Sample records for vector magnetic field

  1. Measurements of Solar Vector Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagyard, M. J. (editor)

    1985-01-01

    Various aspects of the measurement of solar magnetic fields are presented. The four major subdivisions of the study are: (1) theoretical understanding of solar vector magnetic fields; (3) techniques for interpretation of observational data; and (4) techniques for data display.

  2. The vector structure of active magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, E. N.

    1985-01-01

    Observations are needed to show the form of the strains introduced into the fields above the surface of the Sun. The longitudinal component alone does not provide the basic information, so that it has been necessary in the past to use the filamentary structure observed in H sub alpha to supplement the longitudinal information. Vector measurements provide the additional essential information to determine the strains, with the filamentary structure available as a check for consistency. It is to be expected, then, that vector measurements will permit a direct mapping of the strains imposed on the magnetic fields of active regions. It will be interesting to study the relation of those strains to the emergence of magnetic flux, flares, eruptive prominences, etc. In particular we may hope to study the relaxation of the strains via the dynamical nonequilibrium.

  3. Mapping the magnetic field vector in a fountain clock

    SciTech Connect

    Gertsvolf, Marina; Marmet, Louis [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada)

    2011-12-15

    We show how the mapping of the magnetic field vector components can be achieved in a fountain clock by measuring the Larmor transition frequency in atoms that are used as a spatial probe. We control two vector components of the magnetic field and apply audio frequency magnetic pulses to localize and measure the field vector through Zeeman spectroscopy.

  4. Spectral Analysis of Vector Magnetic Field Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Robert L.; OBrien, Michael S.

    1997-01-01

    We investigate the power spectra and cross spectra derived from the three components of the vector magnetic field measured on a straight horizontal path above a statistically stationary source. All of these spectra, which can be estimated from the recorded time series, are related to a single two-dimensional power spectral density via integrals that run in the across-track direction in the wavenumber domain. Thus the measured spectra must obey a number of strong constraints: for example, the sum of the two power spectral densities of the two horizontal field components equals the power spectral density of the vertical component at every wavenumber and the phase spectrum between the vertical and along-track components is always pi/2. These constraints provide powerful checks on the quality of the measured data; if they are violated, measurement or environmental noise should be suspected. The noise due to errors of orientation has a clear characteristic; both the power and phase spectra of the components differ from those of crustal signals, which makes orientation noise easy to detect and to quantify. The spectra of the crustal signals can be inverted to obtain information about the cross-track structure of the field. We illustrate these ideas using a high-altitude Project Magnet profile flown in the southeastern Pacific Ocean.

  5. Charged and neutral vector meson under magnetic field

    E-print Network

    Hao Liu; Lang Yu; Mei Huang

    2014-08-06

    The vector meson $\\rho$ in the presence of external magnetic field has been investigated in the framework of the Nambu--Jona-Lasinio model, where mesons are constructed by infinite sum of quark-loop chains by using random phase approximation. The $\\rho$ meson polarization function is calculated to the leading order of $1/N_c$ expansion. It is found that the constituent quark mass increases with magnetic field, the masses of the neutral vector meson $\\rho^{0}$ with spin component $s_z=0,\\,\\pm1$ and the charged vector meson $\\rho^{\\pm}$ with $s_z=0$ also increases with magnetic field. However, the mass square of the charged vector meson $\\rho^{+}$ ($\\rho^{-}$) with $s_z=+1$ ($s_z=-1$) decreases linearly with magnetic field and drops to zero at the critical magnetic field $e B_c \\simeq 0.2 {\\rm GeV}^2$, which indicates the possible condensation of charged vector meson in the vacuum. This critical magnetic field is much lower than the value $eB_c=0.6 {\\rm GeV}^2$ predicted by a point-like vector meson. We also show that if we use lowest Landau level approximation, the mass of the charged vector meson $\\rho^{\\pm}$ for $s_z=\\pm1$ cannot drop to zero at high magnetic fields.

  6. Charged and neutral vector ? mesons in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hao; Yu, Lang; Huang, Mei

    2015-01-01

    The vector meson ? in the presence of an external magnetic field has been investigated in the framework of the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model, in which mesons are constructed by the infinite sum of quark-loop chains by using random phase approximation. The quark loop of ? meson polarization function is calculated to the leading order of 1 /Nc expansion by taking the quark propagator in Ritus form as well the Landau level representation. It is found that the constituent quark mass increases with magnetic field, the masses of the neutral vector meson ?0 with spin component sz=0 ,±1 , and the charged vector meson ?± with sz=0 also increases with magnetic field. However, the mass square of the charged vector meson ?+ (?-) with sz=+1 (sz=-1 ) decreases linearly with magnetic field and drops to zero at the critical magnetic field e Bc?0.2 GeV2 , which indicates the possible condensation of a charged vector meson in the vacuum. The value of the critical magnetic field is the same by using the Ritus quark propagator as well the Landau level representation of the quark propagator, which is much lower than the value e Bc?0.6 GeV2 predicted by a pointlike vector meson.

  7. Inferring Lower Boundary Driving Conditions Using Vector Magnetic Field Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuck, Peter W.; Linton, Mark; Leake, James; MacNeice, Peter; Allred, Joel

    2012-01-01

    Low-beta coronal MHD simulations of realistic CME events require the detailed specification of the magnetic fields, velocities, densities, temperatures, etc., in the low corona. Presently, the most accurate estimates of solar vector magnetic fields are made in the high-beta photosphere. Several techniques have been developed that provide accurate estimates of the associated photospheric plasma velocities such as the Differential Affine Velocity Estimator for Vector Magnetograms and the Poloidal/Toroidal Decomposition. Nominally, these velocities are consistent with the evolution of the radial magnetic field. To evolve the tangential magnetic field radial gradients must be specified. In addition to estimating the photospheric vector magnetic and velocity fields, a further challenge involves incorporating these fields into an MHD simulation. The simulation boundary must be driven, consistent with the numerical boundary equations, with the goal of accurately reproducing the observed magnetic fields and estimated velocities at some height within the simulation. Even if this goal is achieved, many unanswered questions remain. How can the photospheric magnetic fields and velocities be propagated to the low corona through the transition region? At what cadence must we observe the photosphere to realistically simulate the corona? How do we model the magnetic fields and plasma velocities in the quiet Sun? How sensitive are the solutions to other unknowns that must be specified, such as the global solar magnetic field, and the photospheric temperature and density?

  8. Improvement of vector compensation method for vehicle magnetic distortion field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Hongfeng; Zhang, Qi; Li, Ji; Luo, Shitu; Chen, Dixiang; Pan, Mengchun; Luo, Feilu

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic distortions such as eddy-current field and low frequency magnetic field have not been considered in vector compensation methods. A new compensation method is proposed to suppress these magnetic distortions and improve compensation performance, in which the magnetic distortions related to measurement vectors and time are considered. The experimental system mainly consists of a three-axis fluxgate magnetometer (DM-050), an underwater vehicle and a proton magnetometer, in which the scalar value of magnetic field is obtained with the proton magnetometer and considered to be the true value. Comparing with traditional compensation methods, experimental results show that the magnetic distortions can be further reduced by two times. After compensation, error intensity and RMS error are reduced from 11684.013 nT and 7794.604 nT to 16.219 nT and 5.907 nT respectively. It suggests an effective way to improve the compensation performance of magnetic distortions.

  9. Magnetic Moment of Vector Mesons in the Background Field Method

    E-print Network

    Frank X. Lee; Scott Moerschbacher; Walter Wilcox

    2007-10-11

    We report some results for the magnetic moments of vector mesons extracted from mass shifts in the presence of static external magnetic fields. The calculations are done on $24^4$ quenched lattices using standard Wilson actions, with $\\beta$=6.0 and pion mass down to 500 MeV. The results are compared to those from the form factor method.

  10. The magnetic field of current-carrying polygons: An application of vector field rotations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matthew I. Grivich; David P. Jackson

    2000-01-01

    We calculate the magnetic field around a current loop consisting of a regular N-sided polygon by successively rotating the field obtained from a straight, finite, current-carrying wire. This involves developing and applying a vector field rotation operator, which transforms vector fields the way a rotation matrix transforms scalar fields. Using this result, we explore the various magnetic field components about

  11. Determination of coronal magnetic fields from vector magnetograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Zoran

    1993-01-01

    This report covers technical progress during the second year of the contract entitled 'Determination of Coronal Magnetic Fields from Vector Magnetograms,' NASW-4728, between NASA and Science Applications International Corporation, and covers the period January 1, 1993 to December 31, 1993. Under this contract SAIC has conducted research into the determination of coronal magnetic fields from vector magnetograms, including the development and application of algorithms to determine force-free coronal fields above selected observations of active regions. The contract began on June 30, 1992 and has a completion date of December 31, 1994. This contract is a continuation of work started in a previous contract, NASW-4571, which covered the period November 15, 1990 to December 14, 1991. During this second year we have concentrated on studying additional active regions and in using the estimated coronal magnetic fields to compare to coronal features inferred from observations.

  12. Determination of Coronal Magnetic Fields from Vector Magnetograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Zoran

    1997-01-01

    During the course of the present contract we developed an 'evolutionary technique' for the determination of force-free coronal magnetic fields from vector magnetograph observations. The method can successfully generate nonlinear force- free fields (with non-constant-a) that match vector magnetograms. We demonstrated that it is possible to determine coronal magnetic fields from photospheric measurements, and we applied it to vector magnetograms of active regions. We have also studied theoretical models of coronal fields that lead to disruptions. Specifically, we have demonstrated that the determination of force-free fields from exact boundary data is a well-posed mathematical problem, by verifying that the computed coronal field agrees with an analytic force-free field when boundary data for the analytic field are used; demonstrated that it is possible to determine active-region coronal magnetic fields from photospheric measurements, by computing the coronal field above active region 5747 on 20 October 1989, AR6919 on 15 November 1991, and AR7260 on 18 August 1992, from data taken with the Stokes Polarimeter at Mees Solar Observatory, University of Hawaii; started to analyze active region 7201 on 19 June 1992 using measurements made with the Advanced Stokes Polarimeter at NSO/Sac Peak; investigated the effects of imperfections in the photospheric data on the computed coronal magnetic field; documented the coronal field structure of AR5747 and compared it to the morphology of footpoint emission in a flare, showing that the 'high- pressure' H-alpha footpoints are connected by coronal field lines; shown that the variation of magnetic field strength along current-carrying field lines is significantly different from the variation in a potential field, and that the resulting near-constant area of elementary flux tubes is consistent with observations; begun to develop realistic models of coronal fields which can be used to study flare trigger mechanisms; demonstrated that magnetic nonequilibrium can disrupt sheared coronal arcades, and that helmet streamers can disrupt, leading to coronal mass ejections. Our model has significantly extended the realism with which the coronal magnetic field can be inferred from actual observations. In a subsequent contract awarded by NASA, we have continued to apply and improve the evolutionary technique, to study the physical properties of active regions, and to develop theoretical models of magnetic fields.

  13. The Height Dependence of the Magnetic Vector Field in Sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balthasar, H.; Bommier, V.

    2009-06-01

    A complex active region was observed simultaneously with the solar telescopes VTT and THEMIS on Tenrife in May 2005. Spatial scans across the sunspot group were performed at both telescopes. The full Stokes-vector was recorded in several photospheric spectral lines, i.~e. at the VTT in a group of iron and silicon lines in the near infrared and at THEMIS in iron and chromium lines in the visible. Inversions were carried out independently for the different lines in order to derive the magnetic field strength, its inclination and azimuth together with the temperature stratification. Thus we obtained the three-dimensional structure of the magnetic field. Selected locations in the penumbra and in light bridges were considered in detail. We find a general tendency that the magnetic field is weaker and less inclined in higher layers.

  14. Determination of the coronal magnetic field from vector magnetograph data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Zoran

    1991-01-01

    A new algorithm was developed, tested, and applied to determine coronal magnetic fields above solar active regions. The coronal field above NOAA active region AR5747 was successfully estimated on 20 Oct. 1989 from data taken at the Mees Solar Observatory of the Univ. of Hawaii. It was shown that observational data can be used to obtain realistic estimates of coronal magnetic fields. The model has significantly extended the realism with which the coronal magnetic field can be inferred from observations. The understanding of coronal phenomena will be greatly advanced by a reliable technique, such as the one presented, for deducing the detailed spatial structure of the coronal field. The payoff from major current and proposed NASA observational efforts is heavily dependent on the success with which the coronal field can be inferred from vector magnetograms. In particular, the present inability to reliably obtain the coronal field has been a major obstacle to the theoretical advancement of solar flare theory and prediction. The results have shown that the evolutional algorithm can be used to estimate coronal magnetic fields.

  15. Height variation of the vector magnetic field in solar spicules

    E-print Network

    Suarez, D Orozco; Bueno, J Trujillo

    2015-01-01

    Proving the magnetic configuration of solar spicules has hitherto been difficult due to the lack of spatial resolution and image stability during off-limb ground-based observations. We report spectropolarimetric observations of spicules taken in the He I 1083 nm spectral region with the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter II at the German Vacuum Tower Telescope of the Observatorio del Teide (Tenerife; Canary Islands; Spain). The data provide the variation with geometrical height of the Stokes I, Q, U, and V profiles whose encoded information allows the determination of the magnetic field vector by means of the HAZEL inversion code. The inferred results show that the average magnetic field strength at the base of solar spicules is about 80 gauss and then it decreases rapidly with height to about 30 gauss at a height of 3000 km above the visible solar surface. Moreover, the magnetic field vector is close to vertical at the base of the chromosphere and has mid inclinations (about 50 degree) above 2 Mm height.

  16. Height Variation of the Vector Magnetic Field in Solar Spicules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orozco Suárez, D.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Trujillo Bueno, J.

    2015-04-01

    Proving the magnetic configuration of solar spicules has hitherto been difficult due to the lack of spatial resolution and image stability during off-limb ground-based observations. We report spectropolarimetric observations of spicules taken in the He i 1083 nm spectral region with the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter II at the German Vacuum Tower Telescope of the Observatorio del Teide (Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain). The data provide the variation with geometrical height of the Stokes I, Q, U, and V profiles, whose encoded information allows the determination of the magnetic field vector by means of the HAZEL inversion code. The inferred results show that the average magnetic field strength at the base of solar spicules is about 80 gauss, and then it decreases rapidly with height to about 30 gauss at a height of 3000 km above the visible solar surface. Moreover, the magnetic field vector is close to vertical at the base of the chromosphere and has mid-inclinations (about 50°) above 2 Mm height.

  17. Vector Magnetic Fields and Electric Currents from the Imaging Vector Magnetograph

    E-print Network

    Jing Li; A. A. van Ballegooijen; Don Mickey

    2008-11-01

    First, we describe a general procedure to produce high quality vector magnetograms using the Imaging Vector Magnetograph (IVM) at Mees Solar Observatory. At the spatial resolution 2"x2", the Stokes Q,U,V uncertainty reaches 0.001-0.0005 in time-averaged data over 1-hour in the quiet Sun. When vector magnetic fields are inferred from the time-averaged Stokes spectral images of FeI 6302.5A, the resulting uncertainties are on the order of 10 G for the longitudinal fields, 40 G for the transverse field strength and 9 degree for the magnetic azimuth. The magnetic field inversion used in this work is the "Triplet" code, which was developed and implemented in the IVM software package by the late Barry J. LaBonte. The inversion code is described in detail in the Appendix. Second, we solve for the absolute value of the vertical electric current density, |Jz|, accounting for the above IVM problems, for two different active regions. One is a single sunspot region (NOAA 10001 observed on 20 June 2002) while the other is a more complex, quadrupolar region (NOAA10030 observed on 15 July 2002). We use a calculation that does not require disambiguation of 180 degree in the transverse field directions. The |Jz| uncertainty is on the order of 7.0 mA m^-2. The vertical current density increases with increasing vertical magnetic field. The rate of increase is about 1 -2 times as large in the quadrupolar NOAA 10030 region as in the simple NOAA 10001, and it is more spatially variable over NOAA 10030 than over NOAA 10001.

  18. An Overhaul of the SOLIS/VSM Vector Magnetic Field Pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harker, Brian; SOLIS Team

    2013-07-01

    The vector magnetic field pipeline of the Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun (SOLIS) Vector Spectromagnetograph (VSM) is currently undergoing several key upgrades. Improved algorithms for fringe removal, quicklook vector magnetic field estimation, Milne-Eddington inversion, and geometrical image correction have been implemented, resulting in drastically improved data products which the National Solar Observatory (NSO) routinely provides to the solar community. This poster highlights the recent improvements we have made and points the users of our spectropolarimetric and magnetic field data to our new and improved data products.

  19. A Comprehensive Method of Estimating Electric Fields from Vector Magnetic Field and Doppler Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazachenko, Maria D.; Fisher, George H.; Welsch, Brian T.

    2014-11-01

    Photospheric electric fields, estimated from sequences of vector magnetic field and Doppler measurements, can be used to estimate the flux of magnetic energy (the Poynting flux) into the corona and as time-dependent boundary conditions for dynamic models of the coronal magnetic field. We have modified and extended an existing method to estimate photospheric electric fields that combines a poloidal-toroidal decomposition (PTD) of the evolving magnetic field vector with Doppler and horizontal plasma velocities. Our current, more comprehensive method, which we dub the "PTD-Doppler-FLCT Ideal" (PDFI) technique, can now incorporate Doppler velocities from non-normal viewing angles. It uses the FISHPACK software package to solve several two-dimensional Poisson equations, a faster and more robust approach than our previous implementations. Here, we describe systematic, quantitative tests of the accuracy and robustness of the PDFI technique using synthetic data from anelastic MHD (ANMHD) simulations, which have been used in similar tests in the past. We find that the PDFI method has less than 1% error in the total Poynting flux and a 10% error in the helicity flux rate at a normal viewing angle (? = 0) and less than 25% and 10% errors, respectively, at large viewing angles (? < 60°). We compare our results with other inversion methods at zero viewing angle and find that our method's estimates of the fluxes of magnetic energy and helicity are comparable to or more accurate than other methods. We also discuss the limitations of the PDFI method and its uncertainties.

  20. Vector Fields

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Dray, Tevian

    2006-01-01

    Vector fields are vectors which change from point to point. A standard example is the velocity of moving air, in other words, wind. For instance, the current wind pattern in the San Francisco area can be found at . This site has a 2-dimensional representation; careful reading of the webpage will tell you at what elevation the wind is shown. How would you represent a vector field in 3 dimensions? What features are important? Some simple examples are shown. Each can be rotated by clicking and dragging with the mouse. Explore!

  1. VECTOR TOMOGRAPHY FOR THE CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELD. II. HANLE EFFECT MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kramar, M. [Physics Department, The Catholic University of America, 620 Michigan Avenue NE, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Inhester, B. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Sonnensystemforschung, Max-Plank-Str. 2, D-37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany); Lin, H. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, 34 Ohia Ku Street, Pukalani, Maui, HI 96768 (United States); Davila, J., E-mail: maxim.i.kramar@nasa.gov, E-mail: Joseph.M.Davila@nasa.gov, E-mail: inhester@mps.mpg.de, E-mail: lin@ifa.hawaii.edu [NASA-GSFC, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2013-09-20

    In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of saturated coronal Hanle effect vector tomography or the application of vector tomographic inversion techniques to reconstruct the three-dimensional magnetic field configuration of the solar corona using linear polarization measurements of coronal emission lines. We applied Hanle effect vector tomographic inversion to artificial data produced from analytical coronal magnetic field models with equatorial and meridional currents and global coronal magnetic field models constructed by extrapolation of real photospheric magnetic field measurements. We tested tomographic inversion with only Stokes Q, U, electron density, and temperature inputs to simulate observations over large limb distances where the Stokes I parameters are difficult to obtain with ground-based coronagraphs. We synthesized the coronal linear polarization maps by inputting realistic noise appropriate for ground-based observations over a period of two weeks into the inversion algorithm. We found that our Hanle effect vector tomographic inversion can partially recover the coronal field with a poloidal field configuration, but that it is insensitive to a corona with a toroidal field. This result demonstrates that Hanle effect vector tomography is an effective tool for studying the solar corona and that it is complementary to Zeeman effect vector tomography for the reconstruction of the coronal magnetic field.

  2. First use of synoptic vector magnetograms for global nonlinear, force-free coronal magnetic field models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadesse, T.; Wiegelmann, T.; Gosain, S.; MacNeice, P.; Pevtsov, A. A.

    2014-02-01

    Context. The magnetic field permeating the solar atmosphere is generally thought to provide the energy for much of the activity seen in the solar corona, such as flares, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), etc. To overcome the unavailability of coronal magnetic field measurements, photospheric magnetic field vector data can be used to reconstruct the coronal field. Currently, there are several modelling techniques being used to calculate three-dimensional field lines into the solar atmosphere. Aims: For the first time, synoptic maps of a photospheric-vector magnetic field synthesized from the vector spectromagnetograph (VSM) on Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun (SOLIS) are used to model the coronal magnetic field and estimate free magnetic energy in the global scale. The free energy (i.e., the energy in excess of the potential field energy) is one of the main indicators used in space weather forecasts to predict the eruptivity of active regions. Methods: We solve the nonlinear force-free field equations using an optimization principle in spherical geometry. The resulting three-dimensional magnetic fields are used to estimate the magnetic free energy content Efree = Enlfff - Epot, which is the difference of the magnetic energies between the nonpotential field and the potential field in the global solar corona. For comparison, we overlay the extrapolated magnetic field lines with the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) observations by the atmospheric imaging assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Results: For a single Carrington rotation 2121, we find that the global nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) magnetic energy density is 10.3% higher than the potential one. Most of this free energy is located in active regions.

  3. Rippled graphene in an in-plane magnetic field: effects of a random vector potential.

    PubMed

    Lundeberg, Mark B; Folk, Joshua A

    2010-10-01

    We report measurements of the effects of a random vector potential generated by applying an in-plane magnetic field to a graphene flake. Magnetic flux through the ripples cause orbital effects: Phase-coherent weak localization is suppressed, while quasirandom Lorentz forces lead to anisotropic magnetoresistance. Distinct signatures of these two effects enable the ripple size to be characterized. PMID:21230858

  4. Comment on "Charged vector mesons in a strong magnetic field"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernodub, M. N.

    2014-01-01

    In a recent paper Y. Hidaka and A. Yamamoto [Phys. Rev. D 87, 094502 (2013)] claim—using both analytical and numerical approaches—that the charged ? mesons cannot condense in the vacuum subjected to a strong magnetic field. In this Comment we point out that both the analytical and numerical results of this paper are consistent with the inhomogeneous ?-meson condensation. Furthermore, we show that the numerical results of the paper support the presence of the expected (in quenched lattice QCD) crossover transition driven by the ?-meson condensation. Finally, we stress that the inhomogeneous ?-meson condensation is consistent with both Vafa-Witten and Elitzur theorems.

  5. Making global map of the solar surface Br from the HMI vector magnetic field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, K.; Liu, Y.; Sun, X.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Centeno, R.; Barnes, G.; Leka, K. D.

    2013-06-01

    The Helioseismic Magnetic Imager (HMI) has made full-disk vector magnetic field measurements of the Sun with cadence of 12 minutes. The three-component solar surface magnetic field vector data are from the HMI observations with the data process pipeline modules, VFISV (Very Fast Inversion of the Stokes Vector, Borrero et al., 2011) for Milne-Eddington inversion and the minimum-energy disambiguation algorithm (Metcalf 1994, Leka et al, 2009). The models of the global corona and solar wind, such as the PFSS (potential-field source-surface) model and the MHD simulations, often use the maps of solar surface magnetic field, especially the radial component (Br) as the boundary condition. The HMI observation can provide new Br data for these model. Because of weak magnetic signals at the quiet regions of the Sun, the limb darkening, and geometric effects near solar poles, we need to apply an assumption to make a whole-surface map. In this paper, we tested two assumptions for determining Br at weak-field regions. The coronal structures calculated by the PFSS model with the vector-based Br are compared with those with the magnetogram-based Br and the corona observed by the SDO/AIA (Atmospheric Imaging Assembly). In the tested period, CR 2098, the vector-based Br map gives better agreements than the line-of-sight magnetogram data, though we need further investigation for evaluation.

  6. Simulation study on reconstruction of electric conductivity distribution from magnetic vector field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumi, C.; Nagumo, K.

    2004-07-01

    We describe an effective, versatile technique for reconstructing the electric conductivity distribution from magnetic vector field measurements. Using magnetic vector field data measured over a region of interest (ROI), the assumed steady current vector field is reconstructed to perform conductivity reconstruction. As the current sources/current flow outside the ROI significantly contribute to magnetic fields over the neighbourhood of the ROI border, the extra contributions are reduced in the measured magnetic field data using a derived spatial weight function. The remaining magnetic field measurement errors are coped with utilizing a mollification method in conjunction with a regularization method. In a straightforward manner, our current field reconstruction technique is combined with our previously reported conductivity reconstruction technique. The combined non-contact conductivity reconstruction technique in principle allows handling of an arbitrary geometry of the target conductive ROI and arbitrary current sources existing outside the ROI. The technique is particularly effective when an inherent current flow exists and only field measurements are needed. Technique feasibility is simply verified by reconstructing a 2D conductivity distribution using simulated, noise-filled, magnetic field data. Resultant reconstructions indicate the technique to be a practical means for robustly reconstructing target conductivity distributions.

  7. Preprocessing of vector magnetograph data for a non-linear force-free magnetic field reconstruction

    E-print Network

    Thomas Wiegelmann; Bernd Inhester; Takashi Sakurai

    2006-12-21

    Knowledge regarding the coronal magnetic field is important for the understanding of many phenomena, like flares and coronal mass ejections. Because of the low plasma beta in the solar corona the coronal magnetic field is often assumed to be force-free and we use photospheric vector magnetograph data to extrapolate the magnetic field into the corona with the help of a non-linear force-free optimization code. Unfortunately the measurements of the photospheric magnetic field contain inconsistencies and noise. In particular the transversal components (say Bx and By) of current vector magnetographs have their uncertainties. Furthermore the magnetic field in the photosphere is not necessary force-free and often not consistent with the assumption of a force-free field above. We develop a preprocessing procedure to drive the observed non force-free data towards suitable boundary conditions for a force-free extrapolation. As a result we get a data set which is as close as possible to the measured data and consistent with the force-free assumption.

  8. The derivation of vector magnetic fields from Stokes profiles - Integral versus least squares fitting techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronan, R. S.; Mickey, D. L.; Orrall, F. Q.

    1987-01-01

    The results of two methods for deriving photospheric vector magnetic fields from the Zeeman effect, as observed in the Fe I line at 6302.5 A at high spectral resolution (45 mA), are compared. The first method does not take magnetooptical effects into account, but determines the vector magnetic field from the integral properties of the Stokes profiles. The second method is an iterative least-squares fitting technique which fits the observed Stokes profiles to the profiles predicted by the Unno-Rachkovsky solution to the radiative transfer equation. For sunspot fields above about 1500 gauss, the two methods are found to agree in derived azimuthal and inclination angles to within about + or - 20 deg.

  9. Accessing interior magnetic field vector components in neutron electric dipole moment experiments via exterior measurements, I. Boundary-value techniques

    E-print Network

    B. Plaster

    2013-09-22

    We propose a new concept for determining the interior magnetic field vector components in neutron electric dipole moment experiments. If a closed three-dimensional boundary surface surrounding the fiducial volume of an experiment can be defined such that its interior encloses no currents or sources of magnetization, each of the interior vector field components and the magnetic scalar potential will satisfy a Laplace equation. Therefore, if either the vector field components or the normal derivative of the scalar potential can be measured on the surface of this boundary, thus defining a Dirichlet or Neumann boundary-value problem, respectively, the interior vector field components or the scalar potential (and, thus, the field components via the gradient of the potential) can be uniquely determined via solution of the Laplace equation. We discuss the applicability of this technique to the determination of the interior magnetic field components during the operating phase of neutron electric dipole moment experiments when it is not, in general, feasible to perform direct in situ measurements of the interior field components. We also study the specifications that a vector field probe must satisfy in order to determine the interior vector field components to a certain precision. The technique we propose here may also be applicable to experiments requiring monitoring of the vector magnetic field components within some closed boundary surface, such as searches for neutron-antineutron oscillations along a flight path or measurements in storage rings of the muon anomalous magnetic moment $g-2$ and the proton electric dipole moment.

  10. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) Vector Magnetic Field Pipeline: SHARPs - Space-Weather HMI Active Region Patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobra, M. G.; Sun, X.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Turmon, M.; Liu, Y.; Hayashi, K.; Barnes, G.; Leka, K. D.

    2014-09-01

    A new data product from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) called Space-weather HMI Active Region Patches ( SHARPs) is now available. SDO/HMI is the first space-based instrument to map the full-disk photospheric vector magnetic field with high cadence and continuity. The SHARP data series provide maps in patches that encompass automatically tracked magnetic concentrations for their entire lifetime; map quantities include the photospheric vector magnetic field and its uncertainty, along with Doppler velocity, continuum intensity, and line-of-sight magnetic field. Furthermore, keywords in the SHARP data series provide several parameters that concisely characterize the magnetic-field distribution and its deviation from a potential-field configuration. These indices may be useful for active-region event forecasting and for identifying regions of interest. The indices are calculated per patch and are available on a twelve-minute cadence. Quick-look data are available within approximately three hours of observation; definitive science products are produced approximately five weeks later. SHARP data are available at jsoc.stanford.edu and maps are available in either of two different coordinate systems. This article describes the SHARP data products and presents examples of SHARP data and parameters.

  11. On parasupersymmetric oscillators and relativistic vector mesons in constant magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Debergh, Nathalie; Beckers, Jules

    1995-01-01

    Johnson-Lippmann considerations on oscillators and their connection with the minimal coupling schemes are visited in order to introduce a new Sakata-Taketani equation describing vector mesons in interaction with a constant magnetic field. This new proposal, based on a specific parasupersymmetric oscillator-like system, is characterized by real energies as opposed to previously pointed out relativistic equations corresponding to this interacting context.

  12. Angular Distribution of Solar Wind Magnetic Field Vector at 1 Au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, F.; Li, G.; Zhao, L.; Zhang, Y.; Khabarova, O.; Miao, B.; le Roux, J.

    2015-03-01

    We study the angular distribution of the solar wind magnetic field vector at 1 AU and its solar cycle dependence using ACE observations. A total of twelve 27.27 day (the duration of a solar rotation) intervals during the solar maximum, the solar minimum, as well as the ascending and descending phases of solar cycle 23 are examined. For all selected intervals, we obtain the angular distribution function {{f}? }(? ), where ? is the angle between the instantaneous solar wind magnetic field vector and the average background magnetic field vector, and ? is the period length for the averaging. Our results show that in all periods {{f}? }(? ) has two populations, one at small angles and one at large angles. We suggest that the second population is due to the presence of current sheets in the solar wind. The solar-cycle dependence of {{f}? }(? ) and a ?-scaling property of the second population of {{f}? }(? ) are discussed. The ? scaling shows a clear dependence on the solar wind type. The implication of {{f}? }(? ) for particle acceleration at interplanetary shocks driven by coronal mass ejections, such as those in solar energetic particle events, is also discussed.

  13. Constraint on the primordial vector mode and its magnetic field generation from seven-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Takahashi, Keitaro; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    2012-02-01

    It is often stated that the cosmological vector mode has only a decaying mode and gives negligible effects on cosmological observations. The vector mode, however, has a growing mode if there exists anisotropic stress in energy distributions in the universe. In this paper, we consider a primordial vector mode sustained by free-streaming neutrinos and its associated magnetic field generation. First, we put an observational constraint on the amount of the vector mode from the 7-year WMAP data. The constraint is found as rv?-(r)/(40)+0.012, where rv and r are the amounts of vector and tensor perturbation amplitudes with respect to the scalar one, respectively. Second, we calculate the spectrum of magnetic fields inevitably created from the primordial vector mode, given the constraint on rv. It is found that the maximum amount of magnetic fields generated from the vector mode is given by B?10-22G((rv)/(0.012))1/2((k)/(0.002))(nv+1)/2, with nv being a spectral index of the vector mode. We find a nontrivial cancellation of the magnetic field generation in the radiation-dominated era, which creates a characteristic cutoff in the magnetic field spectrum around k?1.0Mpc-1.

  14. The effect of transverse wave vector and magnetic fields on resonant tunneling times in double-barrier structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongmei; Zhang, Yafei; Xu, Huaizhe

    2007-01-01

    The effect of transverse wave vector and magnetic fields on resonant tunneling times in double-barrier structures, which is significant but has been frequently omitted in previous theoretical methods, has been reported in this paper. The analytical expressions of the longitudinal energies of quasibound levels (LEQBL) and the lifetimes of quasibound levels (LQBL) in symmetrical double-barrier (SDB) structures have been derived as a function of transverse wave vector and longitudinal magnetic fields perpendicular to interfaces. Based on our derived analytical expressions, the LEQBL and LQBL dependence upon transverse wave vector and longitudinal magnetic fields has been explored numerically for a SDB structure. Model calculations show that the LEQBL decrease monotonically and the LQBL shorten with increasing transverse wave vector, and each original LEQBL splits to a series of sub-LEQBL which shift nearly linearly toward the well bottom and the lifetimes of quasibound level series (LQBLS) shorten with increasing Landau-level indices and magnetic fields.

  15. OBSERVATIONAL EVIDENCE OF CHANGING PHOTOSPHERIC VECTOR MAGNETIC FIELDS ASSOCIATED WITH SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Su, J. T.; Jing, J.; Wang, H. M. [Space Weather Research Laboratory, New Jersey Institute of Technology, University Heights, Newark, NJ 07102-1982 (United States); Mao, X. J.; Wang, X. F.; Zhang, H. Q.; Deng, Y. Y.; Guo, J.; Wang, G. P., E-mail: sjt@bao.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2011-06-01

    Recent observations have provided evidence that the solar photospheric magnetic fields could have rapid and permanent changes in both longitudinal and transverse components associated with major flares. As a result, the Lorentz force (LF) acting on the solar photosphere and solar interior could be perturbed, and the change of LF is always nearly in the downward direction. However, these rapid and permanent changes have not been systematically investigated, yet, using vector magnetograms. In this paper, we analyze photospheric vector magnetograms covering five flares to study the evolution of photospheric magnetic fields. In particular, we investigate two-dimensional spatial distributions of the changing LF. Around the major flaring polarity inversion line, the net change of the LF is directed downward in an area of {approx}10{sup 19} cm{sup 2} for X-class flares. For all events, the white-light observations show that sunspots darken in this location after flares, and magnetic fields become more inclined, which is consistent with the ideas put forward by Hudson et al. and Fisher et al., and observations.

  16. Center-to-Limb Variation of the Magnetic Field Vector Distribution in the Internetwork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orozco Suárez, D.

    2012-08-01

    I present a comparison between the Probability Density Functions of the magnetic field strength, inclination, azimuth, and filling factor determined at four different heliocentric angles in the quiet Sun internetwork. The data were acquired with the spectropolarimeter attached to the Solar Optical Telescope onboard the Hinode satellite. The signal-to-the-noise ratio corresponds to ˜ 3600, measured at the continuum of Stokes I. To obtain the PDFs, the data were subjected to a simple one component Milne-Eddington inversion. The results show that for strong fields (above 300 G), variations on the shape of the inclination PDF are detected, suggesting that the geometry of the field vector changes with viewing angle. For weaker fields, the distribution of inclinations does not vary, what concurs with the isotropic nature of the internetwork fields.

  17. The Z3 model of Saturn's magnetic field and the Pioneer 11 vector helium magnetometer observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Acuna, M. H.; Ness, N. F.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetic field observations obtained by the Pioneer 11 vector helium magnetometer are compared with the Z(sub 3) model magnetic field. These Pioneer 11 observations, obtained at close-in radial distances, constitute an important and independent test of the Z(sub 3) zonal harmonic model, which was derived from Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 fluxgate magnetometer observations. Differences between the Pioneer 11 magnetometer and the Z(sub 3) model field are found to be small (approximately 1 percent) and quantitatively consistent with the expected instrumental accuracy. A detailed examination of these differences in spacecraft payload coordinates shows that they are uniquely associated with the instrument frame of reference and operation. A much improved fit to the Pioneer 11 observations is obtained by rotation of the instrument coordinate system about the spacecraft spin axis by 1.4 degree. With this adjustment, possibly associated with an instrumental phase lag or roll attitude error, the Pioneer 11 vector helium magnetometer observations are fully consistent with the Voyager Z(sub 3) model.

  18. The Z3 model of Saturns magnetic field and the Pioneer 11 vector helium magnetometer observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Acuna, M. H.; Ness, N. F.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetic field observations obtained by the Pioneer 11 vector helium magnetometer are compared with the Z(sub 3) model magnetic field. These Pioneer 11 observations, obtained at close-in radial distances, constitute an important and independent test of the Z(sub 3) zonal harmonic model, which was derived from Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 fluxgate magnetometer observations. Differences between the Pioneer 11 magnetometer and the Z(sub 3) model field are found to be small (approximately 1%) and quantitatively consistent with the expected instrumental accuracy. A detailed examination of these differences in spacecraft payload coordinates shows that they are uniquely associated with the instrument frame of reference and operation. A much improved fit to the Pioneer 11 observations is obtained by rotation of the instrument coordinate system about the spacecraft spin axis by 1.4 degree. With this adjustment, possibly associated with an instrumental phase lag or roll attitude error, the Pioneer 11 vector helium magnetometer observations are fully consistent with the Voyager Z(sub 3) model.

  19. Mapping and Initial Interpretation of The Lithospheric Field From Champ Scalar and Vector Magnetic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maus, S.

    Eighteen months into the CHAMP mission there is now a seizable data set of scalar and vector magnetic measurements. With this data the lithospheric magnetic field can be mapped with unprecedented accuracy and resolution. After illustrating certain qual- ity characteristics of the measured data I discuss the correction for magnetospheric currents, which is a key issue in lithospheric field mapping. Our maps of the anomaly of the total intensity and of the vertical component of the magnetic field show considerable agreement with earlier Magsat/POGO maps in areas of strong lithospheric signal. The most significant differences are seen in areas of young crust where the signal is weak. Interestingly, the area with the weakest magnetic signal in the Pacific Ocean does not coincide with the Mid Ocean Ridge (MOR). Generally, anomalies are well aligned with the MORs, though. Over the continents the Archean Shields stand out clearly by their bulk magnetisation against younger crust. Particularly in Africa it may be difficult to explain the observed anomalies by induced magnetisation and a varying Curie depth alone.

  20. Induced Fractional Zero-Point Canonical Angular Momentum on Charged Particles of Aharonov - Bohm Vector Potential and "Spectator" Magnetic Field

    E-print Network

    Jian-Zu Zhang

    2007-11-02

    The induced fractional zero-point canonical angular momentum on charged particles by the Aharonov - Bohm (AB) vector potential is realized via modified combined traps. It explores new features for this type of quantum effects: In a limit of vanishing mechanical kinetic energy the AB vector potential alone cannot induce a fractional zero-point canonical angular momentum on charged particles at the quantum mechanical level in the AB magnetic field-free region; But for the case of the AB vector potential with another one of a "spectator" magnetic field the AB vector potential induces a fractional zero-point canonical angular momentum in the same limit. The "spectator" one does not contribute to such a fractional zero-point quantity, but plays essential role in guaranteeing non-trivial dynamics survived in this limit at the quantum mechanical level. These results are significance in investigations of the AB effects and related fields for both theories and experiments.

  1. Solar Flare Prediction Using SDO/HMI Vector Magnetic Field Data with a Machine-learning Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobra, M. G.; Couvidat, S.

    2015-01-01

    We attempt to forecast M- and X-class solar flares using a machine-learning algorithm, called support vector machine (SVM), and four years of data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory's Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager, the first instrument to continuously map the full-disk photospheric vector magnetic field from space. Most flare forecasting efforts described in the literature use either line-of-sight magnetograms or a relatively small number of ground-based vector magnetograms. This is the first time a large data set of vector magnetograms has been used to forecast solar flares. We build a catalog of flaring and non-flaring active regions sampled from a database of 2071 active regions, comprised of 1.5 million active region patches of vector magnetic field data, and characterize each active region by 25 parameters. We then train and test the machine-learning algorithm and we estimate its performances using forecast verification metrics with an emphasis on the true skill statistic (TSS). We obtain relatively high TSS scores and overall predictive abilities. We surmise that this is partly due to fine-tuning the SVM for this purpose and also to an advantageous set of features that can only be calculated from vector magnetic field data. We also apply a feature selection algorithm to determine which of our 25 features are useful for discriminating between flaring and non-flaring active regions and conclude that only a handful are needed for good predictive abilities.

  2. On the Collective Magnetic Field Strength and Vector Structure of Dark Umbral Cores Measured by the Hinode Spectropolarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schad, T. A.

    2014-05-01

    We study 7530 sunspot umbrae and pores measured by the Hinode Spectropolarimeter (SP) between November 2006 and November 2012. We primarily seek confirmation of the long term secular decrease in the mean magnetic field strength of sunspot umbrae found by Penn and Livingston ( IAU Symp. 273, 126, 2011) between 1998 and 2011. The excellent SP photometric properties and full vector magnetic field determinations from full-Stokes Milne-Eddington inversions are used to address the interrelated properties of the magnetic field strength and brightness temperature for all umbral cores. We find non-linear relationships between magnetic field strength and umbral temperature (and continuum contrast), as well as between umbral radius and magnetic field strength. Using disambiguated vector data, we find that the azimuths measured in the umbral cores reflect an organization weakly influenced by Joy's law. The large selection of umbrae displays a log-normal size spectrum similar to earlier solar cycles. Influenced by the amplitude of the solar cycle and the non-linear relationship between umbral size and core magnetic field strength, the distribution of core magnetic field strengths, fit most effectively with a skew-normal distribution, shows a weak solar cycle dependence. Yet, the mean magnetic field strength does not show a significant long term trend.

  3. Full Vector Magnetic Field Critical Current Characterization of Coated Conductors Deposited on Solution Deposition Planarized IBAD Templates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Reagor; J. Y. Coulter; Vladimir Matias; Chris J. Sheehan; Brian Moeckly

    2011-01-01

    Secondgenerationhightemperaturesuper-conductor (HTS)wireconsistsofmetalsubstratetapestexturedwithinterme- diate buffer layers that are coated with a superconducting layer. The applications of these coated conductors require a high current in magnetic fields that are not restricted to a narrow range of an- gles.Ionbeamassisteddeposition(IBAD)templatetilt,incombina- tion with REBCO vapor deposition, results in asymmetric sample growth. This requires Vector Magnetic Field (VMF) measurement over 180 degrees to be fully described.

  4. Magnetic field sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Nicolas

    2012-09-01

    Earlier papers1-3 in this journal have described experiments on measuring the magnetic fields of current-carrying wires and permanent magnets using magnetic field probes of various kinds. This paper explains how to use an iPad and the free app MagnetMeter-3D Vector Magnetometer and Accelerometer4 (compass HD) to measure the magnetic fields.

  5. Flare activity, sunspot motions, and the evolution of vector magnetic fields in Hale region 17244

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neidig, Donald F.; Hagyard, Mona J.; Machado, Marcos E.; Smith, Jesse B., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The magnetic and dynamical circumstances leading to the 1B/M4 flare of November 5, 1980 are studied, and a strong association is found between the buildup of magnetic shear and the onset of flare activity within the active region. The development of shear, as observed directly in vector magnetograms, is consistent in detail with the dynamical history of the active region and identifies the precise location of the optical and hard-X-ray kernels of the flare emission.

  6. Effects of AC/DC magnetic fields, frequency, and nanoparticle aspect ratio on cellular transfection of gene vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Kris; Mair, Lamar; Fisher, Mike; Rowshon Alam, Md.; Juliano, Rudolph; Superfine, Richard

    2008-10-01

    In order to make non-viral gene delivery a useful tool in the study and treatment of genetic disorders, it is imperative that these methodologies be further refined to yield optimal results. Transfection of magnetic nanoparticles and nanorods are used as non-viral gene vectors to transfect HeLa EGFP-654 cells that stably express a mutated enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene. We deliver antisense oligonucleotides to these cells designed to correct the aberrant splicing caused by the mutation in the EGFP gene. We also transfect human bronchial endothelial cells and immortalized WI-38 lung cells with pEGFP-N1 vectors. To achieve this we bind the genes to magnetic nanoparticles and nanorods and introduce magnetic fields to effect transfection. We wish to examine the effects of magnetic fields on the transfection of these particles and the benefits of using alternating (AC) magnetic fields in improving transfection rates over direct (DC) magnetic fields. We specifically look at the frequency dependence of the AC field and particle aspect ratio as it pertains to influencing transfection rate. We posit that the increase in angular momentum brought about by the AC field and the high aspect ratio of the nanorod particles, is vital to generating the force needed to move the particle through the cell membrane.

  7. Determination of Electric-Field, Magnetic-Field, and Electric-Current Distributions of Infrared Optical Antennas: A Near-Field Optical Vector Network Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmon, Robert L.; Rang, Matthias; Krenz, Peter M.; Lail, Brian A.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Boreman, Glenn D.; Raschke, Markus B.

    2010-10-01

    In addition to the electric field E(r), the associated magnetic field H(r) and current density J(r) characterize any electromagnetic device, providing insight into antenna coupling and mutual impedance. We demonstrate the optical analogue of the radio frequency vector network analyzer implemented in interferometric homodyne scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy for obtaining E(r), H(r), and J(r). The approach is generally applicable and demonstrated for the case of a linear coupled-dipole antenna in the midinfrared spectral region. The determination of the underlying 3D vector electric near-field distribution E(r) with nanometer spatial resolution and full phase and amplitude information is enabled by the design of probe tips with selectivity with respect to E? and E? fabricated by focused ion-beam milling and nano-chemical-vapor-deposition methods.

  8. Determination of electric-field, magnetic-field, and electric-current distributions of infrared optical antennas: a near-field optical vector network analyzer.

    PubMed

    Olmon, Robert L; Rang, Matthias; Krenz, Peter M; Lail, Brian A; Saraf, Laxmikant V; Boreman, Glenn D; Raschke, Markus B

    2010-10-15

    In addition to the electric field E(r), the associated magnetic field H(r) and current density J(r) characterize any electromagnetic device, providing insight into antenna coupling and mutual impedance. We demonstrate the optical analogue of the radio frequency vector network analyzer implemented in interferometric homodyne scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy for obtaining E(r), H(r), and J(r). The approach is generally applicable and demonstrated for the case of a linear coupled-dipole antenna in the midinfrared spectral region. The determination of the underlying 3D vector electric near-field distribution E(r) with nanometer spatial resolution and full phase and amplitude information is enabled by the design of probe tips with selectivity with respect to E(?) and E(?) fabricated by focused ion-beam milling and nano-chemical-vapor-deposition methods. PMID:21231012

  9. Determination of Electric-Field, Magnetic-Field, and Electric-Current Distributions of Infrared Optical Antennas: A Near-Field Optical Vector Network Analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Olmon, Robert L.; Rang, Matthias; Krenz, Peter M.; Lail, Brian A.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Boreman, Glenn D.; Raschke, Markus Bernd

    2010-10-15

    In addition to the electric field E(r), the associated magnetic field H(r) and current density J(r) characterize any electromagnetic device, providing insight into antenna coupling and mutual impedance. We demonstrate the optical analogue of the radio frequency vector network analyzer implemented in interferometric homodyne scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM) for obtaining E(r), H(r), and J(r). The approach is generally applicable and demonstrated for the case of a linear coupled-dipole antenna in the midinfrared. The determination of the underlying 3D vector electric near-field distribution E(r) with nanometer spatial resolution and full phase and amplitude information is enabled by the design of probe tips with selectivity with respect to Ek and E? fabricated by focused ion-beam milling and nano-CVD.

  10. An investigation into the vector ellipticity of extremely low frequency magnetic fields from appliances in UK homes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ainsbury, Elizabeth A.; Conein, Emma; Henshaw, Denis L.

    2005-07-01

    Elliptically polarized magnetic fields induce higher currents in the body compared with their plane polarized counterparts. This investigation examines the degree of vector ellipticity of extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MFs) in the home, with regard to the adverse health effects reportedly associated with ELF-MFs, for instance childhood leukaemia. Tri-axial measurements of the magnitude and phase of the 0-3000 Hz magnetic fields, produced by 226 domestic mains-fed appliances of 32 different types, were carried out in 16 homes in Worcestershire in the summer of 2004. Magnetic field strengths were low, with average (RMS) values of 0.03 ± 0.02 µT across all residences. In contrast, background field ellipticities were high, on average 47 ± 11%. Microwave and electric ovens produced the highest ellipticities: mean respective values of 21 ± 21% and 21 ± 17% were observed 20 cm away from these appliances. There was a negative correlation between field strength and field polarization, which we attribute to the higher relative field contribution close to each individual (single-phase) appliance. The measurements demonstrate that domestic magnetic fields are extremely complex and cannot simply be characterized by traditional measurements such as time-weighted average or peak exposure levels. We conclude that ellipticity should become a relevant metric for future epidemiological studies of health and ELF-MF exposure. This work is supported by the charity CHILDREN with LEUKAEMIA, registered charity number 298405.

  11. High-resolution near-bottom vector magnetic anomalies over Raven Hydrothermal Field, Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tivey, Maurice A.; Johnson, H. Paul; Salmi, Marie S.; Hutnak, Michael

    2014-10-01

    High-resolution, near-bottom vector magnetic data were collected by remotely operated vehicle Jason over the Raven hydrothermal vent field (47°57.3'N 129°5.75'W) located north of Main Endeavour vent field on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The survey was part of a comprehensive heat flow study of the Raven site using innovative thermal blanket technology to map the heat flux and crustal fluid pathways around a solitary hydrothermal vent field. Raven hydrothermal activity is presently located along the western axial valley wall, while additional inactive hydrothermal deposits are found to the NW on the upper rift valley wall. Magnetic inversion results show discrete areas of reduced magnetization associated with both active and inactive hydrothermal vent deposits that also show high conductive heat flow. Higher spatial variability in the heat flow patterns compared to the magnetization is consistent with the heat flow reflecting the currently active but ephemeral thermal environment of fluid flow, while crustal magnetization is representative of the static time-averaged effect of hydrothermal alteration. A general NW to SE trend in reduced magnetization across the Raven area correlates closely with the distribution of hydrothermal deposits and heat flux patterns and suggests that the fluid circulation system at depth is likely controlled by local crustal structure and magma chamber geometry. Magnetic gradient tensor components computed from vector magnetic data improve the resolution of the magnetic anomaly source and indicate that the hydrothermally altered zone directly beneath the Raven site is approximately 15 × 106 m3 in volume.

  12. Topology-Preserving Diffusion of Divergence-Free Vector Fields and Magnetic Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenier, Yann

    2014-09-01

    The usual heat equation is not suitable to preserve the topology of divergence-free vector fields, because it destroys their integral line structure. On the contrary, in the fluid mechanics literature, one can find examples of topology-preserving diffusion equations for divergence-free vector fields. They are very degenerate since they admit all stationary solutions to the Euler equations of incompressible fluids as equilibrium points. For them, we provide a suitable concept of "dissipative solutions", which shares common features with both P.-L. Lions's dissipative solutions to the Euler equations and the concept of "curves of maximal slopes", à la De Giorgi, recently used to study the scalar heat equation in very general metric spaces. We show that the initial value problem admits such global solutions, at least in the two space variable case, and they are unique whenever they are smooth.

  13. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) Vector Magnetic Field Pipeline: Optimization of the Spectral Line Inversion Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centeno, R.; Schou, J.; Hayashi, K.; Norton, A.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Liu, Y.; Leka, K. D.; Barnes, G.

    2014-09-01

    The Very Fast Inversion of the Stokes Vector (VFISV) is a Milne-Eddington spectral line inversion code used to determine the magnetic and thermodynamic parameters of the solar photosphere from observations of the Stokes vector in the 6173 Å Fe i line by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). We report on the modifications made to the original VFISV inversion code in order to optimize its operation within the HMI data pipeline and provide the smoothest solution in active regions. The changes either sped up the computation or reduced the frequency with which the algorithm failed to converge to a satisfactory solution. Additionally, coding bugs which were detected and fixed in the original VFISV release are reported here.

  14. Field-dependent spin chirality and frustration in V3 and Cu3 nanomagnets in transverse magnetic field. 1. Correlations between variable planar spin configurations, vector and scalar chiralities and magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belinsky, Moisey I.

