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Sample records for vector magnetic field

  1. Measurements of Solar Vector Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagyard, M. J. (editor)

    1985-01-01

    Various aspects of the measurement of solar magnetic fields are presented. The four major subdivisions of the study are: (1) theoretical understanding of solar vector magnetic fields; (3) techniques for interpretation of observational data; and (4) techniques for data display.

  2. Magnetic vector field tag and seal

    DOEpatents

    Johnston, Roger G.; Garcia, Anthony R.

    2004-08-31

    One or more magnets are placed in a container (preferably on objects inside the container) and the magnetic field strength and vector direction are measured with a magnetometer from at least one location near the container to provide the container with a magnetic vector field tag and seal. The location(s) of the magnetometer relative to the container are also noted. If the position of any magnet inside the container changes, then the measured vector fields at the these locations also change, indicating that the tag has been removed, the seal has broken, and therefore that the container and objects inside may have been tampered with. A hollow wheel with magnets inside may also provide a similar magnetic vector field tag and seal. As the wheel turns, the magnets tumble randomly inside, removing the tag and breaking the seal.

  3. Vector Magnetic Field in Emerging Flux Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmieder, B.; Pariat, E.

    A crucial phase in magnetic flux emergence is the rise of magnetic flux tubes through the solar photosphere, which represents a severe transition between the very different environments of the solar interior and corona. Multi-wavelength observations with Flare Genesis, TRACE, SoHO, and more recently with the vector magnetographs at THEMIS and Hida (DST) led to the following conclusions. The fragmented magnetic field in the emergence region - with dipped field lines or bald patches - is directly related with Ellerman bombs, arch filament systems, and overlying coronal loops. Measurements of vector magnetic fields have given evidence that undulating "serpentine" fields are present while magnetic flux tubes cross the photosphere. See the sketch below, and for more detail see Pariat et al. (2004, 2007); Watanabe et al. (2008):

  4. Mapping the magnetic field vector in a fountain clock

    SciTech Connect

    Gertsvolf, Marina; Marmet, Louis

    2011-12-15

    We show how the mapping of the magnetic field vector components can be achieved in a fountain clock by measuring the Larmor transition frequency in atoms that are used as a spatial probe. We control two vector components of the magnetic field and apply audio frequency magnetic pulses to localize and measure the field vector through Zeeman spectroscopy.

  5. Inferring Lower Boundary Driving Conditions Using Vector Magnetic Field Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuck, Peter W.; Linton, Mark; Leake, James; MacNeice, Peter; Allred, Joel

    2012-01-01

    Low-beta coronal MHD simulations of realistic CME events require the detailed specification of the magnetic fields, velocities, densities, temperatures, etc., in the low corona. Presently, the most accurate estimates of solar vector magnetic fields are made in the high-beta photosphere. Several techniques have been developed that provide accurate estimates of the associated photospheric plasma velocities such as the Differential Affine Velocity Estimator for Vector Magnetograms and the Poloidal/Toroidal Decomposition. Nominally, these velocities are consistent with the evolution of the radial magnetic field. To evolve the tangential magnetic field radial gradients must be specified. In addition to estimating the photospheric vector magnetic and velocity fields, a further challenge involves incorporating these fields into an MHD simulation. The simulation boundary must be driven, consistent with the numerical boundary equations, with the goal of accurately reproducing the observed magnetic fields and estimated velocities at some height within the simulation. Even if this goal is achieved, many unanswered questions remain. How can the photospheric magnetic fields and velocities be propagated to the low corona through the transition region? At what cadence must we observe the photosphere to realistically simulate the corona? How do we model the magnetic fields and plasma velocities in the quiet Sun? How sensitive are the solutions to other unknowns that must be specified, such as the global solar magnetic field, and the photospheric temperature and density?

  6. Magnetic Moment of Vector Mesons in the Background Field Method

    E-print Network

    Frank X. Lee; Scott Moerschbacher; Walter Wilcox

    2007-10-11

    We report some results for the magnetic moments of vector mesons extracted from mass shifts in the presence of static external magnetic fields. The calculations are done on $24^4$ quenched lattices using standard Wilson actions, with $\\beta$=6.0 and pion mass down to 500 MeV. The results are compared to those from the form factor method.

  7. Vector Magnetic Field Observations of the Solar South Pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wulser, J.-P.; Mickey, D. L.

    1996-05-01

    The structure and dynamics of the magnetic field near the poles of the sun, and its relationship to the coronal temperature and density structure is not well understood. On 1996 March 7, the SoHO spacecraft, and several ground based observatories carried out coordinated observations of the solar South Pole. At that time, the South Pole was tilted about 7 degrees towards the earth, and offered the best possible viewing conditions. We used the Imaging Vector Magnetograph (IVM) at Mees Solar Observatory to obtain a time series of 41 vector magnetograms over a 7 hour period during the campaign. Vector magnetic field observations are uniquely well suited to study the polar field. First, the polar field is expected to be mostly perpendicular to the line-of-sight, and second, the observed direction of the field allows a direct comparison with the observed structure of the corona. Our unique time series of observations allows us to study dynamic changes, while it increases our sensitivity for weak static field structures. We present first results of our South Pole vector magnetic field observations. We discuss them in the context of simultaneous MDI-SoHO line-of-sight observations, and compare our vector fields with the coronal structure as observed by SXT on Yohkoh, and EIT on SoHO.

  8. Determination of coronal magnetic fields from vector magnetograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Zoran

    1993-01-01

    This report covers technical progress during the second year of the contract entitled 'Determination of Coronal Magnetic Fields from Vector Magnetograms,' NASW-4728, between NASA and Science Applications International Corporation, and covers the period January 1, 1993 to December 31, 1993. Under this contract SAIC has conducted research into the determination of coronal magnetic fields from vector magnetograms, including the development and application of algorithms to determine force-free coronal fields above selected observations of active regions. The contract began on June 30, 1992 and has a completion date of December 31, 1994. This contract is a continuation of work started in a previous contract, NASW-4571, which covered the period November 15, 1990 to December 14, 1991. During this second year we have concentrated on studying additional active regions and in using the estimated coronal magnetic fields to compare to coronal features inferred from observations.

  9. Determination of coronal magnetic fields from vector magnetograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Zoran

    1992-01-01

    The determination of coronal magnetic fields from vector magnetograms, including the development and application of algorithms to determine force-free coronal fields above selected observations of active regions is studied. Two additional active regions were selected and analyzed. The restriction of periodicity in the 3-D code which is used to determine the coronal field was removed giving the new code variable mesh spacing and is thus able to provide a more realistic description of coronal fields. The NOAA active region AR5747 of 20 Oct. 1989 was studied. A brief account of progress during the research performed is reported.

  10. Height Variation of the Vector Magnetic Field in Solar Spicules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orozco Suárez, D.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Trujillo Bueno, J.

    2015-04-01

    Proving the magnetic configuration of solar spicules has hitherto been difficult due to the lack of spatial resolution and image stability during off-limb ground-based observations. We report spectropolarimetric observations of spicules taken in the He i 1083 nm spectral region with the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter II at the German Vacuum Tower Telescope of the Observatorio del Teide (Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain). The data provide the variation with geometrical height of the Stokes I, Q, U, and V profiles, whose encoded information allows the determination of the magnetic field vector by means of the HAZEL inversion code. The inferred results show that the average magnetic field strength at the base of solar spicules is about 80 gauss, and then it decreases rapidly with height to about 30 gauss at a height of 3000 km above the visible solar surface. Moreover, the magnetic field vector is close to vertical at the base of the chromosphere and has mid-inclinations (about 50°) above 2 Mm height.

  11. Height variation of the vector magnetic field in solar spicules

    E-print Network

    Suarez, D Orozco; Bueno, J Trujillo

    2015-01-01

    Proving the magnetic configuration of solar spicules has hitherto been difficult due to the lack of spatial resolution and image stability during off-limb ground-based observations. We report spectropolarimetric observations of spicules taken in the He I 1083 nm spectral region with the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter II at the German Vacuum Tower Telescope of the Observatorio del Teide (Tenerife; Canary Islands; Spain). The data provide the variation with geometrical height of the Stokes I, Q, U, and V profiles whose encoded information allows the determination of the magnetic field vector by means of the HAZEL inversion code. The inferred results show that the average magnetic field strength at the base of solar spicules is about 80 gauss and then it decreases rapidly with height to about 30 gauss at a height of 3000 km above the visible solar surface. Moreover, the magnetic field vector is close to vertical at the base of the chromosphere and has mid inclinations (about 50 degree) above 2 Mm height.

  12. Vector Magnetic Fields and Electric Currents from the Imaging Vector Magnetograph

    E-print Network

    Jing Li; A. A. van Ballegooijen; Don Mickey

    2008-11-01

    First, we describe a general procedure to produce high quality vector magnetograms using the Imaging Vector Magnetograph (IVM) at Mees Solar Observatory. At the spatial resolution 2"x2", the Stokes Q,U,V uncertainty reaches 0.001-0.0005 in time-averaged data over 1-hour in the quiet Sun. When vector magnetic fields are inferred from the time-averaged Stokes spectral images of FeI 6302.5A, the resulting uncertainties are on the order of 10 G for the longitudinal fields, 40 G for the transverse field strength and 9 degree for the magnetic azimuth. The magnetic field inversion used in this work is the "Triplet" code, which was developed and implemented in the IVM software package by the late Barry J. LaBonte. The inversion code is described in detail in the Appendix. Second, we solve for the absolute value of the vertical electric current density, |Jz|, accounting for the above IVM problems, for two different active regions. One is a single sunspot region (NOAA 10001 observed on 20 June 2002) while the other is a more complex, quadrupolar region (NOAA10030 observed on 15 July 2002). We use a calculation that does not require disambiguation of 180 degree in the transverse field directions. The |Jz| uncertainty is on the order of 7.0 mA m^-2. The vertical current density increases with increasing vertical magnetic field. The rate of increase is about 1 -2 times as large in the quadrupolar NOAA 10030 region as in the simple NOAA 10001, and it is more spatially variable over NOAA 10030 than over NOAA 10001.

  13. Vector magnetic field and vector current density in and around the ?-spot NOAA 10808†

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bommier, Véronique; Degl'Innocenti, Egidio Landi; Schmieder, Brigitte; Gelly, Bernard

    2011-08-01

    The context is that of the so-called ``fundamental ambiguity'' (also azimuth ambiguity, or 180° ambiguity) in magnetic field vector measurements: two field vectors symmetrical with respect to the line-of-sight have the same polarimetric signature, so that they cannot be discriminated. We propose a method to solve this ambiguity by applying the ``simulated annealing'' algorithm to the minimization of the field divergence, added to the longitudinal current absolute value, the line-of-sight derivative of the magnetic field being inferred by the interpretation of the Zeeman effect observed by spectropolarimetry in two lines formed at different depths. We find that the line pair Fe I ? 6301.5 and Fe I ? 6302.5 is appropriate for this purpose. We treat the example case of the ?-spot of NOAA 10808 observed on 13 September 2005 between 14:25 and 15:25 UT with the THEMIS telescope. Besides the magnetic field resolved map, the electric current density vector map is also obtained. A strong horizontal current density flow is found surrounding each spot inside its penumbra, associated to a non-zero Lorentz force centripetal with respect to the spot center (i.e., oriented towards the spot center). The current wrapping direction is found to depend on the spot polarity: clockwise for the positive polarity, counterclockwise for the negative one. This analysis is made possible thanks to the UNNOFIT2 Milne-Eddington inversion code, where the usual theory is generalized to the case of a line (Fe I ? 6301.5) that is not a normal Zeeman triplet line (like Fe I ? 6302.5).

  14. Vector Magnetic Fields and Electric Currents From the Imaging Vector Magnetograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; van Ballegooijen, A. A.; Mickey, Don

    2009-02-01

    First, we describe a general procedure to produce high-quality vector magnetograms using the Imaging Vector Magnetograph (IVM) at Mees Solar Observatory. Two IVM effects are newly discussed and taken into account: (1) the central wavelength of the Fabry-Pérot is found to drift with time as a result of undiagnosed thermal or mechanical instabilities in the instrument; (2) the Stokes V-sign convention built into the IVM is found to be opposite to the conventional definition used in the study of radiative transfer of polarized radiation. At the spatial resolution 2'' × 2'', the Stokes Q, U, V uncertainty reaches ~1 × 10-3 to 5 × 10-4 in time-averaged data over 1 hr in the quiet Sun. When vector magnetic fields are inferred from the time-averaged Stokes spectral images of FeI 6302.5 Å, the resulting uncertainties are on the order of 10 G for the longitudinal fields (B par), 40 G for the transverse field strength (B bottom) and ~9° for the magnetic azimuth (phi). The magnetic field inversion used in this work is the "Triplet" code, which was developed and implemented in the IVM software package by the late B. J. LaBonte. The inversion code is described in detail in the Appendix. Second, we solve for the absolute value of the vertical electric current density, |Jz |, accounting for the above IVM problems, for two different active regions. One is a single sunspot region (NOAA 10001 observed on 2002 June 20) while the other is a more complex, quadrupolar region (NOAA10030 observed on 2002 July 15). We use a calculation that does not require disambiguation of 180° in the transverse field directions. The |Jz | uncertainty is on the order of ~7.0 mA m-2. The vertical current density increases with increasing vertical magnetic field. The rate of increase is about 1-2 times as large in the quadrupolar NOAA 10030 region as in the simple NOAA 10001, and it is more spatially variable over NOAA 10030 than over NOAA 10001.

  15. GravitoMagnetic Field in Tensor-Vector-Scalar Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Exirifard, Qasem

    2013-04-01

    We study the gravitomagnetism in the TeVeS theory. We compute the gravitomagnetic field that a slow moving mass distribution produces in its Newtonian regime. We report that the consistency between the TeVeS gravitomagnetic field and that predicted by the Einstein-Hilbert theory leads to a relation between the vector and scalar coupling constants of the theory. We translate the Lunar Laser Ranging measurement's data into a constraint on the deviation from this relation.

  16. A comprehensive method of estimating electric fields from vector magnetic field and Doppler measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kazachenko, Maria D.; Fisher, George H.; Welsch, Brian T.

    2014-11-01

    Photospheric electric fields, estimated from sequences of vector magnetic field and Doppler measurements, can be used to estimate the flux of magnetic energy (the Poynting flux) into the corona and as time-dependent boundary conditions for dynamic models of the coronal magnetic field. We have modified and extended an existing method to estimate photospheric electric fields that combines a poloidal-toroidal decomposition (PTD) of the evolving magnetic field vector with Doppler and horizontal plasma velocities. Our current, more comprehensive method, which we dub the 'PTD-Doppler-FLCT Ideal' (PDFI) technique, can now incorporate Doppler velocities from non-normal viewing angles. It uses the FISHPACK software package to solve several two-dimensional Poisson equations, a faster and more robust approach than our previous implementations. Here, we describe systematic, quantitative tests of the accuracy and robustness of the PDFI technique using synthetic data from anelastic MHD (ANMHD) simulations, which have been used in similar tests in the past. We find that the PDFI method has less than 1% error in the total Poynting flux and a 10% error in the helicity flux rate at a normal viewing angle (? = 0) and less than 25% and 10% errors, respectively, at large viewing angles (? < 60°). We compare our results with other inversion methods at zero viewing angle and find that our method's estimates of the fluxes of magnetic energy and helicity are comparable to or more accurate than other methods. We also discuss the limitations of the PDFI method and its uncertainties.

  17. Resolving the 180-degree ambiguity in vector magnetic field measurements: The 'minimum' energy solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalf, Thomas R.

    1994-01-01

    I present a robust algorithm that resolves the 180-deg ambiguity in measurements of the solar vector magnetic field. The technique simultaneously minimizes both the divergence of the magnetic field and the electric current density using a simulated annealing algorithm. This results in the field orientation with approximately minimum free energy. The technique is well-founded physically and is simple to implement.

  18. Measurements of the magnetic field vector using multiple electromagnetically induced transparency resonances in Rb vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, Kevin; Novikova, Irina; Mikhailov, Eugeniy E.; Yudin, Valery I.; Taichenachev, Alexey V.

    2011-01-15

    We study the dependence of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) resonance amplitudes on the external magnetic field direction in a linearly polarized bichromatic light (lin||lin) configuration in {sup 87}Rb vapor. We demonstrate that all seven resolvable EIT resonances exhibit maxima or minima at certain orientations of the laser polarization relative to the wave vector and magnetic field. This effect can be used for the development of a high-precision EIT vector magnetometer.

  19. VECTOR TOMOGRAPHY FOR THE CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELD. II. HANLE EFFECT MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kramar, M.; Inhester, B.; Lin, H.; Davila, J. E-mail: Joseph.M.Davila@nasa.gov E-mail: lin@ifa.hawaii.edu

    2013-09-20

    In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of saturated coronal Hanle effect vector tomography or the application of vector tomographic inversion techniques to reconstruct the three-dimensional magnetic field configuration of the solar corona using linear polarization measurements of coronal emission lines. We applied Hanle effect vector tomographic inversion to artificial data produced from analytical coronal magnetic field models with equatorial and meridional currents and global coronal magnetic field models constructed by extrapolation of real photospheric magnetic field measurements. We tested tomographic inversion with only Stokes Q, U, electron density, and temperature inputs to simulate observations over large limb distances where the Stokes I parameters are difficult to obtain with ground-based coronagraphs. We synthesized the coronal linear polarization maps by inputting realistic noise appropriate for ground-based observations over a period of two weeks into the inversion algorithm. We found that our Hanle effect vector tomographic inversion can partially recover the coronal field with a poloidal field configuration, but that it is insensitive to a corona with a toroidal field. This result demonstrates that Hanle effect vector tomography is an effective tool for studying the solar corona and that it is complementary to Zeeman effect vector tomography for the reconstruction of the coronal magnetic field.

  20. A prototype vector magnetic field monitoring system for a neutron electric dipole moment experiment

    E-print Network

    Nouri, N; Brown, M A; Carr, R; Filippone, B; Osthelder, C; Plaster, B; Slutsky, S; Swank, C

    2015-01-01

    We present results from a first demonstration of a magnetic field monitoring system for a neutron electric dipole moment experiment. The system is designed to reconstruct the vector components of the magnetic field in the interior measurement region solely from exterior measurements.

  1. A prototype vector magnetic field monitoring system for a neutron electric dipole moment experiment

    E-print Network

    N. Nouri; A. Biswas; M. A. Brown; R. Carr; B. Filippone; C. Osthelder; B. Plaster; S. Slutsky; C. Swank

    2015-11-10

    We present results from a first demonstration of a magnetic field monitoring system for a neutron electric dipole moment experiment. The system is designed to reconstruct the vector components of the magnetic field in the interior measurement region solely from exterior measurements.

  2. First Use of Synoptic Vector Magnetograms for Global Nonlinear, Force-Free Coronal Magnetic Field Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tadesse, T.; Wiegelmann, T.; Gosain, S.; MacNeice, P.; Pevtsov, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Context. The magnetic field permeating the solar atmosphere is generally thought to provide the energy for much of the activity seen in the solar corona, such as flares, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), etc. To overcome the unavailability of coronal magnetic field measurements, photospheric magnetic field vector data can be used to reconstruct the coronal field. Currently, there are several modelling techniques being used to calculate three-dimensional field lines into the solar atmosphere. Aims. For the first time, synoptic maps of a photospheric-vector magnetic field synthesized from the vector spectromagnetograph (VSM) on Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun (SOLIS) are used to model the coronal magnetic field and estimate free magnetic energy in the global scale. The free energy (i.e., the energy in excess of the potential field energy) is one of the main indicators used in space weather forecasts to predict the eruptivity of active regions. Methods. We solve the nonlinear force-free field equations using an optimization principle in spherical geometry. The resulting threedimensional magnetic fields are used to estimate the magnetic free energy content E(sub free) = E(sub nlfff) - E(sub pot), which is the difference of the magnetic energies between the nonpotential field and the potential field in the global solar corona. For comparison, we overlay the extrapolated magnetic field lines with the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) observations by the atmospheric imaging assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Results. For a single Carrington rotation 2121, we find that the global nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) magnetic energy density is 10.3% higher than the potential one. Most of this free energy is located in active regions.

  3. Making global map of the solar surface Br from the HMI vector magnetic field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, K.; Liu, Y.; Sun, X.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Centeno, R.; Barnes, G.; Leka, K. D.

    2013-06-01

    The Helioseismic Magnetic Imager (HMI) has made full-disk vector magnetic field measurements of the Sun with cadence of 12 minutes. The three-component solar surface magnetic field vector data are from the HMI observations with the data process pipeline modules, VFISV (Very Fast Inversion of the Stokes Vector, Borrero et al., 2011) for Milne-Eddington inversion and the minimum-energy disambiguation algorithm (Metcalf 1994, Leka et al, 2009). The models of the global corona and solar wind, such as the PFSS (potential-field source-surface) model and the MHD simulations, often use the maps of solar surface magnetic field, especially the radial component (Br) as the boundary condition. The HMI observation can provide new Br data for these model. Because of weak magnetic signals at the quiet regions of the Sun, the limb darkening, and geometric effects near solar poles, we need to apply an assumption to make a whole-surface map. In this paper, we tested two assumptions for determining Br at weak-field regions. The coronal structures calculated by the PFSS model with the vector-based Br are compared with those with the magnetogram-based Br and the corona observed by the SDO/AIA (Atmospheric Imaging Assembly). In the tested period, CR 2098, the vector-based Br map gives better agreements than the line-of-sight magnetogram data, though we need further investigation for evaluation.

  4. The derivation of vector magnetic fields from Stokes profiles - Integral versus least squares fitting techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronan, R. S.; Mickey, D. L.; Orrall, F. Q.

    1987-01-01

    The results of two methods for deriving photospheric vector magnetic fields from the Zeeman effect, as observed in the Fe I line at 6302.5 A at high spectral resolution (45 mA), are compared. The first method does not take magnetooptical effects into account, but determines the vector magnetic field from the integral properties of the Stokes profiles. The second method is an iterative least-squares fitting technique which fits the observed Stokes profiles to the profiles predicted by the Unno-Rachkovsky solution to the radiative transfer equation. For sunspot fields above about 1500 gauss, the two methods are found to agree in derived azimuthal and inclination angles to within about + or - 20 deg.

  5. He I vector magnetic field maps of a sunspot and its superpenumbral fine-structure

    E-print Network

    Schad, T A; Lin, H; Tritschler, A

    2015-01-01

    Advanced inversions of high-resolution spectropolarimetric observations of the He I triplet at 1083 nm are used to generate unique maps of the chromospheric magnetic field vector across a sunspot and its superpenumbral canopy. The observations were acquired by the Facility Infrared Spectropolarimeter (FIRS) at the Dunn Solar Telescope (DST) on 29 January 2012. Multiple atmospheric models are employed in the inversions, as superpenumbral Stokes profiles are dominated by atomic-level polarization while sunspot profiles are Zeeman-dominated but also exhibit signatures perhaps induced by symmetry breaking effects of the radiation field incident on the chromospheric material. We derive the equilibrium magnetic structure of a sunspot in the chromosphere, and further show that the superpenumbral magnetic field does not appear finely structured, unlike the observed intensity structure. This suggests fibrils are not concentrations of magnetic flux but rather distinguished by individualized thermalization. We also dire...

  6. THE VECTOR DIRECTION OF THE INTERSTELLAR MAGNETIC FIELD OUTSIDE THE HELIOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Swisdak, M.; Drake, J. F.; Opher, M.; Alouani Bibi, F.

    2010-02-20

    We propose that magnetic reconnection at the heliopause (HP) only occurs where the interstellar magnetic field points nearly anti-parallel to the heliospheric field. By using large-scale magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the heliosphere to provide the initial conditions for kinetic simulations of HP reconnection, we show that the energetic pickup ions downstream from the solar wind termination shock induce large diamagnetic drifts in the reconnecting plasma and stabilize non-anti-parallel reconnection. With this constraint, the MHD simulations can show where HP reconnection most likely occurs. We also suggest that reconnection triggers the 2-3 kHz radio bursts that emanate from near the HP. Requiring the burst locations to coincide with the loci of anti-parallel reconnection allows us to determine, for the first time, the vector direction of the local interstellar magnetic field. We find it to be oriented toward the southern solar magnetic pole.

  7. He i Vector Magnetic Field Maps of a Sunspot and Its Superpenumbral Fine-Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schad, T. A.; Penn, M. J.; Lin, H.; Tritschler, A.

    2015-06-01

    Advanced inversions of high-resolution spectropolarimetric observations of the He i triplet at 1083 nm are used to generate unique maps of the chromospheric magnetic field vector across a sunspot and its superpenumbral canopy. The observations were acquired by the Facility Infrared Spectropolarimeter (FIRS) at the Dunn Solar Telescope (DST) on 29 January 2012. Multiple atmospheric models are employed in the inversions because superpenumbral Stokes profiles are dominated by atomic-level polarization, while sunspot profiles are Zeeman-dominated, but also exhibit signatures that might be induced by symmetry-breaking effects of the radiation field incident on the chromospheric material. We derive the equilibrium magnetic structure of a sunspot in the chromosphere and furthermore show that the superpenumbral magnetic field does not appear to be finely structured, unlike the observed intensity structure. This suggests that fibrils are not concentrations of magnetic flux, but are instead distinguished by individualized thermalization. We also directly compare our inverted values with a current-free extrapolation of the chromospheric field. With improved measurements in the future, the average shear angle between the inferred magnetic field and the potential field may offer a means to quantify the non-potentiality of the chromospheric magnetic field to study the onset of explosive solar phenomena.

  8. On parasupersymmetric oscillators and relativistic vector mesons in constant magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Debergh, Nathalie; Beckers, Jules

    1995-01-01

    Johnson-Lippmann considerations on oscillators and their connection with the minimal coupling schemes are visited in order to introduce a new Sakata-Taketani equation describing vector mesons in interaction with a constant magnetic field. This new proposal, based on a specific parasupersymmetric oscillator-like system, is characterized by real energies as opposed to previously pointed out relativistic equations corresponding to this interacting context.

  9. Incorporating Vector Magnetic Field Measurements into MHD Models of the Solar Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbett, W. P.

    2003-12-01

    We report on our efforts to incorporate high cadence vector magnetic field measurements of the CME and flare producing active region NOAA 8210 (observed from April 28 to May 2 1998) into the photospheric boundary layers of our 3D MHD models of the solar atmosphere. We find that it is is essential to be able to specify an initial model atmosphere that is both consistent with soft X-ray observations of the corona and with observed vector magnetic field measurements at the photosphere. Further, MHD codes require that certain components of the flowfield be specified at the lower boundary in such a way as to self-consistently update the model photosphere between each successive magnetogram. We will present the results of our application of several techniques to infer the velocity field of magnetized plasma in the photosphere using a time-series of IVM vector magnetograms of NOAA 8210, and will present the results from our latest attempt to model this complex active region.

  10. The Z3 model of Saturns magnetic field and the Pioneer 11 vector helium magnetometer observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Acuna, M. H.; Ness, N. F.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetic field observations obtained by the Pioneer 11 vector helium magnetometer are compared with the Z(sub 3) model magnetic field. These Pioneer 11 observations, obtained at close-in radial distances, constitute an important and independent test of the Z(sub 3) zonal harmonic model, which was derived from Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 fluxgate magnetometer observations. Differences between the Pioneer 11 magnetometer and the Z(sub 3) model field are found to be small (approximately 1%) and quantitatively consistent with the expected instrumental accuracy. A detailed examination of these differences in spacecraft payload coordinates shows that they are uniquely associated with the instrument frame of reference and operation. A much improved fit to the Pioneer 11 observations is obtained by rotation of the instrument coordinate system about the spacecraft spin axis by 1.4 degree. With this adjustment, possibly associated with an instrumental phase lag or roll attitude error, the Pioneer 11 vector helium magnetometer observations are fully consistent with the Voyager Z(sub 3) model.

  11. Numerical Simulation of N-vector Spin Models in a Magnetic Field

    E-print Network

    Tereza Mendes; Attilio Cucchieri

    2006-10-30

    Three-dimensional N-vector spin models may define universality classes for such diverse phenomena as i) the superfluid transition in liquid helium (currently investigated in the micro-gravity environment of the Space Shuttle) and ii) the transition from hadronic matter to a quark-gluon plasma, studied in heavy-ion collisions at the laboratories of Brookhaven and CERN. The models have been extensively studied both by field-theoretical and by statistical mechanical methods, including Monte Carlo simulations using cluster algorithms. These algorithms are applicable also in the presence of a magnetic field. Key quantities for the description of the transitions above -- such as universal critical amplitude ratios and the location of the so-called pseudo-critical line -- can be obtained from the models' magnetic equation of state, which relates magnetization, external magnetic field and temperature. Here we present an improved parametrization for the equation of state of the models, allowing a better fit to the numerical data. Our proposed form is inspired by perturbation theory, with coefficients determined nonperturbatively from fits to the data.

  12. 3D Observation of the Global Coronal Magnetic Field by Vector Tomography using the Coronal Emission Linear Polarization Data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramar, Maxim; Lin, Haosheng; Tomczyk, Steven

    2015-08-01

    Measurement of the coronal magnetic field is a crucial ingredient in understanding the nature of solar coronal phenomena at all scales. However, due to the low density and opacity of the solar atmosphere, the coronal emission measurements are result of a line-of-sight (LOS) integration through a nonuniform temperature, density and magnetic field distribution. Therefore, except in a few special cases, a direct inference of the 3D coronal magnetic field structure from polarization data is in general not possible. Tomography methods allow to resolve the LOS problem.We will present the global-scale, 3D coronal vector magnetic fields obtained by a vector tomographic inversion technique.The Vector tomographic inversion uses measurements of the Fe XIII 10747 A Hanle effect linear polarization signals by the Coronal Multichannel Polarimeter (CoMP) as inputs to derive a coronal magnetic field model that best reproduces the observed polarization signals. The 3D electron density and temperature, needed as additional input, have been reconstructed by scalar field tomography method based on STEREO/EUVI data. We will present the 3D coronal vector magnetic field, electron density and temperature resulted from these inversions.While independent verifications of the vector tomography results cannot be performed, we compared the tomography inverted coronal magnetic fields with those constructed by MagnetoHydroDynamic (MHD) simulation based on observed photospheric magnetic fields and with 3D coronal density structures obtained by scalar field tomography based on coronal observations. We will discuss the utilities and limitations of the inversion technique, and present ideas for future developments.

  13. SOLAR FLARE PREDICTION USING SDO/HMI VECTOR MAGNETIC FIELD DATA WITH A MACHINE-LEARNING ALGORITHM

    SciTech Connect

    Bobra, M. G.; Couvidat, S.

    2015-01-10

    We attempt to forecast M- and X-class solar flares using a machine-learning algorithm, called support vector machine (SVM), and four years of data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory's Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager, the first instrument to continuously map the full-disk photospheric vector magnetic field from space. Most flare forecasting efforts described in the literature use either line-of-sight magnetograms or a relatively small number of ground-based vector magnetograms. This is the first time a large data set of vector magnetograms has been used to forecast solar flares. We build a catalog of flaring and non-flaring active regions sampled from a database of 2071 active regions, comprised of 1.5 million active region patches of vector magnetic field data, and characterize each active region by 25 parameters. We then train and test the machine-learning algorithm and we estimate its performances using forecast verification metrics with an emphasis on the true skill statistic (TSS). We obtain relatively high TSS scores and overall predictive abilities. We surmise that this is partly due to fine-tuning the SVM for this purpose and also to an advantageous set of features that can only be calculated from vector magnetic field data. We also apply a feature selection algorithm to determine which of our 25 features are useful for discriminating between flaring and non-flaring active regions and conclude that only a handful are needed for good predictive abilities.

  14. Magnetic potential, vector and gradient tensor fields of a tesseroid in a geocentric spherical coordinate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Jinsong; Chen, Chao; Lesur, Vincent; Lane, Richard; Wang, Huilin

    2015-06-01

    We examined the mathematical and computational aspects of the magnetic potential, vector and gradient tensor fields of a tesseroid in a geocentric spherical coordinate system (SCS). This work is relevant for 3-D modelling that is performed with lithospheric vertical scales and global, continent or large regional horizontal scales. The curvature of the Earth is significant at these scales and hence, a SCS is more appropriate than the usual Cartesian coordinate system (CCS). The 3-D arrays of spherical prisms (SP; `tesseroids') can be used to model the response of volumes with variable magnetic properties. Analytical solutions do not exist for these model elements and numerical or mixed numerical and analytical solutions must be employed. We compared various methods for calculating the response in terms of accuracy and computational efficiency. The methods were (1) the spherical coordinate magnetic dipole method (MD), (2) variants of the 3-D Gauss-Legendre quadrature integration method (3-D GLQI) with (i) different numbers of nodes in each of the three directions, and (ii) models where we subdivided each SP into a number of smaller tesseroid volume elements, (3) a procedure that we term revised Gauss-Legendre quadrature integration (3-D RGLQI) where the magnetization direction which is constant in a SCS is assumed to be constant in a CCS and equal to the direction at the geometric centre of each tesseroid, (4) the Taylor's series expansion method (TSE) and (5) the rectangular prism method (RP). In any realistic application, both the accuracy and the computational efficiency factors must be considered to determine the optimum approach to employ. In all instances, accuracy improves with increasing distance from the source. It is higher in the percentage terms for potential than the vector or tensor response. The tensor errors are the largest, but they decrease more quickly with distance from the source. In our comparisons of relative computational efficiency, we found that the magnetic potential takes less time to compute than the vector response, which in turn takes less time to compute than the tensor gradient response. The MD method takes less time to compute than either the TSE or RP methods. The efficiency of the (GLQI and) RGLQI methods depends on the polynomial order, but the response typically takes longer to compute than it does for the other methods. The optimum method is a complex function of the desired accuracy, the size of the volume elements, the element latitude and the distance between the source and the observation. For a model of global extent with typical model element size (e.g. 1 degree horizontally and 10 km radially) and observations at altitudes of 10s to 100s of km, a mixture of methods based on the horizontal separation of the source and observation separation would be the optimum approach. To demonstrate the RGLQI method described within this paper, we applied it to the computation of the response for a global magnetization model for observations at 300 and 30 km altitude.

  15. Effects of AC/DC magnetic fields, frequency, and nanoparticle aspect ratio on cellular transfection of gene vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Kris; Mair, Lamar; Fisher, Mike; Rowshon Alam, Md.; Juliano, Rudolph; Superfine, Richard

    2008-10-01

    In order to make non-viral gene delivery a useful tool in the study and treatment of genetic disorders, it is imperative that these methodologies be further refined to yield optimal results. Transfection of magnetic nanoparticles and nanorods are used as non-viral gene vectors to transfect HeLa EGFP-654 cells that stably express a mutated enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene. We deliver antisense oligonucleotides to these cells designed to correct the aberrant splicing caused by the mutation in the EGFP gene. We also transfect human bronchial endothelial cells and immortalized WI-38 lung cells with pEGFP-N1 vectors. To achieve this we bind the genes to magnetic nanoparticles and nanorods and introduce magnetic fields to effect transfection. We wish to examine the effects of magnetic fields on the transfection of these particles and the benefits of using alternating (AC) magnetic fields in improving transfection rates over direct (DC) magnetic fields. We specifically look at the frequency dependence of the AC field and particle aspect ratio as it pertains to influencing transfection rate. We posit that the increase in angular momentum brought about by the AC field and the high aspect ratio of the nanorod particles, is vital to generating the force needed to move the particle through the cell membrane.

  16. Solar Flare Prediction Using SDO/HMI Vector Magnetic Field Data with a Machine-Learning Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobra, M.; Couvidat, S. P.

    2014-12-01

    We attempt to forecast M-and X-class solar flares using a machine-learning algorithm, called Support Vector Machine (SVM), and four years of data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory's Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager, the first instrument to continuously map the full-disk photospheric vector magnetic field from space (Schou et al., 2012). Most flare forecasting efforts described in the literature use either line-of-sight magnetograms or a relatively small number of ground-based vector magnetograms. This is the first time such a large dataset of vector magnetograms has been used to forecast solar flares. We build a catalog of flaring and non-flaring active regions sampled from a database of 2,071 active regions, comprised of 1.5 million active region patches of vector magnetic field data, and characterize each active region by 25 parameters --- which include the flux, energy, shear, current, helicity, gradient, geometry, and Lorentz force. We then train and test the machine-learning algorithm. Finally, we estimate the performance of this algorithm using forecast verification metrics with an emphasis on the true skill statistic (TSS). Bloomfield et al. (2012) suggest the use of the TSS as it is not sensitive to the class imbalance problem. Indeed, there are many more non-flaring active regions in a given time interval than flaring ones: this class imbalance distorts many performance metrics and renders comparison between various studies somewhat unreliable. We obtain relatively high TSS scores and overall predictive abilities. We surmise that this is partly due to fine-tuning the SVM for this purpose and also to an advantageous set of features that can only be calculated from vector magnetic field data. We also apply a feature selection algorithm to determine which of our 25 features are useful for discriminating between flaring and non-flaring active regions and conclude that only a handful are needed for good predictive abilities.

  17. FIRST SYNOPTIC MAPS OF PHOTOSPHERIC VECTOR MAGNETIC FIELD FROM SOLIS/VSM: NON-RADIAL MAGNETIC FIELDS AND HEMISPHERIC PATTERN OF HELICITY

    SciTech Connect

    Gosain, S.; Pevtsov, A. A.; Rudenko, G. V.; Anfinogentov, S. A.

    2013-07-20

    We use daily full-disk vector magnetograms from Vector Spectromagnetograph on Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun system to synthesize the first Carrington maps of the photospheric vector magnetic field. We describe these maps and make a comparison of the observed radial field with the radial field estimate from line-of-sight magnetograms. Furthermore, we employ these maps to study the hemispheric pattern of current helicity density, H{sub c} , during the rising phase of solar cycle 24. The longitudinal average over the 23 consecutive solar rotations shows a clear signature of the hemispheric helicity rule, i.e., H{sub c} is predominantly negative in the north and positive in the south. Although our data include the early phase of cycle 24, there appears to be no evidence for a possible (systematic) reversal of the hemispheric helicity rule at the beginning of the cycle as predicted by some dynamo models. Furthermore, we compute the hemispheric pattern in active region latitudes (-30 Degree-Sign {<=} {theta} {<=} 30 Degree-Sign ) separately for weak (100 G < |B{sub r} | < 500 G) and strong (|B{sub r} | > 1000 G) radial magnetic fields. We find that while the current helicity of strong fields follows the well-known hemispheric rule (i.e., {theta} {center_dot} H{sub c} < 0), H{sub c} of weak fields exhibits an inverse hemispheric behavior (i.e., {theta} {center_dot} H{sub c} > 0), albeit with large statistical scatter. We discuss two plausible scenarios to explain the opposite hemispheric trend of helicity in weak and strong field regions.

  18. The photospheric vector magnetic field of a sunspot and its vertical gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagyard, M. J.; West, E. A.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Smith, J. E.; Henze, W., Jr.; Beckers, J. M.; Bruner, E. C.; Hyder, C. L.; Gurman, J. B.; Shine, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    The results of direct comparisons of photospheric and transition region line-of-sight field observations of sunspots using the SMM UV spectrometer and polarimeter are reported. The analysis accompanying the data is concentrated on demonstrating that the sunspot concentrated magnetic field extends into the transition region. An observation of a sunspot on Oct. 23, 1980 at the S 18 E 03 location is used as an example. Maximum field strengths ranged from 2030-2240 gauss for large and small umbrae viewed and inclination of the field to the line-of-sight was determined for the photosphere and transition region. The distribution of the magnetic field over the sunspot and variation of the line-of-sight gradient are discussed, as are the magnitudes and gradients of the photospheric field across the penumbral-photospheric boundaries.

  19. Field-dependent spin chirality and frustration in V3 and Cu3 nanomagnets in transverse magnetic field. 1. Correlations between variable planar spin configurations, vector and scalar chiralities and magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belinsky, Moisey I.

    2014-05-01

    Correlations between field-dependent planar spin configurations, degenerate frustration, energy, vector ?z and scalar ? chiralities, spin canting, total, in-plane staggered and intermediate spin (IS) magnetizations are considered for the V3, Cu nanomagnets in transverse B?Z magnetic field. The planar spin configurations in Bx?X are characterized by the variable axial ?z(Bx) vector chirality correlated with the total in-plane magnetization Mx(Bx) and the IS magnetization M?12±(Bx), which describes the IS S12 behavior, ?(B?)=0. The in-plane staggered magnetization determines the magnitude of the vector chirality ?z. The low-field frustrated planar 120° configurations are transformed by increasing Bx field into the high-field achiral planar spin-collinear configurations. This transition is accompanied by the reduction of the vector chirality ?z and simultaneous increase of the total Mx(Bx) and IS M?12±(Bx) magnetizations. The spin configurations, chiralities and magnetization are highly anisotropic. In longitudinal B?Z field, the frustrated longitudinal spin-collinear configurations are characterized by the correlated maximal vector and scalar chiralities, ?=2?zMz.

  20. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) Vector Magnetic Field Pipeline: Magnetohydrodynamics Simulation Module for the Global Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, K.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Liu, Y.; Bobra, M. G.; Sun, X. D.; Norton, A. A.

    2015-05-01

    Time-dependent three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulation modules are implemented at the Joint Science Operation Center (JSOC) of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The modules regularly produce three-dimensional data of the time-relaxed minimum-energy state of the solar corona using global solar-surface magnetic-field maps created from Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) full-disk magnetogram data. With the assumption of a polytropic gas with specific-heat ratio of 1.05, three types of simulation products are currently generated: i) simulation data with medium spatial resolution using the definitive calibrated synoptic map of the magnetic field with a cadence of one Carrington rotation, ii) data with low spatial resolution using the definitive version of the synchronic frame format of the magnetic field, with a cadence of one day, and iii) low-resolution data using near-real-time (NRT) synchronic format of the magnetic field on a daily basis. The MHD data available in the JSOC database are three-dimensional, covering heliocentric distances from 1.025 to 4.975 solar radii, and contain all eight MHD variables: the plasma density, temperature, and three components of motion velocity, and three components of the magnetic field. This article describes details of the MHD simulations as well as the production of the input magnetic-field maps, and details of the products available at the JSOC database interface. To assess the merits and limits of the model, we show the simulated data in early 2011 and compare with the actual coronal features observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the near-Earth in-situ data.

  1. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) Vector Magnetic Field Pipeline: Magnetohydrodynamics Simulation Module for the Global Solar Corona

    E-print Network

    Hayashi, Keiji; Liu, Yang; Bobra, Monica G; Sun, Xudong D; Norton, Aimee A

    2015-01-01

    Time-dependent three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulation modules are implemented at the Joint Science Operation Center (JSOC) of Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The modules regularly produce three-dimensional data of the time-relaxed minimum-energy state of the solar corona using global solar-surface magnetic-field maps created from Helioseismic Magnetic Imager (HMI) full-disk magnetogram data. With the assumption of polytropic gas with specific heat ratio of 1.05, three types of simulation products are currently generated: i) simulation data with medium spatial resolution using the definitive calibrated synoptic map of the magnetic field with a cadence of one Carrington rotation, ii) data with low spatial resolution using the definitive version of the synchronic frame format of the magnetic field, with a cadence of one day, and iii) low-resolution data using near-real-time (NRT) synchronic format of the magnetic field on daily basis. The MHD data available in the JSOC database are three-dimen...

  2. Magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction for high-resolution bioimepedance imaging through vector source reconstruction under the static field of MRI magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Mariappan, Leo; Hu, Gang; He, Bin

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction (MAT-MI) is an imaging modality to reconstruct the electrical conductivity of biological tissue based on the acoustic measurements of Lorentz force induced tissue vibration. This study presents the feasibility of the authors' new MAT-MI system and vector source imaging algorithm to perform a complete reconstruction of the conductivity distribution of real biological tissues with ultrasound spatial resolution. Methods: In the present study, using ultrasound beamformation, imaging point spread functions are designed to reconstruct the induced vector source in the object which is used to estimate the object conductivity distribution. Both numerical studies and phantom experiments are performed to demonstrate the merits of the proposed method. Also, through the numerical simulations, the full width half maximum of the imaging point spread function is calculated to estimate of the spatial resolution. The tissue phantom experiments are performed with a MAT-MI imaging system in the static field of a 9.4 T magnetic resonance imaging magnet. Results: The image reconstruction through vector beamformation in the numerical and experimental studies gives a reliable estimate of the conductivity distribution in the object with a ?1.5 mm spatial resolution corresponding to the imaging system frequency of 500 kHz ultrasound. In addition, the experiment results suggest that MAT-MI under high static magnetic field environment is able to reconstruct images of tissue-mimicking gel phantoms and real tissue samples with reliable conductivity contrast. Conclusions: The results demonstrate that MAT-MI is able to image the electrical conductivity properties of biological tissues with better than 2 mm spatial resolution at 500 kHz, and the imaging with MAT-MI under a high static magnetic field environment is able to provide improved imaging contrast for biological tissue conductivity reconstruction.

  3. Magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction for high-resolution bioimepedance imaging through vector source reconstruction under the static field of MRI magnet

    PubMed Central

    Mariappan, Leo; Hu, Gang; He, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction (MAT-MI) is an imaging modality to reconstruct the electrical conductivity of biological tissue based on the acoustic measurements of Lorentz force induced tissue vibration. This study presents the feasibility of the authors' new MAT-MI system and vector source imaging algorithm to perform a complete reconstruction of the conductivity distribution of real biological tissues with ultrasound spatial resolution. Methods: In the present study, using ultrasound beamformation, imaging point spread functions are designed to reconstruct the induced vector source in the object which is used to estimate the object conductivity distribution. Both numerical studies and phantom experiments are performed to demonstrate the merits of the proposed method. Also, through the numerical simulations, the full width half maximum of the imaging point spread function is calculated to estimate of the spatial resolution. The tissue phantom experiments are performed with a MAT-MI imaging system in the static field of a 9.4 T magnetic resonance imaging magnet. Results: The image reconstruction through vector beamformation in the numerical and experimental studies gives a reliable estimate of the conductivity distribution in the object with a ?1.5 mm spatial resolution corresponding to the imaging system frequency of 500 kHz ultrasound. In addition, the experiment results suggest that MAT-MI under high static magnetic field environment is able to reconstruct images of tissue-mimicking gel phantoms and real tissue samples with reliable conductivity contrast. Conclusions: The results demonstrate that MAT-MI is able to image the electrical conductivity properties of biological tissues with better than 2 mm spatial resolution at 500 kHz, and the imaging with MAT-MI under a high static magnetic field environment is able to provide improved imaging contrast for biological tissue conductivity reconstruction. PMID:24506649

  4. Magnetic Fields

    E-print Network

    Schöller, Markus

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter, we give a brief introduction into the use of the Zeeman effect in astronomy and the general detection of magnetic fields in stars, concentrating on the use of FORS2 for longitudinal magnetic field measurements.

  5. Combined magnetic vector-scalar potential finite element computation of 3D magnetic field and performance of modified Lundell alternators in Space Station applications. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ren H.

    1991-01-01

    A method of combined use of magnetic vector potential (MVP) based finite element (FE) formulations and magnetic scalar potential (MSP) based FE formulations for computation of three-dimensional (3D) magnetostatic fields is developed. This combined MVP-MSP 3D-FE method leads to considerable reduction by nearly a factor of 3 in the number of unknowns in comparison to the number of unknowns which must be computed in global MVP based FE solutions. This method allows one to incorporate portions of iron cores sandwiched in between coils (conductors) in current-carrying regions. Thus, it greatly simplifies the geometries of current carrying regions (in comparison with the exclusive MSP based methods) in electric machinery applications. A unique feature of this approach is that the global MSP solution is single valued in nature, that is, no branch cut is needed. This is again a superiority over the exclusive MSP based methods. A Newton-Raphson procedure with a concept of an adaptive relaxation factor was developed and successfully used in solving the 3D-FE problem with magnetic material anisotropy and nonlinearity. Accordingly, this combined MVP-MSP 3D-FE method is most suited for solution of large scale global type magnetic field computations in rotating electric machinery with very complex magnetic circuit geometries, as well as nonlinear and anisotropic material properties.

  6. The effect of line damping, magneto-optics and parasitic light on the derivation of sunspot vector magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skumanich, A.; Lites, B. W.

    1985-01-01

    The least square fitting of Stokes observations of sunspots using a Milne-Eddington-Unno model appears to lead, in many circumstances, to various inconsistencies such as anomalously large doppler widths and, hence, small magnetic fields which are significantly below those inferred solely from the Zeeman splitting in the intensity profile. It is found that the introduction of additional physics into the model such as the inclusion of damping wings and magneto-optic birefrigence significantly improves the fit to Stokes parameters. Model fits excluding the intensity profile, i.e., of both magnitude as well as spectral shape of the polarization parameters alone, suggest that parasitic light in the intensity profile may also be a source of inconsistencies. The consequences of the physical changes on the vector properties of the field derived from the Fe I lambda 6173 line for the 17 November 1975 spot as well as on the thermodynamic state are discussed. A Doppler width delta lambda (D) - 25mA is bound to be consistent with a low spot temperature and microturbulence, and a damping constant of a = 0.2.

  7. 3D Coronal magnetic field from vector magnetograms: non-constant-alpha force-free configuration of the active region NOAA 8151

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Régnier, S.; Amari, T.; Kersalé, E.

    2002-09-01

    The Active Region 8151 (AR 8151) observed in February 1998 is the site of an eruptive event associated with a filament and a S-shaped structure, and producing a slow Coronal Mass Ejection (CME). In order to determine how the CME occurs, we compute the 3D coronal magnetic field and we derive some relevant parameters such as the free magnetic energy and the relative magnetic helicity. The 3D magnetic configuration is reconstructed from photospheric magnetic magnetograms (IVM, Mees Solar Observatory) in the case of a non-constant-alpha force-free (nlff) field model. The reconstruction method is divided into three main steps: the analysis of vector magnetograms (transverse fields, vertical density of electric current, ambiguity of 180deg), the numerical scheme for the nlff magnetic field, the interpretation of the computed magnetic field with respect to the observations. For AR 8151, the nlff field matches the coronal observations from EIT/SOHO and from SXT/Yohkoh. In particular, three characteristic flux tubes are shown: a highly twisted flux tube, a long twisted flux tube and a quasi-potential flux tube. The maximum energy budget is estimated to 2.6*E31 erg and the relative magnetic helicity to 4.7*E34 G2 cm4. From the simple photospheric magnetic distribution and the evidence of highly twisted flux tubes, we argue that the flux rope model is the most likely to describe the initiation mechanism of the eruptive event associated with AR 8151.

  8. Segmentation of discrete vector fields.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongyu; Chen, Wenbin; Shen, I-Fan

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an approach for 2D discrete vector field segmentation based on the Green function and normalized cut. The method is inspired by discrete Hodge Decomposition such that a discrete vector field can be broken down into three simpler components, namely, curl-free, divergence-free, and harmonic components. We show that the Green Function Method (GFM) can be used to approximate the curl-free and the divergence-free components to achieve our goal of the vector field segmentation. The final segmentation curves that represent the boundaries of the influence region of singularities are obtained from the optimal vector field segmentations. These curves are composed of piecewise smooth contours or streamlines. Our method is applicable to both linear and nonlinear discrete vector fields. Experiments show that the segmentations obtained using our approach essentially agree with human perceptual judgement. PMID:16640243

  9. Light scattering of rectangular slot antennas: parallel magnetic vector vs perpendicular electric vector.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dukhyung; Kim, Dai-Sik

    2016-01-01

    We study light scattering off rectangular slot nano antennas on a metal film varying incident polarization and incident angle, to examine which field vector of light is more important: electric vector perpendicular to, versus magnetic vector parallel to the long axis of the rectangle. While vector Babinet's principle would prefer magnetic field along the long axis for optimizing slot antenna function, convention and intuition most often refer to the electric field perpendicular to it. Here, we demonstrate experimentally that in accordance with vector Babinet's principle, the incident magnetic vector parallel to the long axis is the dominant component, with the perpendicular incident electric field making a small contribution of the factor of 1/|?|, the reciprocal of the absolute value of the dielectric constant of the metal, owing to the non-perfectness of metals at optical frequencies. PMID:26740335

  10. NONLINEAR FORCE-FREE FIELD EXTRAPOLATION OF A CORONAL MAGNETIC FLUX ROPE SUPPORTING A LARGE-SCALE SOLAR FILAMENT FROM A PHOTOSPHERIC VECTOR MAGNETOGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Chaowei; Wu, S. T.; Hu, Qiang; Feng, Xueshang E-mail: wus@uah.edu E-mail: fengx@spaceweather.ac.cn

    2014-05-10

    Solar filaments are commonly thought to be supported in magnetic dips, in particular, in those of magnetic flux ropes (FRs). In this Letter, based on the observed photospheric vector magnetogram, we implement a nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolation of a coronal magnetic FR that supports a large-scale intermediate filament between an active region and a weak polarity region. This result is a first, in the sense that current NLFFF extrapolations including the presence of FRs are limited to relatively small-scale filaments that are close to sunspots and along main polarity inversion lines (PILs) with strong transverse field and magnetic shear, and the existence of an FR is usually predictable. In contrast, the present filament lies along the weak-field region (photospheric field strength ? 100 G), where the PIL is very fragmented due to small parasitic polarities on both sides of the PIL and the transverse field has a low signal-to-noise ratio. Thus, extrapolating a large-scale FR in such a case represents a far more difficult challenge. We demonstrate that our CESE-MHD-NLFFF code is sufficient for the challenge. The numerically reproduced magnetic dips of the extrapolated FR match observations of the filament and its barbs very well, which strongly supports the FR-dip model for filaments. The filament is stably sustained because the FR is weakly twisted and strongly confined by the overlying closed arcades.

  11. Magnetic Field, Density Current, and Lorentz Force Full Vector Maps of the NOAA 10808 Double Sunspot: Evidence of Strong Horizontal Current Flows in the Penumbra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bommier, V.; Landi Degl'Innocenti, E.; Schmieder, B.; Gelly, B.

    2011-04-01

    The context is that of the so-called “fundamental ambiguity” (also azimuth ambiguity, or 180° ambiguity) in magnetic field vector measurements: two field vectors symmetrical with respect to the line-of-sight have the same polarimetric signature, so that they cannot be discriminated. We propose a method to solve this ambiguity by applying the “simulated annealing” algorithm to the minimization of the field divergence, added to the longitudinal current absolute value, the line-of-sight derivative of the magnetic field being inferred by the interpretation of the Zeeman effect observed by spectropolarimetry in two lines formed at different depths. We find that the line pair Fe I ? 6301.5 and Fe I ? 6302.5 is appropriate for this purpose. We treat the example case of the ?-spot of NOAA 10808 observed on 13 September 2005 between 14:25 and 15:25 UT with the THEMIS telescope. Besides the magnetic field resolved map, the electric current density vector map is also obtained. A strong horizontal current density flow is found surrounding each spot inside its penumbra, associated to a non-zero Lorentz force centripetal with respect to the spot center (i.e., oriented towards the spot center). The current wrapping direction is found to depend on the spot polarity: clockwise for the positive polarity, counterclockwise for the negative one. This analysis is made possible thanks to the UNNOFIT2 Milne-Eddington inversion code, where the usual theory is generalized to the case of a line Fe I ? 6301.5) that is not a normal Zeeman triplet line (like Fe I ? 6302.5).

  12. Magnetic nanoparticle motion in external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usov, N. A.; Liubimov, B. Ya

    2015-07-01

    A set of equations describing the motion of a free magnetic nanoparticle in an external magnetic field in a vacuum, or in a medium with negligibly small friction forces is postulated. The conservation of the total particle momentum, i.e. the sum of the mechanical and the total spin momentum of the nanoparticle is taken into account explicitly. It is shown that for the motion of a nanoparticle in uniform magnetic field there are three different modes of precession of the unit magnetization vector and the director that is parallel the particle easy anisotropy axis. These modes differ significantly in the precession frequency. For the high-frequency mode the director points approximately along the external magnetic field, whereas the frequency and the characteristic relaxation time of the precession of the unit magnetization vector are close to the corresponding values for conventional ferromagnetic resonance. On the other hand, for the low-frequency modes the unit magnetization vector and the director are nearly parallel and rotate in unison around the external magnetic field. The characteristic relaxation time for the low-frequency modes is remarkably long. This means that in a rare assembly of magnetic nanoparticles there is a possibility of additional resonant absorption of the energy of alternating magnetic field at a frequency that is much smaller compared to conventional ferromagnetic resonance frequency. The scattering of a beam of magnetic nanoparticles in a vacuum in a non-uniform external magnetic field is also considered taking into account the precession of the unit magnetization vector and director.

  13. Combining Linear Polarization Measurements of both Forbidden/Permitted Coronal Emission Lines for measuring the Vector Magnetic Field in the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dima, G. I.; Kuhn, J. R.; Mickey, D.

    2014-12-01

    Measuring the coronal vector magnetic field is still a major challenge in solar physics. This is due to the intrinsic weakness of the field (~4 G at a height of 0.1 Rsun above an active region) and the large thermal broadening of coronal emission lines. Current methods deduce either the direction of the magnetic field or the magnetic flux density. We propose using concurrent linear polarization measurements in the near IR of forbidden and permitted lines to calculate the coronal vector magnetic field. The effect of the magnetic field on the polarization properties of emitted light is encapsulated in the Hanle effect. In the unsaturated Hanle regime both the direction and strength of the magnetic field affect the linear polarization, while for saturated Hanle the polarization is insensitive to the strength of the field. Coronal forbidden lines are always in the saturated Hanle regime so the linear polarization holds no information on the strength of the field. By pairing measurements of both forbidden and permitted lines we would be able to obtain both the direction and strength of the field. The near-IR region of the spectrum offers the opportunity to study this problem from the ground. The FeXIII 1.075 um and SiX 1.431 um forbidden lines are strongly polarizable and are sufficiently bright over a large field of view (out to 1.5 Rsun). Measurements of both these lines can be paired up with the recently observed coronal HeI 1.083 um permitted line. The first data set used to test this technique was taken during the March 29, 2006 total solar eclipse and consisted of near-IR spectra covering the spectral region 0.9-1.8 um, with a field of view of 3 x 3 Rsun. The data revealed unexpectedly strong SiX emission compared to FeXIII. Using the HAO FORWARD suite of codes we produced simulated emission maps from a global HMD model for the day of the eclipse. Comparing the intensity variation of the measurements and the model we predict that SiX emission is more extended for this day that the model would suggest, further supporting the possible usefulness of SiX polarimetry. The development of this method and associated tools will be critical in interpreting the high spectral, spatial and temporal IR measurements that will be possible when the Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST) is completed in a few years time.

  14. Killing Vector Fields and Superharmonic Field Theories

    E-print Network

    Josua Groeger

    2013-01-23

    The harmonic action functional allows a natural generalisation to semi-Riemannian supergeometry, referred to as superharmonic action, which resembles the supersymmetric sigma models studied in high energy physics. We show that Killing vector fields are infinitesimal supersymmetries of the superharmonic action and prove three different Noether theorems in this context. En passant, we provide a homogeneous treatment of five characterisations of Killing vector fields on semi-Riemannian supermanifolds, thus filling a gap in the literature.

  15. The Lorentz transformations of the vectors E, B, P, M and the external electric fields from a stationary superconducting wire with a steady current and from a stationary permanent magnet

    E-print Network

    Tomislav Ivezic

    2012-11-02

    In the first part of this paper we review the fundamental difference between the usual transformations of the three-dimensional (3D) vectors of the electric field $\\mathbf{E}$, the magnetic field $\\mathbf{B}$, the polarization $\\mathbf{P}$, the magnetization $\\mathbf{M}$ and the Lorentz transformations of the 4D geometric quantities, vectors E, B, P, M, with many additional explanations and several new results. In the second part, we have discussed the existence of the electric field vector E outside a stationary superconducting wire with a steady current and also different experiments for the detection of such electric fields. Furthermore, a fundamental prediction of the existence of the external electric field vector E from a stationary permanent magnet is considered. These electric fields are used for the resolution of the "charge-magnet paradox" with 4D geometric quantities for a qualitative explanation of the Aharonov-Bohm effect in terms of fields and not, as usual, in terms of the vector potential and for a qualitative explanation that the particle interference is not a test of a Lorentz-violating model of electrodynamics according to which a magnetic solenoid generates not only a static magnetic field but also a static electric field.

  16. Satellite to study earth's magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The Magnetic Field Satellite (Magsat) designed to measure the near earth magnetic field and crustal anomalies is briefly described. A scalar magnetometer to measure the magnitude of the earth's crustal magnetic field and a vector magnetometer to measure magnetic field direction as well as magnitude are included. The mission and its objectives are summarized along with the data collection and processing system.

  17. Magnetic fields at uranus.

    PubMed

    Ness, N F; Acuña, M H; Behannon, K W; Burlaga, L F; Connerney, J E; Lepping, R P; Neubauer, F M

    1986-07-01

    The magnetic field experiment on the Voyager 2 spacecraft revealed a strong planetary magnetic field of Uranus and an associated magnetosphere and fully developed bipolar masnetic tail. The detached bow shock wave in the solar wind supersonic flow was observed upstream at 23.7 Uranus radii (1 R(U) = 25,600 km) and the magnetopause boundary at 18.0 R(U), near the planet-sun line. A miaximum magnetic field of 413 nanotesla was observed at 4.19 R(U ), just before closest approach. Initial analyses reveal that the planetary magnetic field is well represented by that of a dipole offset from the center of the planet by 0.3 R(U). The angle between Uranus' angular momentum vector and the dipole moment vector has the surprisingly large value of 60 degrees. Thus, in an astrophysical context, the field of Uranus may be described as that of an oblique rotator. The dipole moment of 0.23 gauss R(3)(U), combined with the large spatial offset, leads to minimum and maximum magnetic fields on the surface of the planet of approximately 0.1 and 1.1 gauss, respectively. The rotation period of the magnetic field and hence that of the interior of the planet is estimated to be 17.29+/- 0.10 hours; the magnetotail rotates about the planet-sun line with the same period. Thelarge offset and tilt lead to auroral zones far from the planetary rotation axis poles. The rings and the moons are embedded deep within the magnetosphere, and, because of the large dipole tilt, they will have a profound and diurnally varying influence as absorbers of the trapped radiation belt particles. PMID:17812894

  18. Representation of magnetic fields in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, D. P.

    1975-01-01

    Several methods by which a magnetic field in space can be represented are reviewed with particular attention to problems of the observed geomagnetic field. Time dependence is assumed to be negligible, and five main classes of representation are described by vector potential, scalar potential, orthogonal vectors, Euler potentials, and expanded magnetic field.

