISTRATION clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00931528 PMID:24691606

  2. Aberrant Topological Patterns of Structural Cortical Networks in Psychogenic Erectile Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lu; Guan, Min; Zhu, Xiaobo; Karama, Sherif; Khundrakpam, Budhachandra; Wang, Meiyun; Dong, Minghao; Qin, Wei; Tian, Jie; Evans, Alan C.; Shi, Dapeng

    2015-01-01

    Male sexual arousal (SA) has been known as a multidimensional experience involving closely interrelated and coordinated neurobehavioral components that rely on widespread brain regions. Recent functional neuroimaging studies have shown relation between abnormal/altered dynamics in these circuits and male sexual dysfunction. However, alterations in the topological1 organization of structural brain networks in male sexual dysfunction are still unclear. Here, we used graph theory2 to investigate the topological properties of large-scale structural brain networks, which were constructed using inter-regional correlations of cortical thickness between 78 cortical regions in 40 patients with psychogenic erectile dysfunction (pED) and 39 normal controls. Compared with normal controls, pED patients exhibited a less optimal global topological organization with reduced global and increased local efficiencies. Our results suggest disrupted neural integration among distant brain regions in pED patients, consistent with previous reports of impaired white matter structure and abnormal functional integrity in pED. Additionally, disrupted global network topology in pED was observed to be primarily relevant to altered subnetwork and nodal properties within the networks mediating the cognitive, motivational and inhibitory processes of male SA, possibly indicating disrupted integration of these networks in the whole brain networks and might account for pED patients' abnormal cognitive, motivational and inhibitory processes for male SA. In total, our findings provide evidence for disrupted integrity in large-scale brain networks underlying the neurobehavioral processes of male SA in pED and provide new insights into the understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of pED.

  3. The application of color Doppler flow imaging in the diagnosis and therapeutic effect evaluation of erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Xu-Jun; Bai, Gang; Zhang, Cai-Xia; Xu, Chao; Lu, Fu-Ding; Peng, Yang; Ma, Gang; Han, Cong-Hui; Chen, Jun

    2016-01-01

    We aim to investigate the correlations between hemodynamic parameters, penile rigidity grading, and the therapeutic effects of phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors using color Doppler flow imaging after intracavernosal injection in patients with erectile dysfunction. This study involved 164 patients. After intracavernosal injection with a mixture of papaverine (60 mg), prostaglandin E 1 (10 mg), and lidocaine (2%, 0.5-1 ml), the penile vessels were assessed using color Doppler flow imaging. Penile rigidity was classified based on the Erection Hardness Score system as Grades 4, 3, 2 or 1 (corresponding to Schramek Grades V to II). Then, the patients were given oral sildenafil (50-100 mg) and scored according to the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5) questionnaire. The number of patients with penile rigidities of Schramek Grades II to V was 14, 18, 21, and 111, respectively. The IIEF-5 score was positively correlated with the refilling index of the penile cavernosal artery (r = 0.79, P< 0.05), the peak systolic velocity (r = 0.45, P< 0.05), and penile rigidity (r = 0.75, P< 0.05), and was negatively correlated with the end diastolic velocity (r = -0.74, P< 0.05). For patients with erectile dysfunction, both the IIEF-5 score after sildenafil administration, which is correlated with penile rigidity, and the hemodynamic parameters detected using color Doppler flow imaging may predict the effects of phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor treatment and could provide a reasonable model for the targeted-treatment of erectile dysfunction. PMID:25994651

  4. Malaysian cultural differences in knowledge, attitudes and practices related to erectile dysfunction: focus group discussions.

    PubMed

    Low, W Y; Wong, Y L; Zulkifli, S N; Tan, H M

    2002-12-01

    This qualitative study aimed to examine cultural differences in knowledge, attitudes and practices related to erectile dysfunction (ED) utilizing focus group discussion. Six focus groups consisting of 66 men, 45-70-y-old were conducted-two Malay groups (n=18), two Chinese groups (n=25) and two Indian groups (n=23). Participants were purposely recruited from the general public on a voluntary basis with informed consent. Transcripts were analyzed using qualitative data analysis software ATLASti. The Malay and Chinese traditional remedies for preventing or treating ED are commonly recognized among all races. Many have a negative perception of someone with ED. Malay and Chinese men tended to blame their wife for their problem and thought that the problem might lead to extra-marital affairs, unlike the Indian men who attributed their condition to fate. Malays would prefer traditional medicine for the problem. The Chinese felt they would be more comfortable with a male doctor whilst this is not so with the Malays or Indians. Almost all prefer the doctor to initiate discussion on sexual issues related to their medical condition. There is a need for doctors to consider cultural perspectives in a multicultural society as a lack of understanding of this often contributes to an inadequate consultation. PMID:12494275

  5. Erectile dysfunction following Nd-YAG visual laser-assisted prostatectomy (VLAP).

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Laufer, M; Kaver, I; Braf, Z; Matzkin, H

    1998-03-01

    We investigated if side fire Nd-YAG visual laser prostatectomy (VLAP) causes erectile dysfunction (ED) in patients who were sexually active prior to the procedure. The 36 study patients gave a detailed medical/sexual history: physical examination included bulbo-cavernous reflex (BCR) on rectal examination and routine blood tests. Lasing time, power of the applied laser beam (in watts), coagulation site and energy intensity were recorded. Patients with new onset ED during the one year study period underwent pudendal nerve conduction (PNC), color duplex Doppler ultrasonography, and NPT/RigiScan testing. In 6 out of 36 (16.7%) patients reporting significant post-operative ED, there was a tendency towards higher energy applied and longer lasing time but no correlation between prostate size or the site of energy application. Patients reported loss of night and/or morning erections (n = 5), retrograde ejaculations (n = 2), loss of ejaculate (n = 2), and decreased sensation of orgasm (n = 3). Three had abnormal PNC, duplex Doppler showed abnormal blood supply in four, and all six had abnormal NPT/RigiScan. We believe this is the first demonstration that VLAP may be associated with a high rate of ED and that the lasing time and intensity of applied laser energy may play a role in this outcome. PMID:9542689

  6. Cerebral Activity Changes in Different Traditional Chinese Medicine Patterns of Psychogenic Erectile Dysfunction Patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qi; Zhang, Peihai; Pan, Junjie; Li, Zhengjie; Liu, Jixin; Li, Guangsen; Qin, Wei; You, Yaodong; Yu, Xujun; Sun, Jinbo; Dong, Minghao; Gong, Qiyong; Guo, Jun; Chang, Degui

    2015-01-01

    Background. Pattern differentiation is the foundation of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) treatment for erectile dysfunction (ED). This study aims to investigate the differences in cerebral activity in ED patients with different TCM patterns. Methods. 27 psychogenic ED patients and 27 healthy subjects (HS) were enrolled in this study. Each participant underwent an fMRI scan in resting state. The fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (fALFF) was used to detect the brain activity changes in ED patients with different patterns. Results. Compared to HS, ED patients showed an increased cerebral activity in bilateral cerebellum, insula, globus pallidus, parahippocampal gyrus, orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), and middle cingulate cortex (MCC). Compared to the patients with liver-qi stagnation and spleen deficiency pattern (LSSDP), the patients with kidney-yang deficiency pattern (KDP) showed an increased activity in bilateral brainstem, cerebellum, hippocampus, and the right insula, thalamus, MCC, and a decreased activity in bilateral putamen, medial frontal gyrus, temporal pole, and the right caudate nucleus, OFC, anterior cingulate cortex, and posterior cingulate cortex (P < 0.005). Conclusions. The ED patients with different TCM patterns showed different brain activities. The differences in cerebral activity between LSSDP and KDP were mainly in the emotion-related regions, including prefrontal cortex and cingulated cortex. PMID:26180534

  7. An update on new oral PDE5 inhibitors for the treatment of erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Palit, Victor; Eardley, Ian

    2010-11-01

    The management of erectile dysfunction (ED) has been revolutionized by the discovery of phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors, which have been commercially available for more than a decade and are the first-line therapeutic option for men with ED. Sildenafil, vardenafil and tadalafil were approved by the European Medicine Agency and the US FDA for the treatment of ED on the back of their high efficacy rates and favorable safety profiles. However, despite the fact that more than 50 million patients with ED worldwide have been successfully treated with one of these PDE5 inhibitors, some men--most notably those with severe neurologic damage, diabetes mellitus or severe vascular disease--are resistant to the currently available drugs and require more-invasive treatments, such as intracavernosal injection therapy. Partly as a consequence of this, research into alternative therapeutic approaches continues, including the development of new PDE5 inhibitors, centrally acting pharmaceutical agents, and application of molecular technologies such as gene therapy and stem cell therapy. PMID:21068761

  8. Cerebral Activity Changes in Different Traditional Chinese Medicine Patterns of Psychogenic Erectile Dysfunction Patients

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qi; Zhang, Peihai; Pan, Junjie; Li, Zhengjie; Liu, Jixin; Li, Guangsen; Qin, Wei; You, Yaodong; Yu, Xujun; Sun, Jinbo; Dong, Minghao; Gong, Qiyong; Guo, Jun; Chang, Degui

    2015-01-01

    Background. Pattern differentiation is the foundation of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) treatment for erectile dysfunction (ED). This study aims to investigate the differences in cerebral activity in ED patients with different TCM patterns. Methods. 27 psychogenic ED patients and 27 healthy subjects (HS) were enrolled in this study. Each participant underwent an fMRI scan in resting state. The fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (fALFF) was used to detect the brain activity changes in ED patients with different patterns. Results. Compared to HS, ED patients showed an increased cerebral activity in bilateral cerebellum, insula, globus pallidus, parahippocampal gyrus, orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), and middle cingulate cortex (MCC). Compared to the patients with liver-qi stagnation and spleen deficiency pattern (LSSDP), the patients with kidney-yang deficiency pattern (KDP) showed an increased activity in bilateral brainstem, cerebellum, hippocampus, and the right insula, thalamus, MCC, and a decreased activity in bilateral putamen, medial frontal gyrus, temporal pole, and the right caudate nucleus, OFC, anterior cingulate cortex, and posterior cingulate cortex (P < 0.005). Conclusions. The ED patients with different TCM patterns showed different brain activities. The differences in cerebral activity between LSSDP and KDP were mainly in the emotion-related regions, including prefrontal cortex and cingulated cortex. PMID:26180534

  9. Recruiting endogenous stem cells: a novel therapeutic approach for erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Xin, Zhong-Cheng; Xu, Yong-De; Lin, Guiting; Lue, Tom F; Guo, Ying-Lu

    2016-01-01

    Transplanted stem cells (SCs), owing to their regenerative capacity, represent one of the most promising methods to restore erectile dysfunction (ED). However, insufficient source, invasive procedures, ethical and regulatory issues hamper their use in clinical applications. The endogenous SCs/progenitor cells resident in organ and tissues play critical roles for organogenesis during development and for tissue homeostasis in adulthood. Even without any therapeutic intervention, human body has a robust self-healing capability to repair the damaged tissues or organs. Therefore, SCs-for-ED therapy should not be limited to a supply-side approach. The resident endogenous SCs existing in patients could also be a potential target for ED therapy. The aim of this review was to summarize contemporary evidence regarding: (1) SC niche and SC biological features in vitro; (2) localization and mobilization of endogenous SCs; (3) existing evidence of penile endogenous SCs and their possible mode of mobilization. We performed a search on PubMed for articles related to these aspects in a wide range of basic studies. Together, numerous evidences hold the promise that endogenous SCs would be a novel therapeutic approach for the therapy of ED. PMID:25926601

  10. Brain Networks during Free Viewing of Complex Erotic Movie: New Insights on Psychogenic Erectile Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Cera, Nicoletta; Di Pierro, Ezio Domenico; Ferretti, Antonio; Tartaro, Armando; Romani, Gian Luca; Perrucci, Mauro Gianni

    2014-01-01

    Psychogenic erectile dysfunction (ED) is defined as a male sexual dysfunction characterized by a persistent or recurrent inability to attain adequate penile erection due predominantly or exclusively to psychological or interpersonal factors. Previous fMRI studies were based on the common occurrence in the male sexual behaviour represented by the sexual arousal and penile erection related to viewing of erotic movies. However, there is no experimental evidence of altered brain networks in psychogenic ED patients (EDp). Some studies showed that fMRI activity collected during non sexual movie viewing can be analyzed in a reliable manner with independent component analysis (ICA) and that the resulting brain networks are consistent with previous resting state neuroimaging studies. In the present study, we investigated the modification of the brain networks in EDp compared to healthy controls (HC), using whole-brain fMRI during free viewing of an erotic video clip. Sixteen EDp and nineteen HC were recruited after RigiScan evaluation, psychiatric, and general medical evaluations. The performed ICA showed that visual network (VN), default-mode network (DMN), fronto-parietal network (FPN) and salience network (SN) were spatially consistent across EDp and HC. However, between-group differences in functional connectivity were observed in the DMN and in the SN. In the DMN, EDp showed decreased connectivity values in the inferior parietal lobes, posterior cingulate cortex and medial prefrontal cortex, whereas in the SN decreased and increased connectivity was observed in the right insula and in the anterior cingulate cortex respectively. The decreased levels of intrinsic functional connectivity principally involved the subsystem of DMN relevant for the self relevant mental simulation that concerns remembering of past experiences, thinking to the future and conceiving the viewpoint of the other’s actions. Moreover, the between group differences in the SN nodes suggested a decreased recognition of autonomical and sexual arousal changes in EDp. PMID:25126947

  11. Brain networks during free viewing of complex erotic movie: new insights on psychogenic erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Cera, Nicoletta; Di Pierro, Ezio Domenico; Ferretti, Antonio; Tartaro, Armando; Romani, Gian Luca; Perrucci, Mauro Gianni

    2014-01-01

    Psychogenic erectile dysfunction (ED) is defined as a male sexual dysfunction characterized by a persistent or recurrent inability to attain adequate penile erection due predominantly or exclusively to psychological or interpersonal factors. Previous fMRI studies were based on the common occurrence in the male sexual behaviour represented by the sexual arousal and penile erection related to viewing of erotic movies. However, there is no experimental evidence of altered brain networks in psychogenic ED patients (EDp). Some studies showed that fMRI activity collected during non sexual movie viewing can be analyzed in a reliable manner with independent component analysis (ICA) and that the resulting brain networks are consistent with previous resting state neuroimaging studies. In the present study, we investigated the modification of the brain networks in EDp compared to healthy controls (HC), using whole-brain fMRI during free viewing of an erotic video clip. Sixteen EDp and nineteen HC were recruited after RigiScan evaluation, psychiatric, and general medical evaluations. The performed ICA showed that visual network (VN), default-mode network (DMN), fronto-parietal network (FPN) and salience network (SN) were spatially consistent across EDp and HC. However, between-group differences in functional connectivity were observed in the DMN and in the SN. In the DMN, EDp showed decreased connectivity values in the inferior parietal lobes, posterior cingulate cortex and medial prefrontal cortex, whereas in the SN decreased and increased connectivity was observed in the right insula and in the anterior cingulate cortex respectively. The decreased levels of intrinsic functional connectivity principally involved the subsystem of DMN relevant for the self relevant mental simulation that concerns remembering of past experiences, thinking to the future and conceiving the viewpoint of the other's actions. Moreover, the between group differences in the SN nodes suggested a decreased recognition of autonomical and sexual arousal changes in EDp. PMID:25126947

  12. Androgen Deficiency and Erectile Dysfunction in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    El Saghier, Entesar OA; Shebl, Salah E; Fawzy, Olfat A; Eltayeb, Ihab M; Bekhet, Lamya MA; Gharib, Abdelnasser

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The association between type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and low total serum testosterone (LST) has been identified in several cross-sectional studies. OBJECTIVES To assess the prevalence of androgen deficiency and erectile dysfunction (ED) and their relation to glycemic control within a sample of Egyptian men with T2DM. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A cross-sectional study including 70 men having T2DM. Their ages ranged from 30 to 50 years. They were evaluated for symptoms of androgen deficiency and ED, using a validated Arabic-translated Androgen Deficiency in Aging Males questionnaire and five-items version of the International Index of Erectile Function-5, respectively. Total testosterone (TT), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), and prolactin were measured for all study subjects. Penile hemodynamics was assessed using penile duplex study for subjects who gave history of ED. RESULTS LST was found in 40% of studied men, and 92.9% of them reported overt symptoms of androgen deficiency. ED was detected in 85.7% of those with LST, as opposed to 31.0% of those with normal TT (P < 0.000). TT was lower in diabetic men with ED compared to those without ED (12.04 ± 5.36 vs 17.11 ± 7.11 nmol/L, P < 0.001). Significant negative correlation was found between TT and age, body mass index, waist circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, and HBA1c (P < 0.00). FSH, LH, and prolactin levels were within the normal reference range in all subjects. HbA1c was higher in patients who had LST with ED, compared to those with normal TT and without ED. However, multivariate logistic regression analysis did not reveal a significant association between HBA1c and LST levels. CONCLUSION LST, symptoms of androgen deficiency, and ED are common in the studied sample of Egyptian men with T2DM. Inappropriately normal FSH and LH in face of LST may denote a state of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. HBA1c was found to be more significantly associated with ED than with LST. PMID:26244038

  13. Atorvastatin improves erectile dysfunction in patients initially irresponsive to Sildenafil by the activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    El-Sisi, A A; Hegazy, S K; Salem, K A; AbdElkawy, K S

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed at comparing the effects of atorvastatin and vitamin E on erectile dysfunction in patients initially irresponsive to sildenafil, with investigation into the underlying possible mechanisms. Sixty patients were randomly divided into three groups: the atorvastatin group received 80?mg daily, the vitamin E group received 400?IU daily and the control group received placebo capsules. Patients were examined both before and after 6 weeks of treatment for biochemical tests; Superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPO), C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), nitric oxide (NO) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and for erectile function tests; International index of erectile function (IIEF-5) scores and Rigiscan. Both atorvastatin and vitamin E showed a statistically significant GPO increase (P<0.05) and a statistically significant IL-6 decrease (P<0.05). Only atorvastatin showed a statistically significant increase in NO (15.19%, P<0.05), eNOS (20.58%, P<0.01), IIEF-5 score (53.1%, P<0.001) and Rigiscan rigidity parameters (P<0.01), in addition to a statistically significant decrease in CRP (57.9%, P<0.01). However, SOD showed a statistically significant increase only after vitamin E intake (23.1%, P<0.05). Both atorvatstain and vitamin E had antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. Although activating eNOS by atorvastatin was the real difference, and expected to be the main mechanism for NO increase and for improving erectile dysfunction. Atorvastatin, but not vitamin E, is a promising drug for sildenafil nonresponders. PMID:23324897

  14. Mutagenic and antimutagenic effects of the traditional herb used for treating erectile dysfunction, Butea superba Roxb.

    PubMed

    Cherdshewasart, Wichai; Sutjit, Wandee; Pulcharoen, Kade; Chulasiri, Malyn

    2010-01-01

    Butea superba is a traditional tuberous Thai plant enriched with flavonoids that is used for treating erectile dysfunction. We investigated the mutagenic and antimutagenic potentials of a B. superba extract by using the pre-incubation method of the Ames test. Salmonella typhimurium strains TA 98 and TA 100 were applied as the tester strains in the presence and absence of an S9 mixture. Prior to the mutagenic and antimutagenic tests, the survival of the tester strains was measured by treating with the B. superba extract. The results show that the B. superba extract exhibited dose-dependent cytotoxic effects. Data from the Ames test revealed that the B. superba extract to be non-mutagenic in the presence and absence of the S9 mixture. In contrast, the B. superba extract showed antimutagenic potential towards either or both of the tested mutagens: 2-(2-furyl)-3-(5-nitro-2-furyl)-acrylamide (AF-2) and benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P) in the respective presence and absence of the S9 mixture, respectively. The plant antimutagenic activity was confirmed by a rec assay. A further study by micronucleus test demonstrated that the B. superba extract at the maximum loading volume could induce acute micronucleus formation in the tested animals. The in vitro mutagenic and antimutagenic assays confirmed the safe consumption of B. superba products at low dose (not more than 781.25 microg/ml of the plant extract), but the in vivo genotoxic assay demonstrated the unsafe consumption at a high dose (300 mg/kg of the BW plant extract or 16 g/kg of the BW plant powder). PMID:20460693

  15. Nanoethosomal transdermal delivery of vardenafil for treatment of erectile dysfunction: optimization, characterization, and in vivo evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Fahmy, Usama A

    2015-01-01

    Vesicular drug delivery systems have recently gained attention as a way of improving dosing accuracy for drugs with poor transdermal permeation. The current study focuses on utilization of the natural biocompatible vesicles to formulate vardenafil nanoethosomes (VRD-NE), for the enhancement of their transdermal permeation and bioavailability. Fifteen formulations were prepared by thin-layer evaporation technique according to Box–Behnken design to optimize formulation variables. The effects of lipid composition, sonication time, and ethanol concentration on particle size and encapsulation efficiency were studied. The diffusion of vardenafil (VRD) from the prepared nanoethosomes specified by the design was carried out using automated Franz diffusion cell apparatus. The optimized formula was investigated for in vivo pharmacokinetic parameters compared with oral VRD suspension. Confocal laser scanning microscopy images were used to confirm enhanced diffusion release of VRD in rat skin. The results showed that the optimized formula produced nanoethosomes with an average size of 128 nm and an entrapment efficiency of 76.23%. VRD-NE provided a significant improvement in permeation with an enhancement ratio of 3.05-fold for a film made with optimally formulated VRD-NE compared with a film made with VRD powder. The transdermal bioavailability of VRD from the nanoethosome film was approximately twofold higher than the oral bioavailability from an aqueous suspension. VRD-NE thus provide a promising transdermal drug delivery system. As a result, management of impotence for a longer duration could be achieved with a reduced dosage rate that improves patient tolerability and compliance for the treatment of erectile dysfunction. PMID:26604700

  16. A Population-Based, Longitudinal Study of Erectile Dysfunction and Future Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Inman, Brant A.; Sauver, Jennifer L. St.; Jacobson, Debra J.; McGree, Michaela E.; Nehra, Ajay; Lieber, Michael M.; Roger, Véronique L.; Jacobsen, Steven J.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the association between erectile dysfunction (ED) and the long-term risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) and the role of age as a modifier of this association. PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS: From January 1, 1996, to December 31, 2005, we biennially screened a random sample of 1402 community-dwelling men with regular sexual partners and without known CAD for the presence of ED. Incidence densities of CAD were calculated after age stratification and adjusted for potential confounders by time-dependent Cox proportional hazards models. RESULTS: The prevalence of ED was 2% for men aged 40 to 49 years, 6% for men aged 50 to 59 years, 17% for men aged 60 to 69 years, and 39% for men aged 70 years or older. The CAD incidence densities per 1000 person-years for men without ED in each age group were 0.94 (40-49 years), 5.09 (50-59 years), 10.72 (60-69 years), and 23.30 (?70 years). For men with ED, the incidence densities of CAD for each age group were 48.52 (40-49 years), 27.15 (50-59 years), 23.97 (60-69 years), and 29.63 (?70 years). CONCLUSION: ED and CAD may be differing manifestations of a common underlying vascular pathology. When ED occurs in a younger man, it is associated with a marked increase in the risk of future cardiac events, whereas in older men, ED appears to be of little prognostic importance. Young men with ED may be ideal candidates for cardiovascular risk factor screening and medical intervention. PMID:19181643

  17. A Holistic Treatment Approach to Male Erectile Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millner, Vaughn S.; Ullery, Elizabeth K.

    2002-01-01

    This article offers information about erectile functioning, provides a DSM-IV-TR interpretation of erectile dysfunction, and discusses a biophysical approach to erectile dysfunction treatment. (Contains 36 references.) (GCP)

  18. Minimally invasive infrapubic inflatable penile prosthesis implant for erectile dysfunction: evaluation of efficacy, satisfaction profile and complications.

    PubMed

    Antonini, G; Busetto, G M; De Berardinis, E; Giovannone, R; Vicini, P; Del Giudice, F; Conti, S L; Gentile, V; Perito, P E

    2016-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED), the second most common male sexual disorder, has an important impact on man sexuality and quality of life affecting also female partner's sexual life. ED is usually related to cardiovascular disease or is an iatrogenic cause of pelvic surgery. Many non-surgical treatments have been developed with results that are controversial, while surgical treatment has reached high levels of satisfaction. The aim is to evaluate outcomes and complications related to prosthesis implant in patients suffering from ED not responding to conventional medical therapy or reporting side effects with such a therapy. One hundred eighty Caucasian male suffering from ED were selected. The patient population were divided into two groups: 84 patients with diabetes and metabolic syndrome (group A) and 96 patients with dysfunction following laparoscopic radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer (group B). All subjects underwent primary inflatable penile prosthesis implant with an infrapubic minimally invasive approach. During 12 months of follow-up, we reported 3 (1.67%) explants for infection, 1 (0.56%) urethral erosion, 1 (0.56%) prosthesis extrusion while no intraoperative complications were reported. Mean International Index of Erectile Function-5 (IIEF-5) was 8.2±4.0 and after the surgery (12 months later) was 20.6±2.7. The improvement after the implant is significant in both groups without a statistically significant difference between the two groups (P-value 0.65). Mean Erectile Dysfunction Inventory of Treatment Satisfaction (EDITS) score 1 year after the implant is 72.2±20.7, and there was no statistically significant difference between groups A and B (P-value 0.55). Implantation of an inflatable prosthesis, for treatment of ED, is a safe and efficacious approach; and the patient and partner satisfaction is very high. Surgical technique should be minimally invasive and latest technology equipment should be implanted in order to decrease after surgery common complications (infection and mechanical failure). PMID:26657316

  19. Dual Implantation of Artificial Urinary Sphincter and Inflatable Penile Prostheses for Concurrent Male Urinary Incontinence and Erectile Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shaiji, Tariq F.

    2011-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction and urinary incontinence secondary to sphincter dysfunction are common conditions affecting many men worldwide with a negative effect on quality of life. They are encountered in a number of etiologies most commonly following radical prostatectomy in which they coexist in the same patient. Implantations of an artificial urinary sphincter and inflatable penile prosthesis have proven to be effective in the treatment of both conditions should conservative and minimally invasive measures fail. The recent literature has shown that dual implantation of these devices is feasible and safe with a durable clinical outcome. Once indicated, this can be done in a synchronous or nonsynchronous manner; however, the emerging of the single transverse scrotal incision as well as advancement in the prostheses has made synchronous dual implantation more favourable and appealing option. It provides time and cost savings with an evidence of high patient satisfaction. Synchronous dual implantation should be offered initially when indicated. This paper discusses the surgical techniques of artificial urinary sphincter and inflatable penile prosthesis dual implantation in the management of concurrent moderate-to-severe urinary incontinence and medically refractive erectile dysfunction, in addition to highlighting the existing literature pertaining to this approach. PMID:22162678

  20. Evaluation of a multi-herb supplement for erectile dysfunction: a randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Evidence is lacking for multi-ingredient herbal supplements claiming therapeutic effect in sexual dysfunction in men. We examined the safety and efficacy of VigRX Plus (VXP) – a proprietary polyherbal preparation for improving male sexual function, in a double blind, randomized placebo-controlled, parallel groups, multi-centre study. Methods 78 men aged 25–50?years of age; suffering from mild to moderate erectile dysfunction (ED), participated in this study. Subjects were randomized to receive VXP or placebo at a dose of two capsules twice daily for 12?weeks. The international index of erectile function (IIEF) was the primary outcome measure of efficacy. Other efficacy measures were: Erectile Dysfunction Inventory of Treatment Satisfaction (EDITS), Serum testosterone, Semen analysis, Investigator’s Global assessment and Subjects’ opinion. Results In subjects receiving VXP, the IIEF-Erectile Function (EF) scores improved significantly as compared to placebo. After 12?weeks of treatment, the mean (sd) IIEF-EF score at baseline increased from 16.08 (2.87) to 25.08 (4.56) in the VXP group versus 15.86 (3.24) to 16.47 (4.25) in the placebo group (P?

  1. A comparative review of the options for treatment of erectile dysfunction: which treatment for which patient?

    PubMed

    Hatzimouratidis, Konstantinos; Hatzichristou, Dimitrios G

    2005-01-01

    The field of erectile dysfunction (ED) has been revolutionised over the last two decades. Several treatment options are available today, most of which are associated with high efficacy rates and favourable safety profiles. A MEDLINE search was undertaken in order to evaluate all currently available data on treatment modalities for ED. Phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors (sildenafil, tadalafil, vardenafil) are currently the first-choice of most physicians and patients for the treatment of ED. PDE5 inhibitors have differences in their pharmacological profiles, the most obvious being the long duration of action of tadalafil, but there are no data supporting superiority for any one of them in terms of efficacy or safety. Sublingual apomorphine has limited efficacy compared with the PDE5 inhibitors, and its use is limited to patients with mild ED. Treatment failures with oral drugs may be due to medication, clinician and patient issues. The physician needs to address all of these issues in order to identify true treatment failures. Patients who are truly unresponsive to oral drugs may be offered other treatment options.Intracavernous injections of alprostadil alone, or in combination with other vasoactive agents (papaverine and phentolamine), remain an excellent treatment option, with proven efficacy and safety over time. Topical pharmacotherapy is appealing in nature, but currently available formulations have limited efficacy. Vacuum constriction devices may be offered mainly to elderly patients with occasional intercourse attempts, as younger patients show limited preference because of the unnatural erection that is associated with this treatment modality. Penile prostheses are generally the last treatment option offered, because of invasiveness, cost and non-reversibility; however, they are associated with high satisfaction rates in properly selected patients. All treatment options are associated with particular strengths and weaknesses. A patient-centred approach based on patient needs and expectations is necessary for the management of ED. The clinician must educate the patient and provide a supportive environment for shared decision making. The management strategy must be supplemented by careful follow-up in order to identify changes in patient health and relationship/emotional status that may necessitate treatment optimisation. PMID:16060698

  2. Erectile Dysfunction in Patients with Sleep Apnea – A Nationwide Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yu-Chung; Yang, Chih-Jen; Wu, Meng-Ni; Hsu, Chung-Yao; Hwang, Shang-Jyh; Chong, Inn-Wen; Huang, Ming-Shyan

    2015-01-01

    Increased incidence of erectile dysfunction (ED) has been reported among patients with sleep apnea (SA). However, this association has not been confirmed in a large-scale study. We therefore performed a population-based cohort study using Taiwan National Health Insurance (NHI) database to investigate the association of SA and ED. From the database of one million representative subjects randomly sampled from individuals enrolled in the NHI system in 2010, we identified adult patients having SA and excluded those having a diagnosis of ED prior to SA. From these suspected SA patients, those having SA diagnosis after polysomnography were defined as probable SA patients. The dates of their first SA diagnosis were defined as their index dates. Each SA patient was matched to 30 randomly-selected, age-matched control subjects without any SA diagnosis. The control subjects were assigned index dates as their corresponding SA patients, and were ensured having no ED diagnosis prior to their index dates. Totally, 4,835 male patients with suspected SA (including 1,946 probable SA patients) were matched to 145,050 control subjects (including 58,380 subjects matched to probable SA patients). The incidence rate of ED was significantly higher in probable SA patients as compared with the corresponding control subjects (5.7 vs. 2.3 per 1000 patient-year; adjusted incidence rate ratio = 2.0 [95% CI: 1.8-2.2], p<0.0001). The cumulative incidence was also significantly higher in the probable SA patients (p<0.0001). In multivariable Cox regression analysis, probable SA remained a significant risk factor for the development of ED after adjusting for age, residency, income level and comorbidities (hazard ratio = 2.0 [95%CI: 1.5-2.7], p<0.0001). In line with previous studies, this population-based large-scale study confirmed an increased ED incidence in SA patients in Chinese population. Physicians need to pay attention to the possible underlying SA while treating ED patients. PMID:26177206

  3. Penile prosthesis implantation and tunica albuginea incision without grafting in the treatment of Peyronie's disease with erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Djordjevic, Miroslav L; Kojovic, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated penile prosthesis implantation with tunica albuginea-relaxing incisions without grafting in the treatment of Peyronie's disease associated with erectile dysfunction. Between April 2005 and June 2011, 62 patients underwent surgery due to severe Peyronie's disease associated with erectile dysfunction. Malleable and inflatable penile prostheses were inserted in 49 and 13 cases, respectively. Penile prostheses were inserted into the corpora cavernosa using the standard ventral approach. After lifting the neurovascular bundle, the tunica albuginea was incised and opened at the plaque region to correct the deformities and to lengthen the penis. Subsequently, the wide neurovascular bundle was replaced, and all incisions of the tunica albuginea were covered to prevent corporal grafting. In the median follow-up of 35 months (range 14–82 months), the penis was completely straightened in 59 (95%) patients. Numbness of the glans, which the patients found initially upsetting, decreased or disappeared spontaneously 3–6 months later. Penile prosthesis implantation with tunica albuginea incisions is a viable alternative in the treatment of Peyronie's disease because the extensive dissection of the neurovascular bundle allows a good approach to the plaque and provides excellent covering of the incised tunica albuginea without additional grafting. PMID:23435473

  4. Viewing Sexual Stimuli Associated with Greater Sexual Responsiveness, Not Erectile Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Prause, Nicole; Pfaus, James

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Time spent viewing visual sexual stimuli (VSS) has the potential to habituate the sexual response and generalize to the partner context. Aim The aim of this study was to examine whether the time spent viewing VSS is related to sexual responsiveness felt in the laboratory or with a sexual partner. Methods Nontreatment-seeking men (N?=?280) reported their weekly average VSS viewing in hours. VSS hours were examined in relation to the sexual arousal experienced while viewing a standardized sexual film in the laboratory and erectile problems experienced with a sexual partner. Main Outcome Measures Self-reported sexual arousal in response to sexual films and erectile problems on the International Index of Erectile Function were the main outcome measures. Results More hours viewing VSS was related to stronger experienced sexual responses to VSS in the laboratory, was unrelated to erectile functioning with a partner, and was related to stronger desire for sex with a partner. Conclusions VSS use within the range of hours tested is unlikely to negatively impact sexual functioning, given that responses actually were stronger in those who viewed more VSS. PMID:26185674

  5. [Erectile dysfunction as the first sign of systemic vascular diseases and of organovascular arterial ischemic diseases. Guidelines and Challenge of the Angiology section of Slovak Medical Chamber (AS SMC, 2015)].

    PubMed

    Gavorník, Peter; Dukát, Andrej; Gašpar, ?udovít; Medová, Denisa; Faktorová, Xénia; Gavorníková, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction is a highly prevalent and progressive condition affecting the quality of life of man and his sexual partner. Evidence is accumulating in favour of erectile dysfunction as a sign of a genitovascular disease (GVD) in the majority of patients. Erectile dysfunction may be considered as the clinical manifestation of a organovascular disease affecting penis (male genitovascular disease - MGVD) as well as angina pectoris is the typical manifestation of a vascular disease affecting coronary arteries of a heart (cardiovascular disease - CVD). Several studies confirm the assumption that erectile dysfunction symptoms were found to come prior to cardiovascular disease symptoms in 60-95 % of CVD patients with mean interval of 2-3 years and likewise of all organovascular diseases (OVD). Four potent selective PDE5Is have been approved by the EMA for the treatment of erectile dysfunction. Physicians should systematically look for erectile dysfunction in any male with vascular risk factors.Key words: angiology/vascular medicine - diagnosis - erectile dysfunction - genitovascular arterial disease (GVAD) - management - organovascular diseases. PMID:26375693

  6. Predicting erectile dysfunction in sexually active patients seeking prostate health screening: proposal for a multivariable risk stratification.

    PubMed

    Favilla, V; Russo, G I; Reale, G; Leone, S; Castelli, T; La Vignera, S; Condorelli, R A; Calogero, A E; Cimino, S; Morgia, G

    2015-11-01

    To address the severity of erectile dysfunction (ED) in consecutive sexually active men seeking a prostate health screening through a multivariable risk stratification including comorbidities and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Four hundred and twenty five consecutive subjects with stable sexual relationship with normal testosterone levels were enrolled. The International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5) and the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) questionnaires were collected and health-significant comorbidities were scored with the Charlson comorbidity index (CCI). All the independent predictors of ED were combined to form four different risk categories of ED: low (age?65 years and IPSS<8 and CCI=0), intermediate (one of the following: age>65 years, IPSS?8 or CCI?1), high (two of the following: age>65 years, IPSS?8 or CCI?1) and very high (age >65 years, IPSS?8 and CCI?1). The prevalence of ED increased with increase of CCI (?(2) likelihood ratio: 40.85, P=0.001). The median of the IIEF-5 significantly reduced with the increase of the CCI (P<0.001) and with the worsening of our risk group stratification (P<0.001). At univariate logistic regression analysis very high risk was significantly associated with of ED (odds ratio: 26.85, P<0.001). Very high-risk group predicted ED with 88% and 56% of specificity and sensitivity, respectively. Combining these risk factors through our risk stratification may be usefulness in revealing an underling ED. PMID:26224573

  7. The incidence of erectile dysfunction after pelvic fracture urethral injury: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Blaschko, Sarah D.; Sanford, Melissa T.; Schlomer, Bruce J.; Alwaal, Amjad; Yang, Glen; Villalta, Jacqueline D.; Wessells, Hunter; McAninch, Jack W.; Breyer, Benjamin N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Pelvic fracture urethral injury (PFUI) is associated with a high risk of erectile dysfunction (ED). The effect of the type of posterior urethral disruption repair on erectile function has not been clearly established. We systematically reviewed and conducted a meta-analysis of the proportion of patients with ED at (i) baseline after pelvic fracture with PFUI, (ii) after immediate primary realignment, and (iii) after delayed urethroplasty. Methods Using search terms for primary realignment or urethroplasty and urethral disruption, we systematically reviewed PubMed and EMBASE. A meta-analysis of the proportion of patients with ED was conducted assuming a random-effects model. Results Of 734 articles found, 24 met the inclusion criteria. The estimate of the proportion (95% confidence interval) of patients with ED after (i) PFUI was 34 (25–45)%, after (ii) immediate primary realignment was 16 (8–26)%, and after (iii) delayed urethroplasty was an additional 3 (2–5)% more than the 34% after pelvic fracture in this cohort. Conclusions After pelvic fracture, 34% of patients had ED. After primary endoscopic alignment, patients had a lower reported rate of ED (16%). Delayed urethroplasty conferred an additional 3% risk above the 34% associated with PFUI alone, with 37% of patients having de novo ED. The difference in de novo ED after primary endoscopic alignment vs. delayed urethroplasty is probably due to reporting differences in ED and/or patients with less severe injury undergoing primary realignment. PMID:26019983

  8. THE STAMP TEST DELIVERS THE MESSAGE ON ERECTILE DYSFUNCTION FOLLOWING HIGH DOSE IMRT FOR PROSTATE CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Lanea M. M.; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Sopka, Dennis; Ruth, Karen; Klayton, Tracy; Pollack, Alan; Watkins-Bruner, Deborah; Greenberg, Richard; Price, Robert; Horwitz, Eric M

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate erectile function following high dose radiotherapy for prostate cancer using the international index of erectile function (IIEF), expanded prostate cancer index composite (EPIC), and stamp test. Methods Men with favorable and intermediate risk prostate cancer were assigned to receive prostate intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) vs. an erectile tissue-sparing IMRT technique on a phase III randomized prospective study. The stamp test, IIEF, and EPIC questionnaires were completed at baseline, 6 months, one year, and two years after IMRT. Sexual Health Inventory for Men (SHIM) scores were abstracted from IIEF questionnaires. A partner questionnaire, designated IIEF-P, modeled after the IIEF but from the perspective of the partner, was collected. Results Ninety four men enrolled on the trial who completed at least one questionnaire or one stamp test were analyzed. The median age of the patient population was 62.5 years. The median RT dose was 76 Gy (range: 74–80 Gy). At 6-months and one year after high-dose IMRT, a positive stamp result significantly correlated with median EPIC sexual summary, sexual function (EF), and bother subscale scores. Additionally, 6-months after IMRT the stamp test correlated with median IIEF, IIEF EF domain, and SHIM scores. Robust concordance for the IIEF and SHIM results was appreciated between responding patients: partner pairs. Conclusions Nocturnal tumescence indicated by a positive stamp test correlates well with established quality of life questionnaires after IMRT. The stamp test should strongly be considered as an objective measure of erectile function in future studies of ED in prostate cancer patients. PMID:22749428

  9. Penile Prosthetic Surgery and its Role in the Treatment of End-Stage Erectile Dysfunction – An Update

    PubMed Central

    Jain, S; Terry, TR

    2006-01-01

    The treatment of erectile dysfunction has been revolutionised with the introduction of orally active phosphodiesterase inhibitors which are successful in 70–80% of men. However, there remain a group of men in whom conservative treatment fails and surgical insertion of a penile prosthesis is required. This type of surgery has in the past been associated with technical difficulties and a high complication rate. This has spurred numerous developments in prosthesis design and surgical technique with the field changing at a rapid pace. Perhaps the most significant is the use of antimicrobial coatings on prostheses that have been shown to reduce the infection rate significantly. This review highlights those developments reported in the last 5 years. PMID:16834850

  10. Erectile Dysfunction and Sexual Hormone Levels in Men With Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Efficacy of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Bin; Lin, Qi-Chang; Zeng, Hui-Qing; Jiang, Xing-Tang; Chen, Bo; Chen, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the prevalence of erectile dysfunction (ED) and serum sexual hormone levels were evaluated in men with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). In these patients, the efficacy of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) was determined. The 207 men (mean age 44.0 ± 11.1 years) enrolled in the study were stratified within four groups based on their apnea-hypopnea index score: simple snoring (n = 32), mild OSA (n = 29), moderate OSA (n = 38), and severe OSA (n = 108). The International Index of Erectile Dysfunction-5 (IIEF-5) score was obtained from each patient, and blood samples for the analysis of sexual hormones (prolactin, luteotropin, follicle-stimulating hormone, estradiol, progestin, and testosterone) were drawn in the morning after polysomnography. The IIEF-5 test and serum sexual hormone measurements were repeated after 3 months of CPAP treatment in 53 men with severe OSA. The prevalence of ED was 60.6 % in OSA patients overall and 72.2 % in those with severe OSA. Compared with the simple snoring group, patients with severe OSA had significantly lower testosterone levels (14.06 ± 5.62 vs. 17.02 ± 4.68, p = .018) and lower IIEF-5 scores (16.33 ± 6.50 vs. 24.09 ± 1.94, p = .001). The differences in the other sexual hormones between groups were not significant. After 3 months of CPAP treatment, there were no significant changes in sexual hormone levels, but the IIEF-5 score had improved significantly (18.21 ± 4.05 vs. 19.21 ± 3.86, p = .001). Severe OSA patients have low testosterone concentration and high ED prevalence. IIEF-5 scores increased significantly after CPAP treatment, but there was no effect on serum testosterone levels. PMID:26370402

  11. Phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors for erectile dysfunction in patients with diabetes mellitus: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Balhara, Yatan Pal Singh; Sarkar, Siddharth; Gupta, Rishab

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Patients with diabetes mellitus frequently experience erectile dysfunction. This systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted to find efficacy and tolerability of phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors in patients with diabetes mellitus experiencing erectile dysfunction. Methodology: Electronic searches were carried out to identify English language peer-reviewed randomized controlled trials (RCTs), which reported clinical efficacy of any PDE5 inhibitor in patients with diabetes mellitus having erectile dysfunction. Effect sizes were computed using Cohen's d, and I2-test was used to assess heterogeneity. Pooled mean effect sizes were computed using random-effects model. Number needed to treat (NNT), and the adverse event rates were computed. Results: The systematic review included a total of 17 studies yielding 25 comparisons. Three studies were open RCTs while others were double-blind RCTs. The pooled mean effect size of any PDE5 inhibitor over placebo was 0.926 (95% confidence intervals [CI]: 0.864-0.987; I2 =26.3). The pooled mean effect size for sildenafil was 1.198 (CI: 1.039-1.357; I2 =0), for tadalafil was 0.910 (CI: 0.838-0.981; I2 =33.6), and for vardenafil was 0.678 (CI: 0.627-0.729; I2 =0). In pooled analysis, the NNT for sildenafil, tadalafil, vardenafil and any PDE5 inhibitor was 2.4, 2.6, 4.1 and 3.0 respectively. The most common side effects were headache, flushing, and nasal congestion. Conclusions: PDE5 inhibitors are effective and safe medications for the treatment of sexual dysfunction in patients with diabetes mellitus experiencing erectile dysfunction. PMID:26180759

  12. Is there a relationship between the severity of erectile dysfunction and the comorbidity profile in men with late onset hypogonadism?

    PubMed Central

    Yassin, Aksam A.; Nettleship, Joanne E.; Almehmadi, Yousef; Yassin, Dany-Jan; El Douaihy, Youssef; Saad, Farid

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine whether the severity of erectile dysfunction (ED) in a man diagnosed with late-onset hypogonadism (LOH) gives information about his metabolic syndrome state, as patients with LOH often have sexual symptoms and associated cardiovascular and metabolic comorbidities, but the role of ED in predicting the prevalence of comorbid disease in men with low levels of testosterone is currently unknown. Patients and methods Men (130) diagnosed with LOH and fulfilling the criteria of a total testosterone level of <3.5 ng/mL (<12 nmol/L), and with an erectile function domain score of <21 on the International Index of Erectile Function questionnaire (IIEF, questions 1–5), were enrolled for a subsequent trial of supplementation with testosterone undecanoate. Demographic data were recorded at baseline. The men completed three standardised questionnaires to assess sexual health, including the International Prostate Symptom Score, Ageing Males Symptoms (AMS) and IIEF Sexual Health Inventory for Men (SHIM). Patients were stratified by the severity of ED, with SHIM scores of 1–7 considered severe, 8–11 moderate, and 12–16 mild to moderate. Levels of serum testosterone, sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) and lipids (total cholesterol, triglycerides, high-density and low-density lipoprotein) were assessed, along with plasma fasting glucose and glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) levels. Body weight, body mass index and waist circumference were also recorded. Results There was a significant association between the severity of ED and mean weight (P < 0.001), waist circumference (P < 0.001), triglycerides (P = 0.009), total cholesterol (P = 0.027), HbA1c (P < 0.001), fasting glucose (P = 0.003) and AMS scores (P = 0.043). There were no significant differences in testosterone fractions and SHBG levels between the ED subgroups. There was a positive correlation between the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (type 1 and type 2) and the severity of ED in these men (P = 0.018). Conclusions The descriptive data showed that a greater severity of ED in men with LOH correlated with an increased waist circumference, hyperglycaemia, hypertriglyceridaemia, hyperlipidaemia, and a history of diabetes mellitus. Severe ED is a prognostic indicator of comorbidities in men with LOH. PMID:26413340

  13. Levels of Human Erythrocyte Membrane-Bound and Cytosolic Glycohydrolases Are Associated with Oxidative Stress in Erectile Dysfunction Patients

    PubMed Central

    Massaccesi, L.; Melzi d'Eril, G. V.; Colpi, G. M.; Tettamanti, G.; Goi, G.; Barassi, A.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) and production of NO, by endothelium nitric oxide synthetase (eNOS), are involved in the pathophysiology of erectile dysfunction (ED). Moreover, OS induces modifications of the physicochemical properties of erythrocyte (RBC) plasma membranes and of the enzyme content of the same membranes. Due to their role in signalling early membrane alterations in OS-related pathologies, several plasma membrane and cytosolic glycohydrolases of human RBC have been proposed as new markers of cellular OS. In RBC, NOS can be activated and deactivated by phosphorylation/glycosylation. In this regulatory mechanism O-?-N-AcetylGlucosaminidase is a key enzyme. Cellular levels of O-GlcNAcylated proteins are related to OS; consequently dysfunctional eNOS O-GlcNAcylation seems to have a crucial role in ED. To elucidate the possible association between RBC glycohydrolases and OS, plasma hydroperoxides and antioxidant total defenses (Lag-time), cytosolic O-?-N-AcetylGlucosaminidase, cytosolic and membrane Hexosaminidase, membrane ?-D-Glucuronidase, and ?-D-Glucosidase have been studied in 39 ED patients and 30 controls. In ED subjects hydroperoxides and plasma membrane glycohydrolases activities are significantly increased whereas Lag-time values and cytosolic glycohydrolases activities are significantly decreased. These data confirm the strong OS status in ED patients, the role of the studied glycohydrolases as early OS biomarker and suggest their possible use as specific marker of ED patients, particularly in those undergoing nutritional/pharmacological antioxidant therapy. PMID:25165407

  14. Predictive factors for erectile dysfunction in men with prostate cancer after brachytherapy: Is dose to the penile bulb important?

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, A. Graham . E-mail: gmacdonald@easynet.co.uk; Keyes, Mira; Kruk, Alexandra; Duncan, Graeme; Moravan, Veronika; Morris, W. James

    2005-09-01

    Purpose: To determine predictive factors for postimplant erectile dysfunction (ED) in a cohort of patients, according to prospectively collected data; specifically, to assess the impact of penile bulb volume and D50 and D95 (dose covering 50% and 95% of the penile bulb volume, respectively) on ED. Methods and Materials: Three hundred forty-two patients were identified who were potent before implant and who had at least 2 years' follow-up. Patient, tumor, treatment, and dosimetric data were collected on all patients. Postimplant ED was defined according to both physician-documented and patient-documented outcome data. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to create multivariable models of predictors for ED at 1, 2, and 3 years after implant. Results: Physician-documented rates of ED were 57%, 48%, and 38% at 1, 2, and 3 years after implant, respectively. Patient-documented rates of ED were 70% and 66% at 1 and 2 years, respectively. Multivariable analyses revealed age and degree of preimplant erectile function to be consistently significant predictors of ED. Use of hormones was significant at the 1-year physician-documented ED endpoint but not thereafter, in keeping with the time course of testosterone recovery. Penile bulb volume, D50, and D95 were not found to be predictive for ED at any time point, in contrast to previous studies. In addition, planning ultrasound target volume, number of needles, and institutional case sequence number were significant predictors of ED at various time points, consistent with a traumatic etiology of ED. Conclusions: We found no evidence to support penile bulb dosimetry as an independent predictive factor for ED after implant, using physician-documented or patient-documented outcomes.

  15. Phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors for treating erectile dysfunction and lower urinary tract symptoms secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia: A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Albert; Jabbour, Michel; Bulbul, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Many men have coexistent erectile dysfunction (ED) and lower urinary tract symptoms secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia (LUTS/BPH). Phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors are effective for treating both of these conditions independently. In this review we summarise the evidence supporting a link between ED and LUTS/BPH, and the results from key clinical studies related to the use of PDE5 inhibitors for treating both conditions. The results from these studies suggest that men who have both ED and LUTS/BPH, and are concerned about their sexual dysfunction, might benefit from single-agent, holistic treatment with a PDE5 inhibitor. PMID:26413339

  16. Clinical study on erectile dysfunction in diabetic and non-diabetic subjects and its management with Ficus relegiosa Linn.

    PubMed Central

    Virani, Nilesh V.; Chandola, H. M.; Vyas, S. N.; Jadeja, D. B.

    2010-01-01

    Healthy sexual functioning plays an essential role in maintaining the harmony and happiness in marital life. It provides a media to express love, which is the base for all sorts of creative activities. The absence of this function hampers the marital relationship, leading to frustration and, sometimes, ending in divorce, and causes inadequacy in performing the routine duties. In this study, 53 patients having diabetes mellitus were surveyed to find out the incidence of erectile dysfunction (ED). Considering the high prevalence of the disease and the need to look for alternative medicine, a clinical trial on 44 patients of ED was carried out. These patients were divided into two main groups: diabetic and non-diabetic, and were further divided into two subgroups as trial group and placebo group. In the trial group, Ashvattha Kshirpaka prepared with 10 g powder of its root bark, stem bark, fruit and tender leaf buds was given twice a day. In both the diabetic and the non-diabetic subjects, Ashvattha provided encouraging results on ED as well as on seminal parameters in comparison to the placebo. PMID:22131726

  17. Phenolic Extract from Moringa oleifera Leaves Inhibits Key Enzymes Linked to Erectile Dysfunction and Oxidative Stress in Rats' Penile Tissues.

    PubMed

    Oboh, Ganiyu; Ademiluyi, Adedayo O; Ademosun, Ayokunle O; Olasehinde, Tosin A; Oyeleye, Sunday I; Boligon, Aline A; Athayde, Margareth L

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the antioxidant properties and inhibitory effects of extract from Moringa oleifera leaves on angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE) and arginase activities in vitro. The extract was prepared and phenolic (total phenols and flavonoid) contents, radical (nitric oxide (NO), hydroxyl (OH)) scavenging abilities, and Fe(2+)-chelating ability were assessed. Characterization of the phenolic constituents was done via high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection (HPLC-DAD) analysis. Furthermore, the effects of the extract on Fe(2+)-induced MDA production in rats' penile tissue homogenate as well as its action on ACE and arginase activities were also determined. The extract scavenged NO (?) , OH (?) , chelated Fe(2+), and inhibited MDA production in a dose-dependent pattern with IC50 values of 1.36, 0.52, and 0.38?mg/mL and 194.23?µg/mL, respectively. Gallic acid, chlorogenic acid, quercetin, and kaempferol were the most abundant phenolic compounds identified in the leaf extract. The extract also inhibited ACE and arginase activities in a dose-dependent pattern and their IC50 values were 303.03 and 159.59?µg/mL, respectively. The phenolic contents, inhibition of ACE, arginase, and Fe(2+)-induced MDA production, and radical (OH (?) , NO (?) ) scavenging and Fe(2+)-chelating abilities could be some of the possible mechanisms by which M. oleifera leaves could be used in the treatment and/or management of erectile dysfunction. PMID:26557995

  18. Phenolic Extract from Moringa oleifera Leaves Inhibits Key Enzymes Linked to Erectile Dysfunction and Oxidative Stress in Rats' Penile Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Oboh, Ganiyu; Ademiluyi, Adedayo O.; Ademosun, Ayokunle O.; Olasehinde, Tosin A.; Oyeleye, Sunday I.; Boligon, Aline A.; Athayde, Margareth L.

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the antioxidant properties and inhibitory effects of extract from Moringa oleifera leaves on angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE) and arginase activities in vitro. The extract was prepared and phenolic (total phenols and flavonoid) contents, radical (nitric oxide (NO), hydroxyl (OH)) scavenging abilities, and Fe2+-chelating ability were assessed. Characterization of the phenolic constituents was done via high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection (HPLC-DAD) analysis. Furthermore, the effects of the extract on Fe2+-induced MDA production in rats' penile tissue homogenate as well as its action on ACE and arginase activities were also determined. The extract scavenged NO?, OH?, chelated Fe2+, and inhibited MDA production in a dose-dependent pattern with IC50 values of 1.36, 0.52, and 0.38?mg/mL and 194.23?µg/mL, respectively. Gallic acid, chlorogenic acid, quercetin, and kaempferol were the most abundant phenolic compounds identified in the leaf extract. The extract also inhibited ACE and arginase activities in a dose-dependent pattern and their IC50 values were 303.03 and 159.59?µg/mL, respectively. The phenolic contents, inhibition of ACE, arginase, and Fe2+-induced MDA production, and radical (OH?, NO?) scavenging and Fe2+-chelating abilities could be some of the possible mechanisms by which M. oleifera leaves could be used in the treatment and/or management of erectile dysfunction. PMID:26557995

  19. Increased risk of organic erectile dysfunction in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome: a nationwide population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Chao, C-H; Chen, H-J; Wang, H-Y; Li, T-C; Kao, C-H

    2015-07-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a complex disorder characterized by profound and persistent fatigue and several comorbidities. CFS was previously reported to be associated with female sexual dysfunction. We propose that CFS might also be associated with organic erectile dysfunction (organic ED). We conducted a retrospective cohort study by using data from the National Health Insurance (NHI) Research Database. We identified 2156 male patients who were newly diagnosed with CFS between January 1, 2003 and December 31, 2006. After excluding those younger than 20 years and prevalent cases, 1976 patients were subjected to analysis, and 7904 people served as healthy controls. All study subjects were followed up from the index date to the date of organic ED diagnosis, withdrawal from the NHI program, or the end of 2011. Compared with the non-CFS cohort, the incidence density rate of organic ED was 1.88-fold higher than that in the CFS cohort (3.23 vs. 1.73 per 1000 person-years) with an adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of 1.88 (95% CI = 1.26-2.81) when adjusting for sex and comorbidities. The combined impacts of patients with CFS and cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes mellitus (DM), chronic kidney disease (CKD), depression, and anxiety showed a significant by joint association with organic ED risk compared with patients with no CFS and no counterpart comorbidity. The greatest magnitude of adjusted HR of ED for CFS was observed in individuals without any comorbidity (3.87, 1.95-7.66). The incidence of organic ED is higher among males aged 40 years and over for both CFS and non-CFS cohorts. As the number of comorbidity increases, the incidence of organic ED increases in males without CFS. Higher incidence of organic ED was observed in males with CVD, DM, CKD, depression, or anxiety for both CFS and non-CFS cohorts. PMID:26198797

  20. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis as a novel player in metabolic syndrome-induced erectile dysfunction: an experimental study in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Vignozzi, Linda; Filippi, Sandra; Comeglio, Paolo; Cellai, Ilaria; Sarchielli, Erica; Morelli, Annamaria; Rastrelli, Giulia; Maneschi, Elena; Galli, Andrea; Vannelli, Gabriella Barbara; Saad, Farid; Mannucci, Edoardo; Adorini, Luciano; Maggi, Mario

    2014-03-25

    A pathogenic link between erectile dysfunction (ED) and metabolic syndrome (MetS) is now well established. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), the hepatic hallmark of MetS, is regarded as an active player in the pathogenesis of MetS-associated cardiovascular disease (CVD). This study was aimed at evaluating the relationship between MetS-induced NASH and penile dysfunction. We used a non-genomic, high fat diet (HFD)-induced, rabbit model of MetS, and treated HFD rabbits with testosterone (T), with the selective farnesoid X receptor (FXR) agonist obeticholic acid (OCA), or with the anti-TNF? mAb infliximab. Rabbits fed a regular diet were used as controls. Liver histomorphological and gene expression analysis demonstrated NASH in HFD rabbits. Several genes related to inflammation (including TNF?), activation of stellate cells, fibrosis, and lipid metabolism parameters were negatively associated to maximal acetylcholine (Ach)-induced relaxation in penis. When all these putative liver determinants of penile Ach responsiveness were tested as covariates in a multivariate model, only the association between hepatic TNF? expression and Ach response was confirmed. Accordingly, circulating levels of TNF? were increased 15-fold in HFD rabbits. T and OCA dosing in HFD rabbits both reduced TNF? liver expression and plasma levels, with a parallel increase of penile eNOS expression and responsiveness to Ach. Also neutralization of TNF? with infliximab treatment fully normalized HFD-induced hypo-responsiveness to Ach, as well as responsiveness to vardenafil, a phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor. Thus, MetS-induced NASH in HFD rabbits plays an active role in the pathogenesis of ED, likely through TNF?, as indicated by treatments reducing liver and circulating TNF? levels (T or OCA), or neutralizing TNF? action (infliximab), which significantly improve penile responsiveness to Ach in HFD rabbits. PMID:24486698

  1. The use of drugs Impaza and Nebido in the treatment of erectile dysfunction in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus of reproductive age.

