Note: This page contains sample records for the topic vasectomy from Science.gov.
While these samples are representative of the content of Science.gov,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of Science.gov
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.
Last update: August 15, 2014.
1

Vasectomy  

MedlinePLUS

... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Vasectomy: Overview Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content A vasectomy (pronounced va-SEK- t uh -mee ) is a ...

2

Vasectomy.  

PubMed

This article is intended to familiarize the surgeon with all aspects of vasectomy including preoperative counseling, anesthetic techniques, surgical techniques, postoperative follow-up, and postvasectomy semen analysis. The latest literature regarding the complication rates and failure rates of various vas occlusion techniques is also discussed. PMID:24182975

Rogers, Matthew D; Kolettis, Peter N

2013-11-01

3

Vasectomy reversal  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although vasectomy remains a popular method of contraception, the number of men requesting reversal has risen dramatically.\\u000a The microsurgical Techniques described in this article have yielded excellent results.

Roy A. Brandell; Marc Goldstein

2000-01-01

4

Vasectomy - series (image)  

MedlinePLUS

Vasectomy is the surgical division of the vas deferens. Vasectomy prevents sperm from being released into semen during ejaculation, thus preventing pregnancy. Vasectomy may be recommended for adult men who are ...

5

Making vasectomy attractive.  

PubMed

In 1989, Pro-Pater, a private, nonprofit family planning organization in Brazil, used attractive ads with the message Vasectomy, An Act of Love to promote vasectomy. The number of vasectomies performed/day at Pro-Pater clinics increased from 11 to 20 during the publicity campaign and fell after the ads stopped but continued at higher levels. Word of mouth communication among friends, neighbors, and relatives who had vasectomies maintained these high levels. This type of communication reduced the fear that often involves vasectomies because men hear from men they know and trust that vasectomies are harmless and do not deprive them of potency. In Sao Paulo, the percentage of men familiar with vasectomies and how they are performed increased after the campaign, but in Salvador, knowledge did not increase even though the number of vasectomies in Pro-Pater clinics increased. Organizations in Colombia and Guatemala have also been effective in educating men about vasectomies. These successes were especially relevant in Latin American where machismo has been an obstacle of family planning programs. The no-scalpel technique 1st introduced in China in 1974 reduces the fear of vasectomy and has fewer complications than the conventional technique. Further trained physicians can perform the no-scalpel technique in about 10 minutes compared with 15 minutes for the conventional technique. In 1987 during a 1-day festival in Thailand, physicians averaged 57 no-scalpel vasectomies/day compared with only 33 for conventional vasectomies. This technique has not spread to Guatemala, Brazil, Colombia, the US, and some countries in Asia and Africa. Extensive research does not indicate that vasectomy has an increased risk of testicular cancer, prostate cancer, and myocardial infarction. Physicians are working on ways to improve vasectomy. PMID:12317726

Herndon, N

1992-08-01

6

Common questions about vasectomy.  

PubMed

Vasectomy offers a safe, effective, and permanent method of male contraception, with an overall failure rate of less than 1% in pooled studies. Men older than 30 years in a stable, committed relationship appear to be the best candidates for vasectomy. The no-scalpel technique reduces operative complications, shortens operative time, and hastens resumption of sexual activity. Use of a jet injector instead of a needle to provide local anesthesia (no-needle vasectomy) may reduce pain. Bleeding and infection are short-term complications of vasectomy; long-term complications include sperm granuloma and postvasectomy pain syndrome. One postvasectomy semen analysis demonstrating azoospermia performed after three months and 20 ejaculations is sufficient to establish sterility. Vasectomy reversal is more likely to be successful if performed less than 15 years after vasectomy and in men whose female partner is younger than 40 years. PMID:24364523

Rayala, Brian Z; Viera, Anthony J

2013-12-01

7

Techniques of vasectomy.  

PubMed

Vasectomy remains a safe and effective method of contraception for men. Many variations in surgical technique currently are used by surgeons in the United States, each with its own benefits and drawbacks. Regardless of the surgical method used, the most important factor for successful vasectomy remains the experience and skill of the surgeon. The amount of evidence-based literature on the rationale for the different techniques for vasectomy remains limited. Careful study and innovation of vasectomy techniques will ensure that the most commonly performed urologic surgical procedure remain an excellent form of contraception in the future. PMID:19643233

Art, Kevin S; Nangia, Ajay K

2009-08-01

8

Unintended Pregnancy Prevention: Vasectomy  

MedlinePLUS

... form of permanent contraception, is also known as male sterilization. This procedure can prevent pregnancy by blocking the transport of sperm out of ... vasectomy. 2 In interviews with female partners of men who received ... of pregnancy after vasectomy. Obstetrics and Gynecology 2004 ;103:848– ...

9

Cellular responses to vasectomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

A number of cell populations in the reproductive tract show a response to vasectomy. Some cell types show similar responses in man and all laboratory species, whereas others show marked species variations. This chapter describes these effects in a broadly chronological order and, in a general way, considers changes close to the site of vasectomy first and the longer term

Stuart W McDonald

2000-01-01

10

Recent advances in vasectomy.  

PubMed

Vasectomy is a simple, safe, effective, and popular method of permanent male sterilization worldwide. Physicians should do various preoperative procedures with each man requesting vasectomy: complete medical history, scrotal exam, digital rectal exam, counseling on vasectomy and other forms of contraception, and fertility history. Experienced surgeons use newer, minimally invasive surgical techniques to more quickly perform vasectomy (no- scalpel vasectomy) with reduced vasectomy-related morbidity and more patient satisfaction than the traditional surgical techniques. The traditional techniques require injection of an anesthesia, e.g., lidocaine. Surgeons can perform the no-scalpel vasectomy on an outpatient basis, which reduces complications, costs, and inconvenience. A patient who has azoospermia on 2 consecutive semen analyses at an interval of 5-6 weeks is considered infertile. Even though some studies report an increased risk of prostate cancer in vasectomized men, closer examination of the studies finds a likely screening bias or do not find an increased risk. Nevertheless, providers must inform men asking for vasectomy about these studies. They should perform an annual digital rectal examination in 50-70 year old vasectomized men (as they should for all 50-70 year old men). Vasectomized men in this age group should also have an annual serum prostatic specific antigen. PMID:12287836

Matthews, G J; Schlegel, P N

1994-01-01

11

VASECTOMY AND PROSTATE CANCER  

Microsoft Academic Search

PurposeVasectomy has been associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer in some previous studies but not in others. We evaluated the association in a population based, case control study in Massachusetts.

SAMUEL M. LESKO; CAROL LOUIK; RICHARD VEZINA; LYNN ROSENBERG; SAMUEL SHAPIRO

1999-01-01

12

Patient noncompliance after vasectomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To determine the postoperative instruction compliance rate in men undergoing bilateral vasectomy.Design: Retrospective chart review.Setting: Private practice urological office.Patient(s): The records of all patients undergoing vasectomy were reviewed to determine the rate of compliance with postvasectomy follow-up instructions. It is our policy to have the patient continue to use some form of birth control until he achieves two consecutive

Thomas J. Maatman; Lisa Aldrin; George G. Carothers

1997-01-01

13

Vasectomy Reversal for Treatment of the Post-Vasectomy Pain Syndrome  

Microsoft Academic Search

PurposeThe post-vasectomy pain syndrome is a rare but troublesome complication of vasectomy. We report our experience with 32 patients who underwent vasectomy reversal for relief of the post-vasectomy pain syndrome.

Stanley A. Myers; Christopher E. Mershon; Eugene F. Fuchs

1997-01-01

14

Safety and effectiveness of vasectomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To recommend further research on vasectomy based on a systematic review of the effectiveness and safety of vasectomy.Design: A systematic MEDLINE review of the literature on the safety and effectiveness of vasectomy between 1964 and 1998.Main Outcome Measure(s): Early failure rates are Conclusion(s): Publications to date continue to support the conclusion that vasectomy is a highly effective form of

Pamela J Schwingl; Harry A Guess

2000-01-01

15

Safety and effectiveness of vasectomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To recommend further research on vasectomy based on a systematic review of the effectiveness and safety of vasectomy. Design: A systematic MEDLINE review of the literature on the safety and effectiveness of vasectomy between 1964 and 1998. Main Outcome Measure(s): Early failure rates are ,1%; however, effectiveness and complications vary with experience of surgeons and surgical technique. Early complications,

Pamela J. Schwingl; Harry A. Guess

2000-01-01

16

Wound infection following vasectomy.  

PubMed

Ninety-four patients undergoing vasectomy as day cases were studied prospectively. An overall infection rate of 32.9% was recorded and, apart from haematoma formation and the nasal carriage of organisms, no factors were found that increased the risk of infection. A preoperative hibiscrub shower did not affect the infection rate, even though it was responsible for a significant reduction in skin flora. This raises the possibility of infection following vasectomy being secondary, not occurring at the time of surgery. PMID:6626903

Randall, P E; Ganguli, L; Marcuson, R W

1983-10-01

17

One Thousand Vasectomies  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a prospective study of 1,000 people treated by vasectomy at the Margaret Pyke Centre under local anaesthesia as outpatients minor sepsis occurred in 12 cases, an abscess in one, and haematoma needing drainage in seven. Spontaneous recanalization of the vasa occurred in six patients and an unsuspected third vas was found in one.Except in patients with recanalization or a

Marian N. Barnes; J. P. Blandy; H. R. England; George Gunn; Geraldine Howard; Barbara Law; Bridgett Mason; Jean Medawar; C. Reynolds; R. J. Shearer; M. Singh; Dorothy G. Stanley-Roose

1973-01-01

18

Vasectomy Camps: A Study.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report has three parts. The first part deals with the demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of the acceptors of vasectomy and tubectomy in different camps in India. Studies included in this part have been arranged state-wide. The second part ...

1973-01-01

19

[Vasectomy and its difficulties].  

PubMed

There is an increasing demand for vasectomies due to personal convenience in the context of an ongoing rearrangement of roles and relationships for couples. French doctors remain divided in their attitudes when facing these demands, either because of personal convictions or due to the ambiguities of legislation and the insurance companies. A survey of vasectomies in various countries of the world is given. In the United States it is estimated that 15 million Americans have been vasectomized, more than 1 in 10 aged over 30, and some experts predict that voluntary sterilization will become more popular than oral contraception for couples of all ages. In many third world countries sterilization is considered the only effective solution to family planning. In China and South-Asian countries vasectomy is practiced and birth rates are almost down to European levels. In Spain, Greece, Portugal and Brazil vasectomy is illegal. In African countries it is considered unacceptable and a direct attack upon virility. In France no epidemiological studies have supplied even approximate figures. It has been found that 96% of vasectomized men (married or not) have lived with a partner for 5 years having an average age of 36-38 and 2.7 children. Liberal professions, managers and middle executives are overrepresented; employees and farmers are underrepresented. Before an operation most are well informed about concomitant problems. The prime motive is to limit the number of children. 10% to 20% mentioned a previous unwanted pregnancy due to failure of other contraceptive means. Various techniques for performing the operation and possible complications are described. PMID:3429891

Mesnard, L; Lanson, Y

1987-01-01

20

Current status of vasectomy reversal.  

PubMed

Vasectomy reversal is the most common microsurgical intervention for the treatment of male infertility. Originally introduced in 1977, microsurgical vasectomy reversal has become highly sophisticated and is a minimally invasive, highly efficient and cost-effective treatment option for men with a desire to have children after vasectomy. It can be an effective physiological method of restoring fertility in more than 90% of vasectomized men. Although assisted reproductive technology (ART) is an alternative to vasectomy reversal, it is normally associated with higher costs without offering higher cumulative chances of a pregnancy. Recovery of physiological male fertility can take up to 2 years after vasectomy reversal, especially if reversal is performed >10 years after vasectomy, owing to impaired epididymal function. Under these circumstances, ART can be used to bridge the time until recovery of natural fertility. Although the basic principles of microsurgical vasovasostomy have been established since the late 1970s, there have since been numerous technical innovations to improve the delicate operation and promising new technical modifications, particularly for vasoepididymostomy, have been described. Robotic vasectomy reversal is an emerging field in specialized urologic centers, but whether the high quality of conventional microsurgical vasectomy reversal can be matched by robotic platforms is yet to be seen. PMID:23399733

Schwarzer, J Ullrich; Steinfatt, Heiko

2013-04-01

21

Noninvasive laser vasectomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Development of a noninvasive vasectomy technique may eliminate male fear of complications (incision, bleeding, infection, and scrotal pain) and result in a more popular procedure. These studies build off previous studies that report the ability to thermally target tissue substructures with near infrared laser radiation while maintaining a healthy superficial layer of tissue through active surface cooling. Initial studies showed the ability to increase the working depth compared to that of common dermatological procedures and the translation into an ex vivo canine model targeting the vas deferens in a noninvasive laser vasectomy. Laser and cooling parameter optimization was required to determine the best possible wavelength for a safe transition to an in vivo canine model. Optical clearing agents were investigated as a mechanism to decrease tissue scattering during in vivo procedures to increase optical penetration depth and reduce the overall power required. Optical and thermal computer models were developed to determine the efficacy for a successful transition into a human model. Common clinical imaging modalities (ultrasound, high frequency ultrasound, and optical coherence tomography) were tested as possible candidates for real-time imaging feedback to determine surgical success. Finally, a noninvasive laser vasectomy prototype clamp incorporating laser, cooling, and control in a single package was designed and tested in vivo. Occlusion of the canine vas deferens able to withstand physiological burst pressures measured postoperative was shown during acute and chronic studies. This procedure is ready for azoospermia and recanalization studies in a clinical setting.

Cilip, Christopher Michael

22

Vasectomy reversal technique and results.  

PubMed

Requests for vasectomy reversal have been increasing. Much has been written about the microscopic reversals. However, considerable training and frequent use of the microscope are necessary to maintain proficiency. The literature was reviewed for the different techniques of vasectomy reversal and results vary more with the surgeon than with the technique used. The authors reviewed 66 consecutive nonmicroscope vasectomy reversals performed in an outpatient facility and noticed a pregnancy rate of 63% of those followed over 1 year. 39 cases were performed macroscopically with stents and 27 cases were performed with 2.5 loupe magnification without stents and the pregnancy rate was 65.5% and 61%, respectively. The authors conclude that the nonmicroscopic techniques for vasectomy reversal have essentially equal results as the microscopic technique and are cost effective. It is suggested that the surgeon quote the results to the patient for the operation he proposes. PMID:6830449

Denton, S E; Bohnert, W W; Kurtz, C W

1983-01-01

23

Study Links Vasectomy to Aggressive Prostate Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... page, please enable JavaScript. Study Links Vasectomy to Aggressive Prostate Cancer But the finding doesn't prove ... a vasectomy may be at increased risk for aggressive prostate cancer, a new study suggests. But the ...

24

Hormonal assessment before and after vasectomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Animal experiments have suggested that vasectomy may disturb the endocrine function of the testis. To explore this possibility in man blood was obtained from 277 men who had undergone vasectomy up to six years earlier or who were about to undergo the operation. Mean plasma testosterone concentrations seemed to be slightly higher in those who had undergone vasectomy than in

D C Skegg; J D Mathews; J Guillebaud; M P Vessey; S Biswas; K M Ferguson; Y Kitchin; M D Mansfield; I F Sommerville

1976-01-01

25

Regulatory T cells and vasectomy.  

PubMed

CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) strongly influence the early and late autoimmune responses to meiotic germ cell antigens (MGCA) and the gonadal immunopathology in vasectomized mice. This is supported by the published and recently acquired information presented here. Within 24h of unilateral vasectomy (uni-vx) the ipsilateral epididymis undergoes epithelial cell apoptosis followed by necrosis, severe inflammation, and granuloma formation. Unexpectedly, vasectomy alone induced MGCA-specific tolerance. In contrast, uni-vx plus simultaneous Treg depletion resulted in MGCA-specific autoimmune response and bilateral autoimmune orchitis. Both tolerance and autoimmunity were strictly linked to the early epididymal injury. We now discovered that testicular autoimmunity in uni-vx mice did not occur when Treg depletion was delayed by one week. Remarkably, this delayed Treg depletion also prevented tolerance induction. Therefore, tolerance depends on a rapid de novo Treg response to MGCA exposed after vasectomy. Moreover, tolerance was blunted in mice genetically deficient in PD-1 ligand, suggesting the involvement of induced Treg. We conclude that pre-existing natural Treg prevents post-vasectomy autoimmunity, whereas vasectomy-induced Treg maintains post-vasectomy tolerance. We further discovered that vasectomized mice were still resistant to autoimmune orchitis induction for at least 12-16 months; thus, tolerance is long-lasting. Although significant sperm autoantibodies of low titers became detectable in uni-vx mice at 7 months, the antibody titers fluctuated over time, suggesting a dynamic "balance" between the autoimmune and tolerance states. Finally, we observed severe epididymal fibrosis and hypo-spermatogenesis at 12 months after uni-vx: findings of highly critical clinical significance. PMID:24080233

Rival, Claudia; Wheeler, Karen; Jeffrey, Sarah; Qiao, Hui; Luu, Brian; Tewalt, Eric F; Engelhard, Victor H; Tardif, Stephen; Hardy, Daniel; del Rio, Roxana; Teuscher, Cory; Tung, Kenneth

2013-11-01

26

Effect of seminal oxidative stress on fertility after vasectomy reversal  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To evaluate seminal oxidative stress in men after vasectomy reversal and to determine whether seminal oxidative stress could predict fertility after vasectomy reversal.Design: Measurement of seminal reactive oxygen species (ROS) and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) in normal donors, men who were fertile after vasectomy reversal, and men who were infertile after vasectomy reversal.Setting: A male infertility clinic of a

Peter N Kolettis; Rakesh K Sharma; Fabio F Pasqualotto; David Nelson; Anthony J Thomas Jr; Ashok Agarwal

1999-01-01

27

The need for epididymovasostomy at vasectomy reversal plateaus in older vasectomies: a study of 1229 cases.  

PubMed

Vasectomy reversal involves either vasovasostomy (VV) or epididymovasostomy (EV), and rates of epididymal obstruction and EV increase with time after vasectomy. However, as older vasectomies may not require EV for successful reversal, we hypothesized that sperm production falls after vasectomy and can protect the system from epididymal blowout. Our objective was to define how the need for EV at reversal changes with time after vasectomy through a retrospective review of consecutive reversals performed by three surgeons over a 10-year period. Vasovasotomy was performed with Silber score 1-3 vasal fluid. EVs were performed with Silber score 4 (sperm fragments; creamy fluid) or 5 (sperm absence) fluid. Reversal procedure type was correlated with vasectomy and patient age. Post-operative patency rates, total spermatozoa and motile sperm counts in younger (<15 years) and older (>15 years) vasectomies were assessed. Simple descriptive statistics determined outcome relevance. Among 1229 patients, 406 had either unilateral (n = 252) or bilateral EV's (n = 154) constituting 33% (406/1229) of reversals. Mean patient age was 41.4±7 years (range 22-72). Median vasectomy interval was 10 years (range 1-38). Overall sperm patency rate after reversal was 84%. The rate of unilateral (EV/VV) or bilateral EV increased linearly in vasectomy intervals of 1-22 years at 3% per year, but plateaued at 72% in vasectomy intervals of 24-38 years. Sperm counts were maintained with increasing time after vasectomy, but motile sperm counts decreased significantly (p < 0.001). Pregnancy, secondary azoospermia, varicocoele and sperm granuloma were not assessed. In conclusion, and contrary to conventional thinking, the need for EV at reversal increases with time after vasectomy, but this relationship is not linear. EV rates plateau 22 years after vasectomy, suggesting that protective mechanisms ameliorate epididymal 'blowout'. Upon reversal, sperm output is maintained with time after vasectomy, but motile sperm counts decrease linearly, suggesting epididymal dysfunction influences semen quality after reversal. PMID:24243789

Mui, P; Perkins, A; Burrows, P J; Marks, S F; Turek, P J

2014-01-01

28

Vasectomy and the risk of prostate cancer.  

PubMed Central

Even if there is a weak association between vasectomy and subsequent prostate cancer, we believe that large-scale studies on this question should be of low priority in developing countries where vasectomy is widely practised and where the incidence of prostate cancer is low. Arguments to justify this point of view are presented.

Wildschut, H. I.; Monincx, W.

1994-01-01

29

Ultrastructural changes in rat epididymis after vasectomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Epididymal biopsies from rats that had undergone unilateral or bilateral vasectomies from one to eight months previously were compared with biopsies from their contralateral side or from normal controls to ascertain what ultrastructural changes had occurred. After vasectomy, spermatozoa appeared to dissolve in the lumen of the caput epididymidis and to be absorbed by the principal cells. About 5 weeks

Nancy J. Alexander

1973-01-01

30

PATIENT CHARACTERISTICS ASSOCIATED WITH VASECTOMY REVERSAL  

Microsoft Academic Search

PurposeMore than 30 million couples throughout the world are using vasectomy as a method of birth control. It is estimated that up to 6% of men who undergo voluntary sterilization will eventually request reversal, despite the high cost and relatively low success rate of the procedure. We identified characteristics that predict which vasectomy patients may request reversal. We also examined

J. M. POTTS; F. F. PASQUALOTTO; D. NELSON; A THOMASJR; A. AGARWAL

1999-01-01

31

Who asks for vasectomy reversal and why?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Of the 76 men requesting reversal of vasectomy who were interviewed at Charing Cross Hospital between June 1978 and September 1981, 31 were still married. These men had decided to have a vasectomy during a crisis-a recent pregnancy or financial stress being the commonest reason. Most wanted another child but others wished to be \\

G Howard

1982-01-01

32

Experiences of Vasectomy: A Phenomenological Study  

PubMed Central

Background: Irregular growth of population is considered as a serious threat to the international community. It is a major obstacle for socioeconomic development. One of the methods to control the population is by providing effective methods of contraception. Vasectomy, as a simple and effective contraceptive method, has been approved by the World Health Organization (WHO). It is very important to involve men in the control of population and the promotion of reproductive health. Aims: This study was conducted with the aim of describing the experiences of the men who underwent vasectomy. Materials and Methods: This qualitative study was performed by using a phenomenological research design. The sample consisted of 14 vasectomized men selected through purposive sampling method. In-depth and open interviews with participants were conducted to collect the data. Results: The results were transcribed and recorded in comprehensive field notes. Colaizzi's method was used to analyze the data. Four themes emerged from the obtained results of the present study, which described the structure of the experiences of men as follows: Opinions about vasectomy, own perceptions about vasectomy, experiences with the procedure, and recommendation of vasectomy to others. Conclusion: Vasectomy can influence achievement of family planning goals and participation of men in this regard. The results of this study can help the planners and health-care providers for appropriate interventions, and training and counseling programmers to increase the acceptability and uptake of vasectomy in the society.

Hosseini, Habibollah; Abdi, Fatemeh

2012-01-01

33

VASECTOMY REVERSAL FOR THE POST-VASECTOMY PAIN SYNDROME: : A CLINICAL AND HISTOLOGICAL EVALUATION  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: The cause of the post-vasectomy pain syndrome is unclear. Some postulated etiologies include epididymal congestion, tender sperm granuloma and\\/or nerve entrapment at the vasec- tomy site. To our knowledge nerve proliferation has not been evaluated previously as a cause of pain. Vasectomy reversal is reportedly successful for relieving pain in some patients. We report our experience and correlate histological

AJAY K. NANGIA; JONATHAN L. MYLES; ANTHONY J. THOMAS

2000-01-01

34

Increasing the availability of vasectomy in public-sector clinics.  

PubMed

A program designed to improve the availability of vasectomy in public-sector clinics trained physicians at 43 facilities in no-scalpel vasectomy between 1993 and 1995. Among the 38 clinics that responded to a follow-up survey in 1996, the number of clinics providing vasectomies rose from 23 to 32, an increase of almost 40%, while the number of vasectomies performed rose by 18%. Seventeen of the 32 clinics performed more vasectomies after the training; 10 of the 17 had not previously provided the procedure. In-depth interviews with staff from seven sites that experienced large caseload increases and from seven that experienced decreases identified three elements for the successful establishment or expansion of vasectomy services-sufficient numbers of trained providers, funds to subsidize vasectomies for men who cannot afford them and activities to raise awareness about the availability of low-cost or free vasectomy. PMID:9258652

Haws, J M; McKenzie, M; Mehta, M; Pollack, A E

1997-01-01

35

The safety of vasectomy: recent concerns.  

PubMed

Vasectomy has been accepted for family planning by approximately 42 million couples worldwide, the majority of whom live in developing countries. It is a highly reliable and safe contraceptive method, which has been extensively studied. Recently, however, renewed concerns have been raised about a possible effect between vasectomy and cancer of the prostate many years after the procedure has been performed. These concerns are based on research conducted in the USA, where there is a high and rising incidence of prostate cancer. This review discusses the evidence for this association and its potential impact in developing countries. The factors influencing the development and growth of prostate cancer are poorly understood and complicate any research into risk factors for the disease. Overall incidences of prostate cancer in some developed countries, such as the USA, are fifty times higher than in some developing countries, such as China. The majority of epidemiological studies on the relationship between vasectomy and prostate cancer have been based in the USA, but the findings are inconsistent and the reported associations weak. On the basis of currently available data, no changes in family planning policies with regard to vasectomy are warranted, but the concerns raised by these studies require that research into any possible association be undertaken in developing countries where vasectomy is widely practised. PMID:8324861

Farley, T M; Meirik, O; Mehta, S; Waites, G M

1993-01-01

36

The safety of vasectomy: recent concerns.  

PubMed Central

Vasectomy has been accepted for family planning by approximately 42 million couples worldwide, the majority of whom live in developing countries. It is a highly reliable and safe contraceptive method, which has been extensively studied. Recently, however, renewed concerns have been raised about a possible effect between vasectomy and cancer of the prostate many years after the procedure has been performed. These concerns are based on research conducted in the USA, where there is a high and rising incidence of prostate cancer. This review discusses the evidence for this association and its potential impact in developing countries. The factors influencing the development and growth of prostate cancer are poorly understood and complicate any research into risk factors for the disease. Overall incidences of prostate cancer in some developed countries, such as the USA, are fifty times higher than in some developing countries, such as China. The majority of epidemiological studies on the relationship between vasectomy and prostate cancer have been based in the USA, but the findings are inconsistent and the reported associations weak. On the basis of currently available data, no changes in family planning policies with regard to vasectomy are warranted, but the concerns raised by these studies require that research into any possible association be undertaken in developing countries where vasectomy is widely practised.

Farley, T. M.; Meirik, O.; Mehta, S.; Waites, G. M.

1993-01-01

37

Vasectomy  

MedlinePLUS

... area experienced as a pleasurable wave of tingling sensations through parts of the body. pelvis: The bowl-shaped bone that supports the spine and holds up the digestive, urinary and reproductive organs. The legs connect to the body at the ...

38

Vasectomy  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... 5/5/2008 2 A section of each vas deferens is then cut. The edges are then clumped together, tied, clipped, or any combination of the above. During this procedure, you may feel some tugging in the scrotum. This may be slightly uncomfortable but not painful. One or two sutures may be used to close ...

39

Health consequences of vasectomy in India.  

PubMed Central

Vasectomy acceptance has been declining in India during the past 20 years. Even if the risk of prostate cancer is marginally higher in vasectomized men, this risk in India has to be assessed against the immediate safety and other possible long-term benefits of this procedure. The Indian Council of Medical Research has launched a case-control study, which is unlikely to be time-consuming or beyond the available means and resources, in order to obtain definitive data on this problem. Meanwhile, vasectomy remains an excellent procedure for the couple seeking permanent methods of contraception, and specific efforts to promote its acceptance must continue in India.