    2014-05-01

    Correlations between field-dependent planar spin configurations, degenerate frustration, energy, vector ?z and scalar ? chiralities, spin canting, total, in-plane staggered and intermediate spin (IS) magnetizations are considered for the V3, Cu nanomagnets in transverse B?Z magnetic field. The planar spin configurations in Bx?X are characterized by the variable axial ?z(Bx) vector chirality correlated with the total in-plane magnetization Mx(Bx) and the IS magnetization M?12±(Bx), which describes the IS S12 behavior, ?(B?)=0. The in-plane staggered magnetization determines the magnitude of the vector chirality ?z. The low-field frustrated planar 120° configurations are transformed by increasing Bx field into the high-field achiral planar spin-collinear configurations. This transition is accompanied by the reduction of the vector chirality ?z and simultaneous increase of the total Mx(Bx) and IS M?12±(Bx) magnetizations. The spin configurations, chiralities and magnetization are highly anisotropic. In longitudinal B?Z field, the frustrated longitudinal spin-collinear configurations are characterized by the correlated maximal vector and scalar chiralities, ?=2?zMz.

  15. Observational Evidence of Changing Photospheric Vector Magnetic Fields Associated with Solar Flares

    E-print Network

    . 2002; Wang et al. 2002, 2004a; Yurchyshyn et al. 2004; Wang 2006), white-light (WL) structure changes, substantial changes are found in the longitudinal magnetic fields associated with decaying penumbrae and darkened umbrae at the flaring PIL (Liu et al. 2005) suggesting that changes of the sunspot WL structure

  16. Flare research with the NASA/MSFC vector magnetograph - Observed characteristics of sheared magnetic fields that produce flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. L.; Hagyard, M. J.; Davis, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    The present MSFC Vector Magnetograph has sufficient spatial resolution (2.7 arcsec pixels) and sensitivity to the transverse field (the noise level is about 100 gauss) to map the transverse field in active regions accurately enough to reveal key aspects of the sheared magnetic fields commonly found at flare sites. From the measured shear angle along the polarity inversion line in sites that flared and in other shear sites that didn't flare, evidence is found that a sufficient condition for a flare to occur in 1000 gauss fields in and near sunspots is that both: (1) the maximum shear angle exceed 85 degrees; and (2) the extent of strong shear (shear angle of greater than 80 degrees) exceed 10,000 km.

  17. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) Vector Magnetic Field Pipeline: Magnetohydrodynamics Simulation Module for the Global Solar Corona

    E-print Network

    Hayashi, Keiji; Liu, Yang; Bobra, Monica G; Sun, Xudong D; Norton, Aimee A

    2015-01-01

    Time-dependent three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulation modules are implemented at the Joint Science Operation Center (JSOC) of Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The modules regularly produce three-dimensional data of the time-relaxed minimum-energy state of the solar corona using global solar-surface magnetic-field maps created from Helioseismic Magnetic Imager (HMI) full-disk magnetogram data. With the assumption of polytropic gas with specific heat ratio of 1.05, three types of simulation products are currently generated: i) simulation data with medium spatial resolution using the definitive calibrated synoptic map of the magnetic field with a cadence of one Carrington rotation, ii) data with low spatial resolution using the definitive version of the synchronic frame format of the magnetic field, with a cadence of one day, and iii) low-resolution data using near-real-time (NRT) synchronic format of the magnetic field on daily basis. The MHD data available in the JSOC database are three-dimen...

  18. Kinematics of vector fields

    E-print Network

    S. Manoff

    2000-03-02

    Different (not only by sign) affine connections are introduced for contravariant and covariant tensor fields over a differentiable manifold by means of a non-canonical contraction operator, defining the notion dual bases and commuting with the covariant and with the Lie-differential operator. Classification of the linear transports on the basis of the connections between the connections is given. Notion of relative velocity and relative acceleration for vector fields are determined. By means of these kinematic characteristics several other types of notions as shear velocity, shear acceleration, rotation velocity, rotation acceleration, expansion velocity and expansion acceleration are introduced and on their basis auto-parallel and non-isotropic (non-null) vector fields are classified.

  19. Magnetic Fields

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-09-18

    Students visualize the magnetic field of a strong permanent magnet using a compass. The lesson begins with an analogy to the effect of the Earth's magnetic field on a compass. Students see the connection that the compass simply responds to the Earth's magnetic field since it is the closest, strongest field, and thus the compass responds to the field of the permanent magnets, allowing them the ability to map the field of that magnet in the activity. This information will be important in designing a solution to the grand challenge in activity 4 of the unit.

  20. Magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction for high-resolution bioimepedance imaging through vector source reconstruction under the static field of MRI magnet

    PubMed Central

    Mariappan, Leo; Hu, Gang; He, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction (MAT-MI) is an imaging modality to reconstruct the electrical conductivity of biological tissue based on the acoustic measurements of Lorentz force induced tissue vibration. This study presents the feasibility of the authors' new MAT-MI system and vector source imaging algorithm to perform a complete reconstruction of the conductivity distribution of real biological tissues with ultrasound spatial resolution. Methods: In the present study, using ultrasound beamformation, imaging point spread functions are designed to reconstruct the induced vector source in the object which is used to estimate the object conductivity distribution. Both numerical studies and phantom experiments are performed to demonstrate the merits of the proposed method. Also, through the numerical simulations, the full width half maximum of the imaging point spread function is calculated to estimate of the spatial resolution. The tissue phantom experiments are performed with a MAT-MI imaging system in the static field of a 9.4 T magnetic resonance imaging magnet. Results: The image reconstruction through vector beamformation in the numerical and experimental studies gives a reliable estimate of the conductivity distribution in the object with a ?1.5 mm spatial resolution corresponding to the imaging system frequency of 500 kHz ultrasound. In addition, the experiment results suggest that MAT-MI under high static magnetic field environment is able to reconstruct images of tissue-mimicking gel phantoms and real tissue samples with reliable conductivity contrast. Conclusions: The results demonstrate that MAT-MI is able to image the electrical conductivity properties of biological tissues with better than 2 mm spatial resolution at 500 kHz, and the imaging with MAT-MI under a high static magnetic field environment is able to provide improved imaging contrast for biological tissue conductivity reconstruction. PMID:24506649

  1. Magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction for high-resolution bioimepedance imaging through vector source reconstruction under the static field of MRI magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Mariappan, Leo; Hu, Gang [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minnesota 55455 (United States)] [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minnesota 55455 (United States); He, Bin, E-mail: binhe@umn.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minnesota 55455 and Institute of Engineering in Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minnesota 55455 (United States)] [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minnesota 55455 and Institute of Engineering in Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction (MAT-MI) is an imaging modality to reconstruct the electrical conductivity of biological tissue based on the acoustic measurements of Lorentz force induced tissue vibration. This study presents the feasibility of the authors' new MAT-MI system and vector source imaging algorithm to perform a complete reconstruction of the conductivity distribution of real biological tissues with ultrasound spatial resolution. Methods: In the present study, using ultrasound beamformation, imaging point spread functions are designed to reconstruct the induced vector source in the object which is used to estimate the object conductivity distribution. Both numerical studies and phantom experiments are performed to demonstrate the merits of the proposed method. Also, through the numerical simulations, the full width half maximum of the imaging point spread function is calculated to estimate of the spatial resolution. The tissue phantom experiments are performed with a MAT-MI imaging system in the static field of a 9.4 T magnetic resonance imaging magnet. Results: The image reconstruction through vector beamformation in the numerical and experimental studies gives a reliable estimate of the conductivity distribution in the object with a ?1.5 mm spatial resolution corresponding to the imaging system frequency of 500 kHz ultrasound. In addition, the experiment results suggest that MAT-MI under high static magnetic field environment is able to reconstruct images of tissue-mimicking gel phantoms and real tissue samples with reliable conductivity contrast. Conclusions: The results demonstrate that MAT-MI is able to image the electrical conductivity properties of biological tissues with better than 2 mm spatial resolution at 500 kHz, and the imaging with MAT-MI under a high static magnetic field environment is able to provide improved imaging contrast for biological tissue conductivity reconstruction.

  2. Three dimensional magnetic field computation by a coupled vector-scalar potential method in brushless DC motors with skewed permanent magnet mounts-the no-load and load results

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. A. Alhamadi; N. A. Demerdash

    1994-01-01

    The coupled magnetic vector potential-magnetic scalar potential (CMVP-MSP) method of computation of 3D magnetic fields by finite elements (3D-FE) is applied here to a brushless DC motor with skewed permanent magnet mounts on its rotor. Results of the CMVP-MSP and 3D-FE computation of the magnetic field and associated motor parameters (EMFs and armature inductances) are detailed in this paper. These

  3. Magnetic Fields

    E-print Network

    Schöller, Markus

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter, we give a brief introduction into the use of the Zeeman effect in astronomy and the general detection of magnetic fields in stars, concentrating on the use of FORS2 for longitudinal magnetic field measurements.

  4. Experiments With Magnetic Vector Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the experimental apparatus and method for the study of magnetic vector potential (MVP). Includes a discussion of inherent errors in the calculations involved, precision of the results, and further applications of MVP. (GS)

  5. Combined magnetic vector-scalar potential finite element computation of 3D magnetic field and performance of modified Lundell alternators in Space Station applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ren H.

    1991-02-01

    A method of combined use of magnetic vector potential (MVP) based finite element (FE) formulations and magnetic scalar potential (MSP) based FE formulations for computation of three-dimensional (3D) magnetostatic fields is developed. This combined MVP-MSP 3D-FE method leads to considerable reduction by nearly a factor of 3 in the number of unknowns in comparison to the number of unknowns which must be computed in global MVP based FE solutions. This method allows one to incorporate portions of iron cores sandwiched in between coils (conductors) in current-carrying regions. Thus, it greatly simplifies the geometries of current carrying regions (in comparison with the exclusive MSP based methods) in electric machinery applications. A unique feature of this approach is that the global MSP solution is single valued in nature, that is, no branch cut is needed. This is again a superiority over the exclusive MSP based methods. A Newton-Raphson procedure with a concept of an adaptive relaxation factor was developed and successfully used in solving the 3D-FE problem with magnetic material anisotropy and nonlinearity. Accordingly, this combined MVP-MSP 3D-FE method is most suited for solution of large scale global type magnetic field computations in rotating electric machinery with very complex magnetic circuit geometries, as well as nonlinear and anisotropic material properties.

  6. Combined magnetic vector-scalar potential finite element computation of 3D magnetic field and performance of modified Lundell alternators in Space Station applications. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ren H.

    1991-01-01

    A method of combined use of magnetic vector potential (MVP) based finite element (FE) formulations and magnetic scalar potential (MSP) based FE formulations for computation of three-dimensional (3D) magnetostatic fields is developed. This combined MVP-MSP 3D-FE method leads to considerable reduction by nearly a factor of 3 in the number of unknowns in comparison to the number of unknowns which must be computed in global MVP based FE solutions. This method allows one to incorporate portions of iron cores sandwiched in between coils (conductors) in current-carrying regions. Thus, it greatly simplifies the geometries of current carrying regions (in comparison with the exclusive MSP based methods) in electric machinery applications. A unique feature of this approach is that the global MSP solution is single valued in nature, that is, no branch cut is needed. This is again a superiority over the exclusive MSP based methods. A Newton-Raphson procedure with a concept of an adaptive relaxation factor was developed and successfully used in solving the 3D-FE problem with magnetic material anisotropy and nonlinearity. Accordingly, this combined MVP-MSP 3D-FE method is most suited for solution of large scale global type magnetic field computations in rotating electric machinery with very complex magnetic circuit geometries, as well as nonlinear and anisotropic material properties.

  7. Solar Flare Forecasting Using Time Series of SDO/HMI Vector Magnetic Field Data and Machine Learning Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilonidis, Stathis; Bobra, Monica G.; Couvidat, Sebastien

    2015-04-01

    This project is motivated by the need to understand the physical mechanisms that generate solar flares, and assess whether reliable data-driven flare forecasts are possible. We build a flare forecasting model that takes into account the temporal evolution of the active regions and provides improved forecasts for the next 24 hours. We use SDO/HMI vector magnetic field data for all the flaring regions with magnitude M1.0 or higher that have been observed with HMI and several thousand non-flaring regions. Each region is characterized by hundreds of features, including physical properties, such as the current helicity and the Lorentz force, as well as parameters that describe the temporal evolution of these properties over a two-day interval, starting 3 days and ending 1 day before the flare eruption. All of these features were used to train a Support Vector Machine (SVM), which is a supervised machine learning method used in classification problems. The results show that the SVM algorithm can achieve a True Skill Statistic of 0.91, an accuracy of 0.985, and a Heidke skill score of 0.861, improving the results of Bobra and Couvidat (2015).

  8. The effect of line damping, magneto-optics and parasitic light on the derivation of sunspot vector magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skumanich, A.; Lites, B. W.

    1985-01-01

    The least square fitting of Stokes observations of sunspots using a Milne-Eddington-Unno model appears to lead, in many circumstances, to various inconsistencies such as anomalously large doppler widths and, hence, small magnetic fields which are significantly below those inferred solely from the Zeeman splitting in the intensity profile. It is found that the introduction of additional physics into the model such as the inclusion of damping wings and magneto-optic birefrigence significantly improves the fit to Stokes parameters. Model fits excluding the intensity profile, i.e., of both magnitude as well as spectral shape of the polarization parameters alone, suggest that parasitic light in the intensity profile may also be a source of inconsistencies. The consequences of the physical changes on the vector properties of the field derived from the Fe I lambda 6173 line for the 17 November 1975 spot as well as on the thermodynamic state are discussed. A Doppler width delta lambda (D) - 25mA is bound to be consistent with a low spot temperature and microturbulence, and a damping constant of a = 0.2.

  9. Finite element analysis of hysteresis motor using the vector magnetization-dependent model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hong-Kyu Kim; Hyun-Kyo Jung; Sun-Ki Hong

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a finite element analysis procedure combined with a vector hysteresis model for the accurate analysis of an hysteresis motor. The vector magnetization-dependent model is adopted to calculate the vector magnetization of the hysteresis ring. From the magnitude and direction of the magnetic field intensity, the magnetization of each ring element is calculated by the vector model. By

  10. Vector Fields and Line Integrals

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Knill, Oliver

    Created by Oliver Knill and Dale Winter for the Connected Curriculum Project, this module introduces vector fields, the concept of "work," and the line integral. This is one of a much larger set of learning modules hosted by Duke University.

  11. Magnetic Field Safety Magnetic Field Safety

    E-print Network

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    Magnetic Field Safety Training #12;Magnetic Field Safety Strong Magnetic Fields exist around energized magnets. High magnetic fields alone are a recognized hazard only for personnel with certain medical conditions such as pacemakers, magnetic implants, or embedded shrapnel. In addition, high magnetic

  12. Inflation with Massive Vector Fields

    E-print Network

    Liu, Junyu; Zhou, Siyi

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the coupling between the inflaton and massive vector fields. All renormalizable couplings with shift symmetry of the inflaton are considered. The massive vector can be decomposed into a scalar mode and a divergence-free vector mode. We show that the former naturally interacts with the inflaton and the latter decouples at tree level. The model in general predicts $f_{NL}^\\mathrm{equil} = \\mathcal{O}(1)$, while in some regions of the parameter space large non-Gaussianity can arise.

  13. The Lorentz transformations of the vectors E, B, P, M and the external electric fields from a stationary superconducting wire with a steady current and from a stationary permanent magnet

    E-print Network

    Tomislav Ivezic

    2012-11-02

    In the first part of this paper we review the fundamental difference between the usual transformations of the three-dimensional (3D) vectors of the electric field $\\mathbf{E}$, the magnetic field $\\mathbf{B}$, the polarization $\\mathbf{P}$, the magnetization $\\mathbf{M}$ and the Lorentz transformations of the 4D geometric quantities, vectors E, B, P, M, with many additional explanations and several new results. In the second part, we have discussed the existence of the electric field vector E outside a stationary superconducting wire with a steady current and also different experiments for the detection of such electric fields. Furthermore, a fundamental prediction of the existence of the external electric field vector E from a stationary permanent magnet is considered. These electric fields are used for the resolution of the "charge-magnet paradox" with 4D geometric quantities for a qualitative explanation of the Aharonov-Bohm effect in terms of fields and not, as usual, in terms of the vector potential and for a qualitative explanation that the particle interference is not a test of a Lorentz-violating model of electrodynamics according to which a magnetic solenoid generates not only a static magnetic field but also a static electric field.

  14. Liquid crystal polarimeter for solid-state imaging of solar vector magnetic fields. Final report, 1 October 1988-30 September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    November, L.J.; Wilkins, L.M.

    1992-09-28

    The Liquid Crystal Polarimeter (LCP) is a low-voltage complete Stokes polarimeter and spectral analyzer designed for measuring solar vector magnetic fields. The polarimeter consists of polarization and spectral analyzer sections each containing multiple commercially available nematic and ferro-electric liquid crystals that are modulated in phase at up to 31.5 kHz frequency. Used in conjunction with a Lyot birefringent filter and 2 CCDs, the system provides a complete polarization/spectral measurement for solid-state direct imaging of the vector magnetic flux, Doppler velocity, intensity, and line width in a spectral line. Simultaneous 2 CCD imaging gives reduced atmospheric seeing systematics, and automatic CCD gain and dark-current correction. The liquid-crystal design provides a considerable simplification to previous designs with greatly improved speed, sensitivity, reliability, and accuracy. The system is used with a universally tunable Lyot filter (of conventional rotating-element design) to provide sequential observations in a number of solar lines to permit calibration of field strength and measurements as a function of height in the solar atmosphere. An example vector magnetogram is shown as a proof of concept.

  15. ESTIMATING ELECTRIC FIELDS FROM VECTOR MAGNETOGRAM SEQUENCES

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, G. H.; Welsch, B. T.; Abbett, W. P.; Bercik, D. J. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States)

    2010-05-20

    Determining the electric field distribution on the Sun's photosphere is essential for quantitative studies of how energy flows from the Sun's photosphere, through the corona, and into the heliosphere. This electric field also provides valuable input for data-driven models of the solar atmosphere and the Sun-Earth system. We show how observed vector magnetogram time series can be used to estimate the photospheric electric field. Our method uses a 'poloidal-toroidal decomposition' (PTD) of the time derivative of the vector magnetic field. These solutions provide an electric field whose curl obeys all three components of Faraday's Law. The PTD solutions are not unique; the gradient of a scalar potential can be added to the PTD electric field without affecting consistency with Faraday's Law. We then present an iterative technique to determine a potential function consistent with ideal MHD evolution; but this field is also not a unique solution to Faraday's Law. Finally, we explore a variational approach that minimizes an energy functional to determine a unique electric field, a generalization of Longcope's 'Minimum Energy Fit'. The PTD technique, the iterative technique, and the variational technique are used to estimate electric fields from a pair of synthetic vector magnetograms taken from an MHD simulation; and these fields are compared with the simulation's known electric fields. The PTD and iteration techniques compare favorably to results from existing velocity inversion techniques. These three techniques are then applied to a pair of vector magnetograms of solar active region NOAA AR8210, to demonstrate the methods with real data. Careful examination of the results from all three methods indicates that evolution of the magnetic vector by itself does not provide enough information to determine the true electric field in the photosphere. Either more information from other measurements, or physical constraints other than those considered here are necessary to find the true electric field. However, we show it is possible to construct physically reasonable electric field distributions whose curl matches the evolution of all three components of B. We also show that the horizontal and vertical Poynting flux patterns derived from the three techniques are similar to one another for the cases investigated.

  16. Representation of magnetic fields in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, D. P.

    1975-01-01

    Several methods by which a magnetic field in space can be represented are reviewed with particular attention to problems of the observed geomagnetic field. Time dependence is assumed to be negligible, and five main classes of representation are described by vector potential, scalar potential, orthogonal vectors, Euler potentials, and expanded magnetic field.

  17. Magnetic fields at Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ness, N. F.; Acuna, M. H.; Behannon, K. W.; Burlaga, L. F.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Lepping, R. P.

    1986-01-01

    The conclusions drawn regarding the structure, behavior and composition of the Uranian magnetic field and magnetosphere as revealed by Voyager 2 data are summarized. The planet had a bipolar magnetotail and a bow shock wave which was observed 23.7 Uranus radii (UR) upstream and a magnetopause at 18.0 UR. The magnetic field observed can be represented by a dipole offset from the planet by 0.3 UR. The field vector and the planetary angular momentum vector formed a 60 deg angle, permitting Uranus to be categorized as an oblique rotator, with auroral zones occurring far from the rotation axis polar zones. The surface magnetic field was estimated to lie between 0.1-1.1 gauss. Both the field and the magnetotail rotated around the planet-sun line in a period of about 17.29 hr. Since the ring system is embedded within the magnetosphere, it is expected that the rings are significant absorbers of radiation belt particles.

  18. Vector Field Design on Surfaces EUGENE ZHANG

    E-print Network

    Turk, Greg

    ) Center for Dynamical Systems and Nonlinear Studies, School of Mathematics, Georgia Institute artifacts. In this article, we present a vector field design system that allows the user to create a wide of singularities. Our system combines basis vector fields to make an initial vector field that meets user

  19. Visualizing vector field topology in fluid flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helman, James L.; Hesselink, Lambertus

    1991-01-01

    Methods of automating the analysis and display of vector field topology in general and flow topology in particular are discussed. Two-dimensional vector field topology is reviewed as the basis for the examination of topology in three-dimensional separated flows. The use of tangent surfaces and clipping in visualizing vector field topology in fluid flows is addressed.

  20. Introduction to Vector Field Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David; Shen, Han-Wei

    2010-01-01

    Vector field visualization techniques are essential to help us understand the complex dynamics of flow fields. These can be found in a wide range of applications such as study of flows around an aircraft, the blood flow in our heart chambers, ocean circulation models, and severe weather predictions. The vector fields from these various applications can be visually depicted using a number of techniques such as particle traces and advecting textures. In this tutorial, we present several fundamental algorithms in flow visualization including particle integration, particle tracking in time-dependent flows, and seeding strategies. For flows near surfaces, a wide variety of synthetic texture-based algorithms have been developed to depict near-body flow features. The most common approach is based on the Line Integral Convolution (LIC) algorithm. There also exist extensions of LIC to support more flexible texture generations for 3D flow data. This tutorial reviews these algorithms. Tensor fields are found in several real-world applications and also require the aid of visualization to help users understand their data sets. Examples where one can find tensor fields include mechanics to see how material respond to external forces, civil engineering and geomechanics of roads and bridges, and the study of neural pathway via diffusion tensor imaging. This tutorial will provide an overview of the different tensor field visualization techniques, discuss basic tensor decompositions, and go into detail on glyph based methods, deformation based methods, and streamline based methods. Practical examples will be used when presenting the methods; and applications from some case studies will be used as part of the motivation.

  1. Magnetic fields in astrophysics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ia. B. Zeldovich; A. A. Ruzmaikin; D. D. Sokolov

    1983-01-01

    The evidence of cosmic magnetism is examined, taking into account the Zeeman effect, beats in atomic transitions, the Hanle effect, Faraday rotation, gyro-lines, and the strength and scale of magnetic fields in astrophysics. The origin of magnetic fields is considered along with dynamos, the conditions for magnetic field generation, the topology of flows, magnetic fields in stationary flows, kinematic turbulent

  2. Exploring Magnetic Field Lines

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-06-26

    In this activity, learners explore the magnetic field of a bar magnet as an introduction to understanding Earth's magnetic field. First, learners explore and play with magnets and compasses. Then, learners trace the field lines of the magnet using the compass on a large piece of paper. This activity will also demonstrate why prominences are always "loops."

  3. Quantitative model of the magnetospheric magnetic field

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. P. Olson; K. A. Pfitzer

    1974-01-01

    Quantitative representations of the magnetic fields associated with the magnetopause currents and the distributed currents (tail and quiet time ring currents) have been developed. These fields are used together with a dipole representation of the main field of the earth to model the total vector magnetospheric magnetic field. The model is based on quiet time data averaged over all 'tilt

  4. Exploring Magnetic Fields

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-08-03

    This is an activity about magnetic fields. Using iron filings, learners will observe magnets in various arrangements to investigate the magnetic field lines of force. This information is then related to magnetic loops on the Sun's surface and the magnetic field of the Earth. This is the second activity in the Exploring the Earth's Magnetic Field: An IMAGE Satellite Guide to the Magnetosphere educators guide.

  5. Exploring Magnetic Fields

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In this activity, students investigate the presence of magnetic fields around magnets, the sun and the earth. They will explore magnetic field lines, understand that magnetic lines of force show the strength and direction of magnetic fields, determine how field lines interact between attracting and repelling magnetic poles, and discover that the earth and sun have magnetic properties. They will also discover that magnetic force is invisible and that a "field of force" is a region or space in which one object can attract or repel another.

  6. Magnetic Fields Matter

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-09-18

    This lesson introduces students to the effects of magnetic fields in matter addressing permanent magnets, diamagnetism, paramagnetism, ferromagnetism, and magnetization. First students must compare the magnetic field of a solenoid to the magnetic field of a permanent magnet. Students then learn the response of diamagnetic, paramagnetic, and ferromagnetic material to a magnetic field. Now aware of the mechanism causing a solid to respond to a field, students learn how to measure the response by looking at the net magnetic moment per unit volume of the material.

  7. Preflare magnetic and velocity fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagyard, M. J.; Gaizauskas, V.; Chapman, G. A.; Deloach, A. C.; Gary, G. A.; Jones, H. P.; Karpen, J. T.; Martres, M.-J.; Porter, J. G.; Schmeider, B.

    1986-01-01

    A characterization is given of the preflare magnetic field, using theoretical models of force free fields together with observed field structure to determine the general morphology. Direct observational evidence for sheared magnetic fields is presented. The role of this magnetic shear in the flare process is considered within the context of a MHD model that describes the buildup of magnetic energy, and the concept of a critical value of shear is explored. The related subject of electric currents in the preflare state is discussed next, with emphasis on new insights provided by direct calculations of the vertical electric current density from vector magnetograph data and on the role of these currents in producing preflare brightenings. Results from investigations concerning velocity fields in flaring active regions, describing observations and analyses of preflare ejecta, sheared velocities, and vortical motions near flaring sites are given. This is followed by a critical review of prevalent concepts concerning the association of flux emergence with flares

  8. Visualizing Magnetic Field Lines

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    VU Bioengineering RET Program, School of Engineering,

    In this activity, students take the age old concept of etch-a-sketch a step further. Using iron filings, students begin visualizing magnetic field lines. To do so, students use a compass to read the direction of the magnet's magnetic field. Then, students observe the behavior of iron filings near that magnet as they rotate the filings about the magnet. Finally, students study the behavior of iron filings suspended in mineral oil which displays the magnetic field in three dimensions.

  9. What are Magnetic Fields?

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-08-03

    This is an activity about magnetic fields. Using iron filings, learners will observe magnets in various arrangements to investigate the magnetic field lines of force. This information is then related to magnetic loops on the Sun's surface and the magnetic field of the Earth. This is the second activity in the Magnetic Math booklet; this booklet can be found on the Space Math@NASA website.

  10. Magnetic fields of galaxies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Aleksandr A. Ruzmaikin; Dmitrii D. Sokolov; Anvar M. Shukurov

    1988-01-01

    The current state of the understanding of the magnetic fields of galaxies is reviewed. A simple model of the turbulent dynamo is developed which explains the main observational features of the global magnetic fields of spiral galaxies. The generation of small-scale chaotic magnetic fields in the interstellar medium is also examined. Attention is also given to the role of magnetic

  11. Magnetization strucrure of thermal vent on island arc from vector magnetic anomlies using AUV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isezaki, N.; Matsuo, J.; Sayanagi, K.

    2012-04-01

    The geomagnetic anomaly measured by a scalar magnetometer,such as a proton precession magnetometer cannot be defined its direction, then it does not satisfy the Laplace's equation. Therefore physical formula describing the relation between magnetic field and magnetization cannot be established.Because the difference between results obtained from scalar data and from vector data is very significant, we must use vector magnetic field data for magnetization analyses to get the more reliable and exact solutions. The development program of fundamental tools for exploration of deep seabed resources started with the financial support of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science & Technology (MEXT) in 2008 and will end in 2012. In this project, we are developing magnetic exploration tools for seabed resources using AUV (Autonomous Underwater Vehicle) and other deep-towed vehicles to measure not the scalar magnetic field but the vector magnetic field in order to estimate magnetization structure below the sea-floor exactly and precisely. We conducted AUV magnetic survey in 2010 at the thermal area called Hakurei deposit in the Bayonnaise submarine caldera at the southern end of Izu island arc, about 400km south of Tokyo. We analyzed the observed vector magnetic fields to get the vector magnetic anomaly Fields using the method of Isezaki(1984). We inverted these vector magnetic anomaly fields to magnetization structure. CONCLUSIONS 1.The scalar magnetic field TIA (Total Intensity Anomaly) has no physical formula describing the relation between M (Magnetization) and TIA because TIA does not satisfy the Laplace's equation. Then it is impossible to estimate M from TIA. 2.Anlyses of M using TIA have been done so far under assumption TIA=PTA (Projected Total Anomay on MF (Main Geomagnetic Field)), however, which caused the analysis error due to ?T= TIA - PTA . 3.We succeeded to measure the vector magnetic anomaly fields using AUV despite the severe magnetic noises around the magnetometer sensors. The method of Isezaki(1984) works good to eliminate these noises. 4.We got the very precise magnetization structure in the Bayonnaise submarine caldera area at the southern end of Izu island arc. We used the prism model which forms the shape of magnetized source body whose top is the sea-floor. The total number od prisms is 1500 making the 3 layers (0-80m, 80-160m, 160- 240m below the sea-floor, 25x20=500 prisms in 1 layer). The 4500 unknowns(3 unknowns, Mx,My,Mz in each prosm) are obtained from 12000 observed vector magnetic anomaly fields by inversion method. 5. The tentative result shows that the 1st and 2nd layers have smaller intensity of magnetization compared to the 3rd layer. The 2nd layer has the smallest of three layers. However the Hakurei deposit area in the 2nd layer has the a little bit greater magnetization than surrounding area which suggests that the Hakurei deposit includes some magnetic minerals. 6.We strongly recommend to carry out the magnetic survey using a three component magnetometer to get TF and TA which have many advantages for magnetic analyses (magnetization, upward continuation etc.) which cannot be done using scalar TIA.

  12. Visualizing vector field topology in fluid flows

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James L. Helman; Lambertus Hesselink

    1991-01-01

    Methods for automating the analysis and display of vector field topology in general, and flow topology in particular, are described. By using techniques to extract and visualize topological information, it is possible to combine the simplicity of schematic depictions with the quantitative accuracy of curves and surfaces computed directly from the data. Two-dimensional vector field topology is discussed, covering critical

  13. Vector fields in Kerr/CFT correspondence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghezelbash, A. M.; Siahaan, H. M.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we use the appropriate boundary action for the vector fields near the horizon of the near extremal Kerr black hole to calculate the two-point function for the vector fields in Kerr/CFT correspondence. We show the gauge-independent part of the two-point function is in agreement with what is expected from CFT.

  14. Faraday's law via the magnetic vector potential

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dragan V Redži?

    2007-01-01

    Faraday's law for a filamentary circuit which is moving at relativistic velocities and also changing its shape as it moves is derived via the magnetic vector potential. The derivation is simpler than the usual one, based on the Hertz–Helmholtz identity.

  15. The polar heliospheric magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jokipii, J. R.; Kota, J.

    1989-01-01

    It is suggested that the polar heliospheric magnetic field, at large heliocentric distances, may deviate considerably from the generally accepted Archimedean spiral. Instead, it is suggested that the large-scale field near the poles may be dominated by randomly-oriented transverse magnetic fields with magnitude much larger than the average spiral. The average vector field is still the spiral, but the average magnitude may be much larger. In addition, the field direction is transverse to the radial direction most of the time instead of being nearly radial. This magnetic-field structure has important consequences for the transport of cosmic rays. Preliminary model calculations suggest changes in the radial gradient of galactic cosmic rays which may improve agreement with observations.

  16. Mapping Magnetic Fields

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-08-03

    This is an activity about bar magnets and their invisible magnetic fields. Learners will experiment with magnets and a compass to detect and draw magnetic fields. This is Activity 1 of a larger resource, entitled Exploring the Sun. The NASA spacecraft missions represented by this material include SOHO, TRACE, STEREO, Hinode, and SDO.

  17. Anisotropy of magnetic emulsions induced by magnetic and electric fields

    E-print Network

    Yury I. Dikansky; Alexander N. Tyatyushkin; Arthur R. Zakinyan

    2011-09-10

    The anisotropy of magnetic emulsions induced by simultaneously acting electric and magnetic fields is theoretically and experimentally investigated. Due to the anisotropy, the electric conductivity and magnetic permeability of a magnetic emulsion are no longer scalar coefficients, but are tensors. The electric conductivity and magnetic permeability tensors of sufficiently diluted emulsions in sufficiently weak electric and magnetic fields are found as functions of the electric and magnetic intensity vectors. The theoretically predicted induced anisotropy was verified experimentally. The experimental data are analyzed and compared with theoretical predictions. The results of the analysis and comparison are discussed.

  18. The Declining Magnetic Field

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is an activity about the declining strength of Earth's magnetic field. Learners will review a graph of magnetic field intensity and calculate the amount by which the field has changed its intensity in the last century, the rate of change of its intensity, and when the field should decrease to zero strength at the current rate of change. Learners will also use evidence from relevant sources to create a conjecture on the effects on Earth of a vanished magnetic field. Access to information sources about Earth's magnetic field strength is needed for this activity. This is Activity 7 in the Exploring Magnetism on Earth teachers guide.

  19. Vector field based shape deformations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wolfram Von Funck; Holger Theisel; Hans-peter Seidel

    2006-01-01

    Abstract We present an approach to dene,shape deformations by constructing and,interactively modifying,C, continuous,time-dependent divergence-free vector elds. The deformation is obtained by a path line integration of the mesh vertices. This way, the deformation is volume-preserving, free of (local and global) self-intersections, feature preserving, smoothness preserving, and local. Different modeling metaphors,support the approach,which is able to modify,the vector eld,on-the-y according to

  20. Preprocessing Magnetic Fields with Chromospheric Longitudinal Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Tetsuya T.; Kusano, K.

    2012-06-01

    Nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolation is a powerful tool for the modeling of the magnetic field in the solar corona. However, since the photospheric magnetic field does not in general satisfy the force-free condition, some kind of processing is required to assimilate data into the model. In this paper, we report the results of new preprocessing for the NLFFF extrapolation. Through this preprocessing, we expect to obtain magnetic field data similar to those in the chromosphere. In our preprocessing, we add a new term concerning chromospheric longitudinal fields into the optimization function proposed by Wiegelmann et al. We perform a parameter survey of six free parameters to find minimum force- and torque-freeness with the simulated-annealing method. Analyzed data are a photospheric vector magnetogram of AR 10953 observed with the Hinode spectropolarimeter and a chromospheric longitudinal magnetogram observed with SOLIS spectropolarimeter. It is found that some preprocessed fields show the smallest force- and torque-freeness and are very similar to the chromospheric longitudinal fields. On the other hand, other preprocessed fields show noisy maps, although the force- and torque-freeness are of the same order. By analyzing preprocessed noisy maps in the wave number space, we found that small and large wave number components balance out on the force-free index. We also discuss our iteration limit of the simulated-annealing method and magnetic structure broadening in the chromosphere.

  1. PREPROCESSING MAGNETIC FIELDS WITH CHROMOSPHERIC LONGITUDINAL FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Tetsuya T. [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Kusano, K., E-mail: tyamamot@stelab.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC), Yokohama, Kanagawa 236-0001 (Japan)

    2012-06-20

    Nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolation is a powerful tool for the modeling of the magnetic field in the solar corona. However, since the photospheric magnetic field does not in general satisfy the force-free condition, some kind of processing is required to assimilate data into the model. In this paper, we report the results of new preprocessing for the NLFFF extrapolation. Through this preprocessing, we expect to obtain magnetic field data similar to those in the chromosphere. In our preprocessing, we add a new term concerning chromospheric longitudinal fields into the optimization function proposed by Wiegelmann et al. We perform a parameter survey of six free parameters to find minimum force- and torque-freeness with the simulated-annealing method. Analyzed data are a photospheric vector magnetogram of AR 10953 observed with the Hinode spectropolarimeter and a chromospheric longitudinal magnetogram observed with SOLIS spectropolarimeter. It is found that some preprocessed fields show the smallest force- and torque-freeness and are very similar to the chromospheric longitudinal fields. On the other hand, other preprocessed fields show noisy maps, although the force- and torque-freeness are of the same order. By analyzing preprocessed noisy maps in the wave number space, we found that small and large wave number components balance out on the force-free index. We also discuss our iteration limit of the simulated-annealing method and magnetic structure broadening in the chromosphere.

  2. Magnetic field observations in Comet Halley's coma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedler, W.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Yeroshenko, Ye. G.; Styashkin, V. A.; Russell, C. T.

    1986-05-01

    During the encounter with Comet Halley, the magnetometer (MISCHA) aboard the Vega 1 spacecraft observed an increased level of magnetic field turbulence, resulting from an upstream bow wave. Both Vega spacecraft measured a peak field strength of 70-80 nT and observed draping of magnetic field lines around the cometary obstacle. An unexpected rotation of the magnetic field vector was observed, which may reflect either penetration of magnetic field lines into a diffuse layer related to the contact surface separating the solar-wind and cometary plasma, or the persistence of pre-existing interplanetary field structures.

  3. The Magnetic Field

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Jeffrey Barker

    This demonstration of the magnetic field lines of Earth uses a bar magnet, iron filings, and a compass. The site explains how to measure the magnetic field of the Earth by measuring the direction a compass points from various points on the surface. There is also an explanation of why the north magnetic pole on Earth is actually, by definition, the south pole of a magnet.

  4. Drawing Magnetic Fields

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-09-18

    Students use a compass and a permanent magnet to trace the magnetic field lines produced by the magnet. By positioning the compass in enough spots around the magnet, the overall magnet field will be evident from the collection of arrows representing the direction of the compass needle. In activities 3 and 4 of this unit, students will use this information to design a way to solve the grand challenge of separating metal for a recycling company.

  5. Electricity and Magnetic Fields

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    VU Bioengineering RET Program,

    The grand challenge for this legacy cycle unit is for students to design a way to help a recycler separate aluminum from steel scrap metal. In previous lessons, they have looked at how magnetism might be utilized. In this lesson, students think about how they might use magnets and how they might confront the problem of turning the magnetic field off. Through the accompanying activity students explore the nature of an electrically induced magnetic field and its applicability to the needed magnet.

  6. Magnetic fields at Neptune

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. F. Ness; M. H. Acuna; L. F. Burlaga; J. E. P. Connerney; R. P. Lepping; F. M. Neubauer

    1989-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center-University of Delaware Bartol Research Institute magnetic field experiment on the Voyager 2 spacecraft discovered a strong and complex intrinsic magnetic field of Neptune and an associated magnetosphere and magnetic tail. A maximum magnetic field of nearly 10,000 nanoteslas (1 nanotesla = 10⁻⁵ gauss) was observed near closest approach, at a

  7. Killing vector fields and harmonic superfield theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groeger, Josua

    2014-09-01

    The harmonic action functional allows a natural generalisation to semi-Riemannian supergeometry, also referred to as harmonic, which resembles the supersymmetric sigma models studied in high energy physics. We show that Killing vector fields are infinitesimal supersymmetries of this harmonic action and prove three different Noether theorems in this context. En passant, we provide a homogeneous treatment of five characterisations of Killing vector fields on semi-Riemannian supermanifolds, thus filling a gap in the literature.

  8. Correlation between texture, anisotropy, and vector magnetization processes investigated by two-dimensional vector vibrating sample

    E-print Network

    McHenry, Michael E.

    to characterize texture and magnetic domain structure for a BaO Fe2O3 6 film deposited on 0001 SiC with a MgO 111 and magnetization rotation are characterized by two dimensional vector coil vibrating sample magnetometry VVSM an- isotropy results in a striped magnetic domain structure and vector magnetization processes which

  9. Magnetic Fields Analogous to electric field, a magnet

    E-print Network

    Bertulani, Carlos A. - Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A&M University

    Magnetic Fields Analogous to electric field, a magnet produces a magnetic field, B Set up a B field two ways: Moving electrically charged particles Current in a wire Intrinsic magnetic field Basic) Opposite magnetic poles attract like magnetic poles repel #12;Like the electric field lines

  10. Spectral Lines for Polarization Measurements of the Coronal Magnetic Field. II. Consistent Treatment of the Stokes Vector forMagnetic-Dipole Transitions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Casini; P. G. Judge

    1999-01-01

    We present a compact, self-consistent formulation for the description of polarized radiation from magnetic-dipole transitions occurring in the magnetized solar corona. This work differs from earlier treatments by Sahal-Bréchot and House in the 1970s, in that the radiative emission coefficients for the four Stokes parameters, I, Q, U, and V, are treated to first order in a Taylor expansion of

  11. Magnetic Field Problem

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Wolfgang Christian

    The above animations represent two typical bar magnets each with a North and South pole. The arrows represent the direction of the magnetic field. The color of the arrows represents the magnitude of the field with magnitude increasing as the color changes from blue to green to red to black. You may drag either magnet and double-click anywhere inside the animation to add a magnetic field line, and mouse-down to read the magnitude of the magnetic field at that point.

  12. Magnetic vector data from the western Caribbean reveal possible origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barckhausen, U.; Engels, U.

    2013-12-01

    During a cruise with RV Meteor in the spring of 2010, magnetic measurements were carried out in the central and western Caribbean with up to six magnetic sensors deployed at the same time. These were i) a towed gradiometer consisting of two Overhauser sensors, ii) two towed vector magnetometers, and iii) two shipboard oriented vector magnetometers. While the gradiometer data provide total field magnetic anomalies free from external variations, the vector data can be analyzed with different methods in the space and wavenumber domains. In the case of the towed vector data, attitude control is challenging whereas shipboard data require a very thorough compensation for the ship's magnetic field. The data were analyzed with the goal to gain insight into the origin of the basement rocks especially of the western Caribbean. Position and strike direction of magnetic anomalies in the Columbia basin possibly hold the key to distinguish between an origin of the crust in the Pacific ocean and an alternative in situ formation between the Americas. On six long profiles in the Columbia basin and adjacent regions we find consistently strike directions of the magnetic anomalies around N100°E which seems to be incompatible with a Pacific origin of the crust. Three Project Magnet aeromagnetic vector profiles crossing the research area at different angles were analyzed with the same method and yield very similar results. In our interpretation, the crust underlying the Columbia basin formed during the Cretaceous at a roughly E-W trending spreading center between the Americas. Since the crust likely formed during the Cretaceous Superchron (C 34), the strike direction we find in our data probably does not represent typical seafloor spreading anomalies. Instead we believe it is related to changes in the intensity of the Earth's magnetic field which are known to have left correlated traces in oceanic crust formed during this period. The analysis methods we used are sensitive to intensity changes just as well as to polarity changes. We can demonstrate that the data quality is high and that the strike direction signal is clear and well correlated between the different profiles and that it is also consistent between towed, shipboard, and aeromagnetic sensors.

  13. Mapping Magnetic Field Lines

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-08-03

    This is a lesson about the magnetic field of a bar magnet. The lesson begins with an introductory discussion with learners about magnetism to draw out any misconceptions that may be in their minds. Then, learners freely experiment with bar magnets and various materials, such as paper clips, rulers, copper or aluminum wire, and pencils, to discover that magnets attract metals containing iron, nickel, and/or cobalt but not most other materials. Next, learners experiment with using a magnetic compass to discover how it is affected by the magnet and then draw the magnetic field lines of the magnet by putting dots at the location of the compass arrow. This is the first lesson in the first session of the Exploring Magnetism teacher guide.

  14. Mapping Magnetic Fields

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is an activity about magnetism. Using bar magnets, classroom materials, and a compass, learners will explore how bar magnets interact with one another and with other materials, use a compass to find the direction north, and use various materials to make magnetic field lines visible around a bar magnet. This is an activity in a larger poster resource, entitled The Sun Like It's Never Been Seen Before: In 3D.

  15. The Magnetic Field

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Windows to the Universe

    1997-12-03

    This webpage is part of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) Windows to the Universe program. It describes the nature and configuration of magnetic fields, which are the result of moving electric charges, including how they cause magnetic objects to orient themselves along the direction of the magnetic force points, which are illustrated as lines. Magnetic field lines by convention point outwards at the north magnetic pole and inward at the south magnetic pole. The site features text, scientific illustrations and an animation. Text and vocabulary are selectable for the beginning, intermediate, or advanced reader.

  16. Full vector model for magnetization in sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Ritayan; Tauxe, Lisa

    2009-09-01

    Sediments provide a continuous record of past geomagnetic field variations. Although it is theoretically possible to get both the direction and intensity of the geomagnetic field from sediment records, the mechanism is not fully understood. Previous workers have postulated that flocculation plays an important role in detrital remanent magnetism (DRM). Flocs are porous, loose and highly fragile aggregates of microscopic clay particles and their behavior in a viscous medium is likely to be different than single particles of magnetic minerals. In order to understand the role of flocculation in sediment magnetization, we carried out a set of redeposition experiments at different field intensities and a quasi-constant field inclination of 45°. We present here a simple numerical model of flocculation, incorporating both magnetic and hydrodynamic torques to explain the experimental data. At small floc sizes DRM acquisition is likely to be non-linear in field strengths comparable to the Earth's, but the sediments may be able to record the directions accurately. With increasing floc sizes sediments may retain a record of the intensity that is linearly related to the applied field or a direction parallel to the applied field, but are unlikely to do both at the same time. Also, the majority of the magnetic particles in the sediments may not be contributing significantly towards the net DRM and any bulk normalizing parameter may be unsuitable if the depositional environment has changed over the depositional period.

  17. Vector magnetic analysis within the southern Ayu Trough, equatorial western Pacific

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sang-Mook Lee; Seung-Sep Kim

    2004-01-01

    We present the analysis of magnetic field data of the Ayu Trough, a divergent plate margin located in the southern Philippine Sea plate. The survey, which mapped both axial and off-axis regions of the southern Ayu Trough, recorded the total field using a proton precession magnetometer towed behind the ship and the vector magnetic field using a shipboard three-component fluxgate

  18. Uniformly elliptically-polarized vector optical fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yue; Ren, Zhi-Cheng; Qian, Sheng-Xia; Gao, Xu-Zhen; Li, Yongnan; Tu, Chenghou; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2015-03-01

    We present a modified, more universal scheme for generating vector fields. Here we design in principle and experimentally generate a new kind of uniformly elliptically polarized vector field, which has the same ellipticity and sense of local elliptic polarization at any location and also has a flexibly designable distribution of orientation of the elliptic polarization. An introduced additional degree of freedom is used to flexibly change the ellipticity. In particular, the ellipticity and the orientation of polarization can be independently controlled by two parameters. This makes it easier to both control the spatial structure of the polarization and to engineer the focusing field.

  19. Magnetic Field Problem: Mesuring Current in Wire

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Wolfgang Christian

    A wire carrying an unknown current is shown above. An external magnetic field that has constant magnitude and direction is applied to the top half of the simulation (The gray rectangle is at the boundary for your reference). In addition, there is the magnetic field produced by the current in the wire. The direction arrows show the vector sum of these two fields. (The color of the direction arrows represents the magnitude of the field as before.) Observe the force vector and the force/length in the yellow message box in the lower left hand corner.

  20. Vector boson mass generation without new fields

    E-print Network

    Bernd A. Berg

    2012-04-21

    Previously a model of only vector fields with a local U(2) symmetry was introduced for which one finds a massless U(1) photon and a massive SU(2) vector boson in the lattice regularization. Here it is shown that quantization of its classical continuum action leads to perturbative renormalization difficulties. But, non-perturbative Monte Carlo calculations favor the existence of a quantum continuum limit.

  1. Magnetic Field Distribution of Permanent Magnet Magnetized by Static Magnetic Field Generated by HTS Bulk Magnet

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tetsuo Oka; Nobutaka Kawasaki; Satoshi Fukui; Jun Ogawa; Takao Sato; Toshihisa Terasawa; Yoshitaka Itoh; Ryohei Yabuno

    2012-01-01

    Demagnetized rare earth magnets (Nd-Fe-B) can be fully magnetized by scanning them in the intense static fields over 3 T of a HTS bulk magnet which was cooled to the temperature range lower than 77K with use of cryo-coolers and activated by the field of 5 T. We precisely examined the magnetic field distributions of magnetized permanent magnets. The magnetic

  2. Magnetic Field Spectrum at Cosmological Recombination Revisited

    E-print Network

    Saga, Shohei; Takahashi, Keitaro; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    2015-01-01

    If vector type perturbations are present in the primordial plasma before recombination, the generation of magnetic fields is known to be inevitable through the Harrison mechanism. In the context of the standard cosmological perturbation theory, non-linear couplings of first-order scalar perturbations create second-order vector perturbations, which generate magnetic fields. Here we reinvestigate the generation of magnetic fields at second-order in cosmological perturbations on the basis of our previous study, and extend it by newly taking into account the time evolution of purely second-order vector perturbations with a newly developed second-order Boltzmann code. We confirm that the amplitude of magnetic fields from the product-terms of the first-order scalar modes is consistent with the result in our previous study. However, we find, both numerically and analytically, that the magnetic fields from the purely second-order vector perturbations partially cancel out the magnetic fields from one of the product-te...

  3. Photodetachment in magnetic fields

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. J. Larson; R. Stoneman

    1982-01-01

    The behavior of the photodetachment cross section, near threshold, for atomic negative ioris in a magnetic field is described and illustrated with data on photodetachment of electrons from negative sulfur ions. The effect of the final state interaction is discussed and the photodetachment of atomic negative ions in a magnetic field is compared to photoionization of neutral atoms in a

  4. THE INTERPLANETARY MAGNETIC FIELD

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. A. BAILEY

    1963-01-01

    A new analysis of magnetic and concurrent plasma data collected from the ; space probes Pionecr 5, Explorer 10, and Mariner 2 yields a new model of the ; interplanetary magnetic field. It is hypothesized that the observed ; interplanetary field F\\/sub i\\/ is due to motion of the magnetometer relative to a ; negatively charged rotating sun from which

  5. Magnetic field line Hamiltonian

    SciTech Connect

    Boozer, A.H.

    1984-03-01

    The magnetic field line Hamiltonian and the associated canonical form for the magnetic field are important concepts both for understanding toroidal plasma physics and for practical calculations. A number of important properties of the canonical or Hamiltonian representation are derived and their importance is explained.

  6. Cosmic Magnetic Fields

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elisabete M. de Gouveia Dal Pino; Dal Pino

    2006-01-01

    Most of the visible matter in the Universe is in a plasma state, or more specifically is composed of ionized or partially ionized gas permeated by magnetic fields. Thanks to recent advances on the theory and detection of cosmic magnetic fields there has been a worldwide growing interest in the study of their role on the formation of astrophysical sources

  7. Optical currents in vector fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelsky, O. V.; Gorsky, M. P.; Maksimyak, P. P.; Maksimyak, A. P.; Hanson, S. G.; Zenkova, C. Y.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of phase relations and the degree of mutual coherence of superimposing waves in the arrangements of twowave superposition on the characteristics of the microparticle's motion has been analyzed. The prospects of studying temporal coherence using the proposed approach are made. For the first time, we have shown experimentally the possibility of diagnostics the optical currents in liquids caused by polarization characteristics of an optical field alone, using test metallic particles of nanoscale.

  8. Optical currents in vector fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelsky, O. V.; Gorsky, M. P.; Maksimyak, P. P.; Maksimyak, A. P.; Hanson, S. G.; Zenkova, C. Y.

    2011-09-01

    The influence of phase relations and the degree of mutual coherence of superimposing waves in the arrangements of twowave superposition on the characteristics of the microparticle's motion has been analyzed. The prospects of studying temporal coherence using the proposed approach are made. For the first time, we have shown experimentally the possibility of diagnostics the optical currents in liquids caused by polarization characteristics of an optical field alone, using test metallic particles of nanoscale.