    PubMed

    Mehtiyev, T

    2013-06-01

    The main objective of the study was to investigate the efficacy of using a mono and combined therapy drugs Impaza and Nebido for secondary prevention and treatment of ED. It was examined 79 diabetic patients with ED. The age of patients within 18-60 years, duration of diabetes - from 6 months to 29 years, ED - from 6 months to 12 years. To identify the ED was used International index of erectile function (IIEF). The patients were divided into 3 groups: I - patients with organic ED, II - with psychogenic ED and III group - with mixed ED. Drags Impaza and Nebido used in all three groups, as mono or as complex therapy. It was using routine (anamnesis, clinico- biochemical data) and special (pharmacodopplerography) methods of study. The study did not include patients with increased level of prostate-specific antigen (PSA), polycythemia, obstruction of the urinary tract with the prostate size increasing and prostate cancer. Statistical data was studed by using Pearson's ?2-test. The results showed the following. Indicators of glycohemoglobin above normal reduces the effectiveness of the treatment of erectile dysfunction in patients with diabetes mellitus.The combined use of drugs Impaza and Nebido in patients with ED had a positive resultes in 41,4-91,7% of the cases. These drugs are effective in diabetic patients with mild and moderate form of erectile dysfunction. PMID:23863213

  2. Long-term survival and patient satisfaction with inflatable penile prosthesis for the treatment of erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yoon Seob; Ko, Young Hwii; Song, Phil Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We investigated the long-term survival and patient satisfaction with an inflatable penile prosthesis as a treatment for refractory erectile dysfunction (ED). Materials and Methods Between July 1997 and September 2014, a total of 74 patients underwent implantation of an inflatable penile prosthesis. The present mechanical status of the prosthesis was ascertained by telephone interview and review of medical records, and related clinical factors were analyzed by using Cox proportional hazard regression model. To investigate current status and satisfaction with the devices, novel questionnaires consisting of eight items were administered. Results The mean (±standard deviation) age and follow-up period were 57.0±12.2 years and 105.5±64.0 months, respectively. Sixteen patients (21.6%) experienced a mechanical failure and 4 patients (5.4%) experienced a nonmechanical failure at a median follow-up of 98.0 months. Mechanical and overall survival rates of the inflatable penile prosthesis at 5, 10, and 15 years were 93.3%, 76.5%, and 64.8% and 89.1%, 71.4%, and 60.5%, respectively, without a statistically significant correlation with host factors including age, cause of ED, and presence of obesity, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus. Overall, 53 patients (71.6%) completed the questionnaires. The overall patient satisfaction rate was 86.8%, and 83.0% of the patients replied that they intended to repeat the same procedure. Among the 8 items asked, satisfaction with the rigidity of the device received the highest score (90.6%). In contrast, only 60.4% of subjects experienced orgasm. Conclusions The results of our study suggest that excellent long-term reliability and high patient satisfaction rates make the implantation of an inflatable penile prosthesis a recommendable surgical treatment for refractory ED. PMID:26078844

  3. The use of alprostadil sterile powder in a home self-injection study of Asian men with erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Wu, C C; Xue, Z Y; Apichat, K; Huang, S T; He, Z; Garceau, R J

    1996-01-01

    This study evaluated the individual optimal dose of alprostadil in the office setting that could be used as the basis for effective home self-injection therapy. The study included 150 Asian men with erectile dysfunction (ED). The mean age of study participants was 48.3 years (range, 21 to 74 years), and the mean duration of ED was 3.6 years. The most common cause of ED was venogenic (24%), psychogenic (21%), arteriogenic (13%), neurogenic (0.7%), or a combination of these (41%). An optimal response was seen in 72% of patients (n = 108) in the office and 96% of patients (n = 100) at home. The mean +/- SD office dose of alprostadil was 19.4 +/- 12.8 micrograms versus 18.0 +/- 12.2 micrograms at home. More than half of the patients (57% in an office setting and 53% at home) achieved an optimal response at a dose between 5 and 15 micrograms. By the 20-micrograms dose, 82% of patients had achieved an optimal dose at home compared with 70% of patients in the office. An optimal response was seen at the same dose in the office and home in 75% of patients; the dose at home decreased from the office dose for 16% of the patients and increased for 9%. There were 24 patients who experienced adverse events: penile pain after injection (18 patients), cold sweating (2 patients), pediculosis (1 patient), broken leg (1 patient), ankle pain (1 patient), and prolonged erection (1 patient). One patient discontinued the study because of penile pain. Alprostadil sterile powder offered safe and effective treatment of ED for home self-injection therapy. Once an optimal dose response had been established in the physician's office, further home adjustments were needed in 25% of patients. Penile pain, usually mild, was the most common, possibly related adverse effect reported. PMID:8733986

  4. A comparison of the available phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors in the treatment of erectile dysfunction: a focus on avanafil

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Jeffery D; Hill, Stephen R

    2015-01-01

    Background Numerous pathways can lead to erectile dysfunction (ED) in patients, with some patients having multiple causes. Regardless of the etiology, ED has been successfully treated in many patients with the advent of oral phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors (PDE5Is). With the release of avanafil, there are currently four PDE5I options available, and choosing between them should be based on patient-specific considerations and preferences. Objective To review the treatment of ED with PDE5Is, taking into account the effectiveness, safety, and patient satisfaction of these agents, as well as avanafil’s place in therapy. Methods A PubMed search was completed to find articles published in English studying patient satisfaction and adherence to ED medication. Additional searches looked specifically for any data regarding the use of avanafil. Results ED is effectively treated in most patients with PDE5Is, with the most common side effects from the medications being headache, flushing, and visual disturbances. Patients have identified many different factors, such as efficacy, side effects, duration of action, and daily use, in determining overall satisfaction and the right medication for them. While avanafil does not have any patient satisfaction trials to date, it has been proven to be a safe and effective treatment for ED with possibly the fastest onset of action and fewer visual disturbances than its competitors. Conclusion Avanafil along with the other PDE5Is has shown to be a safe and effective oral treatment for ED, with avanafil’s possible place in therapy for patients who want an on-demand option or as an alternative in patients who experience visual disturbances with the other agents. PMID:26316720

  5. Combined intracavernous vasoactive drugs and sildenafil citrate in treatment of severe erectile dysfunction not responding to on-demand monotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Al-Adl, Ahmed M.; Abdel-Wahab, Osama; El-Karamany, Tarek; Aal, Ashraf A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of chronic use of sildenafil and intracavernous injection (ICI) with trimix in men not responding to on-demand monotherapy with sildenafil or ICI with prostaglandin-E1 (PGE1). Patients and methods The study included 40 patients with erectile dysfunction (ED), with a mean (SD) age of 50.7 (11.3) years and unresponsive to on-demand sildenafil or ICI with PGE1 as monotherapy. They were assessed using the Sexual Health in Men (SHIM)-5 score for ED severity, penile colour Doppler ultrasonography (CDUS) for peak systolic velocity (PSV), end-diastolic velocity (EDV) and resistance index (RI) with an ICI test using 0.25 mL of trimix of papaverine, PGE1 and phentolamine. Testosterone, prolactin and cholesterol levels were assessed. Patients received 25 mg sildenafil daily for 8 weeks, combined with twice weekly ICI with 0.25 mL of trimix. After treatment, the Erection Hardness Score (EHS), penile CDUS with ICI and ED Inventory of Treatment Satisfaction were assessed. Results The mean (SD) SHIM-5 score before treatment was 8.3 (0.5) in 15 of the 40 men and 6.3 (0.4) in 25. Penile haemodynamics were normal in five (13%), showed arterial insufficiency in five (13%), venous occlusive disease in 26 (65%) and mixed vascular in four (10%). There was an improved SHIM-5 score in 28 (70%) patients, as shown by their haemodynamic values, duration of erection and EHS with therapy, and 66% satisfaction with treatment. Adverse effects (penile pain, headache, facial flushing, dyspepsia, nasal congestion, dizziness) were reported in 17 patients (43%). Conclusion Chronic use of trimix plus daily low-dose sildenafil improved penile haemodynamics in these patients with ED not responding to on-demand phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors or ICI with PGE1 monotherapy.

  6. Isolation and Characterization of Smooth Muscle Cells from Rat Corpus Cavernosum Tissue for the Study of Erectile Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Hong; Jung, Seung-Hyo; Ryu, Ji-Kan; Kim, Bokyung; Kim, Hong Sup

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Primary culture of the cavernous smooth muscle cells from corpus cavernous tissues is known to be difficult, mainly because of contamination with fibroblasts. We applied a new method for better isolation of rat penile smooth muscle cells (RPSMCs) from rat corpus cavernosum tissue for reliable ex vivo research on erectile dysfunction. Materials and Methods With the use of 8-week-old adult male Sprague-Dawley rats, ex vivo migrations of rat cavernous tissue were measured by penis and aortic ring assay by use of a Matrigel-based D-valine-modified culture method. The expression of ?-smooth muscle actin (?-SMA) and platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM)-1 in the RPSMCs was determined by standard immunofluorescent staining and immunoblotting. The expression patterns of phosphodiesterase (PDE) family mRNA in RPSMCs were compared with patterns in rat aortic smooth muscle cells (RASMCs) by use of quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Results Immunocytochemical staining showed greater ?-SMA-positive and PCAM-1-negative fluorescence. Moreover, whereas the expression of ?-SMA was detected in the RPSMCs, that of PECAM-1 was not. The levels of PDE1A, PDE1B, PDE1C, PDE2A, PDE3A, PDE4A, PDE4B, PDE4C, PDE4D, and PDE5A mRNA in the RPSMCs were about 3.2-, 4.4-, 3.4-, 29.0-, 3.5-, 2.8-, 2.9-, 6.1-, 45.0-, and 6.0-fold the corresponding expression in RASMCs. Conclusions We developed a two-stage tissue culture method utilizing a Matrigel-based sprouting culture system to facilitate stromal cell sprouting and an adherent culture system using D-valine to eliminate the contamination of fibroblasts into the smooth muscle cells. PMID:22950001

  7. Alga Ecklonia bicyclis, Tribulus terrestris, and glucosamine oligosaccharide improve erectile function, sexual quality of life, and ejaculation function in patients with moderate mild-moderate erectile dysfunction: a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, single-blinded study.

    PubMed

    Sansalone, Salvatore; Leonardi, Rosario; Antonini, Gabriele; Vitarelli, Antonio; Vespasiani, Giuseppe; Basic, Dragoslav; Morgia, Giuseppe; Cimino, Sebastiano; Russo, Giorgio Ivan

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of oral therapy with alga Ecklonia bicyclis, Tribulus terrestris, and glucosamine oligosaccharide (Tradamix TX1000) in patients with erectile dysfunction (ED) at 3 months of follow-up. From January 2013 to September 2013, 177 patients diagnosed with mild-moderate ED (IIEF-EF < 26) were enrolled in this multicenter, single-blinded, placebo-controlled study and randomized in Group A (Tradamix, n = 87) and Group B (placebo, n = 90). Penile color Doppler ultrasound measures, IIEF-15 questionnaire, male sexual health questionnaire-ejaculation disorder (MSHQ-EjD), and sexual quality of life (SQoL-M) were collected. We observed significant changes of the IIEF-15 in Group A (mean difference: 11.54; P < 0.05) at 3 months versus Group B (P < 0.05). PSV (P < 0.05), IIEF-intercourse satisfaction (P < 0.05), IIEF-orgasmic function (mean P < 0.05), IIEF-sexual desire (P < 0.05), IIEF-overall satisfaction (P < 0.05), MSHQ-EjD (mean difference: 1.21; P < 0.05), and SQoL-M (mean difference: 10.2; P < 0.05) were significantly changed in Group A versus baseline and Group B. Patients with moderate arterial dysfunction showed significant increase of PSV (P < 0.05), IIEF-EF (P < 0.05), MSHQ-EjD (P < 0.05), and SQoL-M (P < 0.05) in Group A. Therapy with Tradamix improves erectile and ejaculation function and sexual quality of life in patients with mild-moderate ED and in particular for those with moderate arterial dysfunction. PMID:25136552

  8. Alga Ecklonia bicyclis, Tribulus terrestris, and Glucosamine Oligosaccharide Improve Erectile Function, Sexual Quality of Life, and Ejaculation Function in Patients with Moderate Mild-Moderate Erectile Dysfunction: A Prospective, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Single-Blinded Study

    PubMed Central

    Sansalone, Salvatore; Leonardi, Rosario; Antonini, Gabriele; Vitarelli, Antonio; Vespasiani, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of oral therapy with alga Ecklonia bicyclis, Tribulus terrestris, and glucosamine oligosaccharide (Tradamix TX1000) in patients with erectile dysfunction (ED) at 3 months of follow-up. From January 2013 to September 2013, 177 patients diagnosed with mild-moderate ED (IIEF-EF < 26) were enrolled in this multicenter, single-blinded, placebo-controlled study and randomized in Group A (Tradamix, n = 87) and Group B (placebo, n = 90). Penile color Doppler ultrasound measures, IIEF-15 questionnaire, male sexual health questionnaire-ejaculation disorder (MSHQ-EjD), and sexual quality of life (SQoL-M) were collected. We observed significant changes of the IIEF-15 in Group A (mean difference: 11.54; P < 0.05) at 3 months versus Group B (P < 0.05). PSV (P < 0.05), IIEF-intercourse satisfaction (P < 0.05), IIEF-orgasmic function (mean P < 0.05), IIEF-sexual desire (P < 0.05), IIEF-overall satisfaction (P < 0.05), MSHQ-EjD (mean difference: 1.21; P < 0.05), and SQoL-M (mean difference: 10.2; P < 0.05) were significantly changed in Group A versus baseline and Group B. Patients with moderate arterial dysfunction showed significant increase of PSV (P < 0.05), IIEF-EF (P < 0.05), MSHQ-EjD (P < 0.05), and SQoL-M (P < 0.05) in Group A. Therapy with Tradamix improves erectile and ejaculation function and sexual quality of life in patients with mild-moderate ED and in particular for those with moderate arterial dysfunction. PMID:25136552

  9. Development of UK guidance on the management of erectile dysfunction resulting from radical radiotherapy and androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    White, I D; Wilson, J; Aslet, P; Baxter, A B; Birtle, A; Challacombe, B; Coe, J; Grover, L; Payne, H; Russell, S; Sangar, V; Van As, N; Kirby, M

    2015-01-01

    Aim To develop a management strategy (rehabilitation programme) for erectile dysfunction (ED) after radiotherapy (RT) or androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer that is suitable for use in a UK NHS healthcare context. Methods PubMed literature searches of ED management in this patient group together with a survey of 28 experts in the management of treatment-induced ED from across the UK were conducted. Results Data from 19 articles and completed questionnaires were collated. The findings discussed in this article confirm that RT/ADT for prostate cancer can significantly impair erectile function. While many men achieve erections through PDE5-I use, others need combined management incorporating exercise and lifestyle modifications, psychosexual counselling and other erectile aids. This article offers a comprehensive treatment algorithm to manage patients with ED associated with RT/ADT. Conclusion Based on published research literature and survey analysis, recommendations are proposed for the standardisation of management strategies employed for ED after RT/ADT. In addition to implementing the algorithm, understanding the rationale for the type and timing of ED management strategies is crucial for clinicians, men and their partners. PMID:25283500

  10. Effects of quercetin on intracavernous pressure and expression of nitrogen synthase isoforms in arterial erectile dysfunction rat model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yueyang; Huang, Changting; Liu, Shaoming; Bai, Jianqi; Fan, Xiaojing; Guo, Jun; Jia, Yingyu; Zhang, Zhijie; Chen, Xiaojun; Jia, Yusen; Zhang, Ping; Wang, Bin; Zhang, Xiuju

    2015-01-01

    Object: Oxidative stress involved in the regulation of arterial erectile dysfunction (A-ED). Previously report have indicated that quercetin have an antioxidant effect. In the current study, we have established the rats’ model for study the therapeutic effect of quercetin on A-ED and further investigated the molecular mechanism of action. Methods: Wistar rats were divided into sham group, A-ED group, A-ED group with low dose of quercetin, and A-ED group with high dose of quercetin. Intracavernous pressure (ICP) and mean arterial pressure (MBp) are two important indicators used for evaluation the A-ED. The changes of ICP and MBp were determined by cavernous nerve electrostimulation after treatment of quercetin at indicated doses. The expression of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) subtypes was detected by RT-PCR and Western blotting. Results: Our results indicated that ICP was significantly reduced in A-ED rats model compared with sham group, and was significantly increased after quercetin treatment (P < 0.01), while no significant effect on the MBp. The data also showed that sGC inhibitor ODQ and NOS inhibitor LNNA can significantly inhibited the ICP which induced by quercetin. These results suggest that NO-cGMP signaling pathway plays a crucial role in A-ED. Then, we found that the mRNA and protein levels of eNOS were significantly reduced in A-ED group compared with sham group. After treated with quercetin may cause the eNOS RNA and protein were significantly up-regulated (P < 0.01), showing a dose-dependent effect. iNOS expression have a certain degree of increased after quercetin treatment. nNOS expression was not significantly increased before and after treated with quercetin. In a word, quercetin can improved the A-ED by up-regulated ICP, which related to up-regulation of NO-cGMP signaling pathway. Conclusion: Preliminary results of this study suggested that quercetin protected expression and function of eNOS in cavernous endothelial cells, and restored part of normal function of NO-cGMP pathway in the process of penis erection. PMID:26221305

  11. Vasculogenic Mimicry and Tumor Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Folberg, Robert; Hendrix, Mary J. C.; Maniotis, Andrew J.

    2000-01-01

    Tumors require a blood supply for growth and hematogenous dissemination. Much attention has been focused on the role of angiogenesis—the recruitment of new vessels into a tumor from pre-existing vessels. However, angiogenesis may not be the only mechanism by which tumors acquire a microcirculation. Highly aggressive and metastatic melanoma cells are capable of forming highly patterned vascular channels in vitro that are composed of a basement membrane that stains positive with the periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) reagent in the absence of endothelial cells and fibroblasts. These channels formed in vitro are identical morphologically to PAS-positive channels in histological preparations from highly aggressive primary uveal melanomas, in the vertical growth phase of cutaneous melanomas, and in metastatic uveal and cutaneous melanoma. The generation of microvascular channels by genetically deregulated, aggressive tumor cells was termed “vasculogenic mimicry” to emphasize their de novo generation without participation by endothelial cells and independent of angiogenesis. Techniques designed to identify the tumor microcirculation by the staining of endothelial cells may not be applicable to tumors that express vasculogenic mimicry. Although it is not known if therapeutic strategies targeting endothelial cells will be effective in tumors whose blood supply is formed by tumor cells in the absence of angiogenesis, the biomechanical and molecular events that regulate vasculogenic mimicry provide opportunities for the development of novel forms of tumor-targeted treatments. The unique patterning characteristic of vasculogenic mimicry provides an opportunity to design noninvasive imaging techniques to detect highly aggressive neoplasms and their metastases. PMID:10666364

  12. Hypercholesterolemia-induced erectile dysfunction: endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) uncoupling in the mouse penis by NAD(P)H oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Musicki, Biljana; Liu, Tongyun; Lagoda, Gwen A.; Strong, Travis D.; Sezen, Sena F.; Johnson, Justin M.; Burnett, Arthur L.

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Hypercholesterolemia induces erectile dysfunction (ED) mostly by increasing oxidative stress and impairing endothelial function in the penis, but the mechanisms regulating reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in the penis are not understood. AIMS We evaluated whether hypercholesterolemia activates nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAD[P]H) oxidase in the penis, providing an initial source of ROS to induce endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) uncoupling and endothelial dysfunction resulting in ED. METHODS Low-density-lipoprotein receptor (LDLR)–null mice were fed Western diet for 4 weeks to induce early-stage hyperlipidemia. Wild type (WT) mice fed regular chow served as controls. Mice received NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitor apocynin (10 mM in drinking water) or vehicle. Erectile function was assessed in response to cavernous nerve electrical stimulation. Markers of endothelial function (phospho [P]-vasodilator-stimulated-protein [VASP]-Ser-239), oxidative stress (4-hydroxy-2-nonenal [HNE]), sources of ROS (eNOS uncoupling and NAD[P]H oxidase subunits p67phox, p47phox, and gp91phox), P-eNOS-Ser-1177, and eNOS were measured by Western blot in penes. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Molecular mechanisms of ROS generation and endothelial dysfunction in hypercholesterolemia-induced ED. RESULTS Erectile response was significantly (P<0.05) reduced in hypercholesterolemic LDLR-null mice compared to WT mice. Relative to WT mice, hypercholesterolemia increased (P<0.05) protein expressions of NAD(P)H oxidase subunits p67phox, p47phox and gp91phox, eNOS uncoupling, and 4-HNE-modified proteins, and reduced (P<0.05) P-VASP-Ser-239 expression in the penis. Apocynin treatment of LDLR-null mice preserved (P<0.05) maximal intracavernosal pressure, and reversed (P < 0.05) the abnormalities in protein expressions of gp67phox and gp47phox, 4-HNE, P-VASP-Ser-239, and eNOS uncoupling in the penis. Apocynin treatment of WT mice did not affect any of these parameters. Protein expressions of P-eNOS-Ser-1177 and total eNOS were unaffected by hypercholesterolemia. CONCLUSION Activated NAD(P)H oxidase in the penis is an initial source of oxidative stress resulting in eNOS uncoupling, thus providing a mechanism of eNOS uncoupling and endothelial dysfunction in hypercholesterolemia-induced ED. PMID:20626609

  13. A meta-regression evaluating the effectiveness and prognostic factors of oral phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors for the treatment of erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jin-Qiu; Mao, Chen; Yang, Zu-Yao; Fu, Xiao-Hong; Wong, Samuel Y; Tang, Jin-Ling

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (PDE5-Is) for erectile dysfunction (ED) varies considerably among trials, but available studies investigating the factors that affect the effectiveness are few and findings are not consistent. A systematic search was performed in PubMed, Cochrane Library, and EMBASE to identify randomized controlled trials comparing PDE5-Is with placebo for the treatment of ED. The methodological quality of included studies was assessed by the Cochrane Collaboration's tool for assessing risk of bias. The associations between prespecified study-level factors and effectiveness were tested by a random effects meta-regression model. This study included 93 trials with 26 139 patients. When all PDE5-Is were grouped together, Caucasian ethnicity was associated with 15.636% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.858% to 32.579%) increase in risk ratio (RR) for Global Assessment Questionnaire question-1 (GAQ-1), and 1.473 (95% CI: 0.406 to 2.338) score increase in mean difference (MD) for posttreatment International Index of Erectile Function-Erectile Function domain score (IIEF-EF), compared to Asian ethnicity. A one-score increase in baseline IIEF-EF was associated with -5.635% (95% CI: -9.120% to -2.017%) reduction in RR for GAQ-1, and -0.229 (95% CI: -0.425 to -0.042) score decrease in MD for posttreatment IIEF-EF. In conclusion, PDE5-Is are more effective in Caucasians than Asians, and in patients with more severe ED. PMID:25966626

  14. An open-label, multicenter, randomized, crossover study comparing sildenafil citrate and tadalafil for treating erectile dysfunction in Chinese men naïve to phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Wen-Jun; Li, Hong-Jun; Dai, Yu-Tian; He, Xue-You; Huang, Yi-Ran; Liu, Ji-Hong; Sorsaburu, Sebastian; Ji, Chen; Jin, Jian-Jun; Wang, Xiao-Feng

    2015-01-01

    The study was to compare treatment preference, efficacy, and tolerability of sildenafil citrate (sildenafil) and tadalafil for treating erectile dysfunction (ED) in Chinese men naïve to phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitor therapies. This multicenter, randomized, open-label, crossover study evaluated whether Chinese men with ED preferred 20-mg tadalafil or 100-mg sildenafil. After a 4 weeks baseline assessment, 383 eligible patients were randomized to sequential 20-mg tadalafil per 100-mg sildenafil or vice versa for 8 weeks respectively and then chose which treatment they preferred to take during the 8 weeks extension. Primary efficacy was measured by Question 1 of the PDE5 Inhibitor Treatment Preference Questionnaire (PITPQ). Secondary efficacy was analyzed by PITPQ Question 2, the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) erectile function (EF) domain, sexual encounter profile (SEP) Questions 2 and 3, and the Drug Attributes Questionnaire. Three hundred and fifty men (91%) completed the randomized treatment phase. Two hundred and forty-two per 350 (69.1%) patients preferred 20-mg tadalafil, and 108/350 (30.9%) preferred 100-mg sildenafil (P < 0.001) as their treatment in the 8 weeks extension. Ninety-two per 242 (38%) patients strongly preferred tadalafil and 37/108 (34.3%) strongly the preferred sildenafil. The SEP2 (penetration), SEP3 (successful intercourse), and IIEF-EF domain scores were improved in both tadalafil and sildenafil treatment groups. For patients who preferred tadalafil, getting an erection long after taking the medication was the most reported reason for tadalafil preference. The only treatment-emergent adverse event reported by > 2% of men was headache. After tadalafil and sildenafil treatments, more Chinese men with ED naïve to PDE5 inhibitor preferred tadalafil. Both sildenafil and tadalafil treatments were effective and safe. PMID:25370206

  15. Radiation dose delivered to the proximal penis as a predictor of the risk of erectile dysfunction after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wernicke, A. Gabriella; Valicenti, Richard . E-mail: richard.valicenti@mail.tju.edu; DiEva, Kelly; Houser, Christopher; Pequignot, Ed

    2004-12-01

    Purpose/objective: In this study, we evaluated in a serial manner whether radiation dose to the bulb of the penis is predictive of erectile dysfunction, ejaculatory difficulty (EJ), and overall satisfaction with sex life (quality of life) by using serial validated self-administered questionnaires. Methods and materials: Twenty-nine potent men with AJCC Stage II prostate cancer treated with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy alone to a median dose 72.0 Gy (range: 66.6-79.2 Gy) were evaluated by determining the doses received by the penile bulb. The penile bulb was delineated volumetrically, and the dose-volume histogram was obtained on each patient. Results: The median follow-up time was 35 months (range, 16-43 months). We found that for D{sub 30}, D{sub 45}, D{sub 60}, and D{sub 75} (doses to a percent volume of PB: 30%, 45%, 60%, and 75%), higher than the corresponding median dose (defined as high-dose group) correlated with an increased risk of impotence (erectile dysfunction firmness score = 0) (odds ratio [OR] = 7.5, p = 0.02; OR = 7.5, p = 0.02; OR = 8.6, p = 0.008; and OR = 6.9, p = 0.015, respectively). Similarly, for EJD D{sub 30}, D{sub 45}, D{sub 60}, and D{sub 75}, doses higher than the corresponding median ones correlated with worsening ejaculatory function score (EJ = 0 or 1) (OR = 8, p = 0.013; OR = 8, p 0.013; OR = 9.2, p = 0.015; and OR = 8, p = 0.026, respectively). For quality of life, low ({<=}median dose) dose groups of patients improve over time, whereas high-dose groups of patients worsen. Conclusions: This study supports the existence of a penile bulb dose-volume relationship underlying the development of radiation-induced erectile dysfunction. Our data may guide the use of inverse treatment planning to maximize the probability of maintaining sexual potency after radiation therapy.

  16. Subjective effects of Lepidium meyenii (Maca) extract on well-being and sexual performances in patients with mild erectile dysfunction: a randomised, double-blind clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Zenico, T; Cicero, A F G; Valmorri, L; Mercuriali, M; Bercovich, E

    2009-04-01

    Lepidium meyenii (Maca) is a cultivated root belonging to the brassica family used in the Andean region for its supposed aphrodisiac properties. We carried out a double-blind clinical trial on 50 Caucasian men affected by mild erectile dysfunction (ED), randomised to treatment with Maca dry extract, 2400 mg, or placebo. The treatment effect on ED and subjective well-being was tested administrating before and after 12 weeks the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5) and the Satisfaction Profile (SAT-P). After 12 weeks of treatment, both Maca- and placebo-treated patients experienced a significant increase in IIEF-5 score (P < 0.05 for both). However, patients taking Maca experienced a more significant increase than those taking placebo (1.6 +/- 1.1 versus 0.5 +/- 0.6, P < 0.001). Both Maca- and placebo-treated subjects experienced a significant improvement in psychological performance-related SAT-P score, but the Maca group higher than that of placebo group (+9 +/- 6 versus +6 +/- 5, P < 0.05). However, only Maca-treated patients experienced a significant improvement in physical and social performance-related SAT-P score compared with the baseline (+7 +/- 6 and +7 +/- 6, both P < 0.05). In conclusion, our data support a small but significant effect of Maca supplementation on subjective perception of general and sexual well-being in adult patients with mild ED. PMID:19260845

  17. Lead acetate may cause erectile dysfunction by modulating NO/cGMP pathway in rat corpus cavernosum.

    PubMed

    Senbel, Amira M; Helmy, Mai M

    2013-10-01

    Despite the fact that metal toxicity has been widely reported in industrial toxicological studies, very little has been reported about the effect of lead exposure on erectile function. This study investigated the effect of lead on erectile function in rats and aimed to preliminarily test the mechanisms by which it might affect erection. Rats were injected with lead acetate (0.25-2 mg/kg) intraperitoneally for 21 days. Intracavernosal pressure/mean arterial pressure (ICP/MAP) next to nerve stimulation; nitrite/nitrate; malonaldehyde; and reduced glutathione levels and superoxide dismutase activity in the corpus cavernosum, kidney, and brain were measured in addition to creatinine, urea, and testosterone. For acute studies, rats were injected intravenously with lead acetate, and then ICP/MAP was recorded for 45 min. Subacute treatment significantly reduced erection with significant elevation of malonaldehyde and reduction of nitrite/nitrate levels in the corpus cavernosum. In acute studies, lead (2 and 5 mg/kg) reduced neurogenic erections by 28.42?±?3.76 and 96.84?±?8.52%, respectively, an effect that was masked in the presence of NG-nitro-L-arginine, tetraethyl ammonium, or methylene blue, but not zinc protoporphyrine, and reversed by vitamin C and partially by sildenafil. Lead acetate may inhibit the erectile process in rats. Besides its prooxidant effect and consequent inactivation of nitric oxide, lead may negatively modulate the action of nitric oxide on guanylate cyclase and potassium channels. PMID:23979109

  18. Comparison of a needle-free high-pressure injection system with needle-tipped injection of intracavernosal alprostadil for erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Harding, L M; Adeniyi, A; Everson, R; Barker, S; Ralph, D J; Baranowski, A P

    2002-12-01

    Patients identified from hospital records as using alprostadil injections for erectile dysfunction were invited to take part in this open crossover study. On alternate weeks eight patients were given intracavernosal needle injections and transdermal needle-free injection of alprostadil in a randomized order. Efficacy of injection and associated pain were assessed and compared for the two methods. Pain produced during injection was significantly greater with the needle-free system than with the needle-tipped injection whilst efficacy was significantly less. Bruising was reported in all except one patient following needle-free injection only. Patient ratings of the needle-free injector were significantly lower than ratings for needle-tipped alprostadil delivery and when asked to express a preference, every patient chose the needle-tipped injection over the needle-free device. PMID:12494285

  19. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study to assess the efficacy of tadalafil (Cialis[reg]) in the treatment of erectile dysfunction following three-dimensional conformal external-beam radiotherapy for prostatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Incrocci, Luca . E-mail: l.incrocci@erasmusmc.nl; Slagter, Cleo; Slob, A. Koos; Hop, Wim C.J.

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: Erectile dysfunction after three-dimensional conformal external-beam radiotherapy (3DCRT) for prostatic carcinoma is reported in as many as 64% of those patients. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of the oral drug tadalafil (Cialis (registered) ) in patients with erectile dysfunction after radiotherapy for prostatic carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Patients (N = 358) who completed radiotherapy at least 12 months before the study were approached by mail. All patients had been treated by 3DCRT; 60 patients were included and entered a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study lasting 12 weeks. They received 20 mg of tadalafil or placebo for 6 weeks. Drug or placebo was taken on demand at patient's discretion, with no restrictions regarding the consumption of alcohol or food, at least once a week and no more than once daily. At 6 weeks patients crossed over to the alternative treatment. Data were collected using the Sexual Encounter Profile (SEP) and the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) questionnaires. Side effects were also recorded. Results: Mean age at study entry was 69 years. All patients completed the study. For almost all questions of the IIEF questionnaire there was a significant increase in mean scores from baseline with tadalafil, but not with placebo. Sixty-seven percent of the patients reported an improvement of erectile function with tadalafil (placebo: 20%), and 48% reported successful intercourse with tadalafil (placebo: 9%) (p < 0.0001). Side effects were mild or moderate. Conclusions: Tadalafil is an effective treatment for erectile dysfunction after 3DCRT for prostatic carcinoma with successful intercourse reported in almost 50% of the patients, and it is well tolerated.

  20. There Is No Correlation Between Erectile Dysfunction and Dose to Penile Bulb and Neurovascular Bundles Following Real-Time Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Solan, Amy N. Cesaretti, Jamie A.; Stone, Nelson N.; Stock, Richard G.

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: We evaluated the relationship between the onset of erectile dysfunction and dose to the penile bulb and neurovascular bundles (NVBs) after real-time ultrasound-guided prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: One hundred forty-seven patients who underwent prostate brachytherapy met the following eligibility criteria: (1) treatment with {sup 125}I brachytherapy to a prescribed dose of 160 Gy with or without hormones without supplemental external beam radiation therapy, (2) identification as potent before the time of implantation based on a score of 2 or higher on the physician-assigned Mount Sinai Erectile Function Score and a score of 16 or higher on the abbreviated International Index of Erectile Function patient assessment, and (3) minimum follow-up of 12 months. Median follow-up was 25.7 months (range, 12-47 months). Results: The 3-year actuarial rate of impotence was 23% (34 of 147 patients). An additional 43% of potent patients (49 of 113 patients) were using a potency aid at last follow-up. The penile bulb volume receiving 100% of the prescription dose (V{sub 100}) ranged from 0-0.05 cc (median, 0 cc), with a dose to the hottest 5% (D{sub 5}) range of 12.5-97.9 Gy (median, 40.8 Gy). There was no correlation between penile bulb D{sub 5} or V{sub 100} and postimplantation impotency on actuarial analysis. For the combined right and left NVB structures, V{sub 100} range was 0.3-5.1 cc (median, 1.8 cc), and V{sub 150} range was 0-1.5 cc (median, 0.31 cc). There was no association between NVB V{sub 100} or V{sub 150} and postimplantation impotency on actuarial analysis. Conclusion: Penile bulb doses are low after real-time ultrasound-guided prostate brachytherapy. We found no correlation between dose to either the penile bulb or NVBs and the development of postimplantation impotency.

  1. Adipose tissue-derived stem cell therapy for prevention and treatment of erectile dysfunction in a rat model of Peyronie's disease.

    PubMed

    Gokce, A; Abd Elmageed, Z Y; Lasker, G F; Bouljihad, M; Kim, H; Trost, L W; Kadowitz, P J; Abdel-Mageed, A B; Sikka, S C; Hellstrom, W J

    2014-03-01

    Peyronie's disease (PD) is a localized connective tissue disorder that involves the tunica albuginea (TA) of the penis. While surgical correction remains the gold standard, the search for an effective and less invasive therapy continues. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of intratunical injection of adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) for the prevention and treatment of erectile dysfunction in a rat model of PD. Twenty-four male Sprague-Dawley rats (300-350 g) were randomly divided into four groups: sham, PD, PD + ADSC (prevention) and PD + ADSC (treatment). All rats underwent penile injections into the TA with 50 ?L vehicle (sham) or 0.5 ?g transforming growth factor (TGF)-?1 (remaining groups). The ADSC groups received intratunical injections with 0.5 million rat-labelled ADSCs on day 0 (prevention) or day 30 (treatment). Forty-five days following TGF-?1 injection, rats underwent cavernous nerve stimulation (CNS) with total intracavernous-to-mean arterial pressure ratio (ICP/MAP) and total ICP recorded to measure response to therapy. Tissues were evaluated histologically and for mRNA expression of tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs), matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and zymographic activity of MMPs. Statistical analysis was performed by analysis of variance followed by the Tukey test for post hoc comparisons. In both prevention and treatment groups, intratunical injection of ADSCs resulted in significantly higher ICP/MAP and total ICP in response to CNS compared with the PD group. Local injection of ADSCs prevented and/or reduced Peyronie's-like changes by decreasing the expression of TIMPs, and stimulating expression and activity of MMPs. This study documents the preventive and therapeutic benefits of ADSC on penile fibrosis and erectile function in an animal model of PD. PMID:24574095

  2. Animal models of erectile dysfunction (ED): potential utility of non-human primates as a model of atherosclerosis-induced vascular ED.

    PubMed

    Williams, J K; Andersson, K-E; Christ, G

    2012-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a prevalent medical condition affecting 18 million men and their sexual partners in the United States alone. In the majority of patients, ED is related to alterations in the flow of blood to or from the penis. Undeniably, significant progress has been made in understanding the multifactorial mechanisms that modulate erectile capacity and predispose one to ED, and this, in turn, has led to the availability of more effective treatment options. Nonetheless, all current therapies have untoward side effects, and moreover, there are still no satisfactory treatments for many patients with ED. Further enhancements in the treatment of ED would logically result from both early intervention and more detailed mechanistic insight into the characteristics of the disease process per se. This fact underscores the importance of improved understanding of the initiation, development and progression of ED. However, to do so requires longitudinal studies on animal models that more closely approximate the corresponding clinical features and time course of human disease. The goal of this report is twofold. First, to provide a brief general overview of the applicability of commonly used animal models for the study of ED. The second and primary goal is to highlight the scientific rationale for using non-human primates to evaluate the impact of atherosclerosis-induced vascular disease on the penile and systemic circulatory systems. This latter goal seems especially relevant in light of the recent literature documenting a link between ED and systemic vascular disease, a finding that has major implications in an aging US male population consuming a high fat diet. PMID:22205244

  3. A 2-Stage Genome-Wide Association Study to Identify Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Associated With Development of Erectile Dysfunction Following Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kerns, Sarah L.; Departments of Pathology and Genetics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York ; Stock, Richard; Stone, Nelson; Department of Urology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York ; Buckstein, Michael; Shao, Yongzhao; Campbell, Christopher; Rath, Lynda; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Lammering, Guido; Hixson, Rosetta; Cesaretti, Jamie; Terk, Mitchell; Ostrer, Harry; Rosenstein, Barry S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with development of erectile dysfunction (ED) among prostate cancer patients treated with radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A 2-stage genome-wide association study was performed. Patients were split randomly into a stage I discovery cohort (132 cases, 103 controls) and a stage II replication cohort (128 cases, 102 controls). The discovery cohort was genotyped using Affymetrix 6.0 genome-wide arrays. The 940 top ranking SNPs selected from the discovery cohort were genotyped in the replication cohort using Illumina iSelect custom SNP arrays. Results: Twelve SNPs identified in the discovery cohort and validated in the replication cohort were associated with development of ED following radiation therapy (Fisher combined P values 2.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} to 6.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4}). Notably, these 12 SNPs lie in or near genes involved in erectile function or other normal cellular functions (adhesion and signaling) rather than DNA damage repair. In a multivariable model including nongenetic risk factors, the odds ratios for these SNPs ranged from 1.6 to 5.6 in the pooled cohort. There was a striking relationship between the cumulative number of SNP risk alleles an individual possessed and ED status (Sommers' D P value = 1.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -29}). A 1-allele increase in cumulative SNP score increased the odds for developing ED by a factor of 2.2 (P value = 2.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -19}). The cumulative SNP score model had a sensitivity of 84% and specificity of 75% for prediction of developing ED at the radiation therapy planning stage. Conclusions: This genome-wide association study identified a set of SNPs that are associated with development of ED following radiation therapy. These candidate genetic predictors warrant more definitive validation in an independent cohort.

  4. Adherence to Phosphodiesterase Type 5 Inhibitors in the Treatment of Erectile Dysfunction in Long-Term Users: How Do Men Use the Inhibitors?

    PubMed Central

    Carvalheira, Ana; Forjaz, Vera; Pereira, Nuno Monteiro

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The high effectiveness of phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (PDE5-i) in the treatment of erectile dysfunction (ED) has been demonstrated. However, previous research shows that PDE5-i treatments have high discontinuation rates. Aim The main goals of this study were to (i) characterize the way men use PDE5-i and (ii) analyze the adherence to treatment, identifying the factors that influence PDE5-i use. Methods A total of 148 men with clinical diagnosis for ED who maintained the treatment with PDE5-i for over 3 years were interviewed. Interviews concerning their ongoing treatment were carried out using a standardized questionnaire with quantitative and qualitative items. Main Outcome Measures Physiological measures included the intracavernous alprostadil injection test, associated with penile rigidometry and penile Doppler ultrasound. The qualitative measure included two questions: “Do you use the drug in every sexual intercourse?” and “How do you use the inhibitor?” Results ED causes were classified as venogenic (31%), arteriogenic (23%), psychogenic (18%), iatrogenic (13%), neurogenic (8%), and diabetic (7%). Participation rate was 71.8%. Of the 148 patients studied, 75% claimed not to use PDE5-i in every intercourse. Most used tadalafil (66%), followed by sildenafil (20%), vardenafil (10%), and 4% alternated the type of medicine. Four main categories emerged concerning the factors that determine the intake of PDE5-i in some intercourse situations and not in others: (i) psychological factors; (ii) medication-related factors; (iii) circumstantial factors; and (iv) relational factors. Conclusion The analysis of men's narratives revealed a combination of factors that influence the adherence to PDE5-i. The psychological and medication-related factors were the most prevalent. This study highlighted the importance of taking these factors into account, both at the time of prescription and during the follow-up in order to improve adherence. Carvalheira A, Forjaz V, and Pereira NM. Adherence to phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors in the treatment of erectile dysfunction in long-term users: How do men use the inhibitors? Sex Med 2014;2:96–102. PMID:25356304

  5. What do most erectile dysfunction guidelines have in common? No evidence-based discussion or recommendation of heart-healthy lifestyle changes and/or Panax ginseng

    PubMed Central

    Moyad, Mark A; Park, Kwangsung

    2012-01-01

    Sexual health or erectile dysfunction (ED) state of the art guidelines provide a thorough overview of conventional prescription or other notable extrinsic treatment options. Yet, over the past 10–15 years, a plethora of international researchers have established that individual and comprehensive lifestyle changes can prevent and potentially improve ED. We review the lifestyle evidence that should equate to grade A or level 1 evidence recommendations for ED. We also review the evidence for Panax ginseng, an over-the-counter (OTC) dietary supplement with a 35-year history of laboratory investigations, multiple positive randomized trials over approximately 15 years and several independent meta-analyses and systematic reviews. Perhaps it is time to at least discuss and even emphasize lifestyle and other non-conventional interventions in ED guidelines so that patients can explore a diversity of potentially synergistic choices with their physicians and can improve their quality and quantity of life. Ignoring the consistent, positive data on lifestyle modifications in ED guidelines, for example, is tantamount to ignoring diet and lifestyle changes to reduce the risk of or ameliorate cardiovascular diseases. PMID:23001440

  6. Structure elucidation of phototransformation products of unapproved analogs of the erectile dysfunction drug sildenafil in artificial freshwater with UPLC-Q Exactive-MS.

    PubMed

    Aceña, Jaume; Pérez, Sandra; Gardinali, Piero; Abad, José Luis; Eichhorn, Peter; Heuett, Nubia; Barceló, Damià

    2014-12-01

    In this study, four unapproved analogues of Sildenafil (SDF) were photodegraded under synthetic sunlight in artificial freshwater. Homosildenafil (H-SDF), hydroxyhomo-sildenafil (HH-SDF), norneosildenafil (NR-SDF) and thiosildenafil (T-SDF) were selected because they are frequently detected as adulterants in natural herbal products. Using UPLC-Orbitrap (Q Exactive)-MS, six photoproducts common to H-SDF, HH-SDF and T-SDF and nine unique transformation products of different molecular weights were identified based on their high-resolution (+)ESI product ion spectra. Mass spectral analysis of deuterated H-SDF, labeled on the N-ethyl group, allowed to gain mechanistic insight into the fragmentation pathway of the substituted piperazine ring and to support the postulated photoproduct structures. The mass spectral fragmentation confirmed the stepwise destruction of the piperazine ring eventually producing a sulfonic acid derivative (C17 H20 N4 O5 S: 392.1151?Da). In contrast, the photodegradation of NR-SDF, which lacks a piperazine ring in its structure, formed only two prominent photoproducts originating from N,N-dealkylation of the sulfonamide followed by hydrolysis. The current work constitutes the first study on the photodegradation of analogs of erectile dysfunction drugs and the first detection of two transformation products (m/z 449 and 489) in environmental samples. PMID:25476946

  7. Clinical significance of erectile dysfunction developing after acute coronary event: exception to the rule or confirmation of the artery size hypothesis?

    PubMed Central

    Montorsi, Piero; Ravagnani, Paolo M; Vlachopoulos, Charalambos

    2015-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) has been found to frequently precedes the onset of coronary artery disease (CAD), representing an early marker of subclinical vascular disease, included CAD. Its recognition is, therefore, a “window opportunity” to prevent a coronary event by aggressive treatment of cardiovascular risk factors. The artery size hypothesis (ASH) has been proposed as a putative mechanism to explain the relationship between ED and CAD. Since atherosclerosis is a systemic disorder all major vascular beds should be affected to the same extent. However, symptoms at different points in the system rarely become evident at the same time. This is likely the result of smaller vessels (i.e. the penile artery) being able to less well tolerate the same amount of plaque when compared with larger ones (i.e. the coronary artery). If true, ED will develop before CAD. We present a case in which ED developed after a coronary event yet before a coronary recurrence potentially representing a late marker of vascular progression. Reasons for this unusual sequence are discussed as they might still fit the ASH. PMID:25337840

  8. Improved Penile Histology by Phalloidin Stain: Circular and Longitudinal Cavernous Smooth Muscles, Dual-Endothelium Arteries, and Erectile Dysfunction-Associated Changes

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Guiting; Qiu, Xuefeng; Fandel, Thomas M.; Albersen, Maarten; Wang, Zhong; Lue, Tom F.; Lin, Ching-Shwun

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To investigate whether fluorochrome-conjugated phalloidin can delineate cavernous smooth muscle (CSM) cells and whether it can be combined with immunofluorescence (IF) staining to quantify erectile dysfunction (ED)-associated changes. Methods ED was induced by cavernous nerve crush in rats. Penile tissues of control and ED rats were stained with Alexa-488-conjugated phalloidin and/or with antibodies against rat endothelial cell antigen (RECA), CD31, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), and collagen-IV (Col-IV). Results Phalloidin was able to delineate CSM as composed of a circular and a longitudinal compartment. When combined with IF stain for CD31 or RECA, it helped the identification of the helicine arteries as covered by endothelial cells on both sides of the smooth muscle layer. When combined with IF stain for nNOS, it helped the identification that nNOS-positive nerves were primarily localized within the dorsal nerves and in the adventitia of dorsal arteries. When combined with IF stain for Col-IV, it helped identify that Col-IV was localized around smooth muscles and beneath the endothelium. Phalloidin also facilitated the quantitative analysis of ED-related changes in the penis. In rats with cavernous nerve injury, RECA or Col-IV expression did not change significantly, but CSM and nNOS nerve contents decreased significantly. Conclusions Phalloidin stain improved penile histology, enabling the visualization of the circular and longitudinal compartments in the CSM. It also worked synergistically with IF stain, permitting the visualization of the dual endothelial covering in helicine arteries, and facilitating the quantification of ED-related histological changes. PMID:21840580

  9. Oral Bisphenol A (BPA) given to rats at moderate doses is associated with erectile dysfunction, cavernosal lipofibrosis and alterations of global gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Kovanecz, I; Gelfand, R; Masouminia, M; Gharib, S; Segura, D; Vernet, D; Rajfer, J; Li, D K; Kannan, K; Gonzalez-Cadavid, N F

    2014-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA), a suspected reproductive biohazard and endocrine disruptor, released from plastics is associated with ED in occupationally exposed workers. However, in rats, despite the induction of hypogonadism, apoptosis of the penile corporal smooth muscle (SM), fat infiltration into the cavernosal tissue and changes in global gene expression with the intraperitoneal administration of high dose BPA, ED was not observed. We investigated whether BPA administered orally rather than intraperitoneally to rats for longer periods and lower doses will lead to ED. Main outcome measures are ED, histological, and biochemical markers in rat penile tissues. In all, 2.5-month-old rats were given drinking water daily without and with BPA at 1 and 0.1 mg kg(-1) per day. Two months later, erectile function was determined by cavernosometry and electrical field stimulation (EFS) and serum levels of testosterone (T), estradiol (E2) and BPA were measured. Penile tissue sections were assayed by Masson (SM/collagen), Oil Red O (fat), terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) (apoptosis), immunohistochemistry for Oct4 (stem cells), and ?-SM actin/calponin (SM and myofibroblasts), applying quantitative image analysis. Other markers were assayed by western blotting. DNA microarrays/microRNA (miR) assays defined transcription profiles. Orally administered BPA did not affect body weight, but (1) decreased serum T and E2; (2) reduced the EFS response and increased the drop rate; (3) increased within the corporal tissue the presence of fat, myofibroblasts and apoptosis; (4) lowered the contents of SM and stem cells, but not nerve terminals; and (5) caused alterations in the transcriptional profiles for both mRNA and miRs within the penile shaft. Long-term exposure of rats to oral BPA caused a moderate corporal veno-occlusive dysfunction (CVOD), possibly due to alterations within the corporal tissue that pose gene transcriptional changes related to inflammation, fibrosis and epithelial/mesenchymal transition (EMT). PMID:24305612

  10. Ca2+-activated K+ channel (KCa) stimulation improves relaxant capacity of PDE5 inhibitors in human penile arteries and recovers the reduced efficacy of PDE5 inhibition in diabetic erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    González-Corrochano, R; La Fuente, JM; Cuevas, P; Fernández, A; Chen, MX; Sáenz de Tejada, I; Angulo, J

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose We have evaluated the influence of calcium-activated potassium channels (KCa) activation on cGMP-mediated relaxation in human penile tissues from non-diabetic and diabetic patients, and on the effects of PDE5 inhibitors on erectile responses in control and diabetic rats. Experimental Approach Cavernosal tissues were collected from organ donors and from patients with erectile dysfunction (ED). Relaxations of corpus cavernosum strips (HCC) and penile resistance arteries (HPRA) obtained from these specimens were evaluated. Intracavernosal pressure (ICP) increases to cavernosal nerve electrical stimulation were determined in anaesthetized diabetic and non-diabetic rats. Key Results Concentration-dependent vasodilation to the PDE5 inhibitor, sildenafil, in HPRA was sensitive to endothelium removal, NO/cGMP pathway inhibition and KCa blockade. Accordingly, activation of KCa with NS-8 (10 ?M) significantly potentiated sildenafil-induced relaxations in HPRA (EC50 0.49 ± 0.22 vs. 5.21 ± 0.63 ?M). In HCC, sildenafil-induced relaxation was unaffected by KCa blockade or activation. Potentiating effects in HPRA were reproduced with an alternative PDE5 inhibitor (tadalafil) and KCa activator (NS1619) and prevented by removing the endothelium. Large-conductance KCa (BK) and intermediate-conductance KCa (IK) contribute to NS-8-induced effects and were immunodetected in human and rat penile arteries. NS-8 potentiated sildenafil-induced enhancement of erectile responses in rats. Activation of KCa recovered the impaired relaxation to sildenafil in diabetic HPRA while sildenafil completely reversed diabetes-induced ED in rats only when combined with KCa activation. Conclusions and Implications Activation of KCa improves vasodilatory capacity of PDE5 inhibitors in diabetic and non-diabetic HPRA, resulting in the recovery of erectile function in diabetic rats. These results suggest a therapeutic potential for KCa activation in diabetic ED. PMID:23441682

  11. Radioisotope penogram in diagnosis of vasculogenic impotence

    SciTech Connect

    Fanous, H.N.; Jevtich, M.J.; Chen, D.C.; Edson, M.

    1982-11-01

    A radioisotope technique to estimate penile blood flow is described. The radioisotope penogram is noninvasive and gives a dynamic evaluation of the arterial supply, venous drainage, and blood flow in the corporeal bodies. The penogram is a valuable adjunct in evaluation of patients with vasculogenic impotence.

  12. Genome-Wide Association Study to Identify Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) Associated With the Development of Erectile Dysfunction in African-American Men After Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kerns, Sarah L.; Ostrer, Harry; Stock, Richard; Li, William; Pearlman, Alexander; Campbell, Christopher; Shao Yongzhao; Stone, Nelson; Kusnetz, Lynda; Rosenstein, Barry S.

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: To identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with erectile dysfunction (ED) among African-American prostate cancer patients treated with external beam radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A cohort of African-American prostate cancer patients treated with external beam radiation therapy was observed for the development of ED by use of the five-item Sexual Health Inventory for Men (SHIM) questionnaire. Final analysis included 27 cases (post-treatment SHIM score {<=}7) and 52 control subjects (post-treatment SHIM score {>=}16). A genome-wide association study was performed using approximately 909,000 SNPs genotyped on Affymetrix 6.0 arrays (Affymetrix, Santa Clara, CA). Results: We identified SNP rs2268363, located in the follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) gene, as significantly associated with ED after correcting for multiple comparisons (unadjusted p = 5.46 x 10{sup -8}, Bonferroni p = 0.028). We identified four additional SNPs that tended toward a significant association with an unadjusted p value < 10{sup -6}. Inference of population substructure showed that cases had a higher proportion of African ancestry than control subjects (77% vs. 60%, p = 0.005). A multivariate logistic regression model that incorporated estimated ancestry and four of the top-ranked SNPs was a more accurate classifier of ED than a model that included only clinical variables. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first genome-wide association study to identify SNPs associated with adverse effects resulting from radiotherapy. It is important to note that the SNP that proved to be significantly associated with ED is located within a gene whose encoded product plays a role in male gonad development and function. Another key finding of this project is that the four SNPs most strongly associated with ED were specific to persons of African ancestry and would therefore not have been identified had a cohort of European ancestry been screened. This study demonstrates the feasibility of a genome-wide approach to investigate genetic predisposition to radiation injury.

  13. The Impact of Medical and Surgical Treatment for Benign Prostatic Hypertrophy on Erectile Function.

    PubMed

    Stearns, Gillian L; Sandhu, Jaspreet S

    2015-11-01

    There is a well-known link between treatment for lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and erectile dysfunction. Surgical and medical management of LUTS all have side effect profiles which may affect erectile dysfunction, ejaculatory dysfunction, or libido. These should be taken into consideration during patient counseling. This article reviews the common side effects of the medical and surgical treatments of LUTS. PMID:26438220

  14. Cardiovascular Implications of Erectile Dysfunction

    MedlinePLUS

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  15. Penile xenon (/sup 133/Xe) washout: a rapid method of screening for vasculogenic impotence

    SciTech Connect

    Nseyo, U.O.; Wilbur, H.J.; Kang, S.A.; Flesh, L.; Bennett, A.H.

    1984-01-01

    The radioactive inert gas xenon (/sup 133/Xe) is a well-established isotopic indicator used to assess vascular status in many organ systems. Xenon-133 was used to evaluate male impotence. Xenon-133 was injected subcutaneously at the level of the coronal sulcus in the detumescent state. Using the gamma camera, sequential images were obtained and computer-generated curves calculated. The clearance time for 50 per cent washout of the injected /sup 133/Xe (T1/2) was then calculated for each patient, as well as a control group. Preliminary findings indicate a correlation with such established techniques of evaluating erectile impotence as history, physical examination, penile pulse Doppler tracings, and brachial-penile blood pressure index. The xenon-133 washout study was a rapid, minimally invasive, reproducible, and cost-effective method of screening those impotent patients for vasculogenic etiology of their erectile impotence. We recommend the addition of this method to the surgeon engaged in the care of impotent males.

  16. Lycorine hydrochloride inhibits metastatic melanoma cell-dominant vasculogenic mimicry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruifang; Cao, Zhifei; Tu, Jian; Pan, Yanyan; Shang, Bingxue; Zhang, Gaochuan; Bao, Meimei; Zhang, Shasha; Yang, Ping; Zhou, Quansheng

    2012-09-01

    Melanoma cells actively participate in tumor angiogenesis and vasculogenic mimicry. However, anti-angiogenic therapy in patients with melanoma has not shown a significant survival gain. Thus, new anti-melanoma angiogenic and vasculogenic drugs are highly desired. Using the metastatic melanoma cell line C8161 as a model, we explored melanoma vasculogenic inhibitors and found that lycorine hydrochloride (LH) effectively suppressed C8161 cell-dominant formation of capillary-like tubes in vitro and generation of tumor blood vessels in vivo with low toxicity. Mechanistic studies revealed that LH markedly hindered expression of VE-cadherin in C8161 cells, but did not affect expression of six other important angiogenic and vasculogenic genes. Luciferase assays showed that LH significantly impeded promoter activity of the VE-cadherin gene in a dose-dependent manner. Together, these data suggest that LH inhibits melanoma C8161 cell-dominant vasculogenic mimicry by reducing VE-cadherin gene expression and diminishing cell surface exposure of the protein. PMID:22781316

  17. An Observational Study to Evaluate the Prevalence of Erectile Dysfunction (ED) and Prescribing Pattern of Drugs in Patients with ED Visiting an Andrology Specialty Clinic, Mumbai: 2012-14

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Vijay R.; Bhagat, Sagar B.; Beldar, Amit S.; Patel, Sadiq B.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common occurrence and its incidence is expected to increase significantly along with the increase in various lifestyle diseases. The drug utilization for ED is very low. Also, studies describing the prescription pattern in ED are lacking. Materials and Methods: We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional observational study, including a drug utilization analysis, of 606 prescriptions as per the standard guidelines (WHO and STROBE). Results: Out of 606, 249 (41%) were from the age group of 30-39 years. Addictions were present in 388 (64%). Out of 606, 186 had urological, 154 had cardiovascular and 102 had psychological co-morbid disorders. Out of 348, 201 were prescribed Tadalafil (low dose) on a once daily basis. Out of 172, 121 were prescribed Sildenafil (high dose) on an ‘as and when required’ basis. Nutritional/ herbal supplements were prescribed in 126/606. The ratio of ‘Prescribed Daily Dose’ to ‘Defined Daily Dose’ of Tadalafil, Sildenafil, and Dapoxetine were 1.1, 1.3 and 1.5 respectively. Conclusion: Measures for de-addiction play an important role in the overall management of ED. The most common co-morbid disorders were urological, like BPH, LUTS, etc, followed by cardiovascular, psychological and diabetes. Overall, rational pharmacotherapy was observed. Tadalafil was the most commonly prescribed drug for ED. The main factor in the selection of a particular PDE5 inhibitor was its pharmacokinetics and cost. Udenafil, being the costliest, was the least prescribed. Dapoxetine was used in a significant number of individuals primarily for PE with ED. The combination of Papaverine, Chlorpromazine ± Alprostadil was used as intracavernosal injection in patients not responding to oral drugs. PMID:26393163

  18. The Effect of Endovascular Revascularization of Common Iliac Artery Occlusions on Erectile Function

    SciTech Connect

    Gur, Serkan; Ozkan, Ugur; Onder, Hakan; Tekbas, Gueven; Oguzkurt, Levent

    2013-02-15

    To determine the incidence of erectile dysfunction in patients with common iliac artery (CIA) occlusive disease and the effect of revascularization on erectile function using the sexual health inventory for males (SHIM) questionnaire. All patients (35 men; mean age 57 {+-} 5 years; range 42-67 years) were asked to recall their sexual function before and 1 month after iliac recanalization. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine variables effecting improvement of impotence. The incidence of impotence in patients with CIA occlusion was 74% (26 of 35) preoperatively. Overall 16 (46%) of 35 patients reported improved erectile function after iliac recanalization. The rate of improvement of impotence was 61.5% (16 of 26 impotent patients). Sixteen patients (46%), including seven with normal erectile function before the procedure, had no change. Three patients (8%) reported deterioration of their sexual function, two of whom (6%) had normal erectile function before the procedure. The median SHIM score increased from 14 (range 4-25) before the procedure to 20 (range 1-25) after the procedure (P = 0.005). The type of recanalization, the age of the patients, and the length of occlusion were related to erectile function improvement in univariate analysis. However, these factors were not independent factors for improvement of erectile dysfunction in multivariate analysis (P > 0.05). Endovascular recanalization of CIA occlusions clearly improves sexual function. More than half of the patients with erectile dysfunction who underwent endovascular recanalization of the CIA experienced improvement.

  19. Peyronie's disease and erectile failure

    SciTech Connect

    Metz, P.; Ebbehoj, J.; Uhrenholdt, A.; Wagner, G.

    1983-12-01

    A total of 20 patients with Peyronie's disease, including 15 with erectile failure and 5 with normal potency, underwent evaluation with dynamic xenon washout and infusion cavernosography. Abnormal drainage from the cavernous body was found in 13 of the 15 patients with erectile failure and in none of the 5 potent patients, indicating that this condition seems to be the underlying pathological mechanism leading to erectile impotence in patients with Peyronie's disease.

  20. Prediction of Erectile Function Following Treatment for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Alemozaffar, Mehrdad; Regan, Meredith M.; Cooperberg, Matthew R.; Wei, John T.; Michalski, Jeff M.; Sandler, Howard M.; Hembroff, Larry; Sadetsky, Natalia; Saigal, Christopher S.; Litwin, Mark S.; Klein, Eric; Kibel, Adam S.; Hamstra, Daniel A.; Pisters, Louis L.; Kuban, Deborah A.; Kaplan, Irving D.; Wood, David P.; Ciezki, Jay; Dunn, Rodney L.; Carroll, Peter R.; Sanda, Martin G.