Tripathy, S. P.; Ramachandran, C. R.; Ramachandran, P.

1994-01-01

40

[Hydrocele, spermatocele, and vasectomy : Management of complications].  

PubMed

Indications for hydrocele and spermatocele treatment are based on diagnosis with high-resolution ultrasonography. It must be clear whether hydrocele or spermatocele lead to impairment of the patient - asymptomatic findings do not need correction. In case of younger men, the wish for children must be taken into account as both surgical procedures may lead to infertility, especially spermatocele resection may lead to epididymal obstruction. Advantages and disadvantages of the intervention must be discussed with the patient in detail. In men with a planned vasectomy, the physician must be certain that the patient understands the definitive character of this form of contraception. Men who are not aware of this condition or have conflicts with their partners may not be the best candidates for surgical vasectomy. All three treatment options (hydrocelectomy, spermatocele resection, and vasectomy) may be accompanied by fertility preservation procedures (e.g., cryopreservation of semen prior to surgery). Alternatively, the surgery should not be performed if any doubts exist. Postoperative management includes follow-up examinations and in case of vasectomy after 6-12 weeks and several ejaculations at least two semen analysis with proven azoospermia after centrifugation (or <100,000 immotile spermatozoa) should be documented. Compliance of men is best when this follow-up appointment is already scheduled at the time of surgery. PMID:24806800

Kliesch, S

2014-05-01

41

Effect of Vasectomy on Psychological Functioning  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pie- to postoperative changes in couples electing vasectomy are discussed. High satisfaction with the operation is found, along with apparently desirable changes in attitudes toward child rearing and views of self and spouse. There is, however, concurrent evidence (both on psychometric scales and on clinical ratings) of adverse psychological changes in both husband and wife and of reduced marital satisfaction

FREDERICK J. ZIEGLER; DAVID A. RODGERS

42

Vasectomy surgical techniques: a systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: A wide variety of surgical techniques are used to perform vasectomy. The purpose of this systematic review was to assess if any surgical techniques to isolate or occlude the vas are associated with better outcomes in terms of occlusive and contraceptive effectiveness, and complications. METHODS: We searched MEDLINE (1966-June 2003), EMBASE (1980-June 2003), reference lists of retrieved articles, urology

Michel Labrecque; Caroline Dufresne; Mark A Barone; Karine St-Hilaire

2004-01-01

43

VASECTOMY AND HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS TYPE 1 IN SEMEN  

Microsoft Academic Search

PurposeHuman immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV) is cultured more often from seminal cells than seminal plasma. Because vasectomy causes dramatic reductions in seminal cells and also eliminates secretions from proximal sites in the male reproductive tract, vasectomy may change the potential infectiousness of semen.

JOHN N. KRIEGER; APICHART NIRAPATHPONGPORN; MONTHCHAI CHAIYAPORN; GREGORY PETERSON; IRENA NIKOLAEVA; ROBERT AKRIDGE; SUSAN O. ROSS; ROBERT W. COOMBS

1998-01-01

44

Computer simulation of vasectomy for wolf control  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Recovering gray wolf (Canis lupus) populations in the Lake Superior region of the United States are prompting state management agencies to consider strategies to control population growth. In addition to wolf removal, vasectomy has been proposed. To predict the population effects of different sterilization and removal strategies, we developed a simulation model of wolf dynamics using simple rules for demography and dispersal. Simulations suggested that the effects of vasectomy and removal in a disjunct population depend largely on the degree of annual immigration. With low immigration, periodic sterilization reduced pup production and resulted in lower rates of territory recolonization. Consequently, average pack size, number of packs, and population size were significantly less than those for an untreated population. Periodically removing a proportion of the population produced roughly the same trends as did sterilization; however, more than twice as many wolves had to be removed than sterilized. With high immigration, periodic sterilization reduced pup production but not territory recolonization and produced only moderate reductions in population size relative to an untreated population. Similar reductions in population size were obtained by periodically removing large numbers of wolves. Our analysis does not address the possible effects of vasectomy on larger wolf populations, but it suggests that the subject should be considered through modeling or field testing.

Haight, R.G.; Mech, L.D.

1997-01-01

45

The psychological effects of vasectomy for American men  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviewed evidence concerning the psychological effects of vasectomy for American men. Surveys of postoperative sexual behavior and satisfaction and/or happiness were cited, as were data from studies employing clinical interviews and/or psychological tests. (Author/SB)

Bloom, Larry J.; Houston, B. Kent

1976-01-01

46

Vasectomy and prostate cancer: is there a link?  

PubMed

New Zealand had the highest prevalence of vasectomy in the world. A national survey conducted over the period 1983-86 found that 23% of married women aged 25-44 relied upon their husbands' vasectomies for contraception, while only 19% relied upon tubal ligation. It seems that in no other country male sterilization is more common than female sterilization. Vasectomy seems to be at least as effective as tubal ligation and is even less commonly followed by significant complications, despite unfounded scares over time about potential associations with the decreased production of testicular hormone, atherosclerosis, and testicular cancer. There is, however, current cause for concern that vasectomies potentially increase the risk of prostate cancer. Studies have shown the relative risk of prostate cancer to increase with the number of years since vasectomy. One may attribute these findings to chance, bias, confounding, or a causal relationship, with the first two factors being less likely. We have a poor understanding of the genesis of prostate cancer. The World Health Organization convened a meeting in October 1991 to review the existing biological and epidemiological evidence for any such relationship. The organization recommended future research, but concluded that a causal relationship between vasectomy and risk of prostate cancer appeared unlikely and that changes to family planning policies were unwarranted. In New Zealand, however, where the prevalence of cancer before age 75; 400 men die annually. This high rate of mortality has increased in recent decades. Even though the verdict is still out on the link between vasectomy and prostate cancer, New Zealand doctors should be informing candidates for vasectomy about the possible link with prostate cancer, as well as about the risks and benefits of other contraceptive methods. PMID:8332290

Skegg, D

1993-06-23

47

Clinical aspects of vasectomies performed in the United States in 1995  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives. Currently, no surveillance system collects data on the numbers and characteristics of vasectomies performed annually in the United States. This study provides nationwide data on the numbers of vasectomies and the use of no-scalpel vasectomy, various occlusion methods, fascial interposition, and protocols for analyzing semen after vasectomy.Methods. A retrospective mail survey (with telephone follow-up) was conducted of 1800 urology,

Jeanne M. Haws; Gwendolyn T. Morgan; Amy E. Pollack; Lisa M. Koonin; Robert J. Magnani; Paul M. Gargiullo

1998-01-01

48

SHOULD ALL UROLOGISTS PERFORMING VASECTOMY REVERSALS BE ABLE TO PERFORM VASOEPIDIDYMOSTOMIES IF REQUIRED?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose:While vasectomy reversal is a highly successful procedure 10% to 30% of reversals may fail. Despite the general consensus that an epididymal obstruction may occur following a vasectomy and that some men should undergo vasoepididymostomy (VE) rather than vasovasostomy (VV), the practice of many urologists in our region has been to offer only VV for vasectomy reversal. We examined the

ASHIS CHAWLA; JEANNE O’BRIEN; MICHAEL LISI; ARMAND ZINI; KEITH JARVI

2004-01-01

49

Vasectomy reversal performed 15 years or more after vasectomy: correlation of pregnancy outcome with partner age and with pregnancy results of in vitro fertilization with intracytoplasmic sperm injection  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To document a contemporary series of vasectomy reversals performed in men 15 years or more after vasectomy and to correlate the results with spousal age and results of ICSI for obstructive azoospermia.Setting: University referral center for male infertility.Design: Retrospective analysis of a single surgeon’s experience compared with reported ICSI results.Participant(s): One hundred seventy-three men who had vasectomy reversal 15

Eugene F Fuchs; Richard A Burt

2002-01-01

50

Effectiveness and Complications Associated With 2 Vasectomy Occlusion Techniques  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: We compared the effectiveness and complications associated with 2 common vasec- tomy occlusion techniques, namely clipping and excision of a small vas segment and thermal cautery with fascial interposition and an open testicular end. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the computerized records of 3,761 men who underwent initial vasectomy at a single university hospital family planning clinic and

MICHEL LABRECQUE; HANIF NAZERALI; MYRTO MONDOR; VINCENT FORTIN; MARLINA NASUTION

2002-01-01

51

The effects of vasectomy on testicular metabolism in the guinea-pig.  

PubMed

The effects of vasectomy on testicular DNA production were studied in guinea-pigs at 2 weeks and 2 and 6 months after surgery. By 6 months, vasectomy had resulted in lower testicular weight and absolute DNA, RNA and protein contents, although RNA and DNA concentrations/protein were unchanged. Incorporation of thymidine into the testis had decreased by 2 weeks after vasectomy, and continued to do so unless the ductal system subsequently ruptured and formed a granuloma when thymidine incorporation returned to normal control levels. It is suggested that in the guinea=pig vasectomy alters spermatogenesis by reducing testicular DNA synthesis. PMID:439073

Howards, S S; Flickinger, C J; Noller, D W; Panko, W B

1979-03-01

52

"If you do vasectomy and come back here weak, I will divorce you": a qualitative study of community perceptions about vasectomy in Southern Ghana  

PubMed Central

Background Male involvement in contraceptive use is increasingly becoming a global reproductive health issue. Vasectomy is one of the two male modern contraceptive methods espoused by the National Family Planning Policy in Ghana. Despite these advocacies, there are reports of low patronage of this method in Ghana. This study adhering to RATS guidelines on qualitative research therefore explored the social and cultural factors that may be affecting the low vasectomy uptake in Southern Ghana. Methods The study was conducted in Sefwi Bibiani-Ahwiaso Bekwai (SBAB) District and Komenda-Edina-Eguafo-Abrem (KEEA) Municipal area in the Western and Central regions of Ghana respectively. Twelve Focus Group Discussions were held with both male and female community members. In-depth interviews were also carried out with Community Health Officers (CHOs), Community Health Volunteers (CHVs) and health managers at both the district and regional levels. The discussions and interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using Nvivo 10. Results The study revealed that vasectomy was perceived as an act against God, which was punishable either by death or answerable on judgement day. Vasectomy was also perceived to be a form of castration, which can make men weak and incapable, thereby unable to satisfy their wives sexually, leading to marital conflicts. Women were more concerned about the negative effects of vasectomy on men. Cafalgin and panacin which are locally manufactured analgesics were perceived to have contraceptive abilities and therefore used by men as an alternative to modern contraceptive methods. Conclusions Stigma and the misconceptions in the community may be accounting for the low vasectomy uptake in Ghana despite several advocacy strategies. Women were highly influential in a man's decision on vasectomy. This calls for the need to increase health education to demystify the misconceptions about vasectomy. Vasectomy-related campaign messages should target both men and women.

2014-01-01

53

Effects of Vasectomy on Spermatogenesis and Fertility Outcome After Testicular Sperm Extraction Combined With ICSI  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Each year 40 000 men have a vasectomy in the UK whilst another 2400 request a reversal to begin a second family. Sperm can now be obtained by testicular biopsy and subsequently used in assisted conception with ICSI. The study aims were to compare sperm yields of men post-vasectomy or with obstructive azoospermia (OA) of unknown aetiology with yields

C. M. McVicar; D. A. O’Neill; N. McClure; B. Clements; S. McCullough; S. E. M. Lewis

2006-01-01

54

Late failure of vasectomy after two documented analyses showing azoospermic semen  

Microsoft Academic Search

From April 1970 to December 1980, 14 047 men underwent vasectomy for sterilisation under local anaesthetic at this clinic. In each man sterility was confirmed by two analyses of semen showing azoospermia. Allowing for a minimum follow up of three years, the wives of six of these men subsequently became pregnant between 16 months and three years after vasectomy. Analyses

T Philp; J Guillebaud; D Budd

1984-01-01

55

HOW LITTLE IS ENOUGH? THE EVIDENCE FOR POST-VASECTOMY TESTING  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose:Post-vasectomy semen analysis (PVSA) is the traditional method of confirming sterility after vasectomy. However, PVSA protocols vary in the end points accepted, and the number and timing of tests. In this systematic review we make evidence based recommendations on the appropriate PVSA protocol.

TABATHA GRIFFIN; REBECCA TOOHER; KRIS NOWAKOWSKI; MARK LLOYD; GUY MADDERN

2005-01-01

56

Results of a pilot study of the time to azoospermia after vasectomy in Mexico city  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a joint pilot study by Family Health International (FHI), AVSC International, and the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS), information was gathered on the determinants of azoospermia following vasectomy on 38 healthy men who chose vasectomy for contraception. The time and number of ejaculations associated with loss of sperm motility and loss of sperm eosin vital staining were also

M. Cortes; A. Flick; M. A. Barone; R. Amatya; A. E. Pollack; J. Otero-Flores; C. Juarez; S. McMullen

1997-01-01

57

He's a real man: a qualitative study of the social context of couples' vasectomy decisions among a racially diverse population.  

PubMed

Vasectomy has advantages with respect to safety and cost when compared with female sterilization. The reasons underlying the overall low use of vasectomy, particularly among Black and Latinos, have not been adequately explored. The goals of this study were to (a) explore the social context of vasectomy decisions and (b) generate hypotheses about the social factors contributing to differences in vasectomy use by race/ethnicity. Fourteen group and nine couples interviews were conducted. Participants were 37 heterosexual couples aged 25 to 55 years who had reached their desired family size and self-identified as Black, Latino, or White. Participants discussed reasons that men and women would or would not select male sterilization. Reasons to select vasectomy included a desire to care for their current family, sharing contraceptive responsibility, and infidelity. Reasons not to select vasectomy included negative associations with the term sterilization, loss of manhood, and permanence. Misconceptions about vasectomy included misunderstandings about the vasectomy procedure and adverse postvasectomy sexual function. In addition, Black and Latino participants cited perceived ease of reversibility of female sterilization and lack of support around vasectomy as reasons not to choose it. Improving communication and social support for vasectomy, particularly among Black and Latino communities, may improve vasectomy utilization. Misconceptions regarding female and male sterilization should be targeted in counseling sessions to ensure men, women, and couples are making informed contraceptive decisions. PMID:23144022

Shih, Grace; Dubé, Kate; Sheinbein, Miriam; Borrero, Sonya; Dehlendorf, Christine

2013-05-01

58

Demographics of Men Receiving Vasectomies in the US Military 2000-2009  

PubMed Central

Background We hypothesize that there is a higher incidence of vasectomy within the military at a younger age based on this equal access health care system. Materials and Methods A review of the CHAMPS military database was conducted for men receiving vasectomies from 2000 to 2009. Age at vasectomy, number of children, race, religion, and marital status were recorded and incidence was computed. Results Total of 82,945 vasectomies was performed. The overall incidence to have a vasectomy was approximately 7.10 per 1000 men. The highest rate of occurrence was 14.4 per 1000 men in men 30–34 years old. Whites had a higher rate than blacks at 10.03 per 1000 men compared to 6.27 per 1000 men. Protestants had the highest rate at 8.44 per 1000 men, and Jewish people had the lowest at 1.86 per 1000 men. Married men had a rate of 12.3 per 1000 men, whereas single men were 1.03 per 1000 men. Conclusions The incidence to have a vasectomy in the military was 7.10 per 1000 men, with an age adjusted rate at 8.66 per 1000 men. This information may assist primary care providers in discussing vasectomies as a permanent form of contraception.

Santomauro, Michael; Masterson, James; Marguet, Charles; Crain, Donald

2012-01-01

59

Development of a No-Scalpel Vasectomy Residency Training Program in a Community Family Practice Clinic.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Several excellent review articles have been published recently which discuss the advantages of no scalpel vasectomy and describe the procedural technique. Lacking from these reviews are details regarding how to enlist patients for a training program and s...

D. G. Spradlin

1997-01-01

60

Incidence of disease after vasectomy: a record linkage retrospective cohort study  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE--To determine whether vasectomy is associated with an increased risk of several diseases, and in particular testicular cancer, after operation. DESIGN--Retrospective cohort study using linked medical record abstracts. SETTING--Six health districts in Oxford region. SUBJECTS--13,246 men aged 25-49 years who had undergone vasectomy between 1970 and 1986, and 22,196 comparison subjects who had been admitted during the same period for

H. Nienhuis; M. Goldacre; V. Seagroatt; L. Gill; M. Vessey

1992-01-01

61

Long-term effect of vasectomy on spermatogenesis in men: a morphometric study.  

PubMed

Spermatogenic damage may occur after vasectomy, and the damage is pressure mediated, occurring when the occluded reproductive tract is unable to accommodate additional sperm produced by the testis. This study aimed to determine the long-term effect of vasectomy on spermatogenesis in humans and clarify how the balance between sperm production in the testis and sperm storage in or removal from the tract might be maintained. During inguinal hernia repair, an open biopsy was performed to obtain testicular tissue blocks from 51 Chinese men (aged ?50 years), of whom 25 (control group) had not undergone vasectomy and 26 (vasectomized group) had undergone bilateral vasectomy 22-42 years before. Methacrylate resin-embedded testicular sections were made, and morphometric studies were performed using light microscopy. In addition, sizes of the testis and epididymis were estimated with ultrasonography. The testicular tissue blocks obtained from one control and seven vasectomized men consisted almost completely of connective tissue. In the other 43 men, significant differences were not found between the two groups in the testicular or epididymal size, qualitative histology or quantitative parameters including the mean diameter or volume fraction of the seminiferous tubules. In conclusion, sperm production and sperm storage/removal reached a static equilibrium after vasectomy, likely due to spermatogenic degeneration or less sperm production as a result of aging or due to vasectomy-induced testicular (interstitial) fibrosis. Thus, complications that might occur in association with overproduction of sperm and distension of the tract would disappear or be relieved with time. PMID:23435469

Xiang, Yu; Luo, Peng; Cao, Yun; Yang, Zheng-Wei

2013-05-01

62

[Vasectomy on request: still a moot point for discussion].  

PubMed

In the Federal Republic of Germany, 35.000-40.000 individuals undergo sterilization annually for family planning. A great amount of legal uncertainty surround penal, civil, and tort law (damage and liability of doctor) accountability because of conflicting statutes and interpretations of laws. The penal code on sterilization and abortion has been recently rewritten. Some of the indications for vasectomy are medical, medical-criminological, medical-social, and eugenic. Vasectomies are also performed on request of the patient; this is defined in different ways. A 1871 penal law pronounced the making of a person infertile a bodily injury punishable by 10 years in jail, but if the doctor could adduce special circumstances justifying it, the act was exonerated. Voluntary choice was not acceptable, only medical indication was valid. In 1933, the legal justification of voluntary choice of sterilization was confirmed, and even severe bodily injury was justifiable as long as it was accepted by the affected person, except if the act conflicted with accepted standards of habit, custom, and morals. Medical, eugenic and criminological-sexual medical reasons for sterilization were allowed, other reasons were punishable. In 1943, sterilization by radiation and hormone treatment also became punishable, except in the above allowances. In 1946, the penal code was annulled to extirpate Nazi thinking. The law that replaced it was put out of force in 1955, thus restoring the formed edict about moral conflict in voluntary choice. In 1963, a doctor was punished for 140 voluntary sterilizations, but the 1933 law reduced his sentence to 6 months instead of several years. After that, voluntary sterilization was no longer punished by a German court, but, in 1976, the controversial issue of legal justification of sterilization under free will was tackled in a verdict of the Bundesgerichtshof or Federal Court (BGH) under civil law. A 34-year old mother of 3 children was sterilized in the course of the delivery of the third child. She demanded compensation for pain, but the courts rejected her request on grounds of voluntary choice of procedure. Since, in 1970 and 1976, the Convention of German Doctors endorsed only medical-genetical and severe social reasons for sterilization, the BGH decision was also meant to indicate that the free choice of sterilization was not without limits. The doctor had to make sure that his act was legally acceptable by observing the rules of medical law: exact clarification of the type of treatment, disclosure of attendant consequences, side effects, risks and complications, the danger of failure of sterilization, and education about alternative methods. On demand vasectomy should be undertaken with restraint, since there is no recourse against the doctor; thus, unpleasant consequences could be avoided. PMID:12286653

Muller-mattheis, V; Bonte, W; Ackermann, R

1988-11-01

63

Scrotal haematoma following vasectomy: an unusual surgical emergency.  

PubMed

A 46-year-old man who underwent a vasectomy at his general practitioner presented to the emergency department at a regional hospital with a 6 h history of scrotal swelling and skin discolouration. He was haemodynamically stable on admission, with a large, dark red swelling in his scrotum. The patient was admitted to an acute surgical unit for exploration of his scrotum. Bilateral transverse incisions were made in the patient's groin, and approximately 600 mL of blood was drained from the patient's scrotum. Postoperatively, the patient performed well, and was discharged home on oral antibiotics and analgesia. The patient's scrotum healed well, and after 2 months of follow-up, he was discharged. PMID:24395881

O'Leary, Bobby

2014-01-01

64

Vasectomy by ligation and excision, with or without fascial interposition: a randomized controlled trial [ISRCTN77781689  

PubMed Central

Background Randomized controlled trials comparing different vasectomy occlusion techniques are lacking. Thus, this multicenter randomized trial was conducted to compare the probability of the success of ligation and excision vasectomy with, versus without, fascial interposition (i.e. placing a layer of the vas sheath between two cut ends of the vas). Methods The trial was conducted between December 1999 and June 2002 with a single planned interim analysis. Men requesting vasectomies at eight outpatient clinics in seven countries in North America, Latin America, and Asia were included in the study. The men were randomized to receive vasectomy with versus without fascial interposition. All surgeons performed the vasectomies using the no-scalpel approach to the vas. Participants had a semen analysis two weeks after vasectomy and then every four weeks up to 34 weeks. The primary outcome measure was time to azoospermia. Additional outcome measures were time to severe oligozoospermia (<100 000 sperm/mL) and vasectomy failure based on semen analyses. Results We halted recruitment after the planned interim analysis, when 841 men had been enrolled. Fascial interposition decreased time to azoospermia (hazard ratio [HR], 1.35; P < 0.0001) and time to severe oligozoospermia (HR, 1.32; P < 0.0001) and reduced failures based on semen analysis by about half, from 12.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 9.7 to 16.3) to 5.9% (95% CI, 3.8 to 8.6) (P < 0.0001). Older men benefited less from fascial interposition than younger men in terms of the speed of achieving azoospermia. However, the number of vasectomy failures was reduced to a similar degree in all age groups. Slightly more adverse events occurred in the fascial interposition group, but the difference was not significant. These failure rates may appear high to practitioners in countries such as the USA, but they are similar to results from other careful studies of ligation and excision techniques. Conclusion Fascial interposition significantly improves vasectomy success when ligation and excision is the method of vas occlusion. A limitation of this study is that the correlation between postvasectomy sperm concentrations and risk of pregnancy is not well quantified.

Sokal, David; Irsula, Belinda; Hays, Melissa; Chen-Mok, Mario; Barone, Mark A

2004-01-01

65

Men's narratives of vasectomy: rearticulating masculinity and contraceptive responsibility in San José, Costa Rica.  

PubMed

This article interrogates the modes by which cultural constructions of male contraceptive use emerge in Costa Rica by analyzing men's narratives of vasectomy. Drawing on ethnographic research data, I examine men's contraceptive decision making and perspectives on vasectomy and specify the ways they work through their vasectomy to rearticulate the relationship between masculinity and contraceptive responsibility and tensions in an emerging Costa Rican social modernity. Following Oudshoorn's (2003) analysis on male contraceptive research, this article highlights contraceptive technologies and men's narratives of these technologies as key sites for examining gender politics in contemporary societies and the materialization of new social orders. In the discussion, I argue that the men's narratives examined here potentiate creation of an "alternative technosociality" (Oudshoorn 2003) in Costa Rica, in which men taking contraceptive responsibility does not constitute performing a subordinate masculinity, but simply another way of acting as men. PMID:23674321

Pomales, Tony O

2013-03-01

66

Effects of vasectomy on seminal plasma alkaline phosphatase in male alpacas (Vicugña pacos).  

PubMed

Azoospermia is a common finding in male alpacas which present for infertility. The challenge is to differentiate azoospermia of testicular origin from non-testicular origin. In several species, alkaline phosphatase (AP) concentrations in seminal plasma have been used as a diagnostic marker of contributions of the testis and epididymis to the ejaculate. The purpose of this study was to determine whether AP assay could differentiate testicular from non-testicular azoospermia in male alpacas. An experimental model of bilateral outflow obstruction (pre-scrotal vasectomy) was used in 22 male alpacas, aged 2-9 years. No reproductive history was available. Animals were submitted for electroejaculation (EE) under general anaesthesia and vasectomy performed. Five weeks later, animals were submitted for EE. Vasectomy was not successful in one animal, which was removed from analysis. AP levels were compared in seminal plasma in the pre- and post-vasectomy samples. The mean ± SEM concentration of AP in pre-vasectomy seminal plasma was 504.29 ± 166.45 U/l (range 10-2910); the post-vasectomy levels were 252.48 ± 81.77 U/l (range 0-1640; p = 0.06). In 71.4% of animals, AP levels decreased, varying from 18% to 100% reduction. Results of this study suggest that AP is not produced exclusively by the testis and epididymis in alpacas and that AP assay is not a valid diagnostic test for determination of origin of azoospermia; the gold standard for diagnosis of origin of azoospermia remains testicular biopsy. PMID:23790090

Pearson, L K; Campbell, A J; Sandoval, S; Tibary, A

2013-12-01

67

Vasectomy and prostate cancer: results from a multiethnic case-control study.  

