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Sample records for vector magnetic field

  1. Measurements of Solar Vector Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagyard, M. J. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    Various aspects of the measurement of solar magnetic fields are presented. The four major subdivisions of the study are: (1) theoretical understanding of solar vector magnetic fields; (3) techniques for interpretation of observational data; and (4) techniques for data display.

  2. Magnetic vector field tag and seal

    DOEpatents

    Johnston, Roger G.; Garcia, Anthony R.

    2004-08-31

    One or more magnets are placed in a container (preferably on objects inside the container) and the magnetic field strength and vector direction are measured with a magnetometer from at least one location near the container to provide the container with a magnetic vector field tag and seal. The location(s) of the magnetometer relative to the container are also noted. If the position of any magnet inside the container changes, then the measured vector fields at the these locations also change, indicating that the tag has been removed, the seal has broken, and therefore that the container and objects inside may have been tampered with. A hollow wheel with magnets inside may also provide a similar magnetic vector field tag and seal. As the wheel turns, the magnets tumble randomly inside, removing the tag and breaking the seal.

  3. Vector Magnetic Field in Emerging Flux Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmieder, B.; Pariat, E.

    A crucial phase in magnetic flux emergence is the rise of magnetic flux tubes through the solar photosphere, which represents a severe transition between the very different environments of the solar interior and corona. Multi-wavelength observations with Flare Genesis, TRACE, SoHO, and more recently with the vector magnetographs at THEMIS and Hida (DST) led to the following conclusions. The fragmented magnetic field in the emergence region - with dipped field lines or bald patches - is directly related with Ellerman bombs, arch filament systems, and overlying coronal loops. Measurements of vector magnetic fields have given evidence that undulating "serpentine" fields are present while magnetic flux tubes cross the photosphere. See the sketch below, and for more detail see Pariat et al. (2004, 2007); Watanabe et al. (2008):

  4. Mapping the magnetic field vector in a fountain clock

    SciTech Connect

    Gertsvolf, Marina; Marmet, Louis

    2011-12-15

    We show how the mapping of the magnetic field vector components can be achieved in a fountain clock by measuring the Larmor transition frequency in atoms that are used as a spatial probe. We control two vector components of the magnetic field and apply audio frequency magnetic pulses to localize and measure the field vector through Zeeman spectroscopy.

  5. Spectral Analysis of Vector Magnetic Field Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Robert L.; OBrien, Michael S.

    1997-01-01

    We investigate the power spectra and cross spectra derived from the three components of the vector magnetic field measured on a straight horizontal path above a statistically stationary source. All of these spectra, which can be estimated from the recorded time series, are related to a single two-dimensional power spectral density via integrals that run in the across-track direction in the wavenumber domain. Thus the measured spectra must obey a number of strong constraints: for example, the sum of the two power spectral densities of the two horizontal field components equals the power spectral density of the vertical component at every wavenumber and the phase spectrum between the vertical and along-track components is always pi/2. These constraints provide powerful checks on the quality of the measured data; if they are violated, measurement or environmental noise should be suspected. The noise due to errors of orientation has a clear characteristic; both the power and phase spectra of the components differ from those of crustal signals, which makes orientation noise easy to detect and to quantify. The spectra of the crustal signals can be inverted to obtain information about the cross-track structure of the field. We illustrate these ideas using a high-altitude Project Magnet profile flown in the southeastern Pacific Ocean.

  6. Magnetic-field-compensation optical vector magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Papoyan, Aram; Shmavonyan, Svetlana; Khanbekyan, Alen; Khanbekyan, Karen; Marinelli, Carmela; Mariotti, Emilio

    2016-02-01

    A concept for an optical magnetometer used for the measurement of magnitude and direction of a magnetic field (B-field) in two orthogonal directions is developed based on double scanning of a B-field to compensate the measured field to zero value, which is monitored by a resonant magneto-optical process in an unshielded atomic vapor cell. Implementation of the technique using the nonlinear Hanle effect on the D2 line of rubidium demonstrates viability and efficiency of the proposed concept. The ways to enhance characteristics of the suggested technique and optimize its performance, as well as the possible extension to three-axis magnetometry, are discussed. PMID:26836097

  7. Deriving Potential Coronal Magnetic Fields from Vector Magnetograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsch, Brian T.; Fisher, George H.

    2016-06-01

    The minimum-energy configuration for the magnetic field above the solar photosphere is curl-free (hence, by Ampère's law, also current-free), so can be represented as the gradient of a scalar potential. Since magnetic fields are divergence free, this scalar potential obeys Laplace's equation, given an appropriate boundary condition (BC). With measurements of the full magnetic vector at the photosphere, it is possible to employ either Neumann or Dirichlet BCs there. Historically, the Neumann BC was used with available line-of-sight magnetic field measurements, which approximate the radial field needed for the Neumann BC. Since each BC fully determines the 3D vector magnetic field, either choice will, in general, be inconsistent with some aspect of the observed field on the boundary, due to the presence of both currents and noise in the observed field. We present a method to combine solutions from both Dirichlet and Neumann BCs to determine a hybrid, "least-squares" potential field, which minimizes the integrated square of the residual between the potential and actual fields. We also explore weighting the residuals in the fit by spatially uniform measurement uncertainties. This has advantages both in not overfitting the radial field used for the Neumann BC, and in maximizing consistency with the observations. We demonstrate our methods with SDO/HMI vector magnetic field observations of active region 11158, and find that residual discrepancies between the observed and potential fields are significant, and they are consistent with nonzero horizontal photospheric currents. We also analyze potential fields for two other active regions observed with two different vector magnetographs, and find that hybrid-potential fields have significantly less energy than the Neumann fields in every case - by more than 10^{32} erg in some cases. This has major implications for estimates of free magnetic energy in coronal field models, e.g., non-linear force-free field extrapolations.

  8. Deriving Potential Coronal Magnetic Fields from Vector Magnetograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsch, Brian T.; Fisher, George H.

    2016-08-01

    The minimum-energy configuration for the magnetic field above the solar photosphere is curl-free (hence, by Ampère's law, also current-free), so can be represented as the gradient of a scalar potential. Since magnetic fields are divergence free, this scalar potential obeys Laplace's equation, given an appropriate boundary condition (BC). With measurements of the full magnetic vector at the photosphere, it is possible to employ either Neumann or Dirichlet BCs there. Historically, the Neumann BC was used with available line-of-sight magnetic field measurements, which approximate the radial field needed for the Neumann BC. Since each BC fully determines the 3D vector magnetic field, either choice will, in general, be inconsistent with some aspect of the observed field on the boundary, due to the presence of both currents and noise in the observed field. We present a method to combine solutions from both Dirichlet and Neumann BCs to determine a hybrid, "least-squares" potential field, which minimizes the integrated square of the residual between the potential and actual fields. We also explore weighting the residuals in the fit by spatially uniform measurement uncertainties. This has advantages both in not overfitting the radial field used for the Neumann BC, and in maximizing consistency with the observations. We demonstrate our methods with SDO/HMI vector magnetic field observations of active region 11158, and find that residual discrepancies between the observed and potential fields are significant, and they are consistent with nonzero horizontal photospheric currents. We also analyze potential fields for two other active regions observed with two different vector magnetographs, and find that hybrid-potential fields have significantly less energy than the Neumann fields in every case - by more than 10^{32} erg in some cases. This has major implications for estimates of free magnetic energy in coronal field models, e.g., non-linear force-free field extrapolations.

  9. Lifshitz effects on vector condensate induced by a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ya-Bo; Lu, Jun-Wang; Liu, Mo-Lin; Lu, Jian-Bo; Zhang, Cheng-Yuan; Yang, Zhuo-Qun

    2014-05-01

    By numerical and analytical methods, we study in detail the effects of the Lifshitz dynamical exponent z on the vector condensate induced by an applied magnetic field in the probe limit. Concretely, in the presence of the magnetic field, we obtain the Landau level independent of z, and we also find the critical value by coupling a Maxwell complex vector field and an SU(2) field into a (3+1)-dimensional Lifshitz black hole, respectively. The research results show that for the two models with the lowest Landau level, the increasing z improves the response of the critical temperature to the applied magnetic field even without the charge density, and the analytical results uphold the numerical results. In addition, we find that, even in the Lifshitz black hole, the Maxwell complex vector model is still a generalization of the SU(2) Yang-Mills model. Furthermore, we construct the square vortex lattice and discuss the implications of these results.

  10. Magnetic field satellite /MAGSAT/ spacecraft vector magnetometer calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkal, S. W.

    1980-01-01

    The low-flying MAGSAT spacecraft, launched October 30, 1979, included a Vector Magnetometer to accurately map the magnitude and direction of the magnetic field of the earth. Calibration of the magnetometer included arc-second precision determination of the relative orientations of the three sensor axes in a coordinate system defined by optical references. This determination began with laboratory measurements of the relative alignments of optical components mounted with the magnetometer. The actual calibration procedure then consisted basically of accurate and repeatable positioning of the Vector Magnetometer within a unique magnetic test facility which nulls the earth's magnetic field, then generates magnetic fields of various orientations and strengths. Analysis of the magnetometer sensor outputs together with the position and alignment data then gave the axes orientations. We used precision theodolites and methods related to surveying techniques to achieve the accurate positioning and optical component alignment measurements. The final calibration accuracy exceeded results previously achieved in the facility.

  11. Quantifying solar superactive regions with vector magnetic field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, A. Q.; Wang, J. X.

    2012-07-01

    Context. The vector magnetic field characteristics of superactive regions (SARs) hold the key for understanding why SARs are extremely active and provide the guidance in space weather prediction. Aims: We aim to quantify the characteristics of SARs using the vector magnetograms taken by the Solar Magnetic Field Telescope at Huairou Solar Observatory Station. Methods: The vector magnetic field characteristics of 14 SARs in solar cycles 22 and 23 were analyzed using the following four parameters: 1) the magnetic flux imbalance between opposite polarities; 2) the total photospheric free magnetic energy; 3) the length of the magnetic neutral line with its steep horizontal magnetic gradient; and 4) the area with strong magnetic shear. Furthermore, we selected another eight large and inactive active regions (ARs), which are called fallow ARs (FARs), to compare them with the SARs. Results: We found that most of the SARs have a net magnetic flux higher than 7.0 × 1021 Mx, a total photospheric free magnetic energy higher than 1.0 × 1024 erg cm-1, a magnetic neutral line with a steep horizontal magnetic gradient (≥300 G Mm-1) longer than 30 Mm, and an area with strong magnetic shear (shear angle ≥ 80°) greater than 100 Mm2. In contrast, the values of these parameters for the FARs are mostly very low. The Pearson χ2 test was used to examine the significance of the difference between the SARs and FARs, and the results indicate that these two types of ARs can be fairly distinguished by each of these parameters. The significance levels are 99.55%, 99.98%, 99.98%, and 99.96%, respectively. However, no single parameter can distinguish them perfectly. Therefore we propose a composite index based on these parameters, and find that the distinction between the two types of ARs is also significant with a significance level of 99.96%. These results are useful for a better physical understanding of the SAR and FAR.

  12. Determination of coronal magnetic fields from vector magnetograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Zoran

    1993-01-01

    This report covers technical progress during the second year of the contract entitled 'Determination of Coronal Magnetic Fields from Vector Magnetograms,' NASW-4728, between NASA and Science Applications International Corporation, and covers the period January 1, 1993 to December 31, 1993. Under this contract SAIC has conducted research into the determination of coronal magnetic fields from vector magnetograms, including the development and application of algorithms to determine force-free coronal fields above selected observations of active regions. The contract began on June 30, 1992 and has a completion date of December 31, 1994. This contract is a continuation of work started in a previous contract, NASW-4571, which covered the period November 15, 1990 to December 14, 1991. During this second year we have concentrated on studying additional active regions and in using the estimated coronal magnetic fields to compare to coronal features inferred from observations.

  13. Determination of Coronal Magnetic Fields from Vector Magnetograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Zoran

    1997-01-01

    During the course of the present contract we developed an 'evolutionary technique' for the determination of force-free coronal magnetic fields from vector magnetograph observations. The method can successfully generate nonlinear force- free fields (with non-constant-a) that match vector magnetograms. We demonstrated that it is possible to determine coronal magnetic fields from photospheric measurements, and we applied it to vector magnetograms of active regions. We have also studied theoretical models of coronal fields that lead to disruptions. Specifically, we have demonstrated that the determination of force-free fields from exact boundary data is a well-posed mathematical problem, by verifying that the computed coronal field agrees with an analytic force-free field when boundary data for the analytic field are used; demonstrated that it is possible to determine active-region coronal magnetic fields from photospheric measurements, by computing the coronal field above active region 5747 on 20 October 1989, AR6919 on 15 November 1991, and AR7260 on 18 August 1992, from data taken with the Stokes Polarimeter at Mees Solar Observatory, University of Hawaii; started to analyze active region 7201 on 19 June 1992 using measurements made with the Advanced Stokes Polarimeter at NSO/Sac Peak; investigated the effects of imperfections in the photospheric data on the computed coronal magnetic field; documented the coronal field structure of AR5747 and compared it to the morphology of footpoint emission in a flare, showing that the 'high- pressure' H-alpha footpoints are connected by coronal field lines; shown that the variation of magnetic field strength along current-carrying field lines is significantly different from the variation in a potential field, and that the resulting near-constant area of elementary flux tubes is consistent with observations; begun to develop realistic models of coronal fields which can be used to study flare trigger mechanisms; demonstrated that

  14. Electromagnetic biaxial vector scanner using radial magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Han, Aleum; Cho, Ah Ran; Ju, Suna; Ahn, Si-Hong; Bu, Jong-Uk; Ji, Chang-Hyeon

    2016-07-11

    We present an electromagnetic biaxial vector-graphic scanning micromirror. In contrast to conventional electromagnetic actuators using linear magnetic field, proposed device utilizes a radial magnetic field and uniquely designed current paths to enable the 2 degree-of-freedom scanning motion. As the radial field is generated by concentrically assembled magnets placed under the scanner die, large driving torque can be generated without the aid of hermetic packaging and relatively small device volume can be achieved. Mechanical half scan angle of 6.43° and 4.20° have been achieved at DC current of 250mA and 350mA for horizontal and vertical scans, respectively. Forced actuation along both scan axes has been realized by feedback control. PMID:27410851

  15. Vector magnetic field observations of flux tube emergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmieder, B.; Aulanier, G.; Pariat, E.; Georgoulis, M. K.; Rust, D. M.; Bernasconi, P. N.

    2002-10-01

    With Flare Genesis Experiment (FGE), a balloon borne Observatory high spatial and temporal resolution vector magnetograms have been obtained in an emerging active region. The comparison of the observations (FGE and TRACE) with a linear force-free field analysis of the region shows where the region is non-force-free. An analysis of the magnetic topology furnishes insights into the existence of "bald patches" regions (BPs are regions where the vector field is tangential to the boundary (photosphere) along an inversion line). Magnetic reconnection is possible and local heating of the chromopshere is predicted near the BPs. Ellerman bombs (EBs) were found to coincide with few BPs computed from a linear force-free extrapolation of the observed longitudinal field. But when the actual observations of transverse fields were used to identify BPs, then the correspondence with EB positions improved significantly. We conclude that linear force-free extrapolations must be done with the true observed vertical fields, which require the measurement of the three components of the magnetic field.

  16. Height Variation of the Vector Magnetic Field in Solar Spicules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orozco Suárez, D.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Trujillo Bueno, J.

    2015-04-01

    Proving the magnetic configuration of solar spicules has hitherto been difficult due to the lack of spatial resolution and image stability during off-limb ground-based observations. We report spectropolarimetric observations of spicules taken in the He i 1083 nm spectral region with the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter II at the German Vacuum Tower Telescope of the Observatorio del Teide (Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain). The data provide the variation with geometrical height of the Stokes I, Q, U, and V profiles, whose encoded information allows the determination of the magnetic field vector by means of the HAZEL inversion code. The inferred results show that the average magnetic field strength at the base of solar spicules is about 80 gauss, and then it decreases rapidly with height to about 30 gauss at a height of 3000 km above the visible solar surface. Moreover, the magnetic field vector is close to vertical at the base of the chromosphere and has mid-inclinations (about 50°) above 2 Mm height.

  17. Daily Full-Disk SOLIS Inverted Vector Magnetic Field Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streander, Kim; Norton, A. A.; SOLIS Team

    2009-05-01

    Inverted vector magnetic field data from the SOLIS VSM (Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun Vector Spectromagnetograph) instrument are now available at:http://solis.nso.edu/. Both full-disk and smaller field-of-view data containing active regions are available. The inversion is based on the least-squares minimization FORTRAN code developed by the HAO group, initially used with Advanced Stokes Polarimeter data (Skumanich and Lites, 1987; Auer, Heasley and House, 1977). The main code modification is that a scattered light, or quiet-Sun profile, is simulated for every center-to-limb position on the disk. This simulated profile is used as the scattered light profile, instead of an observed profile averaged from pixels with low polarization within a small field of view. The data are inversions of Stokes I, Q, U and V profiles of the Fe I 630.1 and 630.2 nm lines using a Milne-Eddington (ME) model atmosphere. Stokes I, Q, U and V profile weights are 0.01, 1.0, 1.0 and 0.1, respectively. All the Milne-Eddington inverted data are corrected for the 180º ambiguity using the Non-Potential Field Calculation (NPFC) method developed by Manolis Georgoulis (Johns Hopkins). Note that data are only inverted if the observed polarization signal is above a certain threshold.Data are available daily (weather permitting) beginning April 1, 2009 onwards. Also available is a sample of data from March 2008 containing several active regions near the equator.

  18. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) Vector Magnetic Field Pipeline: Overview and Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeksema, J. Todd; Liu, Yang; Hayashi, Keiji; Sun, Xudong; Schou, Jesper; Couvidat, Sebastien; Norton, Aimee; Bobra, Monica; Centeno, Rebecca; Leka, K. D.; Barnes, Graham; Turmon, Michael

    2014-09-01

    The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) began near-continuous full-disk solar measurements on 1 May 2010 from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). An automated processing pipeline keeps pace with observations to produce observable quantities, including the photospheric vector magnetic field, from sequences of filtergrams. The basic vector-field frame list cadence is 135 seconds, but to reduce noise the filtergrams are combined to derive data products every 720 seconds. The primary 720 s observables were released in mid-2010, including Stokes polarization parameters measured at six wavelengths, as well as intensity, Doppler velocity, and the line-of-sight magnetic field. More advanced products, including the full vector magnetic field, are now available. Automatically identified HMI Active Region Patches (HARPs) track the location and shape of magnetic regions throughout their lifetime. The vector field is computed using the Very Fast Inversion of the Stokes Vector (VFISV) code optimized for the HMI pipeline; the remaining 180∘ azimuth ambiguity is resolved with the Minimum Energy (ME0) code. The Milne-Eddington inversion is performed on all full-disk HMI observations. The disambiguation, until recently run only on HARP regions, is now implemented for the full disk. Vector and scalar quantities in the patches are used to derive active region indices potentially useful for forecasting; the data maps and indices are collected in the SHARP data series, hmi.sharp_720s. Definitive SHARP processing is completed only after the region rotates off the visible disk; quick-look products are produced in near real time. Patches are provided in both CCD and heliographic coordinates. HMI provides continuous coverage of the vector field, but has modest spatial, spectral, and temporal resolution. Coupled with limitations of the analysis and interpretation techniques, effects of the orbital velocity, and instrument performance, the resulting measurements have a certain dynamic

  19. Vector magnetic field sensing by a single nitrogen vacancy center in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.-D.; Sun, F.-W.; Zou, C.-L.; Cui, J.-M.; Zhou, L.-M.; Guo, G.-C.

    2013-03-01

    In this letter, we proposed and experimentally demonstrated a method to detect the vector magnetic field with a single nitrogen vacancy (NV) center in diamond. The magnetic field in parallel with the axis of the NV center can be obtained by detecting the electron Zeeman shift, while the Larmor precession of an ancillary nuclear spin close to the NV center can be used to measure the field perpendicular to the axis. Experimentally, both the Zeeman shift and Larmor precession can be measured through the fluorescence from the NV center. By applying additional calibrated magnetic fields, complete information on the vector magnetic field can be achieved with such a method. This vector magnetic-field detection method is insensitive to temperature fluctuation and it can be applied to nanoscale magnetic measurements.

  20. A comprehensive method of estimating electric fields from vector magnetic field and Doppler measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kazachenko, Maria D.; Fisher, George H.; Welsch, Brian T.

    2014-11-01

    Photospheric electric fields, estimated from sequences of vector magnetic field and Doppler measurements, can be used to estimate the flux of magnetic energy (the Poynting flux) into the corona and as time-dependent boundary conditions for dynamic models of the coronal magnetic field. We have modified and extended an existing method to estimate photospheric electric fields that combines a poloidal-toroidal decomposition (PTD) of the evolving magnetic field vector with Doppler and horizontal plasma velocities. Our current, more comprehensive method, which we dub the 'PTD-Doppler-FLCT Ideal' (PDFI) technique, can now incorporate Doppler velocities from non-normal viewing angles. It uses the FISHPACK software package to solve several two-dimensional Poisson equations, a faster and more robust approach than our previous implementations. Here, we describe systematic, quantitative tests of the accuracy and robustness of the PDFI technique using synthetic data from anelastic MHD (ANMHD) simulations, which have been used in similar tests in the past. We find that the PDFI method has less than 1% error in the total Poynting flux and a 10% error in the helicity flux rate at a normal viewing angle (θ = 0) and less than 25% and 10% errors, respectively, at large viewing angles (θ < 60°). We compare our results with other inversion methods at zero viewing angle and find that our method's estimates of the fluxes of magnetic energy and helicity are comparable to or more accurate than other methods. We also discuss the limitations of the PDFI method and its uncertainties.

  1. Solar monochromatic images in magneto-sensitive spectral lines and maps of vector magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shihui, Y.; Jiehai, J.; Minhan, J.

    1985-01-01

    A new method which allows by use of the monochromatic images in some magneto-sensitive spectra line to derive both the magnetic field strength as well as the angle between magnetic field lines and line of sight for various places in solar active regions is described. In this way two dimensional maps of vector magnetic fields may be constructed. This method was applied to some observational material and reasonable results were obtained. In addition, a project for constructing the three dimensional maps of vector magnetic fields was worked out.

  2. Resolving the 180-degree ambiguity in vector magnetic field measurements: The 'minimum' energy solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalf, Thomas R.

    1994-01-01

    I present a robust algorithm that resolves the 180-deg ambiguity in measurements of the solar vector magnetic field. The technique simultaneously minimizes both the divergence of the magnetic field and the electric current density using a simulated annealing algorithm. This results in the field orientation with approximately minimum free energy. The technique is well-founded physically and is simple to implement.

  3. The magnetic field vector of the Sun-as-a-star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidotto, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    Direct comparison between stellar and solar magnetic maps is hampered by their dramatic differences in resolution. Here, we present a method to filter out the small-scale component of vector fields, in such a way that comparison between solar and stellar (large-scale) magnetic field vector maps can be directly made. Our approach extends the technique widely used to decompose the radial component of the solar magnetic field to the azimuthal and meridional components as well. For that, we self-consistently decompose the three-components of the vector field using spherical harmonics of different l degrees. By retaining the low l degrees in the decomposition, we are able to calculate the large-scale magnetic field vector. Using a synoptic map of the solar vector field at Carrington Rotation CR2109, we derive the solar magnetic field vector at a similar resolution level as that from stellar magnetic images. We demonstrate that the large-scale field of the Sun is not purely radial, as often assumed - at CR2109, 83 per cent of the magnetic energy is in the radial component, while 10 per cent is in the azimuthal and 7 per cent is in the meridional components. By separating the vector field into poloidal and toroidal components, we show that the solar magnetic energy at CR2109 is mainly (>90 per cent) poloidal. Our description is entirely consistent with the description adopted in several stellar studies. Our formalism can also be used to confront synoptic maps synthesized in numerical simulations of dynamo and magnetic flux transport studies to those derived from stellar observations.

  4. VECTOR TOMOGRAPHY FOR THE CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELD. II. HANLE EFFECT MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kramar, M.; Inhester, B.; Lin, H.; Davila, J. E-mail: Joseph.M.Davila@nasa.gov E-mail: lin@ifa.hawaii.edu

    2013-09-20

    In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of saturated coronal Hanle effect vector tomography or the application of vector tomographic inversion techniques to reconstruct the three-dimensional magnetic field configuration of the solar corona using linear polarization measurements of coronal emission lines. We applied Hanle effect vector tomographic inversion to artificial data produced from analytical coronal magnetic field models with equatorial and meridional currents and global coronal magnetic field models constructed by extrapolation of real photospheric magnetic field measurements. We tested tomographic inversion with only Stokes Q, U, electron density, and temperature inputs to simulate observations over large limb distances where the Stokes I parameters are difficult to obtain with ground-based coronagraphs. We synthesized the coronal linear polarization maps by inputting realistic noise appropriate for ground-based observations over a period of two weeks into the inversion algorithm. We found that our Hanle effect vector tomographic inversion can partially recover the coronal field with a poloidal field configuration, but that it is insensitive to a corona with a toroidal field. This result demonstrates that Hanle effect vector tomography is an effective tool for studying the solar corona and that it is complementary to Zeeman effect vector tomography for the reconstruction of the coronal magnetic field.

  5. Accessing Interior Vector Magnetic Field Components in Neutron EDM Experiments via Boundary Value Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaster, Brad

    2012-10-01

    We propose a new technique for the determination and monitoring of the interior vector magnetic field components during the operation of neutron EDM experiments. If a suitable three-dimensional volume surrounding the fiducial volume of an experiment can be defined which contains no interior currents or magnetization, each of the interior vector field components will satisfy the Laplace Equation within this volume. Therefore, if the field components can be measured on the boundary, the interior vector field components can be determined uniquely via numerical solution of the Laplace Equation. We discuss the applicability of this technique to the determination of the magnetic field components and magnetic field gradients in the fiducial volumes of neutron EDM experiments.

  6. First Use of Synoptic Vector Magnetograms for Global Nonlinear, Force-Free Coronal Magnetic Field Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tadesse, T.; Wiegelmann, T.; Gosain, S.; MacNeice, P.; Pevtsov, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Context. The magnetic field permeating the solar atmosphere is generally thought to provide the energy for much of the activity seen in the solar corona, such as flares, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), etc. To overcome the unavailability of coronal magnetic field measurements, photospheric magnetic field vector data can be used to reconstruct the coronal field. Currently, there are several modelling techniques being used to calculate three-dimensional field lines into the solar atmosphere. Aims. For the first time, synoptic maps of a photospheric-vector magnetic field synthesized from the vector spectromagnetograph (VSM) on Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun (SOLIS) are used to model the coronal magnetic field and estimate free magnetic energy in the global scale. The free energy (i.e., the energy in excess of the potential field energy) is one of the main indicators used in space weather forecasts to predict the eruptivity of active regions. Methods. We solve the nonlinear force-free field equations using an optimization principle in spherical geometry. The resulting threedimensional magnetic fields are used to estimate the magnetic free energy content E(sub free) = E(sub nlfff) - E(sub pot), which is the difference of the magnetic energies between the nonpotential field and the potential field in the global solar corona. For comparison, we overlay the extrapolated magnetic field lines with the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) observations by the atmospheric imaging assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Results. For a single Carrington rotation 2121, we find that the global nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) magnetic energy density is 10.3% higher than the potential one. Most of this free energy is located in active regions.

  7. Flare-related changes in pseudo-vector magnetic field derived from line-of-sight magnetograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burtseva, Olga; Gosain, Sanjay; Pevtsov, Alexei A.

    2016-05-01

    Longitudinal field is a projection of full vector field to the line-of-sight direction. Thus, it is possible to derive some information about the vector field from line-of-sight data in round sunspots, assuming that average properties of vector magnetic field in these sunspots depend mostly on distance from center of sunspot. Under this assumption, one can reconstruct vertical, radial, and tangential components of vector magnetic field using azimuthal averaging. This technique can be useful for investigation of twist and inclination in magnetic field in particular in flaring regions when vector data are not available. In this study we validate the cylindrical symmetry technique on example of a simple round sunspot. Then we attempt to study changes in (pseudo-vector) magnetic fields in isolated and round sunspots associated with flare events using SDO/HMI longitudinal magnetograms. We compare the pseudo-vector results with vector data.

  8. Direct Observation of Solar Coronal Magnetic Fields by Vector Tomography of the Coronal Emission Line Polarizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramar, M.; Lin, H.; Tomczyk, S.

    2016-03-01

    We present the first direct “observation” of the global-scale, 3D coronal magnetic fields of Carrington Rotation (CR) Cycle 2112 using vector tomographic inversion techniques. The vector tomographic inversion uses measurements of the Fe xiii 10747 Å Hanle effect polarization signals by the Coronal Multichannel Polarimeter (CoMP) and 3D coronal density and temperature derived from scalar tomographic inversion of Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO)/Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI) coronal emission lines (CELs) intensity images as inputs to derive a coronal magnetic field model that best reproduces the observed polarization signals. While independent verifications of the vector tomography results cannot be performed, we compared the tomography inverted coronal magnetic fields with those constructed by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations based on observed photospheric magnetic fields of CR 2112 and 2113. We found that the MHD model for CR 2112 is qualitatively consistent with the tomography inverted result for most of the reconstruction domain except for several regions. Particularly, for one of the most noticeable regions, we found that the MHD simulation for CR 2113 predicted a model that more closely resembles the vector tomography inverted magnetic fields. In another case, our tomographic reconstruction predicted an open magnetic field at a region where a coronal hole can be seen directly from a STEREO-B/EUVI image. We discuss the utilities and limitations of the tomographic inversion technique, and present ideas for future developments.

  9. Calculating Non-Potentiality in Solar Active Regions Using SDO/HMI Vector Magnetic Field Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobra, M.; Hoeksema, J. T.

    2010-12-01

    Non-potential magnetic fields in solar active regions are thought to be associated with flare occurrence. In this study, we parametrize the non-potentiality of several active regions, using data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), and correlate these parameters with flare occurrence. In particular, we focus on a parameter that we call the Gradient-Weighted Inversion Line Length (GWILL). Using data from SOHO/MDI, Mason et al. found that GWILL generally tends to increase before a solar flare. We investigate whether extending the analysis of Mason et. al. to a three-dimensional field enables us to derive better near real-time indicators of flare occurrence. Before HMI, the availability of vector magnetograms was sparse at best. HMI provides continuous vector magnetogram data at a 12-minute cadence. As such, this study represents the first parametrization of non-potentiality in solar active regions using continuous vector magnetic field data.

  10. Vacuum effects in magnetic field with with account for fermion anomalous magnetic moment and axial-vector interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubnov, Andrey; Gubina, Nadezda; Zhukovsky, Vladimir

    2016-05-01

    We study vacuum polarization effects in the model of Dirac fermions with additional interaction of an anomalous magnetic moment with an external magnetic field and fermion interaction with an axial-vector condensate. The proper time method is used to calculate the one-loop vacuum corrections with consideration for different configurations of the characteristic parameters of these interactions.