    2013-01-01

    Context Sexual function is the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) domain most commonly impaired after prostate cancer treatment; however, validated tools to enable personalized prediction of erectile dysfunction after prostate cancer treatment are lacking. Objective To predict long-term erectile function following prostate cancer treatment based on individual patient and treatment characteristics. Design Pretreatment patient characteristics, sexual HRQOL, and treatment details measured in a longitudinal academic multicenter cohort (Prostate Cancer Outcomes and Satisfaction With Treatment Quality Assessment; enrolled from 2003 through 2006), were used to develop models predicting erectile function 2 years after treatment. A community-based cohort (community-based Cancer of the Prostate Strategic Urologic Research Endeavor [CaPSURE]; enrolled 1995 through 2007) externally validated model performance. Patients in US academic and community-based practices whose HRQOL was measured pretreatment (N = 1201) underwent follow-up after prostatectomy, external radiotherapy, or brachytherapy for prostate cancer. Sexual outcomes among men completing 2 years’ follow-up (n = 1027) were used to develop models predicting erectile function that were externally validated among 1913 patients in a community-based cohort. Main Outcome Measures Patient-reported functional erections suitable for intercourse 2 years following prostate cancer treatment. Results Two years after prostate cancer treatment, 368 (37% [95% CI, 34%–40%]) of all patients and 335 (48% [95% CI, 45%–52%]) of those with functional erections prior to treatment reported functional erections; 531 (53% [95% CI, 50%–56%]) of patients without penile prostheses reported use of medications or other devices for erectile dysfunction. Pretreatment sexual HRQOL score, age, serum prostate-specific antigen level, race/ethnicity, body mass index, and intended treatment details were associated with functional erections 2 years after treatment. Multivariable logistic regression models predicting erectile function estimated 2-year function probabilities from as low as 10% or less to as high as 70% or greater depending on the individual’s pretreatment patient characteristics and treatment details. The models performed well in predicting erections in external validation among CaPSURE cohort patients (areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve, 0.77 [95% CI, 0.74–0.80] for prostatectomy; 0.87 [95% CI, 0.80–0.94] for external radiotherapy; and 0.90 [95% CI, 0.85–0.95] for brachytherapy). Conclusion Stratification by pretreatment patient characteristics and treatment details enables prediction of erectile function 2 years after prostatectomy, external radiotherapy, or brachytherapy for prostate cancer. PMID:21934053

  1. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors for premature ejaculation: review of erectile and ejaculatory side effects.

    PubMed

    Lasker, George F; Halis, Fikret; Gokce, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Premature ejaculation is one of the most prevalent sexual disorders affecting men today. The lack of approved therapies has resulted in the prescription of many 'off-label' treatments to manage the condition. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors have an interesting side effect of prolonging ejaculatory latency. Consequently, these agents are often considered a first line treatment for patients suffering from premature ejaculation. Erectile dysfunction is another common side effect reported by men treated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Nitric oxide is the primary mediator of erectile function. Preclinical studies have provided evidence that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors decrease nitric oxide bioavailability. This invited mini-review aims to examine the physiology of the erectile and ejaculatory responses, discuss the indicated and 'off-label' clinical utility of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and to summarize evidence from basic science and clinical studies pertaining to mechanisms of how selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor therapy modifies ejaculatory and erectile function. PMID:24446888

  2. Vasculogenic dynamics in 3D engineered tissue constructs

    PubMed Central

    Blinder, Yaron J.; Freiman, Alina; Raindel, Noa; Mooney, David J.; Levenberg, Shulamit

    2015-01-01

    Implantable 3D engineered vascular tissue constructs can be formed by co-culturing endothelial and fibroblast cells on macroporous scaffolds. Here we show that these constructs can be used for studying the dynamics of neovascular formation in-vitro by a combination of live confocal imaging and an array of image processing and analysis tools, revealing multiple distinct stages of morphogenesis. We show that this process involves both vasculogenic and angiogenic elements, including an initial endothelial multicellular cluster formation followed by rapid extensive sprouting, ultimately resulting in a stable interconnected endothelial network morphology. This vascular morphogenesis is time-correlated with the deposition and formation of an extensive extra-cellular matrix environment. We further show that endothelial network junctions are formed by two separate morphogenic mechanisms of anastomosis and cluster thinning. PMID:26648270

  3. Chronic administration of sildenafil improves erectile function in a rat model of chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Gurbuz, Nilgun; Kol, Arif; Ipekci, Tumay; Ates, Erhan; Baykal, Asli; Usta, Mustafa F

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between erectile dysfunction (ED) and chronic renal failure (CRF) has been reported in several studies. This study aimed to investigate whether the chronic use of sildenafil could enhance the erectile capacity in CRF-induced rats. In addition, we assessed the effect of that treatment on certain molecules, which have been suggested to play crucial roles in erectile physiology and CRF-related ED as well. Three groups of animals were utilized: (1) age-matched control rats, (2) CRF-induced rats, (3) CRF-induced rats treated with chronic administration of sildenafil (5 mg kg-1 p.o. for 6 weeks [treatment started after 6 weeks of CRF induction]). At 3 months, all animals underwent cavernosal nerve stimulation (CNS) to assess erectile function. Penile tissue advanced glycation end products (AGE's)/5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde, malondialdehyde (MDA), cGMP (ELISA), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and neuronal NOS (nNOS) (Western blot) analyses were performed in all rat groups. CRF-induced rats had a significant decrease in erectile function when compared to control rats (P < 0.05). The increase in both intracavernosal pressure (ICP) and area under the curve of CRF-induced rats treated with sildenafil (Group 3) was greater than CRF-induced rats (Group 2). Additionally, sildenafil treatment decreased AGE, MDA and iNOS levels, while it preserved nNOS and cGMP contents in CRF-induced penile tissue. Decreased AGE, MDA, iNOS and increased nNOS, cGMP levels at the sildenafil-treated group increased both ICP and Total ICP to CNS, which led to improve erectile function in CRF-induced rats. The results of the present study revealed the therapeutic effect of chronic sildenafil administration on erectile function in CRF-induced rats. PMID:25652632

  4. Improvement of erectile function by Korean red ginseng (Panax ginseng) in a male rat model of metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Dae; Kim, Young-Joo; Huh, Jung-Sik; Kim, Sae-Woong; Sohn, Dong-Wan

    2013-01-01

    The seriousness of metabolic syndrome is not due to the disease itself but its promotion of other diseases, such as erectile dysfunction and cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. We investigated the effects of Korean red ginseng (KRG, Panax ginseng) extract on erectile function in a rat model of metabolic syndrome. We divided the rats into three groups: control, metabolic syndrome+normal saline (N/S) and metabolic syndrome+KRG. To determine the occurrence of metabolic syndrome in all groups, body weight and various biochemical parameters (e.g., blood glucose, insulin, cholesterol) were measured, and the intra-abdominal glucose tolerance test was performed. To investigate penile erection, the peak intracavernosal pressure (ICP), mean arterial pressure (MAP) and Masson's trichrome stain were evaluated. Erectile function was also investigated by measuring the cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels of the corpus cavernosum. We found that the various biochemical parameters and body weight were similar in the metabolic syndrome+KRG group and the control group, although the values were slightly higher. The peak ICP/MAP ratio of the metabolic syndrome+N/S group was markedly decreased compared to the other groups. The cGMP level of the corpus cavernosum in the metabolic syndrome+N/S group was significantly lower than that of the other groups. As demonstrated in this model of metabolic syndrome with erectile dysfunction, KRG may improve erectile function. PMID:23377529

  5. Analysis of erectile responses to H2S donors in the anesthetized rat.

    PubMed

    Jupiter, Ryan C; Yoo, Daniel; Pankey, Edward A; Reddy, Vishwaradh V G; Edward, Justin A; Polhemus, David J; Peak, Taylor C; Katakam, Prasad; Kadowitz, Philip J

    2015-09-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a biologically active endogenous gasotransmitter formed in penile tissue that has been shown to relax isolated cavernosal smooth muscle. In the present study, erectile responses to the H2S donors sodium sulfide (Na2S) and sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) were investigated in the anesthetized rat. Intracavernosal injections of Na2S in doses of 0.03-1 mg/kg increased intracavernosal pressure and transiently decreased mean arterial pressure in a dose-dependent manner. Blood pressure responses to Na2S were rapid in onset and short in duration. Responses to Na2S and NaHS were similar at doses up to 0.3 mg/kg, after which a plateau in the erectile response to NaHS was reached. Increases in intracavernosal pressure in response to Na2S were attenuated by tetraethylammonium (K(+) channel inhibitor) and iberiotoxin (large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel inhibitor), whereas glybenclamide [ATP-sensitive K(+) (KATP) channel inhibitor] and inhibitors of nitric oxide (NO) synthase, cyclooxygenase, and cytochrome P-450 epoxygenase had no effect. These data indicate that erectile responses to Na2S are mediated by a tetraethylammonium- and iberiotoxin-sensitive mechanism and that KATP channels, NO, or arachidonic acid metabolites are not involved. Na2S did not alter erectile responses to sodium nitroprusside (NO donor) or cavernosal nerve stimulation, indicating that neither NO nor cGMP metabolism are altered. Thus, Na2S has erectile activity mediated by large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels. It is suggested that strategies that increase H2S formation in penile tissue may be useful in the treatment of erectile dysfunction when NO bioavailability, KATP channel function, or poor responses to PGE1 are present. PMID:26116713

  6. [Erectile rehabilitation after radical prostatectomy].

    PubMed

    Droupy, S; Giuliano, F; Costa, P

    2009-12-01

    The concept of penile rehabilitation involves the procedures designed to improve oxygen delivery the penile erectile tissue to minimized tissue damage during the period of neural recovery following radical prostatectomy. Many basic research studies support the rationale and mechanism of the concept of penile rehabilitation, however they are few clinical studies in the literature that provide a clear medical evidence of its efficacy in patients. Waiting for new data, it is recommended to propose to the patients, following a radical prostatectomy, an active pharmacological penile rehabilitation. This rehabilitation involves counselling with the couple to have regular sexual activities, ideally 1 to 3 times a week. Penile erections could be induced by intracavernosal injections of PGE1 or improved by using PDE5 inhibitors on demand. The results of daily use of PDE5 inhibitor are conflicting and then it cannot be recommended systematically waiting for new data. The rehabilitation could be maintained for about 2 years as results improve with time. PMID:20123519

  7. [Phalloplethysmographic reaction of optical stimulation in men with erectile disorders].

    PubMed

    Tichý, P

    1990-08-01

    Using the phalloplethysmographic test, comprising 50 coloured slides of six categories, 50 men with impaired erectivity and a control group of 50 men free from disorders or complaints as regards sexual life were examined. On exposure of slides of heterosexual partner activities positive reactions were recorded in all examined men. Men with impaired erectivity, however, displayed in response to these optic erotic stimuli a lower vasomotor reactivity. These men reacted more frequently positively also to homosexual stimuli and to children. In two men with erectile dysfunction the phalloplethysmographic examination revealed a bisexual orientation, in one a preference of heterosexual child objects, in another eight a quite undefined age differentiation in heterosexual objects. PMID:2245482

  8. Hidden Risks of Erectile Dysfunction "Treatments" Sold Online

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Updates Section Contents Menu Consumer Updates Animal & Veterinary Children's Health Cosmetics Dietary Supplements Drugs Food Medical Devices Nutrition Radiation-Emitting Products Tobacco Products Vaccines, Blood & ...

  9. Venous surgery in erectile dysfunction: therapeutic strategy and results.

    PubMed

    Austoni, E; Colombo, F; Mantovani, F; Trinchieri, A

    1992-01-01

    The therapeutic rationale of venous surgery is to create an effective obstacle to the pathologically increased venous outflow, determined by an intrinsic pathology of the cavernous bodies. In the last 15 years, many techniques have been proposed, and our therapeutic approach has evolved with our knowledge of penile haemodynamics. Up to October 1990, we performed 316 operations for the relief of impotence. In a 2-year follow-up our recurrence rates were as follows: DDV plus corporpexy (n = 50): 26% (n = 13); DDV plus crura plication (n = 34): 47% (n = 16); DDV plus collateral vein ligation (n = 48): 62.5% (n = 30). PMID:1413328

  10. Beware When Buying "All Natural" Erectile Dysfunction Products

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products For Consumers Home For Consumers Protect ... Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products

  11. What I Need to Know about Erectile Dysfunction

    MedlinePLUS

    ... An erection occurs when blood flow into the penis increases, making the penis larger and firmer. Hormones, blood vessels, nerves, and ... an erection by sending nerve signals to the penis . Touch may cause this urge. Other triggers may ...

  12. Nitric Oxide/EDRF Signaling: Erectile dysfunction and other

    E-print Network

    Wang, Edith

    . Furchgott, Louis J. Ignarro and Ferid Murad for their discoveries concerning " nitric oxide as a signaling School of Medicine Los Angeles Ferid Murad, born 1936 Dept. of Integrative Biology Pharmacology

  13. [Surgical treatments of erectile impotence].

    PubMed

    Sarramon, J P; Bertrand, N; Malavaud, B; Rischmann, P; Chamssudin, A

    1997-01-01

    Impotence affects 10 to 15% of the male population. Organic factors are recognized in 80% of cases. Intracavernosal injections of vasoactive agents (Virag) have provided advances in the physiopathologic understanding of impotence and provide new ways of treating this incapacity. However this option is inaffective in most organic cases: arteriogenic, venogenic or disorders of smooth cavernous muscle. Vasoactive injections for many reasons are abandoned in about 40% of the cases. Two kinds of surgical management can be performed: microrevascularization in order to restore the arterial penile flow or to reduce penile venous flow during erection; implantation of penile prosthesis when other therapeutic possibilities are exhausted. Arterialization of the deep dorsal vein (DDV) appears to be the best procedure in arteriogenic and principally venous impotence. Erectile function in theses case is restored in 60% of our patients. Two types of prostheses can be implanted: semi-rigid with an axial permanent rigidity and inflatable or hydraulic devices with a flaccid aspect after intercourse. These prostheses are technically successful in 75 to 90% of cases, but partner satisfaction does not match surgical success rates. PMID:9183461

  14. Prevalence of Sexual Dysfunctions

    PubMed Central

    Simons, Jeffrey; Carey, Michael P.

    2008-01-01

    Ten years of research that has provided data regarding the prevalence of sexual dysfunctions is reviewed. A thorough review of the literature identified 52 studies that have been published in the 10 years since an earlier review by Spector and Carey (1990). Community samples indicate a current prevalence of 0 - 3% for male orgasmic disorder, 0 - 5% for erectile disorder, and 0 - 3% for male hypoactive sexual desire disorder. Pooling current and 1-year figures provides community prevalence estimates of 7 - 10% for female orgasmic disorder and 4 - 5% for premature ejaculation. Stable community estimates of the current prevalence for the other sexual dysfunctions remain unavailable. Prevalence estimates obtained from primary care and sexuality clinic samples are characteristically higher. Although a relatively large number of studies have been conducted since Spector and Carey’s (1990) review, the lack of methodological rigor of many studies limits the confidence that can be placed in these findings. PMID:11329727

  15. Survivorship: sexual dysfunction (male), version 1.2013.

    PubMed

    Denlinger, Crystal S; Carlson, Robert W; Are, Madhuri; Baker, K Scott; Davis, Elizabeth; Edge, Stephen B; Friedman, Debra L; Goldman, Mindy; Jones, Lee; King, Allison; Kvale, Elizabeth; Langbaum, Terry S; Ligibel, Jennifer A; McCabe, Mary S; McVary, Kevin T; Melisko, Michelle; Montoya, Jose G; Mooney, Kathi; Morgan, Mary Ann; O'Connor, Tracey; Paskett, Electra D; Raza, Muhammad; Syrjala, Karen L; Urba, Susan G; Wakabayashi, Mark T; Zee, Phyllis; McMillian, Nicole; Freedman-Cass, Deborah

    2014-03-01

    Various anticancer treatments, especially those directed toward the pelvis, can damage blood vessels and reduce circulation of blood to the penis and/or damage the autonomic nervous system, resulting in higher rates of erectile dysfunction in survivors than in the general population. In addition, hormonal therapy can contribute to sexual problems, as can depression and anxiety, which are common in cancer survivors. This section of the NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship provides screening, evaluation, and treatment recommendations for male sexual problems, namely erectile dysfunction. PMID:24616541

  16. Survivorship: Sexual Dysfunction (Male), Version 1.2013

    PubMed Central

    Denlinger, Crystal S.; Carlson, Robert W.; Are, Madhuri; Baker, K. Scott; Davis, Elizabeth; Edge, Stephen B.; Friedman, Debra L.; Goldman, Mindy; Jones, Lee; King, Allison; Kvale, Elizabeth; Langbaum, Terry S.; Ligibel, Jennifer A.; McCabe, Mary S.; McVary, Kevin T.; Melisko, Michelle; Montoya, Jose G.; Mooney, Kathi; Morgan, Mary Ann; O’Connor, Tracey; Paskett, Electra D.; Raza, Muhammad; Syrjala, Karen L.; Urba, Susan G.; Wakabayashi, Mark T.; Zee, Phyllis; McMillian, Nicole; Freedman-Cass, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Various anticancer treatments, especially those directed toward the pelvis, can damage blood vessels and reduce circulation of blood to the penis and/or damage the autonomic nervous system, resulting in higher rates of erectile dysfunction in survivors than in the general population. In addition, hormonal therapy can contribute to sexual problems, as can depression and anxiety, which are common in cancer survivors. This section of the NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship provides screening, evaluation, and treatment recommendations for male sexual problems, namely erectile dysfunction. PMID:24616541

  17. Vasculogenic and hematopoietic cellular progenitors are scattered within the prenatal mouse heart.

    PubMed

    Jankowska-Steifer, Ewa; Madej, Maria; Niderla-Bieli?ska, Justyna; Ruminski, S?awomir; Flaht-Zabost, Aleksandra; Czarnowska, Elzbieta; Gula, Grzegorz; Radomska-Le?niewska, Dorota M; Ratajska, Anna

    2015-02-01

    Vasculogenesis and hematopoiesis are co-localized in the embryonic body, but precise phenotypes of the cells contributing to these processes are not defined. The aim of this study was to characterize phenotypic profiles and location of putative vasculogenic and hematopoietic cellular progenitors in the embryonic mouse heart. Confocal microscopy, as well as ultrastructural and stereomicroscopic analyses, was performed on immunohistochemical whole-mount-stained or sectioned hearts at stages 11.5-14 dpc. A FASC analysis was conducted to quantify putative vasculogenic and hematopoietic cells. We found subepicardial blood islands in the form of foci of accumulation of cells belonging to erythroblastic and megakaryocytic lineages at various stages of maturation, exhibiting phenotypes: GATA2(+)/CD41(+), GATA2(-)/CD41(+), GATA2(+)/CD71(-), GATA2(-)/CD71(+), Fli1(+)/CD71(+), Fli1(-)/CD71(+), with a majority of cells expressing the Ter119 antigen, but none of them expressing Flk1. The subepicardium and the outflow tract endothelium were recognized to be the areas where progenitor cells were scattered or adjoining the endothelial cells. These progenitor cells were characterized as possessing the following antigens: CD45(+)/Fli1(+), CD41(+)/Flk1(+), Flk1(+)/Fli1(+). A FACS analysis demonstrated that the CD41/Flk1 double-positive population of cells constituted 2.68% of total cell population isolated from 12.5 dpc hearts. Vessels and tubules were positive for CD31, Flk1, Fli1, Tie2, including blood islands endothelia. The endocardial wall endothelia were found to function as an anchoring apparatus for megakaryocytes releasing platelets into the cardiac cavities. Phenotypic characteristics of vasculogenic (Flk1(+)/Fli1(+)) and hematopoietic (GATA2(+)/CD71(+), CD41(+)/GATA2(+)) progenitors, as well as the putative hemogenic endothelium (Flk1(+)/CD41(+)) in embryonic mouse hearts, have been presented. Cardiac blood islands, the subepicardium and endothelium of the outflow tract cushions have been defined as areas where these progenitor cells can be found. PMID:25201347

  18. Neuromedin B Restores Erectile Function by Protecting the Cavernous Body and the Nitrergic Nerves from Injury in a Diabetic Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Yasuho; Niimi, Aya; Nomiya, Akira; Yamada, Daisuke; Homma, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a major health problem worldwide and affects approximately 75% of diabetic patients, likely due to severely damaged cavernous body. While screening for cytokines produced by adipose tissue-derived stem cells, we detected neuromedin B (NMB). To explore a potential treatment option for ED, we examined whether NMB was capable of restoring erectile function. We also examined the potential mechanism by which NMB could restore erectile function. Male Wistar rats were injected with streptozotocin (STZ) to induce diabetes. An adenovirus expressing NMB (AdNMB) was injected into the penis 6 weeks after STZ administration. Four weeks after the injection of AdNMB, erectile function, penile histology, and protein expression were analyzed. As assessed by the measurement of intracavernous pressure, AdNMB injection significantly restored erectile function compared with the injection of an adenovirus expressing green fluorescent protein. This restoration was associated with conservation of the cavernous body structure and neural nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)-expressing nerves, together with recovery of ?-smooth muscle actin, vascular endothelial-cadherin, and nNOS expression. Furthermore, NMB significantly stimulated the survival of SH-SY5Y cells derived from human neuroblastoma tissue with characteristics similar to neurons. Collectively, these results suggested that NMB restored erectile function via protection of the cavernous body from injury and stimulation of the survival of the associated nerves. NMB may be useful to treat ED patients with a severely damaged cavernous body. PMID:26207818

  19. Erectile Function Durability Following Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Taira, Al V.; Merrick, Gregory S.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Butler, Wayne M.; Wallner, Kent E.; Kurko, Brian S.; Anderson, Richard; Lief, Jonathan H.

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate long-term changes in erectile function following prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: This study included 226 patients with prostate cancer and preimplant erectile function assessed by the International Index of Erectile Function-6 (IIEF-6) who underwent brachytherapy in two prospective randomized trials between February 2001 and January 2003. Median follow-up was 6.4 years. Pre- and postbrachytherapy potency was defined as IIEF-6 >= 13 without pharmacologic or mechanical support. The relationship among clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters and erectile function was examined. Results: The 7-year actuarial rate of potency preservation was 55.6% with median postimplant IIEF of 22 in potent patients. Potent patients were statistically younger (p = 0.014), had a higher preimplant IIEF (p < 0.001), were less likely to be diabetic (p = 0.002), and were more likely to report nocturnal erections (p = 0.008). Potency preservation in men with baseline IIEF scores of 29-30, 24-28, 18-23, and 13-17 were 75.5% vs. 73.6%, 51.7% vs. 44.8%, 48.0% vs. 40.0%, and 23.5% vs. 23.5% in 2004 vs. 2008. In multivariate Cox regression analysis, preimplant IIEF, hypertension, diabetes, prostate size, and brachytherapy dose to proximal penis strongly predicted for potency preservation. Impact of proximal penile dose was most pronounced for men with IIEF of 18-23 and aged 60-69. A significant minority of men who developed postimplant impotence ultimately regained erectile function. Conclusion: Potency preservation and median IIEF scores following brachytherapy are durable. Thoughtful dose sparing of proximal penile structures and early penile rehabilitation may further improve these results.

  20. Efficacy of a novel water-soluble curcumin derivative versus sildenafil citrate in mediating erectile function.

    PubMed

    Zaahkouk, A M S; Abdel Aziz, M T; Rezq, A M; Atta, H M; Fouad, H H; Ahmed, H H; Sabry, D; Yehia, M H

    2015-01-01

    The present study was conducted to assess the efficacy of a novel curcumin derivative (NCD) versus sildenafil citrate in erectile signaling. The study was conducted on 10 control male rats and 50 diabetic male rats divided into the following groups: diabetic, curcumin, NCD, sildenafil and NCD combined with sildenafil. Cavernous tissue (CC) gene expression levels of heme oxygenase (HO)-1, Nrf2, NF-?? and p38, enzyme activities of HO and nitric oxide synthase (NOS), cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and intracavernosal pressure (ICP) were assessed. Results showed that 12 weeks after induction of diabetes, erectile dysfunction was confirmed by the significant decrease in ICP, a significant decrease in cGMP, NOS, HO enzyme activities, a significant decrease in HO-1 gene and a significant elevation of NF-??, p38 genes. Administration of all therapeutic interventions led to a significant elevation in ICP, cGMP levels, a significant increase in HO-1 and NOS enzymes, a significant increase in HO-1 and Nrf2 gene expression, and a significant decrease in NF-??, p38 gene expression. NCD or its combination with sildenafil showed significant efficacy and more prolonged duration of action. In conclusion, NCD could enhance erectile function with more efficacy and more prolonged duration of action. PMID:25099638

  1. Recombinant PAI-1 therapy restores myoendothelial junctions and erectile function in PAI-1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Kavoussi, P K; Heberlein, K; Straub, A C; Lowe, G J; Oliver, J L; Smith, R P; Steers, W D; Annex, B H; Isakson, B E; Lysiak, J J

    2015-12-01

    Myoendothelial junctions are specialised projections of cell : cell contact through the internal elastic lamina between endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells. These junctions allow for endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells to make direct membrane apposition and are involved in cell : cell communication. In this study, we evaluated for the presence of myoendothelial junctions in murine corporal tissue and used plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1-deficient mice, which lack myoendothelial junctions, to determine whether myoendothelial junctions affect erectile function. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated the presence of myoendothelial junctions in the corporal tissue of wild-type mice and confirmed the decreased junction numbers in the tissue of PAI-1(-/-) mice. A potential role for myoendothelial junctions in tumescence was established; in that, PAI-1(-/-) mice demonstrated a significantly longer time to achieve maximal intracavernous pressure. Treatment of PAI-1(-/-) mice with recombinant PAI-1 restored the number of myoendothelial junctions in the corporal tissue and also induced a significant decrease in time to maximal corporal pressures. Myoendothelial junctions were similarly identified in the human corporal tissue. These results suggest a critical role for myoendothelial junctions in erectile pathophysiology and therapies aimed at restoring myoendothelial junction numbers in the corporal tissue may provide a novel therapy for erectile dysfunction. PMID:25557984

  2. Male sexual dysfunction in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Christopher CK; Singam, Praveen; Hong, Goh Eng; Zainuddin, Zulkifli Md

    2011-01-01

    Sex has always been a taboo subject in Asian society. However, over the past few years, awareness in the field of men's sexual health has improved, and interest in sexual health research has recently increased. The epidemiology and prevalence of erectile dysfunction, hypogonadism and premature ejaculation in Asia are similar in the West. However, several issues are specific to Asian males, including culture and beliefs, awareness, compliance and the availability of traditional/complementary medicine. In Asia, sexual medicine is still in its infancy, and a concerted effort from the government, relevant societies, physicians and the media is required to propel sexual medicine to the forefront of health care. PMID:21643001

  3. [Psychological theories and treatments of erectile impotence].

    PubMed

    Mormont, C

    1985-01-01

    The conceptual inaccuracies and the diagnostic difficulties encountered in the study of erectile impotence are underlined by the author. After a review and critique of the psychoanalytical and behavioral trends, of the "new sex therapy" and of cognitivism, the therapeutic methods which derive from these concepts are compared with each other. A particular attention is devoted to anxiety since its definition and prevalence varies considerably in the literature despite a misleading superficial similarity. PMID:3893044

  4. Acetylsalicylic acid protects erectile function in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Hafez, G; Gonulalan, U; Kosan, M; Arioglu, E; Ozturk, B; Cetinkaya, M; Gur, S

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effect of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) treatment on diabetes-induced erectile dysfunction. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups as follows: (i) control (C), (ii) diabetic (D), (iii) ASA-treated control (C+ASA) and (iv) ASA-treated diabetic (D+ASA) groups. In groups 2 and 4, diabetes was induced by injection of 35 mg kg(-1) streptozotocin. ASA (100 mg kg(-1) day(-1) , orally) was administrated to rats in groups 3 and 4 for 8 weeks. Both intracavernosal pressure (ICP) and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) were measured in in vivo studies. In organ bath, the relaxation responses to acetylcholine (ACh), electrical field stimulation (EFS) and sodium nitroprusside were tested in corpus cavernosum (CC) strips. The mRNA expression for neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) was calculated using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction technique. In in vivo experiments, diabetic rats displayed reduced ICP/MAP values, which were normalised with ASA treatment. The relaxant response to high-dose ACh and EFS at low frequencies (1-8 Hz) in CC strips from the D+ASA group were significantly higher when compared to the D group. Treatment with ASA normalised the raised mRNA expressions of nNOS in diabetic penile tissues. ASA may be involved in mRNA of protein synthesis of NO released from nonadrenergic and noncholinergic cavernosal nerve in diabetes. PMID:24428436

  5. Bowel Dysfunction

    MedlinePLUS

    ... PCF Spotlight Glossary African American Men Living with Prostate Cancer Bowel Dysfunction Side Effects Urinary Dysfunction Bowel Dysfunction ... strategies improve, these rates have been dropping. During prostatectomy, damage to the rectum is rare (<2-3%), ...

  6. Bladder, Bowel, and Sexual Dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sakakibara, Ryuji; Kishi, Masahiko; Ogawa, Emina; Tateno, Fuyuki; Uchiyama, Tomoyuki; Yamamoto, Tatsuya; Yamanishi, Tomonori

    2011-01-01

    Bladder dysfunction (urinary urgency/frequency), bowel dysfunction (constipation), and sexual dysfunction (erectile dysfunction) (also called “pelvic organ” dysfunctions) are common nonmotor disorders in Parkinson's disease (PD). In contrast to motor disorders, pelvic organ autonomic dysfunctions are often nonresponsive to levodopa treatment. The brain pathology causing the bladder dysfunction (appearance of overactivity) involves an altered dopamine-basal ganglia circuit, which normally suppresses the micturition reflex. By contrast, peripheral myenteric pathology causing slowed colonic transit (loss of rectal contractions) and central pathology causing weak strain and paradoxical anal sphincter contraction on defecation (PSD, also called as anismus) are responsible for the bowel dysfunction. In addition, hypothalamic dysfunction is mostly responsible for the sexual dysfunction (decrease in libido and erection) in PD, via altered dopamine-oxytocin pathways, which normally promote libido and erection. The pathophysiology of the pelvic organ dysfunction in PD differs from that in multiple system atrophy; therefore, it might aid in differential diagnosis. Anticholinergic agents are used to treat bladder dysfunction in PD, although these drugs should be used with caution particularly in elderly patients who have cognitive decline. Dietary fibers, laxatives, and “prokinetic” drugs such as serotonergic agonists are used to treat bowel dysfunction in PD. Phosphodiesterase inhibitors are used to treat sexual dysfunction in PD. These treatments might be beneficial in maximizing the patients' quality of life. PMID:21918729

  7. Psychosocial aspects of ejaculatory dysfunction and male reproduction.

    PubMed

    Wincze, John P

    2015-11-01

    This article provides a summary of the biopsychosocial model and the assessment and treatment of male sexual dysfunction as manifested in cases of infertility. In couples trying to get pregnant, a unique set of psychosocial and behavioral changes may evolve that directly interferes with a couple's usual pattern of sexual behavior, resulting in sexual dysfunction. The unique set of changes is discussed and how these changes impact on erectile and ejaculatory function. Strategies for assessing and managing male sexual dysfunction that compromise fertility are reviewed. PMID:26297900

  8. HIF-1? induces VE-cadherin expression and modulates vasculogenic mimicry in esophageal carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Na-Na; Zhu, Hong; Zhang, Hong-Jie; Zhang, Wei-Feng; Jin, Hai-Lin; Wang, Lu; Wang, Pin; He, Gui-Jun; Hao, Bo; Shi, Rui-Hua

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1? modulates vasculogenic mimicry (VM) by upregulating VE-cadherin expression in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). METHODS: Esophageal squamous cancer cell lines Eca109 and TE13 were transfected with plasmids harboring small interfering RNAs targeting HIF-1? or VE-cadherin. The proliferation and invasion of esophageal carcinoma cells were detected by MTT and Transwell migration assays. The formation of tubular networks of cells was analyzed by 3D culture in vitro. BALB/c nude mice were used to observe xenograft tumor formation. The relationship between the expression of HIF-1? and VE-cadherin, ephrinA2 (EphA2) and laminin5?2 (LN5?2) was measured by Western blot and real-time polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: Knockdown of HIF-1? inhibited cell proliferation (32.3% ± 6.1% for Eca109 cells and 38.6% ± 6.8% for TE13 cells, P < 0.05). Both Eca109 and TE13 cells formed typical tubular networks. The number of tubular networks markedly decreased when HIF-1? or VE-cadherin was knocked down. Expression of VE-cadherin, EphA2 and LN5?2 was dramatically inhibited, but the expression of matrix metalloproteinase 2 had no obvious change in HIF-1?-silenced cells. Knockdown of VE-cadherin significantly decreased expression of both EphA2 and LN5?2 (P < 0.05), while HIF-1? expression was unchanged. The time for xenograft tumor formation was 6 ± 1.2 d for Eca109 cells and Eca109 cells transfected with HIF-1? Neo control short hairpin RNA (shRNA) vector, and 8.4 ± 2.1 d for Eca109 cells transfected with an shRNA against HIF-1?. Knockdown of HIF-1? inhibited vasculogenic mimicry (VM) and tumorigenicity in vivo. CONCLUSION: HIF-1? may modulate VM in ESCC by regulating VE-cadherin expression, which affects VM formation through EphA2 and LN5?2. PMID:25548487

  9. A new herbal combination, Etana, for enhancing erectile function: an efficacy and safety study in animals.

    PubMed

    Qinna, N; Taha, H; Matalka, K Z; Badwan, A A

    2009-01-01

    We present herein a new herbal combination called Etana that is composed of five herbal extracts including Panax quinquelotius (Ginseng), Eurycoma longifolia (Tongkat Ali), Epimedium grandiflorum (Horny goat weed), Centella asiatica (Gotu Kola) and flower pollen extracts. Most of the above-mentioned extracts have a long historical and traditional use for erectile dysfunction (ED). On the basis of the mechanism of action of each of the above, a combination is introduced to overcome several physiological or induced factors of ED. This study was conducted to show an enhancement of erectile function in male rats. The animals were observed for 3 h after each administration for penile erection, genital grooming and copulation mounting, and the penile erection index (PEI) was calculated. The maximum response was observed at the concentration of 7.5 mg kg(-1) of Etana. At a 7.5 mg kg(-1) single dose, the percentage of responding rats was 53+/-7 with a PEI of 337+/-72 compared with 17+/-6 with a PEI of 30+/-10 for control animals. This PEI was significantly (P<0.001) higher than each single component and than the sum of any two herbal components of Etana. When compared with sildenafil citrate, Etana induced more pronounced PEI than 0.36 mg kg(-1), but similar to 0.71 mg kg(-1) of sildenafil. Furthermore, full acute and sub-acute toxicity studies showed no toxic effects of Etana. In conclusion, this study describes a new and safe combination of herbal components that enhance erectile function in male rats. Clinical studies are warranted for evaluating Etana's significance in ED. PMID:19494825

  10. Transdifferentiation of glioblastoma stem-like cells into mural cells drives vasculogenic mimicry in glioblastomas.

    PubMed

    Scully, Steve; Francescone, Ralph; Faibish, Michael; Bentley, Brooke; Taylor, Sherry L; Oh, Dennis; Schapiro, Robert; Moral, Luis; Yan, Wei; Shao, Rong

    2012-09-12

    Recent evidence has shown that glioblastoma stem-like cells (GSCs) can transdifferentiate into endothelial cells and vascular-like tumor cells. The latter pattern of vascularization indicates an alternative microvascular circulation known as vasculogenic mimicry (VM). However, it remains to be clarified how the GSC-driven VM makes a significant contribution to tumor vasculature. Here, we investigated 11 cases of glioblastomas and found that most of them consisted of blood-perfused vascular channels that coexpress mural cell markers smooth muscle ?-actin and platelet-derived growth factor receptor ?, epidermal growth factor receptor, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (Flk-1), but not CD31 or VE-cadherin. This microvasculature coexisted with endothelial cell-associated vessels. GSCs derived from patients with glioblastomas developed vigorous mural cell-associated vascular channels but few endothelial cell vessels in orthotopic animal models. Suppression of Flk-1 activity and gene expression abrogated GSC transdifferentiation and vascularization in vitro, and inhibited VM in animal models. This study establishes mural-like tumor cells differentiated from GSCs as a significant contributor to microvasculature of glioblastoma and points to Flk-1 as a potential target for therapeutic intervention that could complement current anti-angiogenic treatment. PMID:22973019

  11. Restoration of erectile function with intracavernous injections of endothelial progenitor cells after bilateral cavernous nerve injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Liao, C H; Wu, Y N; Lin, Y H; Syu Huang, R F; Liu, S P; Chiang, H S

    2015-09-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are bone marrow-derived endothelial cells capable of circulating, proliferating, and differentiating into mature endothelial cells. Circulating EPCs can be directly recruited to some extent at sites of injury, and their administration could accelerate repair or endothelialization of the damaged tissue. We investigated the effects of intracavernous injections of EPCs into the corpora cavernosa of rats with erectile dysfunction (ED) caused by bilateral cavernous nerve (CN) injury. Overall, 24 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into three groups: sham surgery, vehicle-only, or EPC treatment. Rats in the EPC treatment and vehicle-only groups were subjected to bilateral CN injury before injection of EPCs or vehicle, respectively, into the corpora cavernosa. Four weeks after surgery, erectile function was assessed by measuring maximum intracavernosal pressure (ICP), change in ICP, area under the ICP curve, and ratio of change in ICP and mean arterial pressure (MAP; ?ICP/MAP). Penile tissue was histomorphometrically analyzed for the expression of neural nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), neurofilament-1 (NF-1), von Willebrand factor (vWF), endothelial NOS (eNOS), and smooth muscle cell content. Maximum ICP and all other functional parameters of erectile function were significantly reduced in the vehicle-only group vs. the sham and EPC treatment groups (all p < 0.001). Smooth muscle cell content was decreased in the vehicle-only vs. the sham and EPC treatment groups (both p < 0.01). Expressions of vWF and eNOS in the dorsal artery were significantly higher in the EPC treatment than the vehicle-only group (p < 0.05). In conclusion, EPC treatment restored erectile function in a rat model of bilateral CN injury through recruitment of EPCs toward the dorsal artery and preservation of smooth muscle cells in the corpus cavernosum. These findings elucidate the therapeutic potential of EPCs for treating ED in humans. PMID:26311341

  12. Psychiatric disorders and sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Waldinger, Marcel D

    2015-01-01

    Sexual problems are highly prevalent among patients with psychiatric disorders. They may be caused by the psychopathology of the psychiatric disorder but also by its pharmacotherapy. Both positive symptoms (e.g., psychosis, hallucinations) as well as negative symptoms (e.g., anhedonia) of schizophrenia may negatively interfere with interpersonal and sexual relationships. Atypical antipsychotics have fewer sexual side-effects than the classic antipsychotics. Mood disorders may affect libido, sexual arousal, orgasm, and erectile function. With the exception of bupropion, agomelatine, mirtazapine, vortioxetine, amineptine, and moclobemide, all antidepressants cause sexual side-effects. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) may particularly delay ejaculation and female orgasm, but also can cause decreased libido and erectile difficulties. SSRI-induced sexual side-effects are dose-dependent and reversible. Very rarely, their sexual side-effects persist after SSRI discontinuation. This is often preceded by genital anesthesia. Some personality characteristics are a risk factor for sexual dysfunction. Also patients with eating disorders may suffer from sexual difficulties. So far, research into psychotropic-induced sexual side-effects suffers from substantial methodologic limitations. Patients tend not to talk with their clinician about their sexual life. Psychiatrists and other doctors need to take the initiative to talk about the patient's sexual life in order to become informed about potential medication-induced sexual difficulties. PMID:26003261

  13. Effect of Genistein on vasculogenic mimicry formation by human uveal melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Rihong; Sun, Qingmin; Yang, Li; Gu, Haijuan; Zeng, Ying; Wang, Bin

    2009-01-01

    Background Vasculogenic mimicry (VM) was increasingly recognized as a form of aggressive melanoma acquiring blood supply. Genistein had attracted much attention as a potential anticancer agent. Therefore, we examined the effect of Genistein on VM in human uveal melanoma cells. Methods VM structure was detected by periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining for uveal melanoma C918 cells cultured on the three-dimensional type I collagen gels after exposed to Genistein. We used reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western Blot analysis to examine the effect of Genistein on vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin) mRNA and protein expression. The nude mice models of human uveal melanoma C918 cells were established to assess the number of VM using immunohistochemical and PAS double-staining. Results Genistein inhibited the survival of C918 cells in vitro. The ectopic model study showed that VM in tumor tissue sections were significantly reduced by Genistein in vivo. In vitro, the VM structure was found in control, 25 and 50 ?M Genistein-treatment groups but not in 100 and 200 ?M. RT-PCR and Western Blot showed that 100 and 200 ?M concentration of Genistein could significantly decrease VE-cadherin mRNA and protein expression of C918 cells compared with control (P < 0.05). However, the 25 and 50 ?M Genistein slightly decreased the VE-cadherin level in vitro (P > 0.05). Conclusion Genistein inhibits VM formation of uveal melanoma cells in vivo and in vitro. One possible underlying molecular mechanism by which Genistein could inhibit VM formation of uveal melanoma is related to down-regulation of VE-cadherin. PMID:19735546

  14. Diagnosis of vasculogenic impotence: Combination of penile xenon-133 washout and papaverine tests

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S.N.; Liu, R.S.; Yu, P.C.; Chang, L.S.; Yeh, S.H.; Kuo, J.S.

    1989-07-01

    The present study evaluates both penile xenon-133 washout (XWT) and papaverine tests (PT) in the diagnosis of vasculogenic impotence. XWT was accomplished by subcutaneous injection of xenon-133 (1-2 mCi in 0.1 mL saline solution) into the dorsal coronal prepuce. Abnormal XWT was suggested in patients whose clearance time (T1/2) was longer than 7.5 minutes and whose penile blood flow rate (Q) was less than 6 mL/100 g tissue/min. PT was done by intracavernous injection of papaverine (60 mg in 20 mL normal saline). Abnormal PT was indicated in patients whose onset of full erection was more than ten minutes after papaverine injection and whose duration of erection was less than one hour. Ten young and 11 older normal volunteers were examined with XWT only; all showed normal results. A total of 60 impotent patients were examined with both XWT and PT and were classified into four groups: in 2 patients (3.3%) both XWT and PT were normal (group I); in 8 (13.3%) XWT was abnormal and PT normal (group II); in 14 (23.3%) XWT was normal and PT abnormal (group III); and in 36 (60%) both XWT and PT were abnormal (group IV). On further examination with bilateral hypogastric arteriography in 10 XWT-abnormal patients and on surgical correction of abnormal curvature in 5 XWT-abnormal patients, all (100%) were proved to have penile arterial insufficiency. Erection cavernosography performed in 15 PT-abnormal patients confirmed penile venous insufficiency in 80 percent. We conclude both XWT and PT are simple and effective for evaluation of the penile arterial blood flow and venous competence, respectively.

  15. The clinical relevance of sexual dysfunction in systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bruni, C; Raja, J; Denton, C P; Matucci-Cerinic, M

    2015-12-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a chronic multi-organ autoimmune disease, leading to important clinical and psychological implications. Among organ complications, sexual dysfunction is a major issue for both male and female gender, with high prevalence and great impact on quality of life, although frequently not addressed by both clinicians and patients. While erectile dysfunction is the most common cause of sexual problems in males, genital tract and general physical changes are major contributors to sexual impairment in females. This review presents current state of the art on this topic, discussing published data on presentation, evaluation and therapeutic options. PMID:26235995

  16. Erectile failure in the aged: evaluation and treatment.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, T; Katz, P G

    1988-01-01

    With aging, there are changes in both libido and erectile function. Although the majority of aged men remain interested in sex, less than 15% report continued sexual intercourse. The cause of this "libido-potency gap" is due primarily to erectile failure. Penile erection is dependent upon a complex interaction of the autonomic nervous system, cardiovascular system, and local neurotransmitters such as acetylcholine and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide. Sexual stimulation causes augmented blood flow into the corpora cavernosa, and restricted outflow, resulting in penile rigidity. With aging, there is a decline in gonadal steroids, nerve conduction velocity, and vascular compliance, any of which could interfere with normal erections. When disease is superimposed on the normal changes of aging, erectile function is further impaired. Evaluation of an elderly male with impotence may consist of a detailed drug history and trial of alternate therapy, as in the case of adverse drug reactions. More often, evaluation entails hormonal assays, penile vascular assessment, neurologic assessment, and an evaluation of nocturnal erectile function. Based on the results of these assessments, appropriate treatment alternatives can be chosen. With the availability of multiple treatment options, patients and physicians can now choose from a range of noninvasive or invasive alternatives depending upon the etiology, associated disorders, and preference of the patient. PMID:3335731

  17. Vasculogenic Mimicry of HT1080 Tumour Cells In Vivo: Critical Role of HIF-1?-Neuropilin-1 Axis

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Roli M.; Bajaj, Manmohan S.; Kale, Vaijayanti P.

    2012-01-01

    HT1080 - a human fibrosarcoma-derived cell line – forms aggressive angiogenic tumours in immuno-compromised mice. In spite of its extensive use as a model of tumour angiogenesis, the molecular event(s) initiating the angiogenic program in these cells are not known. Since hypoxia stimulates tumour angiogenesis, we examined the hypoxia-induced events evoked in these cells. In contrast to cells grown under normoxic conditions, hypoxia-primed (1% O2) HT1080 cells formed robust tubules on growth factor-reduced matrigel and formed significantly larger tumours in xenograft models in a chetomin-sensitive manner, indicating the role of HIF-1?-mediated transcription in these processes. Immuno-histochemical analyses of tumours formed by GFP-expressing HT1080 cells clearly showed that the tumour cells themselves expressed various angiogenic markers including Neuropilin-1 (NRP-1) and formed functional vessels containing red blood cells, thereby unambiguously demonstrating the vasculogenic mimicry of HT1080 cells in vivo. Experiments performed with the HT1080 cells stably transfected with plasmid constructs expressing shNRP-1 or full-length NRP-1 clearly established that the HIF1?-mediated up-regulation of NRP-1 played a deterministic role in the process. Hypoxia-exposure resulted in an up-regulation of c-Myc and OCT3/4 and a down-regulation of KLF4 mRNAs, suggesting their involvement in the tumour formation and angiogenesis. However, silencing of NRP-1 alone, though not affecting proliferation in culture, was sufficient to abrogate the tumour formation completely; clearly establishing that the hypoxia-mediated HIF-1?-dependent up-regulation of NRP-1 is a critical molecular event involved in the vasculogenic mimicry and tumor formation by HT1080 cells in vivo. PMID:23185562

  18. Female Sexual Dysfunction: Therapeutic Options and Experimental Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Allahdadi, Kyan J.; Tostes, Rita C.A.; Webb, R. Clinton

    2010-01-01

    Female sexual dysfunction (FSD) is a prevalent problem, afflicting approximately 40% of women and there are few treatment options. FSD is more typical as women age and is a progressive and widespread condition. Common symptoms associated with FSD include diminished vaginal lubrication, pain and discomfort upon intercourse, decreased sense of arousal and difficulty in achieving orgasm. Only a small percentage of women seek medical attention. In comparison to the overwhelming research and treatment for erectile dysfunction in males, specifically with the development of phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors, significantly less has been explored regarding FSD and treatment is primarily limited to psychological therapy. Several cardiovascular diseases have been linked with FSD including atherosclerosis, peripheral arterial disease and hypertension, all of which are also pathological conditions associated with aging and erectile dysfunction in men. Using animal models, we have expanded our understanding of FSD, however a tremendous amount is still to be learned in order to properly treat women suffering from FSD. The aim of this review is to provide the most current knowledge on FSD, advances in basic science addressing this dysfunction, and explore developing therapeutic options. PMID:19538161

  19. Evaluation of the Effect of Different Doses of Low Energy Shock Wave Therapy on the Erectile Function of Streptozotocin (STZ)-Induced Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Zhou, Feng; Li, Guang-Yong; Wang, Lin; Li, Hui-Xi; Bai, Guang-Yi; Guan, Rui-Li; Xu, Yong-De; Gao, Ze-Zhu; Tian, Wen-Jie; Xin, Zhong-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the therapeutic effect of different doses of low energy shock wave therapy (LESWT) on the erectile dysfunction (ED) in streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic rats. SD rats (n = 75) were randomly divided into 5 groups (normal control, diabetic control, 3 different dose LESWT treated diabetic groups). Diabetic rats were induced by intra-peritoneal injection of STZ (60 mg/kg) and rats with fasting blood glucose ? 300 mg/dL were selected as diabetic models. Twelve weeks later, different doses of LESWT (100, 200 and 300 shocks each time) treatment on penises were used to treat ED (7.33 MPa, 2 shocks/s) three times a week for two weeks. The erectile function was evaluated by intracavernous pressure (ICP) after 1 week washout period. Then the penises were harvested for histological study. The results showed LESWT could significantly improve the erectile function of diabetic rats, increase smooth muscle and endothelial contents, up-regulate the expression of ?-SMA, vWF, nNOS and VEGF, and down- regulate the expression of RAGE in corpus cavernosum. The therapeutic effect might relate to treatment dose positively, and the maximal therapeutic effect was noted in the LESWT300 group. Consequently, 300 shocks each time might be the ideal LESWT dose for diabetic ED treatment. PMID:23698784

  20. Excess adenosine in murine penile erectile tissues contributes to priapism via A2B adenosine receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Tiejuan; Abbasi, Shahrzad; Zhang, Hong; Uray, Karen; Chunn, Janci L.; Xia, Ling Wei; Molina, Jose G.; Weisbrodt, Norman W.; Kellems, Rodney E.; Blackburn, Michael R.; Xia, Yang

    2008-01-01

    Priapism, abnormally prolonged penile erection in the absence of sexual excitation, is associated with ischemia-mediated erectile tissue damage and subsequent erectile dysfunction. It is common among males with sickle cell disease (SCD), and SCD transgenic mice are an accepted model of the disorder. Current strategies to manage priapism suffer from a poor fundamental understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the disorder. Here we report that mice lacking adenosine deaminase (ADA), an enzyme necessary for the breakdown of adenosine, displayed unexpected priapic activity. ADA enzyme therapy successfully corrected the priapic activity both in vivo and in vitro, suggesting that it was dependent on elevated adenosine levels. Further genetic and pharmacologic evidence demonstrated that A2B adenosine receptor–mediated (A2BR-mediated) cAMP and cGMP induction was required for elevated adenosine–induced prolonged penile erection. Finally, priapic activity in SCD transgenic mice was also caused by elevated adenosine levels and A2BR activation. Thus, we have shown that excessive adenosine accumulation in the penis contributes to priapism through increased A2BR signaling in both Ada–/– and SCD transgenic mice. These findings provide insight regarding the molecular basis of priapism and suggest that strategies to either reduce adenosine or block A2BR activation may prove beneficial in the treatment of this disorder. PMID:18340377

  1. Excess adenosine in murine penile erectile tissues contributes to priapism via A2B adenosine receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Mi, Tiejuan; Abbasi, Shahrzad; Zhang, Hong; Uray, Karen; Chunn, Janci L; Xia, Ling Wei; Molina, Jose G; Weisbrodt, Norman W; Kellems, Rodney E; Blackburn, Michael R; Xia, Yang

    2008-04-01

    Priapism, abnormally prolonged penile erection in the absence of sexual excitation, is associated with ischemia-mediated erectile tissue damage and subsequent erectile dysfunction. It is common among males with sickle cell disease (SCD), and SCD transgenic mice are an accepted model of the disorder. Current strategies to manage priapism suffer from a poor fundamental understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the disorder. Here we report that mice lacking adenosine deaminase (ADA), an enzyme necessary for the breakdown of adenosine, displayed unexpected priapic activity. ADA enzyme therapy successfully corrected the priapic activity both in vivo and in vitro, suggesting that it was dependent on elevated adenosine levels. Further genetic and pharmacologic evidence demonstrated that A2B adenosine receptor-mediated (A2BR-mediated) cAMP and cGMP induction was required for elevated adenosine-induced prolonged penile erection. Finally, priapic activity in SCD transgenic mice was also caused by elevated adenosine levels and A2BR activation. Thus, we have shown that excessive adenosine accumulation in the penis contributes to priapism through increased A2BR signaling in both Ada -/- and SCD transgenic mice. These findings provide insight regarding the molecular basis of priapism and suggest that strategies to either reduce adenosine or block A2BR activation may prove beneficial in the treatment of this disorder. PMID:18340377

  2. Curcumin suppresses invasiveness and vasculogenic mimicry of squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx through the inhibition of JAK-2/STAT-3 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Hu, An; Huang, Jing-Juan; Jin, Xiao-Jie; Li, Ji-Ping; Tang, Yuan-Jia; Huang, Xin-Fang; Cui, Hui-Juan; Xu, Wei-Hua; Sun, Guang-Bin

    2015-01-01

    To determine the role of JAK-2/STAT-3 signaling pathway in invasion and vasculogenic mimicry of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma. HEp-2 cells were treated with 1 or 10 ?mol/L curcumin and AG490 (the inhibitor of JAK-2) for 48 h, the invasion and vasculogenic mimicry of tumor cells were tested with Transwell chamber test and tube formation experiment. RT-PCR was used to measure the expression of MMP-2 and VEGF. Western blot assay was employed to determine the expression of JAK-2, STAT3, p-STAT3, MMP-2 and VEGF. Compared to control group?there were less tumor cells permeating membrane and less formed tubes after curcumin or AG490 treatment, RT-PCR showed that the expression of MMP-2 and VEGF at mRNA level were decreased (P < 0.01). Western blotting indicated that the expression of JAK-2, p-STAT3, MMP-2 and VEGF at protein levels were decreased (P < 0.01), while that of STAT-3 protein had no difference among each group (P > 0.05). Immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that the expression of eNOS was down-regulated (P < 0.01). Curcumin and AG490 significantly inhibits invasion and vasculogenic mimicry of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma in vitro, and JAK-2/STAT-3 signaling pathway promotes above processes. PMID:25628937

  3. Gustatory dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Maheswaran, T.; Abikshyeet, P.; Sitra, G.; Gokulanathan, S.; Vaithiyanadane, V.; Jeelani, S.

    2014-01-01

    Tastes in humans provide a vital tool for screening soluble chemicals for food evaluation, selection, and avoidance of potentially toxic substances. Taste or gustatory dysfunctions are implicated in loss of appetite, unintended weight loss, malnutrition, and reduced quality of life. Dental practitioners are often the first clinicians to be presented with complaints about taste dysfunction. This brief review provides a summary of the common causes of taste disorders, problems associated with assessing taste function in a clinical setting and management options available to the dental practitioner. PMID:25210380

  4. PT-141: a melanocortin agonist for the treatment of sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Molinoff, P B; Shadiack, A M; Earle, D; Diamond, L E; Quon, C Y

    2003-06-01

    PT-141, a synthetic peptide analogue of alpha-MSH, is an agonist at melanocortin receptors including the MC3R and MC4R, which are expressed primarily in the central nervous system. Administration of PT-141 to rats and nonhuman primates results in penile erections. Systemic administration of PT-141 to rats activates neurons in the hypothalamus as shown by an increase in c-Fos immunoreactivity. Neurons in the same region of the central nervous system take up pseudorabies virus injected into the corpus cavernosum of the rat penis. Administration of PT-141 to normal men and to patients with erectile dysfunction resulted in a rapid dose-dependent increase in erectile activity. The results suggest that PT-141 holds promise as a new treatment for sexual dysfunction. PMID:12851303

  5. Sensory Dysfunction

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to Web version Sensory Dysfunction Overview Why are smell and taste important? Your senses of smell and taste let you fully enjoy the scents ... bitter and sour. Flavor involves both taste and smell. For example, because a person is able to ...