  9. Damping of cosmic magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Jedamzik, K. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, 85748 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, 85748 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Katalinic, V.; Olinto, A.V. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics and Enrico Fermi Institute, University of Chicago, 5640 S. Ellis Ave., Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics and Enrico Fermi Institute, University of Chicago, 5640 S. Ellis Ave., Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    1998-03-01

    We examine the evolution of magnetic fields in an expanding fluid composed of matter and radiation with particular interest in the evolution of cosmic magnetic fields. We derive the propagation velocities and damping rates for relativistic and non-relativistic fast and slow magnetosonic and Alfv{acute e}n waves in the presence of viscous and heat conducting processes. The analysis covers all magnetohydrodynamics modes in the radiation diffusion and the free-streaming regimes. When our results are applied to the evolution of magnetic fields in the early universe, we find that cosmic magnetic fields are damped from prior to the epoch of neutrino decoupling up to recombination. Similar to the case of sound waves propagating in a demagnetized plasma, fast magnetosonic waves are damped by radiation diffusion on all scales smaller than the radiation diffusion length. The characteristic damping scales are the horizon scale at neutrino decoupling (M{sub {nu}}{approx}10{sup {minus}4}M{sub {circle_dot}} in baryons) and the Silk mass at recombination (M{sub {gamma}}{approx}10{sup 13}M{sub {circle_dot}} in baryons). In contrast, the oscillations of slow magnetosonic and Alfv{acute e}n waves get overdamped in the radiation diffusion regime, resulting in frozen-in magnetic field perturbations. Further damping of these perturbations is possible only if before recombination the wave enters a regime in which radiation free-streams on the scale of the perturbation. The maximum damping scale of slow magnetosonic and Alfv{acute e}n modes is always smaller than or equal to the damping scale of fast magnetosonic waves, and depends on the magnetic field strength and its direction relative to the wave vector. Our findings have multifold implications for cosmology. The dissipation of magnetic field energy into heat during the epoch of neutrino decoupling ensures that most magnetic field configurations generated in the very early universe satisfy big bang nucleosynthesis constraints. Further dissipation before recombination constrains models in which primordial magnetic fields give rise to galactic magnetic fields or density perturbations. Finally, the survival of Alfv{acute e}n and slow magnetosonic modes on scales well below the Silk mass may be of significance for the formation of structure on small scales. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  10. Cosmological magnetic fields

    E-print Network

    Roy Maartens

    2000-07-24

    Magnetic fields are observed not only in stars, but in galaxies, clusters, and even high redshift Lyman-alpha systems. In principle, these fields could play an important role in structure formation and also affect the anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB). The study of cosmological magnetic fields aims not only to quantify these effects on large-scale structure and the CMB, but also to answer one of the outstanding puzzles of modern cosmology: when and how do magnetic fields originate? They are either primordial, i.e. created before the onset of structure formation, or they are generated during the process of structure formation itself.

  11. Interplanetary Magnetic Field Lines

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mendez, J.

    This web page, authored and curated by David P. Stern, provides information and a graphical exercise for students regarding the interaction between magnetic field lines and a plasma. The activity involves tracing a typical interplanetary magnetic field line, dragged out of a location on the Sun by the radial flow of the solar wind. This illustrates the way magnetic field lines are "frozen to the plasma" and the wrapping of field lines due to the rotation of the sun. This is part of the work "The Exploration of the Earth's Magnetosphere". A Spanish translation is available.

  12. The Earth's Magnetic Field

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The magnetic field of the Earth is contained in a region called the magnetosphere. The magnetosphere prevents most of the particles from the sun, carried in solar wind, from hitting the Earth. This site, produced by the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), uses text, scientific illustrations,and remote imagery to explain the occurrence and nature of planetary magnetic fields and magnetospheres, how these fields interact with the solar wind to produce phenomena like auroras, and how magnetic fields of the earth and other planets can be detected and measured by satellite-borne magnetometers.

  13. Hamiltonian vector fields on almost symplectic manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaisman, Izu

    2013-09-01

    Let (M, ?) be an almost symplectic manifold (? is a nondegenerate, not closed, 2-form). We say that a vector field X of M is locally Hamiltonian if LX? = 0, d(i(X)?) = 0, and it is Hamiltonian if, furthermore, the 1-form i(X)? is exact. Such vector fields were considered in Fassò and Sansonetto ["Integrable almost-symplectic Hamiltonian systems," J. Math. Phys. 48, 092902 (2007)], 10.1063/1.2783937, under the name of strongly Hamiltonian, and a corresponding action-angle theorem was proven. Almost symplectic manifolds may have few, nonzero, Hamiltonian vector fields, or even none. Therefore, it is important to have examples and it is our aim to provide such examples here. We also obtain some new general results. In particular, we show that the locally Hamiltonian vector fields generate a Dirac structure on M and we state a reduction theorem of the Marsden-Weinstein type. A final section is dedicated to almost symplectic structures on tangent bundles.

  14. Circular Conditional Autoregressive Modeling of Vector Fields*

    PubMed Central

    Modlin, Danny; Fuentes, Montse; Reich, Brian

    2013-01-01

    As hurricanes approach landfall, there are several hazards for which coastal populations must be prepared. Damaging winds, torrential rains, and tornadoes play havoc with both the coast and inland areas; but, the biggest seaside menace to life and property is the storm surge. Wind fields are used as the primary forcing for the numerical forecasts of the coastal ocean response to hurricane force winds, such as the height of the storm surge and the degree of coastal flooding. Unfortunately, developments in deterministic modeling of these forcings have been hindered by computational expenses. In this paper, we present a multivariate spatial model for vector fields, that we apply to hurricane winds. We parameterize the wind vector at each site in polar coordinates and specify a circular conditional autoregressive (CCAR) model for the vector direction, and a spatial CAR model for speed. We apply our framework for vector fields to hurricane surface wind fields for Hurricane Floyd of 1999 and compare our CCAR model to prior methods that decompose wind speed and direction into its N-S and W-E cardinal components. PMID:24353452

  15. (^-L_n,g)-spaces. Length of a vector field and the angle between two vector fields

    E-print Network

    S. Manoff

    2000-02-22

    The notions of length of a vector field and cosine of the angle between two vector fields over a differentiable manifold with contravariant and covariant affine connections and metrics are introduced and considered. The change of the length of a vector field and of the angle between two vector fields along a contravariant vector field are found. The introduced notions are necessary for investigations of different types of transports over a manifold of the above mentioned type.

  16. Quark magnetar in three-flavor Nambu--Jona-Lasinio model with vector interaction and magnetized gluon potential

    E-print Network

    Peng-Cheng Chu; Xin Wang; Lie-Wen Chen; Mei Huang

    2014-12-16

    We investigate properties of strange quark matter in the framework of SU(3) Nambu--Jona-Lasinio(NJL) model with vector interaction under strong magnetic fields. The effects of vector-isoscalar and vector-isovector interaction on the equation of state of strange quark matter are investigated, and it is found that the equation of state is not sensitive to the vector-isovector interaction, however, a repulsive interaction in the vector-isoscalar channel gives a stiffer equation of state for cold dense quark matter. In the presence of magnetic field, gluons will be magnetized via quark loops, and the contribution from magnetized gluons to the equation of state is also estimated. The sound velocity square is a quantity to measure the hardness or softness of dense quark matter, and in the NJL model without vector interaction at zero magnetic field the sound velocity square is always less than 1/3. It is found that a repulsive vector-isoscalar interaction and a positive pressure contribution from magnetized gluons can enhance the sound velocity square, which can even reach 1. To construct quark magnetars under strong magnetic fields, we consider anisotropic pressures and use a density-dependent magnetic field profile to mimic the magnetic field distribution in a quark star. We also analyze the parameter region for the magnitude of vector-isoscalar interaction and the contribution from magnetized gluons in order to produce 2 solar mass quark magnetars.

  17. Quark magnetar in the three-flavor Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model with vector interactions and a magnetized gluon potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Peng-Cheng; Wang, Xin; Chen, Lie-Wen; Huang, Mei

    2015-01-01

    We investigate properties of strange quark matter in the framework of the SU(3) Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model with vector interactions under strong magnetic fields. The effects of vector-isoscalar and vector-isovector interactions on the equation of state of strange quark matter are investigated, and it is found that the equation of state is not sensitive to the vector-isovector interaction; however, a repulsive interaction in the vector-isoscalar channel gives a stiffer equation of state for cold dense quark matter. In the presence of a magnetic field, gluons will be magnetized via quark loops, and the contribution from magnetized gluons to the equation of state is also estimated. The sound velocity square is a quantity to measure the hardness or softness of dense quark matter, and in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model without vector interaction at zero magnetic field, the sound velocity square is always less than 1 /3 . It is found that a repulsive vector-isoscalar interaction and a positive pressure contribution from magnetized gluons can enhance the sound velocity square, which can even reach 1. To construct quark magnetars under strong magnetic fields, we consider anisotropic pressures and use a density-dependent magnetic field profile to mimic the magnetic field distribution in a quark star. We also analyze the parameter region for the magnitude of vector-isoscalar interaction and the contribution from magnetized gluons in order to produce two-solar-mass quark magnetars.

  18. Sources of Magnetic Field Magnetic Phenomena

    E-print Network

    Tobar, Michael

    push on currents Moving charges can make and feel magnetic forces. We don't understand how permanent will consider the last piece of the puzzle in electromagnetic - changing magnetic fields can make induction. 15Lecture 9 Sources of Magnetic Field 1 Magnetic Phenomena 1. Magnets can push on each other (and

  19. Vector Preisach modeling of magnetic materials under stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ktena, A.

    2015-02-01

    The Preisach formalism is used to model magnetic hysteresis loops in soft magnetic materials subject to tensile stress. The model uses the Stoner-Wohlfarth mechanism of coherent rotation and dispersion of easy axes to capture the vector response of the magnetization. The Preisach density is constructed as the weighed sum of normal probability density functions (pdf) for the regions of high and low induction. The model parameters reflect the effect of strain: increased pinning, modelled by the central pdf parameters; enhanced anisotropy dispersion modelled by the angular dispersion of easy axes. Upon removal of the tensile stress, compressive residual stresses give rise to effective demagnetizing fields leading to lower differential permeability with a two-peak profile. As deformation levels increase, the amplitude of and the relative distance between the two permeability peaks changes which is reflected in the side density parameters. Modelling results are in qualitative agreement with the experimental data. The potential and limitations of the model are discussed.

  20. Lorentz and "apparent" transformations of the electric and magnetic fields

    E-print Network

    Tomislav Ivezic

    2006-07-21

    It is recently discovered that the usual transformations of the three-dimensional (3D) vectors of the electric and magnetic fields differ from the Lorentz transformations (LT) (boosts) of the corresponding 4D quantities that represent the electric and magnetic fields. In this paper, using geometric algebra formalism, this fundamental difference is examined representing the electric and magnetic fields by bivectors.

  1. Use of an inhomogenous magnetic field for silicon crystal growth

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Kakimoto; M. Eguchi; H. Ozoe

    1997-01-01

    The flow of liquid silicon and oxygen transfer during crystal growth under three different types of cusp-shaped magnetic field were clarified using numerical simulation, flow visualization, and infrared measurement of oxygen concentration in grown crystals. Velocity vectors obtained from numerical simulation are almost parallel to cusp-shaped magnetic fields since flow parallel to a magnetic field does not produce a Lorentz

  2. Mapping Magnetic Field Lines

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-08-03

    This is an activity about electromagnetism. Learners will use a compass to map the magnetic field lines surrounding a coil of wire that is connected to a battery. This activity requires a large coil or spool of wire, a source of electricity such as 3 D-cell batteries or an AC to DC power adapter, alligator-clipped wire, and magnetic compasses. This is the third lesson in the second session of the Exploring Magnetism teachers guide.

  3. Photospheric magnetic field and chromospheric emission

    E-print Network

    R. Rezaei; R. Schlichenmaier; C. Beck; W. Schmidt

    2007-01-24

    We present a statistical analysis of network and internetwork properties in the photosphere and the chromosphere. For the first time we simultaneously observed (a) the four Stokes parameters of the photospheric iron line pair at 630.2 nm and (b) the intensity profile of the Ca II H line at 396.8 nm. The vector magnetic field was inferred from the inversion of the iron lines. We aim at an understanding of the coupling between photospheric magnetic field and chromospheric emission.

  4. The First Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widrow, Lawrence M.; Ryu, Dongsu; Schleicher, Dominik R. G.; Subramanian, Kandaswamy; Tsagas, Christos G.; Treumann, Rudolf A.

    2012-05-01

    We review current ideas on the origin of galactic and extragalactic magnetic fields. We begin by summarizing observations of magnetic fields at cosmological redshifts and on cosmological scales. These observations translate into constraints on the strength and scale magnetic fields must have during the early stages of galaxy formation in order to seed the galactic dynamo. We examine mechanisms for the generation of magnetic fields that operate prior during inflation and during subsequent phase transitions such as electroweak symmetry breaking and the quark-hadron phase transition. The implications of strong primordial magnetic fields for the reionization epoch as well as the first generation of stars are discussed in detail. The exotic, early-Universe mechanisms are contrasted with astrophysical processes that generate fields after recombination. For example, a Biermann-type battery can operate in a proto-galaxy during the early stages of structure formation. Moreover, magnetic fields in either an early generation of stars or active galactic nuclei can be dispersed into the intergalactic medium.

  5. On the non-Gaussian correlation of the primordial curvature perturbation with vector fields

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Rajeev Kumar [Département de Physique Théorique and Center for Astroparticle Physics, Université de Genève, 24, Quai E. Ansermet, CH-1211 Genève 4 (Switzerland); Sloth, Martin S., E-mail: rajeev.jain@unige.ch, E-mail: sloth@cp3.dias.sdu.dk [CP3-Origins, Centre for Cosmology and Particle Physics Phenomenology, University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, 5230 Odense M (Denmark)

    2013-02-01

    We compute the three-point cross-correlation function of the primordial curvature perturbation generated during inflation with two powers of a vector field in a model where conformal invariance is broken by a direct coupling of the vector field with the inflaton. If the vector field is identified with the electromagnetic field, this correlation would be a non-Gaussian signature of primordial magnetic fields generated during inflation. We find that the signal is maximized for the flattened configuration where the wave number of the curvature perturbation is twice that of the vector field and in this limit, the magnetic non-linear parameter becomes as large as |b{sub NL}| ? O(10{sup 3}). In the squeezed limit where the wave number of the curvature perturbation vanishes, our results agree with the magnetic consistency relation derived in arXiv:1207.4187.

  6. DISCUSSION ABOUT THE ANALYTICAL CALCULATION OF THE MAGNETIC FIELD CREATED BY PERMANENT MAGNETS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Romain Ravaud; Guy Lemarquand; Valerie Lemarquand; Claude Depollier

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an improvement of the calculation of the magnetic field components created by ring permanent magnets. The three-dimensional approach taken is based on the Coulombian Model. Moreover, the magnetic field components are calculated without using the vector potential or the scalar potential. It is noted that all the expressions given in this paper take into account the magnetic

  7. Magnetic field dosimeter development

    SciTech Connect

    Lemon, D.K.; Skorpik, J.R.; Eick, J.L.

    1980-09-01

    In recent years there has been increased concern over potential health hazards related to exposure of personnel to magnetic fields. If exposure standards are to be established, then a means for measuring magnetic field dose must be available. To meet this need, the Department of Energy has funded development of prototype dosimeters at the Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory. This manual reviews the principle of operation of the dosimeter and also contains step-by-step instructions for its operation.

  8. A low-temperature high resolution scanning tunneling microscope with a three-dimensional magnetic vector field operating in ultrahigh vacuum.

    PubMed

    Mashoff, T; Pratzer, M; Morgenstern, M

    2009-05-01

    We present a low-temperature ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) scanning tunneling microscope setup with a combination of a superconducting solenoid coil and two split-pair magnets, providing a rotatable magnetic field up to 500 mT applicable in all spatial directions. An absolute field maximum of B=7 T(3 T) can be applied perpendicular (parallel) to the sample surface. The instrument is operated at a temperature of 4.8 K. Topographic and spectroscopic measurements on tungsten carbide and indium antimonide revealed a z-noise of 300 fm(pp), which barely changes in magnetic field. The microscope is equipped with a tip exchange mechanism and a lateral sample positioning stage, which allows exact positioning of the tip with an accuracy of 5 microm prior to the measurement. Additional contacts to the sample holder allow, e.g., the application of an additional gate voltage. The UHV part of the system contains versatile possibilities of in situ sample and tip preparation as well as low-energy electron diffraction and Auger analysis. PMID:19485511

  9. Solar Wind Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. J.

    1995-01-01

    The magnetic fields originate as coronal fields that are converted into space by the supersonic, infinitely conducting, solar wind. On average, the sun's rotation causes the field to wind up and form an Archimedes Spiral. However, the field direction changes almost continuously on a variety of scales and the irregular nature of these changes is often interpreted as evidence that the solar wind flow is turbulent.

  10. How the geomagnetic field vector reverses polarity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prevot, M.; Mankinen, E.A.; Gromme, C.S.; Coe, R.S.

    1985-01-01

    A highly detailed record of both the direction and intensity of the Earth's magnetic field as it reverses has been obtained from a Miocene volcanic sequence. The transitional field is low in intensity and is typically non-axisymmetric. Geomagnetic impulses corresponding to astonishingly high rates of change of the field sometimes occur, suggesting that liquid velocity within the Earth's core increases during geomagnetic reversals. ?? 1985 Nature Publishing Group.

  11. Magnetic Field Problem: Current

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Wolfgang Christian

    A cross section of a circular wire loop carrying an unknown current is shown above. The arrows represent the direction of the magnetic field. The color of the arrows represents the magnitude of the field with magnitude increasing as the color changes from blue to green to red to black. You can double-click in the animation to add magnetic field lines, click-drag the center of the loop to reposition it, and click-drag the top or bottom of the loop to change its size.

  12. CMB non-gaussianity from vector fields

    SciTech Connect

    Peloso, Marco [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2014-06-24

    The Planck satellite has recently measured the CMB temperature anisotropies with unprecedented accuracy, and it has provided strong bounds on primordial non-gaussianity. Such bounds constrain models of inflation, and mechanisms that produce the primordial perturbations. We discuss the non-gaussian signatures from the interactions of the inflation ? with spin-1 fields. We study the two different cases in which the inflaton is (i) a pseudo-scalar field with a (?)/(fa) F·F interaction with a vector field, and (ii) a scalar field with a f (?)F{sup 2} interaction. In the first case we obtain the strong limit f{sub a} ? 10{sup 16}GeV on the decay constant. In the second case, specific choices of the function f (?) can lead to a non-gaussianity with a characteristic shape not encountered in standard models of scalar field inflation, and which has also been constrained by Planck.

  13. Magnetic Field Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilin, Andrew V.

    2006-01-01

    The Magnetic Field Solver computer program calculates the magnetic field generated by a group of collinear, cylindrical axisymmetric electromagnet coils. Given the current flowing in, and the number of turns, axial position, and axial and radial dimensions of each coil, the program calculates matrix coefficients for a finite-difference system of equations that approximates a two-dimensional partial differential equation for the magnetic potential contributed by the coil. The program iteratively solves these finite-difference equations by use of the modified incomplete Cholesky preconditioned-conjugate-gradient method. The total magnetic potential as a function of axial (z) and radial (r) position is then calculated as a sum of the magnetic potentials of the individual coils, using a high-accuracy interpolation scheme. Then the r and z components of the magnetic field as functions of r and z are calculated from the total magnetic potential by use of a high-accuracy finite-difference scheme. Notably, for the finite-difference calculations, the program generates nonuniform two-dimensional computational meshes from nonuniform one-dimensional meshes. Each mesh is generated in such a way as to minimize the numerical error for a benchmark one-dimensional magnetostatic problem.

  14. Magnetic fields at Neptune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ness, Norman F.; Acuna, Mario H.; Burlaga, Leonard F.; Connerney, John E. P.; Lepping, Ronald P.

    1989-01-01

    The Voyager 2 magnetic field experiment discovered a complex and powerful magnetic field in Neptune, as well as an associated magnetosphere and magnetic tail. As the spacecraft exited the magnetosphere, the magnetic tail appeared to be monopolar. The auroral zones are probably located far from the rotation poles, and may possess complex geometry. The Neptune rings and all its known moons are imbedded deep within the magnetosphere (except for Nereid, which is outside when it lies sunward of the planet); the radiation belts have a complex structure due to the absorption of energetic particles by the moons and rings of Neptune, as well as losses associated with the significant changes in the diurnally varying magnetosphere configuration.

  15. The Sun and Magnetic Fields

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In this activity about magnetic fields and their relation to the Sun, learners will simulate sunspots by using iron filings to show magnetic fields around a bar or cow magnet, and draw the magnetic field surrounding two dipole magnets, both in parallel and perpendicular alignments. Finally, learners examine images of sunspots to relate their magnetic field drawings and observations to what is seen on the Sun.

  16. Graphene Magnetic Field Sensors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Simone Pisana; Patrick M. Braganca; Ernesto E. Marinero; Bruce A. Gurney

    2010-01-01

    Graphene extraordinary magnetoresistance (EMR) devices have been fabricated and characterized in varying magnetic fields at room temperature. The atomic thickness, high carrier mobility and high current carrying capabilities of graphene are ideally suited for the detection of nanoscale sized magnetic domains. The device sensitivity can reach 10 mV\\/Oe, larger than state of the art InAs 2DEG devices of comparable size

  17. Predicting the magnetic vectors within coronal mass ejections arriving at Earth

    E-print Network

    Savani, N P; Szabo, A; Mays, M L; Thompson, B J; Richardson, I G; Evans, R; Pulkkinen, A; Nieves-Chinchilla, T

    2015-01-01

    The process by which the Sun affects the terrestrial environment on short timescales is predominately driven by the amount of magnetic reconnection between the solar wind and Earth's magnetosphere. Reconnection occurs most efficiently when the solar wind magnetic field has a southward component. The most severe impacts are during the arrival of a coronal mass ejection (CME) when the magnetosphere is both compressed and magnetically connected to the heliospheric environment, leading to disruptions to, for example, power grids and satellite navigation. Unfortunately, forecasting magnetic vectors within coronal mass ejections remains elusive. Here we report how, by combining a statistically robust helicity rule for a CME's solar origin with a simplified flux rope topology the magnetic vectors within the Earth-directed segment of a CME can be predicted. In order to test the validity of this proof-of-concept architecture for estimating the magnetic vectors within CMEs, a total of eight CME events (between 2010 and...

  18. Classification of prostate magnetic resonance spectra using support vector machine

    E-print Network

    that nuclear magnetic resonance spectra are sensitive enough to distinguish normal and cancer. In this paperClassification of prostate magnetic resonance spectra using support vector machine S. Parfait a, we propose a classification technique of spectra from magnetic resonance spectroscopy. We studied au

  19. Magnetic Field and Life

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is a lesson where learners explore magnetic forces, fields, and the relationship between electricity. Learners will use this information to infer how the Earth generates a protective magnetic field. The lesson models scientific inquiry using the 5E instructional model and includes teacher notes, prerequisite concepts, common misconceptions, student journal and reading. This is lesson seven in the Astro-Venture Geology Training Unit that were developed to increase students' awareness of and interest in astrobiology and the many career opportunities that utilize science, math and technology skills. The lessons are designed for educators to use with with the Astro-Venture multimedia modules.

  20. Multiwavelength Magnetic Field Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, T. R.

    2015-03-01

    We model the large-scale Galactic magnetic fields, including a spiral arm compression to generate anisotropic turbulence, by comparing polarized synchrotron and thermal dust emission. Preliminary results show that in the outer Galaxy, the dust emission comes from regions where the fields are more ordered than average while the situation is reversed in the inner Galaxy. We will attempt in subsequent work to present a more complete picture of what the comparison of these observables tells us about the distribution of the components of the magnetized ISM and about the physics of spiral arm shocks and turbulence.

  1. Magnetic Fields in Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Rainer

    The origin and evolution of cosmic magnetic fields, their strength and structure in intergalactic space, their first occurrence in young galaxies, and their dynamical importance for galaxy evolution remain widely unknown. Radio synchrotron emission, its polarization and its Faraday rotation are powerful tools to study the strength and structure of magnetic fields in galaxies. Unpolarized radio synchrotron emission traces isotropic turbulent fields which are strongest in spiral arms and bars (20-30 ?G) and in central starburst regions (50-100 ?G). Such fields are dynamically important; they can affect gas flows and drive gas inflows in central regions. Polarized radio emission traces ordered fields which can be regular or anisotropic turbulent, generated from isotropic turbulent fields by compression or shear. The strongest ordered fields of 10-15 ?G strength are generally found in interarm regions and follow the orientation of adjacent gas spiral arms. In galaxies with strong density waves, ordered (anisotropic turbulent) fields are also observed at the inner edges of the spiral arms. Ordered fields with spiral patterns exist in grand-design, barred and flocculent galaxies, and in central regions of starburst galaxies. Ordered fields in interacting galaxies have asymmetric distributions and are an excellent tracer of past interactions between galaxies or with the intergalactic medium. Irregular galaxies host isotropic turbulent fields often of similar strength as in spiral galaxies, but only weak ordered fields. Faraday rotation measures (RM) of the diffuse polarized radio emission from the disks of several galaxies reveal large-scale spiral patterns that can be described by the superposition of azimuthal modes; these are signatures of regular fields generated by a mean-field ? -? dynamo. So far no indications were found in external galaxies of large-scale field reversals, like the one in the Milky Way. Ordered magnetic fields are also observed in radio halos around edge-on galaxies out to large distances from the plane, with X-shaped patterns. In the outflow cone above a starburst region of NGC 253, RM data indicate a helical magnetic field.

  2. He I VECTOR MAGNETOMETRY OF FIELD-ALIGNED SUPERPENUMBRAL FIBRILS

    SciTech Connect

    Schad, T. A. [Department of Planetary Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Penn, M. J. [National Solar Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Lin, H. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Pukalani, HI 96768 (United States)

    2013-05-10

    Atomic-level polarization and Zeeman effect diagnostics in the neutral helium triplet at 10830 A in principle allow full vector magnetometry of fine-scaled chromospheric fibrils. We present high-resolution spectropolarimetric observations of superpenumbral fibrils in the He I triplet with sufficient polarimetric sensitivity to infer their full magnetic field geometry. He I observations from the Facility Infrared Spectropolarimeter are paired with high-resolution observations of the H{alpha} 6563 A and Ca II 8542 A spectral lines from the Interferometric Bidimensional Spectrometer from the Dunn Solar Telescope in New Mexico. Linear and circular polarization signatures in the He I triplet are measured and described, as well as analyzed with the advanced inversion capability of the ''Hanle and Zeeman Light'' modeling code. Our analysis provides direct evidence for the often assumed field alignment of fibril structures. The projected angle of the fibrils and the inferred magnetic field geometry align within an error of {+-}10 Degree-Sign . We describe changes in the inclination angle of these features that reflect their connectivity with the photospheric magnetic field. Evidence for an accelerated flow ({approx}40 m s{sup -2}) along an individual fibril anchored at its endpoints in the strong sunspot and weaker plage in part supports the magnetic siphon flow mechanism's role in the inverse Evershed effect. However, the connectivity of the outer endpoint of many of the fibrils cannot be established.

  3. High field superconducting magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hait, Thomas P. (Inventor); Shirron, Peter J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A superconducting magnet includes an insulating layer disposed about the surface of a mandrel; a superconducting wire wound in adjacent turns about the mandrel to form the superconducting magnet, wherein the superconducting wire is in thermal communication with the mandrel, and the superconducting magnet has a field-to-current ratio equal to or greater than 1.1 Tesla per Ampere; a thermally conductive potting material configured to fill interstices between the adjacent turns, wherein the thermally conductive potting material and the superconducting wire provide a path for dissipation of heat; and a voltage limiting device disposed across each end of the superconducting wire, wherein the voltage limiting device is configured to prevent a voltage excursion across the superconducting wire during quench of the superconducting magnet.

  4. The history of polarisation measurements: their role in studies of magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wielebinski, R.

    2015-03-01

    Radio astronomy gave us new methods to study magnetic fields. Synchrotron radiation, the main cause of comic radio waves, is highly linearly polarised with the `E' vector normal to the magnetic field. The Faraday Effect rotates the `E' vector in thermal regions by the magnetic field in the line of sight. Also the radio Zeeman Effect has been observed.

  5. Design of a vector magnet for the measurements of anisotropic magnetoresistance and rotational magneto-optic Kerr effect.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Jin, E; Son, H; Tan, A; Cao, W N; Hwang, Chanyong; Qiu, Z Q

    2012-03-01

    A vector magnet is designed and assembled with two electromagnets to produce a rotational magnetic field in any direction within a plane. This design allows a rotation of the magnetic field without a mechanical rotation of the magnets. The fast speed of the field rotation (~10 s for a complete 360° rotation) and the stability against mechanical vibration easily overcome the slow drifting effect in anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) and rotational magneto-optic Kerr effect (ROTMOKE) measurements. As an example we applied this vector magnet to carry out AMR and ROTMOKE measurements on epitaxial growth of Fe(10 nm)?MgO(001) films. The result demonstrates the stability and high quality of the vector magnet in determining the magnetic anisotropy of magnetic thin films using AMR and ROTMOKE techniques. PMID:22462937

  6. Space Vector Modulation based Field Oriented Control scheme for Brushless DC motors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joseph P John; S. Suresh Kumar; B. Jaya

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on various aspects of Space Vector Modulation based Field Oriented Control of Trapezoidal Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motors. The purpose is to introduce in a concise manner the fundamental theory, main results and practical applications of Field Oriented Control (FOC) for Brushless DC motors. The primary focus is on controlling the motor in d-q axis using field oriented

  7. Slow decay of magnetic fields in open Friedmann universes

    SciTech Connect

    Barrow, John D. [DAMTP, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Tsagas, Christos G. [Section of Astrophysics, Astronomy and Mechanics, Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece)

    2008-05-15

    Magnetic fields in Friedmann universes can experience superadiabatic growth without departing from conventional electromagnetism. The reason is the relativistic coupling between vector fields and spacetime geometry, which slows down the decay of large-scale magnetic fields in open universes, compared to that seen in perfectly flat models. The result is a large relative gain in magnetic strength that can lead to astrophysically interesting B fields, even if our Universe is only marginally open today.

  8. Evolution of Stellar Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güdel, Manuel

    2015-03-01

    Stellar magnetic fields can reliably be characterized by several magnetic activity indicators, such as X-ray or radio luminosity. Physical processes leading to such emission provide important information on dynamic processes in stellar atmospheres and magnetic structuring.

  9. Magnetic Fields and Forces in Permanent Magnet Levitated Bearings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kevin D. Bachovchin; James F. Hoburg; Richard F. Post

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic fields and magnetic forces from magnetic bearings made of circular Halbach permanent-magnet arrays are computed and analyzed. The magnetic fields are calculated using superposition of fields due to patches of magnetization charge at surfaces where the magnetization is discontinuous. The magnetic force from the magnetic bearing is computed using superposition of forces on each patch of magnetization charge. The

  10. Magnetic Field of the Earth

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mrs. Merritt

    2005-10-18

    Students can learn about how the magnetic field of the earth is similar to magnets. Go to the following link: Magnetic Field of the Earth 1. What makes the earth like a magnet? 2. How do we measure magnetism? Be sure to check out the fun games and activities on this web site too!! Now click on the following link and listen to a 2 minute presentation about magnetism: Pulse Planet Next go to ...

  11. Primordial magnetic fields from self-ordering scalar fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiguchi, Kouichirou; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    2015-04-01

    A symmetry-breaking phase transition in the early universe could have led to the formation of cosmic defects. Because these defects dynamically excite not only scalar and tensor type cosmological perturbations but also vector type ones, they may serve as a source of primordial magnetic fields. In this study, we calculate the time evolution and the spectrum of magnetic fields that are generated by a type of cosmic defects, called global textures, using the non-linear sigma (NLSM) model. Based on the standard cosmological perturbation theory, we show, both analytically and numerically, that a vector-mode relative velocity between photon and baryon fluids is induced by textures, which inevitably leads to the generation of magnetic fields over a wide range of scales. We find that the amplitude of the magnetic fields is given by B~10?9((1+z)/103)?2.5(v/mpl)2(k/Mpc?1)3.5/?N Gauss in the radiation dominated era for klesssim 1 Mpc?1, with v being the vacuum expectation value of the O(N) symmetric scalar fields. By extrapolating our numerical result toward smaller scales, we expect that B~ 10?14.5((1+z)/103)1/2(v/mpl)2(k/Mpc?1)1/2/?N Gauss on scales of kgtrsim 1 Mpc?1 at redshift 0zgtrsim 110. This might be a seed of the magnetic fields observed on large scales today.

  12. Crustal Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Patrick T.; Ravat, D.; Frawley, James J.

    1999-01-01

    Cosmos 49, Polar Orbit Geophysical Observatory (POGO) (Orbiting Geophysical Observatory (OGO-2, 4 and 6)) and Magsat have been the only low-earth orbiting satellites to measure the crustal magnetic field on a global scale. These missions revealed the presence of long- wavelength (> 500 km) crustal anomalies predominantly located over continents. Ground based methods were, for the most part, unable to record these very large-scale features; no doubt due to the problems of assembling continental scale maps from numerous smaller surveys acquired over many years. Questions arose as to the source and nature of these long-wave length anomalies. As a result there was a great stimulant given to the study of the magnetic properties of the lower crust and upper mantle. Some indication as to the nature of these deep sources has been provided by the recent results from the deep crustal drilling programs. In addition, the mechanism of magnetization, induced or remanent, was largely unknown. For computational ease these anomalies were considered to result solely from induced magnetization. However, recent results from Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA), a magnetometer-bearing mission to Mars, have revealed crustal anomalies with dimensions similar to the largest anomalies on Earth. These Martian features could only have been produced by remanent magnetization, since Mars lacks an inducing field. The origin of long-wavelength crustal anomalies, however, has not been completely determined. Several large crustal magnetic anomalies (e.g., Bangui, Kursk, Kiruna and Central Europe) will be discussed and the role of future satellite magnetometer missions (Orsted, SUNSAT and Champ) in their interpretation evaluated.

  13. Full vector low-temperature magnetic measurements of geologic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinberg, Joshua M.; Solheid, Peter A.; Swanson-Hysell, Nicholas L.; Jackson, Mike J.; Bowles, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    magnetic properties of geologic materials offer insights into an enormous range of important geophysical phenomena ranging from inner core dynamics to paleoclimate. Often it is the low-temperature behavior (<300 K) of magnetic minerals that provides the most useful and highest sensitivity information for a given problem. Conventional measurements of low-temperature remanence are typically conducted on instruments that are limited to measuring one single-axis component of the magnetization vector and are optimized for measurements in strong fields. These instrumental limitations have prevented fully optimized applications and have motivated the development of a low-temperature probe that can be used for low-temperature remanence measurements between 17 and 300 K along three orthogonal axes using a standard 2G Enterprises SQuID rock magnetometer. In this contribution, we describe the design and implementation of this instrument and present data from five case studies that demonstrate the probe's considerable potential for future research: a polycrystalline hematite sample, a polycrystalline hematite and magnetite mixture, a single crystal of magnetite, a single crystal of pyrrhotite, and samples of Umkondo Large Igneous Province diabase sills.

  14. Magnetic Field Activities for the High School Classroom

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ed Eckel

    This unit is designed to acquaint students with the properties of magnetic fields. It is meant to introduce the idea of a "field" through investigations of magnetic fields as produced by various common magnetic materials and direct electrical currents. They will learn that the difference between a magnetic field and a gravitational field is that a gravitational field, in the experience of a student, always points downward and is always of the same strength. Magnetic fields are not limited to one direction or strength. Further, all students will know, by the mid-point of this unit, that magnetic fields are inherently loop shaped. Familiarity with the uniform gravitational field of classical Newtonian dynamics and kinematics is not required. As they complete the unit, students will gain an appreciation for the vector nature of fields, the ubiquity of field sources in the environment, and the ability to visualize such fields as three-dimensional entities.

  15. The WIND magnetic field investigation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. P. Lepping; M. H. Ac?na; L. F. Burlaga; W. M. Farrell; J. A. Slavin; K. H. Schatten; F. Mariani; N. F. Ness; F. M. Neubauer; Y. C. Whang; J. B. Byrnes; R. S. Kennon; P. V. Panetta; J. Scheifele; E. M. Worley

    1995-01-01

    The magnetic field experiment on WIND will provide data for studies of a broad range of scales of structures and fluctuation characteristics of the interplanetary magnetic field throughout the mission, and, where appropriate, relate them to the statics and dynamics of the magnetosphere. The basic instrument of the Magnetic Field Investigation (MFI) is a boom-mounted dual triaxial fluxgate magnetometer and

  16. Magnetic Field Topology in Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardiner, T. A.; Frank, A.

    2000-01-01

    We present results on the magnetic field topology in a pulsed radiative. jet. For initially helical magnetic fields and periodic velocity variations, we find that the magnetic field alternates along the, length of the jet from toroidally dominated in the knots to possibly poloidally dominated in the intervening regions.

  17. Low field magnetic resonance imaging

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander (Berkeley, CA); Sakellariou, Dimitrios (Billancourt, FR); Meriles, Carlos A. (Fort Lee, NJ); Trabesinger, Andreas H. (London, GB)

    2010-07-13

    A method and system of magnetic resonance imaging does not need a large homogenous field to truncate a gradient field. Spatial information is encoded into the spin magnetization by allowing the magnetization to evolve in a non-truncated gradient field and inducing a set of 180 degree rotations prior to signal acquisition.

  18. Magnetic Field Problem: Current and Magnets

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Wolfgang Christian

    The above animations represent two typical bar magnets each with a North and South pole. The arrows represent the direction of the magnetic field. A wire is placed between the magnets and a current that comes out of the page can be turned on.

  19. Polarization evolution characteristics of focused hybridly polarized vector fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Bing; Pan, Yang; Rui, Guanghao; Xu, Danfeng; Zhan, Qiwen; Cui, Yiping

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the focusing property and the polarization evolution characteristics of hybridly polarized vector fields in the focal region. Three types of hybridly polarized vector fields, namely azimuthal-variant hybridly polarized vector field, radial-variant hybridly polarized vector field, and spatial-variant hybridly polarized vector field, are experimentally generated. The intensity distributions and the polarization evolution of these hybridly polarized vector fields focused under low numerical aperture (NA) are experimentally studied and good agreements with the numerical simulations are obtained. The three-dimensional (3D) state of polarization and the field distribution within the focal volume of these hybridly polarized vector fields under high-NA focusing are studied numerically. The optical curl force on Rayleigh particles induced by tightly focused hybridly polarized vector fields, which results in the orbital motion of trapped particles, is analyzed. Simulation results demonstrate that polarization-only modulation provided by the hybridly polarized vector field allows one to control both the intensity distribution and 3D elliptical polarization in the focal region, which may find interesting applications in particle trapping, manipulation, and orientation analysis.

  20. Probing Magnetic Fields With SNRs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kothes, Roland

    2015-03-01

    As supernova remnants (SNRs) expand, their shock waves freeze in and compress magnetic field lines they encounter; consequently we can use SNRs as magnifying glasses for interstellar magnetic fields. A simple model is used to derive polarization and rotation measure (RM) signatures of SNRs. This model is exploited to gain knowledge about the large-scale magnetic field in the Milky Way. Three examples are given which indicate a magnetic anomaly, an azimuthal large-scale magnetic field towards the anti-centre, and a chimney that releases magnetic energy from the plane into the halo.

  1. The Galactic Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansson, Ronnie; Farrar, Glennys R.

    2012-12-01

    With this Letter, we complete our model of the Galactic magnetic field (GMF), by using the WMAP7 22 GHz total synchrotron intensity map and our earlier results to obtain a 13-parameter model of the Galactic random field, and to determine the strength of the striated random field. In combination with our 22-parameter description of the regular GMF, we obtain a very good fit to more than 40,000 extragalactic Faraday rotation measures and the WMAP7 22 GHz polarized and total intensity synchrotron emission maps. The data call for a striated component to the random field whose orientation is aligned with the regular field, having zero mean and rms strength ?20% larger than the regular field. A noteworthy feature of the new model is that the regular field has a significant out-of-plane component, which had not been considered earlier. The new GMF model gives a much better description of the totality of data than previous models in the literature.

  2. THE GALACTIC MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Jansson, Ronnie; Farrar, Glennys R. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States)

    2012-12-10

    With this Letter, we complete our model of the Galactic magnetic field (GMF), by using the WMAP7 22 GHz total synchrotron intensity map and our earlier results to obtain a 13-parameter model of the Galactic random field, and to determine the strength of the striated random field. In combination with our 22-parameter description of the regular GMF, we obtain a very good fit to more than 40,000 extragalactic Faraday rotation measures and the WMAP7 22 GHz polarized and total intensity synchrotron emission maps. The data call for a striated component to the random field whose orientation is aligned with the regular field, having zero mean and rms strength Almost-Equal-To 20% larger than the regular field. A noteworthy feature of the new model is that the regular field has a significant out-of-plane component, which had not been considered earlier. The new GMF model gives a much better description of the totality of data than previous models in the literature.

  3. The Martian magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.

    1979-01-01

    The paper presents an overview of the Martian magnetic field measurements and the criticisms made of them. The measurements of the Mars 2, 3, and 5 spacecraft were interpreted by Dolginov et al. (1976, 1978) to be consistent with an intrinsic planetary magnetic moment of 2.5 times 10 to the 22nd power gauss cu cm, basing this result on the apparent size of the obstacle responsible for deflecting the solar wind and an apparent encounter of the spacecraft with the planetary field. It is shown that if the dependence of the Martian magnetic moment on the rotation rate was linear, the estimate of the moment would be far larger than reported by Dolginov et al. An upper limit of 250 km is calculated for the dynamo radius using the similarity law, compared with 500 km obtained by Dolginov et al. It is concluded that the possible strength of a Martian dynamo is below expectations, and it is likely that the Mars dynamo is not presently operative.

  4. Analysis of noise-induced errors in vector-field electron tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, Z. D. C.; Petersen, T. C.; Paganin, D. M.; Spiers, K. M.; Weyland, M.; Morgan, M. J.

    2014-08-01

    Vector-field electron tomography (VFET) reconstructs electromagnetic vector fields of magnetic nanomaterials using transmission electron microscopy. The theory behind this reconstruction process is well established, but the practical implications of experimental errors and how they affect the accuracy of the reconstructed vector fields is not well understood, hindering progress in the use of these techniques for routine magnetic characterization of nanomaterials. Here, we present an analysis of the propagation of stochastic errors through a VFET algorithm. A method for determining the contribution of image noise to errors in a reconstructed vector potential is derived. Simulations are performed to test the validity of this method when applied to shot noise, which shows good agreement with theory.

  5. Electric and magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.; Robinson, R. S.; Etters, R. D.

    1982-01-01

    A number of energy momentum anomalies are described that result from the use of Abraham-Lorentz electromagnetic theory. These anomalies have in common the motion of charged bodies or current carrying conductors relative to the observer. The anomalies can be avoided by using the nonflow approach, based on internal energy of the electromagnetic field. The anomalies can also be avoided by using the flow approach, if all contributions to flow work are included. The general objective of this research is a fundamental physical understanding of electric and magnetic fields which, in turn, might promote the development of new concepts in electric space propulsion. The approach taken is to investigate quantum representations of these fields.

  6. Multiscale vector fields for image pattern recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, Kah-Chan; Coggins, James M.

    1990-01-01

    A uniform processing framework for low-level vision computing in which a bank of spatial filters maps the image intensity structure at each pixel into an abstract feature space is proposed. Some properties of the filters and the feature space are described. Local orientation is measured by a vector sum in the feature space as follows: each filter's preferred orientation along with the strength of the filter's output determine the orientation and the length of a vector in the feature space; the vectors for all filters are summed to yield a resultant vector for a particular pixel and scale. The orientation of the resultant vector indicates the local orientation, and the magnitude of the vector indicates the strength of the local orientation preference. Limitations of the vector sum method are discussed. Investigations show that the processing framework provides a useful, redundant representation of image structure across orientation and scale.

  7. He I Vector Magnetometry of Field Aligned Superpenumbral Fibrils

    E-print Network

    Schad, T A; Lin, Haosheng

    2013-01-01

    Atomic-level polarization and Zeeman effect diagnostics in the neutral helium triplet at 10830 angstroms in principle allow full vector magnetometry of fine-scaled chromospheric fibrils. We present high-resolution spectropolarimetric observations of superpenumbral fibrils in the He I triplet with sufficient polarimetric sensitivity to infer their full magnetic field geometry. He I observations from the Facility Infrared Spectropolarimeter (FIRS) are paired with high-resolution observations of the Halpha 6563 angstroms and Ca II 8542 angstroms spectral lines from the Interferometric Bidimensional Spectrometer (IBIS) from the Dunn Solar Telescope in New Mexico. Linear and circular polarization signatures in the He I triplet are measured and described, as well as analyzed with the advanced inversion capability of the "Hanle and Zeeman Light" (HAZEL) modeling code. Our analysis provides direct evidence for the often assumed field alignment of fibril structures. The projected angle of the fibrils and the inferred ...

  8. Magnetic field and electric current structure in the chromosphere

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dainis Dravins

    1974-01-01

    Three dimensional vector magnetic field structure throughout the chromosphere above an active region is deduced by combining high resolution Ha filtergrams with a simultaneous digital magnetogram. An analog model of the field is made with 400 metal wires representing fieldlines which are assumed to outline the Ha structure. The height extent of the field is determined from vertical field gradient

  9. Magnetic field programming in quadrupole magnetic field-flow fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephen Williams, P.; Carpino, Francesca; Moore, Lee R.; Zborowski, Maciej

    Magnetic field-flow fractionation (MgFFF) is a technique for the separation and characterization of magnetic nanoparticles. It is explained that the analysis of polydisperse samples requires a programmed decay of field and field gradient during sample elution. A procedure for achieving reproducible field decay with asymptotic approach to zero field using a quadrupole electromagnet is described. An example of an analysis of a polydisperse sample under programmed field decay is given.

  10. Scattering by magnetic fields

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. R. Yafaev

    2005-01-01

    Consider the scattering amplitude $s(\\\\omega,\\\\omega^\\\\prime;\\\\lambda)$,\\u000a$\\\\omega,\\\\omega^\\\\prime\\\\in{\\\\Bbb S}^{d-1}$, $\\\\lambda > 0$, corresponding to an\\u000aarbitrary short-range magnetic field $B(x)$, $x\\\\in{\\\\Bbb R}^d$. This is a smooth\\u000afunction of $\\\\omega$ and $\\\\omega^\\\\prime$ away from the diagonal\\u000a$\\\\omega=\\\\omega^\\\\prime$ but it may be singular on the diagonal. If $d=2$, then\\u000athe singular part of the scattering amplitude (for example, in the transversal\\u000agauge) is a

  11. Magnetic field strength of active region filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuckein, C.; Centeno, R.; Martínez Pillet, V.; Casini, R.; Manso Sainz, R.; Shimizu, T.

    2009-07-01

    Aims: We study the vector magnetic field of a filament observed over a compact active region neutral line. Methods: Spectropolarimetric data acquired with TIP-II (VTT, Tenerife, Spain) of the 10 830 Å spectral region provide full Stokes vectors that were analyzed using three different methods: magnetograph analysis, Milne-Eddington inversions, and PCA-based atomic polarization inversions. Results: The inferred magnetic field strengths in the filament are around 600-700 G by all these three methods. Longitudinal fields are found in the range of 100-200 G whereas the transverse components become dominant, with fields as high as 500-600 G. We find strong transverse fields near the neutral line also at photospheric levels. Conclusions: Our analysis indicates that strong (higher than 500 G, but below kG) transverse magnetic fields are present in active region filaments. This corresponds to the highest field strengths reliably measured in these structures. The profiles of the helium 10 830 Å lines observed in this active region filament are dominated by the Zeeman effect.

  12. On the Computation of Integral Curves in Adaptive Mesh Refinement Vector Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Deines, Eduard; Weber, Gunther H.; Garth, Christoph; Van Straalen, Brian; Borovikov, Sergey; Martin, Daniel F.; Joy, Kenneth I.

    2011-06-27

    Integral curves, such as streamlines, streaklines, pathlines, and timelines, are an essential tool in the analysis of vector field structures, offering straightforward and intuitive interpretation of visualization results. While such curves have a long-standing tradition in vector field visualization, their application to Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) simulation results poses unique problems. AMR is a highly effective discretization method for a variety of physical simulation problems and has recently been applied to the study of vector fields in flow and magnetohydrodynamic applications. The cell-centered nature of AMR data and discontinuities in the vector field representation arising from AMR level boundaries complicate the application of numerical integration methods to compute integral curves. In this paper, we propose a novel approach to alleviate these problems and show its application to streamline visualization in an AMR model of the magnetic field of the solar system as well as to a simulation of two incompressible viscous vortex rings merging.

  13. Magnetic Fields: Visible and Permanent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkeljohn, Dorothy R.; Earl, Robert D.

    1983-01-01

    Children will be able to see the concept of a magnetic field translated into a visible reality using the simple method outlined. Standard shelf paper, magnets, iron filings, and paint in a spray can are used to prepare a permanent and well-detailed picture of the magnetic field. (Author/JN)

  14. Video-rate terahertz electric-field vector imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takai, Mayuko; Takeda, Masatoshi; Sasaki, Manabu; Tachizaki, Takehiro; Yasumatsu, Naoya; Watanabe, Shinichi

    2014-10-01

    We present an experimental setup to dramatically reduce a measurement time for obtaining spatial distributions of terahertz electric-field (E-field) vectors. The method utilizes the electro-optic sampling, and we use a charge-coupled device to detect a spatial distribution of the probe beam polarization rotation by the E-field-induced Pockels effect in a ?110?-oriented ZnTe crystal. A quick rotation of the ZnTe crystal allows analyzing the terahertz E-field direction at each image position, and the terahertz E-field vector mapping at a fixed position of an optical delay line is achieved within 21 ms. Video-rate mapping of terahertz E-field vectors is likely to be useful for achieving real-time sensing of terahertz vector beams, vector vortices, and surface topography. The method is also useful for a fast polarization analysis of terahertz beams.

  15. Tracking Vector Magnetograms with the Magnetic Induction Equation

    E-print Network

    P. W. Schuck

    2008-07-11

    The differential affine velocity estimator (DAVE) developed in Schuck (2006) for estimating velocities from line-of-sight magnetograms is modified to directly incorporate horizontal magnetic fields to produce a differential affine velocity estimator for vector magnetograms (DAVE4VM). The DAVE4VM's performance is demonstrated on the synthetic data from the anelastic pseudospectral ANMHD simulations that were used in the recent comparison of velocity inversion techniques by Welsch (2007). The DAVE4VM predicts roughly 95% of the helicity rate and 75% of the power transmitted through the simulation slice. Inter-comparison between DAVE4VM and DAVE and further analysis of the DAVE method demonstrates that line-of-sight tracking methods capture the shearing motion of magnetic footpoints but are insensitive to flux emergence -- the velocities determined from line-of-sight methods are more consistent with horizontal plasma velocities than with flux transport velocities. These results suggest that previous studies that rely on velocities determined from line-of-sight methods such as the DAVE or local correlation tracking may substantially misrepresent the total helicity rates and power through the photosphere.

  16. The Heliospheric Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, Mathew J.; Forsyth, Robert J.

    2013-11-01

    The heliospheric magnetic field (HMF) is the extension of the coronal magnetic field carried out into the solar system by the solar wind. It is the means by which the Sun interacts with planetary magnetospheres and channels charged particles propagating through the heliosphere. As the HMF remains rooted at the solar photosphere as the Sun rotates, the large-scale HMF traces out an Archimedean spiral. This pattern is distorted by the interaction of fast and slow solar wind streams, as well as the interplanetary manifestations of transient solar eruptions called coronal mass ejections. On the smaller scale, the HMF exhibits an array of waves, discontinuities, and turbulence, which give hints to the solar wind formation process. This review aims to summarise observations and theory of the small- and large-scale structure of the HMF. Solar-cycle and cycle-to-cycle evolution of the HMF is discussed in terms of recent spacecraft observations and pre-spaceage proxies for the HMF in geomagnetic and galactic cosmic ray records.

  17. Photonic Magnetic Field Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyntjes, Geert

    2002-02-01

    Small, in-line polarization rotators or isolators to reduce feedback in fiber optic links can be the basis for excellent magnetic field sensors. Based on the giant magneto-optical (GMO) or Faraday effect in iron garnets, they with a magnetic field of a few hundred Gauss, (20 mT) for an interaction length for an optical beam of a few millimeters achieve a polarization rotation or phase shift of 45 deg (1/8 cycle). When powered by a small laser diode, with the induced linear phase shift recovered at the shot noise limit, we have demonstrated sensitivities at the 3.3 nT/Hz1/2 level for frequencies from less than 1 Hz to frequencies into the high kHz range. Through further improvements; an increase in interaction length, better materials and by far the greatest factor, the addition of a flux concentrator, sensitivities at the pT/Hz1/2 level appear to be within reach. We will detail such a design and discuss the issues that may limit achieving these goals.

  18. A nonfrustrated magnetoelectric with incommensurate magnetic order in magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Syromyatnikov, A. V. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Russian Federation)], E-mail: syromyat@thd.pnpi.spb.ru

    2007-10-15

    We discuss a model nonfrustrated magnetoelectric in which a sufficiently strong magnetoelectric coupling produces an incommensurate magnetic order leading to ferroelectricity. Properties of the magnetoelectric in the magnetic field directed perpendicular to the wave vector describing the spin helix are considered in detail. Analysis of the classical energy shows that in contrast to the naive expectation, the onset of ferroelectricity occurs at a field H{sub c1} that is lower than the saturation field H{sub c2}. We have H{sub c1} = H{sub c2} at large enough magnetoelectric coupling. We show that at H = 0, ferroelectricity occurs at T = T{sub FE} < T{sub N}. A qualitative discussion of the phase diagram in the H-T plane is presented within the mean-field approach.