PubMed

Vasectomy has been associated in some studies with increased prostate cancer risk. This association was assessed on the basis of data collected in a large multiethnic case control study of prostate cancer that was conducted in the United States (Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Hawaii) and Canada (Toronto and Vancouver). In home interviews conducted with newly diagnosed prostate cancer case patients (diagnosed between January 1, 1989 and December 31, 1991 as well as January 1, 1987 and December 31, 1988) and control subjects, information was obtained on the participants' medical history, including a history of vasectomy and the age at which the procedure was performed as well as other potential risk factors. Blood samples were collected from control subjects only and were assayed for concentration of total testosterone, percent of free testosterone, percent of bioavailable testosterone, dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) using an automated, polyclonal-monoclonal immunochemiluminometric prostate-specific antigen (PSA) assay. The analysis was based on 1642 prostate cancer patients and 1636 control subjects. The analysis of PSA, androgens, and SHBG by vasectomy status was based on 850 control subjects with normal PSA concentrations. A history of vasectomy was not significantly associated with prostate cancer risk among all racial/ethnic groups combined (odds ratio [OR] = 1.1; Whites OR = 0.94; Blacks OR = 1.0; or Chinese-Americans OR = 0.96). Among Japanese-Americans, the OR was 1.8, but the statistically significant elevation in risk (OR = 4.1) was limited to more educated men with a history of vasectomy and those with localized cancers (OR = 5.3). ORs did not vary significantly by age at vasectomy or years since vasectomy. Lower serum concentration of SHBG and a higher ratio of DHT to testosterone was found among vasectomized control subjects than among nonvasectomized control subjects. The findings do not support previous reports of increased prostate cancer risk associated with vasectomy. However, the altered endocrine profiles of vasectomized control subjects warrant further evaluation in longitudinal studies. PMID:7538594

John, E M; Whittemore, A S; Wu, A H; Kolonel, L N; Hislop, T G; Howe, G R; West, D W; Hankin, J; Dreon, D M; Teh, C Z

1995-05-01

68

Clinical and Consumer Trial Performance of a Sensitive Immunodiagnostic Home Test That Qualitatively Detects Low Concentrations of Sperm Following Vasectomy  

PubMed Central

Purpose Compliance with post-vasectomy semen analysis could be improved with the availability of a simple, rapid and accurate home test. SpermCheck Vasectomy®, a highly sensitive lateral flow immunochromatographic diagnostic device, was designed to detect extreme oligospermia or azoospermia in men after vasectomy. We report the results of clinical and consumer testing of SpermCheck. Materials and Methods A prospective, noncomparative observational study assessed the ability of SpermCheck Vasectomy to predict post-vasectomy sperm counts obtained using a hemacytometer procedure based on standard World Health Organization methodology. Consumer studies evaluated ease of use. Results A cohort of 144 post-vasectomy semen samples was tested in the clinical trial. SpermCheck was 96% accurate in predicting whether sperm counts were greater or less than a threshold of 250,000 sperm per ml, a level associated with little or no risk of pregnancy. Sensitivity was 93% (95% CI 79% to 98%) and specificity was 97% (91% to 99%). The positive predictive value of the test was 93% (79% to 98%), and most importantly the negative predictive value was 97% (91% to 99%). The test gave a positive result 100% of the time at sperm concentrations of 385,000/ml or greater. Consumer studies with 109 lay volunteers showed that SpermCheck was easy to use. Volunteers obtained the correct or expected test result in every case and the correct response rate on a 20 question survey about the test was 97%. Conclusions SpermCheck Vasectomy, a simple and reliable immunodiagnostic test that can provide evidence of vasectomy success or failure, offers a useful alternative to improve compliance with post-vasectomy sperm monitoring. It is currently the only Food and Drug Administration approved test for this purpose.

Klotz, Kenneth L.; Coppola, Michael A.; Labrecque, Michel; Brugh, Victor M.; Ramsey, Kim; Kim, Kyung-ah; Conaway, Mark R.; Howards, Stuart S.; Flickinger, Charles J.; Herr, John C.

2009-01-01

69

VASECTOMY REVERSAL ASSOCIATED WITH INCREASED REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES PRODUCTION BY SEMINAL FLUID LEUKOCYTES AND SPERM  

Microsoft Academic Search

PurposeReactive oxygen species, which are primarily produced by leukocytes, are generally detrimental to sperm. High reactive oxygen species levels are found in men with abnormal sperm function. Since men often have poor sperm characteristics and infertility after vasectomy reversal, fertile men to determine if reactive oxygen species were elevated in the former group.

ROBERT H. SHAPIRO; CHARLES H. MULLER; GREGORY CHEN; RICHARD E. BERGER

1998-01-01

70

Vasectomy and the risk of prostate cancer in a cohort of multiphasic health-checkup examinees: second report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relationship of vasectomy to prostate cancer was studied in 5,119 men with a self-reported history of vasectomy, identified at multiphasic health checkups undergone during 1977–82 while members of the Northern California Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program. Three unvasectomized comparison subjects were identified for each vasectomized man, matched for age, race, marital status, and date and location of the examination.

Stephen Sidney; Charles P. Quesenberry; Marianne C. Sadler; Harry A. Guess; Eva G. Lydick; Eugene V. Cattolica

1991-01-01

71

Genetic vasectomy-overexpression of Prm1-EGFP fusion protein in elongating spermatids causes dominant male sterility in mice.  

PubMed

Transgenic mice are vital tools in both basic and applied research. Unfortunately, the transgenesis process as well as many other assisted reproductive techniques involving embryo transfer rely on vasectomized males to induce pseudopregnancy in surrogate mothers. Vasectomy is a surgical procedure associated with moderate pain and must be carried out under full anaesthesia by qualified personnel. Eliminating the need for vasectomy would be beneficial from the economic and animal welfare point of view. Our aim was to develop a transgene-based alternative to the surgical vasectomy procedure. We generated several transgenic mouse lines expressing a Protamine-1 (Prm1) EGFP fusion protein under the transcriptional and translational regulatory control of Prm1. Male mice from lines showing moderate transgene expression were fully fertile whereas strong overexpression of the Prm1-EGFP fusion protein resulted in complete and dominant male sterility without affecting the ability to mate and to produce copulatory plugs. Sterility was due to impaired spermatid maturation affecting sperm viability and motility. Furthermore, sperm having high Prm1-EGFP levels failed to support preimplantation embryonic development following Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection (ICSI). The "genetic vasectomy system" was further improved by genetically linking the dominant male sterility to ubiquitous EGFP expression in the soma as an easy phenotypic marker enabling rapid genotyping of transgenic males and females. This double transgenic approach represents a reliable and cost-effective "genetic vasectomy" procedure making the conventional surgical vasectomy methodology obsolete. PMID:20095053

Haueter, Sabine; Kawasumi, Miyuri; Asner, Igor; Brykczynska, Urszula; Cinelli, Paolo; Moisyadi, Stefan; Bürki, Kurt; Peters, Antoine H F M; Pelczar, Pawel

2010-03-01

72

Genetic Vasectomy--Overexpression of Prm1-EGFP Fusion Protein in Elongating Spermatids Causes Dominant Male Sterility in Mice  

PubMed Central

Summary Transgenic mice are vital tools in both basic and applied research. Unfortunately, the transgenesis process as well as many other assisted reproductive techniques involving embryo transfer rely on vasectomized males to induce pseudopregnancy in surrogate mothers. Vasectomy is a surgical procedure associated with moderate pain and must be carried out under full anaesthesia by qualified personnel. Eliminating the need for vasectomy would be beneficial from the economic and animal welfare point of view. Our aim was to develop a transgene-based alternative to the surgical vasectomy procedure. We generated several transgenic mouse lines expressing a Protamine-1 (Prm1) EGFP fusion protein under the transcriptional and translational regulatory control of Prm1. Male mice from lines showing moderate transgene expression were fully fertile whereas strong overexpression of the Prm1-EGFP fusion protein resulted in complete and dominant male sterility without affecting the ability to mate and to produce copulatory plugs. Sterility was due to impaired spermatid maturation affecting sperm viability and motility. Furthermore, sperm having high Prm1-EGFP levels failed to support preimplantation embryonic development following Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection (ICSI). The “genetic vasectomy system” was further improved by genetically linking the dominant male sterility to ubiquitous EGFP expression in the soma as an easy phenotypic marker enabling rapid genotyping of transgenic males and females. This double transgenic approach represents a reliable and cost-effective “genetic vasectomy” procedure making the conventional surgical vasectomy methodology obsolete.

Haueter, Sabine; Kawasumi, Miyuri; Asner, Igor; Brykczynska, Urszula; Cinelli, Paolo; Moisyadi, Stefan; Burki, Kurt; Peters, Antoine H.F.M.; Pelczar, Pawel

2012-01-01

73

Robotic intra-abdominal vasectomy reversal: A new approach to a difficult problem  

PubMed Central

The management of obstructive azoospermia resulting from intra-abdominal vasal obstruction poses a formidable surgical challenge. A number of surgical methods have been described to address this problem, including both open and laparoscopic approaches to mobilize and sometimes even re-route the abdominal vas deferens prior to performing a re-anastamosis. We present the first report, to our knowledge, of robotic intra-abdominal vasectomy reversal used to repair obstructive azoospermia resulting from prior laparoscopic vasectomy. In doing so, we summarize the techniques described previously in the literature and build upon this body of surgical experience by combining robotic-assisted laparoscopic mobilization of the vas with robotic vasovasostomy. We believe this novel approach for repairing intra-abdominal vasal defects minimizes morbidity, while at the same time obviating the need for the operating microscope, and thus represents a practical alternative to existing techniques.

Barazani, Yagil; Kaouk, Jihad; Sabanegh, Edmund S.

2014-01-01

74

HE1\\/NPC2 status in human reproductive tract and ejaculated spermatozoa: consequence of vasectomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have previously demonstrated that the amount of HE1\\/NPC2 mRNA and protein expressed in the human epididymis is decreased under vasectomy. In this study, western blot analyses showed that many vasovasostomized men are characterized by high HE1\\/NPC2 levels in spermatozoa when compared with fertile donors. HE1\\/NPC2 association with sperm from vasovasos- tomized men was not related to low motility per

C. Legare; Michel Thabet; Jean-Luc Gatti; Robert Sullivan

2006-01-01

75

Vasectomy with rivanol injection and fertility control by vital staining with eosin.  

PubMed

A material is presented of 66 males who were treated with Rivanol injection during vasectomy in order to obtain immediate sterility. The fertility control was established using vital eosin staining on seminal fluid at home. One case of recanalization occurred. All patients had infertile spermatozoa or aspermia 10 days after surgery. Increased frequency of complications was not observed. Vital staining with eosin is found to be practical and easily used. PMID:2448262

Lauritsen, N P; Kløve-Mogensen, M; Glavind, K

1987-01-01

76

Laparoscopic vasectomy in African savannah elephant (Loxodonta africana); surgical technique and results.  

PubMed

Several small, enclosed reserves in southern Africa are experiencing significant elephant population growth, which has resulted in associated environmental damage and changes in biodiversity. Although several techniques exist to control elephant populations, e.g., culling, relocation, and immunocontraception, the technique of laparoscopic vasectomy of free-ranging bull elephants was investigated. Bilateral vasectomies were performed in 45 elephants. Of these elephants, one died within 24 hr of recovery and two had complications during surgery but recovered uneventfully. Histologic examination confirmed the resected tissue as ductus deferens in all the bulls. Most animals recovered uneventfully and showed no abnormal behavior after surgery. Complications recorded included incisional dehiscence, 1 full-thickness and 2 partial-thickness lacerations of the large intestine, and initial sling-associated complications, for example, deep radial nerve paresis. One bull was found dead 6 weeks after surgery without showing any prior abnormal signs. Vasectomy in free-ranging African bull elephants may be effectively performed in their normal environment. The surgical procedure can be used as a realistic population management tool in free-ranging elephants without major anesthetic, surgical, or postoperative complications. PMID:24437080

Marais, Hendrik J; Hendrickson, Dean A; Stetter, Mark; Zuba, Jeffery R; Penning, Mark; Siegal-Willott, Jess; Hardy, Christine

2013-12-01

77

Use of text messaging to audit early clinical outcome following vasectomy in primary care.  

PubMed

Fifty patients undergoing vasectomy at community-based day surgery clinics in Grampian were invited to participate in follow-up by text message. Forty-six (92%) of the patients responded, 14 reporting problems, generally of a minor nature, but severe enough to result in unscheduled time off work (n = 4) and oral antibiotic therapy (n = 5). Text messaging appears to be a useful form of communication for audit in this setting. The study findings have influenced the information provided by the authors at preoperative counselling. PMID:21439186

Cooper, Graham; Walker, Jean; Harris, Douglas; Stewart, Rorie; Nicol, Douglas; Ogg, Mike

2011-04-01

78

Use of large-volume, fixed-depth, disposable slides for post-vasectomy semen analysis.  

PubMed

Vasectomy is the surgical procedure used for male contraception. Traditionally, operative success has been established by the issue of a laboratory report stating the achievement of azoospermia. The purpose of this study is to establish if this is an achievable or realistic status and if a change to the current best practice would provide an acceptable and cost-effective alternative. In principle, human fecundity is complex and measured in probabilities, which is inconsistent with the implied absolute requirement to establish the complete absence of spermatozoa. PMID:24693568

Hancock, R; Lindsay, K; Tomlinson, M T

2014-01-01

79

Application of optical coherence tomography and high-frequency ultrasound imaging during noninvasive laser vasectomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A noninvasive approach to vasectomy may eliminate male fear of complications related to surgery and increase its acceptance. Noninvasive laser thermal occlusion of the canine vas deferens has recently been reported. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and high-frequency ultrasound (HFUS) are compared for monitoring laser thermal coagulation of the vas in an acute canine model. Bilateral noninvasive laser coagulation of the vas was performed in six dogs (n=12 vasa) using a Ytterbium fiber laser wavelength of 1075 nm, incident power of 9.0 W, pulse duration of 500 ms, pulse rate of 1 Hz, and 3-mm-diameter spot. Cryogen spray cooling was used to prevent skin burns during the procedure. An OCT system with endoscopic probe and a HFUS system with 20-MHz transducer were used to image the vas immediately before and after the procedure. Vasa were then excised and processed for gross and histologic analysis for comparison with OCT and HFUS images. OCT provided high-resolution, superficial imaging of the compressed vas within the vas ring clamp, while HFUS provided deeper imaging of the vas held manually in the scrotal fold. Both OCT and high HFUS are promising imaging modalities for real-time confirmation of vas occlusion during noninvasive laser vasectomy.

Cilip, Christopher M.; Allaf, Mohamad E.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

2012-04-01

80

Application of optical coherence tomography and high-frequency ultrasound imaging during noninvasive laser vasectomy  

PubMed Central

Abstract. A noninvasive approach to vasectomy may eliminate male fear of complications related to surgery and increase its acceptance. Noninvasive laser thermal occlusion of the canine vas deferens has recently been reported. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and high-frequency ultrasound (HFUS) are compared for monitoring laser thermal coagulation of the vas in an acute canine model. Bilateral noninvasive laser coagulation of the vas was performed in six dogs (n=12 vasa) using a Ytterbium fiber laser wavelength of 1075 nm, incident power of 9.0 W, pulse duration of 500 ms, pulse rate of 1 Hz, and 3-mm-diameter spot. Cryogen spray cooling was used to prevent skin burns during the procedure. An OCT system with endoscopic probe and a HFUS system with 20-MHz transducer were used to image the vas immediately before and after the procedure. Vasa were then excised and processed for gross and histologic analysis for comparison with OCT and HFUS images. OCT provided high-resolution, superficial imaging of the compressed vas within the vas ring clamp, while HFUS provided deeper imaging of the vas held manually in the scrotal fold. Both OCT and high HFUS are promising imaging modalities for real-time confirmation of vas occlusion during noninvasive laser vasectomy.

Cilip, Christopher M.; Allaf, Mohamad E.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

2012-01-01

81

MRI of the epididymis: can the outcome of vasectomy reversal be predicted preoperatively?  

PubMed

OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study is to describe the MRI findings seen with tubular ectasia of the epididymis and investigate whether MRI may predict vasal/epididymal tubular occlusion before vasectomy reversal. MATERIALS AND METHODS. First, we compared epididymal T1 signal intensity (measured as percentage change relative to ipsilateral testis) in 24 patients with sonographically established tubular ectasia compared with 22 control patients (sonographically normal epididymides). Second, in a subset of patients with tubular ectasia who subsequently underwent surgery to restore fertility (n = 10), we examined the relationship between epididymal T1 signal intensity and surgical outcome. Vasovasostomy (simple vas deferens reanastomosis with high success rate) was possible when viable sperm were detected in the vas deferens intraoperatively. When no sperm were detected, vasal/epididymal tubular occlusion was inferred and vasoepididymostomy (vas deferens to epididymal head anastomosis, a technically challenging procedure with poorer outcome) was performed. RESULTS. In tubular ectasia, we found increased epididymal T1 signal intensity (0-77%) compared with normal epididymides (-27 to 20%) (p < 0.0001). In patients with tubular ectasia who underwent surgery (n = 10), we found higher T1 epididymal signal intensity in cases of vasal/epididymal occlusion (0-70%) relative to cases in which vasal/epididymal patency was maintained (0-10%) (p = 0.01). By logistic regression, relative epididymal T1 signal intensity increase above 19.4% corresponded to greater than 90% probability of requiring vasoepididymostomy. CONCLUSION. Increased epididymal T1 signal intensity (likely due to proteinaceous material lodged within the epididymal tubules) at preoperative MRI in patients undergoing vasectomy reversal suggests vasal/epididymal tubular occlusion and requirement for vasoepididymostomy rather than vasovasostomy. PMID:24951200

McCammack, Kevin C; Aganovic, Lejla; Hsieh, Tung-Chin; Guo, Yueyang; Welch, Christian S; Gamst, Anthony C; Cassidy, Fiona

2014-07-01

82

A comparison of abdominal and scrotal approach methods of vasectomy and the influence of analgesic treatment in laboratory mice.  

PubMed

Vasectomized mice are needed in the production of genetically-modified animals. The BVAAWF/FRAME/RSPCA/UFAW Joint Working Group on Refinement recommended that vasectomy should be performed via an incision in the scrotal sac, rather than via laparotomy, arguing that the former could be less painful due to minimal tissue trauma. This study was undertaken to assess the validity of this recommendation. Mice underwent vasectomy via either abdominal or scrotal approach surgery. Mice were filmed for 15 min presurgery and at one, 24 and 48 h postsurgery. Data were obtained using automated behaviour recognition software (HomeCageScan). Meloxicam was administered either alone or combined with acetaminophen prior to surgery. A third group received only saline subcutaneously. Postsurgery behaviour changes were compared between groups at each time point. Exploratory behaviours such as rearing, walking and sniffing were most greatly reduced at one hour following surgery whereas the duration of grooming increased. By 48 h these changes had largely subsided. Results indicated mice undergoing scrotal approach surgery fared better at one hour postsurgery, but the magnitude of this was relatively insignificant compared with the overall effects of surgery. If the observed behaviour changes resulted from pain, results suggested there was no significant advantage of scrotal versus abdominal approach vasectomy. These and other recently obtained data on the effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in mice suggest considerably larger doses of these or more potent analgesics, more precise monitoring of surgical outcomes, or a combination of these factors are needed to determine the extent of pain experienced by mice undergoing vasectomy. PMID:23097564

Miller, Amy L; Wright-Williams, Sian L; Flecknell, Paul A; Roughan, Johnny V

2012-10-01

83

Vasectomy Reversal  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... in place. It gives us the ability to move the anastomosis. during the performance of the anastomosis. ... to allow me to manipulate the vas or move the vas during the anastomosis. to facilitate the ...

84

The significance of sperm heads and tails within the vasal fluid during vasectomy reversal  

PubMed Central

Introduction: The finding of only sperm heads and/or short tails (SHST) during vasectomy reversal (VR) creates a difficult decision for the best method of vasal reconstruction, i.e. vasovasostomy (VV) or epididymovasostomy (EV). Using outcome analyses, we report the impact of SHST alone and combined with qualitative analysis of gross fluid quality in predicting successful VR. Materials and Methods: The records of 356 men who underwent VR by a single surgeon from 2005 to 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Intravasal fluid was assessed for gross quality (i.e., clear, opaque, pasty or creamy) as well as microscopic composition (i.e., motile or non-motile whole sperm, SHST or no sperm). The post-operative patency rates and semen analysis parameters were assessed. Results: Fourteen men (3.9%) demonstrated SHST bilaterally in the vasal fluid. The median duration from vasectomy was 6.0 years (interquartile range 4.0-9.8). Bilateral VVs were performed on 12 men (86%), while two men (14%) had a unilateral VV and a contralateral EV. Of the 26 vasa undergoing VR, the majority of the fluid quality was classified as creamy (n = 20 vasa, 76.9%). The remaining fluid was classified as pasty (n = 3 vasa, 11.5%), opaque (n = 2 vasa, 7.7%) and clear (n = 1 vasa, 3.8%). In cases undergoing bilateral VV with only SHST, patency rates were 90.9%, and both cases of unilateral EV were patent (100%). Conclusions: VV was successful in 90.9% of patients undergoing VR in the setting of SHST alone. Even when creamy or pasty fluid was present, the results surpassed the expected patency rate for an EV. Therefore, the presence of only SHST, regardless of fluid quality, should not dissuade the surgeon from performing a VV. Conclusions: VV was successful in 90.9% of patients undergoing VR in the setting of SHST alone. Even when creamy or pasty fluid was present, the results surpassed the expected patency rate for an EV. Therefore, the presence of only SHST, regardless of fluid quality, should not dissuade the surgeon from performing a VV.

Smith, Ryan P.; Khanna, Abhinav; Kovac, Jason R.; Badhiwala, Niraj; Coward, Robert; Lipshultz, Larry I

2014-01-01

85

Utero-tubal embryo transfer and vasectomy in the mouse model.  

PubMed

The transfer of preimplantation embryos to a surrogate female is a required step for the production of genetically modified mice or to study the effects of epigenetic alterations originated during preimplantation development on subsequent fetal development and adult health. The use of an effective and consistent embryo transfer technique is crucial to enhance the generation of genetically modified animals and to determine the effect of different treatments on implantation rates and survival to term. Embryos at the blastocyst stage are usually transferred by uterine transfer, performing a puncture in the uterine wall to introduce the embryo manipulation pipette. The orifice performed in the uterus does not close after the pipette has been withdrawn, and the embryos can outflow to the abdominal cavity due to the positive pressure of the uterus. The puncture can also produce a hemorrhage that impairs implantation, blocks the transfer pipette and may affect embryo development, especially when embryos without zona are transferred. Consequently, this technique often results in very variable and overall low embryo survival rates. Avoiding these negative effects, utero-tubal embryo transfer take advantage of the utero-tubal junction as a natural barrier that impedes embryo outflow and avoid the puncture of the uterine wall. Vasectomized males are required for obtaining pseudopregnant recipients. A technique to perform vasectomy is described as a complement to the utero-tubal embryo transfer. PMID:24637845

Bermejo-Alvarez, Pablo; Park, Ki-Eun; Telugu, Bhanu P

2014-01-01

86

Nonscalpel Vasectomy as Family Planning Method: A Battle Yet to Be Conquered  

PubMed Central

Though nonscalpel vasectomy (NSV) technique was introduced in India in 1992 to increase male participation in family planning, it has failed to get adequate momentum and to achieve its goal. We conducted a cross-sectional questionnaire-based survey to get insight into apathy of men towards NSV. The study included 428 respondents. Most of the respondents (97.4%) were aware of NSV as a method for permanent male sterilization. The majority of them (97.2%) knew that NSV is done without any charge and cash incentive is given to the NSV client after the procedure. Though 68.0% respondents agreed that permanent sterilization is a possible option for them, only 34.1% respondents were willing to adopt NSV as a method of family planning. Fear of surgical procedure (40.7%), permanent nature of procedure (22.2%), and religious belief (19.0%) were the common reasons for unwillingness to adopt NSV. We conclude that there is a need to design and develop need-based information, education and communication (IEC) strategy to bridge the existing information gap among the eligible couples regarding NSV to improve its adoption. Involvement of community leaders and satisfied clients and utilization of television and radio would enhance the effectiveness of such interventions.

Garg, Pankaj Kumar; Jain, Bhupendra Kumar; Choudhary, Deepti; Chaurasia, Ashish; Pandey, Satya Deo

2013-01-01

87

Nonscalpel vasectomy as family planning method: a battle yet to be conquered.  

PubMed

Though nonscalpel vasectomy (NSV) technique was introduced in India in 1992 to increase male participation in family planning, it has failed to get adequate momentum and to achieve its goal. We conducted a cross-sectional questionnaire-based survey to get insight into apathy of men towards NSV. The study included 428 respondents. Most of the respondents (97.4%) were aware of NSV as a method for permanent male sterilization. The majority of them (97.2%) knew that NSV is done without any charge and cash incentive is given to the NSV client after the procedure. Though 68.0% respondents agreed that permanent sterilization is a possible option for them, only 34.1% respondents were willing to adopt NSV as a method of family planning. Fear of surgical procedure (40.7%), permanent nature of procedure (22.2%), and religious belief (19.0%) were the common reasons for unwillingness to adopt NSV. We conclude that there is a need to design and develop need-based information, education and communication (IEC) strategy to bridge the existing information gap among the eligible couples regarding NSV to improve its adoption. Involvement of community leaders and satisfied clients and utilization of television and radio would enhance the effectiveness of such interventions. PMID:23691369

Garg, Pankaj Kumar; Jain, Bhupendra Kumar; Choudhary, Deepti; Chaurasia, Ashish; Pandey, Satya Deo

2013-01-01

88

Long-term study of vasectomy in Macaca radiata--histological and ultrasonographic analysis of testis and duct system.  

PubMed

This study was aimed to investigate the long-term effect of vasectomy using the bonnet monkey (Macaca radiata) as a primate animal model. Animals weighing around 6 to 8 kg were randomly chosen for bilateral, unilateral vasectomy and sham-control. The postoperative periods of six months and two years were considered as short and long-term, respectively. Sperm were collected and subjected to analysis before euthanasia. The testes and epididymides were excised from euthanized animals then embedded in paraffin. Normal histological changes were observed in sham-operated animals and short-term contralateral testes. In contrast, marked alterations were observed in the testes and epididymides of both short and long-term groups. Seminiferous epithelium was thinned out showing marked depletion of germ cells in long-term; only a thin layer of Sertoli cells, spermatogonia, and fewer spermatocytes were seen. Exfoliation of germ cells and the occurrence of multinucleated giant cells were common features in these tubules. The epididymal tubular lumens were greatly dilated with accumulated spermatozoa in short and long-term animals; significant defects were observed in the epithelium of the long-term animals. Microscopic spermatic granulomas were noticed in epididymides and the vas deferens. Large granulomas were seen in long-term vasectomized monkeys, frequently compressing the surrounding structures. These granulomas could be visualized in ultrasound, however, only at the late stage of its occurrence. Sperm collected from the unilateral vasectomized animals showed a poor motility score in the capillary mucus penetration test (CMPT). Results indicate that the changes observed after vasectomy might be due to pressure initially, whereas in the long-term the damage was supplemented by autoimmune attack. With immunoglobulin (IgG) deposition in contra-lateral unoperated testis of unilateral vasectomized animals it also showed degenerative changes and a concomitant drop in sperm quality. Although, granulomatous reactions were observed in the epididymis and vas deferens but testes were spared from such reactions even in the long-term. PMID:24593799

Seppan, Prakash; Krishnaswamy, Kamakshi

2014-06-01

89

Vasectomy as a proxy: extrapolating health system lessons to male circumcision as an HIV prevention strategy in Papua New Guinea  

PubMed Central

Background Male circumcision (MC) has been shown to reduce the risk of HIV acquisition among heterosexual men, with WHO recommending MC as an essential component of comprehensive HIV prevention programs in high prevalence settings since 2007. While Papua New Guinea (PNG) has a current prevalence of only 1%, the high rates of sexually transmissible diseases and the extensive, but unregulated, practice of penile cutting in PNG have led the National Department of Health (NDoH) to consider introducing a MC program. Given public interest in circumcision even without active promotion by the NDoH, examining the potential health systems implications for MC without raising unrealistic expectations presents a number of methodological issues. In this study we examined health systems lessons learned from a national no-scalpel vasectomy (NSV) program, and their implications for a future MC program in PNG. Methods Fourteen in-depth interviews were conducted with frontline health workers and key government officials involved in NSV programs in PNG over a 3-week period in February and March 2011. Documentary, organizational and policy analysis of HIV and vasectomy services was conducted and triangulated with the interviews. All interviews were digitally recorded and later transcribed. Application of the WHO six building blocks of a health system was applied and further thematic analysis was conducted on the data with assistance from the analysis software MAXQDA. Results Obstacles in funding pathways, inconsistent support by government departments, difficulties with staff retention and erratic delivery of training programs have resulted in mixed success of the national NSV program. Conclusions In an already vulnerable health system significant investment in training, resources and negotiation of clinical space will be required for an effective MC program. Focused leadership and open communication between provincial and national government, NGOs and community is necessary to assist in service sustainability. Ensuring clear policy and guidance across the entire sexual and reproductive health sector will provide opportunities to strengthen key areas of the health system.