  6. Demographic and clinical correlates of sexual dysfunction among Nigerian male outpatients on conventional antipsychotic medications

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In psychotic disorders, early intervention with antipsychotic medications increases the likelihood of favourable long-term course. However, the pharmacologic management especially with conventional antipsychotic medications is complicated by a high rate of adverse effects including sexual dysfunction. This study aims to determine the demographic and clinical factors associated with sexual dysfunction among male psychiatric outpatients on conventional antipsychotic medications in South-western Nigeria. Methods Two hundred and seventy five consecutive male outpatients with psychotic disorders on conventional antipsychotic medications were interviewed. Data was collected on demographic characteristics, illness-related and medication-related variables. Illness severity was assessed with the Brief psychiatric rating scale. The International Index of Erectile Function questionnaire was used to assess for sexual dysfunctions. Results A total of 111 (40.4%) respondents had one or more forms of sexual dysfunction. Sexual desire dysfunction was present in 47 (17.1%) of respondents, erectile dysfunction in 95 (34.5%), orgasmic dysfunctions in 51 (18.5%), intercourse dissatisfaction in 72 (26.2%) and overall dissatisfaction in 64 (23.3%). Sexual dysfunction was significantly associated with employment status, age, marital status, haloperidol use, medication dosage, and presence of psychopathology. Unemployment was the only significant independent correlate of sexual dysfunction, with unemployed respondents twice more likely to have sexual dysfunction compared with those employed (Wald?=?3.865, Odds Ratio?=?2.033, 95% confidence interval?=?1.002 - 4.124, p?=?0.049). Conclusions The high prevalence of sexual dysfunction found in this study suggests a need among clinicians for increased awareness and recognition of the sexual side effects in patients taking conventional antipsychotic medications. This knowledge should guide conventional antipsychotic medication prescription in the at-risk population to improve treatment adherence. PMID:22676295

  7. Vasculogenic mimicry is a major feature and novel predictor of poor prognosis in patients with orbital rhabdomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, LUXIA; HE, YANJIN; SUN, SHIZHEN; SUN, BAOCUN; TANG, XIN

    2015-01-01

    Vasculogenic mimicry (VM) is a key developmental program, frequently activated during cancer invasion and metastasis. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of VM in orbital rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), the correlation between VM and tumor differentiation, recurrence and survival duration, as well as the contribution of epithelial cell kinase (EphA2) and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) in VM initiation. A total of 32 patients were enrolled to investigate the associations between VM in orbital RMS tumors and clinical characteristics, as well as its impact on overall survival. VM was identified and confirmed by CD31/periodic acid-Schiff double staining, while the presence of EphA2 and MMP-2 were examined by immunohistochemical analysis. VM was identified in eleven patients, particularly those with poorly differentiated orbital RMS (P=0.001). Patients with VM exhibited significantly worse survival rates (P=0.001, log-rank test), a significantly increased risk of mortality (P=0.008) and EphA2 and MMP-2 expression levels were enhanced (P=0.005 and 0.001, respectively). The VM and mitotic rate were independent predictors of poor prognosis (P=0.001 and 0.004, respectively), indicated by multivariate Cox proportional hazards models. These results demonstrated that VM is present in orbital RMS and represents an independent prognostic factor for overall survival. In addition, overexpression of EphA2 and MMP-2 may promote VM formation in orbital RMS. PMID:26622724

  8. The Biphasic Effects of Oxidized-Low Density Lipoprotein on the Vasculogenic Function of Endothelial Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Feng-Yen; Tsao, Nai-Wen; Shih, Chun-Ming; Lin, Yi-Wen; Yeh, Jong-Shiua; Chen, Jaw-Wen; Nakagami, Hironori; Morishita, Ryuichi; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Huang, Chun-Yao

    2015-01-01

    Late-outgrowth endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are stress-resistant and responsible for reparative functions in the cardiovascular system. Oxidized-LDL (oxLDL) plays a critical role in cardiovascular disease pathogenesis. However, it is largely unknown what the impacts of oxLDL are on late-outgrowth EPCs. This study aimed to investigate the concentration-related effects of oxLDL on EPC functions and related angiogenesis, in vitro and in vivo. In this study, early and late-outgrowth EPCs were generated from circulating human mononuclear cells. oxLDL may regulate EPC vasculogenic function via the lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1). Lower concentrations (5 ?g/mL) of oxLDL can potentiate EPC tube formation in vitro and in vivo by activating eNOS mechanisms, which are mediated by p38 MAPK- and SAPK/JNK-related pathways. Higher concentrations of oxLDL (10-50 ?g/mL) impaired EPC function via the activation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase pathways and consequent inhibition of eNOS activity, which could be reversed by anti-oxidants (diphenylene iodonium and apocynin) and gp91phox siRNA. In conclusion, oxLDL has concentration-dependent biphasic effects on human late-outgrowth EPC tube formation in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26017136

  9. Application of functional vincristine plus dasatinib liposomes to deletion of vasculogenic mimicry channels in triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Fan; Ju, Rui-Jun; Liu, Lei; Xie, Hong-Jun; Mu, Li-Min; Zhao, Yao; Yan, Yan; Hu, Ying-Jie; Wu, Jia-Shuan; Lu, Wan-Liang

    2015-11-01

    Standard chemotherapy cannot eradicate triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) while the residual cancer cells readily form the vasculogenic mimicry (VM) channels, which lead to the relapse of cancer after treatment. In this study, the functional vincristine plus dasatinib liposomes, modified by a targeting molecule DSPE-PEG2000-c(RGDyK), were fabricated to address this issue. The investigations were performed on TNBC MDA-MB-231 cells and MDA-MB-231 xenografts in nude mice. The liposomes exhibited the superior performances in the following aspects: the enhancement of cellular uptake via targeted action; the induction of apoptosis via activation of caspase 8, 9, and 3, increased expression of Bax, decreased expression of Mcl-1, and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS); and the deletion of VM channels via inhibitions on the VM channel indicators, which consisted of vascular endothelial-cadherin (VE-Cad), focal adhesion kinase (FAK), phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), and matrix metallopeptidases (MMP-2, and MMP-9). Furthermore, the liposomes displayed the prolonged circulation time in the blood, the increased accumulation in tumor tissue, and the improved therapeutic efficacy along with deletion of VM channels in the TNBC-bearing mice. In conclusion, the nanostructured functional drug-loaded liposomes may provide a promising strategy for the treatment of invasive TNBC along with deletion of VM channels. PMID:26429872

  10. The dual control model of male sexual response: a theoretical approach to centrally mediated erectile dysfunction

    E-print Network

    preoccupation with sexual rewards); 4. Where sexual and reproductive behavior is inhibited by chronic stressThe dual control model of male sexual response: a theoretical approach to centrally mediated and Reproduction, Morrison Hall 313, Indiana University, 1165 East Third Street, Bloomington, IN 47405-3700, USA

  11. Chronic High Dose Intraperitoneal Bisphenol A (BPA) Induces Substantial Histological and Gene Expression Alterations in Rat Penile Tissue Without Impairing Erectile Function

    PubMed Central

    Kovanecz, Istvan; Gelfand, Robert; Masouminia, Maryam; Gharib, Sahir; Segura, Denesse; Vernet, Dolores; Rajfer, Jacob; Li, De-Kun; Liao, Chun Yang; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Gonzalez-Cadavid, Nestor F.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Bisphenol A (BPA), released from plastics and dental sealants, is a suspected endocrine disruptor and reproductive toxicant. In occupationally exposed workers, BPA has been associated with erectile dysfunction (ED). Aims To determine whether long-term exposure to high doses of BPA in the rat affects serum levels of testosterone (T) and estradiol (E2), and induces corporal histopathology and resultant ED. Methods Young rats were injected intraperitoneal (IP) injection daily with BPA at 25 mg/kg/day or vehicle (n = 8/group). Erectile function was measured at 3 months by cavernosometry and electrical field stimulation (EFS). BPA was assayed in serum, urine, and penile tissue, and serum T and E2 were determined. Quantitative Masson trichrome, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling, Oil Red O, immunohistochemistry for calponin, ?-smooth muscle actin, and Oct 4 were applied to penile tissue sections. Protein markers were assessed by Western blots and 2–D minigels, and RNA by DNA microarrays. Main Outcome Measures Erectile function, histological, and biochemical markers in corporal tissue. Results In the BPA-treated rats, total and free BPA levels were increased in the serum, urine, and penile tissue while serum T and E2 levels were reduced. In addition, the corpora cavernosa demonstrated a reduction in smooth muscle (SM) content, SM/collagen ratio, together with an increase in myofibroblasts, fat deposits, and apoptosis, but no significant change in collagen content or stem cells (nuclear/perinuclear Oct 4). In the penile shaft, BPA induced a downregulation of Nanog (stem cells), neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nitrergic terminals), and vascular endothelial growth factor (angiogenesis), with genes related to SM tone and cytoskeleton upregulated 5- to 50-fold, accompanied by changes in the multiple protein profile. However, both cavernosometry and EFS were unaltered by BPA. Conclusions While rats treated chronically with a high IP dose of BPA developed hypogonadism and a corporal histo- and molecular-pathology usually associated with ED, no changes were detected in erectile function as measured by EFS and cavernosometry. Further studies using alternate routes of BPA administration with various doses and length of exposure are needed to expand these findings. Kovanecz I, Gelfand R, Masouminia M, Gharib S, Segura D, Vernet D, Rajfer J, Li DK, Liao CY, Kannan K, and Gonzalez-Cadavid NF. Chronic high dose intraperitoneal bisphenol A (BPA) induces substantial histological and gene expression alterations in rat penile tissue without impairing erectile function. PMID:24134786

  12. Efficacy of ellagic acid and sildenafil in diabetes-induced sexual dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Sumanta Kumar; Vishwanath, Manikanta; Gangadarappa, Suma Kallahalli; Razdan, Rema; Inamdar, Mohammed Naseeruddin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Diabetes induced sexual dysfunction is a leading cause of male sexual disorder and an early indicator of cardiovascular complication. Reactive oxygen species generated in body during diabetes is a main causative factor for erectile dysfunction, a sexual dysfunction. Adjuvant antioxidant therapy along with phosphodiesterases type 5 enzyme inhibitor (PDE5i) is more effective than PDE5i alone. Objective: The aim of the study was to investigate efficacy of ellagic acid a known antioxidant and sildenafil in diabetes induced erectile dysfunction. Materials and Methods: Type 1 diabetes was induced in male rats and rats were treated with ellagic acid (50 mg/kg, p.o.) and a combination of ellagic acid (50 mg/kg, p.o.) and sildenafil (5 mg/kg, p.o.), a PDE5i for 28 days. Sexual function was observed in diabetic rat and compared with those of treatment group and normal rats. Effect of ellagic acid was studied on advanced glycation end products (AGE) and isolated rat corpus cavernosum in vitro. Results: Sexual function of diabetic rats was found to be reduced and ellegic acid treatment could preserve sexual function of diabetic rats to some extent. Ellagic acid + sildenafil treatment was more efficient in management of diabetes induced sexual dysfunction. Ellagic acid inhibited (AGE) in vitro implying its role in reducing oxidative stress in diabetes. The polyphenol could not increase sexual function in normal rats and relax isolated rat corpus cavernosum smooth muscle significantly. Conclusion: The study proves usefulness of adjuvant antioxidant therapy in the management of erectile dysfunction in diabetes. PMID:25298678

  13. Outcome predictors of Internet-based brief sex therapy for sexual dysfunctions in heterosexual men.

    PubMed

    Blanken, Irene; Leusink, Peter; van Diest, Selma; Gijs, Luk; van Lankveld, Jacques J D M

    2015-01-01

    The authors investigated whether baseline and therapy process characteristics of 82 heterosexual men participating in an Internet-based sex therapy study predict posttreatment sexual functioning. Problem severity, baseline sexual desire and baseline sexual satisfaction, but also partner problems and quality of the therapeutic relationship are predictive for sexual functioning and sexual satisfaction after finishing Internet-based sex therapy. The obtained outcome predictors could benefit men with sexual dysfunctions by tailoring online therapy programs to their individual characteristics. In addition, therapists should realize that clients suffering from erectile dysfunction or premature ejaculation in online sex therapy attach great importance to the therapeutic relationship. PMID:24918965

  14. Combretastatin A4 phosphate treatment induces vasculogenic mimicry formation of W256 breast carcinoma tumor in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yao, Nan; Ren, Ke; Jiang, Cuihua; Gao, Meng; Huang, Dejian; Lu, Xiao; Lou, Bin; Peng, Fei; Yang, Aizhen; Wang, Xiaoning; Ni, Yicheng; Zhang, Jian

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of combretastatin A4 phosphate (CA4P) on vasculogenic mimicry (VM) channel formation in vitro and in vivo after a single-dose treatment and the underlying mechanism involved in supporting VM. In vitro model of three-dimensional cultures was used to test the effect of CA4P on the tube formation of Walker 256 cells. Western blot analysis was conducted to assess the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1? and VM-associated markers. W256 tumor-bearing rat model was established to demonstrate the effect of CA4P on VM formation and tumor hypoxia by double staining and a hypoxic marker pimonidazole. Anti-tumor efficacy of CA4P treatment was evaluated by tumor growth curve. Under hypoxic conditions for 48 h in vitro, W256 cells formed VM network associated with increased expression of VM markers. Pretreatment with CA4P did not influence the amount of VM in 3-D culture as well as the expression of these key molecules. In vivo, W256 tumors showed marked intratumoral hypoxia after CA4P treatment, accompanied by increased VM formation. CA4P exhibited only a delay in tumor growth within 2 days but rapid tumor regrowth afterward. VM density was positively related to tumor volume and tumor weight at day 8. CA4P causes hypoxia which induces VM formation in W256 tumors through HIF-1?/EphA2/PI3K/matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) signaling pathway, resulting in the consequent regrowth of the damaged tumor. PMID:26026583

  15. The Effect of Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome (CP/CPPS) on Erectile Function: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiang; Zhou, ZhiRui; Qiu, XiaoChun; Wang, Bin; Dai, JiCan

    2015-01-01

    Background High prevalence of erectile dysfunction (ED) has been observed in patients with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS). However, whether or not CP/CPPS is a risk factor of ED remains unknown and controversial. Therefore, we conducted this systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the relationship between CP/CPPS and ED. Methods PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and The Cochrane Library were searched up to November 11, 2014 to identify studies reporting the association between CP/CPPS and ED. Case–control, cohort and cross-sectional studies were included. Quality of the included studies was assessed. The odds ratio of ED and the mean difference of five-item International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5) score were pooled using a random effects model. Subgroup analysis and sensitivity analyses were performed. Results Three cross-sectional studies, two case–control studies, and four retrospective studies with 31,956 participants were included to calculate the pooled odds ratio of ED, and two studies with 1499 participants were included to calculate the pooled mean difference of IIEF-5 scores. A strong correlation was found between CP/CPPS and ED (pooled odds ratio: 3.02, 95% CI: 2.18–4.17, P < 0.01), with heterogeneity across studies (I2 = 65%; P < 0.01). A significant decrease in the IIFE-5 score was observed in the CP/CPPS group (pooled mean difference: ?4.54, 95% CI: ?5.11–?3.98; P < 0.01). Conclusion Our study indicates that patients with CP/CPPS have an increased risk of suffering from ED. Assessment of erectile function is necessary for the therapy of patients with CP/CPPS. Further evidence is necessary to confirm the relationship between CP/CPPS and ED. PMID:26509575

  16. Differentially expressed angiogenic genes in diabetic erectile tissue - results from a microarray screening.

    PubMed

    Castela, Ângela; Soares, Raquel; Rocha, Fátima; Medeiros, Rui; Ribeiro, Ricardo; Monteiro, Cátia; Gomes, Pedro; Vendeira, Pedro; Virag, Ronald; Costa, Carla

    2012-02-01

    Diabetes-induced metabolic derangements promote endothelial malfunction, contributing to erectile dysfunction (ED). However, it remains unclear which angiogenic molecular mechanisms are deregulated in diabetic corpus cavernosum (CC). We investigated early and late alterations in cavernosal angiogenic gene expression associated to diabetes. Angiogenic changes were assessed in penile tissue of streptozotocin-induced Wistar rats, in an early (2-week) and established stage (8-week) of diabetes. Differentially expressed genes were identified by microarrays and expression data validated by quantitative real-time PCR (qrt-PCR). At protein level, quantitative immunohistochemistry confirmed the arrays data and dual immunofluorescence for selected alterations and ?-smooth muscle actin (?-SMA) identified the cellular location of target proteins. The selected differentially expressed genes were also evaluated in human non-diabetic and diabetic CC by quantitative immunolabeling. At 2-week diabetes there was no differential gene expression between non-diabetic and diabetic CC. At 8-week, 10 genes were found down-regulated in diabetics. The results were validated by qrt-PCR for the insulin-like growth factor-1 (Igf1) and the natriuretic peptide receptor-1 (Npr1) genes. Dual immunofluorescence for IGF-1/ ?-SMA showed predominant localization of IGF-1 in SM. NPR-1 expression was diffuse and mostly present in trabecular fibroblasts and SM. Quantitative immunostaining confirmed the decreased expression of both proteins in diabetic tissues. Concordantly, we detected a significant reduction in IGF-1 and NPR-1 protein expressions in human diabetic samples. Microarray analysis identified 10 angiogenic-related molecules deregulated in CC of established diabetes. Among them, IGF-1 and NPR-1 were significantly down-regulated and might result in preventive/therapeutic targets for ED management. PMID:22133301

  17. Combined effect of osteopontin and BMP-2 derived peptides grafted to an adhesive hydrogel on osteogenic and vasculogenic differentiation of marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    He, Xuezhong; Yang, Xiaoming; Jabbari, Esmaiel

    2012-03-27

    The objective of this work was to investigate the combined effect of grafting the peptide corresponding to amino acid residues 162-168 of osteopontin (OPD peptide) and the peptide corresponding to amino acid residues 73-92 of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP peptide) to an RGD-conjugated inert hydrogel on osteogenic and vasculogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal (BMS) cells. RGD-conjugated three-dimensional (3D) porous hydrogel scaffolds with well-defined cylindrical pore geometry were produced from sacrificial wax molds fabricated by fused deposition modeling rapid prototyping system. Propargyl acrylate and 4-pentenal were conjugated to the hydrogel for orthogonal grafting of BMP and OPD peptides by click reaction and oxime ligation, respectively. The OPD peptide was grafted by the reaction between aminooxy moiety of aminooxy-mPEG-OPD (mPEG = mini-poly(ethylene glycol)) and the aldehyde moiety in the hydrogel. The BMP peptide was grafted by the reaction between the azide moiety of Az-mPEG-BMP and the propargyl moiety in the hydrogel. The hydrogels seeded with BMS cells were characterized by biochemical, immunocytochemical, and mRNA analyses. Groups included RGD control hydrogel (RGD), RGD and BMP peptides without OPD (RGD+BMP), RGD and BMP peptides with mutant OPD (RGD+BMP+mOPD), and RGD and BMP peptides with OPD (RGD+BMP+OPD) grafted hydrogels. The extent of mineralization of RGD, RGD+BMP, RGD+BMP+mOPD, and RGD+BMP+OPD groups after 28 days was 650 ± 70, 990 ± 30, 850 ± 30, and 1150 ± 40 mg/(mg of DNA), respectively, indicating that the BMP and OPD peptides enhanced osteogenic differentiation of the BMS cells. The BMS cells seeded on RGD+BMP+OPD grafted hydrogels stained positive for vasculogenic markers ?-SMA, PECAM-1, and VE-cadherin while the groups without OPD peptide (RGD+BMP and RGD+BMP+mOPD) stained only for ?-SMA but not PECAM-1 or VE-cadherin. These results were consistent with the significantly higher PECAM-1 mRNA expression for RGD+BMP+OPD group after 21 and 28 days, compared to the groups without OPD. These findings suggest that the RGD+BMP+OPD peptides provide a favorable microenvironment for concurrent osteogenic and vasculogenic differentiation of progenitor marrow-derived cells. PMID:22372823

  18. Sexual Dysfunction, HIV, and AIDS in Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Shindel, Alan W.; Horberg, Michael A.; Smith, James F.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract HIV infection is associated with sexual dysfunction. Using validated instruments, we investigated the relationship between HIV/AIDS and sexual function in a contemporary cohort of men who have sex with men (MSM). An anonymous Internet-based survey was disseminated to MSM via organizations and social networking sites that cater to this population. Information on ethnodemographic variables, health status (including HIV status, disease stage, and other health conditions), and sexual behavior was collected. Men were categorized as HIV-negative, HIV-positive/AIDS-negative, or HIV-positive /AIDS-positive. A modified validated version of the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) for use in MSM and the Premature Ejaculation Diagnostic Tool (PEDT) were used to stratify risk of sexual dysfunction. The study cohort included 1361 men (236 of whom were HIV-positive) who provided complete data on HIV status, IIEF, and PEDT. There was a significant trend toward greater prevalence of erectile dysfunction (ED) in men with progressive HIV infection 40–59 years of age relative to age matched HIV-negative men (p=0.02). In a logistic regression model controlling for other variables, HIV infection without AIDS was not associated with greater odds of ED; however, HIV infection with AIDS was associated with greater odds of ED (p=0.006). In a separate logistic regression model, HIV infection with or without AIDS was not significantly associated with greater odds of premature ejaculation (p>0.05). Use of phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitor drugs was much more common in HIV-infected men. HIV infection is a risk factor for poorer sexual function primarily due to higher risk of erectile dysfunction in men with AIDS. PMID:21501095

  19. Sexual dysfunction in male patients undergoing hemodialysis in morocco.

    PubMed

    Zamd, Mohamed; Gharbi, Mohammed Benghanem; Ramdani, Benyounes; Zaid, Driss

    2005-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction impairs the quality of life of patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD). The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and the nature of sexual dysfunction in a Moroccan cohort of patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) on HD. This cross-sectional study was carried out with a questionnaire in 86 patients undergoing hemodialysis. Clinical and biological investigations were done. The mean age of our patients was 46.27 +/- 15.68 years old. 81.4% of the cases suffered from a decrease in sexual activity after the onset of HD. The decrease or the loss of libido was noted in 59.3% of the cases. Total impotence was present in 22.1% of the cases and 36% reported partial impotence. Ejaculation was present in 86% of the cases. The comparison between the group of patients who had no sexual dysfunction (group I) and the group of those who had this problem (group II) showed significant differences of age, social status and sexual life before HD. Other significant differences were found regarding frequency of intercourses and sexual satisfaction. Group II was divided into 2 subgroups: IIA included patients who had sexual dysfunction before HD and IIB: those who developed it after. The comparison of this subgroups showed that differences were significant regarding age, weight and vascular risk factors (diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis). Sildenafil was more efficient in the patients of the subgroup IIB. This study suggested that HD was one of many factors causing sexual dysfunction in hemodialysed patients. After this clinical evaluation of sexual dysfunction, we emphasize the value of a global approach of this problem. The use of sildenafil seems to be more valuable in young patients with erectile dysfunction which appeared after long dialysis duration. PMID:18209457

  20. Sexual dysfunction in 2013: Advances in epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, King Chien Joe; Fahmy, Nader; Brock, Gerald B.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To provide a contemporary review of the epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment of premature ejaculation (PE) and erectile dysfunction (ED). Methods We searched for English-language articles published in the past 12 months using the PubMed database. Relevant articles on the subjects of sexual dysfunction, ED and PE were selected for review. Conclusions Recent studies on male sexual dysfunction have provided new therapeutic possibilities. Tramadol, a well-used analgesic, has a new role in the treatment of PE. Super-selective targeting of dorsal penile nerves by surgery or cryoablative technologies might become a viable treatment option for refractory PE in the future. The role of ED as a harbinger of important comorbidities allows for the early detection and intervention of these conditions, which can optimise therapeutic outcomes. The long-term effect of chronic phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors on endothelial dysfunction, the angiogenic potential of low-intensity extracorporeal shock wave therapy, and further advances in drug-eluting endovascular stents might in future allow clinicians to treat ED more definitively. PMID:26558082

  1. Sweet Bee Venom Pharmacopuncture May be Effective for Treating Sexual Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Pavel; Yu, Junsang

    2014-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction (SD) is a health problem which occurs during any phase of the sexual response cycle that keeps the individual or couple from experiencing satisfaction from the sexual activity. SD covers a wide variety of symptoms like in men, erectile dysfunction and premature or delayed ejaculation, in women, spasms of the vagina and pain with sexual intercourse, in both sexes, sexual desire and response. And pharmacopuncture, i.e. injection of subclinical doses of drugs, mostly herb medicine, in acupoints, has been adopted with successful results. This case report showed the effect of bee venom on SD. A 51-year-old male patient with SD, who had a past history of taking Western medication to treat his SD and who had previously undergone surgery on his lower back due to a herniated disc, received treatments using pharmacopuncture of sweet bee venom (SBV) at Gwanwon (CV4), Hoeeum (CV1), Sinsu (BL23), and Gihaesu (BL24) for 20 days. Objectively, the patient showed improvement on most items on the International Index for Erectile Dysfunction (IIEF) like 28 to 29 out of perfect score 30 for erectile function, 10 to 10 out of perfect score 10 for orgasmic function, 6 to 8 out of perfect score 10 for sexual desire, 10 to 13 out of perfect score 15 for satisfaction with intercourse, and 6 to 8 out of perfect score 10 for overall satisfaction; subjectively, his words, the tone of his voice and the look of confidence in his eyes all indicated improvement. Among the variety of effects of SBV pharmacopuncture, urogenital problems such as SD may be health problems that pharmacopuncture can treat effectively. PMID:25780712

  2. Are the Inhibitory Effects of Nicotine on Erectile Response in Nonsmokers Generalizable to Long-Term Smokers? A Reply

    E-print Network

    Meston, Cindy

    Are the Inhibitory Effects of Nicotine on Erectile Response in Nonsmokers Generalizable to Long no difference in erectile response during nicotine administration (via a 21-mg trans- dermal patch) compared to no nicotine admin- istration (24 hours postcessation), while Harte and Meston [2] demonstrated that nonsmoking

  3. Depression and sexual dysfunction among HIV-positive and HIV-negative men who have sex with men: mediation by use of antidepressants and recreational stimulants.

    PubMed

    Hart, Trevor A; Mustanski, Brian; Ryan, Daniel T; Gorbach, Pamina M; Stall, Ron D; Surkan, Pamela J; Plankey, Michael

    2015-02-01

    Erectile dysfunction and other forms of sexual dysfunction are highly prevalent among HIV+ men who have sex with men (MSM). Research has not previously identified the mechanisms by which depression may be associated with sexual dysfunction among HIV-positive and HIV-seronegative (HIV-negative) MSM. The present study examined the role of antidepressant use, stimulant use, and smoking as mediators of the relation between depression and sexual dysfunction among HIV-positive and HIV-negative MSM. Participants enrolled in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study, an ongoing prospective study of the natural and treated histories of HIV infection among MSM in the United States, completed a modified version of the International Index of Erectile Function for MSM. The study sample included 1,363 participants, with 619 HIV-positive men and 744 HIV-negative men. A structural equation model examined depression as a predictor of subsequent sexual dysfunction, mediated by antidepressant use, stimulant use, and smoking. Depression predicted subsequent sexual function among both HIV-negative and HIV-positive MSM. This effect appeared to be both a direct effect and an indirect effect via antidepressant use. Findings suggest that antidepressant medication use may partially explain sexual dysfunction among MSM. PMID:24671728

  4. Sexual Dysfunction in Men Receiving Methadone Maintenance Treatment: Clinical History and Psychobiological Correlates.

    PubMed

    Gerra, Gilberto; Manfredini, Matteo; Somaini, Lorenzo; Maremmani, Icro; Leonardi, Claudio; Donnini, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    A variety of studies evidenced a relationship between drug use disorders and sexual dysfunction. In particular, heroin and opioid agonist medications to treat heroin dependence have been found to be associated with erectile dysfunction and reduced libido. Controversial findings also indicate the possibility of factors other than the pharmacological effects of opioid drugs concurring to sexual dysfunction. With the present study, we investigated the link between sexual dysfunction and long-term exposure to opioid receptor stimulation (heroin dependence, methadone maintenance treatment, methadone dosage), the potentially related hormonal changes reflecting hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis function and prolactin (PRL) pituitary release, the role of adverse childhood experiences in the clinical history and the concomitant symptoms of comorbid mental health disorders in contributing to sexual problems. Forty male patients participating in a long-term methadone treatment program were included in the present study and compared with 40 healthy control subjects who never used drugs nor abused alcohol. All patients and controls were submitted to the Arizona Sexual Experiences Scale (ASEX), Child Experiences of Care and Abuse-Questionnaire (CECA-Q) and the Symptom Check List-90 Scale. A blood sample for testosterone and PRL assays was collected. Methadone dosages were recorded among heroin-dependent patients on maintenance treatment. Methadone patients scored significantly higher than controls on the 5-item rating ASEX scale, on CECA-Q and on Symptoms Check List 90 (SCL 90) scale. Testosterone plasma levels were significantly lower and PRL levels significantly higher in methadone patients with respect to the healthy control group. ASEX scores reflecting sexual dysfunction were directly and significantly correlated with CECA-Q neglect scores and SCL 90 psychiatric symptoms total score. The linear regression model, when applied only to addicted patients, showed that methadone dosages were not significantly correlated with sexual dysfunction scores except for 'erectile dysfunction', for which an inverse association was evidenced. Testosterone values showed a significant inverse correlation with ASEX sexual dysfunction scores, CECA-Q neglect scores and psychiatric symptom at SCL 90 among methadone patients. PRL levels were directly and significantly correlated with sexual dysfunction scores, psychiatric symptoms at SCL 90 and CECA-Q neglect scores. Both testosterone and PRL did not correlate with methadone dosages. The present findings appear to support the view of childhood adversities and comorbid psychiatric symptoms contributing to sexual dysfunction and related hormonal changes among methadone patients, challenging the assumption that attributes sexual problems entirely to the direct pharmacological effects of opioid agonist medications. PMID:26595117

  5. Female sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Wright, Jennifer J; O'Connor, Kim M

    2015-05-01

    Female sexual dysfunction is a common patient concern. After providing an overview regarding the various types of female sexual dysfunction, we will focus on history taking and treatment options for desire, arousal, orgasm, and pain disorders. Testosterone therapy and management of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor-associated sexual dysfunction are reviewed. Treatments for atrophic vaginitis are appraised. Patient cases lead the discussion, providing the reader with clinically relevant information. PMID:25841603

  6. All-trans retinoic acid impairs the vasculogenic mimicry formation ability of U87 stem-like cells through promoting differentiation

    PubMed Central

    LING, GENG-QIANG; LIU, YI-JING; KE, YI-QUAN; CHEN, LEI; JIANG, XIAO-DAN; JIANG, CHUAN-LU; YE, WEI

    2015-01-01

    The poor therapeutic effect of traditional antiangiogenic therapy on glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) may be attributed to vasculogenic mimicry (VM), which was previously reported to be promoted by cancer stem-like cells (SLCs). All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), a potent reagent which drives differentiation, was reported to be able to eradicate cancer SLCs in certain malignancies. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of ATRA on the VM formation ability of U87 glioblastoma SLCs. The expression of cancer SLC markers CD133 and nestin was detected using immunocytochemistry in order to identify U87 SLCs. In addition, the differentiation of these SLCs was observed through detecting the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), ?-tubulin III and galactosylceramidase (Galc) using immunofluorescent staining. The results showed that the expression levels of GFAP, ?-tubulin III and Galc were upregulated following treatment with ATRA in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, ATRA significantly reduced the proliferation, invasiveness, tube formation and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion of U87 SLCs. In conclusion, the VM formation ability of SLCs was found to be negatively correlated with differentiation. These results therefore suggested that ATRA may serve as a promising novel agent for the treatment of GBM due to its role in reducing VM formation. PMID:25760394

  7. A novel bispecific immunotoxin delivered by human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells to target blood vessels and vasculogenic mimicry of malignant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yonghong; Sun, Xinlin; Huang, Min; Ke, Yiquan; Wang, Jihui; Liu, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Background In previous years, immunotoxins have been shown to be a greatly promising therapeutic tool for brain malignancies, such as gliomas. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) exhibit tropism to tumor tissue. However, the effect of bispecific immunotoxins in malignant gliomas is still unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the function of bispecific immunotoxins in human malignant gliomas. Materials and methods In the present study, the bispecific immunotoxin VEGF165-ephrin A1-PE38KDEL was established using deoxyribonucleic acid shuffling and cloning techniques. The VEGF165-ephrin A1-PE38KDEL was delivered by hMSCs to mouse malignant gliomas. The effects of the bispecific immunotoxins on glioma-derived blood vessels and vasculogenic mimicry to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the antitumorigenic effects of immunotoxins were examined in vivo. Results In vitro, transfected hMSCs significantly inhibited the cell viability of gliomas cell lines U87 and U251 in a dose-dependent manner compared with untransfected hMSCs (P<0.01). In vivo, the intratumoral injection of engineered hMSCs was effective at inhibiting tumor growth in a malignant glioma tumor model. Conclusion The bispecific immunotoxin secreted from hMSCs acts as a novel strategy for improving treatment options for malignant gliomas in the clinic. PMID:26089644

  8. Effectiveness of Saikokaryukotsuboreito (Herbal Medicine) for Antipsychotic-Induced Sexual Dysfunction in Male Patients with Schizophrenia: A Description of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Takashi, Tsuboi; Uchida, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Antipsychotics sometimes cause sexual dysfunction in people with schizophrenia. The authors report the effectiveness of Saikokaryukotsuboreito (Japanese traditional herbal medicine, Chai-Hu-Jia-Long-Gu-Mu-Li-Tang in Chinese) for antipsychotic-induced sexual dysfunction in two male patients with schizophrenia. The first patient was a 28-year-old man with schizophrenia who suffered erectile dysfunction induced by olanzapine 10?mg/day; the erectile dysfunction significantly improved following the treatment of Saikokaryukotsuboreito 7.5?g/day. The other case was a 43-year-old man with schizophrenia who was receiving fluphenazine decanoate at 50?mg/month and had difficulties in ejaculation; add-on of Saikokaryukotsuboreito 7.5?g/day recovered his ejaculatory function. There has been no report on the effectiveness of Japanese herbal medicine formulations for antipsychotic-induced sexual dysfunction. Although the effectiveness of Saikokaryukotsuboreito needs to be tested in systematic clinical trials, this herbal medicine may be a treatment option to consider for this annoying side effect. PMID:24587934

  9. PILOT STUDY OF SEXUAL DYSFUNCTION IN PATIENTS WITH PSORIASIS: INFLUENCE OF BIOLOGIC THERAPY

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Villaverde, Ricardo; Sánchez-Cano, Daniel; Rodrigo, Jesus Ramirez; Gutierrez, Carmen Villaverde

    2011-01-01

    Background: Psoriasis is a chronic skin disease that affects 1 to 3% of the population in most industrialized countries. It is commonly associated with a variety of psychological problems including low self-esteem, depression, suicidal thoughts, and sexual dysfunction. Materials and Methods: We have performed a pilot study in which we have tried to assess the impact on sexual dysfunction in patients with psoriasis who have started treatment with biological therapy using validated indexes in Spanish: International Index of Erectile Function for men and female sexual function index in women. Results: Considering the men and women from our study, an improvement in FSFI by an average of 9.5 and 6.3 points is observed, respectively. Conclusion: We considered our series as a first step for a more detailed approach to the study of sexual function in patients with psoriasis. PMID:22345773

  10. Late-stage clinical development in lower urogenital targets: sexual dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Usman

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, late-stage clinical drug development that primarily focuses on urogenital targets has centered around four areas of medical need (both unmet need and aiming to improve on existing therapies). These include male sexual dysfunction (MSD), female sexual dysfunction (FSD), prostatic pathology (neoplastic, pre-neoplasitic, and non-neoplastic), and improvement in lower urinary tract symptoms. Despite the regulatory approval of compounds to treat erectile dysfunction (ED), benign prostatic hyperplasia, a number of treatments for overactive bladder, and stress urinary incontinence, there remains a deficiency in addressing a number of conditions that arise out of pathophysiological dysfunction resulting in lower urogenital tract sexual conditions. In terms of late-stage clinical development, significant progress has most recently been made in MSD development, especially in understanding further a common and complex sexual dysfunction – that of premature ejaculation. The search also continues for compounds that improve ED in terms of better efficacy and superior safety profile compared to the currently marketed phosphodiesterase-5-inhibitors. Whilst there are no approved medications to treat the subtypes of FSD, there has been significant progress in attempting to better understand how to appropriately assess treatment benefit in clinical trial settings for this difficult to diagnose and treat condition. This review will focus on late-stage human clinical development pertaining to MSD and FSD. PMID:16465180

  11. In vitro effect of medicinal plants used to treat erectile dysfunction on smooth muscle relaxation and human sperm.

    PubMed

    Rakuambo, N C; Meyer, J J M; Hussein, A; Huyser, C; Mdlalose, S P; Raidani, T G

    2006-04-21

    Chloroform and ethanol extracts of root bark of Securidaca longepedunculata, Wrightia natalensis and Rhoicissus tridentata were investigated for their in vitro activity on the contraction of corpus cavernosal smooth muscle of white New Zealand rabbits. Some of the extracts of these plants relaxed the corpus cavernosal smooth muscle at low concentrations. The highest activity was obtained from Securidaca longepedunculata chloroform extracts at a concentration of 13.0 mg/ml, which induced 66.6% relaxation. Viagra was used as a positive control in this study. Extracts of Securidaca longepedunculata added to human spermatozoa affected certain sperm parameters negatively at 6.5 mg/ml and higher whilst there was no effect at 1.0 mg/ml. PMID:16309865

  12. Vajikarana: Treatment of sexual dysfunctions based on Indian concepts

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, P. K.; Tripathi, Adarsh; Gupta, S. K.

    2013-01-01

    Vajikarana or Vrishya chikitsa is a one of eight major specialty of the Ashtanga Ayurveda. This subject is concerned with aphrodisiacs, virility and improving health of progeny. As per Charak Samhita, by proper use of these formulations, one becomes endowed with good physique, potency, strength, and complexion and sexually exhilarated and sexually potent. This in turn is helpful in many common sexual dysfunctions, including Infertility, Premature Ejaculation and Erectile dysfunction. The therapy is preceded by living in strict compliance with the directions mentioned in Ayurvedic classics, various methods of body cleansing and other non-medicinal strategies like sexual health promoting conduct, behavior and diet. Certain individualized herbal and herbo-mineral combinations are administered as per the nature of a person according to the Ayurveda. Many limitations need to be considered before considering the use of theses therapy like lack of scientific studies, possibilities of adulteration in the herbal and herbo-mineral combinations available in market and possibilities of unexpected side-effects etc., The article calls upon initiating research in this area so that claims of ancient Ayurvedic texts could be substantiated and vajikaran therapy may be utilized by modern medicine. PMID:23858267

  13. Histone deacetylase 3 expression correlates with vasculogenic mimicry through the phosphoinositide3-kinase / ERK–MMP–laminin5?2 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao; Wang, Ji-Hui; Li, Shun; Li, Lin-Lin; Huang, Min; Zhang, Yong-Hong; Liu, Yang; Yang, Yuan-Tao; Ding, Rui; Ke, Yi-Quan

    2015-01-01

    Vasculogenic mimicry (VM) refers to the process by which highly aggressive tumor cells mimic endothelial cells to form vessel-like structures that aid in supplying enough nutrients to rapidly growing tumors. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) regulate the expression and activity of numerous molecules involved in cancer initiation and progression. Notably, HDAC3 is overexpressed in the majority of carcinomas. However, thus far, no data are available to support the role of HDAC3 in VM. In this study, we subjected glioma specimens to immunohistochemical and histochemical double-staining methods and found that VM and HDAC3 expression were related to the pathological grade of gliomas. The presence of VM correlated with HDAC3 expression in glioma tissues. The formation of tubular structures, as determined by the tube formation assay to evaluate VM, was impaired in U87MG cells when transfected by siRNA or treated with an HDAC3 inhibitor. Importantly, the expression of VM-related molecules such as MMP-2/14 and laminin5?2 was also affected when HDAC3 expression was altered. Furthermore, U87MG cells were treated with a phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor or/and ERK inhibitor and found that the PI3K and ERK signaling pathways play key roles in VM; whereas, in VM, the two signaling pathways did not act upstream or downstream from each other. Taken together, our findings showed that HDAC3 contributed to VM in gliomas, possibly through the PI3K/ERK–MMPs–laminin5?2 signaling pathway, which could potentially be a novel therapeutic target for gliomas. PMID:25940092

  14. Multi-targeting Peptide-Functionalized Nanoparticles Recognized Vasculogenic Mimicry, Tumor Neovasculature, and Glioma Cells for Enhanced Anti-glioma Therapy.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xingye; Yao, Jianhui; Gao, Xiaoling; Jing, Yixian; Kang, Ting; Jiang, Di; Jiang, Tianze; Feng, Jingxian; Zhu, Qianqian; Jiang, Xinguo; Chen, Jun

    2015-12-23

    Chemotherapy failure of glioma, the most aggressive and devastating cancer, might be ascribed to the physiologic barriers of the tumor mainly including heterogeneous tumor perfusion and vascular permeability, which result in a limited penetration of chemotherapeutics. Besides, the vasculogenic mimicry (VM) channels, which are highly resistant to anti-angiogenic therapy and serve as a complement of angiogenesis, were abound in glioma and always associated with tumor recurrence. In order to enhance the therapy effect of anti-glioma, we developed a PEG-PLA-based nanodrug delivery system (nanoparticles, NP) in this study and modified its surface with CK peptide, which was composed of a human sonic hedgehog (SHH) targeting peptide (CVNHPAFAC) and a KDR targeting peptide (K237) through a GYG linker, for facilitating efficient VM channels, tumor neovasculature, and glioma cells multi-targeting delivery of paclitaxel. In vitro cellular assay showed that CK-NP-PTX not only exhibited the strongest antiproliferation effect on U87MG cells and HUVEC cells but also resulted in the most efficient destruction of VM channels when compared with CVNHPAFAC-NP, K237-NP, and the unmodified ones. Besides, CK-NP accumulated more selectively at the glioma site as demonstrated by in vivo and ex vivo imaging. As expected, the glioma-bearing mice treated with CK-NP-PTX achieved the longest median survival time compared to those treated with CVNHPAFAC-NP-PTX and K237-NP-PTX. These findings indicated that the multi-targeting therapy mediated by CK peptide might provide a promising way for glioblastoma therapy. PMID:26619329

  15. Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction

    MedlinePLUS

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) connects your jaw to the side of your head. When it works well, it enables you to ... For people with TMJ dysfunction, problems with the joint and muscles around it may cause Pain that ...

  16. Myocardin restores erectile function in diabetic rats: phenotypic modulation of corpus cavernosum smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    He, S; Zhang, T; Liu, Y; Liu, L; Zhang, H; Chen, F; Wei, A

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether gene transfer of myocardin to the penis of diabetic rats can modulate corpus cavernosum smooth muscle (CCSM) cells phenotype and restore erectile function. Five normal control rats, and 22 diabetic rats were randomly divided into four groups: rats transfected with adCMV-myocardin (N = 6), treated with empty vector (N = 6), injected with medium (N = 5), and sham-operated rats (N = 5). The erectile response was measured 7 days after transfection. The percent of smooth muscle and the expressions of SM?-actin, smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (SMMHC), calponin were evaluated. The increases in intracorporal pressure(ICP)/mean arterial pressure and total ICP in response to nerve stimulation in the adCMV-myocardin treated rats were significantly greater than those in the empty vector (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001), medium only (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001), and sham-operated rats (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001). The suppressed expressions of SM?-actin, SMMHC and calponin were completely restored, and the amount of smooth muscle in diabetic rats were not restored after treatment. It is concluded that myocardin ameliorated erectile responses in diabetic rats mainly via promoting phenotypic modulation of CCSM cells from a proliferative to a contractile state. PMID:24620720

  17. Renal dysfunction in cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Urrunaga, Nathalie H.; Mindikoglu, Ayse L.; Rockey, Don C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Renal dysfunction causes significant morbidity in cirrhotic patients. Diagnosis is challenging because it is based on serum creatinine, which is used to calculate estimated glomerular filtration rate, which itself is not an ideal measure of renal function in patients with cirrhosis. Finding the exact cause of renal injury in patients with cirrhosis remains problematic due to the limitations of the current diagnostic tests. The purpose of this review is to highlight studies used to diagnose renal dysfunction in patients with renal dysfunction and review current treatments. Recent findings New diagnostic criteria and classification of renal dysfunction, especially for acute kidney injury (AKI), have been proposed in hopes of optimizing treatment and improving outcomes. New biomarkers that help to differentiate structural from functional AKI in cirrhotic patients have been developed, but require further investigation. Vasoconstrictors are the most commonly recommended treatment of hepatorenal syndrome (HRS). Given the high mortality in patients with type 1 HRS, all patients with HRS should be evaluated for liver transplantation. When renal dysfunction is considered irreversible, combined liver–kidney transplantation is advised. Summary Development of new biomarkers to differentiate the different types of AKI in cirrhosis holds promise. Early intervention in cirrhotic patients with renal dysfunction offers the best hope of improving outcomes. PMID:25763790

  18. High Rate of Sexual Dysfunction Following Surgery for Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ertekin, Caglar; Tinay, Ilker; Yegen, Cumhur

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Although rectal cancer is a very common malignancy and has an improved cure rate in response to oncological treatment, research on rectal-cancer survivors' sexual function remains limited. Sexual dysfunction (SD) after rectal cancer treatment was measured, and possible predisposing factors that may have an impact on the development of this disorder were identified. Methods Patients undergoing curative rectal cancer surgery from January 2012 to September 2013 were surveyed using questionnaires. The female sexual function index or the International Index of Erectile Function was recorded. A multiple logistic regression was used to test associations of clinical factors with outcomes. Results Fifty-six men (56%) and 28 women (44%) who completed the questionnaire were included in the study. A total of 76 patients of the 86 patients (90.5%) with the diagnosis of rectal cancer who were included in this study reported different levels of SD after radical surgery. A total of 64 patients (76%) from the whole cohort reported moderate to severe SD after treatment of rectal cancer. Gender (P = 0.011) was independently associated with SD. Female patients reported significantly higher rates of moderate to severe SD than male patients. Patients were rarely treated for dysfunction. Conclusion Sexual problems after surgery for rectal cancer are common, but patients are rarely treated for SD. Female patients reported higher rates of SD than males. These results point out the importance of sexual (dys)function in survivors of rectal cancer. More attention should be drawn to this topic for clinical and research purposes. PMID:25360427

  19. Olfactory dysfunction in dementia

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Jorge; Petrosyan, Agavni; Magalhães, Rosana

    2014-01-01

    The natural aging process brings about some inevitable consequences, such as olfactory dysfunction, which is also frequently linked to numerous neurodegenerative disorders. Many age-related dementia, such as Alzheimer’s disease, Vascular dementia, Parkinson’s disease, and Frontotemporal Dementia often display olfactory dysfunction. Despite the overwhelming evidence of above mentioned facts, the symptomatic relevance and potential clinical and pre-clinical value of olfactory dysfunction remains overlooked by many clinicians and public alike. Olfactory dysfunction has strong practical implications on daily activities and, although not as prominent as in other mammals, olfaction is still an evolutionarily relevant sense involved in human survival (e.g., smelling gas; bad food). In this work, we provide a brief review of current research related to the olfactory dysfunction profiles in different types of dementia. Additionally, we present a compilation of accessible, easy to use olfaction assessment tools; and highlight future directions in terms of improving clinical diagnosis in patient care and research. PMID:25405189

  20. Sexual Dysfunction and Infertility

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to have sex), arousal (your body undergoes the physical changes that allow you to have sex), and orgasm. ... treat sexual dysfunction? Your doctor will do a physical exam and ask you questions about your medical and sexual history. Important chemicals in your body, called hormones, affect your interest ...

  1. Perceptual-Motor Dysfunction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pyfer, Jean L.

    Discussed are theoretical and treatment aspects of perceptual motor dysfunction and rehabilitation in 4- to 12-year-old academically failing children involved in a 3-year investigation at the University of Kansas. The program is said to stress increasing the amount of stimulation received by sensory receptors of the vestibular, reflex, and haptic…

  2. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Boland, Michelle L.; Chourasia, Aparajita H.; Macleod, Kay F.

    2013-01-01

    A mechanistic understanding of how mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to cell growth and tumorigenesis is emerging beyond Warburg as an area of research that is under-explored in terms of its significance for clinical management of cancer. Work discussed in this review focuses less on the Warburg effect and more on mitochondria and how dysfunctional mitochondria modulate cell cycle, gene expression, metabolism, cell viability, and other established aspects of cell growth and stress responses. There is increasing evidence that key oncogenes and tumor suppressors modulate mitochondrial dynamics through important signaling pathways and that mitochondrial mass and function vary between tumors and individuals but the significance of these events for cancer are not fully appreciated. We explore the interplay between key molecules involved in mitochondrial fission and fusion and in apoptosis, as well as in mitophagy, biogenesis, and spatial dynamics of mitochondria and consider how these distinct mechanisms are coordinated in response to physiological stresses such as hypoxia and nutrient deprivation. Importantly, we examine how deregulation of these processes in cancer has knock on effects for cell proliferation and growth. We define major forms of mitochondrial dysfunction and address the extent to which the functional consequences of such dysfunction can be determined and exploited for cancer diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24350057

  3. Endothelin and endothelial dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Masaki, Tomoh; Sawamura, Tatsuya

    2006-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and endothelin (ET) produced in endothelial cells are leading molecules which regulate vascular function. Failure of the physiological balance between these two molecules is usually referred to as endothelial dysfunction. ET was initially identified as a potent vasoconstrictive peptide. Three ET isoforms and two ET receptors have been identified. One of the isoforms, ET-1, plays a significant role in many cardiovascular diseases. On the other hand, oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) is known to induce endothelial dysfunction. The endothelial receptor for oxLDL was cloned, and named lectin-like oxidized receptor-1 (LOX-1). Activation of LOX-1 generates reactive oxygen species (ROS), and acivates a transcriptional factor, nuclear factor ?B (NF?B), resulting in down-regulation of NO and up-regulation of ET-1. LOX-1 might be a key molecule in the generation of endothelial dysfunction. In endothelial dysfunction, ET-1 is an aggravating factor of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25792766

  4. Dysfunctional penile cholinergic nerves in diabetic impotent men

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco, R.; Saenz de Tejada, I.; Goldstein, I.; Krane, R.J.; Wotiz, H.H.; Cohen, R.A. )

    1990-08-01

    Impotence in the diabetic man may be secondary to a neuropathic condition of the autonomic penile nerves. The relationship between autonomic neuropathy and impotence in diabetes was studied in human corporeal tissue obtained during implantation of a penile prosthesis in 19 impotent diabetic and 15 nondiabetic patients. The functional status of penile cholinergic nerves was assessed by determining their ability to accumulate tritiated choline (34), and synthesize (34) and release (19) tritiated-acetylcholine after incubation of corporeal tissue with tritiated-choline (34). Tritiated-choline accumulation, and tritiated-acetylcholine synthesis and release were significantly reduced in the corporeal tissue from diabetic patients compared to that from nondiabetic patients (p less than 0.05). The impairment in acetylcholine synthesis worsened with the duration of diabetes (p less than 0.025). No differences in the parameters measured were found between insulin-dependent (11) and noninsulin-dependent (8) diabetic patients. The ability of the cholinergic nerves to synthesize acetylcholine could not be predicted clinically with sensory vibration perception threshold testing. It is concluded that there is a functional penile neuropathic condition of the cholinergic nerves in the corpus cavernosum of diabetic impotent patients that may be responsible for the erectile dysfunction.

  5. Laser irradiation of penile blood as treatment of sexual dysfunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koultchavenia, Ekaterina V.; Khomyakov, Victor T.

    2001-05-01

    40-60% of the men of average age suffer from the violations of sexual functions. Impotence doesn't make direct threat to life; nevertheless this disease essentially reduces quality of life, and consequently deserves the most steadfast attention. There are many methods of treatment of erectile dysfunction. However they are connected with a reception of medicines, which is expensive and has a number of contraindications, or with invasive procedures, or with surgical intervention, that also not always is desirable. We have developed the original device permitting to cause passive erection by creation of a local decompression. The second stage is the effect by an infrared laser radiation (denseness of a potency 4.2 mWt/sm2, continuous radiation with length of a wave 0.89 microns, exposition 5 minutes) on erection glans penis. We observed 24 patients with the complaints on insufficient erection (18), premature ejaculation (6); 2 patients in addition presented the complaint on small sizes of the penis. Age of the patients was 24-46 years, on the average 34.3 years. All have received treatment from 15 sessions in day.

  6. Erectile function and male reproduction in men with spinal cord injury: a review.

    PubMed

    Dimitriadis, F; Karakitsios, K; Tsounapi, P; Tsambalas, S; Loutradis, D; Kanakas, N; Watanabe, N T; Saito, M; Miyagawa, I; Sofikitis, N

    2010-06-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) in men results in defects in erectile function, ejaculatory process and male reproductive potential. There are alterations in the capacity of men with SCI to achieve reflexogenic, psychogenic and nocturnal erections. The sexual function in different stages after SCI and the types of erections depend mainly on the completeness of the injury and the level of neurological damage. Furthermore, most of the SCI men demonstrate defects concerning the entrance of semen into the posterior urethra and the expulsion of the semen through the penile urethra and the urethral orifice. In addition, SCI men develop defects in the secretory function of the Leydig cells, Sertoli cells and the male accessory genital glands. The overall result is a decreased quality of the semen is recovered either with penile vibratory stimulation (PVS) or with electroejaculation. Nowadays the therapeutic andrological approach of SCI men focuses on achievement of erectile function, recovery of spermatozoa and assisted reproductive technology. The first line of therapy recommended for infertility in SCI men is collection of semen via PVS with concomitant evaluation of total motile sperm yields for assisted conception which may include intravaginal insemination, intrauterine insemination, or in vitro fertilisation/intracytoplasmic sperm injection. Patients failing PVS may be referred for electroejaculation or surgical sperm retrieval. PMID:20500744

  7. Effect of Curculigo orchioides on hyperglycemia-induced oligospermia and sexual dysfunction in male rats.

    PubMed

    Thakur, M; Chauhan, N S; Sharma, V; Dixit, V K; Bhargava, S

    2012-01-01

    Sustained hyperglycemia is considered as a major cause of sexual and erectile dysfunction in human population. Curculigo orchioides (CO) is considered as a sexual tonic in Ayurvedic system of medicine with potent antioxidant and adaptogenic properties. The aqueous extract of the herb was evaluated for its effectiveness against streptozotocin-induced hyperglycemic stress and subsequent sexual dysfunction due to hyperglycemia in male rats. Six groups with eight male rats in each group were used for this study and the study was carried out for 28 days. The body and organ weights of the animals were recorded. Behavioral analysis of rats was undertaken to observe the effect on mount, ejaculation and intromission (latencies and frequencies) and hesitation time. Blood glucose and serum testosterone levels were determined 28 days past treatment with CO at 100 and 200?mg?kg(-1) doses. Glibenclamide and sildenafil citrate were used as positive controls. This deleterious effect of sustained hyperglycemia and associated stress was prominently ameliorated in animals treated with aqueous extract of CO. CO treatment was helpful in ameliorating the damage caused by sustained hyperglycemia evidenced in the principle parameters viz. male sexual behavior, sperm count, penile erection index and seminal fructose content Antioxidant and anabolic activities of the extract under investigation could be a major attribute in preserving the sexual functions in hyperglycemic male rats. The study validates the use of CO in traditional medicine for curing diabetes-induced sexual dysfunction and compromised sexual potency. PMID:21918533

  8. Management of ejaculatory dysfunction.

    PubMed

    McMahon, C G

    2014-02-01

    Ejaculatory dysfunction is a common complaint and is often associated with a reduced quality of life for sufferer and partner. The spectrum of ejaculatory dysfunction extends from premature ejaculation (PE) to delayed ejaculation (DE) and anejaculation. Over the past 20-30 years, the PE treatment paradigm, previously limited to behavioural psychotherapy, has expanded to include drug treatment. Multiple well-controlled, evidence-based studies have demonstrated the efficacy and safety of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors in delaying ejaculation, confirming their role as first-line agents for the treatment of lifelong and acquired PE. More recently, there has been increased attention to the psychosocial consequences of PE, its epidemiology, its aetiology and its pathophysiology by both clinicians and the pharmaceutical industry. DE and anejaculation are probably the least common, least studied and least understood of the male sexual dysfunctions. However, their impact is significant as they may result in a lack of sexual fulfilment for both the man and his partner, an effect further compounded when procreation is among the couple's goals of sexual intercourse. The causes of DE, anejaculation and anorgasmia are manifold. Numerous psychotherapeutic treatments are described for the management of delayed or anejaculation. Although some appear to be effective, none has been properly evaluated in large-scale samples. Treatment of DE or anejaculation with pharmacotherapy has met with limited success. No drugs have been approved by regulatory agencies for this purpose, and most drugs that have been identified for potential use have limited efficacy, impart significant side-effects or are yet considered experimental in nature. PMID:24528812

  9. Chronic Cigarette Smoking Impairs Erectile Function through Increased Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis, Decreased nNOS, Endothelial and Smooth Muscle Contents in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yun-Ching; Chin, Chih-Chien; Chen, Chih-Shou; Shindel, Alan. W.; Ho, Dong-Ru; Lin, Ching-Shwun; Shi, Chung-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette use is an independent risk factor for the development of erectile dysfunction (ED). While the association between chronic smoking and ED is well established, the fundamental mechanism(s) of cigarette-related ED are incompletely understood, partly due to no reliable animal model of smoking-induced ED. The present study was designed to validate an in vivo rat model of chronic cigarette-induced ED. Forty 12-week old male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups. Ten rats served as control group and were exposed only to room air. The remaining 30 rats were passively exposed to cigarette smoke (CS) for 4 weeks (n = 10), 12 weeks (n = 10), and 24 weeks (n = 10). At the 24-week time point all rats were assessed with intracavernous pressure (ICP) during cavernous nerve electrostimulation. Blood and urine were collected to measure serum testosterone and oxidative stress, respectively. Corporal tissue was assessed by Western blot for neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). Penile tissues were subjected to immunohistochemistry for endothelial, smooth muscle, and apoptotic content. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) was significantly higher in 24-week cigarette exposed animals compared to the control animals. Mean ICP/MAP ratio and cavernosal smooth muscle/endothelial contents were significantly lower in the 12- and 24-week rats compared to control animals. Oxidative stress was significantly higher in the 24-week cigarette exposed group compared to control animals. Mean nNOS expression was significantly lower, and apoptotic index significantly higher, in CS-exposed animals compared to control animals. These findings indicate that the rat model exposure to CS increases apoptosis and oxidative stress and decreases nNOS, endothelial and smooth muscle contents, and ICP in a dose dependent fashion. The rat model is a useful tool for further study of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of CS-related ED. PMID:26491965

  10. Autonomic dysfunction in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Racosta, Juan Manuel; Kimpinski, Kurt; Morrow, Sarah Anne; Kremenchutzky, Marcelo

    2015-12-01

    Autonomic dysfunction is a prevalent and significant cause of disability among patients with multiple sclerosis. Autonomic dysfunction in multiple sclerosis is usually explained by lesions within central nervous system regions responsible for autonomic regulation, but novel evidence suggests that other factors may be involved as well. Additionally, the interactions between the autonomic nervous system and the immune system have generated increased interest about the role of autonomic dysfunction in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. In this paper we analyze systematically the most relevant signs and symptoms of autonomic dysfunction in MS, considering separately their potential causes and implications. PMID:26070809

  11. [Revisiting meibomian gland dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Baudouin, C

    2014-12-01

    Meibomian gland dysfunctions (MGD) are frequent affections, sometimes asymptomatic, more often responsible for disabling, potentially severe, manifestations. MGD is indeed the most frequent cause of dry eye, through the induction of tear film instability. However, eyelid inflammation, microbial proliferation that modifies melting temperature of meibum, frequent association with skin diseases, as well as potentially severe corneal complications make them complex multifactorial disorders. Complementary mechanisms combine to actually result in a vicious circle, or more accurately a double vicious cycle. The first one is self-stimulated by the microbiological changes, which create their own conditions for MGD development. The second one is related to tear film instability that results from MGD and is also self-stimulated through hyperosmolarity and inflammatory phenomena, which are both consequence and cause of dry eye. We herein propose a new pathophysiological schema on MGD, in order to better identify mechanisms and more efficiently target therapeutics. PMID:25455142

  12. Treatment with a combination of ginger, L-citrulline, muira puama and Paullinia cupana can reverse the progression of corporal smooth muscle loss, fibrosis and veno-occlusive dysfunction in the aging rat

    PubMed Central

    Ferrini, Monica G.; Hlaing, Su M.; Chan, Andre; Artaza, Jorge N.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Aging associated erectile dysfunction is characterized within the corpora by a progressive apoptosis of the smooth muscle cells and their replacement by collagen. Nitric oxide from iNOS has been shown to inhibit these histological changes in the corpora while PDE5 inhibitors as well as certain nutraceuticals such as ginger, paullinia cupana, muira puama and L-citrulline are known to enhance the effects of NO. We evaluated whether the daily oral administration for 2 months with a combination of ginger, paullinia cupana, muira puama and L-citrulline (COMP-4) can effectively delay the ongoing corporal fibrosis, smooth muscle cell apoptosis and cavernosal veno-occlusive dysfunction (CVOD) seen in middle aged rats similar to that seen with tadalafil. Methods 10 Month old Fisher 344 rats were treated or not for two months with COMP-4, tadalafil or a combination of tadalafil plus COMP-4. CVOD was determined by dynamic infusion cavernosometry. Penile sections of the corpora cavernosa were subjected to Masson trichrome staining to evaluate fibrosis and immunohistochemistry for desmin as a marker of smooth muscle content and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) followed by image analysis. Oxidative stress levels were determined by GSH/GSSG ratio in whole blood. Results a decline in the non-treated rat's erectile function is evident by 10-12 months of age and is accompanied by a decrease in the corporal smooth muscle content determined by desmin expression and an increase in corporal fibrosis. The daily treatment for two months with COMP-4 reverses this process by reducing systemic oxidative stress and increasing desmin and iNOS expression, similar to that seen with tadalafil or the combination of COMP-4 plus tadalafil. Conclusion An oral combination of ginger, muira puama, Paullinia cupana and L-citrulline seems to be as effective as daily PDE5 inhibitor therapy in either delaying or reversing the onset of the histological and functional characteristics of aging related erectile dysfunction. PMID:26405615

  13. Reduced melanocortin production causes sexual dysfunction in male mice with POMC neuronal insulin and leptin insensitivity.

    PubMed

    Faulkner, Latrice D; Dowling, Abigail R; Stuart, Ronald C; Nillni, Eduardo A; Hill, Jennifer W

    2015-04-01

    Proopiomelanocortin (POMC)-derived peptides like ?-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH) substantially improve hepatic insulin sensitivity and regulate energy expenditure. Melanocortinergic agents are also powerful inducers of sexual arousal that are being investigated for a possible therapeutic role in erectile dysfunction. It is currently unclear whether reduced melanocortin (MC) activity may contribute to the sexual dysfunction accompanying obesity and type 2 diabetes. Male rodents with leptin and insulin resistance targeted to POMC neurons (leptin receptor [LepR]/insulin receptor [IR]POMC mice) exhibit obesity, hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, and systemic insulin resistance. In this study, we demonstrate that LepR/IRPOMC males are also subfertile due to dramatic alterations in sexual behavior. Remarkably, these reproductive changes are accompanied by decreased ?-MSH production not present when a single receptor type is deleted. Unexpectedly, behavioral sensitivity to ?-MSH and MC receptor expression are also reduced in LepR/IRPOMC males, a potential adaptation of the MC system to altered ?-MSH production. Together, these results suggest that concurrent insulin and leptin resistance in POMC neurons in individuals with obesity or type 2 diabetes can reduce endogenous ?-MSH levels and impair sexual function. PMID:25590244

  14. Exploring gay couples' experience with sexual dysfunction after radical prostatectomy: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Mary-Ellen; Irvine, Jane; Currie, Kristen L; Ritvo, Paul; Trachtenberg, Lianne; Louis, Alyssa; Trachtenberg, John; Jamnicky, Leah; Matthew, Andrew G

    2014-01-01

    This exploratory study examines the experience of three gay couples managing sexual dysfunction as a result of undergoing a radical prostatectomy. Semi-structured interviews were conducted as part of a larger study at an urban hospital in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Interview transcripts were transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. The authors clustered 18 subordinate themes under 3 superordinate themes: (a) acknowledging change in sexual experience (libido, erectile function, sexual activity, orgasmic function); (b) accommodating change in sexual experience (strategies: emphasizing intimacy, embracing plan B, focus on the other; barriers: side-effect concerns, loss of naturalness, communication breakdown, failure to initiate, trial and failure, partner confounds); and (c) accepting change in sexual experience (indicators: emphasizing health, age attributions, finding a new normal; barriers: uncertain outcomes, treatment regrets). Although gay couples and heterosexual couples share many similar challenges, we discovered that gay men have particular sexual roles and can engage in novel accommodation practices, such as open relationships, that have not been noted in heterosexual couples. All couples, regardless of their level of sexual functioning, highlighted the need for more extensive programming related to sexual rehabilitation. Equitable rehabilitative support is critical to assist homosexual couples manage distress associated with prostatectomy-related sexual dysfunction. PMID:23899045

  15. [Thyroid dysfunction during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Díez, Juan J; Iglesias, Pedro; Donnay, Sergio

    2015-10-21

    Recent clinical practice guidelines on thyroid dysfunction and pregnancy have changed health care provided to pregnant women, although their recommendations are under constant revision. Trimester- and area-specific reference ranges for serum thyroid-stimulating hormone are required for proper diagnosis of hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism. There is no doubt on the need of therapy for overt hypothyroidism, while therapy for subclinical hypothyroidism is controversial. Further research is needed to settle adverse effects of isolated hypothyroxinemia and thyroid autoimmunity. Differentiation between hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease and the usually self-limited gestational transient thyrotoxicosis is critical. It is also important to recognize risk factors for postpartum thyroiditis. Supplementation with iodine is recommended to maintain adequate iodine nutrition during pregnancy and avoid serious consequences in offspring. Controversy remains about universal screening for thyroid disease during pregnancy or case-finding in high-risk women. Opinions of some scientific societies and recent cost-benefit studies favour universal screening. Randomized controlled studies currently under development should reduce the uncertainties that still remain in this area. PMID:25433782

  16. Impaired Erectile Function in CD73-deficient Mice with Reduced Endogenous Penile Adenosine Production

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jiaming; Dai, Yingbo; Zhang, Yujin; Zhang, Weiru; Kellems, Rodney E.; Xia, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Adenosine has been implicated in normal and abnormal penile erection. However, a direct role of endogenous adenosine in erectile physiology and pathology has not been established. Aim To determine the functional role of endogenous adenosine production in erectile function. Methods CD73-deficient mice (CD73?/?) and age-matched wild-type (WT) mice were used. Some WT mice were treated with alpha, beta-methylene adenosine diphosphate (ADP) (APCP), a CD73-specific inhibitor. High-performance liquid chromatography was used to measure adenosine levels in mouse penile tissues. In vivo assessment of intracorporal pressure (ICP) normalized to mean arterial pressure (MAP) in response to electrical stimulation (ES) of the cavernous nerve was used. Main Outcome Measurement The main outcome measures of this study were the in vivo assessment of initiation and maintenance of penile erection in WT mice and mice with deficiency in CD73 (ecto-5?-nucleotidase), a key cell-surface enzyme to produce extracellular adenosine. Results Endogenous adenosine levels were elevated in the erected state induced by ES of cavernous nerve compared to the flaccid state in WT mice but not in CD73?/? mice. At cellular levels, we identified that CD73 was highly expressed in the neuronal, endothelial cells, and vascular smooth muscle cells in mouse penis. Functionally, we found that the ratio of ES-induced ICP to MAP in CD73?/? mice was reduced from 0.48 ± 0.03 to 0.33 ± 0.05 and ES-induced slope was reduced from 0.30 ± 0.13 mm Hg/s to 0.15 ± 0.05 mm Hg/s (both P < 0.05). The ratio of ES-induced ICP to MAP in APCP-treated WT mice was reduced from 0.49 ± 0.03 to 0.38 ± 0.06 and ES-induced slope was reduced from 0.29 ± 0.11 mm Hg/s to 0.19 ± 0.04 mm Hg/s (both P < 0.05). Conclusion Overall, our findings demonstrate that CD73-dependent production of endogenous adenosine plays a direct role in initiation and maintenance of penile erection. PMID:21595838

  17. The Dysfunctions of Bureaucratic Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duttweiler, Patricia Cloud

    1988-01-01

    Numerous dysfunctions result from bureaucratic school organization, including an overemphasis on specialized tasks, routine operating rules, and formal procedures for managing teaching and learning. Such schools are characterized by numerous regulations; formal communications; centralized decision making; and sharp distinctions among…

  18. Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction (PTTD)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... ACFAS | Información en Español Advanced Search Home » Foot & Ankle Conditions » Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction (PTTD) Text Size ... the arch, and an inward rolling of the ankle. As the condition progresses, the symptoms will change. ...