  19. Interactive Vector Fields for Painterly Rendering Sven C. Olsen

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce

    vector fields for use in the creation of painterly im- ages and animations. Our aim is to enable casual have included several tools for designing the vector fields used to align the brush strokes a region based approach allows us to create out- put images in which the style of the brush strokes varies

  20. Robust Morse Decompositions of Piecewise Constant Vector Fields

    E-print Network

    Szymczak, Andrzej

    to color code the Morse sets in order to enhance the visualization. We demonstrate the benefits of our1 Robust Morse Decompositions of Piecewise Constant Vector Fields Andrzej Szymczak, Member, IEEE to computing a Morse decomposition of a vector field on a triangulated manifold surface. The basic idea

  1. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    DOEpatents

    Goren, Yehuda (Mountain View, CA); Mahale, Narayan K. (The Woodlands, TX)

    1996-01-01

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles.

  2. Primordial magnetic fields from self-ordering scalar fields

    E-print Network

    Horiguchi, Kouichirou; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    2015-01-01

    A symmetry-breaking phase transition in the early universe could have led to the formation of cosmic defects. Because these defects dynamically excite not only scalar and tensor type cosmological perturbations but also vector type ones, they may serve as a source of primordial magnetic fields. In this study, we calculate the time evolution and the spectrum of magnetic fields that are generated by a type of cosmic defects, called global textures, using the non-linear sigma (NLSM) model. Based on the standard cosmological perturbation theory, we show, both analytically and numerically, that a vector-mode relative velocity between photon and baryon fluids is induced by textures, which inevitably leads to the generation of magnetic fields over a wide range of scales. We find that the amplitude of the magnetic fields is given by $B\\sim{10^{-9}}{((1+z)/10^3)^{-2.5}}({v}/{m_{\\rm pl}})^2({k}/{\\rm Mpc^{-1}})^{3.5}/{\\sqrt{N}}$ Gauss in the radiation dominated era for $k\\lesssim 1$ Mpc$^{-1}$, with $v$ being the vacuum ...

  3. Magnetic field modification of optical magnetic dipoles.

    PubMed

    Armelles, Gaspar; Caballero, Blanca; Cebollada, Alfonso; Garcia-Martin, Antonio; Meneses-Rodríguez, David

    2015-03-11

    Acting on optical magnetic dipoles opens novel routes to govern light-matter interaction. We demonstrate magnetic field modification of the magnetic dipolar moment characteristic of resonant nanoholes in thin magnetoplasmonic films. This is experimentally shown through the demonstration of the magneto-optical analogue of Babinet's principle, where mirror imaged MO spectral dependencies are obtained for two complementary magnetoplasmonic systems: holes in a perforated metallic layer and a layer of disks on a substrate. PMID:25646869

  4. Exposure guidelines for magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, G.

    1987-12-01

    The powerful magnetic fields produced by a controlled fusion experiment at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) necessitated the development of personnel-exposure guidelines for steady magnetic fields. A literature search and conversations with active researchers showed that it is currently possible to develop preliminary exposure guidelines for steady magnetic fields. An overview of the results of past research into the bioeffects of magnetic fields was compiled, along with a discussion of hazards that may be encountered by people with sickle-cell anemia or medical electronic and prosthetic implants. The LLNL steady magnetic-field exposure guidelines along with a review of developments concerning the safety of time-varying fields were also presented in this compilation. Guidelines developed elsewhere for time varying fields were also given. Further research is needed to develop exposure standards for both steady or time-varying fields.

  5. Estimating locations and total magnetization vectors of compact magnetic sources from scalar, vector, or tensor magnetic measurements through combined Helbig and Euler analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phillips, J.D.; Nabighian, M.N.; Smith, D.V.; Li, Y.

    2007-01-01

    The Helbig method for estimating total magnetization directions of compact sources from magnetic vector components is extended so that tensor magnetic gradient components can be used instead. Depths of the compact sources can be estimated using the Euler equation, and their dipole moment magnitudes can be estimated using a least squares fit to the vector component or tensor gradient component data. ?? 2007 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  6. The Vector Field Proton Magnetometer for IGY Satellite Ground Stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, I. R.; Stolarik, J. D.; Heppner, J. P.

    1960-01-01

    The application of homogeneous-bias fields to a proton precessional magnetometer allows the measurement of the vector field by measuring the absolute scalar field F, declination variations (Delta)D, and inclination variations (Delta)I. The absolute scalar field can be measured to an accuracy of +/- 1 gamma and absolute declination and inclination to an accuracy of +/- 2 minutes. This paper describes a vector proton magnetometer that has been in operation at nine Minitrack stations since the spring of 1958.

  7. Magnetic fields in massive stars

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Hubrig; M. Scholler; M. Briquet; M. A. Pogodin; R. V. Yudin; J. F. Gonzalez; T. Morel; P. De; R. Ignace; G. Mathys; G. J. Peters

    2007-01-01

    Although indirect evidence for the presence of magnetic fields in high-mass stars is regularly reported in the literature, the detection of these fields remains an extremely challenging observational problem. We review the recent discoveries of magnetic fields in different types of massive stars and briefly discuss strategies for spectropolarimetric observations to be carried out in the future.

  8. Magnetic fields in massive stars

    E-print Network

    S. Hubrig

    2007-03-09

    Although indirect evidence for the presence of magnetic fields in high-mass stars is regularly reported in the literature, the detection of these fields remains an extremely challenging observational problem. We review the recent discoveries of magnetic fields in different types of massive stars and briefly discuss strategies for spectropolarimetric observations to be carried out in the future.

  9. Magnetic-field-dosimetry system

    SciTech Connect

    Lemon, D.K.; Skorpik, J.R.; Eick, J.L.

    1981-01-21

    A device is provided for measuring the magnetic field dose and peak field exposure. The device includes three Hall-effect sensors all perpendicular to each other, sensing the three dimensional magnetic field and associated electronics for data storage, calculating, retrieving and display.

  10. The Galileo magnetic field investigation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. G. Kivelson; K. K. Khurana; J. D. Means; C. T. Russell; R. C. Snare

    1992-01-01

    The Galileo Orbiter carries a complement of fields and particles instruments designed to provide data needed to shed light on the structure and dynamical variations of the Jovian magnetosphere. Many questions remain regarding the temporal and spatial properties of the magnetospheric magnetic field, how the magnetic field maintains corotation of the embedded plasma and the circumstances under which corotation breaks

  11. Laser fields at flat interfaces: I. Vector potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ra?eev, G.

    2012-07-01

    A model calculating the laser fields at a flat structureless surface taking into account the surface photoelectric effect is presented. The photon is p or transverse magnetic linearly polarized, continuous and its wave length is long, i.e. ?vac ? 12.4 nm. The sharp rise of the electron density at the interface generates an atomic scale spatial dependence of the laser field. In real space and in the temporal gauge, the vector potential A of the laser is obtained as a solution of the classical Ampère-Maxwell and the material equations. The susceptibility is a product of the electron density of the material system with the surface and of the bulk tensor and non-local isotropic (TNLI) polarizability. The electron density is obtained quantum mechanically by solving the Schrödinger equation. The bulk TNLI polarizability including dispersion is calculated from a Drude-Lindhard-Kliewer model. In one dimension perpendicular to the surface the components A_x(z,?) and A_z(z,?) of the vector potential are solutions of the Ampère-Maxwell system of two coupled integro-differential equations. The model, called vector potential from the electron density-coupled integro-differential equations (VPED-CIDE), is used here to obtain the electron escape probability from the power density absorption, the reflectance, the electron density induced by the laser and Feibelman's parameters d? and d?. Some preliminary results on aluminium surfaces are given here and in a companion paper the photoelectron spectra are calculated with results in agreement with the experiment.

  12. First Simultaneous Detection of Moving Magnetic Features in Photospheric Intensity and Magnetic Field Data

    E-print Network

    Lim, Eun-Kyung; Goode, Philip

    2012-01-01

    The formation and the temporal evolution of a bipolar moving magnetic feature (MMF) was studied with high spatial and temporal resolution. The photometric properties were observed with the New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory using a broadband TiO filter (705.7 nm), while the magnetic field was analyzed using the spectropolarimetric data obtained by Hinode. For the first time, we observed a bipolar MMF simultaneously in intensity images and magnetic field data, and studied the details of its structure. The vector magnetic field and the Doppler velocity of the MMF were also studied. A bipolar MMF having its positive polarity closer to the negative penumbra formed being accompanied by a bright, filamentary structure in the TiO data connecting the MMF and a dark penumbral filament. A fast downflow (polarity. The vector magnetic field obtained from the full Stokes inversion revealed that a bipolar MMF has a U-shaped magnetic field configuration. Our observation...

  13. Mercury's magnetic field and interior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Ness, N. F.

    1988-01-01

    The magnetic-field data collected on Mercury by the Mariner-10 spacecraft present substantial evidence for an intrinsic global magnetic field. However, studies of Mercury's thermal evolution show that it is most likely that the inner core region of Mercury solidified or froze early in the planet's history. Thus, the explanation of Mercury's magnetic field in the framework of the traditional planetary dynamo is less than certain.

  14. On the diagnostics of solar small scale magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stodilka, M. I.

    2015-02-01

    The model of small scale magnetic fields was proposed. The fields are described by two distribution functions: for unsigned magnetic field and for field vectors directions. The distribution functions were used to derive expressions for elements of the line absorption matrix and to deduce function that characterizes mutual cancellation of magnetic fields. We received the solutions for polarized radiative transfer problem within 3D MHD model of the solar photosphere and determined Stokes profiles parameters for two magnetosensitive lines Fe I ? 525.0 nm and ? 524.7 nm. The Stokes profiles parameters of the lines were used for further test diagnostics of small scale magnetic fields. A regression approach to diagnostics of the magnetic fields was proposed. The correlation between theoretical and reproduced parameters of small scale magnetic fields is greater than 0.95.

  15. Ferrofilm in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, Randy; Beckham, J. Regan

    2012-10-01

    A vertically draining thin ferrofilm under the influence of gravity and a nonuniform magnetic field is considered. It is observed experimentally that the presence of the magnetic field greatly alters the drainage of the film. A mathematical model is developed to describe the behavior. Experiments are conducted for multiple magnetic field configurations. The model is solved for two different sets of boundary conditions and results are compared to experiments. It is shown that the magnetic field structure, the concentration of magnetite in the solution, and the boundary conditions all have noticeable affects on the evolution of the thinning film. Good qualitative agreement between the model and the experiments is observed.

  16. COMPARISON OF ATMOSPHERIC MOTION VECTORS AND DENSE VECTOR FIELDS CALCULATED FROM MSG IMAGES

    E-print Network

    Szantai André

    COMPARISON OF ATMOSPHERIC MOTION VECTORS AND DENSE VECTOR FIELDS CALCULATED FROM MSG IMAGES André images [Corpetti et al., 2002]. This method has been applied on consecutive MSG images in the thermal at subsatellite point, 15 min standard time interval, 12 channels for MSG satellites). The progress on tracking

  17. Wave-vector dependence of magnetic-turbulence spectra in the solar wind.

    PubMed

    Narita, Y; Glassmeier, K-H; Sahraoui, F; Goldstein, M L

    2010-04-30

    Using four-point measurements of the Cluster spacecraft, the energy distribution was determined for magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind directly in the three-dimensional wave-vector domain in the range |k|field preferring the ecliptic north direction and also by a moderately extended structure parallel to the mean field. From the three-dimensional energy distribution wave vector anisotropy is estimated with respect to directions parallel and perpendicular to the mean magnetic field, and the result suggests the dominance of quasi-two-dimensional turbulence toward smaller spatial scales. PMID:20482101

  18. Electromagnetic fields satisfying the condition B vector product (del vector product B) = 0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evangelidis, E. A.

    1988-04-01

    This paper reexamines the hypothesis of Chu and Ohkawa (1982) who argued for the existence of force-free fields in electromagnetic and plasma theory with the property that the electric field is parallel to the magnetic field. It is proved that electromagnetic fields with electric and magnetic components parallel to one another are solutions of Maxwell's equation and that the magnetic-field equation of Chu and Okhawa (criticized by several authors) is gauge- and relativistically-invariant for specific directions dictated by the electric and magnetic field.

  19. Phenomenon of the time-reversal violating magnetic field generation by a static electric field in a medium and vacuum

    E-print Network

    Vladimir G. Baryshevsky

    1999-12-23

    It is shown that the T- and P-odd weak interactions yield to the existence of both electric field and magnetic (directed along the electric field) field around an electric charge. Similarly the assotiated magnetic field is directed along the vector of strength of stationary gravitational field.

  20. Evolution of pulsar magnetic fields

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Flowers; M. A. Ruderman

    1977-01-01

    Theoretical considerations of neutron star matter and magnetic fields suggest a picture of the evolution of pulsar dipole moments. At birth the spin axis and magnetic dipole are argued to be roughly aligned. Subsequently the magnetic dipole greatly diminishes in strength and changes its direction until it ultimately makes a large angle with the spin axis. This view is supported

  1. Theory of fossil magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudorov, Alexander E.; Khaibrakhmanov, Sergey A.

    2015-02-01

    Theory of fossil magnetic field is based on the observations, analytical estimations and numerical simulations of magnetic flux evolution during star formation in the magnetized cores of molecular clouds. Basic goals, main features of the theory and manifestations of MHD effects in young stellar objects are discussed.

  2. Cosmic Magnetic Fields - An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wielebinski, Richard; Beck, Rainer

    Magnetic fields have been known in antiquity. Aristotle attributes the first of what could be called a scientific discussion on magnetism to Thales, who lived from about 625 BC. In China “magnetic carts” were in use to help the Emperor in his journeys of inspection. Plinius comments that in the Asia Minor province of Magnesia shepherds' staffs get at times “glued” to a stone, a alodestone. In Europe the magnetic compass came through the Arab sailors who met the Portuguese explorers. The first scientific treatise on magnetism, “De Magnete”, was published by William Gilbert who in 1600 described his experiments and suggested that the Earth was a huge magnet. Johannes Kepler was a correspondent of Gilbert and at times suggested that planetary motion was due to magnetic forces. Alas, this concept was demolished by Isaac Newton,who seeing the falling apple decided that gravity was enough. This concept of dealing with gravitational forces only remains en vogue even today. The explanations why magnetic effects must be neglected go from “magnetic energy is only 1% of gravitation” to “magnetic fields only complicate the beautiful computer solutions”. What is disregarded is the fact that magnetic effects are very directional(not omni-directional as gravity) and also the fact that magnetic fields are seen every where in our cosmic universe.

  3. The Local Stellar Velocity Field via Vector Spherical Harmonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markarov, V. V.; Murphy, D. W.

    2007-01-01

    We analyze the local field of stellar tangential velocities for a sample of 42,339 nonbinary Hipparcos stars with accurate parallaxes, using a vector spherical harmonic formalism. We derive simple relations between the parameters of the classical linear model (Ogorodnikov-Milne) of the local systemic field and low-degree terms of the general vector harmonic decomposition. Taking advantage of these relationships, we determine the solar velocity with respect to the local stars of (V(sub X), V(sub Y), V(sub Z)) (10.5, 18.5, 7.3) +/- 0.1 km s(exp -1) not corrected for the asymmetric drift with respect to the local standard of rest. If only stars more distant than 100 pc are considered, the peculiar solar motion is (V(sub X), V(sub Y), V(sub Z)) (9.9, 15.6, 6.9) +/- 0.2 km s(exp -1). The adverse effects of harmonic leakage, which occurs between the reflex solar motion represented by the three electric vector harmonics in the velocity space and higher degree harmonics in the proper-motion space, are eliminated in our analysis by direct subtraction of the reflex solar velocity in its tangential components for each star. The Oort parameters determined by a straightforward least-squares adjustment in vector spherical harmonics are A=14.0 +/- 1.4, B=13.1 +/- 1.2, K=1.1 +/- 1.8, and C=2.9 +/- 1.4 km s(exp -1) kpc(exp -1). The physical meaning and the implications of these parameters are discussed in the framework of a general linear model of the velocity field. We find a few statistically significant higher degree harmonic terms that do not correspond to any parameters in the classical linear model. One of them, a third-degree electric harmonic, is tentatively explained as the response to a negative linear gradient of rotation velocity with distance from the Galactic plane, which we estimate at approximately -20 km s(exp -1) kpc(exp -1). A similar vertical gradient of rotation velocity has been detected for more distant stars representing the thick disk (z greater than 1 kpc), but here we surmise its existence in the thin disk at z less than 200 pc. The most unexpected and unexplained term within the Ogorodnikov-Milne model is the first-degree magnetic harmonic, representing a rigid rotation of the stellar field about the axis -Y pointing opposite to the direction of rotation. This harmonic comes out with a statistically robust coefficient of 6.2 +/- 0.9 km s(exp -1) kpc(exp -1) and is also present in the velocity field of more distant stars. The ensuing upward vertical motion of stars in the general direction of the Galactic center and the downward motion in the anticenter direction are opposite to the vector field expected from the stationary Galactic warp model.

  4. Origin of cosmic magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Campanelli, Leonardo

    2013-08-01

    We calculate, in the free Maxwell theory, the renormalized quantum vacuum expectation value of the two-point magnetic correlation function in de Sitter inflation. We find that quantum magnetic fluctuations remain constant during inflation instead of being washed out adiabatically, as usually assumed in the literature. The quantum-to-classical transition of super-Hubble magnetic modes during inflation allow us to treat the magnetic field classically after reheating, when it is coupled to the primeval plasma. The actual magnetic field is scale independent and has an intensity of few×10(-12)??G if the energy scale of inflation is few×10(16)??GeV. Such a field accounts for galactic and galaxy cluster magnetic fields. PMID:23971556

  5. Measurements of magnetic field alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchnir, M.; Schmidt, E.E.

    1987-11-06

    The procedure for installing Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) dipoles in their respective cryostats involves aligning the average direction of their field with the vertical to an accuracy of 0.5 mrad. The equipment developed for carrying on these measurements is described and the measurements performed on the first few prototypes SSC magnets are presented. The field angle as a function of position in these 16.6 m long magnets is a characteristic of the individual magnet with possible feedback information to its manufacturing procedure. A comparison of this vertical alignment characteristic with a magnetic field intensity (by NMR) characteristic for one of the prototypes is also presented. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  6. Energy momentum flows for the massive vector field

    E-print Network

    George Horton; Chris Dewdney

    2006-09-26

    We present a causal trajectory interpretation for the massive vector field, based on the flows of rest energy and a conserved density defined using the time-like eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the stress-energy-momentum tensor. This work extends our previous work which used a similar procedure for the scalar field. The massive, spin-one, complex vector field is discussed in detail and solutions are classified using the Pauli-Lubanski spin vector. The flows of energy-momentum are illustrated in a simple example of standing waves in a plane.

  7. Femtosecond Laser Processing by Using Patterned Vector Optical Fields

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Kai; Qian, Sheng-Xia; Ren, Zhi-Cheng; Tu, Chenghou; Li, Yongnan; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2013-01-01

    We present and demonstrate an approach for femtosecond laser processing by using patterned vector optical fields (PVOFs) composed of multiple individual vector optical fields. The PVOFs can be flexibly engineered due to the diversity of individual vector optical fields in spatial arrangement and distribution of states of polarization, and it is easily created with the aid of a spatial light modulator. The focused PVOFs will certainly result in various interference patterns, which are then used to fabricate multi-microholes with various patterns on silicon. The present approach can be expanded to fabricate three-dimensional microstructures based on two-photon polymerization. PMID:23884360

  8. Visualizing Vector Fields Using Line Integral Convolution and Dye Advection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Han-Wei; Johnson, Christopher R.; Ma, Kwan-Liu

    1996-01-01

    We present local and global techniques to visualize three-dimensional vector field data. Using the Line Integral Convolution (LIC) method to image the global vector field, our new algorithm allows the user to introduce colored 'dye' into the vector field to highlight local flow features. A fast algorithm is proposed that quickly recomputes the dyed LIC images. In addition, we introduce volume rendering methods that can map the LIC texture on any contour surface and/or translucent region defined by additional scalar quantities, and can follow the advection of colored dye throughout the volume.

  9. Rotating-frame gradient fields for magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance in low fields

    DOEpatents

    Bouchard, Louis-Serge; Pines, Alexander; Demas, Vasiliki

    2014-01-21

    A system and method for Fourier encoding a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal is disclosed. A static magnetic field B.sub.0 is provided along a first direction. An NMR signal from the sample is Fourier encoded by applying a rotating-frame gradient field B.sub.G superimposed on the B.sub.0, where the B.sub.G comprises a vector component rotating in a plane perpendicular to the first direction at an angular frequency .omega.in a laboratory frame. The Fourier-encoded NMR signal is detected.

  10. Three axis vector magnet set-up for cryogenic scanning probe microscopy.

    PubMed

    Galvis, J A; Herrera, E; Guillamón, I; Azpeitia, J; Luccas, R F; Munuera, C; Cuenca, M; Higuera, J A; Díaz, N; Pazos, M; García-Hernandez, M; Buendía, A; Vieira, S; Suderow, H

    2015-01-01

    We describe a three axis vector magnet system for cryogenic scanning probe microscopy measurements. We discuss the magnet support system and the power supply, consisting of a compact three way 100 A current source. We obtain tilted magnetic fields in all directions with maximum value of 5T along z-axis and of 1.2T for XY-plane magnetic fields. We describe a scanning tunneling microscopy-spectroscopy (STM-STS) set-up, operating in a dilution refrigerator, which includes a new high voltage ultralow noise piezodrive electronics and discuss the noise level due to vibrations. STM images and STS maps show atomic resolution and the tilted vortex lattice at 150 mK in the superconductor ?-Bi2Pd. We observe a strongly elongated hexagonal lattice, which corresponds to the projection of the tilted hexagonal vortex lattice on the surface. We also discuss Magnetic Force Microscopy images in a variable temperature insert. PMID:25638089

  11. Three axis vector magnet set-up for cryogenic scanning probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvis, J. A.; Herrera, E.; Guillamón, I.; Azpeitia, J.; Luccas, R. F.; Munuera, C.; Cuenca, M.; Higuera, J. A.; Díaz, N.; Pazos, M.; García-Hernandez, M.; Buendía, A.; Vieira, S.; Suderow, H.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a three axis vector magnet system for cryogenic scanning probe microscopy measurements. We discuss the magnet support system and the power supply, consisting of a compact three way 100 A current source. We obtain tilted magnetic fields in all directions with maximum value of 5T along z-axis and of 1.2T for XY-plane magnetic fields. We describe a scanning tunneling microscopy-spectroscopy (STM-STS) set-up, operating in a dilution refrigerator, which includes a new high voltage ultralow noise piezodrive electronics and discuss the noise level due to vibrations. STM images and STS maps show atomic resolution and the tilted vortex lattice at 150 mK in the superconductor ?-Bi2Pd. We observe a strongly elongated hexagonal lattice, which corresponds to the projection of the tilted hexagonal vortex lattice on the surface. We also discuss Magnetic Force Microscopy images in a variable temperature insert.

  12. The magnetic field of Mercury

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. J. Southwood

    1997-01-01

    The magnetic field of Mercury was measured on two fly-bys of the planet by the Mariner 10 space-craft. The presence of a field at Mercury is interesting for what it implies for both the internal and external sources of field. The internal field of the planet is almost certainly generated by an internal dynamo although there remain many puzzles as

  13. The magnetic field of Mercury

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. J. Southwood

    1997-01-01

    The magnetic field of Mercury was measured on two fly-bys of the planet by the Mariner 10 spacecraft. The presence of a field at Mercury is interesting for what it implies for both the internal and external sources of field. The internal field of the planet is almost certainly generated by an internal dynamo although there remain many puzzles as

  14. Measuring Earth's Local Magnetic Field Using a Helmholtz Coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Jonathan E.

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, I present a low-cost interactive experiment for measuring the strength of Earth's local magnetic field. This activity can be done in most high schools or two-year physics laboratories with limited resources, yet will have a tremendous learning impact. This experiment solidifies the three-dimensional nature of Earth's magnetic field vector and helps reinforce the aspect of the vertical component of Earth's magnetic field. Students should realize that Earth's magnetic field is not fully horizontal (except at the magnetic equator) and that a compass simply indicates the direction of the horizontal component of Earth's magnetic field. A magnetic dip needle compass can be used to determine the angle (known as the "dip angle" or "inclination angle") measured from the direction in which Earth's magnetic field vector points to the horizontal. In this activity, students will be able to determine the horizontal component of the field using a Helmholtz coil and, knowing the dip angle, the Earth's magnetic field strength can be determined.

  15. Analytical maximum likelihood estimation of stellar magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez González, M. J.; Manso Sainz, R.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Belluzzi, L.

    2012-01-01

    The polarized spectrum of stellar radiation encodes valuable information on the conditions of stellar atmospheres and the magnetic fields that permeate them. In this paper, we give explicit expressions to estimate the magnetic field vector and its associated error from the observed Stokes parameters. We study the solar case where specific intensities are observed and then the stellar case, where we receive the polarized flux. In the second case, we concentrate on the explicit expression for the case of a slow rotator with a dipolar magnetic field geometry. Moreover, we also give explicit formulae to retrieve the magnetic field vector from the least-squares deconvolution (LSD) profiles without assuming mean values for the LSD artificial spectral line. The formulae have been obtained assuming that the spectral lines can be described in the weak-field regime and using a maximum likelihood approach. The errors are recovered by means of the Hermitian matrix. The bias of the estimators is analysed in depth.

  16. Survey of the ULF wave Poynting vector near the Earth's magnetic equatorial plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartinger, M. D.; Moldwin, M. B.; Takahashi, K.; Bonnell, J. W.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2013-10-01

    Ultralow frequency (ULF) waves transfer energy in the Earth's magnetosphere through a variety of mechanisms that impact the Earth's ionosphere, radiation belts, and other plasma populations. Measurements of the electromagnetic portion of the energy transfer rate are an important source of information for assessing the importance of ULF waves relative to other energy transfer mechanisms as well as a diagnostic for studying the behavior of ULF waves. Using Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms satellite data, we examine the time?averaged electromagnetic energy transfer rate, or Poynting vector, as a function of frequency and region of the magnetosphere; for this study, we focus on the direction and rate of energy transfer relative to the background magnetic field, comparing perpendicular and parallel transfer rates. This study extends earlier studies of the ULF wave Poynting vector that focused on narrower frequency ranges or specific regions of the magnetosphere; here we consider the 3-50 mHz frequency range, all local time sectors, radial distances from 3 to 13 Re, and magnetic latitudes close to the equatorial plane. We measure time?averaged Poynting vectors that range from 10-11 to 10-5 W/m2 , with larger Poynting vector magnitudes occurring at larger radial distances and smaller frequencies. In every spatial region and frequency we examined, we found a large degree of scatter in both the Poynting vector magnitude and direction. The Poynting vector tends to be anisotropic at all frequencies, with more energy transferred along rather than across the background magnetic field. This preference for parallel energy transfer near the magnetic equator suggests that Joule dissipation in the ionosphere and the acceleration of auroral electrons are the largest sinks of ULF wave energy in the magnetosphere.

  17. THE LAW OF VECTOR FIELDS Daniel H. Gottlieb

    E-print Network

    with the same acceleration, or Kepler's * *laws governing the motion of the planets, or the daily movements THE LAW OF VECTOR FIELDS Daniel H. Something fantastically beautiful. This something is the existence of a few general laws or principles which

  18. Attenuated Vector Tomography -- An Approach to Image Flow Vector Fields with Doppler Ultrasonic Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Qiu; Peng, Qiyu; Huang, Bin; Cheryauka, Arvi; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2008-05-15

    The measurement of flow obtained using continuous wave Doppler ultrasound is formulated as a directional projection of a flow vector field. When a continuous ultrasound wave bounces against a flowing particle, a signal is backscattered. This signal obtains a Doppler frequency shift proportional to the speed of the particle along the ultrasound beam. This occurs for each particle along the beam, giving rise to a Doppler velocity spectrum. The first moment of the spectrum provides the directional projection of the flow along theultrasound beam. Signals reflected from points further away from the detector will have lower amplitude than signals reflected from points closer to the detector. The effect is very much akin to that modeled by the attenuated Radon transform in emission computed tomography.A least-squares method was adopted to reconstruct a 2D vector field from directional projection measurements. Attenuated projections of only the longitudinal projections of the vector field were simulated. The components of the vector field were reconstructed using the gradient algorithm to minimize a least-squares criterion. This result was compared with the reconstruction of longitudinal projections of the vector field without attenuation. Ifattenuation is known, the algorithm was able to accurately reconstruct both components of the full vector field from only one set of directional projection measurements. A better reconstruction was obtained with attenuation than without attenuation implying that attenuation provides important information for the reconstruction of flow vector fields.This confirms previous work where we showed that knowledge of the attenuation distribution helps in the reconstruction of MRI diffusion tensor fields from fewer than the required measurements. In the application of ultrasound the attenuation distribution is obtained with pulse wave transmission computed tomography and flow information is obtained with continuous wave Doppler.

  19. The Global Magnetic Field of Mars and Implications for Crustal Evolution

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. E. P. Connerney; M. H. Acuña; P. J. Wasilewski; G. Kletetschka; N. F. Ness; J. E. P. Connerney; B. Lin; D. L. Mitchell

    2001-01-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft, in nearly circular polar orbit with mean altitude of 400 km, obtained globally-distributed vector magnetic field measurements above the surface of Mars. Observations from March, 1999 through August, 2000 have been compiled to produce the first nearly complete global magnetic field maps of Mars. Mars crustal magnetization appears dichotomized, with intense magnetization mainly confined to

  20. Photon Magnetic Moment and Vacuum Magnetization in an Asymptotically Large Magnetic Field

    E-print Network

    Selym Villalba Chavez

    2010-08-09

    We consider the effect of the photon radiative correction on the vacuum energy in a superstrong magnetic field. The notion of a photon anomalous magnetic moment is analyzed and its connection with the quasiparticle character of the electromagnetic radiation is established. In the infrared domain the magnetic moment turns out to be a vector with two orthogonal components in correspondence with the cylindrical symmetry imposed by the external field. The possibility of defining such quantity in the high energy limit is studied as well. Its existence suggests that the electromagnetic radiation is a source of magnetization to the whole vacuum and thus its electron-positron zero-point energy is slightly modified. The corresponding contribution to the vacuum magnetization density is determined by considering the individual contribution of each vacuum polarization eigenmode in the Euler-Heisenberg Lagrangian. A paramagnetic response is found in one of them, whereas the remaining ones are diamagnetic. Additional issues concerning the transverse pressures are analyzed.

  1. Vector Field Visual Data Analysis Technologies for Petascale Computational Science

    SciTech Connect

    Garth, Christoph; Deines, Eduard; Joy, Kenneth I.; Bethel, E. Wes; Childs, Hank; Weber, Gunther; Ahern, Sean; Pugmire, Dave; Sanderson, Allen; Johnson, Chris

    2009-11-13

    State-of-the-art computational science simulations generate large-scale vector field data sets. Visualization and analysis is a key aspect of obtaining insight into these data sets and represents an important challenge. This article discusses possibilities and challenges of modern vector field visualization and focuses on methods and techniques developed in the SciDAC Visualization and Analytics Center for Enabling Technologies (VACET) and deployed in the open-source visualization tool, VisIt.

  2. A Metric property of Cherry Vector Fields on the torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes, Pedro

    In this paper we consider Cherry Vector Fields on the torus with exactly two singularities: one sink and one saddle, and we prove that the stable manifold of the sink has full Lebesgue measure, whenever the divergence of the vector field at the saddle is less than or equal to zero. This result follows from a result dealing with monotone circle mappings which are constant on an interval.

  3. Conformal Killing vector fields and a virial theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cariñena, José F.; Gheorghiu, Irina; Martínez, Eduardo; Santos, Patrícia

    2014-11-01

    The virial theorem is formulated both intrinsically and in local coordinates for a Lagrangian system of a mechanical type on a Riemann manifold. An important case studied in this paper is that of an affine virial function associated with a vector field on the configuration manifold. The special cases of a virial function associated with a Killing, a homothetic, and a conformal Killing vector field are considered and the corresponding virial theorems are established for these types of functions.

  4. Robust Morse decompositions of piecewise constant vector fields.

    PubMed

    Szymczak, Andrzej; Zhang, Eugene

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new approach to computing a Morse decomposition of a vector field on a triangulated manifold surface. The basic idea is to convert the input vector field to a piecewise constant (PC) vector field, whose trajectories can be computed using simple geometric rules. To overcome the intrinsic difficulty in PC vector fields (in particular, discontinuity along mesh edges), we borrow results from the theory of differential inclusions. The input vector field and its PC variant have similar Morse decompositions. We introduce a robust and efficient algorithm to compute Morse decompositions of a PC vector field. Our approach provides subtriangle precision for Morse sets. In addition, we describe a Morse set classification framework which we use to color code the Morse sets in order to enhance the visualization. We demonstrate the benefits of our approach with three well-known simulation data sets, for which our method has produced Morse decompositions that are similar to or finer than those obtained using existing techniques, and is over an order of magnitude faster. PMID:21747131

  5. Project MAGNET High-level Vector Survey Data Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, Rachel J.

    1992-01-01

    Since 1951, the U.S. Navy, under its Project MAGNET program, has been continuously collecting vector aeromagnetic survey data to support the U.S. Defense Mapping Agency's world magnetic and charting program. During this forty-year period, a variety of survey platforms and instrumentation configurations have been used. The current Project MAGNET survey platform is a Navy Orion RP-3D aircraft which has been specially modified and specially equipped with a redundant suite of navigational positioning, attitude, and magnetic sensors. A review of the survey data collection procedures and calibration and editing techniques applied to the data generated by this suite of instrumentation will be presented. Among the topics covered will be the determination of its parameters from the low-level calibration maneuvers flown over geomagnetic observatories.

  6. The magnetic field of Neptune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Acuna, Mario H.; Ness, Norman F.

    1992-01-01

    A model is given of the planetary magnetic field of Neptune based on a spherical harmonic analysis of the observations obtained by the Voyager 2. Generalized inverse techniques are used to partially solve a severely underdetermined inverse problem, and the resulting model is nonunique since the observations are limited in spatial distribution. Dipole, quadrupole, and octupole coefficients are estimated independently of other terms, and the parameters are shown to be well constrained by the measurement data. The large-scale features of the magnetic field including dipole tilt, offset, and harmonic content are found to characterize a magnetic field that is similar to that of Uranus. The traits of Neptune's magnetic field are theorized to relate to the 'ice' interior of the planet, and the dynamo-field generation reflects this poorly conducting planet.

  7. Resonant magnetic fields from inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Byrnes, Christian T. [CERN, PH-TH Division, CH-1211, Genève 23 (Switzerland); Hollenstein, Lukas; Jain, Rajeev Kumar [Département de Physique Théorique and Center for Astroparticle Physics, Université de Genève, 24, Quai Ernest Ansermet, CH-1211 Genève 4 (Switzerland); Urban, Federico R., E-mail: cbyrnes@cern.ch, E-mail: lukas.hollenstein@unige.ch, E-mail: rajeev.jain@unige.ch, E-mail: urban@phas.ubc.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z1 (Canada)

    2012-03-01

    We propose a novel scenario to generate primordial magnetic fields during inflation induced by an oscillating coupling of the electromagnetic field to the inflaton. This resonant mechanism has two key advantages over previous proposals. First of all, it generates a narrow band of magnetic fields at any required wavelength, thereby allaying the usual problem of a strongly blue spectrum and its associated backreaction. Secondly, it avoids the need for a strong coupling as the coupling is oscillating rather than growing or decaying exponentially. Despite these major advantages, we find that the backreaction is still far too large during inflation if the generated magnetic fields are required to have a strength of O(10{sup ?15} Gauss) today on observationally interesting scales. We provide a more general no-go argument, proving that this problem will apply to any model in which the magnetic fields are generated on subhorizon scales and freeze after horizon crossing.

  8. Resonant magnetic fields from inflation

    E-print Network

    Christian T. Byrnes; Lukas Hollenstein; Rajeev Kumar Jain; Federico R. Urban

    2012-03-06

    We propose a novel scenario to generate primordial magnetic fields during inflation induced by an oscillating coupling of the electromagnetic field to the inflaton. This resonant mechanism has two key advantages over previous proposals. First of all, it generates a narrow band of magnetic fields at any required wavelength, thereby allaying the usual problem of a strongly blue spectrum and its associated backreaction. Secondly, it avoids the need for a strong coupling as the coupling is oscillating rather than growing or decaying exponentially. Despite these major advantages, we find that the backreaction is still far too large during inflation if the generated magnetic fields are required to have a strength of order 10^{-15} Gauss today on observationally interesting scales. We provide a more general no-go argument, proving that this problem will apply to any model in which the magnetic fields are generated on subhorizon scales and freeze after horizon crossing.

  9. Vector spherical wavefunctions for orthorhombic dielectric-magnetic material with gyrotropic-like magnetoelectric properties

    E-print Network

    Lakhtakia, Akhlesh; 10.1007/s12596-012-0084-y

    2012-01-01

    Vector spherical wavefunctions were derived in closed-form to represent time-harmonic electromagnetic fields in an orthorhombic dielectric-magnetic material with gyrotropic-like magnetoelectric properties. These wavefunctions were used to formulate the T matrix for scattering by a three-dimensional object composed of the chosen material. Furthermore, a closed-form, coordinate-free expression of the dyadic Green function for the chosen material was derived. Expressions ascertained for the singularity behavior will be useful for formulating volume integral equations for scattering inside the chosen material. A bilinear expansion of the dyadic Green function was obtained in terms of the derived vector spherical wavefunctions.

  10. Evolution of magnetic field inclination in a forming penumbra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jur?ák, Jan; Bello González, Nazaret; Schlichenmaier, Rolf; Rezaei, Reza

    2014-12-01

    As a sunspot penumbra forms, the magnetic field vector at the outer boundary of the protospot undergoes a transformation. We study the changes of the magnetic field vector at this boundary as a penumbral segment forms. We analyze a set of spectropolarimetric maps covering 2 hr during the formation of a sunspot in NOAA 11024. The data were recorded with the GFPI instrument attached to the German VTT. We observe a stationary umbra/quiet Sun boundary, where the magnetic field becomes more horizontal with time. The magnetic field inclination increases by 5°, reaching a maximum value of about 59°. The maximum inclination coincides with the onset of filament formation. In time, the penumbra filaments become longer and the penumbral bright grains protrude into the umbra, where the magnetic field is stronger and more vertical. Consequently, we observe a decrease in the magnetic field inclination at the boundary as the penumbra grows. In summary, in order to initiate the formation of the penumbra, the magnetic field at the umbral (protospot) boundary becomes more inclined. As the penumbra grows, the umbra/penumbra boundary migrates inwards, and at this boundary the magnetic field turns more vertical again, while it remains inclined in the outer penumbra.

  11. Magnetoacoustic Tomography with Magnetic Induction: Bioimepedance reconstruction through vector source imaging

    PubMed Central

    Mariappan, Leo; He, Bin

    2013-01-01

    Magneto acoustic tomography with magnetic induction (MAT-MI) is a technique proposed to reconstruct the conductivity distribution in biological tissue at ultrasound imaging resolution. A magnetic pulse is used to generate eddy currents in the object, which in the presence of a static magnetic field induces Lorentz force based acoustic waves in the medium. This time resolved acoustic waves are collected with ultrasound transducers and, in the present work, these are used to reconstruct the current source which gives rise to the MAT-MI acoustic signal using vector imaging point spread functions. The reconstructed source is then used to estimate the conductivity distribution of the object. Computer simulations and phantom experiments are performed to demonstrate conductivity reconstruction through vector source imaging in a circular scanning geometry with a limited bandwidth finite size piston transducer. The results demonstrate that the MAT-MI approach is capable of conductivity reconstruction in a physical setting. PMID:23322761

  12. Unveiling locally linearly polarized vector fields with broken axial symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xilin; Lou Kai; Chen Jing; Gu Bing; Li Yongnan [School of Physics and Key Laboratory of Weak Light Nonlinear Photonics, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Wang Huitian [School of Physics and Key Laboratory of Weak Light Nonlinear Photonics, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Nanjing National Laboratory of Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2011-06-15

    We explore how the focusing of axial-symmetry-broken vector fields is associated with a sector aperture whose apex coincides with the field axis. Its focused field is azimuthally split into a pair of orthogonal right- and left-handed circularly polarized partial rings which are rotated by angles of {+-}{pi}/2 with respect to the input vector field carrying no orbital angular momentum (OAM) and no spin angular momentum (SAM), respectively. Each member of the pair of partial rings carries not only the opposite OAM but also the opposite SAM. We unveil the underlying physics behind such an effect.

  13. Schrödinger operators with magnetic fields

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. E. Avron; I. W. Herbst; B. Simon

    1981-01-01

    We prove a large number of results about atoms in constant magnetic field including (i) Asymptotic formula for the ground state energy of Hydrogen in large field, (ii) Proof that the ground state of Hydrogen in an arbitrary constant field hasLz = 0 and of the monotonicity of the binding energy as a function ofB, (iii) Borel summability of Zeeman

  14. Gauge Fields, Membranes, and Subdeterminant Vector Models

    SciTech Connect

    Leigh, Robert G.; Mauri, Andrea; Minic, Djordje; Petkou, Anastasios C. [Department of Physics, University of Illinois, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Dipartimento di Fisica Teorica, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria, Milano 20133 (Italy); IPNAS, Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Crete, GR-71003, Heraklion (Greece)

    2010-06-04

    We present a class of classically marginal N-vector models in d=4 and d=3 whose scalar potentials can be written as subdeterminants of symmetric matrices. The d=3 case can be thought of as a generalization of the scalar sector of the Bagger-Lambert-Gustavsson model. Using the Hubbard-Stratonovich transformation we calculate their effective potentials which exhibit intriguing large-N scaling behaviors. We comment on the possible relevance of our models to strings, membranes, and also to a class of novel spin systems that are based on ternary commutation relations.

  15. Full vector spherical harmonic analysis of the Holocene geomagnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Marcia

    High-quality time-series paleomagnetic measurements have been used to derive spherical harmonic models of Earth's magnetic field for the past 2,000 years. A newly-developed data compilation, PSVMOD2.0 consists of time-series directional and intensity records that significantly improve the data quality and global distribution used to develop previous spherical harmonic models. PSVMOD2.0 consists of 185 paleomagnetic time series records from 85 global sites, including 30 full-vector records (inclination, declination and intensity). It includes data from additional sites in the Southern Hemisphere and Arctic and includes globally distributed sediment relative paleointensity records, significantly improving global coverage over previous models. PSVMOD2.0 records have been assessed in a series of 7 regional intercomparison studies, four in the Northern Hemisphere and 3 in the southern hemisphere. Comparisons on a regional basis have improved the quality and chronology of the data and allowed investigation of spatial coherence and the scale length associated with paleomagnetic secular variation (PSV) features. We have developed a modeling methodology based on nonlinear inversion of the PSVMOD2.0 directional and intensity records. Models of the geomagnetic field in 100-year snapshots have been derived for the past 2,000 with the ultimate goal of developing models spanning the past 8,000 years. We validate the models and the methodology by comparing with the GUFM1 historical models during the 400-year period of overlap. We find that the spatial distribution of sites and quality of data are sufficient to derive models that agree with GUFM1 in the large-scale characteristics of the field. We use the the models derived in this study to downward continue the field to the core-mantle boundary and examine characteristics of the large-scale structure of the magnetic field at the source region. The derived models are temporally consistent from one epoch to the next and exhibit many of the expected characteristics of the field over time (high-latitude flux lobes, South Atlantic reverse flux patch, north pole reverse or null flux region).

  16. Investigating Magnetic Force Fields

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Daryl ("Tish") Monjeau, Bancroft Elementary School, Minneapolis, MN

    2012-03-18

    In this classroom activity, the students will investigate the magnetic pull of a bar magnet at varying distances with the use of paper clips. Students will hypothesize, conduct the experiment, collect the data, and draw conclusions that support their data. Each student will record the experiment and their findings in their science journals. As a class, students will compare each groups' data and their interpretation of the results.

  17. Reconnection of stressed magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hassam, A. B.

    1992-01-01

    It is shown that magnetized plasma configurations under magnetic stress relax irreversibly to the state of minimum stress at a rate that is essentially Alfvenic provided a magnetic null is present. The relaxation is effected by the reconnection at the field null and proceeds at a rate proportional to the absolute value of ln(eta) exp-1, where eta is the resistivity. An analytic calculation in the linear regime is presented.

  18. Preface: Cosmic magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosovichev, Alexander

    2015-02-01

    Recent advances in observations and modeling have opened new perspectives for the understanding of fundamental dynamical processes of cosmic magnetism, and associated magnetic activity on the Sun, stars and galaxies. The goal of the Special Issue is to discuss the progress in solar physics and astrophysics, similarities and differences in phenomenology and physics of magnetic phenomena on the Sun and other stars. Space observatories, ground-based telescopes, and new observational methods have provided tremendous amount of data that need to be analyzed and understood. The solar observations discovered multi-scale organization of solar activity, dramatically changing current paradigms of solar variability. On the other side, stellar observations discovered new regimes of dynamics and magnetism that are different from the corresponding solar phenomena, but described by the same physics. Stars represent an astrophysical laboratory for studying the dynamical, magnetic and radiation processes across a broad range of stellar masses and ages. These studies allow us to look at the origin and evolution of our Sun, whereas detailed investigations of the solar magnetism give us a fundamental basis for interpretation and understanding of unresolved stellar data.

  19. Measuring Earth's Magnetic Field Simply.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Gay B.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a method for measuring the earth's magnetic field using an empty toilet paper tube, copper wire, clear tape, a battery, a linear variable resistor, a small compass, cardboard, a protractor, and an ammeter. (WRM)

  20. The ACE Magnetic Fields Experiment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. W. Smith; J. L'Heureux; N. F. Ness; M. H. Acuña; L. F. Burlaga; J. Scheifele

    1998-01-01

    The magnetic field experiment on ACE provides continuous measurements of the local magnetic field in the interplanetary medium.\\u000a These measurements are essential in the interpretation of simultaneous ACE observations of energetic and thermal particles\\u000a distributions. The experiment consists of a pair of twin, boom- mounted, triaxial fluxgate sensors which are located 165 inches\\u000a (=4.19 m) from the center of the

  1. Magnetic resonance in an elliptic magnetic field

    E-print Network

    E. A. Ivanchenko

    2004-04-20

    The behaviour of a particle with a spin 1/2 and a dipole magnetic moment in a time-varying magnetic field in the form $(h_0 cn(\\omega t,k), h_0 sn(\\omega t,k), H_0 dn(\\omega t,k))$, where $\\omega$ is the driving field frequency, $t$ is the time, $h_0$ and $H_0$ are the field amplitudes, $cn$, $sn$, $dn$ are Jacobi elliptic functions, $ k$ is the modulus of the elliptic functions has been considered. The variation parameter $k$ from zero to 1 gives rise to a wide set of functions from trigonometric shapes to exponential pulse shapes modulating the field. The problem was reduced to the solution of general Heun' equation. The exact solution of the wave function was found at resonance for any $ k$. It has been shown that the transition probability in this case does not depend on $k$. The present study may be useful for analysis interference experiments, improving magnetic spectrometers and the field of quantum computing.

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging System Based on Earth's Magnetic Field

    E-print Network

    StepiÂ?nik, Janez

    magnetic field can be partly compensated by the receiving coil design and shielding of electromagnetic pick magnetic fields. Common sources of static magnetic fields are super conducting coils, electromagnets, and permanent magnets. The induced magnetization, and thus the signal, is proportional to the magnitude

  3. The magnetic field of Neptune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Acuna, Mario H.; Ness, Norman F.

    1991-01-01

    The Voyager 2 observations obtained during the Neptune encounter are used to develop a spherical harmonic model of the planetary magnetic field of Neptune. The model yields a dipole of magnitude 0.14 G R(N) exp 3, tilted by 47 deg toward 72 deg west longitude. Neptune's quadrupole is equal to or exceeding in magnitude the surface dipole field; the octupole is also very large, although less well constrained. The characteristics of the Neptune's magnetic field are illustrated using contour maps of the field on the planet's surface.

  4. Optical sensor of magnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Butler, M.A.; Martin, S.J.

    1986-03-25

    An optical magnetic field strength sensor for measuring the field strength of a magnetic field comprising a dilute magnetic semi-conductor probe having first and second ends, longitudinally positioned in the magnetic field for providing Faraday polarization rotation of light passing therethrough relative to the strength of the magnetic field. Light provided by a remote light source is propagated through an optical fiber coupler and a single optical fiber strand between the probe and the light source for providing a light path therebetween. A polarizer and an apparatus for rotating the polarization of the light is provided in the light path and a reflector is carried by the second end of the probe for reflecting the light back through the probe and thence through the polarizer to the optical coupler. A photo detector apparatus is operably connected to the optical coupler for detecting and measuring the intensity of the reflected light and comparing same to the light source intensity whereby the magnetic field strength may be calculated.

  5. The magnetic field of Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ness, N. F.

    1977-01-01

    The Mariner 10 spacecraft encountered Mercury three times in 1974-1975. The first and third encounters provided detailed observations of a well-developed detached bow shock wave which results from the interaction of the solar wind. The planet possesses a global magnetic field and a modest magnetosphere, which deflects the solar wind. The field is approximately dipolar, with orientation in the same sense as earth, tilted 12 deg from the rotation axis. The magnetic moment corresponds to an undistorted equatorial field intensity of 350 gammas, approximately 1% of earth's. The field, while unequivocally intrinsic to the planet, may be due to remanent magnetization acquired from an extinct dynamo or a primordial magnetic field or due to a presently active dynamo. The latter possibility appears more plausible at present. In any case, the existence of the magnetic field provides very strong evidence of a mature differentiated planetary interior with a large core (core radius about 0.7 Mercury radius) and a record of the history of planetary formation in the magnetization of the crustal rocks.

  6. Chiral transition with magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, Alejandro; Hernández, Luis Alberto; Mizher, Ana Júlia; Rojas, Juan Cristóbal; Villavicencio, Cristián

    2014-06-01

    We study the nature of the chiral transition for an effective theory with spontaneous breaking of symmetry, where charged bosons and fermions are subject to the effects of a constant external magnetic field. The problem is studied in terms of the relative intensity of the magnetic field with respect to the mass and the temperature. When the former is the smallest of the scales, we present a suitable method to obtain magnetic and thermal corrections up to ring order at high temperature. By these means, we solve the problem of the instability in the boson sector for these theories, where the squared masses—taken as functions of the order parameter—can vanish and even become negative. The solution is found by considering the screening properties of the plasma, encoded in the resummation of the ring diagrams at high temperature. We also study the case where the magnetic field is the intermediate of the three scales and explore the nature of the chiral transition as we vary the field strength, the coupling constants, and the number of fermions. We show that the critical temperature for the restoration of chiral symmetry monotonically increases from small to intermediate values of the magnetic field and that this temperature is always above the critical temperature for the case when the magnetic field is absent.

  7. The scientific case for magnetic field satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backus, George E. (editor); Benton, Edward R.; Harrison, Christopher G. A.; Heirtzler, James R.

    1987-01-01

    To make full use of modern magnetic data and the paleomagnetic record, we must greatly improve our understanding of how the geodynamo system works. It is clearly nonlinear, probably chaotic, and its dimensionless parameters cannot yet be reproduced on a laboratory scale. It is accessible only to theory and to measurements made at and above the earth's surface. These measurements include essentially all geophysical types. Gravity and seismology give evidence for undulations in the core-mantle boundary (CMB) and for temperature variations in the lower mantle which can affect core convection and hence the dynamo. VLBI measurements of the variations in the Chandler wobble and length of day are affected by, among other things, the electromagnetic and mechanical transfer of angular momentum across the CMB. Finally, measurements of the vector magnetic field, its intensity, or its direction, give the most direct access to the core dynamo and the electrical conductivity of the lower mantle. The 120 gauss coefficients of degrees up to 10 probably come from the core, with only modest interference by mantle conductivity and crustal magnetization. By contrast, only three angular accelerations enter the problem of angular momentum transfer across the CMB. Satellite measurements of the vector magnetic field are uniquely able to provide the spatial coverage required for extrapolation to the CMB, and to isolate and measure certain magnetic signals which to the student of the geodynamo represent noise, but which are of great interest elsewhere in geophysics. Here, these claims are justified and the mission parameters likely to be scientifically most useful for observing the geodynamo system are described.