2012-01-01

90

Intraluminal occlusion of the seminal duct by laser and Histoacryl: Two non-invasive alternatives for vasectomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Introduction and objective: Vasectomy is a well-established method in family control. Even though it is a safe and low risk operation, this surgery is invasive and difficult to reverse. Therefore the aim of this study was to investigate new non-invasive methods for occlusion of the seminal duct. Material and Methods: Seminal duct tissue was obtained from patients (n=30) suffering from prostate cancer and therefore undergoing prostatectomy. In a first set of experiments, the seminal duct was occluded by intraluminal application of Histoacryl® (Braun Aesculap AG, Tuttlingen, Germany). In a 2nd set of experiments, endoluminal laser induced occlusion was performed. Four different laser wavelengths (1940nm, 1470nm, 1064nm, 940nm) and different sets of laser parameters (e.g. power, exposure duration, fibre diameter, energy applied) were compared. Effectiveness of occlusion of the seminal duct was proven by post-treatment irrigation flow measurement, as well as by morphological analyses. To evaluate a potential damage of the surrounding tissue, external temperature was measured using a thermometer during laser application. Results: Intraluminal application of Histoacryl® induced an immediate and complete occlusion of the seminal duct. The underlying connective tissue maintained its functional integrity after this treatment. By laser light application to a Histoacryl® block, a hole could be created into the block thus indicating the possibility of recanalization. Treatment with laser energy resulted in shrinkage of the ductal lumen. The laser application generally caused necrosis in the epithelium and induced formation of vacuoles in the underlying connective tissue. As described for endoluminal varicose treatment, this distinct local reaction might result in an intense inflammation leading to a functional occlusion of the vas deferens. Conclusions: Both laser-induced occlusion and application of Histoacryl® are fast and simple techniques which may be able to achieve a functional occlusion of the seminal duct. The application of Histoacryl® additionally may be easily reversible by laser treatment.

Freitag, B.; Sroka, R.; Koelle, S.; Becker, A. J.; Khoder, W.; Pongratz, T.; Stief, C. G.; Trottmann, M.

2014-03-01

91

Comparative Effects of Vasectomy Surgery and Buprenorphine Treatment on Faecal Corticosterone Concentrations and Behaviour Assessed by Manual and Automated Analysis Methods in C57 and C3H Mice  

PubMed Central

Establishing effective cage-side pain assessment methods is essential if post-surgical pain is to be controlled effectively in laboratory animals. Changes to overall activity levels are the most common methods of assessment, but may not be the most appropriate for establishing the analgesic properties of drugs, especially in mice, due their high activity levels. Use of drugs that can affect activity (e.g. opioids) is also a problem. The relative merits of both manual and automated behaviour data collection methods was determined in two inbred mouse strains undergoing vasectomy following treatment with one of 2 buprenorphine dose rates. Body weights and the effects of surgery and buprenorphine on faecal corticosterone were also measured. Surgery caused abnormal behaviour and reduced activity levels, but high dose buprenorphine caused such large-scale increases in activity in controls that we could not establish analgesic effects in surgery groups. Only pain-specific behaviour scoring using the manual approach was effective in showing 0.05 mg/kg buprenorphine alleviated post-vasectomy pain. The C57 mice also responded better to buprenorphine than C3H mice, indicating they were either less painful, or more responsive to its analgesic effects. C3H mice were more susceptible to the confounding effects of buprenorphine irrespective of whether data were collected manually or via the automated approach. Faecal corticosterone levels, although variable, were higher in untreated surgery mice than in control groups, also indicating the presence of pain or distress. Pain-specific scoring was superior to activity monitoring for assessing the analgesic properties of buprenorphine in vasectomised mice. Buprenorphine (0.01 mg/kg), in these strains of male mice, for this procedure, provided inadequate analgesia and although 0.05 mg/kg was more effective, not completely so. The findings support the recommendation that analgesic dose rates should be adjusted in relation to the potential severity of the surgical procedure, the mouse strain, and the individual animals' response.

Wright-Williams, Sian; Flecknell, Paul A.; Roughan, Johnny V.

2013-01-01

92

Key Statistics from the National Survey of Family Growth: Vasectomy  

MedlinePLUS

... NCHS Home Surveys and Data Collection Systems Key Statistics from the National Survey of Family Growth V ... Survey of Family Growth Staff Division of Vital Statistics National Center for Health Statistics 3311 Toledo Road ...

93

Termination of a randomized controlled trial of two vasectomy techniques  

Microsoft Academic Search

Family Health International (FHI) and EngenderHealth conducted a multicenter, randomized controlled trial to evaluate a fascial interposition (FI) component of a vas occlusion procedure for male sterilization. A data monitoring committee (DMC) was established to provide independent review of the interim report. The DMC met to review the interim report after enrollment of 552 men. As planned, an estimate of

Mario Chen-Mok; Shrikant I Bangdiwala; Rosalie Dominik; Melissa Hays; Belinda Irsula; David C Sokal

2003-01-01

94

42 CFR 9.7 - Reproduction.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Therefore, all males must be sterilized by vasectomy before acceptance into the system...from females until they are sterilized. Vasectomies are advisable because they are minimally...invasive and because effectiveness of the vasectomy may be validated through...

2013-10-01

95

42 CFR 9.7 - Reproduction.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Therefore, all males must be sterilized by vasectomy before acceptance into the system...from females until they are sterilized. Vasectomies are advisable because they are minimally...invasive and because effectiveness of the vasectomy may be validated through...

2009-10-01

96

42 CFR 9.7 - Reproduction.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Therefore, all males must be sterilized by vasectomy before acceptance into the system...from females until they are sterilized. Vasectomies are advisable because they are minimally...invasive and because effectiveness of the vasectomy may be validated through...

2010-10-01

97

Fate of superfluous sperm products after vasectomy and in the normal male tract of the mouse  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary. The progression of 3H-labelled spermatozoa (thymidine or arginine) was followed through the tracts of unilaterally vasectomized, bilaterally vasectomized, oligozoospermic (t6\\/tw5) and normal mice; the regional lymph nodes were also investi- gated. The same rate of sperm production and transport was found in normal and in vasectomized tracts, down to the corpus epididymidis; there was some delay in sperm- atozoa

C. L. R. Barratt; Jack Cohen

1986-01-01

98

Unintended Pregnancy Prevention: Female Sterilization  

MedlinePLUS

... had tubal sterilization. Women whose partners had a vasectomy were enrolled to serve as the comparison group. ... menstrual cycles. In addition, both tubal sterilization and vasectomy are permanent methods of contraception; therefore, pregnancies would ...

99

Unintended Pregnancy Prevention: Contraception  

MedlinePLUS

... a decision. The risk of pregnancy after vasectomy. Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2004 ;103:848–850. A comparison of women’s regret following vasectomy versus tubal sterilization. Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2002 ;99:1073–1079. Contraceptive sterilization ...

100

A Retrospective Review of Factors Associated with Vasovasostomies in United States Military Members  

PubMed Central

Background Men seeking a vasectomy should receive counseling prior to the procedure that includes discussion of later seeking a reversal. We sought to determine demographic factors that may predispose patients to possibly later seek a vasectomy reversal. Methods All U.S. Military electronic health records were searched between 2000 and 2009 for either a vasectomy or vasovasostomy procedure code. Aggregate demographic information was collected and statistical analysis performed. Result A total of 82,945 patients had a vasectomy of which 4,485 had a vasovasostomy resulting in a vasovasostomy-to-vasectomy rate of 5.04%. The average age at vasovasostomy was 34.9±5.0, with an average interval of 4.1±2.2 years. Men undergoing a vasectomy at a younger age were more likely to have a vasovasostomy. Various religions did have statistically significant differences. Within ethnic groups, only Native Americans [OR=1.39 (95% CI 1.198-1.614)] and Asians [OR=0.501 (95% CI 0.364-0.690)] had statistically significant differences when compared to Caucasians. Men with more children at the time of vasectomy were more likely to have a vasovasostomy. Conclusion Younger men, Native Americans, and men with more children at vasectomy were more likely to undergo a vasovasostomy. The reason for these differences is unknown, but this information may assist during pre-vasectomy counseling.

Masterson, J.; Avalos, E.; Santomauro, M.; Walters, R.; Marguet, C.; L'Esperance, J.; Drain, D.

2013-01-01

101

Studies in Family Planning, Volume 3, Number 8.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Kerala's Pioneering Experiment in Massive Vasectomy Camps," the principal article in this monthly publication of the Population Council, is a detailed research report on the success of a massive vasectomy camp conducted at Cochin, the capital city of the Ernakulam District of Kerala State, India. The second article, "The Gujarat State Massive…

Population Council, New York, NY.

102

Postvasectomy semen analysis: why patients don't follow-up.  

PubMed

Semen analysis following elective vasectomy is necessary to confirm that the procedure was successful. However, many patients fail to follow postoperative instructions to obtain semen analysis. One hundred forty-one patients who had undergone vasectomy at the Family Practice Center of the Medical College of Ohio were surveyed to assess reasons for a poor rate of follow-up after vasectomy. Only 26 percent of respondents had returned two or more semen samples following surgery. Forty-five percent had not returned any samples. The inconvenience and embarrassment of having to bring semen specimens to the laboratory were identified as factors that can affect patient adherence to instructions. Respondents who had not returned any semen specimens were more likely to answer that their spouse would not be very upset if the vasectomy failed and pregnancy resulted. Our survey results identify issues for improving patient care following vasectomy. These include patient education and postoperative protocols. PMID:1847562

Smucker, D R; Mayhew, H E; Nordlund, D J; Hahn, W K; Palmer, K E

1991-01-01

103

Sterilization surgery - making a decision  

MedlinePLUS

Sterilization surgery in women is called tubal ligation . In men, it is called a vasectomy . Often, people in a long-term, monogamous (same person) relationship who have already had several children ...

104

42 CFR 9.3 - Sanctuary policies and responsibilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Establish procedures to prevent any reproduction in the colony through appropriate permanent birth control, preferably by vasectomy of all sexually mature male chimpanzees in the sanctuary; and (8 ) Develop procedures for maintaining...

2010-10-01

105

42 CFR 9.5 - Chimpanzee ownership, fees, and studies.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... (1) Chimpanzees transferred to the sanctuary sites must be permanently incapable of reproduction, for example, by vasectomy, tubal ligation, or another reliable procedure; (2) Complete histories must accompany each chimpanzee. Any...

2010-10-01

106

42 CFR 9.5 - Chimpanzee ownership, fees, and studies.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... (1) Chimpanzees transferred to the sanctuary sites must be permanently incapable of reproduction, for example, by vasectomy, tubal ligation, or another reliable procedure; (2) Complete histories must accompany each chimpanzee. Any...

2013-10-01

107

32 CFR 732.15 - Unauthorized care.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...732.15 Unauthorized care. The following are not authorized by this part: (a) Chiropractic services. (b) Vasectomies. (c) Tubal ligations. (d) Breast augmentations or reductions. (e) Psychiatric care, beyond the initial...

2013-07-01

108

32 CFR 732.15 - Unauthorized care.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...732.15 Unauthorized care. The following are not authorized by this part: (a) Chiropractic services. (b) Vasectomies. (c) Tubal ligations. (d) Breast augmentations or reductions. (e) Psychiatric care, beyond the initial...

2010-07-01

109

42 CFR 9.3 - Sanctuary policies and responsibilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Establish procedures to prevent any reproduction in the colony through appropriate permanent birth control, preferably by vasectomy of all sexually mature male chimpanzees in the sanctuary; and (8 ) Develop procedures for maintaining...

2009-10-01

110

32 CFR 732.15 - Unauthorized care.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...732.15 Unauthorized care. The following are not authorized by this part: (a) Chiropractic services. (b) Vasectomies. (c) Tubal ligations. (d) Breast augmentations or reductions. (e) Psychiatric care, beyond the initial...

2009-07-01

111

42 CFR 9.5 - Chimpanzee ownership, fees, and studies.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... (1) Chimpanzees transferred to the sanctuary sites must be permanently incapable of reproduction, for example, by vasectomy, tubal ligation, or another reliable procedure; (2) Complete histories must accompany each chimpanzee. Any...

2009-10-01

112

 

PubMed Central

Vasectomy is done by a family physician at the family planning clinic of le Centre Hospitalier de l'Université Laval. The technique used combines an occlusion with metal clips and an excision of one to two centimetres of the vas deferens. The post-operative complications encountered with 304 vasectomies were hematomas (4%), infections of the scotal skin (1%), orchi-epididymitis (1%) and granulomas (1%). All these problems were treated on an out-patient basis, and no consultation with specialists was required. Of 151 patients who came back for a post-vasectomy semen examination, one had a test result showing motile spermatozoa. These figures are comparable to other results published. The family physician can easily incorporate this simple and safe procedure into his practice. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6

Labrecque, Michel

1987-01-01

113

Advances in Male Reproductive Surgery: Robotic-Assisted Vasovasostomy  

PubMed Central

It is estimated that 3–6% of all vasectomised men request vasectomy reversal for different reasons. Microsurgical vasovasostomy is the gold standard technique of vasectomy reversal. However, the microsurgical technique is time-consuming and challenging to most urological surgeons. Therefore, alternative methods of vasal anastomosis have been studied including robotic-assisted vasovasostomy. This review discusses the feasibility and practice of robotic-assisted vasovasostomy. Based on the available studies robotic-assisted vasovasostomy is feasible. The reported rate of vasal patency associated with this new technique is similar to that of microsurgical vasovasostomy. There is no clear difference between the 2 approaches in terms of operating time. Robotic-assisted vasovasostomy does not appear to afford significant advantages in the era of vasectomy reversal.

Elzanaty, Saad; Dohle, Gert

2013-01-01

114

Microsurgical vasovasostomy  

PubMed Central

Up to 6% of men who have undergone vasectomy will ultimately elect for reversal in the form of vasovasostomy or vasoepididymostomy for various reasons. Vasovasostomy performed to regain fertility is a technique that has undergone numerous advances during the last century, including the use of microsurgical equipment and principles to construct a meticulous anastomosis. It is important during vasovasostomy to ensure good blood supply to the anastomosis as well as to build as a tension-free anastomosis. Visual inspection to ensure healthy mucosa and inner muscularis as well as atraumatic handling of tissues is helpful. With vasovasostomy, it is essential to create a watertight anastomosis to prevent secondary scar formation. The microdot technique of vasovasostomy allows for markedly discrepant lumens to be brought together more precisely. Thereby, the planning is separated from suture placement, which prevents dog-ears and avoids subsequent leaks. In the age of in vitro fertilization (IVF)/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), it becomes even more important to clarify outcomes after vasectomy reversals, as patients now have a choice between surgical sperm retrieval coupled with IVF/ICSI versus vasectomy reversal. Little data on long-term outcomes for vasectomy reversals exist. Therefore, further research in this field needs to evaluate the rate of late failures and the predictors of late failures.

Herrel, Lindsey; Hsiao, Wayland

2013-01-01

115

Evaluation of Human Sperm Function After Repeated Freezing and Thawing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sperm storage via freezing has been useful for men who have difficulty masturbating during assisted reproductive tech- nology (ART) programs and before impotency caused by chemo- therapy, vasectomy, and other procedures. Studies were undertaken to evaluate the extent of cryoinjury to sperm after repeated freezing and thawing. The results showed that normozoospermic and oligo- zoospermic sperm survived after 3 repeated

ENOKA BANDULARATNE; ARIFF BONGSO

2002-01-01

116

Presterilization Interviewing: An Evaluation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The role of interviewing in diffusing possible harmful side effects of sterilization operations was evaluated in an acute general hospital. Two simultaneous field experiments were conducted with 50 vasectomy couples and 50 tubal-ligation couples. There were no significant differences between the interview and control groups. (Author)

Carey, Raymond G.

1976-01-01

117

[Blockade of calcium channels - a perspectiveof male contraception?].  

PubMed

Besides condoms and vasectomy with their own limitations, no other reliable methods of contraception are available to men. Ion channels play a key role in maturation, capacitation and acrosome reaction of sperms. Blockade of calcium channels with pharmacological inhibitors or compounds isolated from plant extracts might be suggested as one of promising mechanisms of future male contraceptives. PMID:23710989

Driák, D; Svandová, I

2013-04-01

118

DCTD — Developmental Therapeutics Program (DTP)  

Cancer.gov

DTP’s Biological Testing Branch oversees animal-production facilities that produce inbred, outbred, and hybrid strains of rats and mice. This program provides researchers nationwide with genetically defined, pathogen-free laboratory animals, as well as animal-related services such as jugular vein cannulations, vasectomies, ovariectomies, and castrations.

119

Aerospace Medicine Residents' Teaching File: Hyperbilirubinemia. (Reannouncement with New Availability Information).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A 30-year-old white male pilot is admitted for elective vasectomy. During the preoperative evaluation a multiple channel chemistry profile reveals a total bilirubin of 2.7 mg% (normal 0.33-1.2 mg%) with a direct bilirubin of 0.56 mg% (normal 0-0.4mg%). Th...

R. W. Rectenwald

1989-01-01

120

Field Experiments of Family Planning Incentives.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A review of four quasi-experiments on family planning incentives in three Asian nations is presented, and a multi-national comparative field experiment on family planning incentives is proposed. Experiments include: (1) The Ernakulam vasectomy campaigns, (2) Indian Tea Estates retirement bond incentive program, (3) Taiwan educational bond…

Rogers, Everett M.

121

The Censorship of "Maude": A Case Study in the Social Construction of Reality.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The concept of reality held by individuals and societies can be explored by examining reactions to the censorship of the two-part television show in the "Maude" series that dealt with abortion and vasectomy. The station managements of WMBD in Peoria, Illinois, and of WCIA in Champaign-Urbana, Illinois, chose not to broadcast the two "Maude"…

Mihevc, Nancy T.; And Others

122

Applying clinically proven human techniques for contraception and fertility to endangered species and zoo animals: a review.  

PubMed

Reversible contraception that does not alter natural behavior is a critical need for managing zoo populations. In addition to reversible contraception, other fertility techniques perfected in humans may be useful, such as in vitro fertilization (IVF) or oocyte and embryo banking for endangered species like amphibians and Mexican wolves (Canis lupus baileyi). Furthermore, the genetics of human fertility can give a better understanding of fertility in more exotic species. Collaborations were established to apply human fertility techniques to the captive population. Reversible vasectomy might be one solution for reversible contraception that does not alter behavior. Reversible approaches to vasectomy, avoiding secondary epididymal disruption, were attempted in South American bush dogs (Speothos venaticus), chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), gorillas (Gorilla gorilla), Przewalski's horse (Equus przewalski poliakov), and Sika deer (Cervus nippon) in a variety of zoos around the world. These techniques were first perfected in > 4,000 humans before attempting them in zoo animals. In vitro fertilization with gestational surrogacy was used to attempt to break the vicious cycle of hand rearing of purebred orangutans, and egg and ovary vitrification in humans have led to successful gamete banking for Mexican wolves and disappearing amphibians. The study of the human Y chromosome has even explained a mechanism of extinction related to global climate change. The best results with vasectomy reversal (normal sperm counts, pregnancy, and live offspring) were obtained when the original vasectomy was performed "open-ended," so as to avoid pressure-induced epididymal disruption. The attempt at gestational surrogacy for orangutans failed because of severe male infertility and the lack of success with human ovarian hyperstimulation protocols. Vitrification of oocytes is already being employed for the Amphibian Ark Project and for Mexican wolves. Vasectomy can be a reversible contraception option in zoo animals, even in endangered species. Ongoing use of gamete and embryo freezing may salvage vanishing species. PMID:24437091

Silber, Sherman J; Barbey, Natalie; Lenahan, Kathy; Silber, David Z

2013-12-01

123

Expression of Galectin-3 As A Testis Inflammatory Marker in Vasectomised Mice  

PubMed Central

Objective: Vasectomy, though in some cases are being confronted with irreversibility, has been accepted as an effective contraceptive method. It is estimated that near 2-6% of vasectomised men ultimately show a tendency to restore their fertility. In some cases, vasectomy has been considered as an irreversible procedure due to many post-vasectomy complications causing this debate. The aim of present study was to investigate the pattern of expression of galectin-3, an inflammatory factor secreted by macrophages and immune cells, following the vasectomy in mice testis tissue. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, twenty mature male Balb/c mice, aged two months, were divided into two equal groups: sham and vasectomised groups (n=10). They were sacrificed four months after vasectomy, while the pattern of galectin-3 expression was investigated using a standard immunohistochemistry technique on testicular tissues. Stereological analyses of testes parameters in vasectomised and shamoperated groups were compared by mixed model analysis. Results: Based on observations, although galectin-3 was not expressed in sham-operated group, it was expressed in 40% of testicular tissues of vasectomised mice, like: seminiferous tubules, interstitial tissues and tunica albugina. Also, our result showed a significant alteration in number of germ and sertoli cells of testicular tissue in vasectomised group in comparison to sham-operated group. In addition, the result of mixed model method confirmed a significant reduction in germ and sertoli cells of vasectomised group. Conclusion: The expression of galectin-3 at different parts of testicular tissue in vasectomised group is higher than sham group. This express illustrates the increase of degenerative changes and inflammation reactions in testicular tissue, leading to chronic complications and infertility, after the vasovasostomy

Haddad Kashani, Hamed; Moshkdanian, Ghazale; Atlasi, Mohammad Ali; Taherian, Ali Akbar; Naderian, Homayoun; Nikzad, Hossein

2013-01-01

124

La contraception masculine  

Microsoft Academic Search

Resume  Des méthodes de contraception masculine sont actuellement utilisables, en particulier les méthodes mécaniques comme le préservatif,\\u000a dont le taux d’échec est important, ou la vasectomie qui présente un caractère irréversible. De plus, ces méthodes ne sont\\u000a pas acceptées par tous les couples.\\u000a \\u000a Les méthodes hormonales sont basées sur la suppression réversible de la sécrétion des gonadotrophines (LH et FSH) et

Clément Jimenez

2004-01-01

125

Male and female sterilisation.  

PubMed

Sexual sterilization is the major form of fertility control in women who are more than 30 years old. Clinicians usually use laparoscopy to perform female sterilization. They may occlude the fallopian tubes with a clip or ring or coagulate the tubes using bipolar diathermy. It is usually performed on an outpatient basis. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs can generally control the postoperative pain. A serious immediate but rare complication is death, which is often associated with the anesthesia. Complications related to the experience of the surgeon include damage to bowel or blood vessels and tearing of mesosalpinx. Obesity or pelvic adhesions often necessitates either laparotomy or abandonment of sterilization. Some long term complications are hysterectomy and menstrual disorders. Presterilization counseling needs to examine the possibility of regret and to discuss failure rates and complications. Reasons for regret are young at time of sterilization, psychosexual disorder, change of partner, change in financial circumstances, sterilization performed at time of crisis, and death of a child. The failure rate for the Filshie clip is 0.1%. Reasons for failure include pregnant at the time of the procedure, clips placed across the round or ovarian ligament, incomplete occlusion, and fistula formation and recanalization. Failure rates are higher when the sterilization is done during pregnancy because the tubes are thicker and more vascular. Vasectomy involves severing and ligating the vas deferens in both scrotums. Immediate complications are hematoma and infection. Vasectomy patients need to bring 2 semen samples for sperm counts 3-4 months after the procedure. Azoospermia signals a successful vasectomy. If sperm are still present 5-6 months after the procedure, the surgeon should conduct exploratory surgery under general anesthesia. Long term side effects include testicular discomfort and perhaps prostate cancer. The evidence is unclear about the link between vasectomy and prostate cancer, however. PMID:8072940

Gorton, E

1994-08-01

126

[Male contraception].  

PubMed

Contraception allows within a heterosexual couple to have a more fulfilling as possible sexuality while protecting against the occurrence of unintended pregnancy. In a majority of couples, contraception is assumed by women. Currently, male contraceptive methods most commonly used are the male condom and vasectomy. Many other strategies, including hormonal contraceptive regimens, have been proposed and evaluated. The purpose of this review is to present an overview of the various current and future male contraceptive methods. PMID:24412108

Robin, Geoffroy; Marcelli, François; Rigot, Jean-Marc

2014-02-01

127

Use of an optical clearing agent during noninvasive laser coagulation of the canine vas deferens, ex vivo and in vivo  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Development of a noninvasive vasectomy technique may eliminate male fear of complications and result in a more popular procedure. This study explores application of an optical clearing agent (OCA) to the scrotal skin to reduce both the laser power necessary for successful noninvasive laser vasectomy and the probability of scrotal skin burns. A mixture of DMSO/glycerol was noninvasively delivered into the scrotal skin using a Madajet. Near-infrared laser radiation with a range of average powers (7.0-11.7 W) was delivered in conjunction with a range of cryogen spray cooling rates (0.20-0.33 Hz) to the skin surface in a canine model, ex vivo and in vivo. Burst pressure (BP) measurements were conducted to quantify the strength of vas closure. A 30-min application of the OCA improved skin transparency by 26 +/- 5 %, reducing the average power necessary for successful noninvasive laser vasectomy from 9.2 W without OCA (BP = 291 +/- 31 mmHg) to 7.0 W with OCA (BP = 292 +/- 19 mmHg). Control studies without OCA at 7.0 W failed to coagulate the vas with burst pressures (82 +/- 28 mmHg) significantly below typical ejaculation pressures (136 +/- 29 mmHg). Application of an optical clearing agent reduced the laser power necessary for successful noninvasive thermal coagulation of the vas by approximately 25%. This technique may result in the use of a less expensive laser system and eliminate the formation of scrotal skin burns during the procedure.

Cilip, Christopher M.; Ross, Ashley E.; Jarow, Jonathan P.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

2010-02-01

128

Noninvasive laser coagulation of the canine vas deferens, ex vivo  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Male sterilization (vasectomy) is more successful, safer, less expensive, and easier to perform than female sterilization (tubal ligation). However, female sterilization is more popular, due to male fear of vasectomy complications (e.g. incision, bleeding, infection, and scrotal pain). The development of a completely noninvasive vasectomy technique may allay some of these concerns. Ytterbium fiber laser radiation with a wavelength of 1075 nm, average power of 11.7 W, 1-s pulse duration, 0.5 Hz pulse rate, and 3-mm-diameter spot was synchronized with cryogen cooling of the scrotal skin surface in canine tissue for a treatment time of 60 s. Vas thermal lesion dimensions measured 2.0 +/- 0.3 mm diameter by 3.0 +/- 0.9 mm length, without skin damage. The coagulated vas bursting pressure measured 295 +/- 72 mm Hg, significantly higher than typical vas ejaculation pressures of 136 + 29 mm Hg. Noninvasive thermal coagulation and occlusion of the vas is feasible.