  19. Causes of sexual dysfunction (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    Female sexual dysfunction describes women who are indifferent or hostile to sexual intercourse, who have no response to sexual advances or stimulation, or who are unable to have an orgasm during sexual intercourse.

  20. Thyroid dysfunction and pregnancy outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Nazarpour, Sima; Ramezani Tehrani, Fahimeh; Simbar, Masoumeh; Azizi, Fereidoun

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pregnancy has a huge impact on the thyroid function in both healthy women and those that have thyroid dysfunction. The prevalence of thyroid dysfunction in pregnant women is relatively high. Objective: The objective of this review was to increase awareness and to provide a review on adverse effect of thyroid dysfunction including hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism and thyroid autoimmune positivity on pregnancy outcomes. Materials and Methods: In this review, Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Library were searched with appropriate keywords for relevant English manuscript. We used a variety of studies, including randomized clinical trials, cohort (prospective and retrospective), case-control and case reports. Those studies on thyroid disorders among non-pregnant women and articles without adequate quality were excluded. Results: Overt hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism has several adverse effects on pregnancy outcomes. Overt hyperthyroidism was associated with miscarriage, stillbirth, preterm delivery, intrauterine growth retardation, low birth weight, preeclampsia and fetal thyroid dysfunction. Overt hypothyroidism was associated with abortion, anemia, pregnancy-induced hypertension, preeclampsia, placental abruption, postpartum hemorrhage, premature birth, low birth weight, intrauterine fetal death, increased neonatal respiratory distress and infant neuro developmental dysfunction. However the adverse effect of subclinical hypothyroidism, and thyroid antibody positivity on pregnancy outcomes was not clear. While some studies demonstrated higher chance of placental abruption, preterm birth, miscarriage, gestational hypertension, fetal distress, severe preeclampsia and neonatal distress and diabetes in pregnant women with subclinical hypothyroidism or thyroid autoimmunity; the other ones have not reported these adverse effects. Conclusion: While the impacts of overt thyroid dysfunction on feto-maternal morbidities have been clearly identified and its long term impact on childhood development is well known, data on the early and late complications of subclinical thyroid dysfunction during pregnancy or thyroid autoimmunity are controversial. Further studies on maternal and neonatal outcomes of subclinical thyroid dysfunction maternal are needed. PMID:26494985

  1. Endothelin-1 contributes to endothelial dysfunction and enhanced vasoconstriction through augmented superoxide production in penile arteries from insulin-resistant obese rats: role of ETA and ETB receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, A; Martínez, P; Muñoz, M; Benedito, S; García-Sacristán, A; Hernández, M; Prieto, D

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose We assessed whether endothelin-1 (ET-1) inhibits NO and contributes to endothelial dysfunction in penile arteries in a model of insulin resistance-associated erectile dysfunction (ED). Experimental Approach Vascular function was assessed in penile arteries, from obese (OZR) and lean (LZR) Zucker rats, mounted in microvascular myographs. Changes in basal and stimulated levels of superoxide (O2?) were detected by lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence and ET receptor expression was determined by immunohistochemistry. Key Results ET-1 stimulated acute O2? production that was blunted by tempol and the NADPH oxidase inhibitor, apocynin, but markedly enhanced in obese animals. ET-1 inhibited the vasorelaxant effects of ACh and of the NO donor S-nitroso-N-acetyl-DL-penicillamine in arteries from both LZR and OZR. Selective ETA (BQ123) or ETB receptor (BQ788) antagonists reduced both basal and ET-1-stimulated superoxide generation and reversed ET-1-induced inhibition of NO-mediated relaxations in OZR, while only BQ-123 antagonized ET-1 actions in LZR. ET-1-induced vasoconstriction was markedly enhanced by NO synthase blockade and reduced by endothelium removal and apocynin. In endothelium-denuded penile arteries, apocynin blunted augmented ET-1-induced contractions in OZR. Both ETA and ETB receptors were expressed in smooth muscle and the endothelial layer and up-regulated in arteries from OZR. Conclusions and Implications ET-1 stimulates ETA-mediated NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS generation, which inhibits endothelial NO bioavailability and contributes to ET-1-induced contraction in healthy penile arteries. Enhanced vascular expression of ETB receptors contributes to augmented ROS production, endothelial dysfunction and increased vasoconstriction in erectile tissue from insulin-resistant obese rats. Hence, antagonism of ETB receptors might improve the ED associated with insulin-resistant states. PMID:25091502

  2. Examining Sexual Dysfunction in Non-Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: Results of Cross-Sectional Mixed-Methods Research

    PubMed Central

    Kowalkowski, Marc A; Chandrashekar, Aravind; Amiel, Gilad E; Lerner, Seth P; Wittmann, Daniela A; Latini, David M; Goltz, Heather Honoré

    2014-01-01

    Introduction More than 70,000 new cases of bladder cancer are diagnosed in the United States annually; with 75% being non-muscle-invasive (NMIBC). Research examining sexual dysfunction in bladder cancer survivors is limited, and previous studies have focused on cystectomy patients. Aims To evaluate the impact of sexual dysfunction on NMIBC survivors. Methods Mixed-methods data collection integrated a quantitative survey (Study 1; n = 117) and semi-structured qualitative interviews (Study 2; n = 26) from a non-overlapping sample of NMIBC survivors. We performed descriptive and classification and regression tree (CART) analyses of survey data and qualitative analysis of interviews. Main Outcome Measures Self-reported sexual activity, interest in sex, and physiologic symptoms (e.g., male erectile/ejaculatory difficulties, female vaginal dryness) over the previous 4 weeks; partner communication about sexuality; contamination concerns; illness intrusiveness. Results Participants in these studies averaged 65 years of age (mean and median) and were male (77%), white (91%), and married (75%). Survey (Study 1) results linked NMIBC treatment to sexual symptoms and relationship issues. Many participants reported sexual inactivity (38.8%). Sexually active participants reported erectile difficulties (60.0%), vaginal dryness (62.5%), and worry about contaminating partner with treatment agents (23.2%). While almost one-half reported the usefulness of talking with partners about sexual function, only one-fifth of participants reported sharing all concerns with their partners. CART analysis supported the importance of communication. One-half of interviewees (Study 2) reported sexual dysfunction. Two-thirds reported negative impacts on their relationships, including perceived loss of intimacy and divorce; over one-third were sexually inactive for fear of contaminating their partner or spreading NMIBC. Conclusions Survivors' sexual symptoms may result from NMIBC, comorbidities, or both. These results inform literature and practice by raising awareness about the frequency of symptoms and the impact on NMIBC survivors' intimate relationships. Further work is needed to design symptom management education programs to dispel misinformation about contamination post-treatment and improve quality of life. Kowalkowski MA, Chandrashekar A, Amiel GE, Lerner SP, Wittmann DA, Latini DM, and Goltz HH. Examining sexual dysfunction in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer: Results of cross-sectional mixed-methods research. Sex Med 2014;2:141–151. PMID:25356311

  3. Obesity and pelvic floor dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Ramalingam, Kalaivani; Monga, Ash

    2015-05-01

    Obesity is associated with a high prevalence of pelvic floor disorders. Patients with obesity present with a range of urinary, bowel and sexual dysfunction problems as well as uterovaginal prolapse. Urinary incontinence, faecal incontinence and sexual dysfunction are more prevalent in patients with obesity. Uterovaginal prolapse is also more common than in the non-obese population. Weight loss by surgical and non-surgical methods plays a major role in the improvement of these symptoms in such patients. The treatment of symptoms leads to an improvement in their quality of life. However, surgical treatment of these symptoms may be accompanied by an increased risk of complications in obese patients. A better understanding of the mechanism of obesity-associated pelvic floor dysfunction is essential. PMID:25805440

  4. Photobiomodulation on alcohol induced dysfunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zheng-Ping; Liu, Timon C.; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Yan-Fang

    2007-05-01

    Alcohol, which is ubiquitous today, is a major health concern. Its use was already relatively high among the youngest respondents, peaked among young adults, and declined in older age groups. Alcohol is causally related to more than 60 different medical conditions. Overall, 4% of the global burden of disease is attributable to alcohol, which accounts for about as much death and disability globally as tobacco and hypertension. Alcohol also promotes the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and/or interferes with the body's normal defense mechanisms against these compounds through numerous processes, particularly in the liver. Photobiomodulation (PBM) is a cell-specific effect of low intensity monochromatic light or low intensity laser irradiation (LIL) on biological systems. The cellular effects of both alcohol and LIL are ligand-independent so that PBM might rehabilitate alcohol induced dysfunction. The PBM on alcohol induced human neutrophil dysfunction and rat chronic atrophic gastritis, the laser acupuncture on alcohol addiction, and intravascular PBM on alcoholic coma of patients and rats have been observed. The endonasal PBM (EPBM) mediated by Yangming channel, autonomic nervous systems and blood cells is suggested to treat alcohol induced dysfunction in terms of EPBM phenomena, the mechanism of alcohol induced dysfunction and our biological information model of PBM. In our opinion, the therapeutic effects of PBM might also be achieved on alcoholic myopathy.

  5. Mitochondrial dysfunction affects chloroplast functions

    PubMed Central

    Busi, Maria V.; Gomez-Lobato, Maria E.; Araya, Alejandro; Gomez-Casati, Diego F.

    2011-01-01

    The transcriptomic response of A9:u-ATP9 and apetala3:u-ATP9 lines carrying a mitochondrial dysfunction in flower tissues has been characterized. Both lines showed an alteration in the transcription of several genes involved in carbon and nitrogen metabolism, stress responses, transcription factors and DNA binding proteins. Interestingly, several transcripts of photosynthetic-related genes were also affected in their expression such as the mRNAs encoding for chlorophyllase, chlorophyll binding proteins and a PSII. Moreover, chlorophyll levels were reduced and the Mg-dechelatase activity was increased, indicating an alteration in chlorophyll metabolism. Our results suggest that the mitochondrial dysfunction may also affect chloroplastic functions, and that our model could be useful to uncover retrograde signaling mechanisms operating between the three different plant genomes. PMID:22101346

  6. Cognitive Dysfunction and Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Kodl, Christopher T.; Seaquist, Elizabeth R.

    2008-01-01

    The deleterious effects of diabetes mellitus on the retinal, renal, cardiovascular, and peripheral nervous systems are widely acknowledged. Less attention has been given to the effect of diabetes on cognitive function. Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus have been associated with reduced performance on numerous domains of cognitive function. The exact pathophysiology of cognitive dysfunction in diabetes is not completely understood, but it is likely that hyperglycemia, vascular disease, hypoglycemia, and insulin resistance play significant roles. Modalities to study the effect of diabetes on the brain have evolved over the years, including neurocognitive testing, evoked response potentials, and magnetic resonance imaging. Although much insightful research has examined cognitive dysfunction in patients with diabetes, more needs to be understood about the mechanisms and natural history of this complication in order to develop strategies for prevention and treatment. PMID:18436709

  7. Mitochondria: Redox Metabolism and Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jia; Pervaiz, Shazib

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria are the main intracellular location for fuel generation; however, they are not just power plants but involved in a range of other intracellular functions including regulation of redox homeostasis and cell fate. Dysfunction of mitochondria will result in oxidative stress which is one of the underlying causal factors for a variety of diseases including neurodegenerative diseases, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer. In this paper, generation of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) in the mitochondria, redox regulatory roles of certain mitochondrial proteins, and the impact on cell fate will be discussed. The current state of our understanding in mitochondrial dysfunction in pathological states and how we could target them for therapeutic purpose will also be briefly reviewed. PMID:22593827

  8. Amiodarone-induced thyroid dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Danzi, Sara; Klein, Irwin

    2015-05-01

    Amiodarone is an effective medication for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias. Originally developed for the treatment of angina, it is now the most frequently prescribed antiarrhythmia drug despite the fact that its use is limited because of potential serious side effects including adverse effects on the thyroid gland and thyroid hormones. Although the mechanisms of action of amiodarone on the thyroid gland and thyroid hormone metabolism are poorly understood, the structural similarity of amiodarone to thyroid hormones, including the presence of iodine moieties on the inner benzene ring, may play a role in causing thyroid dysfunction. Amiodarone-induced thyroid dysfunction includes amiodarone-induced thyrotoxicosis (AIT) and amiodarone-induced hypothyroidism (AIH). The AIT develops more commonly in iodine-deficient areas and AIH in iodine-sufficient areas. The AIT type 1 usually occurs in patients with known or previously undiagnosed thyroid dysfunction or goiter. The AIT type 2 usually occurs in normal thyroid glands and results in destruction of thyroid tissue caused by thyroiditis. This is the result of an intrinsic drug effect from the amiodarone itself. Mixed types are not uncommon. Patients with cardiac disease receiving amiodarone treatment should be monitored for signs of thyroid dysfunction, which often manifest as a reappearance of the underlying cardiac disease state. When monitoring patients, initial tests should include the full battery of thyroid function tests, thyroid-stimulating hormone, thyroxine, triiodothyronine, and antithyroid antibodies. Mixed types of AIT can be challenging both to diagnose and treat and therapy differs depending on the type of AIT. Treatment can include thionamides and/or glucocorticoids. The AIH responds favorably to thyroid hormone replacement therapy. Amiodarone is lipophilic and has a long half-life in the body. Therefore, stopping the amiodarone therapy usually has little short-term benefit. PMID:24067547

  9. Mitochondrial dysfunction and organophosphorus compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Karami-Mohajeri, Somayyeh; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2013-07-01

    Organophosphorous (OPs) pesticides are the most widely used pesticides in the agriculture and home. However, many acute or chronic poisoning reports about OPs have been published in the recent years. Mitochondria as a site of cellular oxygen consumption and energy production can be a target for OPs poisoning as a non-cholinergic mechanism of toxicity of OPs. In the present review, we have reviewed and criticized all the evidences about the mitochondrial dysfunctions as a mechanism of toxicity of OPs. For this purpose, all biochemical, molecular, and morphological data were retrieved from various studies. Some toxicities of OPs are arisen from dysfunction of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation through alteration of complexes I, II, III, IV and V activities and disruption of mitochondrial membrane. Reductions of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis or induction of its hydrolysis can impair the cellular energy. The OPs disrupt cellular and mitochondrial antioxidant defense, reactive oxygen species generation, and calcium uptake and promote oxidative and genotoxic damage triggering cell death via cytochrome C released from mitochondria and consequent activation of caspases. The mitochondrial dysfunction induced by OPs can be restored by use of antioxidants such as vitamin E and C, alpha-tocopherol, electron donors, and through increasing the cytosolic ATP level. However, to elucidate many aspect of mitochondrial toxicity of Ops, further studies should be performed. - Highlights: • As a non-cholinergic mechanism of toxicity, mitochondria is a target for OPs. • OPs affect action of complexes I, II, III, IV and V in the mitochondria. • OPs reduce mitochondrial ATP. • OPs promote oxidative and genotoxic damage via release of cytochrome C from mitochondria. • OP-induced mitochondrial dysfunction can be restored by increasing the cytosolic ATP.

  10. Mitochondrial dysfunction in demyelinating diseases.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Karen S

    2013-09-01

    Dysfunction of the mitochondrial (mt) system is thought to play an important role in the mechanism of progression of various neurodegenerative disorders, including demyelinating disorders. They are characterized by neuroinflammation, ultimately leading to neurodegeneration. Mitochondria (mt) dysfunction is closely related to the mechanism of neuroinflammation, causing increased production of reactive oxygen species, which is detrimental to neurons and glia. Vice versa, neuroinflammation is increasingly recognized to produce mt failure, which then contributes to further neuronal injury and degeneration. Multiple sclerosis and X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy are examples of neurodemyelinating diseases that despite having a diverse etiology have in common a progressive course and significant neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration, leading to severe neurologic disability. The scientific community has become increasingly interested in how mt dysfunction relates to neuroinflammation and demyelination and what role it may play in the natural history of progressive demyelinating diseases. Research studies investigating how mt failure contributes to the progression of these conditions are emerging. A better understanding of the role of oxidative stress in progressive inflammatory demyelinating diseases might generate new potential neuroprotective therapeutic approaches for these devastating neurologic conditions. PMID:24331361

  11. Epidemiology of Sexual Dysfunction in Iran: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ramezani, Mohammad Arash; Ahmadi, Khodabakhsh; Ghaemmaghami, Afagh; Marzabadi, Esfandiar Azad; Pardakhti, Faezeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to determine the cumulative prevalence rate of every sexual dysfunctions (SDs) in Iranian population. Methods: We searched international database such as: PubMed/Medline, Scopus, PsychNET, and Scholar Google and Iranian database such as Iran Psych, IranDoc, IranMedex, and SID. Search duration was between 1990 and 2013. Results: From 449 articles were retrieved, then 11 articles on male with total sample size of 2142 and 8 articles on female with total sample size of 4391 were selected after critical appraisal. For quality assessment check list to evaluate a prevalence article was contained study population, sampling method, sample size, criteria for SD diagnosis, specific rates, study location, and authors list. In male, erectile dysfunction was 56.1%. In female, pooled estimation prevalence of hypoactive sexual desire disorder in complained group was 65.8% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 51.1-80.6%) compared to general population 35% (95% CI: 17.6-52.1%). Sexual arousal disorder in clinical patient was 59.6% (95% CI: 39-80%) against 33.8% (95% CI: 18.3-49.3%) in general population. Orgasmic disorder in complained was 35.5% (95% CI: 16-55%) and in general population was 35.3% (95% CI: 26.8-43.8%). Sexual pain disorder pooled estimation prevalence were 35.2% (95% CI: 14.5-56%) versus 20.1% (95% CI: 6.4-33.8%) in complained and general population consecutively. Conclusions: The rate of SD in Iran was approximately the same of worldwide except orgasmic disorder which was two times more than the worldwide average. PMID:26097672

  12. Clinical correlates of enlarged prostate size in subjects with sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Corona, Giovanni; Gacci, Mauro; Maseroli, Elisa; Rastrelli, Giulia; Vignozzi, Linda; Sforza, Alessandra; Forti, Gianni; Mannucci, Edoardo; Maggi, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Digito-rectal examination (DRE) of the prostate provides useful information on the state of prostate growth and on the presence of suspected peripheral nodules. The aim of this study is to describe the clinical and biochemical correlates of finding an enlarged prostate size at DRE in subjects with sexual dysfunction (SD). A consecutive series of 2379 patients was retrospectively studied. The analysis was focused on a subset of subjects (n = 1823; mean age 54.7 ± 11.4) selected for being free from overt prostatic diseases. Several parameters were investigated. After adjusting for confounders, the presence of an enlarged prostate size at DRE was associated with a higher risk of metabolic syndrome (HR = 1.346 (1.129-1.759); P = 0.030), type 2 diabetes mellitus (HR = 1.489 (1.120-1.980); P = 0.006), increased LDL cholesterol (>100 mg dl-1 ; HR = 1.354 (1.018-1.801); P = 0.037) and increased mean blood pressure (BP) values (HR = 1.017 (1.007-1.027) for each mmHg increment; P = 0.001). Accordingly, enlarged prostate size was also associated with a higher risk of arteriogenic erectile dysfunction (ED), as well as with other andrological conditions, such as varicocele and premature ejaculation (PE). PSA levels were significantly higher in subjects with enlarged prostate size when compared to the rest of the sample (HR = 3.318 (2.304; 4.799) for each log unit increment in PSA levels; P < 0.0001). Arteriogenic ED, according to different criteria, was also associated with increased PSA levels. In conclusion, our data support the need to examine prostate size either by clinical (DRE) or biochemical (PSA) inspection in subjects with SD, in order to have insights into the nature of the SD and the metabolic and cardiovascular (CV) background of the patient. PMID:24830688

  13. Clinical correlates of enlarged prostate size in subjects with sexual dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Corona, Giovanni; Gacci, Mauro; Maseroli, Elisa; Rastrelli, Giulia; Vignozzi, Linda; Sforza, Alessandra; Forti, Gianni; Mannucci, Edoardo; Maggi, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Digito-rectal examination (DRE) of the prostate provides useful information on the state of prostate growth and on the presence of suspected peripheral nodules. The aim of this study is to describe the clinical and biochemical correlates of finding an enlarged prostate size at DRE in subjects with sexual dysfunction (SD). A consecutive series of 2379 patients was retrospectively studied. The analysis was focused on a subset of subjects (n = 1823; mean age 54.7 ± 11.4) selected for being free from overt prostatic diseases. Several parameters were investigated. After adjusting for confounders, the presence of an enlarged prostate size at DRE was associated with a higher risk of metabolic syndrome (HR = 1.346 (1.129–1.759); P = 0.030), type 2 diabetes mellitus (HR = 1.489 (1.120–1.980); P = 0.006), increased LDL cholesterol (>100 mg dl?1; HR = 1.354 (1.018–1.801); P = 0.037) and increased mean blood pressure (BP) values (HR = 1.017 (1.007–1.027) for each mmHg increment; P = 0.001). Accordingly, enlarged prostate size was also associated with a higher risk of arteriogenic erectile dysfunction (ED), as well as with other andrological conditions, such as varicocele and premature ejaculation (PE). PSA levels were significantly higher in subjects with enlarged prostate size when compared to the rest of the sample (HR = 3.318 (2.304; 4.799) for each log unit increment in PSA levels; P < 0.0001). Arteriogenic ED, according to different criteria, was also associated with increased PSA levels. In conclusion, our data support the need to examine prostate size either by clinical (DRE) or biochemical (PSA) inspection in subjects with SD, in order to have insights into the nature of the SD and the metabolic and cardiovascular (CV) background of the patient. PMID:24830688

  14. Penile rehabilitation with a vacuum erectile device in an animal model is related to an antihypoxic mechanism: blood gas evidence

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hao-Cheng; Yang, Wen-Li; Zhang, Jun-Lan; Dai, Yu-Tian; Wang, Run

    2013-01-01

    Our previous study showed that vacuum erectile device (VED) therapy has improved erectile function in rats with bilateral cavernous nerve crush (BCNC) injuries. This study was designed to explore the mechanism of VED in penile rehabilitation by analyzing cavernous oxygen saturation (SO2) and to examine the effect of VED therapy on preventing penile shrinkage after BCNC. Thirty adult Sprague–Dawley rats were randomly assigned into three groups: group 1, sham surgery; group 2, BCNC; and group 3, BCNC+VED. Penile length and diameter were measured on a weekly basis. After 4 weeks of therapy, the penile blood was extracted by three methods for blood gas analysis (BGA): method 1, cavernous blood was aspirated at the flaccid state; method 2, cavernous blood was aspirated at the traction state; and method 3, cavernous blood was aspirated immediately after applying VED. SO2 values were tested by the blood gas analyzer. The results showed that VED therapy is effective in preventing penile shrinkage induced by BCNC (Penile shortening: BCNC group 1.9±1.1 mm; VED group 0.3±1.0 mm; P<0.01. Penile diameter reduction: BCNC group 0.28±0.14 mm; VED group 0.04±0.14 mm; P<0.01). The mean SO2±s.d. values were increased by VED application (88.25%±4.94%) compared to the flaccid (76.53%±4.16%) or traction groups (78.93%±2.56%) (P<0.05). The calculated blood constructs in the corpus cavernosum right after VED application were 62% arterial and 38% venous blood. These findings suggest that VED therapy can effectively preserve penile size in rats with BCNC injury. The beneficial effect of VED therapy is related to antihypoxia by increasing cavernous blood SO2. PMID:23564044

  15. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hyo Eun; Paek, Sun Ha

    2015-06-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by the selective loss of dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) with motor and nonmotor symptoms. Defective mitochondrial function and increased oxidative stress (OS) have been demonstrated as having an important role in PD pathogenesis, although the underlying mechanism is not clear. The etiopathogenesis of sporadic PD is complex with variable contributions of environmental factors and genetic susceptibility. Both these factors influence various mitochondrial aspects, including their life cycle, bioenergetic capacity, quality control, dynamic changes of morphology and connectivity (fusion, fission), subcellular distribution (transport), and the regulation of cell death pathways. Mitochondrial dysfunction has mainly been reported in various non-dopaminergic cells and tissue samples from human patients as well as transgenic mouse and fruit fly models of PD. Thus, the mitochondria represent a highly promising target for the development of PD biomarkers. However, the limited amount of dopaminergic neurons prevented investigation of their detailed study. For the first time, we established human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT)-immortalized wild type, idiopathic and Parkin deficient mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) isolated from the adipose tissues of PD patients, which could be used as a good cellular model to evaluate mitochondrial dysfunction for the better understanding of PD pathology and for the development of early diagnostic markers and effective therapy targets of PD. In this review, we examine evidence for the roles of mitochondrial dysfunction and increased OS in the neuronal loss that leads to PD and discuss how this knowledge further improve the treatment for patients with PD. PMID:26113789

  16. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Hyo Eun

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by the selective loss of dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) with motor and nonmotor symptoms. Defective mitochondrial function and increased oxidative stress (OS) have been demonstrated as having an important role in PD pathogenesis, although the underlying mechanism is not clear. The etiopathogenesis of sporadic PD is complex with variable contributions of environmental factors and genetic susceptibility. Both these factors influence various mitochondrial aspects, including their life cycle, bioenergetic capacity, quality control, dynamic changes of morphology and connectivity (fusion, fission), subcellular distribution (transport), and the regulation of cell death pathways. Mitochondrial dysfunction has mainly been reported in various non-dopaminergic cells and tissue samples from human patients as well as transgenic mouse and fruit fly models of PD. Thus, the mitochondria represent a highly promising target for the development of PD biomarkers. However, the limited amount of dopaminergic neurons prevented investigation of their detailed study. For the first time, we established human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT)-immortalized wild type, idiopathic and Parkin deficient mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) isolated from the adipose tissues of PD patients, which could be used as a good cellular model to evaluate mitochondrial dysfunction for the better understanding of PD pathology and for the development of early diagnostic markers and effective therapy targets of PD. In this review, we examine evidence for the roles of mitochondrial dysfunction and increased OS in the neuronal loss that leads to PD and discuss how this knowledge further improve the treatment for patients with PD. PMID:26113789

  17. Endothelial dysfunction: a comprehensive appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Esper, Ricardo J; Nordaby, Roberto A; Vilariño, Jorge O; Paragano, Antonio; Cacharrón, José L; Machado, Rogelio A

    2006-01-01

    The endothelium is a thin monocelular layer that covers all the inner surface of the blood vessels, separating the circulating blood from the tissues. It is not an inactive organ, quite the opposite. It works as a receptor-efector organ and responds to each physical or chemical stimulus with the release of the correct substance with which it may maintain vasomotor balance and vascular-tissue homeostasis. It has the property of producing, independently, both agonistic and antagonistic substances that help to keep homeostasis and its function is not only autocrine, but also paracrine and endocrine. In this way it modulates the vascular smooth muscle cells producing relaxation or contraction, and therefore vasodilatation or vasoconstriction. The endothelium regulating homeostasis by controlling the production of prothrombotic and antithrombotic components, and fibrynolitics and antifibrynolitics. Also intervenes in cell proliferation and migration, in leukocyte adhesion and activation and in immunological and inflammatory processes. Cardiovascular risk factors cause oxidative stress that alters the endothelial cells capacity and leads to the so called endothelial "dysfunction" reducing its capacity to maintain homeostasis and leads to the development of pathological inflammatory processes and vascular disease. There are different techniques to evaluate the endothelium functional capacity, that depend on the amount of NO produced and the vasodilatation effect. The percentage of vasodilatation with respect to the basal value represents the endothelial functional capacity. Taking into account that shear stress is one of the most important stimulants for the synthesis and release of NO, the non-invasive technique most often used is the transient flow-modulate "endothelium-dependent" post-ischemic vasodilatation, performed on conductance arteries such as the brachial, radial or femoral arteries. This vasodilatation is compared with the vasodilatation produced by drugs that are NO donors, such as nitroglycerine, called "endothelium independent". The vasodilatation is quantified by measuring the arterial diameter with high resolution ultrasonography. Laser-Doppler techniques are now starting to be used that also consider tissue perfusion. There is so much proof about endothelial dysfunction that it is reasonable to believe that there is diagnostic and prognostic value in its evaluation for the late outcome. There is no doubt that endothelial dysfunction contributes to the initiation and progression of atherosclerotic disease and could be considered an independent vascular risk factor. Although prolonged randomized clinical trials are needed for unequivocal evidence, the data already obtained allows the methods of evaluation of endothelial dysfunction to be considered useful in clinical practice and have overcome the experimental step, being non-invasive increases its value making it use full for follow-up of the progression of the disease and the effects of different treatments. PMID:16504104

  18. Antidepressant-induced sexual dysfunction in men.

    PubMed

    Segraves, Robert Taylor; Balon, Richard

    2014-06-01

    Most of the available antidepressant medications, including tricyclic antidepressants, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and dual noradrenergic/serotonergic reuptake inhibitors have been reported to be associated with sexual dysfunction in both sexes. This manuscript reviews evidence concerning the relative incidence of treatment emergent sexual dysfunction in men being treated with antidepressant drugs. Both double-blind controlled trials and large clinical series report a high incidence of sexual dysfunction, especially ejaculatory delay, with serotonergic drugs. The incidence of sexual dysfunction in men appears to be much lower with drugs whose primary mechanism of action involves adrenergic or dopaminergic systems. PMID:24239785

  19. Clinical signs in diffuse cerebral dysfunction.

    PubMed Central

    Jenkyn, L R; Walsh, D B; Culver, C M; Reeves, A G

    1977-01-01

    Abnormal responses to 13 questions from a typical mental status examination and 32 signs of neurological dysfunction were correlated with increasing degrees of cognitive impairment as measured by the Halstead-Reitan Neuropsychological Battery. Thirteen of these factors were found to be useful predictors of diffuse cerebral dysfunction when combined into a brief screening examination for application at the bedside. PMID:591973

  20. Towards an Analysis of Dysfunctional Grammar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rigaudeau-McKenna, B.

    2005-01-01

    This article applies Systemic Functional Linguistics (SFL) to the study of language dysfunction. It demonstrates the potential that Systemic Functional analysis can offer to one aspect of the analysis of language dysfunction--the failure to realise complexes of clauses. For the purpose of analysis, new concepts and new measures have been created.…

  1. Comparison on the Effects and Safety of Tualang Honey and Tribestan in Sperm Parameters, Erectile Function, and Hormonal Profiles among Oligospermic Males

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Shaiful Bahari; Bakar, Mohd. Bustamanizan; Nik Hussain, Nik Hazlina; Sulaiman, Siti Amrah; Jaafar, Hasnan; Draman, Samsul; Ramli, Roszaman; Wan Yusoff, Wan Zahanim

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of Tualang honey on sperm parameters, erectile function, and hormonal and safety profiles. Methodology. A randomized control trial was done using Tualang honey (20 grams) and Tribestan (750?mg) over a period of 12 weeks. Sperm parameters including sperm concentration, motility, and morphology were analyzed and erectile function was assessed using IIEF-5 questionnaire. Hormonal profiles of testosterone, FSH, and LH were studied. The volunteers were randomized into two groups and the outcomes were analyzed using SPSS version 18. Results. A total of 66 participants were involved. A significant increment of mean sperm concentration (P < 0.001), motility (P = 0.015) and morphology (P = 0.008) was seen in Tualang honey group. In Tribestan group, a significant increment of mean sperm concentration (P = 0.007), and morphology (P = 0.009) was seen. No significant differences of sperm concentration, motility, and morphology were seen between Tualang honey and Tribestan group and similar results were also seen in erectile function and hormonal profile. All safety profiles were normal and no adverse event was reported. Conclusion. Tualang honey effect among oligospermic males was comparable with Tribestan in improving sperm concentration, motility, and morphology. The usage of Tualang honey was also safe with no reported adverse event. PMID:25505918

  2. Diabetes and Retinal Vascular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Eui Seok; Sorenson, Christine M.; Sheibani, Nader

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes predominantly affects the microvascular circulation of the retina resulting in a range of structural changes unique to this tissue. These changes ultimately lead to altered permeability, hyperproliferation of endothelial cells and edema, and abnormal vascularization of the retina with resulting loss of vision. Enhanced production of inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress are primary insults with significant contribution to the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy (DR). We have determined the identity of the retinal vascular cells affected by hyperglycemia, and have delineated the cell autonomous impact of high glucose on function of these cells. We discuss some of the high glucose specific changes in retinal vascular cells and their contribution to retinal vascular dysfunction. This knowledge provides novel insight into the molecular and cellular defects contributing to the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy, and will aid in the development of innovative, as well as target specific therapeutic approaches for prevention and treatment of DR. PMID:25667739

  3. Coronary microvascular dysfunction: an update

    PubMed Central

    Crea, Filippo; Camici, Paolo G.; Bairey Merz, Cathleen Noel

    2014-01-01

    Many patients undergoing coronary angiography because of chest pain syndromes, believed to be indicative of obstructive atherosclerosis of the epicardial coronary arteries, are found to have normal angiograms. In the past two decades, a number of studies have reported that abnormalities in the function and structure of the coronary microcirculation may occur in patients without obstructive atherosclerosis, but with risk factors or with myocardial diseases as well as in patients with obstructive atherosclerosis; furthermore, coronary microvascular dysfunction (CMD) can be iatrogenic. In some instances, CMD represents an epiphenomenon, whereas in others it is an important marker of risk or may even contribute to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular and myocardial diseases, thus becoming a therapeutic target. This review article provides an update on the clinical relevance of CMD in different clinical settings and also the implications for therapy. PMID:24366916

  4. Noradrenergic dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Gannon, Mary; Che, Pulin; Chen, Yunjia; Jiao, Kai; Roberson, Erik D.; Wang, Qin

    2015-01-01

    The brain noradrenergic system supplies the neurotransmitter norepinephrine throughout the brain via widespread efferent projections, and plays a pivotal role in modulating cognitive activities in the cortex. Profound noradrenergic degeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients has been observed for decades, with recent research suggesting that the locus coeruleus (where noradrenergic neurons are mainly located) is a predominant site where AD-related pathology begins. Mounting evidence indicates that the loss of noradrenergic innervation greatly exacerbates AD pathogenesis and progression, although the precise roles of noradrenergic components in AD pathogenesis remain unclear. The aim of this review is to summarize current findings on noradrenergic dysfunction in AD, as well as to point out deficiencies in our knowledge where more research is needed. PMID:26136654

  5. Mitochondrial dysfunction affecting visual pathways.

    PubMed

    Leruez, S; Amati-Bonneau, P; Verny, C; Reynier, P; Procaccio, V; Bonneau, D; Milea, D

    2014-05-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction leads to cellular energetic impairment, which may affect the visual pathways, from the retina to retrochiasmal structures. The most common mitochondrial optic neuropathies include Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and autosomal dominant optic atrophy, but the optic nerve can be affected in other syndromic conditions, such as Wolfram syndrome and Friedreich's ataxia. These disorders may result from mutations in either the mitochondrial DNA or in the nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial proteins. Despite the inconstant genotype-phenotype correlations, a clinical classification of mitochondrial disorders may be made on the basis of distinct neuro-ophthalmic presentations such as optic neuropathy, pigmentary retinopathy and retrochiasmal visual loss. Although no curative treatments are available at present, recent advances throw new light on the pathophysiology of mitochondrial disorders. Current research raises hopes for novel treatment of hereditary optic neuropathies, particularly through the use of new drugs and mitochondrial gene therapy. PMID:24798923

  6. Psychopathy: cognitive and neural dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    R. Blair, R. James

    2013-01-01

    Psychopathy is a developmental disorder marked by emotional deficits and an increased risk for antisocial behavior. It is not equivalent to the diagnosis Antisocial Personality Disorder, which concentrates only on the increased risk for antisocial behavior and not a specific cause—ie, the reduced empathy and guilt that constitutes the emotional deficit. The current review considers data from adults with psychopathy with respect to the main cognitive accounts of the disorder that stress either a primary attention deficit or a primary emotion deficit. In addition, the current review considers data regarding the neurobiology of this disorder. Dysfunction within the amygdala's role in reinforcement learning and the role of ventromedial frontal cortex in the representation of reinforcement value is stressed. Data is also presented indicating potential difficulties within parts of temporal and posterior cingulate cortex. Suggestions are made with respect to why these deficits lead to the development of the disorder. PMID:24174892

  7. Balance Dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rinalduzzi, Steno; Missori, Paolo; Fattapposta, Francesco; Currà, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Stability and mobility in functional motor activities depend on a precise regulation of phasic and tonic muscular activity that is carried out automatically, without conscious awareness. The sensorimotor control of posture involves a complex integration of multisensory inputs that results in a final motor adjustment process. All or some of the components of this system may be dysfunctional in Parkinsonian patients, rendering postural instability one of the most disabling features of Parkinson's disease (PD). Balance control is critical for moving safely in and adapting to the environment. PD induces a multilevel impairment of this function, therefore worsening the patients' physical and psychosocial disability. In this review, we describe the complex ways in which PD impairs posture and balance, collecting and reviewing the available experimental evidence. PMID:25654100

  8. Hypoparathyroidism presenting as cognitive dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Gunjan; Kaur, Darshpreet; Aggarwal, Puneet; Khurana, Tilak

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic dysfunction in hypoparathyroidism is an important cause of intracranial calcifications, which cause cognitive impairment depending on the calcified areas leading to difficulties in executing activities of daily living. We report a case of a 25-year-old man who presented with gradually decreasing organisational skills, memory problems and difficulty in carrying out daily activities. CT imaging of the brain showed extensive calcification in the basal ganglia and cerebral white matter. Comprehensive health-related quality of life and cognitive assessment revealed significant affliction in his activities of daily living along with impairment in recall memory, executive functions and verbal fluency. Owing to late diagnosis, chronicity of cognitive problems could not prevent him from discontinuing his college education. PMID:23709145

  9. Auditory Dysfunction in Patients with Cerebrovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Auditory dysfunction is a common clinical symptom that can induce profound effects on the quality of life of those affected. Cerebrovascular disease (CVD) is the most prevalent neurological disorder today, but it has generally been considered a rare cause of auditory dysfunction. However, a substantial proportion of patients with stroke might have auditory dysfunction that has been underestimated due to difficulties with evaluation. The present study reviews relationships between auditory dysfunction and types of CVD including cerebral infarction, intracerebral hemorrhage, subarachnoid hemorrhage, cerebrovascular malformation, moyamoya disease, and superficial siderosis. Recent advances in the etiology, anatomy, and strategies to diagnose and treat these conditions are described. The numbers of patients with CVD accompanied by auditory dysfunction will increase as the population ages. Cerebrovascular diseases often include the auditory system, resulting in various types of auditory dysfunctions, such as unilateral or bilateral deafness, cortical deafness, pure word deafness, auditory agnosia, and auditory hallucinations, some of which are subtle and can only be detected by precise psychoacoustic and electrophysiological testing. The contribution of CVD to auditory dysfunction needs to be understood because CVD can be fatal if overlooked. PMID:25401133

  10. Myocardial Dysfunction and Shock after Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Jentzer, Jacob C.; Chonde, Meshe D.; Dezfulian, Cameron

    2015-01-01

    Postarrest myocardial dysfunction includes the development of low cardiac output or ventricular systolic or diastolic dysfunction after cardiac arrest. Impaired left ventricular systolic function is reported in nearly two-thirds of patients resuscitated after cardiac arrest. Hypotension and shock requiring vasopressor support are similarly common after cardiac arrest. Whereas shock requiring vasopressor support is consistently associated with an adverse outcome after cardiac arrest, the association between myocardial dysfunction and outcomes is less clear. Myocardial dysfunction and shock after cardiac arrest develop as the result of preexisting cardiac pathology with multiple superimposed insults from resuscitation. The pathophysiology involves cardiovascular ischemia/reperfusion injury and cardiovascular toxicity from excessive levels of inflammatory cytokine activation and catecholamines, among other contributing factors. Similar mechanisms occur in myocardial dysfunction after cardiopulmonary bypass, in sepsis, and in stress-induced cardiomyopathy. Hemodynamic stabilization after resuscitation from cardiac arrest involves restoration of preload, vasopressors to support arterial pressure, and inotropic support if needed to reverse the effects of myocardial dysfunction and improve systemic perfusion. Further research is needed to define the role of postarrest myocardial dysfunction on cardiac arrest outcomes and identify therapeutic strategies. PMID:26421284

  11. Discovery of a selective small-molecule melanocortin-4 receptor agonist with efficacy in a pilot study of sexual dysfunction in humans.

    PubMed

    Lansdell, Mark I; Hepworth, David; Calabrese, Andrew; Brown, Alan D; Blagg, Julian; Burring, Denise J; Wilson, Peter; Fradet, David; Brown, T Bruce; Quinton, Faye; Mistry, Neela; Tang, Kim; Mount, Natalie; Stacey, Peter; Edmunds, Nick; Adams, Cathryn; Gaboardi, Samantha; Neal-Morgan, Stevie; Wayman, Chris; Cole, Susan; Phipps, Joanne; Lewis, Mark; Verrier, Hugh; Gillon, Val; Feeder, Neil; Heatherington, Anne; Sultana, Stefan; Haughie, Scott; Martin, Steven W; Sudworth, Maria; Tweedy, Sarah

    2010-04-22

    The relevance of the melanocortin system to sexual activity is well established, and nonselective peptide agonists of the melanocortin receptors have shown evidence of efficacy in human sexual dysfunction. The role of the MC4 receptor subtype has received particular scrutiny, but the sufficiency of its selective activation in potentiating sexual response has remained uncertain owing to conflicting data from studies in preclinical species. We describe here the discovery of a novel series of small-molecule MC4 receptor agonists derived from library hit 2. The addition of methyl substituents at C3 and C5 of the 4-phenylpiperidin-4-ol ring was found to be markedly potency-enhancing, enabling the combination of low nanomolar potencies with full rule-of-five compliance. In general, the series shows only micromolar activity at other melanocortin receptors. Our preferred compound 40a provided significant systemic exposure in humans on both sublingual and oral administration and was safe and well tolerated up to the maximum tested dose. In a pilot clinical study of male erectile dysfunction, the highest dose of 40a tested (200 mg) provided a similar level of efficacy to sildenafil. PMID:20329799

  12. Peri-operative cognitive dysfunction and protection.

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, J; Rasmussen, L S

    2016-01-01

    Cognition may decline after surgery. Postoperative delirium, especially when hyperactive, may be easily recognised, whereas cognitive dysfunction is subtle and can only be detected using neuropsychological tests. The causes for these two conditions are largely unknown, although they share risk factors, the predominant one being age. Ignorance of the causes for postoperative cognitive dysfunction contributes to the difficulty of conducting interventional studies. Postoperative cognitive disorders are associated with increased mortality and permanent disability. Peri-operative interventions can reduce the rate of delirium in the elderly, but in spite of promising findings in animal experiments, no intervention reduces postoperative cognitive dysfunction in humans. PMID:26620148

  13. [Sexual dysfunction associated with antidepressant agents.

    PubMed

    Bergh, Sara Johanna; Giraldi, Annamaria

    2014-05-26

    Sexual dysfunction is a common adverse effect of antidepressant treatment and a main reason for non-compliance with treatment. Different antidepressant agents are associated with different degrees of dysfunction, which is thought to depend on the agent's pharmacological profile. Agents with serotonergic activity, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) and venlafaxine, yield the highest rate of sexual dysfunction. Non-SSRI agents such as duloxetine, reboxetine and mirtazapine have fewer sexual side effects than SSRI and venlafaxine. Agomelatine and bupropion are similar to placebo. PMID:25352006

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of pelvic floor dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Lalwani, Neeraj; Moshiri, Mariam; Lee, Jean H; Bhargava, Puneet; Dighe, Manjiri K

    2013-11-01

    Pelvic floor dysfunction is largely a complex problem of multiparous and postmenopausal women and is associated with pelvic floor or organ descent. Physical examination can underestimate the extent of the dysfunction and misdiagnose the disorders. Functional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is emerging as a promising tool to evaluate the dynamics of the pelvic floor and use for surgical triage and operative planning. This article reviews the anatomy and pathology of pelvic floor dysfunction, typical imaging findings, and the current role of functional MR imaging. PMID:24210448

  15. Role of Lipotoxicity in Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong-a; Montagnani, Monica; Chandrasekran, Sruti; Quon, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Lipotoxicity, caused in large part by overnutrition, directly leads to endothelial dysfunction. Excess lipids in both the circulation and at the tissue level contribute to endothelial dysfunction that underlies much of the pathophysiology of both metabolic disease, including obesity and diabetes and their CV complications. Direct lipotoxic effects on other organs as well as secondary insults from endothelial dysfunction synergize to cause substantial morbidity and mortality. Lifestyle interventions, including reduced calorie intake, diet, and exercise as well as a variety of pharmacologic interventions targeting various mechanisms underlying lipotoxicity in vascular endothelium significantly modify metabolic and CV risk. PMID:22999242

  16. Kinase dysfunction and kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    London, Cheryl A

    2013-02-01

    With recent advances in molecular biology, abnormalities in cancer cells that contribute to dysregulation of cell survival and proliferation are being characterized with greater precision. Through this process, key abnormalities in cancer cells involving proteins that regulate signal transduction, migration, mitosis and other critical processes have been identified. Such abnormalities often involve a class of proteins called kinases that act to phosphorylate other proteins in the cell, resulting in activation of these proteins in the absence of appropriate stimulation/regulation. Given their role in tumour biology, substantial effort has been directed at blocking the function of these proteins. Several approaches have been used, including monoclonal antibodies and small molecule inhibitors. While antibodies are primarily directed at cell surface proteins, small molecule inhibitors, also known as kinase inhibitors, target proteins throughout the cell. A variety of kinase inhibitors have been approved for the treatment of human cancers. In some instances, these inhibitors have exhibited significant clinical efficacy, and it is likely that their biological activity will be further enhanced as combination regimens with standard treatment modalities are explored. The use of kinase inhibitors in dogs and cats is relatively recent, although two inhibitors, toceranib (Palladia; Pfizer Animal Health, Madison, NJ, USA) and masitinib (Kinavet; Catalent Pharma Solutions, Somerset, NJ, USA) have been approved by the Federal Drug Administration (USA) for use in dogs. This article reviews the biology of protein kinase dysfunction in human and animal cancers, and the application of specific kinase inhibitors to veterinary cancer patients. PMID:23331696

  17. Flibanserin for female sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Reviriego, C

    2014-08-01

    Hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) is the most commonly described form of female sexual dysfunction. There is currently no pharmacological therapy approved to treat HSDD, and therefore, there is an unmet medical need for the development of efficacious treatment alternatives. Flibanserin is a novel, non-hormonal drug for the treatment of HSDD in pre- and postmenopausal women, although the application submitted to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration by Sprout Pharmaceuticals is only for premenopausal women. Flibanserin works by correcting an imbalance of the levels of the neurotransmitters that affect sexual desire. More specifically, flibanserin increases dopamine and norepinephrine, both responsible for sexual excitement, and decreases serotonin, responsible for sexual inhibition. Clinically, flibanserin has exhibited some encouraging results in terms of its ability to increase the frequency of satisfying sexual events, and the intensity of sexual desire. However, adverse events such as dizziness, nausea, fatigue and somnolence, typical of a centrally acting drug, are also frequently related to flibanserin treatment. PMID:25187905

  18. Mitochondrial mechanisms of endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Szewczyk, Adam; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa; Koziel, Agnieszka; Sobieraj, Izabela; Nobik, Wioletta; Lukasiak, Agnieszka; Skup, Agata; Bednarczyk, Piotr; Drabarek, Beata; Dymkowska, Dorota; Wrzosek, Antoni; Zablocki, Krzysztof

    2015-08-01

    Endothelial cells play an important physiological role in vascular homeostasis. They are also the first barrier that separates blood from deeper layers of blood vessels and extravascular tissues. Thus, they are exposed to various physiological blood components as well as challenged by pathological stimuli, which may exert harmful effects on the vascular system by stimulation of excessive generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The major sources of ROS are NADPH oxidase and mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes. Modulation of mitochondrial energy metabolism in endothelial cells is thought to be a promising target for therapy in various cardiovascular diseases. Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) is a regulator of mitochondrial ROS generation and can antagonise oxidative stress-induced endothelial dysfunction. Several studies have revealed the important role of UCP2 in hyperglycaemia-induced modifications of mitochondrial function in endothelial cells. Additionally, potassium fluxes through the inner mitochondrial membrane, which are involved in ROS synthesis, affect the mitochondrial volume and change both the mitochondrial membrane potential and the transport of calcium into the mitochondria. In this review, we concentrate on the mitochondrial role in the cytoprotection phenomena of endothelial cells. PMID:26321271

  19. Dysfunctional attitudes in former psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Schrader, G; Gibbs, A; Harcourt, R

    1986-11-01

    In order to test the hypothesis that patients who are predisposed to depression have an enduring cognitive style, dysfunctional attitudes (Dysfunctional Attitudes Schedule), neuroticism and extraversion (Maudsley Personality Inventory), and severity of depression (Levine-Pilowsky Depression Questionnaire) were measured in a survey of former patients with previous diagnoses of either depressive or nondepressive psychiatric conditions. We found that there were no significant differences in dysfunctional attitudes between these groups of patients and that their scores were similar to those reported for normal populations. There was, however, a correlation between introversion and high dysfunctional attitude scores. Possible implications regarding interactions between cognitive style, personality, and predisposition toward depression are discussed as well as a suggestion that a history of a suicide attempt may predict a poor response to cognitive psychotherapy. PMID:3772354

  20. Meibomian Gland Dysfunction and Treatment (Posterior Blepharitis)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Meibomian Gland Dysfunction and Treatment What are Meibomian (Oil) Glands? Meibomian glands are glands that are arranged ... lashes. The force of an eyelid blink causes oil to be excreted onto the posterior lid margin. ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: Multiple mitochondrial dysfunctions syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... proteins that breaks down a protein building block (amino acid) called glycine when levels become too high. Mutations ... help with understanding multiple mitochondrial dysfunctions syndrome? acidosis ; amino acid ; autosomal ; autosomal recessive ; breakdown ; cardiomyopathy ; cell ; dehydrogenase ; encephalopathy ; ...

  2. Soluble endoglin, hypercholesterolemia and endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Rathouska, Jana; Jezkova, Katerina; Nemeckova, Ivana; Nachtigal, Petr

    2015-12-01

    A soluble form of endoglin (sEng) is known to be an extracellular domain of the full-length membrane endoglin, which is elevated during various pathological conditions related to vascular endothelium. In the current review, we tried to summarize a possible role of soluble endoglin in cardiovascular pathologies, focusing on its relation to endothelial dysfunction and cholesterol levels. We discussed sEng as a proposed biomarker of cardiovascular disease progression, cardiovascular disease treatment and endothelial dysfunction. We also addressed a potential interaction of sEng with TGF-?/eNOS or BMP-9 signaling. We suggest soluble endoglin levels to be monitored, because they reflect the progression/treatment efficacy of cardiovascular diseases related to endothelial dysfunction and hypercholesterolemia. A possible role of soluble endoglin as an inducer of endothelial dysfunction however remains to be elucidated. PMID:26520890

  3. The Dark Side of 5?-Reductase Inhibitors' Therapy: Sexual Dysfunction, High Gleason Grade Prostate Cancer and Depression

    PubMed Central

    Mulgaonkar, Ashwini; Giordano, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    With aging, abnormal benign growth of the prostate results in benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) with concomitant lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Because the prostate is an androgen target tissue, and transforms testosterone into 5?-dihydrotestosterone (5?-DHT), a potent androgen, via 5?-reductase (5?-R) activity, inhibiting this key metabolic reaction was identified as a target for drug development to treat symptoms of BPH. Two drugs, namely finasteride and dutasteride were developed as specific 5?-reductase inhibitors (5?-RIs) and were approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of BPH symptoms. These agents have proven useful in the reducing urinary retention and minimizing surgical intervention in patients with BPH symptoms and considerable literature exists describing the benefits of these agents. In this review we highlight the adverse side effects of 5?-RIs on sexual function, high grade prostate cancer incidence, central nervous system function and on depression. 5?-Rs isoforms (types 1-3) are widely distributed in many tissues including the central nervous system and inhibition of these enzymes results in blockade of synthesis of several key hormones and neuro-active steroids leading to a host of adverse effects, including loss of or reduced libido, erectile dysfunction, orgasmic dysfunction, increased high Gleason grade prostate cancer, observed heart failure and cardiovascular events in clinical trials, and depression. Considerable evidence exists from preclinical and clinical studies, which point to significant and serious adverse effects of 5?-RIs, finasteride and dutasteride, on sexual health, vascular health, psychological health and the overall quality of life. Physicians need to be aware of such potential adverse effects and communicate such information to their patients prior to commencing 5?-RIs therapy. PMID:24955220

  4. Vascular endothelial dysfunction and pharmacological treatment

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jin Bo

    2015-01-01

    The endothelium exerts multiple actions involving regulation of vascular permeability and tone, coagulation and fibrinolysis, inflammatory and immunological reactions and cell growth. Alterations of one or more such actions may cause vascular endothelial dysfunction. Different risk factors such as hypercholesterolemia, homocystinemia, hyperglycemia, hypertension, smoking, inflammation, and aging contribute to the development of endothelial dysfunction. Mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction are multiple, including impaired endothelium-derived vasodilators, enhanced endothelium-derived vasoconstrictors, over production of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species, activation of inflammatory and immune reactions, and imbalance of coagulation and fibrinolysis. Endothelial dysfunction occurs in many cardiovascular diseases, which involves different mechanisms, depending on specific risk factors affecting the disease. Among these mechanisms, a reduction in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability plays a central role in the development of endothelial dysfunction because NO exerts diverse physiological actions, including vasodilation, anti-inflammation, antiplatelet, antiproliferation and antimigration. Experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated that a variety of currently used or investigational drugs, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin AT1 receptors blockers, angiotensin-(1-7), antioxidants, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, endothelial NO synthase enhancers, phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, sphingosine-1-phosphate and statins, exert endothelial protective effects. Due to the difference in mechanisms of action, these drugs need to be used according to specific mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction of the disease. PMID:26635921

  5. Environmental enteric dysfunction: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Rosie J.; Jones, Kelsey D. J.; Berkley, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Environmental enteric dysfunction (EED) refers to an incompletely defined syndrome of inflammation, reduced absorptive capacity, and reduced barrier function in the small intestine. It is widespread among children and adults in low- and middle-income countries. Understanding of EED and its possible consequences for health is currently limited. Objective A narrative review of the current understanding of EED: epidemiology, pathogenesis, therapies, and relevance to child health. Methods Searches for key papers and ongoing trials were conducted using PUBMED 1966–June 2014; ClinicalTrials.gov; the WHO Clinical Trials Registry; the Cochrane Library; hand searches of the references of retrieved literature; discussions with experts; and personal experience from the field. Results EED is established during infancy and is associated with poor sanitation, certain gut infections, and micronutrient deficiencies. Helicobacter pylori infection, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), abnormal gut microbiota, undernutrition, and toxins may all play a role. EED is usually asymptomatic, but it is important due to its association with stunting. Diagnosis is frequently by the dual sugar absorption test, although other biomarkers are emerging. EED may partly explain the reduced efficacy of oral vaccines in low- and middle-income countries and the increased risk of serious infection seen in children with undernutrition. Conclusions Despite its potentially significant impacts, it is currently unclear exactly what causes EED and how it can be treated or prevented. Ongoing trials involve nutritional supplements, water and sanitation interventions, and immunomodulators. Further research is needed to better understand this condition, which is of likely crucial importance for child health and development in low- and middle-income settings. PMID:25902619

  6. www.livestrong.org.livestrong.org Female Sexual DysfunctionFemale Sexual Dysfunction

    E-print Network

    Brent, Roger

    are and being able to describe your symptoms to your health care team can help you manage sexual dysfunction are and being able to describe your symptoms to your health care team can help you manage sexual dysfunction sexual concerns with a doctor or other members of the health care team. However, they can answer

  7. www.livestrong.org.livestrong.org Male Sexual DysfunctionMale Sexual Dysfunction

    E-print Network

    Brent, Roger

    are and being able to describe your symptoms to your health care team can help you manage sexual dysfunction are and being able to describe your symptoms to your health care team can help you manage sexual dysfunction uncomfortable discussing sexual concerns with a doctor or other members of the health care team. However

  8. Sex therapy for female sexual dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction About 45% of women suffer from some form of sexual dysfunction. Despite its high prevalence, there are few studies that have systematically evaluated sex therapy in comparison with other interventions. Objective Review randomized clinical trials that present psychotherapeutic interventions for female sexual dysfunctions. Method Through a search in three databases (Medline, Web of Science and PsycInfo), 1419 references were found. After an analysis of the abstracts, twenty-seven articles met the inclusion criteria and composed this review. Results Sex therapy, as proposed by Masters and Johnson and Heiman and LoPiccolo, is still the most commonly used form of therapy for sexual dysfunctions; although it has shown results, the results do not consistently support that this is the best alternative in the treatment of sexual dysfunctions. Conclusion There is a lack of systematic study of many female sexual dysfunctions. Orgasmic disorder and sexual pain (vaginismus and dyspaurenia) are the most extensively studied disorders and those in which sex therapy seems to have better outcomes. PMID:24066697

  9. Dysfunctional adaptive immunity during parasitic infections

    PubMed Central

    Zander, Ryan A.; Butler, Noah S.