  8. Measurements of Magnetic Field Convection in Spherical Liquid Sodium Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luh, W. J.; Reighard, A. B.; Trucksess, C. D.; Brown, M. R.

    1998-11-01

    We have performed magnetic field measurements both inside and outside a 0.15 m diameter sphere of flowing liquid sodium. Experiments have been conducted in both smooth (laminar flow) and corrugated (turbulent flow) Pyrex spheres. A teflon stirrer generates a non-axisymmetric MHD flow with a magnetic Reynold's number <= 5. Control experiments in water will also be conducted. A precision vector magnetometer measured the effect of rotating liquid sodium on an applied magnetic field (10 Gauss), detecting disturbances of a few percent (0.2-0.3 Gauss). A lock-in amplifier and boxcar averager with pick-up loops are used to measure magnetic fields in the flow. Preliminary results indicate evidence of both toroidal and poloidal convection of the magnetic field (internally and externally); total magnetic flux remains approximately fixed. Results will be compared with TRIM MHD computer simulations.

  9. On a New 4-Vector Cosmological Field Theory

    E-print Network

    G. G. Nyambuya

    2009-05-05

    The original Dirac Equation is modified in the simplest imaginable and most trivial manner to include a universal 4-Vector Cosmological Field term in the space and time dimensions. This cosmological field leads to a modified Dirac Equation capable of explaining why the Universe appears to be made up chiefly of matter. It is seen that this 4-Vector Cosmological Field is actually a particle field and this particle field can possibly be identified with the darkmatter and darkenergy field. Further, this 4-Vector Cosmological Field is seen to give spacetime the desired quantum mechanical properties of randomness. Furthermore, it is seen that in the emergent Universe, the position coordinates of a particle in space -- contrary to the widely accepted belief that the position of a particle in space has no physical significance, we see that that opposite is true - namely that the position of a particle has physical significance. We further note that the 4-Vector Cosmological Field modification to the Dirac Equation leads us to a vacuum model redolent but different from that of Quantum Electrodynamics (QED). This new vacuum model is without virtual particles but darkparticles. We dare to make the suggestion that these darkparticles may possibly explain the current mystery of what really is darkmatter and darkenergy.

  10. Pattern forced geophysical vector field segmentation based on Clifford FFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Linwang; Yu, Zhaoyuan; Luo, Wen; Yi, Lin; Hu, Yong

    2013-10-01

    Vector field segmentation is gaining increasing importance in geophysics research. Existing vector field segmentation methods usually can only handle the statistical characteristics of the original data. It is hard to integrate the patterns forced by certain geophysical phenomena. In this paper, a template matching method is firstly constructed on the foundation of the Clifford Fourier Transformation (CFT). The geometric meanings of both inner and outer components can provide more attractive information about the similarities between original vector field and template data. A composed similarity field is constructed based on the coefficients fields. After that, a modified spatial consistency preserving K-Means cluster algorithm is proposed. This algorithm is applied to the similarity fields to extract the template forced spatial distribution pattern. The complete algorithm for the overall processing is given and the experiments of ENSO forced global ocean surface wind segmentation are configured to test our method. The results suggest that the pattern forced segmentation can extract more latent information that cannot be directly measured from the original data. And the spatial distribution of ENSO influence on the surface wind field is clearly given in the segmentation result. All the above suggest that the method we proposed provides powerful and new thoughts and tools for geophysical vector field data analysis.

  11. Constructing streak surfaces for 3D unsteady vector fields

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tony McLoughlin; Robert S. Laramee; Eugene Zhang

    2010-01-01

    Visualization of 3D, unsteady flow (4D) is very difficult due to both perceptual challenges and the large size of 4D vector field data. One approach to this challenge is to use integral surfaces to visualize the 4D properties of the field. However the construction of streak surfaces has remained elusive due to problems stemming from expensive computation and complex meshing

  12. CHAPTER 3. STRUCTURE OF MAGNETIC FIELDS 1 Structure of Magnetic

    E-print Network

    Callen, James D.

    CHAPTER 3. STRUCTURE OF MAGNETIC FIELDS 1 Chapter 3 Structure of Magnetic Fields Many of the most in Fig. 3.1, the generic structure of the magnetic field can be open (a­c and f) or closed (d,e). In open). The magnetic field structure in closed configurations (d,e) is toroidal in character or topology. That is, its

  13. On the relation between photospheric flow fields and the magnetic field distribution on the solar surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, George W.; Title, A. M.; Topka, K. P.; Tarbell, T. D.; Shine, R. A.

    1988-01-01

    Using the technique of local correlation tracking on a 28 minute time sequence of white-light images of solar granulation, the horizontal flow field on the solar surface is measured. The time series was obtained by the Solar Optical Universal Polarimeter (SOUP) on Spacelab 2 (Space Shuttle flight 51-F) and is free from atmospheric blurring and distortion. The SOUP flow fields have been compared with carefully aligned magnetograms taken over a nine hour period at the Big Bear Solar Observatory before, during, and after the SOUP images. The flow field and the magnetic field agree in considerable detail: vectors which define the flow of the white-light intensity pattern (granulation) point toward magnetic field regions, magnetic fields surround flow cells, and magnetic features move along the flow arrows. The projected locations of free particles ('corks') in the measured flow field congregate at the same locations where the magnetic field is observed.

  14. ?-JETS OF DIFEOMORPHISMS PRESERVING ORBITS OF VECTOR FIELDS

    E-print Network

    Sergiy Maksymenko

    Abstract. Let F be a C ? vector field at the origin O ? Rn, F(O) = 0, and Ft be its local flow. Denote by Ê(F) the set of germs of orbit preserving diffeomorphisms h: R n ? R n at O, and let Êid(F) r, (r ? 0), be the identity component of Ê(F) with respect to Cr topology. Then Êid(F) ? contains a subset ˆ Sh(F) consisting of maps of the form F?(x)(x), where ?: Rn ? R runs over the space of all smooth germs at O. It was proved earlier by the author that if F is a linear vector field, then ˆ Sh(F) = Êid(F) 0. In this paper we present a class of vector fields with degenetare singularities at O for which ˆ Sh(F) coincides with Êid(F) 1 on the level of ?-jets. We also establish a parameter rigidity of linear vector fields and “reduced ” Hamiltonian vector fields of real homogeneous polynomials in two variables. Keywords: orbit preserving diffeomorphism, parameter rigidity, Borel’s theorem. AMSClass: 37C10 1.

  15. jets of diffeomorphisms preserving orbits of vector fields

    E-print Network

    Sergiy Maksymenko

    Abstract. Let F be a C ? vector field defined near the origin O ? Rn, F(O) = 0, and (Ft) be its local flow. Denote by Ê(F) the set of germs of orbit preserving diffeomorphisms h: R n ? R n at O, and let Êid(F) r, (r ? 0), be the identity component of Ê(F) with respect to Cr topology. Then Êid(F) ? contains a subset ˆ Sh(F) consisting of maps of the form F?(x)(x), where ?: Rn ? R runs over the space of all smooth germs at O. It was proved earlier by the author that if F is a linear vector field, then ˆ Sh(F) = Êid(F) 0. In this paper we present a class of examples of vector fields with degenerate singularities at O for which ˆ Sh(F) formally coincides with Êid(F) 1, i.e. on the level of ?-jets at O. We also establish parameter rigidity of linear vector fields and “reduced ” Hamiltonian vector fields of real homogeneous polynomials in two variables. Keywords: orbit preserving diffeomorphism, parameter rigidity, Borel’s theorem. AMSClass: 37C10 1.

  16. Magnetic Field Generation in Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrario, Lilia; Melatos, Andrew; Zrake, Jonathan

    2015-03-01

    Enormous progress has been made on observing stellar magnetism in stars from the main sequence (particularly thanks to the MiMeS, MAGORI and BOB surveys) through to compact objects. Recent data have thrown into sharper relief the vexed question of the origin of stellar magnetic fields, which remains one of the main unanswered questions in astrophysics. In this chapter we review recent work in this area of research. In particular, we look at the fossil field hypothesis which links magnetism in compact stars to magnetism in main sequence and pre-main sequence stars and we consider why its feasibility has now been questioned particularly in the context of highly magnetic white dwarfs. We also review the fossil versus dynamo debate in the context of neutron stars and the roles played by key physical processes such as buoyancy, helicity, and superfluid turbulence, in the generation and stability of neutron star fields. Independent information on the internal magnetic field of neutron stars will come from future gravitational wave detections. Coherent searches for the Crab pulsar with the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO) have already constrained its gravitational wave luminosity to be ?2 % of the observed spin-down luminosity, thus placing a limit of ?1016 G on the internal field. Indirect spin-down limits inferred from recycled pulsars also yield interesting gravitational-wave-related constraints. Thus we may be at the dawn of a new era of exciting discoveries in compact star magnetism driven by the opening of a new, non-electromagnetic observational window. We also review recent advances in the theory and computation of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence as it applies to stellar magnetism and dynamo theory. These advances offer insight into the action of stellar dynamos as well as processes which control the diffusive magnetic flux transport in stars.

  17. Cosmic Structure of Magnetic Fields

    E-print Network

    Peter L. Biermann; Hyesung Kang; Joerg P. Rachen; Dongsu Ryu

    1997-09-25

    The simulations of the formation of cosmological structure allows to determine the spatial inhomogeneity of cosmic magnetic fields. Such simulations, however, do not give an absolute number for the strength of the magnetic field due to insufficient spatial resolution. Combining these simulations with observations of the Rotation Measure to distant radio sources allows then to deduce upper limits for the strength of the magnetic field. These upper limits are of order 0.2 - 2 muG along the filaments and sheets of the galaxy distribution. In one case, the sheet outside the Coma cluster, there is a definitive estimate of the strength of the magnetic field consistent with this range. Such estimates are almost three orders of magnitude higher than hitherto assumed usually. High energy cosmic ray particles can be either focussed or strongly scattered in such magnetic filaments and sheets, depending on the initial transverse momentum. The cosmological background in radio and X-ray wavelengths will have contributions from these intergalactic filaments and sheets, should the magnetic fields really be as high as 0.2 - 2 muG.

  18. Introduction to power-frequency electric and magnetic fields.

    PubMed Central

    Kaune, W T

    1993-01-01

    This paper introduces the reader to electric and magnetic fields, particularly those fields produced by electric power systems and other sources using frequencies in the power-frequency range. Electric fields are produced by electric charges; a magnetic field also is produced if these charges are in motion. Electric fields exert forces on other charges; if in motion, these charges will experience magnetic forces. Power-frequency electric and magnetic fields induce electric currents in conducting bodies such as living organisms. The current density vector is used to describe the distribution of current within a body. The surface of the human body is an excellent shield for power-frequency electric fields, but power-frequency magnetic fields penetrate without significant attenuation; the electric fields induced inside the body by either exposure are comparable in magnitude. Electric fields induced inside a human by most environmental electric and magnetic fields appear to be small in magnitude compared to levels naturally occurring in living tissues. Detection of such fields thus would seem to require the existence of unknown biological mechanisms. Complete characterization of a power-frequency field requires measurement of the magnitudes and electrical phases of the fundamental and harmonic amplitudes of its three vector components. Most available instrumentation measures only a small subset, or some weighted average, of these quantities. Hand-held survey meters have been used widely to measure power-frequency electric and magnetic fields. Automated data-acquisition systems have come into use more recently to make electric- and magnetic-field recordings, covering periods of hours to days, in residences and other environments.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8206045

  19. Magnetic field of Jupiter: A generalized inverse approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.

    1981-01-01

    The estimation of planetary magnetic fields from observations of the magnetic field gathered along a spacecraft flyby trajectory is examined with the aid of generalized inverse techniques, with application to the internal magnetic field of Jupiter. Model nonuniqueness resulting from the limited spatial extent of the observations and noise on the data is explored and quantitative estimates of the model parameter resolution are found. The presence of a substantial magnetic field of external origin due to the currents flowing in the Jovian magnetodisc is found to be an important source of error in estimates of the internal Jovian field, and new models explicitly incorporating these currents are proposed. New internal field models are derived using the vector helium magnetometer observations and the high field fluxgate observations of Pioneer 11, and knowledge of the external current system gained from the Pioneer 10 and Voyagers 1 and 2 encounters.

  20. Magnetic fields of the solar system: A comparative planetology toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholas, J. B.; Purucker, M. E.; Johnson, C. L.; Sabaka, T. J.; Olsen, N.; Sun, Z.; Al Asad, M.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Slavin, J. A.; Alexeev, I. I.; Belenkaya, E. S.; Phillips, R. J.; Solomon, S. C.; Lillis, R. J.; Langlais, B.; Winslow, R. M.; Russell, C. T.; Dougherty, M. K.; Zuber, M. T.

    2011-12-01

    Magnetic fields within the solar system provide a strong organizing force for processes active both within a planet or moon, and outside of it. In the interest of stimulating research and education in the field of comparative planetology, we present documented Fortran and MATLAB source codes and benchmarks to the latest models for planets and satellites that host internal magnetic fields. This presentation is made in the context of an interactive website: http://planetary-mag.net. Models are included for Earth (Comprehensive model CM4 of Sabaka et al., 2004, Geophysics J. Int.), Mercury (Anderson et al, 2011, Science), the Moon (Purucker and Nicholas, 2010, JGR), Mars (Lillis et al., 2010, JGR), and the outer planets Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune (Russell and Dougherty, 2010, Space Science Reviews). All models include magnetic fields of internal origin, and fields of external origin are included in the models for Mercury, the Earth, and the Moon. As models evolve, we intend to include magnetic fields of external origin for the other planets and moons. The website allows the user to select a coordinate system, such as planet-centered, heliocentric, or boundary normal, and the location within that coordinate system, and the vector magnetic field due to each of the component source fields at that location is then calculated and presented. Alternatively, the user can input a range as well as a grid spacing, and the vector magnetic field will be calculated for all points on that grid and be made available as a file for downloading.

  1. Deep-sea Vector Magnetic Anomalies over the Bayonnaise Knoll Caldera (Izu-Ogasawara Arc) (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honsho, C.; Ura, T.; Kim, K.

    2013-12-01

    The Bayonnaise Knoll caldera is located on the eastern margin of the backarc rift zone of the Izu-Ogasawara island arc. The caldera rim is ~3 km in diameter and 100-200 m high from the caldera floor 840-920 m deep. A large active hydrothermal field associated with sulfide deposit, called the Hakurei site, has been found at the foot of the southeastern caldera wall. We conducted deep-sea magnetic measurements using autonomous underwater vehicles to map ~75 % of an area 3 km by 4 km in the caldera. The magnetic vector field data were collected at 40-150 m altitude along the survey lines spaced 80-200 m apart. We improved the conventional correction method applied for removing the effect of vehicle magnetization, which greatly enhanced the precision of the resulting vector anomalies and allowed us to use the vector anomaly instead of the total intensity anomaly for inversion analysis. The magnetization distribution obtained using the vector anomaly was significantly different from the one obtained using the total intensity anomaly, especially in areas where the survey tracks were widely spaced. The aliasing effect appears in areas of sparse data distribution, and the magnetic field is more correctly calculated from the vector anomaly than the total intensity anomaly. The magnetization distribution in the caldera has two major features: a ~1.5-km wide belt of high magnetization, trending NNW-SSE through the caldera, and a clear low magnetization zone, ~300 m x ~500 m wide, extending over the Hakurei site. The high magnetization belt is considered to reflect basaltic volcanism associated with the backarc rifting that occurred after the formation of the Bayonnaise Knoll. The low magnetization zone is interpreted as the alteration zone resulting from the hydrothermal activity. Several zones of localized high magnetization are recognized within the high magnetization belt, some of them in the caldera wall adjacent to the low magnetization zone of the Hakurei site. We speculate that intensive magma intrusion occurred beneath the caldera wall and has provided the heat to generate hydrothermal fluid, which has been spouting out through the caldera wall faults. The surface expression of the vent field extends beyond the alteration zone inferred from the magnetization distribution, spreading upwards in the caldera wall. High-resolution topography around the Hakurei site indicates that the hydrothermal vents are generally distributed over a landform of slope failure. These observations would imply that hydrothermal fluid rising up in the up-flow zone moves laterally as well when it comes near the seafloor, probably along numerous fractures and fissures in the caldera wall. The distribution of pre-existing faults and fractures may rather control the fluid flow pathways in the shallow part and condition the surface extent of the vent field.

  2. Wave-vector-dependent spin filtering and spin transport through magnetic barriers in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Anna, L.; de Martino, A.

    2009-10-01

    We study the spin-resolved transport through magnetic nanostructures in monolayer and bilayer graphene. We take into account both the orbital effect of the inhomogeneous perpendicular magnetic field as well as the in-plane spin splitting due to the Zeeman interaction and to the exchange coupling possibly induced by the proximity of a ferromagnetic insulator. We find that a single barrier exhibits a wave-vector-dependent spin filtering effect at energies close to the transmission threshold. This effect is significantly enhanced in a resonant double barrier configuration, where the spin polarization of the outgoing current can be increased up to 100% by increasing the distance between the barriers.

  3. Evolution of field line helicity during magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, A. J. B.; Yeates, A. R.; Hornig, G.; Wilmot-Smith, A. L.

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the evolution of field line helicity for magnetic fields that connect two boundaries without null points, with emphasis on localized finite-B magnetic reconnection. Total (relative) magnetic helicity is already recognized as an important topological constraint on magnetohydrodynamic processes. Field line helicity offers further advantages because it preserves all topological information and can distinguish between different magnetic fields with the same total helicity. Magnetic reconnection changes field connectivity and field line helicity reflects these changes; the goal of this paper is to characterize that evolution. We start by deriving the evolution equation for field line helicity and examining its terms, also obtaining a simplified form for cases where dynamics are localized within the domain. The main result, which we support using kinematic examples, is that during localized reconnection in a complex magnetic field, the evolution of field line helicity is dominated by a work-like term that is evaluated at the field line endpoints, namely, the scalar product of the generalized field line velocity and the vector potential. Furthermore, the flux integral of this term over certain areas is very small compared to the integral of the unsigned quantity, which indicates that changes of field line helicity happen in a well-organized pairwise manner. It follows that reconnection is very efficient at redistributing helicity in complex magnetic fields despite having little effect on the total helicity.

  4. Simulation of Pedestrian Dynamic Using a Vector Floor Field Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jun; Hou, Zhongsheng; Zhan, Minghui

    2013-04-01

    Simulation of complex scenarios and multi-direction pedestrian flow is a main challenge to microscopic model of pedestrian movement. It is an issue to simulate real pedestrian traffic with great fidelity while keeping its computational cost at an acceptable level. This paper reports on an improved floor field model called vector floor field model to simulate pedestrian flows in some basic scenarios. In this model, vectorization of static floor field and dynamic floor field are used to indicate preference directions and the pedestrian flow tendency, respectively. Pedestrian transition depends on both their preference directions and tendency. The simulations in some basic scenarios are conducted, quantitative comparison to the record of practical experiments and standard floor field model is given as well, and the results indicate the effectivity of this model. An adjusted static vector floor field is also proposed to simulate pedestrian flow in turning scenario. The vector floor field model is also sufficient to simulate some essential features in pedestrian dynamic, such as lane formation. This model can be widely used in the simulation of multi-direction pedestrian at turning, crossing and other junctions.

  5. The magnetic field of Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Acuna, Mario H.; Ness, Norman F.

    1987-01-01

    Aspherical harmonic model of the planetary magnetic field of Uranus is obtained from the Voyager 2 encounter observations using generalized inverse techniques which allow partial solutions to complex (underdetermined) problems. The Goddard Space Flight Center 'Q3' model is characterized by a large dipole tilt (58.6 deg) relative to the rotation axis, a dipole moment of 0.228 G R(Uranus radii cubed) and an unusually large quadrupole moment. Characteristics of this complex model magnetic field are illustrated using contour maps of the field on the planet's surface and discussed in the context of possible dynamo generation in the relatively poorly conducting 'ice' mantle.

  6. MAGNETIC FIELD MEASUREMENTS FOR FAST-CHANGING MAGNETIC FIELDS.

    SciTech Connect

    JAIN, A.; ESCALLIER, J.; GANETIS, G.; LOUIE, W.; MARONE, A.; THOMAS. R.; WANDERER, P.

    2004-10-03

    Several recent applications for fast ramped magnets have been found that require rapid measurement of the field quality during the ramp. (In one instance, accelerator dipoles will be ramped at 1 T/sec, with measurements needed to the accuracy typically required for accelerators.) We have built and tested a new type of magnetic field measuring system to meet this need. The system consists of 16 stationary pickup windings mounted on a cylinder. The signals induced in the windings in a changing magnetic field are sampled and analyzed to obtain the field harmonics. To minimize costs, printed circuit boards were used for the pickup windings and a combination of amplifiers and ADPs used for the voltage readout system. New software was developed for the analysis. Magnetic field measurements of a model dipole developed for the SIS200 accelerator at GSI are presented. The measurements are needed to insure that eddy currents induced by the fast ramps do not impact the field quality needed for successful accelerator operation.

  7. Magnetic Fields in Molecular Clouds

    E-print Network

    Tyler L. Bourke; Alyssa A. Goodman

    2004-01-14

    Magnetic fields are believed to play an important role in the evolution of molecular clouds, from their large scale structure to dense cores, protostellar envelopes, and protoplanetary disks. How important is unclear, and whether magnetic fields are the dominant force driving star formation at any scale is also unclear. In this review we examine the observational data which address these questions, with particular emphasis on high angular resolution observations. Unfortunately the data do not clarify the situation. It is clear that the fields are important, but to what degree we don't yet know. Observations to date have been limited by the sensitivity of available telescopes and instrumentation. In the future ALMA and the SKA in particular should provide great advances in observational studies of magnetic fields, and we discuss which observations are most desirable when they become available.

  8. Modeling Earth's magnetic field variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wardinski, I.

    2012-12-01

    Observations of the Earth's magnetic field taken at the Earth's surface and at satellite altitude have been combined to construct models of the geomagnetic field and its variation. Lesur et al. (2010) developed a kinematic reconstruction of core field changes that satisfied the frozen-flux constraint. By constraining the field evolution to be entirely due to advection of the magnetic field at the core surface it maintained the spatial complexity of the field morphology imposed by a satellite field model backward in time [Wardinski & Lesur,2012]. In this study we attempt a kinematic construction of future variation in Earth's magnetic field variation. Our approach, first seeks to identify typical time scales of the magnetic field and core surface flows present in decadal and millennial field and flow models. Therefore, the individual spherical harmonic coefficients are treated by methods of time series analysis. The second step employs stochastic modelling of the temporal variability of such spherical harmonic coefficients that represent the field and core surface flow. Difficulties arise due to the non-stationary behavior of the field and core surface flow. However, the broad behavior may consist of some homogeneity, which could be captured by a generalized stochastic model that calls for the d'th difference of the time series to be stationary (ARIMA-Model), or by detrending the coefficient time series. By computing stochastic models, we obtain two sets of field-forecasts, the first set is obtained from stochastic models of the Gauss coefficients. Here, first results suggest that secular variation on time scales shorter than 5 years behaves rather randomly and cannot be described sufficiently well by stochastic models. The second set is derived from forward modeling the secular variation using the diffusion-less induction equation (kinematic construction). This approach has not provide consistent results.

  9. Chromospheric magnetic fields of an active region filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Z.; Solanki, S.; Lagg, A.

    2012-06-01

    Vector magnetic fields of an active region filament are co-spatially and co-temporally mapped in photosphere and upper chromosphere, by using spectro-polarimetric observations made by Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter (TIP II) at the German Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT). A Zeeman-based ME inversion is performed on the full Stokes vectors of both the photospheric Si I 1082.7 nm and the chromospheric He I 1083.0 nm lines. We found that the strong magnetic fields, with the field strength of 600 - 800 G in the He I line formation height, are not uncommon among AR filaments. But such strong magnetic field is not always found in AR filaments.

  10. A new type of vector fields with hybrid states of polarization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xi-Lin; Li, Yongnan; Chen, Jing; Guo, Cheng-Shan; Ding, Jianping; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2010-05-10

    We present an idea based on Poincaré sphere and demonstrate the creation of a new type of vector fields, which have hybrid states of polarization. Such a type of hybridly polarized vector fields have completely different property from the reported scalar and vector fields. The novel vector fields are anticipated to result in new effects, phenomena, and applications. PMID:20588932

  11. LABORATORY V MAGNETIC FIELDS AND FORCES

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    's technology. Magnets are used today to image parts of the body, to explore the mysteries of the human brain to combine magnets to change the magnetic field at any point. You must determine the map of the magnetic

  12. Magnetic Fields in Quantum Degenerate Systems and in Vacuum

    E-print Network

    H. Perez Rojas; E. Rodriguez Querts

    2006-12-28

    We consider self-magnetization of charged and neutral vector bosons bearing a magnetic moment in a gas and in vacuum. For charged vector bosons (W bosons) a divergence of the magnetization in both the medium and the electroweak vacuum occurs for the critical field B=B_{wc}=m_{w}^{2}/e. For B>B_{wc} the system is unstable. This behavior suggests the occurrence of a phase transition at B=B_{c}, where the field is self-consistently maintained. This mechanism actually prevents $B$ from reaching the critical value B_{c}. For virtual neutral vector bosons bearing an anomalous magnetic moment, the ground state has a similar behavior for B=B_{nbc}=m_{nb}^{2}/q . The magnetization in the medium is associated to a Bose-Einstein condensate and we conjecture a similar condensate occurs also in the case of vacuum. The model is applied to virtual electron-positron pairs bosonization in a magnetic field B \\sim B_{pc}\\lesssim 2m_{e}^{2}/e, where m_e is the electron mass. This would lead also to vacuum self-magnetization in QED, where in both cases the symmetry breaking is due to a condensate of quasi-massless particles.

  13. A non-linear coupled 3D model for magnetic field and electric circuit equations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Piriou; A. Razek

    1992-01-01

    The authors propose a 3-D numerical model in which the magnetic field and electric circuit equations in the absence of eddy currents are solved simultaneously. To consider the magnetic equations, use is made of a magnetic vector potential formulation with the gauge condition (A.w=0) which makes it possible to reduce the number of unknowns. To take into account the magnetic

  14. Orientation and Magnitude of Mars' Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This image shows the orientation and magnitude of the magnetic field measured by the MGS magnetometer as it sped over the surface of Mars during an early aerobraking pass (Day of the year, 264; 'P6' periapsis pass). At each point along the spacecraft trajectory we've drawn vectors in the direction of the magnetic field measured at that instant; the length of the line is scaled to show the relative magnitude of the field. Imagine traveling along with the MGS spacecraft, holding a string with a magnetized needle on one end: this essentially a compass with a needle that is free to spin in all directions. As you pass over the surface the needle would swing rapidly, first pointing towards the planet and then rotating quickly towards 'up' and back down again. All in a relatively short span of time, say a minute or two, during which time the spacecraft has traveled a couple of hundred miles. You've just passed over one of many 'magnetic anomalies' thus far detected near the surface of Mars. A second major anomaly appears a little later along the spacecraft track, about 1/4 the magnitude of the first - can you find it? The short scale length of the magnetic field signature locates the source near the surface of Mars, perhaps in the crust, a 10 to 75 kilometer thick outer shell of the planet (radius 3397 km).

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  15. On hyperbolicity violations in cosmological models with vector fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovnev, Alexey; Klementev, Aleksandr

    2014-02-01

    Cosmological models with vector fields received much attention in recent years. Unfortunately, most of them are plagued with severe instabilities or other problems. In particular, it was noted in ref. [1] that the models with a non-linear function of the Maxwellian kinetic term do always imply violations of hyperbolicity somewhere in the phase space. In this work we make this statement more precise in several respects and show that those violations may not be present around spatially homogeneous configurations of the vector field.

  16. DC corona discharge ozone production enhanced by magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekárek, S.

    2010-01-01

    We have studied the effect of a stationary magnetic field on the production of ozone from air at atmospheric pressure by a negative corona discharge in a cylindrical electrode configuration. We used a stainless steel hollow needle placed at the axis of the cylindrical discharge chamber as a cathode. The outer wall of the cylinder was used as an anode. The vector of magnetic induction was perpendicular to the vector of current density. We found that: (a) the magnetic field extends the current voltage range of the discharge; (b) for the discharge in the Trichel pulses regime and in the pulseless glow regime, the magnetic field has no substantial effect on the discharge voltage or on the concentration of ozone that is produced; (c) for the discharge in the filamentary streamer regime for a particular current, the magnetic field increases the discharge voltage and consequently an approximately 30% higher ozone concentration can be obtained; (d) the magnetic field does not substantially increase the maximum ozone production yield. A major advantage of using a magnetic field is that the increase in ozone concentration produced by the discharge can be obtained without additional energy requirements.

  17. Indoor localization using magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathapati Subbu, Kalyan Sasidhar

    Indoor localization consists of locating oneself inside new buildings. GPS does not work indoors due to multipath reflection and signal blockage. WiFi based systems assume ubiquitous availability and infrastructure based systems require expensive installations, hence making indoor localization an open problem. This dissertation consists of solving the problem of indoor localization by thoroughly exploiting the indoor ambient magnetic fields comprising mainly of disturbances termed as anomalies in the Earth's magnetic field caused by pillars, doors and elevators in hallways which are ferromagnetic in nature. By observing uniqueness in magnetic signatures collected from different campus buildings, the work presents the identification of landmarks and guideposts from these signatures and further develops magnetic maps of buildings - all of which can be used to locate and navigate people indoors. To understand the reason behind these anomalies, first a comparison between the measured and model generated Earth's magnetic field is made, verifying the presence of a constant field without any disturbances. Then by modeling the magnetic field behavior of different pillars such as steel reinforced concrete, solid steel, and other structures like doors and elevators, the interaction of the Earth's field with the ferromagnetic fields is described thereby explaining the causes of the uniqueness in the signatures that comprise these disturbances. Next, by employing the dynamic time warping algorithm to account for time differences in signatures obtained from users walking at different speeds, an indoor localization application capable of classifying locations using the magnetic signatures is developed solely on the smart phone. The application required users to walk short distances of 3-6 m anywhere in hallway to be located with accuracies of 80-99%. The classification framework was further validated with over 90% accuracies using model generated magnetic signatures representing hallways with different kinds of pillars, doors and elevators. All in all, this dissertation contributes the following: 1) provides a framework for understanding the presence of ambient magnetic fields indoors and utilizing them to solve the indoor localization problem; 2) develops an application that is independent of the user and the smart phones and 3) requires no other infrastructure since it is deployed on a device that encapsulates the sensing, computing and inferring functionalities, thereby making it a novel contribution to the mobile and pervasive computing domain.

  18. Black holes and magnetic fields

    E-print Network

    J. Bicak; V. Karas; T. Ledvinka

    2007-04-09

    Stationary axisymmetric magnetic fields are expelled from outer horizons of black holes as they become extremal. Extreme black holes exhibit Meissner effect also within exact Einstein--Maxwell theory and in string theories in higher dimensions. Since maximally rotating black holes are expected to be astrophysically most important, the expulsion of the magnetic flux from their horizons represents a potential threat to an electromagnetic mechanism launching the jets at the account of black-hole rotation.

  19. The planetary magnetic field and magnetosphere of Jupiter: Pioneer 10

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. J. Smith; L. Davis Jr.; D. E. Jones; P. J. Coleman Jr.; D. S. Colburn; P. Dyal; C. P. Sonett; A. M. A. Frandsen

    1974-01-01

    Data obtained by the Pioneer 10 vector helium magnetometer are presented along with models of the intrinsic magnetic field of JupiteL and its magnetosphere. Data acquired between 2.84 and 6.0 Rj, where the intensity of the planetary field ranged between 1900 and 18,400 'y, were used to develop a six-parameter eccentric dipole model of the field. The dipole so derived

  20. Observations of Mercury's magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ness, N. F.; Behannon, K. W.; Lepping, R. P.; Whang, Y. C.

    1975-01-01

    Magnetic field data obtained by Mariner 10 during the third and final encounter with the planet Mercury on 16 March 1975 were studied. A well developed bow shock and modest magnetosphere, previously observed at first encounter on 29 March 1974, were again observed. In addition, a much stronger magnetic field near closest approach, 400 gamma versus 98 gamma, was observed at an altitude of 327 km and approximately 70 deg north Mercurian latitude. Spherical harmonic analysis of the data provide an estimate of the centered planetary magnetic dipole of 4.7 x 10 to the 22nd power Gauss/cu cm with the axis tilted 12 deg to the rotation axis and in the same sense as Earth's. The interplanetary field was sufficiently different between first and third encounters that in addition to the very large field magnitude observed, it argues strongly against a complex induction process generating the observed planetary field. While a possibility exists that Mercury possesses a remanent field due to magnetization early in its formation, a present day active dynamo seems to be a more likely candidate for its origin.

  1. Magnetic Field Restructuring Associated with Two Successive Solar Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui; Liu, Ying D.; Yang, Zhongwei; Hu, Huidong

    2014-08-01

    We examine two successive flare eruptions (X5.4 and X1.3) on 2012 March 7 in the NOAA active region 11429 and investigate the magnetic field reconfiguration associated with the two eruptions. Using an advanced non-linear force-free field extrapolation method based on the SDO/HMI vector magnetograms, we obtain a stepwise decrease in the magnetic free energy during the eruptions, which is roughly 20%-30% of the energy of the pre-flare phase. We also calculate the magnetic helicity and suggest that the changes of the sign of the helicity injection rate might be associated with the eruptions. Through the investigation of the magnetic field evolution, we find that the appearance of the "implosion" phenomenon has a strong relationship with the occurrence of the first X-class flare. Meanwhile, the magnetic field changes of the successive eruptions with implosion and without implosion were well observed.

  2. Spacecraft attitude determination using the earth's magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, David G.

    1989-01-01

    A method is presented by which the attitude of a low-Earth orbiting spacecraft may be determined using a vector magnetometer, a digital Sun sensor, and a mathematical model of the Earth's magnetic field. The method is currently being implemented for the Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft (as a backup for the failing star trackers) as a way to determine roll gyro drift.

  3. Characterizing the correlation between column density structure and magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soler, J. D.; Hennebelle, P.; Martin, P. G.; Miville-Deschenes, M. A.; Netterfield, B.

    2015-03-01

    We present a statistical tool to characterize correlation between the column density structure and the polarized emission from a molecular cloud. This tool uses the gradient as an estimator of the directionality of the structure in order to systematically relate the orientation of filaments and cores to the orientation of the magnetic field inferred from the polarization vectors.

  4. Vector fields during cosmic inflation: Stability analysis and phenomenological signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himmetoglu, Burak

    This thesis is based on the study of vector fields during cosmic inflation. Cosmic inflation has proven to be an accurate description of the very early universe, not only because of its success in resolving the classical problems of big bang cosmology, but also for introducing a natural mechanism for the generation of primordial fluctuations which give rise to the structure (galaxies and cluster of galaxies) in the universe. For simplicity, most inflationary scenarios assume that the expansion is driven by a scalar field. However, due to the fact that the underlying particle physics model of inflation is unknown, and due to some features emerged in some studies of the cosmic microwave background data, there have recently been considerable interest in vector field driven models of inflation. In this thesis, I present a complete stability analysis of some of the compelling models where vector fields are assumed to play an important role during inflation. The stability analysis is performed by studying all possible fluctuations around the background solution of these models. It is explicitly proven that for models where the gauge invariance of the vector field is broken, the background solution is unstable. The proof is performed both (1) by studying the quadratic action for the fluctuations, and showing that ghost instabilities are present in the model; and (2) by studying the linearized Einstein equations and showing that the solutions diverge close to horizon crossing. For models that are free of instabilities, relevant power spectra are computed and the resulting phenomenology is discussed.

  5. Three-dimensional Magnetostriction and Vector Magnetic Properties under Alternating Magnetic Flux Conditions in Arbitrary Direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakabayashi, Daisuke; Todaka, Takashi; Enokizono, Masato

    This paper presents measured magnetostriction of electrical steel sheets under alternating magnetic flux conditions. In the measurements, we used a two-dimensional vector magnetic property measurement system, and a three-axial strain gauge. In order to know magnetostrictions in arbitrary direction, the strain tensor was evaluated. In addition, we try to evaluate the magnetostrictions in thickness direction. In this paper, the three-dimensional magnetostriction in non-oriented and grain-oriented silicon steel sheets are compared.

  6. Full-vector archeomagnetic and rock-magnetic results from Portuguese kilns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Paccard, Miriam; Tema, Evdokia; McIntosh, Gregg; Letaio, Manuela; Calado, Marco; Botelho, Paulo

    2014-05-01

    Despite the increase in archeomagnetic studies in the past few years, the number of reliable archeointensity data is still limited. At present Europe is the most widely covered region, although the variation in geomagnetic field intensity is not completely known for the last millennia and the occurrence and behaviour of various rapid geomagnetic field changes is under discussion. In this context, new high-reliable full-geomagnetic field vector determinations from unexplored regions are crucial in order to improve our knowledge of past geomagnetic field changes at regional scales. In Portugal, despite the rich cultural heritage and the abundance of archaeological excavations, archaeomagnetic research is still in its infancy. To our knowledge, up to now the only available directional data obtained from more or less well-dated materials come from the study of a Late Bronze Age vitrified wall close to the city of Serpa, southern Portugal, while only two more studies have been published including archaeointesity results from Portuguese pottery. We present here the first full-vector archeomagnetic results (declination, inclination and intensity) from two kilns excavated at two archaeological sites at Lisboa (Portugal). The first structure corresponds to the Largo das Alcaçarias Islamic pottery production workshop located in the eastern suburb Luxbona (current Alfama) and its abandonment has been dated as the 12th century AD. The second kiln was excavated in the Encosta Santana archeological medieval site and was abandoned during the 12th or 13th centuries AD according to archeological evidence. Detailed archaeomagnetic and rock magnetic studies have been carried out in order to determine the magnetic mineralogy and investigate the thermal stability of the phases carrying the archaeomagnetic signal. Both kilns exhibited thermally stability magnetic phases. The magnetic properties of the Largo kiln are dominated by a mixture of magnetite/cation-substituted magnetite and cation-substituted hematite. Those of the Encosta kiln are dominated by magnetite with limited cation substitution, with hysteresis ratios falling close to the single domain - multidomain unmixing curve of Dunlop. The new archeomagnetic and rock-magnetic data are based on the study of several samples per kiln and the archeointensity determinations were obtained using the Thellier classical method with regular partial thermoremanent magnetization (pTRM) checks and TRM anisotropy and cooling rate corrections. From the laboratory experiments, two new high quality mean intensities are now available for Portugal. The new data are the first full-vector results from Portuguese kilns. They significantly contribute to better understand the secular variation of the Earth's magnetic field in western Europe during the 12-13th centuries AD and can be used as reliable input data for geomagnetic field modelling.

  7. Magnetic field tomography, helical magnetic fields and Faraday depolarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horellou, C.; Fletcher, A.

    2014-07-01

    Wide-band radio polarization observations offer the possibility to recover information about the magnetic fields in synchrotron sources, such as details of their three-dimensional configuration, that has previously been inaccessible. The key physical process involved is the Faraday rotation of the polarized emission in the source (and elsewhere along the wave's propagation path to the observer). In order to proceed, reliable methods are required for inverting the signals observed in wavelength space into useful data in Faraday space, with robust estimates of their uncertainty. In this paper, we examine how variations of the intrinsic angle of polarized emission ?0 with the Faraday depth ? within a source affect the observable quantities. Using simple models for the Faraday dispersion F(?) and ?0(?), along with the current and planned properties of the main radio interferometers, we demonstrate how degeneracies among the parameters describing the magneto-ionic medium can be minimized by combining observations in different wavebands. We also discuss how depolarization by Faraday dispersion due to a random component of the magnetic field attenuates the variations in the spectral energy distribution of the polarization and shifts its peak towards shorter wavelengths. This additional effect reduces the prospect of recovering the characteristics of the magnetic field helicity in magneto-ionic media dominated by the turbulent component of the magnetic field.

  8. Magnetic Fields of the Earth and Sun

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is an activity that compares the magnetic field of the Earth to the complex magnetic field of the Sun. Using images of the Earth and Sun that have magnets attached in appropriate orientations, learners will use a handheld magnetic field detector to observe the magnetic field of the Earth and compare it to that of the Sun, especially in sunspot areas. For each group of students, this activity requires use of a handheld magnetic field detector, such as a Magnaprobe or a similar device, a bar magnet, and ten small disc magnets.

  9. Magnetic Forces and Field Line Density

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is an activity about depicting the relative strength of magnetic fields using field line density. Learners will use the magnetic field line drawing of six magnetic poles created in a previous activity and identify the areas of strong, weak, and medium magnetic intensity using the density of magnetic field lines. This is the fifth activity in the Magnetic Math booklet; this booklet can be found on the Space Math@NASA website. How to Draw Magnetic Fields - II in the Magnetic Math booklet must be completed prior to this activity.

  10. 2T/5T Two-Axis Cryogen Free Superconducting Vector Magnet With Variable Temperature Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demikhov, E. I.; Demikhov, T. E.; Kostrov, E. A.; Lysenko, V. V.; Piskunov, N. A.

    2014-05-01

    A conduction cooled 2T / 5T superconducting vector magnetic system with a variable temperature space was developed and tested. The system is based on a commercial two-stage 4 K Gifford-McMahon cryocooler with the cooling power of 1.5 W at 4.2 K. The cool down time of the magnet from room temperature to 3.2 K is 17 hours. The system provides sample temperature range of 6.0-300 K. The clear diameter of variable temperature space is 39 mm. A 5 T solenoid generates magnetic field in the vertical axis and a 2 T split coil generates field in the horizontal axis. The magnets are made of niobium-titanium wire wound on a copper former. A PC controlled rotary drive is applied to rotate a sample holder around the vertical axis. Thus the measured sample can be exposed to the magnetic field in any desired direction. A helium gas gap heat switch is used as a controllable thermal link between the variable temperature space and the 2nd stage to avoid overheating of the magnet at high temperatures of the sample. The system design, manufacturing and test results are presented.

  11. Computation approach for CMB bispectrum from primordial magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, Maresuke; Nitta, Daisuke; Yokoyama, Shuichiro; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Takahashi, Keitaro

    2011-06-01

    We present a detailed calculation of our previous short paper [M. Shiraishi, D. Nitta, S. Yokoyama, K. Ichiki, and K. Takahashi, Phys. Rev. DPRVDAQ1550-7998 82, 121302 (2010).10.1103/PhysRevD.82.121302] in which we have investigated a constraint on the magnetic field strength through comic microwave background temperature bispectrum of vector modes induced from primordial magnetic fields. By taking into account full angular dependence of the bispectrum with spin spherical harmonics and Wigner symbols, we explicitly show that the cosmic microwave background bispectrum induced from the statistical-isotropic primordial vector fluctuations can be also described as an angle-averaged form in the rotationally invariant way. We also study the cases with different spectral indices of the power spectrum of the primordial magnetic fields.

  12. Absolute magnetic helicity and the cylindrical magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Low, B. C.

    2011-05-01

    The different magnetic helicities conserved under conditions of perfect electrical conductivity are expressions of the fundamental property that every evolving fluid surface conserves its net magnetic flux. This basic hydromagnetic point unifies the well known Eulerian helicities with the Lagrangian helicity defined by the conserved fluxes frozen into a prescribed set of disjoint toroidal tubes of fluid flowing as a permanent partition of the entire fluid [B. C. Low, Astrophys. J. 649, 1064 (2006)]. This unifying theory is constructed from first principles, beginning with an analysis of the Eulerian and Lagrangian descriptions of fluids, separating the ideas of fluid and magnetic-flux tubes and removing the complication of the magnetic vector potential's free gauge from the concept of helicity. The analysis prepares for the construction of a conserved Eulerian helicity, without that gauge complication, to describe a 3D anchored flux in an upright cylindrical domain, this helicity called absolute to distinguish it from the well known relative helicity. In a version of the Chandrasekhar-Kendall representation, the evolving field at any instant is a unique superposition of a writhed, untwisted axial flux with a circulating flux of field lines all closed and unlinked within the cylindrical domain. The absolute helicity is then a flux-weighted sum of the writhe of that axial flux and its mutual linkage with the circulating flux. The absolute helicity is also conserved if the frozen-in field and its domain are continuously deformed by changing the separation between the rigid cylinder-ends with no change of cylinder radius. This hitherto intractable cylindrical construction closes a crucial conceptual gap for the fundamentals to be complete at last. The concluding discussion shows the impact of this development on our understanding of helicity, covering (i) the helicities of wholly contained and anchored fields; (ii) the Eulerian and Lagrangian descriptions of field evolution; (iii) twist as a topological property of solenoidal fields versus the linkage properties of open and closed discrete curves treated by Gauss, Caligarneau, Berger, and Prior; and (iv) the change of absolute helicity by resistive diffusion. These are important hydromagnetic properties of twisted magnetic fields in the million-degree hot, highly conducting corona of the Sun.

  13. On the Massless Vector Fields in a Rindler Space

    E-print Network

    Soldati, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    We study the quantum theory of the mass-less vector fields on the Rindler space. We evaluate the Bogoliubov coefficients by means of a new technique based upon the use of light-front coordinates and Mellin transform. We briefly comment about the ensuing Unruh effect and its consequences.

  14. THE LAW OF VECTOR FIELDS Daniel H. Gottlieb

    E-print Network

    with the same acceleration, or Kepler's laws governing the motion of the planets, or the daily movementsTHE LAW OF VECTOR FIELDS Daniel H. Gottlieb 1. Introduction. When I was 13, the intellectual world. Something fantastically beautiful. This something is the existence of a few general laws or principles which

  15. THE LAW OF VECTOR FIELDS Daniel H. Gottlieb

    E-print Network

    to the Earth with the same acceleration, or Kepler's laws governing the motion of the planets, or the dailyTHE LAW OF VECTOR FIELDS Daniel H. Gottlieb 1. Introduction. When I was 13, the intellectual world of a few general laws or principles which imply mathematically most of the known facts of Physics

  16. Human Skin Simulation by Generating Wrinkles along Vector Fields

    E-print Network

    Human Skin Simulation by Generating Wrinkles along Vector Fields by Yosuke Bando A Senior Thesis human bodies is quality of skin. To improve this, it is necessary to represent small wrinkles on skin of Computer Graphics. 3 #12;Contents 1 Introduction 4 2 Topography of skin surface 6 3 Skin surface modeling 7

  17. Flow Charts: Visualization of Vector Fields on Arbitrary Surfaces

    E-print Network

    Utah, University of

    hardware. Ã? 1 INTRODUCTION Avisual assessment of 3D transient flow phenomena is essential in a broad range of scientific, engineering, and medical applications. In many cases, the analysis of a 3D vector field can over long time spans, such as Unsteady Flow LIC (UFLIC), particle-based Unsteady Flow Advection

  18. Analysis of superconducting electromagnetic finite elements based on a magnetic vector potential variational principle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuler, James J.; Felippa, Carlos A.

    1991-01-01

    Electromagnetic finite elements are extended based on a variational principle that uses the electromagnetic four potential as primary variable. The variational principle is extended to include the ability to predict a nonlinear current distribution within a conductor. The extension of this theory is first done on a normal conductor and tested on two different problems. In both problems, the geometry remains the same, but the material properties are different. The geometry is that of a 1-D infinite wire. The first problem is merely a linear control case used to validate the new theory. The second problem is made up of linear conductors with varying conductivities. Both problems perform well and predict current densities that are accurate to within a few ten thousandths of a percent of the exact values. The fourth potential is then removed, leaving only the magnetic vector potential, and the variational principle is further extended to predict magnetic potentials, magnetic fields, the number of charge carriers, and the current densities within a superconductor. The new element produces good results for the mean magnetic field, the vector potential, and the number of superconducting charge carriers despite a relatively high system condition number. The element did not perform well in predicting the current density. Numerical problems inherent to this formulation are explored and possible remedies to produce better current predicting finite elements are presented.

  19. Origin of astrophysical magnetic fields.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, George B.

    The standard model for the origin of magnetic fields observed in stars and galaxies is the ?-? dynamo, in which a feedback loop involving differential rotation and helical turbulence leads to exponential amplification of a large-scale field. Recently this model has been criticized on the grounds that the Lorentz forces associated with the buildup of small-scale fields by the turbulence prevents the turbulent diffusion of magnetic field that is an essential part of the model. The author discusses the consequences for cosmology if dynamo theory is wrong, and reviews recent criticisms from a new perspective. They suggest new calculations that can help to decide whether the theory is right or wrong.

  20. EXPLORER 10 MAGNETIC FIELD MEASUREMENTS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. P. Heppner; N. F. Ness; C. S. Scearce; T. L. Skillman

    1963-01-01

    Magnetic field measurements made by means of Explorer 10 over geocentric ; distances of 1.8 to 42.6R\\/sub e\\/ on March 25experiment on the same satellite are ; referenced in interpretations. The close-in data are consistent with the ; existence of a very weak ring current below 3R\\/sub e\\/ along the trajectory, but ; alternative explanations for the field deviations are

  1. Effects of magnetic fields on iron electrodeposition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Matsushima; T. Nohira; I. Mogi; Y. Ito

    2004-01-01

    The effects of magnetic fields (of 0–5 T magnetic flux density) on iron electrodeposition were investigated in terms of current efficiency, morphology and crystal orientation. The AFM images showed that the shape of iron grains was angular in no magnetic field and roundish in magnetic fields. The occurrence of preferred orientation parallel to the substrate plane was influenced by an

  2. How to Draw Magnetic Fields - I

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is an activity about depicting magnetic fields. Learners will observe two provided drawings of magnetic field line patterns for bar magnets in simple orientations of like and unlike polarities and carefully draw the field lines for both orientations. This is the third activity in the Magnetic Math booklet; this booklet can be found on the Space Math@NASA website.

  3. Transverse Magnetic Field Propellant Isolator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.

    2000-01-01

    An alternative high voltage isolator for electric propulsion and ground-based ion source applications has been designed and tested. This design employs a transverse magnetic field that increases the breakdown voltage. The design can greatly enhance the operating range of laboratory isolators used for high voltage applications.

  4. Jupiter's magnetic field and magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acuna, M. H.; Behannon, K. W.; Connerney, J. E. P.

    1983-01-01

    Among the planets of the solar system, Jupiter is unique in connection with its size and its large magnetic moment, second only to the sun's. The Jovian magnetic field was first detected indirectly by radio astronomers who postulated its existence to explain observations of nonthermal radio emissions from Jupiter at decimetric and decametric wavelengths. Since the early radio astronomical studies of the Jovian magnetosphere, four spacecraft have flown by the planet at close distances and have provided in situ information about the geometry of the magnetic field and its strength. The Jovian magnetosphere is described in terms of three principal regions. The inner magnetosphere is the region where the magnetic field created by sources internal to the planet dominates. The region in which the equatorial currents flow is denoted as the middle magnetosphere. In the outer magnetosphere, the field has a large southward component and exhibits large temporal and/or spatial variations in magnitude and direction in response to changes in solar wind pressure.

  5. Crystal field and magnetic properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flood, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    Magnetization and magnetic susceptibility measurements have been made in the temperature range 1.3 to 4.2 K on powdered samples of ErH3. The susceptibility exhibits Curie-Weiss behavior from 4.2 to 2 K, and intercepts the negative temperature axis at theta = 1.05 + or - 0.05 K, indicating that the material is antiferromagnetic. The low field effective moment is 6.77 + or - 0.27 Bohr magnetons per ion. The magnetization exhibits a temperature independent contribution, the slope of which is (5 + or - 1.2) x 10 to the -6th Weber m/kg Tesla. The saturation moment is 3.84 + or - 1 - 0.15 Bohr magnetons per ion. The results can be qualitatively explained by the effects of crystal fields on the magnetic ions. No definitive assignment of a crystal field ground state can be given, nor can a clear choice between cubically or hexagonally symmetric crystal fields be made. For hexagonal symmetry, the first excited state is estimated to be 86 to 100 K above the ground state. For cubic symmetry, the splitting is on the order of 160 to 180 K.