  11. Vector magnetic field and vector current density in and around the δ-spot NOAA 10808†

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bommier, Véronique; Landi Degl'Innocenti, Egidio; Schmieder, Brigitte; Gelly, Bernard

    2011-08-01

    The context is that of the so-called ``fundamental ambiguity'' (also azimuth ambiguity, or 180° ambiguity) in magnetic field vector measurements: two field vectors symmetrical with respect to the line-of-sight have the same polarimetric signature, so that they cannot be discriminated. We propose a method to solve this ambiguity by applying the ``simulated annealing'' algorithm to the minimization of the field divergence, added to the longitudinal current absolute value, the line-of-sight derivative of the magnetic field being inferred by the interpretation of the Zeeman effect observed by spectropolarimetry in two lines formed at different depths. We find that the line pair Fe I λ 6301.5 and Fe I λ 6302.5 is appropriate for this purpose. We treat the example case of the δ-spot of NOAA 10808 observed on 13 September 2005 between 14:25 and 15:25 UT with the THEMIS telescope. Besides the magnetic field resolved map, the electric current density vector map is also obtained. A strong horizontal current density flow is found surrounding each spot inside its penumbra, associated to a non-zero Lorentz force centripetal with respect to the spot center (i.e., oriented towards the spot center). The current wrapping direction is found to depend on the spot polarity: clockwise for the positive polarity, counterclockwise for the negative one. This analysis is made possible thanks to the UNNOFIT2 Milne-Eddington inversion code, where the usual theory is generalized to the case of a line (Fe I λ 6301.5) that is not a normal Zeeman triplet line (like Fe I λ 6302.5).

  12. Localized crustal magnetic field inversion using inner- and outer-source altitude vector Slepian functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plattner, A.; Simons, F. J.

    2015-12-01

    When inverting for a planetary magnetic potential from vector-valued satellite magnetic field data we need to take into account that the recorded data also contain fields not stemming from the planet but from outer sources in space. In classical global spherical-harmonic analysis this is done by fitting, in addition to the inner sources potential field, a linear combination of outer-source spherical harmonics to the data. This approach has been successfully applied to data with global homogeneous coverage and quality but is not suited for purely regional data. In many situations a local method would be beneficial to take full advantage of data with regionally varying quality or coverage, or to avoid ringing artifacts from sharp intensity contrasts. Here we present a local method that allows such a magnetic source separation. We simultaneously create inner-source and outer-source altitude vector Slepian functions by solving an optimization problem that considers the satellite altitude, the upper radial limit of the satellite trajectory, and the maximum spherical-harmonic degree we want to resolve. This new dual-source altitude vector Slepian system allows to invert for both inner-source and outer-source magnetic potential fields from regional data in a computationally efficient manner, as we show with a series of examples for Earth, the Moon, and terrestrial planets.

  13. The derivation of vector magnetic fields from Stokes profiles - Integral versus least squares fitting techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronan, R. S.; Mickey, D. L.; Orrall, F. Q.

    1987-01-01

    The results of two methods for deriving photospheric vector magnetic fields from the Zeeman effect, as observed in the Fe I line at 6302.5 A at high spectral resolution (45 mA), are compared. The first method does not take magnetooptical effects into account, but determines the vector magnetic field from the integral properties of the Stokes profiles. The second method is an iterative least-squares fitting technique which fits the observed Stokes profiles to the profiles predicted by the Unno-Rachkovsky solution to the radiative transfer equation. For sunspot fields above about 1500 gauss, the two methods are found to agree in derived azimuthal and inclination angles to within about + or - 20 deg.

  14. Magneto-optical effects and the determination of vector magnetic fields from Stokes profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landolfi, M.; Landi Degl'Innocenti, E.

    1982-06-01

    The influence of magnetooptical effects in analytical solutions of the radiative transfer equations for polarized radiation is studied in terms of the single approximations contained in Unno's (1956) solutions. It is shown that the procedures adopted by Auer et al. (1977) for finding the magnetic field vector from Stokes profile data results in large errors in the magnetic field azimuth due to neglect of the magnetooptical effects. The magnetooptical effects are demonstrated to have a larger influence on the linear polarization profiles than other Stokes parameters.

  15. Infrared Dual-line Hanle diagnostic of the Coronal Vector Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dima, Gabriel; Kuhn, Jeffrey; Berdyugina, Svetlana

    2016-04-01

    Measuring the coronal vector magnetic field is still a major challenge in solar physics. This is due to the intrinsic weakness of the field (e.g. ~4G at a height of 0.1Rsun above an active region) and the large thermal broadening of coronal emission lines. We propose using concurrent linear polarization measurements of near-infrared forbidden and permitted lines together with Hanle effect models to calculate the coronal vector magnetic field. In the unsaturated Hanle regime both the direction and strength of the magnetic field affect the linear polarization, while in the saturated regime the polarization is insensitive to the strength of the field. The relatively long radiative lifetimes of coronal forbidden atomic transitions implies that the emission lines are formed in the saturated Hanle regime and the linear polarization is insensitive to the strength of the field. By combining measurements of both forbidden and permitted lines, the direction and strength of the field can be obtained. For example, the SiX 1.4301 um line shows strong linear polarization and has been observed in emission over a large field-of-view (out to elongations of 0.5 Rsun. Here we describe an algorithm that combines linear polarization measurements of the SiX 1.4301 um forbidden line with linear polarization observations of the HeI 1.0830 um permitted coronal line to obtain the vector magnetic field. To illustrate the concept we assume the emitting gas for both atomic transitions is located in the plane of the sky. The further development of this method and associated tools will be a critical step towards interpreting the high spectral, spatial and temporal infrared spectro-polarimetric measurements that will be possible when the Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST) is completed in 2019.

  16. Determination of the Earth's lithospheric magnetic field using vector gradient data from the Swarm satellite constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotsiaros, Stavros; Finlay, Chris; Olsen, Nils

    2015-04-01

    One of the main goals of the Swarm three-satellite constellation mission is to determine the lithospheric field globally with the best possible resolution. To achieve that, explicit advantage of the constellation aspect of Swarm has to be taken by using gradient estimates. We derive lithospheric field models using more than one year of East-West and North-South magnetic gradient data, approximated by first differences of field vector data between the two lower Swarm satellites and along each satellite orbit, respectively. Despite the current relatively high altitude of 450 km of the Swarm satellites, the results are promising. We find that Swarm gradient data are less sensitive to large-scale external field fluctuations and enhance the resolution of the determined lithospheric field compared to only vector data. The derived models agree very well with previous models derived from CHAMP data, serving as an initial validation of the Swarm mission.

  17. Stokes profile analysis and vector magnetic fields. I - Inversion of photospheric lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skumanich, A.; Lites, B. W.

    1987-11-01

    The authors consider improvements to the Auer, Heasley, and House method for the analytic inversion of Stokes profiles via nonlinear least squares. In the application of this method to actual sunspot observations, the authors have found that its simplifications often yield erroneous solutions or nonconvergent behavior. By including damping wings and magneto-optical birefringence and by decoupling the intensity profile from the three-vector polarization profile in the analysis, the authors develop a more robust inversion method that provides a more reliable and accurate estimate of sunspot vector magnetic fields without significant loss of economy.

  18. He i Vector Magnetic Field Maps of a Sunspot and Its Superpenumbral Fine-Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schad, T. A.; Penn, M. J.; Lin, H.; Tritschler, A.

    2015-06-01

    Advanced inversions of high-resolution spectropolarimetric observations of the He i triplet at 1083 nm are used to generate unique maps of the chromospheric magnetic field vector across a sunspot and its superpenumbral canopy. The observations were acquired by the Facility Infrared Spectropolarimeter (FIRS) at the Dunn Solar Telescope (DST) on 29 January 2012. Multiple atmospheric models are employed in the inversions because superpenumbral Stokes profiles are dominated by atomic-level polarization, while sunspot profiles are Zeeman-dominated, but also exhibit signatures that might be induced by symmetry-breaking effects of the radiation field incident on the chromospheric material. We derive the equilibrium magnetic structure of a sunspot in the chromosphere and furthermore show that the superpenumbral magnetic field does not appear to be finely structured, unlike the observed intensity structure. This suggests that fibrils are not concentrations of magnetic flux, but are instead distinguished by individualized thermalization. We also directly compare our inverted values with a current-free extrapolation of the chromospheric field. With improved measurements in the future, the average shear angle between the inferred magnetic field and the potential field may offer a means to quantify the non-potentiality of the chromospheric magnetic field to study the onset of explosive solar phenomena.

  19. Interior Vector Magnetic Field Monitoring for the SNS Neutron EDM Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouri, Nima; Plaster, Brad

    2014-09-01

    A concept has been developed which provides for a real-time determination of the spatial dependence of the vector components of the magnetic field (and, hence, the ∂Bi / ∂xj field gradients) within the interior fiducial volume of the SNS neutron EDM experiment solely from exterior measurements at fixed discrete locations. This technique will be especially important during the operation of the experiment, when direct measurements of the field gradients present within the fiducial volume will not be physically possible. Our method, which is based on the solution to the Laplace Equation, is completely general and does not require the field to possess any type of symmetry. We describe the concept and our systematic approach for optimizing the locations of these exterior measurements. We also present results from prototyping studies of a field monitoring system deployed within a half-scale prototype of the experiment's magnetic field environment. A concept has been developed which provides for a real-time determination of the spatial dependence of the vector components of the magnetic field (and, hence, the ∂Bi / ∂xj field gradients) within the interior fiducial volume of the SNS neutron EDM experiment solely from exterior measurements at fixed discrete locations. This technique will be especially important during the operation of the experiment, when direct measurements of the field gradients present within the fiducial volume will not be physically possible. Our method, which is based on the solution to the Laplace Equation, is completely general and does not require the field to possess any type of symmetry. We describe the concept and our systematic approach for optimizing the locations of these exterior measurements. We also present results from prototyping studies of a field monitoring system deployed within a half-scale prototype of the experiment's magnetic field environment. This work was supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of

  20. On parasupersymmetric oscillators and relativistic vector mesons in constant magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Debergh, Nathalie; Beckers, Jules

    1995-01-01

    Johnson-Lippmann considerations on oscillators and their connection with the minimal coupling schemes are visited in order to introduce a new Sakata-Taketani equation describing vector mesons in interaction with a constant magnetic field. This new proposal, based on a specific parasupersymmetric oscillator-like system, is characterized by real energies as opposed to previously pointed out relativistic equations corresponding to this interacting context.

  1. An Automated Ambiguity-Resolution Code for Hinode/SP Vector Magnetic Field Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leka, K. D.; Barnes, G.; Crouch, A.

    2009-12-01

    A fast, automated algorithm is presented for use in resolving the 180° ambiguity in vector magnetic field data, including those data from Hinode/Spectropolarimeter. The Fortran-based code is loosely based on the Minimum Energy Algorithm, and is distributed to provide ambiguity-resolved data for the general user community. Here we generally describe the released code (available at http://www.cora.nwra.com/AMBIG), examples of its performance and usage for Hinode/SP data.

  2. Angular Distribution of Solar Wind Magnetic Field Vector at 1 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, F.; Li, G.; Zhao, L.; Zhang, Y.; Khabarova, O.; Miao, B.; le Roux, J.

    2015-03-01

    We study the angular distribution of the solar wind magnetic field vector at 1 AU and its solar cycle dependence using ACE observations. A total of twelve 27.27 day (the duration of a solar rotation) intervals during the solar maximum, the solar minimum, as well as the ascending and descending phases of solar cycle 23 are examined. For all selected intervals, we obtain the angular distribution function {{f}τ }(α ), where α is the angle between the instantaneous solar wind magnetic field vector and the average background magnetic field vector, and τ is the period length for the averaging. Our results show that in all periods {{f}τ }(α ) has two populations, one at small angles and one at large angles. We suggest that the second population is due to the presence of current sheets in the solar wind. The solar-cycle dependence of {{f}τ }(α ) and a τ-scaling property of the second population of {{f}τ }(α ) are discussed. The τ scaling shows a clear dependence on the solar wind type. The implication of {{f}τ }(α ) for particle acceleration at interplanetary shocks driven by coronal mass ejections, such as those in solar energetic particle events, is also discussed.

  3. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) Vector Magnetic Field Pipeline: SHARPs - Space-Weather HMI Active Region Patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobra, M. G.; Sun, X.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Turmon, M.; Liu, Y.; Hayashi, K.; Barnes, G.; Leka, K. D.

    2014-09-01

    A new data product from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) called Space-weather HMI Active Region Patches ( SHARPs) is now available. SDO/HMI is the first space-based instrument to map the full-disk photospheric vector magnetic field with high cadence and continuity. The SHARP data series provide maps in patches that encompass automatically tracked magnetic concentrations for their entire lifetime; map quantities include the photospheric vector magnetic field and its uncertainty, along with Doppler velocity, continuum intensity, and line-of-sight magnetic field. Furthermore, keywords in the SHARP data series provide several parameters that concisely characterize the magnetic-field distribution and its deviation from a potential-field configuration. These indices may be useful for active-region event forecasting and for identifying regions of interest. The indices are calculated per patch and are available on a twelve-minute cadence. Quick-look data are available within approximately three hours of observation; definitive science products are produced approximately five weeks later. SHARP data are available at jsoc.stanford.edu and maps are available in either of two different coordinate systems. This article describes the SHARP data products and presents examples of SHARP data and parameters.

  4. Interior Vector Magnetic Field Monitoring via External Measurements for the SNS Neutron EDM Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouri, Nima; Brown, Michael; Carr, Robert; Filippone, Bradley; Osthelder, Charles; Plaster, Bradley; Slutsky, Simon; Swank, Christopher

    2015-10-01

    A prototype of a magnetic field monitoring system designed to reconstruct the vector magnetic field components (and, hence, all nine of the ∂Bi / ∂xj field gradients) within the interior measurement fiducial volume solely from external measurements is under development for the SNS neutron EDM experiment. A first-generation room-temperature prototype array has already been tested. A second-generation prototype array consisting of 12 cryogenic-compatible fluxgate magnetometer probes will be deployed within the cold region of the experiment's 1 / 3 -scale cryogenic magnet testing apparatus. We will report progress towards the development of this second-generation prototype. This work was supported in part by the U. S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Physics under Award No. DE-FG02-08ER41557.

  5. COMPARISON OF FORCE-FREE CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELD MODELING USING VECTOR FIELDS FROM HINODE AND SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY

    SciTech Connect

    Thalmann, J. K.; Tiwari, S. K.; Wiegelmann, T.

    2013-05-20

    Photospheric magnetic vector maps from two different instruments are used to model the nonlinear force-free coronal magnetic field above an active region. We use vector maps inferred from polarization measurements of the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) and the Solar Optical Telescope's Spectropolarimeter (SP) on board Hinode. Besides basing our model calculations on HMI data, we use both SP data of original resolution and scaled down to the resolution of HMI. This allows us to compare the model results based on data from different instruments and to investigate how a binning of high-resolution data affects the model outcome. The resulting three-dimensional magnetic fields are compared in terms of magnetic energy content and magnetic topology. We find stronger magnetic fields in the SP data, translating into a higher total magnetic energy of the SP models. The net Lorentz forces of the HMI and SP lower boundaries verify their force-free compatibility. We find substantial differences in the absolute estimates of the magnetic field energy but similar relative estimates, e.g., the fraction of excess energy and of the flux shared by distinct areas. The location and extension of neighboring connectivity domains differ and the SP model fields tend to be higher and more vertical. Hence, conclusions about the magnetic connectivity based on force-free field models are to be drawn with caution. We find that the deviations of the model solution when based on the lower-resolution SP data are small compared to the differences of the solutions based on data from different instruments.

  6. Photospheric Vector Magnetic Field Evolution of NOAA Active Region 11504 and the Ensuing CME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Alexander; Green, Lucie; Valori, Gherardo; van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; Baker, Deborah; Brooks, David; Palmerio, Erika

    2016-05-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are eruptions of billions of tonnes of plasma from the Sun that drive the most severe space weather effects we observe. In order to be able to produce forecasts of space weather with lead times of the order of days, accurate predictions of the occurrence of CMEs must be developed. The eruptive active-region studied in this work (NOAA 11504) is complex, featuring fragmentation of penumbral magnetic field in the days prior to eruption, as well as rotation of the leading sunspot. SDO/HMI vector photospheric magnetic field measurements are utilised alongside SDO/AIA multi-wavelength extreme ultra-violet (EUV) observations to study the dynamics of the photospheric and coronal structures, as well as Hinode/EIS spectroscopic measurements, including elemental composition data. The EUV data show flare ribbons as well as coronal dimmings, which are used to infer the orientation of the erupting flux rope. This flux rope orientation is then compared to in situ measurements of the flux rope. The vector magnetic field data is used to determine the possible contributions the field fragmentation and sunspot rotation may have made to the formation of the flux rope and the triggering of the CME.

  7. Changes in measured vector magnetic fields when transformed into heliographic coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagyard, M. J.

    1987-01-01

    The changes that occur in measured magnetic fields when they are transformed into a heliographic coordinate system are investigated. To carry out this investigation, measurements of the vector magnetic field of an active region that was observed at 1/3 the solar radius from disk center are taken, and the observed field is transformed into heliographic coordinates. Differences in the calculated potential field that occur when the heliographic normal component of the field is used as the boundary condition rather than the observed line-of-sight component are also examined. The results of this analysis show: (1) that the observed fields of sunspots more closely resemble the generally accepted picture of the distribution of umbral fields if they are displayed in heliographic coordinates; (2) that the differences in the potential calculations are less than 200 G in field strength and 20 deg in field azimuth outside sunspots; and (3) that differences in the two potential calculations in the sunspot areas are no more than 400 G in field strength but range from 60 to 80 deg in field azimuth in localized umbral areas.

  8. OBSERVATIONAL EVIDENCE OF CHANGING PHOTOSPHERIC VECTOR MAGNETIC FIELDS ASSOCIATED WITH SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Su, J. T.; Jing, J.; Wang, H. M.; Mao, X. J.; Wang, X. F.; Zhang, H. Q.; Deng, Y. Y.; Guo, J.; Wang, G. P.

    2011-06-01

    Recent observations have provided evidence that the solar photospheric magnetic fields could have rapid and permanent changes in both longitudinal and transverse components associated with major flares. As a result, the Lorentz force (LF) acting on the solar photosphere and solar interior could be perturbed, and the change of LF is always nearly in the downward direction. However, these rapid and permanent changes have not been systematically investigated, yet, using vector magnetograms. In this paper, we analyze photospheric vector magnetograms covering five flares to study the evolution of photospheric magnetic fields. In particular, we investigate two-dimensional spatial distributions of the changing LF. Around the major flaring polarity inversion line, the net change of the LF is directed downward in an area of {approx}10{sup 19} cm{sup 2} for X-class flares. For all events, the white-light observations show that sunspots darken in this location after flares, and magnetic fields become more inclined, which is consistent with the ideas put forward by Hudson et al. and Fisher et al., and observations.

  9. Vector meson masses from a hidden local symmetry in a constant magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Mamiya; Matsuzaki, Shinya

    2016-06-01

    We discuss the magnetic responses of vector meson masses based on the hidden local symmetry (HLS) model in a constant magnetic field, described by the lightest two-flavor system including the pion, rho and omega mesons in the spectrum. The effective masses influenced under the magnetic field are evaluated according to the derivative or chiral expansion established in the HLS model. At the leading order O (p2), the g factor of the charged rho meson is fixed to be 2, implying that the rho meson at this order is treated just like a pointlike spin-1 particle. Beyond the leading order, one finds anomalous magnetic interactions of the charged rho meson, involving the anomalous magnetic moment, which give corrections to the effective mass. It is then suggested that up to O (p4) the charged rho meson tends to become massless. Of interest is that nontrivial magnetic dependence of neutral mesons emerges to give rise to the significant mixing among neutral mesons. Consequently, it leads to the dramatic enhancement of the omega meson mass, which is testable in future lattice simulations. Corrections from terms beyond O (p4) are also addressed.

  10. The Quiet Sun Magnetic Field Structure Derived from a Full Vector Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bommier, V.

    2011-04-01

    The magnetic field vector of the quiet Sun has been first determined by usual Milne-Eddington inversion of ZIMPOL/THEMIS data. But such an inversion provides the local average field only, i.e. the product of the field strength by the magnetic filling factor. To discriminate between both quantities, an additional method has to be provided. We proposed a direct but approached determination of the filling factor in the spectropolarimetric data themselves. Then we were able to derive the inhomogeneous magnetic field strength (i.e. disambiguated from the filling factor). The methods and results from the ZIMPOL/THEMIS data are now published (Bommier et al. 2009). The present paper is intended to show that the THEMIS/THEMIS data, 10 times more numerous, give the same results, validating thus the THEMIS polarimeter results with the ZIMPOL ones. But the main new result is that finally the inhomogeneous field strength is found clearly dependent on the field inclination angle, thus ruling out the hypothesis of a turbulent field. The corresponding field organization could be: thin scattered vertical tubes of strong field opening and weakening with height (in the photosphere). Thus the weak fields would be horizontally (2D) distributed rather than following their generally admitted 3D turbulent structure. This distribution is not incompatible with the Hanle effect observations, because the Hanle effect is insensitive to the vertical field. The distribution of the thin opening tubes remains to be quantized, but spatial horizontal correlations were observed, which suggests that their size would not be very small with respect to the observation pixel size of 0.2-0.5 arcsec.

  11. Z3 model of Saturns magnetic field and the Pioneer 11 vector helium magnetometer observations

    SciTech Connect

    Connerney, J.E.P.; Acuna, M.H.; Ness, N.F.

    1984-05-01

    Magnetic field observations obtained by the Pioneer 11 vector helium magnetometer are compared with the Z(sub 3) model magnetic field. These Pioneer 11 observations, obtained at close-in radial distances, constitute an important and independent test of the Z(sub 3) zonal harmonic model, which was derived from Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 fluxgate magnetometer observations. Differences between the Pioneer 11 magnetometer and the Z(sub 3) model field are found to be small (approximately 1%) and quantitatively consistent with the expected instrumental accuracy. A detailed examination of these differences in spacecraft payload coordinates shows that they are uniquely associated with the instrument frame of reference and operation. A much improved fit to the Pioneer 11 observations is obtained by rotation of the instrument coordinate system about the spacecraft spin axis by 1.4 degree. With this adjustment, possibly associated with an instrumental phase lag or roll attitude error, the Pioneer 11 vector helium magnetometer observations are fully consistent with the Voyager Z(sub 3) model.

  12. The Z3 model of Saturns magnetic field and the Pioneer 11 vector helium magnetometer observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Acuna, M. H.; Ness, N. F.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetic field observations obtained by the Pioneer 11 vector helium magnetometer are compared with the Z(sub 3) model magnetic field. These Pioneer 11 observations, obtained at close-in radial distances, constitute an important and independent test of the Z(sub 3) zonal harmonic model, which was derived from Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 fluxgate magnetometer observations. Differences between the Pioneer 11 magnetometer and the Z(sub 3) model field are found to be small (approximately 1%) and quantitatively consistent with the expected instrumental accuracy. A detailed examination of these differences in spacecraft payload coordinates shows that they are uniquely associated with the instrument frame of reference and operation. A much improved fit to the Pioneer 11 observations is obtained by rotation of the instrument coordinate system about the spacecraft spin axis by 1.4 degree. With this adjustment, possibly associated with an instrumental phase lag or roll attitude error, the Pioneer 11 vector helium magnetometer observations are fully consistent with the Voyager Z(sub 3) model.

  13. The Z3 model of Saturn's magnetic field and the Pioneer 11 vector helium magnetometer observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Acuna, M. H.; Ness, N. F.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetic field observations obtained by the Pioneer 11 vector helium magnetometer are compared with the Z(sub 3) model magnetic field. These Pioneer 11 observations, obtained at close-in radial distances, constitute an important and independent test of the Z(sub 3) zonal harmonic model, which was derived from Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 fluxgate magnetometer observations. Differences between the Pioneer 11 magnetometer and the Z(sub 3) model field are found to be small (approximately 1 percent) and quantitatively consistent with the expected instrumental accuracy. A detailed examination of these differences in spacecraft payload coordinates shows that they are uniquely associated with the instrument frame of reference and operation. A much improved fit to the Pioneer 11 observations is obtained by rotation of the instrument coordinate system about the spacecraft spin axis by 1.4 degree. With this adjustment, possibly associated with an instrumental phase lag or roll attitude error, the Pioneer 11 vector helium magnetometer observations are fully consistent with the Voyager Z(sub 3) model.

  14. Real time tests for long lead-time forecasting of the magnetic field vectors within CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savani, Neel; Vourlidas, Angelos; Pulkkinen, Antti; Wold, Alexandra M.

    2016-07-01

    The direction of magnetic vectors within coronal mass ejections, CMEs, has significant importance for forecasting terrestrial behavior. We have developed a technique to estimate the time-varying magnetic field at Earth for periods within CMEs (Savani et al 2015, 2016). This technique reduces the complex dynamics in order to create a reliable prediction methodology to operate everyday under robust conditions. In this presentation, we focus on the results and skill scores of the forecasting technique calculated from 40 historical CME events from the pre-STEREO mission. Since these results provided substantial improvements in the long lead-time Kp index forecasts, we have now begun testing under real-time conditions. We will also show the preliminary results of our methodology under these real-time conditions within the CCMC hosted at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.

  15. SOLAR FLARE PREDICTION USING SDO/HMI VECTOR MAGNETIC FIELD DATA WITH A MACHINE-LEARNING ALGORITHM

    SciTech Connect

    Bobra, M. G.; Couvidat, S.

    2015-01-10

    We attempt to forecast M- and X-class solar flares using a machine-learning algorithm, called support vector machine (SVM), and four years of data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory's Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager, the first instrument to continuously map the full-disk photospheric vector magnetic field from space. Most flare forecasting efforts described in the literature use either line-of-sight magnetograms or a relatively small number of ground-based vector magnetograms. This is the first time a large data set of vector magnetograms has been used to forecast solar flares. We build a catalog of flaring and non-flaring active regions sampled from a database of 2071 active regions, comprised of 1.5 million active region patches of vector magnetic field data, and characterize each active region by 25 parameters. We then train and test the machine-learning algorithm and we estimate its performances using forecast verification metrics with an emphasis on the true skill statistic (TSS). We obtain relatively high TSS scores and overall predictive abilities. We surmise that this is partly due to fine-tuning the SVM for this purpose and also to an advantageous set of features that can only be calculated from vector magnetic field data. We also apply a feature selection algorithm to determine which of our 25 features are useful for discriminating between flaring and non-flaring active regions and conclude that only a handful are needed for good predictive abilities.

  16. Influence of the vector interaction and an external magnetic field on the isentropes near the chiral critical end point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Pedro

    2016-06-01

    The location of the critical end point (CEP) and the isentropic trajectories in the QCD phase diagram are investigated. We use the (2 +1 ) Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model with the Polyakov loop coupling for different scenarios, namely by imposing zero strange quark density, which is the case in the ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions, and β equilibrium. The influence of strong magnetic fields and of the vector interaction on the isentropic trajectories around the CEP is discussed. It is shown that the vector interaction and the magnetic field, having opposite effects on the first-order transition, affect the isentropic trajectories differently: as the vector interaction increases, the first-order transition becomes weaker and the isentropes become smoother; when a strong magnetic field is considered, the first-order transition is strengthened and the isentropes are pushed to higher temperatures. No focusing of isentropes in region towards the CEP is seen.

  17. Observations of vector magnetic fields with a magneto-optic filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cacciani, Alessandro; Varsik, John; Zirin, Harold

    1990-01-01

    The use of the magnetooptic filter to observe solar magnetic fields in the potassium line at 7699 A is described. The filter has been used in the Big Bear videomagnetograph since October 23. It gives a high sensitivity and dynamic range for longitudnal magnetic fields and enables measurement of transverse magnetic fields using the sigma component. Examples of the observations are presented.

  18. Creating orbiting vorticity vectors in magnetic particle suspensions through field symmetry transitions–a route to multi-axis mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, James E.; Solis, Kyle Jameson

    2015-11-09

    It has recently been reported that two types of triaxial electric or magnetic fields can drive vorticity in dielectric or magnetic particle suspensions, respectively. The first type-symmetry -- breaking rational fields -- consists of three mutually orthogonal fields, two alternating and one dc, and the second type -- rational triads -- consists of three mutually orthogonal alternating fields. In each case it can be shown through experiment and theory that the fluid vorticity vector is parallel to one of the three field components. For any given set of field frequencies this axis is invariant, but the sign and magnitude of the vorticity (at constant field strength) can be controlled by the phase angles of the alternating components and, at least for some symmetry-breaking rational fields, the direction of the dc field. In short, the locus of possible vorticity vectors is a 1-d set that is symmetric about zero and is along a field direction. In this paper we show that continuous, 3-d control of the vorticity vector is possible by progressively transitioning the field symmetry by applying a dc bias along one of the principal axes. Such biased rational triads are a combination of symmetry-breaking rational fields and rational triads. A surprising aspect of these transitions is that the locus of possible vorticity vectors for any given field bias is extremely complex, encompassing all three spatial dimensions. As a result, the evolution of a vorticity vector as the dc bias is increased is complex, with large components occurring along unexpected directions. More remarkable are the elaborate vorticity vector orbits that occur when one or more of the field frequencies are detuned. As a result, these orbits provide the basis for highly effective mixing strategies wherein the vorticity axis periodically explores a range of orientations and magnitudes.

  19. Creating orbiting vorticity vectors in magnetic particle suspensions through field symmetry transitions-a route to multi-axis mixing.