    2014-01-01

    Parasite-driven dysfunctional adaptive immunity represents an emerging hypothesis to explain the chronic or persistent nature of parasitic infections, as well as the observation that repeated exposure to most parasitic organisms fails to engender sterilizing immunity. This review discusses recent examples from clinical studies and experimental models of parasitic infection that substantiate the role for immune dysfunction in the inefficient generation and maintenance of potent anti-parasitic immunity. Better understanding of the complex interplay between parasites, host adaptive immunity, and relevant negative regulatory circuits will inform efforts to enhance resistance to chronic parasitic infections through vaccination or immunotherapy. PMID:24839433

  10. Hippocampal insulin resistance and cognitive dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Biessels, Geert Jan; Reagan, Lawrence P

    2015-11-01

    Clinical studies suggest a link between type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and insulin resistance (IR) and cognitive dysfunction, but there are significant gaps in our knowledge of the mechanisms underlying this relationship. Animal models of IR help to bridge these gaps and point to hippocampal IR as a potential mediator of cognitive dysfunction in T2DM, as well as in Alzheimer disease (AD). This Review highlights these observations and discusses intervention studies which suggest that the restoration of insulin activity in the hippocampus may be an effective strategy to alleviate the cognitive decline associated with T2DM and AD. PMID:26462756

  11. Renal Endothelial Dysfunction in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Huifang; Harris, Raymond C.

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction has been posited to play an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Due to the heterogeneity of endothelial cells (ECs), it is difficult to generalize about endothelial responses to diabetic stimuli. At present, there are limited techniques fordirectly measuring EC function in vivo, so diagnosis of endothelial disorders still largely depends on indirect assessment of mediators arising from EC injury. In the kidney microcirculation, both afferent and efferent arteries, arterioles and glomerular endothelial cells (GEnC) have all been implicated as targets of diabetic injury. Both hyperglycemia per se, as well as the metabolic consequences of glucose dysregulation, are thought to lead to endothelial cell dysfunction. In this regard, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) plays a central role in EC dysfunction. Impaired eNOS activity can occur at numerous levels, including enzyme uncoupling, post-translational modifications, internalization and decreased expression. Reduced nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability exacerbates oxidative stress, further promoting endothelial dysfunction and injury. The injured ECs may then function as active signal transducers of metabolic, hemodynamic and inflammatory factors that modify the function and morphology of the vessel wall and interact with adjacent cells, which may activate a cascade of inflammatory and proliferative and profibrotic responses in progressive DN. Both pharmacological approaches and potential regenerative therapies hold promise for restoration of impaired endothelial cells in diabetic nephropathy. PMID:24720460

  12. SOMATOSENSORY DYSFUNCTION FOLLOWING ACUTE TRIMETHYLTIN EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A variety of trimethyltin (TMT) -produced sensory and behavioral dysfunctions have been reported. In this study the functional integrity of the somatosensory system was evaluated. Animals were tested using three different measures prior to (day 0) and 1,4, and 16 days following d...

  13. Minimal Brain Dysfunction: Associations with Perinatal Complications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Paul L.

    Examined with over 28,000 7-year-old children whose mothers registered for prenatal care was the relationship between perinatal complications and such characteristics as poor school achievement, hyperactivity, and neurological soft signs associated with the diagnosis of minimal brain dysfunction (MBD). Ten perinatal antecedents were studied:…

  14. Endothelial Dysfunction in Chronic Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Steyers, Curtis M.; Miller, Francis J.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory diseases are associated with accelerated atherosclerosis and increased risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). As the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis is increasingly recognized as an inflammatory process, similarities between atherosclerosis and systemic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel diseases, lupus, psoriasis, spondyloarthritis and others have become a topic of interest. Endothelial dysfunction represents a key step in the initiation and maintenance of atherosclerosis and may serve as a marker for future risk of cardiovascular events. Patients with chronic inflammatory diseases manifest endothelial dysfunction, often early in the course of the disease. Therefore, mechanisms linking systemic inflammatory diseases and atherosclerosis may be best understood at the level of the endothelium. Multiple factors, including circulating inflammatory cytokines, TNF-? (tumor necrosis factor-?), reactive oxygen species, oxidized LDL (low density lipoprotein), autoantibodies and traditional risk factors directly and indirectly activate endothelial cells, leading to impaired vascular relaxation, increased leukocyte adhesion, increased endothelial permeability and generation of a pro-thrombotic state. Pharmacologic agents directed against TNF-?-mediated inflammation may decrease the risk of endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease in these patients. Understanding the precise mechanisms driving endothelial dysfunction in patients with systemic inflammatory diseases may help elucidate the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in the general population. PMID:24968272

  15. Family Roles, Alcoholism, and Family Dysfunction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alford, Karola M.

    1998-01-01

    Examines family roles in college undergraduates (N=748). Comparing role identification found no differences between children of alcoholics (ACOA) and non-ACOAs. Differences were found in participants from dysfunctional families. Results suggest a need for clinicians to re-think the use of role conceptualization in therapeutic work with ACOAs, with…

  16. “Organic” Erection Dysfunction: Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Ronald W.D.

    1988-01-01

    The author of this article discusses the basic diagnostic work-up for a physically based erection dysfunction and reviews the five current treatment options (medicinal, physical, surgical, counselling, and intracavernosal injection). ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:21253073

  17. Cerebral dysfunction after coronary artery bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Goto, Tomoko; Maekawa, Kengo

    2014-04-01

    Cerebral dysfunction after cardiac surgery remains a devastating complication and is growing in importance with our aging populations. Neurological complications following cardiac surgery can be classified broadly as stroke, encephalopathy (including delirium), or postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD). These etiologies are caused primary by cerebral emboli, hypoperfusion, or inflammation that has largely been attributed to the use of cardiopulmonary bypass. Preventative operative strategies, such as off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), can potentially reduce the incidence of postoperative neurological complications by avoiding manipulation of the ascending aorta. Although off-pump CABG is associated with reduced risk of stroke, there are no convincing differences in POCD between off-pump and on-pump CABG. Recently, the focus of postoperative neurological research has shifted from managing cardiopulmonary bypass to patient-related factors. Identifying changes in brains of aged individuals undergoing cardiac surgery may improve strategies for preventing cerebral dysfunction. Advanced age is associated with more undiagnosed cerebrovascular disease and is a major risk factor for stroke and POCD following cardiac surgery. Preoperative cerebrovascular evaluation and adaptation of surgical strategies will provide preventative approaches for cerebral dysfunction after CABG. This review focuses on recent findings of the relationship between perioperative stress and underlying fragility of the brain in cardiac surgical patients. PMID:23982856

  18. Role of Insulin Resistance in Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Muniyappa, Ranganath; Sowers, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Insulin resistance is frequently associated with endothelial dysfunction and has been proposed to play a major role in cardiovascular diseases. Insulin exerts pro- and anti-atherogenic actions on the vasculature. The balance between nitric oxide (NO)-dependent vasodilator actions and endothelin-1- dependent vasoconstrictor actions of insulin is regulated by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent (PI3K) - and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-dependent signaling in vascular endothelium, respectively. During insulin-resistant conditions, pathway-specific impairment in PI3K-dependent signaling may cause imbalance between production of NO and secretion of endothelin-1 and lead to endothelial dysfunction. Insulin sensitizers that target pathway-selective impairment in insulin signaling are known to improve endothelial dysfunction. In this review, we discuss the cellular mechanisms in the endothelium underlying vascular actions of insulin, the role of insulin resistance in mediating endothelial dysfunction, and the effect of insulin sensitizers in restoring the balance in pro- and anti-atherogenic actions of insulin. PMID:23306778

  19. Language dysfunction in children with Rolandic epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Staden, U; Isaacs, E; Boyd, S G; Brandl, U; Neville, B G

    1998-10-01

    Rolandic epilepsy is regarded as the classic example of benign focal epilepsy. However, neuropsychological deficits have been noted in affected children. As Rolandic discharges are mainly distributed over the centrotemporal region, specific interference with language function might be suspected. Therefore, we conducted a standardized neuropsychological assessment in children with Rolandic epilepsy which covered all important aspects of language processing. We measured intelligence Quotient, verbal memory, auditory discrimination, vocabulary, grammar and literacy in 20 children with an active Rolandic focus. Information about performance at school was obtained from teachers by means of a questionnaire. Patients with Rolandic epilepsy failed five of the twelve standardized language tests significantly more often than the normative population and consequently showed impairment of the following functions: reading, spelling, auditory verbal learning, auditory discrimination with background noise and expressive grammar. Thirteen of the 20 children showed language dysfunction with difficulties in two or more of the twelve standardized language tests. In eight of these 13 children the Full Scale Intelligence Quotient was within average range, indicating a specific language deficit. Language dysfunction was closely associated with learning difficulties at school. This study documents a consistent pattern of language dysfunction in children with Rolandic epilepsy which suggests interictal dysfunction of perisylvian language areas. PMID:9810559

  20. The Biochemical Basis of Minimal Brain Dysfunction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaywitz, Sally E.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Available from: C. V. Mosby Company 11830 Westline Industrial Drive St. Louis, Missouri 63141 The research review examines evidence suggesting a biochemical basis for minimal brain dysfunction (MBD), which includes both a relationship between MBD and metabolic abnormalities and a significant genetic influence on the disorder in children. (IM)

  1. Sexual dysfunction in female cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    DeSimone, Michael; Spriggs, Elizabeth; Gass, Jennifer S; Carson, Sandra A; Krychman, Michael L; Dizon, Don S

    2014-02-01

    Cancer survivors face a myriad of long-term effects of their disease, diagnosis, and treatment, and chief among many are problems associated with sexual dysfunction. Yet despite their frequency and the degree of distress they cause patients, sexual dysfunction is not effectively screened for or treated, and this is particularly true in female survivors. Inconsistently performed general sexual health screening at all facets of cancer care and survivorship ultimately translates into missed attempts to identify and treat dysfunction when it does arise. In this paper, we will review the current research and clinical practices addressing sexual dysfunction in female cancer survivors and propose questions in need of future research attention. This article will review the phases of sexual response and how each may be affected by the physical and emotional stress of cancer diagnosis and treatment. We will then discuss existing tools for assessment of sexual function and approaches to their treatment. Finally, we will conclude with advice to health care professionals based on current research and suggest questions for future study. PMID:22643563

  2. Effect of Common Visual Dysfunctions on Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPartland, Brian P.

    1985-01-01

    Six common visual dysfunctions are briefly explained and their relationships to reading noted: (1) ametropia, refractive error; (2) inaccurate saccades, the small jumping eye movements used in reading; (3) inefficient binocularity/fusion; (4) insufficient convergence/divergence; (5) heterophoria, imbalance in extra-ocular muscles; and (6)…

  3. Feeding and Swallowing Dysfunction in Genetic Syndromes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper-Brown, Linda; Copeland, Sara; Dailey, Scott; Downey, Debora; Petersen, Mario Cesar; Stimson, Cheryl; Van Dyke, Don C.

    2008-01-01

    Children with genetic syndromes frequently have feeding problems and swallowing dysfunction as a result of the complex interactions between anatomical, medical, physiological, and behavioral factors. Feeding problems associated with genetic disorders may also cause feeding to be unpleasant, negative, or even painful because of choking, coughing,…

  4. Interneuron Dysfunction in Syndromic Autism: Recent Advances.

    PubMed

    Takano, Tomoyuki

    2015-11-01

    Autism is an extremely heterogeneous disorder, but its frequent cooccurrence with epilepsy leads to speculation that there may be common mechanisms associated with these disorders. Inhibitory interneurons are considered to be the main cellular elements that control hyperexcitability in the brain, and interneuron dysfunction can cause pathological hyperexcitability linked to seizure susceptibility or epilepsy. This review summarizes some of the recent advances that support the relationship between interneuron dysfunction and cognitive impairment in human syndromic autism, with particular reference to the pathophysiological findings of murine experimental models of autism. Alterations in x03B3;-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic circuits include a wide variety of neurobiological dysfunctions and do not simply involve the loss or gain of any given type of inhibitory mechanism. The characteristics of interneuron dysfunction in each murine model of autism differ for each syndrome, and these diversities may be due to differences in genetic backgrounds or some other currently unknown variances. Future studies should give us a greater understanding of the involvement of different classes of GABAergic interneurons and allow us to define the relationship between the precise pathophysiological mechanisms and the corresponding clinical phenotypes in autism. PMID:26183392

  5. Dysfunctional HDL and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Rosenson, Robert S; Brewer, H Bryan; Ansell, Benjamin J; Barter, Philip; Chapman, M John; Heinecke, Jay W; Kontush, Anatol; Tall, Alan R; Webb, Nancy R

    2016-01-01

    High-density lipoproteins (HDLs) protect against atherosclerosis by removing excess cholesterol from macrophages through the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) and ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 (ABCG1) pathways involved in reverse cholesterol transport. Factors that impair the availability of functional apolipoproteins or the activities of ABCA1 and ABCG1 could, therefore, strongly influence atherogenesis. HDL also inhibits lipid oxidation, restores endothelial function, exerts anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic actions, and exerts anti-inflammatory actions in animal models. Such properties could contribute considerably to the capacity of HDL to inhibit atherosclerosis. Systemic and vascular inflammation has been proposed to convert HDL to a dysfunctional form that has impaired antiatherogenic effects. A loss of anti-inflammatory and antioxidative proteins, perhaps in combination with a gain of proinflammatory proteins, might be another important component in rendering HDL dysfunctional. The proinflammatory enzyme myeloperoxidase induces both oxidative modification and nitrosylation of specific residues on plasma and arterial apolipoprotein A-I to render HDL dysfunctional, which results in impaired ABCA1 macrophage transport, the activation of inflammatory pathways, and an increased risk of coronary artery disease. Understanding the features of dysfunctional HDL or apolipoprotein A-I in clinical practice might lead to new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to atherosclerosis. PMID:26323267

  6. Syllable Structure in Dysfunctional Portuguese Children's Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Candeias, Sara; Perdigao, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this work is to investigate whether children with speech dysfunctions (SD) show a deficit in planning some Portuguese syllable structures (PSS) in continuous speech production. Knowledge of which aspects of speech production are affected by SD is necessary for efficient improvement in the therapy techniques. The case-study is focused…

  7. Vascular dysfunctions following spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Popa, F; Grigorean, VT; Onose, G; Sandu, AM; Popescu, M; Burnei, G; Strambu, V; Sinescu, C

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this article is to analyze the vascular dysfunctions occurring after spinal cord injury (SCI). Vascular dysfunctions are common complications of SCI. Cardiovascular disturbances are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in both acute and chronic stages of SCI. Neuroanatomy and physiology of autonomic nervous system, sympathetic and parasympathetic, is reviewed. SCI implies disruption of descendent pathways from central centers to spinal sympathetic neurons, originating in intermediolateral nuclei of T1–L2 cord segments. Loss of supraspinal control over sympathetic nervous system results in reduced overall sympathetic activity below the level of injury and unopposed parasympathetic outflow through intact vagal nerve. SCI associates significant vascular dysfunction. Spinal shock occurs during the acute phase following SCI and it is a transitory suspension of function and reflexes below the level of the injury. Neurogenic shock, part of spinal shock, consists of severe arterial hypotension and bradycardia. Autonomic dysreflexia appears during the chronic phase, after spinal shock resolution, and it is a life–threatening syndrome of massive imbalanced reflex sympathetic discharge occurring in patients with SCI above the splanchnic sympathetic outflow (T5–T6). Arterial hypotension with orthostatic hypotension occurs in both acute and chronic phases. The etiology is multifactorial. We described a few factors influencing the orthostatic hypotension occurrence in SCI: sympathetic nervous system dysfunction, low plasma catecholamine levels, rennin–angiotensin–aldosterone activity, peripheral alpha–adrenoceptor hyperresponsiveness, impaired function of baroreceptors, hyponatremia and low plasmatic volume, cardiovascular deconditioning, morphologic changes in sympathetic neurons, plasticity within spinal circuits, and motor deficit leading to loss of skeletal muscle pumping activity. Additional associated cardiovascular concerns in SCI, such as deep vein thrombosis and long–term risk for coronary heart disease and systemic atherosclerosis are also described. Proper prophylaxis, including non–pharmacologic and pharmacological strategies, diminishes the occurrence of the vascular dysfunction following SCI. Each vascular disturbance requires a specific treatment. PMID:20945818

  8. Penile vibratory stimulation in the recovery of urinary continence and erectile function after nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy: a randomized, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Fode, Mikkel; Borre, Michael; Ohl, Dana A; Lichtbach, Jonas; Sønksen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the effect of penile vibratory stimulation (PVS) in the preservation and restoration of erectile function and urinary continence in conjunction with nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy (RP). Patients and Methods The present study was conducted between July 2010 and March 2013 as a randomized prospective trial at two university hospitals. Eligible participants were continent men with an International Index of Erectile Function-5 (IIEF-5) score of at least 18, scheduled to undergo nerve-sparing RP. Patients were randomized to a PVS group or a control group. Patients in the PVS group were instructed in using a PVS device (FERTI CARE® vibrator). Stimulation was performed at the frenulum once daily by the patients in their own homes for at least 1 week before surgery. After catheter removal, daily PVS was re-initiated for a period of 6 weeks. Participants were evaluated at 3, 6 and 12 months after surgery with the IIEF-5 questionnaire and questions regarding urinary bother. Patients using up to one pad daily for security reasons only were considered continent. The study was registered at http://clinicaltrials.gov/ (NCT01067261). Results Data from 68 patients were available for analyses (30 patients randomized to PVS and 38 patients randomized to the control group). The IIEF-5 score was highest in the PVS group at all time points after surgery with a median score of 18 vs 7.5 in the control group at 12 months (P = 0.09), but the difference only reached borderline significance. At 12 months, 16/30 (53%) patients in the PVS group had reached an IIEF-5 score of at least 18, while this was the case for 12/38 (32%) patients in the control group (P = 0.07). There were no significant differences in the proportions of continent patients between groups at 3, 6 or 12 months. At 12 months 90% of the PVS patients were continent, while 94.7% of the control patients were continent (P = 0.46). Conclusion The present study did not document a significant effect of PVS. However, the method proved to be acceptable for most patients and there was a trend towards better erectile function with PVS. More studies are needed to explore this possible effect further. PMID:24127838

  9. Penile anesthesia in Post SSRI Sexual Dysfunction (PSSD) responds to low-power laser irradiation: a case study and hypothesis about the role of transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels.

    PubMed

    Waldinger, Marcel D; van Coevorden, Ruben S; Schweitzer, Dave H; Georgiadis, Janniko

    2015-04-15

    Treatment of paroxetine-induced penile anesthesia in Post SSRI Sexual Dysfunction (PSSD) by Low-power Laser Irradiation (LPLI) is unknown in medical literature. The aim of the current article is to report partial efficacy of LPLI for paroxetine-induced persistent penile anesthesia. We report on a male patient who presented with a history of reversible loss of smell, taste and skin sensitivity occurring within a week after start of 20mg/day paroxetine-hemihydrate for a depressive period. Concurrently, patient suffered from penile anesthesia, scrotum hypesthesia, anejaculation and erectile difficulties with normal sexual desire. During 2.5 years of paroxetine treatment and throughout 2 years after paroxetine discontinuation, genital and sexual complaints persisted. Penile anesthesia was treated by LPLI with single and multi diode pulsed laser probes. After 20 LPLI-treatment sessions of 15min each, patient reported partial return of penile touch and temperature sensation. Clinical improvement of glans penis sensitivity was reported to 20% and 40%, compared to pre-paroxetine treatment penile sensitivity during erect and flaccid states, respectively. However, anejaculation and erectile difficulties remained unchanged. Briefly, in the current patient with early onset of PSSD, LPLI treatment reduced paroxetine-induced penile anesthesia. It is hypothesized that SSRI treatment induces disturbances of transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels of mechano-, thermo- and chemosensitive nerve endings and receptors resulting in the penile anesthesia in PSSD. It is further hypothesized that there are two types of PSSD, one of which occurs soon after the start of SSRI treatment. PMID:25483212

  10. Mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance: an update

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Magdalene K; Turner, Nigel

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the development of insulin resistance (IR); however, a large variety of association and intervention studies as well as genetic manipulations in rodents have reported contrasting results. Indeed, even 39 years after the first publication describing a relationship between IR and diminished mitochondrial function, it is still unclear whether a direct relationship exists, and more importantly if changes in mitochondrial capacity are a cause or consequence of IR. This review will take a journey through the past and summarise the debate about the occurrence of mitochondrial dysfunction and its possible role in causing decreased insulin action in obesity and type 2 diabetes. Evidence is presented from studies in various human populations, as well as rodents with genetic manipulations of pathways known to affect mitochondrial function and insulin action. Finally, we have discussed whether mitochondria are a potential target for the treatment of IR. PMID:25385852

  11. Family Therapy in Complex Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Boll, Pamela G.; Mercuri, Louis G.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to offer the oral and maxillofacial surgeon a collaborative approach to the treatment of complex temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction. Through a positive relationship with a family therapist, the oral and maxillofacial surgeon in this case reports family therapy intervention as an additive solution to resolving apparent recurrent surgical failures. After three surgical procedures, the oral and maxillofacial surgeon noted continued muscle hyperactivity brought on by family environmental stress and arranged for family therapy treatment before a fourth surgical procedure. This paper presents a complicated TMJ case history, documentation for including the family in treatment of pain problems, collaborative efforts necessary for acceptance of referral for psychological intervention, and a family therapy approach to treatment in complex TMJ dysfunction. PMID:3166348

  12. Neurodegenerative changes initiated by presynaptic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Toru; Nakata, Yasuto; Choong, Chi-Jing; Mochizuki, Hideki

    2013-01-01

    ?-Synucleinopathies are a subgroup of neurodegenerative diseases including dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and Parkinson's disease (PD). Pathologically, these disorders can be characterized by the presence of intraneuronal aggregates composed mainly of ?-synuclein (?Syn), which are called Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites. Recent report showed that more than 90% of ?Syn aggregates are present in the form of very small deposits in presynaptic terminals of the affected neurons in DLB. However, the mechanisms responsible for presynaptic accumulation of abnormal ?Syn remain unclear. In this article, we review recent findings on the involvement of presynaptic dysfunction in the initiation of neuronal dysfunctional changes. This review highlights that the presynaptic failure can be a potential trigger of the dying-back neuronal death in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23919415

  13. Treating cognitive dysfunction in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed Central

    Galletly, C A; Clark, C R; MacFarlane, A C

    2000-01-01

    Cognitive dysfunction is a common, chronically disabling component of schizophrenia. It has been proposed that many of the symptoms of schizophrenia can be understood as a result of disruption of fundamental cognitive processes. This paper reviews treatment strategies aimed at improving cognitive function in patients with schizophrenia. Nonpharmacologic interventions include instruction in the performance of tasks such as the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test. Mixed results have been achieved, but it appears that instruction methods involving reinforcement of information held in working memory are more successful. Computer-aided remediation has also been used with variable success. Novel antipsychotic drugs appear to have an advantage over conventional antipsychotic drugs in terms of their effect on cognitive function. The development of more precisely tailored methods of remedial teaching, along with optimal pharmacologic treatment, may lead to more effective treatment of cognitive dysfunction in patients with schizophrenia. PMID:10740985

  14. Prefrontal system dysfunction and credit card debt.

    PubMed

    Spinella, Marcello; Yang, Bijou; Lester, David

    2004-10-01

    Credit card use often involves a disadvantageous allocation of finances because they allow for spending beyond means and buying on impulse. Accordingly they are associated with increased bankruptcy, anxiety, stress, and health problems. Mounting evidence from functional neuroimaging and clinical studies implicates prefrontal-subcortical systems in processing financial information. This study examined the relationship of credit card debt and executive functions using the Frontal System Behavior Scale (FRSBE). After removing the influences of demographic variables (age, sex, education, and income), credit card debt was associated with the Executive Dysfunction scale, but not the Apathy or Disinhibition scales. This suggests that processes of conceptualizing and organizing finances are most relevant to credit card debt, and implicates dorsolateral prefrontal dysfunction. PMID:15370189

  15. Mitochondrial dysfunction and neurodegeneration in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Su, Kimmy; Bourdette, Dennis; Forte, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) has traditionally been considered an autoimmune inflammatory disorder leading to demyelination and clinical debilitation as evidenced by our current standard anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive treatment regimens. While these approaches do control the frequency of clinical relapses, they do not prevent the progressive functional decline that plagues many people with MS. Many avenues of research indicate that a neurodegenerative process may also play a significant role in MS from the early stages of disease, and one of the current hypotheses identifies mitochondrial dysfunction as a key contributing mechanism. We have hypothesized that pathological permeability transition pore (PTP) opening mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and calcium dysregulation is central to mitochondrial dysfunction and neurodegeneration in MS. This focused review highlights recent evidence supporting this hypothesis, with particular emphasis on our in vitro and in vivo work with the mitochondria-targeted redox enzyme p66ShcA. PMID:23898299

  16. Multiorgan dysfunction related to chronic ketamine abuse

    PubMed Central

    Raj, Binu; Thomas, Sebastian; Hanna, Fahmy W.

    2014-01-01

    Ketamine abuse is being increasingly reported worldwide. The drug can produce a dissociative state and hallucinations, making ketamine a favorite recreational agent among drug addicts. Chronic ketamine abuse can damage many organs, including the brain, heart, liver, gastrointestinal tract, and genitourinary system. We report a patient with chronic ketamine abuse who presented with severe cachexia, upper gastrointestinal involvement, hepatobiliary dysfunction, and acute kidney injury. PMID:24982568

  17. Cardiac dysfunctions following spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Sandu, AM; Popescu, M; Iacobini, MA; Stoian, R; Neascu, C; Popa, F

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this article is to analyze cardiac dysfunctions occurring after spinal cord injury (SCI). Cardiac dysfunctions are common complications following SCI. Cardiovascular disturbances are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in both acute and chronic stages of SCI. We reviewed epidemiology of cardiac disturbances after SCI, and neuroanatomy and pathophysiology of autonomic nervous system, sympathetic and parasympathetic. SCI causes disruption of descendent pathways from central control centers to spinal sympathetic neurons, originating into intermediolateral nuclei of T1–L2 spinal cord segments. Loss of supraspinal control over sympathetic nervous system results in reduced overall sympathetic activity below the level of injury and unopposed parasympathetic outflow through intact vagal nerve. SCI associates significant cardiac dysfunction. Impairment of autonomic nervous control system, mostly in patients with cervical or high thoracic SCI, causes cardiac dysrrhythmias, especially bradycardia and, rarely, cardiac arrest, or tachyarrhytmias and hypotension. Specific complication dependent on the period of time after trauma like spinal shock and autonomic dysreflexia are also reviewed. Spinal shock occurs during the acute phase following SCI and is a transitory suspension of function and reflexes below the level of the injury. Neurogenic shock, part of spinal shock, consists of severe bradycardia and hypotension. Autonomic dysreflexia appears during the chronic phase, after spinal shock resolution, and it is a life–threatening syndrome of massive imbalanced reflex sympathetic discharge occurring in patients with SCI above the splanchnic sympathetic outflow (T5–T6). Besides all this, additional cardiac complications, such as cardiac deconditioning and coronary heart disease may also occur. Proper prophylaxis, including nonpharmacologic and pharmacological strategies and cardiac rehabilitation diminish occurrence of the cardiac dysfunction following SCI. Each type of cardiac disturbance requires specific treatment. PMID:20108532

  18. Minor Neurological Dysfunction in Children with Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Punt, Marja; de Jong, Marianne; de Groot, Erik; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To improve understanding of brain function in children with severe dyslexia in terms of minor neurological dysfunctions (MNDs). Method: One hundred and four children (81 males, 23 females; age range 7-12y; mean age 9y 7mo, SD 1y 2mo;) with severe dyslexia (the presence of a Full-scale IQ score of greater than or equal to 85, retardation in…

  19. Hypothalamic dysfunction following whole-brain irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Mechanick, J.I.; Hochberg, F.H.; LaRocque, A.

    1986-10-01

    The authors describe 15 cases with evidence of hypothalamic dysfunction 2 to 9 years following megavoltage whole-brain x-irradiation for primary glial neoplasm. The patients received 4000 to 5000 rads in 180- to 200-rad fractions. Dysfunction occurred in the absence of computerized tomography-delineated radiation necrosis or hypothalamic invasion by tumor, and antedated the onset of dementia. Fourteen patients displayed symptoms reflecting disturbances of personality, libido, thirst, appetite, or sleep. Hyperprolactinemia (with prolactin levels up to 70 ng/ml) was present in all of the nine patients so tested. Of seven patients tested with thyrotropin-releasing hormone, one demonstrated an abnormal pituitary gland response consistent with a hypothalamic disorder. Seven patients developed cognitive abnormalities. Computerized tomography scans performed a median of 4 years after tumor diagnosis revealed no hypothalamic tumor or diminished density of the hypothalamus. Cortical atrophy was present in 50% of cases and third ventricular dilatation in 58%. Hypothalamic dysfunction, heralded by endocrine, behavioral, and cognitive impairment, represents a common, subtle form of radiation damage.

  20. Sexual dysfunction in patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Luef, Gerhard; Madersbacher, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Sexuality is an important and private aspect of life and sexuality and epilepsy have been intimately linked since ancient time. Disturbances of reproductive and sexual health are common in men and women with epilepsy. Multiple causes may lead to sexual dysfunction. The basis for hyposexuality has been attributed to both epilepsy and antiepileptic drug use, making it difficult to distinguish between the illness-specific and pharmacologic impacts on sexual functioning. Low levels of androgens are associated with sexual arousal insufficiency and sexual dysfunction. Data from animal studies support the hypothesis that hyposexuality occurs as a result of epileptiform activity in the temporal lobe, but not in the motor cortex. Enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs are metabolized in the hepatic P 450 system (e.g., 3A4, 2C9, 2C19), induce hepatic enzymes, increase the hepatic synthesis of sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), and increase the metabolism of sex hormones that might have an additional influence on sexuality in patients with epilepsy. When examining sexual dysfunction in men and women with epilepsy, the Arizona Sexual Experience Scale may be helpful in evaluating sexual function. Laboratory tests for estrogen, free and total testosterone, and serum SHBG may also be useful in evaluating sexual health. PMID:26003256

  1. Episodic neurological dysfunction in hereditary peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Girish Baburao; Mailankody, Pooja; Isnwara, Pawanraj Palu; Prasad, Chandrajit; Mustare, Veerendrakumar

    2015-01-01

    Episodic transient neurological symptoms are an important set of problems presenting to a neurologist in his routine practice. Occasionally, detailed clinical history including past and family history supplemented with focused examination can bring out a rare cause for such symptoms. We describe in this report in a young male presenting with episodic focal neurological dysfunction, with family history of similar episodes in mother and brother. Examination showed features of pes cavus and peripheral neuropathy for which patient was asymptomatic. Mother and brother were established cases of hereditary neuropathy. Imaging on multiple occasions showed reversible white matter abnormalities. Clinical suspicion of X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 (CMT1X) was confirmed with detection of mutation in Gap Junction B1 (GJB1) gene, which codes for connexin 32 protein (c.425G>A; p.R142Q hemizygous mutation). Though this mutation has been already reported in CMTX patients, it has not been associated with transient neurological dysfunctions. This is probably the first reported case of CMTX patient with transient neurological dysfunction from India, whose family members had similar episodes. PMID:25745327

  2. Episodic neurological dysfunction in hereditary peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Girish Baburao; Mailankody, Pooja; Isnwara, Pawanraj Palu; Prasad, Chandrajit; Mustare, Veerendrakumar

    2015-01-01

    Episodic transient neurological symptoms are an important set of problems presenting to a neurologist in his routine practice. Occasionally, detailed clinical history including past and family history supplemented with focused examination can bring out a rare cause for such symptoms. We describe in this report in a young male presenting with episodic focal neurological dysfunction, with family history of similar episodes in mother and brother. Examination showed features of pes cavus and peripheral neuropathy for which patient was asymptomatic. Mother and brother were established cases of hereditary neuropathy. Imaging on multiple occasions showed reversible white matter abnormalities. Clinical suspicion of X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 (CMT1X) was confirmed with detection of mutation in Gap Junction B1 (GJB1) gene, which codes for connexin 32 protein (c.425G>A; p.R142Q hemizygous mutation). Though this mutation has been already reported in CMTX patients, it has not been associated with transient neurological dysfunctions. This is probably the first reported case of CMTX patient with transient neurological dysfunction from India, whose family members had similar episodes. PMID:25745327

  3. Neurocircuitry of limbic dysfunction in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Lipsman, Nir; Woodside, D Blake; Lozano, Andres M

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia Nervosa (AN) is a serious psychiatric condition marked by firmly entrenched and maladaptive behaviors and beliefs about body, weight and food, as well as high rates of psychiatric comorbidity. The neural roots of AN are now beginning to emerge, and appear to be related to dysfunctional, primarily limbic, circuits driving pathological thoughts and behaviors. As a result, the significant physical symptoms of AN are increasingly being understood at least partially as a result of abnormal or dysregulated emotional processing. This paper reviews the nature of limbic dysfunction in AN, and how structural and functional imaging has implicated distinct emotional and perceptual neural circuits driving AN symptoms. We propose that top-down and bottom-up influences converge on key limbic modulatory structures, such as the subcallosal cingulate and insula, whose normal functioning is critical to affective regulation and emotional homeostasis. Dysfunctional activity in these structures, as is seen in AN, may lead to emotional processing deficits and psychiatric symptoms, which then drive maladaptive behaviors. Modulating limbic dysregulation may therefore be a potential treatment strategy in some AN patients. PMID:24703713

  4. Organic Brain Dysfunction and Child Psychiatric Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Philip; Rutter, Michael

    1968-01-01

    The total population of 11,865 children of compulsory school age resident on the Isle of Wight was studied to determine the prevalence of epilepsy, cerebral palsy, and other neurological disorders. With the use of reliable methods, children selected from screening of the total population were individually studied by means of parental interviews and questionaries, neurological examination and psychiatric assessment of each child, information from school teachers, and perusal of the records of hospitals and other agencies. The association between organic brain dysfunction and psychiatric disorder was studied by comparing the findings in the children with epilepsy or with lesions above the brain stem (cerebral palsy and similar disorders) with those in (1) a random sample of the general population, (2) children with lesions below the brain stem (for example, muscular dystrophy or paralyses following poliomyelitis), and (3) children with other chronic physical handicaps not involving the nervous system (for example, asthma, heart disease, or diabetes). Psychiatric disorders in children with neuro-epileptic conditions were five times as common as in the general population and three times as common as in children with chronic physical handicaps not involving the brain. It was concluded, on the basis of a study of factors associated with psychiatric disorder, that the high rate of psychiatric disorder in the neuro-epileptic children was due to the presence of organic brain dysfunction rather than just the existence of a physical handicap (though this also played a part). However, organic brain dysfunction was not associated with any specific type of disorder. Within the neuro-epileptic group the neurological features and the type of fit, intellectual/educational factors, and socio-familial factors all interacted in the development of psychiatric disorder. PMID:4233874

  5. Function and Dysfunction of Human Sinoatrial Node

    PubMed Central

    Joung, Boyoung

    2015-01-01

    Sinoatrial node (SAN) automaticity is jointly regulated by a voltage (cyclic activation and deactivation of membrane ion channels) and Ca2+ clocks (rhythmic spontaneous sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release). Using optical mapping in Langendorff-perfused canine right atrium, we previously demonstrated that the ?-adrenergic stimulation pushes the leading pacemaker to the superior SAN, which has the fastest activation rate and the most robust late diastolic intracellular calcium (Cai) elevation. Dysfunction of the superior SAN is commonly observed in animal models of heart failure and atrial fibrillation (AF), which are known to be associated with abnormal SAN automaticity. Using the 3D electroanatomic mapping techniques, we demonstrated that superior SAN served as the earliest atrial activation site (EAS) during sympathetic stimulation in healthy humans. In contrast, unresponsiveness of superior SAN to sympathetic stimulation was a characteristic finding in patients with AF and SAN dysfunction, and the 3D electroanatomic mapping technique had better diagnostic sensitivity than corrected SAN recovery time testing. However, both tests have significant limitations in detecting patients with symptomatic sick sinus syndrome. Recently, we reported that the location of the EAS can be predicted by the amplitudes of P-wave in the inferior leads. The inferior P-wave amplitudes can also be used to assess the superior SAN responsiveness to sympathetic stimulation. Inverted or isoelectric P-waves at baseline that fail to normalize during isoproterenol infusion suggest SAN dysfunction. P-wave morphology analyses may be helpful in determining the SAN function in patients at risk of symptomatic sick sinus syndrome. PMID:26023305

  6. Clinical significance of liver dysfunction in pregnancy-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Romero, R; Vizoso, J; Emamian, M; Duffy, T; Riely, C; Halford, T; Oyarzun, E; Naftolin, F; Hobbins, J C

    1988-04-01

    Hepatic dysfunction is one of the frequent manifestations of multisystemic involvement in preeclampsia. This study was conducted to establish the impact of liver dysfunction on maternal and neonatal outcome in women with pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH). The prevalence of liver dysfunction as determined by an elevated serum glutamic oxalacetic transaminase (SGOT) concentration was 21% in a population of 355 patients with PIH. Liver dysfunction was associated with the presence of severe hypertension, proteinuria, a lower platelet count, and renal compromise (elevated blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, and uric acid serum concentrations). Abdominal pain was also associated with an SGOT elevation. Liver dysfunction was associated with intrauterine growth retardation and prematurity. Furthermore, the association with these neonatal complications was independent from the severity of the hypertension and the presence of proteinuria. Thus, we conclude that liver dysfunction is a frequent complication of PIH and that it is an independent risk factor for maternal and perinatal complications. PMID:3348861

  7. Emerging Neural Stimulation Technologies for Bladder Dysfunctions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jee Woong; Kim, Daejeong; Yoo, Sangjin; Lee, Hyungsup; Lee, Gu-Haeng; Nam, Yoonkey

    2015-01-01

    In the neural engineering field, physiological dysfunctions are approached by identifying the target nerves and providing artificial stimulation to restore the function. Neural stimulation and recording technologies play a central role in this approach, and various engineering devices and stimulation techniques have become available to the medical community. For bladder control problems, electrical stimulation has been used as one of the treatments, while only a few emerging neurotechnologies have been used to tackle these problems. In this review, we introduce some recent developments in neural stimulation technologies including microelectrode array, closed-loop neural stimulation, optical stimulation, and ultrasound stimulation. PMID:25833475

  8. Corneal transparency: genesis, maintenance and dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Qazi, Yureeda; Wong, Gilbert; Monson, Bryan; Stringham, Jack

    2009-01-01

    Optimal vision is contingent upon transparency of the cornea. Corneal neovascularization, trauma and, surgical procedures such as photorefractive keratectomy and graft rejection after penetrating keratoplasty can lead to corneal opacification. In this article we identify the underlying basis of corneal transparency and factors that compromise the integrity of the cornea. With evidence from work on animal models and clinical studies, we explore the molecular mechanisms of both corneal avascularity and its dysfunction. We also seek to review therapeutic regimens that can safely salvage and restore corneal transparency PMID:19481138

  9. Roles of olfactory system dysfunction in depression.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ti-Fei; Slotnick, Burton M

    2014-10-01

    The olfactory system is involved in sensory functions, emotional regulation and memory formation. Olfactory bulbectomy in rat has been employed as an animal model of depression for antidepressant discovery studies for many years. Olfaction is impaired in animals suffering from chronic stress, and patients with clinical depression were reported to have decreased olfactory function. It is believed that the neurobiological bases of depression might include dysfunction in the olfactory system. Further, brain stimulation, including nasal based drug delivery could provide novel therapies for management of depression. PMID:24879990

  10. Framework for Understanding Balance Dysfunction in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Schoneburg, Bernadette; Mancini, Martina; Horak, Fay; Nutt, John G.

    2013-01-01

    People with Parkinson’s disease (PD) suffer from progressive impairment in their mobility. Locomotor and balance dysfunction that impairs mobility in PD is an important cause of physical and psychosocial disability. The recognition and evaluation of balance dysfunction by the clinician is an essential component of managing PD. In this review, we describe a framework for understanding balance dysfunction in PD to help clinicians recognize patients that are at risk for falling and impaired mobility. PMID:23925954

  11. Myocardial steatosis as a possible mechanistic link between diastolic dysfunction and coronary microvascular dysfunction in women.

    PubMed

    Wei, Janet; Nelson, Michael D; Szczepaniak, Edward W; Smith, Laura; Mehta, Puja K; Thomson, Louise E J; Berman, Daniel S; Li, Debiao; Bairey Merz, C Noel; Szczepaniak, Lidia S

    2016-01-01

    Women with coronary microvascular dysfunction (CMD) and no obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) have increased rates of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). The mechanisms of HFpEF are not well understood. Ectopic fat deposition in the myocardium, termed myocardial steatosis, is frequently associated with diastolic dysfunction in other metabolic diseases. We investigated the prevalence of myocardial steatosis and diastolic dysfunction in women with CMD and subclinical HFpEF. In 13 women, including eight reference controls and five women with CMD and evidence of subclinical HFpEF (left ventricular end-diastolic pressure >12 mmHg), we measured myocardial triglyceride content (TG) and diastolic function, by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and magnetic resonance tissue tagging, respectively. When compared with reference controls, women with CMD had higher myocardial TG content (0.83 ± 0.12% vs. 0.43 ± 0.06%; P = 0.025) and lower diastolic circumferential strain rate (168 ± 12 vs. 217 ± 15%/s; P = 0.012), with myocardial TG content correlating inversely with diastolic circumferential strain rate (r = -0.779; P = 0.002). This study provides proof-of-concept that myocardial steatosis may play an important mechanistic role in the development of diastolic dysfunction in women with CMD and no obstructive CAD. Detailed longitudinal studies are warranted to explore specific treatment strategies targeting myocardial steatosis and its effect on diastolic function. PMID:26519031

  12. Drug-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and cardiotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Varga, Zoltán V; Ferdinandy, Peter; Liaudet, Lucas; Pacher, Pál

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondria has an essential role in myocardial tissue homeostasis; thus deterioration in mitochondrial function eventually leads to cardiomyocyte and endothelial cell death and consequent cardiovascular dysfunction. Several chemical compounds and drugs have been known to directly or indirectly modulate cardiac mitochondrial function, which can account both for the toxicological and pharmacological properties of these substances. In many cases, toxicity problems appear only in the presence of additional cardiovascular disease conditions or develop months/years following the exposure, making the diagnosis difficult. Cardiotoxic agents affecting mitochondria include several widely used anticancer drugs [anthracyclines (Doxorubicin/Adriamycin), cisplatin, trastuzumab (Herceptin), arsenic trioxide (Trisenox), mitoxantrone (Novantrone), imatinib (Gleevec), bevacizumab (Avastin), sunitinib (Sutent), and sorafenib (Nevaxar)], antiviral compound azidothymidine (AZT, Zidovudine) and several oral antidiabetics [e.g., rosiglitazone (Avandia)]. Illicit drugs such as alcohol, cocaine, methamphetamine, ecstasy, and synthetic cannabinoids (spice, K2) may also induce mitochondria-related cardiotoxicity. Mitochondrial toxicity develops due to various mechanisms involving interference with the mitochondrial respiratory chain (e.g., uncoupling) or inhibition of the important mitochondrial enzymes (oxidative phosphorylation, Szent-Györgyi-Krebs cycle, mitochondrial DNA replication, ADP/ATP translocator). The final phase of mitochondrial dysfunction induces loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and an increase in mitochondrial oxidative/nitrative stress, eventually culminating into cell death. This review aims to discuss the mechanisms of mitochondrion-mediated cardiotoxicity of commonly used drugs and some potential cardioprotective strategies to prevent these toxicities. PMID:26386112

  13. Telomere dysfunction causes alveolar stem cell failure

    PubMed Central

    Alder, Jonathan K.; Barkauskas, Christina E.; Limjunyawong, Nathachit; Stanley, Susan E.; Kembou, Frant; Tuder, Rubin M.; Hogan, Brigid L. M.; Mitzner, Wayne; Armanios, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Telomere syndromes have their most common manifestation in lung disease that is recognized as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema. In both conditions, there is loss of alveolar integrity, but the underlying mechanisms are not known. We tested the capacity of alveolar epithelial and stromal cells from mice with short telomeres to support alveolar organoid colony formation and found that type 2 alveolar epithelial cells (AEC2s), the stem cell-containing population, were limiting. When telomere dysfunction was induced in adult AEC2s by conditional deletion of the shelterin component telomeric repeat-binding factor 2, cells survived but remained dormant and showed all the hallmarks of cellular senescence. Telomere dysfunction in AEC2s triggered an immune response, and this was associated with AEC2-derived up-regulation of cytokine signaling pathways that are known to provoke inflammation in the lung. Mice uniformly died after challenge with bleomycin, underscoring an essential role for telomere function in AEC2s for alveolar repair. Our data show that alveoloar progenitor senescence is sufficient to recapitulate the regenerative defects, inflammatory responses, and susceptibility to injury that are characteristic of telomere-mediated lung disease. They suggest alveolar stem cell failure is a driver of telomere-mediated lung disease and that efforts to reverse it may be clinically beneficial. PMID:25840590

  14. Iatrogenic causes of salivary gland dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert, M.M.; Izutsu, K.T.

    1987-02-01

    Saliva is important for maintaining oral health and function. There are instances when medical therapy is intended to decrease salivary flow, such as during general anesthesia, but most instances of iatrogenic salivary gland dysfunction represent untoward or unavoidable side-effects. The clinical expression of the salivary dysfunction can range from very minor transient alteration in saliva flow to a total loss of salivary function. The most common forms of therapy that interfere with salivation are drug therapies, cancer therapies (radiation or chemotherapy), and surgical therapy. These therapies can affect salivation by a number of different mechanisms that include: disruption of autonomic nerve function related to salivation, interference with acinar or ductal cell functions related to salivation, cytotoxicity, indirect effects (vasoconstriction/dilation, fluid and electrolyte balance, etc.), and physical trauma to salivary glands and nerves. A wide variety of drugs is capable of increasing or decreasing salivary flow by mimicking autonomic nervous system actions or by directly acting on cellular processes necessary for salivation: drugs can also indirectly affect salivation by altering fluid and electrolyte balance or by affecting blood flow to the glands. Ionizing radiation can cause permanent damage to salivary glands, damage that is manifest as acinar cell destruction with subsequent atrophy and fibrosis of the glands. Cancer chemotherapy can cause changes in salivation, but the changes are usually much less severe and only transient. Finally, surgical and traumatic injuries interfere with salivation because of either disruption of gland innervation or gross physical damage (or removal) of glandular tissue (including ducts).

  15. Reward system dysfunction in autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Kohls, Gregor; Schulte-Rüther, Martin; Nehrkorn, Barbara; Müller, Kristin; Fink, Gereon R; Kamp-Becker, Inge; Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate; Schultz, Robert T; Konrad, Kerstin

    2013-06-01

    Although it has been suggested that social deficits of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are related to reward circuitry dysfunction, very little is known about the neural reward mechanisms in ASD. In the current functional magnetic resonance imaging study, we investigated brain activations in response to both social and monetary reward in a group of children with ASD, relative to matched controls. Participants with ASD showed the expected hypoactivation in the mesocorticolimbic circuitry in response to both reward types. In particular, diminished activation in the nucleus accumbens was observed when money, but not when social reward, was at stake, whereas the amygdala and anterior cingulate cortex were hypoactivated within the ASD group in response to both rewards. These data indicate that the reward circuitry is compromised in ASD in social as well as in non-social, i.e. monetary conditions, which likely contributes to atypical motivated behaviour. Taken together, with incentives used in this study sample, there is evidence for a general reward dysfunction in ASD. However, more ecologically valid social reward paradigms are needed to fully understand, whether there is any domain specificity to the reward deficit that appears evident in ASD, which would be most consistent with the ASD social phenotype. PMID:22419119

  16. Mitochondrial dysfunction in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Elizabeth A.; Mollen, Kevin P.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) represents a group of idiopathic disorders characterized by chronic or recurring inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. While the exact etiology of disease is unknown, IBD is recognized to be a complex, multifactorial disease that results from an intricate interplay of genetic predisposition, an altered immune response, changes in the intestinal microbiota, and environmental factors. Together, these contribute to a destruction of the intestinal epithelial barrier, increased gut permeability, and an influx of immune cells. Given that most cellular functions as well as maintenance of the epithelial barrier is energy-dependent, it is logical to assume that mitochondrial dysfunction may play a key role in both the onset and recurrence of disease. Indeed several studies have demonstrated evidence of mitochondrial stress and alterations in mitochondrial function within the intestinal epithelium of patients with IBD and mice undergoing experimental colitis. Although the hallmarks of mitochondrial dysfunction, including oxidative stress and impaired ATP production are known to be evident in the intestines of patients with IBD, it is as yet unclear whether these processes occur as a cause of consequence of disease. We provide a current review of mitochondrial function in the setting of intestinal inflammation during IBD. PMID:26484345

  17. Oxidative stress, thyroid dysfunction & Down syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Carlos; Casado, Ángela

    2015-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is one of the most common chromosomal disorders, occurring in one out of 700-1000 live births, and the most common cause of mental retardation. Thyroid dysfunction is the most typical endocrine abnormality in patients with DS. It is well known that thyroid dysfunction is highly prevalent in children and adults with DS and that both hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism are more common in patients with DS than in the general population. Increasing evidence has shown that DS individuals are under unusual increased oxidative stress, which may be involved in the higher prevalence and severity of a number of pathologies associated with the syndrome, as well as the accelerated ageing observed in these individuals. The gene for Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) is coded on chromosome 21 and it is overexpressed (~50%) resulting in an increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) due to overproduction of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). ROS leads to oxidative damage of DNA, proteins and lipids, therefore, oxidative stress may play an important role in the pathogenesis of DS. PMID:26354208

  18. Dysfunctional health service conflict: causes and accelerants.

    PubMed

    Nelson, H Wayne

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the causes and accelerants of dysfunctional health service conflict and how it emerges from the health system's core hierarchical structures, specialized roles, participant psychodynamics, culture, and values. This article sets out to answer whether health care conflict is more widespread and intense than in other settings and if it is, why? To this end, health care power, gender, and educational status gaps are examined with an eye to how they undermine open communication, teamwork, and collaborative forms of conflict and spark a range of dysfunctions, including a pervasive culture of fear; the deny-and-defend lawsuit response; widespread patterns of hierarchical, generational, and lateral bullying; overly avoidant conflict styles among non-elite groups; and a range of other behaviors that lead to numerous human resource problems, including burnout, higher staff turnover, increased errors, poor employee citizenship behavior, patient dissatisfaction, increased patient complaints, and lawsuits. Bad patient outcomes include decreased compliance and increased morbidity and mortality. Health care managers must understand the root causes of these problems to treat them at the source and implement solutions that avoid negative conflict spirals that undermine organizational morale and efficiency. PMID:22534973

  19. Visual pathway neurodegeneration winged by mitochondrial dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Petzold, Axel; Nijland, Philip G; Balk, Lisanne J; Amorini, Angela Maria; Lazzarino, Giacomo; Wattjes, Mike P; Gasperini, Claudio; van der Valk, Paul; Tavazzi, Barbara; Lazzarino, Giuseppe; van Horssen, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To test for structural and functional contribution of mitochondrial dysfunction to neurodegeneration in multiple sclerosis (MS). A visual pathway model void of MS lesions was chosen in order to exclude neurodegeneration secondary to lesion related axonotmesis. Methods A single-centre cohort study (230 MS patients, 63 controls). Spectral domain optical coherence tomography of the retina, 3T magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, spectrophotometric assessment of serum lactate levels. Postmortem immunohistochemistry. Results The visual pathway was void of MS lesions in 31 patients and 31 age-matched controls. Serum lactate was higher in MS compared to controls (P = 0.029). High serum lactate was structurally related to atrophy of the retinal nerve fiber layer at the optic disc (P = 0.041), macula (P = 0.025), and the macular ganglion cell complex (P = 0.041). High serum lactate was functionally related to poor color vision (P < 0.01), Expanded Disability Status Scale score (R = 0.37, P = 0.041), Guy's Neurological disability score (R = 0.38, P = 0.037), MS walking scale (R = 0.50, P = 0.009), upper limb motor function (R = 0.53, P = 0.002). Immunohistochemistry demonstrated increased astrocytic expression of a key lactate generating enzyme in MS lesions as well as profound vascular expression of monocarboxylate transporter-1, which is involved in lactate transport. Interpretation This study provides structural, functional, and translational evidence for visual pathway neurodegeneration in MS related to mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:25750919

  20. Telomere dysfunction causes alveolar stem cell failure.

    PubMed

    Alder, Jonathan K; Barkauskas, Christina E; Limjunyawong, Nathachit; Stanley, Susan E; Kembou, Frant; Tuder, Rubin M; Hogan, Brigid L M; Mitzner, Wayne; Armanios, Mary

    2015-04-21

    Telomere syndromes have their most common manifestation in lung disease that is recognized as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema. In both conditions, there is loss of alveolar integrity, but the underlying mechanisms are not known. We tested the capacity of alveolar epithelial and stromal cells from mice with short telomeres to support alveolar organoid colony formation and found that type 2 alveolar epithelial cells (AEC2s), the stem cell-containing population, were limiting. When telomere dysfunction was induced in adult AEC2s by conditional deletion of the shelterin component telomeric repeat-binding factor 2, cells survived but remained dormant and showed all the hallmarks of cellular senescence. Telomere dysfunction in AEC2s triggered an immune response, and this was associated with AEC2-derived up-regulation of cytokine signaling pathways that are known to provoke inflammation in the lung. Mice uniformly died after challenge with bleomycin, underscoring an essential role for telomere function in AEC2s for alveolar repair. Our data show that alveoloar progenitor senescence is sufficient to recapitulate the regenerative defects, inflammatory responses, and susceptibility to injury that are characteristic of telomere-mediated lung disease. They suggest alveolar stem cell failure is a driver of telomere-mediated lung disease and that efforts to reverse it may be clinically beneficial. PMID:25840590

  1. Symptoms of Autonomic Dysfunction in Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Dominic; Nakamoto, Beau K.; Sullivan, Katherine; Sletten, David M.; Fujii, Satomi; Umekawa, Sari; Kocher, Morgan; Kallianpur, Kalpana J.; Shikuma, Cecilia M.; Low, Phillip

    2015-01-01

    This retrospective study evaluated the frequencies of symptoms associated with autonomic dysfunction in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients on stable combined antiretroviral therapy. Patients infected with HIV reported higher frequencies of dysautonomia symptoms compared with HIV-negative patients, particularly in the autonomic domains related to urinary, sleep, gastroparesis, secretomotor, pupillomotor, and male sexual dysfunction. PMID:26269797

  2. Functional Urban Schools Amid Dysfunctional Settings: Lessons from South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mawdsley, Ralph D.; Bipath, Keshni; Mawdsley, James L.

    2014-01-01

    Similar to Dickens's "Tale of Two Cities", this research study is about a tale of two schools. The first type of school is a dysfunctional school. Dysfunctional schools are schools in a state of chaos (Shipengrower & Conway, 1998). The second school is that of order. The researchers refer to this school as a functional school.…

  3. Molecular and Metabolic Mechanisms of Cardiac Dysfunction in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Mandavia, Chirag H.; Aroor, Annayya R.; DeMarco, Vincent G.; Sowers, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus type 2 (T2DM) is a widespread chronic medical condition with prevalence bordering on the verge of an epidemic. It is of great concern that cardiovascular disease is more common in patients with diabetes than the non-diabetic population. While hypertensive and ischemic heart disease is more common in diabetic patients, there is another type of heart disease in diabetes that is not associated with hypertension or coronary artery disease. This muscle functional disorder is termed “diabetic cardiomyopathy”. Diastolic dysfunction characterized by impaired diastolic relaxation time and reduced contractility precedes systolic dysfunction and is the main pathogenic hallmark of this condition. Even though the pathogenesis of “diabetic cardiomyopathy” is still controversial, impaired cardiac insulin sensitivity and metabolic overload are emerging as major molecular and metabolic mechanisms for cardiac dysfunction. Systemic insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, dysregulation of adipokine secretion, increases in circulating levels of inflammatory mediators, aberrant activation of renin angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS), and increased oxidative stress contribute dysregulated insulin and metabolic signaling in the heart and development of diastolic dysfunction. In addition, maladaptive calcium homeostasis and endothelial cell dysregulation endoplasmic reticular stress play a potential role in cardiomyocyte fibrosis/diastolic dysfunction. In this review, we will focus on emerging molecular and metabolic pathways underlying cardiac dysfunction in diabetes. Elucidation of these mechanisms should provide a better understanding of the various cardiac abnormalities associated with diastolic dysfunction and its progression to systolic dysfunction and heart failure. PMID:23147391

  4. Disconnection as a Mechanism for Cognitive Dysfunction in Multiple Sclerosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dineen, R. A.; Vilisaar, J.; Hlinka, J.; Bradshaw, C. M.; Morgan, P. S.; Constantinescu, C. S.; Auer, D. P.

    2009-01-01

    Disconnection of cognitively important processing regions by injury to the interconnecting white matter provides a potential mechanism for cognitive dysfunction in multiple sclerosis. The contribution of tract-specific white matter injury to dysfunction in different cognitive domains in patients with multiple sclerosis has not previously been…

  5. Coronary Microvascular Dysfunction, Microvascular Angina, and Management.

    PubMed

    Löffler, Adrián I; Bourque, Jamieson M

    2016-01-01

    Recent analyses have found that coronary microvascular dysfunction (CMD) portends a poor prognosis in patients with and without obstructive epicardial coronary artery disease (CAD). Chest pain in the absence of epicardial CAD is a common entity. Angina caused by CMD, microvascular angina (MVA), is often indistinguishable from that caused by obstructive epicardial CAD. The recent emergence of noninvasive techniques that can identify CMD, such as stress positron-emission tomography (PET) and cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) myocardial perfusion imaging, allow improved identification of MVA. Using these tools, higher risk patients with MVA can be differentiated from those at lower risk in the heterogeneous population historically labeled as cardiac syndrome X. Likewise, MVA can be diagnosed in those with obstructive epicardial CAD who have persistent angina despite successful revascularization. There is little evidence to support current treatment strategies for MVA and current literature has not clearly defined CMD or whether therapy improves prognosis. PMID:26694723

  6. Biomarkers of postoperative delirium and cognitive dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Androsova, Ganna; Krause, Roland; Winterer, Georg; Schneider, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Elderly surgical patients frequently experience postoperative delirium (POD) and the subsequent development of postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD). Clinical features include deterioration in cognition, disturbance in attention and reduced awareness of the environment and result in higher morbidity, mortality and greater utilization of social financial assistance. The aging Western societies can expect an increase in the incidence of POD and POCD. The underlying pathophysiological mechanisms have been studied on the molecular level albeit with unsatisfying small research efforts given their societal burden. Here, we review the known physiological and immunological changes and genetic risk factors, identify candidates for further studies and integrate the information into a draft network for exploration on a systems level. The pathogenesis of these postoperative cognitive impairments is multifactorial; application of integrated systems biology has the potential to reconstruct the underlying network of molecular mechanisms and help in the identification of prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers. PMID:26106326

  7. Eye Movements as Indicators of Vestibular Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Menshikova, Galina Ya; Kovalev, Artem I; Klimova, Oxana A; Chernorizov, Alexander M

    2015-08-01

    Virtual reality technologies are in wide use in sport psychology. An advantage of this kind of technology is the possibility to assess sportspeople's readiness to perform complex movements. This study is aimed at developing a method for the evaluation of vestibular function disturbances in young skaters. Such disturbances may occur while skaters are performing rotation movements. To achieve this goal, we induced a vection illusion, accompanied by virtual environment rotation in a CAVE virtual reality system. Vestibular disturbances were tested for two groups-professional skaters and people who had very little or no skating experience. The quantitative evaluation of vestibular dysfunction was based on eye movement characteristics, which were recorded in subjects experiencing a vection illusion. PMID:26562924

  8. The (dys)functional extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Benjamin R; Bade, Nathan D; Riggin, Corinne N; Zhang, Sijia; Haines, Philip G; Ong, Katy L; Janmey, Paul A

    2015-11-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a major component of the biomechanical environment with which cells interact, and it plays important roles in both normal development and disease progression. Mechanical and biochemical factors alter the biomechanical properties of tissues by driving cellular remodeling of the ECM. This review provides an overview of the structural, compositional, and mechanical properties of the ECM that instruct cell behaviors. Case studies are reviewed that highlight mechanotransduction in the context of two distinct tissues: tendons and the heart. Although these two tissues demonstrate differences in relative cell-ECM composition and mechanical environment, they share similar mechanisms underlying ECM dysfunction and cell mechanotransduction. Together, these topics provide a framework for a fundamental understanding of the ECM and how it may vary across normal and diseased tissues in response to mechanical and biochemical cues. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mechanobiology. PMID:25930943

  9. Role of Dendritic Cells in Immune Dysfunction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savary, Cherylyn A.

    1998-01-01

    The specific aims of the project were: (1) Application of the NASA bioreactor to enhance cytokine-regulated proliferation and maturation of dendritic cells (DC). (2) Compare the frequency and function of DC in normal donors and immunocompromised cancer patients. (3) Analyze the effectiveness of cytokine therapy and DC-assisted immunotherapy (using bioreactor-expanded DC) in a murine model of experimental fungal disease. Our investigations have provided new insight into DC immunobiology and have led to the development of methodology to evaluate DC in blood of normal donors and patients. Information gained from these studies has broadened our understanding of possible mechanisms involved in the immune dysfunction of space travelers and earth-bound cancer patients, and could contribute to the design of novel therapies to restore/preserve immunity in these individuals. Several new avenues of investigation were also revealed. The results of studies completed during Round 2 are summarized.