  19. Supplementary Notes: 1. Simulated magnetic field pattern

    E-print Network

    Cai, Long

    magnetic field B0 and the MNP- labeled cell's magnetization vector: || = = ! "# $ !% & '. (3 here, under a 400 G magnetizing field B0) uniformly distributed on a 15-µm diameter spherical cell with the applied bias magnetic field B0 to create a characteristic 2-lobed shape common to all labeled cells

  20. Magnetic fields at Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ness, N. F.; Acuna, M. H.; Behannon, K. W.; Burlaga, L. F.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Lepping, R. P.

    1986-01-01

    The conclusions drawn regarding the structure, behavior and composition of the Uranian magnetic field and magnetosphere as revealed by Voyager 2 data are summarized. The planet had a bipolar magnetotail and a bow shock wave which was observed 23.7 Uranus radii (UR) upstream and a magnetopause at 18.0 UR. The magnetic field observed can be represented by a dipole offset from the planet by 0.3 UR. The field vector and the planetary angular momentum vector formed a 60 deg angle, permitting Uranus to be categorized as an oblique rotator, with auroral zones occurring far from the rotation axis polar zones. The surface magnetic field was estimated to lie between 0.1-1.1 gauss. Both the field and the magnetotail rotated around the planet-sun line in a period of about 17.29 hr. Since the ring system is embedded within the magnetosphere, it is expected that the rings are significant absorbers of radiation belt particles.

  1. Magnetic fields at Uranus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ness, N. F.; Acuna, M. H.; Behannon, K. W.; Burlaga, L. F.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Lepping, R. P.

    1986-07-01

    The conclusions drawn regarding the structure, behavior and composition of the Uranian magnetic field and magnetosphere as revealed by Voyager 2 data are summarized. The planet had a bipolar magnetotail and a bow shock wave which was observed 23.7 Uranus radii (UR) upstream and a magnetopause at 18.0 UR. The magnetic field observed can be represented by a dipole offset from the planet by 0.3 UR. The field vector and the planetary angular momentum vector formed a 60 deg angle, permitting Uranus to be categorized as an oblique rotator, with auroral zones occurring far from the rotation axis polar zones. The surface magnetic field was estimated to lie between 0.1-1.1 gauss. Both the field and the magnetotail rotated around the planet-sun line in a period of about 17.29 hr. Since the ring system is embedded within the magnetosphere, it is expected that the rings are significant absorbers of radiation belt particles.

  2. Composite Vector Particles in External Electromagnetic Fields

    E-print Network

    Davoudi, Zohreh

    2015-01-01

    Lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD) studies of electromagnetic properties of hadrons and light nuclei, such as magnetic moments and polarizabilities, have proven successful with the use of background field methods. With an implementation of nonuniform background electromagnetic fields, properties such as charge radii and higher electromagnetic multipole moments (for states of higher spin) can be additionally obtained. This can be achieved by matching lattice QCD calculations to a corresponding low-energy effective theory that describes the static and quasi-static response of hadrons and nuclei to weak external fields. With particular interest in the case of vector mesons and spin-1 nuclei such as the deuteron, we present an effective field theory of spin-1 particles coupled to external electromagnetic fields. To constrain the charge radius and the electric quadrupole moment of the composite spin-1 field, the single-particle Green's functions in a linearly varying electric field in space are obtained within t...

  3. HMI Magnetic Field Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeksema, Jon T.; HMI Magnetic Field Team

    2013-07-01

    The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on SDO has measured magnetic field, velocity, and intensity in the photosphere over the full disk continuously since May 2010 with arc-second resolution. Scalar images are measured every 45 seconds. From these basic observables the pipeline automatically identifies and tracks active regions on the solar disk. The vector magnetic field and a variety of summary quantities are determined every 720s in these tracked Space-weather HMI Active Region Patches (SHARPS). Synoptic and synchronic maps are constructed daily and after each Carrington Rotation Most data products are available with definitive scientific calibration after a few day deal at and in a quick-look near-real-time version a few minutes after the observations are made. Uncertainties are determined for the derived products. All of the magnetic field products along with movies and images suitable for browsing are available at http:://Hmi.stanford.edu/magnetic. Other products, e.g. coronal field over active regions, can be computed on demand.

  4. Introduction to Vector Field Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David; Shen, Han-Wei

    2010-01-01

    Vector field visualization techniques are essential to help us understand the complex dynamics of flow fields. These can be found in a wide range of applications such as study of flows around an aircraft, the blood flow in our heart chambers, ocean circulation models, and severe weather predictions. The vector fields from these various applications can be visually depicted using a number of techniques such as particle traces and advecting textures. In this tutorial, we present several fundamental algorithms in flow visualization including particle integration, particle tracking in time-dependent flows, and seeding strategies. For flows near surfaces, a wide variety of synthetic texture-based algorithms have been developed to depict near-body flow features. The most common approach is based on the Line Integral Convolution (LIC) algorithm. There also exist extensions of LIC to support more flexible texture generations for 3D flow data. This tutorial reviews these algorithms. Tensor fields are found in several real-world applications and also require the aid of visualization to help users understand their data sets. Examples where one can find tensor fields include mechanics to see how material respond to external forces, civil engineering and geomechanics of roads and bridges, and the study of neural pathway via diffusion tensor imaging. This tutorial will provide an overview of the different tensor field visualization techniques, discuss basic tensor decompositions, and go into detail on glyph based methods, deformation based methods, and streamline based methods. Practical examples will be used when presenting the methods; and applications from some case studies will be used as part of the motivation.

  5. Vector field theories in cosmology

    E-print Network

    A. Tartaglia; N. Radicella

    2007-08-05

    Recently proposed theories based on the cosmic presence of a vectorial field are compared and contrasted. In particular the so called Einstein aether theory is discussed in parallel with a recent proposal of a strained space-time theory (Cosmic Defect theory). We show that the latter fits reasonably well the cosmic observed data with only one, or at most two, adjustable parameters, whilst other vector theories use much more. The Newtonian limits are also compared. Finally we show that the CD theory may be considered as a special case of the aether theories, corresponding to a more compact and consistent paradigm.

  6. The MAVEN Magnetic Field Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Espley, J.; Lawton, P.; Murphy, S.; Odom, J.; Oliversen, R.; Sheppard, D.

    2015-12-01

    The MAVEN magnetic field investigation is part of a comprehensive particles and fields subsystem that will measure the magnetic and electric fields and plasma environment of Mars and its interaction with the solar wind. The magnetic field instrumentation consists of two independent tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer sensors, remotely mounted at the outer extremity of the two solar arrays on small extensions ("boomlets"). The sensors are controlled by independent and functionally identical electronics assemblies that are integrated within the particles and fields subsystem and draw their power from redundant power supplies within that system. Each magnetometer measures the ambient vector magnetic field over a wide dynamic range (to 65,536 nT per axis) with a resolution of 0.008 nT in the most sensitive dynamic range and an accuracy of better than 0.05 %. Both magnetometers sample the ambient magnetic field at an intrinsic sample rate of 32 vector samples per second. Telemetry is transferred from each magnetometer to the particles and fields package once per second and subsequently passed to the spacecraft after some reformatting. The magnetic field data volume may be reduced by averaging and decimation, when necessary to meet telemetry allocations, and application of data compression, utilizing a lossless 8-bit differencing scheme. The MAVEN magnetic field experiment may be reconfigured in flight to meet unanticipated needs and is fully hardware redundant. A spacecraft magnetic control program was implemented to provide a magnetically clean environment for the magnetic sensors and the MAVEN mission plan provides for occasional spacecraft maneuvers—multiple rotations about the spacecraft x and z axes—to characterize spacecraft fields and/or instrument offsets in flight.

  7. The MAVEN Magnetic Field Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Espley, J.; Lawton, P.; Murphy, S.; Odom, J.; Oliversen, R.; Sheppard, D.

    2015-06-01

    The MAVEN magnetic field investigation is part of a comprehensive particles and fields subsystem that will measure the magnetic and electric fields and plasma environment of Mars and its interaction with the solar wind. The magnetic field instrumentation consists of two independent tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer sensors, remotely mounted at the outer extremity of the two solar arrays on small extensions ("boomlets"). The sensors are controlled by independent and functionally identical electronics assemblies that are integrated within the particles and fields subsystem and draw their power from redundant power supplies within that system. Each magnetometer measures the ambient vector magnetic field over a wide dynamic range (to 65,536 nT per axis) with a resolution of 0.008 nT in the most sensitive dynamic range and an accuracy of better than 0.05 %. Both magnetometers sample the ambient magnetic field at an intrinsic sample rate of 32 vector samples per second. Telemetry is transferred from each magnetometer to the particles and fields package once per second and subsequently passed to the spacecraft after some reformatting. The magnetic field data volume may be reduced by averaging and decimation, when necessary to meet telemetry allocations, and application of data compression, utilizing a lossless 8-bit differencing scheme. The MAVEN magnetic field experiment may be reconfigured in flight to meet unanticipated needs and is fully hardware redundant. A spacecraft magnetic control program was implemented to provide a magnetically clean environment for the magnetic sensors and the MAVEN mission plan provides for occasional spacecraft maneuvers—multiple rotations about the spacecraft x and z axes—to characterize spacecraft fields and/or instrument offsets in flight.

  8. The MAVEN Magnetic Field Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Espley, J.; Lawton, P.; Murphy, S.; Odom, J.; Oliversen, R.; Sheppard, D.

    2014-01-01

    The MAVEN magnetic field investigation is part of a comprehensive particles and fields subsystem that will measure the magnetic and electric fields and plasma environment of Mars and its interaction with the solar wind. The magnetic field instrumentation consists of two independent tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer sensors, remotely mounted at the outer extremity of the two solar arrays on small extensions ("boomlets"). The sensors are controlled by independent and functionally identical electronics assemblies that are integrated within the particles and fields subsystem and draw their power from redundant power supplies within that system. Each magnetometer measures the ambient vector magnetic field over a wide dynamic range (to 65,536 nT per axis) with a quantization uncertainty of 0.008 nT in the most sensitive dynamic range and an accuracy of better than 0.05%. Both magnetometers sample the ambient magnetic field at an intrinsic sample rate of 32 vector samples per second. Telemetry is transferred from each magnetometer to the particles and fields package once per second and subsequently passed to the spacecraft after some reformatting. The magnetic field data volume may be reduced by averaging and decimation, when necessary to meet telemetry allocations, and application of data compression, utilizing a lossless 8-bit differencing scheme. The MAVEN magnetic field experiment may be reconfigured in flight to meet unanticipated needs and is fully hardware redundant. A spacecraft magnetic control program was implemented to provide a magnetically clean environment for the magnetic sensors and the MAVEN mission plan provides for occasional spacecraft maneuvers - multiple rotations about the spacecraft x and z axes - to characterize spacecraft fields and/or instrument offsets in flight.

  9. Composite Vector Particles in External Electromagnetic Fields

    E-print Network

    Zohreh Davoudi; William Detmold

    2015-10-08

    Lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD) studies of electromagnetic properties of hadrons and light nuclei, such as magnetic moments and polarizabilities, have proven successful with the use of background field methods. With an implementation of nonuniform background electromagnetic fields, properties such as charge radii and higher electromagnetic multipole moments (for states of higher spin) can be additionally obtained. This can be achieved by matching lattice QCD calculations to a corresponding low-energy effective theory that describes the static and quasi-static response of hadrons and nuclei to weak external fields. With particular interest in the case of vector mesons and spin-1 nuclei such as the deuteron, we present an effective field theory of spin-1 particles coupled to external electromagnetic fields. To constrain the charge radius and the electric quadrupole moment of the composite spin-1 field, the single-particle Green's functions in a linearly varying electric field in space are obtained within the effective theory, providing explicit expressions that can be used to match directly onto lattice QCD correlation functions. The viability of an extraction of the charge radius and the electric quadrupole moment of the deuteron from the upcoming lattice QCD calculations of this nucleus is discussed.

  10. Control of plasma waves associated with the space shuttle by the angle between the orbiter's velocity vector and the magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Cairns, I.H.; Gurnett, D.A. )

    1991-05-01

    The interaction between water outgassed from the space shuttle and the ionospheric plasma leads to production of water ions by charge exchange and an active and complex plasma wave environment for the space shuttle. The authors show that the amplitude and spectral character of some of these waves are controlled by the angle between the magnetic field and the shuttle's velocity vector V{sub T} relative to the ionospheric plasma. When the flow is approximately perpendicular to the magnetic field (V{sub {parallel}}/V{sub T}{approximately}0), large wave amplitudes and characteristic mushroom wave structures are observed, whereas more nearly parallel flows {vert bar}V{parallel}{vert bar} {approximately} V{sub {perpendicular}} are characterized by low wave levels. They show that linear instability theory predicts the growth of Doppler-shifted lower hybrid waves in the observed frequency range when driven by the ring and/or beam distributions of water ions produced by charge exchange in the vicinity of the space shuttle. Two mutually compatible interpretations for the V{sub {parallel}}/V{sub T} effect exist. The first interpretation involves the path lengths available for growth of waves driven by pickup ions varying with the quantity V{sub {parallel}}/V{sub T} and being limited by spatial variations in the water ion distribution. The second interpretation follows directly from the linear theory: decreasing the ring/beam speed V{sub {perpendicular}} of the pickup ions driving the waves (increasing V{sub {parallel}}/V{sub T} results in smaller growth rates), with zero growth rate below some threshold value of V{sub {perpendicular}}.These results have immediate implications for future shuttle missions and orbiting platforms subject to outgassing of water. If these facilities are used for ionospheric plasma studies or active experiments involving plasma waves, the plasma wave background due to pickup ions associated with the orbiter should be minimized.

  11. ECE 390 Electric & Magnetic Fields Catalog Description: Static and quasi-static electric and magnetic fields.

    E-print Network

    ECE 390 ­ Electric & Magnetic Fields Catalog Description: Static and quasi-static electric), A. Jander (secondary) Course Content: · Introduction, review of vector analysis · Static electric fields in free space: Coulomb's law, Gauss's law, and electric potential, electric dipole · Static

  12. Vector fields and Loop Quantum Cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Artymowski, Micha?; Lalak, Zygmunt E-mail: Zygmunt.Lalak@fuw.edu.pl

    2011-09-01

    In the context of the Loop Quantum Cosmology we have analysed the holonomy correction to the classical evolution of the simplified Bianchi I model in the presence of vector fields. For the Universe dominated by a massive vector field or by a combination of a scalar field and a vector field a smooth transition between Kasner-like and Kasner-unlike solutions for a Bianchi I model has been demonstrated. In this case a lack of initial curvature singularity and a finite maximal energy density appear already at the level of General Relativity, which simulates a classical Big Bounce.

  13. Magnetic field mapper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, R. M.; Stenger, F. J.

    1969-01-01

    Magnetic field mapper locates imperfections in cadmium sulphide solar cells by detecting and displaying the variations of the normal component of the magnetic field resulting from current density variations. It can also inspect for nonuniformities in other electrically conductive materials.

  14. Magsat vector magnetometer calibration using Magsat geomagnetic field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lancaster, E. R.; Jennings, T.; Morrissey, M.; Langel, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    From the time of its launch on Oct. 30, 1979 into a nearly polar, Sun synchronous orbit, until it reentered the Earth's atmosphere on June 11, 1980, Magsat measured and transmitted more than three complete sets of global magnetic field data. The data obtained from the mission will be used primarily to compute a currently accurate model of the Earth's main magnetic field, to update and refine world and regional magnetic charts, and to develop a global scalar and vector crustal magnetic anomaly map. The in-flight calibration procecure used for 39 vector magnetometer system parameters is described as well as results obtained from some data sets and the numerical studies designed to evaluate the results.

  15. Representation and visualization of vector field topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helman, James Lowell

    1998-12-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations produce vast amounts of high resolution multivariate data. Techniques that use computer graphics for visualizing scalar fields are relatively well developed, but direct visualization methods are inadequate for gaining insight into complex vector and tensor fields. This thesis discusses methods for applying the theory of vector field topology from dynamical systems to analyze and visualize vector fields and the physical structure of fluid flows. The 2D work generates representations of velocity field topology by locating, characterizing' and connecting critical points in a 2D domain. In 2D, time-dependent flows, correspondences between instantaneous topology skeletons are identified and computer graphics used to display surface representations. In 3D flows, the critical points and curves of skin friction topology provide a basis for generating stream surfaces that provide insight into the 3D structure of flow separations. 3D critical points are identified and depicted using geometric icons to represent their eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Methods for the refinement, tessellation, clipping and display of surfaces defined by adjacent tangent curves are also discussed. In combination, these analysis and visualization techniques are effective and efficient at providing insight into the vector field topology in a data set. The methods are applicable to vector fields in general, but this work focuses on velocity fields from separated flows because vector field topology in these problems is very intimately tied to our physical understanding of these systems.

  16. Magnetic Fields Analogous to electric field, a magnet

    E-print Network

    Bertulani, Carlos A. - Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A&M University

    Magnetic Fields Analogous to electric field, a magnet produces a magnetic field, B Set up a B field two ways: Moving electrically charged particles Current in a wire Intrinsic magnetic field Basic characteristic of elementary particles such as an electron #12;Magnetic Fields Magnetic field lines Direction

  17. Magnetic Gradiometer and Vector Magnetometer Survey of the Eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granot, R.

    2014-12-01

    Some of the fundamental tectonic problems of the Eastern Mediterranean remain unresolved due to the extremely thick sedimentary cover (~15 km) and the lack of accurate magnetic anomaly data. We conducted a magnetic survey of the Herodotus and Levant Basins (Eastern Mediterranean) to study the nature and age of the underlying igneous crust. The towed magnetometer array consisted of two Overhauser sensors recording the total magnetic field in a longitudinal gradiometer mode, and a marine vector magnetometer. Accurate navigation together with the gradiometer data allows the separation of the magnetic signature of the lithosphere from the contributions of the external magnetic field and the geomagnetic field. Total field data in the Herodotus Basin reveal a sequence of long-wavelength NE-SW lineated anomalies (~80 nT) suggesting a deep (~20 km) 2D magnetic source layer. Analysis of the vector data shows a steady azimuth of lineations that is generally consistent with the total field anomalies. The sequence of anomalies is rather short and does not allow a unique identification. However, the continuous northward motion of the African Plate during the Paleozoic and Mesozoic result in predictable anomaly skewness patterns for the different time periods. Forward magnetic modeling best fit the observed anomalies when using Early Permian remanence directions. Altogether, these observations and analysis suggest that a Neo-Tethyan Permian oceanic crust underlies the Herodotus Basin. Two short-wavelengths and strong (~400 nT) anomalies are found in the Levant Basin, proposing rather shallow (~7 km) magnetic sources there. These anomalies spatially coincide with Mesozoic uplifted continental structures (Eratosthenes and Jonah Highs).

  18. Magnetic field observations in Comet Halley's coma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedler, W.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Yeroshenko, Ye. G.; Styashkin, V. A.; Russell, C. T.

    1986-05-01

    During the encounter with Comet Halley, the magnetometer (MISCHA) aboard the Vega 1 spacecraft observed an increased level of magnetic field turbulence, resulting from an upstream bow wave. Both Vega spacecraft measured a peak field strength of 70-80 nT and observed draping of magnetic field lines around the cometary obstacle. An unexpected rotation of the magnetic field vector was observed, which may reflect either penetration of magnetic field lines into a diffuse layer related to the contact surface separating the solar-wind and cometary plasma, or the persistence of pre-existing interplanetary field structures.

  19. Magnetoconvection in sheared magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Bian, N. H.; Garcia, O. E.

    2008-10-15

    The development of magnetoconvection in a sheared magnetic field is investigated. The equilibrium magnetic field B{sub 0} is horizontal and its orientation varies linearly along the vertical axis. Preliminary consideration of the transition from the inertial to the viscous regime of the gravitational resistive interchange instability, reveals that the latter is characterized by the existence of viscoresistive boundary layers of vertical width which scales as Q{sup -1/6}, where Q is the Chandrasekhar number. The situation is analogous to the one encountered in magnetically confined laboratory plasmas, where convective flows are constrained by the magnetic shear to develop in boundary layers located around resonant magnetic surfaces in order to fulfill the 'interchange condition'k{center_dot}B{sub 0}=0, where k is the wave vector of the magnetic perturbation. It follows that when the effect of thermal diffusion is taken into account in the process, convection can only occur above a certain critical value of the Rayleigh number which scales as Q{sup 2/3} for large Q. At the onset, the convection pattern is a superposition of identically thin convective rolls everywhere aligned with the local magnetic field lines and which therefore adopt the magnetic field geometry, a situation also reminiscent of the penumbra of sunspots. Using this degeneracy, equations describing the weakly nonlinear state are obtained and discussed. A reduced magnetohydrodynamic description of magnetoconvection is introduced. Since it is valid for arbitrary magnetic field configurations, it allows a simple extension to the case where there exists an inclination between the direction of gravity and the plane spanned by the equilibrium magnetic field. These reduced magnetohydrodynamic equations are proposed as a powerful tool for further investigations of magnetoconvection in more complex field line geometries.

  20. Vector fields and multidimensional integrable hierarchies

    E-print Network

    Fominov, Yakov

    hierarchy. Special vector fields (area-preserving or volume preserving). A simplest general position case (N Anal. Appl. 13, 166-174 (1979). VE Zakharov and SV Manakov, Multidimensional integrable nonlinear

  1. Magnetic vector data from the western Caribbean reveal possible origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barckhausen, U.; Engels, U.

    2013-12-01

    During a cruise with RV Meteor in the spring of 2010, magnetic measurements were carried out in the central and western Caribbean with up to six magnetic sensors deployed at the same time. These were i) a towed gradiometer consisting of two Overhauser sensors, ii) two towed vector magnetometers, and iii) two shipboard oriented vector magnetometers. While the gradiometer data provide total field magnetic anomalies free from external variations, the vector data can be analyzed with different methods in the space and wavenumber domains. In the case of the towed vector data, attitude control is challenging whereas shipboard data require a very thorough compensation for the ship's magnetic field. The data were analyzed with the goal to gain insight into the origin of the basement rocks especially of the western Caribbean. Position and strike direction of magnetic anomalies in the Columbia basin possibly hold the key to distinguish between an origin of the crust in the Pacific ocean and an alternative in situ formation between the Americas. On six long profiles in the Columbia basin and adjacent regions we find consistently strike directions of the magnetic anomalies around N100°E which seems to be incompatible with a Pacific origin of the crust. Three Project Magnet aeromagnetic vector profiles crossing the research area at different angles were analyzed with the same method and yield very similar results. In our interpretation, the crust underlying the Columbia basin formed during the Cretaceous at a roughly E-W trending spreading center between the Americas. Since the crust likely formed during the Cretaceous Superchron (C 34), the strike direction we find in our data probably does not represent typical seafloor spreading anomalies. Instead we believe it is related to changes in the intensity of the Earth's magnetic field which are known to have left correlated traces in oceanic crust formed during this period. The analysis methods we used are sensitive to intensity changes just as well as to polarity changes. We can demonstrate that the data quality is high and that the strike direction signal is clear and well correlated between the different profiles and that it is also consistent between towed, shipboard, and aeromagnetic sensors.

  2. Killing vector fields and harmonic superfield theories

    SciTech Connect

    Groeger, Josua

    2014-09-15

    The harmonic action functional allows a natural generalisation to semi-Riemannian supergeometry, also referred to as harmonic, which resembles the supersymmetric sigma models studied in high energy physics. We show that Killing vector fields are infinitesimal supersymmetries of this harmonic action and prove three different Noether theorems in this context. En passant, we provide a homogeneous treatment of five characterisations of Killing vector fields on semi-Riemannian supermanifolds, thus filling a gap in the literature.

  3. A Flexible Turbulent Vector Field Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benassi, A.; Davis, A.

    2004-12-01

    Analysis and generation of turbulent vector fields is a necessity in many areas, such as Atmospheric Science. A candidate model of vector field must be flexible enough to tune some features, such as the spacial distribution of vortices, sinks and sources, according to physical measures. To achieve that goal, we propose a model that depends upon a given matricial function called "topolet" and a law of random vectors family. This model has a hierarchical structure. Its spinal column is a tree: the encoding tree of the domain where the vector field lives. The sets of vortices, sinks and sources are driven by some Bernouilli subtrees, directly giving their fractal dimension. At each node of the tree is attached a rate of energy loose giving the spectral slope. All those quantities are independantly identifiable on the base of mathematical proofs. A primitive version of this model have been proposed for generating clouds.

  4. Magnetic Fields and Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Schep, T.J.

    2004-03-15

    Plasmas and magnetic fields are inseparably related in numerous physical circumstances. This is not only the case in natural occurring plasmas like the solar corona and the earth magnetic tail, but also in laboratory plasmas like tokamaks and stellarators.

  5. Ferromagnetic Switching of Knotted Vector Fields in Liquid Crystal Colloids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiaoxuan; Ackerman, Paul J; Liu, Qingkun; Smalyukh, Ivan I

    2015-08-28

    We experimentally realize polydomain and monodomain chiral ferromagnetic liquid crystal colloids that exhibit solitonic and knotted vector field configurations. Formed by dispersions of ferromagnetic nanoplatelets in chiral nematic liquid crystals, these colloidal ferromagnets exhibit spontaneous long-range alignment of magnetic dipole moments of individual platelets, giving rise to a continuum of the magnetization field M(r). Competing effects of surface confinement and chirality prompt spontaneous formation and enable the optical generation of localized twisted solitonic structures with double-twist tubes and torus knots of M(r), which exhibit a strong sensitivity to the direction of weak magnetic fields ?1??mT. Numerical modeling, implemented through free energy minimization to arrive at a field-dependent three-dimensional M(r), shows a good agreement with experiments and provides insights into the torus knot topology of observed field configurations and the corresponding physical underpinnings. PMID:26371682

  6. Vector boson mass generation without new fields

    E-print Network

    Bernd A. Berg

    2012-04-21

    Previously a model of only vector fields with a local U(2) symmetry was introduced for which one finds a massless U(1) photon and a massive SU(2) vector boson in the lattice regularization. Here it is shown that quantization of its classical continuum action leads to perturbative renormalization difficulties. But, non-perturbative Monte Carlo calculations favor the existence of a quantum continuum limit.

  7. Uniformly elliptically-polarized vector optical fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yue; Ren, Zhi-Cheng; Qian, Sheng-Xia; Gao, Xu-Zhen; Li, Yongnan; Tu, Chenghou; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2015-03-01

    We present a modified, more universal scheme for generating vector fields. Here we design in principle and experimentally generate a new kind of uniformly elliptically polarized vector field, which has the same ellipticity and sense of local elliptic polarization at any location and also has a flexibly designable distribution of orientation of the elliptic polarization. An introduced additional degree of freedom is used to flexibly change the ellipticity. In particular, the ellipticity and the orientation of polarization can be independently controlled by two parameters. This makes it easier to both control the spatial structure of the polarization and to engineer the focusing field.

  8. Magnetic field generator

    DOEpatents

    Krienin, Frank (Shoreham, NY)

    1990-01-01

    A magnetic field generating device provides a useful magnetic field within a specific retgion, while keeping nearby surrounding regions virtually field free. By placing an appropriate current density along a flux line of the source, the stray field effects of the generator may be contained. One current carrying structure may support a truncated cosine distribution, and it may be surrounded by a current structure which follows a flux line that would occur in a full coaxial double cosine distribution. Strong magnetic fields may be generated and contained using superconducting cables to approximate required current surfaces.

  9. Magnetic Field & Right Hand Rule

    E-print Network

    Heller, Barbara

    Magnetic Field & Right Hand Rule Academic Resource Center #12;Magnetic Fields And Right Hand Rules By: Anthony Ruth #12;Magnetic Fields vs Electric Fields · Magnetic fields are similar to electric charges and stationary charges. · In addition, magnetic fields create a force only on moving charges

  10. Magnetic Fields in Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Rainer

    Magnetic fields are a major agent in the interstellar medium. They contribute significantly to the total pressure which balances the gas disk against gravitation. They affect the gas flows in spiral arms (Gómez and Cox, 2002). The effective sound speed of the gas is increased by the presence of strong fields which reduce the shock strength. The interstellar fields are closely connected to gas clouds. They affect the dynamics of the gas clouds (Elmegreen, 1981; de Avillez and Breitschwerdt, 2004). The stability and evolution of gas clouds are also influenced by magnetic fields, but it is not understood how (Crutcher, 1999; see Chap. 7). Magnetic fields are essential for the onset of star formation as they enable the removal of angular momentum from the protostellar cloud during its collapse (magnetic braking, Mouschovias, 1990). Strong fields may shift the stellar mass spectrum towards the more massive stars (Mestel, 1990). MHD turbulence distributes energy from supernova explosions within the ISM (Subramanian, 1998) and regenerates the field via the dynamo process (Wielebinski, R., Krause, 1993, Beck et al., 1996; Sect. 6). Magnetic reconnection is a possible heating source for the ISM and halo gas (Birk et al., 1998). Magnetic fields also control the density and distribution of cosmic rays in the ISM. A realistic model for any process in the ISM needs basic information about the magnetic field which has to be provided by observations.

  11. Magnetic field spectrum at cosmological recombination revisited

    E-print Network

    Shohei Saga; Kiyotomo Ichiki; Keitaro Takahashi; Naoshi Sugiyama

    2015-06-03

    If vector type perturbations are present in the primordial plasma before recombination, the generation of magnetic fields is known to be inevitable through the Harrison mechanism. In the context of the standard cosmological perturbation theory, non-linear couplings of first-order scalar perturbations create second-order vector perturbations, which generate magnetic fields. Here we reinvestigate the generation of magnetic fields at second-order in cosmological perturbations on the basis of our previous study, and extend it by newly taking into account the time evolution of purely second-order vector perturbations with a newly developed second-order Boltzmann code. We confirm that the amplitude of magnetic fields from the product-terms of the first-order scalar modes is consistent with the result in our previous study. However, we find, both numerically and analytically, that the magnetic fields from the purely second-order vector perturbations partially cancel out the magnetic fields from one of the product-terms of the first-order scalar modes, in the tight coupling regime in the radiation dominated era. Therefore, the amplitude of the magnetic fields on small scales, $k \\gtrsim 10~h{\\rm Mpc}^{-1}$, is smaller than the previous estimates. The amplitude of the generated magnetic fields at cosmological recombination is about $B_{\\rm rec} =5.0\\times 10^{-24}~{\\rm Gauss}$ on $k = 5.0 \\times 10^{-1}~h{\\rm Mpc}^{-1}$. Finally, we discuss the reason of the discrepancies that exist in estimates of the amplitude of magnetic fields among other authors.

  12. Averages in vector spaces over finite fields 

    E-print Network

    Wright J.; Carbery A.; Stones B.

    2008-01-01

    We study the analogues of the problems of averages and maximal averages over a surface in R-n when the euclidean structure is replaced by that of a vector space over a finite field, and obtain optimal results in a number of model cases....

  13. Circular Conditional Autoregressive Modeling of Vector Fields*

    PubMed Central

    Modlin, Danny; Fuentes, Montse; Reich, Brian

    2013-01-01

    As hurricanes approach landfall, there are several hazards for which coastal populations must be prepared. Damaging winds, torrential rains, and tornadoes play havoc with both the coast and inland areas; but, the biggest seaside menace to life and property is the storm surge. Wind fields are used as the primary forcing for the numerical forecasts of the coastal ocean response to hurricane force winds, such as the height of the storm surge and the degree of coastal flooding. Unfortunately, developments in deterministic modeling of these forcings have been hindered by computational expenses. In this paper, we present a multivariate spatial model for vector fields, that we apply to hurricane winds. We parameterize the wind vector at each site in polar coordinates and specify a circular conditional autoregressive (CCAR) model for the vector direction, and a spatial CAR model for speed. We apply our framework for vector fields to hurricane surface wind fields for Hurricane Floyd of 1999 and compare our CCAR model to prior methods that decompose wind speed and direction into its N-S and W-E cardinal components. PMID:24353452

  14. THREE-CHANNEL DIGITAL RADIO VECTOR FIELD SENSOR: DESCRIPTION AND DEMONSTRATION

    E-print Network

    vector wave field is measured with three orthogonal dipole antennas or the magnetic vector wave field with three orthogonal loop antennas. Three identical parallel channels with anti-aliasing filters limit computer connected to the internet. The RVFS is an implementation of the Information Dense Antenna

  15. Lorentz and "apparent" transformations of the electric and magnetic fields

    E-print Network

    Tomislav Ivezic

    2006-07-21

    It is recently discovered that the usual transformations of the three-dimensional (3D) vectors of the electric and magnetic fields differ from the Lorentz transformations (LT) (boosts) of the corresponding 4D quantities that represent the electric and magnetic fields. In this paper, using geometric algebra formalism, this fundamental difference is examined representing the electric and magnetic fields by bivectors.

  16. Improved determination of vector lithospheric magnetic anomalies from MAGSAT data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravat, Dhananjay

    1993-01-01

    Scientific contributions made in developing new methods to isolate and map vector magnetic anomalies from measurements made by Magsat are described. In addition to the objective of the proposal, the isolation and mapping of equatorial vector lithospheric Magsat anomalies, isolation of polar ionospheric fields during the period were also studied. Significant progress was also made in isolation of polar delta(Z) component and scalar anomalies as well as integration and synthesis of various techniques of removing equatorial and polar ionospheric effects. The significant contributions of this research are: (1) development of empirical/analytical techniques in modeling ionospheric fields in Magsat data and their removal from uncorrected anomalies to obtain better estimates of lithospheric anomalies (this task was accomplished for equatorial delta(X), delta(Z), and delta(B) component and polar delta(Z) and delta(B) component measurements; (2) integration of important processing techniques developed during the last decade with the newly developed technologies of ionospheric field modeling into an optimum processing scheme; and (3) implementation of the above processing scheme to map the most robust magnetic anomalies of the lithosphere (components as well as scalar).

  17. Magnetic field dosimeter development

    SciTech Connect

    Lemon, D.K.; Skorpik, J.R.; Eick, J.L.

    1980-09-01

    In recent years there has been increased concern over potential health hazards related to exposure of personnel to magnetic fields. If exposure standards are to be established, then a means for measuring magnetic field dose must be available. To meet this need, the Department of Energy has funded development of prototype dosimeters at the Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory. This manual reviews the principle of operation of the dosimeter and also contains step-by-step instructions for its operation.

  18. Magnetosheath magnetic field variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibeck, D. G.

    1994-01-01

    A case study using simulations IRM and CCE observations demonstrates that transient magnetospheric events correspond to pressure pulses in the magnetosheath, inward bow shock motion, and magnetopause compression. Statistical surveys indicate that the magnetosheath magnetic field orientation rarely remains constant during periods of magnetopause and bow shock motion (both characterized by periods of 1 to 10 min). There is no tendency for bow shock motion to occur for southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) orientations.

  19. On the non-Gaussian correlation of the primordial curvature perturbation with vector fields

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Rajeev Kumar; Sloth, Martin S. E-mail: sloth@cp3.dias.sdu.dk

    2013-02-01

    We compute the three-point cross-correlation function of the primordial curvature perturbation generated during inflation with two powers of a vector field in a model where conformal invariance is broken by a direct coupling of the vector field with the inflaton. If the vector field is identified with the electromagnetic field, this correlation would be a non-Gaussian signature of primordial magnetic fields generated during inflation. We find that the signal is maximized for the flattened configuration where the wave number of the curvature perturbation is twice that of the vector field and in this limit, the magnetic non-linear parameter becomes as large as |b{sub NL}| ? O(10{sup 3}). In the squeezed limit where the wave number of the curvature perturbation vanishes, our results agree with the magnetic consistency relation derived in arXiv:1207.4187.

  20. Geometric Phase in Fluctuating Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. S.

    2009-08-01

    Geometric phase in a two-level atom with a fluctuating magnetic field is calculated by a nonunit vector ray in a complex projective Hilbert space, where the nonunit vector is a map connecting with density matrices of a quantum open system. We find that the Pancharatnam phase oscillates with evolving time. The Berry phase depends on the fluctuating parameter but it is proportional to the area spanned in the Bloch parameter space.

  1. Solar Wind Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. J.

    1995-01-01

    The magnetic fields originate as coronal fields that are converted into space by the supersonic, infinitely conducting, solar wind. On average, the sun's rotation causes the field to wind up and form an Archimedes Spiral. However, the field direction changes almost continuously on a variety of scales and the irregular nature of these changes is often interpreted as evidence that the solar wind flow is turbulent.

  2. Multifractal vector fields and stochastic Clifford algebra.

    PubMed

    Schertzer, Daniel; Tchiguirinskaia, Ioulia

    2015-12-01

    In the mid 1980s, the development of multifractal concepts and techniques was an important breakthrough for complex system analysis and simulation, in particular, in turbulence and hydrology. Multifractals indeed aimed to track and simulate the scaling singularities of the underlying equations instead of relying on numerical, scale truncated simulations or on simplified conceptual models. However, this development has been rather limited to deal with scalar fields, whereas most of the fields of interest are vector-valued or even manifold-valued. We show in this paper that the combination of stable Lévy processes with Clifford algebra is a good candidate to bridge up the present gap between theory and applications. We show that it indeed defines a convenient framework to generate multifractal vector fields, possibly multifractal manifold-valued fields, based on a few fundamental and complementary properties of Lévy processes and Clifford algebra. In particular, the vector structure of these algebra is much more tractable than the manifold structure of symmetry groups while the Lévy stability grants a given statistical universality. PMID:26723166

  3. Molecules in Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdyugina, Svetlana

    2015-08-01

    Molecules probe cool matter in the Universe and various astrophysical objects. Their ability to sense magnetic fields provides new insights into magnetic properties of these objects. During the past fifteen years we have carried out a theoretical study of molecular magnetic effects such as the Zeeman, Paschen-Back and Hanle effects and their applications for inferring magnetic structures and spatial inhomogeneities on the Sun, cool stars, brown dwarfs, and exoplanets from molecular spectro-polarimetry (e.g., Berdyugina 2011). Here, we present an overview of this study and compare our theoretical predictions with recent laboratory measurements of magnetic properties of some molecules. We present also a new web-based tool to compute molecular magnetic effects and polarized spectra which is supported by the ERC Advanced Grant HotMol.

  4. Magnetic Field Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilin, Andrew V.

    2006-01-01

    The Magnetic Field Solver computer program calculates the magnetic field generated by a group of collinear, cylindrical axisymmetric electromagnet coils. Given the current flowing in, and the number of turns, axial position, and axial and radial dimensions of each coil, the program calculates matrix coefficients for a finite-difference system of equations that approximates a two-dimensional partial differential equation for the magnetic potential contributed by the coil. The program iteratively solves these finite-difference equations by use of the modified incomplete Cholesky preconditioned-conjugate-gradient method. The total magnetic potential as a function of axial (z) and radial (r) position is then calculated as a sum of the magnetic potentials of the individual coils, using a high-accuracy interpolation scheme. Then the r and z components of the magnetic field as functions of r and z are calculated from the total magnetic potential by use of a high-accuracy finite-difference scheme. Notably, for the finite-difference calculations, the program generates nonuniform two-dimensional computational meshes from nonuniform one-dimensional meshes. Each mesh is generated in such a way as to minimize the numerical error for a benchmark one-dimensional magnetostatic problem.

  5. Magnetic Field Measurement System

    SciTech Connect

    Kulesza, Joe; Johnson, Eric; Lyndaker, Aaron; Deyhim, Alex; Waterman, Dave; Blomqvist, K. Ingvar; Dunn, Jonathan Hunter

    2007-01-19

    A magnetic field measurement system was designed, built and installed at MAX Lab, Sweden for the purpose of characterizing the magnetic field produced by Insertion Devices (see Figure 1). The measurement system consists of a large granite beam roughly 2 feet square and 14 feet long that has been polished beyond laboratory grade for flatness and straightness. The granite precision coupled with the design of the carriage yielded minimum position deviations as measured at the probe tip. The Hall probe data collection and compensation technique allows exceptional resolution and range while taking data on the fly to programmable sample spacing. Additional flip coil provides field integral data.

  6. Predicting the magnetic vectors within coronal mass ejections arriving at Earth

    E-print Network

    Savani, N P; Szabo, A; Mays, M L; Thompson, B J; Richardson, I G; Evans, R; Pulkkinen, A; Nieves-Chinchilla, T

    2015-01-01

    The process by which the Sun affects the terrestrial environment on short timescales is predominately driven by the amount of magnetic reconnection between the solar wind and Earth's magnetosphere. Reconnection occurs most efficiently when the solar wind magnetic field has a southward component. The most severe impacts are during the arrival of a coronal mass ejection (CME) when the magnetosphere is both compressed and magnetically connected to the heliospheric environment, leading to disruptions to, for example, power grids and satellite navigation. Unfortunately, forecasting magnetic vectors within coronal mass ejections remains elusive. Here we report how, by combining a statistically robust helicity rule for a CME's solar origin with a simplified flux rope topology the magnetic vectors within the Earth-directed segment of a CME can be predicted. In order to test the validity of this proof-of-concept architecture for estimating the magnetic vectors within CMEs, a total of eight CME events (between 2010 and...

  7. Decay of Resonaces in Strong Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filip, Peter

    2015-08-01

    We suggest that decay properties (branching ratios) of hadronic resonances may become modified in strong external magnetic field. The behavior of K±*, K0* vector mesons as well as ?* (1520) and ?0* baryonic states is considered in static fields 1013-1015 T. In particular, n = 0 Landau level energy increase of charged particles in the external magnetic field, and the interaction of hadron magnetic moments with the field is taken into account. We suggest that enhanced yield of dileptons and photons from ?0(770) mesons may occur if strong decay channel ?0 ? ?+?- is significantly suppressed. CP - violating ?+?- decays of pseudoscalar ?c and ?(547) mesons in the magnetic field are discussed, and superpositions of quarkonium states ?c,b and ?c,b(nP) with ?(nS), ?(nS) mesons in the external field are considered.

  8. Mercury's Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, C. L.

    2014-12-01

    Mercury is the only inner solar system body other than Earth to possess an active core dynamo-driven magnetic field and the only planet with a small, highly dynamic magnetosphere. Measurements made by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft have provided a wealth of data on Mercury's magnetic field environment. Mercury's weak magnetic field was discovered 40 years ago by the Mariner 10 spacecraft, but its large-scale geometry, strength and origin could not be definitively established. MESSENGER data have shown that the field is dynamo-generated and can be described as an offset axisymmetric dipole field (hereafter OAD): the magnetic equator lies ~0.2 RM (RM = 2440 km) north of the geographic equator and the dipole moment is 2.8 x1019 Am2 (~0.03% that of Earth's). The weak internal field and the high, but variable, solar wind ram pressure drive vigorous magnetospheric dynamics and result in an average distance from the planet center to the sub-solar magnetopause of only 1.42 RM. Magnetospheric models developed with MESSENGER data have allowed re-analysis of the Mariner 10 observations, establishing that there has been no measureable secular variation in the internal field over 40 years. Together with spatial power spectra for the OAD, this provides critical constraints for viable dynamo models. Time-varying magnetopause fields induce secondary core fields, the magnitudes of which confirm the core radius estimated from MESSENGER gravity and Earth-based radar data. After accounting for large-scale magnetospheric fields, residual signatures are dominated by additional external fields that are organized in the local time frame and that vary with magnetospheric activity. Birkeland currents have been identified, which likely close in the planetary interior at depths below the base of the crust. Near-periapsis magnetic field measurements at altitudes greater than 200 km have tantalizing hints of crustal fields, but crustal sources cannot be distinguished from core fields, nor cleanly separated from external fields. I will report on recent data acquired at altitudes as low as 25 km that have the potential to resolve these issues. The presence of remanent crustal fields would have profound implications for Mercury's thermal and dynamical histories.

  9. The induced magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Islas, Rafael; Heine, Thomas; Merino, Gabriel

    2012-02-21

    Aromaticity is indispensable for explaining a variety of chemical behaviors, including reactivity, structural features, relative energetic stabilities, and spectroscopic properties. When interpreted as the spatial delocalization of ?-electrons, it represents the driving force for the stabilization of many planar molecular structures. A delocalized electron system is sensitive to an external magnetic field; it responds with an induced magnetic field having a particularly long range. The shape of the induced magnetic field reflects the size and strength of the system of delocalized electrons and can have a large influence on neighboring molecules. In 2004, we proposed using the induced magnetic field as a means of estimating the degree of electron delocalization and aromaticity in planar as well as in nonplanar molecules. We have since tested the method on aromatic, antiaromatic, and nonaromatic compounds, and a refinement now allows the individual treatment of core-, ?-, and ?-electrons. In this Account, we describe the use of the induced magnetic field as an analytical probe for electron delocalization and its application to a large series of uncommon molecules. The compounds include borazine; all-metal aromatic systems Al(4)(n-); molecular stars Si(5)Li(n)(6-n); electronically stabilized planar tetracoordinate carbon; planar hypercoordinate atoms inside boron wheels; and planar boron wheels with fluxional internal boron cluster moieties. In all cases, we have observed that planar structures show a high degree of electron delocalization in the ?-electrons and, in some examples, also in the ?-framework. Quantitatively, the induced magnetic field has contributions from the entire electronic system of a molecule, but at long range the contributions arising from the delocalized electronic ?-system dominate. The induced magnetic field can only indirectly be confirmed by experiment, for example, through intermolecular contributions to NMR chemical shifts. We show that calculating the induced field is a useful method for understanding any planar organic or inorganic system, as it corresponds to the intuitive Pople model for explaining the anomalous proton chemical shifts in aromatic molecules. Indeed, aromatic, antiaromatic, and nonaromatic molecules show differing responses to an external field; that is, they reduce, augment, or do not affect the external field at long range. The induced field can be dissected into different orbital contributions, in the same way that the nucleus-independent chemical shift or the shielding function can be separated into component contributions. The result is a versatile tool that is particularly useful in the analysis of planar, densely packed systems with strong orbital contributions directly atop individual atoms. PMID:21848282

  10. Hessian structures, Euler vector fields, and thermodynamics

    E-print Network

    M. Á. García-Ariza

    2015-11-19

    This paper studies the underlying geometric structure of thermodynamics from a coordinate-free standpoint in the context of Hessian structures. The contribution of this work is the translation of the concept of "extensivity" to geometric terms by means of a vector field and an affine connection. It is shown that entropy's being extensive is equivalent to the vector's being a null direction of the Hessian structure. The latter induces a metric tensor-a generalized version of Ruppeiner's metrics-on the Riemannian Hessian submanifolds of a system's space of equilibrium states. These are embedded, and locally described as level sets of extensive functions. Under this approach, total Legendre transforms and intensive functions are given a straightforward geometrical meaning. The invariance of the metrics under total Legendre transforms is readily observed.

  11. Killing Vector Fields of Standard Static Space-times

    E-print Network

    Fernando Dobarro; Bulent Unal

    2008-01-30

    We consider Killing vector fields on standard static space-times and obtain equations for a vector field on a standard static space-time to be Killing. We also provide a characterization of Killing vector fields on standard static space-times with compact Riemannian parts.

  12. Vertical gradients of sunspot magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagyard, M. J.; Teuber, D.; West, E. A.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Henze, W., Jr.; Beckers, J. M.; Bruner, M.; Hyder, C. L.; Woodgate, B. E.

    1983-01-01

    The results of a Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) guest investigation to determine the vertical gradients of sunspot magnetic fields for the first time from coordinated observations of photospheric and transition-region fields are described. Descriptions are given of both the photospheric vector field of a sunspot, derived from observations using the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center vector magnetograph, and of the line-of-sight component in the transition region, obtained from the SMM Ultraviolet Spectrometer and Polarimeter instrument. On the basis of these data, vertical gradients of the line-of-sight magnetic field component are calculated using three methods. It is found that the vertical gradient of Bz is lower than values from previous studies and that the transition-region field occurs at a height of approximately 4000-6000 km above the photosphere.

  13. Theory of cosmological seed magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Saleem, H.

    2007-07-15

    A theory for the generation of seed magnetic field and plasma flow on cosmological scales driven by externally given baroclinic vectors is presented. The Beltrami-like plasma fields can grow from zero values at initial time t=0 from a nonequilibrium state. Exact analytical solutions of the set of two-fluid equations are obtained that are valid for large plasma {beta}-values as well. Weaknesses of previous models for seed magnetic field generation are also pointed out. The analytical calculations predict the galactic seed magnetic field generated by this mechanism to be of the order of 10{sup -14} G, which may be amplified later by the {alpha}{omega} dynamo (or by some other mechanism) to the present observed values of the order of {approx}(2-10) {mu}G. The theory has been applied to laser-induced plasmas as well and the estimate of the magnetic field's magnitude is in agreement with the experimentally observed values.

  14. An educational path for the magnetic vector potential and its physical implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbieri, S.; Cavinato, M.; Giliberti, M.

    2013-09-01

    We present an educational path for the magnetic vector potential A aimed at undergraduate students and pre-service physics teachers. Starting from the generalized Ampère-Laplace law, in the framework of a slowly varying time-dependent field approximation, the magnetic vector potential is written in terms of its empirical references, i.e. the conduction currents. Therefore, once the currents are known, our approach allows for a clear and univocal physical determination of A, overcoming the mathematical indeterminacy due to the gauge transformations. We have no need to fix a gauge, since for slowly varying time-dependent electric and magnetic fields, the ‘natural’ gauge for A is the Coulomb one. We stress the difference between our approach and those usually presented in the literature. Finally, a physical interpretation of the magnetic vector potential is discussed and some examples of the calculation of A are analysed.

  15. He I VECTOR MAGNETOMETRY OF FIELD-ALIGNED SUPERPENUMBRAL FIBRILS

    SciTech Connect

    Schad, T. A.; Penn, M. J.; Lin, H.

    2013-05-10

    Atomic-level polarization and Zeeman effect diagnostics in the neutral helium triplet at 10830 A in principle allow full vector magnetometry of fine-scaled chromospheric fibrils. We present high-resolution spectropolarimetric observations of superpenumbral fibrils in the He I triplet with sufficient polarimetric sensitivity to infer their full magnetic field geometry. He I observations from the Facility Infrared Spectropolarimeter are paired with high-resolution observations of the H{alpha} 6563 A and Ca II 8542 A spectral lines from the Interferometric Bidimensional Spectrometer from the Dunn Solar Telescope in New Mexico. Linear and circular polarization signatures in the He I triplet are measured and described, as well as analyzed with the advanced inversion capability of the ''Hanle and Zeeman Light'' modeling code. Our analysis provides direct evidence for the often assumed field alignment of fibril structures. The projected angle of the fibrils and the inferred magnetic field geometry align within an error of {+-}10 Degree-Sign . We describe changes in the inclination angle of these features that reflect their connectivity with the photospheric magnetic field. Evidence for an accelerated flow ({approx}40 m s{sup -2}) along an individual fibril anchored at its endpoints in the strong sunspot and weaker plage in part supports the magnetic siphon flow mechanism's role in the inverse Evershed effect. However, the connectivity of the outer endpoint of many of the fibrils cannot be established.

  16. High field superconducting magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hait, Thomas P. (Inventor); Shirron, Peter J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A superconducting magnet includes an insulating layer disposed about the surface of a mandrel; a superconducting wire wound in adjacent turns about the mandrel to form the superconducting magnet, wherein the superconducting wire is in thermal communication with the mandrel, and the superconducting magnet has a field-to-current ratio equal to or greater than 1.1 Tesla per Ampere; a thermally conductive potting material configured to fill interstices between the adjacent turns, wherein the thermally conductive potting material and the superconducting wire provide a path for dissipation of heat; and a voltage limiting device disposed across each end of the superconducting wire, wherein the voltage limiting device is configured to prevent a voltage excursion across the superconducting wire during quench of the superconducting magnet.

  17. Magnetic space-based field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langel, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    Satellite measurements of the geomagnetic field began with the launch of Sputnik 3 in May 1958 and have continued sporadically in the intervening years. A list of spacecraft that have made significant contributions to an understanding of the near-earth geomagnetic field is presented. A new era in near-earth magnetic field measurements began with NASA's launch of Magsat in October 1979. Attention is given to geomagnetic field modeling, crustal magnetic anomaly studies, and investigations of the inner earth. It is concluded that satellite-based magnetic field measurements make global surveys practical for both field modeling and for the mapping of large-scale crustal anomalies. They are the only practical method of accurately modeling the global secular variation. Magsat is providing a significant contribution, both because of the timeliness of the survey and because its vector measurement capability represents an advance in the technology of such measurements.

  18. Slow decay of magnetic fields in open Friedmann universes

    SciTech Connect

    Barrow, John D.; Tsagas, Christos G.

    2008-05-15

    Magnetic fields in Friedmann universes can experience superadiabatic growth without departing from conventional electromagnetism. The reason is the relativistic coupling between vector fields and spacetime geometry, which slows down the decay of large-scale magnetic fields in open universes, compared to that seen in perfectly flat models. The result is a large relative gain in magnetic strength that can lead to astrophysically interesting B fields, even if our Universe is only marginally open today.

  19. Primordial magnetic fields from self-ordering scalar fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiguchi, Kouichirou; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    2015-04-01

    A symmetry-breaking phase transition in the early universe could have led to the formation of cosmic defects. Because these defects dynamically excite not only scalar and tensor type cosmological perturbations but also vector type ones, they may serve as a source of primordial magnetic fields. In this study, we calculate the time evolution and the spectrum of magnetic fields that are generated by a type of cosmic defects, called global textures, using the non-linear sigma (NLSM) model. Based on the standard cosmological perturbation theory, we show, both analytically and numerically, that a vector-mode relative velocity between photon and baryon fluids is induced by textures, which inevitably leads to the generation of magnetic fields over a wide range of scales. We find that the amplitude of the magnetic fields is given by B~10?9((1+z)/103)?2.5(v/mpl)2(k/Mpc?1)3.5/?N Gauss in the radiation dominated era for klesssim 1 Mpc?1, with v being the vacuum expectation value of the O(N) symmetric scalar fields. By extrapolating our numerical result toward smaller scales, we expect that B~ 10?14.5((1+z)/103)1/2(v/mpl)2(k/Mpc?1)1/2/?N Gauss on scales of kgtrsim 1 Mpc?1 at redshift 0zgtrsim 110. This might be a seed of the magnetic fields observed on large scales today.

  20. Radial magnetic field in magnetic confinement device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Hao; Liu, Ming-Hai; Chen, Ming; Rao, Bo; Chen, Jie; Chen, Zhao-Quan; Xiao, Jin-Shui; Hu, Xi-Wei

    2015-09-01

    The intrinsic radial magnetic field (Br) in a tokamak is explored by the solution of the Grad-Shafranov equation in axisymmetric configurations through an expansion of the four terms of the magnetic surfaces. It can be inferred from the simulation results that at the core of the device, the tokamak should possess a three-dimensional magnetic field configuration, which could be reduced to a two-dimensional one when the radial position is greater than 0.6a. The radial magnetic field and the amzimuthal magnetic field have the same order of magnitude at the core of the device. These results can offer a reference for the analysis of the plasma instability, the property of the core plasma, and the magnetic field measurement. Project supported by the Special Domestic Program of ITER, China (Grant No. 2009GB105003).

  1. Coronal Magnetic Field Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegelmann, Thomas; Petrie, Gordon J. D.; Riley, Pete

    2015-07-01

    Coronal magnetic field models use photospheric field measurements as boundary condition to model the solar corona. We review in this paper the most common model assumptions, starting from MHD-models, magnetohydrostatics, force-free and finally potential field models. Each model in this list is somewhat less complex than the previous one and makes more restrictive assumptions by neglecting physical effects. The magnetohydrostatic approach neglects time-dependent phenomena and plasma flows, the force-free approach neglects additionally the gradient of the plasma pressure and the gravity force. This leads to the assumption of a vanishing Lorentz force and electric currents are parallel (or anti-parallel) to the magnetic field lines. Finally, the potential field approach neglects also these currents. We outline the main assumptions, benefits and limitations of these models both from a theoretical (how realistic are the models?) and a practical viewpoint (which computer resources to we need?). Finally we address the important problem of noisy and inconsistent photospheric boundary conditions and the possibility of using chromospheric and coronal observations to improve the models.

  2. Low field magnetic resonance imaging

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander (Berkeley, CA); Sakellariou, Dimitrios (Billancourt, FR); Meriles, Carlos A. (Fort Lee, NJ); Trabesinger, Andreas H. (London, GB)

    2010-07-13

    A method and system of magnetic resonance imaging does not need a large homogenous field to truncate a gradient field. Spatial information is encoded into the spin magnetization by allowing the magnetization to evolve in a non-truncated gradient field and inducing a set of 180 degree rotations prior to signal acquisition.

  3. Robust point matching via vector field consensus.

    PubMed

    Jiayi Ma; Ji Zhao; Jinwen Tian; Yuille, Alan L; Zhuowen Tu

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we propose an efficient algorithm, called vector field consensus, for establishing robust point correspondences between two sets of points. Our algorithm starts by creating a set of putative correspondences which can contain a very large number of false correspondences, or outliers, in addition to a limited number of true correspondences (inliers). Next, we solve for correspondence by interpolating a vector field between the two point sets, which involves estimating a consensus of inlier points whose matching follows a nonparametric geometrical constraint. We formulate this a maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation of a Bayesian model with hidden/latent variables indicating whether matches in the putative set are outliers or inliers. We impose nonparametric geometrical constraints on the correspondence, as a prior distribution, using Tikhonov regularizers in a reproducing kernel Hilbert space. MAP estimation is performed by the EM algorithm which by also estimating the variance of the prior model (initialized to a large value) is able to obtain good estimates very quickly (e.g., avoiding many of the local minima inherent in this formulation). We illustrate this method on data sets in 2D and 3D and demonstrate that it is robust to a very large number of outliers (even up to 90%). We also show that in the special case where there is an underlying parametric geometrical model (e.g., the epipolar line constraint) that we obtain better results than standard alternatives like RANSAC if a large number of outliers are present. This suggests a two-stage strategy, where we use our nonparametric model to reduce the size of the putative set and then apply a parametric variant of our approach to estimate the geometric parameters. Our algorithm is computationally efficient and we provide code for others to use it. In addition, our approach is general and can be applied to other problems, such as learning with a badly corrupted training data set. PMID:24808341

  4. The Galactic Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansson, Ronnie; Farrar, Glennys R.

    2012-12-01

    With this Letter, we complete our model of the Galactic magnetic field (GMF), by using the WMAP7 22 GHz total synchrotron intensity map and our earlier results to obtain a 13-parameter model of the Galactic random field, and to determine the strength of the striated random field. In combination with our 22-parameter description of the regular GMF, we obtain a very good fit to more than 40,000 extragalactic Faraday rotation measures and the WMAP7 22 GHz polarized and total intensity synchrotron emission maps. The data call for a striated component to the random field whose orientation is aligned with the regular field, having zero mean and rms strength ?20% larger than the regular field. A noteworthy feature of the new model is that the regular field has a significant out-of-plane component, which had not been considered earlier. The new GMF model gives a much better description of the totality of data than previous models in the literature.

  5. Electric and magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.; Robinson, R. S.; Etters, R. D.

    1982-01-01

    A number of energy momentum anomalies are described that result from the use of Abraham-Lorentz electromagnetic theory. These anomalies have in common the motion of charged bodies or current carrying conductors relative to the observer. The anomalies can be avoided by using the nonflow approach, based on internal energy of the electromagnetic field. The anomalies can also be avoided by using the flow approach, if all contributions to flow work are included. The general objective of this research is a fundamental physical understanding of electric and magnetic fields which, in turn, might promote the development of new concepts in electric space propulsion. The approach taken is to investigate quantum representations of these fields.

  6. Juno and Jupiter's Magnetic Field (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloxham, J.; Connerney, J. E.; Jorgensen, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    The Juno spacecraft, launched in August 2011, will reach Jupiter in early July 2016, where it will enter a polar orbit, with an 11 day period and a perijove altitude of approximately 5000 km. The baseline mission will last for one year during which Juno will complete 32 orbits, evenly spaced in longitude. The baseline mission presents an unparalleled opportunity for investigating Jupiter's magnetic field. In many ways Jupiter is a better planet for studying dynamo-generated magnetic fields than the Earth: there are no crustal fields, of course, which otherwise mask the dynamo-generated field at high degree; and an orbiting spacecraft can get proportionately much closer to the dynamo region. Assuming Jupiter's dynamo extends to 0.8 Rj, Juno at closet approach is only 0.3 Rc above the dynamo, while Earth orbiting magnetic field missions sample the field at least 1 Rc above the dynamo (where Rc is the respective outer core or dynamo region radius). Juno's MAG Investigation delivers magnetic measurements with exceptional vector accuracy (100 ppm) via two FGM sensors, each co-located with a dedicated pair of non-magnetic star cameras for attitude determination at the sensor. We expect to image Jupiter's dynamo with unsurpassed resolution. Accordingly, we anticipate that the Juno magnetic field investigation may place important constraints on Jupiter's interior structure, and hence on the formation and evolution of Jupiter.