Cilip, Christopher M.; Jarow, Jonathan P.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

2009-02-01

129

Application of an optical clearing agent during noninvasive laser coagulation of the canine vas deferens  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Development of a noninvasive vasectomy technique may eliminate male fear of complications and result in a more popular procedure. This study explores application of an optical clearing agent (OCA) to scrotal skin to reduce laser power necessary for successful noninvasive laser vasectomy and eliminate scrotal skin burns. A mixture of dimethyl sulfoxide and glycerol was noninvasively delivered into scrotal skin using a pneumatic jet device. Near-infrared laser radiation was delivered in conjunction with cryogen spray cooling to the skin surface in a canine model, ex vivo and in vivo. Burst pressure (BP) measurements were conducted to quantify strength of vas closure. A 30-min application of OCA improved skin transparency by 26+/-3%, reducing average power necessary for successful noninvasive laser vasectomy from 9.2 W without OCA (BP=291+/-31 mmHg) to 7.0 W with OCA (BP=292+/-19 mmHg). Control studies without OCA at 7.0 W failed to coagulate the vas with burst pressures (82+/-28 mmHg) significantly below typical ejaculation pressures (136+/-29 mmHg). Application of an OCA reduced the laser power necessary for successful noninvasive thermal coagulation of the vas by ~25%. This technique may result in use of a less expensive laser and eliminate the formation of scrotal skin burns during the procedure.

Cilip, Christopher M.; Ross, Ashley E.; Jarow, Jonathan P.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

2010-07-01

130

Application of an optical clearing agent during noninvasive laser coagulation of the canine vas deferens  

PubMed Central

Development of a noninvasive vasectomy technique may eliminate male fear of complications and result in a more popular procedure. This study explores application of an optical clearing agent (OCA) to scrotal skin to reduce laser power necessary for successful noninvasive laser vasectomy and eliminate scrotal skin burns. A mixture of dimethyl sulfoxide and glycerol was noninvasively delivered into scrotal skin using a pneumatic jet device. Near-infrared laser radiation was delivered in conjunction with cryogen spray cooling to the skin surface in a canine model, ex vivo and in vivo. Burst pressure (BP) measurements were conducted to quantify strength of vas closure. A 30-min application of OCA improved skin transparency by 26±3%, reducing average power necessary for successful noninvasive laser vasectomy from 9.2 W without OCA (BP=291±31 mmHg) to 7.0 W with OCA (BP=292±19 mmHg). Control studies without OCA at 7.0 W failed to coagulate the vas with burst pressures (82±28 mmHg) significantly below typical ejaculation pressures (136±29 mmHg). Application of an OCA reduced the laser power necessary for successful noninvasive thermal coagulation of the vas by ?25%. This technique may result in use of a less expensive laser and eliminate the formation of scrotal skin burns during the procedure.

Cilip, Christopher M.; Ross, Ashley E.; Jarow, Jonathan P.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

2010-01-01

131

A randomized, controlled, multicenter contraceptive efficacy clinical trial of the intravas device, a nonocclusive surgical male sterilization  

PubMed Central

Because of unavoidable complications of vasectomy, this study was undertaken to assess the efficacy and safety of male sterilization with a nonobstructive intravas device (IVD) implanted into the vas lumen by a mini-surgical method compared with no-scalpel vasectomy (NSV). IVDs were categorized into two types: IVD-B has a tail used for fixing to the vas deferens (fixed wing) whereas IVD-A does not. A multicenter prospective randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted in China. The study was comprised of 1459 male volunteers seeking vasectomy who were randomly assigned to the IVD-A (n = 487), IVD-B (n = 485) or NSV (n = 487) groups and underwent operation. Follow-up included visits at the 3rd–6th and 12th postoperative months. The assessments of the subjects involved regular physical examinations (including general and andrological examinations) and semen analysis. The subjects’ partners also underwent monitoring for pregnancy by monthly interviews regarding menstruation and if necessary, urine tests. There were no significant differences in pregnancy rates (0.65% for IVD-A, 0 for IVD-B and 0.21% for NSV) among the three groups (P > 0.05). The cumulative rates of complications at the 12th postoperative month were zero, 0.9% and 1.7% in the three groups, respectively. In conclusion, IVD male sterilization exhibits a low risk of long-term adverse events and was found to be effective as a male sterilization method, similar to the NSV technique. IVD male sterilization is expected to be a novel contraceptive method.

Lu, Wen-Hong; Liang, Xiao-Wei; Gu, Yi-Qun; Wu, Wei-Xiong; Bo, Li-Wei; Zheng, Tian-Gui; Chen, Zhen-Wen

2014-01-01

132

 

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To compare the efficacy of, and complications associated with, vasectomies performed in two medical clinics. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. SETTING: A private medical clinic and a family planning clinic at a teaching hospital in the Quebec City region, where one doctor performs all surgery. PARTICIPANTS: The 1223 men who underwent a first vasectomy between January 1994 and February 1996. INTERVENTIONS: Isolations of the vas deferens through the scrotum was performed using the no-scalpel technique in both clinics. At the private clinic (n = 775), vasectomy was performed by ligature with tantalum clips. At the family planning clinic (n = 448), a combination of cauterisation of the abdominal end of the vas deferens, leaving the testicular end open, and fascial interposition with a clip was used. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Rate of postoperative complications (painful granuloma; noninfectious inflammation of the vas deferens, epididymis, and testes; hematoma; infection; undiagnosed pain) and rate of recanalization (early and late). RESULTS: At the private clinic, 39 patients (5.0%) consulted for postoperative complications, compared with 55 patients (12.3%) at the family planning clinic (chi (2)1 = 21.0; P < 0.001). Of the patients who underwent semen analysis, 15 (2.8%) at the private clinic and 4 (1.2%) at the family planning clinic experienced early or late recanalization (chi (2)1 = 2.2; P < .14). CONCLUSION: The rate of consultation for postoperative complications was lower at the private clinic than at the family planning clinic, but the efficacy of the procedure appeared to be higher at the family planning clinic. The surgical techniques used at the two clinics might partially explain these differences.

Labrecque, M.; Bedard, L.; Laperriere, L.

1998-01-01

133

A randomized, controlled, multicenter contraceptive efficacy clinical trial of the intravas device, a nonocclusive surgical male sterilization.  

PubMed

Because of unavoidable complications of vasectomy, this study was undertaken to assess the efficacy and safety of male sterilization with a nonobstructive intravas device (IVD) implanted into the vas lumen by a mini-surgical method compared with no-scalpel vasectomy (NSV). IVDs were categorized into two types: IVD-B has a tail used for fixing to the vas deferens (fixed wing) whereas IVD-A does not. A multicenter prospective randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted in China. The study was comprised of 1459 male volunteers seeking vasectomy who were randomly assigned to the IVD-A (n = 487), IVD-B (n = 485) or NSV (n = 487) groups and underwent operation. Follow-up included visits at the 3 rd -6 th and 12 th postoperative months. The assessments of the subjects involved regular physical examinations (including general and andrological examinations) and semen analysis. The subjects' partners also underwent monitoring for pregnancy by monthly interviews regarding menstruation and if necessary, urine tests. There were no significant differences in pregnancy rates (0.65% for IVD-A, 0 for IVD-B and 0.21% for NSV) among the three groups (P > 0.05). The cumulative rates of complications at the 12 th postoperative month were zero, 0.9% and 1.7% in the three groups, respectively. In conclusion, IVD male sterilization exhibits a low risk of long-term adverse events and was found to be effective as a male sterilization method, similar to the NSV technique. IVD male sterilization is expected to be a novel contraceptive method. PMID:24589454

Lu, Wen-Hong; Liang, Xiao-Wei; Gu, Yi-Qun; Wu, Wei-Xiong; Bo, Li-Wei; Zheng, Tian-Gui; Chen, Zhen-Wen

2014-01-01

134

Human robotic assisted bilateral vasoepididymostomy and vasovasostomy procedures: initial safety and efficacy trial  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Our goal was to develop a robotic approach for vasoepididymostomy (RAVE) and vasovasostomy (RAVV) using a 4 arm High Definition Platform (Intuitive Surgical, CA) and present our human in-vivo results. All 3 RAVV procedures were successful and one patient had 102 million motile sperm/ml of ejaculate at 1 month post-op. The RAVE procedure patient only had a few non-motile sperm at 6 month follow up in his ejaculate. The use of robotics seems to offer advantages in terms of ergonomics and suture control. Further evaluation is needed to assess the clinical potential of robotics in vasectomy reversal.

Parekattil, Sijo J.; Cohen, Marc S.; Vieweg, Johannes W.

2009-02-01

135

Male contraception: history and development.  

PubMed

Although the twentieth century has seen great strides in the development of female contraception, not a single new agent has been introduced as an approved method for common use for male contraception. Condoms (considered uncomfortable by some) and vasectomy (a permanent invasive procedure) are the only options provided to men, leaving an undue burden on women to bear contraceptive responsibility. Significant developments have, however, been made with regard to hormonal and nonhormonal contraception, and minor, reversible, procedural contraception. This article reviews the currently available, soon to be available, and theoretically possible methods of male contraception. PMID:24286773

Kogan, Paul; Wald, Moshe

2014-02-01

136

ACOG Practice bulletin no. 133: benefits and risks of sterilization.  

PubMed

Female and male sterilization are both safe and effective methods of permanent contraception used by more than 220 million couples worldwide . Approximately 600,000 tubal occlusions and 200,000 vasectomies are performed in the United States annually . For women seeking permanent contraception, sterilization obviates the need for user-dependent contraception throughout their reproductive years and provides an excellent alternative for those with medical contraindications to reversible methods. The purpose of this document is to review the evidence for the safety and effectiveness of female sterilization in comparison with male sterilization and other forms of contraception. PMID:23344305

2013-02-01

137

 

PubMed Central

The rate of non-compliance with the post-vasectomy semen examination procedure at the Centre Hospitalier de l'Université Laval (CHUL) between October 1, 1985 and March 31, 1987 was 21%, one of the highest in the literature. The purpose of our study was to determine the causes of this situation. The socio-demographic profile obtained from the computerized files of 50 patients who did not comply with the procedure was comparable to that of the 183 patients who did comply. A telephone survey of 43 non-compliant patients was carried out. In 70% of the responses to an open question on the reasons for non-compliance, the subject cited on his own negligence. In response to the closed questions, the constraints involved in the semen examination procedure were cited most often (49%). In the responses to both open and closed questions, a lack of information was cited least often. There is not a distinctive profile among vasectomy patients at the CHUL that would make it possible to predict compliance. Despite the fact that it would be difficult to improve the factors associated with patient negligence, it might be possible to increase compliance by following up more closely and lessening the constraints.

Labrecque, Michel; Hamel, Jean-Francois; Prevost, Jean-Francois; Warren, Louis

1989-01-01

138

Hormonal Approaches to Male contraception  

PubMed Central

Purpose of review Condoms and vasectomy are male controlled family planning methods but suffer from limitations in compliance (condoms) and limited reversibility (vasectomy); thus many couples desire other options. Hormonal male contraceptive methods have undergone extensive clinical trials in healthy men and shown to be efficacious, reversible and appear to be safe. Recent Findings The success rate of male hormonal contraception using injectable testosterone alone is high and comparable to methods for women. Addition of progestins to androgens improved the rate of suppression of spermatogenesis. Supported by government or non-government organizations, current studies aim to find the best combination of testosterone and progestins for effective spermatogenesis suppression and to explore other delivery methods for these hormones. Translation of these advances to widespread use in the developed world will need the manufacturing and marketing skills of the pharmaceutical industry. Availability of male contraceptives to the developing world may require commitments of governmental and non-governmental agencies. In a time when imbalance of basic resources and population needs are obvious, this may prove to be a very wise investment. Summary Male hormonal contraception is efficacious, reversible and safe for the target population of younger men in stable relationships. Suppression of spermatogenesis is achieved with a combination of an androgen and a progestin. Partnership with industry will accelerate the marketing of a male hormonal contraceptive. Research is ongoing on selective androgen and progesterone receptor modulators that suppress spermatogenesis, minimize potential adverse events while retaining the androgenic actions.

Wang, Christina; Swerdloff, Ronald S.

2010-01-01

139

Comparison of different autogenous graft materials for reconstruction of large segment vas deferens defect: experimental study in rat.  

PubMed

Purpose: Vasectomy is one of the most common urological operations performed, and provides permanent contraception. Many vasectomized men ultimately seek vasectomy reversalbecause of unforeseen changes in lifestyle. Vasovasostomy has varying rates of success. Inthis study, we utilize vas deferens (VD), artery, and vein grafts to reconstruct 30% and 50%defects of the total vas deferens length. Materials and Methods: Forty two male Wistar rats were divided into three groups as VDgraft, carotid artery and external jugular vein transplantations. Each group was equally dividedinto 2 different subgroups according to the length of transplant material as 1.0 cm (n = 7) and1.5 cm (n = 7). To evaluate whether these materials may be used for long segment vas deferensreconstruction, the patency rate, partial or total graft occlusion, and histologic examination ofall specimens were examined. Results: No patency was found in any of the grafts and many of them suffered destructivechanges in anatomic structure. Sperm granulomas were determined around the testicular sideanastomosis due to accumulated semen fluid which was in our belief, a result of aperistalticzone caused by the grafts. Conclusion: When the poor results obtained in our study are put into perspective, vasoepididymostomyis the only treatment method to date for reconstruction of large segment vasdeferens defects. PMID:24807760

Nasir, Serdar; Soyupek, Sedat; Altuntas, Selman; Konas, Ersay; Roach, Emir Charles; Ozorak, Alper; Bircan, Sema

2014-01-01

140

Sterilization.  

PubMed

Sterilization is accepted as a permanent method of contraception by many couples in the world. Female sterilization is more widely used than male sterilization, but the latter is used by many couples in developed countries. The most widely used methods for female sterilization are simple tubal ligation, electrocautery of the fallopian tubes, and occlusion of the tubes by Hulka or Filshie clips or Falope rings. These procedures may be carried out either by minilaparotomy or by laparoscopy, under local anaesthesia. Sterilization may be performed immediately following pregnancy, or as an interval operation. The effectiveness of female sterilization is high, with failure rates of about 1-2 per 1000 procedures. Immediate complications are few and minor, while there appear to be no serious, long-term adverse effects. It is possible that there is a protective effect against ovarian cancer. Potential new technologies for female sterilization include the use of chemicals, such as quinacrine, for transcervical tubal occlusion, and hysteroscopic methods. Male sterilization is more simple and can readily be performed under local anaesthesia. A new technique originating in China, the no-scalpel technique, has made the procedure even more simple and produces fewer complications such as haematoma. It is possible that the direct injection of plug-forming material into the vas may render the procedure more reversible. Concerns about possible adverse effects of vasectomy on cardiovascular diseases and testicular cancer largely have been dispelled, but a possible weak association between vasectomy and prostatic cancer continues to be studied. PMID:8736725

Wilson, E W

1996-04-01

141

[Sterilization of men].  

PubMed

Male sterilization is the most effective method of contraception next to female sterilization, provided that operative technical errors are avoided and postoperative spermiogram testing is conducted. Primary failures of operative technique, which can lead to legal litigation between patient and doctor, are a) that one side is correctly cut, but on the other side, instead of the vas, a vas-like structure is cut, and b) instead of re-sectioning both the right and left sides, the same vas is cut twice at different points. Simple vasotomy (a single cut) and simple vasectomy with ligation of the vas ends are both unreliable methods. The only reliable operative procedure is vasectomy (removal of a segment of the vas) and tying the vas ends back on themselves (using nonabsorbable material), after previous electrocoagulation of the inner coat of the vas. Statistics show that about 1 in 400 cases remains fertile. [Failure is due to 1) misidentification of at least one vas, or 2) spontaneous recanalization following formation of a sperm granuloma.] Another error with serious consequences is the failure of the physician to inform the patient that even after a correctly performed sterilization sperm may appear in the ejaculate for several months. Other forms of contraception should be used until two control tests confirm a reading of azoospermia in ejaculate taken after a week of abstinence. PMID:6489845

Klosterhalfen, H

1984-09-01

142

A comparison of ABAcard(®) p30 and RSID™-Semen test kits for forensic semen identification.  

PubMed

The screening and confirmatory tests available to a forensic laboratory allow evidence to be examined for the presence of bodily fluids. With the majority of evidence being submitted involving sexual assaults, it is important to have confirmatory tests for the identification of semen that are straightforward, quick, and reliable. The purpose of this study was to compare two commonly used semen identification kits utilized by forensic laboratories: ABAcard(®) p30 and Rapid Stain Identification of Human Semen (RSID™-Semen). These kits were assessed with aged semen stains, fresh and frozen post-vasectomy semen, post-coital samples collected on different substrates, post-vasectomy semen mixed with blood, saliva, and urine, a series of swabs collected at increasing time intervals after sexual intercourse, and multiple non-semen samples. The test kits were compared on the basis of sensitivity, specificity, and the cost and time effectiveness of each protocol. Overall, both semen identification tests performed well in the studies. Both kits proved specificity for identifying semen, however the ABAcard(®) p30 test surpassed the RSID™-Semen test in sensitivity, cost per test, and simplified test protocol. PMID:24237835

Boward, Emily S; Wilson, Stacey L

2013-11-01

143

Optical coherence tomography vs. high-frequency ultrasound during noninvasive laser coagulation of the canine vas deferens  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A noninvasive approach to vasectomy may eliminate male fear of complications related to surgery and increase its acceptance. Noninvasive laser thermal occlusion of the canine vas deferens has recently been reported. In this study, optical coherence tomography (OCT) and high-frequency ultrasound (HFUS) are compared for monitoring laser thermal coagulation of the vas in an acute canine model. Bilateral noninvasive laser coagulation of the vas was performed in 6 dogs (n=12 vasa) using a Ytterbium fiber laser wavelength of 1075 nm, incident power of 9.0 W, pulse duration of 500 ms, pulse rate of 1 Hz, and 3-mm-diameter spot. Cryogen spray cooling was used to prevent skin burns during the procedure. An OCT system with endoscopic probe and a HFUS system with 20-MHz transducer were used to image the vas immediately before and after the procedure. Vasa were then excised and processed for gross and histologic analysis for comparison with OCT and HFUS images. OCT provided high-resolution, superficial imaging of the compressed vas within the vas ring clamp, while HFUS provided deeper imaging of the vas held manually in the scrotal fold. Both OCT and high HFUS are promising imaging modalities for real-time confirmation of vas occlusion during noninvasive laser vasectomy.

Cilip, Christopher M.; Allaf, Mohamad E.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

2012-02-01

144

Analysis of the autoimmune epitopes on human testicular NASP using recombinant and synthetic peptides  

PubMed Central

The human nuclear autoantigenic sperm protein, NASP, is a testicular histone-binding protein of 787 amino acids to which most vasectomized men develop autoantibodies. In this study to define the boundaries of antigenic regions and epitope recognition pattern, recombinant deletion mutants spanning the entire protein coding sequence and a human NASP cDNA sublibrary were screened with vasectomy patients' sera. Employing panel sera from 21 vasectomy patients with anti-sperm antibodies, a heterogeneous pattern of autoantibody binding to the recombinant polypeptides was detected in ELISA and immunoblotting. The majority of sera (20/21) had antibodies to one or more of the NASP fusion proteins. Antigenic sites preferentially recognized by the individual patients' sera were located within aa 32–352 and aa 572–787. Using a patient's serum selected for its reactivity to the whole recombinant protein in Western blots, cDNA clones positive for the C-terminal domain of the molecule were identified. The number and location of linear epitopes in this region were determined by synthetic peptide mapping and inhibition studies. The epitope-containing segment was delimited to the sequence aa 619–692 and analysis of a series of 74 concurrent overlapping 9mer synthetic peptides encompassing this region revealed four linear epitopes: amino acid residues IREKIEDAK (aa 648–656), KESQRSGNV (aa 656–664), AELALKATL (aa 665–673) and GFTPGGGGS (aa 680–688). All individual patients' sera reacted with epitopes within the sequence IRE….GGS (aa 648–688). The strongest reactivity was displayed by peptides corresponding to the sequence AELALKATL (aa 665–673). Thus, multiple continuous autoimmune epitopes in NASP involving sequences in the conserved C-terminal domain as well as in the less conserved testis-specific N-terminal region comprising the histone-binding sites, as predicted for an antigen-driven immune response, may be a target of autoantibodies in vasectomized men and may provide a relevant laboratory variable to describe more accurately the spectrum of autoantibody specificities associated with the clinical manifestation of vasectomy.

Batova, I N; Richardson, R T; Widgren, E E; O'Rand, M G

2000-01-01

145

[Summary of the Dutch College of General Practitioners' practice guideline 'Contraception'].  

PubMed

The choice of a method of contraception is individual, based on factors including good advice from the general practitioner. There are various reliable forms of contraception available, such as the contraceptive pill, the copper or hormone-containing coil (intrauterine device), the vaginal ring, the contraceptive patch, the contraceptive injection, contraceptive implants, and male sterilization (vasectomy) or female sterilization. When choosing for a combined hormonal preparation the preference is for a pill containing levonorgestrel and ethinylestradiol 30 ?g. Women aged ? 35 years who smoke and are not prepared to stop are advised against taking combined preparations. Only liver-enzyme inducing drugs have been proven to have relevant interaction with hormonal contraceptives; this has not been proven in the case of antibiotics. A transvaginal ultrasound is not necessary following an uncomplicated insertion of an intrauterine device. PMID:23062257

Kurver, Miranda J; van der Wijden, Carla L; Burgers, Jako

2012-01-01

146

A Case of Duplicated Vas Deferens Found Incidentally during Varicocelectomy  

PubMed Central

Duplication of the vas deferens is a very rare congenital anomaly in which two vasa deferentia coexist within the spermatic cord. Duplication of the vas deferens can be found during herniorrhaphy, vasectomy, and varicocelectomy performed on the spermatic cord or around the spermatic cord. However, it is estimated that the incidence of duplication of the vas deferens is under-reported and under-recognized. Unless anomalies of the vas deferens such as duplication of the vas deferens are recognized by surgeons, it will be difficult to reduce vas deferens injuries and achieve a satisfactory surgical outcome. In addition, care should be taken in cases of duplication of the vas deferens because it can be complicated by non-testicular genitourinary anomalies. We report a case of duplication of the vas deferens discovered during routine varicocelectomy.

Lee, Jun Nyung; Kim, Hyun Tae; Chung, Sung Kwang

2013-01-01

147

A Case of Duplicated Vas Deferens Found Incidentally during Varicocelectomy.  

PubMed

Duplication of the vas deferens is a very rare congenital anomaly in which two vasa deferentia coexist within the spermatic cord. Duplication of the vas deferens can be found during herniorrhaphy, vasectomy, and varicocelectomy performed on the spermatic cord or around the spermatic cord. However, it is estimated that the incidence of duplication of the vas deferens is under-reported and under-recognized. Unless anomalies of the vas deferens such as duplication of the vas deferens are recognized by surgeons, it will be difficult to reduce vas deferens injuries and achieve a satisfactory surgical outcome. In addition, care should be taken in cases of duplication of the vas deferens because it can be complicated by non-testicular genitourinary anomalies. We report a case of duplication of the vas deferens discovered during routine varicocelectomy. PMID:24459663

Lee, Jun Nyung; Kim, Bum Soo; Kim, Hyun Tae; Chung, Sung Kwang

2013-12-01

148

Malignant mesothelioma of the tunica vaginalis testis: a malignancy associated with recurrent epididymitis?  

PubMed Central

A 53-year-old Taiwanese male had several episodes of left epididymitis with hydrocele refractory to antibiotic treatment. Partial epididymectomy plus preventive vasectomy were planned, and, incidentally, an ill-defined nodule was found lying on the tunica vaginalis near the epididymal head. The pathological diagnosis was malignant mesothelioma of the tunica vaginalis testis. Radical orchiectomy with wide excision of the hemi-scrotal wall was performed. So far, there is no evidence of recurrence after more than 3 years of follow-up. Malignant tumor should be considered in the case of recurrent epididymitis refractory to empirically effective antibiotic treatment. Although the nature of this tumor is highly fatal, the malignancy can possibly be cured by early and aggressive surgical treatment.

2012-01-01

149

[Urological diseases most frequently involved in medical professional liability claims].  

PubMed

Clinical safety and medical professional liability are international major concerns, especially in surgical specialties such as urology. This article analyzes the claims filed at the Council of Medical Colleges of Catalonia between 1990 and 2012, exploring urology procedures. The review of the 173 cases identified in the database highlighted the importance of surgical procedures (74%). Higher frequencies related to scrotaltesticular pathology (34%), especially testicular torsion (7.5%) and vasectomy (19.6%), and prostate pathology (26 %), more specifically the surgical treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (17.9%). Although urology is not among the specialties with the higher frequency of claims, there are special areas of litigation in which it is advisable to implement improvements in clinical safety. PMID:24913755

Vargas-Blasco, César; Gómez-Durán, Esperanza L; Arimany-Manso, Josep; Pera-Bajo, Francisco

2014-03-01

150

Unilateral duplication of vas deferens: a cadaveric case report.  

PubMed

Duplication of vas deferens is a rare congenital anomaly. All previously reported cases of this rare anomaly were identified during procedures such as orchiepexy, inguinal hernia repair, vasectomy, varicocoelectomy, and radical prostatectomy. Here, we report a case of unilateral duplicated vas deferens noted in an adult cadaver during regular dissection for medical students. The right spermatic cord contained 2 separate and completely developed cord-like structures. Both cords communicated separately with the tail of the epididymis. When traced cranially, both traversed the inguinal canal as content of the spermatic cord and finally fused at the level of the deep inguinal ring. No other variations were found in the testis or epididymis, and no variations were seen in the left spermatic cord. In addition, no associated renal abnormalities were noted. PMID:23560239

Sirasanagandla, Srinivasa Rao; Nayak, Satheesha B; Jetti, Raghu; Bhat, Kumar M R

2013-03-01

151

Parthenogenesis in a Brazilian rainbow boa (Epicrates cenchria cenchria).  

PubMed

A 22-year-old captive Brazilian rainbow boa (Epicrates cenchria cenchria) gave birth to four offspring after being housed with a vasectomized male. Sexual reproduction as a result of failed prior vasectomy, recanalization of the vas deferens, or prolonged sperm storage was ruled out using the clinical history, histopathology, and gross necropsy. Short tandem repeat (STR) DNA markers were genotyped in the male, female, and four offspring. None of the offspring possessed a diagnostic STR allele present in the potential sire. In addition, all offspring were homozygous at each STR locus evaluated, supporting parthenogenetic reproduction. This is the first report of parthenogenesis in a Brazilian rainbow boa and has implications for the conservation of reptiles maintained in captive breeding programs. PMID:23086743

Kinney, Matthew E; Wack, Raymund F; Grahn, Robert A; Lyons, Leslie

2013-03-01

152

Increased risk of prostate cancer following sexually transmitted infection in an Asian population.  

PubMed

The relationship between sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and prostate cancer (PC) remains inconclusive. Moreover, all such studies to date have been conducted in Western populations. This study aimed to investigate the risk of PC following STI using a population-based matched-cohort design in Taiwan. The study cohort comprised 1055 patients with STIs, and 10 550 randomly selected subjects were used as a comparison cohort. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis revealed that the hazard ratio for PC during the 5-year follow-up period for patients with a STI was 1.95 (95% confidence interval 1.18-3.23), that of comparison subjects after adjusting for urbanization level, geographical region, monthly income, hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidaemia, obesity, chronic prostatitis, history of vasectomy, tobacco use disorder, and alcohol abuse. We concluded that the risk of PC was higher for men who were diagnosed with a STI in an Asian population. PMID:23461984

Chung, S D; Lin, Y K; Huang, C C; Lin, H C

2013-12-01

153

Health on wheels: public service of a private hospital.  