  10. Hidden consequences of olfactory dysfunction: a patient report series

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The negative consequences of olfactory dysfunction for the quality of life are not widely appreciated and the condition is therefore often ignored or trivialized. Methods 1,000 patients with olfactory dysfunction participated in an online study by submitting accounts of their subjective experiences of how they have been affected by their condition. In addition, they were given the chance to answer 43 specific questions about the consequences of their olfactory dysfunction. Results Although there are less practical problems associated with impaired or distorted odor perception than with impairments in visual or auditory perception, many affected individuals report experiencing olfactory dysfunction as a debilitating condition. Smell loss-induced social isolation and smell loss-induced anhedonia can severely affect quality of life. Conclusions Olfactory dysfunction is a serious condition for those affected by it and it deserves more attention from doctors who treat affected patients as well as from scientist who research treatment options. PMID:23875929

  11. Treating sexual dysfunction in sex offenders: a case example.

    PubMed

    Metz, Michael E; Sawyer, Steven P

    2004-01-01

    Sex offender treatment as a specialized procedure is maturing, and more comprehensive approaches that treat co-morbid patient problems (e.g., mood and anxiety disorders, relationship conflicts, social skills deficits) have emerged. However, little attention has been given to the role of sexual dysfunction in the assessment and treatment of sex offenders. We propose that: (a) sexual dysfunction is a prevalent co-occurring sexual disorder in sex offenders; (b) sexual dysfunction is, by definition, a lack of sexual health, which diminishes overall life satisfaction; and (c) sexual dysfunction can be a contributing factor for some in maintaining offense-related arousal patterns and therefore is a potential contributor to sex-offense risk. This article describes the importance of treating sex dysfunction in selected cases when it is present among men in sex offender treatment, in order to improve the men's quality of life and to deter sex offense recidivism. A brief case example illustrates this benefit. PMID:15205074

  12. [Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, endothelial dysfunction and coronary atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Dursuno?lu, Ne?e; Dursuno?lu, Dursun

    2005-01-01

    In obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), repetitive episodes of apnea cause increased sympathetic nerve activity, increased surges in arterial blood pressure, swings in intrathoracic pressure, oxidative stres, hypoxia and hypercapnia. The association of OSAS with some diseases, having endothelial dysfunction in their physiopathology, such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, obesity, coronary artery diseases, stroke and heart failure is common. Increased sympathetic nerve activity and also endothelial dysfunction which are the results of hypoxia, have important roles in vascular complications of OSAS. When compared with healthy population, an important endothelial dysfunction in OSAS patients and relationship between OSAS severity and endothelial dysfunction have been shown. In this review, the relationship between OSAS and endothelial dysfunction was overviewed. PMID:16258893

  13. Linking oligodendrocyte and myelin dysfunction to neurocircuitry abnormalities in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Nagahide; Sakurai, Takeshi; Davis, Kenneth L.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.

    2010-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence in schizophrenia, from brain imaging, studies in postmortem brains, and genetic association studies, have implicated oligodendrocyte and myelin dysfunction in this disease. Recent studies suggest that oligodendrocyte and myelin dysfunction leads to changes in synaptic formation and function, which could lead to cognitive dysfunction, a core symptom of schizophrenia. Furthermore, there is accumulating data linking oligodendrocyte and myelin dysfunction with dopamine and glutamate abnormalities, both of which are found in schizophrenia. These findings implicate oligodendrocyte and myelin dysfunction as a primary change in schizophrenia, not only as secondary consequences of the illness or treatment. Strategies targeting oligodendrocyte and myelin abnormalities could therefore provide therapeutic opportunities for patients suffering from schizophrenia. PMID:20950668

  14. Hippocampal dysfunctions in tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Miyoung; Kim, Juhwan; Kim, Joong-Sun; Kim, Sung-Ho; Kim, Jong-Choon; Kang, Man-Jong; Jung, Uhee; Shin, Taekyun; Wang, Hongbing; Moon, Changjong

    2014-02-01

    Individuals with cancer are particularly susceptible to depression and cognitive impairment. However, the precise mechanisms underlying cancer-induced hippocampal dysfunction are poorly understood. We investigated the effects of a peripheral tumor on emotional behavior, hippocampus-dependent memory and associated molecular and cellular features using an experimental animal model. Behavioral alterations were examined; stress-related parameters measured; hippocampal neurogenesis evaluated; and the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) assayed, 2 weeks after inoculation of adult BALB/c mice with cells of a colon carcinoma cell line (CT26). As the tumors developed, CT26-inoculated mice showed significant increases in the depression-like behavior (measured using the tail suspension test) and memory impairment (in terms of object recognition) compared with vehicle-inoculated controls. The presence of a peripheral tumor significantly elevated the hippocampal levels of mRNAs encoding interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-?, as well as plasma IL-6 and corticosterone levels. Additionally, the adrenal glands became enlarged, and the numbers of Ki-67-positive proliferating hippocampal cells and doublecortin-positive immature progenitor neurons, as well as the constitutive levels of mRNAs encoding BDNF and COX-2 were significantly reduced. Therefore, a peripheral tumor alone may be sufficient to induce hippocampal dysfunction, possibly by reducing the rate of neurogenesis and the levels of BDNF and COX-2 in that tissue and also by increasing stress-related parameters and the circulating levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:24513875

  15. Dysfunctional HCN ion channels in neurological diseases

    PubMed Central

    DiFrancesco, Jacopo C.; DiFrancesco, Dario

    2015-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels are expressed as four different isoforms (HCN1-4) in the heart and in the central and peripheral nervous systems. HCN channels are activated by membrane hyperpolarization at voltages close to resting membrane potentials and carry the hyperpolarization-activated current, dubbed If (funny current) in heart and Ih in neurons. HCN channels contribute in several ways to neuronal activity and are responsible for many important cellular functions, including cellular excitability, generation, and modulation of rhythmic activity, dendritic integration, transmission of synaptic potentials, and plasticity phenomena. Because of their role, defective HCN channels are natural candidates in the search for potential causes of neurological disorders in humans. Several data, including growing evidence that some forms of epilepsy are associated with HCN mutations, support the notion of an involvement of dysfunctional HCN channels in different experimental models of the disease. Additionally, some anti-epileptic drugs are known to modify the activity of the Ih current. HCN channels are widely expressed in the peripheral nervous system and recent evidence has highlighted the importance of the HCN2 isoform in the transmission of pain. HCN channels are also present in the midbrain system, where they finely regulate the activity of dopaminergic neurons, and a potential role of these channels in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease has recently emerged. The function of HCN channels is regulated by specific accessory proteins, which control the correct expression and modulation of the neuronal Ih current. Alteration of these proteins can severely interfere with the physiological channel function, potentially predisposing to pathological conditions. In this review we address the present knowledge of the association between HCN dysfunctions and neurological diseases, including clinical, genetic, and physiopathological aspects. PMID:25805968

  16. Role of estrogen in diastolic dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhuo; Wang, Hao; Jessup, Jewell A.; Lindsey, Sarah H.; Chappell, Mark C.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction (LVDD) sharply increases in women after menopause and may lead to heart failure. While evidence suggests that estrogens protect the premenopausal heart from hypertension and ventricular remodeling, the specific mechanisms involved remain elusive. Moreover, whether there is a protective role of estrogens against cardiovascular disease, and specifically LVDD, continues to be controversial. Clinical and basic science have implicated activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), linked to the loss of ovarian estrogens, in the pathogenesis of postmenopausal diastolic dysfunction. As a consequence of increased tissue ANG II and low estrogen, a maladaptive nitric oxide synthase (NOS) system produces ROS that contribute to female sex-specific hypertensive heart disease. Recent insights from rodent models that mimic the cardiac phenotype of an estrogen-insufficient or -deficient woman (e.g., premature ovarian failure or postmenopausal), including the ovariectomized congenic mRen2.Lewis female rat, provide evidence showing that estrogen modulates the tissue RAAS and NOS system and related intracellular signaling pathways, in part via the membrane G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30; also called G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1). Complementing the cardiovascular research in this field, the echocardiographic correlates of LVDD as well as inherent limitations to its use in preclinical rodent studies will be briefly presented. Understanding the roles of estrogen and GPR30, their interactions with the local RAAS and NOS system, and the relationship of each of these to LVDD is necessary to identify new therapeutic targets and alternative treatments for diastolic heart failure that achieve the cardiovascular benefits of estrogen replacement without its side effects and contraindications. PMID:24414072

  17. Evaluation of sexual dysfunction in women with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Vafaeimanesh, Jamshid; Raei, Mehdi; Hosseinzadeh, Fatemeh; Parham, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    Background: Sexual dysfunction is a common complication of diabetes that adversely affects their quality of life. Its prevalence is known to be higher in diabetic men with and it is estimated to affect 20-85% of patients but the problem is probably less common in diabetic women. This study investigated the prevalence of sexual dysfunction and its risk factors among women with diabetes. Materials and Methods: This descriptive-analytic study was performed during May 2012 to Feb 2013 at Diabetes clinic of Shahid Beheshti Hospital of Qom and The Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) was used for evaluation of sexual dysfunction. Conclusion: In this study, 59 (53.6%) women had sexual dysfunction. The mean age of patients with sexual dysfunction and healthy people was 48.22 ± 6.61 and 48.14 ± 5.37 years respectively and it was not statistically different in both groups (P = 0.94). Also, there was no significant difference between two groups in average duration of diabetes, fasting blood sugar (FBS), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level, insulin resistance, abdominal circumference and body mass index BMI. Although the history of hypertension, coronary artery disease and exercise levels were not significantly associated with sexual dysfunction, but there was a significant association between albuminuria and sexual dysfunction (P = 0.001). Retinopathy and sexual dysfunction had statistically significant relationship (P = 0.007) while no association was found between diabetic neuropathy and sexual dysfunction (P = 0.79). Results: Sexual dysfunction is a common complication in diabetic patients which accompanies with some complications of diabetes and should be considered especially in patients with nephropathy or retinopathy. PMID:24741512

  18. Serial anthropometry predicts peripheral nerve dysfunction in a community cohort

    PubMed Central

    Ylitalo, Kelly R.; Herman, William H.; Harlow, Siobán D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Obesity is a risk factor for glucose intolerance, but the independent role of obesity in the development of peripheral neuropathy is unclear. This study assessed the impact of body size trajectories on prevalent nerve dysfunction in community-dwelling women with and without glucose intolerance. Methods Annual (1996–2008) anthropometric measures of weight, height, waist circumference, and body mass index (BMI, weight[kg]/height[m2]) were assessed in the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation – Michigan site. Glucose intolerance was defined annually based on current use of diabetes medications, self-reported diabetes diagnosis, and, when available, fasting glucose. Peripheral nerve dysfunction in 2008 was defined as abnormal monofilament testing or ?4 symptoms or signs. Linear mixed models were used to determine trajectories of anthropometry by subsequently-identified nerve dysfunction status. Results Mean BMI was 32.4 kg/m2 at baseline and 27.8% of women had nerve dysfunction in 2008. BMI, weight, and waist circumference increased over time. Women who would have nerve dysfunction were significantly larger than women without dysfunction, independent of glucose intolerance. At mean baseline age of 46, BMI, weight, and waist circumference differed significantly (p-value<0.01) by subsequent nerve dysfunction status, independent of glucose intolerance and hypertension. These body size differences were maintained but not exacerbated over time. Conclusions Peripheral nerve dysfunction is prevalent among community-dwelling women. Twelve years before the nerve assessment, anthropometry differed between women who would and would not have nerve dysfunction, differences that were maintained over time. Obesity deserves attention as an important and potentially modifiable risk factor for peripheral nerve dysfunction. PMID:23161607

  19. Gastrointestinal dysfunction in children with autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Kang, Victor; Wagner, George C; Ming, Xue

    2014-08-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) dysfunctions are frequently reported by parents of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and have been recently recognized as a comorbid condition. However, the clinical significance of these GI dysfunctions remains to be delineated. This study describes the clinical characteristics, associated comorbid disorders, and endoscopic and colonoscopic evaluation of GI dysfunction in a cohort of 164 children with ASD evaluated at a pediatric neurology practice. Symptoms of GI dysfunction were prevalent: 49% of the children reported one or more chronic GI complaints, 22% exhibited diarrhea, 26% suffered from constipation. Furthermore 13% of the parents reported their children to suffer from bloating and/or being gassy and while 10% of the parents reported vomiting or gastroesophageal reflux problems. Similar rates of GI symptoms were reported among pre-school and school-aged children. Inflammation of the gut was found in 6 of the 12 subjects who underwent endoscopic and colonoscopic evaluations, however clinical symptoms did not predict the results of the evaluation. GI dysfunction was significantly associated with sleep disorders and food intolerance, but not with irritability or aggressiveness. In summary, GI dysfunction was prevalent in this cohort of children with ASD, observations consistent with the reports of parents and other clinicians. We conclude that the GI dysfunction in ASD requires proper evaluation and treatment. PMID:24753336

  20. Sensory processing dysfunction among Saudi children with and without autism

    PubMed Central

    Al-Heizan, Mohammed O.; AlAbdulwahab, Sami S; Kachanathu, Shaji John; Natho, Mohan

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] There is a dearth of studies that have examined the occurrence of sensory processing dysfunction and its components in Saudi Arabian children with autism. Therefore, this study investigated the manifestation of sensory processing dysfunction in autism and compared the functional components of sensory processing between Saudi Arabian children with and without autism. [Subjects and Methods] A convenience sample of 46 Saudi Arabian children with autism and 30 children without autism participated in this study. The sensory processing functions of both groups were assessed with the Short Sensory Profile. [Results] The overall findings indicated that 84.8% of children with autism demonstrated definite sensory processing dysfunction. The most prevalent sensory processing dysfunctions involved the under-responsive/seeks sensation (89.13%), auditory filtering (73.90%), and tactile sensitivity (60.87%) domains. Most of the children without autism (66.66%) demonstrated typical sensory function; the most prevalent sensory processing dysfunctions involved the tactile sensitivity (33.3%), under-responsive/seeks sensation (23.33%), and movement sensitivity (20%) domains. [Conclusion] Saudi Arabian children with and without autism have clinically significant sensory dysfunctions. However, the prevalence of those sensory dysfunctions in children with autism is significantly higher than in the children without autism. PMID:26157208

  1. Sensory processing dysfunction among Saudi children with and without autism.

    PubMed

    Al-Heizan, Mohammed O; AlAbdulwahab, Sami S; Kachanathu, Shaji John; Natho, Mohan

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] There is a dearth of studies that have examined the occurrence of sensory processing dysfunction and its components in Saudi Arabian children with autism. Therefore, this study investigated the manifestation of sensory processing dysfunction in autism and compared the functional components of sensory processing between Saudi Arabian children with and without autism. [Subjects and Methods] A convenience sample of 46 Saudi Arabian children with autism and 30 children without autism participated in this study. The sensory processing functions of both groups were assessed with the Short Sensory Profile. [Results] The overall findings indicated that 84.8% of children with autism demonstrated definite sensory processing dysfunction. The most prevalent sensory processing dysfunctions involved the under-responsive/seeks sensation (89.13%), auditory filtering (73.90%), and tactile sensitivity (60.87%) domains. Most of the children without autism (66.66%) demonstrated typical sensory function; the most prevalent sensory processing dysfunctions involved the tactile sensitivity (33.3%), under-responsive/seeks sensation (23.33%), and movement sensitivity (20%) domains. [Conclusion] Saudi Arabian children with and without autism have clinically significant sensory dysfunctions. However, the prevalence of those sensory dysfunctions in children with autism is significantly higher than in the children without autism. PMID:26157208

  2. HIV-1-associated central nervous system dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Krebs, F C; Ross, H; McAllister, J; Wigdahl, B

    2000-01-01

    Despite more than 15 years of extensive investigative efforts, a complete understanding of the neurological consequences of HIV-1 CNS infection remains elusive. Although the resources of numerous investigators have been focused on studies of HIV-1-associated CNS disease, the complex nature of the disease processes that underlie the clinical, pathological, and cellular manifestations of HIV-1 CNS infection have required a larger volume of studies than was initially envisioned. Several major areas remain as the focus of current research efforts. One of the more pressing issues facing researchers and clinicians alike is the search for correlates to the development of HIV-1-associated CNS neuropathology and the onset of HIVD. Although numerous parameters have been studied, none have been shown to be absolute predictors or markers of HIV-1-related CNS dysfunction. The identification of solid correlates of HIVD is an important goal that would permit clinical identification of individuals at risk for developing potentially crippling, life-threatening CNS abnormalities and would facilitate early treatment of nascent neurological problems. A more complete comprehension of the cellular foundations of CNS dysfunction and HIVD is also a fundamental part of strategies designed to treat or prevent HIV-1-associated CNS disease. Future investigations will strive to expand the body of knowledge concerning the complex interactions between infected and uninfected neuroglial cells and the roles of numerous cytokines, chemokines, and other soluble agents that are deregulated during HIV-1 CNS infection. In particular, a thorough understanding of the mechanisms of neurotoxicity may facilitate the development of new therapies that alleviate or eliminate the clinical consequences of CNS infection. Finally, investigators will continue to study HIVD within the context of single and combination drug therapies used in the treatment of HIV-1 infection and AIDS. As newer and more effective systemic treatments for HIV-1 infection and AIDS are introduced, the effects of these treatments on the onset, incidence, and severity of HIVD will also require intensive study. The impact of drug therapies on the ability of the CNS to act as an HIV-1 reservoir will also need to be addressed. Introduction of each new drug or drug combination will necessitate studies of drug penetration into the CNS and efficacy against the development of CNS abnormalities. Furthermore, as more effective treatments prolong the lifespan of individuals infected with HIV-1, the impact of extended survival on the occurrence and severity of HIVD will also require further investigations. The quest for answers to these and other questions will be complicated by the diversity of experimental systems used to study different aspects of HIV-1 CNS infection and HIVD. Each system has its own unique strengths and weaknesses. Clinical observations provide a continuous spectrum of symptomatic findings but reveal little about the underlying mechanisms of disease. In vivo imaging techniques, such as CT and MRI, also provide a continuum of observations, but the images are limited in their resolution. Neuropathological examinations of postmortem HIV-1-infected brains offer gross, cellular, and molecular views (including phenotypic and genotypic analyses of CNS viral isolates) of the diseased brain, but only provide a snapshot of the end-stage neurologic dysfunction. Studies that rely on animal surrogates for HIV-1, including SIV, simian-HIV (SHIV), feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), visna virus, and HIV-1 SCID-hu models, permit experimental protocols that cannot be carried out in humans, but are limited by the fidelity with which each virus and animal model emulates the conditions and events observed in the human host. Finally, in vitro techniques, which include the use of primary cells and cell lines, adult or fetal human cell cultures, and BBB barrier model systems, are also convenient means by which aspe PMID:11013768

  3. Monocyte implication in renal allograft dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Guillén-Gómez, E; Guirado, L; Belmonte, X; Maderuelo, A; Santín, S; Juarez, C; Ars, E; Facundo, C; Ballarín, J A; Vidal, S; Díaz-Encarnación, M M

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are involved in the development and progression of kidney fibrosis. The aim of this study was to analyse the phenotype of circulating monocytes and their ability to predict kidney allograft dysfunction in living kidney transplant recipients. Whole blood samples from 25 kidney recipients and 17 donors were collected at five time-points. Monocyte phenotype was analysed by flow cytometry, and interleukin (IL)-10 and soluble CD163 by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. One week after transplantation, surface CD163 and IL-10 levels increased significantly from baseline [2·99 ± 1·38 mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) to 5·18 ± 2·42 MFI for CD163; 4·5 ± 1·46 pg/ml to 6·7 ± 2·5 pg/ml for IL-10]. This CD163 increase correlated with 4-month creatinine levels (r = 0·4394, P = 0·04). However, soluble CD163 decreased significantly from baseline at 1 week (797·11 ± 340·45 ng/ml to 576·50 ± 293·60 ng/ml). CD14+CD16– monocytes increased at 4 months and correlated positively with creatinine levels at 12 and 24 months (r = 0·6348, P = 0·002 and r = 0·467, P = 0·028, respectively) and negatively with Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) at 12 months (r = 0·6056, P = 0·003). At 4 months, IL-10 decreased significantly (P = 0·008) and correlated positively with creatinine at 2 years (r = 0·68, P = 0·010) and with CD14+CD16– monocytes at 4 months (r = 0·732, P = 0·004). At 24 h, levels of human leucocyte antigen D-related declined from 12·12 ± 5·99 to 5·21 ± 3·84 and CD86 expression decreased from 2·76 ± 1·08 to 1·87 ± 0·95. Both markers recovered progressively until 12 months, when they decreased again. These results indicate that monitoring monocytes could be a promising new prognostic tool of graft dysfunction in renal transplant patients. PMID:24134783

  4. Female Sexual Dysfunction: Prevalence and Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Jaafarpour, Molouk; Khani, Ali; Khajavikhan, Javaher; Suhrabi, Zeinab

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aim: Sexual dysfunction adversely affects quality of life, self esteem and interpersonal relationships and it may often be responsible for psychopathological disturbances. The purpose of this study was to explore the prevalence and associated risk factors for Female Sexual Dysfunction (FSD) in women with Kurdish culture from western Iran . Material and Methods: This was a cross-sectional descriptive survey which included 400 women aged 18–50 years old, married, from Ilam-IR, who were interviewed as per the Iranian version of Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI). The subjects were randomly selected from 4 primary health centres. Results: According to the findings, 185 (46.2%) women reported FSD. Prevalence of FSD increased with age, from 22% in women aged <20 years to 75.7% in women aged 40-50 years. FSD was detected as a desire problem in 45.3% of women, an arousal problem in 37.5%, a lubrication problem in 41.2%, an orgasm problem in 42.0%, a satisfaction problem in 44.5% and a pain problem in 42.5%. The educational level was inversely correlated with the risk of FSD (OR: 1.54 ,95% CI: 1.09-2.13). Patients with FSD were significantly more likely to be older than 40 years (OR: 2.23, 95% CI: 1.12-2.68), who had sexual intercourse fewer than 3 times a week (OR:1.85, 95% CI: 1.23-1.99), who had been married for 10 years or more (OR:1.76, 95% CI: 1.04-1.97), who had 3 children or more (OR: 1.48, 95% CI: 0.97-1.24), who had husbands aged 40 years or more (OR: 2.11, 95% CI: 1.35-2.37) and who were unemployed (OR: 1.34, 95% CI: 1.06-1.63). No significant differences were detected in smoking history, residences and contraception methods used (p>0.05). Conclusion: FSD needs to be recognized as a significant public health problem in Kurd women. Further research, particularly studies on awareness and competency of physicians in the management of FSD, is required. PMID:24551663

  5. Sacral Nerve Stimulation for the Management of Voiding Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Das, Anurag K; White, Mark D; Longhurst, Penelope A

    2000-01-01

    Voiding dysfunction is common, and patients with urge incontinence, frequency/urgency syndromes, and chronic urinary retention are challenging to treat once conservative therapies (such as pharmacologic agents, pelvic floor rehabilitation, and intermittent catheterization) have been exhausted. Sacral nerve stimulation (SNS) is a new, minimally invasive, reversible therapy for the management of refractory voiding dysfunction and provides an attractive therapeutic alternative for patients with this condition. In this review, the role of SNS in the management of voiding dysfunction is examined critically, and the efficacy, risks, and benefits of this new modality are evaluated. PMID:16985735

  6. Acute Liver Dysfunction in the Course of Norovirus Gastroenteritis

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, H.; Watanabe, T.; Miyazaki, T.; Takeuchi, M.; Honda, Y.; Shimada, N.; Nakanishi, K.; Urita, Y.; Sugimoto, M.

    2012-01-01

    A 48-year-old female with abdominal pain and malaise who showed delayed symptom of acute gastroenteritis came to see us. Her illness was diagnosed as norovirus infection, but liver dysfunction accompanied this gastroenteritis. We investigated the pathogenesis of this hepatitis for all causes including drugs, but we could not detect norovirus infection. The liver damage improved shortly in course of the gastroenteritis. She recovered completely within 2 weeks without any damage left. Norovirus-induced liver dysfunction is not known, and there is no report in the literature. We report, for the first time, the case of liver dysfunction with norovirus gastroenteritis. PMID:22423242

  7. Arginase Inhibitor in the Pharmacological Correction of Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Pokrovskiy, Mihail V.; Korokin, Mihail V.; Tsepeleva, Svetlana A.; Pokrovskaya, Tatyana G.; Gureev, Vladimir V.; Konovalova, Elena A.; Gudyrev, Oleg S.; Kochkarov, Vladimir I.; Korokina, Liliya V.; Dudina, Eleonora N.; Babko, Anna V.; Terehova, Elena G.

    2011-01-01

    This paper is about a way of correction of endothelial dysfunction with the inhibitor of arginase: L-norvaline. There is an imbalance between vasoconstriction and vasodilatation factors of endothelium on the basis of endothelial dysfunction. Among vasodilatation agents, nitrogen oxide plays the basic role. Amino acid L-arginine serves as a source of molecules of nitrogen oxide in an organism. Because of the high activity of arginase enzyme which catalyzes the hydrolysis of L-arginine into ornithine and urea, the bioavailability of nitrogen oxide decreases. The inhibitors of arginase suppress the activity of the given enzyme, raising and production of nitrogen oxide, preventing the development of endothelial dysfunction. PMID:21747978

  8. Arginase inhibitor in the pharmacological correction of endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Pokrovskiy, Mihail V; Korokin, Mihail V; Tsepeleva, Svetlana A; Pokrovskaya, Tatyana G; Gureev, Vladimir V; Konovalova, Elena A; Gudyrev, Oleg S; Kochkarov, Vladimir I; Korokina, Liliya V; Dudina, Eleonora N; Babko, Anna V; Terehova, Elena G

    2011-01-01

    THIS PAPER IS ABOUT A WAY OF CORRECTION OF ENDOTHELIAL DYSFUNCTION WITH THE INHIBITOR OF ARGINASE: L-norvaline. There is an imbalance between vasoconstriction and vasodilatation factors of endothelium on the basis of endothelial dysfunction. Among vasodilatation agents, nitrogen oxide plays the basic role. Amino acid L-arginine serves as a source of molecules of nitrogen oxide in an organism. Because of the high activity of arginase enzyme which catalyzes the hydrolysis of L-arginine into ornithine and urea, the bioavailability of nitrogen oxide decreases. The inhibitors of arginase suppress the activity of the given enzyme, raising and production of nitrogen oxide, preventing the development of endothelial dysfunction. PMID:21747978

  9. Mechanism of Neuromuscular Dysfunction in Krabbe Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cantuti-Castelvetri, Ludovico; Maravilla, Erick; Marshall, Michael; Tamayo, Tammy; D'auria, Ludovic; Monge, John; Jeffries, James; Sural-Fehr, Tuba; Lopez-Rosas, Aurora; Li, Guannan; Garcia, Kelly; van Breemen, Richard; Vite, Charles; Garcia, Jesus

    2015-01-01

    The atrophy of skeletal muscles in patients with Krabbe disease is a major debilitating manifestation that worsens their quality of life and limits the clinical efficacy of current therapies. The pathogenic mechanism triggering muscle wasting is unknown. This study examined structural, functional, and metabolic changes conducive to muscle degeneration in Krabbe disease using the murine (twitcher mouse) and canine [globoid cell leukodystrophy (GLD) dog] models. Muscle degeneration, denervation, neuromuscular [neuromuscular junction (NMJ)] abnormalities, and axonal death were investigated using the reporter transgenic twitcher–Thy1.1–yellow fluorescent protein mouse. We found that mutant muscles had significant numbers of smaller-sized muscle fibers, without signs of regeneration. Muscle growth was slow and weak in twitcher mice, with decreased maximum force. The NMJ had significant levels of activated caspase-3 but limited denervation. Mutant NMJ showed reduced surface areas and lower volumes of presynaptic terminals, with depressed nerve control, increased miniature endplate potential (MEPP) amplitude, decreased MEPP frequency, and increased rise and decay rate constants. Twitcher and GLD dog muscles had significant capacity to store psychosine, the neurotoxin that accumulates in Krabbe disease. Mechanistically, muscle defects involved the inactivation of the Akt pathway and activation of the proteasome pathway. Our work indicates that muscular dysfunction in Krabbe disease is compounded by a pathogenic mechanism involving at least the failure of NMJ function, activation of proteosome degradation, and a reduction of the Akt pathway. Akt, which is key for muscle function, may constitute a novel target to complement in therapies for Krabbe disease. PMID:25632136

  10. TRP channels in lower urinary tract dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Franken, J; Uvin, P; De Ridder, D; Voets, T

    2014-01-01

    Lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTd) represents a major healthcare problem. Although it is mostly not lethal, associated social disturbance, medical costs, loss of productivity and especially diminished quality of life should not be underestimated. Although more than 15% of people suffer from a form of LUTd to some extent, pathophysiology often remains obscure. In the past 20 years, transient receptor potential (TRP) channels have become increasingly important in this field of research. These intriguing ion channels are believed to be the main molecular sensors that generate bladder sensation. Therefore, they are intensely pursued as new drug targets for both curative and symptomatic treatment of different forms of LUTd. TRPV1 was the first of its class to be investigated. Actually, even before this channel was cloned, it had already been targeted in the bladder, with clinical trials of intravesical capsaicin instillations. Several other polymodally gated TRP channels, particularly TRPM8, TRPA1 and TRPV4, also appear to play a prominent role in bladder (patho)physiology. With this review, we provide a brief overview of current knowledge on the role of these TRP channels in LUTd and their potential as molecular targets for treatment. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on the pharmacology of TRP channels. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-10 PMID:24895732

  11. Diaphragm and ventilatory dysfunction during cancer cachexia.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Brandon M; Ahn, Bumsoo; Smuder, Ashley J; Al-Rajhi, Monsour; Gill, Luther C; Beharry, Adam W; Powers, Scott K; Fuller, David D; Ferreira, Leonardo F; Judge, Andrew R

    2013-07-01

    Cancer cachexia is characterized by a continuous loss of locomotor skeletal muscle mass, which causes profound muscle weakness. If this atrophy and weakness also occurs in diaphragm muscle, it could lead to respiratory failure, which is a major cause of death in patients with cancer. Thus, the purpose of the current study was to determine whether colon-26 (C-26) cancer cachexia causes diaphragm muscle fiber atrophy and weakness and compromises ventilation. All diaphragm muscle fiber types were significantly atrophied in C-26 mice compared to controls, and the atrophy-related genes, atrogin-1 and MuRF1, significantly increased. Maximum isometric specific force of diaphragm strips, absolute maximal calcium activated force, and maximal specific calcium-activated force of permeabilized diaphragm fibers were all significantly decreased in C-26 mice compared to controls. Further, isotonic contractile properties of the diaphragm were affected to an even greater extent than isometric function. Ventilation measurements demonstrated that C-26 mice have a significantly lower tidal volume compared to controls under basal conditions and, unlike control mice, an inability to increase breathing frequency, tidal volume, and, thus, minute ventilation in response to a respiratory challenge. These data demonstrate that C-26 cancer cachexia causes profound respiratory muscle atrophy and weakness and ventilatory dysfunction. PMID:23515443

  12. Myocardial perfusion echocardiography and coronary microvascular dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Barletta, Giuseppe; Del Bene, Maria Riccarda

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of coronary syndromes has evolved in the last two decades out of the obstructive atherosclerosis of epicardial coronary arteries paradigm to include anatomo-functional abnormalities of coronary microcirculation. No current diagnostic technique allows direct visualization of coronary microcirculation, but functional assessments of this circulation are possible. This represents a challenge in cardiology. Myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE) was a breakthrough in echocardiography several years ago that claimed the capability to detect myocardial perfusion abnormalities and quantify coronary blood flow. Research demonstrated that the integration of quantitative MCE and fractional flow reserve improved the definition of ischemic burden and the relative contribution of collaterals in non-critical coronary stenosis. MCE identified no-reflow and low-flow within and around myocardial infarction, respectively, and predicted the potential functional recovery of stunned myocardium using appropriate interventions. MCE exhibited diagnostic performances that were comparable to positron emission tomography in microvascular reserve and microvascular dysfunction in angina patients. Overall, MCE improved echocardiographic evaluations of ischemic heart disease in daily clinical practice, but the approval of regulatory authorities is lacking.

  13. Mitochondrial dysfunctions during progression of dystrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kyrychenko, Victoria; Poláková, Eva; Janí?ek, Radoslav; Shirokova, Natalia

    2015-08-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive muscle disease with severe cardiac complications. It is believed that cellular oxidative stress and augmented Ca(2+) signaling drives the development of cardiac pathology. Some mitochondrial and metabolic dysfunctions have also been reported. Here we investigate cellular mechanisms responsible for impaired mitochondrial metabolism in dystrophic cardiomyopathy at early stages of the disease. We employed electrophysiological and imaging techniques to study mitochondrial structure and function in cardiomyocytes from mdx mice, an animal model of DMD. Here we show that mitochondrial matrix was progressively oxidized in myocytes isolated from mdx mice. Moreover, an abrupt increase in workload resulted in significantly more pronounced oxidation of mitochondria in dystrophic cells. Electron micrographs revealed a gradually increased number of damaged mitochondria in mdx myocytes. Degradation in mitochondrial structure was correlated with progressive increase in mitochondrial Ca(2+) sequestration and mitochondrial depolarization, despite a substantial and persistent elevation in resting cytosolic sodium levels. Treatment of mdx cells with cyclosporine A, an inhibitor of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP), shifted both resting and workload-dependent mitochondrial redox state to the levels recorded in control myocytes. It also significantly reduced workload dependent depolarization of mitochondrial membrane in dystrophic cardiomyocytes. Overall, our studies highlight age dependent deterioration of mitochondrial function in dystrophic cardiomyocytes, which seems to be associated with excessive opening of mPTP due to oxidative stress and cellular Ca(2+) overload. PMID:25975620

  14. Pharmacogenetics of SSRIs and Sexual Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Osis, Liana; Bishop, Jeffrey R.

    2010-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction (SD) is a common and disconcerting side effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) that often influences a patient’s desire to continue long-term antidepressant treatment. Studies specifically assessing changes in sexual well-being over time illustrate that the incidence of sexual side effects from SSRIs ranges from 20% to 70%, depending on the characteristics of the study sample assessed. Developing strategies to predict who may be at the highest risk for adverse changes in their sexual well-being is an important step in improving the quality of life and treatment of patients who require antidepressant therapy. Pharmacogenetic studies of SSRI-associated SD have identified associations between serotonin and glutamate system genes with aspects of SD. The results of studies investigating genetic variations in drug metabolism enzymes and their relationships to antidepressant-associated adverse effects have been mixed. Continued efforts to characterize the relationships between genetic markers and antidepressant outcomes, and to translate this knowledge to patient care, have the potential to significantly improve the empiric selection of antidepressant agents and to minimize the risk for intolerable side effects.

  15. Immune dysfunction in acute alcoholic hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Dhanda, Ashwin D; Collins, Peter L

    2015-11-14

    Acute alcoholic hepatitis (AAH) is a serious complication of alcohol misuse and has high short term mortality. It is a clinical syndrome characterised by jaundice and coagulopathy in a patient with a history of recent heavy alcohol use and is associated with profound immune dysfunction with a primed but ineffective immune response against pathogens. Here, we review the current knowledge of the pathogenesis and immune defects of AAH and identify areas requiring further study. Alcohol activates the immune system primarily through the disruption of gut tight junction integrity allowing the escape of pathogen-associated molecular particles (PAMPs) into the portal venous system. PAMPs stimulate cells expressing toll-like receptors (mainly myeloid derived cells) and initiate a network of intercellular signalling by secretion of many soluble mediators including cytokines and chemokines. The latter coordinates the infiltration of neutrophils, monocytes and T cells and results in hepatic stellate cell activation, cellular damage and hepatocyte death by necrosis or apoptosis. On the converse of this immune activation is the growing evidence of impaired microbial defence. Neutrophils have reduced phagocytic capacity and oxidative burst and there is recent evidence that T cell exhaustion plays a role in this. PMID:26576079

  16. Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Dysfunction in Food Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Linda Chia-Hui

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial barrier plays a critical role in the maintenance of gut homeostasis by limiting the penetration of luminal bacteria and dietary allergens, yet allowing antigen sampling for the generation of tolerance. Undigested proteins normally do not gain access to the lamina propria due to physical exclusion by tight junctions at the cell-cell contact sites and intracellular degradation by lysosomal enzymes in enterocytes. An intriguing question then arises: how do macromolecular food antigens cross the epithelial barrier? This review discusses the epithelial barrier dysfunction in sensitized intestine with special emphasis on the molecular mechanism of the enhanced transcytotic rates of allergens. The sensitization phase of allergy is characterized by antigen-induced cross-linking of IgE bound to high affinity Fc?RI on mast cell surface, leading to anaphylactic responses. Recent studies have demonstrated that prior to mast cell activation, food allergens are transported in large quantity across the epithelium and are protected from lysosomal degradation by binding to cell surface IgE and low-affinity receptor CD23/Fc?RII. Improved immunotherapies are currently under study including anti-IgE and anti-CD23 antibodies for the management of atopic disorders. PMID:21912563

  17. Immune dysfunction in acute alcoholic hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Dhanda, Ashwin D; Collins, Peter L

    2015-01-01

    Acute alcoholic hepatitis (AAH) is a serious complication of alcohol misuse and has high short term mortality. It is a clinical syndrome characterised by jaundice and coagulopathy in a patient with a history of recent heavy alcohol use and is associated with profound immune dysfunction with a primed but ineffective immune response against pathogens. Here, we review the current knowledge of the pathogenesis and immune defects of AAH and identify areas requiring further study. Alcohol activates the immune system primarily through the disruption of gut tight junction integrity allowing the escape of pathogen-associated molecular particles (PAMPs) into the portal venous system. PAMPs stimulate cells expressing toll-like receptors (mainly myeloid derived cells) and initiate a network of intercellular signalling by secretion of many soluble mediators including cytokines and chemokines. The latter coordinates the infiltration of neutrophils, monocytes and T cells and results in hepatic stellate cell activation, cellular damage and hepatocyte death by necrosis or apoptosis. On the converse of this immune activation is the growing evidence of impaired microbial defence. Neutrophils have reduced phagocytic capacity and oxidative burst and there is recent evidence that T cell exhaustion plays a role in this. PMID:26576079

  18. Musical pleasure and reward: mechanisms and dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Zatorre, Robert J

    2015-03-01

    Most people derive pleasure from music. Neuroimaging studies show that the reward system of the human brain is central to this experience. Specifically, the dorsal and ventral striatum release dopamine when listening to pleasurable music, and activity in these structures also codes the reward value of musical excerpts. Moreover, the striatum interacts with cortical mechanisms involved in perception and valuation of musical stimuli. Recent studies have begun to explore individual differences in the way that this complex system functions. Development of a questionnaire for music reward experiences has allowed the identification of separable factors associated with musical pleasure, described as music-seeking, emotion-evocation, mood regulation, sensorimotor, and social factors. Applying this questionnaire to a large sample uncovered approximately 5% of the population with low sensitivity to musical reward in the absence of generalized anhedonia or depression. Further study of this group revealed that there are individuals who respond normally both behaviorally and psychophysiologically to rewards other than music (e.g., monetary value) but do not experience pleasure from music despite normal music perception ability and preserved ability to identify intended emotions in musical passages. This specific music anhedonia bears further study, as it may shed light on the function and dysfunction of the reward system. PMID:25773636

  19. Sexual dysfunction in women with epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Karan, Vivek; Harsha, S.; Keshava, B. S.; Pradeep, R.; Sathyanarayana Rao, T. S.; Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sexual functioning and variables that influence sexual functioning have not been studied in Indian women with epilepsy. Materials and Methods: In a pilot study, female (age, 18–45 years) outpatients with epilepsy who were in a stable sexual relationship for at least 1-year were screened using the mini international neuropsychiatric interview. Those without anxiety or depressive disorders (n = 60) were studied using the female sexual function index (FSFI; higher scores indicate better functioning). Findings were compared with age- and sex- matched sample of healthy control women drawn from the same sociodemographic population. Results: Women with epilepsy had significantly poorer sexual functioning on all FSFI subscales (desire, arousal, lubrication, orgasm, satisfaction, pain), as well as on the total scale scores, and >70% of these women were rated as dysfunctional on individual FSFI subscales and on the total scale. In multivariate analysis, use of clobazam and phenobarbitone, and longer time after the last seizure were each associated with significantly higher FSFI scores; and longer duration of epilepsy was associated with significantly lower FSFI scores. Conclusion: There is a substantial impairment of sexual functioning in women with epilepsy. This study demonstrates the need for increased awareness of the problem, better case identification, and improved seizure control. PMID:26600586

  20. Brain endothelial dysfunction in cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Musolino, Patricia L; Gong, Yi; Snyder, Juliet M T; Jimenez, Sandra; Lok, Josephine; Lo, Eng H; Moser, Ann B; Grabowski, Eric F; Frosch, Matthew P; Eichler, Florian S

    2015-11-01

    See Aubourg (doi:10.1093/awv271) for a scientific commentary on this article.X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy is caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene leading to accumulation of very long chain fatty acids. Its most severe neurological manifestation is cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy. Here we demonstrate that progressive inflammatory demyelination in cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy coincides with blood-brain barrier dysfunction, increased MMP9 expression, and changes in endothelial tight junction proteins as well as adhesion molecules. ABCD1, but not its closest homologue ABCD2, is highly expressed in human brain microvascular endothelial cells, far exceeding its expression in the systemic vasculature. Silencing of ABCD1 in human brain microvascular endothelial cells causes accumulation of very long chain fatty acids, but much later than the immediate upregulation of adhesion molecules and decrease in tight junction proteins. This results in greater adhesion and transmigration of monocytes across the endothelium. PCR-array screening of human brain microvascular endothelial cells after ABCD1 silencing revealed downregulation of both mRNA and protein levels of the transcription factor c-MYC (encoded by MYC). Interestingly, MYC silencing mimicked the effects of ABCD1 silencing on CLDN5 and ICAM1 without decreasing the levels of ABCD1 protein itself. Together, these data demonstrate that ABCD1 deficiency induces significant alterations in brain endothelium via c-MYC and may thereby contribute to the increased trafficking of leucocytes across the blood-brain barrier as seen in cerebral adrenouleukodystrophy. PMID:26377633

  1. Prison brain? Executive dysfunction in prisoners

    PubMed Central

    Meijers, Jesse; Harte, Joke M.; Jonker, Frank A.; Meynen, Gerben

    2015-01-01

    A better understanding of the functioning of the brain, particularly executive functions, of the prison population could aid in reducing crime rates through the reduction of recidivism rates. Indeed, reoffending appears to be related to executive dysfunction and it is known that executive functions are crucial for self-regulation. In the current paper, studies to executive functions in regular adult prisoners compared to non-offender controls were reviewed. Seven studies were found. Specific executive functions were found to be impaired in the general prison population, i.e., attention and set-shifting, as well as in separate subgroups of violent (i.e., set-shifting and working memory) and non-violent offenders (i.e., inhibition, working memory and problem solving). We conclude that the limited number of studies is remarkable, considering the high impact of this population on society and elaborate on the implications of these specific impairments that were found. Further empirical research is suggested, measuring executive functioning within subjects over time for a group of detainees as well as a control group. PMID:25688221

  2. [Statine and endothelium dysfunction in diabetes].

    PubMed

    Rosati, E; Aracri, N; Bottone, A; Cau, C; Scotti, E

    2002-02-01

    Diabetes is associated with significant morbidity and mortality in the setting of acute coronary syndromes. Exists a progressive relationship between glucose levels and cardiovascular risk. Hyperglycemy in fact produces endothelial dysfunction recognised to be a key accessory to diabetic microangiopathy and macroangiopathy. Furthermore diabetics present high levels of cholesterol which elevate the risk of CHD. The statins, for their effects, may represent the fit therapy. The beneficial effects of statins may extend beyond improving the lipid profile. There are several proposed mechanisms for event reduction by lipid-lowering therapy, which include improved endothelium-dependent vasodilation, stabilization of atherosclerotic lesions, reduction in inflammatory stimuli, and prevention, slowed progression, or regression of atherosclerotic lesions (pleiotropic effects). Cellular experiments suggest that statins have an impact on endothelial function by preventing oxidized LDL-induced reduction of nitric oxide production and increased nitric oxide synthesis. Statins also impact chronic inflammation by reducing mitogen (PDGF) responsiveness, inhibiting smooth muscle cell proliferation, inhibiting monocyte chemotaxis and migration, and by reducing macrophage protease production. The absolute clinical benefit achieved may be greater in diabetic than in nondiabetic patients with CHD because diabetic patients have a higher absolute risk of recurrent CHD events and other atherosclerotic events. PMID:11830720

  3. Personality changes in patients with vestibular dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Paul F.; Darlington, Cynthia L.

    2013-01-01

    The vestibular system is a sensory system that has evolved to detect linear and angular acceleration of the head in all planes so that the brain is not predominantly reliant on visual information to determine self-motion. Since the vestibular system first evolved in invertebrate species in order to detect gravitational vertical, it is likely that the central nervous system has developed a special dependence upon vestibular input. In addition to the deficits in eye movement and postural reflexes that occur following vestibular dysfunction, there is convincing evidence that vestibular loss also causes cognitive and emotional disorders, some of which may be due to the reflexive deficits and some of which are related to the role that ascending vestibular pathways to the limbic system and neocortex play in the sense of spatial orientation. Beyond this, however, patients with vestibular disorders have been reported to experience other personality changes that suggest that vestibular sensation is implicated in the sense of self. These are depersonalization and derealization symptoms such as feeling “spaced out”, “body feeling strange” and “not feeling in control of self”. We propose in this review that these symptoms suggest that the vestibular system may make a unique contribution to the concept of self through information regarding self-motion and self-location that it transmits, albeit indirectly, to areas of the brain such as the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ). PMID:24194706

  4. Cognitive change in motor neurone disease : evidence of orbitofrontal dysfunction 

    E-print Network

    McNeill, Ewan

    2006-01-01

    This study examines the presence of cognitive changes in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a subtype of motor neurone disease. Past research has shown executive dysfunction in patients with ALS and frontotemporal ...

  5. Antidepressant-related sexual dysfunction - perspectives from neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Graf, Heiko; Walter, Martin; Metzger, Coraline D; Abler, Birgit

    2014-06-01

    Sexual dysfunction is not only a common symptom in major depression but also a frequent side-effect of antidepressant medication, mainly of the selective serotonin reuptake-inhibitors (SSRI) that are often prescribed as a first line treatment option. Despite of the increasing incidence and prescription rates, neuronal mechanisms underlying SSRI-related sexual dysfunction are poorly understood and investigations on this topic are scarce. Neuroimaging techniques, mainly functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), provide a feasible approach to investigate these mechanisms since SSRI-related sexual dysfunction is most likely related to central nervous processes. This review summarizes the recent literature regarding the basic clinical findings and imaging correlates of antidepressant-related sexual dysfunction linking brain regions and networks potentially involved to phases and subcomponents of sexual processing and antidepressant action. In particular, fMRI studies on SSRI antidepressants including paroxetine and SNRIs including bupropion are highlighted. PMID:24333547

  6. Long term neurological dysfunction and neonatal hypoglycaemia after diabetic pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Stenninger, E; Flink, R; Eriksson, B; Sahlen, C

    1998-01-01

    AIM—To determine if children born to mothers with diabetes mellitus during pregnancy, who subsequently developed neonatal hypoglycaemia, experienced long term neurological dysfunction.?METHODS—Thirteen children with, and 15 without, neonatal hypoglycaemia (blood glucose < 1.5 mmol/l) were randomly selected from a larger cohort and investigated at the age of 8 years. They were also compared with 28 age matched healthy controls.?RESULTS—Children with neonatal hypoglycaemia had significantly more difficulties in a validated screening test for minimal brain dysfunction than controls and were also more often reported to be hyperactive, impulsive, and easily distracted. On psychological assessment, they had a lower total development score than normoglycaemic children born to diabetic mothers, and control children. ?CONCLUSIONS—Neonatal hypoglycaemia in diabetic pregnancy was associated with long term neurological dysfunction related to minimal brain dysfunction/deficits in attention, motor control, and perception.?? PMID:10194986

  7. Neuropsychological Dysfunction in Schizotypal Personality Disorder: A Profile Analysis

    E-print Network

    personality disorder, neuropsychological dysfunction, verbal learn- ing, abstraction, temporal-limbic system. frontal, left hemisphere, and temporal-limbic brain areas, respectively (Gur et al 1991; Nestor et al 1993

  8. SEXUAL BEHAVIOUR AND DYSFUNCTION IN DIVORCE SEEKING COUPLES

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Shiv; Batra, Lalit

    1996-01-01

    50 divorce seeking couples, when compared with 30 well adjusted couples, showed that sex-related factors and sexual dysfunctions were related to divorce seeking behaviour. A significantly high number of couples in the study group, reported a bad honeymoon, unsatisfactory coital experience, lack of cooperation from the spouse and variant sexual habits. The findings emphasis the importance of imparting adequate knowledge about sex and management of sexual dysfunctions, as part of marital therapy. PMID:21584156

  9. Rapid-onset obesity, hypoventilation, hypothalamic dysfunction, autonomic dysregulation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Maksoud, Ismaeil; Kassab, Lina

    2015-01-01

    Rapid-onset obesity with hypoventilation, hypothalamic dysfunction and autonomic dysregulation syndrome is a rare disorder that presents with rapidly evolving obesity with several endocrine disorders during early childhood. We present here a documented case of a 6-year-old Syrian girl with the characteristic symptoms of rapid-onset obesity with hypothalamic dysfunction, hypoventilation, and autonomic dysregulation, associated with an abdominal mass (mature ganglioneuroma). PMID:26229761

  10. Cytoskeletal Role in the Contractile Dysfunction of Hypertrophied Myocardium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsui, Hiroyuki; Ishihara, Kazuaki; Cooper, George

    1993-04-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy in response to systolic pressure loading frequently results in contractile dysfunction of unknown cause. In the present study, pressure loading increased the microtubule component of the cardiac muscle cell cytoskeleton, which was responsible for the cellular contractile dysfunction observed. The linked microtubule and contractile abnormalities were persistent and thus may have significance for the deterioration of initially compensatory cardiac hypertrophy into congestive heart failure.

  11. Clinical Significance of Endothelial Dysfunction in Essential Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Gkaliagkousi, Eugenia; Gavriilaki, Eleni; Triantafyllou, Areti; Douma, Stella

    2015-11-01

    The endothelium is recognized as a major determinant of vascular physiology and pathophysiology. Over the last few decades, a plethora of studies have implicated endothelial dysfunction in the progression of atherosclerosis and the subclinical target organ damage observed in essential hypertension. However, the clinical significance of diagnosing endothelial dysfunction in patients with essential hypertension remains under investigation. Although a number of vascular and non-vascular markers of endothelial dysfunction have been proposed, there is an ongoing quest for a marker in the clinical setting that is optimal, inexpensive, and reproducible. In addition, endothelial dysfunction emerges as a promising therapeutic target of agents that are readily available in clinical practice. In this context, a better understanding of its role in essential hypertension becomes of great importance. Here, we aim to investigate the clinical significance of endothelial dysfunction in essential hypertension by accumulating novel data on (a) early diagnosis using robust markers with prognostic value in cardiovascular risk prediction, (b) the association of endothelial dysfunction with subclinical vascular organ damage, and PMID:26371063

  12. Renal dysfunction after total body irradiation: Dose-effect relationship

    SciTech Connect

    Kal, Henk B. . E-mail: H.B.Kal@UMCUtrecht.nl; Kempen-Harteveld, M. Loes van

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: Late complications related to total body irradiation (TBI) as part of the conditioning regimen for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation have been increasingly noted. We reviewed and compared the results of treatments with various TBI regimens and tried to derive a dose-effect relationship for the endpoint of late renal dysfunction. The aim was to find the tolerance dose for the kidney when TBI is performed. Methods and Materials: A literature search was performed using PubMed for articles reporting late renal dysfunction. For intercomparison, the various TBI regimens were normalized using the linear-quadratic model, and biologically effective doses (BEDs) were calculated. Results: Eleven reports were found describing the frequency of renal dysfunction after TBI. The frequency of renal dysfunction as a function of the BED was obtained. For BED >16 Gy an increase in the frequency of dysfunction was observed. Conclusions: The tolerance BED for kidney tissue undergoing TBI is about 16 Gy. This BED can be realized with highly fractionated TBI (e.g., 6 x 1.7 Gy or 9 x 1.2 Gy at dose rates >5 cGy/min). To prevent late renal dysfunction, the TBI regimens with BED values >16 Gy (almost all found in published reports) should be applied with appropriate shielding of the kidneys.