  7. Magnetic field imaging with NV ensembles

    E-print Network

    L. M. Pham; D. Le Sage; P. L. Stanwix; T. K. Yeung; D. Glenn; A. Trifonov; P. Cappellaro; P. R. Hemmer; M. D. Lukin; H. Park; A. Yacoby; R. L. Walsworth

    2012-07-13

    We demonstrate a method of imaging spatially varying magnetic fields using a thin layer of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers at the surface of a diamond chip. Fluorescence emitted by the two-dimensional NV ensemble is detected by a CCD array, from which a vector magnetic field pattern is reconstructed. As a demonstration, AC current is passed through wires placed on the diamond chip surface, and the resulting AC magnetic field patterns are imaged using an echo-based technique with sub-micron resolution over a 140 \\mu m x 140 \\mu m field of view, giving single-pixel sensitivity ~100 nT/\\sqrt{Hz}. We discuss ongoing efforts to further improve sensitivity and potential bioimaging applications such as real-time imaging of activity in functional, cultured networks of neurons.

  8. Predicting the magnetic vectors within coronal mass ejections arriving at Earth: 1. Initial architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savani, N. P.; Vourlidas, A.; Szabo, A.; Mays, M. L.; Richardson, I. G.; Thompson, B. J.; Pulkkinen, A.; Evans, R.; Nieves-Chinchilla, T.

    2015-06-01

    The process by which the Sun affects the terrestrial environment on short timescales is predominately driven by the amount of magnetic reconnection between the solar wind and Earth's magnetosphere. Reconnection occurs most efficiently when the solar wind magnetic field has a southward component. The most severe impacts are during the arrival of a coronal mass ejection (CME) when the magnetosphere is both compressed and magnetically connected to the heliospheric environment. Unfortunately, forecasting magnetic vectors within coronal mass ejections remain elusive. Here we report how, by combining a statistically robust helicity rule for a CME's solar origin with a simplified flux rope topology, the magnetic vectors within the Earth-directed segment of a CME can be predicted. In order to test the validity of this proof-of-concept architecture for estimating the magnetic vectors within CMEs, a total of eight CME events (between 2010 and 2014) have been investigated. With a focus on the large false alarm of January 2014, this work highlights the importance of including the early evolutionary effects of a CME for forecasting purposes. The angular rotation in the predicted magnetic field closely follows the broad rotational structure seen within the in situ data. This time-varying field estimate is implemented into a process to quantitatively predict a time-varying Kp index that is described in detail in paper II. Future statistical work, quantifying the uncertainties in this process, may improve the more heuristic approach used by early forecasting systems.

  9. Phase Portraits of Planar Vector Fields: Computer Proofs

    E-print Network

    Guckenheimer, John

    Phase Portraits of Planar Vector Fields: Computer Proofs John Guckenheimer Abstract This paper vector fields. Construct- ing analytical proofs for the qualitative properties of phase portraits has Introduction Poincar´e initiated the geometric analysis of phase portraits of planar vec- tor fields in his

  10. Magnetically Vectored Nanocapsules for Tumor Penetration and Remotely Switchable On-Demand Drug Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Seong Deok

    Hollow-sphere nanocapsules containing intentionally trapped magnetic nanoparticles and defined anticancer drugs provide a powerful magnetic vector under moderate gradient magnetic fields, and enable the nanocapsules to penetrate into the midst of tumors and allow a controlled on-off switchable release of the anticancer drug cargo by remotely applied Radio Frequency (RF) magnetic field. This imageable smart drug delivery system is compact because the drug molecules and magnetic nanoparticles can all be self-contained within 80~150 nm capsules. In vitro as well as in vivo results indicate that the nanocapsules are effective in reducing tumor cell growth. In Chapter 1, the concept of Drug Delivery Systems (DDSs) and the impact of nanotechnology on Drug Delivery Systems were introduced. Triggered drug release using magnetothermally-responsive nanomaterials, magnetic nanoparticles for nanomedicine, and ordered mesoporous materials in the context of Drug Delivery System were discussed. In Chapter 2, creation of remotely controllable, On-Off switchable drug release methodology was described. In this thesis work, triggerable nanocapsules which contain magnetic nanoparticles responsive to external radio frequency (RF) magnetic field have been successfully created. This is in contrast to the regular hollow nanospheres for slow passive release of drugs. The new nanocapsule material consists of bio-inert, bio-compatible or bio-degradable material that we can be selected from a variety of materials depending on specific medical applications. In Chapter 3, study and utilization of magnetic vector for guided tumor penetration was discussed. In the presence of a moderate gradient magnetic field, a powerful magnetic vector is created that allows these nanocapsules to cross cell membranes or blood-tissue barriers and penetrate into the midst of tumors, thus overcoming the well-known problem of limited access of anti-cancer drugs to cancer cells in the interior of a tumor tissue. In Chapter 4, potential applications to Blood-Brain-Barrier (BBB) crossing and other therapeutics was described. In Chapter 5, the study was summarized and concluded.

  11. Thermal vector potential theory of magnon-driven magnetization dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatara, Gen

    2015-08-01

    Thermal vector potential formulation is applied to study the thermal dynamics of magnetic structures for insulating ferromagnets. By separating the variables of the magnetic structure and the magnons, the equation of motion for the structure, including spin-transfer effect because of thermal magnons, is derived for the cases of a domain wall and a vortex. The magnon current is evaluated based on the linear response theory with the thermal vector potential representing the temperature gradient. The velocity of a domain wall when driven by thermal magnons exhibits a strong temperature dependence unlike the case of an electrically driven domain wall in metals.

  12. Planetary magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, David J.

    2003-03-01

    The past several years have seen dramatic developments in the study of planetary magnetic fields, including a wealth of new data, mainly from the Galilean satellites and Mars, together with major improvements in our theoretical modeling effort of the dynamo process believed responsible for large planetary fields. These dynamos arise from thermal or compositional convection in fluid regions of large radial extent. The relevant electrical conductivities range from metallic values to values that may be only about 1% or less that of a typical metal, appropriate to ionic fluids and semiconductors. In all planets, the Coriolis force is dynamically important, but slow rotation may be more favorable for a dynamo than fast rotation. The maintenance and persistence of convection appears to be easy in gas giants and ice-rich giants, but is not assured in terrestrial planets because the quite high electrical conductivity of iron-rich cores guarantees a high thermal conductivity (through the Wiedemann-Franz law), which allows for a large core heat flow by conduction alone. In this sense, high electrical conductivity is unfavorable for a dynamo in a metallic core. Planetary dynamos mostly appear to operate with an internal field ˜(2 ??/ ?) 1/2 where ? is the fluid density, ? is the planetary rotation rate and ? is the conductivity (SI units). Earth, Ganymede, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and maybe Mercury have dynamos, Mars has large remanent magnetism from an ancient dynamo, and the Moon might also require an ancient dynamo. Venus is devoid of a detectable global field but may have had a dynamo in the past. The presence or absence of a dynamo in a terrestrial body (including Ganymede) appears to depend mainly on the thermal histories and energy sources of these bodies, especially the convective state of the silicate mantle and the existence and history of a growing inner solid core. Induced fields observed in Europa and Callisto indicate the strong likelihood of water oceans in these bodies.

  13. On the Computation of Integral Curves in Adaptive Mesh Refinement Vector Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Deines, Eduard; Weber, Gunther H.; Garth, Christoph; Van Straalen, Brian; Borovikov, Sergey; Martin, Daniel F.; Joy, Kenneth I.

    2011-06-27

    Integral curves, such as streamlines, streaklines, pathlines, and timelines, are an essential tool in the analysis of vector field structures, offering straightforward and intuitive interpretation of visualization results. While such curves have a long-standing tradition in vector field visualization, their application to Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) simulation results poses unique problems. AMR is a highly effective discretization method for a variety of physical simulation problems and has recently been applied to the study of vector fields in flow and magnetohydrodynamic applications. The cell-centered nature of AMR data and discontinuities in the vector field representation arising from AMR level boundaries complicate the application of numerical integration methods to compute integral curves. In this paper, we propose a novel approach to alleviate these problems and show its application to streamline visualization in an AMR model of the magnetic field of the solar system as well as to a simulation of two incompressible viscous vortex rings merging.

  14. Magnetic Fields: Visible and Permanent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkeljohn, Dorothy R.; Earl, Robert D.

    1983-01-01

    Children will be able to see the concept of a magnetic field translated into a visible reality using the simple method outlined. Standard shelf paper, magnets, iron filings, and paint in a spray can are used to prepare a permanent and well-detailed picture of the magnetic field. (Author/JN)

  15. Magnetic field therapy: a review.

    PubMed

    Markov, Marko S

    2007-01-01

    There is increasing interest in using permanent magnets for therapeutic purposes encouraged by basic science publications and clinical reports. Magnetotherapy provides a non invasive, safe, and easy method to directly treat the site of injury, the source of pain and inflammation, and other types of disease. The physiological bases for the use of magnetic fields for tissue repair as well as physical principles of dosimetry and application of various magnetic fields are subjects of this review. Analysis of the magnetic and electromagnetic stimulation is followed by a discussion of the advantage of magnetic field stimulation compared with electric current and electric field stimulation. PMID:17454079

  16. What Are Electric and Magnetic Fields? (EMF)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Print this page Share What are Electric and Magnetic Fields? (EMF) Electric and Magnetic Fields Electricity is an essential part of our ... we take for granted. What are electric and magnetic fields? Electric and magnetic fields (EMF) are invisible ...

  17. Electromagnetic fluctuations in magnetized plasmas II: Extension of the theory for parallel wave vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlickeiser, R.; Ganz, A.; Kolberg, U.; Yoon, P. H.

    2015-10-01

    Starting from the recently derived general expressions for the electromagnetic fluctuation spectra (electric and magnetic field) from uncorrelated plasma particles in plasmas with an uniform magnetic field, the case of strictly parallel ( k ? = 0 ) oriented wave vectors with the respect to the uniform magnetic field direction is investigated. To derive fluctuation spectra valid in the entire complex frequency plane, the relevant dispersion functions and form factors are analytically continued to negative values of the imaginary part of the frequency for arbitrary gyrotropic plasma particle distribution functions. The generalized fluctuation-dissipation theorems for non-collective fluctuations in isotropic equal-temperature thermal distribution functions for general complex values of the frequency of the fluctuations with parallel wave vectors are derived.

  18. Magnetization curves and probability angular distribution of the magnetization vector in Er2Fe14Si3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobh, Hala A.; Aly, Samy H.; Shabara, Reham M.; Yehia, Sherif

    2016-01-01

    Specific magnetic and magneto-thermal properties of Er2Fe14Si3, in the temperature range of 80-300 K, have been investigated using basic laws of classical statistical mechanics in a simple model. In this model, the constructed partition function was used to derive, and therefore calculate the temperature and/or field dependence of a host of physical properties. Examples of these properties are: the magnetization, magnetic heat capacity, magnetic susceptibility, probability angular distribution of the magnetization vector, and the associated angular dependence of energy. We highlight a correlation between the energy of the system, its magnetization behavior and the angular location of the magnetization vector. Our results show that Er2Fe14Si3 is an easy-axis system in the temperature range 80-114 K, but switches to an easy-plane system at T?114 K. This transition is also supported by both of the temperature dependence of the magnetic heat capacity, which develops a peak at a temperature ~114 K, and the probability landscape which shows, in zero magnetic field, a prominent peak in the basal plane at T=113.5 K.

  19. Estimating locations and total magnetization vectors of compact magnetic sources from scalar, vector, or tensor magnetic measurements through combined Helbig and Euler analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phillips, J.D.; Nabighian, M.N.; Smith, D.V.; Li, Y.

    2007-01-01

    The Helbig method for estimating total magnetization directions of compact sources from magnetic vector components is extended so that tensor magnetic gradient components can be used instead. Depths of the compact sources can be estimated using the Euler equation, and their dipole moment magnitudes can be estimated using a least squares fit to the vector component or tensor gradient component data. ?? 2007 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  20. Photonic Magnetic Field Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyntjes, Geert

    2002-02-01

    Small, in-line polarization rotators or isolators to reduce feedback in fiber optic links can be the basis for excellent magnetic field sensors. Based on the giant magneto-optical (GMO) or Faraday effect in iron garnets, they with a magnetic field of a few hundred Gauss, (20 mT) for an interaction length for an optical beam of a few millimeters achieve a polarization rotation or phase shift of 45 deg (1/8 cycle). When powered by a small laser diode, with the induced linear phase shift recovered at the shot noise limit, we have demonstrated sensitivities at the 3.3 nT/Hz1/2 level for frequencies from less than 1 Hz to frequencies into the high kHz range. Through further improvements; an increase in interaction length, better materials and by far the greatest factor, the addition of a flux concentrator, sensitivities at the pT/Hz1/2 level appear to be within reach. We will detail such a design and discuss the issues that may limit achieving these goals.

  1. Magnetic Propeller for Uniform Magnetic Field Levitation

    E-print Network

    Krinker, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Three new approaches to generating thrust in uniform magnetic fields are proposed. The first direction is based on employing Lorentz force acting on partial magnetically shielded 8-shaped loop with current in external magnetic field, whereby a net force rather than a torque origins. Another approach, called a Virtual Wire System, is based on creating a magnetic field having an energetic symmetry (a virtual wire), with further superposition of external field. The external field breaks the symmetry causing origination of a net force. Unlike a wire with current, having radial energetic symmetry, the symmetry of the Virtual Wire System is closer to an axial wire. The third approach refers to the first two. It is based on creation of developed surface system, comprising the elements of the first two types. The developed surface approach is a way to drastically increase a thrust-to-weight ratio. The conducted experiments have confirmed feasibility of the proposed approaches.

  2. Magnetic Propeller for Uniform Magnetic Field Levitation

    E-print Network

    Mark Krinker; Alexander Bolonkin

    2008-07-12

    Three new approaches to generating thrust in uniform magnetic fields are proposed. The first direction is based on employing Lorentz force acting on partial magnetically shielded 8-shaped loop with current in external magnetic field, whereby a net force rather than a torque origins. Another approach, called a Virtual Wire System, is based on creating a magnetic field having an energetic symmetry (a virtual wire), with further superposition of external field. The external field breaks the symmetry causing origination of a net force. Unlike a wire with current, having radial energetic symmetry, the symmetry of the Virtual Wire System is closer to an axial wire. The third approach refers to the first two. It is based on creation of developed surface system, comprising the elements of the first two types. The developed surface approach is a way to drastically increase a thrust-to-weight ratio. The conducted experiments have confirmed feasibility of the proposed approaches.

  3. Video-rate terahertz electric-field vector imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Takai, Mayuko; Takeda, Masatoshi; Sasaki, Manabu; Tachizaki, Takehiro; Yasumatsu, Naoya; Watanabe, Shinichi

    2014-10-13

    We present an experimental setup to dramatically reduce a measurement time for obtaining spatial distributions of terahertz electric-field (E-field) vectors. The method utilizes the electro-optic sampling, and we use a charge-coupled device to detect a spatial distribution of the probe beam polarization rotation by the E-field-induced Pockels effect in a ?110?-oriented ZnTe crystal. A quick rotation of the ZnTe crystal allows analyzing the terahertz E-field direction at each image position, and the terahertz E-field vector mapping at a fixed position of an optical delay line is achieved within 21 ms. Video-rate mapping of terahertz E-field vectors is likely to be useful for achieving real-time sensing of terahertz vector beams, vector vortices, and surface topography. The method is also useful for a fast polarization analysis of terahertz beams.

  4. Primordial magnetic fields from the string network

    E-print Network

    Horiguchi, Kouichirou; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    2016-01-01

    Cosmic strings are a type of cosmic defect formed by a symmetry-breaking phase transition in the early universe. Individual strings would have gathered to build a network, and their dynamical motion would induce scalar--, vector-- and tensor--type perturbations. In this paper, we focus on the vector mode perturbations arising from the string network based on the one scale model and calculate the time evolution and the power spectrum of the associated magnetic fields. We show that the relative velocity between photon and baryon fluids induced by the string network can generate magnetic fields over a wide range of scales based on standard cosmology. We obtain the magnetic field spectrum before recombination as $a^2B(k,z)\\sim4\\times10^{-16}G\\mu/((1+z)/1000)^{4.25}(k/{\\rm Mpc}^{-1})^{3.5}$ Gauss on super-horizon scales, and $a^2B(k,z)\\sim2.4\\times10^{-17}G\\mu/((1+z)/1000)^{3.5}(k/{\\rm Mpc}^{-1})^{2.5}$ Gauss on sub-horizon scales in co-moving coordinates. This magnetic field grows up to the end of recombination, ...

  5. Magnetic field contribution to the Lorentz model.

    PubMed

    Oughstun, Kurt E; Albanese, Richard A

    2006-07-01

    The classical Lorentz model of dielectric dispersion is based on the microscopic Lorentz force relation and Newton's second law of motion for an ensemble of harmonically bound electrons. The magnetic field contribution in the Lorentz force relation is neglected because it is typically small in comparison with the electric field contribution. Inclusion of this term leads to a microscopic polarization density that contains both perpendicular and parallel components relative to the plane wave propagation vector. The modified parallel and perpendicular polarizabilities are both nonlinear in the local electric field strength. PMID:16783441

  6. Leptogenesis and primordial magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Andrew J.; Sabancilar, Eray; Vachaspati, Tanmay E-mail: eray.sabancilar@asu.edu

    2014-02-01

    The anomalous conversion of leptons into baryons during leptogenesis is shown to produce a right-handed helical magnetic field; in contrast, the magnetic field produced during electroweak baryogenesis is known to be left-handed. If the cosmological medium is turbulent, the magnetic field evolves to have a present day coherence scale ? 10 pc and field strength ? 10{sup ?18} Gauss. This result is insensitive to the energy scale at which leptogenesis took place. Observations of the amplitude, coherence scale, and helicity of the intergalactic magnetic field promise to provide a powerful probe of physics beyond the Standard Model and the very early universe.

  7. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    DOEpatents

    Goren, Yehuda (Mountain View, CA); Mahale, Narayan K. (The Woodlands, TX)

    1996-01-01

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles.

  8. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    DOEpatents

    Goren, Y.; Mahale, N.K.

    1996-08-06

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles. 6 figs.

  9. Martian external magnetic field proxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langlais, Benoit; Civet, Francois

    2015-04-01

    Mars possesses no dynamic magnetic field of internal origin as it is the case for the Earth or for Mercury. Instead Mars is characterized by an intense and localized magnetic field of crustal origin. This field is the result of past magnetization and demagnetization processes, and reflects its evolution. The Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) interacts with Mars' ionized environment to create an external magnetic field. This external field is weak compared to lithospheric one but very dynamic, and may hamper the detailed analysis of the internal magnetic field at some places or times. Because there are currently no magnetic field measurements made at Mars' surface, it is not possible to directly monitor the external field temporal variability as it is done in Earth's ground magnetic observatories. In this study we examine to indirect ways of quantifying this external field. First we use the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) mission which measures the solar wind about one hour upstream of the bow-shock resulting from the interaction between the solar wind and the Earth's internal magnetic field. These measurements are extrapolated to Mars' position taking into account the orbital configurations of the Mars-Earth system and the velocity of particles carrying the IMF. Second we directly use Mars Global Surveyor magnetic field measurements to quantify the level of variability of the external field. We subtract from the measurements the internal field which is otherwise modeled, and bin the residuals first on a spatial and then on a temporal mesh. This allows to compute daily or semi daily index. We present a comparison of these two proxies and demonstrate their complementarity. We also illustrate our analysis by comparing our Martian external field proxies to terrestrial index at epochs of known strong activity. These proxies will especially be useful for upcoming magnetic field measurements made around or at the surface of Mars.

  10. Magnetic field modification of optical magnetic dipoles.

    PubMed

    Armelles, Gaspar; Caballero, Blanca; Cebollada, Alfonso; Garcia-Martin, Antonio; Meneses-Rodríguez, David

    2015-03-11

    Acting on optical magnetic dipoles opens novel routes to govern light-matter interaction. We demonstrate magnetic field modification of the magnetic dipolar moment characteristic of resonant nanoholes in thin magnetoplasmonic films. This is experimentally shown through the demonstration of the magneto-optical analogue of Babinet's principle, where mirror imaged MO spectral dependencies are obtained for two complementary magnetoplasmonic systems: holes in a perforated metallic layer and a layer of disks on a substrate. PMID:25646869

  11. Vector magnetic hysteresis of hard superconductors and C. Lopez2

    E-print Network

    Majós, Antonio Badía

    Vector magnetic hysteresis of hard superconductors A. Badi´a1 and C. Lo´pez2 1 Departamento de Fi hysteresis. Both features are a manifestation of the nonequilibrium thermodynamic processes which take place type-II materials develop such a pronounced hysteresis that the reversible contribution from

  12. Evolution of twisted magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Zweibel, E.G.; Boozer, A.H.

    1985-02-01

    The magnetic field of the solar corona evolves quasistatically in response to slowly changing photospheric boundary conditions. The magnetic topology is preserved by the low resistivity of the solar atmosphere. We show that a magnetic flux coordinate system simplifies the problem of calculating field evolution with invariant topology. As an example, we calculate the equilibrium of a thin magnetic flux tube with small twist per unit length.

  13. Closed Stream Lines in Uncertain Vector Fields Mathias Otto

    E-print Network

    Closed Stream Lines in Uncertain Vector Fields Mathias Otto Otto-von-Guericke University, Magdeburg Tobias Germer Otto-von-Guericke University, Magdeburg Holger Theisel Otto-von-Guericke that treat this topic. In [Otto et al. 2010] a topological analysis of 2D uncertain vector fields

  14. Exposure guidelines for magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, G.

    1987-12-01

    The powerful magnetic fields produced by a controlled fusion experiment at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) necessitated the development of personnel-exposure guidelines for steady magnetic fields. A literature search and conversations with active researchers showed that it is currently possible to develop preliminary exposure guidelines for steady magnetic fields. An overview of the results of past research into the bioeffects of magnetic fields was compiled, along with a discussion of hazards that may be encountered by people with sickle-cell anemia or medical electronic and prosthetic implants. The LLNL steady magnetic-field exposure guidelines along with a review of developments concerning the safety of time-varying fields were also presented in this compilation. Guidelines developed elsewhere for time varying fields were also given. Further research is needed to develop exposure standards for both steady or time-varying fields.

  15. Magnetic-field-dosimetry system

    DOEpatents

    Lemon, D.K.; Skorpik, J.R.; Eick, J.L.

    1981-01-21

    A device is provided for measuring the magnetic field dose and peak field exposure. The device includes three Hall-effect sensors all perpendicular to each other, sensing the three dimensional magnetic field and associated electronics for data storage, calculating, retrieving and display.

  16. The Vector Field Proton Magnetometer for IGY Satellite Ground Stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, I. R.; Stolarik, J. D.; Heppner, J. P.

    1960-01-01

    The application of homogeneous-bias fields to a proton precessional magnetometer allows the measurement of the vector field by measuring the absolute scalar field F, declination variations (Delta)D, and inclination variations (Delta)I. The absolute scalar field can be measured to an accuracy of +/- 1 gamma and absolute declination and inclination to an accuracy of +/- 2 minutes. This paper describes a vector proton magnetometer that has been in operation at nine Minitrack stations since the spring of 1958.

  17. Vestibular stimulation by magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Ward, Bryan K; Roberts, Dale C; Della Santina, Charles C; Carey, John P; Zee, David S

    2015-04-01

    Individuals working next to strong static magnetic fields occasionally report disorientation and vertigo. With the increasing strength of magnetic fields used for magnetic resonance imaging studies, these reports have become more common. It was recently learned that humans, mice, and zebrafish all demonstrate behaviors consistent with constant peripheral vestibular stimulation while inside a strong, static magnetic field. The proposed mechanism for this effect involves a Lorentz force resulting from the interaction of a strong static magnetic field with naturally occurring ionic currents flowing through the inner ear endolymph into vestibular hair cells. The resulting force within the endolymph is strong enough to displace the lateral semicircular canal cupula, inducing vertigo and the horizontal nystagmus seen in normal mice and in humans. This review explores the evidence for interactions of magnetic fields with the vestibular system. PMID:25735662

  18. Magnetic fields around evolved stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal-Ferreira, M.; Vlemmings, W.; Kemball, A.; Amiri, N.; Maercker, M.; Ramstedt, S.; Olofsson, G.

    2014-04-01

    A number of mechanisms, such as magnetic fields, (binary) companions and circumstellar disks have been suggested to be the cause of non-spherical PNe and in particular collimated outflows. This work investigates one of these mechanisms: the magnetic fields. While MHD simulations show that the fields can indeed be important, few observations of magnetic fields have been done so far. We used the VLBA to observe five evolved stars, with the goal of detecting the magnetic field by means of water maser polarization. The sample consists in four AGB stars (IK Tau, RT Vir, IRC+60370 and AP Lyn) and one pPN (OH231.8+4.2). In four of the five sources, several strong maser features were detected allowing us to measure the linear and/or circular polarization. Based on the circular polarization detections, we infer the strength of the component of the field along the line of sight to be between ~30 mG and ~330 mG in the water maser regions of these four sources. When extrapolated to the surface of the stars, the magnetic field strength would be between a few hundred mG and a few Gauss when assuming a toroidal field geometry and higher when assuming more complex magnetic fields. We conclude that the magnetic energy we derived in the water maser regions is higher than the thermal and kinetic energy, leading to the conclusion that, indeed, magnetic fields probably play an important role in shaping Planetary Nebulae.

  19. Cosmic Magnetic Fields - An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wielebinski, Richard; Beck, Rainer

    Magnetic fields have been known in antiquity. Aristotle attributes the first of what could be called a scientific discussion on magnetism to Thales, who lived from about 625 BC. In China “magnetic carts” were in use to help the Emperor in his journeys of inspection. Plinius comments that in the Asia Minor province of Magnesia shepherds' staffs get at times “glued” to a stone, a alodestone. In Europe the magnetic compass came through the Arab sailors who met the Portuguese explorers. The first scientific treatise on magnetism, “De Magnete”, was published by William Gilbert who in 1600 described his experiments and suggested that the Earth was a huge magnet. Johannes Kepler was a correspondent of Gilbert and at times suggested that planetary motion was due to magnetic forces. Alas, this concept was demolished by Isaac Newton,who seeing the falling apple decided that gravity was enough. This concept of dealing with gravitational forces only remains en vogue even today. The explanations why magnetic effects must be neglected go from “magnetic energy is only 1% of gravitation” to “magnetic fields only complicate the beautiful computer solutions”. What is disregarded is the fact that magnetic effects are very directional(not omni-directional as gravity) and also the fact that magnetic fields are seen every where in our cosmic universe.

  20. Phenomenon of the time-reversal violating magnetic field generation by a static electric field in a medium and vacuum

    E-print Network

    Vladimir G. Baryshevsky

    1999-12-23

    It is shown that the T- and P-odd weak interactions yield to the existence of both electric field and magnetic (directed along the electric field) field around an electric charge. Similarly the assotiated magnetic field is directed along the vector of strength of stationary gravitational field.

  1. Three axis vector magnet set-up for cryogenic scanning probe microscopy.

    PubMed

    Galvis, J A; Herrera, E; Guillamón, I; Azpeitia, J; Luccas, R F; Munuera, C; Cuenca, M; Higuera, J A; Díaz, N; Pazos, M; García-Hernandez, M; Buendía, A; Vieira, S; Suderow, H

    2015-01-01

    We describe a three axis vector magnet system for cryogenic scanning probe microscopy measurements. We discuss the magnet support system and the power supply, consisting of a compact three way 100 A current source. We obtain tilted magnetic fields in all directions with maximum value of 5T along z-axis and of 1.2T for XY-plane magnetic fields. We describe a scanning tunneling microscopy-spectroscopy (STM-STS) set-up, operating in a dilution refrigerator, which includes a new high voltage ultralow noise piezodrive electronics and discuss the noise level due to vibrations. STM images and STS maps show atomic resolution and the tilted vortex lattice at 150 mK in the superconductor ?-Bi2Pd. We observe a strongly elongated hexagonal lattice, which corresponds to the projection of the tilted hexagonal vortex lattice on the surface. We also discuss Magnetic Force Microscopy images in a variable temperature insert. PMID:25638089

  2. Origin of cosmic magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Campanelli, Leonardo

    2013-08-01

    We calculate, in the free Maxwell theory, the renormalized quantum vacuum expectation value of the two-point magnetic correlation function in de Sitter inflation. We find that quantum magnetic fluctuations remain constant during inflation instead of being washed out adiabatically, as usually assumed in the literature. The quantum-to-classical transition of super-Hubble magnetic modes during inflation allow us to treat the magnetic field classically after reheating, when it is coupled to the primeval plasma. The actual magnetic field is scale independent and has an intensity of few×10(-12)??G if the energy scale of inflation is few×10(16)??GeV. Such a field accounts for galactic and galaxy cluster magnetic fields. PMID:23971556

  3. Measurements of magnetic field alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchnir, M.; Schmidt, E.E.

    1987-11-06

    The procedure for installing Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) dipoles in their respective cryostats involves aligning the average direction of their field with the vertical to an accuracy of 0.5 mrad. The equipment developed for carrying on these measurements is described and the measurements performed on the first few prototypes SSC magnets are presented. The field angle as a function of position in these 16.6 m long magnets is a characteristic of the individual magnet with possible feedback information to its manufacturing procedure. A comparison of this vertical alignment characteristic with a magnetic field intensity (by NMR) characteristic for one of the prototypes is also presented. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  4. Spin Chain with Magnetic Field and Spinning String in Magnetic Field Background

    E-print Network

    Wung-Hong Huang

    2006-07-11

    We analyze the fast-moving string in the magnetic Melvin field background and find that the associated effective Lagrangian of string sigma model describes the spin chain model with external magnetic field. The spin vector in the spin chain has been properly deformed and is living on the deformed two-sphere or deformed two-dimensional hyperboloid, depending on the direction around which the string is spinning. We describe in detail the characters of spin deformation and, in particular, see that this is a general property for a string moving in a class of deformed background.

  5. Rotating-frame gradient fields for magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance in low fields

    DOEpatents

    Bouchard, Louis-Serge; Pines, Alexander; Demas, Vasiliki

    2014-01-21

    A system and method for Fourier encoding a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal is disclosed. A static magnetic field B.sub.0 is provided along a first direction. An NMR signal from the sample is Fourier encoded by applying a rotating-frame gradient field B.sub.G superimposed on the B.sub.0, where the B.sub.G comprises a vector component rotating in a plane perpendicular to the first direction at an angular frequency .omega.in a laboratory frame. The Fourier-encoded NMR signal is detected.

  6. The Local Stellar Velocity Field via Vector Spherical Harmonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markarov, V. V.; Murphy, D. W.

    2007-01-01

    We analyze the local field of stellar tangential velocities for a sample of 42,339 nonbinary Hipparcos stars with accurate parallaxes, using a vector spherical harmonic formalism. We derive simple relations between the parameters of the classical linear model (Ogorodnikov-Milne) of the local systemic field and low-degree terms of the general vector harmonic decomposition. Taking advantage of these relationships, we determine the solar velocity with respect to the local stars of (V(sub X), V(sub Y), V(sub Z)) (10.5, 18.5, 7.3) +/- 0.1 km s(exp -1) not corrected for the asymmetric drift with respect to the local standard of rest. If only stars more distant than 100 pc are considered, the peculiar solar motion is (V(sub X), V(sub Y), V(sub Z)) (9.9, 15.6, 6.9) +/- 0.2 km s(exp -1). The adverse effects of harmonic leakage, which occurs between the reflex solar motion represented by the three electric vector harmonics in the velocity space and higher degree harmonics in the proper-motion space, are eliminated in our analysis by direct subtraction of the reflex solar velocity in its tangential components for each star. The Oort parameters determined by a straightforward least-squares adjustment in vector spherical harmonics are A=14.0 +/- 1.4, B=13.1 +/- 1.2, K=1.1 +/- 1.8, and C=2.9 +/- 1.4 km s(exp -1) kpc(exp -1). The physical meaning and the implications of these parameters are discussed in the framework of a general linear model of the velocity field. We find a few statistically significant higher degree harmonic terms that do not correspond to any parameters in the classical linear model. One of them, a third-degree electric harmonic, is tentatively explained as the response to a negative linear gradient of rotation velocity with distance from the Galactic plane, which we estimate at approximately -20 km s(exp -1) kpc(exp -1). A similar vertical gradient of rotation velocity has been detected for more distant stars representing the thick disk (z greater than 1 kpc), but here we surmise its existence in the thin disk at z less than 200 pc. The most unexpected and unexplained term within the Ogorodnikov-Milne model is the first-degree magnetic harmonic, representing a rigid rotation of the stellar field about the axis -Y pointing opposite to the direction of rotation. This harmonic comes out with a statistically robust coefficient of 6.2 +/- 0.9 km s(exp -1) kpc(exp -1) and is also present in the velocity field of more distant stars. The ensuing upward vertical motion of stars in the general direction of the Galactic center and the downward motion in the anticenter direction are opposite to the vector field expected from the stationary Galactic warp model.

  7. Visualizing Vector Fields Using Line Integral Convolution and Dye Advection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Han-Wei; Johnson, Christopher R.; Ma, Kwan-Liu

    1996-01-01

    We present local and global techniques to visualize three-dimensional vector field data. Using the Line Integral Convolution (LIC) method to image the global vector field, our new algorithm allows the user to introduce colored 'dye' into the vector field to highlight local flow features. A fast algorithm is proposed that quickly recomputes the dyed LIC images. In addition, we introduce volume rendering methods that can map the LIC texture on any contour surface and/or translucent region defined by additional scalar quantities, and can follow the advection of colored dye throughout the volume.

  8. Energy momentum flows for the massive vector field

    E-print Network

    George Horton; Chris Dewdney

    2006-09-26

    We present a causal trajectory interpretation for the massive vector field, based on the flows of rest energy and a conserved density defined using the time-like eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the stress-energy-momentum tensor. This work extends our previous work which used a similar procedure for the scalar field. The massive, spin-one, complex vector field is discussed in detail and solutions are classified using the Pauli-Lubanski spin vector. The flows of energy-momentum are illustrated in a simple example of standing waves in a plane.

  9. On parameter space of complex polynomial vector fields in C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Kealey; Tan, Lei

    2016-01-01

    The space ?d of degree d single-variable monic and centered complex polynomial vector fields can be decomposed into loci in which the vector fields have the same topological structure. This paper analyzes the geometric structure of these loci and describes some bifurcations. In particular, it is proved that new homoclinic separatrices can form under small perturbation. By an example, we show that this decomposition of parameter space by combinatorial data is not a cell decomposition. The appendix to this article, joint work with Tan Lei, shows that landing separatrices are stable under small perturbation of the vector field if the multiplicities of the equilibrium points are preserved.

  10. Magnetic field structure in Monoceros R2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarrett, T. H.; Novak, G.; Xie, T.; Goldsmith, P. F.

    1994-01-01

    We have carried out polarimetric observations to investigate the geometry of the magnetic field in the giant molecular cloud Monoceros R2. This study is based upon deep R-band charge coupled device (CCD) polarimetry, covering a total area of 0.5 deg(exp 2) of the giant molecular cloud. The data were calibrated using a new technique that relies on obtaining broad-band photometry of stars simultaneously with polarimetric photometry of the Mon R2 fields, thus providing an accurate means of measuring the electric vectors of starlight which is polarized by the fore-ground dust grains aligned by the magnetic field in the Mon R2 GMC. In this work, (1) we were able to continuously trace magnetic field lines from the largest scales in Mon R2 to the detailed structure of the field in the dense core, as determined from infrared polarimetry; and (2) we have found that the ambient field is apparently modified by a large-scale structure in the Mon R2 cloud. The mean angle of polarization for the complete sample we measured is 158 deg, which is roughly coincident with the local Galactic magnetic field (155 deg). The dispersion in the angle of polarization is 33 deg, similar to that found in the Orion GMC. The dispersion in angle of polarization for stars located along the western side of the three CCD fields is 22 deg. The CCD fields are bisected by a dense ridge of gas defining the boundary of an expanding gas shell that recent observational results at millimeter wavelengths now reveal dominates the Mon R2 GMC. Our results suggest th at the expanding shell has distorted the magnetic field lines extending from the core to the northern gas structure comprising Mon R2.

  11. Analytical maximum likelihood estimation of stellar magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez González, M. J.; Manso Sainz, R.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Belluzzi, L.

    2012-01-01

    The polarized spectrum of stellar radiation encodes valuable information on the conditions of stellar atmospheres and the magnetic fields that permeate them. In this paper, we give explicit expressions to estimate the magnetic field vector and its associated error from the observed Stokes parameters. We study the solar case where specific intensities are observed and then the stellar case, where we receive the polarized flux. In the second case, we concentrate on the explicit expression for the case of a slow rotator with a dipolar magnetic field geometry. Moreover, we also give explicit formulae to retrieve the magnetic field vector from the least-squares deconvolution (LSD) profiles without assuming mean values for the LSD artificial spectral line. The formulae have been obtained assuming that the spectral lines can be described in the weak-field regime and using a maximum likelihood approach. The errors are recovered by means of the Hermitian matrix. The bias of the estimators is analysed in depth.

  12. Photon Magnetic Moment and Vacuum Magnetization in an Asymptotically Large Magnetic Field

    E-print Network

    Selym Villalba Chavez

    2010-08-09

    We consider the effect of the photon radiative correction on the vacuum energy in a superstrong magnetic field. The notion of a photon anomalous magnetic moment is analyzed and its connection with the quasiparticle character of the electromagnetic radiation is established. In the infrared domain the magnetic moment turns out to be a vector with two orthogonal components in correspondence with the cylindrical symmetry imposed by the external field. The possibility of defining such quantity in the high energy limit is studied as well. Its existence suggests that the electromagnetic radiation is a source of magnetization to the whole vacuum and thus its electron-positron zero-point energy is slightly modified. The corresponding contribution to the vacuum magnetization density is determined by considering the individual contribution of each vacuum polarization eigenmode in the Euler-Heisenberg Lagrangian. A paramagnetic response is found in one of them, whereas the remaining ones are diamagnetic. Additional issues concerning the transverse pressures are analyzed.

  13. Project MAGNET High-level Vector Survey Data Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, Rachel J.

    1992-01-01

    Since 1951, the U.S. Navy, under its Project MAGNET program, has been continuously collecting vector aeromagnetic survey data to support the U.S. Defense Mapping Agency's world magnetic and charting program. During this forty-year period, a variety of survey platforms and instrumentation configurations have been used. The current Project MAGNET survey platform is a Navy Orion RP-3D aircraft which has been specially modified and specially equipped with a redundant suite of navigational positioning, attitude, and magnetic sensors. A review of the survey data collection procedures and calibration and editing techniques applied to the data generated by this suite of instrumentation will be presented. Among the topics covered will be the determination of its parameters from the low-level calibration maneuvers flown over geomagnetic observatories.

  14. Development of a vector-tensor system to measure the absolute magnetic flux density and its gradient in magnetically shielded rooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, J.; Knappe-Grüneberg, S.; Gutkelch, D.; Haueisen, J.; Neuber, S.; Schnabel, A.; Burghoff, M.

    2015-05-01

    Several experiments in fundamental physics demand an environment of very low, homogeneous, and stable magnetic fields. For the magnetic characterization of such environments, we present a portable SQUID system that measures the absolute magnetic flux density vector and the gradient tensor. This vector-tensor system contains 13 integrated low-critical temperature (LTc) superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) inside a small cylindrical liquid helium Dewar with a height of 31 cm and 37 cm in diameter. The achievable resolution depends on the flux density of the field under investigation and its temporal drift. Inside a seven-layer mu-metal shield, an accuracy better than ±23 pT for the components of the static magnetic field vector and ±2 pT/cm for each of the nine components of the gradient tensor is reached by using the shifting method.

  15. Development of a vector-tensor system to measure the absolute magnetic flux density and its gradient in magnetically shielded rooms

    SciTech Connect

    Voigt, J.; Knappe-Grüneberg, S.; Gutkelch, D.; Neuber, S.; Schnabel, A.; Burghoff, M.; Haueisen, J.

    2015-05-15

    Several experiments in fundamental physics demand an environment of very low, homogeneous, and stable magnetic fields. For the magnetic characterization of such environments, we present a portable SQUID system that measures the absolute magnetic flux density vector and the gradient tensor. This vector-tensor system contains 13 integrated low-critical temperature (LTc) superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) inside a small cylindrical liquid helium Dewar with a height of 31 cm and 37 cm in diameter. The achievable resolution depends on the flux density of the field under investigation and its temporal drift. Inside a seven-layer mu-metal shield, an accuracy better than ±23 pT for the components of the static magnetic field vector and ±2 pT/cm for each of the nine components of the gradient tensor is reached by using the shifting method.

  16. The role of vector fields in modified gravity scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Tasinato, Gianmassimo; Koyama, Kazuya; Khosravi, Nima E-mail: kazuya.koyama@port.ac.uk

    2013-11-01

    Gravitational vector degrees of freedom typically arise in many examples of modified gravity models. We start to systematically explore their role in these scenarios, studying the effects of coupling gravitational vector and scalar degrees of freedom. We focus on set-ups that enjoy a Galilean symmetry in the scalar sector and an Abelian gauge symmetry in the vector sector. These symmetries, together with the requirement that the equations of motion contain at most two space-time derivatives, only allow for a small number of operators in the Lagrangian for the gravitational fields. We investigate the role of gravitational vector fields for two broad classes of phenomena that characterize modified gravity scenarios. The first is self-acceleration: we analyze in general terms the behavior of vector fluctuations around self-accelerating solutions, and show that vanishing kinetic terms of vector fluctuations lead to instabilities on cosmological backgrounds. The second phenomenon is the screening of long range fifth forces by means of Vainshtein mechanism. We show that if gravitational vector fields are appropriately coupled to a spherically symmetric source, they can play an important role for defining the features of the background solution and the scale of the Vainshtein radius. Our general results can be applied to any concrete model of modified gravity, whose low-energy vector and scalar degrees of freedom satisfy the symmetry requirements that we impose.

  17. Magnetoacoustic Tomography with Magnetic Induction: Bioimepedance reconstruction through vector source imaging

    PubMed Central

    Mariappan, Leo; He, Bin

    2013-01-01

    Magneto acoustic tomography with magnetic induction (MAT-MI) is a technique proposed to reconstruct the conductivity distribution in biological tissue at ultrasound imaging resolution. A magnetic pulse is used to generate eddy currents in the object, which in the presence of a static magnetic field induces Lorentz force based acoustic waves in the medium. This time resolved acoustic waves are collected with ultrasound transducers and, in the present work, these are used to reconstruct the current source which gives rise to the MAT-MI acoustic signal using vector imaging point spread functions. The reconstructed source is then used to estimate the conductivity distribution of the object. Computer simulations and phantom experiments are performed to demonstrate conductivity reconstruction through vector source imaging in a circular scanning geometry with a limited bandwidth finite size piston transducer. The results demonstrate that the MAT-MI approach is capable of conductivity reconstruction in a physical setting. PMID:23322761

  18. Examples of non-conjugated holomorphic vector fields and foliations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teyssier, Loc

    We consider germs of holomorphic vector fields near the origin of C2 with a saddle-node singularity, and the induced singular foliations. In a previous article we described the invariants addressing the analytical classification of these vector fields. They split into three parts: a formal, an orbital and a tangential component. For a fixed formal class, the orbital invariant (associated to the foliation) was obtained by Martinet and Ramis; we give it an integral representation. We then derive examples of non-orbitally conjugated foliations by the use of a "first-step" normal form, whose first-significative jet is an invariant. The tangential invariant also admits an integral representation, hence we derive explicit examples of vector fields, inducing the same foliation, that are not mutually conjugated. In addition, we provide a family of normal forms for vector fields orbitally equivalent to the model of Poincaré-Dulac.

  19. Vector Field Visual Data Analysis Technologies for Petascale Computational Science

    SciTech Connect

    Garth, Christoph; Deines, Eduard; Joy, Kenneth I.; Bethel, E. Wes; Childs, Hank; Weber, Gunther; Ahern, Sean; Pugmire, Dave; Sanderson, Allen; Johnson, Chris

    2009-11-13

    State-of-the-art computational science simulations generate large-scale vector field data sets. Visualization and analysis is a key aspect of obtaining insight into these data sets and represents an important challenge. This article discusses possibilities and challenges of modern vector field visualization and focuses on methods and techniques developed in the SciDAC Visualization and Analytics Center for Enabling Technologies (VACET) and deployed in the open-source visualization tool, VisIt.

  20. Conformal Killing vector fields and a virial theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cariñena, José F.; Gheorghiu, Irina; Martínez, Eduardo; Santos, Patrícia

    2014-11-01

    The virial theorem is formulated both intrinsically and in local coordinates for a Lagrangian system of a mechanical type on a Riemann manifold. An important case studied in this paper is that of an affine virial function associated with a vector field on the configuration manifold. The special cases of a virial function associated with a Killing, a homothetic, and a conformal Killing vector field are considered and the corresponding virial theorems are established for these types of functions.

  1. Robust Morse decompositions of piecewise constant vector fields.

    PubMed

    Szymczak, Andrzej; Zhang, Eugene

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new approach to computing a Morse decomposition of a vector field on a triangulated manifold surface. The basic idea is to convert the input vector field to a piecewise constant (PC) vector field, whose trajectories can be computed using simple geometric rules. To overcome the intrinsic difficulty in PC vector fields (in particular, discontinuity along mesh edges), we borrow results from the theory of differential inclusions. The input vector field and its PC variant have similar Morse decompositions. We introduce a robust and efficient algorithm to compute Morse decompositions of a PC vector field. Our approach provides subtriangle precision for Morse sets. In addition, we describe a Morse set classification framework which we use to color code the Morse sets in order to enhance the visualization. We demonstrate the benefits of our approach with three well-known simulation data sets, for which our method has produced Morse decompositions that are similar to or finer than those obtained using existing techniques, and is over an order of magnitude faster. PMID:21747131

  2. Evolution of magnetic field inclination in a forming penumbra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jur?ák, Jan; Bello González, Nazaret; Schlichenmaier, Rolf; Rezaei, Reza

    2014-12-01

    As a sunspot penumbra forms, the magnetic field vector at the outer boundary of the protospot undergoes a transformation. We study the changes of the magnetic field vector at this boundary as a penumbral segment forms. We analyze a set of spectropolarimetric maps covering 2 hr during the formation of a sunspot in NOAA 11024. The data were recorded with the GFPI instrument attached to the German VTT. We observe a stationary umbra/quiet Sun boundary, where the magnetic field becomes more horizontal with time. The magnetic field inclination increases by 5°, reaching a maximum value of about 59°. The maximum inclination coincides with the onset of filament formation. In time, the penumbra filaments become longer and the penumbral bright grains protrude into the umbra, where the magnetic field is stronger and more vertical. Consequently, we observe a decrease in the magnetic field inclination at the boundary as the penumbra grows. In summary, in order to initiate the formation of the penumbra, the magnetic field at the umbral (protospot) boundary becomes more inclined. As the penumbra grows, the umbra/penumbra boundary migrates inwards, and at this boundary the magnetic field turns more vertical again, while it remains inclined in the outer penumbra.

  3. Static magnetic fields enhance turbulence

    E-print Network

    Pothérat, Alban

    2015-01-01

    More often than not, turbulence occurs under the influence of external fields, mostly rotation and magnetic fields generated either by planets, stellar objects or by an industrial environment. Their effect on the anisotropy and the dissipative behaviour of turbulence is recognised but complex, and it is still difficult to even tell whether they enhance or dampen turbulence. For example, externally imposed magnetic fields suppress free turbulence in electrically conducting fluids (Moffatt 1967), and make it two-dimensional (2D) (Sommeria & Moreau 1982); but their effect on the intensity of forced turbulence, as in pipes, convective flows or otherwise, is not clear. We shall prove that since two-dimensionalisation preferentially affects larger scales, these undergo much less dissipation and sustain intense turbulent fluctuations. When higher magnetic fields are imposed, quasi-2D structures retain more kinetic energy, so that rather than suppressing forced turbulence, external magnetic fields indirectly enha...

  4. AC photovoltaic module magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, C.; Chang, G.J.; Reyes, A.B.; Whitaker, C.M.

    1997-12-31

    Implementation of alternating current (AC) photovoltaic (PV) modules, particularly for distributed applications such as PV rooftops and facades, may be slowed by public concern about electric and magnetic fields (EMF). This paper documents magnetic field measurements on an AC PV module, complementing EMF research on direct-current PV modules conducted by PG and E in 1993. Although not comprehensive, the PV EMF data indicate that 60 Hz magnetic fields (the EMF type of greatest public concern) from PV modules are comparable to, or significantly less than, those from household appliances. Given the present EMF research knowledge, AC PV module EMF may not merit considerable concern.

  5. Planetary science. Low-altitude magnetic field measurements by MESSENGER reveal Mercury's ancient crustal field.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Catherine L; Phillips, Roger J; Purucker, Michael E; Anderson, Brian J; Byrne, Paul K; Denevi, Brett W; Feinberg, Joshua M; Hauck, Steven A; Head, James W; Korth, Haje; James, Peter B; Mazarico, Erwan; Neumann, Gregory A; Philpott, Lydia C; Siegler, Matthew A; Tsyganenko, Nikolai A; Solomon, Sean C

    2015-05-22

    Magnetized rocks can record the history of the magnetic field of a planet, a key constraint for understanding its evolution. From orbital vector magnetic field measurements of Mercury taken by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft at altitudes below 150 kilometers, we have detected remanent magnetization in Mercury's crust. We infer a lower bound on the average age of magnetization of 3.7 to 3.9 billion years. Our findings indicate that a global magnetic field driven by dynamo processes in the fluid outer core operated early in Mercury's history. Ancient field strengths that range from those similar to Mercury's present dipole field to Earth-like values are consistent with the magnetic field observations and with the low iron content of Mercury's crust inferred from MESSENGER elemental composition data. PMID:25953822

  6. Low-altitude magnetic field measurements by MESSENGER reveal Mercury’s ancient crustal field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Catherine L.; Phillips, Roger J.; Purucker, Michael E.; Anderson, Brian J.; Byrne, Paul K.; Denevi, Brett W.; Feinberg, Joshua M.; Hauck, Steven A.; Head, James W.; Korth, Haje; James, Peter B.; Mazarico, Erwan; Neumann, Gregory A.; Philpott, Lydia C.; Siegler, Matthew A.; Tsyganenko, Nikolai A.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2015-05-01

    Magnetized rocks can record the history of the magnetic field of a planet, a key constraint for understanding its evolution. From orbital vector magnetic field measurements of Mercury taken by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft at altitudes below 150 kilometers, we have detected remanent magnetization in Mercury’s crust. We infer a lower bound on the average age of magnetization of 3.7 to 3.9 billion years. Our findings indicate that a global magnetic field driven by dynamo processes in the fluid outer core operated early in Mercury’s history. Ancient field strengths that range from those similar to Mercury’s present dipole field to Earth-like values are consistent with the magnetic field observations and with the low iron content of Mercury’s crust inferred from MESSENGER elemental composition data.

  7. Magnetic Field Generation in Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrario, Lilia; Melatos, Andrew; Zrake, Jonathan

    2015-10-01

    Enormous progress has been made on observing stellar magnetism in stars from the main sequence (particularly thanks to the MiMeS, MAGORI and BOB surveys) through to compact objects. Recent data have thrown into sharper relief the vexed question of the origin of stellar magnetic fields, which remains one of the main unanswered questions in astrophysics. In this chapter we review recent work in this area of research. In particular, we look at the fossil field hypothesis which links magnetism in compact stars to magnetism in main sequence and pre-main sequence stars and we consider why its feasibility has now been questioned particularly in the context of highly magnetic white dwarfs. We also review the fossil versus dynamo debate in the context of neutron stars and the roles played by key physical processes such as buoyancy, helicity, and superfluid turbulence, in the generation and stability of neutron star fields.

  8. Neutron scattering in magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, W.C.

    1984-01-01

    The use of magnetic fields in neutron scattering experimentation is reviewed briefly. Two general areas of application can be distinguished. In one the field acts to change the properties of the scattering sample; in the second the field acts on the neutron itself. Several examples are discussed. Precautions necessary for high precision polarized beam measurements are reviewed. 33 references.

  9. Reconnection of stressed magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hassam, A. B.

    1992-01-01

    It is shown that magnetized plasma configurations under magnetic stress relax irreversibly to the state of minimum stress at a rate that is essentially Alfvenic provided a magnetic null is present. The relaxation is effected by the reconnection at the field null and proceeds at a rate proportional to the absolute value of ln(eta) exp-1, where eta is the resistivity. An analytic calculation in the linear regime is presented.

  10. Influence of the inverse magnetic catalysis and the vector interaction in the location of the critical end point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Pedro; Ferreira, Márcio; Menezes, Débora P.; Moreira, João; Providência, Constança

    2015-08-01

    The effect of a strong magnetic field on the location of the critical end point (CEP) in the QCD phase diagram is discussed under different scenarios. In particular, we consider the contribution of the vector interaction and take into account the inverse magnetic catalysis obtained in lattice QCD calculations at zero chemical potential. The discussion is realized within the (2 +1 ) Polyakov-Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. It is shown that the vector interaction and the magnetic field have opposite competing effects, and that the winning effect depends strongly on the intensity of the magnetic field. The inverse magnetic catalysis at zero chemical potential has two distinct effects for magnetic fields above ?0.3 GeV2: it shifts the CEP to lower chemical potentials, hinders the increase of the CEP temperature and prevents a too large increase of the baryonic density at the CEP. For fields e B <0.1 GeV2 the competing effects between the vector contribution and the magnetic field can move the CEP to regions of temperature and density in the phase diagram that could be more easily accessible to experiments.

  11. Measuring Earth's Magnetic Field Simply.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Gay B.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a method for measuring the earth's magnetic field using an empty toilet paper tube, copper wire, clear tape, a battery, a linear variable resistor, a small compass, cardboard, a protractor, and an ammeter. (WRM)

  12. Modeling and vector control of planar magnetic levitator

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, W.; Trumper, D.L.; Lang, J.H.

    1998-11-01

    The authors designed and implemented a magnetically levitated stage with large planar motion capability. This planar magnetic levitator employs four novel permanent-magnet linear motors. Each motor generates vertical force for suspension against gravity, as well as horizontal force for drive. These linear levitation motors can be used as building blocks in the general class of multi-degree-of-freedom motion stages. In this paper, the authors discuss electromechanical modeling and real-time vector control of such a permanent-magnet levitator. They describe the dynamics in a dq frame introduced to decouple the forces acting on the magnetically levitated moving part, namely, the platen. A transformation similar to the Blondel-Park transformation is derived for commutation of the stator phase currents. The authors provide test results on step responses of the magnetically levitated stage. It shows 5-nm rms positioning noise in x and y, which demonstrates the applicability of such stages in the next-generation photolithography in semiconductor manufacturing.

  13. Black Holes and Magnetic Fields

    E-print Network

    Filip Hejda; Ji?í Bi?ák

    2015-10-01

    We briefly summarise the basic properties of spacetimes representing rotating, charged black holes in strong axisymmetric magnetic fields. We concentrate on extremal cases, for which the horizon surface gravity vanishes. We investigate their properties by finding simpler spacetimes that exhibit their geometries near degenerate horizons. Employing the simpler geometries obtained by near-horizon limiting description we analyse the Meissner effect of magnetic field expulsion from extremal black holes.

  14. Magnetic fields on the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, R.

    1981-01-01

    Synoptic observations of solar magnetic fields are discussed. Seen in long-term averages, the magnetic fields of the Sun show distinctive behavior. The active-region latitudes are characterized by magnetic fields of preceding polarity. The flow of following polarity fields to make up the polar fields is episodic, not continuous. This field motion is a directed poleward flow and is not due to diffusion. The total magnetic flux on the solar surface, which is related linearly to the calcium emission in integrated sunlight, varies from activity minimum to maximum by a factor of 2 or 3. Nearly all this flux is seen at active-region latitudes-only about 1% is at the poles. The total flux of the Sun disappears from the surface at a very rapid rate and is replaced by new flux. All the field and flux patterns that we see originate in active-region latitudes. The polar magnetic fields of the Sun were observed to change polarity recently. The variations of the full-disk solar flux are shown to lead to the proper rotation rate of the Sun, but the phase of the variations is constant for only a year or two at most.

  15. SOLIS/VSM Polar Magnetic Field Data

    E-print Network

    Bertello, Luca

    2015-01-01

    The Vector Spectromagnetograph (VSM) instrument on the Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun (SOLIS) telescope is designed to obtain high-quality magnetic field observations in both the photosphere and chromosphere by measuring the Zeeman-induced polarization of spectral lines. With 1$^{\\prime \\prime}$ spatial resolution (1.14$^{\\prime \\prime}$ before 2010) and 0.05\\AA\\ spectral resolution, the VSM provides, among other products, chromospheric full-disk magnetograms using the CaII 854.2 nm spectral line and both photospheric full-disk vector and longitudinal magnetograms using the FeI 630.15 nm line. Here we describe the procedure used to compute daily weighted averages of the photospheric radial polar magnetic field at different latitude bands from SOLIS/VSM longitudinal full-disk observations. Time series of these measurements are publicly available from the SOLIS website at http://solis.nso.edu/0/vsm/vsm\\_plrfield.html. Future plans include the calculation of the mean polar field strength fr...

  16. Optical sensor of magnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Butler, M.A.; Martin, S.J.

    1986-03-25

    An optical magnetic field strength sensor for measuring the field strength of a magnetic field comprising a dilute magnetic semi-conductor probe having first and second ends, longitudinally positioned in the magnetic field for providing Faraday polarization rotation of light passing therethrough relative to the strength of the magnetic field. Light provided by a remote light source is propagated through an optical fiber coupler and a single optical fiber strand between the probe and the light source for providing a light path therebetween. A polarizer and an apparatus for rotating the polarization of the light is provided in the light path and a reflector is carried by the second end of the probe for reflecting the light back through the probe and thence through the polarizer to the optical coupler. A photo detector apparatus is operably connected to the optical coupler for detecting and measuring the intensity of the reflected light and comparing same to the light source intensity whereby the magnetic field strength may be calculated.

  17. The scientific case for magnetic field satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backus, George E. (editor); Benton, Edward R.; Harrison, Christopher G. A.; Heirtzler, James R.

    1987-01-01

    To make full use of modern magnetic data and the paleomagnetic record, we must greatly improve our understanding of how the geodynamo system works. It is clearly nonlinear, probably chaotic, and its dimensionless parameters cannot yet be reproduced on a laboratory scale. It is accessible only to theory and to measurements made at and above the earth's surface. These measurements include essentially all geophysical types. Gravity and seismology give evidence for undulations in the core-mantle boundary (CMB) and for temperature variations in the lower mantle which can affect core convection and hence the dynamo. VLBI measurements of the variations in the Chandler wobble and length of day are affected by, among other things, the electromagnetic and mechanical transfer of angular momentum across the CMB. Finally, measurements of the vector magnetic field, its intensity, or its direction, give the most direct access to the core dynamo and the electrical conductivity of the lower mantle. The 120 gauss coefficients of degrees up to 10 probably come from the core, with only modest interference by mantle conductivity and crustal magnetization. By contrast, only three angular accelerations enter the problem of angular momentum transfer across the CMB. Satellite measurements of the vector magnetic field are uniquely able to provide the spatial coverage required for extrapolation to the CMB, and to isolate and measure certain magnetic signals which to the student of the geodynamo represent noise, but which are of great interest elsewhere in geophysics. Here, these claims are justified and the mission parameters likely to be scientifically most useful for observing the geodynamo system are described.

  18. Analog of electric and magnetic fields in stationary gravitational systems

    SciTech Connect

    Embacher, F.

    1984-08-01

    Newtonian and Machian aspects of the stationary gravitational field are brought into formal analogy with a stationry electromagnetic field. The electromagnetic vector potential equals (up to a factor) the timelike Killing vector field. The current density is given by the contraction of the Killing vector with the Ricci tensor. A coordinate-dependent split in electric and magnetic field vectors is given, and some results of classical electrodynamics are used to illustrate the analogy. In the linearized theory, the usual Maxwell equations are obtained. The analogy also holds from the point of view of particle motion. The geodesic equation is brought into a special form that exhibits an analog to the Lorentz force. Two examples (which have played an important role in the theoretical discovery of Machian effects) are considered.

  19. Magnetic field induced dynamical chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Somrita; Baura, Alendu; Bag, Bidhan Chandra

    2013-12-15

    In this article, we have studied the dynamics of a particle having charge in the presence of a magnetic field. The motion of the particle is confined in the x–y plane under a two dimensional nonlinear potential. We have shown that constant magnetic field induced dynamical chaos is possible even for a force which is derived from a simple potential. For a given strength of the magnetic field, initial position, and velocity of the particle, the dynamics may be regular, but it may become chaotic when the field is time dependent. Chaotic dynamics is very often if the field is time dependent. Origin of chaos has been explored using the Hamiltonian function of the dynamics in terms of action and angle variables. Applicability of the present study has been discussed with a few examples.

  20. VECTUM. Irregular 2D Velocity Vector Field Plotting Package

    SciTech Connect

    McClurg, F.R.; Mousseau, V.A.

    1992-05-04

    VECTUM is a NCAR Graphics based package, for generating a plot of an irregular 2D velocity vector field. The program reads an ASCII database of x, y, u, v, data pairs and produces a plot in Computer Graphics Metafile (CGM) format. The program also uses an ASCII parameter file for controlling annotation details such as the plot title, arrowhead style, scale of vectors, windowing, etc. Simple geometry (i.e. lines, arcs, splines) can be defined to be included with the velocity vectors. NCAR Graphics drivers can be used to display the CGM file into PostScript, HPGL, HDF, etc, output.