  6. 3D MAGNETIC FIELD CONFIGURATION OF THE 2006 DECEMBER 13 FLARE EXTRAPOLATED WITH THE OPTIMIZATION METHOD

    E-print Network

    Wiegelmann, Thomas

    3D MAGNETIC FIELD CONFIGURATION OF THE 2006 DECEMBER 13 FLARE EXTRAPOLATED WITH THE OPTIMIZATION the three-dimensional (3D) vector magnetic field configuration associated with this flare. The general with two-ribbon flares and CMEs. The 3D field configuration before flares can be di- vided into two parts

  7. Numerical Analysis of Magnetic Field Distribution of Magnetic Micro-barcodes for Suspension Assay Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thanh Son, Vo; Anandakumar, S.; Kim, CheolGi; Jeong, Jong-Ruyl

    2011-12-01

    In this study, we have investigated real-time decoding feasibility of magnetic micro-barcodes in a microfluidic channel by using numerical analysis of magnetic field distribution of the micro-barcodes. The vector potential model based on a molecular current has been used to obtain magnetic stray field distribution of ferromagnetic bars which consisting of the micro-barcodes. It reveals that the stray field distribution of the micro-barcodes strongly depends on the geometries of the ferromagnetic bar. Interestingly enough, we have found that one can avoide the miniaturization process of a magnetic sensor device needed to increase the sensitivity by optimizing the geometries of micro-barcodes. We also estimate a magnetic sensor response depending on flying height and lateral misalignment of the micro-barcodes over the sensor position and found that control of the flying height is crucial factor to enhance the detection sensitivity and reproducibility of a magnetic sensor signal in the suspension assay technology.

  8. Instability of anisotropic cosmological solutions supported by vector fields.

    PubMed

    Himmetoglu, Burak; Contaldi, Carlo R; Peloso, Marco

    2009-03-20

    Models with vector fields acquiring a nonvanishing vacuum expectation value along one spatial direction have been proposed to sustain a prolonged stage of anisotropic accelerated expansion. Such models have been used for realizations of early time inflation, with a possible relation to the large scale cosmic microwave background anomalies, or of the late time dark energy. We show that, quite generally, the concrete realizations proposed so far are plagued by instabilities (either ghosts or unstable growth of the linearized perturbations) which can be ultimately related to the longitudinal vector polarization present in them. Phenomenological results based on these models are therefore unreliable. PMID:19392187

  9. Vector measurements of the current induced effective fields in Ta/CoFeB/MgO heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Masamitsu

    2013-03-01

    Ultrathin magnetic heterostructures exhibit a variety of rich physics owing to the strong effects from the interfaces. Power efficient current induced magnetization switching and domain nucleation, fast current driven domain wall motion have been observed in ultrathin Co or CoFeB layer sandwiched between a heavy metal (Pt, Ta) and an oxide. Most of the current (or voltage) induced effects in these systems can be represented by the ``effective magnetic fields'', which illustrate the strength and direction of the torque exerted on the magnetic moments. A comprehensive understanding of the effective fields is key to the development of magnetic nano-devices aimed for memory and logic applications. We have studied the current induced effective field vector in TaCoFeBMgO heterostructure to reveal the underlying physics of the interaction between the magnetic moments and current in such structure. A low current lock-in detection scheme is used to evaluate the effective field vector. The CoFeB layer is perpendicularly magnetized owing to the interface magnetic anisotropy of CoFeBMgO. We find that the effective field is very sensitive to the thickness of the Ta and CoFeB layers. The effective field even changes its direction when the Ta layer thickness is varied, indicating that there are competing effects that contribute to the effective field generation. We discuss our results in light of the spin Hall effect and an effect due to Rashba-like Hamiltonian. (Acknowledgment: FIRST program)

  10. A high-field superferric NMR magnet.

    PubMed

    Huson, F R; Bryan, R N; MacKay, W W; Herrick, R C; Colvin, J; Ford, J J; Pissanetzky, S; Plishker, G A; Rocha, R; Schmidt, W

    1993-01-01

    Strong, extensive magnetic fringe fields are a significant problem with magnetic resonance imaging magnets. This is particularly acute with 4-T, whole-body research magnets. To date this problem has been addressed by restricting an extensive zone around the unshielded magnet or by placing external unsaturated iron shielding around the magnet. This paper describes a solution to this problem which uses superconducting coils closely integrated with fully saturated iron elements. A 4-T, 30-cm-bore prototype, based on this design principle, was built and tested. The 5 G fringe field is contained within 1 meter of the magnet bore along the z axis. Homogeneity of the raw magnetic field is 10 ppm over 30% of the magnet's diameter after passive shimming. Compared with an unshielded magnet, 20% less superconductor is required to generate the magnetic field. Images and spectra are presented to demonstrate the magnet's viability for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy. PMID:8419740

  11. Magnetic fields in the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullan, D. J.

    1974-01-01

    The observed properties of solar magnetic fields are reviewed, with particular reference to the complexities imposed on the field by motions of the highly conducting gas. Turbulent interactions between gas and field lead to heating or cooling of the gas according to whether the field energy density is less or greater than the maximum kinetic energy density in the convection zone. The field strength above which cooling sets in is 700 gauss. A weak solar dipole field may be primeval, but dynamo action is also important in generating new flux. The dynamo is probably not confined to the convection zone, but extends throughout most of the volume of the sun. Planetary tides appear to play a role in driving the dynamo.

  12. Magnetic fields in spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Marita

    2015-03-01

    The magnetic field structure in edge-on galaxies observed so far shows a plane-parallel magnetic field component in the disk of the galaxy and an X-shaped field in its halo. The plane-parallel field is thought to be the projected axisymmetric (ASS) disk field as observed in face-on galaxies. Some galaxies addionionally exhibit strong vertical magnetic fields in the halo right above and below the central region of the disk. The mean-field dynamo theory in the disk cannot explain these observed fields without the action of a wind, which also probably plays an important role to keep the vertical scale heights constant in galaxies of different Hubble types and star formation activities, as has been observed in the radio continuum: At ?6 cm the vertical scale heights of the thin disk and the thick disk/halo in a sample of five edge-on galaxies are similar with a mean value of 300 +/- 50 pc for the thin disk and 1.8 +/- 0.2 kpc for the thick disk (a table and references are given in Krause 2011) with our sample including the brightest halo observed so far, NGC 253, with strong star formation, as well as one of the weakest halos, NGC 4565, with weak star formation. If synchrotron emission is the dominant loss process of the relativistic electrons the outer shape of the radio emission should be dumbbell-like as has been observed in several edge-on galaxies like e.g. NGC 253 (Heesen et al. 2009) and NGC 4565. As the synchrotron lifetime t syn at a single frequency is proportional to the total magnetic field strength B t -1.5, a cosmic ray bulk speed (velocity of a galactic wind) can be defined as v CR = h CR /t syn = 2 h z /t syn , where h CR and h z are the scale heights of the cosmic rays and the observed radio emission at this freqnency. Similar observed radio scale heights imply a self regulation mechanism between the galactic wind velocity, the total magnetic field strength and the star formation rate SFR in the disk: v CR ~ B t 1.5 ~ SFR ~ 0.5 (Niklas & Beck 1997).

  13. A survey of long term interplanetary magnetic field variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    Interplanetary magnetic field data from 10 IMP, AIMP, and HEOS spacecraft were merged into a composite data set spanning 1963 to 1974. A consideration of the mutual consistency of the individual data sets reveals agreement typically to within 0.2 gamma. Composite data set analysis reveals: (1) whereas the yearly averaged magnitudes of all field vectors show virtually no solar cycle variation, the yearly averaged magnitudes of positive- and negative-polarity field vectors show separate solar cycle variations, consistent with variations in the average azimuthal angles of positive- and negative-polarity field vectors, (2) there is no heliolatitude dependence of long time average field magnitudes, (3) field vectors parallel to the earth-sun line are on the average 1 gamma less in magnitude than field vectors perpendicular to this line, and (4) the heliolatitude-dependent dominant polarity effect exhibits a complex sign reversal in the 1968 to 1971 period and a measure of symmetry in 1972 to 1974 not found in earlier data.

  14. Slotless Permanent-Magnet Machines: General Analytical Magnetic Field Calculation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pierre-Daniel Pfister; Yves Perriard

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a general analytical model for predicting the magnetic field of slotless permanent-magnet machines. The model takes into account the effect of eddy currents in conductive regions and notably in conductive permanent magnets without neglecting their remanent field. The modeling of this effect is important for the design of very high speed slotless permanent-magnet machines, as the power

  15. Magnetic fields in the Mars ionosphere of a noncrustal origin: Magnetization features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinin, E.; Fraenz, M.; Zhang, T. L.; Woch, J.; Wei, Y.

    2014-09-01

    The magnetic field observations by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) performed on the premapping orbits in the years 1997 and 1998 in the low-altitude ionosphere of Mars show the existence of a strong "external" magnetization not related to the "internal" crustal magnetization. A significant increase of the magnetic field strength is observed in the collisional northern ionosphere at altitudes of ˜ 200 km and at 60°-90°solar zenith angles sampled by MGS. The magnetization features and the magnetic field topology vary significantly with the sector structure of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). For ByIMF>0 the magnetic flux tubes transported to altitudes of ˜200 km are suddenly straightened releasing their tangential stresses. For ByIMF<0 a rotation of the magnetic field vector by almost 180°occurs. Such an asymmetry in the ionospheric response on Mars is similar to the asymmetry observed on Venus at the periods of low-solar activity indicating its universal origin for magnetized ionospheres. It is suggested that the electric currents generated in the collisional ionosphere where the ions become demagnetized, while the electrons remain magnetized produce the observed features.

  16. Magnetic field of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Aleksey

    2013-04-01

    The magnetic field of the Earth has global meaning for a life on the Earth. The world geophysical science explains: - occurrence of a magnetic field of the Earth it is transformation of kinetic energy of movements of the fused iron in the liquid core of Earth - into the magnetic energy; - the warming up of a kernel of the Earth occurs due to radioactive disintegration of elements, with excretion of thermal energy. The world science does not define the reasons: - drift of a magnetic dipole on 0,2 a year to the West; - drift of lithospheric slabs and continents. The author offers: an alternative variant existing in a world science the theories "Geodynamo" - it is the theory « the Magnetic field of the Earth », created on the basis of physical laws. Education of a magnetic field of the Earth occurs at moving the electric charge located in a liquid kernel, at rotation of the Earth. At calculation of a magnetic field is used law the Bio Savara for a ring electric current: dB = . Magnetic induction in a kernel of the Earth: B = 2,58 Gs. According to the law of electromagnetic induction the Faradey, rotation of a iron kernel of the Earth in magnetic field causes occurrence of an electric field Emf which moves electrons from the center of a kernel towards the mantle. So of arise the radial electric currents. The magnetic field amplifies the iron of mantle and a kernel of the Earth. As a result of action of a radial electric field the electrons will flow from the center of a kernel in a layer of an electric charge. The central part of a kernel represents the field with a positive electric charge, which creates inverse magnetic field Binv and Emfinv When ?mfinv = ?mf ; ?inv = B, there will be an inversion a magnetic field of the Earth. It is a fact: drift of a magnetic dipole of the Earth in the western direction approximately 0,2 longitude, into a year. Radial electric currents a actions with the basic magnetic field of a Earth - it turn a kernel. It coincides with laws of electromagnetism. According to a rule of the left hand: if the magnetic field in a kernel is directed to drawing, electric current are directed to an axis of rotation of the Earth, - a action of force clockwise (to West). Definition of the force causing drift a kernel according to the law of Ampere F = IBlsin. Powerful force 3,5 × 1012 Nyton, what makes drift of the central part of a kernel of the Earth on 0,2 the longitude in year to West, and also it is engine of the mechanism of movement of slabs together with continents. Movement of a core of the Earth carry out around of a terrestrial axis one circulation in the western direction in 2000 of years. Linear speed of rotation of a kernel concerning a mantle on border the mantle a kernel: V = × 3,471 × 10 = 3,818 × 10 m/s = 33 m/day = 12 km/years. Considering greater viscosity of a mantle, the powerful energy at rotation of a kernel seize a mantle and lithospheric slabs and makes their collisions as a result of which there are earthquakes and volcano. Continents Northern and Southern America every year separate from the Europe and Africa on several centimeters. Atlantic ocean as a result of movement of these slabs with such speed was formed for 200 million years, that in comparison with the age of the Earth - several billions years, not so long time. Drift of a kernel in the western direction is a principal cause of delay of speed of rotation of the Earth. Flow of radial electric currents allot according to the law of Joule - Lenz, the quantity of warmth : Q = I2Rt = IUt, of thermal energy 6,92 × 1017 calories/year. This defines heating of a kernel and the Earth as a whole. In the valley of the median-Atlantic ridge having numerous volcanos, the lava flow constantly thus warm up waters of Atlantic ocean. It is a fact the warm current Gulf Stream. Thawing of a permafrost and ices of Arctic ocean, of glaciers of Greenland and Antarctica is acknowledgement: the warmth of earth defines character of thawing of glaciers and a permafrost. This is a global warming. The version of the author: the period

  17. Interplanetary Magnetic Field Power Spectrum Variations: A VHO Enabled Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szabo, A.; Koval, A.; Merka, J.; Narock, T.

    2011-01-01

    The newly reprocessed high time resolution (11/22 vectors/sec) Wind mission interplanetary magnetic field data and the solar wind key parameter search capability of the Virtual Heliospheric Observatory (VHO) affords an opportunity to study magnetic field power spectral density variations as a function of solar wind conditions. In the reprocessed Wind Magnetic Field Investigation (MFI) data, the spin tone and its harmonics are greatly reduced that allows the meaningful fitting of power spectra to the 2 Hz limit above which digitization noise becomes apparent. The power spectral density is computed and the spectral index is fitted for the MHD and ion inertial regime separately along with the break point between the two for various solar wind conditions. The time periods of fixed solar wind conditions are obtained from VHO searches that greatly simplify the process. The functional dependence of the ion inertial spectral index and break point on solar wind plasma and magnetic field conditions will be discussed

  18. Interplanetary Magnetic Field Power Spectrum Variations: A VHO Enabled Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szabo, A.; Koval, A.; Merka, J.; Narock, T.

    2010-01-01

    The newly reprocessed high time resolution (11/22 vectors/sec) Wind mission interplanetary magnetic field data and the solar wind key parameter search capability of the Virtual Heliospheric Observatory (VHO) affords an opportunity to study magnetic field power spectral density variations as a function of solar wind conditions. In the reprocessed Wind Magnetic Field Investigation (MFI) data, the spin tone and its harmonics are greatly reduced that allows the meaningful fitting of power spectra to the approx.2 Hz limit above which digitization noise becomes apparent. The power spectral density is computed and the spectral index is fitted for the MHD and ion inertial regime separately along with the break point between the two for various solar wind conditions . The time periods of fixed solar wind conditions are obtained from VHO searches that greatly simplify the process. The functional dependence of the ion inertial spectral index and break point on solar wind plasma and magnetic field conditions will be discussed

  19. Advances in high field magnetism at Osaka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Date, M.

    1989-03-01

    Recent advances in high field magnetism mainly done in the High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Osaka University, are reviewed. Various magnetic and electronic properties are induced in high fields; it is emphasized that the newly developed incommensurate mean field model is effective in understanding complex phase diagrams such as in CeSb, CeBi and PrCo 2Si 2.

  20. LABORATORY V MAGNETIC FIELDS AND FORCES

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    's technology. Magnets are used today to image parts of the body, to explore the mysteries of the human brain to combine magnets to change the magnetic field at any point. You decide to determine the form

  1. Stochastic Resonance in Finely Dispersed Magnets: Influence of a Constant Magnetic Field Applied along the Direction of Easy Magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isavnin, A. G.

    2005-07-01

    The dynamic susceptibility of an uniaxial single-domain iron particle is calculated under conditions of stochastic resonance as a function of the strength of an additional constant magnetic field applied along the direction of easy magnetization. Calculations are performed for the model of discrete orientations using the governing equation for the Kramers above-the-barrier transition rates of the magnetic moment vector of the particle. It is demonstrated that the presence of this constant field that breaks the symmetry of the bistable potential results in a decrease in the magnitude of the system response to an external periodic perturbation.

  2. First Simultaneous Detection of Moving Magnetic Features in Photospheric Intensity and Magnetic Field Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Eun-Kyung; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl; Goode, Philip

    2012-07-01

    The formation and the temporal evolution of a bipolar moving magnetic feature (MMF) was studied with high-spatial and temporal resolution. The photometric properties were observed with the New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory using a broadband TiO filter (705.7 nm), while the magnetic field was analyzed using the spectropolarimetric data obtained by Hinode. For the first time, we observed a bipolar MMF simultaneously in intensity images and magnetic field data, and studied the details of its structure. The vector magnetic field and the Doppler velocity of the MMF were also studied. A bipolar MMF with its positive polarity closer to the negative penumbra formed, accompanied by a bright, filamentary structure in the TiO data connecting the MMF and a dark penumbral filament. A fast downflow (<=2 km s-1) was detected at the positive polarity. The vector magnetic field obtained from the full Stokes inversion revealed that a bipolar MMF has a U-shaped magnetic field configuration. Our observations provide a clear intensity counterpart of the observed MMF in the photosphere, and strong evidence of the connection between the MMF and the penumbral filament as a serpentine field.

  3. FIRST SIMULTANEOUS DETECTION OF MOVING MAGNETIC FEATURES IN PHOTOSPHERIC INTENSITY AND MAGNETIC FIELD DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Eun-Kyung; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl; Goode, Philip, E-mail: eklim@bbso.njit.edu [Big Bear Solar Observatory, New Jersey Institute of Technology, 40386 North Shore Lane, Big Bear City, CA 92314-9672 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The formation and the temporal evolution of a bipolar moving magnetic feature (MMF) was studied with high-spatial and temporal resolution. The photometric properties were observed with the New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory using a broadband TiO filter (705.7 nm), while the magnetic field was analyzed using the spectropolarimetric data obtained by Hinode. For the first time, we observed a bipolar MMF simultaneously in intensity images and magnetic field data, and studied the details of its structure. The vector magnetic field and the Doppler velocity of the MMF were also studied. A bipolar MMF with its positive polarity closer to the negative penumbra formed, accompanied by a bright, filamentary structure in the TiO data connecting the MMF and a dark penumbral filament. A fast downflow ({<=}2 km s{sup -1}) was detected at the positive polarity. The vector magnetic field obtained from the full Stokes inversion revealed that a bipolar MMF has a U-shaped magnetic field configuration. Our observations provide a clear intensity counterpart of the observed MMF in the photosphere, and strong evidence of the connection between the MMF and the penumbral filament as a serpentine field.

  4. Quantitative estimates of magnetic field reconnection properties from electric and magnetic field measurements

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Quantitative estimates of magnetic field reconnection properties from electric and magnetic field there are positive electric field components tangential to the magnetopause and a magnetic field component normal to it. Because these three components are the smallest of the six electric and magnetic fields

  5. Explaining Mercury's peculiar magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicht, Johannes; Cao, Hao; Heyner, Daniel; Dietrich, Wieland; Christensen, Ulrich R.

    2014-05-01

    MESSENGER magnetometer data revealed that Mercury's magnetic field is not only particularly weak but also has a peculiar geometry. The MESSENGER team finds that the location of the magnetic equator always lies significantly north of the geographic equator, is largely independent of the distance to the planet, and also varies only weakly with longitude. The field is best described by an axial dipole that is offset to the north by about 20% of the planetary radius. In terms of classical Gauss coefficients, this translates into a low axial dipole component of g10= -190 nT but a relatively large axial quadrupole contribution that amounts to roughly 40% of this value. The axial octupole is also sizable while higher harmonic contributions are much weaker. Very remarkable is also the fact that the equatorial dipole contribution is very small, consistent with a dipole tilt below 0.8 degree, and this is also true for the other non-axisymmetic field contributions. We analyze several numerical dynamos concerning their capability of explaining Mercury's magnetic field. Classical schemes geared to model the geomagnetic field typically show a much weaker quadrupole component and thus a smaller offset. The onset only becomes larger when the dynamo operates in the multipolar regime at higher Rayleigh numbers. However, since the more complex dynamics generally promotes all higher multipole contributions the location of the magnetic equator varies strongly with longitude and distance to the planet. The situation improves when introducing a stably stratified outer layer in the dynamo region, representing either a rigid FeS layer or a sub-adiabatic core-mantle boundary heat flux. This layer filters out the higher harmonic contributions and the field not only becomes sufficiently weak but also assumes a Mercury like offset geometry during a few percent of the simulation time. To increase the likelihood for the offset configuration, the north-south symmetry must be permanently broken and we explore two scenarios. Increasing the heat flux through the northern hemisphere of the core-mantle boundary is an obvious choice but is not supported by current models for Mercury's mantle. We find that a combination of internal rather than bottom driving and an increased heat flux through the equatorial region of the core-mantle boundary also promotes the required symmetry breaking and results in very Mercury like fields. The reason is that the imposed heat flux pattern, though being equatorially symmetric, lowers the critical Rayleigh number for the onset of equatorially anti-symmetric convection modes. In both scenarios, a stably stratified layer or a feedback coupling to the magnetospheric field is required for lowering the field strength to Mercury-like values.

  6. Effects of non-radial magnetic field on measuring magnetic helicity transport across solar photosphere

    E-print Network

    Song, Yongliang

    2015-01-01

    It is generally believed that the evolution of magnetic helicity has a close relationship with solar activity. Before the launch of SDO, earlier studies have mostly used MDI/SOHO line of sight magnetograms and assumed that magnetic fields are radial when calculating magnetic helicity injection rate from photospheric magnetograms. However, this assumption is not necessarily true. Here we use the vector magnetograms and line of sight magnetograms, both taken by HMI/SDO, to estimate the effects of non-radial magnetic field on measuring magnetic helicity injection rate. We find that: 1) The effect of non-radial magnetic field on estimating tangential velocity is relatively small; 2) On estimating magnetic helicity injection rate, the effect of non-radial magnetic field is strong when active regions are observed near the limb and is relatively small when active regions are close to disk center; 3) The effect of non-radial magnetic field becomes minor if the amount of accumulated magnetic helicity is the only conce...

  7. Limits on the possible intrinsic magnetic field of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Elphic, R. C.; Slavin, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    Magnetic field measurements obtained by the Pioneer Venus orbiter at low altitudes in the solar wind wake region are examined for possible surface-correlated features and any possible intrinsic magnetic moment. The field variations observed in the wake do not resemble those expected for a solar wind interaction with even a weak intrinsic magnetic field. Little orbit-to-orbit persistence of features is found in the magnetic records. The magnetic field measurements in the wake are averaged in 10 deg x 10 deg bins to minimize the effects of external field sources. In these 37 bins, the average fields appear to be randomly oriented and consistent with zero mean in the region mapped. Using these 37 averaged vector fields, a maximum intrinsic magnetic dipole moment is obtained of 4.3 + or - 2.0 x 10 to the 21st G cu cm, approximately an order of magnitude less than previous estimates. It is noted that a more conservative estimate of the probable error of the mean is 5.5 x 10 to the 21st G cu cm. The Pioneer Venus measurements are thus consistent with zero planetary moment. The present measurements are found to be far below estimates made on the basis of angular momentum, the so-called magnetic Bode's law, and far below the dynamo scaling law of Busse.

  8. PLANT GROWTH UNDER STATIC MAGNETIC FIELD INFLUENCEê

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. RÃCUCIU; D. CREANGÃ; I. HORGA

    2008-01-01

    Already germinated seeds of Zea mays were cultivated in the presence of static magnetic field in order to observe several biochemical changes and stimulation effect on plantlets growth. Magnetic treatment involved the application of five different values of magnetic induction of static magnetic field, ranging between 50 mT and 250 mT, during 14 days. In order to investigate the biochemical

  9. V-systems, holonomy Lie algebras and logarithmic vector fields

    E-print Network

    M. V. Feigin; A. P. Veselov

    2014-07-31

    It is shown that the description of certain class of representations of the holonomy Lie algebra associated to hyperplane arrangement Delta is essentially equivalent to the classification of V-systems associated to Delta. The flat sections of the corresponding V-connection can be interpreted as vector fields, which are both logarithmic and gradient. We conjecture that the hyperplane arrangement of any V-system is free in Saito's sense and show this for a special class of V-systems called harmonic, which includes all Coxeter systems. In the irreducible Coxeter case the potentials of the corresponding gradient vector fields turn out to be Saito flat coordinates, or their one-parameter deformations.

  10. Field errors in superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, M.Q.

    1982-01-01

    The mission of this workshop is a discussion of the techniques for tracking particles through arbitrary accelerator field configurations to look for dynamical effects that are suggested by various theoretical models but are not amenable to detailed analysis. A major motivation for this type of study is that many of our accelerator projects are based on the use of superconducting magnets which have field imperfections that are larger and of a more complex nature than those of conventional magnets. Questions such as resonances, uncorrectable closed orbit effects, coupling between planes, and diffusion mechanisms all assume new importance. Since, simultaneously, we are trying to do sophisticated beam manipulations such as stacking, high current accelerator, long life storage, and low loss extraction, we clearly need efficient and accurate tracking programs to proceed with confidence.

  11. Plasma stability in a dipole magnetic field

    E-print Network

    Simakov, Andrei N., 1974-

    2001-01-01

    The MHD and kinetic stability of an axially symmetric plasma, confined by a poloidal magnetic field with closed lines, is considered. In such a system the stabilizing effects of plasma compression and magnetic field ...

  12. Periodic instabilities in protostellar disks with azimuthal magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudskikh, V. V.

    2013-06-01

    The stability of magnetohydrodynamic oscillations in a protostellar disk with a toroidal magnetic field is analyzed. It is shown that, apart from the aperiodic magnetorotational instability, two other types of periodic instabilities of non-axisymmetric perturbations can exist. The simultaneous presence of azimuthal and vertical components of the wave vector are necessary for these to exist. One instability is due to the inductive winding-up of the azimuthal magnetic field of the wave, and the other arises when the field amplitude is increased by a comoving Hall wave, transferring magnetic field into a region of enhanced field intensity. The bandwidths of the unstable wave numbers are analyzed as a function of the Hall current, the ? parameter of a plasma, and the angle between the direction of wave propagation and the plane of the disk. Regions in the accretion disks typical of T Tauri stars are indentified where these instabilities could be most active.

  13. Development of Techniques for Visualization of Scalar and Vector Fields in the Immersive Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bidasaria, Hari B.; Wilson, John W.; Nealy, John E.

    2005-01-01

    Visualization of scalar and vector fields in the immersive environment (CAVE - Cave Automated Virtual Environment) is important for its application to radiation shielding research at NASA Langley Research Center. A complete methodology and the underlying software for this purpose have been developed. The developed software has been put to use for the visualization of the earth s magnetic field, and in particular for the study of the South Atlantic Anomaly. The methodology has also been put to use for the visualization of geomagnetically trapped protons and electrons within Earth's magnetosphere.

  14. Deconfined SU(2) vector fields at zero temperature

    E-print Network

    Bernd A. Berg

    2010-06-22

    Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations of pure SU(2)xU(1) lattice gauge theory show a (zero temperature) deconfining phase transition in the SU(2) gluon sector when a term is added to the SU(2) and U(1) Wilson actions, which requires joint U(2) gauge transformations of the SU(2) and U(1) vector fields. Investigations of this deconfined phase are of interest as it could provide an alternative to the Higgs mechanism.

  15. On completeness of orbits of Killing vector fields

    E-print Network

    Piotr T. Chrusciel

    1993-04-21

    A Theorem is proved which reduces the problem of completeness of orbits of Killing vector fields in maximal globally hyperbolic, say vacuum, space--times to some properties of the orbits near the Cauchy surface. In particular it is shown that all Killing orbits are complete in maximal developements of asymptotically flat Cauchy data, or of Cauchy data prescribed on a compact manifold. This result gives a significant strengthening of the uniqueness theorems for black holes.

  16. Two-dimensional magnetic field analysis of internal-rotor permanent-magnet motors

    SciTech Connect

    Faiz, J.; Jafari, H.

    1999-09-01

    An improved analytical method is proposed for predicting magnetic field distribution in the air-gap and permanent-magnet regions of radial field topology of a brushless internal-rotor permanent-magnet motor. It is a two-dimensional model based on a conformal transformation approach where differences in the current density have been compensated for. The method involves a number of integrals of the vector potential, instead of the scalar potential found in the literature. The method is convenient for magnetic fields having complicated boundaries. The motor model is formulated in polar coordinates and accounts for the large effective air gap, resulting from the low magnetic permeability. Results of the motor analysis are compared with predictions from corresponding finite element analysis and other analytical techniques. They indicate the advantage of the developed approach over other recent analytical techniques.

  17. Cross correlations from back reaction on stochastic magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kunze, Kerstin E., E-mail: kkunze@usal.es [Departamento de Física Fundamental and IUFFyM, Universidad de Salamanca, Plaza de la Merced s/n, 37008 Salamanca (Spain)

    2013-02-01

    The induction equation induces non trivial correlations between the primordial curvature mode and the magnetic mode which is a non linear effect. Assuming a stochastic, gaussian magnetic field the resulting power spectra determining the two point cross correlation functions between the primordial curvature perturbation and the magnetic energy density contrast as well as the magnetic anisotropic stress are calculated approximately. The corresponding numerical solutions are used to calculate the angular power spectra determining the temperature anisotropies and polarization of the cosmic microwave background, C{sub l}. It is found that the resulting C{sub l} are sub-leading in comparison to those generated by the compensated mode for a magnetic field which only redshifts with the expansion of the universe. The main focus are scalar modes, however, vector modes will also be briefly discussed.

  18. Magnetic field of Jupiter and its interaction with the solar wind

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. J. Smith; L. Jr. Davis; D. E. Jones; D. S. Colburn; P. J. Jr. Coleman; P. Dyal; C. P. Sonett

    1974-01-01

    Jupiter's magnetic field and its interaction with the magnetized solar ; wind were observed with the Pioneer 10 vector helium magnetometer. The magnetic ; dipole is directed opposite to that of the Earth with a moment of 4.0 gauss R\\/sub ; j\\/ ³ (R\\/sup , Jupiter radius and an inclination of 15' lying in a system ; III meridian of

  19. Rotating copper plasmoid in external magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Pramod K.; Thareja, Raj K. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Uttar Pradesh 208 016 (India)

    2013-02-15

    Effect of nonuniform magnetic field on the expanding copper plasmoid in helium and argon gases using optical emission spectroscopy and fast imaging is presented. We report a peculiar oscillatory rotation of plasmoid in magnetic field and argon ambient. The temporal variation and appearance of the dip in the electron temperature show a direct evidence of the threading and expulsion of the magnetic field lines from the plasmoid. Rayleigh Taylor instability produced at the interface separating magnetic field and plasma is discussed.

  20. Minireview: Biological effects of magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, M.; Mustarelli, P. (Lab. NMR, Pavia (Italy)); Caprotti, M. (Fondazione Clinica del Lavoro, Pavia (Italy))

    1991-01-01

    The literature about the biological effects of magnetic fields is reviewed. The authors begin by discussing the weak and/or time variable fields, responsible for subtle changes in the circadian rhythms of superior animals, which are believed to be induced by same sort of resonant mechanism. The safety issues related with the strong magnetic fields and gradients generated by clinical NMR magnets are then considered. The last portion summarizes the debate about the biological effects of strong and uniform magnetic fields.

  1. Interaction Forces Between Multiple Bodies in a Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joffe, Benjamin

    1996-01-01

    Some of the results from experiments to determine the interaction forces between multiple bodies in a magnetic field are presented in this paper. It is shown how the force values and the force directions depend on the configuration of the bodies, their relative positions to each other, and the vector of the primary magnetic field. A number of efficient new automatic loading and assembly machines, as well as manipulators and robots, have been created based on the relationship between bodies and magnetic fields. A few of these patented magnetic devices are presented. The concepts involved open a new way to design universal grippers for robot and other kinds of mechanisms for the manipulation of objects. Some of these concepts can be used for space applications.

  2. Magnetic properties prediction of NdFeB magnets by using support vector regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Wende

    2014-09-01

    A novel model using support vector regression (SVR) combined with particle swarm optimization (PSO) was employed to construct mathematical model for prediction of the magnetic properties of the NdFeB magnets. The leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOCV) test results strongly supports that the generalization ability of SVR is high enough. Predicted results show that the mean absolute percentage error for magnetic remanence Br, coercivity Hcj and maximum magnetic energy product (BH)max are 0.53%, 3.90%, 1.73%, and the correlation coefficient (R2) is as high as 0.839, 0.967 and 0.940, respectively. This investigation suggests that the PSO-SVR is not only an effective and practical method to simulate the properties of NdFeB, but also a powerful tool to optimatize designing or controlling the experimental process.

  3. Upper limit on the intrinsic magnetic field of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, J. L.; Russell, C. T.

    1987-01-01

    A data set of 18,000 low-altitude nightside vector measurements from the Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) magnetometer is used to establish a new upper limit on the intrinsic dipolar magnetic moment of Venus. Various techniques are used to search for coherence in the magnetic observations which might be attributable to such an intrinsic field, with negative results. A similar search is conducted for surface magnetism, that is, geographically correlated magnetic features, also with negative results. The present study represents the best limits that PVO observations can provide and is limited by the amount of low-altitude nightside data available. New upper limit to the magnetic moment is 8.4 x 10 to the 10th T/cu m or about 10 to the -5th of the terrestrial magnetic moment. This is a factor of four lower than the previous upper limit.

  4. Conformal field theory correlators from classical field theory on anti-de Sitter space: Vector and spinor fields

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. Mück; K. S. Viswanathan

    1998-01-01

    We use the AdS-CFT correspondence to calculate CFT correlation functions of vector and spinor fields. The connection between the AdS and boundary fields is properly treated via a Dirichlet boundary value problem.

  5. Observational Test of Coronal Magnetic Field Models I. Comparison with Potential Field Model

    E-print Network

    Yu Liu; Haosheng Lin

    2008-05-16

    Recent advances have made it possible to obtain two-dimensional line-of-sight magnetic field maps of the solar corona from spectropolarimetric observations of the Fe XIII 1075 nm forbidden coronal emission line. Together with the linear polarization measurements that map the azimuthal direction of the coronal magnetic field, these coronal vector magnetograms now allow for direct observational testing of theoretical coronal magnetic field models. This paper presents a study testing the validity of potential-field coronal magnetic field models. We constructed a theoretical coronal magnetic field model of active region AR 10582 observed by the SOLARC coronagraph in 2004 by a global potential field extrapolation of the synoptic map of Carrington Rotation 2014. Synthesized linear and circular polarization maps from thin layers of the coronal magnetic field model above the active region along the line of sight are compared with the observed maps. We found that reasonable agreement occurs from layers located just above the sunspot of AR 10582, near the plane of the sky. This result provides the first observational evidence that potential field extrapolation can yield a reasonable approximation of the magnetic field configuration of the solar corona for simple and stable active regions.

  6. Magnetic field experiment on the Freja Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freja Magnetic Field Experiment Team

    1994-11-01

    Freja is a Swedish scientific satellite mission to study fine scale auroral processes. Launch was October 6, 1992, piggyback on a Chinese Long March 2C, to the present 600×1750 km, 63° inclination orbit. The JHU/APL provided the Magnetic Field Experiment (MFE), which includes a custom APL-designed Forth, language microprocessor. This approach has led to a truly generic and flexible design with adaptability to differing mission requirements and has resulted in the transfer of significant ground analysis to on-board processing. Special attention has been paid to the analog electronic and digital processing design in an effort to lower system noise levels, verified by inflight data showing unprecedented system noise levels for near-Earth magnetic field measurements, approaching the fluxgate sensor levels. The full dynamic range measurements are of the 3-axis Earth's magnetic field taken at 128 vector samples s-1 and digitized to 16 bit, resolution, primarily used to evaluate currents and the main magnetic field of the Earth. Additional 3-axis ‘AC’ channels are bandpass filtered from 1.5 to 128 Hz to remove the main field spin signal, the range is±650 nT. These vector measurements cover Pc waves to ion gyrofrequency magnetic wave signals up to the oxygen gyrofrequency (˜40 Hz). A separate, seventh channel samples the spin axis sensor with a bandpass filter of 1.5 to 256 Hz, the signal of which is fed to a software FFT. This on-board FFT processing covers the local helium gyrofrequencies (˜160 Hz) and is plotted in the Freja Summary Plots (FSPs) along with disturbance fields. First data were received in the U.S. October 16 from Kiruna, Sweden via the Internet and SPAN e-mail networks, and were from an orbit a few hours earlier over Greenland and Sweden. Data files and data products, e.g., FSPs generated at the Kiruna ground station, are communicated in a similar manner through an automatic mail distribution system in Stockholm to PIs and various users. Distributed management of spacecraft operations by the science team is also achieved by this advanced communications system. An exciting new discovery of the field-aligned current systems is the high frequency wave power or structure associated with the various large-scale currents. The spin axis ‘AC’ data and its standard deviation is a measure of this high-frequency component of the Birkeland current regions. The exact response of these channels and filters as well as the physics behind these wave and/or fine-scale current structures accompanying the large-scale currents is being pursued; nevertheless, the association is clear and the results are used for the MFE Birkeland current monitor calculated in the MFE microprocessor. This monitor then sets a trigger when it is greater than a commandable, preset threshold. This ‘event’ flag can be read by the system unit and used to remotely command all instruments into burst mode data taking and local memory storage. In addition,Freja is equipped with a 400 MHz ‘Low Speed Link’ transmitter which transmits spacecraft hcusekeeping that can be received with a low cost, portable receiver. These housekeeping data include the MFE auroral zone current detector; this space weather information indicates the location and strength of ionospheric current systems that directly impact communications, power systems, long distance telephone lines and near-Earth satellite operations. The JHU/APL MFE is a joint effort with NASA/GSFC and was co-sponsored by the Office of Naval Research and NASA/Headquarters in cooperation with the Swedish National Space Board and the Swedish Space Corporation.

  7. Programmable common-path vector field synthesizer for femtosecond pulses.

    PubMed

    Ninck, M; Galler, A; Feurer, T; Brixner, T

    2007-12-01

    We demonstrate a novel design for a femtosecond vector field synthesizer. Pulse shaping of all four degrees of freedom of the electric field (amplitude, phase, ellipticity, and orientation angle) is achieved with a single 1D double-layer spatial light modulator in a zero-dispersion compressor by modulating the amplitude and phase of the two transverse polarization components in separate halves of the modulator. Being a common-path arrangement, it is interferometrically stable and therefore usable for long-term measurements. The method can be broadly applied in coherent control and nonlinear spectroscopy. PMID:18059939

  8. Magsat - A new satellite to survey the earth's magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mobley, F. F.; Eckard, L. D.; Fountain, G. H.; Ousley, G. W.

    1980-01-01

    The Magsat satellite was launched on Oct. 30, 1979 into a sun-synchronous dawn-dusk orbit, of 97 deg inclination, 350 km perigee, and 550 km apogee. It contains a precision vector magnetometer and a cesium-vapor scalar magnetometer at the end of a 6-m long graphite epoxy scissors boom. The magnetometers are accurate to 2 nanotesla. A pair of star cameras are used to define the body orientation to 10 arc sec rms. An 'attitude transfer system' measures the orientation of the magnetometer sensors relative to the star cameras to approximately 5 arc sec rms. The satellite position is determined to 70 meters rms by Doppler tracking. The overall objective is to determine each component of the earth's vector magnetic field to an accuracy of 6 nanotesla rms. The Magsat satellite gathers a complete picture of the earth's magnetic field every 12 hours. The vector components are sampled 16 times per second with a resolution of 0.5 nanotesla. The data will be used by the U.S. Geological Survey to prepare 1980 world magnetic field charts and to detect large-scale magnetic anomalies in the earth's crust for use in planning resource exploration strategy.

  9. Magnetic monopole and the nature of the static magnetic field

    E-print Network

    Xiuqing Huang

    2008-12-10

    We investigate the factuality of the hypothetical magnetic monopole and the nature of the static magnetic field. It is shown from many aspects that the concept of the massive magnetic monopoles clearly is physically untrue. We argue that the static magnetic field of a bar magnet, in fact, is the static electric field of the periodically quasi-one-dimensional electric-dipole superlattice, which can be well established in some transition metals with the localized d-electron. This research may shed light on the perfect unification of magnetic and electrical phenomena.

  10. Microwave Measurements of Coronal Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibasaki, K.

    2006-08-01

    Magnetic field measurements of the solar corona using microwave observation are reviewed. The solar corona is filled with highly ionised plasma and magnetic field. Moving charged particles interact with magnetic field due to Lorentz force. This results in gyration motion perpendicular to the magnetic field and free motion along the magnetic field. Circularly polarized electro-magnetic waves interact with gyrating electrons efficiently and the interaction depends on the sense of circular polarization (right-handed or left-handed). This is the reason why we can measure magnetic field strength through microwave observations. This process does not require complicated quantum physics but the classical treatment is enough. Hence the inversion of measured values to magnetic field strength is simpler than in the case of optical and infrared measurements. There are several methods to measure magnetic field strength through microwave observations. We can divide them into two categories: one is based on emission mechanisms and the other is based on wave propagation. In the case of emission mechanisms, thermal f-f emission, thermal gyro-resonance emission and non-thermal gyro-synchrotron emission can be used to measure magnetic field strength. In the case of wave propagation, polarization reversal due to propagation through quasi-transverse magnetic field region can be used. Examples of distribution of magnetic field strength in the solar corona measured by Nobeyama Radioheliograph will be presented.

  11. Measuring the magnetic fields of jupiter and the outer solar system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Smith; B. Connor

    1975-01-01

    The vector helium magnetometer, one of the Pioneer-Jupiter experiments, has measured the magnetic field of Jupiter and the interplanetary magnetic field in the outer solar system. The comprehensive scientific objectives of the investigations are explained and are then translated into the major instrument requirements. The principles of operation of the magnetometer, which involve the optical pumping of metastable helium, are

  12. The Double Star magnetic field investigation: instrument design, performance and highlights of the first year's observations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Carr; P. Brown; T. L. Zhang; J. Gloag; T. Horbury; E. Lucek; W. Magnes; H. O'Brien; T. Oddy; U. Auster; P. Austin; O. Aydogar; A. Balogh; W. Baumjohann; T. Beek; H. Eichelberger; K.-H. Fornacon; E. Georgescu; K.-H. Glassmeier; M. Ludlam; R. Nakamura; I. Richter

    2005-01-01

    One of the primary objectives of the Double Star mission is the accurate measurement of the magnetic field vector along the orbits of the two spacecraft. The magnetic field is an essential parameter for the understanding of space plasma processes and is also required for the effective interpretation of data from the other instruments on the spacecraft. We present the

  13. Microstructure of the interplanetary magnetic field near 4 and 5 AU

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. D. Parker

    1980-01-01

    Interplanetary magnetic field fluctuations near 4 and 5 AU are investigated on the basis of Pioneer 10 and 11 vector magnetic field measurements in order to identify extant wave modes and propagation directions as functions of frequency in the range 0.00004 to 0.009 Hz. Analysis of the approximately 500 spectral matrices as functions of frequency obtained from each spacecraft indicates

  14. Nonlinear dynamics of a continuum Heisenberg spin chain with an anisotropy and an external magnetic field

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wu-Ming Liu; Shu-Li Yang; Fu-Cho Pu; Nian-Ning Huang

    1997-01-01

    By stereographically projecting the spin vector onto a complex plane in the equations of motion for a continuum Heisenberg spin chain with an anisotropy (an easy plane and an easy axis) and an external magnetic field, the effect of the magnetic field for integrability of the system is discussed. Then, introducing an auxiliary parameter, the Lax equations for Darboux matrices

  15. Numerical magnetic field analysis and signal processing for fault diagnostics of electrical machines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Pöyhönen; M. Negrea; P. Jover; A. Arkkio; H. Hyötyniemi

    2003-01-01

    Numerical magnetic field analysis is used for predicting the performance of an induction motor and a slip-ring generator having different faults implemented in their structure. Virtual measurement data provided by the numerical magnetic field analysis are analysed using modern signal processing techniques to get a reliable indication of the fault. Support vector machine based classification is applied to fault diagnostics.

  16. The finite element modeling of static and stationary electric and magnetic fields

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ioan E. Lager; Gerrit Mur

    1996-01-01

    A finite-element method is described for computing static and stationary electric and magnetic fields directly in terms of the electric or magnetic field strength. In this way the use of (vector) potentials is avoided and a much higher accuracy is achieved with the same computational effort. The curl equation is supplemented with the electromagnetic compatibility relations and a problem is

  17. Magnetic field-assisted gene delivery: achievements and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Schwerdt, Jose I; Goya, Gerardo F; Calatayud, M Pilar; Hereñú, Claudia B; Reggiani, Paula C; Goya, Rodolfo G

    2012-04-01

    The discovery in the early 2000's that magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) complexed to nonviral or viral vectors can, in the presence of an external magnetic field, greatly enhance gene transfer into cells has raised much interest. This technique, called magnetofection, was initially developed mainly to improve gene transfer in cell cultures, a simpler and more easily controllable scenario than in vivo models. These studies provided evidence for some unique capabilities of magnetofection. Progressively, the interest in magnetofection expanded to its application in animal models and led to the association of this technique with another technology, magnetic drug targeting (MDT). This combination offers the possibility to develop more efficient and less invasive gene therapy strategies for a number of major pathologies like cancer, neurodegeneration and myocardial infarction. The goal of MDT is to concentrate MNPs functionalized with therapeutic drugs, in target areas of the body by means of properly focused external magnetic fields. The availability of stable, nontoxic MNP-gene vector complexes now offers the opportunity to develop magnetic gene targeting (MGT), a variant of MDT in which the gene coding for a therapeutic molecule, rather than the molecule itself, is delivered to a therapeutic target area in the body. This article will first outline the principle of magnetofection, subsequently describing the properties of the magnetic fields and MNPs used in this technique. Next, it will review the results achieved by magnetofection in cell cultures. Last, the potential of MGT for implementing minimally invasive gene therapy will be discussed. PMID:22348552

  18. Single-point Inversion of the Coronal Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plowman, Joseph

    2014-09-01

    The Fe XIII 10747 and 10798 Å lines observed in the solar corona are sensitive to the coronal magnetic field in such a way that, in principle, the full vector field at a point on the line of sight can be inferred from their combined polarization signals. This paper presents analytical inversion formulae for the field parameters and analyzes the uncertainty of magnetic field measurements made from such observations, assuming emission dominated by a single region along the line of sight. We consider the case of the current Coronal Multi-channel Polarimeter (CoMP) instrument as well as the future Coronal Solar Magnetism Observatory (COSMO) and Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) instruments. Uncertainties are estimated with a direct analytic inverse and with a Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm. We find that (in effect) two components of the vector field can be recovered with CoMP, and well recovered with COSMO or ATST, but that the third component can only be recovered when the solar magnetic field is strong and optimally oriented.

  19. The Local Stellar Velocity Field via Vector Spherical Harmonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makarov, V. V.; Murphy, D. W.

    2007-01-01

    We analyze the local field of stellar tangential velocities for a sample of 42,339 nonbinary Hipparcos stars with accurate parallaxes, using a vector spherical harmonic formalism.We derive simple relations between the parameters of the classical linear model (Ogorodnikov-Milne) of the local systemic field and low-degree terms of the general vector harmonic decomposition. Taking advantage of these relationships, we determine the solar velocity with respect to the local stars of (V(sub X), V(sub Y), V(sub Z)) = (10.5, 18.5, 7.3) +/- 0.1 km s(exp -1) not for the asymmetric drift with respect to the local standard of rest. If only stars more distant than 100 pc are considered, the peculiar solar motion is (V(sub X), V(sub Y), V(sub Z)) = (9.9, 15.6, 6.9) +/- 0.2 km s(exp -1). The adverse effects of harmonic leakage, which occurs between the reflex solar motion represented by the three electric vector harmonics in the velocity space and higher degree harmonics in the proper-motion space, are eliminated in our analysis by direct subtraction of the reflex solar velocity in its tangential components for each star...

  20. Targeted Delivery of Human VEGF Gene via Complexes of Magnetic Nanoparticle-Adenoviral Vectors Enhanced Cardiac Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Lailiang; Wang, Weiwei; Delyagina, Evgenya; Lux, Cornelia; Sorg, Heiko; Riehemann, Kristina

    2012-01-01

    This study assessed the concept of whether delivery of magnetic nanobeads (MNBs)/adenoviral vectors (Ad)–encoded hVEGF gene (AdhVEGF) could regenerate ischaemically damaged hearts in a rat acute myocardial infarction model under the control of an external magnetic field. Adenoviral vectors were conjugated to MNBs with the Sulfo-NHS-LC-Biotin linker. In vitro transduction efficacy of MNBs/Ad–encoded luciferase gene (Adluc) was compared with Adluc alone in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) under magnetic field stimulation. In vivo, in a rat acute myocardial infarction (AMI) model, MNBs/AdhVEGF complexes were injected intravenously and an epicardial magnet was employed to attract the circulating MNBs/AdhVEGF complexes. In vitro, compared with Adluc alone, MNBs/Adluc complexes had a 50-fold higher transduction efficiency under the magnetic field. In vivo, epicardial magnet effectively attracted MNBs/AdhVEGF complexes and resulted in strong therapeutic gene expression in the ischemic zone of the infarcted heart. When compared to other MI-treated groups, the MI-M+/AdhVEGF group significantly improved left ventricular function (p<0.05) assessed by pressure-volume loops after 4 weeks. Also the MI-M+/AdhVEGF group exhibited higher capillary and arteriole density and lower collagen deposition than other MI-treated groups (p<0.05). Magnetic targeting enhances transduction efficiency and improves heart function. This novel method to improve gene therapy outcomes in AMI treatment offers the potential into clinical applications. PMID:22844395

  1. Microstructure of the interplanetary magnetic field near 4 and 5 AU

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. D. Parker

    1980-01-01

    Seventy-two days of vector magnetic field measurements from Pioneer 10 and 11 are analyzed for information about magnetic field fluctuations in the quiet solar wind near 4 and 5 AU. Calculated as functions of frequency over the range 4 x 10⁻⁵ to 9 x 10⁻³ Hz, directional properties of magnetic field fluctuations are presented and are discussed with reference to

  2. Harmonic undulator radiations with constant magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeevakhan, Hussain; Mishra, G.

    2015-01-01

    Harmonic undulators has been analysed in the presence of constant magnetic field along the direction of main undulator field. The spectrum modifications in harmonic undulator radiations and intensity degradation as a function of constant magnetic field magnitude at fundamental and third harmonics have been evaluated with a numerical integration method and generalised Bessel function. The role of harmonic field to overcome the intensity reduction due to constant magnetic field and energy spread in electron beam has also been demonstrated.

  3. How to Draw Magnetic Fields - II

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-08-03

    This is an activity about depicting magnetic polarity. Learners will observe several provided drawings of magnetic field line patterns for bar magnets in simple orientations of like and unlike polarities and carefully draw the field lines and depict the polarities for several orientations, including an arrangement of six magnetic poles. This is the fourth activity in the Magnetic Math booklet; this booklet can be found on the Space Math@NASA website.

  4. THE ABRUPT CHANGES IN THE PHOTOSPHERIC MAGNETIC AND LORENTZ FORCE VECTORS DURING SIX MAJOR NEUTRAL-LINE FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Petrie, G. J. D. [National Solar Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)

    2012-11-01

    We analyze the spatial and temporal variations of the abrupt photospheric magnetic changes associated with six major flares using 12 minute, 0.''5 pixel{sup -1} vector magnetograms from NASA's Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager instrument on the Solar Dynamics Observatory satellite. The six major flares occurred near the main magnetic neutral lines of four active regions, NOAA 11158, 11166, 11283, and 11429. During all six flares the neutral-line field vectors became stronger and more horizontal, in each case almost entirely due to strengthening of the horizontal field components parallel to the neutral line. In all six cases the neutral-line pre-flare fields were more vertical than the reference potential fields, and collapsed abruptly and permanently closer to potential-field tilt angles during every flare, implying that the relaxation of magnetic stress associated with non-potential tilt angles plays a major role during major flares. The shear angle with respect to the reference potential field did not show such a pattern, demonstrating that flare processes do not generally relieve magnetic stresses associated with photospheric magnetic shear. The horizontal fields became significantly and permanently more aligned with the neutral line during the four largest flares, suggesting that the collapsing field is on average more aligned with the neutral line than the pre-flare neutral-line field. The vertical Lorentz force had a large, abrupt, permanent downward change during each of the flares, consistent with loop collapse. The horizontal Lorentz force changes acted mostly parallel to the neutral line in opposite directions on each side, a signature of the fields contracting during the flare, pulling the two sides of the neutral line toward each other. The greater effect of the flares on field tilt than on shear may be explained by photospheric line-tying.

  5. The Abrupt Changes in the Photospheric Magnetic and Lorentz Force Vectors during Six Major Neutral-line Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrie, G. J. D.