    PubMed

    Martin, James E; Solis, Kyle J

    2016-01-28

    It has recently been reported that two types of triaxial electric or magnetic fields can drive vorticity in dielectric or magnetic particle suspensions, respectively. The first type-symmetry-breaking rational fields-consists of three mutually orthogonal fields, two alternating and one dc, and the second type-rational triads-consists of three mutually orthogonal alternating fields. In each case it can be shown through experiment and theory that the fluid vorticity vector is parallel to one of the three field components. For any given set of field frequencies this axis is invariant, but the sign and magnitude of the vorticity (at constant field strength) can be controlled by the phase angles of the alternating components and, at least for some symmetry-breaking rational fields, the direction of the dc field. In short, the locus of possible vorticity vectors is a 1-d set that is symmetric about zero and is along a field direction. In this paper we show that continuous, 3-d control of the vorticity vector is possible by progressively transitioning the field symmetry by applying a dc bias along one of the principal axes. Such biased rational triads are a combination of symmetry-breaking rational fields and rational triads. A surprising aspect of these transitions is that the locus of possible vorticity vectors for any given field bias is extremely complex, encompassing all three spatial dimensions. As a result, the evolution of a vorticity vector as the dc bias is increased is complex, with large components occurring along unexpected directions. More remarkable are the elaborate vorticity vector orbits that occur when one or more of the field frequencies are detuned. These orbits provide the basis for highly effective mixing strategies wherein the vorticity axis periodically explores a range of orientations and magnitudes. PMID:26549438

  20. Creating orbiting vorticity vectors in magnetic particle suspensions through field symmetry transitions–a route to multi-axis mixing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Martin, James E.; Solis, Kyle Jameson

    2015-11-09

    It has recently been reported that two types of triaxial electric or magnetic fields can drive vorticity in dielectric or magnetic particle suspensions, respectively. The first type-symmetry -- breaking rational fields -- consists of three mutually orthogonal fields, two alternating and one dc, and the second type -- rational triads -- consists of three mutually orthogonal alternating fields. In each case it can be shown through experiment and theory that the fluid vorticity vector is parallel to one of the three field components. For any given set of field frequencies this axis is invariant, but the sign and magnitude ofmore » the vorticity (at constant field strength) can be controlled by the phase angles of the alternating components and, at least for some symmetry-breaking rational fields, the direction of the dc field. In short, the locus of possible vorticity vectors is a 1-d set that is symmetric about zero and is along a field direction. In this paper we show that continuous, 3-d control of the vorticity vector is possible by progressively transitioning the field symmetry by applying a dc bias along one of the principal axes. Such biased rational triads are a combination of symmetry-breaking rational fields and rational triads. A surprising aspect of these transitions is that the locus of possible vorticity vectors for any given field bias is extremely complex, encompassing all three spatial dimensions. As a result, the evolution of a vorticity vector as the dc bias is increased is complex, with large components occurring along unexpected directions. More remarkable are the elaborate vorticity vector orbits that occur when one or more of the field frequencies are detuned. As a result, these orbits provide the basis for highly effective mixing strategies wherein the vorticity axis periodically explores a range of orientations and magnitudes.« less

  1. Magnetic potential, vector and gradient tensor fields of a tesseroid in a geocentric spherical coordinate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Jinsong; Chen, Chao; Lesur, Vincent; Lane, Richard; Wang, Huilin

    2015-06-01

    We examined the mathematical and computational aspects of the magnetic potential, vector and gradient tensor fields of a tesseroid in a geocentric spherical coordinate system (SCS). This work is relevant for 3-D modelling that is performed with lithospheric vertical scales and global, continent or large regional horizontal scales. The curvature of the Earth is significant at these scales and hence, a SCS is more appropriate than the usual Cartesian coordinate system (CCS). The 3-D arrays of spherical prisms (SP; `tesseroids') can be used to model the response of volumes with variable magnetic properties. Analytical solutions do not exist for these model elements and numerical or mixed numerical and analytical solutions must be employed. We compared various methods for calculating the response in terms of accuracy and computational efficiency. The methods were (1) the spherical coordinate magnetic dipole method (MD), (2) variants of the 3-D Gauss-Legendre quadrature integration method (3-D GLQI) with (i) different numbers of nodes in each of the three directions, and (ii) models where we subdivided each SP into a number of smaller tesseroid volume elements, (3) a procedure that we term revised Gauss-Legendre quadrature integration (3-D RGLQI) where the magnetization direction which is constant in a SCS is assumed to be constant in a CCS and equal to the direction at the geometric centre of each tesseroid, (4) the Taylor's series expansion method (TSE) and (5) the rectangular prism method (RP). In any realistic application, both the accuracy and the computational efficiency factors must be considered to determine the optimum approach to employ. In all instances, accuracy improves with increasing distance from the source. It is higher in the percentage terms for potential than the vector or tensor response. The tensor errors are the largest, but they decrease more quickly with distance from the source. In our comparisons of relative computational efficiency, we found

  2. A design of novel type superconducting magnet for super-high field functional magnetic resonance imaging by using the harmonic analysis method of magnetic vector potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zu, Dong-Lin; Guo, Hua; Song, Xiao-Yu; Bao, Shang-Lian

    2002-10-01

    The approach of expanding the magnetic scalar potential in a series of Legendre polynomials is suitable for designing a conventional superconducting magnetic resonance imaging magnet of distributed solenoidal configuration. Whereas the approach of expanding the magnetic vector potential in associated Legendre harmonics is suitable for designing a single-solenoid magnet that has multiple tiers, in which each tier may have multiple layers with different winding lengths. A set of three equations to suppress some of the lowest higher-order harmonics is found. As an example, a 4T single-solenoid magnetic resonance imaging magnet with 4×6 layers of superconducting wires is designed. The degree of homogeneity in the 0.5m diameter sphere volume is better than 5.8 ppm. The same degree of homogeneity is retained after optimal integralization of turns in each correction layer. The ratio Bm/B0 in the single-solenoid magnet is 30% lower than that in the conventional six-solenoid magnet. This tolerates higher rated superconducting current in the coil. The Lorentz force of the coil in the single-solenoid system is also much lower than in the six-solenoid system. This novel type of magnet possesses significant advantage over conventional magnets, especially when used as a super-high field functional magnetic resonance imaging magnet.

  3. Fractal vector optical fields.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yue; Gao, Xu-Zhen; Cai, Meng-Qiang; Zhang, Guan-Lin; Li, Yongnan; Tu, Chenghou; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2016-07-15

    We introduce the concept of a fractal, which provides an alternative approach for flexibly engineering the optical fields and their focal fields. We propose, design, and create a new family of optical fields-fractal vector optical fields, which build a bridge between the fractal and vector optical fields. The fractal vector optical fields have polarization states exhibiting fractal geometry, and may also involve the phase and/or amplitude simultaneously. The results reveal that the focal fields exhibit self-similarity, and the hierarchy of the fractal has the "weeding" role. The fractal can be used to engineer the focal field. PMID:27420485

  4. Flare activity, sunspot motions, and the evolution of vector magnetic fields in Hale region 17244

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neidig, Donald F.; Hagyard, Mona J.; Machado, Marcos E.; Smith, Jesse B., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The magnetic and dynamical circumstances leading to the 1B/M4 flare of November 5, 1980 are studied, and a strong association is found between the buildup of magnetic shear and the onset of flare activity within the active region. The development of shear, as observed directly in vector magnetograms, is consistent in detail with the dynamical history of the active region and identifies the precise location of the optical and hard-X-ray kernels of the flare emission.

  5. Effects of AC/DC magnetic fields, frequency, and nanoparticle aspect ratio on cellular transfection of gene vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Kris; Mair, Lamar; Fisher, Mike; Rowshon Alam, Md.; Juliano, Rudolph; Superfine, Richard

    2008-10-01

    In order to make non-viral gene delivery a useful tool in the study and treatment of genetic disorders, it is imperative that these methodologies be further refined to yield optimal results. Transfection of magnetic nanoparticles and nanorods are used as non-viral gene vectors to transfect HeLa EGFP-654 cells that stably express a mutated enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene. We deliver antisense oligonucleotides to these cells designed to correct the aberrant splicing caused by the mutation in the EGFP gene. We also transfect human bronchial endothelial cells and immortalized WI-38 lung cells with pEGFP-N1 vectors. To achieve this we bind the genes to magnetic nanoparticles and nanorods and introduce magnetic fields to effect transfection. We wish to examine the effects of magnetic fields on the transfection of these particles and the benefits of using alternating (AC) magnetic fields in improving transfection rates over direct (DC) magnetic fields. We specifically look at the frequency dependence of the AC field and particle aspect ratio as it pertains to influencing transfection rate. We posit that the increase in angular momentum brought about by the AC field and the high aspect ratio of the nanorod particles, is vital to generating the force needed to move the particle through the cell membrane.

  6. Magnetic field sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Nicolas

    2012-09-01

    Earlier papers1-3 in this journal have described experiments on measuring the magnetic fields of current-carrying wires and permanent magnets using magnetic field probes of various kinds. This paper explains how to use an iPad and the free app MagnetMeter-3D Vector Magnetometer and Accelerometer4 (compass HD) to measure the magnetic fields.

  7. Understanding Vector Fields.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curjel, C. R.

    1990-01-01

    Presented are activities that help students understand the idea of a vector field. Included are definitions, flow lines, tangential and normal components along curves, flux and work, field conservation, and differential equations. (KR)

  8. FIRST SYNOPTIC MAPS OF PHOTOSPHERIC VECTOR MAGNETIC FIELD FROM SOLIS/VSM: NON-RADIAL MAGNETIC FIELDS AND HEMISPHERIC PATTERN OF HELICITY

    SciTech Connect

    Gosain, S.; Pevtsov, A. A.; Rudenko, G. V.; Anfinogentov, S. A.

    2013-07-20

    We use daily full-disk vector magnetograms from Vector Spectromagnetograph on Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun system to synthesize the first Carrington maps of the photospheric vector magnetic field. We describe these maps and make a comparison of the observed radial field with the radial field estimate from line-of-sight magnetograms. Furthermore, we employ these maps to study the hemispheric pattern of current helicity density, H{sub c} , during the rising phase of solar cycle 24. The longitudinal average over the 23 consecutive solar rotations shows a clear signature of the hemispheric helicity rule, i.e., H{sub c} is predominantly negative in the north and positive in the south. Although our data include the early phase of cycle 24, there appears to be no evidence for a possible (systematic) reversal of the hemispheric helicity rule at the beginning of the cycle as predicted by some dynamo models. Furthermore, we compute the hemispheric pattern in active region latitudes (-30 Degree-Sign {<=} {theta} {<=} 30 Degree-Sign ) separately for weak (100 G < |B{sub r} | < 500 G) and strong (|B{sub r} | > 1000 G) radial magnetic fields. We find that while the current helicity of strong fields follows the well-known hemispheric rule (i.e., {theta} {center_dot} H{sub c} < 0), H{sub c} of weak fields exhibits an inverse hemispheric behavior (i.e., {theta} {center_dot} H{sub c} > 0), albeit with large statistical scatter. We discuss two plausible scenarios to explain the opposite hemispheric trend of helicity in weak and strong field regions.

  9. GLOBAL TWIST OF SUNSPOT MAGNETIC FIELDS OBTAINED FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION VECTOR MAGNETOGRAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, Sanjiv Kumar; Venkatakrishnan, P.; Sankarasubramanian, K. E-mail: pvk@prl.res.in

    2009-09-10

    The presence of fine structures in sunspot vector magnetic fields has been confirmed from Hinode as well as other earlier observations. We studied 43 sunspots based on the data sets taken from ASP/DLSP, Hinode (SOT/SP), and SVM (USO). In this Letter, (1) we introduce the concept of signed shear angle (SSA) for sunspots and establish its importance for non-force-free fields. (2) We find that the sign of global {alpha} (force-free parameter) is well correlated with that of the global SSA and the photospheric chirality of sunspots. (3) Local {alpha} patches of opposite signs are present in the umbra of each sunspot. The amplitude of the spatial variation of local {alpha} in the umbra is typically of the order of the global {alpha} of the sunspot. (4) We find that the local {alpha} is distributed as alternately positive and negative filaments in the penumbra. The amplitude of azimuthal variation of the local {alpha} in the penumbra is approximately an order of magnitude larger than that in the umbra. The contributions of the local positive and negative currents and {alpha} in the penumbra cancel each other giving almost no contribution for their global values for the whole sunspot. (5) Arc-like structures (partial rings) with a sign opposite to that of the dominant sign of {alpha} of the umbral region are seen at the umbral-penumbral boundaries of some sunspots. (6) Most of the sunspots studied belong to the minimum epoch of the 23rd solar cycle and do not follow the so-called hemispheric helicity rule.

  10. An investigation into the vector ellipticity of extremely low frequency magnetic fields from appliances in UK homes.

    PubMed

    Ainsbury, Elizabeth A; Conein, Emma; Henshaw, Denis L

    2005-07-01

    Elliptically polarized magnetic fields induce higher currents in the body compared with their plane polarized counterparts. This investigation examines the degree of vector ellipticity of extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MFs) in the home, with regard to the adverse health effects reportedly associated with ELF-MFs, for instance childhood leukaemia. Tri-axial measurements of the magnitude and phase of the 0-3000 Hz magnetic fields, produced by 226 domestic mains-fed appliances of 32 different types, were carried out in 16 homes in Worcestershire in the summer of 2004. Magnetic field strengths were low, with average (RMS) values of 0.03 +/- 0.02 microT across all residences. In contrast, background field ellipticities were high, on average 47 +/- 11%. Microwave and electric ovens produced the highest ellipticities: mean respective values of 21 +/- 21% and 21 +/- 17% were observed 20 cm away from these appliances. There was a negative correlation between field strength and field polarization, which we attribute to the higher relative field contribution close to each individual (single-phase) appliance. The measurements demonstrate that domestic magnetic fields are extremely complex and cannot simply be characterized by traditional measurements such as time-weighted average or peak exposure levels. We conclude that ellipticity should become a relevant metric for future epidemiological studies of health and ELF-MF exposure. PMID:15972990

  11. An investigation into the vector ellipticity of extremely low frequency magnetic fields from appliances in UK homes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ainsbury, Elizabeth A.; Conein, Emma; Henshaw, Denis L.

    2005-07-01

    Elliptically polarized magnetic fields induce higher currents in the body compared with their plane polarized counterparts. This investigation examines the degree of vector ellipticity of extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MFs) in the home, with regard to the adverse health effects reportedly associated with ELF-MFs, for instance childhood leukaemia. Tri-axial measurements of the magnitude and phase of the 0-3000 Hz magnetic fields, produced by 226 domestic mains-fed appliances of 32 different types, were carried out in 16 homes in Worcestershire in the summer of 2004. Magnetic field strengths were low, with average (RMS) values of 0.03 ± 0.02 µT across all residences. In contrast, background field ellipticities were high, on average 47 ± 11%. Microwave and electric ovens produced the highest ellipticities: mean respective values of 21 ± 21% and 21 ± 17% were observed 20 cm away from these appliances. There was a negative correlation between field strength and field polarization, which we attribute to the higher relative field contribution close to each individual (single-phase) appliance. The measurements demonstrate that domestic magnetic fields are extremely complex and cannot simply be characterized by traditional measurements such as time-weighted average or peak exposure levels. We conclude that ellipticity should become a relevant metric for future epidemiological studies of health and ELF-MF exposure. This work is supported by the charity CHILDREN with LEUKAEMIA, registered charity number 298405.

  12. High-resolution near-bottom vector magnetic anomalies over Raven Hydrothermal Field, Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tivey, Maurice A.; Johnson, H. Paul; Salmi, Marie S.; Hutnak, Michael

    2014-10-01

    High-resolution, near-bottom vector magnetic data were collected by remotely operated vehicle Jason over the Raven hydrothermal vent field (47°57.3'N 129°5.75'W) located north of Main Endeavour vent field on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The survey was part of a comprehensive heat flow study of the Raven site using innovative thermal blanket technology to map the heat flux and crustal fluid pathways around a solitary hydrothermal vent field. Raven hydrothermal activity is presently located along the western axial valley wall, while additional inactive hydrothermal deposits are found to the NW on the upper rift valley wall. Magnetic inversion results show discrete areas of reduced magnetization associated with both active and inactive hydrothermal vent deposits that also show high conductive heat flow. Higher spatial variability in the heat flow patterns compared to the magnetization is consistent with the heat flow reflecting the currently active but ephemeral thermal environment of fluid flow, while crustal magnetization is representative of the static time-averaged effect of hydrothermal alteration. A general NW to SE trend in reduced magnetization across the Raven area correlates closely with the distribution of hydrothermal deposits and heat flux patterns and suggests that the fluid circulation system at depth is likely controlled by local crustal structure and magma chamber geometry. Magnetic gradient tensor components computed from vector magnetic data improve the resolution of the magnetic anomaly source and indicate that the hydrothermally altered zone directly beneath the Raven site is approximately 15 × 106 m3 in volume.

  13. Three dimensional magnetic fields in extra high speed modified Lundell alternators computed by a combined vector-scalar magnetic potential finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demerdash, N. A.; Wang, R.; Secunde, R.

    1992-01-01

    A 3D finite element (FE) approach was developed and implemented for computation of global magnetic fields in a 14.3 kVA modified Lundell alternator. The essence of the new method is the combined use of magnetic vector and scalar potential formulations in 3D FEs. This approach makes it practical, using state of the art supercomputer resources, to globally analyze magnetic fields and operating performances of rotating machines which have truly 3D magnetic flux patterns. The 3D FE-computed fields and machine inductances as well as various machine performance simulations of the 14.3 kVA machine are presented in this paper and its two companion papers.

  14. On the Vector Tomographic Reconstruction for the pre-CME Coronal Magnetic Field from Fe XIII 10747 A Emission Line Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramar, Maxim; Lin, H.; Inhester, B.; Davila, J.

    2010-05-01

    Magnetic fields are the dominant fields that determine the static and dynamic properties of the solar corona. The coronal mass ejections (CMEs) involve the release of the magnetic energy stored in the magnetic field. Therefore, analyzing the magnetic field could help to understand the nature of CMEs. One of the more promising coronal magnetic field measurement methods that have been successfully demonstrated is the spectropolarimetric observations of the Fe XIII 10747 A forbidden emission line (Lin, Penn & Tomczyk 2000; Lin, Kuhn & Coulter 2004; Tomczyk et al. 2007) formed due to Hanle and Zeeman effects. However, these measurements are integrated over line-of-sight (LOS). Therefore it is impossible to determine the configuration of the coronal magnetic field from a single observation (single viewing direction). Vector tomography based on polarimetric observations of the forbidden coronal emission lines can reconstruct the coronal magnetic field when the observations are obtained from several viewing directions. As the tomography method requires observations from many directions, a rigid rotation of the coronal structures during a half of solar rotation is assumed. However, many pre-CME magnetic configurations evolve more rapidly causing significant reduce in the number of available observing directions. Here we study the sensitivity of the vector tomographic inversion to possible pre-CME coronal magnetic field configurations and the number of available observing directions. We show that the vector tomography techniques has the potential to resolve the 3D coronal non-potential magnetic field structure.

  15. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) Vector Magnetic Field Pipeline: Magnetohydrodynamics Simulation Module for the Global Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, K.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Liu, Y.; Bobra, M. G.; Sun, X. D.; Norton, A. A.

    2015-05-01

    Time-dependent three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulation modules are implemented at the Joint Science Operation Center (JSOC) of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The modules regularly produce three-dimensional data of the time-relaxed minimum-energy state of the solar corona using global solar-surface magnetic-field maps created from Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) full-disk magnetogram data. With the assumption of a polytropic gas with specific-heat ratio of 1.05, three types of simulation products are currently generated: i) simulation data with medium spatial resolution using the definitive calibrated synoptic map of the magnetic field with a cadence of one Carrington rotation, ii) data with low spatial resolution using the definitive version of the synchronic frame format of the magnetic field, with a cadence of one day, and iii) low-resolution data using near-real-time (NRT) synchronic format of the magnetic field on a daily basis. The MHD data available in the JSOC database are three-dimensional, covering heliocentric distances from 1.025 to 4.975 solar radii, and contain all eight MHD variables: the plasma density, temperature, and three components of motion velocity, and three components of the magnetic field. This article describes details of the MHD simulations as well as the production of the input magnetic-field maps, and details of the products available at the JSOC database interface. To assess the merits and limits of the model, we show the simulated data in early 2011 and compare with the actual coronal features observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the near-Earth in-situ data.

  16. Combined excitation of an optically detected magnetic resonance in nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond for precision measurement of the components of a magnetic field vector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vershovskii, A. K.; Dmitriev, A. K.

    2015-11-01

    We used synchronous radio-frequency excitation of three components of a hyperfine resonance line in the scheme of the vector sensor of a magnetic field based on optically detected magnetic resonance in the nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond crystal. As a result, for the first time, the sensitivity of order 1.5 nT Hz-1/2 in the frequency range of 0-100 Hz was reached in the crystal with a volume of 0.01 mm3 glued to the end of an optical fiber.

  17. Fast inversion of Zeeman line profiles using central moments. II. Stokes V moments and determination of vector magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mein, P.; Uitenbroek, H.; Mein, N.; Bommier, V.; Faurobert, M.

    2016-06-01

    Context. In the case of unresolved solar structures or stray light contamination, inversion techniques using four Stokes parameters of Zeeman profiles cannot disentangle the combined contributions of magnetic and nonmagnetic areas to the observed Stokes I. Aims: In the framework of a two-component model atmosphere with filling factor f, we propose an inversion method restricting input data to Q , U, and V profiles, thus overcoming ambiguities from stray light and spatial mixing. Methods: The V-moments inversion (VMI) method uses shifts SV derived from moments of V-profiles and integrals of Q2, U2, and V2 to determine the strength B and inclination ψ of a magnetic field vector through least-squares polynomial fits and with very few iterations. Moment calculations are optimized to reduce data noise effects. To specify the model atmosphere of the magnetic component, an additional parameter δ, deduced from the shape of V-profiles, is used to interpolate between expansions corresponding to two basic models. Results: We perform inversions of HINODE SOT/SP data for inclination ranges 0 <ψ< 60° and 120 <ψ< 180° for the 630.2 nm Fe i line. A damping coefficient is fitted to take instrumental line broadening into account. We estimate errors from data noise. Magnetic field strengths and inclinations deduced from VMI inversion are compared with results from the inversion codes UNNOFIT and MERLIN. Conclusions: The VMI inversion method is insensitive to the dependence of Stokes I profiles on the thermodynamic structure in nonmagnetic areas. In the range of Bf products larger than 200 G, mean field strengths exceed 1000 G and there is not a very significant departure from the UNNOFIT results because of differences between magnetic and nonmagnetic model atmospheres. Further improvements might include additional parameters deduced from the shape of Stokes V profiles and from large sets of 3D-MHD simulations, especially for unresolved magnetic flux tubes.

  18. Magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction for high-resolution bioimepedance imaging through vector source reconstruction under the static field of MRI magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Mariappan, Leo; Hu, Gang; He, Bin

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction (MAT-MI) is an imaging modality to reconstruct the electrical conductivity of biological tissue based on the acoustic measurements of Lorentz force induced tissue vibration. This study presents the feasibility of the authors' new MAT-MI system and vector source imaging algorithm to perform a complete reconstruction of the conductivity distribution of real biological tissues with ultrasound spatial resolution. Methods: In the present study, using ultrasound beamformation, imaging point spread functions are designed to reconstruct the induced vector source in the object which is used to estimate the object conductivity distribution. Both numerical studies and phantom experiments are performed to demonstrate the merits of the proposed method. Also, through the numerical simulations, the full width half maximum of the imaging point spread function is calculated to estimate of the spatial resolution. The tissue phantom experiments are performed with a MAT-MI imaging system in the static field of a 9.4 T magnetic resonance imaging magnet. Results: The image reconstruction through vector beamformation in the numerical and experimental studies gives a reliable estimate of the conductivity distribution in the object with a ∼1.5 mm spatial resolution corresponding to the imaging system frequency of 500 kHz ultrasound. In addition, the experiment results suggest that MAT-MI under high static magnetic field environment is able to reconstruct images of tissue-mimicking gel phantoms and real tissue samples with reliable conductivity contrast. Conclusions: The results demonstrate that MAT-MI is able to image the electrical conductivity properties of biological tissues with better than 2 mm spatial resolution at 500 kHz, and the imaging with MAT-MI under a high static magnetic field environment is able to provide improved imaging contrast for biological tissue conductivity reconstruction.

  19. Magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction for high-resolution bioimepedance imaging through vector source reconstruction under the static field of MRI magnet

    PubMed Central

    Mariappan, Leo; Hu, Gang; He, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction (MAT-MI) is an imaging modality to reconstruct the electrical conductivity of biological tissue based on the acoustic measurements of Lorentz force induced tissue vibration. This study presents the feasibility of the authors' new MAT-MI system and vector source imaging algorithm to perform a complete reconstruction of the conductivity distribution of real biological tissues with ultrasound spatial resolution. Methods: In the present study, using ultrasound beamformation, imaging point spread functions are designed to reconstruct the induced vector source in the object which is used to estimate the object conductivity distribution. Both numerical studies and phantom experiments are performed to demonstrate the merits of the proposed method. Also, through the numerical simulations, the full width half maximum of the imaging point spread function is calculated to estimate of the spatial resolution. The tissue phantom experiments are performed with a MAT-MI imaging system in the static field of a 9.4 T magnetic resonance imaging magnet. Results: The image reconstruction through vector beamformation in the numerical and experimental studies gives a reliable estimate of the conductivity distribution in the object with a ∼1.5 mm spatial resolution corresponding to the imaging system frequency of 500 kHz ultrasound. In addition, the experiment results suggest that MAT-MI under high static magnetic field environment is able to reconstruct images of tissue-mimicking gel phantoms and real tissue samples with reliable conductivity contrast. Conclusions: The results demonstrate that MAT-MI is able to image the electrical conductivity properties of biological tissues with better than 2 mm spatial resolution at 500 kHz, and the imaging with MAT-MI under a high static magnetic field environment is able to provide improved imaging contrast for biological tissue conductivity reconstruction. PMID:24506649

  20. A Search for Vector Magnetic Field Variations Associated with the M-Class Flares of 1991 June 10 in AR 6659

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagyard, Mona J.; Stark, B. A.; Venkatakrishnan, P.

    1998-01-01

    A careful analysis of a 6-hour time sequence of vector magnetograms of AR 6659, observed on 1991 June 10 with the MSFC vector magnetograph, has revealed only minor changes in the vector magnetic field azimuths in the vicinity of two M-class flares, and the association of these changes with the flares is not unambiguous. In this paper we present our analysis of the data which includes comparison of vector magnetograms prior to and during the flares, calculation of distributions of the rms variation of the azimuth at each pixel in the field of view of the active region, and examination of the variation with time of the azimuths at every pixel covered by the main flare emissions as observed with the H-alpha telescope coaligned with the vector magnetograph. We also present results of an analysis of evolutionary changes in the azimuth over the field of view of the active region.

  1. Experiments With Magnetic Vector Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the experimental apparatus and method for the study of magnetic vector potential (MVP). Includes a discussion of inherent errors in the calculations involved, precision of the results, and further applications of MVP. (GS)

  2. Solar Flare Forecasting Using Time Series of SDO/HMI Vector Magnetic Field Data and Machine Learning Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilonidis, Stathis; Bobra, Monica G.; Couvidat, Sebastien

    2015-04-01

    This project is motivated by the need to understand the physical mechanisms that generate solar flares, and assess whether reliable data-driven flare forecasts are possible. We build a flare forecasting model that takes into account the temporal evolution of the active regions and provides improved forecasts for the next 24 hours. We use SDO/HMI vector magnetic field data for all the flaring regions with magnitude M1.0 or higher that have been observed with HMI and several thousand non-flaring regions. Each region is characterized by hundreds of features, including physical properties, such as the current helicity and the Lorentz force, as well as parameters that describe the temporal evolution of these properties over a two-day interval, starting 3 days and ending 1 day before the flare eruption. All of these features were used to train a Support Vector Machine (SVM), which is a supervised machine learning method used in classification problems. The results show that the SVM algorithm can achieve a True Skill Statistic of 0.91, an accuracy of 0.985, and a Heidke skill score of 0.861, improving the results of Bobra and Couvidat (2015).

  3. Combined magnetic vector-scalar potential finite element computation of 3D magnetic field and performance of modified Lundell alternators in Space Station applications. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ren H.

    1991-01-01

    A method of combined use of magnetic vector potential (MVP) based finite element (FE) formulations and magnetic scalar potential (MSP) based FE formulations for computation of three-dimensional (3D) magnetostatic fields is developed. This combined MVP-MSP 3D-FE method leads to considerable reduction by nearly a factor of 3 in the number of unknowns in comparison to the number of unknowns which must be computed in global MVP based FE solutions. This method allows one to incorporate portions of iron cores sandwiched in between coils (conductors) in current-carrying regions. Thus, it greatly simplifies the geometries of current carrying regions (in comparison with the exclusive MSP based methods) in electric machinery applications. A unique feature of this approach is that the global MSP solution is single valued in nature, that is, no branch cut is needed. This is again a superiority over the exclusive MSP based methods. A Newton-Raphson procedure with a concept of an adaptive relaxation factor was developed and successfully used in solving the 3D-FE problem with magnetic material anisotropy and nonlinearity. Accordingly, this combined MVP-MSP 3D-FE method is most suited for solution of large scale global type magnetic field computations in rotating electric machinery with very complex magnetic circuit geometries, as well as nonlinear and anisotropic material properties.

  4. The effect of line damping, magneto-optics and parasitic light on the derivation of sunspot vector magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skumanich, A.; Lites, B. W.

    1985-01-01

    The least square fitting of Stokes observations of sunspots using a Milne-Eddington-Unno model appears to lead, in many circumstances, to various inconsistencies such as anomalously large doppler widths and, hence, small magnetic fields which are significantly below those inferred solely from the Zeeman splitting in the intensity profile. It is found that the introduction of additional physics into the model such as the inclusion of damping wings and magneto-optic birefrigence significantly improves the fit to Stokes parameters. Model fits excluding the intensity profile, i.e., of both magnitude as well as spectral shape of the polarization parameters alone, suggest that parasitic light in the intensity profile may also be a source of inconsistencies. The consequences of the physical changes on the vector properties of the field derived from the Fe I lambda 6173 line for the 17 November 1975 spot as well as on the thermodynamic state are discussed. A Doppler width delta lambda (D) - 25mA is bound to be consistent with a low spot temperature and microturbulence, and a damping constant of a = 0.2.

  5. Deep-sea magnetic vector anomalies over the Hakurei hydrothermal field and the Bayonnaise knoll caldera, Izu-Ogasawara arc, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honsho, Chie; Ura, Tamaki; Kim, Kangsoo

    2013-10-01

    We conducted deep-sea magnetic measurements using autonomous underwater vehicles in the Bayonnaise knoll caldera, the Izu-Ogasawara island arc, which hosts the large Hakurei hydrothermal field. We improved the conventional correction method applied for removing the effect of vehicle magnetization, thus greatly enhancing the precision of the resulting vector anomalies. The magnetization distribution obtained from the vector anomaly data shows a ˜2 km wide belt of high magnetization, trending NNW-SSE going through the caldera, and a low-magnetization zone ˜300 m by ˜500 m in area, extending over the Hakurei site. Comparison between the results obtained using the vector anomaly and the total intensity anomaly shows that the magnetic field is determined more accurately, especially in areas of sparse data distribution, when the vector anomaly rather than the total intensity anomaly is used. We suggest a geologically motivated model that basaltic volcanism associated with the back-arc rifting occurred after the formation of the caldera, resulting in the formation of the high-magnetization belt underneath the silicic caldera. The Hakurei hydrothermal field lies in the intersection of the basaltic volcanism belt and the caldera wall fault, suggesting a mechanism that hot water generated by the heat of the volcanic activity has been spouting out through the caldera wall fault. The deposit apparently extends beyond the low-magnetization zone, climbing up the caldera wall. This may indicate that hot water rising from the deep through the alteration zone is transported laterally when it comes near the seafloor along fissures and fractures in the caldera wall.