  1. Magnetic field effect on hemin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartoszek, Mariola; Balanda, Maria; Skrzypek, Danuta; Drzazga, Zofia

    2001-12-01

    Magnetic behaviour of hemin has been investigated by means of magnetostatic methods, AC-susceptibility measurements and EPR spectroscopy. The measurements were made using polycrystalline and oriented samples of hemin in the temperature range 2.3-292 K and in magnetic fields up to 6 T. In the paramagnetic region, the susceptibility obeys the Curie-Weiss law with positive Curie-Weiss temperature. At low temperature, a rapid increase of the susceptibility is noticed but up to 2 K no long-range correlations are observed. The studies show that the iron ion in hemin exists in two spin states ( S= {5}/{2} and {1}/{2}). The applied magnetic field increases the occupation of the low-spin state. Hemin shows high-field-induced magnetic anisotropy which, similar to the susceptibility, increases with decreasing temperature.

  2. Computational and experimental analysis of TMS-induced electric field vectors critical to neuronal activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krieg, Todd D.; Salinas, Felipe S.; Narayana, Shalini; Fox, Peter T.; Mogul, David J.

    2015-08-01

    Objective. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) represents a powerful technique to noninvasively modulate cortical neurophysiology in the brain. However, the relationship between the magnetic fields created by TMS coils and neuronal activation in the cortex is still not well-understood, making predictable cortical activation by TMS difficult to achieve. Our goal in this study was to investigate the relationship between induced electric fields and cortical activation measured by blood flow response. Particularly, we sought to discover the E-field characteristics that lead to cortical activation. Approach. Subject-specific finite element models (FEMs) of the head and brain were constructed for each of six subjects using magnetic resonance image scans. Positron emission tomography (PET) measured each subject’s cortical response to image-guided robotically-positioned TMS to the primary motor cortex. FEM models that employed the given coil position, orientation, and stimulus intensity in experimental applications of TMS were used to calculate the electric field (E-field) vectors within a region of interest for each subject. TMS-induced E-fields were analyzed to better understand what vector components led to regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) responses recorded by PET. Main results. This study found that decomposing the E-field into orthogonal vector components based on the cortical surface geometry (and hence, cortical neuron directions) led to significant differences between the regions of cortex that were active and nonactive. Specifically, active regions had significantly higher E-field components in the normal inward direction (i.e., parallel to pyramidal neurons in the dendrite-to-axon orientation) and in the tangential direction (i.e., parallel to interneurons) at high gradient. In contrast, nonactive regions had higher E-field vectors in the outward normal direction suggesting inhibitory responses. Significance. These results provide critical new understanding of the factors by which TMS induces cortical activation necessary for predictive and repeatable use of this noninvasive stimulation modality.

  3. Introduction to power-frequency electric and magnetic fields.

    PubMed Central

    Kaune, W T

    1993-01-01

    This paper introduces the reader to electric and magnetic fields, particularly those fields produced by electric power systems and other sources using frequencies in the power-frequency range. Electric fields are produced by electric charges; a magnetic field also is produced if these charges are in motion. Electric fields exert forces on other charges; if in motion, these charges will experience magnetic forces. Power-frequency electric and magnetic fields induce electric currents in conducting bodies such as living organisms. The current density vector is used to describe the distribution of current within a body. The surface of the human body is an excellent shield for power-frequency electric fields, but power-frequency magnetic fields penetrate without significant attenuation; the electric fields induced inside the body by either exposure are comparable in magnitude. Electric fields induced inside a human by most environmental electric and magnetic fields appear to be small in magnitude compared to levels naturally occurring in living tissues. Detection of such fields thus would seem to require the existence of unknown biological mechanisms. Complete characterization of a power-frequency field requires measurement of the magnitudes and electrical phases of the fundamental and harmonic amplitudes of its three vector components. Most available instrumentation measures only a small subset, or some weighted average, of these quantities. Hand-held survey meters have been used widely to measure power-frequency electric and magnetic fields. Automated data-acquisition systems have come into use more recently to make electric- and magnetic-field recordings, covering periods of hours to days, in residences and other environments.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8206045

  4. Magnetic fields of the solar system: A comparative planetology toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholas, J. B.; Purucker, M. E.; Johnson, C. L.; Sabaka, T. J.; Olsen, N.; Sun, Z.; Al Asad, M.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Slavin, J. A.; Alexeev, I. I.; Belenkaya, E. S.; Phillips, R. J.; Solomon, S. C.; Lillis, R. J.; Langlais, B.; Winslow, R. M.; Russell, C. T.; Dougherty, M. K.; Zuber, M. T.

    2011-12-01

    Magnetic fields within the solar system provide a strong organizing force for processes active both within a planet or moon, and outside of it. In the interest of stimulating research and education in the field of comparative planetology, we present documented Fortran and MATLAB source codes and benchmarks to the latest models for planets and satellites that host internal magnetic fields. This presentation is made in the context of an interactive website: http://planetary-mag.net. Models are included for Earth (Comprehensive model CM4 of Sabaka et al., 2004, Geophysics J. Int.), Mercury (Anderson et al, 2011, Science), the Moon (Purucker and Nicholas, 2010, JGR), Mars (Lillis et al., 2010, JGR), and the outer planets Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune (Russell and Dougherty, 2010, Space Science Reviews). All models include magnetic fields of internal origin, and fields of external origin are included in the models for Mercury, the Earth, and the Moon. As models evolve, we intend to include magnetic fields of external origin for the other planets and moons. The website allows the user to select a coordinate system, such as planet-centered, heliocentric, or boundary normal, and the location within that coordinate system, and the vector magnetic field due to each of the component source fields at that location is then calculated and presented. Alternatively, the user can input a range as well as a grid spacing, and the vector magnetic field will be calculated for all points on that grid and be made available as a file for downloading.

  5. PROTOSTELLAR DISK FORMATION ENABLED BY WEAK, MISALIGNED MAGNETIC FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Krumholz, Mark R.; Crutcher, Richard M.; Hull, Charles L. H.

    2013-04-10

    The gas from which stars form is magnetized, and strong magnetic fields can efficiently transport angular momentum. Most theoretical models of this phenomenon find that it should prevent formation of large (>100 AU), rotationally supported disks around most protostars, even when non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects that allow the field and gas to decouple are taken into account. Using recent observations of magnetic field strengths and orientations in protostellar cores, we show that this conclusion is incorrect. The distribution of magnetic field strengths is very broad, and alignments between fields and angular momentum vectors within protostellar cores are essentially random. By combining the field strength and misalignment data with MHD simulations showing that disk formation is expected for both weak and misaligned fields, we show that these observations imply that we should expect disk fractions of {approx}10%-50% even when protostars are still deeply embedded in their parent cores, and even if the gas is governed by ideal MHD.

  6. Magnetic field of Jupiter: A generalized inverse approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.

    1981-01-01

    The estimation of planetary magnetic fields from observations of the magnetic field gathered along a spacecraft flyby trajectory is examined with the aid of generalized inverse techniques, with application to the internal magnetic field of Jupiter. Model nonuniqueness resulting from the limited spatial extent of the observations and noise on the data is explored and quantitative estimates of the model parameter resolution are found. The presence of a substantial magnetic field of external origin due to the currents flowing in the Jovian magnetodisc is found to be an important source of error in estimates of the internal Jovian field, and new models explicitly incorporating these currents are proposed. New internal field models are derived using the vector helium magnetometer observations and the high field fluxgate observations of Pioneer 11, and knowledge of the external current system gained from the Pioneer 10 and Voyagers 1 and 2 encounters.

  7. On a New 4-Vector Cosmological Field Theory

    E-print Network

    G. G. Nyambuya

    2009-05-05

    The original Dirac Equation is modified in the simplest imaginable and most trivial manner to include a universal 4-Vector Cosmological Field term in the space and time dimensions. This cosmological field leads to a modified Dirac Equation capable of explaining why the Universe appears to be made up chiefly of matter. It is seen that this 4-Vector Cosmological Field is actually a particle field and this particle field can possibly be identified with the darkmatter and darkenergy field. Further, this 4-Vector Cosmological Field is seen to give spacetime the desired quantum mechanical properties of randomness. Furthermore, it is seen that in the emergent Universe, the position coordinates of a particle in space -- contrary to the widely accepted belief that the position of a particle in space has no physical significance, we see that that opposite is true - namely that the position of a particle has physical significance. We further note that the 4-Vector Cosmological Field modification to the Dirac Equation leads us to a vacuum model redolent but different from that of Quantum Electrodynamics (QED). This new vacuum model is without virtual particles but darkparticles. We dare to make the suggestion that these darkparticles may possibly explain the current mystery of what really is darkmatter and darkenergy.

  8. Magnetic fields in quiescent prominences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Ballegooijen, A. A.; Martens, P. C. H.

    1990-01-01

    The origin of the axial fields in high-latitude quiescent prominences is considered. The fact that almost all quiescent prominences obey the same hemisphere-dependent rule strongly suggests that the solar differential rotation plays an important role in producing the axial fields. However, the observations are inconsistent with the hypothesis that the axial fields are produced by differential rotation acting on an existing coronal magnetic field. Several possible explanations for this discrepancy are considered. The possibility that the sign of the axial field depends on the topology of the magnetic field in which the prominence is embedded is examined, as is the possibility that the neutral line is tilted with respect to the east-west direction, so that differential rotation causes the neutral line also to rotate with time. The possibility that the axial fields of quiescent prominences have their origin below the solar surface is also considered.

  9. Evolution of field line helicity during magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, A. J. B. Hornig, G.; Wilmot-Smith, A. L.; Yeates, A. R.

    2015-03-15

    We investigate the evolution of field line helicity for magnetic fields that connect two boundaries without null points, with emphasis on localized finite-B magnetic reconnection. Total (relative) magnetic helicity is already recognized as an important topological constraint on magnetohydrodynamic processes. Field line helicity offers further advantages because it preserves all topological information and can distinguish between different magnetic fields with the same total helicity. Magnetic reconnection changes field connectivity and field line helicity reflects these changes; the goal of this paper is to characterize that evolution. We start by deriving the evolution equation for field line helicity and examining its terms, also obtaining a simplified form for cases where dynamics are localized within the domain. The main result, which we support using kinematic examples, is that during localized reconnection in a complex magnetic field, the evolution of field line helicity is dominated by a work-like term that is evaluated at the field line endpoints, namely, the scalar product of the generalized field line velocity and the vector potential. Furthermore, the flux integral of this term over certain areas is very small compared to the integral of the unsigned quantity, which indicates that changes of field line helicity happen in a well-organized pairwise manner. It follows that reconnection is very efficient at redistributing helicity in complex magnetic fields despite having little effect on the total helicity.

  10. The magnetic field of Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Acuna, Mario H.; Ness, Norman F.

    1987-01-01

    Aspherical harmonic model of the planetary magnetic field of Uranus is obtained from the Voyager 2 encounter observations using generalized inverse techniques which allow partial solutions to complex (underdetermined) problems. The Goddard Space Flight Center 'Q3' model is characterized by a large dipole tilt (58.6 deg) relative to the rotation axis, a dipole moment of 0.228 G R(Uranus radii cubed) and an unusually large quadrupole moment. Characteristics of this complex model magnetic field are illustrated using contour maps of the field on the planet's surface and discussed in the context of possible dynamo generation in the relatively poorly conducting 'ice' mantle.

  11. Exchange coupling in hybrid anisotropy magnetic multilayers quantified by vector magnetometry

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, C. Miles, J. J.; Thomson, T.; Anh Nguyen, T. N.; Fang, Y.; Dumas, R. K.; Åkerman, J.

    2015-05-07

    Hybrid anisotropy thin film heterostructures, where layers with perpendicular and in-plane anisotropy are separated by a thin spacer, are novel materials for zero/low field spin torque oscillators and bit patterned media. Here, we report on magnetization reversal and exchange coupling in a archetypal Co/Pd (perpendicular)-NiFe (in-plane) hybrid anisotropy system studied using vector vibrating sample magnetometry. This technique allows us to quantify the magnetization reversal in each individual magnetic layer, and measure of the interlayer exchange as a function of non-magnetic spacer thickness. At large (>1?nm) spacer thicknesses Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida-like exchange dominates, with orange-peel coupling providing a significant contribution only for sub-nm spacer thickness.

  12. Chromospheric magnetic fields of an active region filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Z.; Solanki, S.; Lagg, A.

    2012-06-01

    Vector magnetic fields of an active region filament are co-spatially and co-temporally mapped in photosphere and upper chromosphere, by using spectro-polarimetric observations made by Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter (TIP II) at the German Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT). A Zeeman-based ME inversion is performed on the full Stokes vectors of both the photospheric Si I 1082.7 nm and the chromospheric He I 1083.0 nm lines. We found that the strong magnetic fields, with the field strength of 600 - 800 G in the He I line formation height, are not uncommon among AR filaments. But such strong magnetic field is not always found in AR filaments.

  13. Magnetic Fields in Quantum Degenerate Systems and in Vacuum

    E-print Network

    H. Perez Rojas; E. Rodriguez Querts

    2006-12-28

    We consider self-magnetization of charged and neutral vector bosons bearing a magnetic moment in a gas and in vacuum. For charged vector bosons (W bosons) a divergence of the magnetization in both the medium and the electroweak vacuum occurs for the critical field B=B_{wc}=m_{w}^{2}/e. For B>B_{wc} the system is unstable. This behavior suggests the occurrence of a phase transition at B=B_{c}, where the field is self-consistently maintained. This mechanism actually prevents $B$ from reaching the critical value B_{c}. For virtual neutral vector bosons bearing an anomalous magnetic moment, the ground state has a similar behavior for B=B_{nbc}=m_{nb}^{2}/q . The magnetization in the medium is associated to a Bose-Einstein condensate and we conjecture a similar condensate occurs also in the case of vacuum. The model is applied to virtual electron-positron pairs bosonization in a magnetic field B \\sim B_{pc}\\lesssim 2m_{e}^{2}/e, where m_e is the electron mass. This would lead also to vacuum self-magnetization in QED, where in both cases the symmetry breaking is due to a condensate of quasi-massless particles.

  14. Magnetic field fluctuations during substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairfield, D. H.

    1971-01-01

    Before a magnetospheric substorm and during its early phases the magnetic field magnitude in the geomagnetic tail increases and field lines in the nighttime hemisphere assume a more tail-like configuration. Before the substorm onset a minimum amount of magnetic flux is observed to cross the neutral sheet which means that the neutral sheet currents attain their most earthward locations and their greatest current densities. This configuration apparently results from an increased transport of magnetic flux to the tail caused by a southward interplanetary magnetic field. The field begins relaxing toward a more dipolar configuration at the time of a substorm onset with the recovery probably occurring first between 6 and 10 R sub E. This recovery must be associated with magnetospheric convection which restores magnetic flux to the dayside hemisphere. Field aligned currents appear to be required to connect magnetospheric currents to the auroral electrojets, implying that a net current flows in a limited range of longitudes. Space measurements supporting current systems are limited. More evidence exists for the occurrence of double current sheets which do not involve net current at a given longitude.

  15. Orientation and Magnitude of Mars' Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This image shows the orientation and magnitude of the magnetic field measured by the MGS magnetometer as it sped over the surface of Mars during an early aerobraking pass (Day of the year, 264; 'P6' periapsis pass). At each point along the spacecraft trajectory we've drawn vectors in the direction of the magnetic field measured at that instant; the length of the line is scaled to show the relative magnitude of the field. Imagine traveling along with the MGS spacecraft, holding a string with a magnetized needle on one end: this essentially a compass with a needle that is free to spin in all directions. As you pass over the surface the needle would swing rapidly, first pointing towards the planet and then rotating quickly towards 'up' and back down again. All in a relatively short span of time, say a minute or two, during which time the spacecraft has traveled a couple of hundred miles. You've just passed over one of many 'magnetic anomalies' thus far detected near the surface of Mars. A second major anomaly appears a little later along the spacecraft track, about 1/4 the magnitude of the first - can you find it? The short scale length of the magnetic field signature locates the source near the surface of Mars, perhaps in the crust, a 10 to 75 kilometer thick outer shell of the planet (radius 3397 km).

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  16. Full-vector archeomagnetic and rock-magnetic results from Portuguese kilns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Paccard, Miriam; Tema, Evdokia; McIntosh, Gregg; Letaio, Manuela; Calado, Marco; Botelho, Paulo

    2014-05-01

    Despite the increase in archeomagnetic studies in the past few years, the number of reliable archeointensity data is still limited. At present Europe is the most widely covered region, although the variation in geomagnetic field intensity is not completely known for the last millennia and the occurrence and behaviour of various rapid geomagnetic field changes is under discussion. In this context, new high-reliable full-geomagnetic field vector determinations from unexplored regions are crucial in order to improve our knowledge of past geomagnetic field changes at regional scales. In Portugal, despite the rich cultural heritage and the abundance of archaeological excavations, archaeomagnetic research is still in its infancy. To our knowledge, up to now the only available directional data obtained from more or less well-dated materials come from the study of a Late Bronze Age vitrified wall close to the city of Serpa, southern Portugal, while only two more studies have been published including archaeointesity results from Portuguese pottery. We present here the first full-vector archeomagnetic results (declination, inclination and intensity) from two kilns excavated at two archaeological sites at Lisboa (Portugal). The first structure corresponds to the Largo das Alcaçarias Islamic pottery production workshop located in the eastern suburb Luxbona (current Alfama) and its abandonment has been dated as the 12th century AD. The second kiln was excavated in the Encosta Santana archeological medieval site and was abandoned during the 12th or 13th centuries AD according to archeological evidence. Detailed archaeomagnetic and rock magnetic studies have been carried out in order to determine the magnetic mineralogy and investigate the thermal stability of the phases carrying the archaeomagnetic signal. Both kilns exhibited thermally stability magnetic phases. The magnetic properties of the Largo kiln are dominated by a mixture of magnetite/cation-substituted magnetite and cation-substituted hematite. Those of the Encosta kiln are dominated by magnetite with limited cation substitution, with hysteresis ratios falling close to the single domain - multidomain unmixing curve of Dunlop. The new archeomagnetic and rock-magnetic data are based on the study of several samples per kiln and the archeointensity determinations were obtained using the Thellier classical method with regular partial thermoremanent magnetization (pTRM) checks and TRM anisotropy and cooling rate corrections. From the laboratory experiments, two new high quality mean intensities are now available for Portugal. The new data are the first full-vector results from Portuguese kilns. They significantly contribute to better understand the secular variation of the Earth's magnetic field in western Europe during the 12-13th centuries AD and can be used as reliable input data for geomagnetic field modelling.

  17. Indoor localization using magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathapati Subbu, Kalyan Sasidhar

    Indoor localization consists of locating oneself inside new buildings. GPS does not work indoors due to multipath reflection and signal blockage. WiFi based systems assume ubiquitous availability and infrastructure based systems require expensive installations, hence making indoor localization an open problem. This dissertation consists of solving the problem of indoor localization by thoroughly exploiting the indoor ambient magnetic fields comprising mainly of disturbances termed as anomalies in the Earth's magnetic field caused by pillars, doors and elevators in hallways which are ferromagnetic in nature. By observing uniqueness in magnetic signatures collected from different campus buildings, the work presents the identification of landmarks and guideposts from these signatures and further develops magnetic maps of buildings - all of which can be used to locate and navigate people indoors. To understand the reason behind these anomalies, first a comparison between the measured and model generated Earth's magnetic field is made, verifying the presence of a constant field without any disturbances. Then by modeling the magnetic field behavior of different pillars such as steel reinforced concrete, solid steel, and other structures like doors and elevators, the interaction of the Earth's field with the ferromagnetic fields is described thereby explaining the causes of the uniqueness in the signatures that comprise these disturbances. Next, by employing the dynamic time warping algorithm to account for time differences in signatures obtained from users walking at different speeds, an indoor localization application capable of classifying locations using the magnetic signatures is developed solely on the smart phone. The application required users to walk short distances of 3-6 m anywhere in hallway to be located with accuracies of 80-99%. The classification framework was further validated with over 90% accuracies using model generated magnetic signatures representing hallways with different kinds of pillars, doors and elevators. All in all, this dissertation contributes the following: 1) provides a framework for understanding the presence of ambient magnetic fields indoors and utilizing them to solve the indoor localization problem; 2) develops an application that is independent of the user and the smart phones and 3) requires no other infrastructure since it is deployed on a device that encapsulates the sensing, computing and inferring functionalities, thereby making it a novel contribution to the mobile and pervasive computing domain.

  18. The vector potential and stored energy of thin cosine (n{theta}) helical wiggler magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.

    1995-12-01

    Expressions for pure multipole field components that are present in helical devices have been derived from a current distribution on the surface of an infinitely thin cylinder of radius R. The strength of such magnetic fields varies purely as a Fourier sinusoidal series of the longitudinal coordinate Z in proportion to cos(n{theta}- {omega}{sub m}z), where {omega}{sub m} = (2m-1){pi}/L, L denotes the half-period and m = 1, 2, 3 etc. As an alternative to describing such field components as given by the negative gradient of a scalar potential function (Appendix A), one of course can derive these same fields as the curle of a vector potential function {rvec A}--specifically one for which {nabla} {times} {nabla} {times} {rvec A} = 0 and {nabla}{center_dot}{rvec A} = 0. It is noted that we seek a divergence-free vector that exhibits continuity in any of its components across the interface r = R, a feature that is free of possible concern when applying Stokes` theorem in connection with this form of vector potential. Alternative simpler forms of vector potential, that individually are divergence-free in their respective regions (r < R and r > R), do not exhibit full continuity on r = R and whose curl evaluations provide in these respective regions the correct components of magnetic field are not considered here. Such alternative forms must differ merely by the gradient of scalar functions that with the divergence-free property are required to be ``harmonic`` ({nabla}{sup 2}{Psi} = 0).

  19. On hyperbolicity violations in cosmological models with vector fields

    SciTech Connect

    Golovnev, Alexey; Klementev, Aleksandr E-mail: sas5292@yandex.ru

    2014-02-01

    Cosmological models with vector fields received much attention in recent years. Unfortunately, most of them are plagued with severe instabilities or other problems. In particular, it was noted in ref. [1] that the models with a non-linear function of the Maxwellian kinetic term do always imply violations of hyperbolicity somewhere in the phase space. In this work we make this statement more precise in several respects and show that those violations may not be present around spatially homogeneous configurations of the vector field.

  20. 2T/5T Two-Axis Cryogen Free Superconducting Vector Magnet With Variable Temperature Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demikhov, E. I.; Demikhov, T. E.; Kostrov, E. A.; Lysenko, V. V.; Piskunov, N. A.

    2014-05-01

    A conduction cooled 2T / 5T superconducting vector magnetic system with a variable temperature space was developed and tested. The system is based on a commercial two-stage 4 K Gifford-McMahon cryocooler with the cooling power of 1.5 W at 4.2 K. The cool down time of the magnet from room temperature to 3.2 K is 17 hours. The system provides sample temperature range of 6.0-300 K. The clear diameter of variable temperature space is 39 mm. A 5 T solenoid generates magnetic field in the vertical axis and a 2 T split coil generates field in the horizontal axis. The magnets are made of niobium-titanium wire wound on a copper former. A PC controlled rotary drive is applied to rotate a sample holder around the vertical axis. Thus the measured sample can be exposed to the magnetic field in any desired direction. A helium gas gap heat switch is used as a controllable thermal link between the variable temperature space and the 2nd stage to avoid overheating of the magnet at high temperatures of the sample. The system design, manufacturing and test results are presented.

  1. Magnetic field restructuring associated with two successive solar eruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Rui; Liu, Ying D.; Yang, Zhongwei; Hu, Huidong

    2014-08-20

    We examine two successive flare eruptions (X5.4 and X1.3) on 2012 March 7 in the NOAA active region 11429 and investigate the magnetic field reconfiguration associated with the two eruptions. Using an advanced non-linear force-free field extrapolation method based on the SDO/HMI vector magnetograms, we obtain a stepwise decrease in the magnetic free energy during the eruptions, which is roughly 20%-30% of the energy of the pre-flare phase. We also calculate the magnetic helicity and suggest that the changes of the sign of the helicity injection rate might be associated with the eruptions. Through the investigation of the magnetic field evolution, we find that the appearance of the 'implosion' phenomenon has a strong relationship with the occurrence of the first X-class flare. Meanwhile, the magnetic field changes of the successive eruptions with implosion and without implosion were well observed.

  2. A Method to Estimate Whistler Wave Vector from Polarization Using Three-Component Electric Field Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Abram R.; Holzworth, Robert H.; Pfaff, Robert; Heelis, Roderick; Colestock, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Satellites in the Earth's magnetosphere can be used to record the rich electromagnetic wave activity due to terrestrial lightning, typically up to several tens of kilohertz. With simultaneous recordings of the three components of wave electric field E and of the three components of wave magnetic field B, the entire wavefield, polarization, and wave vector can be specified without any appeal to a priori assumptions about the wave mode and without any reliance on the validity of a dispersion relation. However, some satellites lack such a complete suite of measurements. We develop a method which assumes the theoretical dispersion relation for whistler waves then uses recordings of the three components of wave electric field E but no magnetic components to derive the wave polarization and the wave vector (up to a sign ambiguity on the latter). The method can work only because the dispersion relation, which is assumed, already contains information from the full Maxwell's equations. We illustrate the method with 12-second-duration simultaneous recordings, at 32 kilosample/s (kS, 1000 samples of a digitized signal), of three orthogonal components of wave electric field E from the C/NOFS satellite in low-Earth orbit. Our particular example in this article is shown to contain two broadband whistler features in the range of 4-15 kilohertz, whose wave vectors differ both according to their polar angles from the geomagnetic field B (sub 0) and according to their azimuth around the geomagnetic field B (sub 0).

  3. Analysis of superconducting electromagnetic finite elements based on a magnetic vector potential variational principle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuler, James J.; Felippa, Carlos A.

    1991-01-01

    Electromagnetic finite elements are extended based on a variational principle that uses the electromagnetic four potential as primary variable. The variational principle is extended to include the ability to predict a nonlinear current distribution within a conductor. The extension of this theory is first done on a normal conductor and tested on two different problems. In both problems, the geometry remains the same, but the material properties are different. The geometry is that of a 1-D infinite wire. The first problem is merely a linear control case used to validate the new theory. The second problem is made up of linear conductors with varying conductivities. Both problems perform well and predict current densities that are accurate to within a few ten thousandths of a percent of the exact values. The fourth potential is then removed, leaving only the magnetic vector potential, and the variational principle is further extended to predict magnetic potentials, magnetic fields, the number of charge carriers, and the current densities within a superconductor. The new element produces good results for the mean magnetic field, the vector potential, and the number of superconducting charge carriers despite a relatively high system condition number. The element did not perform well in predicting the current density. Numerical problems inherent to this formulation are explored and possible remedies to produce better current predicting finite elements are presented.

  4. Magnetic field gradients from the ST-5 constellation: Improving magnetic and thermal models of the lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purucker, M.; Sabaka, T.; Le, G.; Slavin, J. A.; Strangeway, R. J.; Busby, C.

    2007-12-01

    We report the development of a new technique (magnetic gradiometry) for satellite-based remote sensing of the lithosphere. The measurements reported here represent the first systematic measurements of lithospheric magnetic field gradients, and were collected from a spinning spacecraft. The three-satellite ST-5 mission collected vector magnetic field observations at 300-800+ km altitudes over mid and high-northern latitudes in 2006. Away from the auroral oval, and over the continents, the gradients of the low altitude (<400 km) total anomaly field are dominated by lithospheric magnetic fields. Using a seismic starting model, and magnetic field observations from ST-5 and other recent satellite missions, we demonstrate how these techniques can be used to improve our knowledge of the processes involved in the thickened crust of the Colorado Plateau and the Sierra Madre Occidental.

  5. Magnetic space-based field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langel, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    Because the near Earth magnetic field is a complex combination of fields from outside the Earth of fields from its core and of fields from its crust, measurements from space prove to be the only practical way to obtain timely, global surveys. Due to difficulty in making accurate vector measurements, early satellites such as Sputnik and Vanguard measured only the magnitude survey. The attitude accuracy was 20 arc sec. Both the Earth's core fields and the fields arising from its crust were mapped from satellite data. The standard model of the core consists of a scalar potential represented by a spherical harmonics series. Models of the crustal field are relatively new. Mathematical representation is achieved in localized areas by arrays of dipoles appropriately located in the Earth's crust. Measurements of the Earth's field are used in navigation, to map charged particles in the magnetosphere, to study fluid properties in the Earth's core, to infer conductivity of the upper mantels, and to delineate regional scale geological features.

  6. Forecasting the magnetic vectors within a CME at L1 by using solar observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savani, N.; Vourlidas, A.; Szabo, A.; Mays, M. L.; Evans, R. M.; Thompson, B. J.; Richardson, I. G.; Pulkkinen, A. A.; Nieves-Chinchilla, T.

    2014-12-01

    The direction of magnetic vectors within coronal mass ejections has important consequences to forecasting terrestrial behaviour, however forecasting these vectors remains predominately elusive. Here, we report that a simplified system is capable of replicating the broad field rotations seen within flux rope CMEs at L1 monitors. The predictions are performed under three main themes: 1) The majority of the field rotations can be simplified to the constant-alpha force-free (CAFF) flux model first implemented circa 1990. 2) The helicity will follow the Bothmer & Schwenn system that relies on a reliable helicity prediction of active regions during solar cycle. Which has been recently confirmed by Wang [2013 ApJ]. 3) The majority of the distortions, deflections and rotations will have already occurred within coronagraphic field of view, thereby allowing the creation of a projected "volume-of-influence" on the Sun, from which Earth's position relative to the CME can be estimated. This presentation will compare predicted results to the observations from 7 CME events and then estimate the sources of uncertainty. As an example, the difference in robust statistics from 2 solar cycles of CAFF model fittings for the field magnitude will be compared to estimates generated from simulated CME-sheaths within forecasting Enlil runs. The figure displays an example field vector forecast from the techniques employed above.

  7. Inverse Magnetic Catalysis in the three-flavor NJL model with axial-vector interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lang; Van Doorsselaere, Jos; Huang, Mei

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we explore the chiral phase transition in QCD within the three-flavor Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model with a negative coupling constant in the isoscalar axial-vector channel, which is associated with a polarized instanton-anti-instanton molecule background. The QCD phase diagram described in this scenario shows a new first order phase transition around the transition temperature Tc toward a phase without chiral condensates, but with nontrivial dynamic chiral chemical potentials for the light quarks, spontaneously giving rise to local charge parity violation and local chirality imbalance. The corresponding critical temperature T5 c for this phase transition decreases with the magnetic field and it gives a natural explanation to the inverse magnetic catalysis effect for light quarks when incorporating a reasonable value of the coupling constant in the isoscalar axial-vector channel. Furthermore, when the isoscalar axial-vector interaction is dominant in the light quark sector and suppressed in the strange quark sector, it is found that there is no inverse magnetic catalysis for strange quark condensate, which agrees with lattice results.

  8. Magnetic Field Issues in Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petropoulos, Labros Spiridon

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance Imaging depend on the capability of the available hardware. Specifically, for the main magnet configuration, using derivative constraints, we can create a static magnetic field with reduced levels of inhomogeneity over a prescribed imaging volume. In the gradient coil, the entire design for the axial elliptical coil, and the mathematical foundation for the transverse elliptical coil have been presented. Also, the design of a self-shielded cylindrical gradient coil with a restricted length has been presented. In order to generate gradient coils adequate for head imaging without including the human shoulders in the design, asymmetric cylindrical coils in which the gradient center is shifted axially towards the end of a finite cylinder have been introduced and theoretical as well as experimental results have been presented. In order to eliminate eddy current effects in the design of the non-shielded asymmetric gradient coils, the self-shielded asymmetric cylindrical gradient coil geometry has been introduced. Continuing the development of novel geometries for the gradient coils, the complete set of self-shielded cylindrical gradient coils, which are designed such that the x component of the magnetic field varies linearly along the three traditional gradient axes, has been presented. In order to understand the behavior of the rf field inside a dielectric object, a mathematical model is briefly presented. Although specific methods can provide an indication of the rf behavior inside a loosely dielectric object, finite element methodology is the ultimate approach for modeling the human torso and generating an accurate picture for the shape of the rf field inside this dielectric object. For this purpose we have developed a 3D finite element model, using the Coulomb gauge condition as a constraint. Agreement with the heterogeneous multilayer planar model has been established, while agreement with theoretical results from the spherical model and experimental results from the cylindrical model at 170 M H z is very good and provides an encouraging sign for using this finite element approach for modeling the rf inside the human body. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  9. Photospheric and coronal magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Sheeley, N.R., Jr. )

    1991-01-01

    Research on small-scale and large-scale photospheric and coronal magnetic fields during 1987-1990 is reviewed, focusing on observational studies. Particular attention is given to the new techniques, which include the correlation tracking of granules, the use of highly Zeeman-sensitive infrared spectral lines and multiple lines to deduce small-scale field strength, the application of long integration times coupled with good seeing conditions to study weak fields, and the use of high-resolution CCD detectors together with computer image-processing techniques to obtain images with unsurpassed spatial resolution. Synoptic observations of large-scale fields during the sunspot cycle are also discussed. 101 refs.

  10. Invariants of differential equations defined by vector fields

    E-print Network

    J. C. Ndogmo

    2007-09-27

    We determine the most general group of equivalence transformations for a family of differential equations defined by an arbitrary vector field on a manifold. We also find all invariants and differential invariants for this group up to the second order. A result on the characterization of classes of these equations by the invariant functions is also given.

  11. The Multiresolution Gradient Vector Field Skeleton Wooi-Boon Goha,*

    E-print Network

    Goh, Wooi Boon

    The Multiresolution Gradient Vector Field Skeleton Wooi-Boon Goha,* and Kai-Yun Chanb a School@ntu.edu.sg Phone: 65-67904611 Fax: 65-67926559 Abstract Many algorithms suppress skeleton associated with boundary of structural and textural skeletons. The former is associated with the general shape structure and the latter

  12. Morse theory for vector fields and the Witten Laplacian

    SciTech Connect

    Enciso, Alberto; Peralta-Salas, Daniel

    2009-05-06

    In this paper we informally review some recent developments on the analytical approach to Morse-type inequalities for vector fields. Throughout this work we focus on the main ideas of this approach and emphasize the application of the theory to concrete examples.

  13. Morse theory for vector fields and the Witten Alberto Enciso

    E-print Network

    Enciso, Alberto

    Morse theory for vector fields and the Witten Laplacian Alberto Enciso and Daniel Peralta. In this paper we informally review some recent developments on the analytical approach to Morse, the topological properties of M? #12;2. WITTEN'S APPROACH TO MORSE THEORY Before we continue, let us introduce

  14. Magnetic fields around black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garofalo, David A. G.

    Active Galactic Nuclei are the most powerful long-lived objects in the universe. They are thought to harbor supermassive black holes that range from 1 million solar masses to 1000 times that value and possibly greater. Theory and observation are converging on a model for these objects that involves the conversion of gravitational potential energy of accreting gas to radiation as well as Poynting flux produced by the interaction of the rotating spacetime and the electromagnetic fields originating in the ionized accretion flow. The presence of black holes in astrophysics is taking center stage, with the output from AGN in various forms such as winds and jets influencing the formation and evolution of the host galaxy. This dissertation addresses some of the basic unanswered questions that plague our current understanding of how rotating black holes interact with their surrounding magnetized accretion disks to produce the enormous observed energy. Two magnetic configurations are examined. The first involves magnetic fields connecting the black hole with the inner accretion disk and the other involves large scale magnetic fields threading the disk and the hole. We study the effects of the former type by establishing the consequences that magnetic torques between the black hole and the inner accretion disk have on the energy dissipation profile. We attempt a plausible explanation to the observed "Deep Minimum" state in the Seyfert galaxy MCG-6- 30-15. For the latter type of magnetic geometry, we study the effects of the strength of the magnetic field threading the black hole within the context of the cherished Blandford & Znajek mechanism for black hole spin energy extraction. We begin by addressing the problem in the non-relativistic regime where we find that the black hole-threading magnetic field is stronger for greater disk thickness, larger magnetic Prandtl number, and for a larger accretion disk. We then study the problem in full relativity where we show that our Newtonian results are excellent approximations for slowly spinning black holes. We proceed to address the issue of the spin dependence of the Blandford & Znajek power. The result we choose to highlight is our finding that given the validity of our assumption for the dynamical behavior of the so-called plunge region in black hole accretors, rotating black holes produce maximum Poynting flux via the Blandford & Znajek process for a black hole spin parameter of about a [approximate] 0.8. This is contrary to the conventional claim that the maximum electromagnetic flux is achieved for highest black hole spin.

  15. Crystal field and magnetic properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flood, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    Magnetization and magnetic susceptibility measurements have been made in the temperature range 1.3 to 4.2 K on powdered samples of ErH3. The susceptibility exhibits Curie-Weiss behavior from 4.2 to 2 K, and intercepts the negative temperature axis at theta = 1.05 + or - 0.05 K, indicating that the material is antiferromagnetic. The low field effective moment is 6.77 + or - 0.27 Bohr magnetons per ion. The magnetization exhibits a temperature independent contribution, the slope of which is (5 + or - 1.2) x 10 to the -6th Weber m/kg Tesla. The saturation moment is 3.84 + or - 1 - 0.15 Bohr magnetons per ion. The results can be qualitatively explained by the effects of crystal fields on the magnetic ions. No definitive assignment of a crystal field ground state can be given, nor can a clear choice between cubically or hexagonally symmetric crystal fields be made. For hexagonal symmetry, the first excited state is estimated to be 86 to 100 K above the ground state. For cubic symmetry, the splitting is on the order of 160 to 180 K.

  16. Transverse Magnetic Field Propellant Isolator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.

    2000-01-01

    An alternative high voltage isolator for electric propulsion and ground-based ion source applications has been designed and tested. This design employs a transverse magnetic field that increases the breakdown voltage. The design can greatly enhance the operating range of laboratory isolators used for high voltage applications.

  17. Heliospheric Electric and Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, Adrian Sabin

    2007-09-01

    From the Maxwell equations in the local Minkowski spacetime chart (derived from the DEUS topology) we obtain the relations to be particularized for a solar type star and a massive star, and later to be used for a 3D representation of the electric and magnetic field topology (in heliosphere or in a stellar atmosphere) and of its evolution with the cosmological time.

  18. Separation of magnetic field lines

    SciTech Connect

    Boozer, Allen H.

    2012-11-15

    The field lines of magnetic fields that depend on three spatial coordinates are shown to have a fundamentally different behavior from those that depend on two coordinates. Unlike two-coordinate cases, a flux tube in a magnetic field that depends on all three spatial coordinates that has a circular cross section at one location along the tube characteristically has a highly distorted cross section at other locations. In an ideal evolution of a magnetic field, the current densities typically increase. Crudely stated, if the current densities increase by a factor {sigma}, the ratio of the long to the short distance across a cross section of a flux tube characteristically increases by e{sup 2{sigma}}, and the ratio of the longer distance to the initial radius increases as e{sup {sigma}}. Electron inertia prevents a plasma from isolating two magnetic field structures on a distance scale shorter than c/{omega}{sub pe}, which is about 10 cm in the solar corona, and reconnection must be triggered if {sigma} becomes sufficiently large. The radius of the sun, R{sub Circled-Dot-Operator }=7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10}cm is about e{sup 23} times larger, so when {sigma} Greater-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 23, two lines separated by c/{omega}{sub pe} at one location can be separated by the full scale of any magnetic structures in the corona at another. The conditions for achieving a large exponentiation, {sigma}, are derived, and the importance of exponentiation is discussed.

  19. Magnetic fields in the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullan, D. J.

    1974-01-01

    The observed properties of solar magnetic fields are reviewed, with particular reference to the complexities imposed on the field by motions of the highly conducting gas. Turbulent interactions between gas and field lead to heating or cooling of the gas according to whether the field energy density is less or greater than the maximum kinetic energy density in the convection zone. The field strength above which cooling sets in is 700 gauss. A weak solar dipole field may be primeval, but dynamo action is also important in generating new flux. The dynamo is probably not confined to the convection zone, but extends throughout most of the volume of the sun. Planetary tides appear to play a role in driving the dynamo.

  20. Ghost instabilities of cosmological models with vector fields nonminimally coupled to the curvature

    SciTech Connect

    Himmetoglu, Burak; Peloso, Marco; Contaldi, Carlo R.

    2009-12-15

    We prove that many cosmological models characterized by vectors nonminimally coupled to the curvature (such as the Turner-Widrow mechanism for the production of magnetic fields during inflation, and models of vector inflation or vector curvaton) contain ghosts. The ghosts are associated with the longitudinal vector polarization present in these models and are found from studying the sign of the eigenvalues of the kinetic matrix for the physical perturbations. Ghosts introduce two main problems: (1) they make the theories ill defined at the quantum level in the high energy/subhorizon regime (and create serious problems for finding a well-behaved UV completion), and (2) they create an instability already at the linearized level. This happens because the eigenvalue corresponding to the ghost crosses zero during the cosmological evolution. At this point the linearized equations for the perturbations become singular (we show that this happens for all the models mentioned above). We explicitly solve the equations in the simplest cases of a vector without a vacuum expectation value in a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker geometry, and of a vector with a vacuum expectation value plus a cosmological constant, and we show that indeed the solutions of the linearized equations diverge when these equations become singular.

  1. The magnetic field of Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acuna, M. H.; Ness, N. F.

    1976-01-01

    The paper is concerned mainly with the intrinsic planetary field which dominates the inner magnetosphere up to a distance of 10 to 12 Jovian radii where other phenomena, such as ring currents and diamagnetic effects of trapped charged particles, become significant. The main magnetic field of Jupiter as determined by in-situ observations by Pioner 10 and 11 is found to be relatively more complex than a simple offset tilted dipole. Deviations from a simple dipole geometry lead to distortions of the charged particle L shells and warping of the magnetic equator. Enhanced absorption effects associated with Io and Amalthea are predicted. The results are consistent with the conclusions derived from extensive radio observations at decimetric and decametric wavelengths for the planetary field.

  2. Oxide superconductors under magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitazawa, K.

    1991-01-01

    One of the current most serious problems for the oxide superconductors from the standpoint of practical application is the various novel features derived mainly from their extremely short coherence. In particular, the coherence length so far observed in the cuprate superconductors is in the range of 0.1 nm perpendicular to the CuO2 plane. This seems to be creating most of the difficulties in the device fabrication and in the performance under the magnetic field. Some of the superconducting properties under the magnetic field will be discussed in terms of the short coherence length. A model will be presented based on the gradual strengthening of the pinning force with decrease in temperature and the weak coupling at the grain boundaries. Secondly, the broadening of the superconducting transition under the magnetic field is discussed. This is observed significantly only when the field is applied perpendicular to the basal plane and the relative orientation of the current to the field is insignificant in determining the extent of broadening. Besides, the change in the strength of the pinning force does not affect the width of the broadening. From these observations discussions will be made on a model based on the giant fluctuation. Based on this model, it is predicted that the coherence length along the c-axis will be the single most important material parameter to determine the performance of the superconductor under a strong magnetic field. It seems that BYCO is superior in this regard to Bi- or Tl-systems as far as the performance at 77 K is considered, although another material with the coherence length slightly longer along the c-axis is still highly desired.

  3. Oxide superconductors under magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitazawa, K.

    1990-01-01

    One of the current most serious problems for the oxide superconductors from the standpoint of practical application is the various novel features derived mainly from their extremely short coherence. In particular, the coherence length so far observed in the cuprate superconductors is in the range of 0.1 nm perpendicular to the CuO2 plane. This seems to be creating most of the difficulties in the device fabrication and in the performance under the magnetic field. Some of the superconducting properties under the magnetic field will be discussed in terms of the short coherence length. A model will be presented based on the gradual strengthening of the pinning force with decrease in temperature and the weak coupling at the grain boundaries. Secondly, the broadening of the superconducting transition under the magnetic field is discussed. This is observed significantly only when the field is applied perpendicular to the basal plane and the relative orientation of the current to the field is insignificant in determining the extent of the broadening. Besides, the change in the strength of the pinning force does not affect the width of the broadening. From these observations discussions will be made on a model based on the giant fluctuation. Based on this model, it is predicted that the coherence length along the c-axis will be the single most important material parameter to determine the performance of the superconductor under a strong magnetic field. It seems that BYCO is superior in this regard to Bi- or Tl-systems as far as the performance at 77 K is considered, although another material with the coherence length slightly longer along the c-axis is still highly desired.

  4. Interplanetary Magnetic Field Power Spectrum Variations: A VHO Enabled Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szabo, A.; Koval, A.; Merka, J.; Narock, T.

    2011-01-01

    The newly reprocessed high time resolution (11/22 vectors/sec) Wind mission interplanetary magnetic field data and the solar wind key parameter search capability of the Virtual Heliospheric Observatory (VHO) affords an opportunity to study magnetic field power spectral density variations as a function of solar wind conditions. In the reprocessed Wind Magnetic Field Investigation (MFI) data, the spin tone and its harmonics are greatly reduced that allows the meaningful fitting of power spectra to the 2 Hz limit above which digitization noise becomes apparent. The power spectral density is computed and the spectral index is fitted for the MHD and ion inertial regime separately along with the break point between the two for various solar wind conditions. The time periods of fixed solar wind conditions are obtained from VHO searches that greatly simplify the process. The functional dependence of the ion inertial spectral index and break point on solar wind plasma and magnetic field conditions will be discussed

  5. Interplanetary Magnetic Field Power Spectrum Variations: A VHO Enabled Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szabo, A.; Koval, A.; Merka, J.; Narock, T.

    2010-01-01

    The newly reprocessed high time resolution (11/22 vectors/sec) Wind mission interplanetary magnetic field data and the solar wind key parameter search capability of the Virtual Heliospheric Observatory (VHO) affords an opportunity to study magnetic field power spectral density variations as a function of solar wind conditions. In the reprocessed Wind Magnetic Field Investigation (MFI) data, the spin tone and its harmonics are greatly reduced that allows the meaningful fitting of power spectra to the approx.2 Hz limit above which digitization noise becomes apparent. The power spectral density is computed and the spectral index is fitted for the MHD and ion inertial regime separately along with the break point between the two for various solar wind conditions . The time periods of fixed solar wind conditions are obtained from VHO searches that greatly simplify the process. The functional dependence of the ion inertial spectral index and break point on solar wind plasma and magnetic field conditions will be discussed

  6. Multi-Instrumental Vector Magnetic Observations and Techniques for Investigating Auroral Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redmon, Robert; Knipp, Delores; Kilcommons, Liam; Richmond, Art; Matsuo, Tomoko; Anderson, Brian; Korth, Haje; Slavin, James; Le, Guan; Wilson, Gordon; Rich, Fred; Denig, William

    2014-05-01

    Space based magnetometers in highly inclined low earth orbits are essential for characterizing the state of the auroral space environment and the dynamic processes within. This paper demonstrates the utility of data derived from multiple satellites including AMPERE (70 Iridium spacecraft), DMSP (4 spacecraft) and ST5 (3 spacecraft), and the AMIENext technique to investigate periods of interest in 2006 and 2010. A new satellite conjunction-finding technique magnetically maps in situ observations to a common altitude in the APEX coordinate system to assess the spatial and temporal stability and quality of vector magnetic measurements (Knipp et al., 2014). In March of 2006, the ST5 constellation was launched into a pearls-on-a-string configuration. Subsequent data processing produced superb, quality controlled magnetic observations from the 90-day mission (e.g. Slavin et al., 2008, Le et al., 2009; Wang et al., 2009). We present conjunction comparisons between the ST5 and DMSP spacecraft during the ST5 mission lifetime, which was dominated by a series of high-speed solar wind events. In May of 2010, a unipolar Magnetic Cloud passed Earth, providing an opportunity to investigate the magnetopshere-ionosphere coupling response to a slow moving transient followed by higher speed flow. This event included significant, long-lived disturbances in the asymmetric ring current and auroral electrojet (AE) index. Assimilation of space-based magnetic observations via the AMIENext procedure, reveal twisting in the dayside patterns, consistent with the sign changes in IMF By and a highly structured topology as IMF Bz turned northward. We present a detailed comparison between the magnetic observations from DMSP and AMPERE. To aid in investigating the local magnetic field and in providing data to assimilative models, we have also created new datasets in self-describing NASA CDF formats for the DMSP and ST5 vector magnetometers and for the DMSP precipitating ion and electron instruments and we will discuss their availability.

  7. Surface vector mapping of magnetic anomalies over the Moon using Kaguya and Lunar Prospector observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunakawa, Hideo; Takahashi, Futoshi; Shimizu, Hisayoshi; Shibuya, Hidetoshi; Matsushima, Masaki

    2015-06-01

    We have provided preliminary global maps of three components of the lunar magnetic anomaly on the surface applying the surface vector mapping (SVM) method. The data used in the present study consist of about 5 million observations of the lunar magnetic field at 10-45 km altitudes by Kaguya and Lunar Prospector. The lunar magnetic anomalies were mapped at 0.2° equi-distance points on the surface by the SVM method, showing the highest intensity of 718 nT in the Crisium antipodal region. Overall features on the SVM maps indicate that elongating magnetic anomalies are likely to be dominant on the Moon except for the young large basins with the impact demagnetization. Remarkable demagnetization features suggested by previous studies are also recognized at Hertzsprung and Kolorev craters on the farside. These features indicate that demagnetized areas extend to about 1-2 radii of the basins/craters. There are well-isolated central magnetic anomalies at four craters: Leibnitz, Aitken, Jules Verne, and Grimaldi craters. Their magnetic poles through the dipole source approximation suggest occurrence of the polar wander prior to 3.3-3.5 Ga. When compared with high-albedo markings at several magnetic anomalies such as the Reiner Gamma anomalies, three-dimensional structures of the magnetic field on/near the surface are well correlated with high-albedo areas. These results indicate that the global SVM maps are useful for the study of the lunar magnetic anomalies in comparison with various geological and geophysical data.

  8. Bacterial Growth in Weak Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masood, Samina

    2015-03-01

    We study the growth of bacteria in a weak magnetic field. Computational analysis of experimental data shows that the growth rate of bacteria is affected by the magnetic field. The effect of magnetic field depends on the strength and type of magnetic field. It also depends on the type of bacteria. We mainly study gram positive and gram negative bacteria of rod type as well as spherical bacteria. Preliminary results show that the weak magnetic field enhances the growth of rod shape gram negative bacteria. Gram positive bacteria can be even killed in the inhomogeneous magnetic field.

  9. An Improved Nuclear Vector Replacement Algorithm for Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Assignment

    E-print Network

    , amide proton; NOE, nuclear Overhauser effect; NOESY nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy; dNN, nuclearAn Improved Nuclear Vector Replacement Algorithm for Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Assignment to the Nuclear Vector Replacement (NVR) algorithm [24] for high-throughput Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR

  10. Helical cosmological magnetic fields from extra-dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atmjeet, Kumar; Seshadri, T. R.; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2015-05-01

    We study the inflationary generation of helical cosmological magnetic fields in a higher-dimensional generalization of the electromagnetic theory. For this purpose, we also include a parity breaking piece to the electromagnetic action. The evolution of an extra-dimensional scale factor allows the breaking of conformal invariance of the effective electromagnetic action in 1 +3 dimensions required for such generation. Analytical solutions for the vector potential can be obtained in terms of Coulomb wave-functions for some special cases. We also present numerical solutions for the vector potential evolution in more general cases. In the presence of a higher-dimensional cosmological constant there exist solutions for the scale factors in which both normal and extra dimensional space either inflate or deflate simultaneously with the same rate. In such a scenario, with the number of extra dimensions D =4 , a scale invariant spectrum of helical magnetic field is obtained. The net helicity arises, as one helical mode comes to dominate over the other at the superhorizon scales. A magnetic field strength of the order of 10-9 G can be obtained for the inflationary scale H ?1 0-3 Mpl . Weaker fields will be generated for lower scales of inflation. Magnetic fields generated in this model respects the bounds on magnetic fields by Planck and ? -ray observations (i.e., 10-16 G

  11. FIRST SIMULTANEOUS DETECTION OF MOVING MAGNETIC FEATURES IN PHOTOSPHERIC INTENSITY AND MAGNETIC FIELD DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Eun-Kyung; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl; Goode, Philip

    2012-07-01

    The formation and the temporal evolution of a bipolar moving magnetic feature (MMF) was studied with high-spatial and temporal resolution. The photometric properties were observed with the New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory using a broadband TiO filter (705.7 nm), while the magnetic field was analyzed using the spectropolarimetric data obtained by Hinode. For the first time, we observed a bipolar MMF simultaneously in intensity images and magnetic field data, and studied the details of its structure. The vector magnetic field and the Doppler velocity of the MMF were also studied. A bipolar MMF with its positive polarity closer to the negative penumbra formed, accompanied by a bright, filamentary structure in the TiO data connecting the MMF and a dark penumbral filament. A fast downflow ({<=}2 km s{sup -1}) was detected at the positive polarity. The vector magnetic field obtained from the full Stokes inversion revealed that a bipolar MMF has a U-shaped magnetic field configuration. Our observations provide a clear intensity counterpart of the observed MMF in the photosphere, and strong evidence of the connection between the MMF and the penumbral filament as a serpentine field.

  12. Superposition of DC magnetic fields by cascading multiple magnets in magnetic loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Fei; He, Sailing

    2015-09-01

    A novel method that can effectively collect the DC magnetic field produced by multiple separated magnets is proposed. With the proposed idea of a magnetic loop, the DC magnetic field produced by these separated magnets can be effectively superimposed together. The separated magnets can be cascaded in series or in parallel. A novel nested magnetic loop is also proposed to achieve a higher DC magnetic field in the common air region without increasing the DC magnetic field in each magnetic loop. The magnetic loop can be made by a magnetic hose, which is designed by transformation optics and can be realized by the combination of super-conductors and ferromagnetic materials.

  13. Magnetic holes in the solar wind. [(interplanetary magnetic fields)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, J. M.; Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.; Lemaire, J. F.

    1976-01-01

    An analysis is presented of high resolution interplanetary magnetic field measurements from the magnetometer on Explorer 43 which showed that low magnetic field intensities in the solar wind at 1 AU occur as distinct depressions or 'holes'. These magnetic holes are new kinetic-scale phenomena, having a characteristic dimension on the order of 20,000 km. They occurred at a rate of 1.5/day in the 18-day time span (March 18 to April 6, 1971) that was analyzed. Most of the magnetic holes are characterized by both a depression in the absolute value of the magnetic field, and a change in the magnetic field direction; some of these are possibly the result of magnetic merging. However, in other cases the magnetic field direction does not change; such holes are not due to magnetic merging, but might be a diamagnetic effect due to localized plasma inhomogeneities.

  14. Explaining Mercury's peculiar magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicht, Johannes; Cao, Hao; Heyner, Daniel; Dietrich, Wieland; Christensen, Ulrich R.

    2014-05-01

    MESSENGER magnetometer data revealed that Mercury's magnetic field is not only particularly weak but also has a peculiar geometry. The MESSENGER team finds that the location of the magnetic equator always lies significantly north of the geographic equator, is largely independent of the distance to the planet, and also varies only weakly with longitude. The field is best described by an axial dipole that is offset to the north by about 20% of the planetary radius. In terms of classical Gauss coefficients, this translates into a low axial dipole component of g10= -190 nT but a relatively large axial quadrupole contribution that amounts to roughly 40% of this value. The axial octupole is also sizable while higher harmonic contributions are much weaker. Very remarkable is also the fact that the equatorial dipole contribution is very small, consistent with a dipole tilt below 0.8 degree, and this is also true for the other non-axisymmetic field contributions. We analyze several numerical dynamos concerning their capability of explaining Mercury's magnetic field. Classical schemes geared to model the geomagnetic field typically show a much weaker quadrupole component and thus a smaller offset. The onset only becomes larger when the dynamo operates in the multipolar regime at higher Rayleigh numbers. However, since the more complex dynamics generally promotes all higher multipole contributions the location of the magnetic equator varies strongly with longitude and distance to the planet. The situation improves when introducing a stably stratified outer layer in the dynamo region, representing either a rigid FeS layer or a sub-adiabatic core-mantle boundary heat flux. This layer filters out the higher harmonic contributions and the field not only becomes sufficiently weak but also assumes a Mercury like offset geometry during a few percent of the simulation time. To increase the likelihood for the offset configuration, the north-south symmetry must be permanently broken and we explore two scenarios. Increasing the heat flux through the northern hemisphere of the core-mantle boundary is an obvious choice but is not supported by current models for Mercury's mantle. We find that a combination of internal rather than bottom driving and an increased heat flux through the equatorial region of the core-mantle boundary also promotes the required symmetry breaking and results in very Mercury like fields. The reason is that the imposed heat flux pattern, though being equatorially symmetric, lowers the critical Rayleigh number for the onset of equatorially anti-symmetric convection modes. In both scenarios, a stably stratified layer or a feedback coupling to the magnetospheric field is required for lowering the field strength to Mercury-like values.

  15. MAGNETIC FIELD CONFINEMENT IN THE SOLAR CORONA. I. FORCE-FREE MAGNETIC FIELDS B. Fornberg,2

    E-print Network

    Fornberg, Bengt

    MAGNETIC FIELD CONFINEMENT IN THE SOLAR CORONA. I. FORCE-FREE MAGNETIC FIELDS N. Flyer,1 B Axisymmetric force-free magnetic fields external to a unit sphere are studied as solutions to boundary value to the formation of an azimuthal rope of twisted magnetic field embedded within the global field, and to the energy

  16. Limits on the possible intrinsic magnetic field of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Elphic, R. C.; Slavin, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    Magnetic field measurements obtained by the Pioneer Venus orbiter at low altitudes in the solar wind wake region are examined for possible surface-correlated features and any possible intrinsic magnetic moment. The field variations observed in the wake do not resemble those expected for a solar wind interaction with even a weak intrinsic magnetic field. Little orbit-to-orbit persistence of features is found in the magnetic records. The magnetic field measurements in the wake are averaged in 10 deg x 10 deg bins to minimize the effects of external field sources. In these 37 bins, the average fields appear to be randomly oriented and consistent with zero mean in the region mapped. Using these 37 averaged vector fields, a maximum intrinsic magnetic dipole moment is obtained of 4.3 + or - 2.0 x 10 to the 21st G cu cm, approximately an order of magnitude less than previous estimates. It is noted that a more conservative estimate of the probable error of the mean is 5.5 x 10 to the 21st G cu cm. The Pioneer Venus measurements are thus consistent with zero planetary moment. The present measurements are found to be far below estimates made on the basis of angular momentum, the so-called magnetic Bode's law, and far below the dynamo scaling law of Busse.

  17. Field errors in superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, M.Q.

    1982-01-01

    The mission of this workshop is a discussion of the techniques for tracking particles through arbitrary accelerator field configurations to look for dynamical effects that are suggested by various theoretical models but are not amenable to detailed analysis. A major motivation for this type of study is that many of our accelerator projects are based on the use of superconducting magnets which have field imperfections that are larger and of a more complex nature than those of conventional magnets. Questions such as resonances, uncorrectable closed orbit effects, coupling between planes, and diffusion mechanisms all assume new importance. Since, simultaneously, we are trying to do sophisticated beam manipulations such as stacking, high current accelerator, long life storage, and low loss extraction, we clearly need efficient and accurate tracking programs to proceed with confidence.

  18. Anisotropic Magnetism in Field-Structured Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Robert A.; Martin, James E.; Odinek, Judy; Venturini, Eugene

    1999-06-24

    Magnetic field-structured-composites (FSCs) are made by structuring magnetic particle suspensions in uniaxial or biaxial (e.g. rotating) magnetic fields, while polymerizing the suspending resin. A uniaxial field produces chain-like particle structures, and a biaxial field produces sheet-like particle structures. In either case, these anisotropic structures affect the measured magnetic hysteresis loops, with the magnetic remanence and susceptibility increased significantly along the axis of the structuring field, and decreased slightly orthogonal to the structuring field, relative to the unstructured particle composite. The coercivity is essentially unaffected by structuring. We present data for FSCs of magnetically soft particles, and demonstrate that the altered magnetism can be accounted for by considering the large local fields that occur in FSCs. FSCS of magnetically hard particles show unexpectedly large anisotropies in the remanence, and this is due to the local field effects in combination with the large crystalline anisotropy of this material.

  19. Field quality aspects of CBA superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, S.; Engelmann, R.; Fernow, R.; Greene, A.F.; Herrera, J.; Kirk, H.; Skaritka, J.; Wanderer, P.; Willen, E.

    1983-01-01

    A series of superconducting dipole magnets for the BNL Colliding Beam Accelerator which were manufactured to have the proper field quality characteristics has been tested. This report presents the analysis of the field harmonics of these magnets.

  20. New techniques in 3D scalar and vector field visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N.; Crawfis, R.; Becker, B.

    1993-05-05

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) we have recently developed several techniques for volume visualization of scalar and vector fields, all of which use back-to-front compositing. The first renders volume density clouds by compositing polyhedral volume cells or their faces. The second is a ``splatting`` scheme which composites textures used to reconstruct the scalar or vector fields. One version calculates the necessary texture values in software, and another takes advantage of hardware texture mapping. The next technique renders contour surface polygons using semi-transparent textures, which adjust appropriately when the surfaces deform in a flow, or change topology. The final one renders the ``flow volume`` of smoke or dye tracer swept out by a fluid flowing through a small generating polygon. All of these techniques are applied to a climate model data set, to visualize cloud density and wind velocity.