    2012-11-01

    We analyze the spatial and temporal variations of the abrupt photospheric magnetic changes associated with six major flares using 12 minute, 0farcs5 pixel-1 vector magnetograms from NASA's Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager instrument on the Solar Dynamics Observatory satellite. The six major flares occurred near the main magnetic neutral lines of four active regions, NOAA 11158, 11166, 11283, and 11429. During all six flares the neutral-line field vectors became stronger and more horizontal, in each case almost entirely due to strengthening of the horizontal field components parallel to the neutral line. In all six cases the neutral-line pre-flare fields were more vertical than the reference potential fields, and collapsed abruptly and permanently closer to potential-field tilt angles during every flare, implying that the relaxation of magnetic stress associated with non-potential tilt angles plays a major role during major flares. The shear angle with respect to the reference potential field did not show such a pattern, demonstrating that flare processes do not generally relieve magnetic stresses associated with photospheric magnetic shear. The horizontal fields became significantly and permanently more aligned with the neutral line during the four largest flares, suggesting that the collapsing field is on average more aligned with the neutral line than the pre-flare neutral-line field. The vertical Lorentz force had a large, abrupt, permanent downward change during each of the flares, consistent with loop collapse. The horizontal Lorentz force changes acted mostly parallel to the neutral line in opposite directions on each side, a signature of the fields contracting during the flare, pulling the two sides of the neutral line toward each other. The greater effect of the flares on field tilt than on shear may be explained by photospheric line-tying.

  6. Interplanetary magnetic field data book

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    An interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) data set is presented that is uniform with respect to inclusion of cislunar IMF data only, and which has as complete time coverage as presently possible over a full solar cycle. Macroscale phenomena in the interplanetary medium (sector structure, heliolatitude variations, solar cycle variations, etc.) and other phenomena (e.g., ground level cosmic-ray events) for which knowledge of the IMF with hourly resolution is necessary, are discussed. Listings and plots of cislunar hourly averaged IMP parameters over the period November 27, 1963, to May 17, 1974, are presented along with discussion of the mutual consistency of the IMF data used herein. The magnetic tape from which the plots and listings were generated, which is available from the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC), is also discussed.

  7. Auroral vector electric field and particle comparisons. II - Electrodynamics of an arc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D. S.; Maynard, N. C.; Troim, J.; Jacobsen, T.; Egeland, A.

    1977-01-01

    The paper reports the results of energetic auroral electron and vector electric field measurements taken near and above a discrete auroral form and discusses their electrodynamic implications. Height-integrated Hall and Pedersen conductivities are computed in a quantitative fashion along the rocket payload trajectory. These conductivities, together with the electric fields, are used to describe the local auroral electrojet current system and to demonstrate an inverse relationship between the local electric field intensity and the height-integrated Pedersen conductivity. An analysis is presented of the divergence of both the electric field and the horizontal current as an effort to infer space charge densities and magnetic-field-aligned electrical currents near an auroral arc.

  8. Non-singular spherical harmonic expressions of geomagnetic vector and gradient tensor fields in the local north-oriented reference frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, J.; Chen, C.; Lesur, V.; Wang, L.

    2014-12-01

    General expressions of magnetic vector (MV) and magnetic gradient tensor (MGT) in terms of the first- and second-order derivatives of spherical harmonics at different degrees and orders, are relatively complicated and singular at the poles. In this paper, we derived alternative non-singular expressions for the MV, the MGT and also the higher-order partial derivatives of the magnetic field in local north-oriented reference frame. Using our newly derived formulae, the magnetic potential, vector and gradient tensor fields at an altitude of 300 km are calculated based on a global lithospheric magnetic field model GRIMM_L120 (version 0.0) and the main magnetic field model of IGRF11. The corresponding results at the poles are discussed and the validity of the derived formulas is verified using the Laplace equation of the potential field.

  9. Magnetic field driven domain-wall propagation in magnetic nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.R. [Physics Department, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Hong Kong (China); Yan, P. [Physics Department, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Hong Kong (China)], E-mail: yanpeng@ust.hk; Lu, J.; He, C. [Physics Department, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Hong Kong (China)

    2009-08-15

    The mechanism of magnetic field induced magnetic domain-wall (DW) propagation in a nanowire is revealed: A static DW cannot exist in a homogeneous magnetic nanowire when an external magnetic field is applied. Thus, a DW must vary with time under a static magnetic field. A moving DW must dissipate energy due to the Gilbert damping. As a result, the wire has to release its Zeeman energy through the DW propagation along the field direction. The DW propagation speed is proportional to the energy dissipation rate that is determined by the DW structure. The negative differential mobility in the intermediate field is due to the transition from high energy dissipation at low field to low energy dissipation at high field. For the field larger than the so-called Walker breakdown field, DW plane precesses around the wire, leading to the propagation speed oscillation.

  10. Permanent Magnet Ecr Plasma Source With Magnetic Field Optimization

    DOEpatents

    Doughty, Frank C. (Plano, TX); Spencer, John E. (Plano, TX)

    2000-12-19

    In a plasma-producing device, an optimized magnet field for electron cyclotron resonance plasma generation is provided by a shaped pole piece. The shaped pole piece adjusts spacing between the magnet and the resonance zone, creates a convex or concave resonance zone, and decreases stray fields between the resonance zone and the workpiece. For a cylindrical permanent magnet, the pole piece includes a disk adjacent the magnet together with an annular cylindrical sidewall structure axially aligned with the magnet and extending from the base around the permanent magnet. The pole piece directs magnetic field lines into the resonance zone, moving the resonance zone further from the face of the magnet. Additional permanent magnets or magnet arrays may be utilized to control field contours on a local scale. Rather than a permeable material, the sidewall structure may be composed of an annular cylindrical magnetic material having a polarity opposite that of the permanent magnet, creating convex regions in the resonance zone. An annular disk-shaped recurve section at the end of the sidewall structure forms magnetic mirrors keeping the plasma off the pole piece. A recurve section composed of magnetic material having a radial polarity forms convex regions and/or magnetic mirrors within the resonance zone.

  11. Logarithmic violation of scaling in strongly anisotropic turbulent transfer of a passive vector field.

    PubMed

    Antonov, N V; Gulitskiy, N M

    2015-01-01

    Inertial-range asymptotic behavior of a vector (e.g., magnetic) field, passively advected by a strongly anisotropic turbulent flow, is studied by means of the field-theoretic renormalization group and the operator product expansion. The advecting velocity field is Gaussian, not correlated in time, with the pair correlation function of the form ??(t-t^{'})/k_{?}^{d-1+?}, where k_{?}=|k_{?}| and k_{?} is the component of the wave vector, perpendicular to the distinguished direction ("direction of the flow")-the d-dimensional generalization of the ensemble introduced by Avellaneda and Majda [Commun. Math. Phys. 131, 381 (1990)CMPHAY0010-361610.1007/BF02161420]. The stochastic advection-diffusion equation for the transverse (divergence-free) vector field includes, as special cases, the kinematic dynamo model for magnetohydrodynamic turbulence and the linearized Navier-Stokes equation. In contrast to the well-known isotropic Kraichnan's model, where various correlation functions exhibit anomalous scaling behavior with infinite sets of anomalous exponents, here the dependence on the integral turbulence scale L has a logarithmic behavior: Instead of powerlike corrections to ordinary scaling, determined by naive (canonical) dimensions, the anomalies manifest themselves as polynomials of logarithms of L. The key point is that the matrices of scaling dimensions of the relevant families of composite operators appear nilpotent and cannot be diagonalized. The detailed proof of this fact is given for the correlation functions of arbitrary order. PMID:25679703

  12. Logarithmic violation of scaling in strongly anisotropic turbulent transfer of a passive vector field

    E-print Network

    N. V. Antonov; N. M. Gulitskiy

    2015-01-21

    Inertial-range asymptotic behavior of a vector (e.g., magnetic) field, passively advected by a strongly anisotropic turbulent flow, is studied by means of the field theoretic renormalization group and the operator product expansion. The advecting velocity field is Gaussian, not correlated in time, with the pair correlation function of the form $\\propto \\delta(t-t') / k_{\\bot}^{d-1+\\xi}$, where $k_{\\bot}=|{\\bf k}_{\\bot}|$ and ${\\bf k}_{\\bot}$ is the component of the wave vector, perpendicular to the distinguished direction (`direction of the flow') -- the $d$-dimensional generalization of the ensemble introduced by Avellaneda and Majda [{\\it Commun. Math. Phys.} {\\bf 131}: 381 (1990)]. The stochastic advection-diffusion equation for the transverse (divergence-free) vector field includes, as special cases, the kinematic dynamo model for magnetohydrodynamic turbulence and the linearized Navier--Stokes equation. In contrast to the well known isotropic Kraichnan's model, where various correlation functions exhibit anomalous scaling behavior with infinite sets of anomalous exponents, here the dependence on the integral turbulence scale $L$ has a logarithmic behavior: instead of power-like corrections to ordinary scaling, determined by naive (canonical) dimensions, the anomalies manifest themselves as polynomials of logarithms of $L$. The key point is that the matrices of scaling dimensions of the relevant families of composite operators appear nilpotent and cannot be diagonalized. The detailed proof of this fact is given for correlation functions of arbitrary order.

  13. Vectors from A to B

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is an activity about vectors and velocity. It outlines the addition and subtraction of vectors, and introduces the application of trigonometry to describing vectors. The resource is designed to support student analysis of THEMIS (Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms) Magnetometer line-plot data. Learners will complete worksheets consisting of problem sets that allow them to work with vector data in magnetic fields. This is activity 15 from Exploring Magnetism: Earth's Magnetic Personality.

  14. Report of the panel on geopotential fields: Magnetic field, section 9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Achache, Jose J.; Backus, George E.; Benton, Edward R.; Harrison, Christopher G. A.; Langel, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the NASA Geodynamics program for magnetic field measurements is to study the physical state, processes and evolution of the Earth and its environment via interpretation of measurements of the near Earth magnetic field in conjunction with other geophysical data. The fields measured derive from sources in the core, the lithosphere, the ionosphere, and the magnetosphere. Panel recommendations include initiation of multi-decade long continuous scalar and vector measurements of the Earth's magnetic field by launching a five year satellite mission to measure the field to about 1 nT accuracy, improvement of our resolution of the lithographic component of the field by developing a low altitude satellite mission, and support of theoretical studies and continuing analysis of data to better understand the source physics and improve the modeling capabilities for different source regions.

  15. Magnetic fluid flow phenomena in DC and rotating magnetic fields

    E-print Network

    Rhodes, Scott E. (Scott Edward), 1981-

    2004-01-01

    An investigation of magnetic fluid experiments and analysis is presented in three parts: a study of magnetic field induced torques in magnetorheological fluids, a characterization and quantitative measurement of properties ...

  16. Isoperimetric problems for the helicity of vector fields and the Biot-Savart and curl operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantarella, Jason; DeTurck, Dennis; Gluck, Herman; Teytel, Mikhail

    2000-08-01

    The helicity of a smooth vector field defined on a domain in three-space is the standard measure of the extent to which the field lines wrap and coil around one another. It plays important roles in fluid mechanics, magnetohydrodynamics, and plasma physics. The isoperimetric problem in this setting is to maximize helicity among all divergence-free vector fields of given energy, defined on and tangent to the boundary of all domains of given volume in three-space. The Biot-Savart operator starts with a divergence-free vector field defined on and tangent to the boundary of a domain in three-space, regards it as a distribution of electric current, and computes its magnetic field. Restricting the magnetic field to the given domain, we modify it by subtracting a gradient vector field so as to keep it divergence-free while making it tangent to the boundary of the domain. The resulting operator, when extended to the L2 completion of this family of vector fields, is compact and self-adjoint, and thus has a largest eigenvalue, whose corresponding eigenfields are smooth by elliptic regularity. The isoperimetric problem for this modified Biot-Savart operator is to maximize its largest eigenvalue among all domains of given volume in three-space. The curl operator, when restricted to the image of the modified Biot-Savart operator, is its inverse, and the isoperimetric problem for this restriction of the curl is to minimize its smallest positive eigenvalue among all domains of given volume in three-space. These three isoperimetric problems are equivalent to one another. In this paper, we will derive the first variation formulas appropriate to these problems, and use them to constrain the nature of any possible solution. For example, suppose that the vector field V, defined on the compact, smoothly bounded domain ?, maximizes helicity among all divergence-free vector fields of given nonzero energy, defined on and tangent to the boundary of all such domains of given volume. We will show that (1) |V| is a nonzero constant on the boundary of each component of ?; (2) all the components of ?? are tori; and (3) the orbits of V are geodesics on ??. Thus, among smooth simply connected domains, none are optimal in the above sense. In principal, one could have a smooth optimal domain in the shape, say, of a solid torus. However, we believe that there are no smooth optimal domains at all, regardless of topological type, and that the true optimizer looks like the singular domain presented in this paper, which we can think of either as an extreme apple, in which the north and south poles have been pressed together, or as an extreme solid torus, in which the hole has been shrunk to a point. A computational search for this singular optimal domain and the helicity-maximizing vector field on it is at present under way, guided by the first variation formulas in this paper.

  17. Behavior of the magnetic structures of the magnetic fluid film under tilted magnetic fields

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. C Yang; I. J Jang; H. E Horng; J. M Wu; Y. C Chiou; Chin-Yih Hong

    1999-01-01

    The patterns of the magnetic structure of the magnetic fluid thin film under tilted magnetic fields were taken to investigate the behavior of magnetic structures. The tilted angle ? is the angle between the direction of applied magnetic field and the normal line of the film. In our previous work, a nearly perfect ordered hexagonal structure in magnetic fluid thin

  18. Behavior of the magnetic structures of the magnetic fluid film under tilted magnetic fields

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. C. Yang; I. J. Jang; H. E. Horng; J. M. Wu; Y. C. Chiou; Chin-Yih Hong

    1999-01-01

    The patterns of the magnetic structure of the magnetic fluid thin film under tilted magnetic fields were taken to investigate the behavior of magnetic structures. The tilted angle theta is the angle between the direction of applied magnetic field and the normal line of the film. In our previous work, a nearly perfect ordered hexagonal structure in magnetic fluid thin

  19. Modelling of solar magnetic field and prominence structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Shi Tsan

    1988-01-01

    Using plasma theory, the interaction is studied between high frequency and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves from which a set of coupling equations resulted. On the basis of this formalism, the modulation instabilities of an electromagnetic soliton in a current sheet are examined, and it is shown that there is a resistive instability at the onset of the magnetic field reconnection. This mechanism could be used to explain the onset of solar flares and prominences. To improve the resolution of vector magnetic fields at the sun's surface, state-of-the-art optics is examined to improve the design and fabrication of a new spaceborne solar vector magnetograph as part of the SAMEX (Solar Active Measurements Experiment) program.

  20. Near-Field Magnetic Dipole Moment Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Patrick K.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the data analysis technique used for magnetic testing at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). Excellent results have been obtained using this technique to convert a spacecraft s measured magnetic field data into its respective magnetic dipole moment model. The model is most accurate with the earth s geomagnetic field cancelled in a spherical region bounded by the measurement magnetometers with a minimum radius large enough to enclose the magnetic source. Considerably enhanced spacecraft magnetic testing is offered by using this technique in conjunction with a computer-controlled magnetic field measurement system. Such a system, with real-time magnetic field display capabilities, has been incorporated into other existing magnetic measurement facilities and is also used at remote locations where transport to a magnetics test facility is impractical.

  1. Full 180° Magnetization Reversal with Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. J.; Hu, J. M.; Ma, J.; Zhang, J. X.; Chen, L. Q.; Nan, C. W.

    2014-12-01

    Achieving 180° magnetization reversal with an electric field rather than a current or magnetic field is a fundamental challenge and represents a technological breakthrough towards new memory cell designs. Here we propose a mesoscale morphological engineering approach to accomplishing full 180° magnetization reversals with electric fields by utilizing both the in-plane piezostrains and magnetic shape anisotropy of a multiferroic heterostructure. Using phase-field simulations, we examined a patterned single-domain nanomagnet with four-fold magnetic axis on a ferroelectric layer with electric-field-induced uniaxial strains. We demonstrated that the uniaxial piezostrains, if non-collinear to the magnetic easy axis of the nanomagnet at certain angles, induce two successive, deterministic 90° magnetization rotations, thereby leading to full 180° magnetization reversals.

  2. Full 180° magnetization reversal with electric fields.

    PubMed

    Wang, J J; Hu, J M; Ma, J; Zhang, J X; Chen, L Q; Nan, C W

    2014-01-01

    Achieving 180° magnetization reversal with an electric field rather than a current or magnetic field is a fundamental challenge and represents a technological breakthrough towards new memory cell designs. Here we propose a mesoscale morphological engineering approach to accomplishing full 180° magnetization reversals with electric fields by utilizing both the in-plane piezostrains and magnetic shape anisotropy of a multiferroic heterostructure. Using phase-field simulations, we examined a patterned single-domain nanomagnet with four-fold magnetic axis on a ferroelectric layer with electric-field-induced uniaxial strains. We demonstrated that the uniaxial piezostrains, if non-collinear to the magnetic easy axis of the nanomagnet at certain angles, induce two successive, deterministic 90° magnetization rotations, thereby leading to full 180° magnetization reversals. PMID:25512070

  3. Magnetic field effects on microwave absorbing materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Ira; Hollingsworth, Charles S.; Mckinney, Ted M.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this program was to gather information to formulate a microwave absorber that can work in the presence of strong constant direct current (DC) magnetic fields. The program was conducted in four steps. The first step was to investigate the electrical and magnetic properties of magnetic and ferrite microwave absorbers in the presence of strong magnetic fields. This included both experimental measurements and a literature survey of properties that may be applicable to finding an appropriate absorbing material. The second step was to identify those material properties that will produce desirable absorptive properties in the presence of intense magnetic fields and determine the range of magnetic field in which the absorbers remain effective. The third step was to establish ferrite absorber designs that will produce low reflection and adequate absorption in the presence of intense inhomogeneous static magnetic fields. The fourth and final step was to prepare and test samples of such magnetic microwave absorbers if such designs seem practical.

  4. Full 180° Magnetization Reversal with Electric Fields

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J. J.; Hu, J. M.; Ma, J.; Zhang, J. X.; Chen, L. Q.; Nan, C. W.

    2014-01-01

    Achieving 180° magnetization reversal with an electric field rather than a current or magnetic field is a fundamental challenge and represents a technological breakthrough towards new memory cell designs. Here we propose a mesoscale morphological engineering approach to accomplishing full 180° magnetization reversals with electric fields by utilizing both the in-plane piezostrains and magnetic shape anisotropy of a multiferroic heterostructure. Using phase-field simulations, we examined a patterned single-domain nanomagnet with four-fold magnetic axis on a ferroelectric layer with electric-field-induced uniaxial strains. We demonstrated that the uniaxial piezostrains, if non-collinear to the magnetic easy axis of the nanomagnet at certain angles, induce two successive, deterministic 90° magnetization rotations, thereby leading to full 180° magnetization reversals. PMID:25512070

  5. Magnetic field calculation and measurement of active magnetic bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Guoping; Zhou, Zude; Hu, Yefa

    2006-11-01

    Magnetic Bearings are typical devices in which electric energy and mechanical energy convert mutually. Magnetic Field indicates the relationship between 2 of the most important parameters in a magnetic bearing - current and force. This paper presents calculation and measurement of the magnetic field distribution of a self-designed magnetic bearing. Firstly, the static Maxwell's equations of the magnetic bearing are presented and a Finite Element Analysis (FEA) is found to solve the equations and get post-process results by means of ANSYS software. Secondly, to confirm the calculation results a Lakeshore460 3-channel Gaussmeter is used to measure the magnetic flux density of the magnetic bearing in X, Y, Z directions accurately. According to the measurement data the author constructs a 3D magnetic field distribution digital model by means of MATLAB software. Thirdly, the calculation results and the measurement data are compared and analyzed; the comparing result indicates that the calculation results are consistent with the measurement data in allowable dimension variation, which means that the FEA calculation method of the magnetic bearing has high precision. Finally, it is concluded that the magnetic field calculation and measurement can accurately reflect the real magnetic distribution in the magnetic bearing and the result can guide the design and analysis of the magnetic bearing effectively.

  6. Exploring Vector Fields with Distribution-based Streamline Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Kewei; Chaudhuri, Abon; Lee, Teng-Yok; Shen, Han-Wei; Wong, Pak C.

    2013-02-26

    Streamline-based techniques are designed based on the idea that properties of streamlines are indicative of features in the underlying field. In this paper, we show that statistical distributions of measurements along the trajectory of a streamline can be used as a robust and effective descriptor to measure the similarity between streamlines. With the distribution-based approach, we present a framework for interactive exploration of 3D vector fields with streamline query and clustering. Streamline queries allow us to rapidly identify streamlines that share similar geometric features to the target streamline. Streamline clustering allows us to group together streamlines of similar shapes. Based on users selection, different clusters with different features at different levels of detail can be visualized to highlight features in 3D flow fields. We demonstrate the utility of our framework with simulation data sets of varying nature and size.

  7. Activity recognition using a mixture of vector fields.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Jacinto C; Figueiredo, Mário A T; Marques, Jorge S

    2013-05-01

    The analysis of moving objects in image sequences (video) has been one of the major themes in computer vision. In this paper, we focus on video-surveillance tasks; more specifically, we consider pedestrian trajectories and propose modeling them through a small set of motion/vector fields together with a space-varying switching mechanism. Despite the diversity of motion patterns that can occur in a given scene, we show that it is often possible to find a relatively small number of typical behaviors, and model each of these behaviors by a "simple" motion field. We increase the expressiveness of the formulation by allowing the trajectories to switch from one motion field to another, in a space-dependent manner. We present an expectation-maximization algorithm to learn all the parameters of the model, and apply it to trajectory classification tasks. Experiments with both synthetic and real data support the claims about the performance of the proposed approach. PMID:23193235

  8. Density matrices and density functionals in strong magnetic fields

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Holas; N. H. March

    1997-01-01

    The equation of motion for the first-order density matrix (1DM) is constructed for interacting electrons moving under the influence of given external scalar and vector potentials. The 1DM is coupled there to the 2DM by means of the electron-electron interaction. This equation is then employed to obtain the differential virial equation for interacting electrons moving in a magnetic field of

  9. Diluted magnetic semiconductors: Novel properties in high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, J. R.

    1990-06-01

    Diluted magnetic semiconductors, II-VI and IV-VI compounds in which the cation is partially replaced by a magnetic ion such as Mn or a rare earth, combine interesting semiconducting and magnetic properties. At zero applied field, the materials behave like normal semiconductors or semimetals with energy gaps that can be varied with the composition of the magnetic ion. In the presence of an applied field, however, novel properties are observed. These include large field-induced splittings of energy levels, leading to strong Faraday rotations and the possibility of energy-gap tuning by magnetic field, field and temperature-dependent g-factors, large negative magnetoresistance followed at higher fields by a slowly varying positive magnetoresistance, and large paramagnetism with coupling of the magnetic ions by superexchange. Not only can these properties be observed in bulk crystal, but also they suggest promising physics and applications in artificially structured materials.

  10. Statistics of Anisotropies in Inflation with Spectator Vector Fields

    E-print Network

    Mikjel Thorsrud; Federico R. Urban; David F. Mota

    2014-05-05

    We study the statistics of the primordial power spectrum in models where massless gauge vectors are coupled to the inflaton, paying special attention to observational implications of having fundamental or effective horizons embedded in a bath of infrared fluctuations. As quantum infrared modes cross the horizon, they classicalize and build a background vector field. We find that the vector experiences a statistical precession phenomenon. Implications for primordial correlators and the interpretation thereof are considered. Firstly, we show how in general two, not only one, additional observables, a quadrupole amplitude and an intrinsic shape parameter, are necessary to fully describe the correction to the curvature power spectrum, and develop a unique parametrization for them. Secondly, we show that the observed anisotropic amplitude and the associated preferred direction depend on the volume of the patch being probed. We calculate non-zero priors for the expected deviations between detections based on microwave background data (which probes the entire Hubble patch) and large scale structure (which only probes a fraction of it).

  11. Deformation of Water by a Magnetic Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Zijun; Dahlberg, E. Dan

    2011-01-01

    After the discovery that superconducting magnets could levitate diamagnetic objects, researchers became interested in measuring the repulsion of diamagnetic fluids in strong magnetic fields, which was given the name "The Moses Effect." Both for the levitation experiments and the quantitative studies on liquids, the large magnetic fields necessary…

  12. Exploring Magnetic Fields with a Compass

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunk, Brandon; Beichner, Robert

    2011-01-01

    A compass is an excellent classroom tool for the exploration of magnetic fields. Any student can tell you that a compass is used to determine which direction is north, but when paired with some basic trigonometry, the compass can be used to actually measure the strength of the magnetic field due to a nearby magnet or current-carrying wire. In this…

  13. A Bayesian hierarchical factorization model for vector fields.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Tao, Dacheng

    2013-11-01

    Factorization-based techniques explain arrays of observations using a relatively small number of factors and provide an essential arsenal for multi-dimensional data analysis. Most factorization models are, however, developed on general arrays of scalar values. For a class of practical data arising from observing spatial signals including images, it is desirable for a model to consider general observations, e.g., handling a vector field and non-exchangeable factors, e.g., handling spatial connections between the columns and the rows of the data. In this paper, a probabilistic model for factorization is proposed. We adopt Bayesian hierarchical modeling and treat the factors as latent random variables. A Markov structure is imposed on the distribution of factors to account for the spatial connections. The model is designed to represent vector arrays sampled from fields of continuous domains. Therefore, a tailored observation model is developed to represent the link between the factor product and the data. The proposed technique has been shown effective in analyzing optical flow fields computed on both synthetic images and real-life videoclips. PMID:23893727

  14. Mass Structure of Axial Vector Types of Leptons and Fields

    E-print Network

    Rasulkhozha S. Sharafiddinov

    2011-04-19

    A classification of currents with respect to C-operation admits the existence of C-noninvariant types of Dirac fermions. Among them one can meet an electroweakly charged C-antisymmetrical leptons, the mass of which includes the electric and weak components responsible for the existence of their anapole charge, charge radius and electric dipole moment. Such connections can constitute the paraleptons of axial-vector currents, for example, at the interactions with field of spinless nuclei of true neutrality. We derive the united equations which relate the structural parts of mass to anapole, charge radius and electric dipole of any truly neutral lepton in the framework of flavour symmetry. Thereby, they establish the C-odd nature of leptons and fields at the level of constancy law of the size implied from the multiplication of a weak mass of C-antisymmetrical lepton by its electric mass. Therefore, all leptons of C-antisymmetricality regardless of the difference in masses of an axial-vector character, have the same anapole with his radius as well as an equal electric dipole. Their analysis together with measured value of an electric dipole moment of lepton gives the right to interpret not only the existence of truly neutral types of leptons and fields but also the availability of mass structure in them as the one of earlier laboratory facts.

  15. Analysis of magnetic field levels at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christodoulou, Christos G.

    1994-01-01

    The scope of this work is to evaluate the magnetic field levels of distribution systems and other equipment at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Magnetic fields levels in several operational areas and various facilities are investigated. Three dimensional mappings and contour are provided along with the measured data. Furthermore, the portion of magnetic fields generated by the 60 Hz fundamental frequency and the portion generated by harmonics are examined. Finally, possible mitigation techniques for attenuating fields from electric panels are discussed.

  16. Reconstruction of environment model by using radar vector field histograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szyma?ski, Zbigniew; Jankowski, Stanis?aw; Szczyrek, Jan

    The paper presents a method of creating an environment model in collision avoidance system for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV). The environment model is generated by the procedures processing the data from on-board equipment and digital maps. The main sensor that provides information about the current situation around the UAV is a radar obstacle detector. Each detected object is defined by such parameters as distance, speed and the number of radial zone. The method is based on the idea of the certainty grid introduced in vector field histogram method which is used as a probabilistic representation of the obstacles. The tests of developed algorithm were performed in simulated environment.

  17. Magnetic field waves at Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Charles W.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Lepping, Ronald P.; Mish, William H.; Wong, Hung K.

    1994-01-01

    The research efforts funded by the Uranus Data Analysis Program (UDAP) grant to the Bartol Research Institute (BRI) involved the study of magnetic field waves associated with the Uranian bow shock. Upstream wave studies are motivated as a study of the physics of collisionless shocks. Collisionless shocks in plasmas are capable of 'reflecting' a fraction of the incoming thermal particle distribution and directing the resulting energetic particle motion back into the upstream region. Once within the upstream region, the backward streaming energetic particles convey information of the approaching shock to the supersonic flow. This particle population is responsible for the generation of upstream magnetic and electrostatic fluctuations known as 'upstream waves', for slowing the incoming wind prior to the formation of the shock ramp, and for heating of the upstream plasma. The waves produced at Uranus not only differed in several regards from the observations at other planetary bow shocks, but also gave new information regarding the nature of the reflected particle populations which were largely unmeasurable by the particle instruments. Four distinct magnetic field wave types were observed upstream of the Uranian bow shock: low-frequency Alfven or fast magnetosonic waves excited by energetic protons originating at or behind the bow shock; whistler wave bursts driven by gyrating ion distributions within the shock ramp; and two whistler wave types simultaneously observed upstream of the flanks of the shock and argued to arise from resonance with energetic electrons. In addition, observations of energetic particle distributions by the LECP experiment, thermal particle populations observed by the PLS experiment, and electron plasma oscillations recorded by the PWS experiment proved instrumental to this study and are included to some degree in the papers and presentations supported by this grant.

  18. Use of along-track magnetic field differences in lithospheric field modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotsiaros, S.; Finlay, C. C.; Olsen, N.

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate that first differences of polar orbiting satellite magnetic data in the along-track direction can be used to obtain high resolution models of the lithospheric field. Along-track differences approximate the north-south magnetic field gradients for non-polar latitudes. In a test case, using 2 yr of low altitude data from the CHAMP satellite, we show that use of along-track differences of vector field data results in an enhanced recovery of the small scale lithospheric field, compared to the use of the vector field data themselves. We show that the along-track technique performs especially well in the estimation of near zonal spherical harmonic coefficients. Moreover, lithospheric field models determined using along-track differences are found to be less sensitive to the presence of unmodelled external field contributions and problems associated with the polar gap are ameliorated. Experiments in modelling the Earth's lithospheric magnetic field with along-track differences are presented here as a proof of concept. We anticipate that use of such along-track differences in combination with east-west field differences, as are now provided by the Swarm satellite constellation, will be important in building the next generation of lithospheric field models.

  19. Abnormal Magnetic Field Effects on Electrogenerated Chemiluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Haiping; Shen, Yan; Wang, Hongfeng; He, Lei; Hu, Bin

    2015-03-01

    We report abnormal magnetic field effects on electrogenerated chemiluminescence (MFEECL) based on triplet emission from the Ru(bpy)3Cl2-TPrA electrochemical system: the appearance of MFEECL after magnetic field ceases. In early studies the normal MFEECL have been observed from electrochemical systems during the application of magnetic field. Here, the abnormal MFEECL suggest that the activated charge-transfer [Ru(bpy)33+ … TPrA•] complexes may become magnetized in magnetic field and experience a long magnetic relaxation after removing magnetic field. Our analysis indicates that the magnetic relaxation can gradually increase the density of charge-transfer complexes within reaction region due to decayed magnetic interactions, leading to a positive component in the abnormal MFEECL. On the other hand, the magnetic relaxation facilitates an inverse conversion from triplets to singlets within charge-transfer complexes. The inverse triplet --> singlet conversion reduces the density of triplet light-emitting states through charge-transfer complexes and gives rise to a negative component in the abnormal MFEECL. The combination of positive and negative components can essentially lead to a non-monotonic profile in the abnormal MFEECL after ceasing magnetic field. Nevertheless, our experimental studies may reveal un-usual magnetic behaviors with long magnetic relaxation from the activated charge-transfer [Ru(bpy)33+ … TPrA•] complexes in solution at room temperature.

  20. Abnormal magnetic field effects on electrogenerated chemiluminescence.

    PubMed

    Pan, Haiping; Shen, Yan; Wang, Hongfeng; He, Lei; Hu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    We report abnormal magnetic field effects on electrogenerated chemiluminescence (MFEECL) based on triplet emission from the Ru(bpy)3Cl2-TPrA electrochemical system: the appearance of MFEECL after magnetic field ceases. In early studies the normal MFEECL have been observed from electrochemical systems during the application of magnetic field. Here, the abnormal MFEECL suggest that the activated charge-transfer [Ru(bpy)3(3+) … TPrA(•)] complexes may become magnetized in magnetic field and experience a long magnetic relaxation after removing magnetic field. Our analysis indicates that the magnetic relaxation can gradually increase the density of charge-transfer complexes within reaction region due to decayed magnetic interactions, leading to a positive component in the abnormal MFEECL. On the other hand, the magnetic relaxation facilitates an inverse conversion from triplets to singlets within charge-transfer complexes. The inverse triplet ? singlet conversion reduces the density of triplet light-emitting states through charge-transfer complexes and gives rise to a negative component in the abnormal MFEECL. The combination of positive and negative components can essentially lead to a non-monotonic profile in the abnormal MFEECL after ceasing magnetic field. Nevertheless, our experimental studies may reveal un-usual magnetic behaviors with long magnetic relaxation from the activated charge-transfer [Ru(bpy)3(3+) … TPrA(•)] complexes in solution at room temperature. PMID:25772580

  1. Abnormal Magnetic Field Effects on Electrogenerated Chemiluminescence

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Haiping; Shen, Yan; Wang, Hongfeng; He, Lei; Hu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    We report abnormal magnetic field effects on electrogenerated chemiluminescence (MFEECL) based on triplet emission from the Ru(bpy)3Cl2-TPrA electrochemical system: the appearance of MFEECL after magnetic field ceases. In early studies the normal MFEECL have been observed from electrochemical systems during the application of magnetic field. Here, the abnormal MFEECL suggest that the activated charge-transfer [Ru(bpy)33+ … TPrA•] complexes may become magnetized in magnetic field and experience a long magnetic relaxation after removing magnetic field. Our analysis indicates that the magnetic relaxation can gradually increase the density of charge-transfer complexes within reaction region due to decayed magnetic interactions, leading to a positive component in the abnormal MFEECL. On the other hand, the magnetic relaxation facilitates an inverse conversion from triplets to singlets within charge-transfer complexes. The inverse triplet ? singlet conversion reduces the density of triplet light-emitting states through charge-transfer complexes and gives rise to a negative component in the abnormal MFEECL. The combination of positive and negative components can essentially lead to a non-monotonic profile in the abnormal MFEECL after ceasing magnetic field. Nevertheless, our experimental studies may reveal un-usual magnetic behaviors with long magnetic relaxation from the activated charge-transfer [Ru(bpy)33+ … TPrA•] complexes in solution at room temperature. PMID:25772580

  2. Construction of Solar-Wind-Like Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Dana Aaron

    2012-01-01

    Fluctuations in the solar wind fields tend to not only have velocities and magnetic fields correlated in the sense consistent with Alfven waves traveling from the Sun, but they also have the magnitude of the magnetic field remarkably constant despite their being broadband. This paper provides, for the first time, a method for constructing fields with nearly constant magnetic field, zero divergence, and with any specified power spectrum for the fluctuations of the components of the field. Every wave vector, k, is associated with two polarizations the relative phases of these can be chosen to minimize the variance of the field magnitude while retaining the\\random character of the fields. The method is applied to a case with one spatial coordinate that demonstrates good agreement with observed time series and power spectra of the magnetic field in the solar wind, as well as with the distribution of the angles of rapid changes (discontinuities), thus showing a deep connection between two seemingly unrelated issues. It is suggested that using this construction will lead to more realistic simulations of solar wind turbulence and of the propagation of energetic particles.

  3. Unique topological characterization of braided magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Yeates, A. R. [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Hornig, G. [Division of Mathematics, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4HN (United Kingdom)

    2013-01-15

    We introduce a topological flux function to quantify the topology of magnetic braids: non-zero, line-tied magnetic fields whose field lines all connect between two boundaries. This scalar function is an ideal invariant defined on a cross-section of the magnetic field, and measures the average poloidal magnetic flux around any given field line, or the average pairwise crossing number between a given field line and all others. Moreover, its integral over the cross-section yields the relative magnetic helicity. Using the fact that the flux function is also an action in the Hamiltonian formulation of the field line equations, we prove that it uniquely characterizes the field line mapping and hence the magnetic topology.

  4. Rotational power loss of magnetic steel sheets in a circular rotational magnetic field in CCW/CW directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Yoshitaka; Shimoji, Hiroyasu; Todaka, Takashi; Enokizono, Masato

    This paper presents rotational power loss properties of magnetic steel sheets under high flux density conditions using two-dimensional vector magnetic properties measurement. Recently it was reported by some research groups that the magnetic power loss measured in a counter clockwise (CCW) rotating field differed from that in a clockwise (CW) rotating field. This phenomenon was only observed in case of higher magnetic flux density excitation condition. We call this the CCW/CW problem. To clarify the reasons why the disagreement exists in the CCW/CW direction, we have examined angle errors of H- and B-coils by using geometrical, optical and magnetic methods. Then we compensated the measured vector components including different signals due to the angle errors. In the components of irremovable small angle error, we have also used the measured field strength waveforms in CCW/CW conditions. We have applied the compensation method to measurement of a grain-oriented electrical steel sheet.

  5. RAPID CHANGES OF PHOTOSPHERIC MAGNETIC FIELD AFTER TETHER-CUTTING RECONNECTION AND MAGNETIC IMPLOSION

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Chang; Deng Na; Liu Rui; Jing Ju; Xu Yan; Wang Shuo; Wang Haimin [Space Weather Research Laboratory, New Jersey Institute of Technology, University Heights, Newark, NJ 07102-1982 (United States); Lee, Jeongwoo [Physics Department, New Jersey Institute of Technology, University Heights, Newark, NJ 07102-1982 (United States); Wiegelmann, Thomas, E-mail: chang.liu@njit.edu [Max Planck Institut fuer Sonnensystemforschung (MPS), Max-Planck-Strasse 2, 37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany)

    2012-01-20

    The rapid, irreversible change of the photospheric magnetic field has been recognized as an important element of the solar flare process. This Letter reports such a rapid change of magnetic fields during the 2011 February 13 M6.6 flare in NOAA AR 11158 that we found from the vector magnetograms of the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) with 12 minute cadence. High-resolution magnetograms of Hinode that are available at {approx}-5.5, -1.5, 1.5, and 4 hr relative to the flare maximum are used to reconstruct a three-dimensional coronal magnetic field under the nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) assumption. UV and hard X-ray images are also used to illuminate the magnetic field evolution and energy release. The rapid change is mainly detected by HMI in a compact region lying in the center of the magnetic sigmoid, where the mean horizontal field strength exhibited a significant increase of 28%. The region lies between the initial strong UV and hard X-ray sources in the chromosphere, which are cospatial with the central feet of the sigmoid according to the NLFFF model. The NLFFF model further shows that strong coronal currents are concentrated immediately above the region, and that, more intriguingly, the coronal current system underwent an apparent downward collapse after the sigmoid eruption. These results are discussed in favor of both the tether-cutting reconnection producing the flare and the ensuing implosion of the coronal field resulting from the energy release.

  6. Bipolar pulse field for magnetic refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    Lubell, Martin S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1994-01-01

    A magnetic refrigeration apparatus includes first and second steady state magnets, each having a field of substantially equal strength and opposite polarity, first and second bodies made of magnetocaloric material disposed respectively in the influence of the fields of the first and second steady state magnets, and a pulsed magnet, concentric with the first and second steady state magnets, and having a field which cycles between the fields of the first and second steady state magnets, thereby cyclically magnetizing and demagnetizing and thus heating and cooling the first and second bodies. Heat exchange apparatus of suitable design can be used to expose a working fluid to the first and second bodies of magnetocaloric material. A controller is provided to synchronize the flow of working fluid with the changing states of magnetization of the first and second bodies.

  7. Bipolar pulse field for magnetic refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    Lubell, M.S.

    1994-10-25

    A magnetic refrigeration apparatus includes first and second steady state magnets, each having a field of substantially equal strength and opposite polarity, first and second bodies made of magnetocaloric material disposed respectively in the influence of the fields of the first and second steady state magnets, and a pulsed magnet, concentric with the first and second steady state magnets, and having a field which cycles between the fields of the first and second steady state magnets, thereby cyclically magnetizing and demagnetizing and thus heating and cooling the first and second bodies. Heat exchange apparatus of suitable design can be used to expose a working fluid to the first and second bodies of magnetocaloric material. A controller is provided to synchronize the flow of working fluid with the changing states of magnetization of the first and second bodies. 2 figs.

  8. Vector scattering from one-dimensional periodic perfectly conducting surface: transverse magnetic polarization.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qi; Dong, Tian-Lin; Chen, Boyuan; Li, Qingxia; Tian, Jiasheng; Chen, Ping

    2014-10-01

    Based on the Rayleigh hypothesis and Floquet's theorem, a vector method for studying electromagnetic wave scattering from a one-dimensional periodic conducting surface with tapered transverse magnetic (TM) wave incidence is presented. The fields are represented by vectors instead of scalars so that the vector behavior of scattering (such as cross polarization) can be naturally explored. The new formulation opens a wide range of applications of the method, concerning not only gratings used in TM polarization but also conical diffraction, crossed gratings, two-dimensional problems, photonic band gaps, nonlinear optics, etc. The numerical results are consistent with the T-matrix method in the particular case in which the plane of incidence is perpendicular to the generators of the surface. For the general case in which the plane of incidence is not perpendicular to generators of the surface, the proposed method obtains significant results that reveal cross-polarized and anisotropic characteristics in the scattering while the energy balance is kept satisfactory. This straightforward approach is much more efficient than the T-matrix; thus it is suitable to extend to other more involved periodic scattering problems. PMID:25401261

  9. Exploring Magnetic Fields in Your Environment

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is a lesson about measuring magnetic field directions of Earth and in the environment. First, learners go outside, far away from buildings, power lines, or anything electrical or metal, and use compasses to identify magnetic North. Next, they use the compasses to probe whether there are any sources of magnetic fields in the local environment, including around electronic equipment such as a CD player and speakers. This is the first lesson in the second session of the Exploring Magnetism teacher guide.

  10. Estimation of conduction velocity vector fields from epicardial mapping data.

    PubMed

    Bayly, P V; KenKnight, B H; Rogers, J M; Hillsley, R E; Ideker, R E; Smith, W M

    1998-05-01

    An automated method to estimate vector fields of propagation velocity from observed epicardial extracellular potentials is introduced. The method relies on fitting polynomial surfaces T(x, y) to the space-time (x, y, t) coordinates of activity. Both speed and direction of propagation are computed from the gradient of the local polynomial surface. The components of velocity, which are total derivatives, are expressed in terms of the partial derivatives which comprise the gradient of T. The method was validated on two-dimensional (2-D) simulations of propagation and then applied to cardiac mapping data. Conduction velocity was estimated at multiple epicardial locations during sinus rhythm, pacing, and ventricular fibrillation (VF) in pigs. Data were obtained via a 528-channel mapping system from 23 x 22 and 24 x 21 arrays of unipolar electrodes sutured to the right ventricular epicardium. Velocity estimates are displayed as vector fields and are used to characterize propagation qualitatively and quantitatively during both simple and complex rhythms. PMID:9581054

  11. Mass Structure of Axial Vector Types of Leptons and Fields

    E-print Network

    Sharafiddinov, Rasulkhozha S

    2011-01-01

    A classification of currents with respect to C-operation admits the existence of C-noninvariant types of Dirac fermions. Among them one can meet an electroweakly charged C-antisymmetrical leptons, the mass of which includes the electric and weak components responsible for the existence of their anapole charge, charge radius and electric dipole moment. Such connections can constitute the paraleptons of axial-vector currents, for example, at the interactions with field of spinless nuclei of true neutrality. We derive the united equations which relate the structural parts of mass to anapole, charge radius and electric dipole of any truly neutral lepton in the framework of flavour symmetry. Thereby, they establish the C-odd nature of leptons and fields at the level of constancy law of the size implied from the multiplication of a weak mass of C-antisymmetrical lepton by its electric mass. Therefore, all leptons of C-antisymmetricality regardless of the difference in masses of an axial-vector character, have the s...

  12. Multiresolution and Explicit Methods for Vector Field Analysis and Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielson, Gregory M.

    1997-01-01

    This is a request for a second renewal (3d year of funding) of a research project on the topic of multiresolution and explicit methods for vector field analysis and visualization. In this report, we describe the progress made on this research project during the second year and give a statement of the planned research for the third year. There are two aspects to this research project. The first is concerned with the development of techniques for computing tangent curves for use in visualizing flow fields. The second aspect of the research project is concerned with the development of multiresolution methods for curvilinear grids and their use as tools for visualization, analysis and archiving of flow data. We report on our work on the development of numerical methods for tangent curve computation first.

  13. Dirac oscillator in an external magnetic field

    E-print Network

    Bhabani Prasad Mandal; Shweta Verma

    2009-12-19

    We show that 2+1 dimensional Dirac oscillators in an external magnetic field is mapped onto the same with reduced angular frequency in absence of magnetic field. This can be used to study the atomic transitions in a radiation field. Relativistic Landau levels are constructed explicitly. Several interesting features of this system are discussed.

  14. DC-based magnetic field controller

    DOEpatents

    Kotter, Dale K. (Shelley, ID); Rankin, Richard A. (Ammon, ID); Morgan, John P,. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1994-01-01

    A magnetic field controller for laboratory devices and in particular to dc operated magnetic field controllers for mass spectrometers, comprising a dc power supply in combination with improvements to a hall probe subsystem, display subsystem, preamplifier, field control subsystem, and an output stage.

  15. DC-based magnetic field controller

    DOEpatents

    Kotter, D.K.; Rankin, R.A.; Morgan, J.P.

    1994-05-31

    A magnetic field controller is described for laboratory devices and in particular to dc operated magnetic field controllers for mass spectrometers, comprising a dc power supply in combination with improvements to a Hall probe subsystem, display subsystem, preamplifier, field control subsystem, and an output stage. 1 fig.

  16. Ohm's law for mean magnetic fields

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Boozer

    1986-01-01

    The magnetic fields associated with plasmas frequently exhibit small amplitude MHD fluctuations. It is useful to have equations for the magnetic field averaged over these fluctuations, the so-called mean field equations. Under very general assumptions it is shown that the effect of MHD fluctuations on a force-free plasma can be represented by one parameter in Ohm's law, which is effectively

  17. Magnetic field sensor for isotropically sensing an incident magnetic field in a sensor plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pant, Bharat B. (Inventor); Wan, Hong (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A magnetic field sensor that isotropically senses an incident magnetic field. This is preferably accomplished by providing a magnetic field sensor device that has one or more circular shaped magnetoresistive sensor elements for sensing the incident magnetic field. The magnetoresistive material used is preferably isotropic, and may be a CMR material or some form of a GMR material. Because the sensor elements are circular in shape, shape anisotropy is eliminated. Thus, the resulting magnetic field sensor device provides an output that is relatively independent of the direction of the incident magnetic field in the sensor plane.

  18. MAGNETIC FIELD CONFINEMENT IN THE SOLAR CORONA. I. FORCE-FREE MAGNETIC FIELDS B. Fornberg,2

    E-print Network

    Fornberg, Bengt

    MAGNETIC FIELD CONFINEMENT IN THE SOLAR CORONA. I. FORCE-FREE MAGNETIC FIELDS N. Flyer,1 B Axisymmetric force-free magnetic fields external to a unit sphere are studied as solutions to boundary value total azimuthal flux with a power-law distribution over the poloidal field. Particular attention is paid

  19. Artificial magnetic field induced by an evanescent wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochol, Ma?gorzata; Sacha, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Cold atomic gases are perfect laboratories for realization of quantum simulators. In order to simulate solid state systems in the presence of magnetic fields special effort has to be made because atoms are charge neutral. There are different methods for realization of artificial magnetic fields, that is the creation of specific conditions so that the motion of neutral particles mimics the dynamics of charged particles in an effective magnetic field. Here, we consider adiabatic motion of atoms in the presence of an evanescent wave. Theoretical description of the adiabatic motion involves artificial vector and scalar potentials related to the Berry phases. Due to the large gradient of the evanescent field amplitude, the potentials can be strong enough to induce measurable effects in cold atomic gases. We show that the resulting artificial magnetic field is able to induce vortices in a Bose-Einstein condensate trapped close to a surface of a prism where the evanescent wave is created. We also analyze motion of an atomic cloud released from a magneto-optical trap that falls down on the surface of the prism. The artificial magnetic field is able to reflect falling atoms that can be observed experimentally.

  20. Artificial magnetic field induced by an evanescent wave

    PubMed Central

    Mochol, Ma?gorzata; Sacha, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Cold atomic gases are perfect laboratories for realization of quantum simulators. In order to simulate solid state systems in the presence of magnetic fields special effort has to be made because atoms are charge neutral. There are different methods for realization of artificial magnetic fields, that is the creation of specific conditions so that the motion of neutral particles mimics the dynamics of charged particles in an effective magnetic field. Here, we consider adiabatic motion of atoms in the presence of an evanescent wave. Theoretical description of the adiabatic motion involves artificial vector and scalar potentials related to the Berry phases. Due to the large gradient of the evanescent field amplitude, the potentials can be strong enough to induce measurable effects in cold atomic gases. We show that the resulting artificial magnetic field is able to induce vortices in a Bose-Einstein condensate trapped close to a surface of a prism where the evanescent wave is created. We also analyze motion of an atomic cloud released from a magneto-optical trap that falls down on the surface of the prism. The artificial magnetic field is able to reflect falling atoms that can be observed experimentally. PMID:25567430

  1. Artificial magnetic field induced by an evanescent wave.

    PubMed

    Mochol, Ma?gorzata; Sacha, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Cold atomic gases are perfect laboratories for realization of quantum simulators. In order to simulate solid state systems in the presence of magnetic fields special effort has to be made because atoms are charge neutral. There are different methods for realization of artificial magnetic fields, that is the creation of specific conditions so that the motion of neutral particles mimics the dynamics of charged particles in an effective magnetic field. Here, we consider adiabatic motion of atoms in the presence of an evanescent wave. Theoretical description of the adiabatic motion involves artificial vector and scalar potentials related to the Berry phases. Due to the large gradient of the evanescent field amplitude, the potentials can be strong enough to induce measurable effects in cold atomic gases. We show that the resulting artificial magnetic field is able to induce vortices in a Bose-Einstein condensate trapped close to a surface of a prism where the evanescent wave is created. We also analyze motion of an atomic cloud released from a magneto-optical trap that falls down on the surface of the prism. The artificial magnetic field is able to reflect falling atoms that can be observed experimentally. PMID:25567430

  2. Vector-current correlation and charge separation via the chiral-magnetic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Seung-Il

    2010-08-01

    We investigate the vector-current correlation ??? (VCC) in the presence of a strong external magnetic field (B=B0z^) at low temperature (T?Tc?) with P and CP violations, indicated by the nonzero chiral-chemical potential (???0), i.e. the chiral-magnetic effect (CME). For this purpose, we employ the instanton-vacuum configuration at finite T with nonzero topological charge (Qt?0). We also consider a simple estimation for the nonzero-mode contributions to the quark propagator, in addition to the zero-mode approximation. From the numerical calculations, it turns out that the longitudinal component of the connected VCC is linear in B0 and shows a bump, representing a corresponding vector meson at |Q|=(300˜400)MeV for T=0. The bump becomes enhanced as T increases and the bump position shifts to a lager |Q| value. In the limit of |Q|?0, the transverse component of the connected VCC disappears, whereas the longitudinal one remains finite and becomes insensitive to B0 with respect to T, due to diluting instanton contributions. Considering the simple collision geometry of heavy-ion collision and some assumptions on the induced magnetic field and screening effect, we can estimate the charge separation as a function of centrality using the present results for the VCC. The numerical results show a qualitative agreement with experiments for the Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions. These results are almost independent on the source of the CME, instanton, or sphaleron, as long as the CME current is linear in B0.

  3. Vector-valued spherical Slepian functions for lithospheric-field analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plattner, A.; Simons, F. J.

    2012-04-01

    One of the mission objectives of Swarm is to resolve and model the lithospheric magnetic field with maximal resolution and accuracy, even in the presence of contaminating signals from secondary sources. In addition, and more generally, lithospheric-field data analysis will have to successfully merge information from the global to the regional scale. In the past decade or so, a variety of global-to-regional modeling techniques have come of age that have, however, been met with mixed feelings by the geomagnetics community. In particular, the theory of scalar Slepian functions has been developed for applications mostly in geodesy, but support from within geomagnetism has been tepid. In the Proceedings of the First Swarm International Science Meeting, now six years ago, it was written with reference to Slepian localization analysis that these methods are theoretically powerful but still need to find their way from the applied mathematician's desk to the geophysicist practitioners'. In the intervening six years "these methods" have done just that, and thereby enjoyed much use in a variety of fields: but the root cause of their slow adoption for lithospheric-field analysis had not been remediated. To this date, only the theory of scalar Slepian functions on the sphere has been completely worked out. In this contribution we report on the development, at last, of a complete vectorial spherical Slepian basis, suited for applications specifically of geomagnetic data analysis, representation, and model inversion. We have designed a basis of vector functions on the sphere that are simultaneously bandlimited to a chosen maximum spherical harmonic degree, while optimally focused on an arbitrarily shaped region of interest. The construction of these bases of vector functions is achieved by solving Slepian's spatiospectral optimization problem in the vector case, as has been done before for scalar functions on the sphere. Scalar Slepian functions have proven to be very useful in fields as wide as geodesy, geomagnetism, gravimetry, geodynamics, biomedical science, planetary science and cosmology. We expect the same benefits from our newly designed vector Slepian bases for example in the inversion for crustal magnetization. In this presentation, we discuss our construction in detail, including a treatment of numerical efficiency for a variety of specific scenarios, and discuss the first examples of fully vectorial-field representation and approximation tailored to problems in lithospheric-field analysis.