PubMed

This article describes the history and activities of the mobile clinic field by the Lorma Medical Center in Carlatan, San Fernando, in the province of La Union. The clinic is free and offers integrated medical services to 4-5 baranguays (villages) per day, averaging 861 cases including an average of 86 family planning cases. The clinic is part of Lorma's Outreach Program which includes a daily radio program answering questions on "Better Health for You and Your Family," a seminar program for local, voluntary health assistants and an "Adopt a Family" program in which nursing students visit and care for an indigent family throughout their training. In September 1977, a mobile vasectomy clinic will begin daily rounds. The mobile clinic program has little access to remote areas because the van cannot navigate the narrow, bumpy roads. However, funding is the program's only real limitation and its possibilities for improved health and family planning services are very great. PMID:12278133

Soriano, M B

1977-06-01

154

Robotic instrumentation: Evolution and microsurgical applications  

PubMed Central

This article presents a review of the history and evolution of robotic instrumentation and its applications in urology. A timeline for the evolution of robotic instrumentation is presented to better facilitate an understanding of our current-day applications. Some new directions including robotic microsurgical applications (robotic assisted denervation of the spermatic cord for chronic orchialgia and robotic assisted vasectomy reversal) are presented. There is a paucity of prospective comparative effectiveness studies for a number of robotic applications. However, right or wrong, human nature has always led to our infatuation with the concept of using tools to meet our needs. This chapter is a brief tribute to where we have come from and where we may be potentially heading in the field of robotic assisted urologic surgery.

Parekattil, Sijo J.; Moran, Michael E.

2010-01-01

155

[Contralateral inguinal metastasis from testicular seminoma].  

PubMed

We report the case of a 42-year-old patient with contralateral inguinal seminoma metastasis. He had a history of prior bilateral open inguinal hernia repair and scrotal vasectomy. Staging CT revealed no further lymphoma or organ metastases. After discussion of adjuvant treatment options and contacting a referral centre for testicular cancer, adjuvant treatment was performed with 3 cycles of cisplatin, etoposide and ifosfamide. The development of the contralateral inguinal metastasis is most likely caused by the prior inguinal and scrotal surgery, whereas a primary atypical retrograde metastatic route can't be ruled out. Physical examination of the inguinal lymph nodes should be performed in all patients with testicular cancer and prior inguinal and scrotal surgery. PMID:22911382

Rausch, S; Yiakoumos, T; Schieber, M; Özdemir, K; Kälble, T

2012-09-01

156

[The problem of overpopulation in Asia].  

PubMed

The relation between medicine and overpopulation is seen in the following: 1) achievements in medicine have decreased mortality leading to population explosion, 2) lack of food supply leads to deficiency diseases, and 3) starvation and overpopulation leads to the social diseases of unemployment and poverty. Population control can be achieved by medical methods of contraception. Japan's overpopulation is contrasted with that of India. In Japan the standard of living is high and food supply adequate because Japan's technological products are exported and food imported. The mostly rural areas of India promote families with many children. The available farmland is not sufficient for all family members. Growing children seek occupations in the cities leading to slum conditions and great poverty and misery as exemplified by Calcutta. In Europe there is a mostly balanced population because industrialization counteracts population growth. Too many children are a financial burden to the parents and the getting of children is prevented by contraception and/or abortion. In developing countries this balance is not yet achieved; industrialization lags behind the application of medical technology which promotes population explosion. To counteract this, medical methods of contraception must be used. In India with an annual population growth of 2.1% (this would lead to a population of 1.17 billion by the year 2008) this control would be best achieved through tubal ligation and/or vasectomy. There is little motivation for other methods in family planning because of the attitude toward poverty and hardship. To achieve a shrinking of their population, vasectomy (easier and less hazardous than tubal ligation) should be performed after the 2nd child. This, obviously, would need a national well-organized, program and a change in attitude of India's inhabitants. If not, the future might lead to rebellion by the poor and starving masses; civil war might break out and thus decimate the population. PMID:7281040

Knaus, J P

1981-06-01

157

Mass media and behavior change: hand in hand.  

PubMed

Since the early 1980s, Johns Hopkins University's Population communication Services has conducted evaluations of mass media campaigns in developing countries which communications personnel have designed to change health and sex behavior. The mass media campaigns involved relaying health and family planning information via radio, television, and pamphlets. The evaluations showed that these campaigns were an effective technique to promote behavior change, e.g. they have boosted demand for contraceptives, condom sales, clinic visits, and inquiries to hotlines. A 6-part television drama incorporating health and family planning into its storyline stimulated behavior change in Pakistan in 1991. 36% of people surveyed after the drama series said they would limit the number of children they would have. 44% planned to improve communication with their spouse. An amusing television promotion in Brazil which ran for 6 months in the late 1980s prompted 58% of new clinic patients in 1 town to seek a vasectomy. 1 clinic experienced an 81% increase in vasectomies. A 6-month campaign to promote condom use in Colombia in 1988-89 resulted in a 75% rise in condom sales. In the mid 1980, a 6-9 month mass media popular music campaign (2 songs and videos disseminated via television, radio, and print materials) in Mexico and Latin America strove to encourage youth to be responsible for their sexual behavior. During the campaign, an adult counseling center received an 800% increase in letters (50-450 letters/month). 4 radio and 5 television spots promoting health and family planning in Kwara State, Nigeria in 1984-87 increased family planning acceptors 500% from 258 to 1526 in the 7 existing clinics. Other successful campaigns took place in the Philippines, Zimbabwe, Indonesia, Turkey, Bolivia and Honduras. PMID:12285445

1992-01-01

158

[Male contraception in 1987].  

PubMed

Male contraception apart from vasectomy and the condom is still in a virtually experimental stage. An acceptable male method must not interfere with sexual function and must meet the same demands for safety, simplicity, efficacy and reversibility as female methods. Condoms are the oldest and most effective reversible male method. Vasectomy is a simple and safe procedure, popular in some countries. Its biggest drawback is its uncertain reversibility even after successful reanastomosis. Hormonal approaches to male contraception are based on use of steroid or peptide compounds to inhibit production of the gonadotropins luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) by the pituitary, resulting in azoospermia. The actual development of such methods has been confounded by imperfect knowledge of the hormonal mechanisms regulating spermatogenesis. The method requires 2 months to become effective because the process of human spermatogenesis is so lengthy. Rates of azoospermia greater than 70-80% have never been achieved. Among substances used, testosterone enanthate is unacceptable because of irregular efficacy and secondary effects inherent in the doses of androgens. Several progestins have been studied in combination with injectable, implanted, or percutaneous androgen therapy. Azoospermia is not usually achieved and secondary effects are significant. Medroxyprogesterone acetate has given more promising results in limited trials. Cyproterone acetate and danazol, a synthetic analog of 17 alpha ethinyl testosterone, are powerful but have significant side effects. The expectation that superanalogs to gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) would provide a male hormonal method has thus far not been met. GnRH agonists have never yet produced a durable azoospermia in human males, even with continuous perfusion of elevated doses. It has recently been shown that the required androgen substitution interferes with achievement of azoospermia. GnRH antagonists appear more promising, but the androgen substitution poses a similar problem to that encountered with GnRH agonists. The first human trials are now underway. The hormonal approach may ultimately provide an interesting choice for individuals able to have regular spermograms, but does not appear feasible on a wide scale. A direct approach to male contraception at the level of the epididymis or testicles is theoretically interesting because of the rapidity of the effect. Gossypol, a phenolic compound extracted from cotton oil or seeds, provides extreme oligospermia in 99.9% of users, but the effect has been irreversible in a nonnegligible proportion of men using it for more than 2 years. Other compounds tested have been too toxic for clinical use. Immunological approaches pose major theoretical problems and all developments remain experimental. A better knowledge of the physiology of spermatogenesis and of the control of sperm movement will be required for development of a satisfactory male contraceptive method. PMID:3310192

Silvestre, L; Varin, C; Bouchard, P

1987-09-21

159

Sperm Recovery and IVF after Testicular Sperm Extraction (TESE): Effect of Male Diagnosis and Use of Off-Site Surgical Centers on Sperm Recovery and IVF  

PubMed Central

Objective Determine whether testicular sperm extractions and pregnancy outcomes are influenced by male and female infertility diagnoses, location of surgical center and time to cryopreservation. Patients One hundred and thirty men undergoing testicular sperm extraction and 76 couples undergoing 123 in vitro fertilization cycles with testicular sperm. Outcome Measures Successful sperm recovery defined as 1–2 sperm/0.5 mL by diagnosis including obstructive azoospermia (n?=?60), non-obstructive azoospermia (n?=?39), cancer (n?=?14), paralysis (n?=?7) and other (n?=?10). Obstructive azoospermia was analyzed as congenital absence of the vas deferens (n?=?22), vasectomy or failed vasectomy reversal (n?=?37) and “other”(n?=?1). Sperm recovery was also evaluated by surgical site including infertility clinic (n?=?54), hospital operating room (n?=?67) and physician’s office (n?=?11). Treatment cycles were evaluated for number of oocytes, fertilization, embryo quality, implantation rate and clinical/ongoing pregnancies as related to male diagnosis, female diagnosis, and use of fresh or cryopreserved testicular sperm. Results Testicular sperm recovery from azoospermic males with all diagnoses was high (70 to 100%) except non-obstructive azoospermia (31%) and was not influenced by distance from surgical center to laboratory. Following in vitro fertilization, rate of fertilization was significantly lower with non-obstructive azoospermia (43%, p?=?<0.0001) compared to other male diagnoses (66%, p?=?<0.0001, 59% p?=?0.015). No differences were noted in clinical pregnancy rate by male diagnosis; however, the delivery rate per cycle was significantly higher with obstructive azoospermia (38% p?=?0.0371) compared to diagnoses of cancer, paralysis or other (16.7%). Women diagnosed with diminished ovarian reserve had a reduced clinical pregnancy rate (7.4% p?=?0.007) compared to those with other diagnoses (44%). Conclusion Testicular sperm extraction is a safe and effective option regardless of the etiology of the azoospermia. The type of surgical center and/or its distance from the laboratory was not related to success. Men with non-obstructive azoospermia have a lower chance of successful sperm retrieval and fertilization.

Omurtag, Kenan; Cooper, Amber; Bullock, Arnold; Naughton, Cathy; Ratts, Valerie; Odem, Randall

2013-01-01

160

Family planning is the first and most important step for rural development.  

PubMed

Mahasarakham province in Thailand has adopted family planning as its primary development policy. Although not a new issue, family planning until now has been largely ignored by most government sectors. Most consider family planning to be the sole responsibility of the Ministry of Public Ealth (MOPH), and this is why family planning has not been as successful as it should be. Discussion covers the general problem (rapid population increase, limited arable land, productivity, social and economic development, and deforestation), problems of family planning in the past (trained personnel and accessibility and government sectors ignoring or hindering family planning programs), integrated rural development (motivation, mobilizing teamwork, the integrated approach, mobile medical team, family planning for both the rich and the poor, and emphasis on vasectomy and IUD), objectives of the family planning program, and implementation. Mahasarakham uses an integrated rural development approach that emphasizes 9 development components: family planning, fisheries development, vegetable growing, water purification, rice banks, soy beans, using anchovies for natural fish sauce, insect extermination by electricity, and fuel from rice banks. All of these components contribute to the development of a better quality of rural life. The major problem is population growth, which at 1.8% remains high. Mahasarakham will promote the family planning program as the top priority, and this service will be brought to the people. The objectives of the family planning program are: to reduce the population growth rate Mahasarakham to zero growth within 2-3 years: to provide access to family planning services to all people in Mahasarakham; to educate people about family planning to increase its acceptance: to initiate a proper rural development program in Mahasarakham; and to promote intergovernmental cooperation by means of the integrated approach, which will have good results in later rural development programs. In fiscal year 1963 family planning in Mahasarakham will place new emphasis on vasectomy and IUD insertion. The program expects to reach a target of not less than 30,000 acceptors. A monthly family planning service in each district must have a minimum of 300 IUD acceptors. All government sectors will be involved in and responsible for this rural development program. PMID:12266147

Mokarapong, T

1983-12-01

161

Female sterilization acceptors at permanent and temporary service delivery settings in Nepal.  

PubMed

Researchers analyzed data collected during August 1991-February 1992 to compare characteristics of female sterilization acceptors at permanent service delivery points with those of acceptors at outreach camps. 4320 currently married women aged 15-49 out of 25,384 ever-married women aged 15-49 were protected from pregnancy by sterilization. 1665 of the women had undergone sterilization at a hospital and 515 had done so at a camp. Rural women were more likely to have received sterilization services from a camp than urban women (94.9% vs. 83.1%). Most acceptors of female sterilization were illiterate, regardless of service delivery point (88.9% for hospital group and 92.2% for camp group). Both groups shared the same mean age (35 years), parity (4), number of living sons (2.3), and number of living daughters (1.7). Among birth spacing methods and vasectomy, vasectomy had the highest level of awareness in both groups (62.3% for hospital group and 64.4% for camp group). The contraceptive implant Norplant and the IUD had the lowest level of awareness, especially in the camp group (10.2% and 6.7% vs. 14.2% and 11.3%, respectively). The camp group had consistently lower spontaneous awareness for spacing methods than the hospital group. Less than 10% of both groups regretted their decision to undergo sterilization. The main reason for regret in both groups was side effects (81%), followed by desire for another child (18% for hospital group and 13% for camp group). Female sterilization was the first contraceptive method used by most women (87.5% for hospital group and 89.9% for camp group). Most camps did not offer IUDs and Norplant. These results suggest that camps have expanded the availability of and accessibility to sterilization services in Nepal without jeopardizing the quality of sterilization services. Yet there is a need to strengthen access to information about other contraceptive methods and to make them available. PMID:12154939

Thapa, S; Pandey, K R; Shrestha, H

1994-01-01

162

A look at a successful fee-charging urban project.  

PubMed

Bangkok's fee-charging Integrated Family Planning and Parasite Control Program (FPPC) is implemented by the Population and Community Development Association (PDA) and has grown from serving 36 schools and raising about US$1500 in 1976 to serving 231 schools and 200 factories and raising over US$75,000 in 1984. In addition to promoting health, the program aims at instilling a lifetime commitment to sensible health and family practices in the community. This urban program has been implemented in conjunction with a rural FPPC program through the financial and technical support of JOICFP, since 1976. Prior to that, PDA provided only family planning services. PDA is currently Thailand's largest private, non-profit organization involved in health care, appropriate technology, refugee assistance, water supply, agricultural marketing, as well as family planning and parasite control. The FPPC program works to mobilize the community to offer its support. Community involvement begins with the management of the program. Another community involvement comes from medical professionals from the local medical university who participate in the program for a fraction of their fees. Community-based family planning volunteers distribute contraceptives throughout their areas. The community also actively supports the FPPC program financially by paying fees. To communicate the benefits that people can derive from the services it offers, Bangkok's Urban FPPC program utilizes sophisticated marketing techniques such as advertising, direct mail, and a variety of public relations efforts. Family planning is publicly promoted in vasectomy festivals held each year throughout Bangkok. Married men are offered vasectomies free of charge if they have had 2 or more children. Exhibitions on parasite control and other health-related topics are also featured together with the sale of promotional items. Many of the program's activities have become major media events. Much of the credit is due to the flexibility of the program to adopt to the changing health needs of the people. Through PDA's efforts in the urban areas, the people of Bangkok are recognizing the need for family planning and health services. PMID:12313885

Traitongyoo, T

1985-10-01

163

Racial variation in tubal sterilization rates: The role of patient-level factors  

PubMed Central

Objective To assess racial differences in attitudes and knowledge about sterilization. Design Cross-sectional survey Setting Questionnaires were mailed to participants’ home addresses Patients 193 women aged 18–45 who had undergone tubal sterilization. Intervention(s) None Main Outcome Measure Attitudes and knowledge about tubal sterilization and awareness of contraceptive alternatives Results We received 193 completed surveys (64% response rate). AA woman were more likely to have a family member who had undergone tubal sterilization, to report that their mothers influenced their sterilization decisions, and to report that prior unintended pregnancy and desire to avoid insertion of a foreign object were very important factors in their decision to choose sterilization over other methods. Compared to white women, AA women more often thought that sterilization reversal could easily restore fertility (62 % vs 36%); that a woman’s sterilization would reverse itself after 5 years (60% vs 23%); and that a man cannot ejaculate after vasectomy (38% vs 13%). Fewer AA women had ever heard of intrauterine contraception (90% vs 98%). Racial differences in knowledge remained statistically significant after adjusting for socioeconomic confounders. Conclusions Misinformation about sterilization and limited awareness of contraceptive alternatives among AA women may contribute to racial disparities in tubal sterilization rates.

Borrero, Sonya; Abebe, Kaleab; Dehlendorf, Christine; Schwarz, Eleanor Bimla; Creinin, Mitchell D.; Nikolajski, Cara; Ibrahim, Said

2010-01-01

164

Reduced meiotic recombination on the XY bivalent is correlated with an increased incidence of sex chromosome aneuploidy in men with non-obstructive azoospermia.  

PubMed

Both aberrant meiotic recombination and an increased frequency of sperm aneuploidy have been observed in infertile men. However, this association has not been demonstrated within individual men. The purpose of this study was to determine the association between the frequency of recombination observed in pachytene spermatocytes and the frequency of aneuploidy in sperm from the same infertile men. Testicular tissue from seven men with non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA) and six men undergoing vasectomy reversal (controls) underwent meiotic analysis. Recombination sites were recorded for individual chromosomes. Testicular and ejaculated sperm from NOA patients and controls, respectively, were tested for aneuploidy frequencies for chromosomes 9, 21, X and Y. There was a significant increase in the frequency of pachytene cells with at least one achiasmate bivalent in infertile men (12.4%) compared with controls (4.2%, P = 0.02). Infertile men also had a significantly higher frequency of sperm disomy than controls for chromosomes 21 (1.0% versus 0.24%, P = 0.001), XX (0.16% versus 0.03%, P = 0.004) and YY (0.12% versus 0.03%, P = 0.04). There was a significant correlation between meiotic cells with zero MLH1 foci in the sex body and total sex chromosome disomy (XX + YY + XY) in sperm from men with NOA (r = 0.79, P = 0.036). PMID:18583429

Sun, F; Mikhaail-Philips, M; Oliver-Bonet, M; Ko, E; Rademaker, A; Turek, P; Martin, R H

2008-07-01

165

India: orientation camps boost new motivational strategy; group discussion on the social aspects of the family welfare program.  

PubMed

About 40,000 orientation camps for influential village leaders were planned to reactivate India's family welfare programme. Each camp averaged 40 participants, and total participation was estimated to be 1.6 million. Emphasis is placed on interpersonal communication and group communication. Special informative and motivational materials; film shows and folk-art programs were provided at the camps. This endeavor has resulted in improving the climate in relation to family planning. Approximately 100,000 community health volunteers are involved in these efforts. A group discussion organized on the family welfare program in September 22, 1979 brought out the following issues: 1) the use of incentives/disincentives in persuading people to accept family planning; 2) predominant factors in the rural areas such as malnutrition which undermine population programs; 3) need for involving voluntary organization in the family welfare program, in addition to creating an awareness of the demographic situation through educational channels; 4) introduction of some insurance schemes for old-age security; 5) approaching family planning programs at the macro level to improve the economic situation, and at micro level to intensify motivational aspects of the program; and 6) more competent handling of the vasectomy program by trained experts. PMID:12262029

1980-01-01

166

Early sexual maturity in male hamadryas baboons (Papio hamadryas hamadryas) and its reproductive implications.  

PubMed

We present data on sexual maturity in young hamadryas baboon males (Papio hamadryas hamadryas) and its reproductive consequences in a large captive baboon colony. Hamadryas baboons live in a multilevel social system, with one-male units (OMUs) as the smallest social entity. Male leaders of OMUs are believed to monopolize matings within their OMUs; hence mating is believed to be polygynous and monandrous. In a captive colony of hamadryas baboons, we found evidence that young males less than 4 years old fathered at least 2.5% of 121 offspring born subsequent to vasectomy of all adult males, and males aged 4-5 years fathered at least 16.5% of the offspring. Additional evidence that these young males are able to sire offspring came from a morphological comparison of sperm from hamadryas males of different ages. The sperm of a 48-month-old hamadryas baboon were morphologically indistinguishable from viable sperm from adult males, whereas sperm from a 45-month-old male showed some aberrations. If successful copulations by adolescent males constitute a regular pattern even in free-ranging hamadryas baboons, a hamadryas male's chances to reproduce would not be limited to his role as an OMU leader as previously assumed, and a male's reproductive career would consist of two phases: the adolescent phase, and the OMU leader male phase. PMID:16331661

Zinner, Dietmar; Krebs, Ellen; Schrod, Annette; Kaumanns, Werner

2006-04-01

167

The effect of medroxyprogesterone acetate on behavioural responses of captive female hamadryas baboons (Papio hamadryas).  

PubMed

Female hormonal contraception is considered here as an alternative to vasectomy for population control in social groups of captive hamadryas baboons (Papio hamadryas). While female hormonal contraceptive methods have been successful, behavioural effects of such agents represent a potential welfare concern. This study examined the effect of medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA; 3.5mg/kg) on perineal tumescence and behaviour in three social groups (total of 3 males, 22 females) of captive hamadryas baboons. The agent had little effect on social interactions such as grooming relationships, aggression and affiliation (all P>0.05), but did cause a reduction in sexual behaviour (P<0.001). Females-mounting-females and females receiving mounting was decreased during MPA treatment compared with the minimal tumescence phase (P<0.001). Age strongly influenced the contraceptive's duration: there was a significant correlation between age and latency of return to oestrus post-MPA (r=0.832, P<0.001) with the latency increasing by 2.61 days per year of age on average. Age also influenced the frequency of behaviours such as affiliation and aggression (P<0.001 and P=0.044, respectively). The absence of adverse behavioural effects further supports the use of MPA in the hamadryas baboon, and its potential use in other non-human primates. PMID:17980521

Guy, Amanda J; Schuerch, Franziska S; Heffernan, Scott; Thomson, Peter C; O'Brien, Justine K; McGreevy, Paul D

2008-11-01

168

Higher uptake of long-acting reversible and permanent methods of contraception by Australian women living in rural and remote areas.  

PubMed

Objectives: To examine factors associated with the uptake of i) long-acting reversible, ii) permanent and iii) traditional contraceptive methods among Australian women. Methods: Participants in the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health born in 1973-78 reported on their contraceptive use at three surveys: 2003, 2006 and 2009. The participants were 5,849 women aged 25-30 in 2003 randomly sampled from Medicare. The main outcome measure was current contraceptive method at age 28-33 years categorised as long-acting reversible methods (implant, IUD, injection), permanent (tubal ligation, vasectomy), and traditional methods (oral contraceptive pills, condoms, withdrawal, safe period). Results: Compared to women living in major cities, women in inner regional areas were more likely to use long-acting (OR=1.26, 95%CI 1.03-1.55) or permanent methods (OR=1.43, 95%CI 1.17-1.76). Women living in outer regional/remote areas were more likely than women living in cities to use long-acting (OR=1.65, 95%CI 1.31-2.08) or permanent methods (OR=1.69, 95%CI 1.43-2.14). Conclusions: Location of residence is an important factor in women's choices about long-acting and permanent contraception in addition to the number and age of their children. Implications: Further research is needed to understand the role of geographical location in women's access to contraceptive options in Australia. PMID:24690048

Lucke, Jayne C; Herbert, Danielle L

2014-04-01

169

Proteins of human semen. I. Two-dimensional mapping of human seminal fluid  

SciTech Connect

The proteins in human seminal plasma were mapped by high-resolution two-dimensional electrophoresis (ISO-DALT and BASO-DALT systems). When analyzed under dissociating conditions, samples from normal fertile males revealed a pattern of over 200 proteins, ranging in mass from 10,000 to 100,000 daltons. Comparison of the mapped proteins from these males and those who had undergone vasectomy allowed us to identify one series of glycoproteins as missing from the semen from vasectomized individuals. Glycoproteins isolated by affinity chromatography with use of concanavalin A were also mapped. Some of the protein spots were identified either by coelectrophoresis with purified proteins or by the electrophoretic transfer of proteins to nitrocellulose sheets and subsequent detection by immunological procedures. The proteins identified include a number of serum proteins as well as prostatic acid phosphatase and creatine kinase. Proteolytic events shown to occur during the liquefaction of semen that occurs early after collection indicate the importance of carefully controlled collection and preparation methods for clinical evaluation of seminal plasma. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride inhibit this proteolysis.

Edwards, J.J.; Tollaksen, S.L.; Anderson, N.G.

1981-08-01

170

The etiology of prostate cancer: what does the epidemiology suggest  

SciTech Connect

The two most important demographic characteristics of prostate cancer in Los Angeles are the high rates among blacks, which are two times those among whites and four times those among Asians, and the rapid increase in rates with age after age 40. Despite the high rates among blacks, a birth cohort analysis indicates that mortality rates among black men born after 1900 have decreased. In this report, epidemiologic and experimental evidence supporting each of three etiologic hypotheses--industrial exposure to cadmium, sexual transmission by an infectious agent, and endocrine factors--are reviewed. Evidence from descriptive data in Los Angeles suggests that only a small portion of cases might be attributable to industrial exposures. In a cohort study of Catholic priests, we found no deficit of prostate cancer mortality, strong evidence against sexual transmission of the disease. Experimental evidence and a limited amount of human data support an endocrine hypothesis. Preliminary results of a case-control study of prostate cancer are presented, but these results are unable to distinguish among these hypotheses further. This study finds a substantial protective effect of vasectomy, an event that is accompanied by reduced prostatic function and size, but this result is thus far statistically insignificant.

Ross, R.K.; Paganini-Hill, A.; Henderson, B.E.

1983-01-01

171

Age-dependence of relative telomere length profiles during spermatogenesis in man.  

PubMed

Telomeres, the protective structures at the outmost ends of chromosomes, shorten in all somatic cells with each cell-division and by cumulative oxidative damage. To counteract that these shortened telomeres are passed on to offspring, the telomeres are elongated by the enzyme, telomerase, during human spermatogenesis. A few groups have tried to elucidate this process by measuring telomerase activity in the various cell-types during spermatogenesis, but until now, no one has ever measured telomere length (TL) during these different stages in humans. Some groups have measured TL in spermatozoa and surprisingly found that telomeres of older men are longer, than those from younger men. To elucidate this phenomenon we investigated if the distribution of TL over the various precursor germ cells in old males differed from young males, perhaps indicating a more ubiquitous telomere elongation in testes from older men. We therefore obtained testicular biopsies from 6 older and 6 younger men undergoing vasectomy. The cells were suspended as single cells and smeared onto slides, followed by characterization of cell stages by phase contrast microscopy. Mean TL in individual cells was subsequently measured by telomere QFISH. Our data revealed no difference in the TL profile during spermatogenesis between younger and older men. All men had a similar profile which strongly resembled the telomerase expression profile found by others. This indicates that the longer telomeres in older men are not caused by a wider window of telomere elongation, stretching over more cell-types of spermatogenesis. PMID:23764353

Jørgensen, Pernille Bach; Fedder, Jens; Koelvraa, Steen; Graakjaer, Jesper

2013-08-01

172

Effects of Mass Media and Cultural Drift in a Model for Social Influence  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the context of an extension of Axelrod's model for social influence, we study the interplay and competition between the cultural drift, represented as random perturbations, and mass media, introduced by means of an external homogeneous field. Unlike previous studies [J. C. González-Avella et al., Phys. Rev. E 72, 065102(R) (2005)], the mass media coupling proposed here is capable of affecting the cultural traits of any individual in the society, including those who do not share any features with the external message. A noise-driven transition is found: for large noise rates, both the ordered (culturally polarized) phase and the disordered (culturally fragmented) phase are observed, while, for lower noise rates, the ordered phase prevails. In the former case, the external field is found to induce cultural ordering, a behavior opposite to that reported in previous studies using a different prescription for the mass media interaction. We compare the predictions of this model to statistical data measuring the impact of a mass media vasectomy promotion campaign in Brazil.