  6. Determination of the Rotation from Vector Magnetic Field Sensor System to Star Camera Head System using Quaternion Representation and GRIMM Inversion Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rother, Martin; Lesur, Vincent

    2010-05-01

    An important, but challenging task for the preparation of a reliable satellite magnetic field vector data set is the handling of the attitude information. Additionally to the Star Camera readings itself, the determination of the rotation between the system of coordinates linked to the magnetic field sensors and the attitude reference system of coordinates (i.e. Star Cameras) is essential. In principal the rotation angles should not vary with time, but it has been found for CHAMP that slightly adjusting these angles in time leads to an improved quality data set. These angles are usually expressed in Euler angles, but rotations can alternatively be described in a quaternion representation. Starting from the well established inversion scheme of the GRIMM geomagnetic model family, the calculation of the unknown rotation between an arbitrary system of coordinates linked to the magnetic data and the reference system of coordinates of the Star Cameras has been introduced using the plain quaternion representation. The quaternion representation is chosen because it avoids multiple solutions and is expected to improve numerical stability. The implementation is flexible enough to cover either only a rotation estimation given a magnetic field model, or a co-estimation of the rotation and the magnetic field model through an iterative approach. First we applied this upgraded scheme to noise free synthetic vector field data as a proof of concept. Then we applied the scheme to CHAMP vector magnetic field readings. The rotation estimation scheme, its convergence and stability have been evaluated. The agreement between our results and those of other modelers has been checked. With CHAMP in orbit for almost 10 years the full range of solar activity levels have been covered. The influence of local time and other environmental (i.e. solar activity) conditions have been investigated.

  7. Light scattering of rectangular slot antennas: parallel magnetic vector vs perpendicular electric vector.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dukhyung; Kim, Dai-Sik

    2016-01-01

    We study light scattering off rectangular slot nano antennas on a metal film varying incident polarization and incident angle, to examine which field vector of light is more important: electric vector perpendicular to, versus magnetic vector parallel to the long axis of the rectangle. While vector Babinet's principle would prefer magnetic field along the long axis for optimizing slot antenna function, convention and intuition most often refer to the electric field perpendicular to it. Here, we demonstrate experimentally that in accordance with vector Babinet's principle, the incident magnetic vector parallel to the long axis is the dominant component, with the perpendicular incident electric field making a small contribution of the factor of 1/|ε|, the reciprocal of the absolute value of the dielectric constant of the metal, owing to the non-perfectness of metals at optical frequencies. PMID:26740335

  8. Light scattering of rectangular slot antennas: parallel magnetic vector vs perpendicular electric vector

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dukhyung; Kim, Dai-Sik

    2016-01-01

    We study light scattering off rectangular slot nano antennas on a metal film varying incident polarization and incident angle, to examine which field vector of light is more important: electric vector perpendicular to, versus magnetic vector parallel to the long axis of the rectangle. While vector Babinet’s principle would prefer magnetic field along the long axis for optimizing slot antenna function, convention and intuition most often refer to the electric field perpendicular to it. Here, we demonstrate experimentally that in accordance with vector Babinet’s principle, the incident magnetic vector parallel to the long axis is the dominant component, with the perpendicular incident electric field making a small contribution of the factor of 1/|ε|, the reciprocal of the absolute value of the dielectric constant of the metal, owing to the non-perfectness of metals at optical frequencies. PMID:26740335

  9. Field Dependence of the Magnetic Propagation Vector of the Heavy Fermion Compound CeCu2Ge2 Studied by Neutron Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loewenhaupt, M.; Geselbracht, P.; Faulhaber, E.; Rotter, M.; Doerr, M.; Schmalzl, K.; Schneidewind, A.

    CeCu2Ge2, the counterpart of the heavy-fermion superconductor CeCu2Si2, exhibits an in-commensurate antiferromagnetically long-range ordered ground state with τ = (0.28 0.28 0.54) below TN = 4.15K. The magnetism is strongly affected by a Kondo screening of the Ce 4f-moments by conduction electrons. The similar energy scale of both, Kondo and exchange interactions, results in a complex magnetic phase diagram and gives rise to potential quantum critical phenomena at very low temperatures. We present elastic neutron diffraction data obtained on a CeCu2Ge2 single crystal employing the cold triple axis spectrometer PANDA at MLZ and the diffractometer D23 at ILL. The field dependence of the magnetic propagation vector was measured at T ≤ 400 mK in the [110]/[001] plane with vertical magnetic fields applied along [1¯10]. We observe a low-field incommensurate magnetic phase AF1, a first order phase transition around 7.8 T with the coexistence of two phases AF1 and AF2 with slightly different propagation vectors, the disappearance of AF1 at 8 T and the existence of AF2 up to 12 T with a possible modification at 10 T. At 12.6 T, yet still well below the value of 26 T of the saturation for magnetic fields in [110] direction, the AF2-type magnetic order is lost and magnetic intensities are not to be found at incommensurate positions in the [110]/[001] plane any more. These new results contradict a previously suggested scenario with a QCP located at 8 T and contribute new information to the B - T phase diagram of CeCu2Ge2 in [110] direction.

  10. Magnetic properties modeling of soft magnetic composite materials using two-dimensional vector hybrid hysteresis model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dandan; Liu, Fugui; Li, Yongjian; Zhao, Zhigang; Zhang, Changgeng; Yang, Qingxin

    2014-05-01

    A 2-D vector hybrid hysteresis model for a soft magnetic composite (SMC) material is established, which is combined with classical Preisach model and Stoner-Wohlfarth (S-W) model. The rotational magnetic properties of SMC materials were studied using the vector model, and the computed results were compared with the experimental measurement. It is shown that the vector hybrid model can effectively simulate the rotational magnetic properties under low magnetization fields.

  11. NONLINEAR FORCE-FREE FIELD EXTRAPOLATION OF A CORONAL MAGNETIC FLUX ROPE SUPPORTING A LARGE-SCALE SOLAR FILAMENT FROM A PHOTOSPHERIC VECTOR MAGNETOGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Chaowei; Wu, S. T.; Hu, Qiang; Feng, Xueshang E-mail: wus@uah.edu E-mail: fengx@spaceweather.ac.cn

    2014-05-10

    Solar filaments are commonly thought to be supported in magnetic dips, in particular, in those of magnetic flux ropes (FRs). In this Letter, based on the observed photospheric vector magnetogram, we implement a nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolation of a coronal magnetic FR that supports a large-scale intermediate filament between an active region and a weak polarity region. This result is a first, in the sense that current NLFFF extrapolations including the presence of FRs are limited to relatively small-scale filaments that are close to sunspots and along main polarity inversion lines (PILs) with strong transverse field and magnetic shear, and the existence of an FR is usually predictable. In contrast, the present filament lies along the weak-field region (photospheric field strength ≲ 100 G), where the PIL is very fragmented due to small parasitic polarities on both sides of the PIL and the transverse field has a low signal-to-noise ratio. Thus, extrapolating a large-scale FR in such a case represents a far more difficult challenge. We demonstrate that our CESE-MHD-NLFFF code is sufficient for the challenge. The numerically reproduced magnetic dips of the extrapolated FR match observations of the filament and its barbs very well, which strongly supports the FR-dip model for filaments. The filament is stably sustained because the FR is weakly twisted and strongly confined by the overlying closed arcades.

  12. Nonlinear Force-free Field Extrapolation of a Coronal Magnetic Flux Rope Supporting a Large-scale Solar Filament from a Photospheric Vector Magnetogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chaowei; Wu, S. T.; Feng, Xueshang; Hu, Qiang

    2014-05-01

    Solar filaments are commonly thought to be supported in magnetic dips, in particular, in those of magnetic flux ropes (FRs). In this Letter, based on the observed photospheric vector magnetogram, we implement a nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolation of a coronal magnetic FR that supports a large-scale intermediate filament between an active region and a weak polarity region. This result is a first, in the sense that current NLFFF extrapolations including the presence of FRs are limited to relatively small-scale filaments that are close to sunspots and along main polarity inversion lines (PILs) with strong transverse field and magnetic shear, and the existence of an FR is usually predictable. In contrast, the present filament lies along the weak-field region (photospheric field strength <~ 100 G), where the PIL is very fragmented due to small parasitic polarities on both sides of the PIL and the transverse field has a low signal-to-noise ratio. Thus, extrapolating a large-scale FR in such a case represents a far more difficult challenge. We demonstrate that our CESE-MHD-NLFFF code is sufficient for the challenge. The numerically reproduced magnetic dips of the extrapolated FR match observations of the filament and its barbs very well, which strongly supports the FR-dip model for filaments. The filament is stably sustained because the FR is weakly twisted and strongly confined by the overlying closed arcades.

  13. Magnetic Field, Density Current, and Lorentz Force Full Vector Maps of the NOAA 10808 Double Sunspot: Evidence of Strong Horizontal Current Flows in the Penumbra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bommier, V.; Landi Degl'Innocenti, E.; Schmieder, B.; Gelly, B.

    2011-04-01

    The context is that of the so-called “fundamental ambiguity” (also azimuth ambiguity, or 180° ambiguity) in magnetic field vector measurements: two field vectors symmetrical with respect to the line-of-sight have the same polarimetric signature, so that they cannot be discriminated. We propose a method to solve this ambiguity by applying the “simulated annealing” algorithm to the minimization of the field divergence, added to the longitudinal current absolute value, the line-of-sight derivative of the magnetic field being inferred by the interpretation of the Zeeman effect observed by spectropolarimetry in two lines formed at different depths. We find that the line pair Fe I λ 6301.5 and Fe I λ 6302.5 is appropriate for this purpose. We treat the example case of the δ-spot of NOAA 10808 observed on 13 September 2005 between 14:25 and 15:25 UT with the THEMIS telescope. Besides the magnetic field resolved map, the electric current density vector map is also obtained. A strong horizontal current density flow is found surrounding each spot inside its penumbra, associated to a non-zero Lorentz force centripetal with respect to the spot center (i.e., oriented towards the spot center). The current wrapping direction is found to depend on the spot polarity: clockwise for the positive polarity, counterclockwise for the negative one. This analysis is made possible thanks to the UNNOFIT2 Milne-Eddington inversion code, where the usual theory is generalized to the case of a line Fe I λ 6301.5) that is not a normal Zeeman triplet line (like Fe I λ 6302.5).

  14. Initial vector magnetic anomaly map from Magsat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langel, R. A.; Schnetzler, C. C.; Phillips, J. D.; Horner, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Global magnetic component anomaly field maps have been derived from the Magsat vector magnetometer data obtained from November 1979 through May 1980. The amplitude of variations of the components over the maps are between 10 and 15 nT, well above the noise in the data. Averaged data, in 2-by-2 deg blocks, exhibit standard errors of the mean of about 1 nT over most of the X and Z maps, and about 2 nT over most of the Y maps. Errors rise to about twice these amounts near the auroral belts. Most of the anomalies in the component data are consistent with a crustal magnetization model which incorporates dipoles aligned only in the direction of the main field. However, there appear to be some regions which require dipoles aligned in some other direction i.e., remanent magnetization.

  15. Combining Linear Polarization Measurements of both Forbidden/Permitted Coronal Emission Lines for measuring the Vector Magnetic Field in the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dima, G. I.; Kuhn, J. R.; Mickey, D.

    2014-12-01

    Measuring the coronal vector magnetic field is still a major challenge in solar physics. This is due to the intrinsic weakness of the field (~4 G at a height of 0.1 Rsun above an active region) and the large thermal broadening of coronal emission lines. Current methods deduce either the direction of the magnetic field or the magnetic flux density. We propose using concurrent linear polarization measurements in the near IR of forbidden and permitted lines to calculate the coronal vector magnetic field. The effect of the magnetic field on the polarization properties of emitted light is encapsulated in the Hanle effect. In the unsaturated Hanle regime both the direction and strength of the magnetic field affect the linear polarization, while for saturated Hanle the polarization is insensitive to the strength of the field. Coronal forbidden lines are always in the saturated Hanle regime so the linear polarization holds no information on the strength of the field. By pairing measurements of both forbidden and permitted lines we would be able to obtain both the direction and strength of the field. The near-IR region of the spectrum offers the opportunity to study this problem from the ground. The FeXIII 1.075 um and SiX 1.431 um forbidden lines are strongly polarizable and are sufficiently bright over a large field of view (out to 1.5 Rsun). Measurements of both these lines can be paired up with the recently observed coronal HeI 1.083 um permitted line. The first data set used to test this technique was taken during the March 29, 2006 total solar eclipse and consisted of near-IR spectra covering the spectral region 0.9-1.8 um, with a field of view of 3 x 3 Rsun. The data revealed unexpectedly strong SiX emission compared to FeXIII. Using the HAO FORWARD suite of codes we produced simulated emission maps from a global HMD model for the day of the eclipse. Comparing the intensity variation of the measurements and the model we predict that SiX emission is more extended for

  16. Manipulation of p-wave scattering of cold atoms in low dimensions using the magnetic field vector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Shi-Guo; Tan, Shina; Jiang, Kaijun

    2014-03-01

    It is well known that the magnetic Feshbach resonances of cold atoms are sensitive to the magnitude of the external magnetic field. Much less attention has been paid to the direction of such a field. In this work we calculate the scattering properties of spin polarized fermionic atoms in reduced dimensions, near a p-wave Feshbach resonance. Because of spatial anisotropy of the p-wave interaction, the scattering has nontrivial dependence on both the magnitude and the direction of the magnetic field. In addition, we identify an inelastic scattering process which is impossible in the isotropic-interaction model; the rate of this process depends considerably on the direction of the magnetic field. Significantly, an EPR entangled pair of identical fermions may be produced during this inelastic collision. This work opens a new method to manipulate resonant cold atomic interactions. CPSF (Grant No. 2012M510187), Special Financial Grant from CPSF (Grant No. 2013T60762), the NSFC projects (Grant No. 11004224 and No.11204355) and the NFRP- China (Grant No. 2011CB921601), NSF (Grant No. PHY-1068511), Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

  17. Satellite to study earth's magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The Magnetic Field Satellite (Magsat) designed to measure the near earth magnetic field and crustal anomalies is briefly described. A scalar magnetometer to measure the magnitude of the earth's crustal magnetic field and a vector magnetometer to measure magnetic field direction as well as magnitude are included. The mission and its objectives are summarized along with the data collection and processing system.

  18. Magnetosheath for almost-aligned solar wind magnetic field and flow vectors: Windobservations across the dawnside magnetosheath at X = -12 Re

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrugia, Charles

    While there are many approximations describing the flow of the solar wind past the mag-netosphere in the magnetosheath, the case of perfectly aligned (parallel or anti-parallel) in-terplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and solar wind flow vectors can be treated exactly in an magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) approach (Spreiter and Rizzi, 1974). In this work we examine a case of nearly-opposed (to within 15 deg) interplanetary field and flow vectors, which occurred on October 24-25, 2001 during passage of the last interplanetary coronal mass ejection in an ejecta merger. Interplanetary data are from the ACE spacecraft. Simultaneously Wind was crossing the near-Earth (X -13 Re) geomagnetic tail and subsequently made a 5-hour-long magnetosheath crossing close to the ecliptic plane (Z = -0.7 Re). Geomagnetic activity was returning steadily to quiet, "ground" conditions. We first compare the predictions of the Spre-iter and Rizzi theory with the Wind magnetosheath observations and find fair agreement, in particular as regards the proportionality of the magnetic field strength and the product of the plasma density and bulk speed. We then carry out a small-perturbation analysis of the Spreiter and Rizzi solution to account for the small IMF components perpendicular to the flow vector. The resulting expression is compared to the time series of the observations and satisfactory agreement is obtained. We also present and discuss observations in the dawnside boundary layer of pulsed, high-speed (v 600 km/s) flows exceeding the solar wind flow speeds. We examine various generating mechanisms and suggest that the most likely causeis a wave of frequency 3.2 mHz excited at the inner edge of the boundary layer.

  19. Representation of magnetic fields in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, D. P.

    1975-01-01

    Several methods by which a magnetic field in space can be represented are reviewed with particular attention to problems of the observed geomagnetic field. Time dependence is assumed to be negligible, and five main classes of representation are described by vector potential, scalar potential, orthogonal vectors, Euler potentials, and expanded magnetic field.

  20. Vector fields in holographic cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    B. Hartle, James; Hawking, S. W.; Hertog, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    We extend the holographic formulation of the semiclassical no-boundary wave function (NBWF) to models with Maxwell vector fields. It is shown that the familiar saddle points of the NBWF have a representation in which a regular, Euclidean asymptotic AdS geometry smoothly joins onto a Lorentzian asymptotically de Sitter universe through a complex transition region. The tree level probabilities of Lorentzian histories are fully specified by the action of the AdS region of the saddle points. The scalar and vector matter profiles in this region are complex from an AdS viewpoint, with universal asymptotic phases. The dual description of the semiclassical NBWF thus involves complex deformations of Euclidean CFTs.

  1. Visualizing vector field topology in fluid flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helman, James L.; Hesselink, Lambertus

    1991-01-01

    Methods of automating the analysis and display of vector field topology in general and flow topology in particular are discussed. Two-dimensional vector field topology is reviewed as the basis for the examination of topology in three-dimensional separated flows. The use of tangent surfaces and clipping in visualizing vector field topology in fluid flows is addressed.

  2. Vector field theories in cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Tartaglia, A.; Radicella, N.

    2007-10-15

    Recently proposed theories based on the cosmic presence of a vectorial field are compared and contrasted. In particular the so-called Einstein aether theory is discussed in parallel with a recent proposal of a strained space-time theory (cosmic defect theory). We show that the latter fits reasonably well the cosmic observed data with only one, or at most two, adjustable parameters, while other vector theories use much more. The Newtonian limits are also compared. Finally we show that the cosmic defect theory may be considered as a special case of the aether theories, corresponding to a more compact and consistent paradigm.

  3. Introduction to Vector Field Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David; Shen, Han-Wei

    2010-01-01

    Vector field visualization techniques are essential to help us understand the complex dynamics of flow fields. These can be found in a wide range of applications such as study of flows around an aircraft, the blood flow in our heart chambers, ocean circulation models, and severe weather predictions. The vector fields from these various applications can be visually depicted using a number of techniques such as particle traces and advecting textures. In this tutorial, we present several fundamental algorithms in flow visualization including particle integration, particle tracking in time-dependent flows, and seeding strategies. For flows near surfaces, a wide variety of synthetic texture-based algorithms have been developed to depict near-body flow features. The most common approach is based on the Line Integral Convolution (LIC) algorithm. There also exist extensions of LIC to support more flexible texture generations for 3D flow data. This tutorial reviews these algorithms. Tensor fields are found in several real-world applications and also require the aid of visualization to help users understand their data sets. Examples where one can find tensor fields include mechanics to see how material respond to external forces, civil engineering and geomechanics of roads and bridges, and the study of neural pathway via diffusion tensor imaging. This tutorial will provide an overview of the different tensor field visualization techniques, discuss basic tensor decompositions, and go into detail on glyph based methods, deformation based methods, and streamline based methods. Practical examples will be used when presenting the methods; and applications from some case studies will be used as part of the motivation.

  4. Carrier-impurity spin transfer dynamics in paramagnetic II-VI diluted magnetic semiconductors in the presence of a wave-vector-dependent magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cygorek, M.; Tamborenea, P. I.; Axt, V. M.

    2016-05-01

    Quantum kinetic equations of motion for carrier and impurity spins in paramagnetic II-VI diluted magnetic semiconductors in a k -dependent effective magnetic field are derived, where the carrier-impurity correlations are taken into account. In the Markov limit, rates for the electron-impurity spin transfer can be derived for electron spins parallel and perpendicular to the impurity spins corresponding to measurable decay rates in Kerr experiments in Faraday and Voigt geometry. Our rigorous microscopic quantum kinetic treatment automatically accounts for the fact that, in an individual spin flip-flop scattering process, a spin flip of an electron is necessarily accompanied by a flop of an impurity spin in the opposite direction and the corresponding change of the impurity Zeeman energy influences the final energy of the electron after the scattering event. This shift in the electron energies after a spin flip-flop scattering process, which usually has been overlooked in the literature, turns out to be especially important in the case of extremely diluted magnetic semiconductors in an external magnetic field. As a specific example for a k -dependent effective magnetic field the effects of a Rashba field on the dynamics of the carrier-impurity correlations in a Hg1 -x -yCdyMnxTe quantum well are described. It is found that, although accounting for the Rashba interaction in the dynamics of the correlations leads to a modified k -space dynamics, the time evolution of the total carrier spin is not significantly influenced. Furthermore, a connection between the present theory and the description of collective carrier-impurity precession modes is presented.

  5. Analysis of lithospheric magnetization in vector spherical harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubbins, D.; Ivers, D.; Masterton, S. M.; Winch, D. E.

    2011-10-01

    The lithospheric contribution to the geomagnetic field arises from magnetized rocks in a thin shell at the Earth's surface. The lithospheric field can be calculated as an integral of the distribution of magnetization using standard results from potential theory. Inversion of the magnetic field for the magnetization suffers from a fundamental non-uniqueness: many important distributions of magnetization yield no potential magnetic field outside the shell. We represent the vertically integrated magnetization (VIM) in terms of vector spherical harmonics that are new to geomagnetism. These vector functions are orthogonal and complete over the sphere: one subset (?) represents the part of the magnetization that produces a potential field outside the shell, the observed field; another subset (?) produces a potential field exclusively inside the shell; and a third, toroidal, subset (?) produces no potential field at all. ? and ? together span the null space of the inverse problem for magnetization with perfect, complete data. We apply the theory to a recent global model of VIM, give an efficient algorithm for finding the lithospheric field, and show that our model of magnetization is dominated by ?, the part producing a potential field inside the shell. This is largely because, to a first approximation, the model was formed by magnetizing a shell with a substantial uniform component by an potential field originating inside the shell. The null space for inversion of lithospheric magnetic anomaly data for VIM is therefore huge. It can be reduced if the magnetization is assumed to be induced by a known inducing field, but the null space for susceptibility is not so easily recovered.

  6. Hysteresis in rotation magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanyi, Amalia

    2000-01-01

    The different properties of the vector Jiles-Atherton hysteresis operator is proved under forced H- and B-field supply. Feeding the magnetic material with alternating and circular polarised rotational excitation, the different properties of the model under the input field intensity and the flux density are investigated and the results are proved in figures.

  7. The magnetic field investigation on Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balogh, A.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Southwood, D. J.; Musmann, G.; Luhr, H.; Neubauer, F. M.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Riedler, W.; Heyn, M. F.; Acuna, M. H.

    1988-01-01

    The magnetic field investigation of the Cluster four-spacecraft mission is designed to provide intercalibrated measurements of the B magnetic field vector. The instrumentation and data processing of the mission are discussed. The instrumentation is identical on the four spacecraft. It consists of two triaxial fluxgate sensors and of a failure tolerant data processing unit. The combined analysis of the four spacecraft data will yield such parameters as the current density vector, wave vectors, and the geometry and structure of discontinuities.

  8. The MAVEN Magnetic Field Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Espley, J.; Lawton, P.; Murphy, S.; Odom, J.; Oliversen, R.; Sheppard, D.

    2014-01-01

    The MAVEN magnetic field investigation is part of a comprehensive particles and fields subsystem that will measure the magnetic and electric fields and plasma environment of Mars and its interaction with the solar wind. The magnetic field instrumentation consists of two independent tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer sensors, remotely mounted at the outer extremity of the two solar arrays on small extensions ("boomlets"). The sensors are controlled by independent and functionally identical electronics assemblies that are integrated within the particles and fields subsystem and draw their power from redundant power supplies within that system. Each magnetometer measures the ambient vector magnetic field over a wide dynamic range (to 65,536 nT per axis) with a quantization uncertainty of 0.008 nT in the most sensitive dynamic range and an accuracy of better than 0.05%. Both magnetometers sample the ambient magnetic field at an intrinsic sample rate of 32 vector samples per second. Telemetry is transferred from each magnetometer to the particles and fields package once per second and subsequently passed to the spacecraft after some reformatting. The magnetic field data volume may be reduced by averaging and decimation, when necessary to meet telemetry allocations, and application of data compression, utilizing a lossless 8-bit differencing scheme. The MAVEN magnetic field experiment may be reconfigured in flight to meet unanticipated needs and is fully hardware redundant. A spacecraft magnetic control program was implemented to provide a magnetically clean environment for the magnetic sensors and the MAVEN mission plan provides for occasional spacecraft maneuvers - multiple rotations about the spacecraft x and z axes - to characterize spacecraft fields and/or instrument offsets in flight.

  9. The MAVEN Magnetic Field Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Espley, J.; Lawton, P.; Murphy, S.; Odom, J.; Oliversen, R.; Sheppard, D.

    2015-12-01

    The MAVEN magnetic field investigation is part of a comprehensive particles and fields subsystem that will measure the magnetic and electric fields and plasma environment of Mars and its interaction with the solar wind. The magnetic field instrumentation consists of two independent tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer sensors, remotely mounted at the outer extremity of the two solar arrays on small extensions ("boomlets"). The sensors are controlled by independent and functionally identical electronics assemblies that are integrated within the particles and fields subsystem and draw their power from redundant power supplies within that system. Each magnetometer measures the ambient vector magnetic field over a wide dynamic range (to 65,536 nT per axis) with a resolution of 0.008 nT in the most sensitive dynamic range and an accuracy of better than 0.05 %. Both magnetometers sample the ambient magnetic field at an intrinsic sample rate of 32 vector samples per second. Telemetry is transferred from each magnetometer to the particles and fields package once per second and subsequently passed to the spacecraft after some reformatting. The magnetic field data volume may be reduced by averaging and decimation, when necessary to meet telemetry allocations, and application of data compression, utilizing a lossless 8-bit differencing scheme. The MAVEN magnetic field experiment may be reconfigured in flight to meet unanticipated needs and is fully hardware redundant. A spacecraft magnetic control program was implemented to provide a magnetically clean environment for the magnetic sensors and the MAVEN mission plan provides for occasional spacecraft maneuvers—multiple rotations about the spacecraft x and z axes—to characterize spacecraft fields and/or instrument offsets in flight.

  10. Interpolation of vector fields from human cardiac DT-MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, F.; Zhu, Y. M.; Rapacchi, S.; Luo, J. H.; Robini, M.; Croisille, P.

    2011-03-01

    There has recently been increased interest in developing tensor data processing methods for the new medical imaging modality referred to as diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI). This paper proposes a method for interpolating the primary vector fields from human cardiac DT-MRI, with the particularity of achieving interpolation and denoising simultaneously. The method consists of localizing the noise-corrupted vectors using the local statistical properties of vector fields, removing the noise-corrupted vectors and reconstructing them by using the thin plate spline (TPS) model, and finally applying global TPS interpolation to increase the resolution in the spatial domain. Experiments on 17 human hearts show that the proposed method allows us to obtain higher resolution while reducing noise, preserving details and improving direction coherence (DC) of vector fields as well as fiber tracking. Moreover, the proposed method perfectly reconstructs azimuth and elevation angle maps.

  11. Ellipsoid flowed around by a harmonic vector field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savchenko, A. O.; Savchenko, O. Ya.

    2012-03-01

    We consider the screening of an external magnetic field in which a superconducting ellipsoid is inserted and a change in the velocity distribution in an ideal liquid flowing around an ellipsoid inserted in it. In both cases, the solution is given by a harmonic vector field parallel to the surface near the ellipsoid.

  12. Clifford Fourier transform on vector fields.

    PubMed

    Ebling, Julia; Scheuermann, Gerik

    2005-01-01

    Image processing and computer vision have robust methods for feature extraction and the computation of derivatives of scalar fields. Furthermore, interpolation and the effects of applying a filter can be analyzed in detail and can be advantages when applying these methods to vector fields to obtain a solid theoretical basis for feature extraction. We recently introduced the Clifford convolution, which is an extension of the classical convolution on scalar fields and provides a unified notation for the convolution of scalar and vector fields. It has attractive geometric properties that allow pattern matching on vector fields. In image processing, the convolution and the Fourier transform operators are closely related by the convolution theorem and, in this paper, we extend the Fourier transform to include general elements of Clifford Algebra, called multivectors, including scalars and vectors. The resulting convolution and derivative theorems are extensions of those for convolution and the Fourier transform on scalar fields. The Clifford Fourier transform allows a frequency analysis of vector fields and the behavior of vector-valued filters. In frequency space, vectors are transformed into general multivectors of the Clifford Algebra. Many basic vector-valued patterns, such as source, sink, saddle points, and potential vortices, can be described by a few multivectors in frequency space. PMID:16138556

  13. Preflare magnetic and velocity fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagyard, M. J.; Gaizauskas, V.; Chapman, G. A.; Deloach, A. C.; Gary, G. A.; Jones, H. P.; Karpen, J. T.; Martres, M.-J.; Porter, J. G.; Schmeider, B.

    1986-01-01

    A characterization is given of the preflare magnetic field, using theoretical models of force free fields together with observed field structure to determine the general morphology. Direct observational evidence for sheared magnetic fields is presented. The role of this magnetic shear in the flare process is considered within the context of a MHD model that describes the buildup of magnetic energy, and the concept of a critical value of shear is explored. The related subject of electric currents in the preflare state is discussed next, with emphasis on new insights provided by direct calculations of the vertical electric current density from vector magnetograph data and on the role of these currents in producing preflare brightenings. Results from investigations concerning velocity fields in flaring active regions, describing observations and analyses of preflare ejecta, sheared velocities, and vortical motions near flaring sites are given. This is followed by a critical review of prevalent concepts concerning the association of flux emergence with flares

  14. Vector fields and Loop Quantum Cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Artymowski, Michał; Lalak, Zygmunt E-mail: Zygmunt.Lalak@fuw.edu.pl

    2011-09-01

    In the context of the Loop Quantum Cosmology we have analysed the holonomy correction to the classical evolution of the simplified Bianchi I model in the presence of vector fields. For the Universe dominated by a massive vector field or by a combination of a scalar field and a vector field a smooth transition between Kasner-like and Kasner-unlike solutions for a Bianchi I model has been demonstrated. In this case a lack of initial curvature singularity and a finite maximal energy density appear already at the level of General Relativity, which simulates a classical Big Bounce.

  15. Magnetization strucrure of thermal vent on island arc from vector magnetic anomlies using AUV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isezaki, N.; Matsuo, J.; Sayanagi, K.