  4. Killing Vector Fields, Maxwell Equations and Lorentzian Spacetimes

    E-print Network

    Waldyr A. Rodrigues Jr

    2008-08-13

    In this paper we first analyze the structure of Maxwell equations in a Lorentzian spacetime where the potential A is proportional to 1-form K physically equivalent to a Killing vector field (supposed to exist). We show that such A obeys the Lorenz gauge and also a wave equation that can be written in terms of the covariant D'Alembertian or the Ricci operator. Moreover, we determine the correct current defined by that potential showing that it is of superconducting type, being two times the product of the components of A by the Ricci 1-form fields. We also study the structure of the spacetime generated by the coupled system consisting of a electromagnetic field F = dA (A, as above), an ideal charged fluid with dynamics described by an action function S and the gravitational field. We show that Einstein equations in this situation is then equivalent to Maxwell equations with a current givn by fFAF (the product meaning the Clifford product of the corresponding form fields), where f is a scalar function which satisfies a well determined algebraic quadratic equation.

  5. Magnetic field waves at Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Charles W.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Lepping, Ronald P.; Mish, William H.; Wong, Hung K.

    1991-01-01

    The proposed research efforts funded by the UDAP grant to the BRI involve the study of magnetic field waves associated with the Uranian bow shock. This is a collaborative venture bringing together investigators at the BRI, Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), and Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). In addition, other collaborations have been formed with investigators granted UDAP funds for similar studies and with investigators affiliated with other Voyager experiments. These investigations and the corresponding collaborations are included in the report. The proposed effort as originally conceived included an examination of waves downstream from the shock within the magnetosheath. However, the observations of unexpected complexity and diversity within the upstream region have necessitated that we confine our efforts to those observations recorded upstream of the bow shock on the inbound and outbound legs of the encounter by the Voyager 2 spacecraft.

  6. A New Facility to Investigate Space Propulsion using Magnetically Vectored and RF Heated Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang-Diaz, F. R.; Squire, J. P.; Guidoni, U.; Yang, T. F.

    1996-11-01

    The Advanced Space Propulsion Laboratory (ASPL) is a new installation at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, NASA. This new facility is investigating the application of magnetically vectored and RF heated plasmas to space propulsion. The central experimental device is a small versatile tandem mirror configured system. The total length of the device is 3.2 m, the central plasma radius is approximately 0.1 m, the mirror magnetic field is up to 2.0 T and the central cell field is up to 0.2 T. The experiment generates and heats the plasma using ECRH and ICRH. A 2 kW, 14 GHz klystron and a 200 kW, 1-10 MHz RF transmitter are being brought into operation. Methods for efficiently heating and preferentially exhausting the plasma out of a hybrid magnetic nozzle at one end of the mirror device are emphasized. The advantages of this novel concept are: electrodeless operation and variable thrust/specific impulse at constant power (200 - 30 N / 5000 - 30,000 seconds at 10 MW with 60thrust operation that is optimized for either minimum flight time or high payload. Examples of flights to Mars are presented where 90 day transit times can be accomplished.

  7. Nonhelical Inverse Transfer of a Decaying Turbulent Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenburg, Axel; Kahniashvili, Tina; Tevzadze, Alexander G.

    2015-02-01

    In the presence of magnetic helicity, inverse transfer from small to large scales is well known in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence and has applications in astrophysics, cosmology, and fusion plasmas. Using high resolution direct numerical simulations of magnetically dominated self-similarly decaying MHD turbulence, we report a similar inverse transfer even in the absence of magnetic helicity. We compute for the first time spectral energy transfer rates to show that this inverse transfer is about half as strong as with helicity, but in both cases the magnetic gain at large scales results from velocity at similar scales interacting with smaller-scale magnetic fields. This suggests that both inverse transfers are a consequence of universal mechanisms for magnetically dominated turbulence. Possible explanations include inverse cascading of the mean squared vector potential associated with local near two dimensionality and the shallower k2 subinertial range spectrum of kinetic energy forcing the magnetic field with a k4 subinertial range to attain larger-scale coherence. The inertial range shows a clear k-2 spectrum and is the first example of fully isotropic magnetically dominated MHD turbulence exhibiting weak turbulence scaling.

  8. Nonhelical inverse transfer of a decaying turbulent magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Brandenburg, Axel; Kahniashvili, Tina; Tevzadze, Alexander G

    2015-02-20

    In the presence of magnetic helicity, inverse transfer from small to large scales is well known in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence and has applications in astrophysics, cosmology, and fusion plasmas. Using high resolution direct numerical simulations of magnetically dominated self-similarly decaying MHD turbulence, we report a similar inverse transfer even in the absence of magnetic helicity. We compute for the first time spectral energy transfer rates to show that this inverse transfer is about half as strong as with helicity, but in both cases the magnetic gain at large scales results from velocity at similar scales interacting with smaller-scale magnetic fields. This suggests that both inverse transfers are a consequence of universal mechanisms for magnetically dominated turbulence. Possible explanations include inverse cascading of the mean squared vector potential associated with local near two dimensionality and the shallower k^{2} subinertial range spectrum of kinetic energy forcing the magnetic field with a k^{4} subinertial range to attain larger-scale coherence. The inertial range shows a clear k^{-2} spectrum and is the first example of fully isotropic magnetically dominated MHD turbulence exhibiting weak turbulence scaling. PMID:25763960

  9. Numerical analysis of magnetic field in superconducting magnetic energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Kanamaru, Y. (Kanazawa Inst. of Technology, 7-1 Ohgigaoka, Nonoichi, Ishikawa 921 (JP)); Amemiya, Y. (Chiba Inst. of Tech., Narashino (Japan))

    1991-09-01

    This paper reports that the superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) is more useful than the other systems of electric energy storage because of larger stored energy and higher efficiency. The other systems are the battery, the flywheel, the pumped-storage power station. Some models of solenoid type SMES are designed in U.S.A. and Japan. But a high magnetic field happens by the large scale SMES in the living environment, and makes the erroneous operations of the computer display, the pacemaker of the heart and the electronic equipments. We study some fit designs of magnetic shielding of the solenoidal type SMES for reduction of the magnetic field in living environment. When some superconducting shielding coils are over the main storage coil, magnetic field reduces remarkably than the case of non shielding coil. The calculated results of the magnetic field are obtained y the finite element method.

  10. Turbulent Prandtl number of a passively advected vector field in helical environment: two-loop renormalization group result.

    PubMed

    Jur?išinová, E; Jur?išin, M; Zalom, P

    2014-04-01

    Using the field-theoretic renormalization group technique in the two-loop approximation, the influence of helicity (spatial parity violation) on the turbulent vector Prandtl number is investigated in the model of a passive vector field advected by the turbulent helical environment driven by the stochastic Navier-Stokes equation. It is shown that the presence of helicity in the turbulent environment can significantly decrease the value of the turbulent vector Prandtl number by up to 15% of its nonhelical value. This result is compared to the corresponding results obtained recently for the turbulent Prandtl number of a passively advected scalar quantity as well as for the turbulent magnetic Prandtl number of a weak magnetic field in the framework of the kinematic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. It is shown that the behavior of the turbulent vector Prandtl number as function of the helicity parameter is much closer to the corresponding behavior of the turbulent Prandtl number of the scalar quantity than to the behavior of the turbulent magnetic Prandtl number. PMID:24827348

  11. Spectra of magnetic fields injected during baryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ng Yifung [CERCA, Department of Physics, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106-7079 (United States); Vachaspati, Tanmay [CERCA, Department of Physics, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106-7079 (United States); Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

    2010-07-15

    Helical magnetic fields are injected into the cosmic medium during cosmological baryogenesis and can potentially provide a useful probe of the early universe. We construct a model to study the injection process during a first order phase transition and to determine the power spectra of the injected magnetic field. By Monte Carlo simulations we evaluate the Fourier space symmetric and helical power spectra of the magnetic field at the time the phase transition completes. The spectra are peaked at the scale given by the inverse size of bubbles at percolation and with a comparable width. These injected magnetic fields set the initial conditions for further cosmological magneto-hydrodynamical evolution.

  12. Flow Transitions in a Rotating Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, M. P.; Mazuruk, K.

    1996-01-01

    Critical Rayleigh numbers have been measured in a liquid metal cylinder of finite height in the presence of a rotating magnetic field. Several different stability regimes were observed, which were determined by the values of the Rayleigh and Hartmann numbers. For weak rotating magnetic fields and small Rayleigh numbers, the experimental observations can be explained by the existence of a single non-axisymmetric meridional roll rotating around the cylinder, driven by the azimuthal component of the magnetic field. The measured dependence of rotational velocity on magnetic field strength is consistent with the existence of laminar flow in this regime.

  13. Magnetic Fields in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haverkorn, Marijke

    This chapter presents a review of observational studies to determine the magnetic field in the Milky Way, both in the disk and in the halo, focused on recent developments and on magnetic fields in the diffuse interstellar medium. I discuss some terminology which is confusingly or inconsistently used and try to summarize current status of our knowledge on magnetic field configurations and strengths in the Milky Way. Although many open questions still exist, more and more conclusions can be drawn on the large-scale and small-scale components of the Galactic magnetic field. The chapter is concluded with a brief outlook to observational projects in the near future.

  14. Magnetic fields in anisotropic relativistic stars

    E-print Network

    Vladimir Folomeev; Vladimir Dzhunushaliev

    2015-02-28

    Relativistic, spherically symmetric configurations consisting of a gravitating magnetized anisotropic fluid are studied. For such configurations, we obtain static equilibrium solutions with an axisymmetric, poloidal magnetic field produced by toroidal electric currents. The presence of such a field results in small deviations of the shape of the configuration from spherical symmetry. This in turn leads to the modification of an equation for the current and correspondingly to changes in the structure of the internal magnetic field for the systems supported by the anisotropic fluid, in contrast to the case of an isotropic fluid, where such deviations do not affect the magnetic field.

  15. Ferroelectric Cathodes in Transverse Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander Dunaevsky; Yevgeny Raitses; Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2002-07-29

    Experimental investigations of a planar ferroelectric cathode in a transverse magnetic field up to 3 kGs are presented. It is shown that the transverse magnetic field affects differently the operation of ferroelectric plasma cathodes in ''bright'' and ''dark'' modes in vacuum. In the ''bright'' mode, when the surface plasma is formed, the application of the transverse magnetic field leads to an increase of the surface plasma density. In the ''dark'' mode, the magnetic field inhibits the development of electron avalanches along the surface, as it does similarly in other kinds of surface discharges in the pre-breakdown mode.

  16. Magnetic fields in anisotropic relativistic stars

    E-print Network

    Folomeev, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Relativistic, spherically symmetric configurations consisting of a gravitating magnetized anisotropic fluid are studied. For such configurations, we obtain static equilibrium solutions with an axisymmetric, poloidal magnetic field produced by toroidal electric currents. The presence of such a field results in small deviations of the shape of the configuration from spherical symmetry. This in turn leads to the modification of an equation for the current and correspondingly to changes in the structure of the internal magnetic field for the systems supported by the anisotropic fluid, in contrast to the case of an isotropic fluid, where such deviations do not affect the magnetic field.

  17. Magnetic field screening effect in electroweak model

    E-print Network

    A. S. Bakry; D. G. Pak; P. M. Zhang; L. P. Zou

    2014-10-03

    It is shown that in the Weinberg-Salam model a magnetic field screening effect for static magnetic solutions takes place. The origin of this phenomenon can be traced to the mutual cancellation of Abelian magnetic fields created by the SU(2) gauge fields and Higgs boson. The effect implies monopole charge screening in the finite energy system of monopoles and antimonopoles. We consider another manifestation of the screening effect which leads to an essential energy decrease of magnetic solutions. Applying a variational method we have found a magnetic field configuration with a topological azimuthal magnetic flux which minimizes the energy functional and possesses a total energy of order 1 TeV. We suppose that a corresponding magnetic bound state exists in the electroweak theory and can be detected by experiment.

  18. Screening magnetic fields by superconductors: A simple model

    SciTech Connect

    Caputo, J.-G., E-mail: caputo@insa-rouen.fr [Laboratoire de Mathématiques, INSA de Rouen, Avenue de l'Université, 76801 Saint-Etienne du Rouvray (France); Gozzelino, L.; Laviano, F.; Ghigo, G.; Gerbaldo, R. [Department of Applied Science and Technology, Politecnico di Torino, 10129, Torino (Italy); Noudem, J.; Thimont, Y.; Bernstein, P. [CRISMAT/LUSAC, Physics Department, Université de Caen (France)

    2013-12-21

    We introduce a simple approach to evaluate the magnetic field distribution around superconducting samples, based on the London equations; the elementary variable is the vector potential. This procedure has no adjustable parameters, only the sample geometry and the London length, ?, determine the solution. This approach was validated by comparing the induction field calculated to the one measured above MgB{sub 2} disks of different diameters, at 20?K and for applied fields lower than 0.4?T. The model can be applied if the flux line penetration inside the sample can be neglected when calculating the induction field distribution outside the superconductor. We conclude by showing on a cup-shape geometry how one can design a magnetic shield satisfying a specific constraint.

  19. Generation of the magnetic field in jets

    E-print Network

    V. Urpin

    2006-05-22

    We consider dynamo action under the combined influence of turbulence and large-scale shear in sheared jets. Shear can stretch turbulent magnetic field lines in such a way that even turbulent motions showing mirror symmetry become suitable for generation of a large-scale magnetic field. We derive the integral induction equation governing the behaviour of the mean field in jets. The main result is that sheared jets may generate a large-scale magnetic field if shear is sufficiently strong. The generated mean field is mainly concentrated in a magnetic sheath surrounding the central region of a jet, and it exhibits sign reversals in the direction of the jet axis. Typically, the magnetic field in a sheath is dominated by the component along the jet that can reach equipartition with the kinetic energy of particles, The field in the central region of jets has a more disordered structure.

  20. Development of marine magnetic vector measurement system using AUV and deep-towed vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayanagi, K.; Isezaki, N.; Matsuo, J.; Harada, M.; Kasaya, T.; Nishimura, K.; Baba, H.

    2012-04-01

    Marine magnetic survey is one of useful methods in order to investigate the nature of the oceanic crust. Most of the data are, however, intensity of the geomagnetic field without its direction. Therefore we cannot properly apply a physical formula describing the relation between magnetic field and magnetization to analyses of the data. With this problem, Isezaki (1986) developed a shipboard three-component magnetometer which measures the geomagnetic vector at the sea. On the other hand, geophysical surveys near the seafloor have been more and more necessary in order to show the details of the oceanic crust. For instance, development of seabed resources like hydrothermal deposits needs higher resolution surveys compared with conventional surveys at the sea for accurate estimation of abundance of the resources. From these viewpoints, we have been developing a measurement system of the deep-sea geomagnetic vector using AUV and deep-towed vehicle. The measurement system consists of two 3-axis flux-gate magnetometers, an Overhauser magnetometer, an optical fiber gyro, a main unit (control, communication, recording), and an onboard unit. These devices except for the onboard unit are installed in pressure cases (depth limit: 6000m). Thus this measurement system can measure three components and intensity of the geomagnetic field in the deep-sea. In 2009, the first test of the measurement system was carried out in the Kumano Basin using AUV Urashima and towing vehicle Yokosuka Deep-Tow during the R/V Yokosuka YK09-09 cruise. In this test, we sank a small magnetic target to the seafloor, and examined how the system worked. As a result, we successfully detected magnetic anomaly of the target to confirm the expected performance of that in the sea. In 2010, the measurement system was tested in the Bayonnaise Knoll area both using a titanium towing frame during the R/V Bosei-maru cruise and using AUV Urashima during the R/V Yokosuka YK10-17 cruise. The purpose of these tests was to evaluate the performance of the system in an actual hydrothermal deposit area for practical applications of that. The Bayonnaise Knoll is a submarine caldera with an outer rim of 2.5-3 km and a floor of 840-920 m, which is located in the Izu-Ogasawara arc. A large hydrothermal deposit, Hakurei deposit lies in the southeast part of the caldera. In the R/V Bosei-maru cruise, we observed three components of magnetic anomalies at depths of 400-570 m along SE-NW and WE tracks across the caldera. In the R/V Yokosuka YK10-17 cruise, we observed three components and intensity of magnetic anomalies at altitudes of 60-100 m around the Hakurei deposit and at depth of 500 m above the caldera. From these tests, we have succeeded in measuring the geomagnetic vector and intensity using the AUV and the deep-towed vehicle, and also have obtained detailed magnetic anomaly in the Hakurei deposit area. We will here present the outlines of the measurement system and the tests in the sea. Note that this study has been supported by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science & Technology (MEXT).

  1. Low-degree Structure in Mercury's Planetary Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Brian J.; Johnson, Catherine L.; Korth, Haje; Winslow, Reka M.; Borovsky, Joseph E.; Purucker, Michael E.; Slavin, James A.; Solomon, Sean C.; Zuber, Maria T.; McNutt, Ralph L. Jr.

    2012-01-01

    The structure of Mercury's internal magnetic field has been determined from analysis of orbital Magnetometer measurements by the MESSENGER spacecraft. We identified the magnetic equator on 531 low-altitude and 120 high-altitude equator crossings from the zero in the radial cylindrical magnetic field component, Beta (sub rho). The low-altitude crossings are offset 479 +/- 6 km northward, indicating an offset of the planetary dipole. The tilt of the magnetic pole relative to the planetary spin axis is less than 0.8 deg.. The high-altitude crossings yield a northward offset of the magnetic equator of 486 +/- 74 km. A field with only nonzero dipole and octupole coefficients also matches the low-altitude observations but cannot yield off-equatorial Beta (sub rho) = 0 at radial distances greater than 3520 km. We compared offset dipole and other descriptions of the field with vector field observations below 600 km for 13 longitudinally distributed, magnetically quiet orbits. An offset dipole with southward directed moment of 190 nT-R-cube (sub M) yields root-mean-square (RMS) residuals below 14 nT, whereas a field with only dipole and octupole terms tuned to match the polar field and the low-altitude magnetic equator crossings yields RMS residuals up to 68 nT. Attributing the residuals from the offset-dipole field to axial degree 3 and 4 contributions we estimate that the Gauss coefficient magnitudes for the additional terms are less than 4% and 7%, respectively, relative to the dipole. The axial alignment and prominent quadrupole are consistent with a non-convecting layer above a deep dynamo in Mercury's fluid outer core.

  2. Reducing Field Distortion in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2010-01-01

    A concept for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system that would utilize a relatively weak magnetic field provides for several design features that differ significantly from the corresponding features of conventional MRI systems. Notable among these features are a magnetic-field configuration that reduces (relative to the conventional configuration) distortion and blurring of the image, the use of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer as the detector, and an imaging procedure suited for the unconventional field configuration and sensor. In a typical application of MRI, a radio-frequency pulse is used to excite precession of the magnetic moments of protons in an applied magnetic field, and the decaying precession is detected for a short time following the pulse. The precession occurs at a resonance frequency proportional to the strengths of the magnetic field and the proton magnetic moment. The magnetic field is configured to vary with position in a known way; hence, by virtue of the aforesaid proportionality, the resonance frequency varies with position in a known way. In other words, position is encoded as resonance frequency. MRI using magnetic fields weaker than those of conventional MRI offers several advantages, including cheaper and smaller equipment, greater compatibility with metallic objects, and higher image quality because of low susceptibility distortion and enhanced spin-lattice-relaxation- time contrast. SQUID MRI is being developed into a practical MRI method for applied magnetic flux densities of the order of only 100 T

  3. SIMULATING MAGNETIC FIELDS IN THE ANTENNAE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Kotarba, H.; Karl, S. J.; Naab, T.; Johansson, P. H.; Lesch, H. [University Observatory Munich, Scheinerstr. 1, D-81679 Munich (Germany); Dolag, K.; Stasyszyn, F. A., E-mail: kotarba@usm.lmu.d [Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany)

    2010-06-20

    We present self-consistent high-resolution simulations of NGC 4038/4039 (the 'Antennae galaxies') including star formation, supernova feedback, and magnetic fields performed with the N-body/smoothed particle hydrodynamic (SPH) code GADGET, in which magnetohydrodynamics are followed with the SPH method. We vary the initial magnetic field in the progenitor disks from 10{sup -9} to 10{sup -4} G. At the time of the best match with the central region of the Antennae system, the magnetic field has been amplified by compression and shear flows to an equilibrium field value of {approx}10 {mu}G, independent of the initial seed field. These simulations are a proof of the principle that galaxy mergers are efficient drivers for the cosmic evolution of magnetic fields. We present a detailed analysis of the magnetic field structure in the central overlap region. Simulated radio and polarization maps are in good morphological and quantitative agreement with the observations. In particular, the two cores with the highest synchrotron intensity and ridges of regular magnetic fields between the cores and at the root of the southern tidal arm develop naturally in our simulations. This indicates that the simulations are capable of realistically following the evolution of the magnetic fields in a highly nonlinear environment. We also discuss the relevance of the amplification effect for present-day magnetic fields in the context of hierarchical structure formation.

  4. Simulations of remanence and field distributions of permanent magnet array with rectangular cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X. N.; Lu, D. W.; Xu, X. B.; Zang, W. C.; Madireddi, Sesha

    2008-08-01

    The magnetic phenomena of a Halbach-type permanent magnet array under a strong self-field such as demagnetization, saturation, deflection, and rotation of remanence vectors occur deep in the interior of the magnets, and thus lead to an inhomogeneous field even for a hollow cylindrical permanent magnet array with circular cavity. Considering the anisotropic magnetization loops of commercially available permanent magnets, the self-consistent remanence and field distributions of a 16 piece hollow cylindrical permanent magnet array with rectangular cavity (HCPMARC) are presented here to simulate the magnetic phenomena inside the magnets. The field distribution of a HCPMARC can be modulated by array structure while keeping both the cross sectional areas of the cavity and the magnets constant. At the expense of field uniformity, a HCPMARC acquires greater center field uniformity than a HCPMACC does. Furthermore, we simulated the magnetization and field distributions for a yoked HCPMARC obtained by replacing the partial permanent magnets with soft ones on both magnetic poles of a yokeless HCPMARC. Such substitution always enhances field uniformity but depresses the center field. This, in turn, causes changes in the average magnitude of the field in the entire rectangular cavity.

  5. The AGN origin of cluster magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hao

    The origin of magnetic fields in galaxy clusters is one of the most fascinating but challenging problems in astrophysics. In this dissertation, the possibility of an Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) origin of cluster magnetic fields is studied through state of the art simulations of magnetic field evolution in large scale structure formation using a newly developed cosmological Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code -- EnzoMHD. After presenting a complete but concise description and verification of the code, we discuss the creation of magnetic fields through the Biermann Battery effect during first star formation and galaxy cluster formation. We find that magnetic fields are produced as predicted by theory in both cases. For the first star formation, we obtain a lower limit of (~ 10 -9 G) for magnetic fields when the first generation stars form. On the other hand, we find that the magnetic energy is amplified 4 orders of magnitude within ~ 10 Gyr during cluster formation. We then study magnetic field injection from AGN into the Intra- Cluster Medium (ICM) and their impact on the ICM. We reproduce the X-ray cavities as well as weak shocks seen in observations in the simulation, and further confirm the idea that AGN outburst must contain lots of magnetic energy (up to 10 61 ergs) and the magnetic fields play an important part in the formation of jet/lobe system. We present high resolution simulations of cluster formation with magnetic fields injected from high redshift AGN. We find that these local magnetic fields are spread quickly throughout the whole cluster by cluster mergers. The ICM is in a turbulent state with a Kolmogorov-like power spectrum. Magnetic fields are amplified to and maintained at the observational level of a few mG by bulk flows at large scale and the ICM turbulence at small scale. The total magnetic energy increases about 25 times to ~ 1.2 × 10^61 ergs at the present time. We conclude that magnetic fields from AGN at high redshift may provide sufficient initial magnetic fields to magnetize the whole cluster.

  6. Detecting ultra-low magnetic fields with common magnetic minerals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Kletetschka; P. J. Wasilewski; T. Kohout; E. Herrero-Bervera; M. D. Fuller

    2004-01-01

    Growing volume of extraterrestrial material is being used to analyze magnetic paleo-intensities. They are important for estimation of paleo-fields that once existed in extraterrestrial environment. The extraterrestrial field can be several orders of magnitudes weaker than a terrestrial field. The data demonstrating that the TRM linear acquisition is valid for such low fields are virtually not existent. We tested the

  7. Hazard surveillance for industrial magnetic fields: II. Field characteristics from waveform measurements.

    PubMed

    Bowman, J D; Methner, M M

    2000-12-01

    Magnetic field characteristics have been surveyed systematically in six factories with the Multiwave(R) II waveform capture instrument. These six facilities manufactured plastics, pharmaceuticals, cement, liquid air products, aluminum parts, and aluminum-framed filters. The study goals were to survey the physical characteristics of magnetic fields that may be related to biological effects under various interaction mechanisms and to relate those characteristics to the field's sources. From 59 waveform measurements at worker locations near sources, we calculated the extremely low frequency (ELF) and static field magnitudes, their frequency characteristics, and spatial characteristics of the 60Hz component. The RMS vector magnitude of the ELF magnetic field (the usual exposure metric in most studies) had medians ranging from 0.53 to 12.83 microT in the six factories. The static magnetic field magnitudes had medians of 24.2-46.2 microT, which is well below the geomagnetic reference field of 55.0 microT because of shielding from steel structures. The maximum static field was 128.6 microT near a DC motor. The frequency spectra of the most common fields is dominated by 60Hz, and has a median total harmonic distortion equal to 14.8%. The most common higher frequencies are the third, fifth, and second harmonics of 60Hz. However, magnetic fields in these workplaces had many other 60Hz harmonics and non-harmonic frequencies due particularly to electric motors and computer monitors. The 60Hz component magnetic fields have elliptical polarization with median axial ratio of 25.4%. The average proportion of the 60Hz component parallel to the static field vector was 51.5+/-3.0%, which indicates a significant trend towards perpendicular orientation between these two field components. In this survey of only six factories, the Multiwave(R) II measurements documented a wide diversity of complex magnetic field characteristics and non-sinusoidal waveforms. Although these characteristics are important to the various mechanisms postulated to explain biological effects, they are overlooked by the popular exposure assessment methods which only measure the ELF magnitude. Therefore, spot measurements with the Multiwave(R) II or similar waveform capture instruments are necessary for a complete magnetic field exposure assessment. PMID:11108784

  8. Quark antiscreening at strong magnetic field and inverse magnetic catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer, E. J.; de la Incera, V.; Wen, X. J.

    2015-03-01

    The dependence of the QCD coupling constant with a strong magnetic field and the implications for the critical temperature of the chiral phase transition are investigated. It is found that the coupling constant becomes anisotropic in a strong magnetic field and that the quarks, confined by the field to the lowest Landau level where they pair with antiquarks, produce an antiscreening effect. These results lead to inverse magnetic catalysis, providing a natural explanation for the behavior of the critical temperature in the strong-field region.

  9. MAGNETIC FIELDS IN INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS FROM ZEEMAN OBSERVATIONS: INFERENCE OF TOTAL FIELD STRENGTHS BY BAYESIAN ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Crutcher, Richard M. [Astronomy Department, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Wandelt, Benjamin [UPMC Universite Paris 06, Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, 98 bis, boulevard Arago, 75014 Paris (France); Heiles, Carl [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Falgarone, Edith [LRA/LERMA, CNRS UMR 8112, Ecole Normale Superieure and Observatoire de Paris, Paris (France); Troland, Thomas H. [Physics and Astronomy Department, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States)

    2010-12-10

    The only direct measurements of interstellar magnetic field strengths depend on the Zeeman effect, which samples the line-of-sight component B{sub z} of the magnetic vector. In this paper, we use a Bayesian approach to analyze the observed probability density function (PDF) of B{sub z} from Zeeman surveys of H I, OH, and CN spectral lines in order to infer a density-dependent stochastic model of the total field strength B in diffuse and molecular clouds. We find that at n < 300 cm{sup -3} (in the diffuse interstellar medium sampled by H I lines), B does not scale with density. This suggests that diffuse clouds are assembled by flows along magnetic field lines, which would increase the density but not the magnetic field strength. We further find strong evidence for B in molecular clouds being randomly distributed between very small values and a maximum that scales with volume density n as B {proportional_to} n {sup 0.65} for n>300 cm{sup -3}, with an uncertainty at the 50% level in the power-law exponent of about {+-}0.05. This break-point density could be interpreted as the average density at which parsec-scale clouds become self-gravitating. Both the uniform PDF of total field strengths and the scaling with density suggest that magnetic fields in molecular clouds are often too weak to dominate the star formation process. The stochasticity of the total field strength B implies that many fields are so weak that the mass/flux ratio in many clouds must be significantly supercritical. A two-thirds power law comes from isotropic contraction of gas too weakly magnetized for the magnetic field to affect the morphology of the collapse. On the other hand, our study does not rule out some clouds having strong magnetic fields with critical mass/flux ratios.

  10. The Evolution of the Earth's Magnetic Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloxham, Jeremy; Gubbins, David

    1989-01-01

    Describes the change of earth's magnetic field at the boundary between the outer core and the mantle. Measurement techniques used during the last 300 years are considered. Discusses the theories and research for explaining the field change. (YP)

  11. Magnetic Braiding and Parallel Electric Fields

    E-print Network

    A. L. Wilmot-Smith; G. Hornig; D. I. Pontin

    2008-10-08

    The braiding of the solar coronal magnetic field via photospheric motions - with subsequent relaxation and magnetic reconnection -- is one of the most widely debated ideas of solar physics. We readdress the theory in the light of developments in three-dimensional magnetic reconnection theory. It is known that the integrated parallel electric field along field lines is the key quantity determining the rate of reconnection, in contrast with the two-dimensional case where the electric field itself is the important quantity. We demonstrate that this difference becomes crucial for sufficiently complex magnetic field structures. A numerical method is used to relax a braided magnetic field to an ideal force-free equilibrium; that equilibrium is found to be smooth, with only large- scale current structures. However, the equilibrium is shown to have a highly filamentary integrated parallel current structure with extremely short length- scales. An analytical model is developed to show that, in a coronal situation, the length scales associated with the integrated parallel current structures will rapidly decrease with increasing complexity, or degree of braiding, of the magnetic field. Analysis shows the decrease in these length scales will, for any finite resistivity, eventually become inconsistent with the stability of a force- free field. Thus the inevitable consequence of the magnetic braiding process is shown to be a loss of equilibrium of the coronal field, probably via magnetic reconnection events.

  12. Magnetic Field Seeding through Supernova Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Daegene; Wise, John

    2015-01-01

    Stellar feedback occurring at small-scales can significantly impact the evolution of galaxies at much larger scales. For example, an appropriate feedback mechanism, including thermal and radiative components, can help regulate star formation, particularly in low-mass galaxies. While feedback models are generally prevalent in numerical simulations, the magnetic component is often neglected. However, measurements of galaxies indicate the presence of fields with a strength on the order of µG. Previous studies have demonstrated the formation of these fields through the amplification of a primordial magnetic field. Here, we describe a self-consistent prescription where magnetic fields are injected in supernova injections, calibrated by observations of magnetic fields in supernova remnants. These fields will then become seeds that evolve by way of mixing and turbulence to result in galactic-scale magnetic fields. As a proof of concept, we apply this method to model the supernova of a single Population III star and trace the evolution of the injected magnetic field. Future studies will apply this prescription to study not only the effects of magnetic fields on galaxy formation and evolution, but also the growth of the magnetized bubbles that form in the IGM.

  13. Graphene Nanoribbon in Sharply Localized Magnetic Fields

    E-print Network

    Abdulaziz D. Alhaidari; Hocine Bahlouli; Abderrahim El Mouhafid; Ahmed Jellal

    2013-03-20

    We study the effect of a sharply localized magnetic field on the electron transport in a strip (ribbon) of graphene sheet, which allows to give results for the transmission and reflection probability through magnetic barriers. The magnetic field is taken as a single and double delta type localized functions, which are treated later as the zero width limit of gaussian fields. For both field configurations, we evaluate analytically and numerically their transmission and reflection coefficients. The possibility of spacial confinement due to the inhomogeneous field configuration is also investigated.

  14. A program to compute magnetic fields, forces, and inductances due to solid rectangular conductors arbitrarily positioned in space

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. T. Honjo; R. M. del Vecchio

    1986-01-01

    The computer program BUS3D was developed to compute the magnetic field and vector potential produced by a collection of rectangular busbars carrying dc current and arbitrarily oriented in space, using exact analytic expressions. The field and vector potential expressions are used in numerical integrations to obtain forces on individual busbars and inductances or mutual inductances between collections of busbars. The

  15. Ballistic dynamics of Dirac particles in electro-magnetic fields

    E-print Network

    Josef Mehringer; Edgardo Stockmeyer

    2014-11-21

    Investigating properties of two-dimensional Dirac operators coupled to an electric and a magnetic field (perpendicular to the plane) requires in general unbounded (vector-) potentials. If the system has a certain symmetry, the fields can be described by one-dimensional potentials $V$ and $A$. Assuming that $|A|<|V|$ outside some arbitrary large ball, we show that absolutely continuous states of the effective Dirac operators spread ballistically. These results are based on well-known methods in spectral dynamics together with certain new Hilbert-Schmidt bounds. We use Lorentz boosts to derive these new estimates.

  16. Cosmic microwave background polarization signals from tangled magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Seshadri, T R; Subramanian, K

    2001-09-01

    Tangled, primordial cosmic magnetic fields create small rotational velocity perturbations on the last scattering surface of the cosmic microwave background radiation. For fields which redshift to a present value of B0 = 3 x 10(-9) G, these vector modes are shown to generate polarization anisotropies of order 0.1-4 microK on small angular scales (500

  17. Coronal magnetic fields produced by photospheric shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturrock, P. A.; Yang, W.-H.

    1987-01-01

    The magneto-frictional method is used for computing force free fields to examine the evolution of the magnetic field of a line dipole, when there is relative shearing motion between the two polarities. It found that the energy of the sheared field can be arbitrarily large compared with the potential field. It is also found that it is possible to fit the magnetic energy, as a function of shear, by a simple functional form.

  18. Control of magnetism by electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsukura, Fumihiro; Tokura, Yoshinori; Ohno, Hideo

    2015-03-01

    The electrical manipulation of magnetism and magnetic properties has been achieved across a number of different material systems. For example, applying an electric field to a ferromagnetic material through an insulator alters its charge-carrier population. In the case of thin films of ferromagnetic semiconductors, this change in carrier density in turn affects the magnetic exchange interaction and magnetic anisotropy; in ferromagnetic metals, it instead changes the Fermi level position at the interface that governs the magnetic anisotropy of the metal. In multiferroics, an applied electric field couples with the magnetization through electrical polarization. This Review summarizes the experimental progress made in the electrical manipulation of magnetization in such materials, discusses our current understanding of the mechanisms, and finally presents the future prospects of the field.

  19. Control of magnetism by electric fields.

    PubMed

    Matsukura, Fumihiro; Tokura, Yoshinori; Ohno, Hideo

    2015-03-01

    The electrical manipulation of magnetism and magnetic properties has been achieved across a number of different material systems. For example, applying an electric field to a ferromagnetic material through an insulator alters its charge-carrier population. In the case of thin films of ferromagnetic semiconductors, this change in carrier density in turn affects the magnetic exchange interaction and magnetic anisotropy; in ferromagnetic metals, it instead changes the Fermi level position at the interface that governs the magnetic anisotropy of the metal. In multiferroics, an applied electric field couples with the magnetization through electrical polarization. This Review summarizes the experimental progress made in the electrical manipulation of magnetization in such materials, discusses our current understanding of the mechanisms, and finally presents the future prospects of the field. PMID:25740132

  20. Magnetic isotope and magnetic field effects on the DNA synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Buchachenko, Anatoly L.; Orlov, Alexei P.; Kuznetsov, Dmitry A.; Breslavskaya, Natalia N.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic isotope and magnetic field effects on the rate of DNA synthesis catalysed by polymerases ? with isotopic ions 24Mg2+, 25Mg2+ and 26Mg2+ in the catalytic sites were detected. No difference in enzymatic activity was found between polymerases ? carrying 24Mg2+ and 26Mg2+ ions with spinless, non-magnetic nuclei 24Mg and 26Mg. However, 25Mg2+ ions with magnetic nucleus 25Mg were shown to suppress enzymatic activity by two to three times with respect to the enzymatic activity of polymerases ? with 24Mg2+ and 26Mg2+ ions. Such an isotopic dependence directly indicates that in the DNA synthesis magnetic mass-independent isotope effect functions. Similar effect is exhibited by polymerases ? with Zn2+ ions carrying magnetic 67Zn and non-magnetic 64Zn nuclei, respectively. A new, ion–radical mechanism of the DNA synthesis is suggested to explain these effects. Magnetic field dependence of the magnesium-catalysed DNA synthesis is in a perfect agreement with the proposed ion–radical mechanism. It is pointed out that the magnetic isotope and magnetic field effects may be used for medicinal purposes (trans-cranial magnetic treatment of cognitive deceases, cell proliferation, control of the cancer cells, etc). PMID:23851636

  1. MAGNETIC FIELD IN THE ISOLATED MASSIVE DENSE CLUMP IRAS 20126+4104

    SciTech Connect

    Shinnaga, Hiroko; Phillips, Thomas G. [California Institute of Technology Submillimeter Observatory, 111 Nowelo Street, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Novak, Giles [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 633 Clark Street Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Vaillancourt, John E. [Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, Universities Space Research Association, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffet Field, CA 94035 (United States); Machida, Masahiro N. [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, 6-10-1 Hakozaki, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Kataoka, Akimasa [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwake-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Tomisaka, Kohji [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan and Department of Astronomy, School of Physical Sciences, Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI), Osawa 2-21-1, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Davidson, Jacqueline; Houde, Martin [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley WA 6009, Perth (Australia); Dowell, C. Darren [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, MS 169-506, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Leeuw, Lerothodi [SETI Institute, 515 North Whisman Avenue, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States)

    2012-05-10

    We measured polarized dust emission at 350 {mu}m toward the high-mass star-forming massive dense clump IRAS 20126+4104 using the SHARC II Polarimeter, SHARP, at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. Most of the observed magnetic field vectors agree well with magnetic field vectors obtained from a numerical simulation for the case when the global magnetic field lines are inclined with respect to the rotation axis of the dense clump. The results of the numerical simulation show that rotation plays an important role on the evolution of the massive dense clump and its magnetic field. The direction of the cold CO 1-0 bipolar outflow is parallel to the observed magnetic field within the dense clump as well as the global magnetic field, as inferred from optical polarimetry data, indicating that the magnetic field also plays a critical role in an early stage of massive star formation. The large-scale Keplerian disk of the massive (proto)star rotates in an almost opposite sense to the clump's envelope. The observed magnetic field morphology and the counterrotating feature of the massive dense clump system provide hints to constrain the role of magnetic fields in the process of high-mass star formation.

  2. Vectors

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Stern, David P. (David Peter), 1931-

    This web page, authored and curated by David P. Stern, introduces vectors as an extension of numbers having both magnitude and direction. The initial motivation is to describe velocity but the material includes a general discussion of vector algebra and an application to forces for the inclined plane. The page contains links to a related lesson plan and further opportunities to explore vectors. This is part of the extensive web site "From Stargazers to Starships", that uses space exploration and space science to introduce topics in physics and astronomy. Translations in Spanish and French are available.

  3. Vector spin modeling for magnetic tunnel junctions with voltage dependent effects

    SciTech Connect

    Manipatruni, Sasikanth, E-mail: sasikanth.manipatruni@intel.com; Nikonov, Dmitri E.; Young, Ian A. [Exploratory Integrated Circuits, Components Research, Intel Corp., Hillsboro, Oregon 97124 (United States)

    2014-05-07

    Integration and co-design of CMOS and spin transfer devices requires accurate vector spin conduction modeling of magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) devices. A physically realistic model of the MTJ should comprehend the spin torque dynamics of nanomagnet interacting with an injected vector spin current and the voltage dependent spin torque. Vector spin modeling allows for calculation of 3 component spin currents and potentials along with the charge currents/potentials in non-collinear magnetic systems. Here, we show 4-component vector spin conduction modeling of magnetic tunnel junction devices coupled with spin transfer torque in the nanomagnet. Nanomagnet dynamics, voltage dependent spin transport, and thermal noise are comprehended in a self-consistent fashion. We show comparison of the model with experimental magnetoresistance (MR) of MTJs and voltage degradation of MR with voltage. Proposed model enables MTJ circuit design that comprehends voltage dependent spin torque effects, switching error rates, spin degradation, and back hopping effects.

  4. Interplanetary stream magnetism: Kinematic effects. [solar magnetic fields and wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Barouch, E.

    1974-01-01

    The particle density, and the magnetic field intensity and direction are calculated in corotating streams of the solar wind, assuming that the solar wind velocity is constant and radial and that its azimuthal variations are not two rapid. The effects of the radial velocity profile in corotating streams on the magnetic fields were examined using kinematic approximation and a variety of field configurations on the inner boundary. Kinematic and dynamic effects are discussed.

  5. Protein crystals orientation in a magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Astier, J P; Veesler, S; Boistelle, R

    1998-07-01

    Nucleation and crystal growth of hen egg-white lysozyme, bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor and porcine pancreatic alpha-amylase were carried out in the presence of a magnetic field of 1.25 T produced by small permanent magnets. Crystals were oriented in the magnetic field, except when heterogeneous nucleation occurred. The orientation of protein crystals in the presence of a magnetic field can be attributed to the anisotropic diamagnetic susceptibility of proteins resulting from the large anisotropy of the alpha-helices due to the axial alignment of the peptide bonds. PMID:9761881

  6. Neutron spin polarization in strong magnetic fields

    E-print Network

    H. Wen; L. S. Kisslinger; Walter Greiner; G. Mao

    2006-01-09

    The effects of strong magnetic fields on the inner crust of neutron stars are investigated after taking into account the anomalous magnetic moments of nucleons. Energy spectra and wave functions for protons and neutrons in a uniform magnetic field are provided. The particle spin polarizations and the yields of protons and neutrons are calculated in a free Fermi gas model. Obvious spin polarization occurs when $B\\geq10^{14}$G for protons and $B\\geq10^{17}$G for neutrons, respectively. It is shown that the neutron spin polarization depends solely on the magnetic field strength.

  7. High concentration ferronematics in low magnetic fields

    E-print Network

    T. Tóth-Katona; P. Salamon; N. Éber; N. Tomašovi?ová; Z. Mitróová; P. Kop?anský

    2014-09-05

    We investigated experimentally the magneto-optical and dielectric properties of magnetic-nanoparticle-doped nematic liquid crystals (ferronematics). Our studies focus on the effect of the very small orienting bias magnetic field $B_{bias}$, and that of the nematic director pretilt at the boundary surfaces in our systems sensitive to low magnetic fields. Based on the results we assert that $B_{bias}$ is not necessarily required for a detectable response to low magnetic fields, and that the initial pretilt, as well as the aggregation of the nanoparticles play an important (though not yet explored enough) role.

  8. Fluctuating magnetic field induced resonant activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Shrabani; Das, Sudip; Baura, Alendu; Bag, Bidhan Chandra

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we have studied the properties of a Brownian particle at stationary state in the presence of a fluctuating magnetic field. Time dependence of the field makes the system thermodynamically open. As a signature of that the steady state distribution function becomes function of damping strength, intensity of fluctuations and constant parts of the applied magnetic field. It also depends on the correlation time of the fluctuating magnetic field. Our another observation is that the random magnetic field can induce the resonant activation phenomenon. Here correlation time is increased under the fixed variance of the fluctuating field. But if the correlation time (?) increases under the fixed field strength then the mean first passage time rapidly grows at low ? and it almost converges at other limit. This is sharp contrast to the usual colored noise driven open system case where the mean first passage time diverges exponentially. We have also observed that a giant enhancement of barrier crossing rate occurs particularly at large strength of constant parts of the applied magnetic field even for very weak fluctuating magnetic field. Finally, break down of the Arrhenius result and disappearance of the Kramers' turn over phenomenon may occur in the presence of a fluctuating magnetic field.

  9. Alignment of magnetic uniaxial particles in a magnetic field: Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovnia, O. A.; Popov, A. G.; Sobolev, A. N.; Hadjipanayis, G. C.

    2014-09-01

    The numerical investigations of the process of alignment of magnetically uniaxial Nd-Fe-B powders in an applied magnetic field were carried out using the discrete element method (DEM). It is shown that magnetic alignment of ensemble of spherical particles provides extremely high degree of alignment, which is achieved in low magnetic fields. A model of formation of anisotropic particles as a combination of spherical particles is suggested. The influence of the shape anisotropy and friction coefficient on the alignment degree was analyzed. The increase in the friction coefficient leads to a decrease in the alignment degree; the simulation results are in qualitative agreement with experimental dependences. It is shown that in magnetic fields higher than 5 T, the calculated field dependences of the alignment degree quantitatively render the experimental data. The increase of about 6% in the alignment degree in the experiments with addition of internal lubricant can be explained by the decrease of 14% in friction coefficient.

  10. Two-axis magnetic field sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jander, Albrecht (Inventor); Nordman, Catherine A. (Inventor); Qian, Zhenghong (Inventor); Smith, Carl H. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A ferromagnetic thin-film based magnetic field sensor with first and second sensitive direction sensing structures each having a nonmagnetic intermediate layer with two major surfaces on opposite sides thereof having a magnetization reference layer on one and an anisotropic ferromagnetic material sensing layer on the other having a length in a selected length direction and a smaller width perpendicular thereto and parallel to the relatively fixed magnetization direction. The relatively fixed magnetization direction of said magnetization reference layer in each is oriented in substantially parallel to the substrate but substantially perpendicular to that of the other. An annealing process is used to form the desired magnetization directions.

  11. Dynamical evolution of a vector field perturbation coupling to Einstein tensor

    E-print Network

    Songbai Chen; Jiliang Jing

    2014-12-04

    We have investigated the wave dynamics of a vector field perturbation coupling to Einstein tensor in the four-dimensional Reissner-Nordstr\\"{o}m black hole spacetime. Our results show that besides the dependence on the coupling between the vector field and Einstein tensor, the wave dynamic equation of the vector field perturbation strongly depends on the parity of the perturbation itself, which is quite different from that of the usual vector field perturbation without the coupling in the four-dimensional spacetime. Moreover, we also find that the vector field perturbation with odd parity grows with exponential rate if the coupling strength is stronger than certain a critical value. However, the vector field perturbation with even parity always decays in the Reissner-Nordstr\\"{o}m black hole spacetime.

  12. A weak combined magnetic field changes root gravitropism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordyum, E. L.; Bogatina, N. I.; Kalinina, Ja. M.; Sheykina, N. V.

    Immobile higher plants are oriented in the gravitational field due to gravitropim that is a physiological growth reaction and consists of three phases: reception of a gravitational signal by statocytes, its transduction to the elongation zone, and finally the organ bending. According to the starch-statolith hypothesis, amyloplasts in the specialized graviperceptive cells - statocytes sediment in the direction of a gravitational vector in the distal part of a cell. The polar arrangement of organelles is maintained by means of the cytoskeleton. On the Kholodny-Went's, theory the root bending is provided by the polar movement of auxin from a root cap to the elongation zone. It is also known that gravistimulation initiates a rapid Ca2+ redistribution in a root apex. Calcium ions modify an activity of many cytoskeletal proteins and clustering of calcium channels may be directed by actin microfilaments. Although the available data show the Ca2+ and cytoskeleton participation in graviperception and signal transduction, the clear evidence with regard to the participation of cytoskeletal elements and calcium ions in these processes is therefore substantial but still circumstantial and requires new experimental data. Roots are characterized with positive gravitropism, i. e. they grow in the direction of a gravitational vector. It was first shown by us that roots change the direction of a gravitropic reaction under gravistimulation in the weak combined magnetic field with a frequency of 32 Hz. 2-3-day old cress seedlings were gravistimulated in moist chambers, which are placed in ?-metal shields. Inside ? -metal shields, combined magnetic fields have been created. Experiments were performed in darkness at temperature 20±10C. Measurements of the magnitude of magnetic fields were carried out with a flux-gate magnetometer. Cress roots reveal negative gravitropism, i. e. they grow in the opposite direction to a gravitational vector, during 2 h of gravistimulation and then roots begin to grow more or less parallel to the Earth's surface, i.e. they reveal plagiotropism. Since such combined magnetic field is adjusted to the cyclotron frequency of Ca2+ ions, these observations demonstrate the participation of calcium ions in root gravitropism. Cyclotron frequency of Ca2+ ions is the formal frequency of ion rotation in the static magnetic field. Simultaneous applying the altering magnetic field with the same frequency can provoke auto-oscillation in the system and consequently change the rate and/or the direction of Ca2+ ion flow in a root under gravistimulation. The data of light, electron, and confocal laser microscopy and kinetics of a gravitropic reaction, which have been obtained on such the new original model, are discussed in the light of current concepts of root gravitropism.

  13. Astrophysical magnetic fields and nonlinear dynamo theory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Axel Brandenburg; Kandaswamy Subramanian

    2005-01-01

    The current understanding of astrophysical magnetic fields is reviewed, focusing on their generation and maintenance by turbulence. In the astrophysical context this generation is usually explained by a self-excited dynamo, which involves flows that can amplify a weak ‘seed’ magnetic field exponentially fast. Particular emphasis is placed on the nonlinear saturation of the dynamo. Analytic and numerical results are discussed

  14. Space Quantization in a Gyrating Magnetic Field

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. I. Rabi

    1937-01-01

    The nonadiabatic transitions which a system with angular momentum J makes in a magnetic field which is rotating about an axis inclined with respect to the field are calculated. It is shown that the effects depend on the sign of the magnetic moment of the system. We therefore have an absolute method for measuring the sign and magnitude of the

  15. Magnetic fields, branes, and noncommutative geometry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniela Bigatti; Leonard Susskind

    2000-01-01

    We construct a simple physical model of a particle moving on the infinite noncommutative 2-plane. The model consists of a pair of opposite charges moving in a strong magnetic field. In addition, the charges are connected by a spring. In the limit of large magnetic field, the charges are frozen into the lowest Landau levels. Interactions of such particles include

  16. Appendix E: Software MEASURING CONSTANT MAGNETIC FIELD

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    , and the Guide Box, shown below. The Guide Box will give you directions and tasks to perform. It will also tell "degree" will make a plot of magnetic field strength as a function of angle (B vs. ). Click "OK" when you. This process is called "zeroing the Hall probe" in the Guide Box. Place the magnetic field sensor wand

  17. CHROMOSPHERIC AND CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELDS Eric Priest

    E-print Network

    Priest, Eric

    CHROMOSPHERIC AND CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELDS Eric Priest Mathematics Institute, St Andrews University the structure of the magnetic field (in the pho­ tosphere, chromosphere and corona) and the dynamics, so that a corona lay above spherical shells of tran­ sition region, chromosphere and photosphere

  18. CHROMOSPHERIC AND CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELDS Eric Priest

    E-print Network

    Priest, Eric

    CHROMOSPHERIC AND CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELDS Eric Priest Mathematics Institute, St Andrews University the structure of the magnetic field (in the pho- tosphere, chromosphere and corona) and the dynamics, so that a corona lay above spherical shells of tran- sition region, chromosphere and photosphere

  19. Statistical analysis of magnetic-field spectra

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jian Wang; Hong Guo

    1998-01-01

    We have calculated and statistically analyzed the magnetic-field spectrum (the B spectrum) at fixed electron Fermi energy for two quantum dot systems with classically chaotic shape. This problem arises naturally in transport measurements where the incoming electron has a fixed energy while one tunes the magnetic field to obtain resonance conductance patterns. The B spectrum, defined as the collection of

  20. On the origins of galactic magnetic fields

    E-print Network

    A. Borzou; H. R. Sepangi; R. Yousefi; A. H. Ziaie

    2009-11-18

    We present a five dimensional unified theory of gravity and electromagnetism which leads to modified Maxwell equations, suggesting a new origin for galactic magnetic fields. It is shown that a region with nonzero scalar curvature would amplify the magnetic fields under certain conditions.