  13. Mitochondrial dysfunction in psychiatric morbidity: current evidence and therapeutic prospects

    PubMed Central

    Toker, Lilach; Agam, Galila

    2015-01-01

    Cumulating evidence for the involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in psychiatric disorders leaves little to no doubt regarding the involvement of this pathology in mood disorders. However, mitochondrial abnormalities are also observed in a wide range of disorders spanning from cancer and diabetes to various neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental disorders such as Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, Huntington’s, autism, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The apparent lack of specificity questions the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in psychiatric disorders, in general, and in mood disorders, in particular. Is mitochondrial dysfunction a general phenomenon, simplistically rendering brain cells to be more vulnerable to a variety of disease-specific perturbations? Or is it an epiphenomenon induced by various disease-specific factors? Or possibly, the severity and the anatomical region of the dysfunction are the ones responsible for the distinct features of the disorders. Whichever of the aforementioned ones, if any, is correct, “mitochondrial dysfunction” became more of a cliché than a therapeutic target. In this review, we summarize current studies supporting the involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in different psychiatric disorders. We address the question of specificity and causality of the different findings and provide an alternative explanation for some of the aforementioned questions. PMID:26442764

  14. Female sexual dysfunction: focus on low desire.

    PubMed

    Kingsberg, Sheryl A; Woodard, Terri

    2015-02-01

    Low or absent sexual desire is the most common sexual dysfunction in women, and its prevalence peaks during midlife. Its etiology is complex and may include biologic, psychologic, and social elements. Major risk factors for its development include poor health status, depression, certain medications, dissatisfaction with partner relationship, and history of physical abuse, sexual abuse, or both. Diagnosis is based on criteria set by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th Edition) and requires that a woman experience personal distress. Clinical evaluation should include medical history, sexual history, and, sometimes, a physical examination. Laboratory data are of limited value, except when warranted by history or physical examination. Treatment options include nonpharmacologic interventions such as education, office-based counseling, and psychotherapy. Although there are no U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved treatments for low desire, pharmacologic agents have been used off-label for this purpose. Bupropion is an antidepressant that has been shown to improve desire in some women with and without depression. Systemic estrogen therapy is not recommended in the absence of vasomotor symptoms and is not directly associated with desire. However, vaginal estrogen is useful in patients presenting with concomitant vaginal atrophy and dyspareunia. Ospemifene is a selective estrogen receptor modulator that can be used as an alternative to vaginal estrogen. Exogenous testosterone has demonstrated efficacy in treating loss of desire in postmenopausal women. However, patients should be counseled that it is not FDA-approved for this purpose and there are limited published long-term safety data. Several agents for the treatment of low desire are currently in development. Gynecologists are in a unique position to address concerns about sexual desire in women. PMID:25569014

  15. Executive dysfunction, brain aging, and political leadership.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Mark; Franklin, David L; Post, Jerrold M

    2014-01-01

    Decision-making is an essential component of executive function, and a critical skill of political leadership. Neuroanatomic localization studies have established the prefrontal cortex as the critical brain site for executive function. In addition to the prefrontal cortex, white matter tracts as well as subcortical brain structures are crucial for optimal executive function. Executive function shows a significant decline beginning at age 60, and this is associated with age-related atrophy of prefrontal cortex, cerebral white matter disease, and cerebral microbleeds. Notably, age-related decline in executive function appears to be a relatively selective cognitive deterioration, generally sparing language and memory function. While an individual may appear to be functioning normally with regard to relatively obvious cognitive functions such as language and memory, that same individual may lack the capacity to integrate these cognitive functions to achieve normal decision-making. From a historical perspective, global decline in cognitive function of political leaders has been alternatively described as a catastrophic event, a slowly progressive deterioration, or a relatively episodic phenomenon. Selective loss of executive function in political leaders is less appreciated, but increased utilization of highly sensitive brain imaging techniques will likely bring greater appreciation to this phenomenon. Former Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon was an example of a political leader with a well-described neurodegenerative condition (cerebral amyloid angiopathy) that creates a neuropathological substrate for executive dysfunction. Based on the known neuroanatomical and neuropathological changes that occur with aging, we should probably assume that a significant proportion of political leaders over the age of 65 have impairment of executive function. PMID:25901887

  16. Cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Martins, Wolney de Andrade; Lopes, Heno Ferreira; Consolim-Colombo, Fernanda Marciano; Gualandro, Sandra de Fátima Menosi; Arteaga-Fernández, Edmundo; Mady, Charles

    2012-01-26

    Sickle cell anemia (SCA) is associated to increased cardiac output, normal heart rate (HR), abnormal QT dispersion and lower diastolic blood pressure (DBP). The mechanisms are still unknown. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that there is cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction (CAD) in SCA. The secondary objectives were to distinguish the roles of chronic anemia and hemoglobinopathy and to evaluate the predominance of the sympathetic or parasympathetic systems in the pathogenesis of CAD. Sixteen subjects with SCA, 13 with sickle cell trait (SCT), 13 with iron deficiency anemia (IDA), and 13 healthy volunteers (HV) were evaluated. All subjects were submitted to 24h-electrocardiogram (24h-ECG), plasma norepinephrine (NE) measurement before and after isometric exercise (IE), and also Valsalva maneuver (VM), diving maneuver (DV), and tilt test (TT). Baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) was also evaluated. The minimum, average and maximum HR as well as the percentage of bradycardia and tachycardia at 24-h ECG were similar in all groups. NE at baseline and after IE did not differ between groups. The SCA group showed less bradycardia at phase IV of VM, less bradycardia during DV, and also less tachycardia and lower DBP during TT. BRS for bradycardia and tachycardia reflex was decreased in the SCA and SCT groups. In conclusion, 1) there is CAD in SCA, and it is characterized by the reduction of BRS and the limitation of HR modulation mediated by the parasympathetic system; 2) cardiovascular sympathetic activity is preserved in SCA; and 3) hemoglobinopathy is the preponderant ethiopathogenic factor. PMID:21868290

  17. Dysfunctional dopaminergic neurotransmission in asocial BTBR mice

    PubMed Central

    Squillace, M; Dodero, L; Federici, M; Migliarini, S; Errico, F; Napolitano, F; Krashia, P; Di Maio, A; Galbusera, A; Bifone, A; Scattoni, M L; Pasqualetti, M; Mercuri, N B; Usiello, A; Gozzi, A

    2014-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are neurodevelopmental conditions characterized by pronounced social and communication deficits and stereotyped behaviours. Recent psychosocial and neuroimaging studies have highlighted reward-processing deficits and reduced dopamine (DA) mesolimbic circuit reactivity in ASD patients. However, the neurobiological and molecular determinants of these deficits remain undetermined. Mouse models recapitulating ASD-like phenotypes could help generate hypotheses about the origin and neurophysiological underpinnings of clinically relevant traits. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), behavioural and molecular readouts to probe dopamine neurotransmission responsivity in BTBR T+ Itpr3tf/J mice (BTBR), an inbred mouse line widely used to model ASD-like symptoms owing to its robust social and communication deficits, and high level of repetitive stereotyped behaviours. C57BL/6J (B6) mice were used as normosocial reference comparators. DA reuptake inhibition with GBR 12909 produced significant striatal DA release in both strains, but failed to elicit fMRI activation in widespread forebrain areas of BTBR mice, including mesolimbic reward and striatal terminals. In addition, BTBR mice exhibited no appreciable motor responses to GBR 12909. DA D1 receptor-dependent behavioural and signalling responses were found to be unaltered in BTBR mice, whereas dramatic reductions in pre- and postsynaptic DA D2 and adenosine A2A receptor function was observed in these animals. Overall these results document profoundly compromised DA D2-mediated neurotransmission in BTBR mice, a finding that is likely to have a role in the distinctive social and behavioural deficits exhibited by these mice. Our results call for a deeper investigation of the role of dopaminergic dysfunction in mouse lines exhibiting ASD-like phenotypes, and possibly in ASD patient populations. PMID:25136890

  18. p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Increases Arginase Activity and Contributes to Endothelial Dysfunction in Corpora Cavernosa from Angiotensin-II Treated Mice

    PubMed Central

    Toque, Haroldo A.; Romero, Maritza J.; Tostes, Rita C.; Shatanawi, Alia; Chandra, Surabhi; Carneiro, Zidonia N.; Inscho, Edward W.; Webb, R. Clinton; Caldwell, Ruth B.; Caldwell, R. William

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Angiotensin II (AngII) activates p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and elevates arginase activity in endothelial cells. Upregulation of arginase activity has been implicated in endothelial dysfunction by reducing NO bioavailability. However, signaling pathways activated by AngII in the penis are largely unknown. Aim We hypothesized that activation of p38 MAPK increases arginase activity and thus impairs penile vascular function in AngII-treated mice. Methods Male C57BL/6 mice were implanted with osmotic minipumps containing saline or AngII (42 ?g/kg/h) for 14 days and co-treated with p38 MAPK inhibitor, SB 203580 (5 ?g/kg/day), beginning 2 days before minipump implantation. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was measured. Corpus cavernosum (CC) tissue was used for vascular functional studies and protein expression levels of p38 MAPK, arginase and constitutive NOS, and arginase activity. Main Outcome Measures Arginase expression and activity; expression of phospho-p38 MAPK, -eNOS and nNOS proteins; endothelium-dependent and nitrergic nerve-mediated relaxations were determined in CC from control and AngII-infused mice. Results AngII increased SBP (22%) and increased CC arginase activity and expression (~2-fold), and phosphorylated P38 MAPK levels (30%) over control. Treatment with SB 203580 prevented these effects. Endothelium-dependent NO-mediated relaxation to acetylcholine was significantly reduced by AngII and this effect was prevented by SB 203580 (P<0.01). AngII (2-week) did not alter nitrergic function. However, SB 203580 significantly increased nitrergic relaxation in both control and AngII tissue at lower frequencies. Maximum contractile responses for phenylephrine and electrical field stimulation were increased by AngII (56% and 171%, respectively), and attenuated by SB 203580 treated. AngII treatment also decreased eNOS phosphorylation at Ser-1177 compared to control. Treatment with SB 203580 prevented all these changes. Conclusion p38 MAPK inhibition corrects penile arginase activity and protects against erectile dysfunction caused by AngII. PMID:20807329

  19. Kidney dysfunction during lenalidomide treatment for AL amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Specter, Richard; Sanchorawala, Vaishali; Seldin, David C.; Shelton, Anthony; Fennessey, Salli; Finn, Kathleen T.; Zeldis, Jerome B.; Dember, Laura M.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Lenalidomide is an immunomodulatory agent used to treat plasma cell dyscrasias. We previously observed worsening of kidney function in a high proportion of patients with AL amyloidosis during lenalidomide treatment. The objective of this study is to characterize alterations in kidney function among patients with AL amyloidosis undergoing treatment with lenalidomide. Methods. This is a secondary analysis of an ongoing clinical trial at a single referral centre. Forty-one patients with AL amyloidosis received lenalidomide with or without dexamethasone in monthly cycles. Kidney dysfunction was defined as ??50% increase in serum creatinine. Severe kidney dysfunction was defined as ??100% increase in serum creatinine. Recovery of renal function was defined as a return of serum creatinine to within 25% of the pre-treatment value or discontinuation of dialysis. Results. Twenty-seven of 41 patients (66%) developed kidney dysfunction during lenalidomide treatment. The kidney dysfunction was severe in 13 of these patients (32%); four of whom required initiation of dialysis (10%). The median time to kidney dysfunction after starting lenalidomide was 44 days (interquartile range 15–108 days). Four of eight patients without underlying renal amyloidosis developed kidney dysfunction. Patients with severe kidney dysfunction were older and had a higher frequency of underlying renal amyloidosis, greater urinary protein excretion, and lower serum albumin. Recovery of renal function occurred in 12 patients (44%). Conclusions. Among patients with AL amyloidosis, worsening of kidney function occurs frequently during lenalidomide treatment. While a causal role of the drug has not been established, our findings suggest that kidney function should be monitored closely during treatment with this drug. PMID:20693160

  20. Arterial wall dysfunction in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Cypiene, A; Kovaite, M; Venalis, A; Dadoniene, J; Rugiene, R; Petrulioniene, Z; Ryliskyte, L; Laucevicius, A

    2009-05-01

    Carotid-radial pulse wave velocity (PWV), aortic augmentation index (AIx) and endothelium-dependent flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) have been repeatedly showed to be related to premature atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases in different settings of population. The increased arterial stiffness and endothelium dysfunction may add to premature aging of the arteries in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. Still data about arterial stiffness and endothelium function in inflammatory rheumatic diseases are not well described. The aim of this study was to determine the PWV, its derivate marker AIx and FMD and factors possibly influencing them in young SLE women without significant organ damage. Thirty women between 23 and 55 years with an established SLE diagnosis and 66 healthy women were consequently included in the study and both groups were comparable according to age, body mass index (BMI), serum lipid profile and creatinine. PWV was determined by measuring carotid-radial pulse wave transit time with the help of applanation tonometry and AIx, its derivate marker, was calculated as a difference between two waveform peaks expressed as a percentage of the pulse pressure. The FMD was performed by obtaining the repeated scans of the brachial artery at rest and during reactive hyperemia. In SLE women, PWV and AIx were significantly higher and FMD was not different from controls. In linear multiple stepwise regression analysis if patients and controls were both considered, PWV was weakly related to mean blood pressure (MBP), AIx was mostly predicted by age and MBP and FMD was predicted by the diameter of blood vessel, BMI, high density lipoproteins. If the sole SLE setting was analyzed, PWV was not related to any of the pending parameters, AIx turned out to be related to organ damage measured by Systemic Lupus International collaborative Clinics (SLICC) index and age, and FMD obtained strong and significant relation with vessel diameter, and BMI, and disease duration. Regardless of the small number of study group patients, we can state that controlling for MBP and taking measures towards organ damage prevention can partially slow down the process of early atherosclerosis in SLE patients. PMID:19395454

  1. Aspects of mental health dysfunction among survivors of childhood cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fidler, Miranda M; Ziff, Oliver J; Wang, Sarra; Cave, Joshua; Janardhanan, Pradeep; Winter, David L; Kelly, Julie; Mehta, Susan; Jenkinson, Helen; Frobisher, Clare; Reulen, Raoul C; Hawkins, Michael M

    2015-01-01

    Background: Some previous studies have reported that survivors of childhood cancer are at an increased risk of developing long-term mental health morbidity, whilst others have reported that this is not the case. Therefore, we analysed 5-year survivors of childhood cancer using the British Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (BCCSS) to determine the risks of aspects of long-term mental health dysfunction. Procedure: Within the BCCSS, 10?488 survivors completed a questionnaire that ascertained mental health-related information via 10 questions from the Short Form-36 survey. Internal analyses were conducted using multivariable logistic regression to determine risk factors for mental health dysfunction. External analyses were undertaken using direct standardisation to compare mental health dysfunction in survivors with UK norms. Results: This study has shown that overall, childhood cancer survivors had a significantly higher prevalence of mental health dysfunction for 6/10 questions analysed compared to UK norms. Central nervous system (CNS) and bone sarcoma survivors reported the greatest dysfunction, compared to expected, with significant excess dysfunction in 10 and 6 questions, respectively; the excess ranged from 4.4–22.3% in CNS survivors and 6.9–15.9% in bone sarcoma survivors. Compared to expected, excess mental health dysfunction increased with attained age; this increase was greatest for reporting ‘limitations in social activities due to health', where the excess rose from 4.5% to 12.8% in those aged 16–24 and 45+, respectively. Within the internal analyses, higher levels of educational attainment and socio-economic classification were protective against mental health dysfunction. Conclusions: Based upon the findings of this large population-based study, childhood cancer survivors report significantly higher levels of mental health dysfunction than those in the general population, where deficits were observed particularly among CNS and bone sarcoma survivors. Limitations were also observed to increase with age, and thus it is important to emphasise the need for mental health evaluation and services across the entire lifespan. There is evidence that low educational attainment and being unemployed or having never worked adversely impacts long-term mental health. These findings provide an evidence base for risk stratification and planning interventions. PMID:26418531

  2. The Role of Interventional Radiology in the Diagnosis and Management of Male Impotence

    SciTech Connect

    Spiliopoulos, Stavros; Shaida, Nadeem; Katsanos, Konstantinos; Krokidis, Miltiadis

    2013-10-15

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is defined as the persistent inability to reach or maintain penile rigidity enough for sexual satisfaction. Nearly 30% of the men between ages 40 and 70 years are affected by ED. A variety of pathologies, including neurological, psychological, or endocrine disorders and drug side effects, may incite ED. A commonly identified cause of ED is vascular disease. Initial diagnostic workup includes a detailed physical examination and laboratory tests. Whilst duplex ultrasound is considered the first-line diagnostic modality, intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography is still considered the 'gold standard' for the diagnosis of arteriogenic impotence. Percutaneous endovascular treatment may be offered in patients with vasculogenic ED that has failed to respond to oral medical therapy as an alternative to penile prosthesis or open surgical repair. In arteriogenic ED balloon angioplasty of the aorto-iliac axis, and in veno-occlusive ED, percutaneous venous ablation using various embolization materials has been reported to be safe and to improve sexual performance. Recently, the ZEN study investigated the safety and feasibility of drug-eluting stents for the treatment of arteriogenic ED attributed to internal pudendal artery stenosis with promising preliminary results. This manuscript highlights the role of interventional radiology in the diagnosis and minimally invasive treatment of male impotence.

  3. [Depressive disorder, treatment and sexual dysfunction--part II].

    PubMed

    Ga?ecki, Piotr; Depko, Andrzej; Wo?niak, Aneta; Talarowska, Monika

    2011-10-01

    Depressive disorders and antidepressant therapy have been associated with sexual dysfunction. Sexual dysfunctions are recognized as a potential side effect of antidepressant therapy. Not reliable algorithms have been developed in the presence of sexual dysfunctions in the course of depressive disorders. The most commonly used methods of treatment of sexual dysfunction in depressive disorders include: waiting for spontaneous remission, reduction in dose of a repressive drug, the change of drug discontinuation for a short time, the use of the drug after having sexual intercourse, drug holidays and corrective medications (yohimbine, phosphodiesterase type 5 and anesthetic creams). Among the most effective agents used in the treatment sre: bupropion, trazodone, nefazodone, agomelatine, tianeptine and flibanserin. Optimal antidepressant treatment should result in remission of the symptoms of the underlying illness and minimize the potential for short-term and long-term adverse effects, including sexual dysfunction. Physicians should monitor their patients for antidepressant-induced sexual adverse effects, as these may affect compliance with therapy and ultimate treatment success. PMID:22097187

  4. Renal dysfunction in cirrhosis is not just a vasomotor nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Adebayo, Danielle; Morabito, Vincenzo; Davenport, Andrew; Jalan, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    The short-term mortality of cirrhotic patients who develop renal dysfunction remains unacceptably high, and as such the treatment of this condition is an unmet need. Although features of kidney injury are well recognized in these patients, the pathophysiology is complex and not completely understood. Improved understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in renal dysfunction occurring on a background of cirrhosis is key to developing effective treatment strategies to improve survival. Renal dysfunction due to hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) is characteristic of cirrhosis. Our current understanding is that HRS is functional in nature and occurs as a consequence of hemodynamic changes associated with portal hypertension. However, there is evidence in the literature suggesting that, histologically, the kidneys are not always normal in the vast majority of patients who present with renal dysfunction on the background of cirrhosis. Furthermore, there is emerging data implicating nonvasomotor mechanisms in the pathophysiology of renal dysfunction in cirrhosis. This mini-review aims to present the evidence suggesting that factors other than hemodynamic dysregulation have an important role in the development of this major complication for patients with progressive cirrhosis. PMID:25296092

  5. Experimental treatments for mitochondrial dysfunction in sepsis: A narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Guilang; Lyu, Juanjuan; Huang, Jingda; Xiang, Dan; Xie, Meiyan; Zeng, Qiyi

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response to infection. Sepsis, which can lead to severe sepsis, septic shock, and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, is an important cause of mortality. Pathogenesis is extremely complex. In recent years, cell hypoxia caused by mitochondrial dysfunction has become a hot research field. Sepsis damages the structure and function of mitochondria, conversely, mitochondrial dysfunction aggravated sepsis. The treatment of sepsis lacks effective specific drugs. The aim of this paper is to undertake a narrative review of the current experimental treatment for mitochondrial dysfunction in sepsis. The search was conducted in PubMed databases and Web of Science databases from 1950 to January 2014. A total of 1,090 references were retrieved by the search, of which 121 researches met all the inclusion criteria were included. Articles on the relationship between sepsis and mitochondria, and drugs used for mitochondrial dysfunction in sepsis were reviewed retrospectively. The drugs were divided into four categories: (1) Drug related to mitochondrial matrix and respiratory chain, (2) drugs of mitochondrial antioxidant and free radical scavengers, (3) drugs related to mitochondrial membrane stability, (4) hormone therapy for septic mitochondria. In animal experiments, many drugs show good results. However, clinical research lacks. In future studies, the urgent need is to develop promising drugs in clinical trials. PMID:25983774

  6. Sexual dysfunction in patients with spinal cord lesions.

    PubMed

    Courtois, Frédérique; Charvier, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Many aspects of sexuality can be disrupted following a spinal cord lesion (SCL). It can alter an individual's self-esteem and body image, interfere with positioning and mobility, introduce unexpected problems with incontinence and spasticity, decrease pleasure, and delay orgasm. Sexual concerns in men can involve erectile function, essential for intercourse, ejaculation function, necessary for fertility, and the ability to reach orgasm. In women they can involve concerns with vaginal lubrication, genital congestion, and vaginal infections, which can all go unnoticed, and orgasm, which may be lost. All of these concerns must be addressed during rehabilitation as individuals with SCL continue to live an active sexual life, and consider sexuality among their top priority for quality of life. This chapter describes the impact of SCL on various phases of men's and women's sexual responses and on various aspects of sexuality. Treatments are described in terms of what is currently available and what is specific to the SCL population. New approaches in particular for women are described, along with tips from sexual counseling which consider an overall approach, taking into account the primary, secondary, and tertiary consequences of the SCL on the individual's sexuality. Throughout the chapter, attempts are made to integrate neurophysiologic knowledge, findings from the literature on SCL, and clinical experience in sexual rehabilitation. PMID:26003247

  7. Recognition and Management of Nonrelaxing Pelvic Floor Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Faubion, Stephanie S.; Shuster, Lynne T.; Bharucha, Adil E.

    2012-01-01

    Nonrelaxing pelvic floor dysfunction is not widely recognized. Unlike in pelvic floor disorders caused by relaxed muscles (eg, pelvic organ prolapse or urinary incontinence, both of which often are identified readily), women affected by nonrelaxing pelvic floor dysfunction may present with a broad range of nonspecific symptoms. These may include pain and problems with defecation, urination, and sexual function, which require relaxation and coordination of pelvic floor muscles and urinary and anal sphincters. These symptoms may adversely affect quality of life. Focus on the global symptom complex, rather than the individual symptoms, may help the clinician identify the condition. The primary care provider is in a position to intervene early, efficiently, and effectively by (1) recognizing the range of symptoms that might suggest nonrelaxing pelvic floor dysfunction, (2) educating patients, (3) performing selective tests when needed to confirm the diagnosis, and (4) providing early referral for physical therapy. PMID:22305030

  8. Sepsis-induced immune dysfunction: can immune therapies reduce mortality?

    PubMed

    Delano, Matthew J; Ward, Peter A

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response induced by an infection, leading to organ dysfunction and mortality. Historically, sepsis-induced organ dysfunction and lethality were attributed to the interplay between inflammatory and antiinflammatory responses. With advances in intensive care management and goal-directed interventions, early sepsis mortality has diminished, only to surge later after "recovery" from acute events, prompting a search for sepsis-induced alterations in immune function. Sepsis is well known to alter innate and adaptive immune responses for sustained periods after clinical "recovery," with immunosuppression being a prominent example of such alterations. Recent studies have centered on immune-modulatory therapy. These efforts are focused on defining and reversing the persistent immune cell dysfunction that is associated with mortality long after the acute events of sepsis have resolved. PMID:26727230

  9. The role of inflammatory cytokines in endothelial dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, C.

    2009-01-01

    Clinical and experimental data support a link between endothelial dysfunction and inflammation. Inflammatory cytokines are important protagonists in formation of atherosclerotic plaque, eliciting effects throughout the atherosclerotic vessel. Importantly, the development of atherosclerotic lesions, regardless of the risk factor, e.g., diabetes, hypertension, obesity, is characterized by disruption in normal function of the endothelial cells. Endothelial cells, which line the internal lumen of the vasculature, are part of a complex system that regulates vasodilation and vasoconstriction, growth of vascular smooth muscle cells, inflammation, and hemostasis, maintaining a proper blood supply to tissues and regulating inflammation and coagulation. Current concepts suggest that the earliest event in atherogenesis is endothelial dysfunction, manifested by deficiencies in the production of nitric oxide (NO) and prostacyclin. The focus of this review is to summarize recent evidence showing the effects of inflammation on vascular dysfunction in ischemic-heart disease, which may prompt new directions for targeting inflammation in future therapies. PMID:18600364

  10. Genetic determinants of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor related sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, James M; Bishop, Jeffrey R

    2014-11-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a troubling obstacle for individuals being treated for depression and can be caused by both depressive symptoms as well as antidepressant drugs. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) represent a class of antidepressants commonly associated with sexual dysfunction, even after symptomatic improvement. Candidate gene studies have identified associations between sexual dysfunction and altered SSRI pharmacokinetics or to the neurotransmitter systems affected by depression and SSRI treatment. The multifactorial nature of this phenotype and study heterogeneity are currently limitations to the translation of these findings to clinical use. Larger, prospective studies of genetic-guided antidepressant selection may help to clarify the clinical utility of pharmacogenetics in minimizing sexual side effects. PMID:25493571

  11. Dreaming and cognition in patients with frontotemporal dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Paiva, Teresa; Bugalho, Paulo; Bentes, Carla

    2011-12-01

    Individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) and temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) have hallucinations and mild cognitive dysfunction. The objective of this work was to study dreams in PD and TLE patients using a common functional model of dream production involving the limbic and paralimbic structures. Dreams were characterised in early-stage PD (19 males) and TLE patients (52) with dream diaries classified by the Hall van de Castle system and were compared with matched controls. In PD, there were significant differences between patients' dreams and those of controls: animals, physical aggression, and a befriender were more common in patients, and aggressor and bodily misfortunes were less common. The dreams of patients with frontal dysfunction showed more aggressive features. TLE patients had lower recall than PD patients and a higher proportion of dreams involving family and familiar settings, lower proportions involving success, and a higher incidence of frontal dysfunction. The dreams of PD and TLE patients share important features. PMID:21737311

  12. Copeptin in Hemodialysis Patients with Left Ventricular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Seok; Yang, Jae Won; Chai, Moon Hee; Lee, Jun Young; Park, Hyeoncheol; Kim, Youngsub; Choi, Seung Ok

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Copeptin has been considered as a useful marker for diagnosis and prediction of prognosis in heart diseases. However, copeptin has not been investigated sufficiently in hemodialysis patients. This study aimed to investigate the general features of copeptin in hemodialysis and to examine the usefulness of copeptin in hemodialysis patients with left ventricular dysfunction (LV dysfunction). Materials and Methods This study included 41 patients on regular hemodialysis. Routine laboratory data and peptides such as the N-terminal of the prohormone brain natriuretic peptide and copeptin were measured on the day of hemodialysis. Body fluid volume was estimated by bioimpedance spectroscopy, and the E/Ea ratio was estimated by echocardiography. Results Copeptin increased to 171.4 pg/mL before hemodialysis. The copeptin had a positive correlation with pre-dialysis body fluid volume (r=0.314; p=0.04). The copeptin level decreased along with body fluid volume and plasma osmolality during hemodialysis. The copeptin increased in the patients with LV dysfunction more than in those with normal LV function (218.7 pg/mL vs. 77.6 pg/mL; p=0.01). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that copeptin had a diagnostic value in the hemodialysis patients with LV dysfunction (area under curve 0.737; p=0.02) and that the cut-off value was 125.48 pg/mL (sensitivity 0.7, specificity 0.8, positive predictive value 0.9, negative predictive value 0.6). Conclusion Copeptin increases in hemodialysis patients and is higher in patients with LV dysfunction. We believe that copeptin can be a useful marker for the diagnosis of LV dysfunction in hemodialysis patients. PMID:26069119

  13. Side Effects of Hormone Therapy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Men Living with Prostate Cancer Side Effects of Hormone Therapy Side Effects Urinary Dysfunction Bowel Dysfunction Erectile Dysfunction Loss of Fertility Side Effects of Hormone Therapy Side Effects of Chemotherapy Side Effects: When ...

  14. Sexual dysfunction and psychological distress in methadone maintenance.

    PubMed

    Spring, W D; Willenbring, M L; Maddux, T L

    1992-11-01

    We administered the Derogatis Sexual Functioning Inventory to 25 methadone maintenance patients who had been on a stable dose of methadone for at least 2 months, and obtained ratings of depression and anxiety, levels of sex hormones, and liver function tests. Five subjects with significantly lower Global Sexual Satisfaction Index scores (p < .0001) had more psychological symptoms, higher methadone doses, poorer body image, and less sexual drive and satisfaction, but normal fund of sexual information and lifetime experience. Sexual dysfunction among methadone maintenance patients may be due to coexisting psychiatric problems rather than caused by opiates. Methadone patients presenting with sexual dysfunction should receive psychiatric evaluation. PMID:1446965

  15. Gastrointestinal Autonomic Dysfunction in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joong-Seok; Sung, Hye-Young

    2015-01-01

    Currently, gastrointestinal dysfunctions in Parkinson’s disease (PD) are well-recognized problems and are known to be an initial symptom in the pathological process that eventually results in PD. Gastrointestinal symptoms may result from the involvement of either the central or enteric nervous systems, or these symptoms may be side effects of antiparkinsonian medications. Weight loss, excessive salivation, dysphagia, nausea/gastroparesis, constipation, and defecation dysfunction all may occur. Increased identification and early detection of these symptoms can result in a significant improvement in the quality of life for PD patients. PMID:26090079

  16. Frontotemporal Dysfunction and Dementia in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Woolley, Susan C; Strong, Michael J

    2015-11-01

    Although amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is classically considered a disorder exclusively affecting motor neurons, there is substantial clinical, neuroimaging, and neuropathologic evidence that more than half of patients have an associated syndrome of frontotemporal dysfunction. These syndromes range from frontotemporal dementia to behavioral or cognitive syndromes. Neuroimaging and neuropathologic findings are consistent with frontotemporal lobar degeneration that underpins alterations in network connectivity. Future clinical trials need to be stratified based on the presence or absence of frontotemporal dysfunction on the disease course of ALS. PMID:26515622

  17. ?-blockers in postoperative myocardial diastolic dysfunction: not a panacea.

    PubMed

    Jivanji, Salim G M; Slavik, Zdenek; Furck, Anke

    2014-01-01

    Successful treatment with heart rate lowering medication has been used to treat adults with chronic myocardial dysfunction of various aetiologies for a number of years. There has been recent evidence for the successful use of ?-receptor blocking medication in highly selected group of infants with diastolic myocardial dysfunction. This case series demonstrates that while the use of ?-receptor blockers in infants early following initial treatment of congenital left heart obstructive lesions appears promising and safe adjunct to more conventional management, the medium-term and long-term care of these patients remains as challenging as before. PMID:25281247

  18. Primary Orgasmic Dysfunction: Diagnostic Considerations and Review of Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Barbara L.

    2009-01-01

    As a diagnostic category, primary orgasmic dysfunction includes all women who have never experienced orgasm under any circumstances except sleep or fantasy. However, the research samples of nonorgasmic women in clinical reports and empirical investigations are heterogeneous with regard to disruption of earlier phases of the sexual response cycle and emotional concomitants of the dysfunction. The major treatment models—systematic desensitization, sensate focus, directed masturbation, and hypnosis—are presented, and empirical support is reviewed. Separate discussion is included for investigations comparing treatment modalities. Finally, a strategy for future programmatic sex therapy research is suggested within the broader context of psychotherapy outcome research. PMID:6828600

  19. Association of Adipokines with Insulin Resistance, Microvascular Dysfunction, and Endothelial Dysfunction in Healthy Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Cynthia; Daskalakis, Constantine

    2015-01-01

    Proinflammatory adipokines (inflammation markers) from visceral adipose tissue may initiate the development of insulin resistance (IR) and endothelial dysfunction (ED). This study's objective was to investigate the association of five inflammation markers (CRP and four adipokines: IL-6, TNF?, PAI-1, and adiponectin) with IR (quantitative insulin resistance check index (QUICKI)), microvascular measures (capillary density and albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR)), and endothelial measures (forearm blood flow (FBF) increases from resting baseline to maximal vasodilation). Analyses were conducted via multiple linear regression. The 295 study participants were between 18 and 45 years of age, without diabetes or hypertension. They included 24% African Americans and 21% Asians with average body mass index of 25.4?kg/m2. All five inflammation markers were significantly associated with QUICKI. All but adiponectin were significantly associated with capillary density, but none were associated with ACR. Finally, IL-6 and PAI-1 were significantly associated with FBF increase. We also identified a potential interaction between obesity and IL-6 among normal-weight and overweight participants: IL-6 appeared to be positively associated with QUICKI and capillary density (beneficial effect), but the inverse was true among obese individuals. These study findings suggest that inflammation measures may be potential early markers of cardiovascular risk in young asymptomatic individuals. PMID:26549941

  20. Neuroanatomical Substrates of Social Cognition Dysfunction in Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelphrey, Kevin; Adolphs, Ralph; Morris, James P.

    2004-01-01

    In this review article, we summarize recent progress toward understanding the neural structures and circuitry underlying dysfunctional social cognition in autism. We review selected studies from the growing literature that has used the functional neuroimaging techniques of cognitive neuroscience to map out the neuroanatomical substrates of social…

  1. Research report EEG evidence for mirror neuron dysfunction in autism

    E-print Network

    Ramachandran, Vilayanur S.

    of the nervous system Topic: Developmental disorders Keywords: Mirror neurons; Autism spectrum disorders; EEG; MuResearch report EEG evidence for mirror neuron dysfunction in autism spectrum disorders Lindsay M Abstract Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are largely characterized by deficits in imitation, pragmatic

  2. Tumor mechanics and metabolic dysfunction Jason C. Tung a

    E-print Network

    Yavuz, Deniz

    Tumor mechanics and metabolic dysfunction Jason C. Tung a , J. Matthew Barnes a , Shraddha R. Desai November 2014 Accepted 25 November 2014 Available online 19 December 2014 Keywords: Tumor microenvironment Tumor metabolism Mechanosignaling Cancer ECM stiffness Free radicals a b s t r a c t Desmosplasia

  3. Identification of Dysfunctional Cooperative Learning Teams Using Taguchi Quality Indexes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsiung, Chin-Min

    2011-01-01

    In this study, dysfunctional cooperative learning teams are identified by comparing the Taguchi "larger-the-better" quality index for the academic achievement of students in a cooperative learning condition with that of students in an individualistic learning condition. In performing the experiments, 42 sophomore mechanical engineering students…

  4. Mitochondrial dysfunction and seizures: the neuronal energy crisis.

    PubMed

    Zsurka, Gábor; Kunz, Wolfram S

    2015-09-01

    Seizures are often the key manifestation of neurological diseases caused by pathogenic mutations in 169 of the genes that have so far been identified to affect mitochondrial function. Mitochondria are the main producers of ATP needed for normal electrical activities of neurons and synaptic transmission. Additionally, they have a central role in neurotransmitter synthesis, calcium homoeostasis, redox signalling, production and modulation of reactive oxygen species, and neuronal death. Hypotheses link mitochondrial failure to seizure generation through changes in calcium homoeostasis, oxidation of ion channels and neurotransmitter transporters by reactive oxygen species, a decrease in neuronal plasma membrane potential, and reduced network inhibition due to interneuronal dysfunction. Seizures, irrespective of their origin, represent an excessive acute energy demand in the brain. Accordingly, secondary mitochondrial dysfunction has been described in various epileptic disorders, including disorders that are mainly of non-mitochondrial origin. An understanding of the reciprocal relation between mitochondrial dysfunction and epilepsy is crucial to select appropriate anticonvulsant treatment and has the potential to open up new therapeutic approaches in the subset of epileptic disorders caused by mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:26293567

  5. Cognitive Visual Dysfunctions in Preterm Children with Periventricular Leukomalacia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fazzi, Elisa; Bova, Stefania; Giovenzana, Alessia; Signorini, Sabrina; Uggetti, Carla; Bianchi, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Aim: Cognitive visual dysfunctions (CVDs) reflect an impairment of the capacity to process visual information. The question of whether CVDs might be classifiable according to the nature and distribution of the underlying brain damage is an intriguing one in child neuropsychology. Method: We studied 22 children born preterm (12 males, 10 females;…

  6. Cardiac sympathetic dysfunction in anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Byun, Jung-Ick; Lee, Soon-Tae; Moon, Jangsup; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Shin, Jung-Won; Sunwoo, Jun-Sang; Lim, Jung-Ah; Shin, Yong-Won; Kim, Tae-Joon; Lee, Keon-Joo; Park, Kyung-Il; Jung, Ki-Young; Lee, Sang Kun; Chu, Kon

    2015-12-01

    Patients with anti-NMDA receptor (anti-NMDAR) encephalitis frequently suffer from autonomic dysfunctions, which can cause substantial morbidity. This study assessed cardiac autonomic functions in patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis using heart rate variability (HRV) analysis. This was a retrospective single-center case-control study. Eleven patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis and 15 age- and sex-matched controls were included in this study. To ensure that autonomic dysfunction does not occur in any encephalitis, we additionally analyzed HRV of 9 patients with herpes encephalitis (HSE) and compared with that of NMDAR encephalitis patients and controls. Five minute resting stationary electrocardiogram was collected from each subject, and HRV was analyzed. Total power and low frequency (LF) power were lower in anti-NMDAR encephalitis patients than those in controls (p=0.005, 0.001 respectively), indicating cardiac autonomic dysfunction especially in sympathetic system. Patients with HSE showed no significant difference in HRV parameters compared with that of controls. Cardiac autonomic dysfunction was associated with 3month functional outcome in anti-NMDAR encephalitis patients. PMID:26275576

  7. Behavioral Approach in ADHD: Testing a Motivational Dysfunction Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, John T.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Etiological models of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) increasingly support the role of a motivational dysfunction pathway, particularly for hyperactive-impulsive symptoms. Overactive behavioral approach tendencies are implicated among these motivational accounts. However, other externalizing disorder symptoms, such as…

  8. Hyperoxia activates ATM independent from mitochondrial ROS and dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Resseguie, Emily A.; Staversky, Rhonda J.; Brookes, Paul S.; O’Reilly, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    High levels of oxygen (hyperoxia) are often used to treat individuals with respiratory distress, yet prolonged hyperoxia causes mitochondrial dysfunction and excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) that can damage molecules such as DNA. Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase is activated by nuclear DNA double strand breaks and delays hyperoxia-induced cell death through downstream targets p53 and p21. Evidence for its role in regulating mitochondrial function is emerging, yet it has not been determined if mitochondrial dysfunction or ROS activates ATM. Because ATM maintains mitochondrial homeostasis, we hypothesized that hyperoxia induces both mitochondrial dysfunction and ROS that activate ATM. In A549 lung epithelial cells, hyperoxia decreased mitochondrial respiratory reserve capacity at 12 h and basal respiration by 48 h. ROS were significantly increased at 24 h, yet mitochondrial DNA double strand breaks were not detected. ATM was not required for activating p53 when mitochondrial respiration was inhibited by chronic exposure to antimycin A. Also, ATM was not further activated by mitochondrial ROS, which were enhanced by depleting manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2). In contrast, ATM dampened the accumulation of mitochondrial ROS during exposure to hyperoxia. Our findings suggest that hyperoxia-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and ROS do not activate ATM. ATM more likely carries out its canonical response to nuclear DNA damage and may function to attenuate mitochondrial ROS that contribute to oxygen toxicity. PMID:25967673

  9. Cognitive Developmental Therapy: Aiding Adult Children of Dysfunctional Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Towers, David A.

    The works of Kegan and Guidano have presented cognition and emotion as complementary modes of knowing that develop together. Cognition is conceived of as being concerned with the knowledge of reality, and emotions are conceptualized as people's system for knowing of their relationship to that reality. Adult children of dysfunctional families are a…

  10. Writing Dysfunction: A Problem in College Composition Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Amy

    Many college students who have been labeled semi-literate because of their excessively poor writing ability in fact possess a neurological dysfunction known as dysgraphia. The symptoms of this disorder range from a consistent but minor inability to spell to a major disarrangement of letters and syntax. The best way to identify dysgraphic students…

  11. Shoulder Dysfunction After Radiotherapy in Surgically and Nonsurgically Treated Necks

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qiang; Guo, Shu; Wang, Di; Xu, Nan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Our goal was to evaluate the shoulder dysfunction after radiotherapy in surgically and nonsurgically treated necks. A prospective pair matched design was performed. A total of 96 patients from 3 groups were enrolled in the study. The patients were asked to complete the shoulder domain section of the University of Washington Quality of Life questionnaire on 2 occasions: preoperatively and 12 months postoperatively. None of the patients had a shoulder impairment before the operation. At the follow-up session, 4 patients who had received radiotherapy only reported mild shoulder dysfunction, the mean score was 96.3, the difference was significant compared with the preoperative score (P?=?0.046). For patients who had received neck dissection, 7 patients reported that the impaired shoulder function caused them to change their work and 14 patients reported that their shoulder function was affected a little; the mean score was 71.6. For patients who had received both neck dissection and postoperative radiotherapy, 9 patients reported that they had changed their work due to shoulder dysfunction and 16 patients reported mild shoulder impairment; the mean score was 65.3 and the difference was not significant (P?=?0.304). Radiotherapy does not increase shoulder dysfunction in surgically treated necks, but it could induce shoulder impairment in nonsurgically treated necks. PMID:26222857

  12. Identifying and Extinguishing Dysfunctional and Deadly Organizational Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mawhinney, Thomas C.

    2009-01-01

    It is possible to define an organization's culture in terms of its dominant behavioral practices and their molar consequences, from the shop floor to the executive suite (Redmon & Mason, 2001). Dysfunctional and potentially deadly practices (for the organization as a whole) can be "latent." They often go undetected until their dramatic…

  13. Role of fibrinogen in cerebrovascular dysfunction after traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Muradashvili, Nino; Lominadze, David

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been associated with various neurological disorders. However, the role of cerebrovascular dysfunction and its mechanisms associated with TBI are still not well understood. Inflammation is the main cause of vascular dysfunction. It affects properties of blood components and the vascular wall leading to changes in blood flow and in interaction of blood components and vascular endothelium exacerbating microcirculatory complications during inflammatory diseases. One of the markers of inflammation is a plasma adhesion protein, fibrinogen (Fg). At elevated levels, Fg can also cause inflammatory responses. One of the manifestations of inflammatory responses is an increase in microvascular permeability leading to accumulation of plasma proteins in the subendothelial matrix and causing vascular remodelling. This has a most devastating effect on cerebral circulation after TBI that is accompanied with an elevation of plasma level of Fg and with an increased cerebrovascular permeability in injury penumbra impairing the normal healing process. This study reviews cerebrovascular alterations after TBI, considers the consequences of increased blood–brain barrier permeability, defines the role of elevated level of Fg and discusses the potential mechanisms of its action leading to vascular dysfunction, which subsequently can cause impairment in neuronal function. Thus, possible mechanisms of vasculo-neuronal dysfunction after TBI are considered. PMID:24063686

  14. NITROTYROSINATION OF A TUBULIN INDUCES EPITHELIAL BARRIER DYSFUNCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrotyrosination of a-Tubulin Induces Epithelial Transport Dysfunction. Yuh-Chin Huang, Lisa Dailey, Wen-Li Zhang and Ilona Jaspers. ORD, Environmental Protection Agency and CEMLB, University of North Carolina

    a-Tubulin undergoes a cyclic removal and readdition of tyrosin...

  15. Iatrogenic myocardial dysfunction after formalization of the heart

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Arnau, J.; Criado, A.; Burgos, R.; Horno, R.; Agosti, J.

    1981-01-01

    A 20-year-old patient with myoepicardial echinococcosis was referred to our hospital for surgical treatment. After polycystectomy had been performed, the surgical area was mistakenly washed with formaldehyde solution, and severe myocardial dysfunction ensued. Histological alterations were compatible with toxic cellular damage. Images PMID:15216184

  16. Iatrogenic myocardial dysfunction after formalization of the heart.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Arnau, J; Criado, A; Burgos, R; Horno, R; Agosti, J

    1981-12-01

    A 20-year-old patient with myoepicardial echinococcosis was referred to our hospital for surgical treatment. After polycystectomy had been performed, the surgical area was mistakenly washed with formaldehyde solution, and severe myocardial dysfunction ensued. Histological alterations were compatible with toxic cellular damage. PMID:15216184

  17. The Dysfunctional Nature of Political Systems in University Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunn, Bruce

    This paper argues that the rapid influx of information technology into society requires a change in university administration from the current political system to a computer based management system for higher productivity. The paper describes the dysfunctional nature of the political system of management in its lack of full accountability. The…

  18. Unraveling Biochemical Pathways Affected by Mitochondrial Dysfunctions Using Metabolomic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Demine, Stéphane; Reddy, Nagabushana; Renard, Patricia; Raes, Martine; Arnould, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction(s) (MDs) can be defined as alterations in the mitochondria, including mitochondrial uncoupling, mitochondrial depolarization, inhibition of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, mitochondrial network fragmentation, mitochondrial or nuclear DNA mutations and the mitochondrial accumulation of protein aggregates. All these MDs are known to alter the capacity of ATP production and are observed in several pathological states/diseases, including cancer, obesity, muscle and neurological disorders. The induction of MDs can also alter the secretion of several metabolites, reactive oxygen species production and modify several cell-signalling pathways to resolve the mitochondrial dysfunction or ultimately trigger cell death. Many metabolites, such as fatty acids and derived compounds, could be secreted into the blood stream by cells suffering from mitochondrial alterations. In this review, we summarize how a mitochondrial uncoupling can modify metabolites, the signalling pathways and transcription factors involved in this process. We describe how to identify the causes or consequences of mitochondrial dysfunction using metabolomics (liquid and gas chromatography associated with mass spectrometry analysis, NMR spectroscopy) in the obesity and insulin resistance thematic. PMID:25257998

  19. Denture-Related Stomatitis Is Associated with Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Osmenda, Grzegorz; Nowakowski, Daniel; Wilk, Grzegorz; Maci?g, Anna; Miko?ajczyk, Tomasz; Sagan, Agnieszka; Filip, Magdalena; Dró?d?, Miros?aw; Guzik, Tomasz J.

    2014-01-01

    Oral inflammation, such as periodontitis, can lead to endothelial dysfunction, accelerated atherosclerosis, and vascular dysfunction. The relationship between vascular dysfunction and other common forms of oral infections such as denture-related stomatitis (DRS) is unknown. Similar risk factors predispose to both conditions including smoking, diabetes, age, and obesity. Accordingly, we aimed to investigate endothelial function and major vascular disease risk factors in 44 consecutive patients with dentures with clinical and microbiological features of DRS (n = 20) and without DRS (n = 24). While there was a tendency for higher occurrence of diabetes and smoking, groups did not differ significantly in respect to major vascular disease risk factors. Groups did not differ in main ambulatory blood pressure, total cholesterol, or even CRP. Importantly, flow mediated dilatation (FMD) was significantly lower in DRS than in non-DRS subjects, while nitroglycerin induced vasorelaxation (NMD) or intima-media thickness (IMT) was similar. Interestingly, while triglyceride levels were normal in both groups, they were higher in DRS subjects, although they did not correlate with either FMD or NMD. Conclusions. Denture related stomatitis is associated with endothelial dysfunction in elderly patients with dentures. This is in part related to the fact that diabetes and smoking increase risk of both DRS and cardiovascular disease. PMID:25045683

  20. Sexual Enhancement Groups for Dysfunctional Women: An Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leiblum, Sandra R.; Ersner-Hershfield, Robin

    1977-01-01

    Three groups of women with sexual dysfunction were evaluated pretreatment and posttreatment. Two groups did not involve partner participation, while the third group included partners on two occasions. Results for all groups were similar. The question of whether orgasm through coitus alone is a reasonable goal is raised and challenged. (Author)

  1. Distinguishing between Poor/Dysfunctional Parenting and Child Emotional Maltreatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfe, David A.; McIsaac, Caroline

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This paper was intended to distinguish between poor parenting and child emotional maltreatment (CEM), to inform child welfare and public health policymakers of the need for differentiated responses. Methods: Scientific literature was integrated with current practice and assumptions relating to poor/dysfunctional parenting and child…

  2. Treatment of Malocclusion and TMJ Dysfunction Secondary to Condylar Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Edward; Walker, Robert V.

    2009-01-01

    Unfavorable sequelae from mandibular fractures includes malocclusion and temporomandibular joint dysfunction. The management of these complications is presented in this article and is largely based on the authors' experience. Cases that provide details on treatment methods are shown. Finally, an algorithm for treatment is suggested. PMID:22110792

  3. Sexual medicine in family practice. Part 2: Treating sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed Central

    Holzapfel, S.

    1993-01-01

    Sexual problems can be caused by organic or psychological factors, or a combination of the two. Deciding which leads to an appropriate management plan. This paper describes the current status of treatments for common sexual dysfunctions seen in family practice. PMID:8471907

  4. Late renal dysfunction in adult survivors of bone marrow transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, C.A.; Cohen, E.P.; Barber-Derus, S.W.; Murray, K.J.; Ash, R.C.; Casper, J.T.; Moulder, J.E. )

    1991-06-01

    Until recently long-term renal toxicity has not been considered a major late complication of bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Late renal dysfunction has been described in a pediatric population status post-BMT which was attributable to the radiation in the preparatory regimen. A thorough review of adults with this type of late renal dysfunction has not previously been described. Fourteen of 103 evaluable adult patients undergoing allogeneic (96) or autologous (7) bone marrow transplantation, predominantly for leukemia and lymphomas, at the Medical College of Wisconsin (Milwaukee, WI) have had a syndrome of renal insufficiency characterized by increased serum creatinine, decreased glomerular filtration rate, anemia, and hypertension. This syndrome developed at a median of 9 months (range, 4.5 to 26 months) posttransplantation in the absence of specific identifiable causes. The cumulative probability of having this renal dysfunction is 20% at 1 year. Renal biopsies performed on seven of these cases showed the endothelium widely separated from the basement membrane, extreme thickening of the glomerular basement membrane, and microthrombi. Previous chemotherapy, antibiotics, and antifungals as well as cyclosporin may add to and possibly potentiate a primary chemoradiation marrow transplant renal injury, but this clinical syndrome is most analogous to clinical and experimental models of radiation nephritis. This late marrow transplant-associated nephritis should be recognized as a potentially limiting factor in the use of some intensive chemoradiation conditioning regimens used for BMT. Some selective attenuation of the radiation to the kidneys may decrease the incidence of this renal dysfunction.

  5. Heading in Soccer: Integral Skill or Grounds for Cognitive Dysfunction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkendall, Donald T.; Garrett, William E., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses how purposeful heading of soccer balls and head injuries affect soccer players' cognitive dysfunction. Cognitive deficits may occur for many reasons. Heading cannot be blamed when details of the actual event and impact are unknown. Concussions are the most common head injury in soccer and a factor in cognitive deficits and are probably…

  6. CARDIOMYOPATHY Exercise-Induced Left Ventricular Systolic Dysfunction

    E-print Network

    Campbell, Kevin P.

    CARDIOMYOPATHY Exercise-Induced Left Ventricular Systolic Dysfunction in Women Heterozygous women each underwent standard exercise stress echocardiography. Results: Heterozygotes demonstrated.62 6 0.07, P = .02). After exercise, the mean LVEF fell to 0.53 6 0.14 in heterozygotes but rose to 0

  7. Concurrent Vision Dysfunctions in Convergence Insufficiency with Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Tara L.; Kim, Eun H.; Vicci, Vincent R.; Dhar, Sunil K.; Biswal, Bharat B.; Barrett, A. M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This study assessed the prevalence of convergence insufficiency (CI) with and without simultaneous vision dysfunctions within the traumatic brain injury (TBI) sample population because although CI is commonly reported with TBI, the prevalence of concurrent visual dysfunctions with CI in TBI is unknown. Methods A retrospective analysis of 557 medical records from TBI civilian patients was conducted. Patients were all evaluated by a single optometrist. Visual acuity, oculomotor, binocular vision function, accommodation, visual fields, ocular health and vestibular function were assessed. Statistical comparisons between the CI and non-CI, as well as in-patient and out-patient subgroups, were conducted using chi-squared and Z-tests. Results Approximately 9% of the TBI sample had CI without the following simultaneous diagnoses: saccade or pursuit dysfunction; 3rd, 4th, or 6th nerve palsy; visual field deficit; visual spatial inattention/neglect; vestibular dysfunction or nystagmus. Photophobia with CI was observed in 16.3% (N=21/130) and vestibular dysfunction with CI was observed in 18.5% (N=24/130) of the CI subgroup. CI and cranial nerve palsies were common and yielded prevalence rates of 23.3% (N=130/557) and 26.9% (N=150/557), respectively, within the TBI sample. Accommodative dysfunction was common within the non-presbyopic TBI sample with a prevalence of 24.4% (N=76/314). Visual field deficits or unilateral visual spatial inattention/neglect were observed within 29.6% (N=80/270) of the TBI in-patient subgroup and were significantly more prevalent compared to the out-patient subgroup (p<0.001). Most TBI patients had visual acuities of 20/60 or better in the TBI sample (85%;N=473/557). Conclusions CI without simultaneous visual or vestibular dysfunctions was observed in about 9% of the visually symptomatic TBI civilian population studied. A thorough visual and vestibular examination is recommended for all TBI patients. PMID:23190716

  8. Left Ventricular Diastolic Dysfunction Assessment with Dual-Source CT

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Zhaoying; Ma, Heng; Zhao, Ying; Fan, Zhanming; Zhang, Zhaoqi; Choi, Sang Il; Choe, Yeon Hyeon; Liu, Jiayi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess the impact of left ventricular (LV) diastolic dysfunction on left atrial (LA) phasic volume and function using dual-source CT (DSCT) and to find a viable alternative prognostic parameter of CT for LV diastolic dysfunction through quantitative evaluation of LA phasic volume and function in patients with LV diastolic dysfunction. Materials and Methods Seventy-seven patients were examined using DSCT and Doppler echocardiography on the same day. Reservoir, conduit, and contractile function of LA were evaluated by measuring LA volume (LAV) during different cardiac phases and all parameters were normalized to body surface area (BSA). Patients were divided into four groups (normal, impaired relaxation, pseudonormal, and restrictive LV diastolic filling) according to echocardiographic findings. The LA phasic volume and function in different stages of LV diastolic function was compared using one-way ANOVA analysis. The correlations between indexed volume of LA (LAVi) and diastolic function in different stages of LV were evaluated using Spearman correlation analysis. Results LA ejection fraction (LAEF), LA contraction, reservoir, and conduit function in patients in impaired relaxation group were not different from those in the normal group, but they were lower in patients in the pseudonormal and restrictive LV diastolic dysfunction groups (P < 0.05). For LA conduit function, there were no significant differences between the patients in the pseudonormal group and restrictive filling group (P = 0.195). There was a strong correlation between the indexed maximal left atrial volume (LAVmax, r = 0.85, P < 0.001), minimal left atrial volume (LAVmin, r = 0.91, P < 0.001), left atrial volume at the onset of P wave (LAVp, r = 0.84, P < 0.001), and different stages of LV diastolic function. The LAVi increased as the severity of LV diastolic dysfunction increased. Conclusions LA remodeling takes place in patients with LV diastolic dysfunction. At the same time, LA phasic volume and function parameters evaluated by DSCT indicated the severity of the LV diastolic dysfunction. Quantitative analysis of LA phasic volume and function parameters using DSCT could be a viable alternative prognostic parameter of LV diastolic function. PMID:25993545

  9. Liver dysfunction associated with artificial nutrition in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Grau, Teodoro; Bonet, Alfonso; Rubio, Mercedes; Mateo, Dolores; Farré, Mercé; Acosta, José Antonio; Blesa, Antonio; Montejo, Juan Carlos; de Lorenzo, Abelardo García; Mesejo, Alfonso

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Liver dysfunction associated with artificial nutrition in critically ill patients is a complication that seems to be frequent, but it has not been assessed previously in a large cohort of critically ill patients. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study of incidence in 40 intensive care units. Different liver dysfunction patterns were defined: (a) cholestasis: alkaline phosphatase of more than 280 IU/l, gamma-glutamyl-transferase of more than 50 IU/l, or bilirubin of more than 1.2 mg/dl; (b) liver necrosis: aspartate aminotransferase of more than 40 IU/l or alanine aminotransferase of more than 42 IU/l, plus bilirubin of more than 1.2 mg/dl or international normalized ratio of more than 1.4; and (c) mixed pattern: alkaline phosphatase of more than 280 IU/l or gamma-glutamyl-transferase of more than 50 IU/l, plus aspartate aminotransferase of more than 40 IU/l or alanine aminotransferase of more than 42 IU/l. Results Seven hundred and twenty-five of 3,409 patients received artificial nutrition: 303 received total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and 422 received enteral nutrition (EN). Twenty-three percent of patients developed liver dysfunction: 30% in the TPN group and 18% in the EN group. The univariate analysis showed an association between liver dysfunction and TPN (p < 0.001), Multiple Organ Dysfunction Score on admission (p < 0.001), sepsis (p < 0.001), early use of artificial nutrition (p < 0.03), and malnutrition (p < 0.01). In the multivariate analysis, liver dysfunction was associated with TPN (p < 0.001), sepsis (p < 0.02), early use of artificial nutrition (p < 0.03), and calculated energy requirements of more than 25 kcal/kg per day (p < 0.05). Conclusion TPN, sepsis, and excessive calculated energy requirements appear as risk factors for developing liver dysfunction. Septic critically ill patients should not be fed with excessive caloric amounts, particularly when TPN is employed. Administering artificial nutrition in the first 24 hours after admission seems to have a protective effect. PMID:17254321

  10. Dysfunction of reward processing correlates with alcohol craving in detoxified alcoholics

    E-print Network

    Knutson, Brian

    Dysfunction of reward processing correlates with alcohol craving in detoxified alcoholics Jana Objective: Alcohol dependence may be associated with dysfunction of mesolimbic circuitry, such that anticipation of nonalcoholic reward fails to activate the ventral striatum, while alcohol-associated cues

  11. Thermal-based probe for testing endothelial dysfunction and possible implications for diagnosing atherosclerosis

    E-print Network

    Lediju, Muyinatu A. (Muyinatu Adebisi)

    2006-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a precursor to atherosclerosis. Thus, the vascular health of an individual can be assessed if endothelial dysfunction can be readily and unambiguously quantified. A thermal-based approach using ...

  12. Prevalence of vestibular dysfunction and associated factors in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Ja-Won; Chang, Mun Young; Woo, Sook-young; Kim, Seonwoo; Cho, Yang-Sun

    2015-01-01

    Objective To report the nationwide prevalence of dizziness and vestibular dysfunction in the Korean population and determine the associated factors. Design Cross-sectional analysis of a nationwide health survey. Methods We obtained data from the 2009 to 2010 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, which were cross-sectional surveys of the South Korean civilian, non-institutionalised population aged 40?years and older (N=3267). A field survey team performed interviews and physical examinations. Structured questionnaires were handed out and balance function tests using the modified Romberg test of standing balance on firm and compliant support surfaces were performed on participants. Failure on the modified Romberg test was regarded to indicate vestibular dysfunction. Results The prevalence of dizziness during the past year was 16.70% (95% CI 14.65% to 18.76%). The presence of vestibular dysfunction was noted in 1.84% (95% CI 1.18% to 2.51%). In addition, the prevalence of experiencing falls and positional dizziness were 1.46% (95% CI 0.87% to 2.06%) and 1.73% (95% CI 1.17% to 2.29%), respectively. Multivariable analysis revealed that dizziness was associated with increased age, female gender, hearing loss and stress. Vestibular dysfunction was associated with increased age, history of dizziness and hearing loss. Conclusions Vertigo and dizziness are the greatest contributors to the burden of disability in the aged population. Screening for dizziness and vestibular dysfunction, and management of associated factors might be important for improving compromised quality of life due to postural imbalance caused by vestibular problems. PMID:26503384

  13. Female sexual dysfunction in patients with substance-related disorders

    PubMed Central

    Diehl, Alessandra; da Silva, Rosiane Lopes; Laranjeira, Ronaldo

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence of female sexual dysfunction symptoms and the associated risk factors in a sample of patients with substance-related disorders admitted to a specialized in-patient care unit. METHODS: This study used a cross-section design, with eight months of data collection, conducted with substance-dependent women using structured questionnaires to collect socio-demographic data and identify their drug of choice. The Drug Abuse Screening Test, Short Alcohol Dependence Data questionnaire, Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence, and Arizona Sexual Experience Scale were also administered. RESULTS: The sample consisted of 105 women who had a mean age of 34.8 years (SD?=?12.1, range?=?18-65) and were predominantly heterosexual (74.3%), single (47.6%), Caucasian (50.5%), catholic (36.2%), and educated only to the level of primary education (40%), with a monthly family income of up to one minimum salary (37.5%). In 42.9% of the patients, crack was the drug of choice; 47.6% of the sample qualified for the Drug Abuse Screening Test (substantial problems related to drugs), 43.8% exhibited Short Alcohol Dependence Data (moderate or severe dependency), 47.6% exhibited Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence (high or very high nicotine dependence). The prevalence of sexual dysfunction symptoms was 34.2% (95% CI?=?[25.3, 44.1]), and a high level of nicotine dependence and low income increased the chances of having sexual dysfunction by 2.72-fold and 2.54 fold, respectively. An association was also observed between female sexual dysfunction symptoms and schooling and levels of drug dependence. CONCLUSIONS: Female sexual dysfunction symptoms were common among this sample and primarily associated with high levels of nicotine use. PMID:23525317

  14. Sexual Dysfunction in Women with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Elyasi, Forouzan; Kashi, Zahra; Tasfieh, Bentolhoda; Bahar, Adele; Khademloo, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background Sexual dysfunction (SD) is one of the important problems in diabetic patients. The present study aimed to determine the prevalence of sexual problems in Iranian women with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among type 2 diabetic women who visited two outpatient endocrine clinics, namely Imam Hospital and Tuba clinic (Sari, Iran) in 2012. Patients were asked to complete two validated questionnaires: Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) and The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) as well as a demographic questionnaire. Analysis was performed using descriptive and analytical tests. P<0.05 was considered to be significant. Results One hundred and fifty women with type 2 diabetes were investigated. Most of the cases aged 40-44 years old. The mean of the total score of the FSFI questionnaire was 22. The prevalence of sexual dysfunction was 78.7% (CI: 71.4-84.4); among these, 58% (CI: 50.0-65.6) reported problems in lubrication, 50% (CI: 42.1-57.9) complained of decreased sexual desire, 50% (CI: 42.1-57.9) had problems with arousal, 47.3% (CI: 39.5-55.3) had dyspareunia, 32.7% (CI: 25.7-40.5) complained of orgasmic dysfunction and 42.7% (CI: 35.0-50.7) reported problems in sexual satisfaction. With regard to the results of the HADS questionnaire, 58.7% (CI: 50.7-66.2) of the patients had depression and 96.7% (CI: 92.4-98.6) had anxiety. Conclusion This study showed the high prevalence of sexual dysfunction in diabetic women, especially among those complaining of depression. Health care professionals dealing with diabetic patients should be aware of possible presence of sexual dysfunction in female patients. PMID:25999619

  15. The Effects of the Cognitive-Behavioral Marriage Enrichment Program on the Dysfunctional Attitudes of Couples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalkan, Melek; Ersanli, Ercumend

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral marriage enrichment program to decrease the level of the dysfunctional attitudes of the couples. Forty participants with dysfunctional attitudes determined by The Dysfunctional Attitude Scale were randomly chosen as experimental and control groups. The results of the…

  16. Use of a Hyaluronic Acid-Carboxymethylcellulose Adhesion Barrier on the Neurovascular Bundle and Prostatic Bed to Facilitate Earlier Recovery of Erectile Function After Robot-Assisted Prostatectomy: An Initial Experience

    PubMed Central

    Joung, Jae Young; Ha, Yun-Sok; Singer, Eric A.; Ercolani, Matthew C.; Favaretto, Ricardo L.; Lee, Dong-Hyeon; Kim, Wun-Jae; Lee, Kang Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Purpose To investigate the efficacy of hyaluronic acid-carboxymethylcellulose (HACM) in facilitating early recovery of erectile function (EF) after radical prostatectomy, we report our initial experience of HACM use on the neurovascular bundle (NVB) after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). Patients and Methods Between 2008 and 2010, 459 consecutive patients who underwent RARP with bilateral nerve-sparing technique were included in this study. Patients were classified into two groups: HACM (group 1; n=162) and non-HACM (group 2; n=287). HACM was delivered to the anatomic location of the NVB after prostate removal. We retrospectively analyzed the surgical outcomes including EF, continence, and perioperative complications. Results At 6 months after surgery, EF recovery rate was 28.5% in group 1 and 17.4% in group 2 (P=0.006). In a subgroup analysis consisting of 225 patients with a preoperative International Index of Erectile Function Short Survey (IIEF)-5 score ?20, the difference in EF recovery at 6 months was significant with 62.8% in group 1 and 27.0% in group 2 (P=0.002), respectively. HACM use was an independent predictor for EF recovery at 6 months after surgery (odds ratio, 2.735; 95% confidence interval, 1.613–4.638; P<0.001). Age and preoperative IIEF-5 were also independent predictors. No differences in continence at 6 months or perioperative complications were found between the two groups. EF recovery was not different between the two groups after 18 months. Conclusions HACM use around the NVBs is safe and facilitates early recovery of EF after nerve-sparing RARP. HACM use is more effective in patients with normal preoperative sexual function. PMID:23879531

  17. Is reversal of endothelial dysfunction still an attractive target in modern cardiology?

    PubMed Central

    Mordi, Ify; Tzemos, Nikolaos

    2014-01-01

    Although the endothelium has a number of important functions, the term endothelial dysfunction is commonly used to describe impairment in its vasodilatory capacity. There have been numerous studies evaluating the relationship between endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease, however assessment of endothelial function is perhaps still primarily thought of as a research tool and has not reached widespread clinical acceptance. In this review we explore the relationship between endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease, its prognostic significance, methods of pharmacological reversal of endothelial dysfunction, and ask the question, is reversal of endothelial dysfunction still an attractive target in modern cardiology? PMID:25228961

  18. Psychological and interpersonal dimensions of sexual function and dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Assalian, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Sex therapy techniques comprise behavioural and cognitive as well as psychodynamic and educational interventions, like reading (‘bibliotherapy’), videotapes and illustrations of anatomical models. Contemporary approaches focus on desire, pleasure and satisfaction. Discussion It is important to assess medical and biological factors involved in the genesis of sexual dysfunctions. Sex therapy techniques were developed by Masters and Johnson, and their premise was to eliminate ‘performance anxiety’ by emphasising the undemanding nature of the sexual relation. New methods were introduced, like Internet-administered techniques, and ‘mindfulness therapy’, and they proved to be effective. Conclusions Psychological treatments have some relieving effects on sexual dysfunction, but for studies of the outcomes it is difficult to meet the requirements of evidence-based medicine. PMID:26558085

  19. Impaired integration in psychopathy: A unified theory of psychopathic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Rachel K B; Hiatt Racer, Kristina; Newman, Joseph P

    2015-10-01

    This article introduces a novel theoretical framework for psychopathy that bridges dominant affective and cognitive models. According to the proposed impaired integration (II) framework of psychopathic dysfunction, topographical irregularities and abnormalities in neural connectivity in psychopathy hinder the complex process of information integration. Central to the II theory is the notion that psychopathic individuals are "'wired up' differently" (Hare, Williamson, & Harpur, 1988, p. 87). Specific theoretical assumptions include decreased functioning of the Salience and Default Mode Networks, normal functioning in executive control networks, and less coordination and flexible switching between networks. Following a review of dominant models of psychopathy, we introduce our II theory as a parsimonious account of behavioral and brain irregularities in psychopathy. The II theory provides a unified theoretical framework for understanding psychopathic dysfunction and integrates principle tenets of affective and cognitive perspectives. Moreover, it accommodates evidence regarding connectivity abnormalities in psychopathy through its network theoretical perspective. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26437150

  20. Flavonols in the Prevention of Diabetes-induced Vascular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Leo, Chen-Huei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: As flavonols are present in fruits and vegetables, they are consumed in considerable amounts in the diet. There is growing evidence that the well-recognized antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and vasorelaxant actions of flavonols may, at least in part, result from modulation of biochemical signaling pathways and kinases. It is well established that diabetes is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Despite clinical management of blood glucose levels, diabetes often results in cardiovascular disease. There is good evidence that endothelial dysfunction contributes significantly to the progression of diabetic cardiovascular diseases. This review describes the biological actions of flavonols that may ameliorate adverse cardiovascular events in diabetes. We discuss evidence that flavonols may be developed as novel pharmacological agents to prevent diabetes-induced vascular dysfunction. PMID:25387248