    2012-04-01

    The geomagnetic anomaly measured by a scalar magnetometer,such as a proton precession magnetometer cannot be defined its direction, then it does not satisfy the Laplace's equation. Therefore physical formula describing the relation between magnetic field and magnetization cannot be established.Because the difference between results obtained from scalar data and from vector data is very significant, we must use vector magnetic field data for magnetization analyses to get the more reliable and exact solutions. The development program of fundamental tools for exploration of deep seabed resources started with the financial support of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science & Technology (MEXT) in 2008 and will end in 2012. In this project, we are developing magnetic exploration tools for seabed resources using AUV (Autonomous Underwater Vehicle) and other deep-towed vehicles to measure not the scalar magnetic field but the vector magnetic field in order to estimate magnetization structure below the sea-floor exactly and precisely. We conducted AUV magnetic survey in 2010 at the thermal area called Hakurei deposit in the Bayonnaise submarine caldera at the southern end of Izu island arc, about 400km south of Tokyo. We analyzed the observed vector magnetic fields to get the vector magnetic anomaly Fields using the method of Isezaki(1984). We inverted these vector magnetic anomaly fields to magnetization structure. CONCLUSIONS 1.The scalar magnetic field TIA (Total Intensity Anomaly) has no physical formula describing the relation between M (Magnetization) and TIA because TIA does not satisfy the Laplace's equation. Then it is impossible to estimate M from TIA. 2.Anlyses of M using TIA have been done so far under assumption TIA=PTA (Projected Total Anomay on MF (Main Geomagnetic Field)), however, which caused the analysis error due to ɛT= TIA - PTA . 3.We succeeded to measure the vector magnetic anomaly fields using AUV despite the severe magnetic noises

  16. Magsat vector magnetometer calibration using Magsat geomagnetic field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lancaster, E. R.; Jennings, T.; Morrissey, M.; Langel, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    From the time of its launch on Oct. 30, 1979 into a nearly polar, Sun synchronous orbit, until it reentered the Earth's atmosphere on June 11, 1980, Magsat measured and transmitted more than three complete sets of global magnetic field data. The data obtained from the mission will be used primarily to compute a currently accurate model of the Earth's main magnetic field, to update and refine world and regional magnetic charts, and to develop a global scalar and vector crustal magnetic anomaly map. The in-flight calibration procecure used for 39 vector magnetometer system parameters is described as well as results obtained from some data sets and the numerical studies designed to evaluate the results.

  17. Imaging vector fields using Line Integral Convolution

    SciTech Connect

    Cabral, B.; Leedom, L.C.

    1993-03-01

    Imaging vector fields has applications in science, art, image processing and special effects. An effective new approach is to use linear and curvilinear filtering techniques to locally blur textures along a vector field. This approach builds on several previous texture generation and filtering techniques. It is, however, unique because it is local, one-dimensional and independent of any predefined geometry or texture. The technique is general and capable of imaging arbitrary two- and three-dimensional vector fields. The local one-dimensional nature of the algorithm lends itself to highly parallel and efficient implementations. Furthermore, the curvilinear filter is capable of rendering detail on very intricate vector fields. Combining this technique with other rendering and image processing techniques -- like periodic motion filtering -- results in richly informative and striking images. The technique can also produce novel special effects.

  18. Killing vector fields and harmonic superfield theories

    SciTech Connect

    Groeger, Josua

    2014-09-15

    The harmonic action functional allows a natural generalisation to semi-Riemannian supergeometry, also referred to as harmonic, which resembles the supersymmetric sigma models studied in high energy physics. We show that Killing vector fields are infinitesimal supersymmetries of this harmonic action and prove three different Noether theorems in this context. En passant, we provide a homogeneous treatment of five characterisations of Killing vector fields on semi-Riemannian supermanifolds, thus filling a gap in the literature.

  19. Killing vector fields and harmonic superfield theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groeger, Josua

    2014-09-01

    The harmonic action functional allows a natural generalisation to semi-Riemannian supergeometry, also referred to as harmonic, which resembles the supersymmetric sigma models studied in high energy physics. We show that Killing vector fields are infinitesimal supersymmetries of this harmonic action and prove three different Noether theorems in this context. En passant, we provide a homogeneous treatment of five characterisations of Killing vector fields on semi-Riemannian supermanifolds, thus filling a gap in the literature.

  20. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance -- Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Three Axis Vector Magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulatowicz, Michael; Clark, Philip; Griffith, Robert; Larsen, Michael; Mirijanian, James

    2012-06-01

    The Northrop Grumman Corporation is leveraging the technology developed for the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (NMRG) to build a combined Electron Paramagnetic Resonance -- Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (EPR-NMR) magnetometer. The EPR-NMR approach provides a high bandwidth and high sensitivity simultaneous measurement of all three vector components of the magnetic field averaged over the small volume of the sensor's one vapor cell. This poster will describe the history, operational principles, and design basics of the EPR-NMR magnetometer including an overview of the NSD designs developed and demonstrated to date. General performance results will also be presented.

  1. Solar Vector Magnetic Field Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rust, David M.

    1997-02-01

    The principal effort was development and flight of the Flare Genesis Experiment (FGE). The FGE is a balloon borne solar telescope that can provide the sharpest view ever of the evolution of activity on the Sun. The goal of the FGE is to obtain the observations needed for a breakthrough in solar flare research both sooner and at significantly lower cost than either a satellite or adaptive optics can offer. The FGE flight was a historic first. This effort has shown that a meter class solar telescope can take advantage of the modern long duration ballooning program in Antarctica to achieve science goals that are central to solar activity research.

  2. PREPROCESSING MAGNETIC FIELDS WITH CHROMOSPHERIC LONGITUDINAL FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Tetsuya T.; Kusano, K.

    2012-06-20

    Nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolation is a powerful tool for the modeling of the magnetic field in the solar corona. However, since the photospheric magnetic field does not in general satisfy the force-free condition, some kind of processing is required to assimilate data into the model. In this paper, we report the results of new preprocessing for the NLFFF extrapolation. Through this preprocessing, we expect to obtain magnetic field data similar to those in the chromosphere. In our preprocessing, we add a new term concerning chromospheric longitudinal fields into the optimization function proposed by Wiegelmann et al. We perform a parameter survey of six free parameters to find minimum force- and torque-freeness with the simulated-annealing method. Analyzed data are a photospheric vector magnetogram of AR 10953 observed with the Hinode spectropolarimeter and a chromospheric longitudinal magnetogram observed with SOLIS spectropolarimeter. It is found that some preprocessed fields show the smallest force- and torque-freeness and are very similar to the chromospheric longitudinal fields. On the other hand, other preprocessed fields show noisy maps, although the force- and torque-freeness are of the same order. By analyzing preprocessed noisy maps in the wave number space, we found that small and large wave number components balance out on the force-free index. We also discuss our iteration limit of the simulated-annealing method and magnetic structure broadening in the chromosphere.

  3. A Flexible Turbulent Vector Field Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benassi, A.; Davis, A.

    2004-12-01

    Analysis and generation of turbulent vector fields is a necessity in many areas, such as Atmospheric Science. A candidate model of vector field must be flexible enough to tune some features, such as the spacial distribution of vortices, sinks and sources, according to physical measures. To achieve that goal, we propose a model that depends upon a given matricial function called "topolet" and a law of random vectors family. This model has a hierarchical structure. Its spinal column is a tree: the encoding tree of the domain where the vector field lives. The sets of vortices, sinks and sources are driven by some Bernouilli subtrees, directly giving their fractal dimension. At each node of the tree is attached a rate of energy loose giving the spectral slope. All those quantities are independantly identifiable on the base of mathematical proofs. A primitive version of this model have been proposed for generating clouds.

  4. Magnetic field observations in Comet Halley's coma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedler, W.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Yeroshenko, Ye. G.; Styashkin, V. A.; Russell, C. T.

    1986-05-01

    During the encounter with Comet Halley, the magnetometer (MISCHA) aboard the Vega 1 spacecraft observed an increased level of magnetic field turbulence, resulting from an upstream bow wave. Both Vega spacecraft measured a peak field strength of 70-80 nT and observed draping of magnetic field lines around the cometary obstacle. An unexpected rotation of the magnetic field vector was observed, which may reflect either penetration of magnetic field lines into a diffuse layer related to the contact surface separating the solar-wind and cometary plasma, or the persistence of pre-existing interplanetary field structures.

  5. Magnetoconvection in sheared magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Bian, N. H.; Garcia, O. E.

    2008-10-15

    The development of magnetoconvection in a sheared magnetic field is investigated. The equilibrium magnetic field B{sub 0} is horizontal and its orientation varies linearly along the vertical axis. Preliminary consideration of the transition from the inertial to the viscous regime of the gravitational resistive interchange instability, reveals that the latter is characterized by the existence of viscoresistive boundary layers of vertical width which scales as Q{sup -1/6}, where Q is the Chandrasekhar number. The situation is analogous to the one encountered in magnetically confined laboratory plasmas, where convective flows are constrained by the magnetic shear to develop in boundary layers located around resonant magnetic surfaces in order to fulfill the 'interchange condition'k{center_dot}B{sub 0}=0, where k is the wave vector of the magnetic perturbation. It follows that when the effect of thermal diffusion is taken into account in the process, convection can only occur above a certain critical value of the Rayleigh number which scales as Q{sup 2/3} for large Q. At the onset, the convection pattern is a superposition of identically thin convective rolls everywhere aligned with the local magnetic field lines and which therefore adopt the magnetic field geometry, a situation also reminiscent of the penumbra of sunspots. Using this degeneracy, equations describing the weakly nonlinear state are obtained and discussed. A reduced magnetohydrodynamic description of magnetoconvection is introduced. Since it is valid for arbitrary magnetic field configurations, it allows a simple extension to the case where there exists an inclination between the direction of gravity and the plane spanned by the equilibrium magnetic field. These reduced magnetohydrodynamic equations are proposed as a powerful tool for further investigations of magnetoconvection in more complex field line geometries.

  6. Photospheric magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, R.

    1972-01-01

    Knowledge on the nature of magnetic fields on the solar surface is reviewed. At least a large part of the magnetic flux in the solar surface is confined to small bundles of lines of force within which the field strength is of the order of 500 gauss. Magnetic fields are closely associated with all types of solar activity. Magnetic flux appears at the surface at the clearly defined birth or regeneration of activity of an active region. As the region ages, the magnetic flux migrates to form large-scale patterns and the polar fields. Some manifestations of the large-scale distribution are discussed.

  7. Magnetic Gradiometer and Vector Magnetometer Survey of the Eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granot, R.

    2014-12-01

    Some of the fundamental tectonic problems of the Eastern Mediterranean remain unresolved due to the extremely thick sedimentary cover (~15 km) and the lack of accurate magnetic anomaly data. We conducted a magnetic survey of the Herodotus and Levant Basins (Eastern Mediterranean) to study the nature and age of the underlying igneous crust. The towed magnetometer array consisted of two Overhauser sensors recording the total magnetic field in a longitudinal gradiometer mode, and a marine vector magnetometer. Accurate navigation together with the gradiometer data allows the separation of the magnetic signature of the lithosphere from the contributions of the external magnetic field and the geomagnetic field. Total field data in the Herodotus Basin reveal a sequence of long-wavelength NE-SW lineated anomalies (~80 nT) suggesting a deep (~20 km) 2D magnetic source layer. Analysis of the vector data shows a steady azimuth of lineations that is generally consistent with the total field anomalies. The sequence of anomalies is rather short and does not allow a unique identification. However, the continuous northward motion of the African Plate during the Paleozoic and Mesozoic result in predictable anomaly skewness patterns for the different time periods. Forward magnetic modeling best fit the observed anomalies when using Early Permian remanence directions. Altogether, these observations and analysis suggest that a Neo-Tethyan Permian oceanic crust underlies the Herodotus Basin. Two short-wavelengths and strong (~400 nT) anomalies are found in the Levant Basin, proposing rather shallow (~7 km) magnetic sources there. These anomalies spatially coincide with Mesozoic uplifted continental structures (Eratosthenes and Jonah Highs).

  8. Magnetic vector data from the western Caribbean reveal possible origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barckhausen, U.; Engels, U.

    2013-12-01

    During a cruise with RV Meteor in the spring of 2010, magnetic measurements were carried out in the central and western Caribbean with up to six magnetic sensors deployed at the same time. These were i) a towed gradiometer consisting of two Overhauser sensors, ii) two towed vector magnetometers, and iii) two shipboard oriented vector magnetometers. While the gradiometer data provide total field magnetic anomalies free from external variations, the vector data can be analyzed with different methods in the space and wavenumber domains. In the case of the towed vector data, attitude control is challenging whereas shipboard data require a very thorough compensation for the ship's magnetic field. The data were analyzed with the goal to gain insight into the origin of the basement rocks especially of the western Caribbean. Position and strike direction of magnetic anomalies in the Columbia basin possibly hold the key to distinguish between an origin of the crust in the Pacific ocean and an alternative in situ formation between the Americas. On six long profiles in the Columbia basin and adjacent regions we find consistently strike directions of the magnetic anomalies around N100°E which seems to be incompatible with a Pacific origin of the crust. Three Project Magnet aeromagnetic vector profiles crossing the research area at different angles were analyzed with the same method and yield very similar results. In our interpretation, the crust underlying the Columbia basin formed during the Cretaceous at a roughly E-W trending spreading center between the Americas. Since the crust likely formed during the Cretaceous Superchron (C 34), the strike direction we find in our data probably does not represent typical seafloor spreading anomalies. Instead we believe it is related to changes in the intensity of the Earth's magnetic field which are known to have left correlated traces in oceanic crust formed during this period. The analysis methods we used are sensitive to intensity

  9. Ferromagnetic Switching of Knotted Vector Fields in Liquid Crystal Colloids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiaoxuan; Ackerman, Paul J; Liu, Qingkun; Smalyukh, Ivan I

    2015-08-28

    We experimentally realize polydomain and monodomain chiral ferromagnetic liquid crystal colloids that exhibit solitonic and knotted vector field configurations. Formed by dispersions of ferromagnetic nanoplatelets in chiral nematic liquid crystals, these colloidal ferromagnets exhibit spontaneous long-range alignment of magnetic dipole moments of individual platelets, giving rise to a continuum of the magnetization field M(r). Competing effects of surface confinement and chirality prompt spontaneous formation and enable the optical generation of localized twisted solitonic structures with double-twist tubes and torus knots of M(r), which exhibit a strong sensitivity to the direction of weak magnetic fields ∼1  mT. Numerical modeling, implemented through free energy minimization to arrive at a field-dependent three-dimensional M(r), shows a good agreement with experiments and provides insights into the torus knot topology of observed field configurations and the corresponding physical underpinnings. PMID:26371682

  10. The magnetic helicity spectrum from solar vector magnetograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenburg, Axel; Zhang, Hongqi; Sokoloff, Dmitry

    2016-05-01

    The gauge-invariant (or relative) magnetic helicity is often measured to characterize the degree of magnetic complexity of active regions. However, magnetic helicity is expected to have different signs on different length scales that can be identified with the large- and small-scale fields used in dynamo theory. To address this, it is important to determine magnetic helicity spectra as functions of wavenumber. These spectra are defined such that the integral over all wavenumbers gives the usual magnetic helicity density in a particular patch of interest. Using vector magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory for active region NOAA 11515, which was on the southern hemisphere, we show that the magnetic helicity spectrum has positive sign on scales below 30 Mm, but negative sign on larger scales. This active region was rather complex and its magnetic helicity was within 26% of its theoretical maximum value. This is much more than that of NOAA 11158, which was also rather complex, but only within 5% of its theoretical maximum value. Since the contribution of larger length scales turned out to be important in the case of NOAA 11515, its total magnetic helicity is dominated by the negative values from large length scales, which explains the unusual sign for the southern hemisphere. Measuring magnetic helicity spectra with DKIST may become an important tool to learn about the workings of the underlying dynamo.

  11. Magnetic field generator

    DOEpatents

    Krienin, Frank

    1990-01-01

    A magnetic field generating device provides a useful magnetic field within a specific retgion, while keeping nearby surrounding regions virtually field free. By placing an appropriate current density along a flux line of the source, the stray field effects of the generator may be contained. One current carrying structure may support a truncated cosine distribution, and it may be surrounded by a current structure which follows a flux line that would occur in a full coaxial double cosine distribution. Strong magnetic fields may be generated and contained using superconducting cables to approximate required current surfaces.

  12. Constraints on primordial magnetic fields from inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Daniel; Kobayashi, Takeshi

    2016-03-01

    We present generic bounds on magnetic fields produced from cosmic inflation. By investigating field bounds on the vector potential, we constrain both the quantum mechanical production of magnetic fields and their classical growth in a model independent way. For classical growth, we show that only if the reheating temperature is as low as Treh lesssim 102 MeV can magnetic fields of 10-15 G be produced on Mpc scales in the present universe. For purely quantum mechanical scenarios, even stronger constraints are derived. Our bounds on classical and quantum mechanical scenarios apply to generic theories of inflationary magnetogenesis with a two-derivative time kinetic term for the vector potential. In both cases, the magnetic field strength is limited by the gravitational back-reaction of the electric fields that are produced simultaneously. As an example of quantum mechanical scenarios, we construct vector field theories whose time diffeomorphisms are spontaneously broken, and explore magnetic field generation in theories with a variable speed of light. Transitions of quantum vector field fluctuations into classical fluctuations are also analyzed in the examples.

  13. Construction of a 3He magnetic force microscope with a vector magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jinho; Yang, Ilkyu; Kim, Yun Won; Shin, Dongwoo; Jeong, Juyoung; Wulferding, Dirk; Yeom, Han Woong; Kim, Jeehoon

    2016-02-01

    We constructed a 3He magnetic force microscope operating at the base temperature of 300 mK under a vector magnetic field of 2-2-9 T in the x-y-z direction. Fiber optic interferometry as a detection scheme is employed in which two home-built fiber walkers are used for the alignment between the cantilever and the optical fiber. The noise level of the laser interferometer is close to its thermodynamic limit. The capabilities of the sub-Kelvin and vector field are demonstrated by imaging the coexistence of magnetism and superconductivity in a ferromagnetic superconductor (ErNi2B2C) at T = 500 mK and by probing a dipole shape of a single Abrikosov vortex with an in-plane tip magnetization.

  14. On Cosmic Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florido, E.; Battaner, E.

    2010-12-01

    Magnetic fields are present in all astrophysical media. However, many models and interpretations of observations often ignore them, because magnetic fields are difficult to handle and because they produce complicated morphological features. Here we will comment on the basic intuitive properties, which even if not completely true, provide a first guiding insight on the physics of a particular astrophysical problem. These magnetic properties are not mathematically demonstrated here. How magnetic fields evolve and how they introduce dynamical effects are considered, also including a short comment on General Relativity Magnetohydrodynamics. In a second part we consider some audacious and speculative matters. They are answers to three questions: a) How draw a cube without lifting the pencil from the paper so that when the pen passes through the same side do in the same direction? B) Are MILAGRO anisotropies miraculous? C) Do cosmic magnetic lenses exist?. The last two questions deal with issues related with the interplay between magnetic fields and cosmic ray propagation.

  15. Acoustic vector fields in underwater waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapids, Brian

    2005-09-01

    The ability to compute the sound pressure level as well as the vectors associated with the acoustic particle motion has existed for some time. However, propagation studies and ambient noise investigations have typically focused only upon the sound pressure levels that would be observed by an omnidirectional hydrophone or array of hydrophones. Recent interest in geophones and accelerometers for use as vector and dyadic sensors should encourage the investigation and analysis of the underlying vector fields contributing to the acoustic intensity and energy density fields. The frequency domain properties of the acoustic vector field generated by monopole sources having frequencies <1kHz in a simple iso-velocity waveguide are presented in order to build a fundamental understanding of the related quantities. Subsequently, similar field quantities computed for more realistic environments such as downward refracting profiles and deep-water profiles supporting convergence zone propagation will be discussed. Regions and phenomena associated with perturbations in the energy flux density will be highlighted.

  16. Circular Conditional Autoregressive Modeling of Vector Fields.

    PubMed

    Modlin, Danny; Fuentes, Montse; Reich, Brian

    2012-02-01

    As hurricanes approach landfall, there are several hazards for which coastal populations must be prepared. Damaging winds, torrential rains, and tornadoes play havoc with both the coast and inland areas; but, the biggest seaside menace to life and property is the storm surge. Wind fields are used as the primary forcing for the numerical forecasts of the coastal ocean response to hurricane force winds, such as the height of the storm surge and the degree of coastal flooding. Unfortunately, developments in deterministic modeling of these forcings have been hindered by computational expenses. In this paper, we present a multivariate spatial model for vector fields, that we apply to hurricane winds. We parameterize the wind vector at each site in polar coordinates and specify a circular conditional autoregressive (CCAR) model for the vector direction, and a spatial CAR model for speed. We apply our framework for vector fields to hurricane surface wind fields for Hurricane Floyd of 1999 and compare our CCAR model to prior methods that decompose wind speed and direction into its N-S and W-E cardinal components. PMID:24353452

  17. Circular Conditional Autoregressive Modeling of Vector Fields*

    PubMed Central

    Modlin, Danny; Fuentes, Montse; Reich, Brian

    2013-01-01

    As hurricanes approach landfall, there are several hazards for which coastal populations must be prepared. Damaging winds, torrential rains, and tornadoes play havoc with both the coast and inland areas; but, the biggest seaside menace to life and property is the storm surge. Wind fields are used as the primary forcing for the numerical forecasts of the coastal ocean response to hurricane force winds, such as the height of the storm surge and the degree of coastal flooding. Unfortunately, developments in deterministic modeling of these forcings have been hindered by computational expenses. In this paper, we present a multivariate spatial model for vector fields, that we apply to hurricane winds. We parameterize the wind vector at each site in polar coordinates and specify a circular conditional autoregressive (CCAR) model for the vector direction, and a spatial CAR model for speed. We apply our framework for vector fields to hurricane surface wind fields for Hurricane Floyd of 1999 and compare our CCAR model to prior methods that decompose wind speed and direction into its N-S and W-E cardinal components. PMID:24353452

  18. Magnetic Fields in Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Rainer

    Magnetic fields are a major agent in the interstellar medium. They contribute significantly to the total pressure which balances the gas disk against gravitation. They affect the gas flows in spiral arms (Gómez and Cox, 2002). The effective sound speed of the gas is increased by the presence of strong fields which reduce the shock strength. The interstellar fields are closely connected to gas clouds. They affect the dynamics of the gas clouds (Elmegreen, 1981; de Avillez and Breitschwerdt, 2004). The stability and evolution of gas clouds are also influenced by magnetic fields, but it is not understood how (Crutcher, 1999; see Chap. 7). Magnetic fields are essential for the onset of star formation as they enable the removal of angular momentum from the protostellar cloud during its collapse (magnetic braking, Mouschovias, 1990). Strong fields may shift the stellar mass spectrum towards the more massive stars (Mestel, 1990). MHD turbulence distributes energy from supernova explosions within the ISM (Subramanian, 1998) and regenerates the field via the dynamo process (Wielebinski, R., Krause, 1993, Beck et al., 1996; Sect. 6). Magnetic reconnection is a possible heating source for the ISM and halo gas (Birk et al., 1998). Magnetic fields also control the density and distribution of cosmic rays in the ISM. A realistic model for any process in the ISM needs basic information about the magnetic field which has to be provided by observations.

  19. Vector magnetic properties of Fe-based amorphous sheets under alternating flux condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, S.; Todaka, T.; Enokizono, M.

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents measured vector magnetic properties of Fe-based amorphous sheets under alternating flux conditions in arbitrary direction. It is well known that amorphous material has usually isotropic magnetic property; however it is changeable by heat-treatment and shows complicated aspects. In this paper, the relationship between the magnetic flux density and field strength vector and iron loss under alternating flux conditions is measured by using a vector magnetic property measurement system. Moreover, the iron losses depending on the exciting frequency are discussed. The results show a weak anisotropy in plane and the frequency dependence of the iron losses shows different tendency in each direction.

  20. GlyphSea: Visualizing Vector Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuinn, Emmett; Chourasia, Amit; Schulze, Jürgen P.; Minster, Jean-Bernard

    2013-12-01

    Understanding vector fields is important in many science and engineering domains. Often glyphs are used to represent vector data as arrows, cones, ellipsoids, and other geometric shapes. When implemented using traditional 3D graphics, these glyphs have drawbacks of being view dependent, orientation ambiguous, and requiring specific geometric resolution. We propose a straightforward new method of procedural dipole texturing of glyph shapes, which overcomes these drawbacks and can enhance existing methods. We demonstrate our method with an interactive application (GlyphSea), which incorporates additional features such as screen space ambient occlusion, glyph displacement, lattices, halos and other contextual visual cues. We also discuss the results and informal feedback from scientists on insights gained by exploring time varying vector datasets in astrophysics and seismology.

  1. Multifractal vector fields and stochastic Clifford algebra

    SciTech Connect

    Schertzer, Daniel Tchiguirinskaia, Ioulia

    2015-12-15

    In the mid 1980s, the development of multifractal concepts and techniques was an important breakthrough for complex system analysis and simulation, in particular, in turbulence and hydrology. Multifractals indeed aimed to track and simulate the scaling singularities of the underlying equations instead of relying on numerical, scale truncated simulations or on simplified conceptual models. However, this development has been rather limited to deal with scalar fields, whereas most of the fields of interest are vector-valued or even manifold-valued. We show in this paper that the combination of stable Lévy processes with Clifford algebra is a good candidate to bridge up the present gap between theory and applications. We show that it indeed defines a convenient framework to generate multifractal vector fields, possibly multifractal manifold-valued fields, based on a few fundamental and complementary properties of Lévy processes and Clifford algebra. In particular, the vector structure of these algebra is much more tractable than the manifold structure of symmetry groups while the Lévy stability grants a given statistical universality.

  2. Multifractal vector fields and stochastic Clifford algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schertzer, Daniel; Tchiguirinskaia, Ioulia

    2015-12-01

    In the mid 1980s, the development of multifractal concepts and techniques was an important breakthrough for complex system analysis and simulation, in particular, in turbulence and hydrology. Multifractals indeed aimed to track and simulate the scaling singularities of the underlying equations instead of relying on numerical, scale truncated simulations or on simplified conceptual models. However, this development has been rather limited to deal with scalar fields, whereas most of the fields of interest are vector-valued or even manifold-valued. We show in this paper that the combination of stable Lévy processes with Clifford algebra is a good candidate to bridge up the present gap between theory and applications. We show that it indeed defines a convenient framework to generate multifractal vector fields, possibly multifractal manifold-valued fields, based on a few fundamental and complementary properties of Lévy processes and Clifford algebra. In particular, the vector structure of these algebra is much more tractable than the manifold structure of symmetry groups while the Lévy stability grants a given statistical universality.

  3. Multifractal vector fields and stochastic Clifford algebra.

    PubMed

    Schertzer, Daniel; Tchiguirinskaia, Ioulia

    2015-12-01

    In the mid 1980s, the development of multifractal concepts and techniques was an important breakthrough for complex system analysis and simulation, in particular, in turbulence and hydrology. Multifractals indeed aimed to track and simulate the scaling singularities of the underlying equations instead of relying on numerical, scale truncated simulations or on simplified conceptual models. However, this development has been rather limited to deal with scalar fields, whereas most of the fields of interest are vector-valued or even manifold-valued. We show in this paper that the combination of stable Lévy processes with Clifford algebra is a good candidate to bridge up the present gap between theory and applications. We show that it indeed defines a convenient framework to generate multifractal vector fields, possibly multifractal manifold-valued fields, based on a few fundamental and complementary properties of Lévy processes and Clifford algebra. In particular, the vector structure of these algebra is much more tractable than the manifold structure of symmetry groups while the Lévy stability grants a given statistical universality. PMID:26723166

  4. Magnetic vectoring of magnetically responsive nanoparticles within the murine peritoneum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klostergaard, Jim; Bankson, James; Auzenne, Edmond; Gibson, Don; Yuill, William; Seeney, Charles E.

    2007-04-01

    Magnetically responsive nanoparticles (MNPs) might be candidates for pro-drug formulations for intraperitoneal (i.p.) treatment of ovarian cancer. We conducted feasibility experiments in an i.p. human ovarian carcinoma xenograft model to determine whether MNPs can be effectively vectored within this environment. Our initial results based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) indicate that i.p.-injected ˜15 nm magnetite-based MNPs can in fact migrate toward NdFeB magnets externally juxtaposed to the peritoneal cavity above the xenografts growing in the anterior abdominal wall. MNP localization to the tumor/peri-tumoral environment occurs. Further development of this MNP pro-drug strategy is underway.

  5. Efficient morse decompositions of vector fields.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guoning; Mischaikow, Konstantin; Laramee, Robert S; Zhang, Eugene

    2008-01-01

    Existing topology-based vector field analysis techniques rely on the ability to extract the individual trajectories such as fixed points, periodic orbits, and separatrices that are sensitive to noise and errors introduced by simulation and interpolation. This can make such vector field analysis unsuitable for rigorous interpretations. We advocate the use of Morse decompositions, which are robust with respect to perturbations, to encode the topological structures of a vector field in the form of a directed graph, called a Morse connection graph (MCG). While an MCG exists for every vector field, it need not be unique. Previous techniques for computing MCG's, while fast, are overly conservative and usually results in MCG's that are too coarse to be useful for the applications. To address this issue, we present a new technique for performing Morse decomposition based on the concept of tau-maps, which typically provides finer MCG's than existing techniques. Furthermore, the choice of tau provides a natural tradeoff between the fineness of the MCG's and the computational costs. We provide efficient implementations of Morse decomposition based on tau-maps, which include the use of forward and backward mapping techniques and an adaptive approach in constructing better approximations of the images of the triangles in the meshes used for simulation.. Furthermore, we propose the use of spatial tau-maps in addition to the original temporal tau-maps. These techniques provide additional trade-offs between the quality of the MCGs and the speed of computation. We demonstrate the utility of our technique with various examples in the plane and on surfaces including engine simulation data sets. PMID:18467759

  6. Magnetic field dosimeter development

    SciTech Connect

    Lemon, D.K.; Skorpik, J.R.; Eick, J.L.

    1980-09-01

    In recent years there has been increased concern over potential health hazards related to exposure of personnel to magnetic fields. If exposure standards are to be established, then a means for measuring magnetic field dose must be available. To meet this need, the Department of Energy has funded development of prototype dosimeters at the Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory. This manual reviews the principle of operation of the dosimeter and also contains step-by-step instructions for its operation.

  7. Magnetic fields in spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, Masashi

    The magnetic-field characteristics in spiral galaxies are investigated, with emphasis on the Milky Way. The dynamo theory is considered, and axisymmetric spiral (ASS) and bisymmetric spiral (BSS) magnetic fields are analyzed. Toroidal and poloidal magnetic fields are discussed.

  8. How the geomagnetic field vector reverses polarity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prevot, M.; Mankinen, E.A.; Gromme, C.S.; Coe, R.S.

    1985-01-01

    A highly detailed record of both the direction and intensity of the Earth's magnetic field as it reverses has been obtained from a Miocene volcanic sequence. The transitional field is low in intensity and is typically non-axisymmetric. Geomagnetic impulses corresponding to astonishingly high rates of change of the field sometimes occur, suggesting that liquid velocity within the Earth's core increases during geomagnetic reversals. ?? 1985 Nature Publishing Group.