  1. Vector field models of modified gravity and the dark sector

    SciTech Connect

    Zuntz, J.; Ferreira, P. G.; Zlosnik, T. G; Bourliot, F.; Starkman, G. D.

    2010-05-15

    We present a comprehensive investigation of cosmological constraints on the class of vector field formulations of modified gravity called generalized Einstein-aether models. Using linear perturbation theory we generate cosmic microwave background and large-scale structure spectra for general parameters of the theory, and then constrain them in various ways. We investigate two parameter regimes: a dark matter candidate where the vector field sources structure formation, and a dark energy candidate where it causes late-time acceleration. We find that the dark matter candidate does not fit the data, and identify five physical problems that can restrict this and other theories of dark matter. The dark energy candidate does fit the data, and we constrain its fundamental parameters; most notably we find that the theory's kinetic index parameter n{sub ae} can differ significantly from its {Lambda}CDM value.

  2. Neutral $?$ and $A$ mesons in magnetic field in SU(2) lattice gauge theory

    E-print Network

    E. V. Luschevskaya; O. V. Larina

    2013-08-09

    Correlators of vector, axial and pseudoscalar currents have been calculated in external strong magnetic field in SU(2) gluodynamics on the lattice. Neutral $\\rho$ and $A$ meson masses with a zero spin projection to the axis parallel to the external magnetic field $B$ are calculated. The mass of the neutral $\\rho$ meson with zero spin decreases with increasing of the magnetic field for available values of the magnetic field $eB\\lesssim 2-2.5\\, \\Gev^2$, such behavior is necessary for a condensation of $\\rho$ mesons in a strong magnetic field.

  3. Development of Techniques for Visualization of Scalar and Vector Fields in the Immersive Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bidasaria, Hari B.; Wilson, John W.; Nealy, John E.

    2005-01-01

    Visualization of scalar and vector fields in the immersive environment (CAVE - Cave Automated Virtual Environment) is important for its application to radiation shielding research at NASA Langley Research Center. A complete methodology and the underlying software for this purpose have been developed. The developed software has been put to use for the visualization of the earth s magnetic field, and in particular for the study of the South Atlantic Anomaly. The methodology has also been put to use for the visualization of geomagnetically trapped protons and electrons within Earth's magnetosphere.

  4. Electric field vector measurements in a surface ionization wave discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, Benjamin M.; Böhm, Patrick S.; Czarnetzki, Uwe; Adamovich, Igor V.; Lempert, Walter R.

    2015-10-01

    This work presents the results of time-resolved electric field vector measurements in a short pulse duration (60 ns full width at half maximum), surface ionization wave discharge in hydrogen using a picosecond four-wave mixing technique. Electric field vector components are measured separately, using pump and Stokes beams linearly polarized in the horizontal and vertical planes, and a polarizer placed in front of the infrared detector. The time-resolved electric field vector is measured at three different locations across the discharge gap, and for three different heights above the alumina ceramic dielectric surface, ~100, 600, and 1100 ?m (total of nine different locations). The results show that after breakdown, the discharge develops as an ionization wave propagating along the dielectric surface at an average speed of 1?mm ns-1. The surface ionization wave forms near the high voltage electrode, close to the dielectric surface (~100 ?m). The wave front is characterized by significant overshoot of both vertical and horizontal electric field vector components. Behind the wave front, the vertical field component is rapidly reduced. As the wave propagates along the dielectric surface, it also extends further away from the dielectric surface, up to ~1?mm near the grounded electrode. The horizontal field component behind the wave front remains quite significant, to sustain the electron current toward the high voltage electrode. After the wave reaches the grounded electrode, the horizontal field component experiences a secondary rise in the quasi-dc discharge, where it sustains the current along the near-surface plasma sheet. The measurement results indicate presence of a cathode layer formed near the grounded electrode with significant cathode voltage fall, ?3?kV, due to high current density in the discharge. The peak reduced electric field in the surface ionization wave is 85-95 Td, consistent with dc breakdown field estimated from the Paschen curve for hydrogen. The present set of data on electric field distribution in a surface ionization wave discharge provides an experimental reference for validation of kinetic models and assessing their predictive capability.

  5. Minireview: Biological effects of magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, M.; Mustarelli, P. ); Caprotti, M. )

    1991-01-01

    The literature about the biological effects of magnetic fields is reviewed. The authors begin by discussing the weak and/or time variable fields, responsible for subtle changes in the circadian rhythms of superior animals, which are believed to be induced by same sort of resonant mechanism. The safety issues related with the strong magnetic fields and gradients generated by clinical NMR magnets are then considered. The last portion summarizes the debate about the biological effects of strong and uniform magnetic fields.

  6. Rotating copper plasmoid in external magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Pramod K.; Thareja, Raj K.

    2013-02-15

    Effect of nonuniform magnetic field on the expanding copper plasmoid in helium and argon gases using optical emission spectroscopy and fast imaging is presented. We report a peculiar oscillatory rotation of plasmoid in magnetic field and argon ambient. The temporal variation and appearance of the dip in the electron temperature show a direct evidence of the threading and expulsion of the magnetic field lines from the plasmoid. Rayleigh Taylor instability produced at the interface separating magnetic field and plasma is discussed.

  7. Relic vector field and CMB large scale anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xingang; Wang, Yi E-mail: yw366@cam.ac.uk

    2014-10-01

    We study the most general effects of relic vector fields on the inflationary background and density perturbations. Such effects are observable if the number of inflationary e-folds is close to the minimum requirement to solve the horizon problem. We show that this can potentially explain two CMB large scale anomalies: the quadrupole-octopole alignment and the quadrupole power suppression. We discuss its effect on the parity anomaly. We also provide analytical template for more detailed data comparison.

  8. Deconfined SU(2) vector fields at zero temperature

    E-print Network

    Bernd A. Berg

    2010-06-22

    Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations of pure SU(2)xU(1) lattice gauge theory show a (zero temperature) deconfining phase transition in the SU(2) gluon sector when a term is added to the SU(2) and U(1) Wilson actions, which requires joint U(2) gauge transformations of the SU(2) and U(1) vector fields. Investigations of this deconfined phase are of interest as it could provide an alternative to the Higgs mechanism.

  9. Forced MHD turbulence in a uniform external magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hossain, M.; Vahala, G.; Montgomery, D.

    1985-01-01

    Two-dimensional dissipative MHD turbulence is randomly driven at small spatial scales and is studied by numerical simulation in the presence of a strong uniform external magnetic field. A behavior is observed which is apparently distinct from the inverse cascade which prevails in the absence of an external magnetic field. The magnetic spectrum becomes dominated by the three longest wavelength Alfven waves in the system allowed by the boundary conditions: those which, in a box size of edge 2 pi, have wave numbers (kx' ky) = (1, 1), and (1, -1), where the external magnetic field is in the x direction. At any given instant, one of these three modes dominates the vector potential spectrum, but they do not constitute a resonantly coupled triad. Rather, they are apparently coupled by the smaller-scale turbulence.

  10. Interaction Forces Between Multiple Bodies in a Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joffe, Benjamin

    1996-01-01

    Some of the results from experiments to determine the interaction forces between multiple bodies in a magnetic field are presented in this paper. It is shown how the force values and the force directions depend on the configuration of the bodies, their relative positions to each other, and the vector of the primary magnetic field. A number of efficient new automatic loading and assembly machines, as well as manipulators and robots, have been created based on the relationship between bodies and magnetic fields. A few of these patented magnetic devices are presented. The concepts involved open a new way to design universal grippers for robot and other kinds of mechanisms for the manipulation of objects. Some of these concepts can be used for space applications.

  11. Quark deconfinement and gluon condensate in a weak magnetic field

    E-print Network

    Ayala, Alejandro; Hernandez, L A; Loewe, M; Rojas, Juan Cristobal; Villavicencio, Cristian

    2015-01-01

    We study QCD finite energy sum rules (FESR) for the axial-vector current correlator in the presence of a magnetic field, in the weak field limit and at zero temperature. We find that the perturbative QCD as well as the hadronic contribution to the sum rules get explicit magnetic field-dependent corrections and that these in turn induce a magnetic field dependence on the deconfinement phenomenological parameter s_0 and on the gluon condensate. The leading corrections turn out to be quadratic in the field strength. We find from the dimension d=2 first FESR that the magnetic field dependence of s_0 is proportional to the absolute value of the light-quark condensate. Hence, it increases with increasing field strength. This implies that the parameters describing chiral symmetry restoration and deconfinement behave similarly as functions of the magnetic filed. Thus, at zero temperature the magnetic field is a catalysing agent of both chiral symmetry breaking and confinement. From the dimension d=4 second FESR we ob...

  12. Weighted averages of magnetization from magnetic field measurements: A fast interpretation tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedi, Maurizio

    2003-08-01

    Magnetic anomalies may be interpreted in terms of weighted averages of magnetization (WAM) by a simple transformation. The WAM transformation consists of dividing at each measurement point the experimental magnetic field by a normalizing field, computed from a source volume with a homogeneous unit-magnetization. The transformation yields a straightforward link among source and field position vectors. A main WAM outcome is that sources at different depths appear well discriminated. Due to the symmetry of the problem, the higher the considered field altitude, the deeper the sources outlined by the transformation. This is shown for single and multi-source synthetic cases as well as for real data. We analyze the real case of Mt. Vulture volcano (Southern Italy), where the related anomaly strongly interferes with that from deep intrusive sources. The volcanic edifice is well identified. The deep source is estimated at about 9 km depth, in agreement with other results.

  13. Magnetic monopole and the nature of the static magnetic field

    E-print Network

    Xiuqing Huang

    2008-12-10

    We investigate the factuality of the hypothetical magnetic monopole and the nature of the static magnetic field. It is shown from many aspects that the concept of the massive magnetic monopoles clearly is physically untrue. We argue that the static magnetic field of a bar magnet, in fact, is the static electric field of the periodically quasi-one-dimensional electric-dipole superlattice, which can be well established in some transition metals with the localized d-electron. This research may shed light on the perfect unification of magnetic and electrical phenomena.

  14. Magnetic field and electric current structure in the chromosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dravins, D.

    1974-01-01

    The three-dimensional vector magnetic field structure in the chromosphere above an active region is deduced by using high-resolution H-alpha filtergrams together with a simultaneous digital magnetogram. An analog model of the field is made with 400 metal wires representing field lines that outline the H-alpha structure. The height extent of the field is determined from vertical field-gradient observations around sunspots, from observed fibril heights, and from an assumption that the sources of the field are largely local. The computed electric currents (typically 10 mA/sq m) are found to flow in patterns not similar to observed features and not parallel to magnetic fields. Force structures correspond to observed solar features; the dynamics to be expected include: downward motion in bipolar areas in the lower chromosphere, an outflow of the outer chromosphere into the corona with radially outward flow above bipolar plage regions, and motion of arch filament systems.

  15. Cluster Magnetic Fields from Galactic Outflows

    E-print Network

    J. Donnert; K. Dolag; H. Lesch; E. Müller

    2008-10-24

    We performed cosmological, magneto-hydrodynamical simulations to follow the evolution of magnetic fields in galaxy clusters, exploring the possibility that the origin of the magnetic seed fields are galactic outflows during the star-burst phase of galactic evolution. To do this we coupled a semi-analytical model for magnetized galactic winds as suggested by \\citet{2006MNRAS.370..319B} to our cosmological simulation. We find that the strength and structure of magnetic fields observed in galaxy clusters are well reproduced for a wide range of model parameters for the magnetized, galactic winds and do only weakly depend on the exact magnetic structure within the assumed galactic outflows. Although the evolution of a primordial magnetic seed field shows no significant differences to that of galaxy clusters fields from previous studies, we find that the magnetic field pollution in the diffuse medium within filaments is below the level predicted by scenarios with pure primordial magnetic seed field. We therefore conclude that magnetized galactic outflows and their subsequent evolution within the intra-cluster medium can fully account for the observed magnetic fields in galaxy clusters. Our findings also suggest that measuring cosmological magnetic fields in low-density environments such as filaments is much more useful than observing cluster magnetic fields to infer their possible origin.

  16. Magnetic field sources and their threat to magnetic media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewell, Steve

    1993-01-01

    Magnetic storage media (tapes, disks, cards, etc.) may be damaged by external magnetic fields. The potential for such damage has been researched, but no objective standard exists for the protection of such media. This paper summarizes a magnetic storage facility standard, Publication 933, that ensures magnetic protection of data storage media.

  17. Bats Respond to Very Weak Magnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Lan-Xiang; Pan, Yong-Xin; Metzner, Walter; Zhang, Jin-Shuo; Zhang, Bing-Fang

    2015-01-01

    How animals, including mammals, can respond to and utilize the direction and intensity of the Earth’s magnetic field for orientation and navigation is contentious. In this study, we experimentally tested whether the Chinese Noctule, Nyctalus plancyi (Vespertilionidae) can sense magnetic field strengths that were even lower than those of the present-day geomagnetic field. Such field strengths occurred during geomagnetic excursions or polarity reversals and thus may have played an important role in the evolution of a magnetic sense. We found that in a present-day local geomagnetic field, the bats showed a clear preference for positioning themselves at the magnetic north. As the field intensity decreased to only 1/5th of the natural intensity (i.e., 10 ?T; the lowest field strength tested here), the bats still responded by positioning themselves at the magnetic north. When the field polarity was artificially reversed, the bats still preferred the new magnetic north, even at the lowest field strength tested (10 ?T), despite the fact that the artificial field orientation was opposite to the natural geomagnetic field (P<0.05). Hence, N. plancyi is able to detect the direction of a magnetic field even at 1/5th of the present-day field strength. This high sensitivity to magnetic fields may explain how magnetic orientation could have evolved in bats even as the Earth’s magnetic field strength varied and the polarity reversed tens of times over the past fifty million years. PMID:25922944

  18. On Killing vector fields of a homogeneous and isotropic universe in closed model

    E-print Network

    Ruslan Sharipov

    2007-08-19

    Killing vector fields of a closed homogeneous and isotropic universe are studied. It is shown that in general case there is no time-like Killing vector fields in such a universe. Two exceptional cases are revealed.

  19. THE ABRUPT CHANGES IN THE PHOTOSPHERIC MAGNETIC AND LORENTZ FORCE VECTORS DURING SIX MAJOR NEUTRAL-LINE FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Petrie, G. J. D.

    2012-11-01

    We analyze the spatial and temporal variations of the abrupt photospheric magnetic changes associated with six major flares using 12 minute, 0.''5 pixel{sup -1} vector magnetograms from NASA's Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager instrument on the Solar Dynamics Observatory satellite. The six major flares occurred near the main magnetic neutral lines of four active regions, NOAA 11158, 11166, 11283, and 11429. During all six flares the neutral-line field vectors became stronger and more horizontal, in each case almost entirely due to strengthening of the horizontal field components parallel to the neutral line. In all six cases the neutral-line pre-flare fields were more vertical than the reference potential fields, and collapsed abruptly and permanently closer to potential-field tilt angles during every flare, implying that the relaxation of magnetic stress associated with non-potential tilt angles plays a major role during major flares. The shear angle with respect to the reference potential field did not show such a pattern, demonstrating that flare processes do not generally relieve magnetic stresses associated with photospheric magnetic shear. The horizontal fields became significantly and permanently more aligned with the neutral line during the four largest flares, suggesting that the collapsing field is on average more aligned with the neutral line than the pre-flare neutral-line field. The vertical Lorentz force had a large, abrupt, permanent downward change during each of the flares, consistent with loop collapse. The horizontal Lorentz force changes acted mostly parallel to the neutral line in opposite directions on each side, a signature of the fields contracting during the flare, pulling the two sides of the neutral line toward each other. The greater effect of the flares on field tilt than on shear may be explained by photospheric line-tying.

  20. Single-point inversion of the coronal magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Plowman, Joseph

    2014-09-01

    The Fe XIII 10747 and 10798 Å lines observed in the solar corona are sensitive to the coronal magnetic field in such a way that, in principle, the full vector field at a point on the line of sight can be inferred from their combined polarization signals. This paper presents analytical inversion formulae for the field parameters and analyzes the uncertainty of magnetic field measurements made from such observations, assuming emission dominated by a single region along the line of sight. We consider the case of the current Coronal Multi-channel Polarimeter (CoMP) instrument as well as the future Coronal Solar Magnetism Observatory (COSMO) and Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) instruments. Uncertainties are estimated with a direct analytic inverse and with a Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm. We find that (in effect) two components of the vector field can be recovered with CoMP, and well recovered with COSMO or ATST, but that the third component can only be recovered when the solar magnetic field is strong and optimally oriented.

  1. Coexistence of Multiple Phases in Magnetized Quark Matter with Vector Repulsion

    E-print Network

    Robson Z. Denke; Marcus Benghi Pinto

    2015-06-17

    We explore the phase structure of dense magnetized quark matter when a repulsive vector interaction, parametrized by $G_V$, is present. Our results show that for a given magnetic field intensity ($B$) one may find a value of $G_V$ for which quark matter may coexist at three different baryonic density values leading to the appearance of two triple points in the phase diagram which have not been observed before. Another novel result is that at high pressure and low temperature we observe a first order transition which presents a negative slope in the $P-T$ that is reminiscent of the solid-liquid transition line observed within the water phase diagram. These unusual patterns occur for $G_V$ and $B$ values which lie within the range presently considered in many investigations related to the study of magnetars.

  2. Conversion of magnetic field energy into kinetic energy in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whang, Y. C.

    1972-01-01

    The outflow of the solar magnetic field energy (the radial component of the Poynting vector) per steradian is inversely proportional to the solar wind velocity. It is a decreasing function of the heliocentric distance. When the magnetic field effect is included in the one-fluid model of the solar wind, the transformation of magnetic field energy into kinetic energy during the expansion process increases the solar wind velocity at 1 AU by 17 percent.

  3. The Local Stellar Velocity Field via Vector Spherical Harmonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makarov, V. V.; Murphy, D. W.

    2007-01-01

    We analyze the local field of stellar tangential velocities for a sample of 42,339 nonbinary Hipparcos stars with accurate parallaxes, using a vector spherical harmonic formalism.We derive simple relations between the parameters of the classical linear model (Ogorodnikov-Milne) of the local systemic field and low-degree terms of the general vector harmonic decomposition. Taking advantage of these relationships, we determine the solar velocity with respect to the local stars of (V(sub X), V(sub Y), V(sub Z)) = (10.5, 18.5, 7.3) +/- 0.1 km s(exp -1) not for the asymmetric drift with respect to the local standard of rest. If only stars more distant than 100 pc are considered, the peculiar solar motion is (V(sub X), V(sub Y), V(sub Z)) = (9.9, 15.6, 6.9) +/- 0.2 km s(exp -1). The adverse effects of harmonic leakage, which occurs between the reflex solar motion represented by the three electric vector harmonics in the velocity space and higher degree harmonics in the proper-motion space, are eliminated in our analysis by direct subtraction of the reflex solar velocity in its tangential components for each star...

  4. Interplanetary magnetic field data book

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    An interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) data set is presented that is uniform with respect to inclusion of cislunar IMF data only, and which has as complete time coverage as presently possible over a full solar cycle. Macroscale phenomena in the interplanetary medium (sector structure, heliolatitude variations, solar cycle variations, etc.) and other phenomena (e.g., ground level cosmic-ray events) for which knowledge of the IMF with hourly resolution is necessary, are discussed. Listings and plots of cislunar hourly averaged IMP parameters over the period November 27, 1963, to May 17, 1974, are presented along with discussion of the mutual consistency of the IMF data used herein. The magnetic tape from which the plots and listings were generated, which is available from the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC), is also discussed.

  5. Permanent Magnet Ecr Plasma Source With Magnetic Field Optimization

    DOEpatents

    Doughty, Frank C. (Plano, TX); Spencer, John E. (Plano, TX)

    2000-12-19

    In a plasma-producing device, an optimized magnet field for electron cyclotron resonance plasma generation is provided by a shaped pole piece. The shaped pole piece adjusts spacing between the magnet and the resonance zone, creates a convex or concave resonance zone, and decreases stray fields between the resonance zone and the workpiece. For a cylindrical permanent magnet, the pole piece includes a disk adjacent the magnet together with an annular cylindrical sidewall structure axially aligned with the magnet and extending from the base around the permanent magnet. The pole piece directs magnetic field lines into the resonance zone, moving the resonance zone further from the face of the magnet. Additional permanent magnets or magnet arrays may be utilized to control field contours on a local scale. Rather than a permeable material, the sidewall structure may be composed of an annular cylindrical magnetic material having a polarity opposite that of the permanent magnet, creating convex regions in the resonance zone. An annular disk-shaped recurve section at the end of the sidewall structure forms magnetic mirrors keeping the plasma off the pole piece. A recurve section composed of magnetic material having a radial polarity forms convex regions and/or magnetic mirrors within the resonance zone.

  6. Logarithmic violation of scaling in strongly anisotropic turbulent transfer of a passive vector field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, N. V.; Gulitskiy, N. M.

    2015-01-01

    Inertial-range asymptotic behavior of a vector (e.g., magnetic) field, passively advected by a strongly anisotropic turbulent flow, is studied by means of the field-theoretic renormalization group and the operator product expansion. The advecting velocity field is Gaussian, not correlated in time, with the pair correlation function of the form ?? (t -t') /k?d -1 +? , where k?=|k?| and k? is the component of the wave vector, perpendicular to the distinguished direction ("direction of the flow")—the d -dimensional generalization of the ensemble introduced by Avellaneda and Majda [Commun. Math. Phys. 131, 381 (1990), 10.1007/BF02161420]. The stochastic advection-diffusion equation for the transverse (divergence-free) vector field includes, as special cases, the kinematic dynamo model for magnetohydrodynamic turbulence and the linearized Navier-Stokes equation. In contrast to the well-known isotropic Kraichnan's model, where various correlation functions exhibit anomalous scaling behavior with infinite sets of anomalous exponents, here the dependence on the integral turbulence scale L has a logarithmic behavior: Instead of powerlike corrections to ordinary scaling, determined by naive (canonical) dimensions, the anomalies manifest themselves as polynomials of logarithms of L . The key point is that the matrices of scaling dimensions of the relevant families of composite operators appear nilpotent and cannot be diagonalized. The detailed proof of this fact is given for the correlation functions of arbitrary order.

  7. Modelling of solar magnetic field and prominence structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Shi Tsan

    1988-01-01

    Using plasma theory, the interaction is studied between high frequency and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves from which a set of coupling equations resulted. On the basis of this formalism, the modulation instabilities of an electromagnetic soliton in a current sheet are examined, and it is shown that there is a resistive instability at the onset of the magnetic field reconnection. This mechanism could be used to explain the onset of solar flares and prominences. To improve the resolution of vector magnetic fields at the sun's surface, state-of-the-art optics is examined to improve the design and fabrication of a new spaceborne solar vector magnetograph as part of the SAMEX (Solar Active Measurements Experiment) program.

  8. Report of the panel on geopotential fields: Magnetic field, section 9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Achache, Jose J.; Backus, George E.; Benton, Edward R.; Harrison, Christopher G. A.; Langel, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the NASA Geodynamics program for magnetic field measurements is to study the physical state, processes and evolution of the Earth and its environment via interpretation of measurements of the near Earth magnetic field in conjunction with other geophysical data. The fields measured derive from sources in the core, the lithosphere, the ionosphere, and the magnetosphere. Panel recommendations include initiation of multi-decade long continuous scalar and vector measurements of the Earth's magnetic field by launching a five year satellite mission to measure the field to about 1 nT accuracy, improvement of our resolution of the lithographic component of the field by developing a low altitude satellite mission, and support of theoretical studies and continuing analysis of data to better understand the source physics and improve the modeling capabilities for different source regions.

  9. Killing Vector Fields in Three Dimensions: A Method to Solve Massive Gravity Field Equations

    E-print Network

    Metin Gurses

    2010-07-29

    Killing vector fields in three dimensions play important role in the construction of the related spacetime geometry. In this work we show that when a three dimensional geometry admits a Killing vector field then the Ricci tensor of the geometry is determined in terms of the Killing vector field and its scalars. In this way we can generate all products and covariant derivatives at any order of the ricci tensor. Using this property we give ways of solving the field equations of Topologically Massive Gravity (TMG) and New Massive Gravity (NMG) introduced recently. In particular when the scalars of the Killing vector field (timelike, spacelike and null cases) are constants then all three dimensional symmetric tensors of the geometry, the ricci and einstein tensors, their covariant derivatives at all orders, their products of all orders are completely determined by the Killing vector field and the metric. Hence the corresponding three dimensional metrics are strong candidates of solving all higher derivative gravitational field equations in three dimensions.

  10. A MATHEMATICAL MODEL FOR AN HOURGLASS MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Ewertowski, Bartek; Basu, Shantanu

    2013-04-10

    Starting with a mathematical boundary value problem for the magnetic vector potential in an axisymmetric cylindrical coordinate system, we derive a general solution for any arbitrary current distribution using the method of Green's functions. We use this to derive an analytic form for an hourglass magnetic field pattern created by electrical currents that are concentrated near (but not confined within) the equatorial plane of a cylindrical coordinate system. Our solution is not characterized by a cusp at the equatorial plane, as in previous solutions based on a current sheet. The pattern we derive provides a very good fit to hourglass magnetic field patterns emerging from three-dimensional numerical simulations of core formation, and can in principle be used for source-fitting of observed magnetic hourglass patterns.

  11. Full 180° Magnetization Reversal with Electric Fields

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J. J.; Hu, J. M.; Ma, J.; Zhang, J. X.; Chen, L. Q.; Nan, C. W.

    2014-01-01

    Achieving 180° magnetization reversal with an electric field rather than a current or magnetic field is a fundamental challenge and represents a technological breakthrough towards new memory cell designs. Here we propose a mesoscale morphological engineering approach to accomplishing full 180° magnetization reversals with electric fields by utilizing both the in-plane piezostrains and magnetic shape anisotropy of a multiferroic heterostructure. Using phase-field simulations, we examined a patterned single-domain nanomagnet with four-fold magnetic axis on a ferroelectric layer with electric-field-induced uniaxial strains. We demonstrated that the uniaxial piezostrains, if non-collinear to the magnetic easy axis of the nanomagnet at certain angles, induce two successive, deterministic 90° magnetization rotations, thereby leading to full 180° magnetization reversals. PMID:25512070

  12. Magnetic field effects on microwave absorbing materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Ira; Hollingsworth, Charles S.; Mckinney, Ted M.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this program was to gather information to formulate a microwave absorber that can work in the presence of strong constant direct current (DC) magnetic fields. The program was conducted in four steps. The first step was to investigate the electrical and magnetic properties of magnetic and ferrite microwave absorbers in the presence of strong magnetic fields. This included both experimental measurements and a literature survey of properties that may be applicable to finding an appropriate absorbing material. The second step was to identify those material properties that will produce desirable absorptive properties in the presence of intense magnetic fields and determine the range of magnetic field in which the absorbers remain effective. The third step was to establish ferrite absorber designs that will produce low reflection and adequate absorption in the presence of intense inhomogeneous static magnetic fields. The fourth and final step was to prepare and test samples of such magnetic microwave absorbers if such designs seem practical.

  13. Deformation of Water by a Magnetic Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Zijun; Dahlberg, E. Dan

    2011-01-01

    After the discovery that superconducting magnets could levitate diamagnetic objects, researchers became interested in measuring the repulsion of diamagnetic fluids in strong magnetic fields, which was given the name "The Moses Effect." Both for the levitation experiments and the quantitative studies on liquids, the large magnetic fields necessary…

  14. Exploring Magnetic Fields with a Compass

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunk, Brandon; Beichner, Robert

    2011-01-01

    A compass is an excellent classroom tool for the exploration of magnetic fields. Any student can tell you that a compass is used to determine which direction is north, but when paired with some basic trigonometry, the compass can be used to actually measure the strength of the magnetic field due to a nearby magnet or current-carrying wire. In this…

  15. Spectropolarimetry in the Sodium 589.6nm D1 line: Evaluating the Resulting Chromospheric (?) Vector Field Maps.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leka, K. D.

    2012-05-01

    Pioneering work by T. R. Metcalf almost two decades ago pointed to the Na 589.6nm D1 line as a contender for providing chromospheric vector magnetic field measurements (using the Zeeman effect). We report here on a systematic examination of what can be expected from Sodium 589.6nm spectropolarimetry, with respects to polarization-signal amplitudes and retrieval, and the implementation of the inversion for this line based on the Jeffries, Lites & Skumanich Weak-Field Approximation algorithm. The analysis is performed using both synthetic data and observations from the Imaging Vector Magnetograph, for which a large dataset of Sodium 589.6nm vector spectropolarimetry exists. The synthetic data are based on a 3-D field extrapolated from photospheric vector magnetograms of two active regions, four distinct model atmospheres coupled with NLTE synthesis of the emergent NaI D1 Stokes polarization spectra, computed for a variety of viewing angles. In this manner, a broad representation of active-region features, field strengths and observing angles are tested using ``hare & hound'' approaches, including evaluating algorithm performance in the presence of noise and instrumental effects. We compare retrieval algorithms for the very weak (as expected) polarization signals, and evaluate the retrieved vector magnetic field at a range of inferred heights. Finally, we provide an example from the IVM and discuss the prospects for obtaining and interpreting chromospheric vector magnetic field maps. Support for this work comes from NASA NAG5-12466, NASA NNH09CE60C, AFOSR F49620-03-C-0019, NSF/NSWP ATM-0519107, NSF/SHINE ATM-0454610, and NSF CRG ATM-0551055.

  16. Magnetic field effect on charged Brownian swimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandoval, M.; Velasco, R. M.; Jiménez-Aquino, J. I.

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the effective diffusion of a spherical self-propelled charged particle swimming at low Reynolds number, and subject to a time-dependent magnetic field and thermal agitation. We find that the presence of an external magnetic field may reduce or enhance (depending on the type of swimming and magnetic field applied) the swimmer's effective diffusion, hence we get another possible strategy to control its displacement. For swimmers performing reciprocal motion, and under an oscillating time-dependent magnetic field, mechanical resonance appears when the swimmer and magnetic frequencies coincide, thus enhancing the particle's effective diffusion. Our analytical results are compared with Brownian Dynamics simulations and we obtain excellent agreement.

  17. Analysis of magnetic field levels at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christodoulou, Christos G.

    1994-01-01

    The scope of this work is to evaluate the magnetic field levels of distribution systems and other equipment at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Magnetic fields levels in several operational areas and various facilities are investigated. Three dimensional mappings and contour are provided along with the measured data. Furthermore, the portion of magnetic fields generated by the 60 Hz fundamental frequency and the portion generated by harmonics are examined. Finally, possible mitigation techniques for attenuating fields from electric panels are discussed.

  18. Statistics of anisotropies in inflation with spectator vector fields

    SciTech Connect

    Thorsrud, Mikjel; Mota, David F.; Urban, Federico R. E-mail: furban@ulb.ac.be

    2014-04-01

    We study the statistics of the primordial power spectrum in models where massless gauge vectors are coupled to the inflaton, paying special attention to observational implications of having fundamental or effective horizons embedded in a bath of infrared fluctuations. As quantum infrared modes cross the horizon, they classicalize and build a background vector field. We find that the vector experiences a statistical precession phenomenon. Implications for primordial correlators and the interpretation thereof are considered. Firstly, we show how in general two, not only one, additional observables, a quadrupole amplitude and an intrinsic shape parameter, are necessary to fully describe the correction to the curvature power spectrum, and develop a unique parametrization for them. Secondly, we show that the observed anisotropic amplitude and the associated preferred direction depend on the volume of the patch being probed. We calculate non-zero priors for the expected deviations between detections based on microwave background data (which probes the entire Hubble patch) and large scale structure (which only probes a fraction of it)

  19. Magnetic field waves at Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Charles W.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Lepping, Ronald P.; Mish, William H.; Wong, Hung K.

    1994-01-01

    The research efforts funded by the Uranus Data Analysis Program (UDAP) grant to the Bartol Research Institute (BRI) involved the study of magnetic field waves associated with the Uranian bow shock. Upstream wave studies are motivated as a study of the physics of collisionless shocks. Collisionless shocks in plasmas are capable of 'reflecting' a fraction of the incoming thermal particle distribution and directing the resulting energetic particle motion back into the upstream region. Once within the upstream region, the backward streaming energetic particles convey information of the approaching shock to the supersonic flow. This particle population is responsible for the generation of upstream magnetic and electrostatic fluctuations known as 'upstream waves', for slowing the incoming wind prior to the formation of the shock ramp, and for heating of the upstream plasma. The waves produced at Uranus not only differed in several regards from the observations at other planetary bow shocks, but also gave new information regarding the nature of the reflected particle populations which were largely unmeasurable by the particle instruments. Four distinct magnetic field wave types were observed upstream of the Uranian bow shock: low-frequency Alfven or fast magnetosonic waves excited by energetic protons originating at or behind the bow shock; whistler wave bursts driven by gyrating ion distributions within the shock ramp; and two whistler wave types simultaneously observed upstream of the flanks of the shock and argued to arise from resonance with energetic electrons. In addition, observations of energetic particle distributions by the LECP experiment, thermal particle populations observed by the PLS experiment, and electron plasma oscillations recorded by the PWS experiment proved instrumental to this study and are included to some degree in the papers and presentations supported by this grant.

  20. Higher dimensional black holes in external magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortaggio, Marcello

    2005-05-01

    We apply a Harrison transformation to higher dimensional asymptotically flat black hole solutions, which puts them into an external magnetic field. First, we magnetize the Schwarzschild-Tangherlini metric in arbitrary spacetime dimension n >= 4. The thus generated exact solution of the Einstein-Maxwell equations describes a static black hole immersed in a Melvin ``fluxbrane'', and generalizes previous results by Ernst for the case n = 4. The magnetic field deforms the shape of the event horizon, but the total area (as a function of the mass) and the thermodynamics remain unaffected. The amount of flux through a one-dimensional loop on the horizon exhibits a maximum for a finite value of the magnetic field strength, and decreases for larger values. In the Aichelburg-Sexl ultrarelativistic limit, the magnetized black hole becomes an impulsive gravitational wave propagating in the Melvin background. Furthermore, we discuss possible applications of a similar Harrison transformation to rotating black objects. This enables us to magnetize the Myers-Perry hole and the (dipole) Emparan-Reall ring at least in the special case when the vector potential is parallel to a nonrotating Killing field. In particular, dipole rings may be held in equilibrium even when their spin vanishes, thus demonstrating (infinite) non-uniqueness of magnetized static uncharged black holes in five dimensions. Physical properties of such rings are discussed.

  1. Cyclicity of a fake saddle inside the quadratic vector fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Maesschalck, P.; Rebollo-Perdomo, S.; Torregrosa, J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper concerns the study of small-amplitude limit cycles that appear in the phase portrait near an unfolded fake saddle singularity. This degenerate singularity is also known as an impassable grain. The canonical form of the unperturbed vector field is like a degenerate flow box. Near the singularity, the phase portrait consists of parallel fibers, all but one of which have no singular points, and at the singular fiber, there is one node. We demonstrate different techniques in order to show that the cyclicity is bigger than or equal to two when the canonical form is quadratic.

  2. Abnormal Magnetic Field Effects on Electrogenerated Chemiluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Haiping; Shen, Yan; Wang, Hongfeng; He, Lei; Hu, Bin

    2015-03-01

    We report abnormal magnetic field effects on electrogenerated chemiluminescence (MFEECL) based on triplet emission from the Ru(bpy)3Cl2-TPrA electrochemical system: the appearance of MFEECL after magnetic field ceases. In early studies the normal MFEECL have been observed from electrochemical systems during the application of magnetic field. Here, the abnormal MFEECL suggest that the activated charge-transfer [Ru(bpy)33+ … TPrA•] complexes may become magnetized in magnetic field and experience a long magnetic relaxation after removing magnetic field. Our analysis indicates that the magnetic relaxation can gradually increase the density of charge-transfer complexes within reaction region due to decayed magnetic interactions, leading to a positive component in the abnormal MFEECL. On the other hand, the magnetic relaxation facilitates an inverse conversion from triplets to singlets within charge-transfer complexes. The inverse triplet --> singlet conversion reduces the density of triplet light-emitting states through charge-transfer complexes and gives rise to a negative component in the abnormal MFEECL. The combination of positive and negative components can essentially lead to a non-monotonic profile in the abnormal MFEECL after ceasing magnetic field. Nevertheless, our experimental studies may reveal un-usual magnetic behaviors with long magnetic relaxation from the activated charge-transfer [Ru(bpy)33+ … TPrA•] complexes in solution at room temperature.

  3. Abnormal Magnetic Field Effects on Electrogenerated Chemiluminescence

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Haiping; Shen, Yan; Wang, Hongfeng; He, Lei; Hu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    We report abnormal magnetic field effects on electrogenerated chemiluminescence (MFEECL) based on triplet emission from the Ru(bpy)3Cl2-TPrA electrochemical system: the appearance of MFEECL after magnetic field ceases. In early studies the normal MFEECL have been observed from electrochemical systems during the application of magnetic field. Here, the abnormal MFEECL suggest that the activated charge-transfer [Ru(bpy)33+ … TPrA•] complexes may become magnetized in magnetic field and experience a long magnetic relaxation after removing magnetic field. Our analysis indicates that the magnetic relaxation can gradually increase the density of charge-transfer complexes within reaction region due to decayed magnetic interactions, leading to a positive component in the abnormal MFEECL. On the other hand, the magnetic relaxation facilitates an inverse conversion from triplets to singlets within charge-transfer complexes. The inverse triplet ? singlet conversion reduces the density of triplet light-emitting states through charge-transfer complexes and gives rise to a negative component in the abnormal MFEECL. The combination of positive and negative components can essentially lead to a non-monotonic profile in the abnormal MFEECL after ceasing magnetic field. Nevertheless, our experimental studies may reveal un-usual magnetic behaviors with long magnetic relaxation from the activated charge-transfer [Ru(bpy)33+ … TPrA•] complexes in solution at room temperature. PMID:25772580

  4. A New Method for Coronal Magnetic Field Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Sibaek; Choe, Gwangson; Lim, Daye

    2015-08-01

    We present a new, simple, variational method for reconstruction of coronal force-free magnetic fields based on vector magnetogram data. Our method employs vector potentials for magnetic field description in order to ensure the divergence-free condition. As boundary conditions, it only requires the normal components of magnetic field and current density so that the boundary conditions are not over-specified as in many other methods. The boundary normal current distribution is initially fixed once and for all and does not need continual adjustment as in stress-and-relax type methods. We have tested the computational code based on our new method in problems with known solutions and those with actual photospheric data. When solutions are fully given at all boundaries, the accuracy of our method is almost comparable to best performing methods in the market. When magnetic field data are given only at the photospheric boundary, our method excels other methods in most “figures of merit” devised by Schrijver et al. (2006). Furthermore the residual force in the solution is at least an order of magnitude smaller than that of any other method. It can also accommodate the source-surface boundary condition at the top boundary. Our method is expected to contribute to the real time monitoring of the sun required for future space weather forecasts.

  5. Construction of solar-wind-like magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Roberts, D Aaron

    2012-12-01

    Fluctuations in the solar wind fields tend to not only have velocities and magnetic fields correlated in the sense consistent with Alfvén waves traveling from the Sun, but they also have the magnitude of the magnetic field remarkably constant despite their being broadband. This Letter provides, for the first time, a method for constructing fields with nearly constant magnetic field, zero divergence, and with any specified power spectrum for the fluctuations of the components of the field. Every wave vector, k, is associated with two polarizations; the relative phases of these can be chosen to minimize the variance of the field magnitude while retaining the "random" character of the fields. The method is applied to a case with one spatial coordinate that demonstrates good agreement with observed time series and power spectra of the magnetic field in the solar wind, as well as with the distribution of the angles of rapid changes ("discontinuities"), thus showing a deep connection between two seemingly unrelated issues. It is suggested that using this construction will lead to more realistic simulations of solar wind turbulence and of the propagation of energetic particles. PMID:23368180

  6. Construction of Solar-Wind-Like Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Dana Aaron

    2012-01-01

    Fluctuations in the solar wind fields tend to not only have velocities and magnetic fields correlated in the sense consistent with Alfven waves traveling from the Sun, but they also have the magnitude of the magnetic field remarkably constant despite their being broadband. This paper provides, for the first time, a method for constructing fields with nearly constant magnetic field, zero divergence, and with any specified power spectrum for the fluctuations of the components of the field. Every wave vector, k, is associated with two polarizations the relative phases of these can be chosen to minimize the variance of the field magnitude while retaining the\\random character of the fields. The method is applied to a case with one spatial coordinate that demonstrates good agreement with observed time series and power spectra of the magnetic field in the solar wind, as well as with the distribution of the angles of rapid changes (discontinuities), thus showing a deep connection between two seemingly unrelated issues. It is suggested that using this construction will lead to more realistic simulations of solar wind turbulence and of the propagation of energetic particles.

  7. Bipolar pulse field for magnetic refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    Lubell, Martin S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1994-01-01

    A magnetic refrigeration apparatus includes first and second steady state magnets, each having a field of substantially equal strength and opposite polarity, first and second bodies made of magnetocaloric material disposed respectively in the influence of the fields of the first and second steady state magnets, and a pulsed magnet, concentric with the first and second steady state magnets, and having a field which cycles between the fields of the first and second steady state magnets, thereby cyclically magnetizing and demagnetizing and thus heating and cooling the first and second bodies. Heat exchange apparatus of suitable design can be used to expose a working fluid to the first and second bodies of magnetocaloric material. A controller is provided to synchronize the flow of working fluid with the changing states of magnetization of the first and second bodies.

  8. Bipolar pulse field for magnetic refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    Lubell, M.S.

    1994-10-25

    A magnetic refrigeration apparatus includes first and second steady state magnets, each having a field of substantially equal strength and opposite polarity, first and second bodies made of magnetocaloric material disposed respectively in the influence of the fields of the first and second steady state magnets, and a pulsed magnet, concentric with the first and second steady state magnets, and having a field which cycles between the fields of the first and second steady state magnets, thereby cyclically magnetizing and demagnetizing and thus heating and cooling the first and second bodies. Heat exchange apparatus of suitable design can be used to expose a working fluid to the first and second bodies of magnetocaloric material. A controller is provided to synchronize the flow of working fluid with the changing states of magnetization of the first and second bodies. 2 figs.

  9. Semiconductor Crystal Growth in Static and Rotating Magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, Martin

    2004-01-01

    Magnetic fields have been applied during the growth of bulk semiconductor crystals to control the convective flow behavior of the melt. A static magnetic field established Lorentz forces which tend to reduce the convective intensity in the melt. At sufficiently high magnetic field strengths, a boundary layer is established ahead of the solid-liquid interface where mass transport is dominated by diffusion. This can have a significant effect on segregation behavior and can eliminate striations in grown crystals resulting from convective instabilities. Experiments on dilute (Ge:Ga) and solid solution (Ge-Si) semiconductor systems show a transition from a completely mixed convective state to a diffusion-controlled state between 0 and 5 Tesla. In HgCdTe, radial segregation approached the diffusion limited regime and the curvature of the solid-liquid interface was reduced by a factor of 3 during growth in magnetic fields in excess of 0.5 Tesla. Convection can also be controlled during growth at reduced gravitational levels. However, the direction of the residual steady-state acceleration vector can compromise this effect if it cannot be controlled. A magnetic field in reduced gravity can suppress disturbances caused by residual transverse accelerations and by random non-steady accelerations. Indeed, a joint program between NASA and the NHMFL resulted in the construction of a prototype spaceflight magnet for crystal growth applications. An alternative to the suppression of convection by static magnetic fields and reduced gravity is the imposition of controlled steady flow generated by rotating magnetic fields (RMF)'s. The potential benefits of an RMF include homogenization of the melt temperature and concentration distribution, and control of the solid-liquid interface shape. Adjusting the strength and frequency of the applied magnetic field allows tailoring of the resultant flow field. A limitation of RMF's is that they introduce deleterious instabilities above a critical magnetic field value. Growth conditions in which static magnetic fields rotational magnetic fields, and reduced gravitational levels can have a beneficial role will be described.

  10. On Magnetic Field Generation Mechanisms in Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherny, O. G.

    Magnetic chemically peculiar stars (CP stars) are characterized by a strong magnetic field, peculiar chemical composition and slow rotation. Since the origin and evolution of CP stars may be responsible for such unusual features, understanding the mechanisms of generation of the magnetic field is one of the ways to learn more about the CP star characteristics. At present there are two mechanisms of magnetic field generation considered in astrophysics, a fossil field hypothesis and turbulent dynamo theory. However, there is another mechanism of magnetic field generation. All the elementary particles including the most abundant, i. e. the protons, electrons, neutrons, have their own angular momenta and the corresponding magnetic momenta. Microscopic magnetic fields are determined generally by these magnetic momenta. Provided that microscopic magnetic fields are aligned, large-scale magnetic fields may be generated, which has been proved in the experiments of Barnett, Einstein and de Haas. This phenomenon is best illustrated by the experiments with iron. Analysis performed in the current study showed that all the large bodies of the Solar System have both an iron-nickel core and a magnetic field, which is proportional to the planet's core volume and its rotational velocity. We hypothesize that the reason for this phenomenon is a magnetic interaction of ferromagnetic materials, which occurred during the formation of the Solar System. We show that the magnitude of the magnetic field of the Earth and a change of magnetic field polarity can be explained by the gyromagnetic effect. In the beginning of formation of the Solar System the prospective Sun was the main attractive center. Therefore, there is a possibility that the Sun contains a massive (relative to the Earth) iron-nickel core.

  11. The Protogalactic Origin for Cosmic Magnetic Fields

    E-print Network

    Russell M. Kulsrud; Renyue Cen; Jeremiah P. Ostriker; Dongsu Ryu

    1996-07-28

    It is demonstrated that strong magnetic fields are produced from a zero initial magnetic field during the pregalactic era, when galaxies are first forming. Their development proceeds in three phases. In the first phase, weak magnetic fields are created by the Biermann battery mechanism, acting in shocked parts of the intergalactic medium where caustics form and intersect. In the second phase, these weak magnetic fields are amplified to strong magnetic fields by the Kolmogoroff turbulence endemic to gravitational structure formation of galaxies. During this second phase, the magnetic fields reach saturation with the turbulent power, but they are coherent only on the scale of the smallest eddy. In the third phase, the magnetic field strength increases to equipartition with the turbulent energy, and the coherence length of the magnetic fields increases to the scale of the largest turbulent eddy, comparable to the scale of the entire galaxy. The resulting magnetic field represents a galactic magnetic field of primordial origin. No further dynamo action is necessary, after the galaxy forms, to explain the origin of magnetic fields. However, the magnetic field may be altered by dynamo action once the galaxy and the galactic disk have formed. It is first shown by direct numerical simulations, that thermoelectric currentsassociated with the Biermann battery, build the field up from zero to $10^{-21}$ G in the regions about to collapse into galaxies, by $z\\sim3$. For weak fields, in the absence of dissipation, the cyclotron frequency ${\\bf \\omega_{cyc}}=e{\\bf B } /m_H c $ and $ {\\bf \\omega}/(1+ \\chi )$, where ${\\bf \\omega = \

  12. Impact of a static magnetic field on high-order harmonic spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, R.; Keitel, C. H.; Jung, R.; Pretzler, G.; Willi, O.

    2007-03-15

    We have studied the influence of a static magnetic field on the high harmonic radiation that is caused by the motion of an atomic electron along the laser propagation direction. Different from the ordinary high harmonic spectrum which has been studied under the influence of a static magnetic field, we found that the spectrum of the harmonic radiation polarized in the laser propagation direction is quite sensitive to an additional static magnetic field. The signal heights of this spectrum can be substantially affected by a relatively weak static magnetic field of the order of 30 T directed along the magnetic-field vector of the linearly polarized laser pulse. This dependence of the signal strength on the external magnetic field has clear potential to be employed as a means to measure magnetic fields.

  13. Electromagnetic and magnetic vector potential bio-information and water.

    PubMed

    Smith, Cyril William

    2015-10-01

    This work developed over the past 40 years starting from dielectric measurements on enzymes and the subsequent finding that the measurements were affected by electric, magnetic, electromagnetic fields and quantum fields. A request for help in the diagnosis and therapy of chemically sensitive patients who had become sensitive to their electromagnetic environment came in 1982. The same symptoms could be provoked by a chemical or a frequency challenge and this led to an appreciation of the synergy between chemical and frequency environmental sensitivities. Experimental cooperation with theoretical physicist Herbert Fröhlich FRS and others led to an understanding of the physics of coherent water in living systems and a mechanism for the memory of water for coherent frequencies. In a coherent system there are interacting frequencies proportionate to any velocity the system will support, in particular the velocity of light and the velocity of coherence diffusion. Thus, there can be biological interaction between the optical, microwave and ELF spectral regions. Frequency modulation of light scattered by bio-fields and its retention in recorded images is discussed. A 'nil-potent' frequency can erase a frequency signature and thence affect a biological system. Homeopathy is interpreted through the biological effects of coherent frequencies derived from the frequency signature of the 'Mother Tincture' and developed through dilution and succussion. A homeopathic potency has a frequency signature therefore it must be able to have a biological effect. PMID:26678733

  14. Analysis of vector magnetic anomalies over the Bayonnaise Knoll caldera obtained from a deep-sea magnetic exploration by AUV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayanagi, K.; Isezaki, N.; Matsuo, J.; Harada, M.; Kasaya, T.

    2011-12-01

    Geophysical surveys near the seafloor are very effective methods in order to investigate fine structures of the oceanic crust. Such surveys have increased in researches and developments of the seafloor, and will be more and more necessary in the future. For example, seabed resources like hydrothermal deposits have recently focused attention behind the international situation for natural resources like a competition of resources development. In order to estimate accurate abundance of those resources, the above detailed investigations should be needed because of low resolution of geophysical surveys on the sea and low efficiency of exploratory drilling. From such a viewpoint, we have been developing a measurement system for magnetic explorations using an AUV and a deep-tow system. The magnetic exploration system consists of two 3-axis flux-gate magnetometers, one/two Overhauser magnetometer(s), an optical fiber gyro, a main unit (control, communication, recording), and an onboard unit. These devices except for the onboard unit are installed in pressure cases (depth limit: 6000m). Thus this system can measure three components and total intensity of the geomagnetic field in the deep sea. In 2009, the first test of the magnetic exploration system was carried out in the Kumano Basin using AUV Urashima and towing vehicle Yokosuka Deep-Tow during the R/V Yokosuka YK09-09 cruise. In this test, we sank a small magnetic target to the seafloor, and examined how the system worked. As a result, we successfully detected magnetic anomaly of the target to confirm the expected performance of that in the sea. In 2010, the magnetic exploration system was further tested in the Bayonnaise Knoll area both using a titanium towing frame during the R/V Bosei-maru cruise and using AUV Urashima during the R/V Yokosuka YK10-17 cruise. The purpose of these tests was to evaluate the performance of the system in an actual hydrothermal deposit area for practical applications of that. The Bayonnaise Knoll is a submarine caldera with an outer rim of 2.5-3 km and a floor of 840-920 m, which is located in the Izu-Ogasawara arc. A large hydrothermal deposit, Hakurei deposit, lies in the southeast part of the caldera. In the R/V Bosei-maru cruise, we observed three components of magnetic anomalies at depths of 400-570 m along SE-NW and WE tracks across the caldera. In the R/V Yokosuka YK10-17 cruise, we observed three components and total intensity of magnetic anomalies at altitudes of 60-100 m around the Hakurei deposit and at depth of 500 m above the caldera. The analysis of these data is now energetically pushed forward. A 3D gridded data set of the vector magnetic anomaly in the latter cruise was made by solving the Laplace's equation in the areas where observation data were not available, which is the unique procedure for analysis of the vector anomalies. Several magnetization solutions have been so far obtained by successive approximation and inversion methods. We will here present the measurement of the geomagnetic field and analysis of magnetization structure in Bayonnaise Knoll caldera. Note that this study has been supported by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science & Technology (MEXT).

  15. Nonlinear energy dissipation of magnetic nanoparticles in oscillating magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto-Aquino, D.; Rinaldi, C.

    2015-11-01

    The heating of magnetic nanoparticle suspensions subjected to alternating magnetic fields enables a variety of emerging applications such as magnetic fluid hyperthermia and triggered drug release. Rosensweig (2002) [25] obtained a model for the heat dissipation rate of a collection of non-interacting particles. However, the assumptions made in this analysis make it rigorously valid only in the limit of small applied magnetic field amplitude and frequency (i.e., values of the Langevin parameter that are much less than unity and frequencies below the inverse relaxation time). In this contribution we approach the problem from an alternative point of view by solving the phenomenological magnetization relaxation equation exactly for the case of arbitrary magnetic field amplitude and frequency and by solving a more accurate magnetization relaxation equation numerically. We also use rotational Brownian dynamics simulations of non-interacting magnetic nanoparticles subjected to an alternating magnetic field to estimate the rate of energy dissipation and compare the results of the phenomenological theories to the particle-scale simulations. The results are summarized in terms of a normalized energy dissipation rate and show that Rosensweig's expression provides an upper bound on the energy dissipation rate achieved at high field frequency and amplitude. Estimates of the predicted dependence of energy dissipation rate, quantified as specific absorption rate (SAR), on magnetic field amplitude and frequency, and particle core and hydrodynamic diameter, are also given.

  16. Development of marine magnetic vector measurement system using AUV and deep-towed vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayanagi, K.; Isezaki, N.; Matsuo, J.; Harada, M.; Kasaya, T.; Nishimura, K.; Baba, H.

    2012-04-01

    Marine magnetic survey is one of useful methods in order to investigate the nature of the oceanic crust. Most of the data are, however, intensity of the geomagnetic field without its direction. Therefore we cannot properly apply a physical formula describing the relation between magnetic field and magnetization to analyses of the data. With this problem, Isezaki (1986) developed a shipboard three-component magnetometer which measures the geomagnetic vector at the sea. On the other hand, geophysical surveys near the seafloor have been more and more necessary in order to show the details of the oceanic crust. For instance, development of seabed resources like hydrothermal deposits needs higher resolution surveys compared with conventional surveys at the sea for accurate estimation of abundance of the resources. From these viewpoints, we have been developing a measurement system of the deep-sea geomagnetic vector using AUV and deep-towed vehicle. The measurement system consists of two 3-axis flux-gate magnetometers, an Overhauser magnetometer, an optical fiber gyro, a main unit (control, communication, recording), and an onboard unit. These devices except for the onboard unit are installed in pressure cases (depth limit: 6000m). Thus this measurement system can measure three components and intensity of the geomagnetic field in the deep-sea. In 2009, the first test of the measurement system was carried out in the Kumano Basin using AUV Urashima and towing vehicle Yokosuka Deep-Tow during the R/V Yokosuka YK09-09 cruise. In this test, we sank a small magnetic target to the seafloor, and examined how the system worked. As a result, we successfully detected magnetic anomaly of the target to confirm the expected performance of that in the sea. In 2010, the measurement system was tested in the Bayonnaise Knoll area both using a titanium towing frame during the R/V Bosei-maru cruise and using AUV Urashima during the R/V Yokosuka YK10-17 cruise. The purpose of these tests was to evaluate the performance of the system in an actual hydrothermal deposit area for practical applications of that. The Bayonnaise Knoll is a submarine caldera with an outer rim of 2.5-3 km and a floor of 840-920 m, which is located in the Izu-Ogasawara arc. A large hydrothermal deposit, Hakurei deposit lies in the southeast part of the caldera. In the R/V Bosei-maru cruise, we observed three components of magnetic anomalies at depths of 400-570 m along SE-NW and WE tracks across the caldera. In the R/V Yokosuka YK10-17 cruise, we observed three components and intensity of magnetic anomalies at altitudes of 60-100 m around the Hakurei deposit and at depth of 500 m above the caldera. From these tests, we have succeeded in measuring the geomagnetic vector and intensity using the AUV and the deep-towed vehicle, and also have obtained detailed magnetic anomaly in the Hakurei deposit area. We will here present the outlines of the measurement system and the tests in the sea. Note that this study has been supported by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science & Technology (MEXT).

  17. DC-based magnetic field controller

    DOEpatents

    Kotter, D.K.; Rankin, R.A.; Morgan, J.P.

    1994-05-31

    A magnetic field controller is described for laboratory devices and in particular to dc operated magnetic field controllers for mass spectrometers, comprising a dc power supply in combination with improvements to a Hall probe subsystem, display subsystem, preamplifier, field control subsystem, and an output stage. 1 fig.

  18. DC-based magnetic field controller

    DOEpatents

    Kotter, Dale K. (Shelley, ID); Rankin, Richard A. (Ammon, ID); Morgan, John P,. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1994-01-01

    A magnetic field controller for laboratory devices and in particular to dc operated magnetic field controllers for mass spectrometers, comprising a dc power supply in combination with improvements to a hall probe subsystem, display subsystem, preamplifier, field control subsystem, and an output stage.

  19. Static uniform magnetic fields and amoebae

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, S.G.; Srikanth, S.; Mahajan, S.M.; Ventrice, C.A.

    1997-03-01

    Three species of potentially pathogenic amoebae were exposed to 71 and 106.5 mT from constant homogeneous magnetic fields and examined for inhibition of population growth. The number of amoebae for three species was significantly less than controls after a 72 h exposure to the magnetic fields when the temperature was 20 C or above. Axenic cultures, i.e., cultures grown without bacteria, were significantly affected after only 24 h. In 20 of 21 tests using the three species, the magnetic field significantly inhibited the growth of amoebae. In one test in which the temperature was 20 C for 48 h, exposure to the magnetic field was not inhibitory. Final numbers of magnetic field-exposed amoebae ranged from 9 to 72% lower than the final numbers of unexposed controls, depending on the species. This research may lead to disinfection strategies utilizing magnetic fields for surfaces on which pathogenic amoebae may proliferate.

  20. Conducting object in the presence of a variable magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savchenko, A. O.; Savchenko, O. Ya.

    2015-07-01

    A numerical method is proposed to determine vector potential and gradient of scalar potential inside a conductor in the presence of a magnetic field that exhibits harmonic variations with time. The problem is reduced to the solution of the Helmholtz equation in a conducting object under the condition that the normal component of the right-hand side of equation on the conducting surface is zero. An iterative procedure is proposed for the solution of the original problem. First, the surface charge distribution that satisfies the boundary condition for the vector potential on the conducting surface is found, and, then, the next approximation for the vector potential is obtained with the aid of the Poisson equation. The method is illustrated using numerical experiments.

  1. Anisotropic cosmology with vector field in the Noether approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Sun; Dong, Yi-Qiao

    2015-09-01

    In this Letter, based on Bianchi-I type cosmological model, we have studied the evolution of universe in terms of a vector field coupled to the scalar field. The symmetries of the system are calculated in the Noether approach, the scalar potential and the gauge kinetic function are also obtained following these symmetries. The dynamical equations are integrated numerically and the behaviors of cosmological evolution are presented certainly. Furthermore, the early-time and late-time scenarios are also reached asymptotically, that is, the universe is during the period of decelerating expansion in the early time while during the period of accelerating expansion in the late time. Moreover, we have also studied the expansion isotropization of the universe during evolution. There is no Kasner solution in the present case, while the universe would approach an isotropic Robertson-Walker one, concretely, a de Sitter type one in the late time.

  2. Multiresolution and Explicit Methods for Vector Field Analysis and Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielson, Gregory M.

    1997-01-01

    This is a request for a second renewal (3d year of funding) of a research project on the topic of multiresolution and explicit methods for vector field analysis and visualization. In this report, we describe the progress made on this research project during the second year and give a statement of the planned research for the third year. There are two aspects to this research project. The first is concerned with the development of techniques for computing tangent curves for use in visualizing flow fields. The second aspect of the research project is concerned with the development of multiresolution methods for curvilinear grids and their use as tools for visualization, analysis and archiving of flow data. We report on our work on the development of numerical methods for tangent curve computation first.

  3. Detailed analysis of permanent magnets by means of free field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husstedt, Hendrik; Kaltenbacher, Manfred

    2014-05-01

    A measurement technique is depicted that allows one to analyze the direction as well as the distribution of the remanence (or remanent magnetization) of permanent magnets. To this end, the magnetic field is measured at several positions around the magnet, and the magnet is subdivided into multiple cells. Then, an efficient method is presented how the remanence vectors of these cells are computed from the measurement values by means of finite element simulations. Finally, the measurement technique is applied to permanent magnets used in magnetically biased chokes which demonstrates the new possibilities and the practical applicability.

  4. Magnetic field waves at Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Charles W.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Lepping, Ronald P.; Mish, William H.; Wong, Hung K.

    1991-01-01

    The proposed research efforts funded by the UDAP grant to the BRI involve the study of magnetic field waves associated with the Uranian bow shock. This is a collaborative venture bringing together investigators at the BRI, Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), and Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). In addition, other collaborations have been formed with investigators granted UDAP funds for similar studies and with investigators affiliated with other Voyager experiments. These investigations and the corresponding collaborations are included in the report. The proposed effort as originally conceived included an examination of waves downstream from the shock within the magnetosheath. However, the observations of unexpected complexity and diversity within the upstream region have necessitated that we confine our efforts to those observations recorded upstream of the bow shock on the inbound and outbound legs of the encounter by the Voyager 2 spacecraft.

  5. Magnetic field effects on plasma ionization balance

    SciTech Connect

    Weisheit, J.C.

    1995-12-31

    Magnetic fields give rise to several phenomena that can significantly affect ionization balance in a plasma. Theoretical models commonly used to determine the charge state distribution (viz., ) of ions in non-magnetized plasmas are reviewed first, for both equilibrium and non-equilibrium situations. Then, after a brief survey of laboratory and cosmic plasmas with strong fields, B > 10{sup 6} Gauss, some of the ways such magnetic fields influence are highlighted. Most key problems have yet to be tackled.