Mazzitello, Karina I.; Candia, Julián; Dossetti, Víctor

173

Aspirin use is associated with lower prostate cancer risk in male carriers of BRCA mutations.  

PubMed

Previous studies have shown that male BRCA mutation carriers stand at increased risk of developing prostate cancer and have concerns about developing cancer. Genetic counseling practitioners often discuss strategies for reducing the risk of cancer for patients at high risk due to their genetic background. Addressing modifiable health habits is one such strategy. Unfortunately, modifiable risk factors for prostate cancer have only been documented in the general population and have not yet been studied in the BRCA carrier subpopulation. Therefore, this study aimed to identify modifiable risk factors for prostate cancer in BRCA carriers. We examined prostate cancer risk factors in 74 men who were part of families with a BRCA mutation. This study examined nine dichotomous variables including: exercise, history of vasectomy, smoking history, alcohol use, finasteride use, statin use, aspirin use, coffee use, and vitamin use. The survey was sent to all cases of prostate cancer in the Hereditary Cancer Center Database at Creighton University with a known BRCA status. This study confirmed the protective benefits of daily aspirin use, which have been observed in previous studies of the general population, and suggests its benefit in BRCA carriers. Protective benefits from regular vigorous exercise and daily coffee use trended towards significance, but neither factor withstood the Bonferroni Correction for multiple comparisons. PMID:23881471

Cossack, Matthew; Ghaffary, Cameron; Watson, Patrice; Snyder, Carrie; Lynch, Henry

2014-04-01

174

Knowledge and practice of family planning in Dschang municipality, Cameroon.  

PubMed

This study was conducted to examine factors which influence contraception in order to ameliorate services. For 12 consecutive months, 706 consenting women on fertility control presenting at the Dschang District Hospital, Cameroon were interviewed and cervical/blood samples collected for analysis. Study respondents were aged 15-50 years (mean 33.61 +/- 6.29 years). Levonorgestrel implants (46.7%) and medroxyprogesterone injections (27.6%) were cost effective over the intrauterine copper device (9.5%), Norgestrel (7.8%), Norethisterone enanthate (6.7%), male condoms (6.4%), Progestin only pills (1.4%) and spermicides (1.1%). Lack of expertise precluded tubal ligation or implants and vasectomy. Stigmatization, male rejection, giving or taking methods without adequate laboratory services or regular health checks and failure to recognize or report adverse reproductive health changes impacted on contraception. Genital infections were identified in 33.7% respondents, vaginal candidiasis 20%, bacterial vaginosis 19%, HIV/AIDS 90%, chlamydia 6% and < 2% other traditional venereal diseases. Sensitization, education, improved diagnostics and attitude change were adopted. PMID:24069743

Fusi-Ngwa, Catherine K; Payne, Vincent K; Asakizi, Augustine N; Katte, Bridget F

2013-03-01

175

[Role of men in contraception, as users and partners].  

PubMed

Reproductive health programs have focused their attention on women; in general, they have not worked much with men. Gender is not only a determinant of inequality, but it also provides explanations for the different factors that have an impact on men and women's health, their disease and their death. This article addresses the factors that are prioritized over the information and decisions concerning the exercise of sexuality and how to regulate reproduction. With regards to the beginning of sexual life, men seem to start earlier, in average, they have their first sexual relation at 16.8 years old. As to the use of contraceptive methods, currently 54.2% of men declare to use them. Out of these, 39.5% choose modern methods whereas 14.5% prefer traditional ones. In Peru, among the modern methods available are the barrier methods (the condom being the most used), the chemical methods or spermicides, and the surgical methods (vasectomy). Among the traditional ones are the "rhythm" based on abstinence during the fertile phase of the menstrual cycle, and the coitus interruptus. The father's role is one of power. Gender relations are relations of power, and parenthood is part of these relations. The father is, above all, the provider of filiation. Marginalization of men in the reproductive process is evident. Their support to their partner is suboptimal, whether it is during pregnancy, during delivery or to prevent the death of the mother. PMID:24100826

Aspilcueta-Gho, Daniel

2013-07-01

176

In vivo serial sampling of epididymal sperm in mice.  

PubMed

This study was undertaken to refine the techniques of in vivo collection of sperm in the mouse. The principal objective was to offer a viable, safe and reliable method for serial collection of in vivo epididimary sperm through the direct puncture of the epididymis. Six C57Bl/6J males were subjected to the whole experiment. First we obtain a sperm sample of the right epididymis, and perform a vasectomy on the left side. This sample was used in an in vitro fertilization (IVF) experiment while the males were individually housed for 10 days to let them recover from the surgery, and then their fertility was tested with natural matings until we obtained a litter of each one. After that, the animals were subjected another time to the same process (sampling, recover and natural mating). The results of these experiments were a fertilization average value of 56.7%, and that all the males had a litter in the first month after the natural matings. This study documented the feasibility of the epididimary puncture technique to in vivo serial sampling of sperm in the mouse. PMID:23760960

Del Val, Gonzalo Moreno; Robledano, Patricia Muñoz

2013-07-01

177

Immunofluorescent characterization of meiotic recombination in human males with variable spermatogenesis.  

PubMed

Homologous recombination is the key to meiotic functioning. The basis of this process is provided by numerous SPO11-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Repair of these breaks occurs via the crossover (CO) and non-crossover (NCO) pathways. By means of immunofluorescence staining of Replication protein A (RPA) and MutL homolog 1 (MLH1) in combination with the DNA damage marker ?H2AX, we studied transitional (CO and NCO) and late (CO) recombination nodules, respectively. Testicular samples were from non-obstructive azoospermic probands (testicular spermatozoa were found) and probands that had a history of normal fertility prior to a vasectomy. All probands were ICSI candidates. ?H2AX foci mostly colocalized with delayed transitional nodules (RPA) for which variation was found among probands. Highest incidences of colocalization were found in patients. The level of MLH1 signal intensity was lower in probands who showed more frequent ?H2AX RPA colocalization in late pachytene, suggesting communication between the CO and NCO pathways. Our results suggest the presence of a genetic risk pathway for children conceived from non-obstructive azoospermic probands and urge for follow-up studies investigating the level of recombination involved de novo mutations in these children. PMID:23413139

de Vries, M; Ramos, L; de Boer, P

2013-03-01

178

Male contraception: another holy grail.  

PubMed

The idea that men should participate in family planning by playing an active role in contraception has become more acceptable in recent years. Up to the present the condom and vasectomy have been the main methods of male contraception. There have been and continue to be efforts to develop an acceptable hormonal contraceptive involving testosterone (T) suppression. However the off target affects, delivery of the analogs and the need for T replacement have proven difficult obstacles to this technology. Research into the development of non-hormonal contraception for men is progressing in several laboratories and this will be the subject of the present review. A number of promising targets for the male pill are being investigated. These involve disruption of spermatogenesis by compromising the integrity of the germinal epithelium, interfering with sperm production at the level of meiosis, attacking specific sperm proteins to disrupt fertilizing ability, or interfering with the assembly of seminal fluid components required by ejaculated sperm for acquisition of motility. Blocking contractility of the vas deferens smooth muscle vasculature to prevent ejaculation is a unique approach that prevents sperm from reaching the egg. We shall note the lack of interest by big pharma with most of the support for male contraception provided by the NIH. PMID:24368213

Murdoch, Fern E; Goldberg, Erwin

2014-01-15

179

[Male contraception].  

PubMed

Various methods of contraception in men are reviewed. One of the methods of contraception is the use of hormonal agents (estrogens, androgens, antiandrogens, progestins, or their combinations), which block spermatogenesis. More advantageous is the use of nonhormonal agents (alpha-chlorhydrine, 6-chloro-6-deoxyglucose, salsosulfapyridine), which act on the process of sperm maturation in the epididymis. Plant extracts show marked contraceptive activity in men. The preparation gossypol isolated from cotton seeds and roots was found to inhibit male fertility. Various isomers of gossypol decreased sperm mobility by inhibiting the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Major side-effect of gossypol was hepatotoxicity. Glycosides isolated from the herb Tripterigium Wilfordii (TW) were found to have the antifertility activity. The antifertility effect of TW glycosides was dose- dependent: large doses were shown to inhibit spermatogenesis, while small doses were found to decrease sperm motility and viability. TW glycosides were free of toxic side-effects. Another approach to regulation of male fertility is the use of surgical methods of contraception including vasectomy. Development of less invasive and reversible surgical methods showed effectiveness of subcutaneous occlusion of vas deferens with various chemical substances (calcium chloride, p-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate). The best results were achieved with high molecular weight medical polyurethane. PMID:2042728

Khomasuridze, A G; Marshaniia, Z S

1991-01-01

180

A comparative study on attitude of contraceptive methods users towards common contraceptive methods  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: Family planning is a method of thinking and a life style which is chosen voluntarily and according to the attitudes and responsible determination of the couples in order to promote the hygiene and convenience of the family. This study aimed to identify and compare the attitudes of the users of common contraceptive methods with regard to each method separately. METHODS: The descriptive study was conducted in 2010. The study samples included 378 women using common contraceptive methods as LD pills, IUD (intrauterine devices), condom, withdrawal, tubectomy (females sterilization) and vasectomy as well as withdrawal method. The samples were selected through systemic random sampling from 9 health care centers. The data collection tool was a researcher-made. In order to determine the validity and reliability of the questionnaires, the content validity and Cronbach's alpha correlation coefficient methods were used. In order to analyze the data, the descriptive and inferential statistical methods (ANOVA) were used. RESULTS: Mean score of attitude regarding different contraceptive methods in the group who were users of the same method was above the users of all the methods; however, total attitude score toward the contraceptive methods was approximately similar to each other in all the groups and there was no significant difference among the different groups. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this study showed that attitude is an important factor in choosing the contraceptive methods; therefore, this issue should to be taken into account by the family planning planners and consultants.

Ehsanpour, Soheila; Mohammadifard, Maedeh; Shahidi, Shahla; Nekouyi, Nafise Sadat

2010-01-01

181

Oral contraceptives, other methods of contraception, and risk reduction for ovarian cancer.  

PubMed

Oral contraceptives reduce the risk of ovarian cancer, but the impact of other methods of contraception has not been fully explored. This population-based, case-control study involved women 20-69 years of age who had ever had intercourse. We compared cases with a recent diagnosis of ovarian cancer (N = 727) with community controls (N = 1,360). All methods of contraception evaluated were associated with a reduced risk for ovarian cancer. After adjustment for age, race, pregnancies, and family history of ovarian cancer, the odds ratios for ever-use of each method as compared with never-use were: oral contraceptives for contraception, 0.6 (95% confidence interval = 0.5-0.8); intrauterine device, 0.8 (95% confidence interval = 0.6-1.0); barrier methods, 0.8 (95% confidence interval = 0.6-0.9); tubal ligation, 0.5 (95% confidence interval 0.4-0.7); and vasectomy, 0.8 (95% confidence interval = 0.6-1.1). Nulligravid women were not protected by any of these contraceptive methods. Multigravid women, however, were protected by all methods. We conclude that various methods of contraception reduce ovarian cancer risk. This effect does not appear to result from contraceptive use being a nonspecific marker of fertility. The results imply mechanisms other than hormonal or ovulatory by which ovarian cancer risk is reduced. PMID:11337604

Ness, R B; Grisso, J A; Vergona, R; Klapper, J; Morgan, M; Wheeler, J E

2001-05-01

182

Sperm-related antigens, antibodies, and circulating immune complexes in sera of recently vasectomized men.  

PubMed Central

Sera from 35 men were collected before and at timed intervals subsequent to vasectomy and examined for the presence of (a) antibody reactive with human spermatozoa, (b) sperm-related antigen, and (c) circulating immune complexes (CIC). Fewer than 10% of the men examined were ever positive for antisperm antibodies. However, sperm-related antigens were elevated in the sera of 18, 18, and 26% of the mean at 2 wk, 2 mo, and 4 mo postvasectomy, respectively. CIC were detected in the sera of some vasectomized men by three different assays. The CIC in patients' sera were precipitated with polyethylene glycol, dissociated, and the individual CIC components identified by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Most, but not all, of the CIC contained antigen reactive with antisperm immunoglobulin (Ig)G and some also contained complement components C3 and/or Clq. IgA was identified in some of the CIC positive for IgG and sperm antigen and two men had IgM-containing CIC. Analysis of the CIC by sucrose gradient centrifugation revealed them to be heterogeneous in size.

Witkin, S S; Zelikovsky, G; Bongiovanni, A M; Geller, N; Good, R A; Day, N K

1982-01-01

183

Robotic assisted andrological surgery  

PubMed Central

The introduction of the operative microscope for andrological surgery in the 1970s provided enhanced magnification and accuracy, unparalleled to any previous visual loop or magnification techniques. This technology revolutionized techniques for microsurgery in andrology. Today, we may be on the verge of a second such revolution by the incorporation of robotic assisted platforms for microsurgery in andrology. Robotic assisted microsurgery is being utilized to a greater degree in andrology and a number of other microsurgical fields, such as ophthalmology, hand surgery, plastics and reconstructive surgery. The potential advantages of robotic assisted platforms include elimination of tremor, improved stability, surgeon ergonomics, scalability of motion, multi-input visual interphases with up to three simultaneous visual views, enhanced magnification, and the ability to manipulate three surgical instruments and cameras simultaneously. This review paper begins with the historical development of robotic microsurgery. It then provides an in-depth presentation of the technique and outcomes of common robotic microsurgical andrological procedures, such as vasectomy reversal, subinguinal varicocelectomy, targeted spermatic cord denervation (for chronic orchialgia) and robotic assisted microsurgical testicular sperm extraction (microTESE).

Parekattil, Sijo J; Gudeloglu, Ahmet

2013-01-01

184

Male fertility regulation: recent advances*  

PubMed Central

Acceptable antifertility drugs for men are proving difficult to produce. Such drugs must aim to achieve complete azoospermia over a long period. This requirement may be relaxed only if it can be shown that the residual sperm produced by men whose spermatogenesis has been suppressed by antifertility drugs to oligospermia are incapable of fertilizing ova. Hormonal methods involving suppression of the secretion of gonadotrophin hormones by the pituitary gland invariably require androgen supplementation, and the use of steroids either alone or in combination requires careful monitoring for their side-effects. A chemical (non-hormonal) approach involving the incapacitation of sperm in the epididymis has been shown to be feasible in animal studies using ?-chlorohydrin and 6-chloro-6-deoxy sugars, although such compounds cannot be developed for human use because of their toxicity. Immunological approaches have the inherent problem of delivery of the antibody to the target. While the search for new and safer chemical and hormonal approaches goes on, the recent evidence that vasectomy offers a safe surgical option leaves responsible men with some choice to add to the condom.

Waites, G. M. H.

1986-01-01

185

Wolf management in the 21st century: From public input to sterilization  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Human-population increase and land development portend increasing conflict with large predators. Concurrently, changes and diversification of human attitudes are bringing increased disagreement about wildlife management. Animal-rights advocacy resulting from urbanization of human populations conflicts with traditional wildlife management. These forces focus more on wolves than on other wildlife because of strong public and media interest in wolves. Thus wolf management in the future will come under even greater public scrutiny, involve more public input, and may have greater restrictions imposed on it. This will lead to increased complexity in wolf management including more zoning, more experimentation with lethal and non-lethal capture techniques and alternate methods of alleviating damage to pets, livestock, and large ungulate herds, and greater public and private subsidy of wolf damage. One form of non-lethal control of wolf populations that may hold some promise is direct sterilization of males to reduce the biotic potential of the wolf population. Experimental vasectomy of five wild male wolves from four packs in Minnesota indicates that sterile males will continue to hold mates and territories, which would be necessary if sterilization is to be a viable technique for assisting with population control. If sterile males held territories but failed to produce pups, such territories might contain only about a third the number of wolves as fertile pack territories. Because wolves are long-lived in unexploited populations and their territories are large, direct sterilization of relatively few animals each year might significantly reduce populations.

Mech. L.D.; Fritts, S.H.; Nelson, M.E.

1996-01-01

186

Chromatin remodelling initiation in spermatids: differences among human males.  

PubMed

During the last phase of spermatogenesis, called spermiogenesis, the nucleosome-based chromatin structure is replaced by a protamine-based DNA packaging. Not much is known about the chromatin remodelling involved in humans and animals. Here, we have investigated initiation of chromatin remodelling over seven probands of which five were diagnosed with non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA) and two with obstructive azoospermia (OA) (failed vaso-vasostomy patients with proven fertility prior to vasectomy, Johnsen scores ?9). Chromatin remodelling was studied evaluating the presence of nucleosomes, histone H3, pre-protamine 2 and protamine 1. This approach was feasible since the local initiation of nucleosome eviction in the sub acrosomal domain, which was visible in alkaline nuclear spread preparations. The patterns of nucleosome and H3 loss were largely congruent. Nucleus wide incorporation of protamine 1 could already be observed at the late round spermatid stage. Both for nucleosome loss and for protamine 1 incorporation, there was distinct variation within and between probands. This did not relate to the efficiency of sperm production per meiocyte. Pre-protamine 2 was always confined to the subacrosomal domain, confirming the role of this area in chromatin remodelling. PMID:23536489

de Vries, M; Ramos, L; Lacroix, R; D'Hauwers, K; Hendriks, J C M; Kremer, J A M; van der Vlag, J; de Boer, P

2013-05-01

187

Male concepts: on masculinity, parenthood and family planning.  

PubMed

A 1980 study on "Masculinity/Femininity Concepts and their Bearing on the Population Program" conducted by the Manila-based Psychological Assessment and Development Corporation revealed that a man's macho image is no longer dependent on the number of children he sires but on the quality of life he provides them regardless of their number. Having many children but not being able to provide for them properly is in fact viewed as a sign of irresponsibility rather than a sign of manliness. The man is still considered the sole breadwinner of the family. Most of the male respondents are unwilling to allow their wives to work unless there is real economic need for it. Most of the men also preferred late rather than early marriage, preferably between the ages of 25 and 30. It is hoped that by this time, a man would have a steady job and a more mature outlook in life. Male respondents considered children to be essential in marriage. Their ideal family size is 4, 2 boys and 2 girls, spaced 2-3 years apart for the sake of the mother's health. Although the men acknowledged the importance of joint decision making in family planning, the fact that they place importance on family and children shows that they have a greater say on matters relating to number and spacing of children. This suggest that men should be the more important target of future family planning campaigns. The study also showed that contraceptive methods used and considered for future use are chosen solely on the basis of lack of side effects and ease of use and availability of the methods; rhythm is the most popular method, followed by the condom, the pill, and withdrawal. Future family planning campaigns should emphasize the lack of harmful effects of contraceptive methods. There were also misconceptions regarding the effects of vasectomy and ligation on sexual identity, suggesting the need for more information dissemination regarding these methods. PMID:12263978

Nolasco, A D

1981-01-01

188

Acquired von Willebrand Syndrome with a Type 2B Phenotype: Diagnostic and Therapeutic Dilemmas.  

PubMed

In this report, we provide evidence of an acquired von Willebrand syndrome (AVWS) with a type 2B phenotype rather than the expected type 1 or 2A. The patient was referred prior to surgical removal of a fibrous mass within the maxillary sinus. His first bleeding 7?years earlier following a retinal tear had been complicated by monocular blindness. Several mucocutanous bleedings followed. Hematological investigations revealed von Willebrand factor (VWF):Ag 91 IU/ml, factor VIII 86 IU/ml, VWF:RCo 34 IU/ml and profound thrombocytopenia with platelet clumping. VWF multimer analysis showed a loss of high-molecular-weight multimers and his plasma aggregated normal platelets under low ristocetin concentration, consistent with type 2B von Willebrand disease (VWD). Sequencing of VWF exon 28 and of the platelet GP1BA gene to investigate the possibility of platelet-type VWD failed to reveal mutations. Serum protein electrophoresis showed a monoclonal IgG protein and led to the diagnosis of monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance (MGUS), raising suspicion of an AVWS. Over 2?years, he experienced severe gingival bleedings and traumatic intracerebral hemorrhage. Following debridement of the sinus mass, the patient required 20 units of packed red blood cells, despite high-dose Humate-P, continuous Amicar and twice-daily platelet transfusions. Bleeding finally ceased following infusion of activated factor VIIa. A history of prior uncomplicated vasectomy and tendon laceration, no family history of bleeding, the inability to identify a causative mutation in either exon 28 VWF or platelet GP1BA and the MGUS led to diagnosis of AVWS with a type 2B phenotype. This case highlights the difficulties in assigning a diagnosis and the management of bleeding in a patient with an atypical presentation of AVWS. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel. PMID:24296552

Scepansky, Ellen; Othman, Maha; Smith, Hedy

2014-01-01

189

Expression of Glycogen synthase kinase 3-? (GSK3-?) gene in azoospermic men  

PubMed Central

Background: The Wnt/?- The Wnt/?-catenin signaling pathway is involved in many developmental processes in both fetal and adult life; its abnormalities can lead to disorders including several types of cancers and malfunction of specific cells and tissues in both animals and humans. Its role in reproductive processes has been proven. Objective: This study was designed to evaluate the expression of the key regulator of this signaling pathway GSK3-? and its presumed role in azoospermia. Materials and Methods: WNT3a protein concentration and GSK3-? gene expression levels were measured and compared between two groups of infertile men. The test groups consisted of 10 patients with obstructive and 10 non-obstructive azoospermia. The control group was selected among healthy men after vasectomies that were willing to conceive a child using a testicular biopsy technique. Samples were obtained by testicular biopsy and screened for the most common mutations (84, 86 and 255) in the SRY region before analyzing. GSK3-? gene expression was assessed quantitatively by real time-PCR. Results: The WNT3a protein concentration had no significant difference between the two test groups and controls. Expression of GSK3-? was down-regulated in non-obstructive azoospermia (3.10±0.19) compared with normal (7.12±0.39) and obstructive azoospermia (6.32±0.42) groups (p=0.001). Conclusion: Down-regulation of GSK-3? may cause to non-obstructive azoospermia. Regulation and modification of GSK-3? gene expression by drugs could be used as a therapeutic solution.

Nazarian, Hamid; Ghaffari Novin, Marefat; Jalili, Mohammad Reza; Mirfakhraie, Reza; Heidari, Mohammad Hassan; Hosseini, Seyed Jalil; Norouzian, Mohsen; Ehsani, Nahid

2014-01-01

190

As the Third World turns.  

PubMed

Throughout the 3rd World, family planners have turned to television in order to spread their message. Combining education and entertainment in the form of advertisements and soap operas, television offers a way to provide clear and memorable information about an otherwise sensitive issue. In 1977, Mexico's Miguel Sabido developed the idea of using television as a means of social instruction. His initial soap opera dealt with adult literacy, and the success of that program led him to develop a show focusing on family planning called "Come Along with Me." Following the airing of this soap opera, attendance to family planning clinics increased by 32%. Since then, Mexico has produced a series of soap operas dealing with sex education, women's status, and the treatment of children. Soon, Mexican viewers will see a soap opera addressing the issue of AIDS. Family planners in other countries have also begun employing television. Conventional communication methods require trained counselors travelling villages, and most often, those most in need of family planning are the most difficult to reach. But over the last 10 years, the number of televisions in the Third World has doubled, and there is now approximately 1 television for every 12 people in the developing nations. In Turkey, advertisements have been used to promote modern methods of contraception. In Brazil, vasectomy has been one of the topics of ad campaigns. Mexico, the Philippines, and Nigeria have also experimented with the use of music videos. Nigeria has already had great success in integrating family planning themes to an already existing variety show. Family planning visits have increased by 47%. International agencies have recognized the value of television and have provided financial support. PMID:12343296

Hagerman, E

1991-01-01

191

Onsite provision of specialized contraceptive services: does title x funding enhance access?  

PubMed

Abstract Background: This article presents the extent to which providers enrolled in California's Family Planning, Access, Care, and Treatment (Family PACT) program offer contraceptive methods onsite, thus eliminating one important access barrier. Family PACT has a diverse provider network, including public-sector providers receiving Title X funding, public-sector providers not receiving Title X funding, and private-sector providers. We explored whether Title X funding enhances providers' ability to offer contraceptive methods that require specialized skills onsite. Methods: Data were derived from 1,072 survey responses to a 2010 provider-capacity survey matched by unique identifier to administrative claims data. Results: A significantly greater proportion of Title X-funded providers compared to non-Title X public and private providers offered onsite services for the following studied methods: intrauterine contraceptives (90% Title X, 51% public non-Title X, 38% private); contraceptive implants (58% Title X, 19% public non-Title X, 7% private); vasectomy (8% Title X, 4% public non-Title X, 1% private); and fertility-awareness methods (69% Title X, 55% public non-Title X, 49% private) (all p<0.0001). The association between onsite provision and Title X funding remained after stratifying individually by clinic specialty, facility capacity to provide reproductive health services (based on staffing), and rural/urban location. Conclusions: Extra funding for publicly funded family-planning programs, through mechanisms such as Title X, appears to be associated with increased onsite access to a wide range of contraceptive services, including those that require special skills and training. PMID:24405313

Thiel de Bocanegra, Heike; Cross Riedel, Julie; Menz, Mary; Darney, Philip D; Brindis, Claire D

2014-05-01

192

Have you heard the rumour?  

PubMed

Rumors and misinformation about the use of contraceptives can arise from general fears about contraception, fears about specific methods, and fears based on a poor understanding of human physiology. In Uganda, general fears about contraception include the notion that usage encourages promiscuity in women, that contraception causes sickness, and that the use of contraception is not socially acceptable. Specific fears about oral contraceptives include the notions that they burn all the women's eggs, that they cause changes in weight, that they cause high blood pressure, and that they are not effective. Specific fears about the IUD are that it can move within the body and that a woman can conceive with it in place (which is true). The condom is thought to be able to disappear in the uterus or to slip off inside a woman's body and require surgical removal. Vasectomy is believed to make men impotent or mentally disturbed. Tubal ligation is thought to stop menstruation or to "overturn" the tubes. Medical personnel can be the source of some of these rumors when they lack appropriate training. Uninformed users can also start rumors. In order to combat these misconceptions and increase the practice of family planning (FP) in Uganda, the FP delivery system must be standardized, FP personnel must be adequately trained, FP providers must counsel clients, satisfied users should disseminate FP information and motivation in their communities, and IEC (information, education, and communication) programs should be increased. In addition to misconceptions, nutritional and sexual taboos affect maternal and child health in Uganda. Some prohibit women from eating high protein foods; others prohibit pregnant women from eating salt. Other practices include 1) deciding whether an infant is really a member of the clan by the behavior of its dried umbilical cord when thrown in water and 2) allowing men instead of women to decide how many children a woman should have. PMID:12318958

Nakato, L

1994-01-01

193

China: the strengthening of family planning at grass-roots level.  