  9. CMB non-gaussianity from vector fields

    SciTech Connect

    Peloso, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The Planck satellite has recently measured the CMB temperature anisotropies with unprecedented accuracy, and it has provided strong bounds on primordial non-gaussianity. Such bounds constrain models of inflation, and mechanisms that produce the primordial perturbations. We discuss the non-gaussian signatures from the interactions of the inflation φ with spin-1 fields. We study the two different cases in which the inflaton is (i) a pseudo-scalar field with a (φ)/(fa) F·F interaction with a vector field, and (ii) a scalar field with a f (φ)F² interaction. In the first case we obtain the strong limit f{sub a} ≥ 10¹⁶GeV on the decay constant. In the second case, specific choices of the function f (φ) can lead to a non-gaussianity with a characteristic shape not encountered in standard models of scalar field inflation, and which has also been constrained by Planck.

  10. Solar Wind Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. J.

    1995-01-01

    The magnetic fields originate as coronal fields that are converted into space by the supersonic, infinitely conducting, solar wind. On average, the sun's rotation causes the field to wind up and form an Archimedes Spiral. However, the field direction changes almost continuously on a variety of scales and the irregular nature of these changes is often interpreted as evidence that the solar wind flow is turbulent.

  11. Improved determination of vector lithospheric magnetic anomalies from MAGSAT data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravat, Dhananjay

    1993-01-01

    Scientific contributions made in developing new methods to isolate and map vector magnetic anomalies from measurements made by Magsat are described. In addition to the objective of the proposal, the isolation and mapping of equatorial vector lithospheric Magsat anomalies, isolation of polar ionospheric fields during the period were also studied. Significant progress was also made in isolation of polar delta(Z) component and scalar anomalies as well as integration and synthesis of various techniques of removing equatorial and polar ionospheric effects. The significant contributions of this research are: (1) development of empirical/analytical techniques in modeling ionospheric fields in Magsat data and their removal from uncorrected anomalies to obtain better estimates of lithospheric anomalies (this task was accomplished for equatorial delta(X), delta(Z), and delta(B) component and polar delta(Z) and delta(B) component measurements; (2) integration of important processing techniques developed during the last decade with the newly developed technologies of ionospheric field modeling into an optimum processing scheme; and (3) implementation of the above processing scheme to map the most robust magnetic anomalies of the lithosphere (components as well as scalar).

  12. Intermittent Vector Fields: A Challenge for Mathematical Geophysics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schertzer, D. J. M.; Tchiguirinskaia, I.

    2014-12-01

    Geophysical fields display strong intermittency over a wide range of scales. Multifractals has become a standard tool to analyze and simulate this key phenomenon for scalar fields. However, fields of interest, e.g. the velocity and the magnetic fields are vector fields. Some time ago, "Lie cascades" were introduced to deal with such fields by considering exponentiation from a stochastic element of a Lie algebra to its corresponding Lie group of transformations. The concerned transformation corresponds to the fine graining/downscaling of the field to higher and higher resolution. Unfortunately, developments were paused due to the possible large number of degrees of freedom of the latter, in particular with respect to the information that can be easily extracted from a d-dimensional vector field. In short, some physics was missing. In this communication, we point out the interest of the Clifford algebra Clp,q to make concrete progress. Ironically, these algebra were mentioned at once as rather straightforward generalizations of the scalar complex cascades, but they were not investigated. On the contrary, the particular case of the "pseudo-quaternions" l(2,R)=Cl2,0=Cl1,1 has been often used to generate generalized scales to analyse and simulate anistropic scaling (scalar) fields. The latter is in fact illustrative of the basic property of the Clifford algebra Clp,q to be generated by a quadratic form Q whose signature (p,q) is fundamental.

  13. Magnetic Field Measurement System

    SciTech Connect

    Kulesza, Joe; Johnson, Eric; Lyndaker, Aaron; Deyhim, Alex; Waterman, Dave; Blomqvist, K. Ingvar; Dunn, Jonathan Hunter

    2007-01-19

    A magnetic field measurement system was designed, built and installed at MAX Lab, Sweden for the purpose of characterizing the magnetic field produced by Insertion Devices (see Figure 1). The measurement system consists of a large granite beam roughly 2 feet square and 14 feet long that has been polished beyond laboratory grade for flatness and straightness. The granite precision coupled with the design of the carriage yielded minimum position deviations as measured at the probe tip. The Hall probe data collection and compensation technique allows exceptional resolution and range while taking data on the fly to programmable sample spacing. Additional flip coil provides field integral data.

  14. Magnetic Field Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilin, Andrew V.

    2006-01-01

    The Magnetic Field Solver computer program calculates the magnetic field generated by a group of collinear, cylindrical axisymmetric electromagnet coils. Given the current flowing in, and the number of turns, axial position, and axial and radial dimensions of each coil, the program calculates matrix coefficients for a finite-difference system of equations that approximates a two-dimensional partial differential equation for the magnetic potential contributed by the coil. The program iteratively solves these finite-difference equations by use of the modified incomplete Cholesky preconditioned-conjugate-gradient method. The total magnetic potential as a function of axial (z) and radial (r) position is then calculated as a sum of the magnetic potentials of the individual coils, using a high-accuracy interpolation scheme. Then the r and z components of the magnetic field as functions of r and z are calculated from the total magnetic potential by use of a high-accuracy finite-difference scheme. Notably, for the finite-difference calculations, the program generates nonuniform two-dimensional computational meshes from nonuniform one-dimensional meshes. Each mesh is generated in such a way as to minimize the numerical error for a benchmark one-dimensional magnetostatic problem.

  15. Magnetic fields at neptune.

    PubMed

    Ness, N F; Acuña, M H; Burlaga, L F; Connerney, J E; Lepping, R P; Neubauer, F M

    1989-12-15

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center-University of Delaware Bartol Research Institute magnetic field experiment on the Voyager 2 spacecraft discovered a strong and complex intrinsic magnetic field of Neptune and an associated magnetosphere and magnetic tail. The detached bow shock wave in the supersonic solar wind flow was detected upstream at 34.9 Neptune radii (R(N)), and the magnetopause boundary was tentatively identified at 26.5 R(N) near the planet-sun line (1 R(N) = 24,765 kilometers). A maximum magnetic field of nearly 10,000 nanoteslas (1 nanotesla = 10(-5) gauss) was observed near closest approach, at a distance of 1.18 R(N). The planetary magnetic field between 4 and 15 R(N) can be well represented by an offset tilted magnetic dipole (OTD), displaced from the center of Neptune by the surprisingly large amount of 0.55 R(N) and inclined by 47 degrees with respect to the rotation axis. The OTD dipole moment is 0.133 gauss-R(N)(3). Within 4 R(N), the magnetic field representation must include localized sources or higher order magnetic multipoles, or both, which are not yet well determined. The obliquity of Neptune and the phase of its rotation at encounter combined serendipitously so that the spacecraft entered the magnetosphere at a time when the polar cusp region was directed almost precisely sunward. As the spacecraft exited the magnetosphere, the magnetic tail appeared to be monopolar, and no crossings of an imbedded magnetic field reversal or plasma neutral sheet were observed. The auroral zones are most likely located far from the rotation poles and may have a complicated geometry. The rings and all the known moons of Neptune are imbedded deep inside the magnetosphere, except for Nereid, which is outside when sunward of the planet. The radiation belts will have a complex structure owing to the absorption of energetic particles by the moons and rings of Neptune and losses associated with the significant changes

  16. Generation of arbitrary vector fields based on a pair of orthogonal elliptically polarized base vectors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Danfeng; Gu, Bing; Rui, Guanghao; Zhan, Qiwen; Cui, Yiping

    2016-02-22

    We present an arbitrary vector field with hybrid polarization based on the combination of a pair of orthogonal elliptically polarized base vectors on the Poincaré sphere. It is shown that the created vector field is only dependent on the latitude angle 2χ but is independent on the longitude angle 2ψ on the Poincaré sphere. By adjusting the latitude angle 2χ, which is related to two identical waveplates in a common path interferometric arrangement, one could obtain arbitrary type of vector fields. Experimentally, we demonstrate the generation of such kind of vector fields and confirm the distribution of state of polarization by the measurement of Stokes parameters. Besides, we investigate the tight focusing properties of these vector fields. It is found that the additional degree of freedom 2χ provided by arbitrary vector field with hybrid polarization allows one to control the spatial structure of polarization and to engineer the focusing field. PMID:26907066

  17. Response to ``Comment on `Resolving the 180° Ambiguity in Solar Vector Magnetic Field Data: Evaluating the Effects of Noise, Spatial Resolution, and Method Assumptions' ''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leka, K. D.; Barnes, Graham; Gary, G. Allen; Crouch, A. D.; Liu, Y.

    2012-02-01

    We address points recently discussed in Georgoulis (2011, Solar Phys., doi:10.1007/s11207-011-9819-1) in reference to Leka et al. (2009, Solar Phys. 260, 83). Most importantly, we find that the results of Georgoulis (2011) a conclusion of Leka et al. (2009) that limited spatial resolution and the presence of unresolved magnetic structures can challenge ambiguity-resolution algorithms. Moreover, the findings of both Metcalf et al. (2006, Solar Phys. 237, 267) and Leka et al. (2009b) are confirmed in Georgoulis (2011): a method’s performance can be diminished when the observed field fails to conform to that method’s assumptions. The implication of boundaries in models of solar magnetic structures is discussed; we confirm that the distribution of the field components in the model used in Leka et al. (2009) is closer to what is observed on the Sun than what is proposed in Georgoulis (2011). It is also shown that method does matter with regards to simulating limited spatial resolution and avoiding an inadvertent introduction of bias. Finally, the assignment of categories to data-analysis algorithms is revisited; we argue that assignments are only useful and elucidating when used appropriately.

  18. Vector magnetic measurement based on directional scattering between polarized plasmon wave and arrayed nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaochuan; Guo, Tuan; Liu, Fu; Wu, Qiang; Li, Jie; Cheng, Linghao; Guan, Bai-Ou

    2015-09-01

    A vector magnetic field sensor based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of a 15° tilted fiber Bragg grating (TFBG) and magnetic fluid is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. Both the orientation and the amplitude of the magnetic fields can be determined unambiguously via the wavelength and intensity monitoring of the SPR, which is essentially dominated by the arrayed Fe3O4 nanoparticles over the nanometric-film of fiber surface.

  19. He I VECTOR MAGNETOMETRY OF FIELD-ALIGNED SUPERPENUMBRAL FIBRILS

    SciTech Connect

    Schad, T. A.; Penn, M. J.; Lin, H.

    2013-05-10

    Atomic-level polarization and Zeeman effect diagnostics in the neutral helium triplet at 10830 A in principle allow full vector magnetometry of fine-scaled chromospheric fibrils. We present high-resolution spectropolarimetric observations of superpenumbral fibrils in the He I triplet with sufficient polarimetric sensitivity to infer their full magnetic field geometry. He I observations from the Facility Infrared Spectropolarimeter are paired with high-resolution observations of the H{alpha} 6563 A and Ca II 8542 A spectral lines from the Interferometric Bidimensional Spectrometer from the Dunn Solar Telescope in New Mexico. Linear and circular polarization signatures in the He I triplet are measured and described, as well as analyzed with the advanced inversion capability of the ''Hanle and Zeeman Light'' modeling code. Our analysis provides direct evidence for the often assumed field alignment of fibril structures. The projected angle of the fibrils and the inferred magnetic field geometry align within an error of {+-}10 Degree-Sign . We describe changes in the inclination angle of these features that reflect their connectivity with the photospheric magnetic field. Evidence for an accelerated flow ({approx}40 m s{sup -2}) along an individual fibril anchored at its endpoints in the strong sunspot and weaker plage in part supports the magnetic siphon flow mechanism's role in the inverse Evershed effect. However, the connectivity of the outer endpoint of many of the fibrils cannot be established.

  20. An Extraordinary Magnetic Field Map of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Acuna, M. H.; Ness, N. F.; Mitchell, D. L.; Lin, R. P.

    2004-01-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft has completed two Mars years in nearly circular polar orbit at a nominal altitude of 400 km. The Mars crust is at least an order of magnitude more intensely magnetized than that of the Earth [1], and intriguing in both its global distribution and geometric properties [2,3]. Measurements of the vector magnetic field have been used to map the magnetic field of crustal origin to high accuracy [4]. We present here a new map of the magnetic field with an order of magnitude increased sensitivity to crustal magnetization. The map is assembled from > 2 full years of MGS night-side observations, and uses along-track filtering to greatly reduce noise due to external field variations.

  1. High field superconducting magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hait, Thomas P. (Inventor); Shirron, Peter J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A superconducting magnet includes an insulating layer disposed about the surface of a mandrel; a superconducting wire wound in adjacent turns about the mandrel to form the superconducting magnet, wherein the superconducting wire is in thermal communication with the mandrel, and the superconducting magnet has a field-to-current ratio equal to or greater than 1.1 Tesla per Ampere; a thermally conductive potting material configured to fill interstices between the adjacent turns, wherein the thermally conductive potting material and the superconducting wire provide a path for dissipation of heat; and a voltage limiting device disposed across each end of the superconducting wire, wherein the voltage limiting device is configured to prevent a voltage excursion across the superconducting wire during quench of the superconducting magnet.

  2. The interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, L., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Large-scale properties of the interplanetary magnetic field as determined by the solar wind velocity structure are examined. The various ways in which magnetic fields affect phenomena in the solar wind are summarized. The dominant role of high and low velocity solar wind streams that persist, with fluctuations and evolution, for weeks or months is emphasized. It is suggested that for most purposes the sector structure is better identified with the stream structure than with the magnetic polarity and that the polarity does not necessarily change from one velocity sector to the next. Several mechanisms that might produce the stream structure are considered. The interaction of the high and low velocity streams is analyzed in a model that is steady state when viewed in a frame that corotates with the sun.

  3. Vertical gradients of sunspot magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagyard, M. J.; Teuber, D.; West, E. A.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Henze, W., Jr.; Beckers, J. M.; Bruner, M.; Hyder, C. L.; Woodgate, B. E.

    1983-04-01

    The results of a Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) guest investigation to determine the vertical gradients of sunspot magnetic fields for the first time from coordinated observations of photospheric and transition-region fields are described. Descriptions are given of both the photospheric vector field of a sunspot, derived from observations using the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center vector magnetograph, and of the line-of-sight component in the transition region, obtained from the SMM Ultraviolet Spectrometer and Polarimeter instrument. On the basis of these data, vertical gradients of the line-of-sight magnetic field component are calculated using three methods. It is found that the vertical gradient of Bz is lower than values from previous studies and that the transition-region field occurs at a height of approximately 4000-6000 km above the photosphere.

  4. Vertical gradients of sunspot magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagyard, M. J.; Teuber, D.; West, E. A.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Henze, W., Jr.; Beckers, J. M.; Bruner, M.; Hyder, C. L.; Woodgate, B. E.

    1983-01-01

    The results of a Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) guest investigation to determine the vertical gradients of sunspot magnetic fields for the first time from coordinated observations of photospheric and transition-region fields are described. Descriptions are given of both the photospheric vector field of a sunspot, derived from observations using the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center vector magnetograph, and of the line-of-sight component in the transition region, obtained from the SMM Ultraviolet Spectrometer and Polarimeter instrument. On the basis of these data, vertical gradients of the line-of-sight magnetic field component are calculated using three methods. It is found that the vertical gradient of Bz is lower than values from previous studies and that the transition-region field occurs at a height of approximately 4000-6000 km above the photosphere.

  5. Bubble nucleation of spatial vector fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoumi, Ali; Xiao, Xiao; Yang, I.-Sheng

    2013-02-01

    We study domain walls and bubble nucleation in a nonrelativistic vector field theory with different longitudinal and transverse speeds of sound. We describe analytical and numerical methods to calculate the orientation-dependent domain-wall tension σ(θ). We then use this tension to calculate the critical bubble shape and show that the tunneling exponent is modified by a factor of sound speed ratio. This implies a big modification in the tunneling rate. The longitudinally oriented domain wall tends to be the heaviest and sometime suffers an instability. It can spontaneously break into zigzag segments. In this case, the critical bubble develops kinks, and its energy, and therefore the tunneling rate, scales with the sound speeds very differently than what would be expected for a smooth bubble.

  6. Robust point matching via vector field consensus.

    PubMed

    Jiayi Ma; Ji Zhao; Jinwen Tian; Yuille, Alan L; Zhuowen Tu

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we propose an efficient algorithm, called vector field consensus, for establishing robust point correspondences between two sets of points. Our algorithm starts by creating a set of putative correspondences which can contain a very large number of false correspondences, or outliers, in addition to a limited number of true correspondences (inliers). Next, we solve for correspondence by interpolating a vector field between the two point sets, which involves estimating a consensus of inlier points whose matching follows a nonparametric geometrical constraint. We formulate this a maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation of a Bayesian model with hidden/latent variables indicating whether matches in the putative set are outliers or inliers. We impose nonparametric geometrical constraints on the correspondence, as a prior distribution, using Tikhonov regularizers in a reproducing kernel Hilbert space. MAP estimation is performed by the EM algorithm which by also estimating the variance of the prior model (initialized to a large value) is able to obtain good estimates very quickly (e.g., avoiding many of the local minima inherent in this formulation). We illustrate this method on data sets in 2D and 3D and demonstrate that it is robust to a very large number of outliers (even up to 90%). We also show that in the special case where there is an underlying parametric geometrical model (e.g., the epipolar line constraint) that we obtain better results than standard alternatives like RANSAC if a large number of outliers are present. This suggests a two-stage strategy, where we use our nonparametric model to reduce the size of the putative set and then apply a parametric variant of our approach to estimate the geometric parameters. Our algorithm is computationally efficient and we provide code for others to use it. In addition, our approach is general and can be applied to other problems, such as learning with a badly corrupted training data set. PMID:24808341

  7. Casimir effect of massive vector fields

    SciTech Connect

    Teo, L. P.

    2010-11-15

    We study the Casimir effect due to a massive vector field in a system of two parallel plates made of real materials, in an arbitrary magnetodielectric background. The plane waves satisfying the Proca equations are classified into transverse modes and longitudinal modes which have different dispersion relations. Transverse modes are further divided into type I and type II corresponding to TE and TM modes in the massless case. For general magnetodielectric media, we argue that the correct boundary conditions are the continuities of H{sub ||}, {phi}, A, and {partial_derivative}{sub x}A{sub x}, where x is the direction normal to the plates. Although there are type I transverse modes that satisfy all the boundary conditions, it is impossible to find type II transverse modes or longitudinal modes that satisfy all the boundary conditions. To circumvent this problem, type II transverse modes and longitudinal modes have to be considered together. We call the contribution to the Casimir energy from type I transverse modes TE contribution, and the contribution from the superposition of type II transverse modes and longitudinal modes TM contribution. Their massless limits give, respectively, the TE and TM contributions to the Casimir energy of a massless vector field. The limit where the plates become perfectly conducting is discussed in detail. For the special case where the background has a unity refractive index, it is shown that the TM contribution to the Casimir energy can be written as a sum of contributions from two different types of modes, corresponding to type II discrete modes and type III continuum modes discussed by Barton and Dombey [G. Barton and N. Dombey, Ann. Phys. (N.Y.) 162, 231 (1985).]. For general background, this splitting does not work. The limit where both plates become infinitely permeable and the limit where one plate becomes perfectly conducting and one plate becomes infinitely permeable are also investigated.

  8. An educational path for the magnetic vector potential and its physical implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbieri, S.; Cavinato, M.; Giliberti, M.

    2013-09-01

    We present an educational path for the magnetic vector potential A aimed at undergraduate students and pre-service physics teachers. Starting from the generalized Ampère-Laplace law, in the framework of a slowly varying time-dependent field approximation, the magnetic vector potential is written in terms of its empirical references, i.e. the conduction currents. Therefore, once the currents are known, our approach allows for a clear and univocal physical determination of A, overcoming the mathematical indeterminacy due to the gauge transformations. We have no need to fix a gauge, since for slowly varying time-dependent electric and magnetic fields, the ‘natural’ gauge for A is the Coulomb one. We stress the difference between our approach and those usually presented in the literature. Finally, a physical interpretation of the magnetic vector potential is discussed and some examples of the calculation of A are analysed.

  9. Crustal Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Patrick T.; Ravat, D.; Frawley, James J.

    1999-01-01

    Cosmos 49, Polar Orbit Geophysical Observatory (POGO) (Orbiting Geophysical Observatory (OGO-2, 4 and 6)) and Magsat have been the only low-earth orbiting satellites to measure the crustal magnetic field on a global scale. These missions revealed the presence of long- wavelength (> 500 km) crustal anomalies predominantly located over continents. Ground based methods were, for the most part, unable to record these very large-scale features; no doubt due to the problems of assembling continental scale maps from numerous smaller surveys acquired over many years. Questions arose as to the source and nature of these long-wave length anomalies. As a result there was a great stimulant given to the study of the magnetic properties of the lower crust and upper mantle. Some indication as to the nature of these deep sources has been provided by the recent results from the deep crustal drilling programs. In addition, the mechanism of magnetization, induced or remanent, was largely unknown. For computational ease these anomalies were considered to result solely from induced magnetization. However, recent results from Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA), a magnetometer-bearing mission to Mars, have revealed crustal anomalies with dimensions similar to the largest anomalies on Earth. These Martian features could only have been produced by remanent magnetization, since Mars lacks an inducing field. The origin of long-wavelength crustal anomalies, however, has not been completely determined. Several large crustal magnetic anomalies (e.g., Bangui, Kursk, Kiruna and Central Europe) will be discussed and the role of future satellite magnetometer missions (Orsted, SUNSAT and Champ) in their interpretation evaluated.

  10. Magnetization dynamics using ultrashort magnetic field pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tudosa, Ioan

    Very short and well shaped magnetic field pulses can be generated using ultra-relativistic electron bunches at Stanford Linear Accelerator. These fields of several Tesla with duration of several picoseconds are used to study the response of magnetic materials to a very short excitation. Precession of a magnetic moment by 90 degrees in a field of 1 Tesla takes about 10 picoseconds, so we explore the range of fast switching of the magnetization by precession. Our experiments are in a region of magnetic excitation that is not yet accessible by other methods. The current table top experiments can generate fields longer than 100 ps and with strength of 0.1 Tesla only. Two types of magnetic were used, magnetic recording media and model magnetic thin films. Information about the magnetization dynamics is extracted from the magnetic patterns generated by the magnetic field. The shape and size of these patterns are influenced by the dissipation of angular momentum involved in the switching process. The high-density recording media, both in-plane and perpendicular type, shows a pattern which indicates a high spin momentum dissipation. The perpendicular magnetic recording media was exposed to multiple magnetic field pulses. We observed an extended transition region between switched and non-switched areas indicating a stochastic switching behavior that cannot be explained by thermal fluctuations. The model films consist of very thin crystalline Fe films on GaAs. Even with these model films we see an enhanced dissipation compared to ferromagnetic resonance studies. The magnetic patterns show that damping increases with time and it is not a constant as usually assumed in the equation describing the magnetization dynamics. The simulation using the theory of spin-wave scattering explains only half of the observed damping. An important feature of this theory is that the spin dissipation is time dependent and depends on the large angle between the magnetization and the magnetic

  11. Magnetic space-based field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langel, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    Satellite measurements of the geomagnetic field began with the launch of Sputnik 3 in May 1958 and have continued sporadically in the intervening years. A list of spacecraft that have made significant contributions to an understanding of the near-earth geomagnetic field is presented. A new era in near-earth magnetic field measurements began with NASA's launch of Magsat in October 1979. Attention is given to geomagnetic field modeling, crustal magnetic anomaly studies, and investigations of the inner earth. It is concluded that satellite-based magnetic field measurements make global surveys practical for both field modeling and for the mapping of large-scale crustal anomalies. They are the only practical method of accurately modeling the global secular variation. Magsat is providing a significant contribution, both because of the timeliness of the survey and because its vector measurement capability represents an advance in the technology of such measurements.

  12. Multiscale vector fields for image pattern recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, Kah-Chan; Coggins, James M.

    1990-01-01

    A uniform processing framework for low-level vision computing in which a bank of spatial filters maps the image intensity structure at each pixel into an abstract feature space is proposed. Some properties of the filters and the feature space are described. Local orientation is measured by a vector sum in the feature space as follows: each filter's preferred orientation along with the strength of the filter's output determine the orientation and the length of a vector in the feature space; the vectors for all filters are summed to yield a resultant vector for a particular pixel and scale. The orientation of the resultant vector indicates the local orientation, and the magnitude of the vector indicates the strength of the local orientation preference. Limitations of the vector sum method are discussed. Investigations show that the processing framework provides a useful, redundant representation of image structure across orientation and scale.

  13. Primordial magnetic fields from the string network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiguchi, Kouichirou; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    2016-08-01

    Cosmic strings are a type of cosmic defect formed by a symmetry-breaking phase transition in the early universe. Individual strings would have gathered to build a network, and their dynamical motion would induce scalar-, vector-, and tensor-type perturbations. In this paper, we focus on the vector mode perturbations arising from the string network based on the one scale model and calculate the time evolution and the power spectrum of the associated magnetic fields. We show that the relative velocity between photon and baryon fluids induced by the string network can generate magnetic fields over a wide range of scales based on standard cosmology. We obtain the magnetic field spectrum before recombination as aB(k,z)~4×10Gμ/1k)3.5 gauss on super-horizon scales, and aB(k,z)~2.4×10Gμ/1k)2.5 gauss on sub-horizon scales in co-moving coordinates. This magnetic field grows up to the end of recombination, and has a final amplitude of approximately B~10Gμ gauss at the k~1 Mpc scale today. This field might serve as a seed for cosmological magnetic fields.

  14. Coronal Magnetic Field Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegelmann, Thomas; Petrie, Gordon J. D.; Riley, Pete

    2015-07-01

    Coronal magnetic field models use photospheric field measurements as boundary condition to model the solar corona. We review in this paper the most common model assumptions, starting from MHD-models, magnetohydrostatics, force-free and finally potential field models. Each model in this list is somewhat less complex than the previous one and makes more restrictive assumptions by neglecting physical effects. The magnetohydrostatic approach neglects time-dependent phenomena and plasma flows, the force-free approach neglects additionally the gradient of the plasma pressure and the gravity force. This leads to the assumption of a vanishing Lorentz force and electric currents are parallel (or anti-parallel) to the magnetic field lines. Finally, the potential field approach neglects also these currents. We outline the main assumptions, benefits and limitations of these models both from a theoretical (how realistic are the models?) and a practical viewpoint (which computer resources to we need?). Finally we address the important problem of noisy and inconsistent photospheric boundary conditions and the possibility of using chromospheric and coronal observations to improve the models.

  15. The history of polarisation measurements: their role in studies of magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wielebinski, R.

    2015-03-01

    Radio astronomy gave us new methods to study magnetic fields. Synchrotron radiation, the main cause of comic radio waves, is highly linearly polarised with the `E' vector normal to the magnetic field. The Faraday Effect rotates the `E' vector in thermal regions by the magnetic field in the line of sight. Also the radio Zeeman Effect has been observed.

  16. Magnetic Gradiometer and Vector Magnetometer Survey of the Galapagos Triple Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gee, J.; Cande, S. C.; Parker, R. L.; Lonsdale, P. F.; Bowles, J.

    2004-05-01

    Several fundamental tectonic problems of the equatorial Pacific remain unsolved due to the lack of magnetic anomaly data. A basic limitation encountered with the use of the standard proton precession magnetometer (or any total field instrument) is that total field anomalies over approximately N/S striking bodies are very small at low magnetic latitudes. Another problem encountered with magnetic surveys near the magnetic equator are the diurnal variations associated with the external field. Measurements of the vector anomalous field and total field gradient offer ways to overcome these limitations. Total field gradiometer data allow recognition and removal of time dependent external field variations. Vector magnetic anomalies provide two distinct advantages over total field measurements. Although the total field anomalies are small (typically 50 nT) over most of the equatorial Pacific, the vertical and horizontal components of the anomalous field are 2-5 times larger. In addition, vector anomaly data can be used to evaluate the two dimensionality of the magnetic source since the along track and vertical anomalies are related by a 90o phase shift for a perfectly two dimensional source. To evaluate the advantages of these systems, we conducted a survey of the trails of the Galapagos triple junction using both a high resolution total field gradiometer and a vector magnetometer. The longitudinal gradiometer system consists of two Overhauser sensors (0.01 nT sensitivity) towed 350 and 450m behind the survey vessel. The towed vector magnetometer utilizes a commercial motion reference sensor (0.02o orientation accuracy with three fluxgate sensors) suitable for measuring horizontal and vertical anomalies as small as 30-50 nT. Vector anomalies across Cocos-Nazca crust corroborate the high degree of linearity of these E/W lineations; horizontal and vertical anomalies exhibit high coherence (>0.9) and the expected 90o phase relationship at wavelengths longer than ~8km. Vector

  17. Slow decay of magnetic fields in open Friedmann universes

    SciTech Connect

    Barrow, John D.; Tsagas, Christos G.

    2008-05-15

    Magnetic fields in Friedmann universes can experience superadiabatic growth without departing from conventional electromagnetism. The reason is the relativistic coupling between vector fields and spacetime geometry, which slows down the decay of large-scale magnetic fields in open universes, compared to that seen in perfectly flat models. The result is a large relative gain in magnetic strength that can lead to astrophysically interesting B fields, even if our Universe is only marginally open today.

  18. Superhorizon magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campanelli, Leonardo

    2016-03-01

    We analyze the evolution of superhorizon-scale magnetic fields from the end of inflation till today. Whatever is the mechanism responsible for their generation during inflation, we find that a given magnetic mode with wave number k evolves, after inflation, according to the values of k ηe , nk , and Ωk , where ηe is the conformal time at the end of inflation, nk is the number density spectrum of inflation-produced photons, and Ωk is the phase difference between the two Bogoliubov coefficients which characterize the state of that mode at the end of inflation. For any realistic inflationary magnetogenesis scenario, we find that nk-1≪|k ηe|≪1 , and three evolutionary scenarios are possible: (i) |Ωk∓π |=O (1 ) , in which case the evolution of the magnetic spectrum Bk(η ) is adiabatic, a2Bk(η )=const , with a being the expansion parameter; (ii) |Ωk∓π |≪|k ηe| , in which case the evolution is superadiabatic, a2Bk(η )∝η ; (iii) |k ηe|≪|Ωk∓π |≪1 or |k ηe|˜|Ωk∓π |≪1 , in which case an early phase of adiabatic evolution is followed, after a time η⋆˜|Ωk∓π |/k , by a superadiabatic evolution. Once a given mode reenters the horizon, it remains frozen into the plasma and then evolves adiabatically till today. As a corollary of our results, we find that inflation-generated magnetic fields evolve adiabatically on all scales and for all times in conformal-invariant free Maxwell theory, while they evolve superadiabatically after inflation on superhorizon scales in the nonconformal-invariant Ratra model, where the inflaton is kinematically coupled to the electromagnetic field. The latter result supports and, somehow, clarifies our recent claim that the Ratra model can account for the presence of cosmic magnetic fields without suffering from both backreaction and strong-coupling problems.