  6. Nonhelical inverse transfer of a decaying turbulent magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Brandenburg, Axel; Kahniashvili, Tina; Tevzadze, Alexander G

    2015-02-20

    In the presence of magnetic helicity, inverse transfer from small to large scales is well known in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence and has applications in astrophysics, cosmology, and fusion plasmas. Using high resolution direct numerical simulations of magnetically dominated self-similarly decaying MHD turbulence, we report a similar inverse transfer even in the absence of magnetic helicity. We compute for the first time spectral energy transfer rates to show that this inverse transfer is about half as strong as with helicity, but in both cases the magnetic gain at large scales results from velocity at similar scales interacting with smaller-scale magnetic fields. This suggests that both inverse transfers are a consequence of universal mechanisms for magnetically dominated turbulence. Possible explanations include inverse cascading of the mean squared vector potential associated with local near two dimensionality and the shallower k^{2} subinertial range spectrum of kinetic energy forcing the magnetic field with a k^{4} subinertial range to attain larger-scale coherence. The inertial range shows a clear k^{-2} spectrum and is the first example of fully isotropic magnetically dominated MHD turbulence exhibiting weak turbulence scaling. PMID:25763960

  7. Minimizing magnetic fields for precision experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altarev, I.; Fierlinger, P.; Lins, T.; Marino, M. G.; Nießen, B.; Petzoldt, G.; Reisner, M.; Stuiber, S.; Sturm, M.; Taggart Singh, J.; Taubenheim, B.; Rohrer, H. K.; Schläpfer, U.

    2015-06-01

    An increasing number of measurements in fundamental and applied physics rely on magnetically shielded environments with sub nano-Tesla residual magnetic fields. State of the art magnetically shielded rooms (MSRs) consist of up to seven layers of high permeability materials in combination with highly conductive shields. Proper magnetic equilibration is crucial to obtain such low magnetic fields with small gradients in any MSR. Here, we report on a scheme to magnetically equilibrate MSRs with a 10 times reduced duration of the magnetic equilibration sequence and a significantly lower magnetic field with improved homogeneity. For the search of the neutron's electric dipole moment, our finding corresponds to a 40% improvement of the statistical reach of the measurement. However, this versatile procedure can improve the performance of any MSR for any application.

  8. Ferroelectric Cathodes in Transverse Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander Dunaevsky; Yevgeny Raitses; Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2002-07-29

    Experimental investigations of a planar ferroelectric cathode in a transverse magnetic field up to 3 kGs are presented. It is shown that the transverse magnetic field affects differently the operation of ferroelectric plasma cathodes in ''bright'' and ''dark'' modes in vacuum. In the ''bright'' mode, when the surface plasma is formed, the application of the transverse magnetic field leads to an increase of the surface plasma density. In the ''dark'' mode, the magnetic field inhibits the development of electron avalanches along the surface, as it does similarly in other kinds of surface discharges in the pre-breakdown mode.

  9. Five years of magnetic field management

    SciTech Connect

    Durkin, C.J.; Fogarty, R.P.; Halleran, T.M.; Mark, Dr. D.A.; Mukhopadhyay, A.

    1995-01-01

    The extensive publicity of epidemiological studies inferring correlation between 60 Hz magnetic fields and childhood leukemia prompted world wide research programs that have as a goal to determine if low frequency magnetic fields represent any risk for the general population, children or utility workers. While supporting this research effort through EPRI, Con Edison embarked on a technical research program aimed to: characterize magnetic fields as to intensity and variation in time; and investigate practical means to manage these magnetic fields through currently known methods. The final goal of these research projects is to establish viable methods to reduce magnetic field intensity to desired values at reasonable distances from the sources. This goal was pursued step by step, starting with an inventory of the main sources of magnetic fields in substations, distribution and transmission facilities and generating plants. The characterization of the sources helped to identify typical cases and select specific cases, far practical applications. The next step was to analyze the specific cases and develop design criteria for managing the magnetic fields in new installations. These criteria included physical arrangement of equipment based oil calculation of magnetic fields, cancellation effect, desired maximum field intensity at specific points and shielding with high magnetic permeability metals (mu-metal and steel). This paper summarizes the authors` experiences and shows the results of the specific projects completed in recent years.

  10. Magnetic fields in anisotropic relativistic stars

    E-print Network

    Vladimir Folomeev; Vladimir Dzhunushaliev

    2015-02-28

    Relativistic, spherically symmetric configurations consisting of a gravitating magnetized anisotropic fluid are studied. For such configurations, we obtain static equilibrium solutions with an axisymmetric, poloidal magnetic field produced by toroidal electric currents. The presence of such a field results in small deviations of the shape of the configuration from spherical symmetry. This in turn leads to the modification of an equation for the current and correspondingly to changes in the structure of the internal magnetic field for the systems supported by the anisotropic fluid, in contrast to the case of an isotropic fluid, where such deviations do not affect the magnetic field.

  11. Magnetic Fields in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haverkorn, Marijke

    This chapter presents a review of observational studies to determine the magnetic field in the Milky Way, both in the disk and in the halo, focused on recent developments and on magnetic fields in the diffuse interstellar medium. I discuss some terminology which is confusingly or inconsistently used and try to summarize current status of our knowledge on magnetic field configurations and strengths in the Milky Way. Although many open questions still exist, more and more conclusions can be drawn on the large-scale and small-scale components of the Galactic magnetic field. The chapter is concluded with a brief outlook to observational projects in the near future.

  12. Killing Vector Fields, Maxwell Equations and Lorentzian Spacetimes

    E-print Network

    Waldyr A. Rodrigues Jr

    2008-08-13

    In this paper we first analyze the structure of Maxwell equations in a Lorentzian spacetime where the potential A is proportional to 1-form K physically equivalent to a Killing vector field (supposed to exist). We show that such A obeys the Lorenz gauge and also a wave equation that can be written in terms of the covariant D'Alembertian or the Ricci operator. Moreover, we determine the correct current defined by that potential showing that it is of superconducting type, being two times the product of the components of A by the Ricci 1-form fields. We also study the structure of the spacetime generated by the coupled system consisting of a electromagnetic field F = dA (A, as above), an ideal charged fluid with dynamics described by an action function S and the gravitational field. We show that Einstein equations in this situation is then equivalent to Maxwell equations with a current givn by fFAF (the product meaning the Clifford product of the corresponding form fields), where f is a scalar function which satisfies a well determined algebraic quadratic equation.

  13. Swarm: ESA's Magnetic Field Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plank, G.; Floberghagen, R.; Menard, Y.; Haagmans, R.

    2013-12-01

    Swarm is the fifth Earth Explorer mission in ESA's Living Planet Programme, and is scheduled for launch in fall 2013. The objective of the Swarm mission is to provide the best-ever survey of the geomagnetic field and its temporal evolution using a constellation of three identical satellites. The mission shall deliver data that allow access to new insights into the Earth system by improved scientific understanding of the Earth's interior and near-Earth electromagnetic environment. After launch and triple satellite release at an initial altitude of about 490 km, a pair of the satellites will fly side-by-side with slowly decaying altitude, while the third satellite will be lifted to 530 km to complete the Swarm constellation. High-precision and high-resolution measurements of the strength, direction and variation of the magnetic field, complemented by precise navigation, accelerometer and electric field measurements, will provide the observations required to separate and model various sources of the geomagnetic field and near-Earth current systems. The mission science goals are to provide a unique view into Earth's core dynamics, mantle conductivity, crustal magnetisation, ionospheric and magnetospheric current systems and upper atmosphere dynamics - ranging from understanding the geodynamo to contributing to space weather. The scientific objectives and results from recent scientific studies will be presented. In addition the current status of the project, which is presently in the final stage of the development phase, will be addressed. A consortium of European scientific institutes is developing a distributed processing system to produce geophysical (Level 2) data products for the Swarm user community. The setup of the Swarm ground segment and the contents of the data products will be addressed. In case the Swarm satellites are already in orbit, a summary of the on-going mission operations activities will be given. More information on Swarm can be found at www.esa.int/esaLP/LPswarm.html.

  14. A Study of Magnetic Fields on Bright-Rimmed Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusune, Takayoshi; Sugitani, Koji

    2015-08-01

    Bright-rimmed clouds (BRCs), which are located at periphery of HII regions, are considered to be potential sites for induced star formation by UV radiation from nearby massive stars. Many theorists have developed 2D/3D hydrodynamical models to understand dynamical evolution of such molecular clouds. Most simulations, however, did not always include the magnetic field effect, which is of importance in the astrophysics. This is because that there are few observation results examining the magnetic field configuration of BRCs in detail. In order to obtain information on magnetic field in and around BRCs, we have made near-infrared (JHKs) imaging polarimetry toward 24 BRCs showing strong interaction with HII region (Urquhart et al. 2009). We used the imaging polarimeter SIRPOL/SIRIUS (FOV ~7.7’ x 7.7’) mounted on IRSF 1.4 m telescope at the South African Astronomical Observatory.We found that polarization vectors, i.e., magnetic fields inside the clouds, follow the curved bright rim just behind the bright rim for almost all of the observed BRCs. Our investigation into the relation between the ambient magnetic field direction and the UV radiation direction suggests a following tendency. In the case that the ambient magnetic field is perpendicular to the direction of incident UV radiation, the clouds are likely to have bright rims with small curvatures. On the other hand, in the case that the ambient field is parallel to the UV radiation, they would have those with larger curvatures. In this presentation, we will present the physical quantities for these BRCs (i.e., magnetic field strength, the post shock pressure by the ionization front, etc.) as well as these morphological results.

  15. Low-degree Structure in Mercury's Planetary Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Brian J.; Johnson, Catherine L.; Korth, Haje; Winslow, Reka M.; Borovsky, Joseph E.; Purucker, Michael E.; Slavin, James A.; Solomon, Sean C.; Zuber, Maria T.; McNutt, Ralph L. Jr.

    2012-01-01

    The structure of Mercury's internal magnetic field has been determined from analysis of orbital Magnetometer measurements by the MESSENGER spacecraft. We identified the magnetic equator on 531 low-altitude and 120 high-altitude equator crossings from the zero in the radial cylindrical magnetic field component, Beta (sub rho). The low-altitude crossings are offset 479 +/- 6 km northward, indicating an offset of the planetary dipole. The tilt of the magnetic pole relative to the planetary spin axis is less than 0.8 deg.. The high-altitude crossings yield a northward offset of the magnetic equator of 486 +/- 74 km. A field with only nonzero dipole and octupole coefficients also matches the low-altitude observations but cannot yield off-equatorial Beta (sub rho) = 0 at radial distances greater than 3520 km. We compared offset dipole and other descriptions of the field with vector field observations below 600 km for 13 longitudinally distributed, magnetically quiet orbits. An offset dipole with southward directed moment of 190 nT-R-cube (sub M) yields root-mean-square (RMS) residuals below 14 nT, whereas a field with only dipole and octupole terms tuned to match the polar field and the low-altitude magnetic equator crossings yields RMS residuals up to 68 nT. Attributing the residuals from the offset-dipole field to axial degree 3 and 4 contributions we estimate that the Gauss coefficient magnitudes for the additional terms are less than 4% and 7%, respectively, relative to the dipole. The axial alignment and prominent quadrupole are consistent with a non-convecting layer above a deep dynamo in Mercury's fluid outer core.

  16. Three Dimensional Probability Distributions of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podesta, J. J.

    2014-12-01

    Empirical probability density functions (PDFs) of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) have been derived from spacecraft data since the early years of the space age. A survey of the literature shows that past studies have investigated the separate Cartesian components of the magnetic field, the vector magnitude, and the direction of the IMF by means of one-dimensional or two-dimensional PDFs. But, to my knowledge, there exist no studies which investigate the three dimensional nature of the IMF by means of three dimensional PDFs, either in (Bx,By,Bz)(B_x,B_y,B_z)-coordinates or (BR,BT,BN)(B_R,B_T,B_N)-coordinates or some other appropriate system of coordinates. Likewise, there exist no studies which investigate three dimensional PDFs of magnetic field fluctuations, that is, vector differences bmB(t+?)-bmB(t)bm{B}(t+tau)-bm{B}(t). In this talk, I shall present examples of three dimensional PDFs obtained from spacecraft data that demonstrate the solar wind magnetic field possesses a very interesting spatial structure that, to my knowledge, has not previously been identified. Perhaps because of the well known model of Barnes (1981) in which the magnitude of the IMF remains constant, it may be commonly believed that there is nothing new to learn from a full three dimensional PDF. To the contrary, there is much to learn from the investigation of three dimensional PDFs of the solar wind plasma velocity and the magnetic field, as well as three dimensional PDFs of their fluctuations. Knowledge of these PDFs will not only improve understanding of solar wind physics, it is an essential prerequisite for the construction of realistic models of the stochastic time series measured by a single spacecraft, one of the longstanding goals of space physics research. In addition, three dimensional PDFs contain valuable information about the anisotropy of solar wind fluctuations in three dimensional physical space, information that may help identify the reason why the three dimensional wave vector spectrum of magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind is not axisymmetric about the direction of the mean magnetic field as recent observations in the ecliptic plane at 1 AU have shown.

  17. Reducing Field Distortion in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2010-01-01

    A concept for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system that would utilize a relatively weak magnetic field provides for several design features that differ significantly from the corresponding features of conventional MRI systems. Notable among these features are a magnetic-field configuration that reduces (relative to the conventional configuration) distortion and blurring of the image, the use of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer as the detector, and an imaging procedure suited for the unconventional field configuration and sensor. In a typical application of MRI, a radio-frequency pulse is used to excite precession of the magnetic moments of protons in an applied magnetic field, and the decaying precession is detected for a short time following the pulse. The precession occurs at a resonance frequency proportional to the strengths of the magnetic field and the proton magnetic moment. The magnetic field is configured to vary with position in a known way; hence, by virtue of the aforesaid proportionality, the resonance frequency varies with position in a known way. In other words, position is encoded as resonance frequency. MRI using magnetic fields weaker than those of conventional MRI offers several advantages, including cheaper and smaller equipment, greater compatibility with metallic objects, and higher image quality because of low susceptibility distortion and enhanced spin-lattice-relaxation- time contrast. SQUID MRI is being developed into a practical MRI method for applied magnetic flux densities of the order of only 100 T

  18. High-field magnetization of polycrystalline praseodymium

    SciTech Connect

    Leyarovski, E.; Mrachkov, J.; Gilewski, A.; Mydlarz, T.

    1987-06-01

    The field dependence of the induced magnetic moment in polycrystalline Pr is studied in impulse magnetic fields up to 45 T at 4.2 K and in stationary magnetic fields up to 18 T at 20 and 30 K. No anomalies in the magnetization have been observed which might be associated with the metamagnetic phase transition in single crystals at 31.5 T (K. A. McEwen, G. J. Cock, L. W. Roeland, and A. R. Mackinstosh, Phys. Rev. Lett. 30, 287 (1973)), as well as with any changes of the orientation of the magnetic moments characteristic for an antiferromagnetic. The observed magnetization is satisfactorily described using a molecular field Hamiltonian including the crystal electric field potential, exchange interactions, and Zeeman-effect term.

  19. High-field magnetization of polycrystalline praseodymium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leyarovski, E.; Mrachkov, J.; Gilewski, A.; Mydlarz, T.

    1987-06-01

    The field dependence of the induced magnetic moment in polycrystalline Pr is studied in impulse magnetic fields up to 45 T at 4.2 K and in stationary magnetic fields up to 18 T at 20 and 30 K. No anomalies in the magnetization have been observed which might be associated with the metamagnetic phase transition in single crystals at 31.5 T [K. A. McEwen, G. J. Cock, L. W. Roeland, and A. R. Mackinstosh, Phys. Rev. Lett. 30, 287 (1973)], as well as with any changes of the orientation of the magnetic moments characteristic for an antiferromagnetic. The observed magnetization is satisfactorily described using a molecular field Hamiltonian including the crystal electric field potential, exchange interactions, and Zeeman-effect term.

  20. Image-Optimized Coronal Magnetic Field Reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, S. I.; Davila, J. M.; Uritsky, V. M.

    2014-12-01

    The magnetic field dominates many of the most important and puzzling processes in the corona. In the absence of direct measurements, solar physicists have struggled for decades to accurately reconstruct the coronal magnetic field using photospheric magnetograms. Even with today's excellent magnetographs, these reconstructions are plagued by several problems, among them long computation time, and poor agreement with the structures seen in EUV and coronagraph images. However no method exists for systematically improving the agreement between coronal images and magnetic reconstructions. Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus will bring us closer to the sun we have ever been before, but taking full advantage of that opportunity requires accurate coronal magnetic field reconstructions so that we can connect the in situ observations offered by these unique missions to magnetic sources at the surface of the Sun. In this study we propose a method to improve coronal magnetic field reconstructions by optimizing agreement between the reconstructed field and white-light coronagraph images.

  1. Vector spin modeling for magnetic tunnel junctions with voltage dependent effects

    SciTech Connect

    Manipatruni, Sasikanth Nikonov, Dmitri E.; Young, Ian A.

    2014-05-07

    Integration and co-design of CMOS and spin transfer devices requires accurate vector spin conduction modeling of magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) devices. A physically realistic model of the MTJ should comprehend the spin torque dynamics of nanomagnet interacting with an injected vector spin current and the voltage dependent spin torque. Vector spin modeling allows for calculation of 3 component spin currents and potentials along with the charge currents/potentials in non-collinear magnetic systems. Here, we show 4-component vector spin conduction modeling of magnetic tunnel junction devices coupled with spin transfer torque in the nanomagnet. Nanomagnet dynamics, voltage dependent spin transport, and thermal noise are comprehended in a self-consistent fashion. We show comparison of the model with experimental magnetoresistance (MR) of MTJs and voltage degradation of MR with voltage. Proposed model enables MTJ circuit design that comprehends voltage dependent spin torque effects, switching error rates, spin degradation, and back hopping effects.

  2. Vector spin modeling for magnetic tunnel junctions with voltage dependent effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manipatruni, Sasikanth; Nikonov, Dmitri E.; Young, Ian A.

    2014-05-01

    Integration and co-design of CMOS and spin transfer devices requires accurate vector spin conduction modeling of magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) devices. A physically realistic model of the MTJ should comprehend the spin torque dynamics of nanomagnet interacting with an injected vector spin current and the voltage dependent spin torque. Vector spin modeling allows for calculation of 3 component spin currents and potentials along with the charge currents/potentials in non-collinear magnetic systems. Here, we show 4-component vector spin conduction modeling of magnetic tunnel junction devices coupled with spin transfer torque in the nanomagnet. Nanomagnet dynamics, voltage dependent spin transport, and thermal noise are comprehended in a self-consistent fashion. We show comparison of the model with experimental magnetoresistance (MR) of MTJs and voltage degradation of MR with voltage. Proposed model enables MTJ circuit design that comprehends voltage dependent spin torque effects, switching error rates, spin degradation, and back hopping effects.

  3. Towards thrust vector control with a 3D steerable magnetic nozzle

    E-print Network

    Carlos III de Madrid, Universidad

    Towards thrust vector control with a 3D steerable magnetic nozzle IEPC-2015-414/ISTS-2015-b-414 Presented at Joint Conference of 30th International Symposium on Space Technology and Science, 34th Madrid, Legan´es, Spain A steerable magnetic nozzle concept is presented that enables contactless thrust

  4. The Physics of Attraction and Repulsion: Magnetism and Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakotte, Heinz

    2001-11-01

    The development of new materials with improved magnetic properties completely changed the modern world in the past decades. Recent progress is predominantly due to a better understanding of magnetism that has gone far beyond compass needles rotating in a magnetic field and bar magnets attracting or repelling each other. New magnetic materials are used to build smaller and smaller read/write heads and hard disks with increased storage capacity, developments that are responsible the revolution in the computer industry. Another example is the field of magnetic levitation that became feasible for commercial applications with the discovery of new superconducting materials, and a prototype train is under development in Japan. In medicine, the development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides an alternative to other (destructive) radiation techniques.

  5. Magnetic field decay in model SSC dipoles

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, W.S.; Althaus, R.F.; Barale, P.J.; Benjegerdes, R.W.; Green, M.A.; Green, M.I.; Scanlan, R.M.

    1988-08-01

    We have observed that some of our model SSC dipoles have long time constant decays of the magnetic field harmonics with amplitudes large enough to result in significant beam loss, if they are not corrected. The magnets were run at constant current at the SSC injection field level of 0.3 tesla for one to three hours and changes in the magnetic field were observed. One explanation for the observed field decay is time dependent superconductor magnetization. Another explanation involves flux creep or flux flow. Data are presented on how the decay changes with previous flux history. Similar magnets with different Nb-Ti filament spacings and matrix materials have different long time field decay. A theoretical model using proximity coupling and flux creep for the observed field decay is discussed. 10 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. MAGNETIC FIELDS IN INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS FROM ZEEMAN OBSERVATIONS: INFERENCE OF TOTAL FIELD STRENGTHS BY BAYESIAN ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Crutcher, Richard M.; Wandelt, Benjamin; Heiles, Carl; Falgarone, Edith

    2010-12-10

    The only direct measurements of interstellar magnetic field strengths depend on the Zeeman effect, which samples the line-of-sight component B{sub z} of the magnetic vector. In this paper, we use a Bayesian approach to analyze the observed probability density function (PDF) of B{sub z} from Zeeman surveys of H I, OH, and CN spectral lines in order to infer a density-dependent stochastic model of the total field strength B in diffuse and molecular clouds. We find that at n < 300 cm{sup -3} (in the diffuse interstellar medium sampled by H I lines), B does not scale with density. This suggests that diffuse clouds are assembled by flows along magnetic field lines, which would increase the density but not the magnetic field strength. We further find strong evidence for B in molecular clouds being randomly distributed between very small values and a maximum that scales with volume density n as B {proportional_to} n {sup 0.65} for n>300 cm{sup -3}, with an uncertainty at the 50% level in the power-law exponent of about {+-}0.05. This break-point density could be interpreted as the average density at which parsec-scale clouds become self-gravitating. Both the uniform PDF of total field strengths and the scaling with density suggest that magnetic fields in molecular clouds are often too weak to dominate the star formation process. The stochasticity of the total field strength B implies that many fields are so weak that the mass/flux ratio in many clouds must be significantly supercritical. A two-thirds power law comes from isotropic contraction of gas too weakly magnetized for the magnetic field to affect the morphology of the collapse. On the other hand, our study does not rule out some clouds having strong magnetic fields with critical mass/flux ratios.

  7. Graphene Nanoribbon in Sharply Localized Magnetic Fields

    E-print Network

    Abdulaziz D. Alhaidari; Hocine Bahlouli; Abderrahim El Mouhafid; Ahmed Jellal

    2013-03-20

    We study the effect of a sharply localized magnetic field on the electron transport in a strip (ribbon) of graphene sheet, which allows to give results for the transmission and reflection probability through magnetic barriers. The magnetic field is taken as a single and double delta type localized functions, which are treated later as the zero width limit of gaussian fields. For both field configurations, we evaluate analytically and numerically their transmission and reflection coefficients. The possibility of spacial confinement due to the inhomogeneous field configuration is also investigated.

  8. Control of magnetism by electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsukura, Fumihiro; Tokura, Yoshinori; Ohno, Hideo

    2015-03-01

    The electrical manipulation of magnetism and magnetic properties has been achieved across a number of different material systems. For example, applying an electric field to a ferromagnetic material through an insulator alters its charge-carrier population. In the case of thin films of ferromagnetic semiconductors, this change in carrier density in turn affects the magnetic exchange interaction and magnetic anisotropy; in ferromagnetic metals, it instead changes the Fermi level position at the interface that governs the magnetic anisotropy of the metal. In multiferroics, an applied electric field couples with the magnetization through electrical polarization. This Review summarizes the experimental progress made in the electrical manipulation of magnetization in such materials, discusses our current understanding of the mechanisms, and finally presents the future prospects of the field.

  9. Ballistic dynamics of Dirac particles in electro-magnetic fields

    E-print Network

    Josef Mehringer; Edgardo Stockmeyer

    2014-11-21

    Investigating properties of two-dimensional Dirac operators coupled to an electric and a magnetic field (perpendicular to the plane) requires in general unbounded (vector-) potentials. If the system has a certain symmetry, the fields can be described by one-dimensional potentials $V$ and $A$. Assuming that $|A|<|V|$ outside some arbitrary large ball, we show that absolutely continuous states of the effective Dirac operators spread ballistically. These results are based on well-known methods in spectral dynamics together with certain new Hilbert-Schmidt bounds. We use Lorentz boosts to derive these new estimates.

  10. Cosmic microwave background polarization signals from tangled magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Seshadri, T R; Subramanian, K

    2001-09-01

    Tangled, primordial cosmic magnetic fields create small rotational velocity perturbations on the last scattering surface of the cosmic microwave background radiation. For fields which redshift to a present value of B0 = 3 x 10(-9) G, these vector modes are shown to generate polarization anisotropies of order 0.1-4 microK on small angular scales (500

  11. Interplanetary stream magnetism: Kinematic effects. [solar magnetic fields and wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Barouch, E.

    1974-01-01

    The particle density, and the magnetic field intensity and direction are calculated in corotating streams of the solar wind, assuming that the solar wind velocity is constant and radial and that its azimuthal variations are not two rapid. The effects of the radial velocity profile in corotating streams on the magnetic fields were examined using kinematic approximation and a variety of field configurations on the inner boundary. Kinematic and dynamic effects are discussed.

  12. Magnetic field evolution of accreting neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Istomin, Y. N.; Semerikov, I. A.

    2016-01-01

    The flow of a matter, accreting on to a magnetized neutron star, is accompanied by an electric current. The closing of the electric current occurs in the crust of a neutron stars in the polar region across the magnetic field. But the conductivity of the crust along the magnetic field greatly exceeds the conductivity across the field, so the current penetrates deep into the crust down up to the superconducting core. The magnetic field, generated by the accretion current, increases greatly with the depth of penetration due to the Hall conductivity of the crust is also much larger than the transverse conductivity. As a result, the current begins to flow mainly in the toroidal direction, creating a strong longitudinal magnetic field, far exceeding an initial dipole field. This field exists only in the narrow polar tube of r width, narrowing with the depth, i.e. with increasing of the crust density ?, r ? ?-1/4. Accordingly, the magnetic field B in the tube increases with the depth, B??1/2, and reaches the value of about 1017 Gauss in the core. It destroys superconducting vortices in the core of a star in the narrow region of the size of the order of 10 cm. Because of generated density gradient of vortices, they constantly flow into this dead zone and the number of vortices decreases, the magnetic field of a star decreases as well. The attenuation of the magnetic field is exponential, B = B0(1 + t/?)-1. The characteristic time of decreasing of the magnetic field ? is equal to ? ? 103 yr. Thus, the magnetic field of accreted neutron stars decreases to values of 108-109 Gauss during 107-106 yr.

  13. Two-axis magnetic field sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jander, Albrecht (Inventor); Nordman, Catherine A. (Inventor); Qian, Zhenghong (Inventor); Smith, Carl H. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A ferromagnetic thin-film based magnetic field sensor with first and second sensitive direction sensing structures each having a nonmagnetic intermediate layer with two major surfaces on opposite sides thereof having a magnetization reference layer on one and an anisotropic ferromagnetic material sensing layer on the other having a length in a selected length direction and a smaller width perpendicular thereto and parallel to the relatively fixed magnetization direction. The relatively fixed magnetization direction of said magnetization reference layer in each is oriented in substantially parallel to the substrate but substantially perpendicular to that of the other. An annealing process is used to form the desired magnetization directions.

  14. The Unified First law in "Cosmic Triad" Vector Field Scenario

    E-print Network

    Yi Zhang; Yungui Gong; Zong-Hong Zhu

    2011-08-04

    In this letter, we try to apply the unified first law to the "cosmic triad" vector field scenario both in the minimal coupling case and in the non-minimalcoupling case. After transferring the non-minimally coupling action in Jordan frame to Einstein frame, the correct dynamical equation (Friedmann equation) is gotten in a thermal equilibrium process by using the already existing entropy while the entropy in the non-minimal coupled "cosmic triad" scenario has not been derived. And after transferring the variables back to Jordan frame, the corresponding Friedmann equation is demonstrated to be correct. For complete arguments, we also calculate the related Misner-Sharp energy in Jordan and Einstein frames.

  15. A vector field method for relativistic transport equations with applications

    E-print Network

    Fajman, David; Smulevici, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    We adapt the vector field method of Klainerman to the study of relativistic transport equations. First, we prove robust decay estimates for velocity averages of solutions to the relativistic massive and massless transport equations, without any compact support requirements (in $x$ or $v$) for the distribution functions. In the second part of this article, we apply our method to the study of the massive and massless Vlasov-Nordstr\\"om systems. In the massive case, we prove global existence and (almost) optimal decay estimates for solutions in dimensions $n \\geq 4$ under some smallness assumptions. In the massless case, the system decouples and we prove optimal decay estimates for the solutions in dimensions $n \\geq 4$ for arbitrarily large data, and in dimension $3$ under some smallness assumptions, exploiting a certain form of the null condition satisfied by the equations. The $3$-dimensional massive case requires an extension of our method and will be treated in future work.

  16. A vector field method for relativistic transport equations with applications

    E-print Network

    David Fajman; Jérémie Joudioux; Jacques Smulevici

    2015-10-16

    We adapt the vector field method of Klainerman to the study of relativistic transport equations. First, we prove robust decay estimates for velocity averages of solutions to the relativistic massive and massless transport equations, without any compact support requirements (in $x$ or $v$) for the distribution functions. In the second part of this article, we apply our method to the study of the massive and massless Vlasov-Nordstr\\"om systems. In the massive case, we prove global existence and (almost) optimal decay estimates for solutions in dimensions $n \\geq 4$ under some smallness assumptions. In the massless case, the system decouples and we prove optimal decay estimates for the solutions in dimensions $n \\geq 4$ for arbitrarily large data, and in dimension $3$ under some smallness assumptions, exploiting a certain form of the null condition satisfied by the equations. The $3$-dimensional massive case requires an extension of our method and will be treated in future work.

  17. Energy of magnetic moment of superconducting current in magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurtovoi, V. L.; Nikulov, A. V.

    2015-09-01

    The energy of magnetic moment of the persistent current circulating in superconducting loop in an externally produced magnetic field is not taken into account in the theory of quantization effects because of identification of the Hamiltonian with the energy. This identification misleads if, in accordance with the conservation law, the energy of a state is the energy expended for its creation. The energy of magnetic moment is deduced from a creation history of the current state in magnetic field both in the classical and quantum case. But taking this energy into account demolishes the agreement between theory and experiment. Impartial consideration of this problem discovers the contradiction both in theory and experiment.

  18. Magnetic field perturbations in the systems where only poloidal magnetic field is present*

    E-print Network

    magnetic field is present). Examples include FRC, levitated dipoles, and long diffuse pinches. We consider · Small perturbations in the general geometry · Uniform magnetic field imposed on the levitated dipole an infinitesimal perturbation causes a dramatic change of the magnetic topology: without perturbations, each field

  19. The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaime, M.; Lacerda, A.; Takano, Y.; Boebinger, G. S.

    2006-11-01

    The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, established in 1990 with support from the National Science Foundation, the State of Florida, and the US Department of Energy, is a facility open to external users around the world. The experimental capabilities are distributed in three campuses. In Tallahassee, Florida, continuous magnetic fields are produced by means of superconducting and resistive magnets reaching fields of up to 33T (resistive), and 45T (hybrid). EMR, ICR, and a 900MHz wide bore NMR magnet are also available. The facility in Gainesville, Florida, is devoted to generating extremely low temperatures in the presence of external magnetic fields (15T, down to 0.4mK), and large MRI imaging capabilities. In Los Alamos, New Mexico, a 9 kV-capable capacitor bank and a number of different liquid Nitrogen-cooled resistive magnets produce repetitive pulses up to 75 T and now a single-shot pulsed up to 300T.

  20. Diffusion of magnetic field via turbulent reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos de Lima, Reinaldo; Lazarian, Alexander; de Gouveia Dal Pino, Elisabete M.; Cho, Jungyeon

    2010-05-01

    The diffusion of astrophysical magnetic fields in conducting fluids in the presence of turbulence depends on whether magnetic fields can change their topology via reconnection in highly conducting media. Recent progress in understanding fast magnetic reconnection in the presence of turbulence is reassuring that the magnetic field behavior in computer simulations and turbulent astrophysical environments is similar, as far as magnetic reconnection is concerned. This makes it meaningful to perform MHD simulations of turbulent flows in order to understand the diffusion of magnetic field in astrophysical environments. Our studies of magnetic field diffusion in turbulent medium reveal interesting new phenomena. First of all, our 3D MHD simulations initiated with anti-correlating magnetic field and gaseous density exhibit at later times a de-correlation of the magnetic field and density, which corresponds well to the observations of the interstellar media. While earlier studies stressed the role of either ambipolar diffusion or time-dependent turbulent fluctuations for de-correlating magnetic field and density, we get the effect of permanent de-correlation with one fluid code, i.e. without invoking ambipolar diffusion. In addition, in the presence of gravity and turbulence, our 3D simulations show the decrease of the magnetic flux-to-mass ratio as the gaseous density at the center of the gravitational potential increases. We observe this effect both in the situations when we start with equilibrium distributions of gas and magnetic field and when we follow the evolution of collapsing dynamically unstable configurations. Thus the process of turbulent magnetic field removal should be applicable both to quasi-static subcritical molecular clouds and cores and violently collapsing supercritical entities. The increase of the gravitational potential as well as the magnetization of the gas increases the segregation of the mass and magnetic flux in the saturated final state of the simulations, supporting the notion that the reconnection-enabled diffusivity relaxes the magnetic field + gas system in the gravitational field to its minimal energy state. This effect is expected to play an important role in star formation, from its initial stages of concentrating interstellar gas to the final stages of the accretion to the forming protostar.

  1. The average stress in a suspension of cube-shaped magnetic particles subject to shear and magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallavajula, Rajesh K.; Archer, Lynden A.; Koch, Donald L.

    2015-09-01

    The effect of a homogeneous magnetic field (H) on the bulk stress in a dilute suspension of weakly Brownian, magnetic cubes suspended in a Newtonian fluid subjected to a linear shear flow is studied. The stresslet on each cube is anisotropic and depends on its orientation. Application of a magnetic field results in anisotropy in the orientation distribution. The steady-state orientation distribution is derived as a function of the angle between the directions of the magnetic field and the fluid vorticity vector and the ratio of the magnetic torque to the viscous torque. Knowledge of the distribution function is used to derive a general expression for the bulk stress in a general linear flow field and a magnetic field. Specific numerical results are obtained for the intrinsic viscosity in a simple shear flow when the magnetic field is either parallel or perpendicular to the vorticity. When the magnetic field is perpendicular to vorticity, we find that the intrinsic viscosity increases at first with increasing shear rate passes through a maximum and then shear thins. The intrinsic viscosity can vary from 3.25 to 5.5 in response to changes in the relative strengths of the shear and magnetic fields. The maximum value of 5.5 is obtained when the magnetic moment of the cube, which is assumed to be parallel to the normal of one of the faces, lies in the flow gradient plane at an angle of ?/4 from the flow direction.

  2. A weak combined magnetic field changes root gravitropism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordyum, E. L.; Bogatina, N. I.; Kalinina, Ja. M.; Sheykina, N. V.

    Immobile higher plants are oriented in the gravitational field due to gravitropim that is a physiological growth reaction and consists of three phases: reception of a gravitational signal by statocytes, its transduction to the elongation zone, and finally the organ bending. According to the starch-statolith hypothesis, amyloplasts in the specialized graviperceptive cells - statocytes sediment in the direction of a gravitational vector in the distal part of a cell. The polar arrangement of organelles is maintained by means of the cytoskeleton. On the Kholodny-Went's, theory the root bending is provided by the polar movement of auxin from a root cap to the elongation zone. It is also known that gravistimulation initiates a rapid Ca2+ redistribution in a root apex. Calcium ions modify an activity of many cytoskeletal proteins and clustering of calcium channels may be directed by actin microfilaments. Although the available data show the Ca2+ and cytoskeleton participation in graviperception and signal transduction, the clear evidence with regard to the participation of cytoskeletal elements and calcium ions in these processes is therefore substantial but still circumstantial and requires new experimental data. Roots are characterized with positive gravitropism, i. e. they grow in the direction of a gravitational vector. It was first shown by us that roots change the direction of a gravitropic reaction under gravistimulation in the weak combined magnetic field with a frequency of 32 Hz. 2-3-day old cress seedlings were gravistimulated in moist chambers, which are placed in ?-metal shields. Inside ? -metal shields, combined magnetic fields have been created. Experiments were performed in darkness at temperature 20±10C. Measurements of the magnitude of magnetic fields were carried out with a flux-gate magnetometer. Cress roots reveal negative gravitropism, i. e. they grow in the opposite direction to a gravitational vector, during 2 h of gravistimulation and then roots begin to grow more or less parallel to the Earth's surface, i.e. they reveal plagiotropism. Since such combined magnetic field is adjusted to the cyclotron frequency of Ca2+ ions, these observations demonstrate the participation of calcium ions in root gravitropism. Cyclotron frequency of Ca2+ ions is the formal frequency of ion rotation in the static magnetic field. Simultaneous applying the altering magnetic field with the same frequency can provoke auto-oscillation in the system and consequently change the rate and/or the direction of Ca2+ ion flow in a root under gravistimulation. The data of light, electron, and confocal laser microscopy and kinetics of a gravitropic reaction, which have been obtained on such the new original model, are discussed in the light of current concepts of root gravitropism.

  3. Magnetic fields in the early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso, D.; Rubinstein, H. R.

    2001-07-01

    This review concerns the origin and the possible effects of magnetic fields in the early Universe. We start by providing the reader with a short overview of the current state of the art of observations of cosmic magnetic fields. We then illustrate the arguments in favor of a primordial origin of magnetic fields in the galaxies and in the clusters of galaxies. We argue that the most promising way to test this hypothesis is to look for possible imprints of magnetic fields on the temperature and polarization anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR). With this purpose in mind, we provide a review of the most relevant effects of magnetic fields on the CMBR. A long chapter of this review is dedicated to particle-physics-inspired models which predict the generation of magnetic fields during the early Universe evolution. Although it is still unclear if any of these models can really explain the origin of galactic and intergalactic magnetic fields, we show that interesting effects may arise anyhow. Among these effects, we discuss the consequences of strong magnetic fields on the big-bang nucleosynthesis, on the masses and couplings of the matter constituents, on the electroweak phase transition, and on the baryon and lepton number violating sphaleron processes. Several intriguing common aspects, and possible interplay, of magnetogenesis and baryogenesis are also discussed.

  4. Magnetic Fields at the Center of Coils

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binder, Philippe; Hui, Kaleonui; Goldman, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    In this note we synthesize and extend expressions for the magnetic field at the center of very short and very long current-carrying coils. Elementary physics textbooks present the following equation for the magnetic field inside a very long current-carrying coil (solenoid): B[subscript sol] = µ[subscript 0] (N/L) I, (1) where I is the current, N…

  5. Metric space analysis of systems immersed in a magnetic field

    E-print Network

    P. M. Sharp; I. D'Amico

    2015-09-23

    Understanding the behavior of quantum systems subject to magnetic fields is of fundamental importance and underpins quantum technologies. However, modeling these systems is a complex task, because of many-body interactions and because many-body approaches such as density functional theory get complicated by the presence of a vector potential into the system Hamiltonian. We use the metric space approach to quantum mechanics to study the effects of varying the magnetic vector potential on quantum systems. The application of this technique to model systems in the ground state provides insight into the fundamental mapping at the core of current density functional theory, which relates the many-body wavefunction, particle density and paramagnetic current density. We show that the role of the paramagnetic current density in this relationship becomes crucial when considering states with different magnetic quantum numbers, $m$. Additionally, varying the magnetic field uncovers a richer complexity for the "band structure" present in ground state metric spaces, as compared to previous studies varying scalar potentials. The robust nature of the metric space approach is strengthened by demonstrating the gauge invariance of the related metric for the paramagnetic current density. We go beyond ground state properties and apply this approach to excited states. The results suggest that, under specific conditions, a universal behavior may exist for the relationships between the physical quantities defining the system.

  6. Permanent magnet edge-field quadrupole

    DOEpatents

    Tatchyn, R.O.

    1997-01-21

    Planar permanent magnet edge-field quadrupoles for use in particle accelerating machines and in insertion devices designed to generate spontaneous or coherent radiation from moving charged particles are disclosed. The invention comprises four magnetized rectangular pieces of permanent magnet material with substantially similar dimensions arranged into two planar arrays situated to generate a field with a substantially dominant quadrupole component in regions close to the device axis. 10 figs.

  7. Permanent magnet edge-field quadrupole

    DOEpatents

    Tatchyn, Roman O. (Mountain View, CA)

    1997-01-01

    Planar permanent magnet edge-field quadrupoles for use in particle accelerating machines and in insertion devices designed to generate spontaneous or coherent radiation from moving charged particles are disclosed. The invention comprises four magnetized rectangular pieces of permanent magnet material with substantially similar dimensions arranged into two planar arrays situated to generate a field with a substantially dominant quadrupole component in regions close to the device axis.

  8. The formation of sunspot penumbra. Magnetic field properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei, R.; Bello González, N.; Schlichenmaier, R.

    2012-01-01

    Aims: We study the magnetic flux emergence and formation of a sunspot penumbra in the active region NOAA 11024. Methods: We simultaneously observed the Stokes parameters of the photospheric iron lines at 1089.6 nm with the TIP and 617.3 nm with the GFPI spectropolarimeters along with broad-band images using G-band and Ca ii K filters at the German VTT. The photospheric magnetic field vector was reconstructed from an inversion of the measured Stokes profiles. Using the AZAM code, we converted the inclination from line-of-sight (LOS) to the local reference frame (LRF). Results: Individual filaments are resolved in maps of magnetic parameters. The formation of the penumbra is intimately related to the inclined magnetic field. No penumbra forms in areas with strong magnetic field strength and small inclination. Within 4.5 h observing time, the LRF magnetic flux of the penumbra increases from 9.7 × 1020 to 18.2 × 1020 Mx, while the magnetic flux of the umbra remains constant at ~3.8 × 1020 Mx. Magnetic flux in the immediate surroundings is incorporated into the spot, and new flux is supplied via small flux patches (SFPs), which on average have a flux of 2-3 × 1018 Mx. The spot's flux increase rate of 4.2 × 1016 Mx s-1 corresponds to the merging of one SFP per minute. We also find that, during the formation of the spot penumbra, a) the maximum magnetic field strength of the umbra does not change; b) the magnetic neutral line keeps the same position relative to the umbra; c) the new flux arrives on the emergence side of the spot while the penumbra forms on the opposite side; d) the average LRF inclination of the light bridges decreases from 50° to 37°; and e) as the penumbra develops, the mean magnetic field strength at the spot border decreases from 1.0 to 0.8 kG. Conclusions: The SFPs associated with elongated granules are the building blocks of structure formation in active regions. During the sunspot formation, their contribution is comparable to the coalescence of pores. Besides a set of critical parameters for the magnetic field, a quiet environment in the surroundings is important for penumbral formation. As remnants of trapped granulation between merging pores, the light bridges are found to play a crucial role in the formation process. They seem to channel the magnetic flux through the spot during its formation. Light bridges are also the locations where the first penumbral filaments form.

  9. Optical trapping of core-shell magnetic microparticles by cylindrical vector beams

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Min-Cheng; Gong, Lei; Li, Di; Zhou, Jin-Hua; Wang, Zi-Qiang; Li, Yin-Mei

    2014-11-03

    Optical trapping of core-shell magnetic microparticles is experimentally demonstrated by using cylindrical vector beams. Second, we investigate the optical trapping efficiencies. The results show that radially and azimuthally polarized beams exhibit higher axial trapping efficiencies than the Gaussian beam. Finally, a trapped particle is manipulated to kill a cancer cell. The results make possible utilizing magnetic particles for optical manipulation, which is an important advantage for magnetic particles as labeling agent in targeted medicine and biological analysis.

  10. Solar magnetic fields measurements with a magneto-optical filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cacciani, A.; Ricci, D.; Rosati, P.; Rhodes, E. J.; Smith, E.

    1990-01-01

    The presence of a magnetic field at different levels inside the sun has crucial implications for helioseismology. The solar oscillation observing program carried out since 1983 at Mt. Wilson with Cacciani magneto-optical filter has recently been modified to acquire full-disk magnetograms with 2 arcsec spatial resolution. A method for the correct determination of magnetic maps which are free of contamination by velocity signal is presented. It is shown that no cross-talk exists between the Doppler and Zeeman shifts of the Na D lines, provided that instrumental polarization effects are taken into account. The observed line-of-sight photospheric field was used to map the vector field in the inner corona, above active regions, in the current free approximation.

  11. Antisymmetric tensor field and spontaneous magnetization in holographic duality

    E-print Network

    Cai, Rong-Gen

    2015-01-01

    A real anti-symmetric tensor field was introduced to realize a holographic magnetic ordered phase in our previous works. However, a more careful analysis shows there is a vector ghost in the model. In this paper we present a modified Lagrangian density for the anti-symmetric tensor, which is ghost free and causality is well-defined, and keeps all the significant results in the original model qualitatively. We show this modified Lagrangian density could come from the dimensional compactification of $p$-form field in String/M-theory. For static curved space-time, we also prove that this modified model is ghost free and dose not violate causality. This new model offers a solid foundation for the application of antisymmetric tensor field in holographic duality, especially for the spontaneous magnetization.

  12. Antisymmetric tensor field and spontaneous magnetization in holographic duality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Rong-Gen; Yang, Run-Qiu

    2015-08-01

    A real antisymmetric tensor field was introduced to realize a holographic magnetic ordered phase in our previous papers. However, a more careful analysis shows there is a vector ghost in the model. In this paper we present a modified Lagrangian density for the antisymmetric tensor, which is ghost free and causality is well defined, and keeps all the significant results in the original model qualitatively. We show this modified Lagrangian density could come from the dimensional compactification of p -form field in string/M theory. For static curved space-time, we also prove that this modified model is ghost free and does not violate causality. This new model offers a solid foundation for the application of antisymmetric tensor field in holographic duality, especially for the spontaneous magnetization.

  13. Structure of magnetic fields in intracluster cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourgouliatos, Konstantinos Nektarios; Braithwaite, Jonathan; Lyutikov, Maxim

    2010-12-01

    Observations of clusters of galaxies show ubiquitous presence of X-ray cavities, presumably blown by the active galactic nuclei (AGN) jets. We consider magnetic field structures of these cavities. Stability requires that they contain both toroidal and poloidal magnetic fields, while realistic configurations should have vanishing magnetic field on the boundary. For axisymmetric configurations embedded in unmagnetized plasma, the continuity of poloidal and toroidal magnetic field components on the surface of the bubble then requires solving the elliptical Grad-Shafranov equation with both Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. This leads to a double eigenvalue problem, relating the pressure gradients and the toroidal magnetic field to the radius of the bubble. We have found fully analytical stable solutions. This result is confirmed by numerical simulation. We present synthetic X-ray images and synchrotron emission profiles and we evaluate the rotation measure for radiation transversing the bubble.

  14. Magnetic fields in Neutron Stars

    E-print Network

    Viganò, Daniele; Miralles, Juan A; Rea, Nanda

    2015-01-01

    Isolated neutron stars show a diversity in timing and spectral properties, which has historically led to a classification in different sub-classes. The magnetic field plays a key role in many aspects of the neutron star phenomenology: it regulates the braking torque responsible for their timing properties and, for magnetars, it provides the energy budget for the outburst activity and high quiescent luminosities (usually well above the rotational energy budget). We aim at unifying this observational variety by linking the results of the state-of-the-art 2D magneto-thermal simulations with observational data. The comparison between theory and observations allows to place two strong constraints on the physical properties of the inner crust. First, strong electrical currents must circulate in the crust, rather than in the star core. Second, the innermost part of the crust must be highly resistive, which is in principle in agreement with the presence of a novel phase of matter so-called nuclear pasta phase.

  15. Magnetic fields in Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viganò, D.; Pons, J. A.; Miralles, J. A.; Rea, N.

    2015-05-01

    Isolated neutron stars show a diversity in timing and spectral properties, which has historically led to a classification in different sub-classes. The magnetic field plays a key role in many aspects of the neutron star phenomenology: it regulates the braking torque responsible for their timing properties and, for magnetars, it provides the energy budget for the outburst activity and high quiescent luminosities (usually well above the rotational energy budget). We aim at unifying this observational variety by linking the results of the state-of-the-art 2D magneto-thermal simulations with observational data. The comparison between theory and observations allows to place two strong constraints on the physical properties of the inner crust. First, strong electrical currents must circulate in the crust, rather than in the star core. Second, the innermost part of the crust must be highly resistive, which is in principle in agreement with the presence of a novel phase of matter so-called nuclear pasta phase.

  16. Diffusion in Electronegative Discharges with Magnetic Fields.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, David Eugene

    Electronegative plasmas are important in a variety of electric discharge applications, such as plasma reactors, negative ion sources, and even electropositive discharges when contaminated with an electronegative impurity. The need for an understanding of the processes and phenomena associated with these electronegative discharges has spurred the development of numerical simulations and models. While many of the devices incorporate various configurations of external magnetic fields, specific attention to the influence of the magnetic field on the discharge operating point, structure, and stability is lacking. To address this deficiency, a collisional model for diffusion in three -component plasmas with an applied magnetic field is developed; it is an extension of Schottky theory allowing for negative ions and a magnetic field. This study analyzes the effect of magnetic fields on diffusion in three-component plasmas; provides an analytic solution for the collisional model in a magnetic field; evaluates the validity of effective diffusion coefficients through an analysis of the afterglow; and provides a regime of validity for the model in terms of magnetic field strength by analytically establishing the critical magnetic field for the onset of "anomalous" diffusion. When a discharge operating at constant current is subjected to an increase in axial magnetic field, the ionization frequency decreases more rapidly in an electronegative discharge than an electropositive discharge, due to negative ions reducing the ambipolar electric field. The model is compared qualitatively to a hydrogen discharge and quantitatively to a sulfur hexafluoride discharge with good agreement. The time-dependent model shows that, for a hydrogen discharge, one can obtain an enhancement of the negative ion density in the afterglow. Electronegative discharges are more unstable with respect to the helical mode instability than electropositive discharges, due to the larger axial electric field and weaker ambipolar electric field in an electronegative discharge.

  17. Pulsed field magnetization characteristics of a holed superconducting bulk magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, K.; Igarashi, R.; Togasaki, R.; Oka, T.

    2015-11-01

    We have proposed a holed superconducting bulk magnet to trap the magnetic field efficiently in the high-performance material excited by pulsed field magnetization. Previously, a single pulsed field was applied with varying amplitudes of the magnetic fields and temperatures to a GdBCO bulk material with four 2-mm-diameter holes, and the time responses of flux density on the bulk surface and trapped field distributions were measured. The experimental results suggested that the number of holes was too high because a large distortion appeared in the trapped field distributions. In this paper, we processed only a single hole with a different hole size and investigated the magnetization characteristics. After estimating the trapped field performance by applying a single pulsed field with varying its amplitude and temperature in the original material, a 1-mm-diameter hole was drilled; then the hole was extended to 2 mm in diameter, and the same experiments were carried out in each sample. A total magnetic flux of both 1-mm-diameter hole and 2-mm-diameter hole samples was about 10 percent higher than that of a four-hole sample at a low temperature. On the other hand, the value of a 2-mm-diameter hole sample was the same as that of a four-hole sample at a high temperature. The experimental results suggested that about 1 mm in diameter was proper for the hole size.

  18. LORENTZ SPACE ESTIMATES FOR VECTOR FIELDS WITH DIVERGENCE AND CURL IN HARDY SPACES

    E-print Network

    Ikegami, Takashi

    LORENTZ SPACE ESTIMATES FOR VECTOR FIELDS WITH DIVERGENCE AND CURL IN HARDY SPACES YOSHIKAZU GIGA AND XINGFEI XIANG Abstract. In this note, we establish the estimate on the Lorentz space L(3/2, 1) for vector. 1. Introduction In this note, we consider the estimate on the Lorentz space L(3/2, 1) for vector

  19. Exoplanet Magnetic Fields and Their Detectability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, S.; Tian, B. Y.; Vilim, R.

    2014-12-01

    The investigation of planetary magnetic fields in our solar system provides a wealth of information on planetary interior structure and dynamics. Satellite magnetic data demonstrates that planetary dynamos can produce a range of magnetic field morphologies and intensities. Numerical dynamo simulations are working towards determining relationships between planetary properties and the resulting magnetic field characteristics. However, with only a handful of planetary dynamos in our solar system, it is challenging to determine specific dependence of magnetic field properties on planetary characteristics. Extrasolar planets therefore provide a unique opportunity by significantly increasing the number of planets for study as well as offering a much larger range of planetary properties to investigate. Although detection of exoplanet magnetic fields is challenging at present, the increasing sophistication of observational tools available to astronomers implies these extrasolar planetary magnetic fields may eventually be detectable. This presentation will discuss potential observational trends for magnetic field strength and morphology for exoplanets based on numerical simulations and interior structure modeling. We will focus on the influence of planetary age, environment, composition and structure.

  20. The magnetic field of ? Orionis A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blazère, A.; Neiner, C.; Tkachenko, A.; Bouret, J.-C.; Rivinius, Th.

    2015-10-01

    Context. ? Ori A is a hot star claimed to host a weak magnetic field, but no clear magnetic detection was obtained so far. In addition, it was recently shown to be a binary system composed of a O9.5I supergiant and a B1IV star. Aims: We aim at verifying the presence of a magnetic field in ? Ori A, identifying to which of the two binary components it belongs (or whether both stars are magnetic), and characterizing the field. Methods: Very high signal-to-noise spectropolarimetric data were obtained with Narval at the Bernard Lyot Telescope (TBL) in France. Archival HEROS, FEROS and UVES spectroscopic data were also used. The data were first disentangled to separate the two components. We then analyzed them with the least-squares deconvolution technique to extract the magnetic information. Results: We confirm that ? Ori A is magnetic. We find that the supergiant component ? Ori Aa is the magnetic component: Zeeman signatures are observed and rotational modulation of the longitudinal magnetic field is clearly detected with a period of 6.829 d. This is the only magnetic O supergiant known as of today. With an oblique dipole field model of the Stokes V profiles, we show that the polar field strength is ~140 G. Because the magnetic field is weak and the stellar wind is strong, ? Ori Aa does not host a centrifugally supported magnetosphere. It may host a dynamical magnetosphere. Its companion ? Ori Ab does not show any magnetic signature, with an upper limit on the undetected field of ~300 G. Based on observations obtained at the Télescope Bernard Lyot (USR5026) operated by the Observatoire Midi-Pyrénées, Université de Toulouse (Paul Sabatier), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France.Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  1. Initial Results from the Vector Electric Field Investigation on the C/NOFS Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R.; Rowland, D.; Acuna, M.; Le, G.; Farrell, W.; Holzworth, R.; Wilson, G.; Burke, W.; Freudenreich, H.; Bromund, K.; Liebrecht, C.; Martin, S.; Kujawski, J.; Uribe, P.; Fourre, R.; McCarthy, M.; Maynard, N.; Berthelier, J.-J.; Steigies, C.

    2009-01-01

    Initial results are presented from the Vector Electric Field Investigation (VEFI) on the Air Force Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite, a mission designed to understand, model, and forecast the presence of equatorial ionospheric irregularities. The VEFI instrument includes a vector DC electric field detector, a fixed-bias Langmuir probe operating in the ion saturation regime, a flux gate magnetometer, an optical lightning detector, and associated electronics including a burst memory. The DC electric field detector has revealed zonal and meridional electric fields that undergo a diurnal variation, typically displaying eastward and outward-directed fields during the day and westward and downward-directed fields at night. In general, the measured DC electric field amplitudes are in the 0.5-2 mV/m range, corresponding to I3 x B drifts of the order of 30-150 m/s. What is surprising is the high degree of large-scale (10's to 100's of km) structure in the DC electric field, particularly at night, regardless of whether well-defined spread-F plasma density depletions are present. The spread-F density depletions and corresponding electric fields that have been detected thus far have displayed a preponderance to appear between midnight and dawn. Associated with the narrow plasma depletions that are detected are broad spectra of electric field and plasma density irregularities for which a full vector set of measurements is available for detailed study. On some occasions, localized regions of low frequency (< 8 Hz) magnetic field broadband irregularities have been detected, suggestive of filamentary currents, although there is no one-to-one correspondence of these waves with the observed plasma density depletions, at least within the data examined thus far. Finally, the data set includes a wide range of ELF/VLF/HF waves corresponding to a variety of plasma waves, in particular banded ELF hiss, whistlers, and lower hybrid wave turbulence triggered by lightning-induced sferics. The VEFI data set represents a treasure trove of measurements that are germane to numerous fundamental aspects of the electrodynamics and irregularities inherent to the Earth's low latitude ionosphere.

  2. Perpendicular magnetic fields in cantilever beam magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, R.; Das, A. K.; Yamaguchi, H.; Pampuch, C.; Ney, A.

    2004-09-01

    Cantilever beam magnetometry is a common technique to determine the magnetoelastic (ME) coupling constants of thin films by measuring the stress that develops when the film magnetization is changed. In cantilever beam experiments performed so far the film magnetization was mainly rotated within the film plane. Here we discuss the measurement of the ME coupling constants, when the magnetizing field is chosen so that it rotates the film magnetization out of the film plane. A major stress contribution, which arises additionally to the ME stress, originates in the torque that magnetic dipoles experience in a magnetic field. In order to separate torque effects from ME contributions in cantilever beam experiments a general method is proposed. With this method the ME coupling constants can be quantitatively determined and furthermore the film magnetization as well as its perpendicular anisotropy constant are obtained quantitatively.

  3. Magnetic-field-controlled reconfigurable semiconductor logic.

    PubMed

    Joo, Sungjung; Kim, Taeyueb; Shin, Sang Hoon; Lim, Ju Young; Hong, Jinki; Song, Jin Dong; Chang, Joonyeon; Lee, Hyun-Woo; Rhie, Kungwon; Han, Suk Hee; Shin, Kyung-Ho; Johnson, Mark

    2013-02-01

    Logic devices based on magnetism show promise for increasing computational efficiency while decreasing consumed power. They offer zero quiescent power and yet combine novel functions such as programmable logic operation and non-volatile built-in memory. However, practical efforts to adapt a magnetic device to logic suffer from a low signal-to-noise ratio and other performance attributes that are not adequate for logic gates. Rather than exploiting magnetoresistive effects that result from spin-dependent transport of carriers, we have approached the development of a magnetic logic device in a different way: we use the phenomenon of large magnetoresistance found in non-magnetic semiconductors in high electric fields. Here we report a device showing a strong diode characteristic that is highly sensitive to both the sign and the magnitude of an external magnetic field, offering a reversible change between two different characteristic states by the application of a magnetic field. This feature results from magnetic control of carrier generation and recombination in an InSb p-n bilayer channel. Simple circuits combining such elementary devices are fabricated and tested, and Boolean logic functions including AND, OR, NAND and NOR are performed. They are programmed dynamically by external electric or magnetic signals, demonstrating magnetic-field-controlled semiconductor reconfigurable logic at room temperature. This magnetic technology permits a new kind of spintronic device, characterized as a current switch rather than a voltage switch, and provides a simple and compact platform for non-volatile reconfigurable logic devices. PMID:23364687

  4. Field Mapping System for Solenoid Magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, K. H.; Jung, Y. K.; Kim, D. E.; Lee, H. G.; Park, S. J.; Chung, C. W.; Kang, B. K.

    2007-01-01

    A three-dimensional Hall probe mapping system for measuring the solenoid magnet of PLS photo-cathode RF e-gun has been developed. It can map the solenoid field either in Cartesian or in cylindrical coordinate system with a measurement reproducibility better than 5 × 10-5 T. The system has three axis motors: one for the azimuthal direction and the other two for the x and z direction. This architecture makes the measuring system simple in fabrication. The magnetic center was calculated using the measured axial component of magnetic field Bz in Cartesian coordinate system because the accuracy of magnetic axis measurement could be improved significantly by using Bz, instead of the radial component of magnetic field Br. This paper describes the measurement system and summarizes the measurement results for the solenoid magnetic of PLS photo-cathode RF e-gun.

  5. Magnetic fields in noninvasive brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Vidal-Dourado, Marcos; Conforto, Adriana Bastos; Caboclo, Luis Otávio Sales Ferreira; Scaff, Milberto; Guilhoto, Laura Maria de Figueiredo Ferreira; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas

    2014-04-01

    The idea that magnetic fields could be used therapeutically arose 2000 years ago. These therapeutic possibilities were expanded after the discovery of electromagnetic induction by the Englishman Michael Faraday and the American Joseph Henry. In 1896, Arsène d'Arsonval reported his experience with noninvasive brain magnetic stimulation to the scientific French community. In the second half of the 20th century, changing magnetic fields emerged as a noninvasive tool to study the nervous system and to modulate neural function. In 1985, Barker, Jalinous, and Freeston presented transcranial magnetic stimulation, a relatively focal and painless technique. Transcranial magnetic stimulation has been proposed as a clinical neurophysiology tool and as a potential adjuvant treatment for psychiatric and neurologic conditions. This article aims to contextualize the progress of use of magnetic fields in the history of neuroscience and medical sciences, until 1985. PMID:23787954

  6. Bethe-hole polarization analyser for the magnetic vector of light

    PubMed Central

    Kihm, H.W.; Koo, S.M.; Kim, Q.H.; Bao, K.; Kihm, J.E.; Bak, W.S.; Eah, S.H.; Lienau, C.; Kim, H.; Nordlander, P.; Halas, N.J.; Park, N.K.; Kim, D.-S.