PubMed

An integrated family planning center, i.e., guidance center, was established in 1983 in the Qingbaijiang District of Chengdu to provide family planning publicity and education, contraceptive guidance, effective contraceptive distribution, and family planning training for village workers. The center serves a predominantly rural population of 355,788. The center's staff of 6 medical workers utilizes a variety of educational materials to popularize family planning, healthy births, and to inform the residents about the government's family planning policies, e.g. "Travels of Monkey King to Huanjin Production Brigade," is shown throughout the countryside. Some medical workers remain at the center and furnish medical and contraceptive services on an outpatient basis. Other medical workers travel throughout the countryside delivering family planning and medical services. During the 1st 6 months of operation the traveling medical workers visited 11 towns and 47 villages. They furnished the IUDs to 994 women who currently had 1 child and performed 492 vasectomies on fathers with 2 or more children. Traveling medical workers also trained village workers to distribute contraceptives on a regular basis to all users in their village, to follow-up IUD acceptors, and to provide prenatal care. Combining all these components into 1 program provided an effective, intensive, and inexpensive approach to family planning. Due to the efforts of the center, 91.52% of the 55,869 married fertile couples in the area have accepted birth control. Presently, the center consists of an outpatient office, an information office, and a patient room. There are plans to further strengthen the center by using it as a facility for training technical personnel at the grassroots level in collection and analysis of population information. Eventually the center will be equipped to provide more technically advanced contraceptive services. PMID:12313217

Zhang, Q

1984-01-01

194

Advocacy in the Western Hemisphere Region: some FPA success stories.  

PubMed

The International Planned Parenthood Federation's Vision 2000 Strategic Plan has emphasized advocacy and the training of family planning associations (FPAs) in the Western Hemisphere region. During the summer of 1995 training programs in advocacy leadership management were sponsored for six FPAs in the Bahamas, Suriname, Belize, Colombia, Honduras, and Brazil. At the Western Hemisphere Regional Council Meeting in September 1995 awards were presented to FPAs for media outstanding projects. These FPAs used outreach to the community to promote the goals of Vision 2000. The Bahamas FPA won the Rosa Cisneros Award for articles published in a magazine that is distributed in primary and secondary schools and deals with the activities, achievements, and opinions of students. Issues include: love, relationships, responsibility, and teen pregnancy. A weekly television talk show also addresses the issues facing youth including education, music, community work, sexuality, pregnancy, and the relationship between teenagers and adults. The Family Planning Association of Honduras was also nominated for the award for a radio show on the health of mothers and children, the problems of adolescents, and FP. The newspaper Tiempo received the award for feature articles on social issues and FP. In 1994 the Association distributed thousands of booklets on contraceptives as well as fliers on vasectomy, female sterilization, oral contraceptives, IUDs, condoms, responsible parenthood, high-risk pregnancy, vaginal cytology, and cervical cancer. Similar posters were placed in hospitals and health centers, in 1997 FP posts, and 400 commercial outlets. The Family Planning Association of Suriname also carried out an impressive advocacy program during the period of 1968-93 with the goals of establishing a balance between population growth and the available resources to achieve well-being with regard to education, health care, nutrition, and housing. PMID:12291093

Andrews, D J

1996-01-01

195

Meeting health and family planning needs in Latin America and the Caribbean.  

PubMed

The operations research and technical assistance (OR/TA) project in The Population Council has concentrated on fertility and infant mortality issues in Latin American and the Caribbean for more than a decade through INOPAL. INOPAL is an acronym for Investigacion Operacional en Planificacion Familiar y Atencion Materno-Infantil para America Latina y el Caribe (Operations Research in Family Planning and Maternal-Child Health in Latin America and the Caribbean). In March 1995, the project entered its third phase, INOPAL III, with the renewal of its contract from the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). To facilitate communication between INOPAL, collaborating agencies, and USAID, INOPAL Director James Foreit moved from Peru to a Council office in Washington, D.C. INOPAL has six objectives: 1) to test the integration of family planning and reproductive health services; 2) to increase access to family planning; 3) to develop strategies to reach special populations; 4) to improve the sustainability of family planning programs; 5) to improve service quality; and 6) to institutionalize operations research capability in the region. INOPAL II conducted 61 subprojects in 12 countries in collaboration with 24 USAID cooperating agencies and other international organizations. The project established new services for postpartum women, adolescents, and rural women; improved program quality and financial sustainability; increased vasectomy promotion and the range of available contraceptives; and developed new modes of service delivery. A key finding of INOPAL II operations research was the importance of increasing cost-effectiveness to ensure program sustainability. INOPAL III will work toward all six objectives, with an emphasis on integrating reproductive health and family planning services. Operations research and technical assistance (OR/TA) subprojects will focus on the prevention and treatment of sexually transmitted diseases, perinatal and postpartum care, and postabortion care. PMID:12319543

1995-06-01

196

Comparison of 808, 980, and 1075nm lasers for noninvasive thermal coagulation of the canine vas deferens, ex vivo  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Successful noninvasive laser coagulation of the canine vas deferens, in vivo, has been previously reported. However, the therapeutic window for treatment is relatively narrow. This study determines the dependence of vas thermal coagulation on laser wavelength for development of a noninvasive laser vasectomy procedure. Noninvasive laser coagulation of canine vas tissue, ex vivo, was performed using three commonly available near-infrared laser wavelengths: 808, 980, and 1075 nm. Each laser delivered an average power of 9.2 W, 500-ms pulse duration, pulse rate of 1.0-Hz, and 3.2-mm diameter laser spot, synchronized with cryogen spray cooling of the scrotal skin surface for a total treatment time of 60 s. Vas burst pressures were measured to determine strength of vas closure and compared to previously reported ejaculation pressures. Gross inspection of vas and scrotal skin was also performed immediately after the procedure as an indicator of thermal coagulation and skin burns. The 1075 nm laser produced the highest vas burst pressures (288 +/- 28 mmHg), significantly greater than previously reported ejaculation pressures (136 +/- 29 mmHg). The 808 nm wavelength produced insufficient vas burst pressures of 141 +/- 61 mmHg, and minor scrotal skin burns were observed in at least one case. The 980 nm wavelength was unable to produce thermal coagulation of the vas, with low burst pressures (89 +/- 58 mmHg) and severe scrotal skin burns. The 1075 nm wavelength was the only near-IR wavelength that consistently thermally coagulated the vas with a strong degree of closure and without any scrotal skin burns.

Cilip, Christopher M.; Schweinsberger, Gino R.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

2011-02-01

197

Noninvasive laser coagulation of the canine vas deferens, in vivo  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Development of a noninvasive vasectomy technique may eliminate male fear of complications (incision, bleeding, infection, and scrotal pain) and result in a more popular procedure. This study builds upon previously reported ex vivo tissue studies by exploring acute and short-term chronic in vivo canine studies. Isolation of the canine vas was achieved using a conventional vas ring clamp method. No perforation of the scrotal skin was necessary to occlude the vas. Laser radiation with a wavelength of 1075 nm, average power of 11.2 W, 500-ms pulse duration, 0.5 Hz pulse rate, and 3-mm-diameter spot was synchronized with cryogen spray cooling of the scrotal skin surface in a total of 8 dogs (n = 16 vasa) for a treatment time of 60 s. Burst pressure measurements were conducted at Days 0 and 21 (n = 8 vasa each day) to quantify the strength of vas closure. The vas was successfully thermally occluded in 15/16 (94%) procedures with 14/15 (93%) vas recording burst pressures above ejaculation pressure. One vas was not present, and another vas recorded a bursting pressure below ejaculation pressure. The coagulated vas bursting pressure averaged 283 +/- 34 mm Hg at Day 0 and 260 +/- 77 mm Hg at Day 21, significantly higher than reported vas ejaculation pressures of 136 +/- 29 mm Hg. Minor scrotal skin burns were observed during the recovery period. Noninvasive thermal occlusion of the vas is feasible in an in vivo canine model. Elimination of minor skin burns and longer term chronic in vivo canine studies are needed to confirm azospermia after vas occlusion without recanalization.

Cilip, Christopher M.; Ross, Ashley E.; Jarow, Jonathan P.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

2010-02-01

198

Optical and thermal simulations of noninvasive laser coagulation of the human vas deferens  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Successful noninvasive laser coagulation of the canine vas deferens, in vivo, has been previously reported. However, there is a significant difference between the optical properties of canine and human skin. In this study, Monte Carlo simulations of light transport through tissue and heat transfer simulations are performed to determine the feasibility of noninvasive laser vasectomy in humans. A laser wavelength of 1064 nm was chosen for deep optical penetration in tissue. Monte Carlo simulations determined the spatial distribution of absorbed photons inside the tissue layers (epidermis, dermis, and vas). The results were convolved with a 3-mm-diameter laser beam, and then used as the spatial heat source for the heat transfer model. A laser pulse duration of 500 ms and pulse rate of 1 Hz, and cryogen spray cooling were incident on the tissue for 60 s. Average laser power (5-9 W), cryogen pulse duration (60-100 ms), cryogen cooling rate (0.5-1.0 Hz), and increase in optical transmission due to optical clearing (0-50 %), were studied. After application of an optical clearing agent to increase skin transmission by 50%, an average laser power of 6 W, cryogen pulse duration of 60 ms, and cryogen cooling rate of 1 Hz resulted in vas temperatures of ~ 60°C, sufficient for thermal coagulation, while 1 mm of the skin surface (epidermis and dermis) remained at a safe temperature of ~ 45 °C. Monte Carlo and heat transfer simulations indicate that it is possible to noninvasively thermally coagulate the human vas without adverse effects (e.g. scrotal skin burns), if an optical clearing agent is applied to the skin prior to the procedure.

Schweinsberger, Gino R.; Cilip, Christopher M.; Trammell, Susan R.; Cherukuri, Harish; Fried, Nathaniel M.

2011-02-01

199

Micro-recanalization in a biodegradable graft for reconstruction of the vas deferens is enhanced by sildenafil citrate  

PubMed Central

This study investigated the effect of sildenafil citrate on micro-recanalization and neovascularization, which were previously demonstrated in a rat model using biodegradable grafts (BGs) for vas deferens reconstruction. A total of 24 male rats underwent bilateral vasectomy with removal of a 0.5-cm vasal segment and were randomly assigned to four groups. Groups 1 and 2 underwent immediate vasovasostomy. Groups 3 and 4 underwent interposition of a 0.5-cm BG in the vasal gap. Groups 1 and 3 were given 5 mg kg?1 day?1 oral sildenafil. Other groups were given placebo. Rats were housed with females 12 weeks postoperatively. Reconstructed vasal segments were harvested 16 weeks postoperatively and analyzed histologically. Fluid from the distal vasal stump was analyzed for motile sperm. Urine samples obtained 16 weeks postoperatively were analyzed for cGMP levels. cGMP levels in rats treated with sildenafil were significantly higher than in control rats. No pregnancies were sired by grafted groups. In all, 5/6 rats in group 1 and 3/6 rats in group 2 sired litters. No motile sperm were noted in the vasal fluid of the grafted groups. Motile sperm were noted in all rats in group 1 and in 5/6 rats in group 2. In addition, 29 and 4 microcanals were detected in the sildenafil and placebo groups, respectively (P = 0.023). No microcanal exceeded 3 mm in length. An average of 12 and 28 blood vessels per graft were noted in the placebo and sildenafil groups, respectively (P < 0.0001). In conclusion, sildenafil enhances micro-recanalization and neovascularization in BG used for vas deferens reconstruction, but does not increase the microcanal length after 16 weeks.

Holoch, Peter A.; Mallapragada, Surya K.; Ariza, Carlos A.; Griffith, Thomas S.; DeYoung, Barry R.; Wald, Moshe

2010-01-01

200

General practitioner notes as a source of information for case-control studies in young women. UK National Case-Control Study Group.  

PubMed Central

STUDY OBJECTIVE--The UK National Case-Control Study was carried out to investigate the relationship between oral contraceptive use and breast cancer risk. This study investigates whether general practitioner notes could be used as the sole data source for epidemiological studies of young women and what the effect would be on non-response and recall bias. DESIGN--Case-control study with data on gynaecological, obstetric, and contraceptive history collected at interview and from general practitioners' notes. Information from these two sources was compared. SETTING--This was a population-based study. PARTICIPANTS--Altogether 755 women with breast cancer aged under 36 years at diagnosis, each with an age-matched control, participated in the study. Response rates at interview were 72% and 89% for cases and controls but GP data were available for 90% of the 1049 case and first-selected control pairs. MAIN RESULTS--There was generally good agreement between the two data sources with respect to obstetric history and gynaecological procedures (hysterectomy, oophorectomy, and tubal ligation). The use of intra-uterine devices, or diaphragm, and partner's vasectomy were not reliably recorded in the GP's notes. The overall results of the UK study would have been qualitatively the same with respect to the relationship between oral contraceptive use and breast cancer risk if GP notes only had been used, in spite of the fact that only about half of all oral contraceptive usage was recorded in the notes. Response rates would have been higher, recall bias eliminated, and the cost of the study halved. CONCLUSIONS--When planning case-control studies in young women, the possibility of using GP notes as the primary data source should be considered. Lack of data on potential confounding factors is a possible drawback to such use. The practice of destroying GP's notes shortly after the death of patients seriously restricts the possibility of using these notes when studying rapidly fatal conditions.

Chilvers, C E; Pike, M C; Taylor, C N; Hermon, C; Crossley, B; Smith, S J

1994-01-01

201

High-Frequency Ultrasound Imaging of Noninvasive Laser Coagulation of the Canine Vas Deferens  

PubMed Central

Background and Objectives A noninvasive approach to vasectomy may eliminate male fear of complications related to surgery (e.g. hematoma, infection, acute and chronic pain, sterilization failure) and increase its acceptance. Noninvasive laser thermal occlusion of the canine vas deferens has recently been reported. In this study, high-frequency ultrasound is used to confirm successful laser thermal coagulation and scarring of the vas in a short-term canine model. Materials and Methods Bilateral noninvasive laser coagulation of the vas was performed in a total of 9 dogs using a laser wavelength of 1075 nm, incident power of 9.0 W, pulse duration of 500 ms, pulse rate of 0.5 Hz, and 3-mm-diameter spot. Cryogen spray was used to cool the scrotal skin surface and prevent burns during the procedure. A clinical ultrasound system with a 13.2-MHz high-frequency transducer was used to image the vas before after the procedure. Burst pressure measurements were performed on excised vasa to confirm thermal occlusion. Results Day 0 and 28 burst pressures averaged 291 ± 31 mmHg and 297 ± 26 mmHg, respectively, significantly greater than ejaculation pressures of 136 ± 29 mmHg. Ultrasound showed a hyperechoic vas segment after thermal coagulation (Day 0) and scarring (Day 28). Doppler ultrasound showed normal blood flow through the testicular artery, indicating no collateral thermal damage to proximal structures. Conclusions High-frequency ultrasound may be used as a noninvasive diagnostic tool to assist in determining successful short-term laser thermal coagulation and scarring of the vas.

Cilip, Christopher M.; Pierorazio, Phillip M.; Ross, Ashley E.; Allaf, Mohamad E.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

2011-01-01

202

Bhorletar: the sustainable village.  

PubMed

The village of Bhorletar, in the middle hills of Nepal, is run by an elected Village Development Committee (VDC). It consists of 9 wards with a total of 3000 people. The village center is growing fast, with 35 new houses built in the last year. Bhorletar is 1 of 8 villages selected by the National Planning Commission and the World Conservation Union (IUCN) to develop and test a system of local environmental planning. The effort is a central part of the National conservation Strategy, which began in 1983. The task of drawing up environmental plans for Bhorletar and 7 other villages was begun in 1990 with the help of 2 nongovernmental organizations and the IUCN planning team. This included drawing up land use maps on forest patches, trees species, landslides, cropping patterns, and hazard-prone areas. Finally, an environmental plan based on this profile was defined by the villagers themselves and approved in meetings. Each village selected its own activities and was granted project funds to supplement the work of men and women from the village. These activities included community forest conservation; improved fuel-wood stoves; new latrines; protective dams and afforestation; improved roads; vegetable gardens and marketing; and a new health post. There is no health post in Bhorletar, and the nearest hospital is a 7 hours' walk away. Contaminated water, poor diet, and a polluted environment are the main causes of a child death rate of around 100 per 1000. Most of the women and girls were too busy with household and farming chores to attend the planning meetings or school. According to the profile, 99 men and only 5 women were practicing family planning. The only family planning commonly available has been an annual vasectomy camp. Women find sterilization services almost impossible to obtain, though they are increasingly using Depo-Provera injections at a health center in the adjoining village. Bhorletar's experience, and that of the 7 other villages, has proved that local communities can plan and carry out their own development programs. PMID:12287332

Rowley, J

1993-01-01

203

A review of the health of people in Jakarta.  

PubMed

A survey was conducted in Jakarta to determine the knowledge and behavior of urban people toward health. The results of the survey will serve as the basis for developing appropriate health-related interventions. Areas included in the study were the following: nutrition, immunization, environmental health, family planning and health services. Information was also obtained on the availability of facilities in the homes. 4 sites in Jakarta were chosen for the project. 1000 family respondents were selected to give general information and another 400 family respondents were selected to give specific information. The sampling was done by a combination of the stratification, cluster and simple random methods. The strata were the middle-income and lower income groups. The data were collected in January 1975. Most of the household heads were 30 to 39 years old, had attended senior high school, and most worked in the private sector. Most of the families were Moslem. The study showed that there was inadequate knowledge of good nutrition, particularly for children under 5 years old. Few of the respondents knew of the importance of breastfeeding. Most of the families had adequate knowledge of immunization. About 80% knew about DPT and polio vaccines. The families were ignorant about diseases brought about by poor environmental conditions. They were also unaware of the consequences of improper garbage disposal. On average, each family had 3.36 living children, while the child death rate was 12%. Most of the families were familiar with oral and injectable contraceptives; 60% were familiar with condoms; and 10% with vasectomy. 68% of the families had been family planning acceptors. 62.3% of the families practiced self-medication: 11.3% went to a private doctor; 4.1% went to other health facilities and personnel; and 22.5% took their sick to the puskesmas (public health centers). The morbidity rate is high. The number of families with access to communication media is high. 7 out of 10 families have newspapers; 4 out of 10 have magazines. Electronic media is extensively available. 75 out of 100 families have wireless sets and 50 have televisions. It is concluded that family health can be improvement through a mass media communications program. PMID:12313889

1985-10-01

204

The Right to Informed Choice. A Study and Opinion Poll of Women Who Were or Were Not Given the Option of a Sterilisation with Their Caesarean Section  

PubMed Central

Background In the Netherlands, caesarean sections (CSs) are rarely combined with tubal occlusion (TO), partly because discussing CS/TO near delivery is considered unethical and earlier hypothetical counselling – i.e. suppose you happen to need a CS – is rare. This results in more unintended pregnancies and is inconsistent with informed choice. We explored whether TO should indeed not be made routinely available to eligible women. Methods and Findings A questionnaire was mailed to 515 Para ?2 who underwent in the past ?1 CS. 498 (96.7%) responded. They were on average 35.3 years old, had 2.5 children, had undergone 1.6 CSs, and 3.3 years had passed since their index delivery, either a CS (393) or vaginal birth (105) after a previous CS. 87% of the 498 believed that pregnant mothers with ?1 children should be routinely counselled about CS/TO. Indeed, 58% and 85% respectively, thought women/couples expecting their second or third child should still be given the TO option days before delivery, if omitted earlier. Counselled women, 138/498 (27.8%), were far more often satisfied than those without CS/TO option. 33/393 had a CS/TO. None indicated regret in the questionnaire. Another 119 also would have elected a CS/TO if given that option. Therefore, 152 (38.7%) of 393 Para ?2 had or would have liked a concurrent TO. 118/119 wrote they still regretted missing this opportunity. The exception's husband had had a vasectomy. 100/119 were good TO candidates: they were ?28 years when they delivered an apparently healthy baby of ?37 weeks. The current contraceptive use of these 100 suggests that this group will have at least 8 unintended pregnancies before age 50. Conclusion The experiences and opinions of previous potential candidates for a CS/TO do not support the reluctance of Dutch obstetricians to counsel pregnant Para ?1 about the TO option for a (potential) CS.

Verkuyl, Douwe A.; van Goor, Gerda M.; Hanssen, Marjo J.; Miedema, Margreet T.; Koppe, Marnix

2011-01-01

205

Voices of acceptors. How family planning has touched the lives of five Filipino couples.  

PubMed

Five Filipino couples present their experience with family planning (FP). Tomasina Campuso relates that her first exposure to FP was in a high school health class. She then received advice from a health center on the rhythm method and became pregnant before her first wedding anniversary. Two months postpartum she returned to the clinic for oral pills, which caused side effects; she switched to an IUD, which had to be fitted twice before a proper fit was achieved. After the second child, she returned to IUD use. Both parents are happy to have spaced and planned their children. One is currently in preschool and the spacing will make it possible for them to send their first child to college; the second child can be helped through college by the first. Joel and Evelyn Gatdula married as teenagers. Evelyn feels that use of FP has made her look younger in spite of having produced 3 children. Their marriage became stronger because of mutual interest in using FP. Evelyn volunteered to use an IUD after her husband volunteered to use condoms. Evelyn, being a Catholic, expressed that greater guild would be felt if she had more children than she could provide or care for. She talks to friends and family about the advantages of contraception. Loida Bilaoen had a very difficult first pregnancy, was confined to her bed, and relied on intravenous fluids. She was happy to use rhythm, and condoms until the second child was born; thereafter she had a ligation, even though she had two boys. The boys attend a private school and she has returned to nursing school. Violeta was one of 13 children. Her first was born after 5 years of marriage and the second came 6 years later. Initially condoms and rhythm were used; currently she is taking oral pills, which are delivered every other month by an outreach worker. There were some initial side effects of weight loss and then a return of her original weight. She felt that without FP they could not have afforded the luxury of owning modern appliances. Gerry and Divine Cruz, after the birth of twins, chose first an IUD and then vasectomy. The decision meant following their conscience rather than Church doctrine. They hope that their girls will achieve their dreams. PMID:12286378

Santos, R P

1993-03-01

206

Policy considerations for the introduction and promotion of the lactational amenorrhea method: advantages and disadvantages of LAM.  

PubMed

Some attributes of LAM are unquestionably positive, such as the fact that it is effective. Clinical trials of LAM have upheld the Bellagio Consensus that the chance of pregnancy is less than 2% in the first 6 months postpartum in amenorrheic women who are fully or nearly fully breastfeeding. Secondary data analyses in numerous settings have drawn the same conclusion. Whether as a strategy or a method, used correctly or even if used imperfectly, LAM is a reliable way to avoid pregnancy. To the extent that LAM represents an additional contraceptive option, this is also clearly positive since a broad array of contraceptive options maximizes the likelihood of finding a good fit between user and method, and increases contraceptive use. Other characteristics of LAM represent potentially positive impacts. If LAM is shown to be an effective conduit to other modern methods, the implications are profoundly positive. If LAM is cost effective, for households and/or for programs, this will also make the method extraordinarily attractive. Conversely, some aspects of LAM are negative, such as the fact that it affords no protection against STDs, it requires counseling from a well-informed provider, and intensive breastfeeding can make heavy demands on the woman's time. Many of the remaining attributes of LAM may not be important to a policy decision about LAM promotion. For example, whether LAM is actualized as a strategy or a method may not be important to a decision to promote LAM, although it has a huge impact on how services are delivered. Some factors may be profound on a local or individual level. For example, one simple factor, such as the absence of full/nearly full breastfeeding, can rule out the method as an option, while another, such as the fact that it provides the needed waiting period during vasectomy counseling, can make LAM the method of choice. Although LAM seems unlikely to have widespread popularity in societies like the United States, within such settings are breastfeeding women for whom other contraceptive choices are not satisfactory and to whom LAM is attractive. Although clinicians cannot be expected to directly provide LAM education in every setting, women should be informed about LAM as an effective contraceptive choice, and clinicians should be prepared to make referrals to competent sources. The future of LAM, especially in terms of formal, programmatic initiatives, may continue to be focussed in transitional and less developed settings. Comparative cost/benefit analyses for both the family planning program and the household will contribute meaningfully to decisions about whether to use LAM and whether to include LAM in national and local family planning policies and programs. The most important call to action is to implement operations research designed to determine what factors, if any, will maximize the uptake of a second modern contraceptive method after LAM protection expires among never-users of family planning, to compare this with other contraceptive strategies, and to evaluate the cost aspects. If the potential of LAM to be a conduit to other modern contraceptive methods is effectively realized, the method can be profoundly important in the development of communities and in family formation. Because LAM is effective in preventing pregnancies, and because it extends the range of contraceptive choices, considering LAM on the policy level is always appropriate. Despite the array of drawbacks to LAM, as with any other family planning method, the potential assets of LAM, especially the promise to introduce nonusers to contraception, are sufficiently important to warrant the introduction of LAM within an operations research framework to both capitalize on its intrinsic strengths and determine its programmatic robustness. In the 10 years since the concept of LAM was pronounced as the Bellagio Consensus, claims have been made both for and against its use. During this time, program and policy leaders have been giv PMID:10205427

Kennedy, K I; Kotelchuck, M

1998-09-01

207

Worldwide trends in funding for contraceptive research and evaluation.  

PubMed

In the past 5 years funding has declined in constant dollars for reproductive and contraceptive research and for the evaluation of long-term contraceptive safety; there has been a general increase in coordination and planning among publicly supported programs, as well as between these programs and private industry. There has been no substantial relaxation of regulatory requirements, and little has been done to make contraceptive research and development (R and D) more attractive to industry. The threat of liability suits and the difficulty in obtaining product liability insurance have become more salient than 5 years ago. This is increasingly restricting clinical research into new methods by both private industry and publicly supported research groups. Nonetheless some major advances have been recorded over the same period. The NORPLANT system, the Today contraceptive sponge, the TCu 380A (a copper-bearing IUD), and biphasic and triphasic pills have all become available in at least some developed and developing countries. In addition, several methods are in advanced stages of clinical trial (e.g., injectable contraceptives for 1 and 6 months' duration; an improved implant, a progestin releasing vaginal ring and Gossypol for sperm inhibition). Presented here are the results of a worldwide survey conducted by the Alan Guttmacher Institute (AGI) of funding for reproductive research, contraceptive development and evaluation of the long-term safety of existing methods. Requests for data on expenditures for 1980-1983 were sent by the AGI to funding agencies, R and D organizations and pharmaceutical companies in the US, Australia, Europe, India and Japan, reported to be doing contraceptive research. Detailed information was sought about fundamental research in reproductive biology, training of pre- and postdoctoral reproductive scientistis, applied research in contraceptive technology and evaluation of the safety of currently marketed contraceptives. An estimated US$154.8 million was spent in 1979 for all 3 categories of research; this amount declined by 12% in 1980. By 1983, expenditures in constant dollars were 79% of the 1979 figure. Contraceptive R and D accounted for 41% of the total expenditures during 1980-1983, fundamental for 52% and long-term contraceptive safety evaluation for 7%. The principal methods under investigation during this period were improved oral contraceptives, other ovulation inhibitors, post-ovulatory methods and pregnancy vaccines. Expenditures for contraceptive development are also presented by contributing organization (publicly supported, private industry and mission-oriented research projects). 46% of funds for evaluation of long-term safety of existing methods were spent on evaluation of oral contraceptives and 16% on the long-term risks of vasectomy. Investigations of barrier methods hardly played any part in overall research on safety in 1980 and 1981; but by 1983 these expenditures were 2nd only to those for the pill. Over the 4-year period, 63% of the funds spent on all types of research were for projects involving female reporduction, 18% for male reproduction and 19% for both. PMID:3843535

Atkinson, L E; Lincoln, R; Forrest, J D

1985-01-01