  19. Magnetic Field Topology in Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardiner, T. A.; Frank, A.

    2000-01-01

    We present results on the magnetic field topology in a pulsed radiative. jet. For initially helical magnetic fields and periodic velocity variations, we find that the magnetic field alternates along the, length of the jet from toroidally dominated in the knots to possibly poloidally dominated in the intervening regions.

  20. Low field magnetic resonance imaging

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Meriles, Carlos A.; Trabesinger, Andreas H.

    2010-07-13

    A method and system of magnetic resonance imaging does not need a large homogenous field to truncate a gradient field. Spatial information is encoded into the spin magnetization by allowing the magnetization to evolve in a non-truncated gradient field and inducing a set of 180 degree rotations prior to signal acquisition.

  1. Electric and magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.; Robinson, R. S.; Etters, R. D.

    1982-01-01

    A number of energy momentum anomalies are described that result from the use of Abraham-Lorentz electromagnetic theory. These anomalies have in common the motion of charged bodies or current carrying conductors relative to the observer. The anomalies can be avoided by using the nonflow approach, based on internal energy of the electromagnetic field. The anomalies can also be avoided by using the flow approach, if all contributions to flow work are included. The general objective of this research is a fundamental physical understanding of electric and magnetic fields which, in turn, might promote the development of new concepts in electric space propulsion. The approach taken is to investigate quantum representations of these fields.

  2. Ray vector fields, prismatic effect, and thick astigmatic optical systems.

    PubMed

    Harris, W F

    1996-06-01

    The application of the concept of ray vector fields to optical systems is reexamined. Paraxial or linear optics defines a four-dimensional ray vector field for any optical system: the vector field maps the incident ray vector into the emergent ray vector. In the case of thin systems, including thin astigmatic lenses, one can define a vector field of reduced dimensionality: the vector field is two-dimensional and maps the ray's incident position into the change in reduced direction. When the index of refraction is the same before and after a thin system, the change in reduced direction is the reduced deflection through the system or the reduced prismatic effect. Contrary to what has recently been claimed, this type of two-dimensional vector field does not apply in general to thick systems. However, a number of different types of two-dimensional vector fields can be defined for various particular classes of optical systems. Thick systems differ qualitatively from thin systems. They do not have equivalent thin lenses and cannot generally be replaced by thin lenses. Equations are derived for the change in reduced direction and deflection for a ray through optical systems in general and through separated two- and three-lens systems in particular. PMID:8807654

  3. Magnetic Field Analysis of a Permanent-Magnet Induction Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuda, Toshihiro; Fukami, Tadashi; Kanamaru, Yasunori; Miyamoto, Toshio

    The permanent-magnet induction generator (PMIG) is a new type of induction machine that has a permanent-magnet rotor inside a squirrel-cage rotor. In this paper, a new technique for the magnetic field analysis of the PMIG is proposed. The proposed technique is based on the PMIG's equivalent circuit and the two-dimensional finite-element analysis (2D-FEA). To execute the 2D-FEA, the phasors of primary and secondary currents are calculated from the equivalent circuit, and the input data for the 2D-FEA is found by converting these phasors into the space vectors. As a result, the internal magnetic fields of the PMIG can be easily analyzed without complicated calculations.

  4. Reconnection of Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Spacecraft observations of steady and nonsteady reconnection at the magnetopause are reviewed. Computer simulations of three-dimensional reconnection in the geomagnetic tail are discussed. Theoretical aspects of the energization of particles in current sheets and of the microprocesses in the diffusion region are presented. Terrella experiments in which magnetospheric reconnection is simulated at both the magnetopause and in the tail are described. The possible role of reconnection in the evolution of solar magnetic fields and solar flares is discussed. A two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic computer simulation of turbulent reconnection is examined. Results concerning reconnection in Tokamak devices are also presented.

  5. Magnetic fields and stardust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildebrand, Roger H.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to outline the principles governing the use of far-infrared and submillimeter polarimetry to investigate magnetic fields and dust in interstellar clouds. Particular topics of discussion are the alignment of dust grains in dense clouds, the dependence on wavelength of polarization due to emission or to partial absorption by aligned grains, the nature of that dependence for mixtures of grains with different properties, and the problem of distinguishing between (1) the effects of the shapes and dielectric functions of the grains and (2) the degree and direction of their alignment.

  6. Video-rate terahertz electric-field vector imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Takai, Mayuko; Takeda, Masatoshi; Sasaki, Manabu; Tachizaki, Takehiro; Yasumatsu, Naoya; Watanabe, Shinichi

    2014-10-13

    We present an experimental setup to dramatically reduce a measurement time for obtaining spatial distributions of terahertz electric-field (E-field) vectors. The method utilizes the electro-optic sampling, and we use a charge-coupled device to detect a spatial distribution of the probe beam polarization rotation by the E-field-induced Pockels effect in a 〈110〉-oriented ZnTe crystal. A quick rotation of the ZnTe crystal allows analyzing the terahertz E-field direction at each image position, and the terahertz E-field vector mapping at a fixed position of an optical delay line is achieved within 21 ms. Video-rate mapping of terahertz E-field vectors is likely to be useful for achieving real-time sensing of terahertz vector beams, vector vortices, and surface topography. The method is also useful for a fast polarization analysis of terahertz beams.

  7. Juno and Jupiter's Magnetic Field (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloxham, J.; Connerney, J. E.; Jorgensen, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    The Juno spacecraft, launched in August 2011, will reach Jupiter in early July 2016, where it will enter a polar orbit, with an 11 day period and a perijove altitude of approximately 5000 km. The baseline mission will last for one year during which Juno will complete 32 orbits, evenly spaced in longitude. The baseline mission presents an unparalleled opportunity for investigating Jupiter's magnetic field. In many ways Jupiter is a better planet for studying dynamo-generated magnetic fields than the Earth: there are no crustal fields, of course, which otherwise mask the dynamo-generated field at high degree; and an orbiting spacecraft can get proportionately much closer to the dynamo region. Assuming Jupiter's dynamo extends to 0.8 Rj, Juno at closet approach is only 0.3 Rc above the dynamo, while Earth orbiting magnetic field missions sample the field at least 1 Rc above the dynamo (where Rc is the respective outer core or dynamo region radius). Juno's MAG Investigation delivers magnetic measurements with exceptional vector accuracy (100 ppm) via two FGM sensors, each co-located with a dedicated pair of non-magnetic star cameras for attitude determination at the sensor. We expect to image Jupiter's dynamo with unsurpassed resolution. Accordingly, we anticipate that the Juno magnetic field investigation may place important constraints on Jupiter's interior structure, and hence on the formation and evolution of Jupiter.

  8. On the Computation of Integral Curves in Adaptive Mesh Refinement Vector Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Deines, Eduard; Weber, Gunther H.; Garth, Christoph; Van Straalen, Brian; Borovikov, Sergey; Martin, Daniel F.; Joy, Kenneth I.

    2011-06-27

    Integral curves, such as streamlines, streaklines, pathlines, and timelines, are an essential tool in the analysis of vector field structures, offering straightforward and intuitive interpretation of visualization results. While such curves have a long-standing tradition in vector field visualization, their application to Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) simulation results poses unique problems. AMR is a highly effective discretization method for a variety of physical simulation problems and has recently been applied to the study of vector fields in flow and magnetohydrodynamic applications. The cell-centered nature of AMR data and discontinuities in the vector field representation arising from AMR level boundaries complicate the application of numerical integration methods to compute integral curves. In this paper, we propose a novel approach to alleviate these problems and show its application to streamline visualization in an AMR model of the magnetic field of the solar system as well as to a simulation of two incompressible viscous vortex rings merging.

  9. Photonic Magnetic Field Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyntjes, Geert

    2002-02-01

    Small, in-line polarization rotators or isolators to reduce feedback in fiber optic links can be the basis for excellent magnetic field sensors. Based on the giant magneto-optical (GMO) or Faraday effect in iron garnets, they with a magnetic field of a few hundred Gauss, (20 mT) for an interaction length for an optical beam of a few millimeters achieve a polarization rotation or phase shift of 45 deg (1/8 cycle). When powered by a small laser diode, with the induced linear phase shift recovered at the shot noise limit, we have demonstrated sensitivities at the 3.3 nT/Hz1/2 level for frequencies from less than 1 Hz to frequencies into the high kHz range. Through further improvements; an increase in interaction length, better materials and by far the greatest factor, the addition of a flux concentrator, sensitivities at the pT/Hz1/2 level appear to be within reach. We will detail such a design and discuss the issues that may limit achieving these goals.

  10. Polar Magnetic Field Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.

    1999-01-01

    This grant covers the initial data reduction and analysis of the magnetic field measurements of the Polar spacecraft. At this writing data for the first three years of the mission have been processed and deposited in the key parameter database. These data are also available in a variety of time resolutions and coordinate systems via a webserver at UCLA that provides both plots and digital data. The flight software has twice been reprogrammed: once to remove a glitch in the data where there were rare collisions between commands in the central processing unit and once to provide burst mode data at 100 samples per second on a regular basis. The instrument continues to function as described in the instrument paper (1.1 in the bibliography attached below). The early observations were compared with observations on the same field lines at lower altitude. The polar magnetic measurements also proved to be most useful for testing the accuracy of MHD models. WE also made important contributions to study of waves and turbulence.

  11. The Curl of a Vector Field: Beyond the Formula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burch, Kimberly Jordan; Choi, Youngna

    2006-01-01

    It has been widely acknowledged that there is some discrepancy in the teaching of vector calculus in mathematics courses and other applied fields. The curl of a vector field is one topic many students can calculate without understanding its significance. In this paper, we explain the origin of the curl after presenting the standard mathematical…

  12. Characterization of the in situ magnetic architecture of oceanic crust (Hess Deep) using near-source vector magnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tominaga, Masako; Tivey, Maurice A.; MacLeod, Christopher J.; Morris, Antony; Lissenberg, C. Johan; Shillington, Donna J.; Ferrini, Vicki

    2016-06-01

    Marine magnetic anomalies are a powerful tool for detecting geomagnetic polarity reversals, lithological boundaries, topographic contrasts, and alteration fronts in the oceanic lithosphere. Our aim here is to detect lithological contacts in fast-spreading lower crust and shallow mantle by characterizing magnetic anomalies and investigating their origins. We conducted a high-resolution, near-bottom, vector magnetic survey of crust exposed in the Hess Deep "tectonic window" using the remotely operated vehicle (ROV) Isis during RRS James Cook cruise JC21 in 2008. Hess Deep is located at the western tip of the propagating rift of the Cocos-Nazca plate boundary near the East Pacific Rise (EPR) (2°15'N, 101°30'W). ROV Isis collected high-resolution bathymetry and near-bottom magnetic data as well as seafloor samples to determine the in situ lithostratigraphy and internal structure of a section of EPR lower crust and mantle exposed on the steep (~20°dipping) south facing slope just north of the Hess Deep nadir. Ten magnetic profiles were collected up the slope using a three-axis fluxgate magnetometer mounted on ROV Isis. We develop and extend the vertical magnetic profile (VMP) approach of Tivey (1996) by incorporating, for the first time, a three-dimensional vector analysis, leading to what we here termed as "vector vertical magnetic profiling" approach. We calculate the source magnetization distribution, the deviation from two dimensionality, and the strike of magnetic boundaries using both the total field Fourier-transform inversion approach and a modified differential vector magnetic analysis. Overall, coherent, long-wavelength total field anomalies are present with a strong magnetization contrast between the upper and lower parts of the slope. The total field anomalies indicate a coherently magnetized source at depth. The upper part of the slope is weakly magnetized and magnetic structure follows the underlying slope morphology, including a "bench" and lobe

  13. Magnetic Fields: Visible and Permanent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkeljohn, Dorothy R.; Earl, Robert D.

    1983-01-01

    Children will be able to see the concept of a magnetic field translated into a visible reality using the simple method outlined. Standard shelf paper, magnets, iron filings, and paint in a spray can are used to prepare a permanent and well-detailed picture of the magnetic field. (Author/JN)

  14. On the possibility of detecting large-scale crustal remanent magnetization with Magsat vector magnetic anomaly data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galliher, S. C.; Mayhew, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    Magnetic anomaly component data measured by Magsat is compared with synthetic anomaly component fields arising from an equivalent source dipole array at the earth's surface generated from total field anomaly data alone. It is found that the synthetic components fit the component data regardless of the dipole orientation assigned to the equivalent sources and of the dipole spacing. Tentative conclusions are: (1) over the U.S., vector anomaly fields can be determined to the accuracy of the measurements from the total field anomaly data alone; and (2) the equivalent source technique is not useful for determining the direction of large-scale crustal magnetization.

  15. Predicting the magnetic vectors within coronal mass ejections arriving at Earth: 1. Initial architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savani, N. P.; Vourlidas, A.; Szabo, A.; Mays, M. L.; Richardson, I. G.; Thompson, B. J.; Pulkkinen, A.; Evans, R.; Nieves-Chinchilla, T.

    2015-06-01

    The process by which the Sun affects the terrestrial environment on short timescales is predominately driven by the amount of magnetic reconnection between the solar wind and Earth's magnetosphere. Reconnection occurs most efficiently when the solar wind magnetic field has a southward component. The most severe impacts are during the arrival of a coronal mass ejection (CME) when the magnetosphere is both compressed and magnetically connected to the heliospheric environment. Unfortunately, forecasting magnetic vectors within coronal mass ejections remain elusive. Here we report how, by combining a statistically robust helicity rule for a CME's solar origin with a simplified flux rope topology, the magnetic vectors within the Earth-directed segment of a CME can be predicted. In order to test the validity of this proof-of-concept architecture for estimating the magnetic vectors within CMEs, a total of eight CME events (between 2010 and 2014) have been investigated. With a focus on the large false alarm of January 2014, this work highlights the importance of including the early evolutionary effects of a CME for forecasting purposes. The angular rotation in the predicted magnetic field closely follows the broad rotational structure seen within the in situ data. This time-varying field estimate is implemented into a process to quantitatively predict a time-varying Kp index that is described in detail in paper II. Future statistical work, quantifying the uncertainties in this process, may improve the more heuristic approach used by early forecasting systems.

  16. Tracking Vector Magnetograms with the Magnetic Induction Equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuck, P.

    2009-01-01

    The differential affine velocity estimator (DAVE) that we developed in 2006 for estimating velocities from line-of-sight magnetograms is modified to directly incorporate horizontal magnetic fields to produce a differential affine velocity estimator for vector magnetograms (DAVE4VM). The DAVE4VM's performance is demonstrated on the synthetic data from the anelastic pseudospectral ANMHD simulations that were used in the recent comparison of velocity inversion techniques by Welsch and coworkers. The DAVE4VM predicts roughly 95% of the helicity rate and 75% of the power transmitted through the simulation slice. Intercomparison between DAVE4VM and DAVE and further analysis of the DAVE method demonstrates that line-of-sight tracking methods capture the shearing motion of magnetic footpoints but are insensitive to flux emergence - the velocities determined from line-of-sight methods are more consistent with horizontal plasma velocities than with flux transport velocities. These results suggest that previous studies that rely on velocities determined from line-of-sight methods such as the DAVE or local correlation tracking may substantially misrepresent the total helicity rates and power through the photosphere.

  17. Simplified solutions to predicting the magnetic vectors within CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savani, Neel; Vourlidas, Angelos; Pulkinnen, Antti

    2016-04-01

    The direction of magnetic vectors within coronal mass ejections, CMEs, has significant importance for forecasting terrestrial behavior. We have developed a technique to estimate the time-varying magnetic field at the Earth for periods within CMEs. This technique uses solar observational data and empirical relationships along with a constant alpha flux rope model to make the predictions. The technique can be more simply treated as the aggregate from two significant contributions: 1) Estimating the initial topological structure of the CME and 2) Estimating the hypothetical Earth-trajectory after CME evolutionary effects have been considered. In this presentation, we focus on how the evolutionary effects during interplanetary propagation affect the prediction made. We focus on how reliable the predictions are for CME events when the structural shape of the CME is well defined through triangulation of multi-point observations. We show that in such cases of reliable triangulation, the predictions are relatively well constrained to perturbations in the hypothetical Earth trajectory. However, we show how the predictions can be drastically different for cases where the CME direction and orientation remain ambiguous by removing the off Sun-Earth line observations.

  18. Statistical anisotropy of the curvature perturbation from vector field perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Dimopoulos, Konstantinos; Karciauskas, Mindaugas; Lyth, David H.; Rodriguez, Yeinzon E-mail: m.karciauskas@lancaster.ac.uk E-mail: yeinzon.rodriguez@uan.edu.co

    2009-05-15

    The {delta}N formula for the primordial curvature perturbation {zeta} is extended to include vector as well as scalar fields. Formulas for the tree-level contributions to the spectrum and bispectrum of {zeta} are given, exhibiting statistical anisotropy. The one-loop contribution to the spectrum of {zeta} is also worked out. We then consider the generation of vector field perturbations from the vacuum, including the longitudinal component that will be present if there is no gauge invariance. Finally, the {delta}N formula is applied to the vector curvaton and vector inflation models with the tensor perturbation also evaluated in the latter case.

  19. Observations of galactic magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Rainer

    Magnetic fields are enchored in gas clouds. Field lines are tangled in spiral arms, but highly regular between the arms. The similarity of pitch angles between gaseous and magnetic arms suggests a coupling between the density wave and the magnetic wave. Observations of large-scale patterns in Faraday rotation favour a dynamo origin of the regular fields. Fields in barred galaxies do not reveal the strong shearing shocks observed in the cold gas, but swing smoothly from the upstream region into the bar. Magnetic fields are important for the dynamcis of gas clouds, for the formation of spiral structures, bars and halos, and for mass and angular momentum transport in central regions.

  20. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    DOEpatents

    Goren, Y.; Mahale, N.K.

    1996-08-06

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles. 6 figs.

  1. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    DOEpatents

    Goren, Yehuda; Mahale, Narayan K.

    1996-01-01

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles.

  2. The magnetic field of a permanent hollow cylindrical magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reich, Felix A.; Stahn, Oliver; Müller, Wolfgang H.

    2015-12-01

    Based on the rational version of Muc(AXWELL)'s equations according to Tuc(RUESDELL) and Tuc(OUPIN) or KOVETZ, cf. (Kovetz in Electromagnetic theory, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2000; Truesdell and Toupin in Handbuch der Physik, Bd. III/1, Springer, Berlin, pp 226-793; appendix, pp 794-858, 2000), we present, for stationary processes, a closed-form solution for the magnetic flux density of a hollow cylindrical magnet. Its magnetization is constant in axial direction. We consider Muc(AXWELL)'s equations in regular and singular points that are obtained by rational electrodynamics, adapted to stationary processes. The magnetic flux density is calculated analytically by means of a vector potential. We obtain a solution in terms of complete elliptic integrals. Therefore, numerical evaluation can be performed in a computationally efficient manner. The solution is written in dimensionless form and can easily be applied to cylinders of arbitrary shape. The relation between the magnetic flux density and the magnetic field is linear, and an explicit relation for the field is presented. With a slight modification the result can be used to obtain the field of a solid cylindrical magnet. The mathematical structure of the solution and, in particular, singularities are discussed.

  3. Martian external magnetic field proxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langlais, Benoit; Civet, Francois

    2015-04-01

    Mars possesses no dynamic magnetic field of internal origin as it is the case for the Earth or for Mercury. Instead Mars is characterized by an intense and localized magnetic field of crustal origin. This field is the result of past magnetization and demagnetization processes, and reflects its evolution. The Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) interacts with Mars' ionized environment to create an external magnetic field. This external field is weak compared to lithospheric one but very dynamic, and may hamper the detailed analysis of the internal magnetic field at some places or times. Because there are currently no magnetic field measurements made at Mars' surface, it is not possible to directly monitor the external field temporal variability as it is done in Earth's ground magnetic observatories. In this study we examine to indirect ways of quantifying this external field. First we use the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) mission which measures the solar wind about one hour upstream of the bow-shock resulting from the interaction between the solar wind and the Earth's internal magnetic field. These measurements are extrapolated to Mars' position taking into account the orbital configurations of the Mars-Earth system and the velocity of particles carrying the IMF. Second we directly use Mars Global Surveyor magnetic field measurements to quantify the level of variability of the external field. We subtract from the measurements the internal field which is otherwise modeled, and bin the residuals first on a spatial and then on a temporal mesh. This allows to compute daily or semi daily index. We present a comparison of these two proxies and demonstrate their complementarity. We also illustrate our analysis by comparing our Martian external field proxies to terrestrial index at epochs of known strong activity. These proxies will especially be useful for upcoming magnetic field measurements made around or at the surface of Mars.

  4. Cyclical magnetic field flow fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasci, T. O.; Johnson, W. P.; Gale, B. K.

    2012-04-01

    In this study, a new magnetic field flow fractionation (FFF) system was designed and modeled by using finite element simulations. Other than current magnetic FFF systems, which use static magnetic fields, our system uses cyclical magnetic fields. Results of the simulations show that our cyclical magnetic FFF system can be used effectively for the separation of magnetic nanoparticles. Cyclical magnetic FFF system is composed of a microfluidic channel (length = 5 cm, height = 30 μm) and 2 coils. Square wave currents of 1 Hz (with 90 deg of phase difference) were applied to the coils. By using Comsol Multiphysics 3.5a, magnetic field profile and corresponding magnetic force exerted on the magnetite nanoparticles were calculated. The magnetic force data were exported from Comsol to Matlab. In Matlab, a parabolic flow profile with maximum flow speed of 0.4 mL/h was defined. Particle trajectories were obtained by the calculation of the particle speeds resulted from both magnetic and hydrodynamic forces. Particle trajectories of the particles with sizes ranging from 10 to 50 nm were simulated and elution times of the particles were calculated. Results show that there is a significant difference between the elution times of the particles so that baseline separation of the particles can be obtained. In this work, it is shown that by the application of cyclical magnetic fields, the separation of magnetic nanoparticles can be done efficiently.

  5. Magnetic field modification of optical magnetic dipoles.

    PubMed

    Armelles, Gaspar; Caballero, Blanca; Cebollada, Alfonso; Garcia-Martin, Antonio; Meneses-Rodríguez, David

    2015-03-11

    Acting on optical magnetic dipoles opens novel routes to govern light-matter interaction. We demonstrate magnetic field modification of the magnetic dipolar moment characteristic of resonant nanoholes in thin magnetoplasmonic films. This is experimentally shown through the demonstration of the magneto-optical analogue of Babinet's principle, where mirror imaged MO spectral dependencies are obtained for two complementary magnetoplasmonic systems: holes in a perforated metallic layer and a layer of disks on a substrate. PMID:25646869

  6. Exposure guidelines for magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Miller, G

    1987-12-01

    The powerful magnetic fields produced by a controlled fusion experiment at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) necessitated the development of personnel-exposure guidelines for steady magnetic fields. A literature search and conversations with active researchers showed that it is currently possible to develop preliminary exposure guidelines for steady magnetic fields. An overview of the results of past research into the bioeffects of magnetic fields was compiled, along with a discussion of hazards that may be encountered by people with sickle-cell anemia or medical electronic and prosthetic implants. The LLNL steady magnetic-field exposure guidelines along with a review of developments concerning the safety of time-varying fields were also presented in this compilation. Guidelines developed elsewhere for time varying fields were also given. Further research is needed to develop exposure standards for both steady or time-varying fields. PMID:3434538

  7. Exposure guidelines for magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, G.

    1987-12-01

    The powerful magnetic fields produced by a controlled fusion experiment at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) necessitated the development of personnel-exposure guidelines for steady magnetic fields. A literature search and conversations with active researchers showed that it is currently possible to develop preliminary exposure guidelines for steady magnetic fields. An overview of the results of past research into the bioeffects of magnetic fields was compiled, along with a discussion of hazards that may be encountered by people with sickle-cell anemia or medical electronic and prosthetic implants. The LLNL steady magnetic-field exposure guidelines along with a review of developments concerning the safety of time-varying fields were also presented in this compilation. Guidelines developed elsewhere for time varying fields were also given. Further research is needed to develop exposure standards for both steady or time-varying fields.

  8. [Magnetic fields and fish behavior].

    PubMed

    Krylov, V V; Iziumov, Iu G; Izvekov, E I; Nepomniashchikh, V A

    2013-01-01

    In the review, contemporary data on the influence of natural and artificial magnetic fields on fish behavior are considered. In this regard, elasmobranchs and teleosts appear to be studied most exhaustively. Elasmobranchs and some teleosts are able to perceive magnetic fields via electroreceptors. A number of teleosts can sense magnetic fields via sensory cells containing crystals of biogenic magnetite. Laboratory experiments and field observations indicate the influence of magnetic fields on fish locomotor activity and spatial distribution. The geomagnetic field can be used by fish for navigation. Besides, artificial magnetic fields and natural fluctuations of the geomagnetic field can affect fish embryos leading to alterations in their development. It is suggested that, afterwards, these alterations can have an effect on fish behavior. PMID:25438567

  9. [Magnetic fields and fish behavior].

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    In the review, contemporary data on the influence of natural and artificial magnetic fields on fish behavior are considered. In this regard, elasmobranchs and teleosts appear to be studied most exhaustively. Elasmobranchs and some teleosts are able to perceive magnetic fields via electroreceptors. A number of teleosts can sense magnetic fields via sensory cells containing crystals of biogenic magnetite. Laboratory experiments and field observations indicate the influence of magnetic fields on fish locomotor activity and spatial distribution. The geomagnetic field can be used by fish for navigation. Besides, artificial magnetic fields and natural fluctuations of the geomagnetic field can affect fish embryos leading to alterations in their development. It is suggested that, afterwards, these alterations can have an effect on fish behavior. PMID:25508098

  10. Magnetic-field-dosimetry system

    DOEpatents

    Lemon, D.K.; Skorpik, J.R.; Eick, J.L.

    1981-01-21

    A device is provided for measuring the magnetic field dose and peak field exposure. The device includes three Hall-effect sensors all perpendicular to each other, sensing the three dimensional magnetic field and associated electronics for data storage, calculating, retrieving and display.

  11. Estimating locations and total magnetization vectors of compact magnetic sources from scalar, vector, or tensor magnetic measurements through combined Helbig and Euler analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phillips, J.D.; Nabighian, M.N.; Smith, D.V.; Li, Y.

    2007-01-01

    The Helbig method for estimating total magnetization directions of compact sources from magnetic vector components is extended so that tensor magnetic gradient components can be used instead. Depths of the compact sources can be estimated using the Euler equation, and their dipole moment magnitudes can be estimated using a least squares fit to the vector component or tensor gradient component data. ?? 2007 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  12. Computation of solar magnetic fields from photospheric observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannakam, L.; Gary, G. A.; Teuber, D. L.

    1984-01-01

    The observational difficulties of obtaining the magnetic field distribution in the chromosphere and corona of the sun has led to methods of extending photospheric magnetic mesurements into the solar atmosphere by mathematical procedures. A new approach to this problem presented here is that a constant alpha force-free field can be uniquely determined from the tangential components of the measured photospheric flux alone. The vector magnetographs now provide measurements of both the solar photospheric tangential and the longitudinal magnetic field. This paper presents derivations for the computation of the solar magnetic field from these type of measurements. The fields considered are assumed to be a constant alpha force-free fields or equivalent, producing vanishing Lorentz forces. Consequently, magnetic field lines and currents are related by a constant and hence show an identical distribution. The magnetic field above simple solar regions are described from the solution of the field equations.

  13. Computation of solar magnetic fields from photospheric observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannakam, L.; Gary, G. A.; Teuber, D. L.

    1984-09-01

    The observational difficulties of obtaining the magnetic field distribution in the chromosphere and corona of the sun has led to methods of extending photospheric magnetic mesurements into the solar atmosphere by mathematical procedures. A new approach to this problem presented here is that a constant alpha force-free field can be uniquely determined from the tangential components of the measured photospheric flux alone. The vector magnetographs now provide measurements of both the solar photospheric tangential and the longitudinal magnetic field. This paper presents derivations for the computation of the solar magnetic field from these type of measurements. The fields considered are assumed to be a constant alpha force-free fields or equivalent, producing vanishing Lorentz forces. Consequently, magnetic field lines and currents are related by a constant and hence show an identical distribution. The magnetic field above simple solar regions are described from the solution of the field equations.

  14. Simplified solutions to predicting the magnetic vectors within CMEs.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savani, N.

    2015-12-01

    The direction of magnetic vectors within coronal mass ejections, CMEs, has significant importance for forecasting terrestrial behavior. However forecasting these vectors remains largely elusive and lies predominately with the difficulty in disassociating the predictive skill of the magnetic configuration during the initiation process with the skill of understanding the evolutionary effects of the topology during propagation. Here, we discuss a simplified system for predicting the magnetic vector within CMEs, driven by observations and empirical relationships. We suggest a modification to a CME helicity rule by Bothmer & Schwenn (1998) can improve the skills with the initiation problem near the solar surface, and accurate triangulation methods of the CME with recent observational studies can improve the predictions of the evolutionary effects. Both tools in conjunction can provide the first steps to providing operationally reliable estimates of the magnetic vectors for all possible CMEs and include scope to improve individual modules within the forecasting scheme. By focusing on Earth-directed CMEs, we can develop forecasting skill scores for multiple CMEs using NOAA definitions for geomagnetic storms. We will present the skill scores of predicted CMEs in relation to their associated Kp values at Earth for CMEs that were predicted in a real-time setting at NASA Space Weather Research Center.

  15. Magnetization curves and probability angular distribution of the magnetization vector in Er2Fe14Si3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobh, Hala A.; Aly, Samy H.; Shabara, Reham M.; Yehia, Sherif

    2016-01-01

    Specific magnetic and magneto-thermal properties of Er2Fe14Si3, in the temperature range of 80-300 K, have been investigated using basic laws of classical statistical mechanics in a simple model. In this model, the constructed partition function was used to derive, and therefore calculate the temperature and/or field dependence of a host of physical properties. Examples of these properties are: the magnetization, magnetic heat capacity, magnetic susceptibility, probability angular distribution of the magnetization vector, and the associated angular dependence of energy. We highlight a correlation between the energy of the system, its magnetization behavior and the angular location of the magnetization vector. Our results show that Er2Fe14Si3 is an easy-axis system in the temperature range 80-114 K, but switches to an easy-plane system at T≥114 K. This transition is also supported by both of the temperature dependence of the magnetic heat capacity, which develops a peak at a temperature ~114 K, and the probability landscape which shows, in zero magnetic field, a prominent peak in the basal plane at T=113.5 K.

  16. Magnetic fields in nearby spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaohui; Lenc, Emil

    2013-10-01

    Magnetic fields play an important role in star formation process and dynamic evolution of galaxies. Previous studies of magnetic fields relied on narrow band polarisation observations and difficult to disentangle magnetised structures along line of sight. Thanks to the broad bandwidth and multi-channels of CABB we are now able to recover the 3D structures of magnetic fields using RM synthesis and QU-fitting. We propose to observe two nearby spirals M83 and NGC 4945 to build clear pictures of their magnetic fields.