    2011-01-01

    The nature of light as an electromagnetic wave with transverse components has been confirmed using optical polarizers, which are sensitive to the orientation of the electric field. Recent advances in nanoscale optical technologies demand their magnetic counterpart, which can sense the orientation of the optical magnetic field. Here we report that subwavelength metallic apertures on infinite plane predominantly sense the magnetic field of light, establishing the orientation of the magnetic component of light as a separate entity from its electric counterpart. A subwavelength aperture combined with a tapered optical fibre probe can also serve as a nanoscale polarization analyser for the optical magnetic field, analogous to a nanoparticle sensing the local electric polarization. As proof of its functionality, we demonstrate the measurement of a magnetic field orientation that is parallel to the electric field, as well as a circularly polarized magnetic field in the presence of a linearly polarized electric field. PMID:21863018

  7. External-field-free magnetic biosensor

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuanpeng; Wang, Yi; Klein, Todd; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2014-03-24

    In this paper, we report a magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) detection scheme without the presence of any external magnetic field. The proposed magnetic sensor uses a patterned groove structure within the sensor so that no external magnetic field is needed to magnetize the MNPs. An example is given based on a giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensing device with a spin valve structure. For this structure, the detection of MNPs located inside the groove and near the free layer is demonstrated under no external magnetic field. Micromagnetic simulations are performed to calculate the signal to noise level of this detection scheme. A maximum signal to noise ratio (SNR) of 18.6?dB from one iron oxide magnetic nanoparticle with 8?nm radius is achieved. As proof of concept, this external-field-free GMR sensor with groove structure of 200?nm?×?200?nm is fabricated using a photo and an electron beam integrated lithography process. Using this sensor, the feasibility demonstration of the detection SNR of 9.3?dB is achieved for 30??l magnetic nanoparticles suspension (30?nm iron oxide particles, 1?mg/ml). This proposed external-field-free sensor structure is not limited to GMR devices and could be applicable to other magnetic biosensing devices.

  8. NEAR-IR IMAGING POLARIMETRY TOWARD A BRIGHT-RIMMED CLOUD: MAGNETIC FIELD IN SFO 74

    SciTech Connect

    Kusune, Takayoshi; Sugitani, Koji; Miao, Jingqi; Tamura, Motohide; Kwon, Jungmi; Sato, Yaeko; Watanabe, Makoto; Nishiyama, Shogo; Nagayama, Takahiro; Sato, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    We have made near-infrared (JHK {sub s}) imaging polarimetry of a bright-rimmed cloud (SFO 74). The polarization vector maps clearly show that the magnetic field in the layer just behind the bright rim is running along the rim, quite different from its ambient magnetic field. The direction of the magnetic field just behind the tip rim is almost perpendicular to that of the incident UV radiation, and the magnetic field configuration appears to be symmetric as a whole with respect to the cloud symmetry axis. We estimated the column and number densities in the two regions (just inside and far inside the tip rim) and then derived the magnetic field strength, applying the Chandrasekhar-Fermi method. The estimated magnetic field strength just inside the tip rim, ?90 ?G, is stronger than that far inside, ?30 ?G. This suggests that the magnetic field strength just inside the tip rim is enhanced by the UV-radiation-induced shock. The shock increases the density within the top layer around the tip and thus increases the strength of the magnetic field. The magnetic pressure seems to be comparable to the turbulent one just inside the tip rim, implying a significant contribution of the magnetic field to the total internal pressure. The mass-to-flux ratio was estimated to be close to the critical value just inside the tip rim. We speculate that the flat-topped bright rim of SFO 74 could be formed by the magnetic field effect.

  9. Near-IR Imaging Polarimetry toward a Bright-rimmed Cloud: Magnetic Field in SFO 74

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusune, Takayoshi; Sugitani, Koji; Miao, Jingqi; Tamura, Motohide; Sato, Yaeko; Kwon, Jungmi; Watanabe, Makoto; Nishiyama, Shogo; Nagayama, Takahiro; Sato, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    We have made near-infrared (JHK s) imaging polarimetry of a bright-rimmed cloud (SFO 74). The polarization vector maps clearly show that the magnetic field in the layer just behind the bright rim is running along the rim, quite different from its ambient magnetic field. The direction of the magnetic field just behind the tip rim is almost perpendicular to that of the incident UV radiation, and the magnetic field configuration appears to be symmetric as a whole with respect to the cloud symmetry axis. We estimated the column and number densities in the two regions (just inside and far inside the tip rim) and then derived the magnetic field strength, applying the Chandrasekhar-Fermi method. The estimated magnetic field strength just inside the tip rim, ~90 ?G, is stronger than that far inside, ~30 ?G. This suggests that the magnetic field strength just inside the tip rim is enhanced by the UV-radiation-induced shock. The shock increases the density within the top layer around the tip and thus increases the strength of the magnetic field. The magnetic pressure seems to be comparable to the turbulent one just inside the tip rim, implying a significant contribution of the magnetic field to the total internal pressure. The mass-to-flux ratio was estimated to be close to the critical value just inside the tip rim. We speculate that the flat-topped bright rim of SFO 74 could be formed by the magnetic field effect.

  10. Skyrmion in a uniform magnetic field

    E-print Network

    He, Bing-Ran

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the skyrmion properties in a uniform magnetic field. Based on the symmetry of the system, we propose an axially symmetric ansatz of a soliton for studying the skyrmion properties. We show the baryon number is always conserved even in a nonzero magnetic background. We find that with increasing magnetic field strength, the static mass of the skyrmion first decreases and then increases as the dominant role shifts from the linear term of the magnetic field to the quadratic term of the magnetic field. On the other hand, the soliton size first increases and then decreases as the magnetic field strength increases. We find that the distribution of the baryon number density and energy density is anisotropic in a uniform magnetic background. Furthermore, the x- and z-axis projection of the radius of the baryon number density is strongly dependent on the increase of the magnetic field, while the energy density does not have this dependency. Finally, in the core part of the magnetar, the equation of state ...

  11. Surface magnetic fields across the HR Diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landstreet, John D.

    2015-10-01

    The past 20 years have seen remarkable advances in spectropolarimetric instrumentation that have allowed us, for the first time, to identify some magnetic stars in most major stages of stellar evolution. We are beginning to see the broad outline of how such fields change during stellar evolution, to confront theoretical hypotheses and models of magnetic field structure and evolution with detailed data, and to understand more of the ways in which the presence of a field in turn affects stellar structure and evolution.

  12. Nonlinear force-free modeling of the solar coronal magnetic field

    E-print Network

    T. Wiegelmann

    2008-01-18

    The coronal magnetic field is an important quantity because the magnetic field dominates the structure of the solar corona. Unfortunately direct measurements of coronal magnetic fields are usually not available. The photospheric magnetic field is measured routinely with vector magnetographs. These photospheric measurements are extrapolated into the solar corona. The extrapolated coronal magnetic field depends on assumptions regarding the coronal plasma, e.g. force-freeness. Force-free means that all non-magnetic forces like pressure gradients and gravity are neglected. This approach is well justified in the solar corona due to the low plasma beta. One has to take care, however, about ambiguities, noise and non-magnetic forces in the photosphere, where the magnetic field vector is measured. Here we review different numerical methods for a nonlinear force-free coronal magnetic field extrapolation: Grad-Rubin codes, upward integration method, MHD-relaxation, optimization and the boundary element approach. We briefly discuss the main features of the different methods and concentrate mainly on recently developed new codes.

  13. Tuning permanent magnets with adjustable field clamps

    SciTech Connect

    Schermer, R.I.

    1987-01-01

    The effective length of a permanent-magnet assembly can be varied by adjusting the geometrical parameters of a field clamp. This paper presents measurements on a representative dipole and quadrupole as the field clamp is withdrawn axially or radially. The detailed behavior depends upon the magnet multipolarity and geometry. As a rule-of-thumb, a 3-mm-thick iron plate placed at one end plane of the magnet will shorten the length by one-third of the magnet bore radius.

  14. Magnetic fields near Mars - First results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riedler, W.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Moehlmann, D.; Oraevskii, V. N.; Eroshenko, E.; Slavin, J.

    1989-01-01

    The magnetic fields of Mars have been measured from Phobos 2 with high temporal resolution in the tail and down to an 850-km altitude. During four successive highly elliptical orbits, the position of the bow shock as well as that of a transition layer, the 'planetopause', were identified. Subsequent circular orbits at 6000-km altitude provided the first high-resolution data in the planetary tail and indicate that the interplanetary magnetic field mainly controls the magnetic tail. Magnetic turbulence was also detected when the spacecraft crossed the orbit of Phobos, indicating the possible existence of a torus near the orbit of this moon.

  15. The Measurement of Magnetic Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berridge, H. J. J.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses five experimental methods used by senior high school students to provide an accurate calibration curve of magnet current against the magnetic flux density produced by an electromagnet. Compares the relative merits of the five methods, both as measurements and from an educational viewpoint. (JR)

  16. Pulsed field magnets at the United States National High Magnetic Field Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, L.J.; Parkin, D.M.; Crow, J.E.; Schneider-Muntau, H.J.; Sullivan, N.S.

    1993-11-01

    The pulsed field facility of the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) consists of four components. Now available are (1) explosive driven flux compression, (2) capacitor-driven magnets, and (3) a 20 T superconducting magnet. The fourth component, a 60 T quasi-continuous magnet, has been designed and is scheduled for installation in early 1995. All magnets have He-4 cryostats giving temperatures from room temperature (RT) to 2.2--1.5 K. Dilution refrigerators for the superconducting 20 T magnet and the 50 T pulsed magnet will be installed by early 1994. A wide range of experiments has been completed within the past year.

  17. Magnetic field configuration in a flaring active region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios, J.; Balmaceda, L. A.; Vieira, L. E.

    2015-10-01

    The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) provides continuous monitoring of the Sun's vector magnetic field through full-disk photospheric data with both high cadence and high spatial resolution. Here we investigate the evolution of AR 11249 from March 6 to March 7, 2012. We make use of HMI Stokes imaging, SDO/SHARPs, the HMI magnetic field line-of-sight (LOS) maps and the transverse components of the magnetic field as well as LOS velocity maps in order to detect regions with significant flux emergence and/or cancellation. In addition, we apply the Local Correlation Tracking (LCT) technique to the total and signed magnetic flux data and derive maps of horizontal velocity. From this analysis, we were able to pinpoint localized shear regions (and a shear channel) where penumbrae and pore formation areas, with strong linear polarization signals, are stretched and squeezed, showing also important downflows and upflows. We have also utilized Hinode/SP data and compared them to the HMI-SHARPs and the HMI-Stokes spectrograms. The aforementioned shear channel seems to correspond well with the X-class flare main channel of March 7 2012, as observed in AIA/SDO 171, 304 and 1600 Å.

  18. Effects of the Non-Radial Magnetic Field on Measuring Magnetic Helicity Transport across the Solar Photosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Y. L.; Zhang, M.

    2015-05-01

    It is generally believed that the evolution of magnetic helicity has a close relationship with solar activity. Before the launch of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), earlier studies had mostly used Michelson Doppler Imager/SOHO line of sight (LOS) magnetograms and assumed that magnetic fields are radial when calculating the magnetic helicity injection rate from photospheric magnetograms. However, this assumption is not necessarily true. Here we use the vector magnetograms and LOS magnetograms, both taken by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on SDO, to estimate the effects of the non-radial magnetic field on measuring the magnetic helicity injection rate. We find that: (1) the effect of the non-radial magnetic field on estimating tangential velocity is relatively small; (2) when estimating the magnetic helicity injection rate, the effect of the non-radial magnetic field is strong when active regions are observed near the limb and is relatively weak when active regions are close to disk center; and (3) the effect of the non-radial magnetic field becomes minor if the amount of accumulated magnetic helicity is the only concern.

  19. Diffusion in electronegative discharges with magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, David E.

    1993-12-01

    Electronegative plasmas are important in a variety of electric discharge applications, such as plasma reactors, negative ion sources, and even electropositive discharges when contaminated with an electronegative impurity. The need for an understanding of the processes and phenomena associated with these electronegative discharges has spurred the development of numerical simulations and models. While many of the devices incorporate various configurations of external magnetic fields, specific attention to the influence of the magnetic field on the discharge operating point, structure, and stability is lacking. To address this deficiency, a collisional model for diffusion in three-component plasmas with an applied magnetic field is developed; it is an extension of Schottky theory allowing for negative ions and a magnetic field. This study analyzes the effect of magnetic fields on diffusion in three-component plasmas; provides an analytic solution for the collisional model in a magnetic field; evaluates the validity of effective diffusion coefficients through an analysis of the afterglow; and provides a regime of validity for the model in terms of magnetic field strength by looking at the onset of anomalous diffusion.

  20. The CMS Magnetic Field Map Performance

    E-print Network

    V. I. Klyukhin; N. Amapane; V. Andreev; A. Ball; B. Curé; A. Hervé; A. Gaddi; H. Gerwig; V. Karimaki; R. Loveless; M. Mulders; S. Popescu; L. I. Sarycheva; T. Virdee

    2011-10-04

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is a general-purpose detector designed to run at the highest luminosity at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Its distinctive featuresinclude a 4 T superconducting solenoid with 6 m diameter by 12.5 m long free bore, enclosed inside a 10000-ton return yoke made of construction steel. Accurate characterization of the magnetic field everywhere in the CMS detector is required. During two major tests of the CMS magnet the magnetic flux density was measured inside the coil in a cylinder of 3.448 m diameter and 7 m length with a specially designed field-mapping pneumatic machine as well as in 140 discrete regions of the CMS yoke with NMR probes, 3-D Hall sensors and flux-loops. A TOSCA 3-D model of the CMS magnet has been developed to describe the magnetic field everywhere outside the tracking volume measured with the field-mapping machine. A volume based representation of the magnetic field is used to provide the CMS simulation and reconstruction software with the magnetic field values. The value of the field at a given point of a volume is obtained by interpolation from a regular grid of values resulting from a TOSCA calculation or, when available, from a parameterization. The results of the measurements and calculations are presented, compared and discussed.

  1. Can primordial magnetic fields seeded by electroweak strings cause an alignment of quasar axes on cosmological scales?

    PubMed

    Poltis, Robert; Stojkovic, Dejan

    2010-10-15

    The decay of nontopological electroweak strings may leave an observable imprint in the Universe today in the form of primordial magnetic fields. Protogalaxies preferentially tend to form with their axis of rotation parallel to an external magnetic field, and, moreover, an external magnetic field produces torque which tends to align the galaxy axis with the magnetic field. We demonstrate that the shape of a magnetic field left over from two looped electroweak strings can explain the observed nontrivial alignment of quasar polarization vectors and make predictions for future observations. PMID:21230960

  2. Evolution of the interplanetary magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    McComas, D.J.

    1993-05-01

    Remote observations of magnetic field topologies in the solar corona and in situ observations of the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) in interplanetary space are used to examine the temporal evolution of the spatial distribution of open and closed field regions emanating from the Sun. The simple ``open`` configuration of inward and outward pointing sectors in the IMF is periodically disrupted by magnetically distinct coronal mass ejections (CMEs) which erupt from previously closed magnetic field regions in the corona into interplanetary space. At 1 AU, CMEs contain counterstreaming halo electrons which indicate their distinct magnetic topologies. This topology is generally thought to be: plasmoids that are completely disconnected from the Sun; magnetic ``bottles,`` still tied to the corona at both ends; or flux ropes which are only partially disconnected. Fully disconnected plasmoids would have no long term effect on the amount of open flux; however, both in situ observations of details of the halo electron distributions and remote coronagraph observations of radial fields following CMEs indicate that CMEs generally do retain at least partial attached to the Sun. Both the magnetic-bottle and flux rope geometries require some mitigating process to close off previously open fields in order to avoid a flux catastrophe. In addition, the average amount of magnetic flux observed in interplanetary space varies over the solar cycle, also indicating that there must be ways in which new flux is opened and previously open flux is closed off. The most likely scenario for closing off open magnetic fields is for reconnection to occurs above helmet streamers, where oppositely directed field regions are juxtaposed in the corona. These events would serve to return closed field arches to the Sun and release open, U-shaped structures into the solar wind.

  3. Evolution of the interplanetary magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    McComas, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    Remote observations of magnetic field topologies in the solar corona and in situ observations of the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) in interplanetary space are used to examine the temporal evolution of the spatial distribution of open and closed field regions emanating from the Sun. The simple open'' configuration of inward and outward pointing sectors in the IMF is periodically disrupted by magnetically distinct coronal mass ejections (CMEs) which erupt from previously closed magnetic field regions in the corona into interplanetary space. At 1 AU, CMEs contain counterstreaming halo electrons which indicate their distinct magnetic topologies. This topology is generally thought to be: plasmoids that are completely disconnected from the Sun; magnetic bottles,'' still tied to the corona at both ends; or flux ropes which are only partially disconnected. Fully disconnected plasmoids would have no long term effect on the amount of open flux; however, both in situ observations of details of the halo electron distributions and remote coronagraph observations of radial fields following CMEs indicate that CMEs generally do retain at least partial attached to the Sun. Both the magnetic-bottle and flux rope geometries require some mitigating process to close off previously open fields in order to avoid a flux catastrophe. In addition, the average amount of magnetic flux observed in interplanetary space varies over the solar cycle, also indicating that there must be ways in which new flux is opened and previously open flux is closed off. The most likely scenario for closing off open magnetic fields is for reconnection to occurs above helmet streamers, where oppositely directed field regions are juxtaposed in the corona. These events would serve to return closed field arches to the Sun and release open, U-shaped structures into the solar wind.

  4. Magnetic Field Measurement with Ground State Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Huirong; Lazarian, A.

    Observational studies of magnetic fields are crucial. We introduce a process "ground state alignment" as a new way to determine the magnetic field direction in diffuse medium. The alignment is due to anisotropic radiation impinging on the atom/ion. The consequence of the process is the polarization of spectral lines resulting from scattering and absorption from aligned atomic/ionic species with fine or hyperfine structure. The magnetic field induces precession and realign the atom/ion and therefore the polarization of the emitted or absorbed radiation reflects the direction of the magnetic field. The atoms get aligned at their low levels and, as the life-time of the atoms/ions we deal with is long, the alignment induced by anisotropic radiation is susceptible to extremely weak magnetic fields (1 G ? B ? 10^{-15} G). In fact, the effects of atomic/ionic alignment were studied in the laboratory decades ago, mostly in relation to the maser research. Recently, the atomic effect has been already detected in observations from circumstellar medium and this is a harbinger of future extensive magnetic field studies. A unique feature of the atomic realignment is that they can reveal the 3D orientation of magnetic field. In this chapter, we shall review the basic physical processes involved in atomic realignment. We shall also discuss its applications to interplanetary, circumstellar and interstellar magnetic fields. In addition, our research reveals that the polarization of the radiation arising from the transitions between fine and hyperfine states of the ground level can provide a unique diagnostics of magnetic fields in the Epoch of Reionization.

  5. Large-scale geometry and temporal variability of the Martian external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittelholz, A.; Johnson, C. L.; Langlais, B.

    2014-12-01

    The martian magnetic field is unique among the terrestrial planets, as it results from the interaction of fields caused by crustal remnant magnetization and a planetary ionosphere with the solar wind and the interplanetary magnetic field. Internal fields of crustal origin have been subject to extensive studies, whereas the focus of our work deals with average spatial structure and time variability in the martian external magnetic field. We use the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) vector magnetic field data to investigate the large-scale geometry and magnitude of such external fields. We analyze the day-time and night-time magnetic signature for the duration of the MGS mission in mapping orbit (2000-2006). We use along-track vector field measurements to estimate the day-time and night-time external fields after the subtraction of predicted crustal magnetic fields at spacecraft altitudes. We also examine day/night differences (i.e., the daily variation) in external fields; these are independent of crustal fields. Because the external fields are modified by the crustal fields, we investigate their structure as a function of latitude in the local time frame and as a function of both latitude and longitude in the body-fixed frame. In the body-fixed-frame B?is generally dominant in magnitude with a day/night variation described to first order by a zonal degree-2 spherical harmonic structure. Br is strongly correlated with the crustal magnetic field. B? shows variable spatial behaviour during both night and day. Seasonal variations are observed as stronger average magnetic fields in the hemisphere pointing towards the sun. Additional shorter time scale variations in the global external field structure are observed.

  6. The effect of the earth's and stray magnetic fields on mobile mass spectrometer systems.

    PubMed

    Bell, Ryan J; Davey, Nicholas G; Martinsen, Morten; Short, R Timothy; Gill, Chris G; Krogh, Erik T

    2015-02-01

    Development of small, field-portable mass spectrometers has enabled a rapid growth of in-field measurements on mobile platforms. In such in-field measurements, unexpected signal variability has been observed by the authors in portable ion traps with internal electron ionization. The orientation of magnetic fields (such as the Earth's) relative to the ionization electron beam trajectory can significantly alter the electron flux into a quadrupole ion trap, resulting in significant changes in the instrumental sensitivity. Instrument simulations and experiments were performed relative to the earth's magnetic field to assess the importance of (1) nonpoint-source electron sources, (2) vertical versus horizontal electron beam orientation, and (3) secondary magnetic fields created by the instrument itself. Electron lens focus effects were explored by additional simulations, and were paralleled by experiments performed with a mass spectrometer mounted on a rotating platform. Additionally, magnetically permeable metals were used to shield (1) the entire instrument from the Earth's magnetic field, and (2) the electron beam from both the Earth's and instrument's magnetic fields. Both simulation and experimental results suggest the predominant influence on directionally dependent signal variability is the result of the summation of two magnetic vectors. As such, the most effective method for reducing this effect is the shielding of the electron beam from both magnetic vectors, thus improving electron beam alignment and removing any directional dependency. The improved ionizing electron beam alignment also allows for significant improvements in overall instrument sensitivity. PMID:25527328

  7. How are static magnetic fields detected biologically?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finegold, Leonard

    2009-03-01

    There is overwhelming evidence that life, from bacteria to birds to bats, detects magnetic fields, using the fields for orientation or navigation. Indeed there are recent reports (based on Google Earth imagery) that cattle and deer align themselves with the earth's magnetic field. [1]. The development of frog and insect eggs are changed by high magnetic fields, probably through known physical mechanisms. However, the mechanisms for eukaryotic navigation and alignment are not clear. Persuasive published models will be discussed. Evidence, that static magnetic fields might produce therapeutic effects, will be updated [2]. [4pt] [1] S. Begall, et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci USA, 105:13451 (2008). [0pt] [2] L. Finegold and B.L. Flamm, BMJ, 332:4 (2006).

  8. Normal glow discharge in axial magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surzhikov, S.; Shang, J.

    2014-10-01

    Theory and results of mathematical modeling of a glow discharge in a parallel-plate configuration with axial magnetic field is presented. The model consists of continuity equations for electron and ion fluids, the Poisson equation for the self-consistent electric field. Numerical simulation results are presented for two-dimensional glow discharge at various initial conditions. The results are obtained for molecular nitrogen at pressure 1-5 Torr, emf of power supply 1-2 kV, and magnetic field induction B = 0-0.5 T. It is shown that in the presence of the axial magnetic field the glow discharge is rotated around its axis of symmetry. Nevertheless it is shown that in the investigated range of discharge parameters in an axial magnetic field the law of the normal current density is retained.

  9. Electric-field guiding of magnetic skyrmions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyaya, Pramey; Yu, Guoqiang; Amiri, Pedram Khalili; Wang, Kang L.

    2015-10-01

    We theoretically study equilibrium and dynamic properties of nanosized magnetic skyrmions in thin magnetic films with broken inversion symmetry, where an electric field couples to magnetization via spin-orbit coupling. Based on a symmetry-based phenomenology and micromagnetic simulations we show that this electric-field coupling, via renormalizing the micromagnetic energy, modifies the equilibrium properties of the skyrmion. This change, in turn, results in a significant alteration of the current-induced skyrmion motion. Particularly, the speed and direction of the skyrmion can be manipulated by designing a desired energy landscape electrically, which we describe within Thiele's analytical model and demonstrate in micromagnetic simulations including electric-field-controlled magnetic anisotropy. We additionally use this electric-field control to construct gates for controlling skyrmion motion exhibiting a transistorlike and multiplexerlike function. The proposed electric-field effect can thus provide a low-energy electrical knob to extend the reach of information processing with skyrmions.

  10. The magnetic field of Mercury, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ness, N. F.; Behannon, K. W.; Lepping, R. P.; Whang, Y. C.

    1974-01-01

    An updated analysis and interpretation is presented of the magnetic field observations obtained during the Mariner 10 encounter with the planet Mercury. The combination of data relating to position of the detached bow shock wave and magnetopause, and the geometry and magnitude of the magnetic field within the magnetosphere-like region surrounding Mercury, lead to the conclusion that an internal planetary field exists with dipole moment approximately 5.1 x 10 the 22nd power Gauss sq cm. The dipole axis has a polarity sense similar to earth's and is tilted 7 deg from the normal to Mercury's orbital plane. The magnetic field observations reveal a significant distortion of the modest Hermean field (350 Gamma at the equator) by the solar wind flow and the formation of a magnetic tail and neutral sheet which begins close to the planet on the night side. The composite data is not consistent with a complex induction process driven by the solar wind flow.

  11. ASYMMETRIC DIFFUSION OF MAGNETIC FIELD LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Beresnyak, Andrey

    2013-04-20

    Stochasticity of magnetic field lines is important for particle transport properties. Magnetic field lines separate faster than diffusively in turbulent plasma, which is called superdiffusion. We discovered that this superdiffusion is pronouncedly asymmetric, so that the separation of field lines along the magnetic field direction is different from the separation in the opposite direction. While the symmetry of the flow is broken by the so-called imbalance or cross-helicity, the difference between forward and backward diffusion is not directly due to imbalance, but a non-trivial consequence of both imbalance and non-reversibility of turbulence. The asymmetric diffusion perpendicular to the mean magnetic field entails a variety of new physical phenomena, such as the production of parallel particle streaming in the presence of perpendicular particle gradients. Such streaming and associated instabilities could be significant for particle transport in laboratory, space, and astrophysical plasmas.

  12. Optimization code with weighting function for the reconstruction of coronal magnetic fields

    E-print Network

    T. Wiegelmann

    2008-02-01

    We developed a code for the reconstruction of nonlinear force-free and non-force-free coronal magnetic fields. The 3D magnetic field is computed numerically with the help of an optimization principle. The force-free and non-force-free codes are compiled in one program. The force-free approach needs photospheric vector magnetograms as input. The non-force-free code additionally requires the line-of-sight integrated coronal density distribution in combination with a tomographic inversion code. Previously the optimization approach has been used to compute magnetic fields using all six boundaries of a computational box. Here we extend this method and show how the coronal magnetic field can be reconstructed only from the bottom boundary, where the boundary conditions are measured with vector magnetographs. The program is planed for use within the Stereo mission.

  13. Ultracold atoms in strong synthetic magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2015-03-01

    The Harper Hofstadter Hamiltonian describes charged particles in the lowest band of a lattice at high magnetic fields. This Hamiltonian can be realized with ultracold atoms using laser assisted tunneling which imprints the same phase into the wavefunction of neutral atoms as a magnetic field dose for electrons. I will describe our observation of a bosonic superfluid in a magnetic field with half a flux quantum per lattice unit cell, and discuss new possibilities for implementing spin-orbit coupling. Work done in collaboration with C.J. Kennedy, G.A. Siviloglou, H. Miyake, W.C. Burton, and Woo Chang Chung.

  14. Relativistic stars with purely toroidal magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kiuchi, Kenta; Yoshida, Shijun

    2008-08-15

    We investigate the effects of the purely toroidal magnetic field on the equilibrium structures of the relativistic stars. The basic equations for obtaining equilibrium solutions of relativistic rotating stars containing purely toroidal magnetic fields are derived for the first time. To solve these basic equations numerically, we extend the Cook-Shapiro-Teukolsky scheme for calculating relativistic rotating stars containing no magnetic field to incorporate the effects of the purely toroidal magnetic fields. By using the numerical scheme, we then calculate a large number of the equilibrium configurations for a particular distribution of the magnetic field in order to explore the equilibrium properties. We also construct the equilibrium sequences of the constant baryon mass and/or the constant magnetic flux, which model the evolution of an isolated neutron star as it loses angular momentum via the gravitational waves. Important properties of the equilibrium configurations of the magnetized stars obtained in this study are summarized as follows: (1) For the nonrotating stars, the matter distribution of the stars is prolately distorted due to the toroidal magnetic fields. (2) For the rapidly rotating stars, the shape of the stellar surface becomes oblate because of the centrifugal force. But, the matter distribution deep inside the star is sufficiently prolate for the mean matter distribution of the star to be prolate. (3) The stronger toroidal magnetic fields lead to the mass shedding of the stars at the lower angular velocity. (4) For some equilibrium sequences of the constant baryon mass and magnetic flux, the stars can spin up as they lose angular momentum.

  15. Texturing Nd-Fe-B magnets under high magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivoirard, S.; Barthem, V. M. T. S.; Bres, R.; Beaugnon, E.; de Miranda, P. E. V.; Givord, D.

    2008-08-01

    An original approach is explored in the preparation of anisotropic hard magnetic alloys. This constitutes a proof of principle toward the preparation of anisotropic bonded magnets. Nd-Fe-B ribbons (50% Nd2Fe14B+50% Nd-Cu alloy), constituted of Nd2Fe14B grains embedded in a Nd-Cu eutectic matrix, were annealed under an applied magnetic field up to 16 T at various temperatures above the Nd-Cu melting temperature. The grain orientation mechanism is described in terms of a competition between the aligning magnetic field torque acting on the solid magnetic grains and the friction counter torque at the interface between the grains and the liquid matrix. The large temperature effect on the orientation behavior is attributed to the associated increase in the liquid phase volume fraction.

  16. Representation of magnetic fields in space. [special attention to Geomagnetic fields and Magnetospheric models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, D. P.

    1976-01-01

    Several mathematical methods which are available for the description of magnetic fields in space are reviewed. Examples of the application of such methods are given, with particular emphasis on work related to the geomagnetic field, and their individual properties and associated problems are described. The methods are grouped in five main classes: (1) methods based on the current density, (2) methods using the scalar magnetic potential, (3) toroidal and poloidal components of the field and spherical vector harmonics, (4) Euler potentials, and (5) local expansions of the field near a given reference point. Special attention is devoted to models of the magnetosphere, to the uniqueness of the scalar potential as derived from observed data, and to the L parameter.

  17. Dynamo Models for Saturn's Axisymmetric Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, S.; Tajdaran, K.

    2012-12-01

    Magnetic field measurements by the Cassini mission have confirmed the earlier Pioneer 11 and Voyager missions' results that Saturn's observed magnetic field is extremely axisymmetric . For example, Saturn's dipole tilt is less than 0.06 degrees (Cao et al., 2011) . The nearly-perfect axisymmetry of Saturn's dipole is troubling because of Cowling's Theorem which states that an axisymmetric magnetic field cannot be maintained by a dynamo. However, Cowling's Theorem applies to the magnetic field generated inside the dynamo source region and we can avert any contradiction with Cowling's Theorem if we can find reason for a non-axisymmetric field generated inside the dynamo region to have an axisymmetrized potential field observed at satellite altitude. Stevenson (1980) proposed a mechanism for this axisymmetrization. He suggested that differential rotation in a stably-stratified electrically conducting layer (i.e. the helium rain-out layer) surrounding the dynamo could act to shear out the non-axisymmetry and hence produce an axisymmetric observed magnetic field. In previous work, we used three-dimensional self-consistent numerical dynamo models to demonstrate that a thin helium rain-out layer can produce a more axisymmetrized field (Stanley, 2010). We also found that the direction of the zonal flows in the layer is a crucial factor for magnetic field axisymmetry. Here we investigate the influence of the thickness of the helium rain-out layer and the intensity of the thermal winds on the axisymmetrization of the field. We search for optimal regions in parameter space for producing axisymmetric magnetic fields with similar spectral properties to the observed Saturnian field.

  18. Current helicity and magnetic field anisotropy in solar active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H.; Stepanov, R.; Kuzanyan, K.; Sokoloff, D.; Zhang, H.; Gao, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The electric current helicity density ? =< ? _{ijk}b_i{partial b_k/partial x_j}rangle contains six terms, where bi are components of the magnetic field. Due to the observational limitations, only four of the above six terms can be inferred from solar photospheric vector magnetograms. By comparing the results for simulation we distinguished the statistical difference of above six terms for isotropic and anisotropic cases. We estimated the relative degree of anisotropy for three typical active regions and found that it is of order 0.8 which means the assumption of local isotropy for the observable current helicity density terms is generally not satisfied for solar active regions. Upon studies of the statistical properties of the anisotropy of magnetic field of solar active regions with latitudes and with evolution in the solar cycle, we conclude that the consistency of that assumption of local homogeneity and isotropy requires further analysis in the light of our findings.

  19. Space applications of superconductivity - High field magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fickett, F. R.

    1979-01-01

    The paper discusses developments in superconducting magnets and their applications in space technology. Superconducting magnets are characterized by high fields (to 15T and higher) and high current densities combined with low mass and small size. The superconducting materials and coil design are being improved and new high-strength composites are being used for magnet structural components. Such problems as maintaining low cooling temperatures (near 4 K) for long periods of time and degradation of existing high-field superconductors at low strain levels can be remedied by research and engineering. Some of the proposed space applications of superconducting magnets include: cosmic ray analysis with magnetic spectrometers, energy storage and conversion, energy generation by magnetohydrodynamic and thermonuclear fusion techniques, and propulsion. Several operational superconducting magnet systems are detailed.

  20. Magnetic Field Strengths in Photodissociation Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balser, Dana S.; Anish Roshi, D.; Jeyakumar, S.; Bania, T. M.; Montet, Benjamin T.; Shitanishi, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    We measure carbon radio recombination line (RRL) emission at 5.3 {{GHz}} toward four H ii regions with the Green Bank Telescope to determine the magnetic field strength in the photodissociation region (PDR) that surrounds the ionized gas. Roshi suggests that the non-thermal line widths of carbon RRLs from PDRs are predominantly due to magneto-hydrodynamic waves, thus allowing the magnetic field strength to be derived. We model the PDR with a simple geometry and perform the non-LTE radiative transfer of the carbon RRL emission to solve for the PDR physical properties. Using the PDR mass density from these models and the carbon RRL non-thermal line width we estimate total magnetic field strengths of B? 100{--}300 ? {{G}} in W3 and NGC 6334A. Our results for W49 and NGC 6334D are less well constrained with total magnetic field strengths between B? 200{--}1000 ? {{G}}. H i and OH Zeeman measurements of the line of sight magnetic field strength ({B}{{los}}), taken from the literature, are between a factor of ? 0.5{--}1 of the lower bound of our carbon RRL magnetic field strength estimates. Since | {B}{{los}}| ?slant B, our results are consistent with the magnetic origin of the non-thermal component of carbon RRL widths.

  1. Intergalactic Magnetic Fields from Quasar Outflows

    E-print Network

    Steven Furlanetto; Abraham Loeb

    2001-02-05

    Outflows from quasars inevitably pollute the intergalactic medium (IGM) with magnetic fields. The short-lived activity of a quasar leaves behind an expanding magnetized bubble in the IGM. We model the expansion of the remnant quasar bubbles and calculate their distribution as a function of size and magnetic field strength at different redshifts. We generically find that by a redshift z=3, about 5-20% of the IGM volume is filled by magnetic fields with an energy density >10% of the mean thermal energy density of a photo-ionized IGM (at T=10^4 K). As massive galaxies and X-ray clusters condense out of the magnetized IGM, the adiabatic compression of the magnetic field could result in the field strength observed in these systems without a need for further dynamo amplification. The intergalactic magnetic field could also provide a nonthermal contribution to the pressure of the photo-ionized gas that may account for the claimed discrepancy between the simulated and observed Doppler width distributions of the Ly-alpha forest.

  2. The theory of the Galactic magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zweibel, Ellen G.

    1987-01-01

    The paper discusses the role of the magnetic field in determining the large scale structure and dynamics of the interstellar medium. It then discusses the origin and maintenance of the Galactic field. The two major competing theories are that the field is primordial and connected to an intergalactic field or that the field is removed from and regenerated within the Galaxy. Finally, cosmic ray acceleration and confinement in the interstellar medium are discussed.

  3. High Field Pulse Magnets with New Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Lesch, B.; Cochran, V. G.; Eyssa, Y.; Tozer, S.; Mielke, C. H.; Rickel, D.; van Sciver, S. W.; Schneider-Muntau, H. J.

    2004-11-01

    High performance pulse magnets using the combination of CuNb conductor and Zylon fiber composite reinforcement with bore sizes of 24, 15 and 10 mm have been designed, manufactured and tested to destruction. The magnets successfully reached the peak fields of 64, 70 and 77.8 T respectively with no destruction. Failures occurred near the end flanges at the layer. The magnet design, manufacturing and testing, and the mode of the failure are described and analyzed.

  4. Magnetic monopoles in field theory and cosmology.

    PubMed

    Rajantie, Arttu

    2012-12-28

    The existence of magnetic monopoles is predicted by many theories of particle physics beyond the standard model. However, in spite of extensive searches, there is no experimental or observational sign of them. I review the role of magnetic monopoles in quantum field theory and discuss their implications for particle physics and cosmology. I also highlight their differences and similarities with monopoles found in frustrated magnetic systems. PMID:23166376

  5. On the Dependence of Solar Wind Speed on Local Magnetic Field Orientation in Highly Alfvénic Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteini, L.; Horbury, T. S.; Neugebauer, M.; Goldstein, B. E.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic field fluctuations from the low frequency part of the solar wind turbulent spectrum have typical amplitudes of the order of the underlying mean field, and then result in large random variations in the instantaneous direction associated with the magnetic field vector on the scale of minutes/few hours. At the same time, since fluctuations are Alfvénic, these also introduce variations in solar wind speed, which reflecting the randomness of the process, are not expected to show a dependence on the direction of the magnetic field. On the contrary, and quite surprisingly, we have found that in highly Alfvénic solar wind streams there exists a remarkably strong correlation between the bulk speed of the plasma and the local direction of the magnetic field. This leads to a systematic increase in the solar wind speed when the magnetic field vector is locally transverse to the velocity, and to a decrease in the speed when the field is more aligned with the radial, regardless of the polarity of the underlying magnetic field. We demonstrate that such an effect is a consequence of Alfvénicity for a unidirectional flux of waves propagating away from the Sun and with approximatively constant magnetic field magnitude. This correlation is systematically present in highly Alfvénic streams observed by Ulysses and Helios from 0.3 AU to 5 AU. The variations in the speed being proportional to the local Alfvén speed results in a modulation of the solar wind profile that is particularly relevant close to the Sun.

  6. Field dependence of the magnetic structure of TbMn{sub 2}O{sub 5}

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterji, T.; Brown, P. J.

    2014-11-28

    The evolution of the magnetic propagation vector of the magnetically ordered phases of TbMn{sub 2}O{sub 5} has been studied as a function of magnetic field applied parallel to both [010] and [100] axes. The results have been used to construct (H, T) phase diagrams showing the regions of stability of the three distinct phases IC1, C, and IC2 known to exist in zero field. Application of magnetic field along [010] increases the stability range of the commensurate C phase at the expense of the two incommensurate phases IC1 and IC2, whereas applying the field along [100] has the opposite effect. The evolution with field of the magnetic structure of the C phase has been determined from the integrated intensities of sets of magnetic reflections measured with different field values. With the field along [010], there are no significant changes in structure in fields up to 6?T. Applying the field parallel to [100] leads to an apparently continuous increase in the z component of the propagation vector from 0.25 in zero field to ?0.3 in 6?T. This change is accompanied by increasing ferromagnetic polarisation of the Tb sublattices. Polarised neutron measurements made on the fundamental reflections show that there is no significant ferromagnetic polarisation of any the Mn sublattices in fields of up to 6?T.

  7. On the helicity of open magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Prior, C.; Yeates, A. R.

    2014-06-01

    We reconsider the topological interpretation of magnetic helicity for magnetic fields in open domains, and relate this to the relative helicity. Specifically, our domains stretch between two parallel planes, and each of these ends may be magnetically open. It is demonstrated that, while the magnetic helicity is gauge-dependent, its value in any gauge may be physically interpreted as the average winding number among all pairs of field lines with respect to some orthonormal frame field. In fact, the choice of gauge is equivalent to the choice of reference field in the relative helicity, meaning that the magnetic helicity is no less physically meaningful. We prove that a particular gauge always measures the winding with respect to a fixed frame, and propose that this is normally the best choice. For periodic fields, this choice is equivalent to measuring relative helicity with respect to a potential reference field. However, for aperiodic fields, we show that the potential field can be twisted. We prove by construction that there always exists a possible untwisted reference field.

  8. Development of optical modulators for measurements of solar magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, E. A.; Smith, J. E.

    1987-01-01

    The measurement of polarized light allows solar astronomers to infer the magnetic field on the Sun. The accuracy of these measurements is dependent on the stable retardation characteristics of the polarization modulators used to minimize the atmospheric effects seen in ground-based observations. This report describes the work by the Space Science Laboratory at Marshall Space Flight Center to improve two types of polarization modulators. As a result, the timing characteristics for both electrooptic crystals (KD*Ps) and liquid crystal devices (LCDs) have been studied and will be used to enhance the capabilities of the MSFC Vector Magnetograph.

  9. The magnetic field of zeta Orionis A

    E-print Network

    Blazère, A; Tkachenko, A; Bouret, J -C; Rivinius, Th

    2015-01-01

    Zeta Ori A is a hot star claimed to host a weak magnetic field, but no clear magnetic detection was obtained so far. In addition, it was recently shown to be a binary system composed of a O9.5I supergiant and a B1IV star. We aim at verifying the presence of a magnetic field in zeta Ori A, identifying to which of the two binary components it belongs (or whether both stars are magnetic), and characterizing the field.Very high signal-to-noise spectropolarimetric data were obtained with Narval at the Bernard Lyot Telescope (TBL) in France. Archival HEROS, FEROS and UVES spectroscopic data were also used. The data were first disentangled to separate the two components. We then analyzed them with the Least-Squares Deconvolution (LSD) technique to extract the magnetic information. We confirm that zeta Ori A is magnetic. We find that the supergiant component zeta Ori Aa is the magnetic component: Zeeman signatures are observed and rotational modulation of the longitudinal magnetic field is clearly detected with a per...

  10. Magnetic Field Effects in Fermion Pairings

    E-print Network

    Vivian de la Incera

    2013-07-29

    This paper considers various fermion pairings of interest for the QCD phases. The effects of an external magnetic field on the pairing mechanisms, on the realization of new condensates, and on the properties of the magnetized phases are all explored and discussed.

  11. Three-dimensional magnetic field determination in magnetic nanoparticles using iterative reconstruction techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphrey, Emma Margaret

    Improving processing methods have consistently decreased the length scales of many magnetic devices. Methods to quantify the physical and magnetic domain structure of magnetic materials are needed to optimize their performance. However, magnetic characterization methods typically only measure one or two components of the magnetic properties. For instance, Lorentz microscopy is used to construct a two-dimensional projection of the magnetic induction. The vector field electron tomography (VFET) method uses Lorentz microscopy and tomography techniques to reconstruct the three-dimensional magnetic induction and magnetic vector potential of a sample. However, these reconstructions suffer from errors due to factors such as missing wedge information due to the nature of the samples and the physical constraints of the transmission electron microscope. Iterative tomographic techniques and the use of prior knowledge have been used in the literature to compensate for missing wedge data. In this work, we present several tools to construct iterative VFET (IVFET) algorithms. The iterative tomography algorithms Simultaneous Iterative Reconstruction Technique (SIRT), Discrete Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (DART), and Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction (MBIR) are summarized, and their relative merits are discussed. A novel approach to solving the Transport of Intensity Equation (TIE) that incorporates phase separation is presented, along with a comparison to the standard method. A model for simulating VFET images of a chain of nanoparticles and tomographic reconstructions using the model are shown. A spherical voxel forward projection model that can be used to update a single voxel of a VFET reconstruction and its projections is presented as a method for updating the reconstruction during iterative tomography.

  12. Modeling and Measurement of Ocean Generated Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, R.; Avera, W. E.; Nelson, J.; Brozena, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    Motion of conductive seawater through the earth's magnetic field will produce magnetic fields. Magnetic fields from motions such as ocean waves and swells are detectable near the ocean's surface but decay rapidly with distance. Non-linear internal waves (NLIWs) generated by mechanisms such as tides over bathymetric features have been predicted to produce magnetic anomalies of .1-1 nT at altitudes of ~ 100 m above the surface (Chave, 1986) due to the large volumes of coherently moving water. An experiment was performed in 2009 by the Defense Research and Development Canada (DRDC) and the US Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) to see if magnetic signatures predicted from oceanographic measurements could be detected by airborne and ocean bottom mounted magnetometers. The test was conducted near the shelf-break off the coast of New Jersey where NLIWs have been observed. Oceanographic measurements were collected by a set of bottom-mounted ADCPs, towed C-T sensors mounted on a "SCANFISH" tow-body, and a hull-mounted ADCP. Magnetic measurements consisted of total-field magnetometers co-located with the bottom mounted ADCPs, three magnetic base-stations (total field and vector) in New Jersey for geomagnetic noise cancellation, and magnetometers aboard two aircraft ( a Canadian National Research Council Convair 580 and the NRL P-3) flown simultaneously with a 20-30 second separation ( corresponding to 2-3 km) along a repeat track over the bottom-mounted sensors. The multiple aircraft and repeat tracks were intended to remove the spatially stationary geologic component. The time-varying geomagnetic signal was extrapolated from the magnetic base-stations to the aircraft measurements. Both aircraft had high quality magnetometers and magnetic-field compensation systems based on co-located vector magnetometers and kinematic GPS. The Convair had two magnetometer and compensation systems mounted in wing-pods with a base-line of ~ 32 m that allowed the calculation of a cross-track gradient. Total-field compensated and edited data from each aircraft and the magnetic base-station data were low-pass filtered and sub-sampled to 4Hz for analysis. Data from the magnetic base-stations exhibit good coherence, as do the data from the ocean-bottom magnetometers. After correction for the geomagnetic component, the two aircraft residuals matched quite closely in both amplitude and phase in many places, but in other places the phase match was poor. This produced an overall poor coherence between the two residuals. However, cross-spectral analysis showed that there was a statistical correlation between the two aircraft residuals in the frequency band 0.02-0.05 Hz (5000-2000 m wavelength for an aircraft flying at 100 m/s). Both the amplitude (0.1-0.2 nT) and wavelength were consistent with predictions computed from the 3-D water velocities and conductivity from the ADCP using a simple model. The predicted undersea magnetic fields correlated well with the measured undersea magnetometer fields at times, but they rarely matched at the "wiggle-for-wiggle" level. More often, it was the statistics that correlated well.

  13. Rock Magnetic Fabrics, Paleomagnetic Vectors, and Rock Magnetic Cyclostratigraphy of the Marcellus FM, Sunbury PA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minguez, D. A.; Kodama, K. P.

    2013-12-01

    We present the preliminary results of a multi-faceted rock magnetic study conducted on 195 samples from the Oatka Creek member of the Marcellus formation, where it has been extracted from the subsurface as a drill core near Sunbury, PA. Samples were oriented based on bedding attitude observed within the core and were removed from the core at a spacing of ?0.25 meters starting from the base (depth ? 500 meters) and spanning 51 meters of stratigraphic section. The results of measurements of the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) consistently demonstrate a nearly triaxial fabric with maximum principal axes clustering east-west and horizontal in geographic coordinates, nearly parallel to the direction of bedding strike. AMS minimum principal axes cluster near the pole to the bedding plane. Anisotropy of anhysteretic remanence (AAR) applied with a 100 mT peak field and a 97 ?T bias field in 9 orientations demonstrates a markedly different fabric, with maximum principal axis clustering north-south and horizontal in geographic coordinates. Minimum principal axes of AAR cluster steeply (~60-70 degrees) to the west. The discrepancy between AAR and AMS fabrics likely indicates the AMS is dominated by paramagnetic clays, and thus may be interpreted as an east-west intersection lineation of clay particles dipping gently north or south. Paleomagnetic directions obtained using Alternating Field (AF) demagnetization in 5 mT steps up to 110 mT demonstrates a high coercivity remanence (>35 mT) with a south and shallow direction (D= 183.4 I=-14.7). This result is consistent with previous studies of the Marcellus formation and the Devonian Catskill red beds. Thermal demagnetization experiments demonstrate a similar magnetization removed by temperatures between 250 and 350 degrees Celsius, however, continued heating results in the acquisition of strong, inconsistent magnetizations likely the result of oxidizing iron sulfides. Thermal demagnetization of orthogonal partial ARMs applied in 100 mT and 50 mT peak fields was conducted on a subset of samples sealed in aluminum foil with alumina-silica cement to prevent oxidization. The results demonstrate that the low coercivity pARM is removed by 400 degrees Celsius and the high coercivity pARM, which is only 10% of the total remanence, is removed by 600 degrees Celsius. The results suggest the presence of low coercivity Fe sulfides and high coercivity magnetite. Lastly, time series analysis of bulk magnetic susceptibility using the Multi-Taper Method (MTM) demonstrates oscillations with a wavelength of 18 meters above the 99% confidence level with respect to the robust red noise. This wavelength may have a duration of 405 kyr given ancillary chronostratigraphic evidence.

  14. Fold-Saddle Bifurcation in Non-Smooth Vector Fields on the Plane

    E-print Network

    Claudio A. Buzzi; Tiago de Carvalho; Marco A. Teixeira

    2010-07-20

    This paper presents results concerning bifurcations of 2D piecewise-smooth dynamical systems governed by vector fields. Generic three parameter families of a class of Non-Smooth Vector Fields are studied and its bifurcation diagrams are exhibited. Our main result describes the unfolding of the so called Fold-Saddle singularity.

  15. Discontinuities in the magnetic field near Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Sven; Saur, Joachim; Treeck, Shari C.; Kriegel, Hendrik; Dougherty, Michele K.

    2014-05-01

    The plasma interaction of Saturn's icy moon Enceladus generates a hemisphere coupling current system that directly connects the giant planet's northern and southern polar magnetosphere. Based on Cassini magnetometer observations from all 20 targeted Enceladus flybys between 2004 and 2014, we study the magnetic field discontinuities associated with these hemisphere coupling currents. We identify a total number of 11 events during which the magnetic field was discontinuous at the surface of the Enceladus flux tube (defined by the bundle of magnetic field lines tangential to the solid body of the moon). A minimum variance analysis is applied to calculate the surface normals of these discontinuities. In agreement with theoretical expectations, the normals are found to be perpendicular to the surface of the Enceladus flux tube. The variation of the hemisphere coupling currents with Enceladean longitude leaves a clear imprint in the strengths of the observed magnetic field jumps as well.

  16. Discontinuities in the Magnetic Field near Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, S.; Saur, J.; van Treeck, S.; Kriegel, H.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2014-12-01

    The plasma interaction of Saturn's icy moon Enceladus generates a hemisphere coupling current system that directly connects the giant planet's northern and southern polar magnetosphere. Based on Cassini magnetometer observations from all 20 targeted Enceladus flybys between 2004 and 2014, we study the magnetic field discontinuities associated with these hemisphere coupling currents. We identify a total number of 11 events during which the magnetic field was discontinuous at the surface of the Enceladus fluxtube (defined by the bundle of magnetic field lines tangential to the solid body of the moon). A Minimum Variance Analysis is applied to calculate the surface normals of these discontinuities. In agreement with theoretical expectations, the normals are found to be perpendicular to the surface of the Enceladus fluxtube. The variation of the hemisphere coupling currents with Enceladean longitude leaves a clear imprint in the strengths of the observed magnetic field jumps as well.

  17. Understanding the Geometry of Astrophysical Magnetic Fields

    E-print Network

    Broderick, Avery E

    2009-01-01

    Faraday rotation measurements have provided an invaluable technique with which to measure the properties of astrophysical magnetized plasmas. Unfortunately, typical observations provide information only about the density-weighted average of the magnetic field component parallel to the line of sight. As a result, the magnetic field geometry along the line of sight, and in many cases even the location of the rotating material, is poorly constrained. Frequently, interpretations of Faraday rotation observations are dependent upon underlying models of the magnetic field being probed (e.g., uniform, turbulent, equipartition). However, we show that at sufficiently low frequencies, specifically below roughly 13 (RM/rad m^-2)^(1/4) (B/G)^(1/2) MHz, the character of Faraday rotation changes, entering what we term the ``super-adiabatic regime'' in which the rotation measure is proportional to the integrated absolute value of the line-of-sight component of the field. As a consequence, comparing rotation measures at high ...

  18. Magnetic Field Response Measurement Acquisition System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E.; Taylor, Bryant D.; Shams, Qamar A.; Fox, Robert L.

    2005-01-01

    A measurement acquisition method that alleviates many shortcomings of traditional measurement systems is presented in this paper. The shortcomings are a finite number of measurement channels, weight penalty associated with measurements, electrical arcing, wire degradations due to wear or chemical decay and the logistics needed to add new sensors. The key to this method is the use of sensors designed as passive inductor-capacitor circuits that produce magnetic field responses. The response attributes correspond to states of physical properties for which the sensors measure. A radio frequency antenna produces a time-varying magnetic field used to power the sensor and receive the magnetic field response of the sensor. An interrogation system for discerning changes in the sensor response is presented herein. Multiple sensors can be interrogated using this method. The method eliminates the need for a data acquisition channel dedicated to each sensor. Methods of developing magnetic field response sensors and the influence of key parameters on measurement acquisition are discussed.

  19. Magnetic Field Response Measurement Acquisition System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E. (Inventor); Taylor, Bryant D. (Inventor); Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Fox, Robert L. (Inventor); Fox, Christopher L. (Inventor); Fox, Melanie L. (Inventor); Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic field response sensors designed as passive inductor-capacitor circuits produce magnetic field responses whose harmonic frequencies correspond to states of physical properties for which the sensors measure. Power to the sensing element is acquired using Faraday induction. A radio frequency antenna produces the time varying magnetic field used for powering the sensor, as well as receiving the magnetic field response of the sensor. An interrogation architecture for discerning changes in sensor s response kequency, resistance and amplitude is integral to the method thus enabling a variety of measurements. Multiple sensors can be interrogated using this method, thus eliminating the need to have a data acquisition channel dedicated to each sensor. The method does not require the sensors to be in proximity to any form of acquisition hardware. A vast array of sensors can be used as interchangeable parts in an overall sensing system.

  20. Lunar magnetic field measurements with a cubesat

    E-print Network

    Garrick-Bethell, Ian

    We have developed a mission concept that uses 3-unit cubesats to perform new measurements of lunar magnetic fields, less than 100 meters above the Moon’s surface. The mission calls for sending the cubesats on impact ...

  1. Influence of magnetic domain walls and magnetic field on the thermal conductivity of magnetic nanowires.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hao-Ting; Lai, Mei-Feng; Hou, Yun-Fang; Wei, Zung-Hang

    2015-05-13

    We investigated the influence of magnetic domain walls and magnetic fields on the thermal conductivity of suspended magnetic nanowires. The thermal conductivity of the nanowires was obtained using steady-state Joule heating to measure the change in resistance caused by spontaneous heating. The results showed that the thermal conductivity coefficients of straight and wavy magnetic nanowires decreased with an increase in the magnetic domain wall number, implying that the scattering between magnons and domain walls hindered the heat transport process. In addition, we proved that the magnetic field considerably reduced the thermal conductivity of a magnetic nanowire. The influence of magnetic domain walls and magnetic fields on the thermal conductivity of polycrystalline magnetic nanowires can be attributed to the scattering of long-wavelength spin waves mediated by intergrain exchange coupling. PMID:25839230

  2. Tracing Magnetic Fields by Atomic Alignment in Extended Radiation Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Heshou; Yan, Huirong; Dong, Le

    2015-05-01

    Tracing magnetic field is crucial as magnetic field plays an important role in many astrophysical processes. Earlier studies have demonstrated that ground state alignment (GSA) is an effective way to detect a weak magnetic field (1G? B? {{10}-15} G) in a diffuse medium. We explore the atomic alignment in the presence of an extended radiation field for both absorption lines and emission lines. The alignment in the circumstellar medium, binary systems, disks, and the local interstellar medium are considered in order to study the alignment in the radiation field where the pumping source has a clear geometric structure. Furthermore, the multipole expansion method is adopted to study GSA induced in the radiation field with unidentified pumping sources. We study the alignment in the dominant radiation components of the general radiation field: the dipole and quadrupole radiation field. We discuss the approximation of GSA in a general radiation field by summing the contribution from the dipole and quadrupole radiation field. We conclude that GSA is a powerful tool for detecting weak magnetic fields in the diffuse medium in general radiation fields.

  3. High-Field Superconducting Magnets Supporting PTOLEMY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Ann; Luo, Audrey; Osherson, Benjamin; Gentile, Charles; Tully, Chris; Cohen, Adam

    2013-10-01

    The Princeton Tritium Observatory for Light, Early Universe, Massive Neutrino Yield (PTOLEMY) is an experiment planned to collect data on Big Bang relic neutrinos, which are predicted to be amongst the oldest and smallest particles in the universe. Currently, a proof-of-principle prototype is being developed at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory to test key technologies associated with the experiment. A prominent technology in the experiment is the Magnetic Adiabatic Collimation with an Electrostatic Filter (MAC-E filter), which guides tritium betas along magnetic field lines generated by superconducting magnets while deflecting those of lower energies. B field mapping is performed to ensure the magnets produce a minimum field at the midpoint of the configuration of the magnets and to verify accuracy of existing models. Preliminary tests indicate the required rapid decrease in B field strength from the bore of the more powerful 3.35 T magnet, with the field dropping to 0.18 T approximately 0.5 feet from the outermost surface of the magnet.

  4. Including gauge symmetry in the localization mechanism of massive vector fields

    E-print Network

    Rommel Guerrero; R. Omar Rodriguez

    2013-10-29

    On the four-dimensional sector of an AdS$_5$ warped geometry the standard electromagnetic interaction can be simulated by massive vector fields via the Ghoroku - Nakamura localization mechanism. We incorporate gauge symmetry to this theory by finding the required interaction terms between the vector bosons and the gravitational field of the scenario. The four-dimensional effective theory defined by a Maxwell term and a tower of Stueckelberg fields is obtained after expanding the vector fields on a massive eigenstates basis where the zero mode is uncoupled from the rest of the spectrum. The corrections generated by the massive gauge fields set to the electrostatic potential are also calculated.

  5. Magnetic-Field-Induced Insulator-Conductor Transition in SU(2) Quenched Lattice Gauge Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Buividovich, P.V.; Kharzeev, D.; Chernodub, M.N., Kalaydzhyan, T., Luschevskaya, E.V., and M.I. Polikarpov

    2010-09-24

    We study the correlator of two vector currents in quenched SU(2) lattice gauge theory with a chirally invariant lattice Dirac operator with a constant external magnetic field. It is found that in the confinement phase the correlator of the components of the current parallel to the magnetic field decays much slower than in the absence of a magnetic field, while for other components the correlation length slightly decreases. We apply the maximal entropy method to extract the corresponding spectral function. In the limit of zero frequency this spectral function yields the electric conductivity of quenched theory. We find that in the confinement phase the external magnetic field induces nonzero electric conductivity along the direction of the field, transforming the system from an insulator into an anisotropic conductor. In the deconfinement phase the conductivity does not exhibit any sizable dependence on the magnetic field.

  6. Magnetic fields of the W4 superbubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, X. Y.; Reich, W.; Reich, P.; Han, J. L.; Kothes, R.

    2015-06-01

    Context. Superbubbles and supershells are the channels for transferring mass and energy from the Galactic disk to the halo. Magnetic fields are believed to play a vital role in their evolution. Aims: We study the radio continuum and polarized emission properties of the W4 superbubble to determine its magnetic field strength. Methods: New sensitive radio continuum observations were made at ?6 cm, ?11 cm, and ?21 cm. The total intensity measurements were used to derive the radio spectrum of the W4 superbubble. The linear polarization data were analysed to determine the magnetic field properties within the bubble shells. Results: The observations show a multi-shell structure of the W4 superbubble. A flat radio continuum spectrum that stems from optically thin thermal emission is derived from 1.4 GHz to 4.8 GHz. By fitting a passive Faraday screen model and considering the filling factor fne, we obtain the thermal electron density ne = 1,0/??ne (±5%) cm-3 and the strength of the line-of-sight component of the magnetic field B// = 5,0/??ne (±10%) ?G (i.e. pointing away from us) within the western shell of the W4 superbubble. When the known tilted geometry of the W4 superbubble is considered, the total magnetic field Btot in its western shell is greater than 12 ?G. The electron density and the magnetic field are lower and weaker in the high-latitude parts of the superbubble. The rotation measure is found to be positive in the eastern shell but negative in the western shell of the W4 superbubble, which is consistent with the case where the magnetic field in the Perseus arm is lifted up from the plane towards high latitudes. Conclusions: The magnetic field strength and the electron density we derived for the W4 superbubble are important parameters for evolution models of superbubbles breaking out of the Galactic plane.