  17. Visualizing Vector Fields Using Line Integral Convolution and Dye Advection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Han-Wei; Johnson, Christopher R.; Ma, Kwan-Liu

    1996-01-01

    We present local and global techniques to visualize three-dimensional vector field data. Using the Line Integral Convolution (LIC) method to image the global vector field, our new algorithm allows the user to introduce colored 'dye' into the vector field to highlight local flow features. A fast algorithm is proposed that quickly recomputes the dyed LIC images. In addition, we introduce volume rendering methods that can map the LIC texture on any contour surface and/or translucent region defined by additional scalar quantities, and can follow the advection of colored dye throughout the volume.

  18. The Local Stellar Velocity Field via Vector Spherical Harmonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markarov, V. V.; Murphy, D. W.

    2007-01-01

    ), but here we surmise its existence in the thin disk at z less than 200 pc. The most unexpected and unexplained term within the Ogorodnikov-Milne model is the first-degree magnetic harmonic, representing a rigid rotation of the stellar field about the axis -Y pointing opposite to the direction of rotation. This harmonic comes out with a statistically robust coefficient of 6.2 +/- 0.9 km s(exp -1) kpc(exp -1) and is also present in the velocity field of more distant stars. The ensuing upward vertical motion of stars in the general direction of the Galactic center and the downward motion in the anticenter direction are opposite to the vector field expected from the stationary Galactic warp model.

  19. The Local Stellar Velocity Field via Vector Spherical Harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, V. V.; Murphy, D. W.

    2007-07-01

    the Ogorodnikov-Milne model is the first-degree magnetic harmonic, representing a rigid rotation of the stellar field about the axis -Y pointing opposite to the direction of rotation. This harmonic comes out with a statistically robust coefficient of 6.2+/-0.9 km s-1 kpc-1 and is also present in the velocity field of more distant stars. The ensuing upward vertical motion of stars in the general direction of the Galactic center and the downward motion in the anticenter direction are opposite to the vector field expected from the stationary Galactic warp model.

  20. Vestibular stimulation by magnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Bryan K.; Roberts, Dale C.; Della Santina, Charles C.; Carey, John P.; Zee, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals working next to strong static magnetic fields occasionally report disorientation and vertigo. With the increasing strength of magnetic fields used for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies, these reports have become more common. It was recently learned that humans, mice and zebrafish all demonstrate behaviors consistent with constant peripheral vestibular stimulation while inside a strong, static magnetic field. The proposed mechanism for this effect involves a Lorentz force resulting from the interaction of a strong static magnetic field with naturally occurring ionic currents flowing through the inner ear endolymph into vestibular hair cells. The resulting force within the endolymph is strong enough to displace the lateral semicircular canal cupula, inducing vertigo and the horizontal nystagmus seen in normal mice and in humans. This review explores the evidence for interactions of magnetic fields with the vestibular system. PMID:25735662

  1. Magnetic fields around evolved stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal-Ferreira, M.; Vlemmings, W.; Kemball, A.; Amiri, N.; Maercker, M.; Ramstedt, S.; Olofsson, G.

    2014-04-01

    A number of mechanisms, such as magnetic fields, (binary) companions and circumstellar disks have been suggested to be the cause of non-spherical PNe and in particular collimated outflows. This work investigates one of these mechanisms: the magnetic fields. While MHD simulations show that the fields can indeed be important, few observations of magnetic fields have been done so far. We used the VLBA to observe five evolved stars, with the goal of detecting the magnetic field by means of water maser polarization. The sample consists in four AGB stars (IK Tau, RT Vir, IRC+60370 and AP Lyn) and one pPN (OH231.8+4.2). In four of the five sources, several strong maser features were detected allowing us to measure the linear and/or circular polarization. Based on the circular polarization detections, we infer the strength of the component of the field along the line of sight to be between ~30 mG and ~330 mG in the water maser regions of these four sources. When extrapolated to the surface of the stars, the magnetic field strength would be between a few hundred mG and a few Gauss when assuming a toroidal field geometry and higher when assuming more complex magnetic fields. We conclude that the magnetic energy we derived in the water maser regions is higher than the thermal and kinetic energy, leading to the conclusion that, indeed, magnetic fields probably play an important role in shaping Planetary Nebulae.

  2. Visualization of 3 Dimensional Seismic Vector Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuinn, E.; Chourasia, A.; Minster, J. H.; Schulze, J.

    2009-12-01

    Earthquake simulations produce vast amounts of surface and volumetric temporal data. We have implemented methods to visualize scalar and vector data that allows comprehension of the large amount of information. We leverage advances in graphics processors to draw oriented and textured geometry interactively. We have developed four glyphs to depict the underlying vector data: spheres, ellipsoids, lines, and voxels. The glyphs can be switched interactively and offer multiple visual representations where each glyph enhances different underlying property. Additionally, we have developed highlighting mechanisms to enhance comprehension of direction of vector data. For instance, a sphere would ordinarily not provide directional cues but with our method of highlight the sphere can indicate the direction. We have also developed interactively tunable methods to resolve occlusion of volumetric data. We present multimodal visual representations that provide an array of interactive and flexible visualization techniques to the scientists for scientific investigation through visualization. The visualization tool can be run on a laptop, desktop or virtual reality (VR) environment. We are leveraging one such state-of-the-art system called “StarCAVE”. The StarCAVE surrounds the user with seamless, immersive and stereoscopic virtual environment. This VR environment provides the capability to view the volumetric data from inside the volume in an immersive manner, which is similar to witnessing the earthquake event from inside earth from any vantage point. Interactive visualization of the Terashake simulation allows scientists to flexibly explore existing data intuitively. This is a crop of the Terashake simulation containing the San Andreas near San Bernadino. Color represents velocity magnitude, while direction is that of the displacement vector.

  3. IMP F and G phase 1 magnetic field analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mish, W. H.

    1972-01-01

    The program developed to analyze magnetic field data from the magnetic field experiment flown in IMP F is reported. The analysis converts the raw X, Y, Z sensor data as received on the magnetic field experiment tape into vector measurements of the ambient magnetic field observed by the experiment. These data are computed for four frames of reference -- apparent, payload, solar ecliptic and solar magnetospheric. In addition 20.45 second statistics are computed for the last three coordinate systems. Finally, a summary tape is produced containing detailed data and sequence statistics as well as the output from the autocorrelation computer, trajectory data and identification information.

  4. Wave-vector dependence of magnetic-turbulence spectra in the solar wind.

    PubMed

    Narita, Y; Glassmeier, K-H; Sahraoui, F; Goldstein, M L

    2010-04-30

    Using four-point measurements of the Cluster spacecraft, the energy distribution was determined for magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind directly in the three-dimensional wave-vector domain in the range |k|field preferring the ecliptic north direction and also by a moderately extended structure parallel to the mean field. From the three-dimensional energy distribution wave vector anisotropy is estimated with respect to directions parallel and perpendicular to the mean magnetic field, and the result suggests the dominance of quasi-two-dimensional turbulence toward smaller spatial scales. PMID:20482101

  5. The Capacitive Magnetic Field Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyatkov, D. O.; Yurchenko, A. V.; Balashov, V. B.; Yurchenko, V. I.

    2016-01-01

    The results of a study of sensitive element magnetic field sensor are represented in this paper. The sensor is based on the change of the capacitance with an active dielectric (ferrofluid) due to the magnitude of magnetic field. To prepare the ferrofluid magnetic particles are used, which have a followingdispersion equal to 50 < Ø < 56, 45 < Ø < 50, 40 < Ø < 45 and Ø < 40micron of nanocrystalline alloy of brand 5BDSR. The dependence of the sensitivity of the capacitive element from the ferrofluid with different dispersion of magnetic particles is considered. The threshold of sensitivity and sensitivity of a measuring cell with ferrofluid by a magnetic field was determined. The experimental graphs of capacitance change of the magnitude of magnetic field are presented.

  6. Origin of cosmic magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Campanelli, Leonardo

    2013-08-01

    We calculate, in the free Maxwell theory, the renormalized quantum vacuum expectation value of the two-point magnetic correlation function in de Sitter inflation. We find that quantum magnetic fluctuations remain constant during inflation instead of being washed out adiabatically, as usually assumed in the literature. The quantum-to-classical transition of super-Hubble magnetic modes during inflation allow us to treat the magnetic field classically after reheating, when it is coupled to the primeval plasma. The actual magnetic field is scale independent and has an intensity of few×10(-12)  G if the energy scale of inflation is few×10(16)  GeV. Such a field accounts for galactic and galaxy cluster magnetic fields. PMID:23971556

  7. Measurements of magnetic field alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchnir, M.; Schmidt, E.E.

    1987-11-06

    The procedure for installing Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) dipoles in their respective cryostats involves aligning the average direction of their field with the vertical to an accuracy of 0.5 mrad. The equipment developed for carrying on these measurements is described and the measurements performed on the first few prototypes SSC magnets are presented. The field angle as a function of position in these 16.6 m long magnets is a characteristic of the individual magnet with possible feedback information to its manufacturing procedure. A comparison of this vertical alignment characteristic with a magnetic field intensity (by NMR) characteristic for one of the prototypes is also presented. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  8. Attenuated Vector Tomography -- An Approach to Image Flow Vector Fields with Doppler Ultrasonic Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Qiu; Peng, Qiyu; Huang, Bin; Cheryauka, Arvi; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2008-05-15

    The measurement of flow obtained using continuous wave Doppler ultrasound is formulated as a directional projection of a flow vector field. When a continuous ultrasound wave bounces against a flowing particle, a signal is backscattered. This signal obtains a Doppler frequency shift proportional to the speed of the particle along the ultrasound beam. This occurs for each particle along the beam, giving rise to a Doppler velocity spectrum. The first moment of the spectrum provides the directional projection of the flow along theultrasound beam. Signals reflected from points further away from the detector will have lower amplitude than signals reflected from points closer to the detector. The effect is very much akin to that modeled by the attenuated Radon transform in emission computed tomography.A least-squares method was adopted to reconstruct a 2D vector field from directional projection measurements. Attenuated projections of only the longitudinal projections of the vector field were simulated. The components of the vector field were reconstructed using the gradient algorithm to minimize a least-squares criterion. This result was compared with the reconstruction of longitudinal projections of the vector field without attenuation. Ifattenuation is known, the algorithm was able to accurately reconstruct both components of the full vector field from only one set of directional projection measurements. A better reconstruction was obtained with attenuation than without attenuation implying that attenuation provides important information for the reconstruction of flow vector fields.This confirms previous work where we showed that knowledge of the attenuation distribution helps in the reconstruction of MRI diffusion tensor fields from fewer than the required measurements. In the application of ultrasound the attenuation distribution is obtained with pulse wave transmission computed tomography and flow information is obtained with continuous wave Doppler.

  9. Magnetic fields in young galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordlund, Åke; Rögnvaldsson, Örnólfur

    We have studied the fate of initial magnetic fields in the hot halo gas out of which the visible parts of galaxies form, using three-dimensional numerical MHD-experiments. The halo gas undergoes compression by several orders of magnitude in the subsonic cooling flow that forms the cold disk. The magnetic field is carried along and is amplified considerably in the process, reaching μG levels for reasonable values of the initial ratio of magnetic to thermal energy density.

  10. Inflation with a massive vector field nonminimally coupled to gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolami, O.; Bessa, V.; Páramos, J.

    2016-03-01

    We study the possibility that inflation is driven by a massive vector field with S O (3 ) global symmetry nonminimally coupled to gravity. From an E3-invariant Robertson-Walker metric we propose an Ansatz for the vector field, allowing us to study the evolution of the system. We study the behavior of the equations of motion using the methods of the theory of dynamical systems and find exponential inflationary regimes.

  11. Vector Field Visual Data Analysis Technologies for Petascale Computational Science

    SciTech Connect

    Garth, Christoph; Deines, Eduard; Joy, Kenneth I.; Bethel, E. Wes; Childs, Hank; Weber, Gunther; Ahern, Sean; Pugmire, Dave; Sanderson, Allen; Johnson, Chris

    2009-11-13

    State-of-the-art computational science simulations generate large-scale vector field data sets. Visualization and analysis is a key aspect of obtaining insight into these data sets and represents an important challenge. This article discusses possibilities and challenges of modern vector field visualization and focuses on methods and techniques developed in the SciDAC Visualization and Analytics Center for Enabling Technologies (VACET) and deployed in the open-source visualization tool, VisIt.

  12. Cosmic Magnetic Fields - An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wielebinski, Richard; Beck, Rainer

    Magnetic fields have been known in antiquity. Aristotle attributes the first of what could be called a scientific discussion on magnetism to Thales, who lived from about 625 BC. In China “magnetic carts” were in use to help the Emperor in his journeys of inspection. Plinius comments that in the Asia Minor province of Magnesia shepherds' staffs get at times “glued” to a stone, a alodestone. In Europe the magnetic compass came through the Arab sailors who met the Portuguese explorers. The first scientific treatise on magnetism, “De Magnete”, was published by William Gilbert who in 1600 described his experiments and suggested that the Earth was a huge magnet. Johannes Kepler was a correspondent of Gilbert and at times suggested that planetary motion was due to magnetic forces. Alas, this concept was demolished by Isaac Newton,who seeing the falling apple decided that gravity was enough. This concept of dealing with gravitational forces only remains en vogue even today. The explanations why magnetic effects must be neglected go from “magnetic energy is only 1% of gravitation” to “magnetic fields only complicate the beautiful computer solutions”. What is disregarded is the fact that magnetic effects are very directional(not omni-directional as gravity) and also the fact that magnetic fields are seen every where in our cosmic universe.

  13. Large-angle magnetization dynamics investigated by vector-resolved magnetization-induced optical second-harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerrits, Th.; Silva, T. J.; Nibarger, J. P.; Rasing, Th.

    2004-12-01

    We examine the relationship between nonlinear magnetic responses and the change in the Gilbert damping parameter α for patterned and unpatterned thin Permalloy films when subjected to pulsed magnetic fields. An improved magnetization-vector-resolved technique utilizing magnetization-induced optical second-harmonic generation was used to measure magnetization dynamics after pulsed-field excitation. The magnetization excitations were achieved with pulsed fields aligned parallel to the hard axis of thin permalloy (Ni80Fe20) films while a dc bias field is applied along the easy axis. At low bias fields, α was inversely related to the bias field, but there was no significant reduction in the absolute value of the magnetization, as might be expected if there was significant spin-wave generation during the damping process. We discuss the discrepancies between data obtained by ferromagnetic resonance, whereby spin-wave generation is prevalent, and pulsed-field studies, with the conclusion that fundamental differences between the two techniques for the excitation of the ferromagnetic spin system might explain the different proclivities toward spin-wave generation manifest in these two experimental methods.

  14. Rotating-frame gradient fields for magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance in low fields

    DOEpatents

    Bouchard, Louis-Serge; Pines, Alexander; Demas, Vasiliki

    2014-01-21

    A system and method for Fourier encoding a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal is disclosed. A static magnetic field B.sub.0 is provided along a first direction. An NMR signal from the sample is Fourier encoded by applying a rotating-frame gradient field B.sub.G superimposed on the B.sub.0, where the B.sub.G comprises a vector component rotating in a plane perpendicular to the first direction at an angular frequency .omega.in a laboratory frame. The Fourier-encoded NMR signal is detected.

  15. Animation of orthogonal texture patterns for vector field visualization.

    PubMed

    Bachthaler, Sven; Weiskopf, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    This paper introduces orthogonal vector field visualization on 2D manifolds: a representation by lines that are perpendicular to the input vector field. Line patterns are generated by line integral convolution (LIC). This visualization is combined with animation based on motion along the vector field. This decoupling of the line direction from the direction of animation allows us to choose the spatial frequencies along the direction of motion independently from the length scales along the LIC line patterns. Vision research indicates that local motion detectors are tuned to certain spatial frequencies of textures, and the above decoupling enables us to generate spatial frequencies optimized for motion perception. Furthermore, we introduce a combined visualization that employs orthogonal LIC patterns together with conventional, tangential streamline LIC patterns in order to benefit from the advantages of these two visualization approaches. In addition, a filtering process is described to achieve a consistent and temporally coherent animation of orthogonal vector field visualization. Different filter kernels and filter methods are compared and discussed in terms of visualization quality and speed. We present respective visualization algorithms for 2D planar vector fields and tangential vector fields on curved surfaces, and demonstrate that those algorithms lend themselves to efficient and interactive GPU implementations. PMID:18467751

  16. The prediction of oceanic lithospheric magnetic anomalies from magnetisation estimates, using vector spherical harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masterton, S.; Gubbins, D.; Ivers, D.; Müller, D.; Winch, D.

    2009-12-01

    High resolution lithospheric magnetic field anomaly maps derived from satellite data now offer immense opportunities to interpret crustal magnetic properties such as susceptibility, depth to Curie isotherm, magnetisation type and intensity. We present a method in which a vector spherical harmonic formulation allows the natural separation of 3 types of lithospheric magnetisation: one responsible for the observed potential field external to the crust, one responsible for the field inside the Earth that is not observed, and a toroidal magnetisation associated with a radial electric current responsible for a non-potential field. The latter two constitute the annihilator in the inverse problem for magnetisation using magnetic field data. Starting from a model of vertically integrated lithospheric magnetisation based on geology, we compute all 3 types of magnetisation and discuss implications of the 2 annihilators for inversion studies. We adopt a forward-modelling approach in which lithospheric magnetisation is estimated independently of satellite data, with particular emphasis on the oceans. Induced and remanent contributions are determined separately. Remanent magnetisation is derived from a combination of magnetic crustal thickness, a remanence intensity-age profile superimposed onto a geomagnetic polarity timescale and a digital age grid of the ocean floor, and magnetisation directions derived from the implementation of updated plate reconstruction models. Induced magnetisation is derived from a combination of magnetic crustal thickness and standard magnetic susceptibilities associated with major geological units. We present comparisons between magnetic anomalies predicted from magnetisation estimates and lithospheric magnetic field models.

  17. Magnetic field synthesis for microwave magnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgenthaler, F. R.

    1982-04-01

    The Microwave and Quantum Magnetics Group of the M.I.T. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science undertook a two-year research program directed at developing synthesis procedures that allow magnetostatic and/or magnetoelastic modes to be specially tailored for microwave signal processing applications that include magnetically tunable filters and limiters as well as delay lines that are either linearly dispersive or nondispersive over prescribed bandwidths. Special emphasis was given to devices employing thin films of yttrium iron garnet (YIG) that are blessed with spatially nonuniform dc magnetic fields.

  18. Magnetic field structure evolution in rotating magnetic field plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, Yuri; Yang Xiaokang; Huang, T.-S.

    2008-07-15

    A study of magnetic field structure evolution during 40-ms plasma discharge has been performed in a new device with 80 cm long/40 cm diameter cylindrical chamber, in which a plasma current I{sub p}{approx_equal}2 kA was driven and sustained by a rotating magnetic field. The main focus of the experiments is on how the changes in externally applied magnetic field affect the current profile and magnetic field in plasma. During plasma discharge, a pulse current was briefly fed to a magnetic coil located at the midplane (middle coil). The magnetic field in cross section of plasma was scanned with pickup probes. Two regimes were studied: without and with an external toroidal field (TF) produced by axial I{sub z} current. With a relatively small current (I{sub m} {<=} 600 A) in the middle coil, the plasma current is boosted up to 5 kA. The magnetic flux surfaces become extended along the axial Z direction, sometimes with the formation of doublet shape plasma. The regime without TF appears to be less stable, presumably due to the reversal of plasma current in central area of plasma column.

  19. Three axis vector magnet set-up for cryogenic scanning probe microscopy.

    PubMed

    Galvis, J A; Herrera, E; Guillamón, I; Azpeitia, J; Luccas, R F; Munuera, C; Cuenca, M; Higuera, J A; Díaz, N; Pazos, M; García-Hernandez, M; Buendía, A; Vieira, S; Suderow, H

    2015-01-01

    We describe a three axis vector magnet system for cryogenic scanning probe microscopy measurements. We discuss the magnet support system and the power supply, consisting of a compact three way 100 A current source. We obtain tilted magnetic fields in all directions with maximum value of 5T along z-axis and of 1.2T for XY-plane magnetic fields. We describe a scanning tunneling microscopy-spectroscopy (STM-STS) set-up, operating in a dilution refrigerator, which includes a new high voltage ultralow noise piezodrive electronics and discuss the noise level due to vibrations. STM images and STS maps show atomic resolution and the tilted vortex lattice at 150 mK in the superconductor β-Bi2Pd. We observe a strongly elongated hexagonal lattice, which corresponds to the projection of the tilted hexagonal vortex lattice on the surface. We also discuss Magnetic Force Microscopy images in a variable temperature insert. PMID:25638089

  20. Three axis vector magnet set-up for cryogenic scanning probe microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Galvis, J. A.; Herrera, E.; Buendía, A.; Guillamón, I.; Vieira, S.; Suderow, H.; Azpeitia, J.; Luccas, R. F.; Munuera, C.; García-Hernandez, M.; and others

    2015-01-15

    We describe a three axis vector magnet system for cryogenic scanning probe microscopy measurements. We discuss the magnet support system and the power supply, consisting of a compact three way 100 A current source. We obtain tilted magnetic fields in all directions with maximum value of 5T along z-axis and of 1.2T for XY-plane magnetic fields. We describe a scanning tunneling microscopy-spectroscopy (STM-STS) set-up, operating in a dilution refrigerator, which includes a new high voltage ultralow noise piezodrive electronics and discuss the noise level due to vibrations. STM images and STS maps show atomic resolution and the tilted vortex lattice at 150 mK in the superconductor β-Bi{sub 2}Pd. We observe a strongly elongated hexagonal lattice, which corresponds to the projection of the tilted hexagonal vortex lattice on the surface. We also discuss Magnetic Force Microscopy images in a variable temperature insert.

  1. Measuring Earth's Local Magnetic Field Using a Helmholtz Coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Jonathan E.

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, I present a low-cost interactive experiment for measuring the strength of Earth's local magnetic field. This activity can be done in most high schools or two-year physics laboratories with limited resources, yet will have a tremendous learning impact. This experiment solidifies the three-dimensional nature of Earth's magnetic field vector and helps reinforce the aspect of the vertical component of Earth's magnetic field. Students should realize that Earth's magnetic field is not fully horizontal (except at the magnetic equator) and that a compass simply indicates the direction of the horizontal component of Earth's magnetic field. A magnetic dip needle compass can be used to determine the angle (known as the "dip angle" or "inclination angle") measured from the direction in which Earth's magnetic field vector points to the horizontal. In this activity, students will be able to determine the horizontal component of the field using a Helmholtz coil and, knowing the dip angle, the Earth's magnetic field strength can be determined.

  2. Full vector spherical harmonic analysis of the Holocene geomagnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Marcia

    High-quality time-series paleomagnetic measurements have been used to derive spherical harmonic models of Earth's magnetic field for the past 2,000 years. A newly-developed data compilation, PSVMOD2.0 consists of time-series directional and intensity records that significantly improve the data quality and global distribution used to develop previous spherical harmonic models. PSVMOD2.0 consists of 185 paleomagnetic time series records from 85 global sites, including 30 full-vector records (inclination, declination and intensity). It includes data from additional sites in the Southern Hemisphere and Arctic and includes globally distributed sediment relative paleointensity records, significantly improving global coverage over previous models. PSVMOD2.0 records have been assessed in a series of 7 regional intercomparison studies, four in the Northern Hemisphere and 3 in the southern hemisphere. Comparisons on a regional basis have improved the quality and chronology of the data and allowed investigation of spatial coherence and the scale length associated with paleomagnetic secular variation (PSV) features. We have developed a modeling methodology based on nonlinear inversion of the PSVMOD2.0 directional and intensity records. Models of the geomagnetic field in 100-year snapshots have been derived for the past 2,000 with the ultimate goal of developing models spanning the past 8,000 years. We validate the models and the methodology by comparing with the GUFM1 historical models during the 400-year period of overlap. We find that the spatial distribution of sites and quality of data are sufficient to derive models that agree with GUFM1 in the large-scale characteristics of the field. We use the the models derived in this study to downward continue the field to the core-mantle boundary and examine characteristics of the large-scale structure of the magnetic field at the source region. The derived models are temporally consistent from one epoch to the next and exhibit

  3. Rotating superconductor magnet for producing rotating lobed magnetic field lines

    DOEpatents

    Hilal, Sadek K.; Sampson, William B.; Leonard, Edward F.

    1978-01-01

    This invention provides a rotating superconductor magnet for producing a rotating lobed magnetic field, comprising a cryostat; a superconducting magnet in the cryostat having a collar for producing a lobed magnetic field having oppositely directed adjacent field lines; rotatable support means for selectively rotating the superconductor magnet; and means for energizing the superconductor magnet.

  4. Project MAGNET High-level Vector Survey Data Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, Rachel J.

    1992-01-01

    Since 1951, the U.S. Navy, under its Project MAGNET program, has been continuously collecting vector aeromagnetic survey data to support the U.S. Defense Mapping Agency's world magnetic and charting program. During this forty-year period, a variety of survey platforms and instrumentation configurations have been used. The current Project MAGNET survey platform is a Navy Orion RP-3D aircraft which has been specially modified and specially equipped with a redundant suite of navigational positioning, attitude, and magnetic sensors. A review of the survey data collection procedures and calibration and editing techniques applied to the data generated by this suite of instrumentation will be presented. Among the topics covered will be the determination of its parameters from the low-level calibration maneuvers flown over geomagnetic observatories.

  5. AC photovoltaic module magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, C.; Chang, G.J.; Reyes, A.B.; Whitaker, C.M.

    1997-12-31

    Implementation of alternating current (AC) photovoltaic (PV) modules, particularly for distributed applications such as PV rooftops and facades, may be slowed by public concern about electric and magnetic fields (EMF). This paper documents magnetic field measurements on an AC PV module, complementing EMF research on direct-current PV modules conducted by PG and E in 1993. Although not comprehensive, the PV EMF data indicate that 60 Hz magnetic fields (the EMF type of greatest public concern) from PV modules are comparable to, or significantly less than, those from household appliances. Given the present EMF research knowledge, AC PV module EMF may not merit considerable concern.

  6. Magnetic Field of Strange Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baghdasaryan, D. S.

    2016-03-01

    The generation of a magnetic field in a strange quark star owing to differential rotation of the superfluid and superconducting quark core relative to the normal electron-nuclear crust of the star is examined. The maximum possible magnetic field on the surface is estimated for various models of strange dwarfs. Depending on the configuration parameters, i.e., the mass M and radius R of the star, a range of 103-105 G is found. These values of the magnetic field may be an additional condition for identification of strange dwarfs among the extensive class of observed white dwarfs.

  7. Magnetic fields and scintillator performance

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.; Ronzhin, A.; Hagopian, V.

    1995-06-01

    Experimental data have shown that the light output of a scintillator depends on the magnitude of the externally applied magnetic fields, and that this variation can affect the calorimeter calibration and possibly resolution. The goal of the measurements presented here is to study the light yield of scintillators in high magnetic fields in conditions that are similar to those anticipated for the LHC CMS detector. Two independent measurements were performed, the first at Fermilab and the second at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory at Florida State University.

  8. Bioluminescence under static magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaka, M.; Ueno, S.

    1998-06-01

    In the present study, the effect of magnetic fields on the emission of light by a living system was studied. The fireflies Hotaria parvula and Luciola cruciata were used as the bioluminescence systems. The firefly light organ was fixed at the edge of an optical fiber. The emitted light was introduced into a single-channel photon-counting system using an optical fiber. We measured both the spectrum of a constant light emission and, the time course of bioluminescence pulses. Two horizontal-type superconducting magnets, which produced 8 and 14 T magnetic fields at their center, were used as the magnetic-field generators. We also carried out an in vitro study of bioluminescence. The enzymatic activity of luciferase was measured under a 14 T magnetic field. We measured emission spectra of bioluminescence over the interval 500-600 nm at 25 °C in a stable emission state. It was observed that the peak wavelength around 550 nm shifted to 560 nm under a 14 T magnetic field. However, the effects of magnetic fields were not significant. Also, we measured the time course of emissions at 550 nm in a transient emission state. The rate in the light intensity under a 14 T magnetic field increased compared to the control. There is a possibility that the change in the emission intensities under a magnetic field is related to a change in the biochemical systems of the firefly, such as the enzymatic process of luciferase and the excited singlet state with subsequent light emission.

  9. Magnetic field structure of Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiremath, K. M.

    2012-04-01

    Recently planet Mercury - an unexplored territory in our solar system - has been of much interest to the scientific community due to recent flybys of the spacecraft MESSENGER that discovered its intrinsic stationary and large-scale dipole like magnetic field structure with an intensity of ˜300nT confirming Mariner 10 observations. In the present study, with the observed constraint of Mercury's atmospheric magnetic field structure, internal magnetic field structure is modeled as a solution of magnetic diffusion equation. In this study, Mercury's internal structure mainly consists of a stable stratified fluid core and the convective mantle. For simplicity, magnetic diffusivity in both parts of the structure is considered to be uniform and constant with a value represented by a suitable averages. It is further assumed that vigorous convection in the mantle disposes of the electric currents leading to a very high diffusivity in that region. Thus, in order to satisfy observed atmospheric magnetic field structure, Mercury's most likely magnetic field structure consists of a solution of MHD diffusion equation in the core and a combined multipolar (dipole and quadrupole like magnetic field structures embedded in the uniform field) solution of a current free like magnetic field structure in the mantle and in the atmosphere. With imposition of appropriate boundary conditions at the core-mantle boundary for the first two diffusion eigen modes, in order to satisfy the observed field structure, present study puts the constraint on Mercury's core radius to be ˜2000km. From the estimated magnetic diffusivity and the core radius, it is also possible to estimate the two diffusion eigen modes with their diffusion time scales of ˜8.6 and 3.7 billion years respectively suggesting that the planet inherits its present-day magnetic field structure from the solar Nebula. It is proposed that permanency of such a large-scale magnetic field structure of the planet is attained during

  10. Magnetic Field Generation in Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrario, Lilia; Melatos, Andrew; Zrake, Jonathan

    2015-10-01

    Enormous progress has been made on observing stellar magnetism in stars from the main sequence (particularly thanks to the MiMeS, MAGORI and BOB surveys) through to compact objects. Recent data have thrown into sharper relief the vexed question of the origin of stellar magnetic fields, which remains one of the main unanswered questions in astrophysics. In this chapter we review recent work in this area of research. In particular, we look at the fossil field hypothesis which links magnetism in compact stars to magnetism in main sequence and pre-main sequence stars and we consider why its feasibility has now been questioned particularly in the context of highly magnetic white dwarfs. We also review the fossil versus dynamo debate in the context of neutron stars and the roles played by key physical processes such as buoyancy, helicity, and superfluid turbulence, in the generation and stability of neutron star fields.