  7. Magnetic fields and massive star formation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qizhou; Keto, Eric; Ho, Paul T. P.; Ching, Tao-Chung; Chen, How-Huan; Qiu, Keping; Girart, Josep M.; Juárez, Carmen; Liu, Hauyu; Tang, Ya-Wen; Koch, Patrick M.; Rao, Ramprasad; Lai, Shih-Ping; Li, Zhi-Yun; Frau, Pau; Li, Hua-Bai; Padovani, Marco; Bontemps, Sylvain

    2014-09-10

    Massive stars (M > 8 M {sub ?}) typically form in parsec-scale molecular clumps that collapse and fragment, leading to the birth of a cluster of stellar objects. We investigate the role of magnetic fields in this process through dust polarization at 870 ?m obtained with the Submillimeter Array (SMA). The SMA observations reveal polarization at scales of ?0.1 pc. The polarization pattern in these objects ranges from ordered hour-glass configurations to more chaotic distributions. By comparing the SMA data with the single dish data at parsec scales, we found that magnetic fields at dense core scales are either aligned within 40° of or perpendicular to the parsec-scale magnetic fields. This finding indicates that magnetic fields play an important role during the collapse and fragmentation of massive molecular clumps and the formation of dense cores. We further compare magnetic fields in dense cores with the major axis of molecular outflows. Despite a limited number of outflows, we found that the outflow axis appears to be randomly oriented with respect to the magnetic field in the core. This result suggests that at the scale of accretion disks (? 10{sup 3} AU), angular momentum and dynamic interactions possibly due to close binary or multiple systems dominate over magnetic fields. With this unprecedentedly large sample of massive clumps, we argue on a statistical basis that magnetic fields play an important role during the formation of dense cores at spatial scales of 0.01-0.1 pc in the context of massive star and cluster star formation.

  8. Nonlinear diffusion waves in high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oreshkin, V. I.; Chaikovsky, S. A.; Labetskaya, N. A.; Datsko, I. M.; Rybka, D. V.; Ratakhin, N. A.; Khishchenko, K. V.

    2015-11-01

    The nonlinear diffusion of a magnetic field and the large-scale instabilities arising upon an electrical explosion of conductors in a superstrong (2-3 MG) magnetic field were investigated experimentally on the MIG high-current generator (up to 2.5 peak current, 100 ns current rise time). It was observed that in the nonlinear stage of the process, the wavelength of thermal instabilities (striations) increased with a rate of 1.5-3 km/s.

  9. Magnetic Fields and Massive Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qizhou; Qiu, Keping; Girart, Josep M.; (Baobab Liu, Hauyu; Tang, Ya-Wen; Koch, Patrick M.; Li, Zhi-Yun; Keto, Eric; Ho, Paul T. P.; Rao, Ramprasad; Lai, Shih-Ping; Ching, Tao-Chung; Frau, Pau; Chen, How-Huan; Li, Hua-Bai; Padovani, Marco; Bontemps, Sylvain; Csengeri, Timea; Juárez, Carmen

    2014-09-01

    Massive stars (M > 8 M ?) typically form in parsec-scale molecular clumps that collapse and fragment, leading to the birth of a cluster of stellar objects. We investigate the role of magnetic fields in this process through dust polarization at 870 ?m obtained with the Submillimeter Array (SMA). The SMA observations reveal polarization at scales of lsim0.1 pc. The polarization pattern in these objects ranges from ordered hour-glass configurations to more chaotic distributions. By comparing the SMA data with the single dish data at parsec scales, we found that magnetic fields at dense core scales are either aligned within 40° of or perpendicular to the parsec-scale magnetic fields. This finding indicates that magnetic fields play an important role during the collapse and fragmentation of massive molecular clumps and the formation of dense cores. We further compare magnetic fields in dense cores with the major axis of molecular outflows. Despite a limited number of outflows, we found that the outflow axis appears to be randomly oriented with respect to the magnetic field in the core. This result suggests that at the scale of accretion disks (lsim 103 AU), angular momentum and dynamic interactions possibly due to close binary or multiple systems dominate over magnetic fields. With this unprecedentedly large sample of massive clumps, we argue on a statistical basis that magnetic fields play an important role during the formation of dense cores at spatial scales of 0.01-0.1 pc in the context of massive star and cluster star formation.

  10. Secondary resonance magnetic force microscopy using an external magnetic field for characterization of magnetic thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dongzi; Mo, Kangxin; Ding, Xidong; Zhao, Liangbing; Lin, Guocong; Zhang, Yueli; Chen, Dihu

    2015-09-01

    A bimodal magnetic force microscopy (MFM) that uses an external magnetic field for the detection and imaging of magnetic thin films is developed. By applying the external modulation magnetic field, the vibration of a cantilever probe is excited by its magnetic tip at its higher eigenmode. Using magnetic nanoparticle samples, the capacity of the technique which allows single-pass imaging of topography and magnetic forces is demonstrated. For the detection of magnetic properties of thin film materials, its signal-to-noise ratio and sensitivity are demonstrated to be superior to conventional MFM in lift mode. The secondary resonance MFM technique provides a promising tool for the characterization of nanoscale magnetic properties of various materials, especially of magnetic thin films with weak magnetism.

  11. Generation of scale invariant magnetic fields in bouncing universes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sriramkumar, L.; Atmjeet, Kumar; Jain, Rajeev Kumar

    2015-09-01

    We consider the generation of primordial magnetic fields in a class of bouncing models when the electromagnetic action is coupled non-minimally to a scalar field that, say, drives the background evolution. For scale factors that have the power law form at very early times and non-minimal couplings which are simple powers of the scale factor, one can easily show that scale invariant spectra for the magnetic field can arise before the bounce for certain values of the indices involved. It will be interesting to examine if these power spectra retain their shape after the bounce. However, analytical solutions for the Fourier modes of the electromagnetic vector potential across the bounce are difficult to obtain. In this work, with the help of a new time variable that we introduce, which we refer to as the e-Script N-fold, we investigate these scenarios numerically. Imposing the initial conditions on the modes in the contracting phase, we numerically evolve the modes across the bounce and evaluate the spectra of the electric and magnetic fields at a suitable time after the bounce. As one could have intuitively expected, though the complete spectra depend on the details of the bounce, we find that, under the original conditions, scale invariant spectra of the magnetic fields do arise for wavenumbers much smaller than the scale associated with the bounce. We also show that magnetic fields which correspond to observed strengths today can be generated for specific values of the parameters. But, we find that, at the bounce, the backreaction due to the electromagnetic modes that have been generated can be significantly large calling into question the viability of the model. We briefly discuss the implications of our results.

  12. Research of weak pulsed magnetic field system derived from the time, displacement, and static magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiao-Dong; Qian, Zheng

    2015-10-01

    The accurate measurement of dynamic characteristics in weak magnetic sensors is urgently required as a greater number of applications for these devices are found. In this paper, a novel weak pulsed magnetic field system is presented. The underlying principle is to drive a permanent magnet passing another magnet rapidly, producing a pulsed weak magnetic field. The magnitude of the field can be adjusted by changing the velocity and distance between the two magnets. The standard value of the pulsed dynamic magnetic field can be traced back to the accurate measurement of time, displacement, and static magnetic field. In this study a detailed procedure for producing a pulse magnetic field system using the above method is outlined after which a theoretical analysis of the permanent magnet movement is discussed. Using the described apparatus a milli-second level pulse-width with a milli-Tesla magnetic field magnitude is used to study the dynamic characteristics of a giant magnetoresistance sensor. We conclude by suggesting possible improvements to the described apparatus.

  13. Research of weak pulsed magnetic field system derived from the time, displacement, and static magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiao-Dong; Qian, Zheng

    2015-10-01

    The accurate measurement of dynamic characteristics in weak magnetic sensors is urgently required as a greater number of applications for these devices are found. In this paper, a novel weak pulsed magnetic field system is presented. The underlying principle is to drive a permanent magnet passing another magnet rapidly, producing a pulsed weak magnetic field. The magnitude of the field can be adjusted by changing the velocity and distance between the two magnets. The standard value of the pulsed dynamic magnetic field can be traced back to the accurate measurement of time, displacement, and static magnetic field. In this study a detailed procedure for producing a pulse magnetic field system using the above method is outlined after which a theoretical analysis of the permanent magnet movement is discussed. Using the described apparatus a milli-second level pulse-width with a milli-Tesla magnetic field magnitude is used to study the dynamic characteristics of a giant magnetoresistance sensor. We conclude by suggesting possible improvements to the described apparatus. PMID:26520987

  14. Magnetic field transfer device and method

    DOEpatents

    Wipf, Stefan L. (Hamburg, DE)

    1990-01-01

    A magnetic field transfer device includes a pair of oppositely wound inner coils which each include at least one winding around an inner coil axis, and an outer coil which includes at least one winding around an outer coil axis. The windings may be formed of superconductors. The axes of the two inner coils are parallel and laterally spaced from each other so that the inner coils are positioned in side-by-side relation. The outer coil is outwardly positioned from the inner coils and rotatable relative to the inner coils about a rotational axis substantially perpendicular to the inner coil axes to generate a hypothetical surface which substantially encloses the inner coils. The outer coil rotates relative to the inner coils between a first position in which the outer coil axis is substantially parallel to the inner coil axes and the outer coil augments the magnetic field formed in one of the inner coils, and a second position 180.degree. from the first position, in which the augmented magnetic field is transferred into the other inner coil and reoriented 180.degree. from the original magnetic field. The magnetic field transfer device allows a magnetic field to be transferred between volumes with negligible work being required to rotate the outer coil with respect to the inner coils.

  15. Magnetic field transfer device and method

    DOEpatents

    Wipf, S.L.

    1990-02-13

    A magnetic field transfer device includes a pair of oppositely wound inner coils which each include at least one winding around an inner coil axis, and an outer coil which includes at least one winding around an outer coil axis. The windings may be formed of superconductors. The axes of the two inner coils are parallel and laterally spaced from each other so that the inner coils are positioned in side-by-side relation. The outer coil is outwardly positioned from the inner coils and rotatable relative to the inner coils about a rotational axis substantially perpendicular to the inner coil axes to generate a hypothetical surface which substantially encloses the inner coils. The outer coil rotates relative to the inner coils between a first position in which the outer coil axis is substantially parallel to the inner coil axes and the outer coil augments the magnetic field formed in one of the inner coils, and a second position 180[degree] from the first position, in which the augmented magnetic field is transferred into the other inner coil and reoriented 180[degree] from the original magnetic field. The magnetic field transfer device allows a magnetic field to be transferred between volumes with negligible work being required to rotate the outer coil with respect to the inner coils. 16 figs.

  16. A Radio and Optical Polarization Study of the Magnetic Field in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, S. A.; Gaensler, B. M.; Stanimirovic, S.; Haverkorn, M.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Dickey, J. M.

    2008-12-01

    We present a study of the magnetic field of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), carried out using radio Faraday rotation and optical starlight polarization data. Consistent negative rotation measures (RMs) across the SMC indicate that the line-of-sight magnetic field is directed uniformly away from us with a strength 0.19 {+-} 0.06 {mu}G. Applying the Chandrasekhar-Fermi method to starlight polarization data yields an ordered magnetic field in the plane of the sky of strength 1.6 {+-} 0.4 {mu}G oriented at a position angle 4deg {+-} 12deg , measured counterclockwise from the great circle on the sky joining the SMC to the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). We construct a three-dimensional magnetic field model of the SMC, under the assumption that the RMs and starlight polarization probe the same underlying large-scale field. The vector defining the overall orientation of the SMC magnetic field shows a potential alignment with the vector joining the center of the SMC to the center of the LMC, suggesting the possibility of a 'pan-Magellanic' magnetic field. A cosmic-ray-driven dynamo is the most viable explanation of the observed field geometry, but has difficulties accounting for the observed unidirectional field lines. A study of Faraday rotation through the Magellanic Bridge is needed to further test the pan-Magellanic field hypothesis.

  17. New techniques for the scientific visualization of three-dimensional multi-variate and vector fields

    SciTech Connect

    Crawfis, R.A.

    1995-10-01

    Volume rendering allows us to represent a density cloud with ideal properties (single scattering, no self-shadowing, etc.). Scientific visualization utilizes this technique by mapping an abstract variable or property in a computer simulation to a synthetic density cloud. This thesis extends volume rendering from its limitation of isotropic density clouds to anisotropic and/or noisy density clouds. Design aspects of these techniques are discussed that aid in the comprehension of scientific information. Anisotropic volume rendering is used to represent vector based quantities in scientific visualization. Velocity and vorticity in a fluid flow, electric and magnetic waves in an electromagnetic simulation, and blood flow within the body are examples of vector based information within a computer simulation or gathered from instrumentation. Understand these fields can be crucial to understanding the overall physics or physiology. Three techniques for representing three-dimensional vector fields are presented: Line Bundles, Textured Splats and Hair Splats. These techniques are aimed at providing a high-level (qualitative) overview of the flows, offering the user a substantial amount of information with a single image or animation. Non-homogenous volume rendering is used to represent multiple variables. Computer simulations can typically have over thirty variables, which describe properties whose understanding are useful to the scientist. Trying to understand each of these separately can be time consuming. Trying to understand any cause and effect relationships between different variables can be impossible. NoiseSplats is introduced to represent two or more properties in a single volume rendering of the data. This technique is also aimed at providing a qualitative overview of the flows.

  18. Laminated magnet field coil sheath

    DOEpatents

    Skaritka, J.R.

    1987-05-15

    A method for manufacturing a magnetic cable trim coil in a sheath assembly for use in a cryogenic particle accelerator. A precisely positioned pattern of trim coil turns is bonded to a flexible substrate sheath that is capable of withstanding cryogenic operating conditions. In the method of the invention the flexible substrate sheath, with the trim coil pattern precisely location relative to a bore tube assembly of an accelerator and is then bonded to the bore tube with a tape suitable for cryogenic application. The resultant assembly can be readily handled and installed within an iron magnet yoke assembly of a suitable cryogenic particle accelerator. 1 fig.

  19. Laminated magnet field coil sheath

    DOEpatents

    Skaritka, John R. (Coram, NY)

    1987-12-01

    a method for manufacturing a magnet cable trim coil in a sheath assembly for use in a cryogenic particle accelerator. A precisely positioned pattern of trim coil turns is bonded to a flexible substrate sheath that is capable of withstanding cryogenic operating conditions. In the method of the invention the flexible sheath, with the trim coil pattern precisely positioned thereon, is accurately positioned at a precise location relative to a bore tube assembly of an accelerator and is then bonded to the bore tube with a tape suitable for cryogenic application. The resultant assembly can be readily handled and installed within an iron magnet yoke assembly of a suitable cryogenic particle accelerator.

  20. From Forbidden Coronal Lines to Meaningful Coronal Magnetic Fields

    E-print Network

    Judge, Philip G; Landi, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    We review methods to measure magnetic fields within the corona using the polarized light in magnetic-dipole (M1) lines. We are particularly interested in both the global magnetic-field evolution over a solar cycle, and the local storage of magnetic free energy within coronal plasmas. We address commonly held skepticisms concerning angular ambiguities and line-of-sight confusion. We argue that ambiguities are in principle no worse than more familiar remotely sensed photospheric vector-fields, and that the diagnosis of M1 line data would benefit from simultaneous observations of EUV lines. Based on calculations and data from eclipses, we discuss the most promising lines and different approaches that might be used. We point to the S-like [Fe {\\sc XI}] line (J=2 to J=1) at 789.2nm as a prime target line (for ATST for example) to augment the hotter 1074.7 and 1079.8 nm Si-like lines of [Fe {\\sc XIII}] currently observed by the Coronal Multi-channel Polarimeter (CoMP). Significant breakthroughs will be made possibl...

  1. From Forbidden Coronal Lines to Meaningful Coronal Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judge, P. G.; Habbal, S.; Landi, E.

    2013-12-01

    We review methods to measure magnetic fields within the corona using the polarized light in magnetic-dipole (M1) lines. We are particularly interested in both the global magnetic-field evolution over a solar cycle, and the local storage of magnetic free energy within coronal plasmas. We address commonly held skepticisms concerning angular ambiguities and line-of-sight confusion. We argue that ambiguities are, in principle, no worse than more familiar remotely sensed photospheric vector fields, and that the diagnosis of M1 line data would benefit from simultaneous observations of EUV lines. Based on calculations and data from eclipses, we discuss the most promising lines and different approaches that might be used. We point to the S-like [Fe xi] line ( J=2 to J=1) at 789.2 nm as a prime target line (for the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) for example) to augment the hotter 1074.7 and 1079.8 nm Si-like lines of [Fe xiii] currently observed by the Coronal Multi-channel Polarimeter (CoMP). Significant breakthroughs will be made possible with the new generation of coronagraphs, in three distinct ways: i) through single-point inversions (which encompasses also the analysis of MHD wave modes), ii) using direct comparisons of synthetic MHD or force-free models with polarization data, and iii) using tomographic techniques.

  2. Magnetic field distribution in the plasma flow generated by a plasma focus discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Mitrofanov, K. N.; Krauz, V. I. Myalton, V. V.; Velikhov, E. P.; Vinogradov, V. P.; Vinogradova, Yu. V.

    2014-11-15

    The magnetic field in the plasma jet propagating from the plasma pinch region along the axis of the chamber in a megajoule PF-3 plasma focus facility is studied. The dynamics of plasma with a trapped magnetic flow is analyzed. The spatial sizes of the plasma jet region in which the magnetic field concentrates are determined in the radial and axial directions. The magnetic field configuration in the plasma jet is investigated: the radial distribution of the azimuthal component of the magnetic field inside the jet is determined. It is shown that the magnetic induction vector at a given point in space can change its direction during the plasma flight. Conclusions regarding the symmetry of the plasma flow propagation relative to the chamber axis are drawn.

  3. Asymptotic freedom in strong magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Andreichikov, M A; Orlovsky, V D; Simonov, Yu A

    2013-04-19

    Perturbative gluon exchange interaction between quark and antiquark, or in a 3q system, is enhanced in a magnetic field and may cause vanishing of the total qq[over ¯] or 3q mass, and even unlimited decrease of it-recently called the magnetic collapse of QCD. The analysis of the one-loop correction below shows a considerable softening of this phenomenon due to qq[over ¯] loop contribution, similar to the Coulomb case of QED, leading to approximately logarithmic damping of gluon exchange interaction (?O(1/ln|eB|)) at large magnetic field. PMID:23679595

  4. Magnetic Field Apparatus (MFA) Hardware Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Ken; Boody, April; Reed, Dave; Wang, Chung; Stuckey, Bob; Cox, Dave

    1999-01-01

    The objectives of this study are threefold: (1) Provide insight into water delivery in microgravity and determine optimal germination paper wetting for subsequent seed germination in microgravity; (2) Observe the behavior of water exposed to a strong localized magnetic field in microgravity; and (3) Simulate the flow of fixative (using water) through the hardware. The Magnetic Field Apparatus (MFA) is a new piece of hardware slated to fly on the Space Shuttle in early 2001. MFA is designed to expose plant tissue to magnets in a microgravity environment, deliver water to the plant tissue, record photographic images of plant tissue, and deliver fixative to the plant tissue.

  5. Fast Reconnection of Weak Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zweibel, Ellen G.

    1998-01-01

    Fast magnetic reconnection refers to annihilation or topological rearrangement of magnetic fields on a timescale that is independent (or nearly independent) of the plasma resistivity. The resistivity of astrophysical plasmas is so low that reconnection is of little practical interest unless it is fast. Yet, the theory of fast magnetic reconnection is on uncertain ground, as models must avoid the tendency of magnetic fields to pile up at the reconnection layer, slowing down the flow. In this paper it is shown that these problems can be avoided to some extent if the flow is three dimensional. On the other hand, it is shown that in the limited but important case of incompressible stagnation point flows, every flow will amplify most magnetic fields. Although examples of fast magnetic reconnection abound, a weak, disordered magnetic field embedded in stagnation point flow will in general be amplified, and should eventually modify the flow. These results support recent arguments against the operation of turbulent resistivity in highly conducting fluids.

  6. Magnetic fields in early-type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunhut, Jason H.; Neiner, Coralie

    2015-10-01

    For several decades we have been cognizant of the presence of magnetic fields in early-type stars, but our understanding of their magnetic properties has recently (over the last decade) expanded due to the new generation of high-resolution spectropolarimeters (ESPaDOnS at CFHT, Narval at TBL, HARPSpol at ESO). The most detailed surface magnetic field maps of intermediate-mass stars have been obtained through Doppler imaging techniques, allowing us to probe the small-scale structure of these stars. Thanks to the effort of large programmes (e.g. the MiMeS project), we have, for the first time, addressed key issues regarding our understanding of the magnetic properties of massive (M > 8 M ?) stars, whose magnetic fields were only first detected about fifteen years ago. In this proceedings article we review the spectropolarimetric observations and statistics derived in recent years that have formed our general understanding of stellar magnetism in early-type stars. We also discuss how these observations have furthered our understanding of the interactions between the magnetic field and stellar wind, as well as the consequences and connections of this interaction with other observed phenomena.

  7. Critical Magnetic Field Determination of Superconducting Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Canabal, A.; Tajima, T.; Dolgashev, V.A.; Tantawi, S.G.; Yamamoto, T.; /Tsukuba, Natl. Res. Lab. Metrol.

    2011-11-04

    Superconducting RF technology is becoming more and more important. With some recent cavity test results showing close to or even higher than the critical magnetic field of 170-180 mT that had been considered a limit, it is very important to develop a way to correctly measure the critical magnetic field (H{sup RF}{sub c}) of superconductors in the RF regime. Using a 11.4 GHz, 50-MW, <1 {mu}s, pulsed power source and a TE013-like mode copper cavity, we have been measuring critical magnetic fields of superconductors for accelerator cavity applications. This device can eliminate both thermal and field emission effects due to a short pulse and no electric field at the sample surface. A model of the system is presented in this paper along with a discussion of preliminary experimental data.

  8. Free magnetic energy and relative magnetic helicity diagnostics for the quality of NLFF field extrapolations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moraitis, Kostas; Archontis, Vasilis; Tziotziou, Konstantinos; Georgoulis, Manolis K.

    We calculate the instantaneous free magnetic energy and relative magnetic helicity of solar active regions using two independent approaches: a) a non-linear force-free (NLFF) method that requires only a single photospheric vector magnetogram, and b) well known semi-analytical formulas that require the full three-dimensional (3D) magnetic field structure. The 3D field is obtained either from MHD simulations, or from observed magnetograms via respective NLFF field extrapolations. We find qualitative agreement between the two methods and, quantitatively, a discrepancy not exceeding a factor of 4. The comparison of the two methods reveals, as a byproduct, two independent tests for the quality of a given force-free field extrapolation. We find that not all extrapolations manage to achieve the force-free condition in a valid, divergence-free, magnetic configuration. This research has been co-financed by the European Union (European Social Fund - ESF) and Greek national funds through the Operational Program "Education and Lifelong Learning" of the National Strategic Reference Framework (NSRF) - Research Funding Program: Thales. Investing in knowledge society through the European Social Fund.

  9. Magnetic field dependence of plasma relaxation times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, D.; Joyce, G.; Turner, L.

    1974-01-01

    A previously derived Fokker-Planck collision integral for an electron plasma in a dc magnetic field is examined in the limit in which the Debye length is greater than the thermal gyroradius, which is in turn greater than the mean distance of closest approach. It is demonstrated that the collision integral can be satisfactorily approximated by the classical Landau value (which ignores the presence of a dc magnetic field) if the following replacement is made: In the Coulomb logarithm, the Debye length is replaced by the gyroradius. This induces a fundamental logarithmic dependence on magnetic field in the relaxation times. Numerical comparison of the asymptotic approximations with the previously derived exact results is made, and good agreement is found. The simplification this introduces into the description of collision processes in magnetized plasma is considerable.

  10. Relativistic Quantum Field Theory with a Physical State Vector

    E-print Network

    Bernd A. Berg

    1998-08-31

    Evolution of a physical quantum state vector is described as governed by two distinct physical laws: Continuous, unitary time evolution and a relativistically covariant reduction process. In previous literature, it was concluded that a relativistically satisfactory version of the collapse postulate is in contradiction with physical measurements of a non-local state history. Here it is shown that such measurements are excluded when reduction is formulated as a physical process and the measurement devices are included as part of the state vector.

  11. Two-component vector wind fields by scanning aerosol lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayor, S. D.; Derian, P.; Hamada, M.; Mauzey, C. F.

    2014-12-01

    Observations of two or more wind components that resolve turbulent perturbations over large areas remain a challenge in the atmospheric boundary layer community. One successful approach to multi-component flow measurement in the engineering community is particle image velocimetry (PIV). This presentation will report on recent progress in the development and validation of two motion estimation algorithms that can be applied to aerosol backscatter imagery to provide two-component horizontal wind fields. The algorithms being developed and tested are a traditional cross-correlation method (i.e., Schols & Eloranta, JGR, 1992) and a new wavelet-based optical flow method (Dérian et al., NMTMA, 2013). These algorithms have been applied to imagery from the Raman-shifted Eye-safe Aerosol Lidar (REAL) collected in Dixon, California, in 2007 (as part of CHATS) and in Chico, California in 2013. The resulting 2-component winds were compared against the same from sonic anemometers and a Doppler lidar. Our results include new insights on the performance of the cross-correaltion algorithm and new experiences with wavelet-based optical flow. Animations of turbulent flow in the atmospheric surface layer over approximately 10-square km areas with 15 s frame update rates will be presented. (Vectors may be spaced as closely as every 10 m, but the spatial resolution is larger and dynamic and related to the availability of small scale aerosol features in the imagery.) In addition to flow visualizations, time-series and space-series comparisons of the wind components with those from sonic anemometer and Doppler lidar data will be presented.

  12. Mechanical propulsion from unsymmetrical magnetic induction fields

    SciTech Connect

    Schlicher, R.L.; Biggs, A.W.; Tedeschi, W.J.

    1995-06-01

    A method is reported for generating mechanical spacecraft propulsion from unsymmetrical magnetic induction fields. It is based on an unsymmetrical three-dimensional loop antenna structure driven by a repetitively-pulsed high-current power supply. Antenna geometry is optimized for generating propulsive thrust rather than radiating electromagnetic energy. Part of this antenna consists of flat electrical conductors, which form a partially-closed quasi-cylindrical volume around a center conductor. Magnetic flux concentrates at the closed end of the quasicylindrical volume thereby creating a magnetic field flux density gradient along a single axis collinear to the Center Conductor. This magnetic field density gradient imbalances the magneto-mechanical forces that result from the interactions of the internal magnetic induction field with the current in the conductors of the antenna structure, in accordance with Lorentz`s Force Law. Also, there are electrically isolated prismatic conductor surfaces attached to the inside surface of the flat conductors which form the closed end of the quasi-cylindrical volume. Mechanical pressures occur on these conductor prisms because of the changing internal magnetic field and are a consequence of Faraday`s Induction Law and Lenz`s Law. Input current rise time and wave shape are crucial to maximizing spacecraft propulsive thrust.

  13. Magnetic fields of Jupiter and Saturn

    SciTech Connect

    Ness, N.F.

    1981-01-01

    The magnetic fields of Jupiter and Saturn and the characteristics of their magnetospheres, formed by interaction with the solar wind, are discussed. The origins of both magnetic fields are associated with a dynamo process deep in the planetary interior. The Jovian magnetosphere is analogous to that of a pulsar magnetosphere: a massive central body with a rapid rotation and an associated intense magnetic field. Its most distinctive feature is its magnetodisk of concentrated plasma and particle flux, and reduced magnetic field intensity. The magnetopause near the subsolar point has been observed at radial distances ranging over 50 to 100 Jovian radii, implying a relatively compressible obstacle to solar wind flow. The composition of an embedded current sheet within the magnetic tail is believed to be influenced by volcanic eruptions and emissions from Io. Spectral troughs of the Jovian radiation belts have been interpreted as possible ring particles. The Saturnian magnetosphere appears to be more like the earth in its topology. It is mainly characterized by a dipole axis parallel to the rotational axis of the planet and a magnetic field intensity much less than expected.

  14. Magnetic nanoparticles for applications in oscillating magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Peeraphatdit, Chorthip

    2010-12-15

    Enzymatic and thermochemical catalysis are both important industrial processes. However, the thermal requirements for each process often render them mutually exclusive: thermochemical catalysis requires high temperature that denatures enzymes. One of the long-term goals of this project is to design a thermocatalytic system that could be used with enzymatic systems in situ to catalyze reaction sequences in one pot; this system would be useful for numerous applications e.g. conversion of biomass to biofuel and other commodity products. The desired thermocatalytic system would need to supply enough thermal energy to catalyze thermochemical reactions, while keeping the enzymes from high temperature denaturation. Magnetic nanoparticles are known to generate heat in an oscillating magnetic field through mechanisms including hysteresis and relaxational losses. We envisioned using these magnetic nanoparticles as the local heat source embedded in sub-micron size mesoporous support to spatially separate the particles from the enzymes. In this study, we set out to find the magnetic materials and instrumental conditions that are sufficient for this purpose. Magnetite was chosen as the first model magnetic material in this study because of its high magnetization values, synthetic control over particle size, shape, functionalization and proven biocompatibility. Our experimental designs were guided by a series of theoretical calculations, which provided clues to the effects of particle size, size distribution, magnetic field, frequency and reaction medium. Materials of theoretically optimal size were synthesized, functionalized, and their effects in the oscillating magnetic field were subsequently investigated. Under our conditions, the materials that clustered e.g. silica-coated and PNIPAM-coated iron oxides exhibited the highest heat generation, while iron oxides embedded in MSNs and mesoporous iron oxides exhibited the least bulk heating. It is worth noting that the specific loss power of PNIPAM-coated Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} was peculiarly high, and the heat loss mechanism of this material remains to be elucidated. Since thermocatalysis is a long-term goal of this project, we also investigated the effects of the oscillating magnetic field system for the synthesis of 7-hydroxycoumarin-3-carboxylic acid. Application of an oscillating magnetic field in the presence of magnetic particles with high thermal response was found to effectively increase the reaction rate of the uncatalyzed synthesis of the coumarin derivative compared to the room temperature control.

  15. Coexistence of spiral magnetic state and weak ferromagnetism in a multiferroic, cross-controlled by external magnetic and electric fields.

    PubMed

    Lyubutin, I S; Pikin, S A

    2013-06-12

    The influence of external magnetic and electric fields on the properties of a multiferroic with a helical magnetic structure is described. Thermodynamics of the phase transition from the antiferromagnetic ferroelectric to the new magnetic state is described for a multiferroic with a perovskite-type structure. In this magnetic state a spiral spin structure and weak ferromagnetism can exist simultaneously. Such a state is a result of the first-order phase transition at a certain temperature below T(N) when, due to the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya effect, a helical magnetic structure occurs. In this state the vectors of electrical polarization and the helicoid of magnetic moments in perovskites are mutually perpendicular and lie in the basic (ab) plane perpendicular to the main c axis. In this case an additional electrical polarization proportional to the square of magnetization appears in the (ab) plane which reduces the common polarization of the ferroelectric. It is shown that a weak ferromagnetic moment m occurs along the c axis in an applied magnetic field in addition to a modulated magnetic structure appearing in the (ab) plane. The dependence of these phenomena on the applied electric field is considered. It is shown that a sign-alternating electric field causes a linear-in-the-field variation of the magnetic moment opposite in sign to the electric field variation (i.e., the greater is the electric field, the smaller is the magnetic moment m). The observed hysteresis phenomena determining the temperature ranges of overheating and overcooling of each phase under applied magnetic and electrical fields are explained. PMID:23676279

  16. Coexistence of spiral magnetic state and weak ferromagnetism in a multiferroic, cross-controlled by external magnetic and electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubutin, I. S.; Pikin, S. A.

    2013-06-01

    The influence of external magnetic and electric fields on the properties of a multiferroic with a helical magnetic structure is described. Thermodynamics of the phase transition from the antiferromagnetic ferroelectric to the new magnetic state is described for a multiferroic with a perovskite-type structure. In this magnetic state a spiral spin structure and weak ferromagnetism can exist simultaneously. Such a state is a result of the first-order phase transition at a certain temperature below TN when, due to the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya effect, a helical magnetic structure occurs. In this state the vectors of electrical polarization and the helicoid of magnetic moments in perovskites are mutually perpendicular and lie in the basic (ab) plane perpendicular to the main c axis. In this case an additional electrical polarization proportional to the square of magnetization appears in the (ab) plane which reduces the common polarization of the ferroelectric. It is shown that a weak ferromagnetic moment m occurs along the c axis in an applied magnetic field in addition to a modulated magnetic structure appearing in the (ab) plane. The dependence of these phenomena on the applied electric field is considered. It is shown that a sign-alternating electric field causes a linear-in-the-field variation of the magnetic moment opposite in sign to the electric field variation (i.e., the greater is the electric field, the smaller is the magnetic moment m). The observed hysteresis phenomena determining the temperature ranges of overheating and overcooling of each phase under applied magnetic and electrical fields are explained.

  17. Superconductivity in Strong Magnetic Field (Greater Than Upper Critical Field)

    SciTech Connect

    Tessema, G.X.; Gamble, B.K.; Skove, M.J.; Lacerda, A.H.; Mielke, C.H.

    1998-08-22

    The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, funded by the National Science Foundation and other US federal Agencies, has in recent years built a wide range of magnetic fields, DC 25 to 35 Tesla, short pulse 50 - 60 Tesla, and quasi-continuous 60 Tesla. Future plans are to push the frontiers to 45 Tesla DC and 70 to 100 Tesla pulse. This user facility, is open for national and international users, and creates an excellent tool for materials research (metals, semiconductors, superconductors, biological systems ..., etc). Here we present results of a systematic study of the upper critical field of a novel superconducting material which is considered a promising candidate for the search for superconductivity beyond H{sub c2} as proposed by several new theories. These theories predict that superconductors with low carrier density can reenter the superconducting phase beyond the conventional upper critical field H{sub c2}. This negates the conventional thinking that superconductivity and magnetic fields are antagonistic.

  18. Satellite-borne study of seismic phenomena by low frequency magnetic field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwingenschuh, Konrad; Magnes, Werner; Xuhui, Shen; Wang, Jindong; Pollinger, Andreas; Hagen, Christian; Prattes, Gustav; Eichelberger, Hans-Ulrich; Wolbang, Daniel; Boudjada, Mohammed Y.; Besser, Bruno P.; Rozhnoi, Alexander A.; Zhang, Tielong

    2015-04-01

    A combined scalar-vector magnetic field experiment will be flown on the upcoming CSES mission (China Seismo-Electromagnetic Satellite). Magnetic field data from DC to 30 Hz will be measured with an accuracy of about 10 pT. A fluxgate instrument will provide the 3 magnetic field components and a new type of an optically pumped magnetometer [see Pollinger, 2010] will measure the magnitude of the ambient magnetic field. The satellite will operate in a Sun synchronous polar orbit at an altitude of about 500 km and with an inclination of 97°. We present a model of magnetic field fluctuations in the upper ionosphere based on previous satellite observations and on a model of the lithospheric-atmospheric-ionospheric coupling. Pollinger et al., CDSM-a new scalar magnetometer, EGU General Assembly 2010

  19. Pioneer 10 and 11 (Jupiter and Saturn) magnetic field experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, D. E.

    1986-01-01

    Magnet field data obtained by the vector helium magnetometer (VHM) during the encounters of Jupiter (Pioneer 10 and 11) and Saturn (Pioneer 11) was analyzed and interpreted. The puzzling characteristics of the Jovian and Saturnian magnetospheric magnetic fields were studied. An apparent substorm (including thinning of the dayside tail current sheet) was observed at Jupiter, as well as evidence suggesting that at the magnetopause the cusp is at an abnormally low latitude. The characteristics of Saturn's ring current as observed by Pioneer 11 were dramatically different from those suggested by the Voyager observations. Most importantly, very strong perturbations in the azimuthal ring current magnetic field suggest that the plane of the ring was not in the dipole equatorial plane, being tilted 5 to 10 deg. relative to the dipole and undergoing significant changes during the encounter. When these changing currents were corrected for, an improved planetary field determination was obtained. In addition, the ring and azimuthal currents at Saturn displayed significantly different time dependences.

  20. Three-dimensional solidification and melting using magnetic field control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulikravich, George S.; Ahuja, Vineet

    1993-01-01

    A new two-fluid mathematical model for fully three dimensional steady solidification under the influence of an arbitrary acceleration vector and with or without an arbitrary externally applied steady magnetic field have been formulated and integrated numerically. The model includes Joule heating and allows for separate temperature dependent physical properties within the melt and the solid. Latent heat of phase change during melting/solidification was incorporated using an enthalpy method. Mushy region was automatically captured by varying viscosity orders of magnitude between liquidus and solidus temperature. Computational results were obtained for silicon melt solidification in a parallelepiped container cooled from above and from a side. The results confirm that the magnetic field has a profound influence on the solidifying melt flow field thus changing convective heat transfer through the boundaries and the amount and shape of the solid accrued. This suggests that development of a quick-response algorithm for active control of three dimensional solidification is feasible since it would require low strength magnetic fields.

  1. Poloidal magnetic fields in superconducting neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriksson, K. T.; Wasserman, I.

    2013-06-01

    We develop the formalism for computing the magnetic field within an axisymmetric neutron star with a strong type II superconductor core surrounded by a normal conductor. The formalism takes full account of the constraints imposed by hydrostatic equilibrium with a barotropic equation of state. A characteristic of this problem is that the currents and fields need to be determined simultaneously and self-consistently. Within the core, the strong type II limit B ? H allows us to compute the shapes of individual field lines. We specialize to purely poloidal magnetic fields that are perpendicular to the equator, and develop the `most dipolar case' in which field lines are vertical at the outer radius of the core, which leads to a magnetic field at the stellar surface that is as close to a dipole as possible. We demonstrate that although field lines from the core may only penetrate a short distance into the normal shell, boundary conditions at the inner radius of the normal shell control the field strength on the surface. Remarkably, we find that for a Newtonian N = 1 polytrope, the surface dipole field strength is Bsurf ? Hb?b/3, where Hb is the magnetic field strength at the outer boundary of the type II core and ?bR is the thickness of the normal shell. For reasonable models, Hb ? 1014 G and ?b ? 0.1 so the surface field strength is Bsurf ? 3 × 1012 G, comparable to the field strengths of many radio pulsars. In general, Hb and ?b are both determined by the equation of state of nuclear matter and by the mass of the neutron star, but Bsurf ˜ 1012 G is probably a robust result for the `most dipolar' case. We speculate on how the wide range of neutron star surface fields might arise in situations with less restrictions on the internal field configuration. We show that quadrupolar distortions are ˜-10-9(Hb/1014 G)2 and arise primarily in the normal shell for B ? Hb.

  2. UNDERSTANDING THE GEOMETRY OF ASTROPHYSICAL MAGNETIC FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Broderick, Avery E.; Blandford, Roger D.

    2010-08-01

    Faraday rotation measurements have provided an invaluable technique for probing the properties of astrophysical magnetized plasmas. Unfortunately, typical observations provide information only about the density-weighted average of the magnetic field component parallel to the line of sight. As a result, the magnetic field geometry along the line of sight, and in many cases even the location of the rotating material, is poorly constrained. Frequently, interpretations of Faraday rotation observations are dependent upon underlying models of the magnetic field being probed (e.g., uniform, turbulent, equipartition). However, we show that at sufficiently low frequencies, specifically below roughly 13(RM/1 rad m{sup -2}){sup 1/4}(B/1 G){sup 1/2} MHz, the character of Faraday rotation changes, entering what we term the 'super-adiabatic regime' in which the rotation measure (RM) is proportional to the integrated absolute value of the line-of-sight component of the field. As a consequence, comparing RMs at high frequencies with those in this new regime provides direct information about the geometry of the magnetic field along the line of sight. Furthermore, the frequency defining the transition to this new regime, {nu}{sub SA}, depends directly upon the local electron density and magnetic field strength where the magnetic field is perpendicular to the line of sight, allowing the unambiguous distinction between Faraday rotation within and in front of the emission region. Typical values of {nu}{sub SA} range from 10 kHz (below the ionospheric cutoff, but above the heliospheric cutoff) to 10 GHz, depending upon the details of the Faraday rotating environment. In particular, for resolved active galactic nuclei, including the black holes at the center of the Milky Way (Sgr A*) and M81, {nu}{sub SA} ranges from roughly 10 MHz to 10 GHz, and thus can be probed via existing and up-coming ground-based radio observatories.

  3. Lightning Magnetic Field Measurements around Langmuir Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, M.; Krehbiel, P. R.; Rison, W.; Aulich, G. D.; Edens, H. E.; Sonnenfeld, R. G.

    2010-12-01

    In the absence of artificial conductors, underground lightning transients are produced by diffusion of the horizontal surface magnetic field of a return stroke vertically downward into the conducting earth. The changing magnetic flux produces an orthogonal horizontal electric field, generating a dispersive, lossy transverse electromagnetic wave that penetrates a hundred meters or more into the ground according to the skin depth of the medium. In turn, the electric field produces currents that flow toward or away from the channel to ground depending on the stroke polarity. The underground transients can produce large radial horizontal potential gradients depending on the distance from the discharge and depth below the surface. In this study we focus on the surface excitation field. The goal of the work is to compare measurements of surface magnetic field waveforms B(t) at different distances from natural lightning discharges with simple and detailed models of the return stroke fields. In addition to providing input to the diffusion mechanism, the results should aid in further understanding return stroke field generation processes. The observational data are to be obtained using orthogonal sets of straightened Rogowski coils to measure magnetic field waveforms in N-S and E-W directions. The waveforms are sampled at 500 kS/s over 1.024 second time intervals and recorded directly onto secure digital cards. The instrument operates off of battery power for several days or weeks at a time in remote, unattended locations and measures magnetic field strengths of up to several tens of amperes/meter. The observations are being made in conjunction with collocated slow electric field change measurements and under good 3-D lightning mapping array (LMA) and fast electric field change coverage.

  4. Interpretation of vector magnetograph data including magneto-optic effects. I - Azimuth angle of the transverse field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, E. A.; Hagyard, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    In this paper, the presence of Faraday rotation in measurements of the orientation of a sunspot's transverse magnetic field is investigated. Using observations obtained with the Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) vector magnetograph, the derived vector magnetic field of a simple, symmetric sunspot is used to calculate the degree of Faraday rotation in the azimuth of the transverse field as a function of wavelength from analytical expressions for the Stokes parameters. These results are then compared with the observed rotation of the field's azimuth which is derived from observations at different wavelengths within the Fe I 5250 A spectral line. From these comparisons, it is found: the observed rotation of the azimuth is simulated to a reasonable degree by the theoretical formulations if the line-formation parameter is varied over the sunspot; these variations are substantiated by the line-intensity data; for the MSFC system, Faraday rotation can be neglected for field strengths less than 1800 G and field inclinations greater than 45 deg; to minimize the effects of Faraday rotation in sunspot umbrae, MSFC magnetograph measurements must be made in the far wings of the Zeeman-sensitive spectral line.

  5. Calculating the 3D magnetic field of ITER for European TBM studies

    E-print Network

    Äkäslompolo, Simppa; Bergmans, Thijs; Gagliardi, Mario; Galabert, Jose; Hirvijoki, Eero; Kurki-Suonio, Taina; Sipilä, Seppo; Snicker, Antti

    2015-01-01

    The magnetic perturbation due to the ferromagnetic test blanket modules (TBMs) may deteriorate fast ion confinement in ITER. This effect must be quantified by numerical studies in 3D. We have implemented a combined finite element method (FEM) -- Biot-Savart law integrator method (BSLIM) to calculate the ITER 3D magnetic field and vector potential in detail. Unavoidable geometry simplifications changed the mass of the TBMs and ferritic inserts (FIs) up to 26%. This has been compensated for by modifying the nonlinear ferromagnetic material properties accordingly. Despite the simplifications, the computation geometry and the calculated fields are highly detailed. The combination of careful FEM mesh design and using BSLIM enables the use of the fields unsmoothed for particle orbit-following simulations. The magnetic field was found to agree with earlier calculations and revealed finer details. The vector potential is intended to serve as input for plasma shielding calculations.

  6. Collective Modes of Chiral Kinetic Theory in Magnetic Field

    E-print Network

    Mikhail Stephanov; Ho-Ung Yee; Yi Yin

    2014-12-31

    We study collective excitations in systems described by chiral kinetic theory in external magnetic field. We consider high-temperature weak-coupling plasma, as well as high-density Landau Fermi liquid with interaction not restricted to be weak. We show that chiral magnetic wave (CMW) emerges in hydrodynamic regime (at frequencies smaller than collision relaxation rate) and the CMW velocity is determined by thermodynamic properties only. We find that in a plasma of opposite chiralities, at frequencies smaller than the chirality-flipping rate, the CMW excitation turns into a vector-like diffusion mode. In the interacting Fermi liquid, the CMW turns into the Landau zero sound mode in the high-frequency collisionless regime.

  7. Measurements of Photospheric and Chromospheric Magnetic Fields

    E-print Network

    Lagg, Andreas; Harvey, Jack; Gosain, Sanjay; Centeno, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    The Sun is replete with magnetic fields, with sunspots, pores and plage regions being their most prominent representatives on the solar surface. But even far away from these active regions, magnetic fields are ubiquitous. To a large extent, their importance for the thermodynamics in the solar photosphere is determined by the total magnetic flux. Whereas in low-flux quiet Sun regions, magnetic structures are shuffled around by the motion of granules, the high-flux areas like sunspots or pores effectively suppress convection, leading to a temperature decrease of up to 3000 K. The importance of magnetic fields to the conditions in higher atmospheric layers, the chromosphere and corona, is indisputable. Magnetic fields in both active and quiet regions are the main coupling agent between the outer layers of the solar atmosphere, and are therefore not only involved in the structuring of these layers, but also for the transport of energy from the solar surface through the corona to the interplanetary space. Conseque...

  8. TESTING MAGNETIC FIELD MODELS FOR THE CLASS 0 PROTOSTAR L1527

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, J. A.; Li, Z.-Y.; Hull, C. L. H.; Plambeck, R. L.; Kwon, W.; Crutcher, R. M.; Looney, L. W.; Novak, G.; Chapman, N. L.; Matthews, B. C.; Stephens, I. W.; Tobin, J. J.; Jones, T. J.

    2014-12-20

    For the Class 0 protostar L1527 we compare 131 polarization vectors from SCUPOL/JCMT, SHARP/CSO, and TADPOL/CARMA observations with the corresponding model polarization vectors of four ideal-MHD, nonturbulent, cloud core collapse models. These four models differ by their initial magnetic fields before collapse; two initially have aligned fields (strong and weak) and two initially have orthogonal fields (strong and weak) with respect to the rotation axis of the L1527 core. Only the initial weak orthogonal field model produces the observed circumstellar disk within L1527. This is a characteristic of nearly all ideal-MHD, nonturbulent, core collapse models. In this paper we test whether this weak orthogonal model also has the best agreement between its magnetic field structure and that inferred from the polarimetry observations of L1527. We found that this is not the case; based on the polarimetry observations, the most favored model of the four is the weak aligned model. However, this model does not produce a circumstellar disk, so our result implies that a nonturbulent, ideal-MHD global collapse model probably does not represent the core collapse that has occurred in L1527. Our study also illustrates the importance of using polarization vectors covering a large area of a cloud core to determine the initial magnetic field orientation before collapse; the inner core magnetic field structure can be highly altered by a collapse, and so measurements from this region alone can give unreliable estimates of the initial field configuration before collapse.

  9. The utilisation of magnetic susceptibility as a vector toward mineralisation in common rock and ore forming minerals.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    English, Matthew; Raub, Tim

    2015-04-01

    Aeromagnetic and ground magnetic surveys of mineral deposits and prospective terrain are a fundamental technique used in mining and economic geology. Inversion of survey data to source parameters (i.e., identification of ore zones) is often simplified by assuming a single, canonical or 'average' value for the magnetic susceptibility of each mappable unit. In some mineral deposits, canonical magnetic susceptibility values for several dominant ore and accessory minerals will be used to calculate mineral concentrations, 3-D distributions, etc. In general, magnetic susceptibility is widely recognised by economic geologists as a fundamental, easily-measured tool used to better understand the prospectivity of ore deposits. Despite this, the quantitative application of magnetic susceptibility, in context of detailed ore petrology, is still a developing field yet one with great potential. In order to assess to what extent, and in which systems, magnetic susceptibility is a vector toward mineralisation, we present aspects of an extensive database of single crystal and ore mineral aggregate samples. This reveals trends and magnitudes for several important rock-forming and ore-associated minerals during alteration, paragenesis, and enrichment. For example, current literature canonical values show that the magnetic susceptibility for pure quartz is strongly diamagnetic but ranges between -1.78x10-5 and -1.00x10-5 (k, vol. SI). However, metamorphic bull quartz and chrysoprase are commonly paramagnetic, with common values for chrysoprase as high as 2.11x10-3. In contrast, measurements from rose quartz samples are lower than those described for pure quartz with modal measurements as low as -2.08x10-5. Measurements for rock crystal quartz form a distribution best described by the canonical diamagnetic value of -1.40x10-5. Modelling should take into account that rock crystal quartz is rarely the best petrological analogue at deposit-scale or in a quartzose terrain. The difference for calculated concentration of a targeted economic mineral in quartz, such as stilbite, can be quite profound as the lever rule applied to a notionally diamagnetic mineral (negative magnetic susceptibility) system dominated by quartz is even more sensitive than typical mass-balance binary systems. Some ore mineral systems show no readily-used systematics in magnetic susceptibility-enrichment space; but for other systems, magnetic susceptibility is clearly a potential economic vector. Broad outlines of these different systems will be presented, in context of several examples, single mineral magnetic susceptibility distributions.

  10. Permanent Magnet Spiral Motor for Magnetic Gradient Energy Utilization: Axial Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valone, Thomas F.

    2010-01-01

    The Spiral Magnetic Motor, which can accelerate a magnetized rotor through 90% of its cycle with only permanent magnets, was an energy milestone for the 20th century patents by Kure Tekkosho in the 1970's. However, the Japanese company used old ferrite magnets which are relatively weak and an electrically-powered coil to jump start every cycle, which defeated the primary benefit of the permanent magnet motor design. The principle of applying an inhomogeneous, anisotropic magnetic field gradient force Fz = ? cos ? dB/dz, with permanent magnets is well-known in physics, e.g., Stern-Gerlach experiment, which exploits the interaction of a magnetic moment with the aligned electron spins of magnetic domains. In this case, it is applied to dB/d? in polar coordinates, where the force F? depends equally on the magnetic moment, the cosine of the angle between the magnetic moment and the field gradient. The radial magnetic field increases in strength (in the attractive mode) or decreases in strength (in the repulsive mode) as the rotor turns through one complete cycle. An electromagnetic pulsed switching has been historically used to help the rotor traverse the gap (detent) between the end of the magnetic stator arc and the beginning (Kure Tekko, 1980). However, alternative magnetic pulse and switching designs have been developed, as well as strategic eddy current creation. This work focuses on the switching mechanism, novel magnetic pulse methods and advantageous angular momentum improvements. For example, a collaborative effort has begun with Toshiyuki Ueno (University of Tokyo) who has invented an extremely low power, combination magnetostrictive-piezoelectric (MS-PZT) device for generating low frequency magnetic fields and consumes "zero power" for static magnetic field production (Ueno, 2004 and 2007a). Utilizing a pickup coil such as an ultra-miniature millihenry inductor with a piezoelectric actuator or simply Wiegand wire geometry, it is shown that the necessary power for magnetic field switching device can be achieved in order to deflect the rotor magnet in transit. The Wiegand effect itself (bistable FeCoV wire called "Vicalloy") invented by John Wiegand (Switchable Magnetic Device, US Patent ?4,247,601), utilizing Barkhausen jumps of magnetic domains, is also applied for a similar achievement (Dilatush, 1977). Conventional approaches for spiral magnetic gradient force production have not been adequate for magnetostatic motors to perform useful work. It is proposed that integrating a magnetic force control device with a spiral stator inhomogeneous axial magnetic field motor is a viable approach to add a sufficient nonlinear boundary shift to apply the angular momentum and potential energy gained in 315 degrees of the motor cycle.

  11. Electric/magnetic field sensor

    DOEpatents

    Schill, Jr., Robert A. (Henderson, NV); Popek, Marc [Las Vegas, NV

    2009-01-27

    A UNLV novel electric/magnetic dot sensor includes a loop of conductor having two ends to the loop, a first end and a second end; the first end of the conductor seamlessly secured to a first conductor within a first sheath; the second end of the conductor seamlessly secured to a second conductor within a second sheath; and the first sheath and the second sheath positioned adjacent each other. The UNLV novel sensor can be made by removing outer layers in a segment of coaxial cable, leaving a continuous link of essentially uncovered conductor between two coaxial cable legs.

  12. Behavior of a Single Langmuir Probe in a Magnetic Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pytlinski, J. T.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Describes an experiment to demonstrate the influence of a magnetic field on the behavior of a single Langmuir probe. The experiment introduces the student to magnetically supported plasma and particle behavior in a magnetic field. (GA)

  13. Initial Observations of the Magnetic Field Measurements on the C/NOFS Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, Guan; Mario, Rob; Acuna, Mario; Rowland, Doug; Bromund, Ken; Freudenreich, Henry; Martin, Steve

    2008-01-01

    The Vector Electric Field Instrument (VEFI) suite onboard the C/NOFS spacecraft includes a sensitive fluxgate magnetometer to measure DC and ULF magnetic fields in the low latitude ionosphere. The instrument includes a DC vector measurement at 1 sample/sec with a range of +/- 45,000 nT whose primary objective is to enable a V x B measurement that is more accurate than that provided by using a magnetic field model. These data will also be used to provide signatures of large-scale ionospheric current systems, which, when analyzed in conjunction with the C/NOFS DC electric field measurements, promise to advance our understanding of equatorial electrodynamics. The instrument also includes an AC-coupled vector measurement in the 0.05 - 8 Hz frequency range at 16 samples/sec with an output range of +/- 900 nT in order to measure small-scale current filaments and possible Alfven waves associated with plasma irregularities. We compare the Earth's magnetic field models such as the most recently updated IGRF (the International Geomagnetic Reference Field) model and the POMME (the POtsdam Magnetic Model of the Earth) model with the measurements in order to provide an in-flight "calibration" of the data as well as compute magnetic field differences to reveal large scale ionospheric currents. Our initial results show that, on average, the POMME model accurately reproduces the C/NOFS-measured magnetic field within 20 nT in magnitude and within 0.1 deg in field direction everywhere in the low latitude ionosphere except in the region of the South Atlantic Anomaly. Initial results of the C/NOFS magnetic field measurements will be shown.

  14. The Magnetic Field in Tapia's Globule 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, B.-G.; Carretti, Ettore; Bhat, Ramesh; Robishaw, Timothy; Crutcher, Richard; Vaillancourt, John

    2014-04-01

    We propose to measure the magnetic field in the Southern Coalsack using the Zeeman effect in OH at 1665 and 1667 MHz. This is motivated by (1) the measurement of a large magnetic field (B~90 uG) in the Coalsack region from optical and near infrared polarimetry and (2) a very low magnetic field (B~1 uG) measured ~30' from the cloud edge using pulsar Faraday rotation measurements. While the derived field strength in the cloud is significantly larger than usually seen in the interstellar medium, the existence of an X-ray emitting envelope around the cloud that contains significant amounts of O VI ions puts the magnetic pressure at approximate equipartition with the thermal pressure of such gas. A chain of observational results indicate that the Coalsack might be a unique, nearby example of externally triggered star formation. This chain starts with the passage of the Upper Centaurus-Lupus super bubble over the cloud, eventually causing triggered star formation. Probing the high magnetic field strength and providing accurate constraints for the interpretation of the observations of the cloud is therefore of great importance for testing this hypothesis.

  15. Dissipation function in a magnetic field (Review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurevich, V. L.

    2015-07-01

    The dissipation function is introduced to describe the behavior of the system of harmonic oscillations interacting with the environment (thermostat). This is a quadratic function of generalized velocities, which determines the rate of dissipation of the mechanical energy in the system. It was assumed earlier (Landau, Lifshitz) that the dissipation function can be introduced only in the absence of magnetic field. In the present review based on the author's studies, it has been shown how the dissipation function can be introduced in the presence of a magnetic field B. In a magnetic field, both dissipative and nondissipative responses arise as a response to perturbation and are expressed in terms of kinetic coefficients. The matrix of nondissipative coefficients can be obtained to determine an additional term formally including it into the equations of motion, which still satisfy the energy conservation law. Then, the dissipative part of the matrix can be considered in exactly the same way as without magnetic field, i.e., it defines the dissipation loss. As examples, the propagation and absorption of ultrasound in a metal or a semiconductor in a magnetic field have been considered using two methods: (i) the method based on the phenomenological theory using the equations of the theory of elasticity and (ii) the method based on the microscopic approach by analyzing and solving the kinetic equation. Both examples are used to illustrate the approach with the dissipation function.

  16. Measurement of the CMS Magnetic Field

    E-print Network

    V. I. Klyukhin; A. Ball; F. Bergsma; D. Campi; B. Curé; A. Gaddi; H. Gerwig; A. Hervé; J. Korienek; F. Linde; C. Lindenmeyer; R. Loveless; M. Mulders; T. Nebel; R. P. Smith; D. Stickland; G. Teafoe; L. Veillet; J. K. Zimmerman

    2011-10-03

    The measurement of the magnetic field in the tracking volume inside the superconducting coil of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector under construction at CERN is done with a fieldmapper designed and produced at Fermilab. The fieldmapper uses 10 3-D B-sensors (Hall probes) developed at NIKHEF and calibrated at CERN to precision 0.05% for a nominal 4 T field. The precise fieldmapper measurements are done in 33840 points inside a cylinder of 1.724 m radius and 7 m long at central fields of 2, 3, 3.5, 3.8, and 4 T. Three components of the magnetic flux density at the CMS coil maximum excitation and the remanent fields on the steel-air interface after discharge of the coil are measured in check-points with 95 3-D B-sensors located near the magnetic flux return yoke elements. Voltages induced in 22 flux-loops made of 405-turn installed on selected segments of the yoke are sampled online during the entire fast discharge (190 s time-constant) of the CMS coil and integrated offline to provide a measurement of the initial magnetic flux density in steel at the maximum field to an accuracy of a few percent. The results of the measurements made at 4 T are reported and compared with a three-dimensional model of the CMS magnet system calculated with TOSCA.

  17. Reducing blood viscosity with magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, R.; Huang, K.

    2011-07-01

    Blood viscosity is a major factor in heart disease. When blood viscosity increases, it damages blood vessels and increases the risk of heart attacks. Currently, the only method of treatment is to take drugs such as aspirin, which has, however, several unwanted side effects. Here we report our finding that blood viscosity can be reduced with magnetic fields of 1 T or above in the blood flow direction. One magnetic field pulse of 1.3 T lasting ˜1 min can reduce the blood viscosity by 20%-30%. After the exposure, in the absence of magnetic field, the blood viscosity slowly moves up, but takes a couple of hours to return to the original value. The process is repeatable. Reapplying the magnetic field reduces the blood viscosity again. By selecting the magnetic field strength and duration, we can keep the blood viscosity within the normal range. In addition, such viscosity reduction does not affect the red blood cells’ normal function. This technology has much potential for physical therapy.

  18. Holographic Gauge Theory with Maxwell Magnetic Field

    E-print Network

    Wung-Hong Huang

    2010-03-13

    We first apply the transformation of mixing azimuthal with wrapped coordinate to the 11D M-theory with a stack N M5-branes to find the spacetime of a stack of N D4-branes with magnetic field in 10D IIA string theory, after the Kaluza-Klein reduction. In the near-horizon limit the background becomes the Melvin magnetic field deformed $AdS_6 \\times S^4$. Although the solution represents the D-branes under the Melvin RR one-form we use a simple observation to see that it also describes the solution of D-branes under the Maxwell magnetic field. As the magnetic field we consider is the part of the background itself we have presented an alternative to previous literature, because our method does not require the assumption of negligible back reaction. Next, we use the found solution to investigate the meson property through D4/D8 system (Sakai-Sugimoto model) and compare it with those studied by other authors. Finally, we present a detailed analysis about the Wilson loop therein and results show that the external Maxwell magnetic field will enhance the quark-antiquark potential.

  19. Cosmic Magnetic Fields: Observations and Prospects

    E-print Network

    Beck, Rainer

    2011-01-01

    Synchrotron emission, its polarization and its Faraday rotation at radio frequencies of 0.2-10 GHz are powerful tools to study the strength and structure of cosmic magnetic fields. The observational results are reviewed for spiral, barred and flocculent galaxies, the Milky Way, halos and relics of galaxy clusters, and for the intergalactic medium. Polarization observations with the forthcoming large radio telescopes will open a new era in the observation of cosmic magnetic fields and will help to understand their origin. At low frequencies, LOFAR (10-250 MHz) will allow us to map the structure of weak magnetic fields in the outer regions and halos of galaxies and galaxy clusters. Polarization at higher frequencies (1-10 GHz), as observed with the EVLA, ASKAP, MeerKAT, APERTIF and the SKA, will trace magnetic fields in the disks and central regions of nearby galaxies in unprecedented detail. Surveys of Faraday rotation measures of pulsars will map the Milky Way's magnetic field with high precision. All-sky sur...

  20. Reionization constraints on primordial magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Kanhaiya L.; Choudhury, T. Roy; Sethi, Shiv K.; Ferrara, Andrea

    2015-08-01

    We study the impact of the extra density fluctuations induced by primordial magnetic fields on the reionization history in the redshift range: 6 < z < 10. We perform a comprehensive Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) physical analysis allowing the variation of parameters related to primordial magnetic fields (strength, B0, and power-spectrum index n_{B}), reionization and ? cold dark matter cosmological model. We find that magnetic field strengths in the range: B0 ? 0.05-0.3 nG (for nearly scale-free power spectra) can significantly alter the reionization history in the above redshift range and can relieve the tension between the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe and quasar absorption spectra data. Our analysis puts upper limits on the magnetic field strength B0 < 0.358, 0.120 and 0.059 nG (95 per cent c.l.) for n_{B} = -2.95, -2.9 and -2.85, respectively. These represent the strongest magnetic field constraints among those available from other cosmological observables.